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Sample records for magnesium matrix composites

  1. Preparation of magnesium metal matrix composites by powder metallurgy process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satish, J.; Satish, K. G., Dr.

    2018-02-01

    Magnesium is the lightest metal used as the source for constructional alloys. Today Magnesium based metal matrix composites are widely used in aerospace, structural, oceanic and automobile applications for its light weight, low density(two thirds that of aluminium), good high temperature mechanical properties and good to excellent corrosion resistance. The reason of designing metal matrix composite is to put in the attractive attributes of metals and ceramics to the base metal. In this study magnesium metal matrix hybrid composite are developed by reinforcing pure magnesium with silicon carbide (SiC) and aluminium oxide by method of powder metallurgy. This method is less expensive and very efficient. The Hardness test was performed on the specimens prepared by powder metallurgy method. The results revealed that the micro hardness of composites was increased with the addition of silicon carbide and alumina particles in magnesium metal matrix composites.

  2. Research Progress in Plasma arc welding of Magnesium Alloys and Magnesium Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Li; Yang, Zou; Yongbo, Li; Lei, Jiao; Ruijun, Hou

    2017-11-01

    Magnesium alloys and magnesium matrix composites by means of its excellent performance have wide application prospect in electronics, automotive, biotechnology, aerospace field, and welding technology has become a key of restricting its application. This paper describes the welding characteristics of magnesium, the obvious advantages in the application and the domestic and foreign research advance technology of plasma arc welding of magnesium, and summarizes the existing problems and development trends of plasma arc welding technology of magnesium.

  3. Microstructural Characterization of Cast Magnesium Matrix Composites by Raman Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Malik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cast magnesium matrix composites reinforced with silicon carbide particles were investigated by using Raman microscopy. 3C, 4H and6H polytypes of SiC particles were identified in the investigated composites. Additionally, Mg2Si compound was detected by Ramanmicroscopy in the composites microstructure.

  4. Microstructural Characterization of Cast Magnesium Matrix Composites by Raman Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Malika M.A.; Majchrzak K.; Braszczyńska-Malik K.N.

    2013-01-01

    Cast magnesium matrix composites reinforced with silicon carbide particles were investigated by using Raman microscopy. 3C, 4H and 6H polytypes of SiC particles were identified in the investigated composites. Additionally, Mg2Si compound was detected by Raman microscopy in the composites microstructure.

  5. Microstructural Characterization of Cast Magnesium Matrix Composites by Raman Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malika M.A.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Cast magnesium matrix composites reinforced with silicon carbide particles were investigated by using Raman microscopy. 3C, 4H and 6H polytypes of SiC particles were identified in the investigated composites. Additionally, Mg2Si compound was detected by Raman microscopy in the composites microstructure.

  6. Cellular Magnesium Matrix Foam Composites for Mechanical Damping Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shunmugasamy, Vasanth Chakravarthy; Mansoor, Bilal; Gupta, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    The damping characteristics of metal alloys and metal matrix composites are relevant to the automotive, aerospace, and marine structures. Use of lightweight materials can help in increasing payload capacity and in decreasing fuel consumption. Lightweight composite materials possessing high damping capabilities that can be designed as structural members can greatly benefit in addressing these needs. In this context, the damping properties of lightweight metals such as aluminum and magnesium and their respective composites have been studied in the existing literature. This review focuses on analyzing the damping properties of aluminum and magnesium alloys and their cellular composites. The damping properties of various lightweight alloys and composites are compared on the basis of their density to understand the potential for weight saving in structural applications. Magnesium alloys are observed to possess better damping properties in comparison to aluminum. However, aluminum matrix syntactic foams reinforced with silicon carbide hollow particles possess a damping capacity and density comparable to magnesium alloy. By using the data presented in the study, composites with specific compositions and properties can be selected for a given application. In addition, the comparison of the results helps in identifying the areas where attention needs to be focused to address the future needs.

  7. NewIn-situ synthesis method of magnesium matrix composites reinforced with TiC particulates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xiuqing

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium matrix composites reinforced with TiC particulates was prepared using a new in-situ synthesis method of remelting and dilution technique. And measurements were performed on the composites. The results of x ray diffraction (XRD analysis confirmed that TiC particulates were synthesized during the sintering process, and they retained in magnesium matrix composites after the remelting and dilution processing. From the microstructure characterization and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA, we could see that fine TiC particulates distributed uniformly in the matrix material.

  8. Effect of magnesium aluminum silicate glass on the thermal shock resistance of BN matrix composite ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cai, Delong; Jia, Dechang; Yang, Zhihua; Zhu, Qishuai; Ocelik, Vaclav; Vainchtein, Ilia D.; De Hosson, Jeff Th M.; Zhou, Yu

    The effects of magnesium aluminum silicate (MAS) glass on the thermal shock resistance and the oxidation behavior of h-BN matrix composites were systematically investigated at temperature differences from 600 degrees C up to 1400 degrees C. The retained strength rate of the composites rose with the

  9. Research on the preparation, biocompatibility and bioactivity of magnesium matrix hydroxyapatite composite material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsheng, Li; Guoxiang, Lin; Lihui, Li

    2016-08-12

    In this paper, magnesium matrix hydroxyapatite composite material was prepared by electrophoretic deposition method. The optimal process parameters of electrophoretic deposition were HA suspension concentration of 0.02 kg/L, aging time of 10 days and voltage of 60 V. Animal experiment and SBF immersion experiment were used to test the biocompatibility and bioactivity of this material respectively. The SD rats were divided into control group and implant group. The implant surrounding tissue was taken to do tissue biopsy, HE dyed and organizational analysis after a certain amount of time in the SD rat body. The biological composite material was soaked in SBF solution under homeothermic condition. After 40 days, the bioactivity of the biological composite material was evaluated by testing the growth ability of apatite on composite material. The experiment results showed that magnesium matrix hydroxyapatite biological composite material was successfully prepared by electrophoretic deposition method. Tissue hyperplasia, connective tissue and new blood vessels appeared in the implant surrounding soft tissue. No infiltration of inflammatory cells of lymphocytes and megakaryocytes around the implant was found. After soaked in SBF solution, a layer bone-like apatite was found on the surface of magnesium matrix hydroxyapatite biological composite material. The magnesium matrix hydroxyapatite biological composite material could promot calcium deposition and induce bone-like apatite formation with no cytotoxicity and good biocompatibility and bioactivity.

  10. Microstructural evolution and strengthening behavior in in-situ magnesium matrix composites fabricated by solidification processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chelliah, Nagaraj M., E-mail: cmnraj.7@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, Rupnagar 140001, Punjab (India); Singh, Harpreet, E-mail: harpreetsingh@iitrpr.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, Rupnagar 140001, Punjab (India); Surappa, M.K., E-mail: mirle@materials.iisc.ac.in [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560012, Karnataka (India)

    2017-06-15

    In-situ magnesium matrix composites with three different matrix materials (including Mg, AZ91 and AE44 Mg-alloys) were fabricated by injecting cross-linked polymer directly into the molten Mg/Mg-alloys, and having it convert to the 2.5 vol% SiCNO ceramic phase using liquid stir-casting method. In-situ chemical reaction took place within the molten slurry tending to produce 42 and 18 vol% Mg{sub 2}Si crystals in Mg and AE44 matrix composites, respectively but not in AZ91 matrix composite. Microstructural evolution of Mg{sub 2}Si crystals was discussed on the basis of availability of heterogeneous nucleation sites and amount of Al-atoms in the molten slurry. The observed micro-hardness and yield strengths are enhanced by factor of four to three as compared to their unreinforced counterparts, and Taylor strengthening was found to be the predominant strengthening mechanism in magnesium and AE44 matrix composites. Summation model predicted the yield strengths of the fabricated composites more preciously when compared to Zhang and Chen, and modified Clyne models. - Highlights: • In-situ magnesium composites were fabricated using liquid stir-casting method. • In-situ pyrolysis of cross-linked polymer has been utilized to obtain ceramic phases. • Mg{sub 2}Si crystals were formed in magnesium and AE44 matrix composites but not in AZ91 matrix composites. • The variation in size and morphology of Mg{sub 2}Si crystals with matrix materials are discussed. • Strengthening mechanisms in in-situ composites are analyzed and discussed.

  11. Effect of aging hardening on in situ synthesis magnesium matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiuqing; Liao Lihua; Ma Naiheng; Wang Haowei

    2006-01-01

    Magnesium matrix composites reinforced with TiC particulates was synthesized using in situ synthesis technique. The result of XRD revealed the presence of TiC in precursor blocks and TiC/AZ91 composites. Effect of aging hardening on the composites was described using Brinell hardness measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results revealed that the aging hardening peak of TiC/AZ91 composite appeared earlier comparatively with that of AZ91 magnesium alloy. And the appearance of aging hardening peak was earlier under the higher aging temperature such as 200 deg. C. The precipitating behavior of Mg 17 Al 12 phase in AZ91 alloy and TiC/AZ91 composites was described. Little discontinuous was discovered in the composites, and the amount of continuous precipitate in the composite matrix is smaller comparatively to that of AZ91 alloy. These results were analyzed with the fine grain size, much more interface between TiC and magnesium and high-density dislocation in magnesium matrix, which was contributed to the addition of TiC particulates

  12. Advanced bredigite-containing magnesium-matrix composites for biodegradable bone implant applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezfuli, Sina Naddaf; Huan, Zhiguang; Mol, Arjan; Leeflang, Sander; Chang, Jiang; Zhou, Jie

    2017-10-01

    The present research was aimed at developing magnesium-matrix composites that could allow effective control over their physiochemical and mechanical responses when in contact with physiological solutions. A biodegradable, bioactive ceramic - bredigite was chosen as the reinforcing phase in the composites, based on the hypothesis that the silicon- and magnesium-containing ceramic could protect magnesium from fast corrosion and at the same time stimulate cell proliferation. Methods to prepare composites with integrated microstructures - a prerequisite to achieve controlled biodegradation were developed. A systematic experimental approach was taken in order to elucidate the in vitro biodegradation mechanisms and kinetics of the composites. It was found that the composites with 20-40% homogenously dispersed bredigite particles, prepared from powders, could indeed significantly decrease the degradation rate of magnesium by up to 24 times. Slow degradation of the composites resulted in the retention of the mechanical integrity of the composites within the strength range of cortical bone after 12days of immersion in a cell culture medium. Cell attachment, cytotoxicity and bioactivity tests confirmed the stimulatory effects of bredigite embedded in the composites on the attachment, viability and differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells. Thus, the multiple benefits of adding bredigite to magnesium in enhancing degradation behavior, mechanical properties, biocompatibility and bioactivity were obtained. The results from this research showed the excellent potential of the bredigite-containing composites for bone implant applications, thus warranting further in vitro and in vivo research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Advanced bredigite-containing magnesium-matrix composites for biodegradable bone implant applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naddaf Dezfuli, S.; Huan, Z.; Mol, J.M.C.; Leeflang, M.A.; Chang, Jiang; Zhou, J.

    2017-01-01

    The present research was aimed at developing magnesium-matrix composites that could allow effective control over their physiochemical and mechanical responses when in contact with physiological solutions. A biodegradable, bioactive ceramic - bredigite was chosen as the reinforcing phase in the

  14. Magnesium, magnesium alloys, and magnesium composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gupta, M; Sharon, Nai Mui Ling

    2011-01-01

    "Properties of Magnesium Composites for Material Scientists, Engineers and Selectors is the first book-length reference to provide an insight into current and future magnesium-based materials in terms...

  15. Microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of a particulate reinforced magnesium matrix composites forged at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, K.K.; Wu, K.; Wang, X.J.; Wu, Y.W.; Hu, X.S.; Zheng, M.Y.; Gan, W.M.; Brokmeier, H.G.

    2010-01-01

    SiCp/AZ91 magnesium matrix composite was fabricated by stir casting. The as-cast ingots were cut into cylindrical billets, and then forged at different temperatures (320, 370, 420, 470 and 520 deg. C) at a constant RAM speed of 15 mm/s with 50% reduction. The microstructure evolution of the composites during forging was investigated by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscope. The texture of the forged composites was measured by neutron diffraction. Mechanical properties of the composite at different forging temperatures were tested by tensile tests at room temperature. It was found that a strong basal plane texture formed during forging, and the intensity of basal plane texture weakened as forging temperatures increased. The particle distribution in the composite was significantly improved by hot forging. Typical microstructures were obtained after forging at different temperatures and the composite with different microstructures offered different mechanical properties during tensile test.

  16. Magnesium, magnesium alloys, and magnesium composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gupta, M; Sharon, Nai Mui Ling

    2011-01-01

    ... of science, characteristics, and applications. It emphasizes the properties of magnesium-based composites and the effects of different types of reinforcements, from micron length to nanometer scale, on the properties of the resulting composites...

  17. Polymer-Derived In- Situ Metal Matrix Composites Created by Direct Injection of a Liquid Polymer into Molten Magnesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarshan; Terauds, Kalvis; Anilchandra, A. R.; Raj, Rishi

    2014-02-01

    We show that a liquid organic precursor can be injected directly into molten magnesium to produce nanoscale ceramic dispersions within the melt. The castings made in this way possess good resistance to tensile deformation at 673 K (400 °C), confirming the non-coarsening nature of these dispersions. Direct liquid injection into molten metals is a significant step toward inserting different chemistries of liquid precursors to generate a variety of polymer-derived metal matrix composites.

  18. Microstructure and mechanical properties of stir cast ZX51/Al2O3p magnesium matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmany-Gorji, Reza; Alizadeh, Ali; Jafari, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium matrix composites can overcome the limitations of magnesium and its alloys. This paper investigates the effect of adding Al 2 O 3 microparticles on microstructure and mechanical response of ZX51 alloy-matrix composites. Stir casting process was chosen due largely to its low cost to fabricate the novel ZX51/Al 2 O 3 p composites. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffractometry were used in order to analyze the microstructure of as-cast composites. Tension, compression, and Brinell hardness tests were performed to determine mechanical properties of the composites. It was revealed that the microstructure of matrix alloy is composed of α-Mg grains and (α-Mg+Ca 2 Mg 6 Zn 3 ) eutectic mixture distributed predominantly along grain boundaries. The addition of Al 2 O 3 p brought about a marked grain refinement and also introduced slight amounts of porosity. The results showed that with increasing volume percentage of Al 2 O 3 p, hardness and yield strength increase while tensile strength, compressive strength, and ductility decrease; in consequence, toughness decreases as well.

  19. Microstructure and Strengthening Mechanisms of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Magnesium Matrix Composites Fabricated by Accumulative Roll Bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Seong Jin; Kim, Woo Jin

    2014-01-01

    A combination of accumulative roll bonding (ARB) and high-energy ball milling was used to fabricate carbon nano tube (CNT)-reinforced Mg composites in sheet form. CNT-Al composite powders synthesized using the high-energy ball-milling process, were coated on the surface of Mg sheets using either spraying or dipping methods. The coated sheets were stacked and then subjected to ARB. Formation of CNT-intermetallic compounds through inter-diffusion between Al and Mg, fragmentation of the CNTintermetallic compounds, and their dispersion into the matrix by plastic flow; as well as dissolution of the intermetallic compound particles into the matrix while leaving CNTs in the matrix, occurred in sequence during the ARB process. This eventually resulted in the uniform distribution of nano-sized CNT particles in the Mg matrix. As the thickness of the Mg sheet and of the coating layer of Al-CNT powder on the surface of the Mg sheet were similar, the dispersion of CNTs into the Mg matrix occurred more uniformly and the strengthening effect of adding CNTs was greater. The strengthening gained by adding CNTs was attributed to Orowan strengthening and dislocation-density increase due to a thermal mismatch between the matrix and the CNTs.

  20. Effect of SiC particles on microarc oxidation process of magnesium matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.Q.; Wang, X.J.; Gong, W.X.; Wu, K.; Wang, F.H.

    2013-01-01

    SiC particles are an important reinforced phase in metal matrix composites. Their effect on the microarc oxidation (MAO, also named plasma electrolytic oxidation-PEO) process of SiC p /AZ91 Mg matrix composites (MMCs) was studied and the mechanism was revealed. The corrosion resistance of MAO coating was also investigated. Voltage–time curves during MAO were recorded to study the barrier film status on the composites. Scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the existing state of SiC particles in MAO. Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to analyze the chemical composition of the coating. Corrosion resistance of the bare and coated composites was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization curves in 3.5% NaCl solution. Results showed that the integrality and electrical insulation properties of the barrier film on the composites were destroyed by the SiC particles. Consequently, the sparking discharge at the early stage of MAO was inhibited, and the growth efficiency of the MAO coating decreased with the increase in the volume fraction of SiC particles. SiC particles did not exist stably during MAO; they were oxidized or partially oxidized into SiO 2 before the overall sparking discharge. The transformation from semi-conductive SiC to insulating SiO 2 by oxidation restrained the current leakage at the original SiC positions and then promoted sparking discharge and coating growth. The corrosion current density of SiC p /AZ91 MMCs was reduced by two orders of magnitude after MAO treatment. However, the corrosion resistances of the coated composites were lower than that of the coated alloy.

  1. Characterisation of Microstructure of We43 Magnesium Matrix Composites Reinforced with Carbon Fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gryc A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the paper the microstructures of WE43 matrix composites reinforced with carbon fibres have been characterised. The influence of reinforcement type and T6 heat treatment (a solution treatment at 525°C for 8 h, a hot water quench and a subsequent ageing treatment at 250°C for 16 h on microstructure have been evaluated. The light microscope and scanning electron microscope investigations have been carried out. No significant differences in samples reinforced with non-coated textiles have been reported. The substantial changes in sample reinforced with nickel-coated textile have been observed. The segregation of alloying elements to the matrix-reinforcement layer has been identified. The T6 heat treatment caused the appearance of disperse precipitates of β phase, but the process cannot be considered as satisfactory (irregular distribution, low volume fraction, relatively large size.

  2. Magnesium, magnesium alloys, and magnesium composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gupta, M; Sharon, Nai Mui Ling

    2011-01-01

    .... With the popularity of magnesium-based materials in the automotive, aerospace, electronics, and sports equipment industries, and its unique role as a lightweight, energy-saving and high-performance...

  3. Microstructure and mechanical properties of stir cast ZX51/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}p magnesium matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmany-Gorji, Reza, E-mail: r_rahmany@ymail.com [Materials Engineering Department, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alizadeh, Ali [Faculty of Materials and Manufacturing Processes, MUT, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jafari, Hassan [Materials Engineering Department, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-09-30

    Magnesium matrix composites can overcome the limitations of magnesium and its alloys. This paper investigates the effect of adding Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} microparticles on microstructure and mechanical response of ZX51 alloy-matrix composites. Stir casting process was chosen due largely to its low cost to fabricate the novel ZX51/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}p composites. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffractometry were used in order to analyze the microstructure of as-cast composites. Tension, compression, and Brinell hardness tests were performed to determine mechanical properties of the composites. It was revealed that the microstructure of matrix alloy is composed of α-Mg grains and (α-Mg+Ca{sub 2}Mg{sub 6}Zn{sub 3}) eutectic mixture distributed predominantly along grain boundaries. The addition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}p brought about a marked grain refinement and also introduced slight amounts of porosity. The results showed that with increasing volume percentage of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}p, hardness and yield strength increase while tensile strength, compressive strength, and ductility decrease; in consequence, toughness decreases as well.

  4. The mechanical properties of magnesium matrix composites reinforced with 10 wt.% W14Al86 alloy particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, H.G.; Ma, X.F.; Zhao, W.; Cai, S.G.; Zhao, B.; Qiao, Z.H.

    2007-01-01

    The Mg-based metal matrix composite reinforced by 10 wt.% W 14 Al 86 alloy particles has been prepared by mechanical alloying and press-forming process. X-ray diffraction studies confirm the formation of the composite. Microstructure characterization of the samples reveals the uniform distribution of fine W 14 Al 86 alloy. Mechanical properties characterization revealed that the reinforcement of W 14 Al 86 alloy lead to a significant increase in hardness and tensile strength of Mg and AZ91

  5. Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicates (CMAS) Reaction Mechanisms and Resistance of Advanced Turbine Environmental Barrier Coatings for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Costa, Gustavo; Harder, Bryan J.; Wiesner, Valerie L.; Hurst, Janet B.; Puleo, Bernadette J.

    2017-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) systems will play a crucial role in future turbine engines for hot-section component applications because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. The development of prime-reliant environmental barrier coatings is an essential requirement to enable the applications of the 2700-3000 F EBC - CMC systems. This presentation primarily focuses on the reaction mechanisms of advanced NASA environmental barrier coating systems, when in contact with Calcium-Magnesium Alumino-Silicates (CMAS) at high temperatures. Advanced oxide-silicate defect cluster environmental barrier coatings are being designed for ultimate balanced controls of the EBC temperature capability and CMAS reactivity, thus improving the CMAS resistance. Further CMAS mitigation strategies are also discussed.

  6. Lithium-aluminum-magnesium electrode composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendres, Carlos A.; Siegel, Stanley

    1978-01-01

    A negative electrode composition is presented for use in a secondary, high-temperature electrochemical cell. The cell also includes a molten salt electrolyte of alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides and a positive electrode including a chalcogen or a metal chalcogenide as the active electrode material. The negative electrode composition includes up to 50 atom percent lithium as the active electrode constituent and a magnesium-aluminum alloy as a structural matrix. Various binary and ternary intermetallic phases of lithium, magnesium, and aluminum are formed but the electrode composition in both its charged and discharged state remains substantially free of the alpha lithium-aluminum phase and exhibits good structural integrity.

  7. NASA's Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings Development for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Understanding Calcium Magnesium Alumino-Silicate (CMAS) Degradations and Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) systems will play a crucial role in next generation turbine engines for hot-section component applications because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures with improved efficiency, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. The development of prime-reliant environmental barrier coatings is essential to the viability and reliability of the envisioned CMC engine component applications, ensuring integrated EBC-CMC system durability and designs are achievable for successful applications of the game-changing component technologies and lifing methodologies.This paper will emphasize recent NASA environmental barrier coating developments for SiCSiC turbine airfoil components, utilizing advanced coating compositions, state-of-the-art processing methods, and combined mechanical and environment testing and durability evaluations. The coating-CMC degradations in the engine fatigue-creep and operating environments are particularly complex; one of the important coating development aspects is to better understand engine environmental interactions and coating life debits, and we have particularly addressed the effect of Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicate (CMAS) from road sand or volcano-ash deposits on the durability of the environmental barrier coating systems, and how the temperature capability, stability and cyclic life of the candidate rare earth oxide and silicate coating systems will be impacted in the presence of the CMAS at high temperatures and under simulated heat flux conditions. Advanced environmental barrier coating systems, including HfO2-Si with rare earth dopant based bond coat systems, will be discussed for the performance improvements to achieve better temperature capability and CMAS resistance for future engine operating conditions.

  8. Cesium immobilization into potassium magnesium phosphate matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayenko, S.Y.; Shkuropatenko, V.A.; Bereznyak, O.P.; Hodyreva, Y.S.; Tarasov, R.V.; Virych, V.D.; Ulybkina, E.A.; Pylypenko, O.V.; Kholomeev, G.O.; Zykova, A.V.; Wagh, Arun S.

    2017-01-01

    The possibility of isomorphous substitution of potassium ions by cesium ions in the structure of potassium magnesium phosphate KMgPO 4 centred dot 6H 2 O (PMP) was shown. It was established, that the Cs included into the PMP matrix does not transfer to the environment during high temperatures heating process (1176 deg C, 3 hours). Analysis of the IR absorption spectrum of the PMP sample has demonstrated that an increase in the amount of additive of the cesium chloride resulted in the shift of the main bands in the spectrum to the low-frequency region with average shift value 10 cm -1 , which indicates the strengthening of bonds in the crystal lattice of matter. The calculated degree of substitution of potassium by cesium during energy release process in the PMP matrix at the level of vitrified high level wastes is about 4%, i. e. the PMP matrix should correspond to the formula K 0.96 Cs 0.04 MgPO 4 centred dot 6H 2 O.

  9. Alkoxide-based magnesium electrolyte compositions for magnesium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Liao, Chen; Guo, Bingkun

    2018-01-30

    Alkoxide magnesium halide compounds having the formula: RO--Mg--X (1) wherein R is a saturated or unsaturated hydrocarbon group that is unsubstituted, or alternatively, substituted with one or more heteroatom linkers and/or one or more heteroatom-containing groups comprising at least one heteroatom selected from fluorine, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur, and silicon; and X is a halide atom. Also described are electrolyte compositions containing a compound of Formula (1) in a suitable polar aprotic or ionic solvent, as well as magnesium batteries in which such electrolytes are incorporated.

  10. Enhanced tensile properties of magnesium composites reinforced with graphene nanoplatelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashad, Muhammad; Pan, Fusheng; Hu, Huanhuan; Asif, Muhammad; Hussain, Shahid; She, Jia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to fabricate magnesium reinforced metal matrix composites using graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) via powder metallurgy processing in order to enhance room temperature mechanical properties. The microstructural evaluation and mechanical behaviors of composite powders and extruded bulk materials were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy-dispersive spectrometer and mechanical tests. The uniform dispersion and large specific surface area per volume of GNPs embedded in magnesium matrix led to increament in microhardness, tensile strength and fracture strains of the composites. For example, when employing the pure magnesium reinforced with 0.30 wt% GNPs, the increase of Young's modulus, yield strength, and failure strain of extruded nanocomposite was +131%, +49.5% and +74.2% respectively, compared to those of extruded materials with no GNPs additive. Additionally, mechanical properties of synthesized composites were compared with previously reported Mg–CNTs composites. It was found that GNPs outperform CNTs due their high specific surface area

  11. Enhanced tensile properties of magnesium composites reinforced with graphene nanoplatelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashad, Muhammad, E-mail: rashadphy87@gmail.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Magnesium Alloys, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Pan, Fusheng, E-mail: fspan@cqu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Magnesium Alloys, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Chongqing Academy of Science and Technology, Chongqing 401123 (China); Hu, Huanhuan [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Magnesium Alloys, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Asif, Muhammad [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Hussain, Shahid [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); She, Jia [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Magnesium Alloys, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2015-04-10

    The aim of this study is to fabricate magnesium reinforced metal matrix composites using graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) via powder metallurgy processing in order to enhance room temperature mechanical properties. The microstructural evaluation and mechanical behaviors of composite powders and extruded bulk materials were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy-dispersive spectrometer and mechanical tests. The uniform dispersion and large specific surface area per volume of GNPs embedded in magnesium matrix led to increament in microhardness, tensile strength and fracture strains of the composites. For example, when employing the pure magnesium reinforced with 0.30 wt% GNPs, the increase of Young's modulus, yield strength, and failure strain of extruded nanocomposite was +131%, +49.5% and +74.2% respectively, compared to those of extruded materials with no GNPs additive. Additionally, mechanical properties of synthesized composites were compared with previously reported Mg–CNTs composites. It was found that GNPs outperform CNTs due their high specific surface area.

  12. Reinforced magnesium composites by metallic particles for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahid, Alireza; Hodgson, Peter [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria 3217 (Australia); Li, Yuncang, E-mail: yuncang.li@rmit.edu.au [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria 3217 (Australia); School of Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3001 (Australia)

    2017-02-08

    Pure magnesium (Mg) implants have unsatisfactory mechanical properties, particularly in loadbearing applications. Particulate-reinforced Mg composites are known as promising materials to provide higher strength implants compared to unreinforced metals. In the current work biocompatible niobium (Nb) and tantalum (Ta) particles are selected as reinforcement, and Mg-Nb and Mg-Ta composites fabricated via a powder metallurgy process associated with the ball milling technique. The effect of Nb and Ta contents on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Mg matrix was investigated. There was a uniform distribution of reinforcements in the Mg matrix with reasonable integrity and no intermetallic formation. The compressive mechanical properties of composites vary with reinforcement contents. The optimal parameters to fabricate biocompatible Mg composites and the optimal composition with appropriate strength, hardness and ductility are recommended.

  13. Composites having an intermetallic containing matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagle, D.C.; Brupbacher, J.M.; Christodoulou, L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a composite material. It comprises: a dispersion of in-situ precipitated second phase particles selected from the group consisting of borides, carbides, nitrides, and sulfides, in an intermetallic containing matrix selected from the group consisting of the aluminides, silicides, and beryllides of nickel, copper, titanium, cobalt, iron, platinum, gold, silver, niobium, tantalum, zinc, molybdenum, hafnium, tin, tungsten, lithium, magnesium, thorium, chromium, vanadium, zirconium, and manganese

  14. Silver Matrix Composites - Structure and Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieczorek J.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Phase compositions of composite materials determine their performance as well as physical and mechanical properties. Depending on the type of applied matrix and the kind, amount and morphology of the matrix reinforcement, it is possible to shape the material properties so that they meet specific operational requirements. In the paper, results of investigations on silver alloy matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particles are presented. The investigations enabled evaluation of hardness, tribological and mechanical properties as well as the structure of produced materials. The matrix of composite material was an alloy of silver and aluminium, magnesium and silicon. As the reinforcing phase, 20-60 μm ceramic particles (SiC, SiO2, Al2O3 and Cs were applied. The volume fraction of the reinforcing phase in the composites was 10%. The composites were produced using the liquid phase (casting technology, followed by plastic work (the KOBO method. The mechanical and tribological properties were analysed for plastic work-subjected composites. The mechanical properties were assessed based on a static tensile and hardness tests. The tribological properties were investigated under dry sliding conditions. The analysis of results led to determination of effects of the composite production technology on their performance. Moreover, a relationship between the type of reinforcing phase and the mechanical and tribological properties was established.

  15. Magnesium based composites fabricated by low pressure infiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, P.; Micski, A.; Savage, S.J.

    1993-01-01

    Magnesiumbased fiber composites have been produced by so called low pressure infiltration. The initial material consist of 'saffil' pre-forms and two magnesium alloys, Mg-9Al-1Zn and WE 54 (approximate composition Mg-5Y-1.5Nd-2(Tb,Er,Dy,Gd)-0.5Zr), and pure magnesium. The preforms consists of 10-30 vol% of short fibers linked together by SiO 2 or Al 2 O 3 . Three different routes have been tested in the search for a good low pressure infiltration method. The experiments cover corrosion testing in NaCl-solution, sliding wear, abrasion and erosion testing. Of the tested infiltration methods the best results were obtained in a resistance heated evacuable furnace, in which the metal was molted in a steel crucible and the preform was conveyed into the melt under protective atmosphere. The infiltration takes place at atmospheric pressure and the cooling is performed in a sealed tube in air. The microscopy studies shows that low pressure infiltrated composites contain considerable amounts of porosity in distinction from those fabricated by squeeze casting. The corrosion test has shown that in the tested environment the alloy WE 54 has good corrosion resistance while Mg-9Al-1Zn and pure magnesium show low corrosion resistance. The influence of fibres in the matrix seems to be very small. Both magnesium and the alloy Mg-9Al-1Zn show for two body abrasion an almost linear improvement of abrasion resistance with increased fiber content. Pure magnesium shows decreasing erosion resistance with increasing fibre content. The Mg-9Al-1Zn-alloy appears to show a maximum in erosion resistance at 10 vol% fibers. In sliding wear the materials show an optimum initial and steady state wear resistance at a fiber content of about 10%. In general Al 2 O 3 -binder gives better wear resistance than SiO 2 -binder. Tensile testing was performed on low pressure infiltrated and squeeze cast composites with WE 54 matrix. It shows that the low pressure infiltrated composites are inferior to those

  16. Synthesis and mechanical behavior of carbon nanotube-magnesium composites hybridized with nanoparticles of alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, Sanjay Kumar; Srivatsan, T.S.; Gupta, Manoj

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes reinforced magnesium based composites were prepared with diligence and care using the powder metallurgy route coupled with rapid microwave sintering. Nanometer-sized particles of alumina were used to hybridize the carbon nanotubes reinforcement in the magnesium matrix so as to establish the intrinsic influence of hybridization on mechanical behavior of the resultant composite material. The yield strength, tensile strength and strain-to-failure of the carbon nanotubes-magnesium composites were found to increase with the addition of nanometer-sized alumina particles to the composite matrix. Scanning electron microscopy observations of the fracture surfaces of the samples deformed and failed in uniaxial tension revealed the presence of cleavage-like features on the fracture surface indicative of the occurrence of locally brittle fracture mechanism in the composite microstructure

  17. Solidification of Magnesium (AM50A) / vol%. SiCp composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, X; Hu, H

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium matrix composite is one of the advanced lightweight materials with high potential to be used in automotive and aircraft industries due to its low density and high specific mechanical properties. The magnesium composites can be fabricated by adding the reinforcements of fibers or/and particles. In the previous literature, extensive studies have been performed on the development of matrix grain structure of aluminum-based metal matrix composites. However, there is limited information available on the development of grain structure during the solidification of particulate-reinforced magnesium. In this work, a 5 vol.% SiC p particulate-reinforced magnesium (AM50A) matrix composite (AM50A/SiC p ) was prepared by stir casting. The solidification behavior of the cast AM50A/SiC p composite was investigated by computer-based thermal analysis. Optical and scanning electron microscopies (SEM) were employed to examine the occurrence of nucleation and grain refinement involved. The results indicate that the addition of SiC p particulates leads to a finer grain structure in the composite compared with the matrix alloy. The refinement of grain structure should be attributed to both the heterogeneous nucleation and the restricted primary crystal growth.

  18. Features of solid solutions composition in magnesium with yttrium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drits, M.E.; Rokhlin, L.L.; Tarytina, I.E.

    1983-01-01

    Additional data on features of yttrium solid solutions composition in magnesium in the course of their decomposition investigation in the case of aging are obtianed. The investigation has been carried out on the base of a binary magnesium-yttrium alloy the composition of which has been close to maximum solubility (at eutectic temperature) and magnesium-yttrium alloys additionally doped with zinc. It is shown that higher yttrium solubility in solid magnesium than it has been expected, issueing from the difference in atomic radii of these metals indicates electron yttrium-magnesium atoms interaction. In oversaturated magnesium-yttrium solid solutions at earlier decomposition stages Mg 3 Cd type ordering is observed. At aging temperatures up to 250 deg C and long exposures corresponding to highest strengthening in oversaturated magnesium yttrium solid solutions a rhombic crystal lattice phase with three symmetric orientations is formed

  19. Machining of Metal Matrix Composites

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Machining of Metal Matrix Composites provides the fundamentals and recent advances in the study of machining of metal matrix composites (MMCs). Each chapter is written by an international expert in this important field of research. Machining of Metal Matrix Composites gives the reader information on machining of MMCs with a special emphasis on aluminium matrix composites. Chapter 1 provides the mechanics and modelling of chip formation for traditional machining processes. Chapter 2 is dedicated to surface integrity when machining MMCs. Chapter 3 describes the machinability aspects of MMCs. Chapter 4 contains information on traditional machining processes and Chapter 5 is dedicated to the grinding of MMCs. Chapter 6 describes the dry cutting of MMCs with SiC particulate reinforcement. Finally, Chapter 7 is dedicated to computational methods and optimization in the machining of MMCs. Machining of Metal Matrix Composites can serve as a useful reference for academics, manufacturing and materials researchers, manu...

  20. Microstructural Analysis of AM50/Mg2Si Cast Magnesium Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik M.A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available AM50/Mg2Si composites containing 5.7 wt. % and 9.9 wt. %. of Mg2Si reinforcing phase were prepared successfully by casting method. The microstructure of the cast AM50/Mg2Si magnesium matrix composites was investigated by light microscopy and X-ray diffractometry (XRD. The microstructure of these composites was characterized by the presence of α-phase (a solid solution of aluminium in magnesium, Mg17Al12 (γ-phase, Al8Mn5 and Mg2Si. It was demonstrated that the Mg2Si phase was formed mainly as primary dendrites and eutectic.

  1. A review on mechanical properties of magnesium based nano composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarafder, Nilanjan; Prasad, M. Lakshmi Vara

    2018-04-01

    A review was done on Magnesium (Mg) based composite materials reinforced with different nano particles such as TiO2, Cu, Y2O3, SiC, ZrO2 and Al2O3. TiO2 and Al2O3 nanoparticles were synthesised by melt deposition process. Cu, Y2O3, SiC and ZrO2 nanoparticles were synthesised by powder metallurgy process. Composite microstructural characteristics shows that the nano-size reinforcements are uniformly distributed in the composite matrix and also minimum porosity with solid interfacial integrity. The mechanical properties showed yield strength improvement by 0.2 percentage and Ultimate tensile strength (UTS) was also improved for all the nano-particles. But UTS was adversely affected with TiO2 reinforcement while ductility was increased. With Cu reinforcement elastic modulus, hardness and fracture resistance increased and improved the co-efficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of Mg based matrix. By Y2O3 reinforcement hardness, fracture resistance was improved and ductility reached maximum by 0.22 volume percentage of Y2O3 and decreased with succeeding increase in Y2O3 reinforcement. The readings exposed that mechanical properties were gathered from the composite comprising 2.0 weight percentage of Y2O3. Ductility and fracture resistance increased with ZrO2 reinforcement in Mg matrix. Using Al2O3 as reinforcement in Mg composite matrix hardness, elastic modulus and ductility was increased but porosity reduced with well interfacial integrity. Dissipation of energy in the form of damping capacity was resolved by classical vibration theory. The result showed that an increasing up to 0.4 volume percentage alumina content increases the damping capacity up to 34 percent. In another sample, addition of 2 weight percentage nano-Al2O3 particles showed big possibility in reducing CTE from 27.9-25.9×10-6 K-1 in Magnesium, tensile and yield strength amplified by 40MPa. In another test, Mg/1.1Al2O3 nanocomposite was manufactured by solidification process followed by hot extrusion

  2. Bulk metallic glass matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi-Yim, H.; Johnson, W.L.

    1997-01-01

    Composites with a bulk metallic glass matrix were synthesized and characterized. This was made possible by the recent development of bulk metallic glasses that exhibit high resistance to crystallization in the undercooled liquid state. In this letter, experimental methods for processing metallic glass composites are introduced. Three different bulk metallic glass forming alloys were used as the matrix materials. Both ceramics and metals were introduced as reinforcement into the metallic glass. The metallic glass matrix remained amorphous after adding up to a 30 vol% fraction of particles or short wires. X-ray diffraction patterns of the composites show only peaks from the second phase particles superimposed on the broad diffuse maxima from the amorphous phase. Optical micrographs reveal uniformly distributed particles in the matrix. The glass transition of the amorphous matrix and the crystallization behavior of the composites were studied by calorimetric methods. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  3. Amorphous metal matrix composite ribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barczy, P.; Szigeti, F.

    1998-01-01

    Composite ribbons with amorphous matrix and ceramic (SiC, WC, MoB) particles were produced by modified planar melt flow casting methods. Weldability, abrasive wear and wood sanding examinations were carried out in order to find optimal material and technology for elevated wear resistance and sanding durability. The correlation between structure and composite properties is discussed. (author)

  4. Ceramic matrix composite article and process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairo, Ronald Robert; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Parolini, Jason Robert

    2016-01-12

    A ceramic matrix composite article and a process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite are disclosed. The ceramic matrix composite article includes a matrix distribution pattern formed by a manifold and ceramic matrix composite plies laid up on the matrix distribution pattern, includes the manifold, or a combination thereof. The manifold includes one or more matrix distribution channels operably connected to a delivery interface, the delivery interface configured for providing matrix material to one or more of the ceramic matrix composite plies. The process includes providing the manifold, forming the matrix distribution pattern by transporting the matrix material through the manifold, and contacting the ceramic matrix composite plies with the matrix material.

  5. A COHERENT MATRIX MODEL FOR THE CONSOLIDATION AND COMPACTION OF AN EXCIPIENT WITH MAGNESIUM STEARATE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    RIEPMA, KA; VROMANS, H; LERK, CF

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports that magnesium stearate sensitivity of brittle materials is not directly related to the degree of fragmentation during compression. A coherent matrix of magnesium stearate, created by the process of dry blending, is highly sustained during consolidation and compaction of the

  6. Enhancing the Hardness and Compressive Response of Magnesium Using Complex Composition Alloy Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khin Sandar Tun

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports the development of new magnesium composites containing complex composition alloy (CCA particles. Materials were synthesized using a powder metallurgy route incorporating hybrid microwave sintering and hot extrusion. The presence and variation in the amount of ball-milled CCA particles (2.5 wt %, 5 wt %, and 7.5 wt % in a magnesium matrix and their effect on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Mg-CCA composites were investigated. The use of CCA particle reinforcement effectively led to a significant matrix grain refinement. Uniformly distributed CCA particles were observed in the microstructure of the composites. The refined microstructure coupled with the intrinsically high hardness of CCA particles (406 HV contributed to the superior mechanical properties of the Mg-CCA composites. A microhardness of 80 HV was achieved in a Mg-7.5HEA (high entropy alloy composite, which is 1.7 times higher than that of pure Mg. A significant improvement in compressive yield strength (63% and ultimate compressive strength (79% in the Mg-7.5CCA composite was achieved when compared to that of pure Mg while maintaining the same ductility level. When compared to ball-milled amorphous particle-reinforced and ceramic-particle-reinforced Mg composites, higher yield and compressive strengths in Mg-CCA composites were achieved at a similar ductility level.

  7. Titanium Matrix Composite Pressure Vessel, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For over 15 years, FMW Composite Systems has developed Metal Matrix Composite manufacturing methodologies for fabricating silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced titanium...

  8. Studies on structural properties of clay magnesium ferrite nano composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Manpreet, E-mail: manpreetchem@pau.edu; Singh, Mandeep [Department of Chemistry, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana-141004 (India); Jeet, Kiran, E-mail: kiranjeet@pau.edu; Kaur, Rajdeep [Electron Microscopy and Nanoscience Laboratory, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana-141004 (India)

    2015-08-28

    Magnesium ferrite-bentonite clay composite was prepared by sol-gel combustion method employing citric acid as complexing agent and fuel. The effect of clay on the structural properties was studied with X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), SEM- Energy dispersive Spectroscope (EDS) and BET surface area analyzer. Decrease in particle size and density was observed on addition of bentonite clay. The BET surface area of nano composite containing just 5 percent clay was 74.86 m{sup 2}/g. Whereas porosity increased from 40.5 per cent for the pure magnesium ferrite to 81.0 percent in the composite showing that nano-composite has potential application as an adsorbent.

  9. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites - A comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  10. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites: A comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  11. Magnesium isotopic composition of the mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, F.; Li, W.; Ke, S.; Marty, B.; Huang, S.; Dauphas, N.; Wu, F.; Helz, R. L.

    2009-12-01

    Studies of Mg isotopic composition of the Earth not only are important for understanding its geochemistry but also can shed light on the accretion history of the Earth as well as the evolution of the Earth-Moon system. However, to date, the Mg isotopic composition of the Earth is still poorly constrained and highly debated. There is uncertainty in the magnitude of Mg isotope fractionation at mantle temperatures and whether the Earth has a chondritic Mg isotopic composition or not. To constrain further the Mg isotopic composition of the mantle and investigate the behavior of Mg isotopes during igneous differentiation, we report >200 high-precision (δ26Mg French Polynesian volcanoes (Society island and Cook Austral chain); 3) olivine grains from Hawaiian volcanoes (Kilauea, Koolau and Loihi) and 4) peridotite xenoliths from Australia, China, France, Tanzania and USA. Global oceanic basalts and peridotite xenoliths have a limited (<0.2 ‰) variation in Mg isotopic composition, with an average δ26Mg = -0.25 relative to DSM3. Olivines from Hawaiian lavas have δ26Mg ranging from -0.43 to +0.03, with most having compositions identical to basalts and peridotites. Therefore, the mantle’s δ26Mg value is estimated to be ~ -0.25 ± 0.1 (2SD), different from that reported by Wiechert and Halliday (2007; δ26Mg = ~ 0) but similar to more recent studies (δ26Mg = -0.27 to -0.33) (Teng et al. 2007; Handler et al. 2009; Yang et al., 2009). Moreover, we suggest the Earth, as represented by the mantle, has a Mg isotopic composition similar to chondrites (δ26Mg = ~-0.33). The need for a model such as that of Wiechert and Halliday (2007) that involves sorting of chondrules and calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions in the proto planetary disc is thus not required to explain the Mg isotopic composition of the Earth.

  12. Fabrication of magnesium based composites reinforced with carbon nanotubes having superior mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Hiroyuki, E-mail: fukkun-fukuda@jwri.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kondoh, Katsuyoshi; Umeda, Junko [Joining and Welding Research Institution, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Fugetsu, Bunshi [Hokkaido University, Niow5, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan)

    2011-06-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Using the IPA based solution, the oxide-free pure Mg/CNTs composite powders could be prepared. {yields} The mechanical strength of the pure Mg composite reinforced with CNTs was not improved though the elongation was enhanced due to the elimination of MgO and less residual strain in the composite. {yields} The mechanical strength of the AZ61Mg alloy composite reinforced with CNTs was improved with maintaining adequate ductility due to the interfacial strengthening of Al{sub 2}MgC{sub 2} ternary carbide. {yields} The CNT addition was not influenced on the microstructure and grain orientations of the AZ61 Mg alloy matrix. - Abstract: Magnesium (Mg) composite reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having superior mechanical properties was fabricated using both pure Mg and AZ61 Mg alloy matrix in this study. The composites were produced via powder metallurgy route containing wet process using isopropyl alcohol (IPA) based zwitterionic surfactant solution with unbundled CNTs. The produced composites were evaluated with tensile test and Vickers hardness test and analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD). As a result, only with AZ61 Mg alloy matrix, tensile strength of the composite was improved. In situ formed Al{sub 2}MgC{sub 2} compounds at the interface between Mg matrix and CNTs effectively reinforced the interfacial bonding and enabled tensile loading transfer from the Mg matrix to nanotubes. Furthermore, it was clarified that the microstructures and grain orientations of the composite matrix were not significantly influenced by CNT addition.

  13. Mechanical, degradation and cytocompatibility properties of magnesium coated phosphate glass fibre reinforced polycaprolactone composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoling; Hasan, Muhammad S; Grant, David M; Harper, Lee T; Parsons, Andrew J; Palmer, Graham; Rudd, Chris D; Ahmed, Ifty

    2014-11-01

    Retention of mechanical properties of phosphate glass fibre reinforced degradable polyesters such as polycaprolactone and polylactic acid in aqueous media has been shown to be strongly influenced by the integrity of the fibre/polymer interface. A previous study utilising 'single fibre' fragmentation tests found that coating with magnesium improved the fibre and matrix interfacial shear strength. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a magnesium coating on the manufacture and characterisation of a random chopped fibre reinforced polycaprolactone composite. Short chopped strand non-woven phosphate glass fibre mats were sputter coated with degradable magnesium to manufacture phosphate glass fibre/polycaprolactone composites. The degradation behaviour (water uptake, mass loss and pH change of the media) of these polycaprolactone composites as well as of pure polycaprolactone was investigated in phosphate buffered saline. The Mg coated fibre reinforced composites revealed less water uptake and mass loss during degradation compared to the non-coated composites. The cations released were also explored and a lower ion release profile for all three cations investigated (namely Na(+), Mg(2+) and Ca(2+)) was seen for the Mg coated composite samples. An increase of 17% in tensile strength and 47% in tensile modulus was obtained for the Mg coated composite samples. Both flexural and tensile properties were investigated and a higher retention of mechanical properties was obtained for the Mg coated fibre reinforced composite samples up to 10 days immersion in PBS. Cytocompatibility study showed both composite samples (coated and non-coated) had good cytocompatibility with human osteosarcoma cell line. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  14. Microstructure of Matrix in UHTC Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sylvia; Stackpoole, Margaret; Gusman, Michael I.; Chavez-Garia Jose; Doxtad, Evan

    2011-01-01

    Approaches to controlling the microstructure of Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs) are described.. One matrix material has been infiltrated into carbon weaves to make composite materials. The microstructure of these composites is described.

  15. Magnesium-molybdenum compounds as matrixes of 99m Tc generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez M, T.S.

    2005-01-01

    In order to finding new production alternatives of 99 Mo/ 99m Tc generators, easy to produce and with high elutriation efficiencies, it is proposed in this work to develop a generator with basis of magnesium and molybdenum that could be irradiated after their synthesis, given the short half life of the only radioisotope produced by the magnesium: 27 Mg (t 1/2 = 9.46 m). It is necessary to mention that have not been reported works in relation to this type of compound, being then important to carry out basic studies on the formation and behavior of these in relation to their matrix functions of those generated of 99 Mo/ 99m Tc. In this work it was determined the effect that has, the magnesium salt used in the synthesis of those molybdenum-magnesium compounds, the molar ratio Mo: Mg, the concentration of the magnesium salt, the pH of the used ammonium molybdates in the synthesis of the final compounds and the washing of the molybdates of synthesized magnesium, in the performance of the 99 Mo/ 99m Tc generators. Parameters like the elutriation efficiency, the radionuclide purity, radiochemical and chemical of the eluates and their pH, were determined in each case, also its were characterized the synthesized compounds using: neutron activation analysis (NAA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy of high vacuum (SEM), besides of complementary techniques: infrared spectroscopy (IR), and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). (Author)

  16. Magnesium-Molybate Compounds as Matrix for 99Mo/99mTc Generators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola Monroy-Guzman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the preparation of a 99mTc generator based on conversion of 99Mo produced by neutron irradiation, into insoluble magnesium 99Mo-molybdates compounds as matrix. The effect of magnesium salt types and concentration, Mg:Mo molar ratios, pH of molybdate solutions, eluate volume as well as the addition order of molybdate and magnesium solutions’ influences on the final 99mTc were evaluated. Polymetalates and polymolybdates salts either crystallized or amorphous were obtained depending on the magnesium salt and Mg:Mo molar ratio used in matrix preparation. 99Mo/99mTc generator production based on magnesium-99Mo molybdate compounds allow reduction of preparation time and eliminates the use of specialized installations. The best generator performances were attained using matrices prepared from 0.1 mol/L MgCl2·6H2O solutions, ammonium molybdate solutions at pH 7 and at a Mg:Mo molar ratio of 1:1.

  17. Multiscale Modeling of Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Mital, Subodh K.; Pineda, Evan J.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Results of multiscale modeling simulations of the nonlinear response of SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites are reported, wherein the microstructure of the ceramic matrix is captured. This micro scale architecture, which contains free Si material as well as the SiC ceramic, is responsible for residual stresses that play an important role in the subsequent thermo-mechanical behavior of the SiC/SiC composite. Using the novel Multiscale Generalized Method of Cells recursive micromechanics theory, the microstructure of the matrix, as well as the microstructure of the composite (fiber and matrix) can be captured.

  18. Microstructural and mechanical properties of titanium particulate reinforced magnesium composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umeda, Junko; Kawakami, Masashi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaragi, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Kondoh, Katsuyoshi, E-mail: kondoh@jwri.osaka-u.ac.jp [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaragi, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Ayman, El-Sayed; Imai, Hisashi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaragi, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2010-10-01

    Pure titanium (Ti) particulate reinforced pure magnesium (Mg) composite materials were fabricated via powder metallurgy route, and their microstructural and mechanical properties were evaluated. When using the elemental mixture of pure Mg and pure Ti powders and consolidating them by solid-state sintering process, no significant increase in tensile strength of the composites was obtained, because of poor bonding strength at the interface between {alpha}-Mg matrix and Ti particles. In particular, coarse magnesium oxide (MgO) particles of about 100 nm were formed via thermite reaction between TiO{sub 2} surface films of Ti particles and Mg raw powders and resulted in preventing the improvement of the mechanical properties of the composite material. On the other hand, when using the atomized pure Mg composite powders reinforced with Ti particulates, their extruded composite material showed obviously improved tensile strength and good elongation, compared to the extruded pure Mg powder material including no Ti particle. The obvious improvement in the tensile strength was due to the restriction of dislocation movement by Ti reinforcements under applied tensile load.

  19. A Novel Acidic Matrix Protein, PfN44, Stabilizes Magnesium Calcite to Inhibit the Crystallization of Aragonite*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Cong; Fang, Dong; Xu, Guangrui; Liang, Jian; Zhang, Guiyou; Wang, Hongzhong; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium is widely used to control calcium carbonate deposition in the shell of pearl oysters. Matrix proteins in the shell are responsible for nucleation and growth of calcium carbonate crystals. However, there is no direct evidence supporting a connection between matrix proteins and magnesium. Here, we identified a novel acidic matrix protein named PfN44 that affected aragonite formation in the shell of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata. Using immunogold labeling assays, we found PfN44 in both the nacreous and prismatic layers. In shell repair, PfN44 was repressed, whereas other matrix proteins were up-regulated. Disturbing the function of PfN44 by RNAi led to the deposition of porous nacreous tablets with overgrowth of crystals in the nacreous layer. By in vitro circular dichroism spectra and fluorescence quenching, we found that PfN44 bound to both calcium and magnesium with a stronger affinity for magnesium. During in vitro calcium carbonate crystallization and calcification of amorphous calcium carbonate, PfN44 regulated the magnesium content of crystalline carbonate polymorphs and stabilized magnesium calcite to inhibit aragonite deposition. Taken together, our results suggested that by stabilizing magnesium calcite to inhibit aragonite deposition, PfN44 participated in P. fucata shell formation. These observations extend our understanding of the connections between matrix proteins and magnesium. PMID:24302723

  20. Thermal stress relaxation in magnesium composites during thermal cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trojanova, Z.; Lukac, P. (Karlova Univ., Prague (Czech Republic)); Kiehn, J.; Kainer, K.U.; Mordike, B.L. (Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany))

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown that the internal friction of Mg - Saffil metal matrix composites can be influenced by thermal stresses, if MMCc are submitted to thermal cycling between room temperature and an upper temperature of cycling. These stresses can be accommodated by generation and motion of dislocations giving the formation of the microplastic zones. The thermal stress relaxation depends on the upper temperature of cycling, the volume fraction of reinforcement and the matrix composition and can result in plastic deformation and strain hardening of the matrix without applied stress. The internal friction measurements can be used for non destructive investigation of processes which influence the mechanical properties. (orig.)

  1. Investigation of Mechanical Properties and Metallurical Characteristics of a Metallic Chromium and Magnesium Oxide Composite

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Manning, Charles

    1963-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been made to evaluate an uncoated thin composite sheet material containing metallic chromium and magnesium oxide for aerospace applications in the temperature range...

  2. Coating magnesium hydroxide on surface of carbon microspheres and interface binding with poly (ethylene terephthalate) matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Baoxia [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Taiyuan University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center on Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Textile Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Yuci 030600 (China); Niu, Mei, E-mail: niumei@tyut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Taiyuan University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Textile Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Yuci 030600 (China); Yang, Yongzhen, E-mail: yyztyut@126.com [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Taiyuan University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center on Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Bai, Jie; Song, Yinghao; Peng, Yun [College of Textile Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Yuci 030600 (China); Liu, Xuguang [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Taiyuan University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • Magnesium hydroxide (MH) as a capsule wall was firstly coated on the surface of carbon microspheres (CMSs) to obtain MH@CMSs by liquid phase deposition method. • An organic layer of 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) was then introduced on the surface of MH@CMSs. • The formed two layers provided the FMH@CMSs/PET with good mechanical and flame-retardant properties. - Abstract: In this account, magnesium hydroxide (MH) employed as a capsule wall was firstly coated on the surface of carbon microspheres (CMSs) to obtain MH@CMSs using liquid phase deposition, then was modified by 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) to form FMH@CMSs. To investigate the interface binding forces, a series of PET composites was prepared by melt compounding with MH@CMSs or FMH@CMSs. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier-transform Infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the morphology, chemical structure, and effect of functionalization of CMSs. The coating degree and thermal stability were investigated by thermogravimetry analysis. The results showed that CMSs were coated by an inorganic shell layer of MH as a capsule wall. On the other hand, MH@CMSs were coated with an organic layer of APTS. When compared to MH@CMSs, the interface binding forces between FMH@CMSs and PET matrix were significantly improved, and the tensile strength of FMH@CMSs/PET was higher than that of MH@CMSs/PET. At 1 wt% mass fraction of FMH@CMSs, the limiting oxygen index (LOI) value of PET composites increased from 21% to 27.6% following a V-0 rating. The tensile strength of FMH@CMSs/PET increased by 66.2% to reach 47.20 MPa, a value nearly similar to that of PET. Overall, the formed two layers provided the FMH@CMSs/PET with good mechanical and flame-retardant properties, which would broaden their scope of application.

  3. Biocorrosion and osteoconductivity of PCL/nHAp composite porous film-based coating of magnesium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdal-hay, Abdalla; Amna, Touseef; Lim, Jae Kyoo

    2013-04-01

    The present study was aimed at designing a novel porous hydroxyapatite/poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (nHAp/PCL) hybrid nanocomposite matrix on a magnesium substrate with high and low porosity. The coated samples were prepared using a dip-coating technique in order to enhance the bioactivity and biocompatibility of the implant and to control the degradation rate of magnesium alloys. The mechanical and biocompatible properties of the coated and uncoated samples were investigated and an in vitro test for corrosion was conducted by electrochemical polarization and measurement of weight loss. The corrosion test results demonstrated that both the pristine PCL and nHAp/PCL composites showed good corrosion resistance in SBF. However, during the extended incubation time, the composite coatings exhibited more uniform and superior resistance to corrosion attack than pristine PCL, and were able to survive severe localized corrosion in physiological solution. Furthermore, the bioactivity of the composite film was determined by the rapid formation of uniform CaP nanoparticles on the sample surfaces during immersion in SBF. The mechanical integrity of the composite coatings displayed better performance (˜34% higher) than the uncoated samples. Finally, our results suggest that the nHAp incorporated with novel PCL composite membranes on magnesium substrates may serve as an excellent 3-D platform for cell attachment, proliferation, migration, and growth in bone tissue. This novel as-synthesized nHAp/PCL membrane on magnesium implants could be used as a potential material for orthopedic applications in the future.

