WorldWideScience

Sample records for maculata coleoptera coccinellidae

  1. Molecular analysis reveals two new dimorphic species of Hesperomyces (Ascomycota, Laboulbeniomycetes) parasitic on the ladybird Coleomegilla maculata (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, Lauren; Weir, Alex; Rossi, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Four morphotypes of Hesperomyces (Ascomycota, Laboulbeniomycetes) were found on the ladybird Coleomegilla maculata (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) from Costa Rica and Ecuador. Partial SSU and ITS rDNA sequence analysis revealed that these belong to two phylogenetic species, each with a pair of morphotypes displaying position specificity. Confirmation of dimorphism in Laboulbeniales highlights the need for a thorough systematic revision of species concepts within the order. The theory of 'position specificity' also needs to be revisited. Copyright © 2013 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Selection of reference genes for RT-qPCR analysis in a predatory biological control agent, Coleomegilla maculata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunxiao; Pan, Huipeng; Noland, Jeffrey Edward; Zhang, Deyong; Zhang, Zhanhong; Liu, Yong; Zhou, Xuguo

    2015-12-10

    Reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is a reliable technique for quantifying gene expression across various biological processes, of which requires a set of suited reference genes to normalize the expression data. Coleomegilla maculata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), is one of the most extensively used biological control agents in the field to manage arthropod pest species. In this study, expression profiles of 16 housekeeping genes selected from C. maculata were cloned and investigated. The performance of these candidates as endogenous controls under specific experimental conditions was evaluated by dedicated algorithms, including geNorm, Normfinder, BestKeeper, and ΔCt method. In addition, RefFinder, a comprehensive platform integrating all the above-mentioned algorithms, ranked the overall stability of these candidate genes. As a result, various sets of suitable reference genes were recommended specifically for experiments involving different tissues, developmental stages, sex, and C. maculate larvae treated with dietary double stranded RNA. This study represents the critical first step to establish a standardized RT-qPCR protocol for the functional genomics research in a ladybeetle C. maculate. Furthermore, it lays the foundation for conducting ecological risk assessment of RNAi-based gene silencing biotechnologies on non-target organisms; in this case, a key predatory biological control agent.

  3. No nutritional benefits of egg cannibalism for Coleomegilla maculata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) on a high-quality diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelwahab, A H; Michaud, J P; Bayoumy, M H; Awadalla, S S; El-Gendy, M

    2017-09-11

    Egg cannibalism serves various functions in the Coccinellidae. Here we examined the fitness consequences of egg cannibalism by neonates, fourth instar larvae, and prereproductive adults of Coleomegilla maculata DeGeer, with beetles fed a diet of Ephestia kuehniella Zeller eggs. Cannibalism of two eggs by neonates had no effect on development, and cannibalism of five eggs by fourth instars did not benefit any aspect of reproduction, but delayed pupation slightly. Cannibalism of eggs by pre-reproductive adults had no effect on reproductive success in any combination of reciprocal crosses of cannibals and non-cannibals. Females did not recognize, nor avoid consuming, their own clutches, and cannibalism propensity did not change following mating and onset of oviposition in either sex. These results contrast with those for more strictly aphidophagous species in which larvae gain developmental benefits, and females may recognize and avoid filial egg clusters while using cannibalism to interfere with conspecific females, whereas males reduce egg cannibalism after mating because they cannot recognize filial clusters. Egg cannibalism may confer developmental benefits to C. maculata when diet is suboptimal, as previously shown, but no such benefits were evident on the high-quality E. kuehniella egg diet. Female C. maculata do not require aphids to reproduce and distribute their eggs broadly in the environment, given that larvae can develop on pollen and non-aphid prey. Thus, C. maculata is not subject to the intraspecific competition that selects for cannibalism in more aphidophagous species, and also lacks many secondary adaptations associated with the behaviour.

  4. Temperature-Dependent Biological and Demographic Parameters of Coleomegilla maculata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Ramos, Juan A; Rojas, M Guadalupe

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of the most suitable environmental conditions for an organism growth and development is a prerequisite for developing mass rearing technology. The temperature requirements for development and the optimal range of temperatures for growth and reproduction of Coleomegilla maculata De Geer were studied. The development time of individual C. maculata larvae was determined at 18, 21, 24, 27, 30, 33, and 36 °C. Development times were converted to development rates and fitted to a nonlinear temperature-dependent model and to the linear day-degree model. Life and fertility table analysis was used to determine the optimal temperature for population growth within a range of favorable temperatures including 24, 25, 26, 27, and 28 °C. Nonlinear estimates of thermal maximum (TM) for the postembryonic development of C. maculata was 35.09 ± 10.35 °C. Estimation of TM based on pupal development was much lower at 27.23 ± 1.52 °C. Linear and nonlinear estimates of low temperature development threshold were 13.13 ± and 4.77 ± 3.03 °C for the whole postembryonic development and 10.95 and 9.18 ± 1.36 °C for the pupal stage alone, respectively. The most favorable temperature for population growth was 25 °C, where C. maculata showed significantly higher intrinsic rate of increase (rm = 0.066) and significantly lower doubling time (10.57 d) than the other favorable temperatures tested. A negative value of rm was obtained at 28 °C, indicating population decline occurring at this temperature making it unfavorable for C. maculata. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  5. Use of Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) powder to enhance artificial diet formulations for Coleomegilla maculata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The predatory lady beetle Coleomegilla maculata has potential to control several arthropod pests on crop plants in greenhouses and high tunnels. However, an effective artificial diet is needed in order to mass produce C. maculata in sufficient quantities for augmentative releases. The objectives of ...

  6. Delphastus catalinae and Coleomegilla maculata lengi (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) as biological control agents of the greenhouse whitefly, trialeurodes vaporariorum (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Eric; Labrecque, Claude; Coderre, Daniel

    2004-11-01

    Predation efficacy and compatibility of the predatory lady beetles Coleomegilla maculata lengi Timberlake and Delphastus catalinae (Horn) against the greenhouse whitefly, Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood) were studied in laboratory on glabrous fuchsia (Fuchsia hybrida Voss cv Lena Corolla) and pubescent poinsettia plants (Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd ex Klotzch cv Dark Red Annette Hegg). On glabrous plants (fuchsia), fourth-instar and adults of C maculata were the most efficient, both against whitefly eggs and pupae. On pubescent plants (poinsettia), the larger stages of C maculata were negatively affected and less efficient than adults of D catalinae. The presence of plant structure did not affect the voracity of either predator species. Finally, the simultaneous use of both predator species generated inter-specific competition. These results provide recommendations for biological control of whitefly in horticultural greenhouses.

  7. Effect of prior diet on consumption and digestion of prey and non-prey food by adults of the generalist predator Coleomegilla maculata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleomegilla maculata adults fed on prey (Colorado potato beetle eggs) or non-prey (corn pollen) food following 7 days of feeding on a mixed diet, showed differences in ingestion, with females consuming greater quantities of pollen, and males consuming greater quantities of eggs, under no-choice con...

  8. Breve Estudio Biológico del Predator Coleomejilla Maculata de Geer (Coleoptera -Coccinellidae en el Valle de Medellín

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bravo V. Gilberto

    1958-09-01

    Full Text Available El insecto tiene los siguientes nombres comunes: "Petaquita", "Grajito". En México lo denominan "Catarinita" y en EE. UU. "Lady Birds"; "Lady-Buys" (Vaquita de Dios. El Coleomegilla maculata de Geer, tiene las siguientes sinonimias: Megilla maculata, coleomegilla fuscilabris, Ceratomegilla fuscilabris, Megilla fuscilabris, Ceratomegilla maculata (Szumkowski 1955 y Ceratomegilla floridiana Leng. (Humbbell 1932. En cuanto a su distribución mundial podemos afirmar que existe el insecto en todo el Continente Americano. En Colombia existe en las zonas de clima cálido y medio. Su ciclo biológico está determinado por condiciones ambientales, así: período de preoviposición comprendido entre 8 a 25 días. Las hembras depositan los huevos sobre plantas de maíz y fríjol y sobre las siguientes malezas: "Coquito" (Cyperus sp., verdolaga (Portulaca oleracea, acedera (Oxalis sp. y otras. El período de incubación demora de 3 a 6 días. La larva es de tipo campodeiforme y tiene una duración que varía entre 10 a 22 días, tiempo en el cual hemos observado hasta 4 instars. El período de encrisalidación puede establecerse entre 3 a 12 días. Los adultos pueden vivir hasta 100 días (Szumkowski 1955. Se ha constatado que las hembras depositan su pos-tura en masas de 4 a 36 huevos, los cuales se consideran con un 100 %, de fertilidad. Las larvas son parasitadas por un pequeño Himenóptero, posiblemente se trate de un Chalcido. Los adultos son parasitados por un braconido al parecer se trata de un Habrobracon. Tanto las larvas como los adultos tienen hábitos canibalescos. La acción predatora del Coleomegilla maculata no está limitada solamente a insectos pequeños de cuerpo blando de la orden Homóptera, sino que su acción destructiva puede ser también sobre muchas especies de lepidópteros perjudiciales (huevos y larvas pequeñas, tales como: Laphygma frugiperda, Agrotis, Diatrea lineolata, Prodenia lati-jascia, Feltias, Alabama

  9. Incorporating a Sorghum Habitat for Enhancing Lady Beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae in Cotton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. G. Tillman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae prey on insect pests in cotton. The objective of this 2 yr on-farm study was to document the impact of a grain sorghum trap crop on the density of Coccinellidae on nearby cotton. Scymnus spp., Coccinella septempunctata (L., Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas, Coleomegilla maculata (De Geer, Cycloneda munda (Say, and Olla v-nigrum (Mulsant were found in sorghum over both years. Lady beetle compositions in sorghum and cotton and in yellow pyramidal traps were similar. For both years, density of lady beetles generally was higher on cotton with sorghum than on control cotton. Our results indicate that sorghum was a source of lady beetles in cotton, and thus incorporation of a sorghum habitat in farmscapes with cotton has great potential to enhance biocontrol of insect pests in cotton.

  10. Occurrence and biology of Dinocampus coccinellae (Schrank, 1802) (Hymenoptera; Braconidae: Euphorinae) parasitising different species of Coccinellidae (Coleoptera) in Neotropical region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, R B; Cruz, I; Figueiredo, M L C; Pereira, A G; Penteado-Dias, A M

    2012-02-01

    Surveys on Coccinellidae (Coleoptera) in Sete Lagoas city, Minas Gerais state, Brazil, indicated the parasitism of adults of the species Coleomegilla maculata De Geer, 1775, Eriopis connexa (Germar, 1824) and Olla v-nigrum (Mulsant, 1866), by Dinocampus coccinellae (Schrank, 1802) (Hymenoptera; Braconidae: Euphorinae). Since then, the parasitoid have been maintained in its original hosts at the Insect Rearing Laboratory - LACRI of the Brazilian Agricultural Research Institution - Embrapa Milho e Sorgo. Besides the citation of occurrence in Brazil, this work also indicates the parasitoid preference for C. maculata (70% of parasitism), followed by O. v-nigrum (43.3% of parasitism) and E. connexa (36.7% of parasitism). Total life cycle of D. coccinellae was longer on C. maculata (32.4 ± 0.48 days), compared to O. v-nigrum (29.5 ± 0.49 days) and E. connexa (27.8 ± 0.4 days). Due to the relatively high percentage of field parasitism, D. coccinellae can reduce the efficiency of biological pest control by Coccinellidae predators especially in the case of C. maculata.

  11. Occurrence and biology of Dinocampus coccinellae (Schrank, 1802 (Hymenoptera; Braconidae: Euphorinae parasitising different species of Coccinellidae (Coleoptera in Neotropical region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RB Silva

    Full Text Available Surveys on Coccinellidae (Coleoptera in Sete Lagoas city, Minas Gerais state, Brazil, indicated the parasitism of adults of the species Coleomegilla maculata De Geer, 1775, Eriopis connexa (Germar, 1824 and Olla v-nigrum (Mulsant, 1866, by Dinocampus coccinellae (Schrank, 1802 (Hymenoptera; Braconidae: Euphorinae. Since then, the parasitoid have been maintained in its original hosts at the Insect Rearing Laboratory - LACRI of the Brazilian Agricultural Research Institution - Embrapa Milho e Sorgo. Besides the citation of occurrence in Brazil, this work also indicates the parasitoid preference for C. maculata (70% of parasitism, followed by O. v-nigrum (43.3% of parasitism and E. connexa (36.7% of parasitism. Total life cycle of D. coccinellae was longer on C. maculata (32.4 ± 0.48 days, compared to O. v-nigrum (29.5 ± 0.49 days and E. connexa (27.8 ± 0.4 days. Due to the relatively high percentage of field parasitism, D. coccinellae can reduce the efficiency of biological pest control by Coccinellidae predators especially in the case of C. maculata.

  12. Effect of selected insecticides on the natural enemies Coleomegilla maculata and Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), Geocoris punctipes (Hemiptera: Lygaeidae), and Bracon mellitor, Cardiochiles nigriceps, and Cotesia marginiventris (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) in cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, P G; Mulrooney, J E

    2000-12-01

    We evaluated the toxicity of three insecticides (lambda cyhalothrin, spinosad, and S-1812) to the natural enemies Bracon mellitor Say, Cardiochiles nigriceps Viereck, Coleomegilla maculata De Geer, Cotesia marginiventris (Cresson), Geocoris punctipes (Say), and Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville, in topical, residual, and field assays. Lambda cyhalothrin exhibited the greatest toxicity to the natural enemies. In topical toxicity tests, lambda cyhalothrin adversely affected each natural enemy species studied. Residues of lambda cyhalothrin on cotton leaves were toxic to B. mellitor, C. nigriceps, C. maculata, and C. punctipes. Interestingly, residues of this insecticide were not very toxic to C. marginiventris and H. convergens. Geocoris punctipes and C. maculata numbers in the field generally were significantly lower for lambda cyhalothrin treatments than for the other four treatments, substantiating the previous tests. Although cotton aphids began to increase over all treatments around the middle of the test period, the number of cotton aphids in the lambda cyhalothrin plots was significantly higher than the number in any of the other treatments. As cotton aphids increased in lambda cyhalothrin field plots, the predator H. convergens also increased in number, indicating that lambda cyhalothrin did not adversely affect it in accordance with the residual tests. Spinosad exhibited marginal to excellent selectivity, but was highly toxic to each parasitoid species and G. punctipes in topical toxicity tests and to B. mellitor in residual tests. Spinosad generally did not affect the number of G. punctipes, H. convergens, and C. maculata in the field except for one day after the second application for G. punctipes. S-1812 exhibited good to excellent selectivity to the natural enemies. Some reduction of G. punctipes occurred for only a short period after the first and second application of this insecticide in the field. H. convergens and C. maculata were affected

  13. Two new species of Scymnini (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from Karnataka, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorani, J

    2015-01-01

    The Scymnini (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) of the Indian region is rich and highly speciose, with nearly 90 described species and scores of undescribed species (Poorani 2002). There is a dire need to systematically revise the genera and species of this tribe from the Indian region. Due to paucity of representative collections covering the entire region and lack of access to types, it is difficult to identify most of the Scymnini of the Indian region to species. As a result, many economically important species remain poorly characterized, or worse, unnamed. Two economically important and unique species of Scymnini (Coccinellidae) belonging to Horniolus Weise (1900) and Scymnus (Pullus) Mulsant (1846) from the Southern Indian state of Karnataka that have remained unnamed for long are treated in this paper. These species are externally similar to other known species and often misidentified. Horniolussororius sp. n. and Scymnus (Pullus) rajeshwariae sp. n. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) are described here and illustrated with notes on their biology and related species.

  14. Diet based fitness variability of Coccinella novemnotata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccinella novemnotata (Herbst) is a species of North American native lady beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) that has come under great ecological duress over the past 30 years and is experiencing a significant decline throughout its native range. This species once was widely distributed across mos...

  15. Review of the tribe Hyperaspidini Mulsant (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biranvand, Amir; Tomaszewska, Wioletta; Nedvěd, Oldřich; Khormizi, Mehdi Zare; Nicolas, Vincent; Canepari, Claudio; Shakarami, Jahanshir; Fekrat, Lida; Fürsch, Helmut

    2017-02-22

    The Iranian species of the tribe Hyperaspidini Mulsant, 1846 (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) are reviewed. The current list includes 12 species, all placed in a single genus Hyperaspis Chevrolat, 1836. Hyperapsis asiatica Lewis, 1896 and H. pumila Mulsant, 1850 are excluded from the Iranian list of Coccinellidae. Diagnoses of the tribe Hyperaspidini and the genus Hyperaspis are given. Images of adult beetles and diagnostic characters of the male genitalia of all species distributed in Iran are shown. A key to identification of the species is presented. Distribution records are provided for each species along with information on host plants and prey species when available.

  16. ECOLOGICAL AND FAUNISTIC REVIEW OF COCCINELLIDAE (COLEOPTERA, COCCINELLIDAE IN THE REPUBLIC OF DAGESTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Mukhtarova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of the study is to conduct ecological and faunal studies of coccinellidae in Dagestan as well as to consider the chorologic, trophic and phenological aspects in connection with the peculiarities of the environment.Materials and methods. As the basis for the research we used the materials obtained by the authors from 1999 to 2016 in various parts of Dagestan. We also conducted expeditions, stationary and semi-stationary studies using traditional methods of entomological research.Results. Inventory of coccinellidae fauna in Dagestan allowed identifying 27 species from 18 genera. It also revealed multiple and rare species. We carried out an analysis on distribution of the species in the high altitude range; identified environmental groups by biotopic preferendum: xerophyllous, mesophyll meadow-steppe, mesophyll forest, and Hygrophila and polytopic species; according to trophic adaptation: Aphidophages, Coccidophages, Mycetophages, Entomophages and Phytophages; We held a zoogeographical analysis of coccinellidae of Dagestan and according to habitat type, 8 zoogeographic groups were identified; We conducted phenological observations of the study sites, stages and timing of winter and winter dormancy, the beginning of mating, egg-laying, the duration of certain stages, the number of generations and other features.Conclusion. This research represents the first comprehensive summary of ladybugs (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae of Dagestan and includes the findings of the composition study, ecological and zoogeographical aspects of coccinellidae fauna of the study area.

  17. Phylogeny of ladybirds (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae): are the subfamilies monophyletic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magro, A; Lecompte, E; Magné, F; Hemptinne, J-L; Crouau-Roy, B

    2010-03-01

    The Coccinellidae (ladybirds) is a highly speciose family of the Coleoptera. Ladybirds are well known because of their use as biocontrol agents, and are the subject of many ecological studies. However, little is known about phylogenetic relationships of the Coccinellidae, and a precise evolutionary framework is needed for the family. This paper provides the first phylogenetic reconstruction of the relationships within the Coccinellidae based on analysis of five genes: the 18S and 28S rRNA nuclear genes and the mitochondrial 12S, 16S rRNA and cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) genes. The phylogenetic relationships of 67 terminal taxa, representative of all the subfamilies of the Coccinellidae (61 species, 37 genera), and relevant outgroups, were reconstructed using multiple approaches, including Bayesian inference with partitioning strategies. The recovered phylogenies are congruent and show that the Coccinellinae is monophyletic but the Coccidulinae, Epilachninae, Scymninae and Chilocorinae are paraphyletic. The tribe Chilocorini is identified as the sister-group of the Coccinellinae for the first time. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Parasitylenchus sp. (Tylenchomorpha: Allantonematidae) parasitizing field populations of Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harding, Susanne; Poinar, George O. Jr.; Dimitrova, Desislava V.;

    2011-01-01

    Adults of the invasive harlequin ladybird, Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), were found to be parasitized by nematodes (Tylenchomorpha: Allantonematidae) in Denmark. The nematodes were identified as Parasitylenchus sp. Major morphological characters of the nematodes did not differ...

  19. An unusual new species of Micraspis Chevrolat (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from northeastern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorani, J

    2014-01-01

    Micraspispusillus sp. n. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is described and illustrated from the northeastern region of India. It is unusual in possessing very large eye canthus and is the smallest species of the genus known from India so far.

  20. A new species of Scymnobius Casey (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Scymnini from Pernambuco, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Adriano Giorgi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Scymnobius Casey (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Scymnini from Pernambuco, Brazil. Scymnobius pernambucensis sp. nov. from Pernambuco, Brazil, is described and illustrated. This is the third species of this genus recorded from Brazil.

  1. Revision of the genus Endochilus Weise (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Chilocorini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łączyński, Piotr; Tomaszewska, Wioletta

    2014-05-20

    The members of the endemic African genus Endochilus Weise, 1898 (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Chilocorini) are redescribed, diagnosed, and illustrated. Lectotypes are designated for Endochilus compater Weise, Endochilus minor Weise, Endochilus plagiatus Sicard, Endochilus rubicundus Weise, and Endochilus styx Sicard. One new species is described: Endochilus abdominalis sp nov. Notes on the genus and nomenclatural history for each species are provided. A key for identification of all species is presented. Adult characters concerning similarities of Endochilus to other genera of African Chilocorini are discussed. This is an open access paper. We use the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license that permits unrestricted use, provided that the paper is properly attributed.

  2. Potential utilization of Artemia franciscana eggs as food for Coleomegilla maculata

    Science.gov (United States)

    We tested the hypothesis that Artemia franciscana Kellogg (brine shrimp, Anostraca: Artemiidae) eggs are suitable factitious, i.e., alternative, food to support the life history of a predatory ladybird beetle, Coleomegilla maculata DeGeer (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). Using progeny from a stock colo...

  3. Effects of rearing density of survival, growth, and development of the ladybird Coleomegilla maculata in Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our research focuses on developing cost- and space-efficient techniques to rear ladybird beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). We evaluated the effects of rearing density on survival, growth and development of Coleomegilla maculata. The hypothesis that survival decreases as rearing density increases ...

  4. Locomotor activity of Phalerisida maculata Kulzer (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae on Chilean sandy beaches Actividad locomotora de Phalerisida maculata Kulzer (Coleoptera, enebrionidae en playas arenosas chilenas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDUARDO JARAMILLO

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available The locomotor activity of the beetle Phalerisida maculata Kulzer (Coleoptera Tenebrionidae was studied on the surface of the substrate in two sandy beaches of the Chilean coast: one in north central (ca. 29ºS and the other in south central Chile (ca.39ºS. During the summer period of 1991 the circadian locomotor activity was studied in the southern beach, while during that of 1997 in both beaches. To analyze the activity, pitfall traps were used which were ordered along two transects extended between the upper beach and the resurgence zone. The traps were checked (i.e. collection of captured insects every two hours for a total period of 26 hours. The results showed that the adults of P. maculata were mostly active during the night hours, whereas the larvae were active during both, the day and night. Studies carried out in the beach located in south central Chile show that differences in the tidal range (neap vs. spring tides do not affect the activity patterns. During the locomotor activity, adult and larvae move to lower intertidal levels than those usually occupied while buried. Results of laboratory experiments using actographs under conditions of darkness and constant temperature, suggest that adults and larvae of P. maculata presented a circadian rhythm similar to that observed in the field experiments. It is concluded that P. maculata presents a behaviour that appear to be under control of an endogenous rhythm, without showing differences in the circadian rhythm of activity when beaches located at different latitudes are comparedSe estudió la actividad locomotriz del escarabajo Phalerisida maculata Kulzer (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae sobre la superficie del sustrato de dos playas arenosas de la costa de Chile: una en el centro norte (ca. 29ºS y otra en el centro sur (ca. 39ºS. Durante el período estival de 1991 se estudió la actividad locomotriz circadiana en la playa del centro sur y durante el de 1997 en ambas playas. Para analizar

  5. Detection of reproducing populations of Coccinella novemnotata within coccinellid assemblages (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in western South Dakota and western Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adults of three native species of lady beetles [Coccinella novemnotata Herbst, Coccinella transversoguttata richardsoni Brown, and Adalia bipunctata (L.); Coleoptera: Coccinellidae] of conservation interest were detected during recent surveys at several locations in western South Dakota and western ...

  6. Tylenchids nematodes (Tylenchida parasitizing field population of Harmonia axyridis, and Cycloneda sanguinea (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora B. Camino

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available For the first time in Argentina, we report that in Harmonia axyridis Pallas, 1773, and Cycloneda sanguinea (Linnaeus, 1763 (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae parasitizing by nematodes which belong to the family of Allantonematidae (Nematoda, Tylenchida. The genera are Metaparasitylenchus Wachek, 1955 (Nickle, 1967, Sulphuretylenchus Rühm, 1956 (Nickle, 1967 and Contortylenchus Rühm, 1956. They will be described and photographied afterwards.

  7. Diapause and post-diapause quiescence demonstrated in overwintering Harmonia axyeidis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in northwestern Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raak-van den Berg, C.L.; Jong, de P.W.; Hemerik, L.; Lenteren, van J.C.

    2013-01-01

    The Asian ladybird Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is regarded as an invasive species in many parts of the world. In a previous study we hypothesised that H. axyridis enters diapause at the end of October and then shifts to a quiescent state in December in northwestern Europe.

  8. Diapause and post-diapause quiescence demonstrated in overwintering Harmonia axyeidis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in northwestern Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raak-van den Berg, C.L.; Jong, de P.W.; Hemerik, L.; Lenteren, van J.C.

    2013-01-01

    The Asian ladybird Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is regarded as an invasive species in many parts of the world. In a previous study we hypothesised that H. axyridis enters diapause at the end of October and then shifts to a quiescent state in December in northwestern Europe.

  9. Incorporating a sorghum habitat for enhancing lady beetles (Coleoptera:Coccinellidae) in cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) are important predators of cotton insect pests. The objective of this 2-yr on-farm study was to examine the ability of a sorghum trap crop with Euschistus spp. pheromone baited capture traps to enhance these predators in cotton in Georgia. Scymnus spp., Cocci...

  10. New record of predatory ladybird beetle (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae feeding on extrafloral nectaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia M. Almeida

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available New record of predatory ladybird beetle (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae feeding on extrafloral nectaries. Feeding by Exoplectra miniata (Germar on extrafloral nectaries of Inga edulis Mart. was observed in Nova Friburgo, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. This is the first record of this behavior for Exoplectrini.

  11. Morphological characterization of pollens from three Apiaceae species and their ingestion by twelve-spotted lady beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. D’Ávila

    Full Text Available Abstract Larvae and adults of certain species of predator lady beetles feed on pollen, guaranteeing their survival, and at times, reproduction in the absence of preferred prey. Palynology, therefore, may contribute in the investigation of botanical families visited by these predators in order to obtain this floral resource. There are records of the visitation of Apiaceae flowers by Coleomegilla maculata DeGeer, 1775 (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, but not the ingestion of their pollen grains by this lady beetle. The external morphology of pollen grains of three Apiaceae aromatic species (Anethum graveolens L., Coriandrum sativum L., Foeniculum vulgare Mill. was characterized, and it was evaluated the ingestion of these pollens by fourth instar larvae and adults of C. maculata upon confinement along with flowers of these Apiaceae for 24 and 48 hours. The pollen grains of those species presented similar external morphology. In the two times of exposure, the larvae ingested the same amount of pollen from the three Apiaceae species, and the amount of C. sativum pollen ingested was the same between larvae and adults. The amount of A. graveolens pollen grains ingested by the adults was significantly greater than the pollens of C. sativum and F. vulgare, in 24 hours, with the opposite occurring in 48 hours. In the first 24 hours, the adults ingested more A. graveolens pollen than the larvae, with the opposite occurring with F. vulgare. There was no significant difference in the amount of Apiaceae pollen ingested between larvae and adults in 48 hours. The results suggest that the pollen-eating habits of certain aphidophagous lady beetles may be crucial in their preservation within agro-ecosystems.

  12. Morphological characterization of pollens from three Apiaceae species and their ingestion by twelve-spotted lady beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ávila, V A; Aguiar-Menezes, E L; Gonçalves-Esteves, V; Mendonça, C B F; Pereira, R N; Santos, T M

    2016-04-19

    Larvae and adults of certain species of predator lady beetles feed on pollen, guaranteeing their survival, and at times, reproduction in the absence of preferred prey. Palynology, therefore, may contribute in the investigation of botanical families visited by these predators in order to obtain this floral resource. There are records of the visitation of Apiaceae flowers by Coleomegilla maculata DeGeer, 1775 (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae), but not the ingestion of their pollen grains by this lady beetle. The external morphology of pollen grains of three Apiaceae aromatic species (Anethum graveolens L., Coriandrum sativum L., Foeniculum vulgare Mill.) was characterized, and it was evaluated the ingestion of these pollens by fourth instar larvae and adults of C. maculata upon confinement along with flowers of these Apiaceae for 24 and 48 hours. The pollen grains of those species presented similar external morphology. In the two times of exposure, the larvae ingested the same amount of pollen from the three Apiaceae species, and the amount of C. sativum pollen ingested was the same between larvae and adults. The amount of A. graveolens pollen grains ingested by the adults was significantly greater than the pollens of C. sativum and F. vulgare, in 24 hours, with the opposite occurring in 48 hours. In the first 24 hours, the adults ingested more A. graveolens pollen than the larvae, with the opposite occurring with F. vulgare. There was no significant difference in the amount of Apiaceae pollen ingested between larvae and adults in 48 hours. The results suggest that the pollen-eating habits of certain aphidophagous lady beetles may be crucial in their preservation within agro-ecosystems.

  13. Hippodamia variegata (Goeze) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) Found in South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippodamia variegata (Goeze) (Coleoptea: Coccinellidae), a Palearctic lady beetles established in North America, is reported for the first time from the state of South Dakota, U.S.A. Implications for biological control and future research are discussed....

  14. Trap Height Affects Capture of Lady Beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in Pecan Orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, T E

    2017-04-01

    There is scarce information regarding the vertical stratification of predaceous Coccinellidae in tall trees. Although numerous studies have been done in orchards and forests, very few studies have assessed the occurrence of predaceous Coccinellidae high in tree canopies. The objective of this study was to examine the abundance of Coccinellidae at different heights in mature pecan, Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch, orchards with tall trees. From spring through late fall during 2013 and 2014, yellow pyramidal Tedders traps were suspended in the pecan canopy at 6.1 and 12.2 m, in addition to being placed on the ground (0 m). The exotic species Harmonia axyridis and Coccinella septempunctata accounted for a high percentage of trap capture during this study. Except for Olla v-nigrum, low numbers of native species (Hippodamia convergens, Coleomegilla maculata, Cycloneda munda, Scymnus spp., and Hyperaspis spp.) were captured. However, significantly more were captured in ground traps rather than in canopy traps with the exception of O. v-nigrum. Similar to most native species, significantly more C. septempunctata were captured in ground traps than canopy traps. This contrasts sharply with H. axyridis captured similarly at all trap heights. The ability to exploit resources across vertical strata, unlike many intraguild predators, may be an underestimated factor helping to explain the invasiveness of H. axyridis. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by a US Government employee and is in the public domain in the US.

  15. Het lieveheersbeestje Harmonia axyridis in Nederland: een aanwinst voor onze fauna of een ongewenste indringer (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuppen, J.; Heijerman, Th.; Wielink, van P.; Loomans, A.

    2004-01-01

    Harmonia axyridis in the Netherlands: a gain for the fauna or an unwanted intruder (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)? The coccinellid Harmonia axyridis (Pallas, 1773), a well-known aphid predator originating from Asia, was found for the first time in the Netherlands (Heilige Landstichting near Nijmegen) i

  16. Adult survival of Delphastus catalinae (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), a predator of whiteflies (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), on diets of whiteflies, honeydew and honey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delphastus catalinae (Horn) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is a predator that is commercially sold for the management of whiteflies. A study was conducted to assay the effect of selected diets on the survival of adult D. catlinae. Treatments of water (as a control), 10% honey, honeydew, and whiteflie...

  17. Redescription of Platynaspisflavoguttata (Gorham) (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) and notes on nomenclature of Platynaspiskapuri Chakraborty & Biswas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorani, J

    2014-01-01

    Platynaspisflavoguttata (Gorham) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is redescribed and the male genitalia are illustrated for the first time. It is also recorded from Sri Lanka for the first time. Platynaspisbimaculata (Hoang, 1983) is a new junior synonym of Platynaspisbimaculata Pang & Mao, 1979 (new synonym). Platynaspiskapuri Chakraborty & Biswas, 2000, the replacement name for Platynaspisbimaculata Pang & Mao, 1979 established by Ukrainsky (2007), is also the new replacement name for Platynaspisbimaculata (Hoang, 1983), as both are junior homonyms of Platynaspisbimaculata Weise, 1888 besides being synonyms. Platynaspishoangi Ukrainsky (2007) is an unnecessary replacement name for Platynaspisbimaculata (Hoang).

  18. Redescription of Platynaspis flavoguttata (Gorham (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae and notes on nomenclature of Platynaspis kapuri Chakraborty & Biswas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Poorani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Platynaspis flavoguttata (Gorham (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae is redescribed and the male genitalia are illustrated for the first time. It is also recorded from Sri Lanka for the first time. Platynaspis bimaculata (Hoang, 1983 is a new junior synonym of Platynaspis bimaculata Pang & Mao, 1979 (new synonym. Platynaspis kapuri Chakraborty & Biswas, 2000, the replacement name for Platynaspis bimaculata Pang & Mao, 1979 established by Ukrainsky (2007, is also the new replacement name for Platynaspis bimaculata (Hoang, 1983, as both are junior homonyms of Platynaspis bimaculata Weise, 1888 besides being synonyms. Platynaspis hoangi Ukrainsky (2007 is an unnecessary replacement name for P. bimaculata (Hoang.

  19. Lady Beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) Communities in Soybean and Maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, K K; Andow, D A

    2016-02-01

    Coccinellids provide the most effective natural control of soybean aphid, but outbreaks remain common. Previous work suggests that native coccinellids are rare in soybean, potentially limiting soybean aphid control. We compared the coccinellid community in soybean with that of maize to identify differences in how coccinellid species use these habitats. As maize has long been used by coccinellids in the Americas, we hypothesized that coccinellids native to the Americas would use maize habitats, while exotic coccinellids would be more common in soybean. We identified and quantified aphids and all species and stages of coccinellids in a randomized complete block experiment with four blocks of 10 by 10 -m plots of soybean and maize in central Minnesota during 2008 and 2009. Coccinellid egg masses were identified by hatching in the laboratory. We used repeated-measures ANOVA to identify the dominant species in each habitat and compared species richness and Shannon's diversity with a paired t-test. Aphids and coccinellids had a similar phenology across habitats, but the coccinellid species composition differed significantly between soybean and maize. In soybean, the exotic, Harmonia axyridis Pallas, was the dominant species, while in maize, H. axyridis and the native, Coleomegilla maculata De Geer, were co-dominant. Eggs of H. axyridis were abundant in both habitats. In contrast, C. maculata eggs were very rare in soybean, despite being abundant in adjacent plots of maize. Species diversity was higher in maize. These findings were consistent with other published studies of coccinellid communities in these habitats. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Predation of Ladybird Beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae by Amphibians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Sloggett

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies of predation of ladybird beetles (Coccinellidae have focused on a limited number of predator taxa, such as birds and ants, while other potential predators have received limited attention. I here consider amphibians as predators of ladybirds. Published amphibian gut analyses show that ladybirds are quite often eaten by frogs and toads (Anura, with recorded frequencies reaching up to 15% of dietary items. Salamanders (Caudata eat ladybirds less frequently, probably as their habits less often bring them into contact with the beetles. Amphibians do not appear to be deleteriously affected by the potentially toxic alkaloids that ladybirds possess. Amphibians, especially frogs and toads, use primarily prey movement as a release cue to attack their food; it is thus likely that their ability to discriminate against ladybirds and other chemically defended prey is limited. Because of this poor discriminatory power, amphibians have apparently evolved non-specific resistance to prey defensive chemicals, including ladybird alkaloids. Although amphibian-related ladybird mortality is limited, in certain habitats it could outweigh mortality from more frequently studied predators, notably birds. The gut analyses from the herpetological literature used in this study, suggest that in studying predation of insects, entomologists should consider specialized literature on other animal groups.

  1. Predation of Ladybird Beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) by Amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloggett, John J

    2012-07-18

    Studies of predation of ladybird beetles (Coccinellidae) have focused on a limited number of predator taxa, such as birds and ants, while other potential predators have received limited attention. I here consider amphibians as predators of ladybirds. Published amphibian gut analyses show that ladybirds are quite often eaten by frogs and toads (Anura), with recorded frequencies reaching up to 15% of dietary items. Salamanders (Caudata) eat ladybirds less frequently, probably as their habits less often bring them into contact with the beetles. Amphibians do not appear to be deleteriously affected by the potentially toxic alkaloids that ladybirds possess. Amphibians, especially frogs and toads, use primarily prey movement as a release cue to attack their food; it is thus likely that their ability to discriminate against ladybirds and other chemically defended prey is limited. Because of this poor discriminatory power, amphibians have apparently evolved non-specific resistance to prey defensive chemicals, including ladybird alkaloids. Although amphibian-related ladybird mortality is limited, in certain habitats it could outweigh mortality from more frequently studied predators, notably birds. The gut analyses from the herpetological literature used in this study, suggest that in studying predation of insects, entomologists should consider specialized literature on other animal groups.

  2. Why eat extra floral nectar? Understanding food selection by Coleomegilla maculata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potential of omnivorous arthropods to stabilize ecosystems makes them an invaluable resource in biological control efforts. Methods of increasing predator abundance throughout agroecoystems include the incorporation of non-prey food items, yet the influence of this on predation rates remains un...

  3. Effect of different diets on biology, reproductive variables and life and fertility tables of Harmonia axyridis (Pallas (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Fediuk de Castro-Guedes

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The biology, reproductive variables and population growth indicators of Harmonia axyridis (Pallas, 1773 (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae fed on three diets, namely Cinara atlantica (Wilson, 1919 (Hemiptera: Aphididae, Brevicoryne brassicae (Linnaeus, 1758 (Hemiptera: Aphididae, and frozen eggs of Anagasta kuehniella (Zeller, 1879 (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae, were evaluated. With all three diets, birth rate was higher than mortality, resulting in positive rm values and thus indicating population growth. Under the conditions used in the experiments, H. axyridis was able to survive, develop and reproduce normally. This demonstrates that are different kind of food that can be essential for supporting the reproduction of some species of Coccinellidae, but not with the same optimization of preferred prey.

  4. Preliminary evaluation of Delphastus catalinae (Coleoptera:Coccinellidae)as a predator of the ficus whitefly, Singhiella simplex (Singh) (Hemiptera:Aleyrodidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The predatory lady beetle Delphastus catalinae (Horn) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) was evaluated as a potential biological control agent against the ficus whitefly, Singhiella simplex (Singh) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), a newly-invasive pest of ficus plants. Adult D. catalinae females were starved for ...

  5. Fauna božjih ovčica (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) u agro-eko sustavu vinograda

    OpenAIRE

    Franin, Kristijan; Barić, Božena; Kuštera, Gabrijela

    2014-01-01

    Sastavni elementi ekološke infrastrukture kao što su cvjetne trake, zatravljena površina unutar vinograda te korovima obrasli rubni dijelovi polja i vinograda imaju važnu ulogu u ekološkoj proizvodnji. Ovaj rad prikazuje rezultate istraživanja utjecaja korova na brojnost i bioraznolikost božjih ovčica. Istraživanje je obavljeno u periodu od svibnja do listopada (2011.–2012.) u vinogradima u okolici Zadra (Sjeverna Dalmacija – Hrvatska). Božje ovčice (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) sakupljane su m...

  6. Performance of Eriopis connexa (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) resistant to lambda-cyhalothrin after extended recovery from knockdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, D S; Rodrigues, A R S; Torres, J B; Lira, R

    2016-12-01

    A population of the predatory lady beetle Eriopis connexa (Germar) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) was recorded as resistant to lambda-cyhalothrin. Adults exposed to this insecticide have recovered from knockdown after 72 h. Thus, the performance of resistant (R) and susceptible (S) populations of E. connexa not exposed to insecticide (R0 and S0) and R adults recovering from knockdown 24, 48, and 72 h after exposure (R24, R48, and R72) was studied. In addition, the fertility life table parameters were calculated for one generation considering the progenies from R0, S0, and R24 populations. The recovery rate from knockdown was 69.4% for R-adults, and greater recovery rate was observed within 48 h following lambda-cyhalothrin exposure. The S-females produced about 50% more eggs and lived longer, when compared with R-females irrespective of the recovery periods after knockdown. The R-females produced similar number of eggs and exhibited similar longevity across all treatments (R0, R24, R48, and R72). Progenies produced by R- and S-populations did not exhibit consistent differences in development and survival. The fertility life table parameters showed higher intrinsic rate of population growth (rm) and lower mean generation time (T) for R0- and R24-females, when compared with those for S0-females. Thus, the time interval needed to recover from knockdown is not related to the adaptive cost of resistance in E. connexa.

  7. Alternative food sources for the ladybird Brumoides foudrasii (Mulsant) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, M S de; Melo, J W S; Barros, R

    2017-07-27

    The predator Brumoides foudrasii (Mulsant) (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) has been naturally found in plants infested by mealybugs. In this study, the striped mealybug Ferrisia dasylirii (Cockerell) (Hemiptera, Pseudococcidae) and Anagasta kuehniella Zeller (Lepidoptera, Pyralidae) eggs were evaluated as diets for the development and reproduction of B. foudrasii. Brumoides foudrasii immatures developed faster when fed with A. kuehniella eggs than when fed with F. dasylirii. However, the survival and longevity of B. foudrasii adults were not affected by the diets. Oviposition was more frequent when B. foudrasii females were fed with F. dasylirii (95%) than those fed with A. kuehniella eggs (65%). Brumoides foudrasii females fed with F. dasylirii were 2.5 times more fecund than those fed with A. kuehniella eggs. Although both diets may be considered proper for B. foudrasii, A. kuehniella eggs were more suitable for immature development, while F. darsyrili provided more nutritious resources for adult biological parameters as oviposition period, egg viability and fecundity. These results suggests that this predator can play an important role in regulating populations of the stripped mealybug F. dasylirii in the field.

  8. Spatial and temporal changes in the abundance and compostion of ladybird (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honek, Alois; Dixon, Anthony Fg; Soares, Antonio O; Skuhrovec, Jiri; Martinkova, Zdenka

    2017-04-01

    Because of their services to agriculture most ladybirds (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) are intensively studied predators of mainly phytophagous pests. The study of the long-term variation in the composition of their communities was stimulated by recent dramatic changes in the abundance of some species. We review and evaluate possible effects of the main causes cited in the literature. Agricultural and habitat changes (particularly urbanization) affect coccinellid abundance, both negatively and positively. In the temperate zone dominant species occur most frequently associated with abundant prey populations on crops, weeds and planted stands of trees resulting from human activity. Invasive non-native species of coccinellids may endanger native species through intraguild predation or competition for resources, but their supposed serious negative effects on native species can differ considerably. Climatic change may influence coccinellid species in several ways, including indirect effects through lower trophic levels and desynchronisation of the phenologies of host plants, prey and coccinellid populations. In the near future we do not expect climate warming to have important effects on ladybird diversity globally, but local changes in the composition of coccinellid communities and abundance of particular species could occur. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Host Range Specificity of Scymnus camptodromus (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), A Predator of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbu, Samita; Cassidy, Katie; Keena, Melody; Tobin, Patrick; Hoover, Kelli

    2016-02-01

    Scymnus (Neopullus) camptodromus Yu and Liu (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) was brought to the United States from China as a potential biological control agent for hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae Annand) (Hemiptera: Adelgidae). Scymnus camptodromus phenology is closely synchronized with that of A. tsugae and has several characteristics of a promising biological control agent. As a prerequisite to field release, S. camptodromus was evaluated for potential nontarget impacts. In host range studies, the predator was given the choice of sympatric adelgid and nonadelgid prey items. Nontarget testing showed that S. camptodromus will feed to some degree on other adelgid species, but highly prefers A. tsugae. We also evaluated larval development of S. camptodromus on pine bark adelgid (Pineus strobi (Hartig)) (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) and larch adelgid (Adelges laricis Vallot) (Hemiptera: Adelgidae); a small proportion of predator larvae was able to develop to adulthood on P. strobi or A. laricis alone. Scymnus camptodromus showed no interest in feeding on woolly alder aphid (Paraprociphilus tessellatus Fitch) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) or woolly apple aphid (Eriosoma lanigerum (Hausmann)) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), and minimal interest in cotton aphid (Aphis gossypii Glover) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) in choice and no-choice experiments. Scymnus camptodromus females did not oviposit on any host material other than A. tsugae-infested hemlock. Under the circumstances of the study, S. camptodromus appears to be a specific predator of A. tsugae, with minimal risk to nontarget species. Although the predator can develop on P. strobi, the likelihood that S. camptodromus would oviposit on pine hosts of this adelgid is small.

  10. Survey of Predatory Coccinellids (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in the Chitral District, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Inamullah; Din, Sadrud; Khan Khalil, Said; Ather Rafi, Muhammad

    2007-01-01

    An extensive survey of predatory Coccinellid beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) was conducted in the Chitral District, Pakistan, over a period of 7 months (April through October, 2001). A total of 2600 specimens of Coccinellids were collected from 12 different localities having altitudes from 1219.40–2651.63 m. Twelve different species belonging to 9 genera of 3 tribes and 2 sub-families were recorded. Two sub-families, viz, Coccinellinae Latreille, 1807 and Chilocorinae Mulsant, 1846 were identified. The following 8 species belonged to family Coccinellinae Latreille 1807 and tribe Coccinellini Latreille 1807: Coccinella septempunctata Linnaeus, 1758, Hippodamia (Adonia) variegata Goeze, 1777, Calvia punctata (Mulsant, 1846), Adalia bipunctata (Linnaeus, 1758),Adalia tetraspilota (Hope, 1831), Aiolocaria hexaspilota Hope 1851, Macroilleis (Halyzia) hauseri Mader, 1930,Oenopia conglobata Linnaeus, 1758. Only one species namely Halyzia tschitscherini Semenov, 1965 represented tribe Psylloborini of the sub-family Coccinellinae Latreille, 1807. Three species occurred from sub-family Chilocorinae Mulsant 1846 and tribe Chilocorini Mulsant 1846: Chilocorus rubidus Hope, 1831, Chilocorus circumdatus (Gyllenhal, 1808), Priscibrumus uropygialis (Mulsant, 1853). From the aforementioned species 6 were recorded for the first time from Pakistan: Chilocorus circumdatus, Calvia punctata, Adalia bipunctata, Macroilleis (Halyzia) hauseri, Priscibrumus uropygialis, and Oenopia conglobata. PMID:20334592

  11. Effect of coastal urbanization on sandy beach coleoptera Phaleria maculata (Kulzer, 1959) in northern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Sergio A; Yáñez-Navea, Katherine; Muñoz, Mauricio

    2014-06-15

    The beetle Phaleria maculata is a common inhabitant of the upper intertidal fringe of Chilean beaches. Anthropogenic intervention in coastal areas has increased intensely, leading to changes in the flora and fauna of sandy beaches. To examine the impact of human activities on P. maculata, we studied several beaches along the northern Chilean coast. Beaches were characterized based on morphodynamics and the level of intervention, leading to the estimation of an "Urbanization Index" based on various indicators. The analysis showed a significant inverse correlation between the rate of urbanization and night sky quality. Larval and adult beetles were almost absent on beaches with high levels of urbanization. The results of simple and multiple correlations based on nMDS ordination showed an inverse relationship between increases in urbanization and the abundance of beetles. Because darkling beetles are very sensitive to human interventions on sandy beaches, we suggest that they are ideal indicator organisms for the health of these environments.

  12. Intercrop movement of convergent lady beetle, Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), between adjacent cotton and alfalfa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastola, Anup; Parajulee, Megha N; Porter, R Patrick; Shrestha, Ram B; Chen, Fa-Jun; Carroll, Stanley C

    2016-02-01

    A 2-year study was conducted to characterize the intercrop movement of convergent lady beetle, Hippodamia convergens Guerin-Meneville (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) between adjacent cotton and alfalfa. A dual protein-marking method was used to assess the intercrop movement of the lady beetles in each crop. In turns field collected lady beetles in each crop were assayed by protein specific ELISA to quantify the movement of beetles between the crops. Results indicated that a high percentage of convergent lady beetles caught in cotton (46% in 2008; 56% in 2009) and alfalfa (46% in 2008; 71% in 2009) contained a protein mark, thus indicating that convergent lady beetle movement was largely bidirectional between the adjacent crops. Although at a much lower proportion, lady beetles also showed unidirectional movement from cotton to alfalfa (5% in 2008 and 6% in 2009) and from alfalfa to cotton (9% in 2008 and 14% in 2009). The season-long bidirectional movement exhibited by the beetles was significantly higher in alfalfa than cotton during both years of the study. The total influx of lady beetles (bidirectional and unidirectional combined) was significantly higher in alfalfa compared with that in cotton for both years. While convergent lady beetles moved between adjacent cotton and alfalfa, they were more attracted to alfalfa when cotton was not flowering and/or when alfalfa offered more opportunities for prey. This study offers much needed information on intercrop movement of the convergent lady beetle that should facilitate integrated pest management decisions in cotton utilizing conservation biological control. © 2014 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  13. Antioxidant responses of Propylaea japonica (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) exposed to high temperature stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shize; Fu, Wenyan; Li, Ning; Zhang, Fan; Liu, Tong-Xian

    2015-02-01

    Temperature is one of the most important environmental factors, and is responsible for a variety of physiological stress responses in organisms. Induced thermal stress is associated with elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation leading to oxidative damage. The ladybeetle, Propylaea japonica (Thunberg) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), is considered a successful natural enemy because of its tolerance to high temperatures in arid and semi-arid areas in China. In this study, we investigated the effect of high temperatures (35, 37, 39, 41 and 43 °C) on the survival and activities of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), peroxidases (POD), glutathione-S-transferases (GST), and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) as well as malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations in P. japonica adults. The results indicated that P. japonica adults could not survive at 43 °C. CAT, GST and TAC were significantly increased when compared to the control (25 °C), and this played an important role in the process of antioxidant response to thermal stress. SOD and POD activity, as well as MDA, did not differ significantly at 35 and 37 °C compared to the control; however, there were increased levels of SOD, POD and MDA when the temperature was above 37 °C. These results suggest that thermal stress leads to oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymes play important roles in reducing oxidative damage in P. japonica adults. This study represents the first comprehensive report on the antioxidant defense system in predaceous coccinellids (the third trophic level). The findings provide useful information for predicting population dynamics and understanding the potential for P. japonica as a natural enemy to control pest insects under varied environmental conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A Bacillus thuringiensis S-Layer Protein Involved in Toxicity against Epilachna varivestis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Guadalupe; Miranda-Rios, Juan; de la Riva, Gustavo; Pardo-López, Liliana; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra

    2006-01-01

    The use of Bacillus thuringiensis as a biopesticide is a viable alternative for insect control since the insecticidal Cry proteins produced by these bacteria are highly specific; harmless to humans, vertebrates, and plants; and completely biodegradable. In addition to Cry proteins, B. thuringiensis produces a number of extracellular compounds, including S-layer proteins (SLP), that contribute to virulence. The S layer is an ordered structure representing a proteinaceous paracrystalline array which completely covers the surfaces of many pathogenic bacteria. In this work, we report the identification of an S-layer protein by the screening of B. thuringiensis strains for activity against the coleopteran pest Epilachna varivestis (Mexican bean beetle; Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). We screened two B. thuringiensis strain collections containing unidentified Cry proteins and also strains isolated from dead insects. Some of the B. thuringiensis strains assayed against E. varivestis showed moderate toxicity. However, a B. thuringiensis strain (GP1) that was isolated from a dead insect showed a remarkably high insecticidal activity. The parasporal crystal produced by the GP1 strain was purified and shown to have insecticidal activity against E. varivestis but not against the lepidopteran Manduca sexta or Spodoptera frugiperda or against the dipteran Aedes aegypti. The gene encoding this protein was cloned and sequenced. It corresponded to an S-layer protein highly similar to previously described SLP in Bacillus anthracis (EA1) and Bacillus licheniformis (OlpA). The phylogenetic relationships among SLP from different bacteria showed that these proteins from Bacillus cereus, Bacillus sphaericus, B. anthracis, B. licheniformis, and B. thuringiensis are arranged in the same main group, suggesting similar origins. This is the first report that demonstrates that an S-layer protein is directly involved in toxicity to a coleopteran pest. PMID:16391064

  15. Scymnus camptodromus (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) Larval Development and Predation of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbu, Samita; Keena, Melody A; Long, David; Ostiguy, Nancy; Hoover, Kelli

    2015-02-01

    Development time and prey consumption of Scymnus (Neopullus) camptodromus Yu and Liu (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) larvae by instar, strain, and temperature were evaluated. S. camptodromus, a specialist predator of hemlock woolly adelgid Adelges tsugae (Annand) (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), was brought to the United States from China as a potential biological control agent for A. tsugae. This beetle has been approved for removal from quarantine but has not yet been field released. We observed that temperature had significant effects on the predator's life history. The larvae tended to develop faster and consume more eggs of A. tsugae per day as rearing temperature increased. Mean egg consumption per day of A. tsugae was less at 15°C than at 20°C. However, as larvae took longer to develop at the lower temperature, the total number of eggs consumed per instar during larval development did not differ significantly between the two temperatures. The lower temperature threshold for predator larval development was estimated to be 5°C, which closely matches the developmental threshold of A. tsugae progrediens. Accumulated degree-days for 50% of the predator neonates to reach adulthood was estimated to be 424. Although temperature had a significant effect on larval development and predation, it did not impact survival, size, or sex ratio of the predator at 15 and 20°C. Furthermore, no remarkable distinctions were observed among different geographical populations of the predator. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Trap height affects capture of lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in pecan orchards

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is scarce information regarding the vertical stratification of predaceous Coccinellidae in tall trees. Although numerous studies have been done in orchards and forests, very few studies have assessed the occurrence of predaceous Coccinellidae high in tree canopies. The objective of this stud...

  17. Effects of Rearing Density on Survival, Growth, and Development of the Ladybird Coleomegilla maculata in Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric W. Riddick

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Our research focuses on developing techniques to rear ladybird beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae. We evaluated the effects of rearing density on survival, growth, and development of Coleomegilla maculata. The hypothesis that a low to moderate rearing density has limited or no effects on survival and development was tested. C. maculata first instars were reared to pupae at a density of 1, 5, 10, 15, or 20 individuals per arena (2.5 cm high, 9.0 cm diameter, and 159 cm3 volume and fed powdered brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana eggs. More larvae survived at the 1 and 5 densities, but no differences were detected between the 10, 15, or 20 densities. Median survival rate was at least 90% for larvae and 100% for pupae at the 10, 15, and 20 densities. Development time, body weight, and sex ratio were unaffected by rearing density. Overall, this study suggests that C. maculata larvae can be reared successfully at a density of 20 larvae/159 cm3 (≈ 0.126 larvae/cm3 in containers provisioned with powdered A. franciscana eggs. Scaling-up the size of containers, and C. maculata density in these containers, should be possible.

  18. Etude morphologique et biologique de la coccinelle Scymnus couturieri Chazeau (Coleoptera-Coccinellidae prédatrice de la cochenille farineuse du manioc Phenacoccus manihoti Matile-Ferrero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obame Minko, D.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphological and Biological Study of Scymnus couturieri Chazeau (Coleoptera-Coccinellidae, Predator of Cassava Mealybug Phenacoccus manihoti Matile-Ferrero (Homoptera-Pseudococcidae in Ivory Coast. Scymnus couturieri is a coccinellidae which was first described from Ivory Coast (2. But that morphological description was just based on the adult. The trophic action developed by Scymnus couturieri in the regulation of the abundance of the cassava mealybug led us to precise that description and to extend our knowledge of the coccinellidae by studying the morphological aspects and the biological parameters. The study brings to the fore the holometaboly development, the low fecondity and the long-lasting biological cycle of the predator.

  19. Predation potential of Chilocorus cacti (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) to the prickly pear cacti pest Dactylopius opuntiae (Hemiptera: Dactylopiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, A; Olvera, H; Rodríguez, S; Barranco, J

    2013-08-01

    Functional response of the predator Chilocorus cacti (Linnaeus) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) on five densities of Dactylopius opuntiae (Cockerell) (Hemiptera: Dactylopiidae) female adults was assessed under laboratory conditions. The searching efficiency of C. cacti significantly decreased as prey density increased. The logistic regression for the predator had a negative and significant linear parameter indicating a type II functional response. Non-linear regression for Holling predator equation estimated a handling time of 1.79 ± 0.129 h and attack rate coefficient of 0.1003 ± 0.030. Most of this handling time was because the predator spent a lot of time removing the waxy coating that protects adult females of D. opuntiae. Chilocorus cacti consumes females of D. opuntiae in their reproductive stage; therefore, it could be an effective natural enemy to suppress or regulate low density populations of D. opuntiae, preventing them to reach high densities.

  20. Effect of Plant Characteristics and Within-Plant Distribution of Prey on Colonization Efficiency of Cryptolaemus montrouzieri (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folukemi Adedipe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptolaemus montrouzieri (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae has been widely used in classical and inundative biological control of mealybugs, including the long-tailed mealybug, Pseudococcus longispinus (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae. This study was conducted to investigate colonization and establishment efficiency of C. montrouzieri to manage P. longispinus on three different ornamental plant species (Ficus elastica, Lilium longiflorum, and Dieffenbachia seguine. Within-plant distribution pattern of P. longispinus and the colonization ecology of adult C. montrouzieri were investigated. Significantly more P. longispinus were found on the upper parts of the plants regardless of plant species, and C. montrouzieri adults discovered P. longispinus significantly faster when they were released on the top of the plants than on the bottom. Choice tests revealed that C. montrouzieri adults preferred smaller P. longispinus nymphs. The implications for utilization of C. montrouzieri for biological control of mealybugs on various ornamental plants are discussed.

  1. Parasitylenchus bifurcatus n. sp. (Tylenchida: Allantonematidae parasitizing Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poinar George O

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The harlequin ladybird, Harmonia axyridis Pallas (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae is native to central and eastern Asia and was purposely introduced into Europe to control aphids. While it proved to be a good biological control agent, its rapid spread and buildup of large populations made it a nuisance, since it overwinters in homes, emits unpleasant odors, stains fabrics, occasionally bites humans and feeds on apples, pears and grapes. Aside from the above, the ravenous appetite of H. axyridis results in their consumption of harmless native insects, including even other ladybird beetles. A study of the natural enemies of H. axyridis in Denmark revealed the presence of nematodes. The present study describes this nematode parasite and discusses aspects of its development and ecology. Methods Adult harlequin ladybird beetles were collected from March to November from four localities in Copenhagen on different plant species. In addition, groups of last-instar larvae and pupae (n = 50 were examined for the presence of nematodes. Living and recently dead nematodes were removed from adult H. axyridis in 0.5% saline solution, the nematodes were then heat killed (at 75C, fixed in 5% formalin and transferred to glycerin on slides for further examination and measurements. Results A new species of Allantonematidae (Tylenchida, Parasitylenchus bifurcatus n. sp., is described from adults of the harlequin ladybird, Harmonia axyridis in Denmark. The new species is characterized by a straight stylet lacking basal thickenings, a bursa and a forked tail tip in the vermiform (infective females and juvenile males. The new species is compared with P. coccinellinae previously described from ladybird beetles in France. Parasitism resulted in depletion of the fat body and partial or complete atrophy of the reproductive organs of the beetles. Infections occurred throughout the year with rates of parasitism reaching up to 35%. The rate increased to 60

  2. Parasitylenchus bifurcatus n. sp. (Tylenchida: Allantonematidae) parasitizing Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The harlequin ladybird, Harmonia axyridis Pallas (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is native to central and eastern Asia and was purposely introduced into Europe to control aphids. While it proved to be a good biological control agent, its rapid spread and buildup of large populations made it a nuisance, since it overwinters in homes, emits unpleasant odors, stains fabrics, occasionally bites humans and feeds on apples, pears and grapes. Aside from the above, the ravenous appetite of H. axyridis results in their consumption of harmless native insects, including even other ladybird beetles. A study of the natural enemies of H. axyridis in Denmark revealed the presence of nematodes. The present study describes this nematode parasite and discusses aspects of its development and ecology. Methods Adult harlequin ladybird beetles were collected from March to November from four localities in Copenhagen on different plant species. In addition, groups of last-instar larvae and pupae (n = 50) were examined for the presence of nematodes. Living and recently dead nematodes were removed from adult H. axyridis in 0.5% saline solution, the nematodes were then heat killed (at 75C), fixed in 5% formalin and transferred to glycerin on slides for further examination and measurements. Results A new species of Allantonematidae (Tylenchida), Parasitylenchus bifurcatus n. sp., is described from adults of the harlequin ladybird, Harmonia axyridis in Denmark. The new species is characterized by a straight stylet lacking basal thickenings, a bursa and a forked tail tip in the vermiform (infective) females and juvenile males. The new species is compared with P. coccinellinae previously described from ladybird beetles in France. Parasitism resulted in depletion of the fat body and partial or complete atrophy of the reproductive organs of the beetles. Infections occurred throughout the year with rates of parasitism reaching up to 35%. The rate increased to 60% when field

  3. Enzymes mediating resistance to lambda-cyhalothrin in Eriopis connexa (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Agna R S; Siqueira, Herbert A A; Torres, Jorge B

    2014-03-01

    Resistance to widely used insecticide, lambda-cyhalothrin, was recently reported in the predatory lady beetle Eriopis connexa (Germar) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). However, to understand whether metabolic mechanisms underlie such resistance, synergism bioassays and in vitro studies were carried out by using inhibitors and model substrates for enzymatic assays, respectively. The LD50s estimated for susceptible and resistant populations ηg of lambda-cyhalothrin/insect, and thus, a 22-fold difference in resistance ratio. Synergism ratios for the susceptible population with piperonyl butoxide (PBO), diethyl maleate (DEM), triphenyl phosphate (TPP), and S,S,S-tributylphosphorotrithioate (DEF) were respectively 33.8-, 0.24-, 0.35-, and 4.25-fold, while for the resistant population, they were 1463.0-, 0.79-, 0.85-, and 282.6-fold, respectively. The synergized resistance ratios were 0.50-, 2.00-, 6.75-, and 8.77-fold with PBO, DEF, DEM, and TPP, respectively, while resistance was virtually suppressed with DEF. The esterase exhibited 4.16-, 4.03-, and 5.38-fold greater activity towards formation of α-naphthol, β-naphthol, and 4-nitrophenol in the resistant population of E. connexa than in the susceptible population. The activity of esterase depended on concentrations of DEF applied, either using α-naphthol or β-naphthol, which completely inhibited the activity at 636 ηM. The PBO inhibited the β-naphthol formation in approximately 50%, suggesting it as inhibitor of esterases. The activities of glutathione-S-transferase were similar and corresponded to 0.36-0.47 ηmol(-1) min(-1)μg of protein, for S and R populations, respectively. Similarly, the activities of cytochrome P450-dependent microsomal monooxygenases were 0.04 and 0.05 ηmol(-1) min(-1)μg of protein. The native gel indicated that the formation of β-naphthol was completely inhibited by methyl-paraoxon, but only partially inhibited by eserine, TPP, and PBO. Although other studies with DEF and PBO have

  4. Effect of Lures and Colors on Capture of Lady Beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in Tedders Pyramidal Traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, E A; Cottrell, T E

    2015-10-01

    Purposeful attraction and aggregation of adult Coccinellidae at target sites would be useful for sampling purposes and pest suppression. We field-tested 1) lures in yellow and black pyramidal traps and 2) pyramidal traps that had been painted one or two colors (without lures) to determine if lures or trap color affected capture of adult Coccinellidae. In only one experiment with lures did a single rate of limonene increase trap capture, whereas no other lure ever did. Yellow traps, regardless of using a lure, always captured significantly more lady beetles than black traps. When single-color red, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple, black, and white traps (without lures) were tested, yellow traps captured significantly more lady beetles. Of all species of Coccinellidae captured in these single-color traps, 95% were the exotic species Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) and Coccinella septempunctata L. H. axyridis alone dominated trap capture comprising 74.1% of all lady beetles. Two-color traps (yellow-green, yellow-orange, yellow-white, and yellow-black) never captured more than single-color yellow traps. These results demonstrate that yellow pyramidal traps can be used to purposefully attract, and when used without a collection device, possibly aggregate adult Coccinellidae at targeted field sites. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  5. Larval life history responses to food deprivation in three species of predatory lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    We studied life history responses of larvae of three coccinellid species, Coleomegilla maculata (DeGeer), Hippodamia convergens Guerin-Meneville, and Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), when deprived of food for different periods of time during the fourth stadium. The coccinellid species did not differ in ...

  6. Resource investigation of coleoptera natural enemy insects in apple orchard in Henan province——Coccinellidae (continuation)%河南省苹果园鞘翅目天敌昆虫资源发生种类记述 ——瓢虫科Coccinellidae(续)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李泽义; 高九思; 员冬梅

    2006-01-01

    @@ 14素菌瓢虫属(Llleis)--柯氏素瓢虫(Llleis koeblei Timbeake) 14.1分类地位 柯氏素裸瓢虫属鞘翅目(Coleoptera)瓢虫科(Coccinellidae)瓢虫亚科(Coccinelinae)素菌瓢虫属(Llleis).

  7. Resource investigation of coleoptera natural enemy insects in apple orchard in Henan province--Coccinellidae(continuation)%河南省苹果园鞘翅目天敌昆虫资源发生种类记述──瓢虫科Coccinellidae (续)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    员冬梅; 高九思; 李泽义

    2006-01-01

    @@ 7 龟纹瓢虫属(Propylea) 7.1 龟纹瓢虫[Propylea japonoca (Thunberg)] 7.1.1 分类地位龟纹瓢虫属鞘翅目(Coleoptera)瓢虫科(Coccinellidae)瓢虫亚科(Coccinelinae)龟纹瓢虫属(Propylea).

