WorldWideScience

Sample records for magnetic helicity signatures

  1. On the Interpretation of Magnetic Helicity Signatures in the Dissipation Range of Solar Wind Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Howes, Gregory G

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of small-scale turbulent fluctuations in the solar wind find a non-zero right-handed magnetic helicity. This has been interpreted as evidence for ion cyclotron damping. However, theoretical and empirical evidence suggests that the majority of the energy in solar wind turbulence resides in low frequency anisotropic kinetic Alfven wave fluctuations that are not subject to ion cyclotron damping. We demonstrate that a dissipation range comprised of kinetic Alfven waves also produces a net right-handed fluctuating magnetic helicity signature consistent with observations. Thus, the observed magnetic helicity signature does not necessarily imply that ion cyclotron damping is energetically important in the solar wind.

  2. Polarization Signatures of Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Shocks in the Blazar Emission Region - I. Force-free Helical Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Haocheng; Li, Hui; Böttcher, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The optical radiation and polarization signatures in blazars are known to be highly variable during flaring activities. It is frequently argued that shocks are the main driver of the flaring events. However, the spectral variability modelings generally lack detailed considerations of the self-consistent magnetic field evolution modeling, thus so far the associated optical polarization signatures are poorly understood. We present the first simultaneous modeling of the optical radiation and polarization signatures based on 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of relativistic shocks in the blazar emission environment, with the simplest physical assumptions. By comparing the results with observations, we find that shocks in a weakly magnetized environment will largely lead to significant changes in the optical polarization signatures, which are seldom seen in observations. Hence an emission region with relatively strong magnetization is preferred. In such an environment, slow shocks may produce minor flares with ei...

  3. Magnetic Helicity and Planetary Dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2012-01-01

    A model planetary dynamo based on the Boussinesq approximation along with homogeneous boundary conditions is considered. A statistical theory describing a large-scale MHD dynamo is found, in which magnetic helicity is the critical parameter

  4. Turbulent Dynamos and Magnetic Helicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Hantao

    1999-04-01

    It is shown that the turbulent dynamo alpha-effect converts magnetic helicity from the turbulent field to the mean field when the turbulence is electromagnetic while the magnetic helicity of the mean-field is transported across space when the turbulence is elcetrostatic or due to the elcetron diamagnetic effect. In all cases, however, the dynamo effect strictly conserves the total helicity expect for a battery effect which vanishes in the limit of magnetohydrodynamics. Implications for astrophysical situations, especially for the solar dynamo, are discussed.

  5. Influence of Magnetic Helicity in MHD

    CERN Document Server

    Candelaresi, Simon; Brandenburg, Axel

    2010-01-01

    Observations have shown that the Sun's magnetic field has helical structures. The helicity content in magnetic field configurations is a crucial constraint on the dynamical evolution of the system. Since helicity is connected with the number of links we investigate configurations with interlocked magnetic flux rings and one with unlinked rings. It turns out that it is not the linking of the tubes which affects the magnetic field decay, but the content of magnetic helicity.

  6. Magnetic Helicity Injection in Solar Active Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Qi Zhang

    2006-01-01

    We present the evolution of magnetic field and its relationship with magnetic (current) helicity in solar active regions from a series of photospheric vector magnetograms obtained by Huairou Solar Observing Station, longitudinal magnetograms by MDI of SOHO and white light images of TRACE. The photospheric current helicity density is a quantity reflecting the local twisted magnetic field and is related to the remaining magnetic helicity in the photosphere, even if the mean current helicity density brings the general chiral property in a layer of solar active regions. As new magnetic flux emerges in active regions, changes of photospheric current helicity density with the injection of magnetic helicity into the corona from the subatmosphere can be detected, including changes in sign caused by the injection of magnetic helicity of opposite sign. Because the injection rate of magnetic helicity and photospheric current helicity density have different means in the solar atmosphere,the injected magnetic helicity is probably not proportional to the current helicity density remaining in the photosphere. The evidence is that rotation of sunspots does not synchronize exactly with the twist of photospheric transverse magnetic field in some active regions (such as, delta active regions). They represent different aspects of magnetic chirality. A combined analysis of the observational magnetic helicity parameters actually provides a relative complete picture of magnetic helicity and its transfer in the solar atmosphere.

  7. Magnetic Helicity and the Solar Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Richard C.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to open a new window into the solar dynamo, convection, and magnetic reconnection through measurement of the helicity density of magnetic fields in the photosphere and tracing of large-scale patterns of magnetic helicity in the corona.

  8. Magnetic Helicity in a Cyclic Convective Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miesch, Mark S.; Zhang, Mei; Augustson, Kyle C.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic helicity is a fundamental agent for magnetic self-organization in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamos. As a conserved quantity in ideal MHD, it establishes a strict topological coupling between large and small-scale magnetic fields. The generation of magnetic fields on scales larger than the velocity field is linked to an upscale transfer of magnetic helicity, either locally in spectral space as in the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in MHD turbulence or non-locally, as in the turbulent alpha-effect of mean-field dynamo theory. Thus, understanding the generation, transport, and dissipation of magnetic helicity is an essential prerequisite to understanding manifestations of magnetic self-organization in the solar dynamo, including sunspots, the prominent dipole and quadrupole moments, and the 22-year magnetic activity cycle. We investigate the role of magnetic helicity in a convective dynamo model that exhibits regular magnetic cycles. The cycle is marked by coherent bands of toroidal field that persist within the convection zone and that are antisymmetric about the equator. When these toriodal bands interact across the equator, it initiates a global restructuring of the magnetic topology that contributes to the reversal of the dipole moment. Thus, the polar field reversals are preceeded by a brief reversal of the subsurface magnetic helicity. There is some evidence that the Sun may exhibit a similar magnetic helicity reversal prior to its polar field reversals.

  9. Helical Magnetic Fields in AGN Jets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y. J. Chen; G.-Y. Zhao; Z.-Q. Shen

    2014-09-01

    We establish a simple model to describe the helical magnetic fields in AGN jets projected on the sky plane and the line-of-sight. This kind of profile has been detected in the polarimetric VLBI observation of many blazar objects, suggesting the existence of helical magnetic fields in these sources.

  10. Decay of helical and non-helical magnetic knots

    CERN Document Server

    Candelaresi, Simon

    2011-01-01

    We present calculations of the relaxation of magnetic field structures that have the shape of particular knots and links. A set of helical magnetic flux configurations is considered, which we call $n$-foil knots of which the trefoil knot is the most primitive member. We also consider two non-helical knots, namely the Borromean rings as well as a single interlocked flux rope that also serves as the logo of the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics in Pune, India. The field decay characteristics of both configurations is investigated and compared with previous calculations of helical and non-helical triple ring configurations. For the $n$-foil knots the decay is described by power laws that range form $t^{-2/3}$ to $t^{-1/3}$, which can be as slow as the $t^{-1/3}$ behavior for helical triple-ring structures that was seen in earlier work. The two non-helical configurations decay like $t^{-1}$, which is somewhat slower than the previously obtained $t^{-3/2}$ behavior in the decay of interlocked ...

  11. The AGS synchrotron with four helical magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsoupas N.; Huang, H.; Roser, T.; MacKay, W.W.; Trbojevic, D.

    2012-05-20

    The idea of using two partial helical magnets was applied successfully to the AGS synchrotron to preserve the proton beam polarization. In this paper we explore in details the idea of using four helical magnets placed symmetrically in the AGS ring. The placement of four helical magnets in the AGS ring provides many advantages over the present setup of the AGS which uses two partial helical magnets. First, the symmetric placement of the four helical magnets allows for a better control of the AGS optics with reduced values of the beta functions especially near beam injection, second, the vertical spin direction during beam injection and extraction is closer to vertical, and third, it provides for a larger 'spin tune gap', which allows the vertical and horizontal tunes to be placed, and prevent the horizontal and vertical intrinsic spin resonances of the AGS to occur during the acceleration cycle. Although the same spin gap can be obtained with a single or two partial helices, the required high field strength of a single helix makes its use impractical, and that of the double helix rather difficult. In this paper we will provide results on the spin tune and on the optics of the AGS with four partial helical magnets, and compare these results with the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets.

  12. Turbulent dynamo with advective magnetic helicity flux

    CERN Document Server

    Del Sordo, Fabio; Brandenburg, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Many astrophysical bodies harbor magnetic fields that are thought to be sustained by dynamo processes. However, it has been argued that the production of large-scale magnetic fields by a mean-field dynamo is strongly suppressed at large magnetic Reynolds numbers owing to the conservation of magnetic helicity. This phenomenon is known as catastrophic quenching. Advection of magnetic field toward the outer boundaries and away from the dynamo is expected to alleviate such quenching. Examples are stellar and galactic winds. Such advection might be able to overcome the constraint imposed by the conservation of magnetic helicity, transporting a fraction of it outside the domain in which the dynamo operates. We study how the dynamo process is affected by advection. In particular, we study the relative roles played by advective and diffusive fluxes of magnetic helicity. We do this by performing direct numerical simulations of a turbulent dynamo of alpha^2 type driven by forced turbulence in a Cartesian domain in the ...

  13. The AGS with four helical magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsoupas, N.; Huang, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Trbojevic, D.

    2010-02-25

    The idea of using multiple partial helical magnets was applied successfully to the AGS synchrotron, to preserve the proton beam polarization. In this paper we explore in details the idea of using four helical magnets placed symmetrically in the AGS ring. This modification provides many advantages over the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets. First, it provides a larger 'spin tune gap' for the placement of the vertical betatron tune of the AGS during acceleration, second, the vertical spin direction during the beam injection and extraction is closer to vertical, third, the symmetric placement of the snakes allows for a better control of the AGS optics, and for reduced values of the beta and eta functions, especially near injection, fourth, the optical properties of the helical magnets also favor the placement of the horizontal betatron tune in the 'spin tune gap', thus eliminating the horizontal spin resonances. In this paper we provide results on the spin tune and on the optics of the AGS with four partial helical magnets, and we compare these results with the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets.

  14. Evidence of Magnetic Helicity in Emerging Flux and Associated Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Chandra, R; Aulanier, G; Malherbe, J M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to look at the magnetic helicity structure of an emerging active region and show that both emergence and flaring signatures are consistent with a same sign for magnetic helicity. We present a multi-wavelength analysis of an M1.6 flare occurring in the active region NOAA 10365 on 27 May, 2003, in which a large new bipole emerges in a decaying active region. The diverging flow pattern and the "tongue" shape of the magnetic field in the photosphere with elongated polarities are highly suggestive of the emergence of a twisted flux tube. The orientation of these tongues indicates the emergence of a flux tube with a right hand twist, i.e. positive magnetic helicity. The flare signatures in the chromosphere are ribbons observed in H-alpha by the MSDP spectrograph in the Meudon solar tower and in 1600 A by TRACE. These ribbons have a `J' shape and are shifted along the inversion line. The pattern of these ribbons suggests that the flare was triggered by magnetic reconnection at coronal height...

  15. Magnetic Helicity Conservation and Astrophysical Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Vishniac, E T; Vishniac, Ethan T.; Cho, Jungyeon

    2000-01-01

    We construct a magnetic helicity conserving dynamo theory which incorporates a calculated magnetic helicity current. In this model the fluid helicity plays a small role in large scale magnetic field generation. Instead, the dynamo process is dominated by a new quantity, derived from asymmetries in the second derivative of the velocity correlation function, closely related to the `twist and fold' dynamo model. The turbulent damping term is, as expected, almost unchanged. Numerical simulations with a spatially constant fluid helicity and vanishing resistivity are not expected to generate large scale fields in equipartition with the turbulent energy density. In fact, there seems to be little prospect for driving a fast dynamo in a closed box containing homogeneous turbulence. On the other hand, there is an efficient analog to the $\\alpha-\\Omega$ dynamo. Systems whose turbulence is driven by some anisotropic local instability in shearing flow, like real stars and accretion disks, and some computer simulations, ma...

  16. Large-scale dynamics of magnetic helicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkmann, Moritz; Dallas, Vassilios

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we investigate the dynamics of magnetic helicity in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulent flows focusing at scales larger than the forcing scale. Our results show a nonlocal inverse cascade of magnetic helicity, which occurs directly from the forcing scale into the largest scales of the magnetic field. We also observe that no magnetic helicity and no energy is transferred to an intermediate range of scales sufficiently smaller than the container size and larger than the forcing scale. Thus, the statistical properties of this range of scales, which increases with scale separation, is shown to be described to a large extent by the zero flux solutions of the absolute statistical equilibrium theory exhibited by the truncated ideal MHD equations.

  17. Magnetic Helicity and Large Scale Magnetic Fields: A Primer

    CERN Document Server

    Blackman, Eric G

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic fields of laboratory, planetary, stellar, and galactic plasmas commonly exhibit significant order on large temporal or spatial scales compared to the otherwise random motions within the hosting system. Such ordered fields can be measured in the case of planets, stars, and galaxies, or inferred indirectly by the action of their dynamical influence, such as jets. Whether large scale fields are amplified in situ or a remnant from previous stages of an object's history is often debated for objects without a definitive magnetic activity cycle. Magnetic helicity, a measure of twist and linkage of magnetic field lines, is a unifying tool for understanding large scale field evolution for both mechanisms of origin. Its importance stems from its two basic properties: (1) magnetic helicity is typically better conserved than magnetic energy; and (2) the magnetic energy associated with a fixed amount of magnetic helicity is minimized when the system relaxes this helical structure to the largest scale available. H...

  18. Cosmological Magnetic Fields from Primordial Helical Seeds

    CERN Document Server

    Sigl, G

    2002-01-01

    Most early Universe scenarios predict negligible magnetic fields on cosmological scales if they are unprocessed during subsequent expansion of the Universe. We present a new numerical treatment of the evolution of primordial fields and apply it to weakly helical seeds as they occur in certain early Universe scenarios. We find that initial helicities not much larger than the baryon to photon number can lead to fields of about 10^{-13} Gauss with coherence scales slightly below a kilo-parsec today.

  19. Magnetic stripes and skyrmions with helicity reversals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiuzhen; Mostovoy, Maxim; Tokunaga, Yusuke; Zhang, Weizhu; Kimoto, Koji; Matsui, Yoshio; Kaneko, Yoshio; Nagaosa, Naoto; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2012-06-05

    It was recently realized that topological spin textures do not merely have mathematical beauty but can also give rise to unique functionalities of magnetic materials. An example is the skyrmion--a nano-sized bundle of noncoplanar spins--that by virtue of its nontrivial topology acts as a flux of magnetic field on spin-polarized electrons. Lorentz transmission electron microscopy recently emerged as a powerful tool for direct visualization of skyrmions in noncentrosymmetric helimagnets. Topologically, skyrmions are equivalent to magnetic bubbles (cylindrical domains) in ferromagnetic thin films, which were extensively explored in the 1970s for data storage applications. In this study we use Lorentz microscopy to image magnetic domain patterns in the prototypical magnetic oxide-M-type hexaferrite with a hint of scandium. Surprisingly, we find that the magnetic bubbles and stripes in the hexaferrite have a much more complex structure than the skyrmions and spirals in helimagnets, which we associate with the new degree of freedom--helicity (or vector spin chirality) describing the direction of spin rotation across the domain walls. We observe numerous random reversals of helicity in the stripe domain state. Random helicity of cylindrical domain walls coexists with the positional order of magnetic bubbles in a triangular lattice. Most unexpectedly, we observe regular helicity reversals inside skyrmions with an unusual multiple-ring structure.

  20. Coronal Magnetic Flux Rope Equilibria and Magnetic Helicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Using a 2.5-dimensional (2.5-D) ideal MHD model, this paper ana lyzes the equilibrium properties of coronal magnetic flux ropes in a bipolar ambient magnetic field. It is found that the geometrical features of the magnetic flux rope,including the height of the rope axis, the half-width of the rope, and the length of the vertical current sheet below the rope, are determined by a single magnetic parameter, the magnetic helicity, which is the sum of the self-helicity of the rope and the mutual helicity between the rope field and the ambient magnetic field. All the geometrical parameters increase monotonically with increasing magnetic helicity.The implication of this result in solar active phenomena is briefly discussed.

  1. Helical magnetized wiggler for synchrotron radiation laser

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Mei; Hirshfield, J L

    1999-01-01

    A helical magnetized iron wiggler has been built for a novel infrared synchrotron radiation laser (SRL) experiment. The wiggler consists of four periods of helical iron structure immersed in a solenoid field. This wiggler is to impart transverse velocity to a prebunched 6 MeV electron beam, and thus to obtain a desired high orbit pitch ratio for the SRL. Field tapering at beam entrance is considered and tested on a similar wiggler. Analytic and simulated characteristics of wigglers of this type are discussed and the performance of the fabricated wigglers is demonstrated experimentally. A 4.7 kG peak field was measured for a 6.4 mm air gap and a 5.4 cm wiggler period at a 20 kG solenoid field. The measured helical fields compare favorably with the analytical solution. This type of helical iron wigglers has the potential to be scaled to small periods with strong field amplitude.

  2. SUPERCONDUCTING HELICAL SNAKE MAGNET FOR THE AGS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WILLEN, E.; ANERELLA, M.; ESCALLIER, G.; GANETIS, G.; GHOSH, A.; GUPTA, R.; HARRISON, M.; JAIN, A.; LUCCIO, A.; MACKAY, W.; MARONE, A.; MURATORE, J.; PLATE, S.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    A superconducting helical magnet has been built for polarized proton acceleration in the Brookhaven AGS. This ''partial Snake'' magnet will help to reduce the loss of polarization of the beam due to machine resonances. It is a 3 T magnet some 1940 mm in magnetic length in which the dipole field rotates with a pitch of 0.2053 degrees/mm for 1154 mm in the center and a pitch of 0.3920 degrees/mm for 393 mm in each end. The coil cross-section is made of two slotted cylinders containing superconductor. In order to minimize residual offsets and deflections of the beam on its orbit through the Snake, a careful balancing of the coil parameters was necessary. In addition to the main helical coils, a solenoid winding was built on the cold bore tube inside the main coils to compensate for the axial component of the field that is experienced by the beam when it is off-axis in this helical magnet. Also, two dipole corrector magnets were placed on the same tube with the solenoid. A low heat leak cryostat was built so that the magnet can operate in the AGS cooled by several cryocoolers. The design, construction and performance of this unique magnet will be summarized.

  3. Superconducting Helical Snake Magnet for the AGS

    CERN Document Server

    Willen, Erich; Escallier, John; Ganetis, George; Ghosh, Arup; Gupta, Ramesh C; Harrison, Michael; Jain, Animesh K; Luccio, Alfredo U; MacKay, William W; Marone, Andrew; Muratore, Joseph F; Okamura, Masahiro; Plate, Stephen R; Roser, Thomas; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Wanderer, Peter

    2005-01-01

    A superconducting helical magnet has been built for polarized proton acceleration in the Brookhaven AGS. This "partial Snake" magnet will help to reduce the loss of polarization of the beam due to machine resonances. It is a 3 T magnet some 1940 mm in magnetic length in which the dipole field rotates with a pitch of 0.2053 degrees/mm for 1154 mm in the center and a pitch of 0.3920 degrees/mm for 393 mm in each end. The coil cross-section is made of two slotted cylinders containing superconductor. In order to minimize residual offsets and deflections of the beam on its orbit through the Snake, a careful balancing of the coil parameters was necessary. In addition to the main helical coils, a solenoid winding was built on the cold bore tube inside the main coils to compensate for the axial component of the field that is experienced by the beam when it is off-axis in this helical magnet. Also, two dipole corrector magnets were placed on the same tube with the solenoid. A low heat leak cryostat was built so that t...

  4. Galactic dynamos supported by magnetic helicity fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Sur, S; Subramanian, K; Sur, Sharanya; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2006-01-01

    We present a simple semi-analytical model of nonlinear, mean-field galactic dynamos and use it to study the effects of various magnetic helicity fluxes. The dynamo equations are reduced using the `no-$z$' approximation to a nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations in time; we demonstrate that the model reproduces accurately earlier results, including those where nonlinear behaviour is driven by a magnetic helicity flux. We discuss the implications and interplay of two types of magnetic helicity flux, one produced by advection (e.g., due to the galactic fountain or wind) and the other, arising from anisotropy of turbulence as suggested by Vishniac & Cho(2001). We argue that the latter is significant if the galactic differential rotation is strong enough: in our model, for $\\Rw\\la-10$ in terms of the corresponding turbulent magnetic Reynolds number. We confirm that the intensity of gas outflow from the galactic disc optimal for the dynamo action is close to that expected for normal spiral galaxie...

  5. Evolution of field line helicity during magnetic reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Alexander J B; Hornig, Gunnar; Wilmot-Smith, Antonia L

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of field line helicity for non-zero magnetic fields that connect two boundaries, with emphasis on localized finite-B magnetic reconnection. Total (relative) magnetic helicity is already recognized as an important topological constraint on magnetohydrodynamic processes. Field line helicity offers further advantages because it preserves all topological information and can distinguish between different magnetic fields with the same total helicity. Magnetic reconnection changes field topology and field line helicity reflects these changes; the goal of this paper is to characterize that evolution. We start by deriving the evolution equation for field line helicity and examining its terms, also obtaining a simplified form for cases where dynamics are localized within the domain. The main result, which we support using kinematic examples, is that during localized reconnection in a topologically complex magnetic field, the evolution of field line helicity is dominated by a work-like term ...

  6. CME Magnetic Structure and Magnetic Cloud Signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Luhmann, J.

    2006-06-01

    An interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) is the counterpart of a coronal mass ejection by definition. However, the relationship between the magnetic structures of the CMEs and that of the situ observations of ICMEs is still quite far from clear, due to observational gaps and the state of our understanding of CMEs. Some studies suggested that the magnetic cloud (MC, a group of ICMEs with fluxrope signatures) magnetic polarity follows the solar large scale magnetic field, and others suggested it follows the local magnetic field of the CME source region. Recent studies found that the relationship is more complex. While solar cycle dependence of the magnetic signature of MCs is clearly evident, the polarity of the MCs does not reverse at the same time when the solar large scale field reverses around solar maximum, but begins to have mixed polarities, and the new polarity may only prevail at the midst of the declining phase. Interestingly, in an independent study of the magnetic topology at the CME source regions, we found a similar solar cycle dependence of the bipolar and quadrupolar topologie. In this work, the link between CMEs and ICMEs is made and the results will shed light on our understanding about the relationship between CME and ICME magnetic structures and how these structures are related to solar local and large scale magnetic fields.Acknowledgement: ATM/NSF-0451438, SRT/NASA-NNG06GE51G and CISM/NSF.

  7. What Helicity Can Tell Us about Solar Magnetic Fields

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alexei A. Pevtsov

    2008-03-01

    Concept of magnetic/current helicity was introduced to solar physics about 15 years ago. Earlier studies led to discovery of such fundamental properties as hemispheric helicity rule, and role of helicity in magnetic reconnection and solar eruptions. Later, the concept was successfully applied in studies of different solar processes from solar dynamo to flare and CME phenomena. Although no silver bullet, helicity has proven to be a very useful “tool” in answering many still-puzzling questions about origin and evolution of solar magnetic fields. I present an overview of some helicity studies and briefly analyze their findings.

  8. Observational Signatures of Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is often referred to as the primary source of energy release during solar flares. Directly observing reconnection occurring in the solar atmosphere, however, is not trivial considering that the scale size of the diffusion region is magnitudes smaller than the observational capabilities of current instrumentation, and coronal magnetic field measurements are not currently sufficient to capture the process. Therefore, predicting and studying observationally feasible signatures of the precursors and consequences of reconnection is necessary for guiding and verifying the simulations that dominate our understanding. I will present a set of such observations, particularly in connection with long-duration solar events, and compare them with recent simulations and theoretical predictions.

  9. Magnetic design constraints of helical solenoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, M. L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Krave, S. T. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Tompkins, J. C. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Yonehara, K. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Flanagan, G. [Muons Inc., Batavia, IL (United States); Kahn, S. A. [Muons Inc., Batavia, IL (United States); Melconian, K. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2015-01-30

    Helical solenoids have been proposed as an option for a Helical Cooling Channel for muons in a proposed Muon Collider. Helical solenoids can provide the required three main field components: solenoidal, helical dipole, and a helical gradient. In general terms, the last two are a function of many geometric parameters: coil aperture, coil radial and longitudinal dimensions, helix period and orbit radius. In this paper, we present design studies of a Helical Solenoid, addressing the geometric tunability limits and auxiliary correction system.

  10. The global distribution of magnetic helicity in the solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, A. R.; Hornig, G.

    2016-10-01

    By defining an appropriate field line helicity, we apply the powerful concept of magnetic helicity to the problem of global magnetic field evolution in the Sun's corona. As an ideal-magnetohydrodynamic invariant, the field line helicity is a meaningful measure of how magnetic helicity is distributed within the coronal volume. It may be interpreted, for each magnetic field line, as a magnetic flux linking with that field line. Using magneto-frictional simulations, we investigate how field line helicity evolves in the non-potential corona as a result of shearing by large-scale motions on the solar surface. On open magnetic field lines, the helicity injected by the Sun is largely output to the solar wind, provided that the coronal relaxation is sufficiently fast. But on closed magnetic field lines, helicity is able to build up. We find that the field line helicity is non-uniformly distributed, and is highly concentrated in twisted magnetic flux ropes. Eruption of these flux ropes is shown to lead to sudden bursts of helicity output, in contrast to the steady flux along the open magnetic field lines. Movies are available at http://www.aanda.org

  11. JOINT INVERSE CASCADE OF MAGNETIC ENERGY AND MAGNETIC HELICITY IN MHD TURBULENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepanov, R.; Frick, P.; Mizeva, I. [Institute of Continuous Media Mechanics, Korolyov str. 1, 614013 Perm (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-10

    We show that oppositely directed fluxes of energy and magnetic helicity coexist in the inertial range in fully developed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence with small-scale sources of magnetic helicity. Using a helical shell model of MHD turbulence, we study the high Reynolds number MHD turbulence for helicity injection at a scale that is much smaller than the scale of energy injection. In a short range of scales larger than the forcing scale of magnetic helicity, a bottleneck-like effect appears, which results in a local reduction of the spectral slope. The slope changes in a domain with a high level of relative magnetic helicity, which determines that part of the magnetic energy is related to the helical modes at a given scale. If the relative helicity approaches unity, the spectral slope tends to –3/2. We show that this energy pileup is caused by an inverse cascade of magnetic energy associated with the magnetic helicity. This negative energy flux is the contribution of the pure magnetic-to-magnetic energy transfer, which vanishes in the non-helical limit. In the context of astrophysical dynamos, our results indicate that a large-scale dynamo can be affected by the magnetic helicity generated at small scales. The kinetic helicity, in particular, is not involved in the process at all. An interesting finding is that an inverse cascade of magnetic energy can be provided by a small-scale source of magnetic helicity fluctuations without a mean injection of magnetic helicity.

  12. Magnetic helicity in stellar dynamos new numerical experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, A; Subramanian, K

    2002-01-01

    The theory of large scale dynamos is reviewed with particular emphasis on the problem of magnetic helicity conservation in the presence of closed and open boundaries. It is concluded that in solar and stellar large scale dynamos the production and destruction of magnetic helicity during one cycle may still be accomplished by ordinary Spitzer resistivity. This is mainly because of geometric effects causing significant magnetic helicity cancellation on each hemisphere, but also partly because the generation of toroidal field by shear does not involve the production of magnetic helicity. A number of alternatives are discussed and dismissed. These include open boundaries which lead to preferential loss of large scale magnetic helicity together with large scale magnetic fields. It is also shown that artificially induced losses of small scale field do not accelerate the production of large scale (poloidal) field. In fact, resistively limited evolution towards saturation is also found at intermediate scales before t...

  13. The global distribution of magnetic helicity in the solar corona

    CERN Document Server

    Yeates, A R

    2016-01-01

    By defining an appropriate field line helicity, we apply the powerful concept of magnetic helicity to the problem of global magnetic field evolution in the Sun's corona. As an ideal-magnetohydrodynamic invariant, the field line helicity is a meaningful measure of how magnetic helicity is distributed within the coronal volume. It may be interpreted, for each magnetic field line, as a magnetic flux linking with that field line. Using magneto-frictional simulations, we investigate how field line helicity evolves in the non-potential corona as a result of shearing by large-scale motions on the solar surface. On open magnetic field lines, the helicity injected by the Sun is largely output to the solar wind, provided that the coronal relaxation is sufficiently fast. But on closed magnetic field lines, helicity is able to build up. We find that the field line helicity is non-uniformly distributed, and is highly concentrated in twisted magnetic flux ropes. Eruption of these flux ropes is shown to lead to sudden burst...

  14. Magnetic Helical Micro- and Nanorobots: Toward Their Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Famin Qiu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic helical micro- and nanorobots can perform 3D navigation in various liquids with a sub-micrometer precision under low-strength rotating magnetic fields (<10 mT. Since magnetic fields with low strengths are harmless to cells and tissues, magnetic helical micro/nanorobots are promising tools for biomedical applications, such as minimally invasive surgery, cell manipulation and analysis, and targeted therapy. This review provides general information on magnetic helical micro/nanorobots, including their fabrication, motion control, and further functionalization for biomedical applications.

  15. Magnetic helicity balance in the Sustained Spheromak Plasma Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallard, B. W.; Hooper, E. B.; Woodruff, S.; Bulmer, R. H.; Hill, D. N.; McLean, H. S.; Wood, R. D.

    2003-07-01

    The magnetic helicity balance between the helicity input injected by a magnetized coaxial gun, the rate-of-change in plasma helicity content, and helicity dissipation in electrode sheaths and Ohmic losses have been examined in the Sustained Spheromak Plasma Experiment (SSPX) [E. B. Hooper, L. D. Pearlstein, and R. H. Bulmer, Nucl. Fusion 39, 863 (1999)]. Helicity is treated as a flux function in the mean-field approximation, allowing separation of helicity drive and losses between closed and open field volumes. For nearly sustained spheromak plasmas with low fluctuations, helicity balance analysis implies a decreasing transport of helicity from the gun input into the spheromak core at higher spheromak electron temperature. Long pulse discharges with continuously increasing helicity and larger fluctuations show higher helicity coupling from the edge to the spheromak core. The magnitude of the sheath voltage drop, inferred from cathode heating and a current threshold dependence of the gun voltage, shows that sheath losses are important and reduce the helicity injection efficiency in SSPX.

  16. Scale Dependence of Magnetic Helicity in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Subramanian, Kandaswamy; Balogh, Andre; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2011-01-01

    We determine the magnetic helicity, along with the magnetic energy, at high latitudes using data from the Ulysses mission. The data set spans the time period from 1993 to 1996. The basic assumption of the analysis is that the solar wind is homogeneous. Because the solar wind speed is high, we follow the approach first pioneered by Matthaeus et al. by which, under the assumption of spatial homogeneity, one can use Fourier transforms of the magnetic field time series to construct one-dimensional spectra of the magnetic energy and magnetic helicity under the assumption that the Taylor frozen-in-flow hypothesis is valid. That is a well-satisfied assumption for the data used in this study. The magnetic helicity derives from the skew-symmetric terms of the three-dimensional magnetic correlation tensor, while the symmetric terms of the tensor are used to determine the magnetic energy spectrum. Our results show a sign change of magnetic helicity at wavenumber k approximately equal to 2AU(sup -1) (or frequency nu approximately equal to 2 microHz) at distances below 2.8AU and at k approximately equal to 30AU(sup -1) (or nu approximately equal to 25 microHz) at larger distances. At small scales the magnetic helicity is positive at northern heliographic latitudes and negative at southern latitudes. The positive magnetic helicity at small scales is argued to be the result of turbulent diffusion reversing the sign relative to what is seen at small scales at the solar surface. Furthermore, the magnetic helicity declines toward solar minimum in 1996. The magnetic helicity flux integrated separately over one hemisphere amounts to about 10(sup 45) Mx(sup 2) cycle(sup -1) at large scales and to a three times lower value at smaller scales.

  17. Measurements of Magnetic Helicity within Two Interacting Flux Ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehaas, Timothy; Gekelman, Walter

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic helicity (HM) has become a useful tool in the exploration of astrophysical plasmas. Its conservation in the MHD limit (and even some fluid approaches) constrains the global behavior of large plasma structures. One such astrophysical structure is a magnetic flux rope: a rope-like, current-carrying plasma embedded in an external magnetic field. Bundles of these ropes are commonly observed extending from the solar surface and can be found in the near-earth environment. In this well-diagnosed experiment (3D measurements of ne, Te, Vp, B, J, E, uflow) , two magnetic flux ropes were generated in the Large Plasma Device at UCLA. These ropes were driven kink-unstable, commencing complex motion. As they interact, helicity conservation is broken in regions of reconnection, turbulence, and instabilities. The changes in helicity can be visualized as 1) the transport of helicity (ϕB +E × A) and 2) the dissipation of the helicity (-2EB). Magnetic helicity is observed to have a negative sign and its counterpart, cross helicity, a positive one. These qualities oscillate 8% peak-to-peak. As the ropes move and the topology of the field lines change, a quasi-separatrix layer (QSL) is formed. The volume averaged HM and the largest value of Q both oscillate but not in phase. In addition to magnetic helicity, similar quantities such as self-helicity, mutual-helicity, vorticity, and canonical helicity are derived and will be presented. This work is supported by LANL-UC research Grant and done at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, which is funded by DOE and NSF.

  18. Magnetic Helicities and Dynamo Action in Magneto-rotational Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodo, G.; Cattaneo, F.; Mignone, A.; Rossi, P.

    2017-07-01

    We examine the relationship between magnetic flux generation, taken as an indicator of large-scale dynamo action, and magnetic helicity, computed as an integral over the dynamo volume, in a simple dynamo. We consider dynamo action driven by magneto-rotational turbulence (MRT) within the shearing-box approximation. We consider magnetically open boundary conditions that allow a flux of helicity in or out of the computational domain. We circumvent the problem of the lack of gauge invariance in open domains by choosing a particular gauge—the winding gauge—that provides a natural interpretation in terms of the average winding number of pairwise field lines. We use this gauge precisely to define and measure the helicity and the helicity flux for several realizations of dynamo action. We find in these cases that the system as a whole does not break reflectional symmetry and that the total helicity remains small even in cases when substantial magnetic flux is generated. We find no particular connection between the generation of magnetic flux and the helicity or the helicity flux through the boundaries. We suggest that this result may be due to the essentially nonlinear nature of the dynamo processes in MRT.

  19. Stabilization of helical magnetic structures in thin multilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Dzemiantsova, L. V.; Meier, G.; R. Röhlsberger

    2014-01-01

    Based on micromagnetic simulations, we report on a novel helical magnetic structure in a soft magnetic film that is sandwiched between and exchange-coupled to two hard magnetic layers. Confined between antiparallel hard magnetic moments, a helix with a turn of 180$^{\\circ}$ is stable without the presence of an external magnetic field. The magnetic stability is determined by the energy minimization and is a result of an internal field created by exchange interaction and anisotropy. Since the i...

  20. Role of helicities for the dynamics of turbulent magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, Wollf-Christian

    2013-01-01

    Investigations of the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity are conducted with pseudospectral, three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of forced and decaying incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. The high-resolution simulations which allow for the necessary scale-separation show that the observed self-similar scaling behavior of magnetic helicity and related quantities can only be understood by taking the full nonlinear interplay of velocity and magnetic fluctuations into account. With the help of the eddy-damped quasi-normal Markovian approximation a probably universal relation between kinetic and magnetic helicities is derived that closely resembles the extended definition of the prominent dynamo pseudoscalar $\\alpha$. This unexpected similarity suggests an additional nonlinear quenching mechanism of the current-helicity contribution to $\\alpha$.

  1. Extragalactic jets with helical magnetic fields: relativistic MHD simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Keppens, R; van der Holst, B; Casse, F

    2008-01-01

    Extragalactic jets are inferred to harbor dynamically important, organized magnetic fields which presumably aid in the collimation of the relativistic jet flows. We here explore by means of grid-adaptive, high resolution numerical simulations the morphology of AGN jets pervaded by helical field and flow topologies. We concentrate on morphological features of the bow shock and the jet beam behind the Mach disk, for various jet Lorentz factors and magnetic field helicities. We investigate the influence of helical magnetic fields on jet beam propagation in overdense external medium. We use the AMRVAC code, employing a novel hybrid block-based AMR strategy, to compute ideal plasma dynamics in special relativity. The helicity of the beam magnetic field is effectively transported down the beam, with compression zones in between diagonal internal cross-shocks showing stronger toroidal field regions. In comparison with equivalent low-relativistic jets which get surrounded by cocoons with vortical backflows filled by ...

  2. Magnetic helicity and energy spectra of a solar active region

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Hongqi; Sokoloff, D D

    2013-01-01

    We compute magnetic helicity and energy spectra of the solar active region NOAA 11158 during 11-15 February 2011 at 20 degr southern heliographic latitude using observational photospheric vector magnetograms. We adopt the isotropic representation of the Fourier-transformed two-point correlation tensor of the magnetic field. The sign of magnetic helicity turns out to be predominantly positive at all wavenumbers. This sign is consistent with what is theoretically expected for the southern hemisphere. The relative magnetic helicity is around 8% and strongest at intermediate wavenumbers of k ~ 0.4 Mm^{-1}, corresponding to a scale of 2 pi/k ~ 16 Mm. The same sign and a somewhat smaller value is also found for the relative current helicity evaluated in real space based on the vertical components of magnetic field and current density. The current helicity spectrum is estimated from the magnetic helicity spectrum and its modulus shows a k^{-5/3} spectrum at large wavenumbers. A similar power law is also obtained for...

  3. The Effects of Spatial Smoothing on Solar Magnetic Helicity and the Hemispheric Helicity Sign Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch Ocker, Stella; Petrie, Gordon

    2016-05-01

    The hemispheric sign rule for solar magnetic helicity, which states that negative/positive helicity occurs preferentially in the northern/southern hemisphere, provides clues to the causes of twisted, flaring magnetic fields. However, previous studies on the hemisphere rule may have been significantly affected by seeing from atmospheric turbulent motions. Using Hinode/SOT-SP data spanning from 2006 to 2012, we studied the effects of two important data processing steps that imitate the effects of atmospheric seeing: noise reduction by ignoring pixel values that are weaker than the estimated noise threshold, and Gaussian spatial smoothing. We applied these processing techniques to the helicity distribution maps for active regions NOAA 11158 and NOAA 11243, along with the average helicities of 36 active regions, in order to imitate and understand the effects of seeing from atmospheric turbulence. We found that rather than changing trends in the helicity distributions, Gaussian smoothing and noise reduction enhanced existing trends by pushing outliers towards the mean or removing them altogether. We also found that, when separated for weak and strong magnetic fields, the average helicities of the 36 active regions conformed to the hemisphere rule for weak field helicities and breached the rule for strong field helicities. In general, we found that data processing did not affect whether the hemisphere rule held for data taken from space-based instruments, and thus that seeing from atmospheric turbulence did not significantly affect previous studies' ground-based results on the hemisphere rule. This work was carried out through the National Solar Observatory Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program, which is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). The National Solar Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the NSF.

  4. Reduction of a Ship's Magnetic Field Signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Holmes, John

    2008-01-01

    Decreasing the magnetic field signature of a naval vessel will reduce its susceptibility to detonating naval influence mines and the probability of a submarine being detected by underwater barriers and maritime patrol aircraft. Both passive and active techniques for reducing the magnetic signatures produced by a vessel's ferromagnetism, roll-induced eddy currents, corrosion-related sources, and stray fields are presented. Mathematical models of simple hull shapes are used to predict the levels of signature reduction that might be achieved through the use of alternate construction materials. Al

  5. Topology of magnetic helicity of torsioned filaments in Hall plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, L C Garcia

    2007-01-01

    A solution of magnetic Hall equations for plasma filaments in the Coulomb gauge is obtained in the non-holonomic frame. Some physical features of the solution include, the non-conservation of the magnetic helicity and the decay of the magnetic field in the filaments. From the mathematical point of view,the presence of Frenet torsion in the filament is actually shown to be fundamental for the breaking of conservation of magnetic helicity in the case of helicoidal filaments. Since the magnetic helicity is not conserved even in the Coulomb gauge, and the magnetic field decays, one can say that the dynamo action fails. Actually the presence of torsion enhances the breaking of magnetic field helicity conservation. A similar formula of the one obtained here without considering the Hall effect has been obtained by Moffatt and Ricca (PRSA-1992) in the case of holonomic filaments. It is shown that unknotted magnetic filaments may place a lower bound on the magnetic energy. Discussions on the writhe number are also dis...

  6. Two-scale analysis of solar magnetic helicity

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, Axel; Singh, Nishant K

    2016-01-01

    We develop a two-scale formalism to determine global magnetic helicity spectra in systems where the local magnetic helicity has opposite signs on both sides of the equator, giving rise to cancelation with conventional methods. We verify this approach using first synthetic one-dimensional magnetic field and then two-dimensional slices from a three-dimensional alpha effect-type dynamo-generated magnetic field with forced turbulence of opposite helicity above and below the midplane of the domain. We then apply this formalism to global solar synoptic vector magnetograms. To improve the statistics, data from three consecutive Carrington rotations (2161--2163) are combined into a single map. We find that the spectral magnetic helicity representative of the northern hemisphere is negative at all wavenumbers and peaks at ~0.06 Mm^{-1} (scales around 100 Mm). There is no evidence of bihelical magnetic fields that are found in three-dimensional turbulence simulations of helicity-driven alpha effect-type turbulent dynam...

  7. Self-similar inverse cascade of magnetic helicity driven by the chiral anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Hirono, Yuji; Yin, Yi

    2015-01-01

    For systems with charged chiral fermions, the imbalance of chirality in the presence of magnetic field generates an electric current - this is the Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME). We study the dynamical real-time evolution of electromagnetic fields coupled by the anomaly to the chiral charge density and the CME current by solving the Maxwell-Chern-Simons equations. We find that the CME induces the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity towards the large distances, and that at late times this cascade becomes self-similar, with universal exponents. We also find that in terms of gauge field topology the inverse cascade represents the transition from linked electric and magnetic fields (Hopfions) to the knotted configuration of magnetic field (Chandrasekhar-Kendall states). The magnetic reconnections are accompanied by the pulses of the CME current directed along the magnetic field lines. We devise an experimental signature of these phenomena in heavy ion collisions, and speculate about implications for condensed matt...

  8. The large-scale dynamics of magnetic helicity

    CERN Document Server

    Linkmann, Moritz

    2016-01-01

    In this Letter we investigate the dynamics of magnetic helicity in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulent flows focusing at scales larger than the forcing scale. Our results show a non-local inverse cascade of magnetic helicity, which occurs directly from the forcing scale into the largest scales of the magnetic fields. We also observe that no magnetic helicity and no energy is transferred to an intermediate range of scales sufficiently smaller than the container size and larger than the forcing scale. Thus, the statistical properties of this range of scales, which increases with scale separation, is shown to be described to a large extent by the zero-flux solutions of the absolute statistical equilibrium theory exhibited by the truncated ideal MHD equations.

  9. Microscopic Processes in Global Relativistic Jets Containing Helical Magnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-Ichi Nishikawa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the study of relativistic jets one of the key open questions is their interaction with the environment on the microscopic level. Here, we study the initial evolution of both electron–proton ( e − – p + and electron–positron ( e ± relativistic jets containing helical magnetic fields, focusing on their interaction with an ambient plasma. We have performed simulations of “global” jets containing helical magnetic fields in order to examine how helical magnetic fields affect kinetic instabilities such as the Weibel instability, the kinetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (kKHI and the Mushroom instability (MI. In our initial simulation study these kinetic instabilities are suppressed and new types of instabilities can grow. In the e − – p + jet simulation a recollimation-like instability occurs and jet electrons are strongly perturbed. In the e ± jet simulation a recollimation-like instability occurs at early times followed by a kinetic instability and the general structure is similar to a simulation without helical magnetic field. Simulations using much larger systems are required in order to thoroughly follow the evolution of global jets containing helical magnetic fields.

  10. Helical Dipole Magnets for Polarized Protons in RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syphers, M.; Courant, E.; Fischer, W.; Luccio, A.; Mariam, F.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Willen, E.; Katayama, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Kawaguchi, T.; Okamura, M.; Tominaka, T.; Wu, H.; Ptitsin, V.; Shatunov, Y.

    1997-05-01

    The Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) will be able to support experiments using polarized proton beams. Siberian Snakes are used to maintain polarization in this high energy superconducting collider. To make efficient use of available space while taking advantage of high field superconducting magnets, 4 Tesla helical dipole magnets will be used. These magnets generate a central dipole field in which the field direction rotates through 360^circ about the longitudinal axis over the length of the device. An arrangement of four such magnets can produce the desired change in the spin direction while keeping the proton orbit outside of the ``Snake'' unaltered. Similar magnet arrangements will be used to produce longitudinal polarization at the two major interaction points in RHIC. The basic requirements and layout of these magnets are described, as well as tolerances on field quality and integrated field strengths. First results of tests of prototype helical magnets will be discussed.

  11. Microscopic Processes in Global Relativistic Jets Containing Helical Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Niemiec, Jacek; Kobzar, Oleh; Pohl, Martin; Gomez, Jose L; Dutan, Ioana; Pe'er, Asaf; Frederiksen, Jacob Trier; Nordlund, AAke; Meli, Athina; Sol, Helene; Hardee, Philip E; Hartmann, Dieter H

    2016-01-01

    In the study of relativistic jets one of the key open questions is their interaction with the environment on the microscopic level. Here, we study the initial evolution of both electron$-$proton ($e^{-}-p^{+}$) and electron$-$positron ($e^{\\pm}$) relativistic jets containing helical magnetic fields, focusing on their interaction with an ambient plasma. We have performed simulations of "global" jets containing helical magnetic fields in order to examine how helical magnetic fields affect kinetic instabilities such as the Weibel instability, the kinetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (kKHI) and the Mushroom instability (MI). In our initial simulation study these kinetic instabilities are suppressed and new types of instabilities can grow. In the $e^{-}-p^{+}$ jet simulation a recollimation-like instability occurs and jet electrons are strongly perturbed. In the $e^{\\pm}$ jet simulation a recollimation-like instability occurs at early times followed by a kinetic instability and the general structure is similar to ...

  12. The Role of Magnetic Helicity in Structuring the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Knizhnik, Kalman J; DeVore, C Richard

    2016-01-01

    Two of the most widely observed and yet most puzzling features of the Sun's magnetic field are coronal loops that are smooth and laminar and prominences/filaments that are strongly sheared. These two features would seem to be quite unrelated in that the loops are near their minimum-energy current-free state, whereas filaments are regions of high magnetic stress and intense electric currents. We argue that, in fact, these two features are inextricably linked in that both are due to a single process: the injection of magnetic helicity into the corona by photospheric motions and the subsequent evolution of this helicity by coronal reconnection. In this paper, we present numerical simulations of the response of a \\citet{Parker72} corona to photospheric driving motions that have varying degrees of helicity preference. We obtain four main conclusions: 1) in agreement with the helicity condensation model of \\citet{Antiochos13}, the inverse cascade of helicity by magnetic reconnection results in the formation of prom...

  13. The Role of Magnetic Helicity in Structuring the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knizhnik, K. J.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.

    2017-01-01

    Two of the most widely observed and striking features of the Sun's magnetic field are coronal loops, which are smooth and laminar, and prominences or filaments, which are strongly sheared. Loops are puzzling because they show little evidence of tangling or braiding, at least on the quiet Sun, despite the chaotic nature of the solar surface convection. Prominences are mysterious because the origin of their underlying magnetic structure—filament channels—is poorly understood at best. These two types of features would seem to be quite unrelated and wholly distinct. We argue that, on the contrary, they are inextricably linked and result from a single process: the injection of magnetic helicity into the corona by photospheric motions and the subsequent evolution of this helicity by coronal reconnection. In this paper, we present numerical simulations of the response of a Parker (1972) corona to photospheric driving motions that have varying degrees of helicity preference. We obtain four main conclusions: (1) in agreement with the helicity condensation model of Antiochos (2013), the inverse cascade of helicity by magnetic reconnection in the corona results in the formation of filament channels localized about polarity inversion lines; (2) this same process removes most complex fine structure from the rest of the corona, resulting in smooth and laminar coronal loops; (3) the amount of remnant tangling in coronal loops is inversely dependent on the net helicity injected by the driving motions; and (4) the structure of the solar corona depends only on the helicity preference of the driving motions and not on their detailed time dependence. We discuss the implications of our results for high-resolution observations of the corona.

  14. The Role of Magnetic Helicity in Structuring the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knizhnik, K. J.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.

    2017-01-01

    Two of the most widely observed and striking features of the Suns magnetic field are coronal loops, which are smooth and laminar, and prominences or filaments, which are strongly sheared. Loops are puzzling because they show little evidence of tangling or braiding, at least on the quiet Sun, despite the chaotic nature of the solar surface convection. Prominences are mysterious because the origin of their underlying magnetic structure filament channels is poorly understood at best. These two types of features would seem to be quite unrelated and wholly distinct. We argue that, on the contrary, they are inextricably linked and result from a single process: the injection of magnetic helicity into the corona by photospheric motions and the subsequent evolution of this helicity by coronal reconnection. In this paper, we present numerical simulations of the response of a Parker (1972) corona to photospheric driving motions that have varying degrees of helicity preference. We obtain four main conclusions: (1) in agreement with the helicity condensation model of Antiochos (2013), the inverse cascade of helicity by magnetic reconnection in the corona results in the formation of filament channels localized about polarity inversion lines; (2) this same process removes most complex fine structure from the rest of the corona, resulting in smooth and laminar coronal loops; (3) the amount of remnant tangling in coronal loops is inversely dependent on the net helicity injected by the driving motions; and (4) the structure of the solar corona depends only on the helicity preference of the driving motions and not on their detailed time dependence. We discuss the implications of our results for high-resolution observations of the corona.

  15. Fluid-magnetic helicity in axisymmetric stationary relativistic magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, G.

    2017-10-01

    The present work is intended to gain a fruitful insight into the understanding of the formations of magneto-vortex configurations and their role in the physical processes of mutual exchange of energies associated with fluid's motion and the magnetic fields in an axisymmetric stationary hydromagnetic system subject to strong gravitational field (e.g., neutron star/magnetar). It is found that the vorticity flux vector field associated with vorticity 2-form is a linear combination of fluid's vorticity vector and of magnetic vorticity vector. The vorticity flux vector obeys Helmholtz's flux conservation. The energy equation associated with the vorticity flux vector field is deduced. It is shown that the mechanical rotation of vorticity flux surfaces contributes to the formation of vorticity flux vector field. The dynamo action for the generation of toroidal components of vorticity flux vector field is described in the presence of meridional circulations. It is shown that the stretching of twisting magnetic lines due to differential rotation leads to the breakdown of gravitational isorotation in the absence of meridional circulations. An explicit expression consists of rotation of vorticity flux surface, energy and angular momentum per baryon for the fluid-magnetic helicity current vector is obtained. The conservation of fluid-magnetic helicity is demonstrated. It is found that the fluid-magnetic helicity displays the energy spectrum arising due to the interaction between the mechanical rotation of vorticity flux surfaces and the fluid's motion obeying Euler's equations. The dissipation of a linear combination of modified fluid helicity and magnetic twist is shown to occur due to coupled effect of frame dragging and meridional circulation. It is found that the growing twist of magnetic lines causes the dissipation of modified fluid helicity in the absence of meridional circulations.

  16. Helicity and alpha-effect by current-driven instabilities of helical magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Gellert, M; Hollerbach, R

    2011-01-01

    Helical magnetic background fields with adjustable pitch angle are imposed on a conducting fluid in a differentially rotating cylindrical container. The small-scale kinetic and current helicities are calculated for various field geometries, and shown to have the opposite sign as the helicity of the large-scale field. These helicities and also the corresponding $\\alpha$-effect scale with the current helicity of the background field. The $\\alpha$-tensor is highly anisotropic as the components $\\alpha_{\\phi\\phi}$ and $\\alpha_{zz}$ have opposite signs. The amplitudes of the azimuthal $\\alpha$-effect computed with the cylindrical 3D MHD code are so small that the operation of an $\\alpha\\Omega$ dynamo on the basis of the current-driven, kink-type instabilities of toroidal fields is highly questionable. In any case the low value of the $\\alpha$-effect would lead to very long growth times of a dynamo in the radiation zone of the Sun and early-type stars of the order of mega-years.

  17. The Effects of Spatial Smoothing on Solar Magnetic Helicity Parameters and the Hemispheric Helicity Sign Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch Ocker, Stella; Petrie, Gordon

    2016-12-01

    The hemispheric preference for negative/positive helicity to occur in the northern/southern solar hemisphere provides clues to the causes of twisted, flaring magnetic fields. Previous studies on the hemisphere rule may have been affected by seeing from atmospheric turbulence. Using Hinode/SOT-SP data spanning 2006-2013, we studied the effects of two spatial smoothing tests that imitate atmospheric seeing: noise reduction by ignoring pixel values weaker than the estimated noise threshold, and Gaussian spatial smoothing. We studied in detail the effects of atmospheric seeing on the helicity distributions across various field strengths for active regions (ARs) NOAA 11158 and NOAA 11243, in addition to studying the average helicities of 179 ARs with and without smoothing. We found that, rather than changing trends in the helicity distributions, spatial smoothing modified existing trends by reducing random noise and by regressing outliers toward the mean, or removing them altogether. Furthermore, the average helicity parameter values of the 179 ARs did not conform to the hemisphere rule: independent of smoothing, the weak-vertical-field values tended to be negative in both hemispheres, and the strong-vertical-field values tended to be positive, especially in the south. We conclude that spatial smoothing does not significantly affect the overall statistics for space-based data, and thus seeing from atmospheric turbulence seems not to have significantly affected previous studies’ ground-based results on the hemisphere rule.

  18. Rashba Torque Driven Domain Wall Motion in Magnetic Helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylypovskyi, Oleksandr V; Sheka, Denis D; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P; Yershov, Kostiantyn V; Makarov, Denys; Gaididei, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Manipulation of the domain wall propagation in magnetic wires is a key practical task for a number of devices including racetrack memory and magnetic logic. Recently, curvilinear effects emerged as an efficient mean to impact substantially the statics and dynamics of magnetic textures. Here, we demonstrate that the curvilinear form of the exchange interaction of a magnetic helix results in an effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction with a complete set of Lifshitz invariants for a one-dimensional system. In contrast to their planar counterparts, the geometrically induced modifications of the static magnetic texture of the domain walls in magnetic helices offer unconventional means to control the wall dynamics relying on spin-orbit Rashba torque. The chiral symmetry breaking due to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction leads to the opposite directions of the domain wall motion in left- or right-handed helices. Furthermore, for the magnetic helices, the emergent effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction can be attributed to the clear geometrical parameters like curvature and torsion offering intuitive understanding of the complex curvilinear effects in magnetism.

  19. Fabrication of a magnetic helical mesostructured silica rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang Qiao, Shi; Cheng, Lina; Yan, Zifeng; Qing Lu, Gao Max

    2008-10-01

    We report a one-step synthesis of magnetic helical mesostructured silica (MHMS) by self-assembly of an achiral surfactant, magnetic nanocrystals with stearic acid ligands and silicate. This core-shell structured material consists of an Fe3O4 superparamagnetic nanocrystal core and a highly ordered periodic helical mesoporous silica shell. We propose that the formation of the helical structure is induced by the interaction between the surfactant and dissociated stearic acid ligands. The MHMS obtained possesses superparamagnetism, uniform mesostructure, narrow pore size distribution, high surface area, and large pore volume. Furthermore, the drug release process is demonstrated using aspirin as a drug model and MHMS as a drug carrier in a sodium phosphate buffer solution.

  20. Validation of the magnetic energy vs. helicity scaling in solar magnetic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Tziotziou, K; Georgoulis, M K; Archontis, V

    2014-01-01

    We assess the validity of the free magnetic energy - relative magnetic helicity diagram for solar magnetic structures. We used two different methods of calculating the free magnetic energy and the relative magnetic helicity budgets: a classical, volume-calculation nonlinear force-free (NLFF) method applied to finite coronal magnetic structures and a surface-calculation NLFF derivation that relies on a single photospheric or chromospheric vector magnetogram. Both methods were applied to two different data sets, namely synthetic active-region cases obtained by three-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations and observed active-region cases, which include both eruptive and noneruptive magnetic structures. The derived energy--helicity diagram shows a consistent monotonic scaling between relative helicity and free energy with a scaling index 0.84$\\pm$0.05 for both data sets and calculation methods. It also confirms the segregation between noneruptive and eruptive active regions and the existence of thresh...

  1. The inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Wolf-Christian; Busse, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of magnetic helicity, $H^M$, which is responsible for large-scale magnetic structure formation in electrically conducting turbulent media is investigated in forced and decaying three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. This is done with the help of high resolution direct numerical simulations and statistical closure theory. The numerically observed spectral scaling of $H^M$ is at variance with earlier work using a statistical closure model [Pouquet et al., J. Fluid Mech. \\textbf{77} 321 (1976)]. By revisiting this theory a universal dynamical balance relation is found that includes effects of kinetic helicity, as well as kinetic and magnetic energy on the inverse cascade of $H^M$ and explains the above-mentioned discrepancy. Considering the result in the context of mean-field dynamo theory suggests a nonlinear modification of the $\\alpha$-dynamo effect important in the context of magnetic field excitation in turbulent plasmas.

  2. Inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Wolf-Christian; Malapaka, Shiva Kumar; Busse, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of magnetic helicity HM, which is responsible for large-scale magnetic structure formation in electrically conducting turbulent media, is investigated in forced and decaying three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. This is done with the help of high-resolution direct numerical simulations and statistical closure theory. The numerically observed spectral scaling of HM is at variance with earlier work using a statistical closure model [Pouquet et al., J. Fluid Mech. 77, 321 (1976)]. By revisiting this theory, a universal dynamical balance relation is found that includes the effects of kinetic helicity as well as kinetic and magnetic energies on the inverse cascade of HM and explains the above-mentioned discrepancy. Consideration of the result in the context of mean-field dynamo theory suggests a nonlinear modification of the α-dynamo effect, which is important in the context of magnetic-field excitation in turbulent plasmas.

  3. Magnetic Helicity Reversals in a Cyclic Convective Dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Miesch, Mark S; Augustson, Kyle C

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the role of magnetic helicity in promoting cyclic magnetic activity in a global, 3D, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of a convective dynamo. This simulation is characterized by coherent bands of toroidal field that exist within the convection zone, with opposite polarities in the northern and southern hemispheres. Throughout most of the cycle, the magnetic helicity in these bands is negative in the northern hemisphere and positive in the southern hemisphere. However, during the declining phase of each cycle, this hemispheric rule reverses. We attribute this to a global restructuring of the magnetic topology that is induced by the interaction of the bands across the equator. This band interaction appears to be ultimately responsible for, or at least associated with, the decay and subsequent reversal of both the toroidal bands and the polar fields. We briefly discuss the implications of these results within the context of solar observations, which also show some potential evidence for toroid...

  4. Effects of magnetic and kinetic helicities on the growth of magnetic fields in laminar and turbulent flows by helical-Fourier decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkmann, Moritz; Sahoo, Ganapati; McKay, Mairi; Berera, Arjun; Biferale, Luca

    2016-11-01

    We perform an analytical and numerical study of incompressible homogeneous conducting fluids by Fourier-helical decomposition of the equations of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and a subsequent reduction of the number of degrees of freedom. From the stability properties of the most general subset of interacting velocity and magnetic fields on a closed Fourier triad, we make predictions on the large-scale magnetic-field growth depending on the distribution of magnetic and kinetic helicities among the three wavenumbers. In the kinematic dynamo regime we predict the formation of a large-scale magnetic component with a magnetic helicity of opposite sign with respect to the kinetic helicity, a sort of triadic-by-triad α-effect in Fourier space, while in presence of strong small-scale magnetic helicity we predict an inverse cascade of magnetic helicity. We confirm these predictions through a series of Direct Numerical Simulations, either seeding different magnetic helical components in a strongly helical flow (turbulent/laminar) or directly injecting helical magnetic fluctuations at small scales. Our results show that important dynamical features of MHD flows can be predicted from an analytically tractable dynamical system derived directly from the MHD equations. ERC ADG NewTURB 2013.

  5. Domain and wall structures in films with helical magnetization profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubuget, Vincent [Laboratoire d' Electrodynamique des Materiaux Avances, Universite Francois Rabelais, CNRS UMR 6157, Parc de Grandmont, F-37200 Tours (France); CEA, DAM, Le Ripault, F-37260 Monts (France); Thiaville, Andre [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS UMR 8502, Bat. 510, F-91405 Orsay (France); Adenot-Engelvin, Anne-Lise, E-mail: anne-lise.adenot-engelvin@cea.f [CEA, DAM, Le Ripault, F-37260 Monts (France); Duverger, Francois; Dubourg, Sebastien [CEA, DAM, Le Ripault, F-37260 Monts (France)

    2011-06-15

    We study soft magnetic bilayers having orthogonal, in-plane easy axes. The layers are thicker than the Bloch wall width linked to the anisotropy, so that a helical magnetization with a large angle exists across the sample thickness. The magnetic domains structure has been investigated at both sample surfaces, using magneto-optical microscopy. The domain structure is found to be similar to that of double films with biquadratic coupling. Two kinds of domain walls are identified, namely with a 90{sup o} and 180{sup o} rotation of the average magnetization. The detailed structure and energy of these walls are studied by micromagnetic calculations. - Research highlights: This paper is devoted to the peculiar domain structure resulting from an anisotropy distribution in the thickness of the sample, realized through specific elaboration conditions. The helical magnetization profile obtained leads to a complex dynamic behaviour described and modelled in Phys.Rev. B 80, 134412 (published in October 2009) which has been already cited three times. This paper sheds light on of the demagnetized state of such samples: a variety of domains structure has been observed by Kerr microscopy, under various saturation fields. The most striking conclusion is driven by the analysis of the magnetization process which implies the co-existence of two types of domain walls in the sample, with four possible directions for the mean magnetization. The magnetization profile of the two walls has been confirmed by numerical simulation.

  6. Effects of magnetic and kinetic helicities on the growth of magnetic fields in laminar and turbulent flows by helical-Fourier decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Linkmann, Moritz; McKay, Mairi; Berera, Arjun; Biferale, Luca

    2016-01-01

    We present a numerical and analytical study of incompressible homogeneous conducting fluids using a Fourier-helical representation. We analytically study both small- and large-scale dynamo properties, as well as the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity, in the most general minimal subset of interacting velocity and magnetic fields on a closed Fourier triad. We mainly focus on the dependency of magnetic field growth as a function of the distribution of kinetic and magnetic helicities among the three interacting wavenumbers. By combining direct numerical simulations of the full magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations with the Fourier-helical decomposition we numerically confirm that in the kinematic dynamo regime the system develops a large-scale magnetic helicity with opposite sign compared to the small-scale kinetic helicity, a sort of triad-by-triad $\\alpha$-effect in Fourier space. Concerning the small-scale perturbations, we predict theoretically and confirm numerically that the largest instability is achived...

  7. Variable-period permanent-magnet helical undulator

    OpenAIRE

    Jungho Mun; Young Uk Jeong; Vinokurov, Nikolay A.; Kitae Lee; Kyu-Ha Jang; Seong Hee Park; Min Yong Jeon; Sang-In Shin

    2014-01-01

    We realized a variable-period permanent-magnet helical undulator with high (∼1  T) field amplitude, which is almost constant over undulator periods of 23–26 mm. Each undulator period has four modular sections of iron poles and permanent magnets embedded in nonmagnetic disks with holes along the undulator axis. Modular plates undergo a longitudinal repulsive force from the magnetic field pressure and the spring coils between modular plates. The undulator period can thus be controlled by mechan...

