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Sample records for macroscopic fe model

  1. Macroscopic models for traffic safety.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oppe, S.

    1988-01-01

    Recently there has been an increased interest in the application of macroscopic models for the description of developments in traffic safety. A discussion was started on the causes of the sudden decrease in the number of fatal and injury accidents after 1974. Before that time these numbers had

  2. A Review on Macroscopic Pedestrian Flow Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kormanová

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews several various approaches to macroscopic pedestrian modelling. It describes hydrodynamic models based on similarity of pedestrian flow with fluids and gases; first-order flow models that use fundamental diagrams and conservation equation; and a model similar to LWR vehicular traffic model, which allows non-classical shocks. At the end of the paper there is stated a comparison of described models, intended to find appropriate macroscopic model to eventually be a part of a hybrid model. The future work of the author is outlined.

  3. Microscopic and macroscopic models for pedestrian crowds

    OpenAIRE

    Makmul, Juntima

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with microscopic and macroscopic models for pedes- trian crowds. In the first chapter, we consider pedestrians exit choices and model human behaviour in an evacuation process. Two microscopic models, discrete and continuous, are studied in this chapter. The former is a cellular automaton model and the latter is a social force model. Different numerical test cases are investigated and their results are compared. In chapter 2, a hierarchy of models for...

  4. Thermomechanical macroscopic model of shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, A.E.; Sakharov, V.Yu.

    2003-01-01

    The phenomenological macroscopic model of the mechanical behaviour of the titanium nickelide-type shape memory alloys is proposed. The model contains as a parameter the average phase shear deformation accompanying the martensite formation. It makes i possible to describe correctly a number of functional properties of the shape memory alloys, in particular, the pseudoelasticity ferroplasticity, plasticity transformation and shape memory effects in the stressed and unstressed samples [ru

  5. Macroscopic balance model for wave rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Gerard E.

    1996-01-01

    A mathematical model for multi-port wave rotors is described. The wave processes that effect energy exchange within the rotor passage are modeled using one-dimensional gas dynamics. Macroscopic mass and energy balances relate volume-averaged thermodynamic properties in the rotor passage control volume to the mass, momentum, and energy fluxes at the ports. Loss models account for entropy production in boundary layers and in separating flows caused by blade-blockage, incidence, and gradual opening and closing of rotor passages. The mathematical model provides a basis for predicting design-point wave rotor performance, port timing, and machine size. Model predictions are evaluated through comparisons with CFD calculations and three-port wave rotor experimental data. A four-port wave rotor design example is provided to demonstrate model applicability. The modeling approach is amenable to wave rotor optimization studies and rapid assessment of the trade-offs associated with integrating wave rotors into gas turbine engine systems.

  6. Models for universal reduction of macroscopic quantum fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diosi, L.

    1988-10-01

    If quantum mechanics is universal, then macroscopic bodies would, in principle, possess macroscopic quantum fluctuations (MQF) in their positions, orientations, densities etc. Such MQF, however, are not observed in nature. The hypothesis is adopted that the absence of MQF is due to a certain universal mechanism. Gravitational measures were applied for reducing MQF of the mass density. This model leads to classical trajectories in the macroscopic limit of translational motion. For massive objects, unwanted macroscopic superpositions of quantum states will be destroyed within short times. (R.P.) 34 refs

  7. Single-Phase Bundle Flows Including Macroscopic Turbulence Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Jun; Yoon, Han Young [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Seok Jong; Cho, Hyoung Kyu [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    To deal with various thermal hydraulic phenomena due to rapid change of fluid properties when an accident happens, securing mechanistic approaches as much as possible may reduce the uncertainty arising from improper applications of the experimental models. In this study, the turbulence mixing model, which is well defined in the subchannel analysis code such as VIPRE, COBRA, and MATRA by experiments, is replaced by a macroscopic k-e turbulence model, which represents the aspect of mathematical derivation. The performance of CUPID with macroscopic turbulence model is validated against several bundle experiments: CNEN 4x4 and PNL 7x7 rod bundle tests. In this study, the macroscopic k-e model has been validated for the application to subchannel analysis. It has been implemented in the CUPID code and validated against CNEN 4x4 and PNL 7x7 rod bundle tests. The results showed that the macroscopic k-e turbulence model can estimate the experiments properly.

  8. Physically-based modeling of the cyclic macroscopic behaviour of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauzay, M.; Evrard, P.; Steckmeyer, A.; Ferrie, E.

    2010-01-01

    Grain size seems to have only a minor influence on the cyclic strain strain curves (CSSCs) of metallic polycrystals of medium to high stacking fault energy (SFE). That is why many authors tried to deduce the macroscopic CSSCs curves from the single crystals ones. Either crystals oriented for single slip or crystals oriented for multiple slip could be considered. In addition, a scale transition law should be used (from the grain scale to the macroscopic scale). Authors generally used either the Sachs rule (homogeneous single slip) or the Taylor one (homogeneous plastic strain, multiple slip). But the predicted macroscopic CSSCs do not generally agree with the experimental data for metals and alloys, presenting various SFE values. In order to avoid the choice of a particular scale transition rule, many finite element (FE) computations have been carried out using meshes of polycrystals including more than one hundred grains without texture. This allows the study of the influence of the crystalline constitutive laws on the macroscopic CSSCs. Activation of a secondary slip system in grains oriented for single slip is either allowed or hindered (slip planarity), which affects strongly the macroscopic CSSCs. The more planar the slip, the higher the predicted macroscopic stress amplitudes. If grains oriented for single slip obey slip planarity and two crystalline CSSCs are used (one for single slip grains and one for multiple slip grains), then the predicted macroscopic CSSCs agree well with experimental data provided the SFE is not too low (316L, copper, nickel, aluminium). Finally, the incremental self-consistent Hill-Hutchinson homogenization model is used for predicting CSS curves and partially validated with respect to the curves computed by the FE method. (authors)

  9. Microscopic to macroscopic depletion model development for FORMOSA-P

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, J.M.; Turinsky, P.J.; Sarsour, H.N.

    1996-01-01

    Microscopic depletion has been gaining popularity with regard to employment in reactor core nodal calculations, mainly attributed to the superiority of microscopic depletion in treating spectral history effects during depletion. Another trend is the employment of loading pattern optimization computer codes in support of reload core design. Use of such optimization codes has significantly reduced design efforts to optimize reload core loading patterns associated with increasingly complicated lattice designs. A microscopic depletion model has been developed for the FORMOSA-P pressurized water reactor (PWR) loading pattern optimization code. This was done for both fidelity improvements and to make FORMOSA-P compatible with microscopic-based nuclear design methods. Needless to say, microscopic depletion requires more computational effort compared with macroscopic depletion. This implies that microscopic depletion may be computationally restrictive if employed during the loading pattern optimization calculation because many loading patterns are examined during the course of an optimization search. Therefore, the microscopic depletion model developed here uses combined models of microscopic and macroscopic depletion. This is done by first performing microscopic depletions for a subset of possible loading patterns from which 'collapsed' macroscopic cross sections are obtained. The collapsed macroscopic cross sections inherently incorporate spectral history effects. Subsequently, the optimization calculations are done using the collapsed macroscopic cross sections. Using this approach allows maintenance of microscopic depletion level accuracy without substantial additional computing resources

  10. Magnetic properties and macroscopic heterogeneity of FeCoNbB Hitperms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butvin, Pavol [Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, 845 11 Bratislava (Slovakia)], E-mail: fyzipbut@savba.sk; Butvinova, Beata [Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, 845 11 Bratislava (Slovakia); Sitek, Jozef; Degmova, Jarmila [Department of Nuclear Physics and Technology, FEI, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Vlasak, Gabriel; Svec, Peter; Janickovic, Dusan [Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, 845 11 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2008-03-15

    Nanocrystalline ribbons of Fe{sub 81-x}Co{sub x}Nb{sub 7}B{sub 12} (where x ranges from 0 to 40.5 at%) Hitperm alloys have been investigated as to their basic magnetic properties and the influence of the macroscopic heterogeneity. Different crystalline share at surfaces compared with the volume average is observed by conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) and Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS), respectively. This marks the presence of macroscopic heterogeneity in these Hitperms. The heterogeneity is generally more significant in Ar-annealed samples than in the vacuum-annealed ones. The characteristic slant hysteresis loops (hard-ribbon-axis) are seen as a rule with few exceptions. An inspection of hysteresis loop response of resin potted samples shows that the surfaces bi-axially squeeze the ribbon interior in heterogeneous Hitperms when the ribbons cool down after annealing. Certain compositions show macroscopic viscous flow prior to crystallization so the heterogeneity gets another chance to induce anisotropy during annealing. The induction attains 1.5 T but saturates poorly due to the heterogeneity and the ensuing anisotropy. Moreover the heterogeneity appears to hamper the crystallization within the ribbon interior. Unlike Finemets, the density of these Hitperms show no pronounced trend with annealing.

  11. Magnetic properties and macroscopic heterogeneity of FeCoNbB Hitperms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butvin, Pavol; Butvinová, Beata; Sitek, Jozef; Degmová, Jarmila; Vlasák, Gabriel; Švec, Peter; Janičkovič, Dušan

    Nanocrystalline ribbons of Fe 81-xCo xNb 7B 12 (where x ranges from 0 to 40.5 at%) Hitperm alloys have been investigated as to their basic magnetic properties and the influence of the macroscopic heterogeneity. Different crystalline share at surfaces compared with the volume average is observed by conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) and Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS), respectively. This marks the presence of macroscopic heterogeneity in these Hitperms. The heterogeneity is generally more significant in Ar-annealed samples than in the vacuum-annealed ones. The characteristic slant hysteresis loops (hard-ribbon-axis) are seen as a rule with few exceptions. An inspection of hysteresis loop response of resin potted samples shows that the surfaces bi-axially squeeze the ribbon interior in heterogeneous Hitperms when the ribbons cool down after annealing. Certain compositions show macroscopic viscous flow prior to crystallization so the heterogeneity gets another chance to induce anisotropy during annealing. The induction attains 1.5 T but saturates poorly due to the heterogeneity and the ensuing anisotropy. Moreover the heterogeneity appears to hamper the crystallization within the ribbon interior. Unlike Finemets, the density of these Hitperms show no pronounced trend with annealing.

  12. Macroscopic properties of model disordered materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knackstedt, M.A.; Roberts, A.P.

    1996-01-01

    Disordered materials are ubiquitous in nature and in industry. Soils, sedimentary rocks, wood, bone, polymer composites, foams, catalysts, gels, concretes and ceramics have properties that depend on material structure. Present techniques for predicting properties are limited by the theoretical and computational difficulty of incorporating a realistic description of material structure. A general model for microstructure was recently proposed by Berk [Berk, Phys.Rev.A, 44 5069 (1991)]. The model is based on level cuts of a Gaussian random field with arbitrary spectral density. The freedom in specifying the parameters of the model allows the modeling of physical materials with diverse morphological characteristics. We have shown that the model qualitatively accounts for the principal features of a wider variety of disordered materials including geologic media, membranes, polymer blends, ceramics and foams. Correlation functions are derived for the model microstructure. From this characterisation we derive mechanical and conductive properties of the materials. Excellent agreement with experimentally measured properties of disordered solids is obtained. The agreement provides a strong hint that it is now possible to correlate effective physical properties of porous solids to microstructure. Simple extensions to modelling properties of non-porous multicomponent blends; metal alloys, ceramics, metal/matrix and polymer composites are also discussed

  13. Macroscopic modelization of the cloud elasticity*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etancelin J.-M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to achieve its promise of providing information technologies (IT on demand, cloud computing needs to rely on a mathematical model capable of directing IT on and off according to a demand pattern to provide a true elasticity. This article provides a first method to reach this goal using a “fluid type” partial differential equations model. On the one hand it examines the question of service time optimization for the simultaneous satisfaction of the cloud consumer and provider. On the other hand it tries to model a way to deliver resources according to the real time capacity of the cloud that depends on parameters such as burst requests and application timeouts. All these questions are illustrated via an implicit finite volume scheme.

  14. Microscopic to Macroscopic Dynamical Models of Sociality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis Salas, Citlali; Woolley, Thomas; Pearce, Eiluned; Dunbar, Robin; Maini, Philip; Social; Evolutionary Neuroscience Research Group (Senrg) Collaboration

    To help them survive, social animals, such as humans, need to share knowledge and responsibilities with other members of the species. The larger their social network, the bigger the pool of knowledge available to them. Since time is a limited resource, a way of optimising its use is meeting amongst individuals whilst fulfilling other necessities. In this sense it is useful to know how many, and how often, early humans could meet during a given period of time whilst performing other necessary tasks, such as food gathering. Using a simplified model of these dynamics, which comprehend encounter and memory, we aim at producing a lower-bound to the number of meetings hunter-gatherers could have during a year. We compare the stochastic agent-based model to its mean-field approximation and explore some of the features necessary for the difference between low population dynamics and its continuum limit. We observe an emergent property that could have an inference in the layered structure seen in each person's social organisation. This could give some insight into hunter-gatherer's lives and the development of the social layered structure we have today. With support from the Mexican Council for Science and Technology (CONACyT), the Public Education Secretariat (SEP), and the Mexican National Autonomous University's Foundation (Fundacion UNAM).

  15. Analysis and Enhancements of a Prolific Macroscopic Model of Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Fietkiewicz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Macroscopic models of epilepsy can deliver surprisingly realistic EEG simulations. In the present study, a prolific series of models is evaluated with regard to theoretical and computational concerns, and enhancements are developed. Specifically, we analyze three aspects of the models: (1 Using dynamical systems analysis, we demonstrate and explain the presence of direct current potentials in the simulated EEG that were previously undocumented. (2 We explain how the system was not ideally formulated for numerical integration of stochastic differential equations. A reformulated system is developed to support proper methodology. (3 We explain an unreported contradiction in the published model specification regarding the use of a mathematical reduction method. We then use the method to reduce the number of equations and further improve the computational efficiency. The intent of our critique is to enhance the evolution of macroscopic modeling of epilepsy and assist others who wish to explore this exciting class of models further.

  16. Wave speeds in the macroscopic extended model for ultrarelativistic gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghero, F., E-mail: borghero@unica.it [Dip. Matematica e Informatica, Università di Cagliari, Via Ospedale 72, 09124 Cagliari (Italy); Demontis, F., E-mail: fdemontis@unica.it [Dip. Matematica, Università di Cagliari, Viale Merello 92, 09123 Cagliari (Italy); Pennisi, S., E-mail: spennisi@unica.it [Dip. Matematica, Università di Cagliari, Via Ospedale 72, 09124 Cagliari (Italy)

    2013-11-15

    Equations determining wave speeds for a model of ultrarelativistic gases are investigated. This model is already present in literature; it deals with an arbitrary number of moments and it was proposed in the context of exact macroscopic approaches in Extended Thermodynamics. We find these results: the whole system for the determination of the wave speeds can be divided into independent subsystems which are expressed by linear combinations, through scalar coefficients, of tensors all of the same order; some wave speeds, but not all of them, are expressed by square roots of rational numbers; finally, we prove that these wave speeds for the macroscopic model are the same of those furnished by the kinetic model.

  17. Macroscopic balance equations for two-phase flow models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, E.D.

    1979-01-01

    The macroscopic, or overall, balance equations of mass, momentum, and energy are derived for a two-fluid model of two-phase flows in complex geometries. These equations provide a base for investigating methods of incorporating improved analysis methods into computer programs, such as RETRAN, which are used for transient and steady-state thermal-hydraulic analyses of nuclear steam supply systems. The equations are derived in a very general manner so that three-dimensional, compressible flows can be analysed. The equations obtained supplement the various partial differential equation two-fluid models of two-phase flow which have recently appeared in the literature. The primary objective of the investigation is the macroscopic balance equations. (Auth.)

  18. A macroscopic model for magnetic shape-memory single crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bessoud, A. L.; Kružík, Martin; Stefanelli, U.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 2 (2013), s. 343-359 ISSN 0044-2275 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100750802; GA ČR GAP201/10/0357 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : magnetostriction * evolution Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.214, year: 2013 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2012/MTR/kruzik-a macroscopic model for magnetic shape- memory single crystals.pdf

  19. The mirrors model: macroscopic diffusion without noise or chaos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiffaudel, Yann; Lefevere, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    Before stating our main result, we first clarify through classical examples the status of the laws of macroscopic physics as laws of large numbers. We next consider the mirrors model in a finite d-dimensional domain and connected to particles reservoirs at fixed chemical potentials. The dynamics is purely deterministic and non-ergodic but takes place in a random environment. We study the macroscopic current of particles in the stationary regime. We show first that when the size of the system goes to infinity, the behaviour of the stationary current of particles is governed by the proportion of orbits crossing the system. This allows us to formulate a necessary and sufficient condition on the distribution of the set of orbits that ensures the validity of Fick’s law. Using this approach, we show that Fick’s law relating the stationary macroscopic current of particles to the concentration difference holds in three dimensions and above. The negative correlations between crossing orbits play a key role in the argument. (letter)

  20. Neutron irradiation and high temperature effects on amorphous Fe-based nano-coatings on steel - A macroscopic assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simos, N.; Zhong, Z.; Dooryhee, E.; Ghose, S.; Gill, S.; Camino, F.; Şavklıyıldız, İ.; Akdoğan, E. K.

    2017-06-01

    The study revealed that loss of ductility in an amorphous Fe-alloy coating on a steel substrate composite structure was essentially prevented from occurring, following radiation with modest neutron doses of ∼2 × 1018 n/cm2. At the higher neutron dose of ∼2 × 1019, macroscopic stress-strain analysis showed that the amorphous Fe-alloy nanostructured coating, while still amorphous, experienced radiation-induced embrittlement, no longer offering protection against ductility loss in the coating-substrate composite structure. Neutron irradiation in a corrosive environment revealed exemplary oxidation/corrosion resistance of the amorphous Fe-alloy coating, which is attributed to the formation of the Fe2B phase in the coating. To establish the impact of elevated temperatures on the amorphous-to-crystalline transition in the amorphous Fe-alloy, electron microscopy was carried out which confirmed the radiation-induced suppression of crystallization in the amorphous Fe-alloy nanostructured coating.

  1. Neutron irradiation and high temperature effects on amorphous Fe-based nano-coatings on steel – A macroscopic assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simos, N.; Zhong, Z.; Dooryhee, E.; Ghose, S.; Gill, S.

    2017-01-01

    Here, this study revealed that loss of ductility in an amorphous Fe-alloy coating on a steel substrate composite structure was essentially prevented from occurring, following radiation with modest neutron doses of ~2 x 10 18 n/cm 2 . At the higher neutron dose of ~2 x 10 19 , macroscopic stress-strain analysis showed that the amorphous Fe-alloy nanostructured coating, while still amorphous, experienced radiation-induced embrittlement, no longer offering protection against ductility loss in the coating-substrate composite structure. Neutron irradiation in a corrosive environment revealed exemplary oxidation/corrosion resistance of the amorphous Fe-alloy coating, which is attributed to the formation of the Fe 2 B phase in the coating. To establish the impact of elevated temperatures on the amorphous-to-crystalline transition in the amorphous Fe-alloy, electron microscopy was carried out which confirmed the radiation-induced suppression of crystallization in the amorphous Fe-alloy nanostructured coating.

  2. Finite element simulation of nanoindentation tests using a macroscopic computational model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khelifa, Mourad; Fierro, Vanessa; Celzard, Alain

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a numerical procedure to simulate nanoindentation tests using a macroscopic computational model. Both theoretical and numerical aspects of the proposed methodology, based on the coupling of isotropic elasticity and anisotropic plasticity described with the quadratic criterion of Hill are presented to model this behaviour. The anisotropic plastic behaviour accounts for the mixed nonlinear hardening (isotropic and kinematic) under large plastic deformation. Nanoindentation tests were simulated to analyse the nonlinear mechanical behaviour of aluminium alloy. The predicted results of the finite element (FE) modelling are in good agreement with the experimental data, thereby confirming the accuracy level of the suggested FE method of analysis. The effects of some technological and mechanical parameters known to have an influence during the nanoindentation tests were also investigated.

  3. Macroscopic Modeling of Transport Phenomena in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian

    An increasing need for energy efficiency and high energy density has sparked a growing interest in direct methanol fuel cells for portable power applications. This type of fuel cell directly generates electricity from a fuel mixture consisting of methanol and water. Although this technology...... surpasses batteries in important areas, fundamental research is still required to improve durability and performance. Particularly the transport of methanol and water within the cell structure is difficult to study in-situ. A demand therefore exist for the fundamental development of mathematical models...... for studying their transport. In this PhD dissertation the macroscopic transport phenomena governing direct methanol fuel cell operation are analyzed, discussed and modeled using the two-fluid approach in the computational fluid dynamics framework of CFX 14. The overall objective of this work is to extend...

  4. Modeling Macroscopic Shape Distortions during Sintering of Multi-layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tadesse Molla, Tesfaye

    as to help achieve defect free multi-layer components. The initial thickness ratio between the layers making the multi-layer has also significant effect on the extent of camber evolution depending on the material systems. During sintering of tubular bi-layer structures, tangential (hoop) stresses are very...... large compared to radial stresses. The maximum value of hoop stress, which can generate processing defects such as cracks and coating peel-offs, occurs at the beginning of the sintering cycle. Unlike most of the models defining material properties based on porosity and grain size only, the multi...... (firing). However, unintended features like shape instabilities of samples, cracks or delamination of layers may arise during sintering of multi-layer composites. Among these defects, macroscopic shape distortions in the samples can cause problems in the assembly or performance of the final component...

  5. Modeling diffusion-governed solidification of ternary alloys - Part 2: Macroscopic transport phenomena and macrosegregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, M; Li, J; Ludwig, A; Kharicha, A

    2014-09-01

    Part 1 of this two-part investigation presented a multiphase solidification model incorporating the finite diffusion kinetics and ternary phase diagram with the macroscopic transport phenomena (Wu et al., 2013). In Part 2, the importance of proper treatment of the finite diffusion kinetics in the calculation of macrosegregation is addressed. Calculations for a two-dimensional (2D) square casting (50 × 50 mm 2 ) of Fe-0.45 wt.%C-1.06 wt.%Mn considering thermo-solutal convection and crystal sedimentation are performed. The modeling result indicates that the infinite liquid mixing kinetics as assumed by classical models (e.g., the Gulliver-Scheil or lever rule), which cannot properly consider the solute enrichment of the interdendritic or inter-granular melt at the early stage of solidification, might lead to an erroneous estimation of the macrosegregation. To confirm this statement, further theoretical and experimental evaluations are desired. The pattern and intensity of the flow and crystal sedimentation are dependent on the crystal morphologies (columnar or equiaxed); hence, the potential error of the calculated macrosegregation caused by the assumed growth kinetics depends on the crystal morphology. Finally, an illustrative simulation of an engineering 2.45-ton steel ingot is performed, and the results are compared with experimental results. This example demonstrates the model applicability for engineering castings regarding both the calculation efficiency and functionality.