  4. Celsian Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Dicarlo, James A.

    1996-01-01

    Glass-ceramic matrix reinforced fiber composite materials developed for use in low dielectric applications, such as radomes. Materials strong and tough, exhibit low dielectric properties, and endure high temperatures.

  5. An investigation of hot deformation response of particulate-reinforced magnesium + 9% titanium composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghunath, B.K.; Karthikeyan, R.; Ganesan, G.; Gupta, M.

    2008-01-01

    An experimental analysis was performed to predict flow curves, dynamic recrystallisation behaviour of AZ91magnesium/titanium metal matrix composite based on result from hot compression test. The compression tests were carried out in a temperature range of 300-500 o C and at a strain rate range of 0.001-1 s -1 and the flow curves were obtained. The processing map of the studied material was obtained by following the dynamic material model. Microstructural characterization studies conducted on the compressed composite samples using optical and scanning electron microscopy, revealed dynamic recrystallization, debonding of Ti Particles, particle breakage, and flow localization. The observations were performed in order to describe the behavior of the material under hot forming operation in terms of material damage and micro structural modification

  6. An investigation of hot deformation response of particulate-reinforced magnesium + 9% titanium composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghunath, B.K. [Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Annamalai University, Chidambaram 608 002, Tamil Nadu (India); Karthikeyan, R. [Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Annamalai University, Chidambaram 608 002, Tamil Nadu (India)], E-mail: ramkalaikarthi@rediffmail.com; Ganesan, G. [Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Annamalai University, Chidambaram 608 002, Tamil Nadu (India); Gupta, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, 10 Kent Ridge Crescent, Singapore 119260 (Singapore)

    2008-07-01

    An experimental analysis was performed to predict flow curves, dynamic recrystallisation behaviour of AZ91magnesium/titanium metal matrix composite based on result from hot compression test. The compression tests were carried out in a temperature range of 300-500 {sup o}C and at a strain rate range of 0.001-1 s{sup -1} and the flow curves were obtained. The processing map of the studied material was obtained by following the dynamic material model. Microstructural characterization studies conducted on the compressed composite samples using optical and scanning electron microscopy, revealed dynamic recrystallization, debonding of Ti Particles, particle breakage, and flow localization. The observations were performed in order to describe the behavior of the material under hot forming operation in terms of material damage and micro structural modification.

  7. COMPOSITION OF FOWLPOX VIRUS AND INCLUSION MATRIX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    RANDALL, C C; GAFFORD, L G; DARLINGTON, R W; HYDE, J

    1964-04-01

    Randall, Charles C. (University of Mississippi School of Medicine, Jackson), Lanelle G. Gafford, Robert W. Darlington, and James M. Hyde. Composition of fowlpox virus and inclusion matrix. J. Bacteriol. 87:939-944. 1964.-Inclusion bodies of fowlpox virus infection are especially favorable starting material for the isolation of virus and inclusion matrix. Electron micrographs of viral particles and matrix indicated a high degree of purification. Density-gradient centrifugation of virus in cesium chloride and potassium tartrate was unsatisfactory because of inactivation, and clumping or disintegration. Chemical analyses of virus and matrix revealed significant amounts of lipid, protein, and deoxyribonucleic acid, but no ribonucleic acid or carbohydrate. Approximately 47% of the weight of the virus and 83% of the matrix were extractable in chloroform-methanol. The lipid partitions of the petroleum ether extracts were similar, except that the phospholipid content of the matrix was 2.2 times that of the virus. Viral particles were sensitive to diethyl ether and chloroform.

  8. Preparation and corrosion resistance of magnesium phytic acid/hydroxyapatite composite coatings on biodegradable AZ31 magnesium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Cai, Shu; Zhang, Feiyang; Xu, Guohua; Wang, Fengwu; Yu, Nian; Wu, Xiaodong

    2017-06-01

    In this work, a magnesium phytic acid/hydroxyapatite composite coating was successfully prepared on AZ31 magnesium alloy substrate by chemical conversion deposition technology with the aim of improving its corrosion resistance and bioactivity. The influence of hydroxyapatite (HA) content on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of the coatings was investigated. The results showed that with the increase of HA content in phytic acid solution, the cracks on the surface of the coatings gradually reduced, which subsequently improved the corrosion resistance of these coated magnesium alloy. Electrochemical measurements in simulated body fluid (SBF) revealed that the composite coating with 45 wt.% HA addition exhibited superior surface integrity and significantly improved corrosion resistance compared with the single phytic acid conversion coating. The results of the immersion test in SBF showed that the composite coating could provide more effective protection for magnesium alloy substrate than that of the single phytic acid coating and showed good bioactivity. Magnesium phytic acid/hydroxyapatite composite, with the desired bioactivity, can be synthesized through chemical conversion deposition technology as protective coatings for surface modification of the biodegradable magnesium alloy implants. The design idea of the new type of biomaterial is belong to the concept of "third generation biomaterial". Corrosion behavior and bioactivity of coated magnesium alloy are the key issues during implantation. In this study, preparation and corrosion behavior of magnesium phytic acid/hydroxyapatite composite coatings on magnesium alloy were studied. The basic findings and significance of this paper are as follows: 1. A novel environmentally friendly, homogenous and crack-free magnesium phytic acid/hydroxyapatite composite coating was fabricated on AZ31 magnesium alloy via chemical conversion deposition technology with the aim of enhancing its corrosion resistance and

  9. Nanophosphor composite scintillators comprising a polymer matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenchausen, Ross Edward; Mckigney, Edward Allen; Gilbertson, Robert David

    2010-11-16

    An improved nanophosphor composite comprises surface modified nanophosphor particles in a solid matrix. The nanophosphor particle surface is modified with an organic ligand, or by covalently bonding a polymeric or polymeric precursor material. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during formation of the composite material. The improved nanophosphor composite may be used in any conventional scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  10. Theoretical and experimental investigation of wear characteristics of aluminum based metal matrix composites using RSM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvi, S.; Rajasekar, E.

    2015-01-01

    The tribological properties such as wear rate, hardness of the aluminum-fly ash composite synthesized by stir casting were investigated by varying the weight % of fly ash from 5 to 20 with constant weight % of zinc and magnesium metal powder. A mathematical model was developed to predict the wear rate of aluminum metal matrix composites and the adequacy of the model was verified using analysis of variance. Scanning electron microscopy was used for the microstructure analysis which showed a uniform distribution of fly ash in the metal matrix. Energy - dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was used for the elemental analysis or chemical characterization of a sample. The results showed that addition of fly ash to aluminum based metal matrix improved both the mechanical and tribological properties of the composites. The fly ash particles improved the wear resistance of the metal matrix composites because the hardness of the samples taken increased as the fly ash content was increased.

  11. Development of zirconium/magnesium phosphate composites for immobilization of fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, D.; Tlustochowicz, M.; Wagh, A.S.

    1999-01-01

    Novel chemically bonded phosphate ceramics have been investigated for the capture and stabilization of volatile fission-product radionuclides. The authors have used low-temperature processing to fabricate zirconium phosphate and zirconium/magnesium phosphate composites. A zirconium/magnesium phosphate composite has been developed and shown to stabilize ash waste that has been contaminated with a radioactive surrogate of the 137 Cs and 90 Sr species. Excellent retention of cesium in the phosphate matrix system was observed in both short- and long-term leaching tests. The retention factor determined by the USEPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure was one order of magnitude better for cesium that for strontium. The effective diffusivity, at room temperature, for cesium and strontium in the waste forms was estimated to be as low as 2.4 x 10 -13 and 1.2 x 10 -11 m 2 /s, respectively. This behavior was attributed to the capture of cesium in the layered zirconium phosphate structure via an intercalation ion-exchange reaction, followed by microencapsulation. However, strontium is believed to be precipitated out in its phosphate form and subsequently microencapsulated in the phosphate ceramic. The performance of these final waste forms, as indicated by the compression strength and the durability in aqueous environments, satisfies the regulatory criteria

  12. Piezoelectric ceramic-reinforced metal matrix composites

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Composite materials comprising piezoelectric ceramic particulates dispersed in a metal matrix are capable of vibration damping. When the piezoelectric ceramic particulates are subjected to strain, such as the strain experienced during vibration of the material, they generate an electrical voltage that is converted into Joule heat in the surrounding metal matrix, thereby dissipating the vibrational energy. The piezoelectric ceramic particulates may also act as reinforcements to improve the mec...

  13. CNTs Modified and Enhanced Cu Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Wen-zhong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The composite powders of 2%-CNTs were prepared by wet ball milling and hydrogen annealing treatment-cold pressing sintering was used to consolidate the ball milled composite powders with different modifications of the CNTs. The results show that the length of the CNTs is shortened, ports are open, and amorphous carbon content is increased by ball milling. And after a mixed acid purification, the impurity on the surface of the CNTs is completely removed,and a large number of oxygen-containing reactive groups are introduced; the most of CNTs can be embedded in the Cu matrix and the CNTs have a close bonding with the Cu matrix, forming the lamellar composite structure, then, ultrafine-grained composite powders can be obtained by hydrogen annealing treatment. Shortening and purification of the CNTs are both good for dispersion and bonding of CNTs in the Cu matrix, and the tensile strength and hardness of the composites after shortening and purification reaches the highest, and is 296MPa and 139.8HV respectively, compared to the matrix, up to 123.6% in tensile strength and 42.9% in hardness, attributed to the fine grain strengthening and load transferring.

  14. Solidification processing of monotectic alloy matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frier, Nancy L.; Shiohara, Yuh; Russell, Kenneth C.

    1989-01-01

    Directionally solidified aluminum-indium alloys of the monotectic composition were found to form an in situ rod composite which obeys a lambda exp 2 R = constant relation. The experimental data shows good agreement with previously reported results. A theoretical boundary between cellular and dendritic growth conditions was derived and compared with experiments. The unique wetting characteristics of the monotectic alloys can be utilized to tailor the interface structure in metal matrix composites. Metal matrix composites with monotectic and hypermonotectic Al-In matrices were made by pressure infiltration, remelted and directionally solidified to observe the wetting characteristics of the alloys as well as the effect on structure of solidification in the constrained field of the fiber interstices. Models for monotectic growth are modified to take into account solidification in these constrained fields.

  15. Processable polyimide adhesive and matrix composite resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Progar, Donald J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A high temperature polyimide composition prepared by reacting 4,4'-isophthaloyldiphthalic anhydride with metaphenylenediamine is employed to prepare matrix resins, adhesives, films, coatings, moldings, and laminates, especially those showing enhanced flow with retention of mechanical and adhesive properties. It can be used in the aerospace industry, for example, in joining metals to metals or metals to composite structures. One area of application is in the manufacture of lighter and stronger aircraft and spacecraft structures.

  16. Corrosion of Graphite Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    cathodic protection of G/AI MMCs resulted in overprotection 13. Overprotection resulted from a local increase in pH near cathodic sites during...34Cathodic Overprotection of SiC/6061-T6 and G/6061- T6 Aluminum Alloy Metal Matrix Composites," Scripta Metallurgica, 22 (1988) 413-418. 14. R

  17. Ceramic matrix composites by microwave assisted CVI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currier, R.P.; Devlin, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) processes for producing continuously reinforced ceramic composites are reviewed. Potential advantages of microwave assisted CVI are noted and numerical studies of microwave assisted CVI are reviewed. The models predict inverted thermal gradients in fibrous ceramic preforms subjected to microwave radiation and suggest processing strategies for achieving uniformly dense composites. Comparisons are made to experimental results on silicon-based composite systems. The role played by the relative ability of fiber and matrix to dissipate microwave energy is noted. Results suggest that microwave induced inverted gradients can be exploited to promote inside-out densification. 10 refs., 2 figs

  18. Lightweight, High Strength Nano-Composite Magnesium for Radiators, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase I SBIR, Terves will develop processing routes to produce high thermal conductivity magnesium composites for use in heat transfer applications such as...

  19. Compressive Deformation Behavior of Closed-Cell Micro-Pore Magnesium Composite Foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The closed-cell micro-pore magnesium composite foam with hollow ceramic microspheres (CMs was fabricated by a modified melt foaming method. The effect of CMs on the compressive deformation behavior of CM-containing magnesium composite foam was investigated. Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used for observation of the microstructure. Finite element modeling of the magnesium composite foam was established to predict localized stress, fracture of CMs, and the compressive deformation behavior of the foam. The results showed that CMs and pores directly affected the compressive deformation behavior of the magnesium composite foam by sharing a part of load applied on the foam. Meanwhile, the presence of Mg2Si phase influenced the mechanical properties of the foam by acting as the crack source during the compression process.

  20. Thermal stress effects in intermetallic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, P. K.; Sensmeier, M. D.; Kupperman, D. S.; Wadley, H. N. G.

    1993-01-01

    Intermetallic matrix composites develop residual stresses from the large thermal expansion mismatch (delta-alpha) between the fibers and matrix. This work was undertaken to: establish improved techniques to measure these thermal stresses in IMC's; determine residual stresses in a variety of IMC systems by experiments and modeling; and, determine the effect of residual stresses on selected mechanical properties of an IMC. X ray diffraction (XRD), neutron diffraction (ND), synchrotron XRD (SXRD), and ultrasonics (US) techniques for measuring thermal stresses in IMC were examined and ND was selected as the most promising technique. ND was demonstrated on a variety of IMC systems encompassing Ti- and Ni-base matrices, SiC, W, and Al2O3 fibers, and different fiber fractions (Vf). Experimental results on these systems agreed with predictions of a concentric cylinder model. In SiC/Ti-base systems, little yielding was found and stresses were controlled primarily by delta-alpha and Vf. In Ni-base matrix systems, yield strength of the matrix and Vf controlled stress levels. The longitudinal residual stresses in SCS-6/Ti-24Al-llNb composite were modified by thermomechanical processing. Increasing residual stress decreased ultimate tensile strength in agreement with model predictions. Fiber pushout strength showed an unexpected inverse correlation with residual stress. In-plane shear yield strength showed no dependence on residual stress. Higher levels of residual tension led to higher fatigue crack growth rates, as suggested by matrix mean stress effects.

  1. Hybrid Ceramic Matrix Fibrous Composites: an Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naslain, R.

    2011-10-01

    Ceramic-Matrix Composites (CMCs) consist of a ceramic fiber architecture in a ceramic matrix, bonded together through a thin interphase. The present contribution is limited to non-oxide CMCs. Their constituents being oxidation-prone, they are protected by external coatings. We state here that CMCs display a hybrid feature, when at least one of their components is not homogeneous from a chemical or microstructural standpoint. Hybrid fiber architectures are used to tailor the mechanical or thermal CMC-properties whereas hybrid interphases, matrices and coatings to improve CMC resistance to aggressive environments.

  2. Hybrid Ceramic Matrix Fibrous Composites: an Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naslain, R

    2011-01-01

    Ceramic-Matrix Composites (CMCs) consist of a ceramic fiber architecture in a ceramic matrix, bonded together through a thin interphase. The present contribution is limited to non-oxide CMCs. Their constituents being oxidation-prone, they are protected by external coatings. We state here that CMCs display a hybrid feature, when at least one of their components is not homogeneous from a chemical or microstructural standpoint. Hybrid fiber architectures are used to tailor the mechanical or thermal CMC-properties whereas hybrid interphases, matrices and coatings to improve CMC resistance to aggressive environments.

  3. Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Materials Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calomino, Anthony

    2001-01-01

    Under the former NASA EPM Program, much initial progress was made in identifying constituent materials and processes for SiC/SiC ceramic composite hot-section components. This presentation discusses the performance benefits of these approaches and elaborates on further constituent and property improvements made under NASA UEET. These include specific treatments at NASA that significantly improve the creep and environmental resistance of the Sylramic(TM) SiC fiber as well as the thermal conductivity and creep resistance of the CVI Sic matrix. Also discussed are recent findings concerning the beneficial effects of certain 2D-fabric architectures and carbon between the BN interphase coating and Sic matrix.

  4. Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Materials Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, James

    2001-01-01

    Under the former NASA EPM Program, much initial progress was made in identifying constituent materials and processes for SiC/SiC ceramic composite hot-section components. This presentation discusses the performance benefits of these approaches and elaborates on further constituent and property improvements made under NASA UEET. These include specific treatments at NASA that significantly improve the creep and environmental resistance of the Sylramic(TM) Sic fiber as well as the thermal conductivity and creep resistance of the CVI Sic matrix. Also discussed are recent findings concerning the beneficial effects of certain 2D-fabric architectures and carbon between the BN interphase coating and Sic matrix.

  5. Special metallurgy - the electrical butt-welding by flashing of sintered magnesium-magnesium oxide composites (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charleux, J.

    1963-01-01

    Electrical resistance welding has become quite important since World War II because of the need of a high yield in aeronautical production. Progress has been due in particular to the improvements made in electronically controlled apparatus making possible the automatic control of welding. For the butt-welding of sections requiring either a high production rate or a high quality weld, the flash butt-welding system has been very much developed these last few years. The use of this welding method is of great importance in the field of the bonding of oxidisable metals such as magnesium or aluminium and its alloys, because the welded joint is free from oxides. This study consists of general considerations on the flash-welding process with regard to temperature distribution in the parts during welding, and to electrical phenomena connected with flashing. Besides this general or theoretical section, we have applied the welding process to the bonding of sintered magnesium, a magnesium-magnesium oxide composite, whose use as a structural element in nuclear reactors is considered. (author) [fr

  6. Ferroelastic ceramic-reinforced metal matrix composites

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Composite materials comprising ferroelastic ceramic particulates dispersed in a metal matrix are capable of vibration damping. When the ferroelastic ceramic particulates are subjected to stress, such as the cyclic stress experienced during vibration of the material, internal stresses in the ceramic cause the material to deform via twinning, domain rotation or domain motion thereby dissipating the vibrational energy. The ferroelastic ceramic particulates may also act as reinforcements to impro...

  7. Creep of plain weave polymer matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Abhishek

    Polymer matrix composites are increasingly used in various industrial sectors to reduce structural weight and improve performance. Woven (also known as textile) composites are one class of polymer matrix composites with increasing market share mostly due to their lightweight, their flexibility to form into desired shape, their mechanical properties and toughness. Due to the viscoelasticity of the polymer matrix, time-dependent degradation in modulus (creep) and strength (creep rupture) are two of the major mechanical properties required by engineers to design a structure reliably when using these materials. Unfortunately, creep and creep rupture of woven composites have received little attention by the research community and thus, there is a dire need to generate additional knowledge and prediction models, given the increasing market share of woven composites in load bearing structural applications. Currently, available creep models are limited in scope and have not been validated for any loading orientation and time period beyond the experimental time window. In this thesis, an analytical creep model, namely the Modified Equivalent Laminate Model (MELM), was developed to predict tensile creep of plain weave composites for any orientation of the load with respect to the orientation of the fill and warp fibers, using creep of unidirectional composites. The ability of the model to predict creep for any orientation of the load is a "first" in this area. The model was validated using an extensive experimental involving the tensile creep of plain weave composites under varying loading orientation and service conditions. Plain weave epoxy (F263)/ carbon fiber (T300) composite, currently used in aerospace applications, was procured as fabrics from Hexcel Corporation. Creep tests were conducted under two loading conditions: on-axis loading (0°) and off-axis loading (45°). Constant load creep, in the temperature range of 80-240°C and stress range of 1-70% UTS of the

  8. Dielectric Cure Monitoring of Thermosetting Matrix Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyoung Geun [Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dae Gil [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-15

    Cure monitoring can be used to improve the quality and productivity of thermosetting resin matrix composite products during their manufacturing process. In this work, the sensitivity of dielectrometry was improved by adequate separation the efforts of sensor and externals on the measured signal. A new algorithm to obtain the degree of cure during dielectric cure monitoring of glass/polyester and glass/epoxy composites was developed by employing a function of both temperature and dissipation factor, in which five cure monitoring parameters were used to calculate the degree of cure. The decreasing pattern of dissipation factor was compared with the relationships between the degree of cure and the resin viscosity. The developed algorithm might be employed for the in situ cure monitoring of thermosetting resin composites

  9. Dielectric Cure Monitoring of Thermosetting Matrix Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyoung Geun; Lee, Dae Gil

    2003-01-01

    Cure monitoring can be used to improve the quality and productivity of thermosetting resin matrix composite products during their manufacturing process. In this work, the sensitivity of dielectrometry was improved by adequate separation the efforts of sensor and externals on the measured signal. A new algorithm to obtain the degree of cure during dielectric cure monitoring of glass/polyester and glass/epoxy composites was developed by employing a function of both temperature and dissipation factor, in which five cure monitoring parameters were used to calculate the degree of cure. The decreasing pattern of dissipation factor was compared with the relationships between the degree of cure and the resin viscosity. The developed algorithm might be employed for the in situ cure monitoring of thermosetting resin composites

  10. Magnesium Matrix Composite Foams-Density, Mechanical Properties, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    the USA is the 2011 Corporate Average Fuel Economy or CAFE standard. For the small car class (footprint < 3.8 m2), the current fuel economy standard...components are now available as standard components or aftermarket parts used for customization . Lightweight alloy wheels are a prominent example of...Mater. Sci. Eng. A 2001, 302, 37–45. 7. CAFE Fuel Economy. Available online: http://www.nhtsa.gov/fuel-economy (accessed on 26 June 2012). 8. Guo

  11. Preparation and characterization of the micro-arc oxidation composite coatings on magnesium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Yanfeng Ge; Bailing Jiang; Ming Liu; Congjie Wang; Wenning Shen

    2014-01-01

    The magnesium alloys attract the light-weight manufacture due to its high strength to weight ratio, however the poor corrosion resistance limits the application in automobile industry. The Micro-arc Composite Ceramic (MCC) coatings on AZ91D magnesium alloys were prepared by Micro-arc Oxidation (MAO) and electrophoresis technologies. The microstructure, corrosion resistance, abrasion resistance, stone impact resistance and adhesion of MCC coatings were studied respectively. The cross section m...

  12. Cooled Ceramic Matrix Composite Propulsion Structures Demonstrated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Dickens, Kevin W.

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) Program has successfully demonstrated cooled ceramic matrix composite (CMC) technology in a scramjet engine test. This demonstration represented the world s largest cooled nonmetallic matrix composite panel fabricated for a scramjet engine and the first cooled nonmetallic composite to be tested in a scramjet facility. Lightweight, high-temperature, actively cooled structures have been identified as a key technology for enabling reliable and low-cost space access. Tradeoff studies have shown this to be the case for a variety of launch platforms, including rockets and hypersonic cruise vehicles. Actively cooled carbon and CMC structures may meet high-performance goals at significantly lower weight, while improving safety by operating with a higher margin between the design temperature and material upper-use temperature. Studies have shown that using actively cooled CMCs can reduce the weight of the cooled flow-path component from 4.5 to 1.6 lb/sq ft and the weight of the propulsion system s cooled surface area by more than 50 percent. This weight savings enables advanced concepts, increased payload, and increased range. The ability of the cooled CMC flow-path components to operate over 1000 F hotter than the state-of-the-art metallic concept adds system design flexibility to space-access vehicle concepts. Other potential system-level benefits include smaller fuel pumps, lower part count, lower cost, and increased operating margin.

  13. Fracture behaviour of brittle (glass) matrix composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Chlup, Zdeněk; Boccaccini, A. R.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 482, - (2005), s. 115-122 ISSN 0255-5476. [International Conference on Materials Structure and Micromechanics of Fracture /4./. Brno, 23.06.2004-25.06.2004] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA2041003; GA ČR(CZ) GA101/02/0683 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : Ceramic matrix composites * fracture toughness * toughening effects Subject RIV: JH - Ceramic s, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.399, year: 2005

  14. Degradation of magnesium and its alloys: dependence on the composition of the synthetic biological media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Wolf-Dieter; de Mele, Monica Fernández Lorenzo; Nascimento, Maria Lucia; Zeddies, Miriam

    2009-08-01

    Magnesium and its alloys are highly degradable metals that are potentially useful as biomaterials, especially in orthopaedic and cardiovascular applications. However, the in vivo corrosion has proved to be too high. Because of the complexity of in vivo conditions, a careful study of the corrosion of magnesium in synthetic solutions that simulate the in vivo environment is necessary as a first approach to predict the actual in vivo situation. The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of the electrolyte composition on the corrosion behavior of magnesium and two Mg-alloys in synthetic biological media. Pure magnesium and its alloys (AZ31 and LAE442) were employed in the experiments. Electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization curves were recorded in sodium chloride and PBS electrolytes with different chloride ion and albumin concentration. Optical and SEM observations complemented by EDX analysis were made. The results showed that magnesium corrosion is localized in chloride- and albumin-containing buffer solutions. They also showed that the chloride concentration and the presence of buffer and protein strongly affect the electrochemical behavior of magnesium and magnesium alloys.

  15. Environmental Barrier Coatings for Ceramic Matrix Composites - An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang; van Roode, Mark; Kashyap, Tania; Zhu, Dongming; Wiesner, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) are increasingly being considered as structural materials for advanced power generation equipment because of their light weight, higher temperature capability, and oxidation resistance. Limitations of SiC/SiC CMCs include surface recession and component cracking and associated chemical changes in the CMC. The solutions pursued to improve the life of SiC/SiC CMCs include the incorporation of coating systems that provide surface protection, which has become known as an Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC). The development of EBCs for the protection of gas turbine hot section CMC components was a continuation of coating development work for corrosion protection of silicon-based monolithics. Work on EBC development for SiC/SiC CMCs has been ongoing at several national laboratories and the original gas turbine equipment manufacturers. The work includes extensive laboratory, rig and engine testing, including testing of EBC coated SiC/SiC CMCs in actual field applications. Another EBC degradation issue which is especially critical for CMC components used in aircraft engines is the degradation from glassy deposits of calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) with other minor oxides. This paper addresses the need for and properties of external coatings on SiC/SiC CMCs to extend their useful life in service and the retention of their properties.

  16. Magnesium isotope compositions of Solar System materials determined by double spiking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hin, R.; Lai, Y. J.; Coath, C.; Elliott, T.

    2015-12-01

    As a major element, magnesium is of interest for investigating large scale processes governing the formation and evolution of rocky planetary bodies. Determining the Mg isotope composition of the Earth and other planetary bodies has hence been a topic of interest ever since mass-dependent fractionation of 'non-traditional' stable isotopes has been used to study high-temperature processes. Published results, however, suffer from disagreement on the Mg isotope compositions of the Earth and chondrites [1-5], which is attributed to residual matrix effects. Nonetheless, most recent studied have converged towards a homogeneous (chondritic) Mg isotope composition in the Solar System [2-5]. However, in several of the recent studies there is a hint of a systematic difference of about 0.02-0.06‰ in the 26Mg/24Mg isotope compositions of chondrites and Earth. Such difference, however, is only resolvable by taking standard errors, which assumes robust data for homogenous sample sets. The discrepancies between various studies unfortunately undermine the confidence in such robustness and homogeneity. The issues with matrix effects during isotopic analyses can be overcome by using a double spike approach. Such methodology generally requires three isotope ratios to solve for three unknowns, a requirement that cannot be met for Mg. However, using a newly developed approach, we present Mg isotope compositions obtained by critical mixture double spiking. This new approach should allow greater confidence in the robustness of the data and hence enable improvement of. Preliminary data indicate that chondrites have a resolvable ~0.04‰ lighter 26Mg/24Mg than (ultra)mafic rocks from Earth, Mars and the eucrite parent body, which appear indistinguishable from each other. It seems implausible that this difference is caused by magmatic process such as partial melting or crystallisation. More likely, Mg isotopes are fractionated by a non-magmatic process during the formation of planets, e

  17. Fracture toughness in metal matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perez Ipiña J.E.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluations of the fracture toughness in metal matrix composites (Duralcan reinforced with 15% of Al(20(3 and SiC are presented in this work. The application of Elastic Plastic Fracture Mechanics is discussed and the obtained values are compared with the ones obtained by means of Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics. Results show that J IC derived K JC values are higher than the corresponding values obtained by direct application of the linear elastic methodology. The effect of a heat treatment on the material fracture toughness was also evaluated in which the analyzed approaches showed, not only different toughness values, but also opposite tendencies. A second comparison of the J IC and K JC values obtained in this work with toughness values reported in the literature is presented and discussed.

  18. Preparation and characterization of graphite-dispersed styrene-acrylic emulsion composite coating on magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Renhui [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Lanzhou University of Technology, College of Science, Lanzhou 730050 (China); Liang Jun, E-mail: jliang@licp.cas.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang Qing [Lanzhou University of Technology, College of Science, Lanzhou 730050 (China)

    2012-03-01

    In this work, an electrically conductive, corrosion resistant graphite-dispersed styrene-acrylic emulsion composite coating on AZ91D magnesium alloy was successfully produced by the method of anodic deposition. The microstructure, composition and conductivity of the composite coating were characterized using optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) and four electrode volume resistivity instrument, respectively. The corrosion resistance of the coating was evaluated using potentiodynamic polarization measurements and salt spray tests. It is found that the graphite-dispersed styrene-acrylic emulsion composite coating was layered structure and displayed good electrical conductivity. The potentiodynamic polarization tests and salt spray tests reveal that the composite coating was successful in providing superior corrosion resistance to AZ91D magnesium alloy.

  19. The role of matrix microstructure in the creep behaviour of discontinuous fiber-reinforced AZ91 magnesium alloy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, Milan; Pahutová, Marie; Kuchařová, Květa; Sklenička, Václav; Langdon, T. G.

    A324, 1-2 (2002), s. 151-156 ISSN 0921-5093. [Symposium on Physics of Materials /8./. Prague, 04.09.2000-08.09.2000] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2041902; GA ČR GA106/99/1717; GA ČR GA106/99/0187 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : composites * magnesium alloys * creep Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 1.107, year: 2002

  20. Method of forming a ceramic matrix composite and a ceramic matrix component

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Diego, Peter; Zhang, James

    2017-05-30

    A method of forming a ceramic matrix composite component includes providing a formed ceramic member having a cavity, filling at least a portion of the cavity with a ceramic foam. The ceramic foam is deposited on a barrier layer covering at least one internal passage of the cavity. The method includes processing the formed ceramic member and ceramic foam to obtain a ceramic matrix composite component. Also provided is a method of forming a ceramic matrix composite blade and a ceramic matrix composite component.

  1. Qualification of Magnesium/Teflon/Viton Pyrotechnic Composition Used in Rocket Motors Ignition System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana de Barros

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The application of fluoropolymers in high-energy-release pyrotechnic compositions is common in the space and defense areas. Pyrotechnic compositions of magnesium/Teflon/Viton are widely used in military flares and pyrogen igniters for igniting the solid propellant of a rocket motor. Pyrotechnic components are considered high-risk products as they may cause catastrophic accidents if initiated or ignited inadvertently. To reduce the hazards involved in the handling, storage and transportation of these devices, the magnesium/Teflon/Viton composition was subjected to various sensitivity tests, DSC and had its stability and compatibility tested with other materials. This composition obtained satisfactory results in all the tests, which qualifies it as safe for production, handling, use, storage and transportation.

  2. Corrosion behavior of magnesium-graphene composites in sodium chloride solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Rashad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Coating of graphene and graphene/polymer composites on metals improves the corrosion resistance of metal substrates. On other hand, graphene embedded inside metal (especially Mg matrices increases or decreases corrosion, is a crucial factor and must be explored. In present study, electrochemical behaviors of magnesium alloys (AZ31 and AZ61 and their composites reinforced with graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs were carried out in 3.5% NaCl solution by polarization method. The surface morphology of composites before and after corrosion tests were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. Experimental results revealed that presence of graphene nanoplatelets in different matrices decrease corrosion resistance of composites. This may be attributed to presence of graphene nanoplatelets which activates the corrosion of magnesium/alloys due to the occurrence of galvanic corrosion and this effect increases with increasing graphene nanoplatelets content. Further, an appropriate model describing the corrosion mechanism was proposed.

  3. Metal Matrix Composite Solar Cell Metallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilt David M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced solar cells are moving to ever thinner formats in order to save mass and in some cases improve performance. As cells are thinned, the possibility that they may fracture or cleave due to mechanical stresses is increased. Fractures of the cell can degrade the overall device performance if the fracture propagates through the contact metallization, which frequently occurs. To address this problem, a novel semiconductor metallization system based on multi-walled carbon nanotube (CNT reinforcement, termed metal matrix composite (MMC metallization is under investigation. Electro-mechanical characterization of MMC films demonstrate their ability to provide electrical conductivity over >40 micron wide cracks in the underlying semiconductor, with the carbon nanotubes bridging the gap. In addition, these materials show a “self-healing” behaviour, electrically reconnecting at ~30 microns when strained past failure. Triple junction (TJ space cells with MMC metallization demonstrated no loss in Jsc after intentional fracture, whereas TJ cells with conventional metallization suffer up to 50% Jsc loss.

  4. Electrochemical deposition of Mg(OH)2/GO composite films for corrosion protection of magnesium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Fengxia Wu; Jun Liang; Weixue Li

    2015-01-01

    Mg(OH)2/graphene oxide (GO) composite film was electrochemical deposited on AZ91D magnesium alloys at constant potential. The characteristics of the Mg(OH)2/GO composite film were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. It was shown that the flaky GO randomly distributed in the composite film. Compared with the Mg(OH)2 film, the Mg(OH)2/GO composite film exhibited more uniform and compac...

  5. Special metallurgy - the electrical butt-welding by flashing of sintered magnesium-magnesium oxide composites (1963); Metallurgie speciale - le soudage electrique en bout par etincelage du composite fritte magnesium-magnesie (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charleux, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    Electrical resistance welding has become quite important since World War II because of the need of a high yield in aeronautical production. Progress has been due in particular to the improvements made in electronically controlled apparatus making possible the automatic control of welding. For the butt-welding of sections requiring either a high production rate or a high quality weld, the flash butt-welding system has been very much developed these last few years. The use of this welding method is of great importance in the field of the bonding of oxidisable metals such as magnesium or aluminium and its alloys, because the welded joint is free from oxides. This study consists of general considerations on the flash-welding process with regard to temperature distribution in the parts during welding, and to electrical phenomena connected with flashing. Besides this general or theoretical section, we have applied the welding process to the bonding of sintered magnesium, a magnesium-magnesium oxide composite, whose use as a structural element in nuclear reactors is considered. (author) [French] Le soudage electrique par resistance a pris un essor important depuis la derniere guerre mondiale a cause du besoin de haut rendement pour la production aeronautique. Les progres ont ete possibles surtout par l'amelioration des appareils de commande electronique qui permettent un controle automatique de la soudure. Pour le soudage bout a bout de profiles, demandant soit un haut debit de fabrication, soit une haute qualite du joint soude, le procede de soudage en bout par etincelage a ete tres developpe ces dernieres annees. Ce mode de soudage a un domaine d'utilisation important dans la liaison des metaux oxydables tels le magnesium ou l'aluminium et ses alliages, du fait de la proprete du joint soude exempt d'oxydes. Cette etude comporte une consideration generale du processus de l'etincelage, quant a la repartition de la temperature dans les pieces pendant le soudage et aux

  6. Special metallurgy - the electrical butt-welding by flashing of sintered magnesium-magnesium oxide composites (1963); Metallurgie speciale - le soudage electrique en bout par etincelage du composite fritte magnesium-magnesie (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charleux, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    Electrical resistance welding has become quite important since World War II because of the need of a high yield in aeronautical production. Progress has been due in particular to the improvements made in electronically controlled apparatus making possible the automatic control of welding. For the butt-welding of sections requiring either a high production rate or a high quality weld, the flash butt-welding system has been very much developed these last few years. The use of this welding method is of great importance in the field of the bonding of oxidisable metals such as magnesium or aluminium and its alloys, because the welded joint is free from oxides. This study consists of general considerations on the flash-welding process with regard to temperature distribution in the parts during welding, and to electrical phenomena connected with flashing. Besides this general or theoretical section, we have applied the welding process to the bonding of sintered magnesium, a magnesium-magnesium oxide composite, whose use as a structural element in nuclear reactors is considered. (author) [French] Le soudage electrique par resistance a pris un essor important depuis la derniere guerre mondiale a cause du besoin de haut rendement pour la production aeronautique. Les progres ont ete possibles surtout par l'amelioration des appareils de commande electronique qui permettent un controle automatique de la soudure. Pour le soudage bout a bout de profiles, demandant soit un haut debit de fabrication, soit une haute qualite du joint soude, le procede de soudage en bout par etincelage a ete tres developpe ces dernieres annees. Ce mode de soudage a un domaine d'utilisation important dans la liaison des metaux oxydables tels le magnesium ou l'aluminium et ses alliages, du fait de la proprete du joint soude exempt d'oxydes. Cette etude comporte une consideration generale du processus de l'etincelage, quant a la repartition de la temperature dans les pieces

  7. Thermal conductivity of microPCMs-filled epoxy matrix composites

    OpenAIRE

    Su, J.F.; Wang, X.Y; Huang, Z.; Zhao, Y.H.; Yuan, X.Y.

    2011-01-01

    Microencapsulated phase change materials (microPCMs) have been widely applied in solid matrix as thermal-storage or temperature-controlling functional composites. The thermal conductivity of these microPCMs/matrix composites is an important property need to be considered. In this study, a series of microPCMs have been fabricated using the in situ polymerization with various core/shell ratio and average diameter; the thermal conductivity of microPCMs/epoxy composites were investigated in detai...

  8. Graphene-Reinforced Metal and Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasar, Ashish K.; Xiong, Guoping; Menezes, Pradeep L.

    2018-06-01

    Composites have tremendous applicability due to their excellent capabilities. The performance of composites mainly depends on the reinforcing material applied. Graphene is successful as an efficient reinforcing material due to its versatile as well as superior properties. Even at very low content, graphene can dramatically improve the properties of polymer and metal matrix composites. This article reviews the fabrication followed by mechanical and tribological properties of metal and polymer matrix composites filled with different kinds of graphene, including single-layer, multilayer, and functionalized graphene. Results reported to date in literature indicate that functionalized graphene or graphene oxide-polymer composites are promising materials offering significantly improved strength and frictional properties. A similar trend of improved properties has been observed in case of graphene-metal matrix composites. However, achieving higher graphene loading with uniform dispersion in metal matrix composites remains a challenge. Although graphene-reinforced composites face some challenges, such as understanding the graphene-matrix interaction or fabrication techniques, graphene-reinforced polymer and metal matrix composites have great potential for application in various fields due to their outstanding properties.

  9. Sustained drug release and electrochemical performance of ethyl cellulose-magnesium hydrogen phosphate composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammad, Faruq, E-mail: fmohammad@ksu.edu.sa [Surfactant Research chair, Department of Chemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Arfin, Tanvir, E-mail: t_arfin@neeri.res.in [Environmental Materials Division, CSIR-National Environmental Engineering Research Institute (CSIR-NEERI), Nehru Marg, Nagpur 440020 (India); Al-Lohedan, Hamad A. [Surfactant Research chair, Department of Chemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-02-01

    In this, a sol-gel method was applied to prepare ethyl cellulose-magnesium hydrogen phosphate (EC-MgHPO{sub 4}) composite that can have potential applications in the sensory, pharmaceutical, and biomedical sectors. The formed composite was thoroughly characterized by making use of the instrumental analysis such as UV–Vis, FT-IR, HRTEM, EDAX, SEM and XRD. For the composite, the other parameters determined includes the water uptake, porosity, thickness, bulk and tapped densities, angle of repose, Carr's index and Hausner ratio. From the results, the material found to exhibit good flowing properties with a Carr's index of 11.11%, Hausner ratio of 1.125, and angle of response of 33°. The EDAX spectrum and HRTEM analysis confirmed for the composite formation and the particles size is investigated to be around 52 nm. The surface porosity due to the EC matrices was confirmed by the SEM analysis, which further used for the loading of drug, Proguanil. In addition, the material's conductivity was studied by taking uni-univalent electrolyte solution (KCl and NaCl) indicated that the conductivity follows the order of KCl > NaCl, while the activation energy obtained from Arrhenius method resembled that the conductivity is strongly influenced by the electrolyte type used. We found from the analysis that, with a decrease in the size of hydrated radii of ions, the conductivity of EC-MgHPO{sub 4} material also observed to be decreased in the order K{sup +} > Na{sup +} and the material proved to be mechanically stable and can be operated over a range of pHs, temperatures, and electrolyte solutions. Further, the drug loading and efficiency studies indicated that the material can trap up to 80% of Proguanil (antimalarial drug) applied for its loading. The Proguanil drug release profiles confirmed for the controlled and sustained release from the EC-MgHPO{sub 4} matrix, as the material can release up to 87% of its total loaded drug over a 90 min period. Finally, the

  10. Sustained drug release and electrochemical performance of ethyl cellulose-magnesium hydrogen phosphate composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammad, Faruq; Arfin, Tanvir; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A.

    2017-01-01

    In this, a sol-gel method was applied to prepare ethyl cellulose-magnesium hydrogen phosphate (EC-MgHPO 4 ) composite that can have potential applications in the sensory, pharmaceutical, and biomedical sectors. The formed composite was thoroughly characterized by making use of the instrumental analysis such as UV–Vis, FT-IR, HRTEM, EDAX, SEM and XRD. For the composite, the other parameters determined includes the water uptake, porosity, thickness, bulk and tapped densities, angle of repose, Carr's index and Hausner ratio. From the results, the material found to exhibit good flowing properties with a Carr's index of 11.11%, Hausner ratio of 1.125, and angle of response of 33°. The EDAX spectrum and HRTEM analysis confirmed for the composite formation and the particles size is investigated to be around 52 nm. The surface porosity due to the EC matrices was confirmed by the SEM analysis, which further used for the loading of drug, Proguanil. In addition, the material's conductivity was studied by taking uni-univalent electrolyte solution (KCl and NaCl) indicated that the conductivity follows the order of KCl > NaCl, while the activation energy obtained from Arrhenius method resembled that the conductivity is strongly influenced by the electrolyte type used. We found from the analysis that, with a decrease in the size of hydrated radii of ions, the conductivity of EC-MgHPO 4 material also observed to be decreased in the order K + > Na + and the material proved to be mechanically stable and can be operated over a range of pHs, temperatures, and electrolyte solutions. Further, the drug loading and efficiency studies indicated that the material can trap up to 80% of Proguanil (antimalarial drug) applied for its loading. The Proguanil drug release profiles confirmed for the controlled and sustained release from the EC-MgHPO 4 matrix, as the material can release up to 87% of its total loaded drug over a 90 min period. Finally, the cell viability and

  11. Studies on the optimization of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Tim W. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1994-01-04

    A methodology for the production of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites from hyper-eutectic copper-chromium alloys was developed. This methodology was derived from a basic study of the precipitation phenomena in these alloys encompassing evaluation of microstructural, electrical, and mechanical properties. The methodology developed produces material with a superior combination of electrical and mechanical properties compared to those presently available in commercial alloys. New and novel alloying procedures were investigated to extend the range of production methods available for these material. These studies focused on the use of High Pressure Gas Atomization and the development of new containment technologies for the liquid alloy. This allowed the production of alloys with a much more refined starting microstructure and lower contamination than available by other methods. The knowledge gained in the previous studies was used to develop two completely new families of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites. These composites are based on immissible alloys with yttrium and magnesium matrices and refractory metal reinforcement. This work extends the physical property range available in deformation processed metal metal matrix composites. Additionally, it also represents new ways to apply these metals in engineering applications.

  12. Magnesium isotopic composition of the Earth and chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Li, Wang-Ye; Ke, Shan; Marty, Bernard; Dauphas, Nicolas; Huang, Shichun; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Pourmand, Ali

    2010-07-01

    To constrain further the Mg isotopic composition of the Earth and chondrites, and investigate the behavior of Mg isotopes during planetary formation and magmatic processes, we report high-precision (±0.06‰ on δ 25Mg and ±0.07‰ on δ 26Mg, 2SD) analyses of Mg isotopes for (1) 47 mid-ocean ridge basalts covering global major ridge segments and spanning a broad range in latitudes, geochemical and radiogenic isotopic compositions; (2) 63 ocean island basalts from Hawaii (Kilauea, Koolau and Loihi) and French Polynesia (Society Island and Cook-Austral chain); (3) 29 peridotite xenoliths from Australia, China, France, Tanzania and USA; and (4) 38 carbonaceous, ordinary and enstatite chondrites including 9 chondrite groups (CI, CM, CO, CV, L, LL, H, EH and EL). Oceanic basalts and peridotite xenoliths have similar Mg isotopic compositions, with average values of δ 25Mg = -0.13 ± 0.05 (2SD) and δ 26Mg = -0.26 ± 0.07 (2SD) for global oceanic basalts ( n = 110) and δ 25Mg = -0.13 ± 0.03 (2SD) and δ 26Mg = -0.25 ± 0.04 (2SD) for global peridotite xenoliths ( n = 29). The identical Mg isotopic compositions in oceanic basalts and peridotites suggest that equilibrium Mg isotope fractionation during partial melting of peridotite mantle and magmatic differentiation of basaltic magma is negligible. Thirty-eight chondrites have indistinguishable Mg isotopic compositions, with δ 25Mg = -0.15 ± 0.04 (2SD) and δ 26Mg = -0.28 ± 0.06 (2SD). The constancy of Mg isotopic compositions in all major types of chondrites suggest that primary and secondary processes that affected the chemical and oxygen isotopic compositions of chondrites did not significantly fractionate Mg isotopes. Collectively, the Mg isotopic composition of the Earth's mantle, based on oceanic basalts and peridotites, is estimated to be -0.13 ± 0.04 for δ 25Mg and -0.25 ± 0.07 for δ 26Mg (2SD, n = 139). The Mg isotopic composition of the Earth, as represented by the mantle, is similar to chondrites

  13. Nanophosphor composite scintillator with a liquid matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKigney, Edward Allen; Burrell, Anthony Keiran; Bennett, Bryan L.; Cooke, David Wayne; Ott, Kevin Curtis; Bacrania, Minesh Kantilal; Del Sesto, Rico Emilio; Gilbertson, Robert David; Muenchausen, Ross Edward; McCleskey, Thomas Mark

    2010-03-16

    An improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid comprises nanophosphor particles in a liquid matrix. The nanophosphor particles are optionally surface modified with an organic ligand. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially surface charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during dispersion in a liquid scintillator matrix. The improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid may be used in any conventional liquid scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  14. Pseudomonas biofilm matrix composition and niche biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Ethan E.; Wozniak, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are a predominant form of growth for bacteria in the environment and in the clinic. Critical for biofilm development are adherence, proliferation, and dispersion phases. Each of these stages includes reinforcement by, or modulation of, the extracellular matrix. Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been a model organism for the study of biofilm formation. Additionally, other Pseudomonas species utilize biofilm formation during plant colonization and environmental persistence. Pseudomonads produce several biofilm matrix molecules, including polysaccharides, nucleic acids, and proteins. Accessory matrix components shown to aid biofilm formation and adaptability under varying conditions are also produced by pseudomonads. Adaptation facilitated by biofilm formation allows for selection of genetic variants with unique and distinguishable colony morphology. Examples include rugose small-colony variants and wrinkly spreaders (WS), which over produce Psl/Pel or cellulose, respectively, and mucoid bacteria that over produce alginate. The well-documented emergence of these variants suggests that pseudomonads take advantage of matrix-building subpopulations conferring specific benefits for the entire population. This review will focus on various polysaccharides as well as additional Pseudomonas biofilm matrix components. Discussions will center on structure–function relationships, regulation, and the role of individual matrix molecules in niche biology. PMID:22212072

  15. Influence of silica nanospheres on corrosion behavior of magnesium matrix syntactic foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, W.; Kannan, S.; Vincent, S.; Eddine, N. N.; Muhammed, A.; Gupta, M.; Karthikeyan, R.; Badari, V.

    2018-04-01

    Over the years, the development of Magnesium alloys as biodegradable implants has seen significant advancements. Magnesium based materials tend to provide numerous advantages in the field of biomedical implants over existing materials such as titanium or stainless steel. The present research focuses on corrosive behavior of Magnesium reinforced with different volume percentages of Hollow Silica Nano Spheres (HSNS). These behaviors were tested in two different simulated body fluids (SBF) namely, Hank’s Buffered Saline Solution (HBSS) and Phosphate Buffered Solution (PBS). This corrosion study was done using the method of electrochemical polarization with a three-electrode configuration. Comparative studies were established by testing pure Mg which provided critical information on the effects of the reinforcing material. The HSNS reinforced Mg displayed desirable characteristics after corrosion experiments; increased corrosion resistance was witnessed with higher volume percentage of HSNS.

  16. Thermal and mechanical behavior of metal matrix and ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, John M. (Editor); Moeller, Helen H. (Editor); Johnson, W. S. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The present conference discusses local stresses in metal-matrix composites (MMCs) subjected to thermal and mechanical loads, the computational simulation of high-temperature MMCs' cyclic behavior, an analysis of a ceramic-matrix composite (CMC) flexure specimen, and a plasticity analysis of fibrous composite laminates under thermomechanical loads. Also discussed are a comparison of methods for determining the fiber-matrix interface frictional stresses of CMCs, the monotonic and cyclic behavior of an SiC/calcium aluminosilicate CMC, the mechanical and thermal properties of an SiC particle-reinforced Al alloy MMC, the temperature-dependent tensile and shear response of a graphite-reinforced 6061 Al-alloy MMC, the fiber/matrix interface bonding strength of MMCs, and fatigue crack growth in an Al2O3 short fiber-reinforced Al-2Mg matrix MMC.

  17. Impurity characterization of magnesium diuranate using simultaneous TG–DTA–FTIR measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raje, Naina, E-mail: nraje@barc.gov.in [Analytical Chemistry Division, B.A.R.C., Mumbai 400 085 (India); Ghonge, Darshana K. [Analytical Chemistry Division, B.A.R.C., Mumbai 400 085 (India); Hemantha Rao, G.V.S. [NFC, ECIL Post, Hyderabad (India); Reddy, A.V.R. [Analytical Chemistry Division, B.A.R.C., Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2013-05-15

    Current studies describe the application of simultaneous thermogravimetry–differential thermal analysis – evolved gas analysis techniques for the compositional characterization of magnesium diuranate (MDU) with respect to the impurities present in the matrix. The stoichiometric composition of MDU was identified as MgU{sub 2}O{sub 7}⋅3H{sub 2}O. Presence of carbonate and sulphate as impurities in the matrix was confirmed through the evolved gas analysis using Fourier Transformation Infrared Spectrometry detection. Carbon and magnesium hydroxide content present as impurities in magnesium diuranate have been determined quantitatively using TG and FTIR techniques and the results are in good agreement. Powder X-ray diffraction analysis of magnesium diuranate suggests the presence of magnesium hydroxide as impurity in the matrix. Also these studies confirm the formation of magnesium uranate, uranium sesquioxide and uranium dioxide above 1000 °C, due to the decomposition of magnesium diuranate.

  18. Modern Nondestructive Test Methods for Army Ceramic Matrix Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Strand, Douglas J

    2008-01-01

    .... Ceramic matrix composites (CMC) are potentially good high-temperature structural materials because of their low density, high elastic moduli, high strength, and for those with weak interfaces, surprisingly good damage tolerance...

  19. Diffraction measurements of residual stress in titanium matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, M.R.; Bourke, M.A.; Goldstone, J.A.; Lawson, A.C.

    1993-01-01

    Metal matrix composites develop residual strains after consolidation due to the thermal expansion mismatch between the reinforcement fiber and the matrix. X-ray and neutron diffraction measured values for the longitudinal residual stress in the matrix of four titanium MMCs are reported. For thick composites (> 6 plies) the surface stress measured by x-ray diffraction matches that determined by neutron diffraction and therefore represents the stress in the bulk region consisting of the fibers and matrix. For thin sheet composites, the surface values are lower than in the interior and increase as the outer rows of fibers are approached. While a rationale for the behavior in the thin sheet has yet to be developed, accounting for composite thickness is important when using x-ray measured values to validate analytic and finite element calculations of the residual stress state

  20. Exploration the extrudability of aluminum matrix composite (LM6/TIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aluminum matrix composites (LM6/TiC) is a mix of excellent properties of aluminum ... ABAQUS/CAE software has been successfully employed for Modeling and ... Experimental results show that, many mechanical properties are improved and ...

  1. Transverse thermal expansion of carbon fiber/epoxy matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmer, J. F.; Diefendorf, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Thermal expansion coefficients and moduli of elasticity have been determined experimentally for a series of epoxy-matrix composites reinforced with carbon and Kevlar fibers. It is found that in the transverse direction the difference between the properties of the fiber and the matrix is not as pronounced as in the longitudinal direction, where the composite properties are fiber-dominated. Therefore, the pattern of fiber packing tends to affect transverse composite properties. The transverse properties of the composites tested are examined from the standpoint of the concept of homogeneity defined as the variation of packing (or lack thereof) throughout a sample.

  2. Magnesium Affects Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate Content and Composition by Affecting Glucose Uptake in Delftia acidovorans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee, W. H.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Precise control of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA composition is necessary in order to synthesize polymers with specific properties. Among the various types of PHA that have been identified, those that contain 4-hydroxybutyrate (4HB monomers are especially useful in the medical and pharmaceutical fields as absorbable biomaterial. In this study, we have investigated the effect of magnesium concentration on the biosynthesis of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate [P(3HB-co-4HB] by Delftia acidovorans DS-17. Our results show that, magnesium affects the copolymer content and composition by affecting glucose uptake from the culture medium. Higher concentrations of magnesium resulted in lower molar fractions of 3HB in the copolymer and reduced uptake of glucose. The results show for the first time that magnesium may be used to achieve fine control of biologically synthesized PHA copolymer composition.

  3. Review on preparation techniques of particle reinforced metal matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAO Bin

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the investigation status of the techniques for preparation of metal matrix composites and the research outcomes achieved recently. The mechanisms, characteristics, application ranges and levels of development of these preparation techniques are analyzed. The advantages and the disadvantages of each technique are synthetically evaluated. Lastly, the future directions of research and the prospects for the preparation techniques of metal matrix composites are forecasted.

  4. Molybdate/phosphate composite conversion coating on magnesium alloy surface for corrosion protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong Zhiyi; Zhu Jin; Qiu Cheng; Liu Yali

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a new conversion coating-molybdate/phosphate (Mo/P) coating on magnesium alloy was prepared and investigated by electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and salt-water immersion experiments, respectively. The results demonstrated that the Mo/P coating contained composite phases, which were consisted of metaphosphate as well as molybdate oxide with an 'alveolate-crystallized' structure. The composite Mo/P conversion coating had better corrosion resistance performance than molybdate (Mo) coating, and even had almost comparable corrosion protection for Mg alloy to the traditional chromate-based coating.

  5. Electrochemical deposition of Mg(OH2/GO composite films for corrosion protection of magnesium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengxia Wu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mg(OH2/graphene oxide (GO composite film was electrochemical deposited on AZ91D magnesium alloys at constant potential. The characteristics of the Mg(OH2/GO composite film were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM, energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS, X-ray diffractometer (XRD and Raman spectroscopy. It was shown that the flaky GO randomly distributed in the composite film. Compared with the Mg(OH2 film, the Mg(OH2/GO composite film exhibited more uniform and compact structure. Potentiodynamic polarization tests revealed that the Mg(OH2/GO composite film could significantly improve the corrosion resistance of Mg(OH2 film with an obvious positive shift of corrosion potential by 0.19 V and a dramatic reduction of corrosion current density by more than one order of magnitude.

  6. Preparation and characterization of the micro-arc oxidation composite coatings on magnesium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfeng Ge

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The magnesium alloys attract the light-weight manufacture due to its high strength to weight ratio, however the poor corrosion resistance limits the application in automobile industry. The Micro-arc Composite Ceramic (MCC coatings on AZ91D magnesium alloys were prepared by Micro-arc Oxidation (MAO and electrophoresis technologies. The microstructure, corrosion resistance, abrasion resistance, stone impact resistance and adhesion of MCC coatings were studied respectively. The cross section morphologies showed that the outer organic coating was filled into the hole on surface of MAO coating, and it acted as a shelter against corrosive products. The copper-accelerated acetic acid salt spray Test, abrasion resistance test, stone impact resistance test, thermal shock resistance test and adhesion test were used to evaluate the protective characterization by the third testing organization which approved by GM. The test results showed the composite coatings meet all the requirements. The MCC coating on Mg presents excellent properties, and it is a promising surface treatment technology on magnesium alloys for production vehicles.

  7. Composition of highly concentrated silicate electrolytes and ultrasound influencing the plasma electrolytic oxidation of magnesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simchen, F.; Rymer, L.-M.; Sieber, M.; Lampke, T.

    2017-03-01

    Magnesium and its alloys are increasingly in use as lightweight construction materials. However, their inappropriate corrosion and wear resistance often prevent their direct practical use. The plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) is a promising, environmentally friendly method to improve the surface characteristics of magnesium materials by the formation of oxide coatings. These PEO layers contain components of the applied electrolyte and can be shifted in their composition by increasing the concentration of the electrolyte constituents. Therefore, in contrast to the use of conventional low concentrated electrolytes, the process results in more stable protective coatings, in which electrolyte species are the dominating constitutes. In the present work, the influence of the composition of highly concentrated alkaline silicate electrolytes with additives of phosphate and glycerol on the quality of PEO layers on the magnesium alloy AZ31 was examined. The effect of ultrasound coupled into the electrolyte bath was also considered. The process was monitored by recording the electrical process variables with a transient recorder and by observation of the discharge phenomena on the sample surface with a camera. The study was conducted on the basis of a design of experiments. The effects of the process parameter variation are considered with regard to the coatings thickness, hardness and corrosion resistance. Information about the statistical significance of the effects of the parameters on the considered properties is obtained by an analysis of variance (ANOVA).

  8. Reactive synthesis of NbAl3 matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, L.; Kim, Y.S.; Gokhale, A.B.; Abbaschian, R.