  8. Effects of bioflavonoids on oviposition behavior in the pink-spotted ladybird beetle Coleomegilla maculata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    One goal of our current research is to mass produce ladybird beetles for biological control of plant pests in greenhouses and other protective structures. Cost-effective mass production involves the use of alternative prey/foods or artificial diets (rather than natural prey, e.g., aphids). One chall...

  9. An annotated checklist of Microweiseinae and Sticholotidini of Iran (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biranvand, Amir; Nedvěd, Oldřich; Tomaszewska, Wioletta; Canepari, Claudio; Shakarami, Jahanshir; Fekrat, Lida; Khormizi, Mehdi Zare

    2016-01-01

    An updated checklist of the Coccinellidae species of the former subfamily Sticholotidinae recorded from Iran is provided. Eleven species are reported: two species classified presently in the subfamily Microweiseinae (in the genera Paracoelopterus Normand, 1936 and Serangium Blackburn, 1889), and nine species classified in the tribe Sticholotidini of the subfamily Coccinellinae (in the genera Coelopterus Mulsant & Rey, 1852 and Pharoscymnus Bedel, 1906). Pharoscymnus smirnovi Dobzhansky, 1927 is removed from the list of the Coccinellidae of Iran. Distribution of species in Iranian provinces is presented. Data concerning their host plants along with their prey species are also included when known. Morphological features of two rarely collected and poorly known species of Iranian fauna, Pharoscymnus brunneosignatus Mader, 1949 and Pharoscymnus pharoides (Marseul, 1868) are diagnosed and illustrated.

  10. Consumption of Bt Maize Pollen Containing Cry1Ie Does Not Negatively Affect Propylea japonica (Thunberg (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghui Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Propylea japonica (Thunberg (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae are prevalent predators and pollen feeders in East Asian maize fields. They are therefore indirectly (via prey and directly (via pollen exposed to Cry proteins within Bt-transgenic maize fields. The effects of Cry1Ie-producing transgenic maize pollen on the fitness of P. japonica was assessed using two dietary-exposure experiments in the laboratory. In the first experiment, survival, larval developmental time, adult fresh weight, and fecundity did not differ between ladybirds consuming Bt or non-Bt maize pollen. In the second experiment, none of the tested lethal and sublethal parameters of P. japonica were negatively affected when fed a rapeseed pollen-based diet containing Cry1Ie protein at 200 μg/g dry weight of diet. In contrast, the larval developmental time, adult fresh weight, and fecundity of P. japonica were significantly adversely affected when fed diet containing the positive control compound E-64. In both experiments, the bioactivity of the Cry1Ie protein in the food sources was confirmed by bioassays with a Cry1Ie-sensitive lepidopteran species. These results indicated that P. japonica are not affected by the consumption of Cry1Ie-expressing maize pollen and are not sensitive to the Cry1Ie protein, suggesting that the growing of Bt maize expressing Cry1Ie protein will pose a negligible risk to P. japonica.

  11. Effect of temperature and photoperiod on the development, reproduction, and predation of the predatory ladybird Cheilomenes sexmaculata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Su; Tan, Xiao-Ling; Guo, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Fan

    2013-12-01

    The polyphagous predatory ladybird Cheilomenes. sexmaculata (F.) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is distributed throughout southern China and has been investigated as a potential biological control agent against herbivorous insects in various agroecosystems. In the current study, we evaluated the preimaginal development, eclosion rate, reproduction, fertility, adult longevity, and prey consumption of C. sexmaculata under five temperature and five photoperiod regimens. The results showed that preadult developmental duration decreased significantly with increasing temperature and amount of daylight. Adult eclosion rate was highest at 35 degrees C and under conditions of complete darkness. Higher temperatures shortened the duration of copulation and preoviposition, prolonged the duration of oviposition, and increased the level of fecundity. Hatchability was highest at 30 degrees C. By contrast, the shortest copulation and oviposition duration and lowest level of fecundity and hatchability occurred with a completely dark photoperiod. Temperature and the gender of C. sexmaculata influenced adult longevity. In addition, there was a significant interaction effect of photoperiod and gender on adult longevity. Furthermore, prey consumption by fourth instar larvae and adult females both increased with increasing temperature and photoperiod. Our results reveal the high thermal and light sensitivities of C. sexmaculata, which highlight the importance of environment regulation in the mass rearing of this natural enemy for application as a biological control in agroecosystems in China.

  12. Genetic Differentiation in Native and Introduced Populations of Cryptolaemus montrouzieri (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and Its Implications for Biological Control Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao-Sen; Jin, Meng-Jie; Ślipiński, Adam; De Clercq, Patrick; Pang, Hong

    2015-10-01

    Cryptolaemus montrouzieri Mulsant (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is an effective biological control agent of Australian origin, which has been introduced worldwide to control mealybugs. Although successfully used for >100 yr, its introduction in a new area may cause environmental risks should the populations become invasive. In the present study, a population genetics method was used to make predictions of the invasive potential of C. montrouzieri. Our results showed a similar level of genetic diversity among all populations. No significant genetic differentiation between native and introduced populations was observed, while three populations from the native region were significantly divergent. The fact that genetic diversity was not reduced in introduced areas suggests that no bottleneck effect has occurred during introduction. To avoid rapid evolution of the introduced C. montrouzieri, the introduction records of each population should be clearly traced and introductions from multiple sources into the same area should be avoided. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Consumption of Bt Maize Pollen Containing Cry1Ie Does Not Negatively Affect Propylea japonica (Thunberg) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yonghui; Liu, Yanmin; Yin, Xinming; Romeis, Jörg; Song, Xinyuan; Chen, Xiuping; Geng, Lili; Peng, Yufa; Li, Yunhe

    2017-03-16

    Propylea japonica (Thunberg) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) are prevalent predators and pollen feeders in East Asian maize fields. They are therefore indirectly (via prey) and directly (via pollen) exposed to Cry proteins within Bt-transgenic maize fields. The effects of Cry1Ie-producing transgenic maize pollen on the fitness of P. japonica was assessed using two dietary-exposure experiments in the laboratory. In the first experiment, survival, larval developmental time, adult fresh weight, and fecundity did not differ between ladybirds consuming Bt or non-Bt maize pollen. In the second experiment, none of the tested lethal and sublethal parameters of P. japonica were negatively affected when fed a rapeseed pollen-based diet containing Cry1Ie protein at 200 μg/g dry weight of diet. In contrast, the larval developmental time, adult fresh weight, and fecundity of P. japonica were significantly adversely affected when fed diet containing the positive control compound E-64. In both experiments, the bioactivity of the Cry1Ie protein in the food sources was confirmed by bioassays with a Cry1Ie-sensitive lepidopteran species. These results indicated that P. japonica are not affected by the consumption of Cry1Ie-expressing maize pollen and are not sensitive to the Cry1Ie protein, suggesting that the growing of Bt maize expressing Cry1Ie protein will pose a negligible risk to P. japonica.

  14. A case of ecological specialization in ladybirds: Iberorhyzobius rondensis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), potential biocontrol agent of Matsucoccus feytaudi (Hemiptera: Matsucoccidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, C; Jactel, H; van Halder, I; Mendel, Z; Branco, M

    2014-06-01

    Specialization is an important attribute of a biological control agent. The maritime pine bast scale, Matsucoccus feytaudi Ducasse (Hemiptera Matsucoccidae), is an invasive species in Southeast France and the North of Italy. Iberorhyzobius rondensis Eizaguirre (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), is a recently described ladybird species. Both adults and larvae are predaceous, feeding on egg masses of M. feytaudi, and are strongly attracted to M. feytaudi's sex pheromone. To evaluate the potential of I. rondensis as a biocontrol agent of the scale, we studied its niche breadth and prey range with emphasis on pine forests and hemipterans as tested prey. In this study, I. rondensis was found to achieve complete development only when fed on M. feytaudi egg masses (92.9% survival) and an artificial prey: eggs of Ephestia kuehniella Zeller (27.6% survival). From the 2nd instar onwards, complete development could be achieved using other prey species, although larvae had significantly higher mortality and slower development. In choice tests, M. feytaudi was the preferred prey. Surveys of the ladybird populations in the Iberian Peninsula revealed that it was found exclusively on Pinus pinaster Aiton, the sole host of M. feytaudi. The unusual specialization of I. rondensis, among other predaceous ladybirds, makes it an appropriate candidate for classical biological control of M. feytaudi.

  15. Treating Prey With Glyphosate Does Not Alter the Demographic Parameters and Predation of the Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saska, Pavel; Skuhrovec, Jirí; Lukáš, Jan; Vlach, Miroslav; Chi, Hsin; Tuan, Shu-Jen; Honek, Alois

    2017-04-01

    Glyphosate is an herbicide that is used worldwide with potential environmental risks to nontarget organisms. We applied an age-stage, two-sex life table approach to assess the sublethal effects of short-term oral exposure to a glyphosate-based herbicide on the life table parameters and biocontrol potential of Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). Aphids (Metopolophium dirhodum (Walker) (Sternorrhyncha: Aphididae)) treated with herbicide (an isopropylamine-salt of glyphosate) at low recommended, maximum recommended, and double the maximum recommended concentration for agricultural situations, and untreated controls were offered to the fourth instar of H. axyridis for 24 h. Development, consumption, and fecundity were measured daily until death. We detected minor differences in the hatching rate and mean generation time, whereas the longevity, fecundity, net reproductive rate, intrinsic rate of increase, finite rate of increase, and consumption were unaffected across treatments. We conclude that biocontrol potential of H. axyridis was not affected by acute oral intoxication by a glyphosate-based herbicide during the larval stage for 24 h under the study design. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Consumption of Bt Maize Pollen Containing Cry1Ie Does Not Negatively Affect Propylea japonica (Thunberg) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yonghui; Liu, Yanmin; Yin, Xinming; Romeis, Jörg; Song, Xinyuan; Chen, Xiuping; Geng, Lili; Peng, Yufa; Li, Yunhe

    2017-01-01

    Propylea japonica (Thunberg) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) are prevalent predators and pollen feeders in East Asian maize fields. They are therefore indirectly (via prey) and directly (via pollen) exposed to Cry proteins within Bt-transgenic maize fields. The effects of Cry1Ie-producing transgenic maize pollen on the fitness of P. japonica was assessed using two dietary-exposure experiments in the laboratory. In the first experiment, survival, larval developmental time, adult fresh weight, and fecundity did not differ between ladybirds consuming Bt or non-Bt maize pollen. In the second experiment, none of the tested lethal and sublethal parameters of P. japonica were negatively affected when fed a rapeseed pollen-based diet containing Cry1Ie protein at 200 μg/g dry weight of diet. In contrast, the larval developmental time, adult fresh weight, and fecundity of P. japonica were significantly adversely affected when fed diet containing the positive control compound E-64. In both experiments, the bioactivity of the Cry1Ie protein in the food sources was confirmed by bioassays with a Cry1Ie-sensitive lepidopteran species. These results indicated that P. japonica are not affected by the consumption of Cry1Ie-expressing maize pollen and are not sensitive to the Cry1Ie protein, suggesting that the growing of Bt maize expressing Cry1Ie protein will pose a negligible risk to P. japonica. PMID:28300767

  17. Sublethal effects of insecticide seed treatments on two nearctic lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscardini, Valéria Fonseca; Gontijo, Pablo Costa; Michaud, J P; Carvalho, Geraldo Andrade

    2015-07-01

    Predatory insects often feed on plants or use plant products to supplement their diet, creating a potential route of exposure to systemic insecticides used as seed treatments. This study examined whether chlorantraniliprole or thiamethoxam might negatively impact Coleomegilla maculata and Hippodamia convergens when the beetles consumed the extrafloral nectar of sunflowers grown from treated seed. We reared both species on eggs of Ephestia kuehniella and then switched adult H. convergens to a diet of greenbugs, Schizaphis graminum, in order to induce oviposition in this species. Excised sunflower stems, either treated or control and refreshed every 48 h, were provided throughout larval development, or for the first week of adult life. Exposure of C. maculata larvae to chlorantraniliprole and thiamethoxam applied as seed treatments delayed adult emergence by prolonging the pupal period. When adults were exposed, thiamethoxam reduced the preoviposition period compared to chlorantraniliprole, whereas the latter treatment cause females to produce fewer clutches during the observation period. Larvae of C. maculata did not appear to obtain sufficient hydration from the sunflower stems and their subsequent fecundity and fertility were compromised in comparison to the adult exposure experiment where larvae received supplemental water during development. Exposure of H. convergens larvae to thiamethoxam skewed the sex ratio in favor of females; both materials reduced the egg viability of resulting adults and increased the period required for eclosion. Exposure of H. convergens adults to chlorantraniliprole reduced egg eclosion times compared to thiamethoxam and exposure to both insecticides reduced pupation times in progeny. The results indicate that both insecticides have negative, sublethal impacts on the biology of these predators when they feed on extrafloral nectar of sunflower plants grown from treated seed.

  18. Aspectos biológicos de Coccidophilus citricola (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae sobre Aspidiotus nerii e Chrysomphalus aonidum (Homoptera, Diaspididae Biological studies of Coccidophilus citricola (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae on Aspidiotus nerii and Chrysomphalus aonidum (Homoptera, Diaspididae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Cesar dos Santos

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Aspectos biológicos de Coccidophilus citricola Brèthes (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae foram estudados sobre Chrysomphalus aonidum Linnaeus e Aspidiotus nerii Bouchè (Homoptera, Diaspididae criadas sobre abóbora. Observou-se a duraç��o (dias do período de ovo, dos quatro ínstares, pré-pupa, pupa, longevidade de adultos e a proporção machos: fêmeas de C. citricola. Determinou-se também verificar a eficiência de predação de adultos de C. citricola sobre A. nerii. C. aonidum e A. nerii são presas adequadas para C. citricola, com desenvolvimento semelhante do coccinelídeo sobre essas cochonilhas; o período de incubação do ovo foi de 7,9 e 8,1 dias com A. nerii e C. aonidum; a duração (dias de cada ínstar larval de C. citricola sobre A. nerii e C. aonidum foram respectivamente de: (I 2,7 e 2,9; (II 3,1 e 3,3; (III 3,0 e 3,3 e (IV 3,2 e 3,1 dias. A duração das fases de pré-pupa e pupa foi de 2,5 e 4,5 dias sobre A. nerii e 2,8 e 4,8 dias sobre C. aonidum e a viabilidade de ovo a adulto foi de 63,2% e 62,7% respectivamente para indivíduos criados sobre essas presas. A longevidade de adultos de C. citricola foi de 57,0 dias com A. nerii e de 62,0 dias com C. aonidum. A proporção macho: fêmea foi de 0,82:1,00. O consumo diário de C. citricola foi de 1,15 adultos ou 2,35 ninfas de 2o ínstar ou 3,16 ninfas de 1o ínstar de A. nerii por dia.Laboratory trials were carried out to study biological aspects of Coccidophilus citricola Brèthes (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae on Chrysomphalus aonidum Linnaeus and Aspidiotus nerii Bouché (Homoptera: Diaspididae. The scales were reared on squashes and then served as food source to the predator. The period of egg, larvae (four ínstars, pre-pupae, pupae, adults’ longevity and male: female ratio was observed. Predatory efficacy of C. citricola on A. nerii was also determined. The period of egg was 7.9 and 8.1 days on A. nerii and C. aonidum. The development (days of different stages of C

  19. Does a Change from Whole to Powdered Food (Artemia franciscana eggs Increase Oviposition in the Ladybird Coleomegilla maculata?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric W. Riddick

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The limited availability of alternative foods to replace natural prey hinders cost-effective mass production of ladybird beetles for augmentative biological control. We compared the effects of powdered vs. whole Artemia franciscana (A. franciscana (brine shrimp eggs with or without a dietary supplement on development and reproduction of Coleomegilla maculata (C. maculata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae. We tested the hypotheses that (1 powdered A. franciscana eggs are more suitable than whole eggs; and (2 palmitic acid, a common fatty acid in natural prey, i.e., aphids, is an effective dietary supplement. Development time, pre-imaginal survival, sex ratio, and body weight of adults did not differ significantly amongst individuals fed powdered vs. whole eggs, with or without 5% palmitic acid. Significantly more oviposition occurred when females were fed powdered eggs than whole eggs and powdered eggs with 5% palmitic acid than whole eggs with or without 5% palmitic acid. A weak functional relationship was found between pre-oviposition time and total oviposition by females fed powdered eggs with 5% palmitic acid; pre-oviposition time decreased as oviposition increased. Food treatments had no significant differential effect on progeny (egg hatch rate. In conclusion, a simple change in A. franciscana egg texture and particle size (i.e., blending whole eggs into a dust-like powder increases oviposition in C. maculata. Supplementing powdered eggs with 5% palmitic acid might accelerate oogenesis (egg maturation in some females.

  20. Molecular cytogenetic studies in the ladybird beetle Henosepilachnaargus Geoffroy, 1762 (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Epilachninae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Pablo; Vela, Jesús; Sanllorente, Olivia; Palomeque, Teresa; Lorite, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    The ladybird Henosepilachnaargus Geoffroy, 1762 has been cytogenetically studied. In addition we have conducted a review of chromosome numbers and the chromosomal system of sex determination available in the literature in species belonging to the genus Henosepilachna and in its closely related genus Epilachna. Chromosome number of Henosepilachnaargus was 2n=18, including the sex chromosome pair, a common diploid chromosome number within the tribe Epilachnini. The study of prophase I meiotic chromosomes showed the typical Xyp "parachute" bivalent as in the majority of species of Coccinellidae. C-banding and fluorescent staining with AT-specific DAPI fluorochrome dye have been carried out for the first time in H. argus. C-banding technique revealed that heterochromatic blocks are pericentromerically located and DAPI staining showed that this heterochromatin is AT rich. Fluorescence in situ hybridizations using rDNA and the telomeric TTAGG sequence as probes have been carried out. FISH using rDNA showed that the nucleolar organizing region is located on the short arm of the X chromosome. FISH with the telomeric sequence revealed that in this species telomeres of chromosomes are composed of the pentanucleotide TTAGG repeats. This is the first study on the telomeric sequences in Coccinellidae.

  1. Risk to native Uroleucon aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) from non-native lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aphids in the genus Uroleucon Mordvilko (Hemiptera: Aphididae) are native herbivores that feed on goldenrod (Solidago spp.) and other Asteraceae in North America. The aphids are potential prey for a wide variety of natural enemies, including native and non-native species of lady beetles (Coleoptera...

  2. Effects of temperature and photoperiod on the aestivo-hibernal egg diapause of Scymnus camptodromus (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keena, Melody A; Trotter, R Talbot; Cheah, Carole; Montgomery, Michael E

    2012-12-01

    Three sequential studies were conducted on the interacting effects of exposure to low (5°C) temperature for 0, 7, 28, 56, or 84 d followed by incubation at 10, 15, or 20°C on the egg diapause of Scymnus (Neopullus) camptodromus Yu and Liu (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). This beetle was imported from China as a potential biological control agent for hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae (Annand) (Hemiptera: Adelgidae). Very few eggs laid and held at a constant 15 or 20°C showed any indication of development. Only eggs exposed to temperature combinations of 5 and 10°C had >50% hatch. Highest percent hatch and fastest development occurred when eggs were held at 5°C for 56 or 84 d followed by holding at 10°C. A model estimated the lower threshold for postdiapause development to be 2°C. The effect of temperature on egg hatch was similar at photoperiods of 12:12 and 16:8 (L:D) h, suggesting egg development is not governed by photoperiod or light exposure. Collectively these data indicate that S. camptodromus eggs laid in the spring and summer go through an aestivo-hibernal diapause that is maintained by warm temperatures and that development resumes when temperatures drop, in parallel with the development of hemlock woolly adelgid. This concurrent development allows S. camptodromus eggs to hatch while hemlock woolly adelgid is laying eggs. This synchrony between the development of S. camptodromus eggs and the overwintering adelgid suggest this beetle may be a good candidate for the biological control of the hemlock woolly adelgid.

  3. Intraguild Predation Among Three Common Coccinellids (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in China: Detection Using DNA-Based Gut-Content Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Wang, Qian; Wang, Dongmei; Xu, Bin; Xu, Jianxiang; Lu, Yanhui; Harwood, James D

    2017-02-01

    The ubiquity of intraguild predation (IGP) has been widely recognized for predatory coccinellids (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). In Chinese agroecosystems, three species (Coccinella septempunctata L., Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), and Propylea japonica (Thunberg)) are particularly common, but there is little information of interactions occurring between them. In no-choice laboratory feeding trials, differential directional predation was observed between species: C. septempunctata preyed on eggs of P. japonica more than H. axyridis and H. axyridis consumed eggs of C. septempunctata and P. japonica equally, whereas P. japonica had a very low predation rate on eggs of the other two species. In choice trials, C. septempunctata and P. japonica larvae preyed less on H. axyridis eggs than those of P. japonica and C. septempunctata, respectively, contrasting with H. axyridis larvae, which showed similar preference for both species. Species-specific primers were developed for each coccinellid and used to determine the relative frequency of prey consumption in the field. Prior to field-based analysis, primer specificity was confirmed and consumption of prey elicited a positive reaction success, and detection time varied between different predator-prey combinations. Predators were then collected from cotton agroecosystems and, interestingly, no DNA of C. septempunctata was found in P. japonica, but all other predator-prey combinations yielded positive documentation of IGP in the field, with the greatest rate of 9% of C. septempunctata testing positive for H. axyridis DNA. This study confirmed the frequency of IGP among three common coccinellids in Chinese agroecosystems and the likelihood for interference to the biological control services provided by these important natural enemies. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Determinants of acute mortality of Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) to ultra-low volume permethrin used for mosquito management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Robert K D; Preftakes, Collin J; Bodin, Jennifer L; Brown, Christopher R; Piccolomini, Alyssa M; Schleier, Jerome J

    2016-01-01

    There are relatively few experimental studies and risk assessments of the effects on non-target insects from ultra-low volume (ULV) insecticides used for management of adult mosquitoes. Therefore, we evaluated factors that may influence the ability of an insect to intercept the insecticide at the time of application by using Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in field bioassay experiments in 2011 and 2015. Treatment factors included different distances, two cage heights (ground-level and 1.5 m above ground) to the point of the application, and covered vs. uncovered cage faces (2015 only). Insecticides used included a water-based formulation (Aqua-Reslin®) and an oil-based formulation (Permanone® 30-30) of permethrin. Cage height was highly significant both years, with much less acute (i.e., short-term exposure) mortality at ground-level compared with 1.5 m. In 2011, acute mortality was less at ground-level (mean = 3.2%, median = 0%) compared to 1.5 m (mean = 85.2%, median = 100%). Cage type also was highly significant, with less mortality in covered cages compared to uncovered cages. Mortality by cage height and cage type was as follows: ground level, covered cage (mean = 2.8%, median = 0.1%); ground level, uncovered cage (mean = 41.9%, median = 9.6%); 1.5 m, covered cage (mean = 6.8%, median = 0%); 1.5 m, uncovered cage (mean = 83.7%, median = 100%). Results suggest that acute mortality to non-target insects may vary considerably based on their height and their ability to directly intercept the insecticide as the aerosol passes through the area being sprayed.

  5. Enumerative and binomial sequential sampling plans for the multicolored Asian lady beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in wine grapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, T L; Burkness, E C; Hutchison, W D

    2007-06-01

    To develop a practical integrated pest management (IPM) system for the multicolored Asian lady beetle, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), in wine grapes, we assessed the spatial distribution of H. axyridis and developed eight sampling plans to estimate adult density or infestation level in grape clusters. We used 49 data sets collected from commercial vineyards in 2004 and 2005, in Minnesota and Wisconsin. Enumerative plans were developed using two precision levels (0.10 and 0.25); the six binomial plans reflected six unique action thresholds (3, 7, 12, 18, 22, and 31% of cluster samples infested with at least one H. axyridis). The spatial distribution of H. axyridis in wine grapes was aggregated, independent of cultivar and year, but it was more randomly distributed as mean density declined. The average sample number (ASN) for each sampling plan was determined using resampling software. For research purposes, an enumerative plan with a precision level of 0.10 (SE/X) resulted in a mean ASN of 546 clusters. For IPM applications, the enumerative plan with a precision level of 0.25 resulted in a mean ASN of 180 clusters. In contrast, the binomial plans resulted in much lower ASNs and provided high probabilities of arriving at correct "treat or no-treat" decisions, making these plans more efficient for IPM applications. For a tally threshold of one adult per cluster, the operating characteristic curves for the six action thresholds provided binomial sequential sampling plans with mean ASNs of only 19-26 clusters, and probabilities of making correct decisions between 83 and 96%. The benefits of the binomial sampling plans are discussed within the context of improving IPM programs for wine grapes.

  6. INVASION OF PREDATOR HARMONIA AXYRIDIS (COLEOPTERA: COCCINELLIDAE AND AN EVALUATION OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL RISK IN PERU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iannacone, José

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The generalist predator Harmonia axyridis Pallas, 1772, is an effective and voracious biological control of pests, especially of aphids. However, worldwide is considered a threat to fruit production, in the reduction of beneficial fauna native and as a household pest. It has been detected from 90 of the last century in several South American countries, mainly in Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay, Colombia and Chile. Its invasion in Peru in recent years includes the arrival, establishment and spread in different urban, agricultural and natural ecosystems. The aim of this study was to determine the characteristics of the invasion of H. axyridis and an environmental risk assessment in Peru. The study was non-probabilistic, not experimental, and cross-sectional chance in 20 towns of Lima, Callao and Madre de Dios, Peru from January to March 2011 to search for different species of Coccinellidae, using standard procedures for collecting entomological. It was recorded aphid-prey specie, and specie and family plant associated. Of the total individuals of coccinellid collected, the 48.60% were H. axyridis, Cycloneda sanguinea (29.01%, Hippodamia convergens (7.37%, Prodilis inclytus (3.81%, Eriopis connexa (3.56% and other seven species (7.66%. Harmonia axyridis, C. sanguinea and H. convergens were surveyed in the following families and locations: 14:14, 13:14 and 4:4, respectively. With regard to the environmental risk assessment of H. axyridis was used van Lenteren protocol that assesses the magnitude and likelihood of risk based on their ability to establish, dispersal potential nontarget habitats, host range, and direct and indirect effects. The environmental risk index (ARI was 77 points from a maximum of 125. The results show a reduction in frequency relative percentage of other species of coccinellids, especially H. convergens and an increase in H. axyridis related to high voracity as a predator, and a high fertility and fecundity. It includes an

  7. Seasonal fluctuation in the population of Harmonia axyridis (Pallas, 1773 (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae and co-occurrence with other Coccinellids in the Federal District of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érica Sevilha Harterreiten-Souza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The multicolored Asian lady beetle, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas, 1773, was first recorded in Brazil in 2002 in Paraná state and subsequently observed in Santa Catarina, Rio Grande do Sul and Minas Gerais. This species can spread to new areas and become dominant in the local community, reducing the density and diversity of native species, mainly Coccinellidae. The objective of this work was to record for the first time the occurrence of H. axyridis in the Federal District and its co-occurrence with other Coccinellidae species. The individuals were collected directly from plants at an organic farm in Taguatinga and in experimental fields of Embrapa Hortaliças, located in the Federal District, from August 2008 to January 2010. We collected 881 Coccinelids, and of these, 110 belong to the species H. axyridis. These were found exclusively on the following plants of the succinea group: maize, cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, kale, cucumber, cotton, tomato and coriander. We also observed its co-occurrence with the following lady beetle species: Cycloneda sanguine (Linnaeus, 1763, Hippodamia convergens (Guerin-Meneville 1842, Eriopis connexa (German, 1824, Scymnus sp., Nephaspis sp., Azya luteipes (Mulsant, 1850, Hyperaspis festiva (Mulsant, 1850, Olla v-nigrum (Mulsant, 1866, Psyllobora sp. and Coleomegilla maculata (De Geer, 1775. So far, we have not found any negative interactions between H. axyridis and these species. This is the northernmost H. axyridis record in Brazil. Moreover, the region was previously considered to have a low probability of occurrence for this species. Therefore, this record confirms that H. axyridis presents great adaptive plasticity to new habitats.

  8. Biological aspects of Eriopis connexa (Germar (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae fed on different insect pests of maize (Zea mays L. and sorghum [Sorghum bicolor L. (Moench.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RB Silva

    Full Text Available Eriopis connexa (Germar (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae occurs in several countries of South America and its mass rearing is important for biological control programmes. This work evaluated biological aspects of E. connexa larva fed on eggs of Anagasta kuehniella (Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae and Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae frozen for one day, fresh eggs of Diatraea saccharalis (Fabricius (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae, S. frugiperda newly-hatched caterpillars, nymphs of Rhopalosiphum maidis (Fitch and Schizaphis graminum (Rondani (Hemiptera: Aphididae. Duration of larva, pupa and larva to adult stages differed among prey offered, whereas the prepupa stage was similar. Larva, pupa, prepupa and larva to adult viabilities were equal or major of 87.5% in all prey, except for larva fed on newly-hatched larvae of S. frugiperda. Eriopis connexa has good adaptation to different prey corroborating its polyphagous feeding habit, which evidences the potential of this natural enemy for controlling corn and sorghum pests.

  9. Biological aspects of Eriopis connexa (Germar) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) fed on different insect pests of maize (Zea mays L.) and sorghum [Sorghum bicolor L. (Moench.)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, R B; Cruz, I; Zanuncio, J C; Figueiredo, M L C; Canevari, G C; Pereira, A G; Serrão, J E

    2013-05-01

    Eriopis connexa (Germar) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) occurs in several countries of South America and its mass rearing is important for biological control programmes. This work evaluated biological aspects of E. connexa larva fed on eggs of Anagasta kuehniella (Zeller) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) and Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) frozen for one day, fresh eggs of Diatraea saccharalis (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), S. frugiperda newly-hatched caterpillars, nymphs of Rhopalosiphum maidis (Fitch) and Schizaphis graminum (Rondani) (Hemiptera: Aphididae). Duration of larva, pupa and larva to adult stages differed among prey offered, whereas the prepupa stage was similar. Larva, pupa, prepupa and larva to adult viabilities were equal or major of 87.5% in all prey, except for larva fed on newly-hatched larvae of S. frugiperda. Eriopis connexa has good adaptation to different prey corroborating its polyphagous feeding habit, which evidences the potential of this natural enemy for controlling corn and sorghum pests.

  10. A revision of the genus Stictobura Crotch (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Sticholotidinae) and description of a new species of Sticholotis Crotch

    Science.gov (United States)

    The species of Stictobura Crotch (1874) (Coccinellidae: Sticholotidinae) are revised. Stictobura gibbula (Weise, 1908) indeed belongs to Sticholotis Crotch (1874) under which it was originally described (stat. rev.) and is removed from Stictobura. Stictobura buruensis Korschefsky (1944) is transferr...

  11. Pengaruh Jenis Mangsa dan Suhu pada Perkembangan Menochilus sexmaculatus Fabricius (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae dan Peranannya dalam Pengendalian Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tris Haris Ramadhan

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae is the vector of citrus greening (Huanglongbing bacterium and the most serious impediment to citrus culture. Classical biological control of this psyllid vector should contribute to suppress their population. This research was conducted to determine the performance of Menochilus sexmaculatus Fabricius (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae when they were fed with D. citri. The larval performance index of M. sexmaculatus on D. citri compared with Aphis craccivora Koch (Hemiptera: Aphididae diet was 1.3.M. sexmaculatus fed with D. citri had lower fitness than those fed with A. craccivora as shown by longer larval stadium, lower adult dry weight, less number of egg produced and lower percentage of egg hatched. M. sexmaculatus grew best at the temperature of 27oC. Employing the exclusion procedure under field condition,M. sexmaculatus could reduce the population of D. citri up to 90%. These findings showed that theM. sexmaculatus could be a potential predator in reducing D. citri, particularly when the more preferred prey A. craccivora was not present.   Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae merupakan kelompok Psyllid yang menularkan penyebab penyakit Huanglongbing yang sangat berbahaya pada tanaman jeruk. Pengendalian hayati klasik telah banyak memberikan kontribusi dalam pengendalian di lapangan. Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk melihat penampilan Menochilus sexmaculatus Fabricius (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae dengan pakan D. citri. Indeks penampilan larva M. sexmaculatus dengan pakan D. citri dibandingkan dengan Aphis craccivora Koch (Hemiptera: Aphididae adalah 1,3. M. sexmaculatus yang diberi pakan D. citri menunjukkan penurunan kebugaran dibandingkan jika diberi pakan A. craccivora seperti yang ditunjukkan dengan stadium larva lebih lama, penurunan berat kering serangga dewasa, telur yang dihasilkan lebih sedikit, dan penurunan jumlah telur yang menetas. Menggunakan metode eksklusi pada kondisi

  12. Molecular phylogeny reveals food plasticity in the evolution of true ladybird beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Coccinellini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalona, Hermes E; Zwick, Andreas; Li, Hao-Sen; Li, Jiahui; Wang, Xingmin; Pang, Hong; Hartley, Diana; Jermiin, Lars S; Nedvěd, Oldřich; Misof, Bernhard; Niehuis, Oliver; Ślipiński, Adam; Tomaszewska, Wioletta

    2017-06-26

    The tribe Coccinellini is a group of relatively large ladybird beetles that exhibits remarkable morphological and biological diversity. Many species are aphidophagous, feeding as larvae and adults on aphids, but some species also feed on other hemipterous insects (i.e., heteropterans, psyllids, whiteflies), beetle and moth larvae, pollen, fungal spores, and even plant tissue. Several species are biological control agents or widespread invasive species (e.g., Harmonia axyridis (Pallas)). Despite the ecological importance of this tribe, relatively little is known about the phylogenetic relationships within it. The generic concepts within the tribe Coccinellini are unstable and do not reflect a natural classification, being largely based on regional revisions. This impedes the phylogenetic study of important traits of Coccinellidae at a global scale (e.g. the evolution of food preferences and biogeography). We present the most comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of Coccinellini to date, based on three nuclear and one mitochondrial gene sequences of 38 taxa, which represent all major Coccinellini lineages. The phylogenetic reconstruction supports the monophyly of Coccinellini and its sister group relationship to Chilocorini. Within Coccinellini, three major clades were recovered that do not correspond to any previously recognised divisions, questioning the traditional differentiation between Halyziini, Discotomini, Tytthaspidini, and Singhikaliini. Ancestral state reconstructions of food preferences and morphological characters support the idea of aphidophagy being the ancestral state in Coccinellini. This indicates a transition from putative obligate scale feeders, as seen in the closely related Chilocorini, to more agile general predators. Our results suggest that the classification of Coccinellini has been misled by convergence in morphological traits. The evolutionary history of Coccinellini has been very dynamic in respect to changes in host preferences, involving

  13. New Coleoptera records for New Brunswick, Canada: Kateretidae, Nitidulidae, Cerylonidae, Endomychidae, Coccinellidae, and Latridiidae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Reginald P.; Sweeney, Jon D.; DeMerchant, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We report 20 new species records for the Coleoptera fauna in New Brunswick, Canada, five of which are new records for the Maritime provinces, including one species that is new for Canada. One species of Kateretidae, Kateretes pusillus (Thunberg) is newly recorded for New Brunswick and the Maritime provinces. Stelidota octomaculata (Say), Phenolia grossa (Fabricius), andCryptarcha strigatula Parsons of the family Nitidulidae are added to the faunal list of New Brunswick; the latter species is new to the Maritime provinces. Two species of Cerylonidae, Philothermus glabriculus LeConte and Cerylon unicolor (Ziegler), are reported for the first time for New Brunswick. Philothermus glabriculus is new for the Maritime provinces. Two species of Endomychidae, Hadromychus chandleri Bousquet and Leschen and Danae testacea (Ziegler) are newly recorded for New Brunswick. Three species of Coccinelidae, Stethorus punctum punctum (LeConte), Naemia seriata seriata Melsheimer, and Macronaemia episcopalis (Kirby) are added to the provincial list. Macronaemia episcopalis (Kirby) is a species new to the Maritime provinces. Nine species of Latridiidae, Cartodere nodifer (Westwood), Dienerella ruficollis (Marsham), Enicmus aterrimus Motschulsky, Enicmus fictus Fall, Encimus histrio Jay and Tomlin, Lathridius minutus (Linnaeus), Stephostethus productus Rosenhauer, Corticaria elongata (Gyllenhal), and Corticarina longipennis (LeConte) are newly recorded for New Brunswick. Stephostehus productus is newly recorded from Canada. Collection and habitat data are presented for all these species. PMID:22539894

  14. New Coleoptera records for New Brunswick, Canada: Kateretidae, Nitidulidae, Cerylonidae, Endomychidae, Coccinellidae, and Latridiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reginald Webster

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We report 20 new species records for the Coleoptera fauna in New Brunswick, Canada, five of which are new records for the Maritime provinces, including one species that is new for Canada. One species of Kateretidae, Kateretes pusillus (Thunberg is newly recorded for New Brunswick and the Maritime provinces. Stelidota octomaculata (Say, Phenolia grossa (Fabricius, and Cryptarcha strigatula Parsons of the family Nitidulidae are added to the faunal list of New Brunswick; the latter species is new to the Maritime provinces. Two species of Cerylonidae, Philothermus glabriculus LeConte and Cerylon unicolor (Ziegler, are reported for the first time for New Brunswick. Philothermus glabriculus is new for the Maritime provinces. Two species of Endomychidae, Hadromychus chandleri Bousquet and Leschen and Danae testacea (Ziegler are newly recorded for New Brunswick. Three species of Coccinelidae, Stethorus punctum punctum (LeConte, Naemia seriata seriata Melsheimer, and Macronaemia episcopalis (Kirby are added to the provincial list. Macronaemia episcopalis (Kirby is a species new to the Maritime provinces. Nine species of Latridiidae, Cartodere nodifer (Westwood, Dienerella ruficollis (Marsham, Enicmus aterrimus Motschulsky, Enicmus fictus Fall, Encimus histrio Jay and Tomlin, Lathridius minutus (Linnaeus, Stephostethus productus Rosenhauer, Corticaria elongata (Gyllenhal, and Corticarina longipennis (LeConte are newly recorded for New Brunswick. Stephostehus productus is newly recorded from Canada. Collection and habitat data are presented for all these species.

  15. New Coleoptera records for New Brunswick, Canada: Kateretidae, Nitidulidae, Cerylonidae, Endomychidae, Coccinellidae, and Latridiidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Reginald P; Sweeney, Jon D; Demerchant, Ian

    2012-01-01

    We report 20 new species records for the Coleoptera fauna in New Brunswick, Canada, five of which are new records for the Maritime provinces, including one species that is new for Canada. One species of Kateretidae, Kateretes pusillus (Thunberg) is newly recorded for New Brunswick and the Maritime provinces. Stelidota octomaculata (Say), Phenolia grossa (Fabricius), andCryptarcha strigatula Parsons of the family Nitidulidae are added to the faunal list of New Brunswick; the latter species is new to the Maritime provinces. Two species of Cerylonidae, Philothermus glabriculus LeConte and Cerylon unicolor (Ziegler), are reported for the first time for New Brunswick. Philothermus glabriculus is new for the Maritime provinces. Two species of Endomychidae, Hadromychus chandleri Bousquet and Leschen and Danae testacea (Ziegler) are newly recorded for New Brunswick. Three species of Coccinelidae, Stethorus punctum punctum (LeConte), Naemia seriata seriata Melsheimer, and Macronaemia episcopalis (Kirby) are added to the provincial list. Macronaemia episcopalis (Kirby) is a species new to the Maritime provinces. Nine species of Latridiidae, Cartodere nodifer (Westwood), Dienerella ruficollis (Marsham), Enicmus aterrimus Motschulsky, Enicmus fictus Fall, Encimus histrio Jay and Tomlin, Lathridius minutus (Linnaeus), Stephostethus productus Rosenhauer, Corticaria elongata (Gyllenhal), and Corticarina longipennis (LeConte) are newly recorded for New Brunswick. Stephostehus productus is newly recorded from Canada. Collection and habitat data are presented for all these species.

  16. A Comprehensive Assessment of the Effects of Transgenic Cry1Ac/Cry1Ab Rice Huahui 1 on Adult Micraspis discolor (Fabricius (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Zhou

    Full Text Available Micraspis discolor (Fabricius (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae is a widely distributed coleoptera predator in southern Asia in rice ecosystem, and adult M. discolor feed on both rice pollen and soft-bodied arthropods. Bitrophic bioassay and tritrophic bioassay were conducted to evaluate the potential impact of Cry1Ac/Cry1Ab-expressing rice Huahui 1 and its non-transgenic counterpart Minghui 63 on fitness parameters of adult M. discolor. The results showed that the survival, and fecundity of this beetle' adults were not different when they fed on Bt rice or non-Bt rice pollen or Nilaparvata lugens (Stål reared on Bt rice or non-Bt rice. Toxicity assessment to ensure M. discolor adults were not sensitive to Cry1Ab or Cry1Ac protein independent from the pollen background, M. discolor adults were fed with an artificial diet containing Cry1Ac, Cry1Ab or both protein approximately 10 times higher concentration than in Huahui 1 rice pollen. No difference was detected for any of the life-table parameters tested between Cry protein-containing and pure diet. Artificial diet containing E-64 (N-(trans-Epoxysuccinyl-L-leucine 4-guanidinobutylamide was included as a positive control. In contrast, the pre-oviposition and fecundity of M. discolor were significantly adversely affected by feeding on E-64-containing diet. In both bioassays, the uptakes of Cry protein by adult M. discolor were tested by ELISA measurements. These results indicated that adults of M. discolor are not affected by Cry1Ab- or Cry1Ac-expressing rice pollen and are not sensitive to Cry protein at concentrations exceeding the levels in rice pollen in Huahui1. This suggests that M. discolor adults would not be harmed by Cry1Ac/Cry1Ab rice if Bt rice Huahui 1 were commercialized.

  17. Elemental distribution in reproductive and neural organs of the Epilachna nylanderi (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), a phytophage of nickel hyperaccumulator Berkheya coddii (Asterales: Asteraceae) by micro-PIXE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesjasz-Przybyłowicz, Jolanta; Orłowska, Elżbieta; Augustyniak, Maria; Nakonieczny, Mirosław; Tarnawska, Monika; Przybyłowicz, Wojciech; Migula, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of metal hyperaccumulation by plants is often explained by a pathogen or herbivore defense hypothesis. However, some insects feeding on metal hyperaccumulating plants are adapted to the high level of metals in plant tissues. Former studies on species that feed on the leaves of Berkheya coddii Roessler 1958 (Asteraceae), a nickel-hyperaccumulating plant, demonstrated several protective mechanisms involved in internal distribution, immobilization, and elimination of Ni from the midgut and Malpighian tubules. These species are mainly coleopterans, including the lady beetle, Epilachna nylanderi (Mulsant 1850) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), collected from the ultramafic ecosystem near Barberton in South Africa. By performing particle-induced X-ray emission microanalysis elemental microanalysis (PIXE), this study examined whether Ni may be harmful to internal body systems that decide on insect reactivity (central nervous system [CNS]), their reproduction, and the relationships between Ni and other micronutrients. Data on elemental distribution of nine selected elements in target organs of E. nylanderi were compared with the existing data for other insect species adapted to the excess of metals. Micro-PIXE maps of seven regions of the CNS showed Ni mainly in the neural connectives, while cerebral ganglia were better protected. Concentrations of other bivalent metals were lower than those of Ni. Testis, compared with other reproductive organs, showed low amounts of Ni. Zn was effectively regulated at physiological dietary levels. In insects exposed to excess dietary Zn, it was also accumulated in the reproductive organs. Comparison of E. nylanderii with other insects that ingest hyperaccumulating plants, especially chrysomelid Chrysolina clathrata (Clark) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), showed lower protection of the CNS and reproductive organs. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  18. A Comprehensive Assessment of the Effects of Transgenic Cry1Ac/Cry1Ab Rice Huahui 1 on Adult Micraspis discolor (Fabricius) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xia; Guo, Yunling; Kong, Hua; Zuo, Jiao; Huang, Qixing; Jia, Ruizong; Guo, Anping; Xu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Micraspis discolor (Fabricius) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is a widely distributed coleoptera predator in southern Asia in rice ecosystem, and adult M. discolor feed on both rice pollen and soft-bodied arthropods. Bitrophic bioassay and tritrophic bioassay were conducted to evaluate the potential impact of Cry1Ac/Cry1Ab-expressing rice Huahui 1 and its non-transgenic counterpart Minghui 63 on fitness parameters of adult M. discolor. The results showed that the survival, and fecundity of this beetle' adults were not different when they fed on Bt rice or non-Bt rice pollen or Nilaparvata lugens (Stål) reared on Bt rice or non-Bt rice. Toxicity assessment to ensure M. discolor adults were not sensitive to Cry1Ab or Cry1Ac protein independent from the pollen background, M. discolor adults were fed with an artificial diet containing Cry1Ac, Cry1Ab or both protein approximately 10 times higher concentration than in Huahui 1 rice pollen. No difference was detected for any of the life-table parameters tested between Cry protein-containing and pure diet. Artificial diet containing E-64 (N-(trans-Epoxysuccinyl)-L-leucine 4-guanidinobutylamide) was included as a positive control. In contrast, the pre-oviposition and fecundity of M. discolor were significantly adversely affected by feeding on E-64-containing diet. In both bioassays, the uptakes of Cry protein by adult M. discolor were tested by ELISA measurements. These results indicated that adults of M. discolor are not affected by Cry1Ab- or Cry1Ac-expressing rice pollen and are not sensitive to Cry protein at concentrations exceeding the levels in rice pollen in Huahui1. This suggests that M. discolor adults would not be harmed by Cry1Ac/Cry1Ab rice if Bt rice Huahui 1 were commercialized.

  19. Phylogeny, classification and evolution of ladybird beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) based on simultaneous analysis of molecular and morphological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seago, Ainsley E; Giorgi, Jose Adriano; Li, Jiahui; Slipiński, Adam

    2011-07-01

    Ladybird beetles (family Coccinellidae) are a species-rich, ecologically diverse group of substantial agricultural significance, yet have been consistently problematic to classify, with evolutionary relationships poorly understood. In order to identify major clades within Coccinellidae, evaluate the current classification system, and identify likely drivers of diversification in this polyphagous group, we conducted the first simultaneous Bayesian analysis of morphological and multi-locus molecular data for any beetle family. Addition of morphological data significantly improved phylogenetic resolution and support for early diverging lineages, thereby better resolving evolutionary relationships than either data type alone. On the basis of these results, we formally recognize the subfamilies Microweisinae and Coccinellinae sensuŚlipiński (2007). No significant support was found for the subfamilies Coccidulinae, Scymninae, Sticholotidinae, or Ortaliinae. Our phylogenetic results suggest that the evolutionary success of Coccinellidae is in large part attributable to the exploitation of ant-tended sternorrhynchan insects as a food source, enabled by the key innovation of unusual defense mechanisms in larvae. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The invasion history, distribution and colour pattern forms of the harlequin ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis (Pall. (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae in Slovakia, Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľubomír Panigaj

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The harlequin ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae has invaded and established in Slovakia. Following unintentional introduction in 2008, the spread of the alien coccinellid was very fast. By the end of 2009, it was recorded across the whole country, and by the end of 2012 it was widely distributed and common in various habitats, particularly gardens, orchards and urban areas, where it was most frequent on trees. The rate of eastward spread was approximately 200 km year-1, similar to the overall rate of spread in Europe. Between 2008 and 2012, the coccinellid was recorded in a total of 153 localities, in altitudes ranging from 98 to 1,250 m. Most records of this species were made in lowlands, hilly areas and valleys separating mountain ridges. However, it was only rarely documented in areas above 700 m a.s.l. The non-melanic colour form (f. succinea was dominant along alongitudinal transect including eight urban areas across Slovakia, with the frequency of melanic forms (f. spectabilis and f. conspicua together between 6.3 and 19.2% and a median equal to 10.5%. The invasion history and distribution of H. axyridis in Slovakia are discussed with regard to the time sequence of records, rate of spread, altitudinal distribution, anthropogenic dispersal, effective recording, proportion of melanic forms and other relevant aspects associated with the spread of this successful invader.

  1. FLUTUAÇÃO POPULACIONAL DE Triozoida limbata ENDERLEIN (HEMIPTERA: TRIOZIDAE E DE Scymnus spp. (COLEOPTERA: COCCINELLIDAE EM POMAR DE GOIABA (Psidium guajava L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Teixeira Duarte

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to analyze the contribution of the natural biological control of the coccinellid predator Scymnus spp. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae on Triozoida limbata Enderlein (Hemiptera: Sternorrhyncha: Triozidae, the aim of this research was to study the populational fluctuation of these arthropods in semi-organic orchard of guava and correlate the populational density of this pest with meteorological elements. We used yellow stick traps for monitoring adult of T. limbata and Scymnus spp., spaced approximately 30 m from each other at a height of 1.5 m above the ground, inside random plants. These traps were maintained in the field for 15 days and replaced by new traps, without interruption, totaling 23 samples. We calculated the Pearson correlation coefficients (r to correlate the populational density of T. limbata with populational fluctuation of Scymnus spp., and meteorological elements. We also made histograms with information about the populational fluctuation of the specimens sampled and temperature (°C and precipitation (mm values. The highest densities of adults of T. limbata occurred almost between spring and summer seasons. The populational density of Scymnus spp. was positively correlated with populational density of T. limbata. There was no correlation between the populational fluctuation of T. limbata with meteorological elements.

  2. Selective effects of natural and synthetic insecticides on mortality of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and its predator Eriopis connexa (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Wagner S; Costa, Mariana A; Cruz, Ivan; Silveira, Rodrigo D; Serrao, Jose E; Zanuncio, Jose C

    2010-08-01

    Spodoptera frugiperda Smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is a serious pest of corn in several American countries. It is mainly controlled with synthetic insecticides. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of the natural products, neem oil and pyroligneous extract, and the synthetic insecticide, lufenuron, at 2.50 mL water (0.25%) on the mortality of 2-, 4- and 6-day-old caterpillars of S. frugiperda, and their selectivities against fourth instar larvae of Eriopis connnexa Germar (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). Four- and 6-day-old S. frugiperda caterpillars showed higher mortality after exposure to neem oil (83.33 +/- 0.83 and 89.58 +/- 0.90%, respectively) and lufenuron (95.83 +/- 0.96 and 85.41 +/- 0.83%), compared to pyroligneous extract (68.75 +/- 0.69 and 31.25 +/- 0.31%). The deleterious effect of pyroligneous extract was higher in 2- (83.33 +/- 0.83% mortality) and 4-day-old (68.75 +/- 0.69%) S. frugiperda caterpillars than in 6-day-old caterpillars (31.25 +/- 0.31%). Larval mortality of the predator E. connexa was lower with neem oil and pyroligneous extract (25.00 +/- 0.33%) than with lufenuron (91.66 +/- 1.22%). Neem oil is thus recommended for control of S. frugiperda because of its high toxicity, combined with its relatively low toxicity to larvae of the natural enemy E. connexa.

  3. The invasion history, distribution and colour pattern forms of the harlequin ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis (Pall.) (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) in Slovakia, Central Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigaj, Lubomír; Zach, Peter; Honěk, Alois; Nedvěd, Oldřich; Kulfan, Ján; Martinková, Zdenka; Selyemová, Diana; Viglášová, Sandra; Roy, Helen E

    2014-01-01

    The harlequin ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) has invaded and established in Slovakia. Following unintentional introduction in 2008, the spread of the alien coccinellid was very fast. By the end of 2009, it was recorded across the whole country, and by the end of 2012 it was widely distributed and common in various habitats, particularly gardens, orchards and urban areas, where it was most frequent on trees. The rate of eastward spread was approximately 200 km year(-1), similar to the overall rate of spread in Europe. Between 2008 and 2012, the coccinellid was recorded in a total of 153 localities, in altitudes ranging from 98 to 1,250 m. Most records of this species were made in lowlands, hilly areas and valleys separating mountain ridges. However, it was only rarely documented in areas above 700 m a.s.l. The non-melanic colour form (f. succinea) was dominant along a longitudinal transect including eight urban areas across Slovakia, with the frequency of melanic forms (f. spectabilis and f. conspicua together) between 6.3 and 19.2% and a median equal to 10.5%. The invasion history and distribution of H. axyridis in Slovakia are discussed with regard to the time sequence of records, rate of spread, altitudinal distribution, anthropogenic dispersal, effective recording, proportion of melanic forms and other relevant aspects associated with the spread of this successful invader.

  4. Stethorus punctillum (Coleoptera: coccinellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    We review the ecology, life history, and effectiveness of Stethorus punctillum, a tiny, black-colored lady beetle of European origin. This lady beetle is a specialist predator of pest mites in greenhouses, interiorscapes, nurseries, and orchards. It attacks pest mites including the two-spotted spi...

  5. Genetics and characteristics of a pigmentation defective laboratory strain of the lady beetle, Coleomegilla maculata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beetles in the family Coccinellidae, commonly known as ladybugs, lady beetles, or ladybirds, are easily identifiable and popular beneficial insects. The species complex Coleomegilla maculata is commonly found in North American agroecosystems and widespread on the North American continent. It is impo...

  6. Selectivity of phytosanitary products used in organic farming on adult of Cryptolaemus montrouzieri (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae under laboratory conditionsSeletividade de produtos fitossanitários, usados no sistema de produção orgânica, sobre adultos de Cryptolaemus montrouzieri (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, em laboratório

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Bernardes Ourique

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The association of pesticides with biological control is possible only if they provide some selectivity to natural enemies. In the organic production system the effect of insecticides on beneficial insects has not been extensively studied. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate in laboratory conditions the effect of pesticides used in this system on the adults of the predator Cryptolaemus montrouzieri Mulsant (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae. We used four treatments, which corresponded to four multiple values (0.25x, 0.5x, 2x and 1x of the concentration recommended by manufacturers of the following products: Rotenat CE®, Pironat®, Biopirol 7M®, Organic Neem®, Natuneem® and lime sulfur, which were tested in C. montrouzieri by topical application and residual exposure. None of the products, at any concentrations tested, had a significant effect on the survival of adults of C. montrouzieri, what did not differ from the distilled water control, showing that the products tested are selective to the adults of this species. However, other forms of exposure and evaluation methods must be studied.A associação do controle biológico com produtos fitossanitários só é possível se estes apresentarem alguma seletividade aos inimigos naturais. No sistema de produção orgânica, o efeito de inseticidas sobre insetos benéficos não tem sido extensivamente estudado. Assim, este trabalho objetivou avaliar em laboratório o efeito de produtos fitossanitários utilizados neste sistema, sobre adultos do predador Cryptolaemus montrouzieri Mulsant (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae. Foram utilizados quatro tratamentos, os quais corresponderam quatro múltiplos (0,25x, 0,5x, 1x e 2x da concentração recomendada pelos fabricantes dos seguintes produtos comerciais: Rotenat CE®, Pironat®, Biopirol 7M®, Organic neem®, Natuneem® e calda sulfocálcica, que foram testados sobre C. montrouzieri por aplicação tópica e exposição a resíduos. Nenhum dos produtos, em qualquer

  7. Ciclo biológico e predação de três espécies de coccinelídeos (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae sobre o pulgão-gigante-do-pinus Cinara atlantica (Wilson (Hemiptera, Aphididae Biological cycle and predation of three coccinellid species (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae on giant conifer aphid Cinara atlantica (Wilson (Hemiptera, Aphididae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nádia Cristina de Oliveira

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Afídeos do gênero Cinara Curtis são importantes pragas de coníferas em vários países. No Brasil Cinara atlantica (Wilson, 1919 tem causado danos em plantações comerciais de Pinus spp. e o controle biológico com predadores pode ser uma opção melhor que o controle químico. Este trabalho teve por objetivo estudar a biologia e a capacidade de predação dos coccinelídeos Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville, 1842, Cycloneda sanguinea (Linnaeus, 1763 e Eriopis connexa (German, 1824 (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae sobre ninfas de C. atlantica. O estudo foi conduzido sob condições controladas (temperatura: 23 ± 1ºC, UR: 70 ± 10% e fotofase: 14 h.. Foi verificado que ninfas de C. atlantica são adequadas como alimento para as três espécies de coccinelídeos, assegurando seu desenvolvimento e reprodução. H. convergens e C. sanguinea apresentaram maior longevidade e capacidade de reprodução e também maior capacidade de predação (3832 e 3633 ninfas de C. atlantica em comparação a 2735 ninfas consumidas por E. connexa durante o ciclo completo, respectivamente para as espécies. Estas espécies de predadores podem contribuir para a redução da população de Cinara no campo.The aphids of the genus Cinara Curtis are important pests of conifers in several countries. In Brazil, Cinara atlantica (Wilson, 1919 has damaged commercial plantations of Pinus spp. and biological control with predators can be a better option than chemical control. The objective of this work was to study biology and predation potential of coccinellids Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville, 1842, Cycloneda sanguinea (Linnaeus, 1763 and Eriopis connexa (German, 1824 (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae on nymphs of C. atlantica. The study was carried out under controlled conditions (temperature: 23 ± 1ºC, RH: 70 ± 10% and fotophase: 14 h. It was verified that C. atlantica nymphs are adequate as food for the three coccinellid species, assuring their development and

  8. Locomotor activity of Cycloneda sanguinea (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae exposed to volatile semiochemicals and to direct contact with the odour source Actividad locomotriz de Cycloneda sanguinea (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae expuesta a semioquímicos volátiles y al contacto directo con la fuente de olor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo E. Heit

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Cycloneda sanguinea (Linnaeus (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae is an opportunistic polyphagous predator and when aphids dominate its menu, a complex foraging behaviour can be expected. An active movement characterized by a high locomotor activity plays an important role in the search of this prey. The behaviour of C. sanguinea adults exposed to volatile semiochemicals emitted by Capsicum annuum Linnaeus (Solanaceae substrates, healthy or infested with Myzus persicae (Sulzer (Hemiptera: Aphididae, or in direct contact with these substrates was here analyzed. The treatments evaluated were: A high aphid-infested pepper leaves, B low aphid-infested pepper leaves, C healthy pepper leaves and D control. Locomotor activity was not significantly different among treatments when C. sanguinea was exposed only to the volatiles. However, when adults were placed in direct contact with the evaluated substrates, statistically significant differences were found among treatments. These preliminary results could indicate that the sole presence of an olfactory stimulus could not be sufficient to modulate a different locomotor pattern in C. sanguinea.Cycloneda sanguinea (Linnaeus (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae es un predador polífago oportunista y cuando su menú está dominado por áfidos, es esperable un comportamiento complejo de forrajeo. Un movimiento activo, caracterizado por alta actividad locomotriz, juega un rol importante en la búsqueda de esta presa. En este trabajo se analizó el comportamiento de adultos de C. sanguinea expuestos a los semioquímicos volátiles, emitidos por sustratos de Capsicum annuum Linnaeus (Solanaceae sanos o infestados con Myzus persicae (Sulzer (Hemiptera: Aphididae, o simplemente puestos en contacto directo con esos sustratos. Los tratamientos evaluados fueron: A hojas de pimiento infestadas con alta densidad de áfidos, B hojas de pimiento infestadas con baja densidad de áfidos, C hojas de pimiento sanas y D control. La actividad

  9. Effect of insecticides on mealybug destroyer (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and parasitoid Leptomastix dactylopii (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), natural enemies of citrus mealybug (Homoptera: Pseudococcidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloyd, Raymond A; Dickinson, Amy

    2006-10-01

    In this study, we measured, under laboratory conditions, the direct and indirect effects of insecticides on mealybug destroyer, Cryptolaemus montrouzieri Mulsant (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), and parasitoid Leptomastix dactylopii Howard (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), natural enemies of citrus mealybug, Planococcus citri (Risso) (Homoptera: Pseudococcidae). The adult stages of both natural enemies were exposed to sprays of the insecticides buprofezin, pyriproxyfen, flonicamid, acetamiprid, dinotefuran, and clothianidin at label-recommended rates to assess direct mortality after 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. The effects of the insecticides on L. dactylopii parasitization rate and percentage of parasitoid emergence also were monitored using the label and 4x the recommended label rate. Dinotefuran was extremely detrimental to the adult parasitoid at the label rate with 100% mortality after 24 h. Buprofezin, pyriproxyfen, and flonicamid were not harmful to L. dactylopii when applied at the label rate. At 4x the recommended label rate, dinotefuran, acetamiprid, and clothianidin were all harmful to the parasitoid with 100% mortality 72 h after application. Both buprofezin and flonicamid were not toxic to L. dactylopii with 100% adult survival after 72 h. Pyriproxyfen and flonicamid, at both the label and 4x the recommended label rate, did not negatively affect L. dactylopii parasitization rate or percentage of parasitoid emergence. Acetamiprid, dinotefuran, and clothianidin were toxic to C. montrouzieri adults with 100% mortality after 48 h, whereas buprofezin, pyriproxyfen, and flonicamid demonstrated minimal (10-20% mortality after 48 h) harmful effects to the predator. Based on the results from our study, the indirect effects of the insect growth regulator (IGR) buprofezin were not decisive; however, the IGR pyriproxyfen and the insecticide flonicamid were not directly or indirectly harmful to the predator C. montrouzieri and parastioid L. dactylopii, indicating that

  10. Development and application of molecular gut-content analysis to detect aphid and coccinellid predation by Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondoni, Gabriele; Athey, Kacie J; Harwood, James D; Conti, Eric; Ricci, Carlo; Obrycki, John J

    2015-12-01

    Despite their positive effect in reducing pest populations, exotic generalist predators sometimes become invasive and contribute to the displacement of indigenous species in the same trophic level. Although laboratory experiments have linked intraguild predation (IGP) to these interactions, field evidence and quantification of IGP are still lacking for most systems. The recent establishment of the exotic Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in Italy raises concern about the detrimental effect that the ladybird could have on native coccinellids. Here we assessed, under laboratory conditions, the acceptability and suitability of eggs of 2 native ladybirds, Adalia bipunctata L. and Oenopia conglobata (L.), as prey items for H. axyridis larvae. Then we developed primers for molecular gut-content analysis to detect predation by H. axyridis on the 2 ladybirds and on the aphid Eucallipterus tiliae L. Species-specific 16S primers were developed for the 3 species and laboratory feeding trials were conducted to quantify the rate of prey DNA breakdown in the gut of H. axyridis. Moreover, to field evaluate primers, H. axyridis 4th instars (n = 132) were systematically collected from linden trees in northern Italy and screened for the presence of prey DNA. Seventy-three percent and 7% of field collected H. axyridis were positive for aphid and coccinellid DNA, respectively. Predation upon aphid and A. bipunctata was lower than predicted if density dependent consumption was expected, while predation upon O. conglobata was significantly higher. Here, we provided the first evidence of IGP among feral populations of H. axyridis and indigenous ladybird beetles, occurring in Italy. © 2014 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  11. Factors affecting establishment and recovery of Sasajiscymnus tsugae (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), an introduced predator of hemlock woolly adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) on eastern hemlock (Pinales: Pinaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakeem, A; Grant, J F; Wiggins, G J; Lambdin, P L; Hale, F A; Buckley, D S; Rhea, J R; Parkman, J P; Taylor, G

    2013-12-01

    To reduce populations of hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), >500,000 Sasajiscymnus tsugae (Sasaji and McClure) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) have been released in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park since 2002. To determine factors affecting establishment and recovery of these predatory beetles, 65 single release sites were sampled using beat sheets from 2008 to 2012. Several abiotic and biotic factors were evaluated for their association with establishment and recovery of S. tsugae. Information on predatory beetle releases (location, year of release, number released, and season of release), topographic features (elevation, slope, Beers transformed aspect, and topographic relative moisture index), and temperature data (minimum and maximum temperatures 1 d after release and average minimum and maximum temperatures 7 d after release) were obtained from Great Smoky Mountains National Park personnel. These factors were evaluated using stepwise logistic regression and Pearson correlation. S. tsugae was recovered from 13 sites 2 to 10 yr after release, and the greatest number was recovered from 2002 release sites. Regression indicated establishment and recovery was negatively associated with year of release and positively associated with the average maximum temperature 7 d after release and elevation (generally, recovery increased as temperatures increased). Several significant correlations were found between presence and number of S. tsugae and year of release, season of release, and temperature variables. These results indicate that releases of S. tsugae should be made in warmer (≍10-25°C) temperatures and monitored for at least 5 yr after releases to enhance establishment and recovery efforts.