  6. Magnetic behavior of PdFeMn on mesoscopic and macroscopic length scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, V. E-mail: volker.wagner@ptb.de; Ahlers, H.; Axelrod, L.; Gordeev, G.; Zabenkin, V

    2001-05-01

    By 3D neutron depolarization (ND) the magnetization and the domain structure were observed for FC and ZFC samples of (Pd{sub 0.9965}Fe{sub 0.0035}){sub 1-x} Mn{sub x} with x=0.05, showing both an FM and a spin-glass-like transition, and x=0 being ferromagnetic. The evolution of the domain structure along the magnetization/demagnetization process - as seen by depolarization - is strongly asymmetric, with maximum change in the domain structure only after magnetization reversal (typical domain size {delta}{approx}3 {mu}m in the virgin state). Near T{sub c}, the alloy approached the behavior of FM PdFe, showing a symmetric change of domain structure on the applied field.

  7. Macroscopic diffusion models for precipitation in crystalline gallium arsenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimmerle, Sven-Joachim Wolfgang

    2009-09-21

    Based on a thermodynamically consistent model for precipitation in gallium arsenide crystals including surface tension and bulk stresses by Dreyer and Duderstadt, we propose two different mathematical models to describe the size evolution of liquid droplets in a crystalline solid. The first model treats the diffusion-controlled regime of interface motion, while the second model is concerned with the interface-controlled regime of interface motion. Our models take care of conservation of mass and substance. These models generalise the well-known Mullins- Sekerka model for Ostwald ripening. We concentrate on arsenic-rich liquid spherical droplets in a gallium arsenide crystal. Droplets can shrink or grow with time but the centres of droplets remain fixed. The liquid is assumed to be homogeneous in space. Due to different scales for typical distances between droplets and typical radii of liquid droplets we can derive formally so-called mean field models. For a model in the diffusion-controlled regime we prove this limit by homogenisation techniques under plausible assumptions. These mean field models generalise the Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner model, which can be derived from the Mullins-Sekerka model rigorously, and is well understood. Mean field models capture the main properties of our system and are well adapted for numerics and further analysis. We determine possible equilibria and discuss their stability. Numerical evidence suggests in which case which one of the two regimes might be appropriate to the experimental situation. (orig.)

  8. Nematic elastomers: from a microscopic model to macroscopic elasticity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xiangjun; Pfahl, Stephan; Mukhopadhyay, Swagatam; Goldbart, Paul M; Zippelius, Annette

    2008-05-01

    A Landau theory is constructed for the gelation transition in cross-linked polymer systems possessing spontaneous nematic ordering, based on symmetry principles and the concept of an order parameter for the amorphous solid state. This theory is substantiated with help of a simple microscopic model of cross-linked dimers. Minimization of the Landau free energy in the presence of nematic order yields the neoclassical theory of the elasticity of nematic elastomers and, in the isotropic limit, the classical theory of isotropic elasticity. These phenomenological theories of elasticity are thereby derived from a microscopic model, and it is furthermore demonstrated that they are universal mean-field descriptions of the elasticity for all chemical gels and vulcanized media.

  9. From microscopic taxation and redistribution models to macroscopic income distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertotti, Maria Letizia; Modanese, Giovanni

    2011-10-01

    We present here a general framework, expressed by a system of nonlinear differential equations, suitable for the modeling of taxation and redistribution in a closed society. This framework allows one to describe the evolution of income distribution over the population and to explain the emergence of collective features based on knowledge of the individual interactions. By making different choices of the framework parameters, we construct different models, whose long-time behavior is then investigated. Asymptotic stationary distributions are found, which enjoy similar properties as those observed in empirical distributions. In particular, they exhibit power law tails of Pareto type and their Lorenz curves and Gini indices are consistent with some real world ones.

  10. General multi-group macroscopic modeling for thermo-chemical non-equilibrium gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yen; Panesi, Marco; Sahai, Amal; Vinokur, Marcel

    2015-04-01

    This paper opens a new door to macroscopic modeling for thermal and chemical non-equilibrium. In a game-changing approach, we discard conventional theories and practices stemming from the separation of internal energy modes and the Landau-Teller relaxation equation. Instead, we solve the fundamental microscopic equations in their moment forms but seek only optimum representations for the microscopic state distribution function that provides converged and time accurate solutions for certain macroscopic quantities at all times. The modeling makes no ad hoc assumptions or simplifications at the microscopic level and includes all possible collisional and radiative processes; it therefore retains all non-equilibrium fluid physics. We formulate the thermal and chemical non-equilibrium macroscopic equations and rate coefficients in a coupled and unified fashion for gases undergoing completely general transitions. All collisional partners can have internal structures and can change their internal energy states after transitions. The model is based on the reconstruction of the state distribution function. The internal energy space is subdivided into multiple groups in order to better describe non-equilibrium state distributions. The logarithm of the distribution function in each group is expressed as a power series in internal energy based on the maximum entropy principle. The method of weighted residuals is applied to the microscopic equations to obtain macroscopic moment equations and rate coefficients succinctly to any order. The model's accuracy depends only on the assumed expression of the state distribution function and the number of groups used and can be self-checked for accuracy and convergence. We show that the macroscopic internal energy transfer, similar to mass and momentum transfers, occurs through nonlinear collisional processes and is not a simple relaxation process described by, e.g., the Landau-Teller equation. Unlike the classical vibrational energy

  11. General multi-group macroscopic modeling for thermo-chemical non-equilibrium gas mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yen; Panesi, Marco; Sahai, Amal; Vinokur, Marcel

    2015-04-07

    This paper opens a new door to macroscopic modeling for thermal and chemical non-equilibrium. In a game-changing approach, we discard conventional theories and practices stemming from the separation of internal energy modes and the Landau-Teller relaxation equation. Instead, we solve the fundamental microscopic equations in their moment forms but seek only optimum representations for the microscopic state distribution function that provides converged and time accurate solutions for certain macroscopic quantities at all times. The modeling makes no ad hoc assumptions or simplifications at the microscopic level and includes all possible collisional and radiative processes; it therefore retains all non-equilibrium fluid physics. We formulate the thermal and chemical non-equilibrium macroscopic equations and rate coefficients in a coupled and unified fashion for gases undergoing completely general transitions. All collisional partners can have internal structures and can change their internal energy states after transitions. The model is based on the reconstruction of the state distribution function. The internal energy space is subdivided into multiple groups in order to better describe non-equilibrium state distributions. The logarithm of the distribution function in each group is expressed as a power series in internal energy based on the maximum entropy principle. The method of weighted residuals is applied to the microscopic equations to obtain macroscopic moment equations and rate coefficients succinctly to any order. The model's accuracy depends only on the assumed expression of the state distribution function and the number of groups used and can be self-checked for accuracy and convergence. We show that the macroscopic internal energy transfer, similar to mass and momentum transfers, occurs through nonlinear collisional processes and is not a simple relaxation process described by, e.g., the Landau-Teller equation. Unlike the classical vibrational energy

  12. Macroscopic modeling for heat and water vapor transfer in dry snow by homogenization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calonne, Neige; Geindreau, Christian; Flin, Frédéric

    2014-11-26

    Dry snow metamorphism, involved in several topics related to cryospheric sciences, is mainly linked to heat and water vapor transfers through snow including sublimation and deposition at the ice-pore interface. In this paper, the macroscopic equivalent modeling of heat and water vapor transfers through a snow layer was derived from the physics at the pore scale using the homogenization of multiple scale expansions. The microscopic phenomena under consideration are heat conduction, vapor diffusion, sublimation, and deposition. The obtained macroscopic equivalent model is described by two coupled transient diffusion equations including a source term arising from phase change at the pore scale. By dimensional analysis, it was shown that the influence of such source terms on the overall transfers can generally not be neglected, except typically under small temperature gradients. The precision and the robustness of the proposed macroscopic modeling were illustrated through 2D numerical simulations. Finally, the effective vapor diffusion tensor arising in the macroscopic modeling was computed on 3D images of snow. The self-consistent formula offers a good estimate of the effective diffusion coefficient with respect to the snow density, within an average relative error of 10%. Our results confirm recent work that the effective vapor diffusion is not enhanced in snow.

  13. General multi-group macroscopic modeling for thermo-chemical non-equilibrium gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yen, E-mail: yen.liu@nasa.gov; Vinokur, Marcel [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California 94035 (United States); Panesi, Marco; Sahai, Amal [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2015-04-07

    This paper opens a new door to macroscopic modeling for thermal and chemical non-equilibrium. In a game-changing approach, we discard conventional theories and practices stemming from the separation of internal energy modes and the Landau-Teller relaxation equation. Instead, we solve the fundamental microscopic equations in their moment forms but seek only optimum representations for the microscopic state distribution function that provides converged and time accurate solutions for certain macroscopic quantities at all times. The modeling makes no ad hoc assumptions or simplifications at the microscopic level and includes all possible collisional and radiative processes; it therefore retains all non-equilibrium fluid physics. We formulate the thermal and chemical non-equilibrium macroscopic equations and rate coefficients in a coupled and unified fashion for gases undergoing completely general transitions. All collisional partners can have internal structures and can change their internal energy states after transitions. The model is based on the reconstruction of the state distribution function. The internal energy space is subdivided into multiple groups in order to better describe non-equilibrium state distributions. The logarithm of the distribution function in each group is expressed as a power series in internal energy based on the maximum entropy principle. The method of weighted residuals is applied to the microscopic equations to obtain macroscopic moment equations and rate coefficients succinctly to any order. The model’s accuracy depends only on the assumed expression of the state distribution function and the number of groups used and can be self-checked for accuracy and convergence. We show that the macroscopic internal energy transfer, similar to mass and momentum transfers, occurs through nonlinear collisional processes and is not a simple relaxation process described by, e.g., the Landau-Teller equation. Unlike the classical vibrational energy

  14. General multi-group macroscopic modeling for thermo-chemical non-equilibrium gas mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yen; Vinokur, Marcel; Panesi, Marco; Sahai, Amal

    2015-01-01

    This paper opens a new door to macroscopic modeling for thermal and chemical non-equilibrium. In a game-changing approach, we discard conventional theories and practices stemming from the separation of internal energy modes and the Landau-Teller relaxation equation. Instead, we solve the fundamental microscopic equations in their moment forms but seek only optimum representations for the microscopic state distribution function that provides converged and time accurate solutions for certain macroscopic quantities at all times. The modeling makes no ad hoc assumptions or simplifications at the microscopic level and includes all possible collisional and radiative processes; it therefore retains all non-equilibrium fluid physics. We formulate the thermal and chemical non-equilibrium macroscopic equations and rate coefficients in a coupled and unified fashion for gases undergoing completely general transitions. All collisional partners can have internal structures and can change their internal energy states after transitions. The model is based on the reconstruction of the state distribution function. The internal energy space is subdivided into multiple groups in order to better describe non-equilibrium state distributions. The logarithm of the distribution function in each group is expressed as a power series in internal energy based on the maximum entropy principle. The method of weighted residuals is applied to the microscopic equations to obtain macroscopic moment equations and rate coefficients succinctly to any order. The model’s accuracy depends only on the assumed expression of the state distribution function and the number of groups used and can be self-checked for accuracy and convergence. We show that the macroscopic internal energy transfer, similar to mass and momentum transfers, occurs through nonlinear collisional processes and is not a simple relaxation process described by, e.g., the Landau-Teller equation. Unlike the classical vibrational energy

  15. Dynamic Model and Control of a Photovoltaic Generation System using Energetic Macroscopic Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Javier; Duarte, José; Vargas, Erwin; Cabrera, Jhon; Jácome, Andrés; Botero, Mónica; Rey, Juan

    2016-10-01

    This paper addresses the Energetic Macroscopic Representation EMR, the modelling and the control of photovoltaic panel PVP generation systems for simulation purposes. The model of the PVP considers the variations on irradiance and temperature. A maximum power point tracking MPPT algorithm is considered to control the power converter. A novel EMR is proposed to consider the dynamic model of the PVP with variations in the irradiance and the temperature. The EMR is evaluated through simulations of a PVP generation system.

  16. Microscopic Simulation and Macroscopic Modeling for Thermal and Chemical Non-Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yen; Panesi, Marco; Vinokur, Marcel; Clarke, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the accurate microscopic simulation and macroscopic modeling of extreme non-equilibrium phenomena, such as encountered during hypersonic entry into a planetary atmosphere. The state-to-state microscopic equations involving internal excitation, de-excitation, dissociation, and recombination of nitrogen molecules due to collisions with nitrogen atoms are solved time-accurately. Strategies to increase the numerical efficiency are discussed. The problem is then modeled using a few macroscopic variables. The model is based on reconstructions of the state distribution function using the maximum entropy principle. The internal energy space is subdivided into multiple groups in order to better describe the non-equilibrium gases. The method of weighted residuals is applied to the microscopic equations to obtain macroscopic moment equations and rate coefficients. The modeling is completely physics-based, and its accuracy depends only on the assumed expression of the state distribution function and the number of groups used. The model makes no assumption at the microscopic level, and all possible collisional and radiative processes are allowed. The model is applicable to both atoms and molecules and their ions. Several limiting cases are presented to show that the model recovers the classical twotemperature models if all states are in one group and the model reduces to the microscopic equations if each group contains only one state. Numerical examples and model validations are carried out for both the uniform and linear distributions. Results show that the original over nine thousand microscopic equations can be reduced to 2 macroscopic equations using 1 to 5 groups with excellent agreement. The computer time is decreased from 18 hours to less than 1 second.

  17. A constitutive model and numerical simulation of sintering processes at macroscopic level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzyk, Krzysztof; Kowalczyk, Piotr; Nosewicz, Szymon; Rojek, Jerzy

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents modelling of both single and double-phase powder sintering processes at the macroscopic level. In particular, its constitutive formulation, numerical implementation and numerical tests are described. The macroscopic constitutive model is based on the assumption that the sintered material is a continuous medium. The parameters of the constitutive model for material under sintering are determined by simulation of sintering at the microscopic level using a micro-scale model. Numerical tests were carried out for a cylindrical specimen under hydrostatic and uniaxial pressure. Results of macroscopic analysis are compared against the microscopic model results. Moreover, numerical simulations are validated by comparison with experimental results. The simulations and preparation of the model are carried out by Abaqus FEA - a software for finite element analysis and computer-aided engineering. A mechanical model is defined by the user procedure "Vumat" which is developed by the first author in Fortran programming language. Modelling presented in the paper can be used to optimize and to better understand the process.

  18. Comparison of collisionless macroscopic models and application to the ion-electron instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahedo, E.; Lapuerta, V.

    2001-01-01

    In a first part, different macroscopic models of linear Landau damping are compared using a concise one-dimensional (1-D) collisionless formulation. The three-moment model of Chang and Callen (CC) [Phys. Fluids B 4, 1167 (1992)] with two closure relations (complex in the Fourier space) for the viscous stress and the heat conduction is found to be equivalent to the two-moment model of Stubbe-Sukhorukov (SS) [Phys. Plasmas 6, 2976 (1999)], which uses a single (complex) closure relation for the pressure. The comparison of the respective closure relations favors clearly the SS pressure law, which associates an anomalous resistivity to the Landau damping. In a second part, a macroscopic interpretation, with the SS model, of the ion-electron instability shows its resistive character for low and intermediate drift velocities, and the transition to the reactive Buneman limit. The pressure law for the electrons is found to verify a simple law, whereas approximate laws are discussed for the ion pressure. These laws are used to close a macroscopic model for stability analyses of nonhomogeneous plasma structures, where SS and CC models are not applicable easily

  19. Monitoring road traffic congestion using a macroscopic traffic model and a statistical monitoring scheme

    KAUST Repository

    Zeroual, Abdelhafid

    2017-08-19

    Monitoring vehicle traffic flow plays a central role in enhancing traffic management, transportation safety and cost savings. In this paper, we propose an innovative approach for detection of traffic congestion. Specifically, we combine the flexibility and simplicity of a piecewise switched linear (PWSL) macroscopic traffic model and the greater capacity of the exponentially-weighted moving average (EWMA) monitoring chart. Macroscopic models, which have few, easily calibrated parameters, are employed to describe a free traffic flow at the macroscopic level. Then, we apply the EWMA monitoring chart to the uncorrelated residuals obtained from the constructed PWSL model to detect congested situations. In this strategy, wavelet-based multiscale filtering of data has been used before the application of the EWMA scheme to improve further the robustness of this method to measurement noise and reduce the false alarms due to modeling errors. The performance of the PWSL-EWMA approach is successfully tested on traffic data from the three lane highway portion of the Interstate 210 (I-210) highway of the west of California and the four lane highway portion of the State Route 60 (SR60) highway from the east of California, provided by the Caltrans Performance Measurement System (PeMS). Results show the ability of the PWSL-EWMA approach to monitor vehicle traffic, confirming the promising application of this statistical tool to the supervision of traffic flow congestion.

  20. Monitoring road traffic congestion using a macroscopic traffic model and a statistical monitoring scheme

    KAUST Repository

    Zeroual, Abdelhafid; Harrou, Fouzi; Sun, Ying; Messai, Nadhir

    2017-01-01

    Monitoring vehicle traffic flow plays a central role in enhancing traffic management, transportation safety and cost savings. In this paper, we propose an innovative approach for detection of traffic congestion. Specifically, we combine the flexibility and simplicity of a piecewise switched linear (PWSL) macroscopic traffic model and the greater capacity of the exponentially-weighted moving average (EWMA) monitoring chart. Macroscopic models, which have few, easily calibrated parameters, are employed to describe a free traffic flow at the macroscopic level. Then, we apply the EWMA monitoring chart to the uncorrelated residuals obtained from the constructed PWSL model to detect congested situations. In this strategy, wavelet-based multiscale filtering of data has been used before the application of the EWMA scheme to improve further the robustness of this method to measurement noise and reduce the false alarms due to modeling errors. The performance of the PWSL-EWMA approach is successfully tested on traffic data from the three lane highway portion of the Interstate 210 (I-210) highway of the west of California and the four lane highway portion of the State Route 60 (SR60) highway from the east of California, provided by the Caltrans Performance Measurement System (PeMS). Results show the ability of the PWSL-EWMA approach to monitor vehicle traffic, confirming the promising application of this statistical tool to the supervision of traffic flow congestion.

  1. Macroscopic damping model for zero degree energy distribution in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Chongshou; Wang Chengshing

    1993-01-01

    A macroscopic damping model is proposed to calculate the zero degree energy distribution in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. The main features of the measured distributions are reproduced, good agreement is obtained in the middle energy region while overestimation results on the high energy side. The average energy loss coefficient of incident nucleons, varying in the reasonable region 0.2-0.6, depends on beam energy and target size

  2. Using Non-linear Homogenization to Improve the Performance of Macroscopic Damage Models of Trabecular Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levrero-Florencio, Francesc; Pankaj, Pankaj

    2018-01-01

    Realistic macro-level finite element simulations of the mechanical behavior of trabecular bone, a cellular anisotropic material, require a suitable constitutive model; a model that incorporates the mechanical response of bone for complex loading scenarios and includes post-elastic phenomena, such as plasticity (permanent deformations) and damage (permanent stiffness reduction), which bone is likely to experience. Some such models have been developed by conducting homogenization-based multiscale finite element simulations on bone micro-structure. While homogenization has been fairly successful in the elastic regime and, to some extent, in modeling the macroscopic plastic response, it has remained a challenge with respect to modeling damage. This study uses a homogenization scheme to upscale the damage behavior from the tissue level (microscale) to the organ level (macroscale) and assesses the suitability of different damage constitutive laws. Ten cubic specimens were each subjected to 21 strain-controlled load cases for a small range of macroscopic post-elastic strains. Isotropic and anisotropic criteria were considered, density and fabric relationships were used in the formulation of the damage law, and a combined isotropic/anisotropic law with tension/compression asymmetry was formulated, based on the homogenized results, as a possible alternative to the currently used single scalar damage criterion. This computational study enhances the current knowledge on the macroscopic damage behavior of trabecular bone. By developing relationships of damage progression with bone's micro-architectural indices (density and fabric) the study also provides an aid for the creation of more precise macroscale continuum models, which are likely to improve clinical predictions.

  3. Microscopic and macroscopic models for the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertsch, Michiel; Franchi, Bruno; Tesi, Maria Carla; Tosin, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    In the first part of this paper we review a mathematical model for the onset and progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) that was developed in subsequent steps over several years. The model is meant to describe the evolution of AD in vivo . In Achdou et al (2013 J. Math. Biol . 67 1369–92) we treated the problem at a microscopic scale, where the typical length scale is a multiple of the size of the soma of a single neuron. Subsequently, in Bertsch et al (2017 Math. Med. Biol . 34 193–214) we concentrated on the macroscopic scale, where brain neurons are regarded as a continuous medium, structured by their degree of malfunctioning. In the second part of the paper we consider the relation between the microscopic and the macroscopic models. In particular we show under which assumptions the kinetic transport equation, which in the macroscopic model governs the evolution of the probability measure for the degree of malfunctioning of neurons, can be derived from a particle-based setting. The models are based on aggregation and diffusion equations for β -Amyloid (A β from now on), a protein fragment that healthy brains regularly produce and eliminate. In case of dementia A β monomers are no longer properly washed out and begin to coalesce forming eventually plaques. Two different mechanisms are assumed to be relevant for the temporal evolution of the disease: (i) diffusion and agglomeration of soluble polymers of amyloid, produced by damaged neurons; (ii) neuron-to-neuron prion-like transmission. In the microscopic model we consider mechanism (i), modelling it by a system of Smoluchowski equations for the amyloid concentration (describing the agglomeration phenomenon), with the addition of a diffusion term as well as of a source term on the neuronal membrane. At the macroscopic level instead we model processes (i) and (ii) by a system of Smoluchowski equations for the amyloid concentration, coupled to a kinetic-type transport equation for the distribution

  4. Microscopic and macroscopic models for the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertsch, Michiel; Franchi, Bruno; Carla Tesi, Maria; Tosin, Andrea

    2017-10-01

    In the first part of this paper we review a mathematical model for the onset and progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) that was developed in subsequent steps over several years. The model is meant to describe the evolution of AD in vivo. In Achdou et al (2013 J. Math. Biol. 67 1369-92) we treated the problem at a microscopic scale, where the typical length scale is a multiple of the size of the soma of a single neuron. Subsequently, in Bertsch et al (2017 Math. Med. Biol. 34 193-214) we concentrated on the macroscopic scale, where brain neurons are regarded as a continuous medium, structured by their degree of malfunctioning. In the second part of the paper we consider the relation between the microscopic and the macroscopic models. In particular we show under which assumptions the kinetic transport equation, which in the macroscopic model governs the evolution of the probability measure for the degree of malfunctioning of neurons, can be derived from a particle-based setting. The models are based on aggregation and diffusion equations for β-Amyloid (Aβ from now on), a protein fragment that healthy brains regularly produce and eliminate. In case of dementia Aβ monomers are no longer properly washed out and begin to coalesce forming eventually plaques. Two different mechanisms are assumed to be relevant for the temporal evolution of the disease: (i) diffusion and agglomeration of soluble polymers of amyloid, produced by damaged neurons; (ii) neuron-to-neuron prion-like transmission. In the microscopic model we consider mechanism (i), modelling it by a system of Smoluchowski equations for the amyloid concentration (describing the agglomeration phenomenon), with the addition of a diffusion term as well as of a source term on the neuronal membrane. At the macroscopic level instead we model processes (i) and (ii) by a system of Smoluchowski equations for the amyloid concentration, coupled to a kinetic-type transport equation for the distribution function of the

  5. On the macroscopic modeling of dilute emulsions under flow in the presence of particle inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwasame, Paul M.; Wagner, Norman J.; Beris, Antony N.