    1990-01-01

    NbAl 3 matrix composites were synthesized in-situ via reactive hot compaction (RHC) of elemental powders. It was found that the simultaneous application of pressure during synthesis was effective in attaining a near-theoretical density matrix at relatively low temperatures and pressures. Using this technique, two types of composites were produced: matrices containing a uniform dispersion of second phase particles (either Nb 3 Al or Nb 2 Al with an Nb core or Nb 2 Al) and matrices reinforced with coated or uncoated ductile Nb filaments. It was found that a limited amount of toughening is obtained using the first approach, while composites containing coated Nb filaments exhibited a significant increase in the ambient temperature fracture toughness. In this paper, various aspects of RHC processing of NbAl 3 matrix composites, the effect of initial stoichiometry and powder size on the microstructure, as well as the mechanical behavior of the composites are discussed

  9. Effect of matrix cracking and material uncertainty on composite plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gayathri, P.; Umesh, K.; Ganguli, R.

    2010-01-01

    A laminated composite plate model based on first order shear deformation theory is implemented using the finite element method. Matrix cracks are introduced into the finite element model by considering changes in the A, B and D matrices of composites. The effects of different boundary conditions, laminate types and ply angles on the behavior of composite plates with matrix cracks are studied. Finally, the effect of material property uncertainty, which is important for composite material on the composite plate, is investigated using Monte Carlo simulations. Probabilistic estimates of damage detection reliability in composite plates are made for static and dynamic measurements. It is found that the effect of uncertainty must be considered for accurate damage detection in composite structures. The estimates of variance obtained for observable system properties due to uncertainty can be used for developing more robust damage detection algorithms.

  10. Effect of Iron Impurity on the Phase Composition, Structure and Properties of Magnesium Alloys Containing Manganese and Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, E. F.

    2017-07-01

    Results of a study of the interaction between iron impurity and manganese and aluminum alloying elements during formation of phase composition in alloys of the Mg - Mn, Mg - Al, Mg - Al - Mn, and Mg - Al - Zn - Mn systems are presented. It is proved that this interaction results in introduction of Fe into the intermetallic phase. The phase compositions of model magnesium alloys and commercial alloys MA2-1 and MA5 are studied. It is shown that both manganese and aluminum may bind the iron impurity into phases. Composite Fe-containing intermetallic phases of different compositions influence differently the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys.

  11. The Candida albicans Biofilm Matrix: Composition, Structure and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Christopher G; Vila, Taissa; Romo, Jesus A; Montelongo-Jauregui, Daniel; Wall, Gina; Ramasubramanian, Anand; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L

    2017-03-01

    A majority of infections caused by Candida albicans -the most frequent fungal pathogen-are associated with biofilm formation. A salient feature of C. albicans biofilms is the presence of the biofilm matrix. This matrix is composed of exopolymeric materials secreted by sessile cells within the biofilm, in which all classes of macromolecules are represented, and provides protection against environmental challenges. In this review, we summarize the knowledge accumulated during the last two decades on the composition, structure, and function of the C. albicans biofilm matrix. Knowledge of the matrix components, its structure, and function will help pave the way to novel strategies to combat C. albicans biofilm infections.

  12. Aluminum matrix composites reinforced with alumina nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Casati, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the latest efforts to develop aluminum nanocomposites with enhanced damping and mechanical properties and good workability. The nanocomposites exhibited high strength, improved damping behavior and good ductility, making them suitable for use as wires. Since the production of metal matrix nanocomposites by conventional melting processes is considered extremely problematic (because of the poor wettability of the nanoparticles), different powder metallurgy routes were investigated, including high-energy ball milling and unconventional compaction methods. Special attention was paid to the structural characterization at the micro- and nanoscale, as uniform nanoparticle dispersion in metal matrix is of prime importance. The aluminum nanocomposites displayed an ultrafine microstructure reinforced with alumina nanoparticles produced in situ or added ex situ. The physical, mechanical and functional characteristics of the materials produced were evaluated using different mechanical tests and micros...

  13. Experimental study on mechanical behavior of fiber/matrix interface in metal matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Q.; Chiang, F.P.

    1994-01-01

    The technique SIEM(Speckle Interferometry with Electron Microscopy) was employed to quantitatively measure the deformation on the fiber/matrix interface in SCS-6/Ti-6-4 composite at a microscale level. The displacement field within the fiber/matrix interphase zone was determined by in-situ observation with sensitivity of 0.003(microm). The macro-mechanical properties were compared with micro-mechanical behavior. It is shown that the strength in the interphase zone is weaker than the matrix tensile strength. The deformation process can be characterized by the uniform deformation, interface strain concentration and debond, and matrix plastic deformation

  14. A Matrix Splitting Method for Composite Function Minimization

    KAUST Repository

    Yuan, Ganzhao

    2016-12-07

    Composite function minimization captures a wide spectrum of applications in both computer vision and machine learning. It includes bound constrained optimization and cardinality regularized optimization as special cases. This paper proposes and analyzes a new Matrix Splitting Method (MSM) for minimizing composite functions. It can be viewed as a generalization of the classical Gauss-Seidel method and the Successive Over-Relaxation method for solving linear systems in the literature. Incorporating a new Gaussian elimination procedure, the matrix splitting method achieves state-of-the-art performance. For convex problems, we establish the global convergence, convergence rate, and iteration complexity of MSM, while for non-convex problems, we prove its global convergence. Finally, we validate the performance of our matrix splitting method on two particular applications: nonnegative matrix factorization and cardinality regularized sparse coding. Extensive experiments show that our method outperforms existing composite function minimization techniques in term of both efficiency and efficacy.

  15. A Matrix Splitting Method for Composite Function Minimization

    KAUST Repository

    Yuan, Ganzhao; Zheng, Wei-Shi; Ghanem, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Composite function minimization captures a wide spectrum of applications in both computer vision and machine learning. It includes bound constrained optimization and cardinality regularized optimization as special cases. This paper proposes and analyzes a new Matrix Splitting Method (MSM) for minimizing composite functions. It can be viewed as a generalization of the classical Gauss-Seidel method and the Successive Over-Relaxation method for solving linear systems in the literature. Incorporating a new Gaussian elimination procedure, the matrix splitting method achieves state-of-the-art performance. For convex problems, we establish the global convergence, convergence rate, and iteration complexity of MSM, while for non-convex problems, we prove its global convergence. Finally, we validate the performance of our matrix splitting method on two particular applications: nonnegative matrix factorization and cardinality regularized sparse coding. Extensive experiments show that our method outperforms existing composite function minimization techniques in term of both efficiency and efficacy.

  16. Cavitation instabilities between fibres in a metal matrix composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2016-01-01

    induced by bonding to the ceramics that only show elastic deformation. In an MMC the stress state in the metal matrix is highly non-uniform, varying between regions where shear stresses are dominant and regions where hydrostatic tension is strong. An Al–SiC whisker composite with a periodic pattern......Short fibre reinforced metal matrix composites (MMC) are studied here to investigate the possibility that a cavitation instability can develop in the metal matrix. The high stress levels needed for a cavitation instability may occur in metal–ceramic systems due to the constraint on plastic flow...... of transversely staggered fibres is here modelled by using an axisymmetric cell model analysis. First the critical stress level is determined for a cavitation instability in an infinite solid made of the Al matrix material. By studying composites with different distributions and aspect ratios of the fibres...

  17. exploration the extrudability of aluminum matrix composite (lm6/tic)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lanez

    2017-11-24

    Nov 24, 2017 ... Aluminum matrix composites (LM6/TiC) is a mix of excellent properties of aluminum casting alloy (LM6), and particles of (TiC) which make it the first choice in many applications like airplane and marine industries. During this research the extrudability and mechanical specifications of this composite ...

  18. Influence of the Sr and Mg Alloying Additions on the Bonding Between Matrix and Reinforcing Particles in the AlSi7Mg/SiC-Cg Hybrid Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolata A. J.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to perform adequate selection of the phase composition of the composite designated for permanent - mould casting air compressor pistons. The hybrid composites based on AlSi7Mg matrix alloy reinforced with mixture of silicon carbide (SiC and glassy carbon (Cg particles were fabricated by the stir casting method. It has been shown that the proper selection of chemical composition of matrix alloy and its modification by used magnesium and strontium additions gives possibility to obtain both the advantageous casting properties of composite suspensions as well as good bonding between particles reinforcements and matrix.

  19. Studies on the ageing of a magnesium-strontium nitrate pyrotechnic composition using isothermal microcalorimetry and thermal analysis techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuukkanen, I.; Brown, S.D.; Charsley, E.L.; Goodall, S.J.; Rooney, J.J.; Griffiths, T.T.; Lemmetyinen, H.

    2004-01-01

    The ageing behaviour of a pyrotechnic composition containing equal parts by mass of magnesium and strontium nitrate has been followed by isothermal microcalorimetry. The measurements were carried out on the samples at 50 deg. C and 65% relative humidity in air using closed ampoules. The results have been compared to those obtained for magnesium powder under the same conditions. Following an initial induction period, the pyrotechnic compositions reacted at a much faster rate than magnesium powder alone. The main reaction products were found to be magnesium hydroxide and strontium nitrite; the amounts formed have been correlated with the cumulative heats of ageing. In addition, the influence of the ageing process on the pyrotechnic reaction has been studied by high temperature differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and by modulated temperature DSC

  20. Bulk metallic glass matrix composite for good biocompatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjoub, F; Metiri, W; Doghmane, A; Hadjoub, Z

    2012-01-01

    Reinforcement volume fraction effects on acoustical parameters of Zr 41.2 Ti 13.8 Cu 12.5 Ni 10 Be 22.5 matrix composites reinforced by Mg, Ag and Cd metals have been studied via a simulation program based on acoustic microscopy technique. Moreover, acoustical parameters of human bone were compared to those of BMGs in both monolithic and reinforced case. It was found that elastic behavior of BMGs matrix composites in high reinforcement volume fraction is similar of that of human bone. This behavior leads to high biocompatibility and good transfer of stress between composite material and human system.

  1. Advanced Ceramic Matrix Composites with Multifunctional and Hybrid Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Morscher, Gregory N.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are leading candidate materials for a number of applications in aeronautics, space, energy, and nuclear industries. Potential composite applications differ in their requirements for thickness. For example, many space applications such as "nozzle ramps" or "heat exchangers" require very thin (structures whereas turbine blades would require very thick parts (> or = 1 cm). Little is known about the effect of thickness on stress-strain behavior or the elevated temperature tensile properties controlled by oxidation diffusion. In this study, composites consisting of woven Hi-Nicalon (trademark) fibers a carbon interphase and CVI SiC matrix were fabricated with different numbers of plies and thicknesses. The effect of thickness on matrix crack formation, matrix crack growth and diffusion kinetics will be discussed. In another approach, hybrid fiber-lay up concepts have been utilized to "alloy" desirable properties of different fiber types for mechanical properties, thermal stress management, and oxidation resistance. Such an approach has potential for the C(sub I)-SiC and SiC(sub f)-SiC composite systems. CVI SiC matrix composites with different stacking sequences of woven C fiber (T300) layers and woven SiC fiber (Hi-Nicalon (trademark)) layers were fabricated. The results will be compared to standard C fiber reinforced CVI SiC matrix and Hi-Nicalon reinforced CVI SiC matrix composites. In addition, shear properties of these composites at different temperatures will also be presented. Other design and implementation issues will be discussed along with advantages and benefits of using these materials for various components in high temperature applications.

  2. Mechanisms of de cohesion in cutting aluminium matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cichosz, Piotr; Karolczak, Pawel; Kuzinovski, Mikolaj

    2008-01-01

    In this paper properties and applications of aluminium matrix composites are presented with a composite reinforced with saffil fibres selected for topical study. Behavior of matrix and reinforcement during machining with a cutting tool is analyzed. The paper presents an explosive quick-stop device designed to obtain undisturbed machined surface for examination. Meso hardness measurements of deformed structure, resultant chips and built-up-edge were carried out. Scanning micrographs of machined surface are presented with morphology and types of chips analysed. Values of the fibrousness angle ψ and thickening index k h of chip are evaluated. The research performed has enabled the authors to define mechanisms of e cohesion during cutting aluminium matrix composites. The results received for composite material are compared with those pertinent to aluminum alloys.

  3. Standard Guide for Testing Polymer Matrix Composite Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This guide summarizes the application of ASTM standard test methods (and other supporting standards) to continuous-fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite materials. The most commonly used or most applicable ASTM standards are included, emphasizing use of standards of Committee D30 on Composite Materials. 1.2 This guide does not cover all possible standards that could apply to polymer matrix composites and restricts discussion to the documented scope. Commonly used but non-standard industry extensions of test method scopes, such as application of static test methods to fatigue testing, are not discussed. A more complete summary of general composite testing standards, including non-ASTM test methods, is included in the Composite Materials Handbook (MIL-HDBK-17). Additional specific recommendations for testing textile (fabric, braided) composites are contained in Guide D6856. 1.3 This guide does not specify a system of measurement; the systems specified within each of the referenced standards shall appl...

  4. Interfacial reactions in intermetallic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantrell, L.B.; Clevenger, E.M.; Perepezko, J.H.

    1993-01-01

    The thermal stability of advanced composites is dominated by the behavior of internal interfaces. Analysis of these internal interfaces often involves consideration of at least ternary order phase equilibria. Limited thermodynamic data exists for ternary and higher order systems. However, a combined approach based upon the use of binary data to estimate ternary phase equilibria and experimentally determined reaction pathways is effective in the analysis of interface reactions in composite systems. In blended powder samples, thermal analysis was used to find possible reaction temperatures, while X-ray analysis, EDS, and EPMA of diffusion couples were used to assess interdiffusion reaction pathways. The approach is illustrated by compatibility studies between TiAl and TiSi 2 at 1,100 C, and in-situ reactions between B 4 C and TiAl at 1300 C where multiple reaction sequences have been analyzed to provide guidance for the design of in-situ reaction processing of composites

  5. Modeling the curing process of thermosetting resin matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loos, A. C.

    1986-01-01

    A model is presented for simulating the curing process of a thermosetting resin matrix composite. The model relates the cure temperature, the cure pressure, and the properties of the prepreg to the thermal, chemical, and rheological processes occurring in the composite during cure. The results calculated with the computer code developed on the basis of the model were compared with the experimental data obtained from autoclave-curved composite laminates. Good agreement between the two sets of results was obtained.

  6. Interfacial reaction effects on erosion of aluminum matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, J.P.; Hiroshima Univ., Higashi-Hiroshima; Matsumura, M.

    1999-01-01

    Alumina borate (A 18 B 4 O 33 ) whisker reinforced aluminum composites have attracted interest because of their high specific strength, high modulus and low cost. An obvious feature of the microstructure in A 18 B 4 O 33 /Al composite is that an interfacial reaction exists between the whisker and the aluminum alloy. In order to discuss the influence of interface interaction between the whisker and matrix on the erosion resistance of composites, two reaction treatments are conducted. From the results of the treated composites, it can be obtained about the erosion characteristics of the composite materials under steady-state conditions

  7. Acoustic emission as a screening tool for ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojard, Greg; Goberman, Dan; Holowczak, John

    2017-02-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are composite materials with ceramic fibers in a high temperature matrix of ceramic or glass-ceramic. This emerging class of materials is viewed as enabling for efficiency improvements in many energy conversion systems. The key controlling property of ceramic matrix composites is a relatively weak interface between the matrix and the fiber that aids crack deflection and fiber pullout resulting in greatly increased toughness over monolithic ceramics. United Technologies Research Center has been investigating glass-ceramic composite systems as a tool to understand processing effects on material performance related to the performance of the weak interface. Changes in the interface have been shown to affect the mechanical performance observed in flexural testing and subsequent microstructural investigations have confirmed the performance (or lack thereof) of the interface coating. Recently, the addition of acoustic emission testing during flexural testing has aided the understanding of the characteristics of the interface and its performance. The acoustic emission onset stress changes with strength and toughness and this could be a quality tool in screening the material before further development and use. The results of testing and analysis will be shown and additional material from other ceramic matrix composite systems may be included to show trends.

  8. Metal Matrix Composites Reinforced by Nano-Particles—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Casati

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Metal matrix composites reinforced by nano-particles are very promising materials, suitable for a large number of applications. These composites consist of a metal matrix filled with nano-particles featuring physical and mechanical properties very different from those of the matrix. The nano-particles can improve the base material in terms of wear resistance, damping properties and mechanical strength. Different kinds of metals, predominantly Al, Mg and Cu, have been employed for the production of composites reinforced by nano-ceramic particles such as carbides, nitrides, oxides as well as carbon nanotubes. The main issue of concern for the synthesis of these materials consists in the low wettability of the reinforcement phase by the molten metal, which does not allow the synthesis by conventional casting methods. Several alternative routes have been presented in literature for the production of nano-composites. This work is aimed at reviewing the most important manufacturing techniques used for the synthesis of bulk metal matrix nanocomposites. Moreover, the strengthening mechanisms responsible for the improvement of mechanical properties of nano-reinforced metal matrix composites have been reviewed and the main potential applications of this new class of materials are envisaged.

  9. Fabrication of metal matrix composites by powder metallurgy: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Guttikonda; Dey, Abhijit; Pandey, K. M.; Maity, S. R.

    2018-04-01

    Now a day's metal matrix components are used in may industries and it finds the applications in many fields so, to make it as better performable materials. So, the need to increase the mechanical properties of the composites is there. As seen from previous studies major problem faced by the MMC's are wetting, interface bonding between reinforcement and matrix material while they are prepared by conventional methods like stir casting, squeeze casting and other techniques which uses liquid molten metals. So many researchers adopt PM to eliminate these defects and to increase the mechanical properties of the composites. Powder metallurgy is one of the better ways to prepare composites and Nano composites. And the major problem faced by the conventional methods are uniform distribution of the reinforcement particles in the matrix alloy, many researchers tried to homogeneously dispersion of reinforcements in matrix but they find it difficult through conventional methods, among all they find ultrasonic dispersion is efficient. This review article is mainly concentrated on importance of powder metallurgy in homogeneous distribution of reinforcement in matrix by ball milling or mechanical milling and how powder metallurgy improves the mechanical properties of the composites.

  10. Modeling the Mechanical Behavior of Ceramic Matrix Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, William

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are ceramic materials, such as SiC, that have been reinforced by high strength fibers, such as carbon. Designers are interested in using ceramic matrix composites because they have the capability of withstanding significant loads while at relatively high temperatures (in excess of 1,000 C). Ceramic matrix composites retain the ceramic materials ability to withstand high temperatures, but also possess a much greater ductility and toughness. Their high strength and medium toughness is what makes them of so much interest to the aerospace community. This work concentrated on two different tasks. The first task was to do an extensive literature search into the mechanical behavior of ceramic matrix composite materials. This report contains the results of this task. The second task was to use this understanding to help interpret the ceramic matrix composite mechanical test results that had already been obtained by NASA. Since the specific details of these test results are subject to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), they are reported in a separate document (Jordan, 1997).

  11. Improving Turbine Performance with Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, James A.

    2007-01-01

    Under the new NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program, efforts are on-going within the Supersonics Project aimed at the implementation of advanced SiC/SiC ceramic composites into hot section components of future gas turbine engines. Due to recent NASA advancements in SiC-based fibers and matrices, these composites are lighter and capable of much higher service temperatures than current metallic superalloys, which in turn will allow the engines to operate at higher efficiencies and reduced emissions. This presentation briefly reviews studies within Task 6.3.3 that are primarily aimed at developing physics-based concepts, tools, and process/property models for micro- and macro-structural design, fabrication, and lifing of SiC/SiC turbine components in general and airfoils in particular. Particular emphasis is currently being placed on understanding and modeling (1) creep effects on residual stress development within the component, (2) fiber architecture effects on key composite properties such as design strength, and (3) preform formation processes so that the optimum architectures can be implemented into complex-shaped components, such as turbine vanes and blades.

  12. High corrosion resistance of electroless composite plating coatings on AZ91D magnesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Y.W.; Shan, D.Y.; Han, E.H.

    2008-01-01

    The process of electroless plating Ni-P on AZ91D magnesium alloys was improved. The Ni-P-ZrO 2 composite coatings and multilayer coatings were investigated based on the new electroless plating process. The coatings surface and cross-section morphologies were observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The chemical compositions were analyzed by EDXS. The corrosion behaviors were evaluated by immersion, salt spray and electrochemical tests. The experimental results indicated that the Ni-P-ZrO 2 composite coatings suffered attack in NaCl solution but displayed passivation characteristics in NaOH and Na 2 SO 4 solutions. The corrosion resistance of Ni-P-ZrO 2 coatings was superior to Ni-P coatings due to the effect of ZrO 2 nano-particle. The multilayer coatings consisting of Ni-P-ZrO 2 /electroplating nickel/Ni-P (from substrate to surface) can protect magnesium alloys from corroding more than 1000 h for the salt spray test

  13. Dry Sliding Wear Charactristics of Aluminum 6061-T6, Magnesium AZ31 and Rock Dust Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandar, R.; Balasundaram, R.; Rajkumar, G.

    2018-02-01

    In recent years, the use of aluminum composite is gaining popularity in a wide range of applications like automobiles, aerospace and constructions (both interior & exterior) panels etc., due to its high strength, low density characteristics. Various reinforcing materials are used with aluminum 6061-T6 in order to have better mechanical properties. The addition of 0.3% of magnesium AZ31 will increase the ultimate tensile strength by 25 %. The reinforcement of rock dust will decrease the density. Hence, in order to have an advantages of magnesium AZ31 and rock dust, in this work, these two constitutes are varied from 1% to 2% on the base material of Al6061-T6 in stir casting. To evaluate the wear characteristics, Pin on disc is used in these composites. The input parameters are speed, time & load. The output response is wear. To minimize the number of experiments, L9 orthogonal array is used. The test results showed that a composite of 97% of Al (6061-T6), 1% Mg (AZ31) & 2 % of rock dust produced less wear. To find the best value of operating parameter for each sample, ANN-GA is used.

  14. Insight of magnesium alloys and composites for orthopedic implant applications – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Radha

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium (Mg and its alloys have been widely researched for orthopedic applications recently. Mg alloys have stupendous advantages over the commercially available stainless steel, Co-Cr-Ni alloy and titanium implants. Till date, extensive mechanical, in-vitro and in-vivo studies have been done to improve the biomedical performance of Mg alloys through alloying, processing conditions, surface modification etc. This review comprehensively describes the strategies for improving the mechanical and degradation performance of Mg alloys through properly tailoring the composition of alloying elements, reinforcements and processing techniques. It also highlights the status and progress of research in to (i the selection of nutrient elements for alloying, reinforcement and its effects (ii type of Mg alloy system (binary, ternary and quaternary and composites (iii grain refinement for strengthening through severe plastic deformation techniques. Furthermore it also emphasizes on the importance of Mg composites with regard to hard tissue applications.

  15. Ceramic matrix composites using polymer pyrolysis and liquid densification processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, H.O.; Petrak, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    The polymer precursor approach for manufacture of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) is both flexible and tailorable to shape and engineering requirements. The tailorability includes a wide range of reinforcements, polymer matrix precursors and fillers. Processing is selected based on cure/pressure requirements to best produce the required shape, radii, fiber volume and fiber orientation. Combinations of tooling used for cure/pressure applications are discussed and fabricated components are shown. ((orig.))

  16. Microstructure, Friction and Wear of Aluminum Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florea, R. M.

    2018-06-01

    MMCs are made by dispersing a reinforcing material into a metal matrix. They are prepared by casting, although several technical challenges exist with casting technology. Achieving a homogeneous distribution of reinforcement within the matrix is one such challenge, and this affects directly on the properties and quality of composite. The aluminum alloy composite materials consist of high strength, high stiffness, more thermal stability, more corrosion and wear resistance, and more fatigue life. Aluminum alloy materials found to be the best alternative with its unique capacity of designing the materials to give required properties. In this work a composite is developed by adding silicon carbide in Aluminum metal matrix by mass ratio 5%, 10% and 15%. Mechanical tests such as hardness test and microstructure test are conducted.

  17. Fatigue and frictional heating in ceramic matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, T.K.; Sørensen, B.F.; Brøndsted, P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental technique for monitoring the damage evolution in ceramic matrix composites during cyclic testing. The damage is related to heat dissipation, which may be measured as radiated heat from the surface of the test specimen. In the present experimental set-up an iso......This paper describes an experimental technique for monitoring the damage evolution in ceramic matrix composites during cyclic testing. The damage is related to heat dissipation, which may be measured as radiated heat from the surface of the test specimen. In the present experimental set...... with a high spatial and temperature resolution and changes in the heat dissipation can be measured almost instantaneously. The technique has been tested on uni-directional ceramic matrix composites. Experimental results are shown and the possibilities and the limitations of the technique are discussed....

  18. Synthesis of a novel alkali-activated magnesium slag-based nanostructural composite and its photocatalytic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yao Jun, E-mail: zhangyaojun@xauat.edu.cn; Kang, Le; Liu, Li Cai; Si, Hai Xiao; Zhang, Ji Fang

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • A novel type of AMSNC is firstly synthesized by three-step reactions. • Magnesium slag-based nanomaterial is applied for degradation of wastewater. • Photocatalytic activities depend on the absorption edges of nanomaterials. • A photocatalytic degradation mechanism was proposed. - Abstract: A novel type of alkali-activated magnesium slag-based nanostructural composite (AMSNC) co-loaded bimetallic oxide semiconductors of NiO and CuO were synthesized by alkaline activation, ion exchange and wet co-impregnation methods, and then firstly employed as a photocatalyst for the degradation of indigo carmine dye. The XRD, TEM and HRTEM results revealed that CuO in the form of tenorite with mean particle size of about 15 nm and NiO in amorphous phase dispersed on the surface of AMSNC support. The decrease of photoluminescence with increasing amount of NiO and CuO demonstrated that the recombination of photogenerated electrons–holes pairs was prevented when the photogenerated electrons transferred from the metal oxide semiconductor to the AMSNC matrix. The 10(NiO + CuO)/AMSNC specimen showed that the photocatalytic degradation efficiency was up to 100% under UV irradiation for 1 h due to the synergistic effect between the AMSNC and active species of NiO and CuO. The mesoporous structures of specimens acted as critical role for the adsorption of dye molecules, and the photocatalytic degradation of indigo carmine dye obeyed first-order reaction kinetics. A degradation mechanism of photocatalytic oxidation was proposed in the paper.

  19. Evolution of Matrix-Twin Interfaces of (1 0 -1 2) Twin in Magnesium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ostapovets, Andriy; Serra, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 128, č. 4 (2015), s. 661-663 ISSN 0587-4246. [ISPMA13 - International Symposium on Physics of Materials /13./. Praha, 31.08.2014-04.09.2014] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0063; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Grant - others:Spanish Secretariat of Research, Development and Innovation (ES) FIS2012-39433-C02-02 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : twinning * magnesium * computer simuations Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 0.525, year: 2015

  20. 4TH International Conference on High-Temperature Ceramic Matrix Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    .... Topic to be covered include fibers, interfaces, interphases, non-oxide ceramic matrix composites, oxide/oxide ceramic matrix composites, coatings, and applications of high-temperature ceramic matrix...

  1. Matrix densification of SiC composites by sintering process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young-Wook; Jang, Doo-Hee; Eom, Jung-Hye; Chun, Yong-Seong

    2007-02-01

    The objectives of this research are to develop a process for dense SiC fiber-SiC composites with a porosity of 5% or less and to develop high-strength SiC fiber-SiC composites with a strength of 500 MPa or higher. To meet the above objectives, the following research topics were investigated ; new process development for the densification of SiC fiber-SiC composites, effect of processing parameters on densification of SiC fiber-SiC composites, effect of additive composition on matrix microstructure, effects of additive composition and content on densification of SiC fiber-SiC composites, mechanical properties of SiC fiber-SiC composites, effect of fiber coating on densification and strength of SiC fiber-SiC composites, development of new additive composition. There has been a great deal of progress in the development of technologies for the processing and densification of SiC fiber-SiC composites and in better understanding of additive-densification-mechanical property relations as results of this project. Based on the progress, dense SiC fiber-SiC composites (≥97%) and high strength SiC fiber-SiC composites (≥600 MPa) have been developed. Development of 2D SiC fiber-SiC composites with a relative density of ≥97% and a strength of ≥600 MPa can be counted as a notable achievement

  2. Progressive delamination in polymer matrix composite laminates: A new approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Minnetyan, L.

    1992-01-01

    A new approach independent of stress intensity factors and fracture toughness parameters has been developed and is described for the computational simulation of progressive delamination in polymer matrix composite laminates. The damage stages are quantified based on physics via composite mechanics while the degradation of the laminate behavior is quantified via the finite element method. The approach accounts for all types of composite behavior, laminate configuration, load conditions, and delamination processes starting from damage initiation, to unstable propagation, and to laminate fracture. Results of laminate fracture in composite beams, panels, plates, and shells are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and versatility of this new approach.

  3. Ceramic matrix composites -- Advanced high-temperature structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowden, R.A.; Ferber, M.K.; DiPietro, S.G.

    1995-01-01

    This symposium on Ceramic Matrix Composites: Advanced High-Temperature Structural Materials was held at the 1994 MRS Fall Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts on November 28--December 2. The symposium was sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technology's Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites Program, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and NASA Lewis Research Center. Among the competing materials for advanced, high-temperature applications, ceramic matrix composites are leading candidates. The symposium was organized such that papers concerning constituents--fibers and matrices--were presented first, followed by composite processing, modeling of mechanical behavior, and thermomechanical testing. More stable reinforcements are necessary to enhance the performance and life of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, and to ensure final acceptance of these materials for high-temperature applications. Encouraging results in the areas of polymer-derived SiC fibers and single crystal oxide filaments were given, suggesting composites with improved thermomechanical properties and stability will be realized in the near future. The significance of the fiber-matrix interface in the design and performance of these materials is evident. Numerous mechanical models to relate interface properties to composite behavior, and interpret test methods and data, were enthusiastically discussed. One issue of great concern for any advanced material for use in extreme environments is stability. This theme arose frequently throughout the symposium and was the topic of focus on the final day. Fifty nine papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  4. Strontium and magnesium substituted dicalcium phosphate dehydrate coating for carbon/carbon composites prepared by pulsed electrodeposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shou-jie, E-mail: jlliushoujie@126.com; Li, He-jun, E-mail: lihejun@nwpu.edu.cn; Zhang, Lei-lei, E-mail: zhangleilei@nwpu.edu.cn; Feng, Lei, E-mail: fengleijinan@163.com; Yao, Pei, E-mail: 1113923884@qq.com

    2015-12-30

    Graphical abstract: The potentiodynamic polarization curve shows that the SM-DCPD coating can dramatically enhance the corrosion potential (E{sub corr}) value and meanwhile decrease the corrosion current density (I{sub corr}) of C/C composites. - Highlights: • Strontium and magnesium substituted dicalcium phosphate dehydrate coatings for carbon/carbon composites were synthesized by pulsed eletrodeposition. • Strontium and magnesium substituted dicalcium phosphate dehydrate coated carbon/carbon composites exhibited excellent bioactivity in vivo. • Strontium and magnesium substituted dicalcium phosphate dehydrate coated carbon/carbon composites showed lower corrosion rate with the comparison to pure carbon/carbon composites. - Abstract: Trace elements substituted apatite coatings have received a lot of interest recently as they have many benefits. In this work, strontium and magnesium substituted DCPD (SM-DCPD) coatings were deposited on carbon/carbon (C/C) composites by pulsed electrodeposition method. The morphology, microstructure, corrosion resistance and in vitro bioactivity of the SM-DCPD coatings are analyzed. The results show that the SM-DCPD coatings exhibit a flake-like morphology with dense and uniform structure. The SM-DCPD coatings could induce the formation of apatite layers on their surface in simulated body fluid. The electrochemical test indicates that the SM-DCPD coatings can evidently decrease the corrosion rate of the C/C composites in simulated body fluid. The SM-DCPD has potential application as the bioactive coatings.

  5. Composite Matrix Regenerator for Stirling Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Timothy R.

    1997-01-01

    This project concerns the design, fabrication and testing of carbon regenerators for use in Stirling power convertors. Radial fiber design with nonmetallic components offers a number of potential advantages over conventional steel regenerators: reduced conduction and pressure drop losses, and the capability for higher temperature, higher frequency operation. Diverse composite fabrication methods are explored and lessons learned are summarized. A pulsed single-blow test rig has been developed that has been used for generating thermal effectiveness data for different flow velocities. Carbon regenerators have been fabricated by carbon vapor infiltration of electroflocked preforms. Performance data in a small Stirling engine are obtained. Prototype regenerators designed for the BP-1000 power convertor were fabricated and delivered to NASA-Lewis.

  6. Electron beam curing of polymer matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janke, C.J.; Wheeler, D.; Saunders, C.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the CRADA was to conduct research and development activities to better understand and utilize the electron beam PMC curing technology. This technology will be used to replace or supplement existing PMC thermal curing processes in Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Programs (DP) projects and American aircraft and aerospace industries. This effort involved Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc./Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp. (Contractor), Sandia National Laboratories, and ten industrial Participants including four major aircraft and aerospace companies, three advanced materials companies, and three electron beam processing organizations. The technical objective of the CRADA was to synthesize and/or modify high performance, electron beam curable materials that meet specific end-use application requirements. There were six tasks in this CRADA including: Electron beam materials development; Electron beam database development; Economic analysis; Low-cost Electron Beam tooling development; Electron beam curing systems integration; and Demonstration articles/prototype structures development. The contractor managed, participated and integrated all the tasks, and optimized the project efforts through the coordination, exchange, and dissemination of information to the project participants. Members of the Contractor team were also the principal inventors on several electron beam related patents and a 1997 R and D 100 Award winner on Electron-Beam-Curable Cationic Epoxy Resins. The CRADA achieved a major breakthrough for the composites industry by having successfully developed high-performance electron beam curable cationic epoxy resins for use in composites, adhesives, tooling compounds, potting compounds, syntactic foams, etc. UCB Chemicals, the world's largest supplier of radiation-curable polymers, has acquired a license to produce and sell these resins worldwide

  7. Drilling of metal matrix composites: cutting forces and chip formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Songmene, V.; Balout, B.; Masounave, J.

    2002-01-01

    Particulate metal matrix composites (MMCs) are known for their low weight and their high wear resistance, but also for the difficulties encountered during their machining. New aluminium MMCs containing with both soft lubricating graphite particles and hard particles (silicon carbide or alumina) with improved machinability were developed. This study investigates the drilling of these composites as compared to non-reinforced aluminium. The microstructure of chip, the cutting forces, the shear angles and the friction at tool-chip interface are used to compare the machinability of these composites. It was found that, during drilling of this new family of composites, the feed rate, and the nature of reinforcing particles govern the cutting forces. The mathematical models established by previous researchers for predicting the cutting forces when drilling metals were validated for these composites. The reinforcing particles within the composite help for chip segmentation, making the composite more brittle and easy to shear during the cutting process. (author)

  8. Compressive behavior of wire reinforced bulk metallic glass matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung-Yub [Department of Materials Science, M/C 138-78, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Clausen, Bjorn [Lujan Neutron Science Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Uestuendag, Ersan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)]. E-mail: ustundag@iastate.edu; Choi-Yim, Haein [Department of Materials Science, M/C 138-78, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Aydiner, C. Can [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Bourke, Mark A.M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2005-06-15

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) possess a unique set of mechanical properties that make them attractive structural materials. However, when loaded without constraint, BMGs fracture catastrophically due to formation of macroscopic shear bands and this behavior reduces their reliability. To address this issue, BMG matrix composites have been developed. In this investigation, neutron diffraction was used during uniaxial compressive loading to measure the internal strains in the second phases of various BMG composites reinforced with Ta, Mo, or stainless steel wires. The diffraction data were then employed to develop a finite element model that deduced the in situ constitutive behavior of each phase. It was found that the reinforcements yielded first and started transferring load to the matrix, which remained elastic during the whole experiment. While the present composites exhibited enhanced ductility, largely due to their ductile reinforcements, they yielded at applied stresses lower than those found in W reinforced composites.

  9. Effect of matrix constitution on interface of aluminium/δ-Al2O3 and strength of metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, P.; Hutchinson, B.; Savage, S.J.

    1992-06-01

    Aluminium based fiber composites have been made by squeeze casting. The 'saffil' pre-forms used in the work employed aluminium oxide binder or silica binder. Two families of alloys have been used based either on high purity aluminium or 3% copper containing alloys. These were both alloyed with a range of magnesium contents from 0.1% to 5% with the aim of varying the degree of reaction and bonding between the matrix and the reinforcing fibres. Studies of macro- and micro structures have been performed as well as non-destructive testing by X-ray radiography. Tensile testing, three point bend tests on notched bars and wetting studies in a wetting balance are also included in the investigation. The structure of the squeeze cast products shows different zones. The extension and appearance of the zones are dependent on the alloy constitution. In general the surface of the casting have small equiaxed grains. This surface zone is replaced by a columnar grain zone which, in the center, transforms to an equiaxed crystal zone. Defects such as pores, fibre-free zones, and 'pockets' in the interface matrix/fiber have been found. Of these defects, only pores can be detected by X-ray radiography. Evaluation of tensile testing shows a relatively large scatter of results. The results reveal a dominant role of matrix composition on strength level. For the 20 vol% reinforced metals, with performs with silica binder, the maximum measured elongation was 3.5%. With alumina binder approximately half of the above mentioned ductility is obtained. The use of grain-refiner, Al-5Ti-B, decreases the ductility of the composite below 2%, independent of the type of binder. From 3-point bend tests fracture energies are estimated to vary between 0.3 and 0.6 Joule. The toughness is low. Studies of the wetting between pieces of ceramic pre-forms and molten Al-2Mg show that generally the wetting is poor. At the same time, the wettability of d-alumina with silicon oxide as binding medium was slightly

  10. Ceramic fiber reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A slurry of BSAS glass powders is cast into tapes which are cut to predetermined sizes. Mats of continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with these matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite which is heated to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot-pressed to form a BSAS glass-ceramic fiber-reinforced composite.

  11. Metallic-fibre-reinforced ceramic-matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevost, F.; Schnedecker, G.; Boncoeur, M.

    1994-01-01

    A refractory metal wire cloth is embedded in an oxide ceramic matrix, using a plasma spraying technology, in order to elaborate composite plates. When mechanically tested, the composite fails with a pseudo-ductile fracture mode whereas the ceramic alone is originally brittle. It exhibits a higher fracture strength, and remains in the form of a single piece even when straining is important. No further heat treatment is needed after the original processing to reach these characteristics. (authors). 2 figs., 2 refs

  12. Thermosetting Polymer-Matrix Composites for Strucutral Repair Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goertzen, William Kirby [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-12-01

    Several classes of thermosetting polymer matrix composites were evaluated for use in structural repair applications. Initial work involved the characterization and evaluation of woven carbon fiber/epoxy matrix composites for structural pipeline repair. Cyanate ester resins were evaluated as a replacement for epoxy in composites for high-temperature pipe repair applications, and as the basis for adhesives for resin infusion repair of high-temperature composite materials. Carbon fiber/cyanate ester matrix composites and fumed silica/cyanate ester nanocomposites were evaluated for their thermal, mechanical, viscoelastic, and rheological properties as they relate to their structure, chemistry, and processing characteristics. The bisphenol E cyanate ester under investigation possesses a high glass transition temperature, excellent mechanical properties, and unique ambient temperature processability. The incorporate of fumed silica served to enhance the mechanical and rheological properties of the polymer and reduce thermal expansion without sacrificing glass transition or drastically altering curing kinetics. Characterization of the composites included dynamic mechanical analysis, thermomechanical analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, rheological and rheokinetic evaluation, and transmission electron microscopy.

  13. Burning and radiance properties of red phosphorus in Magnesium/PTFE/Viton (MTV)-based compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Chen, Xian; Wang, Yanli; Shi, Yuanliang; Shang, Junteng

    2017-09-01

    Red phosphorus (RP) a highly efficient smoke-producing agent. In this study different contents of RP are added into the Magnesium/PTFE/Viton (MTV)-based composition, with the aim of investigating the influence of RP on the burning and radiance properties of MTV-based composition by using a high-temperature differential thermobalance method, a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) remote-sensing spectrometer, a FTIR Spectrometer and a far-infrared thermal imager. The results show that RP improves the initial reaction temperature and reduces the mass burning rate by 0.1-0.17 g·s-1 (34-59%). The addition of RP has no obvious effect on the burning temperature and far-infrared radiation brightness, but the radiating area raises substantially (by 141%), and thus improves the radiation intensity (by 155%).

  14. Environment-friendly, flame retardant thermoplastic elastomer-magnesium hydroxide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hao; Chen, Kunfeng; Li, Xiaonan; Ao, Man; Guo, Xinwen; Xue, Dongfeng

    Halogen-free and environment-friendly magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH)2) was synthesized to enhance the flame retardant properties of thermoplastic elastomer (TPE). When the Mg(OH)2 content was optimized to 35wt.%, the TPE-Mg(OH)2 composites exhibited the best flame retardant properties. The results showed that there was a delay of ignition time of the samples containing Mg(OH)2; compared with the samples without Mg(OH)2, the heat release rate and total heat release decrease by 31.4% and 35.6%, while total smoke production and mass loss rate reduce by 56% and 34.2%, respectively. This work opens a door to manufacture fire-resistant polymer-based composites with environmental-friendly flame retardant additives by controllable crystallization and chemical strategies.

  15. Study on titanium-magnesium composites with bicontinuous structure fabricated by powder metallurgy and ultrasonic infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, S; Huang, L J; An, Q; Geng, L; Wang, X J; Wang, S

    2018-05-01

    Titanium-magnesium (Ti-Mg) composites with bicontinuous structure have been successfully fabricated by powder metallurgy and ultrasonic infiltration for biomaterial potential. In the composites, Ti phase is distributed continuously by sintering necks, while Mg phase is also continuous, distributing at the interconnected pores surrounding the Ti phase. The results showed that the fabricated Ti-Mg composites exhibited low modulus and high strength, which are very suitable for load bearing biomedical materials. The composites with 100 µm and 230 µm particle sizes exhibited Young's modulus of 37.6 GPa and 23.4 GPa, 500.7 MPa and 340 MPa of compressive strength and 631.5 MPa and 375.2 MPa of bending strength, respectively. Moreover, both of the modulus and strength of the composites increase with decreasing of Ti particle sizes. In vitro study has been done for the preliminary evaluation of the Ti-Mg composites. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Load transfer in short fibre reinforced metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garces, Gerardo; Bruno, Giovanni; Wanner, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    The internal load transfer and the deformation behaviour of aluminium-matrix composites reinforced with 2D-random alumina (Saffil) short fibres was studied for different loading modes. The evolution of stress in the metallic matrix was measured by neutron diffraction during in situ uniaxial deformation tests. Tensile and compressive tests were performed with loading axis parallel or perpendicular to the 2D-reinforcement plane. The fibre stresses were computed based on force equilibrium considerations. The results are discussed in light of a model recently established by the co-authors for composites with visco-plastic matrix behaviour and extended to the case of plastic deformation in the present study. Based on that model, the evolution of internal stresses and the macroscopic stress-strain were simulated. Comparison between the experimental and computational results shows a qualitative agreement in all relevant aspects

  17. Metal matrix composites: History, status, factors and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyriac, Ajith James

    The history, status, and future of metal matrix composites are presented by evaluating the progression of available literature through time. The trends that existed and issues that still prevail are discussed and a prediction of the future for MMCs is presented. The factors that govern the performance of metal matrix composites are also discussed. In many developed countries and in several developing countries there exists continued interest in MMCs. Researchers tried numerous combinations of matrices and reinforcements since work strictly on MMCs began in the 1950s. This led to developments for aerospace and defense applications, but resultant commercial applications were limited. The introduction of ceramic whiskers as reinforcement and the development of 'in-situ' eutectics in the 1960s aided high temperature applications in aircraft engines. In the late 1970s the automobile industries started to take MMCs seriously. In the last 20 years, MMCs evolved from laboratories to a class of materials with numerous applications and commercial markets. After the collapse of the Berlin Wall, prevailing order in the world changed drastically. This effect was evident in the progression of metal matrix composites. The internet connected the world like never before and tremendous information was available for researchers around the world. Globalization and the internet resulted in the transformation of the world to a more level playing field, and this effect is evident in the nature and source of research on metal matrix composites happening around the world.

  18. Metal matrix composites. Part 1. Types, properties, applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edil da Costa, C.; Velasco Lopez, F.; Torralba Castello, M.

    2000-01-01

    An overview on the state of the art of metal matrix composites used in the automotive and aerospace industries is made. These materials usually are based on light alloys (Al, Ti and Mg) and reinforced with fibres or particles. In this review, it is presented a general scope on the different MMCs families, about their properties and their main applications. (Author) 61 refs

  19. Analysis of Damage in a Ceramic Matrix Composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Talreja, Ramesh

    1993-01-01

    Mechanisms of damage and the associated mechanical response are stud ied for a unidirectionally fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composite subjected to uniaxial tensile loading parallel to fibers. A multi-stage development of damage is identified, and for each stage the governing mechanisms...

  20. Demineralized dentin matrix composite collagen material for bone tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianan; Yang, Juan; Zhong, Xiaozhong; He, Fengrong; Wu, Xiongwen; Shen, Guanxin

    2013-01-01

    Demineralized dentin matrix (DDM) had been successfully used in clinics as bone repair biomaterial for many years. However, particle morphology of DDM limited it further applications. In this study, DDM and collagen were prepared to DDM composite collagen material. The surface morphology of the material was studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM). MC3T3-E1 cells responses in vitro and tissue responses in vivo by implantation of DDM composite collagen material in bone defect of rabbits were also investigated. SEM analysis showed that DDM composite collagen material evenly distributed and formed a porous scaffold. Cell culture and animal models results indicated that DDM composite collagen material was biocompatible and could support cell proliferation and differentiation. Histological evaluation showed that DDM composite collagen material exhibited good biocompatibility, biodegradability and osteoconductivity with host bone in vivo. The results suggested that DDM composite collagen material might have a significant clinical advantage and potential to be applied in bone and orthopedic surgery.

  1. Characterization and control of the fiber-matrix interface in ceramic matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowden, R.A.

    1989-03-01

    Fiber-reinforced SiC composites fabricated by thermal-gradient forced-flow chemical-vapor infiltration (FCVI) have exhibited both composite (toughened) and brittle behavior during mechanical property evaluation. Detailed analysis of the fiber-matrix interface revealed that a silica layer on the surface of Nicalon Si-C-O fibers tightly bonds the fiber to the matrix. The strongly bonded fiber and matrix, combined with the reduction in the strength of the fibers that occurs during processing, resulted in the observed brittle behavior. The mechanical behavior of Nicalon/SiC composites has been improved by applying thin coatings (silicon carbide, boron, boron nitride, molybdenum, carbon) to the fibers, prior to densification, to control the interfacial bond. Varying degrees of bonding have been achieved with different coating materials and film thicknesses. Fiber-matrix bond strengths have been quantitatively evaluated using an indentation method and a simple tensile test. The effects of bonding and friction on the mechanical behavior of this composite system have been investigated. 167 refs., 59 figs., 18 tabs.

  2. Residual stresses and mechanical properties of metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Christer.

    1993-01-01

    The large difference in coefficient of thermal expansion of the matrix and particles in a metal matrix composite will introduce residual stresses during cooling from process temperature. These stresses are locally very high, and are known to influence the mechanical behaviour of the material. Changes in the stress state will occur during heat treatments and when the material is loaded due to different elastic, plastic, and creep properties of the constituents. The change of residual stresses in an Al-SiC particulate composite after different degree of plastic straining has been studied. The effect of plastic straining was modelled by an Eshelby model. The model and the measurements both show that the stress in the loading direction decreases for a tensile plastic strain and increases for a compressive plastic strain. By x-ray diffraction the stress response in the matrix and particles can be measured independently. This has been used to determine the stress state under and after heat treatments and under mechanical loading in two Al 15% SiC metal matrix composites. By analysing the line width from x-ray experiment the changes in the microstrains in the material were studied. A finite element model was used to model the generation of thermal residual stresses, stress relaxation during heat treatments, and load sharing during the first load cycle. Calculated stresses and microstrains were found to be in good agreement with the measured values. The elastic behaviour of the composite can be understood largely in terms of elastic load transfer between matrix and particles. However, at higher loads when the matrix becomes plastic residual stresses also become important. 21 refs

  3. Magnesium oxychloride cement concrete

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    exposure to water and salt attack by replacing 10% magnesium chloride solution by magnesium sulphate solution ... Having tremendous load bearing capacity, it can withstand .... retention coefficients for similar concrete compositions.

  4. Wear and Corrosion Properties of 316L-SiC Composite Coating Deposited by Cold Spray on Magnesium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Ma, Bing; Liu, Guang; Song, Hui; Wu, Jinming; Cui, Lang; Zheng, Ziyun

    2017-08-01

    In order to improve the wear and corrosion resistance of commonly used magnesium alloys, 316L stainless steel coating and 316L-SiC composite coating have been deposited directly on commercial AZ80 magnesium alloy using cold spraying technology (CS). The microstructure, hardness and bonding strength of as-sprayed coatings were studied. Their tribological properties sliding against Si3N4 and GCr15 steel under unlubricated conditions were evaluated by a ball-on-disk tribometer. Corrosion behaviors of coated samples were also evaluated and compared to that of uncoated magnesium alloy substrate in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution by electrochemical measurements. Scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the corresponding wear tracks and corroded surfaces to determine wear and corrosion mechanisms. The results showed that the as-sprayed coatings possessed higher microhardness and more excellent wear resistance than magnesium alloy substrate. Meanwhile, 316L and 316L-SiC coating also reduced the corrosion current density of magnesium alloy and the galvanic corrosion of the substrates was not observed after 200-h neutral salt spray exposure, which demonstrated that corrosion resistance of a magnesium alloy substrate could be greatly improved by cold-sprayed stainless steel-based coatings.

  5. Dual-nanoparticulate-reinforced aluminum matrix composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Hansang; Cho, Seungchan; Kawasaki, Akira; Leparoux, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) matrix composite materials reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNT) and silicon carbide nanoparticles (nano-SiC) were fabricated by mechanical ball milling, followed by hot-pressing. Nano-SiC was used as an active mixing agent for dispersing the CNTs in the Al powder. The hardness of the produced composites was dramatically increased, up to eight times higher than bulk pure Al, by increasing the amount of nano-SiC particles. A small quantity of aluminum carbide (Al 4 C 3 ) was observed by TEM analysis and quantified using x-ray diffraction. The composite with the highest hardness values contained some nanosized Al 4 C 3 . Along with the CNT and the nano-SiC, Al 4 C 3 also seemed to play a role in the enhanced hardness of the composites. The high energy milling process seems to lead to a homogeneous dispersion of the high aspect ratio CNTs, and of the nearly spherical nano-SiC particles in the Al matrix. This powder metallurgical approach could also be applied to other nanoreinforced composites, such as ceramics or complex matrix materials. (paper)

  6. Influence of Nickel Particle Reinforcement on Cyclic Fatigue and Final Fracture Behavior of a Magnesium Alloy Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Gupta

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure, tensile properties, cyclic stress amplitude fatigue response and final fracture behavior of a magnesium alloy, denoted as AZ31, discontinuously reinforced with nano-particulates of aluminum oxide and micron size nickel particles is presented and discussed. The tensile properties, high cycle fatigue and final fracture behavior of the discontinuously reinforced magnesium alloy are compared with the unreinforced counterpart (AZ31. The elastic modulus and yield strength of the dual particle reinforced magnesium alloy is marginally higher than of the unreinforced counterpart. However, the tensile strength of the composite is lower than the monolithic counterpart. The ductility quantified by elongation to failure over 0.5 inch (12.7 mm gage length of the test specimen showed minimal difference while the reduction in specimen cross-section area of the composite is higher than that of the monolithic counterpart. At the microscopic level, cyclic fatigue fractures of both the composite and the monolithic alloy clearly revealed features indicative of the occurrence of locally ductile and brittle mechanisms. Over the range of maximum stress and at two different load ratios the cyclic fatigue resistance of the magnesium alloy composite is superior to the monolithic counterpart. The mechanisms responsible for improved cyclic fatigue life and resultant fracture behavior of the composite microstructure are highlighted.

  7. Does magnesium compromise the high temperature process ability of novel biodegradable and bioresorbables PLLA/Mg composites?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cifuentes, S. C.; Benavemente, R.; Gonzalez-Carrasco, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the influence of magnesium on melting behaviour and thermal stability of novel bioresorbable PLLA/Mg composites as a way to investigate their processability by conventional techniques, which likely will require a melt process at high temperature to mould the material by using a compression, extrusion or injection stage. For this purpose, and to avoid any high temperature step before analysis, films of PLLA loaded with magnesium particles of different sizes and volume fraction were prepared by solvent casting. DSC, modulated DSC and thermogravimetry analysis demonstrate that although thermal stability of PLLA is reduced, the temperature window for processing the PLLA/Mg composites by conventional thermoplastic routes is wide enough. Moreover, magnesium particles do not alter the crystallization behaviour of the polymer from the melt, which allows further annealing treatments to optimize the crystallinity in terms of the required combination of mechanical properties and degradation rate. (Author)

  8. Does magnesium compromise the high temperature process ability of novel biodegradable and bioresorbables PLLA/Mg composites?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cifuentes, S. C.; Benavemente, R.; Gonzalez-Carrasco, J. L.

    2014-10-01

    This paper addresses the influence of magnesium on melting behaviour and thermal stability of novel bioresorbable PLLA/Mg composites as a way to investigate their processability by conventional techniques, which likely will require a melt process at high temperature to mould the material by using a compression, extrusion or injection stage. For this purpose, and to avoid any high temperature step before analysis, films of PLLA loaded with magnesium particles of different sizes and volume fraction were prepared by solvent casting. DSC, modulated DSC and thermogravimetry analysis demonstrate that although thermal stability of PLLA is reduced, the temperature window for processing the PLLA/Mg composites by conventional thermoplastic routes is wide enough. Moreover, magnesium particles do not alter the crystallization behaviour of the polymer from the melt, which allows further annealing treatments to optimize the crystallinity in terms of the required combination of mechanical properties and degradation rate. (Author)

  9. Carbide-reinforced metal matrix composite by direct metal deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novichenko, D.; Thivillon, L.; Bertrand, Ph.; Smurov, I.

    Direct metal deposition (DMD) is an automated 3D laser cladding technology with co-axial powder injection for industrial applications. The actual objective is to demonstrate the possibility to produce metal matrix composite objects in a single-step process. Powders of Fe-based alloy (16NCD13) and titanium carbide (TiC) are premixed before cladding. Volume content of the carbide-reinforced phase is varied. Relationships between the main laser cladding parameters and the geometry of the built-up objects (single track, 2D coating) are discussed. On the base of parametric study, a laser cladding process map for the deposition of individual tracks was established. Microstructure and composition of the laser-fabricated metal matrix composite objects are examined. Two different types of structures: (a) with the presence of undissolved and (b) precipitated titanium carbides are observed. Mechanism of formation of diverse precipitated titanium carbides is studied.

  10. Stochastic-Strength-Based Damage Simulation Tool for Ceramic Matrix and Polymer Matrix Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Pineda, Evan J.; Walton, Owen J.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic-based, discrete-event progressive damage simulations of ceramic-matrix composite and polymer matrix composite material structures have been enabled through the development of a unique multiscale modeling tool. This effort involves coupling three independently developed software programs: (1) the Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC), (2) the Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life Prediction Program (CARES/ Life), and (3) the Abaqus finite element analysis (FEA) program. MAC/GMC contributes multiscale modeling capabilities and micromechanics relations to determine stresses and deformations at the microscale of the composite material repeating unit cell (RUC). CARES/Life contributes statistical multiaxial failure criteria that can be applied to the individual brittle-material constituents of the RUC. Abaqus is used at the global scale to model the overall composite structure. An Abaqus user-defined material (UMAT) interface, referred to here as "FEAMAC/CARES," was developed that enables MAC/GMC and CARES/Life to operate seamlessly with the Abaqus FEA code. For each FEAMAC/CARES simulation trial, the stochastic nature of brittle material strength results in random, discrete damage events, which incrementally progress and lead to ultimate structural failure. This report describes the FEAMAC/CARES methodology and discusses examples that illustrate the performance of the tool. A comprehensive example problem, simulating the progressive damage of laminated ceramic matrix composites under various off-axis loading conditions and including a double notched tensile specimen geometry, is described in a separate report.

  11. Fibre-matrix bond strength studies of glass, ceramic, and metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, D. H.; Mandell, J. F.; Hong, K. C. C.

    1988-01-01

    An indentation test technique for compressively loading the ends of individual fibers to produce debonding has been applied to metal, glass, and glass-ceramic matrix composites; bond strength values at debond initiation are calculated using a finite-element model. Results are correlated with composite longitudinal and interlaminar shear behavior for carbon and Nicalon fiber-reinforced glasses and glass-ceramics including the effects of matrix modifications, processing conditions, and high-temperature oxidation embrittlement. The data indicate that significant bonding to improve off-axis and shear properties can be tolerated before the longitudinal behavior becomes brittle. Residual stress and other mechanical bonding effects are important, but improved analyses and multiaxial interfacial failure criteria are needed to adequately interpret bond strength data in terms of composite performance.

