WorldWideScience

Sample records for magnetic field applications

  1. Synchrotron Applications of High Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This workshop aims at discussing the scientific potential of X-ray diffraction and spectroscopy in magnetic fields above 30 T. Pulsed magnetic fields in the range of 30 to 40 T have recently become available at Spring-8 and the ESRF (European synchrotron radiation facility). This document gathers the transparencies of the 6 following presentations: 1) pulsed magnetic fields at ESRF: first results; 2) X-ray spectroscopy and diffraction experiments by using mini-coils: applications to valence state transition and frustrated magnet; 3) R{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4}: an ideal system to be studied in X-ray under high magnetic field?; 4) high field studies at the Advanced Photon Source: present status and future plans; 5) synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies under extreme conditions; and 6) projects for pulsed and steady high magnetic fields at the ESRF.

  2. Magnetic nanoparticles for applications in oscillating magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeraphatdit, Chorthip [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Enzymatic and thermochemical catalysis are both important industrial processes. However, the thermal requirements for each process often render them mutually exclusive: thermochemical catalysis requires high temperature that denatures enzymes. One of the long-term goals of this project is to design a thermocatalytic system that could be used with enzymatic systems in situ to catalyze reaction sequences in one pot; this system would be useful for numerous applications e.g. conversion of biomass to biofuel and other commodity products. The desired thermocatalytic system would need to supply enough thermal energy to catalyze thermochemical reactions, while keeping the enzymes from high temperature denaturation. Magnetic nanoparticles are known to generate heat in an oscillating magnetic field through mechanisms including hysteresis and relaxational losses. We envisioned using these magnetic nanoparticles as the local heat source embedded in sub-micron size mesoporous support to spatially separate the particles from the enzymes. In this study, we set out to find the magnetic materials and instrumental conditions that are sufficient for this purpose. Magnetite was chosen as the first model magnetic material in this study because of its high magnetization values, synthetic control over particle size, shape, functionalization and proven biocompatibility. Our experimental designs were guided by a series of theoretical calculations, which provided clues to the effects of particle size, size distribution, magnetic field, frequency and reaction medium. Materials of theoretically optimal size were synthesized, functionalized, and their effects in the oscillating magnetic field were subsequently investigated. Under our conditions, the materials that clustered e.g. silica-coated and PNIPAM-coated iron oxides exhibited the highest heat generation, while iron oxides embedded in MSNs and mesoporous iron oxides exhibited the least bulk heating. It is worth noting that the specific

  3. Effects of Magnetic Field on Biological Cells and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Jen

    2001-03-01

    While there has been extensive research performed in the physics of magnetic fields and the physics and chemistry in life sciences, independent of each other, there has been a paucity of scientific research and development investigating the possible applications of magnetic fields in life sciences. The focus of this presentation is to present the stimulation mechanism by which magnetic fields affect (a) yeast cells (b) plant cells and (c) mammalian normal and cancer cells. Recently we have found that the Saccharomyces Cerevsa yeast growth increases by about 30to a 1 tesla field and the production of CO2 increases by about 30of yeast metabolism may be due to an increase in intercellular interaction and protein channel alignment, the introduction of an alteration in the DNA from the magnetic field exposure or a combination of these mechanisms. We also have found that the application of high magnetic fields (1 tesla and above) can have marked effects on the germination and growth of plants, especially corn, beans and peas. This finding has opened up the possibility of technology developments in botanical growth systems to accelerate seed germination and crop harvesting. Most recently we have investigated the application of high magnetic fields on leukemia, CaCoII and HEP G2 cancer cell lines. We found that when leukemia are exposed to a 12 tesla field for 2 hours has an increase in cell death by about 30that were not exposed to the magnetic field. Viability of CaCoII cells sandwiched between permanent magnets of maximum strength of 1.2 tesla was measured. A decrease in viable cells by 33unexposed cells. HSP 70 was measured for HEPG2 cells that were exposed to permanent magnetic field of 1.2 tesla for 40 minutes and for unexposed cells. It was found that the exposed cells produce 19 times more HSP70 compared to unexposed cells. Our results together with other investigators report suggest a strong evidence of a reduction in the cell growth rate for cancer cells when

  4. Application of high magnetic fields in advanced materials processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Yanwei; XIAO Liye; YAN Luguang

    2006-01-01

    Recently, steady magnetic fields available from cryogen-free superconducting magnets open up new ways to process materials. In this paper,the main results obtained by using a high magnetic field to process several advanced materials are reviewed. These processed objects primarily include superconducting, magnetic, metallic and nanometer-scaled materials. It has been found that a high magnetic field can effectively align grains when fabricating the magnetic and non-magnetic materials and make inclusions migrate in a molten metal. The mechanism is discussed from the theoretical viewpoint of magnetization energy.

  5. Problem solving in magnetic field: Animation in mobile application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najib, A. S. M.; Othman, A. P.; Ibarahim, Z.

    2014-09-01

    This paper is focused on the development of mobile application for smart phone, Android, tablet, iPhone, and iPad as a problem solving tool in magnetic field. Mobile application designs consist of animations that were created by using Flash8 software which could be imported and compiled to prezi.com software slide. The Prezi slide then had been duplicated in Power Point format and instead question bank with complete answer scheme was also additionally generated as a menu in the application. Results of the published mobile application can be viewed and downloaded at Infinite Monkey website or at Google Play Store from your gadgets. Statistics of the application from Google Play Developer Console shows the high impact of the application usage in all over the world.

  6. Development of high temperature superconductors for magnetic field applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larbalestier, D.C.

    1991-12-31

    The key requirement for magnetic field applications of high temperature superconductor (HTS) materials is to have conductors with high transport critical current density available for magnet builders. After 3 or 4 years of being without any such object, conductor makers have had recent success in producing simple conductor prototypes. These have permitted the construction of simple HTS magnets having self fields exceeding 1 tesla at 4K. Thus the scientific feasibility of making powerful HTS magnets has been demonstrated. Attention to the technological aspects of making HTS conductors for magnets with strong flux pinning and reduced superconducting granularity is now sensible and attractive. However, extrinsic defects such as filament sausaging, cracking, misaligned grains and other perturbation to long range current flow must be controlled at a low level if the benefit of intrinsic improvements to the critical current density is to be maintained in the conductor form. Due to the great complexity of the HTS materials, there is sometimes confusion as to whether a given sample has an intrinsically or extrinsically limited critical current density. Systematic microstructure variation experiments and resistive transition analysis are shown to be particularly helpful in this phase of conductor development.

  7. Development of high temperature superconductors for magnetic field applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larbalestier, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    The key requirement for magnetic field applications of high temperature superconductor (HTS) materials is to have conductors with high transport critical current density available for magnet builders. After 3 or 4 years of being without any such object, conductor makers have had recent success in producing simple conductor prototypes. These have permitted the construction of simple HTS magnets having self fields exceeding 1 tesla at 4K. Thus the scientific feasibility of making powerful HTS magnets has been demonstrated. Attention to the technological aspects of making HTS conductors for magnets with strong flux pinning and reduced superconducting granularity is now sensible and attractive. However, extrinsic defects such as filament sausaging, cracking, misaligned grains and other perturbation to long range current flow must be controlled at a low level if the benefit of intrinsic improvements to the critical current density is to be maintained in the conductor form. Due to the great complexity of the HTS materials, there is sometimes confusion as to whether a given sample has an intrinsically or extrinsically limited critical current density. Systematic microstructure variation experiments and resistive transition analysis are shown to be particularly helpful in this phase of conductor development.

  8. Magnetic Field Applications in Semiconductor Crystal Growth and Metallurgy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Grugel, Richard; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Traveling Magnetic Field (TMF) technique, recently proposed to control meridional flow in electrically conducting melts, is reviewed. In particular, the natural convection damping capability of this technique has been numerically demonstrated with the implication of significantly improving crystal quality. Advantages of the traveling magnetic field, in comparison to the more mature rotating magnetic field method, are discussed. Finally, results of experiments with mixing metallic alloys in long ampoules using TMF is presented

  9. Design of Pulsed Strong Magnetic Fields Generator and Preliminary Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Jun; QU Xue-min; WANG Xi-gang; LONG Kai-ping

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This paper aims to designing a pulsed strong magnetic fields generator. Methods: A large value capacitor was used to store electric energy, coil was used for producing magnetic fields, main control, circuit control charge, sampling, discharge, etc. Results: The generator provided a pulsed magnetic field with the ampli-tude of intensity from 0.1-2 T and variable time interval of pulse from 4 s-1 min. It was not only to be operated easily but also performed reliably. Conclusion:The generator will be applied in special clinical diagnosis, therapy and other fields.

  10. Methods of high current magnetic field generator for transcranial magnetic stimulation application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouda, N. R.; Pritchard, J.; Weber, R. J.; Mina, M.

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes the design procedures and underlying concepts of a novel High Current Magnetic Field Generator (HCMFG) with adjustable pulse width for transcranial magnetic stimulation applications. This is achieved by utilizing two different switching devices, the MOSFET and insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT). Results indicate that currents as high as ±1200 A can be generated with inputs of +/-20 V. Special attention to tradeoffs between field generators utilizing IGBT circuits (HCMFG1) and MOSFET circuits (HCMFG2) was considered. The theory of operation, design, experimental results, and electronic setup are presented and analyzed.

  11. Methods of high current magnetic field generator for transcranial magnetic stimulation application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouda, N. R., E-mail: nybouda@iastate.edu; Pritchard, J.; Weber, R. J.; Mina, M. [Department of Electrical and Computer engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    This paper describes the design procedures and underlying concepts of a novel High Current Magnetic Field Generator (HCMFG) with adjustable pulse width for transcranial magnetic stimulation applications. This is achieved by utilizing two different switching devices, the MOSFET and insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT). Results indicate that currents as high as ±1200 A can be generated with inputs of +/−20 V. Special attention to tradeoffs between field generators utilizing IGBT circuits (HCMFG{sub 1}) and MOSFET circuits (HCMFG{sub 2}) was considered. The theory of operation, design, experimental results, and electronic setup are presented and analyzed.

  12. Magnetic Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils

    2015-01-01

    of the fluid flow at the top of the core. However, what is measured at or near the surface of the Earth is the superposition of the core field and fields caused by magnetized rocks in the Earth’s crust, by electric currents flowing in the ionosphere, magnetosphere, and oceans, and by currents induced......he Earth has a large and complicated magnetic field, the major part of which is produced by a self-sustaining dynamo operating in the fluid outer core. Magnetic field observations provide one of the few tools for remote sensing the Earth’s deep interior, especially regarding the dynamics...... in the Earth by time-varying external fields. These sources have their specific characteristics in terms of spatial and temporal variations, and their proper separation, based on magnetic measurements, is a major challenge. Such a separation is a prerequisite for remote sensing by means of magnetic field...

  13. Controlling the magnetic field distribution on the micrometer scale and generation of magnetic bead patterns for microfluidic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xu; Feng, Xuan; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2011-04-19

    As is well known, controlling the local magnetic field distribution on the micrometer scale in a microfluidic chip is significant and has many applications in bioanalysis based on magnetic beads. However, it is a challenge to tailor the magnetic field introduced by external permanent magnets or electromagnets on the micrometer scale. Here, we demonstrated a simple approach to controlling the local magnetic field distribution on the micrometer scale in a microfluidic chip by nickel patterns encapsulated in a thin poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) film under the fluid channel. With the precisely controlled magnetic field, magnetic bead patterns were convenient to generate. Moreover, two kinds of fluorescent magnetic beads were patterned in the microfluidic channel, which demonstrated that it was possible to generate different functional magnetic bead patterns in situ, and could be used for the detection of multiple targets. In addition, this method was applied to generate cancer cell patterns.

  14. Development and applications of NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) in low fields and zero field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielecki, A.

    1987-05-01

    This dissertation is about nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in the absence of applied magnetic fields. NMR is usually done in large magnetic fields, often as large as can be practically attained. The motivation for going the opposite way, toward zero field, is that for certain types of materials, particularly powdered or polycrystalline solids, the NMR spectra in zero field are easier to interpret than those obtained in high field. 92 refs., 60 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Trial Application of Pulse-Field Magnetization to Magnetically Levitated Conveyor System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihito Miyatake

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetically levitated conveyor system using superconductors is discussed. The system is composed of a levitated conveyor, magnetic rails, a linear induction motor, and some power supplies. In the paper, pulse-field magnetization is applied to the system. Then, the levitation height and the dynamics of the conveyor are controlled. The static and dynamic characteristics of the levitated conveyor are discussed.

  16. Application of the anisotropy field distribution method to arrays of magnetic nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    De La Torre Medina, Joaquin; Darques, Michaël; Piraux, Luc; Encinas, Armando

    2009-01-01

    The applicability of the anisotropy field distribution method and the conditions required for an accurate determination of the effective anisotropy field in arrays of magnetic nanowires have been evaluated. In arrays of magnetic nanowires that behave as ideal uniaxial systems having only magnetostatic contributions to the effective anisotropy field, i.e., shape anisotropy and magnetostatic coupling, the method yields accurate values of the average anisotropy field at low-moderate dipolar coup...

  17. Applications of high dielectric materials in high field magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Kristina Noel

    At high magnetic fields, radiation losses, wavelength effects, self-resonance, and the high resistance of components all contribute to losses in conventional RF MRI coil designs. The hypothesis tested here is that these problems can be combated by the use of high permittivity ceramic materials at high fields. High permittivity ceramic dielectric resonators create strong uniform magnetic fields in compact structures at high frequencies and can potentially solve some of the challenges of high field coil design. In this study NMR probes were constructed for operation at 600 MHz (14.1 Tesla) and 900 MHz (21.1 Tesla) using inductively fed CaTiO3 (relative permittivity of 156-166) cylindrical hollow bore dielectric resonators. The designs showed the electric field is largely confined to the dielectric itself, with near zero values in the hollow bore, which accommodates the sample. The 600 MHz probe has an unmatched Q value greater than 2000. Experimental and simulation mapping of the RF field show good agreement, with the ceramic resonator giving a pulse width approximately 25% less than a loop gap resonator of similar inner dimensions. High resolution images, with voxel dimensions less than 50 microm3, have been acquired from fixed zebrafish samples, showing excellent delineation of several fine structures. The 900 MHz probe has an unmatched Q value of 940 and shows Q performance five times better than Alderman-Grant and loop-gap resonators of similar dimensions. High resolution images were acquired of an excised mouse spinal cord (25 microm 3) and an excised rat soleus muscle (20 microm3). The spatial distribution of electromagnetic fields within the human body can be tailored using external dielectric materials. Here, a new material is introduced with high dielectric constant and low background MRI signal. The material is based upon metal titanates, which can be made into geometrically formable suspensions in de-ionized water. The suspension's material properties are

  18. Superconducting Pb stripline resonators in parallel magnetic field and their application for microwave spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebensperger, Nikolaj G.; Thiemann, Markus; Dressel, Martin; Scheffler, Marc

    2016-11-01

    Planar superconducting microwave resonators are key elements in a variety of technical applications and also act as sensitive probes for microwave spectroscopy of various materials of interest in present solid state research. Here superconducting Pb is a suitable material as a basis for microwave stripline resonators. To utilize Pb stripline resonators in a variable magnetic field (e.g. in ESR measurements), the electrodynamics of such resonators in a finite magnetic field has to be fully understood. Therefore we performed microwave transmission measurements (with ample applied power to work in linear response) on superconducting Pb stripline resonators in a variable, parallel magnetic field. We determined surface resistance, penetration depth, as well as real and imaginary parts, {σ }1 and {σ }2, of the complex conductivity of superconducting Pb as a function of a magnetic field. Here we find features reminiscent of those in temperature-dependent measurements, such as a maximum in {σ }1 (coherence peak). At magnetic fields above the critical field of this type-I superconductor we still find a low-loss microwave response, which we assign to remaining superconductivity in the form of filaments within the Pb. Hysteresis effects are found in the quality factor of resonances once the swept magnetic field has exceeded the critical magnetic field. This is due to normal conducting areas that are pinned and can therefore persist in the superconducting phase. Besides zero-field-cooling we show an alternative way to eliminate these even at T\\lt {T}c. Based on our microwave data, we also determine the critical magnetic field and the critical temperature of Pb in a temperature range between 1.6 K and 6.5 K and magnetic fields up to 140 mT, showing good agreement with BCS predictions. We also study a Sn sample in a Pb resonator to demonstrate the applicability of superconducting Pb stripline resonators in the experimental study of other (super-)conducting materials in a

  19. Standard Practices for Usage of Inductive Magnetic Field Probes with Application to Electric Propulsion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Hill, Carrie S.; Turchi, Peter J.; Burton, Rodney L.; Messer, Sarah; Lovberg, Ralph H.; Hallock, Ashley K.

    2013-01-01

    Inductive magnetic field probes (also known as B-dot probes and sometimes as B-probes or magnetic probes) are often employed to perform field measurements in electric propulsion applications where there are time-varying fields. Magnetic field probes provide the means to measure these magnetic fields and can even be used to measure the plasma current density indirectly through the application of Ampere's law. Measurements of this type can yield either global information related to a thruster and its performance or detailed, local data related to the specific physical processes occurring in the plasma. Results of the development of a standard for B-dot probe measurements are presented, condensing the available literature on the subject into an accessible set of rules, guidelines, and techniques to standardize the performance and presentation of future measurements.

  20. Magneto-Optic Fiber Bragg Gratings with Application to High-Resolution Magnetic Field Sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao-Jian Wu; Ying Yang; Kun Qiu

    2008-01-01

    Magneto-optic fiber Bragg gratings (MFBG) based on magneto-optic materials have a lot of potential applications for sensing and optical signal processing. The transmission and reflection spectra of guided optical waves in the MFBG are investigated. According to the sensitivity of MFBG spectral lines to the magneto-optic coupling intensity varying with applied magnetic field, a novel magnetic field sensor of high-resolution up to 0.01 nm/(kA/m) is predicted.

  1. Enantioselective synthesis of helical polydiacetylene by application of linearly polarized light and magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yangyang; Yang, Guang; Xia, Hongyan; Zou, Gang; Zhang, Qijin; Gao, Jiangang

    2014-09-23

    Magnetic optical activity, which can occur in all media and is induced by longitudinal magnetic field, causes the difference in absorption coefficients of left and right circularly polarized light and has the potential for magnetically induced enantioselectivity in chemical reactions. Compared with the well-established technique with circularly polarized light, there are few reports on the production of helical conjugated polymers in a photochemical reaction based on above magnetochiral anisotropy mechanism. Herein, we demonstrate experimentally that the enantioselective polymerization of diacetylene derivative can be achieved in the liquid crystal phase by application of linearly polarized light under a parallel or antiparallel magnetic field. The screw direction of predominant helical polydiacetylene chain can be rigorously controlled with the relative orientation of linearly polarized light and the magnetic field. Moreover, the prepared helical polydiacetylene assemblies can serve as a direct visual probe for the enantioselective recognition of D- or L-lysine.

  2. Novel 1H low field nuclear magnetic resonance applications for the field of biodiesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Paula; Leshem, Adi; Etziony, Oren; Levi, Ofer; Parmet, Yisrael; Saunders, Michael; Wiesman, Zeev

    2013-04-16

    Biodiesel production has increased dramatically over the last decade, raising the need for new rapid and non-destructive analytical tools and technologies. 1H Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (LF-NMR) applications, which offer great potential to the field of biodiesel, have been developed by the Phyto Lipid Biotechnology Lab research team in the last few years. Supervised and un-supervised chemometric tools are suggested for screening new alternative biodiesel feedstocks according to oil content and viscosity. The tools allowed assignment into viscosity groups of biodiesel-petrodiesel samples whose viscosity is unknown, and uncovered biodiesel samples that have residues of unreacted acylglycerol and/or methanol, and poorly separated and cleaned glycerol and water. In the case of composite materials, relaxation time distribution, and cross-correlation methods were successfully applied to differentiate components. Continuous distributed methods were also applied to calculate the yield of the transesterification reaction, and thus monitor the progress of the common and in-situ transesterification reactions, offering a tool for optimization of reaction parameters. Comprehensive applied tools are detailed for the characterization of new alternative biodiesel resources in their whole conformation, monitoring of the biodiesel transesterification reaction, and quality evaluation of the final product, using a non-invasive and non-destructive technology that is new to the biodiesel research area. A new integrated computational-experimental approach for analysis of 1H LF-NMR relaxometry data is also presented, suggesting improved solution stability and peak resolution.

  3. Temperature dependency of magnetic field drifts of HTS pancake coils for NMR/MRI applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyeong Dal; Lee, Se Yeon; Kim, Woo Seok [Dept. of Energy and Electrical Engineering, Korea Polytechnic University, Siheung (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Min [Dept. of Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    We had proposed a winding method so called “Wind-and-Flip”, which enables a persistent current operation of an HTS pancake coil without any electrical joint. In order to improve the magnetic field drift characteristics, a prototype HTS coil with the technique was fabricated, and tested under various temperatures. Because the coil does not have any electric terminals for current leads, an HTS background magnet was used to induce the persistent current in the coil by field cooling process. A conduction cooling system with a GM cryocooler was prepared to keep the operating temperatures of the prototype coil much below the 77 K. We investigated the magnetic field drift characteristics under the various operating temperatures by measuring the center magnetic field with a cryogenic Hall sensor. The persistent current mode operation at 20 ∽ 50K showed a strong possibility of the winding technique for the application such as MRI or NMR.

  4. Fast calculation of magnetic field distribution in magnetic gear for high torque application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiaoxu; Liu, Xiao; Song, Zhanfeng

    2016-01-01

    For applications demanding high torque and high reliability transmission, coaxial magnetic gear (CMG) may be a promising substitute of the mechanical gearbox. However, with the increasing of unit capacity, CMG tends to have a big size with large pole number, which would lead to heavy computation...

  5. Application of a data-driven simulation method to the reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Liang Fan; Hua-Ning Wang; Han He; Xiao-Shuai Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Ever since the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) method for extrapolation of the solar coronal magnetic field was first developed to study the dynamic evolution of twisted magnetic flux tubes,it has proven to be efficient in the reconstruction of the solar coronal magnetic field.A recent example is the so-called data-driven simulation method (DDSM),which has been demonstrated to be valid by an application to model analytic solutions such as a force-free equilibrium given by Low and Lou.We use DDSM for the observed magnetograms to reconstruct the magnetic field above an active region.To avoid an unnecessary sensitivity to boundary conditions,we use a classical total variation diminishing Lax-Friedrichs formulation to iteratively compute the full MHD equations.In order to incorporate a magnetogram consistently and stably,the bottom boundary conditions are derived from the characteristic method.In our simulation,we change the tangential fields continually from an initial potential field to the vector magnetogram.In the relaxation,the initial potential field is changed to a nonlinear magnetic field until the MHD equilibrium state is reached.Such a stable equilibrium is expected to be able to represent the solar atmosphere at a specified time.By inputting the magnetograms before and after the X3.4 flare that occurred on 2006 December 13,we find a topological change after comparing the magnetic field before and after the flare.Some discussions are given regarding the change of magnetic configuration and current distribution.Furthermore,we compare the reconstructed field line configuration with the coronal loop observations by XRT onboard Hinode.The comparison shows a relatively good correlation.

  6. A Highly Sensitive CMOS Digital Hall Sensor for Low Magnetic Field Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Integrated CMOS Hall sensors have been widely used to measure magnetic fields. However, they are difficult to work with in a low magnetic field environment due to their low sensitivity and large offset. This paper describes a highly sensitive digital Hall sensor fabricated in 0.18 μm high voltage CMOS technology for low field applications. The sensor consists of a switched cross-shaped Hall plate and a novel signal conditioner. It effectively eliminates offset and low frequency 1/f noise by applying a dynamic quadrature offset cancellation technique. The measured results show the optimal Hall plate achieves a high current related sensitivity of about 310 V/AT. The whole sensor has a remarkable ability to measure a minimum ±2 mT magnetic field and output a digital Hall signal in a wide temperature range from −40 °C to 120 °C.

  7. A Highly Sensitive CMOS Digital Hall Sensor for Low Magnetic Field Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yue; Pan, Hong-Bin; He, Shu-Zhuan; Li, Li

    2012-01-01

    Integrated CMOS Hall sensors have been widely used to measure magnetic fields. However, they are difficult to work with in a low magnetic field environment due to their low sensitivity and large offset. This paper describes a highly sensitive digital Hall sensor fabricated in 0.18 μm high voltage CMOS technology for low field applications. The sensor consists of a switched cross-shaped Hall plate and a novel signal conditioner. It effectively eliminates offset and low frequency 1/f noise by applying a dynamic quadrature offset cancellation technique. The measured results show the optimal Hall plate achieves a high current related sensitivity of about 310 V/AT. The whole sensor has a remarkable ability to measure a minimum ±2 mT magnetic field and output a digital Hall signal in a wide temperature range from −40 °C to 120 °C. PMID:22438758

  8. Magnetic field models and their application in optimal magnetic divertor design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blommaert, M.; Reiter, D. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research (IEK-4), FZ Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany); Baelmans, M. [KU Leuven, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Leuven (Belgium); Heumann, H. [TEAM CASTOR, INRIA Sophia Antipolis (France); Marandet, Y.; Bufferand, H. [Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS, PIIM, Marseille (France); Gauger, N.R. [TU Kaiserslautern, Chair for Scientific Computing, Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    In recent automated design studies, optimal design methods were introduced to successfully reduce the often excessive heat loads that threaten the divertor target surface. To this end, divertor coils were controlled to improve the magnetic configuration. The divertor performance was then evaluated using a plasma edge transport code and a ''vacuum approach'' for magnetic field perturbations. Recent integration of a free boundary equilibrium (FBE) solver allows to assess the validity of the vacuum approach. It is found that the absence of plasma response currents significantly limits the accuracy of the vacuum approach. Therefore, the optimal magnetic divertor design procedure is extended to incorporate full FBE solutions. The novel procedure is applied to obtain first results for the new WEST (Tungsten Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) divertor currently under construction in the Tore Supra tokamak at CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, France). The sensitivities and the related divertor optimization paths are strongly affected by the extension of the magnetic model. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Ion Viscosity Mediated by Tangled Magnetic Fields: An Application to Black Hole Accretion Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Prasad; Becker, Peter A.; Kafatos, Menas

    1996-01-01

    We examine the viscosity associated with the shear stress exerted by ions in the presence of a tangled magnetic field. As an application, we consider the effect of this mechanism on the structure of black hole accretion disks. We do not attempt to include a self-consistent description of the magnetic field. Instead, we assume the existence of a tangled field with coherence length lambda(sub coh), which is the average distance between the magnetic 'kinks' that scatter the particles. For simplicity, we assume that the field is self-similar, and take lambda(sub coh) to be a fixed fraction zeta of the local disk height H. Ion viscosity in the presence of magnetic fields is generally taken to be the cross-field viscosity, wherein the effective mean free path is the ion Larmor radius lambda(sub L), which is much less than the ion-ion Coulomb mean free path A(sub ii) in hot accretion disks. However, we arrive at a formulation for a 'hybrid' viscosity in which the tangled magnetic field acts as an intermediary in the transfer of momentum between different layers in the shear flow. The hybrid viscosity greatly exceeds the standard cross-field viscosity when (lambda/lambda(sub L)) much greater than (lambda(sub L)/lambda(sub ii)), where lambda = ((lambda(sub ii)(sup -1) + lambda(sub (coh)(sup -1))(sup -1) is the effective mean free path for the ions. This inequality is well satisfied in hot accretion disks, which suggests that the ions may play a much larger role in the momentum transfer process in the presence of magnetic fields than was previously thought. The effect of the hybrid viscosity on the structure of a steady-state, two-temperature, quasi-Keplerian accretion disk is analyzed. The hybrid viscosity is influenced by the degree to which the magnetic field is tangled (represented by zeta = lambda(sub coh)), and also by the relative accretion rate M/M(sub E), where M(sub E) = L(sub E)/c(sup 2) and L(sub E) is the Eddington luminosity. We find that ion viscosity in the

  10. An Overview on Magnetic Field and Electric Field Interactions with Ice Crystallisation; Application in the Case of Frozen Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyush Kumar Jha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ice nucleation is a stochastic process and it is very difficult to be controlled. Freezing technologies and more specifically crystallisation assisted by magnetic, electric and electromagnetic fields have the capability to interact with nucleation. Static magnetic field (SMF may affect matter crystallisation; however, this is still under debate in the literature. Static electric field (SEF has a significant effect on crystallisation; this has been evidenced experimentally and confirmed by the theory. Oscillating magnetic field induces an oscillating electric field and is also expected to interact with water crystallisation. Oscillating electromagnetic fields interact with water, perturb and even disrupt hydrogen bonds, which in turn are thought to increase the degree of supercooling and to generate numerous fine ice crystals. Based on the literature, it seems that the frequency has an influence on the above-mentioned phenomena. This review article summarizes the fundamentals of freezing under magnetic, electric and electromagnetic fields, as well as their applicability and potentials within the food industry.

  11. Recent Advances of MEMS Resonators for Lorentz Force Based Magnetic Field Sensors: Design, Applications and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-May, Agustín Leobardo; Soler-Balcazar, Juan Carlos; Vázquez-Leal, Héctor; Martínez-Castillo, Jaime; Vigueras-Zuñiga, Marco Osvaldo; Aguilera-Cortés, Luz Antonio

    2016-08-24

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) resonators have allowed the development of magnetic field sensors with potential applications such as biomedicine, automotive industry, navigation systems, space satellites, telecommunications and non-destructive testing. We present a review of recent magnetic field sensors based on MEMS resonators, which operate with Lorentz force. These sensors have a compact structure, wide measurement range, low energy consumption, high sensitivity and suitable performance. The design methodology, simulation tools, damping sources, sensing techniques and future applications of magnetic field sensors are discussed. The design process is fundamental in achieving correct selection of the operation principle, sensing technique, materials, fabrication process and readout systems of the sensors. In addition, the description of the main sensing systems and challenges of the MEMS sensors are discussed. To develop the best devices, researches of their mechanical reliability, vacuum packaging, design optimization and temperature compensation circuits are needed. Future applications will require multifunctional sensors for monitoring several physical parameters (e.g., magnetic field, acceleration, angular ratio, humidity, temperature and gases).

  12. Recent Advances of MEMS Resonators for Lorentz Force Based Magnetic Field Sensors: Design, Applications and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-May, Agustín Leobardo; Soler-Balcazar, Juan Carlos; Vázquez-Leal, Héctor; Martínez-Castillo, Jaime; Vigueras-Zuñiga, Marco Osvaldo; Aguilera-Cortés, Luz Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) resonators have allowed the development of magnetic field sensors with potential applications such as biomedicine, automotive industry, navigation systems, space satellites, telecommunications and non-destructive testing. We present a review of recent magnetic field sensors based on MEMS resonators, which operate with Lorentz force. These sensors have a compact structure, wide measurement range, low energy consumption, high sensitivity and suitable performance. The design methodology, simulation tools, damping sources, sensing techniques and future applications of magnetic field sensors are discussed. The design process is fundamental in achieving correct selection of the operation principle, sensing technique, materials, fabrication process and readout systems of the sensors. In addition, the description of the main sensing systems and challenges of the MEMS sensors are discussed. To develop the best devices, researches of their mechanical reliability, vacuum packaging, design optimization and temperature compensation circuits are needed. Future applications will require multifunctional sensors for monitoring several physical parameters (e.g., magnetic field, acceleration, angular ratio, humidity, temperature and gases). PMID:27563912

  13. Recent Advances of MEMS Resonators for Lorentz Force Based Magnetic Field Sensors: Design, Applications and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín Leobardo Herrera-May

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS resonators have allowed the development of magnetic field sensors with potential applications such as biomedicine, automotive industry, navigation systems, space satellites, telecommunications and non-destructive testing. We present a review of recent magnetic field sensors based on MEMS resonators, which operate with Lorentz force. These sensors have a compact structure, wide measurement range, low energy consumption, high sensitivity and suitable performance. The design methodology, simulation tools, damping sources, sensing techniques and future applications of magnetic field sensors are discussed. The design process is fundamental in achieving correct selection of the operation principle, sensing technique, materials, fabrication process and readout systems of the sensors. In addition, the description of the main sensing systems and challenges of the MEMS sensors are discussed. To develop the best devices, researches of their mechanical reliability, vacuum packaging, design optimization and temperature compensation circuits are needed. Future applications will require multifunctional sensors for monitoring several physical parameters (e.g., magnetic field, acceleration, angular ratio, humidity, temperature and gases.

  14. Sterilization of Escherichia coli cells by the application of pulsed magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Mei; QU Jiu-hui; PENG Yong-zhen

    2004-01-01

    The inactivation of microorganisms by pulsed magnetic field was studied. It was improved that theapplication of electromagnetic pulses evidently causes a lethal effect on E. coli cells suspended in phosphate buffersolution Na2 HPO4 / NaH2 PO4 (0.334/0.867 mmol/L). Experimental results indicated that the survivability( N/N0; whereN0 and N are the number of cells survived per milliliter before and after electromagnetic pulses application,respectively) of E. coli decreased with magnetic field intensity B and treatment time t. It was also found that themedium temperatures, the frequencies of pulse f, and the initial bacterial cell concentrations have determinateinfluences in destruction of E. coli cells by the application of magnetic pulses. The application of an magneticintensity B = 160 mT at pulses frequency f = 62 kHz and treatment time t = 16 h result in a considerable destructionlevels of E. coli cells ( N/N0 = 10-4 ). Possible mechanisms involved in sterilization of the magnetic field treatmentwere discussed. In order to shorten the treatment time, many groups of parallel inductive coil were used. Thepracticability test showed that the treatment time was shortened to 4 h with the application of three groups of parallelcoil when the survivability of E. coli cells was less than 0.01%; and the power consumption was about 0.2 kWh/m3 .

  15. Template nanowires for spintronics applications: nanomagnet microwave resonators functioning in zero applied magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourachkine, A; Yazyev, O V; Ducati, C; Ansermet, J-Ph

    2008-11-01

    Low-cost spintronic devices functioning in zero applied magnetic field are required for bringing the idea of spin-based electronics into the real-world industrial applications. Here we present first microwave measurements performed on nanomagnet devices fabricated by electrodeposition inside porous membranes. In the paper, we discuss in details a microwave resonator consisting of three nanomagnets, which functions in zero external magnetic field. By applying a microwave signal at a particular frequency, the magnetization of the middle nanomagnet experiences the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR), and the device outputs a measurable direct current (spin-torque diode effect). Alternatively, the nanodevice can be used as a microwave oscillator functioning in zero field. To test the resonators at microwave frequencies, we developed a simple measurement setup.

  16. Standard Practices for Usage of Inductive Magnetic Field Probes with Application to Electric Propulsion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Hill, Carrie S.

    2013-01-01

    Inductive magnetic field probes (also known as B-dot probes and sometimes as B-probes or magnetic probes) are useful for performing measurements in electric space thrusters and various plasma accelerator applications where a time-varying magnetic field is present. Magnetic field probes have proven to be a mainstay in diagnosing plasma thrusters where changes occur rapidly with respect to time, providing the means to measure the magnetic fields produced by time-varying currents and even an indirect measure of the plasma current density through the application of Ampère's law. Examples of applications where this measurement technique has been employed include pulsed plasma thrusters and quasi-steady magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters. The Electric Propulsion Technical Committee (EPTC) of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) was asked to assemble a Committee on Standards (CoS) for Electric Propulsion Testing. The assembled CoS was tasked with developing Standards and Recommended Practices for various diagnostic techniques used in the evaluation of plasma thrusters. These include measurements that can yield either global information related to a thruster and its performance or detailed, local data related to the specific physical processes occurring in the plasma. This paper presents a summary of the standard, describing the preferred methods for fabrication, calibration, and usage of inductive magnetic field probes for use in diagnosing plasma thrusters. Inductive magnetic field probes (also called B-dot probes throughout this document) are commonly used in electric propulsion (EP) research and testing to measure unsteady magnetic fields produced by time-varying currents. The B-dot probe is relatively simple in construction, and requires minimal cost, making it a low-cost technique that is readily accessible to most researchers. While relatively simple, the design of a B-dot probe is not trivial and there are many opportunities for errors in

  17. Magnetic Field Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Magnetic Field Calculator will calculate the total magnetic field, including components (declination, inclination, horizontal intensity, northerly intensity,...

  18. Molecules in Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdyugina, Svetlana

    2015-08-01

    Molecules probe cool matter in the Universe and various astrophysical objects. Their ability to sense magnetic fields provides new insights into magnetic properties of these objects. During the past fifteen years we have carried out a theoretical study of molecular magnetic effects such as the Zeeman, Paschen-Back and Hanle effects and their applications for inferring magnetic structures and spatial inhomogeneities on the Sun, cool stars, brown dwarfs, and exoplanets from molecular spectro-polarimetry (e.g., Berdyugina 2011). Here, we present an overview of this study and compare our theoretical predictions with recent laboratory measurements of magnetic properties of some molecules. We present also a new web-based tool to compute molecular magnetic effects and polarized spectra which is supported by the ERC Advanced Grant HotMol.

  19. Pulsed high field magnets. An efficient way of shaping laser accelerated proton beams for application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroll, Florian; Schramm, Ulrich [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Bagnoud, Vincent; Blazevic, Abel; Busold, Simon [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz Institut Jena, 07734 Jena (Germany); Brabetz, Christian; Schumacher, Dennis [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Deppert, Oliver; Jahn, Diana; Roth, Markus [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Karsch, Leonhard; Masood, Umar [OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, TU Dresden, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Kraft, Stephan [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Compact laser-driven proton accelerators are a potential alternative to complex, expensive conventional accelerators, enabling unique beam properties, like ultra-high pulse dose. Nevertheless, they still require substantial development in reliable beam generation and transport. We present experimental studies on capture, shape and transport of laser and conventionally accelerated protons via pulsed high-field magnets. These magnets, common research tools in the fields of solid state physics, have been adapted to meet the demands of laser acceleration experiments.Our work distinctively shows that pulsed magnet technology makes laser acceleration more suitable for application and can facilitate compact and efficient accelerators, e.g. for material research as well as medical and biological purposes.

  20. Myocardial T2* Mapping with Ultrahigh Field Magnetic Resonance: Physics and Frontier Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till Huelnhagen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR has become an indispensable clinical tool for the assessment of morphology, function and structure of the heart muscle. By exploiting quantification of the effective transverse relaxation time (T2* CMR also affords myocardial tissue characterization and probing of cardiac physiology, both being in the focus of ongoing research. These developments are fueled by the move to ultrahigh magnetic field strengths, which permits enhanced sensitivity and spatial resolution that help to overcome limitations of current clinical MR systems with the goal to contribute to a better understanding of myocardial (pathophysiology in vivo. In this context, the aim of this report is to introduce myocardial T2* mapping at ultrahigh magnetic fields as a promising technique to non-invasively assess myocardial (pathophysiology. For this purpose the basic principles of T2* assessment, the biophysical mechanisms determining T2* and (preclinical applications of myocardial T2* mapping are presented. Technological challenges and solutions for T2* sensitized CMR at ultrahigh magnetic field strengths are discussed followed by a review of acquisition techniques and post-processing approaches. Preliminary results derived from myocardial T2* mapping in healthy subjects and cardiac patients at 7.0 T are presented. A concluding section discusses remaining questions and challenges and provides an outlook on future developments and potential clinical applications.

  1. Spontaneous current sheets in magnetic fields with applications to stellar X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Eugene N

    1994-01-01

    Expanding upon the ideas first proposed in his seminal book Cosmical Magnetic Fields, Eugene N. Parker here offers the first in-depth treatment of the magnetohydrodynamic theory of spontaneous magnetic discontinuities. In detailing his theory of the spontaneous formation of tangential discontinuities (current sheets) in a magnetic field embedded in highly conducting plasma, Parker shows how it can be used to explain the activity of the external magnetic fields of planets, stars, interstellar gas clouds, and galaxies, as well as the magnetic fields in laboratory plasmas. Provocative and fascinating, Spontaneous Current Sheets in Magnetic Fields presents a bold new theory that will excite interest and discussion throughout the space physics community.

  2. Digital signal processing by virtual instrumentation of a MEMS magnetic field sensor for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Aguirre, Raúl; Domínguez-Nicolás, Saúl M; Manjarrez, Elías; Tapia, Jesús A; Figueras, Eduard; Vázquez-Leal, Héctor; Aguilera-Cortés, Luz A; Herrera-May, Agustín L

    2013-11-05

    We present a signal processing system with virtual instrumentation of a MEMS sensor to detect magnetic flux density for biomedical applications. This system consists of a magnetic field sensor, electronic components implemented on a printed circuit board (PCB), a data acquisition (DAQ) card, and a virtual instrument. It allows the development of a semi-portable prototype with the capacity to filter small electromagnetic interference signals through digital signal processing. The virtual instrument includes an algorithm to implement different configurations of infinite impulse response (IIR) filters. The PCB contains a precision instrumentation amplifier, a demodulator, a low-pass filter (LPF) and a buffer with operational amplifier. The proposed prototype is used for real-time non-invasive monitoring of magnetic flux density in the thoracic cage of rats. The response of the rat respiratory magnetogram displays a similar behavior as the rat electromyogram (EMG).

  3. Digital Signal Processing by Virtual Instrumentation of a MEMS Magnetic Field Sensor for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Aguirre, Raúl; Domínguez-Nicolás, Saúl M.; Manjarrez, Elías; Tapia, Jesús A.; Figueras, Eduard; Vázquez-Leal, Héctor; Aguilera-Cortés, Luz A.; Herrera-May, Agustín L.

    2013-01-01

    We present a signal processing system with virtual instrumentation of a MEMS sensor to detect magnetic flux density for biomedical applications. This system consists of a magnetic field sensor, electronic components implemented on a printed circuit board (PCB), a data acquisition (DAQ) card, and a virtual instrument. It allows the development of a semi-portable prototype with the capacity to filter small electromagnetic interference signals through digital signal processing. The virtual instrument includes an algorithm to implement different configurations of infinite impulse response (IIR) filters. The PCB contains a precision instrumentation amplifier, a demodulator, a low-pass filter (LPF) and a buffer with operational amplifier. The proposed prototype is used for real-time non-invasive monitoring of magnetic flux density in the thoracic cage of rats. The response of the rat respiratory magnetogram displays a similar behavior as the rat electromyogram (EMG). PMID:24196434

  4. Digital Signal Processing by Virtual Instrumentation of a MEMS Magnetic Field Sensor for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Vázquez-Leal

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a signal processing system with virtual instrumentation of a MEMS sensor to detect magnetic flux density for biomedical applications. This system consists of a magnetic field sensor, electronic components implemented on a printed circuit board (PCB, a data acquisition (DAQ card, and a virtual instrument. It allows the development of a semi-portable prototype with the capacity to filter small electromagnetic interference signals through digital signal processing. The virtual instrument includes an algorithm to implement different configurations of infinite impulse response (IIR filters. The PCB contains a precision instrumentation amplifier, a demodulator, a low-pass filter (LPF and a buffer with operational amplifier. The proposed prototype is used for real-time non-invasive monitoring of magnetic flux density in the thoracic cage of rats. The response of the rat respiratory magnetogram displays a similar behavior as the rat electromyogram (EMG.

  5. Cosmological Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kunze, Kerstin E

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic fields are observed on nearly all scales in the universe, from stars and galaxies upto galaxy clusters and even beyond. The origin of cosmic magnetic fields is still an open question, however a large class of models puts its origin in the very early universe. A magnetic dynamo amplifying an initial seed magnetic field could explain the present day strength of the galactic magnetic field. However, it is still an open problem how and when this initial magnetic field was created. Observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) provide a window to the early universe and might therefore be able to tell us whether cosmic magnetic fields are of primordial, cosmological origin and at the same time constrain its parameters. We will give an overview of the observational evidence of large scale magnetic fields, describe generation mechanisms of primordial magnetic fields and possible imprints in the CMB.

  6. Quantification of local geometric distortion in structural magnetic resonance images: Application to ultra-high fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Jonathan C; Khan, Ali R; Zeng, Tony Y; MacDougall, Keith W; Parrent, Andrew G; Peters, Terry M

    2017-01-06

    Ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides superior visualization of brain structures compared to lower fields, but images may be prone to severe geometric inhomogeneity. We propose to quantify local geometric distortion at ultra-high fields in in vivo datasets of human subjects scanned at both ultra-high field and lower fields. By using the displacement field derived from nonlinear image registration between images of the same subject, focal areas of spatial uncertainty are quantified. Through group and subject-specific analysis, we were able to identify regions systematically affected by geometric distortion at air-tissue interfaces prone to magnetic susceptibility, where the gradient coil non-linearity occurs in the occipital and suboccipital regions, as well as with distance from image isocenter. The derived displacement maps, quantified in millimeters, can be used to prospectively evaluate subject-specific local spatial uncertainty that should be taken into account in neuroimaging studies, and also for clinical applications like stereotactic neurosurgery where accuracy is critical. Validation with manual fiducial displacement demonstrated excellent correlation and agreement. Our results point to the need for site-specific calibration of geometric inhomogeneity. Our methodology provides a framework to permit prospective evaluation of the effect of MRI sequences, distortion correction techniques, and scanner hardware/software upgrades on geometric distortion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. An expansion of the field modulus suitable for the description of strong field gradients in axisymmetric magnetic fields: application to single-sided magnet design, field mapping and STRAFI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugon, Cedric; Aubert, Guy; Sakellariou, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    Mapping (or plotting) the magnetic field has a critical importance for the achievement of the homogeneous magnetic field necessary to standard MR experiments. A powerful tool for this purpose is the Spherical Harmonic Expansion (SHE), which provides a simple way to describe the spatial variations of a field in free space. Well-controlled non-zero spatial variations of the field are critical to MRI. The resolution of the image is directly related to the strength of the gradient used to encode space. As a result, it is desirable to have strong variations of the field. In that case, the SHE cannot be used as is, because the field modulus variations are affected by the variations of all components of the field. In this paper, we propose a method based on the SHE to characterize such variations, theoretically and experimentally, in the limit of an axisymmetric magnetic field. Practical applications of this method are proposed through the examples of single-sided magnet design and characterization, along with Stray-Field Imaging (STRAFI).

  8. Oxypnictide SmFeAs(O,F) superconductor: a candidate for high-field magnet applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Kazumasa; Hänisch, Jens; Tarantini, Chiara; Kurth, Fritz; Jaroszynski, Jan; Ueda, Shinya; Naito, Michio; Ichinose, Ataru; Tsukada, Ichiro; Reich, Elke; Grinenko, Vadim; Schultz, Ludwig; Holzapfel, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    The recently discovered oxypnictide superconductor SmFeAs(O,F) is the most attractive material among the Fe-based superconductors due to its highest transition temperature of 56 K and potential for high-field performance. In order to exploit this new material for superconducting applications, the knowledge and understanding of its electro-magnetic properties are needed. Recent success in fabricating epitaxial SmFeAs(O,F) thin films opens a great opportunity to explore their transport properties. Here we report on a high critical current density of over 10(5) A/cm(2) at 45 T and 4.2 K for both main field orientations, feature favourable for high-field magnet applications. Additionally, by investigating the pinning properties, we observed a dimensional crossover between the superconducting coherence length and the FeAs interlayer distance at 30-40 K, indicative of a possible intrinsic Josephson junction in SmFeAs(O,F) at low temperatures that can be employed in electronics applications such as a terahertz radiation source and a superconducting Qubit.

  9. Magnetic Field Grid Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Magnetic Field Properties Calculator will computes the estimated values of Earth's magnetic field(declination, inclination, vertical component, northerly...

  10. The Earth's Magnetic Field

    OpenAIRE

    Edda Lína Gunnarsdóttir 1988

    2012-01-01

    The Earth's magnetic field is essential for life on Earth, as we know it, to exist. It forms a magnetic shield around the planet, protecting it from high energy particles and radiation from the Sun, which can cause damage to life, power systems, orbiting satellites, astronauts and spacecrafts. This report contains a general overview of the Earth's magnetic field. The different sources that contribute to the total magnetic field are presented and the diverse variations in the field are describ...

  11. NMR in pulsed high-field magnets and application to high-T(C) superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stork, H; Bontemps, P; Rikken, G L J A

    2013-09-01

    This article deals with the implementation of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiments in pulsed magnetic fields at the pulsed-field facility of the Laboratoire National des Champs Magnétiques Intenses and its application to the high-T(C) superconductor YBa2Cu3O6.51. The experimental setup is described in detail, including a low-temperature probe head adapted for pulsed fields. An entire paragraph is dedicated to the discussion of NMR in pulsed field and the introduction of an advanced deconvolution technique making use of the induction voltage in an additional pick-up coil. The (63)Cu/(65)Cu NMR experiments on an YBa2Cu3O6.51 single crystal were performed at 2.5K during a field pulse of 46.8-T-amplitude. In the recorded spectrum the (63)Cu center line and high-frequency satellites as well as the (65)Cu center line are identified and are compared with results in literature.

  12. Hall sensor applicable to cryogenic temperatures for magnetic fields up to 25 T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, A.; Sakatsume, S.; Goto, T.; Nakamura, S.; Matsui, H.; Settai, R.; Ohtani, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Hoshi, A.

    An investigation was carried out on commercial Hall sensors used to measure the magnetic field of a superconducting magnet. Surprisingly, one of the GaAs Hall sensors, THS-119A, did not show Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations under high field conditions. This sensor, which is available as an electrical component for commercial circuits, was suitable for measuring magnetic fields up to 25 T at temperatures from 1.5 to 300 K.

  13. Cell death induced by the application of alternating magnetic fields to nanoparticle-loaded dendritic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcos-Campos, I; AsIn, L; Torres, T E; Tres, A; Ibarra, M R; Goya, G F [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Mariano Esquillor s/n, CP 50018, Zaragoza (Spain); Marquina, C, E-mail: goya@unizar.es [Condensed Matter Department, Sciences Faculty, University of Zaragoza, 50009 (Spain)

    2011-05-20

    In this work, the capability of primary, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) to uptake iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is assessed and a strategy to induce selective cell death in these MNP-loaded DCs using external alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) is reported. No significant decrease in the cell viability of MNP-loaded DCs, compared to the control samples, was observed after five days of culture. The number of MNPs incorporated into the cytoplasm was measured by magnetometry, which confirmed that 1-5 pg of the particles were uploaded per cell. The intracellular distribution of these MNPs, assessed by transmission electron microscopy, was found to be primarily inside the endosomic structures. These cells were then subjected to an AMF for 30 min and the viability of the blank DCs (i.e. without MNPs), which were used as control samples, remained essentially unaffected. However, a remarkable decrease of viability from approximately 90% to 2-5% of DCs previously loaded with MNPs was observed after the same 30 min exposure to an AMF. The same results were obtained using MNPs having either positive (NH{sub 2}{sup +}) or negative (COOH{sup -}) surface functional groups. In spite of the massive cell death induced by application of AMF to MNP-loaded DCs, the number of incorporated magnetic particles did not raise the temperature of the cell culture. Clear morphological changes at the cell structure after magnetic field application were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Therefore, local damage produced by the MNPs could be the main mechanism for the selective cell death of MNP-loaded DCs under an AMF. Based on the ability of these cells to evade the reticuloendothelial system, these complexes combined with an AMF should be considered as a potentially powerful tool for tumour therapy.

  14. Cell death induced by the application of alternating magnetic fields to nanoparticle-loaded dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos-Campos, I.; Asín, L.; Torres, T. E.; Marquina, C.; Tres, A.; Ibarra, M. R.; Goya, G. F.

    2011-05-01

    In this work, the capability of primary, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) to uptake iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is assessed and a strategy to induce selective cell death in these MNP-loaded DCs using external alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) is reported. No significant decrease in the cell viability of MNP-loaded DCs, compared to the control samples, was observed after five days of culture. The number of MNPs incorporated into the cytoplasm was measured by magnetometry, which confirmed that 1-5 pg of the particles were uploaded per cell. The intracellular distribution of these MNPs, assessed by transmission electron microscopy, was found to be primarily inside the endosomic structures. These cells were then subjected to an AMF for 30 min and the viability of the blank DCs (i.e. without MNPs), which were used as control samples, remained essentially unaffected. However, a remarkable decrease of viability from approximately 90% to 2-5% of DCs previously loaded with MNPs was observed after the same 30 min exposure to an AMF. The same results were obtained using MNPs having either positive (NH2 + ) or negative (COOH - ) surface functional groups. In spite of the massive cell death induced by application of AMF to MNP-loaded DCs, the number of incorporated magnetic particles did not raise the temperature of the cell culture. Clear morphological changes at the cell structure after magnetic field application were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Therefore, local damage produced by the MNPs could be the main mechanism for the selective cell death of MNP-loaded DCs under an AMF. Based on the ability of these cells to evade the reticuloendothelial system, these complexes combined with an AMF should be considered as a potentially powerful tool for tumour therapy.

  15. Optical, electrical, and magnetic field studies of organic materials for light emitting diodes and photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basel, Tek Prasad

    We studied optical, electrical, and magnetic field responses of films and devices based on organic semiconductors that are used for organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and photovoltaic (OPV) solar cell applications. Our studies show that the hyperfine interaction (HFI)-mediated spin mixing is the key process underlying various magnetic field effects (MFE) and spin transport in aluminum tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)[Alq3]-based OLEDs and organic spin-valve (OSV). Conductivity-detected magnetic resonance in OLEDs and magneto-resistance (MR) in OSVs show substantial isotope dependence. In contrast, isotope-insensitive behavior in the magneto-conductance (MC) of same devices is explained by the collision of spin ½ carriers with triplet polaron pairs. We used steady state optical spectroscopy for studying the energy transfer dynamics in films and OLEDs based on host-guest blends of the fluorescent polymer and phosphorescent molecule. We have also studied the magnetic-field controlled color manipulation in these devices, which provide a strong proof for the `polaron-pair' mechanism underlying the MFE in organic devices. The critical issue that hampers organic spintronics device applications is significant magneto-electroluminescence (MEL) at room temperature (RT). Whereas inorganic spin valves (ISVs) show RT magneto-resistance, MR>80%, however, the devices do not exhibit electroluminescence (EL). In contrast, OLEDs show substantive EL emission, and are particularly attractive because of their flexibility, low cost, and potential for multicolor display. We report a conceptual novel hybrid organic/inorganic spintronics device (h-OLED), where we employ both ISV with large MR at RT, and OLED that has efficient EL emission. We investigated the charge transfer process in an OPV solar cell through optical, electrical, and magnetic field measurements of thin films and devices based on a low bandgap polymer, PTB7 (fluorinated poly-thienothiophene-benzodithiophene). We found that

  16. Kinetic simulations of electric field structure within magnetic island during magnetic reconnection and their applications to the satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S. Y.; Zhou, M.; Yuan, Z. G.; Deng, X. H.; Sahraoui, F.; Pang, Y.; Fu, S.

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic islands are considered to play a crucial role in collisionless magnetic reconnection. We use particle-in-cell simulations to investigate electric field Ez structure in the magnetic islands (including primary and secondary islands) with and without a guide field during magnetic reconnection. It is found that the electric field has multilayers in the primary island and a large bipolar structure in the secondary island in the absence of guide field. The electric field is provided by the Hall term (J × B)z (mainly), the divergence of electron pressure tensor, and the convective term (Vi × B)z in the outer and the inner region of primary island, while the electric field is much smaller (~0) in the middle and the core region of primary island due to the cancelation of the three terms. The single bipolar electric field is primarily provided by the Hall term in the secondary island. In the presence of a guide field, the electric field has multiple layers in the primary island (similar to zero guide field case) and the secondary island. However, there still exists one single large sharp bipolar structure of electric field in the central region of the secondary island. The differences of electric field in the primary and secondary islands are essentially due to the variations of the current Jy. These features can be used as the observational criteria to identify different types of magnetic islands in the magnetosphere using the data of future mission, such as the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission.