    2018-03-01

    Recently, Mwasame et al. ["On the macroscopic modeling of dilute emulsions under flow," J. Fluid Mech. 831, 433 (2017)] developed a macroscopic model for the dynamics and rheology of a dilute emulsion with droplet morphology in the limit of negligible particle inertia using the bracket formulation of non-equilibrium thermodynamics of Beris and Edwards [Thermodynamics of Flowing Systems: With Internal Microstructure (Oxford University Press on Demand, 1994)]. Here, we improve upon that work to also account for particle inertia effects. This advance is facilitated by using the bracket formalism in its inertial form that allows for the natural incorporation of particle inertia effects into macroscopic level constitutive equations, while preserving consistency to the previous inertialess approximation in the limit of zero inertia. The parameters in the resultant Particle Inertia Thermodynamically Consistent Ellipsoidal Emulsion (PITCEE) model are selected by utilizing literature-available mesoscopic theory for the rheology at small capillary and particle Reynolds numbers. At steady state, the lowest level particle inertia effects can be described by including an additional non-affine inertial term into the evolution equation for the conformation tensor, thereby generalizing the Gordon-Schowalter time derivative. This additional term couples the conformation and vorticity tensors and is a function of the Ohnesorge number. The rheological and microstructural predictions arising from the PITCEE model are compared against steady-shear simulation results from the literature. They show a change in the signs of the normal stress differences that is accompanied by a change in the orientation of the major axis of the emulsion droplet toward the velocity gradient direction with increasing Reynolds number, capturing the two main signatures of particle inertia reported in simulations.

  6. Damping width of giant dipole resonances of cold and hot nuclei: A macroscopic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mughabghab, S.F.; Sonzogni, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    A phenomenological macroscopic model of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) damping width of cold and hot nuclei with ground-state spherical and near-spherical shapes is developed. The model is based on a generalized Fermi liquid model which takes into account the nuclear surface dynamics. The temperature dependence of the GDR damping width is accounted for in terms of surface and volume components. Parameter-free expressions for the damping width and the effective deformation are obtained. The model is validated with GDR measurements of the following nuclides: 39,40 K, 42 Ca, 45 Sc, 59,63 Cu, 109-120 Sn, 147 Eu, 194 Hg, and 208 Pb, and is compared with the predictions of other models

  7. Macroscopic Dynamic Modeling of Sequential Batch Cultures of Hybridoma Cells: An Experimental Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Dewasme

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Hybridoma cells are commonly grown for the production of monoclonal antibodies (MAb. For monitoring and control purposes of the bioreactors, dynamic models of the cultures are required. However these models are difficult to infer from the usually limited amount of available experimental data and do not focus on target protein production optimization. This paper explores an experimental case study where hybridoma cells are grown in a sequential batch reactor. The simplest macroscopic reaction scheme translating the data is first derived using a maximum likelihood principal component analysis. Subsequently, nonlinear least-squares estimation is used to determine the kinetic laws. The resulting dynamic model reproduces quite satisfactorily the experimental data, as evidenced in direct and cross-validation tests. Furthermore, model predictions can also be used to predict optimal medium renewal time and composition.

  8. A macroscopic cross-section model for BWR pin-by-pin core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Tatsuya; Endo, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Akio

    2014-01-01

    A macroscopic cross-section model used in boiling water reactor (BWR) pin-by-pin core analysis is studied. In the pin-by-pin core calculation method, pin-cell averaged cross sections are calculated for many combinations of core state and depletion history variables and are tabulated prior to core calculations. Variations of cross sections in a core simulator are caused by two different phenomena (i.e. instantaneous and history effects). We treat them through the core state variables and the exposure-averaged core state variables, respectively. Furthermore, the cross-term effect among the core state and the depletion history variables is considered. In order to confirm the calculation accuracy and discuss the treatment of the cross-term effect, the k-infinity and the pin-by-pin fission rate distributions in a single fuel assembly geometry are compared. Some cross-term effects could be negligible since the impacts of them are sufficiently small. However, the cross-term effects among the control rod history (or the void history) and other variables have large impacts; thus, the consideration of them is crucial. The present macroscopic cross-section model, which considers such dominant cross-term effects, well reproduces the reference results and can be a candidate in practical applications for BWR pin-by-pin core analysis on the normal operations. (author)

  9. Formation of macroscopic surface layers on Fe(0) electrocoagulation electrodes during an extended field trial of arsenic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Genuchten, Case M; Bandaru, Siva R S; Surorova, Elena; Amrose, Susan E; Gadgil, Ashok J; Peña, Jasquelin

    2016-06-01

    Extended field trials to remove arsenic (As) via Fe(0) electrocoagulation (EC) have demonstrated consistent As removal from groundwater to concentrations below 10 μg L(-1). However, the coulombic performance of long-term EC field operation is lower than that of laboratory-based systems. Although EC electrodes used over prolonged periods show distinct passivation layers, which have been linked to decreased treatment efficiency, the spatial distribution and mineralogy of such surface layers have not been investigated. In this work, we combine wet chemical measurements with sub-micron-scale chemical maps and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) to determine the chemical composition and mineral phase of surface layers formed during long-term Fe(0) EC treatment. We analyzed Fe(0) EC electrodes used for 3.5 months of daily treatment of As-contaminated groundwater in rural West Bengal, India. We found that the several mm thick layer that formed on cathodes and anodes consisted of primarily magnetite, with minor fractions of goethite. Spatially-resolved SAED patterns also revealed small quantities of CaCO3, Mn oxides, and SiO2, the source of which was the groundwater electrolyte. We propose that the formation of the surface layer contributes to decreased treatment performance by preventing the migration of EC-generated Fe(II) to the bulk electrolyte, where As removal occurs. The trapped Fe(II) subsequently increases the surface layer size at the expense of treatment efficiency. Based on these findings, we discuss several simple and affordable methods to prevent the efficiency loss due to the surface layer, including alternating polarity cycles and cleaning the Fe(0) surface mechanically or via electrolyte scouring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Wave dynamics in an extended macroscopic traffic flow model with periodic boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Qing; Chu, Xing-Jian; Zhou, Chao-Fan; Yan, Bo-Wen; Jia, Bin; Fang, Chen-Hao

    2018-06-01

    Motivated by the previous traffic flow model considering the real-time traffic state, a modified macroscopic traffic flow model is established. The periodic boundary condition is applied to the car-following model. Besides, the traffic state factor R is defined in order to correct the real traffic conditions in a more reasonable way. It is a key step that we introduce the relaxation time as a density-dependent function and provide corresponding evolvement of traffic flow. Three different typical initial densities, namely the high density, the medium one and the low one, are intensively investigated. It can be found that the hysteresis loop exists in the proposed periodic-boundary system. Furthermore, the linear and nonlinear stability analyses are performed in order to test the robustness of the system.

  11. Macroscopic Model and Simulation Analysis of Air Traffic Flow in Airport Terminal Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honghai Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We focus on the spatiotemporal characteristics and their evolvement law of the air traffic flow in airport terminal area to provide scientific basis for optimizing flight control processes and alleviating severe air traffic conditions. Methods in this work combine mathematical derivation and simulation analysis. Based on cell transmission model the macroscopic models of arrival and departure air traffic flow in terminal area are established. Meanwhile, the interrelationship and influential factors of the three characteristic parameters as traffic flux, density, and velocity are presented. Then according to such models, the macro emergence of traffic flow evolution is emulated with the NetLogo simulation platform, and the correlativity of basic traffic flow parameters is deduced and verified by means of sensitivity analysis. The results suggest that there are remarkable relations among the three characteristic parameters of the air traffic flow in terminal area. Moreover, such relationships evolve distinctly with the flight procedures, control separations, and ATC strategies.

  12. Modeling two-stage bunch compression with wakefields: Macroscopic properties and microbunching instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Bosch

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In a two-stage compression and acceleration system, where each stage compresses a chirped bunch in a magnetic chicane, wakefields affect high-current bunches. The longitudinal wakes affect the macroscopic energy and current profiles of the compressed bunch and cause microbunching at short wavelengths. For macroscopic wavelengths, impedance formulas and tracking simulations show that the wakefields can be dominated by the resistive impedance of coherent edge radiation. For this case, we calculate the minimum initial bunch length that can be compressed without producing an upright tail in phase space and associated current spike. Formulas are also obtained for the jitter in the bunch arrival time downstream of the compressors that results from the bunch-to-bunch variation of current, energy, and chirp. Microbunching may occur at short wavelengths where the longitudinal space-charge wakes dominate or at longer wavelengths dominated by edge radiation. We model this range of wavelengths with frequency-dependent impedance before and after each stage of compression. The growth of current and energy modulations is described by analytic gain formulas that agree with simulations.

  13. A comparison of macroscopic models describing the collective response of sedimenting rod-like particles in shear flows

    KAUST Repository

    Helzel, Christiane; Tzavaras, Athanasios

    2016-01-01

    We consider a kinetic model, which describes the sedimentation of rod-like particles in dilute suspensions under the influence of gravity, presented in Helzel and Tzavaras (submitted for publication). Here we restrict our considerations to shear flow and consider a simplified situation, where the particle orientation is restricted to the plane spanned by the direction of shear and the direction of gravity. For this simplified kinetic model we carry out a linear stability analysis and we derive two different nonlinear macroscopic models which describe the formation of clusters of higher particle density. One of these macroscopic models is based on a diffusive scaling, the other one is based on a so-called quasi-dynamic approximation. Numerical computations, which compare the predictions of the macroscopic models with the kinetic model, complete our presentation.

  14. A comparison of macroscopic models describing the collective response of sedimenting rod-like particles in shear flows

    KAUST Repository

    Helzel, Christiane

    2016-07-22

    We consider a kinetic model, which describes the sedimentation of rod-like particles in dilute suspensions under the influence of gravity, presented in Helzel and Tzavaras (submitted for publication). Here we restrict our considerations to shear flow and consider a simplified situation, where the particle orientation is restricted to the plane spanned by the direction of shear and the direction of gravity. For this simplified kinetic model we carry out a linear stability analysis and we derive two different nonlinear macroscopic models which describe the formation of clusters of higher particle density. One of these macroscopic models is based on a diffusive scaling, the other one is based on a so-called quasi-dynamic approximation. Numerical computations, which compare the predictions of the macroscopic models with the kinetic model, complete our presentation.

  15. Study of n-Butyl Acrylate Self-Initiation Reaction Experimentally and via Macroscopic Mechanistic Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Arabi Shamsabadi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental study of the self-initiation reaction of n-butyl acrylate (n-BA in free-radical polymerization. For the first time, the frequency factor and activation energy of the monomer self-initiation reaction are estimated from measurements of n-BA conversion in free-radical homo-polymerization initiated only by the monomer. The estimation was carried out using a macroscopic mechanistic mathematical model of the reactor. In addition to already-known reactions that contribute to the polymerization, the model considers a n-BA self-initiation reaction mechanism that is based on our previous electronic-level first-principles theoretical study of the self-initiation reaction. Reaction rate equations are derived using the method of moments. The reaction-rate parameter estimates obtained from conversion measurements agree well with estimates obtained via our purely-theoretical quantum chemical calculations.

  16. Agent-Based and Macroscopic Modeling of the Complex Socio-Economic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksejus Kononovičius

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – The focus of this contribution is the correspondence between collective behavior and inter-individual interactions in the complex socio-economic systems. Currently there is a wide selection of papers proposing various models for the both collective behavior and inter-individual interactions in the complex socio-economic systems. Yet the papers directly relating these two concepts are still quite rare. By studying this correspondence we discuss a cutting edge approach to the modeling of complex socio-economic systems. Design/methodology/approach – The collective behavior is often modeled using stochastic and ordinary calculus, while the inter-individual interactions are modeled using agent-based models. In order to obtain the ideal model, one should start from these frameworks and build a bridge to reach another. This is a formidable task, if we consider the top-down approach, namely starting from the collective behavior and moving towards inter-individual interactions. The bottom-up approach also fails, if complex inter-individual interaction models are considered, yet in this case we can start with simple models and increase the complexity as needed. Findings – The bottom-up approach, considering simple agent-based herding model as a model for the inter-individual interactions, allows us to derive certain macroscopic models of the complex socio-economic systems from the agent-based perspective. This provides interesting insights into the collective behavior patterns observed in the complex socio-economic systems. Research limitations/implications –The simplicity of the agent-based herding model might be considered to be somewhat limiting. Yet this simplicity implies that the model is highly universal. It reproduces universal features of social behavior and also can be further extended to fit different socio-economic scenarios. Practical implications – Insights provided in this contribution might be used to modify existing

  17. Ab Initio Modeling Of Friction Reducing Agents Shows Quantum Mechanical Interactions Can Have Macroscopic Manifestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Velázquez, J D; Barroso-Flores, J; Gama Goicochea, A

    2016-11-23

    Two of the most commonly encountered friction-reducing agents used in plastic sheet production are the amides known as erucamide and behenamide, which despite being almost identical chemically, lead to markedly different values of the friction coefficient. To understand the origin of this contrasting behavior, in this work we model brushes made of these two types of linear-chain molecules using quantum mechanical numerical simulations under the density functional theory at the B97D/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. Four chains of erucamide and behenamide were linked to a 2 × 10 zigzag graphene sheet and optimized both in vacuum and in continuous solvent using the SMD implicit solvation model. We find that erucamide chains tend to remain closer together through π-π stacking interactions arising from the double bonds located at C13-C14, a feature behenamide lacks, and thus a more spread configuration is obtained with the latter. It is argued that this arrangement of the erucamide chains is responsible for the lower friction coefficient of erucamide brushes, compared with behenamide brushes, which is a macroscopic consequence of cooperative quantum mechanical interactions. While only quantum level interactions are modeled here, we show that behenamide chains are more spread out in the brush than erucamide chains as a consequence of those interactions. The spread-out configuration allows more solvent particles to penetrate the brush, leading in turn to more friction, in agreement with macroscopic measurements and mesoscale simulations of the friction coefficient reported in the literature.

  18. Macroscopic Quantum States and Quantum Phase Transition in the Dicke Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lian Jin-Ling; Zhang Yuan-Wei; Liang Jiu-Qing

    2012-01-01

    The energy spectrum of Dicke Hamiltonians with and without the rotating wave approximation for an arbitrary atom number is obtained analytically by means of the variational method, in which the effective pseudo-spin Hamiltonian resulting from the expectation value in the boson-field coherent state is diagonalized by the spin-coherent-state transformation. In addition to the ground-state energy, an excited macroscopic quantum-state is found corresponding to the south- and north-pole gauges of the spin-coherent states, respectively. Our results of ground-state energies in exact agreement with various approaches show that these models exhibit a zero-temperature quantum phase transition of the second order for any number of atoms, which was commonly considered as a phenomenon of the thermodynamic limit with the atom number tending to infinity. The critical behavior of the geometric phase is analyzed. (general)

  19. Dynamic Heterogeneous Multiscale Filtration Model: Probing Micro- and Macroscopic Filtration Characteristics of Gasoline Particulate Filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jian; Viswanathan, Sandeep; Rothamer, David A; Foster, David E; Rutland, Christopher J

    2017-10-03

    Motivated by high filtration efficiency (mass- and number-based) and low pressure drop requirements for gasoline particulate filters (GPFs), a previously developed heterogeneous multiscale filtration (HMF) model is extended to simulate dynamic filtration characteristics of GPFs. This dynamic HMF model is based on a probability density function (PDF) description of the pore size distribution and classical filtration theory. The microstructure of the porous substrate in a GPF is resolved and included in the model. Fundamental particulate filtration experiments were conducted using an exhaust filtration analysis (EFA) system for model validation. The particulate in the filtration experiments was sampled from a spark-ignition direct-injection (SIDI) gasoline engine. With the dynamic HMF model, evolution of the microscopic characteristics of the substrate (pore size distribution, porosity, permeability, and deposited particulate inside the porous substrate) during filtration can be probed. Also, predicted macroscopic filtration characteristics including particle number concentration and normalized pressure drop show good agreement with the experimental data. The resulting dynamic HMF model can be used to study the dynamic particulate filtration process in GPFs with distinct microstructures, serving as a powerful tool for GPF design and optimization.

  20. A simple three-dimensional macroscopic root water uptake model based on the hydraulic architecture approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Couvreur

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Many hydrological models including root water uptake (RWU do not consider the dimension of root system hydraulic architecture (HA because explicitly solving water flow in such a complex system is too time consuming. However, they might lack process understanding when basing RWU and plant water stress predictions on functions of variables such as the root length density distribution. On the basis of analytical solutions of water flow in a simple HA, we developed an "implicit" model of the root system HA for simulation of RWU distribution (sink term of Richards' equation and plant water stress in three-dimensional soil water flow models. The new model has three macroscopic parameters defined at the soil element scale, or at the plant scale, rather than for each segment of the root system architecture: the standard sink fraction distribution SSF, the root system equivalent conductance Krs and the compensatory RWU conductance Kcomp. It clearly decouples the process of water stress from compensatory RWU, and its structure is appropriate for hydraulic lift simulation. As compared to a model explicitly solving water flow in a realistic maize root system HA, the implicit model showed to be accurate for predicting RWU distribution and plant collar water potential, with one single set of parameters, in dissimilar water dynamics scenarios. For these scenarios, the computing time of the implicit model was a factor 28 to 214 shorter than that of the explicit one. We also provide a new expression for the effective soil water potential sensed by plants in soils with a heterogeneous water potential distribution, which emerged from the implicit model equations. With the proposed implicit model of the root system HA, new concepts are brought which open avenues towards simple and mechanistic RWU models and water stress functions operational for field scale water dynamics simulation.

  1. Cluster Risk of Walking Scenarios Based on Macroscopic Flow Model and Crowding Force Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, accidents always happen in confined space such as metro stations because of congestion. Various researchers investigated the patterns of dense crowd behaviors in different scenarios via simulations or experiments and proposed methods for avoiding accidents. In this study, a classic continuum macroscopic model was applied to simulate the crowded pedestrian flow in typical scenarios such as at bottlenecks or with an obstacle. The Lax–Wendroff finite difference scheme and artificial viscosity filtering method were used to discretize the model to identify high-density risk areas. Furthermore, we introduced a contact crowding force test of the interactions among pedestrians at bottlenecks. Results revealed that in the most dangerous area, the individual on the corner position bears the maximum pressure in such scenarios is 90.2 N, and there is an approximate exponential relationship between crowding force and density indicated by our data. The results and findings presented in this paper can facilitate more reasonable and precise simulation models by utilizing crowding force and crowd density and ensure the safety of pedestrians in high-density scenarios.

  2. Macroscopic High-Temperature Structural Analysis Model of Small-Scale PCHE Prototype (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kee Nam; Lee, Heong Yeon; Hong, Sung Deok; Park, Hong Yoon

    2011-01-01

    The IHX (intermediate heat exchanger) of a VHTR (very high-temperature reactor) is a core component that transfers the high heat generated by the VHTR at 950 .deg. C to a hydrogen production plant. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute manufactured a small-scale prototype of a PCHE (printed circuit heat exchanger) that was being considered as a candidate for the IHX. In this study, as a part of high-temperature structural integrity evaluation of the small-scale PCHE prototype, we carried out high-temperature structural analysis modeling and macroscopic thermal and elastic structural analysis for the small-scale PCHE prototype under small-scale gas-loop test conditions. The modeling and analysis were performed as a precedent study prior to the performance test in the small-scale gas loop. The results obtained in this study will be compared with the test results for the small-scale PCHE. Moreover, these results will be used in the design of a medium-scale PCHE prototype

  3. Final Report: Model interacting particle systems for simulation and macroscopic description of particulate suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter J. Mucha

    2007-08-30

    Suspensions of solid particles in liquids appear in numerous applications, from environmental settings like river silt, to industrial systems of solids transport and water treatment, and biological flows such as blood flow. Despite their importance, much remains unexplained about these complicated systems. Mucha's research aims to improve understanding of basic properties of suspensions through a program of simulating model interacting particle systems with critical evaluation of proposed continuum equations, in close collaboration with experimentalists. Natural to this approach, the original proposal centered around collaboration with studies already conducted in various experimental groups. However, as was detailed in the 2004 progress report, following the first year of this award, a number of the questions from the original proposal were necessarily redirected towards other specific goals because of changes in the research programs of the proposed experimental collaborators. Nevertheless, the modified project goals and the results that followed from those goals maintain close alignment with the main themes of the original proposal, improving efficient simulation and macroscopic modeling of sedimenting and colloidal suspensions. In particular, the main investigations covered under this award have included: (1) Sedimentation instabilities, including the sedimentation analogue of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (for heavy, particle-laden fluid over lighter, clear fluid). (2) Ageing dynamics of colloidal suspensions at concentrations above the glass transition, using simplified interactions. (3) Stochastic reconstruction of velocity-field dependence for particle image velocimetry (PIV). (4) Stochastic modeling of the near-wall bias in 'nano-PIV'. (5) Distributed Lagrange multiplier simulation of the 'internal splash' of a particle falling through a stable stratified interface. (6) Fundamental study of velocity fluctuations in sedimentation

  4. Macroscopic lattice Boltzmann model for heat and moisture transfer process with phase transformation in unsaturated porous media during freezing process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Wenyu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, a macroscopic lattice Boltzmann model for simulating the heat and moisture transport phenomenon in unsaturated porous media during the freezing process was proposed. The proposed model adopted percolation threshold to reproduce the extra resistance in frozen fringe during the freezing process. The freezing process in Kanagawa sandy loam soil was demonstrated by the proposed model. The numerical result showed good agreement with the experimental result. The proposed model also offered higher computational efficiency and better agreement with the experimental result than the existing numerical models. Lattice Boltzmann method is suitable for simulating complex heat and mass transfer process in porous media at macroscopic scale under proper dimensionless criterion, which makes it a potentially powerful tool for engineering application.

  5. Generalization of first-principles thermodynamic model: Application to hexagonal close-packed ε-Fe3N

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakkedal, Morten B.; Shang, Shu- Li; Liu, Zi-Kui

    2016-01-01

    A complete first-principles thermodynamic model was developed and applied to hexagonal close-packed structure ε-Fe3N. The electronic structure was calculated using density functional theory and the quasiharmonic phonon approximation to determine macroscopic thermodynamic properties at finite...

  6. Simulating Air-Entrapment in Low Permeability Mudrocks using a Macroscopic Invasion Percolation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A.; Holt, R. M.; Ramarao, B.; Clemo, T.