  12. Field-Cage Evaluation of Survival, Reproduction, and Feeding Behavior of Adult Scymnus coniferarum (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), a Predator of Adelges tsugae (Hemiptera: Adelgidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darr, M N; McAvoy, T J; Brewster, C C; Salom, S M

    2016-12-01

    The hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand, is an invasive pest of eastern (Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carrière) and Carolina hemlock (Tsuga caroliniana Engelmann) forests in the eastern United States. Scymnus (Pullus) coniferarum Crotch (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is a lady beetle that preys on A. tsugae in the western United States, where A. tsugae infestations on western hemlocks are not lethal. It is thought that S. coniferarum could be an important predator that helps keep A. tsugae populations from reaching damaging levels in this region. This study assesses the potential of this predator as a biological control agent for A. tsugae in the eastern United States. S. coniferarum predation, reproductive potential, and survival were evaluated in field-cages on adelgid-infested T. canadensis at two sites in southwestern Virginia. Sampling was conducted between December 2012 and June 2014 to evaluate the impact of S. coniferarum on both generations of A. tsuage (sistens and progrediens). Adult S. coniferarum fed on both generations and all life stages of A. tsugae during both field trials at rates comparable to other adelgid-specific predators. Evidence of S. coniferarum oviposition was minimal, and may be attributed to low temperatures and prey availability. S. coniferarum mortality was greatest when exposed to winter temperatures at the higher elevation site in 2013, and least throughout the 2014 spring sample period. S. coniferarum demonstrated a high predation rate on A. tsugae and survived for extended periods of time at sites in southwest Virginia, indicating that this species could be an effective predator of hemlock woolly adelgid in similar climates. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Comparative biology of Cycloneda sanguinea (Linnaeus, 1763 and Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville, 1842 (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae focusing on the control of Cinara spp. (Hemiptera, Aphididae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiane Teresinha Cardoso

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The giant conifer aphids Cinara pinivora (Wilson, 1919 and Cinara atlantica (Wilson, 1919 (Hemiptera, Aphididae have been observed attacking Pinus spp. in Southern and Southeastern Brazil. The coccinellids, on the other hand, were found feeding on these aphids in the field, which can be regarded as potential biological control agents. The biological cycle and mortality rate of larvae of Cycloneda sanguinea (Linnaeus, 1763 and Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville, 1842 (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae were evaluated using twenty larvae of each predator species fed with nymphs of Cinara. The vials with the insects were kept under 15 ºC, 20 ºC and 25 ºC, with 12h photophase and 70 ± 10% relative humidity. The consumption was evaluated every 24 hours and the nymphs replaced. For C. sanguinea, the egg incubation time was 10.5, 5.0 and 4.0 days; the average larval development period was 33.3, 15.8 and 8.6 days and the larval mortality rate 20%,0% and 15%, respectively at 15 ºC, 20 ºC and 25 ºC. For H. convergens, the larval development time was 41.9, 19.3 and 10.9 days at 15 ºC, 20 ºC and 25 ºC, respectively. The larval mortality rate was 35%, 15% and 0% under the three temperatures. Both species developed adequately when fed nymphs of Cinara, however, C. sanguinea performed better than H. convergens, even at 15 ºC, at which temperature the biological cycles of the coccinellids are prolonged, but the temperature is favorable for the development of Cinara populations in the field.

  14. Incidence of Male-Killing Rickettsia spp. (α-Proteobacteria) in the Ten-Spot Ladybird Beetle Adalia decempunctata L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Schulenburg, J. Hinrich Graf; Habig, Michael; Sloggett, John J.; Webberley, K. Mary; Bertrand, Dominique; Hurst, Gregory D. D.; Majerus, Michael E. N.

    2001-01-01

    The diversity of endosymbiotic bacteria that kill male host offspring during embryogenesis and their frequencies in certain groups of host taxa suggest that the evolution of male killing and the subsequent spread of male-killing symbionts are primarily determined by host life history characteristics. We studied the 10-spot ladybird beetle, Adalia decempunctata L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), in which male killing has not been recorded previously, to test this hypothesis, and we also assessed the evolution of the male killer identified by DNA sequence analysis. Our results show that A. decempunctata harbors male-killing Rickettsia (α-proteobacteria). Male-killing bacteria belonging to the genus Rickettsia have previously been reported only for the congeneric two-spot ladybird beetle, Adalia bipunctata L. Phylogenetic analysis of Rickettsia DNA sequences isolated from different populations of the two host species revealed a single origin of male killing in the genus Rickettsia. The data also indicated possible horizontal transfer of symbionts between host species. In addition, A. bipunctata is known to bear at least four different male-killing symbionts in its geographic range two of which coexist in the two locations from which A. decempunctata specimens were obtained for the present study. Since only a single male-killing taxon was found in A. decempunctata, we assume that the two closely related ladybird beetle species must differ in the number and/or geographic distribution of male killers. We discuss the importance of these findings to our understanding of the evolution and dynamics of symbiotic associations between male-killing bacteria and their insect hosts. PMID:11133455

  15. Laboratory Investigations Reveal that Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) Is a Poor Host for Dinocampus coccinellae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro-Guedes, CamilaFediuk; de Almeida, LúciaMassutti

    2016-01-01

    Harmonia axyridis (Pallas, 1773) is an Asian coccinellid released in several places to act as a biological control agent of aphids. Dinocampus coccinellae (Schrank, 1802) is an endoparasite that uses more than 40 coccinellid species as hosts. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the interactions between D. coccinellae and H. axyridis and to determine the impact of the parasitoid on the establishment capacity of H. axyridis It was also investigate the influence of host on the development of D. coccinellae using other Coccinellidae species as hosts: Cycloneda sanguinea, (L., 1763) Cycloneda pulchella (Klug, 1829), Eriopis connexa (Germar, 1824), and Olla v-nigrum (Mulsant, 1866) In no-choice tests, pupa was the least attacked stage, and the fourth instar and adults the most attacked. In choice tests, the pupa was less attacked when combined with all the other stages, and the fourth instar and adults the most attacked. There was statistical difference only for fecundity, fertility, and number of eggs/day, with higher values found in the non-parasitized control group. Due to the low rate of parasitism it is believed that D. coccinellae has little impact on the populations of this coccinellid in Brazil. However, it is noteworthy that an increase in H. axyridis coverage areas can affect the populations of D. coccinellae, as in some places of occurrence, H. axyridis has become the predominant species of Coccinellidae. The result can be a decrease in populations of this species of parasitoid or its better adaptation to the new host. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  16. Algumas características da reprodução e ontogênese de Epilachna paenulata (Germar (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Epilachninae Some reproductive and ontogenetic characteristics of Epilachna paenulata (Germar, 1824 (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Epilachninae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma G. Ganho

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Epilachna paenulata (Germar, 1824 was reared feeding on pumpkin leaves (Cucurbita pepo Lourt. in laboratory conditions at temperatures of 20±0,5ºC, relative humidity of 65±0,5% and 12 hour photoperiod. Groups of fecunded and non-fecunded females were studied. The ovarioles showed four developing stages during egg production, morphologically alike for fecunded and non-fecunded females, but differing in the duration time of the stages. Each ovarium has 24 ovarioles on average, less than any other species known into the genus, and all ovarioles are physiologically active at each oviposition. The mean number of ovarioles is lower when compared with the other species of Epilachninae known. Fecunded and non-fecunded females showed a similar preoviposition period, but longer than any other species known into the genus. The interoviposition period is shorter among fecunded females than non-fecunded and among other species of the genus. The number of ovipositions and eggs per oviposition and the daily oviposition rate are higher among fecunded females than non-fecunded and any other species of the genus. Differing from other Coccinellidae species, the mean eggs width do not change between the first and second ovipositions. The eggs handling decrease the larvae viability. The differences observed in the number of eggs per oviposition, in the interoviposition periods and the daily oviposition rate between fecunded and non-fecunded females showed that mate changes the female reprodutive capacity.

  17. Escolha por sítios específicos para oviposição como fator de estruturação da comunidade de joaninhas (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) em agroecossistemas no Distrito Federal

    OpenAIRE

    Sicsú, Paula Ramos

    2013-01-01

    De acordo com a teoria da exclusão competitiva, espécies aparentadas que exploram recursos semelhantes e coexistem no ambiente devem apresentar diferenças específicas entre seus nichos realizados. Como a distribuição das espécies no ambiente afeta a estruturação das comunidades, será que a estruturação da comunidade de joaninhas afidófagas (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) é ditada pelo padrão de distribuição dos indivíduos das espécies em relação a plantas e pulgões (Hemiptera: Aphidoidea) específ...

  18. Two-Spotted Ladybeetle Adalia bipunctata L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae): A Commercially Available Predator to Control Asian Citrus Psyllid Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Muhammad; Stansly, Philip A.

    2016-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae) is an economically important pest of citrus because it serves as a vector of the causal pathogens of huanglongbing (HLB) also known as citrus greening disease. The increased use of insecticides for control of D. citri negatively impacts several natural enemies including some effective ladybeetle species which are not available commercially. The two-spotted ladybeetle, Adalia bipunctata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is found in some crop and forest ecosystems of Asia, Europe and North America and available commercially. It is known to attack aphids and mealybugs but there are no published records of feeding on psyllids. We evaluated suitability and preference of A. bipunctata for nymphs of D. citri compared to corn leaf aphid Rhopalosiphum maidis (Hemiptera: Aphididae) a global pest of cereal crops and prey for many predaceous insects. We also compared development and reproduction of A. bipunctata on these two species with frozen eggs of the Mediterranean flour moth Ephestia kuehniella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) at 25°C. Initially, more D. citri than R. maidis nymphs were consumed in the no-choice tests although final consumption by larva and adult of A. bipunctata did not differ in the choice and no-choice tests. Larval development was prolonged by one day on D. citri compared to R. maidis nymphs but did not differ between either of these diets and E. kuehniella. Larval survival to adult averaged 93–100% and was not impacted by diet. Adult life span did not differ between diets although those on D. citri and R. maidis nymphs weighed less and produced fewer but more fertile eggs than on E. kuehniella eggs. Significant reduction of D. citri nymphs averaging 54% was observed in colonies caged with adult A. bipunctata on field planted citrus. R° (net reproductive rate) was least for beetles fed R. maidis, but otherwise there were no significant differences in demographic parameters. Successful

  19. Two-Spotted Ladybeetle Adalia bipunctata L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae): A Commercially Available Predator to Control Asian Citrus Psyllid Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Azhar A; Qureshi, Jawwad A; Afzal, Muhammad; Stansly, Philip A

    2016-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae) is an economically important pest of citrus because it serves as a vector of the causal pathogens of huanglongbing (HLB) also known as citrus greening disease. The increased use of insecticides for control of D. citri negatively impacts several natural enemies including some effective ladybeetle species which are not available commercially. The two-spotted ladybeetle, Adalia bipunctata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is found in some crop and forest ecosystems of Asia, Europe and North America and available commercially. It is known to attack aphids and mealybugs but there are no published records of feeding on psyllids. We evaluated suitability and preference of A. bipunctata for nymphs of D. citri compared to corn leaf aphid Rhopalosiphum maidis (Hemiptera: Aphididae) a global pest of cereal crops and prey for many predaceous insects. We also compared development and reproduction of A. bipunctata on these two species with frozen eggs of the Mediterranean flour moth Ephestia kuehniella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) at 25°C. Initially, more D. citri than R. maidis nymphs were consumed in the no-choice tests although final consumption by larva and adult of A. bipunctata did not differ in the choice and no-choice tests. Larval development was prolonged by one day on D. citri compared to R. maidis nymphs but did not differ between either of these diets and E. kuehniella. Larval survival to adult averaged 93-100% and was not impacted by diet. Adult life span did not differ between diets although those on D. citri and R. maidis nymphs weighed less and produced fewer but more fertile eggs than on E. kuehniella eggs. Significant reduction of D. citri nymphs averaging 54% was observed in colonies caged with adult A. bipunctata on field planted citrus. R° (net reproductive rate) was least for beetles fed R. maidis, but otherwise there were no significant differences in demographic parameters. Successful

  20. Egg Cannibalism and its Life History Consequences Vary with Life Stage, Sex, and Reproductive Status in Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayoumy, Mohamed H; Michaud, J P

    2015-08-01

    Egg cannibalism is common in Coccinellidae, but its biological consequences have not been fully explored. We examined egg cannibalism by neonates, fourth instars, and adults of Hippodamia convergens Guerin-Meneville for effects on development, reproduction, and progeny fitness. We also tested female adults for ability to avoid cannibalizing their own eggs and first-instar larvae, and both sexes for changes in cannibalism propensity following mating, all in the presence of ad libitum food [larvae: eggs of Ephestia kuehniella Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), adults: Schizaphis graminum (Rondani)]. Cannibalism by neonates reduced developmental time and increased male body size. Cannibalism in the fourth instar accelerated pupation and led to the production of eggs that hatched faster, regardless of which parent cannibalized. However, egg fertility was improved only by maternal cannibalism in the fourth instar. Females recognized their own egg clusters, sometimes added eggs to them, and preferentially cannibalized nonfilial clusters. Most gravid females cannibalized a first-instar larva within 30 min, whether filial or not. Adult egg cannibalism was similar for virgin males and females, but declined after mating in males, and increased in females, although it had no effect on fecundity or fertility. Daughters of cannibal pairs were heavier than those of other mating combinations, but offspring of noncannibal parents had the fastest development. Reproductive females appeared to use egg cannibalism to reduce risk for their own eggs, increasing the number cannibalized with the number laid. Thus, egg cannibalism in coccinellids varies with life stage, sex, and reproductive condition, independent of food availability, and benefits are life stage specific.

  1. Effects of temperature on population growth parameters of Cryptolaemus montrouzieri (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae reared on Planococcus citri (Homoptera: Pseudococcidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negar Saeedi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of temperature on the development, survival, fecundity and population growth parameters of Cryptolaemus montrouzieri Mulsant (Col.: Coccinellidae reared on Planococcus citri Risso (Hom.: Pseudococcidae was determined at five constant temperatures (18, 22, 26, 30 and 32±1°C in the laboratory conditions. Results showed a temperature - dependent development of the coccinellid. The mean total of immature period was estimated 76.6±0.9, 33.9±0.1, 25.8±0.1, 22.6±0.1 and 26.2±1.4 days at 18, 22, 26, 30 and 32°C, respectively. The highest and lowest values of R0, rm and λ were obtained 369.9±50.2 and 2.5±0.8 (female/female/generation, 0.07±0.01 and 0.02±0.01 (female/female/day and 1.08±0.01 and 1.02±0.01 (day-1 at 26 and 32°C, respectively. The lowest values of generation time (T and doubling time (Dt were calculated 42.2±0.9 and 8.9±0.5 days at 32 and 26°C, respectively. The lower and higher developmental threshold of total of immature period were obtained 11.5 and 25.5°C, respectively. The thermal requirement for completion of total of immature period of this predator were estimated 400 DD. These results showed that 26°C and/or adjacent temperature is most suitable for mass rearing of this predator.

  2. 孟氏隐唇瓢虫的触角感受器%Antennal sensilla of Cryptolaemus montrouzieri Mulsant (Coleoptera:Coccinellidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘平; 张宇宏; 吴红胜; 谢佳沁; 邓从双; 庞虹

    2013-01-01

    The antennal morphology,sensillar types,quantity and distribution of both sexes of Adult Cryptolaemus montrouzieri Mulsant (Coleoptera:Coccinellidae) was investigated with Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM).The results show that antenna of adult C.montrouzieri consists of scape,pedicel,and eight flagellomeres.Seven sensillar types are observed:four types of sensilla basiconicae (s.ba),four types of sensilla chaetica,four types of sensilla trichodea (s.tr),and one type sensilla coeloconica (s.co),one sensilla auriciliica (s.au),cavity-like sensilla (s.cs),and B?hm bristle (s.bm).Sensilla trichodea are the most numerous; sensilla chaetica are the next most abundant.The number of other sensilla types is greatly reduced.On the tip of the 8th flagellomere,various types of sensilla are densely packed,except for s.bm.No remarkable differences are foundin the antennal size,shape,and sensilla types between the male and female of C.montrouzieri.According to the distribution of sensilla and sensilla functions reported in the past,s.tr are presumed to be pheromone receptors in C.montrouzieri,s.ch may function as mechanoreceptors and chemoreceptors,s.ba and s.co are postulated as plant volatiles receptors and chemo-,thermo-,or hygroreceptions,respectively,and s.bm may be related to perceiving the antennal position and movement.%本文使用场发射扫描电子显微镜对孟氏隐唇瓢虫Cryptolaemus montrouzieri Mulsant雌雄成虫的触角和触角感受器进行了观察和研究,并对触角形态,感受器形态、类型、数量及分布进行了统计和分析.孟氏隐唇瓢虫雌雄成虫触角均由柄节,梗节及8个鞭小节组成.观察到7种触角感受器:四种锥形感受器(s.ba),四种刺形感受器(s.ch),四种毛形感受器(s.tr),一种腔锥形感受器(s.co),一种耳形感受器(s.au),一种腔形感受器(s.cl),一种B?hm氏鬃毛(s.bm).毛形感受器和刺形感受器数量最多,其他类型感受器数量都较少.B?hm氏鬃

  3. Ocorrência e Distribuição de Coccinelídeos (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae Associados às Plantas Cítricas no Estado do Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Costa Rodrigues

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available ResumoO estudo objetivou registrar a ocorrência, flutuação populacional das espécies de coccinelídeos e delinear a distribuição geográfica (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae associados as plantas cítricas no Estado do Rio de Janeiro. Foram visitados 11 municípios situados em duas regiões do Estado do Rio de Janeiro: Baixada Fluminense e Região das Baixadas Litorâneas (Região Citrícola. O período de estudo foi de janeiro de 2000 a junho de 2001. Os coccinelídeos foram observados, coletados, conservados e identificados. Desta forma 11 espécies foram observadas no Estado. Os municípios com maior ocorrência de espécies foi Seropédica e Araruama e com menor ocorrência foram São Pedro da Aldeia, Iguaba Grande, Tanguá e Itaboraí. A espécie que se verificou com maior distribuição foi Pentilia egena (Mulsant, 1850, presente em 10 municípios, e com menor distribuição foi Curinus coeruleus Mulsant 1850, presente em apenas um município. Quando avaliada a flutuação populacional, houve uma tendência na redução da população nos meses mais frios (inverno, sendo P. egena a espécie com maior média populacional (40% e espécies dominantes juntamente com Azya luteipes Mulsant 1850. No período de estudo a diversidade de espécies foi considerada relativamente alta (α= 3,91 quando avaliada através do índice de Margalef e Shanon-Wiener (H'= 0,81, sendo considerada uma diversidade relativamente alta. Occurrence and Distribution of Coccinelids (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae Associates at the Citrus Plants in Rio de Janeiro State Abstract. This work aimed to register the occurrence, study the population fluctuation the ladybeetles species and to delineate the geographic distribution (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae associated at citrus plants in Rio de Janeiro State. 11 districts situated in two regions of the Rio de Janeiro State were visited: "Baixada Fluminense" and "Região das Baixadas Litorâneas (Região Citrícola". The study period

  4. Morfologia dos imaturos e do adulto de Coccidophilus citricola Brèthes (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Sticholotidinae, predador de cochonilhas-de-carapaça (Hemiptera, Diaspididae de citros Morphology of immatures and adult of Coccidophilus citricola Brèthes (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Sticholotidinae, predator of citrus armored scales (Hemiptera, Diaspididae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Adaime da Silva

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Imaturos e adultos de Coccidophilus citricola Brèthes, 1905 são descritos e ilustrados com auxílio de microscopia eletrônica de varredura. A larva é comparada com as de Microweisea Cockerel e outras espécies de Coccinellidae, e o adulto com duas espécies norte-americanas de Coccidophilus Brèthes.Immatures and adults of Coccidophilus citricola Brèthes, 1905 are described and illustrated, using scanning electron microscopy. The larva is compared to those of Microweisea Cockerel and other species of Coccinellidae, and the adults with two North American species of the Genus Coccidophilus Brèthes.

  5. The Influence of Exotic Lady Beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) Establishment on the Species Composition of the Native Lady Beetle Community in Missouri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diepenbrock, Lauren M; Fothergill, Kent; Tindall, Kelly V; Losey, John E; Smyth, Rebecca R; Finke, Deborah L

    2016-08-01

    The diversity and abundance of native lady beetles (Coccinellidae) in North America has declined in recent decades. This decline is often correlated with the introduction and establishment of exotic lady beetle species, including Coccinella septempunctata L. and Harmonia axyridis Pallas, suggesting that exotic species precipitated the decline of native lady beetles. We examined species records of native coccinellids in Missouri over 118 yr and asked whether the species composition of the community experienced a shift following the establishment of the exotic species. We found that the contemporary native coccinellid community is different from the community that was present nearly a century ago. However, there was no evidence for a recent abrupt shift in composition triggered by the establishment of exotic species. Instead, our data suggest that the native lady beetle community has been undergoing consistent and gradual change over time, with some species decreasing in abundance and others increasing. While not excluding exotic species as a factor contributing to the decline of native lady beetle species, our findings suggest that other continuous factors, like land use change, may have played a more influential role in determining the composition of the native coccinellid communities within our region. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Antileishmanial polyphenols from Corymbia maculata

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jasmeen Sidana; Dinesh Neeradi; Alka Choudhary; Sushma Singh; William J Foley; Inder Pal Singh

    2013-07-01

    An activity-guided fractionation was used to identify the antileishmanial compounds of Corymbia maculata. The hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol extracts were active in in vitro antileishmanial assay. Twelve polyphenols including 8-demethyl eucalyptin (1), eucalyptin (2), myrciaphenone A (3), myrciaphenone B (4), quercetin-3---D-xylopyranoside (5), myricetin-3---L-rhamnopyranoside (6), quercetin-3---D-galactopyranoside (7), quercetin-3---D-glucopyranoside (8), quercetin-3---L-rhamnopyranoside (9), syringic acid (10), gallic acid-3-methyl ether (11), gallic acid-4-methyl ether (12) and gallic acid (13) were isolated from the active extracts. All the tested compounds except 8-demethyleucalyptin and myrciaphenone B showed strong to moderate (6.9-24.5 M) antileishmanial activity against Leishmania donovani promastigotes. An HPLC-PDA method has been developed to detect/quantify 29 compounds in the extracts of C. maculata leaves. This validated method allows simultaneous quantitation of seven flavonoids, fourteen phloroglucinols and eight other polyphenols and can be applied for qualitative as well as quantitative determination of phytoconstituents in Eucalyptus matrices.

  7. Adult Diapause in Coleoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Hodek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies dealing with adult (reproductive diapause in the Coleoptera are reviewed, as a kind of supplement to the classic compendia. In the first two sections, the general characteristics of adult diapause are described and principal terms explained. Original articles dealing with 19 species from nine coleopteran families (Coccinellidae, Chrysomelidae, Bruchidae, Curculionidae, Carabidae, Silphidae, Scolytidae, Scarabaeidae, and Endomychidae are reviewed. Finally attempts are made at generalisations from the papers reviewed, and hypotheses on diapause evolution are inferred. A polyphenic character of diapause is a prominent feature in C. septempunctata and L. decemlineata, but has been found also in other Coleoptera and in insects generally and often generates voltinism heterogeneity within populations.

  8. Immatures of Epilachna Chevrolat (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Epilachninae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia A. Casari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Description of the pupa and redescription of the larva of Epilachna vigintioctopunctata (Fabricius, collected for the first time on Brugmansia suaveoleus (Humb. and Bonpl. ex Willd. Bercht. and J. Presl (Solanaceae (trombeteiro, in the state of São Paulo (Brazil, is presented. The diagnoses of the described pupae of E. clandestina (Mulsant, E. paenulata (Germar and E. spreta (Mulsant, based on specimens examined, and that of E. cacica Guérin, based on the literature, are presented. A comparison among the known larvae and pupae of this genus is also presented. This is the first description of immatures of E. vigintioctopunctata from the Western Hemisphere.

  9. Harmonia axyridis: a threat to Brazilian Coccinellidae? Harmonia axyridis: uma ameaça aos Coccinellidae brasileiros?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila B. C. Martins

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Harmonia axyridis (Pallas (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae is a polyphagous Asian species, well-known as a classical biological control agent of aphids around the world, introduced probably accidentally in Brazil, sampled for the first time in 2002. It is an important intraguild predator, competing for food with native coccinellids. It was studied H. axyridis alimentary sources and host plants, its abundance compared with native and established species, the influence of abiotic factors and the seasons over the abundance of H. axyridis throughout one year, and discussed the mechanisms which influence the displacement of species. Harmonia axyridis was found in 38 plant species, among them 20 were new records, feeding on 20 aphid species, eight of them new alimentary records. Between 2006/2007, eight Coccinellidae species were collected and H. axyridis was the most abundant (91.23%. Harmonia axyridis peak of abundance occurred in August and September 2007, probably influenced by the temperature and food availability. From 1999 to 2007 a reduction and variation in the diversity of collected species of Coccinellidae were observed with the predominance of H. axyridis, which may indicate their displacement.Harmonia axyridis (Pallas (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae é uma espécie asiática, polífaga e reconhecida como agente de controle biológico de afídeos pelo mundo, provavelmente introduzida acidentalmente no Brasil, coletada pela primeira vez em 2002. É um importante predador intraguilda, pois compete por alimento com as esp��cies nativas de coccinelídeos. Foram estudadas as fontes alimentares de H. axyridis e suas plantas hospedeiras, sua abundância em relação às espécies nativas e estabelecidas, a influência dos fatores abióticos e as estações do ano sobre sua abundância durante um ano e discutidos os mecanismos que influenciam no deslocamento das espécies nativas de Coccinellidae. Além disso, foi testada a influência dos fatores abi

  10. The complete mitochondrial genome of Channa argus, Channa maculata and hybrid snakehead fish [Channa maculata (♀) × Channa argus (♂)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shu-Ren; Ma, Ke-Yi; Xing, Zhi-Jun; Xie, Nan; Wang, Yu-Xi; Wang, Qun; Li, Jia-Le

    2013-06-01

    We sequenced and characterized the complete mitochondrial genome of Channa argus, Channa maculata and their hybrid [C. maculata (♀) and C. argus (♂)]. All the three mitochondrial genomes contained the typical complement of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNAs (tRNAs), 2 ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and 1 control region. The entire mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecule of C. maculata was 16,559 bp long while the complete mtDNA molecule of C. argus and hybrid snakehead fish was 16,558 bp long. This is the first report on the complete mitogenome sequence of C. maculata and hybrid snakehead fish.

  11. Ciclo biológico e predação de três espécies de coccinelídeos (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) sobre o pulgão-gigante-do-pinus Cinara atlantica (Wilson) (Hemiptera, Aphididae)

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira,Nádia Cristina de; Wilcken, Carlos Frederico; Matos,Carlos Alberto O. de

    2004-01-01

    Afídeos do gênero Cinara Curtis são importantes pragas de coníferas em vários países. No Brasil Cinara atlantica (Wilson, 1919) tem causado danos em plantações comerciais de Pinus spp. e o controle biológico com predadores pode ser uma opção melhor que o controle químico. Este trabalho teve por objetivo estudar a biologia e a capacidade de predação dos coccinelídeos Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville, 1842, Cycloneda sanguinea (Linnaeus, 1763) e Eriopis connexa (German, 1824) (Coleoptera,...

  12. Invasions by ladybugs, ladybirds, and other predatory Coleoptera

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Edward W.; Soares, António O.; Yasuda, Hironori

    2011-01-01

    Copyright © International Organization for Biological Control (IOBC) 2011. Species of predatory Coleoptera have become abundant in new geographic regions recently, raising concerns for invaded ecosystems. We address this topic by focusing on invasive alien ladybird beetles (Coccinellidae; known also as ladybugs). Humans appear directly or indirectly responsible for all or most ladybird invasions. Factors hypothesized to have promoted ladybird invasions include genetic diversity (e.g., for ...

  13. Triatoma maculata colonises urban domicilies in Boa Vista, Roraima, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricardo-Silva, Alice; Gonçalves, Teresa Cristina Monte; Luitgards-Moura, José Francisco; Lopes, Catarina Macedo; da Silva, Silvano Pedrosa; Bastos, Amanda Queiroz; Vargas, Nathalia Coelho; Freitas, Maria-Rosa Goreti

    2016-01-01

    During a medical entomology course in Boa Vista, Roraima, colonies of Triatoma maculata closely associated with pigeon nests were observed in concrete air-conditioner box located on the external plastered and cemented walls of a modern brick-built apartment block. In only one eight-hole ceramic brick, located inside one air-conditioner box, 127 specimens of T. maculata were collected. T. maculata is a recognised vector of Trypanosoma cruzi in the surrounding area and its domiciliation increases the risk of Chagas disease transmission. PMID:27759767

  14. Comparison of the northern snakehead (Channa argus) and blotched snakehead (Channa maculata) and their reciprocal hybrids (C. maculata ♀ × C. argus ♂ and C. argus ♀ × C. maculata ♂) based on complete mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xincheng, Zhang; Xinping, Zhu; Kunci, Chen; Jian, Zhao; Qing, Luo; Xiaoyou, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial DNA of Channa argus, Channa maculata, C. maculate ♀ × C. argus ♂ and C. argus ♀ × C. maculata ♂ were sequenced to characterize and compare their mitochondrial genomes. The lengths were 16,558, 16,559, 16,558 and 16,559 bp respectively. Start codon of 13 protein-coding genes was ATG, except that COI was GTG. The control region of the mitogenome were 907, 908, 907 and 908 bp in C. argus, C. maculata and their reciprocal hybrids (C. argus ♀ × C. maculata ♂ and C. maculate ♀ × C. argus ♂), respectively.

  15. Ladies in stripes: taxonomic confusion in a potential mimicry complex among Wallacean Coccinellidae (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiahui; Tomaszewska, Wioletta; Pang, Hong; Ślipiński, Adam

    2014-12-24

    Two species of ladybird beetles, one belonging to Phrynocaria Timberlake (Coccinellni) and the second to Chilocorus Leach (Chilocorini) collected by R.A. Wallace in the Maluku Islands (Indonesia) have identical body size and colour pattern with longitudinal stripes on elytra. Their external features were so similar that G.R. Crotch included both of them in the type series of Chilocorus wallacii Crotch, 1874. The specimen designated as the lectotype of Chilocorus wallacii belongs to Phrynocaria. Coelophora wallacii Crotch, 1874 is also transferred to Phrynocaria (new comb.) and becomes senior homonym and Phrynocaria crotchi new name is proposed for the secondary junior homonym. Chilocorus crotchi sp. nov. is described for the taxon misidentified as Chilocorus wallacii Crotch.

  16. A contribution to Asian Afidentula Kapur (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Epilachnini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingmin; Tomaszewska, Wioletta; Ren, Shunxiang

    2015-01-01

    Two new species of Afidentula, Afidentuladentata sp. n. and Afidentulajinpingensis sp. n. are described from China. Afissasiamensis Dieke is moved to Afidentula comb. n.. All three species are described and illustrated, and a distribution map is given. A key to Asian species of Afidentula is updated. Diagnostic similarities and differences between Afidentula and Afidenta are discussed and illustrated.

  17. Method for continuously rearing Coccinella lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccinella novemnotata L., the ninespotted lady beetle, and Coccinella transversoguttata richardsoni Brown, the transverse lady beetle, are predatory species whose abundance has declined significantly over the last few decades in North America. An ex situ system for continuously rearing these two b...

  18. Two new species of Chnoodes Chevrolat (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Thaysa C; Castro-Guedes, Camila F; Almeida, Lúcia M

    2016-02-09

    Two new species of Chnoodes from Brazil are described: C. machadoi sp. nov. (Holotype male deposited in DZUP: Mato Grosso State, Cáceres muncipality, 13.XI.1984, Buzzi, Mielke, Elias & Casagrande leg.) and C. unimaculata sp. nov. (Holotype female deposited in DZUP: Amapá State, Oiapoque municipality, V.1959, M. Alvarenga leg.). They can be distinguished from all previously described species mainly by the yellowish border of the elytra in C. machadoi sp. nov., and the large mid-dorsal pale spots in C. unimaculata sp. nov. Six species are redescribed: Chnoodes brasiliensis Korschefsky, C. chaudoiri Mulsant, C. discomaculata (Crotch), C. pentagona Crotch, C. pseudosanguinea Brèthes, and C. tarsalis Weise. A key to Brazilian species of Chnoodes and new records are also given.

  19. An annotated checklist of the Coccinellidae (Coleoptera) from New Caledonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nattier, Romain; Jourdan, Hervé; Mille, Christian; Chazeau, Jean

    2015-12-17

    We present an updated checklist of the ladybird beetle fauna of New Caledonia. Fifty species have been tracked from literature and collections, but six should be removed from the list as they represent false records, invalid or unestablished species: Coccinella boletifera Fauvel, Harmonia conformis (Boisduval), Menochilus duodecimpunctatus (Fauvel), Micraspis lineola (Fabricius), Orcus australasiae Boisduval, and Curinus coeruleus (Mulsant). After our investigations, the current described ladybird beetle fauna totals 44 named species, belonging to 18 valid genera. The endemism rate is 47.7% (21 species), with one endemic subgenus, Scymnus (Caledonus). Based on comparisons of the coccinellid faunas of surrounding regions, the New Caledonian fauna has affinities with Australia and Papua New Guinea more than with the rest of the Pacific area. At least 19 species (43.2%) seem to have been introduced by human activities (either deliberately or accidentally).

  20. Epilachnini (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)-A Revision of the World Genera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewska, Wioletta; Szawaryn, Karol

    2016-01-01

    Based on the recent revised generic classification of the tribe Epilachnini (Szawaryn et al. 2015), all 27 genera are re-described, diagnosed, illustrated, and included in an identification key. The following nomenclatural changes are made: Epilachna (Hypsa) Mulsant 1850, Epilachna (Cleta) Mulsant 1850, Solanophila Weise 1898, Epilachna (Aparodentata) Wang and Cao 1993, and Epilachna (Uniparodentata) Wang and Cao 1993 are removed from synonymy of Epilachna Chervolat 1837. The subgenus Cleta of Epilachna is raised to the genus level, as Cleta Mulsant 1850 stat. nov.; the subgenus Uniparodentata of Epilachna is raised to the genus level, as Uniparodentata Wang and Cao 1993 stat. nov. Chazeauiana Tomaszewska and Szawaryn 2015 (type species, Epilachna sahlbergi Mulsant 1850), and Epilachna (Hypsa) Mulsant 1850 (type species, Epilachna nigrolimbata Thomson 1875) are synonymized here under the name Cleta Mulsant 1850 (type species, Epilachna eckloni Mulsant 1850)-new synonyms; Fuerschia Tomaszewska and Szawaryn 2015 (type species, Coccinella canina Fabricius 1781) is synonymized with Solanophila Weise 1898 (type species, Epilachna gibbosa Crotch 1874)-new synonym; Ryszardia Tomaszewska and Szawaryn 2015 (type species, Epilachna decipiens Crotch 1874) and Epilachna (Aparodentata) Wang and Cao, 1993 (type species, Epilachna yongshanensis Cao and Xiao 1984) are synonymized under the name Uniparodentata Wang and Cao 1993 (type species, Epilachna paramagna Pang and Mao 1979)-new synonyms. Henosepilachna (Elateria) Fürsch 1964 (type species: Coccinella elaterii Rossi 1794) is removed from synomyms of Henosepilachna Li 1961 [type species, Coccinella sparsa Herbst 1786 (=Coccinella vigintioctopunctata Fabricius 1775)] and is synonymized here with Chnootriba Chevrolat 1837 (type species: Coccinella similis Thunberg 1781)-new synonym. Coccinella flavofasciata Laporte 1840, Epilachna aequatorialis Gordon 1975, E. bizonata Crotch 1874, E. convergens Crotch 1874, E. cruciata Mulsant 1850, E. dubia Crotch 1874, E. monovittata Gordon 1975, E. orthostriata Gordon 1975, E. paracuta Gordon 1975, E. patricia Mulsant 1850, E. satipensis Gordon 1975, and E. univittata Crotch 1874 are transferred to Toxotoma Weise 1900 (comb. nov.); Afissa chapini Dieke 1947, A. complicata Dieke 1947, A. convexa Dieke 1947, A. magna Dieke 1947, A. militaris Dieke 1947, A. quadricollis Dieke 1947, A. subacuta Dieke 1947, A. szechuana Dieke 1947, Epilachna boymi Jadwiszczak and Węgrzynowicz 2003, E. crepida Pang and Ślipiński 2012, E decipiens Crotch 1874, E. dorotae Bielawski 1979, E. hamulifera Pang and Ślipiński 2012, E. malleforma Peng, Pang and Ren 2002, E. siphodenticulata Hoàng 1983, E. angusta Li 1961, E. bifibra Li 1961, E. chingjing Yu and Wang 1999, E. circumdata Hoàng 1978, E. circummaculata Pang and Mao 1977, E. clematicola Cao and Xiao 1984, E. exornata Bielawski 1965, E. folifera Pang and Mao 1979, E. fugongensis Cao and Xiao 1984, E. glochisifoliata Pang and Mao 1979, E. gressiti Li 1961, E. lata Li 1961, E. madanensis Zeng 2002, E. media Li 1961, E. mobliteratiae Li 1961, E. yongshanensis Cao and Xiao 1984, Solanophila acuta Weise 1900, and S. saginata Weise 1902 are transferred to Uniparodentata Wang and Cao 1993 (comb. nov.); Coccinella canina Fabricius 1781, Epilachna dregei Mulsant 1850, E. infirma Mulsant 1850, E. murrayi Crotch 1874 and E. paykullii Mulsant 1850 are transferred to Solanophila Weise 1898 (comb. nov.); Afissula antennata Bielawski 1967, A. rana Kapur 1958, A. uniformis Pang and Mao 1979, Epilachna ampliata Pang and Mao 1979, E. flavimarginalis Hoàng 1978, E. max Pang and Ślipiński 2012, E. parvula Crotch, E. plicata Weise 1889, and E. sanscrita Crotch 1874 are transferred to Afissa Dieke 1947 (comb. nov.); Epilachna papuensis Crotch 1874 and Subafissa brittoni Bielawski 1963 are transferred to Henosepilachna Li 1961 (comb. nov.); Epilachna admirabilis Crotch 1874, E. alternans Mulsant 1850, E. glochinosa Pang and Mao 1979, E. hopeiana Miyatake 1985, E. insignis Gorham 1892, E. macularis Mulsant 1850, E. parainsignis Pang and Mao 1979, and Solanophila maxima Weise 1898 are transferred to Diekeana Tomaszewska and Szawaryn 2015 (comb. nov.); Epilachna fulvohirta Weise 1895, E nigrolimbata Thomson 1875, Henosepilachna griveaudi Chazeau 1975, H. vadoni Chazeau 1976, Solanophila consignata Weise 1909, S. coquereli Sicard 1907, and S. gyldenstolpei Weise 1924 are transferred to Cleta Mulsant 1850 (comb. nov.); Afidenta janczyki Fürsch 1986, Epilachna capicola Mulsant 1850, E. godarti Mulsant 1850, E. scitula Weise 1898, Henospeilachna acervata Chazeau 1975, and Solanophila blaesa Weise 1905 are transferred to Afidentula Kapur 1958 (com. nov.); Coccinella elaterii Rossi 1794, C. hirta Thunberg 1781, C. pavonia Olivier 1808, Epilachna annulata Kolbe 1897, E. biplagiata Kolbe 1897, E. cinerascens Weise 1907, E. connectens Weise 1912, E. erichi Weise, 1897, E. occellata Bertoloni, 1849, E pauli Weise, 1897, E. tetracycla Gerstaecker, 1871, E. umbratilis Weise 1909, E. vulgaris Weise 1901, Henosepilachna bigemmata Fürsch 1991, Solanophila guttifera Weise 1899, S. hova Weise 1905, and S. kaffaeensis Weise 1906 are transferred to Chnootriba Chevrolat 1837 (com. nov.); Coccinella guttatopustulata Fabricius 1775, Epilachna aruensis Crotch 1874, E. biroi Weise 1902, E. buqueti Montrouzier 1861, E. fulvimana Weise 1903, E. immaculata Bielawski 1963, E. karapensis Bielawski 1963, E. orrori Bielawski 1963, E. samuelsoni Jadwiszczak 1991, and E. slipinskii Jadwiszczak 1987 are transferred to Papuaepilachna Tomaszewska and Szawaryn, 2013 (comb. nov.). The history of classification, the known aspects of the biology and distributional data of the tribe are summarized. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  1. Contribution to the genus Xanthocorus Miyatake (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Chilocorini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjing; Chen, Xiaosheng; Wang, Xingmin; Ren, Shunxiang

    2015-01-01

    The genus Xanthocorus Miyatake, 1970 consists of three species from China, including two new species described here: Xanthocorusnigrosuturalis sp. n. and Xanthocorusmucronatus sp. n. A key to identification of species is given. Diagnoses, detailed descriptions, illustrations, and distributions are provided.

  2. The genus Microserangium Miyatake (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingmin; Slipiński, Adam; Ren, Shunxiang

    2013-01-01

    The genus Microserangium Chapinfrom China is reviewed. Nine species are recognized, including seven new species: M. erythrinum Wang & Ren, sp. n., M. fuscum Wang & Ren, sp. n., M. glossoides Wang & Ren, sp. n., M. shennongensis Wang & Ren, sp. n., M. semilunatum Wang & Ren, sp. n., M. deltoides Wang & Ren, sp. n., M. dactylicum Wang & Ren, sp. n. Male genitalia of M. hainanensis Miyatake, 1961 are described for the first time. All species are described and illustrated. A key and distribution map to the known species from China are given.

  3. A contribution to Asian Afidentula Kapur (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Epilachnini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingmin Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Two new species of Afidentula, A. dentata sp. n. and A. jinpingensis sp. n. are described from China. Afissa siamensis Dieke is moved to Afidentula comb. n.. All three species are described and illustrated, and a distribution map is given. A key to Asian species of Afidentula is updated. Diagnostic similarities and differences between Afidentula and Afidenta are discussed and illustrated.

  4. The tribe Scymnini (Coccinellidae: Coleoptera) from Sindh Province, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Muhammad; Perveen, Rukhsana; Naqvi, Arif-Un-Nisa; Ahmed, Khalil; Raza, Ghulam; Hussain, Ishtiaq

    2015-01-01

    Coccinellids are important natural enemies of aphids, scale insects, mealybugs, whiteflies, jassids and mites. They are being augmented or conserved for population reduction of different agricultural crop pests in the concept of Integrated Pest Management throughout the world. The genera and species in the tribe Scymnini known from Pakistan are revised and redescribed. Two genera including two subgenera and six species among which three species are newly reported, is therefore, a new addition to Coccinellid fauna of Pakistan. Keys to all taxa, descriptions of the higher taxa, species diagnoses, synonymies, and distribution records are included. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  5. Contribution to the genus Xanthocorus Miyatake (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Chilocorini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The genus Xanthocorus Miyatake, 1970 consists of three species from China, including two new species described here: X. nigrosuturalis sp. n. and X. mucronatus sp. n. A key to identification of species is given. Diagnoses, detailed descriptions, illustrations, and distributions are provided.

  6. The genus Microserangium Miyatake (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingmin Wang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The genus Microserangium Chapin from China is reviewed. Nine species are recognized, including seven new species: M. erythrinum Wang & Ren, sp. n., M. fuscum Wang & Ren, sp. n., M. glossoides Wang & Ren, sp. n., M. shennongensis Wang & Ren, sp. n., M. semilunatum Wang & Ren, sp. n., M. deltoides Wang & Ren, sp. n., M. dactylicum Wang & Ren, sp. n. Male genitalia of M. hainanensis Miyatake, 1961 are described for the first time. All species are described and illustrated. A key and distribution map to the known species from China are given.

  7. The evolution of food preferences in Coccinellidae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite the familiarity and economic significance of Coccinellidae, the family has thus far escaped analysis by rigorous phylogenetic methods. As a result, the internal classification remains unstable and there is no framework with which to interpret evolutionary events within the family. Coccinel...

  8. Notas taxonômicas sobre os Brachiacanthini neotropicais (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Hyperaspinae Taxonomical notes on neotropical Brachiacanthini (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Hyperaspinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julianne Milléo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Brachiacantha Chevrolat in Dejean, 1837, Hinda Mulsant, 1850, Cyra Mulsant, 1850 e Tiphysa Mulsant, 1850 foram estudados e é fornecida uma chave para os gêneros. Cleothera loricata Mulsant, 1850 é designada espécie-tipo de Cyra. O lectótipo de Brachiacantha sellata é designado. Três novas combinações são feitas: Cyra loricata (Mulsant, 1850, Cyra scapulata (Mulsant, 1853 e Cyra turbata (Mulsant, 1850. Estão incluídas diagnoses e ilustrações dos caracteres.Brachiacantha Chevrolat in Dejean, 1837, Hinda Mulsant, 1850, Cyra Mulsant, 1850 and Tiphysa Mulsant, 1850 were studied, and a key to genera is added. Cleothera loricata Mulsant, 1850 is designated type species of Cyra. The lectotype of Brachiacantha sellata is designated. Three new combinations are proposed: Cyra loricata (Mulsant, 1850, Cyra scapulata (Mulsant, 1853 and Cyra turbata (Mulsant, 1850. Diagnosis and illustrations of characters are provided.

  9. Beneficial beetles for bioinformatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleomegilla maculata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is a common generalist predator found throughout much of North America. The species is ecologically important and has become a useful subject of genetic research. It is easy to find outdoors, seasonally, and laboratory maintenance Standard Operating...

  10. The effects of diet on herbivory by a predaceous lady beetle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prey and non-prey foods often contain different nutrients, and optimal diets for predatory insects often contain both food classes. We tested whether late instars of Coleomegilla maculata DeGeer (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) reared on prey- Acyrthosiphon pisum Harris (Hemiptera: Aphididae) or eggs of ...

  11. A system for harvesting eggs from the pink-spotted lady beetle

    Science.gov (United States)

    We describe a system for harvesting eggs from a predatory insect, the pink spotted lady beetle. Coleomegilla maculata De Geer (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). Adult beetles placed in square transparent containers that included oviposition substrates hanging from the top of the cage deposited eggs on t...

  12. Characterizing the Pyrenophora teres f. maculata – barley interaction using pathogen genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrenophora teres f. maculata is the cause of the foliar disease spot form net blotch (SFNB) on barley. To evaluate pathogen genetics underlying the P. teres f. maculata- barley interaction, we developed a 105-progeny population by crossing two globally diverse isolates, one from North Dakota, USA a...

  13. Efeito da temperatura sobre o desenvolvimento de Scymnus (Pullus argentinicus (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae Effects of temperature on the development of Scymnus (Pullus argentinicus (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terezinha Monteiro dos Santos

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se a biologia de Scymnus (Pullus argentinicus Weise sobre a presa Schizaphis graminum a 20, 25 e 30ºC. As temperaturas de 25 e 30ºC foram favoráveis ao desenvolvimento de S. (Pullus argentinicus. O período embrionário médio foi de 3,24 dias e o estádio larval de 8,43 dias a 25ºC. A duração média dos ínstares e os períodos pré-pupal e pupal foram significativamente menores a 25 e 30ºC. O percentual de adultos emergidos foi maior a 30ºC (98% ao passo que a 20ºC houve 82% de emergência.The biology of Scymnus (Pullus argentinicus Weise on Schizaphis graminum at the temperatures 20, 25 and 30ºC was studied. The temperatures of 25 and 30ºC were favorable to S. (Pullus argentinicus development. The average of the incubation period was 3.24 days and the larval development was 8.43 days at 25ºC. The duration of the instars and pre-pupal and pupal periods was significantly shorter at 25 and 30ºC. The percentage of emerging adults was higher at 30ºC (98% while at 20ºC this percentual was 82%.

  14. Interactions of the Asian Lady Beetle, Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), and the North American Native Lady Beetle, Coccinella novemnotata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae): Prospects for Recovery Post-Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducatti, Rafael Dal Bosco; Ugine, Todd A; Losey, John

    2017-02-01

    The decline of the North American native lady beetle, Coccinella novemnotata Herbst, is strongly correlated with the introduction of Coccinella septempunctata L., and C. novemnotata are locally extirpated across much of the United States. Since C. novemnotata's decline, the invasive Harmonia axyridis Pallas has become dominant in North America. This study investigated whether H. axyridis has the potential to impede the recovery of C. novemnotata populations. To determine how H. axyridis interacts with C. novemnotata via intraguild predation and competition for prey, we paired first-instar C. novemnotata with first-instar H. axyridis at low and high densities of pea aphid. Coccinella novemnotata survival when paired interspecifically was significantly lower than H. axyridis survival at both aphid densities. Both species had similar weights at eclosion across aphid densities; however, H. axyridis developed faster than C. novemnotata. To examine the effect of larval size on intraguild interactions, we conducted a second experiment where we varied the C. novemnotata and H. axyridis instar in our pairings. Coccinella novemnotata survival and final weight increased when paired with younger H. axyridis larvae. The percentage survival of C. novemnotata in interspecific treatments, at the low aphid density, was lower than for same-aged C. novemnotata reared conspecifically, except for pairs initiated with C. novemnotata larvae that were two instars more advanced than H. axyridis larvae. These results suggest that intraguild predation and competition for prey by H. axyridis have the potential to affect the recovery of C. novemnotata populations negatively. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Development times and age-specific life table parameters of the native lady beetle species Coccinella novemnotata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and its invasive congener Coccinella septempunctata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugine, Todd A; Losey, John E

    2014-08-01

    To determine if differences in life history parameters contribute to native species exclusion, immature development times, larval survivorship, reproductive life history parameters, and age-specific life tables were determined for two populations (eastern United States and western United States) of ninespotted lady beetles (Coccinella novemnotata Herbst) and one population of sevenspotted lady beetles (Coccinella septempunctata L.). Developing larvae were provided an ad libitum diet of pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum Harris) at a constant temperature of 25°C. The first and fourth larval stadia of C. novemnotata were significantly longer than that of C. septempunctata, as was their total development time from egg to newly eclosed adult. Stage-specific developmental mortality was low for both species and did not exceed 7% for the entire development period. The preoviposition period of the two C. novemnotata populations was significantly shorter (15-20%) than that of C. septempunctata. C. novemnotata from both locations laid significantly fewer total eggs than C. septempunctata (34-40% fewer) over the 31-d test period, and also fewer eggs per day (37-43% fewer). The net reproductive rate of the C. novemnotata populations was 42-50% lower than that of C. septempunctata as was C. novemnotata's intrinsic rate of natural increase (rm: 0.1716 and 0.1840 vs. 0.1959 for western and eastern C. novemnotata and C. septempunctata, respectively).

  16. Revision of the genus Harpasus Mulsant (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Chilocorini Revisão do gênero Harpasus Mulsant (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Chilocorini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geovan H. Corrêa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Harpasus Mulsant, 1850 was studied based on the morphology of the exoskeleton and genitalia. The type material of Harpasus aureus Almeida & Carvalho, 2006, H. quadrifolium González, Corrêa & Almeida, 2008 and a homotype of H. zonatus (Mulsant, 1850 were examined. The lectotype of H. eversmanni (Mulsant, 1850 was designated and two new species were described, Harpasus unifasciatus sp. nov. (Teresópolis, RJ, Brazil and Harpasus ferrugineus sp. nov. (Puerto Carreño, Vichada, Colombia. Herein a diagnosis for the genus and its seven species, identification key and information about biological aspects are presented.Harpasus Mulsant, 1850 foi estudado baseado na morfologia do exoesqueleto e genitália. O material tipo de Harpasus aureus Almeida & Carvalho, 2006, H. quadrifolium González, Corrêa & Almeida, 2008 e o homótipo de H. zonatus (Mulsant, 1850 foram examinados. O lectótipo de H. eversmanni (Mulsant, 1850 foi designado e duas novas espécies foram descritas, Harpasus unifasciatus sp. nov. (Teresópolis, RJ, Brasil e Harpasus ferrugineus sp. nov. (Puerto Carreño, Vichada, Colômbia. São apresentadas diagnoses detalhadas para o gênero e suas sete espécies, chave de identificação e informação sobre aspectos biológicos.

  17. Envenomation by the neotropical colubrid Boiruna maculata (Boulenger, 1896: a case report Envenenamento por Colubrídeo Neotropical Boiruna maculata (Boulenger, 1896: registro de um caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina dos SANTOS-COSTA

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report of a Boiruna maculata snake bite in a child admitted to the Hospital Municipal de Pronto Socorro de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. The patient was bitten on the lower left limb, and exhibited pronounced local manifestations of envenomation. She was treated with Bothrops antivenom and was discharged from the hospital five days later with marked improvement of envenomation.Este trabalho relata o envenenamento por serpente do gênero Boiruna maculata em criança admitida e posteriormente hospitalizada no Hospital Municipal de Pronto Socorro de Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil. A paciente foi mordida no membro inferior esquerdo e apresentou sinais de envenenamento local pronunciado, foi tratada como acidente botrópico e permaneceu no hospital por cinco dias, recebendo alta após melhora.

  18. Nutritional evaluation of the moonfish Mene maculata (Bloch & Schneider, 1801) from Parangipettai, southeast coast of India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Palanivel Bharadhirajan; Natarajan Periyasamy; Sambantham Murugan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the nutritions in Mene maculata (Bloch & Schneider, 1801) (M. maculata). Methods: Fishes (14-16 cm) were obtained from the landings at Parangipettai for the evaluation of biochemical composition. The present study deals with biochemical composition such as protein, carbohydrate, lipid, amino acids fatty acids, vitamins and minerals which were evaluated in the moonfish.Results:protein was high in the tissue (23.16%), followed by the carbohydrate (1.3%) and lipid (2.62%). Totally 20 essential and nonessential amino acids were present at the rate of 46.72% and 43.91%. In the analysis, the fatty acid profile by gas chromatography revealed the presence of higher amount of saturated fatty acid (palmitic acid 22.17%) than monounsaturated fatty acid (oleic acid 14.51%) and polyunsaturated fatty acid (alpha linolenic acid 16.07%). Vitamins were detected in M. maculata. Among them, vitamin A was found in higher levels (124.5 mg/g), whereas vitamin B6 was noticed as lower levels (0.34 mg/g). In the present study, totally 5 macro minerals and 2 trace minerals were reported. The macro mineral calcium (156.7 mg/g) was found at the highest level and other minerals such as sodium (31.98 mg/g), potassium (21.33 mg/g), copper (1.43 mg/g) and magnesium (0.341 mg/g) were also detected in the moonfish.Conclusions:The results of proximate composition in M. maculata showed that the percentage of The result showed that the moonfish M. maculata tissue is a valuable food recipe for human consumption, due to its high quality protein and well-balanced amino acids.

  19. Population differentiation of the Chagas disease vector Triatoma maculata (Erichson, 1848) from Colombia and Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsalve, Yoman; Panzera, Francisco; Herrera, Leidi; Triana-Chávez, Omar; Gómez-Palacio, Andrés

    2016-06-01

    The emerging vector of Chagas disease, Triatoma maculata (Hemiptera, Reduviidae), is one of the most widely distributed Triatoma species in northern South America. Despite its increasing relevance as a vector, no consistent picture of the magnitude of genetic and phenetic diversity has yet been developed. Here, several populations of T. maculata from eleven Colombia and Venezuela localities were analyzed based on the morphometry of wings and the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 (ND4) gene sequences. Our results showed clear morphometric and genetic differences among Colombian and Venezuelan populations, indicating high intraspecific diversity. Inter-population divergence is suggested related to East Cordillera in Colombia. Analyses of other populations from Colombia, Venezuela, and Brazil from distinct eco-geographic regions are still needed to understand its systematics and phylogeography as well as its actual role as a vector of Chagas disease.

  20. Tetrodotoxin Concentrations in Pleurobranchaea maculata: Temporal, Spatial and Individual Variability from New Zealand Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Craig Cary

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetrodotoxin (TTX is a potent neurotoxin that has been identified in a range of phylogenetically unrelated marine and terrestrial organisms. Tetrodotoxin was recently detected in New Zealand in Pleurobranchaea maculata (the grey side-gilled sea slug. From June 2010 to June 2011 wild specimens were collected from 10 locations around New Zealand. At one site (Narrow Neck Beach, Auckland up to 10 individuals were collected monthly for 6 months. Attempts were also made to rear P. maculata in captivity. Tetrodotoxin was detected in samples from eight of the ten sites. The highest average (368.7 mg kg−1 and maximum (1414.0 mg kg−1 concentrations were measured in samples from Illiomama Rock (Auckland. Of the toxic populations tested there was significant variability in TTX concentrations among individuals, with the highest difference (62 fold measured at Illiomama Rock. Tetrodotoxin concentrations in samples from Narrow Neck Beach varied temporally, ranging from an average of 184 mg kg−1 in June 2010 to 17.5 mg kg−1 by December 2010. There was no correlation between TTX levels and mass. The highest levels correspond with the egg laying season (June–August and this, in concert with the detection of high levels of TTX in eggs and early larval stages, suggests that TTX may have a defensive function in P. maculata. Only one larva was successfully reared to full maturation and no TTX was detected.

  1. Cyclopia maculata (honeybush tea) stimulates lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pheiffer, Carmen; Dudhia, Zulfaqar; Louw, Johan; Muller, Christo; Joubert, Elizabeth

    2013-10-15

    We have previously, for the first time, demonstrated that hot water extracts of Cyclopia maculata and Cyclopia subternata, endemic South African plants that are consumed as herbal teas, inhibit adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The aim of this study was to extend the anti-obesity investigations of these plants by quantifying lipolysis in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Glycerol concentration in culture supernatants was used as a marker of adipocyte lipolysis. Isoproterenol, a β-adrenergic agonist and a known lipolytic agent, was used as a positive control in our assays. Lipolysis was stimulated by all extracts, although statistical significance was noted for fermented (oxidised) C. maculata only. A concentration of 80μg/ml of C. maculata extract induced maximal lipolysis (1.8-fold, plipolysis was accompanied by an increase in the expression of hormone sensitive lipase (1.6-fold, plipolysis in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes, providing further support for the anti-obesity effects of Cyclopia spp. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Biology of 11-Spotted Beetle Coccinella undicimpunctata L. (Coccinellidae: Coleoptera) on Mustard Aphid Lipaphis erysimi Kalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solangi, Bhai Khan; Ghani Lanjar, Abdul; Lohar, Mohammad Khan

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to study the biology of 11-spotted beetle Coccinella undecimpunctata L. on mustard aphid during the year 2006. The oviposition, fecundity, adult emergence, fertility percentage, sex ratio, longevity and mortality were studied in the laboratory on 10 separately reared pairs of beetles. The results indicated that average pre-copulation period was 4.1±1.28 days post copulation period 3.6±1.26 days, oviposition period, 37.7±6.88 days and post oviposition period 4.0±1.63 days. The mean fecundity was 593.4±86.5 eggs, fertile eggs were 531.80±76.16 with the fertility percentage of 89.63±3.44. the incubation was 3.1±1.19 and 3.1±0.94 days while 1st and 2nd instar larva period was 3.1±1.19 and 3.1±0.87 days and for 3rd and 4th instar larvae averaged 3.5±1.26 and 3.3±0.94 days, respectively whereas the total larval period was 12.9±1.28 days and pupal period 5.6±0.96 days. The average number of pupae observed were 19.9±6.69, while the male emergence was 7.4±2.63 (38.50±13.12%) and the female emergence was 8.9±3.66 (43.48±8.24%). The sex ratio (male: female) averaged 1:1.25±1: 0.45. thus the total male + female emergence was 81.99±13.37 per beetle pair. The mortality recorded was 3.7±3.43 beetles showing an averaged mortality of 17.57±14.51%. Longevity of the male was 36.5±4.17 days and the female longevity of 46.0±9.14 days. It was recorded that longevity period was significantly greater in case of female ladybird beetles as compared to their males. Adult emergence was greater in females of 11-spotted beetles as compared to males and thus the sex ratio was higher in females as compared to males. The longevity was comparably higher in case of females than in male beetles.

  3. In vitro production of adaline and coccinelline, two defensive alkaloids from ladybird beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Pascal; Braekman, Jean-Claude; Daloze, Désiré; Pasteels, Jacques M

    2002-09-01

    In vitro experiments using [1-(14)C] and [2-(14)C]acetate were devised to study the biosynthesis of the defensive coccinellid alkaloids adaline and coccinelline in Adalia 2-punctata and Coccinella 7-punctata, respectively. The labelled alkaloids obtained in these experiments had a specific activity about ten times higher than that of the samples obtained in feeding experiments. This in vitro assay has enabled us to demonstrate that these two alkaloids are most likely biosynthesised through a fatty acid rather than a polyketide pathway, that glutamine is the preferred source of the nitrogen atom and that alkaloid biosynthesis takes place in the insect fat body.

  4. Eating chemically defended prey: alkaloid metabolism in an invasive ladybird predator of other ladybirds (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloggett, J J; Davis, A J

    2010-01-15

    By comparison with studies of herbivore physiological adaptation to plant allelochemicals, work on predator physiological adaptation to potentially toxic prey has been very limited. Such studies are important in understanding how evolution could shape predator diets. An interesting question is the specificity of predator adaptation to prey allelochemicals, given that many predators consume diverse prey with different chemical defences. The ladybird Harmonia axyridis, an invasive species in America, Europe and Africa, is considered a significant predatory threat to native invertebrates, particularly other aphid-eating ladybirds of which it is a strong intraguild predator. Although ladybirds possess species-specific alkaloid defences, H. axyridis exhibits high tolerance for allospecific ladybird prey alkaloids. Nonetheless, it performs poorly on species with novel alkaloids not commonly occurring within its natural range. We examined alkaloid fate in H. axyridis larvae after consumption of two other ladybird species, one containing an alkaloid historically occurring within the predator's native range (isopropyleine) and one containing a novel alkaloid that does not (adaline). Our results indicate that H. axyridis rapidly chemically modifies the alkaloid to which it has been historically exposed to render it less harmful: this probably occurs outside of the gut. The novel, more toxic alkaloid persists in the body unchanged for longer. Our results suggest metabolic alkaloid specialisation, in spite of the diversity of chemically defended prey that the predator consumes. Physiological adaptations appear to have made H. axyridis a successful predator of other ladybirds; however, limitations are imposed by its physiology when it eats prey with novel alkaloids.

  5. Feeding History Affects Intraguild Interactions Between Harmonia Axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and Episyrphus Balteatus (Diptera: Syrphidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingels, B.; van Hassel, P.; Van Leeuwen, T.; De Clercq, P.

    2015-01-01

    While the effect of several factors such as predator and prey size, morphology and developmental stage on intraguild predation (IGP) is widely investigated, little is known about the influence of diet on the occurrence and outcome of IGP. In the present study, the effect of the diet experienced duri

  6. Effect of Air Humidity on Sex Ratio and Development of Ladybird Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oldřich Nedvěd

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Length of development of larvae and pupae of the invasive alien ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis, their survival rates, sex ratio, and fresh mass of the emerged adults were measured at three contrasting levels of relative air humidity: 30, 60, and 90%, 25°C and photoperiod 16L : 8D. Overall sex ratio was 51%, but there was a strong trend for higher proportion of males at low humidity and higher proportion of females at high humidity. Survival rate, larval developmental time, and adult mass were all differently influenced by air humidity depending on the food type. In individuals fed with aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum there was a trend for better survival, shorter development, and higher mass gained at higher humidity. These trends were opposite or nonsignificant in individuals fed with frozen eggs of moth Ephestia kuehniella.

  7. Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas, 1773: New record in Minas Gerais, southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezende, M. Q.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Harmonia axyridis is a voracious aphid predator, which has been used in biological control programs in severalcountries. Due to its fast spreading, H. axyridis is becoming widely distributed across the world. Recently, it was detectedin Viçosa, Minas Gerais, southeastern Brazil. This region shows climatic similarity to its native region and it may facilitatethe establishment of H. axyridis. The species was found in some home gardens feeding on aphids and psyllids. The presenceof the lady beetle in the state of Minas Gerais confirms its high spreading potential in Brazil, reinforcing the necessity forfurther studies on the possible impacts and control methods of its populations.

  8. First record of Hesperomyces virescens (Laboulbeniales, Ascomycota on Harmonia axyridis (Coccinellidae, Coleoptera in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Gorczak

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hesperomyces virescens Thaxt. is a fungal parasite of coccinellid beetles. One of its hosts is the invasive harlequin ladybird Harmonia axyridis (Pallas. We present the first records of this combination from Poland.

  9. Depositories of the type material of the species Coccidophilus lozadaiGonzalez, 2012 (Insecta: Coleoptera: Coccinellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro W. Lozada

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available 6 paratypes of the species Coccidophilus lozadai Gonzalez, 2012, are deposited in the collection of Servicio Nacional de Sanidad Agraria (SENASA, Lima, Peru. The holotype and remaining paratypes are deposited in the Museo de Historia Natural (MUSM, Lima, Peru, and National Museum of Natural History (USNM, Washington, D.C., USA.

  10. First record and bionomics of the mycophagous ladybird Psyllobora bisoctonotata (Mulsant (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae in Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdalla Abdelrahim Satti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Powdery mildews caused by several fungi, particularly of the genera Erysiphe, Sphaerotheca and Leveillula, are destructive diseases of various cultivated and wild plants during winter season (December–March in Sudan. Application of synthetic fungicides is the only control measure practiced. Fortuitously, during a field survey, congregations of coccinellid adults and grubs were found associated with powdery mildews on a wild plant, Xanthium brasilicum Vell., locally known as “Ramtouk”, at Shambat area/Khartoum North. Therefore, the insect was subjected to some bionomical studies conducted during winter season 2011/12. Emphasis was devoted to morphometric investigations, supported with life cycle durations and seasonal trend on the foregoing host. Accordingly, the species was recognized as Psyllobora bisoctonotata (Muls., a well known powdery mildew feeder in several countries. This is the first record of a mycophagous insect in Sudan. Hence, the important morphological features of the different stages were presented. The rearing of the insect on powdery mildew infected Ramtouk leaves in the laboratory (27.50 ± 3.75 °C and 15.83 ± 3.82% R.H. revealed that the mean total lifecycle from egg to adult was 25.28 ± 1.57 days. The insect appeared on X. brasilicum in a very small number in December, peaked in February, and then gradually declined thereafter coinciding with an increase in temperature and a decrease in powdery mildew infection. So far, the real distribution of this mycophagous species and its host range are waiting for more investigations. Meticulous bio-ecological studies are important to ascertain the proper habitat for such insect throughout the year, and to evaluate its potential role as a biocontrol agent for the powdery mildews.

  11. Feeding History Affects Intraguild Interactions between Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae and Episyrphus balteatus (Diptera: Syrphidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brecht Ingels

    Full Text Available While the effect of several factors such as predator and prey size, morphology and developmental stage on intraguild predation (IGP is widely investigated, little is known about the influence of diet on the occurrence and outcome of IGP. In the present study, the effect of the diet experienced during larval development on IGP between the ladybird Harmonia axyridis and the syrphid Episyrphus balteatus is investigated. Four diets were tested for H. axyridis: eggs of the Mediterranean flour moth Ephestia kuehniella, pea aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum, in an ad libitum amount, pea aphids in a limited amount, and honey bee pollen. For E. balteatus only the two aphid diets were tested. First, experiments were performed to determine the quality of the various diets for development of both predators. Second, IGP experiments between H. axyridis and E. balteatus were performed both in Petri dishes and on potted pepper plants. The diet of both species influenced the incidence of IGP between H. axyridis and E. balteatus both in Petri dishes and on potted plants. In general, smaller larvae of H. axyridis (those fed on poor or restricted diet fed more on hoverflies than large (well-nourished ladybird larvae. Further, poorly nourished (smaller larvae of E. balteatus were more susceptible to predation than well-fed (larger hoverfly larvae. The observed effects were not only due to the lower fitness of larvae of both predators reared on an inferior quality diet but also to changes in predator behaviour. The results from this study show that IGP interactions are influenced by a multitude of factors, including feeding history of the organisms involved, and emphasize the importance of taking these factors into account in order to fully understand the ecological relevance of IGP.