  12. Carbon fibre reinforced copper matrix composites: processing routes and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Petitcorps, Y. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 - Pessac (France). ICMCB; Poueylaud, J.M. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 - Pessac (France). ICMCB; Albingre, L. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 - Pessac (France). ICMCB; Berdeu, B. [L`Electrolyse, 33 - Latresne (France); Lobstein, P. [L`Electrolyse, 33 - Latresne (France); Silvain, J.F. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 - Pessac (France). ICMCB

    1997-06-01

    Copper matrix composites are of interest for applications in the electronic field which requires materials with high thermal conductivity properties. The use of carbon fibres can (1) decrease the density and the coefficient of thermal expansion of the material and (2) increase the stiffness and strength to rupture of the resulting composite. In order to produce cheap materials, chemical plating and uniaxial hot pressing processing routes were chosen. 1D-C{sub (P55Thornel)} / Cu prepregs were hot pressed in an argon atmosphere at 750 C during 30 min. The volume fraction of the fibres within the composite was in the range of 10-35%. Physical (density and thermal expansion coefficient) and thermal conductivity properties of the composite were in good agreement with the predictions. However this material exhibits very poor mechanical properties (Young`s modulus and tensile strength). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations of the surfaces of ruptures have shown that (1) a very weak bonding between the graphite fibres and the copper matrix was formed and (2) the rupture of the composite was initiated in the matrix at the copper grain boundaries. In order to overcome these two difficulties, the carbon fibres were pre-coated with a thin layer (100 nm) of cobalt. The aim of the cobalt was to react with the carbon to form carbide compounds and as a consequence to increase the bonding between the metal and the fibre. The tensile properties ({sigma}{sub c}{sup R} and E{sub c}) of this composite were then increased by 50% in comparison with the former material; however the strain to rupture was still too weak ({epsilon}{sub c}{sup R} = 0.5%). In order to explain the role of each constituents, X-ray profiles and TEM analyses were done at the fibre/matrix interface and at the grain boundaries. Some modifications of the chemical plating steps were done to improve the purity of the copper. (orig.)

  13. Research Progress on Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Cu-matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAO Jing-mei

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The critical issues of CNTs/Cu composites were reviewed. The preparation techniques of the composites were classified, and the research progress on powder metallurgic methods, electrochemical methods and other methods was summarized, with an emphasis on the relationship between preparation methods and properties. The interfacial characteristic of the CNTs/Cu composites was analyzed, and the research progress and existing problems of mechanical properties, electrical properties, thermal properties and wear and friction properties of the composites were also summarized. It was pointed out that the key to increase the comprehensive properties of the composites is to obtain the homogeneous distribution of CNTs and good interfacial bonding between CNTs and the Cu matrix by improving the preparation methods.

  14. Internal friction in a new kind of metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    San Juan, J.; No, M.L.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a new kind of metal matrix composites, based on powders of Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys (SMAs) surrounded by an indium matrix, specifically designed to exhibit high mechanical damping. The damping properties have been characterized by mechanical spectroscopy as a function of temperature between 150 and 400 K, frequency between 3 x 10 -3 and 3 Hz, and strain amplitude between 5 x 10 -6 and 10 -4 . The material exhibits, in some range of temperature, internal friction as high as 0.54. The extremely high damping is discussed in the light of the microstructure of the material, which has been characterized in parallel

  15. Laser cladding of wear resistant metal matrix composite coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakovlev, A.; Bertrand, Ph.; Smurov, I.

    2004-01-01

    A number of coatings with wear-resistant properties as well as with a low friction coefficient are produced by laser cladding. The structure of these coatings is determined by required performance and realized as metal matrix composite (MMC), where solid lubricant serves as a ductile matrix (e.g. CuSn), reinforced by appropriate ceramic phase (e.g. WC/Co). One of the engineered coating with functionally graded material (FGM) structure has a dry friction coefficient 0.12. Coatings were produced by coaxial injection of powder blend into the zone of laser beam action. Metallographic and tribological examinations were carried out confirming the advanced performance of engineered coatings

  16. Metal matrix composite fabrication processes for high performance aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponzi, C.

    A survey is conducted of extant methods of metal matrix composite (MMC) production in order to serve as a basis for prospective MMC users' selection of a matrix/reinforcement combination, cost-effective primary fabrication methods, and secondary fabrication techniques for the achievement of desired performance levels. Attention is given to the illustrative cases of structural fittings, control-surface connecting rods, hypersonic aircraft air inlet ramps, helicopter swash plates, and turbine rotor disks. Methods for technical and cost analysis modeling useful in process optimization are noted.

  17. Characterization of selected LDEF polymer matrix resin composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Philip R.; Slemp, Wayne S.; Witte, William G., Jr.; Shen, James Y.

    1991-01-01

    The characterization of selected graphite fiber reinforced epoxy (934 and 5208) and polysulfone (P1700) matrix resin composite materials which received 5 years and 10 months of exposure to the LEO environment on the Long Duration Exposure Facility is reported. Resin loss and a decrease in mechanical performance as well as dramatic visual effects were observed. However, chemical characterization including infrared, thermal, and selected solution property measurements showed that the molecular structure of the polymeric matrix had not changed significantly in response to this exposure. The potential effect of a silicon-containing molecular contamination of these specimens is addressed.

  18. Effect of phase composition on the corrosion properties of alloys of the magnesium-yttrium system in neutral solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnoyarskii, V.V.; Petrova, L.M.; Dobatkina, T.V.; Korol'kova, I.G.

    1992-01-01

    A study is made of the effect of phase composition on the corrosive dissolution of binary alloys of the system magnesium-8.2% yttrium. It is shown that the appearance of the intermetallide Mg 24 Y 5 - being the effective cathode - intensifies self-dissolution of the alloy under conditions of anodic galvanostatic polarization

  19. Corrosion characterization of micro-arc oxidization composite electrophoretic coating on AZ31B magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Congjie [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi’an University of Technology, Xi’an 710048 (China); Jiang, Bailing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Liu, Ming [General Motors China Science Lab, Shanghai 201206 (China); Ge, Yanfeng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi’an University of Technology, Xi’an 710048 (China)

    2015-02-05

    Highlights: • A new protective composite coatings were prepared on AZ31B Mg alloy. • The E-coat locked into MAO coat by discharge channels forming a smoother and compact surface without defects. • Comparing with MAO coat, the MAOE composite coat could provide an excellent barrier for bare Mg against corrosion attack. - Abstract: A two layer composite coating system was applied on the surface of AZ31B magnesium alloy by Micro-arc Oxidation (MAO) plus electrophoretic coat (E-coat) technique. The Mg sample coated with MAO plus E-coat (MAOE) was compared with bare Mg and Mg sample coated by MAO only. The surface microstructure and cross section of bare and coated Mg before and after corrosion were examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The corrosion performance of bare and coated Mg was evaluated using electrochemical measurement and hydrogen evolution test. The results indicated that the corrosion resistance of AZ31B Mg alloy was significantly improved by MAOE composite coating. The corrosion mechanism of bare and coated Mg is discussed.

  20. Effect of gamma irradiation on linear low density polyethylene/magnesium hydroxide/sepiolite composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafiq, Muhammad; Yasin, Tariq

    2012-01-01

    Radiation crosslinking is generally used to improve the thermo-mechanical properties of the composites. A study has been carried out to investigate the effect of gamma radiation on the thermo-mechanical properties of linear low density polyethylene containing magnesium hydroxide (MH) and sepiolite (SP) as non-halogenated flame retardant additives. The developed composites are irradiated at different doses upto maximum of 150 kGy. Infrared spectra of the irradiated composites reveal the reduction in the intensity of O-H band with increase in the absorbed doses, thus indicates a distinct structural change in MH at higher doses. The thermogravimetric analysis results of unirradiated and composites irradiated at low doses (≤75 kGy) show two steps weight loss, which is changed to single step at higher doses with lower thermal stability. The melting temperature (T m ) and crystallization temperature (T c ) of irradiated composites are lowered with irradiation whereas Vicat softening temperature (VST) is increased. The increasing trend in gel content with increase in the absorbed dose confirms the presence of crosslinked network. The mechanical properties, results show significant improvement in the modulus of irradiated composites. The results also confirm that MH gradually loses its OH functionality with irradiation. - Highlights: → We have studied the effect of γ radiation on LLDPE containing Mg(OH) 2 and sepiolite. → IR spectra of the irradiated composites show reduction in the intensity of O-H band. → Reduction in OH band show a distinct structural change in Mg(OH) 2 at higher doses. → TGA results show two steps weight loss at low doses and one step at higher doses. → These results confirm that MH gradually loses its OH functionality with irradiation.

  1. Improving the corrosion resistance of AZ91D magnesium alloy through reinforcement with titanium carbides and borides

    OpenAIRE

    Gobara, Mohamed; Shamekh, Mohamed; Akid, Robert

    2015-01-01

    A composite consisting of magnesium matrix reinforced with a network of TiC–Ti2AlC–TiB2 particulates has been fabricated using a practical in-situ reactive infiltration technique. The microstructural and phase composition of the magnesium matrix composite (R-Mg) was investigated using SEM/EDS and XRD. The analyses revealed the complete formation of TiC, Ti2AlC and TiB2 particles in the magnesium matrix. Comparative compression tests of R-Mg and AZ91D alloy showed that the reinforcing particle...

  2. Does magnesium compromise the high temperature processability of novel biodegradable and bioresorbables PLLA/Mg composites?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cifuentes, Sandra C.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the influence of magnesium on melting behaviour and thermal stability of novel bioresorbable PLLA/Mg composites as a way to investigate their processability by conventional techniques, which likely will require a melt process at high temperature to mould the material by using a compression, extrusion or injection stage. For this purpose, and to avoid any high temperature step before analysis, films of PLLA loaded with magnesium particles of different sizes and volume fraction were prepared by solvent casting. DSC, modulated DSC and thermogravimetry analysis demonstrate that although thermal stability of PLLA is reduced, the temperature window for processing the PLLA/Mg composites by conventional thermoplastic routes is wide enough. Moreover, magnesium particles do not alter the crystallization behaviour of the polymer from the melt, which allows further annealing treatments to optimize the crystallinity in terms of the required combination of mechanical properties and degradation rate.Este trabajo aborda la influencia de magnesio en el comportamiento a fusión y en la estabilidad térmica de nuevos compuestos de PLLA / Mg biorreabsorbibles como una forma de investigar su procesabilidad mediante técnicas convencionales, lo que probablemente requerirá una etapa en estado fundido a alta temperatura para moldear el material mediante el uso de una etapa de compresión, extrusión o inyección. Para este fin, los materiales de PLLA cargados con partículas de magnesio, de diferentes tamaños y fracción de volumen, se prepararon por la técnica de disolución y colada, evitando así el procesado a alta temperatura antes del análisis. El análisis mediante DSC, DSC modulada y termogravimetría demuestra que, aunque la estabilidad térmica de PLLA se reduce, el intervalo de temperatura para su procesado por rutas convencionales es suficientemente amplio. Además, las partículas de magnesio no alteran la cristalización del pol

  3. Intermetallic matrix composites; Proceedings of the MRS Symposium, San Francisco, CA, Apr. 18-20, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anton, D.L.; Martin, P.L.; Miracle, D.B.; Mcmeeking, R.

    1990-01-01

    The present volume on intermetallic matrix composites discusses the modeling, processing, microstructure/property relationships, and compatibility of intermetallic matrix composites. Attention is given to models for the strength of ductile matrix composites, innovative processing techniques for intermetallic matrix composites, ductile phase toughening of brittle intermetallics, and reactive synthesis of NbAl3 matrix composites. Topics addressed include solidification processing of NbCr2 alloys, Ta and Nb reinforced MoSi2, the microstructure and mechanical behavior of Ni3Al-matrix composites, and ductile-phase toughening of Cr3Si with chromium. Also discussed are dislocation morphologies in TiB2/NiAl, the development of highly impact resistant NiAl matrix composites, the effect of notches on the fatigue life of the SCS-6Ti3Al composite, and the chemical stability of fiber-metal matrix composites

  4. Inorganic Polymer Matrix Composite Strength Related to Interface Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Bridge

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Resin transfer molding of an inorganic polymer binder was successfully demonstrated in the preparation of ceramic fiber reinforced engine exhaust valves. Unfortunately, in the preliminary processing trials, the resulting composite valves were too brittle for in-engine evaluation. To address this limited toughness, the effectiveness of a modified fiber-matrix interface is investigated through the use of carbon as a model material fiber coating. After sequential heat treatments composites molded from uncoated and carbon coated fibers are compared using room temperature 3-point bend testing. Carbon coated Nextel fiber reinforced geopolymer composites demonstrated a 50% improvement in strength, versus that of the uncoated fiber reinforced composites, after the 250 °C postcure.

  5. Progressive fracture of polymer matrix composite structures: A new approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Minnetyan, L.

    1992-01-01

    A new approach independent of stress intensity factors and fracture toughness parameters has been developed and is described for the computational simulation of progressive fracture of polymer matrix composite structures. The damage stages are quantified based on physics via composite mechanics while the degradation of the structural behavior is quantified via the finite element method. The approach account for all types of composite behavior, structures, load conditions, and fracture processes starting from damage initiation, to unstable propagation and to global structural collapse. Results of structural fracture in composite beams, panels, plates, and shells are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and versatility of this new approach. Parameters and guidelines are identified which can be used as criteria for structural fracture, inspection intervals, and retirement for cause. Generalization to structures made of monolithic metallic materials are outlined and lessons learned in undertaking the development of new approaches, in general, are summarized.

  6. Mechanical properties of aluminium matrix composites reinforced with intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, B.; Garcia-Escorial, A.; Ibanez, J.; Lieblich, M.

    2001-01-01

    In this work 2124 aluminium matrix composites reinforced with Ni 3 Al, NiAl, MoSi 2 and Cr 3 Si intermetallic powder particles have been investigated. For comparison purposes, un reinforced 2124 and reinforced with SiC have also been studied. In all cases, the same powder metallurgy route was used, i. e. the 2124 alloy was obtained by rapid solidification and the intermetallic particles by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS). The matrix and the intermetallics were mechanically blended, cold compacted and finally hot extruded. Tensile tests were carried out in T1 and T4 treatments. Results indicate that mechanical properties depend strongly on the tendency to form new phases at the matrix-intermetallic interface during processing and/or further thermal treatments. The materials which present better properties are those that present less reaction between matrix and intermetallic reinforcement, i. e. MoSi 2 and SiC reinforced composites. (Author) 9 refs

  7. Preparation and characterization of aluminium-silica metal matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallikarjuna, G. B.; Basavaraj, E.

    2018-04-01

    Aluminum alloys are widely used in aerospace and automobile industries due to their low density and good mechanical properties, better corrosion resistance and wear, low thermal coefficient of expansion as compared to conventional metals and alloys. The excellent properties of these materials and relatively low production cost make them a very attractive for a variety of applications. In this present work, Al alloy LM13-SiO2 composites were produced by stir casting method. The reinforcement SiO2 particle size used for preparation of composites are 106 µm, 150 µm, 250 µm and 355 µm with varying amount of 3 to 12 wt% in steps of 3. The prepared composite specimens were machined as per test standards. Effects of weight percentage of SiO2 particles on wear, tensile strength of Al alloy LM13-SiO2 composites have been investigated. The microstructures of the composites were studied to know the dispersion of the SiO2 particles in matrix. Experimental results shows that there is enhanced mechanical properties, when silica weighing 9% was added to the base aluminium alloy and also similar trend exists in all four different micron size of silica and also it has been observed that addition of SiO2 particles significantly improves wear resistance properties as compared with that of unreinforced matrix.

  8. Silver matrix composites reinforced with galvanically silvered particles

    OpenAIRE

    J. Śleziona; J. Wieczorek,

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The paper presents the possibility of the application of metalic layers drifted with the use of the galvanic methods on the ceramic particles surface. The application of the layers was aimed at obtaining the rewetting of the reinforcing particles with the liquid silver in the course of the producing of silver matrix composites with the use of mechanical stirring method. To enable introducing of the iron powder and glass carbon powder to liquid silver the solution of covering the powd...

  9. Fracture Resistance Evaluation of Fibre Reinforced Brittle Matrix Composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Chlup, Zdeněk

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 290, - (2005), s. 167-174 ISSN 1013-9826. [Fractography of Advanced Ceramic s /2./. Stará Lesná, 03.10.2004-06.10.2004] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA2041003; GA ČR(CZ) GA101/02/0683 Keywords : fibre-reinforced ceramic s * glass matrix composites * chevron notch Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 0.224, year: 2005

  10. Electron Beam Curing of Polymer Matrix Composites - CRADA Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janke, C. J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howell, Dave [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Norris, Robert E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1997-05-01

    The major cost driver in manufacturing polymer matrix composite (PMC) parts and structures, and one of the elements having the greatest effect on their quality and performance, is the standard thermal cure process. Thermal curing of PMCs requires long cure times and high energy consumption, creates residual thermal stresses in the part, produces volatile toxic by-products, and requires expensive tooling that is tolerant of the high cure temperatures.

  11. Matrix-reinforcement reactivity in P/M titanium matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amigo, V.; Romero, F.; Salvador, M. D.; Busquets, D.

    2007-01-01

    The high reactivity of titanium and the facility of the same one to form intermetallics makes difficult obtaining composites with this material and brings the need in any case of covering the principal fibres used as reinforcement. To obtain composites of titanium reinforced with ceramic particles ins proposed in this paper, for this reason it turns out to be fundamental to evaluate the reactivity between the matrix and reinforcement. Both titanium nitride and carbide (TiN and TiC) are investigated as materials of low reactivity whereas titanium silicide (TiSi 2 ) is also studied as materials of major reactivity, already stated by the scientific community. This reactivity will be analysed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) there being obtained distribution maps of the elements that allow to establish the possible influence of the sintering temperature and time. Hereby the matrix-reinforcement interactions are optimized to obtain suitable mechanical properties. (Author) 39 refs

  12. Developing a novel magnesium glycerophosphate/silicate-based organic-inorganic composite cement for bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhengwen; Li, Hong; Wei, Jie; Li, Ruijiang; Yan, Yonggang

    2018-06-01

    Considering that the phospholipids and glycerophosphoric acid are the basic materials throughout the metabolism of the whole life period and the bone is composed of organic polymer collagen and inorganic mineral apatite, a novel self-setting composite of magnesium glycerophosphate (MG) and di-calcium silicate(C2S)/tri-calcium silicate(C3S) was developed as bio-cement for bone repair, reconstruction and regeneration. The composite was prepared by mixing the MG, C2S and C3S with the certain ratios, and using the deionized water and phosphoric acid solution as mixed liquid. The combination and formation of the composites was characterized by FTIR, XPS and XRD. The physicochemical properties were studied by setting time, compressive strength, pH value, weight loss in the PBS and surface change by SEM-EDX. The biocompatibility was evaluated by cell culture in the leaching solution of the composites. The preliminary results showed that when di- and tri-calcium silicate contact with water, there are lots of Ca(OH) 2 generated making the pH value of solution is higher than 9 which is helpful for the formation of hydroxyapatite(HA) that is the main bone material. The new organic-inorganic self-setting bio-cements showed initial setting time is ranged from 20 min to 85 min and the compressive strength reached 30 MPa on the 7th days, suitable as the bone fillers. The weight loss was 20% in the first week, and 25% in the 4th week. Meanwhile, the new HA precipitated on the composite surface during the incubation in the SBF showed bioactivity. The cell cultured in the leaching liquid of the composite showed high proliferation inferring the new bio-cement has good biocompatibility to the cells. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A Novel Injectable Magnesium/Calcium Sulfate Hemihydrate Composite Cement for Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanchuan Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. A novel injectable magnesium/calcium sulfate hemihydrate (Mg/CSH composite with improved properties was reported here. Methods. Composition, setting time, injectability, compressive strength, and bioactivity in simulated body fluid (SBF of the Mg/CSH composite were evaluated. Furthermore, the cellular responses of canine bone marrow stromal cells (cBMSCs and bone formation capacity after the implantation of Mg/CSH in tibia defects of canine were investigated. Results. Mg/CSH possessed a prolonged setting time and markedly improved injectability and mechanical property p<0.05. Mg/CSH samples showed better degradability than CSH in SBF after 21 days of soaking p<0.05. Moreover, the degrees of cell attachment, proliferation, and capability of osteogenic differentiation on the Mg/CSH specimens were higher than those on CSH, without significant cytotoxicity and with the increased proliferation index, ALP activity, and expression levels of integrin β1 and Coll I in cBMSCs p<0.05. Mg/CSH enhanced the efficiency of new bone formation at the tibia defect area, including the significantly elevated bone mineral density, bone area fraction, and Coll I expression level p<0.05. Conclusions. The results implied that this new injectable bone scaffold exhibited promising prospects for bone repair and had a great potential in bone tissue engineering.

  14. In-situ reduced graphene oxide-polyvinyl alcohol composite coatings as protective layers on magnesium substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingkai Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A simple and feasible method was developed to fabricate in-situ reduced graphene oxide-polyvinyl alcohol composite (GO-PVA coatings as protective layers on magnesium substrates. Polyvinyl alcohol was used as an in-situ reductant to transform GO into reduced GO. Contiguous and uniform GO-PVA coatings were prepared on magnesium substrates by dip-coating method, and were further thermally treated at 120 °C under ambient condition to obtain in-situ reduced GO-PVA coatings. Owing to the reducing effect of PVA, thermal treatment at low temperature led to effective in-situ reduction of GO as confirmed by XRD, Raman, FTIR and XPS tests. The corrosion current density of magnesium substrates in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution could be lowered to its 1/25 when using in-situ reduced GO-PVA coatings as protective layers.

  15. The effect of adding magnesium oxide on the mechanical properties of the tricalcium phosphate-zirconia composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sallemi, Imen, E-mail: imen.sallemi@hotmail.com; Bouaziz, Jamel; Ben Ayed, Foued

    2015-02-01

    The effect of magnesium oxide on the mechanical properties of the tricalcium phosphate – 50 wt.% zirconia composites was investigated during a sintering process between 1300 °C and 1400 °C. The characteristics of the samples before and after the sintering process were realized by using the differential thermal analysis, dilatometry, X-ray diffraction, the {sup 31}P magic angle scanning nuclear magnetic resonance, the scanning electron microscope and by considering such mechanical properties as the rupture strength and Vickers hardness. The mechanical performances of the tricalcium phosphate-50 wt.% zirconia composites increased with both the percentage of magnesium oxide and the sintering temperature. At 1400 °C, the mechanical properties of the composites sintered with 10 wt.% magnesium oxide reached their maximum value. Thus, Vickers hardness increased from 554 to 6350 MPa and the rupture strength of the corresponding composites varied from 5.2 to 25 MPa. The increase of the mechanical properties of the samples is due to the formation of both the tetragonal zirconia phase and the liquid phase which helps to fill the pores. The microstructure of needle form is most probably phosphate precipitates which are formed from this liquid phase. Furthermore, the presence of magnesium oxide in the composites prevented the inverse allotropic transformation of zirconia. - Highlights: • We measure the rupture strength and Vickers hardness of bioceramics. • We characterize the effect of MgO on the mechanical properties of the tricalcium phosphate – 50 wt% zirconia composites. • MgO increase the mechanical properties of the composites.

  16. High temperature resin matrix composites for aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. G., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Accomplishments and the outlook for graphite-polyimide composite structures are briefly outlined. Laminates, skin-stiffened and honeycomb sandwich panels, chopped fiber moldings, and structural components were fabricated with Celion/LARC-160 and Celion/PMR-15 composite materials. Interlaminar shear and flexure strength data obtained on as-fabricated specimens and specimens that were exposed for 125 hours at 589 K indicate that epoxy sized and polyimide sized Celion graphite fibers exhibit essentially the same behavior in a PMR-15 matrix composite. Analyses and tests of graphite-polyimide compression and shear panels indicate that utilization in moderately loaded applications offers the potential for achieving a 30 to 50 percent reduction in structural mass compared to conventional aluminum panels. Data on effects of moisture, temperature, thermal cycling, and shuttle fluids on mechanical properties indicate that both LARC-160 and PMR-15 are suitable matrix materials for a graphite-polyimide aft body flap. No technical road blocks to building a graphite-polyimide composite aft body flap are identified.

  17. Assessment of hyaline cartilage matrix composition using near infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palukuru, Uday P; McGoverin, Cushla M; Pleshko, Nancy

    2014-09-01

    Changes in the composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) are characteristic of injury or disease in cartilage tissue. Various imaging modalities and biochemical techniques have been used to assess the changes in cartilage tissue but lack adequate sensitivity, or in the case of biochemical techniques, result in destruction of the sample. Fourier transform near infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy has shown promise for the study of cartilage composition. In the current study NIR spectroscopy was used to identify the contributions of individual components of cartilage in the NIR spectra by assessment of the major cartilage components, collagen and chondroitin sulfate, in pure component mixtures. The NIR spectra were obtained using homogenous pellets made by dilution with potassium bromide. A partial least squares (PLS) model was calculated to predict composition in bovine cartilage samples. Characteristic absorbance peaks between 4000 and 5000 cm(-1) could be attributed to components of cartilage, i.e. collagen and chondroitin sulfate. Prediction of the amount of collagen and chondroitin sulfate in tissues was possible within 8% (w/dw) of values obtained by gold standard biochemical assessment. These results support the use of NIR spectroscopy for in vitro and in vivo applications to assess matrix composition of cartilage tissues, especially when tissue destruction should be avoided. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Characterization and processing of heat treated aluminium matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doifode, Yogesh; Kulkarni, S. G.

    2018-05-01

    The present study is carried out to determine density and porosity of Aluminium bagasse ash reinforced composite produced by powder metallurgy method. Bagasse ash is used as reinforcement material having high silica and alumina contents and varied from 5 weight % to 40 weight%. The manufactured composite is heat treated, the main objective of heat treatment is to prepare the material structurally and physically fit for engineering application. The results showed that the density decreases with percentage increase in reinforcement of bagasse ash from 2.6618 gm/cm3 to 1.9830 gm/cm3 with the minimum value at 40 weight% bagasse ash without heat treatment whereas after heat treatment density of composite increases due filling up of voids and porous holes. Heat treatment processing is the key to this improvement, with the T6 heat treated composite to convene the reduced porosity of composite. Consequently aluminium metal matrix composite combines the strength of the reinforcement to achieve a combination of desirable properties not available in any single material. It may observe that porosity in case of powder metallurgy samples showed more porosity portions compare to the casting samples. In order to achieve optimality in structure and properties of Bagasse ash-reinforcement heat treatment techniques have evolved. Generally, the ceramic reinforcements increase the density of the base alloy during fabrication of composites. However, the addition of lightweight reinforcements reduces the density of the hybrid composites. The results also showed that, the density varies from to with minimum value at 40 wt. % BA. The results of the statistical analysis showed that there are significant differences among the means of each property of the composites at various levels of BA replacement .It was concluded that bagasse ash can be used as reinforcement and the produced composites have low density and heat treatment reduces porosity which could be used in automobile industry for

  19. Magnesium-molybdenum compounds as matrixes of {sup 99m} Tc generators; Compuestos de magnesio-molibdeno como matrices de generadores de {sup 99m} Tc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez M, T S

    2005-07-01

    In order to finding new production alternatives of {sup 99}Mo/ {sup 99m}Tc generators, easy to produce and with high elutriation efficiencies, it is proposed in this work to develop a generator with basis of magnesium and molybdenum that could be irradiated after their synthesis, given the short half life of the only radioisotope produced by the magnesium: {sup 27} Mg (t{sub 1/2} = 9.46 m). It is necessary to mention that have not been reported works in relation to this type of compound, being then important to carry out basic studies on the formation and behavior of these in relation to their matrix functions of those generated of {sup 99} Mo/ {sup 99m} Tc. In this work it was determined the effect that has, the magnesium salt used in the synthesis of those molybdenum-magnesium compounds, the molar ratio Mo: Mg, the concentration of the magnesium salt, the pH of the used ammonium molybdates in the synthesis of the final compounds and the washing of the molybdates of synthesized magnesium, in the performance of the {sup 99} Mo/ {sup 99m} Tc generators. Parameters like the elutriation efficiency, the radionuclide purity, radiochemical and chemical of the eluates and their pH, were determined in each case, also its were characterized the synthesized compounds using: neutron activation analysis (NAA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy of high vacuum (SEM), besides of complementary techniques: infrared spectroscopy (IR), and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). (Author)

  20. Electrochemical process for the manufacturing of titanium alloy matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Soare

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a new method for precursors’ synthesis of titanium alloys matrix composites through an electrochemical process in molten calcium chloride. The cathode of the cell was made from metallic oxides powders and reinforcement ceramic particles, which were pressed and sintered into disk form and the anode from graphite. The process occurred at 850 °C, in two stages, at 2,7 / 3,2 V: the ionization of the oxygen in oxides and the reduction with calcium formed by electrolysis of calcium oxide fed in the electrolyte. The obtained composite precursors, in a form of metallic sponge, were consolidated by pressing and sintering. Chemical and structural analyses on composites samples were performed.

  1. Matrix resin effects in composite delamination - Mode I fracture aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunston, Donald L.; Moulton, Richard J.; Johnston, Norman J.; Bascom, Willard D.

    1987-01-01

    A number of thermoset, toughened thermoset, and thermoplastic resin matrix systems were characterized for Mode I critical strain energy release rates, and their composites were tested for interlaminar critical strain energy release rates using the double cantilever beam method. A clear correlation is found between the two sets of data. With brittle resins, the interlaminar critical strain energy release rates are somewhat larger than the neat resin values due to a full transfer of the neat resin toughness to the composite and toughening mechanisms associated with crack growth. With tougher matrices, the higher critical strain energy release rates are only partially transferred to the composites, presumably because the fibers restrict the crack-tip deformation zones.

  2. Mathematical model for choosing the nuclear safe matrix compositions for fissile material immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorshtein, A.I.; Matyunin, Yu.I.; Poluehktov, P.P.

    2000-01-01

    A mathematical model is proposed for preliminary choice of the nuclear safe matrix compositions for fissile material immobilization. The IBM PC computer software for nuclear safe matrix composition calculations is developed. The limiting concentration of fissile materials in the some used and perspective nuclear safe matrix compositions for radioactive waste immobilization is calculated [ru

  3. Nondestructive characterization of metal-matrix-composites by ultrasonic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joon Hyun

    1992-01-01

    Nondestructive characterizations using ultrasonic technique were conducted systematically on Al 2 O 3 short fiber reinforced pure Al and AC8A aluminium metal-matrix composites. In order to determine the elastic moduli of metal-matrix composites(MMCs), Al 2 O 3 /AC8A composites with volume fraction of Al 2 O 3 short fiber varying up to 30% were fabricated by squeeze casting technique. Pure Al and AC8A reinforced with Al 2 O 3 short fiber were also fabricated by changing the fabrication parameters such as the applied pressure, the volume fraction of fiber. The Influences of texture change associated with change of fabrication parameters were investigated using the sophisticated LFB acoustic microscope with the frequency of 225 MHz. Ultrasonic velocities of longitudinal, shear and Rayleigh waves of the composites were measured by pulse-echo method and line-focus-beam(LBF) acoustic microscope. Ultrasonic velocities of the longitudinal, the shear and Rayleigh waves were found to correlate primarily with the volume fraction of Al 2 O 3 . The elastic constants of composites including Young's Modulus, Shear Modulus, Bulk Modulus and Poisson's ratio were determined on the basis of the longitudinal and the shear wave velocities measured by an ultrasonic pulse-echo method. The Young's Modulus of the composites obtained by ultrasonic technique were slightly lower than those measured by 4-point-bend test and also showed relatively good agreements with the calculated results derived from the equal stress condition. The applicability of LFB acoustic microscope on material characterization of the MMCs was discussed on the basis of the relationships between Rayleigh wave velocity as a function of rotated angle of specimen and fabrication parameters of the MMCs.

  4. Aspects of fabrication aluminium matrix heterophase composites by suspension method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolata, A. J.; Dyzia, M.

    2012-05-01

    Composites with an aluminium alloy matrix (AlMMC) exhibit several advantageous properties such as good strength, stiffness, low density, resistance and dimensional stability to elevated temperatures, good thermal expansion coefficient and particularly high resistance to friction wear. Therefore such composites are more and more used in modern engineering constructions. Composites reinforced with hard ceramic particles (Al2O3, SiC) are gradually being implemented into production in automotive or aircraft industries. Another application of AlMMC is in the electronics industry, where the dimensional stability and capacity to absorb and remove heat is used in radiators. However the main problems are still: a reduction of production costs, developing methods of composite material tests and final product quality assessment, standardisation, development of recycling and mechanical processing methods. AlMMC production technologies, based on liquid-phase methods, and the shaping of products by casting methods, belong to the cheapest production methods. Application of a suspension method for the production of composites with heterophase reinforcement may turn out to be a new material and technological solution. The article presents the material and technological aspects of the transfer procedures for the production of composite suspensions from laboratory scale to a semi-industrial scale.

  5. Aspects of fabrication aluminium matrix heterophase composites by suspension method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolata, A J; Dyzia, M

    2012-01-01

    Composites with an aluminium alloy matrix (AlMMC) exhibit several advantageous properties such as good strength, stiffness, low density, resistance and dimensional stability to elevated temperatures, good thermal expansion coefficient and particularly high resistance to friction wear. Therefore such composites are more and more used in modern engineering constructions. Composites reinforced with hard ceramic particles (Al 2 O 3 , SiC) are gradually being implemented into production in automotive or aircraft industries. Another application of AlMMC is in the electronics industry, where the dimensional stability and capacity to absorb and remove heat is used in radiators. However the main problems are still: a reduction of production costs, developing methods of composite material tests and final product quality assessment, standardisation, development of recycling and mechanical processing methods. AlMMC production technologies, based on liquid-phase methods, and the shaping of products by casting methods, belong to the cheapest production methods. Application of a suspension method for the production of composites with heterophase reinforcement may turn out to be a new material and technological solution. The article presents the material and technological aspects of the transfer procedures for the production of composite suspensions from laboratory scale to a semi-industrial scale.

  6. Aluminium matrix heterophase composites for air compressor pistons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Dyzia

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of surface test of composite shaped in the permanent mould casting process. As part of the research anddevelopment project realized in the Department of Materials Technology at the Silesian University of Technology, a pilot plant scale stand was built to manufacture of more than 50 kg suspensions in a single technological cycle. Made in industrial conditions castings to form in the five inner core mould mounted in GM110 permanent mould casting machine confirmed the possibility of the shaping the composite pistons. Castings made from composite suspension AlSi7Mg/SiC and AlSi7Mg/SiC + Cg according to the technology procedure were classified as correct and devoted to the proper machining forming working surfaces of the piston to the air compressor. Comparative tests were performed for the casting of unreinforced AlSi7Mg alloy and composite castings. To assess the ability to fill the mold cavity and the accuracy of mapping used in contour shape FRT analysis of the distance between the grooves on the surface of the piston skirt. Studies have confirmed the differences in the fluidity of alloy matrix and composites suspensions. The difference in the accuracy of the dimensional mapping mould does not disqualify of composite materials, all castings are classified as correct and used for machining.

  7. Chitosan-magnesium aluminum silicate composite dispersions: characterization of rheology, flocculate size and zeta potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khunawattanakul, Wanwisa; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit; Rades, Thomas; Pongjanyakul, Thaned

    2008-03-03

    Composite dispersions of chitosan (CS), a positively charged polymer, and magnesium aluminum silicate (MAS), a negatively charged clay, were prepared and rheology, flocculate size and zeta potential of the CS-MAS dispersions were investigated. High and low molecular weights of CS (HCS and LCS, respectively) were used in this study. Moreover, the effects of heat treatment at 60 degrees C on the characteristics of the CS-MAS dispersions and the zeta potential of MAS upon addition of CS at different pHs were examined. Incorporation of MAS into CS dispersions caused an increase in viscosity and a shift of CS flow type from Newtonian to pseudoplastic flow with thixotropic properties. Heat treatment brought about a significant decrease in viscosity and hysteresis area of the composite dispersions. Microscopic studies showed that flocculation of MAS occurred after mixing with CS. The size and polydispersity index of the HCS-MAS flocculate were greater than those of the LCS-MAS flocculate. However, a narrower size distribution and the smaller size of the HCS-MAS flocculate were found after heating at 60 degrees C. Zeta potentials of the CS-MAS flocculates were positive and slightly increased with increasing MAS content. In the zeta potential studies, the negative charge of the MAS could be neutralized by the addition of CS. Increasing the pH and molecular weight of CS resulted in higher CS concentrations required to neutralize the charge of MAS. These findings suggest that the electrostatic interaction between CS and MAS caused a change in flow behavior and flocculation of the composite dispersions, depending on the molecular weight of CS. Heat treatment affected the rheological properties and the flocculate size of the composite dispersions. Moreover, pH of medium and molecular weight of CS influence the zeta potential of MAS.

  8. Effect of composition on thermal conductivity of MgO–Nd2Zr2O7 composites for inert matrix materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, A.T.; Giachino, M.M.; Nino, J.C.; McClellan, K.J.

    2014-01-01

    Inert matrix fuels based on magnesium oxide (MgO) as the inert phase have been of historic interest due to its high thermal conductivity. Minor actinide-bearing phases possessing an A 2 B 2 O 7 pyrochlore structure are also believed to contain a range of favorable attributes, suggesting a possible pairing with MgO to yield a high performance inert matrix fuel. The thermal diffusivity, heat capacity, and thermal expansion of MgO–Nd 2 Zr 2 O 7 composites were measured from room temperature to 1273 K, where the MgO phase content was varied from 40 to 70 volume percent. The thermal conductivity of each composition was calculated using these results and then compared to widely employed methods to approximate the thermal conductivity of composite materials based upon the properties of the constituent phases. Results suggest that use of either a rule of mixtures or geometric mean approximation for the thermal conductivity of composite systems such as this one would be subject to significant uncertainties when the constituent properties widely differ. A sigmoidal average of the upper and lower Hashin–Shtrikman bounds was found to be in good agreement with the thermal conductivity of the composites as determined experimentally

  9. Laser Surface Treatment and Modification of Aluminum Alloy Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbass, Muna Khethier

    2018-02-01

    The present work aimed to study the laser surface treatment and modification of Al-4.0%Cu-1.0%Mg alloy matrix composite reinforced with 10%SiC particles produced by stir casting. The specimens of the base alloy and composite were irradiated with an Nd:YAG laser of 1000 mJ, 1064 nm and 3 Hz . Dry wear test using the pin-on -disc technique at different sliding times (5-30 min) at a constant applied load and sliding speed were performed before and after laser treatment. Micro hardness and wear resistance were increased for all samples after laser hardening treatment. The improvement of these properties is explained by microstructural homogenization and grain refinement of the laser treated surface. Modification and refinement of SiC particles and grain refinement in the microstructure of the aluminum alloy matrix (α-Al) were observed by optical and SEM micrographs. The highest increase in hardness was 21.4% and 26.2% for the base alloy and composite sample respectively.

  10. Wear and impact resistance of HVOF sprayedceramic matrix composites coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prawara, B.; Martides, E.; Priyono, B.; Ardy, H.; Rikardo, N.

    2016-02-01

    Ceramic coating has the mechanical properties of high hardness and it is well known for application on wear resistance, but on the other hand the resistance to impact load is low. Therefore its use is limited to applications that have no impact loading. The aim of this research was to obtain ceramic-metallic composite coating which has improved impact resistance compared to conventional ceramic coating. The high impact resistance of ceramic-metallic composite coating is obtained from dispersed metallic alloy phase in ceramic matrix. Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) powder with chrome carbide (Cr3C2) base and ceramic-metal NiAl-Al2O3 with various particle sizes as reinforced particle was deposited on mild steel substrate with High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coating. Repeated impact test showed that reinforced metallic phase size influenced impact resistance of CMC coating. The ability of CMC coating to absorb impact energy has improved eight times and ten times compared with original Cr3C2 and hard chrome plating respectively. On the other hand the high temperature corrosion resistance of CMC coating showed up to 31 cycles of heating at 800°C and water quenching cooling.

  11. Discontinuously reinforced titanium matrix composites for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, V.; Leguey, T.; Monge, M.A.; Munoz, A.; Pareja, R.; Victoria, M.

    2002-01-01

    We have reinforced α-Ti with different contents of TiC particles using the in situ technique and conventional casting. Compositional and microstructural characterization of the TiC/Ti composite material was made by XRD and SEM-EDS. Tensile tests at RT, 723 and 973 K have been performed on samples heat treated at 1000 K for 30 min which were prepared from cold rolled material. The effect of the content, size and morphology of the TiC particles on the tensile properties has been investigated. The results indicate that the expected improvement in the mechanical characteristics of TiC/Ti composites is inhibited by the detrimental presence of coarse dendritic particles of TiC. The premature failure of these composites at RT is due to cracking of the coarse TiC particles. Local softening due to inhomogeneous plastic deformation of the Ti matrix appears to contribute to the tensile failure of the TiC/Ti composites deformed at 723 and 973 K.

  12. Discontinuously reinforced titanium matrix composites for fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, V. E-mail: mvcastro@fis.uc3m.es; Leguey, T.; Monge, M.A.; Munoz, A.; Pareja, R.; Victoria, M

    2002-12-01

    We have reinforced {alpha}-Ti with different contents of TiC particles using the in situ technique and conventional casting. Compositional and microstructural characterization of the TiC/Ti composite material was made by XRD and SEM-EDS. Tensile tests at RT, 723 and 973 K have been performed on samples heat treated at 1000 K for 30 min which were prepared from cold rolled material. The effect of the content, size and morphology of the TiC particles on the tensile properties has been investigated. The results indicate that the expected improvement in the mechanical characteristics of TiC/Ti composites is inhibited by the detrimental presence of coarse dendritic particles of TiC. The premature failure of these composites at RT is due to cracking of the coarse TiC particles. Local softening due to inhomogeneous plastic deformation of the Ti matrix appears to contribute to the tensile failure of the TiC/Ti composites deformed at 723 and 973 K.

  13. Double Vacuum Bag Process for Resin Matrix Composite Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Tan-Hung (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A double vacuum bag molding assembly with improved void management and laminate net shape control which provides a double vacuum enviromnent for use in fabricating composites from prepregs containing air and/or volatiles such as reactive resin matrix composites or composites from solvent containing prepregs with non-reactive resins matrices. By using two vacuum environments during the curing process, a vacuum can be drawn during a B-stage of a two-step cycle without placing the composite under significant relative pressure. During the final cure stage, a significant pressure can be applied by releasing the vacuum in one of the two environments. Inner and outer bags are useful for creating the two vacuum environments with a perforated tool intermediate the two. The composite is placed intermediate a tool plate and a caul plate in the first environment with the inner bag and tool plate defining the first environment. The second environment is characterized by the outer bag which is placed over the inner bag and the tool plate.

  14. Metal Matrix Composite Material by Direct Metal Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novichenko, D.; Marants, A.; Thivillon, L.; Bertrand, P. H.; Smurov, I.

    Direct Metal Deposition (DMD) is a laser cladding process for producing a protective coating on the surface of a metallic part or manufacturing layer-by-layer parts in a single-step process. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the possibility to create carbide-reinforced metal matrix composite objects. Powders of steel 16NCD13 with different volume contents of titanium carbide are tested. On the base of statistical analysis, a laser cladding processing map is constructed. Relationships between the different content of titanium carbide in a powder mixture and the material microstructure are found. Mechanism of formation of various precipitated titanium carbides is investigated.

  15. Baseplates in metallic matrix composites for power and microwave applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massiot, P.

    1997-01-01

    Baseplates for microelectronic devices in fields where transform environments are encountered, such as automotive or airborne must have some fundamental characteristics such as: high thermal conductivity, low density, good mechanical properties and a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) nearly equal to the microelectronic substrates and the components installed on the baseplates. Metallic matrix composites are very good candidates because they perfectly answer to those requirements. In this presentation, with some examples of electronic devices in power and microwave applications we will show the big interest to use this kind of material. (author)

  16. Hexagonal Boron Nitride Impregnated Silane Composite Coating for Corrosion Resistance of Magnesium Alloys for Temporary Bioimplant Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Al-Saadi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium and its alloys are attractive potential materials for construction of biodegradable temporary implant devices. However, their rapid degradation in human body fluid before the desired service life is reached necessitate the application of suitable coatings. To this end, WZ21 magnesium alloy surface was modified by hexagonal boron nitride (hBN-impregnated silane coating. The coating was chemically characterised by Raman spectroscopy. Potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS of the coated alloy in Hanks’ solution showed a five-fold improvement in the corrosion resistance of the alloy due to the composite coating. Post-corrosion analyses corroborated the electrochemical data and provided a mechanistic insight of the improvement provided by the composite coating.

  17. Steel-SiC Metal Matrix Composite Development. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Don D.

    2005-01-01

    One of the key materials challenges for Generation IV reactor technology is to improve the strength and resistance to corrosion and radiation damage in the metal cladding of the fuel pins during high-temperature operation. Various candidate Gen IV designs call for increasing core temperature to improve efficiency and facilitate hydrogen production, operation with molten lead moderator to use fast neutrons. Fuel pin lifetime against swelling and fracture is a significant limit in both respects. The goal of this project is to develop a method for fabricating SiC-reinforced high-strength steel. We are developing a metal-matrix composite (MMC) in which SiC fibers are be embedded within a metal matrix of steel, with adequate interfacial bonding to deliver the full benefit of the tensile strength of the SiC fibers in the composite. In the context of the mission of the SBIR program, this Phase I grant has been successful. The development of a means to attain interfacial bonding between metal and ceramic has been a pacing challenge in materials science and technology for a century. It entails matching or grading of thermal expansion across the interface and attaining a graded chemical composition so that impurities do not concentrate at the boundary to create a slip layer. To date these challenges have been solved in only a modest number of pairings of compatible materials, e.g. Kovar and glass, titanium and ceramic, and aluminum and ceramic. The latter two cases have given rise to the only presently available MMC materials, developed for aerospace applications. Those materials have been possible because the matrix metal is highly reactive at elevated temperature so that graded composition and intimate bonding happens naturally at the fiber-matrix interface. For metals that are not highly reactive at processing temperature, however, successful bonding is much more difficult. Recent success has been made with copper MMCs for cooling channels in first-wall designs for fusion

  18. Ceramic compositions based on nano forsterite/nano magnesium aluminate spinel powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, R.M.; Wahsh, M.M.S.; Khalil, N.M.

    2015-01-01

    According to the wide applications in the field of chemical and engineering industries, forsterite (Mg_2SiO_4)/spinel (MgAl_2O_4) ceramic compositions were the matter of interest of several research works during the last three decades. This work aims at preparation and characterization of improved ceramic bodies based on forsterite and spinel nano powders through controlling the forsterite and spinel contents in the prepared mixes. These prepared ceramic compositions have been investigated through measuring the densification parameters, cold crushing strength as well as volume resistively. Nano spinel was added from 0 to 30 mass% on expense of nano forsterite matrix and fired at 1550 °C for 2 h. The phase composition of the fired samples was examined using x-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. The microstructure of some selected samples was shown using scanning electron microscope (SEM). A pronounced improvement in the sintering, mechanical properties and volume resistively were achieved with increasing of nano spinel addition up to 15 mass%. This is due to the improvement in the matrix of the prepared forsterite/spinel bodies as a result of well distribution of spinel in the forsterite matrix as depicted by SEM analysis. - Highlights: • Ceramic compositions based on nano forsterite/nano-MgAl_2O_4 spinel were synthesized. • CCS was improved (333.78 MPa) through 15 mass% of nano-MgAl_2O_4 spinel addition. • Volume resistivity was enhanced to 203*10"1"3 Ohm cm with 15 mass% of spinel addition. • Beyond 15 mass% spinel, CCS and volume resistivity were decreased.

  19. Metal matrix composites synthesis, wear characteristics, machinability study of MMC brake drum

    CERN Document Server

    Natarajan, Nanjappan; Davim, J Paulo

    2015-01-01

    This book is dedicated to composite materials, presenting different synthesis processes, composite properties and their machining behaviour. The book describes also the problems on manufacturing of metal matrix composite components. Among others, it provides procedures for manufacturing of metal matrix composites and case studies.

  20. Discontinuously reinforced intermetallic matrix composites via XD synthesis. [exothermal dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K. S.; Whittenberger, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    A review is given of recent results obtained for discontinuously reinforced intermetallic matrix composites produced using the XD process. Intermetallic matrices investigated include NiAl, multiphase NiAl + Ni2AlTi, CoAl, near-gamma titanium aluminides, and Ll2 trialuminides containing minor amounts of second phase. Such mechanical properties as low and high temperature strength, compressive and tensile creep, elastic modulus, ambient ductility, and fracture toughness are discussed as functions of reinforcement size, shape, and volume fraction. Microstructures before and after deformation are examined and correlated with measured properties. An observation of interest in many of the systems examined is 'dispersion weakening' at high temperatures and high strain rates. This behavior is not specific to the XD process; rather similar observations have been reported in other discontinuous composites. Proposed mechanisms for this behavior are presented.

  1. Polarization Behavior of Squeeze Cast Al2O3 Fiber Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, S. H.; Kang, Y. C.; Cho, K. M.; Park, I. M.

    1992-01-01

    Electrochemical polarization behavior of squeeze cast Al 2 O 3 short fiber reinforced Al alloy matrix composites was investigated for the basic understanding of the corrosion properties of the composites. The composites were fabricated with variations of fiber volume fraction and matrix alloys. It was found that the reinforced composites are more susceptible to corrosion attack than the unreinforced matrix alloys in general. Corrosion resistance shows decreasing tendency with increasing Al 2 O 3 fiber volume fraction in AC8A matrix. Effect of the matrix alloys revealed that the AC8A Al matrix composite is less susceptible to corrosion attack than the 2024 and 7075 Al matrix composites. Effect of plastic deformation on electrochemical polarization behavior of the squeeze cast Al/Al 2 O 3 composites was examined after extrusion of AC8A-10v/o Al 2 O 3 . Result shows that corrosion resistance is deteriorated after plastic deformation

  2. Life Modeling and Design Analysis for Ceramic Matrix Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The primary research efforts focused on characterizing and modeling static failure, environmental durability, and creep-rupture behavior of two classes of ceramic matrix composites (CMC), silicon carbide fibers in a silicon carbide matrix (SiC/SiC) and carbon fibers in a silicon carbide matrix (C/SiC). An engineering life prediction model (Probabilistic Residual Strength model) has been developed specifically for CMCs. The model uses residual strength as the damage metric for evaluating remaining life and is posed probabilistically in order to account for the stochastic nature of the material s response. In support of the modeling effort, extensive testing of C/SiC in partial pressures of oxygen has been performed. This includes creep testing, tensile testing, half life and residual tensile strength testing. C/SiC is proposed for airframe and propulsion applications in advanced reusable launch vehicles. Figures 1 and 2 illustrate the models predictive capabilities as well as the manner in which experimental tests are being selected in such a manner as to ensure sufficient data is available to aid in model validation.

  3. Surface composite nanostructures of AZ91 magnesium alloy induced by high current pulsed electron beam treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, M.C.; Hao, S.Z.; Wen, H.; Huang, R.F.

    2014-01-01

    High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) treatment was conducted on an AZ91 cast magnesium alloy with accelerating voltage 27 kV, energy density 3 J/cm 2 and pulse duration 2.5 μs. The surface microstructure was characterized by optical microscope (OM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The surface corrosion property was tested with electrochemical method in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. It is found that after 1 pulse of HCPEB treatment, the initial eutectic α phase and Mg 17 Al 12 particles started to dissolve in the surface modified layer of depth ∼15 μm. When using 15 HCPEB pulses, the Al content in surface layer increased noticeably, and the phase structure was modified as composite nanostructures consisted of nano-grained Mg 3.1 Al 0.9 domains surrounded by network of Mg 17 Al 12 phase. The HCPEB treated samples showed an improved corrosion resistance with cathodic current density decreased by two orders of magnitude as compared to the initial AZ91 alloy.

  4. Effect of Fiber Poisson Contraction on Matrix Multicracking Evolution of Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-12-01

    An analytical methodology has been developed to investigate the effect of fiber Poisson contraction on matrix multicracking evolution of fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs). The modified shear-lag model incorporated with the Coulomb friction law is adopted to solve the stress distribution in the interface slip region and intact region of the damaged composite. The critical matrix strain energy criterion which presupposes the existence of an ultimate or critical strain energy limit beyond which the matrix fails has been adopted to describe matrix multicracking of CMCs. As more energy is placed into the composite, matrix fractures and the interface debonding occurs to dissipate the extra energy. The interface debonded length under the process of matrix multicracking is obtained by treating the interface debonding as a particular crack propagation problem along the fiber/matrix interface. The effects of the interfacial frictional coefficient, fiber Poisson ratio, fiber volume fraction, interface debonded energy and cycle number on the interface debonding and matrix multicracking evolution have been analyzed. The theoretical results are compared with experimental data of unidirectional SiC/CAS, SiC/CAS-II and SiC/Borosilicate composites.

  5. Machinability study of Al-TiC metal matrix composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddappa P. N.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites have emerged as an advanced class of structural materials have a combination of different, superior properties compared to an unreinforced matrix, which can result in a number of service benefits such as increased strength, higher elastic moduli, higher service temperature, low CTE, improved wear resistance, high toughness, etc. The excellent mechanical properties of these materials together with weight saving makes them very attractive for a variety of engineering applications in aerospace, automotive, electronic industries, etc. Hence, these materials provide as alternative substitutes for conventional engineering materials when specific mechanical properties necessary for required applications. In this work an attempt is made to study the machining parameters of Al6061/TiC MMC. The composite is developed by reinforcing TiC particles in varying proportions of 3, 6, 9 and 12 % weight fractions to the Al6061 matric alloy through stir casting technique. Cutting forces were measured by varying cutting speed and feed rate with constant depth of cut for different % weight fractions. The results showed that the cutting force increases with the increase of feed rate and decreases with the increase of cutting speed for all the weight fractions. Cutting parameters were optimized using Taguchi technique.

  6. Thermal expansion behaviour of high performance PEEK matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, R K; Mulik, U P; Tiwari, A N; Negi, Y S

    2008-01-01

    The thermal expansion behaviour of high performance poly(ether-ether-ketone) (PEEK) composites reinforced with micro- (8 μm) and nano- (39 nm) sized Al 2 O 3 particles was studied. The distribution of Al 2 O 3 in the PEEK matrix was studied by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) was reduced from 58 x 10 -6 deg. C -1 for pure PEEK to 22 x 10 -6 deg. C -1 at 43 vol% micro-Al 2 O 3 and to 23 x 10 -6 deg. C -1 at 12 vol% nano-Al 2 O 3 composites. For a given volume fraction, nano-Al 2 O 3 particles are more effective in reducing the CTE of composites than that of micro-Al 2 O 3 particles. This may be attributed to the much higher interfacial area or volume of nanocomposites than that of microcomposites. The upper limit and lower limit of the Schapery model separately fit closely the CTE of the micro- and nano-composites, respectively. Other models such as the rule of mixture and Kerner and Turner models were also correlated with the data

  7. Structural and functional polymer-matrix composites for electromagnetic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junhua

    This dissertation addresses the science and technology of functional and structural polymer-matrix composite materials for electromagnetic applications, which include electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding and low observability (Stealth). The structural composites are continuous carbon fiber epoxy-matrix composites, which are widely used for airframes. The functional composites are composites with discontinuous fillers and in both bulk and coating forms. Through composite structure variation, attractive electromagnetic properties have been achieved. With no degradation of the tensile strength or modulus, the shielding effectiveness of the structural composites has been improved by enhancing multiple reflections through light activation of the carbon fiber. The multiple reflections loss of the electromagnetic wave increases from 1.1 to 10.2 dB at 1.0 GHz due to the activation. Such a large effect of multiple reflections has not been previously reported in any material. The observability of these composites has been lowered by decreasing the electrical conductivity (and hence decreasing the reflection loss) through carbon fiber coating. The incorporation of mumetal, a magnetic alloy particulate filler (28-40 mum size), in a latex paint has been found to be effective for enhancing the shielding only if the electrical resistivity of the resulting composite coating is below 10 O.cm, as rendered by a conductive particulate filler, such as nickel flake (14-20 mum size). This effectiveness (39 dB at 1.0 GHz) is attributed to the absorption of the electromagnetic wave by the mumetal and the nickel flake, with the high conductivity rendered by the presence of the nickel flake resulting in a relatively high reflection loss of 15.5 dB. Without the nickel flake, the mumetal gives only 3 dB of shielding and 1.5 dB of reflection loss at 1.0 GHz. Nickel powder (0.3-0.5 mum size) has been found to be an effective filler for improving the shielding of polyethersulfone (PES

  8. Fabrication of metal-matrix composites and adaptive composites using ultrasonic consolidation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, C.Y.; Soar, R.C.

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasonic consolidation (UC) has been used to embed thermally sensitive and damage intolerant fibres within aluminium matrix structures using high frequency, low amplitude, mechanical vibrations. The UC process can induce plastic flow in the metal foils being bonded, to allow the embedding of fibres at typically 25% of the melting temperature of the base metal and at a fraction of the clamping force when compared to fusion processes. To date, the UC process has successfully embedded Sigma silicon carbide (SiC) fibres, shape memory alloy wires and optical fibres, which are presented in this paper. The eventual aim of this research is targeted at the fabrication of adaptive composite structures having the ability to measure external stimuli and respond by adapting their structure accordingly, through the action of embedded active and passive functional fibres within a freeform fabricated metal-matrix structure. This paper presents the fundamental studies of this research to identify embedding methods and working range for the fabrication of adaptive composite structures. The methods considered have produced embedded fibre specimens in which large amounts of plastic flow have been observed, within the matrix, as it is deformed around the fibres, resulting in fully consolidated specimens without damage to the fibres. The microscopic observation techniques and macroscopic functionality tests confirms that the UC process could be applied to the fabrication of metal-matrix composites and adaptive composites, where fusion techniques are not feasible and where a 'cold' process is necessary

  9. Performance of hybrid nano-micro reinforced mg metal matrix composites brake calliper: simulation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatchurrohman, N.; Chia, S. T.

    2017-10-01

    Most commercial vehicles use brake calliper made of grey cast iron (GCI) which possesses heavy weight. This contributes to the total weight of the vehicle which can lead to higher fuel consumption. Another major problem is GCI calliper tends to deflect during clamping action, known as “bending of bridge”. This will result in extended pedal travel. Magnesium metal matrix composites (Mg-MMC) has a potential application in the automotive industry since it having a lower density, higher strength and very good modulus of elasticity as compared to GCI. This paper proposed initial development of hybrid Mg-MMC brake calliper. This was achieved by analyzing the performance of hybrid nano-micro reinforced Mg-MMC and comparing with the conventional GCI brake calliper. It was performed using simulation in ANSYS, a finite element analysis (FEA) software. The results show that hybrid Mg-MMC has better performance in terms of reduction the weight of the brake calliper, reduction in total deformation/deflection and better ability to withstand equivalent elastic strain.