    2011-12-01

    Three radioactive waste disposal landfills at the Waste Control Specialists (WCS) facility in Andrews County, Texas are constructed below grade, within the low-permeability Dockum Group mudrocks (Cooper Canyon Formation) of Triassic age. Recent site investigations at the WCS disposal facilities indicate the presence of a trapped and compressed gas phase in the mudrocks. The Dockum is a low-permeability medium with vertical and horizontal effective hydraulic conductivities of 1.2E-9 cm/s and 2.9E-7 cm/s. The upper 300+ feet of the Dockum is in the unsaturated zone, with an average saturation of 0.87 and average capillary pressure of 2.8 MPa determined from core samples. Air entry pressures on core samples range from from 0.016 to 9.8 MPa, with a mean of 1.0 MPa. Heat dissipation sensors, thermocouple psychrometers, and advanced tensiometers installed in Dockum borehole arrays generally show capillary pressures one order of magnitude less than those measured on core samples. These differences with core data are attributed to the presence of a trapped and compressed gas phase within Dockum materials. In the vicinity of an instrumented borehole, the gas phase pressure equilibrates with atmospheric pressure, lowering the capillary pressure. We have developed a new macroscopic invasion percolation (MIP) model to illustrate the origin of the trapped gas phase in the Dockum rocks. An MIP model differs from invasion percolation (IP) through the definition of macro-scale capillarity. Individual pore throats and necks are not considered. Instead, a near pore-scale block is defined and characterized by a local threshold spanning pressure (a local block-scale breakthrough pressure) that represents the behavior of the subscale network. The model domain is discretized into an array of grid blocks with assigned spanning pressures. An invasion pressure for each block is then determined by the sum of spanning pressure, buoyance forces, and viscous forces. An IP algorithm sorts the

  7. Dynamical and quasi-static multi-physical models of a diesel internal combustion engine using Energetic Macroscopic Representation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horrein, L.; Bouscayrol, A.; Cheng, Y.; El Fassi, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) dynamical and static models. • Organization of ICE model using Energetic Macroscopic Representation. • Description of the distribution of the chemical, thermal and mechanical power. • Implementation of the ICE model in a global vehicle model. - Abstract: In the simulation of new vehicles, the Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) is generally modeled by a static map. This model yields the mechanical power and the fuel consumption. But some studies require the heat energy from the ICE to be considered (i.e. waste heat recovery, thermal regulation of the cabin). A dynamical multi-physical model of a diesel engine is developed to consider its heat energy. This model is organized using Energetic Macroscopic Representation (EMR) in order to be interconnected to other various models of vehicle subsystems. An experimental validation is provided. Moreover a multi-physical quasi-static model is also derived. According to different modeling aims, a comparison of the dynamical and the quasi-static model is discussed in the case of the simulation of a thermal vehicle. These multi-physical models with different simulation time consumption provide good basis for studying the effects of the thermal energy on the vehicle behaviors, including the possibilities of waste heat recovery

  8. NUMERICAL DERIVATIONS OF A MACROSCOPIC MODEL FOR REINFORCED CONCRETE WALLS CONSIDERING IN-PLANE AND OUT-OF-PLANE BEHAVIOR

    OpenAIRE

    LATCHAROTE; Panon KAI, Yoshiro

    2015-01-01

    A macroscopic model, macro plate model, was proposed to represent a wall member of RC walls. Both in-plane and out-of-plane behavior were considered for numerical derivations of macro plate model. For out-of-plane behavior, bending deformation was incorporated with shear deformation to consider out-of-plane deformation as same as in-plane behavior. The hysteretic behavior of macro plate model can be directly expressed by stress-strain relationships in any conventional hysteretic rules, which ...

  9. Heterogeneous traffic flow modelling using second-order macroscopic continuum model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Ranju; Ramadurai, Gitakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    Modelling heterogeneous traffic flow lacking in lane discipline is one of the emerging research areas in the past few years. The two main challenges in modelling are: capturing the effect of varying size of vehicles, and the lack in lane discipline, both of which together lead to the 'gap filling' behaviour of vehicles. The same section length of the road can be occupied by different types of vehicles at the same time, and the conventional measure of traffic concentration, density (vehicles per lane per unit length), is not a good measure for heterogeneous traffic modelling. First aim of this paper is to have a parsimonious model of heterogeneous traffic that can capture the unique phenomena of gap filling. Second aim is to emphasize the suitability of higher-order models for modelling heterogeneous traffic. Third, the paper aims to suggest area occupancy as concentration measure of heterogeneous traffic lacking in lane discipline. The above mentioned two main challenges of heterogeneous traffic flow are addressed by extending an existing second-order continuum model of traffic flow, using area occupancy for traffic concentration instead of density. The extended model is calibrated and validated with field data from an arterial road in Chennai city, and the results are compared with those from few existing generalized multi-class models.

  10. Intense nonneutral beam propagation in a periodic solenoidal field using a macroscopic fluid model with zero thermal emittance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, R.C.; Stoltz, P.; Chen, C.

    1997-08-01

    A macroscopic fluid model is developed to describe the nonlinear dynamics and collective processes in an intense high-current beam propagating in the z-direction through a periodic focusing solenoidal field B z (z + S) = B z (z), where S is the axial periodicity length. The analysis assumes that space-charge effects dominate the effects of thermal beam emittance, Kr b 2 much-gt ε th 2 , and is based on the macroscopic moment-Maxwell equations, truncated by neglecting the pressure tensor and higher-order moments. Assuming a thin beam with r b much-lt S, azimuthally symmetric beam equilibria with ∂/∂t = 0 = ∂/∂θ are investigated. To illustrate the considerable flexibility of the macroscopic formalism, assuming (nearly) uniform axial flow velocity V b over the beam cross section, beam equilibrium properties are calculated for two examples: (a) uniform radial density profile over the interval 0 ≤ r b (z), and (b) an infinitesimally thin annular beam centered at r = r b (z). The analysis generally allows for the azimuthal flow velocity V θb (r,z) to differ from the Larmor frequency, and the model is used to calculate the (leading-order) correction δV zb (r,z) to the axial flow velocity for the step-function density profile in case (a) above

  11. A macroscopic constitutive model of temperature-induced phase transition of polycrystalline Ni2MnGa by directional solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Yuping; Gu, Yunling; Liu, Hongguang

    2015-01-01

    Directional solidification technology has been widely used to improve the properties of polycrystalline Ni 2 MnGa materials. Mechanical training can adjust the internal organizational structures of the materials, reduce the stress of twin boundaries motion, and then result in larger strain at lower outfield levels. In this paper, we test the microscopic structure of Ni 2 MnGa polycrystalline ferromagnetic shape memory alloy produced by directional solidification and compress it along two axes successively for mechanical training. The influences of pre-compressive stresses on the temperature-induced strains are analyzed. The macroscopic mechanical behaviors show anisotropy. According to the generating mechanism of the macroscopic strain, a three-dimensional constitutive model is established. Based on thermodynamic method, the kinetic equations of the martensitic transformation and inverse transformation are presented considering the driving force and energy dissipation. The prediction curves of temperature-induce strains along two different directions are investigated. And the results coincide well with the experiment data. It well explains the macroscopic anisotropy mechanical behaviors and fits for using in engineering

  12. Capturing microscopic features of bone remodeling into a macroscopic model based on biological rationales of bone adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Kwan; Kameo, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Sakae; Adachi, Taiji

    2017-10-01

    To understand Wolff's law, bone adaptation by remodeling at the cellular and tissue levels has been discussed extensively through experimental and simulation studies. For the clinical application of a bone remodeling simulation, it is significant to establish a macroscopic model that incorporates clarified microscopic mechanisms. In this study, we proposed novel macroscopic models based on the microscopic mechanism of osteocytic mechanosensing, in which the flow of fluid in the lacuno-canalicular porosity generated by fluid pressure gradients plays an important role, and theoretically evaluated the proposed models, taking biological rationales of bone adaptation into account. The proposed models were categorized into two groups according to whether the remodeling equilibrium state was defined globally or locally, i.e., the global or local uniformity models. Each remodeling stimulus in the proposed models was quantitatively evaluated through image-based finite element analyses of a swine cancellous bone, according to two introduced criteria associated with the trabecular volume and orientation at remodeling equilibrium based on biological rationales. The evaluation suggested that nonuniformity of the mean stress gradient in the local uniformity model, one of the proposed stimuli, has high validity. Furthermore, the adaptive potential of each stimulus was discussed based on spatial distribution of a remodeling stimulus on the trabecular surface. The theoretical consideration of a remodeling stimulus based on biological rationales of bone adaptation would contribute to the establishment of a clinically applicable and reliable simulation model of bone remodeling.

  13. Estimation of Enthalpy of Formation of Liquid Transition Metal Alloys: A Modified Prescription Based on Macroscopic Atom Model of Cohesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Subramanian; Saibaba, Saroja

    2016-09-01

    The enthalpy of formation Δo H f is an important thermodynamic quantity, which sheds significant light on fundamental cohesive and structural characteristics of an alloy. However, being a difficult one to determine accurately through experiments, simple estimation procedures are often desirable. In the present study, a modified prescription for estimating Δo H f L of liquid transition metal alloys is outlined, based on the Macroscopic Atom Model of cohesion. This prescription relies on self-consistent estimation of liquid-specific model parameters, namely electronegativity ( ϕ L) and bonding electron density ( n b L ). Such unique identification is made through the use of well-established relationships connecting surface tension, compressibility, and molar volume of a metallic liquid with bonding charge density. The electronegativity is obtained through a consistent linear scaling procedure. The preliminary set of values for ϕ L and n b L , together with other auxiliary model parameters, is subsequently optimized to obtain a good numerical agreement between calculated and experimental values of Δo H f L for sixty liquid transition metal alloys. It is found that, with few exceptions, the use of liquid-specific model parameters in Macroscopic Atom Model yields a physically consistent methodology for reliable estimation of mixing enthalpies of liquid alloys.

  14. Macroscopic self-consistent model for external-reflection near-field microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berntsen, S.; Bozhevolnaya, E.; Bozhevolnyi, S.

    1993-01-01

    The self-consistent macroscopic approach based on the Maxwell equations in two-dimensional geometry is developed to describe tip-surface interaction in external-reflection near-field microscopy. The problem is reduced to a single one-dimensional integral equation in terms of the Fourier components of the field at the plane of the sample surface. This equation is extended to take into account a pointlike scatterer placed on the sample surface. The power of light propagating toward the detector as the fiber mode is expressed by using the self-consistent field at the tip surface. Numerical results for trapezium-shaped tips are presented. The authors show that the sharper tip and the more confined fiber mode result in better resolution of the near-field microscope. Moreover, it is found that the tip-surface distance should not be too small so that better resolution is ensured. 14 refs., 10 figs

  15. Investigation of representing hysteresis in macroscopic models of two-phase flow in porous media using intermediate scale experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cihan, Abdullah; Birkholzer, Jens; Trevisan, Luca; Gonzalez-Nicolas, Ana; Illangasekare, Tissa

    2017-01-01

    Incorporating hysteresis into models is important to accurately capture the two phase flow behavior when porous media systems undergo cycles of drainage and imbibition such as in the cases of injection and post-injection redistribution of CO2 during geological CO2 storage (GCS). In the traditional model of two-phase flow, existing constitutive models that parameterize the hysteresis associated with these processes are generally based on the empirical relationships. This manuscript presents development and testing of mathematical hysteretic capillary pressure—saturation—relative permeability models with the objective of more accurately representing the redistribution of the fluids after injection. The constitutive models are developed by relating macroscopic variables to basic physics of two-phase capillary displacements at pore-scale and void space distribution properties. The modeling approach with the developed constitutive models with and without hysteresis as input is tested against some intermediate-scale flow cell experiments to test the ability of the models to represent movement and capillary trapping of immiscible fluids under macroscopically homogeneous and heterogeneous conditions. The hysteretic two-phase flow model predicted the overall plume migration and distribution during and post injection reasonably well and represented the postinjection behavior of the plume more accurately than the nonhysteretic models. Based on the results in this study, neglecting hysteresis in the constitutive models of the traditional two-phase flow theory can seriously overpredict or underpredict the injected fluid distribution during post-injection under both homogeneous and heterogeneous conditions, depending on the selected value of the residual saturation in the nonhysteretic models.

  16. Total Strain FE Model for Reinforced Concrete Floors on Piles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmeyer, H.; Bos, van den A.A.

    2008-01-01

    A finite element (FE) model using a total strain material model has been developed to predict the behavior of warehouse reinforced concrete floors on piles. The material model (not the FE model itself) was calibrated to material tests. The FE model for the floor structure was checked with full-scale

  17. Biomimetic peptide-based models of [FeFe]-hydrogenases: utilization of phosphine-containing peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Souvik [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Arizona State University; Tempe, USA; Nguyen, Thuy-Ai D. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Arizona State University; Tempe, USA; Gan, Lu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Arizona State University; Tempe, USA; Jones, Anne K. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Arizona State University; Tempe, USA

    2015-01-01

    Peptide based models for [FeFe]-hydrogenase were synthesized utilizing unnatural phosphine-amino acids and their electrocatalytic properties were investigated in mixed aqueous-organic solvents.

  18. Process Analytical Technology for Advanced Process Control in Biologics Manufacturing with the Aid of Macroscopic Kinetic Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornecki, Martin; Strube, Jochen

    2018-03-16

    Productivity improvements of mammalian cell culture in the production of recombinant proteins have been made by optimizing cell lines, media, and process operation. This led to enhanced titers and process robustness without increasing the cost of the upstream processing (USP); however, a downstream bottleneck remains. In terms of process control improvement, the process analytical technology (PAT) initiative, initiated by the American Food and Drug Administration (FDA), aims to measure, analyze, monitor, and ultimately control all important attributes of a bioprocess. Especially, spectroscopic methods such as Raman or near-infrared spectroscopy enable one to meet these analytical requirements, preferably in-situ. In combination with chemometric techniques like partial least square (PLS) or principal component analysis (PCA), it is possible to generate soft sensors, which estimate process variables based on process and measurement models for the enhanced control of bioprocesses. Macroscopic kinetic models can be used to simulate cell metabolism. These models are able to enhance the process understanding by predicting the dynamic of cells during cultivation. In this article, in-situ turbidity (transmission, 880 nm) and ex-situ Raman spectroscopy (785 nm) measurements are combined with an offline macroscopic Monod kinetic model in order to predict substrate concentrations. Experimental data of Chinese hamster ovary cultivations in bioreactors show a sufficiently linear correlation (R² ≥ 0.97) between turbidity and total cell concentration. PLS regression of Raman spectra generates a prediction model, which was validated via offline viable cell concentration measurement (RMSE ≤ 13.82, R² ≥ 0.92). Based on these measurements, the macroscopic Monod model can be used to determine different process attributes, e.g., glucose concentration. In consequence, it is possible to approximately calculate (R² ≥ 0.96) glucose concentration based on online cell

  19. Process Analytical Technology for Advanced Process Control in Biologics Manufacturing with the Aid of Macroscopic Kinetic Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kornecki

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Productivity improvements of mammalian cell culture in the production of recombinant proteins have been made by optimizing cell lines, media, and process operation. This led to enhanced titers and process robustness without increasing the cost of the upstream processing (USP; however, a downstream bottleneck remains. In terms of process control improvement, the process analytical technology (PAT initiative, initiated by the American Food and Drug Administration (FDA, aims to measure, analyze, monitor, and ultimately control all important attributes of a bioprocess. Especially, spectroscopic methods such as Raman or near-infrared spectroscopy enable one to meet these analytical requirements, preferably in-situ. In combination with chemometric techniques like partial least square (PLS or principal component analysis (PCA, it is possible to generate soft sensors, which estimate process variables based on process and measurement models for the enhanced control of bioprocesses. Macroscopic kinetic models can be used to simulate cell metabolism. These models are able to enhance the process understanding by predicting the dynamic of cells during cultivation. In this article, in-situ turbidity (transmission, 880 nm and ex-situ Raman spectroscopy (785 nm measurements are combined with an offline macroscopic Monod kinetic model in order to predict substrate concentrations. Experimental data of Chinese hamster ovary cultivations in bioreactors show a sufficiently linear correlation (R2 ≥ 0.97 between turbidity and total cell concentration. PLS regression of Raman spectra generates a prediction model, which was validated via offline viable cell concentration measurement (RMSE ≤ 13.82, R2 ≥ 0.92. Based on these measurements, the macroscopic Monod model can be used to determine different process attributes, e.g., glucose concentration. In consequence, it is possible to approximately calculate (R2 ≥ 0.96 glucose concentration based on online cell

  20. Superposition and macroscopic observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartwright, N.D.

    1976-01-01

    The principle of superposition has long plagued the quantum mechanics of macroscopic bodies. In at least one well-known situation - that of measurement - quantum mechanics predicts a superposition. It is customary to try to reconcile macroscopic reality and quantum mechanics by reducing the superposition to a mixture. To establish consistency with quantum mechanics, values for the apparatus after a measurement are to be distributed in the way predicted by the superposition. The distributions observed, however, are those of the mixture. The statistical predictions of quantum mechanics, it appears, are not borne out by observation in macroscopic situations. It has been shown that, insofar as specific ergodic hypotheses apply to the apparatus after the interaction, the superposition which evolves is experimentally indistinguishable from the corresponding mixture. In this paper an idealized model of the measuring situation is presented in which this consistency can be demonstrated. It includes a simplified version of the measurement solution proposed by Daneri, Loinger, and Prosperi (1962). The model should make clear the kind of statistical evidence required to carry of this approach, and the role of the ergodic hypotheses assumed. (Auth.)

  1. Modeling ancient Egyptian mummification on fresh human tissue: macroscopic and histological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgopoulou, Christina; Shved, Natallia; Wanek, Johann; Rühli, Frank J

    2015-06-01

    Many studies have been concerned with the ancient Egyptian mummification method; nevertheless, little effort has been made to explore it experimentally. The goal of this study is to apply evidence-based diagnostic criteria and state-of-the art methodology in order to improve knowledge on soft tissues preservation and postmortem alterations. Two human lower limbs (LL) from a female donor were (1) "naturally" mummified by dry heat and (2) artificially in natron. At specific time intervals a macroscopic and radiological examination of the LL was performed and skin and muscle samples were taken for histological and biomolecular analysis. Temperature, humidity, pH, and weight of the LL were systematically measured. The mummification by dry heat was stopped after 7 days due to unexpected lack of mummification progress. The mummification in natron was completed successfully after 208 days. The humidity, the external temperature, and the pH were proven with Pearson correlation and principal component analysis as important factors for the mummification process. The steady removal of water from the tissues through the natron has prevented the putrefaction. This is also evident in the absence of bacteria or fungi through the microbiological analysis. The histological analysis revealed very good preservation of the skin and the muscle tissues. In the muscular sample certain degree of structural disintegration can be seen, particularly affecting the epimysium whilst in the skin samples the epidermis, especially the stratum corneum, is mostly affected. The samples show better preservation compared with ancient Egyptian sections and other mummified tissues from historic or forensic context. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Macroscopic constraints on string unification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, T.R.

    1989-03-01

    The comparison of sting theory with experiment requires a huge extrapolation from the microscopic distances, of order of the Planck length, up to the macroscopic laboratory distances. The quantum effects give rise to large corrections to the macroscopic predictions of sting unification. I discus the model-independent constraints on the gravitational sector of string theory due to the inevitable existence of universal Fradkin-Tseytlin dilatons. 9 refs

  3. TDHF-motivated macroscopic model for heavy ion collisions: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biedermann, M.; Reif, R.; Maedler, P.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed investigation of Bertshc's classical TDHF-motivated model for the description of heavy ion collisions is performed. The model agrees well with TDHF and phenomenological models which include deformation degrees of freedom as well as with experimental data. Some quantitative deviations from experiment and/or TDHF can be removed to a large extent if the standard model parameters are considered as adjustable parameters in physically reasonable regions of variation

  4. Agent based models of language competition: macroscopic descriptions and order–disorder transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, F; Castelló, X; San Miguel, M

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of two agent based models of language competition. In the first model, each individual can be in one of two possible states, either using language X or language Y, while the second model incorporates a third state XY, representing individuals that use both languages (bilinguals). We analyze the models on complex networks and two-dimensional square lattices by analytical and numerical methods, and show that they exhibit a transition from one-language dominance to language coexistence. We find that the coexistence of languages is more difficult to maintain in the bilinguals model, where the presence of bilinguals facilitates the ultimate dominance of one of the two languages. A stability analysis reveals that the coexistence is more unlikely to happen in poorly connected than in fully connected networks, and that the dominance of just one language is enhanced as the connectivity decreases. This dominance effect is even stronger in a two-dimensional space, where domain coarsening tends to drive the system towards language consensus

  5. A macroscopic model to simulate the mechanically induced martensitic transformation in metastable austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdahcıoğlu, E.S.; Geijselaers, H.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanically induced martensitic transformation and the associated transformation plasticity phenomena in austenitic stainless steels are studied. The mechanisms responsible for the transformation are investigated and put into perspective based on experimental evidence. The stress and strain partitioning into the austenite and martensite phases are formulated using a mean-field homogenization approach. At this intermediate length-scale the average stress in the austenite phase is computed and utilized to compute the mechanical driving force resolved in the material. The amount of transformation and the transformation plasticity is derived as a function of the driving force. The mechanical response of the material is obtained by combining the homogenization and the transformation models. The model is verified by mechanical tests under biaxial loading conditions during which different transformation rates are observed. As a final verification of the model, a bending test is used which manifests the stress-state dependency of the transformation.

  6. Macroscopic calculational model of fission gas release from water reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Masaki

    1993-01-01

    Existing models for estimating fission gas release rate usually have fuel temperature as independent variable. Use of fuel temperature, however, often brings an excess ambiguity in the estimation because it is not a rigorously definable quantity as a function of heat generation rate and burnup. To derive a mathematical model that gives gas release rate explicitly as a function of design and operational parameters, the Booth-type diffusional model was modified by changing the character of the diffusion constant from physically meaningful quantity into a mere mathematical parameter, and also changing its temperature dependency into power dependency. The derived formula was found, by proper choice of arbitrary constants, to satisfactorily predict the release rates under a variety of irradiation histories up to a burnup of 60,000 MWd/t. For simple power histories, the equation can be solved analytically by defining several transcendental functions, which enables simple calculation of release rate using graphs. (author)

  7. Active learning of constitutive relation from mesoscopic dynamics for macroscopic modeling of non-Newtonian flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lifei; Li, Zhen; Caswell, Bruce; Ouyang, Jie; Karniadakis, George Em

    2018-06-01

    We simulate complex fluids by means of an on-the-fly coupling of the bulk rheology to the underlying microstructure dynamics. In particular, a continuum model of polymeric fluids is constructed without a pre-specified constitutive relation, but instead it is actively learned from mesoscopic simulations where the dynamics of polymer chains is explicitly computed. To couple the bulk rheology of polymeric fluids and the microscale dynamics of polymer chains, the continuum approach (based on the finite volume method) provides the transient flow field as inputs for the (mesoscopic) dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), and in turn DPD returns an effective constitutive relation to close the continuum equations. In this multiscale modeling procedure, we employ an active learning strategy based on Gaussian process regression (GPR) to minimize the number of expensive DPD simulations, where adaptively selected DPD simulations are performed only as necessary. Numerical experiments are carried out for flow past a circular cylinder of a non-Newtonian fluid, modeled at the mesoscopic level by bead-spring chains. The results show that only five DPD simulations are required to achieve an effective closure of the continuum equations at Reynolds number Re = 10. Furthermore, when Re is increased to 100, only one additional DPD simulation is required for constructing an extended GPR-informed model closure. Compared to traditional message-passing multiscale approaches, applying an active learning scheme to multiscale modeling of non-Newtonian fluids can significantly increase the computational efficiency. Although the method demonstrated here obtains only a local viscosity from the polymer dynamics, it can be extended to other multiscale models of complex fluids whose macro-rheology is unknown.