  8. Chiral Charge Erasure via Thermal Fluctuations of Magnetic Helicity

    CERN Document Server

    Long, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    We consider a relativistic plasma of fermions coupled to an Abelian gauge field and carrying a chiral charge asymmetry, which might arise in the early Universe through baryogenesis. It is known that on large length scales, $\\lambda \\gtrsim 1/(\\alpha \\mu_5)$, the chiral anomaly opens an instability toward the erasure of chiral charge and growth of magnetic helicity. Here the chemical potential $\\mu_{5}$ parametrizes the chiral asymmetry and $\\alpha$ is the fine-structure constant. We study the process of chiral charge erasure through the thermal fluctuations of magnetic helicity and contrast with the well-studied phenomenon of Chern-Simons number diffusion. Through the fluctuation-dissipation theorem we estimate the amplitude and time scale of helicity fluctuations on the length scale $\\lambda$, finding $\\delta \\mathcal{H} \\sim \\lambda T$ and $\\tau \\sim \\alpha \\lambda^3 T^2$ for a relativistic plasma at temperature $T$. We argue that the presence of a chiral asymmetry allows the helicity to grow diffusively fo...

  9. Magnetic stripes and skyrmions with helicity reversals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Xiuzhen; Mostovoy, Maxim; Tokunaga, Yusuke; Zhang, Weizhu; Kimoto, Koji; Matsui, Yoshio; Kaneko, Yoshio; Nagaosa, Naoto; Tokura, Yoshinori; MacDonald, Allan H.

    2012-01-01

    It was recently realized that topological spin textures do not merely have mathematical beauty but can also give rise to unique functionalities of magnetic materials. An example is the skyrmion-a nano-sized bundle of noncoplanar spins-that by virtue of its nontrivial topology acts as a flux of

  10. Magnetic stripes and skyrmions with helicity reversals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Xiuzhen; Mostovoy, Maxim; Tokunaga, Yusuke; Zhang, Weizhu; Kimoto, Koji; Matsui, Yoshio; Kaneko, Yoshio; Nagaosa, Naoto; Tokura, Yoshinori; MacDonald, Allan H.

    2012-01-01

    It was recently realized that topological spin textures do not merely have mathematical beauty but can also give rise to unique functionalities of magnetic materials. An example is the skyrmion-a nano-sized bundle of noncoplanar spins-that by virtue of its nontrivial topology acts as a flux of magne

  11. Structural and magnetic properties of a variety of transition metal incorporated DNA double helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Pralok K; Pati, Swapan K

    2014-02-03

    By using density functional theory calculations, the structural, energetic, magnetic, and optical properties for a variety of transition metal (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu) ions incorporated modified-DNA (M-DNA) double helices has been investigated. The DNA is modified with either hydroxypyridone (H) or bis(salicylaldehyde)ethylenediamine (S-en) metalated bases. We find the formation of extended M-O network leading to the ferromagnetic interactions for the case of H-DNA for all the metal ions. More ordered stacking arrangement was found for S-en-DNA. We calculate the exchange coupling constant (J) considering Heisenberg Hamiltonian for quantitative description of magnetic interactions. The ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interactions are obtained by varying different transition metal ions. The extent of the magnetic interaction depends on the number of transition metal ions. Optical profiles show peaks below 2 eV, a clear signature of spin-spin coupling.

  12. Scale-invariant helical magnetic fields and the duration of inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Kahniashvili, Tina; Durrer, Ruth; Tevzadze, Alexander G; Yin, Winston

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study a (nearly) scale-invariant helical magnetic field generated during inflation. We show that, if the helicity of such fields is measured, it can be used to determine the beginning of inflation. Upper bounds can be used to derive constraints on the minimal duration of inflation if one assumes that the magnetic fields generated during inflation are helical.

  13. New mode of operating a magnetized coaxial plasma gun for injecting magnetic helicity into a spheromak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, S; Hill, D N; Stallard, B W; Bulmer, R; Cohen, B; Holcomb, C T; Hooper, E B; McLean, H S; Moller, J; Wood, R D

    2003-03-07

    By operating a magnetized coaxial plasma gun continuously with just sufficient current to enable plasma ejection, large gun-voltage spikes (approximately 1 kV) are produced, giving the highest sustained voltage approximately 500 V and highest sustained helicity injection rate observed in the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment. The spheromak magnetic field increases monotonically with time, exhibiting the lowest fluctuation levels observed during formation of any spheromak (B/B>/=2%). The results suggest an important mechanism for field generation by helicity injection, namely, the merging of helicity-carrying filaments.

  14. Chiral charge erasure via thermal fluctuations of magnetic helicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Andrew J. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago,Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Sabancilar, Eray [Institut de Théorie des Phénoménes Physiques, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne,CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2016-05-11

    We consider a relativistic plasma of fermions coupled to an Abelian gauge field and carrying a chiral charge asymmetry, which might arise in the early Universe through baryogenesis. It is known that on large length scales, λ≳1/(αμ{sub 5}), the chiral anomaly opens an instability toward the erasure of chiral charge and growth of magnetic helicity. Here the chemical potential μ{sub 5} parametrizes the chiral asymmetry and α is the fine-structure constant. We study the process of chiral charge erasure through the thermal fluctuations of magnetic helicity and contrast with the well-studied phenomenon of Chern-Simons number diffusion. Through the fluctuation-dissipation theorem we estimate the amplitude and time scale of helicity fluctuations on the length scale λ, finding δ H∼λT and τ∼αλ{sup 3}T{sup 2} for a relativistic plasma at temperature T. We argue that the presence of a chiral asymmetry allows the helicity to grow diffusively for a time t∼T{sup 3}/(α{sup 5}μ{sub 5}{sup 4}) until it reaches an equilibrium value H∼μ{sub 5}T{sup 2}/α, and the chiral asymmetry is partially erased. If the chiral asymmetry is small, μ{sub 5}magnetic effect for which t∼T/(α{sup 3}μ{sub 5}{sup 2}). This mechanism for chiral charge erasure can be important for the hypercharge sector of the Standard Model as well as extensions including U(1) gauge interactions, such as asymmetric dark matter models.

  15. Chiral charge erasure via thermal fluctuations of magnetic helicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Andrew J.; Sabancilar, Eray

    2016-05-01

    We consider a relativistic plasma of fermions coupled to an Abelian gauge field and carrying a chiral charge asymmetry, which might arise in the early Universe through baryogenesis. It is known that on large length scales, λ gtrsim 1/(αμ5), the chiral anomaly opens an instability toward the erasure of chiral charge and growth of magnetic helicity. Here the chemical potential μ5 parametrizes the chiral asymmetry and α is the fine-structure constant. We study the process of chiral charge erasure through the thermal fluctuations of magnetic helicity and contrast with the well-studied phenomenon of Chern-Simons number diffusion. Through the fluctuation-dissipation theorem we estimate the amplitude and time scale of helicity fluctuations on the length scale λ, finding δScript H ~ λT and τ ~ αλ3T2 for a relativistic plasma at temperature T. We argue that the presence of a chiral asymmetry allows the helicity to grow diffusively for a time t ~ T3/(α5μ54) until it reaches an equilibrium value Script H ~ μ5T2/α, and the chiral asymmetry is partially erased. If the chiral asymmetry is small, μ5 < T/α, this avenue for chiral charge erasure is found to be slower than the chiral magnetic effect for which t ~ T/(α3μ52). This mechanism for chiral charge erasure can be important for the hypercharge sector of the Standard Model as well as extensions including U(1) gauge interactions, such as asymmetric dark matter models.

  16. A new self-propelled magnetic bearing with helical windings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayak, B.

    2016-12-01

    In this work, a design is proposed for an active, permanent magnet based, self-propelled magnetic bearing, i.e. levitating motor having the following features: (i) simple winding structure, (ii) high load supporting capacity, (iii) no eccentricity sensors, (iv) stable confinement in all translational dimensions, (v) stable confinement in all rotational dimensions, and (vi) high efficiency. This design uses an architecture consisting of a helically wound three-phase stator, and a rotor with the magnets also arranged in a helical manner. Active control is used to excite the rotor at a torque angle lying in the second quadrant. This torque angle is independent of the rotor's position inside the stator cavity; hence the control algorithm is similar to that of a conventional permanent magnet synchronous motor. It is motivated through a physical argument that the bearing rotor develops a lift force proportional to the output torque and that it remains stably confined in space. These assertions are then proved rigorously through a calculation of the magnetic fields, forces and torques. The stiffness matrix of the system is presented and a discussion of stable and unstable operating regions is given.

  17. Chiral Magnetism in an Itinerant Helical Magnet, MnSi - An Extended 29Si NMR Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuoka, Hiroshi; Motoya, Kiyoichiro; Majumder, Mayukh; Witt, Sebastian; Krellner, Cornelius; Baenitz, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The microscopic magnetism in the helical, conical and ferromagnetically polarized phases in an itinerant helical magnet, MnSi, has been studied by an extended 29Si NMR at zero field and under external magnetic fields. The temperature dependence of the staggered moment, MQ(T), determined by the 29Si NMR frequency, ν(T), and the nuclear relaxation rate, 1/T1(T), at zero field is in general accord with the SCR theory for weak itinerant ferromagnetic metals and its extension to helical magnets. The external field dependence of resonance frequency, ν(H), follows a vector sum of the contributions from the atomic hyperfine and macroscopic fields with a field induced moment characteristic to itinerant magnets. A discontinuous jump of the resonance frequency at the critical field, Hc, between the conical and the polarized phases has also been found, which suggests a first order like change of the electronic states at Hc.

  18. The Role of Magnetic Helicity in the Structure and Heating of the Sun's Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Knizhnik, Kalman J

    2016-01-01

    Two of the most important features of the solar atmosphere are its hot, smooth coronal loops and the concentrations of magnetic shear, known as filament channels, that reside above photospheric polarity inversion lines (PILs). The shear observed in filament channels represents magnetic helicity, while the smoothness of the coronal loops indicates an apparent lack of magnetic helicity in the rest of the corona. At the same time, models that attempt to explain the high temperatures observed in these coronal loops require magnetic energy, in the form of twist, to be injected at the photosphere. In addition to magnetic energy, this twist also represents magnetic helicity. Unlike magnetic energy, magnetic helicity is conserved under reconnection, and is consequently expected to accumulate and be observed in the corona. However, filament channels, rather than the coronal loops, are the locations in the corona where magnetic helicity is observed, and it manifests itself in the form of shear, rather than twist. This ...

  19. Distribution of Helical Properties of Solar Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kirill M. Kuzanyan; Victor G. Lamburt; Hong-Qi Zhang; Shu-Dong Bao

    2003-01-01

    We summarize studies of helical properties of solar magnetic fieldssuch as current helicity and twist of magnetic fields in solar active regions (ARs),that are observational tracers of the alpha-effect in the solar convective zone (SCZ).Information on their spatial distribution is obtained by analysis of systematic mag-netographic observations of active regions taken at Huairou Solar Observing Stationof National Astronomical Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences. The mainproperty is that the tracers of the alpha-effect are antisymmetric about the solarequator. Identifying longitudinal migration of active regions with their individualrotation rates and taking into account the internal differential rotation law withinthe SCZ known from helioseismology, we deduce the distribution of the effect overdepth. We have found evidence that the alpha-effect changes its value and signnear the bottom of the SCZ, and this is in accord with the theoretical studies andnumerical simulations. We discuss other regularities which can be revealed by fur-ther analysis such as possible dependence on longitude, time, and magnetic fieldstrength, etc.

  20. New helical-shape magnetic pole design for Magnetic Lead Screw enabling structure simplification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Kaiyuan; Xia, Yongming; Wu, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic lead screw (MLS) is a new type of high performance linear actuator that is attractive for many potential applications. The main difficulty of the MLS technology lies in the manufacturing of its complicated helical-shape magnetic poles. Structure simplification is, therefore, quite essent...

  1. Relationship between Magnetic Helicity Injection and Magnetic Reconnection in Double-Null Startup of the UTST Spherical Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takenori; Kamio, Shuji; Cao, Qinghong; Itagaki, Hirotomo; Takemura, Koichiro; Yamasaki, Kotaro; Ishiguchi, Koji; Yamada, Takuma; Inomoto, Michiaki; Ono, Yasushi

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic helicity injection is a useful idea for explaining plasma current drive and startup of various magnetized plasmas such as Spherical Tokamaks (STs). Magnetic reconnection is directly related with the magnetic helicity injection, because it is essential to reorganization of magnetic field lines injected externally. We address how and why helicity injection is related with magnetic reconnection. An ST plasma is produced by using two pairs of external poloidal field coils in the University of Tokyo Spherical Tokamak (UTST) device. In the late phase of the formation, a single ST is connected to the coil flux, which enables magnetic helicity injection from the helicity source (the coil flux) into the helicity sink (the ST plasma). We measured the Y-shaped reconnection region between the ST plasma and the poloidal coil using two dimensional pickup coil arrays in the r-z plane. magnetic reconnection of common flux into private flux causes concentration of current density along the current sheet, forming a high eigen-value area between the helicity source and the helicity sink. We made a parameter scan to study how crucial and effective the plasmoid ejection is for helicity injection and found that the plasmoid motion is a dynamic helicity injection process.

  2. Successive Injection of Opposite Magnetic Helicity in Solar Active Region NOAA 11928

    CERN Document Server

    Vemareddy, P

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the nature and evolution of the photospheric helicity flux transfer is a key to reveal the role of magnetic helicity in coronal dynamics of solar active regions. Using SDO/HMI photospheric vector magnetograms and the derived flow velocity field, we computed boundary driven helicity flux with a 12 minute cadence during the emergence of AR 11928. Accounting the foot point connectivity defined by non-linear force-free magnetic extrapolations, we derived and analyzed the corrected distribution of helicity flux maps. The photospheric helicity flux injection is found to changes sign during the steady emergence of the AR. This reversal is confirmed with the evolution of the photospheric electric currents and with the coronal connectivity as observed in EUV wavelengths with SDO/AIA. During about the three first days of emergence, the AR coronal helicity is positive while later on the field configuration is close to a potential field. As theoretically expected, the magnetic helicity cancelation is associ...

  3. Evolution of Magnetic Helicity and Energy Spectra of Solar Active Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Hongqi; Sokoloff, D D

    2015-01-01

    We adopt an isotropic representation of the Fourier-transformed two-point correlation tensor of the magnetic field for estimating magnetic energy and helicity spectra as well as current helicity spectra of individual active regions and the change of their spectral indices with the solar cycle. The departure of the spectral index of current helicity from 5/3 is analyzed, and it is found that it is lower than that of magnetic energy. There is no obvious relationship between the change of the normalized magnetic helicity and the integral scale of the magnetic field for individual active regions. The evolution of the spectral index reflects the development and distribution of various scales of magnetic structures in active regions. It is found that around solar maximum the magnetic energy and helicity spectra are steeper.

  4. Magnetic helicity and the evolution of decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berera, Arjun; Linkmann, Moritz

    2014-10-01

    Ensemble-averaged high resolution direct numerical simulations of reverse spectral transfer are presented, extending on the many single realization numerical studies done up to now. This identifies this type of spectral transfer as a statistical property of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and thus permits reliable numerical exploration of its dynamics. The magnetic energy decay exponent from these ensemble runs has been determined to be nE=(0.47±0.03)+(13.9±0.8)/Rλ for initially helical magnetic fields. We show that even after removing the Lorentz force term in the momentum equation, thus decoupling it from the induction equation, reverse spectral transfer still persists. The induction equation is now linear with an externally imposed velocity field, thus amenable to numerous analysis techniques. A new door has opened for analyzing reverse spectral transfer, with various ideas discussed.

  5. Evolution of magnetic helicity in the course of kinetic magnetic reconnection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wiegelmann

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the evolution of magnetic helicity density in the course of 2D and 3D kinetic magnetic reconnection through thin current sheets. In 2D, the helicity density near a reconnection X-line becomes purely quadrupolar structured, while in 3D, an additional dipolar structure occurs. This dipolar structure is related to kinetic current instabilities and becomes dominant for spontaneous 3D reconnection, in accordance with the dominating current instabilities. The 2D simulations have been carried out with a newly developed Vlasov-code and the 3D simulations with the particle-in-cell code GISMO.

  6. Nonlinear Magnetic Diffusion and Magnetic Helicity Transport in Galactic Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Kleeorin, N; Rogachevskii, I; Sokoloff, D D

    2003-01-01

    We have extended our previous mean-field galactic dynamo model which included algebraic and dynamic alpha nonlinearities (Kleeorin et al., A&A, v. 387, 453, 2002), to include also a quenching of turbulent diffusivity. We readily obtain equilibrium states for the large-scale magnetic field in the local disc dynamo model, and these fields have strengths that are comparable to the equipartition field strength. We find that the algebraic nonlinearity alone (i.e. quenching of both the alpha effect and turbulent magnetic diffusion) cannot saturate the growth of the mean magnetic field; only the combined effect of algebraic and dynamic nonlinearities can limit the growth of the mean magnetic field. However, in contrast to our earlier work without quenching of the turbulent diffusivity, we cannot now find satisfactory solutions in the no-z approximation to the axisymmetric galactic dynamo problem.

  7. Direct observation of a helical magnetic order near the superconducting state of MnP under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yishu; Feng, Yejun; Cheng, J.-G.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    A recent high-pressure electrical transport study of the 3d transition metal compound MnP manifested a complex pressure-temperature phase diagram of different types of magnetism and superconductivity. However, the nature of the high-pressure magnetic phase proximate to the superconducting state was not determined. We use non-resonant X-ray magnetic diffraction to probe the magnetic order in MnP under pressure. We discover incommensurate helical order in a confined region under high pressure, and ascertain the phase boundary through the pressure evolution of the lattice. Although the antiferromagnetic and superconducting phases are separated, there is no signature of a strong first-order phase transition between them. We discuss how our direct observation of a helimagnetic order in MnP helps to better understand aspects of magnetically-mediated superconductivity.

  8. Increasing the magnetic helicity content of a plasma by pulsing a magnetized source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, S; Stallard, B W; McLean, H S; Hooper, E B; Bulmer, R; Cohen, B I; Hill, D N; Holcomb, C T; Moller, J; Wood, R D

    2004-11-12

    By operating a magnetized coaxial gun in a pulsed mode it is possible to produce large voltage pulses of duration approximately 500 mus while reaching a few kV, giving a discrete input of helicity into a spheromak. In the sustained spheromak physics experiment (SSPX), it is observed that pulsing serves to nearly double the stored magnetic energy and double the temperature. We discuss these results by comparison with 3D MHD simulations of the same phenomenon.

  9. Magnetic Field Confinement in the Corona: The Role of Magnetic Helicity Accumulation

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, M; Zhang, Mei; Low, Natasha Flyer & Boon Chye

    2006-01-01

    A loss of magnetic field confinement is believed to be the cause of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), a major form of solar activity in the corona. The mechanisms for magnetic energy storage are crucial in understanding how a field may possess enough free energy to overcome the Aly limit and open up. Previously, we have pointed out that the accumulation of magnetic helicity in the corona plays a significant role in storing magnetic energy. In this paper, we investigate another hydromagnetic consequence of magnetic-helicity accumulation. We propose a conjecture that there is an upper bound on the total magnetic helicity that a force-free field can contain. This is directly related to the hydromagnetic property that force-free fields in unbounded space have to be self-confining. Although a mathematical proof of this conjecture for any field configuration is formidable, its plausibility can be demonstrated with the properties of several families of power-law, axisymmetric force-free fields. We put forth mathematica...

  10. Physical interpretation of the angle-dependent magnetic helicity spectrum in the solar wind: The nature of turbulent fluctuations near the proton gyroradius scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Kristopher G.; Howes, Gregory G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); TenBarge, Jason M. [IREAP, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Podesta, John J., E-mail: kristopher-klein@uiowa.edu [Center for Space Plasma Physics, Space Science Institute, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2014-04-20

    Motivated by recent observations of distinct parallel and perpendicular signatures in magnetic helicity measurements segregated by wave period and angle between the local magnetic field and the solar wind velocity, this paper undertakes a comparison of three intervals of Ulysses data with synthetic time series generated from a physically motivated turbulence model. From these comparisons, it is hypothesized that the observed signatures result from a perpendicular cascade of Alfvénic fluctuations and a local, non-turbulent population of ion-cyclotron or whistler waves generated by temperature anisotropy instabilities. By constraining the model's free parameters through comparison to in situ data, it is found that, on average, ∼95% of the power near dissipative scales is contained in a perpendicular Alfvénic cascade and that the parallel fluctuations are propagating nearly unidirectionally. The effects of aliasing on magnetic helicity measurements are considered and shown to be significant near the Nyquist frequency.

  11. Physical Interpretation of the Angle Dependent Magnetic Helicity Spectrum in the Solar Wind: The Nature of Turbulent Fluctuations near the Proton Gyroradius Scale

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Kristopher G; TenBarge, Jason M; Podesta, John J

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by recent observations of distinct parallel and perpendicular signatures in magnetic helicity measurements segregated by wave period and angle between the local magnetic field and the solar wind velocity, this paper undertakes a comparison of three intervals of \\emph{Ulysses} data with synthetic time series generated from a physically motivated turbulence model. From these comparisons, it is hypothesized that the observed signatures result from a perpendicular cascade of \\Alfvenic fluctuations and a local, non-turbulent population of ion cyclotron or whistler waves generated by temperature anisotropy instabilities. By constraining the model's free parameters through comparison to \\emph{in situ} data, it is found that, on average, $ \\sim 95\\%$ of the power near dissipative scales is contained in a perpendicular \\Alfvenic cascade and that the parallel fluctuations are propagating nearly unidirectionally. The effects of aliasing on magnetic helicity measurements are considered and shown to be significa...

  12. EVOLUTION OF MAGNETIC HELICITY AND ENERGY SPECTRA OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hongqi [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Brandenburg, Axel [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Sokoloff, D. D., E-mail: hzhang@bao.ac.cn [Department of Physics, Moscow University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-10

    We adopt an isotropic representation of the Fourier-transformed two-point correlation tensor of the magnetic field to estimate the magnetic energy and helicity spectra as well as current helicity spectra of two individual active regions (NOAA 11158 and NOAA 11515) and the change of the spectral indices during their development as well as during the solar cycle. The departure of the spectral indices of magnetic energy and current helicity from 5/3 are analyzed, and it is found that it is lower than the spectral index of the magnetic energy spectrum. Furthermore, the fractional magnetic helicity tends to increase when the scale of the energy-carrying magnetic structures increases. The magnetic helicity of NOAA 11515 violates the expected hemispheric sign rule, which is interpreted as an effect of enhanced field strengths at scales larger than 30–60 Mm with opposite signs of helicity. This is consistent with the general cycle dependence, which shows that around the solar maximum the magnetic energy and helicity spectra are steeper, emphasizing the large-scale field.

  13. A Combined Study of Photospheric Magnetic and Current Helicities and Subsurface Kinetic Helicities of Solar Active Regions during 2006-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, D.; Petrie, G. J. D.; Komm, R.

    2014-11-01

    We compare the average photospheric current helicity Hc , photospheric twist parameter α (a well-known proxy for the full relative magnetic helicity), and subsurface kinetic helicity Hk for 194 active regions observed between 2006-2013. We use 2440 Hinode photospheric vector magnetograms, and the corresponding subsurface fluid velocity data derived from GONG (2006-2012) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (2010-2013) dopplergrams. We find a significant hemispheric bias in all three parameters. The subsurface kinetic helicity is preferentially positive in the southern hemisphere and negative in the northern hemisphere. The photospheric current helicity and the α parameter have the same bias for strong fields (|B| > 1000 G) and no significant bias for weak fields (100 G <|B| < 500 G). We find no significant region-by-region correlation between the subsurface kinetic helicity and either the strong-field current helicity or α. Subsurface fluid motions of a given handedness correspond to photospheric helicities of both signs in approximately equal numbers. However, common variations appear in annual averages of these quantities over all regions. Furthermore, in a subset of 77 regions, we find significant correlations between the temporal profiles of the subsurface and photospheric helicities. In these cases, the sign of the linear correlation coefficient matches the sign relationship between the helicities, indicating that the photospheric magnetic field twist is sensitive to the twisting motions below the surface.

  14. A combined study of photospheric magnetic and current helicities and subsurface kinetic helicities of solar active regions during 2006-2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seligman, D. [National Solar Observatory REU Program, University of Pennsylvania (United States); Petrie, G. J. D.; Komm, R. [National Solar Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    We compare the average photospheric current helicity H{sub c} , photospheric twist parameter α (a well-known proxy for the full relative magnetic helicity), and subsurface kinetic helicity H{sub k} for 194 active regions observed between 2006-2013. We use 2440 Hinode photospheric vector magnetograms, and the corresponding subsurface fluid velocity data derived from GONG (2006-2012) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (2010-2013) dopplergrams. We find a significant hemispheric bias in all three parameters. The subsurface kinetic helicity is preferentially positive in the southern hemisphere and negative in the northern hemisphere. The photospheric current helicity and the α parameter have the same bias for strong fields (|B| > 1000 G) and no significant bias for weak fields (100 G <|B| < 500 G). We find no significant region-by-region correlation between the subsurface kinetic helicity and either the strong-field current helicity or α. Subsurface fluid motions of a given handedness correspond to photospheric helicities of both signs in approximately equal numbers. However, common variations appear in annual averages of these quantities over all regions. Furthermore, in a subset of 77 regions, we find significant correlations between the temporal profiles of the subsurface and photospheric helicities. In these cases, the sign of the linear correlation coefficient matches the sign relationship between the helicities, indicating that the photospheric magnetic field twist is sensitive to the twisting motions below the surface.

  15. Particle-in-cell Simulations of Global Relativistic Jets with Helical Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Duţan, Ioana; Mizuno, Yosuke; Niemiec, Jacek; Kobzar, Oleh; Pohl, Martin; Gómez, Jose L; Pe'er, Asaf; Frederiksen, Jacob T; Nordlund, Åke; Meli, Athina; Sol, Helene; Hardee, Philip E; Hartmann, Dieter H

    2016-01-01

    We study the interaction of relativistic jets with their environment, using 3-dimensional relativistic particle-in-cell simulations for two cases of jet composition: (i) electron-proton ($e^{-}-p^{+}$) and (ii) electron-positron ($e^{\\pm}$) plasmas containing helical magnetic fields. We have performed simulations of "global" jets containing helical magnetic fields in order to examine how helical magnetic fields affect kinetic instabilities such as the Weibel instability, the kinetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and the Mushroom instability. We have found that these kinetic instabilities are suppressed and new types of instabilities can grow. For the $e^{-}-p^{+}$ jet, a recollimation-like instability occurs and jet electrons are strongly perturbed, whereas for the $e^{\\pm}$ jet, a recollimation-like instability occurs at early times followed by kinetic instability and the general structure is similar to a simulation without a helical magnetic field. We plan to perform further simulations using much larger sys...

  16. A Combined Study of Photospheric Magnetic and Current Helicities and Subsurface Kinetic Helicities of Solar Active Regions during 2006-2013

    CERN Document Server

    Seligman, Darryl; Komm, Rudi

    2014-01-01

    We compare the average photospheric current helicity $H_c$, photospheric twist parameter $\\alpha$ (a well-known proxy for the full relative magnetic helicity), and subsurface kinetic helicity $H_k$ for 194 active regions observed between 2006-2013. We use 2440 Hinode photospheric vector magnetograms, and the corresponding subsurface fluid velocity data derived from GONG (2006-2012) and HMI (2010-2013) Dopplergrams. We find a significant hemispheric bias in all three parameters. The subsurface kinetic helicity is preferentially positive in the southern hemisphere and negative in the northern hemisphere. The photospheric current helicity and the $\\alpha$ parameter have the same bias for strong fields ($|B|>1000$ G) and no significant bias for weak fields (100 G $<|B|<500$ G). We find no significant region-by-region correlation between the subsurface kinetic helicity and either the strong-field current helicity or $\\alpha$. Subsurface fluid motions of a given handedness correspond to photospheric helicitie...

  17. Twist, writhe and energy from the helicity of magnetic perturbed vortex filaments

    OpenAIRE

    de Andrade, Luiz Carlos Garcia

    2007-01-01

    The twist and writhe numbers and magnetic energy of an orthogonally perturbed vortex filaments are obtained from the computation of the magnetic helicity of geodesic and abnormal magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) vortex filament solutions. Twist is computed from a formula recently derived by Berger and Prior [J. Phys. A 39 (2006) 8321] and finally writhe is computed from the theorem that the helicity is proportional to the sum of twist and writhe. The writhe number is proportional to the total tors...

  18. Helicity Transformation under the Collision and Merging of Magnetic Flux Ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehaas, Timothy

    2016-10-01

    A magnetic flux rope is a tube-like, current carrying plasma embedded in an external magnetic field. The magnetic field lines resemble threads in a rope, which vary in pitch according to radius. Flux ropes are ubiquitous in astrophysical plasmas, and bundles of these structures play an important role in the dynamics of the space environment. They are observed in the solar atmosphere and near-earth environment where they are seen to twist, merge, tear, and writhe. In this MHD context, their global dynamics are bound by rules of magnetic helicity conservation, unless, under a non-ideal process, helicity is transformed through magnetic reconnection, turbulence, or localized instabilities. These processes are tested under experimental conditions in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD). The device is a twenty-meter long, one-meter diameter, cylindrical vacuum vessel designed to generate a highly reproducible, magnetized plasma. Reliable shot-to-shot repetition of plasma parameters and over four hundred diagnostic ports enable the collection of volumetric datasets (measurements of ne, Te, Vp, B, J, E, uflow) as two kink-unstable flux ropes form, move, collide, and merge. Similar experiments on the LAPD have utilized these volumetric datasets, visualizing magnetic reconnection through a topological quasi-separatrix layer, or QSL. This QSL is shown to be spatially coincident with the reconnection rate, ∫ E . dl , and oscillates (although out of phase) with global helicity. Magnetic helicity is observed to have a negative sign and its counterpart, cross helicity, a positive one. These quantities oscillate 8% peak-to-peak, and the changes in helicity are visualized as 1) the transport of helicity (ϕB + E × A) and 2) the dissipation of the helicity - 2 E . B . This work is supported by LANL-UC research Grant and done at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, which is funded by DOE and NSF.

  19. Magnetic Helicity of Self-Similar Axisymmetric Force-free Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Mei; Low, Boon Chye

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we continue our theoretical studies on addressing what are the possible consequences of magnetic helicity accumulation in the solar corona. Our previous studies suggest that coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are natural products of coronal evolution as a consequence of magnetic helicity accumulation and the triggering of CMEs by surface processes such as flux emergence also have their origin in magnetic helicity accumulation. Here we use the same mathematical approach to study the magnetic helicity of axisymmetric power-law force-free fields, but focus on a family whose surface flux distributions are defined by self-similar force-free fields. The semi-analytical solutions of the axisymmetric self-similar force-free fields enable us to discuss the properties of force-free fields possessing a huge amount of accumulated magnetic helicity. Our study suggests that there may be an absolute upper bound on the total magnetic helicity of all bipolar axisymmetric force-free fields. And with the increase of ac...

  20. Evolution of Magnetic Helicity During Eruptive Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Priest, Eric; Janvier, Miho

    2016-01-01

    During eruptive solar flares and coronal mass ejections, a non-pot{\\-}ential magnetic arcade with much excess magnetic energy goes unstable and reconnects. It produces a twisted erupting flux rope and leaves behind a sheared arcade of hot coronal loops. We suggest that: the twist of the erupting flux rope can be determined from conservation of magnetic flux and magnetic helicity and equipartition of magnetic helicity. It depends on the geometry of the initial pre-eruptive structure. Two cases are considered, in the first of which a flux rope is not present initially but is created during the eruption by the reconnection. In the second case, a flux rope is present under the arcade in the pre-eruptive state, and the effect of the eruption and reconnection is to add an amount of magnetic helicity that depends on the fluxes of the rope and arcade and the geometry.

  1. Matter-induced magnetic moment and neutrino helicity rotation in external fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternov, Alexei I.

    2016-11-01

    The induced magnetic moment that arises due to the propagation of neutrinos in a dispersive medium can affect the dynamics of the neutrino spin in an external electromagnetic field. In particular, it can cause a helicity flip of a massive neutrino in a magnetic field. In some astrophysical media, this helicity transition mechanism could be more effective than a similar process caused by the anomalous magnetic moment of the neutrino. If the neutrino energy is sufficiently high, the two helicity transition mechanisms mentioned above can compensate each other. Then a helicity flip in an external field will not occur. Calculations are carried out using both the methods of relativistic quantum mechanics and the quasiclassical Bargmann-Michel-Telegdi equation.

  2. FIRST SYNOPTIC MAPS OF PHOTOSPHERIC VECTOR MAGNETIC FIELD FROM SOLIS/VSM: NON-RADIAL MAGNETIC FIELDS AND HEMISPHERIC PATTERN OF HELICITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosain, S.; Pevtsov, A. A. [National Solar Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Rudenko, G. V.; Anfinogentov, S. A. [Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP), Russian Academy of Sciences, Irkutsk (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-20

    We use daily full-disk vector magnetograms from Vector Spectromagnetograph on Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun system to synthesize the first Carrington maps of the photospheric vector magnetic field. We describe these maps and make a comparison of the observed radial field with the radial field estimate from line-of-sight magnetograms. Furthermore, we employ these maps to study the hemispheric pattern of current helicity density, H{sub c} , during the rising phase of solar cycle 24. The longitudinal average over the 23 consecutive solar rotations shows a clear signature of the hemispheric helicity rule, i.e., H{sub c} is predominantly negative in the north and positive in the south. Although our data include the early phase of cycle 24, there appears to be no evidence for a possible (systematic) reversal of the hemispheric helicity rule at the beginning of the cycle as predicted by some dynamo models. Furthermore, we compute the hemispheric pattern in active region latitudes (-30 Degree-Sign {<=} {theta} {<=} 30 Degree-Sign ) separately for weak (100 G < |B{sub r} | < 500 G) and strong (|B{sub r} | > 1000 G) radial magnetic fields. We find that while the current helicity of strong fields follows the well-known hemispheric rule (i.e., {theta} {center_dot} H{sub c} < 0), H{sub c} of weak fields exhibits an inverse hemispheric behavior (i.e., {theta} {center_dot} H{sub c} > 0), albeit with large statistical scatter. We discuss two plausible scenarios to explain the opposite hemispheric trend of helicity in weak and strong field regions.

  3. Enantioselective synthesis of helical polydiacetylene by application of linearly polarized light and magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yangyang; Yang, Guang; Xia, Hongyan; Zou, Gang; Zhang, Qijin; Gao, Jiangang

    2014-09-23

    Magnetic optical activity, which can occur in all media and is induced by longitudinal magnetic field, causes the difference in absorption coefficients of left and right circularly polarized light and has the potential for magnetically induced enantioselectivity in chemical reactions. Compared with the well-established technique with circularly polarized light, there are few reports on the production of helical conjugated polymers in a photochemical reaction based on above magnetochiral anisotropy mechanism. Herein, we demonstrate experimentally that the enantioselective polymerization of diacetylene derivative can be achieved in the liquid crystal phase by application of linearly polarized light under a parallel or antiparallel magnetic field. The screw direction of predominant helical polydiacetylene chain can be rigorously controlled with the relative orientation of linearly polarized light and the magnetic field. Moreover, the prepared helical polydiacetylene assemblies can serve as a direct visual probe for the enantioselective recognition of D- or L-lysine.

  4. The origin, evolution and signatures of primordial magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2016-07-01

    The universe is magnetized on all scales probed so far. On the largest scales, galaxies and galaxy clusters host magnetic fields at the micro Gauss level coherent on scales up to ten kpc. Recent observational evidence suggests that even the intergalactic medium in voids could host a weak  ∼  10(-16) Gauss magnetic field, coherent on Mpc scales. An intriguing possibility is that these observed magnetic fields are a relic from the early universe, albeit one which has been subsequently amplified and maintained by a dynamo in collapsed objects. We review here the origin, evolution and signatures of primordial magnetic fields. After a brief summary of magnetohydrodynamics in the expanding universe, we turn to magnetic field generation during inflation and phase transitions. We trace the linear and nonlinear evolution of the generated primordial fields through the radiation era, including viscous effects. Sensitive observational signatures of primordial magnetic fields on the cosmic microwave background, including current constraints from Planck, are discussed. After recombination, primordial magnetic fields could strongly influence structure formation, especially on dwarf galaxy scales. The resulting signatures on reionization, the redshifted 21 cm line, weak lensing and the Lyman-α forest are outlined. Constraints from radio and γ-ray astronomy are summarized. Astrophysical batteries and the role of dynamos in reshaping the primordial field are briefly considered. The review ends with some final thoughts on primordial magnetic fields.

  5. The origin, evolution and signatures of primordial magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2016-07-01

    The universe is magnetized on all scales probed so far. On the largest scales, galaxies and galaxy clusters host magnetic fields at the micro Gauss level coherent on scales up to ten kpc. Recent observational evidence suggests that even the intergalactic medium in voids could host a weak  ˜  10-16 Gauss magnetic field, coherent on Mpc scales. An intriguing possibility is that these observed magnetic fields are a relic from the early universe, albeit one which has been subsequently amplified and maintained by a dynamo in collapsed objects. We review here the origin, evolution and signatures of primordial magnetic fields. After a brief summary of magnetohydrodynamics in the expanding universe, we turn to magnetic field generation during inflation and phase transitions. We trace the linear and nonlinear evolution of the generated primordial fields through the radiation era, including viscous effects. Sensitive observational signatures of primordial magnetic fields on the cosmic microwave background, including current constraints from Planck, are discussed. After recombination, primordial magnetic fields could strongly influence structure formation, especially on dwarf galaxy scales. The resulting signatures on reionization, the redshifted 21 cm line, weak lensing and the Lyman-α forest are outlined. Constraints from radio and γ-ray astronomy are summarized. Astrophysical batteries and the role of dynamos in reshaping the primordial field are briefly considered. The review ends with some final thoughts on primordial magnetic fields.

  6. CMB anisotropies generated by a stochastic background of primordial magnetic fields with non-zero helicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballardini, Mario; Finelli, Fabio; Paoletti, Daniela

    2015-10-01

    We consider the impact of a stochastic background of primordial magnetic fields with non-vanishing helicity on CMB anisotropies in temperature and polarization. We compute the exact expressions for the scalar, vector and tensor part of the energy-momentum tensor including the helical contribution, by assuming a power-law dependence for the spectra and a comoving cutoff which mimics the damping due to viscosity. We also compute the parity-odd correlator between the helical and non-helical contribution which generate the TB and EB cross-correlation in the CMB pattern. We finally show the impact of including the helical term on the power spectra of CMB anisotropies up to multipoles with l ~ Script O(103).

  7. CMB anisotropies generated by a stochastic background of primordial magnetic fields with non-zero helicity

    CERN Document Server

    Ballardini, Mario; Paoletti, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    We consider the impact of a stochastic background of primordial magnetic fields with non-vanishing helicity on CMB anisotropies in temperature and polarization. We compute the exact expressions for the scalar, vector and tensor part of the energy-momentum tensor including the helical contribution, by assuming a power-law dependence for the spectra and a comoving cutoff which mimics the damping due to viscosity. We also compute the parity-odd correlator between the helical and non-helical contribution which generate the TB and EB cross-correlation in the CMB pattern. We finally show the impact of including the helical term on the power spectra of CMB anisotropies up to multipoles with ell ~ O(10^3)$.

  8. Helical electric potential modulation via zonal-flow coupling to resonant magnetic perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leconte, M.; Kim, J.-H.

    2017-08-01

    Helical modulations of the electric potential were observed in several devices during application of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs). To address the implication of the helical modulation on RMP-induced transport, we derive a system of 1D equations for zonal flows (ZFs) and helical potential in the presence of RMPs. As ZFs are turbulence-driven, turbulence plays a major role in this plasma self-organization towards a quasi-equilibrium with 3D helical potential. The model reveals how RMPs modify an initially given a saturated-state of coexisting turbulence and ZFs. It is shown that RMPs trigger a transport bifurcation by allowing energy-transfer out of turbulence-driven ZFs into ZF-driven helical potential.

  9. Magnetic Helicity of the Global Field in Solar Cycles 23 and 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipin, V. V.; Pevtsov, A. A.

    2014-07-01

    For the first time we reconstruct the magnetic helicity density of the global axisymmetric field of the Sun using the method proposed by Brandenburg et al. and Pipin et al. To determine the components of the vector potential, we apply a gauge which is typically employed in mean-field dynamo models. This allows for a direct comparison of the reconstructed helicity with the predictions from the mean-field dynamo models. We apply this method to two different data sets: the synoptic maps of the line-of-sight magnetic field from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and vector magnetic field measurements from the Vector Spectromagnetograph (VSM) on the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) system. Based on the analysis of the MDI/SOHO data, we find that in solar cycle 23 the global magnetic field had positive (negative) magnetic helicity in the northern (southern) hemisphere. This hemispheric sign asymmetry is opposite to the helicity of the solar active regions, but it is in agreement with the predictions of mean-field dynamo models. The data also suggest that the hemispheric helicity rule may have reversed its sign during the early and late phases of cycle 23. Furthermore, the data indicate an imbalance in magnetic helicity between the northern and southern hemispheres. This imbalance seems to correlate with the total level of activity in each hemisphere in cycle 23. The magnetic helicity for the rising phase of cycle 24 is derived from SOLIS/VSM data, and qualitatively its latitudinal pattern is similar to the pattern derived from SOHO/MDI data for cycle 23.

  10. The magnetic signature of ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szitkar, F.; Dyment, J.; Honsho, C.; Horen, H.; Fouquet, Y.

    2013-12-01

    While the magnetic response of basalt-hosted hydrothermal sites is well known, that of ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal sites (UMHS) remains poorly documented. Here we present the magnetic signature of three of the six UMHS investigated to date on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, i.e. sites Rainbow, Ashadze (1 and 2), and Logachev. Two magnetic signatures are observed. Sites Rainbow and Ashadze 1 are both characterized by a positive reduced-to-the-pole magnetic anomaly, i.e. a positive magnetization contrast. Conversely, sites Ashadze 2 and Logachev do not exhibit any clear magnetic signature. Rock-magnetic measurements on samples from site Rainbow reveal a strong magnetization (~30 A/m adding induced and remanent contributions) borne by sulfide-impregnated serpentinites; the magnetic carrier being magnetite. This observation can be explained by three (non exclusive) processes: (1) higher temperature serpentinization at the site resulting in the formation of more abundant / more strongly magnetized magnetite; (2) the reducing hydrothermal fluid protecting magnetite at the site from the oxidation which otherwise affects magnetite in contact with seawater; and (3) the formation of primary (hydrothermal) magnetite. We apply a new inversion method developed by Honsho et al. (2012) to the high-resolution magnetic anomalies acquired 10 m above seafloor at sites Rainbow and Ashadze 1. This method uses the Akaike Bayesian Information Criterion (ABIC) and takes full advantage of the near-seafloor measurements, avoiding the upward-continuation (i.e. loss of resolution) of other inversion schemes. This inversion reveals a difference in the intensity of equivalent magnetization obtained assuming a 100 m thick magnetic layer, ~30 A/m at site Rainbow and only 8A/m at site Ashadze, suggesting a thinner or less magnetized source for the latter. Hydrothermal sites at Ashadze 2 and Logachev are much smaller (of the order of 10 m) than the previous ones (several 100 m). These sites, known as

  11. Magnetic helicity in non-axisymmetric mean-field solar dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Pipin, V V

    2016-01-01

    The paper address the effects of magnetic helicity conservation in a non-linear nonaxisymmetric mean-field solar dynamo model. We study the evolution of the shallow non-axisymmetric magnetic field perturbation with the strength about 10G in the solar convection zone. The dynamo evolves from the pure axisymmetric stage through the short (about 2 years) transient phase when the non-axisymmetric m=1 dynamo mode is dominant to the final stage where the axisymmetry of the dynamo is almost restored. It is found that magnetic helicity is transferred forth and back over the spectral space during the transient phase. Also our simulations shows that the non-axisymmetric distributions of magnetic helicity tend to follows the regions of the Hale polarity rule.

  12. Note: On-chip multifunctional fluorescent-magnetic Janus helical microswimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, G; Decanini, D; Leroy, L; Haghiri-Gosnet, A M

    2016-03-01

    Microswimmers integrated into microfluidic devices that are capable of self-illumination through fluorescence could revolutionize many aspects of technology, especially for biological applications. Few illumination and propulsion techniques of helical microswimmers inside microfluidic channels have been demonstrated. This paper presents the fabrication, detachment, and magnetic propulsions of multifunctional fluorescent-magnetic helical microswimmers integrated inside microfluidics. The fabrication process is based on two-photon laser lithography to pattern 3-D nanostructures from fluorescent photoresist coupled with conventional microfabrication techniques for magnetic thin film deposition by shadowing. After direct integration inside a microfluidic device, injected gas bubble allows gentle detachment of the integrated helical microswimmers whose magnetic propulsion can then be directly applied inside the microfluidic channel using external electromagnetic coil setup. With their small scale, fluorescence, excellent resistance to liquid/gas surface tension, and robust propulsion capability inside the microfluidic channel, the microswimmers can be used as high-resolution and large-range mobile micromanipulators inside microfluidic channels.

  13. Note: On-chip multifunctional fluorescent-magnetic Janus helical microswimmers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, G., E-mail: gilgueng.hwang@lpn.cnrs.fr; Decanini, D.; Leroy, L.; Haghiri-Gosnet, A. M. [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures, CNRS, Route de Nozay, Marcoussis 91460 (France)

    2016-03-15

    Microswimmers integrated into microfluidic devices that are capable of self-illumination through fluorescence could revolutionize many aspects of technology, especially for biological applications. Few illumination and propulsion techniques of helical microswimmers inside microfluidic channels have been demonstrated. This paper presents the fabrication, detachment, and magnetic propulsions of multifunctional fluorescent-magnetic helical microswimmers integrated inside microfluidics. The fabrication process is based on two-photon laser lithography to pattern 3-D nanostructures from fluorescent photoresist coupled with conventional microfabrication techniques for magnetic thin film deposition by shadowing. After direct integration inside a microfluidic device, injected gas bubble allows gentle detachment of the integrated helical microswimmers whose magnetic propulsion can then be directly applied inside the microfluidic channel using external electromagnetic coil setup. With their small scale, fluorescence, excellent resistance to liquid/gas surface tension, and robust propulsion capability inside the microfluidic channel, the microswimmers can be used as high-resolution and large-range mobile micromanipulators inside microfluidic channels.

  14. Bifurcation to 3D helical magnetic equilibrium in an axisymmetric toroidal device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergerson, W F; Auriemma, F; Chapman, B E; Ding, W X; Zanca, P; Brower, D L; Innocente, P; Lin, L; Lorenzini, R; Martines, E; Momo, B; Sarff, J S; Terranova, D

    2011-12-16

    We report the first direct measurement of the internal magnetic field structure associated with a 3D helical equilibrium generated spontaneously in the core of an axisymmetric toroidal plasma containment device. Magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium bifurcation occurs in a reversed-field pinch when the innermost resonant magnetic perturbation grows to a large amplitude, reaching up to 8% of the mean field strength. Magnetic topology evolution is determined by measuring the Faraday effect, revealing that, as the perturbation grows, toroidal symmetry is broken and a helical equilibrium is established. © 2011 American Physical Society

  15. Bifurcation to 3D Helical Magnetic Equilibrium in an Axisymmetric Toroidal Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergerson, W. F.; Auriemma, F.; Chapman, B. E.; Ding, W. X.; Zanca, P.; Brower, D. L.; Innocente, P.; Lin, L.; Lorenzini, R.; Martines, E.; Momo, B.; Sarff, J. S.; Terranova, D.

    2011-12-01

    We report the first direct measurement of the internal magnetic field structure associated with a 3D helical equilibrium generated spontaneously in the core of an axisymmetric toroidal plasma containment device. Magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium bifurcation occurs in a reversed-field pinch when the innermost resonant magnetic perturbation grows to a large amplitude, reaching up to 8% of the mean field strength. Magnetic topology evolution is determined by measuring the Faraday effect, revealing that, as the perturbation grows, toroidal symmetry is broken and a helical equilibrium is established.

  16. Seeded and unseeded helical modes in magnetized, non-imploding cylindrical liner-plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager-Elorriaga, D. A.; Zhang, P.; Steiner, A. M.; Jordan, N. M.; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2016-10-01

    In this research, we generated helical instability modes using unseeded and kink-seeded, non-imploding liner-plasmas at the 1 MA Linear Transformer Driver facility at the University of Michigan in order to determine the effects of externally applied, axial magnetic fields. In order to minimize the coupling of sausage and helical modes to the magneto Rayleigh-Taylor instability, the 400 nm-thick aluminum liners were placed directly around straight-cylindrical (unseeded) or threaded-cylindrical (kink-seeded) support structures to prevent implosion. The evolution of the instabilities was imaged using a combination of laser shadowgraphy and visible self-emission, collected by a 12-frame fast intensified CCD camera. With no axial magnetic field, the unseeded liners developed an azimuthally correlated m = 0 sausage instability (m is the azimuthal mode number). Applying a small external axial magnetic field of 1.1 T (compared to peak azimuthal field of 30 T) generated a smaller amplitude, helically oriented instability structure that is interpreted as an m = +2 helical mode. The kink-seeded liners showed highly developed helical structures growing at the seeded wavelength of λ = 1.27 mm. It was found that the direction of the axial magnetic field played an important role in determining the overall stabilization effects; modes with helices spiraling in the opposite direction of the global magnetic field showed the strongest stabilization. Finally, the Weis-Zhang analytic theory [Weis et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 032706 (2015)] is used to calculate sausage and helical growth rates for experimental parameters in order to study the effects of axial magnetic fields.

  17. MAGNETIC HELICITY TRANSPORTED BY FLUX EMERGENCE AND SHUFFLING MOTIONS IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGION NOAA 10930

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y. [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Kitai, R.; Takizawa, K., E-mail: zhangyin@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: zhangyin@bao.ac.cn [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan)

    2012-06-01

    We present a new methodology which can determine magnetic helicity transport by the passage of helical magnetic field lines from the sub-photosphere and the shuffling motions of footpoints of preexisting coronal field lines separately. It is well known that only the velocity component, which is perpendicular to the magnetic field ({upsilon}{sub B}), has contributed to the helicity accumulation. Here, we demonstrate that {upsilon}{sub B} can be deduced from a horizontal motion and vector magnetograms under a simple relation of {upsilon}{sub t} = {mu}{sub t} + ({upsilon}{sub n}/B{sub n} ) B{sub t}, as suggested by Demoulin and Berger. Then after dividing {upsilon}{sub B} into two components, as one is tangential and the other is normal to the solar surface, we can determine both terms of helicity transport. Active region (AR) NOAA 10930 is analyzed as an example during its solar disk center passage by using data obtained by the Spectropolarimeter and the Narrowband Filter Imager of Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode. We find that in our calculation the helicity injection by flux emergence and shuffling motions have the same sign. During the period we studied, the main contribution of helicity accumulation comes from the flux emergence effect, while the dynamic transient evolution comes from the shuffling motions effect. Our observational results further indicate that for this AR the apparent rotational motion in the following sunspot is the real shuffling motions on the solar surface.

  18. On Signatures of Twisted Magnetic Flux Tube Emergence

    CERN Document Server

    Dominguez, Santiago Vargas; Green, Lucie; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Hood, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies of NOAA active region 10953, by Okamoto {\\it et al.} ({\\it Astrophys. J. Lett.} {\\bf 673}, 215, 2008; {\\it Astrophys. J.} {\\bf 697}, 913, 2009), have interpreted photospheric observations of changing widths of the polarities and reversal of the horizontal magnetic field component as signatures of the emergence of a twisted flux tube within the active region and along its internal polarity inversion line (PIL). A filament is observed along the PIL and the active region is assumed to have an arcade structure. To investigate this scenario, MacTaggart and Hood ({\\it Astrophys. J. Lett.} {\\bf 716}, 219, 2010) constructed a dynamic flux emergence model of a twisted cylinder emerging into an overlying arcade. The photospheric signatures observed by Okamoto {\\it et al.} (2008, 2009) are present in the model although their underlying physical mechanisms differ. The model also produces two additional signatures that can be verified by the observations. The first is an increase in the unsigned magnetic fl...

  19. Magnetic helicity estimations in models and observations of the solar magnetic field. Part I: Finite volume methods

    CERN Document Server

    Valori, Gherardo; Anfinogentov, Sergey; Chen, Feng; Georgoulis, Manolis K; Guo, Yang; Liu, Yang; Moraitis, Kostas; Thalmann, Julia K; Yang, Shangbin

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic helicity is a conserved quantity of ideal magneto-hydrodynamics characterized by an inverse turbulent cascade. Accordingly, it is often invoked as one of the basic physical quantities driving the generation and structuring of magnetic fields in a variety of astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. We provide here the first systematic comparison of six existing methods for the estimation of the helicity of magnetic fields known in a finite volume. All such methods are reviewed, benchmarked, and compared with each other, and specifically tested for accuracy and sensitivity to errors. To that purpose, we consider four groups of numerical tests, ranging from solutions of the three-dimensional, force-free equilibrium, to magneto-hydrodynamical numerical simulations. Almost all methods are found to produce the same value of magnetic helicity within few percent in all tests. In the more solar-relevant and realistic of the tests employed here, the simulation of an eruptive flux rope, the spread in the computed ...

  20. Current helicity pattern of large-scale magnetic field on the photosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Following Pevtsov and Latushko, we study the current helicity pattern of the large-scale magnetic field on the photosphere. We use the same technique as theirs to derive the vector magnetic field (Br,Bθ,Bφ) from full-disk longitudinal magnetograms based on the assumption that large-scale magnetic fields evolve rather slowly and the variations of the longitudinal magnetic fields within certain time duration are caused by the changing position angles only. Different from their study, we have calculated the current helicity maps directly from the derived vector magnetograms, rather than from obtaining the latitudinal variation of hc by ignoring the role of Bθ component and averaging Br and Bφ over all solar longitudes. This approach significantly strengthens the evidence of the hemispheric rule presented in the reconstructed vector magnetic field. Our study shows that the established hemispheric sign rule, that is, positive helicity sign in the southern hemisphere and negative helicity sign in the northern hemisphere, is applicable everywhere in the global magnetic field, namely, also evident in weak fields outside active regions, and that the obtained sign pattern is independent of the longitudinal magnetograms and the parameters that we have used.

  1. Magnetic Energy and Helicity Budgets in the Active-Region Solar Corona. I. Linear Force-Free Approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Georgoulis, M K

    2007-01-01

    We self-consistently derive the magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity budgets of a three-dimensional linear force-free magnetic structure rooted in a lower boundary plane. For the potential magnetic energy we derive a general expression that gives results practically equivalent to those of the magnetic Virial theorem. All magnetic energy and helicity budgets are formulated in terms of surface integrals applied to the lower boundary, thus avoiding computationally intensive three-dimensional magnetic field extrapolations. We analytically and numerically connect our derivations with classical expressions for the magnetic energy and helicity, thus presenting a so-far lacking unified treatment of the energy/helicity budgets in the constant-alpha approximation. Applying our derivations to photospheric vector magnetograms of an eruptive and a noneruptive solar active regions, we find that the most profound quantitative difference between these regions lies in the estimated free magnetic energy and relative ...

  2. First Synoptic Maps of Photospheric Vector Magnetic Field from SOLIS/VSM: Non-Radial Magnetic Fields and Hemispheric Pattern of Helicity

    CERN Document Server

    Gosain, S; Rudenko, G V; Anfinogentov, S A

    2013-01-01

    We use daily full-disk vector magnetograms from Vector Spectromagnetograph (VSM) on Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) system to synthesize the first Carrington maps of the photospheric vector magnetic field. We describe these maps and make a comparison of observed radial field with the radial field estimate from LOS magnetograms. Further, we employ these maps to study the hemispheric pattern of current helicity density, Hc, during the rising phase of the solar cycle 24. Longitudinal average over the 23 consecutive solar rotations shows a clear signature of the hemispheric helicity rule, i.e. Hc is predominantly negative in the North and positive in South. Although our data include the early phase of cycle 24, there appears no evidence for a possible (systematic) reversal of the hemispheric helicity rule at the beginning of cycle as predicted by some dynamo models. Further, we compute the hemispheric pattern in active region latitudes (-30 deg \\le \\theta \\le 30 deg) separately for we...

  3. Turbulent magnetic Prandtl number in helical kinematic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: two-loop renormalization group result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurčišinová, E; Jurčišin, M; Remecký, R; Zalom, P

    2013-04-01

    Using the field theoretic renormalization group technique, the influence of helicity (spatial parity violation) on the turbulent magnetic Prandtl number in the kinematic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is investigated in the two-loop approximation. It is shown that the presence of helicity decreases the value of the turbulent magnetic Prandtl number and, at the same time, the two-loop helical contribution to the turbulent magnetic Prandtl number is at most 4.2% (in the case with the maximal helicity) of its nonhelical value. These results demonstrate, on one hand, the potential importance of the presence of asymmetries in processes in turbulent environments and, on the other hand, the rather strong stability of the properties of diffusion processes of the magnetic field in the conductive turbulent environment with the spatial parity violation in comparison to the corresponding systems without the spatial parity violation. In addition, obtained results are compared to the corresponding results found for the two-loop turbulent Prandtl number in the model of passively advected scalar field. It is shown that the turbulent Prandtl number and the turbulent magnetic Prandtl number, which are the same in fully symmetric isotropic turbulent systems, are essentially different when one considers the spatial parity violation. It means that the properties of the diffusion processes in the turbulent systems with a given symmetry breaking can considerably depend on the internal tensor structure of advected quantities.

  4. Magnetic Energy and Helicity in Two Emerging Active Regions in the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Schuck, P. W.

    2012-01-01

    The magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity in two emerging solar active regions, AR 11072 and AR 11158,are studied. They are computed by integrating over time the energy and relative helicity fluxes across the photosphere. The fluxes consist of two components: one from photospheric tangential flows that shear and braid field lines (shear term), the other from normal flows that advect magnetic flux into the corona (emergence term). For these active regions: (1) relative magnetic helicity in the active-region corona is mainly contributed by the shear term,(2) helicity fluxes from the emergence and the shear terms have the same sign, (3) magnetic energy in the corona (including both potential energy and free energy) is mainly contributed by the emergence term, and(4) energy fluxes from the emergence term and the shear term evolved consistently in phase during the entire flux emergence course.We also examine the apparent tangential velocity derived by tracking field-line footpoints using a simple tracking method. It is found that this velocity is more consistent with tangential plasma velocity than with the flux transport velocity, which agrees with the conclusion by Schuck.

  5. Model for straight and helical solar jets. I. Parametric studies of the magnetic field geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariat, E.; Dalmasse, K.; DeVore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.; Karpen, J. T.

    2015-01-01

    Context. Jets are dynamic, impulsive, well-collimated plasma events developing at many different scales and in different layers of the solar atmosphere. Aims: Jets are believed to be induced by magnetic reconnection, a process central to many astrophysical phenomena. Studying their dynamics can help us to better understand the processes acting in larger eruptive events (e.g., flares and coronal mass ejections) as well as mass, magnetic helicity, and energy transfer at all scales in the solar atmosphere. The relative simplicity of their magnetic geometry and topology, compared with larger solar active events, makes jets ideal candidates for studying the fundamental role of reconnection in energetic events. Methods: In this study, using our recently developed numerical solver ARMS, we present several parametric studies of a 3D numerical magneto-hydrodynamic model of solar-jet-like events. We studied the impact of the magnetic field inclination and photospheric field distribution on the generation and properties of two morphologically different types of solar jets, straight and helical, which can account for the observed so-called standard and blowout jets. Results: Our parametric studies validate our model of jets for different geometric properties of the magnetic configuration. We find that a helical jet is always triggered for the range of parameters we tested. This demonstrates that the 3D magnetic null-point configuration is a very robust structure for the energy storage and impulsive release characteristic of helical jets. In certain regimes determined by magnetic geometry, a straight jet precedes the onset of a helical jet. We show that the reconnection occurring during the straight-jet phase influences the triggering of the helical jet. Conclusions: Our results allow us to better understand the energization, triggering, and driving processes of straight and helical jets. Our model predicts the impulsiveness and energetics of jets in terms of the surrounding

  6. Magnetic Helicity Estimations in Models and Observations of the Solar Magnetic Field. Part I: Finite Volume Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valori, Gherardo; Pariat, Etienne; Anfinogentov, Sergey; Chen, Feng; Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Guo, Yang; Liu, Yang; Moraitis, Kostas; Thalmann, Julia K.; Yang, Shangbin

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic helicity is a conserved quantity of ideal magneto-hydrodynamics characterized by an inverse turbulent cascade. Accordingly, it is often invoked as one of the basic physical quantities driving the generation and structuring of magnetic fields in a variety of astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. We provide here the first systematic comparison of six existing methods for the estimation of the helicity of magnetic fields known in a finite volume. All such methods are reviewed, benchmarked, and compared with each other, and specifically tested for accuracy and sensitivity to errors. To that purpose, we consider four groups of numerical tests, ranging from solutions of the three-dimensional, force-free equilibrium, to magneto-hydrodynamical numerical simulations. Almost all methods are found to produce the same value of magnetic helicity within few percent in all tests. In the more solar-relevant and realistic of the tests employed here, the simulation of an eruptive flux rope, the spread in the computed values obtained by all but one method is only 3 %, indicating the reliability and mutual consistency of such methods in appropriate parameter ranges. However, methods show differences in the sensitivity to numerical resolution and to errors in the solenoidal property of the input fields. In addition to finite volume methods, we also briefly discuss a method that estimates helicity from the field lines' twist, and one that exploits the field's value at one boundary and a coronal minimal connectivity instead of a pre-defined three-dimensional magnetic-field solution.

  7. Global-scale consequences of magnetic-helicity injection and condensation on the sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackay, Duncan H. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, Fife, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); DeVore, C. Richard [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Antiochos, Spiro K., E-mail: dhm@st-and.ac.uk [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    In the recent paper of Antiochos, a new concept for the injection of magnetic helicity into the solar corona by small-scale convective motions and its condensation onto polarity inversion lines (PILs) was developed. We investigate this concept through global simulations of the Sun's photospheric and coronal magnetic fields, and compare the results with the hemispheric pattern of solar filaments. Assuming that the vorticity of the cells is predominantly counterclockwise/clockwise in the northern/southern hemisphere, the convective motions inject negative/positive helicity into each hemisphere. The simulations show that: (1) on a north-south oriented PIL, both differential rotation and convective motions inject the same sign of helicity, which matches that required to reproduce the hemispheric pattern of filaments. (2) On a high-latitude east-west oriented polar crown or subpolar crown PIL, the vorticity of the cells has to be approximately 2-3 times greater than the local differential-rotation gradient in order to overcome the incorrect sign of helicity injection from differential rotation. (3) In the declining phase of the cycle, as a bipole interacts with the polar field, in some cases, helicity condensation can reverse the effect of differential rotation along the east-west lead arm but not in all cases. The results show that this newly developed concept of magnetic helicity injection and condensation, in conjunction with the mechanisms used in Yeates et al., is a viable explanation for the hemispheric pattern of filaments. Future observational studies should focus on examining the vorticity component within convective motions to determine both its magnitude and latitudinal variation relative to the differential-rotation gradient on the Sun.