  10. Influence of tool pin in friction stir welding on activated carbon reinforced aluminium metal matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    DijuSamuel, G.; Raja Dhas, J. Edwin

    2017-10-01

    This paper focus on impact of tool pin in friction stir welding on activated carbon reinforced aluminium metal matrix composite. For fabrication of metal matrix composite AA6061 is used as matrix and activated carbon is used as reinforcement and it is casted using modified stir casting technique. After casting metal matrix composite has undergone various microstructure tests like SEM,EDAX and XRD. FSW is carried out in this metal matrix composite by choosing various tool pin profile like square,round,Threaded round, hexagon and taper. The quality of welded plates is measured in terms of ultimate tensile strength and hardness.

  11. Fabrication of Ceramic Matrix Composite Tubes Using a Porous Mullite/Alumina Matrix and Alumina/Mullite Fiber

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Radsick, Timothy

    2001-01-01

    ... or from inadequate oxide-based ones. A porous mullite/alumina matrix combined with alumina/mullite fiber reinforcement eliminates the need for an interface coating while producing a strong, tough and oxidation resistant composite...

  12. Kinetics of transformation of deformation processed gold-matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongpreedee, Kageeporn

    Gold matrix Ḏeformation-processed M&barbelow;etal M&barbelow;etal C&barbelow;omposites (DMMC) have been developed that have better strength and conductivity than conventional gold alloys. However, DMMC possess metastable two-phase microstructures, and their strength and conductivity decrease after prolonged exposure to elevated temperatures. The kinetics of the transformation from the metastable two-phase microstructure to the equilibrium single-phase solid solution is of interest. This document describes a study of the elevated temperature stability of Au DMMC's and the relationship between microstructure and resistivity of three compositions: Au-7 vol %Ag, Au-14 vol %Ag, and Au-vol 7%Pt. DMMC samples were prepared by a powder metallurgy technique and mechanical processes. The smallest final diameter of these wires was 120 mum. Avrami and Arrhenius relations were used to evaluate the kinetic transformation. The extensive deformation used to produce these composites reshaped the initially equi-axed powder particles into a nanofilamentary composite. Electrical resistivity measurements were used to determine the degree of transformation from the initial metastable nano-filamentary composite to the equilibrium solid solution condition. These measurements indicated that this transformation in Au-14 at%Ag, Au-7 at %Ag Au and Au-7 at %Pt DMMC wires proceeded with activation energies of 141, 156, and 167 kJ/mol, respectively. It is thought that these empirically determined activation energies differ from those determined in single crystal, planar interface Au-Ag and Au-Pt diffusion couples due to chemical potential, surface curvature, and strain effects. The DMMC systems reach the equilibrium solid solution condition faster than single crystal, planar interface systems for two reasons: (1) far more defects (dislocations, grain boundaries, vacancies from non-conservative dislocation motion, etc.) are present in the Au-Ag and Au-Pt DMMC composites, and (2) the small

  13. Magnesium Gluconate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnesium gluconate is used to treat low blood magnesium. Low blood magnesium is caused by gastrointestinal disorders, prolonged vomiting or ... disease, or certain other conditions. Certain drugs lower magnesium levels as well.This medication is sometimes prescribed ...

  14. Advanced composite structures. [metal matrix composites - structural design criteria for spacecraft construction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    A monograph is presented which establishes structural design criteria and recommends practices to ensure the design of sound composite structures, including composite-reinforced metal structures. (It does not discuss design criteria for fiber-glass composites and such advanced composite materials as beryllium wire or sapphire whiskers in a matrix material.) Although the criteria were developed for aircraft applications, they are general enough to be applicable to space vehicles and missiles as well. The monograph covers four broad areas: (1) materials, (2) design, (3) fracture control, and (4) design verification. The materials portion deals with such subjects as material system design, material design levels, and material characterization. The design portion includes panel, shell, and joint design, applied loads, internal loads, design factors, reliability, and maintainability. Fracture control includes such items as stress concentrations, service-life philosophy, and the management plan for control of fracture-related aspects of structural design using composite materials. Design verification discusses ways to prove flightworthiness.

  15. Friction stir welding of Aluminium matrix composites – A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanya Prabhu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding (FSW is established as one of the prominent welding techniques to join aluminium matrix composites (AMCs. It is a solid state welding process, takes place well below the melting temperature of the material, eliminates the detrimental effects of conventional fusion welding process. Although the process is capable to join AMCs, challenges are still open that need to be fulfill to widen its applications. This paper gives the outline of the friction stir welding technique used to join AMCs. Effect of process variables on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints, behavior of reinforcing materials during welding, effect of tool profiles on the joint strength are discussed in detail. Few improvements and direction for future research are also proposed.

  16. Design Concepts for Cooled Ceramic Matrix Composite Turbine Vanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This project demonstrated that higher temperature capabilities of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) can be used to reduce emissions and improve fuel consumption in gas turbine engines. The work involved closely coupling aerothermal and structural analyses for the first-stage vane of a high-pressure turbine (HPT). These vanes are actively cooled, typically using film cooling. Ceramic materials have structural and thermal properties different from conventional metals used for the first-stage HPT vane. This project identified vane configurations that satisfy CMC structural strength and life constraints while maintaining vane aerodynamic efficiency and reducing vane cooling to improve engine performance and reduce emissions. The project examined modifications to vane internal configurations to achieve the desired objectives. Thermal and pressure stresses are equally important, and both were analyzed using an ANSYS® structural analysis. Three-dimensional fluid and heat transfer analyses were used to determine vane aerodynamic performance and heat load distributions.

  17. Nondestructive Damage Evaluation in Ceramic Matrix Composites for Aerospace Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos G. Dassios

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Infrared thermography (IRT and acoustic emission (AE are the two major nondestructive methodologies for evaluating damage in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs for aerospace applications. The two techniques are applied herein to assess and monitor damage formation and evolution in a SiC-fiber reinforced CMC loaded under cyclic and fatigue loading. The paper explains how IRT and AE can be used for the assessment of the material’s performance under fatigue. IRT and AE parameters are specifically used for the characterization of the complex damage mechanisms that occur during CMC fracture, and they enable the identification of the micromechanical processes that control material failure, mainly crack formation and propagation. Additionally, these nondestructive parameters help in early prediction of the residual life of the material and in establishing the fatigue limit of materials rapidly and accurately.

  18. Wear and Reactivity Studies of Melt infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarmon, David C.; Ojard, Greg; Brewer, David N.

    2013-01-01

    As interest grows in the use of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) for critical gas turbine engine components, the effects of the CMCs interaction with the adjoining structure needs to be understood. A series of CMC/material couples were wear tested in a custom elevated temperature test rig and tested as diffusion couples, to identify interactions. Specifically, melt infiltrated silicon carbide/silicon carbide (MI SiC/SiC) CMC was tested in combination with a nickel-based super alloy, Waspaloy, a thermal barrier coating, Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ), and a monolithic ceramic, silicon nitride (Si3N4). To make the tests more representative of actual hardware, the surface of the CMC was kept in the as-received state (not machined) with the full surface features/roughness present. Test results include: scanning electron microscope characterization of the surfaces, micro-structural characterization, and microprobe analysis.

  19. Oxidation resistant coatings for ceramic matrix composite components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaubert, V.M.; Stinton, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hirschfeld, D.A. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Dept. of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering

    1998-11-01

    Corrosion resistant Ca{sub 0.6}Mg{sub 0.4}Zr{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} (CMZP) and Ca{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} (CS-50) coatings for fiber-reinforced SiC-matrix composite heat exchanger tubes have been developed. Aqueous slurries of both oxides were prepared with high solids loading. One coating process consisted of dipping the samples in a slip. A tape casting process has also been created that produced relatively thin and dense coatings covering a large area. A processing technique was developed, utilizing a pre-sintering step, which produced coatings with minimal cracking.

  20. Composite superconductors with copper-aluminum stabilizing matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keilin, V.E.; Anashkin, O.P.; Krivikh, A.V.; Kiriya, I.V.; Kovalev, I.A.; Dolgosheev, P.I.; Rychagov, A.V.; Sytnikov, V.E.

    1992-01-01

    A new type of composite superconductors has been developed. They consist of one or several (cabled) multifilamentary wires with low Cu-to-Sc ratio which are embedded and soldered into grooves made in matrix of rectangular cross-section. The latter consists of aluminum core metallurgically plated with a thin copper sheath. Such conductors combine the advantages of both aluminum and copper as stabilizing materials. They have low density, exhibit almost not magnetoresistance, are relatively cheap and can be produced in very long pieces. Copper plating offers the possibility of soft soldering thus ensuring good electrical and thermal contact between superconducting wires and stabilizing matrix, and helping to join pieces to each other. the properties of two Nb-Ti conductors (3.5 x 2 mm 2 and 7x4 mm 2 ) are described in more detail. The first is used in SC coils for whole-body magnetoresonance tomography, and the second will be used in a open-quotes thinclose quotes coil for charged particles detector. The influence of aluminum purity on SC magnet behavior is also briefly discussed

  1. Poling of PVDF matrix composites for integrated structural load sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghiashtiani, Ghazaleh; Greminger, Michael A.; Zhao, Ping

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to create and evaluate a smart composite structure that can be used for integrated load sensing and structural health monitoring. In this structure, PVDF films are used as the matrix material instead of epoxy resin or other thermoplastics. The reinforcements are two layers of carbon fiber with one layer of Kevlar separating them. Due to the electrical conductivity properties of carbon fiber and the dielectric effect of Kevlar, the structure acts as a capacitor. Furthermore, the piezoelectric properties of the PVDF matrix can be used to monitor the response of the structure under applied loads. In order to exploit the piezoelectric properties of PVDF, the PVDF material must be polarized to align the dipole moments of its crystalline structure. The optimal condition for poling the structure was found by performing a 23 factorial design of experiment (DoE). The factors that were studied in DoE were temperature, voltage, and duration of poling. Finally, the response of the poled structure was monitored by exposing the samples to an applied load.

  2. Advanced Measurements of Silicon Carbide Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhad Farzbod; Stephen J. Reese; Zilong Hua; Marat Khafizov; David H. Hurley

    2012-08-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is being considered as a fuel cladding material for accident tolerant fuel under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program sponsored by the Nuclear Energy Division of the Department of Energy. Silicon carbide has many potential advantages over traditional zirconium based cladding systems. These include high melting point, low susceptibility to corrosion, and low degradation of mechanical properties under neutron irradiation. In addition, ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) made from SiC have high mechanical toughness enabling these materials to withstand thermal and mechanical shock loading. However, many of the fundamental mechanical and thermal properties of SiC CMCs depend strongly on the fabrication process. As a result, extrapolating current materials science databases for these materials to nuclear applications is not possible. The “Advanced Measurements” work package under the LWRS fuels pathway is tasked with the development of measurement techniques that can characterize fundamental thermal and mechanical properties of SiC CMCs. An emphasis is being placed on development of characterization tools that can used for examination of fresh as well as irradiated samples. The work discuss in this report can be divided into two broad categories. The first involves the development of laser ultrasonic techniques to measure the elastic and yield properties and the second involves the development of laser-based techniques to measurement thermal transport properties. Emphasis has been placed on understanding the anisotropic and heterogeneous nature of SiC CMCs in regards to thermal and mechanical properties. The material properties characterized within this work package will be used as validation of advanced materials physics models of SiC CMCs developed under the LWRS fuels pathway. In addition, it is envisioned that similar measurement techniques can be used to provide process control and quality assurance as well as measurement of

  3. Development of antifriction composites based on polypyromellitimide matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olifirov, L.K., E-mail: M80786@yandex.ru [National University of Science and Technology «MISIS» (Russian Federation); Kaloshkin, S.D.; Tcherdyntsev, V.V. [National University of Science and Technology «MISIS» (Russian Federation); Danilov, V.D. [Blagonravov Institute of Machines Science of Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Polypyromellitimide powder from waste of production polyimide films were obtained. • Structure of polypyromellitimide strongly changes after high energy ball milling. • Addition of commercial polyimide powder improve moldability of polypyromellitimide. • Polypyromellitimide based composites show good tribological properties in dry friction mode. -- Abstract: A method of polypyromellitimide powder production from PM-A film was proposed and a possibility of fabricating bulk composites based on polypyromellitimide matrix was investigated. The powders were prepared by the treatment of PM-A films in a planetary ball mill. The compositions based on polypyromellitimide containing additives of Al{sub 65}Cu{sub 23}Fe{sub 12} quasicrystals, graphite, polytetrafluoroethylene and PI-PR-20 polyimide were prepared by the solid-state mixing in an IKA M20 batch mill. The bulk samples were fabricated by the compression molding technique. Thus produced materials were characterized by using the methods of sieve analysis, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, dynamo-mechanical analysis and tribological tests. It was found that the PM-A polypyromellitimide powder had a low sinterability and, therefore, the bulk samples of unfilled PM-A and also the composites based on PM-A containing additives of Al{sub 65}Cu{sub 23}Fe{sub 12} quasicrystals, graphite and polytetrafluoroethylene exhibited a high brittleness and show unstable behavior in the tribological tests. It was found that an addition of 15 wt.% PI-PR-20 polyimide improved the sinterability of PM-A and also provides excellent antifriction properties.

  4. Composition and Performance of Nanostructured Zirconium Titanium Conversion Coating on Aluminum-Magnesium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-xue Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured conversion coating of Al-Mg alloy was obtained via the surface treatment with zirconium titanium salt solution at 25°C for 10 min. The zirconium titanium salt solution is composed of tannic acid 1.00 g·L−1, K2ZrF6 0.75 g·L−1, NaF 1.25 g·L−1, MgSO4 1.0 g/L, and tetra-n-butyl titanate (TBT 0.08 g·L−1. X-ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and Fourier transform infrared spectrum (FT-IR were used to characterize the composition and structure of the obtained conversion coating. The morphology of the conversion coating was obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Results exhibit that the zirconium titanium salt conversion coating of Al-Mg alloy contains Ti, Zr, Al, F, O, Mg, C, Na, and so on. The conversion coating with nm level thickness is smooth, uniform, and compact. Corrosion resistance of conversion coating was evaluated in the 3.5 wt.% NaCl electrolyte through polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectrum (EIS. Self-corrosion current density on the nanostructured conversion coating of Al-Mg alloy is 9.7×10-8A·cm-2, which is only 2% of that on the untreated aluminum-magnesium alloy. This result indicates that the corrosion resistance of the conversion coating is improved markedly after chemical conversion treatment.

  5. Embedded Si/Graphene Composite Fabricated by Magnesium-Thermal Reduction as Anode Material for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiangliu; Ren, Yurong; Yang, Bo; Chen, Wenkai; Ding, Jianning

    2017-12-16

    Embedded Si/graphene composite was fabricated by a novel method, which was in situ generated SiO 2 particles on graphene sheets followed by magnesium-thermal reduction. The tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and flake graphite was used as original materials. On the one hand, the unique structure of as-obtained composite accommodated the large volume change to some extent. Simultaneously, it enhanced electronic conductivity during Li-ion insertion/extraction. The MR-Si/G composite is used as the anode material for lithium ion batteries, which shows high reversible capacity and ascendant cycling stability reach to 950 mAh·g -1 at a current density of 50 mA·g -1 after 60 cycles. These may be conducive to the further advancement of Si-based composite anode design.

  6. Embedded Si/Graphene Composite Fabricated by Magnesium-Thermal Reduction as Anode Material for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiangliu; Ren, Yurong; Yang, Bo; Chen, Wenkai; Ding, Jianning

    2017-12-01

    Embedded Si/graphene composite was fabricated by a novel method, which was in situ generated SiO2 particles on graphene sheets followed by magnesium-thermal reduction. The tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and flake graphite was used as original materials. On the one hand, the unique structure of as-obtained composite accommodated the large volume change to some extent. Simultaneously, it enhanced electronic conductivity during Li-ion insertion/extraction. The MR-Si/G composite is used as the anode material for lithium ion batteries, which shows high reversible capacity and ascendant cycling stability reach to 950 mAh·g-1 at a current density of 50 mA·g-1 after 60 cycles. These may be conducive to the further advancement of Si-based composite anode design.

  7. Metal matrix coated fiber composites and the methods of manufacturing such composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, J.K. Jr.; Gensse, C.

    1993-09-14

    A fiber coating which allows ceramic or metal fibers to be wetted by molten metals is disclosed. The coating inhibits degradation of the physical properties caused by chemical reaction between the fiber and the coating itself or between the fiber and the metal matrix. The fiber coating preferably includes at least a wetting layer, and in some applications, a wetting layer and a barrier layer between the fiber and the wetting layer. The wetting layer promotes fiber wetting by the metal matrix. The barrier layer inhibits fiber degradation. The fiber coating permits the fibers to be infiltrated with the metal matrix resulting in composites having unique properties not obtainable in pure materials. 8 figures.

  8. Wear mechanisms in powder metallurgy high speed steels matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordo, E.; Martinez, M. A.; Torralba, J. M.; Jimenez, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    The development of metal matrix composites has a major interest for automotive and cutting tools industries since they possess better mechanical properties and wear resistance than corresponding base materials. One of the manufacturing methods for these materials includes processing by powder metallurgy techniques. in this case, blending of both, base material and reinforcement powders constitute the most important process in order to achieve a homogeneous distribution of second phase particles. in the present work, composite materials of M3/2 tool steel reinforced with 2.5,5 and 8 vol% of niobium carbide have been prepared. In order to ensure a homogeneous mix, powders of both materials were mixed by dry high-energy mechanical milling at 200 r.p.m. for 40 h. After a recovering annealing, two routes for consolidate were followed die pressing and vacuum sintering, and hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Pin-on-disc tests were carried out to evaluate wear behaviour in all the materials. Results show that ceramic particles additions improve wear resistance of base material. (Author) 9 refs

  9. Weibull modeling of particle cracking in metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, C.A.; Withers, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation into the occurrence of reinforcement cracking within a particulate ZrO 2 /2618 Al alloy metal matrix composite under tensile plastic straining has been carried out, special attention being paid to the dependence of fracture on particle size and shape. The probability of particle cracking has been modeled using a Weibull approach, giving good agreement with the experimental data. Values for the Weibull modulus and the stress required to crack the particles were found to be within the range expected for the cracking of ceramic particles. Additional information regarding the fracture behavior of the particles was provided by in-situ neutron diffraction monitoring of the internal strains, measurement of the variation in the composite Young's modulus with straining and by direct observation of the cracked particles. The values of the particle stress required for the initiation of particle cracking deduced from these supplementary experiments were found to be in good agreement with each other and with the results from the Weibull analysis. Further, it is shown that while both the current experiments, as well as the previous work of others, can be well described by the Weibull approach, the exact values of the Weibull parameters do deduced are very sensitive to the approximations and the assumptions made in constructing the model

  10. Oxygen and Magnesium Isotopic Compositions of Asteroidal Materials Returned from Itokawa by the Hayabusa Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurimoto, H; Abe, M.; Ebihara, M.; Fujimura, A.; Hashizume, K.; Ireland, T. R.; Itoh, S.; Kawaguchi, K.; Kitajima, F.; Mukai, T.; hide

    2011-01-01

    magnesium isotopic composition of several grains. We will present the first results from the isotope analyses that will have been performed.

  11. The influence of matrix composition and reinforcement type on the properties of polysialate composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammell, James A.

    There is a critical need for the development of materials for eliminating fire as a cause of death in aircraft accidents. Currently available composites that use organic matrices not only deteriorate at temperatures above 300°C but also emit toxic fumes. The results presented in this dissertation focus on the development of an inorganic matrix that does not burn or emit toxic fumes. The matrix, known as polysialate, can withstand temperatures in excess of 1000°C. The matrix behaves like a ceramic, but does not need high curing temperatures, so it can be processed like many common organic matrices. The major parameters evaluated in this dissertation are: (i) Influence of reinforcement type, (ii) Matrix formulation for both wet-dry durability and high temperature resistance, (iii) Influence of processing variables such as moisture reduction and storage, (iv) Tensile strain capacity of modified matrices and matrices reinforced with ceramic microfibers and discrete carbon fibers, and (v) analytical modeling of mechanical properties. For the reinforcement type; carbon, glass, and stainless steel wire fabrics were investigated. Carbon fabrics with 1, 3, 12, and 50k tows were used. A matrix chemical formulation that can withstand wetting and drying was developed. This formulation was tested at high temperatures to ascertain its stability above 400°C. On the topic of processing, shelf life of prepregged fabric layers and efficient moisture removal methods were studied. An analytical model based on layered reinforcement was developed for analyzing flexural specimens. It is shown that the new inorganic matrix can withstand wetting and drying, and also high temperature. The layered reinforcement concept provides accurate prediction of strength and stiffness for composites reinforced with 1k and 3k tows. The prepregged fabric layers can be stored for 14 days at -15°C without losing strength.

  12. Surface composition, microstructure and corrosion resistance of AZ31 magnesium alloy irradiated by high-intensity pulsed ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, P.; Lei, M.K.; Zhu, X.P.

    2011-01-01

    High-intensity pulsed ion beam (HIPIB) irradiation of AZ31 magnesium alloy is performed and electrochemical corrosion experiment of irradiated samples is carried out by using potentiodynamic polarization technology in order to explore the effect of HIPIB irradiation on corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy. The surface composition, cross-sectional morphology and microstructure are characterized by using electron probe microanalyzer, optical microscope and transmission electron microscope, respectively. The results indicated that HIPIB irradiation leads to a significant improvement in corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy, in terms of the considerable increase in both corrosion potential and pitting breakdown potential. The microstructural refinement and surface purification induced by HIPIB irradiation are responsible for the improved corrosion resistance. - Research Highlights: → A modified layer about 30 μm thick is obtained by HIPIB irradiation. → Selective ablation of element/impurity phase having lower melting point is observed. → More importantly, microstructural refinement occurred on the irradiated surface. → The modified layer exhibited a significantly improved corrosion resistance. → Improved corrosion resistance is ascribed to the combined effect induced by HIPIB.

  13. Strength and fracture behavior of aluminide matrix composites with ceramic fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, M.; Suganuma, K.; Niihara, K.

    1999-07-01

    This paper investigates the fracture behavior of FeAl and Ni{sub 3}Al matrix composites with ceramic continuous fibers 8.5--10 {micro}m in diameter. When stress is applied to these composites, multiple-fracture of fibers predominantly occurs before matrix cracking, because the load carried by the fibers reaches their fracture strength. Fragments which remain longer than the critical length can provide significant strengthening through load bearing even though fiber breaking has occurred. The ultimate fracture strength of the composites also depends on stress relaxation by plastic deformation of the matrix at a crack tip in the multiple-fractured fibers. Ductilizing of the matrix by B doping improves the ultimate strength at ambient temperatures in both composites. However, their mechanical properties at elevated temperatures are quite different. In the case of Ni{sub 3}Al matrix composites, embrittlement of the matrix is undesirable for high strength and reliability at 873--973 K.

  14. Electrochemical corrosion behavior of composite MAO/sol-gel coatings on magnesium alloy AZ91D using combined micro-arc oxidation and sol-gel technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang Wei; Chen Baizhen; Shi Xichang; Chen Ya; Xiao Xiang

    2009-01-01

    Protective composite coatings were obtained on a magnesium alloy by micro-arc oxidation (MAO) and sol-gel technique. The coatings consisted of a MAO layer and a sol-gel layer. The microstructure and composition of the MAO coating and the composite coatings were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-rays (EDX). Potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and total immersion tests were used to evaluate the corrosion behavior of these coatings in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The results show that the sol-gel layer provides corrosion protection by physically sealing the pores in the MAO coating and acting as a barrier. The composite coatings can suppress the corrosion process by preventing the corrosive ions from transferring or diffusing to the magnesium alloy substrate. This enhances the corrosion resistance of the magnesium alloy AZ91D significantly

  15. Magnesium and Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferda Özdemir

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis (OP is a condition of bone fragility resulting from micro-architectural deterioration and decreased bone mass. OP depends on the interaction of genetic, hormonal, environmental and nutritional factors. Chronic low intakes of vitamin D and possibly magnesium, zinc, fluoride and vitamins K, B12, B6 and folic acid may predispose to osteoporosis. Magnesium is a mineral needed by every cell of your body. It helps maintain normal muscle and nerve function, keeps heart rhythm steady, and bones strong. Mg serves as co-factors for enzymes that help build bone matrix. Magnesium deficiency occurs due to excessive loss of magnesium in urine, gastrointestinal system disorders that cause a loss of magnesium or limit magnesium absorption, or a chronic low intake of magnesium. Signs of magnesium deficiency include confusion, disorientation, loss of appetite, depression, muscle contractions and cramps, tingling, numbness, abnormal heart rhythms, coronary spasm, and seizures. Magnesium deficiency alters calcium metabolism and the hormones that regulates calcium. Several studies have suggested that magnesium supplementation may improve bone mineral density and prevent fractures.

  16. Economical Fabrication of Thick-Section Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Jason; Ramachandran, Gautham; Williams, Brian; Benander, Robert

    2010-01-01

    A method was developed for producing thick-section [>2 in. (approx.5 cm)], continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). Ultramet-modified fiber interface coating and melt infiltration processing, developed previously for thin-section components, were used for the fabrication of CMCs that were an order of magnitude greater in thickness [up to 2.5 in. (approx.6.4 cm)]. Melt processing first involves infiltration of a fiber preform with the desired interface coating, and then with carbon to partially densify the preform. A molten refractory metal is then infiltrated and reacts with the excess carbon to form the carbide matrix without damaging the fiber reinforcement. Infiltration occurs from the inside out as the molten metal fills virtually all the available void space. Densification to thick-section components required modification of the conventional process conditions, and the means by which the large amount of molten metal is introduced into the fiber preform. Modification of the low-temperature, ultraviolet-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process used to apply interface coatings to the fiber preform was also required to accommodate the high preform thickness. The thick-section CMC processing developed in this work proved to be invaluable for component development, fabrication, and testing in two complementary efforts. In a project for the Army, involving SiC/SiC blisk development, nominally 0.8 in. thick x 8 in. diameter (approx. 2 cm thick x 20 cm diameter) components were successfully infiltrated. Blisk hubs were machined using diamond-embedded cutting tools and successfully spin-tested. Good ply uniformity and extremely low residual porosity (41 ksi (approx. 283 MPa) flexural strength.

  17. Magnesium Aminoclay-Fe3O4 (MgAC-Fe3O4 Hybrid Composites for Harvesting of Mixed Microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohwa Kim

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe the synthesis of magnesium aminoclay-iron oxide (MgAC-Fe3O4 hybrid composites for microalgae-harvesting application. MgAC-templated Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs were synthesized in different ratios of MgAC and Fe3O4 NPs. The uniform distribution of Fe3O4 NPs in the MgAC matrix was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. According to obtained X-ray diffraction (XRD patterns, increased MgAC loading leads to decreased intensity of the composites’ (311 plane of Fe3O4 NPs. For harvesting of Chlorella sp. KR-1, Scenedesmus obliquus and mixed microalgae (Chlorella sp. KR-1/ Scenedesmus obliquus, the optimal pH was 4.0. At higher pHs, the microalgae-harvesting efficiencies fell. Sample #1, which had the highest MgAC concentration, showed the most stability: the harvesting efficiencies for Chlorella sp. KR-1, Scenedesmus obliquus, and mixed microalgae were reduced only to ~50% at pH = 10.0. The electrostatic interaction between MgAC and the Fe3O4 NPs in the hybrid samples by microalgae, as confirmed by zeta potential measurements, were attributed to the harvesting mechanisms. Moreover, the zeta potentials of the MgAC-Fe3O4 hybrid composites were reduced as pH was increased, thus diminishing the microalgae-harvesting efficiencies.

  18. Insights From Magnesium Isotopic Compositions on the Oceanic Hydrothermal Circulation: Is Seamount Weathering the Solution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galy, A.; Carder, E.; Elderfield, H.

    2006-12-01

    It has been long recognised that the input of Mg in the ocean by river is removed by precipitation of Mg-rich bearing phases, either directly from the ocean such as dolomite or through hydrothermal circulation in the oceanic crust. The sampling of hydrothermal fluids demonstrated the efficiency of Mg consumption by the alteration of the oceanic crust, even at temperatures as low as 15°. For high-temperature fluids vented through black or white smokers in the vicinity of the ridge, the Mg concentration is up to 50 time lower than in seawater, and the close relationship between chlorine and Mg led to the idea that seawater was feeding the hydrothermal system and that Mg is quantitatively removed from it during high-T° alteration, the so called zero Mg hypothesis. Despite some hint for a non zero Mg hydrothermal end-member for a handful sites, the low concentration of Mg in oceanic hydrothermal fluids (around 1 mmol/l) has been mainly attributed to contamination by seawater during the sampling. Here we present Mg isotopic composition of 14 seawater samples from the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans and the Mediterranean and Red Seas and covering a range of depth of almost 5km and 26 hydrothermal fluids from 7 sites in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans with temperature from 15° to 380°C. We find the magnesium isotope composition of seawater to be constant, with a δ^{26}Mg = -0.82±0.10 ‰ relative to the DSM3 standard. This value is consistent with a long residence time for Mg in seawater. In addition, out of the 26 hydrothermal fluids studied, more than 58% differ from seawater for their Mg isotopic composition by more than 2σ. This number rises up to 88% at 2σmean level and the shift is systematic with the fluids being either indistinguishable from seawater or enriched in light isotopes by up to 2.4‰ in δ^{26}Mg. This clearly demonstrates that fluids having low Mg concentrations are not solely bearing Mg added by contamination during sampling. The isotopic

  19. Creep Forming of Carbon-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Wallace L.; Scotti, Stephan J.; Ashe, Melissa P.; Connolly, Liz

    2007-01-01

    A set of lecture slides describes an investigation of creep forming as a means of imparting desired curvatures to initially flat stock plates of carbon-reinforced ceramic-matrix composite (C-CMC) materials. The investigation is apparently part of a continuing effort to develop improved means of applying small CCMC repair patches to reinforced carbon-carbon leading edges of aerospace vehicles (e.g., space shuttles) prior to re-entry into the atmosphere of the Earth. According to one of the slides, creep forming would be an intermediate step in a process that would yield a fully densified, finished C-CMC part having a desired size and shape (the other steps would include preliminary machining, finish machining, densification by chemical vapor infiltration, and final coating). The investigation included experiments in which C-CMC disks were creep-formed by heating them to unspecified high temperatures for time intervals of the order of 1 hour while they were clamped into single- and double-curvature graphite molds. The creep-formed disks were coated with an oxidation- protection material, then subjected to arc-jet tests, in which the disks exhibited no deterioration after exposure to high-temperature test conditions lasting 490 seconds.

  20. Milling of Nanoparticles Reinforced Al-Based Metal Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alokesh Pramanik

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the face milling of nanoparticles reinforced Al-based metal matrix composites (nano-MMCs using a single insert milling tool. The effects of feed and speed on machined surfaces in terms of surface roughness, surface profile, surface appearance, chip surface, chip ratio, machining forces, and force signals were analyzed. It was found that surface roughness of machined surfaces increased with the increase of feed up to the speed of 60 mm/min. However, at the higher speed (100–140 mm/min, the variation of surface roughness was minor with the increase of feed. The machined surfaces contained the marks of cutting tools, lobes of material flow in layers, pits and craters. The chip ratio increased with the increase of feed at all speeds. The top chip surfaces were full of wrinkles in all cases, though the bottom surfaces carried the evidence of friction, adhesion, and deformed material layers. The effect of feed on machining forces was evident at all speeds. The machining speed was found not to affect machining forces noticeably at a lower feed, but those decreased with the increase of speed for the high feed scenario.

  1. Mechanical and corrosion behaviors of developed copper-based metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manvandra Kumar; Gautam, Rakesh Kumar; Prakash, Rajiv; Ji, Gopal

    2018-03-01

    This work investigates mechanical properties and corrosion resistances of cast copper-tungsten carbide (WC) metal matrix composites (MMCs). Copper matrix composites have been developed by stir casting technique. Different sizes of micro and nano particles of WC particles are utilized as reinforcement to prepare two copper-based composites, however, nano size of WC particles are prepared by high-energy ball milling. XRD (X-rays diffraction) characterize the materials for involvement of different phases. The mechanical behavior of composites has been studied by Vickers hardness test and compression test; while the corrosion behavior of developed composites is investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 0.5 M H2SO4 solutions. The results show that hardness, compressive strength and corrosion resistance of copper matrix composites are very high in comparison to that of copper matrix, which attributed to the microstructural changes occurred during composite formation. SEM (Scanning electron microscopy) reveals the morphology of the corroded surfaces.

  2. Fundamental studies of low velocity impact resistance of graphite fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowles, K.J.

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to relate the impact resistance of graphite fiber reinforced composites with matrix properties through gaining an understanding of the basic mechanics involved in the deformation and fracture process, and the effect of the polymer matrix structure on these mechanisms. It was found that the resin matrix structure influences the composite impact resistance in at least two ways. The integration of flexibilizers into the polymer chain structure tends to reduce the T/sub G/ and the mechanical properties of the polymer. The reduction in the mechanical properties of the matrix does not enhance the composite impact resistance because it allows matrix controlled failure to initiate impact damage. Linear polymers, which contain no active groups for cross-linking, do not toughen composites because the fiber-matrix interfacial bond is not of sufficient strength to prevent interfacial failure from occurring. Toughness must be built into the basic polymer backbone and cross-linking structure

  3. Infiltration processing of metal matrix composites using coated ceramic particulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon-Patino, Carlos Alberto

    2001-07-01

    A new process was developed to fabricate particulate metal matrix composites (MMCs). The process involves three steps: (1) modifying the particulate surface by metal coating, (2) forming a particulate porous compact; and (3) introducing metal into the channel network by vacuum infiltration. MMCs with different reinforcements, volume fractions, and sizes can be produced by this technique. Powders of alumina and silicon carbide were successfully coated with nickel and copper in preparation for infiltration with molten aluminum. Electroless Ni and Cu deposition was used since it enhances the wettability of the reinforcements for composite fabrication. While Cu deposits were polycrystalline, traces of phosphorous co-deposited from the electroless bath gave an amorphous Ni-P coating. The effect of metal coating on wetting behavior was evaluated at 800°C on plain and metal-coated ceramic plates using a sessile drop technique. The metallic films eliminated the non-wetting behavior of the uncoated ceramics, leading to equilibrium contact angles in the order of 12° and below 58° for Ni and Cu coated ceramics, respectively. The spreading data indicated that local diffusion at the triple junction was the governing mechanism of the wetting process. Precipitation of intermetallic phases in the drop/ceramic interface delayed the formation of Al4C3. Infiltration with molten Al showed that the coated-particulates are suitable as reinforcing materials for fabricating MMCs, giving porosity-free components with a homogeneously distributed reinforcing phase. The coating promoted easy metal flow through the preform, compared to the non-infiltration behavior of the uncoated counterparts. Liquid state diffusion kinetics due to temperature dependent viscosity forces controlled the infiltration process. Microstructural analysis indicated the formation of intermetallic phases such as CuAl 2, in the case of Cu coating, and Ni2Al3 and NiAl 3 when Ni-coated powders were infiltrated. The

  4. Wear Characterization of Aluminium/Basalt Fiber Reinforced Metal Matrix Composites - A Novel Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Amuthakkannan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum alloy based metal matrix composite participate have a wider applications in wear resistance applications. Attempt made in current study is that, basalt fiber reinforced aluminum metal matrix composite have been prepared using stir casting method. Different weight percentage of basalt fiber reinforced with Al (6061 metal matrix composites are used to study the wear resistance of the composites. For wear study, percentage of reinforcement, normal load and sliding velocity are the considered as important parameters. To study the effect of basalt fiber reinforcement on the dry sliding wear of Al6061 alloy composites the Pin On wear tester is used. Initially hardness of the composites was tested, it was found that increasing reinforcement in the composite hardness value of the composites also increased. Based on the Grey relation analysis (GRA the effects of wear resistance of the composites were studied.

  5. Interactions between tungsten carbide (WC) particulates and metal matrix in WC-reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou, D.; Hellman, J.; Luhulima, D.; Liimatainen, J.; Lindroos, V.K.

    2003-01-01

    A variety of experimental techniques have been used to investigate the interactions between tungsten carbide (WC-Co 88/12) particulates and the matrix in some new wear resistant cobalt-based superalloy and steel matrix composites produced by hot isostatic pressing. The results show that the chemical composition of the matrix has a strong influence on the interface reaction between WC and matrix and the structural stability of the WC particulates in the composite. Some characteristics of the interaction between matrix and reinforcement are explained by the calculation of diffusion kinetics. The three-body abrasion wear resistance of the composites has been examined based on the ASTM G65-91 standard procedure. The wear behavior of the best composites of this study shows great potential for wear protection applications

  6. Machinability of titanium metal matrix composites (Ti-MMCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramesh, Maryam

    Titanium metal matrix composites (Ti-MMCs), as a new generation of materials, have various potential applications in aerospace and automotive industries. The presence of ceramic particles enhances the physical and mechanical properties of the alloy matrix. However, the hard and abrasive nature of these particles causes various issues in the field of their machinability. Severe tool wear and short tool life are the most important drawbacks of machining this class of materials. There is very limited work in the literature regarding the machinability of this class of materials especially in the area of tool life estimation and tool wear. By far, polycrystalline diamond (PCD) tools appear to be the best choice for machining MMCs from researchers' point of view. However, due to their high cost, economical alternatives are sought. Cubic boron nitride (CBN) inserts, as the second hardest available tools, show superior characteristics such as great wear resistance, high hardness at elevated temperatures, a low coefficient of friction and a high melting point. Yet, so far CBN tools have not been studied during machining of Ti-MMCs. In this study, a comprehensive study has been performed to explore the tool wear mechanisms of CBN inserts during turning of Ti-MMCs. The unique morphology of the worn faces of the tools was investigated for the first time, which led to new insights in the identification of chemical wear mechanisms during machining of Ti-MMCs. Utilizing the full tool life capacity of cutting tools is also very crucial, due to the considerable costs associated with suboptimal replacement of tools. This strongly motivates development of a reliable model for tool life estimation under any cutting conditions. In this study, a novel model based on the survival analysis methodology is developed to estimate the progressive states of tool wear under any cutting conditions during machining of Ti-MMCs. This statistical model takes into account the machining time in

  7. Evaluation of dry sliding wear behavior of silicon particles reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Zhiqiang; Zhang Di; Li Guobin

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports a study on the wear property of powder metallurgy aluminum matrix composites 9Si/Al-Cu-Mg. A on rock wear-testing machine is used to evaluate the wear property of the composites, in which a GCrl5 steel ring is used as the counter face material. The wear behavior of the composites under different conditions is studied. The optical microscope and scanning electron microscope are used to analyze the worn surfaces and the subsurface of the composites in order to research the wear mechanism of the composites. Results indicate that the weight loss of the composite were lower than that of the matrix alloy

  8. Research and Development Progress of National Key Laboratory of Advanced Composites on Advanced Aeronautical Resin Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Bintai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Applications and research progress in advanced aeronautical resin matrix composites by National Key Laboratory of Advanced Composites (LAC were summarized. A novel interlaminar toughening technology employing ultra-thin TP non-woven fabric was developed in LAC, which significantly improved the compression after impact (CAI performances of composite laminates.Newly designed multilayer sandwich stealth composite structures exhibited a good broadband radar absorbing properties at 1-18 GHz.There were remarkable developments in high toughness and high temperature resin matrix composites, covering major composite processing technologies such as prepreg-autoclave procedure, liquid composite molding and automation manufacture, etc. Finally, numerical simulation and optimization methods were deliberately utilized in the study of composites curing behavior, resin flow and curing deformation. A composite material database was also established.In conclusion, LAC has been a great support for the development of aeronautical equipment, playing such roles as innovation leading, system dominating, foundation supporting and application ensuring of aerocomposites.

  9. Fracture Toughness of Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Metal- and Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.L.; Liu, B.; Hwang, K.C.; Chen, Y.L.; Huang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Hierarchical analysis of the fracture toughness enhancement of carbon nanotube- (CNT-) reinforced hard matrix composites is carried out on the basis of shear-lag theory and fracture mechanics. It is found that stronger CNT/matrix interfaces cannot definitely lead to the better fracture toughness of these composites, and the optimal interfacial chemical bond density is that making the failure mode just in the transition from CNT pull-out to CNT break. For hard matrix composites, the fracture toughness of composites with weak interfaces can be improved effectively by increasing the CNT length. However, for soft matrix composite, the fracture toughness improvement due to the reinforcing CNTs quickly becomes saturated with an increase in CNT length. The proposed theoretical model is also applicable to short fiber-reinforced composites.

  10. Fracture Toughness of Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Metal- and Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. L. Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hierarchical analysis of the fracture toughness enhancement of carbon nanotube- (CNT- reinforced hard matrix composites is carried out on the basis of shear-lag theory and facture mechanics. It is found that stronger CNT/matrix interfaces cannot definitely lead to the better fracture toughness of these composites, and the optimal interfacial chemical bond density is that making the failure mode just in the transition from CNT pull-out to CNT break. For hard matrix composites, the fracture toughness of composites with weak interfaces can be improved effectively by increasing the CNT length. However, for soft matrix composite, the fracture toughness improvement due to the reinforcing CNTs quickly becomes saturated with an increase in CNT length. The proposed theoretical model is also applicable to short fiber-reinforced composites.

  11. On Poisson's ratio for metal matrix composite laminates. [aluminum boron composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herakovich, C. T.; Shuart, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    The definition of Poisson's ratio for nonlinear behavior of metal matrix composite laminates is discussed and experimental results for tensile and compressive loading of five different boron-aluminum laminates are presented. It is shown that there may be considerable difference in the value of Poisson's ratio as defined by a total strain or an incremental strain definition. It is argued that the incremental definition is more appropriate for nonlinear material behavior. Results from a (0) laminate indicate that the incremental definition provides a precursor to failure which is not evident if the total strain definition is used.

  12. High Temperature Degradation Mechanisms in Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Ronan A.

    1996-01-01

    Polymer matrix composites are increasingly used in demanding structural applications in which they may be exposed to harsh environments. The durability of such materials is a major concern, potentially limiting both the integrity of the structures and their useful lifetimes. The goal of the current investigation is to develop a mechanism-based model of the chemical degradation which occurs, such that given the external chemical environment and temperatures throughout the laminate, laminate geometry, and ply and/or constituent material properties, we can calculate the concentration of diffusing substances and extent of chemical degradation as functions of time and position throughout the laminate. This objective is met through the development and use of analytical models, coupled to an analysis-driven experimental program which offers both quantitative and qualitative information on the degradation mechanism. Preliminary analyses using a coupled diffusion/reaction model are used to gain insight into the physics of the degradation mechanisms and to identify crucial material parameters. An experimental program is defined based on the results of the preliminary analysis which allows the determination of the necessary material coefficients. Thermogravimetric analyses are carried out in nitrogen, air, and oxygen to provide quantitative information on thermal and oxidative reactions. Powdered samples are used to eliminate diffusion effects. Tests in both inert and oxidative environments allow the separation of thermal and oxidative contributions to specimen mass loss. The concentration dependency of the oxidative reactions is determined from the tests in pure oxygen. Short term isothermal tests at different temperatures are carried out on neat resin and unidirectional macroscopic specimens to identify diffusion effects. Mass loss, specimen shrinkage, the formation of degraded surface layers and surface cracking are recorded as functions of exposure time. Geometry effects

  13. Light-weight wood-magnesium oxychloride cement composite building products made by extrusion

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, X; Li, Z

    2012-01-01

    This is the post-print version of the final paper published in Construction and Building Materials. The published article is available from the link below. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. Copyright @ 2011 Elsevier B.V. Magnesium oxychloride (MOC) cement is ...

  14. Sol-gel synthesis of magnesium oxide-silicon dioxide glass compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1988-01-01

    MgO-SiO2 glasses containing up to 15 mol pct MgO, which could not have been prepared by the conventional glass melting method due to the presence of stable liquid-liquid immiscibility, were synthesized by the sol-gel technique. Clear and transparent gels were obtained from the hydrolysis and polycondensation of silicon tetraethoxide (TEOS) and magnesium nitrate hexahydrate when the water/TEOS mole ratio was four or more. The gelling time decreased with increase in magnesium content, water/TEOS ratio, and reaction temperature. Magnesium nitrate hexahydrate crystallized out of the gels containing 15 and 20 mol pct MgO on slow drying. This problem was partially alleviated by drying the gels quickly at higher temperatures. Monolithic gel samples were prepared using glycerol as the drying control additive. The gels were subjected to various thermal treatments and characterized by several methods. No organic groups could be detected in the glasses after heat treatments to approx. 800 C, but trace amounts of hydroxyl groups were still present. No crystalline phase was found from X-ray diffraction in the gel samples to approx. 890 C. At higher temperatures, alpha quartz precipitated out as the crystalline phase in gels containing up to 10 mol pct MgO. The overall activation energy for gel formation in 10MgO-90SiO2 (mol pct) system for water/TEOS mole ratio of 7.5 was calculated to be 58.7 kJ/mol.

  15. Cytocompatibility of Siloxane-Containing Vaterite/Poly(l-lactic acid) Composite Coatings on Metallic Magnesium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shinya; Maeda, Hirotaka; Obata, Akiko; Lohbauer, Ulrich; Yamamoto, Akiko; Kasuga, Toshihiro

    2013-12-12

    Poly(l-lactic acid)-based films which include 60 wt % of vaterite (V) or siloxane-containing vaterite (SiV) were coated on a pure magnesium substrate, denoted by PLLA/V or PLLA/SiV, respectively, to suppress early corrosion and improve its cytocompatibility. Both coating films adhered to the Mg substrate with 2.3-2.8 MPa of tensile bonding strength. Soaking test for 7 days in α-modified minimum essential medium revealed that the morphological instability of the PLLA/V film caused a higher amount of Mg 2+ ion to be released from the coating sample. On the other hand, in the case of the coating with the PLLA/SiV film, no morphological change even after the soaking test was observed, owing to the suppression of the degradation rate. In cell culture tests, the proliferation of mouse osteoblast-like cell (MC3T3-E1) was significantly enhanced by both coatings, in comparison with the uncoated magnesium substrate. The cell morphology revealed that a few less-spread cells were observed on the PLLA/V film, while more elongated cells were done on the PLLA/SiV film. The cells on the PLLA/SiV film exhibited an extremely higher alkaline phosphatase activity after 21 days of incubation than that on the PLLA/V one. The PLLA/SiV film suppressed the early corrosion and enhanced cytocompatibility on metallic magnesium.

  16. Cytocompatibility of Siloxane-Containing Vaterite/Poly(l-lactic acid Composite Coatings on Metallic Magnesium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Yamada

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Poly(l-lactic acid-based films which include 60 wt % of vaterite (V or siloxane-containing vaterite (SiV were coated on a pure magnesium substrate, denoted by PLLA/V or PLLA/SiV, respectively, to suppress early corrosion and improve its cytocompatibility. Both coating films adhered to the Mg substrate with 2.3–2.8 MPa of tensile bonding strength. Soaking test for 7 days in α-modified minimum essential medium revealed that the morphological instability of the PLLA/V film caused a higher amount of Mg2+ ion to be released from the coating sample. On the other hand, in the case of the coating with the PLLA/SiV film, no morphological change even after the soaking test was observed, owing to the suppression of the degradation rate. In cell culture tests, the proliferation of mouse osteoblast-like cell (MC3T3-E1 was significantly enhanced by both coatings, in comparison with the uncoated magnesium substrate. The cell morphology revealed that a few less-spread cells were observed on the PLLA/V film, while more elongated cells were done on the PLLA/SiV film. The cells on the PLLA/SiV film exhibited an extremely higher alkaline phosphatase activity after 21 days of incubation than that on the PLLA/V one. The PLLA/SiV film suppressed the early corrosion and enhanced cytocompatibility on metallic magnesium.

  17. Strain evolution after fiber failure in a single-fiber metal matrix composite under cyclic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanan, Jay C. [Department of Materials Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)]. E-mail: jay.hanan@okstate.edu; Mahesh, Sivasambu [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Uestuendag, Ersan [Department of Materials Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)]. E-mail: ersan@caltech.edu; Beyerlein, Irene J. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Swift, Geoffrey A. [Department of Materials Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Clausen, Bjorn [Department of Materials Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Brown, Donald W. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Bourke, Mark A.M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2005-06-15

    The evolution of in situ elastic strain with cyclic tensile loading in each phase of a single Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-fiber/aluminum-matrix composite was studied using neutron diffraction (ND). An analytical model appropriate for metal matrix composites (MMCs) was developed to connect the measured axial strain evolution in each phase with the possible micromechanical events that could occur during loading at room temperature: fiber fracture, interfacial slipping, and matrix plastic deformation. Model interpretation showed that the elastic strain evolution in the fiber and matrix was governed by fiber fracture and interface slipping and not by plastic deformation of the matrix, whereas the macroscopic stress-strain response of the composite was influenced by all three. The combined single-fiber composite model and ND experiment introduces a new and quick engineering approach for qualifying the micromechanical response in MMCs due to cyclic loading and fiber fracture.

  18. Strain evolution after fiber failure in a single-fiber metal matrix composite under cyclic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanan, Jay C.; Mahesh, Sivasambu; Uestuendag, Ersan; Beyerlein, Irene J.; Swift, Geoffrey A.; Clausen, Bjorn; Brown, Donald W.; Bourke, Mark A.M.

    2005-01-01

    The evolution of in situ elastic strain with cyclic tensile loading in each phase of a single Al 2 O 3 -fiber/aluminum-matrix composite was studied using neutron diffraction (ND). An analytical model appropriate for metal matrix composites (MMCs) was developed to connect the measured axial strain evolution in each phase with the possible micromechanical events that could occur during loading at room temperature: fiber fracture, interfacial slipping, and matrix plastic deformation. Model interpretation showed that the elastic strain evolution in the fiber and matrix was governed by fiber fracture and interface slipping and not by plastic deformation of the matrix, whereas the macroscopic stress-strain response of the composite was influenced by all three. The combined single-fiber composite model and ND experiment introduces a new and quick engineering approach for qualifying the micromechanical response in MMCs due to cyclic loading and fiber fracture

  19. Application of ceramic short fiber reinforced Al alloy matrix composite on piston for internal combustion engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Shenqing

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and properties of ceramic short fiber reinforced Al-Si alloy matrix composite and it’s application on the piston for internal combustion engines are presented. Alumina or aluminosilicate fibers reinforced Al-Si alloy matrix composite has more excellent synthetical properties at elevated temperature than the matrix alloys. A partially reinforced Al-Si alloy matrix composite piston produced by squeeze casting technique has a firm interface between reinforced and unreinforced areas, low reject rate and good technical tolerance. As a new kind of piston material, it has been used for mass production of about 400,000 pieces of automobile engines piston. China has become one of a few countries in which aluminum alloy matrix composite materials have been used in automobile industry and attained industrialization.

  20. Effect of the type of radiation on the degradation behavior of polymer matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egusa, Shigenori

    1992-01-01

    Four kinds of polymer matrix composites (filler: E-glass or carbon fiber cloth; matrix; epoxy or polyimide resin) were irradiated with neutrons and 60 Co γ-rays at room temperature or at 5 K. Three-point bend tests were then carried out at 77 K. Comparison of the neutron and γ-ray irradiation effects shows that the radiation sensitivity of the glass/epoxy and glass/polyimide composites is 1.8-2.6 times higher to neutrons than to γ-rays, indicating a higher sensitivity of the epoxy and polyimide matrix resins to recoil protons than to γ-rays. Absorbed dose calculations, on the other hand, show that the spatial distribution of the microscopic energy deposition in polymer matrix composites is inhomogeneous for neutrons, although almost homogeneous for γ-rays. In addition, the neutron irradiation of boron-containing E-glass fiber composites produces additional radiation damage due to a 10 B(n,α) 7 Li reaction in the glass fibers, thus significantly enhancing a decrease in the composite strength. These facts indicate that as far as polymer matrix composites are concerned, the irradiation effects of neutrons will be rather difficult to simulate with different types of radiation such as protons and carbon ions from an ion accelerator. Thus, it may be prudent that such simulation irradiation be carried out mainly for pure resins to be used as matrix in polymer matrix composites. (author)

  1. Mechanism of radiation-induced degradation in mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egusa, Shigenori

    1988-01-01

    Four kinds of polymer matrix composites (filler, E-glass or carbon fibre cloth; matrix, epoxy or polyimide resin) and pure epoxy and polyimide resins were irradiated with 60 Co γ-rays or 2 MeV electrons at room temperature. Mechanical tests were then carried out at 77K and at room temperature. Following irradiation, the Young's (tensile) modulus of these composites and pure resins remains practically unchanged even at 170 MGy for both test temperatures. The ultimate strength, however, decreases appreciably with increasing dose. The dose dependence of the composite strength depends not only on the combination of fibre and matrix in the composite but also on the test temperature. A relationship is found between the composite ultimate strain and the matrix ultimate strain, thus indicating that the dose dependence of the composite strength is virtually determined by a change in the matrix ultimate strain due to irradiation. Based on this finding, we propose a mechanism of radiation-induced degradation of a polymer matrix composite in order to explain the dose dependence of the composite strength measured at 77 K and at room temperature. (author)

  2. Numerical Modeling of Macroscopic Behavior of Particulate Composite with Crosslinked Polymer Matrix

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Náhlík, Luboš; Máša, B.; Hutař, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 465, - (2011), s. 129-132 ISSN 1013-9826 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/08/1409 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Particle reinforced composites * polymer matrix composite * mechanical response Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials

  3. Environmental Barrier Coatings for Ceramic Matrix Composites - An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang; Zhu, Dongming; Wiesner, Valerie Lynn; van Roode, Mark; Kashyap, Tania; Zhu, Dongming; Wiesner, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) are increasingly being considered as structural materials for advanced power generation equipment. Broadly speaking the two classes of materials are oxide-based CMCs and non-oxide based CMCs. The non-oxide CMCs are primarily silicon-based. Under conditions prevalent in the gas turbine hot section the water vapor formed in the combustion of gaseous or liquid hydrocarbons reacts with the surface-SiO2 to form volatile products. Progressive surface recession of the SiC-SiC CMC component, strength loss as a result of wall thinning and chemical changes in the component occur, which leads to the loss of structural integrity and mechanical strength and becomes life limiting to the equipment in service. The solutions pursued to improve the life of SiC-SiC CMCs include the incorporation of an external barrier coating to provide surface protection to the CMC substrate. The coating system has become known as an Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC). The relevant early coatings work was focused on coatings for corrosion protection of silicon-based monolithic ceramics operating under severely corrosive conditions. The development of EBCs for gas turbine hot section components was built on the early work for silicon-based monolithics. The first generation EBC is a three-layer coating, which in its simplest configuration consists of a silicon (Si) base coat applied on top of the CMC, a barium-strontium-aluminosilicate (BSAS) surface coat resistant to water vapor attack, and a mullite-based intermediate coating layer between the Si base coat and BSAS top coat. This system can be represented as Si-Mullite-BSAS. While this baseline EBC presented a significant improvement over the uncoated SiC-SiC CMC, for the very long durations of 3-4 years or more expected for industrial operation further improvements in coating durability are desirable. Also, for very demanding applications with higher component temperatures but shorter service lives more rugged EBCs

  4. Microstructure Evolution and Durability of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coating Systems for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Evans, Laura J.; McCue, Terry R.; Harder, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Environmental barrier coated SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) systems will play a crucial role in next generation turbine engines for hot-section component applications because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures with improved efficiency, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. Advanced HfO2 and rare earth silicate environmental barrier coatings (EBCs), along with multicomponent hafnium and rare earth silicide EBC bond coats have been developed. The coating degradation mechanisms in the laboratory simulated engine thermal cycling, and fatigue-creep operating environments are also being investigated. This paper will focus on the microstructural and compositional evolutions of an advanced environmental barrier coating system on a SiC-SiC CMC substrate during the high temperature simulated durability tests, by using a Field Emission Gun Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Wavelength Dispersive Spectroscopy (WDS). The effects of Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicate (CMAS) from road sand or volcano-ash deposits on the degradation mechanisms of the environmental barrier coating systems will also be discussed. The detailed analysis results help understand the EBC-CMC system performance, aiming at the durability improvements to achieve more robust, prime-reliant environmental barrier coatings.

  5. Combined Thermomechanical and Environmental Durability of Environmental Barrier Coating Systems on SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Harder, Bryan; Bhatt, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will play a crucial role in next generation turbine engines for hot-section component applications. The development of prime-reliant environmental barrier coatings is essential to the EBC-CMC system durability, ensuring the successful implementations of the high temperature and lightweight engine component technologies for engine applications.This paper will emphasize recent NASA environmental barrier coating and CMC developments for SiC/SiC turbine airfoil components, utilizing advanced coating compositions and processing methods. The emphasis has been particularly placed on thermomechanical and environment durability evaluations of EBC-CMC systems. We have also addressed the integration of the EBCs with advanced SiC/SiC CMCs, and studied the effects of combustion environments and Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicate (CMAS) deposits on the durability of the EBC-CMC systems under thermal gradient and mechanical loading conditions. Advanced environmental barrier coating systems, including multicomponent rare earth silicate EBCs and HfO2-Si based bond coats, will be discussed for the performance improvements to achieve better temperature capability and CMAS resistance for future engine operating conditions.

  6. Durability and CMAS Resistance of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings Systems for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2015-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) systems will play a crucial role in next generation turbine engines for hot-section component applications because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures with improved efficiency, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. This paper will emphasize advanced environmental barrier coating developments for SiCSiC turbine airfoil components, by using advanced coating compositions and processing, in conjunction with mechanical and environment testing and durability validations. The coating-CMC degradations and durability in the laboratory simulated engine fatigue-creep and complex operating environments are being addressed. The effects of Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicate (CMAS) from road sand or volcano-ash deposits on the degradation mechanisms of the environmental barrier coating systems will be discussed. The results help understand the advanced EBC-CMC system performance, aiming at the durability improvements of more robust, prime-reliant environmental barrier coatings for successful applications of the component technologies and lifing methodologies.

