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Sample records for magnetic alpha-omega dynamo

  1. High magnetic shear gain in a liquid sodium stable couette flow experiment A prelude to an alpha - omega dynamo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgate, Stirling [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Jui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Finn, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pariev, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Beckley, Howard [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH; Si, Jiahe [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH.; Martinic, Joe [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH.; Westpfahl, David [NM INSTIT. OF TECH.; Slutz, James [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH.; Westrom, Zeb [NM INSTIT. OF TECH.; Klein, Brianna [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH.

    2010-11-08

    The {Omega}-phase of the liquid sodium {alpha}-{Omega} dynamo experiment at NMIMT in cooperation with LANL has successfully demonstrated the production of a high toroidal field, B{sub {phi}} {approx_equal} 8 x B{sub r} from the radial component of an applied poloidal magnetic field, B{sub r}. This enhanced toroidal field is produced by rotational shear in stable Couette Row within liquid sodium at Rm {approx_equal} 120. The small turbulence in stable Taylor-Couette Row is caused by Ekman Row where ({delta}v/v){sup 2} {approx} 10{sup -3}. This high {Omega}-gain in low turbulence flow contrasts with a smaller {Omega}-gain in higher turbulence, Helmholtz-unstable shear flows. This result supports the ansatz that large scale astrophysical magnetic fields are created within semi-coherent large scale motions in which turbulence plays a diffusive role that enables magnetic flux linkage.

  2. High Magnetic Shear Gain in a Liquid Sodium Stable Couette Flow Experiment; A Prelude to an alpha-Omega Dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Colgate, Stirling A; Pariev, Vladimir; Finn, John; Beckley, Howard; Si, Jiahe; Martinic, Joe; Westpfahl, David; Slutz, James; Westrom, Cebastian; Klein, Brianna; Schendel, Paul; Scharle, Cletus; McKinney, Travis; Ginanni, Rocky; Bentley, Ian; Mickey, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    The $\\Omega$-phase of the liquid sodium $\\alpha$-$\\Omega$ dynamo experiment at NMIMT in cooperation with LANL has successfully demonstrated the production of a high toroidal field, $B_{\\phi} \\simeq 8\\times B_r$ from the radial component of an applied poloidal magnetic field, $B_r$. This enhanced toroidal field is produced by rotational shear in stable Couette flow within liquid sodium at $Rm \\simeq 120$. The small turbulence in stable Taylor-Couette flow is caused by Ekman flow where $ (\\delta v/v)^2 \\sim 10^{-3} $. This high $\\Omega$-gain in low turbulence flow contrasts with a smaller $\\Omega$-gain in higher turbulence, Helmholtz-unstable shear flows. This result supports the ansatz that large scale astrophysical magnetic fields are created within semi-coherent large scale motions in which turbulence plays only a smaller diffusive role that enables magnetic flux linkage.

  3. The fratricide of alpha-Omega dynamos by their alpha-squared siblings

    CERN Document Server

    Hubbard, Alexander; Brandenburg, Axel

    2011-01-01

    Context. Helically forced magneto-hydrodynamic shearing-sheet turbulence can support different large-scale dynamo modes, although the {\\alpha} - {\\Omega} mode is generally expected to dominate because it is the fastest growing. In an {\\alpha} - {\\Omega} dynamo, most of the field amplification is produced by the shear. As differential rotation is an ubiquitous source of shear in astrophysics, such dynamos are believed to be the source of most astrophysical large-scale magnetic fields. Aims. We study the stability of oscillatory migratory {\\alpha} - {\\Omega} type dynamos in turbulence simulations. Methods. We use shearing-sheet simulations of hydromagnetic turbulence that is helically forced at a wavenumber that is about three times larger than the lowest wavenumber in the domain so that both {\\alpha} - {\\Omega} and {\\alpha}2 dynamo action is possible. Results. After initial dominance and saturation, the {\\alpha} - {\\Omega} mode is found to be destroyed by an orthogonal {\\alpha}2 mode sustained by the helical t...

  4. A Magnetic Alpha-Omega Dynamo in Active Galactic Nuclei Disks: II. Magnetic Field Generation, Theories and Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Pariev, V I; Finn, J M; Pariev, Vladimir I.; Colgate, Stirling A.; Finn, John M.

    2006-01-01

    It is shown that a dynamo can operate in an Active Galactic Nuclei accretion disk due to the Keplerian shear and due to the helical motions of expanding and twisting plumes of plasma heated by many star passages through the disk. Each plume rotates a fraction of the toroidal flux into poloidal flux, always in the same direction, through a finite angle, and proportional to its diameter. The predicted growth rate of poloidal magnetic flux, based upon two analytic approaches and numerical simulations, leads to a rapid exponentiation of a seed field, \\sim 0.1 to \\sim 0.01 per Keplerian period of the inner part of the disk. The initial value of the seed field may therefore be arbitrarily small yet reach, through dynamo gain, saturation very early in the disk history. Because of tidal disruption of stars close to the black hole, the maximum growth rate occurs at a radius of about 100 gravitational radii from the central object. The generated mean magnetic field, a quadrupole field, has predominantly even parity so ...

  5. Simple Model of the (alpha)(omega) Dynamo: Self-Excited Spheromaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, T K

    2010-01-26

    The astrophysical {alpha}{omega} dynamo converting angular momentum to magnetic energy can be interpreted as a self-excited Faraday dynamo together with magnetic relaxation coupling the dynamo poloidal field to the toroidal field produced by dynamo currents. Since both toroidal and poloidal fields are involved, the system can be modeled as helicity creation and transport, in a spheromak plasma configuration in quasi-equilibrium on the time scale of changes in magnetic energy. Neutral beams or plasma gun injection across field lines could create self-excited spheromaks in the laboratory.

  6. The New Mexico alpha-omega Dynamo Experiment Modeling Astrophysical Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Colgate, S A; Beckley, H F; Ferrel, R; Romero, V D; Weatherall, J C

    2001-01-01

    A magnetic dynamo experiment is under construction at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. The experiment is designed to demonstrate in the laboratory the alpha-omega magnetic dynamo, which is believed to operate in many rotating and conducting astrophysical objects. The experiment uses the Couette flow of liquid sodium between two cylinders rotating with different angular velocities to model the omega-effect. The alpha-effect is created by the rising and expanding jets of liquid sodium driven through a pair of orifices in the end plates of the cylindrical vessel, presumably simulating plumes driven by buoyancy in astrophysical objects. The water analog of the dynamo device has been constructed and the flow necessary for the dynamo has been demonstrated. Results of the numerical simulations of the kinematic dynamo are presented. The toroidal field produced by the omega-effect is predicted to be B_{\\phi} \\simeq (R_m/2\\pi) B_{poloidal}\\simeq 20 \\times B_{poloidal} for the expected magnetic Reynold...

  7. A Magnetic Alpha-Omega Dynamo in Active Galactic Nuclei Disks: I. The Hydrodynamics of Star-Disk Collisions and Keplerian Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Pariev, V I; Pariev, Vladimir I.; Colgate, Stirling A.

    2006-01-01

    A magnetic field dynamo in the inner regions of the accretion disk surrounding the supermassive black holes in AGNs may be the mechanism for the generation of magnetic fields in galaxies and in extragalactic space. We argue that the two coherent motions produced by 1) the Keplerian motion and 2) star-disk collisions, numerous in the inner region of AGN accretion disks, are both basic to the formation of a robust, coherent dynamo and consequently the generation of large scale magnetic fields. They are frequent enough to account for an integrated dynamo gain, e^{10^{9}} at 100 gravitational radii of a central black hole, many orders of magnitude greater than required to amplify any seed field no matter how small. The existence of extra-galactic, coherent, large scale magnetic fields whose energies greatly exceed all but massive black hole energies is recognized. In paper II (Pariev, Colgate, and Finn 2006) we argue that in order to produce a dynamo that can access the free energy of black hole formation and pro...

  8. A two-layer $\\alpha\\omega$ dynamo model, and its implications for 1-D dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Roald, C B

    1999-01-01

    I will discuss an attempt at representing an interface dynamo in a simplified, essentially 1D framework. The operation of the dynamo is broken up into two 1D layers, one containing the $\\alpha$ effect and the other containing the $\\omega$ effect, and these two layers are allowed to communicate with each other by the simplest possible representation of diffusion, an analogue of Newton's law of cooling. Dynamical back-reaction of the magnetic field on them with diagrams I computed for a comparable purely 1D model. The bifurcation structure shows remarkable similarity, but a couple of subtle changes imply dramatically different physical behaviour for the model. In particular, the solar-like dynamo mode found in the 1-layer model is not stable in the 2-layer version; instead there is an (apparent) homoclinic bifurcation and a sequence of periodic, quasiperiodic, and chaotic modes. I argue that the fragility of these models makes them effectively useless as predictors or interpreters of more complex dynamos.

  9. Sign of helicity in the alpha-Omega geodynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Xing

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the sign of helicity in the alpha-Omega dynamo and point out that the alpha effect in the geodynamo is induced by helical wave but not helical flow as in the solar dynamo. We then postulate the mechanisms of the Earth's magnetic tilt angle, westward drift and dipole reversals.

  10. Solar Dynamo Near Tachocline and Magnetic Monopoly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryvodubskyj, Valery N.

    To explain the observed magnetic anomaly of the polar Sun's field the turbulent dynamo mechanism based on the joint action of mean helical turbulence and differential rotation (alpha-omega-dynamo) was used near tachocline in the solar convection zone (SCZ). The global magnetic field modes (odd or even ones) excited by dynamo depend on the eigenvalue Kh for a Parker dynamo-wave (K is the wave number of the dynamo-wave and h is the extent of the dynamo region). Estimations of the helicity-parameter and radial angular-velocity gradient based on the most recent helioseismological measurements at the growth phase of solar cycle 23 were obtained using the mixing-length approximation. For the SCZ model by Stix (1989) these estimations indicate that the alpha-omega-dynamo mechanism near the tachocline most efficiency excites the poloidal field main odd mode dipole (Kh ~ -7); while the physical conditions at latitudes above 50 degrees are more favourable for the exitation of the lowest even mode quadrupole (Kh ~ +8). The resulting north-south magnetic asymmetry of the poloidal field can explain the magnetic anomaly (""monopoly"" structure) of the polar fields observed near solar-cycle maxima.

  11. Magnetic Helicity Conservation and Astrophysical Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Vishniac, E T; Vishniac, Ethan T.; Cho, Jungyeon

    2000-01-01

    We construct a magnetic helicity conserving dynamo theory which incorporates a calculated magnetic helicity current. In this model the fluid helicity plays a small role in large scale magnetic field generation. Instead, the dynamo process is dominated by a new quantity, derived from asymmetries in the second derivative of the velocity correlation function, closely related to the `twist and fold' dynamo model. The turbulent damping term is, as expected, almost unchanged. Numerical simulations with a spatially constant fluid helicity and vanishing resistivity are not expected to generate large scale fields in equipartition with the turbulent energy density. In fact, there seems to be little prospect for driving a fast dynamo in a closed box containing homogeneous turbulence. On the other hand, there is an efficient analog to the $\\alpha-\\Omega$ dynamo. Systems whose turbulence is driven by some anisotropic local instability in shearing flow, like real stars and accretion disks, and some computer simulations, ma...

  12. Generation of dynamo magnetic fields in the primordial solar nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, Tomasz F.

    1992-01-01

    The present treatment of dynamo-generated magnetic fields in the primordial solar nebula proceeds in view of the ability of the combined action of Keplerian rotation and helical convention to generate, via alpha-omega dynamo, large-scale magnetic fields in those parts of the nebula with sufficiently high, gas-and magnetic field coupling electrical conductivity. Nebular gas electrical conductivity and the radial distribution of the local dynamo number are calculated for both a viscous-accretion disk model and the quiescent-minimum mass nebula. It is found that magnetic fields can be easily generated and maintained by alpha-omega dynamos occupying the inner and outer parts of the nebula.

  13. Generation of dynamo magnetic fields in thin Keplerian disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Levy, E. H.

    1990-01-01

    The combined action of nonuniform rotation and helical convection in protoplanetary disks, in the Galaxy, or in accretion disks surrounding black holes and other compact objects, enables an alpha-omega dynamo to generate a large-scale magnetic field. In this paper, the properties of such magnetic fields are investigated using a two-dimensional, partially numerical method. The structures of the lowest-order steady state and oscillatory modes are calculated for two kinds of external boundary conditions. A quadruple, steady state, highly localized mode is the most easily excited for low values of the dynamo number. The results indicate that, except under special conditions, disk dynamo modes tend to consist of relatively localized rings structures. For large values of the dynamo number, the magnetic field consists of a number of quasi-independent, spatially localized modes generated in various concentric rings filling the disk inward of a dynamo generation 'front'.

  14. Generation of dynamo magnetic fields in thin Keplerian disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepinski, T.F.; Levy, E.H. (Arizona Univ., Tucson (USA))

    1990-10-01

    The combined action of nonuniform rotation and helical convection in protoplanetary disks, in the Galaxy, or in accretion disks surrounding black holes and other compact objects, enables an alpha-omega dynamo to generate a large-scale magnetic field. In this paper, the properties of such magnetic fields are investigated using a two-dimensional, partially numerical method. The structures of the lowest-order steady state and oscillatory modes are calculated for two kinds of external boundary conditions. A quadruple, steady state, highly localized mode is the most easily excited for low values of the dynamo number. The results indicate that, except under special conditions, disk dynamo modes tend to consist of relatively localized rings structures. For large values of the dynamo number, the magnetic field consists of a number of quasi-independent, spatially localized modes generated in various concentric rings filling the disk inward of a dynamo generation front. 36 refs.

  15. Magnetic energy cascade in spherical geometry: I. The stellar convective dynamo case

    CERN Document Server

    Strugarek, A; Mathis, S; Sarazin, Y

    2013-01-01

    We present a method to characterize the spectral transfers of magnetic energy between scales in simulations of stellar convective dynamos. The full triadic transfer functions are computed thanks to analytical coupling relations of spherical harmonics based on the Clebsch-Gordan coefficients. The method is applied to mean field $\\alpha\\Omega$ dynamo models as benchmark tests. From the physical standpoint, the decomposition of the dynamo field into primary and secondary dynamo families proves very instructive in the $\\alpha\\Omega$ case. The same method is then applied to a fully turbulent dynamo in a solar convection zone, modeled with the 3D MHD ASH code. The initial growth of the magnetic energy spectrum is shown to be non-local. It mainly reproduces the kinetic energy spectrum of convection at intermediate scales. During the saturation phase, two kinds of direct magnetic energy cascades are observed in regions encompassing the smallest scales involved in the simulation. The first cascade is obtained through ...

  16. Dynamo-generated magnetic fields in fast rotating single giants

    CERN Document Server

    Konstantinova-Antova, Renada; Schröder, Klaus-Peter; Petit, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    Red giants offer a good opportunity to study the interplay of magnetic fields and stellar evolution. Using the spectro-polarimeter NARVAL of the Telescope Bernard Lyot (TBL), Pic du Midi, France and the LSD technique, we began a survey of magnetic fields in single G-K-M giants. Early results include 6 MF-detections with fast rotating giants, and for the first time a magnetic field was detected directly in an evolved M-giant: EK Boo. Our results could be explained in the terms of $\\alpha$--$\\omega$ dynamo operating in these giants.

  17. Dynamo magnetic-field generation in turbulent accretion disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, T. F.

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic fields can play important roles in the dynamics and evolution of accretion disks. The presence of strong differential rotation and vertical density gradients in turbulent disks allows the alpha-omega dynamo mechanism to offset the turbulent dissipation and maintain strong magnetic fields. It is found that MHD dynamo magnetic-field normal modes in an accretion disk are highly localized to restricted regions of a disk. Implications for the character of real, dynamically constrained magnetic fields in accretion disks are discussed. The magnetic stress due to the mean magnetic field is found to be of the order of a viscous stress. The dominant stress, however, is likely to come from small-scale fluctuating magnetic fields. These fields may also give rise to energetic flares above the disk surface, providing a possible explanation for the highly variable hard X-ray emission from objects like Cyg X-l.

  18. Magnetic Helicity and Planetary Dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2012-01-01

    A model planetary dynamo based on the Boussinesq approximation along with homogeneous boundary conditions is considered. A statistical theory describing a large-scale MHD dynamo is found, in which magnetic helicity is the critical parameter

  19. Dynamo action in turbulent accretion discs around black holes. 2. The mean magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pudritz, R.E. (British Columbia Univ., Vancouver (Canada). Dept. of Physics)

    1981-06-01

    The presence of strong differential rotation and vertical density gradients in thin accretion discs allows the generation of a large-scale, mean magnetic field by ..cap alpha.. ..omega.. dynamo action. Analytic expressions for the preferred steady-state solutions are found, which when matched on to an exterior vacuum field show that the class of quadrupole modes (Bsub(phi) and Bsub(r) even, and Bsub(z) odd functions of z) are most easily excited. The critical dynamo number of this mode is Qsub(e,c)sup(1/3) = 2.4, corresponding to a turbulent Mach number of Msub(t)sup(e) = 0.19.

  20. Turbulent Dynamos and Magnetic Helicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Hantao

    1999-04-01

    It is shown that the turbulent dynamo alpha-effect converts magnetic helicity from the turbulent field to the mean field when the turbulence is electromagnetic while the magnetic helicity of the mean-field is transported across space when the turbulence is elcetrostatic or due to the elcetron diamagnetic effect. In all cases, however, the dynamo effect strictly conserves the total helicity expect for a battery effect which vanishes in the limit of magnetohydrodynamics. Implications for astrophysical situations, especially for the solar dynamo, are discussed.

  1. Kinematic Dynamo In Turbulent Circumstellar Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, T.

    1993-01-01

    Many circumstellar disks associated with objects ranging from protoplanetary nebulae, to accretion disks around compact stars allow for the generation of magnetic fields by an (alpha)omega dynamo. We have applied kinematic dynamo formalism to geometrically thin accretion disks. We calculate, in the framework of an adiabatic approximation, the normal mode solutions for dynamos operating in disks around compact stars. We then describe the criteria for a viable dynamo in protoplanetary nebulae, and discuss the particular features that make accretion disk dynamos different from planetary, stellar, and galactic dynamos.

  2. Dynamo generation of magnetic field in the white dwarf GD 358

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markiel, J. Andrew; Thomas, John H.; Van Horn, H. M.

    1994-01-01

    On the basis of Whole Earth Telescope observations of the g-mode oscillation spectrum of the white dwarf GD 358, Winget et al. find evidence for significant differential rotation and for a time-varying magnetic field concentrated in the surface layers of this star. Here we argue on theoretical grounds that this magnetic field is produced by an alpha omega dynamo operating in the lower part of a surface convection zone in GD 358. Our argument is based on numerical solutions of the nonlinear, local dynamo equations of Robinson & Durney, with specific parameters based on our detailed models of white-dwarf convective envelopes, and universal constants determined by a calibration with the the Sun's dynamo. The calculations suggest a dynamo cycle period of about 6 years for the fundamental mode, and periods as short as 1 year for the higher-order modes that are expected to dominate in view of the large dynamo number we estimate for GD 358. These dynamo periods are consistent with the changes in the magnetic field of GD 358 over the span of 1 month inferred by Winget et. al. from their observations. Our calculations also suggest a peak dynamo magnetic field strength at the base of the surface convection zone of about 1800 G, which is consistent with the field strength inferred from the observations.

  3. Magnetized Turbulent Dynamo in Protogalaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Malyshkin, L M; Malyshkin, Leonid; Kulsrud, Russell

    2002-01-01

    The prevailing theory for the origin of cosmic magnetic fields is that they have been amplified to their present values by the turbulent dynamo inductive action in the protogalactic and galactic medium. Up to now, in calculation of the turbulent dynamo, it has been customary to assume that there is no back reaction of the magnetic field on the turbulence, as long as the magnetic energy is less than the turbulent kinetic energy. This assumption leads to the kinematic dynamo theory. However, the applicability of this theory to protogalaxies is rather limited. The reason is that in protogalaxies the temperature is very high, and the viscosity is dominated by magnetized ions. As the magnetic field strength grows in time, the ion cyclotron time becomes shorter than the ion collision time, and the plasma becomes strongly magnetized. As a result, the ion viscosity becomes the Braginskii viscosity. Thus, in protogalaxies the back reaction sets in much earlier, at field strengths much lower than those which correspond...

  4. Optimization of the magnetic dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Ashley P

    2012-12-21

    In stars and planets, magnetic fields are believed to originate from the motion of electrically conducting fluids in their interior, through a process known as the dynamo mechanism. In this Letter, an optimization procedure is used to simultaneously address two fundamental questions of dynamo theory: "Which velocity field leads to the most magnetic energy growth?" and "How large does the velocity need to be relative to magnetic diffusion?" In general, this requires optimization over the full space of continuous solenoidal velocity fields possible within the geometry. Here the case of a periodic box is considered. Measuring the strength of the flow with the root-mean-square amplitude, an optimal velocity field is shown to exist, but without limitation on the strain rate, optimization is prone to divergence. Measuring the flow in terms of its associated dissipation leads to the identification of a single optimal at the critical magnetic Reynolds number necessary for a dynamo. This magnetic Reynolds number is found to be only 15% higher than that necessary for transient growth of the magnetic field.

  5. A Vorticity-Magnetic Field Dynamo Instability

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    We generalize the mean field magnetic dynamo to include local evolution of the mean vorticity in addition to the mean magnetic field. The coupled equations exhibit a general mean field dynamo instability that enables the transfer of turbulent energy to the magnetic field and vorticity on larger scales. The growth of the vorticity and magnetic field both require helical turbulence which can be supplied by an underlying global rotation. The dynamo coefficients are derived including the backreac...

  6. Turbulent dynamo with advective magnetic helicity flux

    CERN Document Server

    Del Sordo, Fabio; Brandenburg, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Many astrophysical bodies harbor magnetic fields that are thought to be sustained by dynamo processes. However, it has been argued that the production of large-scale magnetic fields by a mean-field dynamo is strongly suppressed at large magnetic Reynolds numbers owing to the conservation of magnetic helicity. This phenomenon is known as catastrophic quenching. Advection of magnetic field toward the outer boundaries and away from the dynamo is expected to alleviate such quenching. Examples are stellar and galactic winds. Such advection might be able to overcome the constraint imposed by the conservation of magnetic helicity, transporting a fraction of it outside the domain in which the dynamo operates. We study how the dynamo process is affected by advection. In particular, we study the relative roles played by advective and diffusive fluxes of magnetic helicity. We do this by performing direct numerical simulations of a turbulent dynamo of alpha^2 type driven by forced turbulence in a Cartesian domain in the ...

  7. Magnetic Dynamos and Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggleton, P P

    2007-02-15

    Djehuty is a code that has been developed over the last five years by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), from earlier code designed for programmatic efforts. Operating in a massively parallel environment, Djehuty is able to model entire stars in 3D. The object of this proposal was to continue the effort to introduce magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) into Djehuty, and investigate new classes of inherently 3D problems involving the structure, evolution and interaction of stars and planets. However, towards the end of the second year we discovered an unexpected physical process of great importance in the evolution of stars. Consequently for the third year we changed direction and concentrated on this process rather than on magnetic fields. Our new process was discovered while testing the code on red-giant stars, at the 'helium flash'. We found that a thin layer was regularly formed which contained a molecular-weight inversion, and which led therefore to Rayleigh-Taylor instability. This in turn led to some deeper-than-expected mixing, which has the property that (a) much {sup 3}He is consumed, and (b) some {sup 13}C is produced. These two properties are closely in accord with what has been observed over the last thirty years in red giants, whereas what was observed was largely in contradiction to what earlier theoretical models predicted. Thus our new 3D models with Djehuty explain a previously-unexplained problem of some thirty years standing.

  8. Magnetic field reversals and galactic dynamos

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We argue that global magnetic field reversals similar to those observed in the Milky Way occur quite frequently in mean-field galactic dynamo models that have relatively strong, random, seed magnetic fields that are localized in discrete regions. The number of reversals decreases to zero with reduction of the seed strength, efficiency of the galactic dynamo and size of the spots of the seed field. A systematic observational search for magnetic field reversals in a representative sample of spi...

  9. A dynamo model for axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric solar magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, J

    2007-01-01

    Increasing observations are becoming available about a relatively weak, but persistent, non-axisymmetric magnetic field co-existing with the dominant axisymmetric field on the Sun. It indicates that the non-axisymmetric magnetic field plays an important role in the origin of solar activity. A linear non-axisymmetric alpha2-Omega dynamo model is set up to discuss the characteristics of the axisymmetric m=0 and the first non-axisymmetric m=1 modes and to provide further the theoretical bases to explain the active longitude, flip-flop and other non-axisymmetric phenomena. The model consists of a updated solar internal differential rotation, a turbulent diffusivity varied with depth and an alpha-effect working at the tachocline in rotating spherical systems. The difference between the alpha2-Omega and the alpha-Omega models and the conditions to favor the non-axisymmetric modes with the solar-like parameters are also presented.

  10. The Global Solar Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, R. H.; Dikpati, M.; Brandenburg, A.

    2017-09-01

    A brief summary of the various observations and constraints that underlie solar dynamo research are presented. The arguments that indicate that the solar dynamo is an alpha-omega dynamo of the Babcock-Leighton type are then shortly reviewed. The main open questions that remain are concerned with the subsurface dynamics, including why sunspots emerge at preferred latitudes as seen in the familiar butterfly wings, why the cycle is about 11 years long, and why the sunspot groups emerge tilted with respect to the equator (Joy's law). Next, we turn to magnetic helicity, whose conservation property has been identified with the decline of large-scale magnetic fields found in direct numerical simulations at large magnetic Reynolds numbers. However, magnetic helicity fluxes through the solar surface can alleviate this problem and connect theory with observations, as will be discussed.

  11. The Global Solar Dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, R H; Brandenburg, A

    2016-01-01

    A brief summary of the various observations and constraints that underlie solar dynamo research are presented. The arguments that indicate that the solar dynamo is an alpha-omega dynamo of the Babcock-Leighton type are then shortly reviewed. The main open questions that remain are concerned with the subsurface dynamics, including why sunspots emerge at preferred latitudes as seen in the familiar butterfly wings, why the cycle is about 11 years long, and why the sunspot groups emerge tilted with respect to the equator (Joy's law). Next, we turn to magnetic helicity, whose conservation property has been identified with the decline of large-scale magnetic fields found in direct numerical simulations at large magnetic Reynolds numbers. However, magnetic helicity fluxes through the solar surface can alleviate this problem and connect theory with observations, as will be discussed.

  12. Magnetic Helicity in a Cyclic Convective Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miesch, Mark S.; Zhang, Mei; Augustson, Kyle C.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic helicity is a fundamental agent for magnetic self-organization in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamos. As a conserved quantity in ideal MHD, it establishes a strict topological coupling between large and small-scale magnetic fields. The generation of magnetic fields on scales larger than the velocity field is linked to an upscale transfer of magnetic helicity, either locally in spectral space as in the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in MHD turbulence or non-locally, as in the turbulent alpha-effect of mean-field dynamo theory. Thus, understanding the generation, transport, and dissipation of magnetic helicity is an essential prerequisite to understanding manifestations of magnetic self-organization in the solar dynamo, including sunspots, the prominent dipole and quadrupole moments, and the 22-year magnetic activity cycle. We investigate the role of magnetic helicity in a convective dynamo model that exhibits regular magnetic cycles. The cycle is marked by coherent bands of toroidal field that persist within the convection zone and that are antisymmetric about the equator. When these toriodal bands interact across the equator, it initiates a global restructuring of the magnetic topology that contributes to the reversal of the dipole moment. Thus, the polar field reversals are preceeded by a brief reversal of the subsurface magnetic helicity. There is some evidence that the Sun may exhibit a similar magnetic helicity reversal prior to its polar field reversals.

  13. Magnetic dynamo action at low magnetic Prandtl numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyshkin, Leonid M; Boldyrev, Stanislav

    2010-11-19

    Amplification of magnetic field due to kinematic turbulent dynamo action is studied in the regime of small magnetic Prandtl numbers. Such a regime is relevant for planets and stars interiors, as well as for liquid-metal laboratory experiments. A comprehensive analysis based on the Kazantsev-Kraichnan model is reported, which establishes the dynamo threshold and the dynamo growth rates for varying kinetic helicity of turbulent fluctuations. It is proposed that in contrast with the case of large magnetic Prandtl numbers, the kinematic dynamo action at small magnetic Prandtl numbers is significantly affected by kinetic helicity, and it can be made quite efficient with an appropriate choice of the helicity spectrum.

  14. A deep dynamo generating Mercury's magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Ulrich R

    2006-12-21

    Mercury has a global magnetic field of internal origin and it is thought that a dynamo operating in the fluid part of Mercury's large iron core is the most probable cause. However, the low intensity of Mercury's magnetic field--about 1% the strength of the Earth's field--cannot be reconciled with an Earth-like dynamo. With the common assumption that Coriolis and Lorentz forces balance in planetary dynamos, a field thirty times stronger is expected. Here I present a numerical model of a dynamo driven by thermo-compositional convection associated with inner core solidification. The thermal gradient at the core-mantle boundary is subadiabatic, and hence the outer region of the liquid core is stably stratified with the dynamo operating only at depth, where a strong field is generated. Because of the planet's slow rotation the resulting magnetic field is dominated by small-scale components that fluctuate rapidly with time. The dynamo field diffuses through the stable conducting region, where rapidly varying parts are strongly attenuated by the skin effect, while the slowly varying dipole and quadrupole components pass to some degree. The model explains the observed structure and strength of Mercury's surface magnetic field and makes predictions that are testable with space missions both presently flying and planned.

  15. Chaotic flows and fast magnetic dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, John M.; Ott, Edward

    1988-01-01

    The kinematic dynamo problem is considered in the R(m) approaching infinity limit. It is shown that the magnetic field tends to concentrate on a zero volume fractal set; moreover, it displays arbitrarily fine-scaled oscillations between parallel and antiparallel directions. Consideration is given to the relationship between the dynamo growth rate and quantitative measures of chaos, such as the Liapunov element and topological entropy.

  16. Magnetic Helicity and the Solar Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Richard C.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to open a new window into the solar dynamo, convection, and magnetic reconnection through measurement of the helicity density of magnetic fields in the photosphere and tracing of large-scale patterns of magnetic helicity in the corona.

  17. Magnetic field effect on the exciplex between all-s-trans- 1,4-diphenylbuta- 1,3-diene and 1,4-dicyanobenzene: a comparative study with other alpha,omega-diphenyl polyenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, T; Basu, S

    2001-04-01

    The exciplex between all-s-trans-1,4-diphenylbuta-1,3-diene and 1,4-dicyanobenzene has been studied by steady state fluorescence along with the magnetic field effect (MFE) and compared with the other alpha,omega-diphenyl polyenes. The exciplex formation and magnetic field effect are dictated by the chain length of the polyene rather than the electronic requirement of these phenomena. The wavelength dependence of the MFE confirms the presence of two different charge-transfer complexes.

  18. Magnetic Field Amplification via Protostellar Disc Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Dyda, Sergei; Ustyugova, Galina V; Koldoba, Alexander V; Wasserman, Ira

    2015-01-01

    We model the generation of a magnetic field in a protostellar disc using an \\alpha-dynamo and perform axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations of a T Tauri star. We find that for small values of the dimensionless dynamo parameter $\\alpha_d$ the poloidal field grows exponentially at a rate ${\\sigma} \\propto {\\Omega}_K \\sqrt{\\alpha_d}$ , before saturating to a value $\\propto \\sqrt{\\alpha_d}$ . The dynamo excites dipole and octupole modes, but quadrupole modes are suppressed, because of the symmetries of the seed field. Initial seed fields too weak to launch MHD outflows are found to grow sufficiently to launch winds with observationally relevant mass fluxes of order $10^{-9} M_{\\odot}/\\rm{yr}$ for T Tauri stars. For large values of $\\alpha_d$ magnetic loops are generated over the entire disc. These quickly come to dominate the disc dynamics and cause the disc to break up due to the magnetic pressure.

  19. MHD Turbulence and Magnetic Dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V

    2014-01-01

    Incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and magnetic dynamos, which occur in magnetofluids with large fluid and magnetic Reynolds numbers, will be discussed. When Reynolds numbers are large and energy decays slowly, the distribution of energy with respect to length scale becomes quasi-stationary and MHD turbulence can be described statistically. In the limit of infinite Reynolds numbers, viscosity and resistivity become zero and if these values are used in the MHD equations ab initio, a model system called ideal MHD turbulence results. This model system is typically confined in simple geometries with some form of homogeneous boundary conditions, allowing for velocity and magnetic field to be represented by orthogonal function expansions. One advantage to this is that the coefficients of the expansions form a set of nonlinearly interacting variables whose behavior can be described by equilibrium statistical mechanics, i.e., by a canonical ensemble theory based on the global invariants (energy, cross helicity and magnetic helicity) of ideal MHD turbulence. Another advantage is that truncated expansions provide a finite dynamical system whose time evolution can be numerically simulated to test the predictions of the associated statistical mechanics. If ensemble predictions are the same as time averages, then the system is said to be ergodic; if not, the system is nonergodic. Although it had been implicitly assumed in the early days of ideal MHD statistical theory development that these finite dynamical systems were ergodic, numerical simulations provided sufficient evidence that they were, in fact, nonergodic. Specifically, while canonical ensemble theory predicted that expansion coefficients would be (i) zero-mean random variables with (ii) energy that decreased with length scale, it was found that although (ii) was correct, (i) was not and the expected ergodicity was broken. The exact cause of this broken ergodicity was explained, after much

  20. Fluctuation dynamo based on magnetic reconnections

    OpenAIRE

    Baggaley, Andrew W.; Barenghi, Carlo F.; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-01-01

    We develop a new model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined to thin flux ropes advected by a multi-scale flow which models turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnections of flux ropes. The model is particularly suitable for rarefied plasma, such as the Solar corona or galactic halos. We investigate the kinetic energy release into heat, mediated by dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find tha...

  1. Fluctuation dynamo based on magnetic reconnections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggaley, A. W.; Shukurov, A.; Barenghi, C. F.; Subramanian, K.

    2010-01-01

    We develop a new model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined to thin flux ropes advected by a multi-scale flow which models turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnections of flux ropes. The model is particularly suitable for rarefied plasma, such as the solar corona or galactic halos. We investigate the kinetic energy release into heat, mediated by dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that the flux rope dynamo is more than an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into heat. The probability density of the magnetic energy released during reconnections has a power-law form with the slope -3, consistent with the solar corona heating by nanoflares. We also present a nonlinear extension of the model. This shows that a plausible saturation mechanism of the fluctuation dynamo is the suppression of turbulent magnetic diffusivity, due to suppression of random stretching at the location of the flux ropes. We confirm that the probability distribution function of the magnetic line curvature has a power-law form suggested by \\citet{Sheck:2002b}. We argue, however, using our results that this does not imply a persistent folded structure of magnetic field, at least in the nonlinear stage.

  2. Dynamo action in thick disks around Kerr black holes: high-order resistive GRMHD simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Bugli, M; Bucciantini, N

    2014-01-01

    We present the first kinematic study of an $\\alpha\\Omega$-dynamo in the General Relativistic Magneto-HydroDynamics (GRMHD) regime, applied to thick disks orbiting around Kerr black holes and using a fully covariant mean field dynamo closure for the Ohm law. We show that the $\\alpha\\Omega$-dynamo mechanism leads to a continuous exponential growth of the magnetic field within the disk and to the formation of dynamo waves drifting away or toward the equatorial plane. Since the evolution of the magnetic field occurs qualitatively in the same fashion as in the Sun, we present also butterfly diagrams that characterize our models and show the establishment of an additional timescale, which depends on the microscopic properties of the turbulent motions, possibly providing an alternative explanation to periodicities observed in many high-energy astrophysical sources where accretion onto a rotating black hole is believed to operate.

  3. Magnetic reversals from planetary dynamo waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheyko, Andrey; Finlay, Christopher C; Jackson, Andrew

    2016-11-24

    A striking feature of many natural dynamos is their ability to undergo polarity reversals. The best documented example is Earth's magnetic field, which has reversed hundreds of times during its history. The origin of geomagnetic polarity reversals lies in a magnetohydrodynamic process that takes place in Earth's core, but the precise mechanism is debated. The majority of numerical geodynamo simulations that exhibit reversals operate in a regime in which the viscosity of the fluid remains important, and in which the dynamo mechanism primarily involves stretching and twisting of field lines by columnar convection. Here we present an example of another class of reversing-geodynamo model, which operates in a regime of comparatively low viscosity and high magnetic diffusivity. This class does not fit into the paradigm of reversal regimes that are dictated by the value of the local Rossby number (the ratio of advection to Coriolis force). Instead, stretching of the magnetic field by a strong shear in the east-west flow near the imaginary cylinder just touching the inner core and parallel to the axis of rotation is crucial to the reversal mechanism in our models, which involves a process akin to kinematic dynamo waves. Because our results are relevant in a regime of low viscosity and high magnetic diffusivity, and with geophysically appropriate boundary conditions, this form of dynamo wave may also be involved in geomagnetic reversals.

  4. Fluctuation dynamo based on magnetic reconnections

    CERN Document Server

    Baggaley, Andrew W; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-01-01

    We develop a new model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined to thin flux ropes advected by a multi-scale flow which models turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnections of flux ropes. The model is particularly suitable for rarefied plasma, such as the Solar corona or galactic halos. We investigate the kinetic energy release into heat, mediated by dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that the flux rope dynamo is more than an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into heat. The probability density of the magnetic energy released during reconnections has a power-law form with the slope -3, consistent with the Solar corona heating by nanoflares. We also present a nonlinear extension of the model. This shows that a plausible saturation mechanism of the fluctuation dynamo is the suppression of turbulent magnetic diffusivity, due to suppression of random stretching at the location o...

  5. Stochastic flux freezing and magnetic dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyink, Gregory L

    2011-05-01

    Magnetic flux conservation in turbulent plasmas at high magnetic Reynolds numbers is argued neither to hold in the conventional sense nor to be entirely broken, but instead to be valid in a statistical sense associated to the "spontaneous stochasticity" of Lagrangian particle trajectories. The latter phenomenon is due to the explosive separation of particles undergoing turbulent Richardson diffusion, which leads to a breakdown of Laplacian determinism for classical dynamics. Empirical evidence is presented for spontaneous stochasticity, including numerical results. A Lagrangian path-integral approach is then exploited to establish stochastic flux freezing for resistive hydromagnetic equations and to argue, based on the properties of Richardson diffusion, that flux conservation must remain stochastic at infinite magnetic Reynolds number. An important application of these results is the kinematic, fluctuation dynamo in nonhelical, incompressible turbulence at magnetic Prandtl number (Pr(m)) equal to unity. Numerical results on the Lagrangian dynamo mechanisms by a stochastic particle method demonstrate a strong similarity between the Pr(m)=1 and 0 dynamos. Stochasticity of field-line motion is an essential ingredient of both. Finally, some consequences for nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, dynamo, and reconnection are briefly considered.

  6. Galactic dynamos supported by magnetic helicity fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Sur, S; Subramanian, K; Sur, Sharanya; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2006-01-01

    We present a simple semi-analytical model of nonlinear, mean-field galactic dynamos and use it to study the effects of various magnetic helicity fluxes. The dynamo equations are reduced using the `no-$z$' approximation to a nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations in time; we demonstrate that the model reproduces accurately earlier results, including those where nonlinear behaviour is driven by a magnetic helicity flux. We discuss the implications and interplay of two types of magnetic helicity flux, one produced by advection (e.g., due to the galactic fountain or wind) and the other, arising from anisotropy of turbulence as suggested by Vishniac & Cho(2001). We argue that the latter is significant if the galactic differential rotation is strong enough: in our model, for $\\Rw\\la-10$ in terms of the corresponding turbulent magnetic Reynolds number. We confirm that the intensity of gas outflow from the galactic disc optimal for the dynamo action is close to that expected for normal spiral galaxie...

  7. Nonlinear Magnetic Diffusion and Magnetic Helicity Transport in Galactic Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Kleeorin, N; Rogachevskii, I; Sokoloff, D D

    2003-01-01

    We have extended our previous mean-field galactic dynamo model which included algebraic and dynamic alpha nonlinearities (Kleeorin et al., A&A, v. 387, 453, 2002), to include also a quenching of turbulent diffusivity. We readily obtain equilibrium states for the large-scale magnetic field in the local disc dynamo model, and these fields have strengths that are comparable to the equipartition field strength. We find that the algebraic nonlinearity alone (i.e. quenching of both the alpha effect and turbulent magnetic diffusion) cannot saturate the growth of the mean magnetic field; only the combined effect of algebraic and dynamic nonlinearities can limit the growth of the mean magnetic field. However, in contrast to our earlier work without quenching of the turbulent diffusivity, we cannot now find satisfactory solutions in the no-z approximation to the axisymmetric galactic dynamo problem.

  8. Magnetic reversals from planetary dynamo waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheyko, Andrey; Finlay, Chris; Jackson, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    place in Earth's core, but the precise mechanism is debated. The majority of numerical geodynamo simulations that exhibit reversals operate in a regime in which the viscosity of the fluid remains important, and in which the dynamo mechanism primarily involves stretching and twisting of field lines...... by columnar convection. Here we present an example of another class of reversing-geodynamo model, which operates in a regime of comparatively low viscosity and high magnetic diffusivity. This class does not fit into the paradigm of reversal regimes that are dictated by the value of the local Rossby number...

  9. Dynamos at extreme magnetic Prandtl numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, Mahendra K

    2015-01-01

    We present a MHD shell model suitable for the computation of various energy fluxes of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence for very small and very large magnetic Prandtl numbers $\\mathrm{Pm}$; such computations are inaccessible to direct numerical simulations. For small $\\mathrm{Pm}$, we observe that the both kinetic and magnetic energy spectra scale as $k^{-5/3}$ in the inertial range, but the dissipative magnetic energy scales as $k^{-17/3}$. Here, the kinetic energy at large length scale feeds the large-scale magnetic field that cascades to small-scale magnetic field, which gets dissipated by Joule heating. The large $\\mathrm{Pm}$ dynamo has a similar behaviour except that the dissipative kinetic energy scales as $k^{-13/3}$. For this case, the large-scale velocity field transfers energy to large-scale magnetic field, which gets transferred to small-scale velocity and magnetic fields. The energy of the small-scale magnetic field also gets transferred to the small-scale velocity field. The energy accumulated at s...

  10. Magnetic Field Saturation in the Riga Dynamo Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Gailitis, A; Platacis, E; Dementev, S; Cifersons, A; Gerbeth, G; Gundrum, T; Stefani, F; Christen, M; Will, G; Gailitis, Agris; Lielausis, Olgerts; Platacis, Ernests; Dement'ev, Sergej; Cifersons, Arnis; Gerbeth, Gunter; Gundrum, Thomas; Stefani, Frank; Christen, Michael; Will, Gotthard

    2001-01-01

    After the dynamo experiment in November 1999 had shown magnetic field self-excitation in a spiraling liquid metal flow, in a second series of experiments emphasis was placed on the magnetic field saturation regime as the next principal step in the dynamo process. The dependence of the strength of the magnetic field on the rotation rate is studied. Various features of the saturated magnetic field are outlined and possible saturation mechanisms are discussed.

  11. Experimental observation of spatially localized dynamo magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallet, B; Aumaître, S; Boisson, J; Daviaud, F; Dubrulle, B; Bonnefoy, N; Bourgoin, M; Odier, Ph; Pinton, J-F; Plihon, N; Verhille, G; Fauve, S; Pétrélis, F

    2012-04-06

    We report the first experimental observation of a spatially localized dynamo magnetic field, a common feature of astrophysical dynamos and convective dynamo simulations. When the two propellers of the von Kármán sodium experiment are driven at frequencies that differ by 15%, the mean magnetic field's energy measured close to the slower disk is nearly 10 times larger than the one close to the faster one. This strong localization of the magnetic field when a symmetry of the forcing is broken is in good agreement with a prediction based on the interaction between a dipolar and a quadrupolar magnetic mode.

  12. Magnetic dipole moment estimates for an ancient lunar dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, K. A.

    1983-01-01

    The four measured planetary magnetic moments combined with a recent theoretical prediction for dynamo magnetic fields suggests that no dynamo exists in the moon's interior today. For the moon to have had a magnetic moment in the past of sufficient strength to account for at least some of the lunar rock magnetism, the rotation would have been about twenty times faster than it is today and the radius of the fluid, conducting core must have been about 750 km. The argument depends on the validity of the Busse solution to the validity of the MHD problem of planetary dynamos.

  13. Cause of equatorward migration in global convective dynamo simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Warnecke, Jörn; Käpylä, Maarit J; Brandenburg, Axel

    2014-01-01

    We present results from four convectively-driven stellar dynamo simulations in spherical wedge geometry. All of these simulations produce cyclic and migrating mean magnetic fields. Through detailed comparisons we show that the migration direction can be explained by an $\\alpha\\Omega$ dynamo wave following the Parker--Yoshimura rule. We conclude that the equatorward migration in this and previous work is due to a positive (negative) $\\alpha$ effect in the northern (southern) hemisphere and a negative radial gradient of $\\Omega$ outside the inner tangent cylinder of these models. This idea is supported by a strong correlation between negative radial shear and toroidal field strength in the region of equatorward propagation.

  14. Numerical insights into magnetic dynamo action in a turbulent regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenjeres, S.; Hanjalic, K.

    2007-01-01

    We report on hybrid numerical simulations of a turbulent magnetic dynamo. The simulated set-up mimics the Riga dynamo experiment characterized by Re ≈ 3.5 × 106 and (Gailitis et al 2000 Phys. Rev. Lett. 84 4365–8). The simulations were performed by a simultaneous fully coupled solution of the trans

  15. Energy transfers in dynamos with small magnetic Prandtl numbers

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Rohit

    2015-06-25

    We perform numerical simulation of dynamo with magnetic Prandtl number Pm = 0.2 on 10243 grid, and compute the energy fluxes and the shell-to-shell energy transfers. These computations indicate that the magnetic energy growth takes place mainly due to the energy transfers from large-scale velocity field to large-scale magnetic field and that the magnetic energy flux is forward. The steady-state magnetic energy is much smaller than the kinetic energy, rather than equipartition; this is because the magnetic Reynolds number is near the dynamo transition regime. We also contrast our results with those for dynamo with Pm = 20 and decaying dynamo. © 2015 Taylor & Francis.

  16. Dynamos and anti-dynamos as thin magnetic flux ropes in Riemannian spaces

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, L Garcia

    2007-01-01

    Two examples of magnetic anti-dynamos in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are given. The first is a 3D metric conformally related to Arnold cat fast dynamo metric: ${ds_{A}}^{2}=e^{-{\\lambda}z}dp^{2}+e^{{\\lambda}z}dq^{2}+dz^{2}$ is shown to present a behaviour of non-dynamos where the magnetic field exponentially decay in time. The curvature decay as z-coordinates increases without bounds. Some of the Riemann curvature components such as $R_{pzpz}$ also undergoes dissipation while component $R_{qzqz}$ increases without bounds. The remaining curvature component $R_{pqpq}$ is constant on the torus surface. The other anti-dynamo which may be useful in plasma astrophysics is the thin magnetic flux rope or twisted magnetic thin flux tube which also behaves as anti-dynamo since it also decays with time. This model is based on the Riemannian metric of the magnetic twisted flux tube where the axis possesses Frenet curvature and torsion. Since in this last example the Frenet torsion of the axis of the rope is almost zero, o...

  17. Magnetic Helicities and Dynamo Action in Magneto-rotational Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodo, G.; Cattaneo, F.; Mignone, A.; Rossi, P.

    2017-07-01

    We examine the relationship between magnetic flux generation, taken as an indicator of large-scale dynamo action, and magnetic helicity, computed as an integral over the dynamo volume, in a simple dynamo. We consider dynamo action driven by magneto-rotational turbulence (MRT) within the shearing-box approximation. We consider magnetically open boundary conditions that allow a flux of helicity in or out of the computational domain. We circumvent the problem of the lack of gauge invariance in open domains by choosing a particular gauge—the winding gauge—that provides a natural interpretation in terms of the average winding number of pairwise field lines. We use this gauge precisely to define and measure the helicity and the helicity flux for several realizations of dynamo action. We find in these cases that the system as a whole does not break reflectional symmetry and that the total helicity remains small even in cases when substantial magnetic flux is generated. We find no particular connection between the generation of magnetic flux and the helicity or the helicity flux through the boundaries. We suggest that this result may be due to the essentially nonlinear nature of the dynamo processes in MRT.

  18. Turbulent dynamo in a disk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruzmaikin, A.A.; Sokolov, D.D.; Turchaninov, V.I.

    1980-03-01

    The large-scale magnetic field in a rotating, turbulent gaseous disk will be generated by a dynamo process (the ..cap alpha omega..-dynamo) determined by the differential rotation ..omega..(r) and the spirality function ..cap alpha..(z). The generation is best described by a difference approximation to the dynamo equations, using a step greater than the turbulence correlation length and a smooth function ..cap alpha..(z). The critical dynamo-number for exciting the lowest even quadrupole mode is D/sub q/ = -8. The odd dipole mode will be excited only for large dynamo-numberabsolute value (D/sub d/) > or approx. = 500. When absolute value (D) > or approx. = 20, all modes other than the lowest quadrupole mode (for which the threshold Dapprox. =-500) are oscillatory. The results are applied to the Galaxy (D approx. = -10; characteristic growth time, 3 x 10/sup 8/ yr) and to accretion disks in binary systems containing a black hole, where several oscillatory modes can be excited.

  19. Magnetic flux generation and transport in cool stars

    CERN Document Server

    Işık, Emre; Schüssler, Manfred

    2011-01-01

    The Sun and other cool stars harbouring outer convection zones manifest magnetic activity in their atmospheres. The connection between this activity and the properties of a deep-seated dynamo generating the magnetic flux is not well understood. By employing physical models, we study the spatial and temporal characteristics of the observable surface field for various stellar parameters. We combine models for magnetic flux generation, buoyancy instability, and transport, which encompass the entire convection zone. The model components are: (1) a thin-layer alpha-Omega dynamo at the base of the convection zone; (2) buoyancy instabilities and the rise of flux tubes through the convection zone in 3D, which provides a physically consistent determination of emergence latitudes and tilt angles; and (3) horizontal flux transport at the surface. For solar-type stars and rotation periods longer than about 10 days, the latitudinal dynamo waves generated by the deep-seated alpha-Omega dynamo are faithfully reflected by th...

  20. Solar Magnetic Field Reversals and the Role of Dynamo Families

    CERN Document Server

    DeRosa, M L; Hoeksema, J T

    2012-01-01

    The variable magnetic field of the solar photosphere exhibits periodic reversals as a result of dynamo activity occurring within the solar interior. We decompose the surface field as observed by both the Wilcox Solar Observatory and the Michelson Doppler Imager into its harmonic constituents, and present the time evolution of the mode coefficients for the past three sunspot cycles. The interplay between the various modes is then interpreted from the perspective of general dynamo theory, where the coupling between the primary and secondary families of modes is found to correlate with large-scale polarity reversals for many examples of cyclic dynamos. Mean-field dynamos based on the solar parameter regime are then used to explore how such couplings may result in the various long-term trends in the surface magnetic field observed to occur in the solar case.

  1. Small-scale dynamo at low magnetic Prandtl numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Jennifer; Schleicher, Dominik; Bovino, Stefano; Klessen, Ralf S

    2012-12-01

    The present-day Universe is highly magnetized, even though the first magnetic seed fields were most probably extremely weak. To explain the growth of the magnetic field strength over many orders of magnitude, fast amplification processes need to operate. The most efficient mechanism known today is the small-scale dynamo, which converts turbulent kinetic energy into magnetic energy leading to an exponential growth of the magnetic field. The efficiency of the dynamo depends on the type of turbulence indicated by the slope of the turbulence spectrum v(ℓ)∝ℓ^{ϑ}, where v(ℓ) is the eddy velocity at a scale ℓ. We explore turbulent spectra ranging from incompressible Kolmogorov turbulence with ϑ=1/3 to highly compressible Burgers turbulence with ϑ=1/2. In this work, we analyze the properties of the small-scale dynamo for low magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm, which denotes the ratio of the magnetic Reynolds number, Rm, to the hydrodynamical one, Re. We solve the Kazantsev equation, which describes the evolution of the small-scale magnetic field, using the WKB approximation. In the limit of low magnetic Prandtl numbers, the growth rate is proportional to Rm^{(1-ϑ)/(1+ϑ)}. We furthermore discuss the critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm_{crit}, which is required for small-scale dynamo action. The value of Rm_{crit} is roughly 100 for Kolmogorov turbulence and 2700 for Burgers. Furthermore, we discuss that Rm_{crit} provides a stronger constraint in the limit of low Pm than it does for large Pm. We conclude that the small-scale dynamo can operate in the regime of low magnetic Prandtl numbers if the magnetic Reynolds number is large enough. Thus, the magnetic field amplification on small scales can take place in a broad range of physical environments and amplify week magnetic seed fields on short time scales.

  2. Small-scale dynamo at low magnetic Prandtl numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Jennifer; Schleicher, Dominik; Bovino, Stefano; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2012-12-01

    The present-day Universe is highly magnetized, even though the first magnetic seed fields were most probably extremely weak. To explain the growth of the magnetic field strength over many orders of magnitude, fast amplification processes need to operate. The most efficient mechanism known today is the small-scale dynamo, which converts turbulent kinetic energy into magnetic energy leading to an exponential growth of the magnetic field. The efficiency of the dynamo depends on the type of turbulence indicated by the slope of the turbulence spectrum v(ℓ)∝ℓϑ, where v(ℓ) is the eddy velocity at a scale ℓ. We explore turbulent spectra ranging from incompressible Kolmogorov turbulence with ϑ=1/3 to highly compressible Burgers turbulence with ϑ=1/2. In this work, we analyze the properties of the small-scale dynamo for low magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm, which denotes the ratio of the magnetic Reynolds number, Rm, to the hydrodynamical one, Re. We solve the Kazantsev equation, which describes the evolution of the small-scale magnetic field, using the WKB approximation. In the limit of low magnetic Prandtl numbers, the growth rate is proportional to Rm(1-ϑ)/(1+ϑ). We furthermore discuss the critical magnetic Reynolds number Rmcrit, which is required for small-scale dynamo action. The value of Rmcrit is roughly 100 for Kolmogorov turbulence and 2700 for Burgers. Furthermore, we discuss that Rmcrit provides a stronger constraint in the limit of low Pm than it does for large Pm. We conclude that the small-scale dynamo can operate in the regime of low magnetic Prandtl numbers if the magnetic Reynolds number is large enough. Thus, the magnetic field amplification on small scales can take place in a broad range of physical environments and amplify week magnetic seed fields on short time scales.

  3. Sharp magnetic structures from dynamos with density stratification

    CERN Document Server

    Jabbari, Sarah; Kleeorin, Nathan; Rogachevskii, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Recent direct numerical simulations (DNS) of large-scale turbulent dynamos in strongly stratified layers have resulted in surprisingly sharp bipolar structures at the surface. Here we present new DNS of helically and non-helically forced turbulence with and without rotation and compare with corresponding mean-field simulations (MFS) to show that these structures are a generic outcome of a broader class of dynamos in density-stratified layers. The MFS agree qualitatively with the DNS, but the period of oscillations tends to be longer in the DNS. In both DNS and MFS, the sharp structures are produced by converging flows at the surface and are driven by the Lorentz force associated with the large-scale dynamo-driven magnetic field if the dynamo number is at least 5 times supercritical.

  4. Sharp magnetic structures from dynamos with density stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari, Sarah; Brandenburg, Axel; Kleeorin, Nathan; Rogachevskii, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Recent direct numerical simulations (DNS) of large-scale turbulent dynamos in strongly stratified layers have resulted in surprisingly sharp bipolar structures at the surface. Here we present new DNS of helically and non-helically forced turbulence with and without rotation and compare with corresponding mean-field simulations (MFS) to show that these structures are a generic outcome of a broader class of dynamos in density-stratified layers. The MFS agree qualitatively with the DNS, but the period of oscillations tends to be longer in the DNS. In both DNS and MFS, the sharp structures are produced by converging flows at the surface and might be driven in nonlinear stage of evolution by the Lorentz force associated with the large-scale dynamo-driven magnetic field if the dynamo number is at least 2.5 times supercritical.

  5. Dynamo magnetic field modes in thin astrophysical disks - An adiabatic computational approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Levy, E. H.

    1991-01-01

    An adiabatic approximation is applied to the calculation of turbulent MHD dynamo magnetic fields in thin disks. The adiabatic method is employed to investigate conditions under which magnetic fields generated by disk dynamos permeate the entire disk or are localized to restricted regions of a disk. Two specific cases of Keplerian disks are considered. In the first, magnetic field diffusion is assumed to be dominated by turbulent mixing leading to a dynamo number independent of distance from the center of the disk. In the second, the dynamo number is allowed to vary with distance from the disk's center. Localization of dynamo magnetic field structures is found to be a general feature of disk dynamos, except in the special case of stationary modes in dynamos with constant dynamo number. The implications for the dynamical behavior of dynamo magnetized accretion disks are discussed and the results of these exploratory calculations are examined in the context of the protosolar nebula and accretion disks around compact objects.

  6. Shear-driven dynamo waves at high magnetic Reynolds number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, S M; Cattaneo, F

    2013-05-23

    Astrophysical magnetic fields often display remarkable organization, despite being generated by dynamo action driven by turbulent flows at high conductivity. An example is the eleven-year solar cycle, which shows spatial coherence over the entire solar surface. The difficulty in understanding the emergence of this large-scale organization is that whereas at low conductivity (measured by the magnetic Reynolds number, Rm) dynamo fields are well organized, at high Rm their structure is dominated by rapidly varying small-scale fluctuations. This arises because the smallest scales have the highest rate of strain, and can amplify magnetic field most efficiently. Therefore most of the effort to find flows whose large-scale dynamo properties persist at high Rm has been frustrated. Here we report high-resolution simulations of a dynamo that can generate organized fields at high Rm; indeed, the generation mechanism, which involves the interaction between helical flows and shear, only becomes effective at large Rm. The shear does not enhance generation at large scales, as is commonly thought; instead it reduces generation at small scales. The solution consists of propagating dynamo waves, whose existence was postulated more than 60 years ago and which have since been used to model the solar cycle.

  7. On Magnetic Dynamos in Thin Accretion Disks around Compact and Young Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, T. F.

    1993-01-01

    A variety of geometrically thin accretion disks commonly associated with such astronomical objects as X-ray binaries, cataclysmic variables, and protostars are likely to be seats of MHD dynamo actions. Thin disk geometry and the particular physical environment make accretion disk dynamos different from stellar, planetary, or even galactic dynamos. We discuss those particular features of disk dynamos with emphasis on the difference between protoplanetary disk dynamos and those associated with compact stars. We then describe normal mode solutions for thin disk dynamos and discuss implications for the dynamical behavior of dynamo-magnetized accretion disks.

  8. Solar and Stellar Dynamos Saas-Fee Advanced Course 39 Swiss Society for Astrophysics and Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Astrophysical dynamos are at the heart of cosmic magnetic fields of a wide range of scales, from planets and stars to entire galaxies. This book presents a thorough, step-by-step introduction to solar and stellar dynamos. Looking first at the ultimate origin of cosmic seed magnetic fields, the antagonists of field amplification are next considered: resistive decay, flux expulsion, and flows ruled out by anti-dynamo theorems. Two kinematic flows that can act as dynamos are then studied: the Roberts cell and the CP-flow. Mean-field electrodynamics and derivation of the mean-field dynamo equations lead to the alpha Omega-dynamo, the flux transport dynamo, and dynamos based on the Babcock-Leighton mechanism. Alternatives to the mean-field theory are also presented, as are global MHD dynamo simulations. Fluctuations and grand minima in the solar cycle are discussed in terms of dynamo modulations through stochastic forcing and nonlinear effects. The book concludes with an overview of the major challenges in underst...

  9. The Magnetic Furnace: Intense Core Dynamos in B-stars

    CERN Document Server

    Augustson, Kyle C; Toomre, Juri

    2016-01-01

    The dynamo action achieved in the convective cores of main-sequence massive stars is explored here through 3-D global simulations of convective core dynamos operating within a young 10$M_{\\mathrm{sun}}$ B-type star, using the anelastic spherical harmonic (ASH) code. These simulations capture the inner 65% of this star by radius, encompassing the convective nuclear-burning core (about 23% by radius) and a portion of the overlying radiative envelope. Eight rotation rates are considered, ranging from 0.05% to 16% of the surface breakup velocity, thereby capturing both convection barely sensing the effects of rotation to others in which the Coriolis forces are prominent. The vigorous dynamo action realized within all of these turbulent convective cores builds magnetic fields with peak strengths exceeding a megagauss, with the overall magnetic energy (ME) in the faster rotators reaching super-equipartition levels compared to the convective kinetic energy (KE). The core convection typically involves turbulent colum...