  12. Feeding History Affects Intraguild Interactions Between Harmonia Axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and Episyrphus Balteatus (Diptera: Syrphidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingels, B.; van Hassel, P.; Van Leeuwen, T.; De Clercq, P.

    2015-01-01

    While the effect of several factors such as predator and prey size, morphology and developmental stage on intraguild predation (IGP) is widely investigated, little is known about the influence of diet on the occurrence and outcome of IGP. In the present study, the effect of the diet experienced duri

  13. Feeding History Affects Intraguild Interactions between Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and Episyrphus balteatus (Diptera: Syrphidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingels, Brecht; Van Hassel, Pieter; Van Leeuwen, Thomas; De Clercq, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    While the effect of several factors such as predator and prey size, morphology and developmental stage on intraguild predation (IGP) is widely investigated, little is known about the influence of diet on the occurrence and outcome of IGP. In the present study, the effect of the diet experienced during larval development on IGP between the ladybird Harmonia axyridis and the syrphid Episyrphus balteatus is investigated. Four diets were tested for H. axyridis: eggs of the Mediterranean flour moth Ephestia kuehniella, pea aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum, in an ad libitum amount, pea aphids in a limited amount, and honey bee pollen. For E. balteatus only the two aphid diets were tested. First, experiments were performed to determine the quality of the various diets for development of both predators. Second, IGP experiments between H. axyridis and E. balteatus were performed both in Petri dishes and on potted pepper plants. The diet of both species influenced the incidence of IGP between H. axyridis and E. balteatus both in Petri dishes and on potted plants. In general, smaller larvae of H. axyridis (those fed on poor or restricted diet) fed more on hoverflies than large (well-nourished) ladybird larvae. Further, poorly nourished (smaller) larvae of E. balteatus were more susceptible to predation than well-fed (larger) hoverfly larvae. The observed effects were not only due to the lower fitness of larvae of both predators reared on an inferior quality diet but also to changes in predator behaviour. The results from this study show that IGP interactions are influenced by a multitude of factors, including feeding history of the organisms involved, and emphasize the importance of taking these factors into account in order to fully understand the ecological relevance of IGP.

  14. Feeding History Affects Intraguild Interactions Between Harmonia Axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and Episyrphus Balteatus (Diptera: Syrphidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingels, B.; van Hassel, P.; Van Leeuwen, T.; De Clercq, P.

    2015-01-01

    While the effect of several factors such as predator and prey size, morphology and developmental stage on intraguild predation (IGP) is widely investigated, little is known about the influence of diet on the occurrence and outcome of IGP. In the present study, the effect of the diet experienced

  15. Epilachnini (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)—A Revision of the World Genera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewska, Wioletta; Szawaryn, Karol

    2016-01-01

    Based on the recent revised generic classification of the tribe Epilachnini (Szawaryn et al. 2015), all 27 genera are re-described, diagnosed, illustrated, and included in an identification key. The following nomenclatural changes are made: Epilachna (Hypsa) Mulsant 1850, Epilachna (Cleta) Mulsant 1850, Solanophila Weise 1898, Epilachna (Aparodentata) Wang and Cao 1993, and Epilachna (Uniparodentata) Wang and Cao 1993 are removed from synonymy of Epilachna Chervolat 1837. The subgenus Cleta of Epilachna is raised to the genus level, as Cleta Mulsant 1850 stat. nov.; the subgenus Uniparodentata of Epilachna is raised to the genus level, as Uniparodentata Wang and Cao 1993 stat. nov. Chazeauiana Tomaszewska and Szawaryn 2015 (type species, Epilachna sahlbergi Mulsant 1850), and Epilachna (Hypsa) Mulsant 1850 (type species, Epilachna nigrolimbata Thomson 1875) are synonymized here under the name Cleta Mulsant 1850 (type species, Epilachna eckloni Mulsant 1850)—new synonyms; Fuerschia Tomaszewska and Szawaryn 2015 (type species, Coccinella canina Fabricius 1781) is synonymized with Solanophila Weise 1898 (type species, Epilachna gibbosa Crotch 1874)—new synonym; Ryszardia Tomaszewska and Szawaryn 2015 (type species, Epilachna decipiens Crotch 1874) and Epilachna (Aparodentata) Wang and Cao, 1993 (type species, Epilachna yongshanensis Cao and Xiao 1984) are synonymized under the name Uniparodentata Wang and Cao 1993 (type species, Epilachna paramagna Pang and Mao 1979)—new synonyms. Henosepilachna (Elateria) Fürsch 1964 (type species: Coccinella elaterii Rossi 1794) is removed from synomyms of Henosepilachna Li 1961 [type species, Coccinella sparsa Herbst 1786 (=Coccinella vigintioctopunctata Fabricius 1775)] and is synonymized here with Chnootriba Chevrolat 1837 (type species: Coccinella similis Thunberg 1781)—new synonym. Coccinella flavofasciata Laporte 1840, Epilachna aequatorialis Gordon 1975, E. bizonata Crotch 1874, E. convergens Crotch 1874, E. cruciata Mulsant 1850, E. dubia Crotch 1874, E. monovittata Gordon 1975, E. orthostriata Gordon 1975, E. paracuta Gordon 1975, E. patricia Mulsant 1850, E. satipensis Gordon 1975, and E. univittata Crotch 1874 are transferred to Toxotoma Weise 1900 (comb. nov.); Afissa chapini Dieke 1947, A. complicata Dieke 1947, A. convexa Dieke 1947, A. magna Dieke 1947, A. militaris Dieke 1947, A. quadricollis Dieke 1947, A. subacuta Dieke 1947, A. szechuana Dieke 1947, Epilachna boymi Jadwiszczak and Węgrzynowicz 2003, E. crepida Pang and Ślipiński 2012, E. decipiens Crotch 1874, E. dorotae Bielawski 1979, E. hamulifera Pang and Ślipiński 2012, E. malleforma Peng, Pang and Ren 2002, E. siphodenticulata Hoàng 1983, E. angusta Li 1961, E. bifibra Li 1961, E. chingjing Yu and Wang 1999, E. circumdata Hoàng 1978, E. circummaculata Pang and Mao 1977, E. clematicola Cao and Xiao 1984, E. exornata Bielawski 1965, E. folifera Pang and Mao 1979, E. fugongensis Cao and Xiao 1984, E. glochisifoliata Pang and Mao 1979, E. gressiti Li 1961, E. lata Li 1961, E. madanensis Zeng 2002, E. media Li 1961, E. mobliteratiae Li 1961, E. yongshanensis Cao and Xiao 1984, Solanophila acuta Weise 1900, and S. saginata Weise 1902 are transferred to Uniparodentata Wang and Cao 1993 (comb. nov.); Coccinella canina Fabricius 1781, Epilachna dregei Mulsant 1850, E. infirma Mulsant 1850, E. murrayi Crotch 1874 and E. paykullii Mulsant 1850 are transferred to Solanophila Weise 1898 (comb. nov.); Afissula antennata Bielawski 1967, A. rana Kapur 1958, A. uniformis Pang and Mao 1979, Epilachna ampliata Pang and Mao 1979, E. flavimarginalis Hoàng 1978, E. max Pang and Ślipiński 2012, E. parvula Crotch, E. plicata Weise 1889, and E. sanscrita Crotch 1874 are transferred to Afissa Dieke 1947 (comb. nov.); Epilachna papuensis Crotch 1874 and Subafissa brittoni Bielawski 1963 are transferred to Henosepilachna Li 1961 (comb. nov.); Epilachna admirabilis Crotch 1874, E. alternans Mulsant 1850, E. glochinosa Pang and Mao 1979, E. hopeiana Miyatake 1985, E. insignis Gorham 1892, E. macularis Mulsant 1850, E. parainsignis Pang and Mao 1979, and Solanophila maxima Weise 1898 are transferred to Diekeana Tomaszewska and Szawaryn 2015 (comb. nov.); Epilachna fulvohirta Weise 1895, E. nigrolimbata Thomson 1875, Henosepilachna griveaudi Chazeau 1975, H. vadoni Chazeau 1976, Solanophila consignata Weise 1909, S. coquereli Sicard 1907, and S. gyldenstolpei Weise 1924 are transferred to Cleta Mulsant 1850 (comb. nov.); Afidenta janczyki Fürsch 1986, Epilachna capicola Mulsant 1850, E. godarti Mulsant 1850, E. scitula Weise 1898, Henospeilachna acervata Chazeau 1975, and Solanophila blaesa Weise 1905 are transferred to Afidentula Kapur 1958 (com. nov.); Coccinella elaterii Rossi 1794, C. hirta Thunberg 1781, C. pavonia Olivier 1808, Epilachna annulata Kolbe 1897, E. biplagiata Kolbe 1897, E. cinerascens Weise 1907, E. connectens Weise 1912, E. erichi Weise, 1897, E. occellata Bertoloni, 1849, E. pauli Weise, 1897, E. tetracycla Gerstaecker, 1871, E. umbratilis Weise 1909, E. vulgaris Weise 1901, Henosepilachna bigemmata Fürsch 1991, Solanophila guttifera Weise 1899, S. hova Weise 1905, and S. kaffaeensis Weise 1906 are transferred to Chnootriba Chevrolat 1837 (com. nov.); Coccinella guttatopustulata Fabricius 1775, Epilachna aruensis Crotch 1874, E. biroi Weise 1902, E. buqueti Montrouzier 1861, E. fulvimana Weise 1903, E. immaculata Bielawski 1963, E. karapensis Bielawski 1963, E. orrori Bielawski 1963, E. samuelsoni Jadwiszczak 1991, and E. slipinskii Jadwiszczak 1987 are transferred to Papuaepilachna Tomaszewska and Szawaryn, 2013 (comb. nov.). The history of classification, the known aspects of the biology and distributional data of the tribe are summarized. PMID:27651424

  16. A new species and first record of the genus Cynegetis Chevrolat (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Epilachnini) from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingmin; Tomaszewska, Wioletta; Ren, Shunxiang

    2014-01-01

    The first species of the genus Cynegetis Chevrolat is recorded from China. Cynegetischinensis Wang & Ren, sp. n. is described from the Ningxia Province in North China. A key to the known species of Cynegetis is given. Diagnostic similarities and differences between Cynegetis and Subcoccinella Agassiz & Erichson are discussed and illustrated.

  17. A new species and first record of the genus Cynegetis Chevrolat (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Epilachnini from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingmin Wang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The first species of the genus Cynegetis Chevrolat is recorded from China. Cynegetis chinensis Wang & Ren, sp. n. is described from the Ningxia Province in North China. A key to the known species of Cynegetis is given. Diagnostic similarities and differences between Cynegetis and Subcoccinella Agassiz & Erichson are discussed and illustrated.

  18. Influence of ozone on induced resistance in soybean to the Mexican bean beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Hengchen; Kogan, M. (Univ. of Illinois, Champaign (USA)); Endress, A.G. (Illinois Natural History Survey, Champaign, IL (USA))

    1990-08-01

    The influence of ozone (O{sub 3}) on induced resistance in soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr., cv. Williams 82, was investigated. Feeding by larval soybean looper, Pseudoplusia includens (Walker), was used to induce resistance, and the feeding preference of the Mexican bean beetle, Epilachna varivetis Mulsant, was used to indicate induced resistance. Greenhouse grown soybean plants at the V9 growth stage (eight open trifoliolates) were used in all experiments. One day following feeding injury by the soybean looper, the injured plants and the uninjured controls were exposed to three concentrations of ozone in transparent mylar chambers; level in ambient air (about 0.025 ppm), 0.06 ppm, or 0.1 ppm. Plants were exposed for 5 h a day for a period of 2-4 d. Ozone exposure at the levels used in this study produced no visible injuries to leaves. Low doses (up to 4-d-exposure to 0.06 ppm or 2-d exposure to 0.1 ppm) of ozone overrode the resistance in soybean that had been induced by the feeding of soybean looper larvae. Higher doses (3- or 4-d exposure to 0.1 ppm) of ozone actually resulted in a greater acceptability by the Mexican bean beetle of plants injured by the soybean looper than of uninjured plants. Doses of ozone used in these experiments did not significantly alter the feeding preference of the Mexican bean beetle for the uninjured plants. Because ozone pollution and herbivore injury are commonly experienced by plants in nature, the results of this study add another perspective to insect-plant interactions.

  19. Enhanced success of Mexican bean beetle (coleoptera: Coccinellidae) on glutathione-enriched soybean leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, P.R.; Chiment, J.J. (Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research, Ithaca, NY (USA))

    1988-01-01

    Artificial augmentation of soybean leaves with reduced glutathione (GSH) elicited all of the same responses from Mexican bean beetle (MBB), Epilachna varivestis Mulsant, as did fumigation with the air pollutant sulfur dioxide. Larval growth, rate of development, and survivorship as well as adult fecundity and longevity were all significantly greater on excised leaves that had been allowed to imbibe a solution of the tripeptide. In addition, adults showed a strong preference for feeding on the treated leaves over nontreated leaves. Increased fecundity after feeding on treated leaves was a consequence of the earlier and longer period of egg laying rather than a change in the rate of egg production. The effects of GSH treatment were even more distinct than those produced by exposure of plants to the pollutant. These results establish the very close correlation between changes in foliar glutathione and alteration of MBB success on this plant in response to air pollution.

  20. Evaluation of Serangium parcesetosum (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) as a biological control agent of the silverleaf whitefly

    Science.gov (United States)

    The coccinellid predator from India, Serangium parcesetosum Sicard, was studied as a potential biological control agent of the silverleaf whitefly, Bemisia argentifolii Bellows & Perring [also known as the sweetpotato whitefly, B. tahaci (Gennadius) Biotype B]. Studies were performed on prey prefere...

  1. New species and records of Menoscelis Mulsant (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from French Guiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Paula B; Churata-Salcedo, Julissa M; Almeida, Lúcia M

    2016-02-09

    Three new species of Menoscelis Mulsant, 1850 from French Guiana are described: Menoscelis angeloi sp. nov. (Holotype male deposited in MNHN: Point de vue du Bélvédère de Saül, 09.IX.2011, SEAG col.), M. cordata sp. nov. (Holotype female deposited in MNHN: Réserve Naturelle des Nouragues-Saut Pararé 04º02'N, 52º41'W, 08.IX.2009, SEAG col.) and M. flava sp. nov. (Holotype female deposited in MNHN: Montagne des Chevaux 04º44'56"N, 02º26'28"W, 14.I.2012, SLAM, SEAG col.). The male of M. insignis Mulsant is described, and an identification key to the species of Menoscelis is included. New geographic distribution records, maps and a checklist of the species are also provided.

  2. A review of the genus Serangium Blackburn (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingmin Wang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The genus Serangium Blackburn from China is reviewed. The genus Catanella Miyatake is removed from synonymy with Serangium. S. baculum Xiao is transferred to Catanella, as C. baculum (Xiao, comb. n. Twelve species of Serangium are described, keyed and illustrated, including eight new species, S. magnipunctatum Wang & Ren, sp. n., S. trimaculatum Wang & Ren, sp. n., S. centrale Wang & Ren, sp. n., S. leigongicus Wang & Ren, sp. n., S. latilobum Wang & Ren, sp. n., S. digitiforme Wang & Ren, sp. n., S. dulongjiang Wang, Ren & Chen, sp. n., and S. contortum Wang & Ren, sp. n. S. punctum Miyatake is newly recorded from China.

  3. Influence of temperature on reproductive biology and phenotype of a ladybird, Menochilus sexmaculatus (Fabricius) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, A; Omkar; Mishra, G

    2016-05-01

    Body melanisation in insects is polygenic, resulting from genetic polymorphism or phenotypic plasticity, with diverse implications ranging from thermal budgeting to reproductive success. In this study, we assessed the, mate choice, reproductive success, and offspring colouration of typical (T) and melanic (M) morphs of the ladybird Menochilus sexmaculatus paired at three temperatures 15°C, 25°C and 35°C. Mating success of the two morphs and the consequences for offspring fitness and offspring phenotype under these temperature regimes were evaluated. Melanic adults of both sexes achieved significantly higher mating success at 15°C and 25°C, but at 35°C no influence of adult morph on mate selection was observed. Melanic females were more fecund than typical females at all temperatures. Offspring of melanic parents developed faster than those of typicals at 15°C and 25°C, but not at 35°C. Evidence was also found of phenotypic plasticity in colour form at 15°C and 35°C. At 25°C the parents of pure (T) and (M) morphs produced offspring of the same morph. However, low temperature induced partial melanisation among the offspring of typical parents (T). Whereas at 35°C the offspring of (T) parents became paler in colour with very fine zigzag lines on elytra, i.e. they decrease the degree of melanisation. Pure melanics (M) compensated for elevated temperature stress by producing offspring that were either pure melanic but small or large with reduced melanisation. Our results on offspring phenotype variation indicate that the degree of melanism in morphs is a result of environmentally regulated expression of the parental genotype. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of Life Tables of Cheilomenes sexmaculata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) Under Laboratory and Greenhouse Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Li, Shu; Gao, Xi-Wu; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Su

    2015-08-01

    The ladybird Cheilomenes sexmaculata (F.) is an important aphidophagous predator in Asia. In order to mass rear predators for biological control, it is valuable to identify the features of populations that are affected by variations in field conditions. Life tables can provide comprehensive descriptions of the development, survival, and fecundity of a population. However, there are few life table studies of C. sexmaculata. Studies of life history have been carried out in many arthropods using the traditional female age-specific life table, which takes only female individuals into consideration, while the variations in developmental rates amongst individuals are ignored. In this paper, we constructed life tables for C. sexmaculata fed on Myzus persicae (Sulzer) both at constant temperature in the laboratory and fluctuating temperature in the greenhouse, and analyzed the data using the age-stage, two-sex life table. The bootstrap technique was used to estimate the standard errors of the population parameters. The results showed that preadult C. sexmaculata developed more slowly and had lower survival and reproductive rates under greenhouse conditions, as indicated by the curves of age-stage survival rate (s(xj)), age-stage-specific fecundity (f(x j)) of the female stage, age-specific fecundity (m(x)), and age-specific maternity (l(x)m(x)). Our results also showed that the intrinsic rate of increase (r), net reproductive rate (R(0)), and finite rate of increase (λ) under laboratory and greenhouse conditions were 0.1668 d(-1) and 0.1027 d(-1), 192.1 and 53.0, and 1.1815 d(-1) and 1.1082 d(-1), respectively. Our results revealed significantly different life table parameters for C. sexmaculata under laboratory and greenhouse conditions. This information will be useful for developing a successful mass-rearing program for C. sexmaculata for use in biological control. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. FECUNDITY OF FICUS WHITEFLY, SINGHIELLA SIMPLEX (HEMIPTERA: ALEYRODIDAE), AND ITS PREDATION BY DELPHASTUS CATALINAE (COLEOPTERA: COCCINELLIDAE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficus Whitefly (Singhiella simplex) was first reported in Miami-Dade County in August 2007. This invasive pest causes infested plants to exhibit leaf yellowing, followed by leaf drop. The pest has been recorded on multiple ficus hosts including Ficus benjamina, F. altissima, F. bengalensis, F. micro...

  6. Phenotypic plasticity of elytron length in wingless two-spot ladybird beetles Adalia bipunctata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lommen, S.T.E.; Jong, de P.W.; Brakefield, P.M.

    2005-01-01

    Winglessness in the two-spot ladybird beetle Adalia bipunctata (L.) is determined by a single locus with the wingless allele recessive to the winged wildtype allele. The expression of the wingless trait is highly variable, with individuals missing a variable part of elytra and flight wings; the elyt

  7. A new species of Mada Gordon from the Andes (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Epilachnini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szawaryn, Karol; González, Guillermo

    2017-01-26

    Although Gordon (1975) revised the herbivorous ladybirds of the New World, the taxonomy of this group in the Americas is still poorly studied. Some recent efforts have been made at the generic (Szawaryn 2015b) as well as species level (Szawaryn 2015a; González & Gómez 2013; González 2015) to describe and improve our knowledge of the systematics of Neotropical Epilachnini, but they still need more investigation.

  8. Four New Ladybug Species Belonging to Decadiomus Chapin (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segarra-Carmona, A E; Otero, M

    2014-12-01

    While searching for native natural enemies attacking invasive insect pests in Puerto Rico, we found four undescribed ladybug species belonging to the Caribbean ladybug genus Decadiomus Chapin. In this article, we describe the following species from Puerto Rico: Decadiomus seini n. sp., Decadiomus ramosi n. sp., Decadiomus hayuyai n. sp., and Decadiomus martorelli n. sp. Illustrations of the dorsal habitus, shape of prosternal carinae, and drawings of male and female genitalia are presented. We also present a key for Diomini of Puerto Rico and discuss their importance as potential biocontrol agents.

  9. Barcode haplotype variation in North American agroecosystem ladybird beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae

    Science.gov (United States)

    DNA barcodes have proven invaluable in identifying and distinguishing insect pests, for example for determining the provenance of exotic invasives, but relatively few insect natural enemies have been barcoded. We used Folmer et al.’s universal invertebrate primers (1994), and those designed by Heber...

  10. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of a phytophagous ladybird beetle, Henosepilachna pusillanima (Mulsant) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behere, G T; Firake, D M; Tay, W T; Azad Thakur, N S; Ngachan, S V

    2016-01-01

    Ladybird beetles are generally considered as agriculturally beneficial insects, but the ladybird beetles in the coleopteran subfamily Epilachninae are phytophagous and major plant feeding pest species which causes severe economic losses to cucurbitaceous and solanaceous crops. Henosepilachna pusillanima (Mulsant) is one of the important pest species of ladybird beetle. In this report, we sequenced and characterized the complete mitochondrial genome of H. pusillanima. For sequencing of the complete mitochondrial genome, we used the Ion Torrent sequencing platform. The complete circular mitochondrial genome of the H. pusillanima was determined to be 16,216 bp long. There were totally 13 protein coding genes, 22 transfer RNA, 2 ribosomal RNA and a control (A + T-rich) region estimated to be 1690 bp. The gene arrangement and orientations of assembled mitogenome were identical to the reported predatory ladybird beetle Coccinella septempunctata L. This is the first completely sequenced coleopteran mitochondrial genome from the beetle subfamily Epilachninae from India. Data generated in this study will benefit future comparative genomics studies for understanding the evolutionary relationships between predatory and phytophagous coccinellid beetles.

  11. Dual resistance to lambda-cyhalothrin and dicrotophos in Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Paulo R R; Michaud, J P; Rodrigues, Agna R S; Torres, Jorge B

    2016-09-01

    Insecticide resistance is usually associated with pests, but may also evolve in natural enemies. In this study, adult beetles of three distinct North American populations of Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville, and the progeny of reciprocal crosses between the resistant and most susceptible population, were treated topically with varying concentrations of lambda-cyhalothrin and dicrotophos. In addition, the LD50s of both insecticides were applied in combination to resistant individuals. The developmental and reproductive performance of each population was assessed in the absence of insecticide exposure to compare baseline fitness. California and Kansas populations were susceptible to both materials, whereas Georgia (GA) beetles exhibited a resistance ratio (RR50) of 158 to lambda-cyhalothrin and 530 to dicrotophos. Inheritance of lambda-cyhalothrin resistance was X-linked, whereas inheritance of dicrotophos resistance was autosomal. Mortality of resistant beetles treated with a mixture of LD50s of both materials was twice that of those treated with lambda-cyhalothrin alone, but not significantly different from those receiving dicrotophos alone. Life history parameters were largely similar among populations, except that Georgia beetles had higher egg fertility relative to susceptible populations. We conclude that the high levels of resistance to lambda-cyhalothrin and dicrotophos in Georgia beetles reflect heavy loads of these insecticides in local environments, most likely the large acreage under intensive cotton cultivation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Diomus (Coleoptera : Coccinellidae un nuevo género para la fauna ibérica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EIZAGUIRRE, S.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Se cita el género Diomus Mulsant por vez primera para la fauna ibérica, con ejemplares de la costa de Málaga. Se revisa la especie Diomus rubidus Motschulsky, con las subespecies citadas hasta el momento, en su difusión circunmediterránea y macaronésica.

  13. New records of Coccinellidae (Coleoptera) from Wyoming, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunal distributions are dynamic, and the fauna associated with a particular area may change due to accidental or intentional introductions of new species, extinctions, and natural geographic range expansions or contractions of species. Thus, periodic field surveys and collections of fauna are nece...

  14. Kemampuan Pemangsaan Menochilus sexmaculatus F. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae terhadap Rhopalosiphum maidis Fitch (Homoptera: Aphididae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indriya Radiyanto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to study the functional response of M. sexmaculatus. The hypothesis of this study was that age of predator and the numbers of prey will effect predation rate. To test this hypothesis, a set of prey (first and fourth instar and adult R. maidis was separately placed together with first and fourth instar larval and adult female of M. sexmaculatus at different densities. The length of the exposure of the hosts were respectively 13, 14 and 2 hours for 1st instar larval predator, 4th instar larval predator and adult predators. In addition a combination of 1st and 4th instar nymph of R. maidis were exposed to adult M. sexmaculatus for 24 hours. The result of this study showed that the ability to predation of young and adult M. exmaculatus was type II, indicating that M. sexmaculatus can be categorized as effective biological control agent. Adults of M. sexmaculatus are better predators than the larval stages. Based on non linear regression analysis, the maximum numbers of preys consumed by adult females of M. sexmaculatus was 300 individuals of various stages of R. maidis per 24 hours.

  15. A new species of the genus Phaenochilus Weise from China (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Chilocorini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjing; Huo, Lizhi; Chen, Xiaosheng; Ren, Shunxiang; Wang, Xingmin

    2017-01-01

    A new species Phaenochilus albomarginalis Li & Wang, sp. n. is described. The only other species recorded from China is Phaenochilus metasternalis Miyatake, 1970 and it is described here for comparison. Diagnoses, detailed descriptions, illustrations, and distributions are provided.

  16. First records of both subspecies of Brachiacantha quadripunctata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in Mississippi, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The first records of the lady beetles Brachiacantha quadripunctata quadripunctata (Melsheimer) and B. quadripunctata flavifrons Mulsant from Mississippi and their occurrence in sympatry are reported following a review of previously collected material. The new records also extend the known geographi...

  17. Ten years of invasion: Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Helen E; Brown, Peter M J

    2015-08-01

    1. Harmonia axyridis was first recorded in Britain in 2004. Two subsequent earlier records were received from 2003. 2. The UK Ladybird Survey, a citizen science initiative involving online recording, was launched in 2005 to encourage people across Britain to track the spread of H. axyridis. Tens of thousands of people have provided records of H. axyridis and other species of ladybirds, creating an invaluable dataset for large-scale and long-term research. Declines in the distribution of seven (of eight assessed) native species of ladybird have been demonstrated, and correlated with the arrival of H. axyridis, using the records collated through the UK Ladybird Survey. 3. Experimental research and field surveys have also contributed to our understanding of the ecology of H. axyridis and particularly the process of invasion. Harmonia axyridis arrived in Britain through dispersal and introduction events from regions in which it was deliberately released as a biological control agent. The rapid spread of this species has been attributed to its high natural dispersal capability by means of both flight and anthropogenic transport. A number of factors have contributed to the successful establishment and indeed dominance of this polymorphic species within aphidophagous guilds, including high reproductive capacity, intra-guild predation, eurytopic nature, high resistance to natural enemies within the invaded range, and potentially phenotypic plasticity. 4. The global invasion by H. axyridis and subsequent research on this species has contributed to the general understanding of biological invasions.

  18. Renius cornutus, a new genus and species of Chilocorini from Tibet, China (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjing; Huo, Lizhi; Ahrens, Dirk; Ren, Shunxiang; Wang, Xingmin

    2017-01-01

    A new monotypic genus of Chilocorini, Renius Li & Wang, gen. n., with a new species R. cornutus Li et Wang, sp. n. is described from Tibet, China. All diagnostic features are illustrated. The relationships with other genera of Chilocorini are discussed and a key to Chinese genera of Chilocorini is provided.

  19. The genus Shirozuella Sasaji (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Shirozuellini from the Chinese mainland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingmin Wang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The genus Shirozuella Sasaji, 1967 from the Chinese mainland is reviewed. Eight species are recognized, including four new species: S. motuoensis sp. n., S. tibetina sp. n., S. unciforma sp. n., and S. guoyuei sp. n. Male genitalia of S. parenthesis Yu and S. quadrimacularis are described for the first time. All species are described and illustrated. A key and distribution map to the known species from the Chinese mainland are given.

  20. Epiverta Dieke (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Epilachnini): A Complex of Species, Not a Monotypic Genus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Lizhi; Szawaryn, Karol; Wang, Xingmin

    2017-01-01

    Rich sampling and modern research techniques, including SEM, revealed that rarely collected epilachnine species Epiverta chelonia is a complex of four closely related species: E. chelonia (Mader, 1933), E. albopilosa, E. angusta, and E. supinata spp. nov. All Epiverta species are described and illustrated, a key to the species and a distribution map are provided. Lectotype of Solanophila cheloniaMader, 1933 is designated and its type locality delimited to Yunnan Province, Deqin County (China).

  1. The direct effects of male killer infection on fitness of ladybird hosts (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnagdy, S; Majerus, M E N; Gardener, M; Lawson Handley, L-J

    2013-08-01

    Male killing bacteria are common in insects and are thought to persist in host populations primarily by indirect fitness benefits to infected females, whereas direct fitness effects are generally assumed to be neutral or deleterious. Here, we estimated the effect of male killer infection on direct fitness (number of eggs laid, as a measure of fecundity, together with survival) and other life-history traits (development time and body size) in seven ladybird host/male killer combinations. Effects of male killers on fecundity ranged, as expected, from costly to neutral; however, we found evidence of reduced development time and increased survival and body size in infected strains. Greater body size in Spiroplasma-infected Harmonia axyridis corresponded to greater ovariole number and therefore higher potential fecundity. To our knowledge, this is the first report of direct benefits of male killer infection after explicitly controlling for indirect fitness effects. Neutral or deleterious fitness effects of male killer infection should not therefore be automatically assumed. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2013 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  2. New species of Zenoria Mulsant (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from Brazil and Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Paula B; González F, Guillermo

    2016-12-07

    Four new species of Zenoria Mulsant, 1850 are described: Zenoria limitrophi sp. nov. from Brazil; and Z. westerduijni sp. nov., Z. carbo sp. nov., and Z. miroi sp. nov. from Peru. Diagnostic characters are illustrated and relationships with previously described species are discussed.

  3. Reflective Polyethylene Mulch Reduces Mexican Bean Beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) Densities and Damage in Snap Beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottingham, L B; Kuhar, T P

    2016-08-01

    Mexican bean beetle, Epilachna varivestis Mulsant, is a serious pest of snap beans, Phaseolus vulgaris L., in the eastern United States. These beetles are intolerant to direct sunlight, explaining why individuals are typically found on the undersides of leaves and in the lower portion of the plant canopy. We hypothesized that snap beans grown on reflective, agricultural polyethylene (plastic mulch) would have fewer Mexican bean beetles and less injury than those grown on black plastic or bare soil. In 2014 and 2015, beans were seeded into beds of metallized, white, and black plastic, and bare soil, in field plots near Blacksburg, VA. Mexican bean beetle density, feeding injury, predatory arthropods, and snap bean yield were sampled. Reflected light intensity, temperature, and humidity were monitored using data loggers. Pyranometer readings showed that reflected light intensity was highest over metallized plastic and second highest over white plastic; black plastic and bare soil were similarly low. Temperature and humidity were unaffected by treatments. Significant reductions in Mexican bean beetle densities and feeding injury were observed in both metallized and white plastic plots compared to black plastic and bare soil, with metallized plastic having the fewest Mexican bean beetle life stages and injury. Predatory arthropod densities were not reduced by reflective plastic. Metallized plots produced the highest yields, followed by white. The results of this study suggest that growing snap beans on reflective plastic mulch can suppress the incidence and damage of Mexican bean beetle, and increase yield in snap beans. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Sex differences in the radiosensitivity of potato epilachnid Henosepilachna vigintioctopunctata (F. ) (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, J.K.; Ashok Kumar (Himachal Pradesh Univ., Simla (India). Dept. of Bio-sciences)

    1980-07-01

    Sex differences in the radiosensitivity of potato epilachnid, were studied by irradiating 1 to 3 days old adults with ..gamma..-radiation at doses of 0,2,3,5 and 9 Krad. Males were slightly more radiosensitive than females. However, male mortality was significantly higher than that of female throughout the period of observation only at 3 Krad.

  5. Sexual selection drives the evolution of limb regeneration in Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S; Tan, X L; Michaud, J P; Shi, Z K; Zhang, F

    2015-04-01

    When Harmonia axyridis larvae were subjected to amputation of a foreleg in the fourth instar, 83% survived and, of these, 75% regenerated the leg during pupation. Regenerators pupated at heavier weights than controls (unoperated) or non-regenerators, and spent longer in pupation. Regenerated males were preferred by females in choice tests and produced more viable progeny than control males. Unregenerated males were less preferred by females, copulated for shorter periods than control males, and reduced female fecundity. Amputation diminished beneficial paternal effects, whether males regenerated or not, resulting in progeny with slower development and smaller adult body mass relative to control paternity. Progeny of unregenerated males had lower survival and body mass, whether male or female, confirming that regeneration was an honest signal of mate quality. When offspring had a foreleg amputated, a regenerated paternity yielded higher survival than control paternity, but similar rates of regeneration, whereas an unregenerated paternity yielded lower rates of survival and leg regeneration than control paternity. Regenerating beetles were twice as likely to be melanic as non-regenerating or control beetles, suggesting pleiotropic effects of melanism on processes involved in regeneration. This is the first report of complete limb regeneration by a holometabolous insect in the pupal stage, and the first example of sexual selection for regenerative capacity.

  6. The potential of different fruit species as food for Harmonia axyridis (Pallas, 1773 (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Fediuk de Castro Guedes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Harmonia axyridis was detected for the first time in Brazil in 2002. Since then, it has been recorded from the South to the Midwest of the country. Until now, almost all the registered cases were associated with the presence of aphids, its preferred source of food. Due to the occurrence of this species in areas of fruit growing in the South and Southeast of Brazil, the aim of this study was to analyze the preference and use of three different cultivars of fruit. The tests were set at 25ºC ± 1ºC, RH 70% ± 10%, and in a photophase of 12 h and with apples (Gala and Fuji, grapes (Niágara and Rubi, and pears (Williams and Asian. In the undamaged fruit experiment, the insects did not cause any noticeable damage. In the damaged and undamaged fruit experiment, a higher and statistically significant percentage of H. axyridis adults were found in the three damaged fruits. In the different cultivar experiment the Niágara grape, the Gala apple, and the Williams pear were significantly preferred by H. axyridis adults. These results may help in the management of this insect, preventing damage, which have been observed in other places where H. axyridis was introduced.

  7. Comparison of Peach Cultivars for Provision of Extrafloral Nectar Resources to Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Clarissa R; Brown, Mark W; Wäckers, Felix L

    2016-04-22

    Incorporating nonprey sugar resources into apple orchards is a potential means of enhancing biological control services, but little is known about the impacts of extrafloral nectars on aphidophagous coccinellids. We explored peach Prunus persica (L.) Batsch extrafloral nectar as a supplemental resource for Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), a key aphid predator in the mid-Atlantic United States. Extrafloral nectar quantity, temporal production, and carbohydrate profile were assessed for four peach cultivars in orchard and greenhouse culture. Seasonal densities of H. axyridis visiting extrafloral nectaries were estimated, and the propensity of beetles to feed upon extrafloral nectar was compared by cultivar in the laboratory. We also compared survival of newly eclosed adult pairs that were starved or fed aphids with or without extrafloral nectar. Peach extrafloral nectar contained six carbohydrates, with sucrose dominant for all cultivars, but extrafloral nectar production varied significantly by cultivar and collection date, with 'Lovell' yielding higher average seasonal volume than the other cultivars. Harmonia axyridis continuously foraged on peach trees lacking prey, and beetle abundance was positively correlated with the number of leaves actively producing extrafloral nectar. In laboratory assays, newly emerged adult beetles preferentially selected and consumed extrafloral nectar of Lovell peach shoots. Furthermore, when prey were initially unavailable to adult H. axyridis, the beetles were sustained by extrafloral nectar and experienced longer survival compared with beetles without the supplemental resource. Collectively, these results suggest that peach extrafloral nectar is a beneficial resource that could potentially sustain H. axyridis in orchards when prey are scarce. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Elytral macular forms of Coccinella septempunctata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccinella septempunctata L. is a widespread Palearctic species that has been introduced several times into North America within the last century. It is generally considered monomorphic with seven elytral maculae in North America. In this paper, we document variation in elytral color patterns of C...

  9. Biología de Delphastus quinculus (Gordon 1994) (Coleoptera : Coccinellidae) bajo diferentes temperaturas

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina. Escuela de Posgrado. Maestría en Entomología Delphastus quinculus (Gordon, 1994) es un predador que ha sido reportado importante, para el control del complejo de la mosca blanca de los invernaderos Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood, 1856). Para obtener información sobre algunos aspectos de su biología y el efecto de la temperatura en su desarrollo, se realizaron experimentos bajo condiciones de laboratorio a seis1temperaturas constantes...

  10. KELIMPAHAN POPULASI, PREFERENSI DAN KARAKTER KEBUGARAN MENOCHILUS SEXMACULATUS (COLEOPTERA: COCCINELLIDAE PREDATOR KUTUDAUN PADA PERTANAMAN CABAI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novri Nelly

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This predator is efective to control population of aphids, so the aim of research was to study the field population abundance, predator preference to this prey, and fitness character of M. sexmaculatus as predator. The population fluctuation was observed at conventional and organic farming. The preference test was conducted by choice and no choice test for some types of prey. Fitness test was performed by studying its prey, the number of eggs produced and number of eggs hatched. The results showed that M. sexmaculatus population abundance was fluctuated, the abundance higher in chili cultivated conventionaly than cultivated in organic farming.  But in conventional farming  decreased with increasing age of chili. Preference test showed that almost all species of  aphids preferred by M. sexmaculatus.  Some prey species  found were  aphids, thrips and Neotoxoptera. Predator  fitness levels showed by the longevity of females ranged  9-10 days. Oviposition period  was on average five days, while the post-oviposition was two days. The number of eggs produced ranged  100-200 eggs with an average of 135.3 eggs.

  11. Notes on the genus Mada Mulsant with description of a new Andean species (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Epilachnini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szawaryn, Karol

    2015-03-19

    Mada andeana, a new species from the Andes is here described. Diagnostic characters are illustrated for both male and female. Mada durantae González et Gómez is here synonymized with Mada inepta (Gorham), new synonymy.

  12. NOVOUTVRĐENE VRSTE BOŽJIH OVČICA (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) U HRVATSKOJ

    OpenAIRE

    Jelovčan, Siniša; IGRC BARČIĆ, Jasminka; Gotlin Čuljak, Tanja

    2007-01-01

    U radu su opisane novoutvrđene vrste božjih ovčica u Hrvatskoj. Skupljene su tijekom trogodišnjeg istraživanja (2001-2003) pomoću metode otresanja grana i vizualnim pregledom biljaka na prisutnost božjih ovčica. Utvrđene su vrste: Coccinulla sinuatomarginata (Faldermann, 1837) i Epilachna argus (Geoffroy, 1785).

  13. Biology of Scymnus ningshanensis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae): A predator of Adelges tsugae (Homoptera: Adelgidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Montgomery; Hongbin Wang; Defu Yao; Wenhau Lu; Nathan Havill; Guangwu. Li

    2002-01-01

    Information is presented on the occurrence, development, and feeding of Scymnus (Neopullus) ningshanensis Yu et Yao. Information on its biology was collected in the field and laboratory in China and in quarantine in the United States. This lady beetle was found in China only on hemlock infested with ...

  14. Feeding and development of Nephaspis Oculata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) on rugose spiraling whitefly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nephaspis oculata (Blatchley, 1917) is a whitefly predatory lady beetle which has been studied for its biological control effect on different whiteflies. Here, we studied the feeding rate and development of this beetle on rugose spiraling whitefly (RSW), Aleurodicus rugioperculatus Martin 2004, an i...

  15. [Genotypic Diversity of Wolbachia pipientis in Native and Invasive Harmonia axyridis Pall., 1773 (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) Populations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goryacheva, I I; Blekhman, A V; Andrianov, B V; Gorelova, T V; Zakharov, I A

    2015-08-01

    The distribution and variability of reproductive symbiotic Wolbachia pipientis bacteria were studied in seven native and six invasive H. axyridis populations. Wolbachia-infected individuals were found in two invasive and two native populations. We demonstrated for the first time an infection of invasive H. axyridis populations with Wolbachia. Two new molecular forms of Wolbachia were detected by a system of multilocus typing. The supergroup A Wolbachia was found for the first time in H. axyridis. The detected genotypic diversity of Wolbachia indicates repeated and independent infection events in the evolutionary past of H. axyridis.

  16. Physiology of the invasive apple snail Pomacea maculata: tolerance to low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaton, Lewis E.; Schmidt, William; Leblanc, Brody; Carter, Jacoby; Mueck, Kristy; Merino, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Apple snails of the genus Pomacea native to South America have invaded and become established in Europe, Asia, and the United States. Both the channeled apple snail Pomacea canaliculata and the island apple snail Pomacea maculata have been reported in the United States. The two species are difficult to distinguish using morphological characters, leading to uncertainty about the identity of the animals from populations in the United States. Because the snails are subtropical, their tolerance of low temperatures is a critical factor in limiting the spread of the animals from present localities along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico to more northern areas. The tolerance of P. maculata collected in Louisiana to temperatures as low as 0°C was examined. There was no mortality among animals maintained in water at temperatures of 20°C or 15°C for 10 days. Survival of animals during a 10-day exposure to water at temperatures 10°C and 5°C was 50%. The LD50 for a 10-day exposure was 7°C. Snails did not survive more than 5 days in liquid water at 0°C. Ammonia excretion by animals in temperatures of 20°C and 15°C was comparable to values reported for freshwater gastropods; at very low temperatures, excretion of ammonia was decreased. There was no difference in the mean values of the osmolality of the hemolymph of animals exposed to 20°C, 15°C and 10°C for 10 days. Sequencing of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 identified the animals in the Louisiana population used in this study as P. maculata.

  17. The estimation of growth dynamics for Pomacea maculata from hatchling to adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Karyn L.; Zhao, Lihong; Carter, Jacoby

    2017-01-01

    Pomacea maculata is a relatively new invasive species to the Gulf Coast region and potentially threatens local agriculture (rice) and ecosystems (aquatic vegetation). The population dynamics of P. maculata have largely been unquantified, and therefore, scientists and field-workers are ill-equipped to accurately project population sizes and the resulting impact of this species. We studied the growth of P. maculata ranging in weights from 6 to 105 g, identifying the sex of the animals when possible. Our studied population had a 4:9 male:female sex ratio. We present the findings from initial analysis of the individual growth data of males and females, from which it was apparent that females were generally larger than males and that small snails grew faster than larger snails. Since efforts to characterize the male and female growth rates from individual data do not yield statistically supported estimates, we present the estimation of several parameterized growth rate functions within a population-level mathematical model. We provide a comparison of the results using these various growth functions and discuss which best characterizes the dynamics of our observed population. We conclude that both males and females exhibit biphasic growth rates, and thus, their growth is size-dependent. Further, our results suggest that there are notable differences between males and females that are important to take into consideration in order to accurately model this species' population dynamics. Lastly, we include preliminary analyses of ongoing experiments to provide initial estimates of growth in the earliest life stages (hatchling to ≈6 g).

  18. Assessment of the Seedling Reactions of Some Hulless Barley Genotypes to Drechslera teres f. maculata

    OpenAIRE

    Gerlegiz, Emine Tuba; KARAKAYA, Aziz; Celik Oguz, Arzu; MERT, Zafer; Sayim, İsmail; Ergun, Namuk; Aydogan, Sinan

    2015-01-01

    The seedling reactions of three barley cultivars, one hulless barley cultivar, two candidate hulless barley lines and nine hulless barley genotypes were determined under greenhouse conditions to ten isolates of Drechslera teres f. maculata, the causal agent of spot form of net blotch. Isolates were obtained from Ankara, Çankırı, Eskişehir, Kayseri, Konya and Şanlıurfa provinces. The reactions of the cultivars and hulless cultivar ranged between suscepible-resistant. The reactions of the hulle...

  19. Development and Evaluation of Poly Herbal Molluscicidal Extracts for Control of Apple Snail (Pomacea maculata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guruswamy Prabhakaran

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Golden Apple Snail (GAS is the most destructive invasive rice pest in Southeast Asia. The cost of synthetic molluscicides, their toxicity to non-target organisms, and their persistence in the environment have propelled the research of plant-derived molluscicides. Most research efforts have focused on individual plant extracts for their molluscicidal potency against GAS and have not been proven to be entirely effective in rice field conditions. Selective combination of synergistically acting molluscicidal compounds from various plant extracts might be an effective alternative. In this direction, ethanolic extracts from six different plants (Neem, Tobacco, Nerium, Pongamia, Zinger, and Piper were evaluated against Pomacea maculata Perry. Of the various combinations studied, a binary extract (1:1 of nerium and tobacco (LC90 177.71 mg/L, 48 h, and two tri-herbal extract formulations (1:1:1 of (nerium + tobacco + piper and (nerium + tobacco + neem were found to be most effective, with LC90 values of 180.35 mg/L and 191.52 mg/L, respectively, in laboratory conditions. The synergistic effect of combined herbal extracts resulted in significant reduction in LC90 values of the individual extracts. The findings of this study demonstrate that the selective combinations of potent molluscicidal herbal extracts are effective for management of P. maculata under laboratory conditions.

  20. Kinematic control of extreme jump angles in the red leg running frog (Kassina maculata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Christopher Thomas; Porro, Laura Beatriz; Collings, Amber Jade

    2017-03-08

    The kinematic flexibility of frog hindlimbs enables multiple locomotor modes within a single species. Prior work has extensively explored maximum performance capacity in frogs; however, the mechanisms by which anurans modulate performance within locomotor modes remain unclear. We explored how Kassina maculata, a species known for both running and jumping abilities, modulates takeoff angle from horizontal to nearly vertical. Specifically, how do 3D motions of leg segments coordinate to move the center of mass (COM) upwards and forwards? How do joint rotations modulate jump angle? High-speed video was used to quantify 3D joint angles and their respective rotation axis vectors. Inverse kinematics was used to determine how hip, knee and ankle rotations contribute to components of COM motion. Independent of takeoff angle, leg segment retraction (rearward rotation) was twofold greater than adduction (downward rotation). Additionally, the joint rotation axis vectors reoriented through time suggesting dynamic shifts in relative roles of joints. We found two hypothetical mechanisms for increasing takeoff angle: Firstly, greater knee and ankle excursion increased shank adduction, elevating the COM. Secondly, during the steepest jumps the body rotated rapidly backwards to redirect the COM velocity. This rotation was not caused by pelvic angle extension, but rather by kinematic transmission from leg segments via reorientation of the joint rotation axes. We propose that K. maculata uses proximal leg retraction as the principal kinematic drive while dynamically tuning jump trajectory by knee and ankle joint modulation.

  1. First record of Triatoma maculata (Erichson, 1848 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatomini in Riohacha, La Guajira – Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Natalia Gómez-Melendro

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Knowledge of vector insect species, their habitat and geographical distribution is crucial for determining the risk of transmission of the etiologic agents that cause disease in humans, which allows defining strategies for prevention, surveillance and control in line with the characteristics of each area. Objective. To determine the presence and public health importance of vectors of Chagas disease in the indigenous settlements of Marbacella and El Horno of the Wayúu ethnic group in the municipality of Riohacha, La Guajira, Colombia. Materials and methods. From active search, installation and inspection of biosensors and occasional catches, Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatomini were collected intra and in the peridomicile housing of the indigenous settlements of El Horno and Marbacella of the the Wayúu ethnic group. Indices of intra and peridomestic infestation, colonization, density, dispersion and natural infection with Trypanosoma cruzi Chagas, 1909 were calculated. Results. 79.6% (n = 90 of the specimens were collected around the homes and 20.3% (n = 23 inside the homes, all corresponding to Triatoma maculata (Erichson, 1848. The natural infection indices with T. cruzi accounted for 43.5% for Marbacella and 36% for El Horno. Conclusion. This is the first reported capture of individuals of T. maculata, considered a secondary vector of Chagas disease in Colombia, naturally infected with T. cruzi in the municipality of Riohacha expanding the geographical distribution of the species in the department of La Guajira.

  2. A pilot study testing a natural and a synthetic molluscicide for controlling invasive apple snails (Pomacea maculata)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomacea maculata (formerly P. insularum), an apple snail native to South America, was discovered in Louisiana in 2008. These snails strip vegetation, reproduce at tremendous rates, and have reduced rice production and caused ecosystem changes in Asia. In this study snails were exposed to two mollusc...

  3. No Evidence for a Culturable Bacterial Tetrodotoxin Producer in Pleurobranchaea maculata (Gastropoda: Pleurobranchidae and Stylochoplana sp. (Platyhelminthes: Polycladida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren R. Salvitti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetrodotoxin (TTX is a potent neurotoxin found in the tissues of many taxonomically diverse organisms. Its origin has been the topic of much debate, with suggestions including endogenous production, acquisition through diet, and symbiotic bacterial synthesis. Bacterial production of TTX has been reported in isolates from marine biota, but at lower than expected concentrations. In this study, 102 strains were isolated from Pleurobranchaea maculata (Opisthobranchia and Stylochoplana sp. (Platyhelminthes. Tetrodotoxin production was tested utilizing a recently developed sensitive method to detect the C9 base of TTX via liquid chromatography—mass spectrometry. Bacterial strains were characterized by sequencing a region of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. To account for the possibility that TTX is produced by a consortium of bacteria, a series of experiments using marine broth spiked with various P. maculata tissues were undertaken. Sixteen unique strains from P. maculata and one from Stylochoplana sp. were isolated, representing eight different genera; Pseudomonadales, Actinomycetales, Oceanospirillales, Thiotrichales, Rhodobacterales, Sphingomonadales, Bacillales, and Vibrionales. Molecular fingerprinting of bacterial communities from broth experiments showed little change over the first four days. No C9 base or TTX was detected in isolates or broth experiments (past day 0, suggesting a culturable microbial source of TTX in P. maculata and Stylochoplana sp. is unlikely.

  4. No evidence for a culturable bacterial tetrodotoxin producer in Pleurobranchaea maculata (Gastropoda: Pleurobranchidae) and Stylochoplana sp. (Platyhelminthes: Polycladida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvitti, Lauren R; Wood, Susanna A; McNabb, Paul; Cary, Stephen Craig

    2015-01-28

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a potent neurotoxin found in the tissues of many taxonomically diverse organisms. Its origin has been the topic of much debate, with suggestions including endogenous production, acquisition through diet, and symbiotic bacterial synthesis. Bacterial production of TTX has been reported in isolates from marine biota, but at lower than expected concentrations. In this study, 102 strains were isolated from Pleurobranchaea maculata (Opisthobranchia) and Stylochoplana sp. (Platyhelminthes). Tetrodotoxin production was tested utilizing a recently developed sensitive method to detect the C9 base of TTX via liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Bacterial strains were characterized by sequencing a region of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. To account for the possibility that TTX is produced by a consortium of bacteria, a series of experiments using marine broth spiked with various P. maculata tissues were undertaken. Sixteen unique strains from P. maculata and one from Stylochoplana sp. were isolated, representing eight different genera; Pseudomonadales, Actinomycetales, Oceanospirillales, Thiotrichales, Rhodobacterales, Sphingomonadales, Bacillales, and Vibrionales. Molecular fingerprinting of bacterial communities from broth experiments showed little change over the first four days. No C9 base or TTX was detected in isolates or broth experiments (past day 0), suggesting a culturable microbial source of TTX in P. maculata and Stylochoplana sp. is unlikely.

  5. Chemometric analysis of chromatographic fingerprints shows potential of Cyclopia maculata (Andrews) Kies for production of standardized extracts with high xanthone content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Alexandra E; de Beer, Dalene; de Villiers, André; Manley, Marena; Joubert, Elizabeth

    2014-10-29

    Cyclopia species are used for the production of honeybush tea and food ingredient extracts associated with many health benefits. A species-specific high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for Cyclopia maculata, developed and validated, allowed quantification of the major compounds in extracts from "unfermented" and fermented C. maculata. Two xanthones were tentatively identified for the first time in a Cyclopia species, whereas an additional four compounds were tentatively identified for the first time in C. maculata. "Fermentation" (oxidation) decreased the content of all compounds, with the exception of vicenin-2. Similarity analysis of the chromatographic fingerprints of unfermented C. maculata aqueous extracts showed extremely low variation (r ≥ 0.97) between samples. Some differences between wild-harvested and cultivated seedling plants were, however, demonstrated using principal component analysis. Quantitative data of selected compounds confirmed the low level of variation, making this Cyclopia species ideal for the production of standardized food ingredient extracts.

  6. Methoxypyrazine composition of Coccinellidae-tainted Riesling and Pinot noir wine from Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kögel, Susanne; Botezatu, Andreea; Hoffmann, Christoph; Pickering, Gary

    2015-02-01

    Harmonia axyridis (multicolored Asian ladybeetle) and Coccinella septempunctata (seven-spot ladybeetle) (Coccinellidae) are found in many wine regions in Europe and the Americas, where they are responsible for a pronounced wine fault known as 'ladybug taint' when incorporated with grapes during harvest operations. Methoxypyrazines have been proposed in the literature as the compounds responsible for the taint. This study sought to expand on this identification and also determine the effectiveness of heating Coccinellidae-affected grape must prior to fermentation as a possible remedial intervention. Riesling and Pinot noir grapes were infested with H. axyridis or C. septempunctata at different densities and fermented to dryness. The Pinot noir was either must heated prior to fermentation or processed without heating (control). All wines were analyzed for 2-isopropyl-, 2-sec-butyl-, 2-isobutyl- and 2,5-dimethyl-3-methoxypyrazine using headspace solid phase microextraction/multidimensional gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Concentrations of 2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine increased with beetle density for both Coccinellidae species, while other methoxypyrazines showed inconsistent or no variation with infestations levels. Heating of Pinot noir grapes prior to fermentation resulted in a moderate decrease in all methoxypyrazines. These results provide direction for more targeted treatments aimed at remediating musts/wines affected by Coccinellidae and indicate that winegrowers do not need to differentiate between H. axyridis and C. septempunctata when making action threshold decisions in the vineyard or winery. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. A comprehensive assessment of the effects of Bt cotton on Coleomegilla maculata demonstrates no detrimental effects by Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhe Li

    Full Text Available The ladybird beetle, Coleomegilla maculata (DeGeer, is a common and abundant predator in many cropping systems. Its larvae and adults are predaceous, feeding on aphids, thrips, lepidopteran larvae and plant tissues, such as pollen. Therefore, this species is exposed to insecticidal proteins expressed in insect-resistant, genetically engineered cotton expressing Cry proteins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt. A tritrophic bioassay was conduced to evaluate the potential impact of Cry2Ab- and Cry1Ac-expressing cotton on fitness parameters of C. maculata using Bt-susceptible and -resistant larvae of Trichoplusia ni as prey. Coleomegilla maculata survival, development time, adult weight and fecundity were not different when they were fed with resistant T. ni larvae reared on either Bt or control cotton. To ensure that C. maculata were not sensitive to the tested Cry toxins independent from the plant background and to add certainty to the hazard assessment, C. maculata larvae were fed artificial diet incorporated with Cry2Ab, Cry1Ac or both at >10 times higher concentrations than in cotton tissue. Artificial diet containing E-64 was included as a positive control. No differences were detected in any life-table parameters between Cry protein-containing diet treatments and the control diet. In contrast, larvae of C. maculata fed the E-64 could not develop to the pupal stage and the 7-d larval weight was significantly negatively affected. In both feeding assays, the stability and bioactivity of Cry proteins in the food sources were confirmed by ELISA and sensitive-insect bioassays. Our results show that C. maculata is not affected by Bt cotton and is not sensitive to Cry2Ab and Cry1Ac at concentrations exceeding the levels in Bt cotton, thus demonstrating that Bt cotton will pose a negligible risk to C. maculata. More importantly, this study demonstrates a comprehensive system for assessing the risk of genetically modified plants on non

  8. Further contributions to the Coleoptera fauna of New Brunswick with an addition to the fauna of Nova Scotia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Reginald P.; Webster, Vincent L.; Alderson, Chantelle A.; Hughes, Cory C.; Sweeney, Jon D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This paper treats 134 new records of Coleoptera for the province of New Brunswick, Canada from the following 41 families: Gyrinidae, Carabidae, Dytiscidae, Histeridae, Leiodidae, Scarabaeidae, Scirtidae, Buprestidae, Elmidae, Limnichidae, Heteroceridae, Ptilodactylidae, Eucnemidae, Throscidae, Elateridae, Lampyridae, Cantharidae, Dermestidae, Bostrichidae, Ptinidae, Cleridae, Melyridae, Monotomidae, Cryptophagidae, Silvanidae, Laemophloeidae, Nitidulidae, Endomychidae, Coccinellidae, Corylophidae, Latridiidae, Tetratomidae, Melandryidae, Mordellidae, Tenebrionidae, Mycteridae, Pyrochroidae, Aderidae, Scraptiidae, Megalopodidae, and Chrysomelidae. Among these, the following four species are newly recorded from Canada: Dirrhagofarsus ernae Otto, Muona & McClarin (Eucnemidae), Athous equestris (LeConte) (Elateridae), Ernobius opicus Fall (Ptinidae), and Stelidota coenosa Erichson (Nitidulidae). The Family Limnichidae is newly reported for New Brunswick, and one species is added to the fauna of Nova Scotia. Stephostethus productus Rosenhauer (Latridiidae), Tetratoma (Abstrulia) variegata Casey (Tetratomidae), and Chauliognathus marginatus (Fabricius) (Cantharidae) are removed from the faunal list of New Brunswick, and additional records of Lacconotus punctatus LeConte (Mycteridae) are presented and discussed. Lindgren funnel traps provided specimens for 104 (78%) of the species and were the sole source of specimens for 89 (66%) of the species reported here, suggesting they are a very useful tool for sampling Coleoptera fauna in the forests of New Brunswick. PMID:27110171

  9. Two novel tyrosine-containing peptides (Tyr(4)) of the adipokinetic hormone family in beetles of the families Coccinellidae and Silphidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gäde, Gerd; Šimek, Petr; Marco, Heather G

    2015-11-01

    Novel members of the adipokinetic hormone family of peptides have been identified from the corpora cardiaca (CC) of two species of beetles representing two families, the Silphidae and the Coccinellidae. A crude CC extract (0.3 gland equivalents) of the burying beetle, Nicrophorus vespilloides, was active in mobilizing trehalose in a heterologous assay using the cockroach Periplaneta americana, whereas the CC extract (0.5 gland equivalents) of the ladybird beetle, Harmonia axyridis, exhibited no hypertrehalosemic activity. Primary sequences of one adipokinetic hormone from each species were elucidated by liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The multiple MS(N) electrospray mass data revealed an octapeptide with an unusual tyrosine residue at position 4 for each species: pGlu-Leu-Thr-Tyr-Ser-Thr-Gly-Trp amide for N. vespilloides (code-named Nicve-AKH) and pGlu-Ile-Asn-Tyr-Ser-Thr-Gly-Trp amide for H. axyridis (code-named Harax-AKH). Assignment of the correct sequences was confirmed by synthesis of the peptides and co-elution in reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection or by LC-MS. Moreover, synthetic peptides were shown to be active in the heterologous cockroach assay system, but Harax-AKH only at a dose of 30 pmol, which explains the negative result with the crude CC extract. It appears that the tyrosine residue at position 4 can be used as a diagnostic feature for certain beetle adipokinetic peptides, because this feature has not been found in another order other than Coleoptera.

  10. DETERMINATION OF THE SEEDLING REACTIONS OF TWENTY BARLEY CULTIVARS TO SIX ISOLATES OF DRECHSLERA TERES F. MACULATA

    OpenAIRE

    Pınar USTA; KARAKAYA, Aziz; OĞUZ, Arzu ÇELİK; MERT, Zafer; AKAN, Kadir; ÇETİN, Lütfi

    2014-01-01

    Seedling reactions of 20 barley cultivars grown in Turkey were determined under greenhouse conditions to six isolates of Drechslera teres f. maculata, the causal agent of spot form of barley net blotch disease. Isolates were obtained from different provinces of Turkey. Differences among the reactions of the cultivars to the isolates of the fungus were observed. Isolate differences in pathogenicity for each cultivar were also present. The reactions of cultivars to the isolates ranged betwee...

  11. Fitotoxidez de cádmio para Eucalyptus maculata e E. urophylla em solução nutritiva Cadmium phytotoxity to Eucalyptus maculata and E. urophylla in nutrient solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Roberto Fonsêca Sousa Soares

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Estudaram-se os efeitos de doses crescentes de Cd em solução nutritiva no crescimento e absorção mineral de mudas de Eucalyptus maculata e E. urophylla e respectivos sintomas de fitotoxidez em casa de vegetação. Mudas foram mantidas por cinco semanas em vasos contendo 2 L de solução nutritiva de Clark, adicionando-se 0, 45, 90, 135 e 180 miM de Cd fornecido como CdSO4. Após uma semana de exposição aos tratamentos, E. maculata exibiu pontuações avermelhadas nas nervuras, clorose internerval, necrose, murchamento das folhas e escurecimento das raízes. Além desses sintomas, E. urophylla apresentou morte das gemas apicais e acentuada queda de folhas. A dose crítica de Cd para reduzir em 10% a matéria seca da parte aérea foi baixa; 2,4 miM e 1,5 miM de Cd para E. maculata e E. urophylla, respectivamente. Os níveis críticos de toxidez na parte aérea foram de 14,5 mg kg-1 em E. maculata e 10,8 mg kg-1 de Cd em E. urophylla. Esses resultados indicaram que E. maculata é provavelmente menos sensível ao Cd do que E. urophylla. Foi também observado que o Cd reduziu a translocação de Cu em até 24 e 43% em E. maculata e E. urophylla, respectivamente. A translocação de Fe caiu de 36% em média, nas duas espécies no controle para apenas 12% com 180 miM Cd. A elevação nas doses de Cd reduziu os teores de Ca e Mg na parte aérea das espécies, atingindo-se teores de Mg abaixo da faixa considerada adequada em E. urophylla. Ficaram evidenciadas a fitotoxidez de Cd no Eucalyptus e a relação desta com a diminuição da translocação de Cu e Fe e com a diminuição dos teores foliares de Mg.The effects of increasing concentration of Cd in nutrient solution on growth, mineral uptake and phytotoxicity symptoms in Eucalyptus maculata and E. urophylla seedlings were studied under greenhouse conditions. Seedlings were kept for five weeks in 2 L pots containing Clark's nutrient solution amended with 0, 45, 90, 135 and 180 muM as CdSO4

  12. Molecular characterization, phylogeny and expression of a hepcidin gene in the blotched snakehead Channa maculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Li-cai; Wang, Hao; Deng, Li

    2014-05-01

    A hepcidin-like gene (cmHep) was cloned and characterized from the liver of the blotched snakehead Channa maculata. The complete cmHep cDNA was 756 bp in length, containing an open reading frame of 270 bp (encoding 89 amino acids), flanked by 210 bp and 276 bp of 5' and 3' untranslated regions, respectively. The deduced peptide of 89 amino acids consisted of 24 aa, 40 aa and 25 aa for signal peptide, prodomain and mature peptide, respectively. The mature peptide had eight cysteines at the identical conserved positions in common with most of other known hepcidins in vertebrates. cmHepc gene displayed a tripartite structure (three exons interrupted by two introns), which organisation was conserved between the blotched snakehead and other fish species. Phylogenetic analysis of hepcidins from C. maculata and other vertebrates showed that major phylogenetic grouping of fish hepcidin coincided with the current euteleosts classification, indicating the multiphyletic evolution of hepcidin in the teleosts. In the Acanthopterygii subclade, there were two distinct additional subclades named as HAMP-Ac1 and HAMP-Ac2. The blotched snakehead hepcidin was in the group HAMP-Ac1, which has the hypothetical iron regulatory sequence [Q-S/I-H-L/I-S/A] motif in N-terminal of mature peptide. The RT-PCR showed cmHep mRNA transcripts were widely distributed in all tissues tested in the blotched snakehead including the liver, gill, intestine, spleen, head kidney and peripheral white blood cell. The most abundant of cmHep mRNA was detected in liver. A significant up-regulation of cmHep expression was detected only in head kidney at 24h post-challenge with Vibrio parahaemolyticus in blotched snakehead adults, no significant differences found in liver, gill, intestine and spleen. The cmHep expression was up-regulated in spleen, head kidney and intestine at 24h post-injection with LPS in blotched snakehead juveniles, liver cmHep expression was not altered. Iron overloading and poly I

  13. Two molecular markers based on mitochondrial genomes for varieties identification of the northern snakehead (Channa argus) and blotched snakehead (Channa maculata) and their reciprocal hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xincheng, Zhang; Kunci, Chen; Xinping, Zhu; Jian, Zhao; Qing, Luo; Xiaoyou, Hong; Wei, Li; Fengfang, Xiao

    2015-08-01

    The northern snakehead (Channa argus) and blotched snakehead (Channa maculata) and their reciprocal hybrids have played important roles in the Chinese freshwater aquaculture industry, with an annual production in China exceeding 400 thousand tons. While these are popular aquaculture breeds in China, it is not easy to identify northern snakehead, blotched snakehead, and their hybrids. Thus, a method should be developed to identify these varieties. To distinguish between the reciprocal hybrids (C. argus ♀ × C. maculata ♂ and C. maculata ♀ × C. argus ♂), the mitochondrial genome sequences of northern snakehead and blotched snakehead and their reciprocal hybrids were compared. Following the alignment and analysis of mtDNA sequences of northern snakehead, blotched snakehead and their hybrids, two pairs of specific primers were designed based on identified differences ranging from 12S rRNA to 16S rRNA gene. The BY1 primers amplified the same bands in the blotched snakehead and the hybrid (C. maculata ♀ × C. argus ♂), while producing no products in northern snakehead and the hybrid (C. argus ♀ × C. maculata ♂). Amplification with WY1 yielded the opposite results. Then, 30 individuals per fish were randomized to verify the primers, and the results showed that the primers were specific for breeds, as intended. The specific primers can not only simply distinguish between two kinds of hybrids, but also rapidly identify the two parents. This study provides a method of molecular marker identification to identify reciprocal hybrids.