  17. Magnetic fields in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Most of the visible matter in the Universe is ionized, so that cosmic magnetic fields are quite easy to generate and due to the lack of magnetic monopoles hard to destroy. Magnetic fields have been measured in or around practically all celestial objects, either by in-situ measurements of spacecrafts or by the electromagnetic radiation of embedded cosmic rays, gas or dust. The Earth, the Sun, solar planets, stars, pulsars, the Milky Way, nearby galaxies, more distant (radio) galaxies, quasars and even intergalactic space in clusters of galaxies have significant magnetic fields, and even larger volumes of the Universe may be permeated by "dark" magnetic fields. Information on cosmic magnetic fields has increased enormously as the result of the rapid development of observational methods, especially in radio astronomy. In the Milky Way, a wealth of magnetic phenomena was discovered, which are only partly related to objects visible in other spectral ranges. The large-scale structure of the Milky Way's magnetic fie...

  18. Experimental Study of SO2 Removal by Pulsed DBD Along with the Application of Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RONG Ming-zhe; LIU Ding-xin; WANG Xiao-hua; WANG Jun-hua

    2007-01-01

    Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) for SO2 removal from indoor air is investigated.In order to improve the removal efficiency,two novel methods are combined in this paper,namely by applying a pulsed driving voltage with nanosecond rising time and applying a magnetic field.For SO2 removal efficiency,different matches of electric field and magnetic field are discussed.And nanosecond rising edge pulsed power supply and microsecond rising edge pulsed power supply are compared.It can be concluded that a pulsed DBD with nanosecond rising edge should be adopted,and electrical field and magnetic field should be applied in an appropriate match.

  19. Approach to fabricating Co nanowire arrays with perpendicular anisotropy: Application of a magnetic field during deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Shihui; Li, Chao; Ma, Xiao; Li, Wei; Xi, Li; Li, C. X.

    2001-07-01

    Cobalt (Co) nanowire arrays were electrodeposited into the pores of polycarbonate membranes. A magnetic field parallel or perpendicular to the membrane plane was applied during deposition to control the wire growth. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer were employed to investigate the structure as well as the magnetic properties of the nanowire arrays. The results show that the magnetic field applied during deposition strongly influences the growth of Co nanowires, inducing variations in their crystalline structure and magnetic properties. The sample deposited with the field perpendicular to the membrane plane exhibits a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with greatly enhanced coercivity and squareness as a result of the preferred growth of Co grains with the c axis perpendicular to the film plane. In contrast, the deposition in a parallel magnetic field forces Co grains to grow with the c axis parallel to the film plane, resulting in in-plane anisotropy. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  20. The Juno Magnetic Field Investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Benn, Mathias; Bjarnø, Jonas Bækby

    2017-01-01

    The Juno Magnetic Field investigation (MAG) characterizes Jupiter’s planetary magnetic field and magnetosphere, providing the first globally distributed and proximate measurements of the magnetic field of Jupiter. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent magnetometer sensor ...

  1. The First Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Widrow, Lawrence M; Schleicher, Dominik; Subramanian, Kandaswamy; Tsagas, Christos G; Treumann, Rudolf A

    2011-01-01

    We review current ideas on the origin of galactic and extragalactic magnetic fields. We begin by summarizing observations of magnetic fields at cosmological redshifts and on cosmological scales. These observations translate into constraints on the strength and scale magnetic fields must have during the early stages of galaxy formation in order to seed the galactic dynamo. We examine mechanisms for the generation of magnetic fields that operate prior during inflation and during subsequent phase transitions such as electroweak symmetry breaking and the quark-hadron phase transition. The implications of strong primordial magnetic fields for the reionization epoch as well as the first generation of stars is discussed in detail. The exotic, early-Universe mechanisms are contrasted with astrophysical processes that generate fields after recombination. For example, a Biermann-type battery can operate in a proto-galaxy during the early stages of structure formation. Moreover, magnetic fields in either an early genera...

  2. Control of doxorubicin release from magnetic Poly(dl-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles by application of a non-permanent magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peça, Inês N. [Universidade Nova de Lisboa, LAQV, REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia (Portugal); Bicho, A.; Gardner, Rui [Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (Portugal); Cardoso, M. Margarida, E-mail: margarida.cardoso@fct.unl.pt [Universidade Nova de Lisboa, LAQV, REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia (Portugal)

    2015-11-15

    This work studied the effect of the application time of a non-permanent magnetic field on the rate of drug release from iron oxide polymeric nanoparticles. Magnetically responsive doxorubicin loaded poly(d-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles were synthetized by the o/w solvent extraction/evaporation method and characterized. The produced particles show spherical shapes exhibiting a size between 200 and 400 nm, a drug loading of 3.6 % (w/w) and an iron concentration of 20.7 % (w/w). Cell cytotoxicity tests showed that unloaded magnetic PLGA nanoparticles were nontoxic. Concerning the therapeutic activity, doxorubicin-loaded magnetic particles cause a remarkable enhancement of the cell inhibition rates compared to their non-magnetic counterparts (40 against 7 % of dead cells). In vitro drug release studies performed under a non-permanent magnetic field show that the application time and the on/off cycle duration have a great influence with respect to the final amount and to the rate of drug release. The final amount and the rate of doxorubicin released increase with the time of field application reaching higher values for a higher number of pulses with a lower duration. Doxorubicin release mechanism has shown to be governed by Fickian diffusion in the absence of a magnetic field while in the presence of a magnetic field some controlled relaxation polymer chains might also be present. The results show that the drug release rate from magnetic PLGA nanoparticles can be modulated through the application time and the on/off cycles duration of a non-permanent magnetic field.

  3. Analyses and application of the magnetic field at girth welds in pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xinjing; Chen, Shili; Guo, Shixu; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Yu; Jin, Shijiu

    2013-11-01

    This paper proposes a novel method of utilizing weld identification to improve the positioning accuracy of an in-pipe detector in pipelines. The distributions of the magnetic field inside a single pipe are analysed using the equivalent magnetic charge method. Then the causes and characteristics of abnormal magnetic fields near the welds in the pipelines when pipes are welded together are discussed. A spherical carrier equipped with a magnetic sensor is designed and is used to measure the magnetic field inside an annular experimental pipeline when the carrier is pushed forward by the fluid in the pipeline and is rolling along the pipeline. Theory and experimental research show that there are very obvious abnormalities of the magnetic field at the girth welds in the pipelines. The abnormal magnetic field near the welds can be remarkably enhanced and accurately located using the signal enhancement method of continuous wavelet transformation and the peak detection method based on quadratic polynomial fitting respectively, thus enabling the identification and location of the welds. Different approaches are adopted to process magnetic field signals of different intensities in the pipelines in different directions. Finally, by considering construction information on the pipelines recorded previously, the positioning error is kept to less than 5 cm.

  4. Organic magnetic field sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCamey, Dane; Boehme, Christoph

    2017-01-24

    An organic, spin-dependent magnetic field sensor (10) includes an active stack (12) having an organic material with a spin-dependence. The sensor (10) also includes a back electrical contact (14) electrically coupled to a back of the active stack (12) and a front electrical contact (16) electrically coupled to a front of the active stack (12). A magnetic field generator (18) is oriented so as to provide an oscillating magnetic field which penetrates the active stack (12).

  5. Investigation of Force-Freeness of Solar Emerging Magnetic Field via Application of the Virial Theorem to MHD Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Jihye

    2014-01-01

    Force-freeness of a solar magnetic field is a key to reconstructing invisible coronal magnetic structure of an emerging flux region on the Sun where active phenomena such as flares and coronal mass ejections frequently occur. We have performed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations which are adjusted to investigate force-freeness of an emerging magnetic field by using the virial theorem. Our focus is on how the force-free range of an emerging flux region develops and how it depends on the twist of a pre-emerged magnetic field. As an emerging flux region evolves, the upper limit of the force-free range continuously increases while the lower limit is asymptotically reduced to the order of a photospheric pressure scale height above the solar surface. As the twist becomes small the lower limit increases and then seems to be saturated. We also discuss the applicability of the virial theorem to an evolving magnetic structure on the Sun.

  6. Optimization of Magnetic Field-Assisted Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes for Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Raniszewski

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the most effective ways of synthesizing carbon nanotubes is the arc discharge method. This paper describes a system supported by a magnetic field which can be generated by an external coil. An electric arc between two electrodes is stabilized by the magnetic field following mass flux stabilization from the anode to the cathode. In this work four constructions are compared. Different configurations of cathode and coils are calculated and presented. Exemplary results are discussed. The paper describes attempts of magnetic field optimization for different configurations of electrodes.

  7. Compton Scattering Cross Sections in Strong Magnetic Fields: Advances for Neutron Star Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ickes, Jesse; Gonthier, Peter L.; Eiles, Matthew; Baring, Matthew G.; Wadiasingh, Zorawar

    2014-08-01

    Various telescopes including RXTE, INTEGRAL, Suzaku and Fermi have detected steady non-thermal X-ray emission in the 10 ~ 200 keV band from strongly magnetic neutron stars known as magnetars. Magnetic inverse Compton scattering is believed to be a leading candidate for the production of this intense X-ray radiation. Generated by electrons possessing ultra-relativistic energies, this leads to attractive simplifications of the magnetic Compton cross section. We have recently addressed such a case by developing compact analytic expressions using correct spin-dependent widths acquired through the implementation of Sokolov & Ternov (ST) basis states, focusing specifically on ground state-to-ground state scattering. Such scattering in magnetar magnetospheres can cool electrons down to mildly-relativistic energies. Moreover, soft gamma-ray flaring in magnetars may well involve strong Comptonization in expanding clouds of mildly-relativistic pairs. These situations necessitate the development of more general magnetic scattering cross sections, where the incoming photons acquire substantial incident angles relative to the field in the rest frame of the electron, and the intermediate state can be excited to arbitrary Landau levels. Here, we highlight results from such a generalization using ST formalism. The cross sections treat the plethora of harmonic resonances associated with various cyclotron transitions between Landau states. Polarization dependence of the cross section for the four scattering modes is illustrated and compared with the non-relativistic Thompson cross section with classical widths. Results will find application to various neutron star problems, including computation of Eddington luminosities and polarization mode-switching rates in transient magnetar fireballs.We express our gratitude for the generous support of Michigan Space Grant Consortium, the National Science Foundation (grants AST-0607651, AST-1009725, AST-1009731 and PHY/DMR-1004811), and the

  8. Application of a weak magnetic field to improve microbial fuel cell performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing; Li, Wen-Wei; Wang, Yun-Kun; Sun, Min; Liu, Xian-Wei; Sheng, Guo-Ping

    2015-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have emerged as a promising technology for wastewater treatment with concomitant energy production but the performance is usually limited by low microbial activities. This has spurred intensive research interest for microbial enhancement. This study demonstrated an interesting stimulation effect of a static magnetic field (MF) on sludge-inoculated MFCs and explored into the mechanisms. The implementation of a 100-mT MF accelerated the reactor startup and led to increased electricity generation. Under the MF exposure, the activation loss of the MFC was decreased, but there was no increased secretion of redox mediators. Thus, the MF effect was mainly due to enhanced bioelectrochemical activities of anodic microorganisms, which are likely attributed to the oxidative stress and magnetohydrodynamic effects under an MF exposure. This work implies that weak MF may be applied as a simple and effective approach to stimulate microbial activities for various bioelectrochemical energy production and decontamination applications.

  9. The MAVEN Magnetic Field Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J.; Lawton, P.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Sheppard, D.

    2014-01-01

    The MAVEN magnetic field investigation is part of a comprehensive particles and fields subsystem that will measure the magnetic and electric fields and plasma environment of Mars and its interaction with the solar wind. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer sensors, remotely mounted at the outer extremity of the two solar arrays on small extensions ("boomlets"). The sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics assemblies that are integrated within the particles and fields subsystem and draw their power from redundant power supplies within that system. Each magnetometer measures the ambient vector magnetic field over a wide dynamic range (to 65,536 nT per axis) with a quantization uncertainty of 0.008 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range and an accuracy of better than 0.05%. Both magnetometers sample the ambient magnetic field at an intrinsic sample rate of 32 vector samples per second. Telemetry is transferred from each magnetometer to the particles and fields package once per second and subsequently passed to the spacecraft after some reformatting. The magnetic field data volume may be reduced by averaging and decimation, when necessary to meet telemetry allocations, and application of data compression, utilizing a lossless 8-bit differencing scheme. The MAVEN magnetic field experiment may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. A spacecraft magnetic control program was implemented to provide a magnetically clean environment for the magnetic sensors and the MAVEN mission plan provides for occasional spacecraft maneuvers - multiple rotations about the spacecraft x and z axes - to characterize spacecraft fields and/or instrument offsets in flight.

  10. Application of Rotating Magnetic Fields to THM Growth Process: Te-CdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeClair, Mark; Worlikar, Ani; Motakef, Shariar; Gillies, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    The numerical simulation of ongoing traveling heater method (THM) solution growth experiments of CdTe from Te solvent and the influence of a Rotating Magnetic Field (RMF) on control of convection in the solution zone is presented. The application of RMF is pursued as a means to actively control thermo-solutal convection in the solution zone which otherwise would be dominated by buoyancy forces. Numerical simulation and scaling analysis are used to generate a flow-regime map demarcating the boundary separating the buoyancy- and RMF-driven convection in the solution zone. Results indicate that whereas at low gravity levels the application of RMF can completely overwhelm buoyancy-induced convection, at normal gravity levels the successful control of convection by RMF requires use of fairly thin solvent zones. Simulation results also indicate that field strengths required to dominate natural convection on earth may lead to instabilities and transition to turbulence, and an associated deleterious effect on the quality of grown crystals. These and other simulations results are discussed in reference to experimental evidence.

  11. High magnetic field science and its application in the United States current status and future directions

    CERN Document Server

    National Research Council of the National Academies

    2013-01-01

    The Committee to Assess the Current Status and Future Direction of High Magnetic Field Science in the United States was convened by the National Research Council in response to a request by the National Science Foundation. This report answers three questions: (1) What is the current state of high-field magnet science, engineering, and technology in the United States, and are there any conspicuous needs to be addressed? (2) What are the current science drivers and which scientific opportunities and challenges can be anticipated over the next ten years? (3) What are the principal existing and planned high magnetic field facilities outside of the United States, what roles have U.S. high field magnet development efforts played in developing those facilities, and what potentials exist for further international collaboration in this area? A magnetic field is produced by an electrical current in a metal coil. This current exerts an expansive force on the coil, and a magnetic field is "high" if it challenges the str...

  12. The covariant description of electric and magnetic field lines of null fields: application to Hopf-Rañada solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Enk, S. J.

    2013-05-01

    The concept of electric and magnetic field lines is intrinsically non-relativistic. Nonetheless, for certain types of fields satisfying certain geometric properties, field lines can be defined covariantly. More precisely, two Lorentz-invariant 2D surfaces in spacetime can be defined such that magnetic and electric field lines are determined, for any observer, by the intersection of those surfaces with spacelike hyperplanes. An instance of this type of field is constituted by the so-called Hopf-Rañada solutions of the source-free Maxwell equations, which have been studied because of their interesting topological properties, namely, linkage of their field lines. In order to describe both geometric and topological properties in a succinct manner, we employ the tools of geometric algebra (aka Clifford algebra) and use the Clebsch representation for the vector potential as well as the Euler representation for both magnetic and electric fields. This description is easily made covariant, thus allowing us to define electric and magnetic field lines covariantly in a compact geometric language. The definitions of field lines can be phrased in terms of 2D surfaces in space. We display those surfaces in different reference frames, showing how those surfaces change under Lorentz transformations while keeping their topological properties. As a byproduct we also obtain relations between optical helicity, optical chirality and generalizations thereof, and their conservation laws.

  13. Hybrid magnet devices for molecule manipulation and small scale high gradient-field applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, David E.; Hong, Seok-Cheol; Cozzarelli, legal representative, Linda A.; Pollard, Martin J.; Cozzarelli, Nicholas R.

    2009-01-06

    The present disclosure provides a high performance hybrid magnetic structure made from a combination of permanent magnets and ferromagnetic pole materials which are assembled in a predetermined array. The hybrid magnetic structure provides means for separation and other biotechnology applications involving holding, manipulation, or separation of magnetizable molecular structures and targets. Also disclosed are hybrid magnetic tweezers able to exert approximately 1 nN of force to 4.5 .mu.m magnetic bead. The maximum force was experimentally measured to be .about.900 pN which is in good agreement with theoretical estimations and other measurements. In addition, a new analysis scheme that permits fast real-time position measurement in typical geometry of magnetic tweezers has been developed and described in detail.

  14. Characterization of a dielectric phantom for high-field magnetic resonance imaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Qi, E-mail: Qi.Duan@nih.gov; Duyn, Jeff H.; Gudino, Natalia; Zwart, Jacco A. de; Gelderen, Peter van [Advanced MRI Section, Laboratory of Functional and Molecular Imaging, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Sodickson, Daniel K.; Brown, Ryan [The Bernard and Irene Schwartz Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: In this work, a generic recipe for an inexpensive and nontoxic phantom was developed within a range of biologically relevant dielectric properties from 150 MHz to 4.5 GHz. Methods: The recipe includes deionized water as the solvent, NaCl to primarily control conductivity, sucrose to primarily control permittivity, agar–agar to gel the solution and reduce heat diffusivity, and benzoic acid to preserve the gel. Two hundred and seventeen samples were prepared to cover the feasible range of NaCl and sucrose concentrations. Their dielectric properties were measured using a commercial dielectric probe and were fitted to a 3D polynomial to generate a recipe describing the properties as a function of NaCl concentration, sucrose concentration, and frequency. Results: Results indicated that the intuitive linear and independent relationships between NaCl and conductivity and between sucrose and permittivity are not valid. A generic polynomial recipe was developed to characterize the complex relationship between the solutes and the resulting dielectric values and has been made publicly available as a web application. In representative mixtures developed to mimic brain and muscle tissue, less than 2% difference was observed between the predicted and measured conductivity and permittivity values. Conclusions: It is expected that the recipe will be useful for generating dielectric phantoms for general magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) coil development at high magnetic field strength, including coil safety evaluation as well as pulse sequence evaluation (including B{sub 1}{sup +} mapping, B{sub 1}{sup +} shimming, and selective excitation pulse design), and other non-MRI applications which require biologically equivalent dielectric properties.

  15. Application of Nb3Sn superconductors in high-field accelerator magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouden, den Andries; Wessel, Sander; Krooshoop, Erik; Kate, ten Herman

    1997-01-01

    Last year a record central field of 11 T at first excitation at 4.4 K has been achieved with the experimental LHC model dipole magnet MSUT by utilising a high Jc powder-in-tube Nb3Sn conductor. This is the first real breakthrough towards fields well above 10 T at 4 K. The clear influence of magnetis

  16. Ambient magnetic field amplification in shock fronts of relativistic jets: an application to GRB afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    da Silva, G Rocha; Kowal, G; Pino, E M de Gouveia Dal

    2014-01-01

    Strong downstream magnetic fields of order of $\\sim 1$G, with large correlation lengths, are believed to cause the large synchrotron emission at the afterglow phase of gamma ray bursts (GRBs). Despite of the recent theoretical efforts, models have failed to fully explain the amplification of the magnetic field, particularly in a matter dominated scenario. We revisit the problem by considering the synchrotron emission to occur at the expanding shock front of a weakly magnetized relativistic jet over a magnetized surrounding medium. Analytical estimates and a number of high resolution 2D relativistic magneto-hydrodynamical (RMHD) simulations are provided. Jet opening angles of $\\theta = 0^{\\circ} - 20^{\\circ}$, and ambient to jet density ratios of $10^{-4} - 10^2$ were considered. We found that most of the amplification is due to compression of the ambient magnetic field at the contact discontinuity between the reverse and forward shocks at the jet head, with substantial pile-up of the magnetic field lines as t...

  17. PREFACE: 20th International Conference on the Application of High Magnetic Fields in Semiconductor Physics (HMF-20)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faugeras, Clément; Orlita, Milan; Piot, Benjamin; Potemski, Marek

    2013-08-01

    The 20th International Conference on 'High Magnetic Fields in Semiconductor Physics' (HMF-20) was held on 22-27 July 2012, in Chamonix Mont Blanc, France, as a satellite meeting to the 31st International Conference on the Physics of Semiconductors. HMF-20 followed a series of biennial conferences, initiated by Gottfried Landwehr, in Wurzburg, Germany, in 1972. Primarily focused on 'semiconductors' and 'magnetic fields', the main topics of the conference have evolved with time and are now dominated by current themes related to the physics of low dimensional systems in conjunction with the application of magnetic fields. The list of HMF-20 topics included: quantum Hall effect phenomena, graphene and carbon nanotubes, quantum wells, dots and wires, bulk semiconductors, topological insulators and organic conductors, magneto-transport and magneto-spectroscopy, electron correlations and magnetic field driven phases, spin-dependent phenomena and non-equilibrium effects, as well as novel phenomena and new techniques in high magnetic fields. The HMF-20 conference gathered 200 participants from 23 different countries. It was organized by the Laboratoire National des Champs Magnétiques Intenses, Grenoble, France, and greatly sponsored by the European High Magnetic Field Laboratory under the EC-FP7 framework. The 21st edition of the HMF conference series will take place during the summer of 2014 in Florida, USA. We thank the participants who, through their presentations, convivial discussions, and the papers presented here, contributed to the success of HMF-20 and advancements in the physics related to the applications of high magnetic fields. Clément Faugeras, Milan Orlita, Benjamin Piot and Marek Potemski Laboratoire National des Champs Magnétiques Intenses CNRS/UJF/UPS/INSA, Grenoble France

  18. Beta tricalcium phosphate ceramics with controlled crystal orientation fabricated by application of external magnetic field during the slip casting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagio, Takeshi; Yamauchi, Kazushige; Kohama, Takenori; Matsuzaki, Toshiya; Iwai, Kazuhiko

    2013-07-01

    Beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is a resorbable bioceramic that has hitherto been utilized in the medical field. Since it crystallizes in the anisotropic hexagonal system, properties such as chemical and physical ones are expected to depend on its crystal axis direction and/or on its crystal plane (anisotropy). Control of crystal orientation is thus important when used in polycrystalline form. Meanwhile, application of a strong magnetic field has been found to be a promising technique to control crystal orientation of anisotropic shape or structured crystals. In this work, we attempted to fabricate β-TCP ceramics with controlled crystal orientation by applying an external magnetic field during the slip casting process and subsequently sintering them at 1050°C, below the β-α transition temperature. Application of a vertical magnetic field increased intensities of planes perpendicular to c-plane on the top surface, while a horizontal one with simultaneous mechanical mold rotation decreased it. These results indicated that crystal orientation of β-TCP ceramics were successfully controlled by the external magnetic field and together that the magnetic susceptibility of β-TCP is χ(c[perpendicular])>χ(c//).

  19. Magnetic field penetration into a 3D ordered Josephson medium and applicability of the bean model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelikman, M. A.

    2014-11-01

    The results of calculation of penetration of an external magnetic field into a 3D ordered Josephson medium, based on analysis of modification of the configuration in the direction of the decrease in its Gibbs potential, are reported. When the external field slightly exceeds the stability threshold, the Meissner configuration is transformed into a periodic sequence of linear vortices, which are parallel to the boundary of the medium and are located at a certain distance from it. There exists a critical value I C separating two possible regimes of penetration of the external magnetic field into the medium. For I > I C, for any value of the external field, a finite-length boundary current configuration appears, which completely compensates the external field in the bulk of the sample. At the sample boundary, the field decreases with increasing depth almost linearly. The values of the slope of the magnetic field dependence are rational fractions, which remain constant in finite intervals of I. When the value of I exceeds the upper boundary of such an interval, the slope increases and assumes the value of another rational fraction. If, however, I < I C, such a situation takes place only up to a certain value of external field H max. For higher values, the field penetrates into the medium to an infinite depth. These results lead to the conclusion that the Bean assumptions are violated and that Bean's model is inapplicable for analyzing the processes considered here.

  20. Application of magnetic Barkhausen noise in non-destructive testing fields of residual stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin Hechi; Zhang Guangye; Chen Ligong; Ni Chunzhen

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic Barkhausen noise (MBN) is a phenomenon of electromagnetic energy due to the movement of magnetic domain walls inside ferromagnetic materials when they are locally magnetized by an alternating magnetic fields. According to Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction, the noise can be received by the coil attached to the surface of the material being magnetized and the noise carries the message of the characteristics of the material such as stresses, hardness, phase content, etc. Based on the characteristic of the noise, researching about the relationship between the residual stress in the welding assembly and the noise are carried out. Furthermore, data process is performed by RMS (Root Mean Square) equation and Power Spectrum analysis.

  1. Combined application of ultrasonic waves, magnetic fields and optical flow in the rehabilitation of patients and disabled people

    OpenAIRE

    Chukhraiev, N.; Vladimirov, A.; Vilcahuaman, L.; Zukow, W; Samosyuk, N.; Chukhraieva, E.; Butskaya, L.

    2016-01-01

    SHUPYK NATIONAL MEDICAL ACADEMY OF POSTGRADUATE EDUCATION PONTIFICAL CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF PERU RADOM UNIVERSITY SCM «MEDICAL INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES»       Chukhraiev N., Vladimirov А., Vilcahuamаn L., Zukow W., Samosyuk N., Chukhraieva E., Butskaya L.             COMBINED APPLICATION OF ULTRASONIC WAVES, MAGNETIC FIELDS AND OPTICAL FLOW IN THE REHABILITATION OF P...

  2. Combined application of ultrasonic waves, magnetic fields and optical flow in the rehabilitation of patients and disabled people

    OpenAIRE

    Chukhraiev, N.; Vladimirov, A.; Vilcahuaman, L.; Zukow, W.; Samosyuk, N.; Chukhraieva, E.; Butskaya, L.

    2016-01-01

    SHUPYK NATIONAL MEDICAL ACADEMY OF POSTGRADUATE EDUCATION PONTIFICAL CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF PERU RADOM UNIVERSITY SCM «MEDICAL INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES»       Chukhraiev N., Vladimirov А., Vilcahuamаn L., Zukow W., Samosyuk N., Chukhraieva E., Butskaya L.             COMBINED APPLICATION OF ULTRASONIC WAVES, MAGNETIC FIELDS AND OPTICAL FLOW IN THE REHABILITATION OF P...

  3. Application of reflectometry power flow for magnetic field pitch angle measurements in tokamak plasmas (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourdain, P-A; Peebles, W A

    2008-10-01

    Reflectometry has successfully demonstrated measurements of many important parameters in high temperature tokamak fusion plasmas. However, implementing such capabilities in a high-field, large plasma, such as ITER, will be a significant challenge. In ITER, the ratio of plasma size (meters) to the required reflectometry source wavelength (millimeters) is significantly larger than in existing fusion experiments. This suggests that the flow of the launched reflectometer millimeter-wave power can be realistically analyzed using three-dimensional ray tracing techniques. The analytical and numerical studies presented will highlight the fact that the group velocity (or power flow) of the launched microwaves is dependent on the direction of wave propagation relative to the internal magnetic field. It is shown that this dependence strongly modifies power flow near the cutoff layer in a manner that embeds the local magnetic field direction in the "footprint" of the power returned toward the launch antenna. It will be shown that this can potentially be utilized to locally determine the magnetic field pitch angle at the cutoff location. The resultant beam drift and distortion due to magnetic field and relativistic effects also have significant consequences on the design of reflectometry systems for large, high-field fusion experiments. These effects are discussed in the context of the upcoming ITER burning plasma experiment.

  4. APPLICATION OF MULTILAYER FILM CONFIGURATION TO PROTECT PHOTOMULTIPLIER AGAINST EXTERNAL STATIC MAGNETIC FIELDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Batische

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of the screening constant magnetic field is multi-layered film screens system of NiFe/Cu, formed on the cylindrical housing of photomultiplier tubes, and compared with screen-based steel material – brand 80NHS permalloy. It is shown that the most effective is the screen on the basis of the multilayered film screens, which provide shielding effectiveness value 8–10 in magnetic fields with induction of 0,1–1 mT, and 80–100 – in magnetic fields with induction of 2–4 mT , which is 4–5 times higher than for the screen of the material 80NHS.

  5. Histological evaluation of the influence of magnetic field application in autogenous bone grafts in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponzoni Deise

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bone grafts are widely used in oral and maxillofacial reconstruction. The influence of electromagnetic fields and magnets on the endogenous stimulation of target tissues has been investigated. This work aimed to assess the quality of bone healing in surgical cavities filled with autogenous bone grafts, under the influence of a permanent magnetic field produced by in vivo buried devices. Methods Metal devices consisting of commercially pure martensitic stainless steel washers and titanium screws were employed. Thirty male Wistar rats were divided into 3 experimental and 3 control groups. A surgical bone cavity was produced on the right femur, and a bone graft was collected and placed in each hole. Two metallic washers, magnetized in the experimental group but not in the control group, were attached on the borders of the cavity. Results The animals were sacrificed on postoperative days 15, 45 and 60. The histological analysis of control and experimental samples showed adequate integration of the bone grafts, with intense bone neoformation. On days 45 and 60, a continued influence of the magnetic field on the surgical cavity and on the bone graft was observed in samples from the experimental group. Conclusion The results showed intense bone neoformation in the experimental group as compared to control animals. The intense extra-cortical bone neoformation observed suggests that the osteoconductor condition of the graft may be more susceptible to stimulation, when submitted to a magnetic field.

  6. Magnetization reversal in ultrashort magnetic field pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, M; Fassbender, J; Hillebrands, B

    2000-01-01

    We report the switching properties of a thin magnetic film subject to an ultrashort, laterally localized magnetic field pulse, obtained by numerical investigations. The magnetization distribution in the film is calculated on a grid assuming Stoner-like coherent rotation within the grid square size. Perpendicularly and in-plane magnetized films exhibit a magnetization reversal due to a 4 ps magnetic field pulse. Outside the central region the pulse duration is short compared to the precession period. In this area the evolution of the magnetization during the field pulse does not depend strongly on magnetic damping and/or pulse shape. However, the final magnetization distribution is affected by the magnetic damping. Although the pulse duration is short compared to the precession period, the time needed for the relaxation of the magnetization to the equilibrium state is rather large. The influence of the different magnetic anisotropy contributions and the magnetic damping parameter enters into the magnetization ...

  7. Magnetic field-induced spectroscopy of forbidden optical transitions with application to lattice-based optical atomic clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichenachev, A V; Yudin, V I; Oates, C W; Hoyt, C W; Barber, Z W; Hollberg, L

    2006-03-01

    We develop a method of spectroscopy that uses a weak static magnetic field to enable direct optical excitation of forbidden electric-dipole transitions that are otherwise prohibitively weak. The power of this scheme is demonstrated using the important application of optical atomic clocks based on neutral atoms confined to an optical lattice. The simple experimental implementation of this method--a single clock laser combined with a dc magnetic field--relaxes stringent requirements in current lattice-based clocks (e.g., magnetic field shielding and light polarization), and could therefore expedite the realization of the extraordinary performance level predicted for these clocks. We estimate that a clock using alkaline-earth-like atoms such as Yb could achieve a fractional frequency uncertainty of well below 10(-17) for the metrologically preferred even isotopes.

  8. Study on Application of Static Magnetic Field for Adjuvant Arthritis Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norimasa Taniguchi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to examine the effectiveness of the application of static magnetic field (SMF on pain relief, we performed a study on rats with adjuvant arthritis (AA. Sixty female Sprague–Dawley (SD rats (age: 6 weeks, body weight: approximately 160 g were divided into three groups [SMF-treated AA rats (Group I, non-SMF-treated AA rats (Group II and control rats (Group III]. The SD rats were injected in the left hind leg with 0.6 mg/0.05 ml Mycobacterium butyrium to induce AA. The rats were bred for 6 months as chronic pain model. Thereafter, the AA rats were or were not exposed to SMF for 12 weeks. We assessed the changes in the tail surface temperature, locomotor activity, serum inflammatory marker and bone mineral density (BMD using thermography, a metabolism measuring system and the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA method, respectively. The tail surface temperature, locomotor activity and femoral BMD of the SMF-exposed AA rats were significantly higher than those of the non-SMF-exposed AA rats, and the serum inflammatory marker was significantly lower. These findings suggest that the pain relief effects are primarily due to the increased blood circulation caused by the rise in the tail surface temperature. Moreover, the pain relief effects increased with activity and BMD of the AA rats.

  9. Magnetized Reverse Shock: Density-fluctuation-induced Field Distortion, Polarization Degree Reduction, and Application to GRBs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei; Zhang, Bing; Li, Hui; Stone, James M.

    2017-08-01

    The early optical afterglow emission of several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) shows a high linear polarization degree (PD) of tens of percent, suggesting an ordered magnetic field in the emission region. The light curves are consistent with being of a reverse shock (RS) origin. However, the magnetization parameter, σ, of the outflow is unknown. If σ is too small, an ordered field in the RS may be quickly randomized due to turbulence driven by various perturbations so that the PD may not be as high as observed. Here we use the “Athena++” relativistic MHD code to simulate a relativistic jet with an ordered magnetic field propagating into a clumpy ambient medium, with a focus on how density fluctuations may distort the ordered magnetic field and reduce PD in the RS emission for different σ values. For a given density fluctuation, we discover a clear power-law relationship between the relative PD reduction and the σ value of the outflow. Such a relation may be applied to estimate σ of the GRB outflows using the polarization data of early afterglows.

  10. Magnetism Materials and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Trémolet de Lacheisserie, Étienne; Schlenker, Michel

    2005-01-01

    This book treats permanent magnet (hard) materials, magnetically soft materials for low-frequency applications and for high-frequency electronics, magnetostrictive materials, superconductors, magnetic-thin films and multilayers, and ferrofluids. Chapters are dedicated to magnetic recording, the role of magnetism in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and instrumentation for magnetic measurements.   

  11. Survey of Processing Methods for High Strength High Conductivity Wires for High Field Magnet Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, K.; Embury, J.D.

    1998-10-01

    This paper will deal with the basic concepts of attaining combination of high strength and high conductivity in pure materials, in-situ composites and macrocomposites. It will survey current attainments, and outline where some future developments may lie in developing wire products that are close to the theoretical strength of future magnet applications.

  12. Application of Chebyshev Formalism to Identify Nonlinear Magnetic Field Components in Beam Transport Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spata, Michael [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2012-08-01

    An experiment was conducted at Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility to develop a beam-based technique for characterizing the extent of the nonlinearity of the magnetic fields of a beam transport system. Horizontally and vertically oriented pairs of air-core kicker magnets were simultaneously driven at two different frequencies to provide a time-dependent transverse modulation of the beam orbit relative to the unperturbed reference orbit. Fourier decomposition of the position data at eight different points along the beamline was then used to measure the amplitude of these frequencies. For a purely linear transport system one expects to find solely the frequencies that were applied to the kickers with amplitudes that depend on the phase advance of the lattice. In the presence of nonlinear fields one expects to also find harmonics of the driving frequencies that depend on the order of the nonlinearity. Chebyshev polynomials and their unique properties allow one to directly quantify the magnitude of the nonlinearity with the minimum error. A calibration standard was developed using one of the sextupole magnets in a CEBAF beamline. The technique was then applied to a pair of Arc 1 dipoles and then to the magnets in the Transport Recombiner beamline to measure their multipole content as a function of transverse position within the magnets.

  13. Principles and some applications of ''zero field nuclear magnetic resonance''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llor, A.; Virlet, J.

    1987-10-01

    The method known as ''zero field NMR'' is reviewed. The technique allows the observation of nuclear dipolar and quadrupolar interactions in powder samples, which may otherwise be possible in high field on monocristals only. The anisotropy due to the magnetic field is removed although sensitivity is preserved. This method is compared to other Nuclear Resonance spectroscopies: its originality lies in the measurement of the coherent evolution of the system in zero field after a perturbation induced by suddenly switching the magnetic field. The Fourier transform of the ''zero field free induction decay'' then gives the ''zero field spectrum''. The ideal experiment is described with its adaptations due to experimental constraints, as realized in our laboratory at Saclay and in the laboratory of A. Pines at Berkeley. We present with our first measurements a review of most of the results published to date on spin 1/2 as well as spin 1/2 (quadrupolar) nuclei. Possible future developments of the method are also discussed.

  14. Magnetic Field Sensors Based on Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR Technology: Applications in Electrical Current Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Càndid Reig

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The 2007 Nobel Prize in Physics can be understood as a global recognition to the rapid development of the Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR, from both the physics and engineering points of view. Behind the utilization of GMR structures as read heads for massive storage magnetic hard disks, important applications as solid state magnetic sensors have emerged. Low cost, compatibility with standard CMOS technologies and high sensitivity are common advantages of these sensors. This way, they have been successfully applied in a lot different environments. In this work, we are trying to collect the Spanish contributions to the progress of the research related to the GMR based sensors covering, among other subjects, the applications, the sensor design, the modelling and the electronic interfaces, focusing on electrical current sensing applications.

  15. ISR Radial Field Magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    There were 37 (normal) + 3 (special) Radial Field magnets in the ISR to adjust vertically the closed orbit. Gap heights and strengths were 200 mm and .12 Tm in the normal magnets, 220 mm and .18 Tm in the special ones. The core length was 430 mm in both types. Due to their small length as compared to the gap heights the end fringe field errors were very important and had to be compensated by suitably shaping the poles. In order to save on cables, as these magnets were located very far from their power supplies, the coils of the normal type magnets were formed by many turns of solid cpper conductor with some interleaved layers of hollow conductor directly cooled by circulating water

  16. Application of differential magnetic sounding to the study of the Travale-Radicondoli geothermal field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    In 1980 and in 1982, the Laboratory Applied Geophysics of the C.N.R.S. attempted to establish by magnetic differential sounding a possible anomaly of conductivity, linked with the geothermal field of Travale-Radicondoli (Tuscany). Some 25 sites have been occupied along two profiles, one being located between Siena and Populonia, near Piombino, the other one between Siena and Cecina. An important anomaly of the transient magnetic field (some 15% of the normal field) was brought to light in 1980 between Gerfalco (in the S.W.) and Frosini (in the N.E.). It exactly covers the geothermal area of Travale. The direction of the telluric currents causing the anomaly is parallel to the magnetic meridian and their maximum depth is of some 2000 metres. The 1982 campaign has shown that in the North of Travale, anomalous currents move in the N.W.-S.W. direction or even completely E.-W. (in the S.W. of Volterra), and meet in the sea, round Livorno. One can give an interpretation of the phenomena as a whole, if one admits the presence of very conductive layers between Lardello and Travale. The currents which circulate parallel to the coast are channelled locally by this structure which could be closely linked up with the vapour field.

  17. Indoor localization using magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathapati Subbu, Kalyan Sasidhar

    Indoor localization consists of locating oneself inside new buildings. GPS does not work indoors due to multipath reflection and signal blockage. WiFi based systems assume ubiquitous availability and infrastructure based systems require expensive installations, hence making indoor localization an open problem. This dissertation consists of solving the problem of indoor localization by thoroughly exploiting the indoor ambient magnetic fields comprising mainly of disturbances termed as anomalies in the Earth's magnetic field caused by pillars, doors and elevators in hallways which are ferromagnetic in nature. By observing uniqueness in magnetic signatures collected from different campus buildings, the work presents the identification of landmarks and guideposts from these signatures and further develops magnetic maps of buildings - all of which can be used to locate and navigate people indoors. To understand the reason behind these anomalies, first a comparison between the measured and model generated Earth's magnetic field is made, verifying the presence of a constant field without any disturbances. Then by modeling the magnetic field behavior of different pillars such as steel reinforced concrete, solid steel, and other structures like doors and elevators, the interaction of the Earth's field with the ferromagnetic fields is described thereby explaining the causes of the uniqueness in the signatures that comprise these disturbances. Next, by employing the dynamic time warping algorithm to account for time differences in signatures obtained from users walking at different speeds, an indoor localization application capable of classifying locations using the magnetic signatures is developed solely on the smart phone. The application required users to walk short distances of 3-6 m anywhere in hallway to be located with accuracies of 80-99%. The classification framework was further validated with over 90% accuracies using model generated magnetic signatures representing

  18. Cosmic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kronberg, Philipp P

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields are important in the Universe and their effects contain the key to many astrophysical phenomena that are otherwise impossible to understand. This book presents an up-to-date overview of this fast-growing topic and its interconnections to plasma processes, astroparticle physics, high energy astrophysics, and cosmic evolution. The phenomenology and impact of magnetic fields are described in diverse astrophysical contexts within the Universe, from galaxies to the filaments and voids of the intergalactic medium, and out to the largest redshifts. The presentation of mathematical formulae is accessible and is designed to add insight into the broad range of topics discussed. Written for graduate students and researchers in astrophysics and related disciplines, this volume will inspire readers to devise new ways of thinking about magnetic fields in space on galaxy scales and beyond.

  19. Solar Magnetic Fields

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. O. Stenflo

    2008-03-01

    Since the structuring and variability of the Sun and other stars are governed by magnetic fields, much of present-day stellar physics centers around the measurement and understanding of the magnetic fields and their interactions. The Sun, being a prototypical star, plays a unique role in astrophysics, since its proximity allows the fundamental processes to be explored in detail. The PRL anniversary gives us an opportunity to look back at past milestones and try to identify the main unsolved issues that will be addressed in the future.

  20. Magnetic fields for fluid motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Melissa C; Gerner, Matthew D; Fritsch, Ingrid

    2010-05-01

    Three forces induced by magnetic fields offer unique control of fluid motion and new opportunities in microfluidics. This article describes magnetoconvective phenomena in terms of the theory and controversy, tuning by redox processes at electrodes, early-stage applications in analytical chemistry, mature applications in disciplines far afield, and future directions for micro total analysis systems. (To listen to a podcast about this article, please go to the Analytical Chemistry multimedia page at pubs.acs.org/page/ancham/audio/index.html .).

  1. Biomedical applications of magnetic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Mefford, Thompson

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic particles are increasingly being used in a wide variety of biomedical applications. Written by a team of internationally respected experts, this book provides an up-to-date authoritative reference for scientists and engineers. The first section presents the fundamentals of the field by explaining the theory of magnetism, describing techniques to synthesize magnetic particles, and detailing methods to characterize magnetic particles. The second section describes biomedical applications, including chemical sensors and cellular actuators, and diagnostic applications such as drug delivery, hyperthermia cancer treatment, and magnetic resonance imaging contrast.

  2. Solar Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Hood, Alan W

    2011-01-01

    This review provides an introduction to the generation and evolution of the Sun's magnetic field, summarising both observational evidence and theoretical models. The eleven year solar cycle, which is well known from a variety of observed quantities, strongly supports the idea of a large-scale solar dynamo. Current theoretical ideas on the location and mechanism of this dynamo are presented. The solar cycle influences the behaviour of the global coronal magnetic field and it is the eruptions of this field that can impact on the Earth's environment. These global coronal variations can be modelled to a surprising degree of accuracy. Recent high resolution observations of the Sun's magnetic field in quiet regions, away from sunspots, show that there is a continual evolution of a small-scale magnetic field, presumably produced by small-scale dynamo action in the solar interior. Sunspots, a natural consequence of the large-scale dynamo, emerge, evolve and disperse over a period of several days. Numerical simulation...

  3. High field superconducting magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  4. Design and application of permanent magnet flux sources for mechanical testing of magnetoactive elastomers at variable field directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiptmair, F; Major, Z; Haßlacher, R; Hild, S

    2015-08-01

    Magnetoactive elastomers (MAEs) are a class of smart materials whose mechanical properties can be rapidly and reversibly changed by an external magnetic field. Due to this tunability, they are useable for actuators or in active vibration control applications. An extensive magnetomechanical characterization is necessary for MAE material development and requires experiments under cyclic loading in uniform but variable magnetic fields. MAE testing apparatus typically rely on fields of adjustable strength, but fixed (transverse) direction, often provided by electromagnets. In this work, two permanent magnet flux sources were developed as an add-on for a modular test stand, to allow for mechanical testing in uniform fields of variable direction. MAE specimens, based on a silicone matrix with isotropic and anisotropic carbonyl iron particle distributions, were subjected to dynamic mechanical analysis under different field and loading configurations. The magneto-induced increase of stiffness and energy dissipation was determined by the change of the hysteresis loop area and dynamic modulus values. A distinct influence of the composite microstructure and the loading state was observed. Due to the very soft and flexible matrix used for preparing the MAE samples, the material stiffness and damping behavior could be varied over a wide range via the applied field direction and intensity.

  5. Dynamic shielding of the magnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAU, M.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a comparative study of the methods used to control and compensate the direct and alternative magnetic fields. Two frequently used methods in the electromagnetic compatibility of the complex biomagnetism installations were analyzed. The two methods refer to the use of inductive magnetic field sensors (only for alternative fields and of fluxgate magnetometers as active transducers which measures both the direct and alternative components of the magnetic field. The applications of the dynamic control of the magnetic field are: control of the magnetic field of the military ships, control of parasite magnetic field produced by power transformers and the electrical networks, protection of the mass spectrometers, electronic microscopes, SQUID and optical pumping magnetometers for applications in biomagnetism.

  6. The dynamics of magnetic nanoparticles exposed to non-heating alternating magnetic field in biochemical applications: theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovin, Yuri I.; Gribanovsky, Sergey L.; Golovin, Dmitry Y.; Zhigachev, Alexander O.; Klyachko, Natalia L.; Majouga, Alexander G.; Sokolsky, Marina; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2017-02-01

    In the past decade, magneto-nanomechanical approach to biochemical systems stimulation has been studied intensively. This method involves macromolecule structure local deformation via mechanical actuation of functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (f-MNPs) by non-heating low frequency (LF) alternating magnetic field (AMF). Specificity at cellular or molecular level and spatial locality in nanometer scale are its key advantages as compared to magnetic fluid hyperthermia. However, current experimental studies have weak theoretical basis. Several models of magneto-nanomechanical actuation of macromolecules and cells in non-heating uniform LF AMF are presented in the article. Single core-shell spherical, rod-like, and Janus MNPs, as well as dimers consisting of two f-MNPs with macromolecules immobilized on their surfaces are considered. AMF-induced rotational oscillations of MNPs can affect properties and functioning of macromolecules or cellular membranes attached to them via periodic deformations in nanometer scale. This could be widely used in therapy, in particular for targeted drug delivery, controlled drug release, and cancer cell killing. An aggregate composed of MNPs can affect associated macromolecules by force up to several hundreds of piconewton in the case of MNPs of tens of nanometers in diameter and LF AMF below 1 T. AMF parameters and MNP design requirements for effective in vitro and in vivo magneto-nanomechanical treatment are presented.

  7. Design optimization of the sensor spatial arrangement in a direct magnetic field-based localization system for medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marechal, Luc; Shaohui Foong; Zhenglong Sun; Wood, Kristin L

    2015-08-01

    Motivated by the need for developing a neuronavigation system to improve efficacy of intracranial surgical procedures, a localization system using passive magnetic fields for real-time monitoring of the insertion process of an external ventricular drain (EVD) catheter is conceived and developed. This system operates on the principle of measuring the static magnetic field of a magnetic marker using an array of magnetic sensors. An artificial neural network (ANN) is directly used for solving the inverse problem of magnetic dipole localization for improved efficiency and precision. As the accuracy of localization system is highly dependent on the sensor spatial location, an optimization framework, based on understanding and classification of experimental sensor characteristics as well as prior knowledge of the general trajectory of the localization pathway, for design of such sensing assemblies is described and investigated in this paper. Both optimized and non-optimized sensor configurations were experimentally evaluated and results show superior performance from the optimized configuration. While the approach presented here utilizes ventriculostomy as an illustrative platform, it can be extended to other medical applications that require localization inside the body.

  8. Magnetic fields in diffuse media

    CERN Document Server

    Pino, Elisabete; Melioli, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents the current knowledge of magnetic fields in diffuse astrophysical media. Starting with an overview of 21st century instrumentation to observe astrophysical magnetic fields, the chapters cover observational techniques, origin of magnetic fields, magnetic turbulence, basic processes in magnetized fluids, the role of magnetic fields for cosmic rays, in the interstellar medium and for star formation. Written by a group of leading experts the book represents an excellent overview of the field. Nonspecialists will find sufficient background to enter the field and be able to appreciate the state of the art.

  9. Magnetic field directed self-assembly of liquid crystalline block copolymers for membrane applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinadhan, Manesh; Majewski, Pawel W.; Osuji, Chinedum O.

    2011-03-01

    The use of magnetic fields is presented as a facile approach to the control of long range order and alignment of block copolymers. Using SAXS we demonstrate the alignment of lamellar and hexagonally packed cylinder morphologies of a poly(ethylene oxide)-based LC diblock copolymer by slow cooling in the presence of the field through the order-disorder transition. Non-degenerate alignment of the lamellar system is enabled by sample rotation and alignment in the system is shown to be driven by the diamagnetic anisotropy of the LC mesogen, and not anisotropy resulting from crystallization of the PEO block. We consider the effects of lithium doping and field strength on the order-disorder transition of the system, and the effect of lithium content on the critical field required for attaining well aligned films. The controlled alignment of PEO channels over large areas offers a route to selective ion transport in solid state batteries. This work is funded by the NSF under DMR-0847534.

  10. Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegelmann, Thomas; Petrie, Gordon J. D.; Riley, Pete

    2017-09-01

    Coronal magnetic field models use photospheric field measurements as boundary condition to model the solar corona. We review in this paper the most common model assumptions, starting from MHD-models, magnetohydrostatics, force-free and finally potential field models. Each model in this list is somewhat less complex than the previous one and makes more restrictive assumptions by neglecting physical effects. The magnetohydrostatic approach neglects time-dependent phenomena and plasma flows, the force-free approach neglects additionally the gradient of the plasma pressure and the gravity force. This leads to the assumption of a vanishing Lorentz force and electric currents are parallel (or anti-parallel) to the magnetic field lines. Finally, the potential field approach neglects also these currents. We outline the main assumptions, benefits and limitations of these models both from a theoretical (how realistic are the models?) and a practical viewpoint (which computer resources to we need?). Finally we address the important problem of noisy and inconsistent photospheric boundary conditions and the possibility of using chromospheric and coronal observations to improve the models.

  11. Mechanical disruption of tumors by iron particles and magnetic field application results in increased anti-tumor immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam N Bouchlaka

    Full Text Available The primary tumor represents a potential source of antigens for priming immune responses for disseminated disease. Current means of debulking tumors involves the use of cytoreductive conditioning that impairs immune cells or removal by surgery. We hypothesized that activation of the immune system could occur through the localized release of tumor antigens and induction of tumor death due to physical disruption of tumor architecture and destruction of the primary tumor in situ. This was accomplished by intratumor injection of magneto-rheological fluid (MRF consisting of iron microparticles, in Balb/c mice bearing orthotopic 4T1 breast cancer, followed by local application of a magnetic field resulting in immediate coalescence of the particles, tumor cell death, slower growth of primary tumors as well as decreased tumor progression in distant sites and metastatic spread. This treatment was associated with increased activation of DCs in the draining lymph nodes and recruitment of both DCs and CD8(+T cells to the tumor. The particles remained within the tumor and no toxicities were observed. The immune induction observed was significantly greater compared to cryoablation. Further anti-tumor effects were observed when MRF/magnet therapy was combined with systemic low dose immunotherapy. Thus, mechanical disruption of the primary tumor with MRF/magnetic field application represents a novel means to induce systemic immune activation in cancer.

  12. Application of pulsed-magnetic field enhances non-viral gene delivery in primary cells from different origins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamau Chapman, Sarah W. [Institute of Veterinary Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstr. 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Hassa, Paul O. [Institute of Veterinary Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstr. 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) Heidelberg, Meyerhofstrasse 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Koch-Schneidemann, Sabine; Rechenberg, Brigitte von [Musculoskeletal Research Unit, Equine Hospital, Vetsuisse Faculty Zurich, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstr. 260, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Hofmann-Amtenbrink, Margarethe [MatSearch, Chemin Jean Pavillard 14, 1009 Pully (Switzerland); Steitz, Benedikt; Petri-Fink, Alke; Hofmann, Heinrich [Laboratory of Powder Technology, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Hottiger, Michael O. [Institute of Veterinary Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstr. 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland)], E-mail: hottiger@vetbio.uzh.ch

    2008-04-15

    Primary cell lines are more difficult to transfect when compared to immortalized/transformed cell lines, and hence new techniques are required to enhance the transfection efficiency in these cells. We isolated and established primary cultures of synoviocytes, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, melanocytes, macrophages, lung fibroblasts, and embryonic fibroblasts. These cells differed in several properties, and hence were a good representative sample of cells that would be targeted for expression and delivery of therapeutic genes in vivo. The efficiency of gene delivery in all these cells was enhanced using polyethylenimine-coated polyMAG magnetic nanoparticles, and the rates (17-84.2%) surpassed those previously achieved using other methods, especially in cells that are difficult to transfect. The application of permanent and pulsating magnetic fields significantly enhanced the transfection efficiencies in synoviocytes, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, melanocytes and lung fibroblasts, within 5 min of exposure to these magnetic fields. This is an added advantage for future in vivo applications, where rapid gene delivery is required before systemic clearance or filtration of the gene vectors occurs.

  13. Narrow band perfect absorber for maximum localized magnetic and electric field enhancement and sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Zhengdong; Zhang, Senlin; Gong, Chensheng; He, Sailing

    2016-04-01

    Plasmonics offer an exciting way to mediate the interaction between light and matter, allowing strong field enhancement and confinement, large absorption and scattering at resonance. However, simultaneous realization of ultra-narrow band perfect absorption and electromagnetic field enhancement is challenging due to the intrinsic high optical losses and radiative damping in metals. Here, we propose an all-metal plasmonic absorber with an absorption bandwidth less than 8 nm and polarization insensitive absorptivity exceeding 99%. Unlike traditional Metal-Dielectric-Metal configurations, we demonstrate that the narrowband perfect absorption and field enhancement are ascribed to the vertical gap plasmonic mode in the deep subwavelength scale, which has a high quality factor of 120 and mode volume of about 10-4 × (λres/n)3. Based on the coupled mode theory, we verify that the diluted field enhancement is proportional to the absorption, and thus perfect absorption is critical to maximum field enhancement. In addition, the proposed perfect absorber can be operated as a refractive index sensor with a sensitivity of 885 nm/RIU and figure of merit as high as 110. It provides a new design strategy for narrow band perfect absorption and local field enhancement, and has potential applications in biosensors, filters and nonlinear optics.

  14. Magnetic Field Topology in Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, T. A.; Frank, A.

    2000-01-01

    We present results on the magnetic field topology in a pulsed radiative. jet. For initially helical magnetic fields and periodic velocity variations, we find that the magnetic field alternates along the, length of the jet from toroidally dominated in the knots to possibly poloidally dominated in the intervening regions.

  15. Magnetic field switchable dry adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Bovero, Enrico; Menon, Carlo

    2015-02-01

    A magnetic field controllable dry adhesive device is manufactured. The normal adhesion force can be increased or decreased depending on the presence of an applied magnetic field. If the magnetic field is present during the entire normal adhesion test cycle which includes both applying a preloading force and measuring the pulloff pressure, a decrease in adhesion is observed when compared to when there is no applied magnetic field. Similarly, if the magnetic field is present only during the preload portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, a decrease in adhesion is observed because of an increased stiffness of the magnetically controlled dry adhesive device. When the applied magnetic field is present during only the pulloff portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, either an increase or a decrease in normal adhesion is observed depending on the direction of the applied magnetic field.

  16. Magnetic-field-assisted assembly of layered double hydroxide/metal porphyrin ultrathin films and their application for glucose sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Mingfei; Xu, Xiangyu; Han, Jingbin; Zhao, Jingwen; Shi, Wenying; Kong, Xianggui; Wei, Min; Evans, David G; Duan, Xue

    2011-07-01

    The ordered ultrathin films (UTFs) based on CoFe-LDH (layered double hydroxide) nanoplatelets and manganese porphyrin (Mn-TPPS) have been fabricated on ITO substrates via a magnetic-field-assisted (MFA) layer-by-layer (LBL) method and were demonstrated as an electrochemical sensor for glucose. The XRD pattern for the film indicates a long-range stacking order in the normal direction of the substrate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of the MFA LDH/Mn-TPPS UTFs reveal a continuous and uniform surface morphology. Cyclic voltammetry, impedance spectroscopy, and chronoamperometry were used to evaluate the electrochemical performance of the film, and the results show that the MFA-0.5 (0.5 T magnetic field) CoFe-LDH/Mn-TPPS-modified electrode displays the strongest redox current peaks and fastest electron transfer process compared with those of MFA-0 (without magnetic-field) and MFA-0.15 (0.15 T magnetic field). Furthermore, the MFA-0.5 CoFe-LDH/Mn-TPPS exhibits remarkable electrocatalytic activity toward the oxidation of glucose with a linear response range (0.1-15 mM; R(2) = 0.999), low detection limit (0.79 μM) and high sensitivity (66.3 μA mM(-1) cm(-2)). In addition, the glucose sensor prepared by the MFA LBL method also shows good selectivity and reproducibility as well as resistance to poisoning in a chloride ion solution. Therefore, the novel strategy in this work creates new opportunities for the fabrication of nonenzyme sensors with prospective applications in practical detection.