  10. Magnetic helicity in stellar dynamos new numerical experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, A; Subramanian, K

    2002-01-01

    The theory of large scale dynamos is reviewed with particular emphasis on the problem of magnetic helicity conservation in the presence of closed and open boundaries. It is concluded that in solar and stellar large scale dynamos the production and destruction of magnetic helicity during one cycle may still be accomplished by ordinary Spitzer resistivity. This is mainly because of geometric effects causing significant magnetic helicity cancellation on each hemisphere, but also partly because the generation of toroidal field by shear does not involve the production of magnetic helicity. A number of alternatives are discussed and dismissed. These include open boundaries which lead to preferential loss of large scale magnetic helicity together with large scale magnetic fields. It is also shown that artificially induced losses of small scale field do not accelerate the production of large scale (poloidal) field. In fact, resistively limited evolution towards saturation is also found at intermediate scales before t...

  11. Dynamo Action and Magnetic Cycles in F-type Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustson, Kyle C.; Brun, Allan Sacha; Toomre, Juri

    2013-11-01

    Magnetic activity and differential rotation are commonly observed features on main-sequence F-type stars. We seek to make contact with such observations and to provide a self-consistent picture of how differential rotation and magnetic fields arise in the interiors of these stars. The three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic anelastic spherical harmonic code is employed to simulate global-scale convection and dynamo processes in a 1.2 M ⊙ F-type star at two rotation rates. The simulations are carried out in spherical shells that encompass most of the convection zone and a portion of the stably stratified radiative zone below it, allowing us to explore the effects a stable zone has upon the morphology of the global-scale magnetic fields. We find that dynamo action with a high degree of time variation occurs in the star rotating more rapidly at 20 Ω⊙, with the polarity of the mean field reversing on a timescale of about 1600 days. Between reversals, the magnetic energy rises and falls with a fairly regular period, with three magnetic energy cycles required to complete a reversal. The magnetic energy cycles and polarity reversals arise due to a linking of the polar-slip instability in the stable region and dynamo action present in the convection zone. For the more slowly rotating case (10 Ω⊙), persistent wreaths of magnetism are established and maintained by dynamo action. Compared to their hydrodynamic progenitors, the dynamo states here involve a marked reduction in the exhibited latitudinal differential rotation, which also vary during the course of a cycle.

  12. Strong horizontal photospheric magnetic field in a surface dynamo simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SchÜssler, M.; Vögler, A.

    2008-01-01

    Context. Observations with the Hinode spectro-polarimeter have revealed strong horizontal internetwork magnetic fields in the quiet solar photosphere. Aims. We aim to interpret the observations with results from numerical simulations. Methods. Radiative MHD simulations of dynamo action by near-surfa

  13. The Small-Scale Dynamo at Low Magnetic Prandtl Numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Schober, Jennifer; Bovino, Stefano; Klessen, Ralf S

    2012-01-01

    The present-day Universe is highly magnetized, even though the first magnetic seed fields were most probably extremely weak. To explain the growth of the magnetic field strength over many orders of magnitude fast amplification processes need to operate. The most efficient mechanism known today is the small-scale dynamo, which converts turbulent kinetic energy into magnetic energy leading to an exponential growth of the magnetic field. The efficiency of the dynamo depends on the type of turbulence indicated by the slope of the turbulence spectrum v(l) \\propto l^{theta}, where v(l) is the eddy velocity at a scale l. We explore turbulent spectra ranging from incompressible Kolmogorov turbulence with theta = 1/3 to highly compressible Burgers turbulence with theta = 1/2. In this work we analyze the properties of the small-scale dynamo for low magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm, which denotes the ratio of the magnetic Reynolds number, Rm, to the hydrodynamical one, Re. We solve the Kazantsev equation, which describes the...

  14. Magnetic fields in ring galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, D; Silchenko, O; Sokoloff, D; Horellou, C; Beck, R

    2016-01-01

    Many galaxies contain magnetic fields supported by galactic dynamo action. However, nothing definitive is known about magnetic fields in ring galaxies. Here we investigate large-scale magnetic fields in a previously unexplored context, namely ring galaxies, and concentrate our efforts on the structures that appear most promising for galactic dynamo action, i.e. outer star-forming rings in visually unbarred galaxies. We use tested methods for modelling $\\alpha-\\Omega$ galactic dynamos, taking into account the available observational information concerning ionized interstellar matter in ring galaxies. Our main result is that dynamo drivers in ring galaxies are strong enough to excite large-scale magnetic fields in the ring galaxies studied. The variety of dynamo driven magnetic configurations in ring galaxies obtained in our modelling is much richer than that found in classical spiral galaxies. In particular, various long-lived transients are possible. An especially interesting case is that of NGC 4513 where th...

  15. Buoyant Magnetic Loops Generated by Global Convective Dynamo Action

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, Nicholas J; Brun, A Sacha; Miesch, Mark S; Toomre, Juri

    2012-01-01

    Our global 3D simulations of convection and dynamo action in a Sun-like star reveal that persistent wreaths of strong magnetism can be built within the bulk of the convention zone. Here we examine the characteristics of buoyant magnetic structures that are self-consistently created by dynamo action and turbulent convective motions in a simulation with solar stratification but rotating at three times the current solar rate. These buoyant loops originate within sections of the magnetic wreaths in which turbulent flows amplify the fields to much larger values than is possible through laminar processes. These amplified portions can rise through the convective layer by a combination of magnetic buoyancy and advection by convective giant cells, forming buoyant loops. We measure statistical trends in the polarity, twist, and tilt of these loops. Loops are shown to preferentially arise in longitudinal patches somewhat reminiscent of active longitudes in the Sun, although broader in extent. We show that the strength o...

  16. Constraining Substellar Magnetic Dynamos using Auroral Radio Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Melodie; Hallinan, Gregg; Pineda, J. Sebastian; Escala, Ivanna; Burgasser, Adam J.; Stevenson, David J.

    2017-01-01

    An important outstanding problem in dynamo theory is understanding how magnetic fields are generated and sustained in fully convective stellar objects. A number of models for possible dynamo mechanisms in this regime have been proposed but constraining data on magnetic field strengths and topologies across a wide range of mass, age, rotation rate, and temperature are sorely lacking, particularly in the brown dwarf regime. Detections of highly circularly polarized pulsed radio emission provide our only window into magnetic field measurements for objects in the ultracool brown dwarf regime. However, these detections are very rare; previous radio surveys encompassing ˜60 L6 or later targets have yielded only one detection. We have developed a selection strategy for biasing survey targets based on possible optical and infrared tracers of auroral activity. Using our selection strategy, we previously observed six late L and T dwarfs with the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and detected the presence of highly circularly polarized radio emission for five targets. Our initial detections at 4-8 GHz provided the most robust constraints on dynamo theory in this regime, confirming magnetic fields >2.5 kG. To further develop our understanding of magnetic fields in the ultracool brown dwarf mass regime bridging planets and stars, we present constraints on surface magnetic field strengths for two Y-dwarfs as well as higher frequency observations of the previously detected L/T dwarfs corresponding ~3.6 kG fields. By carefully comparing magnetic field measurements derived from auroral radio emission to measurements derived from Zeeman broadening and Zeeman Doppler imaging, we provide tentative evidence that the dynamo operating in this mass regime may be inconsistent with predicted values from currently in vogue models. This suggests that parameters beyond convective flux may influence magnetic field generation in brown dwarfs.

  17. Numerical demonstration of fluctuation dynamo at low magnetic Prandtl numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskakov, A B; Schekochihin, A A; Cowley, S C; McWilliams, J C; Proctor, M R E

    2007-05-18

    Direct numerical simulations of incompressible nonhelical randomly forced MHD turbulence are used to demonstrate for the first time that the fluctuation dynamo exists in the limit of large magnetic Reynolds number Rm>1 and small magnetic Prandtl number Pmdynamo on the hydrodynamic Reynolds number Re is obtained for 1 less than or similar Re less than or similar 6700. In the limit Pmdynamo at large and moderate Prandtl numbers: Rmc less than or similar 200 for Re greater than or similar 6000 compared to Rmc approximately 60 for Pm>or=1. It is not yet possible to determine numerically whether the growth rate of the magnetic energy is proportional, Rm1/2 in the limit Rm-->infinity, as it should be if the dynamo is driven by the inertial-range motions at the resistive scale.

  18. Stellar dynamo models with prominent surface toroidal fields

    CERN Document Server

    Bonanno, Alfio

    2016-01-01

    Recent spectro-polarimetric observations of solar-type stars have shown the presence of photospheric magnetic fields with a predominant toroidal component. If the external field is assumed to be current-free it is impossible to explain these observations within the framework of standard mean-field dynamo theory. In this work it will be shown that if the coronal field of these stars is assumed to be harmonic, the underlying stellar dynamo mechanism can support photospheric magnetic fields with a prominent toroidal component even in the presence of axisymmetric magnetic topologies. In particular it is argued that the observed increase in the toroidal energy in low mass fast rotating stars can be naturally explained with an underlying $\\alpha\\Omega$ mechanism.

  19. The magnetic universe geophysical and astrophysical dynamo theory

    CERN Document Server

    Rüdiger, Günther

    2004-01-01

    Magnetism is one of the most pervasive features of the Universe, with planets, stars and entire galaxies all having associated magnetic fields. All of these fields are generated by the motion of electrically conducting fluids, the so-called dynamo effect. The precise details of what drives the motion, and indeed what the fluid consists of, differ widely though. In this work the authors draw upon their expertise in geophysical and astrophysical MHD to explore some of these phenomena, and describe the similarities and differences between different magnetized objects. They also explain why magn

  20. Recent Progress in Understanding the Sun's Magnetic Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, David. H.

    2004-01-01

    100 years ago we thought that the Sun and stars shone as a result of slow gravitational contraction over a few tens of millions of years - putting astronomers at odds with geologists who claimed that the Earth was much, much older. That mystery was solved in the 1920s and 30s with the discovery of nuclear energy (proving that the geologists had it right all along). Other scientific mysteries concerning the Sun have come and gone but three major mysteries remain: 1) How does the Sun produce sunspots with an 11-year cycle? 2) What produces the huge explosions that result in solar flares, prominence eruptions, and coronal mass ejections? and 3) Why is the Sun's outer atmosphere, the corona, so darned hot? Recent progress in solar astronomy reveals a single key to understanding all three of these mysteries.The 11-year time scale for the sunspot cycle indicates the presence of a magnetic dynamo within the Sun. For decades this dynamo was though to operate within the Sun's convection zone - the outmost 30% of the Sun where convective currents transport heat and advect magnetic lines of force. The two leading theories for the dynamo had very different models for the dynamics of the convection zone. Actual measurements of the dynamics using the techniques of helioseismology showed that both of these models had to be wrong some 20 years ago. A thin layer of strongly sheared flow at the base of the convection zone (now called the tachocline) was then taken to be the seat of the dynamo. Over the last 10 years it has become apparent that a weak meridional circulation within the convection zone also plays a key role in the dynamo. This meridional circulation has plasma rising up from the tachocline in the equatorial regions, spreading out toward the poles at a top speed of about 10-20 m/s at the surface, sinking back down to the tachocline in the polar regions, and then flowing back toward the equator at a top speed of about 1-2 m/s in the tachocline itself. Recent dynamo

  1. Recent Progress in Understanding the Sun's Magnetic Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, David. H.

    2004-01-01

    100 years ago we thought that the Sun and stars shone as a result of slow gravitational contraction over a few tens of millions of years - putting astronomers at odds with geologists who claimed that the Earth was much, much older. That mystery was solved in the 1920s and 30s with the discovery of nuclear energy (proving that the geologists had it right all along). Other scientific mysteries concerning the Sun have come and gone but three major mysteries remain: 1) How does the Sun produce sunspots with an 11-year cycle? 2) What produces the huge explosions that result in solar flares, prominence eruptions, and coronal mass ejections? and 3) Why is the Sun's outer atmosphere, the corona, so darned hot? Recent progress in solar astronomy reveals a single key to understanding all three of these mysteries.The 11-year time scale for the sunspot cycle indicates the presence of a magnetic dynamo within the Sun. For decades this dynamo was though to operate within the Sun's convection zone - the outmost 30% of the Sun where convective currents transport heat and advect magnetic lines of force. The two leading theories for the dynamo had very different models for the dynamics of the convection zone. Actual measurements of the dynamics using the techniques of helioseismology showed that both of these models had to be wrong some 20 years ago. A thin layer of strongly sheared flow at the base of the convection zone (now called the tachocline) was then taken to be the seat of the dynamo. Over the last 10 years it has become apparent that a weak meridional circulation within the convection zone also plays a key role in the dynamo. This meridional circulation has plasma rising up from the tachocline in the equatorial regions, spreading out toward the poles at a top speed of about 10-20 m/s at the surface, sinking back down to the tachocline in the polar regions, and then flowing back toward the equator at a top speed of about 1-2 m/s in the tachocline itself. Recent dynamo

  2. Turbulent ${\\alpha}$-effect in twisted magnetic flux tubes dynamos in Riemannian space

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, Garcia

    2007-01-01

    Analytical solution of first order torsion ${\\alpha}$-effect in twisted magnetic flux tubes representing a flux tube dynamo in Riemannian space is presented. Toroidal and poloidal component of the magnetic field decays as $r^{-1}$, while grow exponentially in time. The rate of speed of the helical dynamo depends upon the value of Frenet curvature of the tube. The $\\alpha$ factor possesses a fundamental contribution from constant torsion tube approximation. It is also assumed that the curvature of the magnetic axis of the tube is constant. Though ${\\alpha}$-effect dynamo equations are rather more complex in Riemann flux tube coordinates, a simple solution assuming force-free magnetic fields is shown to be possible. Dynamo solutions are possible if the dynamo action is able to change the signs of torsion and curvature of the dynamo flux tube simultaneously.

  3. The Magnetic Furnace: Intense Core Dynamos in B Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustson, Kyle C.; Brun, Allan Sacha; Toomre, Juri

    2016-10-01

    The dynamo action achieved in the convective cores of main-sequence massive stars is explored here through three-dimensional (3D) global simulations of convective core dynamos operating within a young 10 {M}⊙ B-type star, using the anelastic spherical harmonic code. These simulations capture the inner 65% of this star by radius, encompassing the convective nuclear-burning core (about 23% by radius) and a portion of the overlying radiative envelope. Eight rotation rates are considered, ranging from 0.05% to 16% of the surface breakup velocity, thereby capturing both convection that barely senses the effects of rotation and other situations in which the Coriolis forces are prominent. The vigorous dynamo action realized within all of these turbulent convective cores builds magnetic fields with peak strengths exceeding a megagauss, with the overall magnetic energy (ME) in the faster rotators reaching super-equipartition levels compared to the convective kinetic energy (KE). The core convection typically involves turbulent columnar velocity structures roughly aligned with the rotation axis, with magnetic fields threading through these rolls and possessing complex linkages throughout the core. The very strong fields are able to coexist with the flows without quenching them through Lorentz forces. The velocity and magnetic fields achieve such a state by being nearly co-aligned, and with peak magnetic islands being somewhat displaced from the fastest flows as the intricate evolution proceeds. As the rotation rate is increased, the primary force balance shifts from nonlinear advection balancing Lorentz forces to a magnetostrophic balance between Coriolis and Lorentz forces.

  4. Magnetic energy dissipation and mean magnetic field generation in planar convection-driven dynamos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilgner, A

    2014-07-01

    A numerical study of dynamos in rotating convecting plane layers is presented which focuses on magnetic energies and dissipation rates and the generation of mean fields (where the mean is taken over horizontal planes). The scaling of the magnetic energy with the flux Rayleigh number is different from the scaling proposed in spherical shells, whereas the same dependence of the magnetic dissipation length on the magnetic Reynolds number is found for the two geometries. Dynamos both with and without mean field exist in rapidly rotating convecting plane layers.

  5. Magnetic Helicity Reversals in a Cyclic Convective Dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Miesch, Mark S; Augustson, Kyle C

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the role of magnetic helicity in promoting cyclic magnetic activity in a global, 3D, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of a convective dynamo. This simulation is characterized by coherent bands of toroidal field that exist within the convection zone, with opposite polarities in the northern and southern hemispheres. Throughout most of the cycle, the magnetic helicity in these bands is negative in the northern hemisphere and positive in the southern hemisphere. However, during the declining phase of each cycle, this hemispheric rule reverses. We attribute this to a global restructuring of the magnetic topology that is induced by the interaction of the bands across the equator. This band interaction appears to be ultimately responsible for, or at least associated with, the decay and subsequent reversal of both the toroidal bands and the polar fields. We briefly discuss the implications of these results within the context of solar observations, which also show some potential evidence for toroid...

  6. Dissipation in dynamos at low and high magnetic Prandtl numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, A

    2010-01-01

    Using simulations of helically driven turbulence, it is shown that the ratio of kinetic to magnetic energy dissipation scales with the magnetic Prandtl number in power law fashion with an exponent of approximately 0.6. Over six orders of magnitude in the magnetic Prandtl number the magnetic field is found to be sustained by large-scale dynamo action of alpha-squared type. This work extends a similar finding for small magnetic Prandtl numbers to the regime of large magnetic Prandtl numbers. At large magnetic Prandtl numbers, most of the energy is dissipated viscously, lowering thus the amount of magnetic energy dissipation, which means that simulations can be performed at magnetic Reynolds numbers that are large compared to the usual limits imposed by a given resolution. This is analogous to an earlier finding that at small magnetic Prandtl numbers, most of the energy is dissipated resistively, lowering the amount of kinetic energy dissipation, so simulations can then be performed at much larger fluid Reynolds...

  7. Dynamos at extreme magnetic Prandtl numbers: insights from shell models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Mahendra K.; Kumar, Rohit

    2016-12-01

    We present an MHD shell model suitable for computation of various energy fluxes of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence for very small and very large magnetic Prandtl numbers $\\mathrm{Pm}$; such computations are inaccessible to direct numerical simulations. For small $\\mathrm{Pm}$, we observe that both kinetic and magnetic energy spectra scale as $k^{-5/3}$ in the inertial range, but the dissipative magnetic energy scales as $k^{-11/3}\\exp(-k/k_\\eta)$. Here, the kinetic energy at large length scale feeds the large-scale magnetic field that cascades to small-scale magnetic field, which gets dissipated by Joule heating. The large-$\\mathrm{Pm}$ dynamo has a similar behaviour except that the dissipative kinetic energy scales as $k^{-13/3}$. For this case, the large-scale velocity field transfers energy to the large-scale magnetic field, which gets transferred to small-scale velocity and magnetic fields; the energy of the small-scale magnetic field also gets transferred to the small-scale velocity field, and the energy thus accumulated is dissipated by the viscous force.

  8. Convection-driven kinematic dynamos at low Rossby and magnetic Prandtl numbers: single mode solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Calkins, Michael A; Tobias, Steven M; Aurnou, Jonathan M; Marti, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The onset of dynamo action is investigated within the context of a newly developed low Rossby, low magnetic Prandtl number, convection-driven dynamo model. The model represents an asymptotically exact form of an $\\alpha^2$ mean field dynamo model in which the small-scale convection is represented explicitly by the finite amplitude, single mode convective solutions first investigated by Bassom and Zhang (Geophys.~Astrophys.~Fluid Dyn., \\textbf{76}, p.223, 1994). Both steady and oscillatory convection are considered for a variety of horizontal planforms. The kinematic helicity is observed to be a monotonically increasing function of the Rayleigh number; as a result, very small magnetic Prandtl number dynamos can be found for a sufficiently large Rayleigh number. All dynamos are found to be oscillatory with an oscillation frequency that increases as the strength of the convection is increased and the magnetic Prandtl number is reduced. Single mode solutions which exhibit boundary layer behavior in the kinematic ...

  9. Ricci dynamo stretch-shear plasma flows and magnetic energy bounds

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, Garcia

    2009-01-01

    Geometrical tools, used in Einstein's general relativity (GR), are applied to dynamo theory, in order to obtain fast dynamo action bounds to magnetic energy, from Killing symmetries in Ricci flows. Magnetic field is shown to be the shear flow tensor eigendirection, in the case of marginal dynamos. Killing symmetries of the Riemann metric, bounded by Einstein space, allows us to reduce the computations. Techniques used are similar to those strain decomposition of the flow in Sobolev space, recently used by Nu\\~nez [JMP \\textbf{43} (2002)] to place bounds in the magnetic energy in the case of hydromagnetic dynamos with plasma resistivity. Contrary to Nu\\~nez case, we assume that the dynamos are kinematic, and the velocity flow gradient is decomposed into expansion, shear and twist. The effective twist vanishes by considering that the frame vorticity coincides with Ricci rotation coefficients. Eigenvalues are here Lyapunov exponents. In analogy to GR, where curvature plays the role of gravity, here Ricci curvatu...

  10. Coupled fluid-flow and magnetic-field simulation of the Riga dynamo experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenjereš, S.; Hanjalić, K.; Renaudier, S.; Stefani, F.; Gerbeth, G.; Gailitis, A.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic fields of planets, stars, and galaxies result from self-excitation in moving electroconducting fluids, also known as the dynamo effect. This phenomenon was recently experimentally confirmed in the Riga dynamo experiment [ A. Gailitis et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 4365 (2000) ; A. Gailitis et

  11. Generation of Large-Scale Magnetic Fields by Small-Scale Dynamo in Shear Flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, J; Bhattacharjee, A

    2015-10-23

    We propose a new mechanism for a turbulent mean-field dynamo in which the magnetic fluctuations resulting from a small-scale dynamo drive the generation of large-scale magnetic fields. This is in stark contrast to the common idea that small-scale magnetic fields should be harmful to large-scale dynamo action. These dynamos occur in the presence of a large-scale velocity shear and do not require net helicity, resulting from off-diagonal components of the turbulent resistivity tensor as the magnetic analogue of the "shear-current" effect. Given the inevitable existence of nonhelical small-scale magnetic fields in turbulent plasmas, as well as the generic nature of velocity shear, the suggested mechanism may help explain the generation of large-scale magnetic fields across a wide range of astrophysical objects.

  12. COHERENT NONHELICAL SHEAR DYNAMOS DRIVEN BY MAGNETIC FLUCTUATIONS AT LOW REYNOLDS NUMBERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A., E-mail: jsquire@caltech.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Nonhelical shear dynamos are studied with a particular focus on the possibility of coherent dynamo action. The primary results—serving as a follow up to the results of Squire and Bhattacharjee—pertain to the “magnetic shear-current effect” as a viable mechanism to drive large-scale magnetic field generation. This effect raises the interesting possibility that the saturated state of the small-scale dynamo could drive large-scale dynamo action, and is likely to be important in the unstratified regions of accretion disk turbulence. In this paper, the effect is studied at low Reynolds numbers, removing the complications of small-scale dynamo excitation and aiding analysis by enabling the use of quasi-linear statistical simulation methods. In addition to the magnetically driven dynamo, new results on the kinematic nonhelical shear dynamo are presented. These illustrate the relationship between coherent and incoherent driving in such dynamos, demonstrating the importance of rotation in determining the relative dominance of each mechanism.

  13. Differential rotation of stretched and twisted thick magnetic flux tube dynamos in Riemannian spaces

    OpenAIRE

    de Andrade, Garcia

    2007-01-01

    The topological mapping between a torus of big radius and a sphere is applied to the Riemannian geometry of a stretched and twisted very thick magnetic flux tube, to obtain spherical dynamos solving the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) self-induction equation for the magnetic flux tubes undergoing differential (non-uniform) rotation along the tube magnetic axis. Constraints on the shear is also computed. It is shown that when the hypothesis of the convective cyclonic dynamo is used the rotation is ...

  14. Metathesis process for preparing an alpha, omega-functionalized olefin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdett, Kenneth A. (Midland, MI); Mokhtarzadeh, Morteza (Charleston, WV); Timmers, Francis J. (Midland, MI)

    2010-10-12

    A cross-metathesis process for preparing an .alpha.,.omega.-functionalized olefin, such as methyl 9-decenoate, and an .alpha.-olefin having three or more carbon atoms, such as 1-decene. The process involves contacting in a first reaction zone an .alpha.-functionalized internal olefin, such as methyl oleate, and an .alpha.-olefinic monomer having three or more carbon atoms, such as 1-decene, with a first metathesis catalyst to prepare an effluent stream containing the .alpha.,.omega.-functionalized olefin, such as methyl 9-decenoate, an unfunctionalized internal olefin, such as 9-octadecene, unconverted reactant olefins, and optionally, an .alpha.,.omega.-difunctionalized internal olefinic dimer, such as dimethyl 9-octadecen-1,18-dioate; separating said effluent streams; then contacting in a second reaction zone the unfunctionalized internal olefin with ethylene in the presence of a second metathesis catalyst to obtain a second product effluent containing the .alpha.-olefinic monomer having three or more carbon atoms; and cycling a portion of the .alpha.-olefinic monomer stream(s) to the first zone.

  15. IS THE SMALL-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELD CORRELATED WITH THE DYNAMO CYCLE?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Brandenburg, Axel, E-mail: bbkarak@nordita.org [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    The small-scale magnetic field is ubiquitous at the solar surface—even at high latitudes. From observations we know that this field is uncorrelated (or perhaps even weakly anticorrelated) with the global sunspot cycle. Our aim is to explore the origin, and particularly the cycle dependence, of such a phenomenon using three-dimensional dynamo simulations. We adopt a simple model of a turbulent dynamo in a shearing box driven by helically forced turbulence. Depending on the dynamo parameters, large-scale (global) and small-scale (local) dynamos can be excited independently in this model. Based on simulations in different parameter regimes, we find that, when only the large-scale dynamo is operating in the system, the small-scale magnetic field generated through shredding and tangling of the large-scale magnetic field is positively correlated with the global magnetic cycle. However, when both dynamos are operating, the small-scale field is produced from both the small-scale dynamo and the tangling of the large-scale field. In this situation, when the large-scale field is weaker than the equipartition value of the turbulence, the small-scale field is almost uncorrelated with the large-scale magnetic cycle. On the other hand, when the large-scale field is stronger than the equipartition value, we observe an anticorrelation between the small-scale field and the large-scale magnetic cycle. This anticorrelation can be interpreted as a suppression of the small-scale dynamo. Based on our studies we conclude that the observed small-scale magnetic field in the Sun is generated by the combined mechanisms of a small-scale dynamo and tangling of the large-scale field.

  16. A new simple dynamo model for stellar activity cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Yokoi, Nobumitsu; Pipin, Valery; Hamba, Fujihiro

    2016-01-01

    A new simple dynamo model for stellar activity cycle is proposed. By considering an inhomogeneous mean flow effect on turbulence, it is shown that turbulent cross helicity (velocity--magnetic-field correlation) should enter the expression of turbulent electromotive force as the coupling coefficient for the mean absolute vorticity. The inclusion of the cross-helicity effect makes the present model different from the current $\\alpha$--$\\Omega$-type models mainly in two points. First, in addition to the usual $\\alpha$ (helicity effect) and $\\beta$ (turbulent magnetic diffusivity), we consider the $\\gamma$ coefficient (cross-helicity effect). Second, unlike the $\\alpha$ and $\\beta$ coefficients, which are often treated as an adjustable parameter in the current studies, the spatiotemporal evolution of $\\gamma$ coefficient should be solved simultaneously with the mean magnetic-field equations. The basic scenario for the stellar activity cycle in the present model is as follows: In the presence of turbulent cross he...

  17. BIPOLAR MAGNETIC SPOTS FROM DYNAMOS IN STRATIFIED SPHERICAL SHELL TURBULENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabbari, Sarah; Brandenburg, Axel; Kleeorin, Nathan; Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Rogachevskii, Igor, E-mail: sarahjab@kth.se [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-06-01

    Recent work by Mitra et al. (2014) has shown that in strongly stratified forced two-layer turbulence with helicity and corresponding large-scale dynamo action in the lower layer, and nonhelical turbulence in the upper, a magnetic field occurs in the upper layer in the form of sharply bounded bipolar magnetic spots. Here we extend this model to spherical wedge geometry covering the northern hemisphere up to 75° latitude and an azimuthal extent of 180°. The kinetic helicity and therefore also the large-scale magnetic field are strongest at low latitudes. For moderately strong stratification, several bipolar spots form that eventually fill the full longitudinal extent. At early times, the polarity of spots reflects the orientation of the underlying azimuthal field, as expected from Parker’s Ω-shaped flux loops. At late times their tilt changes such that there is a radial field of opposite orientation at different latitudes separated by about 10°. Our model demonstrates the spontaneous formation of spots of sizes much larger than the pressure scale height. Their tendency to produce filling factors close to unity is argued to be reminiscent of highly active stars. We confirm that strong stratification and strong scale separation are essential ingredients behind magnetic spot formation, which appears to be associated with downflows at larger depths.

  18. Fast magnetic and electric dynamos in flat Klein bottle plasma flows

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, L C Garcia

    2009-01-01

    Recently Shukurov et al [Phys Rev \\textbf{E} (2008)] presented a numerical solution of a Moebius strip dynamo flow, to investigate its use in modelling dynamo flows in Perm torus of liquid sodium dynamo experiments. Here, by analogy one presents an electric dynamo on a twisted torus or Klein bottle topology. An exact solution in the form of flat Klein bottle dynamo flow is obtained. It is shown that even in the absence of magnetic dynamos initial electric fields can be amplified in distinct points of the Klein bottle. In this case diffusion is taken as ${\\eta}\\approx{5.0{\\times}10^{-3}{\\Omega}-m}$ the electric potential is obtained. The difference of electric fields at the beginning of plasma flow profile is ${\\Delta}E_{Dyn}\\approx{468\\frac{V}{m}}$, which is stronger than the electric dynamo field obtained in the magnetic axis of spheromaks, which is of the order of $E_{Dyn}\\approx{200\\frac{V}{m}}$. The potential of the dynamo at the surface of the Earth computed by Boozer [Phys Fluids \\textbf{B} (1993)] of $...

  19. Magnetic helicity in non-axisymmetric mean-field solar dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Pipin, V V

    2016-01-01

    The paper address the effects of magnetic helicity conservation in a non-linear nonaxisymmetric mean-field solar dynamo model. We study the evolution of the shallow non-axisymmetric magnetic field perturbation with the strength about 10G in the solar convection zone. The dynamo evolves from the pure axisymmetric stage through the short (about 2 years) transient phase when the non-axisymmetric m=1 dynamo mode is dominant to the final stage where the axisymmetry of the dynamo is almost restored. It is found that magnetic helicity is transferred forth and back over the spectral space during the transient phase. Also our simulations shows that the non-axisymmetric distributions of magnetic helicity tend to follows the regions of the Hale polarity rule.

  20. Magnetic dynamo action in random flows with zero and finite correlation times

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, Joanne; Boldyrev, Stanislav; Cattaneo, Fausto

    2011-01-01

    Hydromagnetic dynamo theory provides the prevailing theoretical description for the origin of magnetic fields in the universe. Here we consider the problem of kinematic, small-scale dynamo action driven by a random, incompressible, non-helical, homogeneous and isotropic flow. In the Kazantsev dynamo model the statistics of the driving flow are assumed to be instantaneously correlated in time. Here we compare the results of the model with the dynamo properties of a simulated flow that has equivalent spatial characteristics as the Kazantsev flow but different temporal statistics. In particular, the simulated flow is a solution of the forced Navier-Stokes equations and hence has a finite correlation time. We find that the Kazantsev model typically predicts a larger magnetic growth rate and a magnetic spectrum that peaks at smaller scales. However, we show that by filtering the diffusivity spectrum at small scales it is possible to bring the growth rates into agreement and simultaneously align the magnetic spectr...

  1. Generation of dynamo magnetic fields in protoplanetary and other astrophysical accretion disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Levy, E. H.

    1988-01-01

    A computational method for treating the generation of dynamo magnetic fields in astrophysical disks is presented. The numerical difficulty of handling the boundary condition at infinity in the cylindrical disk geometry is overcome by embedding the disk in a spherical computational space and matching the solutions to analytically tractable spherical functions in the surrounding space. The lowest lying dynamo normal modes for a 'thick' astrophysical disk are calculated. The generated modes found are all oscillatory and spatially localized. Tha potential implications of the results for the properties of dynamo magnetic fields in real astrophysical disks are discussed.

  2. Generation of dynamo magnetic fields in protoplanetary and other astrophysical accretion disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepinski, T.F.; Levy, E.H.

    1988-08-01

    A computational method for treating the generation of dynamo magnetic fields in astrophysical disks is presented. The numerical difficulty of handling the boundary condition at infinity in the cylindrical disk geometry is overcome by embedding the disk in a spherical computational space and matching the solutions to analytically tractable spherical functions in the surrounding space. The lowest lying dynamo normal modes for a thick astrophysical disk are calculated. The generated modes found are all oscillatory and spatially localized. Tha potential implications of the results for the properties of dynamo magnetic fields in real astrophysical disks are discussed. 30 references.

  3. A magnetic betelgeuse? Numerical simulations of non-linear dynamo action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorch, S. B. F.

    2004-01-01

    question regarding the nature of Betelgeuse and supergiants in general is whether these stars may be magnetically active. If so, that may in turn also contribute to their variability. By performing detailed numerical simulations, I find that both linear kinematic and non-linear dynamo action are possible...... and that the non-linear magnetic field saturates at a value somewhat below equipartition: in the linear regime there are two modes of dynamo action....

  4. Turbulent transport coefficients in spherical wedge dynamo simulations of solar-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Warnecke, Jörn; Käpylä, Petri J; Käpylä, Maarit J; Brandenburg, Axel

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the magnetic field generation in global solar-like convective dynamos in the framework of mean-field theory. We simulate a solar-type star in a wedge-shaped spherical shell, where the interplay between convection and rotation self-consistently drives large-scale dynamo. To analyze the dynamo mechanism we apply the test-field method for azimuthally ($\\phi$) averaged fields to determine the 27 turbulent transport coefficients of the electromotive force, of which 9 are related to the $\\alpha$ effect tensor. This method has previously been used either in simulations in Cartesian coordinates or in the geodynamo context and it is applied here for the first time in simulations of solar-like dynamo action. We find that the $\\phi\\phi$-component of the $\\alpha$ tensor does not follow the profile expected from that of kinetic helicity. Beside the dominant $\\alpha$-$\\Omega$ dynamo, also an $\\alpha^2$ dynamo is locally enhanced. The turbulent pumping velocities significantly alter the effective mean flows a...

  5. Reversals of the solar magnetic dipole in the light of observational data and simple dynamo models

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, D; Sokoloff, D D; Hoeksema, J T

    2013-01-01

    Observations show that the photospheric solar magnetic dipole usually does not vanish during the inversion of the solar magnetic field, which occurs in each solar cycle. In contrast, mean-field solar dynamo models predict that the dipole field does become zero. In a recent paper Moss et al. (2013) suggested that this contradiction can be explained as a large-scale manifestation of small-scale magnetic fluctuations. Our aim is to confront this interpretation with the available observational data. Here we compare this interpretation with WSO (Wilcox Solar Observatory) photospheric magnetic field data in order to determine the amplitude of magnetic fluctuations required to explain the phenomenon and to compare the results with predictions from a simple dynamo model which takes fluctuations into account. We demonstrate that the WSO data concerning the magnetic dipole inversions are very similar indeed to the predictions of our very simple solar dynamo model, which includes both mean magnetic field and fluctuation...

  6. Energy transfers and magnetic energy growth in small-scale dynamo

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Rohit Raj

    2013-12-01

    In this letter we investigate the dynamics of magnetic energy growth in small-scale dynamo by studying energy transfers, mainly energy fluxes and shell-to-shell energy transfers. We perform dynamo simulations for the magnetic Prandtl number Pm = 20 on 10243 grid using the pseudospectral method. We demonstrate that the magnetic energy growth is caused by nonlocal energy transfers from the large-scale or forcing-scale velocity field to small-scale magnetic field. The peak of these energy transfers moves towards lower wave numbers as dynamo evolves, which is the reason why the integral scale of the magnetic field increases with time. The energy transfers U2U (velocity to velocity) and B2B (magnetic to magnetic) are forward and local. Copyright © EPLA, 2013.

  7. Basal magnetic flux and the local solar dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Stenflo, J O

    2012-01-01

    The average unsigned magnetic flux density in magnetograms of the quiet Sun is generally dominated by instrumental noise. Due to the entirely different scaling behavior of the noise and the solar magnetic pattern it has been possible to determine the standard deviation of the Gaussian noise distribution and remove the noise contribution from the average unsigned flux density for the whole 15-yr SOHO/MDI data set and for a selection of SDO/HMI magnetograms. There is a very close correlation between the MDI disk-averaged unsigned vertical flux density and the sunspot number, and regression analysis gives a residual level of 2.7 G when the sunspot number is zero. The selected set of HMI magnetograms, which spans the most quiet phase of solar activity, has a lower limit of 3.0 G to the noise-corrected average flux density. These apparently cycle-independent levels may be identified as a basal flux density, which represents an upper limit to the possible flux contribution from a local dynamo, but not evidence for ...

  8. Evolution of protoplanetary disks with dynamo magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Ruiz, M.; Stepinski, Tomasz F.

    1994-01-01

    -consistent evolution of a turbulent PP disk including the effects of a dynamo-generated magnetic field.

  9. Generation of a dynamo magnetic field in a protoplanetary accretion disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, T.; Levy, E. H.

    1987-01-01

    A new computational technique is developed that allows realistic calculations of dynamo magnetic field generation in disk geometries corresponding to protoplanetary and protostellar accretion disks. The approach is of sufficient generality to allow, in the future, a wide class of accretion disk problems to be solved. Here, basic modes of a disk dynamo are calculated. Spatially localized oscillatory states are found to occur in Keplerain disks. A physical interpretation is given that argues that spatially localized fields of the type found in these calculations constitute the basic modes of a Keplerian disk dynamo.

  10. The small scale dynamo and the amplification of magnetic fields in massive primordial haloes

    CERN Document Server

    Latif, M A; Schmidt, W; Niemeyer, J

    2012-01-01

    While our present standard model of cosmology yields no clear prediction for the initial magnetic field strength, efficient dynamo action may compensate for initially weak seed fields via rapid amplification. In particular, the small-scale dynamo is expected to exponentially amplify any weak magnetic field in the presence of turbulence. We explore whether this scenario is viable using cosmological magneto-hydrodynamics simulations modeling the formation of the first galaxies, which are expected to form in so-called atomic cooling halos with virial temperatures $\\rm T_{vir} \\geq 10^{4}$ K. As previous calculations have shown that a high Jeans resolution is needed to resolve turbulent structures and dynamo effects, our calculations employ resolutions of up to 128 cells per Jeans length. The presence of the dynamo can be clearly confirmed for resolutions of at least 64 cells per Jeans length, while saturation occurs at approximate equipartition with turbulent energy. As a result of the large Reynolds numbers in ...

  11. Dynamo dominated accretion and energy flow: The mechanism of active galactic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgate, S.A.; Li, H.

    1998-12-31

    An explanation of the magnetic fields of the universe, the central mass concentration of galaxies, the massive black hole of every galaxy, and the AGN phenomena has been an elusive goal. The authors suggest here the outlines of such a theoretical understanding and point out where the physical understanding is missing. They believe there is an imperative to the sequence of mass flow and hence energy flow in the collapse of a galactic mass starting from the first non-linearity appearing in structure formation following decoupling. This first non-linearity of a two to one density fluctuation, the Lyman-{alpha} clouds, ultimately leads to the emission spectra of the phenomenon of AGN, quasars, blazars, etc. The over-arching physical principle is the various mechanisms for the transport of angular momentum. They believe they have now understood the new physics of two of these mechanisms that have previously been illusive and as a consequence they impose strong constraints on the initial conditions of the mechanisms for the subsequent emission of the gravitational binding energy. The new phenomena described are: (1) the Rossby vortex mechanism of the accretion disk {alpha}-viscosity, and (2) the mechanism of the {alpha}-{Omega} dynamo in the accretion disk. The Rossby vortex mechanism leads to a prediction of the black hole mass and rate of energy release and the {alpha}-{Omega} dynamo leads to the generation of the magnetic flux of the galaxy (and the far greater magnetic flux of clusters) and separately explains the primary flux of energy emission as force-free magnetic energy density. This magnetic flux and magnetic energy density separately are the necessary consequence of the saturation of a dynamo created by the accretion disk with a gain greater than unity.

  12. On magnetic instabilities and dynamo action in stellar radiation zones

    CERN Document Server

    Zahn, J -P; Mathis, S

    2007-01-01

    We examine the MHD instabilities arising in the radiation zone of a differentially rotating star, in which a poloidal field of fossil origin is sheared into a toroidal field. We focus on the non-axisymmetric instability that affects the toroidal magnetic field in a rotating star, which was first studied by Pitts and Tayler in the non-dissipative limit. According to Spruit, it could also drive a dynamo. The Pitts & Tayler instability is manifestly present in our simulations, with its conspicuous m=1 dependence in azimuth. But its analytic treatment used so far is too simplified to be applied to the real stellar situation. Although the instability generated field reaches an energy comparable to that of the mean poloidal field, that field seems unaffected by the instability: it undergoes Ohmic decline, and is neither eroded nor regenerated by the instability. The toroidal field is produced by shearing the poloidal field and it draws its energy from the differential rotation. The small scale motions behave as...

  13. The magnetic shear-current effect: generation of large-scale magnetic fields by the small-scale dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2016-04-01

    > A novel large-scale dynamo mechanism, the magnetic shear-current effect, is discussed and explored. The effect relies on the interaction of magnetic fluctuations with a mean shear flow, meaning the saturated state of the small-scale dynamo can drive a large-scale dynamo - in some sense the inverse of dynamo quenching. The dynamo is non-helical, with the mean field coefficient zero, and is caused by the interaction between an off-diagonal component of the turbulent resistivity and the stretching of the large-scale field by shear flow. Following up on previous numerical and analytic work, this paper presents further details of the numerical evidence for the effect, as well as an heuristic description of how magnetic fluctuations can interact with shear flow to produce the required electromotive force. The pressure response of the fluid is fundamental to this mechanism, which helps explain why the magnetic effect is stronger than its kinematic cousin, and the basic idea is related to the well-known lack of turbulent resistivity quenching by magnetic fluctuations. As well as being interesting for its applications to general high Reynolds number astrophysical turbulence, where strong small-scale magnetic fluctuations are expected to be prevalent, the magnetic shear-current effect is a likely candidate for large-scale dynamo in the unstratified regions of ionized accretion disks. Evidence for this is discussed, as well as future research directions and the challenges involved with understanding details of the effect in astrophysically relevant regimes.

  14. Bounds on the growth of the magnetic energy for the Hall kinematic dynamo equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez, Manuel [Departamento de Analisis Matematico Universidad de Valladolid 47005 Valladolid (Spain)

    2005-09-09

    While the magnetic induction equation in plasmas, governing kinematic dynamos, is a linear one admitting exponential growth of the magnetic energy for certain velocity fields, the addition of the Hall term turns it into a nonlinear parabolic equation. Local existence of solutions may be proved, but in contrast with the magnetohydrodynamics case, for a number of boundary conditions the magnetic energy grows at most linearly in time for stationary velocity fields, and like the square of the time in the general case. It appears that the Hall effect enhances diffusivity in some way to compensate for the positive contribution of the transport of the magnetic field by the flow occurring in fast dynamos.

  15. Memory Effects in Turbulent Dynamo Generation and Propagation of Large Scale Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Fedotov, S; Zubarev, A; Fedotov, Sergei; Ivanov, Alexey; Zubarev, Andrey

    2001-01-01

    We are concerned with large scale magnetic field dynamo generation and propagation of magnetic fronts in turbulent electrically conducting fluids. An effective equation for the large scale magnetic field is developed here that takes into account the finite correlation times of the turbulent flow. This equation involves the memory integrals corresponding to the dynamo source term describing the alpha-effect and turbulent transport of magnetic field. We find that the memory effects can drastically change the dynamo growth rate, in particular, non-local turbulent transport might increase the growth rate several times compared to the conventional gradient transport expression. Moreover, the integral turbulent transport term leads to a large decrease of the speed of magnetic front propagation.

  16. Convection-driven kinematic dynamos at low Rossby and magnetic Prandtl numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Calkins, Michael A; Nieves, David; Julien, Keith; Tobias, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Most large-scale planetary magnetic fields are thought to be driven by low Rossby number convection of a low magnetic Prandtl number fluid. Here kinematic dynamo action is investigated with an asymptotic, rapidly rotating dynamo model for the plane layer geometry that is intrinsically low magnetic Prandtl number. The thermal Prandtl number and Rayleigh number are varied to illustrate fundamental changes in flow regime, ranging from laminar cellular convection to geostrophic turbulence in which an inverse energy cascade is present. A decrease in the efficiency of the convection to generate a dynamo, as determined by an increase in the critical magnetic Reynolds number, is observed as the buoyancy forcing is increased. This decreased efficiency may result from both the loss of correlations associated with the increasingly disordered states of flow that are generated, and boundary layer behavior that enhances magnetic diffusion locally. We find that the spatial characteristics of $\\alpha$, and thus the large-sca...

  17. Latitudinal profile of the ionospheric disturbance dynamo magnetic signature: comparison with the DP2 magnetic disturbance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Z. Zaka

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available During magnetic storms, the auroral electrojets intensification affects the thermospheric circulation on a global scale. This process which leads to electric field and current disturbance at middle and low latitudes, on the quiet day after the end of a storm, has been attributed to the ionospheric disturbance dynamo (Ddyn. The magnetic field disturbance observed as a result of this process is the reduction of the H component amplitude in the equatorial region which constitutes the main characteristic of the ionospheric disturbance dynamo process, associated with a westward electric current flow. The latitudinal profile of the Ddyn disturbance dynamo magnetic signature exhibits an eastward current at mid latitudes and a westward one at low latitudes with a substantial amplification at the magnetic equator. Such current flow reveals an "anti-Sq" system established between the mid latitudes and the equatorial region and opposes the normal Sq current vortex. However, the localization of the eastward current and consequently the position and the extent of the "anti-Sq" current vortex changes from one storm to another. Indeed, for a strong magnetic storm, the eastward current is well established at mid latitudes about 45° N and for a weak magnetic storm, the eastward current is established toward the high latitudes (about 60° N, near the Joule heating region, resulting in a large "anti-Sq" current cell. The latitudinal profile of the Ddyn disturbance as well as the magnetic disturbance DP2 generated by the mechanism of prompt penetration of the magnetospheric convection electric field in general, show a weak disturbance at the low latitudes with a substantial amplification at the magnetic equator. Due to the intensity of the storm, the magnitude of the DP2 appears higher than the Ddyn over the American and Asian sector contrary to the African sector.

  18. Planetary Dynamos: Magnetic Constraints on the Interior Structure and Evolution of a Planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Bob Yunsheng

    Planetary magnetism is a phenomenon that not only protects humanity from the destructive forces of nature, but also provides us with a natural probe into our planet's deep interior. In this dissertation, I will explore some of the insights concerning planetary interiors that can be gained by combining the techniques of interior structure modelling with constraints provided by planetary dynamo theory. Applications to the dynamical history of the Moon, the interior evolution of Jovian planets, and predicted magnetic fields of planets in our solar system and beyond are considered under this framework. The inferred intensity and longevity of the lunar dynamo from paleomagnetic studies has led to the proposition of mechanical stirring, caused by differential rotation of the inner core and the mantle relative to the fluid outer core, as an energy source alternative to convection. Using fully three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) modelling techniques, I simulated the purported mechanism, and found it to reproduce not only the strength and longevity of the inferred lunar dynamo, but also its precipitous decline later in its history. For the Jovian planets, due to the lack of constraints, there are a wide range of acceptable interior models in the literature. By combining 1-D interior modelling techniques with constraints imposed by theories of the planet's dynamo, I was able to construct improved models of these planets' interior structure. The discrepancy between the pictures of the Neptunian interior suggested by dynamo models and by thermal evolution models motivated improvements on our current theories about multipolar magnetic field generation. Therefore, I determined some predictive scaling laws for the magnetic field morphologies of planets (and exoplanets) using parameter studies of interior structure and dynamo models. These results will aid in our understandings of the link between interior properties and observed magnetic field characteristics for planets

  19. Impact of impellers on the axisymmetric magnetic mode in the VKS2 dynamo experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguerre, R; Nore, C; Ribeiro, A; Léorat, J; Guermond, J-L; Plunian, F

    2008-09-05

    In the von Kármán Sodium 2 (VKS2) successful dynamo experiment of September 2006, the observed magnetic field showed a strong axisymmetric component, implying that nonaxisymmetric components of the flow field were acting. By modeling the induction effect of the spiraling flow between the blades of the impellers in a kinematic dynamo code, we find that the axisymmetric magnetic mode is excited. The control parameters are the magnetic Reynolds number of the mean flow, the coefficient measuring the induction effect alpha, and the type of boundary conditions. We show that using realistic values of alpha, the observed critical magnetic Reynolds number, Rm;{c} approximately 32, can be reached easily with ferromagnetic boundary conditions. We conjecture that the dynamo action achieved in this experiment may not be related to the turbulence in the bulk of the flow, but rather to the alpha effect induced by the impellers.

  20. Helical ${\\alpha}$-dynamos as twisted magnetic flux tubes in Riemannian space

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, Garcia

    2007-01-01

    Analytical solution of ${\\alpha}$-dynamo equation representing strongly torsioned helical dynamo is obtained in the thin twisted Riemannian flux tubes approximation. The $\\alpha$ factor possesses a fundamental contribution from torsion which is however weaken in the thin tubes approximation. It is shown that assuming that the poloidal component of the magnetic field is in principle time-independent, the toroidal magnetic field component grows very fast in time, actually it possesses a linear time dependence, while the poloidal component grows under the influence of torsion or twist of the flux tube. The toroidal component decays spatially with as $r^{-2}$ while vorticity may decay as $r^{-5}$ (poloidal component) where r represents the radial distance from the magnetic axis of flux tube. Toroidal component of vorticity decays as $r^{-1}$. In turbulent dynamos unbounded magnetic fields may decay at least as $r^{-3}$.

  1. Periodic magnetorotational dynamo action as a prototype of nonlinear magnetic-field generation in shear flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herault, J; Rincon, F; Cossu, C; Lesur, G; Ogilvie, G I; Longaretti, P-Y

    2011-09-01

    The nature of dynamo action in shear flows prone to magnetohydrodynamc instabilities is investigated using the magnetorotational dynamo in Keplerian shear flow as a prototype problem. Using direct numerical simulations and Newton's method, we compute an exact time-periodic magnetorotational dynamo solution to three-dimensional dissipative incompressible magnetohydrodynamic equations with rotation and shear. We discuss the physical mechanism behind the cycle and show that it results from a combination of linear and nonlinear interactions between a large-scale axisymmetric toroidal magnetic field and nonaxisymmetric perturbations amplified by the magnetorotational instability. We demonstrate that this large-scale dynamo mechanism is overall intrinsically nonlinear and not reducible to the standard mean-field dynamo formalism. Our results therefore provide clear evidence for a generic nonlinear generation mechanism of time-dependent coherent large-scale magnetic fields in shear flows and call for new theoretical dynamo models. These findings may offer important clues to understanding the transitional and statistical properties of subcritical magnetorotational turbulence.

  2. Superbubbles, Galactic Dynamos and the Spike Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Kulsrud, Russell M

    2015-01-01

    We draw attention to a problem with the alpha-Omega dynamo when it is applied to the origin of the galactic magnetic field under the assumption of perfect flux freezing. The standard theory involves the expulsion of undesirable flux and, because of flux freezing, the mass anchored on this flux also must be expelled. The strong galactic gravitational field makes this impossible on energetic grounds. It is shown that if only short pieces of the undesirable field lines are expelled, then mass can flow down along these field lines without requiring much energy. This expulsion of only short lines of force can be accomplished by a spike instability associated with gigantic astrophysical superbubbles. The physics of this instability is discussed and the results enable an estimate to be made of the number of spikes in the galaxy. It appears that there are probably enough spikes to cut all the undesirable lines into pieces as short as a couple of kiloparsecs during a dynamo time of a billion years. These cut pieces th...

  3. Generating buoyant magnetic flux ropes in solar-like convective dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    Our Sun exhibits strong convective dynamo action which results in magnetic flux bundles emerging through the stellar surface as magnetic spots. Global-scale dynamo action is believed to generate large-scale magnetic structures in the deep solar interior through the interplay of convection, rotation, and shear. Portions of these large-scale magnetic structures are then believed to rise through the convective layer, forming magnetic loops which then pierce the photosphere as sunspot pairs. Previous global simulations of 3D MHD convection in rotating spherical shells have demonstrated mechanisms whereby large-scale magnetic wreaths can be generated in the bulk of the convection zone. Our recent simulations have achieved sufficiently high levels of turbulence to permit portions of these wreaths to become magnetically buoyant and rise through the simulated convective layer through a combination of magnetic buoyancy and advection by convective giant cells. These buoyant magnetic loops are created in the bulk of the...

  4. Magnetic and Kinetic Power Spectra as a Tool to Probe the Turbulent Dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Abramenko, V I; Goode, P R

    2011-01-01

    Generation and diffusion of the magnetic field on the Sun is a key mechanism responsible for solar activity on all spatial and temporal scales - from the solar cycle down to the evolution of small-scale magnetic elements in the quiet Sun. The solar dynamo operates as a non-linear dynamical process and is thought to be manifest in two types: as a global dynamo responsible for the solar cycle periodicity, and as a small-scale turbulent dynamo responsible for the formation of magnetic carpet in the quiet Sun. Numerous MHD simulations of the solar turbulence did not yet reach a consensus as to the existence of a turbulent dynamo on the Sun. At the same time, high-resolution observations of the quiet Sun from Hinode instruments suggest possibilities for the turbulent dynamo. Analysis of characteristics of turbulence derived from observations would be beneficial in tackling the problem. We analyse magnetic and velocity energy spectra as derived from Hinode/SOT, SOHO/MDI, SDO/HMI and the New Solar Telescope (NST) of...

  5. Spontaneous Formation of Surface Magnetic Structure from Large-scale Dynamo in Strongly-stratified Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Masada, Youhei

    2016-01-01

    We report the first successful simulation of spontaneous formation of surface magnetic structures from a large-scale dynamo by strongly-stratified thermal convection in Cartesian geometry. The large-scale dynamo observed in our strongly-stratified model has physical properties similar to those in earlier weakly-stratified convective dynamo simulations, indicating that the $\\alpha^2$-type mechanism is responsible for it. Additionally to the large-scale dynamo, we find that large-scale structures of the vertical magnetic field are spontaneously formed in the convection zone surface only for the case of strongly-stratified atmosphere. The organization of the vertical magnetic field proceeds in the upper convection zone within tens of convective turn-over time and band-like bipolar structures are recurrently-appeared in the dynamo-saturated stage. We examine possibilities of several candidates as the origin of the surface magnetic structure formation, and then suggest the existence of an as-yet-unknown mechanism ...

  6. Magnetic fields in the first galaxies: Dynamo amplification and limits from reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Schleicher, Dominik R G; Federrath, Christoph; Miniati, Francesco; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the amplification of magnetic fields by the small-scale dynamo, a process that could efficiently produce strong magnetic fields in the first galaxies. In addition, we derive constraints on the primordial field strength from the epoch of reionization.

  7. Mechanism of Cyclically Polarity Reversing Solar Magnetic Cycle as a Cosmic Dynamo

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hirokazu Yoshimura

    2000-09-01

    We briefly describe historical development of the concept of solar dynamo mechanism that generates electric current and magnetic field by plasma flows inside the solar convection zone. The dynamo is the driver of the cyclically polarity reversing solar magnetic cycle. The reversal process can easily and visually be understood in terms of magnetic field line stretching and twisting and folding in three-dimensional space by plasma flows of differential rotation and global convection under influence of Coriolis force. This process gives rise to formation of a series of huge magnetic flux tubes that propagate along iso-rotation surfaces inside the convection zone. Each of these flux tubes produces one solar cycle. We discuss general characteristics of any plasma flows that can generate magnetic field and reverse the polarity of the magnetic field in a rotating body in the Universe. We also mention a list of problems which are currently being disputed concerning the solar dynamo mechanism together with observational evidences that are to be constraints as well as verifications of any solar cycle dynamo theories of short and long term behaviors of the Sun, particularly time variations of its magnetic field, plasma flows, and luminosity.

  8. Convection-driven kinematic dynamos at low Rossby and magnetic Prandtl numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, Michael A.; Long, Louie; Nieves, David; Julien, Keith; Tobias, Steven M.

    2016-12-01

    Most large-scale planetary magnetic fields are thought to be driven by low Rossby number convection of a low magnetic Prandtl number fluid. Here kinematic dynamo action is investigated with an asymptotic, rapidly rotating dynamo model for the plane layer geometry that is intrinsically low magnetic Prandtl number. The thermal Prandtl number and Rayleigh number are varied to illustrate fundamental changes in flow regime, ranging from laminar cellular convection to geostrophic turbulence in which an inverse energy cascade is present. A decrease in the efficiency of the convection to generate a dynamo, as determined by an increase in the critical magnetic Reynolds number, is observed as the buoyancy forcing is increased. This decreased efficiency may result from both the loss of correlations associated with the increasingly disordered states of flow that are generated, and boundary layer behavior that enhances magnetic diffusion locally. We find that the spatial characteristics of the large-scale magnetic field is dependent only weakly on changes in flow behavior. In contrast, the behavior of the small-scale magnetic field is directly dependent on, and therefore shows significant variations with, the small-scale convective flow field. However, our results are limited to the linear, kinematic dynamo regime; future simulations that include the Lorentz force are therefore necessary to assess the robustness of these results.

  9. Dynamo generated magnetic configurations in accretion discs and the nature of quasi-periodic oscillations in accreting binary systems

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, David; Suleimanov, Valery

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields are important for accretion disc structure. Magnetic fields in a disc system may be transported with the accreted matter. They can be associated with either the central body and/or jet, and be fossil or dynamo excited in situ. We consider dynamo excitation of magnetic fields in accretion discs of accreting binary systems in an attempt to clarify possible configurations of dynamo generated magnetic fields. We first model the entire disc with realistic radial extent and thickness using an alpha-quenching non-linearity. We then study the simultaneous effect of feedback from the Lorentz force from the dynamo-generated field. We perform numerical simulations in the framework of a relatively simple mean-field model which allows the generation of global magnetic configurations. We explore a range of possibilities for the dynamo number, and find quadrupolar-type solutions with irregular temporal oscillations that might be compared to observed rapid luminosity fluctuations. The dipolar symmetry models ...

  10. Constraining Fully Convective Magnetic Dynamos using Brown Dwarf Auroral Radio Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Melodie; Hallinan, Gregg; Pineda, J. Sebastian; Escala, Ivanna; Burgasser, Adam; Bourke, Stephen; Stevenson, David

    2017-05-01

    An important outstanding problem in dynamo theory is understanding how magnetic fields are generated and sustained in fully convective objects, spanning stars through planets. For fully convective dynamo models to accurately predict exoplanet magnetic fields, pushing measurements to include the coolest T and Y dwarfs at the substellar-planetary boundary is critical. A number of models for possible dynamo mechanisms in this regime have been proposed but constraining data on magnetic field strengths and topologies across a wide range of mass, age, rotation rate, and temperature are sorely lacking, particularly in the brown dwarf regime.Detections of highly circularly polarized pulsed radio emission provide our only window into magnetic field measurements for objects in the ultracool brown dwarf regime. However, these detections are very rare; previous radio surveys encompassing ∼60 L6 or later targets have yielded only one detection. We have developed a selection strategy for biasing survey targets by leveraging the emergence of magnetic activity that is driven by planet-like auroral processes in the coolest brown dwarfs. Using our selection strategy, we previously observed six late L and T dwarfs with the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) at 4-8 GHz and detected the presence of highly circularly polarized radio emission for five targets. Our initial detections provided the most robust constraints on dynamo theory in this regime, confirming magnetic fields >2.5 kG. To further probe the mechanisms driving fully convective dynamos at the substellar-planetary boundary, we present magnetic field constraints for two Y-dwarfs and 8-12 GHz radio observations of late L and T dwarfs corresponding to >3.6 kG surface fields. We additionally present initial results for a comprehensive L and T dwarf survey spanning a wide range of rotation periods to test rotation-dominated dynamo models. Finally, we present a method for comparing magnetic field measurements derived from

  11. Magnetic field variation caused by rotational speed change in a magnetohydrodynamic dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagoshi, Takehiro; Hamano, Yozo

    2013-09-20

    We have performed numerical magnetohydrodynamic dynamo simulations in a spherical shell with rotational speed or length-of-day (LOD) variation, which is motivated by correlations between geomagnetic field and climatic variations with ice and non-ice ages. The results show that LOD variation leads to magnetic field variation whose amplitude is considerably larger than that of LOD variation. The heat flux at the outer sphere and the zonal flow also change. The mechanism of the magnetic field variation due to LOD variation is also found. The keys are changes of dynamo activity and Joule heating.