  8. Macroscopic model description of heavy-ion induced complex-fragment emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carjan, N.

    1988-01-01

    The Yukawa-plus-exponential finite-range model and the standard liquid-drop model are shortly reviewed and compared. The dependence of the barrier heights and of the saddle-point shapes on mass-asymmetry and on angular momentum is studied for the compound nuclei 110 Sn, 149 Tb and 194 Hg. The predicted asymmetric-fission barriers, charge yields and total kinetic energies are compared with experimental data obtained from the deexcitation of compound nuclei by complex-fragment emission

  9. Thermophoresis of a spherical particle: Modeling through moment-based, macroscopic transport equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padrino, Juan C.; Sprittles, James; Lockerby, Duncan

    2017-11-01

    Thermophoresis refers to the forces on and motions of objects caused by temperature gradients when these objects are exposed to rarefied gases. This phenomenon can occur when the ratio of the gas mean free path to the characteristic physical length scale (Knudsen number) is not negligible. In this work, we obtain the thermophoretic force on a rigid, heat-conducting spherical particle immersed in a rarefied gas resulting from a uniform temperature gradient imposed far from the sphere. To this end, we model the gas dynamics using the steady, linearized version of the so-called regularized 13-moment equations (R13). This set of equations, derived from the Boltzmann equation using the moment method, provides closures to the mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws in the form of constitutive, transport equations for the stress and heat flux that extends the Navier-Stokes-Fourier model to include rarefaction effects. Integration of the pressure and stress on the surface of the sphere leads to the net force as a function of the Knudsen number, dimensionless temperature gradient, and particle-to-gas thermal conductivity ratio. Results from this expression are compared with predictions from other moment-based models as well as from kinetic models. Supported in the UK by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EP/N016602/1).

  10. Macroscopic Modeling of a One-Dimensional Electrochemical Cell using the Poisson-Nernst-Planck Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, David

    This thesis presents the one-dimensional equations, numerical method and simulations of a model to characterize the dynamical operation of an electrochemical cell. This model extends the current state-of-the art in that it accounts, in a primitive way, for the physics of the electrolyte/electrode interface and incorporates diffuse-charge dynamics, temperature coupling, surface coverage, and polarization phenomena. The one-dimensional equations account for a system with one or two mobile ions of opposite charge, and the electrode reaction we consider (when one is needed) is a one-electron electrodeposition reaction. Though the modeled system is far from representing a realistic electrochemical device, our results show a range of dynamics and behaviors which have not been observed previously, and explore the numerical challenges required when adding more complexity to a model. Furthermore, the basic transport equations (which are developed in three spatial dimensions) can in future accomodate the inclusion of additional physics, and coupling to more complex boundary conditions that incorporate two-dimensional surface phenomena and multi-rate reactions. In the model, the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations are used to model diffusion and electromigration in an electrolyte, and the generalized Frumkin-Butler-Volmer equation is used to model reaction kinetics at electrodes. An energy balance equation is derived and coupled to the diffusion-migration equation. The model also includes dielectric polarization effects by introducing different values of the dielectric permittivity in different regions of the bulk, as well as accounting for surface coverage effects due to adsorption, and finite size "crowding", or steric effects. Advection effects are not modeled but could in future be incorporated. In order to solve the coupled PDE's, we use a variable step size second order scheme in time and finite differencing in space. Numerical tests are performed on a simplified system and

  11. Dynamics of a macroscopic model characterizing mutualism of search engines and web sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanshi; Wu, Hong

    2006-05-01

    We present a model to describe the mutualism relationship between search engines and web sites. In the model, search engines and web sites benefit from each other while the search engines are derived products of the web sites and cannot survive independently. Our goal is to show strategies for the search engines to survive in the internet market. From mathematical analysis of the model, we show that mutualism does not always result in survival. We show various conditions under which the search engines would tend to extinction, persist or grow explosively. Then by the conditions, we deduce a series of strategies for the search engines to survive in the internet market. We present conditions under which the initial number of consumers of the search engines has little contribution to their persistence, which is in agreement with the results in previous works. Furthermore, we show novel conditions under which the initial value plays an important role in the persistence of the search engines and deduce new strategies. We also give suggestions for the web sites to cooperate with the search engines in order to form a win-win situation.

  12. Investigation on macroscopic cross section model for BWR pin-by-pin core analysis - 118

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, T.; Tada, K.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamane, Y.; Kosaka, S.; Hirano, G.

    2010-01-01

    A cross section model used in the pin-by-pin core analysis for BWR is investigated. In the pin-by-pin core calculation method, pin-cell averaged cross sections are calculated for many combinations of state and history variables that have influences on the cross section and are tabulated prior to the core calculations. Variation of a cross section in a core simulator is classified into two different types, i.e., the instantaneous effect and the history effect. The instantaneous effect is incorporated by the variation of cross section which is caused by the instantaneous change of state variables. For this effect, the exposure, the void fraction, the fuel temperature, the moderator temperature and the control rod are used as indexes. The history effect is the cumulative effect of state variables. We treat this effect with a unified approach using the spectral history. To confirm accuracy of the cross section model, the pin-by-pin fission rate distribution and the k-infinity of fuel assembly which are obtained with the tabulated and the reference cross sections are compared. For the instantaneous effect, the present cross section model well reproduces the reference results for all off-nominal conditions. For the history effect, however, considerable differences both on the pin-by-pin fission rate distribution and the k-infinity are observed at high exposure points. (authors)

  13. Macroscopic rate equation modeling of trapping/detrapping of hydrogen isotopes in tungsten materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodille, E.A., E-mail: etienne.hodille@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Bonnin, X. [LSPM-CNRS, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, F-93430 Villetaneuse (France); Bisson, R.; Angot, T. [Aix-Marseille Université, PIIM, CNRS, UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille (France); Becquart, C.S. [Université Lille I, UMET, UMR 8207, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq cédex France (France); Layet, J.M. [Aix-Marseille Université, PIIM, CNRS, UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille (France); Grisolia, C. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2015-12-15

    Relevant parameters for trapping of Hydrogen Isotopes (HIs) in polycrystalline tungsten are determined with the MHIMS code (Migration of Hydrogen Isotopes in MaterialS) which is used to reproduce Thermal Desorption Spectrometry experiments. Three types of traps are found: two intrinsic traps (detrapping energy of 0.87 eV and 1.00 eV) and one extrinsic trap created by ion irradiation (detrapping energy of 1.50 eV). Then MHIMS is used to simulate HIs retention at different fluences and different implantation temperatures. Simulation results agree well with experimental data. It is shown that at 300 K the retention is limited by diffusion in the bulk. For implantation temperatures above 500 K, the retention is limited by trap creation processes. Above 600 K, the retention drops by two orders of magnitude as compared to the retention at 300 K. With the determined detrapping energies, HIs outgassing at room temperature is predicted. After ions implantation at 300 K, 45% of the initial retention is lost to vacuum in 300 000 s while during this time the remaining trapped HIs diffuse twice as deep into the bulk. - Highlights: • Code development to solve numerically the model equations of diffusion and trapping of hydrogen in metals. • Parametrization of the model trapping parameters (detrapping energies and density): fitting of experimental TDS spectrum. • Confrontation model/experiment: evolution of retention with fluence and implantation temperature. • Investigation of period of rest between implantation and TDS on retention and depth profile.

  14. Fast fission phenomenon, deep inelastic reactions and compound nucleus formation described within a dynamical macroscopic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregoire, C.; Ngo, C.; Remaud, B.

    1982-01-01

    We present a dynamical model to describe dissipative heavy ion reactions. It treats explicitly the relative motion of the two ions, the mass asymmetry of the system and the projection of the isospin of each ion. The deformations, which are induced during the collision, are simulated with a time-dependent interaction potential. This is done by a time-dependent transition between a sudden interaction potential in the entrance channel and an adiabatic potential in the exit channel. The model allows us to compute the compound-nucleus cross section and multidifferential cross-sections for deep inelastic reactions. In addition, for some systems, and under certain conditions which are discussed in detail, a new dissipative heavy ion collision appears: fast-fission phenomenon which has intermediate properties between deep inelastic and compound nucleus reactions. The calculated properties concerning fast fission are compared with experimental results and reproduce some of those which could not be understood as belonging to deep inelastic or compound-nucleus reactions. (orig.)

  15. Nuclear physics: Macroscopic aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiatecki, W.J.

    1993-12-01

    A systematic macroscopic, leptodermous approach to nuclear statics and dynamics is described, based formally on the assumptions ℎ → 0 and b/R << 1, where b is the surface diffuseness and R the nuclear radius. The resulting static model of shell-corrected nuclear binding energies and deformabilities is accurate to better than 1 part in a thousand and yields a firm determination of the principal properties of the nuclear fluid. As regards dynamics, the above approach suggests that nuclear shape evolutions will often be dominated by dissipation, but quantitative comparisons with experimental data are more difficult than in the case of statics. In its simplest liquid drop version the model exhibits interesting formal connections to the classic astronomical problem of rotating gravitating masses

  16. Statistical modeling of the reactions Fe(+) + N2O → FeO(+) + N2 and FeO(+) + CO → Fe(+) + CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushakov, Vladimir G; Troe, Jürgen; Johnson, Ryan S; Guo, Hua; Ard, Shaun G; Melko, Joshua J; Shuman, Nicholas S; Viggiano, Albert A

    2015-08-14

    The rates of the reactions Fe(+) + N2O → FeO(+) + N2 and FeO(+) + CO → Fe(+) + CO2 are modeled by statistical rate theory accounting for energy- and angular momentum-specific rate constants for formation of the primary and secondary cationic adducts and their backward and forward reactions. The reactions are both suggested to proceed on sextet and quartet potential energy surfaces with efficient, but probably not complete, equilibration by spin-inversion of the populations of the sextet and quartet adducts. The influence of spin-inversion on the overall reaction rate is investigated. The differences of the two reaction rates mostly are due to different numbers of entrance states (atom + linear rotor or linear rotor + linear rotor, respectively). The reaction Fe(+) + N2O was studied either with (6)Fe(+) or with (4)Fe(+) reactants. Differences in the rate constants of (6)Fe(+) and (4)Fe(+) reacting with N2O are attributed to different contributions from electronically excited potential energy surfaces, such as they originate from the open-electronic shell reactants.

  17. Modeling of magnetic hystereses in soft MREs filled with NdFeB particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalina, K. A.; Brummund, J.; Metsch, P.; Kästner, M.; Borin, D. Yu; Linke, J. M.; Odenbach, S.

    2017-10-01

    Herein, we investigate the structure-property relationships of soft magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) filled with remanently magnetizable particles. The study is motivated from experimental results which indicate a large difference between the magnetization loops of soft MREs filled with NdFeB particles and the loops of such particles embedded in a comparatively stiff matrix, e.g. an epoxy resin. We present a microscale model for MREs based on a general continuum formulation of the magnetomechanical boundary value problem which is valid for finite strains. In particular, we develop an energetically consistent constitutive model for the hysteretic magnetization behavior of the magnetically hard particles. The microstructure is discretized and the problem is solved numerically in terms of a coupled nonlinear finite element approach. Since the local magnetic and mechanical fields are resolved explicitly inside the heterogeneous microstructure of the MRE, our model also accounts for interactions of particles close to each other. In order to connect the microscopic fields to effective macroscopic quantities of the MRE, a suitable computational homogenization scheme is used. Based on this modeling approach, it is demonstrated that the observable macroscopic behavior of the considered MREs results from the rotation of the embedded particles. Furthermore, the performed numerical simulations indicate that the reversion of the sample’s magnetization occurs due to a combination of particle rotations and internal domain conversion processes. All of our simulation results obtained for such materials are in a good qualitative agreement with the experiments.

  18. Effect of film roughness in Fe/MgO/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions: model calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edalati Boostan, Saeideh; Heiliger, Christian [I. Physikalisches Institut, Justus Liebig University Giessen, D-35392 (Germany); Moradi, Hosein [Department of Physics,Faculty of Sciences, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-07-01

    We calculate how interface roughness affects the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) in Fe/MgO/Fe (100) junctions. The used method is based on a single-band tight-binding (SBTB) approximation employing the Green's function formalism. We investigate the influence of disorder at the TMR ratio. Thereby, the disorder is modeled by considering different occupation probabilities of Fe and MgO at interface sites. We calculate the current densities for parallel and anti-parallel configurations for different disorders. The results show that the roughness decreases the TMR that match well with experimental observations.

  19. On the connection between the macroscopical and microscopical evolution in an exactly soluble hopping model. II. Charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banyai, L.; Gartner, P.

    1979-07-01

    The hopping rate equation for charged particles with self-consistent Coulomb interaction on an arbitrary periodic lattice can be solved exactly. It is shown that if one scales the time t and the distances x (including the characteristic length l as t → lambda 2 t, x → lambda x), then in the lambda → infinity limit the charge density and the potential tend to their macroscopical electrodynamic counterparts faster than lambda sup(-3) and lambda sup(-1) respectively. (author)

  20. Comparison of Ab initio low-energy models for LaFePO, LaFeAsO, BaFe2As2, LiFeAs, FeSe, and FeTe. Electron correlation and covalency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, Takashi; Nakamura, Kazuma; Arita, Ryotaro; Imada, Masatoshi

    2010-01-01

    Effective low-energy Hamiltonians for several different families of iron-based superconductors are compared after deriving them from the downfolding scheme based on first-principles calculations. Systematic dependences of the derived model parameters on the families are elucidated, many of which are understood from the systematic variation of the covalency between Fe-3d and pnictogen-/chalcogen-p orbitals. First, LaFePO, LaFeAsO (1111), BaFe 2 As 2 (122), LiFeAs (111), FeSe, and FeTe (11) have overall similar band structures near the Fermi level, where the total widths of 10-fold Fe-3d bands are mostly around 4.5 eV. However, the derived effective models of the 10-fold Fe-3d bands (d model) for FeSe and FeTe have substantially larger effective onsite Coulomb interactions U - 4.2 and 3.4 eV, respectively, after the screening by electrons on other bands and after averaging over orbitals, as compared to ∼2.5 eV for LaFeAsO. The difference is similar in the effective models containing p orbitals of As, Se or Te (dp or dpp model), where U ranges from ∼4 eV for the 1111 family to ∼7 eV for the 11 family. The exchange interaction J has a similar tendency. The family dependence of models indicates a wide variation ranging from weak correlation regime (LaFePO) to substantially strong correlation regime (FeSe). The origin of the larger effective interaction in the 11 family is ascribed to smaller spread of the Wannier orbitals generating larger bare interaction, and to fewer screening channels by the other bands. This variation is primarily derived from the distance h between the pnictogen/chalcogen position and the Fe layer: The longer h for the 11 family generates more ionic character of the bonding between iron and anion atoms, while the shorter h for the 1111 family leads to more covalent-bonding character, the larger spread of the Wannier orbitals, and more efficient screening by the anion p orbitals. The screened interaction of the d model is strongly orbital

  1. Side impact injury prediction with fe simulations of the new advanced world sid fe dummy models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y.; Zhu, F.; Wang, Z.; Ratingen, M.R. van

    2007-01-01

    Two new World SID (50th and 5th) FE models were developed for providing virtual tools of predicting occupant injuries during vehicle side collisions. The virtual dummy models have been verified with their physical counterparts in aspects of lab certification tests, bio-fidelity and sled tests. Many

  2. A macroscopic constitutive model of temperature-induced phase transition of polycrystalline Ni{sub 2}MnGa by directional solidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yuping, E-mail: zhuyuping@126.com; Gu, Yunling; Liu, Hongguang

    2015-02-25

    Directional solidification technology has been widely used to improve the properties of polycrystalline Ni{sub 2}MnGa materials. Mechanical training can adjust the internal organizational structures of the materials, reduce the stress of twin boundaries motion, and then result in larger strain at lower outfield levels. In this paper, we test the microscopic structure of Ni{sub 2}MnGa polycrystalline ferromagnetic shape memory alloy produced by directional solidification and compress it along two axes successively for mechanical training. The influences of pre-compressive stresses on the temperature-induced strains are analyzed. The macroscopic mechanical behaviors show anisotropy. According to the generating mechanism of the macroscopic strain, a three-dimensional constitutive model is established. Based on thermodynamic method, the kinetic equations of the martensitic transformation and inverse transformation are presented considering the driving force and energy dissipation. The prediction curves of temperature-induce strains along two different directions are investigated. And the results coincide well with the experiment data. It well explains the macroscopic anisotropy mechanical behaviors and fits for using in engineering.

  3. Rank distributions: A panoramic macroscopic outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliazar, Iddo I.; Cohen, Morrel H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a panoramic macroscopic outlook of rank distributions. We establish a general framework for the analysis of rank distributions, which classifies them into five macroscopic "socioeconomic" states: monarchy, oligarchy-feudalism, criticality, socialism-capitalism, and communism. Oligarchy-feudalism is shown to be characterized by discrete macroscopic rank distributions, and socialism-capitalism is shown to be characterized by continuous macroscopic size distributions. Criticality is a transition state between oligarchy-feudalism and socialism-capitalism, which can manifest allometric scaling with multifractal spectra. Monarchy and communism are extreme forms of oligarchy-feudalism and socialism-capitalism, respectively, in which the intrinsic randomness vanishes. The general framework is applied to three different models of rank distributions—top-down, bottom-up, and global—and unveils each model's macroscopic universality and versatility. The global model yields a macroscopic classification of the generalized Zipf law, an omnipresent form of rank distributions observed across the sciences. An amalgamation of the three models establishes a universal rank-distribution explanation for the macroscopic emergence of a prevalent class of continuous size distributions, ones governed by unimodal densities with both Pareto and inverse-Pareto power-law tails.

  4. Modeling thermodynamics of Fe-N phases; characterisation of e-Fe2N1-z

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pekelharing, M.I.; Böttger, A.; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    1999-01-01

    In order to arrive at modeling the thermodynamics of Fe-N phases, including long-range (LRO) and short-range ordering (SRO) of the N atoms, it is important to understand the role of N interstitially dissolved in an Fe-host lattice. The crystal structure of -Fe2N1-z consists of an h.c.p. iron...... sublattice and a hexagonal nitrogen sublattice formed by octahedral interstices of the Fe sublattice [1]. Two ground-state structures have been proposed for the ordered arrangement of the N atoms on their own sublattice [1], which were shown to be thermodynamically favourable [2]: configuration A for Fe2N1...... investigated with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Mössbauer spectroscopy. A thermodynamic model accounting for the two configurations of LRO of the N atoms [2,3] was fitted to the N-absorption isotherm at 723 K and resulted in the occupancies of the sites of the nitrogen sublattice. A miscibility gap between...

  5. Macroscopic theory of superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, W.J. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A macroscopic theory for bulk superconductors is developed in the framework of the theory for other magnetic materials, where ''magnetization'' current is separated from ''free'' current on the basis of scale. This contrasts with the usual separation into equilibrium and nonequilibrium currents. In the present approach magnetization, on a large macroscopic scale, results from the vortex current, while the Meissner current and other surface currents are surface contributions to the Maxwell j. The results are important for the development of thermodynamics in type-II superconductors. The advantage of the description developed here is that magnetization becomes a local concept and its associated magnetic field can be given physical meaning

  6. Formation mechanisms of neutral Fe layers in the thermosphere at Antarctica studied with a thermosphere-ionosphere Fe/Fe+ (TIFe) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xinzhao; Yu, Zhibin

    2017-06-01

    With a thermosphere-ionosphere Fe/Fe+ (TIFe) model developed from first principles at the University of Colorado, we present the first quantitative investigation of formation mechanisms of thermospheric Fe layers observed by lidar in Antarctica. These recently discovered neutral metal layers in the thermosphere between 100 and 200 km provide unique tracers for studies of fundamental processes in the space-atmosphere interaction region. The TIFe model formulates and expands the TIFe theory originally proposed by Chu et al. that the thermospheric Fe layers are produced through the neutralization of converged Fe+ layers. Through testing mechanisms and reproducing the 28 May 2011 event at McMurdo, we conceive the lifecycle of meteoric metals via deposition, transport, chemistry, and wave dynamics for thermospheric Fe layers with gravity wave signatures. While the meteor injection of iron species is negligible above 120 km, the polar electric field transports metallic ions Fe+ upward from their main deposition region into the E-F regions, providing the major source of Fe+ (and accordingly Fe) in the thermosphere. Atmospheric wave-induced vertical shears of vertical and horizontal winds converge Fe+ to form dense Fe+ layers. Direct electron-Fe+ recombination is the major channel to neutralize Fe+ layers to form Fe above 120 km. Fe layer shapes are determined by multiple factors of neutral winds, electric field, and aurora activity. Gravity-wave-induced vertical wind plays a key role in forming gravity-wave-shaped Fe layers. Aurora particle precipitation enhances Fe+ neutralization by increasing electron density while accelerating Fe loss via charge transfer with enhanced NO+ and O2+ densities.Plain Language SummaryThe discoveries of neutral metal layers reaching near 200 km in the thermosphere have significant scientific merit because such discoveries challenge the current understandings of upper atmospheric composition, chemistry, dynamics, electrodynamics, and

  7. Macroscopic numerical simulation model of multi-constituent fluid flows in porous medium; Modele macroscopique de simulation numerique d'ecoulements de fluides multiconstituants en milieu poreux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilbois, B.

    2003-07-01

    In this work, a new model is built which allows to take into consideration the overall mass transfer phenomena (in particular convection) taking place inside a mixture of n{sub c} constituents in a porous medium. This model should allow to foresee the quantitative composition of fluids in oil fields and also to improve the knowledge of the flow of different species inside mixtures. The overall physical phenomena taking place at oil fields is explained in the first chapter. Chapter 2 recalls some thermodynamical notions at the equilibrium and outside equilibrium. These notions, necessary to understand the forecasting methods used by petroleum geologists, are described in chapter 3. This chapter includes also a bibliographic study about the methods of simulation of mass and heat transfers in porous media. In chapter 4, using the thermodynamical relations of irreversible processes described in chapter 2, a new type of macroscopic model allowing to describe the overall phenomena analyzed is developed. The numerical method used to solve this new system of equations is precised. Finally, chapter 5 proposes a set of cases for the validation of the uncoupled phenomena and some qualitative examples of modeling of coupled phenomena. (J.S.)

  8. Macroscopic magnetic Self assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Löthman, Per Arvid

    2018-01-01

    Exploring the macroscopic scale's similarities to the microscale is part and parcel of this thesis as reflected in the research question: what can we learn about the microscopic scale by studying the macroscale? Investigations of the environment in which the self-assembly takes place, and the

  9. Macroscopic and microscopic magnetism of metal-metalloid amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcellos, M.A.Z.; Fichtner, P.F.P.; Livi, F.P.; Costa, M.I. da; Baibich, M.N.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper is investigated the interrelation between macroscopic and microscopic magnetic phenomena using experimetnal data from Moessbauer effect and the magnetization of layers of amorphous (Fe 1-x Ni x ) 80 B 20 . The Moessbauer effect measurement show a distribution of hyperfine fields in Fe site as well as a likely distribution of isomeric shifts (M.W.O.) [pt

  10. Modeling Fe II Emission and Revised Fe II (UV) Empirical Templates for the Seyfert 1 Galaxy I Zw 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhweiler, F.; Verner, E.