  17. Minimizing magnetic fields for precision experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Altarev, I; Lins, T; Marino, M G; Nießen, B; Petzoldt, G; Reisner, M; Stuiber, S; Sturm, M; Singh, J T; Taubenheim, B; Rohrer, H K; Schläpfer, U

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of measurements in fundamental and applied physics rely on magnetically shielded environments with sub nano-Tesla residual magnetic fields. State of the art magnetically shielded rooms (MSRs) consist of up to seven layers of high permeability materials in combination with highly conductive shields. Proper magnetic equilibration is crucial to obtain such low magnetic fields with small gradients in any MSR. Here we report on a scheme to magnetically equilibrate MSRs with a 10 times reduced duration of the magnetic equilibration sequence and a significantly lower magnetic field with improved homogeneity. For the search of the neutron's electric dipole moment, our finding corresponds to a linear improvement in the systematic reach and a 40 % improvement of the statistical reach of the measurement. However, this versatile procedure can improve the performance of any MSR for any application.

  18. Limits for primordial magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Caprini, Chiara

    2011-01-01

    A possible explanation for the origin of the magnetic fields observed today in matter structures is that they were generated in the primordial universe. After briefly revising the model of a primordial stochastic magnetic field and sketching the main features of its time evolution in the primordial plasma, we illustrate the current upper bounds on the magnetic field amplitude and spectral index from Cosmic Microwave Background observations and gravitational wave production. We conclude that a primordial magnetic field generated by a non-causal process such as inflation with a red spectrum seems to be favoured as a seed for the magnetic fields observed today in structures.

  19. Superhorizon magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Campanelli, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    [Abridged] We analyze the evolution of superhorizon-scale magnetic fields from the end of inflation till today. Whatever is the mechanism responsible for their generation during inflation, we find that a given magnetic mode with wavenumber $k$ evolves, after inflation, according to the values of $k\\eta_e$, $n_{\\mathbf{k}}$, and $\\Omega_k$, where $\\eta_e$ is the conformal time at the end of inflation, $n_{\\mathbf{k}}$ is the number density spectrum of inflation-produced photons, and $\\Omega_k$ is the phase difference between the two Bogolubov coefficients which characterize the state of that mode at the end of inflation. For any realistic inflationary magnetogenesis scenario, we find that $n_{\\mathbf{k}}^{-1} \\ll |k\\eta_e| \\ll 1$, and three evolutionary scenarios are possible: ($i$) $|\\Omega_k \\mp \\pi| = \\mathcal{O}(1)$, in which case the evolution of the magnetic spectrum $B_k(\\eta)$ is adiabatic, $a^2B_k(\\eta) = \\mbox{const}$, with $a$ being the expansion parameter; ($ii$) $|\\Omega_k \\mp \\pi| \\ll |k\\eta_e|$,...

  20. SCUPOL Magnetic Field Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Poidevin, Frederick; Kowal, Grzegorz; Pino, Elisabete de Gouveia Dal; Magalhaes, Antonio-Mario

    2013-01-01

    We present an extensive analysis of the 850 microns polarization maps of the SCUPOL Catalog produced by Matthews et al. (2009), focusing exclusively on the molecular clouds and star-forming regions. For the sufficiently sampled regions, we characterize the depolarization properties and the turbulent-to-mean magnetic field ratio of each region. Similar sets of parameters are calculated from 2D synthetic maps of dust emission polarization produced with 3D MHD numerical simulations scaled to the S106, OMC-2/3, W49 and DR21 molecular clouds polarization maps. For these specific regions the turbulent MHD regimes retrieved from the simulations, as described by the turbulent Alfv\\`en and sonic Mach numbers, are consistent within a factor 1 to 2 with the values of the same turbulent regimes estimated from the analysis of Zeeman measurements data provided by Crutcher (1999). Constraints on the values of the inclination angle of the mean magnetic field with respect to the LOS are also given. The values obtained from th...

  1. Magnetic Fields: Visible and Permanent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkeljohn, Dorothy R.; Earl, Robert D.

    1983-01-01

    Children will be able to see the concept of a magnetic field translated into a visible reality using the simple method outlined. Standard shelf paper, magnets, iron filings, and paint in a spray can are used to prepare a permanent and well-detailed picture of the magnetic field. (Author/JN)

  2. Nonlinear energy dissipation of magnetic nanoparticles in oscillating magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Aquino, D.; Rinaldi, C.

    2015-11-01

    The heating of magnetic nanoparticle suspensions subjected to alternating magnetic fields enables a variety of emerging applications such as magnetic fluid hyperthermia and triggered drug release. Rosensweig (2002) [25] obtained a model for the heat dissipation rate of a collection of non-interacting particles. However, the assumptions made in this analysis make it rigorously valid only in the limit of small applied magnetic field amplitude and frequency (i.e., values of the Langevin parameter that are much less than unity and frequencies below the inverse relaxation time). In this contribution we approach the problem from an alternative point of view by solving the phenomenological magnetization relaxation equation exactly for the case of arbitrary magnetic field amplitude and frequency and by solving a more accurate magnetization relaxation equation numerically. We also use rotational Brownian dynamics simulations of non-interacting magnetic nanoparticles subjected to an alternating magnetic field to estimate the rate of energy dissipation and compare the results of the phenomenological theories to the particle-scale simulations. The results are summarized in terms of a normalized energy dissipation rate and show that Rosensweig's expression provides an upper bound on the energy dissipation rate achieved at high field frequency and amplitude. Estimates of the predicted dependence of energy dissipation rate, quantified as specific absorption rate (SAR), on magnetic field amplitude and frequency, and particle core and hydrodynamic diameter, are also given.

  3. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  4. Pulsed Field Gradient Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Applications in Yttrium Type Zeolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaoxiong

    Molecular self-diffusion measurements by Pulsed Field Gradient Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (PFG NMR) spectroscopy can be applied to numerous fields. PFG NMR spectroscopy usually requires no special labeling for measuring hydrocarbon self-diffusion in a variety of samples. This is a significant advantage over using radioactive isotopes or photolabeled molecules since no special sample preparation or handling is required. A single set of experiments can yield diffusion coefficients and often can be performed in a few hours. The range of diffusion coefficients (10^{ -4} cm^2/s-10 ^{-10} cm^2/s) which can be determined by PFG NMR covers most ranges of molecular diffusion. This work describes the design of a PFG NMR spectrometer for measuring hydrocarbon self-diffusion in zeolites. The principles of PFG NMR spectroscopy are illustrated. A pulsed field gradient 60 MHz NMR spectrometer was constructed. Diffusion data were acquired by PFG NMR for standard samples of water, ammonia and glycerol and are in good agreement with those reported in the literature. Following verification of spectrometer performance, the self-diffusion coefficients of isobutane in cation exchanged Y type zeolites were determined. The results show that the mobility of molecules in zeolites depends on the nature of the cations. For small crystallite zeolites, intercrystalline and intracrystalline diffusion has been observed. The effective diffusion coefficients strongly depend on the concentration of adsorbate as well as the packing method. Large discrepancies between diffusion coefficients in zeolites measured by PFG NMR and by adsorption rate experiments have been reported. Surface area, crystallite size, percentage of water in the zeolite, percentage of cation exchanged into the zeolite and other physical chemical properties effect hydrocarbon diffusivity. Detailed methods for determining these properties are discussed. As an extended study of zeolite catalysts, the adsorption of ethylene on

  5. Windows on the Human Body – in Vivo High-Field Magnetic Resonance Research and Applications in Medicine and Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewald Moser

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Analogous to the evolution of biological sensor-systems, the progress in “medical sensor-systems”, i.e., diagnostic procedures, is paradigmatically described. Outstanding highlights of this progress are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and spectroscopy (MRS, which enable non-invasive, in vivo acquisition of morphological, functional, and metabolic information from the human body with unsurpassed quality. Recent achievements in high and ultra-high field MR (at 3 and 7 Tesla are described, and representative research applications in Medicine and Psychology in Austria are discussed. Finally, an overview of current and prospective research in multi-modal imaging, potential clinical applications, as well as current limitations and challenges is given.

  6. Windows on the Human Body – in Vivo High-Field Magnetic Resonance Research and Applications in Medicine and Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Ewald; Meyerspeer, Martin; Fischmeister, Florian Ph. S.; Grabner, Günther; Bauer, Herbert; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2010-01-01

    Analogous to the evolution of biological sensor-systems, the progress in “medical sensor-systems”, i.e., diagnostic procedures, is paradigmatically described. Outstanding highlights of this progress are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS), which enable non-invasive, in vivo acquisition of morphological, functional, and metabolic information from the human body with unsurpassed quality. Recent achievements in high and ultra-high field MR (at 3 and 7 Tesla) are described, and representative research applications in Medicine and Psychology in Austria are discussed. Finally, an overview of current and prospective research in multi-modal imaging, potential clinical applications, as well as current limitations and challenges is given. PMID:22219684

  7. Reconnection of Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birn, J.; Priest, E. R.

    2007-01-01

    Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1.1 The Sun E. R. Priest; 1.2 Earth's magnetosphere J. Birn; Part II. Basic Theory of MHD Reconnection: 2.1 Classical theory of two-dimensional reconnection T. G. Forbes; 2.2 Fundamental concepts G. Hornig; 2.3 Three-dimensional reconnection in the absence of magnetic null points G. Hornig; 2.4 Three-dimensional reconnection at magnetic null points D. Pontin; 2.5 Three-dimensional flux tube reconnection M. Linton; Part III. Basic Theory of Collisionless Reconnection: 3.1 Fundamentals of collisionless reconnection J. Drake; 3.2 Diffusion region physics M. Hesse; 3.3 Onset of magnetic reconnection P. Pritchett; 3.4 Hall-MHD reconnection A. Bhattacharjee and J. Dorelli; 3.5 Role of current-aligned instabilities J. Büchner and W. Daughton; 3.6 Nonthermal particle acceleration M. Hoshino; Part IV. Reconnection in the Magnetosphere: 4.1 Reconnection at the magnetopause: concepts and models J. G. Dorelli and A. Bhattacharjee; 4.2 Observations of magnetopause reconnection K.-H. Trattner; 4.3 On the stability of the magnetotail K. Schindler; 4.4 Simulations of reconnection in the magnetotail J. Birn; 4.5 Observations of tail reconnection W. Baumjohann and R. Nakamura; 4.6 Remote sensing of reconnection M. Freeman; Part V. Reconnection in the Sun's Atmosphere: 5.1 Coronal heating E. R. Priest; 5.2 Separator reconnection D. Longcope; 5.3 Pinching of coronal fields V. Titov; 5.4 Numerical experiments on coronal heating K. Galsgaard; 5.5 Solar flares K. Kusano; 5.6 Particle acceleration in flares: theory T. Neukirch; 5.7 Fast particles in flares: observations L. Fletcher; 6. Open problems J. Birn and E. R. Priest; Bibliography; Index.

  8. The Physics of Attraction and Repulsion: Magnetism and Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakotte, Heinz

    2001-11-01

    The development of new materials with improved magnetic properties completely changed the modern world in the past decades. Recent progress is predominantly due to a better understanding of magnetism that has gone far beyond compass needles rotating in a magnetic field and bar magnets attracting or repelling each other. New magnetic materials are used to build smaller and smaller read/write heads and hard disks with increased storage capacity, developments that are responsible the revolution in the computer industry. Another example is the field of magnetic levitation that became feasible for commercial applications with the discovery of new superconducting materials, and a prototype train is under development in Japan. In medicine, the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides an alternative to other (destructive) radiation techniques.

  9. Magnetic field amplification and evolution in turbulent collisionless magnetohydrodynamics: An application to the intracluster medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos-Lima, R.; De Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; Kowal, G. [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofísica e Ciências Atmosféricas, Universidade de São Paulo, R. do Matão, 1226, São Paulo, SP 05508-090 (Brazil); Falceta-Gonçalves, D. [Escola de Artes, Ciências e Humanidades, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua Arlindo Bettio, 1000, São Paulo, SP 03828-000 (Brazil); Lazarian, A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Nakwacki, M. S. [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (IAFE), CONICET (Argentina)

    2014-02-01

    The amplification of magnetic fields (MFs) in the intracluster medium (ICM) is attributed to turbulent dynamo (TD) action, which is generally derived in the collisional-MHD framework. However, this assumption is poorly justified a priori, since in the ICM the ion mean free path between collisions is of the order of the dynamical scales, thus requiring a collisionless MHD description. The present study uses an anisotropic plasma pressure that brings the plasma within a parametric space where collisionless instabilities take place. In this model, a relaxation term of the pressure anisotropy simulates the feedback of the mirror and firehose instabilities, in consistency with empirical studies. Our three-dimensional numerical simulations of forced transonic turbulence, aiming the modeling of the turbulent ICM, were performed for different initial values of the MF intensity and different relaxation rates of the pressure anisotropy. We found that in the high-β plasma regime corresponding to the ICM conditions, a fast anisotropy relaxation rate gives results that are similar to the collisional-MHD model, as far as the statistical properties of the turbulence are concerned. Also, the TD amplification of seed MFs was found to be similar to the collisional-MHD model. The simulations that do not employ the anisotropy relaxation deviate significantly from the collisional-MHD results and show more power at the small-scale fluctuations of both density and velocity as a result of the action of the instabilities. For these simulations, the large-scale fluctuations in the MF are mostly suppressed and the TD fails in amplifying seed MFs.

  10. Magnetic field induced optical vortex beam rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Shuai; Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Shi, Bao-Sen

    2015-01-01

    Light with orbital angular momentum (OAM) has drawn a great deal of attention for its important applications in the fields of precise optical measurements and high capacity optical communications. Here we adopt a method to study the rotation of a light beam, which is based on magnetic field induced circular birefringence in warm 87Rb atomic vapor. The dependence of the rotation angle to the intensity of the magnetic field makes it appropriate for weak magnetic field measurement. We derive a detail theoretical description that is in well agreement with the experimental observations. The experiment shows here provides a new method for precise measurement of magnetic field intensity and expands the application of OAM-carrying light.

  11. Novel functional magnetic materials fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book presents current research on advanced magnetic materials and multifunctional composites. Recent advances in technology and engineering have resulted from the development of advanced magnetic materials with improved functional magnetic and magneto-transport properties. Certain industrial sectors, such as magnetic sensors, microelectronics, and security, demand cost-effective materials with reduced dimensionality and desirable magnetic properties such as enhanced magnetic softness, giant magnetic field sensitivity, and large magnetocaloric effect.  Expert chapters present the most up-to-date information on the fabrication process, processing, tailoring of properties, and applications of different families of modern functional materials for advanced smart applications. Topics covered include novel magnetic materials and applications; amorphous and nanocrystalline magnetic materials and applications; hard magnetic materials; magnetic shape memory alloys; and magnetic oxides. The book's highly interdis...

  12. Magnetism basics and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanita, Carmen-Gabriela

    2012-01-01

    This textbook is aimed at engineering students who are likely to come across magnetics applications in their professional practice. Whether designing lithography equipment containing ferromagnetic brushes, or detecting defects in aeronautics, some basic knowledge of 21st century magnetism is needed. From the magnetic tape on the pocket credit card to the read head in a personal computer, people run into magnetism in many products. Furthermore, in a variety of disciplines tools of the trade exploit magnetic principles, and many interdisciplinary laboratory research areas cross paths with magnetic phenomena that may seem mysterious to the untrained mind. Therefore, this course offers a broad coverage of magnetism topics encountered more often in this millenium, revealing key concepts on which many practical applications rest. Some traditional subjects in magnetism are discussed in the first half of the book, followed by areas likely to spark the curiosity of those more interested in today’s technological achi...

  13. Principles and Application of Magnetic Rubber Testing for Crack Detection in High-Strength Steel Components: I. Active-Field Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Principles and Application of Magnetic Rubber Testing for Crack Detection in High-Strength Steel Components: I...scientific principles governing both active-field and residual-field variants of MRT were examined. The results of theoretical and experimental...investigations into active-field MRT are documented in the current report, which describes the principles of active-field MRT, and then examines both the basis

  14. Vestibular stimulation by magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Bryan K.; Roberts, Dale C.; Della Santina, Charles C.; Carey, John P.; Zee, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals working next to strong static magnetic fields occasionally report disorientation and vertigo. With the increasing strength of magnetic fields used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, these reports have become more common. It was recently learned that humans, mice and zebrafish all demonstrate behaviors consistent with constant peripheral vestibular stimulation while inside a strong, static magnetic field. The proposed mechanism for this effect involves a Lorentz force resulting from the interaction of a strong static magnetic field with naturally occurring ionic currents flowing through the inner ear endolymph into vestibular hair cells. The resulting force within the endolymph is strong enough to displace the lateral semicircular canal cupula, inducing vertigo and the horizontal nystagmus seen in normal mice and in humans. This review explores the evidence for interactions of magnetic fields with the vestibular system. PMID:25735662

  15. Magnetic response to applied electrostatic field in external magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adorno, T.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Caixa Postal 66318, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); University of Florida, Department of Physics, Gainesville, FL (United States); Gitman, D.M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Caixa Postal 66318, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Shabad, A.E. [P. N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-04-15

    We show, within QED and other possible nonlinear theories, that a static charge localized in a finite domain of space becomes a magnetic dipole, if it is placed in an external (constant and homogeneous) magnetic field in the vacuum. The magnetic moment is quadratic in the charge, depends on its size and is parallel to the external field, provided the charge distribution is at least cylindrically symmetric. This magneto-electric effect is a nonlinear response of the magnetized vacuum to an applied electrostatic field. Referring to the simple example of a spherically symmetric applied field, the nonlinearly induced current and its magnetic field are found explicitly throughout the space; the pattern of the lines of force is depicted, both inside and outside the charge, which resembles that of a standard solenoid of classical magnetostatics. (orig.)

  16. Magnetic response to applied electrostatic field in external magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Adorno, T C; Shabad, A E

    2014-01-01

    We show, within QED and other possible nonlinear theories, that a static charge localized in a finite domain of space becomes a magnetic dipole, if it is placed in an external (constant and homogeneous) magnetic field in the vacuum. The magnetic moment is quadratic in the charge, depends on its size and is parallel to the external field, provided the charge distribution is at least cylindrically symmetric. This magneto-electric effect is a nonlinear response of the magnetized vacuum to an applied electrostatic field. Referring to a simple example of a spherically-symmetric applied field, the nonlinearly induced current and its magnetic field are found explicitly throughout the space, the pattern of lines of force is depicted, both inside and outside the charge, which resembles that of a standard solenoid of classical magnetostatics.

  17. Efficiency of Removing Sulfur Dioxide in the Air by Non-Thermal Plasma Along with the Application of the Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The non-thermal plasma created by high voltage pulsed power supply can be used to remove sulfur dioxide in the air, but how to increase the removing efficiency is not clear. It is novel to apply the magnetic field in removing SO2 as discussed in this paper. The mechanisms of removing sulfur dioxide by non-thermal plasma along with the application of the magnetic field are analyzed, and the related factors affecting the removal efficiency, such as the magnitude of pulsed voltage, the polarity of the pulse, the layout of the discharge electrode, especially the magnetic field are experimentally investigated. It can be concluded that the purification efficiency is improved significantly by applying the magnetic field.

  18. Dispersion of Magnetic Fields in Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Hildebrand, Roger H; Dotson, Jessie L; Houde, Martin; Vaillancourt, John E

    2008-01-01

    We describe a method for determining the dispersion of magnetic field vectors about local mean fields in turbulent molecular clouds. The method is designed to avoid inaccurate estimates of MHD or turbulent dispersion - and hence to avoid inaccurate estimates of field strengths - due to large-scale, non-turbulent field structure when using the well-known method of Chandrasekhar and Fermi. Our method also provides accurate, independent estimates of the turbulent to mean magnetic field strength ratio. We discuss applications to the molecular clouds Orion, M17, and DR21.

  19. Nonlinear energy dissipation of magnetic nanoparticles in oscillating magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto-Aquino, D. [ERC Incorporated, Air Force Research Laboratory, 10 E. Saturn Blvd., Edwards AFB, CA 93524 (United States); Rinaldi, C., E-mail: carlos.rinaldi@bme.ufl.edu [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering and Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, PO Box 116131, Gainesville, FL 32611-6131 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The heating of magnetic nanoparticle suspensions subjected to alternating magnetic fields enables a variety of emerging applications such as magnetic fluid hyperthermia and triggered drug release. Rosensweig (2002) [25] obtained a model for the heat dissipation rate of a collection of non-interacting particles. However, the assumptions made in this analysis make it rigorously valid only in the limit of small applied magnetic field amplitude and frequency (i.e., values of the Langevin parameter that are much less than unity and frequencies below the inverse relaxation time). In this contribution we approach the problem from an alternative point of view by solving the phenomenological magnetization relaxation equation exactly for the case of arbitrary magnetic field amplitude and frequency and by solving a more accurate magnetization relaxation equation numerically. We also use rotational Brownian dynamics simulations of non-interacting magnetic nanoparticles subjected to an alternating magnetic field to estimate the rate of energy dissipation and compare the results of the phenomenological theories to the particle-scale simulations. The results are summarized in terms of a normalized energy dissipation rate and show that Rosensweig's expression provides an upper bound on the energy dissipation rate achieved at high field frequency and amplitude. Estimates of the predicted dependence of energy dissipation rate, quantified as specific absorption rate (SAR), on magnetic field amplitude and frequency, and particle core and hydrodynamic diameter, are also given. - Highlights: • Rosensweig's model for SAR was extended to high fields. • The MRSh relaxation equation was used to predict SAR at high fields. • Rotational Brownian dynamics simulations were used to predict SAR. • The results of these models were compared. • Predictions of effect of size and field conditions on SAR are presented.

  20. Pulsed Magnetic Field Driven Gas Core Reactors for Space Power & Propulsion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghaie, Samim; Smith, Blair; Knight, Travis; Butler, Carey

    2003-01-01

    The present results indicated that: 1. A pulsed magnetic driven fission power concept, PMD-GCR is developed for closed (NER) and semi-open (NTR) operations. 2. In power mode, power is generated at alpha less than 1 for power levels of hundreds of KW or higher 3. IN semi open NTR mode, PMD-GCR generates thrust at I(sub sp) approx. 5,000 s and jet power approx. 5KW/Kg. 4. PMD-GCR is highly subcritical and is actively driven to critically. 5. Parallel path with fusion R&D needs in many areas including magnet and plasma.

  1. Superconducting magnets and their applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, J.E.C. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA). Francis Bitter National Magnet Lab.)

    1989-08-01

    Superconducting magnets are now being used in applications as diverse as medical imaging, fusion research, and power conditioning. The steady improvement in the understanding of instability and quenching has allowed increases in current density and compactness of winding. The reduction in winding size that has thus followed has allowed the construction of economic magnets for imaging, for acceleration, and for high-resolution spectrometers. Large magnets for fusion and energy applications have been made possible by composite conductors containing large fractions of copper or aluminum. The advent of high-temperature superconductors may hold the promise, eventually, of very-high-field magnets. Meanwhile low-temperature superconductors capable of generating fields up to 30 T have been developed.

  2. NMR in pulsed magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, Edy

    2011-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments in pulsed magnetic fields up to 30.4 T focused on 1H and 93Nb nuclei are reported. Here we discuss the advantage and limitation of pulsed field NMR and why this technique is able to become a promising research tool. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All Rights Reserved.

  3. New Methods of Low-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Application to Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    receive-only phased-array head coil with soccer -ball element geometry,” Magnet- ic Resonance in Medicine, vol. 56, no. 1, pp. 216–223, 2006. [13] M...relationship with energy metabolism,” in link.springer.com, vol. 102, no. 41, Vi- enna: Springer Vienna, 2009, pp. 207–213. [33] C. Iadecola, “Bright and dark

  4. Electromagnetic Field Modeling of Transcranial Electric and Magnetic Stimulation: Targeting, Individualization, and Safety of Convulsive and Subconvulsive Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhi-De

    The proliferation of noninvasive transcranial electric and magnetic brain stimulation techniques and applications in recent years has led to important insights into brain function and pathophysiology of brain-based disorders. Transcranial electric and magnetic stimulation encompasses a wide spectrum of methods that have developed into therapeutic interventions for a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Although these methods are at different stages of development, the physical principle underlying these techniques is the similar. Namely, an electromagnetic field is induced in the brain either via current injection through scalp electrodes or via electromagnetic induction. The induced electric field modulates the neuronal transmembrane potentials and, thereby, neuronal excitability or activity. Therefore, knowledge of the induced electric field distribution is key in the design and interpretation of basic research and clinical studies. This work aims to delineate the fundamental physical limitations, tradeoffs, and technological feasibility constraints associated with transcranial electric and magnetic stimulation, in order to inform the development of technologies that deliver safer, and more spatially, temporally, and patient specific stimulation. Part I of this dissertation expounds on the issue of spatial targeting of the electric field. Contrasting electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST) configurations that differ markedly in efficacy, side effects, and seizure induction efficiency could advance our understanding of the principles linking treatment parameters and therapeutic outcome and could provide a means of testing hypotheses of the mechanisms of therapeutic action. Using the finite element method, we systematically compare the electric field characteristics of existing forms of ECT and MST. We introduce a method of incorporating a modality-specific neural activation threshold in the electric field models that can

  5. Fundamentals and applications of magnetic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Krishnan, Kannan M

    2016-01-01

    Students and researchers looking for a comprehensive textbook on magnetism, magnetic materials and related applications will find in this book an excellent explanation of the field. Chapters progress logically from the physics of magnetism, to magnetic phenomena in materials, to size and dimensionality effects, to applications. Beginning with a description of magnetic phenomena and measurements on a macroscopic scale, the book then presents discussions of intrinsic and phenomenological concepts of magnetism such as electronic magnetic moments and classical, quantum, and band theories of magnetic behavior. It then covers ordered magnetic materials (emphasizing their structure-sensitive properties) and magnetic phenomena, including magnetic anisotropy, magnetostriction, and magnetic domain structures and dynamics. What follows is a comprehensive description of imaging methods to resolve magnetic microstructures (domains) along with an introduction to micromagnetic modeling. The book then explores in detail size...

  6. Magnetic-field-controlled reconfigurable semiconductor logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Sungjung; Kim, Taeyueb; Shin, Sang Hoon; Lim, Ju Young; Hong, Jinki; Song, Jin Dong; Chang, Joonyeon; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Rhie, Kungwon; Han, Suk Hee; Shin, Kyung-Ho; Johnson, Mark

    2013-02-07

    Logic devices based on magnetism show promise for increasing computational efficiency while decreasing consumed power. They offer zero quiescent power and yet combine novel functions such as programmable logic operation and non-volatile built-in memory. However, practical efforts to adapt a magnetic device to logic suffer from a low signal-to-noise ratio and other performance attributes that are not adequate for logic gates. Rather than exploiting magnetoresistive effects that result from spin-dependent transport of carriers, we have approached the development of a magnetic logic device in a different way: we use the phenomenon of large magnetoresistance found in non-magnetic semiconductors in high electric fields. Here we report a device showing a strong diode characteristic that is highly sensitive to both the sign and the magnitude of an external magnetic field, offering a reversible change between two different characteristic states by the application of a magnetic field. This feature results from magnetic control of carrier generation and recombination in an InSb p-n bilayer channel. Simple circuits combining such elementary devices are fabricated and tested, and Boolean logic functions including AND, OR, NAND and NOR are performed. They are programmed dynamically by external electric or magnetic signals, demonstrating magnetic-field-controlled semiconductor reconfigurable logic at room temperature. This magnetic technology permits a new kind of spintronic device, characterized as a current switch rather than a voltage switch, and provides a simple and compact platform for non-volatile reconfigurable logic devices.

  7. Magnetic Nanoparticles From Fabrication to Clinical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Thanh, Nguyen TK

    2012-01-01

    Offering the latest information in magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) research, Magnetic Nanoparticles: From Fabrication to Clinical Applications provides a comprehensive review, from synthesis, characterization, and biofunctionalization to clinical applications of MNPs, including the diagnosis and treatment of cancers. This book, written by some of the most qualified experts in the field, not only fills a hole in the literature, but also bridges the gaps between all the different areas in this field. Translational research on tailored magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications spans a variet

  8. External-field-free magnetic biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuanpeng; Wang, Yi; Klein, Todd; Wang, Jian-Ping, E-mail: jpwang@umn.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2014-03-24

    In this paper, we report a magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) detection scheme without the presence of any external magnetic field. The proposed magnetic sensor uses a patterned groove structure within the sensor so that no external magnetic field is needed to magnetize the MNPs. An example is given based on a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensing device with a spin valve structure. For this structure, the detection of MNPs located inside the groove and near the free layer is demonstrated under no external magnetic field. Micromagnetic simulations are performed to calculate the signal to noise level of this detection scheme. A maximum signal to noise ratio (SNR) of 18.6 dB from one iron oxide magnetic nanoparticle with 8 nm radius is achieved. As proof of concept, this external-field-free GMR sensor with groove structure of 200 nm × 200 nm is fabricated using a photo and an electron beam integrated lithography process. Using this sensor, the feasibility demonstration of the detection SNR of 9.3 dB is achieved for 30 μl magnetic nanoparticles suspension (30 nm iron oxide particles, 1 mg/ml). This proposed external-field-free sensor structure is not limited to GMR devices and could be applicable to other magnetic biosensing devices.

  9. Gravimetric Measurement of Magnetic Field Gradient Spatial Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Arutunian, S G; Egiazarian, S L; Mailian, M R; Sinenko, I G; Sinjavski, A V; Vasiniuk, I E

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic interaction between a weighing sample and an external magnetic field allows to measure characteristics of magnetic field (a sample with known magnetic characteristics), as well as the magnetic properties of a sample (a known magnetic field). Measurement of materials magnetic permeability is a well known application of this method. In this paper we restrict ourselves to the measurement of magnetic field spatial distribution, which was achieved by scanning of samples from known materials along the vertical axis. Field measurements by Hall detector were done to calibrate obtained data. Such measurements are of great interest in some branches of physics, in particular, in accelerator physics, where the quality of magnetic system parts eventually determine the quality of accelerated bunches. Development of a simple and cheep device for measurement of magnetic field spatial distribution is an urgent problem. The developed system for gravimetric measurement of magnetic field gradients partially solves this ...

  10. Narrow band perfect absorber for maximum localized magnetic and electric field enhancement and sensing applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yong, Zhengdong; Gong, Chengsheng; He, Sailing

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonics offer an exciting way to mediate the interaction between light and matter, allowing strong field enhancement and confinement, large absorption and scattering at resonance. However, simultaneous realization of ultra-narrow band perfect absorption and electromagnetic field enhancement is challenging due to the intrinsic high optical losses and radiative damping in metals. Here, we propose an all-metal plasmonic absorber with an absorption bandwidth less than 8nm and polarization insensitive absorptivity exceeding 99%. Unlike traditional Metal-Dielectric-Metal configurations, we demonstrate that the narrowband perfect absorption and field enhancement are ascribed to the vertical gap plasmonic mode in the deep subwavelength scale, which has a high quality factor of 120 and mode volume of about 10^-4*({\\lambda}/n)^3 . Based on the coupled mode theory, we verify that the diluted field enhancement is proportional to the absorption, and thus perfect absorption is critical to maximum field enhancement. In a...

  11. Magnetic fields in ring galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, D; Silchenko, O; Sokoloff, D; Horellou, C; Beck, R

    2016-01-01

    Many galaxies contain magnetic fields supported by galactic dynamo action. However, nothing definitive is known about magnetic fields in ring galaxies. Here we investigate large-scale magnetic fields in a previously unexplored context, namely ring galaxies, and concentrate our efforts on the structures that appear most promising for galactic dynamo action, i.e. outer star-forming rings in visually unbarred galaxies. We use tested methods for modelling $\\alpha-\\Omega$ galactic dynamos, taking into account the available observational information concerning ionized interstellar matter in ring galaxies. Our main result is that dynamo drivers in ring galaxies are strong enough to excite large-scale magnetic fields in the ring galaxies studied. The variety of dynamo driven magnetic configurations in ring galaxies obtained in our modelling is much richer than that found in classical spiral galaxies. In particular, various long-lived transients are possible. An especially interesting case is that of NGC 4513 where th...

  12. Rotating superconductor magnet for producing rotating lobed magnetic field lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilal, Sadek K.; Sampson, William B.; Leonard, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a rotating superconductor magnet for producing a rotating lobed magnetic field, comprising a cryostat; a superconducting magnet in the cryostat having a collar for producing a lobed magnetic field having oppositely directed adjacent field lines; rotatable support means for selectively rotating the superconductor magnet; and means for energizing the superconductor magnet.

  13. New Methods of Low-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Application to Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    the 2012 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, May 2012, Melbourne Australia. 2. J P Stockman, C Z Cooley, M S Rosen, and L L...printed in- house (Fig. 1). Eight 30-turn receive-only coils (24 AWG, 4x12 cm and 4x14 cm loops) were tiled symmet- rically about the sagittal plane...was simulated on the middle slice of the fully sampled image using in- house code previously developed in our lab. The noise covariance matrix and coil

  14. Low Cost Magnetic Field Controller

    CERN Document Server

    Malafronte, Alexandre A

    2005-01-01

    The Physics Institute of the University of São Paulo (IFUSP) is building a continuous wave (cw) racetrack microtron. This machine has several dipole magnets, like the first and second stage recirculators, and a number of smaller ones in the transport line. These magnets must produce very stable magnetic fields to allow the beam to recirculate along very precise orbits and paths. Furthermore, the fields must be reproducible with great accuracy to allow an easier setup of the machine, though the effects of hysteresis tend to jeopardize the reproducibility. If the magnetic field is chosen by setting the current in the coils, temperature effects over the magnet and power supply tend to change the field. This work describes an inexpensive magnetic field controller that allows a direct measure of the magnetic field through an Hall probe. It includes a microcontroller running a feedback algorithm to control the power supply, in order to keep the field stable and reproducible. The controller can also execu...

  15. Application of Downhole Magnetic Field Measurements in the Identification of Petrological Variations in Basalts, Gabbros and Volcaniclastic Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartetzko, A.; Heike, D.

    2002-12-01

    Downhole magnetic field measurements are routinely carried out during many downhole-logging operations for spatial orientation of borehole wall images. The tools used for this purpose, like the Schlumberger General Purpose Inclinometer Tool (GPIT), were not specifically developed for geological interpretations but comparisons with measurements from precise magnetometers show very good correlations. However, systematic value shifts sometimes occur in some holes and this means that data from the GPIT should be used only qualitatively. We show examples from several holes drilled by the ODP demonstrating the potential of magnetic field logs for geologic and petrologic purposes. Variations in the magnetic field data are caused by different geologic processes in these examples. Injections of Fe-Ti-oxide rich gabbros into olivine gabbro of the lower oceanic crust drilled in ODP Holes 735B and 1105A (SW Indian Ridge) cause distinct signals in the magnetic field logs. The vertical resolution of the tool allows detection of thin layers (10 cm minimum thickness) with small anomalies in the magnetic field logs. Cyclicity in eruption processes at mid-ocean ridges can be revealed using the magnetic field logs. Slight petrologic differences between magmas from different eruptions and changes in the Earth?s magnetic field due to reversals, or secular variations in pauses between the eruptions cause characteristic patterns in the logs (e.g. ODP Holes 395A and 418A). Cooling and subsequent alteration processes cause the formation of different types of Fe- and/or Ti-oxide minerals. Typical examples of the formation of secondary magnetic minerals in subaerial lava flows are seen in ODP Hole 1137A (Kerguelen Plateau). Characteristic anomalies in the magnetic field log correlate well with total gamma ray measurement, which is an indicator for alteration in this type of rocks. Grain Size linked with crystallinity variations in basaltic volcaniclastic deposits and debris flows influence

  16. Magnetic materials fundamentals, products, properties, applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hilzinger, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    At a practical level, this compendium reviews the basics of soft and hard magnetic materials, discusses the advantages of the different processing routes for the exploitation of the magnetic properties and hence assists in proper, fail-safe and economic application of magnetic materials. Essential guidelines and formulas for the calculation of the magnetic and electrical properties, temperature and long-term stability of permanent magnets, of inductive components and magnetic shielding are compiled. Selected fields of application and case studies illustrate the large diversity of technical applications. Application engineers will appreciate the comprehensive compilation of the properties and detailed characteristic curves of modern soft and hard magnetic materials. Materials scientists will enjoy the presentation of the different processing routes and their impact on the magnetic properties and students will profit from the survey from the basics of magnetism down to the applications in inductive components, ...

  17. Resonant magnetic fields from inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Byrnes, Christian T; Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Urban, Federico R

    2012-01-01

    We propose a novel scenario to generate primordial magnetic fields during inflation induced by an oscillating coupling of the electromagnetic field to the inflaton. This resonant mechanism has two key advantages over previous proposals. First of all, it generates a narrow band of magnetic fields at any required wavelength, thereby allaying the usual problem of a strongly blue spectrum and its associated backreaction. Secondly, it avoids the need for a strong coupling as the coupling is oscillating rather than growing or decaying exponentially. Despite these major advantages, we find that the backreaction is still far too large during inflation if the generated magnetic fields are required to have a strength of ${\\cal O}(10^{-15}\\, \\Gauss)$ today on observationally interesting scales. We provide a more general no-go argument, proving that this problem will apply to any model in which the magnetic fields are generated on subhorizon scales and freeze after horizon crossing.

  18. Static magnetic fields enhance turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Pothérat, Alban

    2015-01-01

    More often than not, turbulence occurs under the influence of external fields, mostly rotation and magnetic fields generated either by planets, stellar objects or by an industrial environment. Their effect on the anisotropy and the dissipative behaviour of turbulence is recognised but complex, and it is still difficult to even tell whether they enhance or dampen turbulence. For example, externally imposed magnetic fields suppress free turbulence in electrically conducting fluids (Moffatt 1967), and make it two-dimensional (2D) (Sommeria & Moreau 1982); but their effect on the intensity of forced turbulence, as in pipes, convective flows or otherwise, is not clear. We shall prove that since two-dimensionalisation preferentially affects larger scales, these undergo much less dissipation and sustain intense turbulent fluctuations. When higher magnetic fields are imposed, quasi-2D structures retain more kinetic energy, so that rather than suppressing forced turbulence, external magnetic fields indirectly enha...

  19. High-temperature superconductors in high-field magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijers, Hubertus Wilhelmus

    2009-01-01

    The properties of both BSCCO conductors and YBCO coated conductors and coils are studied to assess their applicability in high-field magnets. First, the magnetic field dependence of the critical current density in these HTS conductors is measured at 4.2 K in magnetic field conditions ranging from s

  20. Compact low field magnetic resonance imaging magnet: Design and optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciandrone, M.; Placidi, G.; Testa, L.; Sotgiu, A.

    2000-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is performed with a very large instrument that allows the patient to be inserted into a region of uniform magnetic field. The field is generated either by an electromagnet (resistive or superconductive) or by a permanent magnet. Electromagnets are designed as air cored solenoids of cylindrical symmetry, with an inner bore of 80-100 cm in diameter. In clinical analysis of peripheral regions of the body (legs, arms, foot, knee, etc.) it would be better to adopt much less expensive magnets leaving the most expensive instruments to applications that require the insertion of the patient in the magnet (head, thorax, abdomen, etc.). These "dedicated" apparati could be smaller and based on resistive magnets that are manufactured and operated at very low cost, particularly if they utilize an iron yoke to reduce power requirements. In order to obtain good field uniformity without the use of a set of shimming coils, we propose both particular construction of a dedicated magnet, using four independently controlled pairs of coils, and an optimization-based strategy for computing, a posteriori, the optimal current values. The optimization phase could be viewed as a low-cost shimming procedure for obtaining the desired magnetic field configuration. Some experimental measurements, confirming the effectiveness of the proposed approach (construction and optimization), have also been reported. In particular, it has been shown that the adoption of the proposed optimization based strategy has allowed the achievement of good uniformity of the magnetic field in about one fourth of the magnet length and about one half of its bore. On the basis of the good experimental results, the dedicated magnet can be used for MRI of peripheral regions of the body and for animal experimentation at very low cost.

  1. Magnetic Fluids: Biomedical Applications and Magnetic Fractionation

    OpenAIRE

    Rheinländer, Thomas; Kötitz, Róman; Weitschies, Werner; Semmler, Wolfhard

    2000-01-01

    In addition to engineering applications, magnetic fluids containing magnetic nanoparticles are being increasingly applied to biomedical purposes. Besides the well established use of magnetic particles for biological separation or as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic particles are also being tested for the inductive heat treatment of tumors or as markers for the quantification of biologically active substances. The properties of magnetic nanoparticles usually exhibit a b...

  2. Origin of cosmic magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, M. J.

    2006-06-01

    The first significant cosmic fields, and the seed field for galactic dynamos probably developed after the formation of the first non-linear structures. The history of star formation and the intergalactic medium is controlled, at least in part, by how and when galaxies and their precursors acquired their fields. The amplification of fields behind shocks, and the diffusivity of the magnetic flux, are crucial to the interpretation of radio sources, gamma ray burst afterglows, and other energetic cosmic phenomena. The build-up of magnetic fields is an important aspect of the overall cosmogonic process.

  3. Magnetic field homogeneity perturbations in finite Halbach dipole magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turek, Krzysztof; Liszkowski, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Halbach hollow cylinder dipole magnets of a low or relatively low aspect ratio attract considerable attention due to their applications, among others, in compact NMR and MRI systems for investigating small objects. However, a complete mathematical framework for the analysis of magnetic fields in these magnets has been developed only for their infinitely long precursors. In such a case the analysis is reduced to two-dimensions (2D). The paper details the analysis of the 3D magnetic field in the Halbach dipole cylinders of a finite length. The analysis is based on three equations in which the components of the magnetic flux density Bx, By and Bz are expanded to infinite power series of the radial coordinate r. The zeroth term in the series corresponds to a homogeneous magnetic field Bc, which is perturbed by the higher order terms due to a finite magnet length. This set of equations is supplemented with an equation for the field profile B(z) along the magnet axis, presented for the first time. It is demonstrated that the geometrical factors in the coefficients of particular powers of r, defined by intricate integrals are the coefficients of the Taylor expansion of the homogeneity profile (B(z)-Bc)/Bc. As a consequence, the components of B can be easily calculated with an arbitrary accuracy. In order to describe perturbations of the field due to segmentation, two additional equations are borrowed from the 2D theory. It is shown that the 2D approach to the perturbations generated by the segmentation can be applied to the 3D Halbach structures unless r is not too close to the inner radius of the cylinder ri. The mathematical framework presented in the paper was verified with great precision by computations of B by a highly accurate integration of the magnetostatic Coulomb law and utilized to analyze the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field in the magnet with the accuracy better than 1 ppm.

  4. A gamma- and X-ray detector for cryogenic, high magnetic field applications

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, R L; Bales, M J; Bass, C D; Beise, E J; Breuer, H; Byrne, J; Chupp, T E; Coakley, K J; Dewey, M S; Fu, C; Gentile, T R; Mumm, H P; Nico, J S; O'Neill, B; Pulliam, K; Thompson, A K; Wietfeldt, F E

    2012-01-01

    As part of an experiment to measure the spectrum of photons emitted in beta-decay of the free neutron, we developed and operated a detector consisting of 12 bismuth germanate (BGO) crystals coupled to avalanche photodiodes (APDs). The detector was operated near liquid nitrogen temperature in the bore of a superconducting magnet and registered photons with energies from 5 keV to 1000 keV. To enlarge the detection range, we also directly detected soft X-rays with energies between 0.2 keV and 20 keV with three large area APDs. The construction and operation of the detector is presented, as well as information on operation of APDs at cryogenic temperatures.

  5. Detection of the change of a magnetic field in the environment by magnetic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyatkov, D.; Yurchenko, A.; Yurchenko, V.

    2017-08-01

    The experimental results of the magnetic field sensor based on various materials are presented. In article the possibility of use of magnetic fluid as a sensitive element of the magnetic field sensor is considered. The importance of current tasks deals with the search of the perspective magnetic substances susceptible to weak magnetic field. The operation principle of the sensor is based on change in the capacity of the condenser with magnetic active medium caused by the magnetic field. The complex organization of magnetic particles into chain aggregates was considered. The principle of measuring the condenser capacity is described. The experimental results are promising for future application.

  6. Magnetic nanomaterials undamentals, synthesis and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Sellmyer, David J

    2017-01-01

    Timely and comprehensive, this book presents recent advances in magnetic nanomaterials research, covering the latest developments, including the design and preparation of magnetic nanoparticles, their physical and chemical properties as well as their applications in different fields, including biomedicine, magnetic energy storage, wave–absorbing and water remediation. By allowing researchers to get to the forefront developments related to magnetic nanomaterials in various disciplines, this is invaluable reading for the nano, magnetic, energy, medical, and environmental communities.

  7. Measuring Earth's Magnetic Field Simply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Gay B.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a method for measuring the earth's magnetic field using an empty toilet paper tube, copper wire, clear tape, a battery, a linear variable resistor, a small compass, cardboard, a protractor, and an ammeter. (WRM)

  8. ISR split-field magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    The experimental apparatus used at intersection 4 around the Split-Field Magnet by the CERN-Bologna Collaboration (experiment R406). The plastic scintillator telescopes are used for precise pulse-height and time-of-flight measurements.

  9. What Are Electric and Magnetic Fields? (EMF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... take for granted. What are electric and magnetic fields? Electric and magnetic fields (EMF) are invisible lines of ... humans. AC electric power produces electric and magnetic fields that create weak electric currents in humans. Being exposed to some kinds ...

  10. The Juno Magnetic Field Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Benn, M.; Bjarno, J. B.; Denver, T.; Espley, J.; Jorgensen, J. L.; Jorgensen, P. S.; Lawton, P.; Malinnikova, A.; Merayo, J. M.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Schnurr, R.; Sheppard, D.; Smith, E. J.

    2017-02-01

    The Juno Magnetic Field investigation (MAG) characterizes Jupiter's planetary magnetic field and magnetosphere, providing the first globally distributed and proximate measurements of the magnetic field of Jupiter. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent magnetometer sensor suites, each consisting of a tri-axial Fluxgate Magnetometer (FGM) sensor and a pair of co-located imaging sensors mounted on an ultra-stable optical bench. The imaging system sensors are part of a subsystem that provides accurate attitude information (to ˜20 arcsec on a spinning spacecraft) near the point of measurement of the magnetic field. The two sensor suites are accommodated at 10 and 12 m from the body of the spacecraft on a 4 m long magnetometer boom affixed to the outer end of one of 's three solar array assemblies. The magnetometer sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics boards within the magnetometer electronics package mounted inside Juno's massive radiation shielded vault. The imaging sensors are controlled by a fully hardware redundant electronics package also mounted within the radiation vault. Each magnetometer sensor measures the vector magnetic field with 100 ppm absolute vector accuracy over a wide dynamic range (to 16 Gauss = 1.6 × 106 nT per axis) with a resolution of ˜0.05 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range (±1600 nT per axis). Both magnetometers sample the magnetic field simultaneously at an intrinsic sample rate of 64 vector samples per second. The magnetic field instrumentation may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. The attitude determination system compares images with an on-board star catalog to provide attitude solutions (quaternions) at a rate of up to 4 solutions per second, and may be configured to acquire images of selected targets for science and engineering analysis. The system tracks and catalogs objects that pass through the imager field of

  11. The Juno Magnetic Field Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Benna, M.; Bjarno, J. B.; Denver, T.; Espley, J.; Jorgensen, J. L.; Jorgensen, P. S.; Lawton, P.; Malinnikova, A.; Merayo, J. M.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The Juno Magnetic Field investigation (MAG) characterizes Jupiter's planetary magnetic field and magnetosphere, providing the first globally distributed and proximate measurements of the magnetic field of Jupiter. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent magnetometer sensor suites, each consisting of a tri-axial Fluxgate Magnetometer (FGM) sensor and a pair of co-located imaging sensors mounted on an ultra-stable optical bench. The imaging system sensors are part of a subsystem that provides accurate attitude information (to approx. 20 arcsec on a spinning spacecraft) near the point of measurement of the magnetic field. The two sensor suites are accommodated at 10 and 12 m from the body of the spacecraft on a 4 m long magnetometer boom affixed to the outer end of one of 's three solar array assemblies. The magnetometer sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics boards within the magnetometer electronics package mounted inside Juno's massive radiation shielded vault. The imaging sensors are controlled by a fully hardware redundant electronics package also mounted within the radiation vault. Each magnetometer sensor measures the vector magnetic field with 100 ppm absolute vector accuracy over a wide dynamic range (to 16 Gauss = 1.6 x 10(exp. 6) nT per axis) with a resolution of approx. 0.05 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range (+/-1600 nT per axis). Both magnetometers sample the magnetic field simultaneously at an intrinsic sample rate of 64 vector samples per second. The magnetic field instrumentation may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. The attitude determination system compares images with an on-board star catalog to provide attitude solutions (quaternions) at a rate of up to 4 solutions per second, and may be configured to acquire images of selected targets for science and engineering analysis. The system tracks and catalogs objects that pass through

  12. Magnetic-Field Hazards Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    produced during pulsed- magnetic-field therapy for non-union of the tibia." Med. Biol. Eng. Comput., Vol. 20, pp. 501-511 (1982). 32. Miller, D. A...Phenum Publishing Co. (1983). 40. Topper, R. F., "Electromagnetic shielding feasibility study," ASD -TDR-63-194 (Armour Research Foundation, Chicago...mammalian cells by strong magnetic fields (1976). 93. Malins, D. C., and Collier, T. K., "Xenobiotic interactions in aquatic organisms-effects on

  13. First-order antiferro-ferromagnetic transition in Fe(49)(Rh(0.93)Pd(0.07))(51) under simultaneous application of magnetic field and external pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Pallavi; Bag, Pallab; Rawat, R; Chaddah, P

    2012-03-07

    A magnetic field-pressure-temperature (H-P-T) phase diagram for first-order antiferromagnetic (AFM) to ferromagnetic (FM) transitions in Fe(49)(Rh(0.93)Pd(0.07))(51) has been constructed using resistivity measurements under simultaneous application of magnetic field (up to 8 T) and pressure (up to 20 kbar). The temperature dependence of resistivity (ρ-T) shows that the width of the transition and the extent of hysteresis decreases with pressure and increases with magnetic field. By exploiting opposing trends of dT(N)/dP and dT(N)/dH (where T(N) is the first-order transition temperature), the relative effects of temperature, magnetic field and pressure on disorder-broadened first-order transitions has been studied. For this, a set of H and P values are chosen for which T(N)(H(1),P(1)) = T(N)(H(2),P(2)). Measurements for such combinations of H and P show that the temperature dependence of resistivity is similar, i.e. the broadening (in temperature) of transition as well as the extent of hysteresis remains independent of H and P. Isothermal magnetoresistance measurements under various constant pressures show that even though the critical field required for AFM-FM transition depends on applied pressure, the extent of hysteresis as well as transition width (in magnetic field) remains constant with varying pressure.

  14. Critical Magnetic Field Determination of Superconducting Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canabal, A.; Tajima, T.; /Los Alamos; Dolgashev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC; Yamamoto, T.; /Tsukuba, Natl. Res. Lab. Metrol.

    2011-11-04

    Superconducting RF technology is becoming more and more important. With some recent cavity test results showing close to or even higher than the critical magnetic field of 170-180 mT that had been considered a limit, it is very important to develop a way to correctly measure the critical magnetic field (H{sup RF}{sub c}) of superconductors in the RF regime. Using a 11.4 GHz, 50-MW, <1 {mu}s, pulsed power source and a TE013-like mode copper cavity, we have been measuring critical magnetic fields of superconductors for accelerator cavity applications. This device can eliminate both thermal and field emission effects due to a short pulse and no electric field at the sample surface. A model of the system is presented in this paper along with a discussion of preliminary experimental data.

  15. Split-Field Magnet facility upgraded

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The Split Field Magnet (SFM) was the largest spectrometer for particles from beam-beam collisions in the ISR. It could determine particle momenta in a large solid angle, but was designed mainly for the analysis of forward travelling particles.As the magnet was working on the ISR circulating beams, its magnetic field had to be such as to restore the correct proton orbit.The SFM, therefore, produced zero field at the crossing point and fields of opposite signs upstream and downstream of it and was completed by 2 large and 2 small compensator magnets. The gradient effects were corrected by magnetic channels equipped with movable flaps. The useful magnetic field volume was 28 m3, the induction in the median plane 1.14 T, the gap heigth 1.1 m, the length 10.5 m, the weight about 1000 ton. Concerning the detectors, the SFM was the first massive application of multiwire proportional chambers (about 70000 wires) which filled the main and the large compensator magnets. In 1976 an improved programme was started with tw...

  16. Mechanical Enhancement of Sensitivity in Natural Rubber Using Electrolytic Polymerization Aided by a Magnetic Field and MCF for Application in Haptic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunio Shimada

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sensors are essential to the fulfillment of every condition of haptic technology, and they need simultaneously to sense shear stress as well as normal force, and temperature. They also must have a strong and simple structure, softness, and large extension. To achieve these conditions simultaneously, we enhanced the sensitivity of sensors utilizing natural rubber (NR-latex through the application of electrolytic polymerization focused on the isoprene C=C bonds in natural rubbers such as NR-latex, and then applied a magnetic field and magnetic compound fluid (MCF as magnetically responsive fluid. When an electric field alone was used in the rubber, the effect of electrolytic polymerization was very small compared to the effect in well-known conductive polymer solution such as plastic. The MCF developed by Shimada in 2001 involved magnetite and metal particles, and acts as a filler in NR-latex. By utilizing the magnetic, electric fields and the MCF, we aligned the electrolytically polymerized C=C along the magnetic field line with the magnetic clusters formed by the aggregation of magnetite and metal particles so as to enhance the effect of electrolytic polymerization. We then demonstrated the effectiveness of the new method of rubber vulcanization on the sensitivity of the rubber by experimentally investigating its electric and dynamic characteristics.

  17. Mechanical Enhancement of Sensitivity in Natural Rubber Using Electrolytic Polymerization Aided by a Magnetic Field and MCF for Application in Haptic Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Kunio; Saga, Norihiko

    2016-09-18

    Sensors are essential to the fulfillment of every condition of haptic technology, and they need simultaneously to sense shear stress as well as normal force, and temperature. They also must have a strong and simple structure, softness, and large extension. To achieve these conditions simultaneously, we enhanced the sensitivity of sensors utilizing natural rubber (NR)-latex through the application of electrolytic polymerization focused on the isoprene C=C bonds in natural rubbers such as NR-latex, and then applied a magnetic field and magnetic compound fluid (MCF) as magnetically responsive fluid. When an electric field alone was used in the rubber, the effect of electrolytic polymerization was very small compared to the effect in well-known conductive polymer solution such as plastic. The MCF developed by Shimada in 2001 involved magnetite and metal particles, and acts as a filler in NR-latex. By utilizing the magnetic, electric fields and the MCF, we aligned the electrolytically polymerized C=C along the magnetic field line with the magnetic clusters formed by the aggregation of magnetite and metal particles so as to enhance the effect of electrolytic polymerization. We then demonstrated the effectiveness of the new method of rubber vulcanization on the sensitivity of the rubber by experimentally investigating its electric and dynamic characteristics.

