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Sample records for macular dystrophy mcdr1

  1. North Carolina macular dystrophy (MCDR1) caused by a novel tandem duplication of the PRDM13 gene

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    Sullivan, Lori S.; Wheaton, Dianna K.; Locke, Kirsten G.; Jones, Kaylie D.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Fulton, Robert S.; Wilson, Richard K.; Blanton, Susan H.; Birch, David G.; Daiger, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify the underlying cause of disease in a large family with North Carolina macular dystrophy (NCMD). Methods A large four-generation family (RFS355) with an autosomal dominant form of NCMD was ascertained. Family members underwent comprehensive visual function evaluations. Blood or saliva from six affected family members and three unaffected spouses was collected and DNA tested for linkage to the MCDR1 locus on chromosome 6q12. Three affected family members and two unaffected spouses underwent whole exome sequencing (WES) and subsequently, custom capture of the linkage region followed by next-generation sequencing (NGS). Standard PCR and dideoxy sequencing were used to further characterize the mutation. Results Of the 12 eyes examined in six affected individuals, all but two had Gass grade 3 macular degeneration features. Large central excavation of the retinal and choroid layers, referred to as a macular caldera, was seen in an age-independent manner in the grade 3 eyes. The calderas are unique to affected individuals with MCDR1. Genome-wide linkage mapping and haplotype analysis of markers from the chromosome 6q region were consistent with linkage to the MCDR1 locus. Whole exome sequencing and custom-capture NGS failed to reveal any rare coding variants segregating with the phenotype. Analysis of the custom-capture NGS sequencing data for copy number variants uncovered a tandem duplication of approximately 60 kb on chromosome 6q. This region contains two genes, CCNC and PRDM13. The duplication creates a partial copy of CCNC and a complete copy of PRDM13. The duplication was found in all affected members of the family and is not present in any unaffected members. The duplication was not seen in 200 ethnically matched normal chromosomes. Conclusions The cause of disease in the original family with MCDR1 and several others has been recently reported to be dysregulation of the PRDM13 gene, caused by either single base substitutions in a DNase 1

  2. Occult Macular Dystrophy

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    Işıl Sayman Muslubaş

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Occult macular dystrophy is an inherited macular dystrophy characterized by a progressive decline of bilateral visual acuity with normal fundus appearance, fluorescein angiogram and full-field electroretinogram. This case report presents a 20-year-old female patient with bilateral progressive decline of visual acuity for six years. Her visual acuity was 3-4/10 in both eyes. Anterior segment and fundus examination, fluorescein angiogram and full-field electroretinogram were normal. She could read all Ishihara pseudoisochromatic plates. Fundus autofluorescence imaging was normal. There was a mild central hyporeflectance on fundus infrared reflectance imaging in both eyes. Reduced foveal thickness and alterations of the photoreceptor inner and outer segment junction were observed by optical coherence tomography in both eyes. Central scotoma was also found by microperimetry and reduced central response was revealed by multifocal electroretinogram in both eyes. These findings are consistent with the clinical characteristics of occult macular dystrophy

  3. Dominant cystoid macular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saksens, N.T.M.; Huet, R.A.C. van; Lith-Verhoeven, J.J. van; Hollander, A.I. den; Hoyng, C.B.; Boon, C.J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical characteristics and long-term follow-up in patients with autosomal dominant cystoid macular dystrophy (DCMD). DESIGN: Retrospective case series. PARTICIPANTS: Ninety-seven patients with DCMD. METHODS: Extensive ophthalmic examination, including visual acuity (VA),

  4. Benign concentric annular macular dystrophy

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    Luísa Salles de Moura Mendonça

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the authors is to show clinical findings of a patient with benign concentric annular macular dystrophy, which is an unusual condition, and part of the "bull’s eye" maculopathy differential diagnosis. An ophthalmologic examination with color perception, fluorescein angiography, and ocular electrophysiology was performed.

  5. Keratoconus in Patients with Macular Stromal Dystrophy.

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    Kosrirukvongs, Panida; Ngowyutagon, Panotsom; Booranapong, Wipawee

    2016-01-01

    To show the association between keratoconus and macular dystrophy. All patients with macular dystrophy and associated clinical findings leading to a diagnosis of keratoconus by corneal topography were retrospectively reviewed during a 10-year period. Uncorrected and best-corrected visual acuity, automated refraction, manifest refraction, corneal thickness, and corneal curvature by corneal topography were evaluated Three patients with macular dystrophy exhibiting decreased vision, multifocal white dense deposits, and haze surrounding the deposits in the corneal stroma were evaluated. All had a steep corneal curvature of >47 diopters and a thin cornea consistent with keratoconus. Penetrating keratoplasty was performed in one patient with severely decreased vision. Macular dystrophy was diagnosed based on an Alcian blue-stained pathological specimen. Keratoconus may develop as a result of changes associated with macular dystrophy. Therefore, patients with severely decreased vision should be evaluated for keratoconus to ensure proper management.

  6. Acetazolamide for cystoid macular oedema in Bietti crystalline retinal dystrophy.

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    Broadhead, Geoffrey K; Chang, Andrew A

    2014-04-01

    Bietti crystalline retinal dystrophy is a rare, inherited disorder whose hallmark is the presence of retinal crystal deposits associated with later chorioretinal degeneration. This condition may rarely be complicated by the development of cystoid macular oedema leading to rapid visual decline. Currently, treatment options for this complication of Bietti dystrophy are limited and the visual prognosis is poor. Here, we present a case of cystoid macular oedema associated with Bietti dystrophy that was successfully diagnosed using multimodal imaging techniques including optical coherence tomography and fluorescein angiography. These modalities confirmed the diagnosis of macular oedema and excluded other possible causes of oedema such as choroidal neovascularisation. In this patient, cystoid macular oedema was resolved with oral acetazolamide therapy, a treatment that has not been previously reported in this context. Acetazolamide treatment resulted in oedema resolution and improvement in visual function, and can be considered a therapeutic option for other patients with Bietti dystrophy who develop cystoid macular oedema.

  7. Octreotide acetate in dominant cystoid macular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogewind, B.F.T.; Pieters, G.; Hoyng, C.B.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: Dominant cystoid macular degeneration (DCMD) is an autosomal dominant trait of cystoid macular edema with poor visual prognosis. Until now, no efficient treatments for DCMD have been reported. The authors evaluated a somatostatin-analogue (octreotide acetate) as treatment for DCMD. METHODS:

  8. The benign concentric annular macular dystrophy locus maps to 6p12.3-q16.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lith-Verhoeven, J.J. van; Hoyng, C.B.; Helm, B. van den; Deutman, A.F.; Brink, H.M.A.; Kemperman, M.H.; Jong, W.H. de; Kremer, J.M.J.; Cremers, F.P.M.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe the clinical findings and to identify the genetic locus in a Dutch family with autosomal dominant benign concentric annular macular dystrophy (BCAMD). METHODS: All family members underwent ophthalmic examination. Linkage analysis of candidate retinal dystrophy loci and a whole g

  9. Analysis of macular cone photoreceptors in a case of occult macular dystrophy

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    Tojo N

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Naoki Tojo Tomoko Nakamura Hironori Ozaki Miyako Oka Toshihiko Oiwake Atsushi HayashiDepartment of Ophthalmology, University of Toyama, Toyama, JapanPurpose: To investigate changes in cone photoreceptors with adaptive optics (AO fundus imaging and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT in a case of occult macular dystrophy (OMD.Patient and methods: Both eyes of a 42-year-old woman diagnosed with OMD were examined. We used an AO fundus camera to obtain images of cone photoreceptors in the macula of the OMD subject and five healthy control subjects. Correlations between the AO images and the SD-OCT images were examined. Cone photoreceptors in eight areas in the macula of OMD and healthy control subjects were analyzed and compared.Results: SD-OCT showed a loss of the cone outer-segment tips line outside of the fovea in both eyes of the subject with OMD. The left eye with decreased visual acuity showed a discontinuous photoreceptor inner-segment and outer-segment line and cone outer-segment tips line at the fovea in SD-OCT and loss of cone mosaics as a dark spot in the AO image. In panoramic AO images and cone-density maps, less cone density was observed in a ring-like region outside the fovea than in the peripheral retina. In most of the areas examined, the cone densities were lower in the OMD eyes than in the healthy control eyes.Conclusions: Cone densities in the macula of the OMD patient were greatly decreased. AO images were found to be useful to evaluate morphologic changes in cone photoreceptors in patients with OMD.Keywords: occult macular dystrophy, adaptive optics, cone photoreceptor, cone analysis, optical coherence tomography

  10. North Carolina Macular Dystrophy Is Caused by Dysregulation of the Retinal Transcription Factor PRDM13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Small, Kent W; DeLuca, Adam P; Whitmore, S Scott

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify specific mutations causing North Carolina macular dystrophy (NCMD). DESIGN: Whole-genome sequencing coupled with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of gene expression in human retinal cells. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 141 members of 12 families...... development. Four of these strongly implicate the involvement of PRDM13 in macular development, whereas the pathophysiologic mechanism of the fifth remains unknown but may involve the developmental dysregulation of IRX1....

  11. Outcomes of Penetrating Keratoplasty for Macular Corneal Dystrophy

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    Karimian, Farid; Baradaran-Rafii, Ali-Reza; Feizi, Sepehr; Zare, Mohammad; Jafarinasab, Mohammad-Reza; Javadi, Mohammad-Ali; Mirdehghan, S. Ali; Einollahi, Bahram

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To report the outcomes of penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) in patients with macular corneal dystrophy (MCD). Methods This retrospective case series includes consecutive patients with MCD who underwent PKP from 1986 to 2006 with at least 6 months’ follow-up. Main outcome measures included best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA), postoperative astigmatism and graft survival. Results Sixty-two eyes of 39 patients with mean age of 34.0±10.5 (range 13–58) years at the time of keratoplasty were included for analysis. After a mean follow-up period of 52.0±47.3 (range 6–190) months, BSCVA improved from 1.4±0.4 logMAR (4/100) preoperatively to 0.2±0.3 logMAR (20/32) at final follow-up (P<0.001).Mean postoperative BSCVA was 0.15±0.40 logMAR in patients (36 eyes) aged less than 35 years at the time of surgery as compared to 0.26±0.25 logMAR in subjects (26 eyes) older than 35 years (P=0.005). Final astigmatism was comparable with different suturing techniques including separate, continuous, and combined sutures (P=0.9). All grafts were clear at final follow-up except a single case of MCD with visually insignificant recurrence.Episodes of immunologic graft rejection occurred in 12 eyes (19.4%) but none led to graft failure. Conclusion PKP for MCD entails favorable outcomes in terms of graft survival and visual improvement. Final visual acuity seems to be better when transplantation is performed before the age of 35 years. PMID:23056668

  12. Outcomes of Penetrating Keratoplasty for Macular Corneal Dystrophy

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    Farid Karimian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To report the outcomes of penetrating keratoplasty (PKP in patients with macular corneal dystrophy (MCD. METHODS: This retrospective case series includes consecutive patients with MCD who underwent PKP from 1986 to 2006 with at least 6 months' follow-up. Main outcome measures included best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA, postoperative astigmatism and graft survival. RESULTS: Sixty-two eyes of 39 patients with mean age of 34.0±10.5 (range 13-58 years at the time of keratoplasty were included for analysis. After a mean follow-up period of 52.0±47.3 (range 6-190 months, BSCVA improved from 1.4±0.4 logMAR (4/100 preoperatively to 0.2±0.3 logMAR (20/32 at final follow-up (P < 0.001. Mean postoperative BSCVA was 0.15±0.40 logMAR in patients (36 eyes aged less than 35 years at the time of surgery as compared to 0.26±0.25 logMAR in subjects (26 eyes older than 35 years (P=0.005. Final astigmatism was comparable with different suturing techniques including separate, continuous, and combined sutures (P=0.9. All grafts were clear at final follow-up except a single case of MCD with visually insignificant recurrence. Episodes of immunologic graft rejection occurred in 12 eyes (19.4% but none led to graft failure. CONCLUSION: PKP for MCD entails favorable outcomes in terms of graft survival and visual improvement

  13. Two siblings with late-onset cone–rod dystrophy and no visible macular degeneration

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    Sakuramoto H

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Hiroyuki Sakuramoto,1 Kazuki Kuniyoshi,1 Kazushige Tsunoda,2 Masakazu Akahori,2 Takeshi Iwata,2 Yoshikazu Shimomura1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-Sayama City, Osaka, Japan; 2National Institute of Sensory Organs, National Hospital Organization Tokyo Medical Center, Tokyo, Japan Background: We report our findings in two siblings with late-onset cone–rod dystrophy (CRD with no visible macular degeneration. Cases and methods: Case 1 was an 82-year-old man who first noticed a decrease in vision and color blindness in his early seventies. His mother and younger sister also had visual disturbances. His decimal visual acuity was 0.3 in the right eye and 0.2 in the left eye. Ophthalmoscopy showed normal fundi, and fluorescein angiography was also normal in both eyes. The photopic single flash and flicker eletroretinograms (ERGs were severely attenuated and the scotopic ERGs were slightly reduced in both eyes. Case 2 was the 80-year-old younger sister of Case 1. She first noticed a decline in vision and photophobia in both eyes in her early seventies. Her decimal visual acuity was 0.4 in the right eye and 0.2 in the left eye. Ophthalmoscopy showed mottling of the retinal pigment epithelium in the midperiphery with no visible macular degeneration. The photopic single flash and flicker ERGs were severely attenuated, and the scotopic ERGs were slightly reduced in both eyes. Conclusion: These siblings are the oldest reported cases of CRD with no visible macular degeneration. Thus, CRD should be considered in patients with reduced visual acuity, color blindness, and photophobia even if they are older than 70 years. Keywords: cone–rod dystrophy, peripheral cone dystrophy, occult macular dystrophy, late onset, macular degeneration, negative ERG

  14. Macular pattern dystrophy and homonymous hemianopia in MELAS syndrome.

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    Kamal-Salah, Radua; Baquero-Aranda, Isabel; Grana-Pérez, María Del Mar; García-Campos, Jose Manuel

    2015-03-12

    We report an unusual association of a pattern dystrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium and homonymous hemianopia in a woman diagnosed with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes syndrome.

  15. CDH3 gene related hypotrichosis and juvenile macular dystrophy – A case with a novel mutation

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    Omer Karti

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions and importance: This case of HJMD was related to a novel homozygous mutation, termed c.447_467del (p.149_156del. These findings have significance for the future mutational analysis and genetic counseling of families with HJMD, particularly in our region. The presence of sparse hair in childhood, with or without limb anomalies, should alert clinicians to request an eye consultation. Pediatricians, dermatologists, and ophthalmologists should be aware of the rarely seen entity of juvenile macular dystrophy with hypotrichosis.

  16. Butterfly-shaped macular dystrophy. Longitudinal case study of two siblings.

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    Petracci, M; Pannini, S; Frezzotti, R

    1993-12-01

    Two brothers with butterfly-shaped macular dystrophy (BSMD) are reported. The anatomical and functional data were analyzed in 11 family members. Progressive photoreceptor dysfunction, supported by ERG abnormalities, was documented in both patients. The progression of the disease was observed over a period of seven years. The present observations emphasize that BSMD, at least in some cases, can be a chronic progressive disorder with secondary involvement of the photoreceptors.

  17. [Role of immunological factors in peripheral vitreo-chorioretinal dystrophies and macular ruptures of the retina].

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    Balashova, L M; Saksonova, E O; Zaĭtseva, N S; Slepova, O S; Teplinskaia, L E; Il'nitskiĭ, V V; Grishin, V L

    1995-01-01

    The authors analyze the results of clinical and immunological examinations of patients with peripheral vitreo-chorioretinal dystrophies (PVCRD) and macular ruptures of the retina. No antibodies to S-AG were detected in the lacrimal fluid in 87.5% of patients with PVCRD without retinal defects. In patients with PVCRD with retinal defects antibodies to S-AG were detected in 70% of cases. These antibodies were absent in the patients with macular ruptures of the retina. In none of the patients were these antibodies detected in the blood serum. The levels of circulating immune complexes were normal in the patients PVCRD and increased in those with macular ruptures of the retina. These data permit a hypothesis on the development of local autoimmune reactions in PVCRD patients in response to the appearance of AG of the injured tissues.

  18. Corneal Higher Order Aberrations in Granular, Lattice and Macular Corneal Dystrophies

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    Yagi-Yaguchi, Yukari; Yamaguchi, Takefumi; Okuyama, Yumi; Satake, Yoshiyuki; Tsubota, Kazuo; Shimazaki, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the corneal higher-order aberrations (HOAs) in granular, lattice and macular corneal dystrophies. Methods This retrospective study includes consecutive patients who were diagnosed as granular corneal dystrophy type2 (GCD2; 121 eyes), lattice corneal dystrophies type 1, type 3A (LCDI; 20 eyes, LCDIIIA; 32 eyes) and macular corneal dystrophies (MCD; 13 eyes), and 18 healthy control eyes. Corneal HOAs were calculated using anterior segment optical coherence tomography, and the correlations between HOAs and visual acuity were analyzed. Results HOAs of the total cornea within 4 mm diameter were significantly larger in GCD2 (0.17 ± 0.35 μm), in LCDI (0.33 ± 0.27), LCDIIIA (0.61 ± 1.56) and in MCD (0.23 ± 0.18), compared with healthy controls (0.09 ± 0.02μm, all P GCD2 (0.32 ± 0.48), in LCDI (0.60 ± 0.46), LCDIIIA (0.83 ± 2.29) and in MCD (0.44 ± 0.24), compared with healthy controls (0.19 ± 0.06, all P GCD2, there was no significant correlation between logMAR and HOAs (r = 0.113, P = 0.227). In MCD, LCDI and LCDIIIA, logMAR was positively significantly correlated with HOAs (r = 0.620 and P = 0.028, r = 0.587 and P = 0.007, r = 0.614 and P < 0.001, respectively). Conclusions Increased HOAs occur in eyes with corneal dystrophies, especially in eye with LCD and MCD. Larger amount corneal HOAs are associated with poorer visual acuity in patients with LCD and MCD. PMID:27536778

  19. Excimer laser phototherapeutic keratectomy in conjunction with mitomycin C in corneal macular and granular dystrophies

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    Erdem Yuksel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate the visual outcomes, recurrence patterns, safety, and efficacy of excimer laser phototherapeutic keratectomy (PTK in conjunction with mitomycin C (MMC for corneal macular and granular diystrophies. Methods: The patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 included patients with macular corneal dystrophy (MCD that caused superficial corneal plaque opacities, and Group 2 included patients with granular corneal dystrophy (GCD. Patients in both groups were pre-, peri-, and postoperatively evaluated. The groups were compared in terms of uncorrected visual acuity (VA, best spectacle-corrected VA, presence of mild or significant recurrence, and time of recurrence. Results: Eighteen eyes (nine with MCD and nine with GCD of 18 patients (10 men and eight women were included. PTK was performed for each eye that was included in this study. The mean ablation amount was 117.8 ± 24.4 µm and 83.5 ± 45.7 µm in MCD and GCD, respectively, (p=0.18. The postoperative improvement of the mean VA was similar between the two groups before recurrences (p>0.43 and after recurrences (p>0.71. There were no statistically significant differences in the recurrence rate and the recurrence-free period for any recurrence type. Conclusion: PTK was an effective, safe, and minimally invasive procedure for patients with MCD and GCD. PTK in conjunction with MMC was similarly effective for both groups in terms of recurrence and visual outcomes.

  20. Mutations in MFSD8, encoding a lysosomal membrane protein, are associated with nonsyndromic autosomal recessive macular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosing, S.; Born, L.I. van den; Sangermano, R.; Banfi, S.; Koenekoop, R.K.; Zonneveld-Vrieling, M.N.; Klaver, C.C.; Lith-Verhoeven, J.J. van; Cremers, F.P.M.; Hollander, A.I. den; Hoyng, C.B.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study aimed to identify the genetic defects in 2 families with autosomal recessive macular dystrophy with central cone involvement. DESIGN: Case series. PARTICIPANTS: Two families and a cohort of 244 individuals with various inherited maculopathies and cone disorders. METHODS:

  1. Two siblings with late-onset cone–rod dystrophy and no visible macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuramoto, Hiroyuki; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Tsunoda, Kazushige; Akahori, Masakazu; Iwata, Takeshi; Shimomura, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    Background We report our findings in two siblings with late-onset cone–rod dystrophy (CRD) with no visible macular degeneration. Cases and methods Case 1 was an 82-year-old man who first noticed a decrease in vision and color blindness in his early seventies. His mother and younger sister also had visual disturbances. His decimal visual acuity was 0.3 in the right eye and 0.2 in the left eye. Ophthalmoscopy showed normal fundi, and fluorescein angiography was also normal in both eyes. The photopic single flash and flicker eletroretinograms (ERGs) were severely attenuated and the scotopic ERGs were slightly reduced in both eyes. Case 2 was the 80-year-old younger sister of Case 1. She first noticed a decline in vision and photophobia in both eyes in her early seventies. Her decimal visual acuity was 0.4 in the right eye and 0.2 in the left eye. Ophthalmoscopy showed mottling of the retinal pigment epithelium in the midperiphery with no visible macular degeneration. The photopic single flash and flicker ERGs were severely attenuated, and the scotopic ERGs were slightly reduced in both eyes. Conclusion These siblings are the oldest reported cases of CRD with no visible macular degeneration. Thus, CRD should be considered in patients with reduced visual acuity, color blindness, and photophobia even if they are older than 70 years. PMID:24039390

  2. Perifoveal function in patients with North Carolina macular dystrophy: the importance of accounting for fixation locus.

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    Seiple, William; Szlyk, Janet P; Paliga, Jennifer; Rabb, Maurice F

    2006-04-01

    To quantify the extent of visual function losses in patients with North Carolina Macular Dystrophy (NCMD) and to demonstrate the importance of accounting for eccentric fixation when making comparisons with normal data. Five patients with NCMD who were from a single family were examined. Multifocal electroretinograms (mfERGs) and psychophysical assessments of acuity and luminance visual field sensitivities were measured throughout the central retina. Comparisons of responses from equivalent retinal areas were accomplished by shifting normal templates to be centered at the locus of fixation for each patient. Losses of psychophysically measured visual function in patients with NCMD extend to areas adjacent to the locations of visible lesions. The multifocal ERG amplitude was reduced only within the area of visible lesion. Multifocal ERG implicit times were delayed throughout the entire central retinal area assessed. ERG timing is a sensitive assay of retinal function, and our results indicate that NCMD has a widespread effect at the level of the mid and outer retina. The findings also demonstrated that it is necessary to account for fixation locus and to ensure that equivalent retinal areas are compared when testing patients with macular disease who have eccentric fixation.

  3. A gene for late-onset fundus flavimaculatus with macular dystrophy maps to chromosome 1p13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, S.; Rozet, J.M.; Bonneau, D.; Souied, E.; Camuzat, A.; Munnich, A.; Kaplan, J. [Hopital des Enfants Malades, Paris (France); Dufier, J.L. [Hopital Laeennec, Paris (France); Amalric, P. [Consultation d`Ophtalmologie, Albi (France); Weissenbach, J. [Genethon, Evry (France)

    1995-02-01

    Fundus flavimaculatus with macular dystrophy is an autosomal recessive disease responsible for a progressive loss of visual acuity in adulthood, with pigmentary changes of the macula, perimacular flecks, and atrophy of the retinal pigmentary epithelium. Since this condition shares several clinical features with Stargardt disease, which has been mapped to chromosome 1p21-p13, we tested the disease for linkage to chromosome 1p. We report the mapping of the disease locus to chromosome 1p13-p21, in the genetic interval defined by loci D1S435 and D1S415, in four multiplex families (maximum lod score 4.79 at recombination fraction 0 for probe AFM217xb2 at locus D1S435). Thus, despite differences in the age at onset, clinical course, and severity, fundus flavimaculatus with macular dystrophy and Stargardt disease are probably allelic disorders. This result supports the view that allelic mutations produce a continuum of macular dystrophies, with onset in early childhood to late adulthood. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Proteoglycan biosynthesis by human corneas from patients with types 1 and 2 macular corneal dystrophy

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    Midura, R.J.; Hascall, V.C.; MacCallum, D.K.; Meyer, R.F.; Thonar, E.J.; Hassell, J.R.; Smith, C.F.; Klintworth, G.K. (National Institute of Dental Research, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-09-15

    Corneal buttons were obtained from patients with types 1 and 2 macular corneal dystrophy (MCD) and from control patients with Fuchs' dystrophy or keratoconus. Buttons were incubated for 20 h in the presence of (3H)glucosamine or (2-3H)mannose. Radiolabeled proteoglycans and lactosaminoglycan-glycoproteins (L-GPs) were purified using chromatography on Q-Sepharose, Superose 6, and octyl-Sepharose. They were identified using chondroitinase ABC, keratanase or endo-beta-galactosidase digestion, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or Superose 6 chromatography. This study confirms previous reports that type 1 MCD corneas synthesize a normal dermatan sulfate-proteoglycan (DS-PG) and an abnormal keratan sulfate-proteoglycan (KS-PG). The data indicate that typ 1 MCD corneas synthesize L-GP instead of KS-PG. This L-GP has a core protein of similar hydrophobicity (elution from octyl-Sepharose) and nearly similar mass (42 kDa) as the core protein of the KS-PG. It has identical glycoconjugates as those of the KS-PG except that they lack sulfate. Thus, type 1 MCD fails to synthesize keratan sulfate as a result of a defect in a sulfotransferase specific for sulfating lactosaminoglycans. Further, proteoglycans synthesized by a cornea from a patient with type 2 MCD were studied. This cornea synthesized a normal ratio of KS-PG to DS-PG although net synthesis of proteoglycans was approximately 30% below normal. The KS-PG appeared normal whereas the DS-PG had dermatan sulfate chains that were approximately 40% shorter than normal.

  5. Follow-up of a Case of Vitelliform Macular Dystrophy Over an 8-year Period

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shizhou Huang; Lezheng Wu; Feng Wen; Guangwei Luo; Futian Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To show the follow-up of a case of vitelliform mac-ular dystrophy with morphological and visual functional tests over an 8-year period. Methods:.Retrospective review of medical records..The mor-phological examination included color photography,.fluores-cein angiography, and ocular coherence tomography (OCT). The visual functional tests included visual acuity, electro-ocu-logram (EOG) and multifocal electroretinography (mfERG). The patient was observed for 8 years, from 2003 to 2011. Results:.During the follow-up,.the improvement of sensory retinal detachment and reduction of yellow-white deposit were observed with color photography and fluorescein angiography. OCT revealed a decrease in sensory retinal detachment and subretinal hyper-reflective deposits; both of these morphologi-cal changes were correspondent. Visual acuity was maintained throughout the follow-up..The Arden ratio of EOG was de-creased. The amplitudes of mfERG were decreased but slightly increased during the follow-up. Conclusion:.The retinal morphological changes and visual function slightly improved in this case of vitelliform macu-lopathy. The prognosis is good. (Eye Science 2014; 29:165-169)

  6. Pathogenic mutations of TGFBI and CHST6 genes in Chinese patients with Avellino, lattice, and macular corneal dystrophies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-nan HUO; Yu-feng YAO; Ping YU

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To investigate gene mutations associated with three different types of corneal dystrophies (CDs),and to establish a phenotype-genotype correlation.Methods:Two patients with Avellino corneal dystrophy (ACD),four patients with lattice corneal dystrophy type Ⅰ (LCD Ⅰ) from one family,and three patients with macular corneal dystrophy type Ⅰ (MCD Ⅰ) were subjected to both clinical and genetic examinations.Slit lamp examination was performed for all the subjects to assess their corneal phenotypes.Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes.The coding regions of the human transforming growth factor β-induced (TGFB/)gene and carbohydrate sulfotransferase 6 (CHST6) gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subjected to direct sequencing.DNA samples from 50 healthy volunteers were used as controls.Results:Clinical examination showed three different phenotypes of CDs.Genetic examination identified that two ACD subjects were associated with homozygous R124H mutation of TGFB/,and four LCD Ⅰ subjects were all associated with R124C heterozygous mutation.One MCD Ⅰ subject was associated with a novel S51X homozygous mutation in CHST6,while the other two MCD Ⅰ subjects harbored a previously reported W232X homozygous mutation.Conclusions:Our study highlights the prevalence of codon 124 mutations in the TGFB/gene among the Chinese ACD and LCD Ⅰ patients.Moreover,we found a novel mutation among MCD Ⅰ patients.

  7. MUTATIONS IN CORNEAL CARBOHYDRATE SULFOTRANSFERASE 6 GENE (CHST6 IN IRANIAN MACULAR CORNEAL DYSTROPHY (MCD PATIENTS: A REPORT OF 7 PATIENTS FROM IRAN

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    Mitra ATAEI

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveMacular Corneal Dystrophy (MCD is a rare autosomal recessive disorder affecting the stroma of cornea. Most cases of MCD are caused by mutations in CHST6 gene. The aim of this study was to determine mutations in the carbohydrate sulfotransferase 6 gene (CHST6 through genetic analysis of 7 Iranian patients with MCD.Materials & MethodsWe screened the CHST6 gene to determine the range of pathogenic mutations. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes. The coding regions of the CHST6 gene were amplified using three pairs of primers, and directly sequenced in the final step.ResultsFour mutations were found to affect the translated protein and each of them corresponded to a particular disease haplotype that has been previously reported.Keywords:Macular Corneal Dystrophy (MCD, Iranian Patients, Carbohydrate Sulfotransferase 6 Gene (CHST6

  8. Long-Term Results of Photodynamic Therapy for Choroidal Neovascularization in Pediatric Patients with Best Vitelliform Macular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodi, Andrea; Murro, Vittoria; Caporossi, Orsola; Passerini, Ilaria; Bacci, Giacomo Maria; Caputo, Roberto; Menchini, Ugo

    2015-06-01

    To report long-term results of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in young patients affected by Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD) complicated by choroidal neovascularization (CNV). We evaluated a group of 30 VMD patients with confirmed mutations in the BEST1 gene. Five of these patients had been diagnosed with CNV when younger than 15 years of age and three of them were treated by PDT. After the treatment they were followed for an average period of 77 months (range 62-99). In all the treated eyes visual acuity was stable during the first year of follow-up and then slowly improved even some years after the treatment. The improvement in visual acuity was associated with the development of fibrous tissue in the macula. PDT was a safe procedure in our series of pediatric patients with VMD complicated by CNV. It was followed by a CNV regression and a consequent improvement in visual acuity which continued to progress even several years after the treatment.

  9. Two sisters with macular dystrophy caused by the 3243A>G mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Gutiérrez, V; García-Montesinos, J; Pardo-Muñoz, A

    2016-05-01

    Two sisters of 54 and 60years old, with a history of diabetes and deafness, consulted for decreased visual acuity (VA). Funduscopic examination revealed patchy areas of chorioretinal atrophy with annular arrangement around the fovea. Genetic study identified the heteroplasmic mutation 3243A>G in mitochondrial DNA, which supports syndrome maternally inherited diabetes and deafness (MIDD) or Ballinger-Wallace disease. The finding of such macular disorders, especially in the presence of diabetes mellitus and deafness, should suggest the performing of a mitochondrial genome screening to identify this unusual syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Descrição de nova distrofia macular associada à síndrome dos cabelos anágenos frouxos New macular dystrophy associated with loose anagen hair syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Teruo Sato

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Descrever os achados oftalmológicos, dermatológicos e de microscopia óptica (MO e microscopia eletrônica de varredura (MEV de nova distrofia macular associada à síndrome dos cabelos anágenos frouxos (SCAF. Métodos: Uma família de sete pacientes, quatro deles afetados, foi examinada. Os pacientes foram submetidos ao exame oftalmológico completo, teste de cores (Ishihara e Farnsworth D-15, ecografia, angiografia, exames laboratoriais e dermatológico, teste do suor, microscopia óptica e microscopia eletrônica de varredura dos fios de cabelo. Resultados: Em duas irmãs afetadas encontramos no fundo de olho dispersões pigmentares em pólo posterior da retina, com estafiloma da mácula. Em dois irmãos foram encontradas as mesmas dispersões pigmentares em pólo posterior, com maior pigmentação e coloração amarelada em área macular e sem estafiloma. A avaliação na microscopia óptica e microscopia eletrônica de varredura dos indivíduos afetados confirmou a SCAF. Em uma mulher e em um homem não afetados todos os exames foram normais, exceto que na MO e MEV encontramos algumas semelhanças com os indivíduos afetados. Quanto ao modo de herança, o heredograma é compatível com herança autossômica recessiva com expressão parcial no heterozigoto. Conclusões: Há somente um relato na literatura internacional da associação de SCAF e coloboma ocular. Neste trabalho descrevemos os achados de nova distrofia macular associada à síndrome dos cabelos anágenos frouxos, distrofia cujos achados fundoscópicos são diferentes entre homens e mulheres. Por se tratar do primeiro relato na literatura, os achados descritos sugerem fortemente que esta associação pode ser parte de uma nova entidade nosológica.Purpose: To describe the ophthalmological, dermatological, light microscopy (LM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM findings of a new macular dystrophy associated with the loose anagen hair syndrome (LAHS. Methods: A

  11. MUTATIONS IN CORNEAL CARBOHYDRATE SULFOTRANSFERASE 6 GENE (CHST6 IN IRANIAN MACULAR CORNEAL DYSTROPHY (MCD PATIENTS: A REPORT OF 7 PATIENTS FROM IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HOUSHMAND Massoud MD

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjectiveMacular Corneal Dystrophy (MCD is a rare autosomal recessive disorder affecting the stroma of cornea. Most cases of MCD are caused by mutations in CHST6 gene. The aim of this study was to determine mutations in the carbohydrate sulfotransferase 6 gene (CHST6 through genetic analysis of 7 Iranian patients with MCD.Materials & MethodsWe screened the CHST6 gene to determine the range of pathogenic mutations. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes. The coding regions of the CHST6 gene were amplified using three pairs of primers, and directly sequenced in the final step.ResultsFour mutations were found to affect the translated protein and each of them corresponded to a particular disease haplotype that has been previously reported

  12. RP1L1 variants are associated with a spectrum of inherited retinal diseases including retinitis pigmentosa and occult macular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Alice E; Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I; Mackay, Donna S; Wright, Genevieve A; Waseem, Naushin H; Michaelides, Michel; Holder, Graham E; Robson, Anthony G; Moore, Anthony T; Plagnol, Vincent; Webster, Andrew R

    2013-03-01

    In one consanguineous family with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a condition characterized by progressive visual loss due to retinal degeneration, homozygosity mapping, and candidate gene sequencing suggested a novel locus. Exome sequencing identified a homozygous frameshifting mutation, c.601delG, p.Lys203Argfs*28, in RP1L1 encoding RP 1-like1, a photoreceptor-specific protein. A screen of a further 285 unrelated individuals with autosomal recessive RP identified an additional proband, homozygous for a missense variant, c.1637G>C, p.Ser546Thr, in RP1L1. A distinct retinal disorder, occult macular dystrophy (OCMD) solely affects the central retinal cone photoreceptors and has previously been reported to be associated with variants in the same gene. The association between mutations in RP1L1 and the disorder OCMD was explored by screening a cohort of 28 unrelated individuals with the condition; 10 were found to harbor rare (minor allele frequency ≤0.5% in the 1,000 genomes dataset) heterozygous RP1L1 missense variants. Analysis of family members revealed many unaffected relatives harboring the same variant. Linkage analysis excluded the possibility of a recessive mode of inheritance, and sequencing of RP1, a photoreceptor protein that interacts with RP1L1, excluded a digenic mechanism involving this gene. These findings imply an important and diverse role for RP1L1 in human retinal physiology and disease.

  13. Myotonic Dystrophy and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-26

    Myotonic Dystrophy; Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy; Muscular Dystrophy; Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1; Myotonic Dystrophy Type 2; Congenital Myotonic Dystrophy; PROMM (Proximal Myotonic Myopathy); Steinert's Disease; Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy

  14. High-resolution meiotic and physical mapping of the Best`s vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2) locus to pericentromeric chromosome 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, B.H.F.; Vogt, G. [Institut fuer Humangenetik, Wuerzburg (Germany); Walker, D. [UBC, Vancouver (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Vitelliform macular dystrophy, also known as Best`s disease, is a juvenile-onset macular degeneration with autosomal dominant inheritance. It is characterized by well-demarcated accumulation of lipofuscin-like material within and beneath the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and classically results in an egg yolk-like appearance of the macula. Typically, carriers of the disease gene show a specific electrophysiological sign which can be detected by electrooculography (EOG). The EOG measures a standing potential between the cornea and the retina which is primarily generated by the RPE. The histopathological findings as well as the EOG abnormalities suggest that Best`s disease is a generalized disorder of the RPE. The basic biochemical defect is still unknown. As a first step in the positional cloning of the defective gene, the Best`s disease locus was mapped to chromosome 11 between markers at D11S871 and INT2. Subsequently, his region was refined to a 3.7 cM interval flanked by loci D11S903 and PYGM. To further narrow the D11S903-PYGM interval and to obtain an estimate of the physical size of the minimal candidate region, we used a combination of high-resolution PCR hybrid mapping and analysis of recombinant Best`s disease chromosomes. We identified six markers from within the D11S903-PYGM interval that show no recombination with the defective gene in three multigeneration Best`s disease pedigrees. Our hybrid panel localizes these markers on either side of the centromere on chromosome 11. The closest markers flanking the disease gene are at D11S986 in band p12-11.22 and at D11S480 in band q13.2-13.3. Our study demonstrates that the physical size of the Best`s disease region is exceedingly larger than was previously estimated from the genetic data due to the proximity of the defective gene to the centromere of chromosome 11.

  15. Mutations in C8orf37, encoding a ciliary protein, are associated with autosomal-recessive retinal dystrophies with early macular involvement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Estrada-Cuzcano, A.; Neveling, K.; Kohl, S.; Banin, E.; Rotenstreich, Y.; Sharon, D.; Falik-Zaccai, T.C.; Hipp, S.; Roepman, R.; Wissinger, B.; Letteboer, S.J.F.; Mans, D.A.; Blokland, E.A.W.; Kwint, M.P.; Gijsen, S.J.; Huet, R.A.C. van; Collin, R.W.J.; Scheffer, H.; Veltman, J.A.; Zrenner, E.; Hollander, A.I. den; Klevering, B.J.; Cremers, F.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are clinically and genetically overlapping heterogeneous retinal dystrophies. By using homozygosity mapping in an individual with autosomal-recessive (ar) RP from a consanguineous family, we identified three sizeable homozygous regions, together

  16. Cystoid Macular Edema in Bietti's Crystalline Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Osman Saatci

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 27-year-old man with progressive bilateral visual decline was diagnosed to have Bietti's crystalline dystrophy (BCD. Fluorescein angiography revealed bilateral petaloid type late hyperfluorescence implicating concurrent cystoid macular edema (CME. Optical coherence tomography exhibited cystoid foveal lacunas OU. During the follow-up of six years, intraretinal crystals reduced in amount but CME persisted angiographically and tomographically. CME is among the rare macular features of BCD including subfoveal sensorial detachment, subretinal neovascular membrane, and macular hole.

  17. Distrofia macular cristalina em paciente com síndrome de Sjögren-Larsson: relato de caso Macular crystalline dystrophy in Sjögren-Larsson syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Leonardo Cruvinel Isaac

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Apresentação de um caso de distrofia macular cristalina em paciente do sexo feminino com síndrome de Sjögren-Larsson. A doença caracteriza-se pela tríade: ictiose congênita, diplegia ou tetraplegia espástica e retardo mental. Os olhos são acometidos em até 100% dos casos sendo característica a presença de maculopatia cristalina como observado na paciente relatada. À fundoscopia observou-se a presença de depósitos esbranquiçados perifoveais. A tomografia de coerência óptica evidenciou pontos hiper-reflexivos correspondentes aos depósitos intrarretinianos, atrofia macular com redução na espessura macular em ambos os olhos. Os achados relacionados à síndrome, à tomografia de coerência óptica foram apresentados de maneira inédita em nosso meio.Presentation of a case of crystalline macular distrophy diagnosed in a female patient with Sjögren-Larsson syndrome. The disease consists of clinical findings of spastic diplegia or tetraplegia, mental retardation, and congential ichthyosis. The eyes are affected in up to 100% of cases, and crystalline maculopathy is the main finding as described in this case report. On fundus examination multiple white dots were observed at ophthalmoscopy. The optical coherence tomography has shown not only the hipereflexive intraretinal spots but also macular atrophy with macular thickness reduction. The tomographic findings were first described in our country.

  18. Imaging characteristics of optical coherence tomography in vitelliform macular dystrophy%卵黄样黄斑营养不良的光学相干断层扫描影像学特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李娟娟; 张文佳; 盛智超; 胡竹林

    2011-01-01

    Objcetive To evaluate the imaging characteristics of optical coher ence tomography( OCT)irIvitelliform macular dystrophy at different stages. Methods The imaging characteristics of OCT in 6 patients(8eyes) with vitelliform macular dys trophy were retrospectively analyzed, which were compared with the results of their fundus examination and fundus fluorescein angiography. Results At the stage of vi telliform, the fundus examination disclosed a round elevated yellowish lesion, OCT showed an area of hyper reflectivity locating between the retinal pigment epithelium lay er and the photoreceptor layer. With the progression of disease, the thickness of ner osensory was increased. At the stage of atrophy, the atrophic focus was observed in the macular area, OCT showed the retinal pignent epithelium-choroid complement was thick.the nerve layer was thin,and the high reflective vessel membrane was seen in the combined choroidal neovascuLarization.Conclusion OCT combined with detailed medical recard,fundus examination and tluorescence fundus angiography can be helpful for the analysis of clinical characteristics and pathologic changes.%目的 探讨卵黄样黄斑营养不良各病变阶段光学相干断层扫描(optical coherence tomography,OCT)的影像学特征.方法 回顾性分析6例(8眼)卵黄样黄斑营养不良患者的OCT图像特征,并与眼底特征、眼底荧光血管造影进行对照分析.结果 卵黄样病变期患者眼底检查可见黄斑区卵圆形隆起病灶,OCT可见视网膜色素上皮层和光感受器层之间有一中等密度反射区域,随病变进展,沉积物厚度增高.萎缩期患者黄斑区见萎缩灶,OCT表现为视网膜色素上皮层脉络膜复合体弥漫性增厚,神经感觉层变薄,合并脉络膜新生血管形成时可见高反射的新生血管膜.结论 详细的病史资料、眼底检查、眼底荧光血管造影以及OCT的联合应用,有助于更科学的分析卵黄样黄斑营养不良的临床特征和病理改变.

  19. Corneal Topography Analysis of Stromal Corneal Dystrophies

    OpenAIRE

    Kocluk, Yusuf; Yalniz-Akkaya, Zuleyha; Burcu, Ayse; Ornek, Firdevs

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to compare the corneal topography and tomography parameters of macular corneal dystrophy (MCD), granular corneal dystrophy (GCD) and lattice corneal dystrophy (LCD) patients obtained by Scheimpflug imaging system. Methods: The charts, photographs and topography images of patients were reviewed retrospectively. This study included 73 eyes of 73 patients (28 MCD, 20 GCG and 25 LCD patients). Topography images were obtained by Pentacam (Oculus Optikgerate, Wetzlar, Germany...

  20. Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Devices The Search for a Cure en español Distrofia muscular About MD Muscular dystrophy (MD) is a genetic ... muscles and cause different degrees of muscle weakness. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common and the most ...

  1. Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Devices The Search for a Cure en español Distrofia muscular About MD Muscular dystrophy (MD) is a ... muscles and cause different degrees of muscle weakness. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common and the ...

  2. Corneal stromal dystrophies: a clinical pathologic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Barbosa Abreu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Corneal dystrophy is defined as bilateral and symmetric primary corneal disease, without previous associated ocular inflammation. Corneal dystrophies are classified according to the involved corneal layer in superficial, stromal, and posterior dystrophy. Incidence of each dystrophy varies according to the geographic region studied. PURPOSE: To evaluate the prevalence of stromal corneal dystrophies among corneal buttons specimens obtained by penetrating keratoplasty (PK in an ocular pathology laboratory and to correlate the diagnosis with patient age and gender. METHODS: Corneal button cases of penetrating keratoplasty from January-1996 to May-2009 were retrieved from the archives of The Henry C. Witelson Ophthalmic Pathology Laboratory and Registry, Montreal, Canada. The cases with histopathological diagnosis of stromal corneal dystrophies were stained with special stains (Peroxid acid Schiff, Masson trichrome, Congo red analyzed under polarized light, and alcian blue for classification and correlated with epidemiological information (age at time of PK and gender from patients' file. RESULTS: 1,300 corneal buttons cases with clinical diagnose of corneal dystrophy were retrieved. Stromal corneal dystrophy was found in 40 (3.1% cases. Lattice corneal dystrophy was the most prevalent with 26 cases (65%. Nineteen were female (73.07% and the PK was performed at average age of 59.3 years old. Combined corneal dystrophy was found in 8 (20% cases, 5 (62.5% of them were female and the average age of the penetrating keratoplasty was 54.8 years old. Granular corneal dystrophy was represented by 5 (12.5% cases, and 2 (40% of them were female. Penetrating keratoplasty was performed at average age of 39.5 years old in granular corneal dystrophy cases. Macular corneal dystrophy was present in only 1 (2.5% case, in a 36 years old female. CONCLUSION: Systematic histopathological approach and evaluation, including special stains in all stromal

  3. Can Vitamin A be Improved to Prevent Blindness due to Age-Related Macular Degeneration, Stargardt Disease and Other Retinal Dystrophies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Leonide; Washington, Ilyas

    2016-01-01

    We discuss how an imperfect visual cycle results in the formation of vitamin A dimers, thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of various retinal diseases, and summarize how slowing vitamin A dimerization has been a therapeutic target of interest to prevent blindness. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of vitamin A dimerization, an alternative form of vitamin A, one that forms dimers more slowly yet maneuvers effortlessly through the visual cycle, was developed. Such a vitamin A, reinforced with deuterium (C20-D3-vitamin A), can be used as a non-disruptive tool to understand the contribution of vitamin A dimers to vision loss. Eventually, C20-D3-vitamin A could become a disease-modifying therapy to slow or stop vision loss associated with dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), Stargardt disease and retinal diseases marked by such vitamin A dimers. Human clinical trials of C20-D3-vitamin A (ALK-001) are underway.

  4. Cystoid Macular Edema in Bietti's Crystalline Retinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Osman Saatci; Hasan Can Doruk; Aylin Yaman

    2014-01-01

    A 27-year-old man with progressive bilateral visual decline was diagnosed to have Bietti's crystalline dystrophy (BCD). Fluorescein angiography revealed bilateral petaloid type late hyperfluorescence implicating concurrent cystoid macular edema (CME). Optical coherence tomography exhibited cystoid foveal lacunas OU. During the follow-up of six years, intraretinal crystals reduced in amount but CME persisted angiographically and tomographically. CME is among the rare macular features of BCD in...

  5. Bietti's Crystalline Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dystrophy > Facts About Bietti's Crystalline Dystrophy Facts About Bietti's Crystalline Dystrophy This information was developed by the ... is the best person to answer specific questions. Bietti’s Crystalline Dystrophy Defined What is Bietti’s Crystalline Dystrophy? ...

  6. The molecular genetics of the corneal dystrophies--current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klintworth, Gordon K

    2003-05-01

    The pertinent literature on inherited corneal diseases is reviewed in terms of the chromosomal localization and identification of the responsible genes. Disorders affecting the cornea have been mapped to human chromosome 1 (central crystalline corneal dystrophy, familial subepithelial corneal amyloidosis, early onset Fuchs dystrophy, posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy), chromosome 4 (Bietti marginal crystalline dystrophy), chromosome 5 (lattice dystrophy types 1 and IIIA, granular corneal dystrophy types 1, 2 and 3, Thiel-Behnke corneal dystrophy), chromosome 9 (lattice dystrophy type II), chromosome 10 (Thiel-Behnke corneal dystrophy), chromosome 12 (Meesmann dystrophy), chromosome 16 (macular corneal dystrophy, fish eye disease, LCAT disease, tyrosinemia type II), chromosome 17 (Meesmann dystrophy, Stocker-Holt dystrophy), chromosome 20 (congenital hereditary endothelial corneal dystrophy types I and II, posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy), chromosome 21 (autosomal dominant keratoconus) and the X chromosome (cornea verticillata, cornea farinata, deep filiform corneal dystrophy, keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans, Lisch corneal dystrophy). Mutations in nine genes (ARSC1, CHST6, COL8A2, GLA, GSN, KRT3, KRT12, M1S1and TGFBI [BIGH3]) account for some of the corneal diseases and three of them are associated with amyloid deposition in the cornea (GSN, M1S1, TGFBI) including most of the lattice corneal dystrophies (LCDs) [LCD types I, IA, II, IIIA, IIIB, IV, V, VI and VII] recognized by their lattice pattern of linear opacities. Genetic studies on inherited diseases affecting the cornea have provided insight into some of these disorders at a basic molecular level and it has become recognized that distinct clinicopathologic phenotypes can result from specific mutations in a particular gene, as well as some different mutations in the same gene. A molecular genetic understanding of inherited corneal diseases is leading to a better appreciation of the

  7. Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... muscular dystrophy. It's important to be vaccinated for pneumonia and to keep up to date with influenza shots. Dietary changes haven't been shown to slow the progression of muscular dystrophy. But proper nutrition is essential because limited mobility can contribute to ...