    2008-03-01

    We use the narrow-lined broad-line region (BLR) of the Seyfert 1 galaxy, I Zw 1, as a laboratory for modeling the ultraviolet (UV) Fe II 2100-3050 Å emission complex. We calculate a grid of Fe II emission spectra representative of BLR clouds and compare them with the observed I Zw 1 spectrum. Our predicted spectrum for log [nH/(cm -3) ] = 11.0, log [ΦH/(cm -2 s-1) ] = 20.5, and ξ/(1 km s-1) = 20, using Cloudy and an 830 level model atom for Fe II with energies up to 14.06 eV, gives a better fit to the UV Fe II emission than models with fewer levels. Our analysis indicates (1) the observed UV Fe II emission must be corrected for an underlying Fe II pseudocontinuum; (2) Fe II emission peaks can be misidentified as that of other ions in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with narrow-lined BLRs possibly affecting deduced physical parameters; (3) the shape of 4200-4700 Å Fe II emission in I Zw 1 and other AGNs is a relative indicator of narrow-line region (NLR) and BLR Fe II emission; (4) predicted ratios of Lyα, C III], and Fe II emission relative to Mg II λ2800 agree with extinction corrected observed I Zw 1 fluxes, except for C IV λ1549 (5) the sensitivity of Fe II emission strength to microturbulence ξ casts doubt on existing relative Fe/Mg abundances derived from Fe II (UV)/Mg II flux ratios. Our calculated Fe II emission spectra, suitable for BLRs in AGNs, are available at http://iacs.cua.edu/people/verner/FeII. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 05-26555.

  11. Thermodynamic modeling of the Co-Fe-O system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Chen, Ming

    2013-01-01

    As a part of the research project aimed at developing a thermodynamic database of the La-Sr-Co-Fe-O system for applications in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs), the Co-Fe-O subsystem was thermodynamically re-modeled in the present work using the CALPHAD methodology. The solid phases were described...... using the Compound Energy Formalism (CEF) and the ionized liquid was modeled with the ionic two-sublattice model based on CEF. A set of self-consistent thermodynamic parameters was obtained eventually. Calculated phase diagrams and thermodynamic properties are presented and compared with experimental...

  12. Macroscopic Optomechanically Induced Transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Jacob; Castelli, Alessandro; Martinez, Luis; Thompson, Johnathon; Chiao, Ray; Sharping, Jay

    Optomechanically induced transparency (OMIT) is an effect wherein the spectrum of a cavity resonance is modified through interference between coupled excitation pathways. In this work we investigate a macroscopic, 3D microwave, superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity incorporating a niobium-coated, silicon-nitride membrane as the flexible boundary. The boundary supports acoustic vibrational resonances, which lead to coupling with the microwave resonances of the SRF cavity. The theoretical development and physical understanding of OMIT for our macroscopic SRF cavity is the same as that for other recently-reported OMIT systems despite vastly different optomechanical coupling factors and device sizes. Our mechanical oscillator has a coupling factor of g0 = 2 π . 1 ×10-5 Hz and is roughly 38 mm in diameter. The Q = 5 ×107 for the SRF cavity allows probing of optomechanical effects in the resolved sideband regime.

  13. Connecting grain-scale physics to macroscopic granular flow behavior using discrete contact-dynamics simulations, centrifuge experiments, and continuum modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Meredith; Stark, Colin; Hung, Chi-Yao; Smith, Breannan; Grinspin, Eitan; Capart, Herve; Li, Liming; Crone, Timothy; Hsu, Leslie; Ling, Hoe

    2014-05-01

    characterize both the convergence of these grain-scale parameters toward the empirical coefficients of the macroscopic descriptions, and the deviations from continuum model predictions caused by nonlocal granular effects for quantities such as erosion rate. We will also summarize the context and implications of our work for both granular physics theory and granular flow hazard risk assessment.

  14. Single macroscopic pillars as model system for bioinspired adhesives: influence of tip dimension, aspect ratio, and tilt angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micciché, Maurizio; Arzt, Eduard; Kroner, Elmar

    2014-05-28

    The goal of our study is to better understand the design parameters of bioinspired dry adhesives inspired by geckos. For this, we fabricated single macroscopic pillars of 400 μm diameter with different aspect ratios and different tip shapes (i.e., flat tips, spherical tips with different radii, and mushroom tips with different diameters). Tilt-angle-dependent adhesion measurements showed that although the tip shape of the pillars strongly influences the pull-off force, the pull-off strength is similar for flat and mushroom-shaped tips. We found no tilt-angle dependency of adhesion for spherical tip structures and, except for high tilt angle and low preload experiments, no tilt-angle effect for mushroom-tip pillars. For flat-tip pillars, we found a strong influence of tilt angle on adhesion, which decreased linearly with increasing aspect ratio. The experiments show that for the tested aspect ratios between 1 and 5, a linear decrease of tilt-angle dependency is found. The results of our studies will help to design bioinspired adhesives for application on smooth and rough surfaces.

  15. Modeling on Fe-Cr microstructure: evolution with Cr content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Arroyo, D.; Perlado, J.M.; Hernandez-Mayoral, M.; Caturla, M.J.; Victoria, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The minimum energy configuration of interstitials in the Fe-Cr system, which is the base for the low activation steels being developed in the European fusion reactor materials community, is determined by magnetism. Magnetism plays also a role in the atomic configurations found with increasing Cr content. Results will be presented from a program in which the microstructure evolution produced after heavy ion irradiation in the range from room temperature to 80 K is studied as a function of the Cr content in alloys produced under well controlled conditions, i.e. from high purity elements and with adequate heat treatment. It is expected that these measurements will serve as matrix for model validation. The first step in such modeling sequence is being performed by modeling the evolution of displacement cascades in Fe using the Dudarev -Derlet and Mendeleev potentials for Fe and the Caro potential for Fe-Cr. It is of particular interest to study the evolution of high-energy cascades, where an attempt will be made to clarify the role of the evolution of sub-cascades. Kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) techniques will be used then to simulate the defect evolution. A new parallel kMC code is being implemented for this purpose. (authors)

  16. Modeling thermodynamics of Fe-N phases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pekelharing, Marjon I.; Böttger, Amarante; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    1999-01-01

    In the present work homogeneous epsilon-nitride powders prepared at 723 K, having nitrogen contents ranging from 26.1 at. % N (z=0.29) to 31.1 at.% N (z=0.10), were investigated with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Mössbauer spectroscopy. A thermodynamic model accounting for the two possible configur......In the present work homogeneous epsilon-nitride powders prepared at 723 K, having nitrogen contents ranging from 26.1 at. % N (z=0.29) to 31.1 at.% N (z=0.10), were investigated with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Mössbauer spectroscopy. A thermodynamic model accounting for the two possible...

  17. Thermodynamic modeling of the Sr-Co-Fe-O system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wei Wei; Povoden-Karadeniz, Erwin; Chen, Ming

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews and assesses phase equilibria and thermodynamic properties of phases in the Sr-Co-Fe-O system, with a focus on oxides, especially the SrCo1 - xFexO3 - δ perovskite. In our work, the SrCo1 - xFexO3 - δ perovskite was modeled with a three-sublattice model, where the three...... sublattices correspond to the A, B and oxygen sites in an ABO3 perovskite, respectively. A number of other important ternary oxide phases in Sr-Co-O and Sr-Co-Fe-O were also considered. Available thermodynamic and phase diagram data were carefully assessed. A thermodynamic description of Sr-Co-O was derived...... using the CALPHAD approach and was further extrapolated to that of Sr-Co-Fe-O. The thermodynamic database of Sr-Co-Fe-O established in this work allows for calculating phase diagrams, thermodynamic properties, cation distribution and defect chemistry properties, and therefore enables material...

  18. Simulating Durum Wheat (Triticum turgidum L. Response to Root Zone Salinity based on Statistics and Macroscopic Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Reza Jalali

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Salinity as an abiotic stress can cause excessive disturbance for seed germination and plant sustainable production. Salinity with three different mechanisms of osmotic potential reduction, ionic toxicity and disturbance of plant nutritional balance, can reduce performance of the final product. Planning for optimal use of available water and saline water with poor quality in agricultural activities is of great importance. Wheat is one of the eight main food sources including rice, corn, sugar beet, cattle, sorghum, millet and cassava which provide 70-90% of all calories and 66-90% of the protein consumed in developing countries. Durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. is an important crop grows in some arid and semi-arid areas of the world such as Middle East and North Africa. In these regions, in addition to soil salinity, sharp decline in rainfall and a sharp drop in groundwater levels in recent years has emphasized on the efficient use of limited soil and water resources. Consequently, in order to use brackish water for agricultural productions, it is required to analyze its quantitative response to salinity stress by simulation models in those regions. The objective of this study is to assess the capability of statistics and macro-simulation models of yield in saline conditions. Materials and methods In this study, two general approach of simulation includes process-physical models and statistical-experimental models were investigated. For this purpose, in order to quantify the salinity effect on seed relative yield of durum wheat (Behrang Variety at different levels of soil salinity, process-physical models of Maas & Hoffman, van Genuchten & Hoffman, Dirksen et al. and Homaee et al. models were used. Also, statistical-experimental models of Modified Gompertz Function, Bi-Exponential Function and Modified Weibull Function were used too. In order to get closer to real conditions of growth circumstances in saline soils, a natural saline

  19. An Improved Model for FE Modeling and Simulation of Closed Cell Al-Alloy Foams

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan, MD. Anwarul

    2010-01-01

    Cell wall material properties of Al-alloy foams have been derived by a combination of nanoindentation experiment and numerical simulation. Using the derived material properties in FE (finite element) modeling of foams, the existing constitutive models of closed-cell Al-alloy foams have been evaluated against experimental results. An improved representative model has been proposed for FE analysis of closed-cell Al-alloy foams. The improved model consists of a combination of spherical and cruci...

  20. Thermodynamic modeling of the Sr-Co-Fe-O system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wei Wei; Povoden-Karadeniz, Erwin; Chen, Ming

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews and assesses phase equilibria and thermodynamic properties of phases in the Sr-Co-Fe-O system, with a focus on oxides, especially the SrCo1 - xFexO3 - δ perovskite. In our work, the SrCo1 - xFexO3 - δ perovskite was modeled with a three-sublattice model, where the three...... sublattices correspond to the A, B and oxygen sites in an ABO3 perovskite, respectively. A number of other important ternary oxide phases in Sr-Co-O and Sr-Co-Fe-O were also considered. Available thermodynamic and phase diagram data were carefully assessed. A thermodynamic description of Sr-Co-O was derived...

  1. A big-data model for multi-modal public transportation with application to macroscopic control and optimisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faizrahnemoon, Mahsa; Schlote, Arieh; Maggi, Lorenzo; Crisostomi, Emanuele; Shorten, Robert

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes a Markov-chain-based approach to modelling multi-modal transportation networks. An advantage of the model is the ability to accommodate complex dynamics and handle huge amounts of data. The transition matrix of the Markov chain is built and the model is validated using the data extracted from a traffic simulator. A realistic test-case using multi-modal data from the city of London is given to further support the ability of the proposed methodology to handle big quantities of data. Then, we use the Markov chain as a control tool to improve the overall efficiency of a transportation network, and some practical examples are described to illustrate the potentials of the approach.

  2. Multiscale Modeling of Polycrystalline NiTi Shape Memory Alloy under Various Plastic Deformation Conditions by Coupling Microstructure Evolution and Macroscopic Mechanical Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Li; Jiang, Shuyong; Zhou, Tao; Tu, Jian; Shi, Laixin; Chen, Qiang; Yang, Mingbo

    2017-10-13

    Numerical modeling of microstructure evolution in various regions during uniaxial compression and canning compression of NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) are studied through combined macroscopic and microscopic finite element simulation in order to investigate plastic deformation of NiTi SMA at 400 °C. In this approach, the macroscale material behavior is modeled with a relatively coarse finite element mesh, and then the corresponding deformation history in some selected regions in this mesh is extracted by the sub-model technique of finite element code ABAQUS and subsequently used as boundary conditions for the microscale simulation by means of crystal plasticity finite element method (CPFEM). Simulation results show that NiTi SMA exhibits an inhomogeneous plastic deformation at the microscale. Moreover, regions that suffered canning compression sustain more homogeneous plastic deformation by comparison with the corresponding regions subjected to uniaxial compression. The mitigation of inhomogeneous plastic deformation contributes to reducing the statistically stored dislocation (SSD) density in polycrystalline aggregation and also to reducing the difference of stress level in various regions of deformed NiTi SMA sample, and therefore sustaining large plastic deformation in the canning compression process.

  3. Multiscale Modeling of Polycrystalline NiTi Shape Memory Alloy under Various Plastic Deformation Conditions by Coupling Microstructure Evolution and Macroscopic Mechanical Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Hu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerical modeling of microstructure evolution in various regions during uniaxial compression and canning compression of NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA are studied through combined macroscopic and microscopic finite element simulation in order to investigate plastic deformation of NiTi SMA at 400 °C. In this approach, the macroscale material behavior is modeled with a relatively coarse finite element mesh, and then the corresponding deformation history in some selected regions in this mesh is extracted by the sub-model technique of finite element code ABAQUS and subsequently used as boundary conditions for the microscale simulation by means of crystal plasticity finite element method (CPFEM. Simulation results show that NiTi SMA exhibits an inhomogeneous plastic deformation at the microscale. Moreover, regions that suffered canning compression sustain more homogeneous plastic deformation by comparison with the corresponding regions subjected to uniaxial compression. The mitigation of inhomogeneous plastic deformation contributes to reducing the statistically stored dislocation (SSD density in polycrystalline aggregation and also to reducing the difference of stress level in various regions of deformed NiTi SMA sample, and therefore sustaining large plastic deformation in the canning compression process.

  4. Seismic scanning tunneling macroscope - Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.

    2012-09-01

    We propose a seismic scanning tunneling macroscope (SSTM) that can detect the presence of sub-wavelength scatterers in the near-field of either the source or the receivers. Analytic formulas for the time reverse mirror (TRM) profile associated with a single scatterer model show that the spatial resolution limit to be, unlike the Abbe limit of λ/2, independent of wavelength and linearly proportional to the source-scatterer separation as long as the point scatterer is in the near-field region; if the sub-wavelength scatterer is a spherical impedance discontinuity then the resolution will also be limited by the radius of the sphere. Therefore, superresolution imaging can be achieved as the scatterer approaches the source. This is analogous to an optical scanning tunneling microscope that has sub-wavelength resolution. Scaled to seismic frequencies, it is theoretically possible to extract 100 Hz information from 20 Hz data by imaging of near-field seismic energy.

  5. Seismic scanning tunneling macroscope - Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.; Hanafy, Sherif M.; Huang, Yunsong

    2012-01-01

    We propose a seismic scanning tunneling macroscope (SSTM) that can detect the presence of sub-wavelength scatterers in the near-field of either the source or the receivers. Analytic formulas for the time reverse mirror (TRM) profile associated with a single scatterer model show that the spatial resolution limit to be, unlike the Abbe limit of λ/2, independent of wavelength and linearly proportional to the source-scatterer separation as long as the point scatterer is in the near-field region; if the sub-wavelength scatterer is a spherical impedance discontinuity then the resolution will also be limited by the radius of the sphere. Therefore, superresolution imaging can be achieved as the scatterer approaches the source. This is analogous to an optical scanning tunneling microscope that has sub-wavelength resolution. Scaled to seismic frequencies, it is theoretically possible to extract 100 Hz information from 20 Hz data by imaging of near-field seismic energy.

  6. Modelling nutrient fluxes from source to river load : a macroscopic analysis applied to the Rhine and Elbe basins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, de M.

    2000-01-01

    In many European rivers, including the major streams of the Rhine and Elbe basins, the nutrient load (N and P) still exceeds target levels. In this paper, a model is presented that describes the river nutrient load as a function of nutrient sources, runoff and lithology in the upstream basin. The

  7. A combined microscopic and macroscopic approach to modeling the transport of pathogenic microorganisms from nonpoint sources of pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yeghiazarian, L.L.; Walker, M.J.; Binning, Philip John

    2006-01-01

    is important for accurate risk assessment and prediction of water contamination events. This paper presents a stochastic Markov model of microorganism transport, with distinct states of microorganism behavior capturing the microbial partitioning between solid and aqueous phases in runoff and soil surface...

  8. Macroscopic averages in Qed in material media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutra, S.M.; Furuya, K.

    1997-01-01

    The starting point of macroscopic theories of quantum electrodynamics in material media is usually the classical macroscopic Maxwell equations that are then quantized. Such approach however, is based on the assumption that a macroscopic description is attainable, i.e., it assumes that we can describe the effect of the atoms of material on the field only in terms of a dielectric constant in the regime where the field has to be treated quantum mechanically. The problem we address is whether this assumption is valid at all and if so, under what conditions. We have chosen a simple model, which allows us to start from first principles and determine the validity of these approximations, without simply taking them for granted as in previous papers

  9. Asymmetric rotor-like probes to polarized fluorescence study of the macroscopically oriented uniaxial media: Model parameters recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buczkowski, M.; Fisz, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the possibility of the numerical data modelling in the case of angle- and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy is investigated. The asymmetric fluorescence probes are assumed to undergo the restricted rotational diffusion in a hosting medium. This process is described quantitatively by the diffusion tensor and the aligning potential. The evolution of the system is expressed in terms of the Smoluchowski equation with an appropriate time-developing operator. A matrix representation of this operator is calculated, then symmetrized and diagonalized. The resulting propagator is used to generate the synthetic noisy data set that imitates results of experimental measurements. The data set serves as a groundwork to the χ 2 optimization, performed by the genetic algorithm followed by the gradient search, in order to recover model parameters, which are diagonal elements of the diffusion tensor, aligning potential expansion coefficients and directions of the electronic dipole moments. This whole procedure properly identifies model parameters, showing that the outlined formalism should be taken in the account in the case of analysing real experimental data

  10. A consistent and verifiable macroscopic model for the dissolution of liquid CO2 in water under hydrate forming conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radhakrishnan, R.; Demurov, A.; Trout, B.L.; Herzog, H.

    2003-01-01

    Direct injection of liquid CO 2 into the ocean has been proposed as one method to reduce the emission levels of CO 2 into the atmosphere. When liquid CO 2 is injected (normally as droplets) at ocean depths >500 m, a solid interfacial region between the CO 2 and the water is observed to form. This region consists of hydrate clathrates and hinders the rate of dissolution of CO 2 . It is, therefore, expected to have a significant impact on the injection of liquid CO 2 into the ocean. Up until now, no consistent and predictive model for the shrinking of droplets of CO 2 under hydrate forming conditions has been proposed. This is because all models proposed to date have had too many unknowns. By computing rates of the physical and chemical processes in hydrates via molecular dynamics simulations, we have been able to determine independently some of these unknowns. We then propose the most reasonable model and use it to make independent predictions of the rates of mass transfer and thickness of the hydrate region. These predictions are compared to measurements, and implications to the rates of shrinkage of CO 2 droplets under varying flow conditions are discussed. (author)

  11. Microscopic and macroscopic bell inequalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, E.

    1984-01-01

    The Bell inequalities, being derived for micro-systems, cannot be tested by (macroscopic) experiments without additional assumptions. A macroscopic definition of local realism is proposed which might be the starting point for deriving Bell inequalities testable without auxiliary assumptions. (orig.)

  12. Extension of Mediema's Macroscopic Atom Model to the Elements of Group 16 (O, S, Se, Te ,Po)

    CERN Document Server

    Neuhausen, J

    2003-01-01

    A consistent set of Miedema-parameters has been developed for the elements of the chalcogen group (Group 16 of the periodic table of the elements: 0, S, Se, Te, Po) from ab-initio quantum-mechanical calculations as weIl as empirical correlations. Using this parameter set thermochemical properties such as enthalpies of formation of solid metal chalcogenides, partial molar enthalpies of solution of chalcogens in liquid and solid metaIs, partial molar enthalpies of evaporation of the chalcogens from liquid metal solution into the monoatomic gaseous state, partial molar enthalpies of adsorption of chalcogenides on metal surfaces at zero coverage and partial molar enthalpies of segregation of the chalcogens in trace amounts within solid metal matrices have been calculated. These properties are compared with available experimental data and discussed with an emphasis on the periodic behaviour of the elements. The model calculations show that a description of the thermochemical properties of the chalcogens using the ...

  13. Extension of Mediema's Macroscopic Atom Model to the Elements of Group 16 (O, S, Se, Te ,Po)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuhausen, J.; Eichler, B

    2003-09-01

    A consistent set of Miedema-parameters has been developed for the elements of the chalcogen group (Group 16 of the periodic table of the elements: 0, S, Se, Te, Po) from ab-initio quantum-mechanical calculations as weIl as empirical correlations. Using this parameter set thermochemical properties such as enthalpies of formation of solid metal chalcogenides, partial molar enthalpies of solution of chalcogens in liquid and solid metaIs, partial molar enthalpies of evaporation of the chalcogens from liquid metal solution into the monoatomic gaseous state, partial molar enthalpies of adsorption of chalcogenides on metal surfaces at zero coverage and partial molar enthalpies of segregation of the chalcogens in trace amounts within solid metal matrices have been calculated. These properties are compared with available experimental data and discussed with an emphasis on the periodic behaviour of the elements. The model calculations show that a description of the thermochemical properties of the chalcogens using the semi-empirical Miedema approach is possible. The calculated properties can serve as a basis for the prediction of the chemical interactions for metal-chalcogen combinations that have not been studied experimentally so far. (author)

  14. Extension of Mediema's Macroscopic Atom Model to the Elements of Group 16 (O, S, Se, Te ,Po)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhausen, J.; Eichler, B.

    2003-09-01

    A consistent set of Miedema-parameters has been developed for the elements of the chalcogen group (Group 16 of the periodic table of the elements: 0, S, Se, Te, Po) from ab-initio quantum-mechanical calculations as weIl as empirical correlations. Using this parameter set thermochemical properties such as enthalpies of formation of solid metal chalcogenides, partial molar enthalpies of solution of chalcogens in liquid and solid metaIs, partial molar enthalpies of evaporation of the chalcogens from liquid metal solution into the monoatomic gaseous state, partial molar enthalpies of adsorption of chalcogenides on metal surfaces at zero coverage and partial molar enthalpies of segregation of the chalcogens in trace amounts within solid metal matrices have been calculated. These properties are compared with available experimental data and discussed with an emphasis on the periodic behaviour of the elements. The model calculations show that a description of the thermochemical properties of the chalcogens using the semi-empirical Miedema approach is possible. The calculated properties can serve as a basis for the prediction of the chemical interactions for metal-chalcogen combinations that have not been studied experimentally so far. (author)

  15. Evaluation of human thorax FE model in various impact scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansová M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The study focused on the validation of the 50th percentile male model — a detailed FE model of the thoracic segment of the human body developed within project Development of a Finite Element Model of the Human Thorax and Upper Extremities (THOMO co-funded by the European Commission (7th Framework Programme. The model response was tested in three impact scenarios: frontal, lateral and oblique. The resulting impactor contact force vs. time and chest deflection vs. time responses were compared with experimental results. The strain profile of the 5th rib was checked with lateral and oblique strain profiles from post-mortem human subject (PMHS experiments. The influence of heart and lungs on the mechanical response of the model was assessed and the material data configuration, giving the most biofidelic thorax behaviour, was identified.