  8. Global-Scale Consequences of Magnetic-Helicity Injection and Condensation on the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Duncan H.; DeVore, C. Richard; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2013-01-01

    In the recent paper of Antiochos, a new concept for the injection of magnetic helicity into the solar corona by small-scale convective motions and its condensation onto polarity inversion lines (PILs) has been developed. We investigate this concept through global simulations of the Sun's photospheric and coronal magnetic fields and compare the results with the hemispheric pattern of solar filaments. Assuming that the vorticity of the cells is predominately counter-clockwise/clockwise in the northern/southern hemisphere, the convective motions inject negative/positive helicity into each hemisphere. The simulations show that: (i) On a north-south orientated PIL, both differential rotation and convective motions inject the same sign of helicity which matches that required to reproduce the hemispheric pattern of filaments. (ii) On a high latitude east-west orientated polar crown or sub-polar crown PIL, the vorticity of the cells has to be approximately 2-3 times greater than the local differential rotation gradient in order to overcome the incorrect sign of helicity injection from differential rotation. (iii) In the declining phase of the cycle, as a bipole interacts with the polar field, in some cases helicity condensation can reverse the effect of differential rotation along the East-West lead arm, but not in all cases. The results show that this newly developed concept of magnetic helicity injection and condensation is a viable method to explain the hemispheric pattern of filaments in conjunction with the mechanisms used in Yeates et al. (2008). Future observational studies should focus on determining the vorticity component within convective motions to determine, both its magnitude and latitudinal variation relative to the differential rotation gradient on the Sun.

  9. BNL alternating gradient synchrotron with four helical magnets to minimize the losses of the polarized proton beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoupas, N.; Huang, H.; MacKay, W. W.; Meot, F.; Roser, T.; Trbojevic, D.

    2013-04-01

    The principle of using multiple partial helical magnets to preserve the polarization of the proton beam during its acceleration was applied successfully to the alternating gradient synchrotron (AGS) which currently operates with two partial helical magnets. In this paper we further explore this idea by using four partial helical magnets placed symmetrically in the AGS ring. This provides many advantages over the present setup of the AGS, which uses two partial helical magnets. First, the symmetric placement of the four helical magnets and their relatively lower field of operation allows for better control of the AGS optics with reduced values of the beta functions especially near beam injection and allows both the vertical and horizontal tunes to be placed within the “spin tune gap,” therefore eliminating the horizontal and vertical intrinsic spin resonances of the AGS during the acceleration cycle. Second, it provides a wider spin tune gap. Third, the vertical spin direction during beam injection and extraction is closer to vertical. Although the spin tune gap, which is created with four partial helices, can also be created with a single or two partial helices, the high field strength of a single helical magnet which is required to generate such a spin tune gap makes the use of the single helical magnet impractical, and that of the two helical magnets rather difficult. In this paper we will provide results on the spin tune and on the optics of the AGS with four partial helical magnets, and compare them with those from the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets. Although in this paper we specifically discuss the effect of the four partial helices on the AGS, this method which can eliminate simultaneously the vertical and horizontal intrinsic spin resonances is a general method and can be applied to any medium energy synchrotron which operates in similar energy range like the AGS and provides the required space to accommodate the four

  10. BNL alternating gradient synchrotron with four helical magnets to minimize the losses of the polarized proton beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Tsoupas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The principle of using multiple partial helical magnets to preserve the polarization of the proton beam during its acceleration was applied successfully to the alternating gradient synchrotron (AGS which currently operates with two partial helical magnets. In this paper we further explore this idea by using four partial helical magnets placed symmetrically in the AGS ring. This provides many advantages over the present setup of the AGS, which uses two partial helical magnets. First, the symmetric placement of the four helical magnets and their relatively lower field of operation allows for better control of the AGS optics with reduced values of the beta functions especially near beam injection and allows both the vertical and horizontal tunes to be placed within the “spin tune gap,” therefore eliminating the horizontal and vertical intrinsic spin resonances of the AGS during the acceleration cycle. Second, it provides a wider spin tune gap. Third, the vertical spin direction during beam injection and extraction is closer to vertical. Although the spin tune gap, which is created with four partial helices, can also be created with a single or two partial helices, the high field strength of a single helical magnet which is required to generate such a spin tune gap makes the use of the single helical magnet impractical, and that of the two helical magnets rather difficult. In this paper we will provide results on the spin tune and on the optics of the AGS with four partial helical magnets, and compare them with those from the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets. Although in this paper we specifically discuss the effect of the four partial helices on the AGS, this method which can eliminate simultaneously the vertical and horizontal intrinsic spin resonances is a general method and can be applied to any medium energy synchrotron which operates in similar energy range like the AGS and provides the required space to

  11. Noiseless manipulation of helical edge state transport by a quantum magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestrov, P. G.; Recher, P.; Brouwer, P. W.

    2016-05-01

    The current through a helical edge state of a quantum spin Hall insulator may be fully transmitted through a magnetically gapped region due to a combination of spin-transfer torque and spin pumping [Meng et al., Phys. Rev. B 90, 205403 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.90.205403]. Using a scattering approach, we here argue that in such a system the current is effectively carried by electrons with energies below the magnet-induced gap and well below the Fermi energy. This has striking consequences, such as the absence of shot noise, an exponential suppression of thermal noise, and an obstruction of thermal transport. For two helical edges covered by the same quantum magnet, the device can act as a robust noiseless current splitter.

  12. Magnet design with 100-kA HTS STARS conductors for the helical fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, N.; Terazaki, Y.; Ito, S.; Tamura, H.; Hamaguchi, S.; Mito, T.; Hashizume, H.; Sagara, A.

    2016-12-01

    The high-temperature superconducting (HTS) option is employed for the conceptual design of the LHD-type helical fusion reactor FFHR-d1. The 100-kA-class STARS (Stacked Tapes Assembled in Rigid Structure) conductor is used for the magnet system including the continuously wound helical coils. Protection of the magnet system in case of a quench is a crucial issue and the hot-spot temperature during an emergency discharge is estimated based on the zero-dimensional and one-dimensional analyses. The number of division of the coil winding package is examined to limit the voltage generation. For cooling the HTS magnet, helium gas flow is considered and its feasibility is examined by simple analysis as a first step.

  13. One-way helical electromagnetic wave propagation supported by magnetized plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Biao; Gao, Wenlong; Guo, Qinghua; Zhang, Shuang

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we reveal the presence of photonic one-way helical surface states in a simple natural system - magnetized plasma. The application of an external magnetic field to a bulk plasma body not only breaks time-reversal-symmetry but also leads to separation of Equi-Frequency Contour surfaces (EFCs) to form topologically nontrivial gaps in k space. Interestingly, these EFCs support topologically protected surface states. We numerically investigate an interface between magnetized plasma, using a realistic model for parameter dispersion, and vacuum, to confirm the existence of one-way scatter-immune helical surface states. Unlike previous proposals for achieving photonic one-way propagation, our scheme does not require the use of artificial structures and should therefore be simple to implement experimentally.

  14. Potential Magnetic Field around a Helical Flux-rope Current Structure in the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Petrie, G J D

    2007-01-01

    We consider the potential magnetic field associated with a helical electric line current flow, idealizing the near-potential coronal field within which a highly localized twisted current structure is embedded. It is found that this field has a significant axial component off the helical magnetic axis where there is no current flow, such that the flux winds around the axis. The helical line current field, in including the effects of flux rope writhe, is therefore more topologically complex than straight line and ring current fields sometimes used in solar flux rope models. The axial flux in magnetic fields around confined current structures may be affected by the writhe of these current structures such that the field twists preferentially with the same handedness as the writhe. This property of fields around confined current structures with writhe may be relevant to classes of coronal magnetic flux rope, including structures observed to have sigmoidal forms in soft X-rays and prominence magnetic fields. For ex...

  15. Cosmological magnetic helicity and birefrigence from primordial torsion in Lorentz violation theories

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, L Garcia

    2011-01-01

    Cosmological magnetic helicity has been thought to be a fundamental agent for magnetic field amplification in the universe. More recently Semikoz and Sokoloff [Phys Rev Lett 92 (2004): 131.301.] showed that the weakness of the seed fields did not necessarily imply the weakness of magnetic cosmological helicity. In this paper we present a derivation of dynamo equation based upon the flat torsion photon non-minimal coupling through Riemann-Cartan spacetime. From this derivation one computes the necessary conditions for a flat torsion field to generate a galactic dynamo seed, from the cosmological magnetic helicity. A peculiar feature of this dynamo equation is that the resistivity depends upon the Ricci scalar curvature. This feature is also present in turbulent dynamo models. Here the electrical effective conductivity is obtained by making use of flat torsion modes of a $R(\\Gamma)F^{2}$ Lagrangean where R refers to the Ricci-Cartan spacetime. Power spectrum of the magnetic field is also computed. Lorentz viola...

  16. Realizing topological stability of magnetic helices in exchange-coupled multilayers for all-spin-based system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fust, Sergej; Mukherjee, Saumya; Paul, Neelima; Stahn, Jochen; Kreuzpaintner, Wolfgang; Böni, Peter; Paul, Amitesh

    2016-09-01

    Topologically stabilized spin configurations like helices in the form of planar domain walls (DWs) or vortex-like structures with magnetic functionalities are more often a theoretical prediction rather than experimental realization. In this paper we report on the exchange coupling and helical phase characteristics within Dy-Fe multilayers. The magnetic hysteresis loops with temperature show an exchange bias field of around 1.0 kOe at 10 K. Polarized neutron reflectivity reveal (i) ferrimagnetic alignment of the layers at low fields forming twisted magnetic helices and a more complicated but stable continuous helical arrangement at higher fields (ii) direct evidence of helices in the form of planar 2π-DWs within both layers of Fe and Dy. The helices within the Fe layers are topologically stabilized by the reasonably strong induced in-plane magnetocrystalline anisotropy of Dy and the exchange coupling at the Fe-Dy interfaces. The helices in Dy are plausibly reminiscent of the helical ordering at higher temperatures induced by the field history and interfacial strain. Stability of the helical order even at large fields have resulted in an effective modulation of the periodicity of the spin-density like waves and subsequent increase in storage energy. This opens broad perspectives for future scientific and technological applications in increasing the energy density for systems in the field of all-spin-based engineering which has the potential for energy-storing elements on nanometer length scales.

  17. Relationships between fluid vorticity, kinetic helicity and magnetic field at the small-scale (quiet-network) on the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Sangeetha, C R

    2016-01-01

    We derive horizontal fluid motions on the solar surface over large areas covering the quiet-Sun magnetic network from local correlation tracking of convective granules imaged in continuum intensity and Doppler velocity by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). From these we calculate horizontal divergence, vertical component of vorticity, and kinetic helicity of fluid motions. We study the correlations between fluid divergence and vorticity, and that between vorticity (kinetic helicity) and magnetic field. We find that the vorticity (kinetic helicity) around small-scale fields exhibits a hemispherical pattern (in sign) similar to that followed by the magnetic helicity of large-scale active regions (containing sunspots). We identify this pattern to be a result of the Coriolis force acting on supergranular-scale flows (both the outflows and inflows), and is consistent with earlier studies using local helioseismology. Further, we show that the magnetic fields cau...

  18. Two-dimensional model of intrinsic magnetic flux losses in helical flux compression generators

    CERN Document Server

    Haurylavets, V V

    2012-01-01

    Helical Flux Compression Generators (HFCG) are used for generation of mega-amper current and high magnetic fields. We propose the two dimensional HFCG filament model based on the new description of the stator and armature contact point. The model developed enables one to quantitatively describe the intrinsic magnetic flux losses and predict the results of experiments with various types of HFCGs. We present the effective resistance calculations based on the non-linear magnetic diffusion effect describing HFCG performance under the strong conductor heating by currents.

  19. Assembly of alginate microfibers to form a helical structure using micromanipulation with a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Huang, Qiang; Shi, Qing; Wang, Huaping; Hu, Chengzhi; Li, Pengyun; Nakajima, Masahiro; Fukuda, Toshio

    2016-10-01

    Helical structures assembled using alginate microfibers have a promising spatial architecture mimicking in vivo vessels for culturing vascular cells. However, the helical structure can only be assembled at the macroscale, since a microassembly-based approach has not yet been developed. In this paper, we propose a magnetic-field-based micromanipulation method to fabricate a helical microstructure. By microfluidic spinning, alginate microfibers encapsulating magnetic nanoparticles are synthesized to enable the control of an electromagnetic needle (EMN). We developed a microrobotic system to actuate a micropipette to fix a free end of the microfiber, and then move the EMN to reel the microfiber around a micropillar. The motion of the EMN is guided using an upright microscope and a side-view camera. Because of the limitation of operation space, a spacer sleeve was designed to keep the tip of the EMN attracted to the microfiber, and simultaneously to keep the other part of the EMN isolated from the microfiber. To ensure the availability of the microfiber for continuously coiling, we enable the EMN tip to slide on the surface of the microfiber without changing the tensioning of the microfiber for positioning control. Furthermore, stable and repeatable micromanipulation was achieved to form multi-turn microfiber coils based on the motion planning of the EMN. Finally, we successfully fabricated a helical microstructure that can be applied in vascular tissue engineering in the future.

  20. Numerical simulation of a helical shape electric arc in the external axial magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urusov, R. M.; Urusova, I. R.

    2016-10-01

    Within the frameworks of non-stationary three-dimensional mathematical model, in approximation of a partial local thermodynamic equilibrium, a numerical calculation was made of characteristics of DC electric arc burning in a cylindrical channel in the uniform external axial magnetic field. The method of numerical simulation of the arc of helical shape in a uniform external axial magnetic field was proposed. This method consists in that that in the computational algorithm, a "scheme" analog of fluctuations for electrons temperature is supplemented. The "scheme" analogue of fluctuations increases a weak numerical asymmetry of electrons temperature distribution, which occurs randomly in the course of computing. This asymmetry can be "picked up" by the external magnetic field that continues to increase up to a certain value, which is sufficient for the formation of helical structure of the arc column. In the absence of fluctuations in the computational algorithm, the arc column in the external axial magnetic field maintains cylindrical axial symmetry, and a helical form of the arc is not observed.

  1. Validation and Benchmarking of a Practical Free Magnetic Energy and Relative Magnetic Helicity Budget Calculation in Solar Magnetic Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Moraitis, K; Georgoulis, M K; Archontis, V

    2014-01-01

    In earlier works we introduced and tested a nonlinear force-free (NLFF) method designed to self-consistently calculate the free magnetic energy and the relative magnetic helicity budgets of the corona of observed solar magnetic structures. The method requires, in principle, only a single, photospheric or low-chromospheric, vector magnetogram of a quiet-Sun patch or an active region and performs calculations in the absence of three-dimensional magnetic and velocity-field information. In this work we strictly validate this method using three-dimensional coronal magnetic fields. Benchmarking employs both synthetic, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations and nonlinear force-free field extrapolations of the active-region solar corona. We find that our time-efficient NLFF method provides budgets that differ from those of more demanding semi-analytical methods by a factor of ~3, at most. This difference is expected from the physical concept and the construction of the method. Temporal correlations show mo...

  2. SPECTRO-POLARIMETRIC IMAGING REVEALS HELICAL MAGNETIC FIELDS IN SOLAR PROMINENCE FEET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González, M. J. Martínez; Sainz, R. Manso; Ramos, A. Asensio; Beck, C.; Díaz, A. J. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Vía Láctea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Rodríguez, J. de la Cruz [Institute for Solar Physics, Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, Albanova University Center, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-03-20

    Solar prominences are clouds of cool plasma levitating above the solar surface and insulated from the million-degree corona by magnetic fields. They form in regions of complex magnetic topology, characterized by non-potential fields, which can evolve abruptly, disintegrating the prominence and ejecting magnetized material into the heliosphere. However, their physics is not yet fully understood because mapping such complex magnetic configurations and their evolution is extremely challenging, and must often be guessed by proxy from photometric observations. Using state-of-the-art spectro-polarimetric data, we reconstruct the structure of the magnetic field in a prominence. We find that prominence feet harbor helical magnetic fields connecting the prominence to the solar surface below.

  3. Imaging bowel obstruction: A comparison between fast magnetic resonance imaging and helical computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beall, D.P.; Fortman, B.J.; Lawler, B.C.; Regan, F

    2002-08-01

    AIM: To compare the accuracy of fast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging using the half-Fourier single shot turbo spin echo (HASTE) sequence with helical computed tomography (CT) in diagnosing bowel obstruction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Prospective evaluation of 44 patients with clinical evidence of bowel obstruction was conducted using various investigations including HASTE MR and helical CT. MR was performed with a Siemens 1.5 Tesla MR Imaging System and CT was performed with one of two Siemens ARHP CT systems using helical technique. MR acquisition allowed data to be gathered in 6-10 minutes and no contrast media were administered. CT imaging consisted of consecutive helical CT through the abdomen and pelvis with oral and intravenous contrast medium used when indicated. Bowel dilation along with the presence and level of obstruction were determined. RESULTS: Twenty-eight patients had bowel obstruction confirmed at laparotomy or by radiographic assessment. Of these, 25 had small bowel obstruction and three had colonic obstructions. The obstruction was due to fibrous adhesions in nine patients, metastases or primary carcinoma in seven, Crohn's disease in four, hernias in two, and inflammation or abscess in two. Other causes of obstruction included lymphoma, intussusception and anastomotic stricture. The cause of obstruction was correctly diagnosed by CT in 71%, and by MR in 95% of cases. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for HASTE MR imaging was 95%, 100% and 96% respectively as compared to 71%, 71% and 71% for helical CT. CONCLUSION: Fast MR imaging using the HASTE sequence is more accurate than helical CT in diagnosing bowel obstruction. Beall, D.P. et al. (2002)

  4. The third order helicity of magnetic fields via link maps II

    CERN Document Server

    Komendarczyk, R

    2009-01-01

    In this sequel we extend the derivation of the third order helicity to magnetic fields supported on unlinked domains in 3-space. The formula is expressed in terms of generators of the deRham cohomology of the configuration space of three points in $\\R^3$, which is a more practical domain from the perspective of applications. It also admits an ergodic interpretation as the asymptotic Milnor $\\bar{\\mu}_{123}$-invariant of orbits of the field.

  5. Study of magnetic helicity injection via plasma imaging using a high-speed digital camera

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, S. C.; Bellan, P. M.

    2002-01-01

    The evolution of a plasma generated by a novel planar coaxial gun is photographed using a state-of-the-art digital camera, which captures eight time-resolved images per discharge. This experiment is designed to study the fundamental physics of magnetic helicity injection, which is an important issue in fusion plasma confinement, as well as solar and astrophysical phenomena such as coronal mass ejections and accretion disk dynamics. The images presented in this paper are not only beautiful but...

  6. Observational Signatures of Magnetic Reconnection in the Extended Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Sabrina; West, Matthew J.; Seaton, Daniel B.; Kobelski, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Observational signatures of reconnection have been studied extensively in the lower corona for decades, successfully providing insight into energy release mechanisms in the region above post-flare arcade loops and below 1.5 solar radii. During large eruptive events, however, energy release continues to occur well beyond the presence of reconnection signatures at these low heights. Supra-Arcade Downflows (SADs) and Supra-Arcade Downflowing Loops (SADLs) are particularly useful measures of continual reconnection in the corona as they may indicate the presence and path of retracting post-reconnection loops. SADs and SADLs have been faintly observed up to 18 hours beyond the passage of coronas mass ejections through the SOHO/LASCO field of view, but a recent event from 2014 October 14 associated with giant arches provides very clear observations of these downflows for days after the initial eruption. We report on this unique event and compare these findings with observational signatures of magnetic reconnection in the extended corona for more typical eruptions.

  7. Observational Signatures of Magnetic Reconnection in the Extended Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Sabrina; West, Matthew J.; Seaton, Danial B.; Kobelski, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Observational signatures of reconnection have been studied extensively in the lower corona for decades, successfully providing insight into energy release mechanisms in the region above post-flare arcade loops and below 1.5 solar radii. During large eruptive events, however, energy release continues to occur well beyond the presence of reconnection signatures at these low heights. Supra-Arcade Downflows (SADs) and Supra-Arcade Downflowing Loops (SADLs) are particularly useful measures of continual reconnection in the corona as they may indicate the presence and path of retracting post-reconnection loops. SADs and SADLs have been faintly observed up to 18 hours beyond the passage of corona mass ejections through the SOHO/LASCO field of view, but a recent event from 2014 October 14 associated with giant arches provides very clear observations of these downflows for days after the initial eruption. We report on this unique event and compare these findings with observational signatures of magnetic reconnection in the extended corona for more typical eruptions.

  8. Cross and magnetic helicity in the outer heliosphere from Voyager 2 observations

    CERN Document Server

    Iovieno, M; Fraternale, F; Richardson, J D; Opher, M; Tordella, D

    2015-01-01

    Plasma velocity and magnetic field measurements from the Voyager 2 mission are used to study solar wind turbulence in the slow solar wind at two different heliocentric distances, 5 and 29 astronomical units, sufficiently far apart to provide information on the radial evolution of this turbulence. The magnetic helicity and the cross-helicity, which express the correlation between the plasma velocity and the magnetic field, are used to characterize the turbulence. Wave number spectra are computed by means of the Taylor hypothesis applied to time resolved single point Voyager 2 measurements. The overall picture we get is complex and difficult to interpret. A substantial decrease of the cross-helicity at smaller scales (over 1-3 hours of observation) with increasing heliocentric distance is observed. At 5 AU the only peak in the probability density of the normalized residual energy is negative, near -0.5. At 29 AU the probability density becomes doubly peaked, with a negative peak at -0.5 and a smaller peak at a ...

  9. Final Techical Report - "Determining How Magnetic Helicity Injection Really Works"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul M. Bellan

    2005-02-15

    This research program involved direct observation of the complicated plasma dynamics underlying spheromak formation. Spheromaks are self-organizing magnetically dominated plasma configurations which potentially offer a simple, low-cost means for confining the plasma in a controlled thermonuclear fusion reactor. The spheromak source used in these studies was a coaxial co-planar magnetized plasma gun which was specifically designed to have the simplest relevant geometry. The simplicity of the geometry facilitated understanding of the basic physics and minimized confusion that would otherwise have resulted from complexities due to the experimental geometry. The coaxial plasma gun was mounted on one end of a large vacuum tank that had excellent optical access so the spheromak formation process could be tracked in detail using ultra-high speed cameras. The main accomplishments of this research program were (1) obtaining experimental data characterizing the detailed physics underlying spheromak formation and the development of new theoretical models motivated by these observations, (2) determining the relationship between spheromak physics and astrophysical jets, (3) developing a new high-speed camera diagnostic for the SSPX spheromak at the Lawrence Livermore National Lab, and (4) training graduate students and postdoctoral fellows.

  10. Numerical Study of Flow Motion and Patterns Driven by a Rotating Permanent Helical Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenzhi; Wang, Xiaodong; Wang, Bo; Baltaretu, Florin; Etay, Jacqueline; Fautrelle, Yves

    2016-10-01

    Liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic flow driven by a rotating permanent helical magnetic field in a cylindrical container is numerically studied. A three-dimensional numerical simulation provides insight into the visualization of the physical fields, including the magnetic field, the Lorentz force density, and the flow structures, especially the flow patterns in the meridional plane. Because the screen parameter is sufficiently small, the model is decoupled into electromagnetic and hydrodynamic components. Two flow patterns in the meridional plane, i.e., the global flow and the secondary flow, are discovered and the impact of several system parameters on their transition is investigated. Finally, a verifying model is used for comparison with the previous experiment.

  11. Helicity, anisotropies, and their competition in a multiferroic magnet: Insight from the phase diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvozdikova, M. V.; Ziman, T.; Zhitomirsky, M. E.

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by the complex phase diagram of MnWO4, we investigate the competition between anisotropy, magnetic field, and helicity for the anisotropic next-nearest-neighbor Heisenberg model. Apart from two competing exchanges, which favor a spiral magnetic structure, the model features the biaxial single-ion anisotropy. The model is treated in the real-space mean-field approximation and the phase diagram containing various incommensurate and commensurate states is obtained for different field orientations. We discuss the similarities and differences of the theoretical phase diagram and the experimental diagram of MnWO4.

  12. Solar Coronal Mass Ejection as a Result of Magnetic Helicity Accumulation in the Corona

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Mei

    2011-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are a major form of solar activities. A CME takes away 10^15-16 g of plasma from solar low corona, to disturb the near-Earth space if the CME direction is favorable. Here we summarize our understandings and reasoning that lead us to conclude that CMEs are the unavoidable products of magnetic helicity accumulation in the corona. Our study puts the formation of magnetic flux ropes and CME eruptions as natural and unavoidable results of coronal evolution.

  13. Magnetic reconstruction of nonaxisymmetric quasi-single-helicity configurations in the Madison Symmetric Torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auriemma, F; Zanca, P; Franz, P; Innocente, P; Lorenzini, R; Momo, B; Terranova, D [Consorzio RFX, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione 35127 Padova (Italy); Bergerson, W F; Ding, W X; Brower, D L [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Chapman, B E [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Quasi-single-helicity (QSH) states, characterized by a magnetic spectrum dominated by the innermost resonant tearing mode, are common to all the reversed field pinch (RFP) experiments. The internal magnetic field structure produced by the dominant mode is investigated for the QSH observed in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) RFP in discharges with zero toroidal magnetic field at the plasma boundary. The reconstruction is based on an MHD model coupled to edge measurements of the magnetic field. The model discards pressure, which has little effect on the equilibrium magnetic profile of present RFP plasmas, but adopts a realistic toroidal geometry. The technique is the adaptation to the MST configuration of a procedure already applied in RFX-mod, but a more general radial profile for the current density is needed for an adequate reconstruction of the MST case. The emerging features are similar to those found in RFX-mod. The helical flux surfaces of the dominant mode provide, with a good degree of reliability, a basis for mapping kinetic quantities such as electron density and soft-x-ray emissivity.

  14. Relationships between Fluid Vorticity, Kinetic Helicity, and Magnetic Field on Small-scales (Quiet-Network) on the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeetha, C. R.; Rajaguru, S. P.

    2016-06-01

    We derive horizontal fluid motions on the solar surface over large areas covering the quiet-Sun magnetic network from local correlation tracking of convective granules imaged in continuum intensity and Doppler velocity by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. From these we calculate the horizontal divergence, the vertical component of vorticity, and the kinetic helicity of fluid motions. We study the correlations between fluid divergence and vorticity, and between vorticity (kinetic helicity) and the magnetic field. We find that the vorticity (kinetic helicity) around small-scale fields exhibits a hemispherical pattern (in sign) similar to that followed by the magnetic helicity of large-scale active regions (containing sunspots). We identify this pattern to be a result of the Coriolis force acting on supergranular-scale flows (both the outflows and inflows), consistent with earlier studies using local helioseismology. Furthermore, we show that the magnetic fields cause transfer of vorticity from supergranular inflow regions to outflow regions, and that they tend to suppress the vortical motions around them when magnetic flux densities exceed about 300 G (from HMI). We also show that such an action of the magnetic fields leads to marked changes in the correlations between fluid divergence and vorticity. These results are speculated to be of importance to local dynamo action (if present) and to the dynamical evolution of magnetic helicity at the small-scale.

  15. A Combined Study of Photospheric Magnetic and Current Helicities and Subsurface Kinetic Helicities of Solar Active Regions during 2006-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Darryl; Petrie, G.; Komm, R.

    2014-01-01

    We compare the average photospheric current helicity H_c, photospheric twist parameter α (a well-known proxy for the full relative magnetic helicity), and subsurface kinetic helicity K_h for 128 active regions observed between 2006-2012. We use 1436 Hinode photospheric vector magnetograms and subsurface fluid velocity data from GONG Dopplergrams. We find a significant hemispheric bias in all three parameters. The K_h parameter is preferentially positive/negative in the southern/northern hemisphere. The H_c and α parameters have the same bias for strong fields |{B}|>1000 G). We examine the temporal variability of each parameter for each active region and identify a significant subset of regions whose three helicity parameters all exhibit clear increasing or decreasing trends. The temporal profiles of these regions have the same bias: positive/negative helicity in the northern/southern hemisphere. The results are consistent with Longcope et al.'s Σ-effect. This work is carried out through the National Solar Observatory Research Experiences for Undergraduate (REU) site program, which is co-funded by the Department of Defense in partnership with the NSF REU Program. The National Solar Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  16. Magnetic fluctuation behavior during the transition between quasi-single helicity and multi helicity states in the reversed-field pinch plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Sakakita, Hajime; Hirano, Yoichi; Koguchi, Haruhisa

    2016-11-01

    We measured the variation of magnetic and electrostatic fluctuations observed during the transition between the quasi-single helicity (QSH) and multi helicity (MH) states in the edge region of the Toroidal Pinch Experiment-Reversed eXperiment reversed-field pinch plasma [Yagi et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 45, 421 (1999)]. The high-frequency magnetic fluctuations largely decrease at the start of the QSH state. During the QSH state, the toroidal and radial magnetic fluctuations slightly increase again between 12 and 18 kHz but the decrease in the poloidal magnetic fluctuation is maintained. The confinement of fast electrons may be improved in the period of the QSH state although the radial magnetic fluctuation increases between 12 and 18 kHz. It is suggested that the improved confinement of fast electrons may be obtained by the decrease in the fast radial magnetic fluctuation having the frequency higher than 20 kHz in the period of the QSH state. Contrarily, the transition from QSH to MH states occurs with the increase in the slow toroidal magnetic fluctuation having the frequency lower than 10 kHz. The QSH state may bring a good confinement of fast electrons by the reduced high-frequency magnetic fluctuation compared with the MH state.

  17. Magnetic helicity conservation and inverse energy cascade in electron magnetohydrodynamic wave packets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jungyeon

    2011-05-13

    Electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD) provides a fluidlike description of small-scale magnetized plasmas. An EMHD wave propagates along magnetic field lines. The direction of propagation can be either parallel or antiparallel to the magnetic field lines. We numerically study propagation of three-dimensional (3D) EMHD wave packets moving in one direction. We obtain two major results. (1) Unlike its magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) counterpart, an EMHD wave packet is dispersive. Because of this, EMHD wave packets traveling in one direction create opposite-traveling wave packets via self-interaction and cascade energy to smaller scales. (2) EMHD wave packets traveling in one direction clearly exhibit inverse energy cascade. We find that the latter is due to conservation of magnetic helicity. We compare inverse energy cascade in 3D EMHD turbulence and two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic turbulence.

  18. Magnetic Helicity Conservation and Inverse Energy Cascade in Electron Magnetohydrodynamic Wave Packets

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Jungyeon

    2011-01-01

    Electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD) provides a fluid-like description of small-scale magnetized plasmas. An EMHD wave (also known as whistler wave) propagates along magnetic field lines. The direction of propagation can be either parallel or anti-parallel to the magnetic field lines. We numerically study propagation of 3-dimensional (3D) EMHD wave packets moving in one direction. We obtain two major results: 1. Unlike its magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) counterpart, an EMHD wave packet is dispersive. Because of this, EMHD wave packets traveling in one direction create opposite traveling wave packets via self-interaction and cascade energy to smaller scales. 2. EMHD wave packets traveling in one direction clearly exhibit inverse energy cascade. We find that the latter is due to conservation of magnetic helicity. We compare inverse energy cascade in 3D EMHD turbulence and 2-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic turbulence.

  19. Helical ${\\alpha}$-dynamos as twisted magnetic flux tubes in Riemannian space

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, Garcia

    2007-01-01

    Analytical solution of ${\\alpha}$-dynamo equation representing strongly torsioned helical dynamo is obtained in the thin twisted Riemannian flux tubes approximation. The $\\alpha$ factor possesses a fundamental contribution from torsion which is however weaken in the thin tubes approximation. It is shown that assuming that the poloidal component of the magnetic field is in principle time-independent, the toroidal magnetic field component grows very fast in time, actually it possesses a linear time dependence, while the poloidal component grows under the influence of torsion or twist of the flux tube. The toroidal component decays spatially with as $r^{-2}$ while vorticity may decay as $r^{-5}$ (poloidal component) where r represents the radial distance from the magnetic axis of flux tube. Toroidal component of vorticity decays as $r^{-1}$. In turbulent dynamos unbounded magnetic fields may decay at least as $r^{-3}$.

  20. In Situ Origin of Large Scale Galactic Magnetic Fields Without Kinetic Helicity?

    CERN Document Server

    Blackman, E G

    1998-01-01

    The origin and sustenance of large scale galactic magnetic fields has been a long standing and controversial astrophysical problem. Here an alternative to the ``standard'' $\\a-\\Omega$ mean field dynamo and primordial theories is pursued. The steady supply of supernovae induced turbulence exponentiates the total field energy, providing a significant seed mean field that can be linearly stretched by shear. The observed micro-Gauss fields would be produced primarily within one vertical diffusion time since it is only during this time that linear stretching can compete with diffusion. This approach does not invoke exponential mean field dynamo growth from the helicity $\\a$-effect but does employ turbulent diffusion, which limits the number of large scale reversals. The approach could be of interest if the helicity effect is suppressed independently of the turbulent diffusion. This is an important but presently unresolved issue.

  1. A new type of radially cooled helices designed for a 25 T magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rub, P.; Joss, W. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Grenoble (France)

    1996-07-01

    The authors designed a new magnet yielding a field of 25 T in a 50 mm room temperature bore for a consumed power of 11.2 MW. It consists of four coils electrically in series and hydraulically in parallel. The two outer coils are Bitter stacks which deliver together 14.7 T in a diameter of 163 mm. Two helices made of CuCrZr alloy with an elastic limit of 360 MPa and an electrical conductivity of 85% IACS constitute the inner part of the magnet. The helices are cut out of cylindrical tubes with an electrical discharge machine and produce a field of 10.4 T in 58 mm. The insulation between turns is obtained by a number of 125 {micro} thick sectors of Kapton, which are maintained by two fiber glass rods. The spaces between the insulators constitute the channels for radial cooling. The high water velocity (about 21 m/s) in the channel results in a relatively low average temperature for the copper. Since July 1994 the magnet has been in operation for several hundred hours and its performance is very encouraging. Presently, it is the only magnet in the facility in which more than 10 MW are dissipated.

  2. Observations of Ion Signatures of Magnetic Reconnection for Northward IMF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Michael O.; Moore, Thomas E.; Fuselier, S.; Lockwood, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Magnetic merging at Earth's magnetopause produces distinct mixtures of ions and electrons as well as signatures in their distribution functions. High resolution measurements allow for the separation of the different distributions and quantification of their characteristics. This provides details on the temporal and spatial nature of the merging site and the resulting history of the merged fields. The event of May 29, 1996 resulted in remote observations of the effects of reconnection on both magnetosheath and magnetosphere populations for a period of approximately three hours. Three-dimensional ion distributions obtained by the Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment on the Polar spacecraft show that field lines threading the spacecraft's location in the northern cusp region contained a mix of D-shaped ions from the magnetosheath and accelerated magnetospheric ions both moving parallel to the local magnetic field. This mix of ions resulted from transmission of magnetosheath ions across the magnetopause at speeds greater than the de-Hoffman-Teller speed and the reflection of cold, slow-moving plasmasphere-like ions at the magnetopause. These observations are used to conclude that these field lines were connected to the ionosphere in the northern hemisphere and, southward of the spacecraft, the interplanetary magnetic field and crossed the magnetopause in the equatorial region southward of the spacecraft.

  3. Observations of Ion Signatures of Magnetic Reconnection for Northward IMF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Michael O.; Moore, Thomas E.; Fuselier, S.; Lockwood, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Magnetic merging at Earth's magnetopause produces distinct mixtures of ions and electrons as well as signatures in their distribution functions. High resolution measurements allow for the separation of the different distributions and quantification of their characteristics. This provides details on the temporal and spatial nature of the merging site and the resulting history of the merged fields. The event of May 29, 1996 resulted in remote observations of the effects of reconnection on both magnetosheath and magnetosphere populations for a period of approximately three hours. Three-dimensional ion distributions obtained by the Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment on the Polar spacecraft show that field lines threading the spacecraft's location in the northern cusp region contained a mix of D-shaped ions from the magnetosheath and accelerated magnetospheric ions both moving parallel to the local magnetic field. This mix of ions resulted from transmission of magnetosheath ions across the magnetopause at speeds greater than the de-Hoffman-Teller speed and the reflection of cold, slow-moving plasmasphere-like ions at the magnetopause. These observations are used to conclude that these field lines were connected to the ionosphere in the northern hemisphere and, southward of the spacecraft, the interplanetary magnetic field and crossed the magnetopause in the equatorial region southward of the spacecraft.

  4. Dynamical process of skyrmion-helical magnetic transformation of the chiral-lattice magnet FeGe probed by small-angle resonant soft x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Y.; Morikawa, D.; Honda, T.; Nakao, H.; Murakami, Y.; Kanazawa, N.; Kawasaki, M.; Arima, T.; Tokura, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Small-angle soft x-ray scattering in resonance with Fe L absorption edge has been investigated for helical magnetic order and magnetic skyrmion crystal (SkX) in B20-type cubic FeGe. Transformation of magnetic structures among helical, conical, SkX, and field-polarized spin-collinear forms is observed with the application of a magnetic field parallel to the incident soft x-ray. The resonant soft x-ray scattering with high q -resolution revealed a transient dynamics of SkX, such as rotation of SkX and variation of the SkX lattice constant, upon the change of magnetic field.

  5. Magneto-acoustic waves driven by self-generated magnetic field: relevance to helical structures in MagLIF experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Jonathan; Barnak, Daniel; Betti, Riccardo; Carreon, Adam; Chang, Po-Yu; Fiksel, Gennady

    2014-10-01

    The observation of coherent helical structures in liner implosions on Z when an axial magnetic field more than 100 times smaller than the azimuthal field is added has yet to be adequately explained. The results have been reproduced in a 3D MHD code by initializing helices on the outer surface, but this produces helices independently of the axial magnetic field. We present the hypothesis that helices are seeded by self-generated magnetic field, which adds a driving term to the dispersion relation for magneto-acoustic waves when there is a temperature gradient perpendicular to the fluid motion. The key feature of this instability is that it is stable when magnetic pressure exceeds a fraction of the thermal pressure, therefore, instability driven by the helical field resulting from the combination of the initial axial field and the growing azimuthal field will stabilize before the net field has a small pitch angle and before the implosion starts, seeding helices on the surface. This work was supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration, Award Number DE-NA0001944, and the Fusion Science Center supported by the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, Number DE-FG02-04ER54786.

  6. Engineered materials for all-optical helicity-dependent magnetic switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangin, S.; Gottwald, M.; Lambert, C.-H.; Steil, D.; Uhlíř, V.; Pang, L.; Hehn, M.; Alebrand, S.; Cinchetti, M.; Malinowski, G.; Fainman, Y.; Aeschlimann, M.; Fullerton, E. E.

    2014-03-01

    The possibility of manipulating magnetic systems without applied magnetic fields have attracted growing attention over the past fifteen years. The low-power manipulation of the magnetization, preferably at ultrashort timescales, has become a fundamental challenge with implications for future magnetic information memory and storage technologies. Here we explore the optical manipulation of the magnetization in engineered magnetic materials. We demonstrate that all-optical helicity-dependent switching (AO-HDS) can be observed not only in selected rare earth-transition metal (RE-TM) alloy films but also in a much broader variety of materials, including RE-TM alloys, multilayers and heterostructures. We further show that RE-free Co-Ir-based synthetic ferrimagnetic heterostructures designed to mimic the magnetic properties of RE-TM alloys also exhibit AO-HDS. These results challenge present theories of AO-HDS and provide a pathway to engineering materials for future applications based on all-optical control of magnetic order.

  7. Helical Magnetic Fields in the NGC1333 IRAS 4A Protostellar Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Ching, Tao-Chung; Zhang, Qizhou; Yang, Louis; Girart, Josep M; Rao, Ramprasad

    2016-01-01

    We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) polarization observations of the CO $J$ = 3--2 line toward the NGC1333 IRAS 4A. The CO Stokes $I$ maps at an angular resolution of $\\sim$1$\\arcsec$ reveal two bipolar outflows from the binary sources of the NGC 1333 IRAS 4A. The kinematic features of the CO emission can be modeled by wind-driven outflows at $\\sim$ 20$\\arcdeg$ inclined from the plane of the sky. Close to the protostars the CO polarization, at an angular resolution of $\\sim$$2\\farcs3$, has a position angle approximately parallel to the magnetic field direction inferred from the dust polarizations. The CO polarization direction appears to vary smoothly from an hourglass field around the core to an arc-like morphology wrapping around the outflow, suggesting a helical structure of magnetic fields that inherits the poloidal fields at the launching point and consists of toroidal fields at a farther distance of outflow. The helical magnetic field is consistent with the theoretical expectations for launching and co...

  8. Electrically controlled spin-transistor operation in a helical magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik, P.; Adamowski, J.

    2016-03-01

    A proposal of an electrically controlled spin transistor in a helical magnetic field is presented. In the proposed device, the transistor action is driven by the Landau-Zener transitions that lead to a backscattering of spin polarized electrons and switching the transistor into the high-resistance state (off state). The on/off state of the transistor can be controlled by the all-electric means using Rashba spin-orbit coupling that can be tuned by the voltages applied to the side electrodes.

  9. Tomographic study of helical modes in bifurcating Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille flow using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, K W; Raguin, L G; Georgiadis, J G

    2001-07-01

    The quantitative visualization of flow in a wide-gap annulus (radius ratio 0.5) between concentric cylinders with the inner cylinder rotating and a superimposed axial flow reveals a novel mixed-mode state at relatively high flow rates. A fast magnetic resonance imaging sequence allows the cinematographic dissection and three-dimensional reconstruction of supercritical nonaxisymmetric modes in a regime where stationary helical and propagating toroidal vortices coexist. The findings shed light on symmetry-breaking instabilities, flow pattern selection, and their consequences for hydrodynamic mixing in a complex laminar flow that constitutes a celebrated prototype of many mixing or fractionation processes.

  10. Influence of external 3D magnetic fields on helical equilibrium and plasma flow in RFX-mod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piovesan, P; Bonfiglio, D; Bonomo, F; Cappello, S; Carraro, L; Cavazzana, R; Gobbin, M; Marrelli, L; Martin, P; Martines, E; Momo, B; Piron, L; Puiatti, M E; Soppelsa, A; Valisa, M; Zanca, P; Zaniol, B [Consorzio RFX, EURATOM-ENEA Association, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy)

    2011-08-15

    A spontaneous transition to a helical equilibrium with an electron internal transport barrier is observed in RFX-mod as the plasma current is raised above 1 MA (Lorenzini R et al 2009 Nature Phys. 5 570). The helical magnetic equilibrium can be controlled with external three-dimensional (3D) magnetic fields applied by 192 active coils, providing proper helical boundary conditions either rotating or static. The persistence of the helical equilibrium is strongly increased in this way. A slight reduction in the energy confinement time of about 15% is observed, likely due to the increased plasma-wall interaction associated with the finite radial magnetic field imposed at the edge. A global helical flow develops in these states and is expected to play a role in the helical self-organization. In particular, its shear may contribute to the ITB formation and is observed to increase with the externally applied radial field. The possible origins of this flow, from nonlinear visco-resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and/or ambipolar electric fields, will be discussed.

  11. Magnetic material in mean-field dynamos driven by small scale helical flows

    CERN Document Server

    Giesecke, Andre; Gerbeth, Gunter

    2014-01-01

    We perform kinematic simulations of dynamo action driven by a helical small scale flow of a conducting fluid in order to deduce mean-field properties of the combined induction action of small scale eddies. We examine two different flow patterns in the style of the G.O. Roberts flow but with a mean vertical component and with internal fixtures that are modelled by regions with vanishing flow. These fixtures represent either rods that lie in the center of individual eddies, or internal dividing walls that provide a separation of the eddies from each other. The fixtures can be made of magnetic material with a relative permeability larger than one which can alter the dynamo behavior. The investigations are motivated by the widely unknown induction effects of the forced helical flow that is used in the core of liquid sodium cooled fast reactors, and from the key role of soft iron impellers in the von-K\\'arm\\'an-Sodium (VKS) dynamo. For both examined flow configurations the consideration of magnetic material within...

  12. Kinematics of and emission from helically orbiting blobs in a relativistic magnetized jet

    CERN Document Server

    Mohan, P

    2015-01-01

    We present a general relativistic (GR) model of jet variability in active galactic nuclei due to orbiting blobs in helical motion along a funnel or cone shaped magnetic surface anchored to the accretion disk near the black hole. Considering a radiation pressure driven flow in the inner region, we find that it stabilizes the flow yielding Lorentz factors ranging between $1.1 - 7$ at small radii for reasonable initial conditions. Assuming these as inputs, simulated light curves (LCs) for the funnel model include Doppler and gravitational shifts, aberration, light bending and time delay. These LCs are studied for quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) and the power spectral density (PSD) shape and yield an increased amplitude ($\\sim$ 12 %); a beamed portion and a systematic phase shift with respect to that from a previous special relativistic model. The results strongly justify implementing a realistic magnetic surface geometry in a GR framework to describe effects on emission from orbital features in the jet close ...

  13. Helical magnetic fields in the M87 jet at arc-second scales

    CERN Document Server

    Algaba, J C; Nakamura, M

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the magnetic field configuration of the M87 jet at arc-second scales by using archival polarimetric VLA data at 8, 15, 22 and 43 GHz. By stacking images over three years in order to enhance the sensitivity, we reveal, for the first time, systematic transverse gradients of the Faraday rotation measure in several knots along the jet. Combining this result with polarization properties and the dynamics of the jet, we suggest the magnetic structure in several knots at kiloparsec scales consists of a systematically wrapped, tightly wound helical configuration. Our analysis brings us a new paradigm where the M87 jet is a fundamentally current carrying system produced in the vicinity of the supermassive black hole, transferring a huge amount of the electromagnetic energy over the host galaxy scale.

  14. The Tayler instability at low magnetic Prandtl numbers: Chiral symmetry breaking and synchronizable helicity oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Stefani, F; Giesecke, A; Weber, N; Weier, T

    2016-01-01

    The current-driven, kink-type Tayler instability (TI) is a key ingredient of the Tayler-Spruit dynamo model for the generation of stellar magnetic fields, but is also discussed as a mechanism that might hamper the up-scaling of liquid metal batteries. Under some circumstances, the TI involves a helical flow pattern which goes along with some alpha effect. Here we focus on the chiral symmetry breaking and the related impact on the alpha effect that would be needed to close the dynamo loop in the Tayler-Spruit model. For low magnetic Prandtl numbers, we observe intrinsic oscillations of the alpha effect. These oscillations serve then as the basis for a synchronized Tayler-Spruit dynamo model, which could possibly link the periodic tidal forces of planets with the oscillation periods of stellar dynamos.

  15. Circular polarimetry reveals helical magnetic fields in the young stellar object HH 135-136

    CERN Document Server

    Chrysostomou, Antonio; Hough, James H

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic fields are believed to have a vital role in regulating and shaping the flow of material onto and away from protostars during their initial mass accretion phase. It is becoming increasingly accepted that bipolar outflows are generated and collimated as material is driven along magnetic field lines and centrifugally accelerated off a rotating accretion disk. However, the precise role of the magnetic field is poorly understood and evidence for its shape and structure has not been forthcoming. Here we report imaging circular polarimetry in the near-infrared and Monte Carlo modelling showing that the magnetic field along the bipolar outflow of the HH 135-136 young stellar object is helical. The field retains this shape for large distances along the outflow, so the field structure can also provide the necessary magnetic pressure for collimation of the outflow. This result lends further weight to the hypothesis - central to any theory of star formation - that the outflow is an important instrument for the r...

  16. First observational application of a connectivity--based helicity flux density

    CERN Document Server

    Dalmasse, K; Valori, G; Démoulin, P; Green, L M

    2013-01-01

    Measuring the magnetic helicity distribution in the solar corona can help in understanding the trigger of solar eruptive events because magnetic helicity is believed to play a key role in solar activity due to its conservation property. A new method for computing the photospheric distribution of the helicity flux was recently developed. This method takes into account the magnetic field connectivity whereas previous methods were based on photospheric signatures only. This novel method maps the true injection of magnetic helicity in active regions. We applied this method for the first time to an observed active region, NOAA 11158, which was the source of intense flaring activity. We used high-resolution vector magnetograms from the SDO/HMI instrument to compute the photospheric flux transport velocities and to perform a nonlinear force-free magnetic field extrapolation. We determined and compared the magnetic helicity flux distribution using a purely photospheric as well as a connectivity-based method. While th...

  17. Magnetic material in mean-field dynamos driven by small scale helical flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesecke, A.; Stefani, F.; Gerbeth, G.

    2014-07-01

    We perform kinematic simulations of dynamo action driven by a helical small scale flow of a conducting fluid in order to deduce mean-field properties of the combined induction action of small scale eddies. We examine two different flow patterns in the style of the G O Roberts flow but with a mean vertical component and with internal fixtures that are modelled by regions with vanishing flow. These fixtures represent either rods that lie in the center of individual eddies, or internal dividing walls that provide a separation of the eddies from each other. The fixtures can be made of magnetic material with a relative permeability larger than one which can alter the dynamo behavior. The investigations are motivated by the widely unknown induction effects of the forced helical flow that is used in the core of liquid sodium cooled fast reactors, and from the key role of soft iron impellers in the von-Kármán-sodium dynamo. For both examined flow configurations the consideration of magnetic material within the fluid flow causes a reduction of the critical magnetic Reynolds number of up to 25%. The development of the growth-rate in the limit of the largest achievable permeabilities suggests no further significant reduction for even larger values of the permeability. In order to study the dynamo behavior of systems that consist of tens of thousands of helical cells we resort to the mean-field dynamo theory (Krause and Rädler 1980 Mean-field Magnetohydrodynamics and Dynamo Theory (Oxford: Pergamon)) in which the action of the small scale flow is parameterized in terms of an α- and β-effect. We compute the relevant elements of the α- and the β-tensor using the so called testfield method. We find a reasonable agreement between the fully resolved models and the corresponding mean-field models for wall or rod materials in the considered range 1\\leqslant {{\\mu }_{r}}\\leqslant 20. Our results may be used for the development of global large scale models with recirculation

  18. Synthesis and magnetic properties of a 1-D helical chain derived from a Nickel-Sodium Schiff base complex

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Apoorva Upadhyay; Chinmoy Das; Shaik Nagul Meera; Stuart K Langley; Keith S Murray; Maheswaran Shanmugam

    2014-09-01

    The reaction of the deprotonated form of the Schiff base ligand; (E)-2-methoxy-6-((phenylimino) methyl)phenol (L) with nickel chloride hydrate results in the formation of the 1-dimentional coordination polymer; Na[Ni(L)2(OMe)(MeOH)] (1). The structure was determined via single crystal X-ray diffraction measurements. A careful analysis of the complex shows that the polymer exists as a helical structure, where the helicity is brought about by the presence of an alkali metal ion which is observed for the first time. Moreover the helical structure in 1 is maintained predominantly through covalent bond rather than supramolecular interactions. Direct current magnetic susceptibility measurement suggests that complex 1 obeys the Curie law. The fitting of magnetic data using the PHI software package yields parameters of = 1, = 2.26 and = +4.51 (or = −7.24cm-1) for 1.

  19. Magnetic Signatures of Impact Fractured Rocks from Sierra Madera, Texas, USA - Implications to Magnetic Anomalies on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, T.; Kletetschka, G.; Wasilewski, P. J.; Mikula, V.

    2007-05-01

    Mars Express Orbiter (sounding radar data) revealed that craters of ancient origin had been covered by thick sediments in northern hemisphere. Mars MOLA topography mission identified many crater on Mars surface. Thus despite the Mars dichotomy, both northern and southern hemisphere have been covered by impacts to similar density. Mars currently has no global magnetic field of internal origin. In southern hemisphere, magnetic field intensities due to anomalies of remanent origin are much lower over the gigantic impact craters (e.g. Hellas, Prometheus, and Argyre). Low magnetic field may not relate to the absence of internal dynamo but due to impacts. For example, the aerial survey over a two billion year old, largest crater on Earth, Vredefort in South Africa observed much lower magnetic intensity over the crater, despite of the strongly magnetized simgle domain (SD) magnetite in shocked granites. Randomized magnetic vector orientations caused by impact may be the origin of the lower magnetic field observed on both Vredefort and Mars. We conducted magnetic analysis for a suite of Sierra Madera Impact deformed rock sites with complete shatter cone structures and multiple striated joint set (MSJS), and the initial results were intriguing. NRM vector orientations, REM ratios, and AF demagnetization curves showed contrasted magnetic signatures between the sites as well as within the samples. The NRM signatures in small scale shatter cones and larger scale shatter cones indicated shock demagnetization (SDM). The peculiar signatures of the site with MSJS may be both SDM and shock magnetization (SRM). We characterized the complexity and distinct magnetic signatures of impact fractured rocks. The results suggest that the size of the shatter cones and structures may reflect the magnetic signatures of both intensity and directions. Also, the dimensional scale of shatter cones is indicative parameters for randomization of the magnetic vector orientations. Such variations may

  20. Magnetic force study for the helical afterburner for the European XFEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Wei, Tao; Li, Yuhui; Pflueger, Joachim

    2017-05-01

    At present the SASE3 undulator line at the European XFEL is using a planar undulator producing linear polarized soft Xray radiation only. In order to satisfy the demand for circular polarized radiation a helical undulator system, the so-called afterburner is in construction. It will be operated as a radiator using the pre-bunched beam of the SASE3 undulator system. Among several options for the magnetic structure the Apple-X geometry was chosen. This is a pure permanent magnet undulator using NdFeB material. Four magnet arrays are arranged symmetrically the beam axis. Polarization can be changed by adjusting the phase shift (PS) between the two orthogonal structures. The field strength can be adjusted either by gap adjustment or alternatively by the amplitude shift (AS) scheme. For an engineering design the maximum values of forces and torques on each of the components under worst case operational conditions are important. The superposition principle is used to reduce calculation time. It is found that the maximum forces Fx, Fy and Fz for a 2m long Apple-X undulator are 1.8*104N, 2.4*104N and 2.3*104N, respectively. More results are presented in this paper.

  1. Engineered materials for all-optical helicity-dependent magnetic switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Eric

    2014-03-01

    The possibilities of manipulating magnetization without applied magnetic fields have attracted growing attention over the last fifteen years. The low-power manipulation of magnetization, preferably at ultra-short time scales, has become a fundamental challenge with implications for future magnetic information memory and storage technologies. Here we explore the optical manipulation of the magnetization of engineered materials and devices using 100 fs optical pulses. We demonstrate that all optical - helicity dependent switching (AO-HDS) can be observed not only in selected rare-earth transition-metal (RE-TM) alloy films but also in a much broader variety of materials, including alloys, multilayers, heterostructures and RE-free Co-Ir-based synthetic ferrimagnets. The discovery of AO-HDS in RE-free TM-based synthetic ferrimagnets can enable breakthroughs for numerous applications since it exploits materials that are currently used in magnetic data storage, memories and logic technologies. In addition, this materials study of AO-HDS offers valuable insight into the underlying mechanisms involved. Indeed the common denominator of the diverse structures showing AO-HDS in this study is that two ferromagnetic sub-lattices exhibit magnetization compensation (and therefore angular momentum compensation) at temperatures near or above room temperature. We are highlighting that compensation plays a major role and that this compensation can be established at the atomic level as in alloys but also over a larger nanometers scale as in the multilayers or in heterostructures. We will also discuss the potential to extend AO-HDS to new classes of magnetic materials. This work was done in collaboration with S. Mangin, M. Gottwald, C-H. Lambert, D. Steil, V. Uhlíř, L. Pang, M. Hehn, S. Alebrand, M. Cinchetti, G. Malinowski, Y. Fainman, and M. Aeschlimann. Supported by the ANR-10-BLANC-1005 ``Friends,'' a grant from the Advanced Storage Technology Consortium, Partner University Fund

  2. Multifrequency Polarimetry of the Nrao 140 Jet: Possible Detection of a Helical Magnetic Field and Constraints on its Pitch Angle

    CERN Document Server

    Asada, Keiichi; Nakamura, Masanori; Kameno, Seiji; Nagai, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    We present results from multifrequency polarimetry of NRAO 140 using the Very Long Baseline Array. These observations allow us to reveal the distributions of both the polarization position angle and the Faraday rotation measure (RM). These distributions are powerful tools to discern the projected and line-of-sight components of the magnetic field, respectively. We find a systematic gradient in the RM distribution, with its sign being opposite at either side of the jet with respect to the jet axis. The sign of the RM changes only with the direction of the magnetic field component along the line of sight, so this can be explained by the existence of helical magnetic components associated with the jet itself. We derive two constraints for the pitch angle of the helical magnetic field from the distributions of the RM and the projected magnetic field; the RM distribution indicates that the helical fields are tightly wound, while that of the projected magnetic field suggests they are loosely wound around the jet ax...

  3. Latitudinal profile of the ionospheric disturbance dynamo magnetic signature: comparison with the DP2 magnetic disturbance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Z. Zaka

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available During magnetic storms, the auroral electrojets intensification affects the thermospheric circulation on a global scale. This process which leads to electric field and current disturbance at middle and low latitudes, on the quiet day after the end of a storm, has been attributed to the ionospheric disturbance dynamo (Ddyn. The magnetic field disturbance observed as a result of this process is the reduction of the H component amplitude in the equatorial region which constitutes the main characteristic of the ionospheric disturbance dynamo process, associated with a westward electric current flow. The latitudinal profile of the Ddyn disturbance dynamo magnetic signature exhibits an eastward current at mid latitudes and a westward one at low latitudes with a substantial amplification at the magnetic equator. Such current flow reveals an "anti-Sq" system established between the mid latitudes and the equatorial region and opposes the normal Sq current vortex. However, the localization of the eastward current and consequently the position and the extent of the "anti-Sq" current vortex changes from one storm to another. Indeed, for a strong magnetic storm, the eastward current is well established at mid latitudes about 45° N and for a weak magnetic storm, the eastward current is established toward the high latitudes (about 60° N, near the Joule heating region, resulting in a large "anti-Sq" current cell. The latitudinal profile of the Ddyn disturbance as well as the magnetic disturbance DP2 generated by the mechanism of prompt penetration of the magnetospheric convection electric field in general, show a weak disturbance at the low latitudes with a substantial amplification at the magnetic equator. Due to the intensity of the storm, the magnitude of the DP2 appears higher than the Ddyn over the American and Asian sector contrary to the African sector.

  4. Is the Long-Term Persistency of Circular Polarisation due to the Constant Helicity of the Magnetic Fields in Rotating Quasar Engines?

    OpenAIRE

    Ensslin, Torsten A.

    2003-01-01

    Many compact radio sources like quasars, blazars, radio galaxies, and micro-quasars emit circular polarisation (CP) with surprising temporal persistent handedness. We propose that the CP is caused by Faraday conversion of linear polarisation synchrotron light which propagates along a line-of-sight through helical magnetic fields. Jet outflows from radio galaxies should have the required magnetic helicity in the emission region due to the magnetic torque of the accretion disc. Also advection d...

  5. Are Spine--Sheath Polarization Structures in the Jets of Active Galactic Nuclei Associated with Helical Magnetic Fields?

    CERN Document Server

    Gabuzda, Denise C; O'Neill, Eamonn L

    2014-01-01

    One possible origin for polarization structures across jets of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) with a central "spine" of orthogonal magnetic field and a "sheath" of longitudinal magnetic field along one or both edges of the jet is the presence of a helical jet magnetic field. Simultaneous Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) polarization observations of AGN displaying partial or full spine--sheath polarization structures were obtained at 4.6, 5.0, 7.9, 8.9, 12.9 and 15.4 GHz, in order to search for additional evidence for helical jet magnetic fields, such as transverse Faraday rotation gradients (due to the systematic change in the line-of-sight magnetic-field component across the jet). Results for eight sources displaying monotonic transverse Faraday rotation gradients with significances $\\geq 3\\sigma$ are presented here. Reversals in the directions of the transverse RM gradients with distance from the core or with time are detected in three of these AGNs. These can be interpreted as evidence for a nested helical m...

  6. Magnetic Signatures of Ionospheric and Magnetospheric Current Systems During Geomagnetic Quiet Conditions—An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Nils; Stolle, Claudia

    2016-09-01

    High-precision magnetic measurements taken by LEO satellites (flying at altitudes between 300 and 800 km) allow for studying the ionospheric and magnetospheric processes and electric currents that causes only weak magnetic signature of a few nanotesla during geomagnetic quiet conditions. Of particular importance for this endeavour are multipoint observations in space, such as provided by the Swarm satellite constellation mission, in order to better characterize the space-time-structure of the current systems. Focusing on geomagnetic quiet conditions, we provide an overview of ionospheric and magnetospheric sources and illustrate their magnetic signatures with Swarm satellite observations.

  7. Magnetic signature of indoor air pollution: Household dust study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Górka-Kostrubiec, Beata; Jeleńska, Maria; Król, Elżbieta

    2014-01-01

    The combination of magnetic and geochemical methods was used to determine the mineralogy, grain size and domain structure of magnetic particles in indoor dust collected in 195 sites in Warsaw, Poland...

  8. Evolution of the baryon asymmetry through the electroweak crossover in the presence of a helical magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, Kohei; Long, Andrew J.

    2016-12-01

    We elaborate upon the model of baryogenesis from decaying magnetic helicity by focusing on the evolution of the baryon number and magnetic field through the Standard Model electroweak crossover. The baryon asymmetry is determined by a competition between the helical hypermagnetic field, which sources baryon number, and the electroweak sphaleron, which tends to wash out baryon number. At the electroweak crossover, both of these processes become inactive; the hypermagnetic field is converted into an electromagnetic field, which does not source baryon number, and the weak gauge boson masses grow, suppressing the electroweak sphaleron reaction. An accurate prediction of the relic baryon asymmetry requires a careful treatment of the crossover. We extend our previous study [K. Kamada and A. J. Long, Phys. Rev. D 94, 063501 (2016)], taking into account the gradual conversion of the hypermagnetic into the electromagnetic field. If the conversion is not completed by the time of sphaleron freeze-out, as both analytic and numerical studies suggest, the relic baryon asymmetry is enhanced compared to previous calculations. The observed baryon asymmetry of the Universe can be obtained for a primordial magnetic field that has a present-day field strength and coherence length of B0˜10-17 G and λ0˜10-3 pc and a positive helicity. For larger B0 the baryon asymmetry is overproduced, which may be in conflict with blazar observations that provide evidence for an intergalactic magnetic field of strength B0≳10-14 - 16 G .

  9. Magnetic Signature Assessment System Using Multiple Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs), Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    Bean, J. Canning, D. Pugsley, J. Frenzel Michael Anderson, D. Edwards, "Field Measurement of Surface Ship Magnetic Signature Using Multiple AUVs... Frenzel , "Spatial Sampling of Magnetic Field Using Collaborating Autonomous Underwater Vehicles", Proceedings ofMSS Battlespace Acoustic and Seismic...J. Pentzer*, D. Odell, T. Bean, J. Canning, D. Pugsley, J. Frenzel Michael Anderson, D. Edwards, "Field Measurement of Surface Ship Magnetic

  10. Vector Magnetic Fields, Sub-surface Stresses and Evolution of Magnetic Helicity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Richard Canfield; Alexei Pevtsov

    2000-09-01

    Observations of the strength and spatial distribution of vector magnetic fields in active regions have revealed several fundamental properties of the twist of their magnetic fields. First, the handedness of this twist obeys a hemispheric rule: left-handed in the northern hemisphere, right-handed in the southern. Second, the rule is weak; active regions often disobey it. It is statistically valid only in a large ensemble. Third, the rule itself, and the amplitude of the scatter about the rule, are quantitatively consistent with twisting of fields by turbulence as flux tubes buoy up through the convection zone. Fourth, there is considerable spatial variation of twist within active regions. However, relaxation to a linear force-free state, which has been documented amply in laboratory plasmas, is not observed.