  12. Dynamo action and magnetic buoyancy in convection simulations with vertical shear

    CERN Document Server

    Guerrero, G

    2011-01-01

    A hypothesis for sunspot formation is the buoyant emergence of magnetic flux tubes created by the strong radial shear at the tachocline. In this scenario, the magnetic field has to exceed a threshold value before it becomes buoyant and emerges through the whole convection zone. We follow the evolution of a random seed magnetic field with the aim of study under what conditions it is possible to excite the dynamo instability and whether the dynamo generated magnetic field becomes buoyantly unstable and emerges to the surface as expected in the flux-tube context. We perform numerical simulations of compressible turbulent convection that include a vertical shear layer. Like the solar tachocline, the shear is located at the interface between convective and stable layers. We find that shear and convection are able to amplify the initial magnetic field and form large-scale elongated magnetic structures. The magnetic field strength depends on several parameters such as the shear amplitude, the thickness and location ...

  13. Energy transfers and magnetic energy growth in small-scale dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Rohit; Samtaney, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    In this letter we investigate the dynamics of magnetic energy growth in small-scale dynamo by studying energy transfers, mainly energy fluxes and shell-to-shell energy transfers. We perform dynamo simulation for magnetic Prandtl number $\\mathrm{Pm}=20$ on $1024^3$ grid using pseudospectral method. We demonstrate using flux and shell-to-shell energy transfer computations that the magnetic energy growth is caused by nonlocal energy transfers from the large scale velocity field to small scale magnetic field. The energy transfers $U2U$ (velocity to velocity) and $B2B$ (magnetic to magnetic) are forward and local. We also show that the magnetic energy grows exponentially with time, and it tends to have equipartition with kinetic energy.

  14. Magnetic field amplification during gravitational collapse - Influence of initial conditions on dynamo evolution and saturation

    CERN Document Server

    Sur, Sharanya; Schleicher, Dominik R G; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S

    2012-01-01

    We study the influence of initial conditions on the magnetic field amplification during the collapse of a magnetised gas cloud. We focus on the dependence of the growth and saturation level of the dynamo generated field on the turbulent properties of the collapsing cloud. In particular, we explore the effect of varying the initial strength and injection scale of turbulence and the initial uniform rotation of the collapsing magnetised cloud. In order to follow the evolution of the magnetic field in both the kinematic and the nonlinear regime, we choose an initial field strength of $\\simeq 1\\,\\mkG$ with the magnetic to kinetic energy ratio, $E_{\\rm m}/E_{\\rm k} \\sim 10^{-4}$. Both gravitational compression and the small-scale dynamo initially amplify the magnetic field. Further into the evolution, the dynamo-generated magnetic field saturates but the total magnetic field continues to grow because of compression. The saturation of the small-scale dynamo is marked by a change in the slope of $B/\\rho^{2/3}$ and by...

  15. Ribbons characterize magnetohydrodynamic magnetic fields better than lines: a lesson from dynamo theory

    CERN Document Server

    Blackman, Eric G

    2014-01-01

    Blackman & Brandenburg argued that magnetic helicity conservation in dynamo theory can in principle be captured by diagrams of mean field dynamos when the magnetic fields are represented by ribbons or tubes, but not by lines. Here we present such a schematic ribbon diagram for the $\\alpha^2$ dynamo that tracks magnetic helicity and provides distinct scales of large scale magnetic helicity, small scale magnetic helicity, and kinetic helicity involved in the process. This also motivates our construction of a new ``2.5 scale'' minimalist generalization of the helicity-evolving equations for the \\alpha^2 dynamo that separately allows for these three distinct length scales while keeping only two dynamical equations. We solve these equations and, as in previous studies, find that the large scale field first grows at a rate independent of the magnetic Reynolds number R_M before quenching to an R_M dependent regime. But we also show that the larger the ratio of the wavenumber where the small scale current helicit...

  16. Numerical modeling of laser-driven experiments aiming to demonstrate magnetic field amplification via turbulent dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeferacos, P.; Rigby, A.; Bott, A.; Bell, A. R.; Bingham, R.; Casner, A.; Cattaneo, F.; Churazov, E. M.; Emig, J.; Flocke, N.; Fiuza, F.; Forest, C. B.; Foster, J.; Graziani, C.; Katz, J.; Koenig, M.; Li, C.-K.; Meinecke, J.; Petrasso, R.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.; Ross, J. S.; Ryu, D.; Ryutov, D.; Weide, K.; White, T. G.; Reville, B.; Miniati, F.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Froula, D. H.; Gregori, G.; Lamb, D. Q.

    2017-04-01

    The universe is permeated by magnetic fields, with strengths ranging from a femtogauss in the voids between the filaments of galaxy clusters to several teragauss in black holes and neutron stars. The standard model behind cosmological magnetic fields is the nonlinear amplification of seed fields via turbulent dynamo to the values observed. We have conceived experiments that aim to demonstrate and study the turbulent dynamo mechanism in the laboratory. Here, we describe the design of these experiments through simulation campaigns using FLASH, a highly capable radiation magnetohydrodynamics code that we have developed, and large-scale three-dimensional simulations on the Mira supercomputer at the Argonne National Laboratory. The simulation results indicate that the experimental platform may be capable of reaching a turbulent plasma state and determining the dynamo amplification. We validate and compare our numerical results with a small subset of experimental data using synthetic diagnostics.

  17. Numerical modeling of laser-driven experiments aiming to demonstrate magnetic field amplification via turbulent dynamo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzeferacos, P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU, United Kingdom; Rigby, A. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU, United Kingdom; Bott, A. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU, United Kingdom; Bell, A. R. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU, United Kingdom; Bingham, R. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX, United Kingdom; Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG, United Kingdom; Casner, A. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon, France; Cattaneo, F. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Churazov, E. M. [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, D-85741 Garching, Germany; Space Research Institute (IKI), Moscow 117997, Russia; Emig, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Flocke, N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Fiuza, F. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Forest, C. B. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA; Foster, J. [AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, West Berkshire, RG7 4PR, United Kingdom; Graziani, C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Katz, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623, USA; Koenig, M. [Laboratoire pour l' Utilisation de Lasers Intenses, UMR7605, CNRS CEA, Université Paris VI Ecole Polytechnique, France; Li, C. -K. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Meinecke, J. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU, United Kingdom; Petrasso, R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Park, H. -S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Remington, B. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Ross, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Ryu, D. [Department of Physics, UNIST, Ulsan 689-798, South Korea; Ryutov, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Weide, K. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; White, T. G. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU, United Kingdom; Reville, B. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, United Kingdom; Miniati, F. [Department of Physics, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich, Switzerland; Schekochihin, A. A. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU, United Kingdom; Froula, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623, USA; Gregori, G. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU, United Kingdom; Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Lamb, D. Q. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA

    2017-03-22

    The universe is permeated by magnetic fields, with strengths ranging from a femtogauss in the voids between the filaments of galaxy clusters to several teragauss in black holes and neutron stars. The standard model behind cosmological magnetic fields is the nonlinear amplification of seed fields via turbulent dynamo to the values observed. We have conceived experiments that aim to demonstrate and study the turbulent dynamo mechanism in the laboratory. Here, we describe the design of these experiments through simulation campaigns using FLASH, a highly capable radiation magnetohydrodynamics code that we have developed, and large-scale three-dimensional simulations on the Mira supercomputer at the Argonne National Laboratory. The simulation results indicate that the experimental platform may be capable of reaching a turbulent plasma state and determining the dynamo amplification. We validate and compare our numerical results with a small subset of experimental data using synthetic diagnostics.

  18. Evidence from numerical experiments for a feedback dynamo generating Mercury's magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyner, Daniel; Wicht, Johannes; Gómez-Pérez, Natalia; Schmitt, Dieter; Auster, Hans-Ulrich; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz

    2011-12-23

    The observed weakness of Mercury's magnetic field poses a long-standing puzzle to dynamo theory. Using numerical dynamo simulations, we show that it could be explained by a negative feedback between the magnetospheric and the internal magnetic fields. Without feedback, a small internal field was amplified by the dynamo process up to Earth-like values. With feedback, the field strength saturated at a much lower level, compatible with the observations at Mercury. The classical saturation mechanism via the Lorentz force was replaced by the external field impact. The resulting surface field was dominated by uneven harmonic components. This will allow the feedback model to be distinguished from other models once a more accurate field model is constructed from MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) and BepiColombo data.

  19. An analytical dynamo solution for large-scale magnetic fields of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Chamandy, Luke

    2016-01-01

    We present an effectively global analytical asymptotic galactic dynamo solution for the regular magnetic field of an axisymmetric thin disc in the saturated state. This solution is constructed by combining two well-known types of local galactic dynamo solution, parameterized by the disc radius. Namely, the critical (zero growth) solution obtained by treating the dynamo equation as a perturbed diffusion equation is normalized using a non-linear solution that makes use of the `no-$z$' approximation and the dynamical $\\alpha$-quenching non-linearity. This overall solution is found to be reasonably accurate when compared with detailed numerical solutions. It is thus potentially useful as a tool for predicting observational signatures of magnetic fields of galaxies. In particular, such solutions could be painted onto galaxies in cosmological simulations to enable the construction of synthetic polarized synchrotron and Faraday rotation measure (RM) datasets. Further, we explore the properties of our numerical solut...

  20. Large-scale dynamo action driven by velocity shear and rotating convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, David W; Proctor, Michael R E

    2009-01-30

    By incorporating a large-scale shear flow into turbulent rotating convection, we show that a sufficiently strong shear can promote dynamo action in flows that are otherwise nondynamos. Our results are consistent with a dynamo driven either by the shear-current effect or by a fluctuating alpha effect interacting with the shear, but not with either a classical alpha(2) or alpha omega dynamo.

  1. The magnetic shear-current effect: generation of large-scale magnetic fields by the small-scale dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Squire, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    A novel large-scale dynamo mechanism, the magnetic shear-current effect, is discussed and explored. The effect relies on the interaction of magnetic fluctuations with a mean shear flow, meaning the saturated state of the small-scale dynamo can drive a large-scale dynamo -- in some sense the inverse of dynamo quenching. The dynamo is nonhelical, with the mean-field $\\alpha$ coefficient zero, and is caused by the interaction between an off-diagonal component of the turbulent resistivity and the stretching of the large-scale field by shear flow. Following up on previous numerical and analytic work, this paper presents further details of the numerical evidence for the effect, as well as an heuristic description of how magnetic fluctuations can interact with shear flow to produce the required electromotive force. The pressure response of the fluid is fundamental to this mechanism, which helps explain why the magnetic effect is stronger than its kinematic cousin, and the basic idea is related to the well-known lack...

  2. Detection of a flow induced magnetic field eigenmode in the Riga dynamo facility

    CERN Document Server

    Gailitis, A; Dementev, S; Platacis, E; Cifersons, A; Gerbeth, G; Gundrum, T; Stefani, F; Christen, M; Hänel, H; Will, G; Gailitis, Agris; Lielausis, Olgerts; Dement'ev, Sergej; Platacis, Ernests; Cifersons, Arnis; Gerbeth, Gunter; Gundrum, Thomas; Stefani, Frank; Christen, Michael; Hänel, Heiko; Will, Gotthard

    2000-01-01

    In an experiment at the Riga sodium dynamo facility, a slowly growing magnetic field eigenmode has been detected over a period of about 15 seconds. For a slightly decreased propeller rotation rate, additional measurements showed a slow decay of this mode. The measured results correspond satisfactory with numerical predictions for the growth rates and frequencies.

  3. Stringent magnetic field limits from early universe dynamos cosmology with torsion

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, Luiz Carlos Garcia

    2013-01-01

    Earlier Bamba et al [JCAP (2012)] have obtained cosmological magnetic fields in teleparallel torsion theories of gravity that are not compatible with galactic dynamos. This result agrees with previous ones obtained by the author which shows [Phys Lett B (2012)] that anti-dynamo generalised theorem to torsion theories forbides such kind of dynamos to explain galactic magnetic fields of the order of ${\\mu}$G. More recently the author has suggested [IJAA (2012)] that a sort of Biermann battery could be obtained in torsioned cosmology. Nevertheless in this paper we show that this can be a particular result, since the second author did not took into account mean field dynamo equations in torsion field background. Actually it is shown that amplification or not of the magnetic field depends upon handness sign of the torsion field vector. It is shown that density fluctuations of spin-torsion density implies also a possibility of amplification of the cosmic magnetic fields. From WMAP data it is possible to estimate th...

  4. Magnetic cycles in a dynamo simulation of fully convective M-star Proxima Centauri

    CERN Document Server

    Yadav, Rakesh K; Wolk, Scott J; Poppenhaeger, Katja

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of an Earth-like exoplanet around Proxima Centauri has shined a spot light on slowly rotating fully convective M-stars. When such stars rotate rapidly (period $\\lesssim 20$ days), they are known to generate very high levels of activity that is powered by a magnetic field much stronger than the solar magnetic field. Recent theoretical efforts are beginning to understand the dynamo process that generates such strong magnetic fields. However, the observational and theoretical landscape remains relatively uncharted for fully convective M-stars that rotate slowly. Here we present an anelastic dynamo simulation for Proxima Centauri, a representative case for slowly rotating fully connective M-stars. The rotating convection spontaneously generates strong differential rotation in the convection zone which drives coherent magnetic cycles where the axisymmetric magnetic field repeatedly changes polarity at all latitudes as time progress. The typical length of the `activity' cycle in the simulation ...

  5. Dynamo magnetic field-induced angular momentum transport in protostellar nebulae - The 'minimum mass' protosolar nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Levy, E. H.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic torques can produce angular momentum redistribution in protostellar nebulas. Dynamo magnetic fields can be generated in differentially rotating and turbulent nebulas and can be the source of magnetic torques that transfer angular momentum from a protostar to a disk, as well as redistribute angular momentum within a disk. A magnetic field strength of 100-1000 G is needed to transport the major part of a protostar's angular momentum into a surrounding disk in a time characteristic of star formation, thus allowing formation of a solar-system size protoplanetary nebula in the usual 'minimum-mass' model of the protosolar nebula. This paper examines the possibility that a dynamo magnetic field could have induced the needed angular momentum transport from the proto-Sun to the protoplanetary nebula.

  6. Dynamo magnetic field-induced angular momentum transport in protostellar nebulae - The minimum mass protosolar nebula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepinski, T.F.; Levy, E.H. (Arizona Univ., Tucson (USA))

    1990-02-01

    Magnetic torques can produce angular momentum redistribution in protostellar nebulas. Dynamo magnetic fields can be generated in differentially rotating and turbulent nebulas and can be the source of magnetic torques that transfer angular momentum from a protostar to a disk, as well as redistribute angular momentum within a disk. A magnetic field strength of 100-1000 G is needed to transport the major part of a protostar's angular momentum into a surrounding disk in a time characteristic of star formation, thus allowing formation of a solar-system size protoplanetary nebula in the usual minimum-mass model of the protosolar nebula. This paper examines the possibility that a dynamo magnetic field could have induced the needed angular momentum transport from the proto-Sun to the protoplanetary nebula. 32 refs.

  7. Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection and Dynamo Processes in a Spatially Rotating Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Gwangson; Lee, Junggi

    2016-04-01

    Spatially rotating magnetic fields have been observed in the solar wind and in the Earth's magnetopause as well as in reversed field pinch (RFP) devices. Such field configurations have a similarity with extended current layers having a spatially varying plasma pressure instead of the spatially varying guide field. It is thus expected that magnetic reconnection may take place in a rotating magnetic field no less than in an extended current layer. We have investigated the spontaneous evolution of a collisionless plasma system embedding a rotating magnetic field with a two-and-a-half-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. It is found that a magnetic-flux-reducing diffusion phase and a magnetic-flux-increasing dynamo phase are alternating with a certain period. The temperature of the system also varies with the same period, showing a similarity to sawtooth oscillations in tokamaks. We have shown that a modified theory of sawtooth oscillations can explain the periodic behavior observed in the simulation. A strong guide field distorts the current layer as was observed in laboratory experiments. This distortion is smoothed out as magnetic islands fade away by the O-line diffusion, but is soon strengthened by the growth of magnetic islands. These processes are all repeating with a fixed period. Our results suggest that a rotating magnetic field configuration continuously undergoes deformation and relaxation in a short time-scale although it might look rather steady in a long-term view.

  8. Simulations of core convection in rotating A-type stars: Magnetic dynamo action

    CERN Document Server

    Brun, A S; Toomre, J; Brun, Allan Sacha; Browning, Matthew K.; Toomre, Juri

    2005-01-01

    Core convection and dynamo activity deep within rotating A-type stars of 2 solar masses are studied with 3--D nonlinear simulations. Our modeling considers the inner 30% by radius of such stars, thus capturing within a spherical domain the convective core and a modest portion of the surrounding radiative envelope. The MHD equations are solved using the ASH code to examine turbulent flows and magnetic fields, both of which exhibit intricate time dependence. By introducing small seed magnetic fields into our progenitor hydrodynamic models rotating at one and four times the solar rate, we assess here how the vigorous convection can amplify those fields and sustain them against ohmic decay. Dynamo action is indeed realized, ultimately yielding magnetic fields that are in energy equipartion with the flow. Such magnetism reduces the differential rotation obtained in the progenitors, partly by Maxwell stresses that transport angular momentum poleward and oppose the Reynolds stresses in the latitudinal balance. In co...

  9. Mean-field dynamos: the old concept and some recent developments

    CERN Document Server

    Rädler, K -H

    2014-01-01

    This article reproduces the Karl Schwarzschild lecture 2013. Some of the basic ideas of electrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics of mean fields in turbulently moving conducting fluids are explained. It is stressed that the connection of the mean electromotive force with the mean magnetic field and its first spatial derivatives is in general neither local nor instantaneous and that quite a few claims concerning pretended failures of the mean-field concept result from ignoring this aspect. In addition to the mean-field dynamo mechanisms of $\\alpha^2$ and $\\alpha$ $\\Omega$ type several others are considered. Much progress in mean-field electrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics results from the test-field method for calculating the coefficients that determine the connection of the mean electromotive force with the mean magnetic field. As an important example the memory effect in homogeneous isotropic turbulence is explained. In magnetohydrodynamic turbulence there is the possibility of a mean electromotive force t...

  10. Chinks in Solar Dynamo Theory: Turbulent Diffusion, Dynamo Waves and Magnetic Helicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLuca, E. E.; Wagner, William J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the generation of magnetic fields in the Sun using two-dimensional and three-dimensional numerical simulations. The results of our investigations have been presented at scientific meetings and published.

  11. An analytical dynamo solution for large-scale magnetic fields of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamandy, Luke

    2016-11-01

    We present an effectively global analytical asymptotic galactic dynamo solution for the regular magnetic field of an axisymmetric thin disc in the saturated state. This solution is constructed by combining two well-known types of local galactic dynamo solution, parametrized by the disc radius. Namely, the critical (zero growth) solution obtained by treating the dynamo equation as a perturbed diffusion equation is normalized using a non-linear solution that makes use of the `no-z' approximation and the dynamical α-quenching non-linearity. This overall solution is found to be reasonably accurate when compared with detailed numerical solutions. It is thus potentially useful as a tool for predicting observational signatures of magnetic fields of galaxies. In particular, such solutions could be painted on to galaxies in cosmological simulations to enable the construction of synthetic polarized synchrotron and Faraday rotation measure data sets. Further, we explore the properties of our numerical solutions, and their dependence on certain parameter values. We illustrate and assess the degree to which numerical solutions based on various levels of approximation, common in the dynamo literature, agree with one another.

  12. Cosmological magnetic fields as string dynamo seeds and axion fields in torsioned spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Andrade, L.C. Garcia, E-mail: garcia@dft.if.uerj.br [Departamento de Física Teórica — IF — Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro-UERJ, Rua São Francisco Xavier, 524, Maracanã, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Cep 20550-003 (Brazil)

    2014-08-01

    In this paper two examples of the generation cosmological magnetic fields (CMF) are given. The first is the string dynamo seed cosmological magnetic field estimated as B{sub seed}∼10{sup -24} Gauss from a static spin polarised cylinder in Einstein-Cartan-Maxwell spacetime. The string dynamo seeds from a static spin polarised cylinder is given by B∼σ{sup 2}R{sup 2} where σ is the spin-torsion density while R is the string radius. The B-field value above is able to seed galactic dynamo. In the BBN the magnetic fields around 10{sup 12} Gauss give rise to a string radius as small as 10{sup 17}l{sub P} where l{sub P} is the Planck length. The second is the CMF from axionic torsion field which is given by B{sub seed}∼10{sup -27} Gauss which is stronger than the primordial magnetic field B{sub BICEP2}∼10{sup -30} Gauss from the BICEP2 recent experiment on primordial gravitational waves and cosmological inflation to axionic torsion. The interaction Lagrangean between axionic torsion scalar φ and magnetic fields used in this last example is given by f{sup 2}(φ)F{sub μν}F{sup μν}. A similar lagrangean has been used by K. Bamba et al. [JCAP 10 (2012) 058] so generate magnetic fields without dynamo action. Since axionic torsion can be associated with axionic domain walls both examples discussed here could be consider as topological defects examples of the generation of primordial magnetic fields in universes endowed with spacetime torsion.

  13. Geodesic dynamo chaotic flows and non-Anosov maps in twisted magnetic flux tubes

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, Garcia

    2008-01-01

    Recently Tang and Boozer [{\\textbf{Phys. Plasmas (2000)}}], have investigated the anisotropies in magnetic field dynamo evolution, from local Lyapunov exponents, giving rise to a metric tensor, in the Alfven twist in magnetic flux tubes (MFTs). Thiffeault and Boozer [\\textbf{Chaos}(2001)] have investigated the how the vanishing of Riemann curvature constrained the Lyapunov exponential stretching of chaotic flows. In this paper, Tang-Boozer-Thiffeault differential geometric framework is used to investigate effects of twisted magnetic flux tube filled with helical chaotic flows on the Riemann curvature tensor. When Frenet torsion is positive, the Riemann curvature is unstable, while the negative torsion induces an stability when time $t\\to{\\infty}$. This enhances the dynamo action inside the MFTs. The Riemann metric, depends on the radial random flows along the poloidal and toroidal directions. The Anosov flows has been applied by Arnold, Zeldovich, Ruzmaikin and Sokoloff [\\textbf{JETP (1982)}] to build a unifo...

  14. Cosmic dynamo analogue and decay of magnetic fields in 3D Ricci flows

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, Garcia

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic curvature effects, investigated by Barrow and Tsagas (BT) [Phys Rev D \\textbf{77},(2008)],as a mechanism for magnetic field decay in open Friedmann universes (${\\Lambda}<0$), are applied to dynamo geometric Ricci flows in 3D curved substrate in laboratory. By simple derivation, a covariant three-dimensional magnetic self-induced equation, presence of these curvature effects, indicates that de Sitter cosmological constant (${\\Lambda}\\ge{0}$), leads to enhancement in the fast kinematic dynamo action which adds to stretching of plasma flows. From the magnetic growth rate, the strong shear case, anti-de Sitter case (${\\Lambda}<0$) BT magnetic decaying fields are possible while for weak shear, fast dynamos are possible. The self-induced equation in Ricci flows is similar to the equation derived by BT in $(3+1)$-spacetime continuum. Lyapunov-de Sitter metric is obtained from Ricci flow eigenvalue problem. In de Sitter analogue there is a decay rate of ${\\gamma}\\approx{-{\\Lambda}}\\approx{-10^{-35}s^{-...

  15. Magnetic Cycles in a Dynamo Simulation of Fully Convective M-star Proxima Centauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rakesh K.; Christensen, Ulrich R.; Wolk, Scott J.; Poppenhaeger, Katja

    2016-12-01

    The recent discovery of an Earth-like exoplanet around Proxima Centauri has shined a spot light on slowly rotating fully convective M-stars. When such stars rotate rapidly (period ≲20 days), they are known to generate very high levels of activity that is powered by a magnetic field much stronger than the solar magnetic field. Recent theoretical efforts are beginning to understand the dynamo process that generates such strong magnetic fields. However, the observational and theoretical landscape remains relatively uncharted for fully convective M-stars that rotate slowly. Here, we present an anelastic dynamo simulation designed to mimic some of the physical characteristics of Proxima Centauri, a representative case for slowly rotating fully convective M-stars. The rotating convection spontaneously generates differential rotation in the convection zone that drives coherent magnetic cycles where the axisymmetric magnetic field repeatedly changes polarity at all latitudes as time progress. The typical length of the “activity” cycle in the simulation is about nine years, in good agreement with the recently proposed activity cycle length of about seven years for Proxima Centauri. Comparing our results with earlier work, we hypothesis that the dynamo mechanism undergoes a fundamental change in nature as fully convective stars spin down with age.

  16. Confinement of the solar tachocline by a cyclic dynamo magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnabé, Roxane; Strugarek, Antoine; Charbonneau, Paul; Brun, Allan Sacha; Zahn, Jean-Paul

    2017-05-01

    Context. The surprising thinness of the solar tachocline is still not understood with certainty today. Among the numerous possible scenarios suggested to explain its radial confinement, one hypothesis is based on Maxwell stresses that are exerted by the cyclic dynamo magnetic field of the Sun penetrating over a skin depth below the turbulent convection zone. Aims: Our goal is to assess under which conditions (turbulence level in the tachocline, strength of the dynamo-generated field, spreading mechanism) this scenario can be realized in the solar tachocline. Methods: We develop a simplified 1D model of the upper tachocline under the influence of an oscillating magnetic field imposed from above. The turbulent transport is parametrized with enhanced turbulent diffusion (or anti-diffusion) coefficients. Two main processes that thicken the tachocline are considered; either turbulent viscous spreading or radiative spreading. An extensive parameter study is carried out to establish the physical parameter regimes under which magnetic confinement of the tachocline that is due to a surface dynamo field can be realized. Results: We have explored a large range of magnetic field amplitudes, viscosities, ohmic diffusivities and thermal diffusivities. We find that, for large but still realistic magnetic field strengths, the differential rotation can be suppressed in the upper radiative zone (and hence the tachocline confined) if weak turbulence is present (with an enhanced ohmic diffusivity of η> 107-8 cm2/ s), even in the presence of radiative spreading. Conclusions: Our results show that a dynamo magnetic field can, in the presence of weak turbulence, prevent the inward burrowing of a tachocline subject to viscous diffusion or radiative spreading.

  17. The Magnetic Furnace: Examining Fully Convective Dynamos And The Influence Of Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustson, Kyle; Mathis, S.; Brun, A. S.; Toomre, J.

    2016-08-01

    The dynamo action likely present within fully convective regions is explored through global-scale 3-D simulations. These simulations provide a contextual analog for the convective dynamos that are likely operating deep within the interiors of fully convective low mass stars. A logarithmic range of rotation rates is considered, thereby capturing both convection barely sensing the effects of rotation to others in which the Coriolis forces are prominent. The vigorous dynamo action realized within all of these turbulent convective cores builds magnetic fields with peak strengths exceeding a megagauss, with the overall magnetic energy (ME) in the faster rotators reaching super-equipartition levels compared to the convective kinetic energy (KE). Such strong fields are able to coexist with the flows without quenching them through Lorentz forces. This state is achieved due to the velocity and magnetic fields being nearly co-aligned, and with peak magnetic islands being somewhat displaced from the fastest flows as the intricate evolution of these MHD structures proceeds. As the rotation rate is increased, the primary force balance shifts from nonlinear advection balancing Lorentz forces to a magnetostrophic balance between Coriolis and Lorentz forces.

  18. Dynamo model for the inverse transfer of magnetic energy in a nonhelical decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Kiwan

    2015-01-01

    The inverse cascade of magnetic energy occurs when helicity or rotational instability exists in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) system. This well known phenomenon provides a basis for the large scale magnetic field in space. However even the decaying nonhelical magnetic energy can evolve to expand its scale. This phenomenon, inverse transfer of decaying nonhelical magnetic field may hold some vital clues to the origin of large scale magnetic field in the astrophysical system without helicity nor any significant driving source. Zeldovich's rope model has been considered as the basic principle with regard to the amplification of magnetic field. However, since the rope model assuming a driving force is not appropriate to the decaying system, we suggest a supplementary dynamo model based on the magnetic induction equation. The model explicitly shows the basic principle of migration and amplification of magnetic field. The expansion of scale and intensity of magnetic field is basically the consequent result of the r...

  19. A magnetic betelgeuse? Numerical simulations of non-linear dynamo action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorch, S. B. F.

    2004-01-01

    Betelgeuse is an example of a cool super-giant displaying brightness fluctuations and irregular surface structures. Simulations by Freytag et al. (2002) of the convective envelope of the star have shown that the fluctuations in the star's luminosity may be caused by giant cell convection. A related...... question regarding the nature of Betelgeuse and supergiants in general is whether these stars may be magnetically active. If so, that may in turn also contribute to their variability. By performing detailed numerical simulations, I find that both linear kinematic and non-linear dynamo action are possible...... and that the non-linear magnetic field saturates at a value somewhat below equipartition: in the linear regime there are two modes of dynamo action....

  20. A dynamo model of magnetic activity in solar-like stars with different rotational velocities

    OpenAIRE

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Leonid L. Kitchatinov; Choudhuri, Arnab Rai

    2014-01-01

    We attempt to provide a quantitative theoretical explanation for the observations that Ca II H/K emission and X-ray emission from solar-like stars increase with decreasing Rossby number (i.e., with faster rotation). Assuming that these emissions are caused by magnetic cycles similar to the sunspot cycle, we construct flux transport dynamo models of $1M_{\\odot}$ stars rotating with different rotation periods. We first compute the differential rotation and the meridional circulation inside thes...

  1. The birth of strange stars and their dynamo-originated magnetic fields

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, R. X.; Busse, F. H.

    2001-01-01

    It is shown that protostrange stars (PSSs) can be convective and that there are two possible scenarios describing their turbulence. Besides the local turbulence on the scale which is less than the mean free path of neutrinos, large-scale (~1 km) convection also may occur with properties that are similar to those of convection in protoneutron stars (PNSs). We thus suggest that strange stars can also create dynamo-originated magnetic fields during the deleptonization episode soon after a supern...

  2. Interplay of CR-driven galactic wind, magnetic field, and galactic dynamo in spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, Marita

    2009-01-01

    From our radio observations of the magnetic field strength and large-scale pattern of spiral galaxies of different Hubble types and star formation rates (SFR) we conclude that - though a high SFR in the disk increases the total magnetic field strength in the disk and the halo - the SFR does not change the global field configuration nor influence the global scale heights of the radio emission. The similar scale heights indicate that the total magnetic field regulates the galactic wind velocities. The galactic wind itself may be essential for an effective dynamo action.

  3. Dynamos, Super-pulsars and Gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Rosswog, S; Rosswog, Stephan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2003-01-01

    The remnant of a neutron star binary coalescence is expected to be temporarily stabilised against gravitational collapse by its differential rotation. We explore the possibility of dynamo activity in this remnant and assess the potential for powering a short-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB). We analyse our three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of neutron star mergers with respect to the flow pattern inside the remnant. If the central, newly formed super-massive neutron star remains stable for a good fraction of a second an efficient low-Rossby number $\\alpha-\\Omega$-dynamo will amplify the initial seed magnetic fields exponentially. We expect that values close to equipartition field strength will be reached within several tens of milliseconds. Such a super-pulsar could power a GRB via a relativistic wind, with an associated spin-down time scale close to the typical duration of a short GRB. Similar mechanisms are expected to be operational in the surrounding torus formed from neutron star debris.

  4. Magnetic material in mean-field dynamos driven by small scale helical flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesecke, A.; Stefani, F.; Gerbeth, G.

    2014-07-01

    We perform kinematic simulations of dynamo action driven by a helical small scale flow of a conducting fluid in order to deduce mean-field properties of the combined induction action of small scale eddies. We examine two different flow patterns in the style of the G O Roberts flow but with a mean vertical component and with internal fixtures that are modelled by regions with vanishing flow. These fixtures represent either rods that lie in the center of individual eddies, or internal dividing walls that provide a separation of the eddies from each other. The fixtures can be made of magnetic material with a relative permeability larger than one which can alter the dynamo behavior. The investigations are motivated by the widely unknown induction effects of the forced helical flow that is used in the core of liquid sodium cooled fast reactors, and from the key role of soft iron impellers in the von-Kármán-sodium dynamo. For both examined flow configurations the consideration of magnetic material within the fluid flow causes a reduction of the critical magnetic Reynolds number of up to 25%. The development of the growth-rate in the limit of the largest achievable permeabilities suggests no further significant reduction for even larger values of the permeability. In order to study the dynamo behavior of systems that consist of tens of thousands of helical cells we resort to the mean-field dynamo theory (Krause and Rädler 1980 Mean-field Magnetohydrodynamics and Dynamo Theory (Oxford: Pergamon)) in which the action of the small scale flow is parameterized in terms of an α- and β-effect. We compute the relevant elements of the α- and the β-tensor using the so called testfield method. We find a reasonable agreement between the fully resolved models and the corresponding mean-field models for wall or rod materials in the considered range 1\\leqslant {{\\mu }_{r}}\\leqslant 20. Our results may be used for the development of global large scale models with recirculation

  5. Turbulent Dynamo Amplification of Magnetic Fields in Laser-Produced Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeferacos, Petros

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic fields are ubiquitous in the Universe, as revealed by diffuse radio-synchrotron emission and Faraday rotation observations, with strengths from a few nG to tens of μG. The energy density of these fields is typically comparable to the energy density of the fluid motions of the plasma in which they are embedded, making magnetic fields essential players in the dynamics of the luminous matter in the Universe. The standard model for the origin of these intergalactic magnetic fields is through the amplification of seed fields via turbulent dynamo to the level consistent with current observations. We have conceived and conducted a series of experiments using high-power laser facilities to study the amplification of magnetic fields via turbulence. In these experiments, we characterize the properties of the fluid and the magnetic field turbulence using a comprehensive suite of plasma and magnetic field diagnostics. We describe the large-scale 3D simulations we performed with the radiation-MHD code FLASH on ANL's Mira to help design and interpret the experiments. We then discuss the results of the experiments, which indicate magnetic Reynolds numbers above the expected dynamo threshold are achieved and seed magnetic fields produced by the Biermann battery mechanism are amplified by turbulent dynamo. We relate our findings to processes occurring in galaxy clusters. We acknowledge funding and resources from the ERC (FP7/2007-2013, no. 256973 and 247039), and the U.S. DOE, Contract No. B591485 to LLNL, FWP 57789 to ANL, Grant No. DE-NA0002724 to the University of Chicago, and contract DE-AC02-06CH11357 to ALCF at ANL.

  6. Kinematic dynamo induced by helical waves

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Xing

    2014-01-01

    We investigate numerically the kinematic dynamo induced by the superposition of two helical waves in a periodic box as a simplified model to understand the dynamo action in astronomical bodies. The effects of magnetic Reynolds number, wavenumber and wave frequency on the dynamo action are studied. It is found that this helical-wave dynamo is a slow dynamo. There exists an optimal wavenumber for the dynamo growth rate. A lower wave frequency facilitates the dynamo action and the oscillations o...

  7. Laminar Plasma Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Z; Barnes, C W; Barnes, D C; Wang, Zhehui; Pariev, Vladimir I.; Barnes, Cris W.; Barnes, Daniel C.

    2002-01-01

    A new kind of dynamo utilizing flowing laboratory plasmas has been identified. Conversion of plasma kinetic energy to magnetic energy is verified numerically by kinematic dynamo simulations for magnetic Reynolds numbers above 210. As opposed to intrinsically-turbulent liquid-sodium dynamos, the proposed plasma dynamos correspond to laminar flow topology. Modest plasma parameters, 1-20 eV temperatures, 10^{19}-10^{20} m^{-3} densities in 0.3-1.0 m scale-lengths driven by velocities on the order of the Alfven Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV), self-consistently satisfy the conditions needed for the magnetic field amplication. Growth rates for the plasma dynamos are obtained numerically with different geometry and magnetic Reynolds numbers. Magnetic-field-free coaxial plasma guns can be used to sustain the plasma flow and the dynamo.

  8. Magnetic material in mean-field dynamos driven by small scale helical flows

    CERN Document Server

    Giesecke, Andre; Gerbeth, Gunter

    2014-01-01

    We perform kinematic simulations of dynamo action driven by a helical small scale flow of a conducting fluid in order to deduce mean-field properties of the combined induction action of small scale eddies. We examine two different flow patterns in the style of the G.O. Roberts flow but with a mean vertical component and with internal fixtures that are modelled by regions with vanishing flow. These fixtures represent either rods that lie in the center of individual eddies, or internal dividing walls that provide a separation of the eddies from each other. The fixtures can be made of magnetic material with a relative permeability larger than one which can alter the dynamo behavior. The investigations are motivated by the widely unknown induction effects of the forced helical flow that is used in the core of liquid sodium cooled fast reactors, and from the key role of soft iron impellers in the von-K\\'arm\\'an-Sodium (VKS) dynamo. For both examined flow configurations the consideration of magnetic material within...

  9. The Effect of an Electrically Conducting Lower Mantle on Dynamo Generated Planetary Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilim, R.; Stanley, S.

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that the lower mantles of Earth[1], Mercury[2], and large terrestrial exoplanets[3, 4] may be good conductors of electricity. This raises questions about the effect of an electrically conducting lower mantle on magnetic field generation in these planets. A core dynamo generated magnetic field can interact with an electrically conducting mantle in two ways. First, magnetic fields lines can be be frozen into the solid mantle. The flows in the core can then stretch the magnetic field lines at the core mantle boundary increasing their strength. Second, any field observed at the surface will be attenuated due to the screening effect, which preferentially attenuates the components of the magnetic field that vary quickest in time. We use a numerical dynamo model to investigate the effect of a conducting mantle on dynamo generated planetary magnetic fields. [1] Ohta, K., Cohen, R. E., Hirose, K., Haule, K., Shimizu, K., and Ohishi, Y. (2012). Experimental and Theoretical Evidence for Pressure-Induced Metallization in FeO with Rocksalt-Type Structure. PRL, 108, 026403 [2] Smith, D. E., Zuber, M. T., Phillips, R. J., Solomon, S. C., Hauck, S. A. II, Lemoine, F. G., Mazarico, E., Neumann, G.A., Peale, S.J., Margot, J.L., Johnson C.L., Torrence, M.H., Perry, M.E., Rowlands D.D., Goossens, S., Head, J.W., Taylor, A.H. (2012). Gravity Field and Internal Structure of Mercury from MESSENGER. Science [3] Nellis, W. J. (2011). Metallic liquid hydrogen and likely Al2O3 metallic glass. The European Physical Journal Special Topics, 196, 121-130 [4] Tsuchiya, T. (2011). Prediction of a hexagonal SiO2 phase affecting stabilities of MgSiO3 and CaSiO3 at multimegabar pressures. PNAS, 108, 1252-1255

  10. The role of rotation on the evolution of dynamo generated magnetic fields in Super Earths

    CERN Document Server

    Zuluaga, Jorge I

    2011-01-01

    Planetary magnetic fields could have a role on the evolution of planetary atmospheres and the required conditions for the emergence and evolution of life (habitability). After briefly review the current efforts to study the evolution of dynamo generated magnetic fields in massive earth-like rocky planets (Super Earths), we take the results from thermal evolution models and updated scaling laws for convection driven magnetodynamos to predict the evolution of the local Rossby number, the basic indicator of core magnetic field geometry and regime. We study the dependence of this property on planetary mass and rotation rate. Previous works have paid Attention only to the evolution of dipolar dominant core magnetic fields assuming rapid rotating planets. Here we extend these results including consistently the effects of rotation on the evolution of planetary magnetic field properties and obtain global constraints to the existence of intense protective magnetic fields in rapidly and slowly rotating Super Earths. We...

  11. Evolution of dynamo-generated magnetic fields in accretion disks around compact and young stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, Tomasz F.

    1994-01-01

    Geometrically thin, optically thick, turbulent accretion disks are believed to surround many stars. Some of them are the compact components of close binaries, while the others are throught to be T Tauri stars. These accretion disks must be magnetized objects because the accreted matter, whether it comes from the companion star (binaries) or from a collapsing molecular cloud core (single young stars), carries an embedded magnetic field. In addition, most accretion disks are hot and turbulent, thus meeting the condition for the MHD turbulent dynamo to maintain and amplify any seed field magnetic field. In fact, for a disk's magnetic field to persist long enough in comparison with the disk viscous time it must be contemporaneously regenerated because the characteristic diffusion time of a magnetic field is typically much shorter than a disk's viscous time. This is true for most thin accretion disks. Consequently, studying magentic fields in thin disks is usually synonymous with studying magnetic dynamos, a fact that is not commonly recognized in the literature. Progress in studying the structure of many accretion disks was achieved mainly because most disks can be regarded as two-dimensional flows in which vertical and radial structures are largely decoupled. By analogy, in a thin disk, one may expect that vertical and radial structures of the magnetic field are decoupled because the magnetic field diffuses more rapidly to the vertical boundary of the disk than along the radius. Thus, an asymptotic method, called an adiabatic approximation, can be applied to accretion disk dynamo. We can represent the solution to the dynamo equation in the form B = Q(r)b(r,z), where Q(r) describes the field distribution along the radius, while the field distribution across the disk is included in the vector function b, which parametrically depends on r and is normalized by the condition max (b(z)) = 1. The field distribution across the disk is established rapidly, while the radial

  12. Solar Nebula Magnetohydrodynamic Dynamos: Kinematic Theory, Dynamical Constraints, and Magnetic Transport of Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, Tomasz F.; Reyes-Ruiz, Mauricio; Vanhala, Harri A. T.

    1993-01-01

    A hydromagnetic dynamo provides the best mechanism for contemporaneously producing magnetic fields in a turbulent solar nebula. We investigate the solar nebula in the framework of a steady-state accretion disk model and establish the criteria for a viable nebular dynamo. We have found that typically a magnetic gap exists in the nebula, the region where the degree of ionization is too small for the magnetic field to couple to the gas. The location and width of this gap depend on the particular model; the supposition is that gaps cover different parts of the nebula at different evolutionary stages. We have found, from several dynamical constraints, that the generated magnetic field is likely to saturate at a strength equal to equipartition with the kinetic energy of turbulence. Maxwell stress arising from a large-scale magnetic field may significantly influence nebular structure, and Maxwell stress due to small-scale fields can actually dominate other stresses in the inner parts of the nebula. We also argue that the bulk of nebular gas, within the scale height from the midplane, is stable against Balbus-Hawley instability.

  13. A Revised Prescription for the Tayler-Spruit Dynamo: Magnetic Angular Momentum Transport in Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Denissenkov, P A; Denissenkov, Pavel A.; Pinsonneault, Marc

    2006-01-01

    Angular momentum transport by internal magnetic fields is an important ingredient for stellar interior models. In this paper we critically examine the basic heuristic assumptions in the model of the Tayler-Spruit dynamo, which describes how a pinch-type instability of a toroidal magnetic field in differentially rotating stellar radiative zones may result in large-scale fluid motion. Our derivation accounts for Coriolis effects in both the growth and damping rates, unlike earlier studies. We present transport coefficients for chemical mixing and angular momentum redistribution by magnetic torques that are significantly different from previous published values. The new magnetic viscosity is reduced by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude compared to the old one, and we find that magnetic angular momentum transport by this mechanism is very sensitive to gradients in the mean molecular weight. The revised coefficients are more compatible with empirical constraints on the timescale of core-envelope coupling in young stars t...

  14. The alpha effect with imposed and dynamo-generated magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Hubbard, A; Käpylä, P J; Brandenburg, A

    2009-01-01

    Estimates for the nonlinear alpha effect in helical turbulence are presented using two different approaches where a uniform magnetic field is applied either to the actual field, or where separate evolution equations are solved for a set of different test fields. Both approaches agree for stronger fields, but there are apparent discrepancies for weaker fields that can be explained by the influence of dynamo-generated magnetic fields on the scale of the domain that are referred to as meso-scale magnetic fields. Examples are discussed where with an imposed magnetic field the alpha effect is either drastically overestimated, or drastically underestimated compared with the kinematic value. It is demonstrated that the kinematic value can be estimated correctly by resetting the magnetic field in regular time intervals.

  15. The magnetic field of Betelgeuse: a local dynamo from giant convection cells?

    CERN Document Server

    Auriere, M; Konstantinova-Antova, R; Perrin, G; Petit, P; Roudier, T

    2010-01-01

    Betelgeuse is an M supergiant with a complex and extended atmosphere, which also harbors spots and giant granules at its surface. A possible magnetic field could contribute to the mass loss and to the heating of the outer atmosphere. We observed Betelgeuse, to directly study and infer the nature of its magnetic field. We used the new-generation spectropolarimeter NARVAL and the least square deconvolution (LSD) method to detect circular polarization within the photospheric absorption lines of Betelgeuse. We have unambiguously detected a weak Stokes V signal in the spectral lines of Betelgeuse, and measured the related surface-averaged longitudinal magnetic field Bl at 6 different epochs over one month. The detected longitudinal field is about one Gauss and is apparently increasing on the time scale of our observations. This work presents the first direct detection of the magnetic field of Betelgeuse. This magnetic field may be associated to the giant convection cells that could enable a "local dynamo:.

  16. Magnetic Quenching of Turbulent Diffusivity: Reconciling Mixing-length Theory Estimates with Kinematic Dynamo Models of the Solar Cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Muñoz-Jaramillo, Andrés; Martens, Petrus C H

    2010-01-01

    The turbulent magnetic diffusivity in the solar convection zone is one of the most poorly constrained ingredients of mean-field dynamo models. This lack of constraint has previously led to controversy regarding the most appropriate set of parameters, as different assumptions on the value of turbulent diffusivity lead to radically different solar cycle predictions. Typically, the dynamo community uses double step diffusivity profiles characterized by low values of diffusivity in the bulk of the convection zone. However, these low diffusivity values are not consistent with theoretical estimates based on mixing-length theory -- which suggest much higher values for turbulent diffusivity. To make matters worse, kinematic dynamo simulations cannot yield sustainable magnetic cycles using these theoretical estimates. In this work we show that magnetic cycles become viable if we combine the theoretically estimated diffusivity profile with magnetic quenching of the diffusivity. Furthermore, we find that the main featur...

  17. The role of rotation in the evolution of dynamo-generated magnetic fields in Super Earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuluaga, Jorge I.; Cuartas, Pablo A.

    2012-01-01

    Planetary magnetic fields could impact the evolution of planetary atmospheres and have a role in the determination of the required conditions for the emergence and evolution of life (planetary habitability). We study here the role of rotation in the evolution of dynamo-generated magnetic fields in massive Earth-like planets, Super Earths (1-10 M⊕). Using the most recent thermal evolution models of Super Earths (Gaidos, E., Conrad, C.P., Manga, M., Hernlund, J. [2010]. Astrophys. J. 718, 596-609; Tachinami, C., Senshu, H., Ida, S. [2011]. Astrophys. J. 726, 70) and updated scaling laws for convection-driven dynamos, we predict the evolution of the local Rossby number. This quantity is one of the proxies for core magnetic field regime, i.e. non-reversing dipolar, reversing dipolar and multipolar. We study the dependence of the local Rossby number and hence the core magnetic field regime on planetary mass and rotation rate. Previous works have focused only on the evolution of core magnetic fields assuming rapidly rotating planets, i.e. planets in the dipolar regime. In this work we go further, including the effects of rotation in the evolution of planetary magnetic field regime and obtaining global constraints to the existence of intense protective magnetic fields in rapidly and slowly rotating Super Earths. We find that the emergence and continued existence of a protective planetary magnetic field is not only a function of planetary mass but also depend on rotation rate. Low-mass Super Earths ( M ≲ 2 M⊕) develop intense surface magnetic fields but their lifetimes will be limited to 2-4 Gyrs for rotational periods larger than 1-4 days. On the other hand and also in the case of slowly rotating planets, more massive Super Earths ( M ≳ 2 M⊕) have weak magnetic fields but their dipoles will last longer. Finally we analyze tidally locked Super Earths inside and outside the habitable zone of GKM stars. Using the results obtained here we develop a classification of

  18. Synthesis of Long Chain Unsaturated-alpha,omega-Dicarboxylic Acids from Renewable Materials via Olefin Metathesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The self-metathesis reaction of soy, rapeseed, tall, and linseed oil fatty acids was investigated for the synthesis of symmetrical long-chain unsaturated-alpha,omega-dicarboxylic acids. The metathesis reactions were carried out in the presence of a Grubbs catalyst under solvent-free conditions at a...

  19. Decay rates of magnetic modes below the threshold of a turbulent dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herault, J; Pétrélis, F; Fauve, S

    2014-04-01

    We measure the decay rates of magnetic field modes in a turbulent flow of liquid sodium below the dynamo threshold. We observe that turbulent fluctuations induce energy transfers between modes with different symmetries (dipolar and quadrupolar). Using symmetry properties, we show how to measure the decay rate of each mode without being restricted to the one with the smallest damping rate. We observe that the respective values of the decay rates of these modes depend on the shape of the propellers driving the flow. Dynamical regimes, including field reversals, are observed only when the modes are both nearly marginal. This is in line with a recently proposed model.

  20. A prevalence of dynamo-generated magnetic fields in the cores of intermediate-mass stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stello, Dennis; Cantiello, Matteo; Fuller, Jim; Huber, Daniel; García, Rafael A; Bedding, Timothy R; Bildsten, Lars; Aguirre, Victor Silva

    2016-01-21

    Magnetic fields play a part in almost all stages of stellar evolution. Most low-mass stars, including the Sun, show surface fields that are generated by dynamo processes in their convective envelopes. Intermediate-mass stars do not have deep convective envelopes, although 10 per cent exhibit strong surface fields that are presumed to be residuals from the star formation process. These stars do have convective cores that might produce internal magnetic fields, and these fields might survive into later stages of stellar evolution, but information has been limited by our inability to measure the fields below the stellar surface. Here we report the strength of dipolar oscillation modes for a sample of 3,600 red giant stars. About 20 per cent of our sample show mode suppression, by strong magnetic fields in the cores, but this fraction is a strong function of mass. Strong core fields occur only in red giants heavier than 1.1 solar masses, and the occurrence rate is at least 50 per cent for intermediate-mass stars (1.6-2.0 solar masses), indicating that powerful dynamos were very common in the previously convective cores of these stars.

  1. The lunar dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Benjamin P; Tikoo, Sonia M

    2014-12-05

    The inductive generation of magnetic fields in fluid planetary interiors is known as the dynamo process. Although the Moon today has no global magnetic field, it has been known since the Apollo era that the lunar rocks and crust are magnetized. Until recently, it was unclear whether this magnetization was the product of a core dynamo or fields generated externally to the Moon. New laboratory and spacecraft measurements strongly indicate that much of this magnetization is the product of an ancient core dynamo. The dynamo field persisted from at least 4.25 to 3.56 billion years ago (Ga), with an intensity reaching that of the present Earth. The field then declined by at least an order of magnitude by ∼3.3 Ga. The mechanisms for sustaining such an intense and long-lived dynamo are uncertain but may include mechanical stirring by the mantle and core crystallization.

  2. Dynamo in protostars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahendra K Verma; Bidya Binay Karak; Rohit Kumar

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we estimate the magnetic Reynolds number of a typical protostar before and after deuterium burning, and claim for the existence of dynamo process in both the phases, because the magnetic Reynolds number of the protostar far exceeds the critical magnetic Reynolds number for dynamo action. Using the equipartition of kinetic and magnetic energies, we estimate the steady-state magnetic field of the protostar to be of the order of kilogauss, which is in good agreement with observations.

  3. Turbulent magnetic pumping in a Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, G.; de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.

    2008-07-01

    Context: The turbulent pumping effect corresponds to the transport of magnetic flux due to the presence of density and turbulence gradients in convectively unstable layers. In the induction equation it appears as an advective term and for this reason it is expected to be important in the solar and stellar dynamo processes. Aims: We explore the effects of turbulent pumping in a flux-dominated Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo model with a solar-like rotation law. Methods: As a first step, only vertical pumping has been considered through the inclusion of a radial diamagnetic term in the induction equation. In the second step, a latitudinal pumping term was included and then, a near-surface shear was included. Results: The results reveal the importance of the pumping mechanism in solving current limitations in mean field dynamo modeling, such as the storage of the magnetic flux and the latitudinal distribution of the sunspots. If a meridional flow is assumed to be present only in the upper part of the convective zone, it is the full turbulent pumping that regulates both the period of the solar cycle and the latitudinal distribution of the sunspot activity. In models that consider shear near the surface, a second shell of toroidal field is generated above r=0.95~R⊙ at all latitudes. If the full pumping is also included, the polar toroidal fields are efficiently advected inwards, and the toroidal magnetic activity survives only at the observed latitudes near the equator. With regard to the parity of the magnetic field, only models that combine turbulent pumping with near-surface shear always converge to the dipolar parity. Conclusions: This result suggests that, under the Babcock-Leighton approach, the equartorward motion of the observed magnetic activity is governed by the latitudinal pumping of the toroidal magnetic field rather than by a large scale coherent meridional flow. Our results support the idea that the parity problem is related to the quadrupolar imprint of

  4. Equatorial ionospheric plasma drifts and O+ concentration enhancements associated with disturbance dynamo during the 2015 St. Patrick's Day magnetic storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao-Song; Wilson, Gordon R.; Hairston, Marc R.; Zhang, Yongliang; Wang, Wenbin; Liu, Jing

    2016-08-01

    Disturbance dynamo is an important dynamic process during magnetic storms. However, very few direct observations of dynamo-induced plasma drifts and ion composition changes in the equatorial ionosphere are available. In this study, we use measurements of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites to identify the characteristics of the disturbance dynamo process in the topside equatorial ionosphere near dawn during the magnetic storm with a minimum Dst of -223 nT on 17 March 2015. Data from four DMSP satellites with equatorial crossings at 0245, 0430, 0630, and 0730 LT are available for this case. The dynamo process was first observed in the postmidnight sector 3-4.7 h after the beginning of the storm main phase and lasted for 31 h, covering the second storm intensification and the initial 20 h of the recovery phase. The dynamo vertical ion drift was upward (up to 150-200 m s-1) in the postmidnight sector and downward (up to ~80 m s-1) in the early morning sector. The dynamo zonal ion drift was westward at these locations and reached ~100 m s-1. The dynamo process caused large enhancements of the O+ concentration (the ratio of the oxygen ion density to the total ion density) at the altitude of 840 km near dawn. The O+ concentration increased from below 60% during the prestorm period to 80-90% during the storm time. More specifically, the O+ density was increased, and the H+ density was decreased. The variations of the O+ concentration were well correlated with the vertical ion drift.

  5. Accretion disc dynamo activity in local simulations spanning weak-to-strong net vertical magnetic flux regimes

    CERN Document Server

    Salvesen, Greg; Armitage, Philip J; Begelman, Mitchell C

    2015-01-01

    Strongly magnetized accretion discs around black holes have attractive features that may explain enigmatic aspects of X-ray binary behaviour. The structure and evolution of these discs are governed by a dynamo-like mechanism, which channels part of the accretion power liberated by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) into an ordered toroidal magnetic field. To study dynamo activity, we performed three-dimensional, stratified, isothermal, ideal magnetohydrodynamic shearing box simulations. The strength of the self-sustained toroidal magnetic field depends on the net vertical magnetic flux, which we vary across almost the entire range over which the MRI is linearly unstable. We quantify disc structure and dynamo properties as a function of the initial ratio of mid-plane gas pressure to vertical magnetic field pressure, $\\beta_0^{\\rm mid} = p_{\\rm gas} / p_B$. For $10^5 \\geq \\beta_0^{\\rm mid} \\geq 10$ the effective $\\alpha$-viscosity parameter scales as a power-law. Dynamo activity persists up to and includin...

  6. Large-scale weakly nonlinear perturbations of convective magnetic dynamos in a rotating layer

    CERN Document Server

    Chertovskih, Roman

    2015-01-01

    We present a new mechanism for generation of large-scale magnetic field by thermal convection which does not involve the alpha-effect. We consider weakly nonlinear perturbations of space-periodic steady convective magnetic dynamos in a rotating layer that were identified in our previous work. The perturbations have a spatial scale in the horizontal direction that is much larger than the period of the perturbed convective magnetohydrodynamic state. Following the formalism of the multiscale stability theory, we have derived the system of amplitude equations governing the evolution of the leading terms in expansion of the perturbations in power series in the scale ratio. This asymptotic analysis is more involved than in the cases considered earlier, because the kernel of the operator of linearisation has zero-mean neutral modes whose origin lies in the spatial invariance of the perturbed regime, the operator reduced on the generalised kernel has two Jordan normal form blocks of size two, and simplifying symmetri...

  7. ESTIMATING THE DEEP SOLAR MERIDIONAL CIRCULATION USING MAGNETIC OBSERVATIONS AND A DYNAMO MODEL: A VARIATIONAL APPROACH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Ching Pui; Jouve, Laurène; Brun, Allan Sacha [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CEA/IRFU Université Paris-Diderot CNRS/INSU, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Fournier, Alexandre [Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Université Paris Diderot UMR 7154 CNRS, F-75005 Paris (France); Talagrand, Olivier [Laboratoire de météorologie dynamique, UMR 8539, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2015-12-01

    We show how magnetic observations of the Sun can be used in conjunction with an axisymmetric flux-transport solar dynamo model in order to estimate the large-scale meridional circulation throughout the convection zone. Our innovative approach rests on variational data assimilation, whereby the distance between predictions and observations (measured by an objective function) is iteratively minimized by means of an optimization algorithm seeking the meridional flow that best accounts for the data. The minimization is performed using a quasi-Newton technique, which requires knowledge of the sensitivity of the objective function to the meridional flow. That sensitivity is efficiently computed via the integration of the adjoint flux-transport dynamo model. Closed-loop (also known as twin) experiments using synthetic data demonstrate the validity and accuracy of this technique for a variety of meridional flow configurations, ranging from unicellular and equatorially symmetric to multicellular and equatorially asymmetric. In this well-controlled synthetic context, we perform a systematic study of the behavior of our variational approach under different observational configurations by varying their spatial density, temporal density, and noise level, as well as the width of the assimilation window. We find that the method is remarkably robust, leading in most cases to a recovery of the true meridional flow to within better than 1%. These encouraging results are a first step toward using this technique to (i) better constrain the physical processes occurring inside the Sun and (ii) better predict solar activity on decadal timescales.

  8. A dynamo model of magnetic activity in solar-like stars with different rotational velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Choudhuri, Arnab Rai

    2014-01-01

    We attempt to provide a quantitative theoretical explanation for the observations that Ca II H/K emission and X-ray emission from solar-like stars increase with decreasing Rossby number (i.e., with faster rotation). Assuming that these emissions are caused by magnetic cycles similar to the sunspot cycle, we construct flux transport dynamo models of $1M_{\\odot}$ stars rotating with different rotation periods. We first compute the differential rotation and the meridional circulation inside these stars from a mean-field hydrodynamics model. Then these are substituted in our dynamo code to produce periodic solutions. We find that the dimensionless amplitude $f_m$ of the toroidal flux through the star increases with decreasing Rossby number. The observational data can be matched if we assume the emissions to go as the power 3-4 of $f_m$. Assuming that the Babcock-Leighton mechanism saturates with increasing rotation, we can provide an explanation for the observed saturation of emission at low Rossby numbers. The m...

  9. Dynamo action at low magnetic Prandtl numbers: mean flow versus fully turbulent motions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponty, Y [CNRS UMR6202, Laboratoire Cassiopee, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, BP 4229, Nice Cedex 04 (France); Mininni, P D [NCAR, P O Box 3000, Boulder Colorado 80307-3000 (United States); Pinton, J-F [CNRS UMR5672, Laboratoire de Physique, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, 46 Allee d' Italie, 69007 Lyon (France); Politano, H [CNRS UMR6202, Laboratoire Cassiopee, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, BP 4229, Nice Cedex 04 (France); Pouquet, A [NCAR, P O Box 3000, Boulder Colorado 80307-3000 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    We compute numerically the threshold for dynamo action in Taylor-Green (TG) swirling flows. Kinematic dynamo calculations, for which the flow field is fixed to its time average, are compared to dynamical runs, with the Navier-Stokes and induction equations jointly solved. The dynamo instability for the kinematic calculations is found to have two branches. The dynamical dynamo threshold at low Reynolds numbers lies within the low branch, while at high Reynolds numbers it gets closer to the high branch. Based on these results, the effect of the mean flow and of the turbulent fluctuations in TG dynamos are discussed.

  10. Coronal influence on dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Warnecke, Jörn

    2013-01-01

    We report on turbulent dynamo simulations in a spherical wedge with an outer coronal layer. We apply a two-layer model where the lower layer represents the convection zone and the upper layer the solar corona. This setup is used to study the coronal influence on the dynamo action beneath the surface. Increasing the radial coronal extent gradually to three times the solar radius and changing the magnetic Reynolds number, we find that dynamo action benefits from the additional coronal extent in terms of higher magnetic energy in the saturated stage. The flux of magnetic helicity can play an important role in this context.