  8. Cone rod dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamel Christian P

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cone rod dystrophies (CRDs (prevalence 1/40,000 are inherited retinal dystrophies that belong to the group of pigmentary retinopathies. CRDs are characterized by retinal pigment deposits visible on fundus examination, predominantly localized to the macular region. In contrast to typical retinitis pigmentosa (RP, also called the rod cone dystrophies (RCDs resulting from the primary loss in rod photoreceptors and later followed by the secondary loss in cone photoreceptors, CRDs reflect the opposite sequence of events. CRD is characterized by primary cone involvement, or, sometimes, by concomitant loss of both cones and rods that explains the predominant symptoms of CRDs: decreased visual acuity, color vision defects, photoaversion and decreased sensitivity in the central visual field, later followed by progressive loss in peripheral vision and night blindness. The clinical course of CRDs is generally more severe and rapid than that of RCDs, leading to earlier legal blindness and disability. At end stage, however, CRDs do not differ from RCDs. CRDs are most frequently non syndromic, but they may also be part of several syndromes, such as Bardet Biedl syndrome and Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 7 (SCA7. Non syndromic CRDs are genetically heterogeneous (ten cloned genes and three loci have been identified so far. The four major causative genes involved in the pathogenesis of CRDs are ABCA4 (which causes Stargardt disease and also 30 to 60% of autosomal recessive CRDs, CRX and GUCY2D (which are responsible for many reported cases of autosomal dominant CRDs, and RPGR (which causes about 2/3 of X-linked RP and also an undetermined percentage of X-linked CRDs. It is likely that highly deleterious mutations in genes that otherwise cause RP or macular dystrophy may also lead to CRDs. The diagnosis of CRDs is based on clinical history, fundus examination and electroretinogram. Molecular diagnosis can be made for some genes, genetic counseling is

  9. Pigmentos maculares Macular pigments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Canovas

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A luteína e a zeaxantina são pigmentos amarelos que se localizam na mácula. Devido à sua localização, diminuem e filtram a quantidade de luz principalmente azul que chega aos fotorreceptores, atuam como antioxidantes e podem melhorar a qualidade visual. Esta é uma revisão do seu mecanismo de incorporação, ação, possíveis aplicações e conhecimento científico a respeito.Lutein and Zeaxanthin are yellow pigments located at the macula. Because of your location macular pigments decrease and filter the amount of blue light that reach photoreceptors, protect the outer retina from oxidative stress and may improve the vision quality. This is a review regarding incorporation mechanism, function and knowledge update.

  10. Myotonic Dystrophy Family Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-28

    Myotonic Dystrophy; Congenital Myotonic Dystrophy; Myotonic Dystrophy 1; Myotonic Dystrophy 2; Dystrophia Myotonica; Dystrophia Myotonica 1; Dystrophia Myotonica 2; Myotonia Dystrophica; Myotonic Dystrophy, Congenital; Myotonic Myopathy, Proximal; PROMM (Proximal Myotonic Myopathy); Proximal Myotonic Myopathy; Steinert Disease; Steinert Myotonic Dystrophy; Steinert's Disease; Myotonia Atrophica

  11. Analysis of CHST6 gene mutation in macular corneal dystrophy%斑状角膜营养不良CHST6基因突变分析研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玉莲; 李璇; 邹鹏飞; 卢建民

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the mutations of the gene in a Chinese family with Macular corneal dystrophy (MCD),and to provide the genetic diagnosis and consultation of heredity for the patients and their families.Methods Genomic DNA was isolated from leukocytes of 3 patients of a family with MCD from the northeast China.The third exon of carbohydrate sulfotransferase 6(CHST6) gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the positions and types of gene mutations were further determined by direct sequencing.Results A common frameshift mutation due to base insert of the third exon:T62A/62-63insA was detected in all 3 MCD patients,and the terminal codon exists at NO.322 base earlier.Conclusions The mutation T62A/62-63insA is first found in MCD family,which can be used for genetic diagnosis and consultation directly.%目的 斑状角膜营养不良(MCD)是一种临床表现为进行性角膜斑状混浊的少见常染色体隐性遗传病,由碳水化合物磺基转移酶(CHST6)基因突变导致,最终常需角膜移植手术治疗.研究MCD患者的CHST6基因突变,为患者及家属提供基因诊断和遗传咨询.方法 聚合酶链式反应法研究.对2009年8月至2010年12月在大连医科大学附属第一医院眼科收治的MCD一家系3例同代患者的CHST6基因的第3外显子片段进行扩增后直接DNA测序,以明确突变位点及突变类型.结果 3例第3外显子均发生共同的复合式突变:T62M62-63insA,致使终止密码子提前出现至第322位碱基.结论 CHST6基因第3外显子的T62A/62-63insA突变可为患者及亲属提供基因诊断及家系遗传指导.且迄今为止该突变首次被发现.

  12. What Is Macular Edema?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Macular Edema Sections What Is Macular Edema? What Causes Macular ... Edema Diagnosis Macular Edema Treatment What Is Macular Edema? Dec. 01, 2010 Macular edema is swelling or ...

  13. [Genetic diagnostic testing in inherited retinal dystrophies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, S; Biskup, S

    2013-03-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies are clinically and genetically highly heterogeneous. They can be divided according to the clinical phenotype and course of the disease, as well as the underlying mode of inheritance. Isolated retinal dystrophies (i.e., retinitis pigmentosa, Leber's congenital amaurosis, cone and cone-rod dystrophy, macular dystrophy, achromatopsia, congenital stationary nightblindness) and syndromal forms (i.e., Usher syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome) can be differentiated. To date almost 180 genes and thousands of distinct mutations have been identified that are responsible for the different forms of these blinding illnesses. Until recently, there was no adequate diagnostic genetic testing available. With the development of the next generation sequencing technologies, a comprehensive genetic screening analysis for all known genes for inherited retinal dystrophies has been established at reasonable costs and in appropriate turn-around times. Depending on the primary clinical diagnosis and the presumed mode of inheritance, different diagnostic panels can be chosen for genetic testing. Statistics show that in 55-80 % of the cases the genetic defect of the inherited retinal dystrophy can be identified with this approach, depending on the initial clinical diagnosis. The aim of any genetic diagnostics is to define the genetic cause of a given illness within the affected patient and family and thereby i) confirm the clinical diagnosis, ii) provide targeted genetic testing in family members, iii) enable therapeutic intervention, iv) give a prognosis on disease course and progression and v) in the long run provide the basis for novel therapeutic approaches and personalised medicine.

  14. Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscular dystrophy (MD) is a group of more than 30 inherited diseases. They all cause muscle weakness and muscle loss. Some forms of MD appear in infancy ... types can vary in whom they affect, which muscles they affect, and what the symptoms are. All ...

  15. Macular Diplopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shippman, Sara; Cohen, Kenneth R; Heiser, Larissa

    2015-01-01

    Maculopathies affect point-to-point foveal correspondence causing diplopia. The effect that the maculopathies have on the interaction of central sensory fusion and peripheral fusion are different than the usual understanding of treatment for diplopia. This paper reviews the pathophysiology of macular diplopia, describes the binocular pathology causing the diplopia, discusses the clinical evaluation, and reviews the present treatments including some newer treatment techniques.

  16. Myotonic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Charles A

    2014-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (dystrophia myotonica, DM) is one of the most common lethal monogenic disorders in populations of European descent. DM type 1 was first described over a century ago. More recently, a second form of the disease, DM type 2 was recognized, which results from repeat expansion in a different gene. Both disorders have autosomal dominant inheritance and multisystem features, including myotonic myopathy, cataract, and cardiac conduction disease. This article reviews the clinical presentation and pathophysiology of DM and discusses current management and future potential for developing targeted therapies.

  17. What Is Macular Edema?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center Global Ophthalmology Guide Eye ... What Is Macular Edema? Dec. 01, 2010 Macular ...

  18. What Is Macular Edema?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tips & Prevention News Ask an Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Macular Edema ... Edema Treatment What Is Macular Edema? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es un Edema Macular? Dec. 01, 2010 ...

  19. Wet Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... macular degeneration Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Wet macular degeneration is a chronic eye disease that causes blurred vision or a blind spot in your visual field. It's generally caused by abnormal blood vessels that leak fluid or blood into ... macular degeneration is one of two types of age-related ...

  20. Genetic heterogeneity of butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy of the fovea.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lith-Verhoeven, J.J. van; Cremers, F.P.M.; Helm, L.J.M. van den; Hoyng, C.B.; Deutman, A.F.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: Butterfly-shaped macular dystrophy (BSMD) has so far only been associated with mutations in the peripherin/RDS gene. The initial aim of our study was to investigate the peripherin/RDS gene as the causative gene in a family with BSMD. Subsequently the putative involvement of the ROM-1 gene,

  1. Genetics Home Reference: myotonic dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions myotonic dystrophy myotonic dystrophy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Myotonic dystrophy is part of a group of inherited disorders ...

  2. [Macular serpiginous choroiditis complicated by macular hole].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brănişteanu, D; Moraru, Andreea

    2014-01-01

    Macular serpiginouschoroiditis is a rare variant of serpiginous choroiditis characterized by a severe recurrent inflammation of both central choroid and retinal pigment epithelium. Visual prognosis is severe due to subsequent distruction of retinal structures. Permanent central visual loss is the consequence of retinal pigment epithelium hyper or hypoplasia and/or subretinal neovascularization leading to fibrous scarring. This article reports the unusual case of rapid development of a macular hole soon after the onset of characteristic clinical features. Despite anti-inflammatory treatment and successful macular hole surgery the visual function remained significantly impaired by secondary central retinal pigment epithelium changes.

  3. Epiretinal membrane: a treatable cause of visual disability in myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, Hannah M; Roxburgh, Richard H; Child, Nicholas; Polkinghorne, Philip J; Frampton, Chris; Danesh-Meyer, Helen V

    2014-01-01

    A wide range of ocular abnormalities have been documented to occur in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1. The objectives of this study were to investigate the macular and optic nerve morphology using optical coherence tomography in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1. A total of 30 myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients and 28 controls were recruited for participation. All participants underwent a thorough ophthalmologic examination, including spectral-domain optical coherence tomography of the macula and retinal nerve fibre layer. Images were reviewed by a retinal specialist ophthalmologist, masked to the diagnosis of the participants. Average macular thickness was significantly greater in the myotonic dystrophy group compared to controls [327.3 μm vs. 308.5 μm (p myotonic dystrophy patient group (p = 0.0002): 48.2 % of myotonic dystrophy patient eyes had evidence of epiretinal membrane, compared with 12.5 % of control eyes. Examination revealed that 56.7 % of myotonic dystrophy patients had an epiretinal membrane in at least one eye. Visual acuity was reduced due to the presence of epiretinal membrane in six patient eyes and none of the control eyes. The presence of an epiretinal membrane was significantly correlated with increasing age in the patient group. We report an increased prevalence of epiretinal membrane in the myotonic dystrophy type 1 group. This may be a previously under-recognised form of visual impairment in this group. Epiretinal membranes can be treated surgically. We suggest that, in addition to a comprehensive clinical examination, optical coherence tomography examination is implemented as part of an ophthalmological assessment for the myotonic dystrophy type 1 patient with reduced visual acuity.

  4. Differentiating full thickness macular holes from impending macular holes and macular pseudoholes

    OpenAIRE

    Tsujikawa, M; Ohji, M; Fujikado, T.; Saito, Y.; Motokura, M.; Ishimoto, I.; Tano, Y.

    1997-01-01

    AIMS—The reliability of scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) microperimetry in differentiating full thickness macular holes from macular pseudoholes and impending macular holes was evaluated.
METHODS—106 eyes with the clinical diagnosis of full thickness macular holes, macular pseudoholes, and impending (stage 1) macular holes were examined for the presence of deep or relative scotoma using SLO microperimetry. The relation between these scotomas and the clinical diagnosis was studied.
RESULTS—...

  5. Pattern Dystrophy of the Macula in a Case of Steinert Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Esteves

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Myotonic dystrophies are typically associated with ocular complications like ptosis, weakness of the ocular muscle and cataracts, but also with less recognized retinal changes. Case Report: A 41-year-old female with type 1 myotonic dystrophy complained of progressive vision loss. Slit lamp examination revealed the presence of typical bilateral polychromatic cataract with posterior subcapsular component. Dilated fundus examination was remarkable for bilateral macular depigmented changes. Multimodal imaging analysis of the macula suggested the presence of a butterfly-shaped pattern dystrophy. Discussion: In cases of myotonic dystrophies it is of great relevance to analyze the presence of retinal changes that might limit the visual improvement following cataract extraction.

  6. Evaluation of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-06

    Becker Muscular Dystrophy; Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2A (Calpain-3 Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2B (Miyoshi Myopathy, Dysferlin Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2I (FKRP-deficiency)

  7. What Is Macular Edema?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tips & Prevention News Ask an Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Macular Edema ... for Thinning Retina Mar 10, 2014 Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es un Edema Macular? Find an Ophthalmologist ...

  8. Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goknur Haliloglu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveUllrich congenital muscular dystrophy is a rather severe type of congenitalmuscular dystrophy with early onset features related to motor development.In general it is inherited in autosomal recessive principles, however in theWestern world mostly seen with de novo dominant mutations in the collagenVI genes. Milder form of the condition is the Bethlem myopathy. There may beoverlap forms in the clinic resembling the Ehler-Danlos syndrome. There hasbeen some radical efforts for cure especially through the apoptosis cascades.Key words: Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy, collgen VI genes, Bethlemmyopathy, autophagy.

  9. Modulation of Stem Cells Differentiation and Myostatin as an Approach to Counteract Fibrosis in Muscle Dystrophy and Regeneration after Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    sclerosis, liver cirrhosis, progressive kidney disease , cardiovas- cular disease , pulmonary fibroses, macular degeneration , and muscle dystrophies...Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in chronic kidney disease : evidence and mechanisms of action. Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 17 2999... degeneration of the muscle, that would also facilitate the differentiation of transplanted dystrophin+ (D+) muscle-derived stem cells (MDSC), in

  10. Learning about Myotonic Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Genetic Tests Genomics and Health Disparities Genetic Discrimination Human Subjects Research Informed Consent for Genomics Research ... with myotonic dystrophy may have a characteristic facial appearance of wasting and weakness of the jaw and ...

  11. Muscular Dystrophy Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Families Live Unlimited Read More Deflazacort demonstrates significant muscle strength improvement in DMD Read More NDA Filing ... the Boot to Support Kids and Adults with Muscular Dystrophy, ALS and Related Diseases Read More Visit ...

  12. Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    ObjectiveUllrich congenital muscular dystrophy is a rather severe type of congenitalmuscular dystrophy with early onset features related to motor development.In general it is inherited in autosomal recessive principles, however in theWestern world mostly seen with de novo dominant mutations in the collagenVI genes. Milder form of the condition is the Bethlem myopathy. There may beoverlap forms in the clinic resembling the Ehler-Danlos syndrome. There hasbeen some radical efforts for cure espe...

  13. Cystoid macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tryfon G Rotsos

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Tryfon G Rotsos1, Marilita M Moschos21Medical Retina Service, Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, UK; 2Department of Ophthalmology, University of Athens, GreeceAbstract: We review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and etiology of cystoid macular edema (CME. Inflammatory, diabetic, post-cataract, and macular edema due to age-related macular degeneration is described. The role of chronic inflammation and hypoxia and direct macular traction is evaluated in each case according to different views from the literature. The different diagnostic methods for evaluating the edema are described. Special attention is given to fluoroangiography and the most modern methods of macula examination, such as ocular coherence tomography and multifocal electroretinography. Finally, we discuss the treatment of cystoid macular edema in relation to its etiology. In this chapter we briefly refer to the therapeutic value of laser treatment especially in diabetic maculopathy or vitrectomy in some selected cases. Our paper is focused mainly on recent therapeutic treatment with intravitreal injection of triamcinolone acetonide and anti-VEGF factors like bevacizumab (Avastin, ranibizumab (Lucentis, pegaptamid (Macugen, and others. The goal of this paper is to review the current status of this treatment for macular edema due to diabetic maculopathy, central retinal vein occlusion and post-cataract surgery. For this reason the results of recent multicenter clinical trials are quoted, as also our experience on the use of intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF factors and we discuss its value in clinical practice.Keywords: cystoid macular edema, anti-VEGF, fluoroangiography, OCT, multifocal electroretinography

  14. What Is Macular Edema?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... health and preserving your vision. Privacy Policy Related Studies Show Zika Virus May Cause More Serious Eye Damage in Babies Than Thought May 31, 2016 Study Compares Eylea, Lucentis and Avastin for Diabetic Macular ...

  15. What Is Macular Edema?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or recognize a face. Macular edema develops when blood vessels in the retina are leaking fluids. The macula ... Your Laser Pointer Dangerous Enough to Cause Eye Injury? Dec 20, 2013 Study Finds Tablets Help People ...

  16. Cataracts and macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoch, D

    1979-09-01

    The intraocular lens restores general vision and some degree of independence and mobility to patients with dense cataracts and macular degeneration. The patient, however, must be repeatedly warned that fine central vision, particularly reading, will not be possible after the surgery. An aphakic spectacle leaves such patients a narrow band of vision when superimposed over the macular lesion, and contact lenses are too small for the patient to manage insertion without help.

  17. X-82 to Treat Age-related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-12

    Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD); Macular Degeneration; Exudative Age-related Macular Degeneration; AMD; Macular Degeneration, Age-related, 10; Eye Diseases; Retinal Degeneration; Retinal Diseases

  18. Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goknur Haliloglu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveUllrich congenital muscular dystrophy is a rather severe type of congenital muscular dystrophy with early onset features related to motor development.In general it is inherited in autosomal recessive principles, however in the Western world mostly seen with de novo dominant mutations in the collagen VI genes. Milder form of the condition is the Bethlem myopathy. There may be overlap forms in the clinic resembling the Ehler-Danlos syndrome. There has been some radical efforts for cure especially through the apoptosis cascades.

  19. Limb girdle muscular dystrophies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, John

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The aim of the study was to describe the clinical spectrum of limb girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs), the pitfalls of the current classification system for LGMDs, and emerging therapies for these conditions. RECENT FINDINGS: Close to half of all LGMD subtypes have been...

  20. Central areolar choroidal dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, C.J.F.; Klevering, B.J.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Zonneveld-Vrieling, M.N.; Theelen, T.; Hollander, A.I. den; Hoyng, C.B.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical characteristics, follow-up data and molecular genetic background in a large group of patients with central areolar choroidal dystrophy (CACD). DESIGN: Retrospective case series study. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred three patients with CACD from the Netherlands. METHODS

  1. Differentiating full thickness macular holes from impending macular holes and macular pseudoholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujikawa, M.; Ohji, M.; Fujikado, T.; Saito, Y.; Motokura, M.; Ishimoto, I.; Tano, Y.

    1997-01-01

    AIMS—The reliability of scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) microperimetry in differentiating full thickness macular holes from macular pseudoholes and impending macular holes was evaluated.
METHODS—106 eyes with the clinical diagnosis of full thickness macular holes, macular pseudoholes, and impending (stage 1) macular holes were examined for the presence of deep or relative scotoma using SLO microperimetry. The relation between these scotomas and the clinical diagnosis was studied.
RESULTS—Deep and relative scotomas were detected in all 57 eyes with clinically defined full thickness macular holes. In contrast, among 49 eyes diagnosed with macular pseudoholes or impending macular holes, no deep and only one relative scotoma was observed. The sensitivity of the presence of a deep scotoma as an indicator of the clinical diagnosis of a full thickness macular hole was 100% (57 of 57), and the specificity was 100% (49 of 49). The sensitivity of the presence of a relative scotoma was 100% (57 of 57) and the specificity was 98.0% (48 of 49).
CONCLUSION—With SLO microperimetry, full thickness macular holes can be precisely and objectively distinguished from other conditions that mimic macular holes.

 PMID:9059244

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Bietti crystalline dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Bietti crystalline dystrophy Bietti crystalline dystrophy Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Bietti crystalline dystrophy is a disorder in which numerous ...

  3. Diabetic Macular Edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Conceição; Pires, Isabel; Cunha-Vaz, José

    The optical coherence tomography (OCT), a noninvasive and noncontact diagnostic method, was introduced in 1995 for imaging macular diseases. In diabetic macular edema (DME), OCT scans show hyporeflectivity, due to intraretinal and/or subretinal fluid accumulation, related to inner and/or outer blood-retinal barrier breakdown. OCT tomograms may also reveal the presence of hard exudates, as hyperreflective spots with a shadow, in the outer retinal layers, among others. In conclusion, OCT is a particularly valuable diagnostic tool in DME, helpful both in the diagnosis and follow-up procedure.

  4. What Is Macular Edema?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may be mild to severe, but in many cases, your peripheral (side) vision remains. Macular edema is often a complication of diabetic retinopathy , and is the most common form of vision loss for people with ... Related Studies Show Zika Virus May Cause More Serious Eye ...

  5. Bietti crystalline dystrophy: a morpho-functional evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parravano, Mariacristina; Sciamanna, Marta; Giorno, Paola; Boninfante, Antonluca; Varano, Monica

    2012-02-01

    We report the clinical findings and macular function of a patient with Bietti crystalline dystrophy. A 39-year-old woman reported visual loss in both eyes and nyctalopia. A complete ophthalmological evaluation, retromode imaging, SD-OCT acquisition, MP1 microperimetry, and multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG) were performed. Microcrystalline deposits in the cornea and the retina with retinal pigment epithelial atrophy were observed. Retromode imaging revealed visualization of normal large choroidal vessels, cystoid macular edema, and small defined glistening lesions. SD-OCT showed changes in the outer retina with numerous microcrystalline deposits. Microperimetry showed an absolute scotoma involving the perimacular area but sparing of the fovea. In both eyes, mfERG analysis suggests a dysfunction of pre-ganglionic retinal elements detectable in the 20 central retinal degrees. The genetic characterization showed an homozygous mutation c.772C > T[p.Leu258Phe] in exon 6. Retromode imaging and SD-OCT were useful tools to determine the extent and the localization of the crystals. Microperimetry should allow evaluation of the progression of the macular changes.

  6. Perceptual learning in patients with macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina ePlank

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD or hereditary macular dystrophies (JMD rely on an efficient use of their peripheral visual field. We trained eight AMD and five JMD patients to perform a texture-discrimination task (TDT at their preferred retinal locus (PRL used for fixation. Six training sessions of approximately one hour duration were conducted over a period of approximately 3 weeks. Before, during and after training twelve patients and twelve age-matched controls (the data from two controls had to be discarded later took part in three functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI sessions to assess training-related changes in the BOLD response in early visual cortex. Patients benefited from the training measurements as indexed by significant decrease (p=.001 in the stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA between the presentation of the texture target on background and the visual mask, and in a significant location specific effect of the PRL with respect to hit rate (p=.014. The following trends were observed: (i Improvement in Vernier acuity for an eccentric line-bisection task; (ii positive correlation between the development of BOLD signals in early visual cortex and initial fixation stability (r=0.531; (iii positive correlation between the increase in task performance and initial fixation stability (r=0.730. The first two trends were non-significant, whereas the third trend was significant at p=.014, Bonferroni corrected. Consequently, our exploratory study suggests that training on the TDT can enhance eccentric vision in patients with central vision loss. This enhancement is accompanied by a modest alteration in the BOLD response in early visual cortex.

  7. [Pathopshysiological mechanisms in macular edema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlea, Cristian; Zolog, Ileana; Blăjan, Codruta; Roşca, C; Turlea, Magdalena; Munteanu, Mihnea; Boruga, Ovidiu

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of diabetic macular edema has known a fast development in the last 5 years where the transition from laser monotherapy to intravitreal pharmacotherapy is becoming standard practice. Intravitreal injections therapy is in a continuous development with promising positive results. The use of intratvitreal devices in the treatment of macular edema of vascular cause has become a viable alternative also in treating diabetic macular edema. Several clinical studies have revealed the superiority of intravitreal treatment versus laser monotherapy. This article is evaluating and reviewing present and future treatments used to combat diabetic macular edema. [corrected].

  8. Muscle diseases: the muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Elizabeth M; Pytel, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Dystrophic muscle disease can occur at any age. Early- or childhood-onset muscular dystrophies may be associated with profound loss of muscle function, affecting ambulation, posture, and cardiac and respiratory function. Late-onset muscular dystrophies or myopathies may be mild and associated with slight weakness and an inability to increase muscle mass. The phenotype of muscular dystrophy is an endpoint that arises from a diverse set of genetic pathways. Genes associated with muscular dystrophies encode proteins of the plasma membrane and extracellular matrix, and the sarcomere and Z band, as well as nuclear membrane components. Because muscle has such distinctive structural and regenerative properties, many of the genes implicated in these disorders target pathways unique to muscle or more highly expressed in muscle. This chapter reviews the basic structural properties of muscle and genetic mechanisms that lead to myopathy and muscular dystrophies that affect all age groups.

  9. Exclusion of LCA5 locus in a consanguineous Turkish family with macular coloboma-type LCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgül, R K; Bozkurt, B; Kiratli, H; Oğüş, A

    2006-07-01

    Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA) is an inherited retinal dystrophy, which causes severe visual impairment in early childhood. Recent molecular genetic studies have linked 11 loci (AIPL1, CRB1, CRX, GUCY2D, RPE65, RDH12, RPGRIP1, TULP1, LCA3, LCA5, and LCA9) to LCA. LCA5 is a new locus, which maps to the 6q11-q16 chromosomal region and was found to be associated with macular coloboma-type LCA in a Pakistani family. Herein, we describe the molecular genetic features of a consanguineous Turkish family in which four children have macular coloboma-type LCA. Haplotype analysis was performed on the DNA of the family members using microsatellite markers against GUCY2D, RPE65, and LCA5. Genomic DNA was screened for mutations by means of single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis in exons of the RPE65 and CRX genes. In haplotype analysis, no linkage to LCA5 or GUCY2D loci was detected. None of the tested markers showed homozygosity or segregation between affected siblings. PCR-SSCP mutation analysis revealed no mutations in the screened RPE65 and CRX genes. We excluded LCA5 as the genetic cause of macular coloboma-type LCA in this Turkish family. Macular coloboma-type LCA shows genetic heterogeneity and it is not possible to establish a phenotype-genotype correlation with LCA5 and macular coloboma.

  10. Macular pigment and fixation after macular translocation surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinhard, Jens; Kanis, Martijn J.; Berendschot, Tos T. J. M.; Schoen, Christiane; Gelisken, Faik; Trauzettel-Klosinski, Susanne; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl U.; Zrenner, Eberhart

    2010-01-01

    Background After full macular translocation (MT) surgery with 3608 retinotomy, the fovea is rarely identifiable. Our aim was to verify the position of the fovea, to determine how patients fixate after MT and to examine distribution and optical density of macular pigment ( MP). Methods 9 patients aft

  11. Genetics Home Reference: age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources (3 links) BrightFocus Foundation: Macular Degeneration Treatment Macular Degeneration Partnership: Low Vision Rehabilitation Prevent Blindness America: Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) ...

  12. Non-foveal macular holes after PPV for macular pucker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abo EL Enin Mostafa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To describe six patients (six eyes who developed an eccentric macular hole after surgery for idiopathic epimacular proliferation. Materials and Methods: Review of records from six patients who developed eccentric macular holes postoperatively following vitrectomy in 107 consecutive cases with peeling of the epimacular proliferation and internal limiting membrane (ILM from June 2004 to January 2009, Results: Eccentric macular holes were developed from nine days to eight months (mean, 3.1 months after epimacular proliferation peeling. The ILM was peeled in addition to the epimacular proliferation in five of the six cases. Of the six eccentric macular holes, four were located temporal to the fovea, one was located superior to the fovea, and one was located nasal to the fovea. Final visual acuities after a mean follow-up period of 17.3 months were 20/20 in two eyes, 20/25 in one eye, 20/40 in two eyes, and 5/200 in one eye. The eye with the eccentric macular hole nasal to the fovea had the poorest final visual acuity of 5/200. Conclusion: Eccentric macular holes occurring after vitrectomy to remove epimacular proliferation is an uncommon postoperative finding. Various explanations have been suggested for the etiology of these holes, but there is no consensus. We suggested that the ILM tear should be initiated with a diamond dusted knife to reduce the likelihood of injury to the underlying Muller cells that may contribute to the formation of eccentric macular holes.

  13. Low-vision rehabilitation by means of MP-1 biofeedback examination in patients with different macular diseases: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vingolo, Enzo M; Salvatore, Serena; Cavarretta, Sonia

    2009-06-01

    Macular disease is one of the main causes of visual impairment. We studied the efficacy of low-vision rehabilitation by means of MP-1 biofeedback examination in patients with different macular disease. Five patients were enrolled (3 female and 2 male, mean age 53.8 years) and a total of 9 eyes was examined: 2 eyes with vitelliform dystrophy, 1 with a post-traumatic macular scar, 2 with Stargardt disease, 2 with myopic macular degeneration, 2 with cone dystrophy. All the patients underwent the following tests: visual acuity, reading speed, fixation test, MP-1 microperimetry. Low-vision rehabilitation, which lasted 10 weeks, consisted of 10 training sessions of 10 min for each eye, performed once a week using the MP-1 biofeedback examination. Statistical analysis was performed using Student's t-test. p values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. After training all patients displayed an improvement in visual acuity, fixation behaviour, retinal sensitivity and reading speed. Fixation behaviour within the 2 degrees diameter circle improved and was statistically significant for reading speed (p = 0.01). Reading speed improved from a mean value of 64.3 to 92 words/min. Our results show that audio feedback can, by increasing attentional modulation, help the brain to fix the final preferred retinal locus. Audio feedback facilitates stimuli transmission between intraretinal neurons as well as between the retina and brain, which is where the highest level of stimuli processing occurs, thereby probably supporting a "remapping phenomenon".

  14. Genome-wide linkage and sequence analysis challenge CCDC66 as a human retinal dystrophy candidate gene and support a distinct NMNAT1-related fundus phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A O; Budde, B S; Nürnberg, P; Kawalia, A; Lenzner, S; Bolz, H J

    2017-03-30

    To uncover the genotype underlying early-onset cone-rod dystrophy and central nummular macular atrophic lesion in 2 siblings from an endogamous Arab family, we performed targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) of 44 retinal dystrophy genes, whole-exome sequencing (WES) and genome-wide linkage analysis. Targeted NGS and WES in the index patient highlighted 2 homozygous variants, a CCDC66 frameshift deletion and a novel missense NMNAT1 variant, c.500G>A (p.Asn167Ser). Linkage and segregation analysis excluded the CCDC66 variant and confirmed the NMNAT1 mutation. Biallelic NMNAT1 mutations cause Leber congenital amaurosis with a central nummular macular atrophic lesion (LCA9). The NMNAT1 mutation reported here underlied cone-rod dystrophy rather than LCA but the fundus lesion was compatible with that of LCA9 patients, highlighting that such a fundus appearance should raise suspicion for biallelic mutations in NMNAT1 when in the context of any retinal dystrophy. Although Ccdc66 mutations have been proposed to cause retinal disease in dogs, our results and public databases challenge CCDC66 as a candidate gene for human retinal dystrophy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Modifying muscular dystrophy through TGFβ

    OpenAIRE

    Ceco, Ermelinda; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy arises from ongoing muscle degeneration and insufficient regeneration. This imbalance leads to loss of muscle with replacement by scar or fibrosis resulting in muscle weakness and, eventually, loss of muscle function. Human muscular dystrophy is characterized by a wide range of disease severity, even when the same genetic mutation is present. This variability implies that other factors, both genetic and environmental, modify the disease outcome. There has been an ongoing ef...

  16. [Duchenne muscular dystrophy pathophysiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péréon, Y; Mercier, S; Magot, A

    2015-12-01

    Dystrophin is a large cytoskeletal protein located at the plasma membrane in both muscle and non-muscle tissues, which mediates interactions between the cytoskeleton, cell membrane, and extracellular matrix. Dystrophin is a key component of multiprotein complexes (dystrophin- associated glycoprotein complex, or DGC). It is also involved in many intracellular cascades affecting membrane proteins such as calcium channels, or various signalisation pathways. In Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, both dystrophin and DGC proteins are missing. This induces excessive membrane fragility and permeability, dysregulation of calcium homeostasis, oxidative damage, which in turn favour muscle cell necrosis. The latter is initially followed by regeneration. With age, the regenerative capacity of the muscles appears to be exhausted and muscle fibres are gradually replaced by connective and adipose tissue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Adult foveomacular vitelliform dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdir Balarin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Adult foveomacular vitelliform dystrophy is a rare pathology. Less than 1% of the reported cases display perifoveal capillary permeability. The three-year follow-up period of the case revealed a rare form, which had not yet been documented. The patient was a 40-year-old female with normal visual acuity, and a minor complaint of metamorphopsia on the left eye. Retinography showed a perifoveal yellowish subretinal area OS.Angiography showed perifoveal leakage OS. Follow up showed that, over 3 years, capillary incompetence disappeared and the yellow area underwent alterations, becoming atrophic OS. Angiography also showed hyperfluorescence (windows defect. Towards the end, it resembled the appearance of late stage of Best's Disease.

  18. Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Age-related Macular Degeneration About AMD Click for more ... a leading cause of vision loss among people age 60 and older. It causes damage to the ...

  19. Paternal transmission of congenital myotonic dystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Bergoffen, J; Kant, J.; Sladky, J; McDonald-McGinn, D; Zackai, E H; Fischbeck, K H

    1994-01-01

    The congenital form of myotonic dystrophy is reported to be almost exclusively, if not exclusively, maternally transmitted. We present a case of congenital myotonic dystrophy which was inherited from a mildly affected father. This family illustrates that the congenital form of myotonic dystrophy can occur without intrauterine or other maternal factors related to the disease. The possibility of paternal transmission of the congenital form of myotonic dystrophy could be considered when counsell...

  20. Genetics of corneal endothelial dystrophies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chitra Kannabiran

    2009-12-01

    The corneal endothelium maintains the level of hydration in the cornea. Dysfunction of the endothelium results in excess accumulation of water in the corneal stroma, leading to swelling of the stroma and loss of transparency. There are four different corneal endothelial dystrophies that are hereditary, progressive, non-inflammatory disorders involving dysfunction of the corneal endothelium. Each of the endothelial dystrophies is genetically heterogeneous with different modes of transmission and/or different genes involved in each subtype. Genes responsible for disease have been identified for only a subset of corneal endothelial dystrophies. Knowledge of genes involved and their function in the corneal endothelium can aid understanding the pathogenesis of the disorder as well as reveal pathways that are important for normal functioning of the endothelium.

  1. Current status in diabetic macular edema treatments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pedro Romero-Aroca

    2013-01-01

    ... status.The photocoagulation laser is currently restricted to focal macular edema in some countries,but due the high cost of intravitreal drugs,the use of laser treatment for focal and diffuse diabetic macular edema(DME...

  2. Facts about Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Degeneration (AMD) > Facts About Age-Related Macular Degeneration Facts About Age-Related Macular Degeneration This information was ... an Eye Care Professional Last Reviewed: September 2015 Fact Sheet Blurb The National Eye Institute (NEI) is ...

  3. Ocular abnormality in myotonic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, J; Hamblet, J; Menefee, M

    1978-08-01

    A 61-year-old white woman with terminal myotonic dystrophy exhibited advanced peripheral and central retinopathy. Retinal lesions were characterized by hyperpigmentation, common, though nonspecific, in myotonic dystrophy. They resemble both heredo (tapetoretinal) and idiopathic involutional degenerations but rarely cause severe visual impairment. Neither the type nor degree of retinopathy appears to correlate with other ocular features or with the stage of the underlying disease. Our histologic observations confirm and extend those previously described. Electron microscopy suggests a primary disorder of mitochondria which may also affect smooth muscle and the myocardium.

  4. [Age related macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayen, Alexandra; Hubert, Isabelle; Berrod, Jean-Paul

    2011-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is a multifactorial disease caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. It is the first cause of blindness in patients over 50 in the western world. The disease has been traditionally classified into early and late stages with dry (atrophic) and wet (neovascular) forms: neovascular form is characterized by new blood vessels development under the macula (choroidal neovascularisation) which lead to a rapid decline of vision associated with metamorphopsia and requiring an urgent ophtalmological examination. Optical coherence tomography is now one of the most important part of the examination for diagnosis and treatment. Patient with age related maculopathy should consider taking a dietary supplement such that used in AREDS. The treatment of the wet ARMD has largely beneficied since year 2006 of anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) molecules such as ranibizumab or bevacizumab given as repeated intravitreal injections. A systematic follow up each 4 to 8 week in required for several years. There is no effective treatment at the moment for dry AMD. For patients with binocular visual acuity under 60/200 rehabilitation includes low vision specialist, vision aids and psychological support.

  5. Wasting mechanisms in muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jonghyun; Tajrishi, Marjan M; Ogura, Yuji; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-10-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a group of more than 30 different clinical genetic disorders that are characterized by progressive skeletal muscle wasting and degeneration. Primary deficiency of specific extracellular matrix, sarcoplasmic, cytoskeletal, or nuclear membrane protein results in several secondary changes such as sarcolemmal instability, calcium influx, fiber necrosis, oxidative stress, inflammatory response, breakdown of extracellular matrix, and eventually fibrosis which leads to loss of ambulance and cardiac and respiratory failure. A number of molecular processes have now been identified which hasten disease progression in human patients and animal models of muscular dystrophy. Accumulating evidence further suggests that aberrant activation of several signaling pathways aggravate pathological cascades in dystrophic muscle. Although replacement of defective gene with wild-type is paramount to cure, management of secondary pathological changes has enormous potential to improving the quality of life and extending lifespan of muscular dystrophy patients. In this article, we have reviewed major cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to muscle wasting in muscular dystrophy. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Molecular basis of muscle wasting.

  6. Prednisone Therapy for Duchenne Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects of prednisone on muscle function and the extent of steroid-related adverse effects were studied in 17 ambulant children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD at University Hospital, Groningen; Rehabilitation Centre, Utrecht; and Leiden University Medical Centre, the Netherlands.

  7. Glucocorticoids for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at the Dubowitz Neuromuscular Centre, Great Ormond Street Hospital, and other centers in the UK, conducted a prospective longitudinal study across 17 neuromuscular centers in the UK of 360 boys aged 3-15 years with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who were treated with daily or intermittent (10 days on/10 days off prednisolone for a mean duration of 4 years.

  8. Inherited myopathies and muscular dystrophies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardamone, Michael; Darras, Basil T.; Ryan, Monique M.

    The inherited myopathies and muscular dystrophies are a diverse group of muscle diseases presenting with common complaints and physical signs: weakness, motor delay, and respiratory and bulbar dysfunction. The myopathies are caused by genetic defects in the contractile apparatus of muscle, and

  9. AMPUTATION AND REFLEX SYMPATHETIC DYSTROPHY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GEERTZEN, JHB; EISMA, WH

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a chronic pain syndrome characterized by chronic burning pain, restricted range of motion, oedema and vasolability. Patients are difficult to treat and the prognosis is very often poor. This report emphasizes that an amputation in case of a reflex sympathetic

  10. Porcine models of muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive, fatal, X-linked disease caused by a failure to accumulate the cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. This disease is modeled by a variety of animal models including several fish models, mice, rats, and dogs. While these models have contributed substantially t...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: lattice corneal dystrophy type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... corneal dystrophy type I lattice corneal dystrophy type I Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Lattice corneal dystrophy type I is an eye disorder that affects the clear, ...

  12. Long-Term Outcomes of Ataluren in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-11

    Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne; Muscular Dystrophies; Muscular Disorders, Atrophic; Muscular Diseases; Musculoskeletal Disease; Neuromuscular Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Genetic Diseases, X-Linked; Genetic Diseases, Inborn

  13. Fungal keratitis in Lattice dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatterjee Samrat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of fungal keratitis occurring in a patient with lattice dystrophy. A 57-year-old farmer presented with a corneal ulcer following probable entry of paddy husk in the right eye, of one month duration. Corneal scraping revealed pigmented fungal filaments while culture grew Alternaria alternata. Treatment with 5% natamycin eye drops and 1% atropine healed the infection in four weeks. We would like to draw attention to the fact that the cornea in lattice dystrophy is prone to frequent erosions and is a compromised epithelial barrier to invasion by microorganisms. Patients must be made aware of this fact and should seek attention at the earliest following any trivial trauma. Management of minor corneal abrasions in them should be directed at healing the epithelium with adequate lubricants and preventing infection with topical antibiotic prophylaxis.

  14. A case of Mac Tel 2 with an unusual sub macular vitelliform lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekha, T; Sarwate, Nikit; Sarwate, Renuka

    2015-01-01

    Observational case report describing the clinical, FFA, OCT and mfERG findings in an elderly female patient with atypical features of macular telangiectasia (Mac Tel 2) RESULTS: A 71-year-old lady was detected to have characteristic features of Mac Tel 2 in the left eye (LE) and a yellowish sub macular vitelliform like lesion in the right eye (RE). FFA showed ill defined hyper fluorescence in the RE and telangiectasia and parafoveal leakage typical of Mac Tel 2 in the LE. On OCT RE had hyper reflective clump of echoes subfoveally with an intact RPE and LE had foveal thinning with hypo reflective intraretinal cavities. mfERG responses were normal in the RE and reduced in the LE. During the course of 3 years LE showed natural progression while RE remained unchanged. Structural and functional evaluation of an unusual sub macular vitelliform lesion seen in association with Mac Tel 2 and its course over a period of 3 years is described. The differentiating features of this lesion from adult onset foveomacular vitelliform dystrophy (AFMD) are discussed.

  15. Translational Research for Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    by successful treatment of patient mutations. In Aim 3, we have completed generation of a DBA/2J congenic mdx strain that appears to better model the...in-frame deletions that are expected to arise by successful treatment of patient mutations. Our transgenic experiments will model the best-case...macrophage infiltration and necrosis), weight loss after weaning, joint contractures , kyphosis, dystrophy of extraocular muscles, abnormal

  16. [Dystroglycan linkage and muscular dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Teruo

    2002-11-01

    Dystroglycan is a key complex between basal lamina laminin, extracellularly and membrano-cytoskeleton, intracellularly. The damage of this linkage is turned out to cause muscular dystrophies. Dystroglycan knockout is lethal. Dystroglycan-associated intracellular proteins such as dystrophin, dystrobrevin, sarcoglycans, plectin and caveolin-3 are responsible for causing severe (Duchenne type) and moderate forms (Becker, LGMDs). Laminin, dystroglycan-binding extracellular protein, is deficient in the most severe form of congenital muscular dystrophy with normal intelligence and eye. Recently, a remarkable progress is made in most severe forms of congenital muscular dystrophy with anomalies of brain and eye such as Fukuyama type (Japan) and muscle-eye-brain disease (Finland). The gene product for Fukuyama type, fukutin, belongs to a family of glycosylation enzymes in bacteria and yeast. Since alpha-dystroglycan contains 14-15 o-glycans, ser/thr-mannose 2-1 GlcNAc 4-1 Gal 3-2 Sial in the middle third mucin-domain and the sial-o-glycan is essential for laminin-binding, and since alpha-dystroglycan is defective in Fukuyama type sarcolemma with anti both sugar moiety- and peptide-antidodies, defective fukutin causes incomplete o-glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan. In '02, it is clarified that a glycosylation enzyme, POMGnT1 which modifies GlcNAc onto ser/thr-mannose, is defective in 6 MEB patients. The loss of the enzyme activity is turned out to lose alpha-dystroglycan from sarcolemma of MEB. These data strongly suggests that o-glycosylation defect of alpha-dystroglycan causes the most severe congenital muscular dystrophy such as Fukuyama type, MEB and Walker Warburg syndrome.

  17. Navigated macular laser decreases retreatment rate for diabetic macular edema: a comparison with conventional macular laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neubauer AS

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aljoscha S Neubauer,1,* Julian Langer,1,* Raffael Liegl,1 Christos Haritoglou,1 Armin Wolf,1 Igor Kozak,2 Florian Seidensticker,1 Michael Ulbig,1 William R Freeman,2 Anselm Kampik,1 Marcus Kernt,1 1Ludwig-Maximilians University, Department of Ophthalmology, Munich, Germany; 2Jacobs Retina Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare clinical outcomes and retreatment rates using navigated macular laser versus conventional laser for the treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME.Methods: In this prospective, interventional pilot study, 46 eyes from 46 consecutive patients with DME were allocated to receive macular laser photocoagulation using navigated laser. Best corrected visual acuity and retreatment rate were evaluated for up to 12 months after treatment. The control group was drawn based on chart review of 119 patients treated by conventional laser at the same institutions during the same time period. Propensity score matching was performed with Stata, based on the nearest-neighbor method.Results: Propensity score matching for age, gender, baseline visual acuity, and number of laser spots yielded 28 matched patients for the control group. Visual acuity after navigated macular laser improved from a mean 0.48 ± 0.37 logMAR by a mean +2.9 letters after 3 months, while the control group showed a mean −4.0 letters (P = 0.03. After 6 months, navigated laser maintained a mean visual gain of +3.3 letters, and the conventional laser group showed a slower mean increase to +1.9 letters versus baseline. Using Kaplan-Meier analysis, the laser retreatment rate showed separation of the survival curves after 2 months, with fewer retreatments in the navigated group than in the conventional laser group during the first 8 months (18% versus 31%, respectively, P = 0.02.Conclusion: The short-term results of this pilot study suggest

  18. Precursors of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Inger Christine; Linneberg, Allan; Larsen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    by questionnaire. Digital grayscale fundus photographs were recorded in red-free illumination and graded for the presence of macular drusen >63µm in either eye and the presence of 20 or more small, hard macular drusen as a mean of both eyes. RESULTS: Macular drusen >63µm were associated with the level of physical...... macular drusen per eye. These findings support that a physically active, heart-healthy lifestyle prevents the earliest manifestation of AMD.......PURPOSE: To investigate associations of small, hard macular drusen and larger macular drusen with obesity-related risk factors. METHODS: Cross-sectional study of 888 subjects aged 30-60 years characterized using anthropometric measurements and blood sample analyses. Physical activity was assessed...

  19. [Therapeutic approach in persistent diabetic macular edema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brănişteanu, Daniel; Moraru, Andreea

    2014-01-01

    Terminology of persistent diabetic macular edema has been initially reserved to cases unresponsive to conventional laser photocoagulation according to ETDRS criteria. While knowledge about pathophysiology of macular edema evolved and new drugs became available, the terminology of persistent diabetic macular edema expanded to include resistance to most current therapies. The purpose of this paper is to review medical and surgical options in the treatment of such difficult cases according to literature data and personal experience.

  20. Bietti crystalline dystrophy and choroidal neovascularisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, B; Parvizi, S; Mohamed, M D

    2011-02-01

    Bietti crystalline dystrophy is a rare autosomal recessive condition characterised by the presence of crystals in the retina and is followed by retinal and choroidal degeneration. We present a novel finding of juxtafoveal choroidal neovascularisation in Bietti crystalline dystrophy and demonstrate a spectral domain optical coherence tomography image of this disorder.

  1. Macular Degeneration Prevention and Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Grant Terms & Conditions Patent & Intellectual Property Policy For Current Awardees FAQs Our Funding Philosophy ... Alzheimer’s Disease Research Macular Degeneration Research National Glaucoma Research ...

  2. [Pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaarniranta, Kai; Seitsonen, Sanna; Paimela, Tuomas; Meri, Seppo; Immonen, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a multiform disease of the macula, the region responsible for detailed central vision. In recent years, plenty of new knowledge of the pathogenesis of this disease has been obtained, and the treatment of exudative macular degeneration has greatly progressed. The number of patients with age-related macular degeneration will multiply in the following decades, because knowledge of mechanisms of development of macular degeneration that could be subject to therapeutic measures is insufficient. Central underlying factors are genetic inheritance, exposure of the retina to chronic oxidative stress and accumulation of inflammation-inducing harmful proteins into or outside of retinal cells.

  3. [Current studies in myotonic dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yimeng; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2014-03-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is a genetic, progressive, multisystemic disease with muscular disorder as its primary symptom. There are two types of DM (DM1 and DM2) caused by mutations in different genes, and in Japan, DM occurs with an incidence of approximately 1 in 20,000. The pathogenic mechanism underlying the disease is RNA toxicity caused by transcripts of aberrantly elongated CTG or CCTG repeats located in the 3' untranslated region or in the intron. The current treatments for DM is limited to symptomatic care. In this review, we will discuss several new therapeutic strategies based on recent studies of RNA toxicity.

  4. Correlations Between Macular, Skin, and Serum Carotenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrady, Christopher D.; Bell, James P.; Besch, Brian M.; Gorusupudi, Aruna; Farnsworth, Kelliann; Ermakov, Igor; Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Ermakova, Maia; Gellermann, Werner; Bernstein, Paul S.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Ocular and systemic measurement and imaging of the macular carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin have been employed extensively as potential biomarkers of AMD risk. In this study, we systematically compare dual wavelength retinal autofluorescence imaging (AFI) of macular pigment with skin resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) and serum carotenoid levels in a clinic-based population. Methods Eighty-eight patients were recruited from retina and general ophthalmology practices from a tertiary referral center and excluded only if they did not have all three modalities tested, had a diagnosis of macular telangiectasia (MacTel) or Stargardt disease, or had poor AFI image quality. Skin, macular, and serum carotenoid levels were measured by RRS, AFI, and HPLC, respectively. Results Skin RRS measurements and serum zeaxanthin concentrations correlated most strongly with AFI macular pigment volume under the curve (MPVUC) measurements up to 9° eccentricity relative to MPVUC or rotationally averaged macular pigment optical density (MPOD) measurements at smaller eccentricities. These measurements were reproducible and not significantly affected by cataracts. We also found that these techniques could readily identify subjects taking oral carotenoid-containing supplements. Conclusions Larger macular pigment volume AFI and skin RRS measurements are noninvasive, objective, and reliable methods to assess ocular and systemic carotenoid levels. They are an attractive alternative to psychophysical and optical methods that measure MPOD at a limited number of eccentricities. Consequently, skin RRS and MPVUC at 9° are both reasonable biomarkers of macular carotenoid status that could be readily adapted to research and clinical settings. PMID:28728169

  5. Effect of macular hole volume on postoperative central macular thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylan Ozturk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate the association between macular hole volume (MHV and postoperative central macular thickness (CMT using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT. Methods: Thirty-three eyes of 30 patients with a large full-thickness idiopathic macular hole with or without vitreomacular traction who underwent surgical intervention were included in this cross-sectional study. Complete ophthalmological examination, including SD-OCT, was performed for all participants during the pre- and postoperative visits. MHV was preoperatively measured using SD-OCT, which captured the widest cross-sectional image of the hole. For normal distribution analysis of the data, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was performed, and for statistical analyses, chi-square, Student's t-test, Mann-Whitney U test, and Pearson's correlation coefficient test were performed. Results: Mean preoperative best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA and MHV were found to be 0.99 ± 0.36 (range, 0.3-2.0 logMAR and 0.139 ± 0.076 (range, 0.004-0.318 mm3, respectively. Mean follow-up was 16.3 ± 14.3 (range, 3-50 months. No statistical correlations were found between MHV and postoperative BCVA (p=0.588 and between MHV and disease recurrence (p=0.544. A weak negative correlation existed between MHV and final CMT scores (p=0.04, r=-0.383. Conclusions: Greater MHV was found to be weakly associated with lower postoperative CMT scores.