  18. Magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Rainer

    2015-12-01

    Radio synchrotron emission, its polarization and Faraday rotation of the polarization angle are powerful tools to study the strength and structure of magnetic fields in galaxies. Unpolarized synchrotron emission traces isotropic turbulent fields which are strongest in spiral arms and bars (20-30 \\upmu G) and in central starburst regions (50-100 \\upmu G). Such fields are dynamically important; they affect gas flows and drive gas inflows in central regions. Polarized emission traces ordered fields, which can be regular or anisotropic turbulent, where the latter originates from isotropic turbulent fields by the action of compression or shear. The strongest ordered fields (10-15 \\upmu G) are generally found in interarm regions. In galaxies with strong density waves, ordered fields are also observed at the inner edges of spiral arms. Ordered fields with spiral patterns exist in grand-design, barred and flocculent galaxies and in central regions. Ordered fields in interacting galaxies have asymmetric distributions and are a tracer of past interactions between galaxies or with the intergalactic medium.—Faraday rotation measures of the diffuse polarized radio emission from galaxy disks reveal large-scale spiral patterns that can be described by the superposition of azimuthal modes; these are signatures of regular fields generated by mean-field dynamos. "Magnetic arms" between gaseous spiral arms may also be products of dynamo action, but need a stable spiral pattern to develop. Helically twisted field loops winding around spiral arms were found in two galaxies so far. Large-scale field reversals, like the one found in the Milky Way, could not yet be detected in external galaxies. In radio halos around edge-on galaxies, ordered magnetic fields with X-shaped patterns are observed. The origin and evolution of cosmic magnetic fields, in particular their first occurrence in young galaxies and their dynamical importance during galaxy evolution, will be studied with

  19. Nanometric alternating magnetic field generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejo, A P; Tejo, F; Vidal-Silva, N; Escrig, J

    2017-07-05

    In this work we introduce an alternating magnetic field generator in a cylindrical nanostructure. This field appears due to the rotation of a magnetic domain wall located at some position, generating a magnetic region that varies its direction of magnetization alternately, thus inducing an alternating magnetic flux in its vicinity. This phenomenon occurs due to the competition between a spin-polarized current and a magnetic field, which allows to control both the angular velocity and the pinning position of the domain wall. As proof of concept, we study the particular case of a diameter-modulated nanowire with a spin-polarized current along its axis and the demagnetizing field produced by its modulation. This inhomogeneous field allows one to control the angular velocity of the domain wall as a function of its position along the nanowire allowing frequencies in the GHz range to be achieved. This generator could be used in telecommunications for devices in the range of radiofrequencies or, following Faraday's induction law, could also induce an electromotive force and be used as a movable alternate voltage source in future nanodevices.

  20. Magnetic Biotransport: Analysis and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward P. Furlani

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic particles are finding increasing use in bioapplications, especially as carrier particles to transport biomaterials such as proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids and whole cells etc. Magnetic particles can be prepared with biofunctional coatings to target and label a specific biomaterial, and they enable controlled manipulation of a labeled biomaterial using an external magnetic field. In this review, we discuss the use of magnetic nanoparticles as transport agents in various bioapplications. We provide an overview of the properties of magnetic nanoparticles and their functionalization for bioapplications. We discuss the basic physics and equations governing the transport of magnetic particles at the micro- and nanoscale. We present two different transport models: a classical Newtonian model for predicting the motion of individual particles, and a drift-diffusion model for predicting the behavior of a concentration of nanoparticles that takes into account Brownian motion. We review specific magnetic biotransport applications including bioseparation, drug delivery and magnetofection. We demonstrate the transport models via application to these processes.

  1. Magnetic Field Generation in Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrario, Lilia; Zrake, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Enormous progress has been made on observing stellar magnetism in stars from the main sequence through to compact objects. Recent data have thrown into sharper relief the vexed question of the origin of stellar magnetic fields, which remains one of the main unanswered questions in astrophysics. In this chapter we review recent work in this area of research. In particular, we look at the fossil field hypothesis which links magnetism in compact stars to magnetism in main sequence and pre-main sequence stars and we consider why its feasibility has now been questioned particularly in the context of highly magnetic white dwarfs. We also review the fossil versus dynamo debate in the context of neutron stars and the roles played by key physical processes such as buoyancy, helicity, and superfluid turbulence,in the generation and stability of neutron star fields. Independent information on the internal magnetic field of neutron stars will come from future gravitational wave detections. Thus we maybe at the dawn of a ...

  2. Large D-2 theory of superconducting fluctuations in a magnetic field and its application to iron pnictides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, James M; Tesanović, Zlatko

    2010-07-16

    A Ginzburg-Landau approach to fluctuations of a layered superconductor in a magnetic field is used to show that the interlayer coupling can be incorporated within an interacting self-consistent theory of a single layer, in the limit of a large number of neighboring layers. The theory exhibits two phase transitions-a vortex liquid-to-solid transition is followed by a Bose-Einstein condensation into the Abrikosov lattice-illustrating the essential role of interlayer coupling. By using this theory, explicit expressions for magnetization, specific heat, and fluctuation conductivity are derived. We compare our results with recent experimental data on the iron-pnictide superconductors.

  3. Magnetic Fields in Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Radio synchrotron emission is a powerful tool to study the strength and structure of magnetic fields in galaxies. Unpolarized synchrotron emission traces isotropic turbulent fields which are strongest in spiral arms and bars (20-30\\mu G) and in central starburst regions (50-100\\mu G). Such fields are dynamically important; they affect gas flows and drive gas inflows in central regions. Polarized emission traces ordered fields, which can be regular or anisotropic turbulent, where the latter originates from isotropic turbulent fields by the action of compression or shear. The strongest ordered fields (10-15\\mu G) are generally found in interarm regions. In galaxies with strong density waves, ordered fields are also observed at the inner edges of spiral arms. Ordered fields with spiral patterns exist in grand-design, barred and flocculent galaxies, and in central regions. Ordered fields in interacting galaxies have asymmetric distributions and are a tracer of past interactions between galaxies or with the interg...

  4. Magnetic field of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Aleksey

    2013-04-01

    The magnetic field of the Earth has global meaning for a life on the Earth. The world geophysical science explains: - occurrence of a magnetic field of the Earth it is transformation of kinetic energy of movements of the fused iron in the liquid core of Earth - into the magnetic energy; - the warming up of a kernel of the Earth occurs due to radioactive disintegration of elements, with excretion of thermal energy. The world science does not define the reasons: - drift of a magnetic dipole on 0,2 a year to the West; - drift of lithospheric slabs and continents. The author offers: an alternative variant existing in a world science the theories "Geodynamo" - it is the theory « the Magnetic field of the Earth », created on the basis of physical laws. Education of a magnetic field of the Earth occurs at moving the electric charge located in a liquid kernel, at rotation of the Earth. At calculation of a magnetic field is used law the Bio Savara for a ring electric current: dB = . Magnetic induction in a kernel of the Earth: B = 2,58 Gs. According to the law of electromagnetic induction the Faradey, rotation of a iron kernel of the Earth in magnetic field causes occurrence of an electric field Emf which moves electrons from the center of a kernel towards the mantle. So of arise the radial electric currents. The magnetic field amplifies the iron of mantle and a kernel of the Earth. As a result of action of a radial electric field the electrons will flow from the center of a kernel in a layer of an electric charge. The central part of a kernel represents the field with a positive electric charge, which creates inverse magnetic field Binv and Emfinv When ?mfinv = ?mf ; ?inv = B, there will be an inversion a magnetic field of the Earth. It is a fact: drift of a magnetic dipole of the Earth in the western direction approximately 0,2 longitude, into a year. Radial electric currents a actions with the basic magnetic field of a Earth - it turn a kernel. It coincides with laws

  5. High field superconducting magnet: Science, Technology and Applications%高场超导磁体科学技术与应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秋良

    2013-01-01

    科学技术的发展对于磁场强度质量的要求越来越高,极端强磁场条件是人类追求的永远的科学目标,它孕育着许多重大的科学发现和新技术的产生,对人类的科学和技术以及生活产生重大的影响.以磁体为核心与电力电子器件以及相关的软件等结合可以构成各种各样科学仪器和装置,广泛应用在科学研究和工业特种装备中.磁技术对于人类的科学与技术进步起到越来越重要的作用,尤其是极高磁场所带来的诸多优点,使得人类对于物质世界认识不断加深,对于生命的起源以及从事疾病的防治的研究有特别重要的意义.本文介绍磁体基本原理、磁场产生的方法与应用以及相关的发展.%Development of superconducting magnet science and technology requires a magnetic field with high strength and good quality.The pursuit of extremely high magnetic field is an eternal scientific goal forscientists and engineers.It is an exciting cutting-edge technology with full of challenges and has been essential for many significant discoveries in science and technology.Combined with power-electronic devices and related software,a whole magnet system can be built up as the key component of various types of scientific instruments and other equipment,and can be fund widespread applications in scientific research and industry.Magnet technology is currently playing a more and more important role in scientific and technological progress.Ultra-high magnetic fields help to give us much deeper understanding of the world of matter and have special significance for research into the origins of life and disease prevention.In this review article,basic magnet principles,methods of generating magnetic fields,magnetic field applications,and numerical methods for the design of magnet structures are briefly introduced and reviewed.

  6. Magnetic field processing of inorganic polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunerth, D.C.; Peterson, E.S. [Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this project is to investigate, understand, and demonstrate the use of magnetic field processing (MFP) to modify the properties of inorganic-based polymers and to develop the basic technical knowledge required for industrial implementation. Polyphosphazene membranes for chemical separation applications are being emphasized by this project. Previous work demonstrated that magnetic fields, appropriately applied during processing, can be used to beneficially modify membrane morphology. MFP membranes have significantly increased flux capabilities while maintaining the same chemical selectivity as the unprocessed membranes.

  7. Magnetic fields of neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Reisenegger, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Neutron stars contain the strongest magnetic fields known in the Universe. In this paper, I discuss briefly how these magnetic fields are inferred from observations, as well as the evidence for their time-evolution. I show how these extremely strong fields are actually weak in terms of their effects on the stellar structure, as is also the case for magnetic stars on the upper main sequence and magnetic white dwarfs, which have similar total magnetic fluxes. I propose a scenario in which a stable hydromagnetic equilibrium (containing a poloidal and a toroidal field component) is established soon after the birth of the neutron star, aided by the strong compositional stratification of neutron star matter, and this state is slowly eroded by non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic processes such as beta decays and ambipolar diffusion in the core of the star and Hall drift and breaking of the solid in its crust. Over sufficiently long time scales, the fluid in the neutron star core will behave as if it were barotropic, becau...

  8. Magnetic fields during galaxy mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Rodenbeck, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Galaxy mergers are expected to play a central role for the evolution of galaxies, and may have a strong impact on their magnetic fields. We present the first grid-based 3D magneto-hydrodynamical simulations investigating the evolution of magnetic fields during merger events. For this purpose, we employ a simplified model considering the merger event of magnetized gaseous disks in the absence of stellar feedback and without a stellar or dark matter component. We show that our model naturally leads to the production of two peaks in the evolution of the average magnetic field strength within 5 kpc, within 25 kpc and on scales in between 5 and 25 kpc. The latter is consistent with the peak in the magnetic field strength reported by Drzazga et al. (2011) in a merger sequence of observed galaxies. We show that the peak on the galactic scale and in the outer regions is likely due to geometrical effects, as the core of one galaxy enters the outskirts of the other one. In addition, there is a physical enhancement of t...

  9. The nucleon in a periodic magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Agadjanov, Andria; Rusetsky, Akaki

    2016-01-01

    The energy shift of a nucleon in a static periodic magnetic field is evaluated at second order in the external field strength in perturbation theory. It is shown that the measurement of this energy shift on the lattice allows one to determine the unknown subtraction function in the forward doubly-virtual Compton scattering amplitude. The limits of applicability of the obtained formula for the energy shift are discussed.

  10. Cell death induced by application of time-varying magnetic fields on nanoparticle-loaded dendritic cells

    CERN Document Server

    Marcos-Campos, I; Torres, T E; Marquina, C; Tres, A; Ibarra, M R; Goya, G F

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To assess the capability of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) to take Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), keeping their viability. To provoke cell death on these MNPs-loaded DCs using an external alternating magnetic field (AMF). Material & methods: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from normal blood and platelets removed by centrifugation. Immunoselected CD14+ cells were cultured for 5 days, and the resulting cell phenotype was determined against several markers using flow cytometry. Co-cultures of DCs and MNPs were done overnight. The amount of Fe3O4 nanoparticles incorporated by DCs was quantified by magnetization measurements. MNPs-loaded DCs were exposed to AMF for 30 min and then cell viability was measured using trypan blue and FACS (annexin-propidium iodide) protocols. Morphological changes were investigated using scanning electron microscopy. Results: No significant decrease in cell viability of MNP/loaded DCs was observed up to five days, as compared against control sam...

  11. Zero magnetic field type magnetic field sensor. Reijikaigata jikai sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonoda, T.; Ueda, R. (Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1990-11-20

    It is shown in this paper that a new type of sensor with excellent characteristics can be made by demagnetizing the sensor core toward a zero field state and then detecting an unknown field to be detected by the demagnetizing current. The core operates equivalently in a zero magnetic field so that the detection sensitivity is determined by the coil constant including the number of turns of the solenoid for demagnetization required to offset the field to be detected. Therefore the detection sensitivity does not depend on its configuration and magnetization characteristics and does not depend on the temperature. It is thereby considered that these characteristics can largely reduce such problems at present as the aging deterioration of magnetic materials or the quality control accompanied by manufacturing. In addition, the following points have been clarified: (1) The upper limit of the detectable range does not exist in principle. (2) The accuracy of the detection is 0.02% to the full scale 20kA/m. (3) The magnetization property required to the core used as a sensor is that it has a rectangular B-H loop which is as sharp as possible. 14 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Compensation of Gradient-Induced Magnetic Field Perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Terence W.; McIntyre, Scott; Rothman, Douglas L.; de Graaf, Robin A.

    2008-01-01

    Pulsed magnetic field gradients are essential for MR imaging and localized spectroscopy applications. However, besides the desired linear field gradients, pulsed currents in a strong external magnetic field also generate unwanted effects like eddy currents, gradient coil vibrations and acoustic noise. While the temporal magnetic field perturbations associated with eddy currents lead to spectral line shape distortions and signal loss, the vibration-related modulations lead to anti-symmetrical sidebands of any large signal (i.e. water), thereby obliterating the signals from smaller signals (i.e. metabolites). Here the measurement, characterization and compensation of vibrations-related magnetic field perturbations is presented. Following a quantitative evaluation of the various temporal components of the main magnetic field, a digital B0 magnetic field waveform is generated which reduces all temporal variations of the main magnetic field to within the spectral noise level. PMID:18329304

  13. Magnetic nanoparticles for application in cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivas, J. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Banobre-Lopez, M. [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pineiro-Redondo, Y. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Rivas, B., E-mail: jose.rivas@usc.es [Department of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Lopez-Quintela, M.A. [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    Magnetic particles play nowadays an important role in different technological areas with potential applications in fields such as electronics, energy and biomedicine. In this report we will focus on the hyperthermia properties of magnetite nanoparticles and the effect of several chemical/physical parameters on their heating properties. We will discuss about the need of searching new smaller magnetic systems in order to fulfill the required physical properties which allow treating tumoral tissues more efficiently by means of magnetically induced heat. Preliminary results will be shown about the effect of a biocompatible shell of core-shell magnetite NPs on the heating properties by application of a RF magnetic field.

  14. Primordial Magnetic Fields and Causality

    CERN Document Server

    Durrer, R; Durrer, Ruth; Caprini, Chiara

    2003-01-01

    In this letter we discuss the implications of causality on a primordial magnetic field. We show that the residual field on large scales is much stronger suppressed than usually assumed and that a helical component is even suppressed even more than the parity even part. We show that due to this strong suppression, even maximal primordial fields generated at the electroweak phase transition can just marginally seed the fields in galaxies and clusters, but they cannot leave any detectable imprint on the cosmic microwave background.

  15. Split Field magnet at the I4 ISR intersection

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The Split-Field Magnet (SFM) at I4 had an unconventional topology, consisting of two dipole magnets of opposite polarity. It formed the heart of the first general facility at the ISR. It had a useful magnetic field volume of 28 m3 and a field in the median plane of 1.14 T. With a gap height of 1.1 m and length of 10.5 m, the magnet weighed about 1000 t. The SFM spectrometer featured the first large-scale application of MWPCs (about 70,000 wires), which filled the main magnet, visible here in 1974, and the two large compensator magnets.

  16. Direct Generation of Intense Compression Waves in Molten Metals by Using a High Static Magnetic Field and Their Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Compression waves propagating through molten metals are contributed to degassing, accelerating reaction rate,removing exclusions from molten metals and refining solidification structures during metallurgical processing of ma-terials. In the present study, two electromagnetic methods are proposed to generate intense compression wavesdirectly in liquid metals. One is the simultaneous imposition of a high frequency electrical current field and a staticmagnetic field; the other is that of a high frequency magnetic field and a static magnetic field. A mathematical modelbased on compressible fluid dynamics and electromagnetic fields theory has been developed to derive pressure distri-butions of the generated waves in a metal. It shows that the intensity of compression waves is proportional to thatof the high frequency electromagnetic force. And the frequency is the same as that of the imposed electromagneticforce. On the basis of theoretical analyses, pressure change in liquid gallium was examined by a pressure transducerunder various conditions. The observed results approximately agreed with the predictions derived from the theoreticalanalyses and calculations. Moreover, the effect of the generated waves on improvement of solidification structureswas also examined. It shows that the generated compression waves can refine solidification structures when they wereapplied to solidification process of Sn-Pb alloy. This study indicates a new method to generate compression wavesby imposing high frequency electromagnetic force locally on molten metals and this kind of compression waves canprobably overcome the difficulties when waves are excited by mechanical vibration in high temperature environments.

  17. Magnetic fields around black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, David A. G.

    Active Galactic Nuclei are the most powerful long-lived objects in the universe. They are thought to harbor supermassive black holes that range from 1 million solar masses to 1000 times that value and possibly greater. Theory and observation are converging on a model for these objects that involves the conversion of gravitational potential energy of accreting gas to radiation as well as Poynting flux produced by the interaction of the rotating spacetime and the electromagnetic fields originating in the ionized accretion flow. The presence of black holes in astrophysics is taking center stage, with the output from AGN in various forms such as winds and jets influencing the formation and evolution of the host galaxy. This dissertation addresses some of the basic unanswered questions that plague our current understanding of how rotating black holes interact with their surrounding magnetized accretion disks to produce the enormous observed energy. Two magnetic configurations are examined. The first involves magnetic fields connecting the black hole with the inner accretion disk and the other involves large scale magnetic fields threading the disk and the hole. We study the effects of the former type by establishing the consequences that magnetic torques between the black hole and the inner accretion disk have on the energy dissipation profile. We attempt a plausible explanation to the observed "Deep Minimum" state in the Seyfert galaxy MCG-6- 30-15. For the latter type of magnetic geometry, we study the effects of the strength of the magnetic field threading the black hole within the context of the cherished Blandford & Znajek mechanism for black hole spin energy extraction. We begin by addressing the problem in the non-relativistic regime where we find that the black hole-threading magnetic field is stronger for greater disk thickness, larger magnetic Prandtl number, and for a larger accretion disk. We then study the problem in full relativity where we show that our

  18. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridjonsson, E. O.; Creber, S. A.; Vrouwenvelder, J. S.; Johns, M. L.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth's magnetic field system.

  19. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Fridjonsson, Einar Orn

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth\\'s magnetic field system.

  20. Modern magnetic materials principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    O'Handley, Robert C

    2000-01-01

    A truly modern treatment of materials that can hold a magnetic field. Covers cutting-edge materials with many important technical applications. Includes examples and problems along with computer solutions.

  1. Tailoring the properties of a magnetic tunnel junction to be used as a magnetic field sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Hugo; Persson, Anders

    2011-01-01

    A magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) can be used as an effective magnetic field sensor thank to its high magnetoresistance ratio. To be used as a magnetic field sensor in different applications, the possibility of tuning the performance of the MTJ is important. Different means of tuning, such as voltage and magnetic field biasing, can be used. In this work, an external magnetic field from a permanent magnet was used to bias the sensing layer of a MTJ along its hard axis, and the effect of the bia...

  2. Chiral transition with magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ayala, Alejandro; Mizher, Ana Julia; Rojas, Juan Cristobal; Villavicencio, Cristian

    2014-01-01

    We study the nature of the chiral transition for an effective theory with spontaneous breaking of symmetry, where charged bosons and fermions are subject to the effects of a constant external magnetic field. The problem is studied in terms of the relative intensity of the magnetic field with respect to the mass and the temperature. When the former is the smallest of the scales, we present a suitable method to obtain magnetic and thermal corrections up to ring order at high temperature. By these means, we solve the problem of the instability in the boson sector for these theories, where the squared masses, taken as functions of the order parameter, can vanish and even become negative. The solution is found by considering the screening properties of the plasma, encoded in the resummation of the ring diagrams at high temperature. We also study the case where the magnetic field is the intermediate of the three scales and explore the nature of the chiral transition as we vary the field strength, the coupling const...

  3. Magnetic Fields of Neutron Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sushan Konar

    2017-09-01

    This article briefly reviews our current understanding of the evolution of magnetic fields in neutron stars, which basically defines the evolutionary pathways between different observational classes of neutron stars. The emphasis here is on the evolution in binary systems and the newly emergent classes of millisecond pulsars.

  4. Superconductivity basics and applications to magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, R G

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the basics and applications of superconducting magnets. It explains the phenomenon of superconductivity, theories of superconductivity, type II superconductors and high-temperature cuprate superconductors. The main focus of the book is on the application to superconducting magnets to accelerators and fusion reactors and other applications of superconducting magnets. The thermal and electromagnetic stability criteria of the conductors and the present status of the fabrication techniques for future magnet applications are addressed. The book is based on the long experience of the author in studying superconducting materials, building magnets and numerous lectures delivered to scholars. A researcher and graduate student will enjoy reading the book to learn various aspects of magnet applications of superconductivity. The book provides the knowledge in the field of applied superconductivity in a comprehensive way.

  5. Modeling Magnetic Fields with FEMM 3.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumbart, James

    2003-03-01

    FEMM (Finite Element Method Magnetics) 3.1, a freeware program, is useful for modeling problems involving magnets, currents and magnetic fields. The applications of such a program involve both education and upper-level research. The program interface is intuitive and robust. As an educational tool, this program is useful because it handles internally the complicated equations needed to be solved when working with magnetism in matter. Since most elementary applications of magnetism involve permanent magnets, this program enables the user to calculate field energies and forces between magnets and magnetic materials, which would otherwise be impossible to obtain. An analysis of a popular physics demonstration, that of a diamagnetic-assisted levitating magnet, will be used to illustrate these concepts in more detail. The sensitivity of the equilibrium points to the spacing of the diamagnetic plates and the position of the upper attracting magnet is well-reproduced in this simulation.

  6. Magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Marita

    2015-03-01

    The magnetic field structure in edge-on galaxies observed so far shows a plane-parallel magnetic field component in the disk of the galaxy and an X-shaped field in its halo. The plane-parallel field is thought to be the projected axisymmetric (ASS) disk field as observed in face-on galaxies. Some galaxies addionionally exhibit strong vertical magnetic fields in the halo right above and below the central region of the disk. The mean-field dynamo theory in the disk cannot explain these observed fields without the action of a wind, which also probably plays an important role to keep the vertical scale heights constant in galaxies of different Hubble types and star formation activities, as has been observed in the radio continuum: At λ6 cm the vertical scale heights of the thin disk and the thick disk/halo in a sample of five edge-on galaxies are similar with a mean value of 300 +/- 50 pc for the thin disk and 1.8 +/- 0.2 kpc for the thick disk (a table and references are given in Krause 2011) with our sample including the brightest halo observed so far, NGC 253, with strong star formation, as well as one of the weakest halos, NGC 4565, with weak star formation. If synchrotron emission is the dominant loss process of the relativistic electrons the outer shape of the radio emission should be dumbbell-like as has been observed in several edge-on galaxies like e.g. NGC 253 (Heesen et al. 2009) and NGC 4565. As the synchrotron lifetime t syn at a single frequency is proportional to the total magnetic field strength B t -1.5, a cosmic ray bulk speed (velocity of a galactic wind) can be defined as v CR = h CR /t syn = 2 h z /t syn , where h CR and h z are the scale heights of the cosmic rays and the observed radio emission at this freqnency. Similar observed radio scale heights imply a self regulation mechanism between the galactic wind velocity, the total magnetic field strength and the star formation rate SFR in the disk: v CR ~ B t 1.5 ~ SFR ~ 0.5 (Niklas & Beck 1997).

  7. Primordial Magnetic Fields that Last?

    CERN Document Server

    Carroll, S M; Carroll, Sean M.; Field, George B.

    1998-01-01

    The magnetic fields we observe in galaxies today may have their origins in the very early universe. While a number of mechanisms have been proposed which lead to an appreciable field amplitude at early times, the subsequent evolution of the field is of crucial importance, especially whether the correlation length of the field can grow as large as the size of a protogalaxy. This talk is a report on work in progress, in which we consider the fate of one specific primordial field scenario, driven by pseudoscalar effects near the electroweak phase transition. We argue that such a scenario has a number of attractive features, although it is still uncertain whether a field of appropriate size can survive until late times.

  8. Magnetic Properties of Erbium Gallium Gallate under High Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xijuan; Cheng Haiying; Yang Cuihong; Wang Wei

    2004-01-01

    A theoretical investigation on the magnetic properties of rare-earth Er3+ in Er3 Ga5 O12 was reported. The average magnetic moments(M) for applied magnetic field H parallel to the [001 ], [ 100], [ 110], [ 111 ] direction was studied based on the quantum theory. Temperature dependence of the magnetic properties is analyzed for H applied parallel to the [ 100] and [ 111 ] crystallographic directions. The magnetization decreases with increasing temperature,showing good agreement with thermal effect. A strong anisotropy of the magnetization is found under high magnetic field, but when the magnetic field is small, M and H are proportional.

  9. Modeling and analysis of magnetic dipoles in weak magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The magnetic leakage field distribution resulting from linear defects of a tube sample in the geomagnetic field is modeled according to the magnetic dipole theory.The formula to compute the normal component of the weak magnetic field is deduced based on the spatial distribution of the magnetic dipole.The shape and characteristics of the zero line (an important criterion for magnetic memory testing) of the normal field is analyzed under different longitudinal magnetizations.Results show that the characteristics of the zero line should be considered when the metal magnetic memory testing method is used to find and locate the defect.

  10. Focus on Materials Analysis and Processing in Magnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshio Sakka, Noriyuki Hirota, Shigeru Horii and Tsutomu Ando

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, interest in the applications of feeble (diamagnetic and paramagnetic magnetic materials has grown, whereas the popularity of ferromagnetic materials remains steady and high. This trend is due to the progress of superconducting magnet technology, particularly liquid-helium-free superconducting magnets that can generate magnetic fields of 10 T and higher. As the magnetic energy is proportional to the square of the applied magnetic field, the magnetic energy of such 10 T magnets is in excess of 10 000 times that of conventional 0.1 T permanent magnets. Consequently, many interesting phenomena have been observed over the last decade, such as the Moses effect, magnetic levitation and the alignment of feeble magnetic materials. Researchers in this area are widely spread around the world, but their number in Japan is relatively high, which might explain the success of magnetic field science and technology in Japan.Processing in magnetic fields is a rapidly expanding research area with a wide range of promising applications in materials science. The 3rd International Workshop on Materials Analysis and Processing in Magnetic Fields (MAP3, which was held on 14–16 May 2008 at the University of Tokyo, Japan, focused on various topics including magnetic field effects on chemical, physical, biological, electrochemical, thermodynamic and hydrodynamic phenomena; magnetic field effects on the crystal growth and processing of materials; diamagnetic levitation, the magneto-Archimedes effect, spin chemistry, magnetic orientation, control of structure by magnetic fields, magnetic separation and purification, magnetic-field-induced phase transitions, properties of materials in high magnetic fields, the development of NMR and MRI, medical applications of magnetic fields, novel magnetic phenomena, physical property measurement by magnetic fields, and the generation of high magnetic fields.This focus issue compiles 13 key papers selected from the proceedings

  11. Galactic and intergalactic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    This course-tested textbook conveys the fundamentals of magnetic fields and relativistic plasma in diffuse cosmic media, with a primary focus on phenomena that have been observed at different wavelengths. Theoretical concepts are addressed wherever necessary, with derivations presented in sufficient detail to be generally accessible.In the first few chapters the authors present an introduction to various astrophysical phenomena related to cosmic magnetism, with scales ranging from molecular clouds in star-forming regions and supernova remnants in the Milky Way, to clusters of galaxies. Later c

  12. Preparation of cold ions in strong magnetic field and its application to gas-phase NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuke, K., E-mail: fuke@kobe-u.ac.jp [Institute for Molecular Science (Japan); Ohshima, Y. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry (Japan); Tona, M. [Ayabo Co. Fukukama (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) technique is widely used as a powerful tool to study the physical and chemical properties of materials. However, this technique is limited to the materials in condensed phases. To extend this technique to the gas-phase molecular ions, we are developing a gas-phase NMR apparatus. In this note, we describe the basic principle of the NMR detection for molecular ions in the gas phase based on a Stern-Gerlach type experiment in a Penning trap and outline the apparatus under development. We also present the experimental procedures and the results on the formation and the manipulation of cold ions under a strong magnetic field, which are the key techniques to detect the NMR by the present method.

  13. Preparation of cold ions in strong magnetic field and its application to gas-phase NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuke, K.; Ohshima, Y.; Tona, M.

    2015-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) technique is widely used as a powerful tool to study the physical and chemical properties of materials. However, this technique is limited to the materials in condensed phases. To extend this technique to the gas-phase molecular ions, we are developing a gas-phase NMR apparatus. In this note, we describe the basic principle of the NMR detection for molecular ions in the gas phase based on a Stern-Gerlach type experiment in a Penning trap and outline the apparatus under development. We also present the experimental procedures and the results on the formation and the manipulation of cold ions under a strong magnetic field, which are the key techniques to detect the NMR by the present method.

  14. Magnetic-Field-Assisted Assembly of Anisotropic Superstructures by Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Their Enhanced Magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chengpeng; Leung, Chi Wah; Pong, Philip W T

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle superstructures with controlled magnetic alignment and desired structural anisotropy hold promise for applications in data storage and energy storage. Assembly of monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles under a magnetic field could lead to highly ordered superstructures, providing distinctive magnetic properties. In this work, a low-cost fabrication technique was demonstrated to assemble sub-20-nm iron oxide nanoparticles into crystalline superstructures under an in-plane magnetic field. The gradient of the applied magnetic field contributes to the anisotropic formation of micron-sized superstructures. The magnitude of the applied magnetic field promotes the alignment of magnetic moments of the nanoparticles. The strong dipole-dipole interactions between the neighboring nanoparticles lead to a close-packed pattern as an energetically favorable configuration. Rod-shaped and spindle-shaped superstructures with uniform size and controlled spacing were obtained using spherical and polyhedral nanoparticles, respectively. The arrangement and alignment of the superstructures can be tuned by changing the experimental conditions. The two types of superstructures both show enhancement of coercivity and saturation magnetization along the applied field direction, which is presumably associated with the magnetic anisotropy and magnetic dipole interactions of the constituent nanoparticles and the increased shape anisotropy of the superstructures. Our results show that the magnetic-field-assisted assembly technique could be used for fabricating nanomaterial-based structures with controlled geometric dimensions and enhanced magnetic properties for magnetic and energy storage applications.

  15. Stress Field of Straight Edge Dislocation in Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhao-long; HU Hai-yun; FAN Tian-you

    2007-01-01

    To study the changes in mechanical properties of materials within magnetic fields and the motion of dislocations,stress fields of dislocation in magnetic field need to be calculated.The straight edge dislocation is of basic importance in various defects.The stress field of straight edge dislocation in an external static magnetic field is determined by the theory of elasticity and electrodynamics according to the Volterra dislocation model for continuous media.This reduces to the known stress field when the magnet field is zero.The results can be used for further study on the strain energy of dislocations and the interactions between dislocations in magnetic fields.

  16. PREFACE: 19th International Conference on the Application of High Magnetic Fields in Semiconductor Physics and Nanotechnology (HMF-19)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraki, Koji; Takeyama, Shojiro

    2011-12-01

    This volume contains invited and contributed papers from the 19th International Conference on the Application of High Magnetic Fields in Semiconductor Physics and Nanotechnology (HMF-19) held in Fukuoka, Japan, from 1-6 August 2010. This conference was mainly sponsored by the Tokyo University-'Horiba International fund', which was donated by Dr Masao Horiba, the founder of Horiba Ltd. The scientific program of HMF-19 consisted of 37 invited talks, 24 contributed talks, and 83 posters, which is available from the conference homepage http://www.hmf19.iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp/index.html. Each manuscript submitted for publication in this volume has been independently reviewed. The Editor is very grateful to all the reviewers for their quick responses and helpful reports and to all the authors for their submissions and patience for the delay in the editorial process. Finally, the Editor would like to express his sincere gratitude to all the individuals involved in the conference organization and all the attendees, who made this conference so successful. Koji Muraki Conference photograph Committees Chair Conference chairS Takeyama(ISSP-UT) Conference secretary T Machida (IIS-UT) Program chair K Muraki (NTT) Local organizing chair K Oto (Chiba Univ.) Advisory Committee International Domestic L Brey (ES) T Ando (TIT) Z H Chen (CN) Y Hirayama (Tohoku Univ.) S Das Sarma (US) G Kido (NIMS) L Eaves (GB) N Miura (JP) J P Eisenstein (US) J Nitta (Tohoku Univ.) K Ensslin (CH) T Takamasu (NIMS) J Furdyna (US) G M Gusev (BR) I Kukushkin (RU) Z D Kvon (RU) G Landwehr (DE) J C Maan (NL) A H MacDonald (US) N F Oliveira Jr (BR) A Pinczuk (US) J C Portal (FR) A Sachrajda (CA) M K Sanyal(IN) R Stepniewski(PL) Program Committee Chair: K Muraki(NTT) International Domestic G Bauer (AU) H Ajiki (Osaka Univ.) G Boebinger (US) H Aoki (Hongo, UT) S Ivanov (RU) K Nomura (RIKEN) K von Klitzing (DE) T Okamoto (Hongo, UT) R Nicholas (GB) T Osada (ISSP-UT ) M Potemski (FR) N Studart (BR) U Zeitler (NL

  17. High magnetic fields in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Laurence J.; Parkin, Don E.; Crow, Jack E.; Schneider-Muntau, Hans J.; Sullivan, Neil S.

    During the past thirty years research using high magnetic fields has technically evolved in the manner, but not the magnitude, of the so-called big science areas of particle physics, plasma physics, neutron scattering, synchrotron light scattering, and astronomy. Starting from the laboratories of individual researchers it moved to a few larger universities, then to centralized national facilities with research and maintenance staffs, and, finally, to joint international ventures to build unique facilities, as illustrated by the subject of this conference. To better understand the nature of this type of research and its societal justification it is helpful to compare it, in general terms, with the aforementioned big-science fields. High magnetic field research differs from particle physics, plasma physics, and astronomy in three respects: (1) it is generic research that cuts across a wide range of scientific disciplines in physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, and engineering; (2) it studies materials and processes that are relevant for a variety of technological applications and it gives insight into biological processes; (3) it has produced, at least, comparably significant results with incomparably smaller resources. Unlike neutron and synchrotron light scattering, which probe matter, high magnetic fields change the thermodynamic state of matter. This change of state is fundamental and independent of other state variables, such as pressure and temperature. After the magnetic field is applied, various techniques are then used to study the new state.

  18. Diagnosis of solar chromospheric magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Hongqi(张洪起)

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the measurements of the chromospheric magnetic field and the spatial configuration of the field at the lower solar atmosphere inferred by the distribution of the solar photospheric and chromospheric magnetic fields. Some questions in the study of the chromospheric magnetic field are also presented.

  19. The HMI Magnetic Field Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeksema, Jon Todd; Liu, Y.; Schou, J.; Scherrer, P.; HMI Science Team

    2009-05-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) will provide frequent full-disk magnetic field data after launch of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), currently scheduled for fall 2009. 16 megapixel line-of-sight magnetograms (Blos) will be recorded every 45 seconds. A full set of polarized filtergrams needed to determine the vector magnetic field requires 90 seconds. Quick-look data will be available within a few minutes of observation. Quick-look space weather and browse products must have identified users, and the list currently includes full disk magnetograms, feature identification and movies, 12-minute disambiguated vector fields in active region patches, time evolution of AR indices, synoptic synchronic frames, potential and MHD model results, and 1 AU predictions. A more complete set of definitive science data products will be offered about a day later and come in three types. "Pipeline” products, such as full disk vector magnetograms, will be computed for all data on an appropriate cadence. A larger menu of "On Demand” products, such as Non-Linear Force Free Field snapshots of an evolving active region, will be produced whenever a user wants them. Less commonly needed "On Request” products that require significant project resources, such as a high resolution MHD simulation of the global corona, will be created subject to availability of resources. Further information can be found at the SDO Joint Science Operations Center web page, jsoc.stanford.edu

  20. A Vorticity-Magnetic Field Dynamo Instability

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    We generalize the mean field magnetic dynamo to include local evolution of the mean vorticity in addition to the mean magnetic field. The coupled equations exhibit a general mean field dynamo instability that enables the transfer of turbulent energy to the magnetic field and vorticity on larger scales. The growth of the vorticity and magnetic field both require helical turbulence which can be supplied by an underlying global rotation. The dynamo coefficients are derived including the backreac...

  1. Magnetic field of a combined plasma trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotenko, V. G.; Moiseenko, V. E.; Ågren, O.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents numerical simulations performed on the structure of a magnetic field created by the magnetic system of a combined plasma trap. The magnetic system includes the stellarator-type magnetic system and one of the mirror-type. For the stellarator type magnetic system the numeric model contains a magnetic system of an l=2 torsatron with the coils of an additional toroidal magnetic field. The mirror-type magnetic system element is considered as being single current-carrying turn enveloping the region of existence of closed magnetic surfaces of the torsatron. The calculations indicate the existence of a vast area of the values of the additional magnetic field magnitude and magnetic field of the single turn where, in principle, the implementation of the closed magnetic surface configuration is quite feasible.

  2. ANALYTIC EXPRESSION OF MAGNETIC FIELD DISTRIBUTION OF RECTANGULAR PERMANENT MAGNETS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苟晓凡; 杨勇; 郑晓静

    2004-01-01

    From the molecular current viewpoint,an analytic expression exactly describing magnetic field distribution of rectangular permanent magnets magnetized sufficiently in one direction was derived from the Biot-Savart's law. This expression is useful not only for the case of one rectangular permanent magnet bulk, but also for that of several rectangular permanent magnet bulks. By using this expression,the relations between magnetic field distribution and the size of rectangular permanent magnets as well as the magnitude of magnetic field and the distance from the point in the space to the top (or bottom) surface of rectangular permanent magnets were discussed in detail. All the calculating results are consistent with experimental ones. For transverse magnetic field which is a main magnetic field of rectangular permanent magnets,in order to describe its distribution,two quantities,one is the uniformity in magnitude and the other is the uniformity in distribution of magnetic field,were defined. Furthermore, the relations between them and the geometric size of the magnet as well as the distance from the surface of permanent magnets were investigated by these formulas. The numerical results show that the geometric size and the distance have a visible influence on the uniformity in magnitude and the uniformity in distribution of the magnetic field.

  3. Synthesis of Micelles Guided Magnetite (Fe3O4) Hollow Spheres and their application for AC Magnetic Field Responsive Drug Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal Goswami, Madhuri

    2016-10-31

    This paper reports on synthesis of hollow spheres of magnetite, guided by micelles and their application in drug release by the stimulus responsive technique. Here oleyelamine micelles are used as the core substance for the formation of magnetite nano hollow spheres (NHS). Diameter and shell thickness of NHS have been changed by changing concentration of the micelles. Mechanism of NHS formation has been established by investigating the aliquot collected at different time during the synthesis of NHS. It has been observed that oleyelamine as micelles play an important role to generate hollow-sphere particles of different diameter and thickness just by varying its amount. Structural analysis was done by XRD measurement and morphological measurements, SEM and TEM were performed to confirm the shape and size of the NHS. FTIR measurement support the formation of magnetite phase too. Frequency dependent AC magnetic measurements and AC magnetic field stimulated drug release event by these particles provide a direction of the promising application of these NHS for better cancer treatment in near future. Being hollow &porous in structure and magnetic in nature, such materials will also be useful in other applications such as in removal of toxic materials, magnetic separation etc.

  4. Magnetic fields induced by a mechanical singularity in a magnetoelastic half plane and their applications to the seismicities in the crust of the Chinese continent

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Rong Qiang

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between the magnetic field and the elastic deformation field in the crust is studied in a simplified way. The magnetic fields generated by the line singularities in a magnetized elastic half-plane are investigated. Using the general solution and Fourier transform technique, the exact solutions for the generated magnetic inductions due to various cases are obtained in a closed form. The results show that the line concentrated force will induced a perturbed magnetic field; The induced magnetic field will indicate the line concentrated force in reverse. The distribution of the vertical component of the magnetic induction caused by the line mechanical singularities is simpler than that of the horizontal component, and it is zero at the origin when the applied magnetic field and the line concentrated force satisfies some conditions. This result is applied to locate the epicenters of the earthquakes and historical earthquakes occurred in the Chinese continental crust. Results show that more than 80\\...

  5. Field and Thermal Characteristics of Magnetizing Fixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes field modeling and thermal modeling for magnetizing fixture. As the detailed characteristics of magnetizing fixture can be obtained, the efficient design of magnetizer which produce desired magnet will be possible using our modeling. For field modeling finite-element analysis is used as part of the design and analysis process for magnetizing fixture. The thermal modeling method of magnetizing fixture resistor uses multi-lumped model with equivalent thermal resistance and thermal capacitance.

  6. Hybrid Magnetics and Power Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mo, Wai Keung; Paasch, Kasper

    A hybrid magnetic approach, merging two different magnetic core properites such as ferrite and iron powder cores, is an effective solution for power converter applications. It can offer similar magnetic properties to that of magnetic powder cores but showing less copper loss than powder cores...

  7. Simulation study of enhancing laser driven multi-keV line-radiation through application of external magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, G. E.; Colvin, J. D.; Blue, B. E.; Fournier, K. B.

    2016-10-01

    We present a path forward for enhancing laser driven, multi-keV line-radiation from mid- to high-Z, sub-quarter-critical density, non-equilibrium plasmas through inhibited thermal transport in the presence of an externally generated magnetic field. Preliminary simulations with Kr and Ag suggest that as much as 50%-100% increases in peak electron temperatures are possible—without any changes in laser drive conditions—with magnetized interactions. The increase in temperature results in ˜2 -3 × enhancements in laser-to-x-ray conversion efficiency for K-shell emission with simultaneous ≲ 4 × reduction in L-shell emission using current field generation capabilities on the Omega laser and near-term capabilities on the National Ignition Facility laser. Increased plasma temperatures and enhanced K-shell emission are observed to come at the cost of degraded volumetric heating. Such enhancements in high-photon-energy x-ray sources could expand the existing laser platforms for increasingly penetrating x-ray radiography.

  8. Application of a Solar Wind Model Driven by Turbulence Dissipation to a 2D Magnetic Field Configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Lionello, Roberto; Downs, Cooper; Linker, Jon A; Mikić, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    Although it is widely accepted that photospheric motions provide the energy source and that the magnetic field must play a key role in the process, the detailed mechanisms responsible for heating the Sun's corona and accelerating the solar wind are still not fully understood. Cranmer et al. (2007) developed a sophisticated, 1D, time-steady model of the solar wind with turbulence dissipation. By varying the coronal magnetic field, they obtain, for a single choice of wave properties, a realistic range of slow and fast wind conditions with a sharp latitudinal transition between the two streams. Using a 1D, time-dependent model of the solar wind of Lionello et al. (2014), which incorporates turbulent dissipation of Alfv\\'en waves to provide heating and acceleration of the plasma, we have explored a similar configuration, obtaining qualitatively equivalent results. However, our calculations suggest that the rapid transition between slow and fast wind suggested by this 1D model may be disrupted in multidimensional ...

  9. Deformation of Water by a Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zijun; Dahlberg, E. Dan

    2011-03-01

    After the discovery that superconducting magnets could levitate diamagnetic objects,1,2 researchers became interested in measuring the repulsion of diamagnetic fluids in strong magnetic fields,3-5 which was given the name "The Moses Effect."5 Both for the levitation experiments and the quantitative studies on liquids, the large magnetic fields necessary were produced by superconducting magnets.

  10. Design and analysis of linear oscillating motor for linear pump application-magnetic field, dynamics and thermotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Zongxia; Wang, Tianyi; Yan, Liang

    2016-11-01

    A linear oscillating motor is an electromagnetic actuator that can achieve short-stroke reciprocating movement directly without auxiliary transmission mechanisms. It has been widely used in linear pump applications as the source of power and motion. However, because of the demand of high power density in a linear actuation system, the performance of linear oscillating motors has been the focus of studies and deserves further research for high power density. In this paper, a general framework of linear oscillating motor design and optimization is addressed in detail, including the electromagnetic, dynamics, and thermal aspects. First, the electromagnetic and dynamics characteristics are modeled to reveal the principle for optimization. Then, optimization and analysis on magnetic structure, resonant system, and thermal features are conducted, which provide the foundation for prototype development. Finally, experimental results are provided for validation. As a whole, this process offers complete guidance for high power density linear oscillating motors in linear pump applications.

  11. Design and analysis of linear oscillating motor for linear pump application-magnetic field, dynamics and thermotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Zongxia; Wang, Tianyi; Yan, Liang

    2016-12-01

    A linear oscillating motor is an electromagnetic actuator that can achieve short-stroke reciprocating movement directly without auxiliary transmission mechanisms. It has been widely used in linear pump applications as the source of power and motion. However, because of the demand of high power density in a linear actuation system, the performance of linear oscillating motors has been the focus of studies and deserves further research for high power density. In this paper, a general framework of linear oscillating motor design and optimization is addressed in detail, including the electromagnetic, dynamics, and thermal aspects. First, the electromagnetic and dynamics characteristics are modeled to reveal the principle for optimization. Then, optimization and analysis on magnetic structure, resonant system, and thermal features are conducted, which provide the foundation for prototype development. Finally, experimental results are provided for validation. As a whole, this process offers complete guidance for high power density linear oscillating motors in linear pump applications.

  12. Scattering in a magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David C. Carey

    2002-08-19

    The fixed target program at Fermilab has come to an end. New projects are in the planning stage. Among them is a muon storage ring. Up to the present, all storage rings in high-energy physics have carried stable particles, namely the electron and proton and their antiparticles. The muon is unstable and decays with a mean lifetime of 2.0 x 10{sup -6} sec. Two types of cooling have been used in the past. One is stochastic cooling where an electrode is used to detect the positions of the particles and send a signal to another position across the ring. Through successive applications of this technique, the phase space is ultimately greatly reduced and beams can be made to collide with a useful event rate. The second type of cooling is electron cooling. Here protons and electrons are made to travel together for a short distance. Equipartition causes transfer of transverse energy of the protons to that of the electrons. Neither of these methods is fast enough to allow acceleration of a sufficient number of muons up to maximum energy before they decay. A new method known as ionization cooling has been proposed.[1] The muons are cooled by passing them through a container of liquid hydrogen. The energy loss reduces both transverse and longitudinal momentum. The longitudinal momentum is restored with RF cavities. The net result is to maintain the longitudinal momentum while cooling the transverse momentum. To minimize the total travel distance of the muons the liquid hydrogen is placed inside the focusing solenoids. The question arises as to whether the presence of the solenoids influences the phase space occupied by the muons. After the muon scatters it has transverse momentum. In a constant longitudinal magnetic field the trajectory wraps around the field lines and coincides in momentum and position with a particle which scatters one cycle later. Here we calculate the change in emittance for both a drift space and a solenoid. We find that the presence of the solenoid does

  13. Magnetic Field Reentrant Superconductivity in Aluminum Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretz-Sullivan, Terence; Goldman, Allen

    Reentrance to the superconducting state through the application of a magnetic field to quasi-one dimensional superconductors driven resistive by current, is counter to the expected properties of superconductors. It was not until recently that a microscopic mechanism explaining the phenomenon was proposed in which superconductivity and phase slip driven dissipation coexist in a non-equilibrium state. Here we present additional results of magnetic field induced reentrance into the superconducting state in quasi-one-dimensional aluminum nanowires with an in-plane magnetic field both transverse to, and along the wire axis. The reentrant behavior is seen in the magnetic field dependence of the I-V characteristic and resistance vs. temperature, and in the wire's magnetoresistance at 450mK. This work was supported by DOE Basic Energy Sciences Grant DE-FG02-02ER46004. Samples were fabricated at the Minnesota Nanofabrication Center. Parts of this work were carried out in the University of Minnesota Characterization Facility, a member of the Materials Research Facilities Network (www.mrfn.org) funded via the NSF MRSEC program.

  14. Passive Magnetic Shielding in Gradient Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Bidinosti, C P

    2013-01-01

    The effect of passive magnetic shielding on dc magnetic field gradients imposed by both external and internal sources is studied. It is found that for concentric cylindrical or spherical shells of high permeability material, higher order multipoles in the magnetic field are shielded progressively better, by a factor related to the order of the multipole. In regard to the design of internal coil systems for the generation of uniform internal fields, we show how one can take advantage of the coupling of the coils to the innermost magnetic shield to further optimize the uniformity of the field. These results demonstrate quantitatively a phenomenon that was previously well-known qualitatively: that the resultant magnetic field within a passively magnetically shielded region can be much more uniform than the applied magnetic field itself. Furthermore we provide formulae relevant to active magnetic compensation systems which attempt to stabilize the interior fields by sensing and cancelling the exterior fields clos...

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging for diagnostic evaluation of hernia of an invertebral disk. Optimisation of imaging parameters by application of various magnetic field intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, H.K.; Oppel, G.; Bluemm, R.; Uhlenbrock, D.

    1988-02-01

    The article reports experience gained within three years with diagnostic NMR imaging of the lumbar spine. On the basis of results obtained by almost 500 examinations, an optimisation concept with regard to measuring sequences and orientation of sectional cuts is presented. Imaging of the spine in three planes, with sectional layer thickness between 3 and 5 mm, using a 1.5 Tesla system, seems to yield the diagnostic optimum, and in our opinion is superior over invasive myelography and CT scanning. A prospective study we made indicates a hit rate of 97.2%, and of 100% for evaluation of the results obtained with the 1.5 Tesla system together with an evaluation of the paraxial sections. The magnetic field intensity of 1.5 Tesla especially improves the quality of images of paraxial cuts as compared with the 0.5 Tesla field system, due to the better contrast-to-noise ratio, and thinner sections.

  16. Superconducting Materials, Magnets and Electric Power Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, George

    2011-03-01

    The surprising discovery of superconductivity a century ago launched a chain of convention-shattering innovations and discoveries in superconducting materials and applications that continues to this day. The range of large-scale applications grows with new materials discoveries - low temperature NbTi and Nb3 Sn for liquid helium cooled superconducting magnets, intermediate temperature MgB2 for inexpensive cryocooled applications including MRI magnets, and high temperature YBCO and BSSCO for high current applications cooled with inexpensive liquid nitrogen. Applications based on YBCO address critical emerging challenges for the electricity grid, including high capacity superconducting cables to distribute power in urban areas; transmission of renewable electricity over long distances from source to load; high capacity DC interconnections among the three US grids; fast, self-healing fault current limiters to increase reliability; low-weight, high capacity generators enabling off-shore wind turbines; and superconducting magnetic energy storage for smoothing the variability of renewable sources. In addition to these grid applications, coated conductors based on YBCO deposited on strong Hastelloy substrates enable a new generation of all superconducting high field magnets capable of producing fields above 30 T, approximately 50% higher than the existing all superconducting limit based on Nb3 Sn . The high fields, low power cost and the quiet electromagnetic and mechanical operation of such magnets could change the character of high field basic research on materials, enable a new generation of high-energy colliding beam experiments and extend the reach of high density superconducting magnetic energy storage.

  17. Micromachined permanent magnets and their MEMS applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyoung Jin

    2002-01-01

    In this research, new micromachined permanent magnets have been proposed, developed and characterized for MEMS applications. In realizing micromachined permanent magnets, a new electroplating technique using external magnetic field and a bumper filling technique using a photolithographically defined mold with resin bonded magnetic particles have been developed. The newly developed micromachining techniques allow thick film-type permanent magnet components to be integrated to magnetic MEMS devices with dimensional control and alignment. Permanent magnet arrays with the dimensions ranging from 30 mum to 200 mum have been developed with an energy density up to 2.7 kJ/m3 in precisely defined forms in the micro scale. For the applications of the permanent magnets developed in this work, three novel magnetic MEMS devices such as a bi-directional magnetic actuator, a magnetically driven optical scanner, and a magnetic cell separator have been successfully realized. After design and modeling, each device has been fabricated and fully characterized. The bi-directional actuator with the electroplated permanent magnet array has achieved bi-directional motion clearly and shown good agreement with the analytical and simulated models. The optical scanner has shown linear bi-directional response under static actuation and stable bi-directional scanning performance under dynamic actuation. As a potential BioMEMS application of the developed permanent magnet, the prototype magnetic cell separator using the electroplated permanent magnet strip array has been proposed and demonstrated for magnetic bead patterning. In conclusion, new thick film-type, electroplated CoNiMnP and epoxy resin bonded Sr-ferrite permanent magnets have been developed and characterized, and then, three new magnetic MEMS devices using the permanent magnets such as a bi-directional magnetic actuator, an optical scanner and a magnetic cell separator have been realized in this research. The new micromachined

  18. Study of the reduced magnetic field required for thermally assisted magnetization reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdausi, H. F. Y.; Utari; Purnama, B.

    2016-11-01

    The reduced magnetic field required for thermally magnetization reversal discussed in this paper. Study of thermally assisted magnetization reversal conduct by using micromagnetic simulation. The magnetic dot size of the simulation was 50 nm × 50 nm × 20 nm. The perpendicularly anisotropy constant was 2 × 106 erg/cm3. Initial condition was set single domain configuration. Then a sufficiently thermal pulse was used to get stochastic effect so that the magnetization along to the induce field direction for pico second duration. The results show that the reduced magnetic field mechanism seem to be temporary antiferromagnetic configuration before single domain configuration in alinging along to field direction. The same mechanims observed for modify of thickness dot particles. The require magnetic field of 145 Oe in thermally assisted magnetization reversal open a posibility for MRAM application.

  19. Experimental Study on Current Decay Characteristics of Persistent Current HTS Magnet by Alternating Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young Gun; Lee, Chang Young; Hwang, Young Jin; Lee, Woo Seung; Lee, Jiho; Jo, Hyun Chul; Chung, Yoon Do; Ko, Tae Kuk

    This paper deals with a current decay characteristics of a high temperature superconducting (HTS) magnet operated in persistent current mode (PCM). In superconducting synchronous machine applications such as linear synchronous motor (LSM), the superconducting coil is designed to operate in the PCM to obtain steady magnetic field with DC transport current. This superconducting magnet operates on a direct current, but it can be exposed to alternating magnetic field due to the armature winding. When the magnet is subjected to an external time-varying magnetic field, it is possible to result in a decay of the current in PCM system due to AC loss. In this research, a PCM system with armature coil which generates time-varying magnetic field was fabricated to verify current decay characteristics by external alternating magnetic field. The current decay rate was measured by using a hall sensor as functions of amplitude and frequency of armature coil.

  20. Magnetic field perturbartions in closed-field-line systems with zero toroidal magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauel, M; Ryutov, D; Kesner, J

    2003-12-02

    In some plasma confinement systems (e.g., field-reversed configurations and levitated dipoles) the confinement is provided by a closed-field-line poloidal magnetic field. We consider the influence of the magnetic field perturbations on the structure of the magnetic field in such systems and find that the effect of perturbations is quite different from that in the systems with a substantial toroidal field. In particular, even infinitesimal perturbations can, in principle, lead to large radial excursions of the field lines in FRCs and levitated dipoles. Under such circumstances, particle drifts and particle collisions may give rise to significant neoclassical transport. Introduction of a weak regular toroidal magnetic field reduces radial excursions of the field lines and neoclassical transport.