  11. Magnetic field amplification by small-scale dynamo action: dependence on turbulence models and Reynolds and Prandtl numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Jennifer; Schleicher, Dominik; Federrath, Christoph; Klessen, Ralf; Banerjee, Robi

    2012-02-01

    The small-scale dynamo is a process by which turbulent kinetic energy is converted into magnetic energy, and thus it is expected to depend crucially on the nature of the turbulence. In this paper, we present a model for the small-scale dynamo that takes into account the slope of the turbulent velocity spectrum v(ℓ)proportional ℓ([symbol see text])V}, where ℓ and v(ℓ) are the size of a turbulent fluctuation and the typical velocity on that scale. The time evolution of the fluctuation component of the magnetic field, i.e., the small-scale field, is described by the Kazantsev equation. We solve this linear differential equation for its eigenvalues with the quantum-mechanical WKB approximation. The validity of this method is estimated as a function of the magnetic Prandtl number Pm. We calculate the minimal magnetic Reynolds number for dynamo action, Rm_{crit}, using our model of the turbulent velocity correlation function. For Kolmogorov turbulence ([symbol see text] = 1/3), we find that the critical magnetic Reynolds number is Rm(crit) (K) ≈ 110 and for Burgers turbulence ([symbol see text] = 1/2) Rm(crit)(B) ≈ 2700. Furthermore, we derive that the growth rate of the small-scale magnetic field for a general type of turbulence is Γ proportional Re((1-[symbol see text])/(1+[symbol see text])) in the limit of infinite magnetic Prandtl number. For decreasing magnetic Prandtl number (down to Pm >/~ 10), the growth rate of the small-scale dynamo decreases. The details of this drop depend on the WKB approximation, which becomes invalid for a magnetic Prandtl number of about unity.

  12. The Kinematic Theory of Solar Dynamo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Generation of the Sun's magnetic fields by self-inductive processes inthe solar electrically conducting interior, the solar dynamo theory, is a fundamen-tally important subject in astrophysics. The kinematic dynamo theory concernshow the magnetic fields are produced by kinematically possible flows without beingconstrained by the dynamic equation. We review a number of basic aspects of thekinematic dynamo theory, including the magnetohydrodynamic approximation forthe dynamo equation, the impossibility of dynamo action with the solar differentialrotation, the Cowling's anti-dynamo theorem in the solar context, the turbulent al-pha effect and recently constructed three-dimensional interface dynamos controlledby the solar tachocline at the base of the convection zone.

  13. The role of MHD turbulence in magnetic self-excitation: A study of the Madison Dynamo Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nornberg, Mark D.

    2006-07-01

    Determining the onset conditions for magnetic field growth in magnetohydrodynamics is fundamental to understanding how astrophysical dynamos such as the Earth, the Sun, and the galaxy self-generate magnetic fields. The Madison Dynamo Experiment was constructed to explore the role of turbulence in changing these onset conditions for an impeller-driven flow of liquid sodium. The flow generates intermittent magnetic bursts with the spatial structure predicted from kinematic dynamo theory. A model of the mean flow was constructed from laser Doppler velocimetry measurements of the flow in an identical-scale water experiment. A kinematic eigenvalue code predicted that the flow would generate a predominantly dipolar magnetic field perpendicular to the symmetry axis for sufficiently high impeller speeds. The flow amplifies the magnetic field by stretching field lines. The field lines are then twisted back onto themselves creating a feedback loop for dynamo growth. The same flow was generated in the sodium experiment and was found to amplify an applied magnetic field oriented perpendicular to the drive shaft axis of the experiment. The amplification increased with motor rotation rate as the induced field became more closely aligned with the applied field, though a reduction in the amplitude is attributed to an enhanced resistivity due to turbulent diffusion. The turbulence was characterized by measurements of the velocity and magnetic power spectra. The velocity spectra have a Kolmogorov scaling. The wavenumber at which resistive dissipation range becomes dominant was observed to increase with flow speed indicating that smaller scale magnetic structures were generated. No amplification due to a small-scale dynamo was observed. The intermittent bursts were analyzed using conditional averaging. The growth rate was found to increase linearly with impeller rotation rate resulting in stronger bursts. The average duration decreased so that the bursts continued to satisfy Poisson

  14. Turbulence and dynamo interlinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; Santos-Lima, R.; Kowal, G.; Falceta-Gonçalves, D.

    2013-07-01

    The role of turbulence in astrophysical environments and its interplay with magnetic fields is still highly debated. In this lecture, we will discuss this issue in the framework of dynamo processes. We will first present a very brief summary of turbulent dynamo theories, then will focus on small scale turbulent dynamos and their particular relevance on the origin and maintenance of magnetic fields in the intra-cluster media (ICM) of galaxies. In these environments, the very low density of the flow requires a collisionless-MHD treatment. We will show the implications of this approach in the turbulent amplification of the magnetic fields in these environments. To finalize, we will also briefly address the connection between MHD turbulence and fast magnetic reconnection and its possible implications in the diffusion of magnetic flux in the dynamo process.

  15. Turbulence and Dynamo Interlinks

    CERN Document Server

    Pino, E M de Gouveia Dal

    2013-01-01

    The role of turbulence in astrophysical environments and its interplay with magnetic fields is still highly debated. In this lecture, we will discuss this issue in the framework of dynamo processes. We will first present a very brief summary of turbulent dynamo theories, then will focus on small scale turbulent dynamos and their particular relevance on the origin and maintenance of magnetic fields in the intra-cluster media (ICM) of galaxies. In these environments, the very low density of the flow requires a collisionless-MHD treatment. We will show the implications of this approach in the turbulent amplification of the magnetic fields in these environments. To finalize, we will also briefly address the connection between MHD turbulence and fast magnetic reconnection and its possible implications in the diffusion of magnetic flux in the dynamo process.

  16. A small-scale dynamo in feedback-dominated galaxies as the origin of cosmic magnetic fields. I-the kinematic phase

    CERN Document Server

    Rieder, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Astrophysical dynamo theories provide various mechanisms for magnetic field amplification inside galaxies, where weak initial fields grow exponentially on various timescales. We investigate the particular role played by stellar feedback mechanisms in creating strong fluid turbulence, allowing for a magnetic dynamo to emerge. Performing magnetohydrodynamic simulations of isolated cooling halos, for both dwarf and Milky Way sized objects, we compare the magnetic field evolution for various initial field topologies and various stellar feedback mechanisms. We find that feedback can indeed drive strong gas turbulence which gives rise to a fast exponential magnetic field growth. Our simulations feature typical properties of Kolmogorov turbulence with a $k ^{-5/3}$ kinetic energy spectrum, as well as the characteristic properties of a small-scale dynamo, with a $k^{3/2}$ magnetic energy spectrum as predicted by Kazantsev dynamo theory. In these feedback-dominated galaxies, stellar feedback provides forcing on large ...

  17. Dynamo action and magnetic activity during the pre-main sequence: Influence of rotation and structural changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emeriau-Viard, Constance; Brun, Allan Sacha

    2017-10-01

    During the PMS, structure and rotation rate of stars evolve significantly. We wish to assess the consequences of these drastic changes on stellar dynamo, internal magnetic field topology and activity level by mean of HPC simulations with the ASH code. To answer this question, we develop 3D MHD simulations that represent specific stages of stellar evolution along the PMS. We choose five different models characterized by the radius of their radiative zone following an evolutionary track, from 1 Myr to 50 Myr, computed by a 1D stellar evolution code. We introduce a seed magnetic field in the youngest model and then we spread it through all simulations. First of all, we study the consequences that the increase of rotation rate and the change of geometry of the convective zone have on the dynamo field that exists in the convective envelop. The magnetic energy increases, the topology of the magnetic field becomes more complex and the axisymmetric magnetic field becomes less predominant as the star ages. The computation of the fully convective MHD model shows that a strong dynamo develops with a ratio of magnetic to kinetic energy reaching equipartition and even super-equipartition states in the faster rotating cases. Magnetic fields resulting from our MHD simulations possess a mixed poloidal-toroidal topology with no obvious dominant component. We also study the relaxation of the vestige dynamo magnetic field within the radiative core and found that it satisfies stability criteria. Hence it does not experience a global reconfiguration and instead slowly relaxes by retaining its mixed poloidal-toroidal topology.

  18. A prevalence of dynamo-generated magnetic fields in the cores of intermediate-mass stars

    CERN Document Server

    Stello, D; Fuller, J; Huber, D; Garcia, R A; Bedding, T R; Bildsten, L; Aguirre, V Silva

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields play a role in almost all stages of stellar evolution. Most low-mass stars, including the Sun, show surface fields that are generated by dynamo processes in their convective envelopes. Intermediate-mass stars do not have deep convective envelopes, although 10% exhibit strong surface fields that are presumed to be residuals from the stellar formation process. These stars do have convective cores that might produce internal magnetic fields, and these might even survive into later stages of stellar evolution, but information has been limited by our inability to measure the fields below the stellar surface. Here we use asteroseismology to study the occurrence of strong magnetic fields in the cores of low- and intermediate-mass stars. We have measured the strength of dipolar oscillation modes, which can be suppressed by a strong magnetic field in the core, in over 3600 red giant stars observed by Kepler. About 20% of our sample show mode suppression but this fraction is a strong function of mass. S...

  19. Three-Dimensional Relativistic MHD Simulations of the Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability: Magnetic Field Amplification by a Turbulent Dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Weiqun; Wang, Peng

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic field strengths inferred for relativistic outflows including gamma-ray bursts (GRB) and active galactic nuclei (AGN) are larger than naively expected by orders of magnitude. We present three-dimensional relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations demonstrating amplification and saturation of magnetic field by a macroscopic turbulent dynamo triggered by the Kelvin-Helmholtz shear instability. We find rapid growth of electromagnetic energy due to the stretching and folding of field lines in the turbulent velocity field resulting from non-linear development of the instability. Using conditions relevant for GRB internal shocks and late phases of GRB afterglow, we obtain amplification of the electromagnetic energy fraction to $\\epsilon_B \\sim 5 \\times 10^{-3}$. This value decays slowly after the shear is dissipated and appears to be largely independent of the initial field strength. The conditions required for operation of the dynamo are the presence of velocity shear and some seed magnetization b...

  20. Generation of strong magnetic fields via the small-scale dynamo during the formation of the first stars

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Robi; Federrath, Christoph; Schleicher, Dominik R G; Klessen, Ralf S

    2012-01-01

    Here we summarize our recent results of high-resolution computer simulations on the turbulent amplification of weak magnetic seed fields showing that such fields will be exponentially amplified also during the gravitational collapse reminiscent to the situation during primordial star formation. The exponential magnetic field amplification is driven by the turbulent small-scale dynamo that can be only observed in computer simulations if the turbulent motions in the central core are sufficiently resolved. We find that the Jeans length, which determines the central core region, has to be resolved by at least 30 grid cells to capture the dynamo activity. We conclude from our studies that strong magnetic fields will be unavoidably created already during the formation of the first stars in the Universe, potentially influencing their evolution and mass distribution.

  1. Magnetic Field Amplification by Small-Scale Dynamo Action: Dependence on Turbulence Models, Reynolds and Prandtl Numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Schober, Jennifer; Federrath, Christoph; Klessen, Ralf; Banerjee, Robi

    2011-01-01

    The small-scale dynamo is a process by which turbulent kinetic energy is converted into magnetic energy, and thus is expected to depend crucially on the nature of turbulence. In this work, we present a model for the small-scale dynamo that takes into account the slope of the turbulent velocity spectrum v(l) ~ l^theta, where l and v(l) are the size of a turbulent fluctuation and the typical velocity on that scale. The time evolution of the fluctuation component of the magnetic field, i.e., the small-scale field, is described by the Kazantsev equation. We solve this linear differential equation for its eigenvalues with the quantum-mechanical WKB-approximation. The validity of this method is estimated as a function of the magnetic Prandtl number Pm. We calculate the minimal magnetic Reynolds number for dynamo action, Rm_crit, using our model of the turbulent velocity correlation function. For Kolmogorov turbulence (theta=1/3), we find that the critical magnetic Reynolds number is approximately 110 and for Burger...

  2. Errata for cosmological magnetic fields and string dynamo in axion torsioned spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Andrade, L C G

    2015-01-01

    Recently much controversy has been shed on BICEP 2 experiments for the concerning this validity or not and a possible set of new experiments to detect primordial inflation and gravitational waves. Since gravitational waves imply the existence of primordial magnetic fields in this context, C Bonvin, R Durrer and R Marteens [Phys Rev Lett (2014)] have tried to associate the presence of primordial magnetic fields to BICEP 2 by making use of CMB tensor modes. Here we show that by considering torsion dilatonic lagrangean one obtains cosmological magnetic fields of the order of $B\\sim{10^{-10}G}$ which may seed galactic dynamos. Actually this new result came out of a mistake of a recent paper published by myself in JCAP (2014). These results are more in accordance with Bamba results [JCAP (2014)] in the context of teleparallel theory of gravity with Einstein's distant parallelism and torsion. These results also support Einstein-Cartan sort of theories of gravity from well-known recent data.

  3. The Atmospheric Dynamics of Alpha Tau (K5 III) -- Clues to Understanding the Magnetic Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter Kenneth G.

    2008-01-01

    Using HST/GHRS, HST/STIS and FUSE archival data for (alpha) Tau and the CHIANTI spectroscopic code, we have derived line shifts, volumetric emission measures, and plasma density estimates, and calculated filling factors for a number of UV lines forming between 10,000 K and 300,000 K in the outer atmosphere of this red giant star. The data suggest the presence of low-temperature extended regions and high-temperature compact regions, associated with magnetically open and closed structures in the stellar atmosphere, respectively. The signatures of UV lines from Alpha Tau can be consistently understood via a model of upward-traveling Alfven waves in a gravitationally stratified atmosphere. These wakes cause non-thermal broadening in UV lines due to unresolved wave motions and downward plasma motions in compact magnetic loops heated by resonant .4lf\\en wave heating. We discuss implications of this interpretation for understanding the nature of magnetic dynamos operating in late-type giants.

  4. Plasma dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Rincon, F; Schekochihin, A A; Valentini, F

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic fields pervade the entire Universe and, through their dynamical interactions with matter, affect the formation and evolution of astrophysical systems from cosmological to planetary scales. How primordial cosmological seed fields arose and were further amplified to $\\mu$Gauss levels reported in nearby galaxy clusters, near equipartition with kinetic energy of plasma motions and on scales of at least tens of kiloparsecs, is a major theoretical puzzle still largely unconstrained by observations. Extragalactic plasmas are weakly collisional (as opposed to collisional magnetohydrodynamic fluids), and whether magnetic-field growth and its sustainment through an efficient dynamo instability driven by chaotic motions is possible in such plasmas is not known. Fully kinetic numerical simulations of the Vlasov equation in a six-dimensional phase space necessary to answer this question have until recently remained beyond computational capabilities. Here, we show by means of such simulations that magnetic-field a...

  5. A coupled 2$\\times$2D Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo model. I. Surface magnetic flux evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Lemerle, Alexandre; Carignan-Dugas, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    The need for reliable predictions of the solar activity cycle motivates the development of dynamo models incorporating a representation of surface processes sufficiently detailed to allow assimilation of magnetographic data. In this series of papers we present one such dynamo model, and document its behavior and properties. This first paper focuses on one of the model's key components, namely surface magnetic flux evolution. Using a genetic algorithm, we obtain best-fit parameters of the transport model by least-squares minimization of the differences between the associated synthetic synoptic magnetogram and real magnetographic data for activity cycle 21. Our fitting procedure also returns Monte Carlo-like error estimates. We show that the range of acceptable surface meridional flow profiles is in good agreement with Doppler measurements, even though the latter are not used in the fitting process. Using a synthetic database of bipolar magnetic region (BMR) emergences reproducing the statistical properties of ...

  6. Small-scale dynamo magnetism as the driver for heating the solar atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amari, Tahar; Luciani, Jean-François; Aly, Jean-Jacques

    2015-06-11

    The long-standing problem of how the solar atmosphere is heated has been addressed by many theoretical studies, which have stressed the relevance of two specific mechanisms, involving magnetic reconnection and waves, as well as the necessity of treating the chromosphere and corona together. But a fully consistent model has not yet been constructed and debate continues, in particular about the possibility of coronal plasma being heated by energetic phenomena observed in the chromosphere. Here we report modelling of the heating of the quiet Sun, in which magnetic fields are generated by a subphotospheric fluid dynamo intrinsically connected to granulation. We find that the fields expand into the chromosphere, where plasma is heated at the rate required to match observations (4,500 watts per square metre) by small-scale eruptions that release magnetic energy and drive sonic motions. Some energetic eruptions can even reach heights of 10 million metres above the surface of the Sun, thereby affecting the very low corona. Extending the model by also taking into account the vertical weak network magnetic field allows for the existence of a mechanism able to heat the corona above, while leaving unchanged the physics of chromospheric eruptions. Such a mechanism rests on the eventual dissipation of Alfvén waves generated inside the chromosphere and that carry upwards the required energy flux of 300 watts per square metre. The model shows a topologically complex magnetic field of 160 gauss on the Sun's surface, agreeing with inferences obtained from spectropolarimetric observations, chromospheric features (contributing only weakly to the coronal heating) that can be identified with observed spicules and blinkers, and vortices that may be possibly associated with observed solar tornadoes.

  7. Parker's dynamo and geomagnetic reversals

    CERN Document Server

    Reshetnyak, M

    2011-01-01

    Fluctuations of the alpha-effect which break equatorial symmetry of the flow in the kinematic Parker's dynamo are considered. We show, that even small (a few percents) fluctuation can leed to the substantial assymmetry of the magnetic field in the hemispheres as well as the propagation of the dynamo wave through the equator plane. We also consider how change of the dynamo number can be used to explain different regimes of magnetic field generation in geodynamo.

  8. Magnetic field amplification in proto-neutron stars -- The role of the neutron-finger instability for dynamo excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Naso, L; Bonanno, A; Paternò, L

    2007-01-01

    During the first 40 s after their birth, proto-neutron stars are expected to be subject to at least two types of instability: the convective instability and the neutron-finger one. Both instabilities involve convective motions and hence can trigger dynamo actions which may be responsible for the large magnetic fields in neutron stars and magnetars. We have solved the mean-field induction equation in a simplified one-dimensional model of both the convective and the neutron-finger instability zones. Although very idealized, the model includes the nonlinearities introduced by the feedback processes which tend to saturate the growth of the magnetic field (alpha-quenching) and suppress its turbulent diffusion (eta-quenching). The possibility of a dynamo action is studied within a dynamical model of turbulent diffusivity where the boundary of the unstable zone is allowed to move. We show that the dynamo action can be operative and that the amplification of the magnetic field can still be very effective. Furthermore...

  9. Global simulations of axisymmetric radiative black hole accretion discs in general relativity with a mean-field magnetic dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sądowski, Aleksander; Narayan, Ramesh; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander; Abarca, David; Zhu, Yucong; McKinney, Jonathan C.

    2015-02-01

    We present a mean-field model that emulates the magnetic dynamo operating in magnetized accretion discs. We have implemented this model in the general relativisic radiation magnetohydrodynamic (GRRMHD) code KORAL, using results from local shearing sheet simulations of the magnetorotational instability to fix the parameters of the dynamo. With the inclusion of this dynamo, we are able to run 2D axisymmetric GRRMHD simulations of accretion discs for arbitrarily long times. The simulated discs exhibit sustained turbulence, with the poloidal and toroidal magnetic field components driven towards a state similar to that seen in 3D studies. Using this dynamo code, we present a set of long-duration global simulations of super-Eddington, optically thick discs around non-spinning and spinning black holes. Super-Eddington discs around non-rotating black holes exhibit a surprisingly large efficiency, η ≈ 0.04, independent of the accretion rate, where we measure efficiency in terms of the total energy output, both radiation and mechanical, flowing out to infinity. This value significantly exceeds the efficiency predicted by slim disc models for these accretion rates. Super-Eddington discs around spinning black holes are even more efficient, and appear to extract black hole rotational energy through a process similar to the Blandford-Znajek mechanism. All the simulated models are characterized by highly super-Eddington radiative fluxes collimated along the rotation axis. We also present a set of simulations that were designed to have Eddington or slightly sub-Eddington accretion rates (dot{M} ≲ 2dot{M}_Edd). None of these models reached a steady state. Instead, the discs collapsed as a result of runaway cooling, presumably because of a thermal instability.

  10. A small-scale dynamo in feedback-dominated galaxies as the origin of cosmic magnetic fields - I. The kinematic phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Michael; Teyssier, Romain

    2016-04-01

    The origin and evolution of magnetic fields in the Universe is still an open question. Their observations in galaxies suggest strong magnetic fields already at high redshift as well as at present time. However, neither primordial magnetic fields nor battery processes can account for such high field strengths, which implies the presence of a dynamo process with rapid growth rates in high-redshift galaxies and subsequent maintenance against decay. We investigate the particular role played by feedback mechanisms in creating strong fluid turbulence, allowing for a magnetic dynamo to emerge. Performing magnetohydrodynamic simulations of isolated cooling gas haloes, we compare the magnetic field evolution for various initial field topologies and various stellar feedback mechanisms. We find that feedback can indeed drive strong gas turbulence and dynamo action. We see typical properties of Kolmogorov turbulence with a k-5/3 kinetic energy spectrum, as well as a small-scale dynamo, with a k3/2 magnetic energy spectrum predicted by Kazantsev dynamo theory. We also investigate simulations with a final quiescent phase. As turbulence decreases, the galactic fountain settles into a thin, rotationally supported disc. The magnetic field develops a large-scale well-ordered structure with even symmetry, which is in good agreement with magnetic field observations of nearby spirals. Our findings suggest that weak initial seed fields were first amplified by a small-scale dynamo during a violent feedback-dominated early phase in the galaxy formation history, followed by a more quiescent evolution, where the fields have slowly decayed or were maintained via large-scale dynamo action.

  11. Antifungal properties of alpha,omega-alkanedicarboxylic acids and their dimethyl esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, H; Shanks, L

    1976-08-01

    Thirteen alpha, omega-alkanedicarboxylic acids (C2-C12, C14, and C16) and their dimethyl esters were tested against Aspergillus niger, Trichoderma viride, and Myrothecium verrucaria in Sabourauc dextrose agar at pH 4.0 AND 5.6. Toxicity to Canadida albicans, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, and Mucor mucedo was determined in the same medium at pH 5.6 and 7.0 in the absence and presence of 10% beef serum. The dicarboxylic acids possessed very poor to no antifungal activity against all six fungi. The fungitoxicity of the dimethyl esters to A. niger, T. viride, and M. verrucaria was C8 = C9 greater than C7 greater than C6 = C5 greater than C10 greater than C4 greater than C11 and to C. albicans, T. mentagrophytes, and M. mucedo C9 greater than C10 greater than C11 greater than C12 = C8 greater than C7 greater than C6 greater than C5 greater than C4 greater than C3. The fungitoxicity of the esters of fatty acids and alpha-omega-alkanedicarboxylic acids was influenced by chain length and not by the pH of the medium or the absence or presence of beef serum.

  12. Magnetization in the South Pole-Aitken basin: Implications for the lunar dynamo and true polar wander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Michael; Hemingway, Doug; Garrick-Bethell, Ian

    2017-04-01

    A number of magnetic anomalies are present along the northern edge of the lunar South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin. A variety of hypotheses for their formation have been proposed, but an in-depth study of their properties has not been performed. Here we use two different methods to invert for their source body characteristics: one that completely searches a small parameter space of less than ten uniform-strength dipoles per anomaly, and another that uses grids of hundreds of dipoles with variable magnetization strengths. Both methods assume uniform magnetization directions at each anomaly and with one exception, produce nearly the same results. We introduce new Monte Carlo methods to quantify errors in our inversions arising from Gaussian time-dependent changes in the external field and the uncertain geometry of the source bodies. We find the errors from uncertainty in source body geometry are almost always higher. We also find a diverse set of magnetization directions around SPA, which we combine with other physical arguments to conclude that the source bodies were likely magnetized in a dynamo field. Igneous intrusions are a reasonable explanation (Purucker et al., 2012) for the directional variability, since they could be intruded over different magnetic epochs. However, the directional variability also implies either surprisingly large amounts of true polar wander or a dynamo not aligned with the lunar spin axis. We also explore the possibility that true polar wander caused by the SPA impact could allow iron-rich SPA ejecta to record a diverse set of magnetic field directions. Some of this material may have also become "sesquinary" ejecta and re-impacted across the Moon on 104-106 year timescales to capture such changes. No completely satisfactory answer emerges, except that the dipole-axis of the lunar dynamo may have been variable in direction.

  13. The Magnetic Fields of the Universe and Their Origin

    CERN Document Server

    Colgate, S A

    2000-01-01

    Recent rotation measure observations of a dozen or so galaxy clusters have revealed a surprisingly large amount of magnetic fields, whose estimated energy and flux are, on average, $\\sim 10^{58}$ ergs and $\\sim 10^{41}$ G cm$^2$, respectively. These quantities are so much larger than any coherent sums of individual galaxies within the cluster that an efficient galactic dynamo is required. We associate these fields with single AGNs within the cluster and therefore with all galaxies during their AGN phase. Only the central, massive black hole (BH) has the necessary binding energy, $\\sim 10^{61}$ ergs. Only the accretion disk during the BH formation has the winding number, $\\sim 10^{11}$ turns, necessary to make the gain and magnetic flux. We present a model of the BH accretion disk dynamo that might create these magnetic fields, where the helicity of the $\\alpha - \\Omega$ dynamo is driven by star-disk collisions. The back reaction of the saturated dynamo forms a force-free field helix that carries the energy an...

  14. Large Scale Dynamos in Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishniac, Ethan T.

    2015-01-01

    We show that a differentially rotating conducting fluid automatically creates a magnetic helicity flux with components along the rotation axis and in the direction of the local vorticity. This drives a rapid growth in the local density of current helicity, which in turn drives a large scale dynamo. The dynamo growth rate derived from this process is not constant, but depends inversely on the large scale magnetic field strength. This dynamo saturates when buoyant losses of magnetic flux compete with the large scale dynamo, providing a simple prediction for magnetic field strength as a function of Rossby number in stars. Increasing anisotropy in the turbulence produces a decreasing magnetic helicity flux, which explains the flattening of the B/Rossby number relation at low Rossby numbers. We also show that the kinetic helicity is always a subdominant effect. There is no kinematic dynamo in real stars.

  15. Magnetic fields in primordial accretion disks

    CERN Document Server

    Latif, Muhammad A

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields are considered as a vital ingredient of contemporary star formation, and may have been important during the formation of the first stars in the presence of an efficient amplification mechanism. Initial seed fields are provided via plasma fluctuations, and are subsequently amplified by the small-scale dynamo, leading to a strong tangled magnetic field. Here we explore how the magnetic field provided by the small-scale dynamo is further amplified via the $\\alpha-\\Omega$ dynamo in a protostellar disk and assess its implications. For this purpose, we consider two characteristic cases, a typical Pop.~III star with $10$~M$_\\odot$ and an accretion rate of $10^{-3}$~M$_\\odot$~yr$^{-1}$, and a supermassive star with $10^5$~M$_\\odot$ and an accretion rate of $10^{-1}$~M$_\\odot$~yr$^{-1}$. For the $10$~M$_\\odot$ Pop.~III star, we find that coherent magnetic fields can be produced on scales of at least $100$~AU, which are sufficient to drive a jet with a luminosity of $100$~L$_\\odot$ and a mass outflow ra...

  16. Simulations of a Magnetic Fluctuation Driven Large Scale Dynamo and Comparison with a Two-scale Model

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Kiwan

    2012-01-01

    Models of large scale (magnetohydrodynamic) dynamos (LSD) which couple large scale field growth to total magnetic helicity evolution best predict the saturation of LSDs seen in simulations. For the simplest so called "{\\alpha}2" LSDs in periodic boxes, the electromotive force driving LSD growth depends on the difference between the time-integrated kinetic and current helicity associated with fluctuations. When the system is helically kinetically forced (KF), the growth of the large scale helical field is accompanied by growth of small scale magnetic (and current) helicity which ultimately quench the LSD. Here, using both simulations and theory, we study the complementary magnetically forced(MF) case in which the system is forced with an electric field that supplies magnetic helicity. For this MF case, the kinetic helicity becomes the back-reactor that saturates the LSD. Simulations of both MF and KF cases can be approximately modeled with the same equations of magnetic helicity evolution, but with complementa...

  17. The Solar Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, David H.

    1998-01-01

    The solar dynamo is the process by which the Sun's magnetic field is generated through the interaction of the field with convection and rotation. In this, it is kin to planetary dynamos and other stellar dynamos. Although the precise mechanism by which the Sun generates its field remains poorly understood despite decades of theoretical and observational work, recent advances suggest that solutions to this solar dynamo problem may be forthcoming. Two basic processes are involved in dynamo activity. When the fluid stresses dominate the magnetic stresses (high plasma beta = 8(pi)rho/B(sup 2)), shear flows can stretch magnetic field lines in the direction of the shear (the "alpha effect") and helical flows can lift and twist field lines into orthogonal planes (the "alpha effect"). These two processes can be active anywhere in the solar convection zone but with different results depending upon their relative strengths and signs. Little is known about how and where these processes occur. Other processes, such as magnetic diffusion and the effects of the fine scale structure of the solar magnetic field, pose additional problems.

  18. The surprising magnetic topology of τ Sco: fossil remnant or dynamo output?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, J.-F.; Howarth, I. D.; Jardine, M. M.; Petit, P.; Catala, C.; Landstreet, J. D.; Bouret, J.-C.; Alecian, E.; Barnes, J. R.; Forveille, T.; Paletou, F.; Manset, N.

    2006-08-01

    We report the discovery of a medium-strength (~0.5 kG) magnetic field on the young, massive star τ Sco (B0.2V), which becomes the third-hottest magnetic star known. Circularly polarized Zeeman signatures are clearly detected in observations collected mostly with the ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter, recently installed on the 3.6-m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope; temporal variability is also clearly established in the polarimetry, and can be unambiguously attributed to rotational modulation with a period close to 41 d. Archival ultraviolet (UV) spectra confirm that this modulation repeats over time-scales of decades, and refine the rotation period to 41.033 +/- 0.002 d. Despite the slow rotation rate of τ Sco, we none the less succeed in reconstructing the large-scale structure of its magnetic topology. We find that the magnetic structure is unusually complex for a hot star, with significant power in spherical-harmonic modes of degree up to 5. The surface topology is dominated by a potential field, although a moderate toroidal component is probably present. We fail to detect intrinsic temporal variability of the magnetic structure over the 1.5-yr period of our spectropolarimetric observations (in agreement with the stable temporal variations of the UV spectra), and infer that any differential surface rotation must be very small. The topology of the extended magnetic field that we derive from the photospheric magnetic maps is also more complex than a global dipole, and features in particular a significantly warped torus of closed magnetic loops encircling the star (tilted at about 90° to the rotation axis), with additional, smaller, networks of closed-field lines. This topology appears to be consistent with the exceptional X-ray properties of τ Sco and also provides a natural explanation of the variability observed in wind-formed UV lines. Although we cannot completely rule out the possibility that the field is produced through dynamo processes of an exotic kind, we

  19. Effect of temperature on the dilution enthalpies of {alpha},{omega}-amino acids in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, C.M., E-mail: cmromeroi@unal.edu.co [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia); Cadena, J.C., E-mail: jccadena@unal.edu.co [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia); Lamprecht, I., E-mail: ingolf.lamprecht@t-online.de [Institut fuer Biologie, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: > The dilution of 3-amino propanoic acid, 4-amino butanoic acid, 5-amino pentanoic acid, and 6-amino hexanoic acid in water is an exothermic process at T = (293.15, 298.15, 303.15, and 308.15) K. > The limiting experimental slopes of the enthalpies of dilution with respect to the molality change {Delta}m, are negative suggesting that the solutes interact with water primarily through their alkyl groups. > The value of the pairwise coefficient is positive at the temperatures considered, and the magnitude increases linearly with the number of methylene groups. > The comparison between the pairwise interaction coefficients for {alpha},{omega}-amino acids and {alpha}-amino acids shows that the change in the enthalpic interaction coefficient is related to the relative position of the polar groups. - Abstract: Dilution enthalpies of aqueous solutions of 3-amino propanoic acid, 4-amino butanoic acid, 5-amino pentanoic acid, and 6-amino hexanoic acid were determined at T = (293.15, 298.15, 303.15, and 308.15) K using an LKB flow microcalorimeter. The homotactic interaction coefficients were obtained according to the McMillan-Mayer theory from the experimental data. For all the systems studied, the dilution of {alpha},{omega}-amino acids in water is an exothermic process; the pair coefficients have positive values which increases with chain length. The obtained values of the interaction coefficients are interpreted in terms of solute-solvent and solute-solute interactions and are used as indicative of hydrophobic behavior of the amino acid studied.

  20. Mathematical aspects of natural dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Dormy, Emmanuel

    2007-01-01

    Although the origin of Earth's and other celestial bodies' magnetic fields remains unknown, we do know that the motion of electrically conducting fluids generates and maintains these fields, forming the basis of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and, to a larger extent, dynamo theory. Answering the need for a comprehensive, interdisciplinary introduction to this area, ""Mathematical Aspects of Natural Dynamos"" provides a foundation in dynamo theory before moving on to modeling aspects of natural dynamos.Bringing together eminent international contributors, the book first introduces governing equatio

  1. Dynamos of giant planets

    CERN Document Server

    Busse, F H; 10.1017/S1743921307000920

    2009-01-01

    Possibilities and difficulties of applying the theory of magnetic field generation by convection flows in rotating spherical fluid shells to the Giant Planets are outlined. Recent progress in the understanding of the distribution of electrical conductivity in the Giant Planets suggests that the dynamo process occurs predominantly in regions of semiconductivity. In contrast to the geodynamo the magnetic field generation in the Giant Planets is thus characterized by strong radial conductivity variations. The importance of the constraint on the Ohmic dissipation provided by the planetary luminosity is emphasized. Planetary dynamos are likely to be of an oscillatory type, although these oscillations may not be evident from the exterior of the planets.

  2. Intermittency in spherical Couette dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Raynaud, Raphaël; 10.1103/PhysRevE.87.033011

    2013-01-01

    We investigate dynamo action in three-dimensional numerical simulations of turbulent spherical Couette flows. Close to the onset of dynamo action, the magnetic field exhibits an intermittent behavior, characterized by a series of short bursts of the magnetic energy separated by low-energy phases. We show that this behavior corresponds to the so-called on-off intermittency. This behavior is here reported for dynamo action with realistic boundary conditions. We investigate the role of magnetic boundary conditions in this phenomenon.

  3. Dynamo efficiency in large scale magnetic fields in parity violation torsion theories

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, Garcia

    2015-01-01

    Earlier a nondynamo theory in teleparallel gravity was developed by Bamba et al-JCAP 2010. Also earlier I have been obtained a dynamo equation generalised to spacetime with torsion - PLB 2012. In this paper we obtained from this equation $10^{-11}G$ instead $10^{-9}G$ obtained by Bamba et al.

  4. Observing and modelling the poloidal and toroidal magnetic fields of the global dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Robert; Duvall, Thomas; Schüssler, Manfred; Schunker, Hannah

    2017-08-01

    The large scale solar dynamo is a cycle where poloidal flux is generated from toroidal flux, and toroidal flux is generated from poloidal flux. The toroidal and poloidal fields can be inferred from observations, and the Babcock-Leighton model shows how differential rotation and flux emergence explain the observed evolution of the fields.

  5. Properties of Nonlinear Dynamo Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    Dynamo theory offers the most promising explanation of the generation of the sun's magnetic cycle. Mean field electrodynamics has provided the platform for linear and nonlinear models of solar dynamos. However, the nonlinearities included are (necessarily) arbitrarily imposed in these models. This paper conducts a systematic survey of the role of nonlinearities in the dynamo process, by considering the behaviour of dynamo waves in the nonlinear regime. It is demonstrated that only by considering realistic nonlinearities that are non-local in space and time can modulation of the basic dynamo wave he achieved. Moreover, this modulation is greatest when there is a large separation of timescales provided by including a low magnetic Prandtl number in the equation for the velocity perturbations.

  6. Strong Field Spherical Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Dormy, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Numerical models of the geodynamo are usually classified in two categories: those denominated dipolar modes, observed when the inertial term is small enough, and multipolar fluctuating dynamos, for stronger forcing. I show that a third dynamo branch corresponding to a dominant force balance between the Coriolis force and the Lorentz force can be produced numerically. This force balance is usually referred to as the strong field limit. This solution co-exists with the often described viscous branch. Direct numerical simulations exhibit a transition from a weak-field dynamo branch, in which viscous effects set the dominant length scale, and the strong field branch in which viscous and inertial effects are largely negligible. These results indicate that a distinguished limit needs to be sought to produce numerical models relevant to the geodynamo and that the usual approach of minimizing the magnetic Prandtl number (ratio of the fluid kinematic viscosity to its magnetic diffusivity) at a given Ekman number is mi...

  7. A proposed paradigm for solar cycle dynamics mediated via turbulent pumping of magnetic flux in Babcock-Leighton type solar dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Hazra, Soumitra

    2016-01-01

    At present, Babcock-Leighton flux transport solar dynamo models appear as the most promising model for explaining diverse observational aspects of the sunspot cycle. The success of these flux transport dynamo models is largely dependent upon a single-cell meridional circulation with a deep equatorward component at the base of the Sun's convection zone. However, recent observations suggest that the meridional flow may in fact be very shallow (confined to the top 10 % of the Sun) and more complex than previously thought. Taken together these observations raise serious concerns on the validity of the flux transport paradigm. By accounting for the turbulent pumping of magnetic flux as evidenced in magnetohydrodynamic simulations of solar convection, we demonstrate that flux transport dynamo models can generate solar-like magnetic cycles even if the meridional flow is shallow. Solar-like periodic reversals is recovered even when meridional circulation is altogether absent, however, in this case the solar surface m...

  8. Copolymeric polythioesters by lipase-catalyzed thioesterification and transthioesterification of alpha,omega-alkanedithiols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, N; Bergander, K; Fehling, E; Klein, E; Vosmann, K; Mukherjee, K D

    2006-04-01

    Linear copolymeric polythioesters [PTE; poly(alpha,omega-alkanedioic acid-co-alpha,omega-alkanedithiols)] were formed in good yield (approximately 69%) by thioesterification of 1,12-dodecanedioic acid with 1,6-hexanedithiol and 1,8-octanedithiol, respectively, catalyzed by immobilized lipase from Rhizomucor miehei (Lipozyme RM IM) in vacuo without a solvent. Similarly, transthioesterification (thiolysis) of diethyl 1,12-dodecanedioate with 1,6-hexanedithiol led to the formation of approximately 66% PTE. Poly (1,12-dodecanedioic acid-co-1,6-hexanedithiol) and poly (1,12-dodecanedioic acid-co-1,8-octanedithiol) were extracted from the reaction mixture using methyl-t-butylether, precipitated at -20 degrees C and the precipitates extracted with boiling i-hexane to yield two fractions of PTE. The i-hexane-insoluble fraction of poly (1,12-dodecanedioic acid-co-1,6-hexanedithiol) shows an average molecular mass (Mw) of 1,212 Da, corresponding to a molecular weight range of up to 13,200 Da and a degree of polymerization of up to 38 monomer units. The i-hexane-insoluble fraction of poly (1,12-dodecanedioic acid-co-1,8-octanedithiol) shows a Mw of 2,360 Da, corresponding to a molecular weight range of up to 19,500 Da and a maximum degree of polymerization of up to 52 monomer units. The low-molecular weight (<800 Da) reaction products of thioesterification of 1,12-dodecanedioic acid with 1,6-hexanedithiol, elucidated by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy, show the following intermediates: (1) 9,20-dioxo-1,8-dithiacycloeicosane; (2) 17,28-dioxo-1,8,9,16-tetrathiacyclooctacosane; (3) 1,12-dodecanedioic acid methyl(O)ester 6'-S-mercaptohexyl thio(S)ester; and (4) oligomeric linear thioester, formed by thioesterification of two molecules of 1,12-dodecanedioic acid with one molecule of 1,6-hexanedithiol.

  9. High magnetic shear gain in a liquid sodium stable Couette flow experiment: a prelude to an α-Ω dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgate, Stirling A; Beckley, Howard; Si, Jiahe; Martinic, Joe; Westpfahl, David; Slutz, James; Westrom, Cebastian; Klein, Brianna; Schendel, Paul; Scharle, Cletus; McKinney, Travis; Ginanni, Rocky; Bentley, Ian; Mickey, Timothy; Ferrel, Regnar; Li, Hui; Pariev, Vladimir; Finn, John

    2011-04-29

    The Ω phase of the liquid sodium α-Ω dynamo experiment at New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology in cooperation with Los Alamos National Laboratory has demonstrated a high toroidal field B(ϕ) that is ≃8×B(r), where B(r) is the radial component of an applied poloidal magnetic field. This enhanced toroidal field is produced by the rotational shear in stable Couette flow within liquid sodium at a magnetic Reynolds number Rm≃120. Small turbulence in stable Taylor-Couette flow is caused by Ekman flow at the end walls, which causes an estimated turbulence energy fraction of (δv/v)(2)∼10(-3).

  10. A Reconnecting Flux Rope Dynamo

    OpenAIRE

    Baggaley, Andrew W.; Barenghi, Carlo F.; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-01-01

    We develop a new model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined in thin flux ropes advected by a multi-scale flow modeling turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnection of the flux ropes. We investigate the kinetic energy release into heat, mediated by the dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that a flux rope dynamo is an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into...

  11. The Karlsruhe Dynamo Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown theoretically in the past that homogeneous dynamos may occur in electrically conducting fluids for various vortical velocity fields. Roberts (1972 investigated spatially periodic, infinitely extended fields of vortices which Busse (1978, 1992 confined to a finite cylindrical domain. Based on Busse's vortex arrangement a conceptual design for an experimental homogeneous dynamo has been developed and a test facility was setup at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The first experiments demonstrated that permanent dynamo action can be generated in a cylindrical container filled with liquid sodium in which by means of guide tubes counterrotating and countercurrent spiral vortices are established. The dynamo is self-exciting and the magnetic field saturates at a mean value for fixed super-critical flow rates. The instantaneous magnetic field fluctuates around this mean value by an order of about 5%. As predicted by theory the mode of the observed magnetic field is non-axisymmetric. In a series of experiments a phase- and a bifurcation diagram has been derived as a function of the spiral and axial flow rates.

  12. Radiative transfer dynamo effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munirov, Vadim R.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic fields in rotating and radiating astrophysical plasma can be produced due to a radiative interaction between plasma layers moving relative to each other. The efficiency of current drive, and with it the associated dynamo effect, is considered in a number of limits. It is shown here, however, that predictions for these generated magnetic fields can be significantly higher when kinetic effects, previously neglected, are taken into account.

  13. Interface dynamos in supernova progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Blackman, E G; Thomas, J H; Blackman, Eric G.; Nordhaus, Jason T.; Thomas, John H.

    2004-01-01

    Observational evidence for anisotropy in supernovae (SN) and their phenomenological connection to jetted sources such as gamma-ray bursts^Mhave revived considerations of the role magnetohydrodynamic outflows might play therein. Understanding the types of dynamos that might operate in supernova progenitors is therefore relevant. In contrast to previous work, here we study an ``interface dynamo'' for the conditions of a rapidly rotating neutron star surrounded by a convective envelope. Such dynamos have been studied for the Sun, naked white dwarfs,and post-AGB stars, where analogous configurations of strong shear layers surrounded by convective envelopes are present. The interface dynamo provides estimates of large-scale poloidal and toroidal fields, whose product enters the Poynting flux. Because the poloidal field is much weaker than the toroidal magnetic field, the actual average Poynting flux is lower than rough estimates which invoke the only the magnitude of the total magnetic energy. The lower value is s...

  14. The DYNAMO Orbiter Project: High Resolution Mapping of Gravity/Magnetic Fields and In Situ Investigation of Mars Atmospheric Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrekar, S.; Chassefiere, E.; Forget, F.; Reme, H.; Mazelle, C.; Blelly, P. -L.; Acuna, M.; Connerney, J.; Purucker, M.; Lin, R.

    2000-01-01

    Dynamo is a small Mars orbiter planned to be launched in 2005 or 2007, in the frame of the NASA/CNES Mars exploration program. It is aimed at improving gravity and magnetic field resolution, in order to better understand the magnetic, geologic and thermal history of Mars, and at characterizing current atmospheric escape, which is still poorly constrained. These objectives are achieved by using a low periapsis orbit, similar to the one used by the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft during its aerobraking phases. The proposed periapsis altitude for Dynamo of 120-130 km, coupled with the global distribution of periapses to be obtained during one Martian year of operation, through about 5000 low passes, will produce a magnetic/gravity field data set with approximately five times the spatial resolution of MGS. Low periapsis provides a unique opportunity to investigate the chemical and dynamical properties of the deep ionosphere, thermosphere, and the interaction between the atmosphere and the solar wind, therefore atmospheric escape, which may have played a crucial role in removing atmosphere, and water, from the planet. There is much room for debate on the importance of current atmosphere escape processes in the evolution of the Martian atmosphere, as early "exotic" processes including hydrodynamic escape and impact erosion are traditionally invoked to explain the apparent sparse inventory of present-day volatiles. Yet, the combination of low surface gravity and the absence of a substantial internally generated magnetic field have undeniable effects on what we observe today. In addition to the current losses in the forms of Jeans and photochemical escape of neutrals, there are solar wind interaction-related erosion mechanisms because the upper atmosphere is directly exposed to the solar wind. The solar wind related loss rates, while now comparable to those of a modest comet, nonetheless occur continuously, with the intriguing possibility of important cumulative and

  15. Reconnecting flux-rope dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggaley, Andrew W.; Barenghi, Carlo F.; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-11-01

    We develop a model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined to thin flux ropes advected by a multiscale model of turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnection of the flux ropes. This model can be viewed as an implementation of the asymptotic limit Rm→∞ for a continuous magnetic field, where magnetic dissipation is strongly localized to small regions of strong-field gradients. We investigate the kinetic-energy release into heat mediated by the dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that a flux-rope dynamo is an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into heat. The probability density of the magnetic energy release in reconnections has a power-law form with the slope -3 , consistent with the solar corona heating by nanoflares.

  16. Reconnecting flux-rope dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggaley, Andrew W; Barenghi, Carlo F; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-11-01

    We develop a model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined to thin flux ropes advected by a multiscale model of turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnection of the flux ropes. This model can be viewed as an implementation of the asymptotic limit R_{m}-->infinity for a continuous magnetic field, where magnetic dissipation is strongly localized to small regions of strong-field gradients. We investigate the kinetic-energy release into heat mediated by the dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that a flux-rope dynamo is an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into heat. The probability density of the magnetic energy release in reconnections has a power-law form with the slope -3 , consistent with the solar corona heating by nanoflares.

  17. Rieger-type periodicity during solar cycles 14-24: estimation of dynamo magnetic field strength in the solar interior

    CERN Document Server

    Gurgenashvili, Eka; Kukhianidze, Vasil; Oliver, Ramon; Ballester, Jose Luis; Ramishvili, Giorgi; Shergelashvili, Bidzina; Hanslmeier, Arnold; Poedts, Stefaan

    2016-01-01

    Solar activity undergoes a variation over time scales of several months known as Rieger-type periodicity, which usually occurs near maxima of sunspot cycles. An early analysis showed that the periodicity appears only in some cycles, and is absent in other cycles. But the appearance/absence during different cycles has not been explained. We performed a wavelet analysis of sunspot data from the Greenwich Royal Observatory and the Royal Observatory of Belgium during cycles 14-24. We found that the Rieger-type periods occur in all cycles, but they are cycle-dependent: shorter periods occur during stronger cycles. Our analysis revealed a periodicity of 185-195 days during the weak cycles 14-15 and 24, and a periodicity of 155-165 days during the stronger cycles 16-23. We derived the dispersion relation of the spherical harmonics of the magnetic Rossby waves in the presence of differential rotation and a toroidal magnetic field in the dynamo layer near the base of the convection zone. This showed that the harmonic ...

  18. Dynamo transition in a five-mode helical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rohit; Wahi, Pankaj

    2017-09-01

    We construct a five-mode helical dynamo model containing three velocity and two magnetic modes and solve it analytically. This model exhibits dynamo transition via supercritical pitchfork bifurcation. We show that the critical magnetic Reynolds number for dynamo transition (Rmc) asymptotes to constant values for very low and very high magnetic Prandtl numbers (Pm). Beyond dynamo transition, secondary bifurcations lead to periodic, quasi-periodic, and chaotic dynamo states as the forcing amplitude is increased and chaos appears through a quasi-periodic route.

  19. Antifungal properties of n-alkanols, alpha, omega-n-alkanediols, and omega-chloro-alpha-alkanols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, H; Shanks, L

    1980-04-01

    Fourteen n-alkanols (C1-C12, C14, and C16), 13 alpha,omega-n-alkanediols (C2-C12, C14, and C16), and 13 omega-chloro-alpha-alkanols (C2-C12, C14, and C16) were tested against Aspergillus niger, Trichoderma viride, and Myrothecium verucaria in Sabouraud dextrose agar at pH 4.0 and 5.6. Toxicity to Candida blbicans, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, and Mucor mucedo was determined in the same medium at pH 5.6 and 7.0 in the absence and presence of 10% beef serum. The fungitoxicity of these alcohols was influenced by chain length and insignificantly by the pH of the medium and the presence of beef serum. The C10-member of each series was most active; the order of activity of the three groups was chloroalkanols greater than alkanols greater than alkanediols. Compared to the fatty acids, the order of fungitoxicity on a weight basis was 2-alkynoic acids greater than 2-alkenoic acids greater than omega-chloralkanols greater than alkanoic acids greater than 2-bromoalkanoic acids greater than 2-fluoroalkanoic acids greater than n-alkoxyacetic acids greater than n-alkanols greater than alpha,omega-n-alkanediols.

  20. Dynamo transition in low-dimensional models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Mahendra K; Lessinnes, Thomas; Carati, Daniele; Sarris, Ioannis; Kumar, Krishna; Singh, Meenakshi

    2008-09-01

    Two low-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic models containing three velocity and three magnetic modes are described. One of them (nonhelical model) has zero kinetic and current helicity, while the other model (helical) has nonzero kinetic and current helicity. The velocity modes are forced in both these models. These low-dimensional models exhibit a dynamo transition at a critical forcing amplitude that depends on the Prandtl number. In the nonhelical model, dynamo exists only for magnetic Prandtl number beyond 1, while the helical model exhibits dynamo for all magnetic Prandtl number. Although the model is far from reproducing all the possible features of dynamo mechanisms, its simplicity allows a very detailed study and the observed dynamo transition is shown to bear similarities with recent numerical and experimental results.

  1. A Reconnecting Flux Rope Dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Baggaley, Andrew W; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-01-01

    We develop a new model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined in thin flux ropes advected by a multi-scale flow modeling turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnection of the flux ropes. We investigate the kinetic energy release into heat, mediated by the dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that a flux rope dynamo is an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into heat. The probability density of the magnetic energy release in reconnections has a power-law form with the slope -3, consistent with the Solar corona heating by nanoflares.

  2. Magnetic anomalies in the Imbrium and Schrödinger impact basins: Orbital evidence for persistence of the lunar core dynamo into the Imbrian epoch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, L. L.; Spudis, P. D.

    2016-11-01

    Approximate maps of the lunar crustal magnetic field at low altitudes in the vicinities of the three Imbrian-aged impact basins, Orientale, Schrödinger, and Imbrium, have been constructed using Lunar Prospector and Kaguya orbital magnetometer data. Detectable anomalies are confirmed to be present well within the rims of Imbrium and Schrödinger. Anomalies in Schrödinger are asymmetrically distributed about the basin center, while a single isolated anomaly is most clearly detected within Imbrium northwest of Timocharis crater. The subsurface within these basins was heated to high temperatures at the time of impact and required long time periods (up to 1 Myr) to cool below the Curie temperature for metallic iron remanence carriers (1043 K). Therefore, consistent with laboratory analyses of returned samples, a steady, long-lived magnetizing field, i.e., a former core dynamo, is inferred to have existed when these basins formed. The asymmetrical distribution within Schrödinger suggests partial demagnetization by later volcanic activity when the dynamo field was much weaker or nonexistent. However, it remains true that anomalies within Imbrian-aged basins are much weaker than those within most Nectarian-aged basins. The virtual absence of anomalies within Orientale where impact melt rocks (the Maunder Formation) are exposed at the surface is difficult to explain unless the dynamo field was much weaker during the Imbrian period.

  3. Kinematic dynamo action in square and hexagonal patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favier, B; Proctor, M R E

    2013-11-01

    We consider kinematic dynamo action in rapidly rotating Boussinesq convection just above onset. The velocity is constrained to have either a square or a hexagonal pattern. For the square pattern, large-scale dynamo action is observed at onset, with most of the magnetic energy being contained in the horizontally averaged component. As the magnetic Reynolds number increases, small-scale dynamo action becomes possible, reducing the overall growth rate of the dynamo. For the hexagonal pattern, the breaking of symmetry between up and down flows results in an effective pumping velocity. For intermediate rotation rates, this additional effect can prevent the growth of any mean-field dynamo, so that only a small-scale dynamo is eventually possible at large enough magnetic Reynolds number. For very large rotation rates, this pumping term becomes negligible, and the dynamo properties of square and hexagonal patterns are qualitatively similar. These results hold for both perfectly conducting and infinite magnetic permeability boundary conditions.

  4. Helicity, Reconnection, and Dynamo Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Hantao

    1998-11-01

    The inter-relationships between magnetic helicity, magnetic reconnection, and dynamo effects are discussed. In laboratory experiments, where two plasmas are driven to merge, the helicity content of each plasma strongly affects the reconnection rate, as well as the shape of the diffusion region. Conversely, magnetic reconnection events also strongly affect the global helicity, resulting in efficient helicity cancellation (but not dissipation) during counter-helicity reconnection and a finite helicity increase or decrease (but less efficiently than dissipation of magnetic energy) during co-helicity reconnection. Close relationships also exist between magnetic helicity and dynamo effects. The turbulent electromotive force along the mean magnetic field (alpha-effect), due to either electrostatic turbulence or the electron diamagnetic effect, transports mean-field helicity across space without dissipation. This has been supported by direct measurements of helicity flux in a laboratory plasma. When the dynamo effect is driven by electromagnetic turbulence, helicity in the turbulent field is converted to mean-field helicity. In all cases, however, dynamo processes conserve total helicity except for a small battery effect, consistent with the observation that the helicity is approximately conserved during magnetic relaxation.

  5. Solar physics. The crucial role of surface magnetic fields for the solar dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Robert; Schüssler, Manfred

    2015-03-20

    Sunspots and the plethora of other phenomena occurring in the course of the 11-year cycle of solar activity are a consequence of the emergence of magnetic flux at the solar surface. The observed orientations of bipolar sunspot groups imply that they originate from toroidal (azimuthally orientated) magnetic flux in the convective envelope of the Sun. We show that the net toroidal magnetic flux generated by differential rotation within a hemisphere of the convection zone is determined by the emerged magnetic flux at the solar surface and thus can be calculated from the observed magnetic field distribution. The main source of the toroidal flux is the roughly dipolar surface magnetic field at the polar caps, which peaks around the minima of the activity cycle.

  6. The crucial role of surface magnetic fields for the solar dynamo

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron, Robert; Schüssler, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Sunspots and the plethora of other phenomena occuring in the course of the 11-year cycle of solar activity are a consequence of the emergence of magnetic flux at the solar surface. The observed orientations of bipolar sunspot groups imply that they originate from toroidal (azimuthally orientated) magnetic flux in the convective envelope of the Sun. We show that the net toroidal magnetic flux generated by differential rotation within a hemisphere of the convection zone is determined by the eme...

  7. COSMIC PLASMA DYNAMO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new dynamo model based on the polarization of plasma is presented in this paper.From the Maxwell equations in a moving medium, a magnetization vector can be causedwith Rongon current. The steady solar magnetic field is solved from the equations. Onthe assumption that the meridianal flow is ignored, the distribution of magnetic field isput out. In the model, there is no additional parameter considered. The intensity ofmagnetic field inside the sun ranges from 1-6T. The surface magnetic field around thepole is in the order of 1×10-3T, at low latitude the calculated surface magnetic fieldhas the order of 1×10-2 T. The maximum magnetic field is around 30° in latitude.

  8. Simulations of galactic dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, Axel

    2014-01-01

    We review our current understanding of galactic dynamo theory, paying particular attention to numerical simulations both of the mean-field equations and the original three-dimensional equations relevant to describing the magnetic field evolution for a turbulent flow. We emphasize the theoretical difficulties in explaining non-axisymmetric magnetic fields in galaxies and discuss the observational basis for such results in terms of rotation measure analysis. Next, we discuss nonlinear theory, the role of magnetic helicity conservation and magnetic helicity fluxes. This leads to the possibility that galactic magnetic fields may be bi-helical, with opposite signs of helicity and large and small length scales. We discuss their observational signatures and close by discussing the possibilities of explaining the origin of primordial magnetic fields.

  9. Some Recent Developments in Solar Dynamo Theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arnab Rai Choudhuri

    2006-06-01

    We discuss the current status of solar dynamo theory and describe the dynamo model developed by our group. The toroidal magnetic field is generated in the tachocline by the strong differential rotation and rises to the solar surface due to magnetic buoyancy to create active regions. The decay of these active regions at the surface gives rise to the poloidal magnetic field by the Babcock–Leighton mechanism. This poloidal field is advected by the meridional circulation first to high latitudes and then down below to the tachocline. Dynamo models based on these ideas match different aspects of observational data reasonably well.

  10. Dynamo and anomalous transport in the reversed field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prager, S.C.

    1998-08-01

    The reversed field pinch is an effective tool to study the macroscopic consequences of magnetic fluctuations, such as the dynamo effect and anomalous transport. Several explanations exist for the dynamo (the self-generation of plasma current)--the MHD dynamo, the kinetic dynamo, and the diamagnetic dynamo. There is some experimental evidence for each, particularly from measurements of ion velocity and electron pressure fluctuations. Magnetic fluctuations are known to produce energy and particle flux in the RFP core. Current profile control is able to decrease fluctuation-induced transport by a factor of five. Improved confinement regimes are also obtained at deep reversal and, possibly, with flow shear.

  11. Turbulent transport and dynamo in sheared magnetohydrodynamics turbulence with a nonuniform magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leprovost, Nicolas; Kim, Eun-Jin

    2009-08-01

    We investigate three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics turbulence in the presence of velocity and magnetic shear (i.e., with both a large-scale shear flow and a nonuniform magnetic field). By assuming a turbulence driven by an external forcing with both helical and nonhelical spectra, we investigate the combined effect of these two shears on turbulence intensity and turbulent transport represented by turbulent diffusivities (turbulent viscosity, alpha and beta effect) in Reynolds-averaged equations. We show that turbulent transport (turbulent viscosity and diffusivity) is quenched by a strong flow shear and a strong magnetic field. For a weak flow shear, we further show that the magnetic shear increases the turbulence intensity while decreasing the turbulent transport. In the presence of a strong flow shear, the effect of the magnetic shear is found to oppose the effect of flow shear (which reduces turbulence due to shear stabilization) by enhancing turbulence and transport, thereby weakening the strong quenching by flow shear stabilization. In the case of a strong magnetic field (compared to flow shear), magnetic shear increases turbulence intensity and quenches turbulent transport.

  12. Global Solar Dynamo Models: Simulations and Predictions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mausumi Dikpati; Peter A. Gilman

    2008-03-01

    Flux-transport type solar dynamos have achieved considerable success in correctly simulating many solar cycle features, and are now being used for prediction of solar cycle timing and amplitude.We first define flux-transport dynamos and demonstrate how they work. The essential added ingredient in this class of models is meridional circulation, which governs the dynamo period and also plays a crucial role in determining the Sun’s memory about its past magnetic fields.We show that flux-transport dynamo models can explain many key features of solar cycles. Then we show that a predictive tool can be built from this class of dynamo that can be used to predict mean solar cycle features by assimilating magnetic field data from previous cycles.

  13. The Role of Magnetic Buoyancy in a Babcock-Leighton Type Solar Dynamo

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dibyendu Nandy; Arnab Rai Choudhuri

    2000-09-01

    We study the effects of incorporating magnetic buoyancy in a model of the solar dynamo—which draws inspiration from the Babcock-Leighton idea of surface processes generating the poloidal field. We present our main results here.

  14. Chaotic dynamics of the magnetic field generated by dynamo action in a turbulent flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrelis, F; Fauve, S [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique, CNRS UMR 8550, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75005 Paris (France)], E-mail: petrelis@lps.ens.fr

    2008-12-10

    We present models related to the results of a recent experiment (the 'VKS experiment') showing the generation of a magnetic field by a fully turbulent flow of liquid sodium. We first discuss the geometry of the mean magnetic field when the two coaxial impellers driving the flow counter-rotate at the same frequency. We then show how we expect this geometry to be modified when the impellers rotate at different frequencies. We also show that, in the latter case, dynamical regimes of the magnetic field can be easily understood from the interaction of modes with dipolar (respectively quadrupolar) symmetry. In particular, this interaction generates magnetic field reversals that have been observed in the experiment and display a hierarchy of timescales similar to the Earth's magnetic field: the duration of the steady phases is widely distributed, but is always much longer than the time needed to switch polarity. In addition to reversals, several other large scale features of the generated magnetic field are obtained when varying the governing parameters of the flow. These results are also understood in the framework of the same model.