  6. Combined therapy for diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Al Rashaed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic macular edema (DME is the main cause of visual impairment in diabetic patients. Macular edema within 1 disk diameter of the fovea is present in 9% of the diabetic population. The management of DME is complex and often multiple treatment approaches are needed. This review demonstrates the benefits of intravitreal triamcinolone, bevacizumab and ranibizumab as adjunctive therapy to macular laser treatment in DME. The published results indicate that intravitreal injections of these agents may have a beneficial effect on macular thickness and visual acuity, independent of the type of macular edema that is present. Therefore, pharmacotherapy could complement focal/grid laser photocoagulation in the management of DME. For this review, we performed a literature search and summarized recent findings regarding combined therapy for DME.

  7. Edema macular diabético Diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Andonegui

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available El edema macular diabético representa la primera causa de pérdida visual en los pacientes con diabetes mellitus. Su complejidad, unida a la aparición de nuevos métodos de diagnóstico así como de novedosas alternativas de tratamiento, hace que el enfoque de esta enfermedad suponga un importante reto para el oftalmólogo. A lo largo de este artículo se describen su patofisiología, manifestaciones clínicas, clasificación, diagnóstico y tratamiento, haciendo especial énfasis en los nuevos métodos diagnósticos y en las diferentes opciones terapéuticas.Diabetic macular edema is the principal cause of visual loss in patients with diabetes mellitus. Its complexity, together with the appearance of new methods of diagnosis and new alternatives for treatment, mean that the approach to this disease is an important challenge for ophthalmologists. This article describes its pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, classification, diagnosis and treatment, with special emphasis on the new diagnostic methods and on the different therapeutic options.

  8. [Muscular Dystrophies Involving the Retinal Function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jägle, H

    2016-03-01

    Muscular dystrophies are rare disorders, with an incidence of approx. 20 in 100 000. Some dystrophies also affect retinal or optic nerve function. In such cases, the ophthalmological findings may be critical for differential diagnosis or patient counseling. For example in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, where the alteration in retinal function seems to reflect cerebral involvement. Other important forms are mitochondrial and metabolic disorders, such as the Kearns-Sayre syndrome and the Refsum syndrome. Molecular genetic analysis has become a major tool for differential diagnosis, but may be complex and demanding. This article gives an overview of major muscular dystrophies involving retinal function and their genetic origin, in order to guide differential diagnosis.

  9. Anesthesia for a Patient with Myotonic Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Kalaycı

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy is the most common myotonic syndrome causing abnormalities of the skeletal and smooth muscles as well as problems related to the cardiac, gastrointestinal and endocrine systems. In affected people, reduced functional residual capacity, vital capacity, and peak inspiratory pressure are observed within the respiratory system. As would be expected, anesthetic management of these patients is challenging for anesthesiologists. In addition, delayed recovery from anesthesia and cardiac and pulmonary complications may develop in the intraoperative and early postoperative periods due to sensitivity to sedatives, anesthetic agents, and neuromuscular blocking agents. Myotonic dystrophy can be performed with the use of appropriate anesthesia procedures as well as carefully communication between anesthesiologists and surgeons. In conclusion, myotonic dystrophy has variations, which makes it important to preoperatively determine specific surgical and anesthetic management strategies for each patient. In this article, we present a patient with myotonic dystrophy who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy surgery for symptomatic cholelithiasis and to discuss the relevant literature.

  10. Duchenne muscular dystrophy - a molecular service

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy using molecular technology was instituted at the ..... utilising non-fat dry milk for analysis of proteins and nucleic acids transferred ... acid to high specific activity in vitro by nick translation with DNA polymerase.

  11. Non-Coding RNAs in Muscle Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Ferlini

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available ncRNAs are the most recently identified class of regulatory RNAs with vital functions in gene expression regulation and cell development. Among the variety of roles they play, their involvement in human diseases has opened new avenues of research towards the discovery and development of novel therapeutic approaches. Important data come from the field of hereditary muscle dystrophies, like Duchenne muscle dystrophy and Myotonic dystrophies, rare diseases affecting 1 in 7000–15,000 newborns and is characterized by severe to mild muscle weakness associated with cardiac involvement. Novel therapeutic approaches are now ongoing for these diseases, also based on splicing modulation. In this review we provide an overview about ncRNAs and their behavior in muscular dystrophy and explore their links with diagnosis, prognosis and treatments, highlighting the role of regulatory RNAs in these pathologies.

  12. Prevalence of generalized retinal dystrophy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mette; Jensen, Hanne; Bregnhøj, Jesper F;

    2014-01-01

    of this study was to examine the prevalence and diagnostic spectrum of generalized retinal dystrophy in the Danish population. METHODS: A population-based cross-sectional study with data from the Danish Retinitis Pigmentosa Registry that comprises all patients in Denmark with generalized retinal....... RESULTS: Of the 5,602,628 Danish citizens on January 1, 2013, 1622 patients were registered as having a generalized retinal dystrophy and were alive and living in Denmark, corresponding to a prevalence of 1:3,454. In 28% of cases the eye condition was part of a syndrome, while the remaining 72% had eye...... disease only. Aside from simplex cases (45%), the most common hereditary pattern was autosomal recessive (23%). CONCLUSION: This epidemiological survey demonstrates that the prevalence of generalized retinal dystrophy in the Danish population is 1:3454. Many of the dystrophies are the subjects of clinical...

  13. Targeting latent TGFβ release in muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceco, Ermelinda; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Gardner, Brandon; Miller, Tamari; DeJesus, Adam; Earley, Judy U; Hadhazy, Michele; Smith, Lucas R; Barton, Elisabeth R; Molkentin, Jeffery D; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2014-10-22

    Latent transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) binding proteins (LTBPs) bind to inactive TGFβ in the extracellular matrix. In mice, muscular dystrophy symptoms are intensified by a genetic polymorphism that changes the hinge region of LTBP, leading to increased proteolytic susceptibility and TGFβ release. We have found that the hinge region of human LTBP4 was also readily proteolysed and that proteolysis could be blocked by an antibody to the hinge region. Transgenic mice were generated to carry a bacterial artificial chromosome encoding the human LTBP4 gene. These transgenic mice displayed larger myofibers, increased damage after muscle injury, and enhanced TGFβ signaling. In the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the human LTBP4 transgene exacerbated muscular dystrophy symptoms and resulted in weaker muscles with an increased inflammatory infiltrate and greater LTBP4 cleavage in vivo. Blocking LTBP4 cleavage may be a therapeutic strategy to reduce TGFβ release and activity and decrease inflammation and muscle damage in muscular dystrophy.

  14. Ventilatory support in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wohlgemuth, M.; Kooi, E.L. van der; Kesteren, R.G. van; Maarel, S.M. van der; Padberg, G.W.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Respiratory insufficiency due to respiratory muscle weakness is a common complication of many neuromuscular diseases. The prevalence of respiratory failure in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is unknown. The authors identified 10 FSHD patients on nocturnal ventilatory support at home,

  15. Brain MRI Findings in Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings in 13 patients with congenital muscular dystrophy (MDCIC and Fukutin-related protein (FKRP gene mutations were retrospectively reviewed in a study at Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK, and European centers.

  16. Update on treatments of diabetic macular edema

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiao-lu; LIU Kun; XU Xun

    2009-01-01

    Objective To review the update research progress about the treatment of diabetic macular edema and to give helpful guidelines in the treatment of diabetic macular edema based on available evidence to date.Data sources A literature search of all English articles was performed on the online electronic PubMed database dated 1984 to 2009. The keywords searched included: macular edema, therapy, laser coagulation, intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide, vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor, protein kinase C inhibitor and Pars plana vitrectomy. After finding relevant articles within these search limits, a manual search was conducted through the references from these articles.Study selection Original articles and critical reviews were reviewed and selected to address the stated purpose.Results To date, demonstrated means to reduce the risk of vision loss from diabetic macular edema include focal/grid laser photocoagulation and improved metabolic control. Emerging pharmacologic therapies (intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide, vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors and protein kinase C beta-isoform inhibitors) and Pars plana vitrectomy have shown early promise in the treatment of diabetic macular edema.Conclusions As there has been extensive development in multiple treatments of diabetic macular edema, choice of the most suitable treatment for specific patients becomes important. Combination therapy of laser, pharmacological and surgical treatment modalities may offer an alternative to treatment of diabetic macular edema.

  17. The limb-girdle muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicklund, Matthew P; Kissel, John T

    2014-08-01

    A collection of more than 30 genetic muscle diseases that share certain key features, limb-girdle muscular dystrophies are characterized by progressive weakness and muscle atrophy of the hips, shoulders, and proximal extremity muscles with postnatal onset. This article discusses clinical, laboratory, and histologic features of the 6 most prevalent limb-girdle dystrophies. In this large group of disorders, certain distinctive features often can guide clinicians to a correct diagnosis.

  18. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: the management of scoliosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Adrian C.; Roper, Helen P.; Chikermane, Ashish A.; Tatman, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    This study summaries the current management of scoliosis in patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. A literature review of Medline was performed and the collected articles critically appraised. This literature is discussed to give an overview of the current management of scoliosis within Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. Importantly, improvements in respiratory care, the use of steroids and improving surgical techniques have allowed patients to maintain quality of life and improved life expectancy in this patient group.

  19. Cardiac involvement in myotonic dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Marie; Diaz, Lars Jorge; Ranthe, Mattis Flyvholm

    2014-01-01

    disorders, arrhythmias, and device implantation). In the DM cohort, SIR for any cardiac disease was 3.42 [95% confidence interval (CI) 3.01-3.86]; for a cardiac disease belonging to the selected subgroups 6.91 (95% CI: 5.93-8.01) and for other cardiac disease 2.59 (95% CI: 2.03-3.25). For a cardiac disease......AIMS: To quantify the association between myotonic dystrophy (DM) and cardiac disease in a nationwide cohort. METHODS AND RESULTS: We identified a nationwide cohort of 1146 DM patients (period 1977-2011) using the National Patient Registry (NPR) and a subcohort of 485 patients who had undergone...... genetic testing for DM1. Information on incident cardiac diseases was obtained from the NPR. We estimated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of cardiac disease compared with the background population, overall and according to selected diagnostic subgroups (cardiomyopathy, heart failure, conduction...

  20. Cystoid macular edema after bone marrow transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khetan Vikas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of cystoid macular edema in a patient who underwent bone marrow transplant for aplastic anemia. After having ruled out all the other causes of cystoid macular edema, we concluded that it was secondary to the bone marrow transplant. The patient had mild visual impairment and did not recover the lost vision. In this case report, we describe in detail the clinical presentation, follow-up, and course of medication that this patient had. It is an illustrated case report of cystoid macular edema after bone marrow transplant with mild visual impairment and no recovery.

  1. Consistency of ocular coherence tomography fast macular thickness mapping in diabetic diffuse macular edema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saraiva, Fabio Petersen; Costa, Patricia Grativol; Inomata, Daniela Lumi; Melo, Carlos Sergio Nascimento; Helal Junior, John; Nakashima, Yoshitaka [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. de Oftalmologia]. E-mail: fabiopetersen@yahoo.com.br

    2007-07-01

    Objectives: To investigate optical coherence tomography consistency on foveal thickness, foveal volume, and macular volume measurements in patients with and without diffuse diabetic macular edema. Introduction: Optical coherence tomography represents an objective technique that provides cross-sectional tomographs of retinal structure in vivo. However, it is expected that poor fixation ability, as seen in diabetic macular edema, could alter its results. Several authors have discussed the reproducibility of optical coherence tomography, but only a few have addressed the topic with respect to diabetic maculopathy. Methods: The study recruited diabetic patients without clinically evident retinopathy (control group) and with diffuse macular edema (case group). Only one eye of each patient was evaluated. Five consecutive fast macular scans were taken using Ocular Coherence Tomography 3; the 6 mm macular map was chosen. The consistency in measurements of foveal thickness, foveal volume, and total macular volume for both groups was evaluated using the Pearson's coefficient of variation. The T-test for independent samples was used in order to compare measurements of both groups. Results: Each group consisted of 20 patients. All measurements had a coefficient of variation less than 10%. The most consistent parameter for both groups was the total macular volume. Discussion: Consistency in measurement is a mainstay of any test. A test is unreliable if its measurements can not be correctly repeated. We found a good index of consistency, even considering patients with an unstable gaze. Conclusions: Optical coherence tomography is a consistent method for diabetic subjects with diffuse macular edema. (author)

  2. Porcine models of muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selsby, Joshua T; Ross, Jason W; Nonneman, Dan; Hollinger, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive, fatal, X-linked disease caused by a failure to accumulate the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. This disease has been studied using a variety of animal models including fish, mice, rats, and dogs. While these models have contributed substantially to our mechanistic understanding of the disease and disease progression, limitations inherent to each model have slowed the clinical advancement of therapies, which necessitates the development of novel large-animal models. Several porcine dystrophin-deficient models have been identified, although disease severity may be so severe as to limit their potential contributions to the field. We have recently identified and completed the initial characterization of a natural porcine model of dystrophin insufficiency. Muscles from these animals display characteristic focal necrosis concomitant with decreased abundance and localization of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex components. These pigs recapitulate many of the cardinal features of muscular dystrophy, have elevated serum creatine kinase activity, and preliminarily appear to display altered locomotion. They also suffer from sudden death preceded by EKG abnormalities. Pig dystrophinopathy models could allow refinement of dosing strategies in human-sized animals in preparation for clinical trials. From an animal handling perspective, these pigs can generally be treated normally, with the understanding that acute stress can lead to sudden death. In summary, the ability to create genetically modified pig models and the serendipitous discovery of genetic disease in the swine industry has resulted in the emergence of new animal tools to facilitate the critical objective of improving the quality and length of life for boys afflicted with such a devastating disease.

  3. Cardiac involvement in myotonic dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koroush Khalighi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Myotonic dystrophy (DM is an inherited progressive muscle disorder caused by defects in muscle proteins. As the incidence of this condition is low, not many are familiar with the multisystem involvement. At times, cardiac disease may even be the predominant manifestation in the form of arrhythmias, conduction defects, and cardiomyopathies. The progression of the disease can lead to sudden, unpredictable death. Thus, it is important to identify this subgroup and treat accordingly. Objective: To identify patients with DM and assess their risk for sudden cardiac death. Methods: Nine patients previously diagnosed with muscular dystrophy were evaluated by cardiologists for various reasons, from a general follow-up to cardiac arrest. All of them had electrocardiograms (EKG and 2-D echocardiograms, and seven of them had further electrophysiological (EP studies. Results: Of the nine patients with DM, eight had EKG evidence of conduction abnormalities ranging from first-degree heart block to complete heart block. Of the seven who had EP studies, five had inducible ventricular tachycardia requiring immediate cardioversion and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD implant. Two of them underwent permanent pacemaker placement due to complete heart block and infra-Hissian block. The remaining two patients opted for a conservative approach with yearly EKG monitoring. Conclusion: Because one-third of the cardiac deaths in patients with DM are sudden, there is a strong need to identify these patients and intervene in those at high risk. Prophylactic pacemaker placement is recommended even in those with minimal conduction system abnormality. However, the common practice is to identify patients at high risk of conduction abnormalities by EP studies and then provide them with prophylactic invasive strategies.

  4. Adaptive optics imaging of the outer retinal tubules in Bietti's crystalline dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battu, R; Akkali, M C; Bhanushali, D; Srinivasan, P; Shetty, R; Berendschot, T T J M; Schouten, J S A G; Webers, C A

    2016-05-01

    PurposeTo study the outer retinal tubules using spectral domain optical coherence tomography and adaptive optics and in patients with Bietti's crystalline dystrophy.MethodsTen eyes of five subjects from five independent families with Bietti's crystalline Dystrophy (BCD) were characterized with best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), full-field electroretinography, and fundus autofluorescence (FAF). High-resolution images were obtained with the spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and adaptive optics (AO).ResultsSD-OCT showed prominent outer retinal layer loss and outer retinal tubulations at the margin of outer retinal loss. AO images displayed prominent macrotubules and microtubules with characteristic features in eight out of the 10 eyes. Crystals were present in all ten eyes. There was a reduction in the cone count in all eyes in the area outside the outer retinal tubules (ORT).ConclusionsThis study describes the morphology of the outer retinal tubules when imaged enface on the adaptive optics in patients with BCD. These findings provide insight into the macular structure of these patients. This may have prognostic implications and refine the study on the pathogenesis of BCD.

  5. FDA OKs 1st Drug to Treat Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html FDA OKs 1st Drug to Treat Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Exondys 51 seems to fill unmet need ... the first drug for a rare form of muscular dystrophy. Exondys 51 (eteplirsen) was granted accelerated approval ...

  6. What Is Age-Related Macular Degeneration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Qué es la degeneración macular relacionada con la edad? Find an Ophthalmologist Advanced Search Ask an Ophthalmologist ... Privacy Policy Terms of Service For Advertisers For Media Ophthalmology Job Center © American Academy of Ophthalmology 2017 ...

  7. Combination Therapy for Diabetic Macular Edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinah Zur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic macular edema is a main reason for visual loss in diabetic patients. Until recent years, macular laser photocoagulation was the only available therapy. The awareness that inflammation is an important factor in the pathogenetic process of DME gave reason for intravitreal treatment with corticosteroids. The introduction of anti-VEGF drugs brought a revolutionary change in the treatment of DME. This paper will review the important clinical trials with an emphasis on combination therapies.

  8. Age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Morten; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    2002-01-01

    (exudative cases); the remainder has only geographic atrophy. In cross-sectional population-based studies about 45% of eyes with AMD have visual acuity reduced to 20/200 or worse. This is true both for exudative AMD and pure geographic atrophy. Age and genetic predisposition are known risk factors for AMD...... a fluorescein angiographic study and a physician capable of interpreting it. For CNV not involving the foveal centre, the only evidence-based treatment is laser photocoagulation. For AMD cases with subfoveal CNV, good visual acuity, and predominantly classic fluorescence pattern on fluorescein angiography....... Smoking is probably also a risk factor. Preventive strategies using macular laser photocoagulation are under investigation, but their efficacy in preventing visual loss is as yet unproven. There is no treatment with proven efficacy for geographic atrophy. Optimal treatment for exudative AMD requires...

  9. Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomographic Findings of Bietti Crystalline Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Osman Saatci

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the OCT features of 24 eyes of 12 patients with Bietti crystalline dystrophy (BCD with the Heidelberg HRA2-OCT. Seventeen of 24 eyes were in intermediate stage of the disease and seven in advanced stage of the disease at the time of latest OCT examination performed in 2014. Outer retinal tubulations and retinal hyperreflective dots were present in 20 of 24 eyes. The remaining four eyes had advanced disease with very thin retina. Appearance of bright plaque on top of RPE-Bruch membrane was present in all eyes. Choroidal hyperreflective spots were noted in 19 of 24 eyes. The remaining five eyes had advanced disease stage with very thin choroid. Mean central macular thickness was 163.08 μm ± 62.52 for all eyes (170.35 μm ± 56.46 in eyes with intermediate disease and 145.42 μm ± 77.2 in eyes with advanced disease. Mean subfoveal choroidal thickness was 95.37 μm ± 55.93 for the study eyes (116.47 ± 46.92 μm in eyes with intermediate disease and 44.14 μm ± 42.43 in eyes with advanced disease. Choroidal hyperreflective spots were noted in 21 of 24 eyes (87.5%. SD-OCT shows the disease progression in retinal and choroidal layers delicately in eyes with BCD and expands our knowledge about the ongoing disease process.

  10. Spectral domain optical coherence tomographic findings of bietti crystalline dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatci, Ali Osman; Doruk, Hasan Can; Yaman, Aylin; Oner, Ferit Hakan

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the OCT features of 24 eyes of 12 patients with Bietti crystalline dystrophy (BCD) with the Heidelberg HRA2-OCT. Seventeen of 24 eyes were in intermediate stage of the disease and seven in advanced stage of the disease at the time of latest OCT examination performed in 2014. Outer retinal tubulations and retinal hyperreflective dots were present in 20 of 24 eyes. The remaining four eyes had advanced disease with very thin retina. Appearance of bright plaque on top of RPE-Bruch membrane was present in all eyes. Choroidal hyperreflective spots were noted in 19 of 24 eyes. The remaining five eyes had advanced disease stage with very thin choroid. Mean central macular thickness was 163.08 μm ± 62.52 for all eyes (170.35 μm ± 56.46 in eyes with intermediate disease and 145.42 μm ± 77.2 in eyes with advanced disease). Mean subfoveal choroidal thickness was 95.37 μm ± 55.93 for the study eyes (116.47 ± 46.92 μm in eyes with intermediate disease and 44.14 μm ± 42.43 in eyes with advanced disease). Choroidal hyperreflective spots were noted in 21 of 24 eyes (87.5%). SD-OCT shows the disease progression in retinal and choroidal layers delicately in eyes with BCD and expands our knowledge about the ongoing disease process.

  11. Macular morphology and visual acuity after macular hole surgery with or without internal limiting membrane peeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, U.C.; Kroyer, K.; Sander, B.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To examine postoperative macular morphology and visual outcome after 12 months in relation to internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling versus no peeling, indocyanine green (ICG) staining and re-operation in eyes that achieved macular hole closure after surgery. Methods: Seventy-four eyes wit...

  12. [Congenital muscular dystrophies in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavone-Mauro, Cristina; Barros, Graciela

    2013-09-06

    From the clinical and genetic point of view, congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) are a heterogenic group of diseases within neuromuscular pathologies. The best known forms are: merosin deficiency CMD, collagen VI deficiency CMD, LMNA-related CMD, selenoprotein-related CMD (SEPN1) and alpha-dystroglycan-related CMD. They present with a broad spectrum of clinical phenotypes. Most of them are transmitted by recessive autosomal inheritance. The initial manifestations very often begin in infancy or in the neonatal period. There are clinical suspicions of the existence of hypotonia and paresis, and they are characterised by a dystrophic pattern in the muscular biopsy (muscle replaced by fibroadipose tissue, with necrosis and cell regeneration). Advances in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of CMD have made it possible to make further progress in the classification of the different subtypes. The aim of this review is to comment on the advances made in recent years as regards the classification of CMD in terms of genetics, the proteins involved and their clinical presentation.

  13. Duchenne muscular dystrophy and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pane, M; Messina, S; Bruno, C; D'Amico, A; Villanova, M; Brancalion, B; Sivo, S; Bianco, F; Striano, P; Battaglia, D; Lettori, D; Vita, G L; Bertini, E; Gualandi, F; Ricotti, V; Ferlini, A; Mercuri, E

    2013-04-01

    Cognitive and behavioral difficulties occur in approximately a third of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The aim of our study was to assess the prevalence of epilepsy in a cohort of 222 DMD patients. Epileptic seizures were found in 14 of the 222 DMD patients (6.3%). The age of onset ranged from 3 months to 16 years (mean 7.8). Seizures were more often focal epilepsy (n=6), generalized tonic-clonic seizures (n=4) or absences (n=4). They were present in 12 of the 149 boys with normal IQ (8.1%) and in two of the 73 with mental retardation (2.7%). In two cases the parents did not report any past or present history of seizures but only 'staring episodes' interpreted as a sign of 'poor attention'. In both patients EEG showed the typical pattern observed in childhood absence epilepsy. Our results suggest that the prevalence of epilepsy in our study (6.3%) is higher than in the general pediatric population (0.5-1%). The risk of epilepsy does not appear to increase in patients with mental retardation.

  14. Therapeutics in duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strober, Jonathan B

    2006-04-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal disorder affecting approximately 1 in 3,500 live born males, characterized by progressive muscle weakness. Several different strategies are being investigated in developing a cure for this disorder. Until a cure is found, therapeutic and supportive care is essential in preventing complications and improving the afflicted child's quality of life. Currently, corticosteroids are the only class of drug that has been extensively studied in this condition, with controversy existing over the use of these drugs, especially in light of the multiple side effects that may occur. The use of nutritional supplements has expanded in recent years as researchers improve our abilities to use gene and stem cell therapies, which will hopefully lead to a cure soon. This article discusses the importance of therapeutic interventions in children with DMD, the current debate over the use of corticosteroids to treat this disease, the growing use of natural supplements as a new means of treating these boys and provides an update on the current state of gene and stem cell therapies.

  15. Genetics of Bietti Crystalline Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Danny S C; Lai, Timothy Y Y; Ng, Tsz Kin; Pang, Chi Pui

    2016-01-01

    Bietti crystalline dystrophy (BCD) is an inherited retinal degenerative disease characterized by crystalline deposits in the retina, followed by progressive atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), choriocapillaris, and photoreceptors. CYP4V2 has been identified as the causative gene for BCD. The CYP4V2 gene belongs to the cytochrome P450 superfamily and encodes for fatty acid ω-hydroxylase of both saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. The CYP4V2 protein is localized most abundantly within the endoplasmic reticulum in the RPE and is postulated to play a role in the physiological lipid recycling system between the RPE and photoreceptors to maintain visual function. Electroretinographic assessments have revealed progressive dysfunction of rod and cone photoreceptors in patients with BCD. Several genotypes have been associated with more severe phenotypes based on clinical and electrophysiological findings. With the advent of multimodal imaging with spectral domain optical coherence tomography, fundus autofluorescence, and adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, more precise delineation of BCD severity and progression is now possible, allowing for the potential future development of targets for gene therapy.

  16. Circulating Biomarkers for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Spitali, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common form of muscular dystrophy. Genetic and biochemical research over the years has characterized the cause, pathophysiology and development of the disease providing several potential therapeutic targets and/or biomarkers. High throughput – omic technologies have provided a comprehensive understanding of the changes occurring in dystrophic muscles. Murine and canine animal models have been a valuable source to profile muscles and body fluids, thus providing candidate biomarkers that can be evaluated in patients. This review will illustrate known circulating biomarkers that could track disease progression and response to therapy in patients affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We present an overview of the transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomics and lipidomic biomarkers described in literature. We show how studies in muscle tissue have led to the identification of serum and urine biomarkers and we highlight the importance of evaluating biomarkers as possible surrogate endpoints to facilitate regulatory processes for new medicinal products. PMID:27858763

  17. Median nail dystrophy involving the thumb nail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahulkrishna Kota

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Median canaliform dystrophy of Heller is a rare entity characterized by a midline or a paramedian ridge or split and canal formation in nail plate of one or both the thumb nails. It is an acquired condition resulting from a temporary defect in the matrix that interferes with nail formation. Habitual picking of the nail base may be responsible for some cases. Histopathology classically shows parakeratosis, accumulation of melanin within and between the nail bed keratinocytes. Treatment of median nail dystrophy includes injectable triamcinalone acetonide, topical 0.1% tacrolimus, and tazarotene 0.05%, which is many a times challenging for a dermatologist. Psychiatric opinion should be taken when associated with the depressive, obsessive-compulsive, or impulse-control disorder. We report a case of 19-year-old male diagnosed as median nail dystrophy.

  18. Weight reduction in boys with muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, R H; Round, J M; Jackson, M J; Griffiths, R D; Lilburn, M F

    1984-06-01

    Many children with muscular dystrophy are overweight, and although weight control is pursued in some centres it is unusual to encourage severe dietary restriction for fear that it might lead to accelerated loss of muscle. In this study, two overweight boys with muscular dystrophy were monitored by whole-body nitrogen balance, total body potassium, strength and functional measurements during calorie restriction. Both patients were found to have a transient loss of nitrogen on commencing the low calorie intake: thereafter, weight loss was not found to have any deleterious effect on muscle bulk or function in either patient. It is suggested that controlled weight-reduction in obese children with muscular dystrophy is a safe and practical way of losing excess fat, which can improve mobility and self-esteem, and may possibly effect longevity.

  19. Corneal stromal dystrophies: a clinical pathologic study Distrofia corneana estromal: um estudo clínicopatológico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Barbosa Abreu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Corneal dystrophy is defined as bilateral and symmetric primary corneal disease, without previous associated ocular inflammation. Corneal dystrophies are classified according to the involved corneal layer in superficial, stromal, and posterior dystrophy. Incidence of each dystrophy varies according to the geographic region studied. PURPOSE: To evaluate the prevalence of stromal corneal dystrophies among corneal buttons specimens obtained by penetrating keratoplasty (PK in an ocular pathology laboratory and to correlate the diagnosis with patient age and gender. METHODS: Corneal button cases of penetrating keratoplasty from January-1996 to May-2009 were retrieved from the archives of The Henry C. Witelson Ophthalmic Pathology Laboratory and Registry, Montreal, Canada. The cases with histopathological diagnosis of stromal corneal dystrophies were stained with special stains (Peroxid acid Schiff, Masson trichrome, Congo red analyzed under polarized light, and alcian blue for classification and correlated with epidemiological information (age at time of PK and gender from patients' file. RESULTS: 1,300 corneal buttons cases with clinical diagnose of corneal dystrophy were retrieved. Stromal corneal dystrophy was found in 40 (3.1% cases. Lattice corneal dystrophy was the most prevalent with 26 cases (65%. Nineteen were female (73.07% and the PK was performed at average age of 59.3 years old. Combined corneal dystrophy was found in 8 (20% cases, 5 (62.5% of them were female and the average age of the penetrating keratoplasty was 54.8 years old. Granular corneal dystrophy was represented by 5 (12.5% cases, and 2 (40% of them were female. Penetrating keratoplasty was performed at average age of 39.5 years old in granular corneal dystrophy cases. Macular corneal dystrophy was present in only 1 (2.5% case, in a 36 years old female. CONCLUSION: Systematic histopathological approach and evaluation, including special stains in all stromal

  20. Advances in gene therapy for muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Razak, Hayder; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive lethal inherited muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a protein required for muscle fibre integrity. So far, many approaches have been tested from the traditional gene addition to newer advanced approaches based on manipulation of the cellular machinery either at the gene transcription, mRNA processing or translation levels. Unfortunately, despite all these efforts, no efficient treatments for DMD are currently available. In this review, we highlight the most advanced therapeutic strategies under investigation as potential DMD treatments.

  1. Macular edema in uveitis with emphasis on ocular sarcoidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norel, J. van

    2015-01-01

    This thesis investigates the accumulation of fluid in the yellow spot (macular edema) in ocular inflammation (uveitis). Macular edema may result in definitive loss of vision.Two methods of imaging of macular edema are fluorescein angiography (FA) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). The first met

  2. Management of macular epiretinal membrane by vitrectomy and intravitreal triamcinolone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay Shukla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient underwent successful vitrectomy for macular epiretinal membrane with anatomical and functional improvement. 10 weeks later, there was a recurrence of macular edema with corresponding visual decline. An intravitreal injection of triamcinolone acetonide not only restored the macular anatomy but also improved the visual outcome beyond that achieved after surgery.

  3. Macular edema in uveitis with emphasis on ocular sarcoidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norel, J. van

    2015-01-01

    This thesis investigates the accumulation of fluid in the yellow spot (macular edema) in ocular inflammation (uveitis). Macular edema may result in definitive loss of vision.Two methods of imaging of macular edema are fluorescein angiography (FA) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). The first met

  4. Surgical treatment of lamellar macular holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalewska, Zofia; Michalewski, Janusz; Odrobina, Dominik; Pikulski, Zbigniew; Cisiecki, Sławomir; Dziegielewski, Krzysztof; Nawrocki, Jerzy

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study is to present functional and anatomical results of pars plana vitrectomy without gas tamponade in lamellar macular holes. Additionally, the study determines factors influencing final outcome. Twenty-six eyes of 26 patients with lamellar macular hole were diagnosed using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The diameters of the lamellar defects were measured. Pars plana vitrectomy with epiretinal membrane (ERM) removal and internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling without endotamponade followed. Follow-up examinations were conducted with SD-OCT for a period of 12 months after surgery. The following factors were examined: maximum and minimum diameter of the lamellar defect, maximum diameter of the disruption of the photoreceptors, representing the photoreceptor layer, central macular thickness, paracentral macular thickness 1000 microm from the centre of the fovea, and maximum paracentral retinal thickness. Retina thickness was measured manually from the inner retina surface to the upper line of retinal pigment epithelium. Prior to surgery, mean visual acuity was 0.2. Twelve months after surgery, the mean visual acuity was 0.51. Lower visual acuity was observed in patients with photoreceptor layer defects localized under the fovea. Epiretinal membranes and complete or partial posterior hyaloid detachment were observed in all cases. The size of the lamellar defect had no influence on final visual acuity. The results obtained show that intraocular gas tamponade is not a crucial step in achieving closure and visual improvement in lamellar macular holes.

  5. Intravitreal triamcinolone for diffuse diabetic macular oedema.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gibran, S K

    2012-02-03

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of intravitreal triamcinolone (IVTA) for the treatment of diffuse diabetic macular oedema (DME) refractory to conventional argon macular laser therapy. METHODS: A prospective, consecutive, and noncomparative case series was undertaken involving 38 eyes of 38 patients with refractory DME. Triamcinolone acetonide (4 mg) in 0.1 ml was injected intravitreally. LogMar visual acuity (VA) and macular thickness measured by ocular coherence tomography (OCT) were assessed preoperatively and postoperatively at 1, 3, and 6 months. RESULTS: All patients completed 6 months of follow up. VA (mean+\\/-SD) improved from 0.905+\\/-0.23 to 0.605+\\/-0.28, 0.555+\\/-0.29, and 0.730+\\/-0.30 at 1, 3, and 6 months, respectively. Macular thickness baseline (mean+\\/-SD) on OCT was 418.7+\\/-104.2 microm and this decreased to 276.9+\\/-72.6 microm, 250.6+\\/-53.1 microm, and 308.8+\\/-87.3 microm at 1, 3, and 6 months, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: IVTA may be a potential temporary treatment for refractory DME. It is effective in decreasing macular thickness and improving VA but the effect lasts approximately for 6 months in the majority of patients. Further investigations are required to establish the safety of IVTA for the treatment of DME.

  6. Corticosteroid Treatment in Diabetic Macular Edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Nurözler Tabakcı

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic macular edema is the most common cause of visual impairment in patients with diabetes mellitus. The pathogenesis of macular edema is complex and multifactorial. For many years, laser photocoagulation has been considered the standard therapy for the treatment of diabetic macular edema; however, few patients achieve significant improvements in visual acuity. Today the intravitreal administration of anti-inflammatory or anti-angiogenic agents together with the use of laser photocoagulation represents the standard of care for the treatment of this complication. The intravitreal route of administration minimizes the systemic side effects of corticosteroids. Steroid-related ocular side effects are elevated intraocular pressure and cataract, while injection-related complications include endophthalmitis, vitreous hemorrhage, and retinal detachment. In order to reduce the risks and complications, intravitreal implants have been developed recently to provide sustained release of corticosteroids and reduce repeated injections for the management of diabetic macular edema. In this review, the efficacy, safety, and therapeutic potential of intravitreal corticosteroids in diabetic macular edema are discussed with a review of recent literature.

  7. [Sighting dominance in patients with macular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaza, Eriko; Fujita, Kyoko; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Yuzawa, Mitsuko

    2007-04-01

    To study sighting dominance by comparing macular disease patients undergoing surgical treatment with controls. We studied visual acuity and sighting dominance in 92 macular disease patients, 27 of whom were assessed for both outcomes. We also studied visual acuity and sighting dominance in 412 controls. Sighting dominance was evaluated using the hole-in-card test. Among the controls, 70% showed right sighting dominance, and 30%, left sighting dominance. On the other hand, in patients with macular disease, right sighting dominance was demonstrated in 51%, and left in 49%; that is, 24% showed sighting dominance of the affected eye and 76%, of the fellow eye. During follow-up, sighting dominance of three of the 27 macular disease patients shifted from the affected eye to the fellow eye, which showed improvement in visual acuity. This study raises the possibility of sighting dominance shifting in patients with macular disease. There were differences among cases in the timing of the shift in sighting dominance, indicating that visual acuity may not be the only factor influencing sighting dominance. Further study is needed to confirm the factors contributing to sighting dominance.

  8. Spontaneously resolving macular cyst in an infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to describe transient macular cysts in an infant and correlate their occurrence with normal development events. A newborn Caucasian girl presented with a protruding corneal mass in her left eye at birth. She underwent a complete ophthalmic examination. A keratinized staphylomatous malformation involving the entire cornea and precluding further visualization of the anterior and posterior segment was observed in the left eye. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT of the right eye performed when the child was approximately 6-week-old had revealed an unexpected finding of macular cysts involving the inner nuclear and outer retinal layers. Corneal transplant in the left eye was performed a month later. Ocular examination under anesthesia just prior to surgery revealed normal intraocular pressure, anterior segment and retina in the right eye. SD-OCT was normal in both eyes and showed complete resolution of the cysts in the right eye. The patient had not been on any medications at that time. Although clinical retinal examination might be unremarkable, SD-OCT may reveal cystic spaces in the macula. In the absence of conditions known to be associated with macular edema, transient macular cysts may arise due to a developmental incompetence of the blood-retinal barrier or may represent transient spaces created during normal migration of retinal cells. Further study is warranted to delineate the entity of transient macular cysts in infancy.

  9. Long-term changes of macular retinal thickness after idiopathic macular hole surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To determine the changes of regional macular retinal thickness(RTwith spectral domain optical coherence tomography(SD-OCTafter successful pars plana vitrectomy(PPVsurgery with inner limiting membrane(ILMpeeling in patients with idiopathic macular hole.METHODS:A non-randomized retrospective case study on 17 patients(17 eyeswho were hospitalized between March 1, 2011 and June 30, 2013. All 17 eyes had been diagnosed with idiopathic macular hole and thereafter underwent 25G-PPV surgeries performed by the same surgeon with ILM peeling and short-term gas tamponade. In the 6mo-plus follow-up after surgery, these eyes were found to have successful closure in the macular hole. The macular RT of the nine areas in the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study was measured by SD-OCT. All patients were applied by SD-OCT with linear scan of the macular. At least four examinations on the operated eye were conducted in contrast to the other normal eye: before the surgery, 3~5wk after the surgery(stage A, 2~3mo after the surgery(stage B, and >6mo after the surgery(stage C.RESULTS:In stage A, the macular RT of operated eyes in the areas of C, IS, II, IN, OS, OI, ON(263.00±39.48, 313.92±18.35, 311.00±18.02, 335.67±19.91, 280.83±33.74, 269.92±23.32, 307.00±28.40were significantly thicker than the corresponding areas of the normal fellow eyes(220.51±23.94, 292.08±21.93, 282.50±20.30, 288.33±20.76, 251.25±17.60, 247.75±21.48, 265.17±24.76μm(PP>0.01. In Stage B, the macular RT in the areas of II, IN, OS(335.67±19.20,319.75±19.20, 273.50±16.89μmwere significantly thicker than the corresponding areas of the normal fellow eyes(286.33±20.46, 293.42±17.64, 252.50±16.32μm(PP> 0.01. In Stage C, the macular RT of operated eyes with the areas of IN(321.17±19.71μmwere significantly thicker than the corresponding areas of the normal fellow eyes(296.25±19.57μm(PP>0.01. Moreover, the macular RT of operated eyes in the areas of ON, IT(307.00±28

  10. A Drosophila model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plas, Mariska Cathelijne van der

    2008-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a severe X-linked disease characterized by progressive muscle wasting and sometimes mild mental retardation. The disease is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. DMD is correlated with the absence of Dp427, which is located along the sarcolemma in skeletal

  11. Cardiac manifestations of myotonic dystrophy type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petri, Helle; Vissing, John; Witting, Nanna

    2012-01-01

    To estimate the degree of cardiac involvement regarding left ventricular ejection fraction, conduction abnormalities, arrhythmia, risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) and the associations between cardiac involvement and cytosine-thymine-guanine (CTG)-repeat, neuromuscular involvement, age and gende...... in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (MD1)....

  12. Cardiomyopathy in becker muscular dystrophy:Overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rady Ho; My-Le Nguyen; Paul Mather

    2016-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy(BMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder involving mutations of the dystrophin gene. Cardiac involvement in BMD has been described and cardiomyopathy represents the number one cause of death in these patients. In this paper, the pathophysiology, clinical evaluations and management of cardiomyopathy in patients with BMD will be discussed.

  13. Infrastructure for Clinical Trials in Duchenne Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    following are key research accomplishments for the Year 1 funding period: Manuscripts in process • DM Escolar, C Tesi -Rocha, E Henricson, J Florence, J...in steroid treated Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. In revision for journal submission. • A. Zimmerman, C. Tesi -Rocha, P.R. Clemens, A. Connolly, S.T

  14. Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy for Inherited Retinal Dystrophies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerard, X.; Garanto Iglesias, A.; Rozet, J.M.; Collin, R.W.J.

    2016-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (IRDs) are an extremely heterogeneous group of genetic diseases for which currently no effective treatment strategies exist. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made utilizing gene augmentation therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD, although several

  15. Nutrition Considerations in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jillian; Samuels, Emily; Mullins, Lucille

    2015-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a serious degenerative muscular disease affecting males. Diagnosis usually occurs in childhood and is confirmed through genetic testing and/or muscle biopsy. Accompanying the disease are several nutrition-related concerns: growth, body composition, energy and protein requirements, constipation, swallowing difficulties, bone health, and complementary medicine. This review article addresses the nutrition aspects of DMD.

  16. Brain Function in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of dystrophin disorders in the CNS function of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD and the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse, an animal model of DMD, is reviewed at the University of New South Wales, University of Sydney, Australia.

  17. Visuospatial Attention Disturbance in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Moura, Maria Clara Drummond Soares; do Valle, Luiz Eduardo Ribeiro; Resende, Maria Bernadete Dutra; Pinto, Katia Osternack

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The cognitive deficits present in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are not yet well characterized. Attention, considered to be the brain mechanism responsible for the selection of sensory stimuli, could be disturbed in DMD, contributing, at least partially, to the observed global cognitive deficit. The aim of this study was to…

  18. INTESTINAL PSEUDOOBSTRUCTION IN MYOTONIC-DYSTROPHY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRUNNER, HG; HAMEL, BCJ; RIEU, P; HOWELER, CJ; PETERS, FTM

    1992-01-01

    We describe four myotonic dystrophy (DM) patients who developed recurrent intestinal pseudo-obstruction. Some episodes were associated with gastroenteritis, while abdominal crowding may have occurred in one case during the third trimester of pregnancy. In most instances, however, no apparent cause c

  19. Clinical features of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy 2.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greef, J.C. de; Lemmers, R.J.; Camano, P.; Day, J.W.; Sacconi, S.; Dunand, M.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Kiuru-Enari, S.; Padberg, G.W.A.M.; Rosa, A.L.; Desnuelle, C.; Spuler, S.; Tarnopolsky, M.; Venance, S.L.; Frants, R.R.; Maarel, S.M. van der; Tawil, R.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In some 5% of patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), no D4Z4 repeat contraction on chromosome 4q35 is observed. Such patients, termed patients with FSHD2, show loss of DNA methylation and heterochromatin markers at the D4Z4 repeat that are similar to patients with D4

  20. Visuospatial Attention Disturbance in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Moura, Maria Clara Drummond Soares; do Valle, Luiz Eduardo Ribeiro; Resende, Maria Bernadete Dutra; Pinto, Katia Osternack

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The cognitive deficits present in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are not yet well characterized. Attention, considered to be the brain mechanism responsible for the selection of sensory stimuli, could be disturbed in DMD, contributing, at least partially, to the observed global cognitive deficit. The aim of this study was to…

  1. Screening for macular disorders: the optometrist's perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsner AE

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ann E Elsner, Brett J King School of Optometry, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA Abstract: Macular screening services can take many forms, offering a variety of roles for optometrists. The need for screening has been demonstrated in industrialized and developing nations alike. Populations of particular interest for macular screening services include individuals at high risk for diabetes, not just diagnosed diabetics, since a significant proportion of those with diabetes do not realize it. Individuals who know they have diabetes are frequently not examined at the recommended intervals. Related populations include patients with a high likelihood of retinal vascular disease and high blood pressure. A second population is older individuals, who are at risk for age-related macular degeneration and degenerative myopia, key causes of vision loss depending upon geographic location and ethnicity. Images showing the complexity of lesions from diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and degenerative myopia illustrate the challenges of screening and classification. A third population to be screened is the large pediatric one. While many children are at risk for developing myopia, which could lead to high myopia, the risk of myopia and retinal damage is far more common in individuals who had low birth weight or premature birth. A variety of types of screening instrumentation are discussed in terms of practicality of use and cost. The technical challenges in populations with dark eyes, small pupils, and poor anterior-segment media are discussed. We discuss the wealth of screening strategies, from permanent sites with trained staff and expert graders to planned campaigns that target specific populations. Successful screening systems include instrumentation that is used within its limits, feedback and supervision during screening and grading, and clear pathways for referral for a complete examination or treatment. Keywords: vision

  2. [New aspects in age related macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlea, C

    2012-01-01

    Being the leading cause of blindness in modern world Age Related Macular Degeneration has beneficiated in the last decade of important progress in diagnosis, classification and the discovery of diverse factors who contribute to the etiology of this disease. Treatments have arised who can postpone the irreversible evolution of the disease and thus preserve vision. Recent findings have identified predisposing genetic factors and also inflamatory and imunological parameters that can be modified trough a good and adequate prevention and therapy This articole reviews new aspects of patology of Age Related Macular Degeneration like the role of complement in maintaining inflamation and the role of oxidative stress on different structures of the retina.

  3. The Electrophysiology in Idiopathic Senile Macular Hole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    Of 12 patients with idiopathic senile full- thickness macular hole, 3 had bilateral involvement, 9 had monocular macular hole. Flash ERG and pattern VEP were performed in the bilateral eyes of all patients. The abnormal rate of the pattern VEP was 93.3% when we used 15' checkboard stimulus, the changes of the VEP appeared as delayed latencies, reduced amplitudes or malformation of P100. The abnormal rate of the flash ERG was 53.3%, showing primary characteristics of reduced amplitudes of cone response b...

  4. Precursors of age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Inger Christine; Toft, Ulla; Linneberg, Allan;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate associations of very early age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with daily intake of vitamin A, beta-carotene, vitamin E, vitamin C, zinc and copper and interactions with AMD-associated polymorphisms in complement factor H (CFHY402H) and ARMS2/LOC387715. METHODS: Cross......: In this cross-sectional study, a higher intake of vitamin A increased the risk of macular drusen >63 μm in subjects with CFHY402H. The study supports that vitamin A may be a risk factor for early AMD....

  5. Identification of the CRB1 gene and analysis of its role in autosomal recessive retinal dystrophies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, Antonia Ingrid den

    2002-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies generally lead to severe visual impairment early in life. Most genes involved in retinal dystrophies are expressed exclusively or predominantly in the retina or the RPE. To identify candidate genes for inherited retinal dystrophies, we isolated

  6. In vivo confocal microscopy in different types of posterior polymorphous dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Kalpana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior polymorphous dystrophy is a rare corneal dystrophy, usually detected by chance. This case series describes the morphologic features in the three different types of posterior polymorphous dystrophy using confocal microscopy.

  7. Angiographically Documented Macular Ischemia after Single Bevacizumab for Macular Edema Secondary to Central Retinal Vein Occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyou Ho; Kang, Eui Chun; Koh, Hyoung Jun

    2017-05-01

    This report describes a case of angiographically documented foveal avascular zone (FAZ) enlargement after a single intravitreal injection of bevacizumab for macular edema secondary to central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO). A 71-year-old female was treated with an intravitreal bevacizumab injection for macular edema following CRVO. Despite successfully decreased edema one month after injection, the postinjection best-corrected visual acuity immediately decreased from 20/40 to 20/1000 (Snellen equivalent). The FAZ area increased from 0.37 mm² to 3.11 mm² (8.4-fold increase). While intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor is effective and should be considered as a first-line treatment for macular edema secondary to CRVO, it may aggravate macular ischemia. © Copyright: Yonsei University College of Medicine 2017.

  8. Long-term effectiveness of ranibizumab for age-related macular degeneration and diabetic macular edema

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Timothy Y. Y.; Fong

    2013-01-01

    Angie HC Fong,1 Timothy YY Lai1,2 1Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Eye Hospital, Kowloon, Hong Kong; 22010 Retina and Macula Centre, Tsimshatsui, Kowloon, Hong Kong Abstract: Neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic macular edema (DME) are major causes of visual impairment in the elderly population worldwide. With the aging population, the prevalence of neovascular AMD and DME has increased substantially o...

  9. Relationship between macular pigment and visual function in subjects with early age-related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Akuffo, Kwadwo Owusu; Nolan, John M.; Peto, Tunde; Stack, Jim; Leung, Irene; Corcoran, Laura; Beatty, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the relationship between macular pigment (MP) and visual function in subjects with early age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods 121 subjects with early AMD enrolled as part of the Central Retinal Enrichment Supplementation Trial (CREST; ISRCTN13894787) were assessed using a range of psychophysical measures of visual function, including best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), letter contrast sensitivity (CS), mesopic and photopic CS, mesopic and photopic glare disa...

  10. Long-term effectiveness of ranibizumab for age-related macular degeneration and diabetic macular edema

    OpenAIRE

    Fong, Angie HC; Lai, Timothy YY

    2013-01-01

    Neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic macular edema (DME) are major causes of visual impairment in the elderly population worldwide. With the aging population, the prevalence of neovascular AMD and DME has increased substantially over the recent years. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been implicated as playing an important role in the pathogenesis of both neovascular AMD and DME. Since its introduction in 2006, ranibizumab, a recombinant, humanized, mon...

  11. Diabetic macular edema, retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration as inflammatory conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Undurti N

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) are complications affecting about 25% of all patients with long-standing type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus and are a major cause of significant decrease in vision and quality of life. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is not uncommon, and diabetes mellitus affects the incidence and progression of AMD through altering hemodynamics, increasing oxidative stress, accumulating advanced glycation end products, etc. Recent studies sug...