  11. Domain size criterion for the observation of all-optical helicity-dependent switching in magnetic thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hadri, Mohammed Salah; Hehn, Michel; Pirro, Philipp; Lambert, Charles-Henri; Malinowski, Grégory; Fullerton, Eric E.; Mangin, Stéphane

    2016-08-01

    To understand the necessary condition for the observation of all-optical helicity-dependent switching (AO-HDS) of magnetization in thin films, we investigated ferromagnetic Co/Pt and Co/Ni multilayers as well as ferrimagnetic TbCo alloys as a function of magnetic layer compositions and thicknesses. We show that both ferro- and ferrimagnets with high saturation magnetization show AO-HDS if their magnetic thickness is strongly reduced below a material-dependent threshold thickness. By taking into account the demagnetizing energy and the domain wall energy, we are able to define a criterion to predict whether AO-HDS or thermal demagnetization (TD) will be observed. This criterion for the observation of AO-HDS is that the equilibrium size of magnetic domains forming during the cooling process should be larger than the laser spot size. From these results we anticipate that more magnetic materials are expected to show AO-HDS. However, the effect of the optical pulses' helicity is hidden by the formation of small magnetic domains during the cooling process.

  12. Helicity, Reconnection, and Dynamo Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Hantao

    1998-11-01

    The inter-relationships between magnetic helicity, magnetic reconnection, and dynamo effects are discussed. In laboratory experiments, where two plasmas are driven to merge, the helicity content of each plasma strongly affects the reconnection rate, as well as the shape of the diffusion region. Conversely, magnetic reconnection events also strongly affect the global helicity, resulting in efficient helicity cancellation (but not dissipation) during counter-helicity reconnection and a finite helicity increase or decrease (but less efficiently than dissipation of magnetic energy) during co-helicity reconnection. Close relationships also exist between magnetic helicity and dynamo effects. The turbulent electromotive force along the mean magnetic field (alpha-effect), due to either electrostatic turbulence or the electron diamagnetic effect, transports mean-field helicity across space without dissipation. This has been supported by direct measurements of helicity flux in a laboratory plasma. When the dynamo effect is driven by electromagnetic turbulence, helicity in the turbulent field is converted to mean-field helicity. In all cases, however, dynamo processes conserve total helicity except for a small battery effect, consistent with the observation that the helicity is approximately conserved during magnetic relaxation.

  13. Evolution of the Baryon Asymmetry through the Electroweak Crossover in the Presence of a Helical Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Kamada, Kohei

    2016-01-01

    We elaborate upon the model of baryogenesis from decaying magnetic helicity by focusing on the evolution of the baryon number and magnetic field through the Standard Model electroweak crossover. The baryon asymmetry is determined by a competition between the helical hypermagnetic field, which sources baryon number, and the electroweak sphaleron, which tends to wash out baryon number. At the electroweak crossover both of these processes become inactive: the hypermagnetic field is converted into an electromagnetic field, which does not source baryon number, and the weak gauge boson masses grow, suppressing the electroweak sphaleron reaction. An accurate prediction of the relic baryon asymmetry requires a careful treatment of the crossover. We extend our previous study [Kamada & Long (2016)] taking into account the gradual conversion of the hypermagnetic into the electromagnetic field. If the conversion is not completed by the time of sphaleron freeze out, as both analytic and numerical studies suggest, the ...

  14. Control of the Helicity Content of a Gun-Generated Spheromak by Incorporating a Conducting Shell into a Magnetized Coaxial Plasma Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Tadafumi; Sekiguchi, Jun'ichi; Asai, Tomohiko

    In the formation of magnetized plasmoid by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), the magnetic helicity content of the generated plasmoid is one of the critical parameters. Typically, the bias coil to generate a poloidal flux is mounted either on the outer electrode or inside the inner electrode. However, most of the flux generated in the conventional method spreads even radially outside of the formation region. Thus, only a fraction of the total magnetic flux is actually exploited for helicity generation in the plasmoid. In the proposed system, the plasma gun incorporates a copper shell mounted on the outer electrode. By changing the rise time of the discharge bias coil current and the geometrical structure of the shell, the magnetic field structure and its time evolution can be controlled. The effect of the copper shell has been numerically simulated for the actual gun structure, and experimentally confirmed. This may increase the magnetic helicity content results, through increased poloidal magnetic field.

  15. Evidence for Helical Magnetic fields in Kiloparsec-Scale AGN Jets and the Action of a Cosmic Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabuzda, D. C.; Christodoulou, D. M.; Contopulos, I.; Kazanas, D.

    2012-01-01

    A search for transverse kiloparsec-scale gradients in Faraday rotation-measure (RM) maps of extragalactic radio sources in the literature has yielded 6 AGNs displaying continuous, monotonic RM gradients across their jets, oriented roughly orthogonal to the local jet direction. The most natural interpretation of such transverse RM gradients is that they are caused by the systematic change in the line-of-sight components of helical magnetic fields associated with these jets. All the identified transverse RM gradients increase in the counterclockwise (CCW) direction on the sky relative to the centers of these AGNs. Taken together with the results of Contopoulos et al. who found evidence for a predominance of clockwise (CW) transverse RM gradients across parsec-scale (VLBI) jets, this provides new evidence for preferred orientations of RM gradients due to helical jet magnetic fields, with a reversal from CW in the inner jets to CCW farther from the centers of activity. This can be explained by the "Poynting-Robertson cosmic-battery" mechanism, which can generate helical magnetic fields with a. characteristic "twist," which are expelled with the jet outflows. If the Poynting-Robertson battery mechanism is not operating, an alternative mechanism must be identified, which is able to explain the 'predominance of CW /CCW RM gradients on parsec/kiloparsec scales.

  16. Magnetic Signature Assessment System using Multiple Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    Sensing, Magnetic & Electric Field Sensorw (BAMS) Symposium, 2009. 2. B. Armstrong*, J. Pentzer*, D. Odell, T. Bean, J. Canning, D. Pugsley, J. Frenzel ...J. Pentzer*, D. Odell, T. Bean, J. Canning, D. Pugsley, J. Frenzel Michael Anderson, D. Edwards, "Field Measurement of Surface Ship Magnetic

  17. Stellar longitudinal magnetic field determination through multi-Zeeman signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Vélez, J C Ramírez; Navarro, S G; Córdova, J P; Sabin, L; Ruelas-Mayorga, A

    2016-01-01

    Context. A lot of effort has been put into the detection and determination of stellar magnetic fields using the spectral signal obtained from the combination of hundreds or thousands of individual lines, an approach known as multi-line techniques. However, so far most of multi-line techniques developed that retrieve stellar mean longitudinal magnetic fields recourse to sometimes heavy simplifications concerning line shapes and Zeeman splittings. Aims. To determine stellar longitudinal magnetic fields by means of the Principal Components Analysis and Zeeman Doppler Imaging (PCA-ZDI) multi-line technique, based on accurate polarised spectral line synthesis. Methods. In this paper we present the methodology to perform inversions of profiles obtained with PCA-ZDI. Results. Inversions with various magnetic geometries, field strengths and rotational velocities show that we can correctly determine the effective longitudinal magnetic field in stars using the PCA-ZDI method.

  18. Combined magnetic resonance urography and targeted helical CT in patients with renal colic: a new approach to reduce delivered dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandino, Alfredo; Minutoli, Fabio; Scribano, Emanuele; Vinci, Sergio; Magno, Carlo; Pergolizzi, Stefano; Settineri, Nicola; Pandolfo, Ignazio; Gaeta, Michele

    2004-08-01

    To determine whether magnetic resonance urography (MRU), obtained before helical computed tomography (CT) in patients with acute renal colic, can help delimit the obstructed area to be subsequently examined by a targeted CT scan, thus reducing the dose of radiation. Patients (51) with symptoms of acute renal colic underwent MRU and a total urinary tract helical CT. CT images from the 5 cm below the level of ureteral obstruction as demonstrated by MRU were selected out. Combined interpretation of MRU and selected CT images constituted protocol A. Protocol B consisted of the entire unenhanced helical CT of the urinary tract. The two protocols were compared regarding the following points: 1) sensitivity in diagnosing the presence of obstructing urinary stones, and 2) the delivered radiation dose. Protocol A and protocol B had, respectively, 98% and 100% sensitivity in demonstrating ureteral stone as a cause of renal colic. Estimated average dose calculated from phantom study was 0.52 mSv for protocol A and 2.83 mSv for protocol B. Therefore, the effective radiation dose was 5.4 times lower in protocol A compared to protocol B. Combined MRU and short helical CT has a high sensitivity in detecting ureteral calculi with a reduced radiation dose. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Unique magnetic signatures of mismatched base pairs in DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apalkov, Vadim; Berashevich, Julia; Chakraborty, Tapash

    2010-02-01

    Magnetic properties of DNA containing mispairs, such as different conformations of the GṡA mispair, or a GṡT mispair inserted into the DNA chain, have been theoretically investigated. The essential ingredients for these studies, the charge transfer integrals, were evaluated from the DNA sequences containing the mispair and optimized in the solvent. We find that the magnetic susceptibilities of the host DNA chain containing a large number of Watson-Crick base pairs are significantly altered in the presence of the mispairs, and the effects depend on the choice of mispairs. In particular, insertion of even a single GṡA mispair changes the nature of magnetization (sign of the susceptibility) of the host DNA. We propose that measurement of the magnetic properties of DNA might provide a direct route to detection and identification of those mispairs.

  20. Magnetic behaviour of amorphous ribbons with creep-induced helical anisotropy and their fluxgate properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Füzer, Jan; Brauer, Peter; Nielsen, Otto V

    1998-01-01

    We have induced a helical destributionby a tortional and tensile stress annealing, in low magnetostriction amorphous ribbons. In this paper we report a theoretical studyof predicted magnetisation curvesand the comparisonwith experimental measurements.......We have induced a helical destributionby a tortional and tensile stress annealing, in low magnetostriction amorphous ribbons. In this paper we report a theoretical studyof predicted magnetisation curvesand the comparisonwith experimental measurements....

  1. Magnetic behaviour of amorphous ribbons with creep-induced helical anisotropy and their fluxgate properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Füzer, Jan; Brauer, Peter; Nielsen, Otto V

    1998-01-01

    We have induced a helical destributionby a tortional and tensile stress annealing, in low magnetostriction amorphous ribbons. In this paper we report a theoretical studyof predicted magnetisation curvesand the comparisonwith experimental measurements.......We have induced a helical destributionby a tortional and tensile stress annealing, in low magnetostriction amorphous ribbons. In this paper we report a theoretical studyof predicted magnetisation curvesand the comparisonwith experimental measurements....

  2. Distinct magnetic signatures of fractional vortex configurations in multiband superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, R. M. da [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciência dos Materiais, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire, s/n, 50670-901 Recife-PE (Brazil); Milošević, M. V.; Peeters, F. M. [Departement Fysica, Universiteit Antwerpen, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Domínguez, D. [Centro Atómico Bariloche, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche, Río Negro (Argentina); Aguiar, J. Albino, E-mail: albino@df.ufpe.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire, s/n, 50670-901 Recife-PE (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciência dos Materiais, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire, s/n, 50670-901 Recife-PE (Brazil)

    2014-12-08

    Vortices carrying fractions of a flux quantum are predicted to exist in multiband superconductors, where vortex core can split between multiple band-specific components of the superconducting condensate. Using the two-component Ginzburg-Landau model, we examine such vortex configurations in a two-band superconducting slab in parallel magnetic field. The fractional vortices appear due to the band-selective vortex penetration caused by different thresholds for vortex entry within each band-condensate, and stabilize near the edges of the sample. We show that the resulting fractional vortex configurations leave distinct fingerprints in the static measurements of the magnetization, as well as in ac dynamic measurements of the magnetic susceptibility, both of which can be readily used for the detection of these fascinating vortex states in several existing multiband superconductors.

  3. Matched injection in a helical undulator taking into account the orbit amplitude and the longitudinal magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Papadichev, V A

    2002-01-01

    Helical undulators are widely used in FELs because they are inexpensive and easy to fabricate. Also, because field amplitudes can be conveniently adjusted with high accuracy. Their main weakness is their use of adiabatic input and output (up to 10 periods each) for matched injection (ejection) of the electron beam in the undulator field. This leads to considerable lengthening of the undulator and optical resonator, without simultaneously providing, in a number of cases, the required injection accuracy (due to some angle error and failure to account for orbit amplitude). Here alternative methods of matched injection are described that take into account orbit amplitude and external magnetic field. The length of correcting elements does not exceed one-half of the undulator period. When the overall length of the helical undulator is large, their application permits its realization in the form of a set of successive sections with free straight gaps in which devices can be placed for measuring beam parameters and c...

  4. Total Magnetic Field Signatures over Submarine HVDC Power Cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. M.; Tchernychev, M.; Johnston, J. M.; Tryggestad, J.

    2013-12-01

    Mikhail Tchernychev, Geometrics, Inc. Ross Johnson, Geometrics, Inc. Jeff Johnston, Geometrics, Inc. High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) technology is widely used to transmit electrical power over considerable distances using submarine cables. The most commonly known examples are the HVDC cable between Italy and Greece (160 km), Victoria-Tasmania (300 km), New Jersey - Long Island (82 km) and the Transbay cable (Pittsburg, California - San-Francisco). These cables are inspected periodically and their location and burial depth verified. This inspection applies to live and idle cables; in particular a survey company could be required to locate pieces of a dead cable for subsequent removal from the sea floor. Most HVDC cables produce a constant magnetic field; therefore one of the possible survey tools would be Marine Total Field Magnetometer. We present mathematical expressions of the expected magnetic fields and compare them with fields observed during actual surveys. We also compare these anomalies fields with magnetic fields produced by other long objects, such as submarine pipelines The data processing techniques are discussed. There include the use of Analytic Signal and direct modeling of Total Magnetic Field. The Analytic Signal analysis can be adapted using ground truth where available, but the total field allows better discrimination of the cable parameters, in particular to distinguish between live and idle cable. Use of a Transverse Gradiometer (TVG) allows for easy discrimination between cable and pipe line objects. Considerable magnetic gradient is present in the case of a pipeline whereas there is less gradient for the DC power cable. Thus the TVG is used to validate assumptions made during the data interpretation process. Data obtained during the TVG surveys suggest that the magnetic field of a live HVDC cable is described by an expression for two infinite long wires carrying current in opposite directions.

  5. Wavelet Analysis as a Tool to Localize Magnetic and Cross-helicity Events in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telloni, D.; Bruno, R.; D'Amicis, R.; Pietropaolo, E.; Carbone, V.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, we adopt the use of the wavelet transform as a new tool to investigate the time behavior at different scales of reduced magnetic helicity, cross-helicity, and residual energy in space plasmas. The main goal is a better characterization of the fluctuations in which interplanetary flux ropes are embedded. This kind of information is still missing in the present literature, and our tool can represent the basis for a new treatment of in situ measurements of this kind of event. There is a debate about the origins of small-scale flux ropes. It has been suggested that they are formed through magnetic reconnection in the solar wind, such as across the heliospheric current sheet. On the other hand, it has also been suggested that they are formed in the corona, similar to magnetic clouds. Thus, it looks like that there are two populations, one originating in the solar wind via magnetic reconnection across the current sheet in the inner heliosphere and the other originating in the corona. Small-scale flux ropes might be the remnants of the streamer belt blobs formed from disconnection; however, a one-to-one observation of a blob and a small-scale flux rope in the solar wind has yet to be found. Within this panorama of possibilities, this new technique appears to be very promising in investigating the origins of these objects advected by the solar wind.

  6. Cross-Scale Observational Signatures of Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Sabrina; Malaspina, David

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a significant mechanism for energy release across many astrophysical applications. In the solar atmosphere, reconnection is considered a primary contributor of flare evolution and coronal heating. Directly observing reconnection occurring in the solar atmosphere, however, is not trivial considering that the scale size of the diffusion region is magnitudes smaller than the observational capabilities of current instrumentation, and coronal magnetic field measurements are not currently sufficient to capture the process. Meanwhile, reconnection occurring in the Earth's magnetosphere transfers energy from the solar wind through a comparable process, although on vastly different scales. Magnetospheric measurements are made in situ rather than remotely; ergo, comparison of observations between the two regimes allows for potentially significant insight into reconnection as a stochastic and possibly turbulent process. We will present a set of observations from long-duration solar events and compare them to in situ measurements from the magnetosphere.

  7. Magnetic Signatures of Several Synthetic Iron Oxides Alteration Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyodo, Y.; Ona-Nguema, G.; Bonville, P.; Lagroix, F.

    2009-05-01

    The alteration of naturally occurring iron oxides and oxyhydroxides, under the influence of varying environmental conditions, including micro-environments and biological activity, is an important research topic because their connection to past climate variations remains to be elucidated. One approach to this subject matter is to perform laboratory experiments using synthetic iron oxides (sensus lato) subjected to specific physical and bio-chemical conditions. In our presentation, we will report on alteration experiments performed on synthetic lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) and maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) particles. A first approach consists in using the starting materials as electron acceptors in bio-reduction experiments involving the iron- reducing bacteria Shewanella putrefaciens and leading to the formation of magnetite (Fe3O4) particles. In a parallel approach, the starting materials are converted to magnetite by slow heating in CO/CO2 atmosphere. Further alteration can be done by slow heating in air, this time inducing aging and oxidation of the material. At various stages of our experiments, the samples are characterized using both magnetic (low-temperature, low-field and high-field magnetic measurements, Mossbaüer spectroscopy, etc.) and non-magnetic techniques (XRD, HRTEM, etc.). The various experiments conducted on these samples will allow us to study different pathways of magnetite formation and alteration in the environment, including solid-state conversion, partial or total dissolution/precipitation, and particles aggregation.

  8. Asteroseismic signatures of evolving internal stellar magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Cantiello, Matteo; Bildsten, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Recent asteroseismic analyses have revealed the presence of strong (B $\\gtrsim 10^5$ G) magnetic fields in the cores of many red giant stars. Here, we examine the implications of these results for the evolution of stellar magnetic fields, and we make predictions for future observations. Those stars with suppressed dipole modes indicative of strong core fields should exhibit moderate but detectable quadrupole mode suppression. The long magnetic diffusion times within stellar cores ensure that dynamo-generated fields are confined to mass coordinates within the main sequence convective core, and the observed sharp increase in dipole mode suppression rates above $1.5 \\, M_\\odot$ may be explained by the larger convective core masses and faster rotation of these more massive stars. In clump stars, core fields of $\\sim10^5 \\, {\\rm G}$ can suppress dipole modes, whose visibility should be equal to or less than the visibility of suppressed modes in ascending red giants. High dipole mode suppression rates in low-mass (...

  9. Magnetic signatures of ionospheric and magnetospheric current systems during geomagnetic quiet conditions - An overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Stolle, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    High-precision magnetic measurements taken by LEO satellites (flying at altitudes between 300 and 800 km) allow for studying the ionosphericand magnetospheric processes and electric currents that causes only weak magnetic signature of a few nanotesla during geomagnetic quiet conditions....... Of particular importance for this endeavour are multipoint observationsin space, such as provided by the Swarm satellite constellation mission, inorder to better characterize the space-time-structure of the current systems. Focusing on geomagnetic quiet conditions, we provide an overview of ionospheric...... and magnetospheric sources and illustrate their magnetic signatureswith Swarm satellite observations....

  10. Effect of a transverse magnetic field on the parameters of a trap using a combination of the second and third harmonics of a helical field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akshanov, B.S.; Pyatov, V.N.; Sebko, V.P.; Tyupa, V.I.

    1975-01-01

    In an analysis of the effect of a transverse magnetic field on the parameters of a trap using a combination of the second and third harmonics of a helical field, an averaging method is used to calculate the parameters of a hybrid (l = 2 plus l = 3) stellarator magnetic trap in a homogeneous, external, transverse magnetic field B/sub perpendicular/. The stabilizing effect of the second harmonic of the magnetic field on the configuration is discussed.

  11. Two novel CPs with double helical chains based rigid tripodal ligands: Syntheses, crystal structures, magnetic susceptibility and fluorescence properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Hou, Xiang-Yang; Zhai, Quan-Guo; Hu, Man-Cheng

    2016-11-01

    Two three-dimensional coordination polymers (CPs), namely [Cd(bpydb)- (H2bpydb)]n·0.5nH2O (1), and [Cu2(bpydb)2]n (2) (2,6-di-p-carboxyphenyl-4,4'- bipyridine1 = H2bpydb), containing a novel double-helical chains, which have been solvothermal synthesized, characterized, and structure determination. CPs 1-2 reveal the new (3,5)-net and (3,6)-net alb topology, respectively. The fluorescence properties of CPs 1-2 were investigated, and magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate that compound 1 has dominating antiferromagnetic couplings between metal ions.

  12. Magnetic and geochemical signatures of flood layers in lake sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Støren, Eivind; Paasche, Øyvind; Hirt, Ann; Kumari, Monika

    2016-04-01

    Floods carry sediments that quickly become deposited whenever rivers meet lakes. In catchments that are subjected to repeated flooding, downstream lakes can therefore contain record of past events across multiple timescales. High-resolution core scanning analyses such as X-ray fluorescence (XRF) scanning and magnetic susceptibility (MS) return data that are frequently used to detect flood layers in soft sediment archives such as lakes, fjords and ocean basins. In order to delineate the copious information that can be extracted from soft sediment records we have explored ways in which high-resolution data can be utilized and subsequently vetted by high-precision measurements. By combining magnetic hysteresis measurements and first-order reversal curves (FORCs) with inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES) measurements of chemical elements on 36 samples, important information not only about flood dynamics and variability are acquired, but also sources of noise in high-resolution scanning techniques are identified. Specifically, we show that a lake flood record from Southern Norway containing ˜ 100 floods distributed over 10 000 years can be sub-divided into at least two groups, suggested to contain floods generated by spring snow melting and intense summer rainstorms. The temporal evolution of this pattern shows a marked shift towards spring floods around 2000 years ago compared to the earlier part of the record. The approach presented here is of universal character and should be applicable to all kinds of soft sediment archives.

  13. Helical plasma thruster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beklemishev, A. D., E-mail: bekl@bk.ru [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    A new scheme of plasma thruster is proposed. It is based on axial acceleration of rotating magnetized plasmas in magnetic field with helical corrugation. The idea is that the propellant ionization zone can be placed into the local magnetic well, so that initially the ions are trapped. The E × B rotation is provided by an applied radial electric field that makes the setup similar to a magnetron discharge. Then, from the rotating plasma viewpoint, the magnetic wells of the helically corrugated field look like axially moving mirror traps. Specific shaping of the corrugation can allow continuous acceleration of trapped plasma ions along the magnetic field by diamagnetic forces. The accelerated propellant is expelled through the expanding field of magnetic nozzle. By features of the acceleration principle, the helical plasma thruster may operate at high energy densities but requires a rather high axial magnetic field, which places it in the same class as the VASIMR{sup ®} rocket engine.

  14. Impact of magnetic topology on radial electric field profile in the scrape-off layer of the Large Helical Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Y.; Ida, K.; Kamiya, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Tsuchiya, H.; Kobayashi, M.; Kawamura, G.; Ohdachi, S.; Sakakibara, S.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Hudson, S.; Feng, Y.; Yamada, I.; Yasuhara, R.; Tanaka, K.; Akiyama, T.; Morisaki, T.; The LHD Experiment Group

    2016-09-01

    The radial electric field in the plasma edge is studied in the Large Helical Device (LHD) experiments. When magnetic field lines become stochastic or open at the plasma edge and connected to the vessel, electrons are lost faster than ions along these field lines. Then, a positive electric field appears in the plasma edge. The radial electric field profile can be used to detect the effective plasma boundary. Magnetic topology is an important issue in stellarator and tokamak research because the 3D boundary has the important role of controlling MHD edge stability with respect to ELMs, and plasma detachment. Since the stochastic magnetic field layer can be controlled in the LHD by changing the preset vacuum magnetic axis, this device is a good platform to study the properties of the radial electric field that appear with the different stochastic layer width. Two magnetic configurations with different widths of the stochastic layer as simulated in vacuum are studied for low-β discharges. It has been found that a positive electric field appeared outside of the last closed flux surface. In fact the positions of the positive electric field are found in the boundary between of the stochastic layer and the scrape-off layer. To understand where is the boundary of the stochastic layer and the scrape-off layer, the magnetic field lines are analyzed statistically. The variance of the magnetic field lines in the stochastic layer is increased outwards for both configurations. However, the skewness, which means the asymmetry of the distribution of the magnetic field line, increases for only one configuration. If the skewness is large, the connection length becomes effectively short. Since that is consistent with the experimental observation, the radial electric field can be considered as an index of the magnetic topology.

  15. Generation of the magnetic helicity in a neutron star driven by the electroweak electron-nucleon interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Dvornikov, Maxim

    2015-01-01

    We study the instability of magnetic fields in a neutron star core driven by the parity violating part of the electron-nucleon interaction in the Standard Model. Assuming a seed field of the order $10^{12}\\thinspace\\text{G}$, that is a common value for pulsars, one obtains its amplification due to such a novel mechanism by about five orders of magnitude, up to $10^{17}\\thinspace\\text{G}$, at time scales $\\sim (10^3 - 10^5)\\thinspace\\text{yr}$. This effect is suggested to be a possible explanation of the origin of the strongest magnetic fields observed in magnetars. The growth of a seed magnetic field energy density is stipulated by the corresponding growth of the magnetic helicity density due to the presence of the anomalous electric current in the Maxwell equation. Such an anomaly is the sum of the two competitive effects: (i) the chiral magnetic effect driven by the difference of chemical potentials for the right and left handed massless electrons and (ii) constant chiral electroweak electron-nucleon intera...

  16. Polarization Signatures distinguish the kinetic- and the magnetic-driven blazar jet models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haocheng; Li, Hui; Taylor, Gregory B.

    2017-01-01

    Blazars are a type of active galaxies whose jets direct close to our line of sight. They exhibit strong variability across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, from radio up to TeV gamma-rays. The radio to optical polarization signatures, which originate from synchrotron emission in a partially ordered magnetic field, show strong variability as well. Two scenarios have been advanced to explain the blazar variability. The kinetic-driven model argues that the emission region can drain kinetic energy through shocks to accelerate nonthermal particles and generate flares. The magnetic-driven model suggests that the magnetic energy can dissipate through current-driven instabilities to fuel the variability. Both models have their merits in understanding blazar spectra and light curves during flares, thus they cannot be distinguished. We perform comprehensive polarization-dependent radiation modeling of shocks and kink instabilities in the blazar emission region, based on detailed relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) simulations. Our approach involves self-consistent magnetic field evolution, nonthermal particle injection based on the energy release from the RMHD simulation, and detailed radiation transfer including all light travel time effects. Hence our method offers the self-consistent time-dependent radiation and polarization signatures from first principles. By comparing the shock and the kink models, we find that while both can interpret the light curves well, the shock model generally produce too strong polarization variations compared to observations. On the other hand, the kink model well fits the general polarization fluctuations and polarization angle swings. We conclude that by coupling first-principle simulations and detailed polarization-dependent radiaiton modeling, polarization signatures can probe the origin of the blazar jet variability, and offer a general diagnostic of the jet physics, including the energy composition, the particle acceleration, and

  17. Helicity-dependent all-optical switching in hybrid metal-ferromagnet structures for ultrafast magnetic data storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Feng

    The emerging Big Data era demands the rapidly increasing need for speed and capacity of storing and processing information. Standalone magnetic recording devices, such as hard disk drives (HDDs), have always been playing a central role in modern data storage and continuously advancing. Recognizing the growing capacity gap between the demand and production, industry has pushed the bit areal density in HDDs to 900 Giga-bit/square-inch, a remarkable 450-million-fold increase since the invention of the first hard disk drive in 1956. However, the further development of HDD capacity is facing a pressing challenge, the so-called superparamagnetic effect, that leads to the loss of information when a single bit becomes too small to preserve the magnetization. This requires new magnetic recording technologies that can write more stable magnetic bits into hard magnetic materials. Recent research has shown that it is possible to use ultrafast laser pulses to switch the magnetization in certain types of magnetic thin films. Surprisingly, such a process does not require an externally applied magnetic field that always exists in conventional HDDs. Furthermore, the optically induced magnetization switching is extremely fast, up to sub-picosecond (10 -12 s) level, while with traditional recording method the deterministic switching does not take place shorter than 20 ps. It's worth noting that the direction of magnetization is related to the helicity of the incident laser pulses. Namely, the right-handed polarized laser pulses will generate magnetization pointing in one direction while left-handed polarized laser pulses generate magnetization pointing in the other direction. This so-called helicity-dependent all-optical switching (HD-AOS) phenomenon can be potentially used in the next-generation of magnetic storage systems. In this thesis, I explore the HD-AOS phenomenon in hybrid metal-ferromagnet structures, which consist of gold and Co/Pt multilayers. The experiment results show

  18. Long-period helical structures and twist-grain boundary phases induced by chemical substitution in the Mn1 -x(Co,Rh ) xGe chiral magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, N.; Deutsch, M.; Chaboussant, G.; Damay, F.; Bonville, P.; Fomicheva, L. N.; Tsvyashchenko, A. V.; Rössler, U. K.; Mirebeau, I.

    2017-07-01

    We study the evolution of helical magnetism in MnGe chiral magnet upon partial substitution of Mn for 3 d -Co and 4 d -Rh ions. At high doping levels, we observe spin helices with very long periods—more than ten times larger than in the pure compound—and sizable ordered moments. This behavior calls for a change in the energy balance of interactions leading to the stabilization of the observed magnetic structures. Strikingly, neutron scattering unambiguously shows a double periodicity in the observed spectra at x =0.5 and >0.2 for Co- and Rh-doping, respectively. In analogy with observations made in smectic liquid crystals, we suggest that it may reveal the presence of magnetic "twist grain boundary" phases, involving a dense short-range correlated network of magnetic screw dislocations. The dislocation cores are here tentatively described as smooth textures, made of nonradial double-core skyrmions.

  19. Magnetic Configuration Effects on Fast Ion Losses Induced by Fast Ion Driven Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes in the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, K. [Nagoya University, Japan; Isobe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Watanabe, F. [Kyoto University, Japan; Spong, Donald A [ORNL; Shimizu, A. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Osakabe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Ohdachi, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Sakakibara, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan

    2012-01-01

    Beam-ion losses induced by fast-ion-driven toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) were measured with a scintillator-based lost fast-ion probe (SLIP) in the large helical device (LHD). The SLIP gave simultaneously the energy E and the pitch angle chi = arccos(v(parallel to)/v) distribution of the lost fast ions. The loss fluxes were investigated for three typical magnetic configurations of R{sub ax{_}vac} = 3.60 m, 3.75 m, and 3.90 m, where R{sub ax{_}vac} is the magnetic axis position of the vacuum field. Dominant losses induced by TAEs in these three configurations were observed in the E/chi regions of 50 similar to 190 keV/40 degrees, 40 similar to 170 keV/25 degrees, and 30 similar to 190 keV/30 degrees, respectively. Lost-ion fluxes induced by TAEs depend clearly on the amplitude of TAE magnetic fluctuations, R{sub ax{_}vac} and the toroidal field strength B{sub t}. The increment of the loss fluxes has the dependence of (b{sub TAE}/B{sub t}){sup s}. The power s increases from s = 1 to 3 with the increase of the magnetic axis position in finite beta plasmas.

  20. Experimental signature of the attractive Coulomb force between positive and negative magnetic monopoles in spin ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, C.; Giblin, S. R.; Lhotel, E.; Prabhakaran, D.; Balakrishnan, G.; Matsuhira, K.; Bramwell, S. T.

    2016-07-01

    A non-Ohmic current that grows exponentially with the square root of applied electric field is well known from thermionic field emission (the Schottky effect), electrolytes (the second Wien effect) and semiconductors (the Poole-Frenkel effect). It is a universal signature of the attractive Coulomb force between positive and negative electrical charges, which is revealed as the charges are driven in opposite directions by the force of an applied electric field. Here we apply thermal quenches to spin ice to prepare metastable populations of bound pairs of positive and negative emergent magnetic monopoles at millikelvin temperatures. We find that the application of a magnetic field results in a universal exponential-root field growth of magnetic current, thus confirming the microscopic Coulomb force between the magnetic monopole quasiparticles and establishing a magnetic analogue of the Poole-Frenkel effect. At temperatures above 300 mK, gradual restoration of kinetic monopole equilibria causes the non-Ohmic current to smoothly evolve into the high-field Wien effect for magnetic monopoles, as confirmed by comparison to a recent and rigorous theory of the Wien effect in spin ice. Our results extend the universality of the exponential-root field form into magnetism and illustrate the power of emergent particle kinetics to describe far-from-equilibrium response in complex systems.

  1. Matched injection in a helical undulator taking into account the orbit amplitude and the longitudinal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadichev, V. A.

    2002-05-01

    Helical undulators are widely used in FELs because they are inexpensive and easy to fabricate. Also, because field amplitudes can be conveniently adjusted with high accuracy. Their main weakness is their use of adiabatic input and output (up to 10 periods each) for matched injection (ejection) of the electron beam in the undulator field. This leads to considerable lengthening of the undulator and optical resonator, without simultaneously providing, in a number of cases, the required injection accuracy (due to some angle error and failure to account for orbit amplitude). Here alternative methods of matched injection are described that take into account orbit amplitude and external magnetic field. The length of correcting elements does not exceed one-half of the undulator period. When the overall length of the helical undulator is large, their application permits its realization in the form of a set of successive sections with free straight gaps in which devices can be placed for measuring beam parameters and correction of the trajectory.

  2. Three-Dimensional Signatures of Intermittent Magnetic Reconnection in Global Simulations of Dayside Magnetosphere Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, M.M.; Sibeck, D.; Hesse, M.; Rastatter, L.; Toth, G.

    2008-01-01

    We performed high resolution global MHD simulations of THEMIS dayside crossings events in May -June 2007. We found that magnetopause surface is not in steady-state even during extended periods of steady solar wind conditions. The so-called tilted reconnection lines become unstable due to formation of pressure bubbles, strong core field flux tubes, vortices, and traveling magnetic field cavities. The topology of FTEs differ from that in two dimension cartoons representing obliquely oriented quasi-2D flux rope. The structure of FTE is changing at spatial scales of 1 -2 Re. Closely located space probes can observe completely different signatures. Branches of bent flux rope can move in opposite directions. THEMIS and Cluster observations are consistent with signatures predicted by simulations.

  3. Investigation of Magnetic Signatures and Microstructures for Heat-Treated Ferritic/Martensitic HT-9 Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henager, Charles H.; McCloy, John S.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Edwards, Danny J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan

    2013-05-01

    There is increased interest in improved methods for in-situ nondestructive interrogation of materials for nuclear reactors in order to ensure reactor safety and quantify material degradation (particularly embrittlement) prior to failure. Therefore, a prototypical ferritic/martensitic alloy, HT-9, of interest to the nuclear materials community was investigated to assess microstructure effects on micromagnetics measurements – Barkhausen noise emission, magnetic hysteresis measurements, and first-order reversal curve analysis – for samples with three different heat-treatments. Microstructural and physical measurements consisted of high-precision density, resonant ultrasound elastic constant determination, Vickers microhardness, grain size, and texture. These were varied in the HT-9 alloy samples and related to various magnetic signatures. In parallel, a meso-scale microstructure model was created for alpha iron and effects of polycrystallinity and demagnetization factor were explored. It was observed that Barkhausen noise emission decreased with increasing hardness and decreasing grain size (lath spacing) while coercivity increased. The results are discussed in terms of the use of magnetic signatures for nondestructive interrogation of radiation damage and other microstructural changes in ferritic/martensitic alloys.

  4. The Promise of Future VSOP-2 Observations for Studies of Helical Magnetic Fields and Their Evolution in Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, M.; Gabuzda, D.

    2009-08-01

    We present here results of an observational search for Faraday Rotation Measure (RM) gradients transverse to the VLBI jet direction in a sample of BL Lac objects that provide evidence for the presence of helical magnetic fields wrapped around the jets. This project has revealed new transverse RM gradients in several sources. In at least three sources, we observe new features, such as reversal of the transverse RM gradient with time or distance from the core. We discuss how these gradients could potentially be used to infer the intrinsic magnetic field configuration of the region surrounding the central black hole (e.g. dipolar, quadropolar; Blandford 2008). The use of 8 GHz VSOP-2 polarization observations in combination with ground VLBI polarization observations at higher frequencies will give us even higher angular resolution to probe in the central regions of the jet, enabling more accurate determination of the RM gradients on smaller scales, and could help identify possible counter-jets in some sources, which could provide a test for the magnetic field configuration of the black hole.

  5. Signature of magnetic-dependent gapless odd frequency states at superconductor/ferromagnet interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bernardo, A; Diesch, S; Gu, Y; Linder, J; Divitini, G; Ducati, C; Scheer, E; Blamire, M G; Robinson, J W A

    2015-01-01

    The theory of superconductivity developed by Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer (BCS) explains the stabilization of electron pairs into a spin-singlet, even frequency, state by the formation of an energy gap within which the density of states is zero. At a superconductor interface with an inhomogeneous ferromagnet, a gapless odd frequency superconducting state is predicted, in which the Cooper pairs are in a spin-triplet state. Although indirect evidence for such a state has been obtained, the gap structure and pairing symmetry have not so far been determined. Here we report scanning tunnelling spectroscopy of Nb superconducting films proximity coupled to epitaxial Ho. These measurements reveal pronounced changes to the Nb subgap superconducting density of states on driving the Ho through a metamagnetic transition from a helical antiferromagnetic to a homogeneous ferromagnetic state for which a BCS-like gap is recovered. The results prove odd frequency spin-triplet superconductivity at superconductor/inhomogeneous magnet interfaces.

  6. The Influence of Helical Magnetic Fields in the Dynamics and Emission of Relativistic Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Roca-Sogorb, M; Gómez, J L; Martí, J M; Antón, L; Aloy, M A; Agudo, I

    2008-01-01

    We present numerical relativistic magnetohydrodynamic and emission simulations aimed to study the role played by the magnetic field in the dynamics and emission of relativistic jets in Active Galactic Nuclei. We focus our analysis on the study of the emission from recollimation shocks since they may provide an interpretation for the stationary components seen at parsec-scales in multiple sources. We show that the relative brightness of the knots associated with the recollimation shocks decreases with increasing jet magnetization, suggesting that jets presenting stationary components may have a relatively weak magnetization, with magnetic fields of the order of equipartition or below.

  7. Optical Signatures from Magnetic 2-D Electron Gases in High Magnetic Fields to 60 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crooker, S.A.; Kikkawa, J.M.; Awschalom, D.D.; Smorchikova, I.P.; Samarth, N.

    1998-11-08

    We present experiments in the 60 Tesla Long-Pulse magnet at the Los Alamos National High Magnetic Field Lab (NHMFL) focusing on the high-field, low temperature photoluminescence (PL) from modulation-doped ZnSe/Zn(Cd,Mn)Se single quantum wells. High-speed charge-coupled array detectors and the long (2 second) duration of the magnet pulse permit continuous acquisition of optical spectra throughout a single magnet shot. High-field PL studies of the magnetic 2D electron gases at temperatures down to 350mK reveal clear intensity oscillations corresponding to integer quantum Hall filling factors, from which we determine the density of the electron gas. At very high magnetic fields, steps in the PL energy are observed which correspond to the partial unlocking of antiferromagnetically bound pairs of Mn2+ spins.

  8. Generation of Helical and Axial Magnetic Fields by the Relativistic Laser Pulses in Under-dense Plasma: Three-Dimensional Particle-in-Cell Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chun-Yang; Zhu, Shao-Ping; He, Xian-Tu

    2002-07-01

    The quasi-static magnetic fields created in the interaction of relativistic laser pulses with under-dense plasmas have been investigated by three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. The relativistic ponderomotive force can drive an intense electron current in the laser propagation direction, which is responsible for the generation of a helical magnetic field. The axial magnetic field results from a difference beat of wave-wave, which drives a solenoidal current. In particular, the physical significance of the kinetic model for the generation of the axial magnetic field is discussed.

  9. Helicity scalings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plunian, F [ISTerre, CNRS, Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France); Lessinnes, T; Carati, D [Physique Statistique et Plasmas, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium); Stepanov, R, E-mail: Franck.Plunian@ujf-grenoble.fr [Institute of Continuous Media Mechanics of the Russian Academy of Science, Perm (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-22

    Using a helical shell model of turbulence, Chen et al. (2003) showed that both helicity and energy dissipate at the Kolmogorov scale, independently from any helicity input. This is in contradiction with a previous paper by Ditlevsen and Giuliani (2001) in which, using a GOY shell model of turbulence, they found that helicity dissipates at a scale larger than the Kolmogorov scale, and does depend on the helicity input. In a recent paper by Lessinnes et al. (2011), we showed that this discrepancy is due to the fact that in the GOY shell model only one helical mode (+ or -) is present at each scale instead of both modes in the helical shell model. Then, using the GOY model, the near cancellation of the helicity flux between the + and - modes cannot occur at small scales, as it should be in true turbulence. We review the main results with a focus on the numerical procedure needed to obtain accurate statistics.

  10. Fundamental mechanism for all-optical helicity-dependent switching of magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Switching magnetizations with femtosecond circularly polarized lasers may have revolutionary impacts on magnetic data storage and relevant applications. Achievements in ferrimagnetic and ferromagnetic materials of various structures strongly imply a general phenomenon of fundamental atom-laser interaction. Rotating an atom’s wave function with the rotating electric field of a circularly polarized laser, I show the quantum mechanics for the atom is equivalent to that in a static electric field of the same magnitude and a tremendous static magnetic field which interacts with the atom in somewhat different ways. When some conditions are satisfied, transitions of atoms in these two crossed effective fields lead to a highly nonequilibrium state with orbital magnetic moments inclining to the effective magnetic field. The switching finally completes after the pulse duration via relaxation. PMID:28117460

  11. Helical surface structures

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, A; Brandenburg, Axel; Blackman, Eric G.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past few years there has been growing interest in helical magnetic field structures seen at the solar surface, in coronal mass ejections, as well as in the solar wind. Although there is a great deal of randomness in the data, on average the extended structures are mostly left-handed on the northern hemisphere and right-handed on the southern. Surface field structures are also classified as dextral (= right bearing) and sinistral (= left bearing) occurring preferentially in the northern and southern hemispheres respectively. Of particular interest here is a quantitative measurement of the associated emergence rates of helical structures, which translate to magnetic helicity fluxes. In this review, we give a brief survey of what has been found so far and what is expected based on models. Particular emphasis is put on the scale dependence of the associated fields and an attempt is made to estimate the helicity flux of the mean field vs. fluctuating field.

  12. Temporal and spatial relationship of flare signatures and the force-free coronal magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Thalmann, Julia K; Su, Yang

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the plasma and magnetic environment of active region NOAA 11261 on 2 August 2011 around a GOES M1.4 flare/CME (SOL2011-08-02T06:19). We compare coronal emission at (extreme) ultraviolet and X-ray wavelengths, using SDO AIA and RHESSI images, in order to identify the relative timing and locations of reconnection-related sources. We trace flare ribbon signatures at ultraviolet wavelengths, in order to pin down the intersection of previously reconnected flaring loops at the lower solar atmosphere. These locations are used to calculate field lines from 3D nonlinear force-free magnetic field models, established on the basis of SDO HMI photospheric vector magnetic field maps. With this procedure, we analyze the quasi-static time evolution of the coronal model magnetic field previously involved in magnetic reconnection. This allows us, for the first time, to estimate the elevation speed of the current sheet's lower tip during an on-disk observed flare, as a few kilometers per second. Comparison to pos...

  13. Magnetic signature of overbank sediment in industry impacted floodplains identified by data mining methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudaničová, Monika; Hutchinson, Simon M.

    2016-11-01

    Our study attempts to identify a characteristic magnetic signature of overbank sediments exhibiting anthropogenically induced magnetic enhancement and thereby to distinguish them from unenhanced sediments with weak magnetic background values, using a novel approach based on data mining methods, thus providing a mean of rapid pollution determination. Data were obtained from 539 bulk samples from vertical profiles through overbank sediment, collected on seven rivers in the eastern Czech Republic and three rivers in northwest England. k-Means clustering and hierarchical clustering methods, paired group (UPGMA) and Ward's method, were used to divide the samples to natural groups according to their attributes. Interparametric ratios: SIRM/χ; SIRM/ARM; and S-0.1T were chosen as attributes for analyses making the resultant model more widely applicable as magnetic concentration values can differ by two orders. Division into three clusters appeared to be optimal and corresponded to inherent clusters in the data scatter. Clustering managed to separate samples with relatively weak anthropogenically induced enhancement, relatively strong anthropogenically induced enhancement and samples lacking enhancement. To describe the clusters explicitly and thus obtain a discrete magnetic signature, classification rules (JRip method) and decision trees (J4.8 and Simple Cart methods) were used. Samples lacking anthropogenic enhancement typically exhibited an S-0.1T 0.5. Samples with relatively stronger anthropogenic enhancement were unequivocally distinguished from the samples with weaker enhancement by an SIRM/ARM > c. 150. Samples with SIRM/ARM in a range c. 126-150 were classified as relatively strongly enhanced when their SIRM/χ > 18 000 A m-1 and relatively less enhanced when their SIRM/χ 6 per cent from anthropogenically enhanced clusters as samples with natural magnetic enhancement. The characteristics of the clusters resulted mainly from the relationship between SIRM/ARM and

  14. Selection of the optimum magnet design for the International Linear Collider positron source helical undulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Scott

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A comparison of possible undulator designs for the International Linear Collider positron source has resulted in a superconducting bifilar wire design being selected. After a comprehensive paper study and fabrication of the two preeminent designs, the superconducting undulator was chosen instead of the permanent magnet alternative. This was because of its superior performance in terms of magnetic field strength and quality, operational flexibility, risk of radiation damage, ease in achieving the required vacuum, and cost. The superconducting undulator design will now be developed into a complete system design for the full 200 m long magnet that is required.

  15. Transport signatures of Kondo physics and quantum criticality in graphene with magnetic impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Tijerina, David A.; Dias da Silva, Luis G. G. V.

    2017-03-01

    Localized magnetic moments have been predicted to develop in graphene samples with vacancies or adsorbates. The interplay between such magnetic impurities and graphene's Dirac quasiparticles leads to remarkable many-body phenomena, which have, so far, proved elusive to experimental efforts. In this article we study the thermodynamic, spectral, and transport signatures of quantum criticality and Kondo physics of a dilute ensemble of atomic impurities in graphene. We consider vacancies and adatoms that either break or preserve graphene's C3 v and inversion symmetries. In a neutral graphene sample, all cases display symmetry-dependent quantum criticality, leading to enhanced impurity scattering for asymmetric impurities, in a manner analogous to bound-state formation by nonmagnetic resonant scatterers. Kondo correlations emerge only in the presence of a back gate, with estimated Kondo temperatures well within the experimentally accessible domain for all impurity types. For symmetry-breaking impurities at charge neutrality, quantum criticality is signaled by T-2 resistivity scaling, leading to full insulating behavior at low temperatures, while low-temperature resistivity plateaus appear both in the noncritical and Kondo regimes. By contrast, the resistivity contribution from symmetric vacancies and hollow-site adsorbates vanishes at charge neutrality and for arbitrary back-gate voltages, respectively. This implies that local probing methods are required for the detection of both Kondo and quantum critical signatures in these symmetry-preserving cases.

  16. Chinks in Solar Dynamo Theory: Turbulent Diffusion, Dynamo Waves and Magnetic Helicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLuca, E. E.; Wagner, William J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the generation of magnetic fields in the Sun using two-dimensional and three-dimensional numerical simulations. The results of our investigations have been presented at scientific meetings and published.

  17. Thermal expansion and magnetovolume studies of the itinerant helical magnet MnSi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, A. E.; Stishov, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    Thermal expansion and forced magnetostriction of MnSi were measured as a function of temperature down to 5 K and magnetic field to 3 T. The small length (volume) discontinuity at the magnetic phase transition in MnSi decreases with application of magnetic field to a value Δ L /L ˜10-7 , and then suddenly the discontinuity seemingly jumps to zero. Thermal expansivity peaks strongly deteriorate with magnetic fields. No specific features identifying a tricritical point were observed. We propose that the Frenkel concept of heterophase fluctuations may be relevant in the current case. Therefore, we suggest that the magnetic phase transition in MnSi always remains first order at any temperature and magnetic field, but the transition is progressively smoothed by heterophase fluctuations. These results question the applicability of a model of a fluctuation-induced first-order phase transition for MnSi. Probably a model of coupling of an order parameter with other degrees of freedom is more appropriate.

  18. Effect of neutral hydrogen on edge impurity behavior in stochastic magnetic field layer of Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, S., E-mail: morita@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Kobayashi, M.; Oishi, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Zhang, H.M. [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Goto, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Cui, Z.Y.; Dong, C.F. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan (China); Hu, L.Q. [Institute of Plasma Physics, P.O.Box 1126, Hefei 230031, Anhui (China); Huang, X.L. [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Kawamura, G.; Masuzaki, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Murakami, I. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Wang, E.H. [Institute of Plasma Physics, P.O.Box 1126, Hefei 230031, Anhui (China)

    2015-08-15

    Two-dimensional (2-D) distribution of impurity line emissions has been measured with 2-D extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectroscopy in Large Helical Device (LHD) for studying the edge impurity transport in stochastic magnetic field layer with three-dimensional (3-D) structure. The impurity behavior in the vicinity of two X-points at inboard and outboard sides of the toroidal plasma can be separately examined with the 2-D measurement. As a result, it is found that the carbon location changes from inboard to outboard X-points when the plasma axis is shifted from R{sub ax} = 3.6 m to 3.75 m. A 3-D simulation with EMC3-EIRENE code agrees with the result at R{sub ax} = 3.75 m but disagreed with the result at R{sub ax} = 3.60 m. The discrepancy between the measurement and simulation at R{sub ax} = 3.60 m is considerably reduced when an effect of neutral hydrogen localized in the inboard side is taken into account, which can modify the density gradient and friction force along the magnetic field.

  19. Hybrid helical snakes and rotators for RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courant, E.D.

    1995-06-13

    The spin rotators and Siberian snakes presently envisaged for RHIC utilize helical dipole magnets. The snakes and the rotators each consist of four helices, each with a full twist (360{degrees}) of the field. Here we investigate an alternate layout, namely combinations of helical and pure bending magnet, and show that this may have advantages.

  20. Conductance through a helical state in an Indium antimonide nanowire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammhuber, J; Cassidy, M C; Pei, F; Nowak, M P; Vuik, A; Gül, Ö; Car, D; Plissard, S R; Bakkers, E P A M; Wimmer, M; Kouwenhoven, L P

    2017-09-07

    The motion of an electron and its spin are generally not coupled. However in a one-dimensional material with strong spin-orbit interaction (SOI) a helical state may emerge at finite magnetic fields, where electrons of opposite spin will have opposite momentum. The existence of this helical state has applications for spin filtering and cooper pair splitter devices and is an essential ingredient for realizing topologically protected quantum computing using Majorana zero modes. Here, we report measurements of a quantum point contact in an indium antimonide nanowire. At magnetic fields exceeding 3 T, the 2 e (2)/h conductance plateau shows a re-entrant feature toward 1 e (2)/h which increases linearly in width with magnetic field. Rotating the magnetic field clearly attributes this experimental signature to SOI and by comparing our observations with a numerical model we extract a spin-orbit energy of approximately 6.5 meV, which is stronger than the spin-orbit energy obtained by other methods.Indium antimonide nanowires have large spin-orbit coupling, which can give rise to helical states that are an important part of proposals for topological quantum computing. Here the authors measure conductance through the helical states and extract a larger spin-orbit energy than obtained before.

  1. Iron oxide nanoparticles with sizes, shapes and compositions resulting in different magnetization signatures as potential labels for multiparametric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Montferrand, Caroline; Hu, Ling; Milosevic, Irena; Russier, Vincent; Bonnin, Dominique; Motte, Laurence; Brioude, Arnaud; Lalatonne, Yoann

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles differing in their size, shape (spherical, hexagonal, rods, cubes) and composition have been synthesized and modified using caffeic acid for transfer to aqueous media and stabilization of the particle suspensions at physiological pH. A super quantum interference device and the recently patented magnetic sensor MIAplex®, which registered a signal proportional to the second derivative of the magnetization curve, were used to study the magnetization behavior of the nanoparticles. The differences in the magnetic signatures of the nanoparticles (spheres and rods) make them promising candidates for the simultaneous detection of different types of biological molecules.

  2. Dynamic Chiral Magnetic Effect and Faraday Rotation in Macroscopically Disordered Helical Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, J.; Pesin, D. A.

    2017-03-01

    We develop an effective medium theory for electromagnetic wave propagation through gapless nonuniform systems with a dynamic chiral magnetic effect. The theory allows us to calculate macroscopic-disorder-induced corrections to the values of optical, as well as chiral magnetic conductivities. In particular, we show that spatial fluctuations of the optical conductivity induce corrections to the effective value of the chiral magnetic conductivity. The absolute value of the effect varies strongly depending on the system parameters, but yields the leading frequency dependence of the polarization rotation and circular dichroism signals. Experimentally, these corrections can be observed as features in the Faraday rotation angle near frequencies that correspond to the bulk plasmon resonances of a material. Such features are not expected to be present in single-crystal samples.

  3. Generation of Helical and Axial Magnetic Fields by the Relativistic Laser Pulses in Under-dense Plasma: Three-Dimensional Particle-in-Cell Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑春阳; 朱少平; 贺贤土

    2002-01-01

    The quasi-static magnetic fields created in the interaction of relativistic laser pulses with under-dense plasmashave been investigated by three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. The relativistic ponderomotive force candrive an intense electron current in the laser propagation direction, which is responsible for the generation ofa helical magnetic field. The axial magnetic field results from a difference beat of wave-wave, which drives asolenoidal current. In particular, the physical significance of the kinetic model for the generation of the axialmagnetic field is discussed.

  4. The Great Solar Active Region NOAA 12192: Helicity Transport, Filament Formation, and Impact on the Polar Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Gordon; McMaken, Tyler C.

    2017-08-01

    The solar active region (AR), NOAA 12192, appeared in 2014 October as the largest AR in 24 years. Here we examine the counterintuitive nature of two diffusion-driven processes in the region: the role of helicity buildup in the formation of a major filament, and the relationship between the effects of supergranular diffusion and meridional flow on the AR and on the polar field. Quantitatively, calculations of current helicity and magnetic twist from Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) vector magnetograms indicate that, though AR 12192 emerged with negative helicity, positive helicity from subsequent flux emergence, consistent with the hemispheric sign-preference of helicity, increased over time within large-scale, weak-field regions such as those near the polarity inversion line (PIL). Morphologically, Atmospheric Imaging Assembly observations of filament barbs, sigmoidal patterns, and bases of Fe xii stalks initially exhibited signatures of negative helicity, and the long filament that subsequently formed had a strong positive helicity consistent with the helicity buildup along the PIL. We find from full-disk HMI magnetograms that AR 12192's leading positive flux was initially closer to the equator but, owing either to the region’s magnetic surroundings or to its asymmetric flux density distribution, was transported poleward more quickly on average than its trailing negative flux, contrary to the canonical pattern of bipole flux transport. This behavior caused the AR to have a smaller effect on the polar fields than expected and enabled the formation of the very long neutral line where the filament formed.

  5. Helical temperature perturbations associated with radially asymmetric magnetic island chains in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2016-12-01

    The simple analysis of Rutherford [Phys. Fluids 16, 1903 (1973)] is generalized in order to incorporate radial magnetic island asymmetry into the nonlinear theory of tearing mode stability in a low-β, large aspect-ratio, quasi-cylindrical, tokamak plasma. The calculation is restricted to cases in which the radial shifts of the island X- and O-points are (almost) equal and opposite. For the sake of simplicity, the calculation concentrates on a particular (but fairly general) class of radially asymmetric island magnetic flux-surfaces that can all be mapped to the same symmetric flux-surfaces by means of a suitable coordinate transform. The combination of island asymmetry (in which the radial shifts of the X- and O-points are almost equal and opposite) and temperature-induced changes in the inductive current profile in the immediate vicinity of the island is found to have no effect on tearing mode stability.

  6. An Improved Neoclassical Drift-Magnetohydrodynamical Fluid Model of Helical Magnetic Island Equilibria in Tokamak Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the perturbed ion polarization current on the stability of neoclassical tearing modes is calculated using an improved, neoclassical, four-field, drift-MHD model. The calculation involves the self-consistent determination of the pressure and scalar electric potential profiles in the vicinity of the associated magnetic island chain, which allows the chain's propagation velocity to be fixed. Two regimes are considered. First, a regime in which neoclassical ion poloidal flow damping is not strong enough to enhance the magnitude of the polarization current (relative to that found in slab geometry). Second, a regime in which neoclassical ion poloidal flow damping is strong enough to significantly enhance the magnitude of the polarization current. In both regimes, two types of solution are considered. First, a freely rotating solution (i.e., an island chain that is not interacting with a static, resonant, magnetic perturbation). Second, a locked solution (i.e., an island chain that has been brought to ...

  7. An improved neoclassical drift-magnetohydrodynamical fluid model of helical magnetic island equilibria in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2016-05-01

    The effect of the perturbed ion polarization current on the stability of neoclassical tearing modes in tokamak plasmas is calculated using an improved, neoclassical, four-field, drift-magnetohydrodynamical model. The calculation involves the self-consistent determination of the pressure and scalar electric potential profiles in the vicinity of the associated magnetic island chain, which allows the chain's propagation velocity to be fixed. Two regimes are considered. First, a regime in which neoclassical ion poloidal flow damping is not strong enough to enhance the magnitude of the polarization current (relative to that found in slab geometry). Second, a regime in which neoclassical ion poloidal flow damping is strong enough to significantly enhance the magnitude of the polarization current. In both regimes, two types of solution are considered. First, a freely rotating solution (i.e., an island chain that is not interacting with a static, resonant, magnetic perturbation). Second, a locked solution (i.e., an island chain that has been brought to rest in the laboratory frame via interaction with a static, resonant, magnetic perturbation). In all cases, the polarization current is found to be either always stabilizing or stabilizing provided that ηi≡d ln Ti/d ln ne does not exceed some threshold value. In certain ranges of ηi, the polarization current is found to have a stabilizing effect on a freely rotating island, but a destabilizing effect on a corresponding locked island.

  8. Cyclotron line signatures of thermal and magnetic mountains from accreting neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Priymak, Maxim; Lasky, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Cyclotron resonance scattering features (CRSFs) in the X-ray spectrum of an accreting neutron star are modified differently by accretion mounds sustained by magnetic and thermocompositional gradients. It is shown that one can discriminate, in principle, between mounds of different physical origins by studying how the line energy, width, and depth of a CRSF depend on the orientation of the neutron star, accreted mass, surface temperature distribution, and equation of state. CRSF signatures including gravitational light bending are computed for both phase-resolved and phase-averaged spectra on the basis of self-consistent Grad-Shafranov mound equilibria satisfying a global flux-freezing constraint. The prospects of multimessenger X-ray and gravitational-wave observations with future instruments are canvassed briefly.

  9. Detection of small hepatocellular carcinoma: Comparison of dynamic enhancement magnetic resonance imaging and multiphase multirow-detector helical CT scanning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Zhao; Jin-Lin Yao; Ying Wang; Kang-Rong Zhou

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To compare the gadolinium-enhanced multiphase dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and multiphase multirow-detector helical CT (MDCT)scanning for detection of small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).METHODS: MDCT scanning and baseline MRI with SE T1-WI and T2-WI sequence combined with FMPSPGR sequence were performed in 37 patients with 43 small HCCs. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were plotted to analyze the results for modality.RESULTS: The areas below ROC curve (Az) were calculated. There was no statistical difference in dynamic enhancement MDCT and MRI. The detection rate of small HCC was 97.5%-97.6% on multiphase MDCT scanning and 90.7%-94.7% on MRI, respectively. The sensitivity of detection for small HCC on MDCT scanning was higher than that on dynamic enhancement MRI. The sensitivity of detection for minute HCC (tumor diameter ≤ 1 cm)was 90.0%-95.0% on MDCT scanning and 70.0%-85.0% on MRI, respectively.CONCLUSION: MDCT scanning should be performed for early detection and effective treatment of small HCC in patients with chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis during follow-up.

  10. Homologous Helical Jets: Observations by IRIS, SDO and Hinode and Magnetic Modeling with Data-Driven Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, Mark C M; Tarbell, T D; Fu, Y; Tian, H; Testa, P; Reeves, K K; Martinez-Sykora, J; Boerner, P; Wuelser, J P; Lemen, J; Title, A M; Hurlburt, N; Kleint, L; Kankelborg, C; Jaeggli, S; Golub, L; McKillop, S; Saar, S; Carlsson, M; Hansteen, V

    2015-01-01

    We report on observations of recurrent jets by instruments onboard the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Hinode spacecrafts. Over a 4-hour period on July 21st 2013, recurrent coronal jets were observed to emanate from NOAA Active Region 11793. FUV spectra probing plasma at transition region temperatures show evidence of oppositely directed flows with components reaching Doppler velocities of +/- 100 km/s. Raster Doppler maps using a Si IV transition region line show all four jets to have helical motion of the same sense. Simultaneous observations of the region by SDO and Hinode show that the jets emanate from a source region comprising a pore embedded in the interior of a supergranule. The parasitic pore has opposite polarity flux compared to the surrounding network field. This leads to a spine-fan magnetic topology in the coronal field that is amenable to jet formation. Time-dependent data-driven simulations are used to investigate the underlying drivers for t...

  11. The Transport of Relative Canonical Helicity

    CERN Document Server

    You, Setthivoine

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of relative canonical helicity is examined in the two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic formalism. Canonical helicity is defined here as the helicity of the plasma species' canonical momentum. The species' canonical helicity are coupled together and can be converted from one into the other while the total gauge-invariant relative canonical helicity remains globally invariant. The conversion is driven by enthalpy differences at a surface common to ion and electron canonical flux tubes. The model provides an explanation for why the threshold for bifurcation in counter-helicity merging depends on the size parameter. The size parameter determines whether magnetic helicity annihilation channels enthalpy into the magnetic flux tube or into the vorticity flow tube components of the canonical flux tube. The transport of relative canonical helicity constrains the interaction between plasma flows and magnetic fields, and provides a more general framework for driving flows and currents from enthalpy or inductive b...

  12. An MSSM Extension with a Mirror Fourth Generation, Neutrino Magnetic Moments and LHC Signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Ibrahim, Tarek

    2008-01-01

    Recent analyses have shown that a sequential fourth generation can be consistent with precision electroweak data. We consider the possibility that the new generation could be a mirror generation with $V+A$ rather than $V-A$ interactions. Specifically we consider an extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model with a light mirror generation (mirMSSM) . Implications of this extension are explored. One consequence is an enhancement of the tau neutrino magnetic moment by several orders of magnitude consistent with the current limits on the magnetic moment of the tau. The masses of the mirror generation arise due to electroweak symmetry breaking, and if a mirror generation exists its mass spectrum must lye below a TeV, and thus should be discovered at the LHC. Mirror particles and mirror sparticles produce many characteristic signatures which should be detectable at the LHC. Heavy higgs boson decays into mirror particles and an analysis of the forward-backward asymmetries can distinguish a mirror generat...