  15. Statistical tests of galactic dynamo theory

    CERN Document Server

    Chamandy, Luke; Taylor, A Russ

    2016-01-01

    Mean-field galactic dynamo theory is the leading theory to explain the prevalence of regular magnetic fields in spiral galaxies, but its systematic comparison with observations is still incomplete and fragmentary. Here we compare predictions of mean-field dynamo models to observational data on magnetic pitch angle and the strength of the mean magnetic field. We demonstrate that a standard $\\alpha^2\\Omega$ dynamo model produces pitch angles of the regular magnetic fields of nearby galaxies that are reasonably consistent with available data. The dynamo estimates of the magnetic field strength are generally within a factor of a few of the observational values. Reasonable agreement between theoretical and observed pitch angles generally requires the turbulent correlation time $\\tau$ to be in the range 10-20 Myr, in agreement with standard estimates. Moreover, good agreement also requires that the ratio of the ionized gas scale height to root-mean-square turbulent velocity increases with radius. Our results thus w...

  16. alpha,omega-Dicarboxylic acid accumulation by acyl-CoA oxidase deficient mutants of Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Martha S; Mokgoro, Masego M; Setati, Evodia; Nicaud, Jean-Marc

    2005-06-01

    alpha,omega-Dicarboxylic acid accumulation from alkanes and alkane degradation intermediates was investigated using Yarrowia lipolytica wild type strain W29 as well as a double, a triple and a quadruple POX-deleted strains. Six genes, POX1 through POX6, encode six acyl-CoA oxidase isozymes in Y. lipolytica. All the strains accumulated dodecanedioic acid (5-20 mg ml(-1)) from the diterminal functionalised 1,12-dodecane diol and 12-hydroxdodecanoic acid. The quadruple-deleted strain was the only strain that was able to accumulate dioic acids from C16 alkanol and monocarboxylic acid as well as from C12, C14 and C16 alkanes (maximum 8 mg ml(-1) from dodecane).

  17. Experimental realization of dynamo action: present status and prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Giesecke, Andre; Gundrum, Thomas; Gerbeth, Gunter; Nore, Caroline; Leorat, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    In the last decades, the experimental study of dynamo action has made great progress. However, after the dynamo experiments in Karlsruhe and Riga, the von-Karman-Sodium (VKS) dynamo is only the third facility that has been able to demonstrate fluid flow driven self-generation of magnetic fields in a laboratory experiment. Further progress in the experimental examination of dynamo action is expected from the planned precession driven dynamo experiment that will be designed in the framework of the liquid sodium facility DRESDYN (DREsden Sodium facility for DYNamo and thermohydraulic studies). In this paper, we briefly present numerical models of the VKS dynamo that demonstrate the close relation between the axisymmetric field observed in that experiment and the soft iron material used for the flow driving impellers. We further show recent results of preparatory water experiments and design studies related to the precession dynamo and delineate the scientific prospects for the final set-up.

  18. Synthesis of nonionic reduced-sugar based bola amphiphiles and gemini surfactants with an alpha,omega-diamino-(oxa)alkyl spacer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, Anno; Engberts, Jan B. F. N.

    2007-01-01

    Reduced-sugar based gemini surfactants with an alpha,omega-diamino-(oxa) alkyl spacer exhibit a rich pH-dependent aggregation behavior and are efficient DNA carriers in gene transfection. Herein, we describe an improved synthetic procedure for these amphiphiles. First, a series of novel nonionic

  19. Synthesis of nonionic reduced-sugar based bola amphiphiles and gemini surfactants with an alpha,omega-diamino-(oxa)alkyl spacer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, Anno; Engberts, Jan B. F. N.

    2007-01-01

    Reduced-sugar based gemini surfactants with an alpha,omega-diamino-(oxa) alkyl spacer exhibit a rich pH-dependent aggregation behavior and are efficient DNA carriers in gene transfection. Herein, we describe an improved synthetic procedure for these amphiphiles. First, a series of novel nonionic bol

  20. Evolution of magnetized protoplanetary disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Ruiz, Mauricio; Stepinski, Tomasz F.

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the global evolution of a turbulent protoplanetary disk in its viscous stage, incorporating the effects of Maxwell stress due to a large-scale magnetic field permeating disk. We assume that the viscous stress is given by an alpha model. A magnetic field is produced contemporaneously by an alpha omega dynamo mechanism and the resultant Maxwell stress assists the viscous stress in providing the means for disk evolution. The aim of this work is to compare the evolution of magnetized and nonmagnetized disks driven by turbulent viscosity of the same magnitude and thus assess the effects of a self-generated magnetic field on the structure and dynamical evolution of protoplanetary disks. Two illustrative examples corresponding to two different initial conditions are considered: a high-mass case that starts with a disk of 0.245 solar mass and angular momentum of 5.6 x 10(exp 52)g sq cm/s, and a low-mass that case starts with a disk of 0.11 solar mass and angular momentum of 1.8 x 10(exp 52)g sq cm/s. For each of these two cases the radial development of a disk is calculated numerically assuming a fiducial value of the dimensionless viscosity parameter alpha(sub ss) = 0.01, as well as alpha(sub ss) = 2 x 10(exp -3). In all cases the central star has a mass equal to 1 solar mass. The most striking feature of magnetized disk evolution is the presence of the surface density bulge located in the region of the disk where the dynamo mechanism cannot support a magnetic field. The bulge persists for a time of the order of 10(exp 5)-10(exp 6) yr. The presence and persistence of the surface density bulge may have important implications for the process of planet formation and the overall characteristics of resultant planetary systems.

  1. Nonlinear MHD dynamo operating at equipartition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archontis, V.; Dorch, Bertil; Nordlund, Åke

    2007-01-01

    Context.We present results from non linear MHD dynamo experiments with a three-dimensional steady and smooth flow that drives fast dynamo action in the kinematic regime. In the saturation regime, the system yields strong magnetic fields, which undergo transitions between an energy-equipartition a......Context.We present results from non linear MHD dynamo experiments with a three-dimensional steady and smooth flow that drives fast dynamo action in the kinematic regime. In the saturation regime, the system yields strong magnetic fields, which undergo transitions between an energy......-equipartition and a turbulent state. The generation and evolution of such strong magnetic fields is relevant for the understanding of dynamo action that occurs in stars and other astrophysical objects. Aims.We study the mode of operation of this dynamo, in the linear and non-linear saturation regimes. We also consider...... the effect of varying the magnetic and fluid Reymolds number on the non-linear behaviour of the system. Methods.We perform three-dimensional non-linear MHD simulations and visualization using a high resolution numerical scheme. Results.We find that this dynamo has a high growth rate in the linear regime...

  2. Dynamo generated by the centrifugal instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcotte, Florence; Gissinger, Christophe

    2016-10-01

    We present a scenario for magnetic field amplification where an electrically conducting fluid is confined in a differentially rotating, spherical shell with thin aspect ratio. When the angular momentum sufficiently decreases outwards, a hydrodynamic instability develops in the equatorial region, characterized by pairs of counter-rotating toroidal vortices similar to those observed in cylindrical Couette flow. These spherical Taylor-Couette vortices generate a subcritical dynamo magnetic field dominated by nonaxisymmetric components. We show that the critical magnetic Reynolds number seems to reach a constant value at large Reynolds number and that the global rotation can strongly decrease the dynamo onset. Our numerical results are understood within the framework of a simple dynamical system, and we propose a low-dimensional model for subcritical dynamo bifurcations. Implications for both laboratory dynamos and astrophysical magnetic fields are finally discussed.

  3. Dynamo generated by the centrifugal instability

    CERN Document Server

    Marcotte, Florence

    2016-01-01

    We present a new scenario for magnetic field amplification where an electrically conducting fluid is confined in a differentially rotating, spherical shell with thin aspect-ratio. When the angular momentum sufficiently decreases outwards, an hydrodynamic instability develops in the equatorial region, characterised by pairs of counter-rotating toroidal vortices similar to those observed in cylindrical Couette flow. These spherical Taylor-Couette vortices generate a subcritical dynamo magnetic field dominated by non-axisymmetric components. We show that the critical magnetic Reynolds number seems to reach a constant value at large Reynolds number and that the global rotation can strongly decrease the dynamo onset. Our numerical results are understood within the framework of a simple dynamical system, and we propose a low-dimensional model for subcritical dynamo bifurcations. Implications for both laboratory dynamos and astrophysical magnetic fields are finally discussed.

  4. Magnetization in the South Pole Aitken basin: Implications for the lunar dynamo and true polar wander

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-14

    Bethell a , c a Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences, University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA, 95064, USA b Red Sky ...space varies burial depth in km, agnetic dipole moment in Am 2 , magnetic dip (inclination) in de- rees downward from the horizontal, and declination...Santa ruz / NASA Ames University Affiliated Research Center, Aligned esearch Program and ( 3) Red Sky Research, LLC. Thanks to Rob oe and Gary

  5. A mechanism for the dynamo terms to sustain closed-flux current, including helicity balance, by driving current which crosses the magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; Sutherland, D. A. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    An analysis of imposed dynamo current drive (IDCD) [T.R. Jarboe et al., Nucl. Fusion 52 083017 (2012)] reveals: (a) current drive on closed flux surfaces seems possible without relaxation, reconnection, or other flux-surface-breaking large events; (b) the scale size of the key physics may be smaller than is often computationally resolved; (c) helicity can be sustained across closed flux; and (d) IDCD current drive is parallel to the current which crosses the magnetic field to produce the current driving force. In addition to agreeing with spheromak data, IDCD agrees with selected tokamak data.

  6. New results on an equipartition dynamo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorch, S. B. F.; Archontis, V.

    2006-01-01

    This contribution presents results from numerical computer experiments with a 3-d steady sine flow (with zero mean helicity) that drives fast dynamo action. The mode of operation of this so-called ``no-cosines" dynamo (recently dubbed ``the Archontis dynamo"" by David Galloway) was studied during...... linear and non-linear saturation regimes. The means were 3-d non-linear MHD simulations and visualization using the high resolution numerical scheme by Nordlund, Galsgaard and others. We have found that the dynamo has a high growth rate in the linear regime, and that it can saturate at a level...... significantly higher that intermittent turbulent dynamos: Namely very close to energy equipartition for high Reynolds numbers. The equipartition solution however is not turbulent but a laminar solution that acts as an attractor to other modes. Similarities and differences, in the way the magnetic field...

  7. A long-lived lunar core dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Erin K; Weiss, Benjamin P; Cassata, William S; Shuster, David L; Tikoo, Sonia M; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Grove, Timothy L; Fuller, Michael D

    2012-01-27

    Paleomagnetic measurements indicate that a core dynamo probably existed on the Moon 4.2 billion years ago. However, the subsequent history of the lunar core dynamo is unknown. Here we report paleomagnetic, petrologic, and (40)Ar/(39)Ar thermochronometry measurements on the 3.7-billion-year-old mare basalt sample 10020. This sample contains a high-coercivity magnetization acquired in a stable field of at least ~12 microteslas. These data extend the known lifetime of the lunar dynamo by 500 million years. Such a long-lived lunar dynamo probably required a power source other than thermochemical convection from secular cooling of the lunar interior. The inferred strong intensity of the lunar paleofield presents a challenge to current dynamo theory.

  8. The Origin of the Magnetic Fields of the Universe The Plasma Astrophysics of the Free Energy of the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Colgate, S A; Pariev, V

    2000-01-01

    (abridged) The interpretation of Faraday rotation measure maps of AGNs within galaxy clusters has revealed regions, $\\sim 50-100$ kpc, that are populated with large, $\\sim 30 \\mu$ G magnetic fields. The magnetic energy of these coherent regions is $\\sim 10^{59-60}$ ergs, and the total magnetic energy over the whole cluster ($\\sim 1$ Mpc across) is expected to be even larger. A sequence of physical processes that are responsible for the production, redistribution and dissipation of these magnetic fields is proposed. These fields are associated with single AGNs within the cluster and therefore with all galaxies during their AGN phase, simply because only the central supermassive black holes ($\\sim 10^8 M_{\\odot}$) have an accessible energy, $\\sim 10^{61}$ ergs. We propose an $\\alpha-\\Omega$ dynamo process in an accretion disk. The disk rotation naturally provides a large winding number, $\\sim 10^{11}$ turns, sufficient to make both large gain and large flux. The helicity of the dynamo can be generated by the di...

  9. HYSTERESIS BETWEEN DISTINCT MODES OF TURBULENT DYNAMOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Brandenburg, Axel [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Kitchatinov, Leonid L., E-mail: bbkarak@nordita.org [Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics, P.O. Box 291, Irkutsk 664033 (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-20

    Nonlinear mean-field models of the solar dynamo show long-term variability, which may be relevant to different states of activity inferred from long-term radiocarbon data. This paper is aimed at probing the dynamo hysteresis predicted by the recent mean-field models of Kitchatinov and Olemskoy with direct numerical simulations. We perform three-dimensional (3D) simulations of large-scale dynamos in a shearing box with helically forced turbulence. As an initial condition, we either take a weak random magnetic field or we start from a snapshot of an earlier simulation. Two quasi-stable states are found to coexist in a certain range of parameters close to the onset of the large-scale dynamo. The simulations converge to one of these states depending on the initial conditions. When either the fractional helicity or the magnetic Prandtl number is increased between successive runs above the critical value for onset of the dynamo, the field strength jumps to a finite value. However, when the fractional helicity or the magnetic Prandtl number is then decreased again, the field strength stays at a similar value (strong field branch) even below the original onset. We also observe intermittent decaying phases away from the strong field branch close to the point where large-scale dynamo action is just possible. The dynamo hysteresis seen previously in mean-field models is thus reproduced by 3D simulations. Its possible relation to distinct modes of solar activity such as grand minima is discussed.

  10. Liquid Metal Dynamo Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luh, W. J.; Choi, Y. H.; Hardy, B. S.; Brown, M. R.

    1997-11-01

    Detection of convected magnetic fields in a small-scale liquid metal dynamo is attempted. Initial experiments will focus on the conversion of toroidal to poloidal flux (a version of the ω effect). A precision vector magnetometer will be used to measure the effect of a rotating magnetofluid on a static magnetic field. Water will be used as a control medium and effects will be compared with a conducting medium (liquid sodium or NaK). A small spherical flask (0.16 m diameter) houses 2 liters of fluid, a teflon stirrer creates an asymmetrical flow pattern, and Helmholtz coils generate a constant magnetic field on the order of 10 gauss. The Reynold's number will be of order unity.

  11. Bistability and chaos in the Taylor-Green dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rakesh K; Verma, Mahendra K; Wahi, Pankaj

    2012-03-01

    Using direct numerical simulations, we study dynamo action under Taylor-Green forcing for a magnetic Prandtl number of 0.5. We observe bistability with weak- and strong-magnetic-field branches. Both the dynamo branches undergo subcritical dynamo transition. We also observe a host of dynamo states including constant, periodic, quasiperiodic, and chaotic magnetic fields. One of the chaotic states originates through a quasiperiodic route with phase locking, while the other chaotic attractor appears to follow the Newhouse-Ruelle-Takens route to chaos. We also observe intermittent transitions between quasiperiodic and chaotic states for a given Taylor-Green forcing.

  12. Problems and Progress in Astrophysical Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Vishniac, E T; Cho, J

    2002-01-01

    Astrophysical objects with negligible resistivity are often threaded by large scale magnetic fields. The generation of these fields is somewhat mysterious, since a magnetic field in a perfectly conducting fluid cannot change the flux threading a fluid element, or the field topology. Classical dynamo theory evades this limit by assuming that magnetic reconnection is fast, even for vanishing resistivity, and that the large scale field can be generated by the action of kinetic helicity. Both these claims have been severely criticized, and the latter appears to conflict with strong theoretical arguments based on magnetic helicity conservation and a series of numerical simulations. Here we discuss recent efforts to explain fast magnetic reconnection through the topological effects of a weak stochastic magnetic field component. We also show how mean-field dynamo theory can be recast in a form which respects magnetic helicity conservation, and how this changes our understanding of astrophysical dynamos. Finally, we ...

  13. Magnetorotational dynamo chimeras. The missing link to turbulent accretion disk dynamo models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riols, A.; Rincon, F.; Cossu, C.; Lesur, G.; Ogilvie, G. I.; Longaretti, P.-Y.

    2017-02-01

    In Keplerian accretion disks, turbulence and magnetic fields may be jointly excited through a subcritical dynamo mechanisminvolving magnetorotational instability (MRI). This dynamo may notably contribute to explaining the time-variability of various accreting systems, as high-resolution simulations of MRI dynamo turbulence exhibit statistical self-organization into large-scale cyclic dynamics. However, understanding the physics underlying these statistical states and assessing their exact astrophysical relevance is theoretically challenging. The study of simple periodic nonlinear MRI dynamo solutions has recently proven useful in this respect, and has highlighted the role of turbulent magnetic diffusion in the seeming impossibility of a dynamo at low magnetic Prandtl number (Pm), a common regime in disks. Arguably though, these simple laminar structures may not be fully representative of the complex, statistically self-organized states expected in astrophysical regimes. Here, we aim at closing this seeming discrepancy by reporting the numerical discovery of exactly periodic, yet semi-statistical "chimeral MRI dynamo states" which are the organized outcome of a succession of MRI-unstable, non-axisymmetric dynamical stages of different forms and amplitudes. Interestingly, these states, while reminiscent of the statistical complexity of turbulent simulations, involve the same physical principles as simpler laminar cycles, and their analysis further confirms the theory that subcritical turbulent magnetic diffusion impedes the sustainment of an MRI dynamo at low Pm. Overall, chimera dynamo cycles therefore offer an unprecedented dual physical and statistical perspective on dynamos in rotating shear flows, which may prove useful in devising more accurate, yet intuitive mean-field models of time-dependent turbulent disk dynamos. Movies associated to Fig. 1 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  14. Configuration Design of Novel Manually Operated Dynamo Flashlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hong-Sen; Wang, Hsin-Te

    This paper synthesizes novel configurations of manually operated dynamo flashlights. Topology and motion characteristics of existing gear dynamos are modified and concluded. The structural sketches and corresponding graph representations for gear trains and dynamos with the defined induced magnetic circuits are defined. Through the concepts of generalization and specialization, the atlas of the structural sketches and graphs of the embedded gear dynamos is obtained subject to the defined design requirements and constraints. And, a systematic approach is proposed to synthesize the novel mechanisms of the embedded gear dynamos. As a result, the embedded three-link and four-link gear dynamos have 12 and 24 novel design configurations, respectively. One prototype of the embedded three-link and another of the embedded four-link gear dynamo are built.

  15. Statistical simulation of the magnetorotational dynamo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squire, J. [PPPL; Bhattacharjee, A. [PPPL

    2014-08-01

    We analyze turbulence and dynamo induced by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) using quasi-linear statistical simulation methods. We find that homogenous turbulence is unstable to a large scale dynamo instability, which saturates to an inhomogenous equilibrium with a very strong dependence on the magnetic Prandtl number (Pm). Despite its enormously reduced nonlinearity, the quasi-linear model exhibits the same qualitative scaling of angular momentum transport with Pm as fully nonlinear turbulence. This demonstrates the relationship of recent convergence problems to the large scale dynamo and suggests possible methods for studying astrophysically relevant regimes at very low or high Pm.

  16. Statistical Simulation of the Magnetorotational Dynamo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squire, Jonathan [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Astrophysical Sciences; Bhattacharjee, Amitava [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Astrophysical Sciences; Max Planck Society, Garching (Germany). Max Planck Inst. for Astrophysik

    2015-02-01

    Turbulence and dynamo induced by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) are analyzed using quasilinear statistical simulation methods. It is found that homogenous turbulence is unstable to a large-scale dynamo instability, which saturates to an inhomogenous equilibrium with a strong dependence on the magnetic Prandtl number (Pm). Despite its enormously reduced nonlinearity, the dependence of the angular momentum transport on Pm in the quasilinear model is qualitatively similar to that of nonlinear MRI turbulence. This demonstrates the importance of the large-scale dynamo and suggests how dramatically simplified models may be used to gain insight into the astrophysically relevant regimes of very low or high Pm.

  17. Statistical simulation of the magnetorotational dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, J; Bhattacharjee, A

    2015-02-27

    Turbulence and dynamo induced by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) are analyzed using quasilinear statistical simulation methods. It is found that homogenous turbulence is unstable to a large-scale dynamo instability, which saturates to an inhomogenous equilibrium with a strong dependence on the magnetic Prandtl number (Pm). Despite its enormously reduced nonlinearity, the dependence of the angular momentum transport on Pm in the quasilinear model is qualitatively similar to that of nonlinear MRI turbulence. This demonstrates the importance of the large-scale dynamo and suggests how dramatically simplified models may be used to gain insight into the astrophysically relevant regimes of very low or high Pm.

  18. Stretch-Twist-Fold and slow filamentary dynamos in liquid sodium Madison Dynamo Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, Garcia

    2009-01-01

    Recently Ricca and Maggione [MHD (2008)] have presented a very simple and interesting model of stretch-twist-fold dynamo in diffusive media based on numerical simulations of Riemannian flux tubes. In this paper we present a yet simpler way of analytically obtaining fast and slow dynamo, generated by by the curvature energy of magnetic filaments in diffusive media. geometrical model for the galactic or accretion disk dynamo in shear flows is presented. In the fast dynamo case it is shown that the absence of stretching leads to the absence of fast dynamos and when torsion of filaments vanishes the dynamo action cannot be support as well. This is the Cowling-Zeldovich theorem for planar flows. Isotropy of the magnetic fields hypothesis is used to compute the fast nature of dynamo. A similar result using non-holonomic Frenet frame has been recently obtained for filamentary dynamos [Garcia de Andrade, AN (2008)]. The stretch-twist-fold (STF) filamented models discussed here may serve to formulate future experiment...

  19. Statistical dynamo theory: Mode excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyng, P

    2009-04-01

    We compute statistical properties of the lowest-order multipole coefficients of the magnetic field generated by a dynamo of arbitrary shape. To this end we expand the field in a complete biorthogonal set of base functions, viz. B= summation operator_{k}a;{k}(t)b;{k}(r) . The properties of these biorthogonal function sets are treated in detail. We consider a linear problem and the statistical properties of the fluid flow are supposed to be given. The turbulent convection may have an arbitrary distribution of spatial scales. The time evolution of the expansion coefficients a;{k} is governed by a stochastic differential equation from which we infer their averages a;{k} , autocorrelation functions a;{k}(t)a;{k *}(t+tau) , and an equation for the cross correlations a;{k}a;{l *} . The eigenfunctions of the dynamo equation (with eigenvalues lambda_{k} ) turn out to be a preferred set in terms of which our results assume their simplest form. The magnetic field of the dynamo is shown to consist of transiently excited eigenmodes whose frequency and coherence time is given by Ilambda_{k} and -1/Rlambda_{k} , respectively. The relative rms excitation level of the eigenmodes, and hence the distribution of magnetic energy over spatial scales, is determined by linear theory. An expression is derived for |a;{k}|;{2}/|a;{0}|;{2} in case the fundamental mode b;{0} has a dominant amplitude, and we outline how this expression may be evaluated. It is estimated that |a;{k}|;{2}/|a;{0}|;{2} approximately 1/N , where N is the number of convective cells in the dynamo. We show that the old problem of a short correlation time (or first-order smoothing approximation) has been partially eliminated. Finally we prove that for a simple statistically steady dynamo with finite resistivity all eigenvalues obey Rlambda_{k}<0 .

  20. Mono-thioesters and di-thioesters by lipase-catalyzed reactions of alpha,omega-alkanedithiols with palmitic acid or its methyl ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, N; Klein, E; Vosmann, K; Mukherjee, K D

    2004-06-01

    1- S-Mono-palmitoyl-hexanedithiol and 1- S-mono-palmitoyl-octanedithiol were prepared in high yield (80-90%) by solvent-free lipase-catalyzed thioesterification of palmitic acid with the corresponding alpha,omega-alkanedithiols in vacuo. Similarly, 1,6-di- S-palmitoyl-hexanedithiol and 1,8-di- S-palmitoyl-octanedithiol were prepared in moderate yield (50-60%) by solvent-free lipase-catalyzed thioesterification of palmitic acid with 1- S-Mono-palmitoyl-hexanedithiol and 1- S-mono-palmitoyl-octanedithiol, respectively. An immobilized lipase preparation from Rhizomucor miehei (Lipozyme RM IM) was more effective than a lipase B preparation from Candida antarctica (Novozym 435) or a lipase preparation from Thermomyces lanuginosus (Lipozyme TL IM). Lipase-catalyzed transthioesterifications of methyl palmitate with alpha,omega-alkanedithiols using the same enzymes were less effective than thioesterification for the preparation of the corresponding 1- S-mono-palmitoyl thioesters.

  1. The Solar Dynamo Zoo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeland, Ricky; Soon, Willie H.; Baliunas, Sallie L.; Hall, Jeffrey C.; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Henry, Gregory W.

    2016-05-01

    We present composite time series of Ca II H & K line core emission indices of up to 50 years in length for a set of 27 solar-analog stars (spectral types G0-G5; within ~10% of the solar mass) and the Sun. These unique data are available thanks to the long-term dedicated efforts of the Mount Wilson Observatory HK project, the Lowell Observatory Solar-Stellar Spectrograph, and the National Solar Observatory/Air Force Research Laboratory/Sacremento Peak K-line monitoring program. The Ca II H & K emission originates in the lower chromosphere and is strongly correlated with the presence of magnetic plage regions in the Sun. These synoptic observations allow us to trace the patterns long-term magnetic variability and explore dynamo behavior over a wide range of rotation regimes and stellar evolution timescales.

  2. Turbulent dynamo in a collisionless plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, François; Califano, Francesco; Schekochihin, Alexander A; Valentini, Francesco

    2016-04-12

    Magnetic fields pervade the entire universe and affect the formation and evolution of astrophysical systems from cosmological to planetary scales. The generation and dynamical amplification of extragalactic magnetic fields through cosmic times (up to microgauss levels reported in nearby galaxy clusters, near equipartition with kinetic energy of plasma motions, and on scales of at least tens of kiloparsecs) are major puzzles largely unconstrained by observations. A dynamo effect converting kinetic flow energy into magnetic energy is often invoked in that context; however, extragalactic plasmas are weakly collisional (as opposed to magnetohydrodynamic fluids), and whether magnetic field growth and sustainment through an efficient turbulent dynamo instability are possible in such plasmas is not established. Fully kinetic numerical simulations of the Vlasov equation in a 6D-phase space necessary to answer this question have, until recently, remained beyond computational capabilities. Here, we show by means of such simulations that magnetic field amplification by dynamo instability does occur in a stochastically driven, nonrelativistic subsonic flow of initially unmagnetized collisionless plasma. We also find that the dynamo self-accelerates and becomes entangled with kinetic instabilities as magnetization increases. The results suggest that such a plasma dynamo may be realizable in laboratory experiments, support the idea that intracluster medium turbulence may have significantly contributed to the amplification of cluster magnetic fields up to near-equipartition levels on a timescale shorter than the Hubble time, and emphasize the crucial role of multiscale kinetic physics in high-energy astrophysical plasmas.

  3. Higher helicity invariants and solar dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, D. D.; Illarionov, E. A.; Akhmet'ev, P. M.

    2017-01-01

    Modern models of nonlinear dynamo saturation in celestial bodies (specifically, on the Sun) are largely based on the consideration of the balance of magnetic helicity. This physical variable has also a topological meaning: it is associated with the linking coefficient of magnetic tubes. In addition to magnetic helicity, magnetohydrodynamics has a number of topological integrals of motion (the so-called higher helicity moments). We have compared these invariants with magnetic helicity properties and concluded that they can hardly serve as nonlinear constraints on dynamo action.

  4. Axial dipolar dynamo action in the Taylor-Green vortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstulovic, Giorgio; Thorner, Gentien; Vest, Julien-Piera; Fauve, Stephan; Brachet, Marc

    2011-12-01

    We present a numerical study of the magnetic field generated by the Taylor-Green vortex. We show that periodic boundary conditions can be used to mimic realistic boundary conditions by prescribing the symmetries of the velocity and magnetic fields. This gives insight into some problems of central interest for dynamos: the possible effect of velocity fluctuations on the dynamo threshold, and the role of boundary conditions on the threshold and on the geometry of the magnetic field generated by dynamo action. In particular, we show that an axial dipolar dynamo similar to the one observed in a recent experiment can be obtained with an appropriate choice of the symmetries of the magnetic field. The nonlinear saturation is studied and a simple model explaining the magnetic Prandtl number dependence of the super- and subcritical nature of the dynamo transition is given.

  5. The Turbulent Dynamo in Highly Compressible Supersonic Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Federrath, Christoph; Bovino, Stefano; Schleicher, Dominik R G

    2014-01-01

    The turbulent dynamo may explain the origin of cosmic magnetism. While the exponential amplification of magnetic fields has been studied for incompressible gases, little is known about dynamo action in highly-compressible, supersonic plasmas, such as the interstellar medium of galaxies and the early Universe. Here we perform the first quantitative comparison of theoretical models of the dynamo growth rate and saturation level with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of supersonic turbulence with grid resolutions of up to 1024^3 cells. We obtain numerical convergence and find that dynamo action occurs for both low and high magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm = nu/eta = 0.1-10 (the ratio of viscous to magnetic dissipation), which had so far only been seen for Pm >= 1 in supersonic turbulence. We measure the critical magnetic Reynolds number, Rm_crit = 129 (+43, -31), showing that the compressible dynamo is almost as efficient as in incompressible gas. Considering the physical conditions of the present a...

  6. Saturation of Zeldovich Stretch-Twist-Fold Map Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Seta, Amit; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2014-01-01

    Zeldovich's stretch-twist fold (STF) dynamo provided a breakthrough in conceptual understanding of fast dynamos, including fluctuation or small scale dynamos. We study the evolution and saturation behaviour of two types of Baker's map dynamos, which have been used to model Zeldovich's STF dynamo process. Using such maps allows one to analyze dynamos at much higher magnetic Reynolds numbers $R_M$ as compared to direct numerical simulations. In the 2-strip map dynamo there is constant constructive folding while the 4-strip map dynamo also allows the possibility of field reversal. Incorporating a diffusive step parameterised by $R_M$, we find that the magnetic field $B(x)$ is amplified only above a critical $R_M=R_{crit} \\sim 4$ for both types of dynamos. We explore the saturation of these dynamos in 3 ways; by a renormalized decrease of the effective $R_M$ (Case I) or due to a decrease in the efficiency of field amplification by stretching (Case II), or a combination of both effects (Case III). For Case I, we s...

  7. Realistic simulation of the emergence of magnetic field generated in a solar convective dynamo from the convection zone into the corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Rempel, Matthias D.; Fan, Yuhong

    2017-08-01

    We present a comprehensive realistic numerical model of emergence of magnetic flux generated in a solar convective dynamo from the convection zone to the corona. The magnetic and velocity fields in a horizontal layer near the top boundary of the solar convective dynamo simulation are used as a time-dependent bottom boundary to drive the radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the emergence of the flux bundles through the upper most convection zone to more than 100 Mm above the surface of the Sun. The simualtion allows a direct comparison bewtween model synthesized observable and real obervations of flux emergence processes through different layers of the solar atmopshere.Emerging flux bundles bring more than 1e23 Mx flux to the photosphere in a period of about 50 hours and give rise to several active regions in a horizontal domain of 200 Mm. The mean corona temperature is about 1 MK for the quiet Sun and is significantly increased after active regions form at the photosphere. The flux emergence process produces a lot of dynamical features, such as coronal bright points, jets, waves and propagating disturbances, as well as flares and mass ejections. The biggest flare reaches M2.5 as indicated by synthetic GOES-15 soft X-ray flux. The total magnetic energy released during the eruption is about 5e31 ergs. The flare leads to a significant corona heating. The mean temperature in the coronal reaches more than 5 MK. And plasma in cusp-shaped post-flare loops is heated to several tens MK. The flare is accompanied by the ejection of a giant flux rope that carries cool and dense plasma. The flux rope is formed during the eruption by the reconnection between a sheared arcade that rises up from the low atmosphere above a bipolar sunspot pair and overlying fieldlines that are mostly perpendicular to the axis of the sheared arcade.

  8. Inverse problem in Parker's dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Reshetnyak, M Yu

    2015-01-01

    The inverse solution of the 1D Parker dynamo equations is considered. The method is based on minimization of the cost-function, which characterize deviation of the model solution properties from the desired ones. The output is the latitude distribution of the magnetic field generation sources: the $\\alpha$- and $\\omega$-effects. Minimization is made using the Monte-Carlo method. The details of the method, as well as some applications, which can be interesting for the broad dynamo community, are considered: conditions when the invisible for the observer at the surface of the planet toroidal part of the magnetic field is much larger than the poloidal counterpart. It is shown that at some particular distributions of $\\alpha$ and $\\omega$ the well-known thesis that sign of the dynamo-number defines equatorial symmetry of the magnetic field to the equator plane, is violated. It is also demonstrated in what circumstances magnetic field in the both hemispheres have different properties, and simple physical explanati...

  9. Statistical Tests of Galactic Dynamo Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamandy, Luke; Shukurov, Anvar; Taylor, A. Russ

    2016-12-01

    Mean-field galactic dynamo theory is the leading theory to explain the prevalence of regular magnetic fields in spiral galaxies, but its systematic comparison with observations is still incomplete and fragmentary. Here we compare predictions of mean-field dynamo models to observational data on magnetic pitch angle and the strength of the mean magnetic field. We demonstrate that a standard {α }2{{Ω }} dynamo model produces pitch angles of the regular magnetic fields of nearby galaxies that are reasonably consistent with available data. The dynamo estimates of the magnetic field strength are generally within a factor of a few of the observational values. Reasonable agreement between theoretical and observed pitch angles generally requires the turbulent correlation time τ to be in the range of 10-20 {Myr}, in agreement with standard estimates. Moreover, good agreement also requires that the ratio of the ionized gas scale height to root-mean-square turbulent velocity increases with radius. Our results thus widen the possibilities to constrain interstellar medium parameters using observations of magnetic fields. This work is a step toward systematic statistical tests of galactic dynamo theory. Such studies are becoming more and more feasible as larger data sets are acquired using current and up-and-coming instruments.

  10. History and results of the Riga dynamo experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Gailitis, Agris; Gundrum, Thomas; Lielausis, Olgerts; Platacis, Ernests; Stefani, Frank

    2008-01-01

    On 11 November 1999, a self-exciting magnetic eigenfield was detected for the first time in the Riga liquid sodium dynamo experiment. We report on the long history leading to this event, and on the subsequent experimental campaigns which provided a wealth of data on the kinematic and the saturated regime of this dynamo. The present state of the theoretical understanding of both regimes is delineated, and some comparisons with other laboratory dynamo experiments are made.

  11. Subcritical dynamo bifurcation in the Taylor-Green flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponty, Y; Laval, J-P; Dubrulle, B; Daviaud, F; Pinton, J-F

    2007-11-30

    We report direct numerical simulations of dynamo generation for flow generated using a Taylor-Green forcing. We find that the bifurcation is subcritical and show its bifurcation diagram. We connect the associated hysteretic behavior with hydrodynamics changes induced by the action of the Lorentz force. We show the geometry of the dynamo magnetic field and discuss how the dynamo transition can be induced when an external field is applied to the flow.

  12. The Dynamo Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    2016-04-01

    The Dynamo Clinical Trial evaluates long-term stellar magnetic health through periodic X-ray examinations (by the Chandra Observatory). So far, there are only three subjects enrolled in the DTC: Alpha Centauri A (a solar-like G dwarf), Alpha Cen B (an early K dwarf, more active than the Sun), and Alpha Canis Majoris A (Procyon, a mid-F subgiant similar in activity to the Sun). Of these, Procyon is a new candidate, so it is too early to judge how it will fare. Of the other two, Alpha Cen B has responded well, with a steady magnetic heartbeat of about 8 years duration. The sickest of the bunch, Alpha Cen A, was in magnetic cardiac arrest during 2005-2010, but has begun responding to treatment in recent years, and seems to be successfully cycling again, perhaps achieving a new peak of magnetic health in the 2016 time frame. If this is the case, it has been 20 years since A's last healthful peak, significantly longer than the middle-aged Sun's 11-year magnetic heartbeat, but perhaps in line with Alpha Cen A's more senescent state (in terms of "relative evolutionary age," apparently an important driver of activity). (By the way, don't miss the exciting movie of the Alpha Cen stars' 20-year X-ray dance.)

  13. Simple Scaling Relationships For Stellar Dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustson, Kyle; Mathis, Stéphane; Brun, Allan Sacha

    2016-12-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of dynamo scaling relationships for the degree of equipartition between magnetic and kinetic energies. Three basic approaches are adopted to explore these scaling relationships, with a first look at two simple models: one assuming magnetostrophy and another that includes the effects of inertia. Next, a third scaling relationship is derived that utilizes the assumptions that the dynamo possesses two integral spatial scales and that it is driven by the balance of buoyancy work and ohmic dissipation as studied in Davidson 2013. The results of which are then compared to a suite of convective dynamo simulations that possess a fully convective domain with a weak density stratification and that captured the behavior of the resulting dynamo for a range of convective Rossby numbers (Augustson et al. 2016).

  14. Helicity and alpha-effect by current-driven instabilities of helical magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Gellert, M; Hollerbach, R

    2011-01-01

    Helical magnetic background fields with adjustable pitch angle are imposed on a conducting fluid in a differentially rotating cylindrical container. The small-scale kinetic and current helicities are calculated for various field geometries, and shown to have the opposite sign as the helicity of the large-scale field. These helicities and also the corresponding $\\alpha$-effect scale with the current helicity of the background field. The $\\alpha$-tensor is highly anisotropic as the components $\\alpha_{\\phi\\phi}$ and $\\alpha_{zz}$ have opposite signs. The amplitudes of the azimuthal $\\alpha$-effect computed with the cylindrical 3D MHD code are so small that the operation of an $\\alpha\\Omega$ dynamo on the basis of the current-driven, kink-type instabilities of toroidal fields is highly questionable. In any case the low value of the $\\alpha$-effect would lead to very long growth times of a dynamo in the radiation zone of the Sun and early-type stars of the order of mega-years.

  15. Tsunami: ocean dynamo generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugioka, Hiroko; Hamano, Yozo; Baba, Kiyoshi; Kasaya, Takafumi; Tada, Noriko; Suetsugu, Daisuke

    2014-01-08

    Secondary magnetic fields are induced by the flow of electrically conducting seawater through the Earth's primary magnetic field ('ocean dynamo effect'), and hence it has long been speculated that tsunami flows should produce measurable magnetic field perturbations, although the signal-to-noise ratio would be small because of the influence of the solar magnetic fields. Here, we report on the detection of deep-seafloor electromagnetic perturbations of 10-micron-order induced by a tsunami, which propagated through a seafloor electromagnetometer array network. The observed data extracted tsunami characteristics, including the direction and velocity of propagation as well as sea-level change, first to verify the induction theory. Presently, offshore observation systems for the early forecasting of tsunami are based on the sea-level measurement by seafloor pressure gauges. In terms of tsunami forecasting accuracy, the integration of vectored electromagnetic measurements into existing scalar observation systems would represent a substantial improvement in the performance of tsunami early-warning systems.

  16. Numerical simulation of Martian historical dynamo: Impact of the Rayleigh number on the dynamo state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG TianYuan; KUANG WeiJia; MA ShiZhuang

    2009-01-01

    The observed Mars remnant magnetism suggests that there was an active dynamo in the Martian core.We use the MoSST core dynamics model to simulate the Martian historical dynamo,focusing on the variation of the dynamo states with the Rayleigh number Ra (a non-dimensional parameter describing the buoyancy force in the core).Our numerical results show that the mean field length scale does not vary monotonically with the Rayleigh number,and the field morphology at the core mantle boundary changes with Rayleigh number.In particular,it drifts westward with a speed decreasing with Rayleigh number.

  17. Numerical simulation of Martian historical dynamo:Impact of the Rayleigh number on the dynamo state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The observed Mars remnant magnetism suggests that there was an active dynamo in the Martian core. We use the MoSST core dynamics model to simulate the Martian historical dynamo, focusing on the variation of the dynamo states with the Rayleigh number Ra (a non-dimensional parameter describing the buoyancy force in the core). Our numerical results show that the mean field length scale does not vary monotonically with the Rayleigh number, and the field morphology at the core mantle boundary changes with Rayleigh number. In particular, it drifts westward with a speed decreasing with Rayleigh number.

  18. Galactic dynamo and helicity losses through fountain flow

    CERN Document Server

    Shukurov, A; Subramanian, K; Brandenburg, A; Shukurov, Anvar; Sokoloff, Dmitry; Subramanian, Kandaswamy; Brandenburg, Axel

    2006-01-01

    Nonlinear behaviour of galactic dynamos is studied, allowing for magnetic helicity removal by the galactic fountain flow. A suitable advection speed is estimated, and a one-dimensional mean-field dynamo model with dynamic alpha-effect is explored. It is shown that the galactic fountain flow is efficient in removing magnetic helicity from galactic discs. This alleviates the constraint on the galactic mean-field dynamo resulting from magnetic helicity conservation and thereby allows the mean magnetic field to saturate at a strength comparable to equipartition with the turbulent kinetic energy.

  19. Does the butterfly diagram indicate asolar flux-transport dynamo?

    CERN Document Server

    Schüssler, M

    2004-01-01

    We address the question whether the properties of the observed latitude-time diagram of sunspot occurence (the butterfly diagram) provide evidence for the operation of a flux-transport dynamo, which explains the migration of the sunspot zones and the period of the solar cycle in terms of a deep equatorward meridional flow. We show that the properties of the butterfly diagram are equally well reproduced by a conventional dynamo model with migrating dynamo waves, but without transport of magnetic flux by a flow. These properties seem to be generic for an oscillatory and migratory field of dipole parity and thus do not permit an observational distinction between different dynamo approaches.

  20. Nonlinear dynamo action in a precessing cylindrical container.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nore, C; Léorat, J; Guermond, J-L; Luddens, F

    2011-07-01

    It is numerically demonstrated by means of a magnetohydrodynamics code that precession can trigger the dynamo effect in a cylindrical container. When the Reynolds number, based on the radius of the cylinder and its angular velocity, increases, the flow, which is initially centrosymmetric, loses its stability and bifurcates to a quasiperiodic motion. This unsteady and asymmetric flow is shown to be capable of sustaining dynamo action in the linear and nonlinear regimes. The magnetic field thus generated is unsteady and quadrupolar. These numerical evidences of dynamo action in a precessing cylindrical container may be useful for an experiment now planned at the Dresden sodium facility for dynamo and thermohydraulic studies in Germany.

  1. Ocean Dynamics: Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Ocean Dynamics: Dynamo Robert Pinkel Marine Physical...execution of the Dynamo Leg IV Experiment in December 2011. Our objective was to document the development of the diurnal surface layer and its...2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ocean Dynamics: Dynamo 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  2. Towards understanding dynamo action in M dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Shulyak, D; Kitchatinov, L; Moss, D

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in observational studies of magnetic activity in M dwarfs urgently requires support from ideas of stellar dynamo theory. We propose a strategy to connect observational and theoretical studies. In particular, we suggest four magnetic configurations that appear relevant to dwarfs from the viewpoint of the most conservative version of dynamo theory, and discuss observational tests to identify the configurations observationally. As expected, any such identification contains substantial uncertainties. However the situation in general looks less pessimistic than might be expected. Several identifications between the phenomenology of individual stars and dynamo models are suggested. Remarkably, all models discussed predict substantial surface magnetic activity at rather high stellar latitudes. This prediction looks unexpected from the viewpoint of our experience observing the Sun (which of course differs in some fundamental ways from these late-type dwarfs). We stress that a fuller understanding of t...

  3. Planetary Dynamos: Investigations of Saturn and Ancient Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanley, Sabine [University of Toronto

    2012-04-18

    Magnetic field observations by spacecraft missions have provided vital information on planetary dynamos. The four giant planets as well as Earth, Mercury and Ganymede have observable magnetic fields generated by active dynamos. In contrast, Moon and Mars only have remanent crustal fields from dynamo action in their early histories. A variety of magnetic field morphologies and intensities can be found in the solar system. We have found that some of the differences between planetary magnetic fields can be explained as the result of the presence of boundary thermal variations or stably-stratified layers. In this talk, I will discuss how dynamos are affected by these complications and discuss the implications for Mars’ magnetic dichotomy and Saturn’s extremely axisymmetric magnetic field.

  4. Persistence and origin of the lunar core dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suavet, Clément; Weiss, Benjamin P; Cassata, William S; Shuster, David L; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Chan, Lindsey; Garrick-Bethell, Ian; Head, James W; Grove, Timothy L; Fuller, Michael D

    2013-05-21

    The lifetime of the ancient lunar core dynamo has implications for its power source and the mechanism of field generation. Here, we report analyses of two 3.56-Gy-old mare basalts demonstrating that they were magnetized in a stable and surprisingly intense dynamo magnetic field of at least ~13 μT. These data extend the known lifetime of the lunar dynamo by ~160 My and indicate that the field was likely continuously active until well after the final large basin-forming impact. This likely excludes impact-driven changes in rotation rate as the source of the dynamo at this time in lunar history. Rather, our results require a persistent power source like precession of the lunar mantle or a compositional convection dynamo.

  5. Could Giant Basin-Forming Impacts Have Killed Martian Dynamo?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, W.; Jiang, W.; Roberts, J.; Frey, H. V.

    2014-01-01

    The observed strong remanent crustal magnetization at the surface of Mars suggests an active dynamo in the past and ceased to exist around early to middle Noachian era, estimated by examining remagnetization strengths in extant and buried impact basins. We investigate whether the Martian dynamo could have been killed by these large basin-forming impacts, via numerical simulation of subcritical dynamos with impact-induced thermal heterogeneity across the core-mantle boundary. We find that subcritical dynamos are prone to the impacts centered on locations within 30 deg of the equator but can easily survive those at higher latitudes. Our results further suggest that magnetic timing places a strong constraint on postimpact polar reorientation, e.g., a minimum 16 deg polar reorientation is needed if Utopia is the dynamo killer.

  6. On the connections between solar and stellar dynamo models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouve, Laurène; Kumar, Rohit

    2017-10-01

    We here discuss the various dynamo models which have been designed to explain the generation and evolution of large-scale magnetic fields in stars. We focus on the models that have been applied to the Sun and can be tested for other solar-type stars now that modern observational techniques provide us with detailed stellar magnetic field observations. Mean-field flux-transport dynamo models have been developed for decades to explain the solar cycle and applications to more rapidly-rotating stars are discussed. Tremendous recent progress has been made on 3D global convective dynamo models. They do not however for now produce regular flux emergence that could be responsible for surface active regions and questions about the role of these active regions in the dynamo mechanism are still difficult to address with such models. We finally discuss 3D kinematic dynamo models which could constitute a promising combined approach, in which data assimilation could be applied.

  7. Dynamo Models of the Solar Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charbonneau Paul

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews recent advances and current debates in modeling the solar cycle as a hydromagnetic dynamo process. Emphasis is placed on (relatively simple dynamo models that are nonetheless detailed enough to be comparable to solar cycle observations. After a brief overview of the dynamo problem and of key observational constraints, we begin by reviewing the various magnetic field regeneration mechanisms that have been proposed in the solar context. We move on to a presentation and critical discussion of extant solar cycle models based on these mechanisms. We then turn to the origin of fluctuations in these models, including amplitude and parity modulation, chaotic behavior, and intermittency. The paper concludes with a discussion of our current state of ignorance regarding various key questions, the most pressing perhaps being the identification of the physical mechanism(s responsible for the generation of the Sun's poloidal magnetic field component.

  8. The Shear Dynamo: quasilinear kinematic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Sridhar, S

    2008-01-01

    Large--scale dynamo action due to turbulence in the presence of a linear shear flow is studied. Our treatment is quasilinear and kinematic but is non perturbative in the strength of the background shear. We derive expressions for the turbulent transport coefficients of the mean magnetic field, by systematic use of the shearing coordinate transformation and the Galilean invariance of the linear shear flow. We prove that, for non helical turbulence, the equation governing the time evolution of the cross shear component of the mean magnetic field is closed, in the sense that it is independent of the other two components. This result is valid for any Galilean--invariant velocity field, independent of its dynamics. Thus we find the shear--current assisted dynamo is essentially absent, although large--scale non helical dynamo action is not ruled out.

  9. Dynamos and MHD theory of turbulence suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizawa, Akira [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Itoh, Sanae-I [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, 87, Kasuga 810- 8580 (Japan); Itoh, Kimitaka [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Yokoi, Nobumitsu [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2004-03-01

    Characteristics of electrically conducting media are reviewed from the macroscopic viewpoint based on mean-field magnetohydrodynamics, while being compared using the methodology and knowledge in fluid mechanics. The themes covered in this review range from the mechanism of generating stellar magnetic fields (dynamo) to transport properties in fusion. The primary concern here is to see the characteristics common to these apparently different phenomena, within the framework of the mean-field theory. Owing to the intrinsic limitation of the approach, the present discussions are limited more or less to specific aspects of phenomena. They are supplemented with reference to theoretical, numerical, and observational approaches intrinsic to each theme. In the description of dynamo phenomena, emphasis is laid on the cross helicity dynamo. Features common to stellar magnetic-field generation and the rotational-motion drive in toroidal plasmas are illustrated on this basis. (topical review)

  10. The Solar Dynamo Zoo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeland, Ricky; Soon, Willie; Baliunas, Sallie; Hall, Jeffrey C.; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Henry, Gregory W.

    2016-07-01

    We present composite time series of Ca II H & K line core emission indices of up to 50 years in length for a set of 27 solar-analog stars (spectral types G0-G5; within 10% of the solar mass) and the Sun. These unique data are available thanks to the long-term dedicated efforts of the Mount Wilson Observatory HK project, the Lowell Observatory Solar-Stellar Spectrograph, and the National Solar Observatory/Air Force Research Laboratory/Sacramento Peak K-line monitoring program. The Ca II H & K emission originates in the lower chromosphere and is strongly correlated with the presence of magnetic plage regions in the Sun. These synoptic observations allow us to trace the patterns long-term magnetic variability and explore dynamo behavior over a wide range of rotation regimes and stellar evolution timescales.In this poster, the Ca HK observations are expressed using the Mount Wilson S-index. Each time series is accompanied by a Lomb-Scargle periodogram, fundemental stellar parameters derived from the Geneva-Copenhagen Survey, and statistics derived from the time series including the median S-index value and seasonal and long-term amplitudes. Statistically significant periodogram peaks are ranked according to a new cycle quality metric. We find that clear, simple, Sun-like cycles are the minority in this sample.

  11. Dynamo : An Instrumental Suite To Characterize Atmospheric Escape and To Complete Magnetic Field Mapping of Mars From The 07 Cnes Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassefiere, E.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Berthelier, J.-J.; Cerisier, J.-C.; Forget, F.; Menvielle, M.; Hulot, G.; Mandea, M.; Reme, H.; Barriot, J.-P.; Blanc, M.; Parrot, M.; Trotignon, J.-G.; Barlier, F.; Touboul, P.; Lilensten, J.; Nagy, A.; Bougher, S.; Waite, H.; Yung, D.; Clarke, J.; Lin, R.; Luhmann, J.; Smrekar, S.; Purucker, M.; Breuer, D.; Szego, K.

    DYNAMO is a suite of instruments to be implemented in the frame of the NASA/CNES Mars program and planned to be flown onboard the 2007 CNES or- biter. It is primarily aimed at characterizing current atmospheric escape, which is still poorly constrained, and at providing a detailed and complete mapping of the crustal magnetic field. These objectives are achieved from a low periapsis orbit (150-170 km x 1000 km), during an extended phase of the mission. They are reached by using a nominal payload composed of : a low-energy ion and neutral mass spectrometer measuring the thermal and hot populations, and wind velocities, complemented by specific sensors of the neutral atmosphere, an energetic particle spectrometer mea- suring all kinds of particles resulting from solar wind interaction, according to their nature, flux and velocity distribution, a Langmuir probe for adequate restitution of the ionospheric environment, associated with more specific plasma instruments, a UV airglow spectrometer allowing to probe high exospheric levels, as well as lower parts of the atmosphere, a 3-axis magnetometer to measure the static part of the magnetic field vector. A radio science experiment is under study, in order to measure electron profiles in the ionosphere, and to improve the resolution of the gravity field.

  12. A theory of the Earth's magnetic field and of sunspots, based on a self-excited dynamo incorporating the Hall effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. de Paor

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A new viewpoint on the generation and maintenance of the Earth's magnetic field is put forward, which integrates self-exciting dynamo theory with the possibility of energy coupling along orthogonal axes provided by the Hall effect. A nonlinear third-order system is derived, with a fourth equation serving as an observer of unspecified geophysical processes which could result in field reversal. Lyapunov analysis proves that chaos is not intrinsic to this system. Relative constancy of one of the variables produces pseudo equilibrium in a second order subsystem and allows for self-excitation of the geomagnetic field. Electromagnetic analysis yields expressions for key parameters. Models for secular variations recorded at London, Palermo and at the Cape of Good Hope over the past four hundred years are offered. Offset of the Earth's magnetic axis from the geographic axis is central to time-varying declination, but its causes have not yet been established. Applicability of the model to the explanation of sunspot activity is outlined. A corroborating experiment published by Peter Barlow in 1831 is appended.

  13. Magnetorotational dynamo chimeras. The missing link to turbulent accretion disk dynamo models?

    CERN Document Server

    Riols, A; Cossu, C; Lesur, G; Ogilvie, G I; Longaretti, P-Y

    2016-01-01

    In Keplerian accretion disks, turbulence and magnetic fields may be jointly excited through a subcritical dynamo process involving the magnetorotational instability (MRI). High-resolution simulations exhibit a tendency towards statistical self-organization of MRI dynamo turbulence into large-scale cyclic dynamics. Understanding the physical origin of these structures, and whether they can be sustained and transport angular momentum efficiently in astrophysical conditions, represents a significant theoretical challenge. The discovery of simple periodic nonlinear MRI dynamo solutions has recently proven useful in this respect, and has notably served to highlight the role of turbulent magnetic diffusion in the seeming decay of the dynamics at low magnetic Prandtl number Pm (magnetic diffusivity larger than viscosity), a common regime in accretion disks. The connection between these simple structures and the statistical organization reported in turbulent simulations remained elusive, though. Here, we report the n...

  14. Current Challenges in Dynamo Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatzmaier, G. A.

    2001-12-01

    Three-dimensional, dynamically self-consistent, numerical simulations have been used for two decades to study the generation of global magnetic fields in the deep fluid interiors of planets and stars. In particular, the number of geodynamo models has increased significantly within the last five years. These simulations of magnetic field generation by laminar convection have provided considerable insight to the dynamo process and have produced large-scale fields similar to those observed. However, no global convective dynamo simulation has yet been able to afford the spatial resolution required to simulate turbulent convection, which surely must exist in these low-viscosity fluids. They have all employed greatly enhanced eddy diffusivities to stabilize the low resolution numerical solutions and crudely account for the transport and mixing by the unresolved turbulence. A grand challenge for the next generation of geodynamo models is to produce a simulation with the thermal and viscous (eddy) diffusivities set no larger than the actual magnetic diffusivity of the Earth's fluid core (2 m2/s), while using the core's dimensions, mass, rotation rate and heat flow. This would correspond to the Ekman and magnetic Ekman numbers both set to 10-9 and the Rayleigh number being many orders of magnitude greater than critical. Dynamo models for stars and planets present an additional complication: the large variation of density with radius. A grand challenge for the next generation of these models is to reach similarly low Ekman numbers and high Rayleigh numbers with a density that decreases by at least three orders of magnitude from the base of the convection zone to the model's outer boundary. The advances in numerical methods and massively parallel computing needed to meet these challenges will be discussed.

  15. Saturation of the turbulent dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, J; Schleicher, D R G; Federrath, C; Bovino, S; Klessen, R S

    2015-08-01

    The origin of strong magnetic fields in the Universe can be explained by amplifying weak seed fields via turbulent motions on small spatial scales and subsequently transporting the magnetic energy to larger scales. This process is known as the turbulent dynamo and depends on the properties of turbulence, i.e., on the hydrodynamical Reynolds number and the compressibility of the gas, and on the magnetic diffusivity. While we know the growth rate of the magnetic energy in the linear regime, the saturation level, i.e., the ratio of magnetic energy to turbulent kinetic energy that can be reached, is not known from analytical calculations. In this paper we present a scale-dependent saturation model based on an effective turbulent resistivity which is determined by the turnover time scale of turbulent eddies and the magnetic energy density. The magnetic resistivity increases compared to the Spitzer value and the effective scale on which the magnetic energy spectrum is at its maximum moves to larger spatial scales. This process ends when the peak reaches a characteristic wave number k☆ which is determined by the critical magnetic Reynolds number. The saturation level of the dynamo also depends on the type of turbulence and differs for the limits of large and small magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm. With our model we find saturation levels between 43.8% and 1.3% for Pm≫1 and between 2.43% and 0.135% for Pm≪1, where the higher values refer to incompressible turbulence and the lower ones to highly compressible turbulence.

  16. Bifurcations and dynamo action in a Taylor Green flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrulle, B.; Blaineau, P.; Mafra Lopes, O.; Daviaud, F.; Laval, J.-P.; Dolganov, R.

    2007-08-01

    We report successive bifurcations in direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of a Taylor-Green flow, in both a hydro- and a magneto-hydrodynamic case. Hydrodynamic bifurcations occur in between different metastable states with different dynamo action, and are triggered by the numerical noise. The various states encountered range from stationary to chaotic or turbulent through possible oscillatory states. The corresponding sequence of bifurcations is reminiscent of the sequence obtained in the von Karman (VK) flow, at aspect ratio Γ=2 (Nore et al 2003 J. Fluid Mech. 477 51). We then use kinematic simulations to compute the dynamo thresholds of the different metastable states. A more detailed study of the turbulent state reveals the existence of two windows of dynamo action. Stochastic numerical simulations are then used to mimic the influence of turbulence on the dynamo threshold of the turbulent state. We show that the dynamo threshold is increased (respectively decreased) by the presence of large scale (resp. small scale) turbulent velocity fluctuations. Finally, DNSs of the magneto-hydrodynamic equations are used to explore the linear and nonlinear stage of the dynamo instability. In the linear stage, we show that the magnetic field favours the bifurcation from the basic state directly towards the turbulent or chaotic stable state. The magnetic field can also temporarily stabilize a metastable state, resulting in cycles of dynamo action, with different Lyapunov exponents. The critical magnetic Reynolds number for dynamo action is found to increase strongly with the Reynolds number. Finally, we provide a preliminary study of the saturation regime above the dynamo threshold. At large magnetic Prandtl number, we have observed two main types of saturations, in agreement with an analytical prediction of Leprovost and Dubrulle (2005 Eur. Phys. J. B 44 395): (i) intermittent dynamo, with vanishing most probable value of the magnetic energy; (ii) dynamo with non vanishing

  17. Helioseismic Constraints and Paradigm Shift in Solar Dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Kosovichev, Alexander G; Zhao, Junwei

    2014-01-01

    Helioseismology provides important constraints for the solar dynamo problem. However, the basic properties and even the depth of the dynamo process, which operates also in other stars, are unknown. Most of the dynamo models suggest that the toroidal magnetic field that emerges on the surface and forms sunspots is generated near the bottom of the convection zone, in the tachocline. However, there is a number of theoretical and observational problems with justifying the deep-seated dynamo models. This leads to the idea that the subsurface angular velocity shear may play an important role in the solar dynamo. Using helioseismology measurements of the internal rotation and meridional circulation, we investigate a mean-field MHD model of dynamo distributed in the bulk of the convection zone but shaped in a near-surface layer. We show that if the boundary conditions at the top of the dynamo region allow the large-scale toroidal magnetic fields to penetrate into the surface, then the dynamo wave propagates along the...

  18. Mars' paleomagnetic field as the result of a single-hemisphere dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Sabine; Elkins-Tanton, Linda; Zuber, Maria T; Parmentier, E Marc

    2008-09-26

    Mars' crustal magnetic field was most likely generated by dynamo action in the planet's early history. Unexplained characteristics of the field include its strength, concentration in the southern hemisphere, and lack of correlation with any surface features except for the hemispheric crustal dichotomy. We used numerical dynamo modeling to demonstrate that the mechanisms proposed to explain crustal dichotomy formation can result in a single-hemisphere dynamo. This dynamo produces strong magnetic fields in only the southern hemisphere. This magnetic field morphology can explain why Mars' crustal magnetic field intensities are substantially stronger in the southern hemisphere without relying on any postdynamo mechanisms.

  19. Facilitating dynamo action via control of large-scale turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limone, A; Hatch, D R; Forest, C B; Jenko, F

    2012-12-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic dynamo effect is considered to be the major cause of magnetic field generation in geo- and astrophysical systems. Recent experimental and numerical results show that turbulence constitutes an obstacle to dynamos; yet its role in this context is not totally clear. Via numerical simulations, we identify large-scale turbulent vortices with a detrimental effect on the amplification of the magnetic field in a geometry of experimental interest and propose a strategy for facilitating the dynamo instability by manipulating these detrimental "hidden" dynamics.