  12. Serous macular detachment, yellow macular deposits, and prominent middle limiting membrane in multiple myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogan B

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Berna Dogan,1 Muhammet Kazim Erol,1 Devrim Toslak,1 Deniz Turgut Coban,1 Mehmet Bulut,1 Ayse Cengiz,1 Esin Sogutlu Sari2 1Antalya Training and Research Hospital, Eye Clinic, Antalya, Turkey; 2Balikesir University Medicine Faculty, Eye Clinic, Balikesir, Turkey Abstract: Bone marrow-derived multiple myeloma is a type of plasma cell tumor that may be associated with ocular complications. A 52-year-old male patient was admitted to our eye clinic with the complaint of sudden visual loss and a visual acuity of 20/50 in the right eye and 20/800 in the left eye. Fundus examination revealed common flame-shaped hemorrhages, venous dilatation and tortuosity, Roth spots, serous macular detachment, and yellow macular deposits in both eyes. Evaluation with fundus fluorescein angiography, fundus autofluorescence, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography resulted in suspicion of hyperviscosity retinopathy and referral to the hematology clinic. After hematology consultation confirmed a diagnosis of multiple myeloma, chemotherapy and plasmapheresis were initiated. Four months after presentation, best-corrected visual acuity was 20/20 in both eyes and improvement in hyperviscosity retinopathy, serous macular detachment, and yellow macular deposits was observed. Keywords: serous macular detachment, yellow macular deposit, prominent middle limiting membrane, multiple myeloma

  13. Cataract extraction in eyes with Fuchs' endothelial dystrophy in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Li-xin; HUANG Yu-sen; Ann Mei-Chi Chiu; LIN Ping; YAO Zhan; SUN Jie

    2005-01-01

    @@ It is a common belief that Fuchs' endothelial dystrophy predominantly affects Caucasians but rarely Asians. However, in one Japanese study, primary corneal guttae (first stage of Fuchs' dystrophy) were found in four of 107 cataract patients.1 With the growing popularity of phacoemulsification in China in the past decade, the increased incidence of endothelial decompensation may be due to learning curves among surgeons as well as that the prevalence of Fuchs' dystrophy among Chinese is higher than we thought. Low index of suspicion for Fuchs' dystrophy may result in missing of diagnosis and occurrence of endothelial decompensation, particularly when no extra protection is provided for endothelial cells during phacoemulsification. This study was aimed at improving our knowledge about Fuchs' dystrophy among Chinese population and reminding surgeons of extra endothelial protection during cataract surgery for patients with Fuchs' dystrophy.

  14. Phase 3 Study of Ataluren in Patients With Nonsense Mutation Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-30

    Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne; Muscular Dystrophies; Muscular Disorders, Atrophic; Muscular Diseases; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Neuromuscular Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Genetic Diseases, X-Linked; Genetic Diseases, Inborn

  15. [Ventricular Tachycardia as a First Manifestation of Myotonic Dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, N Yu; Mironova, N A; Sokolov, S F; Mareev, Yu V; Shlevkov, N B; Saidova, M A; Stukalova, O V; Golitsyn, S P

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of bundle-branch reentrant ventricular tachycardia as a first and severe manifestation of myotonic dystrophy. Progressive cardiac conduction disturbances and cardiac arrhythmias are well-known features of myotonic dystrophy, although they are commonly found in late stage of disease in patients with established diagnosis. We review clinical manifestations, diagnostics, management, and prognostic value of cardiac involvement in myotonic dystrophy.

  16. An unusual central retinal dystrophy associated with ichthyosis vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatci, O A; Ozbek, Z; Köse, S; Durak, I; Kavukçu, S

    2000-06-01

    A number of ichthyosis syndromes may have retinal abnormalities such as the retinitis pigmentosa-like diffuse rod-cone dystrophy in Refsum's syndrome and the maculopathy in Sjögren-Larsson syndrome. We present two sisters who have an unusual, almost identical, bilaterally symmetric central retinal dystrophy associated with ichthyosis vulgaris in the absence of other systemic disorders. We believe that this dystrophy has not been previously described in patients with any of the known varieties of ichthyosis.

  17. Muscular Dystrophies at Different Ages: Metabolic and Endocrine Alterations

    OpenAIRE

    Oriana del Rocío Cruz Guzmán; Ana Laura Chávez García; Maricela Rodríguez-Cruz

    2012-01-01

    Common metabolic and endocrine alterations exist across a wide range of muscular dystrophies. Skeletal muscle plays an important role in glucose metabolism and is a major participant in different signaling pathways. Therefore, its damage may lead to different metabolic disruptions. Two of the most important metabolic alterations in muscular dystrophies may be insulin resistance and obesity. However, only insulin resistance has been demonstrated in myotonic dystrophy. In addition, endocrine di...

  18. Distinct genetic regions modify specific muscle groups in muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Phenotypic expression in the muscular dystrophies is variable, even with the identical mutation, providing strong evidence that genetic modifiers influence outcome. To identify genetic modifier loci, we used quantitative trait locus mapping in two differentially affected mouse strains with muscular dystrophy. Using the Sgcg model of limb girdle muscular dystrophy that lacks the dystrophin-associated protein γ-sarcoglycan, we evaluated chromosomal regions that segregated with two distinct quan...

  19. Molecular mechanisms in muscular dystrophy: a gene expression profiling study.

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a group of neuromuscular disorders characterized by progres¬sive muscle weakness and wasting. Although the underlying genetic defects of a large number of muscular dystrophies are now know, the molecular mechanisms resulting in the devastating effects of the disease are not yet clear. Furthermore, the muscular dystrophies differ in clinical presentation and severity. The processes responsible for this di¬vergence are largely unknown as well. In this thesis, gene e...

  20. Macular thickness and volume in the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subhi, Yousif; Forshaw, Thomas; Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2016-01-01

    manifests in the macula of the elderly focusing on clinical relevant measures that are thicknesses and volumes of different macular areas. Ageing seems to increase center point foveal thickness. Ageing does not seem to change the center subfield thickness significantly. Ageing decreases the inner and outer...

  1. Driving and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the research literature on driving and age-related macular degeneration, which is motivated by the link between driving and the quality of life of older adults and their increased collision rate. It addresses the risk of crashes, driving performance, driving difficulty, self-regulation, and interventions to enhance, safety,…

  2. Current status in diabetic macular edema treatments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pedro; Romero-Aroca

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a serious chronic condition,which increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases,kidney failure and nerve damage leading to amputation.Furthermore the ocular complications include diabetic macular edema,is the leading cause of blindness among adults in the industrialized countries.Today,blindness from diabetic macular edema is largely preventable with timely detection and appropriate interventional therapy.The treatment should include an optimized control of glycemia,arterial tension,lipids and renal status.The photocoagulation laser is currently restricted to focal macular edema in some countries,but due the high cost of intravitreal drugs,the use of laser treatment for focal and diffuse diabetic macular edema(DME),can be valid as gold standard in many countries.The intravitreal anti vascular endothelial growth factor drugs(ranibizumab and bevacizumab),are indicated in the treatment of all types of DME,but the correct protocol for administration should be defined for the different Retina Scientific Societies.The corticosteroids for diffuse DME,has a place in pseudophakic patients,but its complications restricted the use of these drugs for some patients.Finally the intravitreal interface plays an important role and its exploration is mandatory in all DME patients.

  3. Macular Amyloidosis and Epstein-Barr Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalda Nahidi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Amyloidosis is extracellular precipitation of eosinophilic hyaline material of self-origin with special staining features and fibrillar ultrastructure. Macular amyloidosis is limited to the skin, and several factors have been proposed for its pathogenesis. Detection of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV DNA in this lesion suggests that this virus can play a role in pathogenesis of this disease. Objective. EBV DNA detection was done on 30 skin samples with a diagnosis of macular amyloidosis and 31 healthy skin samples in the margin of removed melanocytic nevi by using PCR. Results. In patients positive for beta-globin gene in PCR, BLLF1 gene of EBV virus was positive in 23 patients (8 patients in case and 15 patients in the control group. There was no significant difference in presence of EBV DNA between macular amyloidosis (3.8% and control (23.8% groups (P=0.08. Conclusion. The findings of this study showed that EBV is not involved in pathogenesis of macular amyloidosis.

  4. Depression in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casten, Robin; Rovner, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of disability in the elderly, substantially degrades the quality of their lives, and is a risk factor for depression. Rates of depression in AMD are substantially greater than those found in the general population of older people, and are on par with those of other chronic and disabling…

  5. Establishing baseline rod electroretinogram values in achromatopsia and cone dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Isaac; Khan, Naheed W; Branham, Kari; Wissinger, B; Kohl, Susanne; Heckenlively, J R

    2012-12-01

    To establish the normal range of values for rod-isolated b-wave amplitudes in achromatopsia and cone dystrophies. We reviewed charts of 112 patients with various types of cone dystrophy, and compared their standardized electroretinographic rod b-wave amplitudes with age-matched normal controls. Twenty-six patients had known mutations in achromatopsia and cone dystrophy genes, while 53 were characterized by their inheritance pattern since they had yet to have their gene identified. Visual acuity information and scotomata were documented. We found that patients with achromatopsia and cone dystrophy had rod b-wave amplitudes that were significantly lower than age-matched controls, but found no evidence of rod amplitude progression nor loss of peripheral visual fields in the study group. We found that cone dystrophy patients of all types had depressed rod-isolated ERGs across the board. If typical diagnostic criteria are used, these patients might be considered to have "abnormal" rod-isolated electroretinographic values, and might be called "cone-rod dystrophy", even though the waveforms are stable for years. Patients with cone-rod dysfunction patterns on ERG can be better understood by also performing kinetic (Goldmann) visual fields, which will help to distinguish cone dystrophies from progressive cone-rod dystrophies by central scotomata size and progression over time in many forms of cone-rod dystrophy.

  6. Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: case report and discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Vincenzo; Feinberg, Joseph; Michaels, Jennifer

    2008-09-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is often cited as the third most common form of muscular dystrophy. Therefore, it should be considered in patients with complaints of progressive weakness. We present the case of a man with facial, truncal, and leg weakness that initially sought medical attention for lower back pain. Electrodiagnostic testing revealed findings in the trapezius, serratus anterior, biceps, triceps, pectoralis major, tibialis anterior, and gastrocnemius muscles consistent with a myopathic disorder. Subsequent genetic testing identified a FSHD allele size consistent with a FSHD deletion mutation. Therefore, confirming the diagnosis of FSHD. Unfortunately, no effective treatments currently exist for FSHD. However, supportive measures involving physical therapy and the use of orthotics may aid in improving function and mobility.

  7. Anoctamin 5 muscular dystrophy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting, Nanna; Duno, Morten; Petri, Helle

    2013-01-01

    Since the initial description in 2010 of anoctamin 5 deficiency as a cause of muscular dystrophy, a handful of papers have described this disease in cases of mixed populations. We report the first large regional study and present data on new aspects of prevalence, muscular and cardiac phenotypic...... characteristics, and muscle protein expression. All patients in our neuromuscular unit with genetically unclassified, recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2), Miyoshi-type distal myopathy (MMD) or persistent asymptomatic hyperCK-emia (PACK) were assessed for mutations in the ANO5 gene. Genetically...... confirmed patients were evaluated with muscular and cardiopulmonary examination. Among 40 unclassified patients (28 LGMD2, 5 MMD, 7 PACK), 20 were homozygous or compound heterozygous for ANO5 mutations, (13 LGMD2, 5 MMD, 2 PACK). Prevalence of ANO5 deficiency in Denmark was estimated at 1:100.000 and ANO5...

  8. Microperimetry and optical coherence tomography in a case of traumatic macular hole and associated macular detachment with spontaneous resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalit Aalok

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The association of macular detachment with posttraumatic macular hole is a known but rare occurrence. Spontaneously occurring resolution of the detachment and closure of the macular hole has been reported only once in the literature. We describe a similar rare event in a young male, the documentation of which was done serially by microperimetry (MP and optical coherence tomography (OCT. A 17-year-old male presented with a decrease in vision following a closed globe injury to the left eye. A coexisting macular hole and macular detachment were detected in the affected eye. Serial follow-up with OCT and MP documented complete resolution of the macular hole and the macular detachment within 1 week of presentation. The case highlights that spontaneous resolution of traumatic macular hole and related macular detachment may occur and a waiting period is advisable before undertaking any corrective surgical procedure. The pathophysiologic mechanisms of causation and the resolution of posttraumatic macular hole-related retinal detachment are discussed.

  9. New Advanced Technology for Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    References Aristotle. 350 BC. Historia Animalium: Books VII–X. 1991 edition. D.M. Balme, editor. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA. 435–437...hematological disease, and have been proposed as a source for cell based therapies of muscular dystrophy. Since the University of Minnesota is a center...Blood and Marrow Transplantation program at the University of Minnesota to assure that we receive appropriate tissues as they become available. Having

  10. Severe dystrophy in DiGeorge syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Barnabás Rózsai; (A)kos Kiss; Gy(o)rgyi Csábi; Márta Czakó; Tamás Decsi

    2009-01-01

    We present the case history of a 3-year-old girl who was examined because of severe dystrophy. In the background, cow's milk allergy was found, but her body weight was unchanged after eliminating milk from her diet. Other types of malabsorption were excluded. Based on nasal regurgitation and facial dysmorphisms, the possibility of DiGeorge syndrome was suspected and was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The authors suggest a new feature associated with DiGeorge syndrome.

  11. Growth hormone evaluation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlini, L; Granata, C; Ballestrazzi, A; Cornelio, F; Tassoni, P; Tugnoli, S; Cacciari, E

    1988-10-01

    Growth hormone (GH) release with pharmacological tests and sleep test, somatomedin C and auxological features were studied in 10 patients affected by Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. GH release in these patients seems to be lower than normal; moreover some of them are of short stature without an evident relationship with GH deficit. The possible significance of the data obtained is discussed, particularly in relation to the clinical course of the disease, and to current therapeutic trials with a GH release inhibitor (mazindol).

  12. Urological manifestations of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askeland, Eric J; Arlen, Angela M; Erickson, Bradley A; Mathews, Katherine D; Cooper, Christopher S

    2013-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a dystrophinopathy affecting males that is associated with multiple organ system complications. To our knowledge urological complications of Duchenne muscular dystrophy have been described only anecdotally to date. We reviewed the medical charts of 135 patients with Duchenne or Duchenne-Becker muscular dystrophy for demographics and disease progression, urological diagnoses, intervention and followup. Of 135 patients 67 (50%) had at least 1 documented urological diagnosis and 38 (28%) had multiple manifestations. Lower urinary tract symptoms were the most common urological diagnosis (32% of patients). Survival analysis revealed a median age at onset of lower urinary tract symptoms of 23 years (95% CI 17.7-23.9). Intervention was required in 12 patients (9%), most commonly due to nephrolithiasis. Urological morbidity increased with Duchenne muscular dystrophy progression when stratified by clinical progression. Lower urinary tract symptoms were more common in nonambulatory patients (40.7% vs 19%, p = 0.007), those with a diagnosis of scoliosis (44% vs 19.7%, p = 0.003) and/or scoliosis spine surgery (60% vs 22%, p <0.001), and those on invasive respiratory support (53% vs 29%, p = 0.046). Likewise, nephrolithiasis was more common in nonambulatory patients (10% vs 0%, p = 0.017), those with scoliosis (12% vs 0%, p = 0.004) and/or scoliosis spine surgery (20% vs 1%, p <0.001), and those on invasive respiratory support (29% vs 3%, p <0.001). Only 28% of patients with a urological manifestation were referred to urology. As these patients transition into adolescence and adulthood, the increased prevalence of urological manifestations warrants increased awareness and referral to urologists. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The superhealing MRL background improves muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Mice from the MRL or “superhealing” strain have enhanced repair after acute injury to the skin, cornea, and heart. We now tested an admixture of the MRL genome and found that it altered the course of muscle pathology and cardiac function in a chronic disease model of skeletal and cardiac muscle. Mice lacking γ-sarcoglycan (Sgcg), a dystrophin-associated protein, develop muscular dystrophy and cardiomyopathy similar to their human counterparts with limb girdle muscular dyst...

  14. Bietti’ Crystalline Retinal Dystrophy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Şahin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bietti’ crystalline retinal dystrophy (BCD is a rare, auto­somal, recessively inherited disorder, characterized by the deposition of yellow crystals in the corneal limbus and retina. In this paper we aimed to present a pediatric case with BCD, with clinical, electrophysiological and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT findings and discuss BCD with the light of the literature. J Clin Exp Invest 2016; 7 (1: 94-97

  15. CONGENITAL MYOTONIC DYSTROPHY – CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Neubauer

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Myotonic dystrophy is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by myotonia, myopathy of voluntary and involuntary muscles, frontal baldness in men, cardiac conduction abnormalities, catharacts, intellectual deterioration and endocrinopathy. Men with this disorder have often gonadal atrophy and infertility. On the other hand women are generally fertile. During pregnancy their myopathy worsens, often causing severe obstetrical complications. Their children may develop congenital form of the disease with signs of myopathy in utero and have great difficulties in maintaining life functions after birth, together with other characteristical signs of this form: bilateral facial weakness, severe hypotonia, feeding difficulties, talipes equinovarus and mental retardation. The authors present a female newborn with such congenital form of myotonic dystrophy.Conclusions. The authors have emphasized the importance of medical history, regular updating of all the cases of neuromuscular diseases in the region and clinical characteristics for the recognition of congenital form of myotonic dystrophy because of possible prenatal diagnostics and better antenatal and postantal care.

  16. [Management of myocardial damage in muscular dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Takuhisa

    2011-11-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a fatal complication in many muscular dystrophy cases and has become the most common cause of death in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) since 2001. HF deaths in DMD occur in young patients and increase, along with respiratory failure, in older patients. Managing HF, therefore, is the most important component of DMD treatment. Management of HF is necessary in DMD patients of all ages because myocardial damage progresses regardless of age and disability. Electrocardiography, echocardiography, myocardial single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and natriuretic peptides are used for the diagnosis of myocardial damage and chronic HF. Tissue Doppler echocardiography is in particularly useful for early detection of minute myocardial damage and dysfunction in DMD. The first-line drugs for chronic HF are angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and the prognosis of DMD patients has been improved using these drugs and beta-blockers. Diuretics are added in the presence of pulmonary congestion. Digoxin is most effective at a blood level of 0.5-0.8 ng/mL because of its pharmacokinetics in DMD. Surgical treatment may be necessary in cases of intractable HF. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (biventricular pacing), a treatment with an artificial pacemaker, is indicated for cases that meet specific criteria, including HF with ventricular dyssynchrony. Applications of partial left ventriculectomy (Batista procedure) and left ventricular assist devices in muscular dystrophy are likely in the near future.

  17. Macular Pigment and Lutein Supplementation in ABCA4-associated Retinal Degenerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Tomas S.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Windsor, Elizabeth A. M.; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Swider, Malgorzata; Chico, John D.; Sumaroka, Alexander; Pantelyat, Alexander Y.; Duncan, Keith G.; Gardner, Leigh M.; Emmons, Jessica M.; Steinberg, Janet D.; Stone, Edwin M.; Jacobson, Samuel G.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine macular pigment (MP) optical density (OD) in patients with ABCA4-associated retinal degenerations (ABCA4-RD) and the response of MP and vision to supplementation with lutein. METHODS Stargardt disease or cone-rod dystrophy patients with foveal fixation and with known or suspected disease-causing mutations in the ABCA4 gene were included. MPOD profiles were measured with heterochromatic flicker photometry. Serum carotenoids, visual acuity, foveal sensitivity and retinal thickness were quantified. Changes in MPOD and central vision were determined in a subset of patients receiving oral supplementation with lutein for 6 months. RESULTS MPOD in patients ranged from normal to markedly abnormal. As a group, ABCA4-RD patients had reduced foveal MPOD and there was strong correlation with retinal thickness. Average foveal tissue concentration of MP, estimated by dividing MPOD by retinal thickness, was normal in patients whereas serum concentration of lutein and zeaxanthin was significantly lower than normal. After oral lutein supplementation for 6 months, 91% of the patients showed significant increases in serum lutein and 63% of the patient eyes showed a significant augmentation in MPOD. The retinal responders tended to be female, and have lower serum lutein and zeaxanthin, lower MPOD and greater retinal thickness at baseline. Responding eyes had significantly lower baseline MP concentration compared to non-responding eyes. Central vision was unchanged after the period of supplementation. CONCLUSIONS MP is strongly affected by the stage of ABCA4 disease leading to abnormal foveal architecture. MP could be augmented by supplemental lutein in some patients. There was no change in central vision after 6 months of lutein supplementation. Long-term influences on the natural history of this supplement on macular degenerations require further study. PMID:17325179

  18. Effect of change in macular birefringence imaging protocol on retinal nerve fiber layer thickness parameters using GDx VCC in eyes with macular lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dada, Tanuj; Tinwala, Sana I; Dave, Vivek; Agarwal, Anand; Sharma, Reetika; Wadhwani, Meenakshi

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluates the effect of two macular birefringence protocols (bow-tie retardation and irregular macular scan) using GDx VCC on the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness parameters in normal eyes and eyes with macular lesions. In eyes with macular lesions, the standard protocol led to significant overestimation of RNFL thickness which was normalized using the irregular macular pattern protocol. In eyes with normal macula, absolute RNFL thickness values were higher in irregular macular pattern protocols with the difference being statistically significant for all parameters except for inferior average thickness. This has implications for monitoring glaucoma patients who develop macular lesions during the course of their follow-up.

  19. Complement system dysregulation and inflammation in the retinal pigment epithelium of a mouse model for Stargardt macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, Roxana A; Hu, Jane; Yuan, Quan; Welch, Darcy L; Makshanoff, Jacob; Lloyd, Marcia; McMullen, Stephen; Travis, Gabriel H; Bok, Dean

    2011-05-27

    Accumulation of vitamin A-derived lipofuscin fluorophores in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a pathologic feature of recessive Stargardt macular dystrophy, a blinding disease caused by dysfunction or loss of the ABCA4 transporter in rods and cones. Age-related macular degeneration, a prevalent blinding disease of the elderly, is strongly associated with mutations in the genes for complement regulatory proteins (CRP), causing chronic inflammation of the RPE. Here we explore the possible relationship between lipofuscin accumulation and complement activation in vivo. Using the abca4(-/-) mouse model for recessive Stargardt, we investigated the role of lipofuscin fluorophores (A2E-lipofuscin) on oxidative stress and complement activation. We observed higher expression of oxidative-stress genes and elevated products of lipid peroxidation in eyes from abca4(-/-) versus wild-type mice. We also observed higher levels of complement-activation products in abca4(-/-) RPE cells. Unexpectedly, expression of multiple CRPs, which protect cells from attack by the complement system, were lower in abca4(-/-) versus wild-type RPE. To test whether acute exposure of healthy RPE cells to A2E-lipofuscin affects oxidative stress and expression of CRPs, we fed cultured fetal-derived human RPE cells with rod outer segments from wild-type or abca4(-/-) retinas. In contrast to RPE cells in abca4(-/-) mice, human RPE cells exposed to abca4(-/-) rod outer segments adaptively increased expression of both oxidative-stress and CRP genes. These results suggest that A2E accumulation causes oxidative stress, complement activation, and down-regulation of protective CRP in the Stargardt mouse model. Thus, Stargardt disease and age-related macular degeneration may both be caused by chronic inflammation of the RPE.

  20. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Associated with Bilateral Macular Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Yoshiaki; Horiguchi, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) causes visual loss, predominantly in healthy young men. We recently examined a patient who previously had bilateral macular holes and subsequently developed LHON at 74 years of age. Although his central scotomas were initially attributed to the macular holes, his visual acuity declined following an initial improvement after operative closure of the macular holes; thus, other diagnoses, including LHON, were considered. Furthermore, macular optical coherence tomography (OCT) images remained unchanged in this time. A mitochondrial genetic analysis identified a 11778G→A mutation. From this case, we propose that LHON remains in the differential diagnosis even in older patients, as has previously been reported. PMID:27335507

  1. Gelatinous drop-like corneal dystrophy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaza, Hrishikesh; Barik, Manas R; Reddy, Mamatha M; Mittal, Ruchi; Das, Sujata

    2017-01-01

    Gelatinous drop-like corneal dystrophy (GDLD) is a rare autosomal recessive form of corneal dystrophy characterised by subepithelial and stromal amyloid deposits. It is relatively common in Japan. It usually presents in the first two decades of life with subepithelial nodular lesions that later coalesce to form mulberry-like opacities. Although various surgical modalities have been attempted, recurrence remains a major challenge.

  2. Muscular Dystrophies at Different Ages: Metabolic and Endocrine Alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriana del Rocío Cruz Guzmán

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Common metabolic and endocrine alterations exist across a wide range of muscular dystrophies. Skeletal muscle plays an important role in glucose metabolism and is a major participant in different signaling pathways. Therefore, its damage may lead to different metabolic disruptions. Two of the most important metabolic alterations in muscular dystrophies may be insulin resistance and obesity. However, only insulin resistance has been demonstrated in myotonic dystrophy. In addition, endocrine disturbances such as hypogonadism, low levels of testosterone, and growth hormone have been reported. This eventually will result in consequences such as growth failure and delayed puberty in the case of childhood dystrophies. Other consequences may be reduced male fertility, reduced spermatogenesis, and oligospermia, both in childhood as well as in adult muscular dystrophies. These facts all suggest that there is a need for better comprehension of metabolic and endocrine implications for muscular dystrophies with the purpose of developing improved clinical treatments and/or improvements in the quality of life of patients with dystrophy. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to describe the current knowledge about of metabolic and endocrine alterations in diverse types of dystrophinopathies, which will be divided into two groups: childhood and adult dystrophies which have different age of onset.

  3. Dysphagia is present but mild in myotonic dystrophy type 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Ensink; S. Knuijt; Baziel van Engelen; J. van Vliet; A. Tieleman; Bert de Swart

    2009-01-01

    The phenotype of myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) shows similarities as well as differences to that of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Dysphagia, a predominant feature in DM1, has not yet been examined in DM2. In a recent nationwide questionnaire survey of gastrointestinal symptoms in DM2, 12 out of

  4. Molecular mechanisms in muscular dystrophy : a gene expression profiling study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turk, Rolf

    2006-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a group of neuromuscular disorders characterized by progres¬sive muscle weakness and wasting. Although the underlying genetic defects of a large number of muscular dystrophies are now know, the molecular mechanisms resulting in the devastating effects of the disease are

  5. Dysphagia is present but mild in myotonic dystrophy type 2.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tieleman, A.A.; Knuijt, S.; Vliet, J. van; Swart, B.J.M. de; Ensink, R.J.H.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2009-01-01

    The phenotype of myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) shows similarities as well as differences to that of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Dysphagia, a predominant feature in DM1, has not yet been examined in DM2. In a recent nationwide questionnaire survey of gastrointestinal symptoms in DM2, 12 out of

  6. Dysphagia is present but mild in myotonic dystrophy type 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, Bert de; Tieleman, A.; Knuijt, S.; Vliet, J. van; Ensink, R.; Engelen, Baziel van

    2009-01-01

    The phenotype of myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) shows similarities as well as differences to that of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Dysphagia, a predominant feature in DM1, has not yet been examined in DM2. In a recent nationwide questionnaire survey of gastrointestinal symptoms in DM2, 12 out of

  7. Resistance training in patients with limb-girdle and becker muscular dystrophies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sveen, Marie-Louise; Andersen, Søren P; Ingelsrud, Lina H;

    2013-01-01

    In this study we investigated the effect of strength training in patients with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD).......In this study we investigated the effect of strength training in patients with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD)....

  8. Management of pseudophakic cystoid macular edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Suqin; Patel, Shriji; Baumrind, Ben; Johnson, Keegan; Levinsohn, Daniel; Marcus, Edward; Tannen, Brad; Roy, Monique; Bhagat, Neelakshi; Zarbin, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Pseudophakic cystoid macular edema (PCME) is a common complication following cataract surgery. Acute PCME may resolve spontaneously, but some patients will develop chronic macular edema that affects vision and is difficult to treat. This disease was described more than 50 years ago, and there are multiple options for clinical management. We discuss mechanisms, clinical efficacy, and adverse effects of these treatment modalities. Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents and corticosteroids are widely used and, when combined, may have a synergistic effect. Intravitreal corticosteroids and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) agents have shown promise when topical medications either fail or have had limited effects. Randomized clinical studies evaluating anti-VEGF agents are needed to fully evaluate benefits and risks. When PCME is either refractory to medical therapy or is associated with significant vitreous involvement, pars plana vitrectomy has been shown to improve outcomes, though it is associated with additional risks.

  9. Skin features in myotonic dystrophy type 1: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanati, A; Giannoni, M; Buratti, L; Cagnetti, C; Giuliodori, K; Ganzetti, G; Silvestrini, M; Provinciali, L; Offidani, A

    2015-05-01

    Poor data regarding skin involvement in Myotonic Dystrophy, also named Dystrophia Myotonica type 1, have been reported. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and types of skin disorders in adult patients with Myotonic Dystrophy type 1. Fifty-five patients and one hundred age- and sex-matched healthy subjects were referred to a trained dermatologist for a complete skin examination to check for potential cutaneous hallmarks of disease. No difference in prevalence of preneoplastic, neoplastic, and cutaneous lesions was detected between the two groups. Among morphofunctional, proliferative and inflammatory lesions, focal hyperhidrosis (p Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 significant differences according to sex were found for: early androgenic alopecia, twisted hair and seborrheic dermatitis, whose prevalence was higher in males (p Myotonic Dystrophy type 1. On the other hand, an increased prevalence of morphofunctional, inflammatory, and proliferative diseases involving adnexal structures seems to characterize adult patients with Myotonic Dystrophy type 1.

  10. [Treatment of retinal detachment with macular hole].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikulski, Z; Nawrocki, J; Dziegielewski, K

    1993-01-01

    The methods and results of surgery in 6 cases of retinal detachment with macular hole are presented. In all 6 cases pars plana vitrectomy was performed, in 4 with subsequent SF6 and in 2 with silicone oil tamponade. Retinal attachment was achieved in 4 eyes. Visual acuity 1/50-2/50 was found after surgery in 5 cases. The follow-up ranged from 6 to 9 months.

  11. Immunology of age related macular degeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kijlstra Aize; Yang Peizeng

    2011-01-01

    @@ Age-related macular degeneration(AMD)is the most important cause of blindness in persons over 55 years of age in the Western world.In view of the increasing life expectancy we can assume that the problem will increase dramatically over the coming decades unless preventive or therapeutic measures are developed.Towards this goal many groups all over the world have performed epidemiological studies to identify potential risk factors for AMD.

  12. Depression in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Casten,Robin; Rovner,Barry

    2008-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of disability in the elderly, substantially degrades the quality of their lives, and is a risk factor for depression. Rates of depression in AMD are substantially greater than those found in the general population of older people, and are on par with those of other chronic and disabling diseases. This article discusses the effect of depression on vision-related disability in patients with AMD, suggests methods for screening for depressio...

  13. Rehabilitation Approaches in Macular Degeneration Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Maniglia, Marcello; Benoit R Cottereau; Soler, Vincent; Trotter, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is a visual disease that affects elderly population. It entails a progressive loss of central vision whose consequences are dramatic for the patient’s quality of life. Current rehabilitation programs are restricted to technical aids based on visual devices. They only temporarily improve specific visual functions such as reading skills. Considering the rapid increase of the aging population worldwide, it is crucial to intensify clinical research on AMD in...

  14. Animal models of age related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Pennesi, Mark E.; Neuringer, Martha; Courtney, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss of those over the age of 65 in the industrialized world. The prevalence and need to develop effective treatments for AMD has lead to the development of multiple animal models. AMD is a complex and heterogeneous disease that involves the interaction of both genetic and environmental factors with the unique anatomy of the human macula. Models in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs and non-human primates have recreated many of the ...

  15. Granular corneal dystrophy Groenouw type I (GrI) and Reis-Bücklers' corneal dystrophy (R-B). One entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, H U

    1989-12-01

    This paper maintains that Reis-Bücklers' corneal dystrophy and granular corneal dystrophy Groenouw type I are one and the same disease. Included are some of the technically best photographs of Reis-Bücklers' dystrophy found in the literature, and these are compared with photographs from patients with granular corneal dystrophy examined by the author. It is argued that most of the histological and ultrastructural findings on Reis Bücklers' dystrophy described in the literature are either congruent with what is found in granular corneal dystrophy or unspecific.

  16. Current Treatments of Diabetic Macular Edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chun Chan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic macular edema (DME is a major cause of visual impairment in diabetic patients. Laser photocoagulation is the standard management strategy for macular edema, but its results remain unsatisfactory. Several clinical trials of new treatment modalities for DME have been conducted over the past 10 years. We performed a literature search of English articles, published between 2000 and 2010, by using the PubMed database. The keywords searched included “diabetic macular edema and treatment” with limits set to include only clinical trials and review articles, over 50 articles were reviewed. Among the newer treatment modalities reviewed, therapy with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF antibodies showed significantly better efficacy, with level I evidence. However, multiple injections were required to maintain its efficacy. Therefore, the associated complications and cost implications are the major limitations of this treatment. Several combinations of different modalities have been evaluated in the literature, but none are more efficacious than monotherapy with anti-VEGF antibodies. Since DME is a multifactorial disease, further studies involving combinations of modalities or new treatments modalities may be needed to reduce the number of injections required or improve the visual outcomes in case of DME.

  17. Visual hallucinations in patients with macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holroyd, S; Rabins, P V; Finkelstein, D; Nicholson, M C; Chase, G A; Wisniewski, S C

    1992-12-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of visual hallucinations in patients with macular degeneration, describe such hallucinations phenomenologically, and possibly determine factors predisposing to their development. Using a case-control design, the authors screened 100 consecutive patients with age-related macular degeneration for visual hallucinations. Each patient with visual hallucinations was matched to the next three patients without hallucinations. The patients and comparison subjects were compared in terms of scores on the Beck Depression Inventory, Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status, and a structured questionnaire including demographic characteristics, family history, and medical and psychiatric history. Ophthalmologic data were obtained by chart review. Of the 100 patients, 13 experienced visual hallucinations. Four variables were significantly associated with having hallucinations: living alone, lower cognition score, history of stroke, and bilaterally worse visual acuity. Hallucinations were not associated with family or personal history of psychiatric disorder or with personality traits. In 11 (84.6%) of the 13 patients, the hallucinations had begun in association with an acute change in vision. These results indicate that visual hallucinations are prevalent among patients with macular degeneration. They appear unrelated to primary psychiatric disorder. The predisposing factors of bilaterally worse vision and living alone support an association with sensory deprivation, while history of stroke and worse cognition support a decreased cortical inhibition theory.

  18. First Identification of a Triple Corneal Dystrophy Association: Keratoconus, Epithelial Basement Membrane Corneal Dystrophy and Fuchs' Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosimo Mazzotta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report the observation of a triple corneal dystrophy association consisting of keratoconus (KC, epithelial basement membrane corneal dystrophy (EBMCD and Fuchs' endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD. Methods: A 55-year-old male patient was referred to our cornea service for blurred vision and recurrent foreign body sensation. He reported bilateral recurrent corneal erosions with diurnal visual fluctuations. He underwent corneal biomicroscopy, Scheimpflug tomography, in vivo HRT confocal laser scanning microscopy and genetic testing for TGFBI and ZEB1 mutations using direct DNA sequencing. Results: Biomicroscopic examination revealed the presence of subepithelial central and paracentral corneal opacities. The endothelium showed a bilateral flecked appearance, and the posterior corneal curvature suggested a possible concomitant ectatic disorder. Corneal tomography confirmed the presence of a stage II KC in both eyes. In vivo confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed a concomitant bilateral EBMCD with hyperreflective deposits in basal epithelial cells, subbasal Bowman's layer microfolds and ridges with truncated subbasal nerves as pseudodendritic elements. Stromal analysis revealed honeycomb edematous areas, and the endothelium showed a strawberry surface configuration typical of FECD. The genetic analysis resulted negative for TGFBI mutations and positive for a heterozygous mutation in exon 7 of the gene ZEB1. Conclusion: This is the first case reported in the literature in which KC, EBMCD and FECD are present in the same patient and associated with ZEB1 gene mutation. The triple association was previously established by means of morphological analysis of the cornea using corneal Scheimpflug tomography and in vivo HRT II confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  19. Signs and symptoms of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Becker muscular dystrophy among carriers in the Netherlands : a cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerwaard, EM; Bakker, E; Ippel, PF; Oosterwijk, JC; Majoor-Krakauer, DF; Leschot, NJ; Van Essen, AJ; Brunner, HG; van der Wouw, PA; Wilde, AAM; de Visser, M

    1999-01-01

    Background Carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) may show muscle weakness or dilated cardiomyopathy. Studies focusing on skeletal-muscle involvement were done before DNA analysis was possible. We undertook a cross-sectional study in a population of definit

  20. Signs and symptoms of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Becker muscular dystrophy among carriers in the Netherlands : a cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerwaard, EM; Bakker, E; Ippel, PF; Oosterwijk, JC; Majoor-Krakauer, DF; Leschot, NJ; Van Essen, AJ; Brunner, HG; van der Wouw, PA; Wilde, AAM; de Visser, Marianne

    1999-01-01

    Background Carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) may show muscle weakness or dilated cardiomyopathy. Studies focusing on skeletal-muscle involvement were done before DNA analysis was possible. We undertook a cross-sectional study in a population of

  1. Genetic analysis of CHST6 and TGFBI in Turkish patients with corneal dystrophies: Five novel variations in CHST6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaylacioglu Tuncay, Fulya; Kayman Kurekci, Gülsüm; Guntekin Ergun, Sezen; Pasaoglu, Ozge Tugce; Akata, Rustu Fikret; Dincer, Pervin Rukiye

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify pathogenic variations in carbohydrate sulfotransferase 6 (CHST6) and transforming growth factor, beta-induced (TGFBI) genes in Turkish patients with corneal dystrophy (CD). Methods In this study, patients with macular corneal dystrophy (MCD; n = 18), granular corneal dystrophy type 1 (GCD1; n = 12), and lattice corneal dystrophy type 1 (LCD1; n = 4), as well as 50 healthy controls, were subjected to clinical and genetic examinations. The level of antigenic keratan sulfate (AgKS) in the serum samples of patients with MCD was determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to immunophenotypically subtype the patients as MCD type I and MCD type II. DNA was isolated from venous blood samples from the patients and controls. Variations were analyzed with DNA sequencing in the coding region of CHST6 in patients with MCD and exons 4 and 12 in TGFBI in patients with LCD1 and GCD1. Clinical characteristics and the detected variations were evaluated to determine any existing genotype–phenotype correlations. Results The previously reported R555W mutation in TGFBI was detected in 12 patients with GCD1, and the R124C mutation in TGFBI was detected in four patients with LCD1. Serum AgKS levels indicated that 12 patients with MCD were in subgroup I, and five patients with MCD were in subgroup II. No genetic variation was detected in the coding region of CHST6 for three patients with MCD type II. In other patients with MCD, three previously reported missense variations (c. 1A>T, c.738C>G, and c.631 C>T), three novel missense variations (c.164 T>C, c.526 G>A, c. 610 C>T), and two novel frameshift variations (c.894_895 insG and c. 462_463 delGC) were detected. These variations did not exist in the control chromosomes, 1000 Genomes, and dbSNP. Conclusions This is the first molecular analysis of TGFBI and CHST6 in Turkish patients with different types of CD. We detected previously reported, well-known hot spot mutations in TGFBI in the patients with GCD1

  2. Noncoding RNAs: Emerging Players in Muscular Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germana Falcone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The fascinating world of noncoding RNAs has recently come to light, thanks to the development of powerful sequencing technologies, revealing a variety of RNA molecules playing important regulatory functions in most, if not all, cellular processes. Many noncoding RNAs have been implicated in regulatory networks that are determinant for skeletal muscle differentiation and disease. In this review, we outline the noncoding RNAs involved in physiological mechanisms of myogenesis and those that appear dysregulated in muscle dystrophies, also discussing their potential use as disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  3. A molecular protocol for diagnosing myotonic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guida, M; Marger, R S; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S; Kissel, J T; Mendell, J R; Prior, T W

    1995-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an autosomal dominant genetic disease caused by an unstable CTG repeat sequence in the 3' untranslated region of the myotonin protein kinase gene. The CTG repeat is present 5-30 times in the normal population, whereas DM patients have CTG expansions of 50 to several thousand repeats. The age of onset of the disorder and the severity of the phenotype is roughly correlated with the size of the CTG expansion. We developed a molecular protocol for the diagnosis of DM based on an initial polymerase chain reaction screen to detect normal-sized alleles and small expansions, followed by an improved Southern protocol to detect larger expansions.

  4. Acute effect of pure oxygen breathing on diabetic macular edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinten, Carl Martin; La Cour, Morten; Lund-Andersen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. A small-scale pilot study of the pathophysiology of diabetic macular edema (DME) was made by assessing concomitant changes in macular volume (MV), mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), intraocular pressure (IOP), retinal artery diameter (RAD), and retinal vein diameter (RVD) in response t...

  5. Interocular agreement in melanin and macular pigment optical density.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanis, M.J.; Berendschot, T.T.J.M.; van Norren, D.

    2007-01-01

    Macular pigment (MP) and melanin possibly protect the macular area by absorbing blue light and acting as antioxidants. Because little is known about the interocular correlation of melanin, we determined its optical density (MOD) in both eyes of healthy subjects using fundus reflectometry. The measur

  6. Spontaneous closure of macular hole following blunt trauma

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    Clovis Arcoverde Freitas-Neto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocular trauma can result in macular hole and it can lead to complete loss of central vision. We are reporting a case of traumatic macular hole associated with retinal hemorrhages and choroidal ruptures with spontaneous resolution and total vision recovery.

  7. Acute effect of pure oxygen breathing on diabetic macular edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinten, Carl Martin; La Cour, Morten; Lund-Andersen, Henrik;

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. A small-scale pilot study of the pathophysiology of diabetic macular edema (DME) was made by assessing concomitant changes in macular volume (MV), mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), intraocular pressure (IOP), retinal artery diameter (RAD), and retinal vein diameter (RVD) in response...

  8. Quantification of metamorphopsia in patients with macular hole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroyer, K.; Christensen, U.; Larsen, M.;

    2008-01-01

    .001). CONCLUSIONS. The level of metamorphopsia declined as a function of eccentricity and affected the central 10 of visual field. Macular hole size had an independent effect on interocular disparity. These results confirm reports that visuospatial distortion in the presence of macular hole is primarily the result...

  9. Prevalence of age-related macular degeneration in elderly Caucasians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erke, Maja G; Bertelsen, Geir; Peto, Tunde;

    2012-01-01

    To describe the sex- and age-specific prevalence of drusen, geographic atrophy, and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD).......To describe the sex- and age-specific prevalence of drusen, geographic atrophy, and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD)....

  10. Effect of macular photocoagulation on visual acuity of Omani patients with clinically significant macular edema

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    Zafar A Zaidi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of macular laser treatment on the visual acuity (VA of Omani diabetic patients with clinically significant macular edema (CSME. Visual outcome was also correlated with duration and control of diabetes and presence or absence of hypertension and hyperlipidemia. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective noncomparative cohort study involving 101 eyes of 72 Omani diabetic patients. Change in VA was determined using Snellen′s VA chart. The mean duration of follow-up was approximately 21 months (range, 16-24 months. Results: 29.7% of the patients maintained their vision, 35.6% showed improvement, whereas 34.7% showed a decrease in their vision. Positive visual outcome showed a statistically significant direct relationship with tight control of diabetes and absence of hypertension and an inverse relationship with the duration of diabetes. Presence of hyperlipedemia did not show a statistically significant relationship with positive visual outcome. However, it showed a trend to better visual outcome in the absence of hyperlipedemia. Peak incidence of macular edema was seen at the age of 52.3 years. Conclusion: Macular photocoagulation was found to be an effective method of treatment for CSME among Omani diabetic patients, which has resulted in a positive visual outcome in 65.3% of the patients (stable and improved vision. Effective control of diabetes, duration of diabetes, and hypertension are the factors which influence the postlaser visual outcome.

  11. Visual loss related to macular subretinal fluid and cystoid macular edema in HIV-related optic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gautier, David; Rabier, Valérie; Jallet, Ghislaine;

    2012-01-01

    Optic nerve involvement may occur in various infectious diseases, but is rarely reported after infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We report the atypical case of a 38-year-old patient in whom the presenting features of HIV infection were due to a bilateral optic neuropathy associ...... associated with macular subretinal fluid and cystoid macular edema, which responded well to antiretroviral therapy....

  12. Myasthenia gravis and thymoma coexisting with myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmekci, Ozgul; Karasoy, Hatice; Bademkiran, Fikret; Akkus, Dilek Evyapan; Yuceyar, Nur

    2014-01-01

    We describe a 34-year old man presenting with subacute generalized myasthenic symptoms. His clinical features and laboratory investigations demonstrated both myasthenia gravis and myotonic dystrophy type 1. The computerized tomography of chest revealed anterior mediastinal mass. The lymphocyte-rich thymoma was removed surgically and he received radiotherapy. Recent observations suggested that the patients with myotonic dystrophy may have an increased risk of benign and malignant tumours but its coexistence with thymoma is very rare. The risk of thymoma associated with myotonic dystrophy is unknown.

  13. MR imaging of fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy; a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Yoo Kyung; Koo, Hae Soo; Park, Ki Deuk [Ewha Womans Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-11-01

    Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy is a genetic disease and common in Japan. The typical clinical features are hypotonia with an early infantile onset and severe developmental delay. The diagnosis is based on pathologic evidence of muscular dystrophy revealed by biopsy or an increased serum creatine kinase levels. Involvement of the brain is characterized by abnormal cerebral cortical dysplasia, cerebellar dysplasia, and white matter changes. We encountered a case of Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy in which brain MRI findings were typical, and present this case together with a review of the literature.

  14. The superhealing MRL background improves muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heydemann Ahlke

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mice from the MRL or “superhealing” strain have enhanced repair after acute injury to the skin, cornea, and heart. We now tested an admixture of the MRL genome and found that it altered the course of muscle pathology and cardiac function in a chronic disease model of skeletal and cardiac muscle. Mice lacking γ-sarcoglycan (Sgcg, a dystrophin-associated protein, develop muscular dystrophy and cardiomyopathy similar to their human counterparts with limb girdle muscular dystrophy. With disruption of the dystrophin complex, the muscle plasma membrane becomes leaky and muscles develop increased fibrosis. Methods MRL/MpJ mice were bred with Sgcg mice, and cardiac function was measured. Muscles were assessed for fibrosis and membrane leak using measurements of hydroxyproline and Evans blue dye. Quantitative trait locus mapping was conducted using single nucleotide polymorphisms distinct between the two parental strains. Results Introduction of the MRL genome reduced fibrosis but did not alter membrane leak in skeletal muscle of the Sgcg model. The MRL genome was also associated with improved cardiac function with reversal of depressed fractional shortening and the left ventricular ejection fraction. We conducted a genome-wide analysis of genetic modifiers and found that a region on chromosome 2 was associated with cardiac, diaphragm muscle and abdominal muscle fibrosis. Conclusions These data are consistent with a model where the MRL genome acts in a dominant manner to suppress fibrosis in this chronic disease setting of heart and muscle disease.

  15. Muscle MRI findings in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerevini, Simonetta; Caliendo, Giandomenico; Falini, Andrea [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Neuroradiology Unit, Head and Neck Department, Milan (Italy); Scarlato, Marina; Previtali, Stefano Carlo [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Department of Neurology, INSPE and Division of Neuroscience, Milan (Italy); Maggi, Lorenzo; Pasanisi, Barbara; Morandi, Lucia [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico ' ' Carlo Besta' ' , Neuromuscular Diseases and Neuroimmunology Unit, Milan (Italy); Cava, Mariangela [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Department of Radiology and Center for Experimental Imaging, Milan (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is characterized by extremely variable degrees of facial, scapular and lower limb muscle involvement. Clinical and genetic determination can be difficult, as molecular analysis is not always definitive, and other similar muscle disorders may have overlapping clinical manifestations. Whole-body muscle MRI examination for fat infiltration, atrophy and oedema was performed to identify specific patterns of muscle involvement in FSHD patients (30 subjects), and compared to a group of control patients (23) affected by other myopathies (NFSHD). In FSHD patients, we detected a specific pattern of muscle fatty replacement and atrophy, particularly in upper girdle muscles. The most frequently affected muscles, including paucisymptomatic and severely affected FSHD patients, were trapezius, teres major and serratus anterior. Moreover, asymmetric muscle involvement was significantly higher in FSHD as compared to NFSHD patients. In conclusion, muscle MRI is very sensitive for identifying a specific pattern of involvement in FSHD patients and in detecting selective muscle involvement of non-clinically testable muscles. Muscle MRI constitutes a reliable tool for differentiating FSHD from other muscular dystrophies to direct diagnostic molecular analysis, as well as to investigate FSHD natural history and follow-up of the disease. (orig.)

  16. Congenital muscular dystrophy with inflammation: Diagnostic considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaumudi Konkay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Muscle biopsy features of congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD vary from usual dystrophic picture to normal or nonspecific myopathic picture or prominent fibrosis or striking inflammatory infiltrate, which may lead to diagnostic errors. A series of patients of CMD with significant inflammatory infiltrates on muscle biopsy were correlated with laminin α 2 deficiency on immunohistochemistry (IHC. Material and Methods: Cryostat sections of muscle biopsies from the patients diagnosed as CMD on clinical and muscle biopsy features from 1996 to 2014 were reviewed with hematoxylin and eosin(H&E, enzyme and immunohistochemistry (IHC with laminin α 2. Muscle biopsies with inflammatory infiltrate were correlated with laminin α 2 deficiency. Results: There were 65 patients of CMD, with inflammation on muscle biopsy in 16. IHC with laminin α 2 was available in nine patients, of which six showed complete absence along sarcolemma (five presented with floppy infant syndrome and one with delayed motor milestones and three showed discontinuous, and less intense staining. Conclusions: CMD show variable degrees of inflammation on muscle biopsy. A diagnosis of laminin α 2 deficient CMD should be considered in patients of muscular dystrophy with inflammation, in children with hypotonia/delayed motor milestones.

  17. Meretoja's Syndrome: Lattice Corneal Dystrophy, Gelsolin Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, C.; Neves, M.; Oliveira, L.; Beirão, M.