  14. Isolation and characterization of Aeromonas schubertii from diseased snakehead, Channa maculata (Lacepède).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y F; Liang, R S; Zhuo, X L; Wu, X T; Zou, J X

    2012-06-01

    Pure bacterial cultures were isolated from diseased snakeheads, Channa maculata (Lacepède), suffering high mortality in a farm in Zhongshan, southern China. Three isolates, namely ZS20100725, ZS20100725-1 and ZS20100725-2, were identified as Aeromonas schubertii. All the isolates showed high 16S rRNA sequence similarities with A. schubertii. The isolates exhibited strong virulence to snakeheads in experimental challenges with LD(50) ranging between 1.4 × 10(4) and 6.4 × 10(6) CFU g(-1). Two of the isolates were positive for haemolysin, elastase, lipase and lecithinase by phenotypic determination, which was further confirmed by PCR amplification of the haemolysin and elastase genes. In sterile liquid medium, the best growth conditions of strain ZS20100725 were 30 °C, pH 7 and 0.5% salinity (w/v). Antibiotic susceptibility tests showed that strain ZS20100725 was susceptible to cefoxitin, cefoperazone and chloramphenicol. Furthermore, histopathology of diseased snakeheads infected with A. schubertii showed necrosis and congestion in liver, kidney and spleen and also damage to the cardiac muscle, intestine and gills.

  15. Clinical and Experimental Study on Treatment of Psoriasis Maculata by Leyin(乐银)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨洪浦; 胡人杰; 齐云; 徐丽敏; 乔树芳

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To observe the therapeutic effect of Leyin (乐银, LY) in treating psoriasis mac-ulata (PM) and its effects on cellular immunity and vaginal epithelial cell mitosis in experimental mice.Methods: In this clinical study, 260 out-patients of PM were randomly divided into the observed group (n= 160) and the control group (n= 100), who were treated with oral intake of LY and Yinxieling granuleup study was also conducted on them. In the experimental study, delayed allergic model mice were treatedwith immunosuppressor (cyclophosphamide) and LY separately to observe the effects on their immunefunction and inhibition of vaginal epithelial cell proliferation. Results: In the observed group, 8 patients(5%) were cured, 32 (20%) basically cured, 48 (30%) markedly improved, 48 (30%) improved and 24(15 %) unchanged, the total effective rate being 85 %, while in the control group, the corresponding num-bers were 4, 8, 14, 38, 36 and 64% respectively, with the comparison of the total effective rate betweenthe two groups showing significant difference(P<0. 01). Adverse reactions were not found in the study.Experimental study showed that LY could enhance the immune function of mice and had a certain inhibito-ry effect on vaginal epithelial cell proliferation. Conclusion: LY could treat PM effectively and shows im-mune enhancing and anti-mitosis effect in mice.

  16. FAUNÍSTIC STUDY OF BEETLES (COLEOPTERA IN A SILVICULTURAL-PASTORAL SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Machado Auad

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to conduct a survey of beetles (Coleoptera in a silvicultural-pastoral system, estimating constancy, abundance, richness, diversity of families and seasonality, from July 2006 to June 2008. The study was carried out at the Embrapa Dairy Cattle station, in Coronel Pacheco, Minas Gerais, Brazil. The beetles were collected in Malaise traps, every two weeks, and taken to the laboratory for analysis. A total of 26 families, 294 morphospecies and 1,606 specimens were found. The Elateridae, Mordelidae, Chrysomelidae, Coccinellidae and Curculionidae families were the most abundant, rich and diverse. The Scarabaeidae and Scolytidae families were also among the most abundant, and the Cerambycidae family was among the richest, while the Bruchidae and Carabidae families presented high diversity.  The largest number of individuals and morphospecies sampled occurred during the period of rain. November 2007 presented the most (n = 535 specimens captures of any month, followed by October 2006, September 2007, March and April of 2008.

  17. Coleoptera in the Altai Mountains (Mongolia: species richness and community patterns along an ecological gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyundelger Khurelpurev

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Altai Mountains located in western Mongolia comprise diverse habitats including forest, mountain steppe, dry steppe, semidesert, and desert. This study used advanced statistics to examine how diversity and species composition of beetle communities depend on vegetation pattern and environmental factors along an ecological gradient from steppe to desert. Our study included the beetle families Tenebrionidae, Carabidae, Curculionidae, and Coccinellidae, which account for the majority of the known beetle fauna in the area. The most abundant Coleoptera in all plots were Harpalus limbaris, Corsyra fusula, and Anatolica cellicola; otherwise, we caught a large number of rare species. The beta diversity of communities was correlated with distance between plots. Species richness of beetles was positively impacted by plant cover and correlated negatively with rising temperatures, whereas Shannon diversity of beetle communities was significantly higher in areas with higher precipitation. Distribution and community composition of Coleopterans were governed by environmental factors, especially plant diversity, mean annual temperature, and summer precipitation, as revealed by redundancy analysis.

  18. A System for Harvesting Eggs from the Pink-Spotted Lady Beetle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret L. Allen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a system for harvesting eggs from a predatory insect, the pink-spotted lady beetle, Coleomegilla maculata De Geer (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae. Adult beetles placed in square, transparent containers that included oviposition substrates hanging from the top of the cage deposited eggs on the materials provided. We harvested eggs from these substrates in quantities sufficient for either destructive sampling or synchronous development of larvae. We evaluated effects of crowding inside cages; effects of a chemical attractant on oviposition behavior; egg cannibalism. Females preferred a textured surface rather than a smooth, waxy one for laying eggs. Crowding inhibited oviposition of beetles. Presence of a chemical attractant (methyl salicylate did not significantly improve oviposition. This paper describes an inexpensive system for harvesting eggs from C. maculata. Refinement of this system should improve oviposition and reduce cannibalism.

  19. Revisão das espécies brasileiras do gênero Exoplectra Chevrolat (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Exoplectrinae, Exoplectrini A revision of Brazilian species of the genus Exoplectra Chevrolat (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Exoplectrinae, Exoplectrini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana V. Costa

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available As espécies brasileiras de Exoplectra Chevrolat, 1844 são revisadas com base no estudo de caracteres morfológicos do exoesqueleto e genitália. Dentre as 37 espécies do gênero foram estudadas 14 brasileiras, incluindo as três propostas como novas. Foi examinado o material-tipo de nove espécies. São designados os lectótipos de E. angustifrons Weise, 1895, E. calcarata (Germar, 1824, E. coccinea (Fabricius, 1801 e E. miniata (Germar, 1824. Exoplectra companyoi Mulsant, 1850 é revalidada; E. aenea (Fabricius, 1801, E. bernardinensis Brèthes, 1925, E. impotens Mulsant, 1850, E. luteicornis Mulsant, 1850 e E. irregularis (Crotch, 1874 são provisoriamente removidas do gênero. São propostas duas novas espécies do Brasil: E. columba sp. nov., do Paraná e E. bimaculata sp. nov., do Amamzonas. É apresentada chave dicotômica para as espécies, fotos e desenhos das principais estruturas utilizadas para identificação.The Brazilian species of Exoplectra Chevrolat, 1844, based on the morphological analysis of external characters and genitalia, are revised. Among the 37 species in the genera, 14 Brazilian species were analysed, including three new species. It was studied the type material of nine of them. The lectotypes of E. angustifrons Weise, 1895, E. calcarata (Germar, 1824, E. coccinea (Fabricius, 1801 and E. miniata (Germar, 1824 are designated. Exoplectra companyoi Mulsant, 1850 is revalidated; E. aenea (Fabricius, 1801, E. bernardinensis Brèthes, 1925, E. impotens Mulsant, 1850, E. luteicornis Mulsant, 1850 and E. irregularis (Crotch, 1874 are provisionally removed from the genus. Two new species from Brazil are proposed: E. columba sp. nov., from Paraná and E. bimaculata sp. nov., from Amazonas. Dicotomic key for species is presented as well as pictures and illustrations for the main structures used in the identification.

  20. Effects of hydroperiod duration on survival, developmental rate, and size at metamorphosis in boreal chorus frog tadpoles (Pseudacris maculata)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amburgey, Staci; Funk, W. Chris; Murphy, Melanie; Muths, Erin

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between climate-driven habitat conditions and survival is key to preserving biodiversity in the face of rapid climate change. Hydroperiod—the length of time water is in a wetland—is a critical limiting habitat variable for amphibians as larvae must metamorphose before ponds dry. Changes in precipitation and temperature patterns are affecting hydroperiod globally, but the impact of these changes on amphibian persistence is poorly understood. We studied the responses of Boreal Chorus Frog (Pseudacris maculata) tadpoles to simulated hydroperiods (i.e., water level reductions) in the laboratory using individuals collected from ponds spanning a range of natural hydroperiods (Colorado Front Range, USA). To assess the effects of experimental hydroperiod reduction, we measured mortality, time to metamorphosis, and size at metamorphosis. We found that tadpoles grew at rates reflecting the hydroperiods of their native ponds, regardless of experimental treatment. Tadpoles from permanent ponds metamorphosed faster than those from ephemeral ponds across all experimental treatments, a pattern which may represent a predation selection gradient or countergradient variation in developmental rates. Size at metamorphosis did not vary across experimental treatments. Mortality was low overall but varied with pond of origin. Our results suggest that adaptation to local hydroperiod and/or predation and temperature conditions is important in P. maculata. Moreover, the lack of a plastic response to reduced hydroperiods suggests that P. maculata may not be able to metamorphose quickly enough to escape drying ponds. These results have important implications for amphibian persistence in ponds predicted to dry more quickly due to rapid climate change.

  1. Resistance and susceptibility of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) cultivars to the aphid Therioaphis maculata (Homoptera:Aphididae): insect biology and cultivar evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ALEXANDRE DE ALMEIDA E SILVA; ELENICE MOURO VARANDA; JOS(E) RICARDO BAROSELA

    2006-01-01

    Biology of the aphid Therioaphis maculata was studied on alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), including four resistant (Mesa-Sirsa, CUF101, Baker and Lahontan) and two susceptible (ARC and Caliverde) alfalfa cultivars, and one of the most cropped Brazilian cultivars, Crioula. Under controlled conditions, antibiosis (i.e., reduced longevity, fecundity and increased mortality of the aphid) was observed mainly on the resistant alfalfa cultivars,except on Lahontan. Crioula seemed to be tolerant to aphids. Present data support geographic limitation usage of cultivars, and we suggest Baker and Mesa-Sirsa as sources of antibiosis,and provide biological information of a tropical T. maculata biotype on alfalfa.

  2. The mitochondrial genome of the multicolored Asian lady beetle Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) and a phylogenetic analysis of the Polyphaga (Insecta: Coleoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Fang-Fang; Zhu, Liang; Wang, Su; Wei, Shu-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Here, we report the mitochondrial genome sequence of the multicolored Asian lady beetle Harmonia axyridis (Pallas, 1773) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) (GenBank accession No. KR108208). This is the first species with sequenced mitochondrial genome from the genus Harmonia. The current length with partitial A + T-rich region of this mitochondrial genome is 16,387 bp. All the typical genes were sequenced except the trnI and trnQ. As in most other sequenced mitochondrial genomes of Coleoptera, there is no re-arrangement in the sequenced region compared with the pupative ancestral arrangement of insects. All protein-coding genes start with ATN codons. Five, five and three protein-coding genes stop with termination codon TAA, TA and T, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis using Bayesian method based on the first and second codon positions of the protein-coding genes supported that the Scirtidae is a basal lineage of Polyphaga. The Harmonia and the Coccinella form a sister lineage. The monophyly of Staphyliniformia, Scarabaeiformia and Cucujiformia was supported. The Buprestidae was found to be a sister group to the Bostrichiformia.

  3. Evidence for a Nest Defense Pheromone in Bald-Faced Hornets, Dolichovespula Maculata, and Identification of Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Sebastian Ibarra; Gries, Regine; Zhai, Huimin; Derstine, Nathan; McCann, Sean; Gries, Gerhard

    2016-05-01

    In eusocial insects like Bald-faced hornets, Dolichovespula maculata, nest defense is essential because nests contain a large number of protein-rich larvae and pupae, and thus are attractive to nest predators. Our objectives were to investigate whether D. maculata exhibit pheromone-mediated nest defense, and to identify and field test any pheromone components. We tested for pheromone-mediated nest defense behavior of D. maculata by placing a paired box-apparatus near the entrance of D. maculata nests, and treating both boxes with a solvent control, or one of the two boxes with a solvent control and the other with either venom sac extract, the putative source of nest defense pheromone, or synthetic pheromone. The sound impulses caused by nest mates attempting to sting or strike the boxes were recorded for 3 min. Compared to the double-control treatment, the number of strikes increased 27-fold when one of the two boxes was treated with venom sac extract, providing evidence for an alarm response. The box treated with venom sac extract also induced a significantly greater proportion of strikes than the corresponding control box, providing evidence for a target-oriented response. Analyzing venom sac extract by gas chromatographic-electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD) and GC-mass spectrometry resulted in the identification of seven candidate pheromone components: (a) dimethylaminoethanol, (b) dimethylamino ethyl acetate, (c) 2,5-dimethylpyrazine, (d) N-3-methylbutylacetamide, (e) 2-heptadecanone, (f) (Z)-8-heptadecen-2-one, and (g) (Z)-10-nonadecen-2-one. Testing in paired-box bioassays blends of the nitrogen-containing volatile components a-d, the less volatile ketones e-g, or both (a-g), indicated that a-d primarily have an alarm function. The ketones e-g, in contrast, induced target-oriented responses, possibly marking the box, or potential nest predators, for guided and concerted attacks, or enhancing the alarm-inducing effect of the volatile pheromone components

  4. Strong geographical variation in wing aspect ratio of a damselfly, Calopteryx maculata (Odonata: Zygoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Hassall

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Geographical patterns in body size have been described across a wide range of species, leading to the development of a series of fundamental biological rules. However, shape variables are less well-described despite having substantial consequences for organism performance. Wing aspect ratio (AR has been proposed as a key shape parameter that determines function in flying animals, with high AR corresponding to longer, thinner wings that promote high manoeuvrability, low speed flight, and low AR corresponding to shorter, broader wings that promote high efficiency long distance flight. From this principle it might be predicted that populations living in cooler areas would exhibit low AR wings to compensate for reduced muscle efficiency at lower temperatures. I test this hypothesis using the riverine damselfly, Calopteryx maculata, sampled from 34 sites across its range margin in North America. Nine hundred and seven male specimens were captured from across the 34 sites (mean = 26.7 ± 2.9 SE per site, dissected and measured to quantify the area and length of all four wings. Geometric morphometrics were employed to investigate geographical variation in wing shape. The majority of variation in wing shape involved changes in wing aspect ratio, confirmed independently by geometric morphometrics and wing measurements. There was a strong negative relationship between wing aspect ratio and the maximum temperature of the warmest month which varies from west-east in North America, creating a positive relationship with longitude. This pattern suggests that higher aspect ratio may be associated with areas in which greater flight efficiency is required: regions of lower temperatures during the flight season. I discuss my findings in light of research of the functional ecology of wing shape across vertebrate and invertebrate taxa.

  5. First finding of the parasitic fungus Hesperomyces virescens (Laboulbeniales on native and invasive ladybirds (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haelewaters Danny

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hesperomyces virescens is a fungal ectoparasite (Laboulbeniales that infects adult ladybirds. Research has recently focused on this parasite due to the discovery of its prevalence on the globally invasive harlequin ladybird Harmonia axyridis and for its potential use in studies of co-evolution and pathogen spread. We collected adults from ten species of ladybirds in the Western Cape Province, South Africa, and screened for the presence of H. virescens. Infections with H. virescens were found in the samples of two species, H. axyridis and the native Cheilomenes propinqua. This marks the first record of H. virescens on H. axyridis from the African continent and the first record on Cheilomenes worldwide.

  6. Honeydew volatile emission acts as a kairomonal message for the Asian lady beetle Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera:Coccinellidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pascal D. Leroy; Eric Haubruge; Stéphanie Heuskin; Ahmed Sabri; Fran(c)ois J. Verheggen; Julien Farmakidis; Georges Lognay; Philippe Thonart; Jean-Paul Wathelet; Yves Brostaux

    2012-01-01

    The Asian lady beetle Harmonia axyridis Pallas is considered as an invasive species in most territories where it has been introduced.Because aphid honeydew acts as an attractant for many aphid predators and parasitoids,the objectives of this work were to collect and identify the volatile compounds released from the aphid excretory product to evaluate how these semiochemicals could affect the H.axyridis foraging behavior.Twelve volatile chemicals were identified from the Megoura viciae Buckton honeydew including four alcohols,three ketones,three aldehydes,a pyrazine and a monoterpene.The volatiles 3-methyl-1-butanol and 3-methyl-butanal were highlighted as the two most abundant semiochemicals released from the M.viciae honeydew.Vicia faba L.plants treated with crude honeydew attracted more than 80% of the tested individuals with 40% of attracted beetles located on the plant.Four volatile compounds (3-hydroxy-2-butanone,3-methyl-butanal,3-methyl-1-butanol and limonene) were also highlighted to attract more than 75% of the coccinellids toward the odor source and to locate about 35% of them on the plants.Limonene was the most efficient attractant since 89% of the H.axyridis responded to this odor.The use of the identified semiochemicals as well as the composition of an artificial honeydew could certainly be helpful to control the dispersal of the Asian lady beetle H.axyridis.

  7. Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) exhibits no preference between Bt and non-Bt maize fed Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, Carla C; Koch, Robert L; Burkness, Eric C; Meissle, Michael; Romeis, Joerg; Hutchison, William D; Fernandes, Marcos G

    2012-01-01

    A recent shift in managing insect resistance to genetically engineered (GE) maize consists of mixing non-GE seed with GE seed known as "refuge in a bag", which increases the likelihood of predators encountering both prey fed Bt and prey fed non-Bt maize. We therefore conducted laboratory choice-test feeding studies to determine if a predator, Harmonia axyridis, shows any preference between prey fed Bt and non-Bt maize leaves. The prey species was Spodoptera frugiperda, which were fed Bt maize (MON-810), expressing the single Cry1Ab protein, or non-Bt maize. The predators were third instar larvae and female adults of H. axyridis. Individual predators were offered Bt and non-Bt fed prey larvae that had fed for 24, 48 or 72 h. Ten and 15 larvae of each prey type were offered to third instar and adult predators, respectively. Observations of arenas were conducted at 1, 2, 3, 6, 15 and 24 h after the start of the experiment to determine the number and type of prey eaten by each individual predator. Prey larvae that fed on non-Bt leaves were significantly larger than larvae fed Bt leaves. Both predator stages had eaten nearly all the prey by the end of the experiment. However, in all combinations of predator stage and prey age, the number of each prey type consumed did not differ significantly. ELISA measurements confirmed the presence of Cry1Ab in leaf tissue (23-33 µg/g dry weight) and S. frugiperda (2.1-2.2 µg/g), while mean concentrations in H. axyridis were very low (0.01-0.2 µg/g). These results confirm the predatory status of H. axyridis on S. frugiperda and that both H. axyridis adults and larvae show no preference between prey types. The lack of preference between Bt-fed and non-Bt-fed prey should act in favor of insect resistance management strategies using mixtures of GE and non-GE maize seed.

  8. A taxonomic review of the genus Horniolus Weise from China, with description of a new species (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaosheng Chen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Five species of the genus Horniolus Weise, 1901 from China are revised, including the description of a new species, Horniolus hainanensis Chen & Ren, sp. n. Horniolus sonduongensis Hoàng, 1979 is reported from China for the first time. A key to the species from China is provided. Nomenclatural history, diagnoses, detailed descriptions, illustrations, and distribution for each species have been provided. A checklist of all known species of this genus is also presented.

  9. Lethal and sublethal effects of thiamethoxam on the whitefly predator Serangium japonicum (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) through different exposure routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Feng-Luan; Zheng, Yu; Zhao, Jian-Wei; Desneux, Nicolas; He, Yu-Xian; Weng, Qi-Yong

    2015-06-01

    Given expectations for a booming usage of thiamethoxam and increasing availability of the promising biological agent Serangium japonicum for the control of Bemisia tabaci in China, an evaluation of their compatibility is crucial for integrated pest management (IPM). This study examined the lethal and sublethal effects of thiamethoxam on S. japonicum through three exposure routes. An acute toxicity bioassay showed that LC50 values of thiamethoxam for S. japonicum through residue contact, egg-dip, and systemic treatment were 6.65, 4.37, and 2.43 mg AI L(-1), respectively. The prey consumption of S. japonicum given different densities of B. tabaci eggs under control, discontinuous, egg-dip and systemic exposure scenarios showed a good fit to a Type II functional response. Predation of S. japonicum was most affected under systemic exposure, followed by egg-dip, and discontinuous, which was only slightly affected. In all cases tested, however, predators recovered their predation capacity rapidly, either after 24h of exposure or 24h after the end of exposure. Thiamethoxam was highly toxic to S. japonicum regardless of exposure routes. Sublethal effects of thiamethoxam applied systemically or foliar both impaired the biological control of S. japonicum on B. tabaci. Therefore, thiamethoxam should be used with caution in IPM of B. tabaci.

  10. CHECK LIST OF COCCIDOPHAGOUS SPECIES OF LADYBIRDS (COLEOPTERA: COCCINELLIDAE) FROM CHINA%中国食蚧瓢虫名录

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾涛; 庞虹

    2000-01-01

    食蚧瓢虫在蚧虫生物防治中具有很重要的作用.根据食性可分为专性食蚧瓢虫和兼性食蚧瓢虫.本文记录了我国食蚧瓢虫8亚科26属65种,其中澳洲瓢虫和孟氏隐唇瓢虫为国外引进种.

  11. Discovery and identification of a male-killing agent in the Japanese ladybird Propylea japonica (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majerus Michael EN

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endosymbionts that manipulate the reproduction of their hosts have been reported widely in invertebrates. One such group of endosymbionts is the male-killers. To date all male-killers reported are bacterial in nature, but comprise a diverse group. Ladybirds have been described as a model system for the study of male-killing, which has been reported in multiple species from widespread geographic locations. Whilst criteria of low egg hatch-rate and female-biased progenic sex ratio have been used to identify female hosts of male-killers, variation in vertical transmission efficiency and host genetic factors may result in variation in these phenotypic indicators of male-killer presence. Molecular identification of bacteria and screening for bacterial presence provide us with a more accurate method than breeding data alone to link the presence of the bacteria to the male-killing phenotype. In addition, by identifying the bacteria responsible we may find evidence for horizontal transfer between endosymbiont hosts and can gain insight into the evolutionary origins of male-killing. Phylogenetic placement of male-killing bacteria will allow us to address the question of whether male-killing is a potential strategy for only some, or all, maternally inherited bacteria. Together, phenotypic and molecular characterisation of male-killers will allow a deeper insight into the interactions between host and endosymbiont, which ultimately may lead to an understanding of how male-killers identify and kill male-hosts. Results A male-killer was detected in the Japanese coccinellid, Propylea japonica (Thunberg a species not previously known to harbour male-killers. Families produced by female P. japonica showed significantly female-biased sex ratios. One female produced only daughters. This male-killer trait was maternally inherited and antibiotic treatment produced a full, heritable cure. Molecular analysis identified Rickettsia to be associated with the trait in this species of ladybird. Conclusion We conclude that P. japonica is host to a bacterial male-killer that is vertically inherited with variable transmission efficiency. Rickettsia presence correlates with the male-killing trait, but there is some variation in the phenotypic expression of the trait due to interaction with host factors. Phylogenetic analysis using the 16S rRNA and 17 kDa antigen genes suggests there may have been horizontal transfer of Rickettsial male-killers between different ladybird hosts.

  12. Species Diversity of ladybirds (Coccinellidae: Coleoptera) in China%中国瓢虫的物种多样性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高爱保

    2006-01-01

    瓢虫是生物防治蚜虫、介壳虫等农、林害虫的天敌昆虫,对瓢虫的多样性研究是进行分类、生物防治的重要基础.本文对中国迄今记录的约680种瓢虫起源、进化、食性、分布作了综述,并说明了研究生物多样性的意义.

  13. Biology and fertility life table of Eriopis connexa, Harmonia axyridis and Olla v-nigrum (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazycki, L C F; Semedo, R E S; Silva, A; Bisognin, A Z; Bernardi, O; Garcia, M S; Nava, D E

    2015-11-10

    AbstractThe coccinellids Eriopis connexa (Germar), Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) and Olla v-nigrum (Mulsant) are important natural biological control agents. The purpose of this paper was to study the biology and create a fertility life table of these three coccinellid species. For the biology study, 50 insects/species were used and kept in groups of 10 in glass vials (2300cm3). For the three species studied, the viability of the total cycle varied from 45 to 50%. O. v-nigrumwas the species which presented the longest oviposition period. However, H. axiridis demonstrated the best reproductive performance and ability of population growth in each generation. In conclusion, the use of commercially obtained pollen and A. kuenhiella eggs enables the development of coccinellids E. connexa, H. axyridis and O. v-nigrum under laboratory conditions, since the insects completed their biological cycle and originated adults with good reproductive performance.

  14. Intraguild Predation by Harmonia Axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) on Native Insects in Europe: Molecular Detection from Field Samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, P.M.J.; Ingels, B.; Wheatley, A.; Rhule, E.L.; de Clercq, P.; van Leeuwen, T.; Thomas, A.

    2015-01-01

    Intraguild predation (IGP) is a potential mechanism of negative effects on native species populations by invasive non-native species such as Harmonia axyridis. Molecular techniques (polymerase chain reaction) were used to probe for the presence of various insect (coccinellid, syrphid and chrysopid)

  15. New Species of Tenuisvalvae (Duverger) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) Feeding on Parthenolecanium perlatum (Cockerell) (Hemiptera: Coccidae) in Citrus Crop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, P B; Castro-Guedes, C F; Peronti, A L B G; Almeida, L M

    2017-03-16

    A new species of Hyperaspidini, Tenuisvalvae quadripunctata sp. nov. is described and illustrated. The genus is now represented by 11 species, all native of South America, and the new taxon is integrated into the existing key to species of the genus. Ecological data for T. quadripunctata sp. nov. and a list with prey and host plants to the species of the genus Tenuisvalvae are provided.

  16. Contribution to the knowledge of the subgenus Scymnus (Parapullus Yang, 1978 (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, with description of eight new species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaosheng Chen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Eight new species of the subgenus Scymnus (Parapullus Yang, 1978 from China are described and illustrated: S. (P. hastatus sp. n., S. (P. baxianshanensis sp. n., S. (P. laojielingensis sp. n., S. (P. annuliformis sp. n., S. (P. papillatus sp. n., S. (P. dichotomus sp. n., S. (P. shenmuensis sp. n. and S. (P. yanzigouensis sp. n. Diagnoses and distributions are provided for each species. An updated key to the Chinese species of the subgenus Parapullus is given. A catalogue to all known species of this subgenus is also presented.

  17. The genus Aspidimerus Mulsant, 1850 (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) from China, with descriptions of two new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Lizhi; Wang, Xingmin; Chen, Xiaosheng; Ren, Shunxiang

    2013-01-01

    Chinese members of the genus Aspidimerus Mulsant, 1850 are reviewed. Ten species are recognized, including two new species: A. zhenkangicus Huo & Ren, sp. n. and A. menglensis Huo & Ren, sp. n. A. kabakovi Hoàng is recorded from China for the first time. A. blandus (Mader, 1954) is recognized as synonymous with A. ruficrus Gorham, 1895 (syn. n.). Aspidimerus rectangulatus Kuznetsov & Pang, 1991 and A. serratus Kuznetsov & Pang, 1991 are transferred to the genus Pseudaspidimerus Kapur, 1948 (comb. n.). All species from China are described and illustrated. Distribution maps of the Chinese species, a key and a catalogue of all known Aspidimerus are provided.

  18. Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae exhibits no preference between Bt and non-Bt maize fed Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla C Dutra

    Full Text Available A recent shift in managing insect resistance to genetically engineered (GE maize consists of mixing non-GE seed with GE seed known as "refuge in a bag", which increases the likelihood of predators encountering both prey fed Bt and prey fed non-Bt maize. We therefore conducted laboratory choice-test feeding studies to determine if a predator, Harmonia axyridis, shows any preference between prey fed Bt and non-Bt maize leaves. The prey species was Spodoptera frugiperda, which were fed Bt maize (MON-810, expressing the single Cry1Ab protein, or non-Bt maize. The predators were third instar larvae and female adults of H. axyridis. Individual predators were offered Bt and non-Bt fed prey larvae that had fed for 24, 48 or 72 h. Ten and 15 larvae of each prey type were offered to third instar and adult predators, respectively. Observations of arenas were conducted at 1, 2, 3, 6, 15 and 24 h after the start of the experiment to determine the number and type of prey eaten by each individual predator. Prey larvae that fed on non-Bt leaves were significantly larger than larvae fed Bt leaves. Both predator stages had eaten nearly all the prey by the end of the experiment. However, in all combinations of predator stage and prey age, the number of each prey type consumed did not differ significantly. ELISA measurements confirmed the presence of Cry1Ab in leaf tissue (23-33 µg/g dry weight and S. frugiperda (2.1-2.2 µg/g, while mean concentrations in H. axyridis were very low (0.01-0.2 µg/g. These results confirm the predatory status of H. axyridis on S. frugiperda and that both H. axyridis adults and larvae show no preference between prey types. The lack of preference between Bt-fed and non-Bt-fed prey should act in favor of insect resistance management strategies using mixtures of GE and non-GE maize seed.

  19. The impact of six insecticides commonly used in control of agricultural pests on the generalist predator Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Kenia Fernanda Aguiar; Zanuzo Zanardi, Odimar; de Morais, Matheus Rovere; Jacob, Cynthia Renata Oliveira; de Oliveira, Monique Bárbara; Yamamoto, Pedro Takao

    2017-11-01

    Hippodamia convergens is an important predator found in different agroecosystems. We evaluated the impacts of six insecticides on eggs, larvae and adults of this predator. For eggs, all insecticides reduced larval hatching rates, but did not affect egg duration. Chlorpyrifos and phosmet reduced larval survival; and chlorpyrifos, etofenprox and phosmet prolonged the larva development time. The survival and duration of pupae were not affected by all insecticides tested. Chlorpyrifos reduced fecundity, fertility and longevity when eggs were sprayed. For first-instar larvae, chlorpyrifos, etofenprox, phosmet and imidacloprid caused 100% mortality, while azadirachtin and thiamethoxam caused 35.0 and 52.7% mortality, respectively. However, azadirachtin and thiamethoxam did not affect the other biological parameters of the predator. In adults, chlorpyrifos, etofenprox and phosmet reduced adult survival. Chlorpyrifos, etofenprox, and phosmet reduced fecundity and longevity, but did not affect fertility. Azadirachtin, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam did not affect fecundity, fertility or longevity. Based on demographic parameters, all insecticides reduced the net reproductive rate (Ro), intrinsic rate of increase (r) and finite rate of increase (λ) of the predator when eggs were treated directly. Azadirachtin, chlorpyrifos, etofenprox and phosmet increased the mean generation time (T), while the effects of imidacloprid and thiamethoxam were similar to the control. When first-instar larvae were treated, azadirachtin and thiamethoxam reduced the Ro, r and λ. Thiamethoxam increased the T value, while the effects of the other insecticides were similar to the control. These insecticides should be used with caution, in order to reduce their harmful effects on the predator in agroecosystems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of photoperiod on slow and fast developing individuals in aphidophagous ladybirds, Menochilus sexmaculatus and Propylea dissecta (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Neha; Mishra, Geetanjali; Omkar

    2016-02-01

    The effects of environmental parameters on insect development have been studied extensively. But the reasons for 2 differential developmental rates within same cohort under varying environmental factors have not been explored. For the purpose, in this study the existence and stability of slow and fast development under 5 photoperiods (i.e., 8L: 16D, 10L : 14D, 12L : 12D, 14L : 10D and 16L : 8D; light and dark hours per day) and its effect on body mass and reproductive attributes in 2 aphidophagous ladybirds, Menochilus sexmaculatus (Fabricius) and Propylea dissecta (Mulsant) was examined on Aphis craccivora Koch at 27 ± 1 °C temperature. A clear bimodal (2 peaks, where the first peak represented the fast developing and the 2nd peak slow developing individuals) pattern of distribution at each photoperiod was found. The proportion of slow and fast developing individuals in a cohort differed with photoperiods. The slow developing individuals were more in numbers at 8L : 16D, in equal numbers at 14L : 10D and in less numbers at 16L: 8D, indicating that the variation in emergence was owing to exogenous cues influenced differential rates of mortality. Slow developing individuals had female biased sex ratio, higher longevity and lower body mass than fast developing individuals. Fast developing females laid higher numbers of eggs with higher egg viability than slow developing females. Study of such variations in development at different photoperiods is helpful to understand its role in the development of insects particularly ladybirds and permits the selection of fast developing bioagents for their use in biocontrol of pest species. © 2014 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  1. Lambda-Cyhalothrin Resistance in the Lady Beetle Eriopis connexa (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) Confers Tolerance to Other Pyrethroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, J B; Rodrigues, A R S; Barros, E M; Santos, D S

    2015-02-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are widely recommended to control insect defoliators but lack efficacy against most aphid species. Thus, conserving aphid predators such as the lady beetle Eriopis connexa (Germar) is important to pest management in crop ecosystems that require pyrethroid sprays. In a greenhouse, early fourth-instar larvae and 5-day-old adults from susceptible (S) and resistant (R) E. connexa populations were caged on lambda-cyhalothrin-treated cotton plants, after which survival and egg production (for those caged at adult stage) were assessed. In the laboratory, similar groups were subjected to dried residues and topical treatment with one of eight pyrethroids (alpha-cypermethrin, bifenthrin, deltamethrin, esfenvalerate, fenpropathrin, permethrin, zeta-cypermethrin, and lambda-cyhalothrin), the organophosphate methidathion, or water and wetting agent. After caging on treated cotton terminals, 66% of the R-population larvae survived to adulthood, compared with 2% of those from the S-population. At 12 d after caging at adult stage under the same conditions, 64% of the females from the R-population survived and laid eggs, compared with 100% mortality and no oviposition for the S-females. In trials involving dried insecticide residues, gain in survival based on the survival difference (percentage for R-population minus percentage for S-population) across all tested pyrethroids varied from 3 to 63% for larvae and from 3 to 70% for adults. In trials involving topical sprays of the tested pyrethroids, survival differences ranged from 36 to 96% for larvae and from 21 to 82% for adults. Fenpropathrin and bifenthrin were the least and most toxic, respectively. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Egg Predation Risk Trigger Adult Hoverfly (Diptera: Syrphidae to Avoid Laying Eggs in Patches Attended by Ladybird Larvae (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nugroho Susetya Putra

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Oviposition preference of a predatory hoverfly, Episyrphus balteatus on the presence of its potential predators, the ladybird larvae which are inflicted serious impacts on its eggs was examined in a non-choice test. Our results revealed that the biggest and the most aggressive species of ladybird, Harmonia axyridis caused the worst impact on hoverfly eggs by attacking and feeding on. The species and developmental stages of ladybird were attributed to the level of predation risk. We correlated the oviposition site selection by hoverfly females to the egg predation risk level inflicted by ladybird larvae. Hoverfly females laid the least number of eggs on the patches attended by the strongest competitor, the larva of H. axyridis, and tended to lay the highest number of eggs on colonies attended by the weakest competitor, the larva of Scymnus posticalis. In addition, the impact of the fourth instar larva of ladybirds was stronger than of the first instar larva.

  3. Effects of gamma radiation on potato epilachnid, Henosepilachna vigintioctopunctata(F), (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae). Pt. 1. Radiosensitivity of different developmental stages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, J.K.; Kumar, A. (Himachal Pradesh Univ., Simla (India). Dept. of Bio-sciences)

    1983-03-01

    It is evident from the present study that after 30 Gy irradiation of eggs, grubs, pupae and adults, the resulting adults were sterile. The larval stage appears to be most radiosensitive as suggested by lower larval survival and adult malformations. Mature pupae were quite radioresistant and there was no malformation of adults such as found after irradiation of immature pupae. Moreover, this stage is very easy to handle during irradiation. These results indicate that for sterile insect techniques either mature pupae or adults are the ideal stages for irradiation of H. vigintioctopunctata with minimum somatic damage.

  4. Habitat diversity of the Multicolored Asian ladybeetle Harmonia axyridis Pallas (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae in agricultural and arboreal ecosystems: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandereycken, A.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Multicolored Asian ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas, native to Asia, is an invasive species in many European and American countries. Initially introduced as a biological control agent against aphids and coccids in greenhouses, this alien species rapidly invaded many habitats such as forests, meadows, wetlands, and agricultural crops. This paper reviews the habitats (forests, crops, herbs, gardens and orchards where H. axyridis has been observed, either during insect samplings or as part of Integrated Pest Management (IPM programs. Studies have referenced H. axyridis on 106 plant taxa (35 arboreal species, 21 crop species, 27 herbaceous species, 11 ornamental species, and 12 orchard species and have identified 89 plant-prey relationships (34 arboreal species, 16 crop species, 13 herbaceous species, 10 ornamental species, and 16 orchard species in different countries. Harmonia axyridis is more abundant in forest areas, principally on Acer, Salix, Tilia and Quercus, than in agroecosystems. Some plant species, such as Urtica dioica L., which surround crops, contain large numbers of H. axyridis and could constitute important reserves of this alien species in advance of aphid invasions into crops. This review highlights the polyphagy and eurytopic aspect of H. axyridis.

  5. Tanggap fungsional Menochilus sexmaculatus Fabricius (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae terhadap Aphis gossypii (Glover (Homoptera: Aphididae pada umur tanaman cabai berbeda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novri Nelly

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The lady beetle, Menochilus sexmaculatus is one of the biological control agents that can be used to control aphids. Presently, there is a lack of information about the effectiveness of this beetle to control aphids. The objective of this research was to study the functional response of M. sexmaculatus on Aphis gossypii at different ages of plants. All preys were exposed to one M. sexmaculatus adult for an hour at five different densities of aphids (10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 individuals is four different ages of chilli plants (2,4,6, and 8 weeks. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and logistic regression to determine the type of functional response. The results showed that the ability of M. sexmaculatus to prey was not significant at 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 weeks old chilli plants. At 2 week old chilli plants M. sexmaculatus showed type I of functional response, while at 4, 6 and 8 weeks the functional response were type III.

  6. First finding of the parasitic fungus Hesperomyces virescens (Laboulbeniales) on native and invasive ladybirds (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haelewaters, Danny; Minnaar, Ingrid A; Clusella-Trullas, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Hesperomyces virescens is a fungal ectoparasite (Laboulbeniales) that infects adult ladybirds. Research has recently focused on this parasite due to the discovery of its prevalence on the globally invasive harlequin ladybird Harmonia axyridis and for its potential use in studies of co-evolution and pathogen spread. We collected adults from ten species of ladybirds in the Western Cape Province, South Africa, and screened for the presence of H. virescens. Infections with H. virescens were found in the samples of two species, H. axyridis and the native Cheilomenes propinqua. This marks the first record of H. virescens on H. axyridis from the African continent and the first record on Cheilomenes worldwide. © D. Haelewaters et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2016.

  7. Molecular Cloning and Induced Expression of Six Small Heat Shock Proteins Mediating Cold-Hardiness in Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Juan; Shi, Zuo-Kun; Shen, Qi-Da; Xu, Cai-Di; Wang, Bing; Meng, Zhao-Jun; Wang, Shi-Gui; Tang, Bin; Wang, Su

    2017-01-01

    The main function of small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) as molecular chaperones is to protect proteins from denaturation under adverse conditions. Molecular and physiological data were used to examine the sHSPs underlying cold-hardiness in Harmonia axyridis. Complementary DNA sequences were obtained for six H. axyridis sHSPs based on its transcriptome, and the expression of the genes coding for these sHSPs was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) in several developmental stages, under short-term cooling or heating conditions, and in black and yellow females of experimental and overwintering populations under low-temperature storage. In addition, we measured water content and the super cooling and freezing points (SCP and FP, respectively) of H. axyridis individuals from experimental and overwintering populations. The average water content was not significantly different between adults of both populations, but the SCP and FP of the overwintering population were significantly lower than that of the experimental population. Overall, the six sHSPs genes showed different expression patterns among developmental stages. In the short-term cooling treatment, Hsp16.25 and Hsp21.00 expressions first increased and then decreased, while Hsp10.87 and Hsp21.56 expressions increased during the entire process. Under short-term heating, the expressions of Hsp21.00, Hsp21.62, Hsp10.87, and Hsp16.25 showed an increasing trend, whereas Hsp36.77 first decreased and then increased. Under low-temperature storage conditions, the expression of Hsp36.77 decreased, while the expressions of Hsp21.00 and Hsp21.62 were higher than that of the control group in the experimental population. The expression of Hsp36.77 first increased and then decreased, whereas Hsp21.56 expression was always higher than that of the control group in the overwintering population. Thus, differences in sHSPs gene expression were correlated with the H. axyridis forms, suggesting that the mechanism of cold resistance might differ among them. Although, Hsp36.77, Hsp16.25, Hsp21.00, and Hsp21.62 regulated cold- hardiness, the only significant differences between overwintering and experimental populations were found for Hsp16.25 and Hsp21.00.

  8. Intraguild predation by Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) on native insects in Europe: molecular detection from field samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, P.M.J.; Ingels, B.; Wheatley, A.; Rhule, E.L.; de Clercq, P.; Van Leeuwen, T.; Thomas, A.

    2015-01-01

    Intraguild predation (IGP) is a potential mechanism of negative effects on native species populations by invasive non-native species such as Harmonia axyridis. Molecular techniques (polymerase chain reaction) were used to probe for the presence of various insect (coccinellid, syrphid and chrysopid)

  9. A taxonomic review of the genus Horniolus Weise from China, with description of a new species (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaosheng; Xie, Xiufeng; Ren, Shunxiang; Wang, Xingmin

    2016-01-01

    Five species of the genus Horniolus Weise, 1901 from China are revised, including the description of a new species, Horniolus hainanensis Chen & Ren, sp. n.Horniolus sonduongensis Hoàng, 1979 is reported from China for the first time. A key to the species from China is provided. Nomenclatural history, diagnoses, detailed descriptions, illustrations, and distribution for each species have been provided. A checklist of all known species of this genus is also presented.

  10. Biology and fertility life table of Eriopis connexa, Harmonia axyridis and Olla v-nigrum (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. C. F. Zazycki

    Full Text Available Abstract The coccinellids Eriopis connexa (Germar, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas and Olla v-nigrum (Mulsant are important natural biological control agents. The purpose of this paper was to study the biology and create a fertility life table of these three coccinellid species. For the biology study, 50 insects/species were used and kept in groups of 10 in glass vials (2300cm3. For the three species studied, the viability of the total cycle varied from 45 to 50%. O. v-nigrum was the species which presented the longest oviposition period. However, H. axiridis demonstrated the best reproductive performance and ability of population growth in each generation. In conclusion, the use of commercially obtained pollen and A. kuenhiella eggs enables the development of coccinellids E. connexa, H. axyridis and O. v-nigrum under laboratory conditions, since the insects completed their biological cycle and originated adults with good reproductive performance.

  11. Discovery of a New World ladybird beetle Nephaspis indus Gordon, 1996 (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Scymnini) on the Island of Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaosheng; Xie, Xiufeng; Ren, Shunxiang; Wang, Xingmin

    2016-01-01

    Nephaspis indus Gordon, 1996 was imported into Taiwan from Hawaii in 1990 as a biological control agent for the spiralling whitefly, Aleurodicus dispersus Russell, 1965 (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae). However, its establishment was not known prior to this study. Nephaspis indus Gordon, 1996, a natural enemy of Aleurodicus dispersus Russell (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) native to the Neotropical region, is recorded as established in Taiwan for the first time. The present paper provides a detailed further description and illustrations of the adult. Diagnostic characters for the genus and species are given and the nomenclature of this species is also discussed.

  12. Pirimicarb, an aphid selective insecticide, adversely affects demographic parameters of the aphid predator Hippodamia variegata (Goeze (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmani Shima

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Demographic toxicology is recommended for toxicity determination of the long term effects of a pesticide since it gives a more accurate and efficient measure of the effect of a pesticide. Thus, in the current study the sublethal effects of pirimicarb (carbamate insecticide two concentrations of LC30 and LC10 were used against third instar larvae of Hippodamia variegata (Goeze in order to determine the effects of the pesticide on demographic parameters of the predator under laboratory conditions. Results showed that pirimicarb did not affect individual life parameters such as development time of larva, pupa, adult longevity, female and male longevity, adult preoviposition period (APOP, and total preoviposition period (TPOP. However, population parameters such as intrinsic rate of increase (r, net reproductive rate (R0, mean generation time (T, and finite rate of increase (λ was affected by sublethal treatment. For example, intrinsic rate of increase (r was 0.18 day-1 in the controls but it was 0.13 and 0.14 day-1 in the treated insects with LC10 and LC30 concentrations, respectively. Also, there were significant differences between mean generation time (T of the treatments and the controls i.e. mean generation time of the controls was 29.03 days while mean generation time in the two treatments of LC10 and LC30 was 33.93 and 31.66 days, respectively. The finite rate of increase was also significantly affected by sublethal effects of the pesticide. The results showed that pirimicarb, even at low concentrations, has potential to adversely affect the predatory ladybird, therefore care should be taken when this insecticide is used in the Integrated Pest Management (IPM program.

  13. Revision of the subgenus Orthoscymnus Canepari of Scymnus Kugelann (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae), with descriptions of four new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaosheng; Canepari, Claudio; Wang, Xingmin; Ren, Shunxiang

    2016-01-01

    The subgenus Orthoscymnus Canepari, 1997 of Scymnus Kugelann, 1794 is herein revised. Seven species of the Orthoscymnus fauna are recognized, of which four species, Scymnus (Orthoscymnus) jilongicus sp. n., Scymnus (Orthoscymnus) paradoxus sp. n., Scymnus (Orthoscymnus) crispatus sp. n. and Scymnus (Orthoscymnus) duomaculatus sp. n., are described as new to science. Scymnus (Orthoscymnus) rhododendri Canepari is recorded from China for the first time. Scymnus (Pullus) robustibasalis Yu is transferred to the subgenus Orthoscymnus (comb. n.). All species are diagnosed, described and illustrated, and distributions are provided for each species. A key to the species is included.

  14. South American Coccinellidae (Coleoptera), Part XVII: Systematic revision of the genera Cyrea Gordon and Canepari and Tiphysa Mulsant (Hyperaspidinae: Brachiacanthini)

    OpenAIRE

    Canepari, Claudio; Gordon, Robert D.; Hanley, Guy A.

    2016-01-01

    Cyrea Gordon and Canepari (121 species) and Tiphysa Mulsant (2 species) are discussed, species are described, illustrations are provided, and a key to all recognized species is included. New synonyms recognized are: Hyperaspis arrowi var. darwini Brèthes = Cyrea arrowi (Brèthes); Hyperaspis trivittata Weise, Hyperaspis mundula Weise = Cyrea emiliae (Mulsant); Cleothera scapulata Mulsant, Cleothera mercabilis Mulsant, Hyperaspis iheringi Weise = Cyrea flavoguttata (Mulsant); Cleothera graci...

  15. Molecular Cloning and Induced Expression of Six Small Heat Shock Proteins Mediating Cold-Hardiness in Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Juan; Shi, Zuo-Kun; Shen, Qi-Da; Xu, Cai-Di; Wang, Bing; Meng, Zhao-Jun; Wang, Shi-Gui; Tang, Bin; Wang, Su

    2017-01-01

    The main function of small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) as molecular chaperones is to protect proteins from denaturation under adverse conditions. Molecular and physiological data were used to examine the sHSPs underlying cold-hardiness in Harmonia axyridis. Complementary DNA sequences were obtained for six H. axyridis sHSPs based on its transcriptome, and the expression of the genes coding for these sHSPs was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) in several developmental stages, under short-term cooling or heating conditions, and in black and yellow females of experimental and overwintering populations under low-temperature storage. In addition, we measured water content and the super cooling and freezing points (SCP and FP, respectively) of H. axyridis individuals from experimental and overwintering populations. The average water content was not significantly different between adults of both populations, but the SCP and FP of the overwintering population were significantly lower than that of the experimental population. Overall, the six sHSPs genes showed different expression patterns among developmental stages. In the short-term cooling treatment, Hsp16.25 and Hsp21.00 expressions first increased and then decreased, while Hsp10.87 and Hsp21.56 expressions increased during the entire process. Under short-term heating, the expressions of Hsp21.00, Hsp21.62, Hsp10.87, and Hsp16.25 showed an increasing trend, whereas Hsp36.77 first decreased and then increased. Under low-temperature storage conditions, the expression of Hsp36.77 decreased, while the expressions of Hsp21.00 and Hsp21.62 were higher than that of the control group in the experimental population. The expression of Hsp36.77 first increased and then decreased, whereas Hsp21.56 expression was always higher than that of the control group in the overwintering population. Thus, differences in sHSPs gene expression were correlated with the H. axyridis forms, suggesting that the mechanism of cold resistance might differ among them. Although, Hsp36.77, Hsp16.25, Hsp21.00, and Hsp21.62 regulated cold- hardiness, the only significant differences between overwintering and experimental populations were found for Hsp16.25 and Hsp21.00. PMID:28232804

  16. Larval and female footprints as feeding deterrent cues for immature stages of two congeneric ladybird predators (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B; Mishra, G; Omkar

    2014-10-01

    In the present study predation parameters, i.e. consumption rate, conversion efficiency and growth rate, and total developmental duration of immature stages of two congeneric ladybirds, Coccinella septempunctata (L.) and Coccinella transversalis F., have been evaluated in presence of conspecific and heterospecific fourth instar larval and adult female tracks. We hypothesized that the semiochemicals within larval/adult female tracks might act as foraging/feeding deterrent pheromones (FDPs) and would reduce the predation parameters; and would prolong total developmental duration of ladybird predators. Results of the study positively affirmed our hypothesis. The deterrence in prey consumption and reduction in conversion efficiency and growth rate was density dependent with species-specific variations. Consumption rate, conversion efficiency, and growth rate of larval instars decreased and the total developmental duration of immature stages increased when exposed to an increasing density of zero, two, three, and four conspecific/heterospecific larval/adult female tracks. Between ladybird species, C. septempunctata had higher consumption rate, growth rate, and total developmental durations, whereas conversion efficiency was higher in C. transversalis. Despite the presence of semiochemical tracks as foraging barriers, early instars showed higher conversion efficiencies and growth rates, whereas fourth instars had highest consumption rate in all experimental treatments. The present study, therefore, suggests that semiochemical tracks significantly reduce the predation potential and prolong developmental duration of conspecifics and heterospecifics. They, thus behave as FDP.

  17. Evaluación de la estructura espacial de Triatoma maculata del centro-occidente de Venezuela y su viabilidad alimentado con sangre humana en condiciones de laboratorio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keila Torres

    2010-03-01

    Conclusiones. T. maculata de la localidad de Xaguas podría encontrarse en un estado de adaptación al domicilio con fuentes sanguíneas diferentes al humano y en un estado incipiente de adaptación al domicilio con la sangre humana como fuente de alimentación.

  18. A diversidade inventarial de Coleoptera (Insecta em uma paisagem antropizada do Bioma Araucária The inventory diversity of Coleoptera (Insecta of an anthropized landscape in the Biome Araucaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma G. Ganho

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Como parte do Projeto PROVIVE, foram analisadas a riqueza de espécies, a composição taxonômica, a proporção de espécies raras e a constância taxonômica ao nível de família relacionada à riqueza de espécies, em comunidades de Coleoptera, em Vila Velha, Ponta Grossa, Paraná. Os dados foram obtidos a partir de coletas através de armadilha malaise no estrato do sub-bosque de cinco áreas com diferentes graus de intervenção antrópica, de setembro de 1999 a agosto de 2000. As 52 semanas de amostragem nas cinco áreas resultaram na coleta de 10.822 indivíduos de 1659 espécies. Todas as áreas apresentaram alta riqueza de espécies e diversidade, como indicado por vários índices. A área em estágio mais avançado de sucessão vegetal foi menos rica do que aquelas em estágio inicial/intermediária. De acordo com diferentes estimadores de riqueza de espécies, o número de espécies coletadas poderia aumentar de 22-123% com o aumento do esforço de coleta. As áreas menos conservadas foram mais ricas em espécies raras ("singletons", "doubletons" e únicas do que as mais conservadas. Nas cinco áreas houve uma constância taxonômica entre as famílias mais ricas (Curculionidae, Chrysomelidae, Cerambycidae, Staphylinidae, Mordelidae, Elateridae, Scarabaeidae, Coccinellidae e Tenebrionidae envolvendo 60% do total de espécies, como observado para a abundância de indivíduos. A existência de um padrão de constância taxonômica de famílias, quando considerados 60% da riqueza de espécies e/ou de abundância de indivíduos por local, poderá tornar mais fácil e rápido o estudo de comunidades de Coleoptera, habilitando a ordem a ser um táxon indicador de condições ambientais de áreas florestadas.The species richness, taxonomic composition, rare species, and taxonomic constancy at family level were studied in communities of Coleoptera in Vila Velha, Ponta Grossa, Paraná, as part of PROVIVE project. The data were gathered

  19. Notes on Dutch Cryptophagidae (Coleoptera).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vorst, O.; Johnson, C.

    2008-01-01

    Aantekeningen over Nederlandse Cryptophagidae (Coleoptera) Zeven soorten cryptophagiden worden hier voor het eerst gemeld voor de Nederlandse fauna. Van twee soorten is duidelijk dat ze hier al geruime tijd voorkomen. Zo werd het enige Nederlandse exemplaar van Atomaria atra al in 1949 verzameld,

  20. Beschermde kevers in Nederland (Coleoptera)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijbregts, J.

    2003-01-01

    Protected beetles in the Netherlands (Coleoptera) The status of all by law protected beetles of the Netherlands is discussed. Several specimens of Cerambyx cerdo are known from the Netherlands, but all of these are considered to have been imported with oak-wood. Taking the European distribution into

  1. Índice de defecación y éxito reproductivo de Triatoma maculata (Hemiptera:Reduviidaeen condiciones de laboratorio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Aldana

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió el comportamiento reproductivo y de defecación de Triatoma maculata (Erichson 1848alimentando artificialmente con sangre humana.Los estadios II y III mostraron mayor frecuencia de defecaciones (ID=0.6 n=40,el estadio V no alcanzó la diferenciación sexual, la fertilidad fue 55%(n=865,fecundidad 8 huevos/hembra/semana (n=26,22 días de desarrollo embrionario (n=477,longevidad de hembras 51 días (n=26,el tiempo intermuda aumenta progresivamente desde 35 días en el estadio I hasta 46 días en el estadio IV,el porcentaje de muda varió desde 0%en el estadio V hasta 63%en el estadio III,la mortalidad varió desde 8%en el estadio III hasta 100%en el estadio V (n=40.Los resultados del presente trabajo aportan evidencias que explican la menor capacidad vectorial y la baja densidad de T.maculata en el domicilio humano.Defecation index and reproductive success of Triatoma maculata (Hemiptera: Reduviidae under laboratory conditions.The reproductive and defecating behavior of Triatoma maculata (Erichson 1848was studied on animals from an university culture in Venezuela.This species does not reach the importance of Rhodnius prolixus Stal 1859 as Chagas disease vector in Venezuela.This study addressed the role of defecating frequency,an index of how dangerous the animals are for the human population,and its relationship with why T.maculata is a less important vector than R.prolixus .Human blood was fed to the insects through an artificial feeding device.The 2nd and 3rd instar nymphs defecated more frequently (Id=0.6,n=40,and our Vth instar nymphs did not complete sexual differentiation.Fertility was 55%(n=865and fecundity 8 eggs/female/week (n=26. Egg incubation lasted 22 days (n=477.Female longevity was 51 days (n=26.Intermould time grew progressively from 35 days for 1st to 40 days for 4th instar nymphs (n=40.Mould percentage varied from 0% for Vth to 63%for 3rd instar nymphs.Mortality varied from 8% for 3rd to 100% for Vth instar nymphs

  2. Isparta İlinde Coleoptera Takımına ait Türler Üzerinde Faunistik Çalışmalar(*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İ. KARACA

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Isparta ve İlçelerinin Coleoptera faunasıyla ilgili biyolojik zenginliği ortaya koymak amacıyla 2002-2004 yılları arasında çalışmalar sürdürülmüştür. Bölgede özellikle Eğirdir, Beyşehir ve Kovada Gölleri arasındaki değişik habitatlarda, tarım ve tarım dışı alanlarda örneklemeler yapılarak bu araştırma yürütülmüştür. Çalışma konusunu oluşturan Coleoptera takımına ait örnekler değişik bitkiler üzerinden toplanıldığı gibi toprak yüzeyi, taş altı ve bitki döküntüleri altı gibi değişik ortamlardan da toplanmıştır. Çalışma süresince Carabidae, Histeridae, Lucanidae, Geotrupidae, Scarabeidae, Melolonthidae, Cetoniidae, Buprestidae, Elateridae, Coccinellidae, Cerambycidae, Chrysomelidae, Curculionidae ve Scolytidae familyalarına ait toplam 90 tür saptanmıştır. Carabidae ve Coccinellidae familyalarına ait olduğu belirlenen toplam 16 farklı avcı böcek türü saptanmış ve toplam tür sayısının % 14,4' ünü temsil ettikleri belirlenmiştir. Geriye kalan % 75,6' lik dilimi oluşturan böceklerin ise fitofag türler olduğu belirlenmiştir.

  3. Differentiation of the traditional Chinese medicinal plants Euphorbia humifusa and E. maculata from adulterants by TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Heng-Gang; Wang, Hong; Li, De-Zhu; Xue, Chun-Ying; Wang, Qing-Zhong

    2008-02-01

    DNA sequence analysis of the rDNA internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction were exploited for their applications in the differentiation of the traditional chinese medicinal plants euphorbia humifusa and e. maculata from three related adulterants e. hypericifolia, E. atoto and E. prostrata. The data demonstrated that variations in the ITS1 regions were very low at the intra-species level but extremely high at the inter-species level, so that they could be easily distinguished at the DNA level. The sequence difference allowed an effective and reliable differentiation of E. humifusa and E. maculata from the adulterants by TaqMan real-time PCR.

  4. The association of Triatoma maculata (Ericsson 1848) with the gecko Thecadactylus rapicauda (Houttuyn 1782) (Reptilia:Squamata:Gekkonidae):a strategy of domiciliation of the Chagas disease peridomestic vector in Venezuela?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reyes-Lugo M; Rodrguez-Acosta A; Reyes-Contreras M; Salvi I; Gelves W; Aviln A; Llavaneras D; Navarrete LF; Cordero G; Snchez EE

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the bioecological relationship between Chagas disease peridomestic vectors and reptiles as source of feeding. Methods: In a three-story building, triatomines were captured by direct search and electric vacuum cleaner search in and outside the building. Then, age structure of the captured Triatoma maculata (T. maculata) were identified and recorded. Reptiles living in sympatric with the triatomines were also searched. Results: T. maculata were found living sympatric with geckos (Thecadactylus rapicauda) and they bit residents of the apartment building in study. A total of 1 448 individuals of T. maculata were captured within three days, of which 74.2% (1 074 eggs) were eggs, 21.5% were nymphs at different stages, and 4.3% were adults. Conclusions: The association of T. maculata and T. rapicauda is an effective strategy of colonizing dwellings located in the vicinity of the habitat where both species are present; and therefore, could have implications of high importance in the intradomiciliary transmission of Chagas disease.

  5. A pilot study testing a natural and a synthetic Molluscicide for controlling invasive apple snails (Pomacea maculata)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Heather M.; Jenkins, Jill A.; Berhow, Mark; Carter, Jacoby

    2016-01-01

    Pomacea maculata (formerly P. insularum), an apple snail native to South America, was discovered in Louisiana in 2008. These snails strip vegetation, reproduce at tremendous rates, and have reduced rice production and caused ecosystem changes in Asia. In this pilot study snails were exposed to two molluscicides, a tea (Camellia sinensis) seed derivative (TSD) or niclosamide monohydrate (Pestanal®, 2′,5-dichloro-4′-nitrosalicylanilide, CAS #73360-56-2). Mortality was recorded after exposure to high or low concentrations (0.03 and 0.015 g/L for TSD, 1.3 and 0.13 mg/L for niclosamide). The TSD induced 100 % mortality at both concentrations. Niclosamide caused 100 % and 17 % mortality at high and low concentrations respectively. These molluscicides were also tested on potential biocontrol agents, the red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) and redear sunfish (Lepomis microlophus). No crayfish mortalities occurred at either concentration for either chemical, but sunfish experienced 100 % mortality with TSD (0.03 g/L), and 21 % mortality with niclosamide (0.13 mg/L).

  6. Genetic variation among and within provenances and progenies of Corymbia maculata (Hook. K.D. Hill and L.A.S. Johnson, in Pederneiras, SP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Sanae Sato

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to estimate genetic parameters and variation in a provenance-progeny test of C. maculata (ex Eucalyptus maculata Hook., conducted at Pederneiras Experimental Station, in São Paulo Forest Institute. The test was based on 21 open-pollination progenies from provenance Woondum St. Forest and 17 from provenance Wondai St. Forest, both in Australia. A compact family block design was adopted consisting of ten blocks, six plants per straight-line plot and two outer border rows, with spacing 3 x 2 m. Traits assessed included diameter at breast height (DBH, height, volume, form and survival rate at age 4 and 21 years. Significant differences were detected only at age 4 between provenances for DAP and height and among progenies for DAP, height and volume. The coefficient of genetic variation was higher for all traits at age 21. The heritability coefficient at the progeny level ( was also higher at age 21 and ranged from 0.21 for volume to 0.40 for height, indicating that genetic progress can be achieved through selection of the best progenies. Genetic correlations were high between traits within and between age categories, showing that potential genetic gains can be achieved through indirect, early selection. Results indicate that considerable gains can be made if high selection intensity is applied among and within progenies, with values ranging from 12.48% for height to 21.77% for volume.

  7. Coleoptera Associated with Decaying Wood in a Tropical Deciduous Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-López, N Z; Andrés-Hernández, A R; Carrillo-Ruiz, H; Rivas-Arancibia, S P

    2016-08-01

    Coleoptera is the largest and diverse group of organisms, but few studies are dedicated to determine the diversity and feeding guilds of saproxylic Coleoptera. We demonstrate the diversity, abundance, feeding guilds, and succession process of Coleoptera associated with decaying wood in a tropical deciduous forest in the Mixteca Poblana, Mexico. Decaying wood was sampled and classified into four stages of decay, and the associated Coleoptera. The wood was identified according to their anatomy. Diversity was estimated using the Simpson index, while abundance was estimated using a Kruskal-Wallis test; the association of Coleoptera with wood species and decay was assessed using canonical correspondence analysis. Decay wood stage I is the most abundant (51%), followed by stage III (21%). We collected 93 Coleoptera belonging to 14 families, 41 genera, and 44 species. The family Cerambycidae was the most abundant, with 29% of individuals, followed by Tenebrionidae with 27% and Carabidae with 13%. We recognized six feeding guilds. The greatest diversity of Coleoptera was recorded in decaying Acacia farnesiana and Bursera linanoe. Kruskal-Wallis analysis indicated that the abundance of Coleoptera varied according to the species and stage of decay of the wood. The canonical analysis showed that the species and stage of decay of wood determined the composition and community structure of Coleoptera.

  8. Action of sulfurous acid on pollen. [Hepatica triloba; Helleborus orientalis; Vinca minor; Viola tricolor; Primula officinalis; Lilium candidum; Petunia; Pisum; Helleborus viridus; Galanthus nivealis; Vinca major; Convallaria maialis; Narcissus poeticus; Caltha palustris; Cystisus laburnum; Orchis maculata; Bilbergia; Eranthus; Crocus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabachnikoff, V.

    1912-01-23

    The following ornamental plants: Hepatica triloba, Helleborus orientalis, Vinca minor, Viola tricolor, Primula officinalis, Lilium candidum, Petunia, Pisum, Helleborus viridus, Galanthus nivealis, Vinca major, Convallaria maialis, Narcissus poeticus, Caltha palustris, Cystisus laburnum, Orchis maculata, Bilbergia, Eranthus, and Crocus were tested for seed production. Exposure to sulfuric acid ranged from three to forty-eight hours. Responses were noted for varying concentrations.