  20. Mean-field theory and self-consistent dynamo modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizawa, Akira; Yokoi, Nobumitsu [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Industrial Science; Itoh, Sanae-I [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2001-12-01

    Mean-field theory of dynamo is discussed with emphasis on the statistical formulation of turbulence effects on the magnetohydrodynamic equations and the construction of a self-consistent dynamo model. The dynamo mechanism is sought in the combination of the turbulent residual-helicity and cross-helicity effects. On the basis of this mechanism, discussions are made on the generation of planetary magnetic fields such as geomagnetic field and sunspots and on the occurrence of flow by magnetic fields in planetary and fusion phenomena. (author)

  1. What is a large-scale dynamo?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, G.; Pongkitiwanichakul, P.; Cattaneo, F.; Tobias, S. M.

    2017-01-01

    We consider kinematic dynamo action in a sheared helical flow at moderate to high values of the magnetic Reynolds number (Rm). We find exponentially growing solutions which, for large enough shear, take the form of a coherent part embedded in incoherent fluctuations. We argue that at large Rm large-scale dynamo action should be identified by the presence of structures coherent in time, rather than those at large spatial scales. We further argue that although the growth rate is determined by small-scale processes, the period of the coherent structures is set by mean-field considerations.

  2. Spectral gaps, inertial manifolds and kinematic dynamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez, Manuel [Departamento de Analisis Matematico, Universidad de Valladolid, 47005 Valladolid (Spain)]. E-mail: mnjmhd@am.uva.es

    2005-10-17

    Inertial manifolds are desirable objects when ones wishes a dynamical process to behave asymptotically as a finite-dimensional ones. Recently [Physica D 194 (2004) 297] these manifolds are constructed for the kinematic dynamo problem with time-periodic velocity. It turns out, however, that the conditions imposed on the fluid velocity to guarantee the existence of inertial manifolds are too demanding, in the sense that they imply that all the solutions tend exponentially to zero. The inertial manifolds are meaningful because they represent different decay rates, but the classical dynamos where the magnetic field is maintained or grows are not covered by this approach, at least until more refined estimates are found.

  3. Invisible dynamo in mean-field models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnyak, M. Yu.

    2016-07-01

    The inverse problem in a spherical shell to find the two-dimensional spatial distributions of the α-effect and differential rotation in a mean-field dynamo model has been solved. The derived distributions lead to the generation of a magnetic field concentrated inside the convection zone. The magnetic field is shown to have no time to rise from the region of maximum generation located in the lower layers to the surface in the polarity reversal time due to magnetic diffusion. The ratio of the maximum magnetic energy in the convection zone to its value at the outer boundary reaches two orders of magnitude or more. This result is important in interpreting the observed stellar and planetary magnetic fields. The proposed method of solving the inverse nonlinear dynamo problem is easily adapted for a wide class of mathematical-physics problems.

  4. A Theoretical Study of the Build-up of the Sun’s Polar Magnetic Field by using a 3D Kinematic Dynamo Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazra, Gopal; Choudhuri, Arnab Rai; Miesch, Mark S.

    2017-01-01

    We develop a three-dimensional kinematic self-sustaining model of the solar dynamo in which the poloidal field generation is from tilted bipolar sunspot pairs placed on the solar surface above regions of strong toroidal field by using the SpotMaker algorithm, and then the transport of this poloidal field to the tachocline is primarily caused by turbulent diffusion. We obtain a dipolar solution within a certain range of parameters. We use this model to study the build-up of the polar magnetic field and show that some insights obtained from surface flux transport models have to be revised. We present results obtained by putting a single bipolar sunspot pair in a hemisphere and two symmetrical sunspot pairs in two hemispheres. We find that the polar fields produced by them disappear due to the upward advection of poloidal flux at low latitudes, which emerges as oppositely signed radial flux and which is then advected poleward by the meridional flow. We also study the effect that a large sunspot pair, violating Hale’s polarity law, would have on the polar field. We find that there would be some effect—especially if the anti-Hale pair appears at high latitudes in the mid-phase of the cycle—though the effect is not very dramatic.

  5. A theoretical study of the build-up of the Sun's polar magnetic field by using a 3D kinematic dynamo model

    CERN Document Server

    Hazra, Gopal; Miesch, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    We develop a three-dimensional kinematic self-sustaining model of the solar dynamo in which the poloidal field generation is from tilted bipolar sunspot pairs placed on the solar surface above regions of strong toroidal field by using the SpotMaker algorithm and then the transport of this poloidal field to the tachocline is primarily caused by turbulent diffusion. We obtain a dipolar solution within a certain range of parameters. We use this model to study the build-up of the polar magnetic field and show that some insights obtained from surface flux transport (SFT) models have to be revised. We present results obtained by putting a single bipolar sunspot pair in a hemisphere and two symmetrical sunspot pairs in two hemispheres. We find that the polar fields produced by them disappear due to subduction by the meridional circulation sinking underneath the surface in the polar region, which is not included in the SFT models. We also study the effect that a large sunspot pair violating Hale's polarity law would ...

  6. What can we say about seed fields for galactic dynamos?

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate that a quasi-uniform cosmological seed field is a much less suitable seed for a galactic dynamo than has often been believed. The age of the Universe is insufficient for a conventional galactic dynamo to generate a contemporary galactic magnetic field starting from such a seed, accepting conventional estimates for physical quantities. We discuss modifications to the scenario for the evolution of galactic magnetic fields implied by this result. We also consider briefly the impli...

  7. Shear dynamo problem: Quasilinear kinematic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, S; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-04-01

    Large-scale dynamo action due to turbulence in the presence of a linear shear flow is studied. Our treatment is quasilinear and kinematic but is nonperturbative in the shear strength. We derive the integrodifferential equation for the evolution of the mean magnetic field by systematic use of the shearing coordinate transformation and the Galilean invariance of the linear shear flow. For nonhelical turbulence the time evolution of the cross-shear components of the mean field does not depend on any other components excepting themselves. This is valid for any Galilean-invariant velocity field, independent of its dynamics. Hence the shear-current assisted dynamo is essentially absent, although large-scale nonhelical dynamo action is not ruled out.

  8. Stretch fast dynamo mechanism via conformal mapping in Riemannian manifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia de Andrade, L. C.

    2007-10-01

    Two new analytical solutions of the self-induction equation in Riemannian manifolds are presented. The first represents a twisted magnetic flux tube or flux rope in plasma astrophysics, where the rotation of the flow implies that the poloidal field is amplified from toroidal field, in the spirit of dynamo theory. The value of the amplification depends on the Frenet torsion of the magnetic axis of the tube. Actually this result illustrates the Zeldovich stretch, twist, and fold method to generate dynamos from straight and untwisted ropes. Based on the fact that this problem was previously handled, using a Riemannian geometry of twisted magnetic flux ropes [Phys Plasmas 13, 022309 (2006)], investigation of a second dynamo solution, conformally related to the Arnold kinematic fast dynamo, is obtained. In this solution, it is shown that the conformal effect on the fast dynamo metric enhances the Zeldovich stretch, and therefore a new dynamo solution is obtained. When a conformal mapping is performed in an Arnold fast dynamo line element, a uniform stretch is obtained in the original line element.

  9. A global galactic dynamo with a corona constrained by relative helicity

    CERN Document Server

    Prasad, A

    2015-01-01

    We present a model for a global axisymmetric turbulent dynamo operating in a galaxy with a corona which treats the supernovae (SNe) and magneto-rotational instability (MRI) driven turbulence parameters under a common formalism. The nonlinear quenching of the dynamo is alleviated by inclusion of small-scale advective and diffusive magnetic helicity fluxes, which allow the gauge invariant magnetic helicity to be transferred outside the disk and consequently build up a corona during the course of dynamo action. The time-dependent dynamo equations are expressed in a separable form and solved through an eigenvector expansion constructed using the steady-state solutions of the dynamo equation. The parametric evolution of the dynamo solution allows us to estimate the final structure of the global magnetic field and the saturated value of the turbulence parameter $\\alpha_m$, even before solving the dynamical equations for evolution of magnetic fields in the disk and the corona, along with $\\alpha$-quenching. We then ...

  10. Fluctuation dynamos and their Faraday rotation signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Bhat, Pallavi

    2012-01-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in many astrophysical systems like galaxies, galaxy clusters and possibly even the IGM filaments. We study fluctuation dynamo action in turbulent systems focusing on one observational signature; the Faraday rotation measure (RM) from background radio sources seen through the magnetic field generated by such a dynamo. We simulate the fluctuation dynamo (FD) in periodic boxes up to resolutions of 512^3, with varying fluid and magnetic Reynolds numbers, and measure the resulting random RMs. We show that the resulting rms value of RM is quite significant, given that the FD produces intermittent fields. When the dynamo saturates, it is of order 40%-50% of the value expected in a model where fields of strength B_rms uniformly fill cells of the largest turbulent eddy but are randomly oriented from one cell to another. This level of RM dispersion obtains across different values of magnetic Reynolds number and Prandtl number explored. We also use the random RMs to probe the structure of the ge...

  11. Antipodal Magnetic Anomalies on the Moon, Contributions from Impact Induced Currents Due to Positive Holes and Flexoelectric Phenomina and Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletetschka, G.; Freund, F.; Wasilewski, P. J.; Mikula, V.; Kohout, Tomas

    2005-01-01

    Large impacts on the Moon generate large pressure pulses that penetrate the whole body. Several of these large impacts may have generated antipodal structure with anomalous magnetic intensity.These regions can be more than a thousand km across, with fields of the order of tens to hundreds of nT. This is the case of Orientale, Imbrium, Serenitatis, Crisium, and Nectaris impact basins. The production of large-scale magnetic fields and associated crustal magnetization due to lunar basin-forming impacts was hypothesized to have an origin in fields external to the impact plasma cloud that are produced by the magnetohydrodynamic interaction of the cloud with ambient magnetic fields and plasmas. During the period of compressed antipodal field amplification, seismic compressional waves from the impact converge at the antipode resulting in transient shock pressures that reach 2 GPa (20 kbar). This can produce conditions for shock magnetic acquisition of the crust antipodal to impact basins.

  12. Comments on the kinetic dynamo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1995-08-24

    It is conjectured that transport by parallel mass flow in a braided magnetic field, rather than hyper-resistivity, drives the dynamo effect after stochasticity is established. In this paper the authors do not attempt a rigorous proof of this conjecture, which requires showing that braiding introduces correlations analogous to those giving rise to the neoclassical bootstrap current. The authors do offer plausible arguments for the conjecture and show that it leads to interesting consequences if true. Namely, magnetic fluctuations would then scale with the magnetic Reynolds number S like {tilde B}/B {approximately} S{sup {minus}1/2} and the Rechester-Rosenbluth thermal diffusivity like {chi}e {proportional_to} S{sup {minus}1} . This scaling would explain the highest temperatures obtained in the CTX spheromak. It also suggests that a fully-bootstrapped current drive experiment could be carried out on-the DIII-D tokamak.

  13. Hemispherical Parker waves driven by thermal shear in planetary dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Dietrich, Wieland; Wicht, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Planetary and stellar magnetic fields are thought to be sustained by helical motions ($\\alpha$-effect) and, if present, differential rotation ($\\Omega$-effect). In the Sun, the strong differential rotation in the tachocline is responsible for an efficient $\\Omega$-effect creating a strong axisymmetric azimuthal magnetic field. This is a prerequisite for Parker dynamo waves that may be responsible for the solar cycle. In the liquid iron cores of terrestrial planets, the Coriolis force organizes convection into columns with a strong helical flow component. These likely dominate magnetic field generation while the $\\Omega$-effect is of secondary importance. Here we use numerical simulations to show that the planetary dynamo scenario may change when the heat flux through the outer boundary is higher in one hemisphere than in the other. A hemispherical dynamo is promoted that is dominated by fierce thermal wind responsible for a strong $\\Omega$-effect. As a consequence Parker dynamo waves are excited equivalent to...

  14. Wave-driven dynamo action in spherical magnetohydrodynamic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, K; Jenko, F; Tilgner, A; Forest, C B

    2009-11-01

    Hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic numerical studies of a mechanically forced two-vortex flow inside a sphere are reported. The simulations are performed in the intermediate regime between the laminar flow and developed turbulence, where a hydrodynamic instability is found to generate internal waves with a characteristic m=2 zonal wave number. It is shown that this time-periodic flow acts as a dynamo, although snapshots of the flow as well as the mean flow are not dynamos. The magnetic fields' growth rate exhibits resonance effects depending on the wave frequency. Furthermore, a cyclic self-killing and self-recovering dynamo based on the relative alignment of the velocity and magnetic fields is presented. The phenomena are explained in terms of a mixing of nonorthogonal eigenstates of the time-dependent linear operator of the magnetic induction equation. The potential relevance of this mechanism to dynamo experiments is discussed.

  15. The Alpha Dynamo Effects in Laboratory Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hantao Ji; Stewart C. Prager

    2001-10-16

    A concise review of observations of the alpha dynamo effect in laboratory plasmas is given. Unlike many astrophysical systems, the laboratory pinch plasmas are driven magnetically. When the system is overdriven, the resultant instabilities cause magnetic and flow fields to fluctuate, and their correlation induces electromotive forces along the mean magnetic field. This alpha-effect drives mean parallel electric current, which, in turn, modifies the initial background mean magnetic structure towards the stable regime. This drive-and-relax cycle, or the so-called self-organization process, happens in magnetized plasmas in a timescale much shorter than resistive diffusion time, thus it is a fast and unquenched dynamo process. The observed alpha-effect redistributes magnetic helicity (a measure of twistedness and knottedness of magnetic field lines) but conserves its total value. It can be shown that fast and unquenched dynamos are natural consequences of a driven system where fluctuations are statistically either not stationary in time or not homogeneous in space, or both. Implications to astrophysical phenomena will be discussed.

  16. Comparison of terrestrial and solar dynamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Keke [Center for Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics, Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Exeter, EX4 4QE (United Kingdom); Schubert, Gerald [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1567 (United States)

    2006-05-01

    The Earth's magnetic field has undergone temporal and spatial variations including polarity reversals. Paleomagnetic and historical magnetic field measurements suggest persistent distinct patterns of variation of the geomagnetic field taking place in different regions of the Earth. These patterns can be explained by core-mantle thermal interaction in which lateral variations in heat flux across the core-mantle boundary drive core flows at the top of the Earth's fluid core. The solar magnetic field has also undergone variation on widely separated scales. It is generally believed that the nearly 22-year sunspot cycle and its spatial symmetry with respect to the equator are a consequence of magnetohydrodynamic processes taking place in a highly differentially rotating layer between the convective and radiative regions of the Sun. For the Earth, the task of modelling an Earth-like and self-sustaining dynamo remains a major challenge because of the length scale disparities associated with the extremely small Ekman number of the Earth's fluid outer core. The scale disparities are not only the root of severe difficulties in modelling the geodynamo but they are also characteristic of the geodynamo dynamics. For the Sun, the solar tachocline offers an ideal location for the generation and storage of the Sun's strong azimuthal magnetic fields while the large-scale solar surface magnetic activity represents the rising and emerging of deep-seated, strong toroidal magnetic fields driven by magnetic buoyancy. However, a global solar dynamo model which dynamically incorporates the radiative core and is capable of reproducing a self-consistent and nearly solid-body rotating core with an overlying strongly radial shear layer remains a major challenge. Significant progress has been made towards understanding the complex dynamo processes in the Earth and Sun. We discuss the main differences and similarities between the geomagnetic and solar magnetic fields. We

  17. Extracting scaling laws from numerical dynamo models

    CERN Document Server

    Stelzer, Z

    2013-01-01

    Earth's magnetic field is generated by processes in the electrically conducting, liquid outer core, subsumed under the term `geodynamo'. In the last decades, great effort has been put into the numerical simulation of core dynamics following from the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. However, the numerical simulations are far from Earth's core in terms of several control parameters. Different scaling analyses found simple scaling laws for quantities like heat transport, flow velocity, magnetic field strength and magnetic dissipation time. We use an extensive dataset of 116 numerical dynamo models compiled by Christensen and co-workers to analyse these scalings from a rigorous model selection point of view. Our method of choice is leave-one-out cross-validation which rates models according to their predictive abilities. In contrast to earlier results, we find that diffusive processes are not negligible for the flow velocity and magnetic field strength in the numerical dynamos. Also the scaling of the magneti...

  18. The Development of the Alpha-Omega Completed Sentence Form (AOCSF): An Instrument to Aid in the Measurement, Identification, and Assessment of an Individual's "Adaptational Approach(es)" to the Stressful Event of Death and Related Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Ronald; And Others

    The Alpha Omega Completed Sentence Form (AOCSF) was developed to identify and measure a person's adaptational approaches to information concerning their own death or the possible death of a significant other. In contrast to the Kubler-Ross stage theory, the adaptational approach recognizes a person's capacity to assimilate new information which…

  19. TIDALLY DRIVEN DYNAMOS IN A ROTATING SPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cébron, D.; Hollerbach, R., E-mail: david.cebron@ujf-grenoble.fr, E-mail: r.hollerbach@leeds.ac.uk [Institut für Geophysik, Sonneggstrasse 5, ETH Zürich, Zürich CH-8092 (Switzerland)

    2014-07-01

    Large-scale planetary or stellar magnetic fields generated by a dynamo effect are mostly attributed to flows forced by buoyancy forces in electrically conducting fluid layers. However, these large-scale fields may also be controlled by tides, as previously suggested for the star τ-boo, Mars, or the early Moon. By simulating a small local patch of a rotating fluid, Barker and Lithwick have recently shown that tides can drive small-scale dynamos by exciting a hydrodynamic instability, the so-called elliptical (or tidal) instability. By performing global magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a rotating spherical fluid body, we investigate if this instability can also drive the observed large-scale magnetic fields. We are thus interested in the dynamo threshold and the generated magnetic field in order to test if such a mechanism is relevant for planets and stars. Rather than solving the problem in a geometry deformed by tides, we consider a spherical fluid body and add a body force to mimic the tidal deformation in the bulk of the fluid. This allows us to use an efficient spectral code to solve the magnetohydrodynamic problem. We first compare the hydrodynamic results with theoretical asymptotic results and numerical results obtained in a truly deformed ellipsoid, which confirms the presence of elliptical instability. We then perform magnetohydrodynamic simulations and investigate the dynamo capability of the flow. Kinematic and self-consistent dynamos are finally simulated, showing that the elliptical instability is capable of generating a dipole-dominated large-scale magnetic field in global simulations of a fluid rotating sphere.

  20. First evaluation of the thermodynamic properties for spheres to elongated micelles transition of some propanediyl-alpha,omega-bis(dimethylalkylammonium bromide) surfactants in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisicaro, Emilia; Compari, Carlotta; Duce, Elenia; Contestabili, Cristina; Viscardi, Guido; Quagliotto, Pierluigi

    2005-02-10

    The apparent and partial molar enthalpies, apparent molar volumes, and adiabatic compressibilities at 298 K of the aqueous solutions of the cationic gemini surfactants propanediyl-alpha,omega-bis(octyldimethylammonium bromide) (8-3-8) and propanediyl-alpha,omega-bis(dodecyldimethylammonium bromide) (12-3-12) have been measured as a function of concentration. The trends of the partial molar enthalpies versus concentration are the first well documented thermodynamic evidence of sphere to rod transition in the micellar phase, involving a detectable quantity of heat, and allow the determination of the change in enthalpy associated with this transition. The changes in enthalpies upon micellization and for the sphere to elongated micelles transition, DeltaH(s)(-->)(r), have been obtained from the experimental data by using a pseudo-phase transition approach: -1.5 kJ mol(-1) for 8-3-8 and -3.9 kJ mol(-1) for 12-3-12. No evidence of the above transition is found in the trends of volumetric properties versus m. The apparent adiabatic molar compressibilities for the compounds under investigation are also reported here for the first time: a negative group contribution for the methylene group is evaluated, when the surfactants are present in solution as a single molecule, reflecting its solvation structure. In the micellar phase, the -CH(2)- group contribution becomes positive. A value of 1.17 x 10(-3) cm(3) bar(-1) mol(-1) for the change in adiabatic molar compressibility upon micellization is obtained. The lower values of the methylene group contributions to the volumetric properties for the monomers support the hypothesis of partial association of the chains before the cmc.

  1. Dynamo effect in a driven helical flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feudel, F; Gellert, M; Rüdiger, S; Witt, A; Seehafer, N

    2003-10-01

    The Roberts flow, a helical flow in the form of convectionlike rolls, is known to be capable of both kinematic and nonlinear dynamo action. We study the Roberts dynamo with particular attention being paid to the spatial structure of the generated magnetic field and its back-reaction on the flow. The dynamo bifurcation is decisively determined by the symmetry group of the problem, which is given by a subgroup of discrete transformations and a continuous translational invariance of the flow. In the bifurcation the continuous symmetry is broken while the discrete subgroup symmetry completely survives. Its actions help in understanding the spatial structures of the magnetic field and of the modified flow. In accordance with experimental observations, the magnetic field component perpendicular to the originally invariant direction is much stronger than the component in this direction. Furthermore, the magnetic field is largely concentrated in layers separating the convectionlike rolls of the flow and containing, in particular, its stagnation points, which are isolated for the modified flow while they are line filling for the original Roberts flow. The magnetic field is strongest near beta-type stagnation points, with a two-dimensional unstable and a one-dimensional stable manifold, and is weak near alpha-type stagnation points, with a two-dimensional stable and a one-dimensional unstable manifold. This contrasts with the usual picture that dynamo action is promoted at the alpha points and impeded at the beta points. Both the creation of isolated stagnation points and the concentration of strong fields at the beta points may be understood as a result of the way in which the Roberts dynamo saturates. It is also found that, while the original Roberts flow is regular, the modified flow is chaotic in the layers between the convectionlike rolls where the magnetic field is concentrated. This chaoticity, which results from the back-reaction of the magnetic field on the flow

  2. Constraints on dynamo action in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helander, P.; Strumik, M.; Schekochihin, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    Upper bounds are derived on the amount of magnetic energy that can be generated by dynamo action in collisional and collisionless plasmas with and without external forcing. A hierarchy of mathematical descriptions is considered for the plasma dynamics: ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), visco-resistive MHD, the double-adiabatic theory of Chew, Goldberger and Low (CGL), kinetic MHD and other kinetic models. It is found that dynamo action is greatly constrained in models where the magnetic moment of any particle species is conserved. In the absence of external forcing, the magnetic energy then remains small at all times if it is small in the initial state. In other words, a small `seed' magnetic field cannot be amplified significantly, regardless of the nature of flow, as long as the collision frequency and gyroradius are small enough to be negligible. A similar conclusion also holds if the system is subject to external forcing as long as this forcing conserves the magnetic moment of at least one plasma species and does not greatly increase the total energy of the plasma (i.e. in practice, is subsonic). Dynamo action therefore always requires collisions or some small-scale kinetic mechanism for breaking the adiabatic invariance of the magnetic moment.

  3. Resonant oscillations in ${\\alpha}^{2}$-dynamos on a closed, twisted Riemannian 2D flux tubes

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, Garcia

    2009-01-01

    Chicone et al [CMP (1995)] have shown that, kinematic fast dynamos in diffusive media, could exist only on a closed, 2D Riemannian manifold of constant negative curvature. This report, shows that their result cannot be extended to oscillatory ${\\alpha}^{2}$-dynamos, when there are resonance modes, between toroidal and poloidal frequencies of twisted magnetic flux tubes. Thus, dynamo action can be supported in regions, where Riemannian curvature is positive. For turbulent dynamos, this seems physically reasonable, since recently, [Shukurov et al PRE (2008)] have obtained a Moebius flow strip in sodium liquid, torus Perm dynamo where curvature is also connected to the magnetic fields via diffusion. This could be done, by adjusting the corresponding frequencies till they achieved resonance. Actually 2D torus, is a manifold of zero mean curvature, where regions of positive and negative curvatures exist. It is shown that, Riemannian solitonic surface, endowed with a steady ${\\alpha}^{2}$-dynamo from magnetic filam...

  4. Dynamo onset as a first-order transition: lessons from a shell model for magnetohydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Ganapati; Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Pandit, Rahul

    2010-03-01

    We carry out systematic and high-resolution studies of dynamo action in a shell model for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence over wide ranges of the magnetic Prandtl number PrM and the magnetic Reynolds number ReM. Our study suggests that it is natural to think of dynamo onset as a nonequilibrium first-order phase transition between two different turbulent, but statistically steady, states. The ratio of the magnetic and kinetic energies is a convenient order parameter for this transition. By using this order parameter, we obtain the stability diagram (or nonequilibrium phase diagram) for dynamo formation in our MHD shell model in the (PrM-1,ReM) plane. The dynamo boundary, which separates dynamo and no-dynamo regions, appears to have a fractal character. We obtain a hysteretic behavior of the order parameter across this boundary and suggestions of nucleation-type phenomena.

  5. Azimuthal dynamo wave in spherical shell convection

    CERN Document Server

    Cole, Elizabeth; Mantere, Maarit J; Brandenburg, Axel

    2013-01-01

    We report the finding of an azimuthal dynamo wave of a low-order (m=1) mode in direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent convection in spherical shells. Such waves are predicted by mean field dynamo theory and have been obtained previously in mean-field models. Observational results both from photometry and Doppler imaging have revealed persistent drifts of spots for several rapidly rotating stars, but, although an azimuthal dynamo wave has been proposed as a possible mechanism responsible for this behavior, it has been judged as unlikely, as practical evidence for such waves from DNS has been lacking. The large-scale magnetic field in our DNS, which is due to self-consistent dynamo action, is dominated by a retrograde m=1 mode. Its pattern speed is nearly independent of latitude and does not reflect the speed of the differential rotation at any depth. The extrema of magnetic m=1 structures coincide reasonably with the maxima of m=2 structures of the temperature. These results provide direct support for...

  6. Turbulent magnetic fields in the quiet Sun: implications of Hinode observations and small-scale dynamo simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, Jonathan Pietarila; Schuessler, Manfred

    2008-01-01

    Using turbulent MHD simulations (magnetic Reynolds numbers up to 8000) and Hinode observations, we study effects of turbulence on measuring the solar magnetic field outside active regions. Firstly, from synthetic Stokes V profiles for the FeI lines at 630.1 and 630.2 nm, we show that a peaked probability distribution function (PDF) for observationally-derived field estimates is consistent with a monotonic PDF for actual vertical field strengths. Hence, the prevalence of weak fields is greater than would be naively inferred from observations. Secondly, we employ the fractal self-similar geometry of the turbulent solar magnetic field to derive two estimates (numerical and observational) of the true mean vertical unsigned flux density. We also find observational evidence that the scales of magnetic structuring in the photosphere extend at least down to an order of magnitude smaller than 200 km: the self-similar power-law scaling in the signed measure from a Hinode magnetogram ranges (over two decades in length s...

  7. Statistical analysis of the mass-to-flux ratio in turbulent cores: effects of magnetic field reversals and dynamo amplification

    CERN Document Server

    Bertram, Erik; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S

    2011-01-01

    We study the mass-to-flux ratio (M/\\Phi) of clumps and cores in simulations of supersonic, magnetohydrodynamical turbulence for different initial magnetic field strengths. We investigate whether the (M/\\Phi)-ratio of core and envelope, R = (M/\\Phi)_{core}/(M/\\Phi)_{envelope} can be used to distinguish between theories of ambipolar diffusion and turbulence-regulated star formation. We analyse R for different Lines-of-Sight (LoS) in various sub-cubes of our simulation box. We find that, 1) the average and median values of |R| for different times and initial magnetic field strengths are typically greater, but close to unity, 2) the average and median values of |R| saturate at average values of |R| ~ 1 for smaller magnetic fields, 3) values of |R| < 1 for small magnetic fields in the envelope are caused by field reversals when turbulence twists the field lines such that field components in different directions average out. Finally, we propose two mechanisms for generating values |R| ~< 1 for the weak and st...

  8. An ancient core dynamo in asteroid Vesta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Roger R; Weiss, Benjamin P; Shuster, David L; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Grove, Timothy L; Suavet, Clément; Lima, Eduardo A; Li, Luyao; Kuan, Aaron T

    2012-10-12

    The asteroid Vesta is the smallest known planetary body that has experienced large-scale igneous differentiation. However, it has been previously uncertain whether Vesta and similarly sized planetesimals formed advecting metallic cores and dynamo magnetic fields. Here we show that remanent magnetization in the eucrite meteorite Allan Hills A81001 formed during cooling on Vesta 3.69 billion years ago in a surface magnetic field of at least 2 microteslas. This field most likely originated from crustal remanence produced by an earlier dynamo, suggesting that Vesta formed an advecting liquid metallic core. Furthermore, the inferred present-day crustal fields can account for the lack of solar wind ion-generated space weathering effects on Vesta.

  9. A Non-axisymmetric Spherical α2-Dynamo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Using the Chebyshev-tau method, the generation of oscillatory nonaxisymmetric stellar magnetic fields by the α2-dynamo is studied in spherical geometry. Following the boundary conditions given by Schubert & Zhang, the spherical α2-dynamo consists of a fully convective spherical shell with inner radius ri and outer radius ro. A comparison of the critical dynamo numbers of axisymmetric and φ-dependent modes for different thicknesses of the convective shell and different α-profiles leads to the following qualitative results: (I) when the angular factor of α-profile is sinnθ cosθ (n = 1, 2, 4) the solutions of the α2-dynamo are oscillatory and non-axisymmetric, (ii) the thinner the convective shell, the more easily is the nonaxisymmetric mode excited and the higher is the latitudinal wave number, (iii) the thickness of the outer convective shell has an effect on the symmetries of the magnetic fields.

  10. Observations of non-solar-type dynamo processes in stars with shallow convective zones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeffers, S.V.; Donati, J.F.; Alecian, E.; Marsden, S.C.

    2010-01-01

    The magnetic field topology and differential rotation are fundamental signatures of the dynamo processes that generate the magnetic activity observed in the Sun and solar-type stars. To investigate how these dynamo processes evolve in stars with shallow convective zones, we present high-resolution s

  11. Experimental demonstration of a homogeneous two-scale dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieglitz, R.; Muller, U.

    2002-06-01

    It has been shown theoretically in the past that homogeneous dynamos may occur for various velocity fields. G.O. Roberts investigated spatially periodic velocity fields, which Busse confined to a finite cylindrical domain. Using a mean field approach he derived an approximate condition for the onset of dynamo action. Based on Busse's idea at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe a conceptual design for an experimental homogeneous dynamo was developed, and a test facility was set up. The first experiments demonstrated that a permanent dynamo can exist in a cylindrical container filled with liquid sodium in which by means of guide vanes counter rotating and counter current spiral vortices are arranged. The dynamo is self-exciting at sufficiently high flow rates, and the magnetic field saturates at a mean value. The instantaneous magnetic field fluctuates around this mean value by about 5%. As predicted by theory the mode of the observed magnetic field is strongly non-axisymmetric. In a series of experiments a phase and a bifurcation diagramm for dynamo action was derived which depend on the spiral and axial flow rates. Figs 5, Refs 14.

  12. THE TURBULENT DYNAMO IN HIGHLY COMPRESSIBLE SUPERSONIC PLASMAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federrath, Christoph [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Schober, Jennifer [Universität Heidelberg, Zentrum für Astronomie, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Strasse 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bovino, Stefano; Schleicher, Dominik R. G., E-mail: christoph.federrath@anu.edu.au [Institut für Astrophysik, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2014-12-20

    The turbulent dynamo may explain the origin of cosmic magnetism. While the exponential amplification of magnetic fields has been studied for incompressible gases, little is known about dynamo action in highly compressible, supersonic plasmas, such as the interstellar medium of galaxies and the early universe. Here we perform the first quantitative comparison of theoretical models of the dynamo growth rate and saturation level with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of supersonic turbulence with grid resolutions of up to 1024{sup 3} cells. We obtain numerical convergence and find that dynamo action occurs for both low and high magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm = ν/η = 0.1-10 (the ratio of viscous to magnetic dissipation), which had so far only been seen for Pm ≥ 1 in supersonic turbulence. We measure the critical magnetic Reynolds number, Rm{sub crit}=129{sub −31}{sup +43}, showing that the compressible dynamo is almost as efficient as in incompressible gas. Considering the physical conditions of the present and early universe, we conclude that magnetic fields need to be taken into account during structure formation from the early to the present cosmic ages, because they suppress gas fragmentation and drive powerful jets and outflows, both greatly affecting the initial mass function of stars.

  13. Numerical Simulations of Dynamos Generated in Spherical Couette Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Guervilly, Céline; 10.1080/03091920903550955

    2010-01-01

    We numerically investigate the efficiency of a spherical Couette flow at generating a self-sustained magnetic field. No dynamo action occurs for axisymmetric flow while we always found a dynamo when non-axisymmetric hydrodynamical instabilities are excited. Without rotation of the outer sphere, typical critical magnetic Reynolds numbers $Rm_c$ are of the order of a few thousands. They increase as the mechanical forcing imposed by the inner core on the flow increases (Reynolds number $Re$). Namely, no dynamo is found if the magnetic Prandtl number $Pm=Rm/Re$ is less than a critical value $Pm_c\\sim 1$. Oscillating quadrupolar dynamos are present in the vicinity of the dynamo onset. Saturated magnetic fields obtained in supercritical regimes (either $Re>2 Re_c$ or $Pm>2Pm_c$) correspond to the equipartition between magnetic and kinetic energies. A global rotation of the system (Ekman numbers $E=10^{-3}, 10^{-4}$) yields to a slight decrease (factor 2) of the critical magnetic Prandtl number, but we find a peculi...

  14. Fluctuation Dynamo and Turbulent Induction at Small Prandtl Number

    CERN Document Server

    Eyink, Gregory L

    2010-01-01

    We study the Lagrangian mechanism of the fluctuation dynamo at zero Prandtl number and infinite magnetic Reynolds number, in the Kazantsev-Kraichnan model of white-noise advection. With a rough velocity field corresponding to a turbulent inertial-range, flux-freezing holds only in a stochastic sense. We show that field-lines arriving to the same point which were initially separated by many resistive lengths are important to the dynamo. Magnetic vectors of the seed field that point parallel to the initial separation vector arrive anti-correlated and produce an "anti-dynamo" effect. We also study the problem of "magnetic induction" of a spatially uniform seed field. We find no essential distinction between this process and fluctuation dynamo, both producing the same growth-rates and small-scale magnetic correlations. In the regime of very rough velocity fields where fluctuation dynamo fails, we obtain the induced magnetic energy spectra. We use these results to evaluate theories proposed for magnetic spectra in...

  15. Extrapolating Solar Dynamo Models Throughout the Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, B. T.; Miesch, M. S.; Augustson, K.; Featherstone, N. A.

    2014-12-01

    There are multiple theories that aim to explain the behavior of the solar dynamo, and their associated models have been fiercely contested. The two prevailing theories investigated in this project are the Convective Dynamo model that arises from the pure solving of the magnetohydrodynamic equations, as well as the Babcock-Leighton model that relies on sunspot dissipation and reconnection. Recently, the supercomputer simulations CASH and BASH have formed models of the behavior of the Convective and Babcock-Leighton models, respectively, in the convective zone of the sun. These models show the behavior of the models within the sun, while much less is known about the effects these models may have further away from the solar surface. The goal of this work is to investigate any fundamental differences between the Convective and Babcock-Leighton models of the solar dynamo outside of the sun and extending into the solar system via the use of potential field source surface extrapolations implemented via python code that operates on data from CASH and BASH. The use of real solar data to visualize supergranular flow data in the BASH model is also used to learn more about the behavior of the Babcock-Leighton Dynamo. From the process of these extrapolations it has been determined that the Babcock-Leighton model, as represented by BASH, maintains complex magnetic fields much further into the heliosphere before reverting into a basic dipole field, providing 3D visualisations of the models distant from the sun.

  16. Differential Rotation in Solar Convective Dynamo Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yuhong

    2015-01-01

    We carry out a magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of convective dynamo in the rotating solar convective envelope driven by the solar radiative diffusive heat flux. The simulation is similar to that reported in Fan & Fang (2014) but with further reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion. The resulting convective dynamo produces a large scale mean field that exhibits similar irregular cyclic behavior and polarity reversals, and self-consistently maintains a solar-like differential rotation. The main driver for the solar-like differential rotation (with faster rotating equator) is a net outward transport of angular momentum away from the rotation axis by the Reynolds stress, and we found that this transport is enhanced with reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion.

  17. Differential rotation in solar convective dynamo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuhong; Fang, Fang

    2016-10-01

    We carry out a magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of convective dynamo in the rotating solar convective envelope driven by the solar radiative diffusive heat flux. The simulation is similar to that reported in Fan and Fang (2014) but with further reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion. The resulting convective dynamo produces a large scale mean field that exhibits similar irregular cyclic behavior and polarity reversals, and self-consistently maintains a solar-like differential rotation. The main driver for the solar-like differential rotation (with faster rotating equator) is a net outward transport of angular momentum away from the rotation axis by the Reynolds stress, and we found that this transport is enhanced with reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion.

  18. Galactic Dynamos and Galactic Winds

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Spiral galaxies host dynamically important magnetic fields which can affect gas flows in the disks and halos. Total magnetic fields in spiral galaxies are strongest (up to 30 \\muG) in the spiral arms where they are mostly turbulent or tangled. Polarized synchrotron emission shows that the resolved regular fields are generally strongest in the interarm regions (up to 15 \\muG). Faraday rotation measures of radio polarization vectors in the disks of several spiral galaxies reveal large-scale patterns which are signatures of coherent fields generated by a mean-field dynamo. -- Magnetic fields are also observed in radio halos around edge-on galaxies at heights of a few kpc above the disk. Cosmic-ray driven galactic winds transport gas and magnetic fields from the disk into the halo. The magnetic energy density is larger than the thermal energy density, but smaller than the kinetic energy density of the outflow. The orientation of field lines allows to estimate the wind speed and direction. There is no observation ...

  19. Predictive Scaling Laws for Spherical Rotating Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Oruba, Ludivine

    2013-01-01

    State of the art numerical models of the Geodynamo are still performed in a parameter regime extremely remote from the values relevant to the physics of the Earth's core. In order to establish a connection between dynamo modeling and the geophysical motivation, scaling laws have been proposed. Such scaling laws establish the dependence of essential quantities (such as the magnetic field strength) on measured or controlled quantities. They allow for a direct confrontation of advanced models with geophysical observations.(...)

  20. Role of large-scale velocity fluctuations in a two-vortex kinematic dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, E J; Brown, B P; Rahbarnia, K; Forest, C B

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the Dudley-James two-vortex flow, which inspired several laboratory-scale liquid-metal experiments, in order to better demonstrate its relation to astrophysical dynamos. A coordinate transformation splits the flow into components that are axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric relative to the induced magnetic dipole moment. The reformulation gives the flow the same dynamo ingredients as are present in more complicated convection-driven dynamo simulations. These ingredients are currents driven by the mean flow and currents driven by correlations between fluctuations in the flow and fluctuations in the magnetic field. The simple model allows us to isolate the dynamics of the growing eigenvector and trace them back to individual three-wave couplings between the magnetic field and the flow. This simple model demonstrates the necessity of poloidal advection in sustaining the dynamo and points to the effect of large-scale flow fluctuations in exciting a dynamo magnetic field.

  1. Kinetic Magnetorotational Turbulence and Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Matthew; Stone, James; Quataert, Eliot

    2016-10-01

    Low-luminosity black-hole accretion flows, such as that at the Galactic center, are collisionless. A kinetic approach is thus necessary to understand the transport of heat and angular momentum, the acceleration of particles, and the growth and structure of the magnetic field in these systems. We present results from the first 6D kinetic numerical simulation of magnetorotational turbulence and dynamo, using the local shearing-box model. Special attention will be paid to the enhanced transport of angular momentum by field-aligned pressure anisotropies, as well as to the ion-Larmor-scale kinetic instabilities (firehose, mirror, ion-cyclotron) which regulate those anisotropies. Energy spectra and phase-space evolution will be discussed. Time permitting, dedicated nonlinear studies of firehose and mirror instabilities in a shearing plasma will also be presented as a complement to the study of the magnetorotational instability. The profits, perils, and price of using a kinetic approach will be briefly mentioned.

  2. Direct numerical simulations of helical dynamo action: MHD and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Gómez

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetohydrodynamic dynamo action is often invoked to explain the existence of magnetic fields in several astronomical objects. In this work, we present direct numerical simulations of MHD helical dynamos, to study the exponential growth and saturation of magnetic fields. Simulations are made within the framework of incompressible flows and using periodic boundary conditions. The statistical properties of the flow are studied, and it is found that its helicity displays strong spatial fluctuations. Regions with large kinetic helicity are also strongly concentrated in space, forming elongated structures. In dynamo simulations using these flows, we found that the growth rate and the saturation level of magnetic energy and magnetic helicity reach an asymptotic value as the Reynolds number is increased. Finally, extensions of the MHD theory to include kinetic effects relevant in astrophysical environments are discussed.

  3. Small-Scale Dynamo Action in Primordial Halos

    CERN Document Server

    Schober, Jennifer; Klessen, Ralf S; Federrath, Christoph; Bovino, Stefano; Glover, Simon; Banerjee, Robi

    2012-01-01

    The first galaxies form due to gravitational collapse of primordial halos. During this collapse, weak magnetic seed fields get amplified exponentially by the small-scale dynamo - a process converting kinetic energy from turbulence into magnetic energy. We use the Kazantsev theory, which describes the small-scale dynamo analytically, to study magnetic field amplification for different turbulent velocity correlation functions. For incompressible turbulence (Kolmogorov turbulence), we find that the growth rate is proportional to the square root of the hydrodynamic Reynolds number, Re^(1/2). In the case of highly compressible turbulence (Burgers turbulence) the growth rate increases proportional to Re^(1/3). With a detailed chemical network we are able to follow the chemical evolution and determine the kinetic and magnetic viscosities (due to Ohmic and ambipolar diffusion) during the collapse of the halo. This way, we can calculate the growth rate of the small-scale dynamo quantitatively and predict the evolution...

  4. Convection-driven dynamos in the limit of rapid rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, Michael; Long, Louie; Nieves, David; Julien, Keith; Tobias, Steven

    2016-11-01

    Most large-scale planetary magnetic fields are thought to be driven by rapidly rotating convection. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) remains an important tool for investigating the physics of dynamos, but remains severely restricted in parameter space relative to geo- and astrophysical systems. Asymptotic models provide a complimentary approach to DNS that have the ability to access planetary-like magnetohydrodynamical regimes. We utilize an asymptotic dynamo model to investigate the influence of convective flow regime on dynamo action. We find that the spatial characteristics of the large-scale magnetic field are dependent only weakly on changes in flow behavior. In contrast, the behavior of the small-scale magnetic field is directly dependent on, and therefore shows significant variations with, the small-scale convective flow field. These results may suggest why many previous DNS studies, which reside in a vastly different parameter space relative to planets, are nonetheless successful in reproducing many of the observed features of planetary magnetic fields.

  5. A two-billion-year history for the lunar dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikoo, Sonia M; Weiss, Benjamin P; Shuster, David L; Suavet, Clément; Wang, Huapei; Grove, Timothy L

    2017-08-01

    Magnetic studies of lunar rocks indicate that the Moon generated a core dynamo with surface field intensities of ~20 to 110 μT between at least 4.25 and 3.56 billion years ago (Ga). The field subsequently declined to history requires an extraordinarily long-lived power source like core crystallization or precession. No single dynamo mechanism proposed thus far can explain the strong fields inferred for the period before 3.56 Ga while also allowing the dynamo to persist in such a weakened state beyond ~2.5 Ga. Therefore, our results suggest that the dynamo was powered by at least two distinct mechanisms operating during early and late lunar history.

  6. Nonlinear regimes in mean-field full-sphere dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Pipin, V V

    2016-01-01

    The mean-field dynamo model is employed to study the non-linear dynamo regimes in a fully convective star of mass 0.3$M_{\\odot}$ rotating with period of 10 days. The differential rotation law was estimated using the mean-field hydrodynamic and heat transport equations. For the intermediate parameter of the turbulent magnetic Reynolds number, $Pm_{T}=3$ we found the oscillating dynamo regimes with period about 40Yr. The higher $Pm_{T}$ results to longer dynamo periods. The meridional circulation has one cell per hemisphere. It is counter-clockwise in the Northen hemisphere. The amplitude of the flow at the surface around 1 m/s. Tne models with regards for meridional circulation show the anti-symmetric relative to equator magnetic field. If the large-scale flows is fixed we find that the dynamo transits from axisymmetric to non-axisymmetric regimes for the overcritical parameter of the $\\alpha$effect. The change of dynamo regime occurs because of the non-axisymmetric non-linear $\\alpha$-effect. The situation pe...

  7. Kinematic dynamo, supersymmetry breaking, and chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikov, Igor V.; Enßlin, Torsten A.

    2016-04-01

    The kinematic dynamo (KD) describes the growth of magnetic fields generated by the flow of a conducting medium in the limit of vanishing backaction of the fields onto the flow. The KD is therefore an important model system for understanding astrophysical magnetism. Here, the mathematical correspondence between the KD and a specific stochastic differential equation (SDE) viewed from the perspective of the supersymmetric theory of stochastics (STS) is discussed. The STS is a novel, approximation-free framework to investigate SDEs. The correspondence reported here permits insights from the STS to be applied to the theory of KD and vice versa. It was previously known that the fast KD in the idealistic limit of no magnetic diffusion requires chaotic flows. The KD-STS correspondence shows that this is also true for the diffusive KD. From the STS perspective, the KD possesses a topological supersymmetry, and the dynamo effect can be viewed as its spontaneous breakdown. This supersymmetry breaking can be regarded as the stochastic generalization of the concept of dynamical chaos. As this supersymmetry breaking happens in both the diffusive and the nondiffusive cases, the necessity of the underlying SDE being chaotic is given in either case. The observed exponentially growing and oscillating KD modes prove physically that dynamical spectra of the STS evolution operator that break the topological supersymmetry exist with both real and complex ground state eigenvalues. Finally, we comment on the nonexistence of dynamos for scalar quantities.

  8. Dynamo generated field emergence through recurrent plasmoid ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Warnecke, Jörn

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic buoyancy is believed to drive the transport of magnetic flux tubes from the convection zone to the surface of the Sun. The magnetic fields form twisted loop-like structures in the solar atmosphere. In this paper we use helical forcing to produce a large-scale dynamo-generated magnetic field, which rises even without magnetic buoyancy. A two layer system is used as computational domain where the upper part represents the solar atmosphere. Here, the evolution of the magnetic field is solved with the stress--and--relax method. Below this region a magnetic field is produced by a helical forcing function in the momentum equation, which leads to dynamo action. We find twisted magnetic fields emerging frequently to the outer layer, forming arch-like structures. In addition, recurrent plasmoid ejections can be found by looking at space--time diagrams of the magnetic field. Recent simulations in spherical coordinates show similar results.

  9. Searching for the fastest dynamo: laminar ABC flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexakis, Alexandros

    2011-08-01

    The growth rate of the dynamo instability as a function of the magnetic Reynolds number R(M) is investigated by means of numerical simulations for the family of the Arnold-Beltrami-Childress (ABC) flows and for two different forcing scales. For the ABC flows that are driven at the largest available length scale, it is found that, as the magnetic Reynolds number is increased: (a) The flow that results first in a dynamo is the 2 1/2-dimensional flow for which A=B and C=0 (and all permutations). (b) The second type of flow that results in a dynamo is the one for which A=B≃2C/5 (and permutations). (c) The most symmetric flow, A=B=C, is the third type of flow that results in a dynamo. (d) As R(M) is increased, the A=B=C flow stops being a dynamo and transitions from a local maximum to a third-order saddle point. (e) At larger R(M), the A=B=C flow reestablishes itself as a dynamo but remains a saddle point. (f) At the largest examined R(M), the growth rate of the 2 1/2-dimensional flows starts to decay, the A=B=C flow comes close to a local maximum again, and the flow A=B≃2C/5 (and permutations) results in the fastest dynamo with growth rate γ≃0.12 at the largest examined R(M). For the ABC flows that are driven at the second largest available length scale, it is found that (a) the 2 1/2-dimensional flows A=B,C=0 (and permutations) are again the first flows that result in a dynamo with a decreased onset. (b) The most symmetric flow, A=B=C, is the second type of flow that results in a dynamo. It is, and it remains, a local maximum. (c) At larger R(M), the flow A=B≃2C/5 (and permutations) appears as the third type of flow that results in a dynamo. As R(M) is increased, it becomes the flow with the largest growth rate. The growth rates appear to have some correlation with the Lyapunov exponents, but constructive refolding of the field lines appears equally important in determining the fastest dynamo flow.

  10. High Magnetic Shear Gain in a Liquid Sodium Stable Couette Flow Experiment: A Prelude to an α-Ω Dynamo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgate, S. A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Beckley, H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Si, J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Martinic, J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Westpfahl, D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Slutz, J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Westrom, C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Klein, B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schendel, P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Scharle, C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); McKinney, T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ginanni, R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bentley, I. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mickey, T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ferrel, R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Li, H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pariev, V. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Finn, J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2011-04-28

    The Ω phase of the liquid sodium α-Ω dynamo experiment at New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology in cooperation with Los Alamos National Laboratory has demonstrated a high toroidal field BΦ that is ≃8×Br, where Br is the radial component of an applied poloidal magnetic field. This enhanced toroidal field is produced by the rotational shear in stable Couette flow within liquid sodium at a magnetic Reynolds number Rm≃120. Small turbulence in stable Taylor-Couette flow is caused by Ekman flow at the end walls, which causes an estimated turbulence energy fraction of (δv/v)2~10-3.

  11. Solar Cycle #24 and the Solar Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, Kenneth; Pesnell, W. Dean

    2007-01-01

    . This appears consistent with a weakening polar field, but coronal hole data must be scrutinized carefully as observing techniques have changed. We also discuss new solar dynamo ideas, and the SODA (SOlar Dynamo Amplitude) index, which provides the user with the ability to track the Sun's hidden, dynamo magnetic fields throughout the various stages of the Sun's cycle. Our solar dynamo ideas are a modernization and rejuvenation of the Babcock-Leighton original idea of a shallow solar dynamo, using modern observations that appear to support their shallow dynamo viewpoint. We are in awe of being able to see an object the size of the Sun undergoing as dramatic a change as our model provides in a few short years. The Sun, however, has undergone changes as rapid as this before! The weather on the Sun is at least as fickle as the weather on the Earth.

  12. A coupled $2\\times2$D Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo model. II. Reference dynamo solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Lemerle, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we complete the presentation of a new hybrid $2\\times2$D flux transport dynamo (FTD) model of the solar cycle based on the Babcock-Leighton mechanism of poloidal magnetic field regeneration via the surface decay of bipolar magnetic regions (BMRs). This hybrid model is constructed by allowing the surface flux transport (SFT) simulation described in Lemerle et al. 2015 to provide the poloidal source term to an axisymmetric FTD simulation defined in a meridional plane, which in turn generates the BMRs required by the SFT. A key aspect of this coupling is the definition of an emergence function describing the probability of BMR emergence as a function of the spatial distribution of the internal axisymmetric magnetic field. We use a genetic algorithm to calibrate this function, together with other model parameters, against observed cycle 21 emergence data. We present a reference dynamo solution reproducing many solar cycle characteristics, including good hemispheric coupling, phase relationship betwe...

  13. Convective Dynamo Simulation with a Grand Minimum

    CERN Document Server

    Augustson, Kyle; Miesch, Mark; Toomre, Juri

    2015-01-01

    The global-scale dynamo action achieved in a simulation of a Sun-like star rotating at thrice the solar rate is assessed. The 3-D MHD Anelastic Spherical Harmonic (ASH) code, augmented with a viscosity minimization scheme, is employed to capture convection and dynamo processes in this G-type star. The simulation is carried out in a spherical shell that encompasses 3.8 density scale heights of the solar convection zone. It is found that dynamo action with a high degree of time variation occurs, with many periodic polarity reversals occurring roughly every 6.2 years. The magnetic energy also rises and falls with a regular period. The magnetic energy cycles arise from a Lorentz-force feedback on the differential rotation, whereas the processes leading to polarity reversals are more complex, appearing to arise from the interaction of convection with the mean toroidal fields. Moreover, an equatorial migration of toroidal field is found, which is linked to the changing differential rotation, and potentially to a no...

  14. MHD Turbulence, Turbulent Dynamo and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Beresnyak, Andrey

    2014-01-01

    MHD Turbulence is common in many space physics and astrophysics environments. We first discuss the properties of incompressible MHD turbulence. A well-conductive fluid amplifies initial magnetic fields in a process called small-scale dynamo. Below equipartition scale for kinetic and magnetic energies the spectrum is steep (Kolmogorov -5/3) and is represented by critically balanced strong MHD turbulence. In this paper we report the basic reasoning behind universal nonlinear small-scale dynamo and the inertial range of MHD turbulence. We measured the efficiency of the small-scale dynamo $C_E=0.05$, Kolmogorov constant $C_K=4.2$ and anisotropy constant $C_A=0.63$ for MHD turbulence in high-resolution direct numerical simulations. We also discuss so-called imbalanced or cross-helical MHD turbulence which is relevant for in many objects, most prominently in the solar wind. We show that properties of incompressible MHD turbulence are similar to the properties of Alfv\\'enic part of MHD cascade in compressible turbul...

  15. SADE: The starspot and dynamo explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, P. C. H.; Acton, L. W. A.; Klumpar, D.; Kankelborg, C.; Stern, R. A.; Peres, G.; Culhane, J. L.

    2003-09-01

    We propose a mission called SADE, the Starspot And Dynamo Explorer, to study dynamo activity in nearby late-type stars. The onboard instruments will be a Ca-K telescope for magnetically dominated chromospheric emission, and an X-ray grazing incidence telescope to study coronal emission. We design the mission for a life-time of 15 years or longer to capture a full activity cycle for most solar-type stars. We aim to firmly establish the spectrum of the relation between chromospheric and corona' emission in late-type stars, and capture one or more stars going into or coming out of a Maunder type minimum. Operation costs will be kept to a minimum by automating mission operations to a maximum, and have the science operations be carried out by students at Montana State University.

  16. Universal nonlinear small-scale dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresnyak, A

    2012-01-20

    We consider astrophysically relevant nonlinear MHD dynamo at large Reynolds numbers (Re). We argue that it is universal in a sense that magnetic energy grows at a rate which is a constant fraction C(E) of the total turbulent dissipation rate. On the basis of locality bounds we claim that this "efficiency of the small-scale dynamo", C(E), is a true constant for large Re and is determined only by strongly nonlinear dynamics at the equipartition scale. We measured C(E) in numerical simulations and observed a value around 0.05 in the highest resolution simulations. We address the issue of C(E) being small, unlike the Kolmogorov constant which is of order unity.

  17. ON THE ROLE OF TACHOCLINES IN SOLAR AND STELLAR DYNAMOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, G. [Physics Department, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627, Belo Horizonte, MG, 31270-901 (Brazil); Smolarkiewicz, P. K. [European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Reading RG2 9AX (United Kingdom); De Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M. [Astronomy Department, IAG-USP Rua do mato, 1226, São Paulo, SP, 05508-090 (Brazil); Kosovichev, A. G. [New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07103 (United States); Mansour, N. N., E-mail: guerrero@fisica.ufmg.br, E-mail: smolar@ecmwf.int, E-mail: dalpino@astro.iag.usp.br, E-mail: sasha@bbso.njit.edu, E-mail: Nagi.N.Mansour@nasa.gov [NASA, Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Mountain View, CA 94040 (United States)

    2016-03-10

    Rotational shear layers at the boundary between radiative and convective zones, tachoclines, play a key role in the process of magnetic field generation in solar-like stars. We present two sets of global simulations of rotating turbulent convection and dynamo. The first set considers a stellar convective envelope only; the second one, aiming at the formation of a tachocline, also considers the upper part of the radiative zone. Our results indicate that the resulting properties of the mean flows and dynamo, such as the growth rate, saturation energy, and mode, depend on the Rossby number (Ro). For the first set of models either oscillatory (with ∼2 yr period) or steady dynamo solutions are obtained. The models in the second set naturally develop a tachocline, which in turn leads to the generation of a strong mean magnetic field. Since the field is also deposited in the stable deeper layer, its evolutionary timescale is much longer than in the models without a tachocline. Surprisingly, the magnetic field in the upper turbulent convection zone evolves on the same timescale as the deep field. These models result in either an oscillatory dynamo with a ∼30 yr period or a steady dynamo depending on Ro. In terms of the mean-field dynamo coefficients computed using the first-order smoothing approximation, the field evolution in the oscillatory models without a tachocline seems to be consistent with dynamo waves propagating according to the Parker–Yoshimura sign rule. In the models with tachoclines the dynamics is more complex and involves other transport mechanisms as well as tachocline instabilities.

  18. Shear dynamo, turbulence, and the magnetorotational instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Jonathan

    The formation, evolution, and detailed structure of accretion disks remain poorly understood, with wide implications across a variety of astrophysical disciplines. While the most pressing question --- what causes the high angular momentum fluxes that are necessary to explain observations? --- is nicely answered by the idea that the disk is turbulent, a more complete grasp of the fundamental processes is necessary to capture the wide variety of behaviors observed in the night sky. This thesis studies the turbulence in ionized accretion disks from a theoretical standpoint, in particular focusing on the generation of magnetic fields in these processes, known as dynamo. Such fields are expected to be enormously important, both by enabling the magnetorotational instability (which evolves into virulent turbulence), and through large-scale structure formation, which may transport angular momentum in different ways and be fundamental for the formation of jets. The central result of this thesis is the suggestion of a new large-scale dynamo mechanism in shear flows --- the "magnetic shear-current effect" --- which relies on a positive feedback from small-scale magnetic fields. As well as being a very promising candidate for driving field generation in the central regions of accretion disks, this effect is interesting because small-scale magnetic fields have historically been considered to have a negative effect on the large-scale dynamo, damping growth and leading to dire predictions for final saturation amplitudes. Given that small-scale fields are ubiquitous in plasma turbulence above moderate Reynolds numbers, the finding that they could instead have a positive effect in some situations is interesting from a theoretical and practical standpoint. The effect is studied using direct numerical simulation, analytic techniques, and novel statistical simulation methods. In addition to the dynamo, much attention is given to the linear physics of disks and its relevance to

  19. Modelling the dynamo in fully convective M-stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rakesh Kumar; Christensen, Ulrich; Morin, Julien; Wolk, Scott; Poppenhaeger, Katja; Reiners, Ansgar; gastine, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    M-stars are among the most active and numerous stars in our galaxy. Their activity plays a fundamentally important role in shaping the exoplanetary biosphere since the habitable zones are very close to these stars. Therefore, modeling M-star activity has become a focal point in habitability studies. The fully convective members of the M-star population demand more immediate attention due to the discovery of Earth-like exoplanets around our stellar neighbors Proxima Centauri and TRAPPIST-1 which are both fully convective. The activity of these stars is driven by their convective dynamo, which may be fundamentally different from the solar dynamo due the absence of radiative cores. We model this dynamo mechanism using high-resolution 3D anelastic MHD simulations. To understand the evolution of the dynamo mechanism we simulate two cases, one with a fast enough rotation period to model a star in the `saturated' regime of the rotation-activity realtionship and the other with a slower period to represent cases in the `unsaturated' regime. We find the rotation period fundamentally controls the behavior of the dynamo solution: faster rotation promotes strong magnetic fields (of order kG) on both small and large length scales and the dipolar component of the magnetic field is dominant and stable, however, slower rotation leads to weaker magnetic fields which exhibit cyclic behavior. In this talk, I will present the simulation results and discuss how we can use them to interpret several observed features of the M-star activity.

  20. Spatial Nonlocality of the Small-Scale Solar Dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Lamb, Derek A; DeForest, Craig E

    2014-01-01

    We explore the nature of the small-scale solar dynamo by tracking magnetic features. We investigate two previously-explored categories of the small-scale solar dynamo: shallow and deep. Recent modeling work on the shallow dynamo has produced a number of scenarios for how a strong network concentration can influence the formation and polarity of nearby small-scale magnetic features. These scenarios have measurable signatures, which we test for here using magnetograms from the Narrowband Filter Imager (NFI) on Hinode. We find no statistical tendency for newly-formed magnetic features to cluster around or away from network concentrations, nor do we find any statistical relationship between their polarities. We conclude that there is no shallow or "surface" dynamo on the spatial scales observable by Hinode/NFI. In light of these results, we offer a scenario in which the sub-surface field in a deep solar dynamo is stretched and distorted via turbulence, allowing the field to emerge at random locations on the photo...

  1. Objective vortex detection in an astrophysical dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempel, E. L.; Chian, A. C.-L.; Beron-Vera, F. J.; Szanyi, S.; Haller, G.

    2017-03-01

    A novel technique for detecting Lagrangian vortices is applied to a helical magnetohydrodynamic dynamo simulation. The vortices are given by tubular level surfaces of the Lagrangian averaged vorticity deviation, the trajectory integral of the normed difference of the vorticity from its spatial mean. This simple method is objective, i.e. invariant under time-dependent rotations and translations of the coordinate frame. We also adapt the technique to use it on magnetic fields and propose the method of integrated averaged current deviation to determine precisely the boundary of magnetic vortices. The relevance of the results for the study of vortices in solar plasmas is discussed.