  16. Linking microscopic spatial patterns of tissue destruction in emphysema to macroscopic decline in stiffness using a 3D computational model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harikrishnan Parameswaran

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary emphysema is a connective tissue disease characterized by the progressive destruction of alveolar walls leading to airspace enlargement and decreased elastic recoil of the lung. However, the relationship between microscopic tissue structure and decline in stiffness of the lung is not well understood. In this study, we developed a 3D computational model of lung tissue in which a pre-strained cuboidal block of tissue was represented by a tessellation of space filling polyhedra, with each polyhedral unit-cell representing an alveolus. Destruction of alveolar walls was mimicked by eliminating faces that separate two polyhedral either randomly or in a spatially correlated manner, in which the highest force bearing walls were removed at each step. Simulations were carried out to establish a link between the geometries that emerged and the rate of decline in bulk modulus of the tissue block. The spatially correlated process set up by the force-based destruction lead to a significantly faster rate of decline in bulk modulus accompanied by highly heterogeneous structures than the random destruction pattern. Using the Karhunen-Loève transformation, an estimator of the change in bulk modulus from the first four moments of airspace cell volumes was setup. Simulations were then obtained for tissue destruction with different idealized alveolar geometry, levels of pre-strain, linear and nonlinear elasticity assumptions for alveolar walls and also mixed destruction patterns where both random and force-based destruction occurs simultaneously. In all these cases, the change in bulk modulus from cell volumes was accurately estimated. We conclude that microscopic structural changes in emphysema and the associated decline in tissue stiffness are linked by the spatial pattern of the destruction process.

  17. Macroscopic fluorescence imaging: a novel technique to monitor retention and distribution of injected microspheres in an experimental model of ischemic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Andreas; Rojas, Sebastian V; Baraki, Hassina; Rathert, Christian; Schecker, Natalie; Hernandez, Sara Rojas; Schwanke, Kristin; Zweigerdt, Robert; Martin, Ulrich; Saito, Shunsuke; Haverich, Axel; Kutschka, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    The limited effectiveness of cardiac cell therapy has generated concern regarding its clinical relevance. Experimental studies show that cell retention and engraftment are low after injection into ischemic myocardium, which may restrict therapy effectiveness significantly. Surgical aspects and mechanical loss are suspected to be the main culprits behind this phenomenon. As current techniques of monitoring intramyocardial injections are complex and time-consuming, the aim of the study was to develop a fast and simple model to study cardiac retention and distribution following intramyocardial injections. For this purpose, our main hypothesis was that macroscopic fluorescence imaging could adequately serve as a detection method for intramyocardial injections. A total of 20 mice underwent ligation of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) for myocardial infarction. Fluorescent microspheres with cellular dimensions were used as cell surrogates. Particles (5 × 10(5)) were injected into the infarcted area of explanted resting hearts (Ex vivo myocardial injetions EVMI, n = 10) and in vivo into beating hearts (In vivo myocardial injections IVMI, n = 10). Microsphere quantification was performed by fluorescence imaging of explanted organs. Measurements were repeated after a reduction to homogenate dilutions. Cardiac microsphere retention was 2.78 × 10(5) ± 0.31 × 10(5) in the EVMI group. In the IVMI group, cardiac retention of microspheres was significantly lower (0.74 × 10(5) ± 0.18 × 10(5); pfluorescence imaging revealed venous drainage through the coronary sinus, resulting in a microsphere accumulation in the left (0.90 × 10(5) ± 0.20 × 10(5)) and the right (1.07 × 10(5) ± 0.17 × 10(5)) lung. Processing to homogenates involved further particle loss (pfluorescence imaging method for biodistribution analysis which enabled the quantification of fluorescent microspheres after intramyocardial delivery using macroscopic fluorescence imaging. This new technique

  18. Development and Characterization of a Rate-Dependent Three-Dimensional Macroscopic Plasticity Model Suitable for Use in Composite Impact Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Carney, Kelly S.; DuBois, Paul; Hoffarth, Canio; Rajan, Subramaniam; Blankenhorn, Gunther

    2015-01-01

    Several key capabilities have been identified by the aerospace community as lacking in the material/models for composite materials currently available within commercial transient dynamic finite element codes such as LS-DYNA. Some of the specific desired features that have been identified include the incorporation of both plasticity and damage within the material model, the capability of using the material model to analyze the response of both three-dimensional solid elements and two dimensional shell elements, and the ability to simulate the response of composites composed with a variety of composite architectures, including laminates, weaves and braids. In addition, a need has been expressed to have a material model that utilizes tabulated experimentally based input to define the evolution of plasticity and damage as opposed to utilizing discrete input parameters (such as modulus and strength) and analytical functions based on curve fitting. To begin to address these needs, an orthotropic macroscopic plasticity based model suitable for implementation within LS-DYNA has been developed. Specifically, the Tsai-Wu composite failure model has been generalized and extended to a strain-hardening based orthotropic plasticity model with a non-associative flow rule. The coefficients in the yield function are determined based on tabulated stress-strain curves in the various normal and shear directions, along with selected off-axis curves. Incorporating rate dependence into the yield function is achieved by using a series of tabluated input curves, each at a different constant strain rate. The non-associative flow-rule is used to compute the evolution of the effective plastic strain. Systematic procedures have been developed to determine the values of the various coefficients in the yield function and the flow rule based on the tabulated input data. An algorithm based on the radial return method has been developed to facilitate the numerical implementation of the material

  19. Quantum equilibria for macroscopic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grib, A; Khrennikov, A; Parfionov, G; Starkov, K

    2006-01-01

    Nash equilibria are found for some quantum games with particles with spin-1/2 for which two spin projections on different directions in space are measured. Examples of macroscopic games with the same equilibria are given. Mixed strategies for participants of these games are calculated using probability amplitudes according to the rules of quantum mechanics in spite of the macroscopic nature of the game and absence of Planck's constant. A possible role of quantum logical lattices for the existence of macroscopic quantum equilibria is discussed. Some examples for spin-1 cases are also considered

  20. Quantum equilibria for macroscopic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grib, A [Department of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy, Russian State Pedagogical University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Khrennikov, A [Centre for Mathematical Modelling in Physics and Cognitive Sciences Vaexjoe University (Sweden); Parfionov, G [Department of Mathematics, St. Petersburg State University of Economics and Finances (Russian Federation); Starkov, K [Department of Mathematics, St. Petersburg State University of Economics and Finances (Russian Federation)

    2006-06-30

    Nash equilibria are found for some quantum games with particles with spin-1/2 for which two spin projections on different directions in space are measured. Examples of macroscopic games with the same equilibria are given. Mixed strategies for participants of these games are calculated using probability amplitudes according to the rules of quantum mechanics in spite of the macroscopic nature of the game and absence of Planck's constant. A possible role of quantum logical lattices for the existence of macroscopic quantum equilibria is discussed. Some examples for spin-1 cases are also considered.

  1. Classical behaviour of macroscopic bodies and quantum measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghirardi, G.; Rimini, A.; Weber, T.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes a recent attempt of giving a consistent and unified description of microscopic and macroscopic phenomena. The model presented in this paper exhibits the nice features of leaving unaltered the quantum description of microsystems and of accounting for the classical behaviour of the macroscopic objects when their dynamical evolution is consistently deduced from the dynamics of their elementary constituents

  2. Redox reactions of [FeFe]-hydrogenase models containing an internal amine and a pendant phosphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dehua; Wang, Mei; Chen, Lin; Wang, Ning; Sun, Licheng

    2014-02-03

    A diiron dithiolate complex with a pendant phosphine coordinated to one of the iron centers, [(μ-SCH2)2N(CH2C6H4-o-PPh2){Fe2(CO)5}] (1), was prepared and structurally characterized. The pendant phosphine is dissociated together with a CO ligand in the presence of excess PMe3, to afford [(μ-SCH2)2N(CH2C6H4-o-PPh2){Fe(CO)2(PMe3)}2] (2). Redox reactions of 2 and related complexes were studied in detail by in situ IR spectroscopy. A series of new Fe(II)Fe(I) ([3](+) and [6](+)), Fe(II)Fe(II) ([4](2+)), and Fe(I)Fe(I) (5) complexes relevant to Hox, Hox(CO), and Hred states of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase active site were detected. Among these complexes, the molecular structures of the diferrous complex [4](2+) with the internal amine and the pendant phosphine co-coordinated to the same iron center and the triphosphine diiron complex 5 were determined by X-ray crystallography. To make a comparison, the redox reactions of an analogous complex, [(μ-SCH2)2N(CH2C6H5){Fe(CO)2(PMe3)}2] (7), were also investigated by in situ IR spectroscopy in the absence or presence of extrinsic PPh3, which has no influence on the oxidation reaction of 7. The pendant phosphine in the second coordination sphere makes the redox reaction of 2 different from that of its analogue 7.

  3. Superconductivity and macroscopic quantum phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogovin, D.; Scully, M.

    1976-01-01

    It is often asserted that superconducting systems are manifestations of quantum mechanics on a macroscopic scale. In this review article it is demonstrated that this quantum assertion is true within the framework of the microscopic theory of superconductivity. (Auth.)

  4. Interpretation of macroscopic quantum phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, K.

    1986-01-01

    It is argued that a quantum theory without observer is required for the interpretation of macroscopic quantum tunnelling. Such a theory is obtained by augmenting QED by the actual electric field in the rest system of the universe. An equation of the motion of this field is formulated form which the correct macroscopic behavior of the universe and the validity of the Born interpretation is derived. Care is taken to use mathematically sound concepts only. (Author)

  5. Carbonate-mediated Fe(II) oxidation in the air-cathode fuel cell: a kinetic model in terms of Fe(II) speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Zhai, Lin-Feng; Cui, Yu-Zhi; Sun, Min; Jiang, Yuan

    2013-06-06

    Due to the high redox activity of Fe(II) and its abundance in natural waters, the electro-oxidation of Fe(II) can be found in many air-cathode fuel cell systems, such as acid mine drainage fuel cells and sediment microbial fuel cells. To deeply understand these iron-related systems, it is essential to elucidate the kinetics and mechanisms involved in the electro-oxidation of Fe(II). This work aims to develop a kinetic model that adequately describes the electro-oxidation process of Fe(II) in air-cathode fuel cells. The speciation of Fe(II) is incorporated into the model, and contributions of individual Fe(II) species to the overall Fe(II) oxidation rate are quantitatively evaluated. The results show that the kinetic model can accurately predict the electro-oxidation rate of Fe(II) in air-cathode fuel cells. FeCO3, Fe(OH)2, and Fe(CO3)2(2-) are the most important species determining the electro-oxidation kinetics of Fe(II). The Fe(II) oxidation rate is primarily controlled by the oxidation of FeCO3 species at low pH, whereas at high pH Fe(OH)2 and Fe(CO3)2(2-) are the dominant species. Solution pH, carbonate concentration, and solution salinity are able to influence the electro-oxidation kinetics of Fe(II) through changing both distribution and kinetic activity of Fe(II) species.

  6. The microscopic model of BiFeO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, R. S.

    2018-05-01

    Many years and great effort have been spent constructing the microscopic model for the room temperature multiferroic BiFeO3. However, earlier models implicitly assumed that the cycloidal wavevector q was confined to one of the three-fold symmetric axes in the hexagonal plane normal to the electric polarization. Because recent measurements indicate that q can be rotated by a magnetic field, it is essential to properly treat the anisotropy that confines q at low fields. We propose that the anisotropy energy -K3S6sin6 θ cos 6 ϕ confines the wavevectors q to the three-fold axis ϕ = 0 and ± 2 π / 3 within the hexagonal plane with θ = π / 2 .

  7. Macroscopic and non-linear quantum games

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aerts, D.; D'Hooghe, A.; Posiewnik, A.; Pykacz, J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We consider two models of quantum games. The first one is Marinatto and Weber's 'restricted' quantum game in which only the identity and the spin-flip operators are used. We show that this quantum game allows macroscopic mechanistic realization with the use of a version of the 'macroscopic quantum machine' described by Aerts already in 1980s. In the second model we use non-linear quantum state transformations which operate on points of spin-1/2 on the Bloch sphere and which can be used to distinguish optimally between two non-orthogonal states. We show that efficiency of these non-linear strategies out-perform any linear ones. Some hints on the possible theory of non-linear quantum games are given. (author)

  8. Macroscopic acoustoelectric charge transport in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandhu, L.; Lawton, L. M.; Nash, G. R.

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrate macroscopic acoustoelectric transport in graphene, transferred onto piezoelectric lithium niobate substrates, between electrodes up to 500 μm apart. Using double finger interdigital transducers we have characterised the acoustoelectric current as a function of both surface acoustic wave intensity and frequency. The results are consistent with a relatively simple classical relaxation model, in which the acoustoelectric current is proportional to both the surface acoustic wave intensity and the attenuation of the wave caused by the charge transport.

  9. Test of level density models from reactions of Li6 on Fe58 and Li7 on Fe57

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oginni, B. M.; Grimes, S. M.; Voinov, A. V.; Adekola, A. S.; Brune, C. R.; Carter, D. E.; Heinen, Z.; Jacobs, D.; Massey, T. N.; O'Donnell, J. E.; Schiller, A.

    2009-09-01

    The reactions of Li6 on Fe58 and Li7 on Fe57 have been studied at 15 MeV beam energy. These two reactions produce the same compound nucleus, Cu64. The charged particle spectra were measured at backward angles. The data obtained have been compared with Hauser-Feshbach model calculations. The level density parameters of Ni63 and Co60 have been obtained from the particle evaporation spectra. We also find contributions from the break up of the lithium projectiles to the low energy region of the α spectra.

  10. Bioavailability of organically bound Fe to model phytoplankton of the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Hassler

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Iron (Fe is known to be mostly bound to organic ligands and to limit primary productivity in the Southern Ocean. It is thus important to investigate the bioavailability of organically bound Fe. In this study, we used four phytoplankton species of the Southern Ocean (Phaeocystis sp., Chaetoceros sp., Fragilariopsis kerguelensis and Thalassiosira antarctica Comber to measure the influence of various organic ligands on Fe solubility and bioavailability. Short-term uptake Fe:C ratios were inversely related to the surface area to volume ratios of the phytoplankton. The ratio of extracellular to intracellular Fe is used to discuss the relative importance of diffusive supply and uptake to control Fe bioavailability. The effect of excess organic ligands on Fe bioavailability cannot be solely explained by their effect on Fe solubility. For most strains studied, the bioavailability of Fe can be enhanced relative to inorganic Fe in the presence of porphyrin, catecholate siderophore and saccharides whereas it was decreased in presence of hydroxamate siderophore and organic amine. For Thalassiosira, iron bioavailability was not affected by the presence of porphyrin, catecholate siderophore and saccharides. The enhancement of Fe bioavailability in presence of saccharides is presented as the result from both the formation of bioavailable (or chemically labile organic form of Fe and the stabilisation of Fe within the dissolved phase. Given the ubiquitous presence of saccharides in the ocean, these compounds might represent an important factor to control the basal level of soluble and bioavailable Fe. Results show that the use of model phytoplankton is promising to improve mechanistic understanding of Fe bioavailability and primary productivity in HNLC regions of the ocean.

  11. Bimodality in macroscopic dynamics of nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastrukov, S.I.; Salamatin, V.S.; Strteltsova, O.I.; Molodtsova, I.V.; Podgainy, D.V.; )

    2000-01-01

    The elastodynamic collective model of nuclear fission is outlined whose underlying idea is that the stiff structure of nuclear shells imparts to nucleus properties typical of a small piece of an elastic solid. Emphasis is placed on the macroscopic dynamics of nuclear deformations resulting in fission by two energetically different modes. The low-energy S-mode is the fission due to disruption of elongated quadrupole spheroidal shape. The characteristic features of the high-energy T-mode of division by means of torsional shear deformations is the compact scission configuration. Analytic and numerical estimates for the macroscopic fission-barrier heights are presented, followed by discussion of fingerprints of the above dynamical bimodality in the available data [ru

  12. Ion irradiation effects on high purity bcc Fe and model FeCr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, Arunodaya

    2014-01-01

    FeCr binary alloys are a simple representative of the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (F-M) steels, which are currently the most promising candidates as structural materials for the sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) and future fusion systems. However, the impact of Cr on the evolution of the irradiated microstructure in these materials is not well understood in these materials. Moreover, particularly for fusion applications, the radiation damage scenario is expected to be complicated further by the presence of large quantities of He produced by the nuclear transmutation (∼ 10 appm He/dpa). Within this context, an elaborate ion irradiation study was performed at 500 C on a wide variety of high purity FeCr alloys (with Cr content ranging from ∼ 3 wt.% to 14 wt.%) and a bcc Fe, to probe in detail the influence of Cr and He on the evolution of microstructure. The irradiations were performed using Fe self-ions, in single beam mode and in dual beam mode (damage by Fe ions and co-implantation of He), to separate ballistic damage effect from the impact of simultaneous He injection. Three different dose ranges were studied: high dose (157 dpa, 17 appm He/dpa for the dual beam case), intermediate dose (45 dpa, 57 appm He/dpa for dual beam case) and in-situ low dose (0.33 dpa, 3030 appm He/dpa for the dual beam case). The experiments were performed at the JANNuS triple beam facility and dual beam in situ irradiation facility at CEA-Saclay and CSNSM, Orsay respectively. The microstructure was principally characterized by conventional TEM, APT and EDS in STEM mode. The main results are as follows: 1) A comparison of the cavity microstructure in high dose irradiated Fe revealed strong swelling reduction by the addition of He. It was achieved by a drastic reduction in cavity sizes and an increased number density. This behaviour was observed all along the damage depth, up to the damage peak. 2) Cavity microstructure was also studied in the dual beam high dose

  13. Thermal activation and macroscopic quantum tunneling in a DC SQUID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharifi, F.; Gavilano, J.L.; VanHarlingen, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    The authors report measurements of the transition rate from metastable minima in the two-dimensional 1 of a dc SQUID as a function of applied flux temperature. The authors observe a crossover from energy-activated escape to macroscopic quantum tunneling at a critical temperature. The macroscopic quantum tunneling rate is substantially reduced by damping, and also broadens the crossover region. Most interestingly, the authors observe thermal rates that are suppressed from those predicted by the two-dimensional thermal activation model. The authors discuss possible explanations for this based on the interaction of the macroscopic degree of freedom in the device and energy level effects

  14. Modeling of chromium precipitation in Fe-Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallenius, J.; Olsson, P.; Lagerstedt, C.; Sandberg, N.; Chakarova, R.; Pontikis, V.

    2004-01-01

    We have implemented a set of Embedded Atom Method (EAM) potentials for simulation of Fe-Cr alloys. The functions for the pure elements were fitted to the respective elastic constants, vacancy formation energy, and thermal expansion coefficients. For Cr, properties of the paramagnetic state were applied, providing a positive Cauchy pressure and hence applicability of the EAM. By relaxing the requirement of reproducing the pressure-volume relation at short interaction distances, stability of the self-interstitial could be obtained. Our Fe-potential gives E lang110rang f -E lang111rang f =-0.23 eV. Mixed Fe-Cr pair potentials were fitted to the calculated mixing enthalpy of ferromagnetic Fe-Cr, which is negative for Cr concentrations below 6%. Simulation of thermal aging in Fe-Cr alloys using a potential fitted to the mixing enthalpy of Fe-20Cr exhibited pronounced Cr-precipitation for temperatures below 900 K, in agreement with the phase diagram. No such ordering was observed at any temperature using a potential fitted to the mixing enthalpy of Fe-5Cr. Applied to recoil cascade simulations the new potentials predict a smaller number of surviving defects than potentials found in the literature. We obtain a cascade efficiency of 0.135 NRT for damage energies in between 10 and 20 keV. An enhanced probability for Cr atoms to end up in defect structures is observed

  15. A Structural Molar Volume Model for Oxide Melts Part III: Fe Oxide-Containing Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, Eric; Gheribi, Aimen E.; Jung, In-Ho

    2016-04-01

    As part III of this series, the model is extended to iron oxide-containing melts. All available experimental data in the FeO-Fe2O3-Na2O-K2O-MgO-CaO-MnO-Al2O3-SiO2 system were critically evaluated based on the experimental condition. The variations of FeO and Fe2O3 in the melts were taken into account by using FactSage to calculate the Fe2+/Fe3+ distribution. The molar volume model with unary and binary model parameters can be used to predict the molar volume of the molten oxide of the Li2O-Na2O-K2O-MgO-CaO-MnO-PbO-FeO-Fe2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 system in the entire range of compositions, temperatures, and oxygen partial pressures from Fe saturation to 1 atm pressure.

  16. Modeling Equilibrium Fe Isotope Fractionation in Fe-Organic Complexes: Implications for the use of Fe Isotopes as a Biomarker and Trends Based on the Properties of Bound Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domagal-Goldman, S.; Kubicki, J. D.

    2006-05-01

    Fe Isotopes have been proposed as a useful tracer of biological and geochemical processes. Key to understanding the effects these various processes have on Fe isotopes is accurate modeling of the reactions responsible for the isotope fractionations. In this study, we examined the theoretical basis for the claims that Fe isotopes can be used as a biomarker. This was done by using molecular orbital/density functional theory (MO/DFT) calculations to predict the equilibrium fractionation of Fe isotopes due to changes in the redox state and the bonding environment of Fe. Specifically, we predicted vibrational frequencies for iron desferrioxamine (Fe-DFOB), iron triscatechol (Fe(cat)3), iron trisoxalate (Fe(ox)3), and hexaaquo iron (Fe(H2O)6) for complexes containing both ferrous (Fe2+) and ferric (Fe3+) iron. Using these vibrational frequencies, we then predicted fractionation factors between these six complexes. The predicted fractionation factors resulting from changes in the redox state of Fe fell in the range 2.5- 3.5‰. The fractionation factors resulting from changes in the bonding environment of Fe ranged from 0.2 to 1.4‰. These results indicate that changes in the bonding strength of Fe ligands are less important to Fe isotope fractionation processes than are changes to the redox state of Fe. The implications for use of Fe as a tracer of biological processes is clear: abiological redox changes must be ruled out in a sample before Fe isotopes are considered as a potential biomarker. Furthermore, the use of Fe isotopes to measure the redox state of the Earths surface environment through time is supported by this work, since changes in the redox state of Fe appear to be the more important driver of isotopic fractionations. In addition to the large differences between redox-driven fractionations and ligand-driven fractionations, we will also show general trends in the demand for heavy Fe isotopes as a function of properties of the bound ligand. This will help the

  17. Constitutive modeling of two-phase metallic composites with application to tungsten-based composite 93W–4.9Ni–2.1Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, W.R.; Gao, C.Y.; Ke, Y.L.