  9. Fauna de Coleoptera no Parque Estadual de Vila Velha, Ponta Grossa, Paraná, Brasil: abundância e riqueza das famílias capturadas através de armadilhas malaise Coleoptera fauna in the Parque Estadual de Vila Velha, Ponta Grossa, Parana, Brazil: abundance and family richness captured with malaise traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma G. Ganho

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The Coleoptera fauna of Parque Estadual de Vila Velha, Ponta Grossa, Parana, was sampled during 52 weeks using malaise traps (from September 1999 to August 2000. Five different sites were selected according to floristic conditions: one site in initial stage of vegetacional succession; one in intermediate stage; one in advanced stage (recognized as a mature forest; one with an Araucaria angustifolia (Bertol. Kuntze plantation, invaded by native forest vegetation; and a fifth site in the edge area. The Coleoptera communities from the five sites were analyzed based on abundance and family richness. The total of specimens collected was 10,822 belonging to 64 families. The most abundant sites were those in initial and intermediate stages of plant succession; the abundance in the edge area was the lowest. The family richness is not related with the level of preservation of the sites. The beetle community structures of the five sites were not significantly different when involving all the families captured; but the more correlated pair-wise site structures reflected the vegetational stages of the sites. A temporal comparison of the beetle community structures was made, based on data gathered in one of the selected site which were sampled 13 years ago (1986/1987. The fauna collected in this year was more related with that of the initial stage of succession, in 1999/2000, than the one collected in the same area, in 1999/2000, nowadays considered as an intermediate stage of succession. This fact probably represents a parallel succession of fauna and flora. The dominant families, about 60% of total abundance, include Chrysomelidae, Curculionidae, Cerambycidae, Elateridae and Staphylinidae. Eventually, one or two of them, were substituted by Scarabaeidae, Ptilodactylidae, Cleridae, Coccinellidae, Lampyridae, Scolytidae, Cucujidae, Nitidulidae, Cantharidae, Scirtidae and Phengodidae. As observed in Vila Velha and other localities, there are a taxonomic

  10. Resistência natural da madeira de Corymbia maculata (Hook. K.D.Hill & L.A.S. Johnson a fungos e cupins xilófagos, em condições de laboratório Wood natural resistance of Corymbia maculata (Hook. K.D.Hill & L.A.S Johnson to wood destroying fungi and termites, under laboratory tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juarez Benigno Paes

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available A pesquisa teve o objetivo de avaliar a resistência natural da madeira de Corymbia maculata a fungos e a cupins xilófagos, em condições de laboratório. De peças radiais (tábuas que continham o cerne e o alburno intactos foram retirados corpos-de-prova de 2,00 x 2,00 x 1,00 cm, com a menor dimensão na direção tangencial (ensaio com fungos, e de 2,54 x 2,00 x 0,64 cm, com a maior dimensão na direção das fibras (ensaio com cupins, em quatro posições na direção medula-casca. As amostras foram submetidas à ação dos fungos Postia placenta, Neolentinus lepideus e Polyporus fumosus por 12 semanas, ou à ação de cupins do gênero Nasutitermes por 30 dias. Constatou-se que a resistência da madeira ao apodrecimento foi dependente da posição na direção medula-casca e dos fungos utilizados. As amostras retiradas nas posições mais externas do tronco foram mais deterioradas que as internas. Dentro de cada posição, os fungos causaram deterioração semelhante à madeira, exceto para a posição mais externa (alburno, em que o fungo P. fumosus causou menos deterioração que os demais. De modo geral, a madeira de C. maculata foi altamente resistente (posições internas ou resistente (posições externas aos fungos ensaiados. Somente para o fungo N. lepideus a posição mais externa foi moderadamente resistente. Quanto aos cupins, a resistência da madeira não foi afetada pela posição na direção medula-casca e apresentou uma baixa perda de massa para as posições analisadas. Além disto, os cupins causaram somente desgaste superficial à madeira, e morreram durante o ensaio, o que permitiu classificar a madeira de C.maculata como resistente aos cupins ensaiados.This research evaluated the natural resistance of Corymbia maculata wood to wood-destroying fungi and termites, under laboratory tests. Radial pieces (boards, containing intact heartwood and sapwood were transformed into test samples measuring 2.00 x 2.00 x 1.00 cm

  11. Estudio seroepidemiológico y entomológico sobre la enfermedad de Chagas en un área infestada por Triatoma maculata (Erichson 1848 en el centro-occidente de Venezuela An entomological and seroepidemiological study of Chagas' disease in an area in central-western Venezuela infested with Triatoma maculata (Erichson 1848

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Rojas

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo se realizó un estudio seroepidemiológico, entomológico y de factores de riesgo para la infestación de las viviendas en un área infestada por Triatoma maculata (Parroquia Xaguas, Municipio Urdaneta, Estado Lara, Venezuela. Se muestrearon 140 viviendas, 509 personas y 110 cánidos, a los cuales se les determinó anticuerpos séricos anti-Trypanosoma cruzi mediante ELISA y MABA, utilizando antígenos recombinantes. La infección por Tr. cruzi de los triatominos fue determinada por microscopía óptica y PCR. Los resultados mostraron una seroprevalencia en humanos de 1,57% y en cánidos de 6,36%. De los 545 triatominos capturados 97,98% fueron T. maculata, 1,65% Eratyrus mucronatus y 0,37% Panstrongylus geniculatus; con índices vectoriales de infección 0,36%, infestación 16,4%, colonización 39,1%, coinfestación 8,6% y dispersión 100%. La presencia de vectores en el domicilio y peridomicilio estuvo asociada a la presencia de gallinas, desorden en el peridomicilio, caprinos, gallineros y/o distribución del domicilio. Los resultados permiten concluir que T. maculata es el vector predominante en la región, con capacidad de infestar y colonizar el domicilio y estaría involucrado en la transmisión de la enfermedad de Chagas.This article presents a study on seroepidemiological, entomologic, and risk factors for domiciliary infestation in a circumscribed area infested with Triatoma maculata in Parroquia Xaguas, Urdaneta Municipality, Lara State, Venezuela. One hundred and forty households, 509 persons, and 110 dogs were sampled. Serum anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies were determined by means of ELISA and MABA techniques using recombinant antigens. Tr. cruzi infection in the triatomines was determined by direct microscopy and PCR. According to the results, 1.57% of humans and 6.36% of dogs were positive for serum anti-Tr. cruzi antibodies. Triatomine species were: 97.98% T. maculata, 1.65% Eratyrus mucronatus, and 0

  12. Bioindication Potential of the Coleoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belitskaya Mariya Nikolaevna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Different families of Coleoptera ambiguously respond to the pollution of SPZs with industrial emissions. For example, the SPZ of Volgograd aluminum plant has the changing biodiversity of insect communities at different distances from the pollution source. The increasing level of pollution is accompanied by the reduction in species abundance. At a distance of 200 m a special ecological zone with the specific composition of the entomofauna was formed. It is significantly different from other habitats. No Cerambycidae species may survive in the zone of maximum pollution, and the number of Curculionidae species is reduced significantly. The number of Cerambycidae decreases by more than 40 % in the presence of even minimal contamination. The most sensitive bioindicators are represented by such insects as Cerambycidae, Curculionidae and Chrysomelidae. Changes in the indices can be described by the function y = arctan (x, where x is the distance from the pollution source (in meters. The specificity of this function is to identify levels of possible changes of species richness and numerical abundance of communities. On the basis of trigonometric functions describing the changes in the species composition and abundance, the authors offered the method for assessing the quality of the environment in SPZs. The use of three families of insects opens up prospects of differentiation zones of technogenic pressure.

  13. Effect of buprofezin on survival of immature stages of Harmonia axyridis, Stethorus punctum picipes (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), Orius tristicolor (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae), and Geocoris spp. (Hemiptera: Geocoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, David G

    2004-06-01

    The effect of buprofezin, a chitin synthesis inhibitor, on development and survival of immature stages of Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), Stethortus punctum picipes Casey, Orius tristicolor (White), Geocoris pallens Stål, and Geocoris punctipes (Say), was examined in a series of laboratory bioassays. Very few H. axyridis larvae (3.1%) treated with buprofezin reached adulthood, although 65% of treated pupae emerged successfully. Buprofezin caused no mortality to eggs of S. punctum picipes but 71.1% of treated early instar larvae failed to complete development. Eighty percent of treated late instars and 92.3% of pupae produced viable adults. Early instar nymphs of O. tristicolor were unaffected by buprofezin, whereas 47.7 and 85% of G. punctipes and G. pallens nymphs, respectively, failed to complete development. Treated eggs of G. pallens hatched successfully. The use of buprofezin in integrated pest management in Washington state wine grapes is discussed.

  14. Egg Predation by the Introduced Lady Beetle, Coccinella septempunctata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae, Lowers Mortality but Raises Relative Risk for the Native Lady Beetle, Coccinella novemnotata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakim Turnipseed

    Full Text Available Populations of the native ninespotted lady beetle, Coccinella novemnotata Herbst, have undergone precipitous declines in North America following the establishment of the exotic sevenspotted lady beetle, Coccinella septempunctata L. Recent volunteer efforts have made it possible to establish colonies of the now-rare C. novemnotata and test mechanisms contributing to its decline. We evaluated the relative frequencies of intraguild predation and cannibalism of eggs between these two species. A single C. novemnotata or C. septempunctata adult was exposed to conspecific and heterospecific eggs in either the presence or absence of pea aphids. The study revealed two expected results: 1 eggs of C. novemnotata were consumed more frequently than eggs of C. septempunctata by both species, and 2 egg consumption was higher when aphids were absent, independent of predator and egg species. There were also two unexpected results from the study: 1 the asymmetry between egg predation rates was higher when aphids were present, and 2 higher predation rates on C. novemnotata eggs in the absence of alternate prey was due to a relatively higher rate of intraspecific cannibalism. This implies that C. novemnotata would have suffered higher egg mortality rates before the invasion of C. septempunctata, but even though the aggregate rate of egg predation on C. novemnotata eggs is lower post-invasion, it is still significantly higher than the aggregate rate of predation of C. septempunctata eggs. This differential pattern of asymmetric predation could contribute to habitat compression and the overall decline of C. novemnotata.

  15. Comparison of the incidence of sibling cannibalism between male-killing Spiroplasma infected and uninfected clutches of a predatory ladybird beetle, Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakamura, K.; Miura, K.; Jong, de P.W.; Ueno, H.

    2006-01-01

    The incidence of sibling cannibalism in clutches of Harmonia axyridis infected by the male-killing Spiroplasma was compared with that in uninfected clutches, and the way in which fitness compensation was realized by sibling cannibalism was investigated. Primarily the rate of sibling cannibalism was

  16. The effect of Chrysoperla carnea (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) and Adalia bipunctata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) on the spread of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) by Aphis gossypii (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzón, A; Budia, F; Medina, P; Morales, I; Fereres, A; Viñuela, E

    2015-02-01

    The effects of two aphidophagous predators, the larvae of Chrysoperla carnea and adults of Adalia bipunctata, on the spread of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) transmitted in a non-persistent manner by the cotton aphid Aphis gossypii were studied under semi-field conditions. Natural enemies and aphids were released inside insect-proof cages (1 m × 1 m × 1 m) with a central CMV-infected cucumber plant surrounded by 48 healthy cucumber seedlings, and the spatiotemporal dynamics of the virus and vector were evaluated in the short and long term (1 and 5 days) in the presence and absence of the natural enemy. The spatial analysis by distance indices methodology together with other indices measuring the dispersal around a single focus was used to assess the spatial pattern and the degree of association between the virus and its vector. Both natural enemies significantly reduced the number of aphids in the CMV-source plant after 5 days but not after 1 day. The CMV transmission rate was generally low, especially after 1 day, due to the limited movement of aphids from the central CMV-source plant, which increased slightly after 5 days. Infected plants were mainly located around the central virus-infected source plant, and the percentage of aphid occupation and CMV-infected plants did not differ significantly in absence and presence of natural enemies. The distribution patterns of A. gossypii and CMV were only coincident close to the central plant. The complexity of multitrophic interactions and the role of aphid predators in the spread of CMV are discussed.

  17. Notes on the taxonomic identity of Bystus hirtulus (Kirsch) and transfer from Endomychidae to Coccinellidae (Coleoptera: Cucujoidea), with designation of a lectotype for Alexia hirtula Kirsch

    Science.gov (United States)

    During a review of type material of the New World endomychid genus Bystus Guérin-Méneville (Anamorphinae), the type series of Alexia hirtula Kirsch from Peru was examined and shown to contain a mixture of different taxa, none of which belong to the genus Bystus, the subfamily Anamorphinae, or even t...

  18. Morfologia dos Coccinellini (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) Depositados na Coleção Entomológica dos Campos Gerais do Paraná, Ponta Grossa, Paraná

    OpenAIRE

    Julianne Milléo; Willian Meira

    2012-01-01

    Foi realizada uma análise comparativa com base na morfologia detalhada do exoesqueleto e genitália do adulto de oito espécies de Coccinellini: Coleomegilla quadrifasciata (Schönherr, 1808); Cycloneda sanguinea (Linnaeus, 1763); Cycloneda pulchella (Klug, 1829); Eriopis connexa (Germar, 1824); Harmonia axyridis (Pallas, 1773); Hippodamia convergens (Guérin, 1842); Neocalvia anastomozans (Crotch, 1874); Olla v-nigrum (Mulsant, 1866). É apresentado uma cha...

  19. Morfologia dos Coccinellini (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae Depositados na Coleção Entomológica dos Campos Gerais do Paraná, Ponta Grossa, Paraná

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julianne Milléo

    2012-07-01

    Abstract. A comparative analysis was carried out based on the detailed morphology of exoskeleton and genitalia of the adult of eight species of the Coccinellini: Coleomegilla quadrifasciata (Schönherr, 1808; Cycloneda sanguinea (Linnaeus, 1763; Cycloneda pulchella (Klug, 1829; Eriopis connexa (Germar, 1824; Harmonia axyridis (Pallas, 1773; Hippodamia convergens (Guérin, 1842; Neocalvia anastomozans (Crotch, 1874; Olla v-nigrum (Mulsant, 1866. A dichotomic key, diagnoses for the species with description of new characters and records of the plants in which it was collected, are added.

  20. Effect of prey limitation on competitive interactions between a native lady beetle, Coccinella novemnotata, and an invasive lady beetle, Coccinella septempunctata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnipseed, Rakim K; Ugine, Todd A; Losey, John E

    2014-08-01

    The size and geographic distribution of Coccinella novemnotata Herbst populations have been decreasing rapidly across North America closely following the establishment, spread, and population growth of the invasive seven-spotted lady beetle, Coccinella septempunctata L. To determine whether intraguild predation and competition for prey may be partially responsible for the decline, we paired first-instar larvae of two populations of C. novemnotata (eastern and western) with first-instar C. septempunctata at low or high aphid densities. Survival of both C. novemnotata populations was significantly lower when larvae were paired with C. septempunctata, and western C. novemnotata exhibited significantly lower survival compared with the eastern population. This relationship depended on aphid density with the greatest survival of both C. novemnotata populations occurring at the high aphid density. Both male and female C. novemnotata weighed less on the day of eclosion when paired with C. septempunctata as compared with pairings with conspecifics. In a second test, C. septempunctata and C. novemnotata instars were varied at the start of the trial and C. novemnotata survival to adulthood in the presence of C. septempunctata was dependent of the instar of C. novemnotata used to initiate the experiment. C. novemnotata exhibited higher rates of survival and weighed significantly more on the day of eclosion when C. novemnotata was older than its C. septempunctata partner. These results suggest that interspecific competition including intraguild predation by C. septempunctata may contribute to C. novemnotata population declines, but that the intensity of this impact may vary across C. novemnotata populations.

  1. Methods and technologies for collecting, surveying and sampling predatory ladybirds (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)%捕食性瓢虫采集与调查取样技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兴民; 陈晓胜; 邱宝利; 任顺祥

    2014-01-01

    捕食性瓢虫是重要的害虫天敌类群之一,主要捕食蚜虫、介壳虫、粉虱、叶螨等,对这些害虫的种群数量起着重要的控制作用.本文详细描述和发展了捕食性瓢虫的采集方法以及针对不同生态系统中捕食性瓢虫的调查和取样技术,为更好的利用瓢虫防治害虫提供技术支撑.

  2. Research of sexual behaviour and evolutionary mechanism of ladybird beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)%瓢虫性选择行为及进化机制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢佳沁; 庞虹

    2016-01-01

    昆虫性选择行为一直是行为生物学家和进化生物学家所关注的热点.早期对瓢虫性选择行为研究主要集中在非随机性交配模式,随着研究的深入,近些年对瓢虫性选择行为研究取得了许多新成果,包括多次交配的行为机制、性选择的识别机制、精子传送及竞争等.为全面地了解瓢虫性选择行为研究现状,本文总结了瓢虫非随机性交配模式,综述了近十余年对瓢虫性行为及进化的研究成果,同时对瓢虫性选择行为未来的研究方向进行了展望.

  3. Comparison of the incidence of sibling cannibalism between male-killing Spiroplasma infected and uninfected clutches of a predatory ladybird beetle, Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakamura, K.; Miura, K.; Jong, de P.W.; Ueno, H.

    2006-01-01

    The incidence of sibling cannibalism in clutches of Harmonia axyridis infected by the male-killing Spiroplasma was compared with that in uninfected clutches, and the way in which fitness compensation was realized by sibling cannibalism was investigated. Primarily the rate of sibling cannibalism was

  4. Toxicity and sublethal effects of six insecticides to last instar larvae and adults of the biocontrol agents Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) and Adalia bipunctata (L.) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzón, A; Medina, P; Amor, F; Viñuela, E; Budia, F

    2015-08-01

    To further develop Integrated Pest Management (IPM) strategies against crop pests, it is important to evaluate the effects of insecticides on biological control agents. Therefore, we tested the toxicity and sublethal effects (fecundity and fertility) of flonicamid, flubendiamide, metaflumizone, spirotetramat, sulfoxaflor and deltamethrin on the natural enemies Chrysoperla carnea and Adalia bipunctata. The side effects of the active ingredients of the insecticides were evaluated with residual contact tests for the larvae and adults of these predators in the laboratory. Flonicamid, flubendiamide, metaflumizone and spirotetramat were innocuous to last instar larvae and adults of C. carnea and A. bipunctata. Sulfoxaflor was slightly toxic to adults of C. carnea and was highly toxic to the L4 larvae of A. bipunctata. For A. bipunctata, sulfoxaflor and deltamethrin were the most damaging compounds with a cumulative larval mortality of 100%. Deltamethrin was also the most toxic compound to larvae and adults of C. carnea. In accordance with the results obtained, the compounds flonicamid, flubendiamide, metaflumizone and spirotetramat might be incorporated into IPM programs in combination with these natural enemies for the control of particular greenhouse pests. Nevertheless, the use of sulfoxaflor and deltamethrin in IPM strategies should be taken into consideration when releasing either of these biological control agents, due to the toxic behavior observed under laboratory conditions. The need for developing sustainable approaches to combine the use of these insecticides and natural enemies within an IPM framework is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Relative Toxicity of Two Aphicides to Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae): Implications for Integrated Management of Sugarcane Aphid, Melanaphis sacchari (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colares, Felipe; Michaud, J P; Bain, Clint L; Torres, Jorge B

    2017-02-01

    Flupyradifurone and sulfoxaflor present novel insecticide chemistries with particular efficacy against aphids, and the recent emergence of sugarcane aphid, Melanaphis sacchari (Zehntner), as a pest of sorghum in the United States has resulted in their widespread use. We examined their toxicity to Hippodamia convergens Guerin-Meneville, an important aphid biocontrol agent. We exposed beetles to topical applications of the field rate (FR) of these insecticides, fed them contaminated food (eggs of Ephestia kuehniella Zeller), and gave first-instar larvae 24-h exposures to leaf residues. More than half of fourth-instar larvae receiving topical applications of sulfoxaflor at FR survived, whereas flupyradifurone at 0.1× FR caused 90% mortality. Adults survived topical treatments better than larvae and without measurable mortality, except flupyradifurone at FR, which killed more than 80% of beetles. Survivors of all treatments had fertility similar to controls, whether treated as larvae or adults. Ingestion of contaminated food caused significant mortality in all treatments (15-40% for adults and 55-85% for larvae), with no significant differences between insecticides at FR. Leaf residues of sulfoxaflor at 1.0 and 2.0× FR caused approximately 60 and 80% mortality of first instars, respectively, whereas flupyradifurone at 0.1 and 1.0× FR caused > 90% mortality. Although sulfoxaflor was less toxic to H. convergens than flupyradifurone, the tested FR of flupyradifurone has now been reduced by half. We conclude that neither insecticide appears as toxic as other nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists, and that both materials are compatible with integrated pest management programs for M. sacchari. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Protective effects of egg stalk of Paratrioza sinica (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) at various angles and spacing against three predaceous coccinellids, Harmonia axyridis, Coccinella septempunctata and Hippodamia variegata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pengxiang; Ma, Baoxu; Yan, Shuo; Xu, Jing; He, Jia; Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Runzhi

    2017-08-26

    Paratrioza sinica, is a major pest of wolfberries. Coccinellids could effectively control various developmental stages of P. sinica damage except the stalked egg. To analyze the protective role of egg stalks against predaceous coccinellids, Harmonia axyridis, Coccinella septempunctata and Hippodamia variegata, we studied the functional responses and effects of two potential factors: the angle between egg stalk and leaf plane, and the spacing between egg stalks. The searching rate, handling time and theoretical maximum egg consumption of H. variegata was optimal among 3 ladybug species. The egg consumption by coccinellids were maximum and minimum at 0° and 90°, respectively. Average reduction rates from 0° to 90° of egg consumed by larvae of coccinellids and H. variegata were significantly lower compared to adults and other 2 species, respectively. Optimal spacing of egg consumption varied with different predator species and their developmental stages, which were nearly close to the body lengths of predators. Egg stalk was served as a physical protection against the predators. Selective advantage of egg stalk is a facilitator in protection against predators during evolution, which needs more attention. Reasonable selection of predator and irrigation strategy may exhibit positive control performance. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Toxicity assessment of four insecticides with different modes of action on pupae and adults of Eriopis connexa (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), a relevant predator of the Neotropical Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Marilina Noelia; Schneider, Marcela Inés; Rimoldi, Federico; Ladux, Lorena Sabrina; Desneux, Nicolas; Ronco, Alicia Estela

    2016-08-01

    Pesticides can be toxic to nontarget organisms including the natural enemies of agricultural pests, thus reducing the biodiversity of agroecosystems. The lethal and sublethal effects of four insecticides with different modes of action-pyriproxyfen, teflubenzuron, acetamiprid, and cypermethrin-were evaluated on pupae and adults of Eriopis connexa, an effective predator in horticultural crops. Pupal survival was reduced by pyriproxyfen (26 %) and cypermethrin (41 %). Malformations in adults emerged from treated pupae were observed after acetamiprid (82.7 and 100 % for 100 and 200 mg a.i./l, respectively), pyriproxyfen (48.6 %), and cypermethrin (13.3 %) treatments. A longer mean oviposition time was also observed in adults emerged from pupae treated with cypermethrin. Moreover, the latter insecticide as well as teflubenzuron did not reduce reproductive parameters, whereas females emerged from pyriproxyfen-treated pupae were not be able to lay eggs even when females showed large abdomens. Upon exposure of adults, survival was reduced to approximately 90 % by acetamiprid, but no reduction occurred with pyriproxyfen, teflubenzuron, or cypermethrin though the fecundity at fifth oviposition time of the female survivors was reduced. Pyriproxyfen decreased the hatching at all the oviposition times tested, whereas fertility was reduced in the fourth and fifth ovipositions by teflubenzuron and in the first and third ovipositions by cypermethrin. In conclusion, all four insecticides tested exhibited lethal or sublethal effects, or both, on E. connexa. The neurotoxic insecticides were more harmful than the insect-growth regulators, and pupae were more susceptible than adults. The toxicity of insecticides on the conservation of predators in agroecosystems of the Neotropical Region is discussed.

  8. Egg Predation by the Introduced Lady Beetle, Coccinella septempunctata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), Lowers Mortality but Raises Relative Risk for the Native Lady Beetle, Coccinella novemnotata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnipseed, Rakim; Ugine, Todd A.; Losey, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Populations of the native ninespotted lady beetle, Coccinella novemnotata Herbst, have undergone precipitous declines in North America following the establishment of the exotic sevenspotted lady beetle, Coccinella septempunctata L. Recent volunteer efforts have made it possible to establish colonies of the now-rare C. novemnotata and test mechanisms contributing to its decline. We evaluated the relative frequencies of intraguild predation and cannibalism of eggs between these two species. A single C. novemnotata or C. septempunctata adult was exposed to conspecific and heterospecific eggs in either the presence or absence of pea aphids. The study revealed two expected results: 1) eggs of C. novemnotata were consumed more frequently than eggs of C. septempunctata by both species, and 2) egg consumption was higher when aphids were absent, independent of predator and egg species. There were also two unexpected results from the study: 1) the asymmetry between egg predation rates was higher when aphids were present, and 2) higher predation rates on C. novemnotata eggs in the absence of alternate prey was due to a relatively higher rate of intraspecific cannibalism. This implies that C. novemnotata would have suffered higher egg mortality rates before the invasion of C. septempunctata, but even though the aggregate rate of egg predation on C. novemnotata eggs is lower post-invasion, it is still significantly higher than the aggregate rate of predation of C. septempunctata eggs. This differential pattern of asymmetric predation could contribute to habitat compression and the overall decline of C. novemnotata. PMID:26090935

  9. Effect of Verticillium lecanii on biological characteristics and life table of Serangium japonicum (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), a predator of whiteflies under laboratory conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lazreg Fatiha; Zhen Huang; Shun-Xiang Ren; Shaukat Ali

    2008-01-01

    Effects of entomopathogenic fungus Verticillium lecanii on biological characteristics and life table of Serangiumjaponicum, a predator of whiteflies against five different conidial concentrations (1×104, 1×105, 1×106, 1×107, and 1×108 conidia/mL) were studied under laboratory conditions. The developmental periods for all immature stages (from eggs, 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th instar nymph and pupae up to emergence) among the treatments were significantly different when compared to that of control, and the longest development period was observed as treated with 1×108spore/mL. However, no significant difference on the percent survival of all immature stages was observed among the treatments and control. Also, there were no significantly different effects of V. lecanii on mean generation time, intrinsic rate, the finite rate of increase and longevity of S. japonicum among the treatments and control.

  10. C-banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization with rDNA sequences in chromosomes of Cycloneda sanguinea Linnaeus (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Mariza Dortas Maffei

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe mitotic and meiotic chromosomes of Cycloneda sanguinea using C-banding, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH rDNA probes, and sequential FISH/Ag-NOR staining. The chromosome number was 2n = 18 + XX for females and 2n = 18 + Xy for males. The X chromosome was metacentric and the Y chromosome was very small. During meiosis, the karyotypic meioformula was n = 9 + Xy p, and sex chromosomes configured a parachute at metaphase I. At the beginning of pachytene, bivalents were still individualized, and sex chromosomes were associated end-to-end through the heteropycnotic region of the X chromosome. Later in pachytene, further condensation led to the formation of a pseudo-ring by the sex bivalent. All chromosomes showed pericentromeric heterochromatin. FISH and sequential FISH/Ag-NOR staining evidenced the location of the nucleolar organizer region in one pair of autosomes (at spermatogonial metaphase. During meiosis, these genes were mapped to a region outside the sex vesicle by FISH, although Xy p was deeply stained with silver at metaphase I. These results suggest that these argyrophilic substances are of a nucleolar protein nature, and seem to be synthesized by a pair of autosomes and imported during meiosis (prophase I to the sex pair, during the association of the sex chromosomes.

  11. Influence of Plant Diversity on the Numerical Response of Eriopis connexa (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae to Changes in Cereal Aphid Density in Wheat Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María C. Tulli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cereal aphids cause economic injury to wheat crops. In Argentina, Eriopis connexa is an indigenous ladybird. In the present study, the numerical response of E. connexa to changes in aphid density on wheat crops with high and low plant diversity was investigated. The study was carried out in Balcarce, Buenos Aires, Argentina, from September to December 2007 and 2008, on two wheat crops with either a higher plant diversity (HPD with refuge strips or a lower plant diversity (LPD without refuge strips. Crops were sampled every week and the abundance of aphids and E. connexa was recorded. The dominant aphid species were Schizaphis graminum, Metopolophium dirhodum, and Sitobion avenae. Eriopis connexa showed a linear increase in the numerical response to an increase in aphid density, which varied in space and time. The abundance of E. connexa increased in relation to the crop development and aphid population and was higher in the HPD than in the LPD system. This predator increased its reproductive numerical response only in 2008, with a significant liner response in the HPD system. This suggests that the potential of E. connexa as a predator of cereal aphids also increases directly in proportion to landscape vegetal diversity.

  12. Evaluation of Bioinsecticides for Management of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) and the Effect on the Whitefly Predator Delphastus catalinae (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in Organic Squash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razze, Janine M; Liburd, Oscar E; Nuessly, Gregg S; Samuel-Foo, Michelle

    2016-08-01

    Organic zucchini squash is a high-value vegetable crop in Florida and potential exists to expand its production throughout the state. A lack of knowledge on the effectiveness of organic products and their integration with natural enemies is an important constraint to the regulation of pest populations in organic squash production in Florida. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of insecticides labeled for organic production that can be used for management of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) biotype B, on organically grown squash; and to determine the effects of the most efficient insecticides on a key natural enemy, Delphastus catalinae (Horn). Experiments were conducted in the greenhouse in exclusion cages. The first experiment compared the effects of four bioinsecticides on whitefly densities. Insecticides include 1) AzaSol (azadirachtin), 2) PyGanic EC 1.4 (pyrethrin), 3) M-Pede (insecticidal soap), and 4) Entrust (spinosad). The second experiment investigated the effects of bioinsecticides on D. catalinae Treatment effectiveness was evaluated 1, 3, and 5 d posttreatment. PyGanic and M-Pede were highly effective in controlling whitefly populations on organic squash, while moderate control was provided by AzaSol and there was no control provided by Entrust. PyGanic and M-Pede treatments reduced D. catalinae populations when adults were released 1 d post pesticide application. However, when adults were released 5 d post application, there was no reduction. The importance of using bioinsecticides in combination with natural enemies to regulate pest populations in organic cropping systems is discussed.

  13. A Comprehensive Selection of Reference Genes for RT-qPCR Analysis in a Predatory Lady Beetle, Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huipeng Pan

    Full Text Available Reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR is a reliable, rapid, and reproducible technique for measuring and evaluating changes in gene expression. To facilitate gene expression studies and obtain more accurate RT-qPCR data, normalization relative to stable reference genes is required. In this study, expression profiles of seven candidate reference genes, including β-actin (Actin, elongation factor 1 α (EF1A, glyceralde hyde-3-phosphate dehydro-genase (GAPDH, cyclophilins A (CypA, vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (ATPase, 28S ribosomal RNA (28S, and 18S ribosomal RNA (18S from Hippodamia convergens were investigated. H. convergens is an abundant predatory species in the New World, and has been widely used as a biological control agent against sap-sucking insect pests, primarily aphids. A total of four analytical methods, geNorm, Normfinder, BestKeeper, and the ΔCt method, were employed to evaluate the performance of these seven genes as endogenous controls under diverse experimental conditions. Additionally, RefFinder, a comprehensive evaluation platform integrating the four above mentioned algorithms, ranked the overall stability of these candidate genes. A suite of reference genes were specifically recommended for each experimental condition. Among them, 28S, EF1A, and CypA were the best reference genes across different development stages; GAPDH, 28S, and CypA were most stable in different tissues. GAPDH and CypA were most stable in female and male adults and photoperiod conditions, 28S and EF1A were most stable under a range of temperatures, Actin and CypA were most stable under dietary RNAi condition. This work establishes a standardized RT-qPCR analysis in H. convergens. Additionally, this study lays a foundation for functional genomics research in H. convergens and sheds light on the ecological risk assessment of RNAi-based biopesticides on this non-target biological control agent.

  14. Heavy metals in carabids (Coleoptera, Carabidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruslan Butovsky

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Carabid beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae are one of the most studied soil groups in relation to heavy metal (HM accumulation and use for bioindication of environmental pollution. Accumulation of Zn and Cu in carabid beetles was species-, sex- and trophic group-specific. No differences were found in HM contents between omnivorous and carnivorous species. The use of carabid beetles as indicators of HM accumulation appears to be rather limited.

  15. New longhorn beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae from Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pil Nataša

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The most recent data (Ilić, 2005 indicate the presence of 245 longhorn beetle species (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae in Serbia. Not included in the mentioned publication, the following five species should be added to the list: Cortodera discolor Fairmaire, 1866; Stenopterus similatus Holzschuh 1979; Chlorophorus aegyptiacus (Fabricius, 1775; Agapanthia osmanlis (Reiche, 1858; Agapanthia maculicornis (Gyllenhal, 1817 (Pil and Stojanović in press. A total number of 250 species are presently known for the Serbian longhorn beetle fauna.

  16. Present and future potential habitat distribution of Carcharhinus falciformis and Canthidermis maculata by-catch species in the tropical tuna purse-seine fishery under climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerea eLezama Ochoa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available By-catch species from tropical tuna purse seine fishery have been affected by fishery pressures since the last century; however, the habitat distribution and the climate change impacts on these species are poorly known. With the objective of predicting the potential suitable habitat for a shark (Carcharhinus falciformis and a teleost (Canthidermis maculata in the Indian, Atlantic and Eastern Pacific Oceans, a MaxEnt species distribution model (SDM was developed using data collected by observers in tuna purse seiners. The relative percentage of contribution of some environmental variables (depth, sea surface temperature, salinity and primary production and the potential impact of climate change on species habitat by the end of the century under the A2 scenario (scenario with average concentrations of carbon dioxide of 856 ppm by 2100 were also evaluated. Results showed that by-catch species can be correctly modelled using observed occurrence records and few environmental variables with SDM. Results from projected maps showed that the equatorial band and some coastal upwelling regions were the most suitable areas for both by-catch species in the three oceans in concordance with the main fishing grounds. Sea surface temperature was the most important environmental variable which contributed to explain the habitat distribution of the two species in the three oceans in general. Under climate change scenarios, the largest change in present habitat suitability is observed in the Atlantic Ocean (around 16% of the present habitat suitability area of Carcharhinus falciformis and Canthidermis maculata, respectively whereas the change is less in the Pacific (around 10% and 8% and Indian Oceans (around 3% and 2 %. In some regions such as Somalia, the Atlantic equatorial band or Peru’s coastal upwelling areas, these species could lose potential habitat whereas in the south of the equator in the Indian Ocean, the Benguela System and in the Pacific coast of

  17. Necrobiont Coleoptera North-West Caucasus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Viktorovich Pushkin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The complex necrobionts of the alpine girdle of Northwest Caucasus is described ecologically. The specific composition of groups is circumscribed. The legitimacies of creation necrobionts of the complex from a type of a landscape and taxonomic of an accessory of a corpse are detected. Studying of regional features ¬of formation necrobionts complexes has, both scientific, and practical -interest. Throughout 20 years we studied fauna and ecological features necrobiont Coleoptera mountain landscapes of Northwest Caucasus and -adjoining areas of Ciscaucasia.

  18. Immatures of Acanthocinini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sônia A. Casari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Immatures of Acanthocinini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae. Larva and pupa of Eutrypanus dorsalis (Germar, 1928, collected in trunks of Pinus elliottii Engelm., and Paratenthras martinsi Monné, 1998, collected in spathes of Scheelea phalerata (Mart. ex Spreng. Burret, are described and illustrated. Larva and pupa of Lophopoeum timbouvae Lameere, 1884, collected in Hymenaea corbaril L., Enterolobium contortisiliquum (Vell. Morong and Pterogyne nitens Tul., are redescribed and illustrated. A table with all described immatures of Lamiinae, and a comparison among the immatures of Acanthocinini are presented. Biological notes and new records are also included.

  19. A Triatoma maculata (Hemiptera, Reduviidae, Triatominae population from Roraima, Amazon region, Brazil, has some bionomic characteristics of a potential Chagas disease vector Uma população de Triatoma maculata (Hemiptera, Reduviidae, Triatominae proveniente de Roraima, Amazônia, Brasil, possui algumas características bionômicas de vetor potencial de doença de Chagas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Francisco Luitgards-Moura

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Even though Chagas disease is rare in the Brazilian Amazon, the conditions for the establishment of domiciliated cycles prevail in many areas where triatomines are of frequent occurrence. In Roraima, a previous serological and entomological survey in three agricultural settlements showed the existence of all transmission cycle elements, i.e., individuals infected by Trypanosoma cruzi, triatomine species previously found harboring T. cruzi in the broader Amazon region of neighboring countries and, domicile/ peridomicile conditions favorable to triatomine colonization. Triatoma maculata was the most frequent species, found in chicken houses in the peridomicile and sporadically within residences. Aiming to investigate the possibility of T. maculata to possess the potentiality to transmit T. cruzi in the area, bionomic characteristics were studied under laboratory conditions. These were feeding frequency, time for defecation after a blood meal, time elapsed in voluntary fasting pre- and pos-ecdysis, moulting time periods, pre-oviposition and oviposition periods and index of oviposition, incubation period, egg viability, longevity and mortality rate. Results show that the Passarão population of T. maculata should be considered a potential vector of T. cruzi since it shows a capacity to infest artificial ecotopes in the peridomicile, to carry out large number of meals during the nymphal cycle, to have a relatively short developmental cycle capable of producing 2.9 generations/year, to blood source eclecticism, to defecate immediately after the blood meal while still on the host and to the fact that has been previously found naturally infected by T.cruzi.A doença de Chagas é de rara ocorrência na Região Amazônica Brasileira, onde contudo as condições para o estabelecimento de ciclos domésticos existem. Um estudo previamente realizado em áreas de colonização agrícola no Estado de Roraima, mostrou a possibilidade de ciclos autóctones de

  20. Competition for Aphid Prey between Different Lady Beetle Species in a Laboratory Arena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christy Leppanen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct competition for aphid prey (Hemiptera: Aphididae was evaluated between and among several lady beetle species (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae. The behavior of three native (Coccinella trifasciata, Coleomegilla maculata, and Hippodamia convergens and four nonnative (Coccinella septempunctata, Harmonia axyridis, Hippodamia variegata, and Propylea quatuordecimpunctata lady beetles was observed in laboratory arenas. The beetles were kept alone, paired with conspecifics or paired with heterospecifics, and presented with potato aphids (Macrosiphum euphorbiae. Harmonia axyridis was the most successful aphid predator in our study, being able to find aphids more quickly and consume more of them compared to most other lady beetle species. It was also by far the most aggressive of the tested species. Coccinella septempunctata, C. trifasciata, and C. maculata generally followed H. axyridis in aphid consumption. Prey discovery, consumption, and aggressive behaviors were dependent on which species were present in the arena. Except for the generally superior H. axyridis, there was no obvious dominance hierarchy among the other tested species and no dichotomy between the native and non-native species. Asymmetric interactions between lady beetle species may affect their abilities to coexist in the same habitat.

  1. First estimates of the probability of survival in a small-bodied, high-elevation frog (Boreal Chorus Frog, Pseudacris maculata), or how historical data can be useful

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muths, Erin L.; Scherer, R. D.; Amburgey, S. M.; Matthews, T.; Spencer, A. W.; Corn, P.S.

    2016-01-01

    In an era of shrinking budgets yet increasing demands for conservation, the value of existing (i.e., historical) data are elevated. Lengthy time series on common, or previously common, species are particularly valuable and may be available only through the use of historical information. We provide first estimates of the probability of survival and longevity (0.67–0.79 and 5–7 years, respectively) for a subalpine population of a small-bodied, ostensibly common amphibian, the Boreal Chorus Frog (Pseudacris maculata (Agassiz, 1850)), using historical data and contemporary, hypothesis-driven information–theoretic analyses. We also test a priori hypotheses about the effects of color morph (as suggested by early reports) and of drought (as suggested by recent climate predictions) on survival. Using robust mark–recapture models, we find some support for early hypotheses regarding the effect of color on survival, but we find no effect of drought. The congruence between early findings and our analyses highlights the usefulness of historical information in providing raw data for contemporary analyses and context for conservation and management decisions.

  2. The evolution of asymmetric genitalia in Coleoptera

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Paulien; van Beek, Rick; Hoogenboom, Tamara; zu Schlochtern, Melanie Meijer

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of asymmetry in male genitalia is a pervasive and recurrent phenomenon across almost the entire animal kingdom. Although in some taxa the asymmetry may be a response to the evolution of one-sided, male-above copulation from a more ancestral female-above condition, in other taxa, such as Mammalia and Coleoptera, this explanation appears insufficient. We carried out an informal assessment of genital asymmetry across the Coleoptera and found that male genital asymmetry is present in 43% of all beetle families, and at all within-family taxonomic levels. In the most diverse group, Cucujiformia, however, genital asymmetry is comparatively rare. We also reconstructed the phylogeny of the leiodid tribe Cholevini, and mapped aspects of genital asymmetry on the tree, revealing that endophallus sclerites, endophallus, median lobe and parameres are, in a nested fashion, increasingly unlikely to have evolved asymmetry. We interpret these results in the light of cryptic female choice versus sexually antagonistic coevolution and advocate further ways in which the phenomenon may be better understood. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Provocative questions in left–right asymmetry’. PMID:27821530

  3. Primeiro registro de Harmonia axyridis (Pallas (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae: um coccinelídeo originário da região Paleártica First record of Harmonia axyridis (Pallas (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae: a lady beetle native to the Palaearctic region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia Massutti de Almeida

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Specimens of Harmonia axyridis (Pallas, 1773 an asiatic species were caugth in Capão do Tigre, Curitiba, Paraná, South of Brazil, for the first time, feeding on Tinocallis kahawalnokani (Kirkaldy (Hemiptera, Aphididae on Lagerstroemia indica Linnaeus (Lythraceae.

  4. Luta biológica clássica com Hyperaspis pantherina Fürsch (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae no combate à Orthezia insignis Browne (Homoptera: Ortheziidae em jacarandá Biological control with Hyperaspis pantherina Fürsch (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae to control Orthezia insignis Browne (Homoptera: Ortheziidae on blue jacaranda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Félix

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Os jacarandás e várias plantas ornamentais que ornamentam passeios e áreas ajardinadas da cidade do Funchal encontram-se infestados pela cochonilha Orthezia insignis Browne. Para combater esta praga foi importada do Quénia, uma joaninha, Hyperaspis pantherina Fürsch. Este predador é específico de O. insignis e tem sido utilizado, com sucesso em programas de luta biológica, em vários países de África, no Peru, Hawai e na Ilha de Santa Helena. Na Ilha da Madeira, desde Julho de 2002, H. pantherina está a ser criado em laboratório e largado em jacarandás infestados com o objectivo de combater a cochonilha-dojacarandá através da luta biológica clássica. Referem-se as largadas de H. pantherina e o sistema de monitorização adoptado para verificar a aclimatação do predador.The Jacaranda trees and other ornamental plants used in sidewalks and gardenlike areas of sidewalks and other gardened areas of the downton Capital city of Madeira Island (Funchal, are infested by the Jacaranda or Lantana Bug, Orthezia insignis Browne. A ladybird, Hyperaspis pantherina Fürsch, was imported from Kenya to control this pest. This ladybird is a specific predator of O. insignis and it has been used, successfully in biological control programs, in several countries of Africa, in Peru, Hawaii and in Santa Helena Island. In Madeira Island, H. pantherina is being reared in laboratory and released into infested jacarandas since July 2002, in a classical biological control way. The releasing of H. pantherina is described in detail as well as the adopted monitoring system to verify its acclimation.

  5. Revisão do gênero Oryssomus Mulsant (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Exoplectrinae, Oryssomini e descrição de Gordonoryssomus, gen.n. A review of the genus Oryssomus Mulsant (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Exoplectrinae, Oryssomini and description of Gordonoryssomus, gen.n.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia Massutti de Almeida

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available The Genus Oryssomus is revised and illustrations of pertinent characters are provided. A key to the genera of Oryssomini and to the species of Oryssomus and Gordonoryssomus are added. Gordonoryssomus. gen.n. is described: type species: Oryssomus deyrollei Crotch, 1874. A new species of Oryssomus, O. unimaculatus, sp.n.. from Amazonas, Brazil and three of Gordonoryssomus, G. nigrus, sp.n.. from Santa Cruz, Bolívia, G. nigripilosus. sp.n., from Espirito Santo, Brazil and G. delicatus, sp.n.. from Rio de Janeiro, Minas Gerais, Santa Catarina and Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, are described.

  6. Molecular cloning of cDNAs and structural model analysis of two gonadotropin beta-subunits of snakehead fish (Channa maculata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Abhijit; Shen, San-Tai; Yu, John Yuh-Lin

    2005-09-15

    The cDNAs encoding beta-subunits of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) have been cloned from the pituitary of snakehead fish, Channa maculata, and the three-dimensional structural models of the encoded FSH and LH were investigated. The cloned cDNAs, including 5'-untranslated region (UTR), open-reading frame, and 3'-UTR followed by a poly(A) tail, were obtained by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and rapid amplification of cDNA end methods. The open-reading frames of FSH-beta cDNA encodes a 120-amino acid protein with a signal peptide of 18 amino acids and a mature protein of 102 amino acids; while LH-beta cDNA encodes a 140-amino acid protein with a signal peptide of 33 amino acids and a mature protein of 115 amino acids. The amino acid sequence identities of snakehead fish FSH-beta and LH-beta in comparison with other fish are 27.8-81.9% and 45.2-88.8%, respectively; while in comparison with tetrapods are 26.2-28.9% and 37.5-51.2%, respectively. Both FSH-beta and LH-beta of snakehead fish resemble most to those of Perciformes, implying their closer phylogenetic relationship. All 12 cysteine residues are conserved in snakehead fish LH-beta; while 11 cysteine residues are conserved in its FSH-beta. The third cysteine is absent in snakehead fish FSH-beta; instead, a positionally shifted cysteine residue is present at the N-terminus, as found in some phylogenetic related fish. The structure models of snakehead fish FSH and LH, constructed by using the crystal structures of human FSH and human chorionic gonadotropin as respective template, showed that the positionally shifted N-terminal cysteine residue of snakehead fish FSH-beta likely can substitute the third cysteine to form a disulfide bond with the 12th cysteine.

  7. Evaluation of vacuum technology to kill larvae of the Asian longhorned beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), and the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhangjing Chen; Marshall S. White; Melody A. Keena; Therese M. Poland; Erin L. Clark

    2008-01-01

    The potential for using vacuum technology to kill larvae of the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB), Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), and emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in solid-wood packing materials (SWPM) and other wood products was assessed. Current...

  8. Molecular markers detect cryptic predation on coffee berry borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) by silvanid and laemophloeid flat bark beetles (Coleoptera: Silvanidae, Laemophloeidae) in coffee beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei(Coleoptera: Curculionidae)(Ferrari), is a serious pest of coffee worldwide and has been recently introduced in Hawai’i, first detected in the state in 2010. Adult silvanid flat bark beetles, Cathartus quadricollis (Coleoptera: Silvanidae) and adult laemoph...

  9. Clave de las especies de Conoderus Grupo II (Coleoptera: Elateridae Key of the species of Conoderus Group II (Coleoptera: Elateridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta E. Guzmán De Tomé

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN: Se presenta una reseña histórica, diagnosis y clave de identificación de 33 especies exclusivamente neotropicales, del género Conoderus Eschscholtz 1829 Grupo II, (Coleoptera, Elateridae proporcionando, datos de su distribución e ilustraciones de cuatro especies representativas de la región.ABSTRACT. An identification of 33 species of Conoderus Group II, Eschscholtz 1829 (Coleoptera, Elateridae with full diagnosis, distribution, with representative illustrations of four species of the neotropical region.

  10. New species of Hemilophini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae) from Colombia and Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monné, Marcela L; Monné, Miguel A

    2015-12-02

    Three new species of Hemilophini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae) are described: Chrysaperda mimica sp. nov. and Malacoscylus nearnsi sp. nov. from Ecuador, and Eulachnesia boteroi sp. nov. from Colombia.

  11. Repellency of Hydroethanolic Extracts of Ricinus communis (Euphorbiaceae) to Scyphophorus acupunctatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in the Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cinthia Pacheco-Sánchez; Patricia Villa-Ayala; Roberto Montes-Belmont; Rodolfo Figueroa-Brito; Alfredo Jiménez-Pérez

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The agave snout weevil Scyphophorus acupunctatus Gyllenhal (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is an ubiquitous insect and the main pest of blue tequila agave, Agave tequilana Weber, and other agaves...

  12. Noteworthy records of Hispines from Belize (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Robert F C Naczi; Staines, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    Cephaloleia consanguinea Baly, Cephaloleia fulvolimbata Baly, Cephaloleia ruficollis Baly, Chalepus amabilis Baly, Chalepus brevicornis (Baly), Chalepus pici Descarpentries and Villiers, Microrhopala erebus (Newman), Octhispa bimaculata Uhmann, Octotoma championi Baly, Pseudispa tuberculata Staines, Sceloenopla erudita (Baly), Stenispa guatemalensis Uhmann, Sumitrosis gestroi (Weise), and Sumitrosis terminatus (Baly) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Cassidinae) are new country records of hispine c...

  13. Elmidae Curtis, 1830 (Coleoptera, Polyphaga, Byrrhoidea) of the Neotropical region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Melissa Ottoboni; Dos Passos, Maria Ines Da Silva; Fonseca-Gessner, Alaíde Aparecida; Froehlich, Claudio Gilberto

    2013-10-29

    A bibliography of significant taxonomic papers on Elmidae (Coleoptera, Polyphaga, Byrrhoidea), and a checklist of valid species and subspecies and their geographic distributions are provided. Forty-seven genera and 430 valid species are included. Maps show the geographic distribution of the genera by country.

  14. Temperature-dependent development of Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) is a nonnative pest that vectors the pathogenic fungus Raffaelea lauricola, which causes laurel wilt in trees of the family Lauraceae. Laurel wilt is present in the commercial growing areas of avocado (Perse...

  15. Morphometric analysis of instar variation in Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measurements of head capsule, mandible, metanotum, and body weight were done on larvae of Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionide) from the second to the last instar. Instar number varied from 14 to 18, but 15 or 16 instars were the most common. The value of dimensional measurements was evalua...

  16. A coffee berry borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    One hundred years ago, one of the most significant biological invasions of an agricultural insect pest in the Americas was initiated. Endemic to Africa, the coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei; Coleoptera: Curculionidae) was accidentally introduced to Brazil in 1913 and years later invaded coffe...

  17. Predation by Flat Bark Beetles (Coleoptera: Silvanidae and Laemophloeidae) on Coffee Berry Borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Hawaii coffee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffee berry borer(CBB), Hypothenemus hampei, is a serious pest of coffee worldwide and a new invasive pest in Hawaii. Adult flat bark beetles, mainly Leptophloeus sp.(75%) and Cathartus quadricollis(21%) (Coleoptera: Laemophloeidae and Silvanidae, respectively), were found feeding in CBB-infested c...

  18. Bazı arpa genotiplerinin Drechslera teres f. maculata(Smed.-Pet., 1971)'ya karşı fide dönemi reaksiyonlarının belirlenmesi

    OpenAIRE

    AKTAŞDOĞAN, Duygu; KARAKAYA, Aziz; ÇELİK OĞUZ, Arzu; MERT, Zafer; SAYİM, İsmail; ERGÜN, Namuk; AYDOĞAN, Sinan

    2013-01-01

    Üç arpa çeşidinin, 2 arpa çeşit adayının ve 20 ileri kademe arpa hattının Drechslera teres f. maculata (Smed.-Pet., 1971)'nın Sivas ve Eskişehir illerinden elde edilmiş iki izolatına karşı sera koşullarında fide dönemi reaksiyonları belirlenmiştir. Bülbül 89 çeşidi Sivas izolatına orta derecede hassas-hassas reaksiyon gösterirken Eskişehir izolatına orta derecede hassas reaksiyon göstermiştir. Avcı 2002 çeşidi her iki izolata da dayanıklı-orta derecede dayanıklı reaksiyon göstermiştir. Aydanh...

  19. A checklist of stag beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea: Lucanidae) from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolozzi, Luca; Ghahari, Hassan; Sprecher-Uebersax, Eva; Zilioli, Michele

    2014-11-26

    An updated checklist of the Lucanidae (Coleoptera) from Iran is given. New locality records are listed and some dubious distributional records are discussed. Dorcus vavrai Nonfried, 1905 is placed in synonymy with Dorcus peyronis Reiche and Saulcy, 1856 (new synonymy) The female of Lucanus xerxes Král, 2004 is described. A key for the identification of the Iranian stag beetle species is also provided and all the species are figured.

  20. Mode of overwintering of invasive Harmonia axyridis in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raak-van den Berg, C.L.; Hemerik, L.; Jong, de P.W.; Lenteren, van J.C.

    2012-01-01

    After establishment of Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in Europe, population densities of native ladybird species have decreased. The post-hibernation onset of female reproduction, a key characteristic influencing population dynamics and competition with related species, was s

  1. Predicting the potential geographical distribution of the harlequin ladybird, Harmonia axyridis, using the CLIMEX model - BioControl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poutsma, J.; Loomans, A.; Aukema, B.; Heijerman, Th.

    2008-01-01

    Harmonia axyridis (Pallas, 1773) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is a ladybird beetle native to temperate and subtropical parts of Asia. Since 1916 populations of this species have been introduced throughout the world, either deliberately, or by accident through international transport. Harmonia axyridi

  2. Physiological benefits of nectar-feeding by a predatory beetle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extrafloral nectar is an important food source for many animals, including predatory lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), although the physiological benefits of nectar consumption are poorly understood for most consumers. Under laboratory conditions, we confined new females of Coleomegilla macu...

  3. Predicting the potential geographical distribution of the harlequin ladybird, Harmonia axyridis, using the CLIMEX model - BioControl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poutsma, J.; Loomans, A.; Aukema, B.; Heijerman, Th.

    2008-01-01

    Harmonia axyridis (Pallas, 1773) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is a ladybird beetle native to temperate and subtropical parts of Asia. Since 1916 populations of this species have been introduced throughout the world, either deliberately, or by accident through international transport. Harmonia axyridi

  4. Nocturnal Migration of Coleoptera: Carabidae in North China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Vertical-looking radar (VLR) has allowed long-term automatic monitoring of the altitudinal and temporal dynamics of high-flying insect populations. To investigate whether ground beetle, insect of Coleoptera, was capable of migrating and its migration pattern by taking advantages of capability of the VLR for long-term real-time automatic monitoring, the migration of Coleoptera ground beetle was investigated by setting up radar observation points, making long-term observation using the VLR and related supplementary equipment, and analyzing low altitude air current and large area circulating current in combination with the meteorological data. Information obtained in 2005 and 2006 showed that the seasonal activities of ground beetles traps of trap lamps were mainly from late June to late August, peak period was mainly in August, seasonal traps of high-altitude lamps and ground lamps were featured by sudden increase and sudden decrease; in peak period, the height of radar echo point could be as high as 600 m, while it was mainly below the height of 450 m; night activities mainly occurred from 20:00 to 22:00, in very few nights, radar echo could last until about 04:00, changes in numbers of ground beetles within the searchlights were consistent with radar echo intensity; ground beetle images were successfully trapped in the sweep nets carried by captive balloons at the height of 200 m. Some species of Carabidaes had some degrees of migration, thus providing the foundation for investigating the migration of Coleoptera insects.

  5. Sex- and Size-Related Patterns of Carrion Visitation in Necrodes littoralis (Coleoptera: Silphidae) and Creophilus maxillosus (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mądra-Bielewicz, Anna; Frątczak-Łagiewska, Katarzyna; Matuszewski, Szymon

    2016-12-28

    The estimation of postmortem interval (PMI) based on successional patterns of adult insects is largely limited, due to the lack of potential PMI markers. Sex and size of adult insects could be easily used for such estimation. In this study, sex- and size-related patterns of carrion attendance by adult insects were analyzed in Necrodes littoralis (Coleoptera: Silphidae) and Creophilus maxillosus (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae). For both species, abundance of males and females changed similarly during decomposition. A slightly female-biased sex ratio was recorded in N. littoralis. Females of N. littoralis started visiting carcasses, on average, one day earlier than males. There was a rise in size of males of N. littoralis at the end of decomposition, whereas for females of both species and males of C. maxillosus, no size-related patterns of carrion visitation were found. Current results demonstrate that size and sex of adult carrion beetles are poor indicators of PMI.

  6. Estados inmaduros de Ancognatha ustulata (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae: Dynastinae: Cyclocephalini Immature stages of Ancognatha ustulata (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae: Dynastinae: Cyclocephalini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhon César Neita-Moreno

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Se describen y se ilustran por primera vez la larva de tercer estadio y la pupa de Ancognatha ustulata Burmeister, 1847 (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae: Dynastinae: Cyclocephalini. Se aportan datos sobre la biología de la especie y su distribución en Colombia. Se proporciona una clave para la identificación de las larvas de tercer estadio conocidas de las especies del género Ancognatha Erichson.The third instar larva and pupa of Ancognatha ustulata Burmeister, 1847 (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae: Dynastinae: Cyclocephalini are described and illustrated for the first time. New data on larval biology and distribution of the species in Colombia are included. A key to the known third stage larvae of Ancognatha Erichson is provided.

  7. Medically important beetles (insecta: coleoptera of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Nikbakhtzadeh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on coleopteran species that are responsible for the emergence of recent cases of dermatological manifestations in Iran. To the best of our knowledge, five species of the family Meloidae and nine species of the genus Paederus are by far the only beetles recognized as medically important in Iran. The staphylinids consists of Paederus ilsae, P. iliensis, P. fuscipes, P. kalalovae, P. balcanicus, P. lenkoranus, P. littoralis, P. carpathicus, P. nigricornis, while the meloids are Mylabris impressa, M. guerini, Muzimes iranicus, Alosimus smyrnensis and Epicauta sharpi. Most cases of linear dermatitis in this country occur in areas bordering the Caspian Sea. This problem is caused by beetles of the genus Paederus which are present as adults from mid-April to October with particularly high incidences from May to August. Fars (in southern Iran ranks second in number of cases of insect-induced dermatitis. The third major region in which this type of dermatitis has been recorded is Hamedan Province, in the west of the country. Meloid dermatitis showed its highest severity in 2001, when a considerable number of patients sought medical help in Toyserkan and Nahavand counties. New cases of skin blistering were reported along the Persian Gulf coast and the agent was identified as Epicauta sharpi (Coleoptera: Meloidae. In all these regions, it was observed that recorded cases of lesions coincided precisely with the yearly peaks of the beetles. Paederus fuscipes and P. kalalovae are the predominant species along the Caspian Sea shore. It appears that P. fuscipes is homogeneously distributed throughout the Caspian Sea region while the distribution of the other species is more irregular. Paederus fuscipes is probably the major agent that causes linear dermatitis in northern Iran. Whereas this disease is a rural difficulty in the south, mainly in villages or small towns, it is an urban problem in northern provinces along the Caspian Sea shore

  8. Diversidad de coleópteros en un bosque alto andino del municipio de Santa Rosa de Viterbo (Boyacá (Diversity of coleoptera in a high forest Andean in the municipality of Santa Rosa de Viterbo (Boyacá

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Bohórquez Salazar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo presenta los resultados de un estudio desarrollado en el municipio de Santa Rosa de Viterbo, ubicado a 2750 msnm, en un relicto de bosque húmedo montano bajo (bh-M. Dicho estudio tuvo como finalidad identificar la diversidad y riqueza de entomofauna referida al orden Coleóptera, en los predios de la Escuela de Policía Rafael Reyes (ESREY. Es importante señalar que este es el primer estudio de este tipo realizado en la zona. Se reportan un total de 270 individuos capturados pertenecientes a 17 familias, 25 subfamilias, 30 tribus y 44 géneros; siendo Coccinellidae la familia más representativa (19,3% y Dryophthoridae la familia menos representativa (0,4%. Vale la pena mencionar que, según lo reportado por Martínez (2005, no se encuentran registros de ningún género de Carabidae en el municipio, por lo que se puede destacar que los resultados publicados en este artículo son los primeros registros para Santa Rosa de Viterbo. Así mismo, la revisión de Medina, Lopera-Toro, Vitolo & Gill, (2001 sobre escarabajos coprófagos de Colombia indica que los géneros encontrados en este estudio no se registran a una altitud mayor a 2600 msnm por lo que se puede reportar un registro altitudinal para Canthon y Dichotomius Finalmente, en el artículo se presentan los resultados de un proceso de educación desarrollado con niños de grado quinto de primaria de una institución educativa del municipio y con los semilleros de investigación de la ESREY, proceso que fue diseñado como estrategia para promover la apropiación social de conocimiento y divulgación de los resultados del trabajo. (Abstract. This article presents the results of a study conducted in the municipality of Santa Rosa de Viterbo, located at 2750 meters above sea level, in a relict humid montane forest under (bh-M. This study aimed to identify the diversity and richness of Coleoptera order entomofauna referred to in the grounds of the School of Police Rafael Reyes

  9. Family-Group Names In Coleoptera (Insecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice Bouchard

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We synthesize data on all known extant and fossil Coleoptera family-group names for the first time. A catalogue of 4887 family-group names (124 fossil, 4763 extant based on 4707 distinct genera in Coleoptera is given. A total of 4492 names are available, 183 of which are permanently invalid because they are based on a preoccupied or a suppressed type genus. Names are listed in a classification framework. We recognize as valid 24 superfamilies, 211 families, 541 subfamilies, 1663 tribes and 740 subtribes. For each name, the original spelling, author, year of publication, page number, correct stem and type genus are included. The original spelling and availability of each name were checked from primary literature. A list of necessary changes due to Priority and Homonymy problems, and actions taken, is given. Current usage of names was conserved, whenever possible, to promote stability of the classification. New synonymies (family-group names followed by genus-group names: Agronomina Gistel, 1848 syn. n. of Amarina Zimmermann, 1832 (Carabidae, Hylepnigalioini Gistel, 1856 syn. n. of Melandryini Leach, 1815 (Melandryidae, Polycystophoridae Gistel, 1856 syn. n. of Malachiinae Fleming, 1821 (Melyridae, Sclerasteinae Gistel, 1856 syn. n. of Ptilininae Shuckard, 1839 (Ptinidae, Phloeonomini Ádám, 2001 syn. n. of Omaliini MacLeay, 1825 (Staphylinidae, Sepedophilini Ádám, 2001 syn. n. of Tachyporini MacLeay, 1825 (Staphylinidae, Phibalini Gistel, 1856 syn. n. of Cteniopodini Solier, 1835 (Tenebrionidae; Agronoma Gistel 1848 (type species Carabus familiaris Duftschmid, 1812, designated herein syn. n. of Amara Bonelli, 1810 (Carabidae, Hylepnigalio Gistel, 1856 (type species Chrysomela caraboides Linnaeus, 1760, by monotypy syn. n. of Melandrya Fabricius, 1801 (Melandryidae, Polycystophorus Gistel, 1856 (type species Cantharis aeneus Linnaeus, 1758, designated herein syn. n. of Malachius Fabricius, 1775 (Melyridae, Sclerastes Gistel, 1856 (type species

  10. Illustrated guide to the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire and related species (Coleoptera, Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 33 species of Agrilus (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) hypothesized to be most closely related to Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (the emerald ash borer), are described and illustrated. Morphology (adults and immatures), biology, distribution, detailed taxonomic history and systematics are presented fo...

  11. Apostasimerini (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Baridinae). Rectification of authorship, year of publication, rank, and taxa included

    Science.gov (United States)

    The following nomenclatural changes are proposed in the Coleoptera, Curculionidae: the author of Apostasimerini is Schoenherr (1844), not Lacordaire (1866); Madopterini Lacordaire, 1866 is demoted to subtribe of Apostasimerini; Erirhinus mourei Bondar, 1943 is a new synonym of Apostasimerus serriros...

  12. First record of Molorchus minor minor (Linnaeus (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubirajara R. Martins

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Molorchus minor minor (Linnaeus (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae is recorded for the first time in Brazil (Bahia. It was originally described from Europe and is currently widely distributed in that continent and Asia.

  13. A new species of the genus Falsoibidion Pic (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae) from Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seunghyun; Lee, Seunghwan

    2016-01-01

    A new species of the genus Falsoibidion Pic, 1922 (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Cerambycinae, Callidiopini) from Korea is described. Habitus and genitalia of male and female of the new species are illustrated.

  14. Methods for assessing infestations of sunflower stem weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in sunflower stems

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sunflower stem weevil, Cylindrocopturus adspersus LeConte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), reduces sunflower, Helianthus annuus L. (Asteraceae), yields by spreading pathogens, damaging vascular tissues, and promoting lodging of sunflower plants. To assess weevil populations for host plant resistanc...

  15. 孟氏隐唇瓢虫成虫自残幼虫的研究%The research of cannibalism to larva in Cryptolaemus montrouzieri Mulsant ( Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) adult

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋瑞鑫; 张宇宏; 吴红胜; 刘平; 谢佳沁; 庞虹

    2012-01-01

    The cannibalism behavior of adults to larvae in Cryptolaemus montrouzieri, and the fecundity of females reared on larvae were studied in laboratory. The results showed the mortality of larvae cannibalized by females in 48 hours was 60% , which was higher than males did. And compared the other body parts, the abdomen of larvae were attacked more by females. However, to a certain extent the wax covers on larvae was able to defense the attack by adult. The oviposition rate and average fecundity of females fed on larvae were lower than fed on mealybugs respectively.%在室内对孟氏隐唇瓢虫成虫自残幼虫的行为以及雌虫取食幼虫后的生殖力进行了研究,结果表明,雌成虫在48h内残杀幼虫造成的死亡率为60%,显著高于雄成虫;与其他部位相比幼虫的腹部遭受更多地攻击,幼虫体表覆盖的蜡丝在一定程度上抵御了成虫的攻击.与取食粉蚧的雌虫相比,取食瓢虫幼虫的雌虫产卵率和平均产卵量均显著降低.