    2017-01-01

    Lattice corneal dystrophy gelsolin type was first described in 1969 by Jouko Meretoja, a Finnish ophthalmologist. It is caused by an autosomal dominant mutation in gelsolin gene resulting in unstable protein fragments and amyloid deposition in various organs. The age of onset is usually after the third decade of life and typical diagnostic triad includes progressive bilateral facial paralysis, loose skin, and lattice corneal dystrophy. We report a case of a 53-year-old female patient referred to our Department of Ophthalmology by severe dry eye and incomplete eyelid closure. She had severe bilateral facial paresis, significant orbicularis, and perioral sagging as well as hypoesthesia of extremities and was diagnosed with Meretoja's syndrome at the age of 50, confirmed by the presence of gelsolin mutation. At our observation she had bilateral diminished tear film break-up time and Schirmer test, diffuse keratitis, corneal opacification, and neovascularization in the left eye. She was treated with preservative-free lubricants and topical cyclosporine, associated with nocturnal complete occlusion of both eyes, and underwent placement of lacrimal punctal plugs. Ocular symptoms are the first to appear and our role as ophthalmologists is essential for the diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of ocular alterations in these patients. PMID:28250773

  18. Sleep disordered breathing in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Marca, Giacomo; Frusciante, Roberto; Dittoni, Serena; Vollono, Catello; Buccarella, Cristina; Iannaccone, Elisabetta; Rossi, Monica; Scarano, Emanuele; Pirronti, Tommaso; Cianfoni, Alessandro; Mazza, Salvatore; Tonali, Pietro A; Ricci, Enzo

    2009-10-15

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is one of the most frequent forms of muscular dystrophy. The aims of this study were: 1) to evaluate the prevalence of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) in patients with FSHD; 2) to define the sleep-related respiratory patterns in FSHD patients with SDB; and 3) to find the clinical predictors of SDB. Fifty-one consecutive FSHD patients were enrolled, 23 women, mean age 45.7+/-12.3 years (range: 26-72). The diagnosis of FSHD was confirmed by genetic tests. All patients underwent medical and neurological evaluations, subjective evaluation of sleep and full-night laboratory-based polysomnography. Twenty patients presented SDB: 13 presented obstructive apneas, four presented REM related oxygen desaturations and three showed a mixed pattern. Three patients needed positive airways pressure. SDB was not related to the severity of the disease. Body mass index, neck circumference and daytime sleepiness did not allow prediction of SDB. In conclusion, the results suggest a high prevalence of SDB in patients with FSHD. The presence of SDB does not depend on the clinical severity of the disease. SDB is often asymptomatic, and no clinical or physical measure can reliably predict its occurrence. A screening of SDB should be included in the clinical assessment of FSHD.

  19. Efficacy of intravitreal ranibizumab injection combined with macular grid photocoagulation for diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu-Lin Jiang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To evaluate the clinical efficacy of intravitreal injection of ranibizumab combined with macular grid photocoagulation for diabetic macular edema(DME.METHODS:Totally 60 eyes(60 patientswith DME were randomly divided into 2 groups: 30 eyes of simple injection group underwent intravitreal injection of ranibizumab, and 30 eyes of combined treatment group underwent intravitreal injection of ranibizumab and macular grid photocoagulation 1wk later. The best corrected visual acuity(BCVA, central macular thickness(CMTmeasured by optical coherence tomography(OCTand postoperative complications were observed.RESULTS:In simple injection group, the BCVA after operation were separately 0.390±0.075(4wk, 0.367±0.088(8wkand 0.319±0.064(12wk,the CMT after operation were separately 221.63±112.34μm(4wk, 337.73±99.56μm(8wkand 432.92±100.46μm(12wk, which were much better than pre-operation. But during follow-up, the BCVA presented down trend and the CMT was on the rise slowly. In combined treatment group, the BCVA after operation were separately 0.385±0.036(4wk, 0.382±0.079(8wkand 0.377±0.097(12wk,the CMT after operation were separately 249.77±106.55μm(4wk, 270.40±92.88μm(8wkand 275.84±97.34μm(12wk, which were satisfactory and steady during follow-up, better than simple injection group(PCONCLUSION:Intravitreal injection of ranibizumab can effectively improve visual acuity and decrease central foveal thickness for patients with DME, combining with macular grid photocoagulation can ensure therapeutic effects steady and permanent.

  20. Rebound macular edema following oral acetazolamide therapy for juvenile X-linked retinoschisis in an Italian family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galantuomo, Maria Silvana; Fossarello, Maurizio; Cuccu, Alberto; Farci, Roberta; Preising, Markus N; Lorenz, Birgit; Napoli, Pietro Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    Background Juvenile X-linked retinoschisis (RS1, OMIM: 312700) is a hereditary vitreoretinal dystrophy characterized by bilateral foveal schisis and, in half of the patients, splitting through the nerve fiber layer in the peripheral retina. In the first decade of life, patients usually develop a decrease in visual acuity. Long-term visual outcomes can be poor due to the limited number of known successful treatments. Purpose The purposes of this study were to present, for the first time, a p.Arg197Cys missense mutation in the RS1 gene (OMIM: 300839) in a four-generation Italian family with RS1 and to examine the clinical response to the treatment with acetazolamide tablets alone or in combination with dorzolamide eye drops as assessed by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods Eleven individuals, including two brothers with RS1 (patients 1 and 2), underwent a full medical history examination and a comprehensive ocular assessment that involved SD-OCT, fluorescein angiography, electroretinography and DNA analysis. Each RS1 patient received oral acetazolamide (375 mg daily) during the first three months. Thereafter, patient 1 continued only with dorzolamide eyedrops three times a day for a period of three months, while patient 2 spontaneously stopped both medications. Results Sequence analysis of the RS1 gene identified a hemizygous c.589C>T (p.Arg197Cys) missense mutation in exon 6, which has not been previously reported in an Italian family. A different response to the medical therapy was observed in the four eyes of the two affected brothers hemizygous for this abnormality. Of note, after acetazolamide interruption, a rebound effect on cystoid macular edema reduced the beneficial effects of the initial therapy for RS1 from p.Arg197Cys mutation. Indeed, a minimal rebound effect on cystoid macular edema, and an improvement in visual acuity, was observed in patient 1 during the six months of treatment. Conversely, in patient 2, an initial

  1. The macular mapping test: a reliability study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies Leon N

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD is the leading cause of visual disability in people over 60 years of age in the developed world. The success of treatment deteriorates with increased latency of diagnosis. The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of the macular mapping test (MMT, and to investigate its potential as a screening tool. Methods The study population comprised of 31 healthy eyes of 31 participants. To assess reliability, four macular mapping test (MMT measurements were taken in two sessions separated by one hour by two practitioners, with reversal of order in the second session. MMT readings were also taken from 17 age-related maculopathy (ARM, and 12 AMD affected eyes. Results For the normal cohort, average MMT scores ranged from 85.5 to 100.0 MMT points. Scores ranged from 79.0 to 99.0 for the ARM group and from 9.0 to 92.0 for the AMD group. MMT scores were reliable to within ± 7.0 points. The difference between AMD affected eyes and controls (z = 3.761, p = Conclusion The reliability data shows that a change of 14 points or more is required to indicate a clinically significant change. This value is required for use of the MMT as an outcome measure in clinical trials. Although there was no difference between MMT scores from ARM affected eyes and controls, the MMT has the advantage over the Amsler grid in that it uses a letter target, has a peripheral fixation aid, and it provides a numerical score. This score could be beneficial in office and home monitoring of AMD progression, as well as an outcome measure in clinical research.

  2. Outcomes of chronic macular hole surgical repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shripaad Y Shukla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report visual and anatomic outcomes of chronic macular hole surgery, with analysis of pre-operative OCT-based hole size and post-operative closure type. Settings and Design: An IRB-approved, retrospective case series of 26 eyes of 24 patients who underwent surgery for stage 3 or 4 idiopathic chronic macular holes at a tertiary care referral center. Statistical Analysis: Student′s t-test. Results: Nineteen of 26 eyes (73% had visual improvement after surgery on most recent exam. Twenty-one of 26 eyes (81% achieved anatomic closure; 16 of 26 eyes (62% achieved type 1, and five of 26 eyes (19% achieved type 2 closure. Post-operative LogMAR VA for type 1 closure holes (0.49 was significantly greater than for type 2 closure and open holes (1.26, P < 0.003 and 1.10, P < 0.005, respectively, despite similar pre-operative VA (P = 0.51 and 0.68, respectively. Mean pre-operative hole diameter for eyes with type 1 closure, type 2 closure, and holes that remained open were 554, 929, and 1205 microns, respectively. Mean pre-operative hole diameter was significantly larger in eyes that remained open as compared to eyes with type 1 closure (P = 0.015. Conclusion: Vitrectomy to repair chronic macular holes can improve vision and achieve long-term closure. Holes of greater than 3.4 years duration were associated with a greater incidence of remaining open and type 2 closure. Larger holes (mean diameter of 1205 microns were more likely to remain open after repair.

  3. Expression profiling of muscles from Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy and laminin-alpha 2 deficient congenital muscular dystrophy; is congenital muscular dystrophy a primary fibrotic disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Mariko; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Noguchi, Satoru; Sese, Jun; Okinaga, Takeshi; Tsukahara, Toshifumi; Guicheney, Pascale; Ozono, Keiichi; Nishino, Ichizo; Morishita, Shinichi; Toda, Tatsushi

    2006-04-07

    Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) and laminin-alpha2 deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (MDC1A) are congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) and they both are categorized into the same clinical entity of muscular dystrophy as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). All three disorders share a common etiologic defect in the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex, which connects muscle structural proteins with the extracellular basement membrane. To investigate the pathophysiology of these CMDs, we generated microarray gene expression profiles of skeletal muscle from patients in various clinical stages. Despite diverse pathological changes, the correlation coefficient of overall gene expression among these samples was considerably high. We performed a multi-dimensional statistical analysis, the Distillation, to extract determinant genes that distinguish CMD muscle from normal controls. Up-regulated genes were primarily extracellular matrix (ECM) components, whereas down-regulated genes included structural components of mature muscle. These observations reflect active interstitial fibrosis with less active regeneration of muscle cell components in the CMDs, characteristics that are clearly distinct from those of DMD. Although the severity of fibrosis varied among the specimens tested, ECM gene expression was consistently high without substantial changes through the clinical course. Further, in situ hybridization showed more prominent ECM gene expression on muscle cells than on interstitial tissue cells, suggesting that ECM components are induced by regeneration process rather than by 'dystrophy.' These data imply that the etiology of FCMD and MDC1A differs from that of the chronic phase of classical muscular dystrophy, and the major pathophysiologic change in CMDs might instead result from primary active fibrosis.

  4. [Age-related macular degeneration (AMD)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Stephan; Kurz-Levin, Malaika

    2009-03-01

    Today age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most frequent cause for legal blindness in western industrialized countries. The prevalence of this disease rises with increasing age. A multifactorial pathogenesis of AMD is postulated including genetic predisposition and environmental risk factors. The most relevant modifiable risk factor is smoking. Up to today there is no cure of this chronic disease. Prophylaxis, including a healthy diet and antioxidants as nutrional supplements for selected patients, aims to slow down the disease progression. Significant progress has been made in the treatment of the neovascular form of the disease using inhibitors of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF).

  5. Cardiac involvement in patients with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2 and Becker muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sveen, Marie-Louise; Thune, Jens Jakob; Køber, Lars;

    2008-01-01

    of dystrophic changes on muscle biopsy. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates a high prevalence of cardiac involvement in patients with LGMD2I, LGMD2E, and BMD. Patients with LGMD2A, LGMD2D, and unclassified LGMD2 have a much lower and milder prevalence of cardiac involvement.......OBJECTIVE: To investigate the extent of cardiac involvement in patients with 1 of the 12 groups of recessively inherited limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2 (LGMD2A-L) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). DESIGN: Prospective screening. SETTING: Neuromuscular Clinic and Department of Cardiology...... at Rigshospitalet. Patients One hundred one patients with LGMD2A-I and BMD and 29 patients with LGMD2 and no molecular diagnosis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Clinical investigation, echocardiography, and electrocardiographic findings. RESULTS: Cardiac involvement was present in 24 of 100 patients (24%) with LGMD2A...

  6. Disease: H00814 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H00814 Vitelliform macular dystrophy, including: Best disease / Juvenile vitelliform macular... dystrophy (VMD2) ; Adult-onset vitelliform macular dystrophy (AVMD); Autosomal recessive bestrophi...nopathy (ARB) Vitelliform macular dystrophy is characterized by autosomal dominant inheritance and autofluor...f Adult-onset vitelliform macular dystrophy (AVMD) is between 30 and 50 years accompanied by slowly progress...RPH2 in juvenile and adult vitelliform macular dystrophies: a rationale for molecular analysis. Ophthalmolog

  7. Valley sign in Becker muscular dystrophy and outliers of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradhan Sunil

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Valley sign has been described in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. As there are genetic and clinical similarities between DMD and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD, this clinical sign is evaluated in this study in BMD and DMD/BMD outliers. To evaluate the sign, 28 patients with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD, 8 DMD/BMD outliers and 44 age-matched male controls with other neuromuscular diseases were studied. The sign was examined after asking patients to abduct their arms to about 90ºwith hands directed upwards; the muscle bulk over the back of the shoulders was observed. The sign was considered positive if the infraspinatus and deltoid muscles were enlarged and between these two muscles, the muscles forming the posterior axillary fold were wasted as if there were a valley between the two mounts. Twenty-five BMD patients and 7 DMD/BMD outliers had positive valley sign. However, it was less remarkable in comparison to DMD. It was absent in all the 44 controls. It was concluded that the presence of valley sign may help in differentiating BMD from other progressive neuromuscular disorders of that age group.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Institute National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Educational Resources (13 links) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Centre for Genetics Education Cleveland Clinic: Muscular Dystrophy Disease InfoSearch: Becker ...

  9. Strength training and albuterol in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooi, EL; Vogels, OJM; van Asseldonk, RJGP; Lindeman, E; Hendriks, JCM; Wohlgemuth, M; van der Maarel, SM; Padberg, GW

    2004-01-01

    Background: In animals and healthy volunteers beta2-adrenergic agonists increase muscle strength and mass, in particular when combined with strength training. In patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) albuterol may exert anabolic effects. The authors evaluated the effect of

  10. Cardiac assessment of patients with late stage Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bockel, E. A. P.; Lind, J. S.; Zijlstra, J. G.; Wijkstra, P. J.; Meijer, P. M.; van den Berg, M. P.; Slart, R. H. J. A.; Aarts, L. P. H. J.; Tulleken, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients used to die mainly from pulmonary problems. However, as advances in respiratory care increase life expectancy, mortality due to cardiomyopathy rises. Echocardiography remains the standard diagnostic modality for cardiomyopathy in DMD patients, b

  11. Immunoglobulins in granular corneal dystrophy Groenouw type I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, H U; Bojsen-Møller, M; Schrøder, H D

    1993-01-01

    Three patients with granular corneal dystrophy Groenouw type I underwent corneal grafting, and cryostat sections of the corneal buttons were examined immunohistochemically for immunoglobulins. Positive results were obtained for IgG, Kappa-, and Lambda chains with immunofluorescence technique...

  12. Current and emerging treatment strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Mah JK

    2016-01-01

    Jean K Mah Department of Pediatrics and Clinical Neurosciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Abstract: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in childhood. It is caused by mutations of the DMD gene, leading to progressive muscle weakness, loss of independent ambulation by early teens, and premature death due to cardiorespiratory complications. The diagnosis can usually be made after careful review of the...

  13. The new frontier in muscular dystrophy research: booster genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvall, Eva; Wewer, Ulla M

    2003-01-01

    More than 30 different forms of muscular dystrophy (MD) have been molecularly characterized and can be diagnosed, but progress toward treatment has been slow. Gene replacement therapy has met with great difficulty because of the large size of the defective genes and because of difficulties...... of the boosters are better understood, drugs may be developed to provide the boost to muscle. Some of the experiences in models of muscular dystrophy may inspire new approaches in other genetic degenerative diseases as well....

  14. Update on corticosteroids for diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwartz SG

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stephen G Schwartz,1 Ingrid U Scott,2,3 Michael W Stewart,4 Harry W Flynn Jr1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, 2Department of Ophthalmology, 3Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, 4Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, FL, USA Abstract: Diabetic macular edema (DME remains an important cause of visual loss. Although anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF agents are generally used as first-line treatments for patients with center-involving DME, there is an important role for corticosteroids as well. Corticosteroids may be especially useful in pseudophakic patients poorly responsive to anti-VEGF therapies, in patients wishing to reduce the number of required injections, and in pregnant patients. Intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide has been used for many years but is not approved for this indication. An extended-release bioerodable dexamethasone delivery system and an extended-release nonbioerodable fluocinolone acetonide insert have both achieved regulatory approval for the treatment of DME. All intravitreal corticosteroids are associated with risks of cataract progression, elevation of intraocular pressure, and endophthalmitis. There is no current consensus regarding the use of corticosteroids, but they are valuable for selected patients with center-involving DME. Keywords: diabetic macular edema, vascular endothelial growth factor, triamcinolone acetonide, dexamethasone, fluocinolone acetonide, randomized clinical trial

  15. Acute Macular Neuroretinopathy Associated With Chikungunya Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Claudine E; Navajas, Eduardo V; Warner, Simon J; Heisler, Morgan; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2016-06-01

    A 47-year-old man with recent travel to the Caribbean was admitted with acute febrileillness associated with arthralgia and skin rash followed by sudden onset of bilateral visual field defects. Funduscopy revealed subtle bilateral paracentral dark lesions nasal to the fovea best seen on near infrared imaging as hyporeflective, wedge-shaped, paracentral macular lesions. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) through the lesions revealed hyperreflective bands at the level of the outer plexiform layer and outer nuclear layer (ONL), with concomitant attenuation of the underlying external limiting membrane (ELM), ellipsoid zone (EZ), and interdigitation zone (IZ). Neither fluorescein angiography nor speckle variance OCT angiography (sv-OCTA) showed any defects in retinal circulation. Work up revealed positive Immunoglobulin M for Chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Six months later, the patient had persistent scotomas, although reduced in size. SD-OCT showed subtle ONL thinning and restoration of the ELM, although EZ and IZ remained disrupted. Chikungunya fever may manifest as bilateral acute macular neuroretinopathy (AMN). Clinicians should be aware of possible systemic associations of AMN. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:596-599.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Cardiac function in muscular dystrophy associates with abdominal muscle pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Brandon B.; Swaggart, Kayleigh A.; Kim, Gene; Watson, Sydeaka; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The muscular dystrophies target muscle groups differentially. In mouse models of muscular dystrophy, notably the mdx model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, the diaphragm muscle shows marked fibrosis and at an earlier age than other muscle groups, more reflective of the histopathology seen in human muscular dystrophy. Methods Using a mouse model of limb girdle muscular dystrophy, the Sgcg mouse, we compared muscle pathology across different muscle groups and heart. A cohort of nearly 200 Sgcg mice were studied using multiple measures of pathology including echocardiography, Evans blue dye uptake and hydroxyproline content in multiple muscle groups. Spearman rank correlations were determined among echocardiographic and pathological parameters. Findings The abdominal muscles were found to have more fibrosis than other muscle groups, including the diaphragm muscle. The abdominal muscles also had more Evans blue dye uptake than other muscle groups. The amount of diaphragm fibrosis was found to correlate positively with fibrosis in the left ventricle, and abdominal muscle fibrosis correlated with impaired left ventricular function. Fibrosis in the abdominal muscles negatively correlated with fibrosis in the diaphragm and right ventricles. Together these data reflect the recruitment of abdominal muscles as respiratory muscles in muscular dystrophy, a finding consistent with data from human patients. PMID:26029630

  17. [Physiopathology of macular edema in central vein occlusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanca, Horia T; Manea, Georgiana

    2012-01-01

    Retinal Vein Occlusions are vascular diseases affecting the Central Retinal Vein and its branches causing decreased retinal drainage resulting in significant clinical and functional pathological changes. RVO determines the increase of vascular permeability, with edema and hemorrhage and development of collateral vessels in a few weeks. Among the serious consequences of venous occlusion is the installation of macular edema to which depends long-term visual prognosis. Macular Edema is the accumulation of intraretinal serous fluid in the macular area caused by the breakdown of blood-retinal barrier.

  18. Infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy caused by uniparental disomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomons, Joyce; Ridgway, Oliver; Hardy, Carol; Kurian, Manju A; Kurian, Manju; Jayawant, Sandeep; Hughes, Sarah; Pretorius, Pieter; Németh, Andrea H

    2014-04-01

    Infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy (INAD) is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the phospholipase A2 group 6 (Pla2G6) gene. Affected individuals usually present between the ages of 6 months and 2 years with rapid cognitive and motor regression and axial hypotonia. Gait disturbance, limb spasticity, cerebellar signs, and optic atrophy are other common features associated with INAD. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can sometimes contribute towards the diagnosis, the confirmation of INAD is by Pla2G6 gene analysis. In this case report, we describe the first individual (female) with INAD due to a combination of uniparental heterodisomy and isodisomy; we discuss the possible underlying mechanism and highlight the importance of parental carrier testing in accurately predicting the recurrence risk in these families. We also confirm the recent report of hypertrophy of the clava (also known as the 'gracile tubercle') as a useful MRI sign in INAD.

  19. Natural history of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing KE

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is X-linked recessive hereditary disease. DMD gene mutations result in dystrophin deficiency, which causes not only muscle movement disorders but also scoliosis, cognitive dysfunction, urinary tract diseases, respiratory diseases and heart diseases. Most patients die in early adult for respiratory and circulatory failure. Early multidisciplinary therapies will significantly delay disease progression and improve patients' quality of life. However, DMD diagnosis and treatment exist significantly time delay now. In this study, we review the natural history of DMD, including motor, cognitive, respiratory and heart function, for improving DMD early recognition, diagnosis and treatment, so as to benefit DMD patients. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.05.004

  20. Cardiac involvement in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia; Meng, Gerhard

    2005-01-01

    Cardiac involvement (CI) in form of myocardial thickening in a patient with genetically confirmed facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHMD) has not been reported. The patient is a 50-year-old male with a tandem repeat size of 17 and 14 kb in the D4Z4 locus on chromosome 4q35. The clinical cardiologic investigation was normal. Blood pressure was 150/90 mm Hg. Funduscopy, 24-hour ambulatory ECG, and 24-hour blood pressure monitoring were normal. ECG showed incomplete right bundle branch block, ST elevation in V2-V4, tall T waves in V3-V5, and hypertrophy signs. Echocardiography revealed left ventricular myocardial thickening of the posterior wall (11.7 mm) and the septum (15.5 mm). In conclusion, CI in genetically confirmed FSHMD may manifest not only as ECG abnormalities but also as left ventricular myocardial thickening. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy: a polyalanine myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brais, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    It has been 10 years since the identification of the first PABPN1 gene (GCN)(n)/polyalanine mutations responsible for oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). These mutations have been found in most cases of OPMD diagnosed in more than 35 countries. Sequence analyses have shown that such mutations have occurred numerous times in human history. Although PABPN1 was found early on to be a component of the classic filamentous intranuclear inclusions (INIs), mRNA and other proteins also have been found to coaggregate in the INIs. It is still unclear if the INIs play a pathologic or a protective role. The generation of numerous cell and animal models of OPMD has led to greater insight into its complex molecular pathophysiology and identified the first candidate therapeutic molecules. This paper reviews basic and clinical research on OPMD, with special emphasis on recent developments in the understanding of its pathophysiology.

  2. Recent advances in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perkins KJ

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Kelly J Perkins,1,2 Kay E Davies21Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, 2MRC Functional Genomics Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UKAbstract: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, an allelic X-linked progressive muscle-wasting disease, is one of the most common single-gene disorders in the developed world. Despite knowledge of the underlying genetic causation and resultant pathophysiology from lack of dystrophin protein at the muscle sarcolemma, clinical intervention is currently restricted to symptom management. In recent years, however, unprecedented advances in strategies devised to correct the primary defect through gene- and cell-based therapeutics hold particular promise for treating dystrophic muscle. Conventional gene replacement and endogenous modification strategies have greatly benefited from continued improvements in encapsidation capacity, transduction efficiency, and systemic delivery. In particular, RNA-based modifying approaches such as exon skipping enable expression of a shorter but functional dystrophin protein and rapid progress toward clinical application. Emerging combined gene- and cell-therapy strategies also illustrate particular promise in enabling ex vivo genetic correction and autologous transplantation to circumvent a number of immune challenges. These approaches are complemented by a vast array of pharmacological approaches, in particular the successful identification of molecules that enable functional replacement or ameliorate secondary DMD pathology. Animal models have been instrumental in providing proof of principle for many of these strategies, leading to several recent trials that have investigated their efficacy in DMD patients. Although none has reached the point of clinical use, rapid improvements in experimental technology and design draw this goal ever closer. Here, we review therapeutic approaches to DMD, with particular emphasis on recent progress in strategic development, preclinical evaluation and

  3. Comparative Study of Anterior Eye Segment Measurements with Spectral Swept-Source and Time-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in Eyes with Corneal Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna K. Nowinska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare anterior eye segment measurements and morphology obtained with two optical coherence tomography systems (TD OCT, SS OCT in eyes with corneal dystrophies (CDs. Methods. Fifty healthy volunteers (50 eyes and 54 patients (96 eyes diagnosed with CD (epithelial basement membrane dystrophy, EBMD = 12 eyes; Thiel-Behnke CD = 6 eyes; lattice CD TGFBI type = 15 eyes; granular CD type 1 = 7 eyes, granular CD type 2 = 2 eyes; macular CD = 23 eyes; and Fuchs endothelial CD = 31 eyes were recruited for the study. Automated and manual central corneal thickness (aCCT, mCCT, anterior chamber depth (ACD, and nasal and temporal trabecular iris angle (nTIA, tTIA were measured and compared with Bland-Altman plots. Results. Good agreement between the TD and SS OCT measurements was demonstrated for mCCT and aCCT in normal individuals and for mCCT in the CDs group. The ACD, nTIA, and tTIA measurements differed significantly in both groups. TBCD, LCD, and FECD caused increased CCT. MCD caused significant corneal thinning. FECD affected all analyzed parameters. Conclusions. Better agreement between SS OCT and TD OCT measurements was demonstrated in normal individuals compared to the CDs group. OCT provides comprehensive corneal deposits analysis and demonstrates the association of CD with CCT, ACD, and TIA measurements.

  4. Clinical and tomographic aspects of macular microholes; Aspectos clinicos e tomograficos dos microburacos maculares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novelli, Fernando Jose de [Hospital de Olhos Sadalla Amin Ghanem, Joinville, SC (Brazil)], e-mail: Fernando.novelli@gmail.com; Maia Junior, Otacilio de Oliveira [Fundacao Monte Tabor, Salvador, BA (Brazil). Hospital Sao Rafael; Nobrega, Mario Junqueira [Universidade da Regiao de Joinville (UNIVILLE), Joinville, SC (Brazil); Garrido Neto, Theodomiro [Universidade do Estado do Amazonas (UEA), Manaus, AM (Brazil); Takahashi, Walter Yukihiko [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. de Oftalmologia

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To describe the clinical aspects and evaluate optical coherence tomography of macular microholes. Methods: Seven patients were assessed (8 eyes) with microholes of the macula. All patients underwent complete eye examination, fundus photography, fluorescent angiography and OCT-3 imaging. Results: Ages ranged from 26 to 69 years. Six patients were female (85.7%) and five of them had microhole in the right eye. The presenting symptom was decrease in visual acuity (71.3%) and central scotoma in (14.3%). Five eyes (71.4%) had no defects shown by fluorescent angiography. A defect in the outer retina was demonstrated in all eyes on optical coherence tomography. The lesions were nonprogressive. Conclusion: Macular microholes are small lamellar defects in the outer retina. The condition is nonprogressive, generally unilateral and compatible with good visual acuity. Fundus biomicroscopy associated with an optical coherence tomography are the main elements in the diagnosis and study of this pathology. (author)

  5. LASER PHOTOCOAGULATION IN DIABETIC MACULAR EDEMA: EFFECTS ON VISUAL ACUITY AND MACULAR EDEMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Dehghan

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the importance of clinically significant macular edema in diabetic patients, this study is aimed to determine if laser photocoagulation is effective in the treatment of clinically significant diabetic macular edema. In addition, the effects of risk factors arc surveyed* This is an existing data study considering patients with clinically significant diabetic macular edema, treated with argon-green laser photocoagulation in Labbafinejad hospital, department of lasertherapy, from 1995 to 1997. in 60 (42.6% eyes the treatment method was focal, in 22 (15.6% eyes grid, and in 59 (41.84 modified grid laser photocoagulation was performed. The results are based upon deterioration of visual acuity, occurance of moderate visual loss and improvement or persistence of CSME. We studied 114 eyes from 87 patients. Two years after initial treatment, visual acuity improved in 19.1% of eyes, unchanged in 9.5% and worsened in 71.4% of eyes. After this period the rate of moderate visual loss was 28.6% and CSME was improved in 23.8% of eyes. According to our study, baseline visual acuity and retinopathy severity were two important intervening factors in response to lasertherapy. Comparing our results with natural course of diabetic macular edema, indicates that in assessing visual outcome laser photocoagulation is an effective modality in treatment of CSME, but it is not effective in maintaining or improving visual acuity, which is due to patients delay in visiting ophthalmologists and paying not enough attention to follow-up visits.

  6. Assessment of Macular Sensitivity and Fixation Stability by MP-1 Microperimetry in Diabetic Macular Edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuncay Küsbeci

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pur po se: To evaluate macular light sensitivity and fixation stability in subjects with clinically significant macular edema (CSME related to diabetes mellitus. Ma te ri al and Met hod: Thirty eyes of 22 patients with CSME, as defined by Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study, and 32 eyes of 32 healthy subjects were enrolled in this study. Microperimetry was performed with the Micro Perimeter MP-1 in both groups. The mean retinal sensitivities at central 4°, at central 12° and at central 20° were measured. The mean extent of preferred retinal locus (PRL, fixation stability and fixation location were calculated using fixation test in MP-1 microperimeter. Statistical analysis was performed using student t-test and chisquare test. Re sults: The mean best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA was significantly lower in the CSME group than the control group (p<0.001. The mean retinal sensitivities at central 4°, 12° and 20° areas were significantly lower in the CSME group compared to the control group (p<0.001, for each central degrees. In subjects with CSME, fixation stability was detected as stable in 8 (26.7% eyes, relatively unstable in 21 (70% eyes and unstable in 1 (3.3% eye. Significant decrease was found in fixation stability and fixation location scores in eyes with CSME compared to control subjects (p<0.001. The difference of mean extent in PRL between the groups was statistically significant (p<0.001. Dis cus si on: The macular light sensitivity and fixation stability are affected in patients with CSME. MP-1 micropeimetry might be helpful to evaluate the extent of PRL and useful for evaluation of severity and progression of diabetic macular edema. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2012; 42: 310-5

  7. Coroidite serpiginosa macular: relato de caso Macular serpiginous choroiditis: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Klejnberg

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A coroidite serpiginosa é uma doença rara, que pode causar perda visual irreversível quando a mácula é atingida. Este artigo relata um caso de coroidite serpiginosa com acometimento macular isolado, submetido a tratamento com injeções subtenoniana e intravítrea de triancinolona. Os aspectos clínicos e diagnósticos diferenciais desta doença ocular são discutidos, assim como, os achados de angiografia fluoresceínica e tomografia de coerência óptica de alta resolução.Serpiginous choroiditis is a rare ocular inflammatory disease that can lead to permanent vision loss due to macular involvement. This article reports a case of a patient with macular serpiginous choroiditis submitted to subtenon and intravitreal triamcinolone injections. The clinical aspects and differential diagnosis of this ocular disease, including fluorescein angiogram and high-resolution optical coherence tomography are discussed.

  8. Creatine kinase response to high-intensity aerobic exercise in adult-onset muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren P; Sveen, Marie-Louise; Hansen, Regitze S

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effect of high-intensity exercise on plasma creatine kinase (CK) in patients with muscular dystrophies.......We investigated the effect of high-intensity exercise on plasma creatine kinase (CK) in patients with muscular dystrophies....

  9. NIH study shows increased risk for two types of myotonic muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adults with a form of muscular dystrophy called myotonic muscular dystrophy (MMD) may be at increased risk of developing cancer, according to a study by investigators at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health.

  10. Quantification of retinal layer thickness changes in acute macular neuroretinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Marion R; Beck, Marco; Kolb, Simone

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To quantitatively evaluate retinal layer thickness changes in acute macular neuroretinopathy (AMN). METHODS: AMN areas were identified using near-infrared reflectance (NIR) images. Intraretinal layer segmentation using Heidelberg software was performed. The inbuilt ETDRS -grid was moved ...

  11. Prognostic significance of delayed structural recovery after macular hole surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ulrik C; Krøyer, Kristian; Sander, Birgit

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the prognostic significance for visual function of persistent subfoveal fluid and persistent photoreceptor layer discontinuity in eyes in which hole closure had been obtained 3 months after macular hole surgery. DESIGN: Ancillary study of subjects enrolled in a randomized...... clinical trial. PARTICIPANTS: Participants were recruited from a randomized clinical trial evaluating internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling in macular hole surgery. The study included 74 eyes in which a contiguous retinal surface or a full attachment with a flat neuroretinal rim had been reestablished...... OUTCOME MEASURES: Postoperative foveal configuration and foveal photoreceptor layer discontinuity diameter 3 months after macular hole surgery. RESULTS: Persistent subfoveal fluid 3 months after macular hole surgery, which was found in 36.5% of eyes, was not associated with a significantly different BCVA...

  12. Macular surgery using intraoperative spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Riazi-Esfahani

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Intraoperative SD-OCT is a useful imaging technique which provides vitreoretinal surgeons with rapid awareness of changes in macular anatomy during surgery and may therefore result in better anatomical and visual outcomes.

  13. Successful treatment of pseudophakic cystoid macular edema with intravitreal bevacizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Antonio; Prascina, Francesco; Russo, Vincenzo; Iaculli, Cristiana; Primavera, Vito; Querques, Giuseppe; Stella, Andrea; Delle Noci, Nicola

    2008-07-01

    A 67-year-old woman developed refractory pseudophakic cystoid macular edema (CME) after uneventful phacoemulsification. Three months after an intravitreal injection of bevacizumab (1.25 mg), the CME was completely resolved, with resultant improvement in visual acuity.

  14. Disappearance of diabetic macular hard exudates after hemodialysis introduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsuo,Toshihiko

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available

    We report herein the disappearance of macular hard exudates after the introduction of hemodialysis in diabetic patients. A 62-year-old woman and a 52-year-old man with diabetes mellitus showed hard exudates in the macula of the left eyes. Both patients had previously undergone panretinal photocoagulation in both eyes. During the follow-up, hemodialysis was introduced for deteriorating chronic renal failure caused by diabetic nephropathy. Half a year later, macular hard exudates in the left eyes disappeared dramatically in both patients, but the visual acuity remained the same. No additional laser treatment was done during the observation period. Hemodialysis is considered to have accelerated the resolution of macular hard exudates in both patients. The deposition of macular hard exudates in diabetic patients is due in part to concurrent poor renal function.

  15. Acute macular edema following intracorporeal prostaglandin injection for erectile dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asahi MG

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Masumi G Asahi, Calvin Chou, Ron P Gallemore Retina Macula Institute, Torrance, CA, USA Purpose: We aimed to describe the first case of macular edema following intracorporeal injection of alprostadil, a prostaglandin E1. Methods: This was a retrospective case report followed with optical coherence tomography, fundus photos, and fluorescein angiography images. Results: A patient developed bilateral cystoid macular edema following intracorporeal injection of alprostadil, a prostaglandin E1 for treatment of erectile dysfunction. The edema resolved following treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs and corticosteroids, with subsequent recovery in visual acuity. Discussion: Systemic prostaglandin administration can cause macular edema and vision loss, indicating that elevated systemic prostaglandin levels may affect visual function. This has potential implications for other systemic disorders and treatments that could affect macular function. Keywords: alprostadil, inflammation

  16. Omics in Ophthalmology: Advances in Genomics and Precision Medicine for Leber Congenital Amaurosis and Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hollander, Anneke I

    2016-03-01

    The genomic revolution has had a huge impact on our understanding of the genetic defects and disease mechanisms underlying ophthalmic diseases. Two examples are discussed here. The first is Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a severe inherited retinal dystrophy leading to severe vision loss in children, and the second is age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of vision loss in the elderly. Twenty years ago, the genetic causes of these diseases were unknown. Currently, more than 20 LCA genes have been identified, and genetic testing can now successfully identify the genetic defects in at least 75% of all LCA cases. Gene-specific treatments have entered the clinical trial phase for three LCA genes, and for seven LCA genes gene-specific therapies have been tested in model systems. Age-related macular degeneration is a multifactorial disease caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Currently, more than 40 loci have been identified for AMD, accounting for 15%-65% of the total genetic contribution to AMD. Despite the progress that has been made so far, genetic testing is not yet recommended for AMD, but this may change if we move to clinical trials or treatments that are dependent on an individual's genotype. The identification of serum or plasma biomarkers using other "-omics" technologies may further improve predictive tests and our understanding of the disease mechanisms of AMD. Ultimately, it is anticipated that predictive tests will help to stratify patients for the most suitable therapy, which will enable the development of precision medicine, tailored to individual needs.

  17. Multiple extra macular branch retinal vein occlusions in hyperhomocysteinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Diwakar Gore

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperhomocysteinemia is a well-known modifiable risk factor for thromboembolism. Retinal vascular occlusion in patients having hyperhomocysteinemia is a known entity, particularly in young patients. However, multiple extra macular branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO is a rare condition, which can be a presentation of this disease. We present a patient who had multiple extra macular BRVO; on complete systemic workup, he was found to have raised homocysteine levels.

  18. Simple Raman Instrument for in Vivo Detection of Macular Pigments

    OpenAIRE

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; Gellermann, Werner

    2005-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy holds promise as a novel noninvasive technology for the quantification of the macular pigments (MP) lutein and zeaxanthin. These compounds, which are members of the carotenoid family, are thought to prevent or delay the onset of age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the elderly. It is highly likely that they achieve this protection through their function as optical filters and/or antioxidants. Using resonant excitation in the visib...

  19. Pathology of Macular Foveoschisis Associated with Degenerative Myopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny Tang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a clinicopathological paper on the histologic findings in myopia-associated macular foveoschisis. The findings on ophthalmic pathological study of a 73-year-old woman with high myopia are reviewed. Multiple retinoschisis cavities involving both the macula and retinal periphery were disclosed. Our paper offers tissue evidence and supports recent ocular coherence tomography reports of eyes with high myopia and associated macular foveoschisis.

  20. [Depression in Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narváez, Yamile Reveiz; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos

    2012-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a cause for disability in the elderly since it greatly affects their quality of life and increases depression likelihood. This article discusses the negative effect depression has on patients with age-related macular degeneration and summarizes the interventions available for decreasing their depression index. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. CKD Increases the Risk of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Liew, Gerald; Mitchell, Paul; Wong, Tien Yin; Iyengar, Sudha K; Wang, Jie Jin

    2008-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the United States and often coexists with chronic kidney disease. Both conditions share common genetic and environmental risk factors. A total of 1183 participants aged 54+ were examined in the population-based, prospective cohort Blue Mountains Eye Study (Australia) to determine if chronic kidney disease increases the risk of age-related macular degeneration. Moderate chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerul...

  2. Retinal structure in young patients aged 10 years or less with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schatz, Patrik; Sharon, Dror; Al-Hamdani, Sermed

    2016-01-01

    ranged from subtle thickening at the level of the retinal pigment epithelium-photoreceptor interdigitation line, to subretinal fluid and precipitate-like changes at the level of the photoreceptor outer segments, and further to choroidal neovascularization. The photoreceptor inner segment ellipsoid layer...... of the retinal pigment epithelium-photoreceptor interdigitation line. The photoreceptor inner segment seems to be unaffected unless choroidal neovascularization develops, which seems promising regarding future gene therapy....

  3. Novel GUCA1A Mutations Suggesting Possible Mechanisms of Pathogenesis in Cone, Cone-Rod, and Macular Dystrophy Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunka Kamenarova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report two novel GUCA1A (the gene for guanylate cyclase activating protein 1 mutations identified in unrelated Spanish families affected by autosomal dominant retinal degeneration (adRD with cone and rod involvement. All patients from a three-generation adRD pedigree underwent detailed ophthalmic evaluation. Total genome scan using single-nucleotide polymorphisms and then the linkage analysis were undertaken on the pedigree. Haplotype analysis revealed a 55.37 Mb genomic interval cosegregating with the disease phenotype on chromosome 6p21.31-q15. Mutation screening of positional candidate genes found a heterozygous transition c.250C>T in exon 4 of GUCA1A, corresponding to a novel mutation p.L84F. A second missense mutation, c.320T>C (p.I107T, was detected by screening of the gene in a Spanish patients cohort. Using bioinformatics approach, we predicted that either haploinsufficiency or dominant-negative effect accompanied by creation of a novel function for the mutant protein is a possible mechanism of the disease due to c.250C>T and c.320T>C. Although additional functional studies are required, our data in relation to the c.250C>T mutation open the possibility that transacting factors binding to de novo created recognition site resulting in formation of aberrant splicing variant is a disease model which may be more widespread than previously recognized as a mechanism causing inherited RD.

  4. Visual function of the idiopathic macular hole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Tao Ren

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The idiopathic macular hole(IMHis research priority associated with the regenerate quickly of vitrectomy. The unaided visual acuity and the best corrected visual acuity is partial for the visual acuity of the patient with IMH.The mechanism and clinical significance of modern visual function measurements associated with IMH, including contrast sensitivity, visual field, multifocal electroretinogram, and stereoscopic vision, have been introduced. These measurements could be of great value in early diagnosis of IMH, assessment of surgical indication and evaluation of visual performance after vitrectomy. They would also be helpful to the analysis of postoperative impaired visual function and its management. Having an adequate understanding of the contents and significance of visual function is helpful to the improvement of IMH surgery techniques and postoperative visual acuity.

  5. [Macular surgery in a new point of view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branişteanu, D; Moraru, Andreea

    2014-01-01

    To reveal the differences in anatomical and functional results following standard 20-gauge vitrectomy and modern transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy in macular surface pathology. Retrospective, interventional, comparative evaluation of macular pathology cases operated by standard 20-gauge vitrectomy and transconjunctival 23 G sutureless vitrectomy. In evaluation were included a comparable number of epiretinal membranes (both idiopathic and secondary) and stage 3 and 4 macular holes. A postoperative anatomical and functional analysis was performed and also the incidence of pre-and postoperative complications was noted. Transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy was associated with a shorter operating time and quicker anatomical and functional results. If in epiretinal membranes there was no significant difference in final results, in macular holes anatomical and functional results were better with sutureless vitrectomy. These results confirm the efficacy and safety of both surgical procedures in macular surface pathology. Better anatomical and functional results in macular holes and quicker functional rehabilitation in all cases promote sutureless vitrectomy as new standard procedure in these cases.

  6. Optic Coherence Tomography of Idiopathic Macular Epiretinal Membranes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing Liu; Yunlan Ling; Jingjing Huang; Xiaoping Zheng

    2002-01-01

    bjectives: To study the characteristics of optical coherence tomography (OCT)inopathic macular epiretinal membranes (IMEM) and the relationship between thethickness offovea and the vision of affected eyes.Methods:A total of 67 cases (73 eyes) with clinical diagnosis of IMEM using direct,indirect ophthalmoscope, three mirror contact lens, fundus color photography or fundusfluorescein angiography (FFA)were examined with OCTResults: Epiretinal membranes (ERMs) with macular edema were found in 32 eyes,proliferative ERMs in 20 eyes, ERMs with macular pseudoholes in 14 eyes and ERMswith laminar macular holes in 7 eyes. Based on OCT, the ERMs were clearly andpartially seperated from the retinal (27 eyes, 38.36% ), the retinal thickness of thefovea was the thickest in the proliferative ERMs and the thinnest in the ERMs withlaminar macular holes. The statistical analysis showed there was a negative correlationbetween the thickness of fovea and visual acuity ( r = - 0. 454, P = 0. 000).Conclusion:There were four types of images of OCT in IMEM: ERMs with macularedema, proliferative ERMs, ERMs with macular pseudohole and ERMs with laminarmacular hole; and the thicker the fovea under the OCT, the poorer the vision acuity in the affected eyes with ERMs.

  7. Clinical Observation on Juvenile Macular Hole without Trauma and Hypermyopia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tieying Zhao; Qingshan Chen; Ming Li; Xunqing Gu; Rulong Gao; Feng Wen

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical characteristics of juvenile macular hole without trauma and hypermyopia, and research the mechanism of macular hole.Methods: Sixty-seven patients less than 40 years of age were studied retrospectively from June 1998 to March 2003. Five cases (7 eyes) aged from 22 to 38 years were reported and the clinical characteristics that had macular hole without trauma or hypermyopia were summed up.Results: There was 1 male and 4 females with visual acuity from 0.08 to 0.8. The images of optical coherence tomography (OCT) showed full thickness macular hole in 5 patients (7 eyes), and the diameters were from 87 to 1043 μm. Among them, 2 cases were combined with retina pigmentosa; 1 case with binocular Coat's disease; 1 case had bilateral macular hole combined with Eagles' disease; 1 case was combined with 2-2.5PD old retinochoroidal lesion under middle-peripheral fundus, and 1.5 PD retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) defect on the optical disk.Conclusion: The juvenile macular hole without trauma and hypermyopia combined the different retina vascular damages and the RPE defects.

  8. CKD increases the risk of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Gerald; Mitchell, Paul; Wong, Tien Yin; Iyengar, Sudha K; Wang, Jie Jin

    2008-04-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the United States and often coexists with chronic kidney disease. Both conditions share common genetic and environmental risk factors. A total of 1183 participants aged 54+ were examined in the population-based, prospective cohort Blue Mountains Eye Study (Australia) to determine if chronic kidney disease increases the risk of age-related macular degeneration. Moderate chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate macular degeneration was 3.9% in participants with no/mild chronic kidney disease (35 of 897) and 17.5% in those with moderate chronic kidney disease (50 of 286). After adjusting for age, sex, cigarette smoking, hypertension, complement factor H polymorphism, and other risk factors, persons with moderate chronic kidney disease were 3 times more likely to develop early age-related macular degeneration than persons with no/mild chronic kidney disease (odds ratio = 3.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.8 to 5.7, P macular degeneration (odds ratio = 2.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.5 to 2.8, P chronic kidney disease have a higher risk of early age-related macular degeneration, suggesting the possibility of shared pathophysiologic mechanisms between the two conditions.

  9. FHL1 reduces dystrophy in transgenic mice overexpressing FSHD muscular dystrophy region gene 1 (FRG1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra J Feeney

    Full Text Available Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD is an autosomal-dominant disease with no effective treatment. The genetic cause of FSHD is complex and the primary pathogenic insult underlying the muscle disease is unknown. Several disease candidate genes have been proposed including DUX4 and FRG1. Expression analysis studies of FSHD report the deregulation of genes which mediate myoblast differentiation and fusion. Transgenic mice overexpressing FRG1 recapitulate the FSHD muscular dystrophy phenotype. Our current study selectively examines how increased expression of FRG1 may contribute to myoblast differentiation defects. We generated stable C2C12 cell lines overexpressing FRG1, which exhibited a myoblast fusion defect upon differentiation. To determine if myoblast fusion defects contribute to the FRG1 mouse dystrophic phenotype, this strain was crossed with skeletal muscle specific FHL1-transgenic mice. We previously reported that FHL1 promotes myoblast fusion in vitro and FHL1-transgenic mice develop skeletal muscle hypertrophy. In the current study, FRG1 mice overexpressing FHL1 showed an improvement in the dystrophic phenotype, including a reduced spinal kyphosis, increased muscle mass and myofiber size, and decreased muscle fibrosis. FHL1 expression in FRG1 mice, did not alter satellite cell number or activation, but enhanced myoblast fusion. Primary myoblasts isolated from FRG1 mice showed a myoblast fusion defect that was rescued by FHL1 expression. Therefore, increased FRG1 expression may contribute to a muscular dystrophy phenotype resembling FSHD by impairing myoblast fusion, a defect that can be rescued by enhanced myoblast fusion via expression of FHL1.

  10. Peripapillary and Macular Choroidal Thickness in Glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Hosseini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare choroidal thickness (CT between individuals with and without glaucomatous damage and to explore the association of peripapillary and submacular CT with glaucoma severity using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT. Methods: Ninety-one eyes of 20 normal subjects and 43 glaucoma patients from the UCLA SD-OCT Imaging Study were enrolled. Imaging was performed using Cirrus HDOCT. Choroidal thickness was measured at four predetermined points in the macular and peripapillary regions, and compared between glaucoma and control groups before and after adjusting for potential confounding variables. Results: The average (± standard deviation mean deviation (MD on visual fields was −0.3 (±2.0 dB in controls and −3.5 (±3.5 dB in glaucoma patients. Age, axial length and their interaction were the most significant factors affecting CT on multivariate analysis. Adjusted average CT (corrected for age, axial length, their interaction, gender and lens status however, was not different between glaucoma patients and the control group (P=0.083 except in the temporal parafoveal region (P=0.037; nor was choroidal thickness related to glaucoma severity (r=−0.187, P=0.176 for correlation with MD, r=−0.151, P=0.275 for correlation with average nerve fiber layer thickness. Conclusions: Choroidal thickness of the macular and peripapillary regions is not decreased in glaucoma. Anatomical measurements with SD-OCT do not support the possible influence of the choroid on the pathophysiology of glaucoma.

  11. LAMA2-related myopathy; frequency among congenital and limb-girdle muscular dystrophies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkken, Nicoline; Born, Alfred Peter; Duno, Morten;

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Muscular dystrophy caused by LAMA2-gene mutations is an autosomal recessive disease typically presenting as a severe, early-onset congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD). However, milder cases with a limb-girdle type muscular dystrophy (LGMD) have been described. Methods: In this study...

  12. Morphologic imaging in muscular dystrophies and inflammatory myopathies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degardin, Adrian; Lacour, Arnaud; Vermersch, Patrick [CHU de Lille, Clinique neurologique, Lille (France); Morillon, David; Cotten, Anne [CHRU de Lille, Service de Radiologie Osteoarticulaire, Hopital Roger Salengro, Lille (France); Stojkovic, Tanya [G-H Pitie-Salpetriere, Institut de Myologie, Paris (France)

    2010-12-15

    To determine if magnetic resonance imaging (MR imaging) is useful in the diagnostic workup of muscular dystrophies and idiopathic inflammatory myopathies for describing the topography of muscle involvement. MR imaging was performed in 31 patients: 8 with dystrophic myotony types 1 (n = 4) or 2 (n = 4); 11 with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, including dysferlinopathy, calpainopathy, sarcoglycanopathy, and dystrophy associated with fukutin-related protein mutation; 3 with Becker muscular dystrophy; and 9 with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, including polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and sporadic inclusion body myositis. Analysis of T1 images enabled us to describe the most affected muscles and the muscles usually spared for each muscular disease. In particular, examination of pelvis, thigh, and leg muscles demonstrated significant differences between the muscular diseases. On STIR images, hyperintensities were present in 62% of our patients with muscular dystrophies. A specific pattern of muscular involvement was established for each muscular disease. Hyperintensities observed on STIR images precede fatty degeneration and are not specific for inflammatory myopathies. (orig.)