  13. Serpent: Magnetic signatures of serpentinized mantle and mesoscale oceanic variability along the Alaska/Aleutian subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purucker, Michael; Serpent Team

    2010-05-01

    NASA recently solicited suborbital missions as a part of its new Earth Venture program element. These missions are designed as complete PI-led investigations to conduct innovative, integrated, hypothesis or scientific question driven approaches to pressing questions in Earth System science. The missions should require sustained observations (5 years) and significant resources (team led by Raytheon's Photon Research Associates, propose to carry out a suborbital magnetic survey of the Aleutian subduction zone using NASA's Global Hawk to test the magnetic serpentinite hypothesis. This hypothesis states that dewatering of the descending slab within subduction zones produces an observable static magnetic signature through the formation of serpentinite in the overriding mantle. This signature may serve as a predictor of the location of large megathrust earthquakes and their associated tsunamis. Magnetic field measurements from 20 km (sub-orbital) altitude are essential to the testing of this hypothesis; analysis shows orbital and/or near-surface measurements are not likely to provide sufficient sensitivity and uniform calibration to confirm or reject the hypothesis, nor to consistently map its presence around the world. Static and dynamic magnetic signatures from the motion of seawater in the earth's magnetic field have the potential to confound an evaluation of the magnetic serpentinite hypothesis. Through a combination of modeling and exact repeat surveys over the subduction zone, spaced weeks to as much as six months apart, we can study the magnetic signature of the motion that characterizes the mesoscale oceanic circulation in order to develop the best possible corrections for lithospheric imaging, and elucidating the intrinsic and unique oceanic information content in the magnetic fields for the first time ever. The role of water in subduction zones, and in the overlying ocean, can be traced by sustained suborbital observations of the magnetic field. At critical

  14. Global Asymmetries in the Heliosphere: Signature of the Interstellar Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opher, Merav; Alouani-Bibi, Fathallah; Izmodenov, Vladislav; Richardson, John; Toth, Gabor; Gombosi, Tamas

    In recent years it become clear that magnetic field effects, plays an important role in the Heliosphere, from shaping it and possible being responsible for the asymmetries observed in the Voyager data (e.g., Opher et al. 2007, 2009). However, the strength and orientation of the field in the local interstellar medium near the heliosphere has been poorly constrained. Previous estimates of the field strength range from 1.8-2.5 G and the field was thought to be parallel to the Galactic plane or inclined by 38-60 (Lallement et al. 2005) or 60-90 (Opher et al. 2007) to this plane. These estimates relied either on indirect observational inferences or modeling in which the interstellar neutral hydrogen was not taken into account. We will discuss recent work that indicate that based on asymmetries detected by Voyager 1 and 2 and measurements of the deflection of the solar wind plasma flows in the heliosheath (Opher et al. 2009) indicate that the field strength in the local interstellar medium is strong, between 4-5 G (Other works such as Izmodenov 2009; Pogorelov et al. 2009; Ratkiewickz et al. 2009 found similar strength). The field is tilted 20-30 from the interstellar medium flow direction (resulting from the peculiar motion of the Sun in the Galaxy) and is at an angle of about 30 from the Galactic plane. We will discuss the effect of such magnetic field in the global asymmetries of the heliosphere. We further will comment on the effect on asymmetries of our recent model of Kinetic-MHD model treating the neutrals in kinetic fashion (Alouani-Bibi et al. 2010). We will relate our findings with the most recent results of IBEX that indicate that the interstellar magnetic field has a strong signature in the emission of energetic neutrals.

  15. Electron acceleration in the inverse free electron laser with a helical wiggler by axial magnetic field and ion-channel guiding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reza Khazaeinezhad; Mahdi Esmaeilzadeh

    2012-01-01

    Electron acceleration in the inverse free electron laser (IFEL) with a helical wiggler in the presence of ion-channel guiding and axial magnetic field is investigated in this article.The effects of tapering wiggler amplitude and axial magnetic field are calculated for the electron acceleration.In free electron lasers,electron beams lose energy through radiation while in IFEL electron beams gain energy from the laser.The equation of electron motion and the equation of energy exchange between a single electron and electromagnetic waves are derived and then solved numerically using the fourth order Runge-Kutta method.The tapering effects of a wiggler magnetic field on electron acceleration are investigated and the results show that the electron acceleration increases in the case of a tapered wiggler magnetic field with a proper taper constant.

  16. Energy and helicity budgets of solar quiet regions

    CERN Document Server

    Tziotziou, K; Georgoulis, M K; Kontogiannis, I

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity budgets of solar quiet regions. Using a novel non-linear force-free method requiring single solar vector magnetograms we calculate the instantaneous free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity budgets in 55 quiet-Sun vector magnetograms. As in a previous work on active regions, we construct here for the first time the (free) energy-(relative) helicity diagram of quiet-Sun regions. We find that quiet-Sun regions have no dominant sense of helicity and show monotonic correlations a) between free magnetic energy/relative helicity and magnetic network area and, consequently, b) between free magnetic energy and helicity. Free magnetic energy budgets of quiet-Sun regions represent a rather continuous extension of respective active-region budgets towards lower values, but the corresponding helicity transition is discontinuous due to the incoherence of the helicity sense contrary to active regions. We further estimate the instantaneous free...

  17. Single-molecule magnet behavior in an octanuclear dysprosium(iii) aggregate inherited from helical triangular Dy3 SMM-building blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Lang; Wu, Jianfeng; Guo, Mei; Tang, Jinkui

    2016-06-28

    An unprecedented octanuclear dysprosium(iii) cluster with the formula [Dy8L6(μ3-OH)4(μ2-CH3O)2(CH3OH)6(H2O)2]·6H2O·10CH3OH·2CH3CN () based on a nonlinearly tritopic aroylhydrazone ligand H3L has been isolated, realizing the successful linking of pairwise interesting triangular Dy3 SMMs. It is noteworthy that two enantiomers (Λ and Δ configurations) individually behaving as a coordination-induced chirality presented in the Dy3 helicate are connected in the meso Dy8 cluster. Remarkably, alternating-current magnetic susceptibility measurements revealed that the Dy8 cluster shows typical SMM behavior inherited from its Dy3 helical precursor. It is one of the rare polynuclear Lnn SMMs (n > 7) under zero dc field.

  18. Higher helicity invariants and solar dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, D. D.; Illarionov, E. A.; Akhmet'ev, P. M.

    2017-01-01

    Modern models of nonlinear dynamo saturation in celestial bodies (specifically, on the Sun) are largely based on the consideration of the balance of magnetic helicity. This physical variable has also a topological meaning: it is associated with the linking coefficient of magnetic tubes. In addition to magnetic helicity, magnetohydrodynamics has a number of topological integrals of motion (the so-called higher helicity moments). We have compared these invariants with magnetic helicity properties and concluded that they can hardly serve as nonlinear constraints on dynamo action.

  19. SPring-8 twin helical undulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, T; Tanaka, T; Tanabe, T; Maréchal, X M; Kumagai, K; Kitamura, H

    1998-05-01

    There are several ways of producing circularly polarized light, such as using asymmetric devices, crossed undulators etc. The SPring-8 helical undulator introduces a simple way of producing both horizontal and vertical fields in one undulator. All the magnet arrays are arranged above and below the plane of the electron orbit, so there is no limitation of access from the sides of the undulator. For the SPring-8 BL25SU, two helical undulators will be installed in tandem, and the helicity of the polarization can be switched at up to 10 Hz using five kicker magnets.

  20. 3D Characterization of the Magnetic Signature of a Medium Sized Impact Crater at Odessa, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, A.; Soule, D.; Everett, M.; Rodman, T.; Mangue Ndong, M.; Pereira, A.; Platt, P.; Trahan, A.

    2008-12-01

    Meteorite impacts are a common occurrence throughout Earth's geologic history. Many of the surface expressions of large ancient impacts have been subsequently erased by weathering and erosion processes. The study of preserved meteorite impacts is necessary to better understand this natural hazard which has been increasingly linked to rapid climate change and mass extinctions. The 60 ka Odessa meteorite crater located in Ector Co. Texas, is unique because it is not only well-preserved, but also has been the subject of extensive geologic examination. Geologic mapping and numeric models indicate that the crater was caused by a relatively small oblique impactor. The crater rim is remarkably well exposed. Much of the ejecta blanket is present, although deeply eroded. There has been considerable site disturbance due to drilling, shaft excavation, trenching, construction of a museum, trails, and the oil/gas activity in surrounding fields. Two previous geophysical investigations have shown that our data clearly corresponds to large-scale thrust deformation. With this in mind we have performed 3D high resolution magnetic gradiometer surveys that will allow us to quantify and characterize the magnetic signature of small to medium impacts. We will tie this data set to a 3D photorealistic outcrop image provided by laser scanning with coarser-scale, below-ground geophysical information. Our geophysical imagery provides a useful constraint on numerical simulations of the impact and its immediate regional-scale environmental effects. This information can be used to identify impact sites whose surface expression has been erased by natural erosional processes, allowing for improved frequency estimates and improved geo-hazard assessment.

  1. Experimental and theoretical analyses of penetration processes of externally applied rotating helical magnetic perturbation fields in TEXTOR and HYBTOK-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Y [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, D-52425 (Germany); Bock, M F M de [FOM Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, EURATOM Association, Postbus 1207, NL-3430 BE Nieuwegein, The (Netherlands); Finken, K H [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, D-52425 (Germany); Jakubowski, M [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, D-52425 (Germany); Jaspers, R [FOM Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, EURATOM Association, Postbus 1207, NL-3430 BE Nieuwegein, The (Netherlands); Koslowski, H R [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, D-52425 (Germany); Kraemer-Flecken, A [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, D-52425 (Germany); Lehnen, M [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, D-52425 (Germany); Liang, Y [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, D-52425 (Germany); Loewenbrueck, K [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, D-52425 (Germany); Matsunaga, G [Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 311-0193 (Japan); Reiser, D [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, D-52425 (Germany); Samm, U [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, D-52425 (Germany); Sewell, G [Mathematics Department Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas (United States); Takamura, S [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, 464-8603 Nagoya (Japan); Unterberg, B; Wolf, R C; Zimmermann, O [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, D-52425 (Germany)

    2007-05-15

    Penetration processes of rotating helical magnetic perturbation field into tokamak plasmas have been investigated by the dynamic ergodic divertor (DED) in TEXTOR. Experimental observations of the field penetration and field amplification are performed and the data are interpreted by theoretical analyses based on a linearized two-fluid plasma model. It is observed that the growth of the forced magnetic reconnection by the rotating DED-field is accompanied by a change in the plasma fluid rotation. The theoretical model is also applied to the DED experiment in the small tokamak device HYBTOK-II. It is confirmed that the theoretical analyses can explain the observed radial profiles of the DED-field in the plasma by inserting small magnetic pick-up coils in HYBTOK-II.

  2. A mechanism for the dynamo terms to sustain closed-flux current, including helicity balance, by driving current which crosses the magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; Sutherland, D. A. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    An analysis of imposed dynamo current drive (IDCD) [T.R. Jarboe et al., Nucl. Fusion 52 083017 (2012)] reveals: (a) current drive on closed flux surfaces seems possible without relaxation, reconnection, or other flux-surface-breaking large events; (b) the scale size of the key physics may be smaller than is often computationally resolved; (c) helicity can be sustained across closed flux; and (d) IDCD current drive is parallel to the current which crosses the magnetic field to produce the current driving force. In addition to agreeing with spheromak data, IDCD agrees with selected tokamak data.

  3. The effects of self-fields on the electron trajectory in a two-stream free electron laser with a helical wiggler and an axial guiding magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Saviz; E. Lashani; Farzin M. Aghamir

    2012-01-01

    A theory for the two-stream free-electron laser (TSFEL) with a helical wiggler and an axial guide magnetic field is developed.In the analysis,the effects of self-fields are taken into account.An analysis of the two-stream steady-state electron trajectories is given by solving the equation of motion.Numerical calculations show that there are seven groups of orbits in the presence of self-fields instead of two groups reported in the absence of self-fields.The stability of the trajectories is studied numerically.

  4. Observations at Low Latitudes of Magnetic Merging Signatures Within a Flux Transfer Event During a Northward IMF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, M. O.; Avanov, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    Flux transfer events (FTE) have been postulated to result from transient magnetic merging. If so, the ion distributions within an event should exhibit features known to result from merging. Observations of a FTE by instruments on the Polar spacecraft revealed classical merging signatures that included: 1) D-shaped, accelerated, magnetosheath ion distributions, 2) a well defined de Hoffman-Teller frame, 3) local stress balance, and 4) a P-N magnetic field signature. This FTE was observed near the magnetic equator at approx. 13 MLT under conditions of a moderately northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) (clock angle of less than 10 deg). The nature of the ion distributions and the consistency of the measured cutoff speed with that calculated from the measured local magnetic field and the derived de Hoffman-Teller speed show the ion injection to be local. Coupled with the northward IMF these results lead to the conclusion that component merging in the low latitude region was responsible for the FTE.

  5. Magnetic Signatures and Curie Surface Trend Across an Arc-Continent Collision Zone: An Example from Central Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manalo, Pearlyn C.; Dimalanta, Carla B.; Ramos, Noelynna T.; Faustino-Eslava, Decibel V.; Queaño, Karlo L.; Yumul, Graciano P.

    2016-05-01

    Ground and aeromagnetic data are combined to characterize the onshore and offshore magnetic properties of the central Philippines, whose tectonic setting is complicated by opposing subduction zones, large-scale strike-slip faulting and arc-continent collision. The striking difference between the magnetic signatures of the islands with established continental affinity and those of the islands belonging to the island arc terrane is observed. Negative magnetic anomalies are registered over the continental terrane, while positive magnetic anomalies are observed over the Philippine Mobile Belt. Several linear features in the magnetic anomaly map coincide with the trace of the Philippine Fault and its splays. Power spectral analysis of the magnetic data reveals that the Curie depth across the central Philippines varies. The deepest point of the magnetic crust is beneath Mindoro Island at 32 km. The Curie surface shallows toward the east: the Curie surface is 21 km deep between the islands of Sibuyan and Masbate, and 18 km deep at the junction of Buruanga Peninsula and Panay Island. The shallowest Curie surface (18 km) coincides with the boundary of the arc-continent collision, signifying the obduction of mantle rocks over the continental basement. Comparison of the calculated Curie depth with recent crustal thickness models reveals the same eastwards thinning trend and range of depths. The coincidence of the magnetic boundary and the density boundary may support the existence of a compositional boundary that reflects the crust-mantle interface.

  6. Antiparallel magnetic merging signatures during IMF BY>>0: longitudinal and latitudinal cusp aurora bifurcations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Massetti

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A prominent dayside auroral event, occurred during an IMF BY-dominated time interval, and characterized by the contemporaneous longitudinal and latitudinal cusp bifurcations, is reported. The event was recorded the 19 December 2002, between about 09:30–10:45 UT, by the ITACA2 twin auroral monitors system, in the Greenland-Svalbard zone. The splitting of the ionospheric footprint of the geomagnetic cusp, traced by the dayside auroral activity, was recently identified with the signatures of antiparallel reconnection episodes ongoing at different magnetopause locations, during large IMF BY periods. The first part of the event showed a broad longitudinal bifurcation of the red-dominated cusp aurora, displaced in the prenoon and postnoon, with a separation up to ~1800 km, during northeast directed IMF (clock-angle rotating from 45° to 90°. This observation widens the range of IMF regimes that are known to drive a longitudinal bifurcation of the cusp, since previous case-studies reported these events to occur during southeast/southwest oriented IMF (clock-angle ≈135°. The second part of the event, developed when the IMF turned to a nearly horizontal orientation (BY>>0, BZ~0, clock-angle ~90°, and exhibited the simultaneous activation of the cusp auroras in three distinct areas: i two of them associated to the above-mentioned longitudinally bifurcated cusp (~73°–75° CGM latitude, type 1 cusp aurora, and linked to (nearantiparallel magnetic reconnection patches equatorward the northern and the southern cusp, ii the other one characterized by isolated high-latitude (~76°–77° CGM latitude, type 2 cusp aurora rayed arc(s with intense green emission, and triggered by (nearantiparallel merging at the northern lobe (usually observed during positive IMF BZ, poleward the local cusp. During this phase, the longitudinal separation of the low-latitude type~1 cusp aurora was about 1000 km wide, with a 500 km gap, while the latitudinal separation

  7. DETECTION OF STATIC ECCENTRICITY FAULT IN SATURATED INDUCTION MOTORS BY AIR-GAP MAGNETIC FLUX SIGNATURE ANALYSIS USING FINITE ELEMENT METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Halem

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Unfortunately, motor current signature analysis (MCSA cannot detect the small degrees of the purely static eccentricity (SE defects, while the air-gap magnetic flux signature analysis (FSA is applied successfully. The simulation results are obtained by using time stepping finite elements (TSFE method. In order to show the impact of magnetic saturation upon the diagnosis of SE fault, the analysis is carried out for saturated induction motors. The index signatures of static eccentricity fault around fundamental and PSHs are detected successfully for saturated motor.

  8. Nonlinear helical MHD instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zueva, N.M.; Solov' ev, L.S.

    1977-07-01

    An examination is made of the boundary problem on the development of MHD instability in a toroidal plasma. Two types of local helical instability are noted - Alfven and thermal, and the corresponding criteria of instability are cited. An evaluation is made of the maximum attainable kinetic energy, limited by the degree to which the law of conservation is fulfilled. An examination is made of a precise solution to a kinematic problem on the helical evolution of a cylindrical magnetic configuration at a given velocity distribution in a plasma. A numerical computation of the development of MHD instability in a plasma cylinder by a computerized solution of MHD equations is made where the process's helical symmetry is conserved. The development of instability is of a resonance nature. The instability involves the entire cross section of the plasma and leads to an inside-out reversal of the magnetic surfaces when there is a maximum unstable equilibrium configuration in the nonlinear stage. The examined instability in the tore is apparently stabilized by a magnetic hole when certain limitations are placed on the distribution of flows in the plasma. 29 references, 8 figures.

  9. Search for signatures of magnetically-induced alignment in the arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Ahn, E J; Albuquerque, I F M; Allard, D; Allekotte, I; Allen, J; Allison, P; Castillo, J Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Ambrosio, M; Aminaei, A; Anchordoqui, L; Andringa, S; Antičić, T; Anzalone, A; Aramo, C; Arganda, E; Arqueros, F; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Aublin, J; Ave, M; Avenier, M; Avila, G; Bäcker, T; Balzer, M; Barber, K B; Barbosa, A F; Bardenet, R; Barroso, S L C; Baughman, B; Bäuml, J; Beatty, J J; Becker, B R; Becker, K H; Bellétoile, A; Bellido, J A; BenZvi, S; Berat, C; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blanco, F; Blanco, M; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Boháčová, M; Boncioli, D; Bonifazi, C; Bonino, R; Borodai, N; Brack, J; Brogueira, P; Brown, W C; Bruijn, R; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Burton, R E; Caballero-Mora, K S; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Castellina, A; Catalano, O; Cataldi, G; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chauvin, J; Cheng, S H; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chou, A; Chudoba, J; Clay, R W; Coluccia, M R; Conceição, R; Contreras, F; Cook, H; Cooper, M J; Coppens, J; Cordier, A; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Creusot, A; Criss, A; Cronin, J; Curutiu, A; Dagoret-Campagne, S; Dallier, R; Dasso, S; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; De Domenico, M; De Donato, C; de Jong, S J; De La Vega, G; Junior, W J M de Mello; Neto, J R T de Mello; De Mitri, I; de Souza, V; de Vries, K D; Decerprit, G; del Peral, L; del Río, M; Deligny, O; Dembinski, H; Dhital, N; Di Giulio, C; Diaz, J C; Castro, M L Díaz; Diep, P N; Dobrigkeit, C; Docters, W; D'Olivo, J C; Dong, P N; Dorofeev, A; Anjos, J C dos; Dova, M T; D'Urso, D; Dutan, I; Ebr, J; Engel, R; Erdmann, M; Escobar, C O; Espadanal, J; Etchegoyen, A; Luis, P Facal San; Tapia, I Fajardo; Falcke, H; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferguson, A P; Ferrero, A; Fick, B; Filevich, A; Filipčič, A; Fliescher, S; Fracchiolla, C E; Fraenkel, E D; Fröhlich, U; Fuchs, B; Gaior, R; Gamarra, R F; Gambetta, S; García, B; Gámez, D García; Garcia-Pinto, D; Gascon, A; Gemmeke, H; Gesterling, K; Ghia, P L; Giaccari, U; Giller, M; Glass, H; Gold, M S; Golup, G; Albarracin, F Gomez; Berisso, M Gómez; Gonçalves, P; Gonzalez, D; Gonzalez, J G; Gookin, B; Góra, D; Gorgi, A; Gouffon, P; Gozzini, S R; Grashorn, E; Grebe, S; Griffith, N; Grigat, M; Grillo, A F; Guardincerri, Y; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Guzman, A; Hague, J D; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harmsma, S; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Hebbeker, T; Heck, D; Herve, A E; Hojvat, C; Hollon, N; Holmes, V C; Homola, P; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Hrabovský, M; Huege, T; Insolia, A; Ionita, F; Italiano, A; Jarne, C; Jiraskova, S; Josebachuili, M; Kadija, K; Kampert, K H; Karhan, P; Kasper, P; Kégl, B; Keilhauer, B; Keivani, A; Kelley, J L; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Knapp, J; Koang, D -H; Kotera, K; Krohm, N; Krömer, O; Kruppke-Hansen, D; Kuehn, F; Kuempel, D; Kulbartz, J K; Kunka, N; La Rosa, G; Lachaud, C; Lautridou, P; Leão, M S A B; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; de Oliveira, M A Leigui; Lemiere, A; Letessier-Selvon, A; Lhenry-Yvon, I; Link, K; López, R; Agüera, A Lopez; Louedec, K; Bahilo, J Lozano; Lu, L; Lucero, A; Ludwig, M; Lyberis, H; Maccarone, M C; Macolino, C; Maldera, S; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Marin, J; Marin, V; Maris, I C; Falcon, H R Marquez; Marsella, G; Martello, D; Martin, L; Martinez, H; Bravo, O Martínez; Mathes, H J; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, G; Maurizio, D; Mazur, P O; Medina-Tanco, G; Melissas, M; Melo, D; Menichetti, E; Menshikov, A; Mertsch, P; Meurer, C; Mićanović, S; Micheletti, M I; Miller, W; Miramonti, L; Molina-Bueno, L; Mollerach, S; Monasor, M; Ragaigne, D Monnier; Montanet, F; Morales, B; Morello, C; Moreno, E; Moreno, J C; Morris, C; Mostafá, M; Moura, C A; Mueller, S; Muller, M A; Müller, G; Münchmeyer, M; Mussa, R; Navarra, G; Navarro, J L; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Nelles, A; Neuser, J; Nhung, P T; Niemietz, L; Nierstenhoefer, N; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Nožka, L; Nyklicek, M; Oehlschläger, J; Olinto, A; Oliva, P; Olmos-Gilbaja, V M; Ortiz, M; Pacheco, N; Selmi-Dei, D Pakk; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Palmieri, N; Parente, G; Parizot, E; Parra, A; Parsons, R D; Pastor, S; Paul, T; Pech, M; Pȩkala, J; Pelayo, R; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Pesce, R; Petermann, E; Petrera, S; Petrinca, P; Petrolini, A; Petrov, Y; Petrovic, J; Pfendner, C; Phan, N; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pieroni, P; Pimenta, M; Pirronello, V; Platino, M; Ponce, V H; Pontz, M; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Querchfeld, S; Rautenberg, J; Ravel, O; Ravignani, D; Revenu, B; Ridky, J; Riggi, S; Risse, M; Ristori, P; Rivera, H; Rizi, V; Roberts, J; Robledo, C; de Carvalho, W Rodrigues; Rodriguez, G; Martino, J Rodriguez; Rojo, J Rodriguez; Rodriguez-Cabo, I; Rodríguez-Frías, M D; Ros, G; Rosado, J; Rossler, T; Roth, M; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Rühle, C; Salamida, F; Salazar, H; Salina, G; Sánchez, F; Santo, C E; Santos, E; Santos, E M; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, B; Sarkar, S; Sato, R; Scharf, N; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schiffer, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, F; Scholten, O; Schoorlemmer, H; Schovancova, J; Schovánek, P; Schröder, F; Schulte, S; Schuster, D; Sciutto, S J; Scuderi, M; Segreto, A; Settimo, M; Shadkam, A; Shellard, R C; Sidelnik, I; Sigl, G; Lopez, H H Silva; Śmiałkowski, A; Šmída, R; Snow, G R; Sommers, P; Sorokin, J; Spinka, H; Squartini, R; Stanic, S; Stapleton, J; Stasielak, J; Stephan, M; Strazzeri, E; Stutz, A; Suarez, F; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Šuša, T; Sutherland, M S; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Szuba, M; Tamashiro, A; Tapia, A; Tartare, M; Taşcău, O; Ruiz, C G Tavera; Tcaciuc, R; Tegolo, D; Thao, N T; Thomas, D; Tiffenberg, J; Timmermans, C; Tiwari, D K; Tkaczyk, W; Peixoto, C J Todero; Tomé, B; Tonachini, A; Travnicek, P; Tridapalli, D B; Tristram, G; Trovato, E; Tueros, M; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Galicia, J F Valdés; Valiño, I; Valore, L; Berg, A M van den; Varela, E; Cárdenas, B Vargas; Vázquez, J R; Vázquez, R A; Veberič, D; Verzi, V; Vicha, J; Videla, M; Villaseñor, L; Wahlberg, H; Wahrlich, P; Wainberg, O; Walz, D; Warner, D; Watson, A A; Weber, M; Weidenhaupt, K; Weindl, A; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Wieczorek, G; Wiencke, L; Wilczyńska, B; Wilczyński, H; Will, M; Williams, C; Winchen, T; Winnick, M G; Wommer, M; Wundheiler, B; Yamamoto, T; Yapici, T; Younk, P; Yuan, G; Yushkov, A; Zamorano, B; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zaw, I; Zepeda, A; Silva, M Zimbres; Ziolkowski, M; 10.1016/j.astropartphys.2011.10.004

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of data recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory in which we search for groups of directionally-aligned events (or `multiplets') which exhibit a correlation between arrival direction and the inverse of the energy. These signatures are expected from sets of events coming from the same source after having been deflected by intervening coherent magnetic fields. The observation of several events from the same source would open the possibility to accurately reconstruct the position of the source and also measure the integral of the component of the magnetic field orthogonal to the trajectory of the cosmic rays. We describe the largest multiplets found and compute the probability that they appeared by chance from an isotropic distribution. We find no statistically significant evidence for the presence of multiplets arising from magnetic deflections in the present data.

  10. High energy signatures of quasi-spherical accretion onto rotating, magnetized neutron star in the ejector-accretor intermediate state

    CERN Document Server

    Bednarek, W

    2015-01-01

    We consider a simple scenario for the accretion of matter onto a neutron star in order to understand processes in the inner pulsar magnetosphere during the transition stage between different accretion modes. A simple quasi-spherical accretion process onto rotating, magnetized compact object is analyzed in order to search for the radiative signatures which could appear during transition between ejecting and accreting modes. It is argued that different accretion modes can be present in a single neutron star along different magnetic field lines for specific range of parameters characterising the pulsar (rotational period, surface magnetic field strength) and the density of surrounding medium. The radiation processes characteristic for the ejecting pulsar, i.e. curvature and synchrotron radiation produced by primary electrons in the pulsar outer gap, are expected to be modified by the presence of additional thermal radiation from the neutron star surface. We predict that during the transition from the pure ejecto...

  11. Search for signatures of magnetically-induced alignment in the arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre Auger Collaboration; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antičić, T.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bäuml, J.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; Benzvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Domenico, M.; de Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; Del Peral, L.; Del Río, M.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; Dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Fajardo Tapia, I.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gascon, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Gesterling, K.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Guzman, A.; Hague, J. D.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jarne, C.; Jiraskova, S.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Kotera, K.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lautridou, P.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, J.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Mertsch, P.; Meurer, C.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P. T.; Niemietz, L.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parra, A.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; PeĶala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Phan, N.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Robledo, C.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-D'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Silva Lopez, H. H.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tamashiro, A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Taşcău, O.; Tavera Ruiz, C. G.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tiwari, D. K.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Winnick, M. G.; Wommer, M.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of data recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory in which we search for groups of directionally-aligned events (or 'multiplets') which exhibit a correlation between arrival direction and the inverse of the energy. These signatures are expected from sets of events coming from the same source after having been deflected by intervening coherent magnetic fields. The observation of several events from the same source would open the possibility to accurately reconstruct the position of the source and also measure the integral of the component of the magnetic field orthogonal to the trajectory of the cosmic rays. We describe the largest multiplets found and compute the probability that they appeared by chance from an isotropic distribution. We find no statistically significant evidence for the presence of multiplets arising from magnetic deflections in the present data.

  12. Search for signatures of magnetically-induced alignment in the arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, P.; /Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M.; /Turin U. /INFN, Turin; Ahn, E.J.; /Fermilab; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; /Sao Paulo U.; Allard, D.; /APC, Paris; Allekotte, I.; /Buenos Aires, CONICET; Allen, J.; /New York U.; Allison, P.; /Ohio State U.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; /Mexico U., ICN; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; /Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M.; /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Nijmegen U., IMAPP

    2011-11-01

    We present the results of an analysis of data recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory in which we search for groups of directionally-aligned events (or ''multiplets'') which exhibit a correlation between arrival direction and the inverse of the energy. These signatures are expected from sets of events coming from the same source after having been deflected by intervening coherent magnetic fields. The observation of several events from the same source would open the possibility to accurately reconstruct the position of the source and also measure the integral of the component of the magnetic field orthogonal to the trajectory of the cosmic rays. We describe the largest multiplets found and compute the probability that they appeared by chance from an isotropic distribution. We find no statistically significant evidence for the presence of multiplets arising from magnetic deflections in the present data.

  13. Magnetic structure and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction in the S =1/2 helical-honeycomb antiferromagnet α -Cu2V2O7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitgeatpong, G.; Zhao, Y.; Avdeev, M.; Piltz, R. O.; Sato, T. J.; Matan, K.

    2015-07-01

    Magnetic properties of the S =1/2 antiferromagnet α -Cu2V2O7 have been studied using magnetization, quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations, and neutron diffraction. Magnetic susceptibility shows a broad peak at ˜50 K followed by an abrupt increase indicative of a phase transition to a magnetically ordered state at TN=33.4 (1 ) K. Above TN, a fit to the Curie-Weiss law gives a Curie-Weiss temperature of Θ =-73 (1 ) K suggesting the dominant antiferromagnetic coupling. The result of the QMC calculations on the helical-honeycomb spin network with two antiferromagnetic exchange interactions J1 and J2 provides a better fit to the susceptibility than the previously proposed spin-chain model. Two sets of the coupling parameters J1:J2=1 :0.45 with J1=5.79 (1 ) meV and 0.65 :1 with J2=6.31 (1 ) meV yield equally good fits down to ˜TN . Below TN, weak ferromagnetism due to spin canting is observed. The canting is caused by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction with an estimated b c -plane component |Dp|≃0.14 J1 . Neutron diffraction reveals that the S =1/2 Cu2 + spins antiferromagnetically align in the F d'd'2 magnetic space group. The ordered moment of 0.93(9) μB is predominantly along the crystallographic a axis.

  14. Rock magnetic signature of paleoenvironmental changes in the Izu Bonin rear arc over the last 1 Ma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kars, Myriam; Vautravers, Maryline; Musgrave, Robert; Kodama, Kazuto

    2015-04-01

    climatic proxies in order to investigate the rock magnetic signature of climate changes in the Izu Bonin rear arc in the Late Pleistocene.

  15. Helical filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbieri, Nicholas; Lim, Khan; Durand, Magali; Baudelet, Matthieu; Richardson, Martin [Townes Laser Institute, CREOL—The College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Hosseinimakarem, Zahra; Johnson, Eric [Micro-Photonics Laboratory – Center for Optical Material Science, Clemson, Anderson, South Carolina 29634 (United States)

    2014-06-30

    The shaping of laser-induced filamenting plasma channels into helical structures by guiding the process with a non-diffracting beam is demonstrated. This was achieved using a Bessel beam superposition to control the phase of an ultrafast laser beam possessing intensities sufficient to induce Kerr effect driven non-linear self-focusing. Several experimental methods were used to characterize the resulting beams and confirm the observed structures are laser air filaments.

  16. Helical mode interactions and spectral transfer processes in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Linkmann, Moritz F; McKay, Mairi E; Jäger, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Spectral transfer processes in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are investigated analytically by decomposition of the velocity and magnetic fields in Fourier space into helical modes. Steady solutions of the dynamical system which governs the evolution of the helical modes are determined, and a stability analysis of these solutions is carried out. The interpretation of the analysis is that unstable solutions lead to energy transfer between the interacting modes while stable solutions do not. From this, a dependence of possible interscale energy and helicity transfers on the helicities of the interacting modes is derived. As expected from the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in 3D MHD turbulence, mode interactions with like helicities lead to transfer of energy and magnetic helicity to smaller wavenumbers. However, some interactions of modes with unlike helicities also contribute to an inverse energy transfer. As such, an inverse energy cascade for nonhelical magnetic fields is shown to be possible. Fu...

  17. Magnetic Configuration Effects on Fast Ion Losses Induced by Fast Ion Driven Toroidal Alfv~n Eigenmodes in the Large Helical Device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. OGAWA; M. ISOBE; K. TOI; F. WATANABE; D. A. SPONG; A. SHIMIZU; M. OSAKABE; D. S. DARROW; S. OHDACHI; S. SAKAKIBARA; LHD Experiment -Group

    2012-01-01

    Beam-ion losses induced by fast-ion-driven toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) were measured with a scintillator-based lost fast-ion probe (SLIP) in the large helical device (LHD). The SLIP gave simultaneously the energy E and the pitch angle X=arccos(v///v) distribution of the lost fast ions. The loss fluxes were investigated for three typical magnetic configurations of Rax-vac=3.60 m, 3.75 m. and 3.90 m, where Rax-vac is the magnetic axis position of the vacuum field. Dominant losses induced by TAEs in these three configurations were observed in the E/X regions of 50-190 keV/40°, 40-170 keV/25°, and 30-190 keV/30°, respectively. Lost-ion fluxes induced by TAEs depend clearly on the amplitude of TAE magnetic fluctuations, Rax-vac and the toroidal field strength Bt. The increment of the loss fluxes has the dependence of (bTAE/Bt)s. The power s increases from s = 1 to 3 with the increase of the magnetic axis position in finite beta plasmas.

  18. The next large helical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iiyoshi, Atsuo; Yamazaki, Kozo

    1995-06-01

    Helical systems have the strong advantage of inherent steady-state operation for fusion reactors. Two large helical devices with fully superconducting coil systems are presently under design and construction. One is the LHD (Large Helical Device) [Fusion Technol. 17, 169 (1990)] with major radius=3.9 m and magnetic field=3-4 T, that is under construction during 1990-1997 at NIFS (National Institute for Fusion Science), Nagoya/Toki, Japan; it features continuous helical coils and a clean helical divertor focusing on edge configuration optimization. The other one in the W7-X (Wendelstein 7-X) [in Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion Nuclear Research, 1990, (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1991), Vol. 3, p. 525] with major radius=5.5 m and magnetic field=3 T, that is under review at IPP (Max-Planck Institute for Plasma Physics), Garching, Germany; it has adopted a modular coil system after elaborate optimization studies. These two programs are complementary in promoting world helical fusion research and in extending the understanding of toroidal plasmas through comparisons with large tokamaks.

  19. Helical Aharonov-Casher edge states

    OpenAIRE

    Heremans, J. J.; Xu, L. L.

    2010-01-01

    It is shown that an Aharonov-Casher vector potential in a two-dimensional geometry can lead to helical edge states. The Aharonov-Casher vector potential is the electromagnetic dual of the magnetic vector potential, and leads to traveling states at the sample edge in analogy to the integer quantum Hall effect. The helical edge states are predicted to appear in a narrow channel geometry with parabolic or sufficiently symmetric confinement potential. The implications of the helical Aharonov-Cash...

  20. A solar tornado observed by AIA/SDO: Rotational flow and evolution of magnetic helicity in a prominence and cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xing; Leonard, Drew; Jeska, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    During 2011/09/24, as observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument of the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) and ground-based \\Ha\\ telescopes, a prominence and associated cavity appeared above the southwest limb. On 2011/09/25 8:00UT material flows upwards from the prominence core along a narrow loop-like structure, accompanied by a rise ($\\geq$50,000km) of the prominence core and the loop. As the loop fades by 10:00, small blobs and streaks of varying brightness rotate around the top part of the prominence and cavity, mimicking a cyclone. The most intense and coherent rotation lasts for over three hours, with emission in both hot ($\\sim$1MK) and cold (hydrogen and helium) lines. We suggest that the cyclonic appearance and overall evolution of the structure can be interpreted in terms of the expansion of helical structures into the cavity, and the movement of plasma along helical structures which appears as a rotation when viewed along the helix axis. The coordinated movement of material between...

  1. An Anomalous Composition in Slow Solar Wind as a Signature of Magnetic Reconnection in its Source Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L.; Landi, E.; Lepri, S. T.; Kocher, M.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Fisk, L. A.; Raines, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we study a subset of slow solar winds characterized by an anomalous charge state composition and ion temperatures compared to average solar wind distributions, and thus referred to as an “Outlier” wind. We find that although this wind is slower and denser than normal slow wind, it is accelerated from the same source regions (active regions and quiet-Sun regions) as the latter and its occurrence rate depends on the solar cycle. The defining property of the Outlier wind is that its charge state composition is the same as that of normal slow wind, with the only exception being a very large decrease in the abundance of fully charged species (He2+, C6+, N7+, O8+, Mg12+), resulting in a significant depletion of the He and C element abundances. Based on these observations, we suggest three possible scenarios for the origin of this wind: (1) local magnetic waves preferentially accelerating non-fully stripped ions over fully stripped ions from a loop opened by reconnection; (2) depleted fully stripped ions already contained in the corona magnetic loops before they are opened up by reconnection; or (3) fully stripped ions depleted by Coulomb collision after magnetic reconnection in the solar corona. If any one of these three scenarios is confirmed, the Outlier wind represents a direct signature of slow wind release through magnetic reconnection.

  2. Remanent Magnetization: Signature of Many-Body Localization in Quantum Antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, V.; Müller, M.

    2017-06-01

    We study the remanent magnetization in antiferromagnetic, many-body localized quantum spin chains, initialized in a fully magnetized state. Its long time limit is an order parameter for the localization transition, which is readily accessible by standard experimental probes in magnets. We analytically calculate its value in the strong-disorder regime exploiting the explicit construction of quasilocal conserved quantities of the localized phase. We discuss analogies in cold atomic systems.

  3. Mineralogical, geochemical, and magnetic signatures of surface sediments from the Canadian Beaufort Shelf and Amundsen Gulf (Canadian Arctic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa, Adriana; Montero-Serrano, Jean-Carlos; St-Onge, Guillaume; Rochon, André; Desiage, Pierre-Arnaud

    2017-02-01

    Mineralogical, geochemical, magnetic, and siliciclastic grain-size signatures of 34 surface sediment samples from the Mackenzie-Beaufort Sea Slope and Amundsen Gulf were studied in order to better constrain the redox status, detrital particle provenance, and sediment dynamics in the western Canadian Arctic. Redox-sensitive elements (Mn, Fe, V, Cr, Zn) indicate that modern sedimentary deposition within the Mackenzie-Beaufort Sea Slope and Amundsen Gulf took place under oxic bottom-water conditions, with more turbulent mixing conditions and thus a well-oxygenated water column prevailing within the Amundsen Gulf. The analytical data obtained, combined with multivariate statistical (notably, principal component and fuzzy c-means clustering analyses) and spatial analyses, allowed the division of the study area into four provinces with distinct sedimentary compositions: (1) the Mackenzie Trough-Canadian Beaufort Shelf with high phyllosilicate-Fe oxide-magnetite and Al-K-Ti-Fe-Cr-V-Zn-P contents; (2) Southwestern Banks Island, characterized by high dolomite-K-feldspar and Ca-Mg-LOI contents; (3) the Central Amundsen Gulf, a transitional zone typified by intermediate phyllosilicate-magnetite-K-feldspar-dolomite and Al-K-Ti-Fe-Mn-V-Zn-Sr-Ca-Mg-LOI contents; and (4) mud volcanoes on the Canadian Beaufort Shelf distinguished by poorly sorted coarse-silt with high quartz-plagioclase-authigenic carbonate and Si-Zr contents, as well as high magnetic susceptibility. Our results also confirm that the present-day sedimentary dynamics on the Canadian Beaufort Shelf is mainly controlled by sediment supply from the Mackenzie River. Overall, these insights provide a basis for future studies using mineralogical, geochemical, and magnetic signatures of Canadian Arctic sediments in order to reconstruct past variations in sediment inputs and transport pathways related to late Quaternary climate and oceanographic changes.

  4. Computing Model of the Torque of Magnetic Helical Gear Transmission with Radial Magnetizing Cross Axis%径向磁化交错轴磁性斜齿轮传动力矩的计算模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴克亮

    2012-01-01

    Based on the basic equation of static magnetic field and constitutive relations of magnetic media, the equivalent current model of permanent magnet is deduced. Then a three - dimensional model for computing the torque of radial magnetizing cross axis magnetic helical gear transmission is established by using the equivalent current model. Finally the three - dimensional model is verified by the experimentation. The result shows the three - dimensional model is accurate for torque calculation and is well studied for the parametric analysis and optimal design of this kind of permanent magnetic gear.%根据恒定磁场的基本方程及磁媒质的本构关系,给出了永磁体的等效电流模型.基于该等效电流模型,建立了适用于计算径向磁化交错轴磁性斜齿轮传动机构传动力矩的三维数学模型,并参照实验数据对该模型进行了验证.结果表明建立的传动力矩数学模型是正确的,适用于这种磁性齿轮传动机构的结构参数分析与优化设计.

  5. High surface magnetic field in red giants as a new signature of planet engulfment?

    CERN Document Server

    Privitera, Giovanni; Eggenberger, Patrick; Georgy, Cyril; Ekström, Sylvia; Vidotto, Aline A; Bianda, Michele; Villaver, Eva; ud-Doula, Asif

    2016-01-01

    Context. Red-giant stars may engulf planets. This may increase the rotation rate of their convective envelope, which could lead to strong dynamo-triggered magnetic fields. Aims. We explore the possibility of generating magnetic fields in red giants that have gone through the process of a planet engulfment. We compare them with similar models that evolve without any planets. We discuss the impact of stellar wind magnetic braking on the evolution of the surface velocity of the parent star. Methods. With rotating stellar models with and without planets and an empirical relation between the Rossby number and the surface magnetic field, we deduce the evolution of the surface magnetic field along the red-giant branch. The effects of wind magnetic braking is explored using a relation deduced from MHD simulations. Results. The stellar evolution model of a 1.7 M$_\\odot$ without planet engulfment and that has a time-averaged rotation velocity during the Main-Sequence equal to 100 km s$^{-1}$, shows a surface magnetic f...

  6. Magnetic configuration effects on TAE-induced losses and a comparison with the orbit-following model in the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, K. [Nagoya University, Japan; Isobe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Toi, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Spong, Donald A [ORNL; Osakabe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan

    2012-01-01

    Fast-ion losses from Large Helical Device (LHD) plasmas due to toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAEs) were measured by a scintillator-based lost fast-ion probe (SLIP) to understand the loss processes. TAE-induced losses measured by the SLIP appeared in energy E ranges of around 50-180 keV with pitch angles. between 35 degrees-45 degrees, and increased with the increase in TAE amplitudes. Position shifts of the magnetic axis due to a finite plasma pressure led not only to an increase in TAE-induced losses but also to a stronger scaling of fast-ion losses on TAE amplitudes. Characteristics of the observed fast-ion losses were compared with a numerical simulation based on orbit-following models in which the TAE fluctuations are taken into account. The calculation indicated that the number of lost fast ions reaching the SLIP increased with the increase in the TAE amplitude at the TAE gap. Moreover, the calculated dependence of fast-ion loss fluxes on the fluctuation amplitude became stronger in the case of large magnetic axis shifts, compared with the case of smaller shifts, as was observed in the experiments. The simulation results agreed qualitatively with the experimental observations in the LHD.

  7. The magnetic signature of the San Gregorio gold mine area, Uruguay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barcellos, Andre Bernardi Bicca de; Koppe, Jair Carlos [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Ferreira, Francisco Jose Fonseca [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia; Costa, Antonio Flavio Uberti [Companhia de Pesquisas de Recursos Minerais (CPRM), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1995-12-31

    The San Gregorio gold mine lies on a northwest trending shear structure in the Uruguay shield, southwest Minas de Corrales. Ground magnetic surveys in the vicinity of the gold deposit suggest several structures that appear to have controlled the gold mineralization. The analysis of magnetic susceptibility values allowed to concluded that the most important anomaly sources of the San Gregorio mine are the non altered basic rocks, mainly the quartz diorites which generally occur in the hanging wall of the mineralized zone. Other lithologies shows low levels of magnetic susceptibility with weak contrast between mineralization and host rocks. (author). 3 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  8. Sign of helicity in the alpha-Omega geodynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Xing

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the sign of helicity in the alpha-Omega dynamo and point out that the alpha effect in the geodynamo is induced by helical wave but not helical flow as in the solar dynamo. We then postulate the mechanisms of the Earth's magnetic tilt angle, westward drift and dipole reversals.

  9. Magnetic signature of the lunar South Pole-Aitken basin: Character, origin, and age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purucker, Michael E.; Head, James W., III; Wilson, Lionel

    2012-05-01

    A new magnetic map of the Moon, based on Lunar Prospector magnetometer observations, sheds light on the origin of the South Pole-Aitken basin (SPA), the largest and oldest of the recognized lunar basins. A set of WNW-trending linear to arcuate magnetic features, evident in both the radial and scalar observations, covers much of a 1000 km wide region centered on the NW portion of SPA. The source bodies are not at the surface because the magnetic features show no first-order correspondence to any surface topographic or structural feature. Patchy mare basalts of possible late Imbrian-age are emplaced within SPA and are inferred to have been emplaced through dikes, directly from mantle sources. We infer that the magnetic features represent dike swarms that served as feeders for these mare basalts, as evident from the location of the Thomson/Mare Ingenii, Van de Graaff, and Leeuwenhoek mare basalts on the two largest magnetic features in the region. Modeling suggests that the dike zone is between 25 and 50 km wide at the surface, and dike magnetization contrasts are in the range of 0.2 A/m. We theorize that the basaltic dikes were emplaced in the lunar crust when a long-lived dynamo was active. Based on pressure, temperature, and stress conditions prevalent in the lunar crust, dikes are expected to be a dominantly subsurface phenomenon, consistent with the observations reported here.

  10. Magnetic flux emergence in granular convection: radiative MHD simulations and observational signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, M. C. M.; Schüssler, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.

    2007-05-01

    Aims:We study the emergence of magnetic flux from the near-surface layers of the solar convection zone into the photosphere. Methods: To model magnetic flux emergence, we carried out a set of numerical radiative magnetohydrodynamics simulations. Our simulations take into account the effects of compressibility, energy exchange via radiative transfer, and partial ionization in the equation of state. All these physical ingredients are essential for a proper treatment of the problem. Furthermore, the inclusion of radiative transfer allows us to directly compare the simulation results with actual observations of emerging flux. Results: We find that the interaction between the magnetic flux tube and the external flow field has an important influence on the emergent morphology of the magnetic field. Depending on the initial properties of the flux tube (e.g. field strength, twist, entropy etc.), the emergence process can also modify the local granulation pattern. The emergence of magnetic flux tubes with a flux of 1019 Mx disturbs the granulation and leads to the transient appearance of a dark lane, which is coincident with upflowing material. These results are consistent with observed properties of emerging magnetic flux. Movies are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  11. Magnetic Signature of the Lunar South Pole-Aitken Basin: Character, Origin, and Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purucker, Michael E.; Head, James W., III; Wilson, Lionel

    2012-01-01

    A new magnetic map of the Moon, based on Lunar Prospector (LP) magnetometer observations, sheds light on the origin of the South Pole-Aitken Basin (SPA), the largest and oldest of the recognized lunar basins. A set of WNW-trending linear to arcuate magnetic features, evident in both the radial and scalar observations, covers much of a 1000 km wide region centered on the NW portion of SPA. The source bodies are not at the surface because the magnetic features show no first-order correspondence to any surface topographic or structural feature. Patchy mare basalts of possible late Imbrianage are emplaced within SPA and are inferred to have been emplaced through dikes, directly from mantle sources. We infer that the magnetic features represent dike swarms that served as feeders for these mare basalts, as evident from the location of the Thomson/ Mare Ingenii, Van de Graaff, and Leeuwenhoek mare basalts on the two largest magnetic features in the region. Modeling suggests that the dike zone is between 25 and 50 km wide at the surface, and dike magnetization contrasts are in the range of 0.2 A/m. We theorize that the basaltic dikes were emplaced in the lunar crust when a long-lived dynamo was active. Based on pressure, temperature, and stress conditions prevalent in the lunar crust, dikes are expected to be a dominantly subsurface phenomenon, consistent with the observations reported here.

  12. X-ray emission from star-forming galaxies - signatures of cosmic rays and magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, J.; Schleicher, D. R. G.; Klessen, R. S.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of magnetic fields in galaxies is still an open problem in astrophysics. In nearby galaxies the far-infrared-radio correlation indicates the coupling between magnetic fields and star formation. The correlation arises from the synchrotron emission of cosmic ray electrons travelling through the interstellar magnetic fields. However, with an increase of the interstellar radiation field (ISRF), inverse Compton scattering becomes the dominant energy loss mechanism of cosmic ray electrons with a typical emission frequency in the X-ray regime. The ISRF depends on the one hand on the star formation rate and becomes stronger in starburst galaxies, and on the other hand increases with redshift due to the higher temperature of the cosmic microwave background. With a model for the star formation rate of galaxies, the ISRF, and the cosmic ray spectrum, we can calculate the expected X-ray luminosity resulting from the inverse Compton emission. Except for galaxies with an active galactic nucleus the main additional contribution to the X-ray luminosity comes from X-ray binaries. We estimate this contribution with an analytical model as well as with an observational relation, and compare it to the pure inverse Compton luminosity. Using data from the Chandra Deep Field Survey and far-infrared observations from Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array, we then determine upper limits for the cosmic ray energy. Assuming that the magnetic energy in a galaxy is in equipartition with the energy density of the cosmic rays, we obtain upper limits for the magnetic field strength. Our results suggest that the mean magnetic energy of young galaxies is similar to the one in local galaxies. This points towards an early generation of galactic magnetic fields, which is in agreement with current dynamo evolution models.

  13. Hydrodynamic and kinetic models for spin-1/2 electron-positron quantum plasmas: Annihilation interaction, helicity conservation, and wave dispersion in magnetized plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, Pavel A., E-mail: andreevpa@physics.msu.ru [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-15

    We discuss the complete theory of spin-1/2 electron-positron quantum plasmas, when electrons and positrons move with velocities mach smaller than the speed of light. We derive a set of two fluid quantum hydrodynamic equations consisting of the continuity, Euler, spin (magnetic moment) evolution equations for each species. We explicitly include the Coulomb, spin-spin, Darwin and annihilation interactions. The annihilation interaction is the main topic of the paper. We consider the contribution of the annihilation interaction in the quantum hydrodynamic equations and in the spectrum of waves in magnetized electron-positron plasmas. We consider the propagation of waves parallel and perpendicular to an external magnetic field. We also consider the oblique propagation of longitudinal waves. We derive the set of quantum kinetic equations for electron-positron plasmas with the Darwin and annihilation interactions. We apply the kinetic theory to the linear wave behavior in absence of external fields. We calculate the contribution of the Darwin and annihilation interactions in the Landau damping of the Langmuir waves. We should mention that the annihilation interaction does not change number of particles in the system. It does not related to annihilation itself, but it exists as a result of interaction of an electron-positron pair via conversion of the pair into virtual photon. A pair of the non-linear Schrodinger equations for the electron-positron plasmas including the Darwin and annihilation interactions is derived. Existence of the conserving helicity in electron-positron quantum plasmas of spinning particles with the Darwin and annihilation interactions is demonstrated. We show that the annihilation interaction plays an important role in the quantum electron-positron plasmas giving the contribution of the same magnitude as the spin-spin interaction.

  14. Hydrodynamic and kinetic models for spin-1/2 electron-positron quantum plasmas: Annihilation interaction, helicity conservation, and wave dispersion in magnetized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, Pavel A.

    2015-06-01

    We discuss the complete theory of spin-1/2 electron-positron quantum plasmas, when electrons and positrons move with velocities mach smaller than the speed of light. We derive a set of two fluid quantum hydrodynamic equations consisting of the continuity, Euler, spin (magnetic moment) evolution equations for each species. We explicitly include the Coulomb, spin-spin, Darwin and annihilation interactions. The annihilation interaction is the main topic of the paper. We consider the contribution of the annihilation interaction in the quantum hydrodynamic equations and in the spectrum of waves in magnetized electron-positron plasmas. We consider the propagation of waves parallel and perpendicular to an external magnetic field. We also consider the oblique propagation of longitudinal waves. We derive the set of quantum kinetic equations for electron-positron plasmas with the Darwin and annihilation interactions. We apply the kinetic theory to the linear wave behavior in absence of external fields. We calculate the contribution of the Darwin and annihilation interactions in the Landau damping of the Langmuir waves. We should mention that the annihilation interaction does not change number of particles in the system. It does not related to annihilation itself, but it exists as a result of interaction of an electron-positron pair via conversion of the pair into virtual photon. A pair of the non-linear Schrodinger equations for the electron-positron plasmas including the Darwin and annihilation interactions is derived. Existence of the conserving helicity in electron-positron quantum plasmas of spinning particles with the Darwin and annihilation interactions is demonstrated. We show that the annihilation interaction plays an important role in the quantum electron-positron plasmas giving the contribution of the same magnitude as the spin-spin interaction.

  15. X-Ray Emission from Star-Forming Galaxies - Signatures of Cosmic Rays and Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Schober, Jennifer; Klessen, Ralf S

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of magnetic fields in galaxies is still an open problem in astrophysics. In nearby galaxies the far-infrared-radio correlation indicates the coupling between magnetic fields and star formation. The correlation arises from the synchrotron emission of cosmic ray electrons traveling through the interstellar magnetic fields. However, with an increase of the interstellar radiation field (ISRF), inverse Compton scattering becomes the dominant energy loss mechanism of cosmic ray electrons with a typical emission frequency in the X-ray regime. The ISRF depends on the one hand on the star formation rate and becomes stronger in starburst galaxies, and on the other hand increases with redshift due to the evolution of the cosmic microwave background. With a model for the star formation rate of galaxies, the ISRF, and the cosmic ray spectrum, we can calculate the expected X-ray luminosity resulting from the inverse Compton emission. Except for galaxies with an active galactic nucleus the main additional cont...

  16. Reconstructing the Vulcano Island evolution from 3D modeling of magnetic signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Rosalba; Currenti, Gilda

    2016-06-01

    High-resolution ground and marine magnetic data are exploited for a detailed definition of a 3D model of the Vulcano Island volcanic complex. The resulting 3D magnetic imaging, obtained by 3-D inverse modeling technique, has delivered useful constraints both to reconstruct the Vulcano Island evolution and to be used as input data for volcanic hazard assessment models. Our results constrained the depth and geometry of the main geo-structural features revealing more subsurface volcanic structures than exposed ones and allowing to elucidate the relationships between them. The recognition of two different magnetization sectors, approximatively coincident with the structural depressions of Piano caldera, in the southern half of the island, and La Fossa caldera at the north, suggests a complex structural and volcanic evolution. Magnetic highs identified across the southern half of the island reflect the main crystallized feeding systems, intrusions and buried vents, whose NNW-SSE preferential alignment highlights the role of the NNW-SSE Tindari-Letojanni regional system from the initial activity of the submarine edifice, to the more recent activity of the Vulcano complex. The low magnetization area, in the middle part of the island may result from hydrothermally altered rocks. Their presence not only in the central part of the volcano edifice but also in other peripheral areas, is a sign of a more diffuse historical hydrothermal activity than in present days. Moreover, the high magnetization heterogeneity within the upper flanks of La Fossa cone edifice is an imprint of a composite distribution of unaltered and altered rocks with different mechanical properties, which poses in this area a high risk level for failure processes especially during volcanic or hydrothermal crisis.

  17. Environmental Magnetic Signature Of Late Quaternary Climate and Paleoceanography in the Bering Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platzman, E. S.; Lund, S.; Kirby, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    High latitude drilling during IODP expedition 323 in the Bering Sea provides a unique opportunity to study in detail the evolution of Quaternary paleoceanography, climate and glacial history of the Bering Sea gateway to the Arctic Ocean. Our study focuses on a 400 ky interval of Quaternary marine sediments cored along the Bering Slope. Samples for magnetic analysis were obtained from sites U1339, U1343, U1344, U1345, at depths of 1008-3484 m. Sediments in these cores are a mixture of siliclastic material, derived primarily from terrigeneous sources, and biogenic material. Detailed measurements of the variation in bulk magnetic properties including natural remanent magnetization (NRM), susceptibility, ARM, and IRM, have been used to monitor changes in concentration, composition and grainsize of the magnetic components. In addition, sediment grain size analysis was preformed on biogenic free aliquots at selected intervals. Our results indicate that the dramatic bimodal magnetic intensity signal that alternates between a strong and weak NRM and magnetic susceptibility is associated with relatively course and fine grain sizes repectively. This is the opposite to the pattern estimated by our initial IODP Ex. 323 reports. Current models propose that, as has been observed in the North Atlantic, high intensities are likely to be related to high contributions of terrigenous and glaciomarine sediments deposited during glacial periods and low intensities are likely to occur during interglacials when continental sediments become trapped on the on the shelf. Contrary to this hypothesis, however, we find compelling evidence for a substantial increase in terrigenous input during the interglacial periods and what appears to be a predominantly pelagic signal during the glacial periods. Comparison of our data with other proxy data including oxygen isotopes, NGR, GRA allows us to investigate the possible causal links between these changes and the environmental history of the North

  18. Ferromagnetic grain boundary signature in die-upset RE-Fe-B magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson Lewis, L.; Zhu, Y.; Welch, D.O.

    1994-07-01

    Previous nanostructural and nanocompositional studies performed on the boundaries of deformed grains in two die-upset rare earth magnets with bulk compositions Nd{sub 13.75}Fe{sub 80.25}B{sub 6}, and Pr{sub 13.75}Fe{sub 80.25}B{sub 6} indicate that the intergranular phase in many grain boundaries is enriched in iron relative to the bulk. Preliminary magnetic data are presented that provide further evidence that this grain boundary phase is indeed iron-rich, and in fact appears to be ferromagnetic. Hysteresis loops were performed at 800 K on die-upset magnets with the above compositions. Each sample showed a clear hysteresis with coercivities between 34 and 40 Oe average remanence 4{pi}M{sub R} of 6.8 G for the Nd-based sample and 10.3 G for the Pr-based sample. The ferromagnetic signals measured at high temperature in these magnets are attributed to the iron-rich grain boundary phase. The implications of this conclusion with respect to coercivity are discussed.

  19. Prediction of Solar Flares Using Unique Signatures of Magnetic Field Images

    CERN Document Server

    Raboonik, Abbas; Alipour, Nasibe; Wheatland, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Prediction of solar flares is an important task in solar physics. The occurrence of solar flares is highly dependent on the structure and the topology of solar magnetic fields. A new method for predicting large (M and X class) flares is presented, which uses machine learning methods applied to the Zernike moments of magnetograms observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) for a period of six years from 2 June 2010 to 1 August 2016. Magnetic field images consisting of the radial component of the magnetic field are converted to finite sets of Zernike moments and fed to the Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier. Zernike moments have the capability to elicit unique features from any 2-D image, which may allow more accurate classification. The results indicate whether an arbitrary active region has the potential to produce at least one large flare. We show that the majority of large flares can be predicted within 48 hours before their occurrence, with only ...

  20. Prediction of Solar Flares Using Unique Signatures of Magnetic Field Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raboonik, Abbas; Safari, Hossein; Alipour, Nasibe; Wheatland, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    Prediction of solar flares is an important task in solar physics. The occurrence of solar flares is highly dependent on the structure and topology of solar magnetic fields. A new method for predicting large (M- and X-class) flares is presented, which uses machine learning methods applied to the Zernike moments (ZM) of magnetograms observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory for a period of six years from 2010 June 2 to 2016 August 1. Magnetic field images consisting of the radial component of the magnetic field are converted to finite sets of ZMs and fed to the support vector machine classifier. ZMs have the capability to elicit unique features from any 2D image, which may allow more accurate classification. The results indicate whether an arbitrary active region has the potential to produce at least one large flare. We show that the majority of large flares can be predicted within 48 hr before their occurrence, with only 10 false negatives out of 385 flaring active region magnetograms and 21 false positives out of 179 non-flaring active region magnetograms. Our method may provide a useful tool for the prediction of solar flares, which can be employed alongside other forecasting methods.

  1. Magnetic signature of current carrying edge localized modes filaments on the Joint European Torus tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Migliucci, P.; Naulin, Volker

    2010-01-01

    Fast magnetic pickup coils are used in forward modeling to match parameters in a simple edge localized mode (ELM) filament model. This novel method allows us to determine key parameters for the evolution of the ELM filaments, as effective mode number, radial and toroidal velocities, and average...

  2. Different molecular signatures in magnetic resonance imaging-staged facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Tasca (Giorgio); M. Pescatori (Mario); M. Monforte (Mauro); M. Mirabella (Massimiliano); E. Iannaccone (Elisabetta); R. Frusciante (Roberto); T. Cubeddu (Tiziana); F. Laschena (Francesco); P. Ottaviani (Pierfrancesco); E. Ricci (Enzo)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is one of the most common muscular dystrophies and is characterized by a non-conventional genetic mechanism activated by pathogenic D4Z4 repeat contractions. By muscle Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) we observed that T2-short tau

  3. The mean electro-motive force, current- and cross-helicity under the influence of rotation, magnetic field and shear

    CERN Document Server

    Pipin, V V

    2006-01-01

    The expressions for the mean electromotive force (MEMF) is derived for the case of the stratified magnetohydrodynamical turbulence that is subjected to the influence of rotation, large-scale magnetic field (LSMF) and shear. The derivations were made in the framework of mean-field magnetohydrodynamics. The effect of turbulent flows and fluctuating magnetic fields on the evolution of the large-scale fields is computed within the so-called "minimal tau-approximation" (MTA). The influence of the large-scale fields such as rotation, LSMF and uniform shear (differential rotation) on the different parts of the MEMF (such as $\\alpha$ - effect, turbulent diffusion, turbulent transport and etc.) is explicitly defined via factors describing the efficiency of rotational and LSMF's influence on the turbulent flows. Whenever it possible we make comparison with results obtained earlier within the second order correlation approximation (SOCA). In computing the mean electro-motive force we take into account the influence of t...

  4. Seismic heating signatures in the Japan Trench subduction plate-boundary fault zone: evidence from a preliminary rock magnetic `geothermometer'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Dekkers, Mark J.; Zhang, Bo

    2016-04-01

    Frictional heating during earthquake rupture reveals important information on earthquake mechanisms and energy dissipation. The amount of annealing varies widely and is, as yet, poorly constrained. Here we use magnetic susceptibility versus temperature measurements during cycling to increasingly elevated temperatures to constrain the maximum temperature a slip zone has experienced. The case study comprises sheared clay cored from the Japan Trench subduction plate-boundary fault zone (décollement), which accommodated the large slip of the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake. The décollement was cored during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 343, the Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project (JFAST). Heating signatures with estimated maximum temperatures ranging from ˜300 to over 500 °C are determined close to the multiple slip surfaces within the décollement. Since it is impossible to tie a specific slip surface to a certain earthquake, thermal evidence for the cumulative effect of several earthquakes is unveiled. This as yet preliminary rock magnetic `geothermometer' would be a useful tool to detect seismic heating along faults that experienced medium temperature rise, a range which is difficult to assess with other approaches.