  16. Molecular analysis of the gut contents of Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) as a method for detecting intra-guild predation by this species on aphidophagous predators other than coccinellids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingels, B.; Aebi, A.; Hautier, L.; Van Leeuwen, T.; De Clercq, P.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that the invasive ladybird Harmonia axyridis is a strong intra-guild predator of native species of ladybird. Laboratory studies have shown that H. axyridis can be an intra-guild predator of aphid predators other than coccinellids, including the hoverfly Episyrphus b

  17. Biología de Cycloneda Sanguínea L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae Criado sobre el Afido Verde de los Cítricos (Aphís Citricola Van Der Goot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurtado Mejía Juan Guillermo

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Los estudios de laboratorio sobre la biología del escarabajo (Cycloneda sanguinea L. alimentado con el áfido verde de los cítricos (Aphis citricola Van der Goot presentó 4 ínstares larvales. La duración de huevo al adulto fue de 30,2 días. Las tasas de desarrollo para los ínstares larvales para la longitud del cuerpo, ancho de la cápsula cefálica y la longitud del profémur fueron 1,65 mm, 1,33 mm y 1,416 mm, respectivamente. El factor de Dyar hallado para los instares larvales de la longitud del cuerpo, ancho de la cápsula cefálica y longitud del profémur fueron de 1,68 mm, 1,32 mm y 1,38 mm, respectivamente. Tanto las tasas de desarrollo como el factor de Dyar mostraron variaciones entre instares y características morfológicas. Sin embargo, una de las características, ancho de la cápsula cefálica, evidenció una medida constante (1,3 mm.

  18. Fatores climáticos na dinâmica populacional de Anastrepha spp. (diptera: tephritidae e de Scymnus spp. (coleoptera: coccinellidae em um pomar experimental de goiaba (Psidium guajava L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Aparecido Calore

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho objetivou caracterizar a dinâmica populacional de Anastrepha spp. e de Scymnus spp. em pomar experimental semiorgânico de goiaba (Psidium guajava L., em Pindorama-SP, na Agência Paulista de Tecnologia dos Agronegócios (APTA e correlacioná-la com fatores meteorológicos. Para o levantamento da dinâmica populacional, os espécimes foram monitorados com armadilhas adesivas amarelas (25 cm x 9,5 cm, trocadas a cada 15 dias, no período de um ano (entre junho de 2009 e junho de 2010. Os insetos foram avaliados e quantificados no Laboratório de Seletividade Ecológica da UNESP-FCAV em Jaboticabal-SP. Observou-se a ocorrência de Anastrepha spp. e Scymnus spp. durante todo o período de amostragem. Com base nos resultados obtidos e nas condições de desenvolvimento do presente trabalho, foram possíveis as seguintes conclusões: a Ocorre aumento na densidade populacional de Anastrepha spp. com o aumento das temperaturas mínima, média e máxima; b Os picos populacionais de Anastrepha spp. ocorrem de janeiro a março e coincidem com o período de disponibilidade de frutos maduros no pomar de goiaba; c Constatam-se as maiores ocorrências do predador Scymnus spp. no período de setembro a dezembro, e as menores ocorrências, em fevereiro e março; d As precipitações não interferem na dinâmica populacional de Anastrepha spp. e de Scymnus spp..

  19. The color preference of Cryptolaemus montrouzieri Mulsant (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) on substrates%孟氏隐唇瓢虫对产卵基质的颜色选择行为研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋瑞鑫; 张宇宏; 吴红胜; 庞虹

    2011-01-01

    在室内26±2℃,RH=50±10%,L:D=16h:8h环境下,使用白色、红色、蓝色、紫色、黑色5种棉花作为孟氏隐唇瓢虫Cryptolaemus montrouzieri Mulsant的产卵基质供其产卵,研究该瓢虫对产卵基质的颜色偏好性.结果表明连续10日内该瓢虫在红色棉花上的产卵次数和总产卵量最多,产卵次数与总产卵量表现出一定的线性关系.该结果对了解环境条件对孟氏隐唇瓢虫的生长发育、繁殖的影响,为天敌瓢虫人工扩繁,卵的收集提供了理论依据.%The color preference of Cryptolaemus montrouzieri on substrates was investigated with providing 5 colors cotton substrates: white, red, blue, purple, and black, for oviposition selection at 26 ± 2℃, 50 ± 10% RH and a photoperiod of 16 h L: 8 h D indoor environment. The results suggested that the oviposition times and total number of eggs laid on red color cotton by C. montrouzieri in ten days was much more than that on the other color cotton respectively, and the oviposition times and total number of eggs laid on color cottons existed linear relationships. Our findings would be as theoretical basis for eggs collected of the ladybird in mass artificial rearing.

  20. A Preliminary Report on the Use of Bench-Top X-Ray Micro-Computerised Tomography to Study the Malpighian Tubules of the Overwintering Seven Spotted Ladybird Coccinella septempunctata L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Bell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of micro-CT scanning techniques on a small sample of “Seven-spot ladybirds” Coccinella septempunctata, collected in December 2009, identified an accumulation of material with a very high, relative X-ray attenuation value in the malpighian tubules of most but not all of the individuals sampled. The passage of metals such as cadmium in soil through a food chain to finally accumulate in high concentrations in ladybirds and lacewings has been previously reported. The identification of the dense material found in our sample of ladybirds, its origin, and the process by which it accumulates in, and is processed by, the malpighian tubules is the challenge ahead. The authors speculate that a straightforward means of monitoring levels of metallic pollutants in the environment might emerge.

  1. EFFECT OF NEPHUS RYUGUUS (KAMIYA) (COLEOPTERA: COCCINELLIDAE) ON ORACELLA ACUTA (LOBDELL) (HOMOPTERA: PSEUDOCOCCIDAE) IN PINE FOREST%圆斑弯叶毛瓢虫对湿地松粉蚧的控制作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李莹; 田明义; 刘永康; 梁铭生

    2002-01-01

    圆斑弯叶毛瓢虫是湿地松粉蚧的本地捕食性天敌,本论文通过林间散放圆斑弯叶毛瓢虫评价其对湿地松粉蚧的控制作用.结果表明,通过散放瓢虫的成虫和幼虫,增加林间瓢虫的数量,能较好地抑制湿地松粉蚧的增长.散放瓢虫50多天后,在散放成虫区,湿地松粉蚧的对照存活率达0.28,即控制效果为72%;在散放瓢虫幼虫区,粉蚧的对照存活率为0.10,即控制效果达90%.从持续作用和控制效果比较,散放幼虫较好,且以瓢虫幼虫与粉蚧雌成虫益害比为2:5时对湿地松粉蚧的控制效果最好.

  2. Método para avaliação de risco ambiental de toxinas Bt sobre organismos não-alvo em laboratório : foco no predador Cycloneda sanguinea (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    O plantio extensivo de monoculturas e o uso de práticas agronômicas intensivas tornam a agricultura, e a produção em massa de alimentos, um dos principais fatores de risco à conservação da biodiversidade. Avanços no campo da engenharia genética propõem-se a diminuir tais impactos, promovendo aumento de produtividade e redução no uso de agrotóxicos, principalmente através da transferência de genes interespécies. Um exemplo desse tip...

  3. Descrição dos estágios imaturos de Epilachna spreta (Muls., 1850 (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, com redescrição, comentários e chave para três outras espécies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.S. Ribeiro

    1989-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper includes descriptions of the immature stages of Epilachna spreta (Muls., 1850, as well as redescriptions together with certain comments of E. paenulata (Germ., 1824, E. cacica (Guér., 1844 and E. clandestina (Muls., 1850 are presented. Two new species groups have been established and named as "paenulata" and "cacica". A key for the fourth instar larvae of the species commonly found in South Brazil is included.

  4. Review of the lady beetle genus Phaenochilus Weise (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Chilocorini), with description of a new species from Thailand and that preys on cycad auacaspis scale, Aulacaspis yasumatsui Takagi (Diaspididae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Species of the genus Phaenochilus are reviewed, keyed, and illustrated, and an annotated checklist provided. A new species, Phaenochilus kashaya, that feeds on an invasive pest of cycads, cycad aulacaspis scale, Aulacaspis yasumatsui Takagi (Hemiptera: Sternorrhyncha: Diaspididae), is described fro...

  5. Passalidae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea) of the Greater and Lesser Antilles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Ferbans, Larry; Reyes-Castillo, Pedro; Schuster, Jack C

    2015-05-12

    We present a synthesis of the state of knowledge concerning the species of Passalidae (Coleoptera) of the West Indies and we present a key to the species. The recently described genus Antillanax Boucher renders the subgenus Passalus (Pertinax) Kaup paraphyletic, therefore we place Antillanax in synonymy with Passalus (Pertinax) and we propose a new combination for Passalus (Pertinax) doesburgi (Boucher). The island richest in species is Hispaniola, with five species, three of them endemic. Excluding Trinidad and Tobago, the passalid fauna of the West Indies comprises 13 species; this is low richness, but with high endemism (50%), especially for the Greater Antilles.

  6. Revision of the genus Altitatiayus Weinreich(Coleoptera, Lucanidae, Lucaninae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paschoal C. Grossi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Revision of the genus Altitatiayus Weinreich (Coleoptera, Lucanidae, Lucaninae. The South American genus Altitatiayus Weinreich is revised and now includes six species, A. rotundatus (Boileau, A. ruficollis (Lüderwaldt, A. godinhorum (Bomans & Arnaud, A. dulceae (Bomans & Arnaud, A. trifurcatus (Grossi & Racca-Filho and A. koikei sp. nov. (Minas Gerais, Brazil. All species are described and illustrated. For the first time male and female genitalia are illustrated for five species and observations on the behavior of two species are included.

  7. The tribe Phanaeini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Figueroa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We examine the occurrence of the tribe Phanaeini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae in Peru based on the collection at Museo de Historia Natural of the Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos and on data provided in literature. Each species is presented with citations of its diagnosis, distribution and related comments. Peruvian Phanaeini includes 30 species in nine genera: Coprophanaeus, Dendropaemon, Gromphas, Oruscatus, Oxysternon, Phanaeus, Sulcophanaeus, Tetramereia and Megatharsis. Oruscatus davus is the only species distributed in the high Andes; Phanaeus lunaris and P. achilles occur in the northern arid zone shared by Peru and Ecuador; the remaining species are Amazonian.

  8. An annotated catalogue of the Buprestidae of Iran (Coleoptera: Buprestoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahari, Hassan; Volkovitsh, Mark G; Bellamy, Charles L

    2015-07-08

    An annotated taxonomic catalogue of the jewel beetles (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) of Iran is given. Original descriptions and recent revisionary or catalogue data are included along with the distribution, both within and outside of Iran, ecological data and host plant associations, junior synonyms, and comments. A complete bibliography completes the catalogue. In total 428 species and 52 subspecies of jewel beetles belonging to 6 subfamilies (Julodinae, Polycestinae, Galbellinae, Chrysochroinae, Buprestinae, and Agrilinae), 20 tribes, and 38 genera are known from Iran including doubtful records and 4 nomina nuda. It is likely that the number of jewel beetle species from Iran will be between 460-480 and possibly even more species.

  9. Fossil history of Mesozoic weevils (Coleoptera:Curculionoidea)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrei A.Legalov

    2012-01-01

    The first synopsis of Mesozoic weevils (Curculionoidea: Coleoptera) is presented.Changes of family,genera and species abundance during the Mesozoic revealed three distributional patterns.The Jurassic (Karatau) fauna was dominated by the Nemonychidae.During the Early Cretaceous (beginning at the Jurassic/Cretaceous border),the Ithyceridae was the prevalent group with a significant role played by the Nemonychidae.In the Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian and Turonian),the major groups were the Curculionidae and Brentidae.Obviously,the change of weevil fauna during this period was due to the expansion of the angiosperms,which provided multiple niches in their vegetative and reproductive organs for weevil development.

  10. Electrophysiological responses of chafer beetle, Holotrichia serrata (F. (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesavan Subaharan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The chafer beetle, Holotrichia serrata F. (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae in its larval stage is a serious pest on sugarcane, vegetables, groundnut and coconut in many parts of India. The antennal response of adults to host volatiles and pheromone gland extracts was assessed by electroantennography. Among the preferred host of H. serrata, the volatiles from neem, Azadirachta indica A. Juss leaf extract elicited higher antennal response than gulmohar Delonix regia L. flowers and Ailanthus excelsa (Roxb leaf extracts. The order of response was the same irrespective of the sex. In general the antennal response to pheromone gland and host extracts was higher in males than in females.

  11. Determination of Coleoptera fauna on carcasses in Ankara province, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Senem; Sert, Osman

    2009-01-10

    In this study, 40 species from Staphylinidae, Histeridae, Dermestidae, Silphidae, Nitidulidae and Cleridae families of Coleoptera which were found in 12 pig (Sus scrofa L.) carcasses were identified and recorded during a one-year period at the Hacettepe University Beytepe Campus located in Ankara, Turkey. According to the duration of their presence on the carcasses, 22 of these species were accepted to be important in decomposition. Their distribution over the months and the duration of their presence in the various decomposition stages over the seasons were determined.

  12. BESOUROS COPRÓFAGOS (COLEOPTERA; SCARABAEIDAE) COLETADOS EM PIRACICABA, SP

    OpenAIRE

    RODRIGUES, S. R.; MARCHINI,L.C.

    1998-01-01

    Através do uso de armadilhas "pitfall" iscadas com massa fecal fresca de bovinos, realizou-se a coleta de besouros coprófagos (Coleoptera; Scarabaeidae), durante o período de 15 de abril de 1995 a 17 de fevereiro de 1996, em área de pastagem ao lado de confinamento de bovinos, em Piracicaba, SP. Coletou-se um total de 11 espécies distribuidas nos gêneros Aphodius, Ataenius, Trichillum, Eurysternus, Dichotomius e Canthon. Os besouros coprófagos de comportamento endocoprídeo representaram 72,73...

  13. Possible origin of B chromosome in Dichotomius sericeus (Coleoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Igor Costa; Milani, Diogo; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo Cavalcanti; Rocha, Marília França; Moura, Rita Cássia

    2016-08-01

    B chromosomes have so far been described in about 80 species of Coleoptera, mainly using conventional staining analysis. In this study, 152 individuals of the dung beetle Dichotomius sericeus (Coleoptera), collected from three isolated geographical areas in the State of Pernambuco, Brazil, were analyzed to determine the frequency, prevalence, distribution, meiotic behavior, and possible B chromosome origin. The cytogenetic analysis consisted of conventional staining, C-banding, triple fluorochrome staining (CMA3/DA/DAPI), and fluorescent in situ hybridization using ribosomal DNAs (rDNAs) and H3 histone gene as probes, as well as microdissection and chromosome painting of the B chromosome. The B chromosomes were detected in all populations analyzed. Analysis revealed the heterochromatic nature and the presence of G+C-rich blocks and 18S rDNA on the B chromosome. FISH with DNA from microdissected B chromosome painted the entire extension of the B chromosome for all populations, besides the pericentromeric regions of all the autosomes, as well as the X chromosome. Finally, cross-hybridization in nine related species of Dichotomius using the microdissected B chromosome as probe did not reveal any hybridization signal. The results suggest an intraspecific and monophyletic origin for B chromosomes in D. sericeus, probably from the second or third autosomal pair.

  14. Rove beetles of medical importance in Brazil (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Paederinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana S. Vieira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Rove beetles of medical importance in Brazil (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Paederinae. The rove beetles of the genus Paederus Fabricius, 1775 are the most important group within Coleoptera causing dermatitis around the world. The medical importance of Paederus depends on its toxic hemolymph released when these beetles are crushed on human skin. The effects are mainly dermatitis linearis and some sporadic cases of conjunctivitis. In Brazil seven species of Paederus are known to cause dermatitis: P. amazonicus Sharp, 1876, P. brasiliensis Erichson, 1840, P. columbinus Laporte, 1835, P. ferus Erichson, 1840, P. mutans Sharp, 1876, P. protensus Sharp, 1876 stat. rev., and Paederus rutilicornis Erichson, 1840. Paederus mutans and P. protensus are for the first time recorded as of medical importance, whereas the record of P. rutilicornis in Brazil is doubtful. All seven species are redescribed and a dichotomous key is provided. The geographic distributions of all species are documented. The results provided here include the most recent and relevant taxonomic revision of Paederus of the Neotropical region, the first identification key for Brazilian species and the increase of recorded species of medical importance in the world.

  15. Variations on a Theme: Antennal Lobe Architecture across Coleoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmann, Martin; Schmidt, Rovenna; Heuer, Carsten M; Schachtner, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Beetles comprise about 400,000 described species, nearly one third of all known animal species. The enormous success of the order Coleoptera is reflected by a rich diversity of lifestyles, behaviors, morphological, and physiological adaptions. All these evolutionary adaptions that have been driven by a variety of parameters over the last about 300 million years, make the Coleoptera an ideal field to study the evolution of the brain on the interface between the basic bauplan of the insect brain and the adaptions that occurred. In the current study we concentrated on the paired antennal lobes (AL), the part of the brain that is typically responsible for the first processing of olfactory information collected from olfactory sensilla on antenna and mouthparts. We analyzed 63 beetle species from 22 different families and thus provide an extensive comparison of principal neuroarchitecture of the AL. On the examined anatomical level, we found a broad diversity including AL containing a wide range of glomeruli numbers reaching from 50 to 150 glomeruli and several species with numerous small glomeruli, resembling the microglomerular design described in acridid grasshoppers and diving beetles, and substructures within the glomeruli that have to date only been described for the small hive beetle, Aethina tumida. A first comparison of the various anatomical features of the AL with available descriptions of lifestyle and behaviors did so far not reveal useful correlations. In summary, the current study provides a solid basis for further studies to unravel mechanisms that are basic to evolutionary adaptions of the insect olfactory system.

  16. [Comparative histology of mushroom bodies in carnivorous beetles of the suborder polyphaga (Insecta, Coleoptera)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panov, A A

    2013-01-01

    Mushroom bodies in beetles of the families Histeridae, Staphylinidae, Cantharidae, Trogossitidae, Peltidae, Cleridae, Malachiidae, and Coccinellidae are shown to be rather poorly developed. The calyx region of the mushroom bodies in these beetles never forms two separate cups, and the peduncular apparatus includes a unified shaft almost over its entire length. Only the pedunculus contains two separate shafts in a few cases. Two proliferative centers consisting of one to three neuroblasts are often found in each Kenyon cell group. The shift from carnivorous to feeding on pollen or leaves, which has taken place in some taxa, does not visibly affect the degree of mushroom body development.

  17. Searching for natural lineages within the Cerylonid Series (Coleoptera: Cucujoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, James A; Whiting, Michael F; McHugh, Joseph V

    2008-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships within the diverse beetle superfamily Cucujoidea are poorly known. The Cerylonid Series (C.S.) is the largest of all proposed superfamilial cucujoid groups, comprising eight families and representing most of the known cucujoid species diversity. The monophyly of the C.S., however, has never been formally tested and the higher-level relationships among and within the constituent families remain equivocal. Here we present a phylogenetic study based on 18S and 28S rDNA for 16 outgroup taxa and 61 C.S. ingroup taxa, representing seven of the eight C.S. families and 20 of 39 subfamilies. We test the monophyly of the C.S., investigate the relationships among the C.S. families, and test the monophyly of the constituent families and subfamilies. Phylogenetic reconstruction of the combined data was achieved via standard static alignment parsimony analyses, Direct Optimization using parsimony, and partitioned Bayesian analysis. All three analyses support the paraphyly of Cucujoidea with respect to Tenebrionoidea and confirm the monophyly of the C.S. The C.S. families Bothrideridae, Cerylonidae, Discolomatidae, Coccinellidae and Corylophidae are supported as monophyletic in all analyses. Only the Bayesian analysis recovers a monophyletic Latridiidae. Endomychidae is recovered as polyphyletic in all analyses. Of the 14 subfamilies with multiple terminals in this study, 11 were supported as monophyletic. The corylophid subfamily Corylophinae and the coccinellid subfamilies Chilocorinae and Scymninae are recovered as paraphyletic. A sister grouping of Anamorphinae+Corylophidae is supported in all analyses. Other taxonomic implications are discussed in light of our results.

  18. Vertical stratification of beetles (Coleoptera) and flies (Diptera) in temperate forest canopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Dorothy Y; Robert, Katleen; Brochu, Kristen; Larrivée, Maxim; Buddle, Christopher M; Wheeler, Terry A

    2014-02-01

    Forest canopies support high arthropod biodiversity, but in temperate canopies, little is known about the spatial distribution of these arthropods. This is an important first step toward understanding ecological roles of insects in temperate canopies. The objective of this study was to assess differences in the species composition of two dominant and diverse taxa (Diptera and Coleoptera) along a vertical gradient in temperate deciduous forest canopies. Five sugar maple trees from each of three deciduous forest sites in southern Quebec were sampled using a combination of window and trunk traps placed in three vertical strata (understory, mid-canopy, and upper-canopy) for three sampling periods throughout the summer. Coleoptera species richness and abundance did not differ between canopy heights, but more specimens and species of Diptera were collected in the upper-canopy. Community composition of Coleoptera and Diptera varied significantly by trap height. Window traps collected more specimens and species of Coleoptera than trunk traps, although both trap types should be used to maximize representation of the entire Coleoptera community. There were no differences in abundance, diversity, or composition of Diptera collected between trap types. Our data confirm the relevance of sampling all strata in a forest when studying canopy arthropod biodiversity.

  19. ISOLATION AND PRELIMINARY IDENTIFICATION OF RHABDOVIRUS FROM CHANNA MACULATA CULTURED IN POND%池塘养殖斑鳢弹状病毒的分离与初步鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗霞; 邓国成; 赵长臣; 廖国礼; 陈昆慈; 杨小静

    2013-01-01

    During September, 2010, an unknown disease with highly mortality of over 80% broke out in cultured Channa maculata, at Foshan area of Guangdong province. A strain of rhabdovirus was isolated from the diseased Channa maculata. After the third passage, obvious cytopathic effect (CPE) could be observed in EPC and FHM, inocu-lated with the ultra-filtrate of liver, spleen and kidney from diseased fishes with no bacteria. Mass of bullet-shaped vi-ruses which about 53 nm×140 nm in size, were observed in the ultrathin sections made of infected EPC under electron microscopy. Both artificial infection for healthy Channa maculata with either filtrate of tissues or infected EPC by in-traperitoneal injection caused 100% mortality. The symptoms of the infected fishes were similar to those of natural in-fection. This result indicated that this virus was the lethal pathogen of the fulminant disease. With the primers designed according to the conserved regions of SCRV N gene, specific products with predicted size (400 bp) were obtained from all the diseased tissues and infected cells. Comparative analysis of nucleotide sequences was performed with the Gen-Bank databases using BLAST database network service. The results showed that the gene products shared a highest identity (i.e., 94%) with the corresponding sequence of SCRV [EF575725.1]. On the basis of neighbor-joining analyses of the N gene sequences, phylogenetic tree was constructed with the Clustalx and Mega 4, and it formed a single cluster with SCRV. As their sizes and symptoms of the diseased fishes had some differences, the virus in present research was named as CHRV tentatively.%从患暴发性死亡的斑鳢病灶中分离出一株弹状病毒。取病鱼肝、脾、肾组织过滤液接种EPC、FHM细胞,连续传至第3代后28℃培养35h出现细胞病变(CPE),测得病毒半数细胞感染量为10−5.746/0.1 mL。将病变细胞制成超薄切片,透射电镜下观察到细胞质中存在大量呈子

  20. Age and growth of moonfish, Mene maculata from mouth of the Beibu Gulf, South China Sea%北部湾口眼镜鱼年龄与生长

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜时强; 冯波; 侯刚; 卢伙胜; 颜云榕

    2012-01-01

    Fish age and growth are key biological parameters for the assessment of fisheries resources. By the purse seiners and trawlers catch sampling, a total of 1 025 individuals of moonfish, Mene maculata were collected monthly in the mouth of the Beibu Gulf, South China Sea from August 2010 to May 2011. The samples ranged from 83 to 256 mm with fork length (FL). By biological measurement and age identification of 292 (female: 148, male: 144) pieces of vertebrae section, the age and growth of M. maculata were studied. Results showed that the annuli was composited of opaque wide band and transparent narrow band which indicated they were formed once a year, from August to October by monthly changes in the Marginal Growth Increment (MGI). Moreover, the Gonadosomatic index (GSI) designated that the time of reproduction period and formed annuli were similar. Both the GSI and the pelagic water temperature peaked from August to October, which indicated the close relationship of M. maculata spawned periods and pelagic water temperature. Age was determined by reading annuli on vertebrae, and the estimated age ranges from 0+ to 5+ years for female and from 0+ to 4+ years for male. The females and males moonfish showed similar ages structure and growth patterns, and the body weight and fork length data fitted the function W=6×l0-5L2.8415(n=1025, r2=0.94, P>0.05). The fork length and age data fitted the von Bertalanffy growth function Lt=334.85[l-e-0.17(t+0.92)]. It can be safely concluded that moonfish grows faster before age three, and then slows down.%2010年5月至2011年4月,对北部湾口海域作业的灯光围网和拖网渔船渔获物中的眼镜鱼进行逐月(除6、7月)采样,通过生物学测定(1 025尾)及292枚(雌性:148枚,雄性:144枚)脊椎骨的年龄鉴定,对眼镜鱼年龄和生长进行研究.结果表明,眼镜鱼脊椎骨上的年轮由宽窄相间的明带和暗带组成,边缘增长率(marginal growth increment,MGI)计算结果显

  1. Coleoptera associated with macrophytes of the genus Salvinia in four oxbow lakes in two river basins in southeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula-Bueno, M C; Fonseca-Gessner, A A

    2015-11-01

    Macrophytes in oxbow lakes represent an important substrate for the Coleoptera. Two oxbow lakes the Rio Paranapanema were studied and the other two Rio Mogi-Guaçu, in the State de São Paulo, Brasil. In this study, there is greater similarity between the communities of Coleoptera of lakes greater connectivity with the main river channel or the difference in the species of Salvinia collected in the lakes studied interferes Coleoptera fauna that uses as substrate. A total of 9,222 specimens of Coleoptera were collected and identified in 10 families and 40 genera. The analysis MDS for abundance of Coleoptera showed the grouping of the oxbow lakes the Paranapanema River and a distancing the oxbow lakes the Mogi-Guaçu. The PERMANOVA test did not reveal any difference in the fauna between the wet and dry periods. It was concluded that the connectivity between river and lake is not decisive for the richness and abundance of aquatic fauna of Coleoptera. Therefore, the richness and abundance of aquatic Coleoptera associated vary with the species of Salvinia used as substrate.

  2. Tolerance of wheat (Poales: Poaceae) seedlings to wireworm (Coleoptera: Elateridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbotham, Ryan W; Froese, Paul S; Carter, Arron H

    2014-04-01

    Wireworms (Coleoptera: Elateridae), the subterranean larval stage of the click beetle, are becoming more prevalent in many cropping systems and posing an increasing economic threat to wheat growers in the Pacific Northwest following the cancellation of the insecticide lindane in 2006. Current insecticide seed treatments alone are not adequate for wireworm control. The objective of this study was to evaluate a diverse set of 163 wheat genotypes for tolerance to wireworm feeding. Entries were planted in replicated field trials over 3 yr and evaluated for their performance when grown in the presence of wireworms. Entries were rated based on survival and given a tolerance score. Results indicated that differences exist among wheat genotypes in their level of tolerance to wireworm feeding. In particular, consistently high-ranking genotypes of interest may be 'BR 18', 'Sonalika', 'Safed Lerma', and 'Hollis'. These genotypes, used in conjunction with other cultural or chemical control methods, may help provide an economic means of controlling wireworms.

  3. On the mysterious Hylobius huguenini Reitter, 1891 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Molytinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Germann

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available During verifications of museum material for the Catalogue of the Palaearctic Coleoptera, the type specimen of Hylobius huguenini Reitter, 1891 conserved in the Hungarian National Museum was examined. The type specimen had been found by Gustav Huguenin in the Emmental region in Switzerland. The species was never found again and remained therefore mysterious. After the examination of the type specimen, it became clear that Hylobius huguenini belongs to the American genus Heilipodus Kuschel, 1955 (comb. nov., and there it ranks as a good species next to Heilipodus goeldii sp. nov., described here, and H. polyspilus (Pascoe, 1889, both from Brazil. The type specimens of Heilipodus goeldii sp. nov. were found in the Emil August Göldi-collection in the Natural History Museum of the Burgergemeinde Bern. 

  4. The genus Leptostylopsis of Hispaniola (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Acanthocinini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Lingafelter

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The generic differences and similarities between Leptostylus LeConte and Leptostylopsis Dillon (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Acanthocinini are discussed. Leptostylopsis is redescribed and the following species are transferred from Leptostylus to Leptostylopsis: Leptostylopsis annulipes (Fisher 1942, comb. n.; Leptostylopsis poeyi (Fisher 1925, comb. n.; and Leptostylopsis viridicomus (Fisher 1942, comb. n. Leptostylopsis hispaniolae (Fisher 1942 is a syn. n. of Leptostylopsis annulipes (Fisher 1942. Seven new species of Leptostylopsis from Hispaniola are diagnosed, described, and illustrated: L. basifulvus Lingafelter and Micheli, sp. n.; L. caliginosus Lingafelter and Micheli, sp. n.; L. chlorescens Lingafelter and Micheli, sp. n.; L. humerofulvus Lingafelter and Micheli, sp. n.; L. perfasciatus Lingafelter and Micheli, sp. n.; L. puntacanaensis Lingafelter and Micheli, sp. n.; and L. thomasi Lingafelter and Micheli, sp. n. Redescriptions and distributional data are provided for the six previously described species known from Hispaniola, and a dichotomous key to all thirteen species of Leptostylopsis from Hispaniola is provided.

  5. Brachylophora, a new brachypterous genus of Rhopalophorini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin O. S. Clarke

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Brachylophora, a new brachypterous genus of Rhopalophorini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae. Brachylophora auricollis (Bruch, 1918 comb. nov. = Pasiphyle auricollis Bruch, 1918, originally described from Argentina (Salta, is redescribed and illustrated. Although with reduced elytra, the genus is transferred from Rhinotragini to Rhopalophorini based on the following characters: eyes well separated in both sexes, frons between eyes depressed and lacking frontal suture; pro-, meso-, and metasternum planar; mesothorax parallel-sided, not at all declivous before mesosternal process; metasternum large, together with mesosternum twice length of prosternum, metepisternum very wide, entire suture separating it from metasternum clearly visible when viewed from below; female ovipositor shortened with short cylindrical styles; and, more generally, structural features of hind legs, and surface ornamentation. Habitus similar to Coremia group. Bolivian specimens were netted as they visited flowers of Croton sp. (Euphorbiaceae.

  6. Fitossociologia do estrato arbóreo e arbustivo em sub-bosque de talhões de Pinus elliottii e Eucalyptus maculata/citriodora na Estação Experimental de Tupi, Piracicaba – SP. Phytosociology of the arboreal and arbustive stratum in understory of Pinus elliottii and Eucalyptus maculata/citriodora at Estação Experimental de Tupi, Piracicaba – SP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Maria Galera GONÇALVES

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A Estação Experimental de Tupi – EET, Piracicaba–SP, é uma unidade do Instituto Florestal com 198 ha, onde a maior parte foi reflorestada com espécies dos gêneros Pinus e Eucalyptus entre as décadas de 1950 e 1980. Neste estudo se fez o levantamento fitossociológico do sub-bosque em talhão de Pinus elliottii – TP e de Eucalyptus maculata/citriodora – TE. Foram instaladas 30 parcelas com 100 m2 (10 m x 10 m em cada ambiente, de onde foram amostrados todos os indivíduos arbustivos e arbóreos com diâmetro 3,0 cm, e altura 1,0 m. No talhão de Pinus foram identificadas 26 famílias e 63 espécies e no talhão de Eucalyptus foram 20 famílias e 57 espécies. A família Fabaceae ocorreu com a maior riqueza, com 25 espécies quando somados os dois ambientes. As espécies com maior densidade em cada ambiente foram: Piper arboreum com 115 ind. ha-1 (TP e Melia azedarach com 173,3 ind. ha-1 (TE. Essas apresentaram comportamento de invasoras. A espécie M. azedarach teve também o maior Índice de Valor de Importância nos dois ambientes (IVI = 34,4 em TP e 47,8 em TE, devido à sua elevada densidade. Por outro lado, as espécies raras somaram 45,5 e 27,5% do IVI total em TP e em TE, respectivamente. As comunidades vegetais estudadas mostraram alta riqueza de espécies, porém ocorreram muitas espécies raras. Os resultados obtidos demonstraram que as espécies exóticas estudadas (Pinus e Eucalyptus podem ser utilizadas como pioneiras no processo de recuperação de áreas degradadas. No entanto, para se obter comunidades vegetais com alta diversidade são necessárias intervenções de manejo visando controlar a densidade das espécies dominantes. Palavras-chave: reflorestamento; restabelecimento; floresta estacional semidecidual; manejo florestal.The Estação Experimental de Tupi in Piracicaba, SP, is one of the Forest Institute units mostly of its 198 ha was recovered with the genera Pinus and Eucalyptus species between the decades

  7. Diversity of forensic rove beetles (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae) associated with decaying pig carcass in a forest biotope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekeirsschieter, Jessica; Frederick, Christine; Verheggen, Francois J; Drugmand, Didier; Haubruge, Eric

    2013-07-01

    Most forensic studies are focused on Diptera pattern colonization while neglecting Coleoptera succession. So far, little information is available on the postmortem colonization by beetles and the decomposition process they initiate under temperate biogeoclimatic countries. These beetles have, however, been referred to as being part of the entomofaunal colonization of a dead body. Forensic entomologists need increased databases detailing the distribution, ecology, and phenology of necrophagous insects, including staphylinids (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae). While pig carcasses are commonly used in forensic entomology studies to surrogate human decomposition and to investigate the entomofaunal succession, very few works have been conducted in Europe on large carcasses. Our work reports the monitoring of the presence of adult rove beetles (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae) on decaying pig carcasses in a forest biotope during four seasons (spring, summer, fall, and winter). A total of 23 genera comprising 60 species of rove beetles were collected from pig carcasses.

  8. Track analysis of the Neotropical Entimini (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Entiminae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Romo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Track analysis of the Neotropical Entimini (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Entiminae. Distributional patterns of the species belonging to the tribe Entimini from the Neotropical region were analyzed. Based on a track analysis of 22 species of Entimus, Rhigus, and Phaedropus, for which distributional data were available, two generalized tracks were found. One is located in northern Brazil, corresponding to the Amazonian subregion, and is determined by Phaedropus candidus and Rhigus speciosus. The other is located in southern Brazil, corresponding to the Parana subregion, and is determined by Entimus imperialis, E. excelsus, Phaedropus togatus, Rhigus dejeanii, R. faldermanni, R. horridus, R. lateritus, R. nigrosparsus, and R. tribuloides. The development of the Chacoan subregion is hypothesized to have been the dynamic vicariant event that fragmented the former Amazonian-Parana forest.Análisis de trazos de Entimini Neotropical (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Entiminae. Se analizaron los patrones de distribución de la tribu Entimini en la región Neotropical. Con base en un análisis de los trazos de 22 especies de Entimus, Rhigus y Phaedropus, para los cuales se contaba con datos de distribución, se hallaron dos trazos generalizados. Uno se localiza en el norte de Brasil, en la subregión Amazónica, y está sustentado por Phaedropus candidus y Rhigus speciosus. El otro se localiza en el sur de Brasil, en la subregión Paranaense, y está sustentado por Entimus imperialis, E. excelsus, Phaedropus togatus, Rhigus dejeanii, R. faldermanni, R. horridus, R. lateritus, R. nigrosparsus y R. tribuloides. Se hipotetiza que el desarrollo de la subregión Chaqueña constituyó el evento de vicarianza dinámica que fragmentó el antiguo bosque Amazónico-Paranaense.

  9. Walking stability of Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabricius, 1792 (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Pires

    Full Text Available Abstract Results obtained in studies can contribute to the advancement of science and innovative methods and techniques for developing practical activities. Reporting conditions that may restrict the implementation of research is critical to ensure the optimal development of further technical studies. The objective of this study was to assess the walking stability of R. dominica on a flat and smooth surface. The study was based on the determination of mortality, morphology and walking stability of the insect outside the grain mass, on a flat and smooth surface. Mortality of adults of this Coleoptera in conditions with and without food was similar, which explains the difficulty that this insect had for accessing the food source on the flat and smooth surface. The measurements of body length (BOL, width (BOW and height (BOH of R. dominica were compared with those of Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae, which showed good ability to walk in these conditions. This study indicated that the former presents lower BOL and BOW, and greater BOH than the second, and all these variables showed differences when analyzed simultaneously by means of the construction of multivariate morphometric indices (Width × Height, Length × Height and Height × Length × Width. These morphometric variables, together with the definition of the geometry most similar to the body shape, resulted in determination of the center of gravity (CG and static rollover threshold (SRTgeom for both species. Rhyzopertha dominica and T. castaneum presented CGs considered high and low, respectively, and together with the values obtained for SRTgeom, may justify that R. dominica can be considered a less stable species during movement, and presents greater risk of rollover on flat and smooth surfaces.

  10. Diversidad de la familia Carabidae (Coleoptera en Chile Diversity of the family Carabidae (Coleoptera in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SERGIO ROIG-JUÑENT

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Carabidae constituye dentro de los coléopteros chilenos, la cuarta familia en importancia por su cantidad de especies. El presente trabajo incluye una breve compilación acerca de la historia de la familia y de las primeras expediciones realizadas en Chile. También se realizan comparaciones de la diversidad de carábidos chilenos con respecto a otros países y el Neotrópico. Para Chile, se conocen 21 tribus, con 95 géneros y 365 especies, que representan el 38,8, 28,8 y 7,9 % de la fauna del Neotrópico, respectivamente. Chile posee un bajo número de tribus comparado con otros países, sin embargo, constituye un área importante por la presencia de seis tribus relictuales, principalmente pangeicas o gondwánicas. Chile posee 18 géneros endémicos (18,5 % de su fauna de Carabidae, 28 cuya distribución está restringida a Chile y Argentina y seis restringidos a Chile, Argentina y Uruguay. La cantidad de especies presentes en Chile es inferior a la que poseen otros países de América del Sur, pero la cantidad de especies endémicas es muy alta (204 y representa el 55,8 % de su fauna de carábidos. El alto grado de endemismo que posee Chile con respecto a otros países de América del Sur puede deberse a su condición de aislamiento, siendo las barreras más importantes la región desértica del norte y la cordillera de Los Andes. Este hecho también se vislumbra por la ausencia de importantes tribus neotropicales como Galeritini, Scaritini y Brachinini. También se incluyen en este trabajo claves para la identificación de todas las tribus y géneros presentes en Chile, como así también una breve descripción acerca de la diversidad y ambientes en los que se encuentra cada géneroThe family Carabidae is the fourth largest Coleoptera family in Chile. The present work includes a brief compilation on the taxonomic history of the family and the first expeditions to Chile. In addition, knowledge of carabid diversity in Chile is compared with

  11. Coleoptera species inhabiting prairie wetlands of the Cottonwood Lake Area, Stutsman County, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, B.A.; Swanson, G.A.

    1989-01-01

    The aquatic Coleoptera of a prairie wetland complex in Stutsman County, North Dakota, were collected from April 1979 to November 1980. Identification of 2594 individuals confirmed 57 species, including seven new records for North Dakota. Two seasonally flooded and two semipermanent wetlands, totaling 7.43 ha, contained 53% of the Dytiscidae, 43% of the Haliplidae, 38% of the Hydrophilidae, and 22% of the Gyrinidae species previously identified from North Dakota. Although 49.1% of the Coleoptera species occurred in both types of wetlands, the occurrence of 29 species varied by wetland class.

  12. Novas espécies de Esthlogena s. str. Thomson (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena M. Galileo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Novas espécies de Esthlogena s. str. Thomson (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae. Novas espécies de Pteropliini descritas: Esthlogena (E. nigrosuturalis do México e Panamá; E. (E. chicacaoensis e E. (E. amaliae da Guatemala; E. (E. dissimilis do Peru. Todas as espécies são ilustradas.New species of Esthlogena s. str. Thomson (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae. New species described of Pteropliini: Esthlogena (E. nigrosuturalis from Mexico and Panama; E. (E. chicacaoensis and E. (E. amaliae from Guatemala; E. (E. dissimilis from Peru. All species are illustrated.

  13. Influence of growing location and cultivar on Rhyzopertha dominica (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae) and Sitophilus oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) infestation of rough rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FRANK H. ARTHUR; RUSTY C. BAUTISTA; TERRENCE J. SIEBENMORGEN

    2007-01-01

    Long-grain rice cultivars Cocodrie, Wells, and XP 723 grown in three locations (Hazen, MO; Essex and Newport, AR, USA), and medium-grain rice cultivars Bengal and XP 713 grown in two locations (Jonesboro and Lodge Corner, AR, USA), were harvested and assayed for susceptibility to Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae), the lesser grain borer, and Sitophilus oryzae (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), the rice weevil, on rice held at 27℃ 57% and 75% relative humidity (RH).Separate samples from the same harvest lots were also analyzed for the physical characteristics of brown rice yield, percentage whole kernels and kernel thickness. Progeny production and feeding damage of R. dominica were significantly different among long-grain cultivars within two of the three locations (P < 0.05), but not for location or RH (P ≥ 0.05), while progeny production of S. oryzae was different among cultivars, location, and RH (P < 0.05). On medium-grain rice, both cultivar and location were significant for progeny production of R. dominica, but not RH, while cultivar and RH were significant for progeny production of S. oryzae, but not location. On both rice types, feeding damage of R. dominica followed the same trends and was always strongly positively correlated with progeny production (P < 0.05), but for S. oryzae there were several instances in which progeny production was not correlated with feeding damage (P ≥ 0.05). Physical characteristics of both rice types were statistically significant (P < 0.01) but actual numerical differences were extremely small, and were generally not correlated with progeny production of either species. Results indicate that the location in which a particular rice cultivar is grown, along with its characteristics, could affect susceptibility of the rice to R. dominica and S. oryzae.

  14. Host plant oviposition preference of Ceratapion basicorne (Coleoptera:Apionidae), a potential biological control agent of yellow starthistle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceratapion basicorne (Coleoptera: Apionidae) is a weevil native to Europe and western Asia that is being evaluated as a prospective classical biological control agent of Centaurea solstitialis (yellow starthistle) in the United States. Choice oviposition experiments were conducted under laboratory ...

  15. Un nouveau genre, une nouvelle espèce de Torneutini : Gnathopraxithea sarryi nov. sp. (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae)

    OpenAIRE

    C. A. C. Seabra; Tavakilian, Gérard

    1986-01-01

    Description de #Gnathopraxithea sarryi$, nouveau genre, nouvelle espèce, illustrée par deux photographies, avec son insertion dans la clef des genres de #Torneutini$ (#Coleoptera$, #Cerambycidae$). (Résumé d'auteur)

  16. Histopathology and identification of pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila in diseased snakehead Channa maculata%斑鳢嗜水气单胞茵病病原的鉴定及其病理组织学的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈言峰; 马文山; 陈文慧; 梁日深; 廖富蘋; 邹记兴

    2011-01-01

    从患病斑鳢Channa maculata体内分离到一株细菌(FS20100810),经人工感染试验证实为该病的病原菌.该菌株兼性厌氧,为革兰氏阴性杆菌,能运动,无芽孢,无荚膜,能发酵葡萄糖、蔗糖、麦芽糖、甘露醇、七叶苷,氧化酶反应、接触酶反应、吲哚试验和M.R.试验均为阳性.该菌株对斑鳢的半致死浓度为6.83x105 cfu/mL.16S rRNA基因序列与嗜水气单胞菌Aeromonas hydrophila的同源性为99.6%.药敏试验结果显示,该菌株对氧氟沙星、菌必治、先锋噻肟等抗生素敏感,对复方新诺明等中度敏感,对苯唑青霉素、青霉素G、氨苄青霉素耐药.通过对人工感染的斑鳢进行组织切片观察,发现病鱼的鳃、心肌、肝脏、肾脏、脾脏、肠道等器官组织均有明显的病理变化.%A pathogen(FS20100810) was isolated from ulcered snakehead, Channa maculata, which was proved to be the pathogenic bacterium of the disease by re-infection experiments. The strain was found to be gram negative, anaerobic, bacilliform in shape and motile. It had no capsule and gemma,and utilized glucoses, sucrose, maltose, mannitol, esculin as energy and its oxidase reaction, catalase reaction, indole and M. R. Test were positive. The half lethal concentration value for the strain to the snakehead was 6. 83xl05 cfu/mL. Homology analysis showed that it had the high similarity to Aeromonas hydrophila with 99. 6% similarity. The drug sensitivity showed the strain was sensitive to ofloxacin, ceftriaxone, and Cefotamine was intermediately sensitive to complex sinomin and was resistant to oxazocilline, penicillin G and ampicillin. There were obvious pathological changes in the tissues of the gills, cardiac muscles, livers, kidneys, spleens and intestines in the snakeheads challenged by strain FS20100810 by pathohistological observation.

  17. Soil-Applied Imidacloprid Translocates to Ornamental Flowers and Reduces Survival of Adult Coleomegilla maculata, Harmonia axyridis, and Hippodamia convergens Lady Beetles, and Larval Danaus plexippus and Vanessa cardui Butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krischik, Vera; Rogers, Mary; Gupta, Garima; Varshney, Aruna

    2015-01-01

    Integrated Pest Management (IPM) is a decision making process used to manage pests that relies on many tactics, including cultural and biological control, which are practices that conserve beneficial insects and mites, and when needed, the use of conventional insecticides. However, systemic, soil-applied neonicotinoid insecticides are translocated to pollen and nectar of flowers, often for months, and may reduce survival of flower-feeding beneficial insects. Imidacloprid seed-treated crops (0.05 mg AI (active ingredient) /canola seed and 1.2 mg AI/corn seed) translocate less than 10 ppb to pollen and nectar. However, higher rates of soil-applied imidacloprid are used in nurseries and urban landscapes, such as 300 mg AI/10 L (3 gallon) pot and 69 g AI applied to the soil under a 61 (24 in) cm diam. tree. Translocation of imidacloprid from soil (300 mg AI) to flowers of Asclepias curassavica resulted in 6,030 ppb in 1X and 10,400 ppb in 2X treatments, which are similar to imidacloprid residues found in another plant species we studied. A second imidacloprid soil application 7 months later resulted in 21,000 ppb in 1X and 45,000 ppb in 2X treatments. Consequently, greenhouse/nursery use of imidacloprid applied to flowering plants can result in 793 to 1,368 times higher concentration compared to an imidacloprid seed treatment (7.6 ppb pollen in seed- treated canola), where most research has focused. These higher imidacloprid levels caused significant mortality in both 1X and 2X treatments in 3 lady beetle species, Coleomegilla maculata, Harmonia axyridis, and Hippodamia convergens, but not a fourth species, Coccinella septempunctata. Adult survival were not reduced for monarch, Danaus plexippus and painted lady, Vanessa cardui, butterflies, but larval survival was significantly reduced. The use of the neonicotinoid imidacloprid at greenhouse/nursery rates reduced survival of beneficial insects feeding on pollen and nectar and is incompatible with the principles of IPM

  18. Soil-applied imidacloprid translocates to ornamental flowers and reduces survival of adult Coleomegilla maculata, Harmonia axyridis, and Hippodamia convergens lady beetles, and larval Danaus plexippus and Vanessa cardui butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krischik, Vera; Rogers, Mary; Gupta, Garima; Varshney, Aruna

    2015-01-01

    Integrated Pest Management (IPM) is a decision making process used to manage pests that relies on many tactics, including cultural and biological control, which are practices that conserve beneficial insects and mites, and when needed, the use of conventional insecticides. However, systemic, soil-applied neonicotinoid insecticides are translocated to pollen and nectar of flowers, often for months, and may reduce survival of flower-feeding beneficial insects. Imidacloprid seed-treated crops (0.05 mg AI (active ingredient) /canola seed and 1.2 mg AI/corn seed) translocate less than 10 ppb to pollen and nectar. However, higher rates of soil-applied imidacloprid are used in nurseries and urban landscapes, such as 300 mg AI/10 L (3 gallon) pot and 69 g AI applied to the soil under a 61 (24 in) cm diam. tree. Translocation of imidacloprid from soil (300 mg AI) to flowers of Asclepias curassavica resulted in 6,030 ppb in 1X and 10,400 ppb in 2X treatments, which are similar to imidacloprid residues found in another plant species we studied. A second imidacloprid soil application 7 months later resulted in 21,000 ppb in 1X and 45,000 ppb in 2X treatments. Consequently, greenhouse/nursery use of imidacloprid applied to flowering plants can result in 793 to 1,368 times higher concentration compared to an imidacloprid seed treatment (7.6 ppb pollen in seed- treated canola), where most research has focused. These higher imidacloprid levels caused significant mortality in both 1X and 2X treatments in 3 lady beetle species, Coleomegilla maculata, Harmonia axyridis, and Hippodamia convergens, but not a fourth species, Coccinella septempunctata. Adult survival were not reduced for monarch, Danaus plexippus and painted lady, Vanessa cardui, butterflies, but larval survival was significantly reduced. The use of the neonicotinoid imidacloprid at greenhouse/nursery rates reduced survival of beneficial insects feeding on pollen and nectar and is incompatible with the principles of IPM.

  19. Soil-applied imidacloprid translocates to ornamental flowers and reduces survival of adult Coleomegilla maculata, Harmonia axyridis, and Hippodamia convergens lady beetles, and larval Danaus plexippus and Vanessa cardui butterflies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Krischik

    Full Text Available Integrated Pest Management (IPM is a decision making process used to manage pests that relies on many tactics, including cultural and biological control, which are practices that conserve beneficial insects and mites, and when needed, the use of conventional insecticides. However, systemic, soil-applied neonicotinoid insecticides are translocated to pollen and nectar of flowers, often for months, and may reduce survival of flower-feeding beneficial insects. Imidacloprid seed-treated crops (0.05 mg AI (active ingredient /canola seed and 1.2 mg AI/corn seed translocate less than 10 ppb to pollen and nectar. However, higher rates of soil-applied imidacloprid are used in nurseries and urban landscapes, such as 300 mg AI/10 L (3 gallon pot and 69 g AI applied to the soil under a 61 (24 in cm diam. tree. Translocation of imidacloprid from soil (300 mg AI to flowers of Asclepias curassavica resulted in 6,030 ppb in 1X and 10,400 ppb in 2X treatments, which are similar to imidacloprid residues found in another plant species we studied. A second imidacloprid soil application 7 months later resulted in 21,000 ppb in 1X and 45,000 ppb in 2X treatments. Consequently, greenhouse/nursery use of imidacloprid applied to flowering plants can result in 793 to 1,368 times higher concentration compared to an imidacloprid seed treatment (7.6 ppb pollen in seed- treated canola, where most research has focused. These higher imidacloprid levels caused significant mortality in both 1X and 2X treatments in 3 lady beetle species, Coleomegilla maculata, Harmonia axyridis, and Hippodamia convergens, but not a fourth species, Coccinella septempunctata. Adult survival were not reduced for monarch, Danaus plexippus and painted lady, Vanessa cardui, butterflies, but larval survival was significantly reduced. The use of the neonicotinoid imidacloprid at greenhouse/nursery rates reduced survival of beneficial insects feeding on pollen and nectar and is incompatible with the

  20. Upper lethal temperature limits of the common furniture beetle Anobium punctatum (Coleoptera: Anobiidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lise Stengård; Jensen, Karl-Martin Vagn

    1996-01-01

    The susceptibility of the egg, larval and adult stages of Anobium punctatum De Geer (Coleoptera: Anobiidae) to heat (46-54°C, 25-30% RH) was investigated. The larval stage was found to be most tolerant to heat. Very short exposure (5 min) of the larvae to temperatures of 52°C and above led to 100...

  1. Contribution to the knowledge of seed-beetles (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Bruchinae) in Xinjiang, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, You; Wang, Zhiliang; Guo, Jianjun; Nápoles, Jesús Romero; Ji, Yingchao; Jiang, Chunyan; Zhang, Runzhi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Nineteen species of seed-beetles belonging to the subfamily Bruchinae (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) were collected in Xinjiang, China. Of these, the following four were new records for China: Bruchus affinis Frolich, 1799, Bruchus atomarius L., 1761, Bruchus loti Paykull, 1800 and Kytorhinus kergoati Delobel & Legalov, 2009. We provide an annotated checklist, illustrations and a key to the 19 species. PMID:25610333

  2. Diversity of Scolytinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) attracted to avocado, lychee, and essential oil lures

    Science.gov (United States)

    The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is an exotic wood-boring insect that vectors laurel wilt, a lethal vascular disease of trees in the Lauraceae, including avocado (Persea americana) and native Persea species (redbay, swampbay). As part...

  3. Chemical Control of the Redbay Ambrosia Beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Scolytinae) in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is an exotic pest of U.S. trees in the family Lauraceae, including avocado (Persea americana) and redbay (P. borbonia). It threatens avocado production in Florida by transmitting Raffaelea lauricola, the fungal...

  4. EPURAEA DEUBELI REITTER, 1898, A CONFIRMED SAPROXYLIC SAP BEETLE FOR THE ITALIAN FAUNA (Coleoptera, Nitidulidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Audisio

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available During ecological investigations on saproxylic beetle communities at Monte Baldo (Veneto, Verona province, two specimens of Epuraea deubeli Reitter, 1898 (Coleoptera, Nitidulidae were recently collected. It is the first known sure record of this species in Italy (previously known from Northern, Eastern, and Central Europe, southwards to Austria, and from Western Siberia.

  5. Integrating kaolin clay for ambrosia beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) management in ornamental tree nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Invasive ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) are an important pest problem at ornamental tree nurseries. Available chemical measures are not completely effective, and due to the length of the beetle dispersal period and product breakdown, repeated treatments can become costly in ...

  6. Ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) assemblages in narrow hedgerows in a Danish agricultural landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lövei, G. L.; Magura, T.

    2015-01-01

    The role of hedgerows in supporting ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) in a Danish agricultural landscape was examined. Nine old, well established single-row hedges were selected for the study, three each of a native species (hawthorn, Crataegus monogyna), a non-native deciduous one (rowan...

  7. Biology, ecology, and management of Xylosandrus spp. ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in ornamental tree nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xylosandrus germanus (Blandford) and Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) are two of the most damaging non-native ambrosia beetle pests in ornamental tree nurseries. Adult females tunnel into the stems and branches of host trees to create galleries with bro...

  8. Effect of light quality on movement of Pterostichus melanarius (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allema, A.B.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this project was to study the effect of red light on night time behaviour of Pterostichus melanarius (Coleoptera: Carabidae). An experiment was conducted in experimental arenas in the autumn of 2008. Beetles were recorded 20 min per hour during a period of 8 hours under red light, near in

  9. Host boring preferences of the tea shot-hole borer Euwallacea fornicatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The non-native shot-hole borer, Euwallacea nr. fornicatus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), was discovered in Florida’s avocado production area in Homestead in 2010. It is a highly polyphagous ambrosia beetle that carries Fusarium fungal symbionts. In susceptible host trees, the fung...

  10. A new species and first record of Cotinis Burmeister (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae) for Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasca-Álvarez, Héctor Jaime; Deloya, Cuauhtémoc

    2015-04-20

    A new Cotinis Burmeister (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae: Gymnetini) species from Venezuela is described and illustrated. The new species is compared with Cotinis barthelemyi (Gory & Percheron) from Colombia. The Neotropical distribution of Cotinis is expanded to Venezuela. A revised key to the species of Cotinis is provided in both English and Spanish.

  11. Study on the genus Daptus ground-beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae from Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ik Je Choi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A genus Daptus Fischer von Waldheim, 1823 of the tribe Harpalini Bonelli, 1810 (Coleoptera: Carabidae is reported for the first time from Korea, based on the Daptus vittatus Fischer von Waldheim from Incheon, Korea. Redescription of the species and illustrations of diagnostic characteristics, including genitalia characteristics of both sexes, are provided.

  12. Contribution to the knowledge of seed-beetles (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Bruchinae in Xinjiang, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nineteen species of seed-beetles belonging to the subfamily Bruchinae (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae were collected in Xinjiang, China. Of these, the following four were new records for China: Bruchus affinis Frolich, 1799, B. atomarius L., 1761, B. loti Paykull, 1800 and Kytorhinus kergoati Delobel & Legalov, 2009. We provide an annotated checklist, illustrations and a key to the 19 species.

  13. Trapping Phyllophaga spp. (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae) in the United States and Canada using sex attractants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul S. Robbins; Steven R. Alm; Charles D. Armstrong; Anne L. Averill; Thomas C. Baker; Robert J. Bauernfiend; Frederick P. Baxendale; S. Kris Braman; Rick L. Brandenburg; Daniel B. Cash; Gary J. Couch; Richard S. Cowles; Robert L. Crocker; Zandra D. DeLamar; Timothy G. Dittl; Sheila M. Fitzpatrick; Kathy L. Flanders; Tom Forgatsch; Timothy J. Gibb; Bruce D. Gill; Daniel O. Gilrein; Clyde S. Gorsuch; Abner M. Hammond; Patricia D. Hastings; David W. Held; Paul R. Heller; Rose T. Hiskes; James L. Holliman; William G. Hudson; Michael G. Klein; Vera L. Krischik; David J. Lee; Charles E. Linn; Nancy J. Luce; Kenna E. MacKenzie; Catherine M. Mannion; Sridhar Polavarapu; Daniel A. Potter; Wendell L. Roelofs; Brian M. Rovals; Glenn A. Salsbury; Nathan M. Schiff; David J. Shetlar; Margaret Skinner; Beverly L. Sparks; Jessica A. Sutschek; Timothy P. Sutschek; Stanley R. Swier; Martha M. Sylvia; Niel J. Vickers; Patricia J. Vittum; Richard Weidman; Donald C. Weber; R. Chris Williamson; Michael G. Villani

    2006-01-01

    The sex pheromone of the scarab beetle, Phyllophaga anxia, is a blend of the methyl esters of two amino acids, L-valine and L-isoleucine. A field trapping study was conducted, deploying different blends of the two compounds at 59 locations in the United States and Canada. More than 57,000 males of 61 Phyllophaga species (Coleoptera...

  14. A redescription of Trichillum hirsutum Boucomont with notes on other interesting brazilian Scarabaeinae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae).

    OpenAIRE

    Ratcliffe,Brett C.

    1981-01-01

    Abstract Trichillum hirsutum Boucomont (Coleoptera: Scarabeidae: Scarabaeinae) is redescribed because of errors in the original description. New distribution records are presented for Trichillum hirsutum Boucomont, Ipselissus alvarengai Pereira and Martinez (new state records); and Trichillum boucomonti Saylor and Cryptccanthon peckorum Howden (new country records for Brazil).

  15. Het voorkomen van de snuitkevers Ceratapion gibbirostre en C. carduorum in Nederland (Coleoptera: Apionidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijerman, T.; Alders, K.

    2001-01-01

    The occurrence of Ceratapion gibbirostre and C. carduorum in the Netherlands (Coleoptera: Apionidae) We re-examined the Dutch material of Ceratapion carduorum, present in the main Dutch museum collections and some private collections. It was found that in the past C. carduorum was confused with C.

  16. A contribution to the rove beetles (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae, Paederinae in north of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Mohammadi Dehcheshmeh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, 19 species of rove beetles (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae, belonging to the subfamily Paederinae Fleming 1821, were collected from Mazandaran province, north of Iran, during 2015-2016. Two species, Rugilus angustatus Geoffroy 1758 and Astenus lyonessius (joy 1908 are reported for the first time from Iran.

  17. Faunistic study of the aquatic beetles (Coleoptera: Polyphaga of Markazi Province (Central Iran with new records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vafaei R.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we establish the presence of 24 aquatic beetle (Coleoptera: Polyphaga species belonging to 13 genera and five families in Markazi Province of Central Iran. Specimens were collected between 2001 and 2005. Eleven species and four genera are recorded from Iran for the first time. The ecological significance of the new records is briefly discussed. .

  18. High-level phylogeny of the Coleoptera inferred with mitochondrial genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ming-Long; Zhang, Qi-Lin; Zhang, Li; Guo, Zhong-Long; Liu, Yong-Jian; Shen, Yu-Ying; Shao, Renfu

    2016-11-01

    The Coleoptera (beetles) exhibits tremendous morphological, ecological, and behavioral diversity. To better understand the phylogenetics and evolution of beetles, we sequenced three complete mitogenomes from two families (Cleridae and Meloidae), which share conserved mitogenomic features with other completely sequenced beetles. We assessed the influence of six datasets and three inference methods on topology and nodal support within the Coleoptera. We found that both Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood with homogeneous-site models were greatly affected by nucleotide compositional heterogeneity, while the heterogeneous-site mixture model in PhyloBayes could provide better phylogenetic signals for the Coleoptera. The amino acid dataset generated more reliable tree topology at the higher taxonomic levels (i.e. suborders and series), where the inclusion of rRNA genes and the third positions of protein-coding genes improved phylogenetic inference at the superfamily level, especially under a heterogeneous-site model. We recovered the suborder relationships as (Archostemata+Adephaga)+(Myxophaga+Polyphaga). The series relationships within Polyphaga were recovered as (Scirtiformia+(Elateriformia+((Bostrichiformia+Scarabaeiformia+Staphyliniformia)+Cucujiformia))). All superfamilies within Cucujiformia were recovered as monophyletic. We obtained a cucujiform phylogeny of (Cleroidea+(Coccinelloidea+((Lymexyloidea+Tenebrionoidea)+(Cucujoidea+(Chrysomeloidea+Curculionoidea))))). This study showed that although tree topologies were sensitive to data types and inference methods, mitogenomic data could provide useful information for resolving the Coleoptera phylogeny at various taxonomic levels by using suitable datasets and heterogeneous-site models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The genus Platytenerus Miyatake, 1985 (Coleoptera: Cleridae: Neorthopleurinae), with description of a new species from Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-23

    The genus Platytenerus Miyatake, 1985 (Coleoptera: Cleridae) is redescribed and classified into the subfamily Neorthopleurinae Opitz, 2009. A phylogenetic tree is supplementally provided for Platytenerus based on twenty morphological and two geographical characters. A new species of the genus, Platytenerus iriomotensis sp. n. is described from Iriomote Island, Okinawa, Japan.

  20. Review of the genus Ceresium Newman, 1842 (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in Fiji

    Science.gov (United States)

    A taxonomic review of the genus Ceresium (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) found within the Fiji Islands is presented. A total of 17 species is treated. Full morphological descriptions and comparative images of each species are included, along with a dichotomous key for their identification....

  1. Novel method for determining sex of live adult Laricobius nigrinus (Coleoptera: Derodontidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    William Shepherd; Michael Montgomery; Brian Sullivan; Albert (Bud) Mayfield

    2014-01-01

    A method for determining the sex of live adult Laricobius nigrinus Fender (Coleoptera:Derodontidae) is described. Beetles were briefly chilled and positioned ventral-side-up under a dissecting microscope. Two forceps with blunted ends were used to gently brace the beetle and press on the centre of the abdomen to extrude its terminal segments. Male beetles were...

  2. Het voorkomen van Carabus auronitens in Oost-Nederland (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, E.; Haken, ten B.

    2005-01-01

    The distribution of Carabus auronitens in the eastern part of the Netherlands (Coleoptera: Carabidae) Carabus auronitens Fabricius, 1792 is a carabid beetle with two distinct (meta)populations in the eastern part of The Netherlands: Achterhoek en Twente. The first recording in the Achterhoek was don

  3. Rearing redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), on semi-artifical media

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Lake Maner; James Hanula; S. Kristine Braman

    2014-01-01

    Semi-artificial diets consisting of redbay (Persea borbonia (L.) Spreng,; Laurales: Lauraceae) sawdust and various nutrients were tested for rearing Xyleborus glabratus Eichoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in vitro. Comparison of 2 media, modified and standard, adapted from Biedermann et al. (2009) showed that the more...

  4. Life cycle, development, and culture of Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is a wood-boring pest that transmits the fungal pathogen Raffaelea lauricola, the causal agent of laurel wilt disease in American Lauraceae. This study documents the gallery formation patterns of X. gla...

  5. A new species of Golinca Thomson (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae): first record of the genus for Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valois, M; Silva, F

    2015-02-16

    Golinca trevisani Valois & Silva, new species (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae: Trichiini: Incina) from Ouro Preto do Oeste, Rondônia, and Amazonas, Brazil is described, representing the first record of the genus Golinca for Brazil. Diagnosis, illustrations of key morphological characters, the first male genitalia description in the genus, and a key for identification of four species of Golinca are provided.

  6. Bioacoustics of Acanthoscelides obtectus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae) on Phaseolus vulgaris (Fabaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acanthoscelides obtectus (Say) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is an economically important pest of common bean Phaseolus vulgaris L. (Fabaceae) in the tropics and subtropics. It is difficult to detect the presence of A. obtectus because the larvae are cryptic and spend most of their developmental time...

  7. Testing abundance-range size relationships in European carabid beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotze, J.; Niemelä, J.; O'Hara, R.B.; Turin, H.

    2003-01-01

    Four of the eight hypotheses proposed in the literature for explaining the relationship between abundance and range size (the sampling artifact, phylogenetic non-independence, range position and resource breadth hypotheses) were tested by using atlas data for carabid beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae)

  8. Impact of Adult Weight, Density, and Age on Reproduction of Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The impact of adult weight, age, and density on reproduction of Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) was studied. The impact of adult weight on reproduction was determined in two ways: 1) counting the daily progeny of individual adult pairs of known weight and analyzing the data with line...

  9. Use of nutrient self selection as a diet refining tool in Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new method to refine existing dietary supplements for improving production of the yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), was tested. Self selected ratios of 6 dietary ingredients by T. molitor larvae were used to produce a dietary supplement. This supplement was compared...