  13. Assessment of disease activity in muscular dystrophies by noninvasive imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Katie K; Lim, Leland; Speedy, Sedona; Rando, Thomas A

    2013-05-01

    Muscular dystrophies are a class of disorders that cause progressive muscle wasting. A major hurdle for discovering treatments for the muscular dystrophies is a lack of reliable assays to monitor disease progression in animal models. We have developed a novel mouse model to assess disease activity noninvasively in mice with muscular dystrophies. These mice express an inducible luciferase reporter gene in muscle stem cells. In dystrophic mice, muscle stem cells activate and proliferate in response to muscle degeneration, resulting in an increase in the level of luciferase expression, which can be monitored by noninvasive, bioluminescence imaging. We applied this noninvasive imaging to assess disease activity in a mouse model of the human disease limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B (LGMD2B), caused by a mutation in the dysferlin gene. We monitored the natural history and disease progression in these dysferlin-deficient mice up to 18 months of age and were able to detect disease activity prior to the appearance of any overt disease manifestation by histopathological analyses. Disease activity was reflected by changes in luciferase activity over time, and disease burden was reflected by cumulative luciferase activity, which paralleled disease progression as determined by histopathological analysis. The ability to monitor disease activity noninvasively in mouse models of muscular dystrophy will be invaluable for the assessment of disease progression and the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions.

  14. Risk factors of age-related macular degeneration in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia Nano

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSES: To assess the risk factors of age-related macular degeneration in Argentina using a case-control study. METHODS: Surveys were used for subjects' antioxidant intake, age/gender, race, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes (and type of treatment, smoking, sunlight exposure, red meat consumption, fish consumption, presence of age-related macular degeneration and family history of age-related macular degeneration. Main effects models for logistic regression and ordinal logistic regression were used to analyze the results. RESULTS: There were 175 cases and 175 controls with a mean age of 75.4 years and 75.5 years, respectively, of whom 236 (67.4% were female. Of the cases with age-related macular degeneration, 159 (45.4% had age-related macular degeneration in their left eyes, 154 (44.0% in their right eyes, and 138 (39.4% in both eyes. Of the cases with age-related macular degeneration in their left eyes, 47.8% had the dry type, 40.3% had the wet type, and the type was unknown for 11.9%. The comparable figures for right eyes were: 51.9%, 34.4%, and 13.7%, respectively. The main effects model was dominated by higher sunlight exposure (OR [odds ratio]: 3.3 and a family history of age-related macular degeneration (OR: 4.3. Other factors included hypertension (OR: 2.1, smoking (OR: 2.2, and being of the Mestizo race, which lowered the risk of age-related macular degeneration (OR: 0.40. Red meat/fish consumption, body mass index, and iris color did not have an effect. Higher age was associated with progression to more severe age-related macular degeneration. CONCLUSION: Sunlight exposure, family history of age-related macular degeneration, and an older age were the significant risk factors. There may be other variables, as the risk was not explained very well by the existing factors. A larger sample may produce different and better results.

  15. Treatment of idiopathic macular hole with silicone oil tamponade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanovska-Adjievska B

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Biljana Ivanovska-Adjievska,1 Salih Boskurt,1 Faruk Semiz,1 Hakan Yuzer,1 Vesna Dimovska-Jordanova21European Eye Hospital, Skopje, Macedonia, 2Clinic for Eye Diseases, University "St Cyril and Methodius", Skopje, MacedoniaPurpose: We analyzed the anatomical and visual outcomes after surgical treatment of idiopathic macular holes with pars plana vitrectomy, internal limiting membrane (ILM peeling using Brilliant Blue dye, and silicone oil tamponade without postoperative posturing.Methods: This was a retrospective interventional study of 10 eyes in eight patients who underwent surgical treatment of idiopathic macular holes using pars plana vitrectomy, ILM peeling using Brilliant Blue dye, and silicone oil tamponade without postoperative posturing. The preoperative staging of macular holes and postoperative anatomic outcomes were assessed using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography.Results: All patients were women with a mean age of 66.86 ± 4.8 years. In two patients, bilateral macular holes were present and both eyes were operated on. Stage 2 macular hole was diagnosed in three eyes, three eyes had stage 3, and four eyes had stage 4 macular holes. Anatomical success and closure of the macular hole was achieved in nine eyes (90% after one operation. In one eye, the macular hole was closed after reoperation. The preoperative mean best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA was 0.15 decimal units (0.8 logMAR units. Until the end of the follow-up period, BCVA was 0.25 decimal units (0.6 logMAR units. Visual acuity was improved in seven patients (70%. In two patients (20%, visual acuity remained at the same level, and in one eye (10%, visual acuity decreased. Postoperatively, all patients reported a significant reduction of metamorphopsia.Conclusion: Initial results after 20G pars plana vitrectomy with peeling of the ILM, use of dye (Brilliant Blue, and tamponade with silicone oil without postoperative posturing gave good anatomical and functional

  16. Serum Creatinine Level: A Supplemental Index to Distinguish Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy from Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huili Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To improve assessment of dystrophinopathy, the aim of this study was to identify whether serum creatinine (Crn level reflects disease severity. Methods. Biochemical, Vignos score, and genetic data were collected on 212 boys with dystrophinopathy. Results. Serum Crn level had a strong inverse correlation with Vignos score by simple correlation (r=-0.793 and partial correlation analysis after adjustment for age, height, and weight (r=-0.791; both P<0.01. Serum Crn level was significantly higher in patients with in-frame than out-of-frame mutations (Z=-4.716, P<0.01 and in Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD patients than Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD patients at ages 4, 5, 7, and 9 yr (all P<0.0125. After adjusting for age, height, and weight, BMD patients still had a significantly higher serum Crn level than DMD patients (β=7.140, t=6.277, P<0.01. Conclusions. Serum Crn level reflected disease severity and may serve as a supplemental index to distinguish DMD from BMD in clinical practice.

  17. The effects of myotonic dystrophy and Duchenne muscular dystrophy on the orofacial muscles and dentofacial morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliaridis, S; Katsaros, C

    1998-12-01

    This article takes a closer view of two of the less rare myopathies, myotonic dystrophy (MyD) and Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). A high prevalence of malocclusions was found among the patients affected by these diseases. The development of the malocclusions in MyD patients seems to be strongly related to the vertical aberration of their craniofacial growth due to the involvement of the masticator, muscles in association with the possibly less affected suprahyoid musculature. Thus, a new situation is established around the teeth transversely. The lowered tongue is not in a position to counterbalance the forces developed during the lowering of the mandible by the stretched facial musculature. This may affect the teeth transversely, decreasing the width of the palate and causing posterior crossbite. The lowered position of the mandible, in combination with the decreased biting forces, may permit an overeruption of the posterior teeth, with increased palatal vault height and development of anterior open bite. The development of the malocclusions in DMD patients also seems to be strongly related to the involvement of the orofacial muscles by the disease. However, the posterior crossbite is not developed owing to the narrow maxillary arch, as is the case in MyD patients. On the contrary, the posterior crossbite in DMD is due to the transversal expansion of the mandibular arch, possibly because of the decreased tonus of the masseter muscle near the molars, in combination with the enlarged hypotonic tongue and the predominance of the less affected orbicularis oris muscle.

  18. Optimizing Bone Health in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason L. Buckner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness, with eventual loss of ambulation and premature death. The approved therapy with corticosteroids improves muscle strength, prolongs ambulation, and maintains pulmonary function. However, the osteoporotic impact of chronic corticosteroid use further impairs the underlying reduced bone mass seen in DMD, leading to increased fragility fractures of long bones and vertebrae. These serious sequelae adversely affect quality of life and can impact survival. The current clinical issues relating to bone health and bone health screening methods in DMD are presented in this review. Diagnostic studies, including biochemical markers of bone turnover and bone mineral density by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA, as well as spinal imaging using densitometric lateral spinal imaging, and treatment to optimize bone health in patients with DMD are discussed. Treatment with bisphosphonates offers a method to increase bone mass in these children; oral and intravenous bisphosphonates have been used successfully although treatment is typically reserved for children with fractures and/or bone pain with low bone mass by DXA.

  19. Wnt7a treatment ameliorates muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Maltzahn, Julia; Renaud, Jean-Marc; Parise, Gianni; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2012-12-11

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating genetic muscular disorder of childhood marked by progressive debilitating muscle weakness and wasting, and ultimately death in the second or third decade of life. Wnt7a signaling through its receptor Fzd7 accelerates and augments regeneration by stimulating satellite stem cell expansion through the planar cell polarity pathway, as well as myofiber hypertrophy through the AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) anabolic pathway. We investigated the therapeutic potential of the secreted factor Wnt7a for focal treatment of dystrophic DMD muscles using the mdx mouse model, and found that Wnt7a treatment efficiently induced satellite cell expansion and myofiber hypertrophy in treated mucles in mdx mice. Importantly, Wnt7a treatment resulted in a significant increase in muscle strength, as determined by generation of specific force. Furthermore, Wnt7a reduced the level of contractile damage, likely by inducing a shift in fiber type toward slow-twitch. Finally, we found that Wnt7a similarly induced myotube hypertrophy and a shift in fiber type toward slow-twitch in human primary myotubes. Taken together, our findings suggest that Wnt7a is a promising candidate for development as an ameliorative treatment for DMD.

  20. Falls and stumbles in myotonic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, C M; Busse, M E; Sampson, C M; Rogers, M T; Fenton-May, J; van Deursen, R

    2006-03-01

    To investigate falls and risk factors in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) compared with healthy volunteers. 13 sequential patients with DM1 from different kindreds were compared with 12 healthy volunteers. All subjects were evaluated using the Rivermead Mobility Index, Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment, and modified Activities Specific Balance Confidence scale. Measures of lower limb muscle strength, gait speed, and 7-day ambulatory activity monitoring were recorded. Subjects returned a weekly card detailing stumbles and falls. 11 of 13 patients (mean age 46.5 years, seven female) had 127 stumbles and 34 falls over the 13 weeks, compared with 10 of 12 healthy subjects (34.4 years, seven female) who had 26 stumbles and three falls. Patients were less active than healthy subjects but had more falls and stumbles per 5000 right steps taken (mean (SD) events, 0.21 (0.29) v 0.02 (0.02), p = 0.007). Patients who fell (n = 6) had on average a lower Rivermead Mobility score, slower self selected gait speed, and higher depression scores than those who did not. DM1 patients stumble or fall about 10 times more often than healthy volunteers. Routine inquiry about falls and stumbles is justified. A study of multidisciplinary intervention to reduce the risk of falls seems warranted.

  1. Electrical impedance myography in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statland, Jeffrey M; Heatwole, Chad; Eichinger, Katy; Dilek, Nuran; Martens, William B; Tawil, Rabi

    2016-10-01

    In this study we determined the reliability and validity of electrical impedance myography (EIM) in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). We performed a prospective study of EIM on 16 bilateral limb and trunk muscles in 35 genetically defined and clinically affected FSHD patients (reliability testing on 18 patients). Summary scores based on body region were derived. Reactance and phase (50 and 100 kHz) were compared with measures of strength, FSHD disease severity, and functional outcomes. Participants were mostly men, mean age 53.0 years, and included a full range of severity. Limb and trunk muscles showed good to excellent reliability [intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) 0.72-0.99]. Summary scores for the arm, leg, and trunk showed excellent reliability (ICC 0.89-0.98). Reactance was the most sensitive EIM parameter to a broad range of FSHD disease metrics. EIM is a reliable measure of muscle composition in FSHD that offers the possibility to serially evaluate affected muscles. Muscle Nerve 54: 696-701, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Autophagy in granular corneal dystrophy type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung-Il; Kim, Eung Kweon

    2016-03-01

    Autophagy is a lysosomal degradative process that is essential for cellular homeostasis and metabolic stress adaptation. Defective autophagy is involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases including granular corneal dystrophy type 2 (GCD2). GCD2 is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by substitution of histidine for arginine at codon 124 (R124H) in the transforming growth factor β-induced gene (TGFBI) on chromosome 5q31. Transforming growth factor β-induced protein (TGFBIp) is degraded by autophagy, but mutant-TGFBIp accumulates in autophagosomes and/or lysosomes, despite significant activation of basal autophagy, in GCD2 corneal fibroblasts. Furthermore, inhibition of autophagy induces cell death of GCD2 corneal fibroblasts through active caspase-3. As there is currently no pharmacological treatment for GCD2, development of novel therapies is required. A potential strategy for preventing cytoplasmic accumulation of mutant-TGFBIp in GCD2 corneal fibroblasts is to enhance mutant-TGFBIp degradation. This could be achieved by activation of the autophagic pathway. Here, we will consider the role and the potential therapeutic benefits of autophagy in GCD2, with focus on TGFBIp degradation, in light of the recently established role of autophagy in protein degradation.

  3. Molecular diagnosis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallamilli, Babi Ramesh Reddy; Ankala, Arunkanth; Hegde, Madhuri

    2014-10-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked inherited neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene (DMD; locus Xp21.2). The mutation spectrum of DMD is unique in that 65% of causative mutations are intragenic deletions, with intragenic duplications and point mutations (along with other sequence variants) accounting for 6% to 10% and 30% to 35%, respectively. The strategy for molecular diagnostic testing for DMD involves initial screening for deletions/duplications using microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) followed by full-sequence analysis of DMD for sequence variants. Recently, next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based targeted gene analysis has become clinically available for detection of point mutations and other sequence variants (small insertions, deletions, and indels). This unit initially discusses the strategic algorithm for establishing a molecular diagnosis of DMD and later provides detailed protocols of current molecular diagnostic methods for DMD, including array-CGH, PCR-based Sanger sequencing, and NGS-based sequencing assay.

  4. In vivo confocal microscopy in recurrent granular dystrophy in corneal graft after penetrating keratoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traversi, Claudio; Martone, Gianluca; Malandrini, Alex; Tosi, Gian Marco; Caporossi, Aldo

    2006-11-01

    Two case reports of recurrent granular dystrophy in corneal grafts after penetrating keratoplasty are presented. Slit-lamp examination and confocal microscopy (HRT II) were performed in two patients with recurrent granular dystrophy. All confocal microscopic findings of granular dystrophy were evaluated in the graft. Dystrophic lesions of the donor cornea presented the same confocal microscopic aspects in both eyes, and were similar to granular dystrophy lesions. Confocal microscopy is an imaging method that may provide new information on corneal microanatomy in dystrophies. It may be particularly useful in improving the early diagnosis of dystrophic lesions in corneal grafts.

  5. Single night postoperative prone posturing in idiopathic macular hole surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the role of postoperative prone posturing for a single night in the outcome of trans pars plana vitrectomy (TPPV) with internal limiting membrane (ILM) peel and 20% perfluoroethane (C2F6) internal tamponade for idiopathic macular hole. Methods. This prospective trial enrolled 14 eyes in 14 consecutive patients with idiopathic macular hole. All eyes underwent TPPV with vision blue assisted ILM peeling with and without phacoemulsification and intraocular lens (IOL) for macular hole. Intraocular gas tamponade (20% C2F6) was used in all cases with postoperative face-down posturing overnight and without specific posturing afterwards. LogMAR visual acuity, appearance by slit-lamp biomicroscopy, and ocular coherence tomography (OCT) scans were compared preoperatively and postoperatively to assess outcome. Results. Among 14 eyes recruited, all eyes were phakic; 50% of patients underwent concurrent phacoemulsification with IOL. The macular holes were categorized preoperatively by OCT appearance, 4 (28.57%) were stage 2, 7 (50%) were stage 3, and 3 (21.43%) were stage 4. Mean macular hole size was 0.35 disk diameters. Symptoms of macular hole had been present for an average of 6.5 months. All holes (100%) were closed 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Mean visual acuity (logMAR) was improved to 0.61 at 3 months and was stable at 6 months after the surgery. None of the eyes had worse vision postoperatively. Conclusions. Vitrectomy with ILM peeling and 20% C2F6 gas with a brief postoperative 1 night prone posturing regimen is a reasonable approach to achieve anatomic closure in idiopathic macular hole. Concurrent cataract extraction did not alter outcomes and was not associated with any additional complications.

  6. Prenatal growth restriction, retinal dystrophy, diabetes insipidus and white matter disease: expanding the spectrum of PRPS1-related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Maawali, Almundher; Dupuis, Lucie; Blaser, Susan; Heon, Elise; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Al-Murshedi, Fathiya; Marshall, Christian R; Paton, Tara; Scherer, Stephen W; Roelofsen, Jeroen; van Kuilenburg, André B P; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    PRPS1 codes for the enzyme phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase-1 (PRS-1). The spectrum of PRPS1-related disorders associated with reduced activity includes Arts syndrome, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease-5 (CMTX5) and X-linked non-syndromic sensorineural deafness (DFN2). We describe a novel phenotype associated with decreased PRS-1 function in two affected male siblings. Using whole exome and Sanger sequencing techniques, we identified a novel missense mutation in PRPS1. The clinical phenotype in our patients is characterized by high prenatal maternal α-fetoprotein, intrauterine growth restriction, dysmorphic facial features, severe intellectual disability and spastic quadraparesis. Additional phenotypic features include macular coloboma-like lesions with retinal dystrophy, severe short stature and diabetes insipidus. Exome sequencing of the two affected male siblings identified a shared putative pathogenic mutation c.586C>T p.(Arg196Trp) in the PRPS1 gene that was maternally inherited. Follow-up testing showed normal levels of hypoxanthine in urine samples and uric acid levels in blood serum. The PRS activity was significantly reduced in erythrocytes of the two patients. Nucleotide analysis in erythrocytes revealed abnormally low guanosine triphosphate and guanosine diphosphate. This presentation is the most severe form of PRPS1-deficiency syndrome described to date and expands the spectrum of PRPS1-related disorders.

  7. Annexin A6 modifies muscular dystrophy by mediating sarcolemmal repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaggart, Kayleigh A; Demonbreun, Alexis R; Vo, Andy H; Swanson, Kaitlin E; Kim, Ellis Y; Fahrenbach, John P; Holley-Cuthrell, Jenan; Eskin, Ascia; Chen, Zugen; Squire, Kevin; Heydemann, Ahlke; Palmer, Abraham A; Nelson, Stanley F; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2014-04-22

    Many monogenic disorders, including the muscular dystrophies, display phenotypic variability despite the same disease-causing mutation. To identify genetic modifiers of muscular dystrophy and its associated cardiomyopathy, we used quantitative trait locus mapping and whole genome sequencing in a mouse model. This approach uncovered a modifier locus on chromosome 11 associated with sarcolemmal membrane damage and heart mass. Whole genome and RNA sequencing identified Anxa6, encoding annexin A6, as a modifier gene. A synonymous variant in exon 11 creates a cryptic splice donor, resulting in a truncated annexin A6 protein called ANXA6N32. Live cell imaging showed that annexin A6 orchestrates a repair zone and cap at the site of membrane disruption. In contrast, ANXA6N32 dramatically disrupted the annexin A6-rich cap and the associated repair zone, permitting membrane leak. Anxa6 is a modifier of muscular dystrophy and membrane repair after injury.

  8. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension in a child with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weig, Spencer G; Zinn, Matthias M; Howard, James F

    2011-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an X-linked, recessively inherited disorder characterized by progressive weakness attributable to the absence of dystrophin expression in muscle. In multiple studies, the chronic administration of corticosteroids slowed the loss of ambulation that develops in mid to late childhood. Corticosteroids, however, frequently produce unacceptable side effects, including Cushingoid appearance and weight gain. Deflazacort, an oxazoline analogue of prednisolone, produces equivalent benefits on muscle with fewer reported Cushingoid side effects. We present a 9-year-old boy with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who developed morbid obesity and subsequent idiopathic intracranial hypertension after 2 years of receiving deflazacort. Although deflazacort is typically thought to produce less obesity than prednisone, severe Cushingoid side effects may occur in some individuals. To our knowledge, this description is the first of idiopathic intracranial hypertension complicating chronic corticosteroid treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  9. Crystalline Subtype of Pre-Descemetic Corneal Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Dolz-Marco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report corneal findings in a familial case of the crystalline subtype of pre- Descemetic corneal dystrophy. Case Report: A 19-year-old girl and her 44-year-old mother were found to have asymptomatic, bilateral, punctiform and multi-colored crystalline opacities across the whole posterior layer of the corneas. Endothelial specular microscopy revealed the presence of white round flecks located at different levels anterior to the endothelium. No systemic abnormalities or medications could be related to account for these findings. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is the third familial report of this rare corneal disorder. Differential diagnosis may include Schnyder corneal dystrophy, cystinosis, Bietti΄s dystrophy and monoclonal gammopathy.

  10. Long-term effectiveness of ranibizumab for age-related macular degeneration and diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fong AH

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Angie HC Fong,1 Timothy YY Lai1,2 1Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Eye Hospital, Kowloon, Hong Kong; 22010 Retina and Macula Centre, Tsimshatsui, Kowloon, Hong Kong Abstract: Neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD and diabetic macular edema (DME are major causes of visual impairment in the elderly population worldwide. With the aging population, the prevalence of neovascular AMD and DME has increased substantially over the recent years. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF has been implicated as playing an important role in the pathogenesis of both neovascular AMD and DME. Since its introduction in 2006, ranibizumab, a recombinant, humanized, monoclonal antibody fragment against all isoforms of VEGF-A, has revolutionized the treatment of neovascular AMD and DME. The efficacy and safety of ranibizumab in neovascular AMD has been demonstrated in the ANCHOR and MARINA trials. Further studies including the PIER, PrONTO, and SUSTAIN trials have also evaluated the optimal dosing regimen of ranibizumab in neovascular AMD. The CATT and IVAN trials compared the safety and efficacy of ranibizumab with off-label use of bevacizumab. Studies such as SUSTAIN and HORIZON have shown that ranibizumab has a good safety profile and is well tolerated for over 4 years with very few serious ocular and systemic adverse events. For DME, Phase II RESOLVE study and Phase III RISE and RIDE studies have demonstrated superiority of ranibizumab treatment in improving vision over placebo controls. Phase II READ and Phase III RESOLVE and REVEAL studies have shown that ranibizumab is more effective both as monotherapy and in combination with laser compared with laser monotherapy. The 3-year results from the DRCRnet protocol I study found that ranibizumab with deferred laser resulted in better long-term visual outcome compared with ranibizumab with prompt laser. This review summarizes various

  11. Age related macular degeneration and visual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoforidis, John B; Tecce, Nicola; Dell'Omo, Roberto; Mastropasqua, Rodolfo; Verolino, Marco; Costagliola, Ciro

    2011-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of central blindness or low vision among the elderly in industrialized countries. AMD is caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Among modifiable environmental risk factors, cigarette smoking has been associated with both the dry and wet forms of AMD and may increase the likelihood of worsening pre-existing AMD. Despite advances, the treatment of AMD has limitations and affected patients are often referred for low vision rehabilitation to help them cope with their remaining eyesight. The characteristic visual impairment for both forms of AMD is loss of central vision (central scotoma). This loss results in severe difficulties with reading that may be only partly compensated by magnifying glasses or screen-projection devices. The loss of central vision associated with the disease has a profound impact on patient quality of life. With progressive central visual loss, patients lose their ability to perform the more complex activities of daily living. Common vision aids include low vision filters, magnifiers, telescopes and electronic aids. Low vision rehabilitation (LVR) is a new subspecialty emerging from the traditional fields of ophthalmology, optometry, occupational therapy, and sociology, with an ever-increasing impact on the usual concepts of research, education, and services for visually impaired patients. Relatively few ophthalmologists practise LVR and fewer still routinely use prismatic image relocation (IR) in AMD patients. IR is a method of stabilizing oculomotor functions with the purpose of promoting better function of preferred retinal loci (PRLs). The aim of vision rehabilitation therapy consists in the achievement of techniques designed to improve PRL usage. The use of PRLs to compensate for diseased foveae has offered hope to these patients in regaining some function. However, in a recently published meta-analysis, prism spectacles were found to be unlikely to be of

  12. Analysis of human transforming growth factor β-induced gene mutation in corneal dystrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李杨; 孙旭光; 任慧媛; 董冰; 王智群; 孙秀英

    2004-01-01

    Background Corneal dystrophy is a group of inherited blinding diseases of the cornea. This study was to identify the mutations of the keratoepithelin (KE) gene for proper diagnosis of corneal dystrophy. Methods Three families with corneal dystrophy were analysed. Thirteen individuals at risk for corneal dystrophy in family A, the proband and her son in family B, and the proband in family C were examined after their blood samples were obtained. Mutation screening of human transforming growth factor β-induced gene (BIGH3 gene) was performed. Results Five individuals in family A were found by clinical evaluation to be affected with granular corneal dystrophy and carried the BIGH3 mutation W555R. However, both probands in families B and C, also diagnosed with granular corneal dystrophy, harboured the BIGH3 mutation R124H. Conclusion Molecular genetic analysis can improve accurate diagnosis of corneal dystrophy.

  13. [DIAGNOSTIC VARIATIONS OF X-LINKED MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY WITH CONTRACTURES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvirkvelia, N; Shakarishvili, R; Gugutsidze, D; Khizanishvili, N

    2015-01-01

    Case report with review describes X-linked muscular dystrophy with contractures in 28 years old man and his cousin. The disease revealed itself in an early stage (age 5-10), the process was progressing with apparent tendons retraction and contraction, limited movement in the areas of the neck and back of spine, atrophy of shoulder and pelvic yard and back muscles. Intellect was intact. Cardyomyopathy was exhibited. CK was normal. EMG showed classic myopathic features. Muscle biopsy showed different caliber groups of muscle fibers, growth of endo-perimesial connective tissue. Clinical manifestations together with electrophysiological and histological data suggest consistency with Rotthauwe-Mortier-Bayer X-linked muscular dystrophy.

  14. Muscle regeneration and inflammation in patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauerslev, S; Ørngreen, Mette Cathrine; Hertz, Jens Michael;

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether inflammation and regeneration are prominent in mildly affected muscles of patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 1A (FSHD1A). Inflammation in muscle has been suggested by MRI studies in patients with FSHD1A.......The aim of this study was to investigate whether inflammation and regeneration are prominent in mildly affected muscles of patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 1A (FSHD1A). Inflammation in muscle has been suggested by MRI studies in patients with FSHD1A....

  15. [Myotonic dystrophy as a contraindication for electroconvulsive therapy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynhoven, L M L; Scherders, M J W T; van Suijlekom, J A

    2009-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman with medication-resistant major depression was referred to our clinic for electroconvulsive therapy. After an extensive evaluation of our patient's condition we concluded that in this case the comorbid myotonic dystrophy was a contraindication for the performance of electroconvulsive therapy. However, in the current Dutch Psychiatric Association guidelines this illness is not mentioned as a possible contraindication for electroconvulsive therapy. This raises the question of whether myotonic dystrophy should now be incorporated in these guidelines and makes us wonder to what extent our conclusion could have consequences for the treatment of other neuromuscular illnesses.

  16. The paradox of muscle hypertrophy in muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornegay, Joe N; Childers, Martin K; Bogan, Daniel J; Bogan, Janet R; Nghiem, Peter; Wang, Jiahui; Fan, Zheng; Howard, James F; Schatzberg, Scott J; Dow, Jennifer L; Grange, Robert W; Styner, Martin A; Hoffman, Eric P; Wagner, Kathryn R

    2012-02-01

    Mutations in the dystrophin gene cause Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy in humans and syndromes in mice, dogs, and cats. Affected humans and dogs have progressive disease that leads primarily to muscle atrophy. Mdx mice progress through an initial phase of muscle hypertrophy followed by atrophy. Cats have persistent muscle hypertrophy. Hypertrophy in humans has been attributed to deposition of fat and connective tissue (pseudohypertrophy). Increased muscle mass (true hypertrophy) has been documented in animal models. Muscle hypertrophy can exaggerate postural instability and joint contractures. Deleterious consequences of muscle hypertrophy should be considered when developing treatments for muscular dystrophy.

  17. Structural deterioration of tendon collagen in genetic muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, R H

    1975-08-19

    The structure of gastrocnemius tendons from chickens with genetically induced muscular dystrophy has been studied by low-angle X-ray diffraction. Compared with normal samples there is poor alignment of collagen within the tendons. This difference is quite pronounced at eight weeks when the affected birds are still in comparatively good physical condition. Similar changes have been reported for birds with nutritionally induced muscular dystrophy (Bartlett, M. W., Egelstaff, P. A., Holden, T. M., Stinson, R. H. and Sweeny, P. R. (1973) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 328, 213-220).

  18. Decreased fixation stability of the preferred retinal location in juvenile macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bethlehem, Richard A I; Dumoulin, Serge O.; Dalmaijer, Edwin S.; Smit, Miranda; Berendschot, Tos T J M; Nijboer, Tanja C W; Van Der Stigchel, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Macular degeneration is the main cause for diminished visual acuity in the elderly. The juvenile form of macular degeneration has equally detrimental consequences on foveal vision. To compensate for loss of foveal vision most patients with macular degeneration adopt an eccentric preferred retinal lo

  19. Intravitreal gas injection for the treatment of diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McHugh D

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Dominic McHugh, Bhaskar Gupta, Manzar Saeed King's College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London, England, UK Purpose: This study investigates the efficacy of an intravitreal gas injection in inducing a posterior vitreous detachment (PVD in patients with clinically significant diabetic macular edema refractory to laser therapy. Methods: A local ethics committee-approved technique of an intravitreal injection of pure perfluoropropane gas (C3F8 was performed for all participants. After a period of prone positioning, the patients underwent regular and detailed clinical review. Main outcome measures: The induction of a PVD, change in macular thickness, change in visual acuity. Results: A PVD was induced in all five eyes with subsequent signs of reduction in macular thickness and resolution of exudates. Mean visual improvement was 11 ETDRS (Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study letters (range 4–21. Apart from a transient vitreous hemorrhage in one eye, there were no significant treatment-related complications. Conclusion: The induction of a PVD by pneumatic retinopexy appears to have a significant influence on diabetic macular edema in eyes which have not successfully responded to macular laser therapy. A randomized clinical trial is justified on the basis of the initial promising data. Keywords: optical coherence tomography, OCT, posterior vitreous detachment, perfluoropropane

  20. Diabetic macular edema, retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration as inflammatory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Undurti N

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) are complications affecting about 25% of all patients with long-standing type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus and are a major cause of significant decrease in vision and quality of life. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is not uncommon, and diabetes mellitus affects the incidence and progression of AMD through altering hemodynamics, increasing oxidative stress, accumulating advanced glycation end products, etc. Recent studies suggest that DME, DR and AMD are inflammatory conditions characterized by a breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier, inflammatory processes and an increase in vascular permeability. Key factors that seem to have a dominant role in DME, DR and AMD are angiotensin II, prostaglandins and the vascular endothelial growth factor and a deficiency of anti-inflammatory bioactive lipids. The imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory eicosanoids and enhanced production of pro-angiogenic factors may initiate the onset and progression of DME, DR and AMD. This implies that bioactive lipids that possess anti-inflammatory actions and suppress the production of angiogenic factors could be employed in the prevention and management of DME, DR and AMD.

  1. New Computer Simulations of Macular Neural Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Doshay, D.; Linton, S.; Parnas, B.; Montgomery, K.; Chimento, T.

    1994-01-01

    We use high performance graphics workstations and supercomputers to study the functional significance of the three-dimensional (3-D) organization of gravity sensors. These sensors have a prototypic architecture foreshadowing more complex systems. Scaled-down simulations run on a Silicon Graphics workstation and scaled-up, 3-D versions run on a Cray Y-MP supercomputer. A semi-automated method of reconstruction of neural tissue from serial sections studied in a transmission electron microscope has been developed to eliminate tedious conventional photography. The reconstructions use a mesh as a step in generating a neural surface for visualization. Two meshes are required to model calyx surfaces. The meshes are connected and the resulting prisms represent the cytoplasm and the bounding membranes. A finite volume analysis method is employed to simulate voltage changes along the calyx in response to synapse activation on the calyx or on calyceal processes. The finite volume method insures that charge is conserved at the calyx-process junction. These and other models indicate that efferent processes act as voltage followers, and that the morphology of some afferent processes affects their functioning. In a final application, morphological information is symbolically represented in three dimensions in a computer. The possible functioning of the connectivities is tested using mathematical interpretations of physiological parameters taken from the literature. Symbolic, 3-D simulations are in progress to probe the functional significance of the connectivities. This research is expected to advance computer-based studies of macular functioning and of synaptic plasticity.

  2. Diabetic Macular Edema Pathophysiology: Vasogenic versus Inflammatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Romero-Aroca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic macular edema (DME can cause blindness in diabetic patients suffering from diabetic retinopathy (DR. DM parameters controls (glycemia, arterial tension, and lipids are the gold standard for preventing DR and DME. Although the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is known to play a role in the development of DME, the pathological processes leading to the onset of this disease are highly complex and the exact sequence in which they occur is still not completely understood. Angiogenesis and inflammation have been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of this disease. However, it still remains to be clarified whether angiogenesis following VEGF overexpression is a cause or a consequence of inflammation. This paper provides a review of the data currently available, focusing on VEGF, angiogenesis, and inflammation. Our analysis suggests that angiogenesis and inflammation act interdependently during the development of DME. Knowledge of DME etiology seems to be important in treatments with anti-VEGF or anti-inflammatory drugs. Current diagnostic techniques do not permit us to differentiate between both etiologies. In the future, diagnosing the physiopathology of each patient with DME will help us to select the most effective drug.

  3. Diabetic Macular Edema Pathophysiology: Vasogenic versus Inflammatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baget-Bernaldiz, Marc; Pareja-Rios, Alicia; Lopez-Galvez, Maribel; Navarro-Gil, Raul; Verges, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) can cause blindness in diabetic patients suffering from diabetic retinopathy (DR). DM parameters controls (glycemia, arterial tension, and lipids) are the gold standard for preventing DR and DME. Although the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is known to play a role in the development of DME, the pathological processes leading to the onset of this disease are highly complex and the exact sequence in which they occur is still not completely understood. Angiogenesis and inflammation have been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of this disease. However, it still remains to be clarified whether angiogenesis following VEGF overexpression is a cause or a consequence of inflammation. This paper provides a review of the data currently available, focusing on VEGF, angiogenesis, and inflammation. Our analysis suggests that angiogenesis and inflammation act interdependently during the development of DME. Knowledge of DME etiology seems to be important in treatments with anti-VEGF or anti-inflammatory drugs. Current diagnostic techniques do not permit us to differentiate between both etiologies. In the future, diagnosing the physiopathology of each patient with DME will help us to select the most effective drug.

  4. Animal models of age related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennesi, Mark E; Neuringer, Martha; Courtney, Robert J

    2012-08-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss of those over the age of 65 in the industrialized world. The prevalence and need to develop effective treatments for AMD has lead to the development of multiple animal models. AMD is a complex and heterogeneous disease that involves the interaction of both genetic and environmental factors with the unique anatomy of the human macula. Models in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs and non-human primates have recreated many of the histological features of AMD and provided much insight into the underlying pathological mechanisms of this disease. In spite of the large number of models developed, no one model yet recapitulates all of the features of human AMD. However, these models have helped reveal the roles of chronic oxidative damage, inflammation and immune dysregulation, and lipid metabolism in the development of AMD. Models for induced choroidal neovascularization have served as the backbone for testing new therapies. This article will review the diversity of animal models that exist for AMD as well as their strengths and limitations.

  5. Neuropsychological profile of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perumal, Anna Roshini; Rajeswaran, Jamuna; Nalini, Atchayaram

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an inherited myogenic disorder characterized by progressive muscle wasting. DMD is a fatal X-linked recessive disorder with an estimated prevalence of 1 in 3,500 male live births. This disease has long been associated with intellectual impairment. Research has shown that boys with DMD have variable intellectual performance, indicating the presence of specific cognitive deficits. The aim of the study was to use a battery of intelligence, learning, and memory tests to identify a neuropsychological profile in boys with DMD. A total of 22 boys diagnosed with DMD in the age range of 6 to 10 years old were evaluated using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition, Rey's Auditory Verbal Learning Test, and the Memory for Designs Test. The data were interpreted using means, standard deviations, percentages, and percentiles. Normative data were also used for further interpretation. The results showed that boys with DMD had a significantly lower IQ (88.5). Verbal IQ (86.59) was found to be lower than Performance IQ (92.64). There was evidence of impaired performance on the Processing Speed, Freedom From Distractibility, and Verbal Comprehension Indexes. Specific deficits in information processing, complex attention, immediate verbal memory span, verbal working memory, verbal comprehension, vocabulary, visuoconstruction ability, and verbal learning and encoding were observed. However, perceptional organization, general fund of information, abstract reasoning, visual discrimination and acuity, visual learning and memory, and verbal memory were adequate. The neuropsychological findings support the hypothesis that these children have specific cognitive deficits as opposed to a global intellectual deficit.

  6. Gastrointestinal manifestations in myotonic muscular dystrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Massimo Bellini; Sonia Biagi; Cristina Stasi; Francesco Costa; Maria Gloria Mumolo; Angelo Ricchiuti; Santino Marchi

    2006-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (MD) is characterized by myotonic phenomena and progressive muscular weakness.Involvement of the gastrointestinal tract is frequent and may occur at any level. The clinical manifestations have previously been attributed to motility disorders caused by smooth muscle damage, but histologic evidence of alterations has been scarce and conflicting.A neural factor has also been hypothesized. In the upper digestive tract, dysphagia, heartburn, regurgitation and dyspepsia are the most common complaints, while in the lower tract, abdominal pain, bloating and changes in bowel habits are often reported. Digestive symptoms may be the first sign of dystrophic disease and may precede the musculo-skeletal features. The impairment of gastrointestinal function may be sometimes so gradual that the patients adapt to it with little awareness of symptoms. In such cases routine endoscopic and ultrasonographic evaluations are not sufficient and targeted techniques (electrogastrography, manometry,electromyography, functional ultrasonography,scintigraphy, etc.) are needed. There is a low correlation between the degree of skeletal muscle involvement and the presence and severity of gastrointestinal disturbances whereas a positive correlation with the duration of the skeletal muscle disease has been reported.The drugs recommended for treating the gastrointestinal complaints such as prokinetic, antidyspeptic drugs and laxatives, are mainly aimed at correcting the motility disorders.Gastrointestinal involvement in MD remains a complex and intriguing condition since many important problems are still unsolved. Further studies concentrating on genetic aspects, early diagnostic techniques and the development of new therapeutic strategies are needed to improve our management of the gastrointestinal manifestations of MD.

  7. Granular Corneal Dystrophy Manifesting after Radial Keratotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepehr Feizi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To report manifestation of granular corneal dystrophy after radial keratotomy (RK. CASE REPORT: A 32-year-old man presented with white radial lines in both corneas. He had undergone uncomplicated RK in both eyes 8 years ago. Preoperative refraction had been OD: -3.5 -0.75@180 and OS: -3.0 -0.5@175. Uncorrected visual acuity was OD: 8/10 and OS: 7/10; best corrected visual acuity was 9/10 in both eyes with OD: -0.5 -0.5@60 and OS: -0.75 -0.5@80. Slit lamp examination revealed discrete well-demarcated whitish lesions with clear intervening stroma in the central anterior cornea consistent with granular dystrophy. Similar opacities were present within the RK incisions. CONCLUSION: Granular dystrophy deposits may appear within RK incisions besides other previously reported locations.

  1. Strength training and albuterol in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, E.L. van der; Vogels, O.J.M.; Asseldonk, R.J. van; Lindeman, E.J.M.; Hendriks, J.C.M.; Wohlgemuth, M.; Maarel, S.M. van der; Padberg, G.W.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In animals and healthy volunteers beta2-adrenergic agonists increase muscle strength and mass, in particular when combined with strength training. In patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) albuterol may exert anabolic effects. The authors evaluated the effect of stre

  2. Poor Facial Affect Recognition among Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, V. J.; Fee, R. J.; De Vivo, D. C.; Goldstein, E.

    2007-01-01

    Children with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy (MD) have delayed language and poor social skills and some meet criteria for Pervasive Developmental Disorder, yet they are identified by molecular, rather than behavioral, characteristics. To determine whether comprehension of facial affect is compromised in boys with MD, children were given a…

  3. Antisense mediated exon skipping therapy for duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brolin, Camilla; Shiraishi, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene (DMD) that result in the absence of essential muscle protein dystrophin. Among many different approaches for DMD treatment, exon skipping, mediated by antisense oligonucleotides, is one of the most pr...... oligonucleotides (2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate (2OME-PS), phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO)) and peptide nucleic acid (PNA)....

  4. Severe paraspinal muscle involvement in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlqvist, Julia R; Vissing, Christoffer R; Thomsen, Carsten;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In this study, involvement of paraspinal muscles in 50 patients with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) was evaluated using MRI. METHODS: The Dixon MRI technique was used in this observational study to quantify muscle fat content of paraspinal and leg muscles. Muscle strength in the ...

  5. The role of stem cells in muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meregalli, Mirella; Farini, Andrea; Colleoni, Federica; Cassinelli, Letizia; Torrente, Yvan

    2012-06-01

    Muscular dystrophies are heterogeneous neuromuscular disorders of inherited origin, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Cell-based therapies were used to promote muscle regeneration with the hope that the host cells repopulated the muscle and improved muscle function and pathology. Stem cells were preferable for therapeutic applications, due to their capacity of self-renewal and differentiative potential. In the last years, encouraging results were obtained with adult stem cells to treat muscular dystrophies. Adult stem cells were found into various tissues of the body and they were able to maintain, generate, and replace terminally differentiated cells within their own specific tissue because of cell turnover or tissue injury. Moreover, it became clear that these cells could participate into regeneration of more than just their resident organ. Here, we described multiple types of muscle and non muscle-derived myogenic stem cells, their characterization and their possible use to treat muscular dystrophies. We also underlined that most promising possibility for the management and therapy of DMD is a combination of different approaches, such as gene and stem cell therapy.

  6. Functional protein networks unifying limb girdle muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morrée, Antoine de

    2011-01-01

    Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy (LGMD) is a rare progressive heterogeneous disorder that can be caused by mutations in at least 21 different genes. These genes are often widely expressed and encode proteins with highly differing functions. And yet mutations in all of them give rise to a similar clini

  7. Occupational Potential in a Population with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schkade, Janette K.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-five males with Duchenne muscular dystrophy were tested to assess their potential for occupational activity. Tests measured possible sensory deficits, strength, endurance, and fatigue in response to sustained fine motor activity. Results indicate that, within limitations, persons with this diagnosis can engage in activity leading to skill…

  8. Swallow Characteristics in Patients with Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Phyllis M.; Neel, Amy T.; Sprouls, Gwyneth; Morrison, Leslie

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This prospective investigation evaluates oral weakness and its impact on swallow function, weight, and quality of life in patients with oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). Method: Intraoral pressure, swallow pressure, and endurance were measured using an Iowa Oral Performance Instrument in participants with OPMD and matched…

  9. A clinical and genetic study in myotonic dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Höweler (Chris)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractThe genetic counselling for myotonic dystrophy patients appears to be relatively simple. The disease is transtnitted as an autosomal dominant trait, and the patients risk of transmitting the abnormal gene to his children is 50%. However, many patients at the age at which genetic counsell

  10. Poor Facial Affect Recognition among Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, V. J.; Fee, R. J.; De Vivo, D. C.; Goldstein, E.

    2007-01-01

    Children with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy (MD) have delayed language and poor social skills and some meet criteria for Pervasive Developmental Disorder, yet they are identified by molecular, rather than behavioral, characteristics. To determine whether comprehension of facial affect is compromised in boys with MD, children were given a…

  11. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy and respiratory failure; what about the diaphragm?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazenberg, A; van Alfen, N; Voet, N B M; Kerstjens, H. A. M.; Wijkstra, P J

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We present a case of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) with a diaphragm paralysis as the primary cause of ventilatory failure. FSHD is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder with a restricted pattern of weakness. Although respiratory weakness is a relatively unknown in

  12. Becker′s Muscular Dystrophy-A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendran P

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of Becker′s Muscular dystrophy (BMD in a 26-year-old male is reported. Muscle biopsy immunohistochemical staining showed absence of labelling for dystrophin along the sacrolemmal membrane in majority of the fibres. Antibodies to adhalin and merosin showed normal localisation along the sacrolemma.

  13. Neurotrophins, cytokines, oxidative parameters and funcionality in Progressive Muscular Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CLARISSA M. COMIM

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the levels of brain derived-neurotrophic factor (BDNF, cytokines and oxidative parameters in serum and tried to correlate them with the age and functionality of patients with Progressive Muscle Dystrophies (PMD. The patients were separated into six groups (case and controls pared by age and gender, as follows: Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD; Steinert Myotonic Dystrophy (SMD; and Limb-girdle Muscular Dystrophy type-2A (LGMD2A. DMD patients (±17.9 years old had a decrease of functionality, an increase in the IL-1β and TNF-α levels and a decrease of IL-10 levels and superoxide dismutase activity in serum. SMD patients (±25.8 years old had a decrease of BDNF and IL-10 levels and superoxide dismutase activity and an increase of IL-1β levels in serum. LGMD2A patients (±27.7 years old had an decrease only in serum levels of IL-10. This research showed the first evidence of BDNF involvement in the SMD patients and a possible unbalance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels, along with decreased superoxide dismutase activity in serum of DMD and SMD patients.

  14. Population-based incidence and prevalence of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deenen, J.C.W.; Arnts, H.; Maarel, S.M. van der; Padberg, G.W.A.M.; Verschuuren, J.J.; Bakker, E.; Weinreich, S.S.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence and prevalence of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) in the Netherlands. METHODS: Using 3-source capture-recapture methodology, we estimated the total yearly number of newly found symptomatic individuals with FSHD, including those not registered in an

  15. [Chronologic study of signs of myocardiopathy in progressive muscular dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barona Zamora, P; Narbona García, J; Alvarez Gómez, M J; Fidalgo Andrés, M L; Sáenz de Buruaga, J; Villa Elizaga, I

    1993-02-01

    In order to analyze the evolution of cardiomyopathy in progressive muscular dystrophies, thirty-three patients (17 with Duchenne type, 11 with Becker type and 5 with the autosomal recessive type dystrophy) were studied retrospectively. Cardiac and systemic follow-up every 3-6 months was made in 29 patients. The electrocardiogram was the first test that became altered, followed by the echocardiogram and thoracic radiograph and finally heart failure manifestations. There was a direct correlation between age and the appearance of abnormal cardiac tests. Electrocardiographic alterations, in patients who were less than 12.5 years of age, were significantly more frequent in the group with Duchenne dystrophy that in the no-Duchenne group. In regards to the appearance of the echocardiographic and radiographic abnormalities, there were no significant differences between the two groups. However, we have noticed a trend towards a more frequent and earlier presentation of these abnormalities in the Duchenne's muscular dystrophy than in the no-Duchenne group.

  16. Dysphagia in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Assessed by Validated Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Sally K.; Garrod, Rachel; Hart, Nicholas; Miller, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Background: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) leads to progressive muscular weakness and death, most typically from respiratory complications. Dysphagia is common in DMD; however, the most appropriate swallowing assessments have not been universally agreed and the symptoms of dysphagia remain under-reported. Aims: To investigate symptoms of…

  17. Modifying muscular dystrophy through transforming growth factor-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceco, Ermelinda; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2013-09-01

    Muscular dystrophy arises from ongoing muscle degeneration and insufficient regeneration. This imbalance leads to loss of muscle, with replacement by scar or fibrotic tissue, resulting in muscle weakness and, eventually, loss of muscle function. Human muscular dystrophy is characterized by a wide range of disease severity, even when the same genetic mutation is present. This variability implies that other factors, both genetic and environmental, modify the disease outcome. There has been an ongoing effort to define the genetic and molecular bases that influence muscular dystrophy onset and progression. Modifier genes for muscle disease have been identified through both candidate gene approaches and genome-wide surveys. Multiple lines of experimental evidence have now converged on the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) pathway as a modifier for muscular dystrophy. TGF-β signaling is upregulated in dystrophic muscle as a result of a destabilized plasma membrane and/or an altered extracellular matrix. Given the important biological role of the TGF-β pathway, and its role beyond muscle homeostasis, we review modifier genes that alter the TGF-β pathway and approaches to modulate TGF-β activity to ameliorate muscle disease.

  18. Cardiac involvement in carriers of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerwaard, EM; van der Wouw, PA; Wilde, AAM; Bakker, E; Ippel, PF; Oosterwijk, JC; Majoor-Krakauer, DF; van Essen, AJ; Leschot, NJ; de Visser, M

    1999-01-01

    A cross-sectional study in a cohort of DNA proven carriers of Duchenne (DMD) and Becker (BMD) muscular dystrophy was undertaken with the following objectives: (1) to estimate the frequency of electrocardiographic (ECG) and echocardiographic abnormalities; (2) to establish the proportion of carriers

  19. Muscle Weakness and Speech in Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neel, Amy T.; Palmer, Phyllis M.; Sprouls, Gwyneth; Morrison, Leslie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We documented speech and voice characteristics associated with oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). Although it is a rare disease, OPMD offers the opportunity to study the impact of myopathic weakness on speech production in the absence of neurologic deficits in a relatively homogeneous group of speakers. Methods: Twelve individuals…

  20. Strength training and albuterol in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooi, EL; Vogels, OJM; van Asseldonk, RJGP; Lindeman, E; Hendriks, JCM; Wohlgemuth, M; van der Maarel, SM; Padberg, GW

    2004-01-01

    Background: In animals and healthy volunteers beta2-adrenergic agonists increase muscle strength and mass, in particular when combined with strength training. In patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) albuterol may exert anabolic effects. The authors evaluated the effect of stre

  1. Functional protein networks unifying limb girdle muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morrée, Antoine de

    2011-01-01

    Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy (LGMD) is a rare progressive heterogeneous disorder that can be caused by mutations in at least 21 different genes. These genes are often widely expressed and encode proteins with highly differing functions. And yet mutations in all of them give rise to a similar

  2. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy: Early treatment and psychological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, J.H.B.; De Bruijn, H.; De Bruijn-Kofman, A.T.; Arendzen, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    We report the results of two prospective studies of early treatment and psychological aspects in a series of 26 patients with sympathetic reflex dystrophy of the hand in which treatment was started within 3 months after diagnosis. Ismelin blocks is an often used therapy in sympathetic reflex dystrop

  3. Muscle phenotype in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anne Grete Kielgast; Orngreen, Mette C; Preisler, Nicolai Rasmus;

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The pathogenesis of muscle involvement in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is not well understood. In this study, we characterized the muscle phenotype in patients with confirmed DM1. Methods: In 38 patients, muscle strength was tested by hand-held dynamometry. Myotonia...