  5. Generalized helicity and Beltrami fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buniy, Roman V., E-mail: roman.buniy@gmail.com [Schmid College of Science, Chapman University, Orange, CA 92866 (United States); Isaac Newton Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0EH (United Kingdom); Kephart, Thomas W., E-mail: tom.kephart@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Isaac Newton Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0EH (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15

    We propose covariant and non-abelian generalizations of the magnetic helicity and Beltrami equation. The gauge invariance, variational principle, conserved current, energy–momentum tensor and choice of boundary conditions elucidate the subject. In particular, we prove that any extremal of the Yang–Mills action functional 1/4 ∫{sub Ω}trF{sub μν}F{sup μν}d{sup 4}x subject to the local constraint ε{sup μναβ}trF{sub μν}F{sub αβ}=0 satisfies the covariant non-abelian Beltrami equation. -- Highlights: •We introduce the covariant non-abelian helicity and Beltrami equation. •The Yang–Mills action and instanton term constraint lead to the Beltrami equation. •Solutions of the Beltrami equation conserve helicity.

  6. Fault imprint in clay units: magnetic fabric, structural and mineralogical signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Eva; Homberg, Catherine; Schnyder, Johann; Person, Alain; du Peloux1, Arthur; Dick, Pierre

    2014-05-01

    Fault-induced deformations in clay units can be difficult to decipher because strain markers are not always visible at outcrop scale or using geophysical methods. Previous studies have indicated that the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (ASM) provides a powerful and rapid technique to investigate tectonic deformation in clay units even when they appear quite homogenous and undeformed at the outcrop scale (Lee et al. 1990, Mattei et al. 1997). We report here a study based on ASM, structural analysis and magnetic and clay mineralogy from two boreholes (TF1 and ASM1)drilled horizontally in the Experimental Station of Tournemire of the Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) in Aveyron (France). The boreholes intersect a N-S trending strike-slip fault from west to east. The ASM study indicates the evolution of the magnetic fabric from the undeformed host rock to the fault core. Also, all the fractures cutting the studied interval of the core have been measured as well as the slip vectors which are generally well preserved. In the two boreholes, the undeformed sediments outside the fault zone are characterized by an oblate fabric, a sub-vertical minimum susceptibility axis (k3) perpendicular to the bedding plane and without magnetic lineation. Within the fault zone, a tilt in the bedding plane has been observed in two boreholes TF1 and ASM1. In addition, in the TF1 core, the fault area presents a tectonic fabric characterized by a triaxial AMS ellipsoid. Moreover, the magnetic lineation increases and k3 switches from a vertical to a sub-horizontal plane. This kind of fabric has not been observed in borehole ASM1. The structural analysis of the individual fractures making the fault zone indicates a complex tectonic history with different imprint in the two fault segments cut by the two boreholes. The large majority of fractures correspond to dextral strike-slip faults but normal and reverse movements were observed and are more or less

  7. Acoustic signatures in the Cosmic Microwave Background bispectrum from primordial magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Zhang, Hong-Bo

    2010-01-01

    Using the full radiation transfer function, we numerically calculate the CMB angular bispectrum seeded by the compensated magnetic scalar density mode. We find that, for the primordial magnetic fields characterized by index $n_B=-2.9$ and mean-field amplitude $B_{\\lam}=9{\\rm~nG}$, the angular bispectrum is dominated by two primordial magnetic shapes. For the reduced bispectrum $b^{(1)}_{l_1l_2l_3}$ seeded by primordial shape $f^{(1)}(k,q,p)$, both the profile and amplitude look similar to those of the primary CMB anisotropies. However, for different parameters ($l_1,l_2$), the bispectrum $b^{(1)}_{l_1l_2l_3}$ oscillate around different asymptotic values in the high-$l_3$ regime. This feature is different from the standard case where all modes approach to zero asymptotically in the high-$l$ limit. On the other hand, the behaviors of reduced bispectrum $b^{(2)}_{l_1l_2l_3}$ sourced by the shape $f^{(2)}(k,q,p)$ are quite different from those of the primary curvature perturbations. In the low-$l$ regime, its amp...

  8. Magnetoelectric-field helicities and reactive power flows

    CERN Document Server

    Kamenetskii, E O; Shavit, R

    2015-01-01

    The dual symmetry between the electric and magnetic fields underlies Maxwell's electrodynamics. Due to this symmetry one can describe topological properties of an electromagnetic field in free space and obtain the conservation law of optical (electromagnetic) helicity. What kind of the field helicity one can expect to see when the electromagnetic-field symmetry is broken? The near fields originated from small ferrite particles with magnetic dipolar mode (MDM) oscillations are the fields with the electric and magnetic components, but with broken dual (electric-magnetic) symmetry. These fields, called magnetoelectric (ME) fields, have topological properties different from such properties of electromagnetic fields. The helicity states of ME fields are topologically protected quantum like states. In this paper, we study the helicity properties of ME fields. We analyze conservation laws of the ME-field helicity and show that the helicity density is related to an imaginary part of the complex power flow density. We...

  9. Stochastic Particle Acceleration by Helical Turbulence in Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Fleishman, Gregory D

    2012-01-01

    Flaring release of magnetic energy in solar corona is only possible if the magnetic field deviates from a potential one. We show that the linear MHD modes excited on top of the non-potential magnetic field possess a nonzero kinetic helicity. Accordingly, this necessarily results in a noticeable kinetic helicity of the turbulence, composed of these linear modes with various scales and random phases, generated at the flare site by the primary energy release, which may be important for many applications. In particular, a nonzero turbulence helicity has a potentially strong effect on the particle acceleration because the helical component of the turbulence induces a mean regular large-scale (DC) electric field capable of directly accelerating the charged particles in addition to the commonly considered stochastic turbulent electric field. In this paper, we derive the kinetic helicity density of the linear MHD modes excited on top of a twisted large-scale magnetic field, estimate the corresponding turbulence helic...

  10. Magnetic signatures of ion cyclotron waves during Cassini's high-inclination orbits of Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Zachary; Simon, Sven

    2017-02-01

    Based on magnetic field data from Cassini's high-inclination orbits of Saturn (radius RS = 60 , 268 km), we analyze the latitudinal distribution of ion cyclotron waves in the giant planet's magnetosphere. Our survey takes into account magnetic field data from all high-inclination orbits between 2004 and 2015. We analyze the dependency of the occurrence rate and amplitude of the ion cyclotron waves on radial distance ρ to Saturn's rotation axis, vertical distance z to Saturn's equatorial plane, and magnetic latitude λ. The occurrence rate of ion cyclotron waves is approximately 100% in Saturn's equatorial plane between the orbits of Enceladus and Dione and decreases to 50% at altitudes of | z | ≈ 0.6RS . Ion cyclotron waves were detected up to | z | = 2.0RS . The occurrence rate displays strong, non-monotonic variations with respect to ρ, z, and λ. The vertical amplitude profile of the waves exhibits an M-like pattern with two distinct peaks near z = ± 0.3RS and the central minimum at z=0. Compared to earlier observations, we find this M-like structure to be inflated in±z direction by a factor of three. The available magnetic field data provides only weak evidence for a local impact of Enceladus and Dione on the ion cyclotron wave field. Using the observed Doppler shift of the ion cyclotron wave frequency during Cassini's high-inclination orbits, we demonstrate the existence of a narrow band of bidirectional wave propagation. This band is centered around Saturn's equatorial plane and possesses a half-width of | z | = 0.15RS , which agrees well with the vertical scale height of Saturn's neutral cloud. To the north of this band, all ion cyclotron waves propagate towards the north (z > 0); and to the south, all waves propagate towards the south (z < 0). In companion with our previous study (Meeks et al., 2016), this survey provides the complete three-dimensional picture of the ion cyclotron wave field between the orbits of Enceladus and Rhea during the Cassini

  11. Magnetic and geochemical signatures of flood layers in a lake system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Støren, Eivind W. N.; Paasche, Øyvind; Hirt, Ann M.; Kumari, Monika

    2016-10-01

    River floods holds the capasity to erode and transport sediments that are deposited whenever the discharge is reduced. In catchments that are subjected to repeated flooding, downstream lakes can therefore contain a record of past events across multiple timescales. High-resolution core scanning analyses, such as X-ray fluorescence (XRF) scanning and magnetic susceptibility (MS) provide data that are frequently used to detect flood layers in soft sediment archives, such as lakes, fjords and ocean basins. Deposits of past floods also can potentially reveal information about the evolution of flood events as well as source area. Here we explore ways in which subtle variability in high-resolution data can be utilized and subsequently vetted by high-precision measurements in order to delineate the copious information that can be extracted from soft sediment records. By combining magnetic hysteresis measurements and first-order reversal curves (FORCs) with inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES) measurements of chemical elements on 36 samples, questions about flood dynamics and variability are raised, and also sources of noise in high-resolution scanning techniques are discussed. Specifically, we show that a lake flood record from Southern Norway containing 92 floods distributed over 10,000 years can be subdivided into two groups of floods that were generated either by spring snow melting, intense summer rainstorms, or a combination of both. The temporal evolution of this pattern shows a marked shift toward spring floods around 2000 years ago compared to the earlier part of the record.

  12. Signature of Collision of Magnetic Flux Tubes in the Quiet Solar Photosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Andic, Aleksandra

    2010-01-01

    Collision of the magnetic flux tubes in the Quiet Sun was proposed as one of the possible sources for the heating of the solar atmosphere (Furusawa and Sakai, 2000). The solar photosphere was observed using the New Solar Telescope ad Big Bear Solar Observatory. In TiO spectral line at 705.68 nm we approached resolution of 0.1". The horizontal plasma wave was observed spreading from the larger bright point. Shorty after this wave an increase in the oscillatory power appeared at the same location as the observed bright point. This behavior matches some of the results from the simulation of the collision of the two flux tubes with a weak current.

  13. Helical channel design and technology for cooling of muon beams

    CERN Document Server

    Yonehara, K; Johnson, R P

    2012-01-01

    Novel magnetic helical channel designs for capture and cooling of bright muon beams are being developed using numerical simulations based on new inventions such as helical solenoid (HS) magnets and hydrogen-pressurized RF (HPRF) cavities. We are close to the factor of a million six-dimensional phase space (6D) reduction needed for muon colliders. Recent experimental and simulation results are presented.

  14. Evidence of internal rotation and a helical magnetic field in the jet of the quasar NRAO150

    CERN Document Server

    Molina, Sol N; Gómez, José L; Krichbaum, Thomas P; Martí-Vidal, Iván; Roy, Alan L

    2014-01-01

    The source NRAO150 is a very prominent millimeter to radio emitting quasar at redshift z=1.52 for which previous millimeter VLBI observations revealed a fast counterclockwise rotation of the innermost regions of the jet. Here we present new polarimetric multi-epoch VLBI-imaging observations of NRAO150 performed at 8, 15, 22, 43, and 86GHz with the VLBA and GMVA between 2006 and 2010. All new and previous observational evidence are consistent with an interpretation of the source behavior where the jet is seen at an extremely small angle to the line of sight, and the high frequency emitting regions in NRAO150 rotate at high speeds on the plane of the sky with respect to a reference point that does not need to be related to any particularly prominent jet feature. The observed polarization angle distribution at 22, 43, and 86 GHz during observing epochs with high polarization degree suggests that we have detected the toroidal component of the magnetic field threading the innermost jet plasma regions. This is also...

  15. Adjustable phase planar helical undulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Roger G.; Lidia, Steve

    1993-11-01

    We present here the design description of a new type of planar helical undulator, which we are constructing for the SPEAR storage ring at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. It comprises four rows of pure permanent magnet blocks, one row in each quadrant about the axis defined by the electron beam. Rows may be translated longitudinally with respect to each other to change the helicity of the magnetic field they create at the position of the beam. They may also be translated longitudinally to vary the energy of the x-rays emitted, unlike designs where this function is performed by varying the gap between the rows. This work includes numerical calculations of the fields, electron trajectories, and x-ray spectra, including off-axis effects.

  16. An experimental superconducting helical undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caspi, S.; Taylor, C. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Improvements in the technology of superconducting magnets for high energy physics and recent advancements in SC materials with the artificial pinning centers (APC){sup 2}, have made a bifilar helical SC device an attractive candidate for a single-pass free electron laser (FEL){sup 3}. Initial studies have suggested that a 6.5 mm inner diameter helical device, with a 27 mm period, can generate a central field of 2-2.5 Tesla. Additional studies have also suggested that with a stored energy of 300 J/m, such a device can be made self-protecting in the event of a quench. However, since the most critical area associated with high current density SC magnets is connected with quenching and training, a short experimental device will have to be built and tested. In this paper we discuss technical issues relevant to the construction of such a device, including a conceptual design, fields, and forces.

  17. Segregation of helicity in inertial wave packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, A.

    2017-03-01

    Inertial waves are known to exist in the Earth's rapidly rotating outer core and could be important for the dynamo generation. It is well known that a monochromatic inertial plane wave traveling parallel to the rotation axis (along positive z ) has negative helicity while the wave traveling antiparallel (negative z ) has positive helicity. Such a helicity segregation, north and south of the equator, is necessary for the α2-dynamo model based on inertial waves [Davidson, Geophys. J. Int. 198, 1832 (2014), 10.1093/gji/ggu220] to work. The core is likely to contain a myriad of inertial waves of different wave numbers and frequencies. In this study, we investigate whether this characteristic of helicity segregation also holds for an inertial wave packet comprising waves with the same sign of Cg ,z, the z component of group velocity. We first derive the polarization relations for inertial waves and subsequently derive the resultant helicity in wave packets forming as a result of superposition of two or more waves. We find that the helicity segregation does hold for an inertial wave packet unless the wave numbers of the constituent waves are widely separated. In the latter case, regions of opposite color helicity do appear, but the mean helicity retains the expected sign. An illustration of this observation is provided by (a) calculating the resultant helicity for a wave packet formed by superposition of four upward-propagating inertial waves with different wave vectors and (b) conducting the direct numerical simulation of a Gaussian eddy under rapid rotation. Last, the possible effects of other forces such as the viscous dissipation, the Lorentz force, buoyancy stratification, and nonlinearity on helicity are investigated and discussed. The helical structure of the wave packet is likely to remain unaffected by dissipation or the magnetic field, but can be modified by the presence of linearly stable stratification and nonlinearity.

  18. Design study of a normal conducting helical snake for AGS

    CERN Document Server

    Takano, Junpei; Okamura, Masahiro; Roser, Thomas; MacKay, William W; Luccio, Alfredo U; Takano, Koji

    2004-01-01

    A new normal conducting snake magnet is being fabricated for the Alternate Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) project, a superconducting type helical dipole magnets had been developed and it performed successfully in high-energy polarized proton acceleration. The new AGS helical snake has the same basic magnetic structure but is more complicated. To achieve no beam shift and no beam deflection in one magnetic device, helical pitches and rotating angles were carefully calculated. Compared to a superconducting magnet, a normal warm magnet must have a large cross- sectional area of conductors which make it difficult to design a magnet with large helical pitch. We developed a modified window frame structure to accommodate the large number of conductors. Its three dimensional magnetic field was simulated by using OPERA3D/TOSCA. 3 Refs.

  19. Currents for Arbitrary Helicity

    CERN Document Server

    Dragon, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Using Mackey's classification of unitary representations of the Poincar\\'e group on massles states of arbitrary helicity we disprove the claim that states with helicity |h|>=1 cannot couple to a conserved current by constructing such a current.

  20. Ion temperature gradient modes in toroidal helical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, T. [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Sugama, H.; Kanno, R.; Okamoto, M.

    2000-04-01

    Linear properties of ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes in helical systems are studied. The real frequency, growth rate, and eigenfunction are obtained for both stable and unstable cases by solving a kinetic integral equation with proper analytic continuation performed in the complex frequency plane. Based on the model magnetic configuration for toroidal helical systems like the Large Helical Device (LHD), dependences of the ITG mode properties on various plasma equilibrium parameters are investigated. Particularly, relative effects of {nabla}B-curvature drifts driven by the toroidicity and by the helical ripples are examined in order to compare the ITG modes in helical systems with those in tokamaks. (author)

  1. Kinematic dynamo induced by helical waves

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Xing

    2014-01-01

    We investigate numerically the kinematic dynamo induced by the superposition of two helical waves in a periodic box as a simplified model to understand the dynamo action in astronomical bodies. The effects of magnetic Reynolds number, wavenumber and wave frequency on the dynamo action are studied. It is found that this helical-wave dynamo is a slow dynamo. There exists an optimal wavenumber for the dynamo growth rate. A lower wave frequency facilitates the dynamo action and the oscillations o...

  2. Different molecular signatures in magnetic resonance imaging-staged facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy muscles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Tasca

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD is one of the most common muscular dystrophies and is characterized by a non-conventional genetic mechanism activated by pathogenic D4Z4 repeat contractions. By muscle Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI we observed that T2-short tau inversion recovery (T2-STIR sequences identify two different conditions in which each muscle can be found before the irreversible dystrophic alteration, marked as T1-weighted sequence hyperintensity, takes place. We studied these conditions in order to obtain further information on the molecular mechanisms involved in the selective wasting of single muscles or muscle groups in this disease. METHODS: Histopathology, gene expression profiling and real time PCR were performed on biopsies from FSHD muscles with different MRI pattern (T1-weighted normal/T2-STIR normal and T1-weighted normal/T2-STIR hyperintense. Data were compared with those from inflammatory myopathies, dysferlinopathies and normal controls. In order to validate obtained results, two additional FSHD samples with different MRI pattern were analyzed. RESULTS: Myopathic and inflammatory changes characterized T2-STIR hyperintense FSHD muscles, at variance with T2-STIR normal muscles. These two states could be easily distinguished from each other by their transcriptional profile. The comparison between T2-STIR hyperintense FSHD muscles and inflammatory myopathy muscles showed peculiar changes, although many alterations were shared among these conditions. CONCLUSIONS: At the single muscle level, different stages of the disease correspond to the two MRI patterns. T2-STIR hyperintense FSHD muscles are more similar to inflammatory myopathies than to T2-STIR normal FSHD muscles or other muscular dystrophies, and share with them upregulation of genes involved in innate and adaptive immunity. Our data suggest that selective inflammation, together with perturbation in biological processes such as neoangiogenesis

  3. Scaling laws in decaying helical 3D magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Christensson, M; Brandenburg, A; Christensson, Mattias; Hindmarsh, Mark; Brandenburg, Axel

    2002-01-01

    We study the evolution of growth and decay laws for the magnetic field coherence length xi, energy E_M and magnetic helicity H in freely decaying 3D MHD turbulence. We show that with certain assumptions, self-similarity of the magnetic power spectrum alone implies that xi ~ t^{1/2}. This in turn implies that magnetic helicity decays as H ~ t^{-2s}, where s=(xi_diff/xi_H)^2, in terms of xi_diff, the diffusion length scale, and xi_H, a length scale defined from the helicity power spectrum. The relative magnetic helicity remains constant, implying that the magnetic energy decays as E_M ~ t^{-0.5-2s}. At late times s is constant and inversely proportional to the magnetic Reynolds number Re_M.

  4. Galactic dynamo and helicity losses through fountain flow

    CERN Document Server

    Shukurov, A; Subramanian, K; Brandenburg, A; Shukurov, Anvar; Sokoloff, Dmitry; Subramanian, Kandaswamy; Brandenburg, Axel

    2006-01-01

    Nonlinear behaviour of galactic dynamos is studied, allowing for magnetic helicity removal by the galactic fountain flow. A suitable advection speed is estimated, and a one-dimensional mean-field dynamo model with dynamic alpha-effect is explored. It is shown that the galactic fountain flow is efficient in removing magnetic helicity from galactic discs. This alleviates the constraint on the galactic mean-field dynamo resulting from magnetic helicity conservation and thereby allows the mean magnetic field to saturate at a strength comparable to equipartition with the turbulent kinetic energy.

  5. Numerical Simulations of Helicity Condensation in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L.; DeVore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2015-01-01

    The helicity condensation model has been proposed by Antiochos (2013) to explain the observed smoothness of coronal loops and the observed buildup of magnetic shear at filament channels. The basic hypothesis of the model is that magnetic reconnection in the corona causes the magnetic stress injected by photospheric motions to collect only at those special locations where prominences form. In this work we present the first detailed quantitative MHD simulations of the reconnection evolution proposed by the helicity condensation model. We use the well-known ansatz of modeling the closed corona as an initially uniform field between two horizontal photospheric plates. The system is driven by applying photospheric rotational flows that inject magnetic helicity into the system. The flows are confined to a finite region on the photosphere so as to mimic the finite flux system of, for example, a bipolar active region. The calculations demonstrate that, contrary to common belief, coronal loops having opposite helicity do not reconnect, whereas loops having the same sense of helicity do reconnect. Furthermore, we find that for a given amount of helicity injected into the corona, the evolution of the magnetic shear is insensitive to whether the pattern of driving photospheric motions is fixed or quasi-random. In all cases, the shear propagates via reconnection to the boundary of the flow region while the total magnetic helicity is conserved, as predicted by the model. We discuss the implications of our results for solar observations and for future, more realistic simulations of the helicity condensation process.

  6. Shearing Wind Helicity and Thermal Wind Helicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Helicity is defined as H=V.ω, where V and ω are the velocity and vorticity vectors, respectively.Many works have pointed out that the larger the helicity is, the longer the life cycle of the weather system is. However, the direct relationship of the helicity to the evolution of the weather system is not quite clear. In this paper, the concept of helicity is generalized as shearing wind helicity (SWH). Dynamically,it is found that the average SWH is directly related to the increase of the average cyclonic rotation of the weather system. Physically, it is also pointed out that the SWH, as a matter of fact, is the sum of the torsion terms and the divergence term in the vorticity equation. Thermal wind helicity (TWH), as a derivative of SWH, is also discussed here because it links the temperature field and the vertical wind field. These two quantities may be effective for diagnosing a weather system. This paper applies these two quantities in cylindrical coordinates to study the development of Hurricane Andrew to validate their practical use. Through analyzing the hurricane, it is found that TWH can well describe the characteristics of the hurricane such as the strong convection and release of latent heat. SWH is not only a good quantity for diagnosing the weather system, but also an effective one for diagnosing the development of the hurricane.

  7. Novel 1D Copper(ll) Helical Chain Formed by Weak Coordination-driven Self-assembly: Synthesis, Structure, and Magnetic Property

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄婉云; 陈自卢; 邹华红; 刘冬成; 梁福沛

    2012-01-01

    A novel 1D copper(II) helical chain is constructed through the connection of tetranuclear copper(ll) units [Cu4(L)(Py)4] (H8L=N,N'-(BINOL-3,3'-dicarboxyl)-disalicylhydrazide, where BINOL is 1,l'-binaphthalenyl-2,2'- diol, py=pyridine) by weak coordination-driven self-assembly, and characterized by IR, single crystal X-ray dif- fraction, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray power diffraction analysis. Interestingly, the helical chains are packed in an alternating left-(M) and right-handed (P) chirality, the orientation of the helices was determined by the axial chirality of the ligand. The complex shows antiferromagnetic interactions between the copper centers.

  8. Helicity at Photospheric and Chromospheric Heights

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, S K; Sankarasubramanian, K

    2009-01-01

    In the solar atmosphere the twist parameter $\\alpha$ has the same sign as magnetic helicity. It has been observed using photospheric vector magnetograms that negative/positive helicity is dominant in the northern/southern hemisphere of the Sun. Chromospheric features show dextral/sinistral dominance in the northern/southern hemisphere and sigmoids observed in X-rays also have a dominant sense of reverse-S/forward-S in the northern/southern hemisphere. It is of interest whether individual features have one-to-one correspondence in terms of helicity at different atmospheric heights. We use UBF \\Halpha images from the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST) and other \\Halpha data from Udaipur Solar Observatory and Big Bear Solar Observatory. Near-simultaneous vector magnetograms from the DST are used to establish one-to-one correspondence of helicity at photospheric and chromospheric heights. We plan to extend this investigation with more data including coronal intensities.

  9. Spin versus helicity in processes involving transversity

    CERN Document Server

    Mekhfi, Mustapha

    2011-01-01

    We construct the spin formalism in order to deal in a direct and natural way with processes involving transversity which are now of increasing popularity. The helicity formalism which is more appropriate for collision processes of definite helicity has been so far used also to manage processes with transversity, but at the price of computing numerous helicity amplitudes generally involving unnecessary kinematical variables.In a second step we work out the correspondence between both formalisms and retrieve in another way all results of the helicity formalism but in simpler forms.We then compute certain processes for comparison.A special process:the quark dipole magnetic moment is shown to be exclusively treated within the spin formalism as it is directly related to the transverse spin of the quark inside the baryon.

  10. Microfluidic Lithography of Bioinspired Helical Micromotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yunru; Shang, Luoran; Gao, Wei; Zhao, Ze; Wang, Huan; Zhao, Yuanjin

    2017-07-29

    Considerable efforts have been devoted to developing artificial micro/nanomotors that can convert energy into movement. A flow lithography integrated microfluidic spinning and spiraling system is developed for the continuous generation of bioinspired helical micromotors. Because the generation processes could be precisely tuned by adjusting the flow rates and the illuminating frequency, the length, diameter, and pitch of the helical micromotors were highly controllable. Benefiting from the fast online gelation and polymerization, the resultant helical micromotors could be imparted with Janus, triplex, and core-shell cross-sectional structures that have never been achieved by other methods. Owing to the spatially controlled encapsulation of functional nanoparticles in the microstructures, the helical micromotors can perform locomotion not only by magnetically actuated rotation or corkscrew motion but also through chemically powered catalytic reaction. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Current helicity and electromotive force of magnetoconvection influenced by helical background fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ruediger, Guenther

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the empirical finding that the known hemispheric rules for the current helicity at the solar surface are not strict, the excitation of small-scale current helicity by the influence of a large-scale helical magnetic background fields on nonrotating magnetoconvection is demonstrated. It is shown within a quasilinear analytic theory of driven turbulence and by nonlinear simulations of magnetoconvection that the resulting small-scale current helicity has the same sign as the large-scale current helicity while the ratio of both pseudo-scalars is of the order of the magnetic Reynolds number of the convection. The same models do not provide finite values of the small-scale kinetic helicity. On the other hand, a turbulence-induced electromotive force is produced including the diamagnetic pumping term as well as the eddy diffusivity but no alpha effect. It is thus argued that the relations by Pouquet & Patterson (1978) and Keinigs (1983) for the simultaneous existence of small-scale current helicity a...

  12. Pressure drop and heat transfer of a mercury single-phase flow and an air-mercury two-phase flow in a helical tube under a strong magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Minoru E-mail: mtakahas@nr.titech.ac.jp; Momozaki, Yoichi

    2000-11-01

    For the reduction of a large magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) pressure drop of a liquid metal single-phase flow, a liquid metal two-phase flow cooling system has been proposed. As a fundamental study, MHD pressure drops and heat transfer characteristics of a mercury single-phase flow and an air-mercury two-phase flow were experimentally investigated. A strong transverse magnetic field relevant to the fusion reactor conditions was applied to the mercury single-phase flow and the air-mercury two-phase flow in a helically coiled tube that was inserted in the vertical bore of a solenoidal superconducting magnet. It was found that MHD pressure drops of a mercury single-phase flow in the helically coiled tube were nearly equal to those in a straight tube. The Nusselt number at an outside wall was higher than that at an inside wall both in the mercury single-phase flow in the absence and presence of a magnetic field. The Nusselt number of the mercury single-phase flow decreased, increased and again decreased with an increase in the magnetic flux density. MHD pressure drops did not decrease appreciably by injecting air into a mercury flow and changing the mercury flow into the air-mercury two-phase flow. Remarkable heat transfer enhancement did not appear by the air injection. The injection of air into the mercury flow enhanced heat transfer in the ranges of high mercury flow rate and low magnetic flux density, possibly due to the agitation effect of air bubbles. The air injection deteriorated heat transfer in the range of low mercury flow rates possibly because of the occupation of air near heating wall.

  13. A Helicity-Based Method to Infer the CME Magnetic Field Magnitude in Sun and Geospace: Generalization and Extension to Sun-Like and M-Dwarf Stars and Implications for Exoplanet Habitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsourakos, S.; Georgoulis, M. K.

    2017-07-01

    Patsourakos et al. ( Astrophys. J. 817, 14, 2016) and Patsourakos and Georgoulis ( Astron. Astrophys. 595, A121, 2016) introduced a method to infer the axial magnetic field in flux-rope coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the solar corona and farther away in the interplanetary medium. The method, based on the conservation principle of magnetic helicity, uses the relative magnetic helicity of the solar source region as input estimates, along with the radius and length of the corresponding CME flux rope. The method was initially applied to cylindrical force-free flux ropes, with encouraging results. We hereby extend our framework along two distinct lines. First, we generalize our formalism to several possible flux-rope configurations (linear and nonlinear force-free, non-force-free, spheromak, and torus) to investigate the dependence of the resulting CME axial magnetic field on input parameters and the employed flux-rope configuration. Second, we generalize our framework to both Sun-like and active M-dwarf stars hosting superflares. In a qualitative sense, we find that Earth may not experience severe atmosphere-eroding magnetospheric compression even for eruptive solar superflares with energies {≈} 104 times higher than those of the largest Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) X-class flares currently observed. In addition, the two recently discovered exoplanets with the highest Earth-similarity index, Kepler 438b and Proxima b, seem to lie in the prohibitive zone of atmospheric erosion due to interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs), except when they possess planetary magnetic fields that are much higher than that of Earth.

  14. Signature Balancing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordkamp, H.W.; Brink, M. van den

    2006-01-01

    Signatures are an important part of the design of a ship. In an ideal situation, signatures must be as low as possible. However, due to budget constraints it is most unlikely to reach this ideal situation. The arising question is which levels of signatures are optimal given the different scenarios i

  15. Helicity and its role in the varieties of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, David C.; Bates, Jason W.

    Magnetic helicity has appeared as an important but slippery quantity in the theory of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in two contexts: (1) as a slowly-decaying ideal invariant that can control to some extent the formation of a "relaxed" MHD state—one far from thermal equilibrium—in laboratory confinement devices such as the toroidal pinch; and (2) as a potentially inversely-cascadable global quantity in driven, homogeneous MHD turbulence. In the former case, the origin of helicity is straightforwardly clear: electric current is forced to flow along a dc magnetic field, generating poloidal magnetic flux and causing the magnetic field lines to kink up, helically. In the latter, helicity's origins and physical interpretation are more obscure, sometimes having to do with mechanically driven helical motions which supposedly generate magnetic helicity that, however, no longer has any obvious "linked flux" interpretation. In both cases, its usefulness and even its definition sometimes depend sensitively on boundary conditions in a way that, say, those for energy do not. We will examine what the utility of the concept of magnetic helicity has so far been shown to be in discussing turbulent MHD, and comment on some of the ways it differs from other global ideal invariants that have been discussed, such as kinetic energy in 2D Navier-Stokes flows, and mean-square magnetic vector potential in 2D MHD. Attention will be devoted to the evidence for variational principles such as "maximal helicity," or "minimum energy," conjectured to predict various relaxation processes and late-time laminar states in evolving MHD situations. What is believed to be an important distinction between applications of the principles to decaying and driven situations will be stressed. Our discussion will be confined to the cases of small but non-zero transport coefficients, and will not deal with any possible role of helicity in ideal MHD.

  16. Driving Solar Eruptions via Helicity Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Joel Timothy; Antiochos, Spiro K.; DeVore, C. Richard

    2017-08-01

    One of the important questions in solar physics is, “How does the Sun store and release energy in coronal mass ejections"? Key to answering this question is understanding how the sun (a) stores magnetic energy in the form of a solar filament and (b) suddenly releases this energy as a coronal mass ejection. An important model for the energy release is the ‘magnetic breakout’ - a positive-feedback mechanism between filament ejection and magnetic reconnection. Recent theory and numerical calculations have demonstrated that helicity injected into the corona via photospheric driving can accumulate in the form of a filament channel of strongly sheared magnetic fields that can provide the free energy for a coronal mass ejection. We present preliminary calculations that, for the first time, incorporate helicity injection in a breakout topology to model a fully self-consistent eruption, from filament formation to ejection.

  17. Direct numerical simulations of helical dynamo action: MHD and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Gómez

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetohydrodynamic dynamo action is often invoked to explain the existence of magnetic fields in several astronomical objects. In this work, we present direct numerical simulations of MHD helical dynamos, to study the exponential growth and saturation of magnetic fields. Simulations are made within the framework of incompressible flows and using periodic boundary conditions. The statistical properties of the flow are studied, and it is found that its helicity displays strong spatial fluctuations. Regions with large kinetic helicity are also strongly concentrated in space, forming elongated structures. In dynamo simulations using these flows, we found that the growth rate and the saturation level of magnetic energy and magnetic helicity reach an asymptotic value as the Reynolds number is increased. Finally, extensions of the MHD theory to include kinetic effects relevant in astrophysical environments are discussed.

  18. Physics of collapses in toroidal helical plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Itoh, Sanae; Fukuyama, Atsushi; Yagi, Masatoshi

    1998-12-31

    Theoretical model for the collapse events in toroidal helical plasmas with magnetic hill is presented. There exists a turbulent-turbulent transition at a critical pressure gradient, leading to a sudden increase of the anomalous transport. When the magnetic shear is low, the nonlinear excitation of the global mode is possible. This model explains an abrupt growth of the perturbations, i.e., the trigger phenomena. Achievable limit of the plasma beta value is discussed. (author)

  19. Chiral Exact Relations for Helicities in Hall Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Supratik

    2016-01-01

    Besides total energy, three-dimensional incompressible Hall magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) possesses two inviscid invariants which are the magnetic helicity and the generalized helicity. New exact relations are derived for homogeneous (non-isotropic) stationary Hall MHD turbulence (and also for its inertialess electron MHD limit) with non-zero helicities and in the asymptotic limit of large Reynolds numbers. The universal laws are written only in terms of mixed second-order structure functions, i.e. the scalar product of two different increments. It provides, therefore, a direct measurement of the dissipation rates for the corresponding invariant flux. This study shows that the generalized helicity cascade is strongly linked to the left polarized fluctuations while the magnetic helicity cascade is linked to the right polarized fluctuations.

  20. Chiral exact relations for helicities in Hall magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Supratik; Galtier, Sébastien

    2016-03-01

    Besides total energy, three-dimensional incompressible Hall magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) possesses two inviscid invariants, which are the magnetic helicity and the generalized helicity. Exact relations are derived for homogeneous (nonisotropic) stationary Hall MHD turbulence (and also for its inertialess electron MHD limit) with nonzero helicities and in the asymptotic limit of large Reynolds numbers. The universal laws are written only in terms of mixed second-order structure functions, i.e., the scalar product of two different increments. It provides, therefore, a direct measurement of the dissipation rates for the corresponding invariant flux. This study shows that the generalized helicity cascade is strongly linked to the left polarized fluctuations, while the magnetic helicity cascade is linked to the right polarized fluctuations.

  1. Coordination chemistry strategies for dynamic helicates: time-programmable chirality switching with labile and inert metal helicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Hiroyuki; Tsukube, Hiroshi

    2012-11-01

    'Chirality switching' is one of the most important chemical processes controlling many biological systems. DNAs and proteins often work as time-programmed functional helices, in which specific external stimuli alter the helical direction and tune the time scale of subsequent events. Although a variety of organic foldamers and their hybrids with natural helices have been developed, we highlight coordination chemistry strategies for development of structurally and functionally defined metal helicates. These metal helicates have characteristic coordination geometries, redox reactivities and spectroscopic/magnetic properties as well as complex chiralities. Several kinds of inert metal helicates maintain rigid helical structures and their stereoisomers are separable by optical resolution techniques, while labile metal helicates offer dynamic inversion of their helical structures via non-covalent interactions with external chemical signals. The latter particularly have dynamically ordered helical structures, which are controlled by the combinations of metal centres and chiral ligands. They further function as time-programmable switches of chirality-derived dynamic rotations, translations, stretching and shape flipping, which are useful applications in nanoscience and related technology.

  2. Can carotid stenosis be operated without arteriography? Contribution of magnetic resonance and helical computerized tomography angiography; Peut-on operer une stenose carotidienne sans arteriographie? Apport de l`angioMR et/ou de l`angioscanner helicoidal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auffrau-Calvier, E.; Kersaint-Gilly, A. de; Desal, H.A.; Viarouge, M.P.; Havet, T. [Hopital Laennec, 44 - Nantes (France)

    1996-09-01

    The aim of this work is to ascertain the role of the magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and to compare it with the Doppler effect, the X-ray angiography and the new method of helical computerized tomography. Seventy one carotid bifurcations in 37 patients with suspected cerebral vascular events has been evaluated with the MRA and digitalized angiography, the reference method. The obtained data corroborate the good results proposed by other authors reporting in the literature and allow to propose this examination as a new means of investigating carotid bifurcations. Work with the helical computerized tomography appears to be promising too but there are few reported series. Therefore, there appears to be two interesting points: the reliability of distinguishing between very severe stenosis and occlusion, and the fine-tuned analysis of the plaque with detection of ulcerations. When a consistent approach is used to the evaluation of the carotid bifurcation, the Willis circle and the cerebral parenchyma, the MRA can complete the Doppler echo data and the preoperative arteriography can only be used in patients when the MRA and the Doppler echo results disagree. (authors)

  3. Muon Beam Helical Cooling Channel Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Flanagan, G; Kazakevich, G M; Marhauser, Frank; Neubauer, Michael; Roberts, T; Yoshikawa, C; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Morozov, Vasiliy; Kashikhin, V S; Lopes, Mattlock; Tollestrup, A; Yonehara, Katsuya; Zloblin, A

    2013-06-01

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet.

  4. Helical superconducting black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donos, Aristomenis; Gauntlett, Jerome P

    2012-05-25

    We construct novel static, asymptotically five-dimensional anti-de Sitter black hole solutions with Bianchi type-VII(0) symmetry that are holographically dual to superconducting phases in four spacetime dimensions with a helical p-wave order. We calculate the precise temperature dependence of the pitch of the helical order. At zero temperature the black holes have a vanishing entropy and approach domain wall solutions that reveal homogenous, nonisotropic dual ground states with an emergent scaling symmetry.

  5. Local and nonlocal advected invariants and helicities in magnetohydrodynamics and gas dynamics I: Lie dragging approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, G. M.; Dasgupta, B.; McKenzie, J. F.; Hu, Q.; Zank, G. P.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper advected invariants and conservation laws in ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and gas dynamics are obtained using Lie dragging techniques. There are different classes of invariants that are advected or Lie dragged with the flow. Simple examples are the advection of the entropy S (a 0-form), and the conservation of magnetic flux (an invariant 2-form advected with the flow). The magnetic flux conservation law is equivalent to Faraday's equation. The gauge condition for the magnetic helicity to be advected with the flow is determined. Different variants of the helicity in ideal fluid dynamics and MHD including: fluid helicity, cross helicity and magnetic helicity are investigated. The fluid helicity conservation law and the cross-helicity conservation law in MHD are derived for the case of a barotropic gas. If the magnetic field lies in the constant entropy surface, then the gas pressure can depend on both the entropy and the density. In these cases the conservation laws are local conservation laws. For non-barotropic gases, we obtain nonlocal conservation laws for fluid helicity and cross helicity by using Clebsch variables. These nonlocal conservation laws are the main new results of the paper. Ertel's theorem and potential vorticity, the Hollman invariant, and the Godbillon-Vey invariant for special flows for which the magnetic helicity is zero are also discussed.

  6. Inhomogeneous helicity effect in the solar angular-momentum transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Nobumitsu

    2017-04-01

    Coupled with mean absolute vorticity Ω∗ (rotation and mean relative vorticity), inhomogeneous turbulent helicity is expected to contribute to the generation of global flow structure against the linear and angular momentum mixing due to turbulent or eddy viscosity. This inhomogeneous helicity effect was originally derived in Yokoi & Yoshizawa (1993) [1], and recently has been validated by direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of rotating helical turbulence [2]. Turbulence effect enters the mean-vorticity equation through the turbulent vortexmotive force ⟨u'×ω'⟩ [u': velocity fluctuation, ω'(= ∇× u'): vorticity fluctuation], which is the vorticity counterpart of the electromotive force ⟨u'× b'⟩ (b': magnetic fluctuation) in the mean magnetic-field induction. The mean velocity induction δU is proportional to the vortexmotive force. According to the theoretical result [1,2], it is expressed as δU = -νT∇×Ω∗-ηT(∇2H)Ω∗, where ηT is the transport coefficient, H = ⟨u'ṡω'⟩ the turbulent helicity, and Ω∗ the mean absolute vorticity. The first term corresponds to the enhanced diffusion due to turbulent viscosity νT. The second term expresses the large-scale flow generation due to inhomogeneous helicity. Since helicity is self-generated in rotating stratified turbulence [3], an inhomogeneous helicity distribution is expected to exist in the solar convection zone. A rising flow with expansion near the surface of the Sun generates a strongly negative helicity there [4]. This spatial distribution of helicity would lead to a positive Laplacian of turbulent helicity (∇2H > 0) in the subsurface layer of the Sun. In the combination with the large-scale vorticity associated with the meridional circulation, the inhomogeneous helicity effect works for accelerating the mean velocity in the azimuthal direction. The relevance of this inhomogeneous helicity effect in the solar convection zone is discussed further. References [1] Yokoi, N. and

  7. A helically distorted MHD flux rope model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobald, Michael L.; Montgomery, David

    1990-01-01

    A flux rope model is proposed which has a variable degree of helical distortion from axisymmetry. The basis for this suggestion is a series of numerical and analytical investigations of magnetohydrodynamic states which result when an axial electric current is directed down on dc magnetic field. The helically distorted states involve a flow velocity and seem to be favored because of their lower rate of energy dissipation. Emphasis is on the magnetometer and particle energy analyzer traces that might be characteristic of such flux ropes. It is shown that even a fractionally small helical distortion may considerably alter the traces in minimum-variance coordinates. In short, what may be fairly common MHD processes can render a flux rope almost unrecognizable under standard diagnostics, even if the departures from axisymmetry are not great.

  8. Field of a helical Siberian Snake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luccio, A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-02-01

    To preserve the spin polarization of a beam of high energy protons in a circular accelerator, magnets with periodic magnetic field, called Siberian Snakes are being used. Recently, it was proposed to build Siberian Snakes with superconducting helical dipoles. In a helical, or twisted dipole, the magnetic field is perpendicular to the axis of the helix and rotates around it as one proceeds along the magnet. In an engineering study of a 4 Tesla helical snake, the coil geometry is derived, by twisting, from the geometry of a cosine superconducting dipole. While waiting for magnetic measurement data on such a prototype, an analytical expression for the field of the helice is important, to calculate the particle trajectories and the spin precession in the helix. This model will also allow to determine the optical characteristics of the snake, as an insertion in the lattice of the accelerator. In particular, one can calculate the integrated multipoles through the magnet and the equivalent transfer matrix. An expression for the field in the helix body, i.e., excluding the fringe field was given in a classical paper. An alternate expression can be found by elaborating on the treatment of the field of a transverse wiggler obtained under the rather general conditions that the variables are separable. This expression exactly satisfies Maxwell`s div and curl equations for a stationary field, {del} {center_dot} B = 0, {del} x B = 0. This approach is useful in that it will allow one to use much of the work already done on the problem of inserting wigglers and undulators in the lattice of a circular accelerator.

  9. TRANSITION-REGION/CORONAL SIGNATURES AND MAGNETIC SETTING OF SUNSPOT PENUMBRAL JETS: HINODE (SOT/FG), Hi-C, AND SDO/AIA OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, Sanjiv K.; Moore, Ronald L.; Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Mail Code ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Alpert, Shane E., E-mail: sanjiv.k.tiwari@nasa.gov [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

    2016-01-10

    Penumbral microjets (PJs) are transient narrow bright features in the chromosphere of sunspot penumbrae, first characterized by Katsukawa et al. using the Ca ii H-line filter on Hinode's Solar Optical Telescope (SOT). It was proposed that the PJs form as a result of reconnection between two magnetic components of penumbrae (spines and interspines), and that they could contribute to the transition region (TR) and coronal heating above sunspot penumbrae. We propose a modified picture of formation of PJs based on recent results on the internal structure of sunspot penumbral filaments. Using data of a sunspot from Hinode/SOT, High Resolution Coronal Imager, and different passbands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we examine whether PJs have signatures in the TR and corona. We find hardly any discernible signature of normal PJs in any AIA passbands, except for a few of them showing up in the 1600 Å images. However, we discovered exceptionally stronger jets with similar lifetimes but bigger sizes (up to 600 km wide) occurring repeatedly in a few locations in the penumbra, where evidence of patches of opposite-polarity fields in the tails of some penumbral filaments is seen in Stokes-V images. These tail PJs do display signatures in the TR. Whether they have any coronal-temperature plasma is unclear. We infer that none of the PJs, including the tail PJs, directly heat the corona in active regions significantly, but any penumbral jet might drive some coronal heating indirectly via the generation of Alfvén waves and/or braiding of the coronal field.

  10. Exchange-striction associated with the elliptical proper helical magnetic structure in the ferroelectric phase of CuFe{sub 1-y}Ga{sub y}O{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terada, N; Kitazawa, H [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0047 (Japan); Nakajima, T; Mitsuda, S [Department of Physics, Tokyo University of Science, Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan); Matsuda, M; Kakurai, K [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki, 319-1195 (Japan); Tanaka, Y, E-mail: terada.noriki@nims.go.j [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2010-02-01

    Recently, the detail magnetic structure in the ferroelectric phase of CuFe{sub 1-y}Ga{sub y}O{sub 2} has been determined to be the proper helical structure with the ellipticity of {approx} 0.9 by the comprehensive neutron diffraction study.[Nakajima et al. Phys. Rev. B 79 214423 (2009)] In the present study, we have investigated the lattice modulation associated with the elliptical magnetic structure, using the resonant X-ray diffraction measurements on CuFe{sub 0.965}Ga{sub 0.035}O{sub 2}. We observed the superlattice reflection indexed as (0 1 + 2q{sub m} 0), where q{sub m} is the wave number of the magnetic modulation. The energy spectrum near the Fe-K absorption edge for the (0 1 + 2q{sub m} 0) intensity conforms with that for the fundamental (0 2 0) intensity within experimental accuracy, suggesting that the superlattice modulation is at least associated with displacements of the Fe ions. We discuss the origin of the superlattice modulation with the exchange striction model.

  11. Transition-Region/Coronal Signatures and Magnetic Setting of Sunspot Penumbral Jets: {\\it Hinode} (SOT/FG), Hi-C and {\\it SDO}/AIA Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Sanjiv K; Winebarger, Amy R; Alpert, Shane E

    2015-01-01

    Penumbral microjets (PJs) are transient narrow bright features in the chromosphere of sunspot penumbrae, first characterized by Katsukawa et al (2007) using the \\CaII\\ H-line filter on {\\it Hinode}'s Solar Optical Telescope (SOT). It was proposed that the PJs form as a result of reconnection between two magnetic components of penumbra (spines and interspines), and that they could contribute to the transition region (TR) and coronal heating above sunspot penumbrae. We propose a modified picture of formation of PJs based on recent results on internal structure of sunspot penumbral filaments. Using data of a sunspot from {\\it Hinode}/SOT, High Resolution Coronal Imager, and different passbands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the {\\it Solar Dynamics Observatory}, we examine whether PJs have signatures in the TR and corona. We find hardly any discernible signature of normal PJs in any AIA passbands, except a few of them showing up in the 1600 \\AA\\ images. However, we discovered exceptionally stro...

  12. Seismic heating signatures in the Japan Trench subduction plate-boundary fault zone : evidence from a preliminary rock magnetic 'geothermometer'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, T.; Dekkers, M.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073463744; Zhang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Frictional heating during earthquake rupture reveals important information on earthquake mechanisms and energy dissipation. The amount of annealing varies widely and is, as yet, poorly constrained. Here we use magnetic susceptibility versus temperature measurements during cycling to increasingly ele

  13. Magnetic Signatures of Quantum Critical Points of the Ferrimagnetic Mixed Spin-(1/2, S) Heisenberg Chains at Finite Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strečka, Jozef; Verkholyak, Taras

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic properties of the ferrimagnetic mixed spin-(1/2,S) Heisenberg chains are examined using quantum Monte Carlo simulations for two different quantum spin numbers S=1 and 3/2. The calculated magnetization curves at finite temperatures are confronted with zero-temperature magnetization data obtained within the density matrix renormalization group method, which imply an existence of two quantum critical points determining a breakdown of the gapped Lieb-Mattis ferrimagnetic phase and Tomonaga-Luttinger spin-liquid phase, respectively. While a square root behavior of the magnetization accompanying each quantum critical point is gradually smoothed upon rising temperature, the susceptibility and isothermal entropy change data at low temperatures provide a stronger evidence of the zero-temperature quantum critical points through marked local maxima and minima, respectively.

  14. Heavy metal pollution in farmland irrigated with river water near a steel plant—magnetic and geochemical signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunxia; Appel, Erwin; Qiao, Qingqing

    2013-03-01

    The presence of heavy metals (HMs) in the environment is a major threat for humans. Magnetic proxies provide a rapid method for assessing the degree of HM pollution in environment. We have studied farmland soil irrigated with polluted river water in the vicinity of a steel plant in Loudi city (Hunan Province, China) to test the efficiency of magnetic methods for detecting the degree of HM pollution. Both magnetic and non-magnetic (microscopic, chemical and statistical) methods were used to characterize these farmland soils. Enhanced magnetic concentration values were found in the upper arable soil horizon (0-20 cm), which is related to the presence of spherical ˜10 to 30 μm sized magnetite particles. The spatial distribution of magnetic concentration and HM contents in the farmland soils matches with the spatial pattern of these parameters in river sediments. These findings provide evidence that HM pollution of the farmland soil is mainly caused by irrigation with wastewater. HMs Zn, Pb, Cu, Cd, Co, Ni, V are well correlate with magnetic susceptibility (χ). The pollution load index (PLI) of all nine anthropogenic HMs (including also Cr and Mo) and log10(χ) are significantly correlated. Using the resulting linear PLI-log10(χ) function, values of χ can serve as a convenient tool for semi-quantifying the degree of HM pollution in the uppermost ˜20 cm of the studied farmland soils. These findings suggest that magnetic methods can generally serve as a convenient tool for detecting and mapping HM pollution in farmland soil irrigated with wastewater from sites nearby heavy industrial activities.

  15. Flow of hypermagnetic helicity in the embryo of a new phase in the electroweak phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Akhmet'ev, P M; Sokoloff, D D

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of the magnetic helicity during the electroweak phase transition in the early Universe is studied. It is shown that the boundary surface between symmetric (hypermagnetic) phase and Maxwellian phase with a broken symmetry is a membrana for the separation of the magnetic helicity. Assuming the total linking number of knots of hypermagnetic field is negative, it is proved that the helicity rising in the Maxwellian phase is left-handed.

  16. Mathisson's helical motions demystified

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, L Filipe O; Zilhão, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    The motion of spinning test particles in general relativity is described by Mathisson-Papapetrou-Dixon equations, which are undetermined up to a spin supplementary condition, the latter being today still an open question. The Mathisson-Pirani (MP) condition is known to lead to rather mysterious helical motions which have been deemed unphysical, and for this reason discarded. We show that these assessments are unfounded and originate from a subtle (but crucial) misconception. We discuss the kinematical explanation of the helical motions, and dynamically interpret them through the concept of hidden momentum, which has an electromagnetic analogue. We also show that, contrary to previous claims, the frequency of the helical motions coincides exactly with the zitterbewegung frequency of the Dirac equation for the electron.

  17. Helical dipole partial Siberian snake for the AGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takano, J [RIKEN, Saitama, (Japan); Ahrens, L A [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Alforque, R [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Bai, M [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Brown, K [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Courant, E D [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Ganetis, G [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Gardner, C J [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Glenn, J W [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Hattori, T [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, (Japan); Huang, H [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Jain, A [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Luccio, A U [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); MacKay, W W [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Okamura, M [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Roser, T [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Tsoupas, N [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Tepikian, S [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Tuozzolo, J [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Wood, J [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Zelenski, A [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Zeno, K [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2006-11-15

    Overcoming depolarization resonances in medium class synchrotrons (3 to 50 GeV) is one of the key issues in accelerating a highly polarized proton beam up to very high energies. Since such synchrotrons, including the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) and the J-PARC Main Ring, generally do not have sufficiently long straight sections to accommodate full Siberian snakes with reasonable beam excursions, the practical solution is to use partial Siberian snakes that rotate the particle spin about a horizontal axis by a fraction of 180 degrees. For the AGS, we designed and installed a new partial Siberian snake consisting of a helical dipole magnet with a double pitch structure. The helical structure reduced the amount of transverse coupling as compared to that achieved by the previous solenoidal partial snake. This coupling led to partial depolarization at certain energies from horizontal betatron oscillations. The helical magnetic field in the snake magnet was calculated using a 3D magnetic field code TOSCA, and was optimized by segmenting the helical pitch and varying the lengths of the segments. Fabrication errors were checked and verified to be within required tolerances. Finally, the transverse field was measured by rotating harmonic coils. After installation, we achieved a 37.5% improvement in polarization - from 40% with the old solenoid to 55% with the new helical snake, thereby demonstrating that the helical partial snake is an effective device to suppress depolarization resonances in medium-sized synchrotrons.

  18. Helical dipole partial Siberian snake for the AGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, J.; Ahrens, L. A.; Alforque, R.; Bai, M.; Brown, K.; Courant, E. D.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C. J.; Glenn, J. W.; Hattori, T.; Huang, H.; Jain, A.; Luccio, A. U.; MacKay, W. W.; Okamura, M.; Roser, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Tepikian, S.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wood, J.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.

    2006-11-01

    Overcoming depolarization resonances in medium class synchrotrons (3 to 50 GeV) is one of the key issues in accelerating a highly polarized proton beam up to very high energies. Since such synchrotrons, including the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) and the J-PARC Main Ring, generally do not have sufficiently long straight sections to accommodate full Siberian snakes with reasonable beam excursions, the practical solution is to use partial Siberian snakes that rotate the particle spin about a horizontal axis by a fraction of 180 degrees. For the AGS, we designed and installed a new partial Siberian snake consisting of a helical dipole magnet with a double pitch structure. The helical structure reduced the amount of transverse coupling as compared to that achieved by the previous solenoidal partial snake. This coupling led to partial depolarization at certain energies from horizontal betatron oscillations. The helical magnetic field in the snake magnet was calculated using a 3D magnetic field code TOSCA, and was optimized by segmenting the helical pitch and varying the lengths of the segments. Fabrication errors were checked and verified to be within required tolerances. Finally, the transverse field was measured by rotating harmonic coils. After installation, we achieved a 37.5% improvement in polarization - from 40% with the old solenoid to 55% with the new helical snake, thereby demonstrating that the helical partial snake is an effective device to suppress depolarization resonances in medium-sized synchrotrons.

  19. A model for straight and helical solar jets. II. Parametric study of the plasma beta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariat, E.; Dalmasse, K.; DeVore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.; Karpen, J. T.

    2016-11-01

    Context. Jets are dynamic, impulsive, well-collimated plasma events that develop at many different scales and in different layers of the solar atmosphere. Aims: Jets are believed to be induced by magnetic reconnection, a process central to many astrophysical phenomena. Within the solar atmosphere, jet-like events develop in many different environments, e.g., in the vicinity of active regions, as well as in coronal holes, and at various scales, from small photospheric spicules to large coronal jets. In all these events, signatures of helical structure and/or twisting/rotating motions are regularly observed. We aim to establish that a single model can generally reproduce the observed properties of these jet-like events. Methods: Using our state-of-the-art numerical solver ARMS, we present a parametric study of a numerical tridimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of solar jet-like events. Within the MHD paradigm, we study the impact of varying the atmospheric plasma β on the generation and properties of solar-like jets. Results: The parametric study validates our model of jets for plasma β ranging from 10-3 to 1, typical of the different layers and magnetic environments of the solar atmosphere. Our model of jets can robustly explain the generation of helical solar jet-like events at various β ≤ 1. We introduces the new result that the plasma β modifies the morphology of the helical jet, explaining the different observed shapes of jets at different scales and in different layers of the solar atmosphere. Conclusions: Our results enable us to understand the energisation, triggering, and driving processes of jet-like events. Our model enables us to make predictions of the impulsiveness and energetics of jets as determined by the surrounding environment, as well as the morphological properties of the resulting jets.

  20. Extreme magnetic anisotropy and multiple superconducting transition signatures in a [Nb(23 nm)/Ni(5 nm)] 5 multilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Long, L. E.; Kryukov, S. A.; Joshi, Amish G.; Xu, Wentao; Bosomtwi, A.; Kirby, B. J.; Fitzsimmons, M. R.

    2008-04-01

    We have applied polarized neutron reflectometry, and novel SQUID and vibrating reed magnetometry to probe a [Nb(23 nm)/Ni(5 nm)]5 multilayer (ML) whose superconducting state magnetic anisotropy is dominated by confined (in-plane) supercurrents in DC magnetic fields, H, applied nearly parallel to the ML plane. The upper critical field exhibits abrupt shifts (0.1-0.6 K) in near-parallel fields, but is field-independent for μ0H < 0.8 T when the ML is exactly aligned with the DC field, indicating suppression of orbital pairbreaking and the possible presence of unconventional superconducting pairing states.

  1. Energy fluxes in helical magnetohydrodynamics and dynamo action

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahendra K Verma

    2003-10-01

    Renormalized viscosity, renormalized resistivity, and various energy fluxes are calculated for helical magnetohydrodynamics using perturbative field theory. The calculation is of first-order in perturbation. Kinetic and magnetic helicities do not affect the renormalized parameters, but they induce an inverse cascade of magnetic energy. The sources for the large-scale magnetic field have been shown to be (1) energy flux from large-scale velocity field to large-scale magnetic field arising due to non-helical interactions and (2) inverse energy flux of magnetic energy caused by helical interactions. Based on our flux results, a primitive model for galactic dynamo has been constructed. Our calculations yield dynamo time-scale for a typical galaxy to be of the order of 108 years. Our field-theoretic calculations also reveal that the flux of magnetic helicity is backward, consistent with the earlier observations based on absolute equilibrium theory.

  2. ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    10332324

    'electronic signature' means data attached to, incorporated in, or logically ... See Cwele v S 2012 4 All SA 497 (SCA); Mohlabeng v Minister of Safety and Security ... ZAKZPHC 51 (2 September 2010); Delta Finance, a Division of Wesbank, ...

  3. Helical Muon Beam Cooling Channel Engineering Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikhin, V.S.; Lopes, M.L.; Romanov, G.V.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Yonehara, K.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab; Flanagan, G.; Johnson, R.P.; Kazakevich, G.M.; Marhauser, F.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2012-05-01

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), a novel technique for six-dimensional (6D) ionization cooling of muon beams, has shown considerable promise based on analytic and simulation studies. However, the implementation of this revolutionary method of muon cooling requires new techniques for the integration of hydrogen-pressurized, high-power RF cavities into the low-temperature superconducting magnets of the HCC. We present the progress toward a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb{sub 3}Sn based HCC test section. We include discussions on the pressure and thermal barriers needed within the cryostat to maintain operation of the magnet at 4.2 K while operating the RF and energy absorber at a higher temperature. Additionally, we include progress on the Nb{sub 3}Sn helical solenoid design.

  4. Thermodynamic signature of a magnetic-field-driven phase transition within the superconducting state of an underdoped cuprate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, J. B.; Vafek, O.; Betts, J. B.; Balakirev, F. F.; Hardy, W. N.; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D. A.; Boebinger, G. S.

    2016-01-01

    More than a quarter century after the discovery of the high-temperature superconductor (HTS) YBa2Cu3O6+δ (YBCO; ref. ), studies continue to uncover complexity in its phase diagram. In addition to HTS and the pseudogap, there is growing evidence for multiple phases with boundaries which are functions of temperature (T), doping (p) and magnetic field. Here we report the low-temperature electronic specific heat (Celec) of YBa2Cu3O6.43 and YBa2Cu3O6.47 (p = 0.076 and 0.084) up to a magnetic field (H) of 34.5 T, a poorly understood region of the underdoped H-T-p phase space. We observe two regimes in the low-temperature limit: below a characteristic magnetic field H' ~ 12-15 T, Celec/T obeys an expected H1/2 behaviour; however, near H' there is a sharp inflection followed by a linear-in-H behaviour. H' rests deep within the superconducting phase and, thus, the linear-in-H behaviour is observed in the zero-resistance regime. In the limit of zero temperature, Celec/T is proportional to the zero-energy electronic density of states. At one of our dopings, the inflection is sharp only at lowest temperatures, and we thus conclude that this inflection is evidence of a magnetic-field-driven quantum phase transition.

  5. Airborne gamma-ray and magnetic anomaly signatures of serpentinite in relation to soil geochemistry, northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCafferty, A.E.; Van Gosen, B. S.

    2009-01-01

    Serpentinized ultramafic rocks and associated soils in northern California are characterized by high concentrations of Cr and Ni, low levels of radioelements (K, Th, and U) and high amounts of ferrimagnetic minerals (primarily magnetite). Geophysical attributes over ultramafic rocks, which include airborne gamma-ray and magnetic anomaly data, are quantified and provide indirect measurements on the relative abundance of radioelements and magnetic minerals, respectively. Attributes are defined through a statistical modeling approach and the results are portrayed as probabilities in chart and map form. Two predictive models are presented, including one derived from the aeromagnetic anomaly data and one from a combination of the airborne K, Th and U gamma-ray data. Both models distinguish preferential values within the aerogeophysical data that coincide with mapped and potentially unmapped ultramafic rocks. The magnetic predictive model shows positive probabilities associated with magnetic anomaly highs and, to a lesser degree, anomaly lows, which accurately locate many known ultramafic outcrops, but more interestingly, locate potentially unmapped ultramafic rocks, possible extensions of ultramafic bodies that dip into the shallow subsurface, as well as prospective buried ultramafic rocks. The airborne radiometric model shows positive probabilities in association with anomalously low gamma radiation measurements over ultramafic rock, which is similar to that produced by gabbro, metavolcanic rock, and water bodies. All of these features share the characteristic of being depleted in K, Th and U. Gabbro is the only rock type in the study area that shares similar magnetic properties with the ultramafic rock. The aerogeophysical model results are compared to the distribution of ultramafic outcrops and to Cr, Ni, K, Th and U concentrations and magnetic susceptibility measurements from soil samples. Analysis of the soil data indicates high positive correlation between

  6. Magnetic signature of submarine volcanoes in the Phlegrean Fields-Ischia Ridge (North-Western side of the Bay of Naples, Southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Secomandi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of the Phlegrean Fields-Ischia submarine ridge by the analysis and interpretation of high-resolution aeromagnetic data recently acquired in the Western Procida offshore. The investigated area is located along the ridge connecting Ischia to the Phlegrean Fields and is characterized by the existence of several monogenetic volcanoes aligned on a NE-SW system of faults. The high-resolution magnetic data yielded new information on the area, highlighting particularly the signature of a volcanic body located between Pt. Serra and the Ruommoli shoal. This structure has not been clearly described before and we named it as the Pt. Serra submarine volcano. The computation of the analytic signal and horizontal gradient of the data distinctly located this structure and definined the position of its rims. A 2D modeling and 3D inversion of data provided information on the volcano’s thickness, width and magnetization, disclosing a meaningful igneous body extending down to several hundred meters b.s.l.

  7. Design activities on helical DEMO reactor FFHR-d1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagara, A., E-mail: sagara.akio@LHD.nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Goto, T.; Miyazawa, J.; Yanagi, N.; Tanaka, T.; Tamura, H.; Sakamoto, R.; Tanaka, M.; Tsumori, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Mitarai, O. [Tokai University, 9-1-1 Toroku, Kumamoto 862-8652 (Japan); Imagawa, S.; Muroga, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conceptual design studies of the helical DEMO reactor FFHR-d1 have been conducted. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Design window analyses with core plasma and engineering designs have been carried out. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer R and Ds on blanket, magnet, tritium control, fuelling and heating systems are discussed. - Abstract: Based on high-density and high-temperature plasma experiments in the large helical device (LHD), conceptual design studies of the LHD-type helical DEMO reactor FFHR-d1 have been conducted by integrating wide-ranged R and D activities on core plasmas and reactor technologies through cooperative researches under the fusion engineering research project, which has been launched newly in NIFS. Current activities for the FFHR-d1 in this project are presented on design window analyses with designs on core plasma, neutronics for liquid blankets, continuous helical magnets, pellet fueling, tritium systems and plasma heating devices.