  10. Testing abundance-range size relationships in European carabid beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotze, J.; Niemelä, J.; O'Hara, R.B.; Turin, H.

    2003-01-01

    Four of the eight hypotheses proposed in the literature for explaining the relationship between abundance and range size (the sampling artifact, phylogenetic non-independence, range position and resource breadth hypotheses) were tested by using atlas data for carabid beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae)

  11. Chaves para a identificação dos principais Coleoptera (Insecta associados com produtos armazenados Keys for the identification of Coleoptera (Insecta associated with stored products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Valle da Silva Pereira

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available An illustrated key to identify nine families of Coleoptera commonly found in stored products is presented. Keys for the identification of Anobiidae [Lasioderma serricorne (Fabricius, 1792, Stegobium paniceum (Linnaeus, 1761], Bruchidae [Acanthoscelides obtectus (Say, 1831, Zabrotes subfasciatus (Boheman, 1833], Curculionidae [Sitophilus oryzae (Linnaeus, 1763, S. zeamais Motschulsky, 1885], Silvanidae [Ahasverus advena (Waltl, 1832, Cathartus quadricollis (Guérin, 1892, Oryzaephilus mercator (Fauvel, 1889, O. surinamensis (Linnaeus, 1758] and Tenebrionidae [Gnathocerus cornutus (Fabricius, 1798, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst, 1797, T. confusum du Val, 1868] are also provided. These keys cover the most frequent Coleoptera found in stored products, specially grains, and are to the adult stage only. Illustrations of external morphology and general characteristics are provided for each species reported.

  12. First record of necrophagy by Scybalocanthon nigriceps Harold (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Scarabaeinae Primeiro relato de necrofagia por Scybalocanthon nigriceps Harold (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Scarabaeinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri F. Messas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available First record of necrophagy by Scybalocanthon nigriceps Harold (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Scarabaeinae. The S. nigriceps specimen was observed making small cuts and removing portions of the carcass of a frog Haddadus binotatus (Spix in February 24, 2011, in Serra do Japi, São Paulo State, Brazil. This note presents another record of necrophagy for Scybalocanthon.Primeiro relato de necrofagia por Scybalocanthon nigriceps Harold (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Scarabaeinae. O espécime de S. nigriceps foi observado fazendo pequenos cortes e removendo porções da carcaça da rã Haddadus binotatus (Spix em 24 de fevereiro de 2011 na Serra do Japi, Estado de São Paulo, Brasil. Esta nota apresenta mais um registro de negrofagia para Scybalocanthon.

  13. Investigation of the current population of Dendroctonus micans (Kugelann (Coleoptera: Curculionidae and colonization rate of Rhizophagus grandis Gyllenhal (Coleoptera: Monotomidae in spruce forests of Artvin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazan Alkan Akıncı

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, current population of Dendroctonus micans (Kugelann (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, and colonization status of its specific predator Rhizophagus grandis Gyllenhal (Coleoptera: Monotomidae in spruce forests of Artvin were investigated. Field works were conducted in a total of 30 sampling plots and along 20 transects. Sampling plots were 30 × 10 m in size and transects 50 m long. Presently, D. micans has a “very low infestation” rate in Artvin spruce forests and D. micans infestation rate is 4.1 times lower than the early 2000s. The trees at the stands edges were attacked more than trees in stand closure. All the larval galleries of D. micans were colonized by R. grandis. R. grandis could colonize larval galleries of its prey even in endemic conditions.

  14. ESPECIES DE DRYOPHTHORINAE (COLEOPTERA: CURCULIONIDAE ASOCIADAS A PLÁTANO Y BANANO (Musaspp. EN COLOMBIA Dryophthorinae Species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae Associted to Platain and Banana crops (Musaspp. in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAULA A SEPÚLVEDA-CANO

    Full Text Available Se presenta una sinopsis de los escarabajos de la subfamilia Dryophthorinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae asociados a cultivos de plátano y banano en Colombia. Adicionalmente se ofrecen claves ilustradas para las especies del país. Se registran seis especies asociadas a dichos cultivos: Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar, 1824, Metamasius hemipterus (Linnaeus, 1758, Metamasius hebetatus (Gyllenhal, 1838, Metamasius submaculatus Champion, 1910, Rhyncophorus palmarum (Linnaeus, 1758 y Polytus mellerborgii (Boheman, 1838.This synopsis is about beetle&#’;s subfamily Dryophthorinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae associated to plantain and banana crops. Additionally keys illustrated for the species of the country are offered. Six species associated to these cultures are registered: Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar, 1824, Metamasius hemipterus (Linnaeus, 1758, Metamasius hebetatus (Gyllenhal, 1838, Metamasius submaculatus Champion, 1910, Rhyncophorus palmarum (Linnaeus, 1758 y Polytus mellerborgii (Boheman, 1838.

  15. Multistate characters and diet shifts: evolution of Erotylidae (Coleoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leschen, Richard A B; Buckley, Thomas R

    2007-02-01

    The dominance of angiosperms has played a direct role in the diversification of insects, especially Coleoptera. The shift to angiosperm feeding from other diets is likely to have increased the rate of speciation in Phytophaga. However, Phytophaga is only one of many hyperdiverse lineages of beetles and studies of host-shift proliferation have been somewhat limited to groups that primitively feed on plants. We have studied the diet-diverse beetle family Erotylidae (Cucujoidea) to determine if diet is correlated with high diversification rates and morphological evolution by first reconstructing ancestral diets and then testing for associations between diet and species number and diet and ovipositor type. A Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of morphological data that was previously published in Leschen (2003, Pages 1-108 in Fauna of New Zealand, 47; 53 terminal taxa and 1 outgroup, 120 adult characters and 1 diet character) yielded results that are similar to the parsimony analyses of Leschen (2003). Ancestral state reconstructions based on Bayesian and parsimony inference were largely congruent and both reconstructed microfungal feeding (the diet of the outgroup Biphyllidae) at the root of the Erotylidae tree. Shifts among microfungal, saprophagous, and phytophagous diets were most frequent. The largest numbers of species are contained in lineages that are macrofungal feeders (subfamily Erotylinae) and phytophagous (derived Languriinae), although the Bayesian posterior predictive tests of character state correlation were unable to detect any significant associations. Ovipositor morphology correlated with diet (i.e., acute forms were associated with phytophagy and unspecialized forms were associated with a mixture of diets). Although there is a general trend to increased species number associated with the shift from microfungal feeding to phytophagy (based on character mapping and mainly restricted to shifts in Languriinae), there is a large radiation of taxa feeding on

  16. Suscetibilidade de Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabricius (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae ao enxofre Susceptibility of Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabricius (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae to sulfur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto Gonçalves

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available As criações de Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabricius (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae são freqüentemente infestadas pelo ácaro Acarophenax lacunatus (Cross e Krantz (Prostigmata: Acarophenacidae. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar doses de enxofre, acaricida eficaz contra A. lacunatus, não-prejudiciais ao desenvolvimento de R. dominica. As unidades experimentais foram constituídas de placas de Petri contendo 30 g de grãos de trigo infestados com 30 adultos de R. dominica. Os tratamentos consistiram na utilização de doses de enxofre sobre os grãos, correspondentes a 0,0; 0,6; 0,9; 1,2; 1,5; 3,0; 6,0; 12,0; 24,0 e 48,0mg i a g-1, em dez repetições. As unidades experimentais foram armazenadas por 60 dias a 30±1°C, 60±5% UR e escotofase de 24h. O desenvolvimento de R. dominica foi afetado pela utilização de doses de enxofre maiores que 3,0mg i a g-1.The laboratory rearing of Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabricius (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae is frequently infested by the parasite mite Acarophenax lacunatus (Cross and Krantz (Prostigmata: Acarophenacidae. This study was aimed at evaluating the sulfur doses, an effective acaricide against A. lacunatus, not harmful to the development of with R. dominica. The experimental units were Petri dishes containing 30g of whole wheat grains powdered with the different doses of the sulfur (0.0, 0.6, 0.9, 1.2, 1.5, 3.0, 6.0, 12.0, 24.0 and 48.0mg a i g-1 infested with 30 adults of R. dominica, in ten replicates. All treatments were maintained under controlled conditions (30±1°C, 60±5% r h and 24h scotophase for 60 days after the insect infestation. Sulfur doses higher than 3.0mg a i g-1 negatively affected R. dominica development.

  17. DNA barcoding of Japanese click beetles (Coleoptera, Elateridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, Yuichi; Ôhira, Hitoo; Murase, Yukio; Moriyama, Akihiko; Kumazawa, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Click beetles (Coleoptera: Elateridae) represent one of the largest groups of beetle insects. Some click beetles in larval form, known as wireworms, are destructive agricultural pests. Morphological identification of click beetles is generally difficult and requires taxonomic expertise. This study reports on the DNA barcoding of Japanese click beetles to enable their rapid and accurate identification. We collected and assembled 762 cytochrome oxidase subunit I barcode sequences from 275 species, which cover approximately 75% of the common species found on the Japanese main island, Honshu. This barcode library also contains 20 out of the 21 potential pest species recorded in Japan. Our analysis shows that most morphologically identified species form distinct phylogenetic clusters separated from each other by large molecular distances. This supports the general usefulness of the DNA barcoding approach for quick and reliable identification of Japanese elaterid species for environmental impact assessment, agricultural pest control, and biodiversity analysis. On the other hand, the taxonomic boundary in dozens of species did not agree with the boundary of barcode index numbers (a criterion for sequence-based species delimitation). These findings urge taxonomic reinvestigation of these mismatched taxa.

  18. Economic analysis of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) management options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannatta, A R; Hauer, R H; Schuettpelz, N M

    2012-02-01

    Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), plays a significant role in the health and extent of management of native North American ash species in urban forests. An economic analysis of management options was performed to aid decision makers in preparing for likely future infestations. Separate ash tree population valuations were derived from the i-Tree Streets program and the Council of Tree and Landscape Appraisers (CTLA) methodology. A relative economic analysis was used to compare a control option (do-nothing approach, only removing ash trees as they die) to three distinct management options: 1) preemptive removal of all ash trees over a 5 yr period, 2) preemptive removal of all ash trees and replacement with comparable nonash trees, or 3) treating the entire population of ash trees with insecticides to minimize mortality. For each valuation and management option, an annual analysis was performed for both the remaining ash tree population and those lost to emerald ash borer. Retention of ash trees using insecticide treatments typically retained greater urban forest value, followed by doing nothing (control), which was better than preemptive removal and replacement. Preemptive removal without tree replacement, which was the least expensive management option, also provided the lowest net urban forest value over the 20-yr simulation. A "no emerald ash borer" scenario was modeled to further serve as a benchmark for each management option and provide a level of economic justification for regulatory programs aimed at slowing the movement of emerald ash borer.

  19. Bruchid (Coleoptera: Bruchidae) ovicidal phenylbutanoid from Zingiber purpureum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandara, K A Nimal P; Kumar, Vijaya; Saxena, Ramesh C; Ramdas, Puthenveetil K

    2005-08-01

    The larvicidal activity of the dichloromethane extract of Zingiber purpureum Roscoe (Zingiberaceae) rhizome against the second instar of Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae) is shown to be due to 4-(3',4'-dimethoxyphenyl)buta-1,3-diene. The diene also showed ovicidal activity against the bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) (Coleoptera: Bruchidae). Most of the eggs laid by bruchids on treated cowpea seeds were transparent, and very few of them contained developing embryos. The few larvae produced from these embryos were unable to penetrate the seed coat and enter the seed. Similar effects were seen when adults were exposed to the compound and then placed on untreated cowpea seeds, suggesting that a new type of maternally mediated ovicidal effect was involved. Coated and impregnated granular formulations of the extract were evaluated for use in the control of bruchid infestation of stored cowpea seeds. Coated granules showed activity similar to that of the crude extract but were found to lose activity rapidly. Impregnated granules were found to be less active than the crude extract.

  20. Rove Beetles (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae of Lanjak Entimau, Sarawak, East Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauziah Abdullah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A study to determine the abundance of rove beetle (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae was conducted from 15 to 28 June, 2008 at the dipterocarp forest of Lanjak Entimau, Sarawak, Malaysia. Collections were made at five sites namely Kawi River, Menyaring II, Satap, Begua and Joh River. A total of 175 rove beetles comprising of 17 species were sampled from all 5 sites of Lanjak Entimau. There was a high abundance (Margalef index, 3.097 and moderate diversity (Simpson diversity index, 0.798 of rove beetles at Lanjak Entimau. Four species were identified to species level, Orphnebius bakerianus Motschulscky, 1858, Eleusis kraatzi LeConte, 1863, Belonuchus quadratu Nordman, 1837, Bledius gracilicornis Casey, 1889. Seven species were identified to genus level Orphnebius sp., Coproporus sp., Paederus sp1, Paederus sp2, Hesperus sp., Lispinus sp., Bledius sp. and six species could not be identified even to genus level. Six unidentified species probably new for Science. Moderate diversity and high abundance of rove beetles at Lanjak Entimau are due to diverse habitats. Some differences in species sampled from peninsular Malaysia is explained in terms of isolation between Sarawak in Borneo island with peninsular Malaysia.

  1. Plant compounds insecticide activity against Coleoptera pests of stored products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Marcio Dionizio; Picanco, Marcelo Coutinho; Guedes, Raul Narciso Carvalho; Campos, Mateus Ribeiro de; Silva, Gerson Adriano; Martins, Julio Claudio [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Animal]. E-mail: marcio.dionizio@gmail.com; picanco@ufv.br; guedes@ufv.br; mateusc3@yahoo.com.br; agronomiasilva@yahoo.com.br

    2007-07-15

    The objective of this work was to screen plants with insecticide activity, in order to isolate, identify and assess the bioactivity of insecticide compounds present in these plants, against Coleoptera pests of stored products: Oryzaephilus surinamensis L. (Silvanidae), Rhyzopertha dominica F. (Bostrichidae) and Sitophilus zeamais Mots. (Curculionidae). The plant species used were: basil (Ocimum selloi Benth.), rue (Ruta graveolens L.), lion's ear (Leonotis nepetifolia (L.) R.Br.), jimson weed (Datura stramonium L.), baleeira herb (Cordia verbenacea L.), mint (Mentha piperita L.), wild balsam apple (Mormodica charantia L.), and billy goat weed or mentrasto (Ageratum conyzoides L.). The insecticide activity of hexane and ethanol extracts from those plants on R. dominica was evaluated. Among them, only hexane extract of A. conyzoides showed insecticide activity; the hexane extract of this species was successively fractionated by silica gel column chromatography, for isolation and purification of the active compounds. Compounds 5,6,7,8,3',4',5'-heptamethoxyflavone; 5,6,7,8,3'-pentamethoxy-4',5'-methilenedioxyflavone and coumarin were identified. However, only coumarin showed insecticide activity against three insect pests (LD{sub 50} from 2.72 to 39.71 mg g{sup -1} a.i.). The increasing order of insects susceptibility to coumarin was R. dominica, S. zeamais and O. surinamensis. (author)

  2. Strategies of karyotype differentiation in Elateridae (Coleoptera, Polyphaga).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Marielle Cristina; Rosa, Simone Policena; Almeida, Mara Cristina; Costa, Cleide; Cella, Doralice Maria

    2007-01-01

    The chromosome study of five species of the family Elateridae, belonging to the subfamilies Agrypninae and Elaterinae, and the analysis of the cytogenetic data previously recorded for this family permitted the establishment of the main strategies of karyotypic differentiation that has occurred in the elaterids. In Agrypninae, the three species studied (Conoderus fuscofasciatus, Conoderus rufidens, and Conoderus sp.) showed the male karyotype 2n=16+X0. This karyotypic uniformity detected in these Conoderus species has also been shared with other species of the same genus, differing considerably from chromosomal heterogeneity verified in the subfamily Agrypninae. The use of the C-banding technique in C. fuscofasciatus and Conoderus sp. revealed constitutive heterochromatin in the pericentromeric region of the majority of the chromosomes. In C. fuscofasciatus, additional constitutive heterochromatin were also observed in the long arm terminal region of almost all chromosomes. Among the representatives of Elaterinae, the karyotype 2n=18+Xy(p) of Pomachilius sp.2 was similar to that verified in the majority of the Coleoptera species, contrasting with the chromosomal formula 2n=18+X0 detected in Cardiorhinus rufilateris, which is most common in the species of Elaterinae. In the majority of the elaterids, the chromosomal differentiation has frequently been driven by reduction of the diploid number; but, among the four cytogenetically examined subfamilies, there are some differences in relation to the trends of karyotypic evolution.

  3. The family Cavognathidae (Coleoptera: Cucujoidea) in Argentina and adjacent countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Osvaldo Di; Turienzo, Paola

    2016-03-14

    The family Cavognathidae (Coleoptera: Cucujoidea) in Argentina is represented by three species of the genus Taphropiestes Reitter, 1875: T. fusca Reitter, 1875 [Chubut], T. magna Ślipiński & Tomaszewska, 2010 [Río Negro; Chubut], and T. plaumanni Ślipiński & Tomaszewska 2010 [Buenos Aires]. A total of 2565 larvae (multiple instars), 83 pupae, 2028 live adults, and 16 dead adults of T. plaumanni were found in Argentina between 2005 and 2013 in the nests of birds representing the families Columbidae, Emberizidae, Falconidae, Furnariidae, Hirundinidae, Mimidae, Passeridae, Psittacidae, Troglodytidae and Tyrannidae. The adults were most abundant in closed mud nests of Furnarius rufus (Gmelin, 1788) [Furnariidae] and its inquiline birds, but the larvae were most abundant in wood nest boxes. When T. plaumanni was scarcely represented in bird nests from some localities, Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer, 1797), an exotic darkling beetle [Col.: Tenebrionidae: Tenebrioninae], and one native species, Phobelius crenatus Blanchard, 1842 [Col.: Tenebrionidae: Lagriinae], were most abundant in stick nests of Furnariidae. In contrast, when A. diaperinus and P. crenatus were absent in one locality from the province of Buenos Aires, T. plaumanni was the most abundant beetle. A complete account of data is provided for these collections of T. plaumanni in Argentina. Known distributional data for all Argentinian species of Taphropiestes are plotted on maps with biogeographical provinces indicated.

  4. Using malaise traps to sample ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulyshen, Michael D., James L. Hanula, and Scott Horn

    2005-01-01

    Pitfall traps provide an easy and inexpensive way to sample ground-dwelling arthropods (Spence and Niemela 1994; Spence et al. 1997; Abildsnes and Tommeras 2000) and have been used exclusively in many studies of the abundance and diversity of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae). Despite the popularity of this trapping technique, pitfall traps have many disadvantages. For example, they often fail to collect both small (Spence and Niemela 1994) and trap-shy species (Benest 1989), eventually deplete the local carabid population (Digweed et al. 1995), require a species to be ground-dwelling in order to be captured (Liebherr and Mahar 1979), and produce different results depending on trap diameter and material, type of preservative used, and trap placement (Greenslade 1964; Luff 1975; Work et al. 2002). Further complications arise from seasonal patterns of movement among the beetles themselves (Maelfait and Desender 1990), as well as numerous climatic factors, differences in plant cover, and variable surface conditions (Adis 1979). Because of these limitations, pitfall trap data give an incomplete picture of the carabid community and should be interpreted carefully. Additional methods, such as use of Berlese funnels and litter washing (Spence and Niemela 1994), collection from lights (Usis and MacLean 1998), and deployment of flight intercept devices (Liebherr and Mahar 1979; Paarmann and Stork 1987), should be incorporated in surveys to better ascertain the species composition and relative numbers of ground beetles. Flight intercept devices, like pitfall traps, have the advantage of being easy to use and replicate, but their value to carabid surveys is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of Malaise traps for sampling ground beetles in a bottomland hardwood forest.

  5. Using malaise traps to sample ground beetles (Coleoptera. Carabidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulyshen, Michael D. [USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, New Ellenton, SC (United States); Hanula, James L. [USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, New Ellenton, SC (United States); Horn, Scott [USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, New Ellenton, SC (United States)

    2012-04-02

    Pitfall traps provide an easy and inexpensive way to sample ground-dwelling arthropods (Spence and Niemela 1994; Spence et al. 1997; Abildsnes and Tommeras 2000) and have been used exclusively in many studies of the abundance and diversity of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae). Despite the popularity of this trapping technique, pitfall traps have many disadvantages. For example, they often fail to collect both small (Spence and Niemela 1994) and trap-shy species (Benest 1989), eventually deplete the local carabid population (Digweed et al. 1995), require a species to be ground-dwelling in order to be captured (Liebherr and Mahar 1979), and produce different results depending on trap diameter and material, type of preservative used, and trap placement (Greenslade 1964; Luff 1975; Work et al. 2002). Further complications arise from seasonal patterns of movement among the beetles themselves (Maelfait and Desender 1990), as well as numerous climatic factors, differences in plant cover, and variable surface conditions (Adis 1979). Because of these limitations, pitfall trap data give an incomplete picture of the carabid community and should be interpreted carefully. Additional methods, such as use of Berlese funnels and litter washing (Spence and Niemela 1994), collection from lights (Usis and MacLean 1998), and deployment of flight intercept devices (Liebherr and Mahar 1979; Paarmann and Stork 1987), should be incorporated in surveys to better ascertain the species composition and relative numbers of ground beetles. Flight intercept devices, like pitfall traps, have the advantage of being easy to use and replicate, but their value to carabid surveys is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of Malaise traps for sampling ground beetles in a bottomland hardwood forest.

  6. Attractant and disruptant semiochemicals for Dendroctonus jeffreyi (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, B L; Smith, S L; Brownie, C

    2013-04-01

    Jeffrey pine, Pinus jeffreyi Greville and Balfour, is a dominant yellow pine and important overstory component of forests growing on diverse sites from southwestern Oregon to Baja California to western Nevada. The Jeffrey pine beetle, Dendroctonus jeffreyi Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is monophagous on Jeffrey pine and its primary insect pest. Despite the importance of P. jeffreyi, difficult terrain, environmental concerns, and lack of roads can constrain pest management activities. Semiochemicals are often easier to apply and more environmentally acceptable than other options, but they are lacking in this system. Attractants have been identified, but field bioassays have been limited because of infrequent or short duration outbreaks and a lack of beetles during nonoutbreak periods. Disruptant semiochemicals have not been assessed for D. jeffreyi during outbreak conditions; however, commercially available semiochemicals have been implicated as disruptants for this bark beetle. The objective of this study was to identify the most effective commercially available attractant and disruptant semiochemicals for D. jeffreyi. Our highest observed catch occurred with the blend of 5% 1-heptanol and 95% n-heptane. When this was used to challenge potential disruptant semiochemicals, the combination of S-(-)-verbenone and the green leaf volatile blend (cis-3-Hexenol and 1-Hexanol) reduced trap catch by ≍80%. However, frontalin was most effective, reducing the number of D. jeffreyi caught by >96%. Within each year of the study, the percentage female of D. jeffreyi caught with our attractant decreased from start to end of the experimental period. On average, our first collection in a year (mid-June to early July) was 59% female, whereas our last (mid-August) was 34%. Frontalin was equally or more effective against females (the pioneering sex) than males, providing optimism that semiochemical disruption may be possible for protecting Jeffrey pines from D

  7. A family of chemoreceptors in Tribolium castaneum (Tenebrionidae: Coleoptera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohatmed Abdel-Latief

    Full Text Available Chemoperception in invertebrates is mediated by a family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR. To date nothing is known about the molecular mechanisms of chemoperception in coleopteran species. Recently the genome of Tribolium castaneum was sequenced for use as a model species for the Coleoptera. Using blast searches analyses of the T. castaneum genome with previously predicted amino acid sequences of insect chemoreceptor genes, a putative chemoreceptor family consisting of 62 gustatory receptors (Grs and 26 olfactory receptors (Ors was identified. The receptors have seven transmembrane domains (7TMs and all belong to the GPCR receptor family. The expression of the T. castaneum chemoreceptor genes was investigated using quantification real- time RT-PCR and in situ whole mount RT-PCR analysis in the antennae, mouth parts, and prolegs of the adults and larvae. All of the predicted TcasGrs were expressed in the labium, maxillae, and prolegs of the adults but TcasGr13, 19, 28, 47, 62, 98, and 61 were not expressed in the prolegs. The TcasOrs were localized only in the antennae and not in any of the beetles gustatory organs with one exception; the TcasOr16 (like DmelOr83b, which was localized in the antennae, labium, and prolegs of the beetles. A group of six TcasGrs that presents a lineage with the sugar receptors subfamily in Drosophila melanogaster were localized in the lacinia of the Tribolium larvae. TcasGr1, 3, and 39, presented an ortholog to CO(2 receptors in D. melanogaster and Anopheles gambiae was recorded. Low expression of almost all of the predicted chemoreceptor genes was observed in the head tissues that contain the brains and suboesophageal ganglion (SOG. These findings demonstrate the identification of a chemoreceptor family in Tribolium, which is evolutionarily related to other insect species.

  8. Biological aspects of Leucothyreus ambrosius Blanchard (Coleoptera, Melolonthidae, Rutelinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Soares Gomes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Biological aspects of Leucothyreus ambrosius Blanchard (Coleoptera, Melolonthidae, Rutelinae. Coleopterans of the family Melolonthidae comprise a large group of species that feed on different food sources, including plant roots, stems, and leaves, in addition to plant materials at different decomposition stages. Several species are found in the genus Leucothyreus, occurring in different regions of Brazil, including the various biomes in the country. Information on the biology of species of the genus Leucothyreus is scarce, therefore, we conducted studies on the biological aspects of Leucothyreus ambrosius Blanchard, 1850. The period of adult occurrence was determined with a light trap installed between a cropped and pasture area in the municipality of Aquidauana, Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil. Adults collected in the field were used to form insect pairs and the studies were initiated in the entomology laboratory as the adults began ovipositing. Adults were observed flying in the field from October to December. Eggs were obtained as pairs were formed and a colony was established, the embryonic period lasting 14.6 days on average. The larval period in the 1st instar lasted 21.6 days, in the 2nd instar 19.6 days, and in the 3rd instar, 85.6 days. The head capsule width was 1.48 mm in the 1st instar, 2.44 mm in the 2nd, and 3.83 mm in 3rd larval instar. The pupal stage had an average duration of 35.5 days. The egg to adult period lasted 173.3 days. Morphometric information for the larval and adult stages is presented in this study.

  9. Karakterisasi lundi putih (Melolonthidae: Coleoptera pada pertanaman salak berdasarkan ciri morfologi dan pola pita protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KRISNANDARI TITIK MARYATI

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak. Maryati KT, Sugiyarto. 2009. Karakterisasi lundi putih (Melolonthidae: Coleoptera pada pertanaman salak berdasarkan ciri morfologi dan pola pita protein. Bioteknologi 6: 80-87. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui keanekaragaman lundi putih (Melolonthidae; Coleoptera berdasarkan ciri morfologi dan pola pita protein yang ditemukan di lahan pertanaman salak pondoh di Kabupaten Sleman, Yogyakarta dan Kabupaten Magelang, Jawa Tengah. Pada masing-masing wilayah diambil lima titik sampling. Analisis morfologi lundi putih digunakan metode deskriptif, dan analisis pola pita protein digunakan analisis kualitatif berdasarkan muncul tidaknya pola pita pada gel, dan secara kuantitatif berdasarkan nilai mobilitas relatif protein (RF. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa sampel lundi putih di Kabupaten Sleman dan Magelang, berdasar karakter morfologi hanya satu spesies yaitu Holotrichia sp. Karakter pola pita protein sampel lundi putih dari Sleman dan Magelang mempunyai perbedaan jumlah pita protein dan berat molekulnya.

  10. Gold bugs and beyond: a review of iridescence and structural colour mechanisms in beetles (Coleoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seago, Ainsley E; Brady, Parrish; Vigneron, Jean-Pol; Schultz, Tom D

    2009-04-01

    Members of the order Coleoptera are sometimes referred to as 'living jewels', in allusion to the strikingly diverse array of iridescence mechanisms and optical effects that have arisen in beetles. A number of novel and sophisticated reflectance mechanisms have been discovered in recent years, including three-dimensional photonic crystals and quasi-ordered coherent scattering arrays. However, the literature on beetle structural coloration is often redundant and lacks synthesis, with little interchange between the entomological and optical research communities. Here, an overview is provided for all iridescence mechanisms observed in Coleoptera. Types of iridescence are illustrated and classified into three mechanistic groups: multilayer reflectors, three-dimensional photonic crystals and diffraction gratings. Taxonomic and phylogenetic distributions are provided, along with discussion of the putative functions and evolutionary pathways by which iridescence has repeatedly arisen in beetles.

  11. Characterization of white grub (Melolonthidae; Coleoptera in salak plantation based on morphology and protein banding pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUGIYARTO

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Maryati KT, Sugiyarto. 2010. Characterization of white grub (Melolonthidae; Coleoptera in salak plantation based on morphology and protein banding pattern. Nusantara Bioscience 1: 72-77. This research aims to find out the white grub (Melolonthidae; Coleoptera variability based on the morphological characteristic and protein banding pattern found in ”salak pondoh” farm in Regencies of Sleman, Yogyakarta and Magelang, Central Java. Each area has five sampling points. Morphological analysis on white grub was conducted using descriptive method and analysis on protein banding pattern was conducted using qualitative analysis based on the presence or absent of band pattern on the gel, and qualitatively based on the relative mobility value (Rf of protein. The result indicated that the white grub in Sleman and Magelang, based on morphology characteristic is only one species, namely Holothricia sp. Based on the protein banding pattern, the white grub sample have differences of protein band number and protein molecular weight. Key words: Salacca zalacca, white grub, morphology, protein banding pattern.Abstrak. Maryati KT, Sugiyarto. 2010. Karakterisasi lundi putih (Melolonthidae: Coleoptera pada pertanaman salak berdasarkan ciri morfologi dan pola pita protein. Nusantara Bioscience 1: 72-77. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui keanekaragaman lundi putih (Melolonthidae; Coleoptera berdasarkan ciri morfologi dan pola pita protein yang ditemukan di lahan pertanaman salak pondoh di Kabupaten Sleman, Yogyakarta dan Kabupaten Magelang, Jawa Tengah. Pada masing-masing wilayah diambil lima titik sampling. Analisis morfologi lundi putih digunakan metode deskriptif, dan analisis pola pita protein digunakan analisis kualitatif berdasarkan muncul tidaknya pola pita pada gel, dan secara kuantitatif berdasarkan nilai mobilitas relatif protein (RF. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa sampel lundi putih di Kabupaten Sleman dan Magelang, berdasar karakter

  12. Especies mexicanas de Curculionidae (Insecta: Coleoptera) asociadas con agaves (Asparagaceae: Agavoideae)

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Romo; Morrone, Juan J.

    2012-01-01

    Se estudiaron las especies de picudos o gorgojos (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) asociadas con agaves (Asparagaceae: Agavoideae) en México. Se registraron 5 especies asociadas con especies de Agave, Furcraea, Hesperoyucca, Polianthes y Yucca; de éstas, 4 pertenecen a la subfamilia Dryophthorinae (Scyphophorus acupunctatus, S. yuccae, Rhinostomus frontalis y Cactophagus spinolae) y 1 a la Baridinae (Peltophorus polymitus). Se presentan diagnosis, ilustraciones y una clave para la identificación de...

  13. A checklist of the genus Blosyrus Schoenherr (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Entiminae of the world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Mahendiran

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available An annotated checklist of Blosyrus Schoenherr (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Entiminae comprising 101 species with their updated nomenclature, synonyms and distribution is given. The distribution pattern indicates that the genus is diversified mostly in the Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia regions. Out of 101 species, 92 occur in Sub-Saharan Africa. From India, eight species were recorded. In India, the distribution is mainly in West Bengal, Assam, Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka and Tamil Nadu.

  14. Factors Affecting Pheromone Production by the Pepper Weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Collection Efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Eller, Fred J.; Palmquist, Debra E.

    2014-01-01

    Several factors affecting pheromone production by male pepper weevils, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) as well as collection efficiency were investigated. Factors studied included: porous polymer adsorbents (Tenax versus Super Q), male age, time of day, male density, and male diet. Super Q was found to be a superior adsorbent for the male-produced alcohols and geranic acid as well as the plant-produced E-β-ocimene. Pheromone production increased with male age up to about ...

  15. Sobre la presencia de Catops subfuscus Kellner, 1846 en los Pirineos (Coleoptera, Leiodidae, Cholevinae, Catopini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fresneda, J.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available On the presence of Catops subfuscus Kellner, 1846 in the Pyrenees (Coleoptera, Leiodidae, Cholevinae, Catopini We provide new distribution data for Catops subfuscus Kellner, 1846. We update the geonemy of the species and, based on recent data, we confirm its presence in the subterranean environment on both sides of the Pyrenean massif. Illustrations of the aedeagus and a distribution map are provided.

  16. A New Seed Beetle Species to the Bulgarian Fauna: Bruchidius siliquastri, Delobel (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anelia M. Stojanova

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A seed beetle Bruchidius siliquastri DELOBEL, 2007 (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae was reared from ripe pods of Cercis siliquastrum (Fabaceae in Bulgaria and this is the first record of the species to the Bulgarian fauna. New host plants of the bruchid species were established on the basis of material collected in Hungary: Cercis occidentalis, Cercis chinensis and Cercis griffithii. A rich hymenopteran complex associated with the seed beetle was reared and comments on it are presented.

  17. A New Seed Beetle Species to the Bulgarian Fauna: Bruchidius siliquastri, Delobel (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae)

    OpenAIRE

    Anelia M. Stojanova; Zoltán György; Zoltán László

    2011-01-01

    A seed beetle Bruchidius siliquastri DELOBEL, 2007 (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) was reared from ripe pods of Cercis siliquastrum (Fabaceae) in Bulgaria and this is the first record of the species to the Bulgarian fauna. New host plants of the bruchid species were established on the basis of material collected in Hungary: Cercis occidentalis, Cercis chinensis and Cercis griffithii. A rich hymenopteran complex associated with the seed beetle was reared and comments on it are prese...

  18. New species and records of Macrodactylus Dejean (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae: Macrodactylini) from Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce-Pérez, Roberto; Morón, Miguel Ángel

    2014-08-28

    Two new species of Macrodactylus Dejean (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae) from Bolivia are described and illustrated: M. megaphyllus new species (from Comarapa, Santa Cruz and Sehuenca, Cochabamba) and M. yunganus new species (from Mairana and Comarapa, Santa Cruz). In addition, the species Macrodactylus bolivianus Moser, M. gracilis Moser, and M. nobilis Frey are redescribed and illustrated to help facilitate identification of these species. A key to the 10 species of Macrodactylus presently known from Bolivia is provided. 

  19. Factors Affecting Pheromone Production by the Pepper Weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Collection Efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Eller, Fred; Palmquist,Debra

    2014-01-01

    Several factors affecting pheromone production by male pepper weevils, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) as well as collection efficiency were investigated. Factors studied included: porous polymer adsorbents (Tenax versus Super Q), male age, time of day, male density, and male diet. Super Q was found to be a superior adsorbent for the male-produced alcohols and geranic acid as well as the plant-produced E-β-ocimene. Pheromone production increased with male age up to about a...

  20. Factors Affecting Pheromone Production by the Pepper Weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Collection Efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Eller, Fred J.; Debra E. Palmquist

    2014-01-01

    Several factors affecting pheromone production by male pepper weevils, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) as well as collection efficiency were investigated. Factors studied included: porous polymer adsorbents (Tenax versus Super Q), male age, time of day, male density, and male diet. Super Q was found to be a superior adsorbent for the male-produced alcohols and geranic acid as well as the plant-produced E-β-ocimene. Pheromone production increased with male age up to about ...

  1. ESPECIES DE DRYOPHTHORINAE (COLEOPTERA: CURCULIONIDAE ASOCIADAS A PLÁTANO Y BANANO (Musa spp. EN COLOMBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAULA A. SEPÚLVEDA-CANO

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta una sinopsis de los escarabajos de la subfamilia Dryophthorinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae asociados a cultivos de plátano y banano en Colombia. Adicionalmente se ofrecen claves ilustradas para las especies del país. Se registran seis especies asociadas a dichos cultivos: Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar, 1824, Metamasius hemipterus (Linnaeus, 1758, Metamasius hebetatus (Gyllenhal, 1838, Metamasius submaculatus Champion, 1910, Rhyncophorus palmarum (Linnaeus, 1758 y Polytus mellerborgii (Boheman, 1838.

  2. Tiger Beetles' (Coleoptera: Carabidae, Cicindelinae) pupal stage: current state of knowledge and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roza, André S; Mermudes, José R M

    2017-01-26

    The tiger beetles (Carabidae: Cicindelinae) include about 2,822 species and 120 genera around the world. They are one of the most widely studied families of Coleoptera. However, the knowledge about their immature stages is incipient and usually restricted to the larval stages. Pupal characteristics have been among the most ignored aspects of tiger beetle biology. Here we compile and update the current knowledge of tiger beetle pupae.

  3. Susceptibility of Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer) (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae) to cypermethrin, dichlorvos and triflumuron in southern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Andreia Mauruto Chernaki-Leffer; Daniel Ricardo Sosa-Gómez; Lúcia M. de Almeida; Ivani de Oliveira Negrão Lopes

    2011-01-01

    Susceptibility of Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer) (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae) to cypermethrin, dichlorvos and triflumuron in southern Brazil. The lesser mealworm, Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer), is an important insect pest in poultry houses in Brazil. Susceptibility of the lesser mealworm collected from eight poultry houses in Paraná state, southern Brazil, was evaluated for cypermethrin, dichlorvos and triflumuron. Adult A. diaperinus were tested in bioassays with cypermethrin and dichlorvo...

  4. Kuršių nerijos nacionalinio parko vabalai (Coleoptera): sistema, fauna ir ekologija

    OpenAIRE

    Ferenca, Romas

    2005-01-01

    The results of faunistical and ecological research on beetles (Coleoptera) of Curonian Spit were presented in this work. A species composition of different habitats: Baltic sea coastal area and the foredune ridge,wooded dunes, humid dune slacks, white and grey dunes and Curonian lagoons was established on the basis of research. The greatest species diversity was established in humid dune slacks (234 species), the lowest species diversity was established eudominant, dominant, subdominant an...

  5. The Alticini (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae, Galerucinae) of Sicily: Recent records and updated checklist

    OpenAIRE

    Cosimo Baviera; Maurizio Biondi

    2015-01-01

    This paper compiles an updated checklist of the Sicilian flea beetle species (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae, Galerucinae, Alticini) by a critical bibliographic screening and adding new material, mainly collected by the first author in the last few decades. The data provided expand the known distribution of many poorly known species in Sicily. An updated checklist of the species recorded from the island, including those based on unpublished data or extracted from recently examined material, is sup...

  6. Development of Steinernema feltiae (Rhabditida: Steinernematidae in larvae of Chaetonyx robustus (Coleoptera: Orphnidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Gradinarov

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Steinernema feltiae (Filipjev, 1934 infects and reproduces in larvae of Chaetonyx robustus Schaum, 1862 (Coleoptera: Orphnidae, isolated from soil of the same habitat. Insects of the family Orphnidae are reported for the first time as hosts of entomopathogenic nematodes. Lack of establishment of natural infected larvae may be due to the lower susceptibility of C. robustus to nematode invasion and random factors related to the spatial distribution of infective juveniles in soil.

  7. Wireworms’ Management: An Overview of the Existing Methods, with Particular Regards to Agriotes spp. (Coleoptera: Elateridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Barsics

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireworms (Coleoptera: Elateridae are important soil dwelling pests worldwide causing yield losses in many crops. The progressive restrictions in the matter of efficient synthetic chemicals for health and environmental care brought out the need for alternative management techniques. This paper summarizes the main potential tools that have been studied up to now and that could be applied together in integrated pest management systems and suggests guidelines for future research.

  8. New distribution record of Cybocephalus kathrynae (Coleoptera, Cybocephalidae on Mona Island, Puerto Rico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Carlos Curbelo-Rodríguez

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available New distribution record of Cybocephalus Kathrynae (Coleoptera, Cybocephalidae on Mona Island, Puerto Rico. A new record of Cybocephalus kathrynae T.R. Smith (Cybocephalidae is reported for Puerto Rico. Adults were collected from the flowers of Mammillaria nivosa (Cactaceae on Mona Island Reserve. Prior to this study, this beetle species was only reported for Monroe and Miami-Dade Counties, Florida, USA.

  9. Species of beetles (Coleoptera; Scarabaeidae associated to banana (Musa spp. in Ceballos, Ciego de Avila, Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luisa Sisne Luis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A white light trap was placed in bananas plantations, according to Sisne, 2009 and MINAG, 1985, in the Citric enterprise of Ciego de Ávila during the period between May and July of 2010 with the objective of determining the composition of genus and species of the order Coleoptera family Scarabaeidae associated to the agroecosystem. The species Cyclocephala cubana Chapin, Phyllophaga puberula Duval, and Phyllophaga patruelis Chev. are associated to bananas crops in these areas.

  10. Novas espécies de Onciderini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae da Bolívia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubirajara R. Martins

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Novas espécies descritas da Bolívia, Santa Cruz: Trachysomus apipunga sp. nov., Hesychotypa aotinga sp. nov., Cacostola apyraiuba sp. nov. and Glypthaga nearnsi sp. nov.New species of Onciderini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae from Bolivia. New species described from Santa Cruz: Trachysomus apipunga sp. nov., Hesychotypa aotinga sp. nov., Cacostola apyraiuba sp. nov. and Glypthaga nearnsi sp. nov.

  11. Occurrence of Faustinus sp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in Southeastern Brazil tomato crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Dias de Almeida

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Occurrence of Faustinus sp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. plantations in the State of Espirito Santo, Brazil, was confirmed through field observations carried out between April 2006 and March 2008. Larvae of Faustinus sp. bore the stems of tomato plants, whereas adults feed on the leaves. Bored stems are then easily broken by the wind, by manual handling or by plant weight itself. Crop rotation and removal of crop residues may help reduce pest population levels.

  12. Molecular Markers Detect Cryptic Predation on Coffee Berry Borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) by Silvanid and Laemophloeid Flat Bark Beetles (Coleoptera: Silvanidae, Laemophloeidae) in Coffee Beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Sheina B; Yoneishi, Nicole M; Brill, Eva; Geib, Scott M; Follett, Peter A

    2016-02-01

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is a serious pest of coffee worldwide. It was first detected in Hawai'i in 2010. Two predatory beetles, Cathartus quadricollis (Coleoptera: Silvanidae) and Leptophloeus sp. (Coleoptera: Laemophloeidae), have been observed in H. hampei-infested coffee. Under laboratory conditions, colony-reared C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. prey upon all life stages of H. hampei. However, the H. hampei life cycle occurs almost exclusively within a coffee bean obscured from direct observation. Thus, it is unknown if C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. consume H. hampei as prey in the wild. To demonstrate predation of H. hampei by C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp., a molecular assay was developed utilizing species-specific primers targeting short regions of the mitochondrial COI gene to determine species presence. Using these primers, wild C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. were collected and screened for the presence of H. hampei DNA using PCR. Analysis of collections from five coffee farms revealed predation of C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. on H. hampei. Further laboratory testing showed that H. hampei DNA could be detected in predators for as long as 48 h after feeding, indicating the farm-caught predators had preyed on H. hampei within 2 d of sampling. This study demonstrates the utility of molecular markers for the study of the ecology of predators and prey with cryptic behavior, and suggests C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. might be useful biocontrol agents against H. hampei. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  13. Fauna Europaea: Coleoptera 2 (excl. series Elateriformia, Scarabaeiformia, Staphyliniformia and superfamily Curculionoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Audisio

    2015-04-01

    Coleoptera represent a huge assemblage of holometabolous insects, including as a whole more than 200 recognized families and some 400,000 described species worldwide. Basic information is summarized on their biology, ecology, economic relevance, and estimated number of undescribed species worldwide. Little less than 30,000 species are listed from Europe. The Coleoptera 2 section of the Fauna Europaea database (Archostemata, Myxophaga, Adephaga and Polyphaga excl. the series Elateriformia, Scarabaeiformia, Staphyliniformia and the superfamily Curculionoidea encompasses 80 families (according to the previously accepted family-level systematic framework and approximately 13,000 species. Tabulations included a complete list of the families dealt with, the number of species in each, the names of all involved specialists, and, when possible, an estimate of the gaps in terms of total number of species at an European level. A list of some recent useful references is appended. Most families included in the Coleoptera 2 Section have been updated in the most recent release of the Fauna Europaea index, or are ready to be updated as soon as the FaEu data management environment completes its migration from Zoological Museum Amsterdam to Berlin Museum für Naturkunde.

  14. Walking Responses of Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) to Its Aggregation Pheromone and Odors of Wheat Infestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, B J; Cai, L; Faucher, C; Michie, M; Berna, A; Ren, Y; Anderson, A; Chyb, S; Xu, W

    2017-03-03

    The red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), is a worldwide pest of stored grains. Using "Y"-tube olfactometry we studied the response of T. castaneum to odors from simulated wheat infestations containing conspecifics, and infestations containing the lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae), and the granary weevil Sitophilus granarius (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Tribolium castaneum larvae were significantly attracted to odors from all three test species. Tribolium castaneum adults were attracted to grains infested by R. dominica and flour infested by T. castaneum but repelled from grains infested by S. granarius. Further behavioral analysis with pheromones showed that T. castaneum were significantly attracted to their aggregation pheromone, dimethyldecanal (DMD), but not to the R. dominica aggregation pheromone, a mixture of dominicalure 1 and 2. Female T. castaneum adults were attracted to ∼50-fold less DMD than larvae and 100-fold less than male adults, suggesting they are more sensitive to DMD. This study improves our understanding of T. castaneum behaviors to infested grain volatile compounds and pheromones, and may help develop new control methods for grain pest species.

  15. Espécies de Gorybia Pascoe (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Piezocerini ocorrentes na Bolívia Species of Gorybia Pascoe (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Piezocerini occurring in Bolivia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena M. Galileo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Species of Gorybia Pascoe (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Piezocerini occurring in Bolivia. The genus Gorybia (Cerambycinae, Piezocerini consists of 45 described species with seven species recorded from Bolivia. Nine new species are described herein from Bolivia: G. abnormalis sp. nov.; G. alveolata sp. nov.; G. asyka sp. nov.; G. florida sp. nov.; G. inarmata sp. nov.; G. longithorax sp. nov.; G. guenda sp. nov.; G. tuberosa sp. nov. and G. wappesi sp. nov. A key to the species now known to occur in Bolivia is included.

  16. Alien seed beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae) in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yus-Ramos, Rafael; Ventura, Daniel; Bensusan, Keith; Coello-García, Pedro; György, Zoltán; Stojanova, Anelia

    2014-07-01

    Under the framework of the DAISIE consortium, whose main mission is to make an inventory of the alien invasive species of Europe and its islands, we review the current state of knowledge and provide an up-to-date catalogue and distributional status for alien seed beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae) in Europe. This work is based on studies of the species detected from the last century to the present, but with greater emphasis on the beginning of the 21st century, during which new biological studies have been carried out and findings made in European countries. The main objective of this paper is to focus on this last fact, which has promoted new views on the existing and potential threat of exotic bruchids in relation to climate change. This must now be regarded as a matter of concern for European agricultural and environmental policies. Only species of exotic origin introduced in European regions outside their native range were considered. Therefore, species of European origin spreading to new countries within Europe are not treated. Also, we provide a new approach to classifying alien seed beetle species according to their ability to become established, distinguishing between the well-established and those that may appear in seed stores but are not capable of invading natural and agricultural ecosystems. We present a taxonomic characterization of the alien bruchids found in Europe, providing an illustrated key based on external morphological characters of adults. The key facilitates the identification of the sixteen most frequently recorded genera, which represent 37 of the 42 species of exotic species recorded in Europe up to the present, whether established, not established or occasional. Finally, we provide a summary of the state of knowledge of the taxonomy and biology of the 20 most worrying species as pests, both established and non-established. This includes, where appropriate, an illustrated key for the identification of species. The study

  17. Evaluation of Standard Loose Plastic Packaging for the Management of Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae) and Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebriondiae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Muhammad Waqar; Gulraize; Ali, Usman; Ur Rehman, Fazal; Najeeb, Hafsa; Sohail, Maryam; Irsa, Bakhtawar; Muzaffar, Zubaria; Chaudhry, Muhammad Shafiq

    2016-01-01

    Three standard foodstuff plastic packaging namely polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), and polyvinylchloride (PVC) were evaluated for management of lesser grain borer Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae) and red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae). Resistance parameters in packaging were recorded as punctures, holes, penetrations, sealing defects, and invasions with two thicknesses and tested for two lengths of time. Damages like punctures, holes and penetrations by both insects were more in PE packaging however R. dominica made more penetrations in PP than in PE. For both insects sealing defects and invasions were predominant in PVC than in others. Thickness did not affect significantly damage types but significantly more holes and penetrations by R. dominica were in less thickness. Punctures and holes by R. dominica were more after less time period but other damages in packaging were more after more time period. However for T. castaneum all sorts of damages were seen more after more time period. Overall categorization between two insects showed R. dominica made more penetrations and T. castaneum made more invasions compared with their counterparts. Pictures were taken under camera fitted microscope to magnify punctures and holes in different packaging and thicknesses. Insect mortality due to phosphine was more in PP and PE packaging and least in PVC packaging and thickness effect was marginal. T. castaneum mortality was significantly more after 48 h than after 24 h. Damages extent in packaging and fumigation results showed PP to be the best of three packaging materials to manage these insects.

  18. Evaluation of Standard Loose Plastic Packaging for the Management of Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae) and Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebriondiae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Muhammad Waqar; Gulraize; Ali, Usman; Ur Rehman, Fazal; Najeeb, Hafsa; Sohail, Maryam; Irsa, Bakhtawar; Muzaffar, Zubaria; Chaudhry, Muhammad Shafiq

    2016-01-01

    Three standard foodstuff plastic packaging namely polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), and polyvinylchloride (PVC) were evaluated for management of lesser grain borer Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae) and red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae). Resistance parameters in packaging were recorded as punctures, holes, penetrations, sealing defects, and invasions with two thicknesses and tested for two lengths of time. Damages like punctures, holes and penetrations by both insects were more in PE packaging however R. dominica made more penetrations in PP than in PE. For both insects sealing defects and invasions were predominant in PVC than in others. Thickness did not affect significantly damage types but significantly more holes and penetrations by R. dominica were in less thickness. Punctures and holes by R. dominica were more after less time period but other damages in packaging were more after more time period. However for T. castaneum all sorts of damages were seen more after more time period. Overall categorization between two insects showed R. dominica made more penetrations and T. castaneum made more invasions compared with their counterparts. Pictures were taken under camera fitted microscope to magnify punctures and holes in different packaging and thicknesses. Insect mortality due to phosphine was more in PP and PE packaging and least in PVC packaging and thickness effect was marginal. T. castaneum mortality was significantly more after 48 h than after 24 h. Damages extent in packaging and fumigation results showed PP to be the best of three packaging materials to manage these insects. PMID:27638958

  19. Comparative Growth and Survival of Hylurgus ligniperda (Coleoptera: Scolytinae) and Arhopalus ferus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) Reared on Artificial or Natural Diet at 15 or 25°C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, C M; Bader, M K-F; Pawson, S M

    2016-02-01

    Two saproxylic forest insects, Hylurgus ligniperda (F.) (Coleoptera: Scolytinae) and Arhopalus ferus (Mulsant)(Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), were reared on artificial or natural diet at 15 or 25°C to compare larval growth rates and survival. A significant diet by temperature interaction was observed in the growth of H. ligniperda larvae,which developed faster when reared on natural diet at 15°C, but grew faster and pupated significantly earlier when reared on artificial diet at 25°C. However, H. ligniperda survival by the end of the experiment was low on both diets when reared at 25°C (10.1%, 95% CI: 5.2–15.1%), which suggests that rearing at lower temperatures may be required. A. ferus larvae gained significantly larger body size when reared on artificial diet than on natural diet at both temperatures. Survival of A. ferus reared on artificial diet was significantly lower than larvae reared on natural diet at 25°C. The significant differences between A. ferus larval development rates when reared on artificial and natural diets preclude the use of artificial diet to collect meaningful data to construct temperature development models for ecological comparisons. Artificial diet provided a suitable medium for mass production of individuals for research purposes, e.g., test mortality in response to treatments. However, additional rearing studies are needed to determine whether the larger artificially reared larvae result in adults that are healthier, more productive, and live longer.

  20. Key to larvae of the South American subfamilies of weevils (Coleoptera, Curculionoidea Clave para larvas de las subfamilias sudamericanas de gorgojos (Coleoptera, Curculionoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADRIANA E. MARVALDI

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea from South America are classsified into seven families and 28 subfamilies as follows: Nemonychidae (Rhinorhynchinae, Anthribidae (Anthribinae, Belidae (Belinae and Oxycoryninae, Attelabidae (Attelabinae and Rhynchitinae, Brentidae (Apioninae and Brentinae, Caridae (Carinae and Curculionidae (Erirhininae, Dryophthorinae, Entiminae, Aterpinae, Gonipterinae, Rhythirrininae, Thecesterninae, Eugnominae, Hyperinae, Curculioninae, Cryptorhynchinae, Mesoptiliinae (= Magdalidinae, Molytinae, Baridinae, Lixinae, Conoderinae (= Zygopinae, Cossoninae, Scolytinae and Platypodinae. A dichotomous key for the larval stage is provided for identification of the families and subfamilies of Curculionoidea present in South America. The key is based on external morphological characters and contains data on larval feeding habitsLos gorgojos (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea de Sudamérica están clasificados en siete familias y 28 subfamilias como se muestra a continuación: Nemonychidae (Rhinorhynchinae, Anthribidae (Anthribinae, Belidae (Belinae y Oxycoryninae, Attelabidae (Attelabinae y Rhynchitinae, Brentidae (Apioninae y Brentinae, Caridae (Carinae y Curculionidae (Erirhininae, Dryophthorinae, Entiminae, Aterpinae, Gonipterinae, Rhythirrininae, Thecesterninae, Eugnominae, Hyperinae, Curculioninae, Cryptorhynchinae, Mesoptiliinae (= Magdalidinae, Molytinae, Baridinae, Lixinae, Conoderinae (= Zygopinae, Cossoninae, Scolytinae y Platypodinae. Se brinda una clave dicotómica para el estado de larva de Curculionoidea en Sudamérica, para su determinación a nivel de familias y subfamilias. La clave está basada sobre caracteres morfológicos externos y se presentan además datos de hábitos alimentarios

  1. Especies mexicanas de Curculionidae (Insecta: Coleoptera asociadas con agaves (Asparagaceae: Agavoideae Mexican species of Curculionidae (Insecta: Coleoptera associated to agaves (Asparagaceae: Agavoideae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Romo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Se estudiaron las especies de picudos o gorgojos (Coleoptera: Curculionidae asociadas con agaves (Asparagaceae: Agavoideae en México. Se registraron 5 especies asociadas con especies de Agave, Furcraea, Hesperoyucca, Polianthes y Yucca; de éstas, 4 pertenecen a la subfamilia Dryophthorinae (Scyphophorus acupunctatus, S. yuccae, Rhinostomus frontalis y Cactophagus spinolae y 1 a la Baridinae (Peltophorus polymitus. Se presentan diagnosis, ilustraciones y una clave para la identificación de las 5 especies de curculiónidos asociados con agaves. Se establecen las siguientes sinonimias: Sphenophorus validus LeConte, 1858 = Cactophagus spinolae (Gyllenhal, 1838; y Zygops polymitus seminiveus LeConte, 1884, Z. p. leopardinus Desbrochers, 1891 y Z. p. suffusus Casey, 1892 = Peltophorus polymitus Boheman, 1845.Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae associated with agaves (Asparagaceae: Agavoideae from Mexico are analyzed. Five species were recorded associated with species of Agave, Furcraea, Hesperoyucca, Polianthes, and Yucca. Four of these species belong to the subfamily Dryophthorinae (Scyphophorus acupunctatus, S. yuccae, Rhinostomus frontalis, and Cactophagus spinolae and 1 belongs to the subfamily Baridinae (Peltophorus polymitus. Diagnoses, illustrations and a key are presented for identifying the 5 species of weevils found on agaves. The following synonymies are established: Sphenophorus validus LeConte, 1858 = Cactophagus spinolae (Gyllenhal, 1838; and Zygops polymitus seminiveus LeConte, 1884, Z. p. leopardinus Desbrochers, 1891, and Z. p. suffusus Casey, 1892 = Peltophorus polymitus Boheman, 1845.

  2. Acoustic Detection of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae) and Oryctes elegans (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) in Phoenix dactylifera (Arecales: Arecacae) Trees and Offshoots in Saudi Arabian Orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankin, R W; Al-Ayedh, H Y; Aldryhim, Y; Rohde, B

    2016-04-01

    Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier) (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae) larvae are cryptic, internal tissue-feeding pests of palm trees that are difficult to detect; consequently, infestations may remain hidden until they are widespread in an orchard. Infested trees and propagable offshoots that develop from axillary buds on the trunk frequently are transported inadvertently to previously uninfested areas. Acoustic methods can be used for scouting and early detection of R. ferrugineus, but until now have not been tested on multiple trees and offshoots in commercial date palm orchard environments. For this report, the acoustic detectability of R. ferrugineus was assessed in Saudi Arabian date palm orchards in the presence of commonly occurring wind, bird noise, machinery noise, and nontarget insects. Signal analyses were developed to detect R. ferrugineus and another insect pest, Oryctes elegans Prell (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae), frequently co-occurring in the orchards, and discriminate both from background noise. In addition, it was possible to distinguish R. ferrugineus from O. elegans in offshoots by differences in the temporal patterns of their sound impulses. As has been observed often with other insect pests, populations of the two species appeared clumped rather than uniform or random. The results are discussed in relation to development of automated methods that could assist orchard managers in quickly identifying infested trees and offshoots so that R. ferrugineus infestations can be targeted and the likelihood of transferring infested offshoots to uninfested areas can be reduced.

  3. New myrmecomorphous longhorned beetles from Haiti and the Dominican Republic with a key to Anaglyptini and Tillomorphini of Hispaniola (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Cerambycinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    First records of the tribes Anaglyptini and Tillomorphini (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Cerambycinae) are documented for Hispaniola. A new genus of highly myrmecomorphic longhorned beetle (Licracantha, new genus) is described and illustrated based on one species (Licracantha formicaria, new species) a...

  4. Leaf beetles are ant-nest beetles: the curious life of the juvenile stages of case-bearers (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Cryptocephalinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although some species of Cryptocephalinae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) have been documented with ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) for almost 200 years, information on this association is fragmentary. This contribution synthesizes scattered literature to determine the patterns in ant host use. Some degr...

  5. The influence of vegetation and landscape structural connectivity on butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea and Hesperiidae), Carabids (Coleoptera: Carabidae), Syrphids (Diptera: Syrphidae), and sawflies (Hymenoptera: Symphyta) in Northern Italy farmland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgio, G.; Sommaggio, D.; Marini, M.; Chiarucci, A.; Landi, S.; Fabbri, R.; Pesarini, F.; Genghini, M.; Ferrari, R.; Muzzi, E.; Lenteren, van J.C.; Masetti, A.

    2015-01-01

    Landscape structure as well as local vegetation influence biodiversity in agroecosystems. A study was performed to evaluate the effect of floristic diversity, vegetation patterns, and landscape structural connectivity on butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea and Hesperiidae), carabids (Coleoptera:

  6. A NOVEL CADHERIN-LIKE GENE FROM WESTERN CORN ROOTWORM, DIABROTICA VIRGIFERA VIRGIFERA (COLEOPTERA: CHRYSOMELIDAE), LARVAL MIDGUT TISSUE

    Science.gov (United States)

    A cadherin-like gene and its mRNA were cloned from western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera: Coleoptera), an economically important agricultural pest in North America and Europe. The full length cDNA (5371 bp in length) encodes an open reading frame for a 1688 amino ...

  7. Development and characterization of 11 microsatellite markers in the root-gall-forming weevil, Ceutorhynchus assimilis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The host race of Ceutorhynchus assimilis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) that specifically develops on Lepidium draba (Brassicales: Brassicaceae), an invasive weed in North America, is being considered for use as a biocontrol agent. Because there are other races that attack other plants, it is important...

  8. Description and phylogeny of a new microsporidium from the elm leaf beetle, Xanthogaleruca luteola Muller, 1766 (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study describes a new genus and species of microsporidia which is a pathogen of the elm leaf beetle, Xanthogaleruca luteola Muller, 1776 (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). The beetles were collected from Istanbul in Turkey. All developmental stages are uninucleate and in direct contact with the host ...

  9. Behavioral responses of plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to different enantiomer concentrations and blends of the synthetic aggregation pheromone grandisoic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Host plant odors are important for insect location of food and mates. Synergy between host plant odors and aggregation pheromones occurs in many Curculionidae species. The plum curculio Conotrachelus nenuphar Herbst (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is a major pest of pome and stone fruit. Males produce t...

  10. Nuevos datos de distribución de los Cholevinae hipogeos del Atlas marroquí (Coleoptera, Leiodidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fresneda, J.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available New distribution data for the hypogean Cholevinae from the Moroccan Atlas (Coleoptera, Leiodidae The authors report new findings on the distribution of Speonemadus maroccanus (Jeannel, 1936, Nargus (Demochrus rufipennis (Lucas, 1846, Choleva (Choleva kocheri Henrot, 1962 and Catops fuscus fuscoides Reitter, 1909. The geonemy of these species is updated and the research is illustrated with maps of their distribution.

  11. From forest to plantation? Obscure papers reveal alternate host plants for the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is the most devastating insect pest of coffee throughout the world. The insect is endemic to Africa but can now be found throughout nearly all coffee producing countries. One area of the basic biology of the insec...

  12. Biology and host preferences of Cryptorhynchus melastomae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a possible biocontrol agent for Miconia calvescens (Melastomataceae) in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Reichert; M.T. Johnson; E. Chacon; R.S. Anderson; T.A. Wheeler

    2010-01-01

    The introduced plant Miconia calvescens (Melastomataceae) poses a grave threat to Hawaii's native ecosystems and biodiversity. One potential candidate for classical biological control is Cryptorhynchus melastomae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Cryptorhynchinae), a stem-boring weevil from Central and South America. This weevil...

  13. Effects of starvation and mating status on the activity of the flea beetle, Phyllotreta nemorum (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oku, K.; Vermeer, K.M.C.A.; Verbaarschot, P.; Jong, de P.W.

    2010-01-01

    Flea beetles are characterized by their tendency to jump. They can also fly. First, the effects of starvation on flight activity in the flea beetle, Phyllotreta nemorum L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) were determined. After starving P. nemorum for five days a greater number of individuals of both sex

  14. Effect of temperature on reproduction and embryonic development of the cabbage stem flea beetle, Psylliodes chrysocephala L., (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Helle; Sørensen, Helle; Bligaard, J.

    2015-01-01

    The cabbage stem flea beetle, Psylliodes chrysocephala (L.) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is a major pest of winter oilseed rape. Despite the importance of this pest, detailed information on reproduction to predict risk of crop damage is lacking. This study investigates the effect of temperature...

  15. Book review: Leaf and Seed Beetles of South Carolina (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae and Orsodacnidae), by J. C. Ciegler

    Science.gov (United States)

    The book entitled Leaf and Seed Beetles of South Carolina (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae and Orsodacnidae), by J. C. Ciegler. (246 pages, 324 black and white illustrations, 8.5 “ x 11"; ISBN 0-9753471-8-7. Forty dollars, paperback. Biota of South Carolina. Volume 5. Clemson University, Clemson, S. ...

  16. Biology and natural enemies of Agrilus fleischeri (Coleoptera:Buprestidae), a newly emerging destructive buprestid pest in Northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    The jewel beetle Agrilus fleischeri Obenberger (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is a newly emerging major pest of poplar trees (Populus spp.) in northeast China and is responsible for the poplar mortality throughout its distribution range. In order to determine how to manage this pest effectively, we stud...

  17. Microcenoscelis n. gen. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae: Ulomini) from tropical Africa, with description of a blind species from Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schawaller, Wolfgang

    2015-10-05

    Microcenoscelis n. gen. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae: Ulomini) caeca n. sp. is described from Zimbabwe, a small and completely blind species. A second known species, however with completely developed eyes, and originally described as Uloma minuscula Ardoin, 1969, was also placed in the new genus. Microcenoscelis n. gen. seems to be mostly related to the genera Cenoscelis Wollaston, 1867, and Cneocnemis Gebien, 1914.

  18. Veranderingen in de lijst van Nederlandse snuitkevers: Simo hirticornis vervalt voor onze fauna en S. variegates wordt toegevoegd (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijerman, T.

    2002-01-01

    Changes to the Dutch list of weevils: Simo hirticornis to be deleted and S. variegatus to be added (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Some years ago Palm (1995) discovered that the weevil ‘Simo hirticornis’ was a mixture of two species: S. hirticornis en S. variegatus. Dutch material from institutional co

  19. Biology and life history of Argopistes tsekooni (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in China, a promising biological control agent of Chinese privet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y-Z Zhang; J. Sun; J.L. Hanula

    2009-01-01

    The biology and life history of Argopistes tsekooni Chen (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a potential biological control agent of Chinese privet, Ligustrum sinense Lour., was studied under laboratory and outdoor conditions in Huangshan City of Anhui Province, China, in 2006. A. tsekooni larvae are leafminers that...

  20. Seasonal flight activity and distribution of metallic woodboring beetles (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) collected in North Carolina and Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metallic wood boring insects (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) species are responsible for high levels of host plant injury to deciduous shade and flowering trees in commercial nurseries, urban forests, and managed landscapes. Ornamental plant producers in the southeastern U.S. have ranked borers, includin...