  7. 3-D FEM Modeling of fiber/matrix interface debonding in UD composites including surface effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pupurs, A; Varna, J

    2012-01-01

    Fiber/matrix interface debond growth is one of the main mechanisms of damage evolution in unidirectional (UD) polymer composites. Because for polymer composites the fiber strain to failure is smaller than for the matrix multiple fiber breaks occur at random positions when high mechanical stress is applied to the composite. The energy released due to each fiber break is usually larger than necessary for the creation of a fiber break therefore a partial debonding of fiber/matrix interface is typically observed. Thus the stiffness reduction of UD composite is contributed both from the fiber breaks and from the interface debonds. The aim of this paper is to analyze the debond growth in carbon fiber/epoxy and glass fiber/epoxy UD composites using fracture mechanics principles by calculation of energy release rate G II . A 3-D FEM model is developed for calculation of energy release rate for fiber/matrix interface debonds at different locations in the composite including the composite surface region where the stress state differs from the one in the bulk composite. In the model individual partially debonded fiber is surrounded by matrix region and embedded in a homogenized composite.

  8. Composite Layers “MgAl Intermetalic Layer / PVD Coating” Obtained On The AZ91D Magnesium Alloy By Different Hybrid Surface Treatment Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smolik J.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium alloys have very interesting physical properties which make them ‘materials of the future’ for tools and machine components in many industry areas. However, very low corrosion and tribological resistance of magnesium alloys hampers the implementation of this material in the industry. One of the methods to improve the properties of magnesium alloys is the application of the solutions of surface engineering like hybrid technologies. In this paper, the authors compare the tribological and corrosion properties of two types of “MgAlitermetalic / PVD coating” composite layers obtained by two different hybrid surface treatment technologies. In the first configuration, the “MgAlitermetalic / PVD coating” composite layer was obtained by multisource hybrid surface treatment technology combining magnetron sputtering (MS, arc evaporation (AE and vacuum heating methods. The second type of a composite layer was prepared using a hybrid technology combined with a diffusion treatment process in Al-powder and the electron beam evaporation (EB method. The authors conclude, that even though the application of „MgAlitermetalic / PVD coating” composite layers can be an effective solution to increase the abrasive wear resistance of magnesium alloys, it is not a good solution to increase its corrosion resistance.

  9. Stress and Damage in Polymer Matrix Composite Materials Due to Material Degradation at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Hugh L.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes analytical methods for calculating stresses and damage caused by degradation of the matrix constituent in polymer matrix composite materials. Laminate geometry, material properties, and matrix degradation states are specified as functions of position and time. Matrix shrinkage and property changes are modeled as functions of the degradation states. The model is incorporated into an existing composite mechanics computer code. Stresses, strains, and deformations at the laminate, ply, and micro levels are calculated, and from these calculations it is determined if there is failure of any kind. The rationale for the model (based on published experimental work) is presented, its integration into the laminate analysis code is outlined, and example results are given, with comparisons to existing material and structural data. The mechanisms behind the changes in properties and in surface cracking during long-term aging of polyimide matrix composites are clarified. High-temperature-material test methods are also evaluated.

  10. ASTM and VAMAS activities in titanium matrix composites test methods development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. S.; Harmon, D. M.; Bartolotta, P. A.; Russ, S. M.

    1994-01-01

    Titanium matrix composites (TMC's) are being considered for a number of aerospace applications ranging from high performance engine components to airframe structures in areas that require high stiffness to weight ratios at temperatures up to 400 C. TMC's exhibit unique mechanical behavior due to fiber-matrix interface failures, matrix cracks bridged by fibers, thermo-viscoplastic behavior of the matrix at elevated temperatures, and the development of significant thermal residual stresses in the composite due to fabrication. Standard testing methodology must be developed to reflect the uniqueness of this type of material systems. The purpose of this paper is to review the current activities in ASTM and Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards (VAMAS) that are directed toward the development of standard test methodology for titanium matrix composites.

  11. THE STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF COMPOSITE LASER CLAD COATINGS WITH Ni BASED MATRIX WITH WC PARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zita Iždinská

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the influence of the processing conditions on the microstructure and abrasive wear behavior of composite laser clad coatings with Ni based matrix reinforced with 50% WC particles is analyzed. Composite powder was applied in the form of coatings onto a mild steel substrate (Fe–0.17% C by different laser powers and cladding speeds. The microstructure of the coatings was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Tribological properties of coatings were evaluated by pin-on-disc wear test. It appeared that the hardness of the matrix of composite coatings decreases with increasing cladding speed. However, wear resistance of composite coatings with decreasing hardness of Ni based matrix increases. Significantly enhanced wear resistance of WC composite coatings in comparison with Ni based coatings is attributed to the hard phase structures in composite coatings.

  12. Prediction of the creep properties of discontinuous fibre composites from the matrix creep law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilde-Soerensen, J.B.; Boecker Pedersen, O.; Lilholt, H.

    1975-02-01

    Existing theories for predicting the creep properties of discontinuous fibre composites with non-creeping fibres from matrix creep properties, originally based on a power law, are extended to include an exponential law, and in principle a general matrixlaw. An analysis shows that the composite creep curve can be obtained by a simple displacement of the matrix creep curve in a log sigma vs. log epsilon diagram. This principle, that each point on the matrix curve has a corresponding point on the composite curve,is given a physical interpretation. The direction of displacement is such that the transition from a power law toan exponential law occurs at a lower strain rate for the composite than for the unreinforced matrix. This emphasizes the importance of the exponential creep range in the creep of fibre composites. The combined use of matrix and composite data may allow the creep phenomenon to be studied over a larger range of strain rates than otherwise possible. A method for constructing generalized composite creep diagrams is suggested. Creep properties predicted from matrix data by the present analysis are compared with experimental data from the literature. (author)

  13. Composites of aluminum alloy and magnesium alloy with graphite showing low thermal expansion and high specific thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddone, Valerio; Boerner, Benji; Reich, Stephanie

    2017-12-01

    High thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion and low density are three important features in novel materials for high performance electronics, mobile applications and aerospace. Spark plasma sintering was used to produce light metal-graphite composites with an excellent combination of these three properties. By adding up to 50 vol.% of macroscopic graphite flakes, the thermal expansion coefficient of magnesium and aluminum alloys was tuned down to zero or negative values, while the specific thermal conductivity was over four times higher than in copper. No degradation of the samples was observed after thermal stress tests and thermal cycling. Tensile strength and hardness measurements proved sufficient mechanical stability for most thermal management applications. For the production of the alloys, both prealloyed powders and elemental mixtures were used; the addition of trace elements to cope with the oxidation of the powders was studied.

  14. Fabrication of multifunctional CaP-TC composite coatings and the corrosion protection they provide for magnesium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Cui; Zhang, Xiaoxu; Li, Qing

    2017-08-28

    Two major problems with magnesium (Mg) alloy biomaterials are the poor corrosion resistance and infection associated with implantation. In this study, a novel calcium phosphate (CaP)/tetracycline (TC) composite coating for Mg implants that can both improve the corrosion resistance of Mg and release a drug in a durable way is reported. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images showed that TC additives make the CaP coating more compact and uniform. Electrochemical tests indicated CaP/TC coatings can provide excellent corrosion protection for Mg alloy substrates. Besides, TC additives can also provide effective prevention of bone infection and inflammation due to its broad-spectrum antibacterial properties. The one-step hydrothermal process reported here greatly simplified the multi-step fabrication of smart coatings reported previously.

  15. Synthesis and thermal decomposition behaviors of magnesium borohydride ammoniates with controllable composition as hydrogen storage materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanjing; Liu, Yongfeng; Li, You; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge

    2013-02-01

    An ammonia-redistribution strategy for synthesizing metal borohydride ammoniates with controllable coordination number of NH(3) was proposed, and a series of magnesium borohydride ammoniates were easily synthesized by a mechanochemical reaction between Mg(BH(4))(2) and its hexaammoniate. A strong dependence of the dehydrogenation temperature and purity of the released hydrogen upon heating on the coordination number of NH(3) was elaborated for Mg(BH(4))(2)·xNH(3) owing to the change in the molar ratio of H(δ+) and H(δ-), the charge distribution on H(δ+) and H(δ-), and the strength of the coordinate bond N:→Mg(2+). The monoammoniate of magnesium borohydride (Mg(BH(4))(2)·NH(3)) was obtained for the first time. It can release 6.5% pure hydrogen within 50 minutes at 180 °C. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Design Concepts for Cooled Ceramic Matrix Composite Turbine Vanes, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The work proposed herein is to demonstrate that the higher temperature capabilities of Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) can be fully utilized to reduce emissions and...

  17. Polyvinylpyrrolidone Matrix as an Effective Reducing Agent and Stabilizer during Reception of Silver Nanoparticles in Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Semenyuk, Nataliya; Kostiv, Ulyana; Dudok, Galyna; Nechay, Jaroslav; Skorokhoda, Volodymyr

    2013-01-01

    The use of polyvinylpyrrolidone matrix as an effective reducing agent and stabilizer during reception of silver nanoparticles in composites is substantiated. The influence of various factors on patterns of obtaining silver nanoparticles and their size.

  18. Carbon dioxide selective mixed matrix composite membrane containing ZIF-7 nano-fillers

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Tao; Pan, Yichang; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor; Lai, Zhiping

    2013-01-01

    Mixed matrix materials made from selective inorganic fillers and polymers are very attractive for the manufacturing of gas separation membranes. But only few of these materials could be manufactured into high-performance asymmetric or composite

  19. The Micromechanics of Deformation and Failure in Metal-Matrix Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Needleman, Alan

    1997-01-01

    .... However, metal-matrix composites often have low ductility and low fracture toughness. An improved understanding of the basic deformation and failure mechanisms is needed to overcome these problems...

  20. Composite Armor Performance Enhancement by Tethered Polymer Chains at the Fiber-Matrix Interface

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kalika, D

    1998-01-01

    ... properties of fiber composites. The governing strategy was to tailor the discontinuous fiber-matrix interface so as to introduce a volume of interaction capable of providing additional, molecular-level energy dissipation mechanisms...

  1. Insight into highly efficient removal of cadmium and methylene blue by eco-friendly magnesium silicate-hydrothermal carbon composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ting; Yuan, Xingzhong; Chen, Xiaohong; Wu, Zhibin; Wang, Hou; Leng, Lijian; Wang, Hui; Jiang, Longbo; Zeng, Guangming

    2018-01-01

    Water pollution is one of the forefront environmental problems. Due to the simplification, flexibility and low cost, the adsorption becomes one of the most fashionable technology and the exploitation of adsorbents has drawn greatly attention. In this study, a novel magnesium silicate-hydrothermal carbon composite (MS-C) was synthesized by facile hydrothermal carbonization and used to remove the cadmium (Cd(II)) and methylene blue (MB) from wastewater. It was shown that the porous and lump-like magnesium silicate (MS) was decorated with multiple hydrothermal carbon (HC) via the Csbnd Osbnd Si covalent bonding. Further, the adsorption behavior of Cd(II) and MB based on the MS, HC, and MS-C were systematically investigated. The equilibrium data of both Cd(II) and MB were fitted well with Langmuir model. Compared to pure MS and HC, the adsorption capacity of composite was significantly improved, accompanied by the maximum adsorption capacity of 108 mg/g for Cd(II) and 418 mg/g for MB, respectively. In the Cd(II)-MB binary system, the adsorption of Cd(II) was favored in comparison with that of MB. The removal of Cd(II) was mainly ascribed to electrostatic attraction and the ion exchange interaction. Meanwhile, the adsorption of MB onto adsorbent was driven by the electrostatic attraction, π-π interaction and hydrogen bond. In view of these empirical results and real water treatment, the environmental friendly and low-cost MS-C holds a potential for separate or simultaneous removal of Cd(II) and MB in practical applications.

  2. Anisotropic thermal expansion behaviors of copper matrix in β-eucryptite/copper composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lidong; Xue Zongwei; Qiao Yingjie; Fei, W.D.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The thermal expansion behaviors of Cu matrix were studied by in situ XRD. ► The expansion of Cu{1 1 1} plane is linear, that of Cu{2 0 0} is nonlinear. ► The anisotropic thermal expansion of Cu is related to the twinning of Cu matrix. ► The twinning of Cu matrix makes the CTE of the composite increasing. - Abstract: A β-eucryptite/copper composite was fabricated by spark plasma sintering process. The thermal expansion behaviors of Cu matrix of the composite were studied by in situ X-ray diffraction during heating process. The results show that Cu matrix exhibits anisotropic thermal expansion behaviors for different crystallographic directions, the expansion of Cu{1 1 1} plane is linear in the temperature range from 20 °C to 300 °C and the expansion of Cu{2 0 0} is nonlinear with a inflection at about 180 °C. The microstructures of Cu matrix before and after thermal expansion testing were investigated using transmission electronic microscope. The anisotropic thermal expansion behavior is related to the deformation twinning formed in the matrix during heating process. At the same time, the deformation twinning of Cu matrix makes the average coefficient of thermal expansion of the composite increase.

  3. Tensile Stress Rupture Behavior of a Woven Ceramic Matrix Composite in Humid Environments at Intermediate Temperature

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    LaRochelle, Kevin J

    2005-01-01

    Stress rupture tests on the Sylramic(TM) fiber with an in-situ layer of boron nitride, boron nitride interphase, and SiC matrix ceramic matrix composite were performed at 550 degrees C and 750 degrees C with 0.0, 0.2...

  4. Ceramic fiber-reinforced monoclinic celsian phase glass-ceramic matrix composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Dicarlo, James A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A hyridopolysilazane-derived ceramic fiber reinforced monoclinic celsian phase barium aluminum silicate glass-ceramic matrix composite material is prepared by ball-milling an aqueous slurry of BAS glass powder and fine monoclinic celsian seeds. The fibers improve the mechanical strength and fracture toughness and with the matrix provide superior dielectric properties.

  5. Structure, composition and function of interfaces in ceramic fibre/matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pippel, E.

    1993-01-01

    Improving the properties of fibre reinforced ceramics and glasses by optimizing their microstructure requires the knowledge of this structure down to the atomic level. In these materials energy-dissipative processes during fracture particularly act within an interface layer or layer system between fibre and matrix which can either be produced by fibre coating, or which develops during the processing of the composites. Examples are presented of the microstructural phenomena of such layers revealed by HVEM and HREM and complemented by microchemical information via a nanoscale EDXS equipment. The investigations are carried out on Nicalon fibres in Duran glass as well as on Tyranno, Nicalon and carbon fibres in different SiC-matrices. Finally, a process is discussed which may control the important interface parameters. (orig.)

  6. Modelling of polypropylene fibre-matrix composites using finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Polypropylene (PP fibre-matrix composites previously prepared and studied experimentally were modelled using finite element analysis (FEA in this work. FEA confirmed that fibre content and composition controlled stress distribution in all-PP composites. The stress concentration at the fibre-matrix interface became greater with less fibre content. Variations in fibre composition were more significant in higher stress regions of the composites. When fibre modulus increased, the stress concentration at the fibres decreased and the shear stress at the fibre-matrix interface became more intense. The ratio between matrix modulus and fibre modulus was important, as was the interfacial stress in reducing premature interfacial failure and increasing mechanical properties. The model demonstrated that with low fibre concentration, there were insufficient fibres to distribute the applied stress. Under these conditions the matrix yielded when the applied stress reached the matrix yield stress, resulting in increased fibre axial stress. When the fibre content was high, there was matrix depletion and stress transfer was inefficient. The predictions of the FEA model were consistent with experimental and published data.

  7. A Review on Artificial Aging Behaviors of Fiber Reinforced Polymer-matrix Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Meng Jiangyan; Wang Yunying

    2016-01-01

    As is known, factors in climate environment such as hygrothermal effect and UV may have a negative effect on the mechanical properties of fiber reinforced polymer-matrix composites, resulting in their strength and stiffness degraded. In this review, we summarize all the recent studies on the artificial climate aging, hygrothermal aging, and thermal-oxidation aging of fiber reinforced polymer-matrix composites, as well as their artificial accelerated aging and natural aging. In addition, studi...

  8. Composite properties for S-2 glass in a room-temperature-curable epoxy matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, L. L.; Moore, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    The authors have measured thermal and mechanical properties of several composites of S-2 glass fiber in a room-temperature-curable epoxy matrix. The filament-wound composites ranged from 50 to 70 vol% fiber. The composites had generally good to excellent mechanical properties, particularly in view of the moderate cost of the material. However, the composites showed rapid increases in transverse thermal expansion above 50 C, and this property must be carefully considered if any use above that temperature is contemplated.

  9. The chemical composition of red giants in 47 Tucanae. II. Magnesium isotopes and pollution scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thygesen, A. O.; Sbordone, L.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Ventura, P.; Yong, D.; Collet, R.; Christlieb, N.; Melendez, J.; Zaggia, S.

    2016-04-01

    Context. The phenomenon of multiple populations in globular clusters is still far from understood, with several proposed mechanisms to explain the observed behaviour. The study of elemental and isotopic abundance patterns are crucial for investigating the differences among candidate pollution mechanisms. Aims: We derive magnesium isotopic ratios for 13 stars in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae (NGC 104) to provide new, detailed information about the nucleosynthesis that has occurred within the cluster. For the first time, the impact of 3D model stellar atmospheres on the derived Mg isotopic ratios is investigated. Methods: Using both tailored 1D atmospheric models and 3D hydrodynamical models, we derive magnesium isotopic ratios from four features of MgH near 5135 Å in 13 giants near the tip of the red giant branch, using high signal-to-noise, high-resolution spectra. Results: We derive the magnesium isotopic ratios for all stars and find no significant offset of the isotopic distribution between the pristine and the polluted populations. Furthermore, we do not detect any statistically significant differences in the spread in the Mg isotopes in either population. No trends were found between the Mg isotopes and [Al/Fe]. The inclusion of 3D atmospheres has a significant impact on the derived 25Mg/24Mg ratio, increasing it by a factor of up to 2.5, compared to 1D. The 26Mg/24Mg ratio, on the other hand, essentially remains unchanged. Conclusions: We confirm the results seen from other globular clusters, where no strong variation in the isotopic ratios is observed between stellar populations, for observed ranges in [Al/Fe]. We see no evidence for any significant activation of the Mg-Al burning chain. The use of 3D atmospheres causes an increase of a factor of up to 2.5 in the fraction of 25Mg, resolving part of the discrepancy between the observed isotopic fraction and the predictions from pollution models. Based on observations made with the ESO Very Large Telescope

  10. Unified continuum damage model for matrix cracking in composite rotor blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollayi, Hemaraju; Harursampath, Dineshkumar [Nonlinear Multifunctional Composites - Analysis and Design Lab (NMCAD Lab) Department of Aerospace Engineering Indian Institute of Science Bangalore - 560012, Karnataka (India)

    2015-03-10

    This paper deals with modeling of the first damage mode, matrix micro-cracking, in helicopter rotor/wind turbine blades and how this effects the overall cross-sectional stiffness. The helicopter/wind turbine rotor system operates in a highly dynamic and unsteady environment leading to severe vibratory loads present in the system. Repeated exposure to this loading condition can induce damage in the composite rotor blades. These rotor/turbine blades are generally made of fiber-reinforced laminated composites and exhibit various competing modes of damage such as matrix micro-cracking, delamination, and fiber breakage. There is a need to study the behavior of the composite rotor system under various key damage modes in composite materials for developing Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system. Each blade is modeled as a beam based on geometrically non-linear 3-D elasticity theory. Each blade thus splits into 2-D analyzes of cross-sections and non-linear 1-D analyzes along the beam reference curves. Two different tools are used here for complete 3-D analysis: VABS for 2-D cross-sectional analysis and GEBT for 1-D beam analysis. The physically-based failure models for matrix in compression and tension loading are used in the present work. Matrix cracking is detected using two failure criterion: Matrix Failure in Compression and Matrix Failure in Tension which are based on the recovered field. A strain variable is set which drives the damage variable for matrix cracking and this damage variable is used to estimate the reduced cross-sectional stiffness. The matrix micro-cracking is performed in two different approaches: (i) Element-wise, and (ii) Node-wise. The procedure presented in this paper is implemented in VABS as matrix micro-cracking modeling module. Three examples are presented to investigate the matrix failure model which illustrate the effect of matrix cracking on cross-sectional stiffness by varying the applied cyclic load.

  11. Unified continuum damage model for matrix cracking in composite rotor blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollayi, Hemaraju; Harursampath, Dineshkumar

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with modeling of the first damage mode, matrix micro-cracking, in helicopter rotor/wind turbine blades and how this effects the overall cross-sectional stiffness. The helicopter/wind turbine rotor system operates in a highly dynamic and unsteady environment leading to severe vibratory loads present in the system. Repeated exposure to this loading condition can induce damage in the composite rotor blades. These rotor/turbine blades are generally made of fiber-reinforced laminated composites and exhibit various competing modes of damage such as matrix micro-cracking, delamination, and fiber breakage. There is a need to study the behavior of the composite rotor system under various key damage modes in composite materials for developing Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system. Each blade is modeled as a beam based on geometrically non-linear 3-D elasticity theory. Each blade thus splits into 2-D analyzes of cross-sections and non-linear 1-D analyzes along the beam reference curves. Two different tools are used here for complete 3-D analysis: VABS for 2-D cross-sectional analysis and GEBT for 1-D beam analysis. The physically-based failure models for matrix in compression and tension loading are used in the present work. Matrix cracking is detected using two failure criterion: Matrix Failure in Compression and Matrix Failure in Tension which are based on the recovered field. A strain variable is set which drives the damage variable for matrix cracking and this damage variable is used to estimate the reduced cross-sectional stiffness. The matrix micro-cracking is performed in two different approaches: (i) Element-wise, and (ii) Node-wise. The procedure presented in this paper is implemented in VABS as matrix micro-cracking modeling module. Three examples are presented to investigate the matrix failure model which illustrate the effect of matrix cracking on cross-sectional stiffness by varying the applied cyclic load

  12. Composite Materials With Uncured Epoxy Matrix Exposed in Stratosphere During NASA Stratospheric Balloon Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondyurin, Alexey; Kondyurina, Irina; Bilek, Marcela; de Groh, Kim K.

    2013-01-01

    A cassette of uncured composite materials with epoxy resin matrixes was exposed in the stratosphere (40 km altitude) over three days. Temperature variations of -76 to 32.5C and pressure up to 2.1 torr were recorded during flight. An analysis of the chemical structure of the composites showed, that the polymer matrix exposed in the stratosphere becomes crosslinked, while the ground control materials react by way of polymerization reaction of epoxy groups. The space irradiations are considered to be responsible for crosslinking of the uncured polymers exposed in the stratosphere. The composites were cured on Earth after landing. Analysis of the cured composites showed that the polymer matrix remains active under stratospheric conditions. The results can be used for predicting curing processes of polymer composites in a free space environment during an orbital space flight.

  13. Study of magnesium bismuth alloys with a composition close to Mg3Bi2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tournier, Jean

    1964-01-01

    The author reports the study of magnesium-bismuth alloys with a high bismuth content. These alloys were aimed to be irradiated in a pile at a temperature of about 300 C, and thus had specific requirements regarding their bismuth content, a high density, a high fusion point with also a pressure strength constraint. The author first reports the determination of an alloy grade which could meet these requirements, and then reports issues related to their elaboration by performing optical micrography and X ray analysis in order to investigate their homogeneity. Then, the alloy hot compression strength has been assessed under significantly higher constraining conditions. Fusion point and density have also been measured. As a fast alloy degradation has been noticed, brief corrosion tests have been performed

  14. Effects of ductile matrix failure in three dimensional analysis of metal matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    1998-01-01

    Full three dimensional numerical cell model analyses are carried out for a metal reinforced by short fibers, to study the development of ductile matrix failure. A porous ductile material model is used to describe the effect of the nucleation and growth of voids to coalescence. In each case studied...

  15. The Particle Shape of WC Governing the Fracture Mechanism of Particle Reinforced Iron Matrix Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zulai; Wang, Pengfei; Shan, Quan; Jiang, Yehua; Wei, He; Tan, Jun

    2018-06-11

    In this work, tungsten carbide particles (WC p , spherical and irregular particles)-reinforced iron matrix composites were manufactured utilizing a liquid sintering technique. The mechanical properties and the fracture mechanism of WC p /iron matrix composites were investigated theoretically and experimentally. The crack schematic diagram and fracture simulation diagram of WC p /iron matrix composites were summarized, indicating that the micro-crack was initiated both from the interface for spherical and irregular WC p /iron matrix composites. However, irregular WC p had a tendency to form spherical WC p . The micro-cracks then expanded to a wide macro-crack at the interface, leading to a final failure of the composites. In comparison with the spherical WC p , the irregular WC p were prone to break due to the stress concentration resulting in being prone to generating brittle cracking. The study on the fracture mechanisms of WC p /iron matrix composites might provide a theoretical guidance for the design and engineering application of particle reinforced composites.

  16. Development and characterization of woven kevlar reinforced epoxy matrix composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imran, A.; Alam, S.; Irfan, S.; Iftikhar, F.; Raza, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Composite materials are actually well established materials that have demonstrated their promising advantages among the light weight structural materials used for aerospace and advanced applications. A great effort is now being made to develop and characterize the Kevlar Epoxy Composite Materials by changing the % age composition of curing agent in epoxy matrix. In order to study the phenomenon; how the change in composition of curing agent effect the composite material and which optimum composition can give the optimum properties of the material, when Kevlar reinforced to Epoxy Matrix by Hand Lay-up process. It was ensured that factors which can .affect the experiment remained the same for each experiment. The composite produced were subjected to mechanical tests to analyze the performance, to optimize the material. (author)

  17. Nonlinear behavior of matrix-inclusion composites under high confining pressure: application to concrete and mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tuan Hung; Dormieux, Luc; Jeannin, Laurent; Burlion, Nicolas; Barthélémy, Jean-François

    2008-08-01

    This paper is devoted to a micromechanics-based simulation of the response of concrete to hydrostatic and oedometric compressions. Concrete is described as a composite made up of a cement matrix in which rigid inclusions are embedded. The focus is put on the role of the interface between matrix and inclusion which represent the interfacial transition zone (ITZ). A plastic behavior is considered for both the matrix and the interfaces. The effective response of the composite is derived from the modified secant method adapted to the situation of imperfect interfaces. To cite this article: T.H. Le et al., C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  18. Effective longitudinal strength of high temperature metal-matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craddock, J.N.; Savvides, I.

    1991-01-01

    Several models for predicting the longitudinal strength of fiber composites are presented, ranging from a simple netting analysis to a model incorporating curvilinear strain hardening for all the components. Results from these models are presented for tungsten fiber reinforced superalloys, FeCrAlY and MARM200. It is shown that a simple elastic limit micromechanical model does not always adequately describe the useful strength of the composites. The methods proposed here are shown to be more appropriate for predicting the effective composite strength. 2 refs

  19. Degradation behavior of n-MAO/EPD bio-ceramic composite coatings on magnesium alloy in simulated body fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Ying, E-mail: yxiong@zjut.edu.cn [College of Mechanical Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China); Lu, Chao [College of Mechanical Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China); Wang, Chao; Song, Renguo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Materials Surface Science and Technology, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • A bio-ceramic n-MAO/EPD coating was prepared by combined MAO and EPD technique. • The precipitates of Ca/P compound are formed on the surface samples during immersion. • The n-MAO/EPD coating with HA dense structure has a favorable anti-corrosion effect. • Two degradation mechanism models for the n-MAO and n-MAO/EPD coating were proposed. - Abstract: The bio-ceramic composite coatings have been fabricated on ZK60 magnesium (Mg) alloy to improve its bio-corrosion resistance in a simulated body fluid (SBF). Firstly, micro-arc oxidation coatings (n-MAO coating) with the addition of zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) and cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) nano-particles were prepared by MAO technique on ZK60Mg alloy in alkaline electrolyte. Secondly, nano-hydroxyapatite (HA) was deposited on the surface of n-MAO coatings by using electrophoretic deposition (EPD) technique. The degradation behavior of the coated samples was investigated by means of immersion tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in the SBF at 36.5 ± 0.5 °C. The variation of phase composition, surface and cross-section morphology of coatings at different immersion stages were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The results showed that the precipitation layer with biological activity formed on the surface of coated samples during the SBF immersion, which can inhibit Mg alloys from degrading effectively. The n-MAO/EPD composite coating with HA dense structure has a favorable anti-corrosion effect compared to the n-MAO coating. Degradation mechanism model of the corrosion process at different corrosion stages for two kinds of coatings were proposed. The long-term corrosion protection of the n-MAO/EPD composite coating was governed significantly by the synergistic effect of phase composition stability and micro structural integrity.

  20. Degradation behavior of n-MAO/EPD bio-ceramic composite coatings on magnesium alloy in simulated body fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Ying; Lu, Chao; Wang, Chao; Song, Renguo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A bio-ceramic n-MAO/EPD coating was prepared by combined MAO and EPD technique. • The precipitates of Ca/P compound are formed on the surface samples during immersion. • The n-MAO/EPD coating with HA dense structure has a favorable anti-corrosion effect. • Two degradation mechanism models for the n-MAO and n-MAO/EPD coating were proposed. - Abstract: The bio-ceramic composite coatings have been fabricated on ZK60 magnesium (Mg) alloy to improve its bio-corrosion resistance in a simulated body fluid (SBF). Firstly, micro-arc oxidation coatings (n-MAO coating) with the addition of zirconium oxide (ZrO 2 ) and cerium oxide (CeO 2 ) nano-particles were prepared by MAO technique on ZK60Mg alloy in alkaline electrolyte. Secondly, nano-hydroxyapatite (HA) was deposited on the surface of n-MAO coatings by using electrophoretic deposition (EPD) technique. The degradation behavior of the coated samples was investigated by means of immersion tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in the SBF at 36.5 ± 0.5 °C. The variation of phase composition, surface and cross-section morphology of coatings at different immersion stages were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The results showed that the precipitation layer with biological activity formed on the surface of coated samples during the SBF immersion, which can inhibit Mg alloys from degrading effectively. The n-MAO/EPD composite coating with HA dense structure has a favorable anti-corrosion effect compared to the n-MAO coating. Degradation mechanism model of the corrosion process at different corrosion stages for two kinds of coatings were proposed. The long-term corrosion protection of the n-MAO/EPD composite coating was governed significantly by the synergistic effect of phase composition stability and micro structural integrity

  1. Pre-form ceramic matrix composite cavity and method of forming and method of forming a ceramic matrix composite component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, Philip Harold; Delvaux, John McConnell; Taxacher, Glenn Curtis

    2015-06-09

    A pre-form CMC cavity and method of forming pre-form CMC cavity for a ceramic matrix component includes providing a mandrel, applying a base ply to the mandrel, laying-up at least one CMC ply on the base ply, removing the mandrel, and densifying the base ply and the at least one CMC ply. The remaining densified base ply and at least one CMC ply form a ceramic matrix component having a desired geometry and a cavity formed therein. Also provided is a method of forming a CMC component.

  2. Effect of particulate matrix inhibitors on microstructure and properties of 2-D carbon-carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tlomak, P.; Takano, Shigeru; Wright, M.A.; Ju, Chien-Ping.

    1991-01-01

    Extended-life applications of structural carbon-carbon (C-C) composites involve multiple periods of operation in high-temperature oxidizing environments and as such require a reliable oxidation protection system (OPS). Advanced OPS's generally consist of an external ceramic coating combined with an in-depth matrix inhibitor. This work investigated the effects produced by particulate inhibitors doped on the matrix on the microstructure of 2D, PAN fiber-pitch matrix C-C's. Boron and zirconium-based particulate inhibitors were added to the matrix material prior to heat treatment. A process was developed to assure a uniform distribution of the inhibitors. Oxidation behavior of such matrix-inhibited composites was evaluated using isothermal oxidation tests. 5 refs

  3. VARTM Processing of High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Criss, Jr, Jim M

    2008-01-01

    The overall technical objective of the Phase 1 effort was to extend and advance the state the-art in high temperature composite fabrication techniques by developing a High Tempera Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM...

  4. Fabrication of fiber composites with a MAX phase matrix by reactive melt infiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenz, F; Krenkel, W

    2011-01-01

    Due to the inherent brittleness of ceramics it is very desirable to increase the damage tolerance of ceramics. The ternary MAX phases are a promising group of materials with high fracture toughness. The topic of this study is the development of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) with a matrix containing MAX phases, to achieve a damage tolerant structural composite material. For this purpose carbon fiber reinforced preforms with a carbon-titanium carbide matrix (C/C-TiC) were developed and infiltrated with silicon by a pressureless reactive melt infiltration. Finally liquid silicon caused the formation of SiC, TiSi 2 and Ti 3 SiC 2 in the matrix of the composite.

  5. Corrosion of Metal-Matrix Composites with Aluminium Alloy Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bobic

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behaviour of MMCs with aluminium alloy matrix was presented. The corrosion characteristics of boron-, graphite-, silicon carbide-, alumina- and mica- reinforced aluminium MMCs were reviewed. The reinforcing phase influence on MMCs corrosion rate as well as on various corrosion forms (galvanic, pitting, stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatique, tribocorrosion was discussed. Some corrosion protection methods of aluminium based MMCs were described

  6. Al-TiC in situ composite coating fabricated by low power pulsed laser cladding on AZ91D magnesium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liuqing; Li, Zhiyong; Zhang, Yingqiao; Wei, Shouzheng; Liu, Fuqiang

    2018-03-01

    Al + (Ti + B4C) composite coating was cladded on AZ91D magnesium alloy by a low power pulsed Nd-YAG laser. The Ti+B4C mixed powder is with the ratio of Ti: B4C = 5:1, which was then mixed with Al powder by weight fraction of 10%, 15% and 20%, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometer and X-ray diffraction were used to study the microstructure, chemical composition and phase composition of the coating. Results showed that the coating had satisfied metallurgical bonding with the magnesium substrate. Al3Mg2, Al12Mg17, Al3Ti and TiC were formed by in-situ reaction. The coatings have micro-hardness of 348HV, which is about 5-6 times higher than that of AZ91D. The wear resistance and corrosion resistance of the coatings are enhanced with the addition of the mixed powder.

  7. Phase Stability and Thermal Conductivity of Composite Environmental Barrier Coatings on SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkel, Samantha; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    Advanced environmental barrier coatings are being developed to protect SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites in harsh combustion environments. The current coating development emphasis has been placed on the significantly improved cyclic durability and combustion environment stability in high-heat-flux and high velocity gas turbine engine environments. Environmental barrier coating systems based on hafnia (HfO2) and ytterbium silicate, HfO2-Si nano-composite bond coat systems have been processed and their stability and thermal conductivity behavior have been evaluated in simulated turbine environments. The incorporation of Silicon Carbide Nanotubes (SiCNT) into high stability (HfO2) and/or HfO2-silicon composite bond coats, along with ZrO2, HfO2 and rare earth silicate composite top coat systems, showed promise as excellent environmental barriers to protect the SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites.

  8. Bone induction by composite of bioerodible polyorthoester and demineralized bone matrix in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Solheim, E; Bang, G

    1991-01-01

    A composite of a local, sustained, drug-release system, Alzamer bioerodible polyorthoester, and demineralized bone-matrix (DBM) particles implanted in the abdominal muscle of 89 Wistar rats induced cartilage and bone formation at the same rate as DBM when evaluated histologically and by 85Sr uptake....... The composite implant was technically easier to use than DBM alone....

  9. Bone induction by composite of bioerodible polyorthoester and deminiralized bone matrix in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinholt, E.M.; Solheim, E.; Bang, G.; Sudmann, E.

    1991-01-01

    A composite of a local, sustained, drug-release system, Alzamer bioerodible polyorthoester, and demineralized bone-matrix (DBM) particles implanted in the abdominal muscle of 89 Wistar rats induced cartilage and bone formation at the same rate as DBM when evaluated histologically and by 85 Sr uptake. The composite implant was technically easier to use than DBM alone. (author)

  10. In vitro degradation and surface bioactivity of iron-matrix composites containing silicate-based bioceramic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, S; Xu, Y; Zhou, J.; Li, H; Chang, Jiang; Huan, Z

    2017-01-01

    Iron-matrix composites with calcium silicate (CS) bioceramic as the reinforcing phase were fabricated through powder metallurgy processes. The microstructures, mechanical properties, apatite deposition and biodegradation behavior of the Fe-CS composites, as well as cell attachment and proliferation

  11. Bibliography on Ceramic Matrix Composites and Reinforcing Whiskers, Platelets, and Fibers, 1970-1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Triphasic Sol-Gel Route 2.2.3.8 Srikanth, V. Ravindranathan, P. Crystallization of Gel-Derived Mullite-Zirconia Rani, L. Roy, R. Composites Metal and...179 9.8.1 ArmorMaterials 9.8.1.5 Ceramic Matrix Composite Reactor /Radiator 9.8.1.1 Armor Structures Development and Current Status of Armor Pacquette, E

  12. Development and optimization of manufacture process for heat resistant fibre reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Glogar, Petr; Hron, P.; Burian, M.; Balík, Karel; Černý, Martin; Sucharda, Zbyněk; Vymazalová, Z.; Červencl, J.; Pivoňka, M.

    -, č. 14 (2005), 25-32 ISSN 1214-9691 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/02/0177 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : polysiloxane resin * pyrolysis * ceramic matrix composite Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials

  13. Young`s modulus of ceramic matrix composites with polysiloxane based matrix at elevated temperatures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černý, Martin; Glogar, Petr

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 6 (2004), s. 2239-2242 ISSN 0022-2461 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/02/0177; GA ČR GP106/02/P025 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3046908 Keywords : composite material * Young `s modulus * high temperature Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 0.864, year: 2004

  14. Influence of reinforcement proportion and matrix composition on pitting corrosion behaviour of cast aluminium matrix composites (A3xx.x/SiCp)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, A.; Merino, M.C.; Merino, S.; Viejo, F.; Carboneras, M.; Arrabal, R.

    2005-01-01

    The influence of silicon carbide (SiCp) proportion and matrix composition on four aluminium metal matrix composites (A360/SiC/10p, A360/SiC/20p, A380/SiC/10p, A380/SiC/20p) immersed in 1-3.5 wt% NaCl at 22 deg C was investigated by potentiodynamic polarization. The kinetics of the corrosion process was studied on the basis of gravimetric measurements. The nature of corrosion products was analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and low angle X-ray diffraction (XRD). The corrosion damage in Al/SiCp composites was caused by pitting attack and by nucleation and growth of Al 2 O 3 . 3H 2 O on the material surface. The main attack nucleation sites were the interface region between the matrix and the reinforcement particles. The corrosion process was influenced more by the concentration of alloy elements in the matrix than by the proportion of SiCp reinforcement and saline concentration

  15. Influence of reinforcement proportion and matrix composition on pitting corrosion behaviour of cast aluminium matrix composites (A3xx.x/SiCp)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardo, A. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: anpardo@quim.ucm.es; Merino, M.C. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Merino, S. [Departamento de Tecnologia Industrial, Universidad Alfonso X El Sabio, 28691, Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Viejo, F. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Carboneras, M. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Arrabal, R. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    The influence of silicon carbide (SiCp) proportion and matrix composition on four aluminium metal matrix composites (A360/SiC/10p, A360/SiC/20p, A380/SiC/10p, A380/SiC/20p) immersed in 1-3.5 wt% NaCl at 22 deg C was investigated by potentiodynamic polarization. The kinetics of the corrosion process was studied on the basis of gravimetric measurements. The nature of corrosion products was analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and low angle X-ray diffraction (XRD). The corrosion damage in Al/SiCp composites was caused by pitting attack and by nucleation and growth of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} . 3H{sub 2}O on the material surface. The main attack nucleation sites were the interface region between the matrix and the reinforcement particles. The corrosion process was influenced more by the concentration of alloy elements in the matrix than by the proportion of SiCp reinforcement and saline concentration.

  16. Damage analysis of fiber reinforced resin matrix composites irradiated by CW laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Hong; Hu Kaiwei; Mu Jingyang; Bai Shuxin

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the damage modes of the carbon fiber and the glass fiber reinforced epoxy or bakelite resin matrix composites irradiated by CW laser under different power densities were analyzed, and the changes of the microstructure and the tensile strength of the composites were also researched. When the resin matrix composites were radiated at a power density more than 0.1 kW/cm 2 , the matrix would be decomposed and the tensile properties of the radiated samples were lost over 30% while the carbon fiber hardly damaged and the glass fiber melted. When the power density of the laser was raised to 1 kW/cm 2 , the matrix burned violently and the carbon fiber cloth began to split with some carbon fiber being fractured, therefore, the fracture strength of the radiated sample lost over 80%. The higher the power density of radiation was, the more serious the damage of the sample was. It was also found that the difference of the matrixes had little effect on the damage extent of the composites. The influence of the radiation density on the temperature of the radiated surface of the carbon/resin composite was numerically calculated by ANSYS finite element software and the calculation results coincided with the damage mode of the radiated composites. (authors)

  17. Characterization of hybrid aluminum matrix composites for advanced applications – A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaswinder Singh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid aluminum matrix composites (HAMCs are the second generation of composites that have potential to substitute single reinforced composites due to improved properties. This paper investigates the feasibility and viability of developing low cost-high performance hybrid composites for automotive and aerospace applications. Further, the fabrication characteristics and mechanical behavior of HAMCs fabricated by stir casting route have also been reviewed. The optical micrographs of the HAMCs indicate that the reinforcing particles are fairly distributed in the matrix alloy and the porosity levels have been found to be acceptable for the casted composites. The density, hardness, tensile behavior and fracture toughness of these composites have been found to be either comparable or superior to the ceramic reinforced composites. It has been observed from the literature that the direct strengthening of composites occurs due to the presence of hard ceramic phase, while the indirect strengthening arises from the thermal mismatch between the matrix alloy and reinforcing phase during solidification. Based on the database for material properties, the application area of HAMCs has been proposed in the present review. It has been concluded that the hybrid composites offer more flexibility and reliability in the design of possible components depending upon the reinforcement's combination and composition.

  18. Microstructure Characteristics of Fe-Matrix Composites Reinforced by In-Situ Carbide Particulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaodong; Song, Yanpei

    2017-10-01

    Carbide particulates reinforced iron-matrix composites were prepared by in-situ synthesis reaction between Ti, V and C on liquid alloys surface. The microstructure of the composite was characterized by SEM, TEM and OM. The results showed that the main phases were α-Fe, carbide particulate; besides, there were small amounts of γ-Fe and graphite (G) in the composite. The carbides were TiVC2 and VC in the shape of short bar and graininess. The matrix consisted of martensite and small amounts of retained austenite.

  19. Residual strain evolution during the deformation of single fiber metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanan, J.C.; Uestuendag, E.; Clausen, B. [Dept. of Materials Science, California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States); Sivasambu, M.; Beyerlein, I.J. [Theoretical Div., Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, D.W.; Bourke, M.A.M. [Materials Science and Technology Div., Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2002-07-01

    Successful application of metal matrix composites often requires strength and lifetime predictions that account for the deformation of each phase. Yet, the deformation of individual phases in composites usually differs significantly from their respective monolithic behaviors. An approach is presented that quantifies the deformation parameters of each phase using neutron diffraction measurements before, during, and after failure under tensile loading in model composites consisting of a single alumina fiber embedded in an aluminum matrix. The evolution of residual strains after loading was examined including the effects of fiber failure. (orig.)

  20. Fabrication and properties of ceramic composites with a boron nitride matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D.P.; Cofer, C.G.; Economy, J.

    1995-01-01

    Boron nitride (BN) matrix composites reinforced by a number of different ceramic fibers have been prepared using a low-viscosity, borazine oligomer which converts in very high yield to a stable BN matrix when heated to 1,200 C. Fibers including Nicalon (SiC), FP (Al 2 O 3 ), Sumica and Nextel 440 (Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 ) were evaluated. The Nicalon/BN and Sumica/BN composites displayed good flexural strengths of 380 and 420 MPa, respectively, and modulus values in both cases of 80 GPa. On the other hand, FP/BN and Nextel/BN composites exhibited very brittle behavior. Nicalon fiber with a carbon coating as a buffer barrier improved the strength by 30%, with a large amount of fiber pullout from the BN matrix. In all cases except for Nicalon, the composites showed low dielectric constant and loss

  1. CEMCAN Software Enhanced for Predicting the Properties of Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Mital, Subodh K.; DiCarlo, James A.

    2000-01-01

    Major advancements are needed in current high-temperature materials to meet the requirements of future space and aeropropulsion structural components. Ceramic matrix composites (CMC's) are one class of materials that are being evaluated as candidate materials for many high-temperature applications. Past efforts to improve the performance of CMC's focused primarily on improving the properties of the fiber, interfacial coatings, and matrix constituents as individual phases. Design and analysis tools must take into consideration the complex geometries, microstructures, and fabrication processes involved in these composites and must allow the composite properties to be tailored for optimum performance. Major accomplishments during the past year include the development and inclusion of woven CMC micromechanics methodology into the CEMCAN (Ceramic Matrix Composites Analyzer) computer code. The code enables one to calibrate a consistent set of constituent properties as a function of temperature with the aid of experimentally measured data.

  2. Stereological observations of platelet-reinforced mullite- and zirconia-matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherian, I.K.; Kriven, W.M.; Lehigh, M.D.; Nettleship, I.

    1996-01-01

    Recently, the effect of solid inclusions on the sintering of ceramic powders has been explained in terms of a back-stress that opposes densification. Several analyses have been proposed to describe this problem. However, little quantitative information exists concerning the effect of reinforcement on microstructural evolution. This study compares the microstructural development of zirconia and mullite matrices in the presence of alumina platelets. The effect of platelet loading on density is similar for both composites. Quantitative stereological examinations reveal that the average grain size and pore size are finer for the zirconia-matrix composite. The platelet loading does not have any noticeable effect on the average grain size of the matrix in either composite. However, the average pore size increases as the volume fraction of platelets increases for both materials. Contiguity measurements have detected some aggregation of platelets in the zirconia-matrix composite

  3. Magnesium Hydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnesium hydroxide is used on a short-term basis to treat constipation.This medication is sometimes prescribed ... Magnesium hydroxide come as a tablet and liquid to take by mouth. It usually is taken as ...

  4. Magnesium Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnesium is an element your body needs to function normally. Magnesium oxide may be used for different reasons. Some people use it as ... one to four times daily depending on which brand is used and what condition you have. Follow ...

  5. Ferromagnetic Levan Composite: An Affinity Matrix to Purify Lectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Angeli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and inexpensive procedure used magnetite and levan to synthesize a composite recovered by a magnetic field. Lectins from Canavalia ensiformis (Con A and Cratylia mollis (Cramoll 1 and Cramoll 1,4 did bind specifically to composite. The magnetic property of derivative favored washing out contaminating proteins and recovery of pure lectins with glucose elution. Cramoll 1 was purified by this affinity binding procedure in two steps instead of a previous three-step protocol with ammonium sulfate fractionation, affinity chromatography on Sephadex G-75, and ion exchange chromatography through a CM-cellulose column.

  6. Mechanics of Platelet-Matrix Composites across Scales: Theory, Multiscale Modeling, and 3D Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhavand, Navid

    Many natural and biomimetic composites - such as nacre, silk and clay-polymer - exhibit a remarkable balance of strength, toughness, and/or stiffness, which call for a universal measure to quantify this outstanding feature given the platelet-matrix structure and material characteristics of the constituents. Analogously, there is an urgent need to quantify the mechanics of emerging electronic and photonic systems such as stacked heterostructures, which are composed of strong in-plane bonding networks but weak interplanar bonding matrices. In this regard, development of a universal composition-structure-property map for natural platelet-matrix composites, and stacked heterostructures opens up new doors for designing materials with superior mechanical performance. In this dissertation, a multiscale bottom-up approach is adopted to analyze and predict the mechanical properties of platelet-matrix composites. Design guidelines are provided by developing universally valid (across different length scales) diagrams for science-based engineering of numerous natural and synthetic platelet-matrix composites and stacked heterostructures while significantly broadening the spectrum of strategies for fabricating new composites with specific and optimized mechanical properties. First, molecular dynamics simulations are utilized to unravel the fundamental underlying physics and chemistry of the binding nature at the atomic-level interface of organic-inorganic composites. Polymer-cementitious composites are considered as case studies to understand bonding mechanism at the nanoscale and open up new venues for potential mechanical enhancement at the macro-scale. Next, sophisticated mathematical derivations based on elasticity and plasticity theories are presented to describe pre-crack (intrinsic) mechanical performance of platelet-matrix composites at the microscale. These derivations lead to developing a unified framework to construct series of universal composition

  7. A new method for soldering particle-reinforced aluminum metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Jinbin; Mu, Yunchao [Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Luo, Xiangwei [Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450002 (China); Niu, Jitai, E-mail: niujitai@163.com [Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Soldering of 55% SiCp/Al composite and Kovar is first achieved in the world. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nickel plating is required on the surface of the composites before soldering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low welding temperature is set to avoid overheating of the matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical and metallurgical bonding of composites and Kovar is carried out. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High tension strength of 225 MPa in soldering seam has been obtained. - Abstract: Soldering of aluminum metal matrix composites (Al-SiC) to other structural materials, or even to themselves, has proved unsuccessful mainly due to the poor wetting of these composites by conventional soldering alloys. This paper reports a new approach, which improves the wetting properties of these composites by molting solder alloys to promote stronger bonds. The new approach relies on nickel-plating of the composite's faying surface prior to application of a solder alloy. Based on this approach, an aluminum metal matrix composite containing 55 vol.% SiC particles is successfully soldered to a Fe-Ni-Co alloy (commercially known as Kovar 4J29). The solder material is a zinc-based alloy (Zn-Cd-Ag-Cu) with a melting point of about 400 Degree-Sign C. Microscopic examinations of the aluminum metal matrix composites (Al-MMCs)-Kovar interfaces show that the nickel-plating, prior to soldering, could noticeably enhance the reaction between the molten solder and composites. The fractography of the shear-tested samples revealed that fracture occurs within the composite (i.e. cohesive failure), indicating a good adhesion between the solder alloy and the Al-SiC composite.

  8. A new method for soldering particle-reinforced aluminum metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Jinbin; Mu, Yunchao; Luo, Xiangwei; Niu, Jitai

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Soldering of 55% SiCp/Al composite and Kovar is first achieved in the world. ► The nickel plating is required on the surface of the composites before soldering. ► Low welding temperature is set to avoid overheating of the matrix. ► Chemical and metallurgical bonding of composites and Kovar is carried out. ► High tension strength of 225 MPa in soldering seam has been obtained. - Abstract: Soldering of aluminum metal matrix composites (Al–SiC) to other structural materials, or even to themselves, has proved unsuccessful mainly due to the poor wetting of these composites by conventional soldering alloys. This paper reports a new approach, which improves the wetting properties of these composites by molting solder alloys to promote stronger bonds. The new approach relies on nickel-plating of the composite's faying surface prior to application of a solder alloy. Based on this approach, an aluminum metal matrix composite containing 55 vol.% SiC particles is successfully soldered to a Fe–Ni–Co alloy (commercially known as Kovar 4J29). The solder material is a zinc-based alloy (Zn–Cd–Ag–Cu) with a melting point of about 400 °C. Microscopic examinations of the aluminum metal matrix composites (Al-MMCs)–Kovar interfaces show that the nickel-plating, prior to soldering, could noticeably enhance the reaction between the molten solder and composites. The fractography of the shear-tested samples revealed that fracture occurs within the composite (i.e. cohesive failure), indicating a good adhesion between the solder alloy and the Al–SiC composite.

  9. Optimization and characterization of woven kevlar reinforced epoxy matrix composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imran, A.; Aslam, S.

    2007-01-01

    Composite materials are actually well established materials that have demonstrated their promising advantages among the light weight structural materials used for aerospace and advanced applications. An effort is now being made to develop and characterize the Kevlar Epoxy Composite Materials by changing the vol. fraction of Kevlar in epoxy matrix. The optimum characteristics were observed with 37% fiber with resin by applying hand-lay-up process. The composites produced were subjected to mechanical testing to evaluate the mechanical characteristics. (author)

  10. "A New Class of Creep Resistant Oxide/Oxide Ceramic Matrix Composites"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Mohit Jain, Dr. Ganesh Skandan, Prof. Roger Cannon, Rutgers University

    2007-03-30

    Despite recent progress in the development of SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), their application in industrial gas turbines for distributed energy (DE) systems has been limited. The poor oxidation resistance of the non-oxide ceramics warrants the use of envrionmental barrier coatings (EBCs), which in turn lead to issues pertaining to life expectancy of the coatings. On the other hand, oxide/oxide CMCs are potential replacements, but their use has been limited until now due to the poor creep resistance at high temperatures, particularly above 1200 oC: the lack of a creep resistant matrix has been a major limiting factor. Using yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) as the matrix material system, we have advanced the state-of-the-art in oxide/oxide CMCs by introducing innovations in both the structure and composition of the matrix material, thereby leading to high temperature matrix creep properties not achieved until now. An array of YAG-based powders with a unique set of particle characteristics were produced in-house and sintered to full density and compressive creep data was obtained. Aided in part by the composition and the microstructure, the creep rates were found to be two orders of magnitude smaller than the most creep resistant oxide fiber available commercially. Even after accounting for porosity and a smaller matrix grain size in a practical CMC component, the YAG-based matrix material was found to creep slower than the most creep resistant oxide fiber available commercially.

  11. Niobium Carbide-Reinforced Al Matrix Composites Produced by High-Energy Ball Milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travessa, Dilermando Nagle; Silva, Marina Judice; Cardoso, Kátia Regina

    2017-06-01

    Aluminum and its alloys are key materials for the transportation industry as they contribute to the development of lightweight structures. The dispersion of hard ceramic particles in the Al soft matrix can lead to a substantial strengthening effect, resulting in composite materials exhibiting interesting mechanical properties and inspiring their technological use in sectors like the automotive and aerospace industries. Powder metallurgy techniques are attractive to design metal matrix composites, achieving a homogeneous distribution of the reinforcement into the metal matrix. In this work, pure aluminum has been reinforced with particles of niobium carbide (NbC), an extremely hard and stable refractory ceramic. Its use as a reinforcing phase in metal matrix composites has not been deeply explored. Composite powders produced after different milling times, with 10 and 20 vol pct of NbC were produced by high-energy ball milling and characterized by scanning electron microscopy and by X-ray diffraction to establish a relationship between the milling time and size, morphology, and distribution of the particles in the composite powder. Subsequently, an Al/10 pct NbC composite powder was hot extruded into cylindrical bars. The strength of the obtained composite bars is comparable to the commercial high-strength, aeronautical-grade aluminum alloys.

  12. Alumina matrix ceramic-nickel composites formed by centrifugal slip casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Zygmuntowicz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on the possibility of fabricating the alumina matrix ceramic-nickel composites with gradient concentration of metal particles. Centrifugal slip casting method was chosen for the composite fabrication. This method allows fabrication of the graded distribution of nickel particles in the hollow cylinder composites. The horizontal rotation axis was applied. The samples were characterized by XRD, SEM and quantitative description of the microstructure. The macroscopic as well as SEM observations of the prepared composites confirmed the gradient concentration of Ni particles in the composite materials. The application of the centrifugal slip casting method allows for the graded distribution of metal particles in the samples.

  13. Effect of fiber content on the properties of glass fiber-phenolic matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaki, M.Y.; Shahid, M.R.; Subhani, T.; Sharif, M.N.

    2003-01-01

    Glass fiber-Phenolic matrix composite is used for the manufacturing of parts /components related to electronic and aerospace industry due to its high strength, dimensional stability and excellent electrical insulation properties. The evaluation of this composite material is necessary prior to make parts/components of new designs. In the present research, thermosetting phenolic plastic was reinforced with E-glass fiber in different fiber-to-resin ratios to produce composites of different compositions. Mechanical and electrical properties of these composite materials were evaluated with reference to the effect of fiber content variation in phenolic resin. (author)

  14. Stimulated light emission in a dielectrically disordered composite porous matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, E.; Künzner, N.; Diener, J.; Fujii, Minoru; Timoshenko, V. Yu.; Kovalev, D.

    2005-06-01

    We report on a medium exhibiting extremely efficient light scattering properties: a liquid network formed in a porous matrix. Liquid fragments confined in the solid matrix result in a random fluctuation of the dielectric function and act as scattering objects for photons. The optical scattering efficiency is defined by the filling factor of the liquid in the pores and its dielectric constant. The spectral dependence of the scattering length of photons indicates that the phenomenon is governed by a Mie-type scattering mechanism. The degree of the dielectric disorder of the medium, i.e. the level of opacity is tunable by the ambient vapor pressure of the dielectric substance. In the strongest scattering regime the scattering length of photons is found to be in the micrometer range. By incorporation of dye molecules in the voids of the porous layer a system exhibiting optical gain is realized. In the multiple scattering regime the optical path of diffusively propagating photons is enhanced and light amplification through stimulated emission occurs: a strong intensity enhancement of the dye emission accompanied by significant spectral narrowing is observed above the excitation threshold for a layer being in the opalescence state.

  15. Improving the corrosion resistance of AZ91D magnesium alloy through reinforcement with titanium carbides and borides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Gobara

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A composite consisting of magnesium matrix reinforced with a network of TiC–Ti2AlC–TiB2 particulates has been fabricated using a practical in-situ reactive infiltration technique. The microstructural and phase composition of the magnesium matrix composite (R-Mg was investigated using SEM/EDS and XRD. The analyses revealed the complete formation of TiC, Ti2AlC and TiB2 particles in the magnesium matrix. Comparative compression tests of R-Mg and AZ91D alloy showed that the reinforcing particles improve the mechanical properties of Mg alloy. EIS and potentiodynamic polarization results indicated that the reinforcing particles significantly improve the corrosion resistance of the reinforced alloy in 3.5% NaCl solution.