  2. An Instability-driven Dynamo for $\\gamma$ Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Araya-Gochez, R A

    2000-01-01

    We show that an MHD-instability driven dynamo (IDD) operating in a hot accretion disk is capable of generating energetically adequate magnetic flux deposition rates above and below a mildly advective accretion disk structure. The dynamo is driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) of a toroidal field in a shear flow and is limited by the buoyancy of `horizontal' flux and by reconnection in the turbulent medium. The efficiency of magnetic energy deposition is estimated to be comparable to the neutrino losses although an MHD collimation mechanism may deem this process a more viable alternative to neutrino-burst-driven models of gamma ray bursts.

  3. Fluctuation dynamo and turbulent induction at small Prandtl number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyink, Gregory L

    2010-10-01

    We study the Lagrangian mechanism of the fluctuation dynamo at zero Prandtl number and infinite magnetic Reynolds number, in the Kazantsev-Kraichnan model of white-noise advection. With a rough velocity field corresponding to a turbulent inertial range, flux freezing holds only in a stochastic sense. We show that field lines arriving to the same point which were initially separated by many resistive lengths are important to the dynamo. Magnetic vectors of the seed field that point parallel to the initial separation vector arrive anticorrelated and produce an "antidynamo" effect. We also study the problem of "magnetic induction" of a spatially uniform seed field. We find no essential distinction between this process and fluctuation dynamo, both producing the same growth rates and small-scale magnetic correlations. In the regime of very rough velocity fields where fluctuation dynamo fails, we obtain the induced magnetic energy spectra. We use these results to evaluate theories proposed for magnetic spectra in laboratory experiments of turbulent induction.

  4. Constraints on dynamo action in plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Helander, P; Schekochihin, A A

    2016-01-01

    Upper bounds are derived on the amount of magnetic energy that can be generated by dynamo action in collisional and collisionless plasmas with and without external forcing. A hierarchy of mathematical descriptions is considered for the plasma dynamics: ideal MHD, visco-resistive MHD, the double-adiabatic theory of Chew, Goldberger and Low (CGL), kinetic MHD, and other kinetic models. It is found that dynamo action is greatly constrained in models where the magnetic moment of any particle species is conserved. In the absence of external forcing, the magnetic energy then remains small at all times if it is small in the initial state. In other words, a small "seed" magnetic field cannot be amplified significantly, regardless of the nature of flow, as long as the collision frequency and gyroradius are small enough to be negligible. A similar conclusion also holds if the system is subject to external forcing as long as this forcing conserves the magnetic moment of at least one plasma species and does not greatly i...

  5. A simplified model of collision-driven dynamo action in small bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Xing

    2013-01-01

    We investigate numerically the self-sustained dynamo action in a spinning sphere whose sense of rotation reverses periodically. This system serves as a simple model of a dynamo in small bodies powered by frequent collisions. It is found that dynamo action is possible in some intervals of collision rates. At high Ekman numbers the laminar spin-up flow is helical in the boundary layers and the Ekman circulation together with the azimuthal shear powers the dynamo action. At low Ekman number a non-axisymmetric instability helps the dynamo action. The intermittency of magnetic field occurs at low Ekman number. A lower bound of magnetic energy is numerically obtained, and the space-averaged field in the fluid core and the surface field of a small body are roughly estimated.

  6. Introduction to Plasma Dynamo, Reconnection and Shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intrator, Thomas P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-30

    In our plasma universe, most of what we can observe is composed of ionized gas, or plasma. This plasma is a conducting fluid, which advects magnetic fields when it flows. Magnetic structure occurs from the smallest planetary to the largest cosmic scales. We introduce at a basic level some interesting features of non linear magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). For example, in our plasma universe, dynamo creates magnetic fields from gravitationally driven flow energy in an electrically conducting medium, and conversely magnetic reconnection annihilates magnetic field and accelerates particles. Shocks occur when flows move faster than the local velocity (sonic or Alfven speed) for the propagation of information. Both reconnection and shocks can accelerate particles, perhaps to gigantic energies, for example as observed with 10{sup 20} eV cosmic rays.

  7. Resonance in Forced Flux Transport Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Gilman, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    We show that simple 2 and 3-layer flux-transport dynamos, when forced at the top by a poloidal source term, can produce a widely varying amplitude of toroidal field at the bottom, depending on how close the meridional flow speed of the bottom layer is to the propagation speed of the forcing applied above the top layer, and how close the amplitude of the $\\alpha$-effect is to two values that give rise to a resonant response. This effect should be present in this class of dynamo model no matter how many layers are included. This result could have implications for the prediction of future solar cycles from the surface magnetic fields of prior cycles. It could be looked for in flux-transport dynamos that are more realistic for the Sun, done in spherical geometry with differential rotation, meridional flow and $\\alpha$-effect that vary with latitude and time as well as radius. Because of these variations, if resonance occurs, it should be more localized in time, latitude and radius.

  8. Dynamo waves in Friedmann and Misner cosmologies

    OpenAIRE

    de Andrade, Garcia

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that Misner metric can be obtained as solution of dynamo waves equations and Friedmann hyperbolic metrics are obtained when the dynamo waves are absent. In the case of dynamo waves ICM fields are computed and galactic dynamos are obtained.

  9. The fate of alpha dynamos at large $Rm$

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    At the heart of today's solar magnetic field evolution models lies the alpha dynamo description. In this work, we investigate the fate of alpha-dynamos as the magnetic Reynolds number $Rm$ is increased. Using Floquet theory, we are able to precisely quantify mean field effects like the alpha and beta effect (i) by rigorously distinguishing dynamo modes that involve large scale components from the ones that only involve small scales, and by (ii) providing a way to investigate arbitrary large scale separations with minimal computational cost. We apply this framework to helical and non-helical flows as well as to random flows with short correlation time. Our results determine that the alpha-description is valid for $Rm$ smaller than a critical value $Rm_c$ at which small scale dynamo instability starts. When $Rm$ is above $Rm_c$ the dynamo ceases to follow the mean field description and the growth rate of the large scale modes becomes independent of the scale separation while the energy in the large scale modes ...

  10. Measurement of the dynamo effect in a plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, H. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Prager, S.C.; Almagri, A.F.; Sarff, J.S. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics; Hirano, Y. [Electrotechnical Lab., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Plasma Section; Toyama, H. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    1995-11-01

    A series of the detailed experiments has been conducted in three laboratory plasma devices to measure the dynamo electric field along the equilibrium field line (the {alpha} effect) arising from the correlation between the fluctuating flow velocity and magnetic field. The fluctuating flow velocity is obtained from probe measurement of the fluctuating E x B drift and electron diamagnetic drift. The three major findings are (1) the {alpha} effect accounts for the dynamo current generation, even in the time dependence through a ``sawtooth`` cycle; (2) at low collisionality the dynamo is explained primarily by the widely studied pressureless Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, i.e., the fluctuating velocity is dominated by the E x B drift; (3) at high collisionality, a new ``electron diamagnetic dynamo`` is observed, in which the fluctuating velocity is dominated by the diamagnetic drift. In addition, direct measurements of the helicity flux indicate that the dynamo activity transports magnetic helicity from one part of the plasma to another, but the total helicity is roughly conserved, verifying J.B. Taylor`s conjecture.

  11. A New Challenge to Solar Dynamo Models from Helioseismic Observations: The Latitudinal Dependence of the Progression of the Solar Cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Simoniello, R; Jain, K; Hill, F

    2016-01-01

    The solar cycle onset at mid-latitudes, the slow down of the sunspot drift toward the equator, the tail-like attachment and the overlap of successive cycles at the time of activity minimum are delicate issues in $\\alpha\\Omega$ dynamo wave and flux transport dynamo models. Very different parameter values produce similar results, making it difficult to understand the origin of these solar cycle properties. We use GONG helioseismic data to investigate the progression of the solar cycle as observed in intermediate-degree global $p$-mode frequency shifts at different latitudes and subsurface layers, from the beginning of solar cycle 23 up to the maximum of the current solar cycle. We also analyze those for high-degree modes in each hemisphere obtained through the ring-diagram technique of local helioseismology. The analysis highlighted differences in the progression of the cycle below 15\\degr\\ compared to higher latitudes. While the cycle starts at mid-latitudes and then migrates equatorward/poleward, the sunspot ...

  12. Gravitational dynamos and the low-frequency geomagnetic secular variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, P.

    2007-01-01

    Self-sustaining numerical dynamos are used to infer the sources of low-frequency secular variation of the geomagnetic field. Gravitational dynamo models powered by compositional convection in an electrically conducting, rotating fluid shell exhibit several regimes of magnetic field behavior with an increasing Rayleigh number of the convection, including nearly steady dipoles, chaotic nonreversing dipoles, and chaotic reversing dipoles. The time average dipole strength and dipolarity of the magnetic field decrease, whereas the dipole variability, average dipole tilt angle, and frequency of polarity reversals increase with Rayleigh number. Chaotic gravitational dynamos have large-amplitude dipole secular variation with maximum power at frequencies corresponding to a few cycles per million years on Earth. Their external magnetic field structure, dipole statistics, low-frequency power spectra, and polarity reversal frequency are comparable to the geomagnetic field. The magnetic variability is driven by the Lorentz force and is characterized by an inverse correlation between dynamo magnetic and kinetic energy fluctuations. A constant energy dissipation theory accounts for this inverse energy correlation, which is shown to produce conditions favorable for dipole drift, polarity reversals, and excursions. PMID:18048345

  13. Turbulent dynamo in a conducting fluid and partially ionized gas

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Siyao

    2016-01-01

    By following the Kazantsev theory and taking into account both microscopic and turbulent diffusion of magnetic fields, we develop a unified treatment of the kinematic and nonlinear stages of turbulent dynamo, and study the dynamo process for a full range of magnetic Prandtl number Pm and ionization fractions. We find a striking similarity between the dependence of dynamo behavior on Pm in a conducting fluid and R (a function of ionization fraction) in partially ionized gas. In a weakly ionized medium, the kinematic stage is largely extended, including not only exponential growth but a new regime of dynamo characterized by linear-in-time growth of magnetic field strength, and the resulting magnetic energy is much higher than the kinetic energy carried by viscous-scale eddies. Unlike the kinematic stage, the subsequent nonlinear stage is unaffected by microscopic diffusion processes and has a universal linear-in-time growth of magnetic energy with the growth rate as a constant fraction $3/38$ of the turbulent e...

  14. Magnetohydrodynamic dynamo in disc-like astrophysical bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepinski, T.F.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic dynamos in disc-like astrophysical bodies have been considered for some time. Important astrophysical objects like accretion discs, protostellar and protoplanetary nebulae, and galaxies are thought to regenerate a magnetic field through a dynamo mechanism. Although there is a well-developed theory for describing the regeneration of magnetic fields in these objects, there are not any specific methods to calculate such magnetic fields in the general case. In this work, after a description of the dynamo theory, the specific method for solving the nonspherical dynamo is introduced. The unique feature of this method is accommodation of variable magnetic diffusivity in order to model the shape of a disc-like body. The detailed construction of the method is presented, as well as description of mathematical and numerical methods used for obtaining the solution. The method of checking the model with respect to sell-established spherical models is also presented. Finally, some examples are calculated and discussion is given on the behavior of calculated magnetic fields and possible astrophysical implications.

  15. Solar Dynamo Driven by Periodic Flow Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Hans G.; Hartle, Richard E.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have proposed that the periodicity of the solar magnetic cycle is determined by wave mean flow interactions analogous to those driving the Quasi Biennial Oscillation in the Earth's atmosphere. Upward propagating gravity waves would produce oscillating flows near the top of the radiation zone that in turn would drive a kinematic dynamo to generate the 22-year solar magnetic cycle. The dynamo we propose is built on a given time independent magnetic field B, which allows us to estimate the time dependent, oscillating components of the magnetic field, (Delta)B. The toroidal magnetic field (Delta)B(sub phi) is directly driven by zonal flow and is relatively large in the source region, (Delta)(sub phi)/B(sub Theta) much greater than 1. Consistent with observations, this field peaks at low latitudes and has opposite polarities in both hemispheres. The oscillating poloidal magnetic field component, (Delta)B(sub Theta), is driven by the meridional circulation, which is difficult to assess without a numerical model that properly accounts for the solar atmosphere dynamics. Scale-analysis suggests that (Delta)B(sub Theta) is small compared to B(sub Theta) in the dynamo region. Relative to B(sub Theta), however, the oscillating magnetic field perturbations are expected to be transported more rapidly upwards in the convection zone to the solar surface. As a result, (Delta)B(sub Theta) (and (Delta)B(sub phi)) should grow relative to B(sub Theta), so that the magnetic fields reverse at the surface as observed. Since the meridional and zonai flow oscillations are out of phase, the poloidal magnetic field peaks during times when the toroidal field reverses direction, which is observed. With the proposed wave driven flow oscillation, the magnitude of the oscillating poloidal magnetic field increases with the mean rotation rate of the fluid. This is consistent with the Bode-Blackett empirical scaling law, which reveals that in massive astrophysical bodies the magnetic moment tends

  16. Mean-field cosmological dynamos in Riemannian space with isotropic diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, L Garcia

    2009-01-01

    Mean-field cosmological dynamos in Riemannian space with isotropic diffusion}} Previous attempts for building a cosmic dynamo including preheating in inflationary universes [Bassett et al Phys Rev (2001)] has not included mean field or turbulent dynamos. In this paper a mean field dynamo in cosmic scales on a Riemannian spatial cosmological section background, is set up. When magnetic fields and flow velocities are parallel propagated along the Riemannian space dynamo action is obtained. Turbulent diffusivity ${\\beta}$ is coupled with the Ricci magnetic curvature, as in Marklund and Clarkson [MNRAS (2005)], GR-MHD dynamo equation. Mean electric field possesses an extra term where Ricci tensor couples with magnetic vector potential in Ohm's law. In Goedel universe induces a mean field dynamo growth rate ${\\gamma}=2{\\omega}^{2}{\\beta}$. In this frame kinetic helicity vanishes. In radiation era this yields ${\\gamma}\\approx{2{\\beta}{\\times}10^{-12}s^{-1}}$. In non-comoving the magnetic field is expressed as $B\\ap...

  17. An update of Leighton's solar dynamo model

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, R H

    2016-01-01

    In 1969 Leighton developed a quasi-1D mathematical model of the solar dynamo, building upon the phenomenological scenario of Babcock(1961). Here we present a modification and extension of Leighton's model. Using the axisymmetric component of the magnetic field, we consider the radial field component at the solar surface and the radially integrated toroidal magnetic flux in the convection zone, both as functions of latitude. No assumptions are made with regard to the radial location of the toroidal flux. The model includes the effects of turbulent diffusion at the surface and in the convection zone, poleward meridional flow at the surface and an equatorward return flow affecting the toroidal flux, latitudinal differential rotation and the near-surface layer of radial rotational shear, downward convective pumping of magnetic flux in the shear layer, and flux emergence in the form of tilted bipolar magnetic regions. While the parameters relevant for the transport of the surface field are taken from observations,...

  18. Dynamo efficiency controlled by hydrodynamic bistability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, Sophie; Herault, Johann; Herault, Johann; Fauve, Stephan; Gissinger, Christophe; Pétrélis, François; Daviaud, François; Dubrulle, Bérengère; Boisson, Jean; Bourgoin, Mickaël; Verhille, Gautier; Odier, Philippe; Pinton, Jean-François; Plihon, Nicolas

    2014-06-01

    Hydrodynamic and magnetic behaviors in a modified experimental setup of the von Kármán sodium flow-where one disk has been replaced by a propeller-are investigated. When the rotation frequencies of the disk and the propeller are different, we show that the fully turbulent hydrodynamic flow undergoes a global bifurcation between two configurations. The bistability of these flow configurations is associated with the dynamics of the central shear layer. The bistable flows are shown to have different dynamo efficiencies; thus for a given rotation rate of the soft-iron disk, two distinct magnetic behaviors are observed depending on the flow configuration. The hydrodynamic transition controls the magnetic field behavior, and bifurcations between high and low magnetic field branches are investigated.

  19. Computer simulation of a magnetohydrodynamic dynamo. II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Akira; Sato, Tetsuya; Complexity Simulation Group

    1995-05-01

    A computer simulation of a magnetohydrodynamic dynamo in a rapidly rotating spherical shell is performed. Extensive parameter runs are carried out changing electrical resistivity. When resistivity is sufficiently small, total magnetic energy can grow more than ten times larger than total kinetic energy of convection motion which is driven by an unlimited external energy source. When resistivity is relatively large and magnetic energy is comparable or smaller than kinetic energy, the convection motion maintains its well-organized structure. However, when resistivity is small and magnetic energy becomes larger than kinetic energy, the well-organized convection motion is highly irregular. The magnetic field is organized in two ways. One is the concentration of component parallel to the rotation axis and the other is the concentration of perpendicular component. The parallel component tends to be confined inside anticyclonic columnar convection cells, while the perpendicular component is confined outside convection cells.

  20. The dynamo bifurcation in rotating spherical shells

    CERN Document Server

    Morin, Vincent; 10.1142/S021797920906378X

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the nature of the dynamo bifurcation in a configuration applicable to the Earth's liquid outer core, i.e. in a rotating spherical shell with thermally driven motions. We show that the nature of the bifurcation, which can be either supercritical or subcritical or even take the form of isola (or detached lobes) strongly depends on the parameters. This dependence is described in a range of parameters numerically accessible (which unfortunately remains remote from geophysical application), and we show how the magnetic Prandtl number and the Ekman number control these transitions.

  1. Magnetohydrodynamic dynamo: global flow generation in plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoi, Nobumitsu; Yoshizawa, Akira [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Industrial Science; Itoh, Kimitaka; Itoh, Sanae-I.

    1999-07-01

    Generation mechanism of the spontaneous plasma rotation observed in an improved confinement mode in tokamak's is examined from the viewpoint of the turbulent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamo. A dynamo model, where the concept of cross helicity (velocity/magnetic-field correlation) plays a key role, is applied to the reversed shear (RS) modes. The concave electric-current profile occurred in the RS modes is shown to be a cause of the global plasma rotation through a numerical simulation of the cross-helicity turbulence model. (author)

  2. Coherent structures and the saturation of a nonlinear dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Rempel, Erico L; Brandenburg, Axel; Muñoz, Pablo R

    2012-01-01

    Eulerian and Lagrangian tools are used to detect coherent structures in the velocity and magnetic fields of a mean--field dynamo, produced by direct numerical simulations of the three--dimensional compressible magnetohydrodynamic equations with an isotropic helical forcing and moderate Reynolds number. Two distinct stages of the dynamo are studied, the kinematic stage, where a seed magnetic field undergoes exponential growth, and the saturated regime. It is shown that the Lagrangian analysis detects structures with greater detail, besides providing information on the chaotic mixing properties of the flow and the magnetic fields. The traditional way of detecting Lagrangian coherent structures using finite--time Lyapunov exponents is compared with a recently developed method called function M. The latter is shown to produce clearer pictures which readily permit the identification of hyperbolic regions in the magnetic field, where chaotic transport/dispersion of magnetic field lines is highly enhanced.

  3. Kinematic Dynamo, Supersymmetry Breaking, and Chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Ovchinnikov, Igor V

    2015-01-01

    The kinematic dynamo (KD) describes the growth of magnetic fields generated by the flow of a conducting medium in the limit of vanishing backaction of the fields onto the flow. The KD is therefore an important model system for understanding astrophysical magnetism. Here, the mathematical correspondence between the KD and a specific stochastic differential equation (SDE) viewed from the perspective of the supersymmetric theory of stochastics (STS) is discussed. The STS is a novel, approximation-free framework to investigate SDEs. The correspondence reported here permits insights from the STS to be applied to the theory of KD and vice versa. It was previously known that the fast KD in the idealistic limit of no magnetic diffusion requires chaotic flows. The KD-STS correspondence shows that this is also true for the diffusive KD. From the STS perspective, the KD possesses a topological supersymmetry and the dynamo effect can be viewed as its spontaneous breakdown. This supersymmetry breaking can be regarded as t...

  4. Suppression of a kinematic dynamo by large shear

    CERN Document Server

    Sood, Aditi; Kim, Eun-jin

    2016-01-01

    We numerically solve the magnetic induction equation in a spherical shell geometry, with a kinematically prescribed axisymmetric flow that consists of a superposition of a small-scale helical flow and a large-scale shear flow. The small-scale flow is chosen to be a local analog of the classical Roberts cells, consisting of strongly helical vortex rolls. The large-scale flow is a shearing motion in either the radial or the latitudinal directions. In the absence of large-scale shear, the small-scale flow is an efficient dynamo, in agreement with previous results. Adding increasingly large shear flows strongly suppresses the dynamo efficiency, indicating that shear is not always a favourable ingredient in dynamo action.

  5. Predicting cycle 24 using various dynamo-based tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dikpati

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Various dynamo-based techniques have been used to predict the mean solar cycle features, namely the amplitude and the timings of onset and peak. All methods use information from previous cycles, including particularly polar fields, drift-speed of the sunspot zone to the equator, and remnant magnetic flux from the decay of active regions. Polar fields predict a low cycle 24, while spot zone migration and remnant flux both lead to predictions of a high cycle 24. These methods both predict delayed onset for cycle 24. We will describe how each of these methods relates to dynamo processes. We will present the latest results from our flux-transport dynamo, including some sensitivity tests and how our model relates to polar fields and spot zone drift methods.

  6. Hall current effects in mean-field dynamo theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lingam, Manasvi

    2016-01-01

    The role of the Hall term on large scale dynamo action is investigated by means of the First Order Smoothing Approximation. It is shown that the standard $\\alpha$ coefficient is altered, and is zero when a specific double Beltrami state is attained, in contrast to the Alfv\\'enic state for MHD dynamos. The $\\beta$ coefficient is no longer positive definite, and thereby enables dynamo action even if $\\alpha$-quenching were to operate. The similarities and differences with the (magnetic) shear-current effect are pointed out, and a mechanism that may be potentially responsible for $\\beta < 0$ is advanced. The results are compared against previous studies, and their astrophysical relevance is also highlighted.

  7. A long-lived lunar dynamo driven by continuous mechanical stirring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, C A; Stevenson, D J; Nimmo, F

    2011-11-09

    Lunar rocks contain a record of an ancient magnetic field that seems to have persisted for more than 400 million years and which has been attributed to a lunar dynamo. Models of conventional dynamos driven by thermal or compositional convection have had difficulty reproducing the existence and apparently long duration of the lunar dynamo. Here we investigate an alternative mechanism of dynamo generation: continuous mechanical stirring arising from the differential motion, due to Earth-driven precession of the lunar spin axis, between the solid silicate mantle and the liquid core beneath. We show that the fluid motions and the power required to drive a dynamo operating continuously for more than one billion years and generating a magnetic field that had an intensity of more than one microtesla 4.2 billion years ago are readily obtained by mechanical stirring. The magnetic field is predicted to decrease with time and to shut off naturally when the Moon recedes far enough from Earth that the dissipated power is insufficient to drive a dynamo; in our nominal model, this occurred at about 48 Earth radii (2.7 billion years ago). Thus, lunar palaeomagnetic measurements may be able to constrain the poorly known early orbital evolution of the Moon. This mechanism may also be applicable to dynamos in other bodies, such as large asteroids.

  8. Global Simulations of Dynamo and Magnetorotational Instability in Madison Plasma Experiments and Astrophysical Disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebrahimi, Fatima [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States)

    2014-07-31

    Large-scale magnetic fields have been observed in widely different types of astrophysical objects. These magnetic fields are believed to be caused by the so-called dynamo effect. Could a large-scale magnetic field grow out of turbulence (i.e. the alpha dynamo effect)? How could the topological properties and the complexity of magnetic field as a global quantity, the so called magnetic helicity, be important in the dynamo effect? In addition to understanding the dynamo mechanism in astrophysical accretion disks, anomalous angular momentum transport has also been a longstanding problem in accretion disks and laboratory plasmas. To investigate both dynamo and momentum transport, we have performed both numerical modeling of laboratory experiments that are intended to simulate nature and modeling of configurations with direct relevance to astrophysical disks. Our simulations use fluid approximations (Magnetohydrodynamics - MHD model), where plasma is treated as a single fluid, or two fluids, in the presence of electromagnetic forces. Our major physics objective is to study the possibility of magnetic field generation (so called MRI small-scale and large-scale dynamos) and its role in Magneto-rotational Instability (MRI) saturation through nonlinear simulations in both MHD and Hall regimes.

  9. Overview of the Madison Dynamo Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nicholas Z.; Forest, C. B.; Kaplan, E. J.; Kendrick, R. D.; Nornberg, M. D.; Spence, E. J.

    2010-05-01

    The observation of the dynamo effect in a simply connected turbulent system has yet to be observed in the laboratory without the use of highly ferromagnetic materials. In the Madison Dynamo Experiment, two counter-rotating impellers drive a turbulent flow of liquid sodium in a one meter-diameter sphere. Two main results have been discovered so far: first, no sustained self-excited field was seen, but intermittent bursts of a transverse dipole field similar to the induced field predicted by laminar kinematics were observed. Second, a weak, DC external seed field, sharing the symmetry axis of the mean flow, was applied to the flowing sodium. Data modeling showed that the currents measured in the sodium could not be explained from the mean flow alone. However, the overall trend was consistent with an enhanced resistivity (a beta effect). These experiments have demonstrated the need for a turbulent electromotive force to describe the dynamics of the magnetic field evolution. This poster will present efforts to optimize the flow in order to observe spontaneous magnetic field generation as well as methods to characterize the turbulent EMF. The addition of an equatorial and poloidal baffles to the experiment will help in the reduction of large-scale turbulence and optimization of the helicity of the mean flow. A high current H-bridge signal generator has been constructed to apply 500 Gauss, sinusoidal fields with frequencies up to 10 Hz. The profile of the response will be measured by an internal array of 3D hall probes. This profile should provide an indication of the turbulent enhancement to resistivity. The strengthened externally applied field will also be used to explore a sub-critical dynamo transition that has recently been discovered in numerical simulations.

  10. Contributions to the theory of a two-scale homogeneous dynamo experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rädler, Karl-Heinz; Brandenburg, Axel

    2003-02-01

    The principle of the two-scale dynamo experiment at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe is closely related to that of the Roberts dynamo working with a simple fluid flow which is, with respect to proper Cartesian coordinates x, y, and z, periodic in x and y and independent of z. A modified Roberts dynamo problem is considered with a flow more similar to that in the experimental device. Solutions are calculated numerically, and on this basis an estimate of the excitation condition of the experimental dynamo is given. The modified Roberts dynamo problem is also considered in the framework of the mean-field dynamo theory, in which the crucial induction effect of the fluid motion is an anisotropic alpha effect. Numerical results are given for the dependence of the mean-field coefficients on the fluid flow rates. The excitation condition of the dynamo is also discussed within this framework. The behavior of the dynamo in the nonlinear regime, i.e., with backreaction of the magnetic field on the fluid flow, depends on the effect of the Lorentz force on the flow rates. The quantities determining this effect are calculated numerically. The results for the mean-field coefficients and the quantities describing the backreaction provide corrections to earlier results, which were obtained under simplifying assumptions.

  11. Toward an asymptotic behaviour of the ABC dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Bouya, Ismaël

    2016-01-01

    The ABC flow was originally introduced by Arnol'd to investigate Lagrangian chaos. It soon became the prototype example to illustrate magnetic-field amplification via fast dynamo action, i.e. dynamo action exhibiting magnetic-field amplification on a typical timescale independent of the electrical resistivity of the medium. Even though this flow is the most classical example for this important class of dynamos (with application to large-scale astrophysical objects), it was recently pointed out (Bouya Isma\\"el and Dormy Emmanuel, Phys. Fluids, 25 (2013) 037103) that the fast dynamo nature of this flow was unclear, as the growth rate still depended on the magnetic Reynolds number at the largest values available so far $(\\text{Rm} = 25000)$ . Using state-of-the-art high-performance computing, we present high-resolution simulations (up to 40963) and extend the value of $\\text{Rm}$ up to $ 5\\cdot10^5$ . Interestingly, even at these huge values, the growth rate of the leading eigenmode still depends on the controll...

  12. On the saturation of astrophysical dynamos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorch, Bertil; Archontis, Vasilis

    2004-01-01

    In the context of astrophysical dynamos we illustrate that the no-cosines flow, with zero mean helicity, can drive fast dynamo action and we study the dynamo's mode of operation during both the linear and non-linear saturation regimes. It turns out that in addition to a high growth rate in the li......In the context of astrophysical dynamos we illustrate that the no-cosines flow, with zero mean helicity, can drive fast dynamo action and we study the dynamo's mode of operation during both the linear and non-linear saturation regimes. It turns out that in addition to a high growth rate...

  13. Dynamo saturation in direct simulations of the multi-phase turbulent interstellar medium

    CERN Document Server

    Bendre, A; Elstner, D

    2015-01-01

    The ordered magnetic field observed via polarized synchrotron emission in nearby disc galaxies can be explained by a mean-field dynamo operating in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). Additionally, vertical-flux initial conditions are potentially able to influence this dynamo via the occurrence of the magneto-rotational instability (MRI). We aim to study the influence of various initial field configurations on the saturated state of the mean-field dynamo. This is motivated by the observation that different saturation behavior was previously obtained for different supernova rates. We perform direct numerical simulations (DNS) of three-dimensional local boxes of the vertically stratified, turbulent interstellar medium, employing shearing-periodic boundary conditions horizontally. Unlike in our previous work, we also impose a vertical seed magnetic field. We run the simulations until the growth of the magnetic energy becomes negligible. We furthermore perform simulations of equivalent 1D dynamo models, with a...

  14. Convection-driven spherical shell dynamos at varying Prandtl numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Käpylä, P J; Olspert, N; Warnecke, J; Brandenburg, A

    2016-01-01

    (abidged) Context: Stellar convection zones are characterized by vigorous high-Reynolds number turbulence at low Prandtl numbers. Aims: We study the dynamo and differential rotation regimes at varying levels of viscous, thermal, and magnetic diffusion. Methods: We perform three-dimensional simulations of stratified fully compressible magnetohydrodynamic convection in rotating spherical wedges at various thermal and magnetic Prandtl numbers. Results: We find that the rotation profiles for high thermal diffusivity show a monotonically increasing angular velocity from the bottom of the convection zone to the top and from the poles toward the equator. For sufficiently rapid rotation, a region of negative radial shear develops at mid-latitudes as the thermal diffusivity is decreased. This coincides with a change in the dynamo mode from poleward propagating activity belts to equatorward propagating ones. Furthermore, the cyclic solutions disappear at the highest magnetic Reynolds numbers. The total magnetic energy ...

  15. The small-scale turbulent dynamo in smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Tricco, Terrence S; Federrath, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Supersonic turbulence is believed to be at the heart of star formation. We have performed smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics (SPMHD) simulations of the small-scale dynamo amplification of magnetic fields in supersonic turbulence. The calculations use isothermal gas driven at rms velocity of Mach 10 so that conditions are representative of star-forming molecular clouds in the Milky Way. The growth of magnetic energy is followed for 10 orders in magnitude until it reaches saturation, a few percent of the kinetic energy. The results of our dynamo calculations are compared with results from grid-based methods, finding excellent agreement on their statistics and their qualitative behaviour. The simulations utilise the latest algorithmic developments we have developed, in particular, a new divergence cleaning approach to maintain the solenoidal constraint on the magnetic field and a method to reduce the numerical dissipation of the magnetic shock capturing scheme. We demonstrate that our divergence cleaning met...

  16. Smoothed Particle Magnetohydrodynamics Simulations of Protostellar Jets and Turbulent Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Tricco, Terrence S; Federrath, Christoph; Bate, Matthew R

    2013-01-01

    We presents results from Smoothed Particle Magnetohydrodynamics simulations of collapsing molecular cloud cores, and dynamo amplification of the magnetic field in the presence of Mach 10 magnetised turbulence. Our star formation simulations have produced, for the first time ever, highly collimated magnetised protostellar jets from the first hydrostatic core phase. Up to 40% of the initial core mass may be ejected through this outflow. The primary difficulty in performing these simulations is maintaining the divergence free constraint of the magnetic field, and to address this issue, we have developed a new divergence cleaning method which has allowed us to stably follow the evolution of these protostellar jets for long periods. The simulations performed of supersonic MHD turbulence are able to exponentially amplify magnetic energy by up to 10 orders of magnitude via turbulent dynamo. To reduce numerical dissipation, a new shock detection algorithm is utilised which is able to track magnetic shocks throughout ...

  17. Non-linear dynamo waves in an incompressible medium when the turbulence dissipative coefficients depend on temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Pataraya

    Full Text Available Non-linear α-ω; dynamo waves existing in an incompressible medium with the turbulence dissipative coefficients depending on temperature are studied in this paper. We investigate of α-ω solar non-linear dynamo waves when only the first harmonics of magnetic induction components are included. If we ignore the second harmonics in the non-linear equation, the turbulent magnetic diffusion coefficient increases together with the temperature, the coefficient of turbulent viscosity decreases, and for an interval of time the value of dynamo number is greater than 1. In these conditions a stationary solution of the non-linear equation for the dynamo wave's amplitude exists; meaning that the magnetic field is sufficiently excited. The amplitude of the dynamo waves oscillates and becomes stationary. Using these results we can explain the existence of Maunder's minimum.

  18. Robustness of oscillatory α2 dynamos in spherical wedges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, E.; Brandenburg, A.; Käpylä, P. J.; Käpylä, M. J.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Large-scale dynamo simulations are sometimes confined to spherical wedge geometries by imposing artificial boundary conditions at high latitudes. This may lead to spatio-temporal behaviours that are not representative of those in full spherical shells. Aims: We study the connection between spherical wedge and full spherical shell geometries using simple mean-field dynamos. Methods: We solve the equations for one-dimensional time-dependent α2 and α2Ω mean-field dynamos with only latitudinal extent to examine the effects of varying the polar angle θ0 between the latitudinal boundaries and the poles in spherical coordinates. Results: In the case of constant α and ηt profiles, we find oscillatory solutions only with the commonly used perfect conductor boundary condition in a wedge geometry, while for full spheres all boundary conditions produce stationary solutions, indicating that perfect conductor conditions lead to unphysical solutions in such a wedge setup. To search for configurations in which this problem can be alleviated we choose a profile of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity that decreases toward the poles, corresponding to high conductivity there. Oscillatory solutions are now achieved with models extending to the poles, but the magnetic field is strongly concentrated near the poles and the oscillation period is very long. By changing both the turbulent magnetic diffusivity and α profiles so that both effects are more concentrated toward the equator, we see oscillatory dynamos with equatorward drift, shorter cycles, and magnetic fields distributed over a wider range of latitudes. Those profiles thus remove the sensitive and unphysical dependence on θ0. When introducing radial shear, we again see oscillatory dynamos, and the direction of drift follows the Parker-Yoshimura rule. Conclusions: A reduced α effect near the poles with a turbulent diffusivity concentrated toward the equator yields oscillatory dynamos with equatorward migration and

  19. N-heterocyclic carbene-induced zwitterionic ring-opening polymerization of ethylene oxide and direct synthesis of alpha,omega-difunctionalized poly(ethylene oxide)s and poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(epsilon-caprolactone) block copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynaud, Jean; Absalon, Christelle; Gnanou, Yves; Taton, Daniel

    2009-03-11

    An N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC), namely, 1,3-bis-(diisopropyl)imidazol-2-ylidene (1), was demonstrated to bring about the metal-free ring-opening polymerization of ethylene oxide at 50 degrees C in dimethyl sulfoxide, in absence of any other reagents. Poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) of polydispersities ethylene oxide to form a zwitterionic species, namely 1,3-bis-(diisopropyl)imidazol-2-ylidinium alkoxide, that further propagates by a zwitterionic ring-opening polymerization (ZROP) mechanism. Through an appropriate choice of terminating agent NuH or NuSiMe(3) at the completion of the polymerization, a variety of end-functionalized PEO chains could be generated. In particular, alpha,omega-bis(hydroxy)-telechelic PEO, alpha-benzyl,omega-hydroxy, and alpha-azido,omega-hydroxy-difunctionalized PEOs were synthesized by NHC (1)-initiated ZROP, using H(2)O, PhCH(2)OH, and N(3)SiMe(3) as terminating agent, respectively. Characterization of these alpha,omega-difunctionalized PEOs by techniques such as (1)H NMR spectroscopy, MALDI-TOF spectrometry, and size exclusion chromatography confirmed the quantitative introduction of functional groups at both alpha and omega positions of the PEO chains and the formation of very narrow molar mass polymers. Finally, the synthesis of a poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(epsilon-caprolactone) diblock copolymer by sequential ZROP of the corresponding monomers was successfully achieved using (1) as organic initiator without isolation of the PEO block intermediate.

  20. Optimal Length Scale for a Turbulent Dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, Mira; Alexakis, Alexandros; Fauve, Stephan

    2016-02-19

    We demonstrate that there is an optimal forcing length scale for low Prandtl number dynamo flows that can significantly reduce the required energy injection rate. The investigation is based on simulations of the induction equation in a periodic box of size 2πL. The flows considered are the laminar and turbulent ABC flows forced at different forcing wave numbers k_{f}, where the turbulent case is simulated using a subgrid turbulence model. At the smallest allowed forcing wave number k_{f}=k_{min}=1/L the laminar critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm_{c}^{lam} is more than an order of magnitude smaller than the turbulent critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm_{c}^{turb} due to the hindering effect of turbulent fluctuations. We show that this hindering effect is almost suppressed when the forcing wave number k_{f} is increased above an optimum wave number k_{f}L≃4 for which Rm_{c}^{turb} is minimum. At this optimal wave number, Rm_{c}^{turb} is smaller by more than a factor of 10 than the case forced in k_{f}=1. This leads to a reduction of the energy injection rate by 3 orders of magnitude when compared to the case where the system is forced at the largest scales and thus provides a new strategy for the design of a fully turbulent experimental dynamo.

  1. On dynamo action in the giant star Pollux : first results

    CERN Document Server

    Palacios, A

    2013-01-01

    We present preliminary results of a 3D MHD simulation of the convective envelope of the giant star Pollux for which the rotation period and the magnetic ?eld intensity have been measured from spectroscopic and spectropolarimetric observations. This giant is one of the ?rst single giants with a detected magnetic ?eld, and the one with the weakest ?eld so far. Our aim is to understand the development and the action of the dynamo in its extended convective envelope.

  2. Laminar and Turbulent Dynamos in Chiral Magnetohydrodynamics. I. Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogachevskii, Igor; Ruchayskiy, Oleg; Boyarsky, Alexey; Fröhlich, Jürg; Kleeorin, Nathan; Brandenburg, Axel; Schober, Jennifer

    2017-09-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) description of plasmas with relativistic particles necessarily includes an additional new field, the chiral chemical potential associated with the axial charge (i.e., the number difference between right- and left-handed relativistic fermions). This chiral chemical potential gives rise to a contribution to the electric current density of the plasma (chiral magnetic effect). We present a self-consistent treatment of the chiral MHD equations, which include the back-reaction of the magnetic field on a chiral chemical potential and its interaction with the plasma velocity field. A number of novel phenomena are exhibited. First, we show that the chiral magnetic effect decreases the frequency of the Alfvén wave for incompressible flows, increases the frequencies of the Alfvén wave and of the fast magnetosonic wave for compressible flows, and decreases the frequency of the slow magnetosonic wave. Second, we show that, in addition to the well-known laminar chiral dynamo effect, which is not related to fluid motions, there is a dynamo caused by the joint action of velocity shear and chiral magnetic effect. In the presence of turbulence with vanishing mean kinetic helicity, the derived mean-field chiral MHD equations describe turbulent large-scale dynamos caused by the chiral alpha effect, which is dominant for large fluid and magnetic Reynolds numbers. The chiral alpha effect is due to an interaction of the chiral magnetic effect and fluctuations of the small-scale current produced by tangling magnetic fluctuations (which are generated by tangling of the large-scale magnetic field by sheared velocity fluctuations). These dynamo effects may have interesting consequences in the dynamics of the early universe, neutron stars, and the quark–gluon plasma.

  3. Acceleration of Plasma Flows Due to Inverse Dynamo Mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Mahajan, S M; Mikeladze, S V; Sigua, K I; Mahajan, Swadesh M.; Shatashvili, Nana L.; Mikeladze, Solomon V.; Sigua, Ketevan I.

    2005-01-01

    The "inverse-dynamo" mechanism - the amplification/generation of fast plasma flows by short scale (turbulent) magnetic fields via magneto-fluid coupling is recognized and explored. It is shown that large-scale magnetic fields and flows are generated simultaneously and proportionately from short scale fields and flows. The stronger the short-scale driver, the stronger are the large-scale products. Stellar and astrophysical applications are suggested.

  4. Large-scale-vortex dynamos in planar rotating convection

    CERN Document Server

    Guervilly, Céline; Jones, Chris A

    2016-01-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated how large-scale vortices may arise spontaneously in rotating planar convection. Here we examine the dynamo properties of such flows in rotating Boussinesq convection. For moderate values of the magnetic Reynolds number ($100 \\lesssim Rm \\lesssim 550$, with $Rm$ based on the box depth and the convective velocity), a large-scale (i.e. system-size) magnetic field is generated. The amplitude of the magnetic energy oscillates in time, out of phase with the oscillating amplitude of the large-scale vortex. The dynamo mechanism relies on those components of the flow that have length scales lying between that of the large-scale vortex and the typical convective cell size; smaller-scale flows are not required. The large-scale vortex plays a crucial role in the magnetic induction despite being essentially two-dimensional. For larger magnetic Reynolds numbers, the dynamo is small scale, with a magnetic energy spectrum that peaks at the scale of the convective cells. In this case, ...

  5. An impact-driven dynamo for the early Moon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bars, M; Wieczorek, M A; Karatekin, O; Cébron, D; Laneuville, M

    2011-11-09

    The origin of lunar magnetic anomalies remains unresolved after their discovery more than four decades ago. A commonly invoked hypothesis is that the Moon might once have possessed a thermally driven core dynamo, but this theory is problematical given the small size of the core and the required surface magnetic field strengths. An alternative hypothesis is that impact events might have amplified ambient fields near the antipodes of the largest basins, but many magnetic anomalies exist that are not associated with basin antipodes. Here we propose a new model for magnetic field generation, in which dynamo action comes from impact-induced changes in the Moon's rotation rate. Basin-forming impact events are energetic enough to have unlocked the Moon from synchronous rotation, and we demonstrate that the subsequent large-scale fluid flows in the core, excited by the tidal distortion of the core-mantle boundary, could have powered a lunar dynamo. Predicted surface magnetic field strengths are on the order of several microteslas, consistent with palaeomagnetic measurements, and the duration of these fields is sufficient to explain the central magnetic anomalies associated with several large impact basins.

  6. A 3D Babcock-Leighton Solar Dynamo Model

    CERN Document Server

    Miesch, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    We present a 3D kinematic solar dynamo model in which poloidal field is generated by the emergence and dispersal of tilted sunspot pairs (more generally Bipolar Magnetic Regions, or BMRs). The axisymmetric component of this model functions similarly to previous 2D Babcock-Leighton (BL) dynamo models that employ a double-ring prescription for poloidal field generation but we generalize this prescription into a 3D flux emergence algorithm that places BMRs on the surface in response to the dynamo-generated toroidal field. In this way, the model can be regarded as a unification of BL dynamo models (2D in radius/latitude) and surface flux transport models (2D in latitude/longitude) into a more self-consistent framework that captures the full 3D structure of the evolving magnetic field. The model reproduces some basic features of the solar cycle including an 11-yr periodicity, equatorward migration of toroidal flux in the deep convection zone, and poleward propagation of poloidal flux at the surface. The poleward-p...

  7. Mean-field dynamo action in renovating shearing flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolekar, Sanved; Subramanian, Kandaswamy; Sridhar, S

    2012-08-01

    We study mean-field dynamo action in renovating flows with finite and nonzero correlation time (τ) in the presence of shear. Previous results obtained when shear was absent are generalized to the case with shear. The question of whether the mean magnetic field can grow in the presence of shear and nonhelical turbulence, as seen in numerical simulations, is examined. We show in a general manner that, if the motions are strictly nonhelical, then such mean-field dynamo action is not possible. This result is not limited to low (fluid or magnetic) Reynolds numbers nor does it use any closure approximation; it only assumes that the flow renovates itself after each time interval τ. Specifying to a particular form of the renovating flow with helicity, we recover the standard dispersion relation of the α(2)Ω dynamo, in the small τ or large wavelength limit. Thus mean fields grow even in the presence of rapidly growing fluctuations, surprisingly, in a manner predicted by the standard quasilinear closure, even though such a closure is not strictly justified. Our work also suggests the possibility of obtaining mean-field dynamo growth in the presence of helicity fluctuations, although having a coherent helicity will be more efficient.

  8. On the role of tachoclines in solar and stellar dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Guerrero, G; Pino, E M de Gouveia Dal; Kosovichev, A G; Mansour, N N

    2015-01-01

    Rotational shear layers at the boundary between radiative and convective zones, tachoclines, play a key role in the dynamo process of magnetic field generation in the Sun and solar-like stars. We present two sets of global simulations of rotating turbulent convection and dynamo. The first set considers a stellar convective envelope only; the second one, aiming at the formation of a tachocline, considers also the upper part of the radiative zone. Our results indicate that dynamo properties like the growth rate, the saturation energy and mode depend on the Rossby (Ro) number. The models with slow rotation in the first set of simulations reproduce remarkably well the solar differential rotation in the convection zone. Depending on the value of Ro either oscillatory (with ~2 yr period) or steady dynamo solutions are obtained. The models in the second set naturally develop a tachocline which, in turn, leads to the generation of strong mean magnetic field (~1 Tesla). Since the field is also deposited into the stabl...

  9. An update of Leighton's solar dynamo model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, R. H.; Schüssler, M.

    2017-02-01

    In 1969, Leighton developed a quasi-1D mathematical model of the solar dynamo, building upon the phenomenological scenario of Babcock published in 1961. Here we present a modification and extension of Leighton's model. Using the axisymmetric component (longitudinal average) of the magnetic field, we consider the radial field component at the solar surface and the radially integrated toroidal magnetic flux in the convection zone, both as functions of latitude. No assumptions are made with regard to the radial location of the toroidal flux. The model includes the effects of (i) turbulent diffusion at the surface and in the convection zone; (ii) poleward meridional flow at the surface and an equatorward return flow affecting the toroidal flux; (iii) latitudinal differential rotation and the near-surface layer of radial rotational shear; (iv) downward convective pumping of magnetic flux in the shear layer; and (v) flux emergence in the form of tilted bipolar magnetic regions treated as a source term for the radial surface field. While the parameters relevant for the transport of the surface field are taken from observations, the model condenses the unknown properties of magnetic field and flow in the convection zone into a few free parameters (turbulent diffusivity, effective return flow, amplitude of the source term, and a parameter describing the effective radial shear). Comparison with the results of 2D flux transport dynamo codes shows that the model captures the essential features of these simulations. We make use of the computational efficiency of the model to carry out an extended parameter study. We cover an extended domain of the 4D parameter space and identify the parameter ranges that provide solar-like solutions. Dipole parity is always preferred and solutions with periods around 22 yr and a correct phase difference between flux emergence in low latitudes and the strength of the polar fields are found for a return flow speed around 2 m s-1, turbulent

  10. Solar Cycle 24 and the Solar Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesnell, W. D.; Schatten, K.

    2007-01-01

    We will discuss the polar field precursor method for solar activity prediction, which predicts cycle 24 will be significantly lower than recent activity cycles, and some new ideas rejuvenating Babcock's shallow surface dynamo. The polar field precursor method is based on Babcock and Leighton's dynamo models wherein the polar field at solar minimum plays a major role in generating the next cycle's toroidal field and sunspots. Thus, by examining the polar fields of the Sun near solar minimum, a forecast for the next cycle's activity is obtained. With the current low value for the Sun's polar fields, this method predicts solar cycle 24 will be one of the lowest in recent times, with smoothed F10.7 radio flux values peaking near 135 plus or minus 35 (2 sigma), in the 2012-2013 timeframe (equivalent to smoothed Rz near 80 plus or minus 35 [2 sigma]). One may have to consider solar activity as far back as the early 20th century to find a cycle of comparable magnitude. We discuss unusual behavior in the Sun's polar fields that support this prediction. Normally, the solar precursor method is consistent with the geomagnetic precursor method, wherein geomagnetic variations are thought to be a good measure of the Sun's polar field strength. Because of the unusual polar field, the Earth does not appear to be currently bathed in the Sun's extended polar field (the interplanetary field), hence negating the primal cause behind the geomagnetic precursor technique. We also discuss how percolation may support Babcock's original shallow solar dynamo. In this process ephemeral regions from the solar magnetic carpet, guided by shallow surface fields, may collect to form pores and sunspots.

  11. Dynamo model for grand maxima of solar activity: can superflares occur on the Sun?

    CERN Document Server

    Kitchatinov, L L

    2016-01-01

    Recent data on superflares on sun-like stars and radiocarbon data on solar activity in the past are both indicative of transient epochs of unusually high magnetic activity. We propose an explanation for the grand activity maxima in the framework of a solar dynamo model with fluctuating parameters. Solar-type dynamos are oscillatory because of the combination of the solar-type differential rotation with positive (in the northern hemisphere) alpha-effect. An artificial reversal of the sign in the alpha-effect changes the dynamo to a steady regime with hundreds of times larger magnetic energy compared to the amplitude of the cyclic dynamo. Sufficiently large and durable fluctuations reversing the sign of the alpha-effect during the growth phase of a magnetic cycle can, therefore, cause a transient change to a steady dynamo with considerably increased magnetic energy. This qualitative scenario for grand activity maxima is supported by computations of the dynamo model with a fluctuating alpha-effect. The computed ...

  12. A GLOBAL GALACTIC DYNAMO WITH A CORONA CONSTRAINED BY RELATIVE HELICITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, A.; Mangalam, A., E-mail: avijeet@iiap.res.in, E-mail: mangalam@iiap.res.in [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Sarjapur Road, Koramangala, Bangalore, 560034 (India)

    2016-01-20

    We present a model for a global axisymmetric turbulent dynamo operating in a galaxy with a corona that treats the parameters of turbulence driven by supernovae and by magneto-rotational instability under a common formalism. The nonlinear quenching of the dynamo is alleviated by the inclusion of small-scale advective and diffusive magnetic helicity fluxes, which allow the gauge-invariant magnetic helicity to be transferred outside the disk and consequently to build up a corona during the course of dynamo action. The time-dependent dynamo equations are expressed in a separable form and solved through an eigenvector expansion constructed using the steady-state solutions of the dynamo equation. The parametric evolution of the dynamo solution allows us to estimate the final structure of the global magnetic field and the saturated value of the turbulence parameter α{sub m}, even before solving the dynamical equations for evolution of magnetic fields in the disk and the corona, along with α-quenching. We then solve these equations simultaneously to study the saturation of the large-scale magnetic field, its dependence on the small-scale magnetic helicity fluxes, and the corresponding evolution of the force-free field in the corona. The quadrupolar large-scale magnetic field in the disk is found to reach equipartition strength within a timescale of 1 Gyr. The large-scale magnetic field in the corona obtained is much weaker than the field inside the disk and has only a weak impact on the dynamo operation.

  13. Evidence for dynamo bistability among very low mass stars

    CERN Document Server

    Morin, J; Donati, J -F; Dormy, E; Forveille, T; Jardine, M; Petit, P; Schrinner, M

    2012-01-01

    Dynamo action in fully convective stars is a debated issue that also questions our understanding of magnetic field generation in partly convective Sun-like stars. During the past few years, spectropolari- metric observations have demonstrated that fully convective objects are able to trigger strong large-scale and long-lived magnetic fields. We present here the first spectropolarimetric study of a sample of active late M dwarfs (M5-M8) carried out with ESPaDOnS@CFHT. It reveals the co-existence of two distinct types of magnetism among stars having similar masses and rotation rates. A possible explanation for this unexpected discovery is the existence of two dynamo branches in this parameter regime, we discuss here the possible identification with the weak vs strong field bistability predicted for the geodynamo.

  14. Stellar Dynamo Models with Prominent Surface Toroidal Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, Alfio

    2016-12-01

    Recent spectro-polarimetric observations of solar-type stars have shown the presence of photospheric magnetic fields with a predominant toroidal component. If the external field is assumed to be current-free it is impossible to explain these observations within the framework of standard mean-field dynamo theory. In this work, it will be shown that if the coronal field of these stars is assumed to be harmonic, the underlying stellar dynamo mechanism can support photospheric magnetic fields with a prominent toroidal component even in the presence of axisymmetric magnetic topologies. In particular, it is argued that the observed increase in the toroidal energy in low-mass fast-rotating stars can be naturally explained with an underlying αΩ mechanism.

  15. Weak and Strong Field Dynamos: from the Earth to the stars

    CERN Document Server

    Morin, J; Schrinner, M; Donati, J -F

    2011-01-01

    Observations of magnetism in very low mass stars recently made important progress, revealing characteristics that are now to be understood in the framework of dynamo theory. In parallel, there is growing evidence that dynamo processes in these stars share many similarities with planetary dynamos. We investigate the extent to which the weak \\emph{vs} strong field bistability predicted for the geodynamo can apply to recent observations of two groups of very low mass fully-convective stars sharing similar stellar parameters but generating radically different types of magnetic fields. Our analysis is based on previously published spectropolarimetric and spectroscopic data. We argue that these can be interpreted in the framework of weak and strong field dynamos.

  16. A new method for computing the eigenfunctions and their adjoints of the dynamo operator

    CERN Document Server

    Schrinner, M; Jiang, J; Hoyng, P

    2009-01-01

    We present a new method to determine the eigensolutions of the induction and the dynamo equation in a fluid embedded in vacuum. The magnetic field is expanded in a complete set of functions. The new method is based on the biorthogonality of the adjoint electric current and the vector potential with an inner product defined by a volume integral over the fluid domain. The advantage of this method is that the velocity and the dynamo coefficients of the induction and the dynamo equation do not have to be differentiated and thus even numerically determined tabulated values of the coefficients produce reasonable results. We provide test calculations and compare with published results obtained by the classical treatment based on the biorthogonality of the magnetic field and its adjoint. We especially consider dynamos with mean-field coefficients determined from direct numerical simulations of the geodynamo and compare with initial value calculations and the full MHD simulations.

  17. Research in Solar Dynamo Theories%太阳发电机理论研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴建清; 杨志良

    2011-01-01

    太阳活动主要是由磁场产生的,因此,对太阳磁场性质和起源的研究具有重要意义.太阳发电机理论主要研究的是太阳上观测到的与太阳活动相关的磁场起源、磁场特征、各种活动现象之间的相关性及其变化规律.其是太阳物理学中有待解决的最基本、最重要的问题.根据太阳黑子及太阳周期的相关观测,介绍了构成发电机的基本要素,具体描述了各种典型发电机模型,并对其分别进行评述,进而探讨了目前存在的问题及发展方向.%Various activities of the Sun, such as flare, coronal mass ejections, solar wind, which will affect the normal work of satellites, radio communication and electric power system. Therefore, researching the activities of the Sun has great significance for human. Moreover, these activities are dominated by the magnetic field. The purpose of study the solar dynamo theories is not only to unpuzzle the correlation and variation among various activities, but also to explain the origin and character of the magnetic fields on the Sun. The paper briefly reviews the relevant observational data pertaining to sunspots and solar cycle first and researches evolution if the solar dynamo theories. Then the three basic elements of the dynamo, the differential rotation, meridional circulation and magnetic diffusivity, with the fundamental equations of magnetic field generation are introduced. Magnetic induced equation is the first basic equation for dynamo theories and the first item of induced equation is from Ohm Law. Moreover, mean field dynamos which contain Babcock-Leighton dynamo, interface dynamo and flux transport dynamo, non-axisymmetric dynamo, MHD simulation and small scale dynamo are described. The advantages and shortcomings of them are presented respectively. Finally, the existing problems and possible development in the future for solar dynamo theories are suggested.

  18. Two spinning ways for precession dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappanera, L; Guermond, J-L; Léorat, J; Nore, C

    2016-04-01

    It is numerically demonstrated by means of a magnetohydrodynamic code that precession can trigger dynamo action in a cylindrical container. Fixing the angle between the spin and the precession axis to be 1/2π, two limit configurations of the spinning axis are explored: either the symmetry axis of the cylinder is parallel to the spin axis (this configuration is henceforth referred to as the axial spin case), or it is perpendicular to the spin axis (this configuration is referred to as the equatorial spin case). In both cases, the centro-symmetry of the flow breaks when the kinetic Reynolds number increases. Equatorial spinning is found to be more efficient in breaking the centro-symmetry of the flow. In both cases, the average flow in the reference frame of the mantle converges to a counter-rotation with respect to the spin axis as the Reynolds number grows. We find a scaling law for the average kinetic energy in term of the Reynolds number in the axial spin case. In the equatorial spin case, the unsteady asymmetric flow is shown to be capable of sustaining dynamo action in the linear and nonlinear regimes. The magnetic field is mainly dipolar in the equatorial spin case, while it is is mainly quadrupolar in the axial spin case.

  19. Energy oscillations and a possible route to chaos in a modified Riga dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Stefani, Frank; Gerbeth, Gunter

    2010-01-01

    Starting from the present version of the Riga dynamo experiment with its rotating magnetic eigenfield dominated by a single frequency we ask for those modifications of this set-up that would allow for a non-trivial magnetic field behaviour in the saturation regime. Assuming an increased ratio of azimuthal to axial flow velocity, we obtain energy oscillations with a frequency below the eigenfrequency of the magnetic field. These new oscillations are identified as magneto-inertial waves that result from a slight imbalance of Lorentz and inertial forces. Increasing the azimuthal velocity further, or increasing the total magnetic Reynolds number, we find transitions to a chaotic behaviour of the dynamo.

  20. Optimum reduction of the dynamo threshold by a ferromagnetic layer located in the flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herault, J; Pétrélis, F

    2014-09-01

    We consider a fluid dynamo model generated by the flow on both sides of a moving layer. The magnetic permeability of the layer is larger than that of the flow. We show that there exists an optimum value of magnetic permeability for which the critical magnetic Reynolds number for dynamo onset is smaller than for a nonmagnetic material and also smaller than for a layer of infinite magnetic permeability. We present a mechanism that provides an explanation for recent experimental results. A similar effect occurs when the electrical conductivity of the layer is large.

  1. Statistical Mechanics of Turbulent Dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2014-01-01

    Incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and magnetic dynamos, which occur in magnetofluids with large fluid and magnetic Reynolds numbers, will be discussed. When Reynolds numbers are large and energy decays slowly, the distribution of energy with respect to length scale becomes quasi-stationary and MHD turbulence can be described statistically. In the limit of infinite Reynolds numbers, viscosity and resistivity become zero and if these values are used in the MHD equations ab initio, a model system called ideal MHD turbulence results. This model system is typically confined in simple geometries with some form of homogeneous boundary conditions, allowing for velocity and magnetic field to be represented by orthogonal function expansions. One advantage to this is that the coefficients of the expansions form a set of nonlinearly interacting variables whose behavior can be described by equilibrium statistical mechanics, i.e., by a canonical ensemble theory based on the global invariants (energy, cross helicity and magnetic helicity) of ideal MHD turbulence. Another advantage is that truncated expansions provide a finite dynamical system whose time evolution can be numerically simulated to test the predictions of the associated statistical mechanics. If ensemble predictions are the same as time averages, then the system is said to be ergodic; if not, the system is nonergodic. Although it had been implicitly assumed in the early days of ideal MHD statistical theory development that these finite dynamical systems were ergodic, numerical simulations provided sufficient evidence that they were, in fact, nonergodic. Specifically, while canonical ensemble theory predicted that expansion coefficients would be (i) zero-mean random variables with (ii) energy that decreased with length scale, it was found that although (ii) was correct, (i) was not and the expected ergodicity was broken. The exact cause of this broken ergodicity was explained, after much

  2. Solar-type dynamo behaviour in fully convective stars without a tachocline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Nicholas J; Drake, Jeremy J

    2016-07-28

    In solar-type stars (with radiative cores and convective envelopes like our Sun), the magnetic field powers star spots, flares and other solar phenomena, as well as chromospheric and coronal emission at ultraviolet to X-ray wavelengths. The dynamo responsible for generating the field depends on the shearing of internal magnetic fields by differential rotation. The shearing has long been thought to take place in a boundary layer known as the tachocline between the radiative core and the convective envelope. Fully convective stars do not have a tachocline and their dynamo mechanism is expected to be very different, although its exact form and physical dependencies are not known. Here we report observations of four fully convective stars whose X-ray emission correlates with their rotation periods in the same way as in solar-type stars. As the X-ray activity-rotation relationship is a well-established proxy for the behaviour of the magnetic dynamo, these results imply that fully convective stars also operate a solar-type dynamo. The lack of a tachocline in fully convective stars therefore suggests that this is not a critical ingredient in the solar dynamo and supports models in which the dynamo originates throughout the convection zone.

  3. Solar-type dynamo behaviour in fully convective stars without a tachocline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Nicholas J.; Drake, Jeremy J.