  1. Bats respond to very weak magnetic fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan-Xiang Tian

    Full Text Available How animals, including mammals, can respond to and utilize the direction and intensity of the Earth's magnetic field for orientation and navigation is contentious. In this study, we experimentally tested whether the Chinese Noctule, Nyctalus plancyi (Vespertilionidae can sense magnetic field strengths that were even lower than those of the present-day geomagnetic field. Such field strengths occurred during geomagnetic excursions or polarity reversals and thus may have played an important role in the evolution of a magnetic sense. We found that in a present-day local geomagnetic field, the bats showed a clear preference for positioning themselves at the magnetic north. As the field intensity decreased to only 1/5th of the natural intensity (i.e., 10 μT; the lowest field strength tested here, the bats still responded by positioning themselves at the magnetic north. When the field polarity was artificially reversed, the bats still preferred the new magnetic north, even at the lowest field strength tested (10 μT, despite the fact that the artificial field orientation was opposite to the natural geomagnetic field (P<0.05. Hence, N. plancyi is able to detect the direction of a magnetic field even at 1/5th of the present-day field strength. This high sensitivity to magnetic fields may explain how magnetic orientation could have evolved in bats even as the Earth's magnetic field strength varied and the polarity reversed tens of times over the past fifty million years.

  2. Hybrid Shielding for Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, David; Royal, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Precision symmetry measurements such as the search for the electric dipole moment of the neutron require magnetic shielding rooms to reduce the ambient field to the pT scale. The massive mu-metal sheets and large separation between layers make these shield rooms bulky and expensive. Active field cancellation systems used to reduce the surrounding field are limited in uniformity of cancellation. A novel approach to reducing the space between shield layers and increasing the effectiveness of active cancellation is to combine the two systems into a hybrid system, with active and passive layers interspersed. We demonstrate this idea in a prototype with an active layer sandwiched between two passive layers of shielding.

  3. Manifestations of Magnetic Field Inhomogeneities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lawrence Rudnick

    2011-12-01

    Both observations and simulations reveal large inhomogeneities in magnetic field distributions in diffuse plasmas. Incorporating these inhomogeneities into various calculations can significantly change the inferred physical conditions. In extragalactic sources, e.g., these can compromise analyses of spectral ageing, which I will illustrate with some current work on cluster relics. I also briefly re-examine the old issue of how inhomogeneous fields affect particle lifetimes; perhaps not surprisingly, the next generation of radio telescopes are unlikely to find many sources that can extend their lifetimes from putting relativistic electrons into a low-field ‘freezer’. Finally, I preview some new EVLA results on the complex relic in Abell 2256, with implications for the interspersing of its relativistic and thermal plasmas.

  4. Effects of magnetic field on fluidization properties of magnetic pearls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maoming Fan; Zhenfu Luo; Yuemin Zhao; Qingru Chen; Daniel Tao; Xiuxiang Tao; Zhenqiang Chen

    2007-01-01

    An experimental study of the influence of external magnetic field on the fluidization behavior of magnetic pearls was carried out. Magnetic pearls are a magnetic form of iron oxide that mainly consists of Fe2O3 which are recovered from a high-volume power plant fly ash from pulverized coal combustion. Due to its abundance, low price and particular physical and chemical properties, magnetic pearls can be used as a heavy medium for minerals or solid waste dry separation based on density difference. This paper introduces the properties of magnetic pearls and compares the performance of magnetic pearls fluidised bed operation with or without an external magnetic field. Experimental results show that an external magnetic field significantly improves the fluidization performance of magnetic pearls such as uniformity and stability.

  5. The application of MRI and MRS in psychiatry and performance evaluation of magnetic field homogeneity in MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua Hsuan

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a safe non-invasive tool to study the physiological mechanisms of the human brain. MRS has the capability to provide the information regarding neurochemicals in brains of patients with neuropsychiatric disorders. Therefore, to produce measurable and interpretable information in MRI and MRS, a quality control (QC) program is required. Magnetic field homogeneity (MFH) is an important factor for QC when the volume sizes and neurochemical levels are quantified. Poor main (B0) MFH leads to artifacts, signal losses and broadened line widths. The American College of Radiology's (ACR) MRI QC manual mandates annual checks of MFH, suggesting tests using spectral line widths (FWHM) and phase-difference (Deltaϕ) maps. A new method, dubbed the bandwidth-difference (DeltaBW) method, is proposed along with a prototype phantom for determining MFH. The DeltaBW method is compared with standard methods and has also been tested in different model MRI systems from various manufacturers. Direct comparisons of the data obtained using the DeltaBW method demonstrated good agreement with data obtained using the linewidth method and the frequency map data provided by one MRI system manufacturer. As a result, the DeltaBW method produces measurements of MFH at various Diameter Sphere Volume (DSV) values that can be obtained from a single set of phantom images. The conclusion of the study is that the accuracy of DeltaBW B0 homogeneity measurements of MFH is comparable to the other methods tested while the ease of measurement in practical clinical setting is considerably improved.

  6. Field modeling for transcranial magnetic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thielscher, Axel; Antunes, Andre; Saturnino, Guilherme B

    2015-01-01

    Electric field calculations based on numerical methods and increasingly realistic head models are more and more used in research on Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS). However, they are still far from being established as standard tools for the planning and analysis in practical applications...... of TMS. Here, we start by delineating three main challenges that need to be addressed to unravel their full potential. This comprises (i) identifying and dealing with the model uncertainties, (ii) establishing a clear link between the induced fields and the physiological stimulation effects, and (iii...

  7. Topological basis for understanding the behavior of the heavy-fermion metal β -YbAlB4 under application of magnetic field and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaginyan, V. R.; Msezane, A. Z.; Popov, K. G.; Clark, J. W.; Khodel, V. A.; Zverev, M. V.

    2016-05-01

    Informative recent measurements on the heavy-fermion metal β -YbAlB4 performed with applied magnetic field and pressure as control parameters are analyzed with the goal of establishing a sound theoretical explanation for the inferred scaling laws and non-Fermi-liquid (NFL) behavior, which demonstrate some unexpected features. Most notably, the robustness of the NFL behavior of the thermodynamic properties and of the anomalous T3 /2 temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity under applied pressure P in zero magnetic field is at variance with the fragility of the NFL phase under application of a field B . We show that a consistent topological basis for this combination of observations, as well as the empirical scaling laws, may be found within fermion-condensation theory in the emergence and destruction of a flat band, and explains that the paramagnetic NFL phase takes place without magnetic criticality, not from quantum critical fluctuations. Schematic T -B and T -P phase diagrams are presented to illuminate this scenario.

  8. Magnetic Helicity and Large Scale Magnetic Fields: A Primer

    CERN Document Server

    Blackman, Eric G

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic fields of laboratory, planetary, stellar, and galactic plasmas commonly exhibit significant order on large temporal or spatial scales compared to the otherwise random motions within the hosting system. Such ordered fields can be measured in the case of planets, stars, and galaxies, or inferred indirectly by the action of their dynamical influence, such as jets. Whether large scale fields are amplified in situ or a remnant from previous stages of an object's history is often debated for objects without a definitive magnetic activity cycle. Magnetic helicity, a measure of twist and linkage of magnetic field lines, is a unifying tool for understanding large scale field evolution for both mechanisms of origin. Its importance stems from its two basic properties: (1) magnetic helicity is typically better conserved than magnetic energy; and (2) the magnetic energy associated with a fixed amount of magnetic helicity is minimized when the system relaxes this helical structure to the largest scale available. H...

  9. Developments in deep brain stimulation using time dependent magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowther, L.J.; Nlebedim, I.C.; Jiles, D.C.

    2012-03-07

    The effect of head model complexity upon the strength of field in different brain regions for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been investigated. Experimental measurements were used to verify the validity of magnetic field calculations and induced electric field calculations for three 3D human head models of varying complexity. Results show the inability for simplified head models to accurately determine the site of high fields that lead to neuronal stimulation and highlight the necessity for realistic head modeling for TMS applications.

  10. Interaction between two magnetic dipoles in a uniform magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Ku

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A new formula for the interaction force between two magnetic dipoles in a uniform magnetic field is derived taking their mutual magnetic interaction into consideration and used to simulate their relative motion. Results show that when the angle β between the direction of external magnetic field and the centerline of two magnetic dipoles is 0 ° or 90 °, magnetic dipoles approach each other or move away from each other in a straight line, respectively. And the time required for them to contact each other from the initial position is related to the specific susceptibility and the diameter of magnetic particles, medium viscosity and magnetic field strength. When β is between 0 ° and 90 °, magnetic dipole pair performs approximate elliptical motion, and the motion trajectory is affected by the specific susceptibility, diameter and medium viscosity but not magnetic field strength. However, time required for magnetic dipoles to complete the same motion trajectory is shorter when adopting stronger magnetic field. Moreover, the subsequent motion trajectory of magnetic dipoles is ascertained once the initial position is set in a predetermined motion trajectory. Additionally, magnetic potential energy of magnetic dipole pairs is transformed into kinetic energy and friction energy during the motion.

  11. Composite Match Index with Application of Interior Deformation Field Measurement from Magnetic Resonance Volumetric Images of Human Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penglin Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Whereas a variety of different feature-point matching approaches have been reported in computer vision, few feature-point matching approaches employed in images from nonrigid, nonuniform human tissues have been reported. The present work is concerned with interior deformation field measurement of complex human tissues from three-dimensional magnetic resonance (MR volumetric images. To improve the reliability of matching results, this paper proposes composite match index (CMI as the foundation of multimethod fusion methods to increase the reliability of these various methods. Thereinto, we discuss the definition, components, and weight determination of CMI. To test the validity of the proposed approach, it is applied to actual MR volumetric images obtained from a volunteer’s calf. The main result is consistent with the actual condition.

  12. Spin spatial splitter based on a magnetic nanostructure with zero average magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xu-Hui; Zhang, Gui-Lian, E-mail: glzhang01@126.com; Kong, Yong-Hong; Li, Ai-Hua; Fu, Xi

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • The lateral displacement of spin electron is investigated theoretically in a new magnetic nanostructure with a zero average magnetic field. • The lateral displacement is found to be dependent strongly on the spins. • Such a magnetic nanostructure can serve as a spin spatial splitter for spintronics applications. - Abstract: We report a theoretical study on spin-polarized lateral displacement for the electron across a magnetic nanostructure with a zero average magnetic field, which can be experimentally realized by depositing a ferromagnetic stripe with a plumb magnetization on the top of a semiconductor heterostructure. It is shown that, the lateral displacement depends strongly on the electron spins due to the Zeeman coupling and the intrinsic symmetry, though the average magnetic field is vanishing in the nanostructure. It is also shown that the spin-polarized lateral displacement is related closely to the structural parameters. Therefore, such a novel magnetic nanostructure may be used as a spin spatial splitter for spintronics applications.

  13. Effective magnetic moment of neutrinos in strong magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez, A; Masood, S S; Gaitan, R; Rodríguez, S

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we compute the effective magnetic moment of neutrinos propagating in dense high magnetized medium. Taking typical values of magnetic field and densities of astrophysical objects (such as the cores of supernovae and neutron stars) we obtain an effective type of dipole magnetic moment in agreement with astrophysical and cosmological bounds. (Author)

  14. Stellar magnetic fields - The role of a magnetic field in the peculiar M giant, HD 4174

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stencel, R. E.; Ionson, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Principles of coronal heating via basic electrodynamic effects, viz., resonant absorption of Alfven surface waves (quiescent) and magnetic tearing instabilities (impulsive), are detailed to argue three principles which may have application to late-type evolved stars. First, if one observes that B-squared/8 pi is much greater than rho times v-squared in a stellar atmosphere, then the observed magnetic field must originate in an interior dynamo. Second, low mass-loss rates could imply the presence of closed magnetic flux loops within the outer atmosphere, which constrain hydrodynamic flows when the magnetic body forces exceed the driving forces. Third, given that such magnetic loops effect an enhancement of the local heating rate, a positive correlation is predicted between the existence of a corona and low mass-loss rates. Application of these principles is made in the case of the peculiar M giant star HD 4174, which is purported to have a kilogauss magnetic field. Several of its spectroscopic peculiarities are shown to be consistent with the above principles, and further observational checks are suggested. Possible application to dMe and RS CVn objects is sketched.

  15. Magnetic Field Gradient Waveform Monitoring for Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hui

    Linear magnetic field gradients have played a central role in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) since Fourier Transform MRI was proposed three decades ago. Their primary function is to encode spatial information into MR signals. Magnetic field gradients are also used to sensitize the image contrast to coherent and/or incoherent motion, to selectively enhance an MR signal, and to minimize image artifacts. Modern MR imaging techniques increasingly rely on the implementation of complex gradient waveforms for the manipulation of spin dynamics. However, gradient system infidelities caused by eddy currents, gradient amplifier imperfections and group delays, often result in image artifacts and other errors (e.g., phase and intensity errors). This remains a critical problem for a wide range of MRI techniques on modern commercial systems, but is of particular concern for advanced MRI pulse sequences. Measuring the real magnetic field gradients, i.e., characterizing eddy currents, is critical to addressing and remedying this problem. Gradient measurement and eddy current calibration are therefore a general topic of importance to the science of MRI. The Magnetic Field Gradient Monitor (MFGM) idea was proposed and developed specifically to meet these challenges. The MFGM method is the heart of this thesis. MFGM methods permit a variety of magnetic field gradient problems to be investigated and systematically remedied. Eddy current effects associated with MR compatible metallic pressure vessels were analyzed, simulated, measured and corrected. The appropriate correction of eddy currents may enable most MR/MRI applications with metallic pressure vessels. Quantitative imaging (1D/2D) with model pressure vessels was successfully achieved by combining image reconstruction with MFGM determined gradient waveform behaviour. Other categories of MR applications with metallic vessels, including diffusion measurement and spin echo SPI T2 mapping, cannot be realized solely by MFGM guided

  16. Magnetic field penetration of erosion switch plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Rodney J.; Jones, Michael E.; Grossmann, John M.; Ottinger, Paul F.

    1988-10-01

    Computer simulations demonstrate that the entrainment (or advection) of magnetic field with the flow of cathode-emitted electrons can constitute a dominant mechanism for the magnetic field penetration of erosion switch plasmas. Cross-field drift in the accelerating electric field near the cathode starts the penetration process. Plasma erosion propagates the point for emission and magnetic field injection along the cathode toward the load-for the possibility of rapid switch opening.

  17. Magnetic field reversals and galactic dynamos

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We argue that global magnetic field reversals similar to those observed in the Milky Way occur quite frequently in mean-field galactic dynamo models that have relatively strong, random, seed magnetic fields that are localized in discrete regions. The number of reversals decreases to zero with reduction of the seed strength, efficiency of the galactic dynamo and size of the spots of the seed field. A systematic observational search for magnetic field reversals in a representative sample of spi...

  18. Heat flow control in thermo-magnetic convective systems using engineered magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaewook; Nomura, Tsuyoshi; Dede, Ercan M.

    2012-09-01

    We present the design of a magnetically controlled convective heat transfer system. The underlying thermo-magnetic instability phenomenon is described, and enhanced convective fluid flow patterns are determined using non-linear programming techniques plus a design sensitivity analysis. Specifically, the magnetic fluid body force is computed by finding the optimal distribution and magnetization direction of a magnetic field source, where the objective is to minimize the maximum temperature of a closed loop heat transfer system. Sizeable fluid recirculation zones are induced by arranging magnetic field generation elements in configurations similar to Halbach arrays. Applications include improved heat flow control for electromechanical systems.

  19. Application of transcerebral, weak (1 microT) complex magnetic fields and mystical experiences: are they generated by field-induced dimethyltryptamine release from the pineal organ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, D R; Persinger, M A

    2003-12-01

    During the last 15 years weak, complex magnetic fields have been applied across the two cerebral hemispheres at the level of the temporoparietal lobes of more than 500 volunteers. Most of these subjects have reported visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive sensations as well as experiences of detachment from the body of 'sentient beings'. Similar but more intense experiences were reported by Strassman in 2001 for volunteers who were injected with N,n-dimethyltryptamine, a compound Strassman hypothesized as the primary mediator of these experiences. If this speculation is valid, then subjects who are exposed to the very weak, complex fields known to elicit similar experiences should display significant increases in the metabolites of this compound within their blood.

  20. Giga-Gauss scale quasistatic magnetic field generation with laser

    CERN Document Server

    Korneev, Philipp; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    A simple setup for the generation of ultra-intense quasistatic magnetic fields is proposed and analysed. Estimations and numerical Particle-In-Cell calculations show that magnetic fields of gigagauss scale may be generated with conventional powerful relativistic lasers interacting with the appropriate targets of a special geometry. The setup may be useful for a wide range of applications, from laboratory astrophysics to magnetized ICF schemes.

  1. Application of Laplace transform for the exact effect of a magnetic field on heat transfer of carbon nanotubes-suspended nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebaid, Abdelhalim; Al Sharif, Mohammed A. [Tabuk Univ. (Saudi Arabia). Faculty of Science

    2015-10-01

    Since the discovery of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs), there is an increasing interest in their applications in industry and medical fields. Attempts of using such CNTs as drug carriers and in cancer therapy in the presence of a magnetic field are now undertaken because of their direct impacts on increasing the thermal conductivity of base fluids. Two types of CNTs are well known for the researchers, the single-walled CNT (SWCNTs) and the multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs); however, the subject of which one is more effective in treatment of cancer deserves more investigations. The present article discusses the effect of such types of CNTs on the flow and heat transfer of nanofluids in the presence of a magnetic field. Exact analytical solution for the heat equation has been obtained by using the Laplace transform, where the solution is expressed in terms of a new special function, the generalised incomplete gamma function. The effects of various parameters on the fluid velocity, temperature distribution, and heat transfer rates have been introduced. Details of possible applications of the current results in the treatment of cancer have been also discussed.

  2. Magnetic Field in Superlattices Semiconductors of Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Nascimento

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present a study on the super-semiconductor networks, using the Kronig-Penney model for the effective mass approximation, and then the calculations for the application of the magnetic field perpendicular and parallel to the layers of super lattices crystals. The magnetic field applied parallel to the layers, was used to adjust the resonance of a higher energy subband of a well by thermal excitation with a lower energy subband of the adjacent well, increasing energy levels in its tunneling rate. We use the formalism of Schrödinger equation of quantum mechanics. Introducing the calculations in a systematic way in superlattices for each semiconductor quantum well to assess their energy spectrum systematically studied.

  3. A Magnetic Field Sensor Based on a Magnetic Fluid-Filled FP-FBG Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Xia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on the characteristic magnetic-controlled refractive index property, in this paper, a magnetic fluid is used as a sensitive medium to detect the magnetic field in the fiber optic Fabry-Perot (FP cavity. The temperature compensation in fiber Fabry-Perot magnetic sensor is demonstrated and achieved. The refractive index of the magnetic fluid varies with the applied magnetic field and external temperature, and a cross-sensitivity effect of the temperature and magnetic field occurs in the Fabry-Perot magnetic sensor and the accuracy of magnetic field measurements is affected by the thermal effect. In order to overcome this problem, we propose a modified sensor structure. With a fiber Bragg grating (FBG written in the insert fiber end of the Fabry-Perot cavity, the FBG acts as a temperature compensation unit for the magnetic field measurement and it provides an effective solution to the cross-sensitivity effect. The experimental results show that the sensitivity of magnetic field detection improves from 0.23 nm/mT to 0.53 nm/mT, and the magnetic field measurement resolution finally reaches 37.7 T. The temperature-compensated FP-FBG magnetic sensor has obvious advantages of small volume and high sensitivity, and it has a good prospect in applications in the power industry and national defense technology areas.

  4. A Magnetic Field Sensor Based on a Magnetic Fluid-Filled FP-FBG Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ji; Wang, Fuyin; Luo, Hong; Wang, Qi; Xiong, Shuidong

    2016-04-29

    Based on the characteristic magnetic-controlled refractive index property, in this paper, a magnetic fluid is used as a sensitive medium to detect the magnetic field in the fiber optic Fabry-Perot (FP) cavity. The temperature compensation in fiber Fabry-Perot magnetic sensor is demonstrated and achieved. The refractive index of the magnetic fluid varies with the applied magnetic field and external temperature, and a cross-sensitivity effect of the temperature and magnetic field occurs in the Fabry-Perot magnetic sensor and the accuracy of magnetic field measurements is affected by the thermal effect. In order to overcome this problem, we propose a modified sensor structure. With a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) written in the insert fiber end of the Fabry-Perot cavity, the FBG acts as a temperature compensation unit for the magnetic field measurement and it provides an effective solution to the cross-sensitivity effect. The experimental results show that the sensitivity of magnetic field detection improves from 0.23 nm/mT to 0.53 nm/mT, and the magnetic field measurement resolution finally reaches 37.7 T. The temperature-compensated FP-FBG magnetic sensor has obvious advantages of small volume and high sensitivity, and it has a good prospect in applications in the power industry and national defense technology areas.

  5. The magnetic field of cortical current sources: the application of a spatial filtering model to the forward and inverse problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S; Roth, B J; Wikswo, J P

    1990-07-01

    We extend our theoretical model based on spatial filtering to determine the ability of a SQUID magnetometer to resolve 2 localized current sources in the brain. We find that in order to resolve 2 separated but coaxial cortical sources, the source-to-pickup coil distance must be comparable to the distance between the 2 sources. The size of the current sources affects the resolving power of a magnetometer, but an anisotropy of 3 in the cortical tissue does not produce a significant effect. The model also provides a solution of the inverse calculation, either to reconstruct the original current source distribution from the measured magnetic field, or to continue the field at the magnetometer inward towards the sources. Both the inverse and inward calculations are limited by the fact that the inverse filter function serves as a high-pass filter, which leads to instabilities at high spatial frequencies, particularly in the presence of noise. The instabilities can be minimized by choosing an appropriate window to attenuate the noise, but this in turn reduces the spatial resolution.

  6. The evolution of primordial magnetic fields since their generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahniashvili, Tina; Brandenburg, Axel; Tevzadze, Alexander G.

    2016-10-01

    We study the evolution of primordial magnetic fields in an expanding cosmic plasma. For this purpose we present a comprehensive theoretical model to consider the evolution of MHD turbulence that can be used over a wide range of physical conditions, including cosmological and astrophysical applications. We model different types of decaying cosmic MHD turbulence in the expanding Universe and characterize the large-scale magnetic fields in such a medium. Direct numerical simulations of freely decaying MHD turbulence are performed for different magnetogenesis scenarios: magnetic fields generated during cosmic inflation as well as electroweak and QCD phase transitions in the early Universe. Magnetic fields and fluid motions are strongly coupled due to the high Reynolds number in the early Universe. Hence, we abandon the simple adiabatic dilution model to estimate magnetic field amplitudes in the expanding Universe and include turbulent mixing effects on the large-scale magnetic field evolution. Numerical simulations have been carried out for non-helical and helical magnetic field configurations. The numerical results show the possibility of inverse transfer of energy in magnetically dominated non-helical MHD turbulence. On the other hand, decay properties of helical turbulence depend on whether the turbulent magnetic field is in a weakly or a fully helical state. Our results show that primordial magnetic fields can be considered as a seed for the observed large-scale magnetic fields in galaxies and clusters. Bounds on the magnetic field strength are obtained and are consistent with the upper and lower limits set by observations of extragalactic magnetic fields.

  7. Near-Field Magnetic Dipole Moment Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Patrick K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the data analysis technique used for magnetic testing at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Excellent results have been obtained using this technique to convert a spacecraft s measured magnetic field data into its respective magnetic dipole moment model. The model is most accurate with the earth s geomagnetic field cancelled in a spherical region bounded by the measurement magnetometers with a minimum radius large enough to enclose the magnetic source. Considerably enhanced spacecraft magnetic testing is offered by using this technique in conjunction with a computer-controlled magnetic field measurement system. Such a system, with real-time magnetic field display capabilities, has been incorporated into other existing magnetic measurement facilities and is also used at remote locations where transport to a magnetics test facility is impractical.

  8. Magnetic Fields from the Electroweak Phase Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Törnkvist, O

    1998-01-01

    I review some of the mechanisms through which primordial magnetic fields may be created in the electroweak phase transition. I show that no magnetic fields are produced initially from two-bubble collisions in a first-order transition. The initial field produced in a three-bubble collision is computed. The evolution of fields at later times is discussed.

  9. The change of electric potentials in the oral cavity after application of extremely low frequency pulsed magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Skomro

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Electric potentials occurring in the oral cavity deserve attention as they may cause various diseases and subjective feelings, which are very difficult to treat. The aim of this study was to evaluate the electric potentials within the oral cavity in patients with metal fillings and metal prosthetic restorations, after using a pulsed electromagnetic field. The study was carried out on 84 patients. The Viofor JPS Classic device was used in the treatment. It generates a pulsed electromagnetic field with low induction of the extremely low frequency (ELF range. Average values of electric potentials in the preliminary test were about the same in both groups; they were 148.8 mV and 145.5 mV. After another appliance of ELF fields there was found a steady decline in the average value of electric potentials in the study group. This decrease was statistically highly significant, while mean values of electric potentials in the control group were characterized by a slightly upward tendency. The obtained statistically significant reduction of electric potentials in the oral cavity of patients having metal fillings and metal prosthetic restorations, after application of the Viofor JPS Classic device, implies a huge impact of ELF pulsed electromagnetic field on inhibition of electrochemical processes, as well as on inhibition of dental alloy corrosion. 

  10. The change of electric potentials in the oral cavity after application of extremely low frequency pulsed magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skomro, Piotr; Lietz-Kijak, Danuta; Kijak, Edward; Bogdziewicz-Wałęsa, Olga; Opalko, Krystyna

    2012-12-11

    Electric potentials occurring in the oral cavity deserve attention as they may cause various diseases and subjective feelings, which are very difficult to treat. The aim of this study was to evaluate the electric potentials within the oral cavity in patients with metal fillings and metal prosthetic restorations, after using a pulsed electromagnetic field. The study was carried out on 84 patients. The Viofor JPS Classic device was used in the treatment. It generates a pulsed electromagnetic field with low induction of the extremely low frequency (ELF) range. Average values of electric potentials in the preliminary test were about the same in both groups; they were 148.8 mV and 145.5 mV. After another appliance of ELF fields there was found a steady decline in the average value of electric potentials in the study group. This decrease was statistically highly significant, while mean values of electric potentials in the control group were characterized by a slightly upward tendency. The obtained statistically significant reduction of electric potentials in the oral cavity of patients having metal fillings and metal prosthetic restorations, after application of the Viofor JPS Classic device, implies a huge impact of ELF pulsed electromagnetic field on inhibition of electrochemical processes, as well as on inhibition of dental alloy corrosion. 

  11. Strong and superstrong pulsed magnetic fields generation

    CERN Document Server

    Shneerson, German A; Krivosheev, Sergey I

    2014-01-01

    Strong pulsed magnetic fields are important for several fields in physics and engineering, such as power generation and accelerator facilities. Basic aspects of the generation of strong and superstrong pulsed magnetic fields technique are given, including the physics and hydrodynamics of the conductors interacting with the field as well as an account of the significant progress in generation of strong magnetic fields using the magnetic accumulation technique. Results of computer simulations as well as a survey of available field technology are completing the volume.

  12. Magnetic Biotransport: Analysis and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Edward P. Furlani

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic particles are finding increasing use in bioapplications, especially as carrier particles to transport biomaterials such as proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids and whole cells etc. Magnetic particles can be prepared with biofunctional coatings to target and label a specific biomaterial, and they enable controlled manipulation of a labeled biomaterial using an external magnetic field. In this review, we discuss the use of magnetic nanoparticles as transport agents in various bioapplicatio...

  13. Deformation of Water by a Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zijun; Dahlberg, E. Dan

    2011-01-01

    After the discovery that superconducting magnets could levitate diamagnetic objects, researchers became interested in measuring the repulsion of diamagnetic fluids in strong magnetic fields, which was given the name "The Moses Effect." Both for the levitation experiments and the quantitative studies on liquids, the large magnetic fields necessary…

  14. Exploring Magnetic Fields with a Compass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunk, Brandon; Beichner, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A compass is an excellent classroom tool for the exploration of magnetic fields. Any student can tell you that a compass is used to determine which direction is north, but when paired with some basic trigonometry, the compass can be used to actually measure the strength of the magnetic field due to a nearby magnet or current-carrying wire. In this…

  15. High magnetic field test of bismuth Hall sensors for ITER steady state magnetic diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, I.; Entler, S.; Kohout, M.; Kočan, M.; Vayakis, G.

    2016-11-01

    Performance of bismuth Hall sensors developed for the ITER steady state magnetic diagnostic was investigated for high magnetic fields in the range ±7 T. Response of the sensors to the magnetic field was found to be nonlinear particularly within the range ±1 T. Significant contribution of the planar Hall effect to the sensors output voltage causing undesirable cross field sensitivity was identified. It was demonstrated that this effect can be minimized by the optimization of the sensor geometry and alignment with the magnetic field and by the application of "current-spinning technique."

  16. Biological Effect of Magnetic Field in Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-Wei ZENG

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the biological effect of magnetic field in mice bodies. Method: With a piece of permanent magnet embeded in mice bodies beside the femoral artery and vein to measure the electrophoretic velocity(um/s). Result: The magnetic field in mice bodies on the experiment group that the electrophoretic velocity is faster more than control and free group.Conclusion:The magnetic field in animal's body can raise the negative electric charges on the surface of erythrocyte to improve the microcirculation, this is the biological effect of magnetic field.

  17. The Magnetic Field Effect on Planetary Nebulae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. R. Khesali; K. Kokabi

    2006-01-01

    In our previous work on the 3-dimensional dynamical structure of planetary nebulae the effect of magnetic field was not considered. Recently Jordan et al. have directly detected magnetic fields in the central stars of some planetary nebulae. This discovery supports the hypothesis that the non-spherical shape of most planetary nebulae is caused by magnetic fields in AGB stars. In this study we focus on the role of initially weak toroidal magnetic fields embedded in a stellar wind in altering the shape of the PN. We found that magnetic pressure is probably influential on the observed shape of most PNe.

  18. Magnetic field concentrator for probing optical magnetic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosiewicz, Tomasz J; Wróbel, Piotr; Szoplik, Tomasz

    2010-12-06

    Development of all dielectric and plasmonic metamaterials with a tunable optical frequency magnetic response creates a need for new inspection techniques. We propose a method of measuring magnetic responses of such metamaterials within a wide range of optical frequencies with a single probe. A tapered fiber probe with a radially corrugated metal coating concentrates azimuthally polarized light in the near-field into a subwavelength spot the longitudinal magnetic field component which is much stronger than the perpendicular electric one. The active probe may be used in a future scanning near-field magnetic microscope for studies of magnetic responses of subwavelength elementary cells of metamaterials.

  19. Synchrotron Intensity Gradients as Tracers of Interstellar Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarian, A.; Yuen, Ka Ho; Lee, Hyeseung; Cho, J.

    2017-06-01

    On the basis of the modern understanding of MHD turbulence, we propose a new way of using synchrotron radiation: using synchrotron intensity gradients (SIGs) for tracing astrophysical magnetic fields. We successfully test the new technique using synthetic data obtained with 3D MHD simulations and provide the demonstration of the practical utility of the technique by comparing the directions of magnetic fields that are obtained with PLANCK synchrotron intensity data to the directions obtained with PLANCK synchrotron polarization data. We demonstrate that the SIGs can reliably trace magnetic fields in the presence of noise and can provide detailed maps of magnetic field directions. We also show that the SIGs are relatively robust for tracing magnetic fields while the low spatial frequencies of the synchrotron image are removed. This makes the SIGs applicable to the tracing of magnetic fields using interferometric data with single-dish measurement absent. We discuss the synergy of using the SIGs together with synchrotron polarization in order to find the actual direction of the magnetic fields and quantify the effects of Faraday rotation as well as with other ways of studying astrophysical magnetic fields. We test our method in the presence of noise and the resolution effects. We stress the complementary nature of the studies using the SIG technique and those employing the recently introduced velocity gradient techniques that trace magnetic fields using spectroscopic data.

  20. Probing High Temperature Superconductors with Magnetometry in Ultrahigh Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lu [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-07-26

    The objective of this research is to investigate the high-field magnetic properties of high temperature superconductors, materials that conduct electricity without loss. A technique known as high-resolution torque magnetometry that was developed to directly measure the magnetization of high temperature superconductors. This technique was implemented using the 65 Tesla pulsed magnetic field facility that is part of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This research addressed unanswered questions about the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity, determine the electronic structure of high temperature superconductors, and shed light on the mechanism of high temperature superconductivity and on potential applications of these materials in areas such as energy generation and power transmission. Further applications of the technology resolve the novel physical phenomena such as correlated topological insulators, and spin liquid state in quantum magnets.

  1. Electrolytic tiltmeters inside magnetic fields: Some observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, J. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Arce, P. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Barcala, J.M. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Calvo, E. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Ferrando, A. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: antonio.ferrando@ciemat.es; Josa, M.I. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Luque, J.M. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Molinero, A. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Navarrete, J. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Oller, J.C. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Yuste, C. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Calderon, A. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Garcia-Moral, L.A. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Gomez, G. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Gonzalez-Sanchez, F.J. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Martinez-Rivero, C. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Matorras, F. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Rodrigo, T. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Ruiz-Arbol, P. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Scodellaro, L. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Sobron, M. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Vila, I. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Virto, A.L. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain)

    2007-04-21

    We present observations of the electrolytic clinometers behaviour inside magnetic field environments introducing phenomenological expressions to account for the measured output voltage variations as functions of field gradients and field strengths.

  2. From Inverse to Delayed Magnetic Catalysis in Strong Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, Shijun

    2016-01-01

    We study magnetic field effect on chiral phase transition in a Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model. In comparison with mean field approximation containing quarks only, including mesons as quantum fluctuations in the model leads to a transition from inverse to delayed magnetic catalysis at finite temperature and delays the transition at finite baryon chemical potential. The location of the critical end point depends on the the magnetic field non-monotonously.

  3. Aerospace applications of magnetic bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downer, James; Goldie, James; Gondhalekar, Vijay; Hockney, Richard

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic bearings have traditionally been considered for use in aerospace applications only where performance advantages have been the primary, if not only, consideration. Conventional wisdom has been that magnetic bearings have certain performance advantages which must be traded off against increased weight, volume, electric power consumption, and system complexity. These perceptions have hampered the use of magnetic bearings in many aerospace applications because weight, volume, and power are almost always primary considerations. This paper will review progress on several active aerospace magnetic bearings programs at SatCon Technology Corporation. The magnetic bearing programs at SatCon cover a broad spectrum of applications including: a magnetically-suspended spacecraft integrated power and attitude control system (IPACS), a magnetically-suspended momentum wheel, magnetic bearings for the gas generator rotor of a turboshaft engine, a vibration-attenuating magnetic bearing system for an airborne telescope, and magnetic bearings for the compressor of a space-rated heat pump system. The emphasis of these programs is to develop magnetic bearing technologies to the point where magnetic bearings can be truly useful, reliable, and well tested components for the aerospace community.

  4. Magnetic field enhanced cell uptake efficiency of magnetic silica mesoporous nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Zhang, Jixi; Xia, Weiliang; Gu, Hongchen

    2012-06-01

    The advantages of using magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles (M-MSNs) in biomedical applications have been widely recognized. However, poor uptake efficiency may hinder the potential of M-MSNs in many applications, such as cell tracking, drug delivery, fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging. An external magnetic field may improve the cellular uptake efficiency. In this paper, we evaluated the effect of a magnetic field on the uptake of M-MSNs. We found that the internalization of M-MSNs by A549 cancer cells could be accelerated and enhanced by a magnetic field. An endocytosis study indicated that M-MSNs were internalized by A549 cells mainly through an energy-dependent pathway, namely clathrin-induced endocytosis. Transmission electron microscopy showed that M-MSNs were trafficked into lysosomes. With the help of a magnetic field, anticancer drug-loaded M-MSNs induced elevated cancer cell growth inhibition.

  5. Field free line magnetic particle imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Erbe, Marlitt

    2014-01-01

    Marlitt Erbe provides a detailed introduction into the young research field of Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) and field free line (FFL) imaging in particular. She derives a mathematical description of magnetic field generation for FFL imaging in MPI. To substantiate the simulation studies on magnetic FFL generation with a proof-of-concept, the author introduces the FFL field demonstrator, which provides the world's first experimentally generated rotated and translated magnetic FFL field complying with the requirements for FFL reconstruction. Furthermore, she proposes a scanner design of consi

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging and its applicability in veterinary cardiology

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, José Manuel de Seiça

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a technique whereby images are created by the manipulation of hydrogen atoms in magnetic fields; it is based on the principle of nuclear magnetic resonance (MR), which is non-invasive and non-ionising (Constantine, Shan, Flamm, & Sivananthan, 2004). Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CMRI) uses the same principle: application of magnetic-field gradients that are adjusted to highlight desired tissue characteristics, producing a variety of sequences that all...

  7. A new ring-shape high-temperature superconducting trapped-field magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jie; Zhang, Min; Wang, Yawei; Li, Xiaojian; Patel, Jay; Yuan, Weijia

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a new trapped-field magnet made of second-generation high-temperature superconducting (2G HTS) rings. This so-called ring-shape 2G HTS magnet has the potential to provide much stronger magnetic fields relative to existing permanent magnets. Compared to existing 2G HTS trapped- field magnets, e.g. 2G HTS bulks and stacks, this new ring-shape 2G HTS magnet is more flexible in size and can be made into magnets with large dimensions for industrial applications. Effective magnetization is the key to being able to use trapped-field magnets. Therefore, this paper focuses on the magnetization mechanism of this new magnet using both experimental and numerical methods. Unique features have been identified and quantified for this new type of HTS magnet in the field cooling and zero field cooling process. The magnetization mechanism can be understood by the interaction between shielding currents and the penetration of external magnetic fields. An accumulation in the trapped field was observed by using multiple pulse field cooling. Three types of demagnetization were studied to measure the trapped-field decay for practical applications. Our results show that this new ring-shape HTS magnet is very promising in the trapping of a high magnetic field. As a super-permanent magnet, it will have a significant impact on large-scale industrial applications, e.g. the development of HTS machines with a very high power density and HTS magnetic resonance imaging devices.

  8. Magnetic field mapper based on rotating coils

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2087244; Arpaia, Pasquale

    This thesis presents a magnetic field mapper based on rotating coils. The requirements, the architecture, the conceptual design, and the prototype for straight magnets were shown. The proposed system is made up of a rotating coil transducer and a train-like system for longitudinal motion and positioning inside magnet bore. The mapper allows a localized measurement of magnetic fields and the variation of the harmonic multipole content in the magnet ends. The proof-of-principle demonstration and the experimental characterization of the rotating-coil transducer specifically conceived for mapping validated the main objective of satisfying the magnetic measurement needs of the next generation of compact accelerators.

  9. Measurements of flux pumping activation of trapped field magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinstein, Roy; Parks, Drew; Sawh, Ravi-Persad [Texas Center for Superconductivity, 202 Houston Science Center, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5002 (United States); Davey, Kent [Physics Department, 617 Science and Research Building I, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Large grains of high temperature superconducting (HTS) material can be utilized as trapped field magnets (TFMs). Persistent currents are set up in the HTS when it is cooled in a magnetic field, or exposed to a magnetic field after cooling. TFMs have been improved over the past two decades by the efforts of a large number of worldwide research groups. However, applications using TFMs have lagged, in part due to the problem of high fields needed for activation. We describe herein experiments designed to observe the behaviour of TFM activation using repeated applications of low fields (called 'pumping'). Significant partial activation is obtained using a non-uniform pumping field (e.g., a small permanent magnet) which is higher in the centre of the HTS than at the periphery. Cooling in zero field followed by pumping with such a field results in trapping the full applied field, in comparison to half of the applied field being trapped by cooling in zero field followed by application of a uniform field. We find that for partial activation by cooling in a field and subsequent activation by pumping, the resulting fields are additive. We also conclude that for activation by fluxoid pumping, creep assists the process.

  10. Tuning of Heat Transfer Rate of Cobalt Manganese Ferrite Based Magnetic Fluids in Varying Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margabandhu MARIMUTHU

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic fluids are the colloidal solutions containing suspended magnetic nanoparticles in carrier fluids. The present work analyzed the heat transfer characteristics of de-ionized water and transformer oil (base fluids based cobalt manganese ferrite (Co1-xMnxFe2O4 coated with oleic acid synthesized via co-precipitation technique magnetic fluids in  varying magnetic field. Experimental investigations were carried out to analyze the heat transfer property of synthesized magnetic fluids (MNF in varying magnetic field applied in perpendicular direction to the thermal gradient of magnetic fluids. The experimental results indicate that the magnetic fluids show enhancement in heat transfer rate than carrier fluids in absence of magnetic field and it shows decrement in heat transfer rate in presence of varying magnetic field. Thus, the results reveal that the heat transfer characteristics of cobalt manganese ferrite based magnetic fluids was tunable by controlling the direction and influence of magnetic field strength. This tunable heat transfer property of cobalt manganese ferrite based magnetic fluids could be applicable in heat transport phenomena of transformers and in microelectronic devices.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.3.16662

  11. Magnetic Fields and Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Van Loo, S; Falle, S A E G

    2012-01-01

    Research performed in the 1950s and 1960s by Leon Mestel on the roles of magnetic fields in star formation established the framework within which he and other key figures have conducted subsequent investigations on the subject. This short tribute to Leon contains a brief summary of some, but not all, of his ground breaking contributions in the area. It also mentions of some of the relevant problems that have received attention in the last few years. The coverage is not comprehensive, and the authors have drawn on their own results more and touched more briefly on those of others than they would in a normal review. Theirs is a personal contribution to the issue honouring Leon, one of the truly great gentlemen, wits, and most insightful of astrophysicists.

  12. Time-varied magnetic field enhances transport of magnetic nanoparticles in viscous gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Cristin; Friedman, Gary; Alamia, John; Barbee, Kenneth; Polyak, Boris

    2010-01-01

    The potential of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to deliver various forms of therapy has not been fully realized, in part due to difficulties in transporting the carriers through soft tissue to different target sites. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that transport of MNPs through a viscous gel can be controlled by a combined AC (time-varying) magnetic field and static field gradient. MNP velocity and transport efficiency were measured in a viscous gel at various settings of magnetic field and magnetite loadings. Combined application of an AC magnetic field with the static field gradient resulted in a nearly 30-fold increase in MNP transport efficiency in viscous gel for 30% (w/w) magnetite-loaded particles as compared with static field conditions. The 'oscillating' effect of an AC magnetic field greatly improves the ability to transport MNPs within soft media by decreasing the effective viscosity of the gel.

  13. DC-based magnetic field controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotter, Dale K. (Shelley, ID); Rankin, Richard A. (Ammon, ID); Morgan, John P,. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01

    A magnetic field controller for laboratory devices and in particular to dc operated magnetic field controllers for mass spectrometers, comprising a dc power supply in combination with improvements to a hall probe subsystem, display subsystem, preamplifier, field control subsystem, and an output stage.

  14. DC-based magnetic field controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.; Morgan, J.P.

    1994-05-31

    A magnetic field controller is described for laboratory devices and in particular to dc operated magnetic field controllers for mass spectrometers, comprising a dc power supply in combination with improvements to a Hall probe subsystem, display subsystem, preamplifier, field control subsystem, and an output stage. 1 fig.

  15. High magnetic fields science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Miura, Noboru

    2003-01-01

    This three-volume book provides a comprehensive review of experiments in very strong magnetic fields that can only be generated with very special magnets. The first volume is entirely devoted to the technology of laboratory magnets: permanent, superconducting, high-power water-cooled and hybrid; pulsed magnets, both nondestructive and destructive (megagauss fields). Volumes 2 and 3 contain reviews of the different areas of research where strong magnetic fields are an essential research tool. These volumes deal primarily with solid-state physics; other research areas covered are biological syst

  16. Trapped magnetic field measurements on HTS bulk by peak controlled pulsed field magnetization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ida, Tetsuya; Watasaki, Masahiro [Department of Electronic Control Engineering, Hiroshima National College of Maritime Technology, 4272-1, Higashino, Ohsakikamijima-cho, Toyota-gun, Hiroshima 725-0231 (Japan); Kimura, Yosuke [Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. Technical Institute System Technology Development Centre 1-1, Kawasaki-cho, Akashi-shi, Hyogo 673-8666 (Japan); Miki, Motohiro; Izumi, Mitsuru, E-mail: ida@hiroshima-cmt.ac.j [Department of Marine Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, 2-1-6, Etchu-jima, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8533 (Japan)

    2010-06-01

    For the past several years, we have studied the high-temperature superconducting (HTS) synchronous motor assembled with melt-textured Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk magnets. If the single pulse field magnetizes a bulk effectively, size of electrical motor will become small for the strong magnetic field of the HTS magnets without reducing output power of motor. In the previous study, we showed that the HTS bulk was magnetized to excellent cone-shape magnetic field distribution by using the waveform control pulse magnetization (WCPM) method. The WCPM technique made possible the active control of the waveform on which magnetic flux motion depended. We generated the pulse waveform with controlled risetime for HTS bulk magnetization to suppress the magnetic flux motion which decreases magnetization efficiency. The pulsed maximum magnetic flux density with slow risetime is not beyond the maximum magnetic flux density which is trapped by the static field magnetization. But, as for applying the pulse which has fast risetime, the magnetic flux which exceed greatly the threshold penetrates the bulk and causes the disorder of the trapped magnetic distribution. This fact suggests the possibility that the threshold at pulsed magnetization influences the dynamic magnetic flux motion. In this study, Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk is magnetized by the controlled arbitrary trapezoidal shape pulse, of which the maximum magnetic flux density is controlled not to exceed the threshold. We will present the trapped magnetic characteristics and the technique to generate the controlled pulsed field.

  17. Magnetic field evolution in tidal disruption events

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnerot, Clément; Lodato, Giuseppe; Rossi, Elena M

    2016-01-01

    When a star gets tidally disrupted by a supermassive black hole, its magnetic field is expected to be transmitted to the debris. In this paper, we study this process via smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamical simulations of the disruption and early debris evolution including the stellar magnetic field. As the gas stretches into a stream, we show that the magnetic field evolution is strongly dependent on its orientation with respect to the stretching direction. In particular, an alignment of the field lines with the direction of stretching induces an increase of the magnetic energy. For disruptions happening well within the tidal radius, the star compression causes the magnetic field strength to sharply increase by an order of magnitude at the time of pericentre passage. If the disruption is partial, we find evidence for a dynamo process occurring inside the surviving core due to the formation of vortices. This causes an amplification of the magnetic field strength by a factor of $\\sim 10$. However, this valu...

  18. Demagnetizing fields in active magnetic regenerators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Bahl, Christian R.H.; Smith, Anders

    2014-01-01

    is in general both a function of the overall shape of the regenerator and its morphology (packed particles, parallel plates etc.) as well as the magnetization of the material. Due to the pronounced temperature dependence of the magnetization near the Curie temperature, the demagnetization field is also......A magnetic material in an externally applied magnetic field will in general experience a spatially varying internal magnetic field due to demagnetizing effects. When the performance of active magnetic regenerators (AMRs) is evaluated using numerical models the internal field is often assumed...... temperature dependent. We propose a relatively straightforward method to correct sufficiently for the demagnetizing field in AMR models. We discuss how the demagnetizing field behaves in regenerators made of packed spheres under realistic operation conditions....

  19. New knowledge of the Galactic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Han, J L

    2009-01-01

    The magnetic fields of our Milky Way galaxy are the main agent for cosmic rays to transport. In the last decade, much new knowledge has been gained from measurements of the Galactic magnetic fields. In the Galactic disk, from the RMs of a large number of newly discovered pulsars, the large-scale magnetic fields along the spiral arms have been delineated in a much larger region than ever before, with alternating directions in the arm and interarm regions. The toroidal fields in the Galactic halo were revealed to have opposite directions below and above the Galactic plane, which is an indication of an A0 mode dynamo operating in the halo. The strength of large-scale fields obtained from pulsar RM data has been found to increase exponentially towards the Galactic center. Compared to the steep Kolmogorov spectrum of magnetic energy at small scales, the large-scale magnetic fields show a shallow broken spatial magnetic energy spectrum.

  20. Behaviour of ferrocholesterics under external magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu, Emil; Motoc, Cornelia

    2001-08-01

    The influence of an external magnetic field on the orientational behaviour of a ferrocholesteric with a positive magnetic anisotropy is investigated. Both the phenomena arising when the field was switched on or switched off are considered. It is found that the field needed for a ferrocholesteric-ferronematic transition BFC↑ is higher when compared to that obtained for the pure cholesteric ( BC↑). A similar result was obtained when estimating the critical field for the homeotropic ferronematic-ferrocholesteric (focal conic) transition, occurring when the magnetic field was decreased or switched off. We found that BFC↓> BC↓. These results are explained when considering that the magnetic moments of the magnetic powder are not oriented parallel to the liquid crystal molecular directors, therefore hindering their orientation under a magnetic field.

  1. Coulomb crystals in the magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Baiko, D A

    2009-01-01

    The body-centered cubic Coulomb crystal of ions in the presence of a uniform magnetic field is studied using the rigid electron background approximation. The phonon mode spectra are calculated for a wide range of magnetic field strengths and for several orientations of the field in the crystal. The phonon spectra are used to calculate the phonon contribution to the crystal energy, entropy, specific heat, Debye-Waller factor of ions, and the rms ion displacements from the lattice nodes for a broad range of densities, temperatures, chemical compositions, and magnetic fields. Strong magnetic field dramatically alters the properties of quantum crystals. The phonon specific heat increases by many orders of magnitude. The ion displacements from their equilibrium positions become strongly anisotropic. The results can be relevant for dusty plasmas, ion plasmas in Penning traps, and especially for the crust of magnetars (neutron stars with superstrong magnetic fields $B \\gtrsim 10^{14}$ G). The effect of the magnetic ...

  2. Generating the optimal magnetic field for magnetic refrigeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Insinga, Andrea Roberto; Smith, Anders

    2016-01-01

    remanence distribution for any desired magnetic field. The method is based on the reciprocity theorem, which through the use of virtual magnets can be used to calculate the optimal remanence distribution. Furthermore, we present a method for segmenting a given magnet design that always results...

  3. Isoperimetric Inequalities and Magnetic Fields at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    McInnes, Brett

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the generalization of the classical isoperimetric inequality to asymptotically hyperbolic Riemannian manifolds. It has been discovered that the AdS/CFT correspondence in string theory requires that such an inequality hold in order to be internally consistent. In a particular application, to the systems formed in collisions of heavy ions in particle colliders, we show how to formulate this inequality in terms of measurable physical quantities, the magnetic field and the temperature. Experiments under way at CERN in Geneva can thus be said to be testing an isoperimetric inequality.

  4. Exploiting BSA to Inhibit the Fibrous Aggregation of Magnetic Nanoparticles under an Alternating Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Gu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The alternating magnetic field was discovered to be capable of inducing the fibrous aggregation of magnetic nanoparticles. However, this anisotropic aggregation may be unfavorable for practical applications. Here, we reported that the adsorption of BSA (bovine serum albumin on the surfaces of magnetic nanoparticles can effectively make the fibrous aggregation of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles turn into a more isotropic aggregation in the presence of the alternating magnetic field. Also, the heating curves with and without BSA adsorption under different pH conditions were measured to show the influence of the colloidal aggregation states on the collective calorific behavior of magnetic nanoparticles.

  5. Applications of Magnetic Microbubbles for Theranostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Cai, Fang Yang, Ning Gu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Compared with other diagnostic methods, ultrasound is proven to be a safe, simple, non-invasive and cost-effective imaging technique, but the resolution is not comparable to that of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound employing microbubbles can gain a better resolution and is now widely used to diagnose a number of diseases in the clinic. For the last decade, microbubbles have been widely used as ultrasound contrast agents, drug delivery systems and nucleic acid transfection tools. However, microbubbles are not fairly stable enough in some conditions and are not well administrated distributed in the circulation system. On the other hand, magnetic nanoparticles, as MRI contrast agents, can non-specifically penetrate into normal tissues because of their relatively small sizes. By taking advantage of these two kinds of agents, the magnetic microbubbles which couple magnetic iron oxides nanoparticles in the microbubble structure have been explored. The stability of microbubbles can be raised by encapsulating magnetic nanoparticles into the bubble shells and with the guidance of magnetic field, magnetic microbubbles can be delivered to regions of interest, and after appropriate ultrasound exposure, the nanoparticles can be released to the desired area while the magnetic microbubbles collapse. In this review, we summarize magnetic microbubbles used in diagnostic and therapeutic fields, and predict the potential applications of magnetic microbubbles in the future.

  6. Rotating magnetic field induced oscillation of magnetic particles for in vivo mechanical destruction of malignant glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu; Muroski, Megan E; Petit, Dorothée C M C; Mansell, Rhodri; Vemulkar, Tarun; Morshed, Ramin A; Han, Yu; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Horbinski, Craig M; Huang, Xinlei; Zhang, Lingjiao; Cowburn, Russell P; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2016-02-10

    Magnetic particles that can be precisely controlled under a magnetic field and transduce energy from the applied field open the way for innovative cancer treatment. Although these particles represent an area of active development for drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia, the in vivo anti-tumor effect under a low-frequency magnetic field using magnetic particles has not yet been demonstrated. To-date, induced cancer cell death via the oscillation of nanoparticles under a low-frequency magnetic field has only been observed in vitro. In this report, we demonstrate the successful use of spin-vortex, disk-shaped permalloy magnetic particles in a low-frequency, rotating magnetic field for the in vitro and in vivo destruction of glioma cells. The internalized nanomagnets align themselves to the plane of the rotating magnetic field, creating a strong mechanical force which damages the cancer cell structure inducing programmed cell death. In vivo, the magnetic field treatment successfully reduces brain tumor size and increases the survival rate of mice bearing intracranial glioma xenografts, without adverse side effects. This study demonstrates a novel approach of controlling magnetic particles for treating malignant glioma that should be applicable to treat a wide range of cancers.

  7. Antimagnets: controlling magnetic fields with superconductor-metamaterial hybrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Alvaro; Navau, Carles; Prat-Camps, Jordi; Chen Duxing, E-mail: alvar.sanchez@uab.cat [Grup d' Electromagnetisme, Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2011-09-15

    Magnetism is very important in various areas of science and technology, ranging from magnetic recording through energy generation to trapping cold atoms. Physicists have managed to master magnetism-to create and manipulate magnetic fields-almost at will. Surprisingly, there is at least one property that has been elusive until now: how to 'switch off' the magnetic interaction of a magnetic material with existing magnetic fields without modifying them. Here we introduce the antimagnet, a design that conceals the magnetic response of a given volume from its exterior, without altering the external magnetic fields, in some respects analogous to recent theoretical proposals for cloaking electromagnetic waves with metamaterials. However, unlike these devices, which require extreme material properties, our device is feasible and needs only two kinds of available materials: superconductors and isotropic magnetic materials. Antimagnets may have applications in magnetic-based medical techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging or in reducing the magnetic signature of vessels or planes.

  8. Magnetic field sensor for isotropically sensing an incident magnetic field in a sensor plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Bharat B. (Inventor); Wan, Hong (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A magnetic field sensor that isotropically senses an incident magnetic field. This is preferably accomplished by providing a magnetic field sensor device that has one or more circular shaped magnetoresistive sensor elements for sensing the incident magnetic field. The magnetoresistive material used is preferably isotropic, and may be a CMR material or some form of a GMR material. Because the sensor elements are circular in shape, shape anisotropy is eliminated. Thus, the resulting magnetic field sensor device provides an output that is relatively independent of the direction of the incident magnetic field in the sensor plane.