  16. Engineering Interfaces in Metal Matrix Composites (Volume 3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-10

    or aluminum decreases as the modulus of the fibers increases (Amateau and Dull 1977; Baker and Bonfield 1978; Kohara and Muto 1986; Maruyama and...J.Wiley & Sons, N.Y., Chapter 15. Knox, C. E. (1982) Handbook of Composites, Edited by G.Lubin (Van Nostrand Reinhold) 136-195. Kohara , S. and Muto

  17. Laboratory for the Processing and Evaluation of Inorganic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-01

    modulus of the fibers increases (Amateau and Dull 1977; Baker and Bonfield 1978; Kohara and Muto 1986; Maruyama and Rabenberg 1986; Chawla 1987...15. Knox, C. E. (1982) Handbook of Composites, Edited by G.Lubin (Van Nostrand Reinhold) 136-195. Kohara , S. and Muto, N., (1986) Degradation of PAN

  18. Mechanical properties of Nextel trademark 312 fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidyanathan, K.R.; Sankar, J.; Kelkar, A.D.; Weaver, B.

    1995-01-01

    Vapor phase synthesis is emerging as a method for the preparation of near final-shape, ceramic matrix composites for advanced structural applications. Oxide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites are currently being developed for these applications. The mechanical properties of Nextel trademark 312 fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites fabricated employing the forced-flow, thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process (FCVI) were evaluated at room temperature in pure tension. The composites were fabricated with a 0.15 μm pyrolytic carbon interface layer for improving the toughness of the composite system. Because of the available FCVI apparatus, only short length specimens (7--8 cm) could be fabricated. Room temperature tensile strengths were measured and compared to room temperature flexure strength results for the composite. Excellent toughness and composite behavior was obtained for the composite system. Fractography as well as possible factors responsible for the differences in tensile and flexural strengths for the composite system is presented in this paper

  19. Non-self-similar cracking in unidirectional metal-matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajesh, G.; Dharani, L.R.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental investigations on the fracture behavior of unidirectional Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) show the presence of extensive matrix damage and non-self-similar cracking of fibers near the notch tip. These failures are primarily observed in the interior layers of an MMC, presenting experimental difficulties in studying them. Hence an investigation of the matrix damage and fiber fracture near the notch tip is necessary to determine the stress concentration at the notch tip. The classical shear lag (CLSL) assumption has been used in the present study to investigate longitudinal matrix damage and nonself-similar cracking of fibers at the notch tip of an MMC. It is seen that non-self-similar cracking of fibers reduces the stress concentration at the notch tip considerably and the effect of matrix damage is negligible after a large number of fibers have broken beyond the notch tip in a non-self-similar manner. Finally, an effort has been made to include non-self-similar fiber fracture and matrix damage to model the fracture behavior of a unidirectional boron/aluminum composite for two different matrices viz. a 6061-0 fully annealed aluminum matrix and a heat treated 6061-T6 aluminum matrix. Results have been drawn for several characteristics pertaining to the shear stiffnesses and the shear yield stresses of the two matrices and compared with the available experimental results

  20. Wear study of Al-SiC metal matrix composites processed through microwave energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honnaiah, C.; Srinath, M. S.; Prasad, S. L. Ajit

    2018-04-01

    Particulate reinforced metal matrix composites are finding wider acceptance in many industrial applications due to their isotropic properties and ease of manufacture. Uniform distribution of reinforcement particulates and good bonding between matrix and reinforcement phases are essential features in order to obtain metal matrix composites with improved properties. Conventional powder metallurgy technique can successfully overcome the limitation of stir casting techniques, but it is time consuming and not cost effective. Use of microwave technology for processing particulate reinforced metal matrix composites through powder metallurgy technique is being increasingly explored in recent times because of its cost effectiveness and speed of processing. The present work is an attempt to process Al-SiC metal matrix composites using microwaves irradiated at 2.45 GHz frequency and 900 W power for 10 minutes. Further, dry sliding wear studies were conducted at different loads at constant velocity of 2 m/s for various sliding distances using pin-on-disc equipment. Analysis of the obtained results show that the microwave processed Al-SiC composite material shows around 34 % of resistance to wear than the aluminium alloy.

  1. The effect of alumina nanofillers size and shape on mechanical behavior of PMMA matrix composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Hasan Somaya Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Composites with the addition of alumina nanofillers show improvement in mechanical properties. The PMMA polymer was used as a matrix and two different types of nanofillers, having extremely different shapes were added in the matrix to form the composite. Reinforcements were based on alumina nanoparticles having either spherical shape or whiskers having the length to diameter ratio of 100. The influence of alumina fillers size, shape and fillers loading on mechanical properties of prepared composite were studied using the nanoindentation measurements and dynamic mechanical analysis. It was observed that both alumina whiskers and alumina spherical nanoparticles added in the PMMA matrix improved the mechanical properties of the composite but the improvement was significantly higher with alumina whisker reinforcement. The concentration of the reinforcing alumina spherical nanoparticles and alumina whiskers in PMMA matrix varied up to 5 wt. %. The best performance was obtained by the addition of 3 wt. % of alumina whiskers in the PMMA matrix with regard to mechanical properties of the obtained composite.

  2. Zinc oxide-potassium ferricyanide composite thin film matrix for biosensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Shibu [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Arya, Sunil K. [Department of Science and Technology Centre on Biomolecular Electronics, National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India); Singh, S.P. [Department of Engineering Science and Materials, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, PR 00680 (United States); Sreenivas, K. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Malhotra, B.D. [Department of Science and Technology Centre on Biomolecular Electronics, National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India); Gupta, Vinay, E-mail: vgupta@physics.du.ac.in [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India)

    2009-10-27

    Thin film of zinc oxide-potassium ferricyanide (ZnO-KFCN) composite has been deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated corning glass using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The composite thin film electrode has been exploited for amperometric biosensing in a mediator-free electrolyte. The composite matrix has the advantages of high iso-electric point of ZnO along with enhanced electron communication due to the presence of a redox species in the matrix itself. Glucose oxidase (GOx) has been chosen as the model enzyme for studying the application of the developed matrix to biosensing. The sensing response of the bio-electrode, GOx/ZnO-KFCN/ITO/glass, towards glucose was studied using cylic voltammetry (CV) and photometric assay. The bio-electrode exhibits good linearity from 2.78 mM to 11.11 mM glucose concentration. The low value of Michaelis-Menten constant (1.69 mM) indicates an enhanced affinity of the immobilized enzyme towards its substrate. A quassireversible system is obtained with the composite matrix. The results confirm promising application of the ZnO-KFCN composite matrix for amperometric biosensing applications in a mediator-less electrolyte that could lead to the realization of an integrated lab-on-chip device.

  3. Zinc oxide-potassium ferricyanide composite thin film matrix for biosensing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Shibu; Arya, Sunil K.; Singh, S.P.; Sreenivas, K.; Malhotra, B.D.; Gupta, Vinay

    2009-01-01

    Thin film of zinc oxide-potassium ferricyanide (ZnO-KFCN) composite has been deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated corning glass using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The composite thin film electrode has been exploited for amperometric biosensing in a mediator-free electrolyte. The composite matrix has the advantages of high iso-electric point of ZnO along with enhanced electron communication due to the presence of a redox species in the matrix itself. Glucose oxidase (GOx) has been chosen as the model enzyme for studying the application of the developed matrix to biosensing. The sensing response of the bio-electrode, GOx/ZnO-KFCN/ITO/glass, towards glucose was studied using cylic voltammetry (CV) and photometric assay. The bio-electrode exhibits good linearity from 2.78 mM to 11.11 mM glucose concentration. The low value of Michaelis-Menten constant (1.69 mM) indicates an enhanced affinity of the immobilized enzyme towards its substrate. A quassireversible system is obtained with the composite matrix. The results confirm promising application of the ZnO-KFCN composite matrix for amperometric biosensing applications in a mediator-less electrolyte that could lead to the realization of an integrated lab-on-chip device.

  4. Creep and threshold tension in aluminum-matrix composite with short fibers obtained by hot pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, M.F; Gonzalez Oliver, C.R.J

    2004-01-01

    An aluminum matrix composite reinforced with 5% vol. of short fibers of silicon carbide and un-reinforced matrix, produced by pulvimetallurgy (PM) were studied using creep compression at different deformation speeds and in the range of 300 o C to 500 o C. The creep curve of both materials showed the typical behavior of a material with threshold tension τ 0 ; with an estimate value of 6.31MPa for the matrix at 400 o C and 6.43, 8.76 and 11MPa at 350, 400 and 450 o C respectively for the composite. The τ 0 was shown to obey a thermally activated mechanism whose energy is about 17 kJ/mol. Nanometric particles of aluminum oxide were scattered throughout the matrix and the composite, arising from the inevitable film of oxides and hydroxides formed in the metallic powder. The exponent of power-law creep occurs in the values of n = 4.3 to 4.85 by reducing the tension to an effective value τ-τ 0 , corresponding to a drilling fault in both materials. In the composite, the activation energy was estimated at 167 to 125 kJ/mol, close to the self- diffusion enthalpy of the pure aluminum at 143.4 kJ/mol so that the creep process in the composite is controlled exclusively by the deformation of the matrix (CW)

  5. Phase formation, dielectric and magnetic properties of bismuth ferrite–lead magnesium niobate multiferroic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wongmaneerung, R., E-mail: re_nok@yahoo.com [Faculty of Science, Maejo University, Chiang Mai 50290 (Thailand); Padchasri, J.; Tipakontitikul, R. [Department of Physics, Ubonratchathani University, Ubonratchathani 31490 (Thailand); Loan, T.H. [International Training Institute for Materials Science (ITIMS), Hanoi University of Science and Technology, No. 1, Dai Co Viet, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Jantaratana, P. [Department of Physics, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Yimnirun, R. [School of Physics, Institute of Science, and NANOTEC-SUT Center of Excellence of Advanced Functional Nanomaterials, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Ananta, S. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2014-09-01

    Highlights: • A bimodal particle size concept was designed in the production of BF–PMN composites. • A very abnormal diffuse dielectric pattern is observed during the heating process. • BF–PMN composites show highly saturated magnetization. - Abstract: Binary multiferroic composites (1−x)BiFeO{sub 3}–xPb(Mg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3} (BF–PMN; x = 0.0–50 wt%) were fabricated through a traditional ceramic process. The effect of the PMN contents on the phase assemblage, microstructure, dielectric and magnetic properties of the samples were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), LCR meter and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), respectively. The results indicate that all composites show that perovskite structure and PMN phase is compatible with the BF phase. The microstructure displays the mix phases between BF, PMN, Bi-rich BF and Fe-rich BF phases. Dielectric anomalies of these composites are totally different from BiFeO{sub 3} single phase. Moreover, the dielectric constant is found to increase as the content of PMN decreases. Magnetic transition temperatures are in the range of 270–440 °C. Interestingly, the M–H hysteresis loop measurements indicated that all composites exhibited weak ferromagnetism behavior at room temperature. The maximum remanent magnetization M{sub r} is observed for x = 30 wt% and then decreases when the PMN content is more than 40 wt%.

  6. On low cycle fatigue in metal matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Ø; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2000-01-01

    A numerical cell model analysis is used to study the development of fatigue damage in aluminium reinforced by aligned, short SiC fibres. The material is subjected to cyclic loading with either stress control or strain control, and the matrix material is represented by a cyclic plasticity model......, in which continuum damage mechanics is incorporated to model fatigue damage evolution. This material model uses a superposition of kinematic and isotropic hardening, and is able to account for the Bauschinger effect as well as ratchetting, mean stress relaxation, and cyclic hardening or softening. The cell...... model represents a material with transversely staggered fibres. With focus on low cyclic fatigue, the effect of different fibre aspect ratios, different triaxial stress states, and balanced as well as unbalanced cyclic loading is studied....

  7. Structural and surface properties of highly ordered mesoporous magnesium-aluminium composite oxides derived from facile synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Dahai, E-mail: pandahai@foxmail.com; Dong, Zhaoyang; He, Min; Chen, Wei; Chen, Shuwei; Yu, Feng; Fan, Binbin; Cui, Xingyu; Li, Ruifeng, E-mail: rfli@tyut.edu.cn

    2017-01-15

    Highly ordered mesoporous magnesium-aluminium composite oxides (denoted as OMMA-x) with a variety of n{sub Al}/n{sub Mg} ratios have been successfully synthesized via a facile strategy, and a salt effect was proposed to explain the formation mechanism. The incorporation of Mg can significantly improve the structural and surface properties of ordered mesoporous alumina (OMA) material. The resultant OMMA-x exhibited a much more ordered 2-D hexagonal mesostructure, a narrower pore size distribution, a higher specific surface area and pore volume, and a stronger basicity than those of OMA. More importantly, the highly homogeneous incorporation of Mg at the atomic level and the formation of framework Mg−O−Al bonds could effectively suppress the formation of crystalline alumina during the calcination process. As a result, OMMA-x demonstrated a superior thermal stability. For example, the ordered mesostructure of OMMA-8 could be well maintained with a high surface area of 182 m{sup 2}/g even after thermal treatment at 1000 °C. - Graphical abstract: A schematic procedure to illustrate the preparation of highly ordered mesoporous Mg-Al composite oxides (OMMA-x) with highly homogeneously dispersed Mg species and enhanced structural stability. - Highlights: • Mesoporous Mg-Al composite oxides with excellent structural and surface properties. • A highly homogeneous incorporation of Mg into the mesoporous framework of alumina. • A superior structural stability up to 1000 °C coupled with a large surface area. • A salt effect from the addition of Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O to explain the formation mechanism.

  8. Investigation of the low-speed impact behavior of dual particle size metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerit, Afşın Alper

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • AA2124 matrix composites reinforced with SiC particles were manufactured. • Low-speed impact behaviors of composites were investigated. • Composites were manufactured with single (SPS) and dual particle sizes (DPS). • Impact behaviors of DPS composites are more favorable than the SPS composites. • Approximately 50–60% of input energy was absorbed by the composite samples. - Abstract: SiC-reinforced aluminum matrix composites were manufactured by powder metallurgy using either single or dual particle sized SiC powders and samples sintered under argon atmosphere. Quasi-static loading, low-speed impact tests and hardness tests were used to investigate mechanical behavior and found that dual particle size composites had improved hardness and impact performance compared to single particle size composites. Sample microstructure, particle distributions, plastic deformations and post-testing damages were examined by scanning electron microscopy and identified microstructure agglomerations in SPS composites. Impact traces were characterized by broken and missing SiC particles and plastically deformed composite areas

  9. Electroless Ni-P/Nano-SiO2 Composite Plating on Dual Phase Magnesium-Lithium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Y.; Zhang, Z. W.; Zhang, M. L.

    The application of Mg-Li alloys is restricted in practice due to mainly poor corrosion resistance and wear resistance. Electroless nickel plating is one of the common and effective ways to protect alloys from corrosion. In this study, nano-SiO2 particles with Ni-P matrix have been successfully co-deposited onto dual phase Mg-8Li base alloy through electroless plating, generating homogeneously Ni-P/nano-SiO2 composite coating. The morphology, elemental composition and structures of coatings were investigated. Coating performances were evaluated using hardness tests and electrochemical analysis. The results indicate that the Ni-P/nano-SiO2 composite coating can significantly improve the wear and corrosion resistance.

  10. High Porosity Alumina as Matrix Material for Composites of Al-Mg Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gömze, L A; Egész, Á; Gömze, L N; Ojima, F

    2013-01-01

    The sophisticated industry and technologies require higher and higher assumptions against mechanical strength and surface hardness of ceramic reinforced metal alloys and metal matrix composites. Applying the well-known alumina powders by dry pressing technology and some special pore-forming additives and sintering technology the authors have successfully developed a new, high porosity alumina matrix material for composites of advenced Al-Mg alloys. The developed new matrix material have higher than 30% porosity, with homogenous porous structure and pore sizes from few nano up to 2–3 mm depending on the alloys containments. Thanks to the used materials and the sintering conditions the authors could decrease the wetting angles less than 90° between the high porosity alumina matrix and the Al-Mg alloys. Applied analytical methods in this research were laser granulometry, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Digital image analysis was applied to microscopy results, to enhance the results of transformation

  11. Chemical-vapor-infiltrated silicon nitride, boron nitride, and silicon carbide matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventri, R.D.; Galasso, F.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports composites of carbon/chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) Si 3 N 4 , carbon/CVD BN, mullite/CVD SiC, and SiC yarn/CVD SiC prepared to determine if there were inherent toughness in these systems. The matrices were deposited at high enough temperatures to ensure that they were crystalline, which should make them more stable at high temperatures. The fiber-matrix bonding in the C/Si 3 N 4 composite appeared to be too strong; the layers of BN in the matrix of the C/BN were too weakly bonded; and the mullite/SiC composite was not as tough as the SiC/SiC composites. Only the SiC yarn/CVD SiC composite exhibited both strength and toughness

  12. The development and mechanical characterization of aluminium copper-carbon fiber metal matrix hybrid composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor, M. U.; Feroze, M.; Ahmad, T.; Kamran, M.; Butt, M. T. Z.

    2018-04-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) come under advanced materials that can be used for a wide range of industrial applications. MMCs contain a non-metallic reinforcement incorporated into a metallic matrix which can enhance properties over base metal alloys. Copper-Carbon fiber reinforced aluminium based hybrid composites were prepared by compo casting method. 4 weight % copper was used as alloying element with Al because of its precipitation hardened properties. Different weight compositions of composites were developed and characterized by mechanical testing. A significant improvement in tensile strength and micro hardness were found, before and after heat treatment of the composite. The SEM analysis of the fractured surfaces showed dispersed and embedded Carbon fibers within the network leading to the enhanced strength.

  13. Structure and properties of nanocrystalline soft magnetic composite materials with silicon polymer matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrzanski, L.A.; Nowosielski, R.; Konieczny, J.; PrzybyI, A.; WysIocki, J.

    2005-01-01

    The paper concerns investigation of nanocrystalline composites technology preparation. The composites in the form of rings with rectangular transverse section, and with polymer matrix and nanocrystalline metallic powders fulfillment were made, for obtaining good ferromagnetic properties. The nanocrystalline ferromagnetic powders were manufactured by high-energy ball milling of metallic glasses strips in an as-quenched state. Generally for investigation, Co matrix alloys with the silicon polymer were used. Magnetic properties in the form of hysteresis loop by rings method were measured. Generally composite cores showed lower soft ferromagnetic properties than winded cores of nanocrystalline strips, but composite cores showed interesting mechanical properties. Furthermore, the structure of strips and powders on properties of composites were investigated

  14. Consolidation effects on tensile properties of an elemental Al matrix composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, F. [Building 4515, MS 6064, Metals and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)]. E-mail: tangf@ornl.gov; Meeks, H. [Ceracon Inc., 5150 Fairoaks Blvd. 01-330, Carmichael, CA 95628 (United States); Spowart, J.E. [UES Incorporated, AFRL/MLLM Building 655, 2230 Tenth St. Suite 1, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433 (United States); Gnaeupel-Herold, T. [NIST Center for Neutron Research, 100 Bureau Dr. Stop 8562, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8562 (United States); Prask, H. [NIST Center for Neutron Research, 100 Bureau Dr. Stop 8562, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8562 (United States); Anderson, I.E. [Materials and Engineering Physics Program, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2004-11-25

    In a simplified composite design, an unalloyed Al matrix was reinforced by spherical Al-Cu-Fe alloy particles (30 vol.%), using either commercial purity (99.7%) or high purity (99.99%) fine powders (diameter < 10 {mu}m). This composite material was consolidated by either vacuum hot pressing (VHP) or quasi-isostatic forging. The spatial distribution of reinforcement particles in both VHP and forged samples was shown to be almost the same by quantitative characterization with a multi-scale area fraction analysis technique. The tensile properties of all composite samples were tested and the forged materials showed significantly higher strength, while the elastic modulus values of all composite materials were close to the upper bound of theoretical predictions. Neutron diffraction measurements showed that there were high compressive residual stresses in the Al matrix of the forged samples and relatively low Al matrix residual stresses (predominantly compressive) in the VHP samples. By tensile tests and neutron diffraction measurements of the forged samples after annealing, it was shown that the high compressive residual stresses in the Al matrix were relieved and that tensile strength was also reduced to almost the same level as that of the VHP samples. Therefore, it was deduced that increased compressive residual stresses and enhanced dislocation densities in the forged composites raised the tensile strength to higher values than those of the VHP composites.

  15. Microstructural characterisation of electrodeposited coatings of metal matrix composite with alumina nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indyka, P; Beltowska-Lehman, E; Bigos, A

    2012-01-01

    In the present work a nanocrystalline Ni-W metallic matrix was used to fabricate Ni-W/Al 2 O 3 composite coatings. The MMC (metal matrix composite) coatings with inert α-Al 2 O 3 particles (30 - 90 nm) were electrodeposited from aqueous electrolytes under direct current (DC) and controlled hydrodynamic conditions in a system with a rotating disk electrode (RDE). The chemical composition and microstructure of electrodeposited composites mainly control their functional properties; however, the particles must be uniformly dispersed to exhibit the dispersion-hardening effect. In order to increase the alumina particles incorporation as well as to promote the uniform distribution of the ceramic phase in a matrix, outer ultrasonic field was applied during electrodeposition. The influence of embedded alumina nanoparticles on structural characteristics (morphology, phase composition, residual stresses) of the resulting Ni-W/Al 2 O 3 coatings was investigated in order to obtain a nanocomposite with high hardness and relatively low residual stresses. Surface and cross-section morphology and the chemical composition of deposits was examined in the scanning electron microscope, the EDS technique was used. Microstructure and phase composition were determined by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Based on microstructural and micromechanical properties of the coatings, the optimum conditions for obtaining crack-free homogeneous Ni-W/Al 2 O 3 composite coatings have been determined.

  16. Influence of reinforcement grade and matrix composition on corrosion resistance of cast aluminium matrix composites (A3xx.x/SiCp) in a humid environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardo, A.; Viejo, F.; Carboneras, M. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Facultad de Quimica Universidad Complutense, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Merino, M.C. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Facultad de Quimica Universidad Complutense, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Tecnologia Industrial, Universidad Alfonso X El Sabio, 28691, Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Lopez, M.D. [Escuela Superior de Ciencias Experimentales y Tecnologia, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, 28931, Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Merino, S. [Departamento de Tecnologia Industrial, Universidad Alfonso X El Sabio, 28691, Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain)

    2003-05-01

    A study of the influence of the silicon carbide (SiC{sub p}) proportion and the matrix concentration of four aluminium metal matrix composites (A360/SiC/10p, A360/SiC/20p, A380/SiC/10p, A380/SiC/20p) exposed to high relative humid environment was carried out under simulation in a climatic chamber. The matrix of A360/SiC/xxp composites was virtually free of copper while the A380/SiC/xxp matrix contained 3.13-3.45wt% Cu and 1.39-1.44wt% Ni. The kinetics of the corrosion process was studied on the basis of gravimetric tests. The nature of corrosion products was analysed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Low Angle X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) before and after accelerated testing to determine the influence of microstructural changes on corrosion behaviour during exposure to the corrosive environment. The corrosion damage to Al/SiCp composites was low at 80% Relative Humidity (RH) and increased with temperature, SiCp proportion, relative humidity and Cu matrix concentration. The main attack nucleation sites were the interface region between the matrix and the reinforcement particles. The corrosion process was influenced more by the concentration of alloy elements in the matrix than by the proportion of SiCp reinforcement. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Eine Studie zum Einfluss des Siliziumkarbidanteils (SiCp) und der Zusammensetzung des Grundwerkstoffs von vier Aluminiummatrixverbundwerkstoffen (A360/SiC/10p, A360/SiC/20p, A380/SiC/10p, A380/SiC/20p), die in Umgebungen mit relativ hoher Feuchtigkeit ausgelagert waren, wurde unter simulierten Bedingungen in einer Klimakammer durchgefuehrt. Die Matrix des A360/SiC/xxp-Verbundwerkstoffs war praktisch Kupfer-frei waehrend die A380/SiC/xxp Matrix 3,13-3,45 Gew.-% Cu und 1,39-1,44 Gew.-% Ni enthielt. Die Kinetik des Korrosionsprozesses wurde auf der Basis von gravimetrischen Messungen studiert. Die Beschaffenheit der Korrosionsprodukte wurde mittelt REM-Untersuchungen und

  17. Overview of CMC (Ceramic Matrix Composite) Research at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiser, J. Douglas; Grady, Joseph E.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Wiesner, Valerie L.; Zhu, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    In support of NASAs Aeronautics Research Mission, the Glenn Research Center has developed and assessed various constituents for a high temperature (2700F) SiCSiC CMC system for turbine engine applications. Combinations of highly creep-resistant SiC fibers, advanced 3D weaves, durable environmental barrier coatings (EBCs), and a 2700F-capable hybrid SiC matrix are being developed evaluated. The resulting improvements in CMC mechanical properties and durability will be summarized. The development and validation of models for predicting the effects of the environment on the durability of CMCs and EBCs and other operating-environment challenges including the effect of CMAS (calcium magnesium aluminosilicate) degradation of EBCs will be discussed. Progress toward the development of CMC joining technology for 2400F joint applications will also be reviewed.

  18. Boron-bearing species in ceramic matrix composites for long-term aerospace applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naslain, R.; Guette, A.; Rebillat, F.; Pailler, R.; Langlais, F.; Bourrat, X.

    2004-01-01

    Boron-bearing refractory species are introduced in non-oxide ceramic matrix fibrous composites (such as SiC/SiC composites) to improve their oxidation resistance under load at high temperatures with a view to applications in the aerospace field. B-doped pyrocarbon and hex-BN have been successfully used as interphase (instead of pure pyrocarbon) either as homogeneous or multilayered fiber coatings, to arrest and deflect matrix cracks formed under load (mechanical fuse function) and to give toughness to the materials. A self-healing multilayered matrix is designed and used in a model composite, which combines B-doped pyrocarbon mechanical fuse layers and B- and Si-bearing compound (namely B 4 C and SiC) layers forming B 2 O 3 -based fluid healing phases when exposed to an oxidizing atmosphere. All the materials are deposited by chemical vapor infiltration. Lifetimes under tensile loading of several hundreds hours at high temperatures are reported

  19. Synthesizing (ZrAl3 + AlN)/Mg-Al composites by a 'matrix exchange' method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tong; Li, Zengqiang; Hu, Kaiqi; Han, Mengxia; Liu, Xiangfa

    2018-06-01

    A method named 'matrix exchange' to synthesize ZrAl3 and AlN reinforced Mg-Al composite was developed in this paper. By inserting Al-10ZrN master alloy into Mg matrix and reheating the cooled ingot to 550 °C, Al and Mg atoms diffuse to the opposite side. As a result, liquid melt occurs once the interface areas reach to proper compositions. Then dissolved Al atoms react with ZrN, leading to the in-situ formation of ZrAl3 and AlN particles, while the Al matrix is finally replaced by Mg. This study provides a new insight for preparing Mg composites.

  20. Niobium-Matrix-Composite High-Temperature Turbine Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Richard B.; Tuffias, Robert H.; La Ferla, Raffaele; Heng, Sangvavann; Harding, John T.

    1995-01-01

    High-temperture composite-material turbine blades comprising mainly niobium matrices reinforced with refractory-material fibers being developed. Of refractory fibrous materials investigated, FP-AL(2)0(3), tungsten, and polymer-based SiC fibers most promising. Blade of this type hollow and formed in nearly net shape by wrapping mesh of reinforcing refractory fibers around molybdenum mandrel, then using thermal-gradient chemical-vapor infiltration (CVI) to fill interstices with niobium. CVI process controllable and repeatable, and kinetics of both deposition and infiltration well understood.

  1. High-Temperature Ceramic Matrix Composite with High Corrosion Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-02

    description of high temperature oxidation processes of composite ceramic materials of ZrB2 - SiC and ZrB2-SiC-Zr(Mo)Si2 systems up to high (~1300 °C...analysis was applied using MІN-7 mineralogical microscope and a set of standard immersion liquids with the known values of refraction coefficients...2.0 V) corresponds to the simultaneous formation of ZrO2 zirconium dioxide of monoclinic modification and Zr(OH)4 zirconium hydroxide which is

  2. Universal composition-structure-property maps for natural and biomimetic platelet-matrix composites and stacked heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhavand, Navid; Shahsavari, Rouzbeh

    2015-03-16

    Many natural and biomimetic platelet-matrix composites--such as nacre, silk, and clay-polymer-exhibit a remarkable balance of strength, toughness and/or stiffness, which call for a universal measure to quantify this outstanding feature given the structure and material characteristics of the constituents. Analogously, there is an urgent need to quantify the mechanics of emerging electronic and photonic systems such as stacked heterostructures. Here we report the development of a unified framework to construct universal composition-structure-property diagrams that decode the interplay between various geometries and inherent material features in both platelet-matrix composites and stacked heterostructures. We study the effects of elastic and elastic-perfectly plastic matrices, overlap offset ratio and the competing mechanisms of platelet versus matrix failures. Validated by several 3D-printed specimens and a wide range of natural and synthetic materials across scales, the proposed universally valid diagrams have important implications for science-based engineering of numerous platelet-matrix composites and stacked heterostructures.

  3. The effect of the matrix superplastic deformation on interface reaction in fiber-reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astanin, V.V.; Imayeva, L.A.

    1995-01-01

    It is known that superplastic deformation affects the processes o solid phases bonding. In particular, the effect of a character of matrix flow upon nucleation and growth of the reaction products at the fiber/matrix interface should be expected during consolidation of the fiber-reinforced composites under superplastic conditions. The matrix material flow in thin clearance (about 20μm) between strengthening fibers is a special feature of composite consolidation. In previous papers, it was shown that the character of the flow in thin specimens, when the specimen thickness is equal to several grain sizes, is very different from that in thick specimens. In this manner the question of the effect of the deformation on the fiber/matrix interface formation is complicated and one should consider the peculiarities of matrix deformation during the composite fabrication and the effect of localization of the deformation on the fiber/matrix interface reaction. In this paper, the authors shall focus on these two problems

  4. Data on a Laves phase intermetallic matrix composite in situ toughened by ductile precipitates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Alexander J; Bhowmik, Ayan; Purkayastha, Surajit; Jones, Nicholas G; Giuliani, Finn; Clegg, William J; Dye, David; Stone, Howard J

    2017-10-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled "Laves phase intermetallic matrix composite in situ toughened by ductile precipitates" (Knowles et al.) [1]. The composite comprised a Fe 2 (Mo, Ti) matrix with bcc (Mo, Ti) precipitated laths produced in situ by an aging heat treatment, which was shown to confer a toughening effect (Knowles et al.) [1]. Here, details are given on a focused ion beam (FIB) slice and view experiment performed on the composite so as to determine that the 3D morphology of the bcc (Mo, Ti) precipitates were laths rather than needles. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (S(TEM)) micrographs of the microstructure as well as energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) maps are presented that identify the elemental partitioning between the C14 Laves matrix and the bcc laths, with Mo rejected from the matrix into laths. A TEM selected area diffraction pattern (SADP) and key is provided that was used to validate the orientation relation between the matrix and laths identified in (Knowles et al.) [1] along with details of the transformation matrix determined.

  5. Data on a Laves phase intermetallic matrix composite in situ toughened by ductile precipitates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J. Knowles

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled “Laves phase intermetallic matrix composite in situ toughened by ductile precipitates” (Knowles et al. [1]. The composite comprised a Fe2(Mo, Ti matrix with bcc (Mo, Ti precipitated laths produced in situ by an aging heat treatment, which was shown to confer a toughening effect (Knowles et al. [1]. Here, details are given on a focused ion beam (FIB slice and view experiment performed on the composite so as to determine that the 3D morphology of the bcc (Mo, Ti precipitates were laths rather than needles. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (S(TEM micrographs of the microstructure as well as energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX maps are presented that identify the elemental partitioning between the C14 Laves matrix and the bcc laths, with Mo rejected from the matrix into laths. A TEM selected area diffraction pattern (SADP and key is provided that was used to validate the orientation relation between the matrix and laths identified in (Knowles et al. [1] along with details of the transformation matrix determined.

  6. Effective and Environmentally Friendly Nickel Coating on the Magnesium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Škugor Rončević

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The low density and good mechanical properties make magnesium and its alloys attractive construction materials in the electronics, automotive, and aerospace industry, together with application in medicine due to their biocompatibility. Magnesium AZ91D alloy is an alloy with a high content of aluminum, whose mechanical properties overshadow the low corrosion resistance caused by the composition of the alloy and the existence of two phases: α magnesium matrix and β magnesium aluminum intermetallic compound. To improve the corrosion resistance, it is necessary to find an effective protection method for the alloy surface. Knowing and predicting electrochemical processes is an essential for the design and optimization of protective coatings on magnesium and its alloys. In this work, the formations of nickel protective coatings on the magnesium AZ91D alloy surface by electrodeposition and chemical deposition, are presented. For this purpose, environmentally friendly electrolytes were used. The corrosion resistance of the protected alloy was determined in chloride medium using appropriate electrochemical techniques. Characterization of the surface was performed with highly sophisticated surface-analytical methods.

  7. Tempering Behavior of TiC-Reinforced SKD11 Steel Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ji-In; Kim, Seong Hoon; Heo, Yoon-Uk; Kim, Dae Ha; Hwang, Keum-Cheol; Suh, Dong-Woo

    2018-03-01

    TiC-reinforced SKD11 steel matrix composite, fabricated by a pressure infiltration casting, undergoes monotonic decrease in hardness as tempering temperature increases. Element mappings by TEM-EDS and thermodynamic calculation indicate that remarkable redistribution of V between the reinforcement and the steel matrix occurs by partial dissolution and re-precipitation of MC carbides upon casting process. The absence of secondary hardening is led by the enrichment of V in the reinforcement that reduces the V content in the steel matrix; this reduction in V content makes the precipitation of fine VC sluggish during the tempering.

  8. A planar model study of creep in metal matrix composites with misaligned short fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, N.J.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of fibre misalignment on the creep behaviour of metal matrix composites is modelled, including hardening behaviour (stage 1), dynamic recovery and steady state creep (stage 2) of the matrix material, using an internal variable constitutive model for the creep behaviour of the metal...... matrix. Numerical plane strain results in terms of average properties and detailed local deformation behaviour up to large strains are needed to show effects of fibre misalignment on the development of inelastic strains and the resulting over-all creep resistance of the material. The creep resistance...

  9. Influence of the Composition of the Hank’s Balanced Salt Solution on the Corrosion Behavior of AZ31 and AZ61 Magnesium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Tkacz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical corrosion characteristics of AZ31 and AZ61 magnesium alloys were analyzed in terms of potentiodynamic tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The influence of the solution composition and material surface finish was examined also through the analysis of corrosion products created on the samples’ surface after electrochemical measurements in terms of scanning electron microscopy using energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Obtained data revealed the differences in the response of the magnesium alloys to enriched Hank’s Balanced Salt Solution—HBSS+ (with Mg2+ and Ca2+ ions and Hank’s Balanced Salt Solution—HBSS (without Mg2+ and Ca2+ ions. Both examined alloys exhibited better corrosion resistance from the thermodynamic and kinetic point of view in the enriched HBSS+. AZ61 magnesium alloy reached higher values of polarization resistance than AZ31 magnesium alloy in both the used corrosion solutions. Phosphate-based corrosion products were characteristic for the AZ31 and AZ61 alloys tested in the HBSS (without Mg2+ and Ca2+ ions. The combination of phosphate-based corrosion products and clusters of MgO and Mg(OH2 was typical for the surface of samples tested in the enriched HBSS+ (with Mg2+ and Ca2+ ions. Pitting corrosion attack was observed only in the case of enriched HBSS+.

  10. Ultrasound as a tool for the development of aerospace structural titanium and ceramic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpur, P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper outlines new concepts for the utilization of various ultrasonic techniques for the evaluation of different aspects of development and use of metal matrix composites. The authors introduce a novel mechanical parameter called interfacial shear stiffness coefficient which can be measured using ultrasonic shear wave reflectivity technique to characterize and quantify the matrix-fiber interface. Such nondestructive methods of interface characterization are essential because the utilization of metal matrix composites for aerospace applications require good characterization and evaluation of nascent composite systems in research and developmental stages. During development, it would be critical to evaluate (a) the compatibility of different types of matrix materials with different types of fibers, (b) the effect of different types of fiber coating on the load transfer between the matrix and the fiber, (c) the effect of processing conditions such as temperature, pressure, duration of processing, etc., (d) the suitability of the overall mechanical properties for the intended application, and (e) the mechanical behavior of the composite for life prediction studies

  11. Vanadium Pentoxide-Based Composite Synthesized Using Microwave Water Plasma for Cathode Material in Rechargeable Magnesium Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuhiko Yajima

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Multivalent cation rechargeable batteries are expected to perform well as high-capacity storage devices. Rechargeable magnesium batteries have an advantage in terms of resource utilization and safety. Here, we report on sulfur-doped vanadium pentoxide (S-V2O5 as a potential material for the cathodes of such a battery; S-V2O5 showed a specific capacity of 300 mAh·g−1. S-V2O5 was prepared by a method using a low-temperature plasma generated by carbon felt and a 2.45 GHz microwave generator. This study investigates the ability of S-V2O5 to achieve high capacity when added to metal oxide. The highest recorded capacity (420 mAh·g−1 was reached with MnO2 added to composite SMn-V2O5, which has a higher proportion of included sulfur than found in S-V2O5. Results from transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Micro-Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy show that the bulk of the SMn-V2O5 was the orthorhombic V2O5 structure; the surface was a xerogel-like V2O5 and a solid solution of MnO2 and sulfur.

  12. Thermomechanical and Environmental Durability of Environmental Barrier Coated Ceramic Matrix Composites Under Thermal Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Harder, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the developments of thermo-mechanical testing approaches and durability performance of environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and EBC coated SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). Critical testing aspects of the CMCs will be described, including state of the art instrumentations such as temperature, thermal gradient, and full field strain measurements; materials thermal conductivity evolutions and thermal stress resistance; NDE methods; thermo-mechanical stress and environment interactions associated damage accumulations. Examples are also given for testing ceramic matrix composite sub-elements and small airfoils to help better understand the critical and complex CMC and EBC properties in engine relevant testing environments.

  13. Requirements of frictional debonding at fiber/matrix interfaces for tough ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Chun-Hway

    1992-11-01

    Optimum toughening of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites requires debonding at fiber/matrix interfaces and subsequent frictional sliding between the fibers and the matrix as the main crack extends through the composite. Criteria of both interfacial debonding vs fiber fracture, and frictional debonding vs frictionless debonding, are illustrated. To achieve interfacial debonding, the ratio of the fiber strength to the interfacial shear strength must exceed a critical value; to achieve a frictional interface after interfacial debonding, the ratio of the interfacial residual clamping stress to the interfacial shear strength must also exceed a critical value. While interfacial debonding is not sensitive to Poisson's effect, the frictional interface is sensitive to Poisson's effect.

  14. Combined-load buckling behavior of metal-matrix composite sandwich panels under different thermal environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, William L.; Jackson, Raymond H.

    1991-01-01

    Combined compressive and shear buckling analysis was conducted on flat rectangular sandwich panels with the consideration of transverse shear effects of the core. The sandwich panel is fabricated with titanium honeycomb core and laminated metal matrix composite face sheets. The results show that the square panel has the highest combined load buckling strength, and that the buckling strength decreases sharply with the increases of both temperature and panel aspect ratio. The effect of layup (fiber orientation) on the buckling strength of the panels was studied in detail. The metal matrix composite sandwich panel was much more efficient than the sandwich panel with nonreinforced face sheets and had the same specific weight.

  15. Sintering by infiltration of loose mixture of powders, a method for metal matrix composite elaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantinescu, V.; Orban, R.; Colan, H.

    1993-01-01

    Starting from the observation that Sintering by Infiltration of Loose Mixture of Powders confers large possibilities for both complex shaped and of large dimensions Particulate Reinforced Metal Matrix Composite components elaboration, its mechanism comparative with those of the classical melt infiltration was investigated. Appropriate measures in order to prevent an excessive hydrostatic flow of the melt and, consequently, reinforcement particle dispersion, as well as to promote wetting in both infiltration and liquid phase sintering stages of the process were established as necessary. Some experimental results in the method application to the fusion tungsten carbide and diamond reinforced metal matrix composite elaboration are, also, presented. (orig.)

  16. Chemical stability of the fiber coating/matrix interface in silicon-based ceramic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.N.; Jacobson, N.S.

    1995-01-01

    Carbon and boron nitride are used as fiber coatings in silicon-based composites. In order to assess the long-term stability of these materials, reactions of carbon/Si 3 N 4 and BN/SiC were studied at high temperatures with Knudsen effusion, coupon tests, and by microstructural examination. in the carbon/Si 3 N 4 system, carbon reacted with Si 3 N 4 to form gaseous N 2 and SiC. The formation of SiC limited further reaction by physically separating the carbon and Si 3 N 4 . Consequently, the development of high p(N 2 ) at the interface, predicted from thermochemical calculations, did not occur, thus limiting the potential deleterious effects of the reaction on the composite. Strong indications of a reaction between BN and SiC were shown by TEM and SIMS analysis of the BN/SiC interface. In long-term exposures, this reaction can lead to a depletion of a BN coating and/or an unfavorable change of the interfacial properties, limiting the beneficial effects of the coating

  17. Chemical Stability of the Fiber Coating/Matrix Interface in Silicon-Based Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1995-01-01

    Carbon and boron nitride are used as fiber coatings in silicon-based composites. In order to assess the long-term stability of these materials, reactions of carbon/Si3N4 and BN/SiC were studied at high temperatures with Knudsen effusion, coupon tests, and microstructural examination. In the carbon/Si3N4 system, carbon reacted with Si3N4 to form gaseous N2 and SiC. The formation of SiC limited further reaction by physically separating the carbon and Si3N4. Consequently, the development of high p(N2) at the interface, predicted from thermochemical calculations, did not occur, thus limiting the potential deleterious effects of the reaction on the composite. Strong indications of a reaction between BN and SiC were shown by TEM and SIMS analysis of the BN/SiC interface. In long-term exposures, this reaction can lead to a depletion of a BN coating and/or an unfavorable change of the interfacial properties, limiting the beneficial effects of the coating.

  18. Optimal fabrication processes for unidirectional metal-matrix composites: A computational simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Morel, M.

    1990-01-01

    A method is proposed for optimizing the fabrication process of unidirectional metal matrix composites. The temperature and pressure histories are optimized such that the residual microstresses of the composite at the end of the fabrication process are minimized and the material integrity throughout the process is ensured. The response of the composite during the fabrication is simulated based on a nonlinear micromechanics theory. The optimal fabrication problem is formulated and solved with non-linear programming. Application cases regarding the optimization of the fabrication cool-down phases of unidirectional ultra-high modulus graphite/copper and silicon carbide/titanium composites are presented.

  19. Optimal fabrication processes for unidirectional metal-matrix composites - A computational simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Morel, M.

    1990-01-01

    A method is proposed for optimizing the fabrication process of unidirectional metal matrix composites. The temperature and pressure histories are optimized such that the residual microstresses of the composite at the end of the fabrication process are minimized and the material integrity throughout the process is ensured. The response of the composite during the fabrication is simulated based on a nonlinear micromechanics theory. The optimal fabrication problem is formulated and solved with nonlinear programming. Application cases regarding the optimization of the fabrication cool-down phases of unidirectional ultra-high modulus graphite/copper and silicon carbide/titanium composites are presented.

  20. Wear Resistance of TiC Reinforced Cast Steel Matrix Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobula S.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Wear resistance of TiC-cast steel metal matrix composite has been investigated. Composites were obtained with SHSB method known as SHS synthesis during casting. It has been shown the differences in wear between composite and base cast steel. The Miller slurry machine test were used to determine wear loss of the specimens. The slurry was composed of SiC and water. The worn surface of specimens after test, were studied by SEM. Experimental observation has shown that surface of composite zone is not homogenous and consist the matrix lakes. Microscopic observations revealed the long grooves with SiC particles indented in the base alloy area, and spalling pits in the composite area. Due to the presence of TiC carbides on composite layer, specimens with TiC reinforced cast steel exhibited higher abrasion resistance. The wear of TiC reinforced cast steel mechanism was initially by wearing of soft matrix and in second stage by polishing and spalling of TiC. Summary weight loss after 16hr test was 0,14÷0,23 g for composite specimens and 0,90 g for base steel.

  1. Al-matrix composite materials reinforced by Al-Cu-Fe particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonneville, J; Laplanche, G; Joulain, A; Gauthier-Brunet, V; Dubois, S

    2010-01-01

    Al-matrix material composites were produced using hot isostatic pressing technique, starting with pure Al and icosahedral (i) Al-Cu-Fe powders. Depending on the processing temperature, the final reinforcement particles are either still of the initial i-phase or transformed into the tetragonal ω-Al0 0.70 Cu 0.20 Fe 0.10 crystalline phase. Compression tests performed in the temperature range 293K - 823K on the two types of composite, i.e. Al/i and Al/ω, indicate that the flow stress of both composites is strongly temperature dependent and exhibit distinct regimes with increasing temperature. Differences exist between the two composites, in particular in yield stress values. In the low temperature regime (T ≤ 570K), the yield stress of the Al/ω composite is nearly 75% higher than that of the Al/i composite, while for T > 570K both composites exhibit similar yield stress values. The results are interpreted in terms of load transfer contribution between the matrix and the reinforcement particles and elementary dislocation mechanisms in the Al matrix.

  2. Advanced ceramic matrix composites for high energy x-ray generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Amir Azam; Labbe, Jean Claude

    2011-01-01

    High energy x-ray targets are the anodes used in high performance tubes, designed to work for long operating times and at high power. Such tubes are used in computed tomography (CT) scan machines. Usually the tubes used in CT scanners have to continuously work at high temperatures and for longer scan durations in order to get maximum information during a single scan. These anodes are composed of a refractory substrate which supports a refractory metallic coating. The present work is a review of the development of a ceramic metal composite based on aluminium nitride (AlN) and molybdenum for potential application as the substrate. This composite is surface engineered by coating with tungsten, the most popular material for high energy x-ray targets. To spray metallic coatings on the surface of ceramic matrix composites dc blown arc plasma is employed. The objective is to increase the performance and the life of an x-ray tube. Aluminium nitride-molybdenum ceramic matrix composites were produced by uniaxial hotpressing mixtures of AlN and Mo powders. These composites were characterized for their mechanical, thermal, electrical and micro-structural properties. An optimized composition was selected which contained 25 vol.% of metallic phase dispersed in the AlN matrix. These composites were produced in the actual size of an anode and coated with tungsten through dc blown arc plasma spraying. The results have shown that sintering of large size anodes is possible through uniaxial pressing, using a modified sintering cycle

  3. Diode Laser Assisted Filament Winding of Thermoplastic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadrini, Fabrizio; Squeo, Erica Anna; Prosperi, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    A new consolidation method for the laser-assisted filament winding of thermoplastic prepregs is discussed: for the first time a diode laser is used, as well as long glass fiber reinforced polypropylene prepregs. A consolidation apparatus was built by means of a CNC motion table, a stepper motor and a simple tensioner. Preliminary tests were performed in a hoop winding configuration: only the winding speed was changed, and all the other process parameters (laser power, distance from the laser focus, consolidation force) were kept constant. Small wound rings with an internal diameter of 25 mm were produced and compression tests were carried out to evaluate the composite agglomeration in dependence of the winding speed. At lower winding speeds, a strong interpenetration of adjacent layers was observed.

  4. Diode Laser Assisted Filament Winding of Thermoplastic Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Prosperi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A new consolidation method for the laser-assisted filament winding of thermoplastic prepregs is discussed: for the first time a diode laser is used, as well as long glass fiber reinforced polypropylene prepregs. A consolidation apparatus was built by means of a CNC motion table, a stepper motor and a simple tensioner. Preliminary tests were performed in a hoop winding configuration: only the winding speed was changed, and all the other process parameters (laser power, distance from the laser focus, consolidation force were kept constant. Small wound rings with an internal diameter of 25 mm were produced and compression tests were carried out to evaluate the composite agglomeration in dependence of the winding speed. At lower winding speeds, a stronginterpenetration of adjacent layers was observed.

  5. Corn gluten meal as a biodegradable matrix material in wood fibre reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beg, M.D.H.; Pickering, K.L.; Weal, S.J.

    2005-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate corn gluten meal (CGM) as a biodegradable matrix material for wood fibre reinforced composites. CGM was used alone, as well as hybridized with polypropylene, and reinforced with radiata pine (Pinus Radiata) fibre using a twin-screw extruder followed by injection moulding. Tensile testing, scanning electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry were carried out to assess the composites. For composites from CGM and wood fibres, extrusion was carried out with the aid of the following plasticizers: octanoic acid, glycerol, polyethylene glycol and water. Windows of processability for the different plasticizers were obtained for all plasticizers. These were found to lie between 20 and 50 wt.% of plasticizer with a maximum of approximately 20% wood fibre reinforcement. The best mechanical properties were obtained with a matrix containing 10 wt.% octanoic acid and 30 wt.% water, which gave a tensile strength and Young's modulus of 18.7 MPa and 4 GPa, respectively. Hybrid matrix composites were compounded with a maleated polypropylene coupling agent and benzoyl peroxide as a cross-linking agent. The highest tensile strength and Young's modulus obtained from hybrid matrix composites were 36.9 MPa and 5.8 GPa with 50 wt.% fibre

  6. Corn gluten meal as a biodegradable matrix material in wood fibre reinforced composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beg, M.D.H. [Department of Materials and Process Engineering, University of Waikato, Private Bag 3105, Hamilton (New Zealand); Pickering, K.L. [Department of Materials and Process Engineering, University of Waikato, Private Bag 3105, Hamilton (New Zealand)]. E-mail: klp@waikato.ac.nz; Weal, S.J. [Department of Materials and Process Engineering, University of Waikato, Private Bag 3105, Hamilton (New Zealand)

    2005-12-05

    This study was undertaken to investigate corn gluten meal (CGM) as a biodegradable matrix material for wood fibre reinforced composites. CGM was used alone, as well as hybridized with polypropylene, and reinforced with radiata pine (Pinus Radiata) fibre using a twin-screw extruder followed by injection moulding. Tensile testing, scanning electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry were carried out to assess the composites. For composites from CGM and wood fibres, extrusion was carried out with the aid of the following plasticizers: octanoic acid, glycerol, polyethylene glycol and water. Windows of processability for the different plasticizers were obtained for all plasticizers. These were found to lie between 20 and 50 wt.% of plasticizer with a maximum of approximately 20% wood fibre reinforcement. The best mechanical properties were obtained with a matrix containing 10 wt.% octanoic acid and 30 wt.% water, which gave a tensile strength and Young's modulus of 18.7 MPa and 4 GPa, respectively. Hybrid matrix composites were compounded with a maleated polypropylene coupling agent and benzoyl peroxide as a cross-linking agent. The highest tensile strength and Young's modulus obtained from hybrid matrix composites were 36.9 MPa and 5.8 GPa with 50 wt.% fibre.

  7. Processing, microstructure and mechanical properties of nickel particles embedded aluminium matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Devinder; Bauri, Ranjit

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Al-Ni particle composite was successfully processed by FSP. → No harmful intermetallics formed. → The composite showed a 3 fold increase in yield strength with high ductility. → FSP also lead to a refined recrystallized grain structure. → A continuous type dynamic recrystallization process seems to be working during FSP. - Abstract: Nickel particles were embedded into an Al matrix by friction stir processing (FSP) to produce metal particle reinforced composite. FSP resulted in uniform dispersion of nickel particles with excellent interfacial bonding with the Al matrix and also lead to significant grain refinement of the matrix. The novelty of the process is that the composite was processed in one step without any pretreatment being given to the constituents and no harmful intermetallic formed. The novel feature of the composite is that it shows a three fold increase in the yield strength while appreciable amount of ductility is retained. The hardness also improved significantly. The fracture surface showed a ductile failure mode and also revealed the superior bonding between the particles and the matrix. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed a dynamically recrystallized equiaxed microstructure. A gradual increase in misorientation from sub-grain to high-angle boundaries is observed from EBSD analysis pointing towards a continuous type dynamic recrystallization mechanism.

  8. Improving hardness and toughness of boride composites based on aluminum magnesium boride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Justin Steven

    The search for new super-hard materials has usually focused on strongly bonded, highly symmetric crystal structures similar to diamond. The two hardest single-phase materials, diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN), are metastable, and both must be produced at high temperatures and pressures, which makes their production costly. In 2000, a superhard composite based on a low-symmetry, boron-rich compound was reported. Since then, many advances have been made in the study of this AlMgB14--TiB2 composite. The composite has been shown to exhibit hardness greater than either of its constituent phases, relying on its sub-micron microstructure to provide hardening and strengthening mechanisms. With possible hardness around 40 GPa, an AlMgB 14--60 vol% TiB2 approaches the hardness of cBN, yet is amenable to processing under ambient pressure conditions. There are interesting aspects of both the AlMgB14 and TiB 2 phases. AlMgB14 is comprised of a framework of boron, mostly in icosahedral arrangements. It is part of a family of 12 known compounds with the same boron lattice, with the metal atoms replaced by Li, Na, Y or a number of Lanthanides. Another peculiar trait of this family of compounds is that every one contains a certain amount of intrinsic vacancies on one or both of the metal sites. These vacancies are significant, ranging from 3 to 43% of sites depending on the composition. TiB2 is a popular specialty ceramic material due to its high hardness, moderate toughness, good corrosion resistance, and high thermal and electrical conductivity. The major drawback is the difficulty of densification of pure TiB2 ceramics. A combination of sintering aids, pressure, and temperatures of 1800°C are often required to achieve near full density articles. The AlMgB14--TiB2 composites can achieve 99% density from hotpressing at 1400°C. This is mostly due to the preparation of powders by a high-energy milling technique known as mechanical alloying. The resulting fine powders have

  9. Fiber coating/matrix reactions in silicon-base ceramic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.N.; Jacobson, N.S.

    1992-01-01

    The Knudsen cell technique and coupons of carbon coated Si3N4 and BN coated SiC were employed to study the possible reactions at the SiC/C/Si3N4 and SiC/BN/SiC interface. Carbon reacts with Si3N4 to form gaseous N2 and solid SiC. Solid SiC acts as a physical barrier to the reaction, which prevents the generation of high N2 pressure predicted from thermochemical calculations. Thus, deleterious effects of the reaction to the composite are limited. Limited reactions between BN and C-rich SiC was observed. However, the vapor pressure was so low that it is not likely to cause any interfacial instability. The predicted formation of a BN-C solid solution was not observed. 10 refs

  10. Fiber coating/matrix reactions in silicon-base ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K. N.; Jacobson, N. S.

    1992-01-01

    The Knudsen cell technique and coupons of carbon coated Si3N4 and BN coated SiC were employed to study the possible reactions at the SiC/C/Si3N4 and SiC/BN/SiC interface. Carbon reacts with Si3N4 to form gaseous N2 and solid SiC. Solid SiC acts as a physical barrier to the reaction, which prevents the generation of high N2 pressure predicted from thermochemical calculations. Thus, deleterious effects of the reaction to the composite are limited. Limited reactions between BN and C-rich SiC was observed. However, the vapor pressure was so low that it is not likely to cause any interfacial instability. The predicted formation of a BN-C solid solution was not observed.

  11. Corrosion behaviour of 2124 aluminium alloy-silicon carbide metal matrix composites in sodium chloride environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Nirbhay; Vadera, K.K.; Ramesh Kumar, A.V.; Singh, R.S.; Monga, S.S.; Mathur, G.N.

    1999-01-01

    Aluminium alloy based particle reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) are being considered for a range of applications. Their mechanical properties have been investigated in detail, but more information about their corrosion resistance is needed. In this investigation, the corrosion behaviour of silicon carbide particulates (SiC p )-2124 aluminium metal matrix composites was studied in 3 wt% sodium chloride solution by means of electrochemical technique and optical microscope. The effects of weight percentages and particle size of silicon carbide particulates on corrosion behaviour of the composite were studied in NaCl and it was observed that corrosion rate increases linearly with the increasing weight percentage of SiC p . The corrosion rate of the MMC increases by increasing the size of SiC particles. Anodization improved corrosion resistance of the composites. (author)

  12. Fracture and fatigue considerations in the development of ductile-phase reinforced intermetallic-matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkateswara Rao, K.T.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1994-01-01

    The salient microstructural factors influencing fracture and fatigue-crack growth resistance of ductile-particle reinforced intermetallic-matrix composites at ambient temperature are reviewed through examples from the Nb/MoSi 2 , TiNb/TiAl, Nb/TiAl and Nb/Nb 3 Al systems; specific emphasis is placed on properties and morphology of the reinforcement and its interfacial properties with the matrix. It is shown that composites must be fabricated with a high aspect ratio ductile-reinforcement morphology in order to promote crack-particle interception and resultant crack bridging for improved fracture and fatigue properties. Concurrently, however, the ductile phases have contrasting effects on crack growth under monotonic vs. cyclic loading suggesting that composite microstructures tailored for optimal toughness may not necessarily yield optimal fatigue resistance. Perspectives for the future development of damage-tolerant intermetallic-composite microstructures are discussed

  13. Support Services for Ceramic Fiber-Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, J.P.

    2000-06-06

    Structural and functional materials used in solid- and liquid-fueled energy systems are subject to gas- and condensed-phase corrosion and erosion by entrained particles. For a given material, its temperature and the composition of the corrodents determine the corrosion rates, while gas flow conditions and particle aerodynamic diameters determine erosion rates. Because there are several mechanisms by which corrodents deposit on a surface, the corrodent composition depends not only on the composition of the fuel, but also on the temperature of the material and the size range of the particles being deposited. In general, it is difficult to simulate under controlled laboratory conditions all of the possible corrosion and erosion mechanisms to which a material may be exposed in an energy system. Therefore, with funding from the Advanced Research Materials Program, the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is coordinating with NCC Engineering and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to provide researchers with no-cost opportunities to expose materials in pilot-scale systems to conditions of corrosion and erosion similar to those occurring in commercial power systems. The EERC has two pilot-scale solid-fuel systems available for exposure of materials coupons. The slagging furnace system (SFS) was built under the DOE Combustion 2000 Program as a testing facility for advanced heat exchanger subsystems. It is a 2.5-MMBtu/hr (2.6 x 10{sup 6} kJ/hr) solid-fuel combustion system with exit temperatures of 2700 to 2900 F to ensure that the ash in the main combustor is molten and flowing. Sample coupons may be exposed in the system either within the slagging zone or near the convective air heater at 1800 F (980 C). In addition, a pilot-scale entrained-bed gasifier system known as the transport reactor development unit (TRDU) is available. Also operating at approximately 2.5 MMBtu/hr (2.6 x 10{sup 6} kJ/hr), it is a pressurized unit

  14. Effect of γ irradiation on the properties of basalt fiber reinforced epoxy resin matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ran; Gu, Yizhuo; Yang, Zhongjia; Li, Min; Wang, Shaokai; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray (γ-ray) irradiation is a crucial reason for the aging in materials used for nuclear industry. Due to high specific strength and stiffness, light weight and good corrosion resistance, fiber reinforced composites are regarded as an alternative of traditional materials used on nuclear facilities. In this study, basalt fiber (BF)/AG80 epoxy composite laminates were fabricated by autoclave process and treated with "6"0Co gamma irradiation dose up to 2.0 MGy. Irradiation induced polymer chain scission and oxidation of AG80 resin were detected from physical and chemical analysis. The experimental results show that the tensile and flexural performances of irradiated BF/AG80 composite maintain stable and have a low amplitude attenuation respectively, and the interlaminar shear strength has increased from irradiation dose of 0–1.5 MGy. Furthermore, the comparison between the studied BF composite and reported polymer and composite materials was done for evaluating the γ resistance property of BF composite. - Highlights: • The properties of basalt fiber reinforced epoxy resin matrix composite under "6"0Co γ irradiation up to 2.0 MGy were studied. • Basalt fiber can weaken the aging effects of γ irradiation on the resin matrix. • Tensile property of basalt fiber composite remains stable and flexural property has a low degree of attenuation. • Basalt fiber composite is an ideal candidate of structural material for nuclear industry.