  8. Helical electron-beam microbunching by harmonic coupling in a helical undulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsing, E; Musumeci, P; Reiche, S; Tikhoplav, R; Marinelli, A; Rosenzweig, J B; Gover, A

    2009-05-01

    Microbunching of a relativistic electron beam into a helix is examined analytically and in simulation. Helical microbunching is shown to occur naturally when an e beam interacts resonantly at the harmonics of the combined field of a helical magnetic undulator and an axisymmetric input laser beam. This type of interaction is proposed as a method to generate a strongly prebunched e beam for coherent emission of light with orbital angular momentum at virtually any wavelength. The results from the linear microbunching theory show excellent agreement with three-dimensional numerical simulations.

  9. CERTIFICATELESS SIGNATURE AND BLIND SIGNATURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Lei; Zhang Futai

    2008-01-01

    Certificateless public key cryptography is a new paradigm introduced by AI-Riyami and Paterson. It eliminates the need of the certificates in traditional public key cryptosystems and the key escrow problem in IDentity-based Public Key Cryptography (ID-PKC). Due to the advantages of the certificateless public key cryptography,a new efficient certificateless pairing-based signature scheme is presented,which has some advantages over previous constructions in computational cost. Based on this new signature scheme,a certificateless blind signature scheme is proposed. The security of our schemes is proven based on the hardness of computational Diffie-Hellman problem.

  10. Faraday rotation and polarization gradients in the jet of 3C~120: Interaction with the external medium and a helical magnetic field?

    CERN Document Server

    Gomez, J -L; Jorstad, S G; Agudo, I; Roca-Sogorb, M

    2008-01-01

    We present a sequence of 12 monthly polarimetric 15, 22, and 43 GHz VLBA observations of the radio galaxy 3C 120 revealing a systematic presence of gradients in Faraday rotation and degree of polarization across and along the jet. The degree of polarization increases with distance from the core and toward the jet edges, and has an asymmetric profile in which the northern side of the jet is more highly polarized. The Faraday rotation measure is also stratified across the jet width, with larger values for the southern side. We find a localized region of high Faraday rotation measure superposed on this structure between approximately 3 and 4 mas from the core, with a peak of about 6000 rad/m^2. Interaction of the jet with the external medium or a cloud would explain the confined region of enhanced Faraday rotation, as well as the stratification in degree of polarization and the flaring of superluminal knots when crossing this region. The data are also consistent with a helical field in a two-fluid jet model, con...

  11. Hydrodynamic and kinetic models for spin-1/2 electron-positron quantum plasmas: Annihilation interaction, helicity conservation, and wave dispersion in magnetized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, Pavel A

    2014-01-01

    We discuss complete theory of spin-1/2 electron-positron quantum plasmas, when electrons and positrons move with velocities mach smaller than the speed of light. We derive a set of two fluid quantum hydrodynamic equations consisting of the continuity, Euler, spin (magnetic moment) evolution equations for each species. We explicitly include the Coulomb, spin-spin, Darwin and annihilation interactions. The annihilation interaction is the main topic of the paper. We consider contribution of the annihilation interaction in the quantum hydrodynamic equations and in spectrum of waves in magnetized electron-positron plasmas. We consider propagation of waves parallel and perpendicular to an external magnetic field. We also consider oblique propagation of longitudinal waves. We derive set of quantum kinetic equations for electron-positron plasmas with the Darwin and annihilation interactions. We apply the kinetic theory for the linear wave behavior in absence of external fields. We calculate contribution of the Darwin...

  12. Calibrating MMS Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux Measurements and Characterizing 3D Electric Field Signatures of Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuster, J. R.; Torbert, R. B.; Vaith, H.; Argall, M. R.; Li, G.; Chen, L. J.; Ergun, R. E.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Marklund, G. T.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Russell, C. T.; Magnes, W.; Le Contel, O.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    The electron drift instruments (EDIs) onboard each MMS spacecraft are designed with large geometric factors (~0.01cm2 str) to facilitate detection of weak (~100 nA) electron beams fired and received by the two gun-detector units (GDUs) when EDI is in its "electric field mode" to determine the local electric and magnetic fields. A consequence of the large geometric factor is that "ambient mode" electron flux measurements (500 eV electrons having 0°, 90°, or 180° pitch angle) can vary depending on the orientation of the EDI instrument with respect to the magnetic field, a nonphysical effect that requires a correction. Here, we present determinations of the θ- and ø-dependent correction factors for the eight EDI GDUs, where θ (ø) is the polar (azimuthal) angle between the GDU symmetry axis and the local magnetic field direction, and compare the corrected fluxes with those measured by the fast plasma instrument (FPI). Using these corrected, high time resolution (~1,000 samples per second) ambient electron fluxes, combined with the unprecedentedly high resolution 3D electric field measurements taken by the spin-plane and axial double probes (SDP and ADP), we are equipped to accurately detect electron-scale current layers and electric field waves associated with the non-Maxwellian (anisotropic and agyrotropic) particle distribution functions predicted to exist in the reconnection diffusion region. We compare initial observations of the diffusion region with distributions and wave analysis from PIC simulations of asymmetric reconnection applicable for modeling reconnection at the Earth's magnetopause, where MMS will begin Science Phase 1 as of September 1, 2015.

  13. Helical relativistic electron beam and THz radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Son, S

    2011-01-01

    A THz laser generation utilizing a helical relativistic electron beam propagating through a strong magnetic field is discussed. The initial amplification rate in this scheme is much stronger than that in the conventional free electron laser. A magnetic field of the order of Tesla can yield a radiation in the range of 0.5 to 3 THz, corresponding to the total energy of mJ and the duration of tens of pico-second, or the temporal power of the order of GW.

  14. Insertion of helical Siberian snakes in RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luccio, A.; Pilat, F.

    1995-05-01

    Spin rotators and Siberian snakes for RHIC can be built using 4 helical magnets obtained, by twisting, from the cosine dipoles. The authors found that the fringe fields are important. In the calculations they have used a plausible model for the fringe. However, only magnetic measurements on the prototypes presently being built will allow a final optimization. The linear coupling at injection, {Delta}Q{sub min} < 10{sup {minus}2}, is well within the range of the RHIC decoupling system. At storage, the coupling introduced by the devices ({Delta}Q{sub min} < 10{sup {minus}4}) is negligible.

  15. Planck intermediate results. XXXIII. Signature of the magnetic field geometry of interstellar filaments in dust polarization maps

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Alves, M I R; Arnaud, M; Arzoumanian, D; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Berné, O; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bracco, A; Burigana, C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Combet, C; Couchot, F; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Ferrière, K; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Guillet, V; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D L; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oppermann, N; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Perrotta, F; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Pratt, G W; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Ricciardi, S; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Soler, J D; Stolyarov, V; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    Planck observations at 353GHz provide the first fully-sampled maps of the polarized dust emission of interstellar filaments, offering unprecedented information on the structure of the magnetic field. We present the polarization properties of three nearby filaments, Musca, B211, and L1506. These three filaments have similar total intensities (Stokes I), while the variations of the Stokes Q and U are all different: the Musca filament is visible in the Q and U maps, B211 and L1506 are seen in the Q map but are not distinguishable in the U map, and the Q increase for L1506 is not spatially coincident with that of I. They all offer 3pc segments, along which both the filament and the background Stokes parameters are almost uniform. In all three cases, the polarization fraction (p) towards the filaments is smaller than that of their background. The polarized emission results from the combination of the magnetic field (B) structure and the dust polarization properties. We model the variations of the Stokes parameters...

  16. The Writhe of Helical Structures in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toeroek, T.; Berger, M. A.; Kliem, B.

    2010-01-01

    Context. Helicity is a fundamental property of magnetic fields, conserved in ideal MHD. In flux rope topology, it consists of twist and writhe helicity. Despite the common occurrence of helical structures in the solar atmosphere, little is known about how their shape relates to the writhe, which fraction of helicity is contained in writhe, and how much helicity is exchanged between twist and writhe when they erupt. Aims. Here we perform a quantitative investigation of these questions relevant for coronal flux ropes. Methods. The decomposition of the writhe of a curve into local and nonlocal components greatly facilitates its computation. We use it to study the relation between writhe and projected S shape of helical curves and to measure writhe and twist in numerical simulations of flux rope instabilities. The results are discussed with regard to filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Results. (1) We demonstrate that the relation between writhe and projected S shape is not unique in principle, but that the ambiguity does not affect low-lying structures, thus supporting the established empirical rule which associates stable forward (reverse) S shaped structures low in the corona with positive (negative) helicity. (2) Kink-unstable erupting flux ropes are found to transform a far smaller fraction of their twist helicity into writhe helicity than often assumed. (3) Confined flux rope eruptions tend to show stronger writhe at low heights than ejective eruptions (CMEs). This argues against suggestions that the writhing facilitates the rise of the rope through the overlying field. (4) Erupting filaments which are S shaped already before the eruption and keep the sign of their axis writhe (which is expected if field of one chirality dominates the source volume of the eruption), must reverse their S shape in the course of the rise. Implications for the occurrence of the helical kink instability in such events are discussed.

  17. Flat Helical Nanosieves

    CERN Document Server

    Mei, Shengtao; Hussain, Sajid; Huang, Kun; Ling, Xiaohui; Siew, Shawn Yohanes; Liu, Hong; Teng, Jinghua; Danner, Aaron; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Compact and miniaturized devices with flexible functionalities are always highly demanded in optical integrated systems. Plasmonic nanosieve has been successfully harnessed as an ultrathin flat platform for complex manipulation of light, including holography, vortex generation and non-linear processes. Compared with most of reported single-functional devices, multi-functional nanosieves might find more complex and novel applications across nano-photonics, optics and nanotechnology. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a promising roadmap for nanosieve-based helical devices, which achieves full manipulations of optical vortices, including its generation, hybridization, spatial multiplexing, focusing and non-diffraction propagation etc., by controlling the geometric phase of spin light via over 121 thousands of spatially-rotated nano-sieves. Thanks to such spin-conversion nanosieve helical elements, it is no longer necessary to employ the conventional two-beam interferometric measurement to characterize optical ...

  18. Helices and vector bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Rudakov, A N

    1990-01-01

    This volume is devoted to the use of helices as a method for studying exceptional vector bundles, an important and natural concept in algebraic geometry. The work arises out of a series of seminars organised in Moscow by A. N. Rudakov. The first article sets up the general machinery, and later ones explore its use in various contexts. As to be expected, the approach is concrete; the theory is considered for quadrics, ruled surfaces, K3 surfaces and P3(C).

  19. Multifunctionality in bimetallic Ln(III)[W(V)(CN)8]3- (Ln = Gd, Nd) coordination helices: optical activity, luminescence, and magnetic coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorazy, Szymon; Nakabayashi, Koji; Arczynski, Mirosław; Pełka, Robert; Ohkoshi, Shin-ichi; Sieklucka, Barbara

    2014-06-02

    Two chiral luminescent derivatives of pyridine bis(oxazoline) (Pybox), (SS/RR)-iPr-Pybox (2,6-bis[4-isopropyl-2-oxazolin-2-yl]pyridine) and (SRSR/RSRS)-Ind-Pybox (2,6-bis[8H-indeno[1,2-d]oxazolin-2-yl]pyridine), have been combined with lanthanide ions (Gd(3+), Nd(3+)) and octacyanotungstate(V) metalloligand to afford a remarkable series of eight bimetallic CN(-)-bridged coordination chains: {[Ln(III)(SS/RR-iPr-Pybox)(dmf)4]3[W(V)(CN)8]3}n ⋅dmf⋅4 H2O (Ln = Gd, 1-SS and 1-RR; Ln = Nd, 2-SS and 2-RR) and {[Ln(III)(SRSR/RSRS-Ind-Pybox)(dmf)4][W(V)(CN)8]}n⋅5 MeCN⋅4 MeOH (Ln = Gd, 3-SRSR and 3-RSRS; Ln = Nd, 4-SRSR and 4-RSRS). These materials display enantiopure structural helicity, which results in strong optical activity in the range 200-450 nm, as confirmed by natural circular dichroism (NCD) spectra and the corresponding UV/Vis absorption spectra. Under irradiation with UV light, the Gd(III)-W(V) chains show dominant ligand-based red phosphorescence, with λmax ≈660 nm for 1-(SS/RR) and 680 nm for 3-(SRSR/RSRS). The Nd(III)-W(V) chains, 2-(SS/RR) and 4-(SRSR/RSRS), exhibit near-infrared luminescence with sharp lines at 986, 1066, and 1340 nm derived from intra-f (4)F3/2 → (4)I9/2,11/2,13/2 transitions of the Nd(III) centers. This emission is realized through efficient ligand-to-metal energy transfer from the Pybox derivative to the lanthanide ion. Due to the presence of paramagnetic lanthanide(III) and [W(V)(CN)8](3-) moieties connected by cyanide bridges, 1-(SS/RR) and 3-(SRSR/RSRS) are ferrimagnetic spin chains originating from antiferromagnetic coupling between Gd(III) (SGd = 7/2) and W(V) (SW = 1/2) centers with J1-(SS) = -0.96(1) cm(-1), J1-(RR) =-0.95(1) cm(-1), J3-(SRSR) = -0.91(1) cm(-1), and J3-(RSRS) =-0.94(1) cm(-1). 2-(SS/RR) and 4-(SRSR/RSRS) display ferromagnetic coupling within their Nd(III)-NC-W(V) linkages.

  20. Initial transient process in a simple helical flux compression generator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Xian-Jun

    2006-01-01

    An analytical scheme on the initial transient process in a simple helical flux compression generator, which includes the distributions of both the magnetic field in the hollow of an armature and the conducting current density in the stator, is developed by means of a diffusion equation. A relationship between frequency of the conducting current, root of the characteristic function of Bessel equation and decay time in the armature is given. The skin depth in the helical stator is calculated and is compared with the approximate one which is widely used in the calculation of magnetic diffusion. Our analytical results are helpful to understanding the mechanism of the loss of magnetic flux in both the armature and stator and to suggesting an optimal design for improving performance of the helical flux compression generator.

  1. Signature of magnetic phase separation in the ground state of Pr1-xCaxMnO3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sha, Hao [Florida International University, Miami; Ye, Feng [ORNL; Dai, Pengcheng [ORNL; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A [ORNL; Mesa, Dalgis [ORNL; Lynn, J. W. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Tomioka, Y. [Correlated Electron Research Center (CERC), Japan; Tokura, Y. [University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; Zhang, Jiandi [Florida International University, Miami

    2008-01-01

    Neutron scattering has been used to investigate the evolution of the long- and short-range charge-ordered (CO), ferromagnetic (FM), and antiferromagnetic (AF) correlations in single crystals of $\\rm Pr_{1-x}Ca_{x}MnO_3$ ($x$ = 0.3, 0.35 and 0.4). These correlations are a ssociated with the existence of spin clusters with populations that drastically depend on the doping ($x$) and temperature. Concentrated spin clusters coexist with long-range canted AF order in a wide temperature range for $x$ = 0.3 while clusters do not appear in the $x$ = 0.4 crystal. In contrast, both CO and AF order parameters in the $x$ = 0.35 crystal show a precipitous decrease below $\\sim$ 35 K where spin clusters form. These results provide direct evidence of magnetic phase separation and indicate that there is a critical doping $x_{c}$ (close to $x$ = 0.35) that divides the phase-separated site-centered from the homogeneous bond-centered or charge-disproportionated CO ground state.

  2. Weaving knotted vector fields with tunable helicity

    CERN Document Server

    Kedia, Hridesh; Dennis, Mark R; Irvine, William T M

    2016-01-01

    We present a general construction of divergence-free knotted vector fields from complex scalar fields, whose closed field lines encode many kinds of knots and links, including torus knots, their cables, the figure-8 knot and its generalizations. As finite-energy physical fields they represent initial states for fields such as the magnetic field in a plasma, or the vorticity field in a fluid. We give a systematic procedure for calculating the vector potential, starting from complex scalar functions with knotted zero filaments, thus enabling an explicit computation of the helicity of these knotted fields. The construction can be used to generate isolated knotted flux tubes, filled by knots encoded in the lines of the vector field. Lastly we give examples of manifestly knotted vector fields with vanishing helicity. Our results provide building blocks for analytical models and simulations alike.

  3. Broadband optical isolator based on helical metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hu; Yang, ZhenYu; Zhao, Ming; Wu, Lin; Zhang, Peng

    2015-05-01

    Based on helical metamaterials, a new broadband optical isolator with a triple-helix structure is proposed in this paper. The right-handed circularly polarized light can transmit through the isolator with its polarization unchanged. The reverse propagating light, which is caused by the reflection of the latter optical devices, is converted into left-handed circularly polarized light that is suppressed by the proposed isolator because of absorption. Our design has some unprecedented advantages such as broad frequency ranges and a compact structure; moreover, neither polarizers nor adscititious magnetic fields are required. Properties of the isolator are investigated using the finite-difference time-domain method, and this phenomenon is studied by the mechanism of helical antenna theory.

  4. Weyl spinors and the helicity formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Diaz-Cruz, J Lorenzo; Meza-Aldama, O; Perez, Jonathan Reyes

    2015-01-01

    In this work we give a review of the original formulation of the relativistic wave equation for particles with spin one-half. Traditionally \\`a la Dirac, it's proposed that the ``square root'' of the Klein-Gordon (K-G) equation involves a 4 component (Dirac) spinor and in the non-relativistic limit it can be written as 2 equations for two 2 component spinors. On the other hand, there exists Weyl's formalism, in which one works from the beginning with 2 component Weyl spinors, which are the fundamental objects of the helicity formalism. In this work we rederive Weyl's equations directly, starting from K-G equation. We also obtain the electromagnetic interaction through minimal coupling and we get the interaction with the magnetic moment. As an example of the use of that formalism, we calculate Compton scattering using the helicity methods.

  5. Helical propulsion in shear-thinning fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Gomez, Saul; Lauga, Eric; Zenit, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Swimming microorganisms often have to propel in complex, non-Newtonian fluids. We carry out experiments with self-propelling helical swimmers driven by an externally rotating magnetic field in shear-thinning, inelastic fluids. Similarly to swimming in a Newtonian fluid, we obtain for each fluid a locomotion speed which scales linearly with the rotation frequency of the swimmer, but with a prefactor which depends on the power index of the fluid. The fluid is seen to always increase the swimming speed of the helix, up to 50% faster and thus the strongest of such type reported to date. The maximum relative increase for a fluid power index of around 0.6. Using simple scalings, we argue that the speed increase is not due to the local decrease of the flow viscosity around the helical filament but hypothesise instead that it originates from confinement-like effect due to viscosity stratification around the swimmer.

  6. Conservation of writhe helicity under anti-parallel reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Laing, Christian E; Sumners, De Witt L

    2014-01-01

    Reconnection is a fundamental event in many areas of science, from the interaction of vortices in classical and quantum fluids, and magnetic flux tubes in magnetohydrodynamics and plasma physics, to the recombination in polymer physics and DNA biology. By using fundamental results in topological fluid mechanics, the helicity of a flux tube can be calculated in terms of writhe and twist contributions. Here we show that the writhe is conserved under anti-parallel reconnection. Hence, for a pair of interacting flux tubes of equal flux, if the twist of the reconnected tube is the sum of the original twists of the interacting tubes, then helicity is conserved during reconnection. Thus, any deviation from helicity conservation is entirely due to the intrinsic twist inserted or deleted locally at the reconnection site. This result has important implications for helicity and energy considerations in various physical contexts.

  7. Classification of signature-only signature models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO ZhengJun; LIU MuLan

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a set of criterions for classifying signature-only signature models. By the criterions, we classify signature models into 5 basic types and 69 general classes. Theoretically, 21141 kinds of signature models can be derived by appro-priately combining different general classes. The result comprises almost existing signature models. It will be helpful for exploring new signature models. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time for investigation of the problem of classifica-tion of signature-only signature models.

  8. Helical muon beam cooling channel engineering design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-08-07

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet. The first phase of this project saw the development of a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb3Sn based HS test section. Two very novel ideas are required to realize the design. The first idea is the use of dielectric inserts in the RF cavities to make them smaller for a given frequency so that the cavities and associated plumbing easily fit inside the magnet cryostat. Calculations indicate that heat loads will be tolerable, while RF breakdown of the dielectric inserts will be suppressed by the pressurized hydrogen gas. The second new idea is the use of a multi-layer Nb3Sn helical solenoid. The technology demonstrations for the two aforementioned key components of a 10T, 805 MHz HCC were begun in this project. The work load in the Fermilab Technical Division made it difficult to test a multi-layer Nb3Sn solenoid as originally planned. Instead, a complementary project was approved by the DOE

  9. Helical muon beam cooling channel engineering design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-08-07

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet. The first phase of this project saw the development of a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb3Sn-based HS test section. Two very novel ideas are required to realize the design. The first idea is the use of dielectric inserts in the RF cavities to make them smaller for a given frequency so that the cavities and associated plumbing easily fit inside the magnet cryostat. Calculations indicate that heat loads will be tolerable, while RF breakdown of the dielectric inserts will be suppressed by the pressurized hydrogen gas. The second new idea is the use of a multi-layer Nb3Sn helical solenoid. The technology demonstrations for the two aforementioned key components of a 10T, 805 MHz HCC were begun in this project. The work load in the Fermilab Technical Division made it difficult to test a multi-layer Nb3Sn solenoid as originally planned. Instead, a complementary

  10. Helical CT for lumbosacral spinal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatsuno, Satoshi; Fukuda, Kunihiko [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of helical CT for lumbosacral pathology. We performed helical CT with multiplanar reconstruction, including the formation of oblique transaxial and coronal images, in 62 patients with various lumboscral disorders, including 32 non-enhanced CT and 36 CT after myelography. We correlated the appearance of the stenotic spinal canal and neoplastic disease with the findings on MRI obtained at nearly the same time. We obtained helical CT images in all cases in about 30 seconds. The diagnostic ability of helical CT was roughly equal to that of MRI in patients with spondylosis deformans, spondylolisthesis and herniated nucleus pulposus. There was no significant difference in diagnostic value for degenerative lumbosacral disease with canal and foraminal stenosis between non-enhanced and post-myelography helical CT. However, non-enhanced helical CT could not clearly demonstrate neoplastic disease because of the poor contrast resolution. Helical CT was useful in evaluating degenerative disorder and its diagnostic value was nearly equal to that of MRI. We considered that helical CT may be suitable for the assessment of patients with severe lumbago owing to the markedly shortened examination time. However, if helical CT is used as a screening method for lumbosacral disease, one must be careful of its limitations, for example, poor detectability of neoplastic disease, vascular anomalies and so on. (author)

  11. Helicity Transfer in Turbulent Models

    CERN Document Server

    Biferale, L; Toschi, F

    1998-01-01

    Helicity transfer in a shell model of turbulence is investigated. We show that a Reynolds-independent helicity flux is present in the model when the large scale forcing breaks inversion symmetry. The equivalent in Shell Models of the ``2/15 law'', obtained from helicity conservation in Navier-Stokes eqs., is derived and tested. The odd part of helicity flux statistic is found to be dominated by a few very intense events. In a particular model, we calculate analytically leading and sub-leading contribution to the scaling of triple velocity correlation.

  12. Investigation of ULF magnetic pulsations, air conductivity changes, and infra red signatures associated with the 30 October Alum Rock M5.4 earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bleier

    2009-04-01

    ionization reported to be associated with radon emission from the ground (Ouzounov, 2007, and a series of laboratory rock stressing experiments (Freund, 2006, 2007a, b, c to determine if field data was consistent either of these accounts. We could not find a data set with pre-earthquake radon measurements taken near the Alum Rock epicenter to compare against our field data. However, based on the Alum Rock data set example and another data set at Parkfield, the field tests are at least consistent with the lab experiments showing currents, magnetic field disturbances, air conductivity changes, and IR signatures. This is encouraging, but more instrumented earthquake examples are needed to prove a repeating pattern for these types of pre-earthquake EM signatures.

  13. Controlling skyrmion helicity via engineered Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Sebastián A.; Troncoso, Roberto E.

    2016-10-01

    Single magnetic skyrmion dynamics in chiral magnets with a spatially inhomogeneous Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) is considered. Based on the relation between DMI coupling and skyrmion helicity, it is argued that the latter must be included as an extra degree of freedom in the dynamics of skyrmions. An effective description of the skyrmion dynamics for an arbitrary inhomogeneous DMI coupling is obtained through the collective coordinates method. The resulting generalized Thiele equation is a dynamical system for the center of mass position and helicity of the skyrmion. It is found that the dissipative tensor and hence the Hall angle become helicity dependent. The skyrmion position and helicity dynamics are fully characterized by our model in two particular examples of engineered DMI coupling: half-planes with opposite-sign DMI and linearly varying DMI. In light of the experiment of Shibata et al (2013 Nat. Nanotechnol. 8 723) on the magnitude and sign of the DMI, our results constitute the first step toward a more complete understanding of the skyrmion helicity as a new degree of freedom that could be harnessed in future high-density magnetic storage and logic devices.

  14. Note on the helicity decomposition of spin and orbital optical currents

    CERN Document Server

    Aiello, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In the helicity representation, the Poynting vector (current) for a monochromatic optical field, when calculated using either the electric or the magnetic field, separates into right-handed and left-handed contributions, with no cross-helicity contributions. Cross-helicity terms do appear in the orbital and spin contributions to the current. But when the electric and magnetic formulas are averaged ('electric-magnetic democracy'), these terms cancel, restoring the separation into right-handed and left-handed currents for orbital and spin separately.

  15. Cool and hot flux ropes, their helicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nindos, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    We will review recent indirect and direct evidence for the existence of magnetic flux ropes in the solar atmosphere. Magnetic flux ropes may appear as S-shaped or reverse S-shaped (sigmoidal) structures in regions that are likely to erupt, and may also show in nonlinear force-free field extrapolations that use data from photospheric vector magnetograms as boundary condition. The availability of high sensitivity data recorded with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution in hot EUV wavelengths by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) has revealed the existence of coherent structures identified as hot flux ropes. In this presentation, we will review the properties of both cool and hot flux ropes with an emphasis on the frequency of their occurrence in large flares and on their magnetic helicity content.

  16. Design principles for Bernal spirals and helices with tunable pitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejer, Szilard N; Chakrabarti, Dwaipayan; Kusumaatmaja, Halim; Wales, David J

    2014-08-21

    Using the framework of potential energy landscape theory, we describe two in silico designs for self-assembling helical colloidal superstructures based upon dipolar dumbbells and Janus-type building blocks, respectively. Helical superstructures with controllable pitch length are obtained using external magnetic field driven assembly of asymmetric dumbbells involving screened electrostatic as well as magnetic dipolar interactions. The pitch of the helix is tuned by modulating the Debye screening length over an experimentally accessible range. The second design is based on building blocks composed of rigidly linked spheres with short-range anisotropic interactions, which are predicted to self-assemble into Bernal spirals. These spirals are quite flexible, and longer helices undergo rearrangements via cooperative, hinge-like moves, in agreement with experiment.

  17. Propulsion by Helical Strips in Circular Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesilyurt, Serhat; Demir, Ebru

    2016-11-01

    Progress in manufacturing techniques avails the production of artificial micro swimmers (AMS) in various shapes and sizes. There are numerous studies on the generation of efficient locomotion by means of helical tails with circular cross-sections. This work focuses on locomotion with helical strips in circular channels. A CFD model is used to analyze the effects of geometric parameters and the radius of the channel on swimming velocity of infinite helical-strips in circular channels. Results show that there is an optimum wavelength that depends on thickness to channel radius ratio, suggesting that these parameters need to be optimized simultaneously. With constant torque, thinner strips swim faster, whereas under constant angular velocity application, thicker strips (in radial direction) prevail. As width approaches the wavelength, velocity decreases under both conditions, unless a magnetically coated tail is simulated, for which width has an optimum value. Increasing channel radius to helix amplitude ratio increases the velocity up to a maximum and after a slight drop, saturation occurs as bulk swimming conditions are approached.

  18. Employing Helicity Amplitudes for Resummation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moult, I.; Stewart, I.W.; Tackmann, F.J.; Waalewijn, W.J.

    2015-01-01

    Many state-of-the-art QCD calculations for multileg processes use helicity amplitudes as their fundamental ingredients. We construct a simple and easy-to-use helicity operator basis in soft-collinear effective theory (SCET), for which the hard Wilson coefficients from matching QCD onto SCET are dire

  19. Quark Helicity and Transversity Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Dae Sung

    2016-01-01

    The quark transversity distribution inside nucleon is less understood than the quark unpolarized and helicity distributions inside nucleon. In particular, it is important to know clearly why the quark helicity and transversity distributions are different. We investigate the origin of their discrepancy.

  20. Tunable symmetry breaking and helical edge transport in a graphene quantum spin Hall state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, A F; Sanchez-Yamagishi, J D; Hunt, B; Choi, S H; Watanabe, K; Taniguchi, T; Ashoori, R C; Jarillo-Herrero, P

    2014-01-23

    Low-dimensional electronic systems have traditionally been obtained by electrostatically confining electrons, either in heterostructures or in intrinsically nanoscale materials such as single molecules, nanowires and graphene. Recently, a new method has emerged with the recognition that symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phases, which occur in systems with an energy gap to quasiparticle excitations (such as insulators or superconductors), can host robust surface states that remain gapless as long as the relevant global symmetry remains unbroken. The nature of the charge carriers in SPT surface states is intimately tied to the symmetry of the bulk, resulting in one- and two-dimensional electronic systems with novel properties. For example, time reversal symmetry endows the massless charge carriers on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator with helicity, fixing the orientation of their spin relative to their momentum. Weakly breaking this symmetry generates a gap on the surface, resulting in charge carriers with finite effective mass and exotic spin textures. Analogous manipulations have yet to be demonstrated in two-dimensional topological insulators, where the primary example of a SPT phase is the quantum spin Hall state. Here we demonstrate experimentally that charge-neutral monolayer graphene has a quantum spin Hall state when it is subjected to a very large magnetic field angled with respect to the graphene plane. In contrast to time-reversal-symmetric systems, this state is protected by a symmetry of planar spin rotations that emerges as electron spins in a half-filled Landau level are polarized by the large magnetic field. The properties of the resulting helical edge states can be modulated by balancing the applied field against an intrinsic antiferromagnetic instability, which tends to spontaneously break the spin-rotation symmetry. In the resulting canted antiferromagnetic state, we observe transport signatures of gapped edge states

  1. Dynamics of local isolated magnetic flux tubes in a fast-rotating stellar atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, W.; Tajima, C.T. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Physics; Matsumoto, R. [Chiba Univ. (Japan)]|[ASRC, JAERI, Naka (Japan); Shibata, K. [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka (Japan)

    1998-01-01

    Dynamics of magnetic flux tubes in the fast rotating stellar atmosphere is studied. We focus on the effects and signatures of the instability of the flux tube emergence influenced by the Coriolis force. We present the result from a linear stability analysis and discuss its possible signatures in the course of the evolution of G-type and M-type stars. We present a three dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulation of local isolated magnetic flux tubes under a magnetic buoyancy instability in co-rotating Cartesian coordinates. We find that the combination of the buoyancy instability and the Coriolis effect gives rise to a mechanism, to twist the emerging magnetic flux tube into a helical structure. The tilt angle, east-west asymmetry and magnetic helicity of the Twisted flux tubes in the simulations are studied in detail. The linear and nonlinear analyses provide hints as to what kind of pattern of large spots in young M-type main-sequence stars might be observed. We find that young and old G-type stars may have different distributions of spots while M-type stars may always have low latitudes spots. The size of stellar spots may decrease when a star becomes older, due to the decreasing of magnetic field. A qualitative comparison with solar observations is also presented.

  2. The Advanced Helical Generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reisman, D B; Javedani, J B; Ellsworth, G F; Kuklo, R M; Goerz, D A; White, A D; Tallerico, L J; Gidding, D A; Murphy, M J; Chase, J B

    2009-10-26

    A high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) generator called the Advanced Helical Generator (AHG) has been designed, built, and successfully tested. The AHG incorporates design principles of voltage and current management to obtain a high current and energy gain. Its design was facilitated by the use of modern modeling tools as well as high precision manufacture. The result was a first-shot success. The AHG delivered 16 Mega-Amperes of current and 11 Mega-Joules of energy to a quasi-static 80 nH inductive load. A current gain of 154 times was obtained with a peak exponential rise time of 20 {micro}s. We will describe in detail the design and testing of the AHG.

  3. Helicity dependent parton distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Scopetta, Sergio; 10.4249/scholarpedia.10226

    2011-01-01

    The helicity dependent parton distributions describe the number density of partons with given longitudinal momentum x and given polarization in a hadron polarized longitudinally with respect to its motion. After the discovery, more than 70 years ago, that the proton is not elementary, the observation of Bjorken scaling in the late 1960s lead to the idea of hadrons containing almost pointlike constituents, the partons. Since then, Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) has played a crucial role in our understanding of hadron structure. Through DIS experiments it has been possible to link the partons to the quarks, and to unveil the presence of other pointlike constituents, the gluons, which lead into a dynamical theory of quarks and gluons - quantum chromodynamics (QCD). Polarized DIS, i.e. the collision of a longitudinally polarized lepton beam on a polarized target (either longitudinally or transversely polarized), provides a complementary information regarding the structure of the nucleon. Whereas ordinary DIS pro...

  4. Local and Nonlocal Advected Invariants and Helicities in Magnetohydrodynamics and Gas Dynamics I: Lie Dragging Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Gary M; McKenzie, James F; Hu, Qiang; Zank, Gary P

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we discuss conservation laws in ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and gas dynamics associated with advected invariants. The invariants in some cases, can be related to fluid relabelling symmetries associated with the Lagrangian map. There are different classes of invariants that are advected or Lie dragged with the flow. Simple examples are the advection of the entropy S (a 0-form), and the conservation of magnetic flux (an invariant 2-form advected with the flow). The magnetic flux conservation law is equivalent to Faraday's equation. We discuss the gauge condition required for the magnetic helicity to be advected with the flow. The conditions for the cross helicity to be an invariant are discussed. We discuss the different variants of helicity in fluid dynamics and in MHD, including: fluid helicity, cross helicity and magnetic helicity. The fluid helicity conservation law and the cross helcity conservation law in MHD are derived for the case of a barotropic gas. If the magnetic field lies in th...

  5. RING PROXY SIGNATURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Proxy signatures have been used to enable the transfer of digital signing power within some context and ring signatures can be used to provide the anonymity of a signer. By combining the functionalities of proxy signatures and ring signatures, this paper introduces a new concept, named ring proxy signature, which is a proxy signature generated by an anonymous member from a set of potential signers. The paper also constructs the first concrete ring proxy signature scheme based on the provably secure Schnorr's signatures and two ID-based ring proxy signature schemes. The security analysis is provided as well.

  6. Use of Helical Fields to Allow a Long Pulse Reversed Field Pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Boozer and N. Pomphrey

    2008-11-20

    The maintenance of the magnetic configuration of a Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) is an unsolved problem. Even a toroidal loop voltage does not suffice to maintain the magnetic configuration in axisymmetry but could if the plasma had helical shaping. The theoretical tools for plasma optimization using helical shaping have advanced, so an RFP could be relatively easily designed for optimal performance with a spatially constant toroidal loop voltage. A demonstration that interesting solutions exist is given.

  7. Improved cerebral microbleeds detection using their magnetic signature on T2*-phase-contrast: A comparison study in a clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaaouana, Takoua; Bertrand, Anne; Ouamer, Fatma; Law-Ye, Bruno; Pyatigorskaya, Nadya; Bouyahia, Ali; Thiery, Nathalie; Dufouil, Carole; Delmaire, Christine; Dormont, Didier; de Rochefort, Ludovic; Chupin, Marie

    2017-01-01

    In vivo detection of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) from T2* gradient recalled echo (GRE) magnitude image suffers from low specificity, modest inter-rater reproducibility and is biased by its sensitivity to acquisition parameters. New methods were proposed for improving this identification, but they mostly rely on 3D acquisitions, not always feasible in clinical practice. A fast 2D phase processing technique for computing internal field maps (IFM) has been shown to make it possible to characterize CMBs through their magnetic signature in routine clinical setting, based on 2D multi-slice acquisitions. However, its clinical interest for CMBs identification with respect to more common images remained to be assessed. To do so, systematic experiments were undertaken to compare the ratings obtained by trained observers with several image types, T2* magnitude, Susceptibility Weighted Imaging reconstructions (SWI) and IFM built from the same T2*-weighted acquisition. 15 participants from the MEMENTO multi-center cohort were selected: six subjects with numerous CMBs (20 ± 6 CMBs), five subjects with a few CMBs (2 ± 1 CMBs) and four subjects without CMB. 2D multi-slice T2* GRE sequences were acquired on Philips and Siemens 3T systems. After pilot experiments, T2* magnitude, Susceptibility Weighted Imaging (SWI) minimum intensity projection (mIP) on three slices and IFM were considered for the rating experiments. A graphical user interface (GUI) was designed in order to consistently display images in random order. Six raters of various background and expertise independently selected "definite" or "possible" CMBs. Rating results were compared with respect to a specific consensus reference, on both lesion and subject type points of view. IFM yielded increased sensitivity and decreased false positives rate (FPR) for CMBs identification compared to T2* magnitude and SWI-mIP images. Inter-rater variability was decreased with IFM when identifying subjects with numerous lesions

  8. Ion temperature gradient turbulence in helical and axisymmetric RFP plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Predebon, I

    2015-01-01

    Turbulence induced by the ion temperature gradient (ITG) is investigated in the helical and axisymmetric plasma states of a reversed field pinch device by means of gyrokinetic calculations. The two magnetic configurations are systematically compared, both linearly and nonlinearly, in order to evaluate the impact of the geometry on the instability and its ensuing transport, as well as on the production of zonal flows. Despite its enhanced confinement, the high-current helical state demonstrates a lower ITG stability threshold compared to the axisymmetric state, and ITG turbulence is expected to become an important contributor to the total heat transport.

  9. Progressive and resonant wave helices application to electron paramagnetic resonance; Helices a ondes progressives et resonnantes application a la resonance paramagnetique electronique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volino, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    We show that helices can be used as resonant systems. Their properties are theoretically and experimentally studied. We describe resonant helices for electron paramagnetic resonance in X-band and develop a comparison between their sensitivity and the sensitivity of a normal resonant cavity. For cylindrical samples less than 3 mm diameter, the helix is more sensitive and can produce more intense microwave magnetic fields. (author) [French] Il est montre que les helices peuvent etre utilisees comme systeme resonnant. Leurs proprietes sont discutees theoriquement et experimentalement. Des helices resonnantes en bande X pour la resonance paramagnetique electronique sont decrites et leur sensibilite est comparee a celle des cavites resonnantes. Pour des echantillons cylindriques de moins de 3 mm de diametre, l'helice est plus sensible et peut produire des champs magnetiques hyper fins plus intenses. (auteur)

  10. INVESTIGATION OF HELICITY AND ENERGY FLUX TRANSPORT IN THREE EMERGING SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vemareddy, P., E-mail: vemareddy@iiap.res.in [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, II Block, Koramangala, Bangalore-560 034 (India)

    2015-06-20

    We report the results of an investigation of helicity and energy flux transport from three emerging solar active regions (ARs). Using time sequence vector magnetic field observations obtained from the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager, the velocity field of plasma flows is derived by the differential affine velocity estimator for vector magnetograms. In three cases, the magnetic fluxes evolve to pump net positive, negative, and mixed-sign helicity flux into the corona. The coronal helicity flux is dominantly coming from the shear term that is related to horizontal flux motions, whereas energy flux is dominantly contributed by the emergence term. The shear helicity flux has a phase delay of 5–14 hr with respect to absolute magnetic flux. The nonlinear curve of coronal energy versus relative helicity identifies the configuration of coronal magnetic fields, which is approximated by a fit of linear force-free fields. The nature of coronal helicity related to the particular pattern of evolving magnetic fluxes at the photosphere has implications for the generation mechanism of two kinds of observed activity in the ARs.

  11. About group digital signatures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adriana Cristina Enache

    2012-01-01

    ...).A group digital signature is a digital signature with enhanced privacy features that allows members of a given group to anonymously sign messages on behalf of the group, producing a group signature...

  12. Asymmetric catalysis with helical polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Megens, Rik P.; Roelfes, Gerard

    Inspired by nature, the use of helical biopolymer catalysts has emerged over the last years as a new approach to asymmetric catalysis. In this Concept article the various approaches and designs and their application in asymmetric catalysis will be discussed.

  13. Asymmetric catalysis with helical polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Megens, Rik P.; Roelfes, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    Inspired by nature, the use of helical biopolymer catalysts has emerged over the last years as a new approach to asymmetric catalysis. In this Concept article the various approaches and designs and their application in asymmetric catalysis will be discussed.

  14. Modeling helicity dissipation-rate equation

    CERN Document Server

    Yokoi, Nobumitsu

    2016-01-01

    Transport equation of the dissipation rate of turbulent helicity is derived with the aid of a statistical analytical closure theory of inhomogeneous turbulence. It is shown that an assumption on the helicity scaling with an algebraic relationship between the helicity and its dissipation rate leads to the transport equation of the turbulent helicity dissipation rate without resorting to a heuristic modeling.

  15. omega-Helices in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enkhbayar, Purevjav; Boldgiv, Bazartseren; Matsushima, Norio

    2010-05-01

    A modification of the alpha-helix, termed the omega-helix, has four residues in one turn of a helix. We searched the omega-helix in proteins by the HELFIT program which determines the helical parameters-pitch, residues per turn, radius, and handedness-and p = rmsd/(N - 1)(1/2) estimating helical regularity, where "rmsd" is the root mean square deviation from the best fit helix and "N" is helix length. A total of 1,496 regular alpha-helices 6-9 residues long with p < or = 0.10 A were identified from 866 protein chains. The statistical analysis provides a strong evidence that the frequency distribution of helices versus n indicates the bimodality of typical alpha-helix and omega-helix. Sixty-two right handed omega-helices identified (7.2% of proteins) show non-planarity of the peptide groups. There is amino acid preference of Asp and Cys. These observations and analyses insist that the omega-helices occur really in proteins.

  16. Employing Helicity Amplitudes for Resummation

    CERN Document Server

    Moult, Ian; Tackmann, Frank J; Waalewijn, Wouter J

    2015-01-01

    Many state-of-the-art QCD calculations for multileg processes use helicity amplitudes as their fundamental ingredients. We construct a simple and easy-to-use helicity operator basis in soft-collinear effective theory (SCET), for which the hard Wilson coefficients from matching QCD onto SCET are directly given in terms of color-ordered helicity amplitudes. Using this basis allows one to seamlessly combine fixed-order helicity amplitudes at any order they are known with a resummation of higher-order logarithmic corrections. In particular, the virtual loop amplitudes can be employed in factorization theorems to make predictions for exclusive jet cross sections without the use of numerical subtraction schemes to handle real-virtual infrared cancellations. We also discuss matching onto SCET in renormalization schemes with helicities in $4$- and $d$-dimensions. To demonstrate that our helicity operator basis is easy to use, we provide an explicit construction of the operator basis, as well as results for the hard m...

  17. Helical flow in RFX-mod tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piron, L.; Zaniol, B.; Bonfiglio, D.; Carraro, L.; Kirk, A.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, R.; Piron, C.; Piovesan, P.; Zuin, M.

    2017-05-01

    This work presents the first evidence of helical flow in RFX-mod q(a)  Jardin et al 2015 Phys. Rev. Lett. 115 215001). Among them, the 3D fully non-linear PIXIE3D has been used to calculate synthetic flow measurements, using a 2D flow modelling code. Inputs to the code are the PIXIE3D flow maps, the ion emission profiles as calculated by a 1D collisional radiative impurity transport code (Carraro et al 2000 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 42 731) and a synthetic diagnostic with the same geometry installed in RFX-mod. Good agreement between the synthetic and the experimental flow behaviour has been obtained, confirming that the flow oscillations observed with the associated convective cells are a signature of helical flow.

  18. Helical Nanomachines for Fast Mechanical Mapping of Heterogeneous Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Arijit

    2016-01-01

    Artificial micro and nano machines have been envisioned and demonstrated as potential candidates for variety of applications, ranging from targeted drug or gene delivery, cell manipulation, environmental sensing and many more. Here, we demonstrate the application of helical nanomachines that can measure and map the local rheological properties of a complex heterogeneous environment. The position of the helical nanomachine was controlled precisely using magnetic fields, while the instantaneous orientation provided an estimation of the viscosity of the surrounding medium with high spatial and temporal accuracy. Apart from providing viscosity estimates in purely viscous and viscoelastic media with shear rate independent viscosity (Boger fluids), their motion was also found to be extremely sensitive to fluid elasticity. Taken together we report a promising new technique of mapping the rheological properties of a complex fluidic environment by helical nanomachines with high spatial and temporal resolutions, a func...

  19. Dual electromagnetism: Helicity, spin, momentum, and angular momentum

    CERN Document Server

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y; Nori, Franco

    2012-01-01

    The dual symmetry between electric and magnetic fields is an important intrinsic property of Maxwell equations in free space. This symmetry underlies the conservation of optical helicity (chirality). However, the standard field-theory formulation of electromagnetism lacks helicity conservation because the field Lagrangian is not dual symmetric. To resolve this discrepancy between the symmetries of the Lagrangian and Maxwell equations, we put forward a dual-symmetric Lagrangian formulation of electromagnetism. This preserves the form of Maxwell equations, all fundamental conservation laws of standard electromagnetism, but recovers the helicity conservation as one of the Noether currents. Moreover, we show that the dual-symmetric electromagnetism naturally yields a meaningful separation of the spin and orbital degrees of freedom of light, in complete agreement with other recent results.

  20. Equilibrium reconstruction for Single Helical Axis reversed field pinch plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Martines, Emilio; Momo, Barbara; Terranova, David; Zanca, Paolo; Alfier, Alberto; Bonomo, Federica; Canton, Alessandra; Fassina, Alessandro; Franz, Paolo; Innocente, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Single Helical Axis (SHAx) configurations are emerging as the natural state for high current reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas. These states feature the presence of transport barriers in the core plasma. Here we present a method for computing the equilibrium magnetic surfaces for these states in the force-free approximation, which has been implemented in the SHEq code. The method is based on the superposition of a zeroth order axisymmetric equilibrium and of a first order helical perturbation computed according to Newcomb's equation supplemented with edge magnetic field measurements. The mapping of the measured electron temperature profiles, soft X-ray emission and interferometric density measurements on the computed magnetic surfaces demonstrates the quality of the equilibrium reconstruction. The procedure for computing flux surface averages is illustrated, and applied to the evaluation of the thermal conductivity profile. The consistency of the evaluated equilibria with Ohm's law is also discussed.

  1. Equilibrium reconstruction for single helical axis reversed field pinch plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martines, E; Lorenzini, R; Momo, B; Terranova, D; Zanca, P; Alfier, A; Bonomo, F; Canton, A; Fassina, A; Franz, P; Innocente, P, E-mail: emilio.martines@igi.cnr.it [Consorzio RFX, Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy)

    2011-03-15

    Single helical axis configurations are emerging as the natural state for high-current reversed field pinch plasmas. These states feature the presence of transport barriers in the core plasma. Here we present a method for computing the equilibrium magnetic surfaces for these states in the force-free approximation, which has been implemented in the SHEq code. The method is based on the superposition of a zeroth-order axisymmetric equilibrium and of a first-order helical perturbation computed according to Newcomb's equation supplemented with edge magnetic field measurements. The mapping of the measured electron temperature profiles, soft x-ray emission and interferometric density measurements on the computed magnetic surfaces demonstrates the quality of the equilibrium reconstruction. The procedure for computing flux surface averages is illustrated, and applied to the evaluation of the thermal conductivity profile. The consistency of the evaluated equilibria with Ohm's law is also discussed.

  2. Dynamo transition in a five-mode helical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rohit; Wahi, Pankaj

    2017-09-01

    We construct a five-mode helical dynamo model containing three velocity and two magnetic modes and solve it analytically. This model exhibits dynamo transition via supercritical pitchfork bifurcation. We show that the critical magnetic Reynolds number for dynamo transition (Rmc) asymptotes to constant values for very low and very high magnetic Prandtl numbers (Pm). Beyond dynamo transition, secondary bifurcations lead to periodic, quasi-periodic, and chaotic dynamo states as the forcing amplitude is increased and chaos appears through a quasi-periodic route.

  3. Brownian motion of helical flagella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshikawa, H; Saito, N

    1979-07-01

    We develops a theory of the Brownian motion of a rigid helical object such as bacterial flagella. The statistical properties of the random forces acting on the helical object are discussed and the coefficients of the correlations of the random forces are determined. The averages , and are also calculated where z and theta are the position along and angle around the helix axis respectively. Although the theory is limited to short time interval, direct comparison with experiment is possible by using the recently developed cinematography technique.

  4. Optical and Infrared Helical Metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaschke Johannes

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available By tailoring metamaterials with chiral unit cells, giant optical activity and strong circular dichroism have been achieved successfully over the past decade. Metamaterials based on arrays of metal helices have revolutionized the field of chiral metamaterials, because of their capability of exhibiting these pronounced chiro-optical effects over previously unmatched bandwidths. More recently, a large number of new metamaterial designs based on metal helices have been introduced with either optimized optical performance or other chiro-optical properties for novel applications.

  5. A hypothesis on neutrino helicity

    CERN Document Server

    Sahin, I

    2016-01-01

    It is firmly established by experimental results that neutrinos are almost 100\\% longitudinally polarized and left-handed. It is also confirmed by neutrino oscillation experiments that neutrinos have tiny but non-zero masses. Since the helicity is not a Lorentz invariant quantity for massive particles, neutrinos can not be strictly left-handed. On the other hand, it is generally assumed that ultrarelativistic massive fermions can be described well enough by the Weyl equations. We discuss the validity of this assumption and propose a new hypothesis according to which neutrinos can be described by pure helicity states although they are not massless.

  6. Helical spin rotators and snakes for RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ptitsin, V.I.; Shatunov, Yu.M. [Budker Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Peggs, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The RHIC collider, now under construction at BNL, will have the possibility of polarized proton-proton collisions up to a beam energy of 250 Gev. Polarized proton beams of such high energy can be only obtained with the use of siberian snakes, a special kind of spin rotator that rotates the particle spin by 180{degree} around an axis lying in the horizontal plane. Siberian snakes help to preserve the beam polarization while numerous spin depolarizing resonances are crossed, during acceleration. In order to collide longitudinally polarized beams, it is also planned to install spin rotators around two interaction regions. This paper discusses snake and spin rotator designs based on sequences of four helical magnets. The schemes that were chosen to be applied at RHIC are presented.

  7. A model for straight and helical solar jets: II. Parametric study of the plasma beta

    CERN Document Server

    Pariat, E; DeVore, C R; Antiochos, S K; Karpen, J T

    2016-01-01

    Jets are dynamic, impulsive, well-collimated plasma events that develop at many different scales and in different layers of the solar atmosphere. Jets are believed to be induced by magnetic reconnection, a process central to many astrophysical phenomena. Within the solar atmosphere, jet-like events develop in many different environments, e.g., in the vicinity of active regions as well as in coronal holes, and at various scales, from small photospheric spicules to large coronal jets. In all these events, signatures of helical structure and/or twisting/rotating motions are regularly observed. The present study aims to establish that a single model can generally reproduce the observed properties of these jet-like events. In this study, using our state-of-the-art numerical solver ARMS, we present a parametric study of a numerical tridimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of solar jet-like events. Within the MHD paradigm, we study the impact of varying the atmospheric plasma $\\beta$ on the generation and prop...

  8. Magnetic signature of river sediments drained into the southern and eastern part of the South China Sea (Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, Borneo, Luzon and Taiwan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissel, Catherine; Liu, Zhifei; Li, Jinhua; Wandres, Camille

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic properties of 22 river samples collected in the Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, Borneo, Luzon and Taiwan have been investigated in order to magnetically characterize the sediments drained and deposited into the South China Sea. The geological formations as well as the present climatic conditions are different from one region to another. Laboratory analyses include low-field magnetic susceptibility, anhysteretic (ARM) and isothermal (IRM) remanent magnetizations acquisition and decay, back-field acquisition, thermal demagnetization of three-axes IRM, hysteresis cycles and low-temperature magnetic measurements. The magnetic properties indicate that the sediments are a mixture of hematite, magnetite and pyrrhotite in different proportions depending on the region. Combined with results previously reported for the three main Asian rivers (Pearl, Red and Mekong rivers), the new data indicate that, in general, hematite-rich sediments are delivered to the southern basin of the South China Sea while the northern basin is fed with magnetite and pyrrhotite-rich sediments. In addition to this general picture, some variability is observed at smaller geographic scales. Indeed, the magnetic assemblages are closely related to the geology of the various catchments while clay minerals, previously reported for the same samples, are more representative of the climatic conditions under which the parent rocks have evolved within each catchment. The magnetic fraction, now well characterized in the main river sediments drained into the South China Sea, can be used as a tracer for changes in precipitation on land and in oceanic water mass transport and exchange.

  9. Exact scaling laws for helical three-dimensional two-fluid turbulent plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Andrés, Nahuel; Sahraoui, Fouad

    2016-01-01

    We derive exact scaling laws for a three-dimensional incompressible helical two-fluid plasma, without the assumption of isotropy. For each ideal invariant of the two-fluid model, i.e. the total energy, the electron helicity and the proton helicity, we derive simple scaling laws in terms of two-point increments correlation functions expressed in terms of the velocity field of each species and the magnetic field. These variables are appropriate for comparison with \\textit{in-situ} measurements in the solar wind at different spatial ranges and data from numerical simulations. Finally, with the exact scaling laws and dimensional analysis we predict the magnetic energy and electron helicity spectra for different ranges of scales.

  10. Is gadolinium a helical antiferromagnet or a collinear ferromagnet?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S N Kaul

    2003-03-01

    Controversial issues concerning the nature of magnetic ordering in gadolinium are briefly reviewed. The recent experimental results are shown to resolve most of such issues in that they rule out the possibility of a helical spin structure in Gd and clearly bring out the role of long-range dipolar interactions in stabilising collinear ferromagnetic order for temperatures between the spin-reorientation temperature and the Curie point.

  11. Fast Theoretical Simulation for Design of Helical Flux Compression Generators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xian-Jun; DONG Zhi-Wei

    2006-01-01

    A theoretical scheme is derived to achieve the numerical simulation of helical flux compression generator (HFCG) design, by which not only any physical approximation is not made, but also numerical simulation can be fast obtained. In particular, an analytic formula to calculate the inductance is deduced, which is extremely close to the experimental results. The physical process of relevant interesting physical quantity, such as inductance, enlarging current, and magnetic flux density, can be calculated to compare with the experimentally quantitative results.

  12. Magnetic twist: a source and property of space weather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Dhrubaditya

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We present evidence for finite magnetic helicity density in the heliosphere and numerical models thereof, and relate it to the magnetic field properties of the dynamo in the solar convection zone. Methods: We use simulations and solar wind data to compute magnetic helicity either directly from the simulations or indirectly using time series of the skew-symmetric components of the magnetic correlation tensor. Results: We find that the solar dynamo produces negative magnetic helicity at small scales and positive at large scales. However, in the heliosphere these properties are reversed and the magnetic helicity is now positive at small scales and negative at large scales. We explain this by the fact that a negative diffusive magnetic helicity flux corresponds to a positive gradient of magnetic helicity, which leads to a change of sign from negative to positive values at some radius in the northern hemisphere.

  13. Applications of 2D helical vortex dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okulov, Valery; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2010-01-01

    In the paper, we show how the assumption of helical symmetry in the context of 2D helical vortices can be exploited to analyse and to model various cases of rotating flows. From theory, examples of three basic applications of 2D dynamics of helical vortices embedded in flows with helical symmetry...... of the vorticity field are addressed. These included some of the problems related to vortex breakdown, instability of far wakes behind rotors and vortex theory of ideal rotors....

  14. On the triple correlations in helical turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Chkhetiani, O

    1997-01-01

    The evolution of correlation characteristics in homogeneous helical turbulence is considered. Additional K'arm'an-Howarth type equations, describing the evolution of the mixed correlation tensor of the velocity and vorticity are obtained. In the helical scaling region, the solution of obtained equation gives the exact relation between antisymmetric component of a rank-three tensor and the average dissipation of helicity. This relation is a helical analogue of Kolmogorov's known 4/5 law.

  15. Magnetic dynamo action at low magnetic Prandtl numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyshkin, Leonid M; Boldyrev, Stanislav

    2010-11-19

    Amplification of magnetic field due to kinematic turbulent dynamo action is studied in the regime of small magnetic Prandtl numbers. Such a regime is relevant for planets and stars interiors, as well as for liquid-metal laboratory experiments. A comprehensive analysis based on the Kazantsev-Kraichnan model is reported, which establishes the dynamo threshold and the dynamo growth rates for varying kinetic helicity of turbulent fluctuations. It is proposed that in contrast with the case of large magnetic Prandtl numbers, the kinematic dynamo action at small magnetic Prandtl numbers is significantly affected by kinetic helicity, and it can be made quite efficient with an appropriate choice of the helicity spectrum.

  16. Entanglement of helicity and energy in kinetic Alfven wave/whistler turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Galtier, S

    2014-01-01

    The role of magnetic helicity is investigated in kinetic Alfv\\'en wave and oblique whistler turbulence in presence of a relatively intense external magnetic field $b_0 {\\bf e_\\parallel}$. In this situation, turbulence is strongly anisotropic and the fluid equations describing both regimes are the reduced electron magnetohydrodynamics (REMHD) whose derivation, originally made from the gyrokinetic theory, is also obtained here from compressible Hall MHD. We use the asymptotic equations derived by Galtier \\& Bhattacharjee (2003) to study the REMHD dynamics in the weak turbulence regime. The analysis is focused on the magnetic helicity equation for which we obtain the exact solutions: they correspond to the entanglement relation, $n+\\tilde n = -6$, where $n$ and $\\tilde n$ are the power law indices of the perpendicular (to ${\\bf b_0}$) wave number magnetic energy and helicity spectra respectively. Therefore, the spectra derived in the past from the energy equation only, namely $n=-2.5$ and $\\tilde n = - 3.5$,...

  17. Rock magnetic and other geophysical signatures of relative sea level change in the Middle Cambrian Wheeler Formation, Drum Mountains, West-Central Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halgedahl, S. L.; Jarrard, R. D.

    2011-12-01

    The Wheeler Formation of West-Central Utah is a succession of mixed carbonate-siliciclastic rocks deposited during the Middle Cambrian along a passive continental margin of Laurentia (western margin, in today's coordinates). The depositional setting was a gentle ramp, bounded by a normal fault on the south. The present study focuses on the Wheeler Formation in the Drum Mountains, Utah, which is thought to have recorded Middle Cambrian sea level changes and which is known to yield exceptionally-preserved fossils with soft parts, similar to the famed Burgess shale. An integrated approach has been used here to investigate the following: (1) high-resolution changes in water depth (sea level changes?) with stratigraphic position; (2) where exceptionally preserved fossils are most likely to occur; and (3) mineralogical indicators of sea level change, such as magnetic susceptibility and other rock magnetic properties. Rocks consist of limestones, argillaceous limestones, and finely-bedded mudstones (shales). Methods used here are: measurements of magnetic susceptibility, natural remanent magnetization, and viscous remanent magnetization; hysteresis loops; spectral gamma ray; coulometry to determine calcite content; X-ray diffraction; and field mapping. In these rocks, mineralogical analyses indicate primarily a 2-component system of calcite and terrigenous minerals, mainly illite. Magnetic susceptibility, gamma ray, and coulometry results strongly indicate that magnetic susceptibility stems primarily from the paramagnetic clay component, namely, illite. Thus, both magnetic susceptibility and gamma ray increase linearly with decreasing calcite content throughout the section studied. Deep-water shales yield very high values of gamma ray and magnetic susceptibility; by contrast, carbonates with low gamma ray and low magnetic susceptibilities were deposited in relatively shallow water. These results lead to the following conclusions: (1) changes in relative water depth have

  18. Enantiomeric differentiation by synthetic helical polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashima, Eiji; Iida, Hiroki; Okamoto, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the synthesis of helical polymers and their applications as chiral materials, in particular chiral stationary phases (CSPs), for high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) are reviewed with an emphasis on the key role of the helical conformations with one-handedness for the prominent chiral recognition of enantiomers. The historical background of artificial optically active helical polymers is also briefly described.

  19. Twist, Writhe & Helicity in the inner penumbra of a sunspot

    CERN Document Server

    Cobo, Basilio Ruiz

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work is the determination of the twist, writhe, and self magnetic helicity of penumbral filaments located in an inner Sunspot penumbra. To this extent, we inverted data taken with the spectropolarimeter (SP) aboard {\\it Hinode} with the SIR (Stokes Inversion based on Response function) code. For the construction of a 3D geometrical model we applied a genetic algorithm minimizing the divergence of $\\vec{B}$ and the net magnetohydrodynamic force, consequently a force-free solution would be reached if possible. We estimated two proxies to the magnetic helicity frequently used in literature: the force-free parameter $\\alpha_z$ and the current helicity term $h_{c_{z}}$. We show that both proxies are only qualitative indicators of the local twist as the magnetic field in the area under study significantly departures from a force-free configuration. The local twist shows significant values only at the borders of bright penumbral filaments with opposite signs on each side. These locations are precisel...

  20. Some consequences of shear on galactic dynamos with helicity fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongzhe; Blackman, Eric G.

    2017-08-01

    Galactic dynamo models sustained by supernova (SN) driven turbulence and differential rotation have revealed that the sustenance of large-scale fields requires a flux of small-scale magnetic helicity to be viable. Here we generalize a minimalist analytic version of such galactic dynamos to explore some heretofore unincluded contributions from shear on the total turbulent energy and turbulent correlation time, with the helicity fluxes maintained by either winds, diffusion or magnetic buoyancy. We construct an analytic framework for modelling the turbulent energy and correlation time as a function of SN rate and shear. We compare our prescription with previous approaches that include only rotation. The solutions depend separately on the rotation period and the eddy turnover time and not just on their ratio (the Rossby number). We consider models in which these two time-scales are allowed to be independent and also a case in which they are mutually dependent on radius when a radial-dependent SN rate model is invoked. For the case of a fixed rotation period (or a fixed radius), we show that the influence of shear is dramatic for low Rossby numbers, reducing the correlation time of the turbulence, which, in turn, strongly reduces the saturation value of the dynamo compared to the case when the shear is ignored. We also show that even in the absence of winds or diffusive fluxes, magnetic buoyancy may be able to sustain sufficient helicity fluxes to avoid quenching.

  1. Efficient Threshold Signature Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sattar J Aboud

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce a new threshold signature RSA-typed scheme. The proposed scheme has the characteristics of un-forgeable and robustness in random oracle model. Also, signature generation and verification is entirely non-interactive. In addition, the length of the entity signature participate is restricted by a steady times of the length of the RSA signature modulus. Also, the signing process of the proposed scheme is more efficient in terms of time complexity and interaction.

  2. Performance of Upgraded Cooling System for Lhd Helical Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaguchi, S.; Imagawa, S.; Obana, T.; Yanagi, N.; Moriuchi, S.; Sekiguchi, H.; Oba, K.; Mito, T.; Motojima, O.; Okamura, T.; Semba, T.; Yoshinaga, S.; Wakisaka, H.