  9. Trapped field measurements of Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk superconductor in controlled pulse field magnetizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ida, T [Department of Electronic Control Engineering, Hiroshima National College of Maritime Technology, 4272-1, Higashino, Ohsakikamijima-cho, Toyota-gun, Hiroshima 725-0231 (Japan); Kimura, Y; Sano, T; Yamaguchi, K; Izumi, M [Department of Marine Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, 2-1-6, Etchu-jima, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8533 (Japan); Miki, M [Kitano Seiki Co. Ltd., 7-13-7, Chuo, Ohta-ku, Tokyo 143-0024 (Japan)], E-mail: ida@hiroshima-cmt.ac.jp

    2008-02-01

    For large-scale electric power application of the melt-processed high temperature superconductor (HTS) bulks, especially at rotating machine, development of trapping much higher magnetic fields by using pulsed magnetization technique is essential. It is difficult to use static field cooling (FCM) technique that is most effective magnetizing method for the general industrial HTS applications, because the FCM requires large-scale superconducting magnets. Because the rise in temperature due to the magnetic flux motion decreases the pinning force, we controlled the magnetic flux penetrating to the bulk for the effective magnetization. A couple of vortex-type copper coils applied a magnetic field to a Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk, which dimension was 45mm in diameter and 19 mm in thickness. HTS bulk was magnetized by the controlled pulse field without passive LCR pulse. We controlled waveform by using the discharge current that IGBT chopper in pulse magnetizer intermitted. We applied the pulse magnetic field with the various risetime to the HTS bulk in liquid nitrogen. The various conditions of the controlled waveform pulse to trap well-dressed profile magnetized the Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk, strongly at 77K. In the present study, we show several properties which was measured in the PFM of the HTS bulk.

  10. On the origin of cosmic magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulsrud, Russell M.; Zweibel, Ellen G.

    2008-04-01

    and most popular mechanism is the α-Ω mean field dynamo theory developed by a number of people in the late sixties. This theory and its application to galactic magnetic fields is discussed in considerable detail in this review. We point out certain difficulties with this theory that make it seem unlikely that this is the whole story. The main difficulty with this as the only such amplification mechanism is rooted in the fact that, on galactic scales, flux is constant and is frozen in the interstellar medium. This implies that flux must be removed from the galactic discs, as is well recognized by the standard theory. For our Galaxy this turns out to be a major problem, since unless the flux and the interstellar mass are somehow separated, some interstellar mass must also be removed from the deep galactic gravitational well. This is very difficult. It is pointed out that unless the field has a substantial field strength, much larger than that of the seed fields, this separation can hardly happen. And of course, it must if the α-Ω dynamo is to start from the ultra weak seed field. (It is our philosophy, expressed in this review, that if an origin theory is unable to create the magnetic field in our Galaxy it is essentially incomplete.) Thus, it is more reasonable for the first and largest amplification to occur before the Galaxy forms, and the matter embedded in the field is gravitationally trapped. Two such mechanisms are discussed for such a pregalactic origin; (1) they are generated in the turbulence of the protogalaxy and (2) the fields come from giant radio jets. Several arguments against a primordial origin are also discussed, as are ways around them. Our conclusion as to the most likely origin of cosmic magnetic fields is that they are first produced at moderate field strengths by primordial mechanisms and then changed and their strength increased to their present value and structure by a galactic disc dynamo. The primordial mechanisms have not yet been

  11. Multi-time scaling based modeling of transient electro-magnetic fields in vibrating media with antenna applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghmaie, Reza; Ghosh, Somnath

    2017-07-01

    This paper develops an accurate and efficient finite element model for simulating coupled transient electromagnetic and dynamic mechanical fields that differ widely in the frequency ranges. This coupled modeling framework is necessary for effective modeling and simulation of structures such as antennae that are governed by multi-physics problems operating in different frequency and temporal regimes. A key development is the wavelet transformation induced multi-time scaling or WATMUS method that is designed to overcome shortcomings of modeling coupled multi-physics problems that are governed by disparate frequencies. The WATMUS-based FE model is enhanced in this paper with a scaled and preconditioned Newton-GMRES solver for efficient solution. Results from the WATMUS-based FE model show the accuracy and highly improved computational efficiency in comparison with single time-scale methods. The coupled FE model is used to solve two different antenna problems with large electromagnetic to mechanical frequency ratios. The examples considered are a monopole antenna and a microstrip patch antenna. Comparing the electromagnetic fields with the progression of mechanical cycles demonstrate complex multi-physics relations in these applications.

  12. Beam Transport in Toroidal Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, N; Meusel, O; Ratzinger, U

    2016-01-01

    The concept of a storage ring with toroidal magnetic field was presented in the two previous EPAC conferences. Here we report the first results of experiments performed with beam transport in toroidal magnetic fields and details of the injection system. The beam transport experiments were carried out with 30 degree toroidal segments with an axial magnetic field of 0.6T. The multi turn injection system relies on a transverse injection coil together with an electric kicker system.

  13. Fluctuation conductivity of disordered superconductors in magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasinski, Brian; Schwiete, Georg

    2013-07-01

    We calculate fluctuation corrections to the longitudinal conductivity of disordered superconductors subject to an external magnetic field. We derive analytic expressions that are valid in the entire metallic part of the temperature-magnetic field phase diagram as long as the effect of the magnetic field on the spin degrees of freedom of the electrons may be neglected. Our calculations are based on a kinetic equation approach. For the special case of superconducting films and wires in parallel magnetic fields, we perform a detailed comparison with results that were previously obtained with diagrammatic perturbation theory in the imaginary-time formalism. As an application, we study the fluctuation conductivity of films in tilted magnetic fields with a special focus on the low-temperature regime. We present a detailed discussion of the phenomenon of the nonmonotonic magnetoresistance and find that it displays a pronounced dependence on the tilting angle.

  14. Magnetic nanoparticles and concentrated magnetic nanofluids: Synthesis, properties and some applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ladislau Vékás; Doina Bica; Mikhail V. Avdeev

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews some recent results concerning chemical synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles and preparation of various types of magnetic nanofluids. Structural properties and behaviour in external magnetic field of magnetic nanofluids will be emphasized with relation to their use in leakage-free rotating seals and in biomedical applications.

  15. Magnetically modified bioсells in constant magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, E. G.; Panina, L. K.; Kolikov, V. A.; Bogomolova, E. V.; Snetov, V. N.; Cherepkova, I. A.; Kiselev, A. A.

    2017-02-01

    Paper addresses the inverse problem in determining the area, where the external constant magnetic field captures the biological cells modified by the magnetic nanoparticles. Zero velocity isolines, in area where the modified cells are captured by the magnetic field were determined by numerical method for two locations of the magnet. The problem was solved taking into account the gravitational field, magnetic induction, density of medium, concentration and size of cells, and size and magnetization of nanoparticles attached to the cell. Increase in the number of the nanoparticles attached to the cell and decrease in the cell' size, enlarges the area, where the modified cells are captured and concentrated by the magnet. Solution is confirmed by the visible pattern formation of the modified cells Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  16. Near-zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Ledbetter, Micah; Theis, Thomas; Blanchard, John; Ring, Hattie; Ganssle, Paul; Appelt, Stephan; Bluemich, Bernhard; Pines, Alex; Budker, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    We investigate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in near-zero-field, where the Zeeman interaction can be treated as a perturbation to the electron mediated scalar interaction (J-coupling). This is in stark contrast to the high field case, where heteronuclear J-couplings are normally treated as a small perturbation. We show that the presence of very small magnetic fields results in splitting of the zero-field NMR lines, imparting considerable additional information to the pure zero-field spectr...

  17. Application of magnetic field hyperthermia and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles to HIV-1-specific T-cell cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams JP

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available James P Williams,1 Paul Southern,2 Anya Lissina,3 Helen C Christian,4 Andrew K Sewell,3 Rodney Phillips,1,5,6 Quentin Pankhurst,2 John Frater1,5,6 1Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK; 2Davy-Faraday Research Laboratory, Royal Institution of Great Britain, London, UK; 3Institute of Infection and Immunity, Cardiff University School of Medicine, Cardiff, UK; 4Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; 5James Martin 21st Century School, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK; 6Oxford NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, Oxford, UK Abstract: The latent HIV-1 reservoir remains the major barrier to HIV-1 eradication. Although successful at limiting HIV replication, highly active antiretroviral therapy is unable to cure HIV infection, thus novel therapeutic strategies are needed to eliminate the virus. Magnetic field hyperthermia (MFH generates thermoablative cytotoxic temperatures in target-cell populations, and has delivered promising outcomes in animal models, as well as in several cancer clinical trials. MFH has been proposed as a strategy to improve the killing of HIV-infected cells and for targeting the HIV latent reservoirs. We wished to determine whether MFH could be used to enhance cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL targeting of HIV-infected cells in a proof-of-concept study. Here, for the first time, we apply MFH to an infectious disease (HIV-1 using the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle FeraSpin R. We attempt to improve the cytotoxic potential of T-cell receptor-transfected HIV-specific CTLs using thermotherapy, and assess superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle toxicity, uptake, and effect on cell function using more sensitive methods than previously described. FeraSpin R exhibited only limited toxicity, demonstrated efficient uptake and cell-surface attachment, and only modestly impacted T-cell function. In contrast to the cancer models, insufficient MFH was

  18. Magnetic field evolution in tidal disruption events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnerot, Clément; Price, Daniel J.; Lodato, Giuseppe; Rossi, Elena M.

    2017-08-01

    When a star gets tidally disrupted by a supermassive black hole, its magnetic field is expected to pervade its debris. In this paper, we study this process via smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamical simulations of the disruption and early debris evolution including the stellar magnetic field. As the gas stretches into a stream, we show that the magnetic field evolution is strongly dependent on its orientation with respect to the stretching direction. In particular, an alignment of the field lines with the direction of stretching induces an increase of the magnetic energy. For disruptions happening well within the tidal radius, the star compression causes the magnetic field strength to sharply increase by an order of magnitude at the time of pericentre passage. If the disruption is partial, we find evidence for a dynamo process occurring inside the surviving core due to the formation of vortices. This causes an amplification of the magnetic field strength by a factor of ˜10. However, this value represents a lower limit since it increases with numerical resolution. For an initial field strength of 1 G, the magnetic field never becomes dynamically important. Instead, the disruption of a star with a strong 1 MG magnetic field produces a debris stream within which magnetic pressure becomes similar to gas pressure a few tens of hours after disruption. If the remnant of one or multiple partial disruptions is eventually fully disrupted, its magnetic field could be large enough to magnetically power the relativistic jet detected from Swift J1644+57. Magnetized streams could also be significantly thickened by magnetic pressure when it overcomes the confining effect of self-gravity.

  19. Magnetic field screening effect in electroweak model

    CERN Document Server

    Bakry, A; Zhang, P M; Zou, L P

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that in the Weinberg-Salam model a magnetic field screening effect for static magnetic solutions takes place. The origin of that phenomenon is conditioned by features of the electro-weak interaction, namely, there is mutual cancellation of Abelian magnetic fields created by the SU(2) gauge fields and Higgs boson. The effect implies monopole charge screening in finite energy system of monopoles and antimonopoles. We consider another manifestation of the screening effect which leads to an essential energy decrease of magnetic solutions. Applying variational method we have found a magnetic field configuration with a topological azimuthal magnetic flux which minimizes the energy functional and possesses a total energy of order 1 TeV. We suppose that corresponding magnetic bound state exists in the electroweak theory and can be detected in experiment.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Level Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    According to Maxwell electromagnetic field theory and magnetic vector potential integral equation, a mathematical model of LMF (Level Magnetic Field) for EMBR (Electromagnetic brake) was proposed, and the reliable software for LMF calculation was developed. The distribution of magnetic flux density given by numerical simulation shows that the magnetic flux density is greater in the magnet and magnetic leakage is observed in the gap. The magnetic flux density is uniform in horizontal plane and a peak is observed in vertical plane. Furthermore, the effects of electromagnetic and structural parameters on magnetic flux density were discussed. The relationship between magnetic flux, electromagnetic parameters and structural parameters is obtained by dimensional analysis, simulation experiment and least square method.

  1. Rydberg EIT in High Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lu; Anderson, David; Miller, Stephanie; Raithel, Georg

    2016-05-01

    We present progress towards an all-optical approach for measurements of strong magnetic fields using electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) with Rydberg atoms in an atomic vapor. Rydberg EIT spectroscopy is a promising technique for the development of atom-based, calibration- and drift-free technology for high magnetic field sensing. In this effort, Rydberg EIT is employed to spectroscopically investigate the response of Rydberg atoms exposed to strong magnetic fields, in which Rydberg atoms are in the strong-field regime. In our setup, two neodymium block magnets are used to generate fields of about 0.8 Tesla, which strongly perturb the atoms. Information on the field strength and direction is obtained by a comparison of experimental spectra with calculated spectral maps. Investigations of magnetic-field inhomogeneities and other decoherence sources will be discussed.

  2. Optical fibers with composite magnetic coating for magnetic field sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radojevic, V.; Nedeljkovic, D.; Talijan, N. E-mail: ntalijan@elab.tmf.bg.ac.yu; Trifunovic, D.; Aleksic, R

    2004-05-01

    The investigated system for optical fiber sensor was multi-mode optical fiber with magnetic composite coating. Polymer component of composite coating was poly (ethylene-co-vinyl acetate)-EVA, and the magnetic component was powder of SmCo{sub 5} permanent magnet in form of single domain particles. The influence of the applied external magnetic field on the change of intensity of the light signal propagated through optical fiber was investigated.

  3. Optical fibers with composite magnetic coating for magnetic field sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radojevic, V.; Nedeljkovic, D.; Talijan, N.; Trifunovic, D.; Aleksic, R.

    2004-05-01

    The investigated system for optical fiber sensor was multi-mode optical fiber with magnetic composite coating. Polymer component of composite coating was poly (ethylene-co-vinyl acetate)-EVA, and the magnetic component was powder of SmCo5 permanent magnet in form of single domain particles. The influence of the applied external magnetic field on the change of intensity of the light signal propagated through optical fiber was investigated.

  4. Vibration-induced field fluctuations in a superconducting magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, J. W.; Bohnet, J. G.; Sawyer, B. C.; Uys, H.; Biercuk, M. J.; Bollinger, J. J.

    2016-06-01

    Superconducting magnets enable precise control of nuclear and electron spins, and are used in experiments that explore biological and condensed-matter systems, and fundamental atomic particles. In high-precision applications, a common view is that slow (Be+9 electron-spin qubits in the 4.46 -T field of a superconducting magnet. We measure a spin-echo T2 coherence time of ˜6 ms for the Be+9 electron-spin resonance at 124 GHz , limited by part-per-billion fractional fluctuations in the magnet's homogeneous field. Vibration isolation of the magnet improved T2 to ˜50 ms.

  5. An Intergalactic Magnetic Field from Quasar Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Furlanetto, S; Furlanetto, Steven; Loeb, Abraham

    2001-01-01

    Outflows from quasars inevitably pollute the intergalactic medium (IGM) with magnetic fields. The short-lived activity of a quasar leaves behind an expanding magnetized bubble in the IGM. We model the expansion of the remnant quasar bubbles and calculate their distribution as a function magnetic field strength at different redshifts. We find that by a redshift z ~ 3, about 5-80% of the IGM volume is filled by magnetic fields with an energy density > 10% of the mean thermal energy density of a photo-ionized IGM (at ~ 10^4 K). As massive galaxies and X-ray clusters condense out of the magnetized IGM, the adiabatic compression of the magnetic field could result in the fields observed in these systems without a need for further dynamo amplification.

  6. Maximum trapped field of a ring bulk superconductor by low pulsed field magnetization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchimoto, M. [Hokkaido Institute of Technology, 7-15 Maeda, Teine-ku, Sapporo 006-8585 (Japan)], E-mail: tsuchi@hit.ac.jp; Kamijo, H. [Railway Technical Research Institute, 2-8-38, Hikari-cho, Kokubunji, Tokyo 185-8540 (Japan)

    2007-10-01

    Pulsed field magnetization is an important technique for a bulk superconducting magnet, which is one practical application of a bulk high T{sub c} superconductor (HTS). Full magnetization of a ring HTS is effective to obtain large trapped field for low pulsed field magnetization. In this study, trapped field in a ring bulk superconductor by the low pulsed field magnetization is numerically analyzed under assumption of variable shielding current by the temperature control. Differences between one-dimensional Bean model and axisymmetric three-dimensional numerical solution are discussed through the analysis. There is maximum trapped field in the axisymmetric three-dimensional model because of finite thickness of the ring HTS. The shielding current density and inner radius of the ring HTS are discussed to obtain the maximum trapped field.

  7. An Equivalent Source Method for Modelling the Lithospheric Magnetic Field Using Satellite and Airborne Magnetic Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kother, Livia Kathleen; Hammer, Magnus Danel; Finlay, Chris

    for the remaining lithospheric magnetic field consists of magnetic point sources (monopoles) arranged in an icosahedron grid with an increasing grid resolution towards the airborne survey area. The corresponding source values are estimated using an iteratively reweighted least squares algorithm that includes model......We present a technique for modelling the lithospheric magnetic field based on estimation of equivalent potential field sources. As a first demonstration we present an application to magnetic field measurements made by the CHAMP satellite during the period 2009-2010. Three component vector field....... Advantages of the equivalent source method include its local nature and the ease of transforming to spherical harmonics when needed. The method can also be applied in local, high resolution, investigations of the lithospheric magnetic field, for example where suitable aeromagnetic data is available...

  8. MDI Synoptic Charts of Magnetic Field: Interpolation of Polar Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Hoeksema, J. T.; Zhao, X.; Larson, R. M.

    2007-05-01

    In this poster, we compare various methods for interpolation of polar field for the MDI synoptic charts of magnetic field. By examining the coronal and heliospheric magnetic field computed from the synoptic charts based on a Potential Field Source Surface model (PFSS), and by comparing the heliospheric current sheets and footpoints of open fields with the observations, we conclude that the coronal and heliospheric fields calculated from the synoptic charts are sensitive to the polar field interpolation, and a time-dependent interpolation method using the observed polar fields is the best among the seven methods investigated.

  9. Magnetic Fields above the Surface of aSuperconductor with Internal Magnetism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluhm, Hendrik; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC, SSRl

    2007-06-26

    The author presents a method for calculating the magnetic fields near a planar surface of a superconductor with a given intrinsic magnetization in the London limit. He computes solutions for various magnetic domain boundary configurations and derives relations between the spectral densities of the magnetization and the resulting field in the vacuum half space, which are useful if the magnetization can be considered as a statistical quantity and its features are too small to be resolved individually. The results are useful for analyzing and designing magnetic scanning experiments. Application to existing data from such experiments on Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} show that a domain wall would have been detectable, but the magnetic field of randomly oriented small domains and small defects may have been smaller than the experimental noise level.

  10. Efficient magnetic fields for supporting toroidal plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Landreman, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic field that supports tokamak and stellarator plasmas must be produced by coils well separated from the plasma. However the larger the separation, the more difficult it is to produce a given magnetic field in the plasma region, so plasma configurations should be chosen that can be supported as efficiently as possible by distant coils. The properties of curl-free magnetic fields allow magnetic field distributions to be ranked in order of their difficulty of production from a distance. Plasma shapes with low curvature and spectral width may be difficult to support, whereas plasma shapes with sharp edges may be efficiently supported by distant coils. Two measures of difficulty, which correctly identify such differences in difficulty, will be examined. These measures, which can be expressed as matrices, relate the externally-produced normal magnetic field on the plasma surface to the either the normal field or current on a distant control surface. A singular value decomposition (SVD) of either matrix y...

  11. Magnetic Field Effects on Relaxation Parameters of The Hexamethylenetetramine (HMT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Nurcan

    2013-03-01

    The use of low magnetic field is one of the method for improvement of the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of detection of the chemical compounds by nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). We investigated the FID phenomenon of nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) from hexamethylenetetramine (HMT), C6H12N4, under magnetic field. The influence of the low magnetic field (up to 30 mT) was investigated for the detection of the pulse NQR signal for HMT We detected the pure NQR FID signal of HMT with a short pulse interval. The intensity of the FID signal changed with applied magnetic field. The application of the low magnetic field produces the splitting and brodening of the NQR line. We observed T1, T2 and T2*. HMT has a long T2*(near 1.5ms). This one represents the suitable sample for investigation of the influence of low magnetic field for NQR detection. The application of the low magnetic field produces the splitting and brodening of the NQR line.

  12. The Evolution of the Earth's Magnetic Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloxham, Jeremy; Gubbins, David

    1989-01-01

    Describes the change of earth's magnetic field at the boundary between the outer core and the mantle. Measurement techniques used during the last 300 years are considered. Discusses the theories and research for explaining the field change. (YP)

  13. Electrical Properties of Nanostructured Magnetic Colloid and Influence of Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PU Sheng-Li; CHEN Xian-Feng; DI Zi-Yun; GENG Tao; XIA Yu-Xing

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the electrical properties of the nanostructured magnetic colloid without and with magnetic Held. The competition between the directional motion of the charged magnetic nanoparticles and other minor nonmagnetic impurities (also small amount of ions) under applied voltage and their random orientation due to thermal activation is implemented to elaborate the electrically conduction mechanism under zero magnetic Geld. Two equivalent electric circuits are employed for explaining the charging and discharging processes. The tunnelling conduction mechanism upon application of externally magnetic field may exist in the nanostructured magnetic colloid. The alternation of the two conduction mechanisms accounts for the current spikes when the magnetic field is switched on or off. This work presents the peculiar electrical phenomena of the magnetically colloidal system.

  14. Assembly of magnetic spheres in strong homogeneous magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, René; Stanković, Igor

    2017-01-01

    The assembly in two dimensions of spherical magnets in strong magnetic field is addressed theoretically. It is shown that the attraction and assembly of parallel magnetic chains is the result of a delicate interplay of dipole-dipole interactions and short ranged excluded volume correlations. Minimal energy structures are obtained by numerical optimization procedure as well as analytical considerations. For a small number of constitutive magnets Ntot ≤ 26, a straight chain is found to be the ground state. In the regime of larger Ntot ≥ 27, the magnets form two touching chains with equally long tails at both ends. We succeed to identify the transition from two to three touching chains at Ntot = 129. Overall, this study sheds light on the mechanisms of the recently experimentally observed ribbon formation of superparamagnetic colloids via lateral aggregation of magnetic chains in magnetic field (Darras et al., 2016).

  15. Resolution changes of MCP-PMTs in magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieke, J.; Belias, A.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Kalicy, G.; Krebs, M.; Lehmann, D.; Nerling, F.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Pfaffinger, M.; Uhlig, F.; Düren, M.; Etzelmüller, E.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kröck, B.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Schmidt, M.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Schlimme, S.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.

    2016-05-01

    Micro-channel plate photomultiplier tubes (MCP-PMTs) are chosen in many applications that have to cope with strong magnetic fields. The DIRC detectors of the PANDA experiment plan to employ them as they show excellent timing characteristics, radiation hardness, relatively low dark count rates and sufficient lifetime. This article mainly focuses on the performance of the position reconstruction of detected photons. Two different MCP-PMTs with segmented anode geometries have been tested in magnetic fields of different strengths. The variation of their performance has been studied. The measurements show improved position resolution and image shifts with increasing magnetic field strength.

  16. Dosimetry in clinical static magnetic fields using plastic scintillation detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefanowicz, S.; Latzel, H.; Lindvold, Lars René

    2013-01-01

    , however, not clear yet how dosimetry will be conducted as standard methods and might not be easily transferred to systems with clinical magnetic fields. For dosimetry in MRI accelerators, we have tested plastic scintillation detectors (PSD) coupled to optical fibers. They are suitable for real-time and in......-vivo dosimetry in radiation treatments and diagnostics and could be, being all-optical, promising candidates for this application. To study the basic feasibility of using PSDs with organic scintillators in magnetic fields, we measured the response of these dosimeters in presence of magnetic fields up to 1 T...

  17. Growth of Magnetite Nanoparticles Under Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang J.; Peng Z.M.; Chen Q.W.

    2004-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Over the past several years, the preparation and characterization ofnanoscale magnetic materials, especially one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure, have attracted much attention as the nanomaterials would allow investigating the fundamental aspects of magnetic-ordering phenomena in magnetic materials with reduced dimensions and could lead to new potential applications such as data storage technology[1-6].

  18. Paschen-Back effect in the CrH molecule and its application for magnetic field measurements on stars, brown dwarfs, and hot exoplanets

    OpenAIRE

    Kuzmychov, O.; Berdyugina, S. V.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the Paschen-Back effect in the (0,0) band of the A6{\\Sigma}+-X6{\\Sigma}+ system of the CrH molecule, and we examined its potential for estimating magnetic fields on stars and substellar objects, such as brown dwarfs and hot exoplanets. We carried out quantum mechanical calculations to obtain the energy level structure of the electronic-vibrational-rotational states considered both in the absence and in the presence of a magnetic field. Level mixing due to magnetic field pertur...

  19. Switchable Magnetic Bottles and Field Gradients for Particle Traps

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Manuel; Quint, Wolfgang; von Lindenfels, David; Wiesel, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Versatile methods for the manipulation of individual quantum systems, such as confined particles, have become central elements in current developments in precision spectroscopy, frequency standards, quantum information processing, quantum simulation, and alike. For atomic and some subatomic particles, both neutral and charged, a precise control of magnetic fields is essen- tial. In this paper, we discuss possibilities for the creation of specific magnetic field configurations which find appli- cation in these areas. In particular, we pursue the idea of a magnetic bottle which can be switched on and off by transition between the normal and the superconducting phase of a suitable material in cryogenic environments, for example in trap experiments in moderate magnetic fields. Methods for a fine-tuning of the magnetic field and its linear and quadratic components in a trap are presented together with possible applications.

  20. Vibration-induced field fluctuations in a superconducting magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Britton, J W; Bohnet, J G; Uys, H; Biercuk, M J; Bollinger, J J

    2015-01-01

    Superconducting magnets enable precise control of nuclear and electron spins, and are used in experiments that explore biological and condensed matter systems, and fundamental atomic particles. In high-precision applications, a common view is that that slow (<1 Hz) drift of the homogeneous magnetic field limits control and measurement precision. We report on previously undocumented higher-frequency field noise (10 Hz to 200 Hz) that limits the coherence time of 9Be+ electron-spin qubits in the 4.46 T field of a superconducting magnet. We measure a spin-echo T2 coherence time of ~6 ms for the 9Be+ electron-spin resonance at 124 GHz, limited by part-per-billion fractional fluctuations in the magnet's homogeneous field. Vibration isolation of the magnet improved T2 to ~50 ms.

  1. Evolution of Neutron Star Magnetic Fields

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dipankar Bhattacharya

    2002-03-01

    This paper reviews the current status of the theoretical models of the evolution of the magnetic fields of neutron stars other than magnetars. It appears that the magnetic fields of neutron stars decay significantly only if they are in binary systems. Three major physical models for this, namely spindown-induced flux expulsion, ohmic evolution of crustal field and diamagnetic screening of the field by accreted plasma, are reviewed.

  2. Field-stepped broadband NMR in pulsed magnets and application to SrCu2(BO3)2 at 54 T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlrautz, J.; Haase, J.; Green, E. L.; Zhang, Z. T.; Wosnitza, J.; Herrmannsdörfer, T.; Dabkowska, H. A.; Gaulin, B. D.; Stern, R.; Kühne, H.

    2016-10-01

    Pulsed magnets generate the highest magnetic fields as brief transients during which the observation of NMR is difficult, however, this is the only route to unique insight into material properties up to the regime of 100 T. Here, it is shown how rather broad NMR spectra can be assembled in a pulsed magnet during a single field pulse by using the inherent time dependence of the field for the recording of field-stepped free induction decays that cover a broad frequency range. The technique is then applied to 11B NMR of the spin-dimer system SrCu2(BO3)2, a magnetic insulator known to undergo a series of field-driven changes of the magnetic ground state. At peak fields of about 54T at the Dresden High Magnetic Field Laboratory, 11B NMR spectra spanning a total of about 9MHz width are reconstructed. The results are in good accordance with a change from a high-temperature paramagnetic state to a low-temperature commensurate superstructure of field-induced spin-dimer triplets.

  3. Magnetic Nanomaterials and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurii K. Gun'ko

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This Special Issue of Nanomaterials is dedicated to the development of new magnetic nanomaterials and their applications in biomedicine, catalysis, spintronics and other areas. The publications in this Issue demonstrate that the interest in magnetic nanomaterials is continuously growing and their realm is expanding rapidly. Some highlights of the publications in this issue are discussed below. [...

  4. Two-axis magnetic field sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jander, Albrecht (Inventor); Nordman, Catherine A. (Inventor); Qian, Zhenghong (Inventor); Smith, Carl H. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A ferromagnetic thin-film based magnetic field sensor with first and second sensitive direction sensing structures each having a nonmagnetic intermediate layer with two major surfaces on opposite sides thereof having a magnetization reference layer on one and an anisotropic ferromagnetic material sensing layer on the other having a length in a selected length direction and a smaller width perpendicular thereto and parallel to the relatively fixed magnetization direction. The relatively fixed magnetization direction of said magnetization reference layer in each is oriented in substantially parallel to the substrate but substantially perpendicular to that of the other. An annealing process is used to form the desired magnetization directions.

  5. Magnetic fields and rotation of spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Battaner, E; Florido, E

    1998-01-01

    We present a simplified model in which we suggest that two important galactic problems -the magnetic field configuration at large scales and the flat rotation curve- may be simultaneously explained. A highly convective disc produces a high turbulent magnetic diffusion in the vertical direction, stablishing a merging of extragalactic and galactic magnetic fields. The outer disc may then adquire a magnetic energy gradient very close to the gradient required to explain the rotation curve, without the hypothesis of galactic dark matter. Our model predicts symmetries of the galactic field in noticeable agreement with the large scale structure of our galaxy.

  6. Rotating artificial gauge magnetic and electric fields

    CERN Document Server

    Lembessis, V E; Alshamari, S; Siddig, A; Aldossary, O M

    2016-01-01

    We consider the creation of artificial gauge magnetic and electric fields created when a two-level atom interacts with an optical Ferris wheel light field.These fields have the spatial structure of the optical Ferris wheel field intensity profile. If this optical field pattern is made to rotate in space then we have the creation of artificial electromagnetic fields which propagate in closed paths. The properties of such fields are presented and discussed

  7. Paschen-Back effect in the CrH molecule and its application for magnetic field measurements on stars, brown dwarfs, and hot exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmychov, O.; Berdyugina, S. V.

    2013-10-01

    Aims: We investigated the Paschen-Back effect in the (0,0) band of the A6Σ+ - X6Σ+ system of the CrH molecule, and we examined its potential for estimating magnetic fields on stars and substellar objects, such as brown dwarfs and hot exoplanets. Methods: We carried out quantum mechanical calculations to obtain the energy level structure of the electronic-vibrational-rotational states considered both in the absence and in the presence of a magnetic field. Level mixing due to magnetic field perturbation (the Paschen-Back effect) was consistently taken into account. Then, we calculated frequencies and strengths of transitions between magnetic sublevels. Employing these results and solving numerically a set of the radiative transfer equations for polarized radiation, we calculated Stokes parameters for both the individual lines and the (0,0) band depending on the strength and orientation of the magnetic field. Results: We demonstrate that magnetic splitting of the individual CrH lines shows a significant asymmetry due to the Paschen-Back effect already at 1 G field. This leads to a considerable signal in both circular and linear polarization, up to 30% at the magnetic field strength of ≥3 kG in early L dwarfs. The polarization does not cancel out completely even at very low spectral resolution and is seen as broad-band polarization of a few percent. Since the line asymmetry depends only on the magnetic field strength and not on the filling factor, CrH lines provide a very sensitive tool for direct measurement of the stellar magnetic fields on faint cool objects, such as brown dwarfs and hot Jupiters, observed with low spectral resolution.

  8. Magnetic fields in Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Viganò, Daniele; Miralles, Juan A; Rea, Nanda

    2015-01-01

    Isolated neutron stars show a diversity in timing and spectral properties, which has historically led to a classification in different sub-classes. The magnetic field plays a key role in many aspects of the neutron star phenomenology: it regulates the braking torque responsible for their timing properties and, for magnetars, it provides the energy budget for the outburst activity and high quiescent luminosities (usually well above the rotational energy budget). We aim at unifying this observational variety by linking the results of the state-of-the-art 2D magneto-thermal simulations with observational data. The comparison between theory and observations allows to place two strong constraints on the physical properties of the inner crust. First, strong electrical currents must circulate in the crust, rather than in the star core. Second, the innermost part of the crust must be highly resistive, which is in principle in agreement with the presence of a novel phase of matter so-called nuclear pasta phase.

  9. Earth magnetism a guided tour through magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, Wallace H

    2001-01-01

    An introductory guide to global magnetic field properties, Earth Magnetism addresses, in non-technical prose, many of the frequently asked questions about Earth''s magnetic field. Magnetism surrounds and penetrates our Earth in ways basic science courses can rarely address. It affects navigation, communication, and even the growth of crystals. As we observe and experience an 11-year solar maximum, we may witness spectacular satellite-destroying solar storms as they interact with our magnetic field. Written by an acknowledged expert in the field, this book will enrich courses in earth science, atmospheric science, geology, meteorology, geomagnetism, and geophysics. Contains nearly 200 original illustrations and eight pages of full-color plates.* Largely mathematics-free and with a wide breadth of material suitable for general readers* Integrates material from geomagnetism, paleomagnetism, and solar-terrestrial space physics.* Features nearly 200 original illustrations and 4 pages of colour plates

  10. Magnetic fields of HgMn stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubrig, S.; Gonzalez, J. F.; Ilyin, I.

    2012-01-01

    Context. The frequent presence of weak magnetic fields on the surface of spotted late-B stars with HgMn peculiarity in binary systems has been controversial during the two last decades. Recent studies of magnetic fields in these stars using the least-squares deconvolution (LSD) technique have fai...

  11. Ground Vehicle Navigation Using Magnetic Field Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shockley, Jeremiah A.

    The Earth's magnetic field has been the bedrock of navigation for centuries. The latest research highlights the uniqueness of magnetic field measurements based on position due to large scale variations as well as localized perturbations. These observable changes in the Earth's magnetic field as a function of position provide distinct information which can be used for navigation. This dissertation describes ground vehicle navigation exploiting variation in Earth's magnetic field using a self-contained navigation system consisting of only a magnetometer and magnetic field maps. In order to achieve navigation, effective calibration enables repeatable magnetic field measurements from different vehicles and facilitates mapping of the observable magnetic field as a function of position. A new modified ellipsoid calibration technique for strapdown magnetometers in large vehicles is described, as well as analysis of position measurement generation comparing a multitude of measurement compositions using existing and newly developed likelihood techniques. Finally, navigation solutions are presented using both a position measurement and direct incorporation of the magnetometer measurements via a particle filter to demonstrate road navigation in three different environments. Emphatically, the results affirm that navigation using magnetic field variation in ground vehicles is viable and achieves adequate performance for road level navigation.

  12. Lattice Planar QED in external magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Cea, Paolo; Giudice, Pietro; Papa, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    We investigate planar Quantum ElectroDynamics (QED) with two degenerate staggered fermions in an external magnetic field on the lattice. Our preliminary results indicate that in external magnetic fields there is dynamical generation of mass for two-dimensional massless Dirac fermions in the weak coupling region. We comment on possible implications to the quantum Hall effect in graphene.

  13. Helical Magnetic Fields in AGN Jets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y. J. Chen; G.-Y. Zhao; Z.-Q. Shen

    2014-09-01

    We establish a simple model to describe the helical magnetic fields in AGN jets projected on the sky plane and the line-of-sight. This kind of profile has been detected in the polarimetric VLBI observation of many blazar objects, suggesting the existence of helical magnetic fields in these sources.

  14. Magnetic Fields at the Center of Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Philippe; Hui, Kaleonui; Goldman, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    In this note we synthesize and extend expressions for the magnetic field at the center of very short and very long current-carrying coils. Elementary physics textbooks present the following equation for the magnetic field inside a very long current-carrying coil (solenoid): B[subscript sol] = µ[subscript 0] (N/L) I, (1) where I is the current, N…

  15. Magnetic Fields in Stars: Origin and Impact

    CERN Document Server

    Langer, N

    2013-01-01

    Various types of magnetic fields occur in stars: small scale fields, large scale fields, and internal toroidal fields. While the latter may be ubiquitous in stars due to differential rotation, small scale fields (spots) may be associated with envelop convection in all low and high mass stars. The stable large scale fields found in only about 10 per cent of intermediate mass and massive stars may be understood as a consequence of dynamical binary interaction, e.g., the merging of two stars in a binary. We relate these ideas to magnetic fields in white dwarfs and neutron stars, and to their role in core-collapse and thermonuclear supernova explosions.

  16. Classical theory of electric and magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Good, Roland H

    1971-01-01

    Classical Theory of Electric and Magnetic Fields is a textbook on the principles of electricity and magnetism. This book discusses mathematical techniques, calculations, with examples of physical reasoning, that are generally applied in theoretical physics. This text reviews the classical theory of electric and magnetic fields, Maxwell's Equations, Lorentz Force, and Faraday's Law of Induction. The book also focuses on electrostatics and the general methods for solving electrostatic problems concerning images, inversion, complex variable, or separation of variables. The text also explains ma

  17. Pair annihilation in superstrong magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty, J. K.; Bussard, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The kinematical and dynamical aspects of the annihilation processes in superstrong magnetic fields are studied. The feasibility and potential significance of detecting from magnetic neutron stars are discussed. The discussion proceeds from the derivation of the fully relativistic differential cross sections and annihilation rates for both one- and two-photon emission from a ground-state gas of electrons and positrons in a static, uniform magnetic field.

  18. Mechanics of magnetic fluid column in strong magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polunin, V. M.; Ryapolov, P. A.; Platonov, V. B.

    2017-06-01

    Elastic-and magnetic properties of magnetic fluid confined by ponderomotive force in a tube fixed in horizontal position are considered. The system is placed in a strong magnetic field under the influence of external static and dynamic perturbations. An experimental setup has been developed. A theoretical basis of the processes of magnetic colloid elastic deformation has been proposed. The values of the static ponderomotive elasticity coefficient and the elasticity coefficient under dynamic action are experimentally determined. The calculations of the saturation magnetization for two magnetic fluid samples, carried out according to the equation containing the dynamic elasticity coefficient, are in good agreement with the experimental magnetization curve. The described method is of interest when studying magnetophoresis and aggregation of nanoparticles in magnetic colloids.

  19. Role of Inclined Magnetic Field and Copper Nanoparticles on Peristaltic Flow of Nanofluid through Inclined Annulus: Application of the Clot Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzadi, Iqra; Nadeem, S.

    2017-06-01

    A genuine neurotic condition is experienced when some blood constituents accumulate on the wall of the artery get withdrew from the wall, again join the circulatory system and coagulation occur. Role of copper nanoparticles and inclined magnetic field on the peristaltic flow of a nanofluid in an annular region of inclined annulus is investigated. We represent the clot model by considering the small artery as an annulus whose outer tube has a wave of sinusoidal nature and inner tube has a clot on its walls. Lubrication approach is used to simplify the problem. Close form solutions are determined for temperature and velocity profile. Impact of related parameters on pressure rise, pressure gradient, velocity and streamlines are interpreted graphically. Comparison among the pure blood and copper blood is presented and analyzed. One main finding of the considered analysis is that the inclusion of copper nanoparticles enlarges the amplitude of the velocity. Therefore, the considered study plays a dominant role in biomedical applications.

  20. Delayed quarkonium formation in a magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Kei

    2016-01-01

    Formation time of heavy quarkonia in a homogeneous magnetic field is analyzed by using a phenomenological ansatz of the vector current correlator. Because the existence of a magnetic field mixes vector quarkonia ($J/\\psi$, $\\psi^\\prime$) and their pseudoscalar partners ($\\eta_c$, $\\eta_c^\\prime$), the properties of the quarkonia can be modified through such a spin mixing. This means that the formation time of quarkonia is also changed by the magnetic field. We show the formation time of vector quarkonia is delayed by an idealized constant magnetic field, where the formation time of the excited state becomes longer than that of the ground state. As a more realistic situation in heavy-ion collisions, effects by a time-dependent magnetic field are also discussed.

  1. Structure of magnetic fields in intracluster cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Gourgouliatos, Konstantinos Nektarios; Lyutikov, Maxim

    2010-01-01

    Observations of clusters of galaxies show ubiquitous presence of X-ray cavities, presumably blown by the AGN jets. We consider magnetic field structures of these cavities. Stability requires that they contain both toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields, while realistic configurations should have vanishing magnetic field on the boundary. For axisymmetric configurations embedded in unmagnetized plasma, the continuity of poloidal and toroidal magnetic field components on the surface of the bubble then requires solving the elliptical Grad-Shafranov equation with both Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. This leads to a double eigenvalue problem, relating the pressure gradients and the toroidal magnetic field to the radius of the bubble. We have found fully analytical stable solutions. This result is confirmed by numerical simulation. We present synthetic X-ray images and synchrotron emission profiles and evaluate the rotation measure for radiation traversing the bubble.

  2. Probing Magnetic Fields of Early Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-06-01

    How do magnetic fields form and evolve in early galaxies? A new study has provided some clever observations to help us answer this question.The Puzzle of Growing FieldsDynamo theory is the primary model describing how magnetic fields develop in galaxies. In this picture, magnetic fields start out as weak seed fields that are small and unordered. These fields then become ordered and amplified by large-scale rotation and turbulence in galaxy disks and halos, eventually leading to the magnetic fields we observe in galaxies today.Schematic showinghow to indirectly measure protogalactic magnetic fields. The measured polarization of a background quasar is altered by the fields in a foreground protogalaxy. Click for a closer look! [Farnes et al. 2017/Adolf Schaller/STSCI/NRAO/AUI/NSF]To test this model, we need observations of the magnetic fields in young protogalaxies. Unfortunately, we dont have the sensitivity to be able to measure these fields directly but a team of scientists led by Jamie Farnes (Radboud University in the Netherlands) have come up with a creative alternative.The key is to find early protogalaxies that absorb the light of more distant background objects. If a protogalaxy lies between us and a distant quasar, then magnetic fields of the protogalaxy if present will affect the polarization measurements of the background quasar.Observing Galactic Building BlocksTop: Redshift distribution for the background quasars in the authors sample. Bottom: Redshift distribution for the foreground protogalaxies the authors are exploring. [Farnes et al. 2017]Farnes and collaborators examined two types of foreground protogalaxies: Damped Lyman-Alpha Absorbers (DLAs) and Lyman Limit Systems (LLSs). They obtained polarimetric data for a sample of 114 distant quasars with nothing in the foreground (the control sample), 19 quasars with DLAs in the foreground, and 27 quasars with LLSs in the foreground. They then used statistical analysis techniques to draw conclusions about

  3. A new Jeans resolution criterion for (M)HD simulations of self-gravitating gas: Application to magnetic field amplification by gravity-driven turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Federrath, Christoph; Schleicher, Dominik R G; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S

    2011-01-01

    Cosmic structure formation is characterized by the complex interplay between gravity, turbulence, and magnetic fields. The processes by which gravitational energy is converted into turbulent and magnetic energies, however, remain poorly understood. Here, we show with high-resolution, adaptive-mesh simulations that MHD turbulence is efficiently driven by extracting energy from the gravitational potential during the collapse of a dense gas cloud. Compressible motions generated during the contraction are converted into solenoidal, turbulent motions, leading to a natural energy ratio of E_sol/E_tot of approximately 2/3. We find that the energy injection scale of gravity-driven turbulence is close to the local Jeans scale. If small seeds of the magnetic field are present, they are amplified exponentially fast via the small-scale dynamo process. The magnetic field grows most efficiently on the smallest scales, for which the stretching, twisting, and folding of field lines, and the turbulent vortices are sufficientl...

  4. Applications of Thermoresponsive Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Yildiz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, magnetic nanoparticles carrying thermoresponsive polymeric coatings have gained increasing attention in material sciences due to the fact that resultant platforms offer controllable modalities such as imaging, drug delivery, and magnetic separation. As a result, novel materials including biosensors, therapeutic platforms, imaging agents, and magnetic separators have been realized. Since the number of publications reporting the applications of thermoresponsive magnetic nanoparticle has increased steadily over the years, a comprehensive review will be beneficial. In this paper, we aim to review publications studying applications of thermoresponsive nanoparticles in biomedical sciences as well as in environmental and chemical sciences. The paper also briefly discusses chemical formulations, characterizations, and properties of the thermoresponsive magnetic particles and then provides future outlooks.

  5. Fluctuations in the relativistic plasma and primordial magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemoine, D. (Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS, 98bis Bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France) DAEC, Observatoire de Paris, Universite Paris VII, CNRS (UA173), F-92195 Meudon Cedex (France))

    1995-03-15

    The stochastic fluctuations of the electromagnetic field in a relativistic electron-positron plasma are studied. The correlation functions of the fluctuating four-current, electric and magnetic fields are computed to leading order using the Schwinger-Keldysh closed time path formulation of thermal field theory. As an application, we consider the scenario proposed by Tajima [ital et] [ital al]. for generating a primordial magnetic field from thermal fluctuations in the prerecombination plasma. We compute the level of magnetic fluctuations sustained by the pair plasma at or before the epoch of big bang nucleosynthesis and conclude that the early Universe was pervaded by a strong low-frequency, albeit small-scale, random magnetic field. The astrophysical implications are briefly discussed.

  6. Formation of magnetically anisotropic composite films at low magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazi Zahedi, Maryam; Ennen, Inga; Marchi, Sophie; Barthel, Markus J.; Hütten, Andreas; Athanassiou, Athanassia; Fragouli, Despina

    2017-04-01

    We present a straightforward two-step technique for the fabrication of poly (methyl methacrylate) composites with embedded aligned magnetic chains. First, ferromagnetic microwires are realized in a poly (methyl methacrylate) solution by assembling iron nanoparticles in a methyl methacrylate solution under heat in an external magnetic field of 160 mT. The simultaneous thermal polymerization of the monomer throughout the wires is responsible for their permanent linkage and stability. Next, the polymer solution containing the randomly dispersed microwires is casted on a solid substrate in the presence of a low magnetic field (20–40 mT) which induces the final alignment of the microwires into long magnetic chains upon evaporation of the solvent. We prove that the presence of the nanoparticles assembled in the form of microwires is a key factor for the formation of the anisotropic films under low magnetic fields. In fact, such low fields are not capable of driving and assembling dispersed magnetic nanoparticles in the same type of polymer solutions. Hence, this innovative approach can be utilized for the synthesis of magnetically anisotropic nanocomposite films at low magnetic fields.

  7. Teaching Representation Translations with Magnetic Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillotson, Wilson Andrew; McCaskey, Timothy; Nasser, Luis

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a laboratory exercise designed to help students translate between different field representations. It starts with students qualitatively mapping field lines for various bar magnet configurations and continues with a Hall probe experiment in which students execute a series of scaffolded tasks, culminating in the prediction and measurement of the spatial variation of magnetic field components along a line near magnets. We describe the experimental tasks, various difficulties students have throughout, and ways this lab makes even their incorrect predictions better. We suggest that developing lab activities of this nature brings a new dimension to the ways students learn and interact with field concepts.

  8. Magnetic fields of HgMn stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubrig, S.; González, J. F.; Ilyin, I.

    2012-01-01

    Context. The frequent presence of weak magnetic fields on the surface of spotted late-B stars with HgMn peculiarity in binary systems has been controversial during the two last decades. Recent studies of magnetic fields in these stars using the least-squares deconvolution (LSD) technique have...... failed to detect magnetic fields, indicating an upper limit on the longitudinal field between 8 and 15G. In these LSD studies, assumptions were made that all spectral lines are identical in shape and can be described by a scaled mean profile. Aims. We re-analyse the available spectropolarimetric material...

  9. Warm inflation in presence of magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Piccinelli, Gabriella; Ayala, Alejandro; Mizher, Ana Julia

    2013-01-01

    We present preliminary results on the possible effects that primordial magnetic fields can have for a warm inflation scenario, based on global supersymmetry, with a new-inflation-type potential. This work is motivated by two considerations: first, magnetic fields seem to be present in the universe on all scales, which rises the possibility that they could also permeate the early universe; second, the recent emergence of inflationary models where the inflaton is not assumed to be isolated but instead it is taken as an interacting field, even during the inflationary expansion. The effects of magnetic fields are included resorting to Schwinger proper time method.

  10. Application of in situ digital holography to the study of the effect of a magnetic field on the anodic dissolution of iron in thichloroacetic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XUEGENG YANG

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of a magnetic field on the anodic dissolution of iron in 1.0 mol dm-3 trichloroacetic acid solution was studied by the potentiodynamic polarization method and in situ digital holography. It was found that the magnetohydrodynamic force increased the mass transport, which resulted in a faster anodic dissolution of iron. The effect of the magnetic field was analyzed by holograms and is discussed in terms of the magnetohydrodynamic force.

  11. Field Mapping System for Solenoid Magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, K. H.; Jung, Y. K.; Kim, D. E.; Lee, H. G.; Park, S. J.; Chung, C. W.; Kang, B. K.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional Hall probe mapping system for measuring the solenoid magnet of PLS photo-cathode RF e-gun has been developed. It can map the solenoid field either in Cartesian or in cylindrical coordinate system with a measurement reproducibility better than 5 × 10-5 T. The system has three axis motors: one for the azimuthal direction and the other two for the x and z direction. This architecture makes the measuring system simple in fabrication. The magnetic center was calculated using the measured axial component of magnetic field Bz in Cartesian coordinate system because the accuracy of magnetic axis measurement could be improved significantly by using Bz, instead of the radial component of magnetic field Br. This paper describes the measurement system and summarizes the measurement results for the solenoid magnetic of PLS photo-cathode RF e-gun.

  12. Solar Force-free Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Wiegelmann, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of the solar corona is dominated by the magnetic field. In most areas in the corona magnetic forces are so dominant that all non-magnetic forces like plasma pressure gradient and gravity can be neglected in the lowest order. This model assumption is called the force-free field assumption, as the Lorentz force vanishes. This can be obtained by either vanishing electric currents (leading to potential fields) or the currents are co-aligned with the magnetic field lines. First we discuss a mathematically simpler approach that the magnetic field and currents are proportional with one global constant, the so-called linear force-free field approximation. In the generic case, however, the relation between magnetic fields and electric currents is nonlinear and analytic solutions have been only found for special cases, like 1D or 2D configurations. For constructing realistic nonlinear force-free coronal magnetic field models in 3D, sophisticated numerical computations are required and boundar...

  13. Application of magnetically-perturbed time-dependent density functional theory to magnetic circular dichroism. IV. The influence of zero-field splitting on the spectra of S > 1/2 molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seth, Michael, E-mail: mseth@ucalgary.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Calgary, University Drive 2500, Calgary, AB T2N-1N4 (Canada); Ziegler, Tom, E-mail: ziegler@ucalgary.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Calgary, University Drive 2500, Calgary, AB T2N-1N4 (Canada)

    2012-02-20

    The theory of calculating magnetic circular dichroism in the presence of zero-field splitting is presented and illustrated with applications to small and medium-sized systems. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZFS and MCD calculated with DFT are combined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Influence of ZFS on the MCD spectra of group 15 hydrides analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absorption and MCD spectra of Fe-EDTA-peroxide complex calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZFS does not appear to influence MCD spectra qualitatively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantitative effects are present and difficult to model. - Abstract: An implementation into the ADF program of a method for calculating zero-field splitting (ZFS) of molecules with spin degenerate ground states and S > 1/2 is reported. ZFS can influence temperature-dependent magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) intensity. Previously published equations for the calculation of MCD with time-dependent density functional theory are modified to take zero-field splitting into account. The MCD spectra of the group 15 hydrides and the complex formed from iron (III), ethylenediaminetetraacetate and peroxide, [Fe(III)(EDTA)O{sub 2}]{sup 3-} are simulated. These spectra are analyzed with particular reference to the influence of ZFS on the MCD intensity.

  14. Magnetic monopole field exposed by electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Béché, A; Van Tendeloo, G; Verbeeck, J

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic monopoles have provided a rich field of study, leading to a wide area of research in particle physics, solid state physics, ultra-cold gases, superconductors, cosmology, and gauge theory. So far, no true magnetic monopoles were found experimentally. Using the Aharonov-Bohm effect, one of the central results of quantum physics, shows however, that an effective monopole field can be produced. Understanding the effects of such a monopole field on its surroundings is crucial to its observation and provides a better grasp of fundamental physical theory. We realize the diffraction of fast electrons at a magnetic monopole field generated by a nanoscopic magnetized ferromagnetic needle. Previous studies have been limited to theoretical semiclassical optical calculations of the motion of electrons in such a monopole field. Solid state systems like the recently studied 'spin ice' provide a constrained system to study similar fields, but make it impossible to separate the monopole from the material. Free space ...

  15. Interplanetary magnetic field and geomagnetic Dst variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, V. L.; Desai, U. D.

    1973-01-01

    The interplanetary magnetic field has been shown to influence the ring current field represented by Dst. Explorer 28 hourly magnetic field observations have been used with the hourly Dst values. The moderate geomagnetic storms of 60 gammas and quiet-time fluctuations of 10 to 30 gammas are correlated with the north to south change of the interplanetary field component perpendicular to the ecliptic. This change in the interplanetary field occurs one to three hours earlier than the corresponding change in the Dst field.

  16. Field-induced magnetic states in holmium tetraboride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunt, D.; Balakrishnan, G.; Wildes, A. R.; Ouladdiaf, B.; Qureshi, N.; Petrenko, O. A.

    2017-01-01

    A study of the zero field and field induced magnetic states of the frustrated rare earth tetraboride HoB4 has been carried out using single crystal neutron diffraction complemented by magnetization measurements. In zero field, HoB4 shows magnetic phase transitions at TN 1=7.1 K to an incommensurate state with a propagation vector (δ ,δ ,δ') , where δ =0.02 and δ'=0.43 and at TN 2=5.7 K to a noncollinear commensurate antiferromagnetic structure. Polarized neutron diffraction measurements in zero field have revealed that the incommensurate reflections, albeit much reduced in intensity, persist down to 1.5 K despite antiferromagnetic ordering at 5.7 K. At lower temperatures, application of a magnetic field along the c axis initially re-establishes the incommensurate phase as the dominant magnetic state in a narrow field range, just prior to HoB4 ordering with an up-up-down ferrimagnetic structure characterized by the (h k 1/3 ) -type reflections between 18 and 24 kOe. This field range is marked by the previously reported M /Msat=1/3 magnetization plateau, which we also see in our magnetization measurements. The region between 21 and 33 kOe is characterized by the increase in the intensity of the antiferromagnetic reflections, such as (100), the maximum of which coincides with the appearance of the narrow magnetization plateau with M /Msat≈3/5 . Further increase of the magnetic field results in the stabilization of a polarized state above 33 kOe, while the incommensurate reflections are clearly present in all fields up to 59 kOe. We propose the H -T phase diagram of HoB4 for the H ∥c containing both stationary and transitionary magnetic phases which overlap and show significant history dependence.