  15. Experimental and numerical analysis of short sisal fiber-cement composites produced with recycled matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, Paulo Roberto Lopes; Barros, Joaquim A. O.; Santos, Daniele Justo; Fontes, Cintia Maria; Lima, José Mário F.; Toledo Filho, Romildo

    2016-01-01

    "Published online: 02 Jan 2017" The proper use of renewable or recycled source materials can contribute significantly to reducing the environmental impact of construction industry. In this work, cement based composites reinforced with natural fibers were developed and their mechanical behavior was characterized. To ensure the composite sustainability and durability, the ordinary Portland cement matrix was modified by adding metakaolin and the natural aggregate was substitute...

  16. Characterization of ceramic matrix composite degradation using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Christine; Criner, Amanda Keck; Imel, Megan; King, Derek

    2018-04-01

    Data collected with a handheld Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) device is analyzed and considered as a useful method for detecting and quantifying oxidation on the surface of ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials. Experiments examine silicon carbide (SiC) coupons, looking for changes in chemical composition before and after thermal exposure. Using mathematical, physical and statistical models for FTIR reflectance data, this research seeks to quantify any detected spectral changes as an indicator of surface oxidation on the CMC coupon.

  17. Mechanical behaviour of aluminium matrix composites with particles in high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amigo, V.; Salvador, M. D.; Ferrer, C.; Costa d, C. E.; Busquets, D.

    2001-01-01

    The aluminium matrix composites materials reinforced by ceramic particles can be elaborated by powder metallurgy techniques, with extrusion processes. These can provide new materials, with a better mechanical behaviour and moreover when we need those properties at higher temperatures. Aluminium alloy reinforced composites with silicon nitride particles by powder extrusion process was done. Their mechanical properties were characterised at room and elevated temperatures. (Author) 28 refs

  18. Additional results on space environmental effects on polymer matrix composites: Experiment A0180

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennyson, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    Additional experimental results on the atomic oxygen erosion of boron, Kevlar, and graphite fiber reinforced epoxy matrix composites are presented. Damage of composite laminates due to micrometeoroid/debris impacts is also examined with particular emphasis on the relationship between damage area and actual hole size due to particle penetration. Special attention is given to one micrometeoroid impact on an aluminum base plate which resulted in ejecta visible on an adjoining vertical flange structure

  19. Nanofiber reinforcement of a geopolymer matrix for improved composite materials mechanical performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, AKM Samsur

    Geopolymers have the potential to cross the process performance gap between polymer matrix and ceramic matrix composites (CMC), enabling high temperature capable composites that are manufactured at relatively low temperatures. Unfortunately, the inherently low toughness of these geopolymers limits the performance of the resulting fiber reinforced geopolymer matrix composites. Toughness improvements in composites can be addressed through the adjustments in the fiber/matrix interfacial strength and through the improvements in the inherent toughness of the constituent materials. This study investigates the potential to improve the inherent toughness of the geopolymer matrix material through the addition of nanofillers, by considering physical dimensions, mechanical properties, reinforcing capability and interfacial bond strength effects. A process optimization study was first undertaken to develop the ability to produce consistent, neat geopolymer samples, a critical precursor to producing nano-filled geopolymer for toughness evaluation. After that, single edge notched bend beam fracture toughness and un-notched beam flexural strength were evaluated for silicon carbide, alumina and carbon nanofillers reinforced geopolymer samples treated at various temperatures in reactive and inert environments. Toughness results of silicon carbide and carbon nanofillers reinforced geopolymers suggested that with the improved baseline properties, high aspect ratio nanofillers with high interfacial bond strength are the most capable in further improving the toughness of geopolymers. Among the high aspect ratio nanofillers i.e. nanofibers, 2vol% silicon carbide whicker (SCW) showed the highest improvement in fracture toughness and flexural strength of ~164% & ~185%, respectively. After heat treatment at 650 °C, SCW reinforcement was found to be effective, with little reduction in the performance, while the performance of alumina nanofiber (ANF) reinforced geopolymer significantly

  20. Effect of atmosphere on the fabrication of Si2N2O matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Si2N2O matrix composites were fabricated by solid/gas reaction in air or N2 atmosphere. The effects of atmosphere on the phase and microstructure of the composites were investigated. The reaction mechanism of Si2N2O system was discussed by analysing the variation of the Gibbs free energy with temperature. The effect of N2 and air on sintering of Si2N2O matrix composites was discussed in relation to observed kinetics and thermodynamic calculations. The results showed that gradient structure of Si2N2O matrix composites were obtained in N2 atmosphere. While high N2 concentration was useful for the formation of the pure β-Si3N4 ceramics, low N2 concentration was proposed to form the pure Si2N2O ceramics. However, in the air atmosphere, structure of the Si3N4/SiO2 composites is homogeneous without the gradient structure appearing. Its composition is a little different as the O2 concentration changes.

  1. Standard test method for translaminar fracture toughness of laminated and pultruded polymer matrix composite materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of translaminar fracture toughness, KTL, for laminated and pultruded polymer matrix composite materials of various ply orientations using test results from monotonically loaded notched specimens. 1.2 This test method is applicable to room temperature laboratory air environments. 1.3 Composite materials that can be tested by this test method are not limited by thickness or by type of polymer matrix or fiber, provided that the specimen sizes and the test results meet the requirements of this test method. This test method was developed primarily from test results of various carbon fiber – epoxy matrix laminates and from additional results of glass fiber – epoxy matrix, glass fiber-polyester matrix pultrusions and carbon fiber – bismaleimide matrix laminates (1-4, 6, 7). 1.4 A range of eccentrically loaded, single-edge-notch tension, ESE(T), specimen sizes with proportional planar dimensions is provided, but planar size may be variable and adjusted, with asso...

  2. Friction Stir Processing of Copper-Coated SiC Particulate-Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wei Huang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we proposed a novel friction stir processing (FSP to produce a locally reinforced aluminum matrix composite (AMC by stirring copper-coated SiC particulate reinforcement into Al6061 alloy matrix. Electroless-plating process was applied to deposit the copper surface coating on the SiC particulate reinforcement for the purpose of improving the interfacial adhesion between SiC particles and Al matrix. The core-shell SiC structure provides a layer for the atomic diffusion between aluminum and copper to enhance the cohesion between reinforcing particles and matrix on one hand, the dispersion of fine copper in the Al matrix during FSP provides further dispersive strengthening and solid solution strengthening, on the other hand. Hardness distribution and tensile results across the stir zone validated the novel concept in improving the mechanical properties of AMC that was realized via FSP. Optical microscope (OM and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM investigations were conducted to investigate the microstructure. Energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS, electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA, and X-ray diffraction (XRD were explored to analyze the atomic inter-diffusion and the formation of intermetallic at interface. The possible strengthening mechanisms of the AMC containing Cu-coated SiC particulate reinforcement were interpreted. The concept of strengthening developed in this work may open a new way of fabricating of particulate reinforced metal matrix composites.

  3. Development of Magnesium and Siloxane-containing Vaterite and its Composite Materials for Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya eYamada

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Development of novel biomaterials with Mg2+, Ca2+ and silicate ions releasability for bone regeneration is now in progress. Several inorganic ions have been reported to stimulate bone-forming cells. We featured Ca2+, silicate and especially Mg2+ ions as growth factors for osteoblasts. Various biomaterials, such as ceramic powders and organic-inorganic composites, releasing the ions have been developed and investigated in their cytocompatibilities in our previous work. Through the investigation, providing the three ions was found to be effective to activate osteogenic cells. Mg and siloxane-containing vaterite (MgSiV was prepared by a carbonation process as an inorganic particles, which can provide simultaneously releasing ability of Ca2+, silicate and Mg2+ ions to biodegradable polymers. Poly(L-lactic acid (PLLA- and bioactive PLLA-based composites containing vaterite coatings were discussed on their degradability and cytocompatibility using a metallic Mg substrate as Mg2+ ion source. PLLA/SiV composite film, which has a releasability of silicate ions besides Ca2+ ion, was coated on a pure Mg substrate to be compared with the PLLA/V coating. The degradability and releasability of inorganic ions were morphologically and quantitatively monitored in a cell culture medium. The bonding strength between the coatings and Mg substrates was one of the key factors to control Mg2+ ion release from the substrates. The cell culture tests were conducted using mouse osteoblast-like cells (MC3T3-E1 cells; cellular morphology, proliferation and differentiation on the materials were evaluated. The PLLA/V and PLLA/SiV coatings on Mg substrates were found to enhance the proliferation; especially the PLLA/SiV coating possessed a higher ability of inducing the osteogenic differentiation of the cells.

  4. Characterization of Ni-P-SiO2 nano-composite coating on magnesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadreddini, S.; Salehi, Z.; Rassaie, H.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effects of SiO2 nanoparticles added to the electroless Ni-P coating were studied. The surface morphology, corrosion behavior, hardness and porosity of Ni-P-SiO2composite were investigated. The related microstructure was investigated through field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and the amount of SiO2 was examined by Energy Dispersive Analysis of X-ray (EDX). The corrosion behavior was evaluated through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and polarization techniques. The results illustrated that with increasing the quantity of the SiO2 nanoparticles, the corrosion rate decreased and the hardness increased.

  5. Excellent plasticity of a new Ti-based metallic glass matrix composite upon dynamic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, R.F. [Laboratory of Applied Physics and Mechanics of Advanced Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Jiao, Z.M. [Institute of Applied Mechanics and Biomedical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Wang, Y.S.; Wang, Z. [Laboratory of Applied Physics and Mechanics of Advanced Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Wang, Z.H.; Ma, S.G. [Institute of Applied Mechanics and Biomedical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Qiao, J.W., E-mail: qiaojunwei@gmail.com [Laboratory of Applied Physics and Mechanics of Advanced Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2016-11-20

    Quasi-static and dynamic compressive properties of in-situ Ti{sub 60}Zr{sub 14}V{sub 12}Cu{sub 4}Be{sub 10} bulk metallic glass matrix composites containing ductile dendrites were investigated. Upon quasi-static compressive loading, the composite exhibits a high fracture strength of ~2,600 MPa, combined with a considerable plasticity of ~40% at room temperature. However, upon dynamic loading, an excellent plasticity of ~16% can be obtained due to the abundant dislocations and severe lattice distortions within dendrites and multiplication of shear bands within the glass matrix analyzed by transmission-electron microscopy. A constitutive relationship is obtained by Johnson-Cook plasticity model, which is employed to model the dynamic flow stress behavior. In addition, under dynamic compression, the adiabatic temperature rise increases with increasing strain rates, resulting in that the softening effect within the glass matrix is obviously enhanced during deformation.

  6. Analysis of metal-matrix composite structures. I - Micromechanics constitutive theory. II - Laminate analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenburg, R. T.; Reddy, J. N.

    1991-01-01

    The micromechanical constitutive theory is used to examine the nonlinear behavior of continuous-fiber-reinforced metal-matrix composite structures. Effective lamina constitutive relations based on the Abouli micromechanics theory are presented. The inelastic matrix behavior is modeled by the unified viscoplasticity theory of Bodner and Partom. The laminate constitutive relations are incorporated into a first-order deformation plate theory. The resulting boundary value problem is solved by utilizing the finite element method. Attention is also given to computational aspects of the numerical solution, including the temporal integration of the inelastic strains and the spatial integration of bending moments. Numerical results the nonlinear response of metal matrix composites subjected to extensional and bending loads are presented.

  7. Mechanical Properties of TC4 Matrix Composites Prepared by Laser Cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Lin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the penetration performance of TC4, the direct laser deposition technology was used to prepare TC4 composite material. TA15+30% TiC powder, TA15+20%Cr3C2 powder and TA15+15%B4C powder were used as deposited materials for TC4 matrix. The micromorphology, change of hardness of the deposited coating and mechanical properties of the three composites were studied. The experimental results demonstrate that the TC4 matrix with the three kinds of materials can form a complete metallurgical bonding, and the strength of TC4-(TA15+TiC, TC4-(TA15+Cr3C2 and TC4-(TA15+B4C are higher than that of TC4 matrix materials, while the plasticity is slightly worse.

  8. The converse magnetoelectric coupling in asymmetric granule/matrix composite film with Ni/PZT component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Su, Ning-Ning; Cui, Wen-Li; Yan, Shi-Nong

    2018-04-01

    In this work, a type of asymmetric granule/matrix composite film is designed, where the Ni granule is dispersed in PZT matrix, meanwhile the top and bottom electrode is constituted by Au and SRO respectively. Predicted through the electrostatic screening model and mean field approximation, considerable electrostatic charge is induced on Ni granule surface by ferroelectric PZT polarization. Predicted through the spin splitting model and spherical shell approximation, both the magnetization and magnetic anisotropy of Ni granule are modulated by ferroelectric PZT polarization. As the volume fraction of Ni granule is increased, the electric modulation of magnetization and magnetic anisotropy is reduced and enhanced respectively. As the dimension of granule/matrix composite is varied, such modulation is retained. Due to the large area-volume ratio of nano-granule, this work benefits to realize the converse magnetoelectric coupling in nanoscale.

  9. A Study on AE Signal Analysis of Composite Materials Using Matrix Piezo Electric Sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Yeun Ho; Choi, Jin Ho; Kweon, Jin Hwe

    2007-01-01

    As fiber reinforced composite materials are widely used in aircraft, space structures and robot arms, the study on non-destructive testing methods has become an important research area for improving their reliability and safety. AE (acoustic emission) can evaluate the defects by detecting the emitting strain energy when elastic waves are generated by the initiation and growth of crack, plastic deformation, fiber breakage, matrix cleavage, or delamination. In the paper, AE signals generated under uniaxial tension were measured and analyzed using the 8x8 matrix piezo electric sensor. The electronic circuit to control the transmitting distance of AE signals was designed and constructed. The optical data storage system was also designed to store the AE signal of 64 channels using LED (light emitting diode) elements. From the tests, it was shown that the source location and propagation path of AE signals in composite materials could be detected effectively by the 8x8 matrix piezo electric sensor

  10. Nondestructive evaluation of ceramic and metal matrix composites for NASA's HITEMP and enabling propulsion materials programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    1992-01-01

    In a preliminary study, ultrasonic, x-ray opaque, and fluorescent dye penetrants techniques were used to evaluate and characterize ceramic and metal matrix composites. Techniques are highlighted for identifying porosity, fiber alignment, fiber uniformity, matrix cracks, fiber fractures, unbonds or disbonds between laminae, and fiber-to-matrix bond variations. The nondestructive evaluations (NDE) were performed during processing and after thermomechanical testing. Specific examples are given for Si3N4/SiC (SCS-6 fiber), FeCrAlY/Al2O3 fibers, Ti-15-3/SiC (SCS-6 fiber) materials, and Si3N4/SiC (SCS-6 fiber) actively cooled panel components. Results of this study indicate that the choice of the NDE tools to be used can be optimized to yield a faithful and accurate evaluation of advanced composites.

  11. Effect of sintering temperatures on titanium matrix composites reinforced by ceramic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, F.; Amigo, V.; Busquets, D.; Klyatskina, E. [Mechanical and Materials Engineering Department. Polytechnical University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    Titanium and titanium composites have a potential use in aerospace and biotechnology industries, and nowadays in others like sports and fashion ones. In this work composite materials, based on titanium matrix reinforced with ceramic particles, have been developed. PM route is used to obtain compact and sintered samples. TiN and TiAl powders, are milled with Ti powder in different volumetric percentages in a ball mill. These mixtures are pressed in a uniaxial press and sintered in a vacuum furnace at different temperatures between 1180 to 1220 deg. C. Porosity of samples is analysed, before and after the sintering process, by Archimedes technique and by image analysis. Mechanical properties and the reinforcement particles influence in the titanium matrix are studied by flexion test in green and sintered states, and by hardness and microhardness tests. Complimentarily, a microstructural analysis is carried out by optical and electron microscopy, and the reactivity between the reinforce particles and titanium matrix are studied. (authors)

  12. Sliding wear resistance of metal matrix composite layers prepared by high power laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelik, Vaclav; Matthews, D; de Hosson, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    Two laser surface engineering techniques, Laser Cladding and Laser Melt Injection (LMI), were used to prepare three different metal matrix composite layers with a thickness of about 1 mm and approximately 25-30% volume fraction of ceramic particles. SiC/Al-8Si, WC/Ti-6Al-4V and TiB2/Ti-6Al-4V layers

  13. Effect of static pre-loading on fracture toughness of Nicalon fibre glass matrix composite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Chlup, Zdeněk; Chawla, K. K.; Kulkarmi, R.; Koopman, M.; Boccaccini, A. R.

    č. 367 (2004), s. 17-23 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2041003; GA MŠk ME 491 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : Nicalon fibre * glass matrix composite * fracture toughness Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.445, year: 2004

  14. Significance of Shrinkage Induced Clamping Pressure in Fiber-Matrix Bonding in Cementitious Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stang, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    used in high performance cementitious composite materials.Assuming a Coulomb type of friction on the fiber/matrix interface andusing typical values for the frictional coefficient it is shownthat the shrinkage induced clamping pressure could be one of the mostimportant factors determining the frictional...

  15. Effects of thermal residual stresses and fiber packing on deformation of metal-matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, T.; Suresh, S.

    1993-01-01

    The combined effects of thermal residual stresses and fiber spatial distribution on the deformation of a 6061 aluminum alloy containing a fixed concentration unidirectional boron fibers have been analyzed using detailed finite element models. The geometrical structure includes perfectly periodic, uniformly space fiber arrangements in square and hexagonal cells, as well as different cells in which either 30 or 60 fibers are randomly placed in the ductile matrix. The model involves an elastic-plastic matrix, elastic fibers, and mechanically bonded interfaces. The results indicate that both fiber packing and thermal residual stresses can have a significant effect on the stress-strain characteristics of the composite. The thermal residual stresses cause pronounced matrix yielding which also influences the apparent overall stiffness of the composite during the initial stages of subsequent far-field loading along the axial and transverse direction. Furthermore, the thermal residual stresses apparently elevate the flow stress of the composite during transverse tension. Such effects can be traced back to the level of constraint imposed on the matrix by local fiber spacing. The implications of the present results to the processing of the composites are also briefly addressed

  16. Metal particles constraint in glass matrix composites and its impact on fracture toughness enhancement

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotoul, M.; Dlouhý, Ivo

    387-389 (2004), s. 404-408 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/02/0683 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : brittle matrix composites * crack bridging * crack trapping Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.445, year: 2004

  17. Thermomechanically induced residual strains in Al/SiCp metal-matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, T.; Clarke, A.P.

    1998-01-01

    Residual lattice strains in the aluminium and SiC phases of F3S.20S extruded A359 20% SiC metal-matrix composite were measured by using neutron diffi action at room and elevated temperatures to monitor the effects of in situ uniaxial plastic deformations. The results are interpreted with referenc...

  18. Production of NbC reinforced aluminum matrix composites by mechanical alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Marina Judice; Cardoso, Katia Regina; Travessa, Dilermando Nagle

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum and their alloys are key materials for the automotive and aerospace industries. The dispersion of hard ceramic particles in the Al soft matrix produces lightweight composites with interesting properties, as environmental resistance, high specific strength and stiffness, high thermal and electrical conductivity, and good wear resistance, encouraging their technological use. Powder metallurgy techniques like mechanical alloying (MA) are very attractive to design metal matrix composites, as they are able to achieve a homogeneous distribution of well dispersed particles inside the metal matrix. In this work, pure aluminum has been reinforced with particles of Niobium carbide (NbC), an extremely hard and stable refractory ceramic. NbC is frequently used as a grain growth inhibitor in micro-alloyed steel due to their low solubility in austenite. In the present work, NbC is expected to act as a reinforcing phase by its fine dispersion into the aluminum matrix, produced by MA. Composite powders produced after different milling times (up to 50h), with 10 and 20% (volume) of NbC were characterized by diffraction laser particle size analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by X-ray diffraction (DRX), in order to establish a relationship between the milling time and the characteristics of the powder produced, as size and morphology, crystallite size and reinforcement distribution. This characterization is important in defining the MA process for production of composites for further consolidation by hot extrusion process. (author)

  19. Hardfacing of aluminium alloys by means of metal matrix composites produced by laser surface alloying

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pityana, SL

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available . In these experiments the laser power was varied from 3 to 4.0 kW, the laser scan speed was varied from 0.8 to 2.0 m/min. The powder feed rate was varied from 2 to 5 g/min. The structural characterisation of the metal matrix composite included X-ray diffraction (XRD...

  20. Microstructure and wear behaviour of Al/TiB2 metal matrix composite

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Popoola, AP

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Al/TiB2 metal matrix composite (MMCs) was fabricated on aluminium AA1200 with the aim of improving the wear resistance property of the substrate. The characterization of the MMCs was carried out by Optical Microscopy (OM), Scanning Electron...

  1. Composite biomaterials with chemical bonding between hydroxyapatite filler particles and PEG/PBT copolymer matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Qing; de Wijn, J.R.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens

    1998-01-01

    In an effort to make composites from hydroxyapatite and a PEG/PBT copolymer (PolyactiveTM 70/30), chemical linkages were introduced between the filler particles and polymer matrix using hexamethylene diisocyanate as a coupling agent. Infrared spectra (IR) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA)

  2. Fabrication of WCp/NiBSi metal matrix composite by electron beam melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Hui, E-mail: penghui@buaa.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University (BUAA), No. 37 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory for Advanced Functional Material and Thin Film Technology, Beihang University, No. 37 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials & Performance (Ministry of Education), Beihang University, No. 37 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Liu, Chang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University (BUAA), No. 37 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Guo, Hongbo, E-mail: guo.hongbo@buaa.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University (BUAA), No. 37 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory for Advanced Functional Material and Thin Film Technology, Beihang University, No. 37 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials & Performance (Ministry of Education), Beihang University, No. 37 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Yuan, Yuan [Zhuzhou Seed Cemented Carbide Technology Co. Ltd, No. 1099 Xiangda Road, Zhuzhou, Hunan 412000 (China); Gong, Shengkai; Xu, Huibin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University (BUAA), No. 37 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory for Advanced Functional Material and Thin Film Technology, Beihang University, No. 37 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials & Performance (Ministry of Education), Beihang University, No. 37 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2016-06-01

    A blend of NiBSi and WC powders was used as raw material for fabricating a metal matrix composite (MMC) by electron beam melting (EBM). Dense and crack-free microstructure was produced with evenly distributed WC reinforcements. Mechanical properties, including macro- and micro-hardness, flexural strength, impact toughness and compressive strength, were investigated.

  3. Weld microstructure in cast AlSi9/SiC(p metal matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wysocki

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Welded joint in cast AlSi9/SiC/20(p metal matrix composite by manual TIG arc welding using AlMg5 filler metal has been described inhis paper. Cooling curves have been stated, and the influence in distribution of reinforced particles on crystallization and weldmicrostructure. Welded joint mechanical properties have been determined: hardness and tensile.

  4. Microstructure characterization of laser-deposited titanium carbide and zirconium-based titanium metal matrix composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ochonogor, OF

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available . In this work, the technique is used to fabricate metal matrix composites (MMCs) by using an elementally blended feedstock combining metal and ceramic powders in the melt pool, which melt and solidify to create the required morphology. Ti6Al4V + TiC MMCs were...

  5. METAL MATRIX COMPOSITE BRAKE ROTORS: HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT AND PRODUCT LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Rahman

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Metal matrix composites (MMCs have become attractive for engineering structural applications due to their excellent specific strength and are increasingly seen as an alternative to conventional materials, particularly in the automotive industry. In this study, a historical background on the development and application of metal matrix composites for automotive brake rotors is presented. The discussion also includes an analysis of the product life cycle with stir casting as a case study. The historical review analysis revealed that gradual development of material and processing techniques have led to lighter weight, lower cost and higher performance brake rotors as a result of a better understanding of the mechanics of metal matrix composites. It emerged from the study that the stir casting technique provides ease of operation, sustainability and, most significantly, very competitive costs without sacrificing quality relative to other techniques; as such, it is the most attractive manufacturing process in the industry. These findings can be used for future design and manufacture of an efficient and effective aluminium matrix composite brake rotor for automotive and other applications.

  6. On the homogenization of metal matrix composites using strain gradient plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azizi, Reza; Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Legarth, Brian Nyvang

    2014-01-01

    The homogenized response of metal matrix composites (MMC) is studied using strain gradient plasticity. The material model employed is a rate independent formulation of energetic strain gradient plasticity at the micro scale and conventional rate independent plasticity at the macro scale. Free...

  7. Properties of porous FeAlOy/FeAlx ceramic matrix composite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 36; Issue 7. Properties of porous FeAlO/FeAl ceramic matrix composite influenced by mechanical activation of FeAl powder. V Usoltsev S Tikhov A Salanov V Sadykov G Golubkova O Lomovskii. Volume 36 Issue 7 December 2013 pp 1195-1200 ...

  8. Production of NbC reinforced aluminum matrix composites by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Marina Judice; Cardoso, Katia Regina; Travessa, Dilermando Nagle, E-mail: dilermando.travessa@unifesp.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencia e Tecnologia

    2014-07-01

    Aluminum and their alloys are key materials for the automotive and aerospace industries. The dispersion of hard ceramic particles in the Al soft matrix produces lightweight composites with interesting properties, as environmental resistance, high specific strength and stiffness, high thermal and electrical conductivity, and good wear resistance, encouraging their technological use. Powder metallurgy techniques like mechanical alloying (MA) are very attractive to design metal matrix composites, as they are able to achieve a homogeneous distribution of well dispersed particles inside the metal matrix. In this work, pure aluminum has been reinforced with particles of Niobium carbide (NbC), an extremely hard and stable refractory ceramic. NbC is frequently used as a grain growth inhibitor in micro-alloyed steel due to their low solubility in austenite. In the present work, NbC is expected to act as a reinforcing phase by its fine dispersion into the aluminum matrix, produced by MA. Composite powders produced after different milling times (up to 50h), with 10 and 20% (volume) of NbC were characterized by diffraction laser particle size analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by X-ray diffraction (DRX), in order to establish a relationship between the milling time and the characteristics of the powder produced, as size and morphology, crystallite size and reinforcement distribution. This characterization is important in defining the MA process for production of composites for further consolidation by hot extrusion process. (author)

  9. Fabrication of WCp/NiBSi metal matrix composite by electron beam melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Hui; Liu, Chang; Guo, Hongbo; Yuan, Yuan; Gong, Shengkai; Xu, Huibin

    2016-01-01

    A blend of NiBSi and WC powders was used as raw material for fabricating a metal matrix composite (MMC) by electron beam melting (EBM). Dense and crack-free microstructure was produced with evenly distributed WC reinforcements. Mechanical properties, including macro- and micro-hardness, flexural strength, impact toughness and compressive strength, were investigated.

  10. Design feasibility study of a divertor component reinforced with fibrous metal matrix composite laminate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, J.-H.

    2005-01-01

    Fibrous metal matrix composites possess advanced mechanical properties compared to conventional alloys. It is expected that the application of these composites to a divertor component will enhance the structural reliability. A possible design concept would be a system consisting of tungsten armour, copper composite interlayer and copper heat sink where the composite interlayer is locally inserted into the highly stressed domain near the bond interface. For assessment of the design feasibility of the composite divertor concept, a non-linear multi-scale finite element analysis was performed. To this end, a micro-mechanics algorithm was implemented into a finite element code. A reactor-relevant heat flux load was assumed. Focus was placed on the evolution of stress state, plastic deformation and ductile damage on both macro- and microscopic scales. The structural response of the component and the micro-scale stress evolution of the composite laminate were investigated

  11. Design feasibility study of a divertor component reinforced with fibrous metal matrix composite laminate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, J.-H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: j.h.you@ipp.mpg.de

    2005-01-01

    Fibrous metal matrix composites possess advanced mechanical properties compared to conventional alloys. It is expected that the application of these composites to a divertor component will enhance the structural reliability. A possible design concept would be a system consisting of tungsten armour, copper composite interlayer and copper heat sink where the composite interlayer is locally inserted into the highly stressed domain near the bond interface. For assessment of the design feasibility of the composite divertor concept, a non-linear multi-scale finite element analysis was performed. To this end, a micro-mechanics algorithm was implemented into a finite element code. A reactor-relevant heat flux load was assumed. Focus was placed on the evolution of stress state, plastic deformation and ductile damage on both macro- and microscopic scales. The structural response of the component and the micro-scale stress evolution of the composite laminate were investigated.

  12. Influence of Heat Treatment on Abrasive Wear Resistance of Silumin Matrix Composite Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawdzińska K.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors attempted at examining the effect of heat treatment on abrasive wear resistance of metal composite castings. Metal matrix composites were made by infiltrating preforms created from unordered short fibers (graphite or silumin with liquid aluminium alloy AlSi12(b. Thus prepared composites were subject to solution heat treatment at a temperature of 520°C for four hours, then aging at a temperature of 220°C for four hours. Abrasion resistance of the material was tested before and after thermal treatment.

  13. Features of film growth during plasma anodizing of Al 2024/SiC metal matrix composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue Wenbin [Key Laboratory for Radiation Beam Technology and Materials Modification, Institute of Low Energy Nuclear Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)]. E-mail: xuewb@bnu.edu.cn

    2006-07-15

    Plasma anodizing is a novel promising process to fabricate corrosion-resistant protective films on metal matrix composites. The corrosion-resistant films were prepared by plasma anodizing on SiC reinforced aluminum matrix composite. The morphology and microstructure of films were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Specifically, the morphology of residual SiC reinforcement particles in the film was observed. It is found that the most SiC reinforcement particles have been molten to become silicon oxide, but a few tiny SiC particles still remain in the film close to the composite/film interface. This interface is irregular due to the hindering effect of SiC particles on the film growth. Morphology and distribution of residual SiC particles in film provide direct evidence to identify the local melt occurs in the interior of plasma anodizing film even near the composite/film interface. A model of film growth by plasma anodizing on metal matrix composites was proposed.

  14. Features of film growth during plasma anodizing of Al 2024/SiC metal matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Wenbin

    2006-01-01

    Plasma anodizing is a novel promising process to fabricate corrosion-resistant protective films on metal matrix composites. The corrosion-resistant films were prepared by plasma anodizing on SiC reinforced aluminum matrix composite. The morphology and microstructure of films were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Specifically, the morphology of residual SiC reinforcement particles in the film was observed. It is found that the most SiC reinforcement particles have been molten to become silicon oxide, but a few tiny SiC particles still remain in the film close to the composite/film interface. This interface is irregular due to the hindering effect of SiC particles on the film growth. Morphology and distribution of residual SiC particles in film provide direct evidence to identify the local melt occurs in the interior of plasma anodizing film even near the composite/film interface. A model of film growth by plasma anodizing on metal matrix composites was proposed

  15. Temperature and composition dependence of magnetic properties of cobalt-chromium co-substituted magnesium ferrite nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Javed, E-mail: mjiqauchem@yahoo.com [Surface and Solid State Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Ahmad, Zahoor [Surface and Solid State Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Meydan, Turgut; Melikhov, Yevgen [Wolfson Center for Magnetics, School of Engineering, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-15

    The temperature and composition dependence of magnetic properties of Co-Cr co-substituted magnesium ferrite, Mg{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}Cr{sub x}Fe{sub 2-x}O{sub 4} (x=0.0-0.5), prepared by novel polyethylene glycol assisted microemulsion method, are studied. The synthesized materials are characterized by the Moessbauer spectrometer and standard magnetic measurements. Major hysteresis loops are measured up to the magnetic field of 50 kOe at 300, 200 and 100 K. The high field regimes of these loops are modeled using the Law of Approach to saturation to determine the first-order cubic anisotropy coefficient and saturation magnetization. Both the saturation magnetization and the anisotropy coefficient are observed to increase with the decrease in temperature for all Co-Cr co-substitution levels. Also, both the saturation magnetization and the anisotropy coefficient achieved maximum value at x=0.3 and x=0.2, respectively. Explanation of the observed behavior is proposed in terms of the site occupancy of the co-substituent, Co{sup 2+} and Cr{sup 3+} in the cubic spinel lattice. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mg{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}Cr{sub x}Fe{sub 2-x}O{sub 4} are synthesized by novel PEG assisted microemulsion method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-Cr occupied octahedral site confirmed by the Moessbauer analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High field regime of M-H loops are modeled using the Law of Approach to saturation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The values of M{sub S}, M{sub r}, H{sub C} and K{sub 1} are found to increase with decreasing temperature.

  16. Vacuum brazing of high volume fraction SiC particles reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Dongfeng; Niu, Jitai; Gao, Zeng; Wang, Peng

    2015-03-01

    This experiment chooses A356 aluminum matrix composites containing 55% SiC particle reinforcing phase as the parent metal and Al-Si-Cu-Zn-Ni alloy metal as the filler metal. The brazing process is carried out in vacuum brazing furnace at the temperature of 550°C and 560°C for 3 min, respectively. The interfacial microstructures and fracture surfaces are investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy spectrum analysis (EDS). The result shows that adequacy of element diffusion are superior when brazing at 560°C, because of higher activity and liquidity. Dislocations and twins are observed at the interface between filler and composite due to the different expansion coefficient of the aluminum alloy matrix and SiC particles. The fracture analysis shows that the brittle fracture mainly located at interface of filler and composites.

  17. Oxidation behaviour of cast aluminium matrix composites with Ce surface coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, A.; Merino, M.C.; Arrabal, R.; Feliu, S.; Viejo, F.

    2007-01-01

    The oxidation behaviour of SiC-reinforced aluminium matrix composites (A3xx.x/SiCp) has been studied after Ce-based treatments. Kinetics data of oxidation process were obtained from gravimetric tests performed at different temperatures (350, 425 and 500 o C). The nature of the oxidation layer was analyzed by scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The extent of oxidation degradation in untreated composites was preferentially localized in matrix/SiCp interfaces favouring the MgO formation. Ce coatings favoured a uniform oxidation of the composite surface with MgAl 2 O 4 spinel formation. This oxide increased the surface hardness of the materials

  18. Dry Sliding Friction and Wear Studies of Fly Ash Reinforced AA-6351 Metal Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Uthayakumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fly ash particles are potentially used in metal matrix composites due to their low cost, low density, and availability in large quantities as waste by-products in thermal power plants. This study describes multifactor-based experiments that were applied to research and investigation on dry sliding wear system of stir-cast aluminum alloy 6351 with 5, 10, and 15 wt.% fly ash reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs. The effects of parameters such as load, sliding speed, and percentage of fly ash on the sliding wear, specific wear rate, and friction coefficient were analyzed using Grey relational analysis on a pin-on-disc machine. Analysis of variance (ANOVA was also employed to investigate which design parameters significantly affect the wear behavior of the composite. The results showed that the applied load exerted the greatest effect on the dry sliding wear followed by the sliding velocity.

  19. Characterization on C/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites with Novel Fiber Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petko, Jeanne; Kiser, J. Douglas; McCue, Terry; Verrilli, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) are attractive candidate materials in the aerospace industry due to their high specific strength, low density and higher temperature capabilities. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is pursuing the use of CMC components in advanced Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) propulsion applications. Carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) is the primary material of interest for a variety of RLV propulsion applications. These composites offer high- strength carbon fibers and a high modulus, oxidation-resistant matrix. For comparison, two types of carbon fibers were processed with novel types of interface coatings (multilayer and pseudoporous). For RLV propulsion applications, environmental durability will be critical. The coatings show promise of protecting the carbon fibers from the oxidizing environment. The strengths and microstructures of these composite materials are presented.

  20. Fabrication of BN/Al(-Mg) metal matrix composite (MMC) by pressureless infiltration technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, W.G.; Kwon, H. [School of Advanced Materials Eng., Kookmin Univ., Seoul (Korea)

    2004-07-01

    BN/Al(-Mg) metal matrix composite (MMC) was fabricated by the pressureless infiltration technique. The phase characterizations of the composites were analyzed using the SEM, TEM, EDS and EPMA on reaction products after the electrochemical dissolution of the matrix. It is confirmed that aluminum nitride (AlN) was formed by the reaction of Mg{sub 3}N{sub 2} and Al alloy melt. Plate type AlN and polyhedral type Mg(-Al) boride were formed by the reaction between Mg{sub 3}N{sub 2}, BN and molten Al in the composite. The reaction mechanism in the fabrication of BN/Al(-Mg) MMC was derived from the phase analysis results and the thermodynamic investigation. (orig.)

  1. Composite Coatings with Ceramic Matrix Including Nanomaterials as Solid Lubricants for Oil-Less Automotive Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Posmyk A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the theoretical basis of manufacturing and chosen applications of composite coatings with ceramic matrix containing nanomaterials as a solid lubricant (AHC+NL. From a theoretical point of view, in order to reduce the friction coefficient of sliding contacts, two materials are required, i.e. one with a high hardness and the other with low shear strength. In case of composite coatings AHC+NL the matrix is a very hard and wear resistant anodic oxide coating (AHC whereas the solid lubricant used is the nanomaterial (NL featuring a low shear strength such as glassy carbon nanotubes (GC. Friction coefficient of cast iron GJL-350 sliding against the coating itself is much higher (0.18-0.22 than when it slides against a composite coating (0.08-0.14. It is possible to reduce the friction due to the presence of carbon nanotubes, or metal nanowires.

  2. Insights on synergy of materials and structures in biomimetic platelet-matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhavand, Navid; Shahsavari, Rouzbeh

    2018-01-01

    Hybrid materials such as biomimetic platelet-matrix composites are in high demand to confer low weight and multifunctional mechanical properties. This letter reports interfacial-bond regulated assembly of polymers on cement-an archetype model with significant infrastructure applications. We demonstrate a series of 20+ molecular dynamics studies on decoding and optimizing the complex interfacial interactions including the role and types of various heterogeneous, competing interfacial bonds that are key to adhesion and interfacial strength. Our results show an existence of an optimum overlap length scale (˜15 nm) between polymers and cement crystals, exhibiting the best balance of strength, toughness, stiffness, and ductility for the composite. This finding, combined with the fundamental insights into the nature of interfacial bonds, provides key hypotheses for selection and processing of constituents to deliberate the best synergy in the structure and materials of platelet-matrix composites.

  3. Preparation of Ti-aluminide reinforced in situ aluminium matrix composites by reactive hot pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, D.; Ghosh, S.; Basumallick, A.; Basu, B.

    2007-01-01

    Aluminium based metal matrix composites reinforced with in situ Ti-aluminide and alumina particles were prepared by reactive hot pressing a powder mix of aluminium and nanosized TiO 2 powders. The reinforcements were formed in situ by exothermal reaction between the TiO 2 nano crystalline powder and aluminium. The thermal characteristics of the in situ reaction were studied with the aid of Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques were employed to study the microstructural architecture of the composites as a function of hot pressing temperature and volume percent reinforcement. Microhardness measurements on the as prepared in situ aluminium matrix composites exhibit significant increase in hardness with increase in hot pressing temperature and volume fraction of reinforcement

  4. Evaluation of mechanical properties of aluminium alloy–alumina–boron carbide metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijaya Ramnath, B.; Elanchezhian, C.; Jaivignesh, M.; Rajesh, S.; Parswajinan, C.; Siddique Ahmed Ghias, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Fabrication of MMC with aluminium alloy–alumina–boron carbide is done. • Different proportions of reinforcements are added. • The effects of varying proportions are studied. • Investigation on mechanical properties above composites is performed. • Failure morphology analysis is done using SEM. - Abstract: This paper deals with the fabrication and mechanical investigation of aluminium alloy, alumina (Al 2 O 3 ) and boron carbide metal matrix composites. Aluminium is the matrix metal having properties like light weight, high strength and ease of machinability. Alumina which has better wear resistance, high strength, hardness and boron carbide which has excellent hardness and fracture toughness are added as reinforcements. Here, the fabrication is done by stir casting which involves mixing the required quantities of additives into stirred molten aluminium. After solidification, the samples are prepared and tested to find the various mechanical properties like tensile, flexural, impact and hardness. The internal structure of the composite is observed using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM)

  5. Overall mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced metal matrix composites for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, J.H.; Bolt, H.

    2002-01-01

    The high-temperature strength and creep properties are among the crucial criteria for the structural materials of plasma facing components (PFC) of fusion reactors, as they will be subjected to severe thermal stresses. The fiber-reinforced metal matrix composites are a potential heat sink material for the PFC application, since the combination of different material properties can lead to versatile performances. In this article, the overall mechanical properties of two model composites based on theoretical predictions are presented. The matrix materials considered were a precipitation hardened CuCrZr alloy and reduced activation martensitic steel 'Eurofer'. Continuous SiC fibers were used for the reinforcement. The results demonstrate that yield stress, ultimate tensile strength, work hardening rate and creep resistance could be extensively improved by the fiber reinforcement up to fiber content of 40 vol.%. The influence of the residual stresses on the plastic behavior of the composites is also discussed

  6. EVALUATION OF EFFECTIVE PROPERTIES OF BASALT TEXTILE REINFORCED CERAMIC MATRIX COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soňa Valentová

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is concerned with the analysis of a ceramic matrix composite, more specifically the plain weave textile fabric composite made of basalt fibers embedded into the pyrolyzed polysiloxane matrix. Attention is paid to the determination of effective elastic properties of the yarn via homogenization based on the Mori-Tanaka averaging scheme and the 1st order numerical homogenization method adopting a suitable representative computational model. The latter approach is then employed to simulate the response of the yarn when loaded beyond the elastic limits. The required mechanical properties of individual material phases are directly measured using nanoindentation with in-build scanning probe microscopy. Applicability of the proposed computational methodology is supported by the analysis of a unidirectional fibrous composite, representing the yarn, subjected to a macroscopically uniform strain.

  7. Enhancement of interfacial properties of basalt fiber reinforced nylon 6 matrix composites with silane coupling agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work solution surface treatment was applied for producing basalt fiber reinforced PA6 matrix composites. Beyond scanning electron microscopy, static and dynamic mechanical tests, dynamic mechanical analysis of composites was used for qualifying the interfacial adhesion in a wide temperature range. The loss factor peak height of loss factor is particularly important, because it is in close relationship with the mobility of polymer molecular chain segments and side groups, hence it correlates with the number and strength of primary or secondary bondings established between the matrix and the basalt fibers. It was proven, that the interfacial adhesion between basalt fibers and polyamide can be largely improved by the application of silane coupling agents in the entire usage temperature range of composites. The presence of coupling agents on the surface of basalt fibers was proven by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The best results were obtained by 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane coupling agent.

  8. Microstructure and hardness of WC-Co particle reinforced iron matrix surface composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Peng

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a high Cr cast iron surface composite material reinforced with WC-Co particles 2-6 mm in size was prepared using a pressureless sand mold infiltration casting technique. The composition, microstructure and hardness were determined by means of energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA, scanning electron microscope (SEM and Rockwell hardness measurements. It is determined that the obtained composite layer is about 15 mm thick with a WC-Co particle volumetric fraction of ~38%. During solidification, interface reaction takes place between WC-Co particles and high chromium cast iron. Melting and dissolving of prefabricated particles are also found, suggesting that local Co melting and diffusion play an important role in promoting interface metallurgical bonding. The composite layer is composed of ferrite and a series of carbides, such as (Cr, W, Fe23C6, WC, W2C, M6C and M12C. The inhomogeneous hardness in the obtained composite material shows a gradient decrease from the particle reinforced metal matrix composite layer to the matrix layer. The maximum hardness of 86.3 HRA (69.5 HRC is obtained on the particle reinforced surface, strongly indicating that the composite can be used as wear resistant material.

  9. Characterization of Ni–P–SiO{sub 2} nano-composite coating on magnesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadreddini, S., E-mail: sina.sadreddini1986@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salehi, Z. [Department of Chemical Science and Technology, Tor Vergata University, Rome (Italy); Rassaie, H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The enhancement of SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles in the bath up to 12.5 g/l, increased the amount of coating particles to 4.62 wt%. • Better corrosion resistance and lower porosity could be obtained by expansion prevention of corrosion cavity with deposition of nanoparticles in the coating. • Microhardness increases with increasing the SiO{sub 2} particles concentration. - Abstract: In this study, the effects of SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles added to the electroless Ni–P coating were studied. The surface morphology, corrosion behavior, hardness and porosity of Ni–P–SiO{sub 2}composite were investigated. The related microstructure was investigated through field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and the amount of SiO{sub 2} was examined by Energy Dispersive Analysis of X-ray (EDX). The corrosion behavior was evaluated through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and polarization techniques. The results illustrated that with increasing the quantity of the SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, the corrosion rate decreased and the hardness increased.

  10. Characterization of Ni–P–SiO2 nano-composite coating on magnesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadreddini, S.; Salehi, Z.; Rassaie, H.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The enhancement of SiO 2 nanoparticles in the bath up to 12.5 g/l, increased the amount of coating particles to 4.62 wt%. • Better corrosion resistance and lower porosity could be obtained by expansion prevention of corrosion cavity with deposition of nanoparticles in the coating. • Microhardness increases with increasing the SiO 2 particles concentration. - Abstract: In this study, the effects of SiO 2 nanoparticles added to the electroless Ni–P coating were studied. The surface morphology, corrosion behavior, hardness and porosity of Ni–P–SiO 2 composite were investigated. The related microstructure was investigated through field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and the amount of SiO 2 was examined by Energy Dispersive Analysis of X-ray (EDX). The corrosion behavior was evaluated through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and polarization techniques. The results illustrated that with increasing the quantity of the SiO 2 nanoparticles, the corrosion rate decreased and the hardness increased

  11. Composites Based on Polytetrafluoroethylene and Detonation Nanodiamonds: Filler-Matrix Chemical Interaction and Its Effect on a Composite's Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshcheev, A. P.; Perov, A. A.; Gorokhov, P. V.; Zaripov, N. V.; Tereshenkov, A. V.; Khatipov, S. A.

    2018-06-01

    Specific properties of PTFE composites filled with ultradisperse detonation diamonds (UDDs) with different surface chemistries are studied. It is found for the first time that filler in the form of UDDs affects not only the rate of PTFE thermal decomposition in vacuum pyrolysis, but also the chemical composition of the products of degradation. The wear resistance of UDD/PTFE composites is shown to depend strongly on the UDD surface chemistry. The presence of UDDs in a PTFE composite is found to result in perfluorocarbon telomeres, released as a readily condensable fraction upon composite pyrolysis. The chemical interaction between PTFE and UDDs, characterized by an increase in the rate of gas evolution and a change in the desorbed gas's composition, is found to occur at temperature as low as 380°C. It is shown that the intensity of this interaction depends on the concentration of oxygen-containing surface groups, the efficiency of UDDs in terms of the composite's wear resistance being reduced due to the presence of these groups. Based on the experimental data, a conclusion is reached about the chemical interaction between UDDs and a PTFE matrix, its dependence on the nanodiamond surface chemistry, and its effect on a composite's tribology.

  12. A study of microstructure and wear behaviour of TiB2/Al metal matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sreenivasan

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the study of microstructure and wear characteristics of TiB2 reinforced aluminium metal matrix composites (MMCs. Matrix alloys with 5, 10 and 15% of TiB2 were made using stir casting technique. Effect of sliding velocity on the wear behaviour and tribo-chemistry of the worn surfaces of both matrix and composites sliding against a EN24 steel disc has been investigated under dry conditions. A pin-on-disc wear testing machine was used to find the wear rate, in which EN24 steel disc was used as the counter face, loads of 10-60N in steps of 10N and speeds of 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 rpm were employed. The results showed that the wear rate was increased with an increase in load and sliding speed for both the materials. However, a lower wear rate was obtained for MMCs when compared to the matrix alloys. The wear transition from slight to severe was presented at the critical applied loads. The transition loads for the MMCs were much higher than that of the matrix alloy. The transition loads were increased with increase in TiB2 and the same was decreased with the increase of sliding speeds. The SEM and EDS analyses were undertaken to demonstrate the effect of TiB2 particles on the wear mechanism for each conditions.

  13. Flight-vehicle materials, structures, and dynamics - Assessment and future directions. Vol. 3 - Ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Stanley R. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The present volume discusses ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites in prospective aerospace systems, monolithic ceramics, transformation-toughened and whisker-reinforced ceramic composites, glass-ceramic matrix composites, reaction-bonded Si3N4 and SiC composites, and chemical vapor-infiltrated composites. Also discussed are the sol-gel-processing of ceramic composites, the fabrication and properties of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites with directed metal oxidation, the fracture behavior of ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs), the fatigue of fiber-reinforced CMCs, creep and rupture of CMCs, structural design methodologies for ceramic-based materials systems, the joining of ceramics and CMCs, and carbon-carbon composites.

  14. Improvement of thermal conductivity of ceramic matrix composites for 4. generation nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrero, J.

    2009-11-01

    This study deals with thermal conductivity improvement of SiCf/SiC ceramic matrix composites materials to be used as cladding material in 4. generation nuclear reactor. The purpose of the study is to develop a composite for which both the temperature and irradiation effect is less pronounced on thermal conductivity of material than for SiC. This material will be used as matrix in CMC with SiC fibers. Some TiC-SiC composites with different SiC volume contents were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The sintering process enables to fabricate specimens very fast, with a very fine microstructure and without any sintering aids. Neutron irradiation has been simulated using heavy ions, at room temperature and at 500 C. Evolution of the thermal properties of irradiated materials is measured using modulated photothermal IR radiometry experiment and was related to structural evolution as function of dose and temperature. It appears that such approach is reliable to evaluate TiC potentiality as matrix in CMC. Finally, CMC with TiC matrix and SiC fibers were fabricated and both mechanical and thermal properties were measured and compare to SiCf/SiC CMC. (author)

  15. Mapping the coupled role of structure and materials in mechanics of platelet-matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzanian, Shafee; Shahsavari, Rouzbeh

    2018-03-01

    Despite significant progresses on understanding and mimicking the delicate nano/microstructure of biomaterials such as nacre, decoding the indistinguishable merger of materials and structures in controlling the tradeoff in mechanical properties has been long an engineering pursuit. Herein, we focus on an archetype platelet-matrix composite and perform ∼400 nonlinear finite element simulations to decode the complex interplay between various structural features and material characteristics in conferring the balance of mechanical properties. We study various combinatorial models expressed by four key dimensionless parameters, i.e. characteristic platelet length, matrix plasticity, platelet dissimilarity, and overlap offset, whose effects are all condensed in a new unifying parameter, defined as the multiplication of strength, toughness, and stiffness over composite volume. This parameter, which maximizes at a critical characteristic length, controls the transition from intrinsic toughening (matrix plasticity driven without crack growths) to extrinsic toughening phenomena involving progressive crack propagations. This finding, combined with various abstract volumetric and radar plots, will not only shed light on decoupling the complex role of structure and materials on mechanical performance and their trends, but provides important guidelines for designing lightweight staggered platelet-matrix composites while ensuring the best (balance) of their mechanical properties.

  16. Matrix intensification alters avian functional group composition in adjacent rainforest fragments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justus P Deikumah

    Full Text Available Conversion of farmland land-use matrices to surface mining is an increasing threat to the habitat quality of forest remnants and their constituent biota, with consequences for ecosystem functionality. We evaluated the effects of matrix type on bird community composition and the abundance and evenness within avian functional groups in south-west Ghana. We hypothesized that surface mining near remnants may result in a shift in functional composition of avifaunal communities, potentially disrupting ecological processes within tropical forest ecosystems. Matrix intensification and proximity to the remnant edge strongly influenced the abundance of members of several functional guilds. Obligate frugivores, strict terrestrial insectivores, lower and upper strata birds, and insect gleaners were most negatively affected by adjacent mining matrices, suggesting certain ecosystem processes such as seed dispersal may be disrupted by landscape change in this region. Evenness of these functional guilds was also lower in remnants adjacent to surface mining, regardless of the distance from remnant edge, with the exception of strict terrestrial insectivores. These shifts suggest matrix intensification can influence avian functional group composition and related ecosystem-level processes in adjacent forest remnants. The management of matrix habitat quality near and within mine concessions is important for improving efforts to preserveavian biodiversity in landscapes undergoing intensification such as through increased surface mining.

  17. Feasibility study on development of metal matrix composite by microwave stir casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingappa, S. M.; Srinath, M. S.; Amarendra, H. J.

    2018-04-01

    Need for better service oriented materials has boosted the demand for metal matrix composite materials, which can be developed to have necessary properties. One of the most widely utilized metal matrix composite is Al-SiC, which is having a matrix made of aluminium metal and SiC as reinforcement. Lightweight and conductivity of aluminium, when combined with hardness and wear resistance of SiC provides an excellent platform for various applications in the field of electronics, automotives, and aerospace and so on. However, uniform distribution of reinforcement particles is an issue and has to be addressed. The present study is an attempt made to develop Al-SiC metal matrix composite by melting base metal using microwave hybrid heating technique, followed by addition of reinforcement and stirring the mixture for obtaining homogenous mixture. X-Ray Diffraction analysis shows the presence of aluminium and SiC in the cast material. Further, microstructural study shows the distribution of SiC particles in the grain boundaries.

  18. An investigation of flow properties of metal matrix composites suspensions for injection molding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, F.; Bevis, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Flow properties of metal matrix composites suspensions have significant effects on the fibre orientation during mould filling. The results presented in this paper relate to the flow properties of aluminium powder and glass fibres compounded into a sacrificial thermoplastics binder. For this purpose, a range of aluminium compounds and aluminium composite suspensions were investigated over a wide shear rate range expected to occur during injection mould process. Aluminium composites wee prepared by substituting glass fibres for aluminium in aluminium compound. Aluminium composite containing a maximum critical volume fraction of fibres which did not exhibit an increase n viscosity was determined. The effect of temperature on the flow behaviour of aluminium composite was also investigated. (author)

  19. MOFwich: Sandwiched Metal-Organic Framework-Containing Mixed Matrix Composites for Chemical Warfare Agent Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Gregory W; Lu, Annie X; Hall, Morgan G; Browe, Matthew A; Tovar, Trenton; Epps, Thomas H

    2018-02-28

    This work describes a new strategy for fabricating mixed matrix composites containing layered metal-organic framework (MOF)/polymer films as functional barriers for chemical warfare agent protection. Through the use of mechanically robust polymers as the top and bottom encasing layers, a high-MOF-loading, high-performance-core layer can be sandwiched within. We term this multifunctional composite "MOFwich". We found that the use of elastomeric encasing layers enabled core layer reformation after breakage, an important feature for composites and membranes alike. The incorporation of MOFs into the core layer led to enhanced removal of chemical warfare agents while simultaneously promoting moisture vapor transport through the composite, showcasing the promise of these composites for protection applications.

  20. High performance corrosion and wear resistant composite titanium nitride layers produced on the AZ91D magnesium alloy by a hybrid method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Tacikowski

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Composite, diffusive titanium nitride layers formed on a titanium and aluminum sub-layer were produced on the AZ91D magnesium alloy. The layers were obtained using a hybrid method which combined the PVD processes with the final sealing by a hydrothermal treatment. The microstructure, resistance to corrosion, mechanical damage, and frictional wear of the layers were examined. The properties of the AZ91D alloy covered with these layers were compared with those of the untreated alloy and of some engineering materials such as 316L stainless steel, 100Cr6 bearing steel, and the AZ91D alloy subjected to commercial anodizing. It has been found that the composite diffusive nitride layer produced on the AZ91D alloy and then sealed by the hydrothermal treatment ensures the corrosion resistance comparable with that of 316L stainless steel. The layers are characterized by higher electrochemical durability which is due to the surface being overbuilt with the titanium oxides formed, as shown by the XPS examinations, from titanium nitride during the hydrothermal treatment. The composite titanium nitride layers exhibit high resistance to mechanical damage and wear, including frictional wear which is comparable with that of 100Cr6 bearing steel. The performance properties of the AZ91D magnesium alloy covered with the composite titanium nitride coating are substantially superior to those of the alloy subjected to commercial anodizing which is the dominant technique employed in industrial practice.