    2008-03-01

    Helical coils of the Large Helical Device (LHD) are large scale superconducting magnets for heliotron plasma experiments. The helical coils had been cooled by saturated helium at 4.4 K, 120 kPa until 2005. An upgrade of the cooling system was carried out in 2006 in order to improve the cryogenic stability of the helical coils and then it has been possible to supply the coils with subcooled helium at 3.2 K, 120 kPa. A designed mass flow of the supplied subcooled helium is 50 g/s. The subcooled helium is generated at a heat exchanger in a saturated helium bath. A series of two centrifugal cold compressors with gas foil bearing is utilized to lower the helium pressure in the bath. The supplied helium temperature is regulated by rotational speed of the cold compressors and power of a heater in the bath. The mass flow of the supplied helium is also controlled manually by a supply valve and its surplus is evaporated by ten heaters at the outlet above the coils. In the present study, the performance of the cooling system has been investigated and a stable operating method has also developed. As the result, it was confirmed that the performance of the upgraded cooling system satisfies the requirements.

  3. Universal transport signatures of Majorana fermions in superconductor-Luttinger liquid junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidkowski, Lukasz; Alicea, Jason; Lindner, Netanel H.; Lutchyn, Roman M.; Fisher, Matthew P. A.

    2012-06-01

    One of the most promising proposals for engineering topological superconductivity and Majorana fermions employs a spin-orbit coupled nanowire subjected to a magnetic field and proximate to an s-wave superconductor. When only part of the wire's length contacts to the superconductor, the remaining conducting portion serves as a natural lead that can be used to probe these Majorana modes via tunneling. The enhanced role of interactions in one dimension dictates that this configuration should be viewed as a superconductor-Luttinger liquid junction. We investigate such junctions between both helical and spinful Luttinger liquids, and topological as well as nontopological superconductors. We determine the phase diagram for each case and show that universal low-energy transport in these systems is governed by fixed points describing either perfect normal reflection or perfect Andreev reflection. In addition to capturing (in some instances) the familiar Majorana-mediated “zero-bias anomaly” in a new framework, we show that interactions yield dramatic consequences in certain regimes. Indeed, we establish that strong repulsion removes this conductance anomaly altogether while strong attraction produces dynamically generated effective Majorana modes even in a junction with a trivial superconductor. Interactions further lead to striking signatures in the local density of states and the line shape of the conductance peak at finite voltage, and also are essential for establishing smoking-gun transport signatures of Majorana fermions in spinful Luttinger liquid junctions.

  4. End-to-End Thiocyanato-Bridged Helical Chain Polymer and Dichlorido-Bridged Copper(II) Complexes with a Hydrazone Ligand: Synthesis, Characterisation by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Variable-Temperature Magnetic Studies, and Inhibitory Effects on Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Kuheli; Datta, Amitabha; Sinha, Chittaranjan; Huang, Jui-Hsien; Garribba, Eugenio; Hsiao, Ching-Sheng; Hsu, Chin-Lin

    2012-04-01

    The reactions of the tridentate hydrazone ligand, N'-[1-(pyridin-2-yl)ethylidene]acetohydrazide (HL), obtained by condensation of 2-acetylpyridine with acetic hyadrazide, with copper nitrate trihydrate in the presence of thiocyanate, or with CuCl2 produce two distinct coordination compounds, namely a one-dimensional helical coordination chain of [CuL(NCS)] n (1) units, and a doubly chlorido-bridged dinuclear complex [Cu2L2Cl2] (2) (where L=CH3C(O)=N-N=CCH3C5H4N). Single-crystal X-ray structural determination studies reveal that in complex 1, a deprotonated hydrazone ligand L(-) coordinates a copper(II) ion that is bridged to two neighbouring metal centres by SCN(-) anions, generating a one-dimensional helical coordination chain. In complex 2, two symmetry-related, adjacent copper(II) coordination entities are doubly chlorido-bridged, producing a dicopper entity with a Cu⋅⋅⋅Cu distance of 3.402 (1) Å. The two coordination compounds have been fully characterised by elemental analysis, spectroscopic techniques including IR, UV-vis and electron paramagnetic resonance, and variable-temperature magnetic studies. The biological effects of 1 and 2 on the viability of human colorectal carcinoma cells (COLO-205 and HT-29) were evaluated using an MTT assay, and the results indicate that these complexes induce a decrease in cell-population growth of human colorectal carcinoma cells with apoptosis.

  5. Dynamo effect in a driven helical flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feudel, F; Gellert, M; Rüdiger, S; Witt, A; Seehafer, N

    2003-10-01

    The Roberts flow, a helical flow in the form of convectionlike rolls, is known to be capable of both kinematic and nonlinear dynamo action. We study the Roberts dynamo with particular attention being paid to the spatial structure of the generated magnetic field and its back-reaction on the flow. The dynamo bifurcation is decisively determined by the symmetry group of the problem, which is given by a subgroup of discrete transformations and a continuous translational invariance of the flow. In the bifurcation the continuous symmetry is broken while the discrete subgroup symmetry completely survives. Its actions help in understanding the spatial structures of the magnetic field and of the modified flow. In accordance with experimental observations, the magnetic field component perpendicular to the originally invariant direction is much stronger than the component in this direction. Furthermore, the magnetic field is largely concentrated in layers separating the convectionlike rolls of the flow and containing, in particular, its stagnation points, which are isolated for the modified flow while they are line filling for the original Roberts flow. The magnetic field is strongest near beta-type stagnation points, with a two-dimensional unstable and a one-dimensional stable manifold, and is weak near alpha-type stagnation points, with a two-dimensional stable and a one-dimensional unstable manifold. This contrasts with the usual picture that dynamo action is promoted at the alpha points and impeded at the beta points. Both the creation of isolated stagnation points and the concentration of strong fields at the beta points may be understood as a result of the way in which the Roberts dynamo saturates. It is also found that, while the original Roberts flow is regular, the modified flow is chaotic in the layers between the convectionlike rolls where the magnetic field is concentrated. This chaoticity, which results from the back-reaction of the magnetic field on the flow

  6. Performance tests on helical Savonius rotors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamoji, M.A.; Kedare, S.B. [Department of Energy Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay (India); Prabhu, S.V. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay (India)

    2009-03-15

    Conventional Savonius rotors have high coefficient of static torque at certain rotor angles and a negative coefficient of static torque from 135 to 165 and from 315 to 345 in one cycle of 360 . In order to decrease this variation in static torque from 0 to 360 , a helical Savonius rotor with a twist of 90 is proposed. In this study, tests on helical Savonius rotors are conducted in an open jet wind tunnel. Coefficient of static torque, coefficient of torque and coefficient of power for each helical Savonius rotor are measured. The performance of helical rotor with shaft between the end plates and helical rotor without shaft between the end plates at different overlap ratios namely 0.0, 0.1 and 0.16 is compared. Helical Savonius rotor without shaft is also compared with the performance of the conventional Savonius rotor. The results indicate that all the helical Savonius rotors have positive coefficient of static torque at all the rotor angles. The helical rotors with shaft have lower coefficient of power than the helical rotors without shaft. Helical rotor without shaft at an overlap ratio of 0.0 and an aspect ratio of 0.88 is found to have almost the same coefficient of power when compared with the conventional Savonius rotor. Correlation for coefficient of torque and power is developed for helical Savonius rotor for a range of Reynolds numbers studied. (author)

  7. On ULF Signatures of Lightning Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bösinger, T.; Shalimov, S. L.

    2008-06-01

    Recent works on magnetic signatures due to distant lightning discharges are reviewed. Emphasis is laid on magnetic signatures in the ULF range (in the old definition from less than 1 mHz up to 1 Hz), that is in the frequency range below the Schumann resonance. These signatures are known to be of importance for the excitation of the ionospheric Alfvén resonator (IAR) which works only at night time conditions. This emphasizes the difference between night and day time ULF signatures of lightning. The IAR forms a link between the atmosphere and magnetosphere. Similarities and differences of this link in the VLF (Trimpi effect) and ULF range are worked out. A search for a unique signature of sprite-associated positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) lightning discharges ended with a negative result. In this context, however, a new model of lightning-associated induced mesospheric currents was built. Depending on mesospheric condition it can produce magnetic signatures in the entire frequency range from VLF, ELF to ULF. In the latter case it can explain signatures known as the Ultra Slow Tail of +CG lightning discharges. A current problem on the magnetic background noise intensity has been solved by taking more seriously the contribution of +CG lightning discharges to the overall background noise. Their low occurrence rate is more than compensated by their large and long lasting continuing currents. By superposed epoch analysis it could be shown that the ULF response to -CG is one to two orders smaller that in case of +CG with similar peak current values of the return stroke.

  8. Predictive supracolloidal helices from patchy particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ruohai; Mao, Jian; Xie, Xu-Ming; Yan, Li-Tang

    2014-11-01

    A priori prediction of supracolloidal architectures from nanoparticle and colloidal assembly is a challenging goal in materials chemistry and physics. Despite intense research in this area, much less has been known about the predictive science of supracolloidal helices from designed building blocks. Therefore, developing conceptually new rules to construct supracolloidal architectures with predictive helicity is becoming an important and urgent task of great scientific interest. Here, inspired by biological helices, we show that the rational design of patchy arrangement and interaction can drive patchy particles to self-assemble into biomolecular mimetic supracolloidal helices. We further derive a facile design rule for encoding the target supracolloidal helices, thus opening the doors to the predictive science of these supracolloidal architectures. It is also found that kinetics and reaction pathway during the formation of supracolloidal helices offer a unique way to study supramolecular polymerization, and that well-controlled supracolloidal helices can exhibit tailorable circular dichroism effects at visible wavelengths.

  9. A helical scintillating fiber hodoscope

    CERN Document Server

    Altmeier, M; Bisplinghoff, J; Bissel, T; Bollmann, R; Busch, M; Büsser, K; Colberg, T; Demiroers, L; Diehl, O; Dohrmann, F; Engelhardt, H P; Eversheim, P D; Felden, O; Gebel, R; Glende, M; Greiff, J; Gross, A; Gross-Hardt, R; Hinterberger, F; Jahn, R; Jeske, M; Jonas, E; Krause, H; Lahr, U; Langkau, R; Lindemann, T; Lindlein, J; Maier, R; Maschuw, R; Mayer-Kuckuck, T; Meinerzhagen, A; Naehle, O; Pfuff, M; Prasuhn, D; Rohdjess, H; Rosendaal, D; Von Rossen, P; Sanz, B; Schirm, N; Schulz-Rojahn, M; Schwarz, V; Scobel, W; Thomas, S; Trelle, H J; Weise, E; Wellinghausen, A; Wiedmann, W; Woller, K; Ziegler, R

    1999-01-01

    A novel scintillating fiber hodoscope in helically cylindric geometry has been developed for detection of low multiplicity events of fast protons and other light charged particles in the internal target experiment EDDA at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. The hodoscope consists of 640 scintillating fibers (2.5 mm diameter), arranged in four layers surrounding the COSY beam pipe. The fibers are helically wound in opposing directions and read out individually using 16-channel photomultipliers connected to a modified commercial encoding system. The detector covers an angular range of 9 deg. <= THETA<=72 deg. and 0 deg. <=phi (cursive,open) Greek<=360 deg. in the lab frame. The detector length is 590 mm, the inner diameter 161 mm. Geometry and granularity of the hodoscope afford a position resolution of about 1.3 mm. The detector design took into consideration a maximum of reliability and a minimum of maintenance. An LED array may be used for monitoring purposes. (author)

  10. A helical scintillating fiber hodoscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altmeier, M.; Bauer, F.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bissel, T.; Bollmann, R.; Busch, M.; Buesser, K.; Colberg, T.; Demiroers, L.; Diehl, O.; Dohrmann, F.; Engelhardt, H.P.; Eversheim, P.D.; Felden, O.; Gebel, R.; Glende, M.; Greiff, J.; Gross, A.; Gross-Hardt, R.; Hinterberger, F.; Jahn, R.; Jeske, M.; Jonas, E.; Krause, H.; Lahr, U.; Langkau, R.; Lindemann, T.; Lindlein, J.; Maier, R.; Maschuw, R.; Mayer-Kuckuck, T.; Meinerzhagen, A.; Naehle, O.; Pfuff, M.; Prasuhn, D.; Rohdjess, H.; Rosendaal, D.; Rossen, P. von; Sanz, B.; Schirm, N.; Schulz-Rojahn, M.; Schwarz, V.; Scobel, W.; Thomas, S.; Trelle, H.J.; Weise, E.; Wellinghausen, A.; Wiedmann, W.; Woller, K.; Ziegler, R

    1999-07-21

    A novel scintillating fiber hodoscope in helically cylindric geometry has been developed for detection of low multiplicity events of fast protons and other light charged particles in the internal target experiment EDDA at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. The hodoscope consists of 640 scintillating fibers (2.5 mm diameter), arranged in four layers surrounding the COSY beam pipe. The fibers are helically wound in opposing directions and read out individually using 16-channel photomultipliers connected to a modified commercial encoding system. The detector covers an angular range of 9 deg. {<=}{theta}{<=}72 deg. and 0 deg. {<=}phi (cursive,open) Greek{<=}360 deg. in the lab frame. The detector length is 590 mm, the inner diameter 161 mm. Geometry and granularity of the hodoscope afford a position resolution of about 1.3 mm. The detector design took into consideration a maximum of reliability and a minimum of maintenance. An LED array may be used for monitoring purposes. (author)

  11. Quantum threshold group signature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In most situations, the signer is generally a single person. However, when the message is written on behalf of an organization, a valid message may require the approval or consent of several persons. Threshold signature is a solution to this problem. Generally speaking, as an authority which can be trusted by all members does not exist, a threshold signature scheme without a trusted party appears more attractive. Following some ideas of the classical Shamir’s threshold signature scheme, a quantum threshold group signature one is proposed. In the proposed scheme, only t or more of n persons in the group can generate the group signature and any t-1 or fewer ones cannot do that. In the verification phase, any t or more of n signature receivers can verify the message and any t-1 or fewer receivers cannot verify the validity of the signature.

  12. About group digital signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Cristina Enache

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Group signatures try to combine security (no framing, no cheating and privacy(anonymity, unlinkability.A group digital signature is a digital signature with enhanced privacy features that allows members of a given group to anonymously sign messages on behalf of the group, producing a group signature. However, in the case of dispute the identity of the signature's originator can be revealed by a designated entity (group manager. The present paper describes the main concepts about group signatures, along with a brief state of the art and shows a personal cryptographic library implemented in Java that includes two group signatures.

  13. Emulsification-Induced Homohelicity in Racemic Helical Polymer for Preparing Optically Active Helical Polymer Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Biao; Deng, Jinrui; Deng, Jianping

    2016-04-01

    Optically active nano- and microparticles have constituted a significant category of advanced functional materials. However, constructing optically active particles derived from synthetic helical polymers still remains as a big challenge. In the present study, it is attempted to induce a racemic helical polymer (containing right- and left-handed helices in equal amount) to prefer one predominant helicity in aqueous media by using emulsifier in the presence of chiral additive (emulsification process). Excitingly, the emulsification process promotes the racemic helical polymer to unify the helicity and directly provides optically active nanoparticles constructed by chirally helical polymer. A possible mechanism is proposed to explain the emulsification-induced homohelicity effect. The present study establishes a novel strategy for preparing chirally helical polymer-derived optically active nanoparticles based on racemic helical polymers.

  14. Helical Antimicrobial Sulfono- {gamma} -AApeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yaqiong; Wu, Haifan; Teng, Peng; Bai, Ge; Lin, Xiaoyang; Zuo, Xiaobing; Cao, Chuanhai; Cai, Jianfeng

    2015-06-11

    Host-defense peptides (HDPs) such as magainin 2 have emerged as potential therapeutic agents combating antibiotic resistance. Inspired by their structures and mechanism of action, herein we report the fi rst example of antimicrobial helical sulfono- γ - AApeptide foldamers. The lead molecule displays broad-spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against multi-drug-resistant Gram- positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Time-kill studies and fl uorescence microscopy suggest that sulfono- γ -AApeptides eradicate bacteria by taking a mode of action analogous to that of HDPs. Clear structure - function relationships exist in the studied sequences. Longer sequences, presumably adopting more-de fi ned helical structures, are more potent than shorter ones. Interestingly, the sequence with less helical propensity in solution could be more selective than the stronger helix-forming sequences. Moreover, this class of antimicrobial agents are resistant to proteolytic degradation. These results may lead to the development of a new class of antimicrobial foldamers combating emerging antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  15. Helically twisted photonic crystal fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, P St J; Beravat, R; Wong, G K L

    2017-02-28

    Recent theoretical and experimental work on helically twisted photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) is reviewed. Helical Bloch theory is introduced, including a new formalism based on the tight-binding approximation. It is used to explore and explain a variety of unusual effects that appear in a range of different twisted PCFs, including fibres with a single core and fibres with N cores arranged in a ring around the fibre axis. We discuss a new kind of birefringence that causes the propagation constants of left- and right-spinning optical vortices to be non-degenerate for the same order of orbital angular momentum (OAM). Topological effects, arising from the twisted periodic 'space', cause light to spiral around the fibre axis, with fascinating consequences, including the appearance of dips in the transmission spectrum and low loss guidance in coreless PCF. Discussing twisted fibres with a single off-axis core, we report that optical activity in a PCF is opposite in sign to that seen in a step-index fibre. Fabrication techniques are briefly described and emerging applications reviewed. The analytical results of helical Bloch theory are verified by an extensive series of 'numerical experiments' based on finite-element solutions of Maxwell's equations in a helicoidal frame.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'. © 2017 The Authors.

  16. Helically twisted photonic crystal fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, P. St. J.; Beravat, R.; Wong, G. K. L.

    2017-02-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental work on helically twisted photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) is reviewed. Helical Bloch theory is introduced, including a new formalism based on the tight-binding approximation. It is used to explore and explain a variety of unusual effects that appear in a range of different twisted PCFs, including fibres with a single core and fibres with N cores arranged in a ring around the fibre axis. We discuss a new kind of birefringence that causes the propagation constants of left- and right-spinning optical vortices to be non-degenerate for the same order of orbital angular momentum (OAM). Topological effects, arising from the twisted periodic `space', cause light to spiral around the fibre axis, with fascinating consequences, including the appearance of dips in the transmission spectrum and low loss guidance in coreless PCF. Discussing twisted fibres with a single off-axis core, we report that optical activity in a PCF is opposite in sign to that seen in a step-index fibre. Fabrication techniques are briefly described and emerging applications reviewed. The analytical results of helical Bloch theory are verified by an extensive series of `numerical experiments' based on finite-element solutions of Maxwell's equations in a helicoidal frame. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  17. Helically twisted photonic crystal fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beravat, R.; Wong, G. K. L.

    2017-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental work on helically twisted photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) is reviewed. Helical Bloch theory is introduced, including a new formalism based on the tight-binding approximation. It is used to explore and explain a variety of unusual effects that appear in a range of different twisted PCFs, including fibres with a single core and fibres with N cores arranged in a ring around the fibre axis. We discuss a new kind of birefringence that causes the propagation constants of left- and right-spinning optical vortices to be non-degenerate for the same order of orbital angular momentum (OAM). Topological effects, arising from the twisted periodic ‘space’, cause light to spiral around the fibre axis, with fascinating consequences, including the appearance of dips in the transmission spectrum and low loss guidance in coreless PCF. Discussing twisted fibres with a single off-axis core, we report that optical activity in a PCF is opposite in sign to that seen in a step-index fibre. Fabrication techniques are briefly described and emerging applications reviewed. The analytical results of helical Bloch theory are verified by an extensive series of ‘numerical experiments’ based on finite-element solutions of Maxwell's equations in a helicoidal frame. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Optical orbital angular momentum’. PMID:28069771

  18. Spin Helicity in Chiral Lanthanide Chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalcea, Ionut; Perfetti, Mauro; Pineider, Francesco; Tesi, Lorenzo; Mereacre, Valeriu; Wilhelm, Fabrice; Rogalev, Andrei; Anson, Christopher E; Powell, Annie K; Sessoli, Roberta

    2016-10-17

    We report here the determination of the helical spin structure of three Ln-based chiral chains of the formula [Ln(Hnic)(nic)2(NO3)]n (Hnic = nicotinic acid; Ln = Tb, Dy, and Er) by means of cantilever torque magnetometry. While the Dy and Er derivatives are strongly axial (easy-axis and easy-plane anisotropy, respectively), the Tb derivative is characterized by a remarkable rhombicity. In agreement with these findings, alternating-current susceptibility reveals slow magnetic relaxation only in the Dy derivative. Dilution of Dy(III) ions in the diamagnetic Y-based analogue shows that the weak ferromagnetic intrachain interactions do not contribute significantly to the energy barrier for the reversal of magnetization, which is better described as a single-ion process. Single crystals of the two enantiomers of the Dy derivative have also been investigated using hard X-ray synchrotron radiation at the L-edge of the metal revealing optical activity although with negligible involvement of the 4f electrons of the Dy(III) ion.

  19. Effect of the helicity injection rate and the Lundquist number on spheromak sustainment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Martínez, Pablo Luis, E-mail: pablogm@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) and Sede Andina—Universidad Nacional de Río Negro (UNRN), Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche, Río Negro (Argentina); Lampugnani, Leandro Gabriel; Farengo, Ricardo [Instituto Balseiro and Centro Atómico Bariloche (CAB-CNEA), Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche, Río Negro (Argentina)

    2014-12-15

    The dynamics of the magnetic relaxation process during the sustainment of spheromak configurations at different helicity injection rates is studied. The three-dimensional activity is recovered using time-dependent resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations. A cylindrical flux conserver with concentric electrodes is used to model configurations driven by a magnetized coaxial gun. Magnetic helicity is injected by tangential boundary flows. Different regimes of sustainment are identified and characterized in terms of the safety factor profile. The spatial and temporal behavior of fluctuations is described. The dynamo action is shown to be in close agreement with existing experimental data. These results are relevant to the design and operation of helicity injected devices, as well as to basic understanding of the plasma relaxation mechanism in quasi-steady state.

  20. Effect of the helicity injection rate and the Lundquist number on spheromak sustainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Martínez, Pablo Luis; Lampugnani, Leandro Gabriel; Farengo, Ricardo

    2014-12-01

    The dynamics of the magnetic relaxation process during the sustainment of spheromak configurations at different helicity injection rates is studied. The three-dimensional activity is recovered using time-dependent resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations. A cylindrical flux conserver with concentric electrodes is used to model configurations driven by a magnetized coaxial gun. Magnetic helicity is injected by tangential boundary flows. Different regimes of sustainment are identified and characterized in terms of the safety factor profile. The spatial and temporal behavior of fluctuations is described. The dynamo action is shown to be in close agreement with existing experimental data. These results are relevant to the design and operation of helicity injected devices, as well as to basic understanding of the plasma relaxation mechanism in quasi-steady state.

  1. Paramagnetic Response of Helical Carbon Fibers%螺旋碳纤维的顺磁响应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱俊廷; 简贤; 王定川; 周祚万

    2012-01-01

    采用化学气相沉积法制备了螺旋碳纤维,通过XRD、EDX和SEM对样品进行了表征和分析,采用研磨方法考察了螺旋结构的破坏情况,并对比了研磨前后样品的低温磁性.结果表明,在有效去除催化剂的情况下,螺旋形貌被破坏以后,碳纤维的抗磁性信号增强.基于单电子受缚于螺旋线的物理模型对实验结果进行分析和讨论,认为螺旋形貌具有顺磁响应,并阐释了其产生机理.%The helical carbon fibers were fabricated using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process and were characterized by XRD, EDX and SEM. The magnetic properties of helical carbon fibers were studied experimentally. The response to external magnetic field was tested by SQUID at 3K. It showed that the magnetization of helical carbon fiber response negatively to external magnetic field, and the diamagnetism of the carbon fibers without helical structure was stronger than helical carbon fibers. The observation of experiments indicated that paramagnetism was caused by helical structure. In addition, the mechanism of the magnetic property of helical structure was qualitative studied by the model of a free electron constrained on a helical coil. The results showed paramagnetism induced by electronic bro-ken-chirality in mesoscale can be realized in a helical structure.

  2. Plasma transport simulation modeling for helical confinement systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, K.; Amano, T.

    1991-08-01

    New empirical and theoretical transport models for helical confinement systems are developed based on the neoclassical transport theory including the effect of radial electric field and multi-helicity magnetic components, and the drift wave turbulence transport for electrostatic and electromagnetic modes, or the anomalous semi-empirical transport. These electron thermal diffusivities are compared with CHS (Compact Helical System) experimental data, which indicates that the central transport coefficient of the ECH plasma agrees with the neoclassical axi-symmetric value and the transport outside the half radius is anomalous. On the other hand, the transport of NBI-heated plasmas is anomalous in the whole plasma region. This anomaly is not explained by the electrostatic drift wave turbulence models in these flat-density-profile discharges. For the detailed prediction of plasma parameters in LHD (Large Helical Device), 3-D(dimensional) equilibrium/1-D transport simulations including empirical or drift wave turbulence models are carried out, which suggests that the global confinement time of LHD is determined mainly by the electron anomalous transport near the plasma edge region rather than the helical ripple transport in the core region. Even if the ripple loss can be eliminated, the increase of the global confinement is 10%. However, the rise in the central ion temperature is more than 20%. If the anomalous loss can be reduced to the half level of the present scaling, like so-called `H-mode` of the tokamak discharge, the neoclassical ripple loss through the ion channel becomes important even in the plasma core. The 5% radial inward shift of the plasma column with respect to the major radius is effective for improving plasma confinement and raising more than 50% of the fusion product by reducing this neoclassical asymmetric ion transport loss and increasing 10% in the plasma radius. (author).

  3. ISEE 3 observations of low-energy proton bidirectional events and their relation to isolated interplanetary magnetic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, R. G.; Sanderson, T. R.; Tranquille, C.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Smith, E. J.

    1987-01-01

    The paper represents the results of a comprehensive survey of low-energy proton bidirectional anisotropies and associated transient magnetic structures as observed in the 35-1600 keV energy range on ISEE-3 during the last solar maximum. The majority of observed bidirectional flow (BDF) events (more than 70 percent) are associated with isolated magnetic structures which are postulated to be an interplanetary manifestation of coronal mass ejection (CME) events. The observed BDF events can be qualitatively grouped into five classes depending on the field signature of the related magnetic structure and the association (or lack of association) with an interplanetary shock. Concerning the topology of the CME-related magnetic structures, the observations are interpreted as being consistent with a detached bubble, comprising closed loops or tightly wound helices.

  4. Helical Kink Instability in a Confined Solar Eruption

    CERN Document Server

    Hassanin, Alshaimaa

    2016-01-01

    A model for strongly writhing confined solar eruptions suggests an origin in the helical kink instability of a coronal flux rope which remains stable against the torus instability. This model is tested against the well observed filament eruption on 2002 May 27 in a parametric MHD simulation study which comprises all phases of the event. Good agreement with the essential observed properties is obtained. These include the confinement, terminal height, writhing, distortion, and dissolution of the filament, and the flare loops. The agreement is robust against variations in a representative range of parameter space. Careful comparisons with the observation data constrain the ratio of the external toroidal and poloidal field components to $B_\\mathrm{et}/B_\\mathrm{ep}\\approx1$ and the initial flux rope twist to $\\Phi\\approx4\\pi$. Different from ejective eruptions, two distinct phases of strong magnetic reconnection can occur. First, the erupting flux is cut by reconnection with overlying flux in the helical current ...

  5. Nonmodal analysis of helical and azimuthal magnetorotational instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Mamatsashvili, G

    2016-01-01

    The helical and the azimuthal magnetorotational instabilities operate in rotating magnetized flows with relatively steep negative or extremely steep positive shear. The corresponding lower and upper Liu limits of the shear, which determine the threshold of modal growth of these instabilities, are continuously connected when some axial electrical current is allowed to pass through the rotating fluid. We investigate the nonmodal dynamics of these instabilities arising from the nonnormality of shear flow in the local approximation, generalizing the results of the modal approach. It is demonstrated that moderate transient/nonmodal amplification of both types of magnetorotational instability occurs within the Liu limits, where the system is stable according to modal analysis. We show that for the helical magnetorotational instability this magnetohydrodynamic behavior is closely connected with the nonmodal growth of the underlying purely hydrodynamic problem.

  6. On the Stability of Cylindrical Tangential Discontinuity, Generation and Damping of Helical Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ershkovich, A I

    2015-01-01

    Stability of cylindrical interface between two ideal incompressible fluids, including the magnetic field, surface tension and gravitational field is studied in linear approximation. We found that helical waves arising both in plasma comet tails and on the vertical cylindrical water jet in the air are described by the same dispersion equation where the comet tail magnetic field plays the same stabilizing role as surface tension for water jet. Hence they represent the same phenomenon of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. Thus helical waves in comet tails and astrophysical jets may be simulated in the laboratory. The resonance nature of the Kelvin- instability damping is demonstrated.

  7. Density filament and helical field line structures in three dimensional Weibel-mediated collisionless shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritaka, Toseo; Sakawa, Youichi; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Morita, Taichi; Yamaura, Yuta; Ishikawa, Taishi; Takabe, Hideaki

    2016-03-01

    Collisionless shocks mediated by Weibel instability are attracting attention for their relevance to experimental demonstrations of astrophysical shocks in high-intensity laser facilities. The three dimensional structure of Weibel-mediated shocks is investigated through a fully kinetic particle-in-cell simulation. The structures obtained are characterized by the following features: (i) helical magnetic field lines elongated in the direction upstream of the shock region, (ii) high and low density filaments inside the helical field lines. These structures originate from the interaction between counter-streaming plasma flow and magnetic vortexes caused by Weibel instability, and potentially affect the shock formation mechanism.

  8. Employing Helicity Amplitudes for Resummation in SCET

    CERN Document Server

    Moult, Ian; Tackmann, Frank J; Waalewijn, Wouter J

    2016-01-01

    Helicity amplitudes are the fundamental ingredients of many QCD calculations for multi-leg processes. We describe how these can seamlessly be combined with resummation in Soft-Collinear Effective Theory (SCET), by constructing a helicity operator basis for which the Wilson coefficients are directly given in terms of color-ordered helicity amplitudes. This basis is crossing symmetric and has simple transformation properties under discrete symmetries.

  9. Generalized Group Signature Scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The concept of generalized group signature scheme will bepresent. Based on the generalized secret sharing scheme proposed by Lin and Ha rn, a non-interactive approach is designed for realizing such generalized group signature scheme. Using the new scheme, the authorized subsets of the group in w hich the group member can cooperate to produce the valid signature for any messa ge can be randomly specified

  10. Unconditionally Secure Quantum Signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Amiri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Signature schemes, proposed in 1976 by Diffie and Hellman, have become ubiquitous across modern communications. They allow for the exchange of messages from one sender to multiple recipients, with the guarantees that messages cannot be forged or tampered with and that messages also can be forwarded from one recipient to another without compromising their validity. Signatures are different from, but no less important than encryption, which ensures the privacy of a message. Commonly used signature protocols—signatures based on the Rivest–Adleman–Shamir (RSA algorithm, the digital signature algorithm (DSA, and the elliptic curve digital signature algorithm (ECDSA—are only computationally secure, similar to public key encryption methods. In fact, since these rely on the difficulty of finding discrete logarithms or factoring large primes, it is known that they will become completely insecure with the emergence of quantum computers. We may therefore see a shift towards signature protocols that will remain secure even in a post-quantum world. Ideally, such schemes would provide unconditional or information-theoretic security. In this paper, we aim to provide an accessible and comprehensive review of existing unconditionally securesecure signature schemes for signing classical messages, with a focus on unconditionally secure quantum signature schemes.

  11. Radar Signature Calculation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: The calculation, analysis, and visualization of the spatially extended radar signatures of complex objects such as ships in a sea multipath environment and...

  12. Blind Collective Signature Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay A. Moldovyan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Using the digital signature (DS scheme specified by Belarusian DS standard there are designed the collective and blind collective DS protocols. Signature formation is performed simultaneously by all of the assigned signers, therefore the proposed protocols can be used also as protocols for simultaneous signing a contract. The proposed blind collective DS protocol represents a particular implementation of the blind multisignature schemes that is a novel type of the signature schemes. The proposed protocols are the first implementations of the multisignature schemes based on Belarusian signature standard.

  13. Revisiting fermion helicity flip in Podolsky's Electromagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Sales, Jorge Henrique; Thibes, Ronaldo

    2016-01-01

    The spin projection of a massive particle onto its direction of motion is called helicity (or "handedness"). It can therefore be positive or negative. When a particle's helicity changes from positive to negative (or vice-versa) due to its interaction with other particles or fields, we say there is a helicity flip. In this work we show that such helicity flip can be seen for an electron of $20 MeV$ of energy interacting with a charged scalar meson through the exchange of a virtual photon. This photon {\\it does not} necessarily need to be Podolsky's proposed photon; in fact, it is independent of it.

  14. Decay of trefoil and other magnetic knots

    CERN Document Server

    Candelaresi, Simon; Brandenburg, Axel

    2010-01-01

    Two setups with interlocked magnetic flux tubes are used to study the evolution of magnetic energy and helicity on magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) systems like plasmas. In one setup the initial helicity is zero while in the other it is finite. To see if it is the actual linking or merely the helicity content that influences the dynamics of the system we also consider a setup with unlinked field lines as well as a field configuration in the shape of a trefoil knot. For helical systems the decay of magnetic energy is slowed down by the helicity which decays slowly. It turns out that it is the helicity content, rather than the actual linking, that is significant for the dynamics.

  15. The FIELDS Instrument Suite for Solar Probe Plus. Measuring the Coronal Plasma and Magnetic Field, Plasma Waves and Turbulence, and Radio Signatures of Solar Transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, S. D.; Goetz, K.; Harvey, P. R.; Turin, P.; Bonnell, J. W.; Dudok de Wit, T.; Ergun, R. E.; MacDowall, R. J.; Pulupa, M.; Andre, M.; Bolton, M.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Bowen, T. A.; Burgess, D.; Cattell, C. A.; Chandran, B. D. G.; Chaston, C. C.; Chen, C. H. K.; Choi, M. K.; Connerney, J. E.; Cranmer, S.; Diaz-Aguado, M.; Donakowski, W.; Drake, J. F.; Farrell, W. M.; Fergeau, P.; Fermin, J.; Fischer, J.; Fox, N.; Glaser, D.; Goldstein, M.; Gordon, D.; Hanson, E.; Harris, S. E.; Hayes, L. M.; Hinze, J. J.; Hollweg, J. V.; Horbury, T. S.; Howard, R. A.; Hoxie, V.; Jannet, G.; Karlsson, M.; Kasper, J. C.; Kellogg, P. J.; Kien, M.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.; Krucker, S.; Lynch, J. J.; Maksimovic, M.; Malaspina, D. M.; Marker, S.; Martin, P.; Martinez-Oliveros, J.; McCauley, J.; McComas, D. J.; McDonald, T.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Moncuquet, M.; Monson, S. J.; Mozer, F. S.; Murphy, S. D.; Odom, J.; Oliverson, R.; Olson, J.; Parker, E. N.; Pankow, D.; Phan, T.; Quataert, E.; Quinn, T.; Ruplin, S. W.; Salem, C.; Seitz, D.; Sheppard, D. A.; Siy, A.; Stevens, K.; Summers, D.; Szabo, A.; Timofeeva, M.; Vaivads, A.; Velli, M.; Yehle, A.; Werthimer, D.; Wygant, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    NASA's Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission will make the first in situ measurements of the solar corona and the birthplace of the solar wind. The FIELDS instrument suite on SPP will make direct measurements of electric and magnetic fields, the properties of in situ plasma waves, electron density and temperature profiles, and interplanetary radio emissions, amongst other things. Here, we describe the scientific objectives targeted by the SPP/FIELDS instrument, the instrument design itself, and the instrument concept of operations and planned data products.

  16. Isomer shift and magnetic moment of the long-lived 1/2$^{+}$ isomer in $^{79}_{30}$Zn$_{49}$: signature of shape coexistence near $^{78}$Ni

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, X.F.; Xie, L.; Babcock, C.; Billowes, J.; Bissell, M.L.; Blaum, K.; Cheal, B.; Flanagan, K.T.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Gins, W.; Gorges, C.; Grob, L.K.; Heylen, H.; Kaufmann, S.; Kowalska, M.; Kraemer, J.; Malbrunot-Ettenauer, S.; Neugart, R.; Neyens, G.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Papuga, J.; Sánchez, R.; Yordanov, D.T.

    2016-01-01

    Collinear laser spectroscopy has been performed on the $^{79}_{30}$Zn$_{49}$ isotope at ISOLDE-CERN. The existence of a long-lived isomer with a few hundred milliseconds half-life was confirmed, and the nuclear spins and moments of the ground and isomeric states in $^{79}$Zn as well as the isomer shift were measured. From the observed hyperfine structures, spins $I = 9/2$ and $I = 1/2$ are firmly assigned to the ground and isomeric states. The magnetic moment $\\mu$ ($^{79}$Zn) = $-$1.1866(10) $\\mu_{\\rm{N}}$, confirms the spin-parity $9/2^{+}$ with a $\

  17. Large Bi-Polar Signature in a Perpendicular Electric Field of Two-Dimensional Electrostatic Solitary Waves Associated with Magnetic Reconnection: Statistics and Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shi-You; Zhang, Shi-Feng; Deng, Xiao-Hua; Cai, Hong

    2013-01-01

    More than 300 electrostatic solitary waves (ESWs) with a large perpendicular component which is a bi-polar waveform structure are observed in the boundary layer within the magnetic reconnection diffusion region in the near-Earth magnetotail. Such ESWs are called two-dimensional ESWs. A Singe-reconnection-based-statistical study of two-dimensional ESWs shows that: (1) ESWs can be continuously observed in the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL) associated with the magnetic reconnection diffusion region, and their amplitude ranges are mainly from several tens to hundreds of μV/m (2) both one-dimension-like ESWs (very small magnitude on E⊥) and two-dimension-like ESWs (large magnitude on E⊥, which are even comparable to that in the E‖) are observed within a small time interval; (3) within the observation time spans, more than 61% of ESWs are regarded as two-dimensional ESWs for the I2D > 20%. We discuss the bi-polar structure in E⊥. The observation of ESWs with a large bi-polar structure in the perpendicular electric field gives evidence that the unique waveform differs from previous understanding from observations and simulations which suggests that it should be a uni-polar waveform structure in the E⊥ of ESWs.

  18. Isomer Shift and Magnetic Moment of the Long-Lived 1/2^{+} Isomer in _{30}^{79}Zn_{49}: Signature of Shape Coexistence near ^{78}Ni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X F; Wraith, C; Xie, L; Babcock, C; Billowes, J; Bissell, M L; Blaum, K; Cheal, B; Flanagan, K T; Garcia Ruiz, R F; Gins, W; Gorges, C; Grob, L K; Heylen, H; Kaufmann, S; Kowalska, M; Kraemer, J; Malbrunot-Ettenauer, S; Neugart, R; Neyens, G; Nörtershäuser, W; Papuga, J; Sánchez, R; Yordanov, D T

    2016-05-01

    Collinear laser spectroscopy is performed on the _{30}^{79}Zn_{49} isotope at ISOLDE-CERN. The existence of a long-lived isomer with a few hundred milliseconds half-life is confirmed, and the nuclear spins and moments of the ground and isomeric states in ^{79}Zn as well as the isomer shift are measured. From the observed hyperfine structures, spins I=9/2 and I=1/2 are firmly assigned to the ground and isomeric states. The magnetic moment μ (^{79}Zn)=-1.1866(10)μ_{N}, confirms the spin-parity 9/2^{+} with a νg_{9/2}^{-1} shell-model configuration, in excellent agreement with the prediction from large scale shell-model theories. The magnetic moment μ (^{79m}Zn)=-1.0180(12)μ_{N} supports a positive parity for the isomer, with a wave function dominated by a 2h-1p neutron excitation across the N=50 shell gap. The large isomer shift reveals an increase of the intruder isomer mean square charge radius with respect to that of the ground state, δ⟨r_{c}^{2}⟩^{79,79m}=+0.204(6)  fm^{2}, providing first evidence of shape coexistence.

  19. Helical coil thermal hydraulic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramello, M.; Bertani, C.; De Salve, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-11-01

    A model has been developed in Matlab environment for the thermal hydraulic analysis of helical coil and shell steam generators. The model considers the internal flow inside one helix and its associated control volume of water on the external side, both characterized by their inlet thermodynamic conditions and the characteristic geometry data. The model evaluates the behaviour of the thermal-hydraulic parameters of the two fluids, such as temperature, pressure, heat transfer coefficients, flow quality, void fraction and heat flux. The evaluation of the heat transfer coefficients as well as the pressure drops has been performed by means of the most validated literature correlations. The model has been applied to one of the steam generators of the IRIS modular reactor and a comparison has been performed with the RELAP5/Mod.3.3 code applied to an inclined straight pipe that has the same length and the same elevation change between inlet and outlet of the real helix. The predictions of the developed model and RELAP5/Mod.3.3 code are in fairly good agreement before the dryout region, while the dryout front inside the helical pipes is predicted at a lower distance from inlet by the model.

  20. Technology of Electronic Signatur

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    An electronic signature uses a hash of message and an asymetrical algorithm of encryption for its generation. During verification of message on receiver side the hash of original message must be identical with the hash of received message. Electronic message is secured autentization of author and integrity of transmission date. By electronic signature it is possible to sign everything what is in digital form.

  1. Revocable Ring Signature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dennis Y. W. Liu; Joseph K. Liu; Yi Mu; Willy Susilo; Duncan S. Wong

    2007-01-01

    Group signature allows the anonymity of a real signer in a group to be revoked by a trusted party called group manager. It also gives the group manager the absolute power of controlling the formation of the group. Ring signature, on the other hand, does not allow anyone to revoke the signer anonymity, while allowing the real signer to forma group (also known as a ring) arbitrarily without being controlled by any other party. In this paper, we propose a new variant for ring signature, called Revocable Ring Signature. The signature allows a real signer to form a ring arbitrarily while allowing a set of authorities to revoke the anonymity of the real signer. This new variant inherits the desirable properties from both group signature and ring signature in such a way that the real signer will be responsible for what it has signed as the anonymity is revocable by authorities while the real signer still has the freedom on ring formation. We provide a formal security model for revocable ring signature and propose an efficient construction which is proven secure under our security model.

  2. Digital Signature Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, Vesna; Biely, Helmut

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Digital Signature Project that was developed in Austria to establish an infrastructure for applying smart card-based digital signatures in banking and electronic-commerce applications. Discusses the need to conform to international standards, an international certification infrastructure, and security features for a public directory…

  3. The wobbling-to-swimming transition of rotated helices

    CERN Document Server

    Man, Yi

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of work aims at designing and testing micron-scale synthetic swimmers. One method, inspired by the locomotion of flagellated bacteria, consists of applying a rotating magnetic field to a rigid, helically-shaped, propeller attached to a magnetic head. When the resulting device, termed an artificial bacteria flagellum, is aligned perpendicularly to the applied field, the helix rotates and the swimmer moves forward. Experimental investigation of artificial bacteria flagella shows that at low frequency of the applied field, the axis of the helix does not align perpendicularly to the field but wobbles around the helix, with an angle increasing as the inverse of the field frequency. By numerical computations and asymptotic analysis, we provide a theoretical explanation for this wobbling behavior. We numerically demonstrate the wobbling-to-swimming transition as a function of the helix geometry and the dimensionless Mason number which quantifies the ratio of viscous to magnetic torques. We then employ...

  4. Optimization of the AGS superconducting helical partial snake strength.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin,F.; Huang, H.; Luccio, A.U.; Roser, T.

    2008-06-23

    Two helical partial snakes, one super-conducting (a.k.a cold snake) and one normal conducting (a.k.a warm snake), have preserved the polarization of proton beam up to 65% in the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at the extraction energy from 85% at injection. In order to overcome spin resonances, stronger partial snakes would be required. However, the stronger the partial snake, the more the stable spin direction tilted producing a stronger horizontal intrinsic resonance. The balance between increasing the spin tune gap generated by the snakes and reducing the tilted stable spin direction has to be considered to maintain the polarization. Because the magnetic field of the warm snake has to be a constant, only the cold snake with a maximum 3T magnetic field can be varied to find out the optimum snake strength. This paper presents simulation results by spin tracking with different cold snake magnetic fields. Some experimental data are also analyzed.

  5. Helical bunching and symmetry lowering inducing multiferroicity in Fe langasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaix, L.; Ballou, R.; Cano, A.; Petit, S.; de Brion, S.; Ollivier, J.; Regnault, L.-P.; Ressouche, E.; Constable, E.; Colin, C. V.; Zorko, A.; Scagnoli, V.; Balay, J.; Lejay, P.; Simonet, V.

    2016-06-01

    The chiral Fe-based langasites represent model systems of triangle-based frustrated magnets with a strong potential for multiferroicity. We report neutron-scattering measurements for the multichiral Ba3M Fe3Si2O14 (M =Nb ,Ta ) langasites revealing new important features of the magnetic order of these systems: the bunching of the helical modulation along the c axis and the in-plane distortion of the 120∘ Fe-spin arrangement. We discuss these subtle features in terms of the microscopic spin Hamiltonian and provide the link to the magnetically induced electric polarization observed in these systems. Thus, our findings put the multiferroicity of this attractive family of materials on solid ground.

  6. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    by B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet operation was very satisfactory till the technical stop at the end of the year 2010. The field was ramped down on 5th December 2010, following the successful regeneration test of the turbine filters at full field on 3rd December 2010. This will limit in the future the quantity of magnet cycles, as it is no longer necessary to ramp down the magnet for this type of intervention. This is made possible by the use of the spare liquid Helium volume to cool the magnet while turbines 1 and 2 are stopped, leaving only the third turbine in operation. This obviously requires full availability of the operators to supervise the operation, as it is not automated. The cryogenics was stopped on 6th December 2010 and the magnet was left without cooling until 18th January 2011, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The maintenance of the vacuum pumping was done immediately after the magnet stop, when the magnet was still at very low temperature. Only the vacuum pumping of the ma...

  7. Single-handed helical wrapping of single-walled carbon nanotubes by chiral, ionic, semiconducting polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deria, Pravas; Von Bargen, Christopher D; Olivier, Jean-Hubert; Kumbhar, Amar S; Saven, Jeffery G; Therien, Michael J

    2013-10-30

    We establish the requisite design for aryleneethynylene polymers that give rise to single-handed helical wrapping of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Highly charged semiconducting polymers that utilize either an (R)- or (S)-1,1'-bi-2-naphthol component in their respective conjugated backbones manifest HRTEM and AFM images of single-chain-wrapped SWNTs that reveal significant preferences for the anticipated helical wrapping handedness; statistical analysis of these images, however, indicates that ∼20% of the helical structures are formed with the "unexpected" handedness. CD spectroscopic data, coupled with TDDFT-based computational studies that correlate the spectral signatures of semiconducting polymer-wrapped SWNT assemblies with the structural properties of the chiral 1,1'-binaphthyl unit, suggest strongly that two distinct binaphthalene SWNT binding modes, cisoid-facial and cisoid-side, are possible for these polymers, with the latter mode responsible for inversion of helical chirality and the population of polymer-SWNT superstructures that feature the unexpected polymer helical wrapping chirality at the nanotube surface. Analogous aryleneethynylene polymers were synthesized that feature a 2,2'-(1,3-benzyloxy)-bridged (b)-1,1'-bi-2-naphthol unit: this 1,1'-bi-2-naphthol derivative is characterized by a bridging 2,2'-1,3 benzyloxy tether that restricts the torsional angle between the two naphthalene subunits along its C1-C1' chirality axis to larger, oblique angles that facilitate more extensive van der Waals contact of the naphthyl subunits with the nanotube. Similar microscopic, spectroscopic, and computational studies determine that chiral polymers based on conformationally restricted transoid binaphthyl units direct preferential facial binding of the polymer with the SWNT and thereby guarantee helically wrapped polymer-nanotube superstructures of fixed helical chirality. Molecular dynamics simulations provide an integrated picture tying together the

  8. ECE Measurements of Helical Plasmas in LHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Y.; Inagaki, S.; Ito, Y.; Kawahata, K.; Sasao, H.; de Vries, P.

    1999-11-01

    This paper presents ECE measurements on LHD, which is the l=2, n=10 heriotron with the major radius of 3.8 m, with the averaged minor radius of 60 cm and with the helical field of up to 3 T. The ECE is collected from both inner and outer sides, since the magnetic field has a peaked profile. ECE is detcted with Michelson, GPC and 70 GHz and 140 GHz radiometers. The LHD plasma is generated using ECH of up to 1 MW and is heated using NBI of up to 8 GW. Notch filters reduce the ECH leakage. The polarization of ECE is theoretically and experimentally investigated in the heriotoron system, where the field angle rotates -30 to 30^o. The polarization follows as the field angle changes. Since the density profile is flat, ECE is cut off in the edge region in the high density LHD plasma. An interesting observation is the breathing phenomena, which is as follows: the electron temperature and other plasma parameters oscillate with frequency of 0.5-1Hz like a sine-wave when the NBI power is about 1 MW.

  9. Magnetic and Electromagnetic Signatures around Polile Tshisa Hot Spring in the Northern Neotectonic Belt in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madi, Kakaba; Nyabeze, Peter K.; Gwavava, Oswald; Sekiba, Matome; Zhao, Baojin

    2016-08-01

    Finding productive boreholes in the Karoo fractured aquifers has never been an easy task. Fractured Karoo aquifers in the neotectonic zones in the Eastern Cape Province can be targeted for groundwater exploration. The Polile Tshisa hot spring is located in a seismo-tectonic region beset by neotectonics. Hot springs are indicative of circulation of groundwater at great depths along fault zones, and accordingly of neotectonics. The characterisation of hot springs by means of magnetic and electromagnetic methods can help infer the occurrence of structures which are favourable for groundwater potential. The Polile Tshisa hot spring is characterised by faults, fractures, and dolerite dykes. All these structures make the hot spring a good case study for groundwater exploration.

  10. g-factor and quadrupole moment of the 212− isomeric state in 131La: Signature for a weakly-deformed magnetic rotational band head

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmeet Kaur

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The g-factor and the static quadrupole moment of a magnetic rotational band head 212− at 2121 keV in 131La have been determined by means of the time-differential perturbed angular distribution technique. The measured value of the g-factor, +1.060(4, is in agreement with the theoretical value for a three quasi-proton, π3{112−[505]⊗52+[422]⊗52+[413]} Nilsson configuration assignment. The observed spectroscopic quadrupole moment ratio, Qs(212−,131LaQs(192−,137La=0.457(4, supports the collective oblate shape (γ∼−60° with quadrupole deformation β2<0.07. The half-life of the 212− state, 37.2(1 ns, is re-measured with better accuracy.

  11. g-factor and quadrupole moment of the 21/2- isomeric state in 131La: Signature for a weakly-deformed magnetic rotational band head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Bansal, Neeraj; Bhati, A. K.; Kumar, R.; Sharma, Vijay R.; Kapoor, K.; Kumar, V.; Kaur, Navneet

    2017-02-01

    The g-factor and the static quadrupole moment of a magnetic rotational band head 21/2- at 2121 keV in 131La have been determined by means of the time-differential perturbed angular distribution technique. The measured value of the g-factor, + 1.060 (4), is in agreement with the theoretical value for a three quasi-proton, π3 {11/2- [ 505 ] ⊗5/2+ [ 422 ] ⊗5/2+ [ 413 ] } Nilsson configuration assignment. The observed spectroscopic quadrupole moment ratio, Qs (21/2- ,131 La)/Qs (19/2- ,137 La) = 0.457 (4), supports the collective oblate shape (γ ∼ - 60 °) with quadrupole deformation β2 < 0.07. The half-life of the 21/2- state, 37.2(1) ns, is re-measured with better accuracy.

  12. Chaotic and regular instantons in helical shell models of turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    De Pietro, Massimo; Biferale, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Shell models of turbulence have a finite-time blowup, i.e. the enstrophy diverges while the single shell velocities stay finite, in the inviscid limit. The signature of this blowup is represented by self-similar instantonic structures traveling coherently through the inertial range. These solutions might influence the energy transfer and the anomalous scaling properties empirically observed for the forced and viscous models. In this paper we present a study of the instantonic solutions for a class of shell-models of turbulence based on the exact decomposition of the Navier-Stokes equations in helical eigenstates. We found that depending on the helical structure of the shell interactions instantons are chaotic or regular. Some instantonic solutions tend to recover mirror symmetry for scales small enough. All models that have anomalous scaling develop regular non-chaotic instantons. Vice-versa, models that have mean field non-anomalous scaling in the stationary regime are those that have chaotic instantons. Fin...

  13. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of HIV fusion peptide 13CO to lipid 31P proximities support similar partially inserted membrane locations of the α helical and β sheet peptide structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrys, Charles M; Qiang, Wei; Sun, Yan; Xie, Li; Schmick, Scott D; Weliky, David P

    2013-10-03

    Fusion of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) membrane and the host cell membrane is an initial step of infection of the host cell. Fusion is catalyzed by gp41, which is an integral membrane protein of HIV. The fusion peptide (FP) is the ∼25 N-terminal residues of gp41 and is a domain of gp41 that plays a key role in fusion catalysis likely through interaction with the host cell membrane. Much of our understanding of the FP domain has been accomplished with studies of "HFP", i.e., a ∼25-residue peptide composed of the FP sequence but lacking the rest of gp41. HFP catalyzes fusion between membrane vesicles and serves as a model system to understand fusion catalysis. HFP binds to membranes and the membrane location of HFP is likely a significant determinant of fusion catalysis perhaps because the consequent membrane perturbation reduces the fusion activation energy. In the present study, many HFPs were synthesized and differed in the residue position that was (13)CO backbone labeled. Samples were then prepared that each contained a singly (13)CO labeled HFP incorporated into membranes that lacked cholesterol. HFP had distinct molecular populations with either α helical or oligomeric β sheet structure. Proximity between the HFP (13)CO nuclei and (31)P nuclei in the membrane headgroups was probed by solid-state NMR (SSNMR) rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) measurements. For many samples, there were distinct (13)CO shifts for the α helical and β sheet structures so that the proximities to (31)P nuclei could be determined for each structure. Data from several differently labeled HFPs were then incorporated into a membrane location model for the particular structure. In addition to the (13)CO labeled residue position, the HFPs also differed in sequence and/or chemical structure. "HFPmn" was a linear peptide that contained the 23 N-terminal residues of gp41. "HFPmn_V2E" contained the V2E mutation that for HIV leads to greatly reduced extent of fusion and

  14. Suppression and control of leakage field in electromagnetic helical microwiggler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohigashi, N. [Kansai Univ., Osaka (Japan); Tsunawaki, Y. [Osaka Sangyo Univ. (Japan); Imasaki, K. [Institute for Laser Technology, Osaka (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Shortening the period of electromagnetic wiggler introduces both the radical increase of the leakage field and the decrease of the field in the gap region. The leakage field is severer problem in planar electromagnetic wiggler than in helical wiggler. Hence, in order to develop a short period electromagnetic wiggler, we have adopted {open_quotes}three poles per period{close_quotes} type electromagnetic helical microwiggler. In this work, we inserted the permanent magnet (PM) blocks with specific magnetized directions in the space between magnetic poles, for suppressing the leakage field flowing out from a pole face to the neighboring pole face. These PM-blocks must have higher intrinsic coersive force than saturation field of pole material. The gap field due to each pole is adjustable by controlling the leakage fields, that is, controlling the position of each iron screw set in each retainer fixing the PM-blocks. At present time, a test wiggler with period 7.8mm, periodical number 10 and gap length 4.6mm has been manufactured. Because the ratio of PM-block aperture to gap length is important parameter to suppress the leakage field, the parameter has been surveyed experimentally for PM-blocks with several dimensions of aperture. The field strength of 3-5kG (K=0.2-0.4) would be expected in the wiggler.

  15. Simulations of a Magnetic Fluctuation Driven Large Scale Dynamo and Comparison with a Two-scale Model

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Kiwan

    2012-01-01

    Models of large scale (magnetohydrodynamic) dynamos (LSD) which couple large scale field growth to total magnetic helicity evolution best predict the saturation of LSDs seen in simulations. For the simplest so called "{\\alpha}2" LSDs in periodic boxes, the electromotive force driving LSD growth depends on the difference between the time-integrated kinetic and current helicity associated with fluctuations. When the system is helically kinetically forced (KF), the growth of the large scale helical field is accompanied by growth of small scale magnetic (and current) helicity which ultimately quench the LSD. Here, using both simulations and theory, we study the complementary magnetically forced(MF) case in which the system is forced with an electric field that supplies magnetic helicity. For this MF case, the kinetic helicity becomes the back-reactor that saturates the LSD. Simulations of both MF and KF cases can be approximately modeled with the same equations of magnetic helicity evolution, but with complementa...

  16. Gate control of spin polarization in a quantum Hall regime toward reconfigurable network of helical channels (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokhinson, Leonid; Kazakov, Aleksandr; Simion, George; Lyanda-Geller, Yuli; Kolkovsky, Valery; Karczewski, Grzegorz; Adamus, Zbigniew; Wojtowicz, Tomasz

    2016-10-01

    Several experiments in nanowires detected signatures of Majorana fermions, building block for topologicaly protected quantum computer. Now the focus of research is shifting toward systems where non-Abelian statistics of excitations can be demonstrated. To achieve this goal we are developing a new dilute magnetic semiconductor-based platform where non-Abelian excitations can be created and manipulated in a two-dimensional plane, with support for Majorana and higher order non-Abelian excitations. Here we report development of heterostructures where spin polarization of a two-dimensional electron gas in a quantum Hall regime can be controlled locally by electrostatic gating. This is demonstrated via voltage induced shift of quantum Hall ferromagnetic transition in the CdTe quantum wells with engineered placement of paramagnetic Mn impurities. The structures can be used to form helical domain walls in integer quantum Hall regime which, coupled to an s-wave superconductor, are expected to support Majorana zero modes. These heterostructures can be used as a testbed to study gate-reconfigurable domain walls networks.

  17. Enhanced ion anisotropy by nonconventional coordination geometry: single-chain magnet behavior for a [{Fe(II)L}2{Nb(IV)(CN)8}] helical chain compound designed with heptacoordinate Fe(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatakrishnan, Thengarai S; Sahoo, Shaon; Bréfuel, Nicolas; Duhayon, Carine; Paulsen, Carley; Barra, Anne-Laure; Ramasesha, S; Sutter, Jean-Pascal

    2010-05-05

    Nonconventional heptacoordination in combination with efficient magnetic exchange coupling is shown to yield a 1-D heteronuclear {Fe(II)Nb(IV)} compound with remarkable magnetic features when compared to other Fe(II)-based single chain magnets (SCM). Cyano-bridged heterometallic {3d-4d} and {3d-5d} chains are formed upon assembling Fe(II) bearing a pentadentate macrocycle as the blocking ligand with octacyano metallates, [M(CN)(8)](4-) (M = Nb(IV), Mo(IV), W(IV)). X-ray diffraction (single-crystal and powder) measurements reveal that the [{(H(2)O)Fe(L(1))}{M(CN)(8)}{Fe(L(1))}](infinity) architectures consist of isomorphous 1-D polymeric structures based on the alternation of {Fe(L(1))}(2+) and {M(CN)(8)}(4-) units (L(1) stands for the pentadentate macrocycle). Analysis of the magnetic susceptibility behavior revealed cyano-bridged {Fe-Nb} exchange interaction to be antiferromagnetic with J = -20 cm(-1) deduced from fitting an Ising model taking into account the noncollinear spin arrangement. For this ferrimagnetic chain a slow relaxation of its magnetization is observed at low temperature revealing a SCM behavior with Delta/k(B) = 74 K and tau(0) = 4.6 x 10(-11) s. The M versus H behavior exhibits a hysteresis loop with a coercive field of 4 kOe at 1 K and reveals at 380 mK magnetic avalanche processes, i.e., abrupt reversals in magnetization as H is varied. The origin of these characteristics is attributed to the combination of efficient {Fe-Nb} exchange interaction and significant anisotropy of the {Fe(L(1))} unit. High field EPR and magnetization experiments have revealed for the parent compound [Fe(L(1))(H(2)O)(2)]Cl(2) a negative zero field splitting parameter of D approximately = -17 cm(-1). The crystal structure, magnetic behavior, and Mossbauer data for [Fe(L(1))(H(2)O)(2)]Cl(2) are also reported.

  18. Helical chirality induction of expanded porphyrin analogues

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jun-Ichiro Setsune

    2012-11-01

    Expanded porphyrin analogues with unique figure-eight conformation were prepared by way of useful pyrrole intermediates such as bis(azafulvene)s and 2-borylpyrrole. Supramolecular chirogenesis of cyclooctapyrrole O1 with 32-cycloconjugation was successfully applied to determine absolute configuration of chiral carboxylic acids. Dinuclear CuII complex of cyclooctapyrrole O2 with interrupted -conjugation was resolved by HPLC into enantiomers and their helical handedness was determined by theoretical simulation of their CD spectral pattern. Enantioselective induction of helicity in the metal helicate formation in the presence of a chiral promoter was demonstrated by using ()-(+)-1-(1-phenyl)ethylamine that favoured , helicity. Dinuclear CoII complexes of cyclotetrapyrroletetrapyridine O3 were found to be substitution labile and pick up amino acid anions in water. Those amino acid complexes of O3Co2 were rendered to adopt a particular unidirectional helical conformation preferentially depending on the ligated amino acid anion.

  19. Magnetic microwires a magneto-optical study

    CERN Document Server

    Chizhik, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    PrefaceKerr Effect as Method of Investigation of Magnetization Reversal in Magnetic Wires Cold-Drawn Fe-Rich Amorphous Wire Conventional Co-Rich Amorphous WireInteraction Between Glass-Covered MicrowiresCircular Magnetic Bistability in Co-Rich Amorphous Microwires Effect of High-Frequency Driving Current on Magnetization Reversal in Co-Rich Amorphous MicrowiresRelation Between Surface Magnetization Reversal and Magnetoimpedance Helical Magnetic Structure Magnetization Reversal in Crossed Magnetic Field Visualization of Barkhausen Jump Magnetizatio

  20. Solubilization and fractionation of paired helical filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, P J; Correas, I; Avila, J

    1992-09-01

    Paired helical filaments isolated from brains of two different patients with Alzheimer's disease were extensively treated with the ionic detergent, sodium dodecyl sulphate. Filaments were solubilized at different extents, depending on the brain examined, thus suggesting the existence of two types of paired helical filaments: sodium dodecyl sulphate-soluble and insoluble filaments. In the first case, the number of structures resembling paired helical filaments greatly decreased after the detergent treatment, as observed by electron microscopy. Simultaneously, a decrease in the amount of sedimentable protein was also observed upon centrifugation of the sodium dodecyl sulfate-treated paired helical filaments. A sodium dodecyl sulphate-soluble fraction was isolated as a supernatant after low-speed centrifugation of the sodium dodecyl sulphate-treated paired helical filaments. The addition of the non-ionic detergent Nonidet-P40 to this fraction resulted in the formation of paired helical filament-like structures. When the sodium dodecyl sulphate-soluble fraction was further fractionated by high-speed centrifugation, three subfractions were observed: a supernatant, a pellet and a thin layer between these two subfractions. No paired helical filaments were observed in any of these subfractions, even after addition of Nonidet P-40. However, when they were mixed back together, the treatment with Nonidet P-40 resulted in the visualization of paired helical filament-like structures. These results suggest that at least two different components are needed for the reconstitution of paired helical filaments as determined by electron microscopy. The method described here may allow the study of the components involved in the formation of paired helical filaments and the identification of possible factors capable of blocking this process.