  17. Polarized radiation diagnostics of stellar magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathys, Gautier

    The main techniques used to diagnose magnetic fields in stars from polarimetric observations are presented. First, a summary of the physics of spectral line formation in the presence of a magnetic field is given. Departures from the simple case of linear Zeeman effect are briefly considered: partial Paschen-Back effect, contribution of hyperfine structure, and combined Stark and Zeeman effects. Important approximate solutions of the equation of transfer of polarized light in spectral lines are introduced. The procedure for disk-integration of emergent Stokes profiles, which is central to stellar magnetic field studies, is described, with special attention to the treatment of stellar rotation. This formalism is used to discuss the determination of the mean longitudinal magnetic field (through the photographic technique and through Balmer line photopolarimetry). This is done within the specific framework of Ap stars, which, with their unique large-scale organized magnetic fields, are an ideal laboratory for studies of stellar magnetism. Special attention is paid to those Ap stars whose magnetically split line components are resolved in high-dispersion Stokes I spectra, and to the determination of their mean magnetic field modulus. Various techniques of exploitation of the information contained in polarized spectral line profiles are reviewed: the moment technique (in particular, the determination of the crossover and of the mean quadratic field), Zeeman-Doppler imaging, and least-squares deconvolution. The prospects that these methods open for linear polarization studies are sketched. The way in which linear polarization diagnostics complement their Stokes I and V counterparts is emphasized by consideration of the results of broad band linear polarization measurements. Illustrations of the use of various diagnostics to derive properties of the magnetic fields of Ap stars are given. This is used to show the interest of deriving more physically realistic models of the

  18. Magnetic field modeling with a set of individual localized coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juchem, Christoph; Nixon, Terence W; McIntyre, Scott; Rothman, Douglas L; de Graaf, Robin A

    2010-06-01

    A set of generic, circular individual coils is shown to be capable of generating highly complex magnetic field distributions in a flexible fashion. Arbitrarily oriented linear field gradients can be generated in three-dimensional as well as sliced volumes at amplitudes that allow imaging applications. The multi-coil approach permits the simultaneous generation of linear MRI encoding fields and complex shim fields by the same setup, thereby reducing system complexity. The choice of the sensitive volume over which the magnetic fields are optimized remains temporally and spatially variable at all times. The restriction of the field synthesis to experimentally relevant, smaller volumes such as single slices directly translates into improved efficiency, i.e. higher magnetic field amplitudes and/or reduced coil currents. For applications like arterial spin labeling, signal spoiling and diffusion weighting, perfect linearity of the gradient fields is not required and reduced demands on accuracy can also be readily translated into improved efficiency. The first experimental realization was achieved for mouse head MRI with 24 coils that were mounted on the surface of a cylindrical former. Oblique linear field gradients of 20 kHz/cm (47 mT/m) were generated with a maximum current of 1.4A which allowed radial imaging of a mouse head. The potential of the new approach for generating arbitrary magnetic field shapes is demonstrated by synthesizing the more complex, higher order spherical harmonic magnetic field distributions X2-Y2, Z2 and Z2X. The new multi-coil approach provides the framework for the integration of conventional imaging and shim coils into a single multi-coil system in which shape, strength, accuracy and spatial coverage of the magnetic field can be specifically optimized for the application at hand.

  19. Hyperfine magnetic fields in substituted Finemet alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brzózka, K., E-mail: k.brzozka@uthrad.pl [University of Technology and Humanities in Radom, Department of Physics (Poland); Sovák, P. [P.J. Šafárik University, Institute of Physics (Slovakia); Szumiata, T.; Gawroński, M.; Górka, B. [University of Technology and Humanities in Radom, Department of Physics (Poland)

    2016-12-15

    Transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to determine the hyperfine fields of Finemet-type alloys in form of ribbons, substituted alternatively by Mn, Ni, Co, Al, Zn, V or Ge of various concentration. The comparative analysis of magnetic hyperfine fields was carried out which enabled to understand the role of added elements in as-quenched as well as annealed samples. Moreover, the influence of the substitution on the mean direction of the local hyperfine magnetic field was examined.

  20. Magnetic fields in Local Group dwarf irregulars

    CERN Document Server

    Chyzy, Krzysztof T; Beck, Rainer; Bomans, Dominik J

    2011-01-01

    We clarify whether strong magnetic fields can be effectively generated in typically low-mass dwarf galaxies and what is the role of dwarf galaxies in the magnetization of the Universe. We performed a search for radio emission and magnetic fields in an unbiased sample of 12 Local Group (LG) irregular and dwarf irregular galaxies with the 100m Effelsberg telescope at 2.64 and 4.85GHz. Magnetic fields in LG dwarfs are three times weaker than in the normal spirals (6muG) are observed only in dwarfs of extreme characteristics while typical LG dwarfs are not suitable objects for efficient supply of magnetic fields to the intergalactic medium.

  1. Temperature and magnetic field induced multiple magnetic transitions in DyAg(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Parul; Chattopadhyay, M K; Sharath Chandra, L S; Sharma, V K; Roy, S B

    2011-02-09

    The magnetic properties of the rare-earth intermetallic compound DyAg(2) are studied in detail with the help of magnetization and heat capacity measurements. It is shown that the multiple magnetic phase transitions can be induced in DyAg(2) both by temperature and magnetic field. The detailed magnetic phase diagram of DyAg(2) is determined experimentally. It was already known that DyAg(2) undergoes an incommensurate to commensurate antiferromagnetic phase transition close to 10 K. The present experimental results highlight the first order nature of this phase transition, and show that this transition can be induced by magnetic field as well. It is further shown that another isothermal magnetic field induced transition or metamagnetic transition exhibited by DyAg(2) at still lower temperatures is also of first order nature. The multiple magnetic phase transitions in DyAg(2) give rise to large peaks in the temperature dependence of the heat capacity below 17 K, which indicates its potential as a magnetic regenerator material for cryocooler related applications. In addition it is found that because of the presence of the temperature and field induced magnetic phase transitions, and because of short range magnetic correlations deep inside the paramagnetic regime, DyAg(2) exhibits a fairly large magnetocaloric effect over a wide temperature window, e.g., between 10 and 60 K.

  2. Pulsed Field Waveforms for Magnetization of HTS Gd-Ba-Cu-O Bulk Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ida, T [Department of Electronic Control Engineering, Hiroshima National College of Maritime Technology, 4272-1, Higashino, Ohsakikamijima-cho, Toyota-gun, Hiroshima 725-0231 (Japan); Matsuzaki, H [Department of Marine Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, 2-1-6, Etchu-jima, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8533 (Japan); Morita, E [Department of Marine Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, 2-1-6, Etchu-jima, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8533 (Japan); Sakashita, H [Department of Electronic Control Engineering, Hiroshima National College of Maritime Technology, 4272-1, Higashino, Ohsakikamijima-cho, Toyota-gun, Hiroshima 725-0231 (Japan); Harada, T [Department of Electronic Control Engineering, Hiroshima National College of Maritime Technology, 4272-1, Higashino, Ohsakikamijima-cho, Toyota-gun, Hiroshima 725-0231 (Japan); Ogata, H [Department of Marine Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, 2-1-6, Etchu-jima, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8533 (Japan); Kimura, Y [Department of Marine Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, 2-1-6, Etchu-jima, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8533 (Japan); Miki, M [Kitano Seiki Co. Ltd., 7-13-7, Chuo, Ohta-ku, Tokyo 143-0024 (Japan); Kitano, M [Kitano Seiki Co. Ltd., 7-13-7, Chuo, Ohta-ku, Tokyo 143-0024 (Japan); Izumi, M [Department of Marine Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, 2-1-6, Etchu-jima, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8533 (Japan)

    2006-06-01

    Progress in pulse magnetization technique for high-temperature superconductor bulks of melt-textured RE-Ba-Cu-O with large diameter is important for the realization of power applications. We studied the pulsed power source and pulsed field waveforms to enhance to improve the magnetization properties for Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk. The risetime and duration of pulse waveform effectively varied distribution of magnetic flux.

  3. Interleaving Gradient Magnetic Field Method for Diffusion Weighted Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Song; ZU Zhong-Liang; BAO Shang-Lian

    2008-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance spectroscopy(DWS)has considerable potential in clinical and research applications.However.it is seldom implemented in conventional magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)scanners due to the strict hardware requirements.We propose an interleaving gradient magnetic field(IGMF)method based on point resolved spectroscopy(PRESS).Four interlaced powerful diffusion sensitive gradient magnetic fields are positioned around the two πrefocusing rf pulses in the PRESS sequence.This method utilizes the interval time in the PRESS pulse sequence,doubles the duration time of the diffusion sensitive gradient magnetic field and decreases the detrimental effect of the induced eddy current.The results of theoretical analysis and experimental observation demonstrate that the IGMF method is suitable for conventional MRI scanners.

  4. Miniature coils for producing pulsed inplane magnetic fields for nanospintronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawliszak, Łukasz; Zgirski, Maciej [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, al.Lotnikow 32/46, PL 02-668 Warszawa (Poland); Tekielak, Maria [Faculty of Physics, University of Białystok, ul.Lipowa 41, PL 15-424 Białystok (Poland)

    2015-03-15

    Nanospintronic and related research often requires the application of quickly rising magnetic field pulses in the plane of the studied planar structure. We have designed and fabricated sub-millimeter-sized coils capable of delivering pulses of the magnetic field up to ∼500 Oe in the plane of the sample with the rise time of the order of 10 ns. The placement of the sample above the coil allows for easy access to its surface with manipulators or light beams for, e.g., Kerr microscopy. We use the fabricated coil to drive magnetic domain walls in 1 μm wide permalloy wires and measure magnetic domain wall velocity as a function of the applied magnetic field.

  5. Instability of strong magnetic field and neutrino magnetic dipole moment

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Hyun Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Vacuum instability of the strong electromagnetic field has been discussed since long time ago. The instability of the strong electric field due to creation of electron pairs is one of the examples, which is known as Schwinger process. What matters are the coupling of particles to the electromagnetic field and the mass of the particle to be produced. The critical electric field for electrons in the minimal coupling is ~ m^2/e . Spin 1/2 neutral particles but with magnetic dipole moments can interact with the electromagnetic field through Pauli coupling. The instability of the particular vacuum under the strong magnetic field can be formulated as the emergence of imaginary parts of the effective potential. In this talk, the development of the imaginary part in the effective potential as a function of the magnetic field strength is discussed for the configurations of the uniform magnetic field and the inhomogeneous magnetic field. Neutrinos are the lightest particle(if not photon or gluon) in the "standard model...

  6. Combining electric and magnetic static field for the tuning of the lifetime of zero energy Feshbach resonances: Application to 3He+NH collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Stoecklin, T

    2009-01-01

    We study the variation of the positions of two magnetically tuned Zero energy Feshbach resonances when a parallel superimposed electric field is applied. We show that their variation as a function of the electric field follows a simple analytical law and is then predictable. We find that depending on the initial state of the diatomic molecule the resonance is either shifted to higher or to lower values of the magnetic field when the electric field is applied. We calculate the Close Coupling lifetimes of these resonances and show that they also follow a simple law as a function of both the magnetic and the electric field. We demonstrate using this expression that the lifetime of the resonances can be maximised by choosing an appropriate value of the applied electric and found a good agreement with the results of our Close Coupling calculations. These results could be checked in future experiments dedicated to the 3He + NH collisions

  7. Computation of magnetic fields in hysteretic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adly, A.A.; Mayergoyz, I.D.; Gomez, R.D.; Burke, E.R. (Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States))

    1993-11-01

    A newly developed vector Preisach-type model of hysteresis is applied to the computation of static magnetic fields in media with hysteresis. Time stepping technique is used to trace the time evolution of local magnetic fields which form the history of magnetizing process. At each time step, the magnetostatic problem is formulated in terms of an integral equation and an efficient iterative algorithm is employed for solving this problem. The technique has been used to simulate some magnetic recording processes. Sample results of these simulations are given in the paper.

  8. Magnetic fields of HgMn stars

    CERN Document Server

    Hubrig, S; Ilyin, I; Korhonen, H; Schoeller, M; Savanov, I; Arlt, R; Castelli, F; Curto, G Lo; Briquet, M; Dall, T H

    2012-01-01

    The frequent presence of weak magnetic fields on the surface of spotted late-B stars with HgMn peculiarity in binary systems has been controversial during the two last decades. We re-analyse available spectropolarimetric material by applying the moment technique on spectral lines of inhomogeneously distributed elements separately. Furthermore, we present new determinations of the mean longitudinal magnetic field for the HgMn star HD65949 and the hotter analog of HgMn stars, the PGa star HD19400, using FORS2 installed at the VLT. We also give new measurements of the eclipsing system AR Aur with a primary star of HgMn peculiarity which were obtained with the SOFIN spectropolarimeter installed at the Nordic Optical Telescope. We downloaded from the ESO archive the publically available HARPS spectra for eight HgMn stars and one normal and one superficially normal B-type star obtained in 2010. The application of the moment technique to the HARPS and SOFIN spectra allowed us to study the presence of the longitudina...

  9. Nuclear magnetization in gallium arsenide quantum dots at zero magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallen, G; Kunz, S; Amand, T; Bouet, L; Kuroda, T; Mano, T; Paget, D; Krebs, O; Marie, X; Sakoda, K; Urbaszek, B

    2014-01-01

    Optical and electrical control of the nuclear spin system allows enhancing the sensitivity of NMR applications and spin-based information storage and processing. Dynamic nuclear polarization in semiconductors is commonly achieved in the presence of a stabilizing external magnetic field. Here we report efficient optical pumping of nuclear spins at zero magnetic field in strain-free GaAs quantum dots. The strong interaction of a single, optically injected electron spin with the nuclear spins acts as a stabilizing, effective magnetic field (Knight field) on the nuclei. We optically tune the Knight field amplitude and direction. In combination with a small transverse magnetic field, we are able to control the longitudinal and transverse components of the nuclear spin polarization in the absence of lattice strain--that is, in dots with strongly reduced static nuclear quadrupole effects, as reproduced by our model calculations.

  10. Nuclear magnetization in gallium arsenide quantum dots at zero magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallen, G.; Kunz, S.; Amand, T.; Bouet, L.; Kuroda, T.; Mano, T.; Paget, D.; Krebs, O.; Marie, X.; Sakoda, K.; Urbaszek, B.

    2014-02-01

    Optical and electrical control of the nuclear spin system allows enhancing the sensitivity of NMR applications and spin-based information storage and processing. Dynamic nuclear polarization in semiconductors is commonly achieved in the presence of a stabilizing external magnetic field. Here we report efficient optical pumping of nuclear spins at zero magnetic field in strain-free GaAs quantum dots. The strong interaction of a single, optically injected electron spin with the nuclear spins acts as a stabilizing, effective magnetic field (Knight field) on the nuclei. We optically tune the Knight field amplitude and direction. In combination with a small transverse magnetic field, we are able to control the longitudinal and transverse components of the nuclear spin polarization in the absence of lattice strain—that is, in dots with strongly reduced static nuclear quadrupole effects, as reproduced by our model calculations.

  11. Efficient magnetic fields for supporting toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landreman, Matt, E-mail: mattland@umd.edu [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Boozer, Allen H. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    The magnetic field that supports tokamak and stellarator plasmas must be produced by coils well separated from the plasma. However, the larger the separation, the more difficult it is to produce a given magnetic field in the plasma region, so plasma configurations should be chosen that can be supported as efficiently as possible by distant coils. The efficiency of an externally generated magnetic field is a measure of the field's shaping component magnitude at the plasma compared to the magnitude near the coils; the efficiency of a plasma equilibrium can be measured using the efficiency of the required external shaping field. Counterintuitively, plasma shapes with low curvature and spectral width may have low efficiency, whereas plasma shapes with sharp edges may have high efficiency. Two precise measures of magnetic field efficiency, which correctly identify such differences in difficulty, will be examined. These measures, which can be expressed as matrices, relate the externally produced normal magnetic field on the plasma surface to the either the normal field or current on a distant control surface. A singular value decomposition (SVD) of either matrix yields an efficiency ordered basis for the magnetic field distributions. Calculations are carried out for both tokamak and stellarator cases. For axisymmetric surfaces with circular cross-section, the SVD is calculated analytically, and the range of poloidal and toroidal mode numbers that can be controlled to a given desired level is determined. If formulated properly, these efficiency measures are independent of the coordinates used to parameterize the surfaces.

  12. Quark matter under strong magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peres Menezes, Debora [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Depto de Fisica - CFM, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Laercio Lopes, Luiz [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Depto de Fisica - CFM, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Campus VIII, Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais, Varginha, MG (Brazil)

    2016-02-15

    We revisit three of the mathematical formalisms used to describe magnetized quark matter in compact objects within the MIT and the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio models and then compare their results. The tree formalisms are based on 1) isotropic equations of state, 2) anisotropic equations of state with different parallel and perpendicular pressures and 3) the assumption of a chaotic field approximation that results in a truly isotropic equation of state. We have seen that the magnetization obtained with both models is very different: while the MIT model produces well-behaved curves that are always positive for large magnetic fields, the NJL model yields a magnetization with lots of spikes and negative values. This fact has strong consequences on the results based on the existence of anisotropic equations of state. We have also seen that, while the isotropic formalism results in maximum stellar masses that increase considerably when the magnetic fields increase, maximum masses obtained with the chaotic field approximation never vary more than 5.5%. The effect of the magnetic field on the radii is opposed in the MIT and NJL models: with both formalisms, isotropic and chaotic field approximation, for a fixed mass, the radii increase with the increase of the magnetic field in the MIT bag model and decrease in the NJL, the radii of quark stars described by the NJL model being smaller than the ones described by the MIT model. (orig.)

  13. Influence of static magnetic field strength on the temperature resolution of a magnetic nanoparticle thermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jing; Dieckhoff, Jan; Schilling, Meinhard; Ludwig, Frank

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates the influence of dc magnetic field strength on the resolution of a magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) thermometer, which employs the fundamental f0 and 2f0 harmonics of the MNP magnetization induced by ac and superimposed dc magnetic fields. In ac and parallel dc magnetic fields, the strength of dc magnetic field modulates the harmonics of the MNP magnetization, which affects their temperature sensitivities and measurement signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). A temperature-adjustable fluxgate-based magnetic particle spectrometer was used to measure the spectra of the MNP magnetization at different temperatures. To determine the temperature, the amplitudes of the measured f0 and 2f0 harmonics were modeled based on the static Langevin function. AC susceptibility measurements on a MNP sample demonstrate the applicability of the static Langevin function for the description of the MNP magnetization spectra at a low frequency ac magnetic field without taking into account the MNP dynamics. Our simulations and experiments show that with increasing dc magnetic field from 0.2 mT to 2.0 mT, both the amplitude of the 2f0 harmonic and the temperature sensitivity of the amplitude ratio of the 2f0 to f0 harmonics increase by a factor of about 10 in an ac magnetic field with a frequency of 70 Hz and an amplitude of 1 mT. Concomitantly, the SNR of the 2f0 harmonic significantly increases by about 20 dB. Consequently, the temperature resolution of the MNP thermometer is improved from 1.97 K to 0.26 K.

  14. Alignment of magnetic uniaxial particles in a magnetic field: Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovnia, O.A., E-mail: golovnya@imp.uran.ru [Institute of Metal Physics, Str. S. Kovalevskoy, 18, 620990 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Popov, A.G [Institute of Metal Physics, Str. S. Kovalevskoy, 18, 620990 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Sobolev, A.N. [South Ural State University (National Research University), av. Lenina, 76, 454080 Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation); Hadjipanayis, G.C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, 217 Sharp Lab, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The numerical investigations of the process of alignment of magnetically uniaxial Nd–Fe–B powders in an applied magnetic field were carried out using the discrete element method (DEM). It is shown that magnetic alignment of ensemble of spherical particles provides extremely high degree of alignment, which is achieved in low magnetic fields. A model of formation of anisotropic particles as a combination of spherical particles is suggested. The influence of the shape anisotropy and friction coefficient on the alignment degree was analyzed. The increase in the friction coefficient leads to a decrease in the alignment degree; the simulation results are in qualitative agreement with experimental dependences. It is shown that in magnetic fields higher than 5 T, the calculated field dependences of the alignment degree quantitatively render the experimental data. The increase of about 6% in the alignment degree in the experiments with addition of internal lubricant can be explained by the decrease of 14% in friction coefficient. - Highlights: • We simulate the magnetic alignment of ensemble of Nd–Fe–B spherical uniaxial particles. • Anisotropic particles as a combination of spherical particles are constructed. • Influence of the particle shape anisotropy and friction on the alignment is analyzed. • We compare calculated and experimental data on field dependence of magnetic alignment. • The results render the experimental dependence.

  15. Fractional dynamics of charged particles in magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronel-Escamilla, A.; Gómez-Aguilar, J. F.; Alvarado-Méndez, E.; Guerrero-Ramírez, G. V.; Escobar-Jiménez, R. F.

    2016-02-01

    In many physical applications the electrons play a relevant role. For example, when a beam of electrons accelerated to relativistic velocities is used as an active medium to generate Free Electron Lasers (FEL), the electrons are bound to atoms, but move freely in a magnetic field. The relaxation time, longitudinal effects and transverse variations of the optical field are parameters that play an important role in the efficiency of this laser. The electron dynamics in a magnetic field is a means of radiation source for coupling to the electric field. The transverse motion of the electrons leads to either gain or loss energy from or to the field, depending on the position of the particle regarding the phase of the external radiation field. Due to the importance to know with great certainty the displacement of charged particles in a magnetic field, in this work we study the fractional dynamics of charged particles in magnetic fields. Newton’s second law is considered and the order of the fractional differential equation is (0;1]. Based on the Grünwald-Letnikov (GL) definition, the discretization of fractional differential equations is reported to get numerical simulations. Comparison between the numerical solutions obtained on Euler’s numerical method for the classical case and the GL definition in the fractional approach proves the good performance of the numerical scheme applied. Three application examples are shown: constant magnetic field, ramp magnetic field and harmonic magnetic field. In the first example the results obtained show bistability. Dissipative effects are observed in the system and the standard dynamic is recovered when the order of the fractional derivative is 1.

  16. Superior homogeneity of trapped magnetic field in superconducting MgB2 bulk magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, A.; Akasaka, T.; Tomita, M.; Kishio, K.

    2017-03-01

    Homogeneity of trapped magnetic field in radial and circumferential directions of high temperature superconducting bulk magnets, MgB2 (T c ˜38.3 K) and YBa2Cu3O y (T c ˜91.5 K), have been measured. In polycrystalline MgB2 bulks, the circularity of trapped magnetic field in a cylindrical disk is over 97% at 20-32.5 K, while that of YBa2Cu3O y was ˜87% at 77 K. Magnetic field distribution of MgB2 bulk was satisfactorily homogeneous and these measurements suggest MgB2 bulks with highly efficient cryocoolers should be very useful for novel high field permanent magnet applications.

  17. A Novel Method of Zero Offset Reduction in Hall Effect Sensors with Applications to Magnetic Field Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng; Liu, Ji-Gou; Zhang, Quan

    2015-02-01

    The paper presents a novel method to reduce the zero offset in Hall-Effect based magnetic measurement with single power supply. This method consists of a coarse zero compensation and a fine zero adjustment afterwards. By using the proposed method the zero output offset of Hall Effect sensors under using single power supply can be controlled within 0.2%. This method can be applied to all Hall Effect sensors with analog output and other similar sensors, which are powered with a single voltage or current source.

  18. Electric-field guiding of magnetic skyrmions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyaya, Pramey; Yu, Guoqiang; Amiri, Pedram Khalili; Wang, Kang L.

    2015-10-01

    We theoretically study equilibrium and dynamic properties of nanosized magnetic skyrmions in thin magnetic films with broken inversion symmetry, where an electric field couples to magnetization via spin-orbit coupling. Based on a symmetry-based phenomenology and micromagnetic simulations we show that this electric-field coupling, via renormalizing the micromagnetic energy, modifies the equilibrium properties of the skyrmion. This change, in turn, results in a significant alteration of the current-induced skyrmion motion. Particularly, the speed and direction of the skyrmion can be manipulated by designing a desired energy landscape electrically, which we describe within Thiele's analytical model and demonstrate in micromagnetic simulations including electric-field-controlled magnetic anisotropy. We additionally use this electric-field control to construct gates for controlling skyrmion motion exhibiting a transistorlike and multiplexerlike function. The proposed electric-field effect can thus provide a low-energy electrical knob to extend the reach of information processing with skyrmions.

  19. Magnetic field in the primitive solar nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, E. H.

    1978-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites have apparently been magnetized in their early history in magnetic fields with intensities of 0.1 to 10 G, but the origin of the magnetizing field has remained obscured. It is suggested that the magnetic field recorded in the remanence of carbonaceous chondrites may have been produced by a self-excited hydromagnetic dynamo in the gaseous preplanetary nebula from which the solar system is thought to have formed. Recently computed models for the evolution of the preplanetary nebula, consisting of turbulent and differentially rotating gaseous disks with characteristic radial scales of several AU, are used to demonstrate the feasibility of this hypothesis. The maximum field intensity that might be realized by the dynamo production process is estimated to be as high as 1 to 10 G, taking into account two dynamical mechanisms that limit the strength of the field (the Coriolis force and ambipolar diffusion).

  20. Magnetic field evolution in neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, F.; Reisenegger, A.; Valdivia, J. A.

    2017-07-01

    Neutron stars contain the strongest magnetic fields known in the Universe. Using numerical simulations restricted to axially symmetric geometry, we study the long-term evolution of the magnetic field in the interior of an isolated neutron star under the effect of ambipolar diffusion, i.e. the drift of the magnetic field and the charged particles relative to the neutrons. We model the stellar interior as an electrically neutral fluid composed of neutrons, protons and electrons; these species can be converted into each other by weak interactions (beta decays), suffer binary collisions, and be affected by each other's macroscopic electromagnetic fields. We show that, in the restricted case of pure ambipolar diffusion, neglecting weak interactions, the magnetic fields evolves towards a stable MHD equilibria configuration, in the timescales analytically expected.

  1. Field-enhanced magnetic moment in ellipsoidal nano-hematite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Vikash; Sen, Somaditya; Gelting, David R.; Gajdardziska-Josifovska, Marija; Schmidt, Marius; Guptasarma, Prasenjit

    2014-04-01

    Bulk hematite is a canted antiferromagnet at room temperature and displays weak magnetic coercivity above the Morin transition temperature T M ˜ 262 K. Below T M, hematite displays traditional antiferromagnetic behavior, with no net magnetic moment or magnetic hysteresis. Here, we report that ellipsoidal nanocrystals of hematite (ENH) display a significant field-enhanced magnetic moment (FEMM) upon being poled by a magnetic field. This poled moment displays a giant coercive field of nearly 6000 Oe at low temperature. Atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy indicates that the nanocrystals are single crystalline, and that the surfaces are bulk-terminated. The apical terminations include the sets of planes, which are implicated in possible formation of FM-arrangements near the surface. We tentatively suggest that FEMM in ENH could also arise from uncompensated surface spins or a shell of ordered spins oriented and pinned near the surface by a magnetic field. The gradual loss of magnetic moment with increasing temperature could arise as a result of competition between surface pinning energy, and kT. The large coercive field points toward possible applications for ENH in digital magnetic recording.

  2. Magnetic Helical Micro- and Nanorobots: Toward Their Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Famin Qiu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic helical micro- and nanorobots can perform 3D navigation in various liquids with a sub-micrometer precision under low-strength rotating magnetic fields (<10 mT. Since magnetic fields with low strengths are harmless to cells and tissues, magnetic helical micro/nanorobots are promising tools for biomedical applications, such as minimally invasive surgery, cell manipulation and analysis, and targeted therapy. This review provides general information on magnetic helical micro/nanorobots, including their fabrication, motion control, and further functionalization for biomedical applications.

  3. Processing and characterization of superconducting solenoids made of Bi-2212/Ag-alloy multifilament round wire for high field magnet applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng

    As the only high temperature superconductor with round wire (RW) geometry, Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x (Bi-2212) superconducting wire has the advantages of being multi-filamentary, macroscopically isotropic and twistable. With overpressure (OP) processing techniques recently developed by our group at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), the engineering current density (Je) of Bi-2212 RW can be dramatically increased. For example, Je of more than 600 A/mm 2 (4.2 K and 20 T) is achieved after 100 bar OP processing. With these intrinsically beneficial properties and recent processing progress, Bi-2212 RW has become very attractive for high field magnet applications, especially for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) magnets and accelerator magnets etc. This thesis summarizes my graduate study on Bi-2212 solenoids for high field and high homogeneity NMR magnet applications, which mainly includes performance study of Bi-2212 RW insulations, 1 bar and OP processing study of Bi-2212 solenoids, and development of superconducting joints between Bi-2212 RW conductors. Electrical insulation is one of the key components of Bi-2212 coils to provide sufficient electrical standoff within coil winding pack. A TiO 2/polymer insulation offered by nGimat LLC was systematically investigated by differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dielectric property measurements, and transport critical current (Ic) property measurements. About 29% of the insulation by weight is polymer. When the Bi-2212 wire is fully heat treated, this decomposes with slow heating to 400 °C in flowing O2. After the full reaction, we found that the TiO2 did not degrade the critical current properties, adhered well to the conductor, and provided a breakdown voltage of more than 100 V. A Bi-2212 RW wound solenoid coil was built using this insulation being offered by nGimat LLC. The coil resistance was constant through coil winding, polymer burn

  4. Spectrum of Neutral Helium in Strong Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, M D; Ceperley, D M; Jones, Matthew D.; Ortiz, Gerardo; Ceperley, David M.

    1998-01-01

    We present extensive and accurate calculations for the excited state spectrum of spin-polarized neutral helium in a range of magnetic field strengths up to $10^{12}$ G. Of considerable interest to models of magnetic white dwarf stellar atmospheres, we also present results for the dipole strengths of the low lying transitions among these states. Our methods rely on a systematically saturated basis set approach to solving the Hartree--Fock self-consistent field equations, combined with an ``exact'' stochastic method to estimate the residual basis set truncation error and electron correlation effects. We also discuss the applicability of the adiabatic approximation to strongly magnetized multi-electron atoms.

  5. Quantum Electrodynamics in a Uniform Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, J

    2005-01-01

    A systematic formalism for quantum electrodynamics in a classical uniform magnetic field is discussed. The first order radiative correction to the ground state energy of an electron is calculated. This then leads to the anomalous magnetic moment of an electron without divergent integrals. Thorough analyses of this problem are given for the weak magnetic field limit. A new expression for the radiative correction to the ground state energy is obtained. This contains only one integral with an additional summation with respect to each Landau level. The importance of this formalism is also addressed in order to deal with quantum electrodynamics in an intense external field.

  6. Hyperon Stars in Strong Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Gomes, R O; Vasconcellos, C A Z

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the effects of strong magnetic fields on the properties of hyperon stars. The matter is described by a hadronic model with parametric coupling. The matter is considered to be at zero temperature, charge neutral, beta-equilibrated, containing the baryonic octet, electrons and muons. The charged particles have their orbital motions Landau-quantized in the presence of strong magnetic fields (SMF). Two parametrisations of a chemical potential dependent static magnetic field are considered, reaching $1-2 \\times 10^{18}\\,G$ in the center of the star. Finally, the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov (TOV) equations are solved to obtain the mass-radius relation and population of the stars.

  7. Magnetic fields from second-order interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Osano, Bob

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that when two types of perturbations interact in cosmological perturbation theory, the interaction may lead to the generation of a third type. In this article we discuss the generation of magnetic fields from such interactions. We determine conditions under which the interaction of a first-order magnetic field with a first-order scalar-or vector-, or tensor-perturbations would lead to the generation of second order magnetic field. The analysis is done in a covariant-index-free approach, but could be done in the standard covariant indexed-approach.

  8. Dissipative charged fluid in a magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Abbasi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We study the collective excitations in a dissipative charged fluid at zero chemical potential when an external magnetic field is present. While in the absence of magnetic field, four collective excitations appear in the fluid, we find five hydrodynamic modes here. This implies that the magnetic field splits the degeneracy between the transverse shear modes. Using linear response theory, we then compute the retarded response functions. In particular, it turns out that the correlation between charge and the energy fluctuations will no longer vanish, even at zero chemical potential. By use of the response functions, we also derive the relevant Kubo formulas for the transport coefficients.

  9. Magnetic fields from second-order interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Osano, Bob

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that when two types of perturbations interact in cosmological perturbation theory, the interaction may lead to the generation of a third type. In this article we discuss the generation of magnetic fields from such interactions. We determine conditions under which the interaction of a first-order magnetic field with a first-order scalar-or vector-, or tensor-perturbations would lead to the generation of second order magnetic field. The analysis is done in a covariant-index-fre...

  10. Characteristic Lengths of Magnetic Field in Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Jungyeon

    2009-01-01

    In the framework of turbulence dynamo, flow motions amplify a weak seed magnetic field through the stretching of field lines. Although the amplification process has been a topic of active research, less attention has been paid to the length scales of magnetic field. In this paper, we described a numerical study on characteristic lengths of magnetic field in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. We considered the case of very weak or zero mean magnetic field, which is applicable to the turbulence in the intergalactic space. Our findings are as follows. (1) At saturation, the peak of magnetic field spectrum occurs at $\\sim L_0/2$, where $L_0$ is the energy injection scale, while the most energy containing scale is $\\sim L_0/5$. The peak scale of spectrum of projected, two-dimensional field is $\\sim L_0$. (2) During the stage of magnetic field amplification, the energy equipartition scale shows a power-law increase of $\\sim t^{1.5}$, while the integral and curvature scales show a linear increase. The equipartition, in...

  11. Growth characteristics of maize seeds exposed to magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashisth, Ananta; Joshi, Devendra Kumar

    2017-02-01

    Standardization of magnetic field was done for maximum enhancement in germination characteristics of maize seeds. Seeds of maize were exposed to static magnetic fields of strength 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 for 1, 2, 3, and 4 h for all field strengths. Results indicate that magnetic field application enhanced seed performance in terms of percentage germination, speed of germination, seedling length, and seedling dry weight significantly compared to unexposed control. Among the various combinations of field strength and duration, 200 mT for 1 h exposure gave best results. Exposure of seeds to magnetic fields improved seed coat membrane integrity as it reduced cellular leakage and, consequently, electrical conductivity. Experiments conducted at a research farm as well as farmer's field showed that plants raised from seeds exposed to 200 mT for 1 h had higher values of leaf area index, shoot length, number of leaves, chlorophyll content, shoot/root dry weight, and root characteristics as compared to corresponding values in untreated control. From the studies, it may be concluded that exposure of dry seeds to static magnetic field of 200 mT for 1 h improved shoot and root growth. Improved root system and biomass led to increased seed yield. Improved functional root parameters suggested that magnetically treated maize seeds could be used under moisture stress conditions. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:151-157, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Magnetic Field Control of Combustion Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmina, I.; Valdmanis, R.; Zake, M.; Kalis, H.; Marinaki, M.; Strautins, U.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental studies and mathematical modelling of the effects of magnetic field on combustion dynamics at thermo-chemical conversion of biomass are carried out with the aim of providing control of the processes developing in the reaction zone of swirling flame. The joint research of the magnetic field effect on the combustion dynamics includes the estimation of this effect on the formation of the swirling flame dynamics, flame temperature and composition, providing analysis of the magnetic field effects on the flame characteristics. The results of experiments have shown that the magnetic field exerts the influence on the flow velocity components by enhancing a swirl motion in the flame reaction zone with swirl-enhanced mixing of the axial flow of volatiles with cold air swirl, by cooling the flame reaction zone and by limiting the thermo-chemical conversion of volatiles. Mathematical modelling of magnetic field effect on the formation of the flame dynamics confirms that the electromagnetic force, which is induced by the electric current surrounding the flame, leads to field-enhanced increase of flow vorticity by enhancing mixing of the reactants. The magnetic field effect on the flame temperature and rate of reactions leads to conclusion that field-enhanced increase of the flow vorticity results in flame cooling by limiting the chemical conversion of the reactants.

  13. Magnetic field evolution of accreting neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Istomin, Ya N

    2016-01-01

    The flow of a matter, accreting onto a magnetized neutron star, is accompanied by an electric current. The closing of the electric current occurs in the crust of a neutron stars in the polar region across the magnetic field. But the conductivity of the crust along the magnetic field greatly exceeds the conductivity across the field, so the current penetrates deep into the crust down up to the super conducting core. The magnetic field, generated by the accretion current, increases greatly with the depth of penetration due to the Hall conductivity of the crust is also much larger than the transverse conductivity. As a result, the current begins to flow mainly in the toroidal direction, creating a strong longitudinal magnetic field, far exceeding an initial dipole field. This field exists only in the narrow polar tube of $r$ width, narrowing with the depth, i.e. with increasing of the crust density $\\rho$, $r\\propto \\rho^{-1/4}$. Accordingly, the magnetic field $B$ in the tube increases with the depth, $B\\propto...

  14. Reversals of the Earth's Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Duene E.

    J.A. Jacobs of Cambridge University has written a concise, authoritative, and up-todate text on reversals of the earth's magnetic field. Chapter 1 is a concise summary of the basic attributes of the geomagnetic field and its behavior in different time frames. It explains spherical harmonic analysis of the field and presents the history of acquisition of the data that best represent the recent field. Lastly, it includes a short summary of the origin and electrodynamics of the magnetic field, outlining the current theoretical basis for its generation.

  15. Tuning plasmonic cloaks with an external magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Kort-Kamp, W J M; Pinheiro, F A; Farina, C

    2013-01-01

    We propose a mechanism to actively tune the operation of plasmonic cloaks with an external magnetic field by investigating electromagnetic scattering by a dielectric cylinder coated with a magneto-optical shell. In the long wavelength limit we show that the presence of an external magnetic field may drastically reduce the scattering cross-section at all observation angles. We demonstrate that the application of external magnetic fields can modify the operation wavelength without the need of changing material and/or geometrical parameters. We also show that applied magnetic fields can reversibly switch on and off the cloak operation. These results, which could be achieved for existing magneto-optical materials, are shown to be robust to material losses, so that they may pave the way for developing actively tunable, versatile plasmonic cloaks.

  16. Interferometric methods for mapping static electric and magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pozzi, Giulio; Beleggia, Marco; Kasama, Takeshi;

    2014-01-01

    The mapping of static electric and magnetic fields using electron probes with a resolution and sensitivity that are sufficient to reveal nanoscale features in materials requires the use of phase-sensitive methods such as the shadow technique, coherent Foucault imaging and the Transport of Intensi......) the model-independent determination of the locations and magnitudes of field sources (electric charges and magnetic dipoles) directly from electron holographic data.......The mapping of static electric and magnetic fields using electron probes with a resolution and sensitivity that are sufficient to reveal nanoscale features in materials requires the use of phase-sensitive methods such as the shadow technique, coherent Foucault imaging and the Transport of Intensity...... on theoretical models that form the basis of the quantitative interpretation of electron holographic data. We review the application of electron holography to a variety of samples (including electric fields associated with p–n junctions in semiconductors, quantized magnetic flux in superconductors...

  17. Magnetic field considerations in fusion power plant environs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liemohn, H.B.; Lessor, D.L.; Duane, B.H.

    1976-09-01

    A summary of magnetic field production mechanisms and effects is given. Discussions are included on the following areas: (1) stray magnetic and electric fields from tokamaks, (2) methods for reducing magnetic fields, (3) economics of magnetic field reductions, (4) forces on magnetizable objects near magnetic confinement fusion reactors, (5) electric field transients in tokamaks, (6) attenuation and decay of electromagnetic fields, and (7) magnetic field transients from tokamak malfunctions.

  18. Magnetic fields in early protostellar disk formation

    CERN Document Server

    González-Casanova, Diego F; Lazarian, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We consider formation of accretion disks from a realistically turbulent molecular gas using 3D MHD simulations. In particular, we analyze the effect of the fast turbulent reconnection described by the Lazarian & Vishniac (1999) model for the removal of magnetic flux from a disk. With our numerical simulations we demonstrate how the fast reconnection enables protostellar disk formation resolving the so-called "magnetic braking catastrophe". In particular, we provide a detailed study of the dynamics of a 0.5 M$_\\odot$ protostar and the formation of its disk for up to several thousands years. We measure the evolution of the mass, angular momentum, magnetic field, and turbulence around the star. We consider effects of two processes that strongly affect the magnetic transfer of angular momentum, both of which are based on turbulent reconnection: the first, "reconnection diffusion", removes the magnetic flux from the disk, the other involves the change of the magnetic field's topology, but does not change the a...

  19. Intergalactic Magnetic Fields from Quasar Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Furlanetto, S; Furlanetto, Steven; Loeb, Abraham

    2001-01-01

    Outflows from quasars inevitably pollute the intergalactic medium (IGM) with magnetic fields. The short-lived activity of a quasar leaves behind an expanding magnetized bubble in the IGM. We model the expansion of the remnant quasar bubbles and calculate their distribution as a function of size and magnetic field strength at different redshifts. We generically find that by a redshift z=3, about 5-20% of the IGM volume is filled by magnetic fields with an energy density >10% of the mean thermal energy density of a photo-ionized IGM (at T=10^4 K). As massive galaxies and X-ray clusters condense out of the magnetized IGM, the adiabatic compression of the magnetic field could result in the field strength observed in these systems without a need for further dynamo amplification. The intergalactic magnetic field could also provide a nonthermal contribution to the pressure of the photo-ionized gas that may account for the claimed discrepancy between the simulated and observed Doppler width distributions of the Ly-al...

  20. The CMS Magnetic Field Map Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Klyukhin, VI; Sarycheva, L I; Klyukhin, V I; Ball, A; Gaddi, A; Amapane, N; Gerwig, H; Andreev, V; Cure, B; Mulders, M; Loveless, R; Karimaki, V; Popescu, S; Herve, A

    2010-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general-purpose detector designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive featuresinclude a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6 m diameter by 12.5 m long free bore, enclosed inside a 10000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. Accurate characterization of the magnetic field everywhere in the CMS detector is required. During two major tests of the CMS magnet the magnetic flux density was measured inside the coil in a cylinder of 3.448 m diameter and 7 m length with a specially designed field-mapping pneumatic machine as well as in 140 discrete regions of the CMS yoke with NMR probes, 3-D Hall sensors and flux-loops. A TOSCA 3-D model of the CMS magnet has been developed to describe the magnetic field everywhere outside the tracking volume measured with the field-mapping machine. A volume based representation of the magnetic field is used to provide the CMS simulation and reconstruction software with the magnetic field ...

  1. Iron Oxide Nanocrystals for Magnetic Hyperthermia Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale L. Huber

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanocrystals have been investigated extensively in the past several years for several potential applications, such as information technology, MRI contrast agents, and for drug conjugation and delivery. A specific property of interest in biomedicine is magnetic hyperthermia—an increase in temperature resulting from the thermal energy released by magnetic nanocrystals in an external alternating magnetic field. Iron oxide nanocrystals of various sizes and morphologies were synthesized and tested for specific losses (heating power using frequencies of 111.1 kHz and 629.2 kHz, and corresponding magnetic field strengths of 9 and 25 mT. Polymorphous nanocrystals as well as spherical nanocrystals and nanowires in paramagnetic to ferromagnetic size range exhibited good heating power. A remarkable 30 °C temperature increase was observed in a nanowire sample at 111 kHz and magnetic field of 25 mT (19.6 kA/m, which is very close to the typical values of 100 kHz and 20 mT used in medical treatments.

  2. Compact Electric- And Magnetic-Field Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterhalter, Daniel; Smith, Edward

    1994-01-01

    Compact sensor measures both electric and magnetic fields. Includes both short electric-field dipole and search-coil magnetometer. Three mounted orthogonally providing triaxial measurements of electromagnetic field at frequencies ranging from near 0 to about 10 kHz.

  3. Paschen-Back effect in the CrH molecule and its application for magnetic field measurements on stars, brown dwarfs, and hot exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Kuzmychov, O

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the Paschen-Back effect in the (0,0) band of the A6{\\Sigma}+-X6{\\Sigma}+ system of the CrH molecule, and we examined its potential for estimating magnetic fields on stars and substellar objects, such as brown dwarfs and hot exoplanets. We carried out quantum mechanical calculations to obtain the energy level structure of the electronic-vibrational-rotational states considered both in the absence and in the presence of a magnetic field. Level mixing due to magnetic field perturbation (the Paschen-Back effect) was consistently taken into account. Then, we calculated frequencies and strengths of transitions between magnetic sublevels. Employing these results and solving numerically a set of the radiative transfer equations for polarized radiation, we calculated Stokes parameters for both the individual lines and the (0,0) band depending on the strength and orientation of the magnetic field. We demonstrate that magnetic splitting of the individual CrH lines shows a significant asymmetry due to the...

  4. High Field Pulse Magnets with New Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Lesch, B.; Cochran, V. G.; Eyssa, Y.; Tozer, S.; Mielke, C. H.; Rickel, D.; van Sciver, S. W.; Schneider-Muntau, H. J.

    2004-11-01

    High performance pulse magnets using the combination of CuNb conductor and Zylon fiber composite reinforcement with bore sizes of 24, 15 and 10 mm have been designed, manufactured and tested to destruction. The magnets successfully reached the peak fields of 64, 70 and 77.8 T respectively with no destruction. Failures occurred near the end flanges at the layer. The magnet design, manufacturing and testing, and the mode of the failure are described and analyzed.

  5. Magnetic nanobeads: Synthesis and application in biomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid Waseem

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nanobiotechnology appears to be an emerging science which leads to new developments in the field of medicine. Importance of the magnetic nanomaterials in biomedical science cannot be overlooked. The most commonly used chemical methods to synthesize drugable magnetic nanobeads are co-precipitation, thermal decomposition and microemulsion. However monodispersion, selection of an appropriate coating material for in vivo application, stability and unique physical properties like size, shape and composition of nanobeads remain unsettled challenge. The use of hazardous reagents during chemical synthesis is another impediment for in vivo application of the magnetic nanobeads. The current minireview put forth the pros and cons of chemical and biological synthesis of magnetic nanobeads. We critically focus on chemical and biological methods of synthesis of the magnetic nanobeads along with their biomedical applications and subsequently suggest a suitable synthetic approach for potential biocompatible nanobeads. Biogenic synthesis is proposed to be the best option which generates biocompatible nanobeads. Reducing enzymes present in plants, plant materials or microbes reduce precursor inorganic salts to nano sized materials. These nanomaterials exhibit biomolecules on their surface. The use of biologically synthesized magnetic nanobeads in diagnostics and therapeutics would be safe for human and ecosystem.

  6. Dynamics of magnetic nanoparticles in a viscous fluid driven by rotating magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usadel, Klaus D.

    2017-03-01

    The rotational dynamics of magnetic nanoparticles in rotating magnetic fields in the presence of thermal noise is studied both theoretically and by performing numerical calculations. Equations for the dynamics of particles with uniaxial magnetic anisotropy are studied and the phase lag between the rotating magnetic moment and the driving field is obtained. It is shown that for large enough anisotropy energy the magnetic moment is locked to the anisotropy axis so that the particle behaves like a rotating magnetic dipole. The corresponding rigid dipole model is analyzed both numerically by solving the appropriate Fokker-Planck equation and analytically by applying an effective field method. In the special case of a rotating magnetic field applied analytic results are obtained in perfect agreement with numerical results based on the Fokker-Planck equation. The analytic formulas derived are not restricted to small magnetic fields or low frequencies and are therefore important for applications. The illustrative numerical calculations presented are performed for magnetic parameters typical for iron oxide.

  7. Light Polarization Using Ferrofluids and Magnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Tufaile

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We are presenting an experimental setup based on polarized light, enabling the visualization of the magnetic field of magnetic assemblies using a Hele-Shaw cell filled with ferrofluids. We have simulated the observed patterns with hypergeometric polynomials.

  8. The magnetic field of zeta Orionis A

    CERN Document Server

    Blazère, A; Tkachenko, A; Bouret, J -C; Rivinius, Th

    2015-01-01

    Zeta Ori A is a hot star claimed to host a weak magnetic field, but no clear magnetic detection was obtained so far. In addition, it was recently shown to be a binary system composed of a O9.5I supergiant and a B1IV star. We aim at verifying the presence of a magnetic field in zeta Ori A, identifying to which of the two binary components it belongs (or whether both stars are magnetic), and characterizing the field.Very high signal-to-noise spectropolarimetric data were obtained with Narval at the Bernard Lyot Telescope (TBL) in France. Archival HEROS, FEROS and UVES spectroscopic data were also used. The data were first disentangled to separate the two components. We then analyzed them with the Least-Squares Deconvolution (LSD) technique to extract the magnetic information. We confirm that zeta Ori A is magnetic. We find that the supergiant component zeta Ori Aa is the magnetic component: Zeeman signatures are observed and rotational modulation of the longitudinal magnetic field is clearly detected with a per...

  9. Studies of Solar Vector Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jingxiu

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we report a few advances in the studies based on the solar vector magnetic field observations which were carried out mainly with the Solar Magnetic Field Telescope at the Huairou Solar Observing Station in the 1990s. (1) We developed necessary methodology and concepts in vector magnetogram analysis (Wang et al. 1996). For the first time, we proposed to use the photospheric free magnetic energy to quantify the major flare productivity of solar active regions (ARs), and it had been proved to be the best parameter in representing the major flare activity. (2) We revealed that there was always a dominant sense of magnetic shear in a given AR (Wang 1994), which was taken as the premise of the helicity calculation in ARs; we made the first quantitative estimation of magnetic helicity evolution in ARs (Wang 1996). (3) We identified the first group of evidence of magnetic reconnection in the lower solar atmosphere with vector magnetic field observations and proposed a two-step reconnection flare model to interpret the observed association of flux cancellation and flares (Wang and Shi 1993). Efforts to quantify the major flare productivity of super active regions with vector magnetic field observations have been also taken.

  10. High Field Magnetization of Tb Single Crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roeland, L. W.; Cock, G. J.; Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1975-01-01

    The magnetization of Tb single crystals was measured in magnetic fields to 34T along the hard direction at temperature of 1.8, 4.2, 65.5 and 77K, and along with easy direction at 4.2 and 77K. The data are compared with the results of a self-consistent spin wave calculation using a phenomenological...

  11. Effects of High Magnetic Field on Recrystallization Behavior in Fe-Si Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya Xu; H.Ohtsuka; S.Umezawa; K.Anak; S.Miyazaki; H.Wada

    2000-01-01

    Effects of high magnetic field on recrystallization, coarsening after primary recrystallization and texture evolution were studied in non-oriented and oriented 3% silicon steels. The highest applied magnetic field strength was 10 Tesla. It was found that primary recrystallization process and coarsening after primary recrystallization are both retarded by the application of magnetic field during annealing. A difference between primary recrystallization textures annealed with or without a magnetic field was found in both non-oriented and oriented 3% silicon specimens. It was found that the amount of texture component { 111 } increases by the application of magnetic field during annealing.

  12. Zero modes in finite range magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, C; Nash, C

    2000-01-01

    We find a class of Fermion zero modes of Abelian Dirac operators in three dimensional Euclidean space where the gauge potentials and the related magnetic fields are nonzero only in a finite space region.

  13. Axion production from primordial magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, Kohei; Nakai, Yuichiro

    2017-07-01

    Production of axionlike particles (ALPs) by primordial magnetic fields may have significant impacts on cosmology. We discuss the production of ALPs in the presence of the primordial magnetic fields. We find a region of the ALP mass and photon coupling which realizes the observed properties of the dark matter with appropriate initial conditions for the magnetic fields. This region may be interesting in light of recent indications for the 3.5 keV lines from galaxy clusters. For a small axion mass, a region of previously allowed parameter spaces is excluded by overproduction of ALPs as a hot/warm dark matter component. Since the abundance of ALPs strongly depends on the initial conditions of primordial magnetic fields, our results provide implications for scenarios of magnetogenesis.

  14. Compact muon solenoid magnet reaches full field

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Scientist of the U.S. Department of Energy in Fermilab and collaborators of the US/CMS project announced that the world's largest superconducting solenoid magnet has reached full field in tests at CERN. (1 apge)

  15. A Topology for the Penumbral Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Almeida, J Sanchez

    2009-01-01

    We describe a scenario for the topology of the magnetic field in penumbrae that accounts for recent observations showing upflows, downflows, and reverse magnetic polarities. According to our conjecture, short narrow magnetic loops fill the penumbral photosphere. Flows along these arched field lines are responsible for both the Evershed effect and the convective transport. This scenario seems to be qualitatively consistent with most existing observations, including the dark cores in penumbral filaments reported by Scharmer et al. Each bright filament with dark core would be a system of two paired convective rolls with the dark core tracing the common lane where the plasma sinks down. The magnetic loops would have a hot footpoint in one of the bright filament and a cold footpoint in the dark core. The scenario fits in most of our theoretical prejudices (siphon flows along field lines, presence of overturning convection, drag of field lines by downdrafts, etc). If the conjecture turns out to be correct, the mild...

  16. Local Magnetic Field Role in Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, Patrick M; Ho, Paul T P; Zhang, Qizhou; Girart, Josep M; Chen, Huei-Ru V; Lai, Shih-Ping; Li, Hua-bai; Li, Zhi-Yun; Liu, Hau-Yu B; Padovani, Marco; Qiu, Keping; Rao, Ramprasad; Yen, Hsi-Wei; Frau, Pau; Chen, How-Huan; Ching, Tao-Chung

    2015-01-01

    We highlight distinct and systematic observational features of magnetic field morphologies in polarized submm dust continuum. We illustrate this with specific examples and show statistical trends from a sample of 50 star-forming regions.

  17. Revisiting holographic superconductor with Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Momeni, Davood

    2014-01-01

    We study the effect of the bulk magnetic field (charge) on scalar condensation using an analytical approach of matching. An AdS-magnetized black hole solution has been used as a probe solution of normal phase of a strongly coupled condensed matter system on boundary. In the zero temperature limit of the black hole and infinite temperature, we show that there exists a critical magnetic field and so, the Meissner's effect presented. We compare this analytical result with our previous variational approach. By studying the different between heat capacities of the normal and superconducting phases near the critical point, we show that this thermodynamic quantity becomes divergent as the Rutgers formula predicted. Mathematical pole of Rutgers formula gives us a maximum for magnetic field which at this value, the system backs to the normal phase. In zero temperature we investigate exact series solutions of the field equations using an appropriate boundary conditions set. We show that conformal dimension is fixed by ...

  18. A Holographic Bound on Cosmic Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    McInnes, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic fields large enough to be observable are ubiquitous in astrophysics, even at extremely large length scales. This has led to the suggestion that such fields are seeded at very early (inflationary) times, and subsequently amplified by various processes involving, for example, dynamo effects. Many such mechanisms give rise to extremely large magnetic fields at the end of inflationary reheating, and therefore also during the quark-gluon plasma epoch of the early universe. Such plasmas have a well-known holographic description. We show that holography imposes an upper bound on the intensity of magnetic fields (scaled by the squared temperature) in these circumstances, and that the values expected in some models of cosmic magnetism come close to attaining that bound.

  19. Magnetic Fields in Limb Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozitsky, V. G.; Lozitska, N. I.; Botygina, O. A.

    2013-02-01

    Two limb solar flares, of 14 July 2005 and 19 July 2012, of importance X1.2 and M7.7, are analyzed at present work. Magnetic field strength in named flares are investigated by Stokes I±V profiles of Hα and D3 HeI lines. There are direct evidences to the magnetic field inhomogeneity in flares, in particular, non-paralelism of bisectors in I+V and I-V profiles. In some flare places, the local maximums of bisectors splitting were found in both lines. If these bisector splittings are interpreted as Zeeman effect manifestation, the following magnetic field strengths reach up to 2200 G in Hα and 1300 G in D3. According to calculations, the observed peculiarities of line profiles may indicate the existence of optically thick emissive small-scale elements with strong magnetic fields and lowered temperature.

  20. Construction of high magnetic field facilities approved

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ On 25 January, the National Development and Reform Commission gave the green light to a proposal to construct high magnetic field facilities for experimental use. The suggestion was jointly submitted by the Ministry of Education and CAS.

  1. The Magnetic Field of Helmholtz Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berridge, H. J. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the magnetic field of Helmholtz coils qualitatively and then provides the basis for a quantitative expression. Since the mathematical calculations are very involved, a computer program for solving the mathematical expression is presented and explained. (GS)

  2. EIT waves and coronal magnetic field diagnostics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN PengFei

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic field in the solar lower atmosphere can be measured by the use of the Zeeman and Hanle effects. By contrast, the coronal magnetic field well above the solar surface, which directly controls various eruptive phenomena, can not be precisely measured with the traditional techniques. Several attempts are being made to probe the coronal magnetic field, such as force-free extrapolation based on the photospheric magnetograms, gyroresonance radio emissions, and coronal seismology based on MHD waves in the corona. Compared to the waves trapped in the localized coronal loops, EIT waves are the only global-scale wave phenomenon, and thus are the ideal tool for the coronal global seismology. In this paper, we review the observations and modelings of EIT waves, and illustrate how they can be applied to probe the global magnetic field in the corona.