  4. Phonological Awareness Skills in Young Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Phoebe; Woodyatt, Gail

    2011-01-01

    Substantial research has detailed the reading deficits experienced by children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Although phonological awareness (PA) is vital in reading development, little is known about PA in the DMD population. This pilot study describes the PA abilities of a group of five young children with DMD, comparing the results…

  5. Dasatinib as a treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipscomb, Leanne; Piggott, Robert W; Emmerson, Tracy; Winder, Steve J

    2016-01-15

    Identification of a systemically acting and universal small molecule therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy would be an enormous advance for this condition. Based on evidence gained from studies on mouse genetic models, we have identified tyrosine phosphorylation and degradation of β-dystroglycan as a key event in the aetiology of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Thus, preventing tyrosine phosphorylation and degradation of β-dystroglycan presents itself as a potential therapeutic strategy. Using the dystrophic sapje zebrafish, we have investigated the use of tyrosine kinase and other inhibitors to treat the dystrophic symptoms in this model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Dasatinib, a potent and specific Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was found to decrease the levels of β-dystroglycan phosphorylation on tyrosine and to increase the relative levels of non-phosphorylated β-dystroglycan in sapje zebrafish. Furthermore, dasatinib treatment resulted in the improved physical appearance of the sapje zebrafish musculature and increased swimming ability as measured by both duration and distance of swimming of dasatinib-treated fish compared with control animals. These data suggest great promise for pharmacological agents that prevent the phosphorylation of β-dystroglycan on tyrosine and subsequent steps in the degradation pathway as therapeutic targets for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  6. Dysphagia in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Assessed by Validated Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Sally K.; Garrod, Rachel; Hart, Nicholas; Miller, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Background: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) leads to progressive muscular weakness and death, most typically from respiratory complications. Dysphagia is common in DMD; however, the most appropriate swallowing assessments have not been universally agreed and the symptoms of dysphagia remain under-reported. Aims: To investigate symptoms of…

  7. New developments in age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyndon da Cruz

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization (WHO estimates that over 3 million people (9% of global blindness are blinded by age-related macular degeneration (AMD. AMD affects people over the age of 55. There are two main types of AMD, dry and wet. In dry AMD, patients slowly lose vision through progressive atrophy of the macular tissue. Wet, or exudative, AMD, is associated with new blood vessels called subretinal neovascular membranes (or SRNVM and affected patients lose vision more rapidly due to fluid leakage and haemorrhage at the macula.

  8. Machine learning based detection of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic macular edema (DME) from optical coherence tomography (OCT) images

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yu; Zhang, Yaonan; Yao, Zhaomin; Zhao, Ruixue; Zhou, Fengfeng

    2016-01-01

    Non-lethal macular diseases greatly impact patients’ life quality, and will cause vision loss at the late stages. Visual inspection of the optical coherence tomography (OCT) images by the experienced clinicians is the main diagnosis technique. We proposed a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) model to discriminate age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic macular edema (DME) and healthy macula. The linear configuration pattern (LCP) based features of the OCT images were screened by the Corr...

  9. Volcano like pattern in optical coherence tomography in chronic diabetic macular edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Sivakami A; Hussain, Nazimul; Hebri, Sudhira P; Lootah, Afra M; Dekhain, Moza A

    2014-04-01

    In this article we herein report an interesting vitreo-macular interface abnormality associated with chronic diabetic cystoid macular edema. It is an observational case study of three diabetic patients examined in the diabetic clinic. All the patients had proliferative diabetic retinopathy with chronic macular edema. A serial cross sectional OCT examination and tracking of both the longitudinal progression of macular thickening and vitreo-macular interface revealed cystoid macular edema with a characteristic hyperreflective vitreous shadow emerging from the vitreofoveal interface. All the patients had dehiscence of inner retinal layers. This particular morphological feature at the vitreo-foveolar interface, which we name as "volcano sign", has not been described earlier. The probable mechanism of such a finding probably could be due to slow progressive leakage of chronic cytoid fluid into the vitreous with condensation of the overlying vitreous. Vitreo-macular traction followed by posterior vitreous detachment probably would have contributed to such a morphological event.

  10. [Atypical reaction to anesthesia in Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Helga Cristina Almeida da; Hiray, Marcia; Vainzof, Mariz; Schmidt, Beny; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle; Amaral, José Luiz Gomes do

    2017-05-31

    Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy affects skeletal muscles and leads to progressive muscle weakness and risk of atypical anesthetic reactions following exposure to succinylcholine or halogenated agents. The aim of this report is to describe the investigation and diagnosis of a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy and review the care required in anesthesia. Male patient, 14 years old, referred for hyperCKemia (chronic increase of serum creatine kinase levels - CK), with CK values of 7,779-29,040IU.L(-1) (normal 174IU.L(-1)). He presented with a discrete delay in motor milestones acquisition (sitting at 9 months, walking at 18 months). He had a history of liver transplantation. In the neurological examination, the patient showed difficulty in walking on one's heels, myopathic sign (hands supported on the thighs to stand), high arched palate, calf hypertrophy, winged scapulae, global muscle hypotonia and arreflexia. Spirometry showed mild restrictive respiratory insufficiency (forced vital capacity: 77% of predicted). The in vitro muscle contracture test in response to halothane and caffeine was normal. Muscular dystrophy analysis by Western blot showed reduced dystrophin (20% of normal) for both antibodies (C and N-terminal), allowing the diagnosis of Becker muscular dystrophy. On preanesthetic assessment, the history of delayed motor development, as well as clinical and/or laboratory signs of myopathy, should encourage neurological evaluation, aiming at diagnosing subclinical myopathies and planning the necessary care to prevent anesthetic complications. Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy, although it does not increase susceptibility to MH, may lead to atypical fatal reactions in anesthesia. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Treatment of macular degeneration, according to Bangerter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, K D

    1997-10-30

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common cause of visual loss among elderly patients. Although some risk factors have been determined, the ultimate cause of the disease is not known. For a long time, therapeutic nihilism has been the rule among ophthalmologists confronted with such patients. Bangerter has not shared this attitude, especially since the time that he incidentally discovered, more than 40 years ago, the beneficial effects of radiotherapy, in discouraging the growth of new vessels at the posterior pole of the eye. A variety of approaches are combined and used by Bangerter in the treatment of the different types of AMD, including retrobulbar injections of either vasodilating medications (in the dry - or atrophic - type) or corticosteroids (in the wet - or exudative - type), general medical measures aimed at improving metabolic and vascular functions such as supplementation with trace elements, antioxidants, and vitamins; ozone therapy; advice to increase physical fitness, improve nutrition, and abstain from smoking; and protection from excessive light exposure. Being convinced of the usefulness of his type of combination treatment, he has always rejected undertaking controlled clinical trials, of only single aspects of the therapy, as unethical and invalid. For this reason, scientific journals have not proven cooperative in several attempts at publishing his results, as collected in retrospective surveys. Recently, however, some of the several approaches combined by Bangerter in treating AMD have been pronounced effective by other investigators. We present here an overview of his treatment approaches, as few people are aware of them, to clear up misconceptions and to set records straight.

  12. Rehabilitation Approaches in Macular Degeneration Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniglia, Marcello; Cottereau, Benoit R; Soler, Vincent; Trotter, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is a visual disease that affects elderly population. It entails a progressive loss of central vision whose consequences are dramatic for the patient's quality of life. Current rehabilitation programs are restricted to technical aids based on visual devices. They only temporarily improve specific visual functions such as reading skills. Considering the rapid increase of the aging population worldwide, it is crucial to intensify clinical research on AMD in order to develop simple and efficient methods that improve the patient's visual performances in many different contexts. One very promising approach to face this challenge is based on perceptual learning (PL). Through intensive practice, PL can induce neural plasticity in sensory cortices and result in long-lasting enhancements for various perceptual tasks in both normal and visually impaired populations. A growing number of studies showed how appropriate PL protocols improve visual functions in visual disorders, namely amblyopia, presbyopia or myopia. In order to successfully apply these approaches to more severe conditions such as AMD, numerous challenges have to be overcome. Indeed, the overall elderly age of patients and the reduced cortical surface that is devoted to peripheral vision potentially limit neural plasticity in this population. In addition, ocular fixation becomes much less stable because patients have to rely on peripheral fixation spots outside the scotoma whose size keeps on evolving. The aim of this review article is to discuss the recent literature on this topic and to offer a unified approach for developing new rehabilitation programs of AMD using PL. We argue that with an appropriate experimental and training protocol that is adapted to each patient needs, PL can offer fascinating opportunities for the development of simple, non-expensive rehabilitation approaches a large spectrum of visual functions in AMD patients.

  13. Rehabilitation Approaches in Macular Degeneration Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniglia, Marcello; Cottereau, Benoit R.; Soler, Vincent; Trotter, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is a visual disease that affects elderly population. It entails a progressive loss of central vision whose consequences are dramatic for the patient’s quality of life. Current rehabilitation programs are restricted to technical aids based on visual devices. They only temporarily improve specific visual functions such as reading skills. Considering the rapid increase of the aging population worldwide, it is crucial to intensify clinical research on AMD in order to develop simple and efficient methods that improve the patient’s visual performances in many different contexts. One very promising approach to face this challenge is based on perceptual learning (PL). Through intensive practice, PL can induce neural plasticity in sensory cortices and result in long-lasting enhancements for various perceptual tasks in both normal and visually impaired populations. A growing number of studies showed how appropriate PL protocols improve visual functions in visual disorders, namely amblyopia, presbyopia or myopia. In order to successfully apply these approaches to more severe conditions such as AMD, numerous challenges have to be overcome. Indeed, the overall elderly age of patients and the reduced cortical surface that is devoted to peripheral vision potentially limit neural plasticity in this population. In addition, ocular fixation becomes much less stable because patients have to rely on peripheral fixation spots outside the scotoma whose size keeps on evolving. The aim of this review article is to discuss the recent literature on this topic and to offer a unified approach for developing new rehabilitation programs of AMD using PL. We argue that with an appropriate experimental and training protocol that is adapted to each patient needs, PL can offer fascinating opportunities for the development of simple, non-expensive rehabilitation approaches a large spectrum of visual functions in AMD patients. PMID:28082876

  14. Aspectos atuais na fisiopatologia do edema macular diabético Recent aspects on physiopathology of diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Martins dos Santos Motta

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available O edema macular é a principal causa de baixa visual em pacientes diabéticos. Seu mecanismo de formação é complexo e envolve alterações bioquímicas e estruturais. Os autores fazem uma revisão e atualização dos conceitos fisiopatológicos envolvidos na maculopatia diabética.Macular edema is the leading cause of poor vision in diabetic patients.The mechanism of edema formation is complex and involves biochemical and structural changes. The authors review and update the physiopathologic concepts related to diabetic maculopathy.

  15. Health state utilities in patients with diabetic retinopathy, diabetic macular oedema and age-related macular degeneration: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Poku, E.; Brazier, J; Carlton, J; Ferreira, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background\\ud \\ud Health state utility values (HSUVs) are important in the assessment of the cost effectiveness of new interventions. In the case of visual conditions, models generally tend have tended to be built around a set of health states defined by visual acuity (VA). The aim of this review was to assess the impact of VA on HSUVs in patients with diabetic retinopathy, diabetic macular oedema or age-related macular degeneration.\\ud \\ud Methods\\ud \\ud A systematic literature search was un...

  16. Long-term effectiveness of ranibizumab for age-related macular degeneration and diabetic macular edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Angie H C; Lai, Timothy Y Y

    2013-01-01

    Neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic macular edema (DME) are major causes of visual impairment in the elderly population worldwide. With the aging population, the prevalence of neovascular AMD and DME has increased substantially over the recent years. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been implicated as playing an important role in the pathogenesis of both neovascular AMD and DME. Since its introduction in 2006, ranibizumab, a recombinant, humanized, monoclonal antibody fragment against all isoforms of VEGF-A, has revolutionized the treatment of neovascular AMD and DME. The efficacy and safety of ranibizumab in neovascular AMD has been demonstrated in the ANCHOR and MARINA trials. Further studies including the PIER, PrONTO, and SUSTAIN trials have also evaluated the optimal dosing regimen of ranibizumab in neovascular AMD. The CATT and IVAN trials compared the safety and efficacy of ranibizumab with off-label use of bevacizumab. Studies such as SUSTAIN and HORIZON have shown that ranibizumab has a good safety profile and is well tolerated for over 4 years with very few serious ocular and systemic adverse events. For DME, Phase II RESOLVE study and Phase III RISE and RIDE studies have demonstrated superiority of ranibizumab treatment in improving vision over placebo controls. Phase II READ and Phase III RESOLVE and REVEAL studies have shown that ranibizumab is more effective both as monotherapy and in combination with laser compared with laser monotherapy. The 3-year results from the DRCRnet protocol I study found that ranibizumab with deferred laser resulted in better long-term visual outcome compared with ranibizumab with prompt laser. This review summarizes various important clinical trials on the long-term efficacy and safety of ranibizumab in the treatment of neovascular AMD and DME. The pharmacological properties of ranibizumab, its cost effectiveness, and impact on quality of life will also be discussed.

  17. The Link Between Stress Disorders and Autonomic Dysfunction in Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasna eSabharwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophy is a progressive disease of muscle weakness, muscle atrophy and cardiac dysfunction. Patients afflicted with muscular dystrophy exhibit autonomic dysfunction along with cognitive impairment, severe depression, sadness, and anxiety. Although the psychological aspects of cardiovascular disorders and stress disorders are well known, the physiological mechanism underlying this relationship is not well understood, particularly in muscular dystrophy. Therefore, the goal of this perspective is to highlight the importance of autonomic dysfunction and psychological stress disorders in the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy. This article will for the first time - (i outline autonomic mechanisms that are common to both psychological stress and cardiovascular disorders in muscular dystrophy; (ii propose therapies that would improve behavioral and autonomic functions in muscular dystrophy.

  18. Macular laser photocoagulation guided by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography versus fluorescein angiography for diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallego-Pinazo R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Roberto Gallego-Pinazo1,2, Ana Marina Suelves-Cogollos1, Rosa Dolz-Marco1, J Fernando Arevalo3, Salvador García-Delpech1, J Luis Mullor4, Manuel Díaz-Llopis1,2,51Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia, Spain; 2Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Raras, Valencia, Spain; 3Retina and Vitreous Service, Clinical Ophthalmology Center, Caracas, Venezuela; 4Unit of Experimental Ophthalmology, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia, Spain; 5University of Valencia, Faculty of Medicine, Valencia, SpainBackground: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT and fluorescein angiography (FA in the guidance of macular laser photocoagulation for diabetic macular edema.Methods: This was a prospective interventional clinical comparative pilot study. Forty eyes from 24 consecutive patients with diabetic macular edema were allocated to receive laser photocoagulation guided by SD-OCT or FA. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA, central macular thickness, and retinal volume were assessed at baseline and two months after treatment.Results: Subjects treated using FA-guided laser improved BCVA from the logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR 0.52 ± 0.2 to 0.37 ± 0.2 (P < 0.001, and decreased mean central macular thickness from 397.25 ± 139.1 to 333.50 ± 105.7 µm (P < 0.001 and retinal volume from 12.61 ± 1.6 to 10.94 ± 1.4 mm3 (P < 0.001. Subjects treated using SD-OCT guided laser had improved BCVA from 0.48 ± 0.2 to 0.33 ± 0.2 logMAR (P < 0.001, and decreased mean central macular thickness from 425.90 ± 149.6 to 353.4 ± 140 µm (P < 0.001 and retinal volume from 12.38 ± 2.1 to 11.53 ± 1.1 mm3 (P < 0.001. No significant differences between the groups were found in two-month BCVA (P = 0.505, two-month central macular thickness (P = 0.660, or two-month retinal volume (P = 0.582.Conclusion: The short-term results of this pilot study

  19. Comparison of Deflazacort and Prednisone in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaneh KARIMZADEH

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite this Article: Karimzadeh P, Ghazavi A. Comparison of Deflazacort and Prednisone in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. IranianJournal of Child Neurology 2012;6(1:5-12.ObjectiveDuchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a degenerative disease that usually becomes clinically detectable in childhood as progressive proximal weakness. No cure is yet available for DMD, but the use of steroids improves muscle strength and function. This study has been carried out to select the best steroid for the management of DMD.Materials & MethodsThis study is a single-blind, randomized clinical trial with a sample volume of 34 DMD patients. Half of these patients were treated with deflazacort (0.9 mg/kg daily and the other half with prednisone (0.75 mg/kg daily for a period of 18 months. The motor function score and excess body weight were registered one year after the start and also at the end of the study and compared between the two groups.ResultsDeflazacort was more effective in the improvement of motor function after one year, but there was no significant difference between the two drugs at the end of the study (18 months after start. Weight gain after one year and at the end of the study was higher in prednisone group and steroid treatment with deflazacort appears to cause fewer side effects than prednisone regarding weight gain.ConclusionDeflazacort seems to be more effective than prednisone in the improvement of motor function causing fewer side effects, particularly weight gain. This medication may be important for the improvement of motor function and could be used as the best steroidal treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. References Lankester BJA, Whitehouse MR, Gargan MF. Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Current Orthopedics 2007;21:298- 300. Wenger DR, Rang M. The art and practice of children’s orthopedics. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott; Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins; 1993. Sussman M. Duchenne muscular dystrophy. J Am Acad Orthop Surg 2002 Mar

  20. Awareness, Knowledge, and Concern about Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimarolli, Verena R.; Laban-Baker, Allie; Hamilton, Wanda S.; Stuen, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD)--a common eye disease causing vision loss--can be detected early through regular eye-health examinations, and measures can be taken to prevent visual decline. Getting eye examinations requires certain levels of awareness, knowledge, and concern related to AMD. However, little is known about AMD-related…

  1. Inverted Internal Limiting Membrane Flap For Large Traumatic Macular Holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Shousha, Mohsen Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the role of inverted internal limiting membrane flap as a treatment option for large traumatic macular holes.This is a prospective noncomparative study in which 12 eyes with large traumatic macular holes (basal diameter of 1300-2800 μm) since 3 to 6 months were subjected to standard 23-gauge vitrectomy with removal of the posterior hyaloid, brilliant blue G (BBG)-assisted internal limiting membrane peeling in a circular fashion keeping it attached to the edge of the hole to create a flap. At the end of the surgery, air fluid exchange was done with inversion of the internal limiting membrane flap inside the macular hole using the soft tipped cannula and sulfur hexafluoride 20% as tamponade. The main follow-up measures are the best corrected visual acuity and the optical coherence tomography for 6 to 9 months.All the included eyes had a closed hole from the first week postoperative and along the follow-up period (6-9 months). The best corrected visual acuity improved from 20/2000 to 20/200 with a median of 20/400 preoperatively to 20/400 to 20/50 with a median of 20/100 at the end of follow-up period.Inverted internal limiting membrane flap is a good adjuvant to standard vitrectomy in the management of large traumatic macular holes that led to the 100% closure rate and improvement of best corrected visual acuity.

  2. The Experience of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Elaine Y. H.; Guymer, Robyn H.; Hassell, Jennifer B.; Keeffe, Jill E.

    2004-01-01

    This qualitative article describes the impact of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) among 15 participants: how a person makes sense of ARMD, the effect of ARMD on the person's quality of life, the psychological disturbances associated with the limitations of ARMD, and the influence of ARMD on social interactions. Such in-depth appreciation of…

  3. Non-invasive in vivo measurement of macular carotenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, James L. (Inventor); Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A non-invasive in vivo method for assessing macular carotenoids includes performing Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) on a retina of a subject. A spatial representation of carotenoid levels in the macula based on data from the OCT of the retina can be generated.

  4. Assessing Errors Inherent in OCT-Derived Macular Thickness Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Odell

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available SD-OCT has become an essential tool for evaluating macular pathology; however several aspects of data collection and analysis affect the accuracy of retinal thickness measurements. Here we evaluated sampling density, scan centering, and axial length compensation as factors affecting the accuracy of macular thickness maps. Forty-three patients with various retinal pathologies and 113 normal subjects were imaged using Cirrus HD-OCT. Reduced B-scan density was associated with increased interpolation error in ETDRS macular thickness plots. Correcting for individual differences in axial length revealed modest errors in retinal thickness maps, while more pronounced errors were observed when the ETDRS plot was not positioned at the center of the fovea (which can occur as a result of errant fixation. Cumulative error can exceed hundreds of microns, even under “ideal observer” conditions. This preventable error is particularly relevant when attempting to compare macular thickness maps to normative databases or measuring the area or volume of retinal features.

  5. Complement factor d in age-related macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanton, C.M.; Yates, J.R.W.; Hollander, A.I. den; Seddon, J.M.; Swaroop, A.; Stambolian, D.; Fauser, S.; Hoyng, C.B.; Yu, Y.; Atsuhiro, K.; Branham, K.; Othman, M.; Chen, W.; Kortvely, E.; Chalmers, K.; Hayward, C.; Moore, A.T.; Dhillon, B.; Ueffing, M.; Wright, A.F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To examine the role of complement factor D (CFD) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) by analysis of genetic association, copy number variation, and plasma CFD concentrations. Methods. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CFD gene were genotyped and the results analyzed by

  6. Resultado funcional e índice macular em portadores de buraco macular submetidos à cirurgia com remoção da membrana limitante interna Functional outcome and macular index in macular hole patients who underwent surgery with internal limiting membrane removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Diniz

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Avaliar o resultado funcional e o índice macular dos portadores de buraco macular submetidos à cirurgia com remoção da membrana limitante interna. MÉTODOS: Quinze olhos de 15 pacientes com buraco macular estágios 2, 3 e 4 foram incluídos no estudo. Todos foram submetidos à cirurgia de buraco macular convencional com remoção da membrana limitante interna corada pelo azul de tripan. Melhor acuidade visual com correção e cortes transversais medidos por tomografia de coerência óptica (OCT foram avaliados no pré- e pós-operatório. O índice macular (razão entre a altura e base do buraco macular foi calculado e correlacionado com o diâmetro mínimo do buraco macular e o ganho de acuidade visual pós-operatória. RESULTADOS: Obteve-se fechamento do buraco macular em todos pacientes operados. Em 86,7%, houve ganho de pelo menos três linhas de visão. O índice macular demonstrou correlação negativa significante com o diâmetro mínimo (r=0,811. Não foi observada correlação significante entre o índice macular e o ganho de acuidade visual pós-operatória (r=0,351. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados funcionais na cirurgia do buraco macular com remoção da membrana limitante interna foram bons neste grupo de pacientes. O índice macular demonstrou ser compatível com a configuração espacial do buraco macular, porém não foi preditor de resultados visuais.PURPOSE: To evaluate the functional outcome and macular index in patients with macular hole who underwent surgery with internal limiting membrane removal. METHODS: Fifteen eyes of 15 patients with idiopathic macular hole stages 2, 3 or 4 were enrolled in this study. All patients underwent conventional macular hole surgery with trypan blue staining to remove the internal limiting membrane. The best-corrected visual acuity and cross-sectional images of macular hole measured by optical coherence tomography (OCT were evaluated pre- and postoperatively. The macular hole index

  7. Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis in Myotonic Dystrophy: DMPK Gene Mutation, Insulin Resistance and Development of Steatohepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Bhardwaj, Rishi R.; Andrea Duchini

    2010-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is a multisystemic disorder characterized by repeat expansion mutations of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene resulting in a defective muscular insulin receptor and insulin resistance. We describe a patient with myotonic dystrophy who developed biopsy-proven non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. We suggest that patients with myotonic dystrophy are at risk of developing steatohepatitis. The relationship between defective insulin receptor and development of steatohe...

  8. Animal Models for Muscular Dystrophy Show Different Patterns of Sarcolemmal Disruption

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    Genetic defects in a number of components of the dystrophin–glycoprotein complex (DGC) lead to distinct forms of muscular dystrophy. However, little is known about how alterations in the DGC are manifested in the pathophysiology present in dystrophic muscle tissue. One hypothesis is that the DGC protects the sarcolemma from contraction-induced damage. Using tracer molecules, we compared sarcolemmal integrity in animal models for muscular dystrophy and in muscular dystrophy patient samples. Ev...

  9. Diagnosis and cell-based therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy in humans, mice, and zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of genetically caused muscle degenerative disorders. The Kunkel laboratory has had a longstanding research program into the pathogenesis and treatment of these diseases. Starting with our identification of dystrophin as the defective protein in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), we have continued our work on normal dystrophin function and how it is altered in muscular dystrophy. Our work has led to the identification of the defective genes in...

  10. Translational Studies of GALGT2 Gene Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Paul T. Martin, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: The Research Institute...for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0416 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Paul T. Martin...translational studies in support of developing GALGT2 gene therapy for use in Duchenne Muscular dystrophy patients. In year 2, we have completed

  11. Best practice guidelines and recommendations on the molecular diagnosis of myotonic dystrophy types 1 and 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Kress, Wolfram; Catalli, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is an autosomal dominant, multisystem disorder that is characterized by myotonic myopathy. The symptoms and severity of myotonic dystrophy type l (DM1) ranges from severe and congenital forms, which frequently result in death because of respiratory deficiency, through to late-o...... testing and reporting is very important for the optimal counseling in myotonic dystrophy. Here, we describe best practice guidelines for clinical molecular genetic analysis and reporting in DM1 and DM2, including presymptomatic and prenatal testing....

  12. Distrofia retiniana com onda rápida escotópica (DRORE associada à síndrome dos cabelos anágenos frouxos (SCAF. Parte I: Achados oftalmológicos Scotopic fast wave retinal dystrophy (SFWRD associated with loose anagen hair syndrome (LAHS. Part I: Ophthalmological findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Teruo Sato

    2004-06-01

    ópica associada à síndrome dos cabelos anágenos frouxos, distrofia cujos achados fundoscópicos são diferentes entre homens e mulheres e com traçado eletrorretinográfico característico.PURPOSE: To describe the ophthalmological findings of a new macular dystrophy associated with loose anagen hair syndrome (LAHS. METHODS: Eleven patients of the same family, four of whom presented ocular abnormalities, were examined. Seven patients were submitted to the following examinations: a complete ophthalmological examination, color test, ultrasonography, angiography, visual field, optic disc topography, electro-oculogram (EOG, electroretinogram (ERG, laboratory and dermatological tests, sweat testing, light microscopy (LM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM of the scalp hair. In four patients, children of affected, examination was restricted to an ophthalmological examination and light microscopy and the scanning electron microscopy of the scalp hair. RESULTS: Of the four affected patients, two affected sisters showed pigmentary dispersions in the posterior pole of the retina with macular coloboma. Two brothers showed pigmentary dispersions in the posterior pole, with greater pigmentation and a yellowish aspect of the macular area without coloboma. The results of the ectro-oculogram and electroretinogram were within normal limits in three patients without ocular abnormalities. Whereas, electro-oculogram was subnormal and electroretinogram was subnormal with short implicit time (fast in the scotopic phase of the patients with the macular dystrophy, suggesting that the site of this dystrophy is at the level of the retinal pigment epithelium. Due to this peculiar behavior of the implicit time of the wave, such finding can be considered as fundamental to make the diagnosis of this dystrophy. The denomination could be scotopic fast wave retinal dystrophy (SFWRD. Light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy of scalp hair confirmed the loose anagen hair syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: We

  13. Intraoperative Changes in Idiopathic Macular Holes by Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Hayashi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To examine anatomical changes in idiopathic macular holes during surgery using handheld spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT. Methods: Five eyes of 5 patients who underwent surgery for the repair of idiopathic macular holes were examined. The surgery included standard 25-gauge, 3-port pars plana vitrectomy, removal of the internal limiting membrane (ILM, fluid-air exchange, and 20% sulfur hexafluoride tamponade. Intraoperative SD-OCT images of the macular holes were obtained after ILM removal and under fluid-air exchange using a handheld SD-OCT. From SD-OCT images, the macular hole base diameter (MHBD was measured and compared. Results: All macular holes were successfully closed after the primary surgery. The mean MHBD under fluid-air exchange was significantly smaller than the mean MHBD after ILM removal and the preoperative mean MHBD. In 1 eye with a stage 3 macular hole, SD-OCT images revealed that the inner edges of the macular hole touched each other under fluid-air exchange. Conclusion: Fluid-air exchange significantly reduced MHBD during surgery to repair macular holes. Fluid-air exchange may be an important step for macular hole closure as it reduces the base diameter of the macular hole.

  14. Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1): a triplet repeat expansion disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashok; Agarwal, Sarita; Agarwal, Divya; Phadke, Shubha R

    2013-06-15

    Myotonic dystrophy is a progressive multisystem genetic disorder affecting about 1 in 8000 people worldwide. The unstable repeat expansions of (CTG)n or (CCTG)n in the DMPK and ZNF9 genes cause the two known subtypes of myotonic dystrophy: (i) myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and (ii) myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) respectively. There is currently no cure but supportive management helps equally to reduce the morbidity and mortality and patients need close follow up to pay attention to their clinical problems. This review will focus on the clinical features, molecular view and genetics, diagnosis and management of DM1.

  15. The brain in myotonic dystrophy 1 and 2: evidence for a predominant white matter disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnerop, Martina; Weber, Bernd; Schoene-Bake, Jan-Christoph; Roeske, Sandra; Mirbach, Sandra; Anspach, Christian; Schneider-Gold, Christiane; Betz, Regina C; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Tittgemeyer, Marc; Klockgether, Thomas; Kornblum, Cornelia

    2011-12-01

    Myotonic dystrophy types 1 and 2 are progressive multisystemic disorders with potential brain involvement. We compared 22 myotonic dystrophy type 1 and 22 myotonic dystrophy type 2 clinically and neuropsychologically well-characterized patients and a corresponding healthy control group using structural brain magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T (T(1)/T(2)/diffusion-weighted). Voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging with tract-based spatial statistics were applied for voxel-wise analysis of cerebral grey and white matter affection (P(corrected) brain changes with clinical and neuropsychological data. White matter lesions rated visually were more prevalent and severe in myotonic dystrophy type 1 compared with controls, with frontal white matter most prominently affected in both disorders, and temporal lesions restricted to myotonic dystrophy type 1. Voxel-based morphometry analyses demonstrated extensive white matter involvement in all cerebral lobes, brainstem and corpus callosum in myotonic dystrophy types 1 and 2, while grey matter decrease (cortical areas, thalamus, putamen) was restricted to myotonic dystrophy type 1. Accordingly, we found more prominent white matter affection in myotonic dystrophy type 1 than myotonic dystrophy type 2 by diffusion tensor imaging. Association fibres throughout the whole brain, limbic system fibre tracts, the callosal body and projection fibres (e.g. internal/external capsules) were affected in myotonic dystrophy types 1 and 2. Central motor pathways were exclusively impaired in myotonic dystrophy type 1. We found mild executive and attentional deficits in our patients when neuropsychological tests were corrected for manual motor dysfunctioning. Regression analyses revealed associations of white matter affection with several clinical parameters in both disease entities, but not with neuropsychological performance. We showed that depressed mood and fatigue were more prominent in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1

  16. Optimal management of idiopathic macular holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madi HA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Haifa A Madi,1,* Ibrahim Masri,1,* David H Steel1,2 1Sunderland Eye Infirmary, Sunderland, 2Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Newcastle, UK *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: This review evaluates the current surgical options for the management of idiopathic macular holes (IMHs, including vitrectomy, ocriplasmin (OCP, and expansile gas use, and discusses key background information to inform the choice of treatment. An evidence-based approach to selecting the best treatment option for the individual patient based on IMH characteristics and patient-specific factors is suggested. For holes without vitreomacular attachment (VMA, vitrectomy is the only option with three key surgical variables: whether to peel the inner limiting membrane (ILM, the type of tamponade agent to be used, and the requirement for postoperative face-down posturing. There is a general consensus that ILM peeling improves primary anatomical hole closure rate; however, in small holes (<250 µm, it is uncertain whether peeling is always required. It has been increasingly recognized that long-acting gas and face-down positioning are not always necessary in patients with small- and medium-sized holes, but large (>400 µm and chronic holes (>1-year history are usually treated with long-acting gas and posturing. Several studies on posturing and gas choice were carried out in combination with ILM peeling, which may also influence the gas and posturing requirement. Combined phacovitrectomy appears to offer more rapid visual recovery without affecting the long-term outcomes of vitrectomy for IMH. OCP is licensed for use in patients with small- or medium-sized holes and VMA. A greater success rate in using OCP has been reported in smaller holes, but further predictive factors for its success are needed to refine its use. It is important to counsel patients realistically regarding the rates of success with

  17. Visual function 5 years or more after macular translocation surgery for myopic choroidal neovascularisation and age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, K; Kachi, S; Iwata, E; Ishikawa, K; Terasaki, H

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the changes in the best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) after 1 year and after ≥5 years after macular translocation for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) or myopic choroidal neovascularisation (mCNV). Methods The medical records of 61 consecutive patients who underwent macular translocation with 360° retinotomy for AMD (35 eyes) or mCNV (26 eyes) were reviewed. Overall, 40 patients, 17 mCNV and 23 AMD, were followed for at least 5 years. BCVA and area of the Goldmann visual field (VF) measured before, 12 months after surgery, and at the final visit. Results In the 23 AMD eyes followed for ≥5 years, the mean preoperative BCVA was 1.149±0.105 logMAR units, which significantly improved to 0.69±0.06 logMAR units at 1 year (P142 logMAR units on their final examination. The area of the VF was significantly decreased at 12 months and did not change significantly thereafter. Conclusions Our results show that macular translocation surgery significantly improves the BCVA and significantly decreases the VF area of eyes with mCNV or AMD after first 1 year. The BCVA and VF area do not change significantly from the values at 1 year for at least 5 years. PMID:22173070

  18. Lipids, lipid genes, and incident age-related macular degeneration: The three continent age-related macular degeneration consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Klein (Ronald); C.E. Myers (Chelsea); G.H.S. Buitendijk (Gabrielle); E. Rochtchina (Elena); X. Gao (Xiaoyi); P.T.V.M. de Jong (Paulus); T.A. Sivakumaran (Theru); G. Burlutsky (George); R. McKean-Cowdin (Roberta); A. Hofman (Albert); S.K. Iyengar (Sudha); K.E. Lee (Kristine); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); J.R. Vingerling (Hans); P. Mitchell (Paul); B.E.K. Klein (Barbara); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline); J.J. Wang (Jie Jin)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractPurpose To describe associations of serum lipid levels and lipid pathway genes to the incidence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design Meta-analysis. Methods setting: Three population-based cohorts. population: A total of 6950 participants from the Beaver Dam Eye Study (BDES),

  19. Lipids, lipid genes, and incident age-related macular degeneration : the three continent age-related macular degeneration consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Ronald; Myers, Chelsea E; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H S; Rochtchina, Elena; Gao, Xiaoyi; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Sivakumaran, Theru A; Burlutsky, George; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Hofman, Albert; Iyengar, Sudha K; Lee, Kristine E; Stricker, Bruno H; Vingerling, Johannes R; Mitchell, Paul; Klein, Barbara E K; Klaver, Caroline C W; Wang, Jie Jin

    PURPOSE: To describe associations of serum lipid levels and lipid pathway genes to the incidence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). DESIGN: Meta-analysis. METHODS: setting: Three population-based cohorts. population: A total of 6950 participants from the Beaver Dam Eye Study (BDES), Blue

  20. Durable recovery of the macular architecture and functionality of a diagnosed age-related macular degeneration 1 year after a single intravitreal injection of dobesilate

    OpenAIRE

    Cuevas, P; Outeiriño, L A; Azanza, C; Giménez-Gallego, G

    2013-01-01

    Among the age-related diseases that affect vision, age-related macular degeneration is the most frequent cause of blindness in patients older than 60 years. In this communication, we report the full anatomical and functional recovery of a patient diagnosed with wet age-related macular degeneration 1 year after a single intravitreal injection of dobesilate.

  1. Durable recovery of the macular architecture and functionality of a diagnosed age-related macular degeneration 1 year after a single intravitreal injection of dobesilate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, P; Outeiriño, L A; Azanza, C; Giménez-Gallego, G

    2013-11-13

    Among the age-related diseases that affect vision, age-related macular degeneration is the most frequent cause of blindness in patients older than 60 years. In this communication, we report the full anatomical and functional recovery of a patient diagnosed with wet age-related macular degeneration 1 year after a single intravitreal injection of dobesilate.

  2. Durable recovery of the macular architecture and functionality of a diagnosed age-related macular degeneration 1 year after a single intravitreal injection of dobesilate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, P; Outeiriño, L A; Azanza, C; Giménez-Gallego, G

    2013-01-01

    Among the age-related diseases that affect vision, age-related macular degeneration is the most frequent cause of blindness in patients older than 60 years. In this communication, we report the full anatomical and functional recovery of a patient diagnosed with wet age-related macular degeneration 1 year after a single intravitreal injection of dobesilate. PMID:24225910

  3. Triamcinolona subtenoniana en el edema macular diabético Subtenon triamcinolone in the diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddy Mesa Hernández

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN: La prevalencia de la retinopatía diabética está determinada por el tipo de diabetes mellitus y por el tiempo de evolución de la enfermedad. El edema macular es la principal causa de la disminución de la agudeza visual en el paciente diabético. Un diagnóstico precoz y certero de esta enfermedad, unido al establecimiento de un tratamiento adecuado es crucial en el esfuerzo por reducir la incapacidad visual. El propósito de este trabajo fue determinar la efectividad de la triamcinolona subtenoniana como tratamiento del edema macular en un grupo de pacientes diabéticos. MÉTODOS: Se realizó un estudio descriptivo-prospectivo de caso control. La muestra estuvo formada por 30 pacientes diabéticos que fueron atendidos en el Hospital Clínicoquirúrgico "Dr. Miguel Enríquez, desde enero a junio de 2007, con diagnóstico de edema macular diabético que cumplieron con los criterios de inclusión. RESULTADOS: Predominó el sexo femenino, el grupo de edades más frecuentes fue de 55 a 65 años. Se relacionó el tiempo de evolución con la presencia de edema macular, se evidenció una involución de esta patología, así como una mejoría en la agudeza visual después de aplicado el tratamiento y no se presentaron complicaciones graves. CONCLUSIONES: El tratamiento con acetato de triamcinolona por vía subtenoniana posterior es una alternativa efectiva en el tratamiento de el edema macular.INTRODUCTION: Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy is determined by type of diabetes mellitus and the length of development of the disease. Macular edema is the main cause of reduction in visual acuity of the diabetic patient. An early exact diagnosis of the disease together with an adequate treatment is essential to decrease visual disability. The objective of this paper was to evaluate the effectiveness of subtenon triamcinolone as therapy for macular edema in a group of diabetics. METHODS: A prospective descriptive case-control study was

  4. EVALUATION OF MACULAR ISCHEMIA IN EYES WITH CENTRAL RETINAL VEIN OCCLUSION: An Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghashut, Rima; Muraoka, Yuki; Ooto, Sotaro; Iida, Yuto; Miwa, Yuko; Suzuma, Kiyoshi; Murakami, Tomoaki; Kadomoto, Shin; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2017-06-30

    To quantitatively assess macular perfusion status using optical coherence tomography angiography in eyes with aflibercept-treated central retinal vein occlusion and resolved macular edema and to investigate the impact of macular morphology and perfusion status on visual function. This prospective consecutive case series included 23 patients with central retinal vein occlusion. All patients received intravitreal aflibercept injections before analysis. Visual acuity, macular sensitivity, and the macular nonperfusion area (NPA) were evaluated in eyes without macular edema. The macular NPA was evaluated by optical coherence tomography angiography using 3 mm × 3 mm images of the macula. Foveal ellipsoid zone disruption was also analyzed. The superficial macular NPA measured 4.15 mm ± 0.71 mm (95% confidence interval 3.85-4.46), and the deep macular NPA measured 4.23 mm ± 0.97 mm (95% confidence interval 3.82-4.56). The logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution visual acuity was significantly associated with foveal ellipsoid zone disruption (P = 0.001), the superficial macular NPA (P = 0.015), and the deep macular NPA (P = 0.018). Macular sensitivity correlated negatively with logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution visual acuity (P = 0.007), the superficial macular NPA (P = 0.029), and the deep macular NPA (P = 0.040), but not with the foveal ellipsoid zone disruption (P = 0.435). Optical coherence tomography angiography is a novel technique that enables segmented evaluation of the macular perfusion status in eyes with central retinal vein occlusion and provides visual prognostic information. Enlargement of the macular NPA in the superficial and deep layers was significantly correlated with impaired visual acuity and with decreased macular sensitivity in patients with aflibercept-treated central retinal vein occlusion and resolved macular edema.

  5. Muscular dystrophy meets protein biochemistry, the mother of invention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Steven D; Miner, Jeffrey H

    2017-03-01

    Muscular dystrophies result from a defect in the linkage between the muscle fiber cytoskeleton and the basement membrane (BM). Congenital muscular dystrophy type MDC1A is caused by mutations in laminin α2 that either reduce its expression or impair its ability to polymerize within the muscle fiber BM. Defects in this BM lead to muscle fiber damage from the force of contraction. In this issue of the JCI, McKee and colleagues use a laminin polymerization-competent, designer chimeric BM protein in vivo to restore function of a polymerization-defective laminin, leading to normalized muscle structure and strength in a mouse model of MDC1A. Delivery of such a protein to patients could ameliorate many aspects of their disease.

  6. Electrophysiological studies in American Quarter horses with neuroaxonal dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finno, Carrie J; Aleman, Monica; Ofri, Ron; Hollingsworth, Steven R; Madigan, John E; Winfield, Laramie; Bannasch, Danika L

    2012-09-01

    Neuroaxonal dystrophy (NAD) is a disease characterized by the sudden onset of neurologic signs in horses ranging from 4 to 36 months of age. Equine degenerative myeloencephalopathy (EDM), a disease that has been associated with low vitamin E concentrations, is considered a more advanced form of NAD. The objective of this report is to describe the electrophysiological features of NAD/EDM in American Quarter horses (QHs). HORSES: Six NAD/EDM-affected QHs and six unaffected QHs were evaluated by ophthalmic examination and electroretinography. Five of the NAD/EDM-affected QH and five unaffected QHs were also evaluated by electroencephalography (EEG). Ophthalmic examination, ERGs, and EEGs were unremarkable in NAD/EDM cases. Neuroaxonal dystrophy/EDM does not appear to cause clinical signs of ocular disease or functional ERG/EEG deficits in QHs. © 2012 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  7. Satellite Cells in Muscular Dystrophy - Lost in Polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Natasha C; Chevalier, Fabien P; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    Recent findings employing the mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have revealed that muscle satellite stem cells play a direct role in contributing to disease etiology and progression of DMD, the most common and severe form of muscular dystrophy. Lack of dystrophin expression in DMD has critical consequences in satellite cells including an inability to establish cell polarity, abrogation of asymmetric satellite stem-cell divisions, and failure to enter the myogenic program. Thus, muscle wasting in dystrophic mice is not only caused by myofiber fragility but is exacerbated by intrinsic satellite cell dysfunction leading to impaired regeneration. Despite intense research and clinical efforts, there is still no effective cure for DMD. In this review we highlight recent research advances in DMD and discuss the current state of treatment and, importantly, how we can incorporate satellite cell-targeted therapeutic strategies to correct satellite cell dysfunction in DMD.

  8. Sands of Sahara after LASIK in Avellino Corneal Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio Mantelli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a patient diagnosed with Avellino corneal dystrophy (ACD who developed diffuse interstitial keratitis following excimer laser insitu keratomileusis (LASIK. ACD is an autosomal dominant corneal dystrophy characterized by multiple asymmetric stromal opacities that impair vision. Accepted treatments for this condition include corneal transplantation and phototherapeutic keratectomy (PTK. Our patient underwent LASIK at another institution to correct myopia. LASIK and photorefractive keratectomy (PRK are usually contraindicated in ACD for the high risk of disease recurrence and postoperative complications. The patient came to our attention lamenting blurry vision, decreased visual acuity, and photophobia. Ophthalmologic examination revealed bilateral interstitial keratitis, also known as “sands of Sahara”, a seldom-seen complication of LASIK characterized by fine and diffuse granular infiltrates at the surgical flap interface.The risk of developing interstitial keratitis, as in the case presented here, represents another valid reason for avoiding LASIK in patients with ACD.

  9. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies in India: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish V Khadilkar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs are common in India. Information on LGMDs has been gradually evolving in the recent years. This information is scattered in case series and case studies. The aim of this study is to collate available Indian information on LGMDs and put it in perspective. PubMed search using keywords such as limb-girdle muscular dystrophies in India, sarcoglycanopathies, dysferlinopathy, calpainopathy, and GNE myopathy was carried out. The published information on LGMDs in Indian context suggests that dysferlinopathy, calpainopathy, sarcoglycanopathies, and other myopathies such as GNE myopathy are frequently seen in India. Besides these, anecdotal reports of many other forms are available, some with genetic support and others showing immunocytochemical defects. The genotypic information on LGMDs is gradually evolving and founder mutations have been detected in selected populations. Further multicenter studies are necessary to document the incidence and prevalence of these common conditions in India.

  10. Muscular dystrophies: key elements for everyday diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Palladino

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders that share similar clinical features and dystrophic changes on muscle biopsy, associated with progressive weakness. Weakness may be noted at birth or develop in late adult life. In recent years, cardiac involvement has been observed in a growing number of genetic muscle diseases, and considerable progress has been made in understanding the relationships between disease skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle disease. This review will focus on the skeletal muscle diseases most commonly associated with cardiac complications that can be diagnosed by echocardiography, such as dystrophinopathies including Duchenne (DMD and Becker (BMD muscular dystrophies, cardiomyopathy of DMD/BMD carriers and X-L dilated cardiomyopathy.

  11. Change in macular thickness in a case of refractory diabetic macular edema with dexamethasone intravitreal implant in comparison to intravitreal bevacizumab: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the significant improvement of central macular thickness in a case of clinically significant macular edema after dexamethasone 0.7 mg sustained-release intravitreal implant (Ozurdex®; Allergan, Inc, Irvine, CA, USA. Patient presented to us with persistent clinically significant macular edema (CSME in both eyes. Right eye received dexamethasone implant and left eye received two intravitreal bevacizumab injections 1.25 mg/0.05 mL (Avastin®; Genentech Inc., South San Francisco, CA, USA with an interval of four weeks. After six weeks of follow-up, dexamethasone implant in the right eye showed normal macular thickness whereas persistent macular edema (ME was found even after second intravitreal bevacizumab injection in the left eye.

  12. NAD+ biosynthesis ameliorates a zebrafish model of muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle F Goody

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies are common, currently incurable diseases. A subset of dystrophies result from genetic disruptions in complexes that attach muscle fibers to their surrounding extracellular matrix microenvironment. Cell-matrix adhesions are exquisite sensors of physiological conditions and mediate responses that allow cells to adapt to changing conditions. Thus, one approach towards finding targets for future therapeutic applications is to identify cell adhesion pathways that mediate these dynamic, adaptive responses in vivo. We find that nicotinamide riboside kinase 2b-mediated NAD+ biosynthesis, which functions as a small molecule agonist of muscle fiber-extracellular matrix adhesion, corrects dystrophic phenotypes in zebrafish lacking either a primary component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex or integrin alpha7. Exogenous NAD+ or a vitamin precursor to NAD+ reduces muscle fiber degeneration and results in significantly faster escape responses in dystrophic embryos. Overexpression of paxillin, a cell adhesion protein downstream of NAD+ in this novel cell adhesion pathway, reduces muscle degeneration in zebrafish with intact integrin receptors but does not improve motility. Activation of this pathway significantly increases organization of laminin, a major component of the extracellular matrix basement membrane. Our results indicate that the primary protective effects of NAD+ result from changes to the basement membrane, as a wild-type basement membrane is sufficient to increase resilience of dystrophic muscle fibers to damage. The surprising result that NAD+ supplementation ameliorates dystrophy in dystrophin-glycoprotein complex- or integrin alpha7-deficient zebrafish suggests the existence of an additional laminin receptor complex that anchors muscle fibers to the basement membrane. We find that integrin alpha6 participates in this pathway, but either integrin alpha7 or the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex is required in conjunction

  13. Duchenne muscular dystrophy with associated growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafoor, Tariq; Mahmood, Arshad; Shams, Shahnaz

    2003-12-01

    A patient with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and growth hormone (GH) deficiency is described who had no clinical evidence of muscular weakness before initiation of GH replacement therapy. Treatment with human GH resulted in appearance of symptoms of easy fatigability and proximal muscle weakness. Thorough investigations including serum creatinine phosphokinase (CK) levels is recommended in every patient with GH deficiency before starting GH replacement therapy.

  14. Torn apart: membrane rupture in muscular dystrophies and associated cardiomyopathies

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are often caused by mutations in cytoskeletal proteins that render cells more susceptible to strain-induced injury in mechanically active tissues such as skeletal or cardiac muscle. In this issue of the JCI, Han et al. report that dysferlin participates in membrane resealing in cardiomyocytes and that exercise results in increased membrane damage and disturbed cardiac function in dysferlin-deficient mice (see the related article beginning on page 1805). Thus, in addition ...