    2016-07-01

    In solar-type stars (with radiative cores and convective envelopes like our Sun), the magnetic field powers star spots, flares and other solar phenomena, as well as chromospheric and coronal emission at ultraviolet to X-ray wavelengths. The dynamo responsible for generating the field depends on the shearing of internal magnetic fields by differential rotation. The shearing has long been thought to take place in a boundary layer known as the tachocline between the radiative core and the convective envelope. Fully convective stars do not have a tachocline and their dynamo mechanism is expected to be very different, although its exact form and physical dependencies are not known. Here we report observations of four fully convective stars whose X-ray emission correlates with their rotation periods in the same way as in solar-type stars. As the X-ray activity-rotation relationship is a well-established proxy for the behaviour of the magnetic dynamo, these results imply that fully convective stars also operate a solar-type dynamo. The lack of a tachocline in fully convective stars therefore suggests that this is not a critical ingredient in the solar dynamo and supports models in which the dynamo originates throughout the convection zone.

  4. Solar small-scale dynamo and polarity of sunspot groups

    CERN Document Server

    Sokoloff, D; Abramenko, V

    2015-01-01

    In order to clarify a possible role of small-scale dynamo in formation of solar magnetic field, we suggest an observational test for small-scale dynamo action based on statistics of anti-Hale sunspot groups. As we have shown, according to theoretical expectations the small-scale dynamo action has to provide a population of sunspot groups which do not follow the Hale polarity law, and the density of such groups on the time-latitude diagram is expected to be independent on the phase of the solar cycle. Correspondingly, a percentage of the anti-Hale groups is expected to reach its maximum values during solar minima. For several solar cycles, we considered statistics of anti-Hale groups obtained by several scientific teams, including ours, to find that the percentage of anti-Hale groups becomes indeed maximal during a solar minimum. Our interpretation is that this fact may be explained by the small-scale dynamo action inside the solar convective zone.

  5. Solar small-scale dynamo and polarity of sunspot groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokoloff, D.; Khlystova, A.; Abramenko, V.

    2015-08-01

    In order to clarify a possible role of small-scale dynamo in formation of solar magnetic field, we suggest an observational test for small-scale dynamo action based on statistics of anti-Hale sunspot groups. As we have shown, according to theoretical expectations the small-scale dynamo action has to provide a population of sunspot groups which do not follow the Hale polarity law, and the density of such groups on the time-latitude diagram is expected to be independent on the phase of the solar cycle. Correspondingly, a percentage of the anti-Hale groups is expected to reach its maximum values during solar minima. For several solar cycles, we considered statistics of anti-Hale groups obtained by several scientific teams, including ours, to find that the percentage of anti-Hale groups becomes indeed maximal during a solar minimum. Our interpretation is that this fact may be explained by the small-scale dynamo action inside the solar convective zone.

  6. Dynamos in accretion discs

    OpenAIRE

    Brandenburg, A.; von Rekowski, B.

    2007-01-01

    It is argued that accretion discs in young stellar objects may have hot coronae that are heated by magnetic reconnection. This is a consequence of the magneto-rotational instability driving turbulence in the disc. Magnetic reconnection away from the midplane leads to heating of the corona which, in turn, contributes to driving disc winds.

  7. Slow plasma dynamo driven by electric current helicity in non-compact Riemann surfaces of negative curvature

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, Garcia

    2009-01-01

    Boozer addressed the role of magnetic helicity in dynamos [Phys Fluids \\textbf{B},(1993)]. He pointed out that the magnetic helicity conservation implies that the dynamo action is more easily attainable if the electric potential varies over the surface of the dynamo. This provided us with motivation to investigate dynamos in Riemannian curved surfaces [Phys Plasmas \\textbf{14}, (2007);\\textbf{15} (2008)]. Thiffeault and Boozer [Phys Plasmas (2003)] discussed the onset of dissipation in kinematic dynamos. When curvature is constant and negative, a simple simple laminar dynamo solution is obtained on the flow topology of a Poincare disk, whose Gauss curvature is $K=-1$. By considering a laminar plasma dynamo [Wang et al, Phys Plasmas (2002)] the electric current helicity ${\\lambda}\\approx{2.34m^{-1}}$ for a Reynolds magnetic number of $Rm\\approx{210}$ and a growth rate of magnetic field $|{\\gamma}|\\approx{0.022}$. Negative constant curvature non-compact $\\textbf{H}^{2}$, has also been used in one-component elec...

  8. The combined effect of precession and convection on the dynamo action

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Xing

    2016-01-01

    To understand the generation of the Earth's and planetary magnetic fields, we investigate numerically the combined effect of precession and convection on the dynamo action in a spherical shell. The convection alone, the precession alone and the combined effect of convection and precession are studied at the low Ekman number at which the precessing flow is already unstable. The key result is that although the precession or convection alone is not strong to support the dynamo action the combined effect of precession and convection can support the dynamo action because of the resonance of precessional and convective instabilities. This result may interpret why the geodynamo maintains for such a long history compared to the Martian dynamo.

  9. Dynamos driven by poloidal flows in untwisted, curved and flat Riemannian diffusive flux tubes

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, L C Garcia

    2010-01-01

    Recently Vishik anti-fast dynamo theorem, has been tested against non-stretching flux tubes [Phys Plasmas 15 (2008)]. In this paper, another anti-dynamo theorem, called Cowling's theorem, which states that axisymmetric magnetic fields cannot support dynamo action, is carefully tested against thick tubular and curved Riemannian untwisted flows, as well as thin flux tubes in diffusive and diffusionless media. In the non-diffusive media the Cowling's theorem is not violated in thin Riemann-flat untwisted flux tubes, where the Frenet curvature is negative. Nevertheless the diffusion action in the thin flux tube leads to a a dynamo action driven by poloidal flows as shown by Love and Gubbins (Geophysical Res.) in the context of geodynamos. Actually it is shown that a slow dynamo action is obtained. In this case the Frenet and Riemann curvature still vanishes. In the case of magnetic filaments in diffusive media dynamo action is obtained when the Frenet scalar curvature is negative. Since the Riemann curvature tens...

  10. New approach to scaling rules for stellar and planetary dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Barrois, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Glorified dimensional analysis is used to derive scaling rules for internal and external magnetic field strengths and various time scales. Naive dimensional analysis is inconclusive because of multiple time scales, but physical arguments serve to weed out irrelevant parameters. Time scales can be derived from linearized instability analysis instead of ill-founded assumptions of Magnetic-Archimedean-Coriolis (MAC) balance. Further relationships can be derived from high-level models of coupled main field components and differential rotation. The ratios of the external dipole field to internal magnetic fields and of differential to overall rotation depend on details of the dynamo mechanism.

  11. Plasmoid ejections driven by dynamo action underneath a spherical surface

    CERN Document Server

    Warnecke, Jörn; Mitra, Dhrubaditya

    2010-01-01

    We present a unified three-dimensional model of the convection zone and upper atmosphere of the Sun in spherical geometry. In this model, magnetic fields, generated by a helically forced dynamo in the convection zone, emerge without the assistance of magnetic buoyancy. We use an isothermal equation of state with gravity and density stratification. Recurrent plasmoid ejections, which rise through the outer atmosphere, is observed. In addition, the current helicity of the small--scale field is transported outwards and form large structures like magnetic clouds.

  12. Some consequences of shear on galactic dynamos with helicity fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongzhe; Blackman, Eric G.

    2017-08-01

    Galactic dynamo models sustained by supernova (SN) driven turbulence and differential rotation have revealed that the sustenance of large-scale fields requires a flux of small-scale magnetic helicity to be viable. Here we generalize a minimalist analytic version of such galactic dynamos to explore some heretofore unincluded contributions from shear on the total turbulent energy and turbulent correlation time, with the helicity fluxes maintained by either winds, diffusion or magnetic buoyancy. We construct an analytic framework for modelling the turbulent energy and correlation time as a function of SN rate and shear. We compare our prescription with previous approaches that include only rotation. The solutions depend separately on the rotation period and the eddy turnover time and not just on their ratio (the Rossby number). We consider models in which these two time-scales are allowed to be independent and also a case in which they are mutually dependent on radius when a radial-dependent SN rate model is invoked. For the case of a fixed rotation period (or a fixed radius), we show that the influence of shear is dramatic for low Rossby numbers, reducing the correlation time of the turbulence, which, in turn, strongly reduces the saturation value of the dynamo compared to the case when the shear is ignored. We also show that even in the absence of winds or diffusive fluxes, magnetic buoyancy may be able to sustain sufficient helicity fluxes to avoid quenching.

  13. Modeling MHD accretion-ejection: episodic ejections of jets triggered by a mean-field disk dynamo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepanovs, Deniss; Fendt, Christian; Sheikhnezami, Somayeh, E-mail: deniss@stepanovs.org, E-mail: fendt@mpia.de [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-11-20

    We present MHD simulations exploring the launching, acceleration, and collimation of jets and disk winds. The evolution of the disk structure is consistently taken into account. Extending our earlier studies, we now consider the self-generation of the magnetic field by an α{sup 2}Ω mean-field dynamo. The disk magnetization remains on a rather low level, which helps to evolve the simulations for T > 10, 000 dynamical time steps on a domain extending 1500 inner disk radii. We find the magnetic field of the inner disk to be similar to the commonly found open field structure, favoring magneto-centrifugal launching. The outer disk field is highly inclined and predominantly radial. Here, differential rotation induces a strong toroidal component, which plays a key role in outflow launching. These outflows from the outer disk are slower, denser, and less collimated. If the dynamo action is not quenched, magnetic flux is continuously generated, diffuses outward through the disk, and fills the entire disk. We have invented a toy model triggering a time-dependent mean-field dynamo. The duty cycles of this dynamo lead to episodic ejections on similar timescales. When the dynamo is suppressed as the magnetization falls below a critical value, the generation of the outflows and also accretion is inhibited. The general result is that we can steer episodic ejection and large-scale jet knots by a disk-intrinsic dynamo that is time-dependent and regenerates the jet-launching magnetic field.

  14. Metric-torsion preheating: cosmic dynamo mechanism?

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, L C Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Earlier Bassett et al [Phys Rev D 63 (2001) 023506] investigated the amplification of large scale magnetic fields during preheating and inflation in several different models. They argued that in the presence of conductivity resonance effect is weakened. From a dynamo equation in spacetimes endowed with torsion recently derived by Garcia de Andrade [Phys Lett B 711: 143 (2012)] it is shown that a in a universe with pure torsion in Minkowski spacetime the cosmological magnetic field is enhanced by ohmic or non-conductivity effect, which shows that the metric-torsion effects is worth while of being studied. In this paper we investigated the metric-torsion preheating perturbation, which leads to the seed cosmological magnetic field in the universe with torsion is of the order of $B_{seed}\\sim{10^{-37}Gauss}$ which is several orders of magnitude weaker than the decoupling value obtained from pure metric preheating of $10^{-15}Gauss$. Despite of the weakness of the magnetic field this seed field may seed the galact...

  15. Towards the geophysical regime in numerical dynamo models: studies of rapidly-rotating convection driven dynamos with low Pm and constant heat flux boundary conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheyko, A.A.; Finlay, Chris; Marti, P.

    We present a set of numerical dynamo models with the convection strength varied by a factor of 30 and the ratio of magnetic to viscous diffusivities by a factor of 20 at rapid rotation rates (E =nu/(2 Omega d^2 ) = 10-6 and 10-7 ) using a heat flux outer BC. This regime has been little explored...... on the structure of the dynamos and how this changes in relation to the selection of control parameters, a comparison with the proposed rotating convection and dynamo scaling laws, energy spectra of steady solutions and inner core rotation rates. Magnetic field on the CMB. E=2.959*10-7, Ra=6591.0, Pm=0.05, Pr=1....

  16. NRL Satellite Support for DYNAMO Field Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NRL Satellite Support for DYNAMO Field Program Jeffrey...Jeff.Hawkins@nrlmry.navy.mil Document Number: N0001412WX20870 LONG-TERM GOALS To provide the ONR-sponsored DYNAMO field program with a...the Indian Ocean. OBJECTIVES Develop a NRL-MRY near real-time web page that enables DYNAMO field program participants to view the evolving

  17. adidas Dynamo Formotion 2 Lo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    随着天气越来越热,低帮款战靴也越来越受到球迷的喜爱。尤其是拥有高性能、低价位的战靴.会更加让人期待,而Dynamo Formotion 2 Lo就满足了以上两项要求。

  18. Inertia-less convectively-driven dynamo models in the limit of low Rossby number

    CERN Document Server

    Calkins, Michael A; Tobias, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Compositional convection is thought to be an important energy source for magnetic field generation within planetary interiors. The Prandtl number, $Pr$, characterizing compositional convection is significantly larger than unity, suggesting that the inertial force may not be important on the small scales of convection. We develop asymptotic dynamo models for the case of small Rossby number and large Prandtl number in which inertia is absent on the convective scale. The relevant diffusivity parameter for this limit is the compositional Roberts number, $q = D/\\eta$, which is the ratio of compositional and magnetic diffusivities. Dynamo models are developed for both order one $q$ and the more geophysically relevant low $q$ limit. For both cases the ratio of magnetic to kinetic energy densities, $M$, is asymptotically large and reflects the fact that Alfv\\'en waves have been filtered from the dynamics. Taken together with previous investigations of asymptotic dynamo models for $Pr=O(1)$, our results show that the ...

  19. The Atmospheric Dynamics of Alpha Tau (K5 III) - Clues to Understanding the Magnetic Dynamo in Late-Type Giant Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Airapetian, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Using HST/GHRS, HST/STIS and FUSE archival data for a Tau and the CHIANTI spectroscopic code, we have derived line shifts, volumetric emission measures, and plasma density estimates, and calculated filling factors for a number of UV lines forming between 10,000 K and 300,000 K in the outer atmosphere of this red giant star. The data suggest the presence of low-temperature extended regions and high-temperature compact regions, associated with magnetically open and closed structures in the stellar atmosphere, respectively. The signatures of UV lines from a Tau can be consistently understood via a model of upward-traveling Alfv6n waves in a gravitationally stratified atmosphere. These waves cause nonthermal broadening in UV lines due to unresolved wave motions and downward plasma motions in compact magnetic loops heated by resonant Alfven wave heating.

  20. SADE: Starspot and Dynamo Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, P. C. H.

    2003-05-01

    In soft X-rays the solar coronal radiance varies by a factor of 70 over the solar activity cycle. A similar variation in most stars in the existing X-ray database has not been found (Stern 2001); even stars which exhibit chromospheric activity cycles show only marginal evidence for X-ray cycles. This is rather puzzling as the time span and multiple coverage of the X-ray sky should reveal at least a hint of such a pronounced cyclical variation. By the time of the meeting we will have submitted a SMEX proposal with the above acronym to determine the nature and amplitude of the variation in X-ray emission of nearby solar analogs that have a cyclic chromospheric Ca-K variability similar to that of the Sun. In doing so we aim to expand our knowledge of the parameter space of stellar dynamos, which will lead to a better understanding of the dynamo process in general -- an unresolved fundamental problem in astrophysics -- and the solar dynamo in particular. This is an investigation at the cross-section of the NASA themes ``Structure and Evolution of the Universe", and the ``Sun-Earth Connection". In my presentation I will describe the SADE instrument design, observing strategy, and possible science results. SADE is proposed by a consortium led by MSU, including Swales, CfA, LMSAL, UCL, OAP, and Bangalore.

  1. Rotating convection-driven dynamos at low Ekman number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotvig, Jon; Jones, Chris A

    2002-11-01

    We present a fully 3D self-consistent convection-driven dynamo model with reference to the geodynamo. A relatively low Ekman number regime is reached, with the aim of investigating the dynamical behavior at low viscosity. This regime is computationally very demanding, which has prompted us to adopt a plane layer model with an inclined rotation vector, and to make use of efficiently parallelized code. No hyperdiffusion is used, all diffusive operators are in the classical form. Our model has infinite Prandtl number, a Rayleigh number that scales as E(-1/3) (E being the Ekman number), and a constant Roberts number. The optimized model allows us to study dynamos with Ekman numbers in the range [10(-5),10(-4)]. In this regime we find strong-field dynamos where the induced magnetic fields satisfy Taylor's constraint to good accuracy. The solutions are characterized by (i) a MAC balance within the bulk, i.e., Coriolis, pressure, Lorentz, and buoyancy forces are of comparable magnitude, while viscous forces are only significant in thin boundary layers, (ii) the Elsasser number is O(10), (iii) the strong magnetic fields cannot prevent small-scale structures from becoming dominant over the large-scale components, (iv) the Taylor-Proudman effect is detectable, (v) the Taylorization decreases as the Ekman number is lowered, and (vi) the ageostrophic velocity component makes up 80% of the flow.

  2. Numerical studies of dynamo action in a turbulent shear flow

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Nishant K

    2013-01-01

    We perform numerical experiments to study the shear dynamo problem where we look for the growth of large-scale magnetic field due to non-helical stirring at small scales in a background linear shear flow, in previously unexplored parameter regimes. We demonstrate the large-scale dynamo action in the limit when the fluid Reynolds number (Re) is below unity whereas the magnetic Reynolds number (Rem) is above unity; the exponential growth rate scales linearly with shear, which is consistent with earlier numerical works. The limit of low Re is particularly interesting, as seeing the dynamo action in this limit would provide enough motivation for further theoretical investigations, which may focus the attention to this analytically more tractable limit of Re 1. We also perform simulations in the limits when, (i) both (Re, Rem) 1 & Rem < 1, and compute all components of the turbulent transport coefficients (\\alpha_{ij} and \\eta_{ij}) using the test-field method. A reasonably good agreement is seen between ...

  3. Emission of Gravitational Waves from a Magnetohydrodynamic Dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2015-01-01

    The failure of the laser-interferometer gravitational wave antennas to measure the tiny changes of lengths many orders of magnitude smaller than the diameter of a proton raises the question of whether the reason for this failure is a large gravitational wave background noise, and if so, where this background noise is coming from. It is conjectured that it comes from gravitational waves emitted from a magnetohydrodynamic dynamo in the center of the sun, with the large magnetic field from this dynamo shielded by thermomagnetic currents in the tachocline. Using the moon as a large Weber bar, these gravitational waves could possibly be detected by the Poisson diffraction into the center of the lunar shadow during a total solar eclipse.

  4. Convective dynamo action in a spherical shell: symmetries and modulation

    CERN Document Server

    Raynaud, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    We consider dynamo action driven by three-dimensional rotating anelastic convection in a spherical shell. Motivated by the behaviour of the solar dynamo, we examine the interaction of hydromagnetic modes with different symmetries and demonstrate how complicated interactions between convection, differential rotation and magnetic fields may lead to modulation of the basic cycle. For some parameters, Type 1 modulation occurs by the transfer of energy between modes of different symmetries with little change in the overall amplitude, for other parameters, the modulation is of Type 2, where the amplitude is significantly affected (leading to grand minima in activity) without significant changes in symmetry. Most importantly, we identify the presence of "supermodulation" in the solutions, where the activity switches chaotically between Type 1 and Type 2 modulation, this is believed to be an important process in solar activity.

  5. SADE, the Student Astrophysical Dynamo Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, P.; Acton, L.; Klumpar, D.; Stern, R.; Peres, G.; Culhane, L.

    In soft x-rays the solar coronal radiance varies by a factor of 10-30 over the solar activity cycle. A similar variation in most stars in the existing x-ray database has not been found (Stern 2001); even stars which exhibit chromospheric activity cycles show only marginal evidence for X-ray cycles. This is rather puzzling as the time span and multiple coverage of the x-ray sky should reveal at least a hint of such a pronounced cyclical variation. We propose a mission called the Student Astrophysical Dynamo Explorer to measure the x-ray brightness of about 75 stars once every 5 days for up to 15 years. Selection of prime stars takes into account location (avoid eclipse), rotation rate, Ca-K observations, and magnetic field strength, to focus on the best candidates for dynamo studies. We baseline a nested 4-5 mirror system with 200 cm^2 geometric area, with a 1.5 to 2 meter focal length, 15 arcsec on-axis resolution, and Au or Ni coatings. The strawman detector is a back-illuminated CCD of 512x512 pixels, with pixels that can be large as a 15 arcseconds. Available exposure time per star per visit is about an hour and a half. We are exploring the option of adding a visible light detector for astroseismology. To minimize operations cost for this long duration mission we envisage tracking and commanding from a simple ground station at Montana State University, operated by students under the auspices of MSU's Space Science and Engineering Lab (SSEL).

  6. Turbulent dynamos in spherical shell segments of varying geometrical extent

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Brandenburg, Axel; Moss, David

    2008-01-01

    We use three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of the helically forced magnetohydrodynamic equations in spherical shell segments in order to study the effects of changes in the geometrical shape and size of the domain on the growth and saturation of large-scale magnetic fields. We inject kinetic energy along with kinetic helicity in spherical domains via helical forcing using Chandrasekhar-Kendall functions. We use perfect conductor boundary conditions for the magnetic field to ensure that no magnetic helicity escapes the domain boundaries. We find dynamo action giving rise to magnetic fields at scales larger than the characteristic scale of the forcing. The magnetic energy exceeds the kinetic energy over dissipative time scales, similar to that seen earlier in Cartesian simulations in periodic boxes. As we increase the size of the domain in the azimuthal direction we find that the nonlinearly saturated magnetic field organizes itself in long-lived cellular structures with aspect ratios close to unity....

  7. Cosmic ray driven dynamo in galactic disks. A parameter study

    CERN Document Server

    MichałHanasz,; Kowal, Grzegorz; Lesch, Harald

    2008-01-01

    We present a parameter study of the magnetohydrodynamical dynamo driven by cosmic rays in the interstellar medium (ISM) focusing on the efficiency of magnetic field amplification and the issue of energy equipartition between magnetic, kinetic and cosmic ray (CR) energies. We perform numerical CR-MHD simulations of the ISM using the extended version of ZEUS-3D code in the shearing box approximation and taking into account the presence of Ohmic resistivity, tidal forces and vertical disk gravity. CRs are supplied in randomly distributed supernova (SN) remnants and are described by the diffusion-advection equation, which incorporates an anisotropic diffusion tensor. The azimuthal magnetic flux and total magnetic energy are amplified depending on a particular choice of model parameters. We find that the most favorable conditions for magnetic field amplification correspond to magnetic diffusivity of the order of $3\\times 10^{25} \\cm^2\\s^{-1}$, SN rates close to those observed in the Milky Way, periodic SN activity...

  8. Dynamo action in dissipative, forced, rotating MHD turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is an inherent feature of large-scale, energetic astrophysical and geophysical magnetofluids. In general, these are rotating and are energized through buoyancy and shear, while viscosity and resistivity provide a means of dissipation of kinetic and magnetic energy. Studies of unforced, rotating, ideal (i.e., non-dissipative) MHD turbulence have produced interesting results, but it is important to determine how these results are affected by dissipation and forcing. Here, we extend our previous work and examine dissipative, forced, and rotating MHD turbulence. Incompressibility is assumed, and finite Fourier series represent turbulent velocity and magnetic field on a 643 grid. Forcing occurs at an intermediate wave number by a method that keeps total energy relatively constant and allows for injection of kinetic and magnetic helicity. We find that 3-D energy spectra are asymmetric when forcing is present. We also find that dynamo action occurs when forcing has either kinetic or magnetic helicity, with magnetic helicity injection being more important. In forced, dissipative MHD turbulence, the dynamo manifests itself as a large-scale coherent structure that is similar to that seen in the ideal case. These results imply that MHD turbulence, per se, may play a fundamental role in the creation and maintenance of large-scale (i.e., dipolar) stellar and planetary magnetic fields.

  9. Energy fluxes in helical magnetohydrodynamics and dynamo action

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahendra K Verma

    2003-10-01

    Renormalized viscosity, renormalized resistivity, and various energy fluxes are calculated for helical magnetohydrodynamics using perturbative field theory. The calculation is of first-order in perturbation. Kinetic and magnetic helicities do not affect the renormalized parameters, but they induce an inverse cascade of magnetic energy. The sources for the large-scale magnetic field have been shown to be (1) energy flux from large-scale velocity field to large-scale magnetic field arising due to non-helical interactions and (2) inverse energy flux of magnetic energy caused by helical interactions. Based on our flux results, a primitive model for galactic dynamo has been constructed. Our calculations yield dynamo time-scale for a typical galaxy to be of the order of 108 years. Our field-theoretic calculations also reveal that the flux of magnetic helicity is backward, consistent with the earlier observations based on absolute equilibrium theory.

  10. Realistic modeling of local dynamo processes on the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Kitiashvili, I N; Mansour, N N; Wray, A A

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic fields are usually observed in the quiet Sun as small-scale elements that cover the entire solar surface (the `salt and pepper' patterns in line-of-sight magnetograms). By using 3D radiative MHD numerical simulations we find that these fields result from a local dynamo action in the top layers of the convection zone, where extremely weak 'seed' magnetic fields (e.g., from a $10^{-6}$ G) can locally grow above the mean equipartition field, to a stronger than 2000~G field localized in magnetic structures. Our results reveal that the magnetic flux is predominantly generated in regions of small-scale helical downflows. We find that the local dynamo action takes place mostly in a shallow, about 500~km deep, subsurface layer, from which the generated field is transported into the deeper layers by convective downdrafts. We demonstrate that the observed dominance of vertical magnetic fields at the photosphere and horizontal fields above the photosphere can be explained by small-scale magnetic loops produced ...

  11. A Three-Dimensional Babcock-Leighton Solar Dynamo Model: Initial Results with Axisymmetric Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Miesch, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to introduce the STABLE (Surface flux Transport And Babcock-LEighton) solar dynamo model. STABLE is a 3D Babcock-Leighton/Flux Transport dynamo model in which the source of poloidal field is the explicit emergence, distortion, and dispersal of bipolar magnetic regions (BMRs). Here we describe the STABLE model in more detail than we have previously and we verify it by reproducing a 2D mean-field benchmark. We also present some representative dynamo simulations, focusing on the special case of kinematic magnetic induction and axisymmetric flow fields. Not all solutions are supercritical; it can be a challenge for the BL mechanism to sustain the dynamo when the turbulent diffusion near the surface is $\\geq 10^{12}$ cm$^2$ s$^{-1}$. However, if BMRs are sufficiently large, deep, and numerous, then sustained, cyclic, dynamo solutions can be found that exhibit solar-like features. Furthermore, we find that the shearing of radial magnetic flux by the surface differential rotation ...

  12. Dynamo threshold detection in the von Kármán sodium experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, Sophie; Bonnefoy, Nicolas; Bourgoin, Mickael; Odier, Philippe; Pinton, Jean-François; Plihon, Nicolas; Verhille, Gautier; Boisson, Jean; Daviaud, François; Dubrulle, Bérengère

    2013-07-01

    Predicting dynamo self-generation in liquid metal experiments has been an ongoing question for many years. In contrast to simple dynamical systems for which reliable techniques have been developed, the ability to predict the dynamo capacity of a flow and the estimate of the corresponding critical value of the magnetic Reynolds number (the control parameter of the instability) has been elusive, partly due to the high level of turbulent fluctuations of flows in such experiments (with kinetic Reynolds numbers in excess of 10(6)). We address these issues here, using the von Kármán sodium experiment and studying its response to an externally applied magnetic field. We first show that a dynamo threshold can be estimated from analysis related to critical slowing down and susceptibility divergence, in configurations for which dynamo action is indeed observed. These approaches are then applied to flow configurations that have failed to self-generate magnetic fields within operational limits, and we quantify the dynamo capacity of these configurations.

  13. A three-dimensional Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo model: Initial results with axisymmetric flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miesch, Mark S.; Teweldebirhan, Kinfe

    2016-10-01

    The main objective of this paper is to introduce the STABLE (Surface flux Transport And Babcock-LEighton) solar dynamo model. STABLE is a 3D Babcock-Leighton/Flux Transport dynamo model in which the source of poloidal field is the explicit emergence, distortion, and dispersal of bipolar magnetic regions (BMRs). Here we describe the STABLE model in more detail than we have previously and we verify it by reproducing a 2D mean-field benchmark. We also present some representative dynamo simulations, focusing on the special case of kinematic magnetic induction and axisymmetric flow fields. Not all solutions are supercritical; it can be a challenge for the BL mechanism to sustain the dynamo when the turbulent diffusion near the surface is ⩾ 1012 cm2 s-1. However, if BMRs are sufficiently large, deep, and numerous, then sustained, cyclic, dynamo solutions can be found that exhibit solar-like features. Furthermore, we find that the shearing of radial magnetic flux by the surface differential rotation can account for most of the net toroidal flux generation in each hemisphere, as has been recently argued for the Sun by Cameron and Schüssler (2015).

  14. Finite correlation time effects in kinematic dynamo problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schekochihin, A.A.; Kulsrud, R.M.

    2000-02-11

    One-point statistics of the magnetic fluctuations in kinematic regime with large Prandtl number and non delta-correlated in time advecting velocity field are studied. A perturbation expansion in the ratio of the velocity correlation time to the dynamo growth time is constructed in the spirit of the Kliatskin-Tatarskii functional method and carried out to first order. The convergence properties are improved compared to the commonly used van Kampen-Terwiel method. The zeroth-order growth rate of the magnetic energy is estimated to be reduced (in three dimensions) by approximately 40%. This reduction is quite close to existing numerical results.

  15. Convection-driven spherical shell dynamos at varying Prandtl numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käpylä, P. J.; Käpylä, M. J.; Olspert, N.; Warnecke, J.; Brandenburg, A.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Stellar convection zones are characterized by vigorous high-Reynolds number turbulence at low Prandtl numbers. Aims: We study the dynamo and differential rotation regimes at varying levels of viscous, thermal, and magnetic diffusion. Methods: We perform three-dimensional simulations of stratified fully compressible magnetohydrodynamic convection in rotating spherical wedges at various thermal and magnetic Prandtl numbers (from 0.25 to 2 and from 0.25 to 5, respectively). Differential rotation and large-scale magnetic fields are produced self-consistently. Results: We find that for high thermal diffusivity, the rotation profiles show a monotonically increasing angular velocity from the bottom of the convection zone to the top and from the poles toward the equator. For sufficiently rapid rotation, a region of negative radial shear develops at mid-latitudes as the thermal diffusivity is decreased, corresponding to an increase of the Prandtl number. This coincides with and results in a change of the dynamo mode from poleward propagating activity belts to equatorward propagating ones. Furthermore, the clearly cyclic solutions disappear at the highest magnetic Reynolds numbers and give way to irregular sign changes or quasi-stationary states. The total (mean and fluctuating) magnetic energy increases as a function of the magnetic Reynolds number in the range studied here (5-151), but the energies of the mean magnetic fields level off at high magnetic Reynolds numbers. The differential rotation is strongly affected by the magnetic fields and almost vanishes at the highest magnetic Reynolds numbers. In some of our most turbulent cases, however, we find that two regimes are possible, where either differential rotation is strong and mean magnetic fields are relatively weak, or vice versa. Conclusions: Our simulations indicate a strong nonlinear feedback of magnetic fields on differential rotation, leading to qualitative changes in the behaviors of large

  16. Solar-wind/magnetospheric dynamos: MHD-scale collective entry of the solar wind energy, momentum and mass into the magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yan; Lysak, Robert L.

    1992-01-01

    A quasi open MHD (Magnetohydrodynamic) scale anomalous transport controlled boundary layer model is proposed, where the MHD collective behavior of magnetofluids (direct dynamo effect, anomalous viscous interaction and anomalous diffusion of the mass and the magnetic field) plays the main role in the conversion of the Solar Wind (SW) kinetic and magnetic energy into electromagnetic energy in the Magnetosphere (MSp). The so called direct and indirect dynamo effects are based on inductive and purely dissipative energy conversion, respectively. The self organization ability of vector fields in turbulent magnetofluids implies an inductive response of the plasma, which leads to the direct dynamo effect. The direct dynamo effect describes the direct formation of localized field aligned currents and the transverse Alfven waves and provides a source for MHD scale anomalous diffusivity and viscosity. The SW/MSp coupling depends on the dynamo efficiency.

  17. Precession-driven dynamos in a full sphere and the role of large scale cyclonic vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Yufeng; Noir, Jerome; Jackson, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Precession has been proposed as an alternative power source for planetary dynamos. Previous hydrodynamic simulations suggested that precession can generate very complex flows in planetary liquid cores [Y. Lin, P. Marti, and J. Noir, "Shear-driven parametric instability in a precessing sphere," Physics of Fluids 27, 046601 (2015)]. In the present study, we numerically investigate the magnetohydrodynamics of a precessing sphere. We demonstrate precession driven dynamos in different flow regimes, from laminar to turbulent flows. In particular, we highlight the magnetic field generation by large scale cyclonic vortices, which has not been explored previously. In this regime, dynamos can be sustained at relatively low Ekman numbers and magnetic Prandtl numbers, which paves the way for planetary applications.

  18. ECH on the Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milhone, Jason; Clark, Mike; Collins, Cami; Cooper, Chris; Katz, Noam; Nonn, Paul; Wallace, John; Forest, Cary

    2012-10-01

    The Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment (MPDX) is a 3 meter diameter sphere consisting of 36 axisymmetric rings of samarium cobalt magnets in a ring-cusp configuration. Electrostatic electrodes on the edge will be used to spin the plasma. The purpose of MPDX is to study flow-driven magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. Electron cyclotron heating will be used for the ionization and heating of the plasma. A benefit of the ECH is the plasma will have hot electrons leading to good electrical conduction and high magnetic Reynolds number. In addition, direct heating of the electrons helps to obtain a large ionization fraction and a low neutral density. The ECH system on MPDX will consist of 5 separate lines distributed at various positions around the vacuum vessel. Each line will have a 20 kW magnetron operating in continuous wave mode at 2.45 GHz outputting in WR-340 waveguide. The power will be transferred to the vacuum vessel through WR-284 waveguide. Each line will contain a directional coupler for measuring reflected power. A manual 3-stub tuner will be used for impedance matching. The purpose of these elements is to optimize the efficiency of energy transfer to the plasma.

  19. High Performance Computing Application: Solar Dynamo Model Project II, Corona and Heliosphere Component Initialization, Integration and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-24

    allocate solar heating into any location of the corona . Its total contribution depended on the integration of the unsigned magnetic flux at 1 Rs...AFRL-RD-PS- TR-2015-0028 AFRL-RD-PS- TR-2015-0028 HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING APPLICATION: SOLAR DYNAMO MODEL PROJECT II; CORONA AND HELIOSPHERE...Dynamo Model Project II, Corona and Heliosphere Component Initialization, Integration and Validation 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  20. Mechanically-forced dynamos (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bars, M.

    2013-12-01

    It is a commonly accepted hypothesis that convection is responsible for planetary dynamos. However, the validity of the convective dynamo model can be questioned in various planets and moons as well as in asteroids, where the constraints from thermal evolution and compositional core models are sometimes difficult to reconcile with available data from paleomagnetism and in situ measurements. Over the last few years, researches have thus been pursued to find alternative mechanisms for sustaining intense three-dimensional motions in liquid cores, a necessary ingredient for planetary dynamo. In particular, mechanical forcings driven by libration, precession, nutation and tides, have received a renewed interest, following the first studies by Malkus in the 60's. A huge reservoir of energy is available in the rotational and orbital motions of all planetary systems. If planetary bodies were completely rigid and rotating at a constant spin rate, their fluid layers in the absence of convection would also behave rigidly and follow the spin of their boundaries. But small periodic perturbations of the shape of the core/mantle boundary (i.e. dynamic tides) and/or small periodic perturbations of the direction of the spin vector (i.e. precession and nutation) and/or small periodic perturbations of the spin rate (i.e. libration) systematically perturb this rigid state. Then, each of these small perturbations is capable of triggering instabilities in fluid layers, conveying energy from the spin and orbital motions to drive intense three-dimensional flows in the liquid cores. With the view to establish a general framework for planetary applications, I will present here the basic physical ingredients of these instabilities, which involve a resonance between the considered mechanical forcing and two inertial waves of the core. I will then review the numerical and experimental validations of this generic principle, and the few magnetohydrodynamic validations of their dynamo capacity

  1. Performance benchmarks for a next generation numerical dynamo model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Hiroaki; Heien, Eric; Aubert, Julien; Aurnou, Jonathan M.; Avery, Margaret; Brown, Ben; Buffett, Bruce A.; Busse, Friedrich; Christensen, Ulrich R.; Davies, Christopher J.; Featherstone, Nicholas; Gastine, Thomas; Glatzmaier, Gary A.; Gubbins, David; Guermond, Jean-Luc; Hayashi, Yoshi-Yuki; Hollerbach, Rainer; Hwang, Lorraine J.; Jackson, Andrew; Jones, Chris A.; Jiang, Weiyuan; Kellogg, Louise H.; Kuang, Weijia; Landeau, Maylis; Marti, Philippe; Olson, Peter; Ribeiro, Adolfo; Sasaki, Youhei; Schaeffer, Nathanaël.; Simitev, Radostin D.; Sheyko, Andrey; Silva, Luis; Stanley, Sabine; Takahashi, Futoshi; Takehiro, Shin-ichi; Wicht, Johannes; Willis, Ashley P.

    2016-05-01

    Numerical simulations of the geodynamo have successfully represented many observable characteristics of the geomagnetic field, yielding insight into the fundamental processes that generate magnetic fields in the Earth's core. Because of limited spatial resolution, however, the diffusivities in numerical dynamo models are much larger than those in the Earth's core, and consequently, questions remain about how realistic these models are. The typical strategy used to address this issue has been to continue to increase the resolution of these quasi-laminar models with increasing computational resources, thus pushing them toward more realistic parameter regimes. We assess which methods are most promising for the next generation of supercomputers, which will offer access to O(106) processor cores for large problems. Here we report performance and accuracy benchmarks from 15 dynamo codes that employ a range of numerical and parallelization methods. Computational performance is assessed on the basis of weak and strong scaling behavior up to 16,384 processor cores. Extrapolations of our weak-scaling results indicate that dynamo codes that employ two-dimensional or three-dimensional domain decompositions can perform efficiently on up to ˜106 processor cores, paving the way for more realistic simulations in the next model generation.

  2. Enhancement of small-scale turbulent dynamo by large-scale shear

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Nishant K; Brandenburg, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Using direct numerical simulations we show that large-scale shear in non-helically forced turbulence supports small-scale dynamo action with zero mean magnetic field, i.e., the dynamo growth rate increases with shear and shear enhances or even produces turbulence, which, in turn, further increases the dynamo growth rate. When the production rates of turbulent kinetic energy due to shear and forcing are of the same order, we find scalings for the growth rate $\\gamma$ of the small-scale dynamo and the turbulent velocity $u_{\\rm rms}$ with shear rate $S$ that are independent of the magnetic Prandtl number: $\\gamma \\propto |S|$ and $u_{\\rm rms} \\propto |S|^{2/3}$. Having compensated for shear-induced effects on turbulent velocity, we find that the normalized growth rate of the small-scale dynamo exhibits a universal scaling, $\\widetilde{\\gamma}\\propto |S|^{2/3}$, arising solely from the induction equation for a given velocity field.

  3. Large- and small-scale interactions and quenching in an alpha2-dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Peter; Stepanov, Rodion; Sokoloff, Dmitry

    2006-12-01

    The evolution of the large-scale magnetic field in a turbulent flow of conducting fluid is considered in the framework of a multiscale alpha2-dynamo model, which includes the poloidal and the toroidal components for the large-scale magnetic field and a shell model for the small-scale magnetohydrodynamical turbulence. The conjugation of the mean-field description for the large-scale field and the shell formalism for the small-scale turbulence is based on strict conformity to the conservation laws. The model displays a substantial magnetic contribution to the alpha effect. It was shown that a large-scale magnetic field can be generated by current helicity even solely. The alpha quenching and the role of the magnetic Prandtl number (Pm) are studied. We have determined the dynamic nature of the saturation mechanism of dynamo action. Any simultaneous cross correlation of alpha and large-scale magnetic field energy EB is negligible, whereas coupling between alpha and EB becomes substantial for moderate time lags. An unexpected result is the behavior of the large-scale magnetic energy with variation of the magnetic Prandtl number. Diminishing of Pm does not have an inevitable ill effect on the magnetic field generation. The most efficient large-scale dynamo operates under relatively low Prandtl numbers--then the small-scale dynamo is suppressed and the decrease of Pm can lead even to superequipartition of the large-scale magnetic field (i.e., EB>Eu). In contrast, the growth of Pm does not promote the large-scale magnetic field generation. A growing counteraction of the magnetic alpha effect reduces the level of mean large-scale magnetic energy at the saturated state.

  4. Shell-to-shell energy transfer in magnetohydrodynamics. II. Kinematic dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mininni, Pablo; Alexakis, Alexandros; Pouquet, Annick

    2005-10-01

    We study the transfer of energy between different scales for forced three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics turbulent flows in the kinematic dynamo regime. Two different forces are examined: a nonhelical Taylor-Green flow with magnetic Prandtl number P(M) = 0.4 and a helical ABC flow with P(M) = 1. This analysis allows us to examine which scales of the velocity flow are responsible for dynamo action and identify which scales of the magnetic field receive energy directly from the velocity field and which scales receive magnetic energy through the cascade of the magnetic field from large to small scales. Our results show that the turbulent velocity fluctuations in the inertial range are responsible for the magnetic field amplification at small scales (small-scale dynamo) while the large-scale field is amplified mostly due to the large-scale flow. A direct cascade of the magnetic field energy from large to small scales is also presented and is a complementary mechanism for the increase of the magnetic field at small scales. The input of energy from the inertial range velocity field into the small magnetic scales dominates over the energy cascade up to the wave number where the magnetic energy spectrum peaks. At even smaller scales, most of the magnetic energy input is from the cascading process.

  5. Solar dynamo and geomagnetic activity

    CERN Document Server

    Georgieva, Katya

    2010-01-01

    The correlation between geomagnetic activity and the sunspot number in the 11-year solar cycle exhibits long-term variations due to the varying time lag between the sunspot-related and non-sunspot related geomagnetic activity, and the varying relative amplitude of the respective geomagnetic activity peaks. As the sunspot-related and non-sunspot related geomagnetic activity are caused by different solar agents, related to the solar toroidal and poloidal fields, respectively, we use their variations to derive the parameters of the solar dynamo transforming the poloidal field into toroidal field and back. We find that in the last 12 cycles the solar surface meridional circulation varied between 5 and 20 m/s (averaged over latitude and over the sunspot cycle), the deep circulation varied between 2.5 and 5.5 m/s, and the diffusivity in the whole of the convection zone was ~10**12 m2/s. In the last 12 cycles solar dynamo has been operating in moderately diffusion dominated regime in the bulk of the convection zone....

  6. The DYNAMO Project: An Introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Ferrier

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available European concerns about the consequences of anthropogenic impacts on environmental quality have led to the establishment of various dynamic modelling approaches through which the consequences of impacts over time can be assessed. Similarly, throughout Europe, there has been extensive collection of regional data on 'environmental capital' resulting in the production of wide area mapping of environmental quality (soils, land use etc. The aim of the DYNAMO was to integrate data and models, specifically; (1 to enhance the existing process based models to evaluate the impacts of multiple drivers of environmental change; (2 to evaluate these models at intensively studied (and manipulated catchments and stands; (3 to scale up in time from observations collected over several years to predict the long term impacts over decades, and (4 to scale up in space from the individual site level to regional, National and European scale. The project aims to develop and enhance regional modelling approaches so that European scale impacts of acidic deposition, land use (forestry practices and global change can be determined without compromising process level understanding of ecosystem function. The DYNAMO project contributes to the EU TERI (Terrestrial Ecosystems Research Initiative framework of the Environment and Climate Programme of the European Commission.

  7. Final Technical Report for DOE DE-FG02-05ER54831 "Laboratory Studies of Dynamos."

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forest, Cary B. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-11-06

    Laboratory Studies of Dynamos: Executive Summary. The self-generation of magnetic fields by astrophysical bodies like planets, stars, accretion disks, galaxies, and even galaxy clusters arises due to a mechanism referred to as a homogeneous dynamo. It is quite simple to demonstrate the generation of a magnetic fi eld from a rotating copper disk coupled with a coil of wire, a device known as the homopolar dynamo. The device works like a magnetic fi eld ampli er with a feedback circuit: the differential rotation of a metal disk past an infinitesimally small seed magnetic field induces currents in the disk which, when coupled to a coil winding, can amplify the field until it becomes strong enough to slow the rotation of the disk. What is remarkable is that the same type of circuit may be achieved in a flowing conducting fluid such as a liquid metal in the case of planetary dynamos or a plasma in the case of astrophysical dynamos. The complexity of describing planetary and stellar dynamos despite their ubiquity and the plethora of observational data from the Earth and the Sun motivates the demonstration of a laboratory homogenous dynamo. To create a homogenous dynamo, one first needs a su fficiently large, fast flow of a highly conducting fluid that the velocity shear in the fluid can bend magnetic field lines. With a high Rm-flow, the magnetic fi eld can be ampli ed by the stretching action provided by di fferential rotation. The other critical ingredient is a flow geometry that provides feedback so that the ampli ed eld reinforces the initial in nitesimal seed field - a mechanism that recreates the feedback provided by the coil of wire in the homopolar dynamo. In the Madison Dynamo Experiment, this combination of magnetic ampli cation and feedback is feasible in the simple geometry of two counter-rotating helical vortices in a 1 meter-diameter spherical vessel lled with liquid sodium. For an optimal helical pitch of the flow the threshold for exciting a dynamo is

  8. Dynamo tests for stratification below the core-mantle boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Peter; Landeau, Maylis; Reynolds, Evan

    2017-10-01

    Evidence from seismology, mineral physics, and core dynamics suggests a layer with an overall stable stratification in the Earth's outer core, possibly thermal in origin, extending below the core-mantle boundary (CMB) for several hundred kilometers. Yet vigorous deep mantle convection with locally elevated heat flux implies locally unstable thermal stratification below the CMB, consistent with interpretations of non-dipole geomagnetic field behavior that favor upwelling flows in places below the CMB. To resolve this apparent inconsistency, we investigate the structure of convection and magnetic fields in the core using numerical dynamos with laterally heterogeneous boundary heat flux. Strongly heterogeneous boundary heat flux generates localized convection beneath the CMB that coexists with an overall stable stratification there. Our partially stratified dynamos are distinguished by their time average magnetic field structures. Without stratification or with stratification confined to a thin layer, the octupole component is small and the CMB magnetic field structure includes polar intensity minima. With more extensive stratification, the octupole component is large and the magnetic field structure includes intense patches or high intensity lobes in the polar regions. Comparisons with the time-averaged geomagnetic field are generally favorable for partial stratification in a thin (<400 km) layer but unfavorable for stratification in a thick (∼1000 km) layer beneath the CMB.

  9. MHD Dynamo phenomenon in our lab (Petrus Peregrinus Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gailitis, Agris

    2016-04-01

    Celestial objects generate magnetic field very like technical dynamo do. Field induces current in a moving electroconductor. The induced current amplifies magnetic field. At large enough product conductivity time's velocity time's size amplification exceeds losses and situation without magnetic field is impossible. Such scenario is obvious for technical dynamo made from insolated wire but not so for uniform conductor as in celestial bodies. Development of the idea took literally the entire 20th century. Discovery of sunspot magnetic fields at the century rise and laboratory verification at the very fall. At thirties Cowling noticed that geometrically simple shaped (axially symmetrical) field can't sustain itself. Process must be more complex, somehow spatially fragmented. At the middle of century Parker and Steenbeck saw such fragmentation in a turbulent structure of hydrodynamic flow. Shortly after his α-effect approach was made ready Steenbeck invited us to think on molten Na experiments for theory verification. The first idea was to push the Na flow through the hand-blown pipe maze. Similar industrial scale experiment after years and regardless of us was realized in Karlsruhe. Seeking for something cheaper we stopped at Ponomarenko idea - axially symmetric helical flow can't generate axi-simmetric field but it can generate azimuthally structured one. The mathematical model was modified to experimental conditions and numerically optimized. The Dynamo stand was built and it works. Even after optimization Dynamo stand exceeds usual size of hydraulic experiments. 2m3 of molten Na circulate there by means of propeller powered from 200kW motor. When circulation exceeds 0.6 m3/s (at 120°C) seemingly from nowhere appears magnetic field. Twisted field pattern slowly (about 1.5Hz) rotates round flow axis. Up to 0.1T field stay as long as stay circulation and temperature. When sodium is heated up or slowed down the field is slowly dying out. Phenomenon is much richer

  10. Planetary Magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connerney, J. E. P.

    2007-01-01

    The chapter on Planetary Magnetism by Connerney describes the magnetic fields of the planets, from Mercury to Neptune, including the large satellites (Moon, Ganymede) that have or once had active dynamos. The chapter describes the spacecraft missions and observations that, along with select remote observations, form the basis of our knowledge of planetary magnetic fields. Connerney describes the methods of analysis used to characterize planetary magnetic fields, and the models used to represent the main field (due to dynamo action in the planet's interior) and/or remnant magnetic fields locked in the planet's crust, where appropriate. These observations provide valuable insights into dynamo generation of magnetic fields, the structure and composition of planetary interiors, and the evolution of planets.

  11. A Model of the Turbulent Electric Dynamo in Multi-Phase Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dementyeva, Svetlana; Mareev, Evgeny

    2016-04-01

    Many terrestrial and astrophysical phenomena witness the conversion of kinetic energy into electric energy (the energy of the quasi-stationary electric field) in conducting media, which is natural to treat as manifestations of electric dynamo by analogy with well-known theory of magnetic dynamo. Such phenomena include thunderstorms and lightning in the Earth's atmosphere and atmospheres of other planets, electric activity caused by dust storms in terrestrial and Martian atmospheres, snow storms, electrical discharges occurring in technological setups, connected with intense mixing of aerosol particles like in the milling industry. We have developed a model of the large-scale turbulent electric dynamo in a weakly conducting medium, containing two heavy-particle components. We have distinguished two main classes of charging mechanisms (inductive and non-inductive) in accordance with the dependence or independence of the electric charge, transferred during a particle collision, on the electric field intensity and considered the simplified models which demonstrate the possibility of dynamo realization and its specific peculiarities for these mechanisms. Dynamo (the large-scale electric field growth) appears due to the charge separation between the colliding and rebounding particles. This process is may be greatly intensified by the turbulent mixing of particles with different masses and, consequently, different inertia. The particle charge fluctuations themselves (small-scale dynamo), however, do not automatically mean growth of the large-scale electric field without a large-scale asymmetry. Such an asymmetry arises due to the dependence of the transferred charge magnitude on the electric field intensity in the case of the inductive mechanism of charge separation, or due to the gravity and convection for non-inductive mechanisms. We have found that in the case of the inductive mechanism the large-scale dynamo occurs if the medium conductivity is small enough while the

  12. Dynamo Models of the Solar Cycle: Current Trends and Future Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Nandy, Dibyendu

    2011-01-01

    The magnetic cycle of the Sun, as manifested in the cyclic appearance of sunspots, significantly influences our space environment and space-based technologies by generating what is now termed as space weather. Long-term variation in the Sun's magnetic output also influences planetary atmospheres and climate through modulation of solar irradiance. Here, I summarize the current state of understanding of this magnetic cycle, highlighting important observational constraints, detailing the kinematic dynamo modeling approach and commenting on future prospects.

  13. Dynamo activities driven by magneto-rotational instability and Parker instability in galactic gaseous disk

    OpenAIRE

    Machida, Mami; NAKAMURA, Kenji E.; Kudoh, Takahiro; Akahori, Takuya; Yoshiaki, SOFUE; Matsumoto, Ryoji

    2013-01-01

    We carried out global three-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic simulations of dynamo activities in galactic gaseous disks without assuming equatorial symmetry. Numerical results indicate the growth of azimuthal magnetic fields non-symmetric to the equatorial plane. As magneto-rotational instability (MRI) grows, the mean strength of magnetic fields is amplified until the magnetic pressure becomes as large as 10% of the gas pressure. When the local plasma $\\beta$ ($ = p_{\\rm gas}/p_{\\rm mag}$) be...

  14. Magneto-Vortex Dynamo Model in Solar convection zone

    CERN Document Server

    Ershkov, Sergey V

    2011-01-01

    Here is presented a new magneto-vortex dynamo model for modeling & predicting of a processes in Solar plasma convection zone. Solar convection zone is located above the level r > 0,6-0,7 R, where R is a Solar radius. A key feature of such a model is that equation of Solar plasma motion as well as equation of magnetic fields evolution - are reduced to Helmholtz's vortex equation, which is up-graded in according with alpha-effect (Coriolis force forms an additional vorticity field or magnetic field due to Sun's differential rotation). Such an additional vorticity or magnetic field are proved to be concentrated at the proper belt in Solar convection zone under the influence of Coriolis force (at the middle latitudes of the Sun in respect to equator). Besides, such an an additional vorticity & magnetic fields are to be the basic sources of well-known phenomena "Maunder's butterfly" diagram.

  15. Variational data assimilation for the initial-value dynamo problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kuan; Jackson, Andrew; Livermore, Philip W

    2011-11-01

    The secular variation of the geomagnetic field as observed at the Earth's surface results from the complex magnetohydrodynamics taking place in the fluid core of the Earth. One way to analyze this system is to use the data in concert with an underlying dynamical model of the system through the technique of variational data assimilation, in much the same way as is employed in meteorology and oceanography. The aim is to discover an optimal initial condition that leads to a trajectory of the system in agreement with observations. Taking the Earth's core to be an electrically conducting fluid sphere in which convection takes place, we develop the continuous adjoint forms of the magnetohydrodynamic equations that govern the dynamical system together with the corresponding numerical algorithms appropriate for a fully spectral method. These adjoint equations enable a computationally fast iterative improvement of the initial condition that determines the system evolution. The initial condition depends on the three dimensional form of quantities such as the magnetic field in the entire sphere. For the magnetic field, conservation of the divergence-free condition for the adjoint magnetic field requires the introduction of an adjoint pressure term satisfying a zero boundary condition. We thus find that solving the forward and adjoint dynamo system requires different numerical algorithms. In this paper, an efficient algorithm for numerically solving this problem is developed and tested for two illustrative problems in a whole sphere: one is a kinematic problem with prescribed velocity field, and the second is associated with the Hall-effect dynamo, exhibiting considerable nonlinearity. The algorithm exhibits reliable numerical accuracy and stability. Using both the analytical and the numerical techniques of this paper, the adjoint dynamo system can be solved directly with the same order of computational complexity as that required to solve the forward problem. These numerical

  16. On self-exciting coupled Faraday disk homopolar dynamos driving series motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, Irene M.; Hide, Raymond; Soward, Andrew M.

    1998-06-01

    We present the results of a preliminary analytical and numerical study of one of the simpler members of a hierarchy of N (where N ≥ 1) coupled self-exciting Faraday disk homopolar dynamos, incorporating motors as additional electrical elements driven by the dynamo-generated current, as proposed by Hide (1997). The hierarchy is a generalisation of a single disk dynamo ( N = 1) with just one electric motor in the system, and crucially, incorporating effects due to mechanical friction in both the disk and the motor, as investigated by Hide et al. (1996). This is describable by a set of three coupled autonomous nonlinear ordinary differential equations, which, due to the presence of the motor, has solutions corresponding to co-existing periodic states of increasing complexity, as well as to chaotic dynamics. We consider the case of two such homopolar dynamos ( N = 2) with generally dissimilar characteristics but coupled together magnetically, with the aim of determining the extent to which this coupled system differs in its behaviour from the single disk dynamo with a series motor (Hide et al. 1996). In the case when the units are identical, the behaviour of the double dynamo system (after initial transients have decayed away) is identical to that of the single dynamo system, with solutions (including “synchronised chaos”) locked in both amplitude and phase. When there is no motor in the system and the coefficient of mechanical friction in the disks is small, these transients resemble the well-known ‘non-synchronous’, but structurally unstable Rikitake solution.

  17. Progress in Magnetohydrodynamic Dynamo Experiments and Analysis of the Results%磁流体发电机实验进展及分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭开明; 杨志良; 景海荣; 陈荣; 郑建川; 潘业欣

    2016-01-01

    阐述了磁流体发电机实验的发展过程并介绍了发电机实验的主要结果.磁流体发电机实验基于磁流体发电机理论,利用液态金属钠作为导电流体,在多种速度场和不同雷诺系数情况下,探测到发电机效应,得到自激发磁场、磁场饱和及磁场反转现象.但磁场强度与实验参数之间的具体相关关系还有待进一步验证.%This paper describes state-of-the-art experiments of magnetohydrodynamic dy-namo and the main results of the current dynamo experiments. We first introduce the the-oretical basis of dynamos, which contains kinematic dynamo theory and dynamic dynamo theory. Then we describe the magnetohydrodynamic dynamo experiments based on the cur-rent theories. The experiments simulated liquid sodium as plasma, analysed the dynamo effects of different velocity distributions and the relation of velocity field and magnetic field. In the Riga dynamo experiment, the frequency of the magnetic field reversal was a constant if the plasma rotates with a constant speed. In the VKG magnetohydrodynamic dynamo experiment, the magnetic field inversed when the rotational frequencies of Propellers were different. However, Lyon also got the inverse field when he made use of external magnified circulation simulation effect in the VKG experiment. We can turn to study MHD instability and fluctuation after we testified the dynamo theory.

  18. Analysis, Control, Synchronization and SPICE Implementation of a Novel 4-D Hyperchaotic Rikitake Dynamo System without Equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vaidyanathan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chaos theory has wide applications and its importance can be seen by the voluminous publications on various applications in several branches of science, commerce and engineering. Control, tracking or regulation and synchronization of different types of chaotic systems are importance areas of research in the control literature and various methods have been adopted over the past few decades for tackling these research problems. Also, the discovery of novel chaotic and hyperchaotic systems in various applications, their qualitative properties and the control of such systems are also important research areas in chaos theory. This paper announces a novel 4-D hyperchaotic Rikitake dynamo system, which is derived by adding a state feedback control to the famous 3-D Rikitake two-disk dynamo system (1958. The frequent and irregular reversals of the Earth’s magnetic field inspired a number of early studies involving electrical currents within the Earth’s molten core. One of the first such models to exhibit reversals was Rikitake’s two-disk dynamo system (Rikitake, 1958. This paper discusses the qualitative properties of the novel hyperchaotic Rikitake dynamo system. We note that the novel hyperchaotic Rikitake dynamo system has no equilibrium points. The Lyapunov exponents of the hyperchaotic Rikitake dynamo system are found as �! = 0.09136, �! = 0.02198, �! = 0 and �! = −2.11190. The Kaplan-Yorke fractional dimension of the novel hyperchaotic Rikitake dynamo system is found as �!" = 3.05367. Next, this paper discusses control and synchronization of the novel hyperchaotic Rikitake dynamo system with unknown parameters using adaptive control method. The main results are established using Lyapunov stability theory and numerically illustrated using MATLAB. Finally, for the 4-D novel hyperchaotic system, an electronic circuit realization in SPICE has been described to confirm the feasibility of the theoretical hyperchaotic Rikitake dynamo

  19. Effect of soft-iron impellers on the von Kármán-sodium dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mingtian

    2014-01-01

    The explanation for the observed axisymmetric magnetic field in the von Kármán-sodium (VKS) dynamo experiment is still an unresolved question. In this paper, the integral equation approach is extended to investigate the VKS dynamo action by taking into account the discontinuity of the magnetic permeability and electrical conductivity in the conducting region. When the relative magnetic permeability of the soft-iron impellers is set to 65, a steady toroidal field that is apparently axisymmetric is excited at the critical magnetic Reynolds number, Rmc≈27.23, which is close to the experimental result, Rmc≈30. Our results show that the critical magnetic Reynolds number declines as the relative magnetic permeability of the impellers increases. Furthermore, when the relative magnetic permeability is not greater than 37, an equatorial magnetic field with an azimuthal wave number m=1 is the dominant mode, otherwise a steady toroidal field with an azimuthal wave number m=0 predominates the magnetic field generated by the VKS dynamo action.

  20. Power requirement of the geodynamo from ohmic losses in numerical and laboratory dynamos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Ulrich R; Tilgner, Andreas

    2004-05-13

    In the Earth's fluid outer core, a dynamo process converts thermal and gravitational energy into magnetic energy. The power needed to sustain the geomagnetic field is set by the ohmic losses (dissipation due to electrical resistance). Recent estimates of ohmic losses cover a wide range, from 0.1 to 3.5 TW, or roughly 0.3-10% of the Earth's surface heat flow. The energy requirement of the dynamo puts constraints on the thermal budget and evolution of the core through Earth's history. Here we use a set of numerical dynamo models to derive scaling relations between the core's characteristic dissipation time and the core's magnetic and hydrodynamic Reynolds numbers--dimensionless numbers that measure the ratio of advective transport to magnetic and viscous diffusion, respectively. The ohmic dissipation of the Karlsruhe dynamo experiment supports a simple dependence on the magnetic Reynolds number alone, indicating that flow turbulence in the experiment and in the Earth's core has little influence on its characteristic dissipation time. We use these results to predict moderate ohmic dissipation in the range of 0.2-0.5 TW, which removes the need for strong radioactive heating in the core and allows the age of the solid inner core to exceed 2.5 billion years.