  3. High-Field Superconducting Magnets Supporting PTOLEMY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Ann; Luo, Audrey; Osherson, Benjamin; Gentile, Charles; Tully, Chris; Cohen, Adam

    2013-10-01

    The Princeton Tritium Observatory for Light, Early Universe, Massive Neutrino Yield (PTOLEMY) is an experiment planned to collect data on Big Bang relic neutrinos, which are predicted to be amongst the oldest and smallest particles in the universe. Currently, a proof-of-principle prototype is being developed at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory to test key technologies associated with the experiment. A prominent technology in the experiment is the Magnetic Adiabatic Collimation with an Electrostatic Filter (MAC-E filter), which guides tritium betas along magnetic field lines generated by superconducting magnets while deflecting those of lower energies. B field mapping is performed to ensure the magnets produce a minimum field at the midpoint of the configuration of the magnets and to verify accuracy of existing models. Preliminary tests indicate the required rapid decrease in B field strength from the bore of the more powerful 3.35 T magnet, with the field dropping to 0.18 T approximately 0.5 feet from the outermost surface of the magnet.

  4. Magnetic Field Amplification in Young Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Schober, Jennifer; Klessen, Ralf S

    2013-01-01

    The Universe at present is highly magnetized, with fields of the order of a few 10^-5 G and coherence lengths larger than 10 kpc in typical galaxies like the Milky Way. We propose that the magnetic field was amplified to this values already during the formation and the early evolution of the galaxies. Turbulence in young galaxies is driven by accretion as well as by supernova (SN) explosions of the first generation of stars. The small-scale dynamo can convert the turbulent kinetic energy into magnetic energy and amplify very weak primordial magnetic seed fields on short timescales. The amplification takes place in two phases: in the kinematic phase the magnetic field grows exponentially, with the largest growth on the smallest non-resistive scale. In the following non-linear phase the magnetic energy is shifted towards larger scales until the dynamo saturates on the turbulent forcing scale. To describe the amplification of the magnetic field quantitatively we model the microphysics in the interstellar medium ...

  5. Effects of magnetic fields on dissolution of arthritis causing crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Y.; Iwasaka, M.

    2015-05-01

    The number of gout patients has rapidly increased because of excess alcohol and salt intake. The agent responsible for gout is the monosodium urate (MSU) crystal. MSU crystals are found in blood and consist of uric acid and sodium. As a substitute for drug dosing or excessive water intake, physical stimulation by magnetic fields represents a new medical treatment for gout. In this study, we investigated the effects of a magnetic field on the dissolution of a MSU crystal suspension. The white MSU crystal suspension was dissolved in an alkaline solution. We measured the light transmission of the MSU crystal suspension by a transmitted light measuring system. The magnetic field was generated by a horizontal electromagnet (maximum field strength was 500 mT). The MSU crystal suspension that dissolved during the application of a magnetic field of 500 mT clearly had a higher dissolution rate when compared with the control sample. We postulate that the alkali solution promoted penetration upon diamagnetic rotation and this magnetic field orienting is because of the pronounced diamagnetic susceptibility anisotropy of the MSU crystal. The results indicate that magnetic fields represent an effective gout treatment approach.

  6. Application of polarization ellipse technique for analysis of ULF magnetic fields from two distant stations in Koyna-Warna seismoactive region, West India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Dudkin

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A new approach is developed to find the source azimuth of the ultra low frequency (ULF electromagnetic (EM signals believed to be emanating from well defined seismic zone. The method is test applied on magnetic data procured from the seismoactive region of Koyna-Warna, known for prolonged reservoir triggered seismicity. Extremely low-noise, high-sensitivity LEMI-30 search coil magnetometers were used to measure simultaneously the vector magnetic field in the frequency range 0.001–32 Hz at two stations, the one located within and another ~100 km away from the seismic active zone. During the observation campaign extending from 15 March to 30 June 2006 two earthquakes (EQs of magnitude (ML>4 occurred, which are searched for the presence of precursory EM signals.

    Comparison of polarization ellipses (PE parameters formed by the magnetic field components at the measurement stations, in select frequency bands, allows discrimination of seismo-EM signals from the natural background ULF signals of magnetospheric/ionospheric origin. The magnetic field components corresponding to spectral bands dominated by seismo-EM fields define the PE plane which at any instant contains the source of the EM fields. Intersection lines of such defined PE planes for distant observation stations clutter in to the source region. Approximating the magnetic-dipole configuration for the source, the magnetic field components along the intersection lines suggest that azimuth of the EM source align in the NNW-SSE direction. This direction well coincides with the orientation of nodal plane of normal fault plane mechanism for the two largest EQs recorded during the campaign. More significantly the correspondence of this direction with the tectonic controlled trend in local seismicity, it has been surmised that high pressure fluid flow along the fault that facilitate EQs in the region may also be the source mechanism for EM fields by electrokinetic effect.

  7. Magnetic fields and massive star formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qizhou; Keto, Eric; Ho, Paul T. P.; Ching, Tao-Chung; Chen, How-Huan [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Qiu, Keping [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China); Girart, Josep M.; Juárez, Carmen [Institut de Ciències de l' Espai, (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciències, C5p 2, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Liu, Hauyu; Tang, Ya-Wen; Koch, Patrick M.; Rao, Ramprasad; Lai, Shih-Ping [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Li, Zhi-Yun [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Frau, Pau [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, Alfonso XII, 3 E-28014 Madrid (Spain); Li, Hua-Bai [Department of Physics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Padovani, Marco [Laboratoire de Radioastronomie Millimétrique, UMR 8112 du CNRS, École Normale Supérieure et Observatoire de Paris, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Bontemps, Sylvain [OASU/LAB-UMR5804, CNRS, Université Bordeaux 1, F-33270 Floirac (France); Csengeri, Timea, E-mail: qzhang@cfa.harvard.edu [Max Planck Institute for Radioastronomy, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2014-09-10

    Massive stars (M > 8 M {sub ☉}) typically form in parsec-scale molecular clumps that collapse and fragment, leading to the birth of a cluster of stellar objects. We investigate the role of magnetic fields in this process through dust polarization at 870 μm obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The SMA observations reveal polarization at scales of ≲0.1 pc. The polarization pattern in these objects ranges from ordered hour-glass configurations to more chaotic distributions. By comparing the SMA data with the single dish data at parsec scales, we found that magnetic fields at dense core scales are either aligned within 40° of or perpendicular to the parsec-scale magnetic fields. This finding indicates that magnetic fields play an important role during the collapse and fragmentation of massive molecular clumps and the formation of dense cores. We further compare magnetic fields in dense cores with the major axis of molecular outflows. Despite a limited number of outflows, we found that the outflow axis appears to be randomly oriented with respect to the magnetic field in the core. This result suggests that at the scale of accretion disks (≲ 10{sup 3} AU), angular momentum and dynamic interactions possibly due to close binary or multiple systems dominate over magnetic fields. With this unprecedentedly large sample of massive clumps, we argue on a statistical basis that magnetic fields play an important role during the formation of dense cores at spatial scales of 0.01-0.1 pc in the context of massive star and cluster star formation.

  8. Core Processes: Earth's eccentric magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Earth’s magnetic field is characterized by a puzzling hemispheric asymmetry. Calculations of core dynamo processes suggest that lopsided growth of the planet’s inner core may be part of the cause.......Earth’s magnetic field is characterized by a puzzling hemispheric asymmetry. Calculations of core dynamo processes suggest that lopsided growth of the planet’s inner core may be part of the cause....

  9. Orbit stability in billiards in magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Kovács, Z

    1997-01-01

    We study the stability properties of orbits in dispersing billiards in a homogeneous magnetic field by using a modified formalism based on the Bunimovich-Sinai curvature (horocycle method). We identify simple periodic orbits that can be stabilized by the magnetic field in the four-disk model and the square-lattice Lorentz gas. The stable orbits can play a key role in determining the transport properties of these models.

  10. Semiconductor Crystal Growth in Static and Rotating Magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic fields have been applied during the growth of bulk semiconductor crystals to control the convective flow behavior of the melt. A static magnetic field established Lorentz forces which tend to reduce the convective intensity in the melt. At sufficiently high magnetic field strengths, a boundary layer is established ahead of the solid-liquid interface where mass transport is dominated by diffusion. This can have a significant effect on segregation behavior and can eliminate striations in grown crystals resulting from convective instabilities. Experiments on dilute (Ge:Ga) and solid solution (Ge-Si) semiconductor systems show a transition from a completely mixed convective state to a diffusion-controlled state between 0 and 5 Tesla. In HgCdTe, radial segregation approached the diffusion limited regime and the curvature of the solid-liquid interface was reduced by a factor of 3 during growth in magnetic fields in excess of 0.5 Tesla. Convection can also be controlled during growth at reduced gravitational levels. However, the direction of the residual steady-state acceleration vector can compromise this effect if it cannot be controlled. A magnetic field in reduced gravity can suppress disturbances caused by residual transverse accelerations and by random non-steady accelerations. Indeed, a joint program between NASA and the NHMFL resulted in the construction of a prototype spaceflight magnet for crystal growth applications. An alternative to the suppression of convection by static magnetic fields and reduced gravity is the imposition of controlled steady flow generated by rotating magnetic fields (RMF)'s. The potential benefits of an RMF include homogenization of the melt temperature and concentration distribution, and control of the solid-liquid interface shape. Adjusting the strength and frequency of the applied magnetic field allows tailoring of the resultant flow field. A limitation of RMF's is that they introduce deleterious instabilities above a

  11. $\\bar{\\psi} \\psi$-condensate in constant magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Anguiano-Galicia, M de J; Raya, A

    2007-01-01

    We solve Dirac equation in the presence of a constant magnetic field in (3+1)- and (2+1)-dimensions. Quantizing the fermion field, we calculate $\\bar{\\psi} \\psi$-condensate from first principles for parity conserving and violating Lagrangians for arbitrary field strength. We make comparison with the results already known in the literature for some particular cases and point out the relevance of our work for possible physical applications.

  12. Excitation of magnetization using a modulated radiation damping field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, Jamie D; Huang, Susie Y; Lin, Yung-Ya

    2006-10-12

    In this work, pulsed-field gradients are used to modulate the radiation damping field generated by the detection coil in an NMR experiment in order that spins with significantly different chemical shifts can affect one another via the radiation damping field. Experiments performed on solutions of acetone/water and acetone/DMSO/water demonstrate that spins with chemical shift differences much greater than the effective radiation damping field strength can still be coupled by modulating the radiation damping field. Implications for applications in high-field NMR and for developing sensitive magnetization detectors are discussed.

  13. Secular variation of the Earth's magnetic field and application to paleomagnetic dating of historical lava flows in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roperch, Pierrick; Chauvin, Annick; Lara, Luis E.; Moreno, Hugo

    2015-05-01

    The recent geomagnetic secular variation is mainly characterized by the large growth of the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly during the last three centuries, first documented by the geomagnetic model gufm1 (Jackson et al., 2000). We report new paleomagnetic results (directions and paleointensities) from several sites in two well dated lava flows in Chile, the 1835 AD eruption of the Osorno volcano and the 1751 AD eruption of the Llaima volcano. In addition, paleointensities were obtained on 14 samples from bricks of shelters built along the main road across the Andes from Santiago (Chile) to Mendoza (Argentina) in 1770 ± 5 AD. The results confirm the high reliability of the global geomagnetic model gufm1 for the last three centuries with a large amplitude of the secular variation in inclination (∼20°) and intensity (∼25 μT). Results from three 14C dated volcanic units in the time interval 1400-1750 AD indicate that more paleomagnetic results in well dated lava flows are necessary to improve the robustness of existing global geomagnetic models. At this stage, precise paleomagnetic or archeomagnetic dating in South America using global models should be restricted to the last 3 centuries. To illustrate the potential of paleomagnetic dating in region and time interval with very large geomagnetic secular variation, we report paleomagnetic data from several sites in historical lava flows (1700-1900 AD) from the Antuco, Llaima and Villarrica volcanoes that permit to refine the ages of the major historical effusive volcanic events.

  14. Magnetic Field Measurement on a Refined Kicker

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Tai-Ching; Lin, Fu-Yuan

    2005-01-01

    To prepare for the operation of top-up mode and increase the efficiency of injection at storage ring, National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (NSRRC) has upgraded the kicker magnets and power supply. We have built up a new magnetic field measurement system to test the kicker. This system, including a search coil and a coil loop, can map the field and take the first integral of field automatically. We also simulate the trajectory of electron beam by pulsed wire method of field measurement. We analyze the performance of the kicker system in this paper.

  15. Biological systems in high magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, A.

    1990-12-01

    Diamagnetic orientation of biological systems have been investigated theoretically and experimentally. Fibrinogen, one of blood proteins, were polymerized in static high magnetic fields up to 8 T. Clotted gels composed of oriented fibrin fibers were obtained even in a field as low as 1 T. Red blood cells (RBC) show full orientation with their plane parallel to the applied field of 4 T. It is confirmed experimentally that the magnetic orientation of RBC is caused by diamagnetic anisotropy. Full orientation is also obtained with blood platelet in a field of 3 T.

  16. Cooling Curve of Strange Star in Strong Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-Qin; LUO Zhi-Quan

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, firstly, we investigate the neutrino emissivity from quark Urca process in strong magnetic field. Then, we discuss the heat capacity of strange stars in strong magnetic field. Finally, we give the cooling curve in strong magnetic field. In order to make a comparison, we also give the corresponding cooling curve in the case of null magnetic field. It turns out that strange stars cool faster in strong magnetic field than that without magnetic field.

  17. Magnetopause Reconnection Impact Parameters from Multiple Spacecraft Magnetic Field Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Deirdre E.; Reiff, Patricia H.

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel technique that exploits multiple spacecraft data to determine the impact parameters of the most general form of magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause. The method consists of a superposed epoch of multiple spacecraft magnetometer measurements that yields the instantaneous magnetic spatial gradients near a magnetopause reconnection site. The gradients establish the instantaneous positions of the spacecraft relative to the reconnection site. The analysis is well suited to evaluating the spatial scales of singular field line reconnection, which is characterized by a two-dimensional x-type topology adjacent and perpendicular to a reconnecting singular field line. Application of the method to Cluster data known to lie in the vicinity of a northward IMF reconnection site establishes a field topology consistent with singular field line reconnection and a normal magnetic field component of 20 nT. The corresponding current structure consists of a 130 km sheet possibly embedding a thinner. bifurcated sheet.

  18. Instabilities of MHD Waves Produced by Coupling of Rotation and Gradient of Magnetic Field and its Possible Application in the Galactic Central Region

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Ipsita

    2008-01-01

    An analysis of MHD wave propagating in a gravitating and rotating medium permeated by non-uniform magnetic field has been done. It has been found that the Gradient of Magnetic Field when coupled with Rotation becomes capable to generate few instabilities (Temporal or Spatial) leading to the damping or amplification of MHD waves. The Jean's criterion is not sufficient for stability always. Rather, the waves will suffer instability unless their wave length (frequency) is less (greater) than certain critical values. Otherwise, those will smoothly propagate outward. Out of different scenarioes depending on the direction of the magnetic field, its gradient, rotation and wave propagation three important Special Cases have been discussed and different stability criteria have been derived. Finally, using the above theory we have obtained the stability/instability criteria for the waves moving parallel and perpendicular to the galactic plane in the Core and Periphery of the Central Region of Galaxy (C.R.G.) due to the...

  19. Combustion instability mitigation by magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jocher, Agnes; Pitsch, Heinz; Gomez, Thomas; Bonnety, Jérôme; Legros, Guillaume

    2017-06-01

    The present interdisciplinary study combines electromagnetics and combustion to unveil an original and basic experiment displaying a spontaneous flame instability that is mitigated as the non-premixed sooting flame experiences a magnetic perturbation. This magnetic instability mitigation is reproduced by direct numerical simulations to be further elucidated by a flow stability analysis. A key role in the stabilization process is attributed to the momentum and thermochemistry coupling that the magnetic force, acting mainly on paramagnetic oxygen, contributes to sustain. The spatial local stability analysis based on the numerical simulations shows that the magnetic field tends to reduce the growth rates of small flame perturbations.

  20. Catalysis of dynamical symmetry breaking by a magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Miransky, V A

    1995-01-01

    A constant magnetic field in 3+1 and 2+1 dimensions is a strong catalyst of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking, leading to the generation of a fermion mass even at the weakest attractive interaction between fermions. The essence of this effect is the dimensional reduction D/rightarrow D-2 in the dynamics of fermion pairing in a magnetic field. The effect is illustrated in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model and QED. Possible applications of this effect and its extension to inhomogeneous field configurations are discussed.

  1. Production and detection of atomic hexadecapole at Earth's magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, V M; Auzinsh, M; Gawlik, W; Grisins, P; Higbie, J M; Jackson Kimball, D F; Krzemien, L; Ledbetter, M P; Pustelny, S; Rochester, S M; Yashchuk, V V; Budker, D

    2008-07-21

    Optical magnetometers measure magnetic fields with extremely high precision and without cryogenics. However, at geomagnetic fields, important for applications from landmine removal to archaeology, they suffer from nonlinear Zeeman splitting, leading to systematic dependence on sensor orientation. We present experimental results on a method of eliminating this systematic error, using the hexadecapole atomic polarization moment. In particular, we demonstrate selective production of the atomic hexadecapole moment at Earth's magnetic field and verify its immunity to nonlinear Zeeman splitting. This technique promises to eliminate directional errors in all-optical atomic magnetometers, potentially improving their measurement accuracy by several orders of magnitude.

  2. Neutron investigations of magnetic properties of crystal substances with use of a pulsed magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Nitts, V V

    2001-01-01

    Bases for neutron researches of magnetic properties of crystal substances with use of a pulsed magnetic field and analysis of possible application of various neutron sources in this area are submitted. The review of the most interesting physical results is presented. Main investigations on pulsed reactors of JINR are researches on kinetics of the first order reorientational phase transitions induced in single crystals, and also measurements of antiferromagnetic ordering induced by an external magnetic field. Magnetic phase transitions, induced by a field up to 160 kOe in several magnetic ordering substances, were studied in KEK (Japan). Experiment on observation of spin-flop transition in MnF sub 2 was carried out on TRIGA-reactor in a mode of single flashes of power

  3. Pulsed field probe of real time magnetization dynamics in magnetic nanoparticle systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulkes, T.; Syed, M.; Taplin, T.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are extensively used in biotechnology. These applications rely on magnetic properties that are a keen function of MNP size, distribution, and shape. Various magneto-optical techniques, including Faraday Rotation (FR), Cotton-Mouton Effect, etc., have been employed to characterize magnetic properties of MNPs. Generally, these measurements employ AC or DC fields. In this work, we describe the results from a FR setup that uses pulsed magnetic fields and an analysis technique that makes use of the entire pulse shape to investigate size distribution and shape anisotropy. The setup employs a light source, polarizing components, and a detector that are used to measure the rotation of light from a sample that is subjected to a pulsed magnetic field. This magnetic field "snapshot" is recorded alongside the intensity pulse of the sample's response. This side by side comparison yields useful information about the real time magnetization dynamics of the system being probed. The setup is highly flexible with variable control of pulse length and peak magnitude. Examining the raw data for the response of bare Fe3O4 and hybrid Au and Fe3O4 nanorods reveals interesting information about Brownian relaxation and the hydrodynamic size of these nanorods. This analysis exploits the self-referencing nature of this measurement to highlight the impact of an applied field on creating a field induced transparency for a longitudinal measurement. Possible sources for this behavior include shape anisotropy and field assisted aggregate formation.

  4. Wuhan pulsed high magnetic field center

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Liang; Peng, Tao; Ding, Honfa; Han, Xiaotao; Ding, Tonghai; Chen, Jin; Wang, Junfeng; Xie, Jianfeng; Wang, Shaoliang; Duan, Xianzhong; Wang, Cheng; Herlach, Fritz; Vanacken, Johan; Pan, Yuan

    2008-01-01

    Wuhan pulsed high magnetic field facility is under development. Magnets of bore sizes from 12 to 34 mm with the peak field in the range of 50 to 80 T have been designed. The pulsed power supplies consists of a 12 MJ, 25 kV capacitor bank and a 100 MVA/100 MJ flywheel pulse generator. A prototype 1 MJ, 25 kV capacitor bank is under construction. Five magnets wound with CuNb wire and copper wire reinforced internally with Zylon fiber composites and externally with stainless steel shells have be...

  5. Magnetic Field Apparatus (MFA) Hardware Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ken; Boody, April; Reed, Dave; Wang, Chung; Stuckey, Bob; Cox, Dave

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this study are threefold: (1) Provide insight into water delivery in microgravity and determine optimal germination paper wetting for subsequent seed germination in microgravity; (2) Observe the behavior of water exposed to a strong localized magnetic field in microgravity; and (3) Simulate the flow of fixative (using water) through the hardware. The Magnetic Field Apparatus (MFA) is a new piece of hardware slated to fly on the Space Shuttle in early 2001. MFA is designed to expose plant tissue to magnets in a microgravity environment, deliver water to the plant tissue, record photographic images of plant tissue, and deliver fixative to the plant tissue.

  6. Wuhan pulsed high magnetic field center

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Liang; Peng, Tao; Ding, Honfa; Han, Xiaotao; Ding, Tonghai; Chen, Jin; Wang, Junfeng; Xie, Jianfeng; Wang, Shaoliang; DUAN, Xianzhong; Wang, Cheng; Herlach, Fritz; Vanacken, Johan; Pan, Yuan

    2008-01-01

    Wuhan pulsed high magnetic field facility is under development. Magnets of bore sizes from 12 to 34 mm with the peak field in the range of 50 to 80 T have been designed. The pulsed power supplies consists of a 12 MJ, 25 kV capacitor bank and a 100 MVA/100 MJ flywheel pulse generator. A prototype 1 MJ, 25 kV capacitor bank is under construction. Five magnets wound with CuNb wire and copper wire reinforced internally with Zylon fiber composites and externally with stainless steel shells have be...

  7. New electric field in asymmetric magnetic reconnection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakit, K; Shay, M A; Cassak, P A; Ruffolo, D

    2013-09-27

    We present a theory and numerical evidence for the existence of a previously unexplored in-plane electric field in collisionless asymmetric magnetic reconnection. This electric field, dubbed the "Larmor electric field," is associated with finite Larmor radius effects and is distinct from the known Hall electric field. Potentially, it could be an important indicator for the upcoming Magnetospheric Multiscale mission to locate reconnection sites as we expect it to appear on the magnetospheric side, pointing earthward, at the dayside magnetopause reconnection site.

  8. Influence of magnetic domain walls and magnetic field on the thermal conductivity of magnetic nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hao-Ting; Lai, Mei-Feng; Hou, Yun-Fang; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2015-05-13

    We investigated the influence of magnetic domain walls and magnetic fields on the thermal conductivity of suspended magnetic nanowires. The thermal conductivity of the nanowires was obtained using steady-state Joule heating to measure the change in resistance caused by spontaneous heating. The results showed that the thermal conductivity coefficients of straight and wavy magnetic nanowires decreased with an increase in the magnetic domain wall number, implying that the scattering between magnons and domain walls hindered the heat transport process. In addition, we proved that the magnetic field considerably reduced the thermal conductivity of a magnetic nanowire. The influence of magnetic domain walls and magnetic fields on the thermal conductivity of polycrystalline magnetic nanowires can be attributed to the scattering of long-wavelength spin waves mediated by intergrain exchange coupling.

  9. Where is magnetic anisotropy field pointing to?

    CERN Document Server

    Gutowski, Marek W

    2013-01-01

    The desired result of magnetic anisotropy investigations is the determination of value(s) of various anisotropy constant(s). This is sometimes difficult, especially when the precise knowledge of saturation magnetization is required, as it happens in ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) studies. In such cases we usually resort to `trick' and fit our experimental data to the quantity called \\emph{anisotropy field}, which is strictly proportional to the ratio of the searched anisotropy constant and saturation magnetization. Yet, this quantity is scalar, simply a number, and is therefore of little value for modeling or simulations of the magnetostatic or micromagnetic structures. Here we show how to `translate' the values of magnetic anisotropy constants into the complete vector of magnetic anisotropy field. Our derivation is rigorous and covers the most often encountered cases, from uniaxial to cubic anisotropy.

  10. Electronic structure, electron field emission and magnetic behaviors of carbon nanotubes fabricated on La0.66Sr0.33MnO3 (LSMO) for spintronics application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Sekhar Chandra; Tsai, Huang-Ming; Chen, Huang-Chin; Wu, Shang-Lun; Ling, Dah-Chin; Lin, I-Nan; Pong, Way-Faung

    2011-12-01

    This work elucidates the electronic structure, electron field emission and magnetic anisotropic behaviors of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) for the spin-electronics device application grown on the La0.66Sr0.33MnO3 (LSMO)/SrTiO3 (STO) substrate. Micro-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and valence-band photoemission spectroscopy (VBPES) were used for the study of electronics structure. The field emission characteristics were studied from the electron field emission current density (J) versus applied electric field (E(A)) from which the turn-on electric field (E(TOE)) was evaluated. The magnetization behaviors are also presented by the M-H hysteresis loop and were obtained by applying the magnetic field in the parallel and perpendicular direction of the CNTs at 305 K and 5 K temperatures. A magnetic measurement shows that the coercivity of the CNTs/LSMO/STO is higher and has hig anisotropic-nature than the composite LSMO/STO that could be the good material for the future possible spin-electronics device applications.

  11. Functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudovan, Dragoș; Balaure, Paul Cătălin; Mihăiescu, Dan Eduard; Fudulu, Adrian; Purcăreanu, Bogdan; Radu, Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Functionalized magnetic nanoparticles followed two main directions in the field of biomedical applications: one direction is as image enhancing agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the other is as drugdelivery devices for various biologically-active substances. A third field which just emerges in nanomedicine is the field of the so-called theranostic devices which combines in the same delivery vehicle both the therapeutic agent and the contrast substance. The advantages of using nanoparticles instead of larger carriers for delivery of both drug and image contrast enhancing agents will be highlighted throughout this review article. Despite the ever increasing number of articles reporting both in vitro and in vivo studies carried out on functionalized magnetic nanoparticles and envisaging their potential biomedical applications, only few formulations reached the phase of clinical trials and even fewer became marketed products. The perspectives in the field are open, since new drugs require new delivery devices and possibly new means of functionalization. At the same time, the field of nanomedicine also provides the opportunity to better exploit drugs that are already in clinical use by improving their bioavailability through appropriate nanoformulations.

  12. Bootstrapping the Coronal Magnetic Field with STEREO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2010-05-01

    The 3D coronal magnetic field obtained from stereoscopically triangulated loops has been compared with standard photospheric magnetogram extrapolations. We found a large misalignment of 20-40 deg, depending on the complexity of an AR (Sandman et al. 2009; DeRosa et al. 2009). These studies prove that the magnetic field in the photosphere is not force-free and fundamentally cannot reproduce the coronal magnetic field. Bootstrapping with coronal loop 3D geometries are required to improve modeling of the coronal field. Such coronal field bootstrapping methods are currently developed using stereoscopically triangulated loops from STEREO/EUVI and preliminary results show already a significantly reduced misalignment of 10-20 deg.

  13. Fast Reconnection of Weak Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweibel, Ellen G.

    1998-01-01

    Fast magnetic reconnection refers to annihilation or topological rearrangement of magnetic fields on a timescale that is independent (or nearly independent) of the plasma resistivity. The resistivity of astrophysical plasmas is so low that reconnection is of little practical interest unless it is fast. Yet, the theory of fast magnetic reconnection is on uncertain ground, as models must avoid the tendency of magnetic fields to pile up at the reconnection layer, slowing down the flow. In this paper it is shown that these problems can be avoided to some extent if the flow is three dimensional. On the other hand, it is shown that in the limited but important case of incompressible stagnation point flows, every flow will amplify most magnetic fields. Although examples of fast magnetic reconnection abound, a weak, disordered magnetic field embedded in stagnation point flow will in general be amplified, and should eventually modify the flow. These results support recent arguments against the operation of turbulent resistivity in highly conducting fluids.

  14. Growth of Czochralski silicon under magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yuesheng; LIU Caichi; WANG Haiyun; ZHANG Weilian; YANG Qingxin; LI Yangxian; REN Binyan; LIU Fugui

    2004-01-01

    Growth of Czochralski (CZ) silicon crystals under the magnetic field induced by a cusp-shaped permanent magnet of NdFeB has been investigated. It is found that the mass transport in silicon melt was controlled by its diffusion while the magnetic intensity at the edge of a crucible was over 0.15 T. In comparison with the growth of conventional CZ silicon without magnetic field, the resistivity homogeneity of the CZ silicon under the magnetic field was improved. Furthermore, the Marangoni convection which has a significant influence on the control of oxygen concentration was observed on the surface of silicon melt. It is suggested that the crystal growth mechanism in magnetic field was similar to that in micro-gravity if a critical value was reached, named the growth of equivalent micro-gravity. The relationship of the equivalent micro-gravity and the magnetic intensity was derived as g=(v0/veff)g0. Finally, the orders of the equivalent micro-gravity corresponding to two crucibles with characteristic sizes were calculated.

  15. Inversion of Zeeman polarization for solar magnetic field diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Derouich, M

    2016-01-01

    The topic of magnetic field diagnostics with the Zeeman effect is currently vividly discussed. There are some testable inversion codes available to the spectropolarimetry community and their application allowed for a better understanding of the magnetism of the solar atmosphere. In this context, we propose an inversion technique associated with a new numerical code. The inversion procedure is promising and particularly successful for interpreting the Stokes profiles in quick and sufficiently precise way. In our inversion, we fit a part of each Stokes profile around a target wavelength, and then determine the magnetic field as a function of the wavelength which is equivalent to get the magnetic field as a function of the height of line formation. To test the performance of the new numerical code, we employed "hare and hound" approach by comparing an exact solution (called input) with the solution obtained by the code (called output). The precision of the code is also checked by comparing our results to the one...

  16. Nonlinear Theoretical Tools for Fusion-related Microturbulence: Historical Evolution, and Recent Applications to Stochastic Magnetic Fields, Zonal-flow Dynamics, and Intermittency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.A. Krommes

    2009-05-19

    Fusion physics poses an extremely challenging, practically complex problem that does not yield readily to simple paradigms. Nevertheless, various of the theoretical tools and conceptual advances emphasized at the KaufmanFest 2007 have motivated and/or found application to the development of fusion-related plasma turbulence theory. A brief historical commentary is given on some aspects of that specialty, with emphasis on the role (and limitations) of Hamiltonian/symplectic approaches, variational methods, oscillation-center theory, and nonlinear dynamics. It is shown how to extract a renormalized ponderomotive force from the statistical equations of plasma turbulence, and the possibility of a renormalized K-χ theorem is discussed. An unusual application of quasilinear theory to the problem of plasma equilibria in the presence of stochastic magnetic fields is described. The modern problem of zonal-flow dynamics illustrates a confluence of several techniques, including (i) the application of nonlinear-dynamics methods, especially center-manifold theory, to the problem of the transition to plasma turbulence in the face of self-generated zonal flows; and (ii) the use of Hamiltonian formalism to determine the appropriate (Casimir) invariant to be used in a novel wave-kinetic analysis of systems of interacting zonal flows and drift waves. Recent progress in the theory of intermittent chaotic statistics and the generation of coherent structures from turbulence is mentioned, and an appeal is made for some new tools to cope with these interesting and difficult problems in nonlinear plasma physics. Finally, the important influence of the intellectually stimulating research environment fostered by Prof. Allan Kaufman on the author's thinking and teaching methodology is described.

  17. Up and down cascades: three-dimensional magnetic field model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanter, E M; Shnirman, M G; Le Mouël, J L

    2002-06-01

    In our previous works we already have proposed a two-dimensional model of geodynamo. Now we use the same approach to build a three-dimensional self-excited geodynamo model that generates a large scale magnetic field from whatever small initial field, using the up and down cascade effects of a multiscale turbulent system of cyclones. The multiscale system of turbulent cyclones evolves in six domains of an equatorial cylindrical layer of the core. The appearance of new cyclones is realized by two cascades: a turbulent direct cascade and an inverse cascade of coupling of similar cyclones. The interaction between the different domains is effected through a direct cascade parameter which is essential for the statistics of the long-life symmetry breaking. Generation of the secondary magnetic field results from the interaction of the components of the primary magnetic field with the turbulent cyclones. The amplification of the magnetic field is due to the transfer of energy from the turbulent helical motion to the generated magnetic field. The model demonstrates a phase transition through the parameter characterizing this energy transfer. In the supercritical domain we obtain long-term intervals of constant polarity (chrons) and quick reversals; relevant time constants agree with paleomagnetic observations. Possible application of the model to the study of the geometrical structure of the geomagnetic field (and briefly other planetary fields) is discussed.

  18. Simulating magnetic fields in the Antennae galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kotarba, H; Naab, T; Johansson, P H; Dolag, K; Lesch, H

    2009-01-01

    We present self-consistent high-resolution simulations of NGC4038/4039 (the "Antennae galaxies") including star formation, supernova feedback and magnetic fields performed with the N-body/SPH code Gadget, in which hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics are followed with the SPH method. We vary the initial magnetic field in the progenitor disks from 1 nG to 1 muG. At the time of the best match with the central region of the Antennae system the magnetic field has been amplified by compression and shear flows to an equilibrium field of approximately 10 muG, independent of the initial seed field. This simulations are a proof of the principle that galaxy mergers are efficient drivers for the cosmic evolution of magnetic fields. We present a detailed analysis of the magnetic field structure in the central overlap region. Simulated radio and polarization maps are in good morphological and quantitative agreement with the observations. In particular, the two cores with the highest synchrotron intensity and ridges of r...

  19. Magnetic Field Transport in Accretion Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Amir; Vishniac, Ethan

    2017-06-01

    The most plausible theories for launching astrophysical jets rely on strong magnetic fields at the inner parts of some accretion disks. An internal dynamo can in principle generate small scale magnetic fields in situ but generating a large scale field in a disk seems a difficult task in the dynamo theories. In fact, as far as numerous numerical experiments indicate, a dynamo-generated field in general would not be coherent enough over the large length scales of order the disk's radius. Instead, a large scale poloidal field dragged in from the environment, and compressed by the accretion, provides a more promising possibility. The difficulty in the latter picture, however, arises from the reconnection of the radial field component across the mid-plane which annihilates the field faster than it is dragged inward by the accretion. We suggest that a combination of different effects, including magnetic buoyancy and turbulent pumping, is responsible for the vertical transport of the field lines toward the surface of the disk. The radial component of the poloidal field vanishes at the mid-plane, which efficiently impedes reconnection, and grows exponentially toward the surface where it can become much larger than the vertical field component. This allows the poloidal field to be efficiently advected to small radii until the allowed bending angle drops to of order unity, and the field can drive a strong outflow.

  20. Superconductivity in Strong Magnetic Field (Greater Than Upper Critical Field)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tessema, G.X.; Gamble, B.K.; Skove, M.J.; Lacerda, A.H.; Mielke, C.H.

    1998-08-22

    The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, funded by the National Science Foundation and other US federal Agencies, has in recent years built a wide range of magnetic fields, DC 25 to 35 Tesla, short pulse 50 - 60 Tesla, and quasi-continuous 60 Tesla. Future plans are to push the frontiers to 45 Tesla DC and 70 to 100 Tesla pulse. This user facility, is open for national and international users, and creates an excellent tool for materials research (metals, semiconductors, superconductors, biological systems ..., etc). Here we present results of a systematic study of the upper critical field of a novel superconducting material which is considered a promising candidate for the search for superconductivity beyond H{sub c2} as proposed by several new theories. These theories predict that superconductors with low carrier density can reenter the superconducting phase beyond the conventional upper critical field H{sub c2}. This negates the conventional thinking that superconductivity and magnetic fields are antagonistic.

  1. Magnetic Pressure as a Scalar Representation of Field Effects in Magnetic Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zborowski, Maciej; Moore, Lee R.; Williams, P. Stephen; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic microsphere suspensions undergo complex motion when exposed to finite sources of the magnetic field, such as small permanent magnets. The computational complexity is compounded by a difficulty in choosing a suitable choice of visualization tools because this often requires using the magnetic force vector field in three dimensions. Here we present a potentially simpler approach by using the magnetic pressure. It is a scalar quantity, pm = B2/2μ0, and its usefulness has been already demonstrated in applications to magnetohydrodynamics and ferrohydrodynamics (where B is the applied field and μ0 = 4π×10−7 T.m/A). The equilibrium distribution of the magnetic bead plug in aqueous suspension is calculated as an isosurface of the magnitude of the magnetic pressure pm = const, in the field of two permanent magnet blocks calculated from closed formulas. The geometry was adapted from a publication on the magnetic bead suspensions in microsystems and the predicted bead plug distribution is shown to agree remarkably well with the experiment. PMID:25382882

  2. Control of magnetic anisotropy field of (001) oriented L1{sub 0}-Fe(Pd{sub x}Pt{sub 1-x}) films for MRAM application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshimura, Satoru; Omiya, Shogo; Egawa, Genta; Saito, Hitoshi [Center for Geo-environmental Science, Faculty of Engineering and Resource Science, Akita University, Tegatagakuen-machi 1-1, Akita, 010-8502 (Japan); Bai Jianmin, E-mail: syoshi@gipc.akita-u.ac.jp [Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of the Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, TianShui Road, S 222, LanZhou, GanSu, 730000 (China)

    2011-01-01

    L1{sub 0}-Fe(Pd,Pt) films which are expected to have tunable perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and lower ordering temperature compared with the L1{sub 0}-FePt films were fabricated and investigated in order to realize high-performance Magnetic Random Access Memory (MRAM) with spin-transfer magnetization switching method and Magnetic Domain-Wall Racetrack Memory with current-driven domain wall motion. The main results are as follows: (1) The long-range chemical order degree S for the L1{sub 0}-Fe(Pd,Pt) films with the optimized thermal treatment temperature fabricated on MgO(001) substrate was about 0.8. (2) The perpendicular coercive force and magnetic anisotropy field for the L1{sub 0}-FePd film with the thermal treatment temperature of 600 {sup 0}C were 300 Oe and 14 kOe respectively, whereas the L1{sub 0}-FePt film with the thermal treatment temperature of 800 {sup 0}C were 2000 Oe and 102 kOe, respectively. (3) The optimized ordering temperature to obtain L1{sub 0} single phase decreased continuously from 800{sup 0}C to 600{sup 0}C with the increasing Pd content for the Fe(Pd,Pt) films. (4) The perpendicular magnetic anisotropy field for the L1{sub 0}-Fe(Pd,Pt) films decreased continuously from 102 kOe to 14 kOe with the increasing Pd content. It is found that the Fe(Pd,Pd) films which have tunable perpendicular magnetic anisotropy field is one of suitable ferromagnetic material for high-performance magnetic recording devices.

  3. Study of marine magnetic field

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhattacharya, G.C.

    (COB) is again both a basic scientific requirement as well at some places is a requirement under the UNCLOS related Legal Continental Shelf demarcation purpose. In the oceanic areas, the marine magnetic studies are one of the essential tools... oceans increased, more and more deviations from this simplified model, such as propagating ridges and overlapping spreading centers were discovered. These observations enabled the study of new aspects of seafloor spreading process beyond the initial...

  4. Magnetic field amplification in turbulent astrophysical plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Federrath, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role in astrophysical accretion discs, and in the interstellar and intergalactic medium. They drive jets, suppress fragmentation in star-forming clouds and can have a significant impact on the accretion rate of stars. However, the exact amplification mechanisms of cosmic magnetic fields remain relatively poorly understood. Here I start by reviewing recent advances in the numerical and theoretical modelling of the 'turbulent dynamo', which may explain the origin of galactic and inter-galactic magnetic fields. While dynamo action was previously investigated in great detail for incompressible plasmas, I here place particular emphasis on highly compressible astrophysical plasmas, which are characterised by strong density fluctuations and shocks, such as the interstellar medium. I find that dynamo action works not only in subsonic plasmas, but also in highly supersonic, compressible plasmas, as well as for low and high magnetic Prandtl numbers. I further present new numerical simu...

  5. The Magnetic Field of Solar Spicules

    CERN Document Server

    Centeno, R; Ramos, A Asensio

    2009-01-01

    Determining the magnetic field of solar spicules is vital for developing adequate models of these plasma jets, which are thought to play a key role in the thermal, dynamic, and magnetic structure of the chromosphere. Here we report on magnetic spicule properties in a very quiet region of the off-limb solar atmosphere, as inferred from new spectropolarimetric observations in the HeI 10830 A triplet. We have used a novel inversion code for Stokes profiles caused by the joint action of atomic level polarization and the Hanle and Zeeman effects (HAZEL) to interpret the observations. Magnetic fields as strong as 40G were unambiguously detected in a very localized area of the slit, which may represent a possible lower value of the field strength of organized network spicules.

  6. QCD thermodynamics and magnetization in nonzero magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Tawfik, Abdel Nasser; Ezzelarab, Nada; Shalaby, Asmaa G

    2016-01-01

    In nonzero magnetic field, the magnetic properties and thermodynamics of the quantum-chromodynamic (QCD) matter is studied in the hadron resonance gas and the Polyakov linear-sigma models and compared with recent lattice calculations. Both models are fairly suited to describe the degrees of freedom in the hadronic phase. The partonic ones are only accessible by the second model. It is found that the QCD matter has paramagnetic properties, which monotonically depend on the temperature and are not affected by the hadron-quark phase-transition. Furthermore, raising the magnetic field strength increases the thermodynamic quantities, especially in the hadronic phase but reduces the critical temperature, i.e. inverse magnetic catalysis.

  7. The magnetic fields of Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, N. F.

    1981-01-01

    The magnetic fields of Jupiter and Saturn and the characteristics of their magnetospheres, formed by interaction with the solar wind, are discussed. The origins of both magnetic fields are associated with a dynamo process deep in the planetary interior. The Jovian magnetosphere is analogous to that of a pulsar magnetosphere: a massive central body with a rapid rotation and an associated intense magnetic field. Its most distinctive feature is its magnetodisk of concentrated plasma and particle flux, and reduced magnetic field intensity. The magnetopause near the subsolar point has been observed at radial distances ranging over 50 to 100 Jovian radii, implying a relatively compressible obstacle to solar wind flow. The composition of an embedded current sheet within the magnetic tail is believed to be influenced by volcanic eruptions and emissions from Io. Spectral troughs of the Jovian radiation belts have been interpreted as possible ring particles. The Saturnian magnetosphere appears to be more like the earth in its topology. It is mainly characterized by a dipole axis parallel to the rotational axis of the planet and a magnetic field intensity much less than expected.

  8. Optical peak gain in a PbSe/CdSe core-shell quantum dot in the presence of magnetic field for mid-infrared laser applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanamoorthy, S. N.; John Peter, A.; Lee, Chang Woo

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic field induced electronic properties and some nonlinear optical properties of an exciton are investigated taking into account the geometrical confinement effects in a PbSe/CdSe core-shell heterostructure. The effects of dielectric mismatch between the inner and outer materials, built-in internal electric fields and the self-polarization potential are included in the calculation of obtaining these properties. Self-polarization charges are incorporated at the interface of the core-shell materials. The magnetic field dependent exciton binding energies are found with the ratio of core-shell radii of the dot using variational formulism within the single band effective mass approximation. The magnetic field induced oscillator strength and the radiative life time of the exciton are studied for a constant dot radius. The absorption coefficients and the optical gain as a function of photon energy, the peak gain with the current density are investigated in the PbSe/CdSe core-shell dot for various values of magnetic field strength.

  9. Measurements of Photospheric and Chromospheric Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagg, Andreas; Lites, Bruce; Harvey, Jack; Gosain, Sanjay; Centeno, Rebecca

    2017-09-01

    The Sun is replete with magnetic fields, with sunspots, pores and plage regions being their most prominent representatives on the solar surface. But even far away from these active regions, magnetic fields are ubiquitous. To a large extent, their importance for the thermodynamics in the solar photosphere is determined by the total magnetic flux. Whereas in low-flux quiet Sun regions, magnetic structures are shuffled around by the motion of granules, the high-flux areas like sunspots or pores effectively suppress convection, leading to a temperature decrease of up to 3000 K. The importance of magnetic fields to the conditions in higher atmospheric layers, the chromosphere and corona, is indisputable. Magnetic fields in both active and quiet regions are the main coupling agent between the outer layers of the solar atmosphere, and are therefore not only involved in the structuring of these layers, but also for the transport of energy from the solar surface through the corona to the interplanetary space. Consequently, inference of magnetic fields in the photosphere, and especially in the chromosphere, is crucial to deepen our understanding not only for solar phenomena such as chromospheric and coronal heating, flares or coronal mass ejections, but also for fundamental physical topics like dynamo theory or atomic physics. In this review, we present an overview of significant advances during the last decades in measurement techniques, analysis methods, and the availability of observatories, together with some selected results. We discuss the problems of determining magnetic fields at smallest spatial scales, connected with increasing demands on polarimetric sensitivity and temporal resolution, and highlight some promising future developments for their solution.

  10. Magnetorelaxometry assisting biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiekhorst, Frank; Steinhoff, Uwe; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Trahms, Lutz

    2012-05-01

    Due to their biocompatibility and small size, iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) can be guided to virtually every biological environment. MNP are susceptible to external magnetic fields and can thus be used for transport of drugs and genes, for heat generation in magnetic hyperthermia or for contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging of biological tissue. At the same time, their magnetic properties allow one to develop sensitive and specific measurement methods to non-invasively detect MNP, to quantify MNP distribution in tissue and to determine their binding state. In this article, we review the application of magnetorelaxometry (MRX) for MNP detection. The underlying physical properties of MNP responsible for the generation of the MRX signal with its characteristic parameters of relaxation amplitude and relaxation time are described. Existing single and multi-channel MRX devices are reviewed. Finally, we thoroughly describe some applications of MRX to cellular MNP quantification, MNP organ distribution and MNP-based binding assays. Providing specific MNP signals, a detection limit down to a few nanogram MNP, in-vivo capability in conscious animals and measurement times of a few seconds, MRX is a valuable tool to improve the application of MNP for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

  11. Enhanced trapped field performance of bulk high-temperature superconductors using split coil, pulsed field magnetization with an iron yoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainslie, M. D.; Fujishiro, H.; Mochizuki, H.; Takahashi, K.; Shi, Y.-H.; Namburi, D. K.; Zou, J.; Zhou, D.; Dennis, A. R.; Cardwell, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    Investigating and predicting the magnetization of bulk superconducting materials and developing practical magnetizing techniques is crucial to using them as trapped field magnets in engineering applications. The pulsed field magnetization (PFM) technique is considered to be a compact, mobile and relative inexpensive way to magnetize bulk samples, requiring shorter magnetization times (on the order of milliseconds) and a smaller and less complicated magnetization fixture; however, the trapped field produced by PFM is generally much smaller than that of slower zero field cooling or field cooling techniques, particularly at lower operating temperatures. In this paper, the PFM of two, standard Ag-containing Gd-Ba-Cu-O samples is carried out using two types of magnetizing coils: (1) a solenoid coil, and (2) a split coil, both of which make use of an iron yoke to enhance the trapped magnetic field. It is shown that a significantly higher trapped field can be achieved using a split coil with an iron yoke, and in order to explain these how this arrangement works in detail, numerical simulations using a 2D axisymmetric finite element method based on the H -formulation are carried to qualitatively reproduce and analyze the magnetization process from both electromagnetic and thermal points of view. It is observed that after the pulse peak significantly less flux exits the bulk when the iron core is present, resulting in a higher peak trapped field, as well as more overall trapped flux, after the magnetization process is complete. The results have important implications for practical applications of bulk superconductors as such a split coil arrangement with an iron yoke could be incorporated into the design of a portable, high magnetic field source/magnet to enhance the available magnetic field or in an axial gap-type bulk superconducting electric machine, where iron can be incorporated into the stator windings to (1) improve the trapped field from the magnetization process

  12. Application of magnetic refrigeration and its assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitanovski, Andrej [University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland, Hesso, Institute of Thermal Sciences IGT-SIT, Route de Cheseaux 1, CH 1401 Yverdon-les-Bains (Switzerland)], E-mail: andrej.kitanovski@heig-vd.ch; Egolf, Peter W. [University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland, Hesso, Institute of Thermal Sciences IGT-SIT, Route de Cheseaux 1, CH 1401 Yverdon-les-Bains (Switzerland)

    2009-04-15

    Magnetic refrigeration has the potential to replace conventional refrigeration-with often problematic refrigerants-in several niche markets or even some main markets of the refrigeration domain. Based on this insight, for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy a list of almost all existing refrigeration technologies was worked out. Then an evaluation how good magnetic refrigeration applies to each of these technologies was performed. For this purpose a calculation tool to determine the coefficient of performance (COP) and the exergy efficiency as a function of the magnetic field strength and the rotation frequency of a rotary-type magnetic refrigerator was developed. The evaluation clearly shows that some application domains are more ideal for a replacement of conventional refrigerators by their magnetic counterparts than others. In the pre-study, four good examples were chosen for a more comprehensive investigation and working out of more detailed results. In this article, the calculation method is briefly described. COP values and exergy efficiencies of one very suitable technology, namely the magnetic household refrigerator, are presented for different operation conditions. Summarizing, it is stated that magnetic refrigeration is a serious environmentally benign alternative to some conventional cooling, refrigeration and air-conditioning technologies.

  13. Magnetic polymer nanocomposites for sensing applications

    KAUST Repository

    Alfadhel, Ahmed

    2014-11-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of magnetic polymer nanocomposites for a wide range of sensing applications. The composites are made of magnetic nanowires (NWs) incorporated into polymers such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) or UV sensitive SU-S. The developed composites utilize the permanent magnetic behavior of the NWs, allowing remote operation without an additional magnetic field to magnetize the NWs, which simplifies miniaturization and integration in microsystems. In addition, the nanocomposite benefits from the easy patterning of the polymer leading to a corrosion resistant, highly elastic, and permanent magnetic material that can be used to develop highly sensitive systems. Nanocomposite pillars are realized and integrated on magnetic sensor elements to achieve highly sensitive and power efficient flow and tactile sensors. The developed flow sensor can detect air and water flow at a power consumption as little as SO nW and a resolution up to 15 μm/s with easily modifiable performance. A tactile sensor element prototype is realized using the same concept, where a pressure range of 0-169 kPa is detected with a resolution of up to 1.3 kPa. © 2014 IEEE.

  14. Magnetizing a complex plasma without a magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Kählert, H; Bonitz, M; Löwen, H; Greiner, F; Piel, A

    2012-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a concept that mimics the magnetization of the heavy dust particles in a complex plasma while leaving the properties of the light species practically unaffected. It makes use of the frictional coupling between a complex plasma and the neutral gas, which allows to transfer angular momentum from a rotating gas column to a well-controlled rotation of the dust cloud. This induces a Coriolis force that acts exactly as the Lorentz force in a magnetic field. Experimental normal mode measurements for a small dust cluster with four particles show excellent agreement with theoretical predictions for a magnetized plasma.

  15. Primordial magnetic fields from the string network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, Kouichirou; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2016-08-01

    Cosmic strings are a type of cosmic defect formed by a symmetry-breaking phase transition in the early universe. Individual strings would have gathered to build a network, and their dynamical motion would induce scalar-, vector-, and tensor-type perturbations. In this paper, we focus on the vector mode perturbations arising from the string network based on the one scale model and calculate the time evolution and the power spectrum of the associated magnetic fields. We show that the relative velocity between photon and baryon fluids induced by the string network can generate magnetic fields over a wide range of scales based on standard cosmology. We obtain the magnetic field spectrum before recombination as aB(k,z)~4×10Gμ/1k)3.5 gauss on super-horizon scales, and aB(k,z)~2.4×10Gμ/1k)2.5 gauss on sub-horizon scales in co-moving coordinates. This magnetic field grows up to the end of recombination, and has a final amplitude of approximately B~10Gμ gauss at the k~1 Mpc scale today. This field might serve as a seed for cosmological magnetic fields.

  16. Lightning Magnetic Field Measurements around Langmuir Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, M.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.; Aulich, G. D.; Edens, H. E.; Sonnenfeld, R. G.

    2010-12-01

    In the absence of artificial conductors, underground lightning transients are produced by diffusion of the horizontal surface magnetic field of a return stroke vertically downward into the conducting earth. The changing magnetic flux produces an orthogonal horizontal electric field, generating a dispersive, lossy transverse electromagnetic wave that penetrates a hundred meters or more into the ground according to the skin depth of the medium. In turn, the electric field produces currents that flow toward or away from the channel to ground depending on the stroke polarity. The underground transients can produce large radial horizontal potential gradients depending on the distance from the discharge and depth below the surface. In this study we focus on the surface excitation field. The goal of the work is to compare measurements of surface magnetic field waveforms B(t) at different distances from natural lightning discharges with simple and detailed models of the return stroke fields. In addition to providing input to the diffusion mechanism, the results should aid in further understanding return stroke field generation processes. The observational data are to be obtained using orthogonal sets of straightened Rogowski coils to measure magnetic field waveforms in N-S and E-W directions. The waveforms are sampled at 500 kS/s over 1.024 second time intervals and recorded directly onto secure digital cards. The instrument operates off of battery power for several days or weeks at a time in remote, unattended locations and measures magnetic field strengths of up to several tens of amperes/meter. The observations are being made in conjunction with collocated slow electric field change measurements and under good 3-D lightning mapping array (LMA) and fast electric field change coverage.

  17. Teaching Representation Translations with Magnetic Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillotson, Wilson Andrew; McCaskey, Timothy; Nasser, Luis

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a laboratory exercise designed to help students translate between different field representations. It starts with students qualitatively mapping field lines for various bar magnet configurations and continues with a Hall probe experiment in which students execute a series of scaffolded tasks, culminating in the prediction and…

  18. Galactic magnetic fields and hierarchical galaxy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, Luiz Felippe S; Fletcher, Andrew; Baugh, Carlton

    2015-01-01

    A framework is introduced for coupling the evolution of galactic magnetic fields sustained by the mean-field dynamo with the formation and evolution of galaxies in the cold dark matter cosmology. Estimates of the steady-state strength of the large-scale and turbulence magnetic fields from mean-field and fluctuation dynamo models are used together with galaxy properties predicted by semi-analytic models of galaxy formation for a population of spiral galaxies. We find that the field strength is mostly controlled by the evolving gas content of the galaxies. Thus, because of the differences in the implementation of the star formation law, feedback from supernovae and ram-pressure stripping, each of the galaxy formation models considered predicts a distribution of field strengths with unique features. The most prominent of them is the difference in typical magnetic fields strengths obtained for the satellite and central galaxies populations as well as the typical strength of the large-scale magnetic field in galax...

  19. A deep dynamo generating Mercury's magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Ulrich R

    2006-12-21

    Mercury has a global magnetic field of internal origin and it is thought that a dynamo operating in the fluid part of Mercury's large iron core is the most probable cause. However, the low intensity of Mercury's magnetic field--about 1% the strength of the Earth's field--cannot be reconciled with an Earth-like dynamo. With the common assumption that Coriolis and Lorentz forces balance in planetary dynamos, a field thirty times stronger is expected. Here I present a numerical model of a dynamo driven by thermo-compositional convection associated with inner core solidification. The thermal gradient at the core-mantle boundary is subadiabatic, and hence the outer region of the liquid core is stably stratified with the dynamo operating only at depth, where a strong field is generated. Because of the planet's slow rotation the resulting magnetic field is dominated by small-scale components that fluctuate rapidly with time. The dynamo field diffuses through the stable conducting region, where rapidly varying parts are strongly attenuated by the skin effect, while the slowly varying dipole and quadrupole components pass to some degree. The model explains the observed structure and strength of Mercury's surface magnetic field and makes predictions that are testable with space missions both presently flying and planned.

  20. Teaching Representation Translations with Magnetic Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillotson, Wilson Andrew; McCaskey, Timothy; Nasser, Luis

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a laboratory exercise designed to help students translate between different field representations. It starts with students qualitatively mapping field lines for various bar magnet configurations and continues with a Hall probe experiment in which students execute a series of scaffolded tasks, culminating in the prediction and…