  15. Gene Therapy for Muscular Dystrophy: Lessons Learned and Path Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendell, Jerry R.; Rodino-Klapac, Louise; Sahenk, Zarife; Malik, Vinod; Kaspar, Brian K.; Walker, Christopher M.; Clark, K. Reed

    2012-01-01

    Our Translational Gene Therapy Center has used small molecules for exon skipping and mutation suppression and gene transfer to replace or provide surrogate genes as tools for molecular-based approaches for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. Exon skipping is targeted at the pre-mRNA level allowing one or more exons to be omitted to restore the reading frame. In Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), clinical trials have been performed with two different oligomers, a 2′O-methyl-ribo-oligonucleoside-phosphorothioate (2′OMe) and a phosphorodiamidate morpholino (PMO). Both have demonstrated early evidence of efficacy. A second molecular approach involves suppression of stop codons to promote readthrough of the DMD gene. We have been able to establish proof of principle for mutation suppression using the aminoglycoside, gentamicin. A safer, orally administered, alternative agent referred to as Ataluren (PTC124) has been used in clinical trials and is currently under consideration for approval by the FDA. Using a gene therapy approach, we have completed two trials and have initiated a third. For DMD, we used a mini-dystrophin transferred in adeno-associated virus (AAV). In this trial an immune response was seen directed against transgene product, a quite unexpected outcome that will help guide further studies. For limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2D (alpha-sarcoglycan deficiency), the transgene was again transferred using AAV but in this study, a muscle specific creatine kinase promoter controlled gene expression that persisted for six months. A third gene therapy trial has been initiated with transfer of the follistatin gene in AAV directly to the quadriceps muscle. Two diseases with selective quadriceps muscle weakness are undergoing gene transfer including sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). Increasing the size and strength of the muscle is the goal of this study. Most importantly, no adverse events have been encountered in

  16. Aerobic training and postexercise protein in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Grete; Prahm, Kira P; Dahlqvist, Julia R;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of regular aerobic training and postexercise protein-carbohydrate supplementation in patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel study, we randomized untrained men (n = 21...... not add any further improvement to training effects alone. CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE: This study provides Class II evidence that regular aerobic training with or without postexercise protein-carbohydrate supplementation improves fitness and workload in patients with FSHD....

  17. Deflazacort in Duchenne dystrophy: study of long-term effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, C; Pegoraro, E; Turella, E; Intino, M T; Pini, A; Costa, C

    1994-04-01

    A randomized double-blind controlled trial of deflazacort was conducted in 28 Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients either treated with deflazacort 2.0 mg/kg alternate-day therapy or placebo. The deflazacort group showed significant improvement in climbing stairs (P loss of ambulation for the treated group after we started the trial was 33.2 +/- 9 months; for the placebo group it was 20.5 +/- 11 months (deflazacort vs. placebo group, P weight gain and slight behavioral changes.

  18. Sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity in patients with muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano eMerlini

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aging sarcopenia and muscular dystrophy are two conditions characterized by lower skeletal muscle quantity, lower muscle strength, and lower physical performance. Aging is associated with a peculiar alteration in body composition called sarcopenic obesity characterized by a decrease in lean body mass and increase in fat mass. To evaluate the presence of sarcopenia and obesity in a cohort of adult patients with muscular dystrophy we have used the measurement techniques considered golden standard for sarcopenia that is for muscle mass dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA, for muscle strength hand held dynamometry, and for physical performance gait speed. The study involved 14 adult patients with different types of muscular dystrophy. We were able to demonstrate that all patient were sarcopenic-obese. We showed in fact that all were sarcopenic based on appendicular lean, fat & bone free, mass index (ALMI. In addition all resulted obese according to the % of body fat determined by DXA in contrast with their body mass index ranging from underweight to obese. Skeletal muscle mass determined by DXA was markedly reduced in all patients and correlated with residual muscle strength determined by hand held dynamometry, and physical performances determined by gait speed and respiratory function. Finally we showed that ALMI was the best linear explicator of muscle strength and physical function. Altogether, our study suggest the relevance of a proper evaluation of body composition in muscular dystrophy and we propose to use, both in research and practice, the measurement techniques that has already been demonstrated effective in aging sarcopenia.

  19. Gene Therapy and Gene Editing for the Corneal Dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Keryn A; Irani, Yazad D

    2016-01-01

    Despite ever-increasing understanding of the genetic underpinnings of many corneal dystrophies, gene therapy designed to ameliorate disease has not yet been reported in any human patient. In this review, we explore the likely reasons for this apparent failure of translation. We identify the requirements for success: the genetic defect involved must have been identified and mapped, vision in the affected patient must be significantly impaired or likely to be impaired, no better or equivalently effective treatment must be available, the treatment must be capable of modulating corneal pathology, and delivery of the construct to the appropriate cell must be practicable. We consider which of the corneal dystrophies might be amenable to treatment by genetic manipulations, summarize existing therapeutic options for treatment, and explore gene editing using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat/Cas and other similar transformative technologies as the way of the future. We then summarize recent laboratory-based advances in gene delivery and the development of in vitro and in vivo models of the corneal dystrophies. Finally, we review recent experimental work that has increased our knowledge of the pathobiology of these conditions.

  20. Skeletal muscle CT of lower extremities in myotonic dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Ryosuke; Imai, Terukuni; Sadashima, Hiromichi; Matsumoto, Sadayuki; Yamamoto, Toru; Kusaka, Hirofumi; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Maya, Kiyomi; Tanabe, Masaya

    1988-02-01

    We evaluated the leg and thigh muscles of 4 control subjects and 10 patients with myotonic dystrophy using computed tomography. Taking previous reports about the skeletal muscle CT of myotonic dystrophy into account, we concluded that the following 5 features are characteristic of myotonic dystrophy: 1. The main change is the appearance of low-density areas in muscles; these areas reflect fat tissue. In addition, the muscle mass decreases in size. 2. The leg is more severely affected than the thigh. 3. In the thigh, although the m. quadriceps femoris, especially the vastus muscles, tends to be affected, the m. adductor longus and magnus tend to be preserved. 4. In the leg, although the m. tibialis anterior and m. triceps surae tend to be affected, the m. peroneus longus, brevis, and m. tibialis posterior tend to be preserved. 5. Compensatory hypertrophy is often observed in the m. rectus femoris, m. adductor longus, m. adductor magnus, m. peroneus longus, and m. peroneus brevis, accompanied by the involvement of their agonist muscles.

  1. Altered cross-bridge properties in skeletal muscle dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz eGuellich

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Force and motion generated by skeletal muscle ultimately depends on the cyclical interaction of actin with myosin. This mechanical process is regulated by intracellular Ca2+ through the thin filament-associated regulatory proteins i.e.; troponins and tropomyosin. Muscular dystrophies are a group of heterogeneous genetic affections characterized by progressive degeneration and weakness of the skeletal muscle as a consequence of loss of muscle tissue which directly reduces the number of potential myosin cross-bridges involved in force production. Mutations in genes responsible for skeletal muscle dystrophies have been shown to modify the function of contractile proteins and cross-bridge interactions. Altered gene expression or RNA splicing or post-translational modifications of contractile proteins such as those related to oxidative stress, may affect cross-bridge function by modifying key proteins of the excitation-contraction coupling. Micro-architectural change in myofilament is another mechanism of altered cross-bridge performance. In this review, we provide an overview about changes in cross-bridge performance in skeletal muscle dystrophies and discuss their ultimate impacts on striated muscle function.

  2. Therapeutic Potential of Immunoproteasome Inhibition in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farini, Andrea; Sitzia, Clementina; Cassani, Barbara; Cassinelli, Letizia; Rigoni, Rosita; Colleoni, Federica; Fusco, Nicola; Gatti, Stefano; Bella, Pamela; Villa, Chiara; Napolitano, Filomena; Maiavacca, Rita; Bosari, Silvano; Villa, Anna; Torrente, Yvan

    2016-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an inherited fatal genetic disease characterized by mutations in dystrophin gene, causing membrane fragility leading to myofiber necrosis and inflammatory cell recruitment in dystrophic muscles. The resulting environment enriched in proinflammatory cytokines, like IFN-γ and TNF-α, determines the transformation of myofiber constitutive proteasome into the immunoproteasome, a multisubunit complex involved in the activation of cell-mediate immunity. This event has a fundamental role in producing peptides for antigen presentation by MHC class I, for the immune response and also for cytokine production and T-cell differentiation. Here, we characterized for the first time the presence of T-lymphocytes activated against revertant dystrophin epitopes, in the animal model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the mdx mice. Moreover, we specifically blocked i-proteasome subunit LMP7, which was up-regulated in dystrophic skeletal muscles, and we demonstrated the rescue of the dystrophin expression and the amelioration of the dystrophic phenotype. The i-proteasome blocking lowered myofiber MHC class I expression and self-antigen presentation to T cells, thus reducing the specific antidystrophin T cell response, the muscular cell infiltrate, and proinflammatory cytokine production, together with muscle force recovery. We suggest that i-proteasome inhibition should be considered as new promising therapeutic approach for Duchenne muscular dystrophy pathology.

  3. Cardiac involvement in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sophie; Mavrogeni; George; Markousis-Mavrogenis; Antigoni; Papavasiliou; Genovefa; Kolovou

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy(DMD/BMD) are X-linked muscular diseases responsible for over 80% of all muscular dystrophies. Cardiac disease is a common manifestation,not necessarily related to the degree of skeletal myopathy; it may be the predominant manifestation with or without any other evidence of muscular disease. Death is usually due to ventricular dysfunction,heart block or malignant arrhythmias. Not only DMD/BMD patients,but also female carriers may present cardiac involvement. Clinically overt heart failure in dystrophinopathies may be delayed or absent,due to relative physical inactivity. The commonest electrocardiographic findings include conduction defects,arrhythmias(supraventricular or ventricular),hypertrophy and evidence of myocardial necrosis. Echocardiography can assess a marked variability of left ventricular dysfunction,independently of age of onset or mutation groups. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance(CMR) has documented a pattern of epicardial fibrosis in both dystrophinopathies’ patients and carriers that can be observed even if overt muscular disease is absent. Recently,new CMR techniques,such as postcontrast myocardial T1 mapping,have been used in Duchenne muscular dystrophy to detect diffuse myocardial fibrosis. A combined approach using clinical assessment and CMR evaluation may motivate early cardioprotective treatment in both patients and asymptomatic carriers and delay the development of serious cardiac complications.

  4. Muscular dystrophy in PTFR/cavin-1 null mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Shi-Ying; Pilch, Paul F.

    2017-01-01

    ice and humans lacking the caveolae component polymerase I transcription release factor (PTRF, also known as cavin-1) exhibit lipo- and muscular dystrophy. Here we describe the molecular features underlying the muscle phenotype for PTRF/cavin-1 null mice. These animals had a decreased ability to exercise, and exhibited muscle hypertrophy with increased muscle fiber size and muscle mass due, in part, to constitutive activation of the Akt pathway. Their muscles were fibrotic and exhibited impaired membrane integrity accompanied by an apparent compensatory activation of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex along with elevated expression of proteins involved in muscle repair function. Ptrf deletion also caused decreased mitochondrial function, oxygen consumption, and altered myofiber composition. Thus, in addition to compromised adipocyte-related physiology, the absence of PTRF/cavin-1 in mice caused a unique form of muscular dystrophy with a phenotype similar or identical to that seen in humans lacking this protein. Further understanding of this muscular dystrophy model will provide information relevant to the human situation and guidance for potential therapies.

  5. Lipogenesis mitigates dysregulated sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium uptake in muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paran, Christopher W; Zou, Kai; Ferrara, Patrick J; Song, Haowei; Turk, John; Funai, Katsuhiko

    2015-12-01

    Muscular dystrophy is accompanied by a reduction in activity of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) that contributes to abnormal Ca(2+) homeostasis in sarco/endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER). Recent findings suggest that skeletal muscle fatty acid synthase (FAS) modulates SERCA activity and muscle function via its effects on SR membrane phospholipids. In this study, we examined muscle's lipid metabolism in mdx mice, a mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). De novo lipogenesis was ~50% reduced in mdx muscles compared to wildtype (WT) muscles. Gene expressions of lipogenic and other ER lipid-modifying enzymes were found to be differentially expressed between wildtype (WT) and mdx muscles. A comprehensive examination of muscles' SR phospholipidome revealed elevated phosphatidylcholine (PC) and PC/phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) ratio in mdx compared to WT mice. Studies in primary myocytes suggested that defects in key lipogenic enzymes including FAS, stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1), and Lipin1 are likely contributing to reduced SERCA activity in mdx mice. Triple transgenic expression of FAS, SCD1, and Lipin1 (3TG) in mdx myocytes partly rescued SERCA activity, which coincided with an increase in SR PE that normalized PC/PE ratio. These findings implicate a defect in lipogenesis to be a contributing factor for SERCA dysfunction in muscular dystrophy. Restoration of muscle's lipogenic pathway appears to mitigate SERCA function through its effects on SR membrane composition.

  6. Molecular Signatures of Membrane Protein Complexes Underlying Muscular Dystrophy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Rolf; Hsiao, Jordy J.; Smits, Melinda M.; Ng, Brandon H.; Pospisil, Tyler C.; Jones, Kayla S.; Campbell, Kevin P.; Wright, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding components of the sarcolemmal dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) are responsible for a large number of muscular dystrophies. As such, molecular dissection of the DGC is expected to both reveal pathological mechanisms, and provides a biological framework for validating new DGC components. Establishment of the molecular composition of plasma-membrane protein complexes has been hampered by a lack of suitable biochemical approaches. Here we present an analytical workflow based upon the principles of protein correlation profiling that has enabled us to model the molecular composition of the DGC in mouse skeletal muscle. We also report our analysis of protein complexes in mice harboring mutations in DGC components. Bioinformatic analyses suggested that cell-adhesion pathways were under the transcriptional control of NFκB in DGC mutant mice, which is a finding that is supported by previous studies that showed NFκB-regulated pathways underlie the pathophysiology of DGC-related muscular dystrophies. Moreover, the bioinformatic analyses suggested that inflammatory and compensatory mechanisms were activated in skeletal muscle of DGC mutant mice. Additionally, this proteomic study provides a molecular framework to refine our understanding of the DGC, identification of protein biomarkers of neuromuscular disease, and pharmacological interrogation of the DGC in adult skeletal muscle https://www.mda.org/disease/congenital-muscular-dystrophy/research. PMID:27099343

  7. Combination of Anti-VEGF and Laser Photocoagulation for Diabetic Macular Edema: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura N. Distefano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic macular edema (DME is the most common cause of vision loss in diabetic patients. Thirty years ago, the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS demonstrated that focal/grid laser photocoagulation reduces moderate vision loss from DME by 50% or more; thus, macular photocoagulation became the gold standard treatment for DME. However, with the development of anti-VEGF drugs (bevacizumab, ranibizumab, and aflibercept, better outcomes were obtained in terms of visual acuity gain and decrease in macular thickness in some studies when antiangiogenic drugs were administered in monotherapy. Macular laser therapy may still play an important role as an adjuvant treatment because it is able to improve macular thickness outcomes and reduce the number of injections needed. Here, we review some of the clinical trials that have assessed the efficacy of macular laser treatment, either as part of the treatment protocol or as rescue therapy.

  8. One day wonder: Fast resolution of macular edema following intravitreal ranibizumab in retinal venous occlusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalit Verma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Macular edema is a significant cause of vision loss in patients with central retinal vein occlusions and branch retinal vein occlusions. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF appears to be a key factor in the pathogenesis of this disease. Anti-VEGF therapy, such as intravitreal ranibizumab provides an effective treatment against vision-threatening macular edema. We report three patients of retinal vein occlusion with macular edema who demonstrated overnight resolution of macular edema following treatment with intravitreal ranibizumab (0.5 mg. 3D optical coherence tomography (Optovue was used as a tool for comparison of the macular thickness before and after treatment. The significant reductions in the central foveal thickness demonstrated in these patients one night after intravitreal injections could have significant influence on modifying current treatment protocols. Early treatment of macular edema related to retinal venous occlusive disease with anti-VEGF injections could result in faster visual rehabilitation in these patients.

  9. Macular Hole Progression after Intravitreal Bevacizumab for Hemicentral Retinal Vein Occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Nagpal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Macular edema secondary to retinal vein occlusion is commonly being treated with off-label intravitreal bevacizumab with good outcomes. A significant reduction in macular edema and improvement in visual acuity is seen following such a treatment with no serious adverse effects. In the reported case, a full-thickness macular hole was noticed one month after intravitreal bevacizumab for macular edema secondary to hemicentral retinal vein occlusion. On a detailed review of the pre- and postoptical coherence tomography scans, it was realized that there was a preexisting stage 2-3 macular hole which was masked by the hemorrhages and edema at the fovea and the macular hole had progressed following the injection.

  10. Porcine Zygote Injection with Cas9/sgRNA Results in DMD-Modified Pig with Muscle Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Hong-Hao Yu; Heng Zhao; Yu-Bo Qing; Wei-Rong Pan; Bao-Yu Jia; Hong-Ye Zhao; Xing-Xu Huang; Hong-Jiang Wei

    2016-01-01

    Dystrophinopathy, including Duchenne muscle dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscle dystrophy (BMD) is an incurable X-linked hereditary muscle dystrophy caused by a mutation in the DMD gene in coding dystrophin. Advances in further understanding DMD/BMD for therapy are expected. Studies on mdx mice and dogs with muscle dystrophy provide limited insight into DMD disease mechanisms and therapeutic testing because of the different pathological manifestations. Miniature pigs share similar physiology an...

  11. Emerging therapies for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration and diabetic macular edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, M Vaughn; Lauer, Andreas K

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) and choroidal neovascularization (CNV) associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are the leading causes of vision loss in the industrialized world. The mainstay of treatment for both conditions has been thermal laser photocoagulation, while there have been recent advances in the treatment of CNV using photodynamic therapy with verteporfin. While both of these treatments have prevented further vision loss in a subset of patients, vision improvement is rare. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A therapy has revolutionized the treatment of both conditions. Pegaptanib, an anti-VEGF aptamer, prevents vision loss in CNV, although the performance is similar to that of photodynamic therapy. Ranibizumab, an antibody fragment, and bevacizumab, a full-length humanized monoclonal antibody against VEGF, have both shown promising results, with improvements in visual acuity in the treatment of both diseases. VEGF trap, a modified soluble VEGF receptor analog, binds VEGF more tightly than all other anti-VEGF therapies, and has also shown promising results in early trials. Other treatment strategies to decrease the effect of VEGF have used small interfering RNA to inhibit VEGF production and VEGF receptor production. Corticosteroids have shown efficacy in controlled trials, including anacortave acetate in the treatment and prevention of CNV, and intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide and the fluocinolone acetonide implant in the treatment of DME. Receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as vatalanib, inhibit downstream effects of VEGF, and have been effective in the treatment of CNV in early studies. Squalamine lactate inhibits plasma membrane ion channels with downstream effects on VEGF, and has shown promising results with systemic administration. Initial results are also encouraging for other growth factors, including pigment epithelium-derived factor administered via an adenoviral vector. Ruboxistaurin, which decreases protein

  12. Macular morphology and response to ranibizumab treatment in patients with wet age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dervenis N

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nikolaos Dervenis, Saad Younis Western Eye Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess whether specific characteristics of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT affect structural and functional outcomes and number of injections needed in ranibizumab (0.05 mL of 10 mg/mL Lucentis solution-treated wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD patients. Patients and methods: This retrospective case series included 62 newly diagnosed wet AMD patients treated with three monthly intravitreal ranibizumab injections followed by monthly follow-up and pro re nata retreatment. The presence of dome-shaped pigment epithelial detachment (PED, disruption of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE, and subretinal and intraretinal fluid was associated with changes in Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study visual acuity, central macular thickness (CMT, and number of injections needed during the 6-month follow-up. Results: The presence of PED was associated with lower values of CMT at presentation (399 µm [±132 µm] vs 310 µm [±51 µm], P=0.005. The presence of RPE disruption was associated with worse visual acuity in month 6 (0.36 [±0.22] vs 0.61 [0.45], P=0.027 and fewer injections (4.23 [±0.92] vs 3.55 [±0.60], P=0.007. The presence of intraretinal fluid at presentation was associated with worse visual acuity outcomes in month 4 (P=0.045 but not in month 6. Conclusion: The dome-shaped PED was associated with lower CMT at presentation, but it did not affect response to treatment. RPE disruption was associated with worse functional outcomes with fewer injections. Intraretinal fluid at presentation may suggest delayed response to treatment. Individualized SD-OCT analysis could lead to individualized approach to wet AMD patients. SD-OCT can offer imaging biomarkers to assess the prognosis of anti-VEGF treatment in AMD patients. Keywords: AMD, spectral domain optical

  13. Consistency of ocular coherence tomography fast macular thickness mapping in diabetic diffuse macular edema Consistência da tomografia de coerência óptica no edema macular difuso diabético

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Petersen Saraiva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To investigate optical coherence tomography consistency on foveal thickness, foveal volume, and macular volume measurements in patients with and without diffuse diabetic macular edema. INTRODUCTION: Optical coherence tomography represents an objective technique that provides cross-sectional tomographs of retinal structure in vivo. However, it is expected that poor fixation ability, as seen in diabetic macular edema, could alter its results. Several authors have discussed the reproducibility of optical coherence tomography, but only a few have addressed the topic with respect to diabetic maculopathy. METHODS: The study recruited diabetic patients without clinically evident retinopathy (control group and with diffuse macular edema (case group. Only one eye of each patient was evaluated. Five consecutive fast macular scans were taken using Ocular Coherence Tomography 3; the 6 mm macular map was chosen. The consistency in measurements of foveal thickness, foveal volume, and total macular volume for both groups was evaluated using the Pearson's coefficient of variation. The T-test for independent samples was used in order to compare measurements of both groups. RESULTS: Each group consisted of 20 patients. All measurements had a coefficient of variation less than 10%. The most consistent parameter for both groups was the total macular volume. DISCUSSION: Consistency in measurement is a mainstay of any test. A test is unreliable if its measurements can not be correctly repeated. We found a good index of consistency, even considering patients with an unstable gaze. CONCLUSIONS: Optical coherence tomography is a consistent method for diabetic subjects with diffuse macular edema.OBJETIVOS: Investigar a consistência das medidas de espessura foveal, volume foveal e volume macular total feitas pela tomografia de coerência óptica em pacientes com e sem edema macular difuso diabético. INTRODUÇÃO: A tomografia de coerência óptica é uma t

  14. Idiopathic horseshoe-like macular tear: a case report

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    Kubota M

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Masaomi Kubota,1 Tomohiro Shibata,1 Hisato Gunji,1 Hiroshi Tsuneoka2 1Department of Ophthalmology, The Jikei University School of Medicine Kashiwa Hospital, Chiba, 2Department of Ophthalmology, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan Background: Although a few cases with idiopathic horseshoe-like macular tear have been reported, the mechanism remains unknown and a standard treatment has yet to be determined. Objective: To report the outcome for a patient with idiopathic horseshoe-like macular tear who underwent vitreous surgery. Case report: A 65-year-old man with no previous injury or ophthalmic disease presented with abnormal vision in his left eye. Best-corrected visual acuity was 0.8 in the right and 0.3 in the left, and the relative afferent pupillary defect was negative. Ophthalmoscopy revealed a horseshoe-like tear on the temporal side of the macula in the left eye. The tear size was 0.75 disc diameters (DD. Optical coherence tomography showed that the focal retinal detachment reached the fovea. A few days after the first visit, there was no longer adhesion of the flap of the tear to the retina and the tear size had increased to 1.5 DD. The patient underwent vitreous surgery similar to large macular hole surgery, with the tear closure repaired using the inverted internal limiting membrane flap technique with 20% SF6 gas tamponade. Although the tear decreased to 0.5 DD after the surgery, complete closure of the tear was not achieved. Conclusion: While cases with horseshoe-like macular tear following trauma and branch retinal vein occlusion have been reported, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported idiopathic case. In the present case, there was expansion of the tear until the patient actually underwent surgery. If vertical vitreous traction indeed plays a role in horseshoe-like macular tears, this will need to be taken into consideration at the time of the vitreous surgery in these types of cases. Keywords

  15. Bilateral macular holes in X-linked retinoschisis: Now the spectrum is wider

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    Manoj Gautam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral occurrence of macular hole in X-linked retinoschisis is an extremely rare event. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT findings revealed that formation of a macular hole is secondary to the retinoschisis process alone. Bilateral macular holes should be added to the spectrum of X-linked retinoschisis variations and the retinoschisis process alone should be accounted for their formation.

  16. Severe Macular Edema in Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis-Related Uveitis

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    Maria Pia Paroli

    2013-01-01

    unilateral macular edema. OCT revealed massive macular thickening (range from 550 μm to 1214 μm. Conclusions. Macular edema appeared in female adolescent patients in eyes with long-dating CAU submitted to cataract surgery. In such patients, in presence of age-related microvascular changes due to the enhancer effect of sex hormones, cataract extraction should be a factor triggering the retinal complication.

  17. Genetics of Immunological and Inflammatory Components in Age-related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Tuo, Jingsheng; Grob, Seanna; Zhang, Kang; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), affecting 30 to 50 million elder individuals worldwide, is a disease affecting the macular retina and choroid that can lead to irreversible central vision loss and blindness. Recent findings support a role for immunologic processes in AMD pathogenesis, including generation of inflammatory related molecules in the Bruch’s membrane, recruitment of macrophages, complement activation, microglial activation and accumulation in the macular lesions. Pro-inflam...

  18. Degeneração macular relacionada à idade: novas perspectivas Age-related macular degeneration: new perspectives

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    Marcio Bittar Nehemy

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A degeneração macular relacionada à idade (DMRI é a principal causa de cegueira legal em indivíduos acima de 50 anos de idade. Embora estudos recentes tenham mostrado que o fator genético é significativo, a patogênese da degeneração macular relacionada à idade permanece obscura, e os fatores de risco não estão ainda completamente estabelecidos. Estudos multicêntricos randomizados, publicados nos últimos anos, demonstraram que uma combinação de vitaminas e minerais é eficaz na redução do risco de desenvolvimento de neovascularização e de progressão para os estágios mais avançados da degeneração macular relacionada à idade. De maneira análoga, a terapia fotodinâmica (PDT e a terapia antiangiogênica também tiveram sua eficácia comprovada no tratamento de membrana neovascular coroideana subfoveal associada à degeneração macular relacionada à idade. Ambas reduzem o risco de perda de visão e, eventualmente, permitem melhora temporária da acuidade visual. Outras modalidades de tratamento, tais como fotocoagulação a laser, remoção cirúrgica da membrana e termoterapia transpupilar (TTT, podem beneficiar apenas um pequeno subgrupo de pacientes. Uma melhor compreensão dos mecanismos fisiopatológicos e dos eventos moleculares nas diversas fases da doença deverão propiciar, em futuro próximo, melhores estratégias para o controle e tratamento da degeneração macular relacionada à idade.Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD is a major source of legal blindness in individuals older than 50 years. Even though recent reports suggest that genetics plays an important role, its pathogenesis remains puzzling and the risk factors for its occurrence are not completely established. Vitamin and mineral supplementation reduced the risk of development of choroidal neovascularization (CNV or progression to the most advanced stages of age-related macular degeneration. Photodynamic therapy (PDT and antiangiogenic therapy

  19. Primary cataract as a key to recognition of myotonic dystrophy type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voermans, N.C.; Erasmus, C.E.; Ockeloen, C.W.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Eggink, C.A.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Primary cataract is often the initial manifestation of the adult-onset type of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), the most common muscular dystrophy in adults. It is caused by a CTG repeat expansion within the DMPK gene, and anticipation may cause earlier onset and more severe symptoms in

  20. Cardiac abnormalities in a follow-up study on carriers of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Westrum, S. M. Schade; Hoogerwaard, E. M.; Dekker, L.; Standaar, T. S.; Bakker, E.; Ippel, P. F.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; Majoor-Krakauer, D. F.; van Essen, A. J.; Leschot, N. J.; Wilde, A. A. M.; de Haan, R. J.; de Visser, M.; van der Kooi, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Cardiac involvement has been reported in carriers of dystrophin mutations giving rise to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). The progress of these abnormalities during long-term follow-up is unknown. We describe the long-term follow-up of dilated cardio

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings of Basal Cell Adenoma in Curschmann-Steinert Myotonic Dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudolph, J.; Berl, J.; Hamm, B.; Klingebiel, R. [Univ. Medicine Berlin, Campus Charite Mitte (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-03-15

    Myotonic dystrophy Curschmann Steinert is a common hereditary disorder that in some cases can be combined with cutaneous tumors, which is an association that is rarely described in the literature. We present the magnetic resonance imaging in the unusual combination of a patient with known myotonic dystrophy and recurrent basal cell tumor.

  2. Warming up Improves Speech Production in Patients with Adult Onset Myotonic Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Swart, B.J.M.; van Engelen, B.G.M.; Maassen, B.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to study whether warming up decreases myotonia (muscle stiffness) during speech production or causes adverse effects due to fatigue or exhaustion caused by intensive speech activity in patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy. Thirty patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy (MD) and ten healthy controls…

  3. Myotonia and flaccid dysarthria in patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, B.J.M. de; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Kerkhof, J.P. van de; Maassen, B.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myotonia and weakness are the most important components of dysarthric speech in myotonic dystrophy. OBJECTIVE: To specify and quantify possible defects in speech execution in patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy. METHODS: Studies on speech production were done on 30 mildly affect

  4. Myotonic dystrophy as a cause of colonic pseudoobstruction: not just another constipated child

    OpenAIRE

    Glaser, Andrea M.; Johnston, Jennifer H; Gleason, Wallace A.; Rhoads, J. Marc

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Muscular dystrophy has been traditionally associated with common gastrointestinal symptoms such as reflux, constipation, and dysphasia. In myotonic dystrophy, there are rare reports of chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIPOS). We herein present a case of CIPOS requiring colectomy and with good results.

  5. Clinical and molecular characterization of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy due to LAMA2 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavassini, Bruno F; Carboni, Nicola; Nielsen, Jørgen E;

    2011-01-01

    In this study we describe the clinical and molecular characteristics of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) due to LAMA2 mutations.......In this study we describe the clinical and molecular characteristics of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) due to LAMA2 mutations....

  6. Novel insights into the molecular pathogenesis of CYP4V2-associated Bietti's retinal dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astuti, G.D.N; Sun, V.; Bauwens, M.; Zobor, D.; Leroy, B.P.; Omar, A.; Jurklies, B.; Lopez, I.; Ren, H.; Yazar, V.; Hamel, C.; Kellner, U.; Wissinger, B.; Kohl, S.; Baere, E. De; Collin, R.W.J.; Koenekoop, R.K.

    2015-01-01

    Bietti's crystalline dystrophy (BCD) is a rare, autosomal recessive retinal degenerative disease associated with mutations in CYP4V2. In this study, we describe the genetic and clinical findings in 19 unrelated BCD patients recruited from five international retinal dystrophy clinics. Patients underw

  7. Clinical Course, Genetic Etiology, and Visual Outcome in Cone and Cone-Rod Dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiadens, Alberta A. H. J.; Phan, T. My Lan; Zekveld-Vroon, Renate C.; Leroy, Bart P.; van den Born, L. Ingeborgh; Hoyng, Carel B.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Roosing, Susanne; Pott, Jan-Willem R.; van Schooneveld, Mary J.; van Moll-Ramirez, Norka; van Genderen, Maria M.; Boon, Camiel J. F.; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.; De Baere, Elfride; Cremers, Frans P. M.; Lotery, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical course, genetic etiology, and visual prognosis in patients with cone dystrophy (CD) and cone-rod dystrophy (CRD). Design: Clinic-based, longitudinal, multicenter study. Participants: Consecutive probands with CD (N = 98), CRD (N = 83), and affected relatives (N =

  8. Clinical course, genetic etiology, and visual outcome in cone and cone-rod dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiadens, A.A.; Phan, T.M.; Zekveld-Vroon, R.C.; Leroy, B.P.; Born, L.I. van den; Hoyng, C.B.; Klaver, C.C.; Writing Committee for the Cone Disorders Study Group, C.; Roosing, S.; Pott, J.W.; Schooneveld, M.J. van; Moll-Ramirez, N. van; Genderen, M.M. van; Boon, C.J.F.; Hollander, A.I. den; Bergen, A.A.; Baere, E. de; Cremers, F.P.; Lotery, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical course, genetic etiology, and visual prognosis in patients with cone dystrophy (CD) and cone-rod dystrophy (CRD). DESIGN: Clinic-based, longitudinal, multicenter study. PARTICIPANTS: Consecutive probands with CD (N = 98), CRD (N = 83), and affected relatives (N =

  9. Clinical genetic aspects of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helderman-van den Enden, Apollonia Theodora Josina Maria

    2012-01-01

    Dystrophinopathies include the well known Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). This thesis is a collection of several clinical and genetic studies on dystrophinopathies with implications for genetic counselling of patients and their families and for future therapy (

  10. Myotonic dystrophy (DM1) and dysphagia: the need for dysphagia management guidelines and an assessment tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LaDonna, K.A.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Venance, S.L.

    2011-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM1) is the most prevalent muscular dystrophy occurring in adulthood. DM1 is a multi-systemic disorder resulting in early-onset cataracts, cardiac rhythm problems, muscle weakness, ptosis, and cognitive and psychiatric manifestations. Dysphagia is one of the most problematic

  11. Best practice guidelines and recommendations on the molecular diagnosis of myotonic dystrophy types 1 and 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamsteeg, E.J.; Kress, W.; Catalli, C.; Hertz, J.M.; Witsch-Baumgartner, M.; Buckley, M.F.; Engelen, B.G. van; Schwartz, M.; Scheffer, H.

    2012-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is an autosomal dominant, multisystem disorder that is characterized by myotonic myopathy. The symptoms and severity of myotonic dystrophy type l (DM1) ranges from severe and congenital forms, which frequently result in death because of respiratory deficiency, through to late-onse

  12. Miyoshi-type distal muscular dystrophy - Clinical spectrum in 24 Dutch patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linssen, WHJP; Notermans, NC; VanderGraaf, Y; Wokke, JHJ; VanDoorn, PA; Howeler, CJ; Busch, HFM; DeJager, AEJ; DeVisser, M

    1997-01-01

    Miyoshi-type distal muscular dystrophy has now been found to be more frequent outside Japan than was previously thought. We studied 24 Dutch patients with Miyoshi-type distal muscular dystrophy and focused on its clinical expression and natural history, muscle CT-scans and muscle biopsy findings. Ou

  13. Meeting the Assistive Technology Needs of Students with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Kathryn Wolff; Mezei, Peter J.; Avant, Mary Jane Thompson

    2009-01-01

    Students with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have a degenerative disease that requires ongoing changes in assistive technology (AT). The AT team needs to be knowledgeable about the disease and its progression in order to meet these students' changing needs in a timely manner. The unique needs of students with Duchenne muscular dystrophy in…

  14. Effect of sildenafil on skeletal and cardiac muscle in Becker muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting, Nanna; Kruuse, Christina; Nyhuus, Bo

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) and Duchenne muscular dystrophy lack neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). nNOS mediates physiological sympatholysis, thus ensuring adequate blood supply to working muscle. In mice lacking dystrophin, restoration of nNOS effects by a phosp...

  15. Quality of life of adult men with Duchenne muscular dystrophy in the Netherlands : Implications for care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pangalila, Robert F.; Van Den Bos, Geertrudis A M; Bartels, Bart; Bergen, Michael P.; Kampelmacher, Mike J.; Stam, Henk J.; Roebroeck, Marij E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess quality of life of adults with Duchenne muscular dystrophy in the Netherlands and to identify domains and major problems influencing quality of life. Design: Cross-sectional. Subjects: Seventy-nine men aged ≥ 20 years with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Methods: The Medical

  16. Different molecular signatures in magnetic resonance imaging-staged facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Tasca (Giorgio); M. Pescatori (Mario); M. Monforte (Mauro); M. Mirabella (Massimiliano); E. Iannaccone (Elisabetta); R. Frusciante (Roberto); T. Cubeddu (Tiziana); F. Laschena (Francesco); P. Ottaviani (Pierfrancesco); E. Ricci (Enzo)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is one of the most common muscular dystrophies and is characterized by a non-conventional genetic mechanism activated by pathogenic D4Z4 repeat contractions. By muscle Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) we observed that T2-short tau

  17. Meeting the Assistive Technology Needs of Students with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Kathryn Wolff; Mezei, Peter J.; Avant, Mary Jane Thompson

    2009-01-01

    Students with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have a degenerative disease that requires ongoing changes in assistive technology (AT). The AT team needs to be knowledgeable about the disease and its progression in order to meet these students' changing needs in a timely manner. The unique needs of students with Duchenne muscular dystrophy in…

  18. [Cystoid macular oedema after fingolimod treatment in multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio-Sánchez, V M; Trujillo-Guzmán, L; Ramoa-Osorio, R

    2014-03-01

    A woman, treated with immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive drugs for multiple sclerosis, developed macular oedema 4 months after oral fingolimod administration. The patient was previously seen by an ophthalmologist, with a normal anterior segment and funduscopic examination. Four months after the treatment she referred to decreased visual acuity in both eyes. The funduscopic and OCT examination now revealed cystoid macular oedema (CME). Attention to visual changes and periodic funduscopic examinations are an important part of monitoring while using fingolimod. In our patient early recognition and discontinuation of fingolimod did not result in resolution of the CME. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Wearable diagnostic system for age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohaghegh, N; Zadeh, E Ghafar; Magierowski, S

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a novel head-mounted point-of-care diagnostic system for detection and continuous monitoring of Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD). This wearable embedded open-source platform enables accurate monitoring of AMD by taking advantage of multiple standard graphical interface techniques such as Amsler Grid, Threshold Amsler Grid, Macular Computerized Psychophysical Test and Preferential Hyperacuity Perimeter (PHP). Here, we describe the proposed multi-Grid or so-called NGRID software and elaborate on the hardware prototype. This prototype includes a commercially available Oculus HMD incorporated with a single board computer. As the first step towards a fully integrated wearable system, this paper successfully proves the functionality of head-mounted graphical interface device ready for a live demonstration. Participants can experience this device and take a 10-minute AMD eye-exam. Furthermore, NGRID has been approved and permitted for an in-hospital clinical trial.

  20. Compact single-channel Raman detector for macular pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; Gellermann, Werner

    2004-07-01

    Raman detection of macular pigments (MP) holds promise as a novel noninvasive technology for the quantification of lutein and zeaxanthin carotenoids, which are thought to prevent or delay the onset of age-related macular degeneration. Using resonant excitation in the visible, we measure the Raman signals that originate from the double-bond stretch vibrations of the p-conjugated carotenoid molecule's carbon backbone. In this paper we describe the construction and performance of a new, compact, and low-cost MP Raman instrument using dielectric, angle-tuned band-pass filters for wavelength selection and single-channel photo-multiplier detection of carotenoid Raman responses. MP concentration measurements are fast and accurate, as seen in experiments with model eyes and living human eyes. The ease and rapidity of Raman MP measurements, the relative simplicity of the instrumentation, the high accuracy of the measurements, and the lack of significant systematic errors should make this technology useful for widespread clinical research.

  1. Fingolimod Associated Bilateral Cystoid Macular Edema—Wait and See?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Refik Pul

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Fingolimod 0.5-mg once-daily is an approved therapy for patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis (MS. Several pivotal and real-world studies have demonstrated that fingolimod is associated with the development of macular edema (ME. Herein, we present a case of a diabetic MS patient who developed severe bilateral ME during fingolimod treatment. By means of this case study we provide a detailed review about fingolimod associated macular edema (FAME, its current incidence with or without diabetes mellitus, and previous therapy attempts and outcomes in MS patients. Intravitreal administration of antibodies raised against vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A has not yet been used in the management of FAME, however, the excellent therapeutic response in our patient may justify the use of anti-VEGF-A agents in combination with cessation of fingolimod to achieve fast resolution of FAME and to prevent visual deficits, particularly in bilateral FAME.

  2. Grid pattern Argon Laser photocoagulation for diabetic diffuse macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karkhane R

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to determine the effect of Grid pattern laser photocoagulation on diabetic diffuse macular edema with assessment of visual outcome. Patients & Methods: The author reviewed the medical records of 84 eyes of 62 patients with diabetic diffuse macular edema treated with Grid pattern green Argon laser photocoagulation in Farabi Eye Hospital between the years 1992-1995, the follow-up period was 16-48 months (average 24.55±6.42, median 28 mounths. Results: Visual acuity was improved in 11.9%; unchanged in 65.4% and worsened in 22.7% of eyes. Conclusion: In assessing long-term visual outcome, Grid laser photocoagulation is an effective modality in maintaining or improving visual acuity.

  3. Vitrectomy for bilateral macular schisis without apparent optic disc anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andonegui, José; Maya, José Ramón; Echeverría, Marta; Alcaine, Araceli

    2016-01-01

    A 78-year-old man complained of bilateral visual acuity loss. Optical coherence tomography examination showed bilateral macular schisis with fluid accumulation in the external retinal layers without vitreous traction. Fundus examination and fluorescein angiography were normal in both eyes. Both eyes were treated by phacoemulsification, intraocular lens implantation, and vitrectomy without laser, gas exchange, or retinal fenestration. Slow and progressive fluid resorption and improvement in VA were observed in both eyes. Macular schisis similar to the one associated with optic disc anomalies is a possibility in patients without apparent disc anomalies. Vitrectomy without laser, gas, or retinal fenestration may be a good therapeutic option even in patients with a PVD preoperatively. PMID:27703873

  4. Localized bi-nasal macular edema in optic chiasmal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro J Lavaque

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 28-year-old healthy male complaining of vision loss in his right eye was discovered to have localized bi-nasal macular edema in the presence of a pituitary adenoma. The presence of a junctional scotoma composed by a central scotoma in the right eye associated with superior temporal quadrantanopia in the fellow eye was seen. The pattern detected in the visual field suggested the presence of an expansive mass at the level of the optic chiasm. Optical coherence tomography findings also revealed subtle macular thickness beyond normal in the superior and nasal quadrants of both maculae. This report illustrates the importance of suspecting a pituitary adenoma in the light of uncharacteristic retinal alterations.

  5. Clinical and histopathological study of primary cutaneous macular amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Razvi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Primary cutaneous amyloidosis often presents with pigmentary dystonias of the skin in the form of asymptomatic reticulate hyper-pigmentation or pruritic lichenoid papular lesions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of primary cutaneous macular amyloidosis and also to find out the possible etiological agents, to correlate their clinical disease with histopathological positivity for amyloid deposition, and to find out the percentage of positive cas-es by special stains. A total of 24 patients attending dermatology out-patient clinic of Princess Esra Hospital, Hyderabad over a pe-riod of 1 year presenting with hyperpigmented skin lesions and clinically diagnosed as macular amyloidosis were taken up for this study.

  6. [Surgical treatment of macular pucker--preliminary report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrocki, J; Pikulski, Z; Dziegielewski, K

    1993-01-01

    The authors presented preliminary results of pars plana vitrectomy applied in 8 eyes with macular pucker. The aim of the surgery was to remove epiretinal membranes and it was achieved in 7 eyes; in one some fragments of the membrane remained. Visual acuity before surgery ranged from 1/50 to 3/50, after the treatment it was improved in 7 cases, in one being the same as before.

  7. Smoking and Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Review and Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velilla, Sara; García-Medina, José Javier; García-Layana, Alfredo; Pons-Vázquez, Sheila; Pinazo-Durán, M. Dolores; Gómez-Ulla, Francisco; Arévalo, J. Fernando; Díaz-Llopis, Manuel; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the main socioeconomical health issues worldwide. AMD has a multifactorial etiology with a variety of risk factors. Smoking is the most important modifiable risk factor for AMD development and progression. The present review summarizes the epidemiological studies evaluating the association between smoking and AMD, the mechanisms through which smoking induces damage to the chorioretinal tissues, and the relevance of advising patients to quit smoking for their visual health. PMID:24368940

  8. The role of epigenetics in age-related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Gemenetzi, M; Lotery, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that epigenetic mechanisms influence gene expression and can explain how interactions between genetics and the environment result in particular phenotypes during development. The extent to which this epigenetic effect contributes to phenotype heritability in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is currently ill defined. However, emerging evidence suggests that epigenetic changes are relevant to AMD and as such provide an exciting new avenue of research fo...

  9. Bilateral macular injury caused by a femtosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Juan-Marcos, L; Cañete-Campos, C; Cruz-González, F; López-Corral, A; Hernández-Galilea, E

    2014-11-01

    We describe the case of a 35-year-old man who arrived in the Emergency Department with bilateral macular injury caused by accidental exposure to an industrial femtosecond laser. Workers operating industrial lasers must protect their eyes properly when handling these devices. Otherwise, retina damage may occur which usually is recoverable. However, sometimes this damage causes permanent visual loss. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Binocular Refraction in Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Skrbek, Matěj

    2013-01-01

    We’ve been finding possible association of central vision damage with binocular vision disorders in our clients suffering from age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), but whose visual acuity still allowed us to examine their binocular vision. Our findings show that there is a significant number of patients with heterophoria in horizontal, as well as vertical direction. The clients rate the vision with prismatic correction as more comfortable, clearer and long-term tolerable. Getting used ...

  11. Vitreomacular traction and age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green-Simms, Amy E; Bakri, Sophie J

    2011-05-01

    The interaction between the vitreous and the internal limiting membrane of the retina is important in the pathoetiology of numerous ocular disease processes. Recent studies have focused on the vitreo-retinal interface in the context of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), linking vitreo-retinal adhesion to exudative AMD in particular. This review summarizes our knowledge of vitreous anatomy and recent investigations regarding vitreomacular adhesion and AMD.

  12. Pinpointing the Earliest Defects in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Magnusson, Kristinn P; Shan Duan; Haraldur Sigurdsson; Hjorvar Petursson; Zhenglin Yang; Yu Zhao; Bernstein, Paul S.; Jian Ge; Fridbert Jonasson; Einar Stefansson; Gudleif Helgadottir; Norman A Zabriskie; Thorlakur Jonsson; Asgeir Björnsson; Theodora Thorlacius

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment in the developed world. The two forms of advanced AMD, geographic atrophy and neovascular AMD, represent different pathological processes in the macula that lead to loss of central vision. Soft drusen, characterized by deposits in the macula without visual loss, are considered to be a precursor of advanced AMD. Recently, it has been proposed that a common missense variant, Y402H, in t...

  13. Stereotactic radiotherapy in neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Ranjbar, Mahdy; Kurz, Maximilian; Holzhey, Annekatrin; Melchert, Corinna; Rades, Dirk; Grisanti, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) is a new approach to treat neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). The INTREPID trial suggested that SRT could reduce the frequency of regular intravitreal injections (IVIs) with antivascular endothelial growth factor drugs, which are necessary to control disease activity. However, the efficacy of SRT in nAMD and resulting morphological changes have not been validated under real-life circumstances, an issue, which we would like to address ...

  14. The Burden of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Jordana K. Schmier; Mechelle L. Jones; Halpern, Michael T.

    2006-01-01

    As age-related macular degeneration (AMD) becomes more prevalent as a result of longer life expectancy and the number of elderly people worldwide, it will become increasingly important to understand its potential health and economic impact for appropriate healthcare planning. This review identified published literature on costs and resource use associated with AMD. Despite the increasing prevalence of AMD, the worldwide burden of illness is unknown. Several studies of direct medical costs, bo...

  15. Updates in the Management of Diabetic Macular Edema

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher Mathew; Anastasia Yunirakasiwi; Srinivasan Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease which has multiple effects on different end-organs, including the retina. In this paper, we discuss updates on diabetic macular edema (DME) and the management options. The underlying pathology of DME is the leakage of exudates from retinal microaneurysms, which trigger subsequent inflammatory reactions. Both clinical and imaging techniques are useful in diagnosing, classifying, and gauging the severity of DME. We performed a comprehensive literature sear...

  16. An Immunologic Study on Age-related Macular Degeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    Forty-one patients with age-related macular degeneration(AMD) were detected for serum autoantibodies against normal humanretinal protein by means of Western immunoblot analysis.Twenty-sevenout of the 41 patients showed positive response,with a rate of 66 percent.The positive rate of antiretinal antibody in the AMD patients wassignificantly higher than that in normal controls (18%) and in patients withother retinal diseases (24%) (p<0.0005).These antiretinal antibodies fromthe AMD patients partly reacted...

  17. Geriatric vision loss due to cataracts, macular degeneration, and glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenbaum, Joseph W

    2012-01-01

    The major causes of impaired vision in the elderly population of the United States are cataracts, macular degeneration, and open-angle glaucoma. Cataracts and macular degeneration usually reduce central vision, especially reading and near activities, whereas chronic glaucoma characteristically attacks peripheral vision in a silent way, impacting balance, walking, and driving. Untreated, these visual problems lead to issues with regard to taking medications, keeping track of finances and personal information, walking, watching television, and attending the theater, and often create social isolation. Thus, visually impaired individuals enter nursing homes 3 years earlier, have twice the risk of falling, and have 4× the risk of hip fracture. Consequently, many elderly with low vision exercise greater demands on community services. With the prospect of little improvement and sustained visual loss, in the face of poor tolerance of low-vision services and not accepting magnification as the only way to read, clinical depression is common. In many instances, however, early and accurate diagnosis can result in timely treatment and can preserve quality of life. This review will look at current diagnostic and therapeutic considerations. Currently, about 20.5 million people in the United States have cataracts. The number will reach 30 million by 2020. About 1.75 million Americans currently have some form of macular degeneration, and the number is estimated to increase to 2.95 million in 2020. Approximately 2.2 million Americans have glaucoma, and by 2020 that number is estimated to be close to 3.4 million people. It is projected that by 2030 there will be 72.1 million seniors. With some overlap of the above 3 groups conservatively estimated (if you add the 2030 cataract group to the macular degeneration and glaucoma groups), then about 1 in 2 senior individuals by 2030 may have some significant ocular disease, which could account for about 50% of the healthcare budget for the

  18. Present and Possible Therapies for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Khan; Ketan Agarwal; Mohamed Loutfi; Ahmed Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of blindness in the elderly population worldwide and is defined as a chronic, progressive disorder characterized by changes occurring within the macula reflective of the ageing process. At present, the prevalence of AMD is currently rising and is estimated to increase by a third by 2020. Although our understanding of the several components underpinning the pathogenesis of this condition has increased significantly, the treatment ...

  19. Smoking and Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Review and Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Velilla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is one of the main socioeconomical health issues worldwide. AMD has a multifactorial etiology with a variety of risk factors. Smoking is the most important modifiable risk factor for AMD development and progression. The present review summarizes the epidemiological studies evaluating the association between smoking and AMD, the mechanisms through which smoking induces damage to the chorioretinal tissues, and the relevance of advising patients to quit smoking for their visual health.

  20. Early detection of age related macular degeneration: current status

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, Roy; Loewenstein, Anat

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of choroidal neovascularization (CNV), a main cause of severe vision loss in age related macular degeneration (AMD), is crucial in order to preserve vision and the quality of life of patients. This review summarizes current literature on the subject of early detection of CNV, both in the clinic setting and mainly in the patient’s home. New technologies are evolving to allow for earlier detection and thus vision preservation in AMD patients.