    2014-01-01

    The two-phase metallic composites, composed by the metallic particulate reinforcing phase and the metallic matrix phase, have attracted a lot of attention in recent years for their excellent material properties. However, the constitutive modeling of two-phase metallic composites is still lacking currently. Most used models for them are basically oriented for single-phase homogeneous metallic materials, and have not considered the microstructural evolution of the components in the composite. This paper develops a new constitutive model for two-phase metallic composites based on the thermally activated dislocation motion mechanism and the volume fraction evolution. By establishing the relation between microscopic volume fraction and macroscopic state variables (strain, strain rate and temperature), the evolution law of volume fraction during the plastic deformation in two-phase composites is proposed for the first time and introduced into the new model. Then the new model is applied to a typical two-phase tungsten-based composite – 93W–4.9Ni–2.1Fe tungsten heavy alloy. It has been found that our model can effectively describe the plastic deformation behaviors of the tungsten-based composite, because of the introduction of volume fraction evolution and the connecting of macroscopic state variables and micromechanical characteristics in the constitutive model. The model's validation by experimental data indicates that our new model can provide a satisfactory prediction of flow stress for two-phase metallic composites, which is better than conventional single-phase homogeneous constitutive models including the Johnson–Cook (JC), Khan–Huang–Liang (KHL), Nemat-Nasser–Li (NNL), Zerilli–Armstrong (ZA) and Voyiadjis–Abed (VA) models

  18. Dynamical fusion thresholds in macroscopic and microscopic theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, K.T.R.; Sierk, A.J.; Nix, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Macroscopic and microscopic results demonstrating the existence of dynamical fusion thresholds are presented. For macroscopic theories, it is shown that the extra-push dynamics is sensitive to some details of the models used, e.g. the shape parametrization and the type of viscosity. The dependence of the effect upon the charge and angular momentum of the system is also studied. Calculated macroscopic results for mass-symmetric systems are compared to experimental mass-asymmetric results by use of a tentative scaling procedure, which takes into account both the entrance-channel and the saddle-point regions of configuration space. Two types of dynamical fusion thresholds occur in TDHF studies: (1) the microscopic analogue of the macroscopic extra push threshold, and (2) the relatively high energy at which the TDHF angular momentum window opens. Both of these microscopic thresholds are found to be very sensitive to the choice of the effective two-body interaction

  19. Application of damping mechanism model and stacking fault probability in Fe-Mn alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, S.K.; Wen, Y.H.; Li, N.; Teng, J.; Ding, S.; Xu, Y.G.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the damping mechanism model of Fe-Mn alloy was analyzed using dislocation theory. Moreover, as an important parameter in Fe-Mn based alloy, the effect of stacking fault probability on the damping capacity of Fe-19.35Mn alloy after deep-cooling or tensile deformation was also studied. The damping capacity was measured using reversal torsion pendulum. The stacking fault probability of γ-austenite and ε-martensite was determined by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) profile analysis. The microstructure was observed using scanning electronic microscope (SEM). The results indicated that with the strain amplitude increasing above a critical value, the damping capacity of Fe-19.35Mn alloy increased rapidly which could be explained using the breakaway model of Shockley partial dislocations. Deep-cooling and suitable tensile deformation could improve the damping capacity owning to the increasing of stacking fault probability of Fe-19.35Mn alloy

  20. Bayesian nonlinear structural FE model and seismic input identification for damage assessment of civil structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astroza, Rodrigo; Ebrahimian, Hamed; Li, Yong; Conte, Joel P.

    2017-09-01

    A methodology is proposed to update mechanics-based nonlinear finite element (FE) models of civil structures subjected to unknown input excitation. The approach allows to jointly estimate unknown time-invariant model parameters of a nonlinear FE model of the structure and the unknown time histories of input excitations using spatially-sparse output response measurements recorded during an earthquake event. The unscented Kalman filter, which circumvents the computation of FE response sensitivities with respect to the unknown model parameters and unknown input excitations by using a deterministic sampling approach, is employed as the estimation tool. The use of measurement data obtained from arrays of heterogeneous sensors, including accelerometers, displacement sensors, and strain gauges is investigated. Based on the estimated FE model parameters and input excitations, the updated nonlinear FE model can be interrogated to detect, localize, classify, and assess damage in the structure. Numerically simulated response data of a three-dimensional 4-story 2-by-1 bay steel frame structure with six unknown model parameters subjected to unknown bi-directional horizontal seismic excitation, and a three-dimensional 5-story 2-by-1 bay reinforced concrete frame structure with nine unknown model parameters subjected to unknown bi-directional horizontal seismic excitation are used to illustrate and validate the proposed methodology. The results of the validation studies show the excellent performance and robustness of the proposed algorithm to jointly estimate unknown FE model parameters and unknown input excitations.

  1. Macroscopic reality and the dynamical reduction program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghirardi, G.C.

    1995-10-01

    With reference to recently proposed theoretical models accounting for reduction in terms of a unified dynamics governing all physical processes, we analyze the problem of working out a worldview accommodating our knowledge about natural phenomena. We stress the relevant conceptual differences between the considered models and standard quantum mechanics. In spite of the fact that both theories describe individual physical systems within a genuine Hilbert space framework, the nice features of spontaneous reduction theories drastically limit the class of states which are dynamically stable. This allows one to work out a description of the world in terms of a mass density function in ordinary configuration space. A topology based on this function and differing radically from the one characterizing the Hilbert space is introduced and in terms of it the idea of similarity of macroscopic situations is made precise. Finally it is shown how the formalism and the proposed interpretation yield a natural criterion for establishing the psychophysical parallelism. The conclusion is that, within the considered theoretical models and at the nonrelativistic level, one can satisfy all sensible requirements for a consistent, unified, and objective description of reality at the macroscopic level. (author). 16 refs

  2. Macroscopic reality and the dynamical reduction program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghirardi, G C

    1995-10-01

    With reference to recently proposed theoretical models accounting for reduction in terms of a unified dynamics governing all physical processes, we analyze the problem of working out a worldview accommodating our knowledge about natural phenomena. We stress the relevant conceptual differences between the considered models and standard quantum mechanics. In spite of the fact that both theories describe individual physical systems within a genuine Hilbert space framework, the nice features of spontaneous reduction theories drastically limit the class of states which are dynamically stable. This allows one to work out a description of the world in terms of a mass density function in ordinary configuration space. A topology based on this function and differing radically from the one characterizing the Hilbert space is introduced and in terms of it the idea of similarity of macroscopic situations is made precise. Finally it is shown how the formalism and the proposed interpretation yield a natural criterion for establishing the psychophysical parallelism. The conclusion is that, within the considered theoretical models and at the nonrelativistic level, one can satisfy all sensible requirements for a consistent, unified, and objective description of reality at the macroscopic level. (author). 16 refs.

  3. Precision Glass Molding: Validation of an FE Model for Thermo-Mechanical Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarhadi, Ali; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2014-01-01

    glass molding process including heating, pressing, and cooling stages. Temperature- dependent viscoelastic and structural relaxation behavior of the glass material are implemented through a FORTRAN material subroutine (UMAT) into the commercial FEM program ABAQUS, and the FE model is validated...

  4. Spectroscopic properties of Fe2+ ions at tetragonal sites-Crystal field effects and microscopic modeling of spin Hamiltonian parameters for Fe2+ (S=2) ions in K2FeF4 and K2ZnF4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudowicz, C.; Piwowarska, D.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic and spectroscopic properties of the planar antiferromagnet K 2 FeF 4 are determined by the Fe 2+ ions at tetragonal sites. The two-dimensional easy-plane anisotropy exhibited by K 2 FeF 4 is due to the zero field splitting (ZFS) terms arising from the orbital singlet ground state of Fe 2+ ions with the spin S=2. To provide insight into the single-ion magnetic anisotropy of K 2 FeF 4 , the crystal field theory and the microscopic spin Hamiltonian (MSH) approach based on the tensor method is adopted. Survey of available experimental data on the crystal field energy levels and free-ion parameters for Fe 2+ ions in K 2 FeF 4 and related compounds is carried out to provide input for microscopic modeling of the ZFS parameters and the Zeeman electronic ones. The ZFS parameters are expressed in the extended Stevens notation and include contributions up to the fourth-order using as perturbation the spin-orbit and electronic spin-spin couplings within the tetragonal crystal field states of the ground 5 D multiplet. Modeling of the ZFS parameters and the Zeeman electronic ones is carried out. Variation of these parameters is studied taking into account reasonable ranges of the microscopic ones, i.e. the spin-orbit and spin-spin coupling constants, and the energy level splittings, suitable for Fe 2+ ions in K 2 FeF 4 and Fe 2+ :K 2 ZnF 4 . Conversions between the ZFS parameters in the extended Stevens notation and the conventional ones are considered to enable comparison with the data of others. Comparative analysis of the MSH formulas derived earlier and our more complete ones indicates the importance of terms omitted earlier as well as the fourth-order ZFS parameters and the spin-spin coupling related contributions. The results may be useful also for Fe 2+ ions at axial symmetry sites in related systems, i.e. Fe:K 2 MnF 4 , Rb 2 Co 1-x Fe x F 4 , Fe 2+ :Rb 2 CrCl 4 , and Fe 2+ :Rb 2 ZnCl 4 . - Highlights: → Truncated zero field splitting (ZFS) terms for Fe 2+ in K

  5. Analysis of the Glass-Forming Ability of Fe-Er Alloys, Based on Thermodynamic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunyan, N. A.; Zaitsev, A. I.; Dunaev, S. F.; Kalmykov, K. B.; El'nyakov, D. D.; Shaposhnikov, N. G.

    2018-05-01

    The Fe-Er phase diagram and thermodynamic properties of all its phases are assessed by means of self-consistent analysis. To refine the data on phase equilibria in the Fe-Er system, an investigation is performed in the 10-40 at % range of Er concentrations. The temperature-concentration dependences of the thermodynamic properties of a melt are presented using the model of ideal associated solutions. Thermodynamic parameters of each phase are obtained, and the calculated results are in agreement with available experimental data. The correlation between the thermodynamic properties of liquid Fe-Er alloys and their tendency toward amorphization are studied. It is shown that compositions of amorphous alloys prepared by melt quenching coincide with the ranges of concentration with the predominance of Fe3Er and FeEr2 associative groups that have large negative entropies of formation.

  6. Stress control in electrodeposited CoFe films—Experimental study and analytical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brankovic, Stanko R.; Kagajwala, Burhanuddin; George, Jinnie; Majkic, Goran; Stafford, Gery; Ruchhoeft, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Work investigating the effect of saccharin as an additive on growth stress and structure of electrodeposited CoFe films is presented. The saccharin concentrations were in the range between 0 g L −1 and 1.5 g L −1 . The stress measurements are performed in situ during electrodeposition of CoFe films using cantilever-bending method (curvature measurements). The structure of CoFe films was studied by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Results show that growth stress is a decreasing function of saccharin concentration. No appreciable change in composition, grain size, orientation or texture of CoFe films are observed with increasing saccharin content in solution. The growth stress dependence on saccharin concentration is discussed within the framework of analytical model, which directly links the observed stress decrease with the apparent saccharin coverage of the CoFe film surface during the electrodeposition process.

  7. Astronaut Bone Medical Standards Derived from Finite Element (FE) Models of QCT Scans from Population Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibonga, J. D.; Feiveson, A. H.

    2014-01-01

    This work was accomplished in support of the Finite Element [FE] Strength Task Group, NASA Johnson Space Center [JSC], Houston, TX. This group was charged with the task of developing rules for using finite-element [FE] bone-strength measures to construct operating bands for bone health that are relevant to astronauts following exposure to spaceflight. FE modeling is a computational tool used by engineers to estimate the failure loads of complex structures. Recently, some engineers have used this tool to characterize the failure loads of the hip in population studies that also monitored fracture outcomes. A Directed Research Task was authorized in July, 2012 to investigate FE data from these population studies to derive these proposed standards of bone health as a function of age and gender. The proposed standards make use of an FE-based index that integrates multiple contributors to bone strength, an expanded evaluation that is critical after an astronaut is exposed to spaceflight. The current index of bone health used by NASA is the measurement of areal BMD. There was a concern voiced by a research and clinical advisory panel that the sole use of areal BMD would be insufficient to fully evaluate the effects of spaceflight on the hip. Hence, NASA may not have a full understanding of fracture risk, both during and after a mission, and may be poorly estimating in-flight countermeasure efficacy. The FE Strength Task Group - composed of principal investigators of the aforementioned population studies and of FE modelers -donated some of its population QCT data to estimate of hip bone strength by FE modeling for this specific purpose. Consequently, Human Health Countermeasures [HHC] has compiled a dataset of FE hip strengths, generated by a single FE modeling approach, from human subjects (approx.1060) with ages covering the age range of the astronauts. The dataset has been analyzed to generate a set of FE strength cutoffs for the following scenarios: a) Qualify an

  8. Measurement contextuality is implied by macroscopic realism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zeqian; Montina, A.

    2011-01-01

    Ontological theories of quantum mechanics provide a realistic description of single systems by means of well-defined quantities conditioning the measurement outcomes. In order to be complete, they should also fulfill the minimal condition of macroscopic realism. Under the assumption of outcome determinism and for Hilbert space dimension greater than 2, they were all proved to be contextual for projective measurements. In recent years a generalized concept of noncontextuality was introduced that applies also to the case of outcome indeterminism and unsharp measurements. It was pointed out that the Beltrametti-Bugajski model is an example of measurement noncontextual indeterminist theory. Here we provide a simple proof that this model is the only one with such a feature for projective measurements and Hilbert space dimension greater than 2. In other words, there is no extension of quantum theory providing more accurate predictions of outcomes and simultaneously preserving the minimal labeling of events through projective operators. As a corollary, noncontextuality for projective measurements implies noncontextuality for unsharp measurements. By noting that the condition of macroscopic realism requires an extension of quantum theory, unless a breaking of unitarity is invoked, we arrive at the conclusion that the only way to solve the measurement problem in the framework of an ontological theory is by relaxing the hypothesis of measurement noncontextuality in its generalized sense.

  9. Theoretical models for electron conduction in polymer systems—I. Macroscopic calculations of d.c. transient conductivity after pulse irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartczak, Witold M.; Kroh, Jerzy

    The simulation of the transient d.c. conductivity in a quasi one-dimensional system of charges produced by a pulse of ionizing radiation in a solid sample has been performed. The simulation is based on the macroscopic conductivity equations and can provide physical insight into d.c. conductivity measurements, particularly for the case of transient currents in samples with internal space charge. We consider the system of mobile (negative) and immobile (positive) charges produced by a pulse of ionizing radiation in the sample under a fixed external voltage V0. The presence of space charge results in an electric field which is a function of both the spatial and the time variable: E( z, t). Given the space charge density, the electric field can be calculated from the Poisson equation. However, for an arbitrary space charge distribution, the corresponding equations can only be solved numerically. The two non-trivial cases for which approximate analytical solutions can be provided are: (i) The density of the current carriers n( z, t) is negligible in comparison with the density of immobile space charge N( z). A general analytical solution has been found for this case using Green's functions. The solutions for two cases, viz. the homogeneous distribution of space charge N( z) = N, and the non-homogeneous exponential distribution N( z) = A exp(- Bz), have been separately discussed. (ii) The space charge created in the pulse without any space charge present prior to the irradiation.

  10. Macroscopic description of isoscalar giant multipole resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nix, J.R.; Sierk, A.J.

    1980-01-01

    On the basis of a simple macroscopic model, we calculate the isoscalar giant-resonance energy as a function of mass number and multipole degree. The restoring force is determined from the distortion of the Fermi surface, and the inertia is determined for the incompressible, irrotational flow of nucleons with unit effective mass. With no adjustable parameters, the resulting closed expression reproduces correctly the available experimental data, namely the magnitude and dependence upon mass number of the giant quadrupole energy and the magnitude of the giant octupole energy for 208 Pb. We also calculate the isoscalar giant-resonance width as a function of mass number and multipole degree for various macroscopic damping mechanisms, including two-body viscosity, one-body dissipation, and modified one-body dissipation. None of these damping mechanisms reproduces correctly all features of the available experimental data, namely the magnitude and dependence upon mass number of the giant quadrupole width and the magnitude of the giant octupole width for 208 Pb

  11. Concept and development of an orthotropic FE model of the proximal femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, Dieter Christian; Pandorf, Thomas; Portheine, Frank; Radermacher, Klaus; Schiffers, Norbert; Prescher, Andreas; Weichert, Dieter; Niethard, Fritz Uwe

    2003-02-01

    In contrast to many isotropic finite-element (FE) models of the femur in literature, it was the object of our study to develop an orthotropic FE "model femur" to realistically simulate three-dimensional bone remodelling. The three-dimensional geometry of the proximal femur was reconstructed by CT scans of a pair of cadaveric femurs at equal distances of 2mm. These three-dimensional CT models were implemented into an FE simulation tool. Well-known "density-determined" bony material properties (Young's modulus; Poisson's ratio; ultimate strength in pressure, tension and torsion; shear modulus) were assigned to each FE of the same "CT-density-characterized" volumetric group. In order to fix the principal directions of stiffness in FE areas with the same "density characterization", the cadaveric femurs were cut in 2mm slices in frontal (left femur) and sagittal plane (right femur). Each femoral slice was scanned into a computer-based image processing system. On these images, the principal directions of stiffness of cancellous and cortical bone were determined manually using the orientation of the trabecular structures and the Haversian system. Finally, these geometric data were matched with the "CT-density characterized" three-dimensional femur model. In addition, the time and density-dependent adaptive behaviour of bone remodelling was taken into account by implementation of Carter's criterion. In the constructed "model femur", each FE is characterized by the principal directions of the stiffness and the "CT-density-determined" material properties of cortical and cancellous bone. Thus, on the basis of anatomic data a three-dimensional FE simulation reference model of the proximal femur was realized considering orthotropic conditions of bone behaviour. With the orthotropic "model femur", the fundamental basis has been formed to realize realistic simulations of the dynamical processes of bone remodelling under different loading conditions or operative procedures

  12. Development of a FE Model for the Stress Analysis of HTGR TRISO-coated particle fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Moon Sung; Lee, Y. W.; Jeong, K. C.; Kim, Y. K.; Oh, S. C.; Chang, J. H.

    2005-12-01

    Finite element modelling of the stresses in TRISO-coated fuel particle under normal operating conditions was carried out with use of the structural analysis computer code ABAQUS. The FE model took into account the irradiation induced swelling and the creep of the PyC layers, the internal fission gas pressure that builds up during irradiation and the constant external ambient pressure. All of the inputs such as particle dimensions, swelling rates and creep rates of PyC layers and other mechanical properties used in these calculations were adopted from Miller's publication published in 1993. The FE model was verified against Miller's solution. Results of this model were found to be in good agreement with Miller's results. With use of the FE model, the static behavior of the TRISO-coated fuel particle, such as load shares, stress contours, stress variations as a function of fluence and shape changes of the TRISO -coated layers were investigated

  13. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in a dc SQUID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.C.

    1986-01-01

    The theory of macroscopic quantum tunneling is applied to a current-biased dc SQUID whose dynamics can be described by a two-dimensional mechanical system with a dissipative environment. Based on the phenomenological model proposed by Caldeira and Leggett, the dissipative environment is represented by a set of harmonic oscillators coupling to the system. After integrating out the environmental degrees of freedom, an effective Euclidean action is found for the two-dimensional system. The action is used to provide the quantum tunneling rate formalism for the dc SQUID. Under certain conditions, the tunneling rate reduces to that of a single current-biased Josephson junction with an adjustable effective critical current

  14. Decoherence bypass of macroscopic superpositions in quantum measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spehner, Dominique; Haake, Fritz

    2008-01-01

    We study a class of quantum measurement models. A microscopic object is entangled with a macroscopic pointer such that a distinct pointer position is tied to each eigenvalue of the measured object observable. Those different pointer positions mutually decohere under the influence of an environment. Overcoming limitations of previous approaches we (i) cope with initial correlations between pointer and environment by considering them initially in a metastable local thermal equilibrium, (ii) allow for object-pointer entanglement and environment-induced decoherence of distinct pointer readouts to proceed simultaneously, such that mixtures of macroscopically distinct object-pointer product states arise without intervening macroscopic superpositions, and (iii) go beyond the Markovian treatment of decoherence. (fast track communication)

  15. Modeling 13.3nm Fe XXIII Flare Emissions Using the GOES-R EXIS Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rook, H.; Thiemann, E.

    2017-12-01

    The solar EUV spectrum is dominated by atomic transitions in ionized atoms in the solar atmosphere. As solar flares evolve, plasma temperatures and densities change, influencing abundances of various ions, changing intensities of different EUV wavelengths observed from the sun. Quantifying solar flare spectral irradiance is important for constraining models of Earth's atmosphere, improving communications quality, and controlling satellite navigation. However, high time cadence measurements of flare irradiance across the entire EUV spectrum were not available prior to the launch of SDO. The EVE MEGS-A instrument aboard SDO collected 0.1nm EUV spectrum data from 2010 until 2014, when the instrument failed. No current or future instrument is capable of similar high resolution and time cadence EUV observation. This necessitates a full EUV spectrum model to study EUV phenomena at Earth. It has been recently demonstrated that one hot flare EUV line, such as the 13.3nm Fe XXIII line, can be used to model cooler flare EUV line emissions, filling the role of MEGS-A. Since unblended measurements of Fe XXIII are typically unavailable, a proxy for the Fe XXIII line must be found. In this study, we construct two models of this line, first using the GOES 0.1-0.8nm soft x-ray (SXR) channel as the Fe XXIII proxy, and second using a physics-based model dependent on GOES emission measure and temperature data. We determine that the more sophisticated physics-based model shows better agreement with Fe XXIII measurements, although the simple proxy model also performs well. We also conclude that the high correlation between Fe XXIII emissions and the GOES 0.1-0.8nm band is because both emissions tend to peak near the GOES emission measure peak despite large differences in their contribution functions.

  16. Modeling the SEI-formation on graphite electrodes in liFePO4 batteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, D.; Danilov, D.L.; Zhang, Zhongru; Chen, H.; Yang, Y.; Notten, P.H.L.

    2015-01-01

    An advanced model is proposed, describing the capacity losses of C6/LiFePO4 batteries under storage and cycling conditions. These capacity losses are attributed to the growth of a Solid Electrolyte Interface (SEI) at the surface of graphite particles in the negative electrode. The model assumes the

  17. CuFeO2 formation using fused deposition modeling 3D printing and sintering technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salea, A.; Dasaesamoh, A.; Prathumwan, R.; Kongkaew, T.; Subannajui, K.

    2017-09-01

    CuFeO2 is a metal oxide mineral material which is called delafossite. It can potentially be used as a chemical catalyst, and gas sensing material. There are methods to fabricate CuFeO2 such as chemical synthesis, sintering, sputtering, and chemical vapor deposition. In our work, CuFeO2 is prepared by Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) 3D printing. The composite filament which composed of Cu and Fe elements is printed in three dimensions, and then sintered and annealed at high temperature to obtain CuFeO2. Suitable polymer blend and maximum percent volume of metal powder are studied. When percent volume of metal powder is increased, melt flow rate of polymer blend is also increased. The most suitable printing condition is reported and the properties of CuFeO2 are observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Dynamic Scanning Calorimeter, X-ray diffraction. As a new method to produce semiconductor, this technique has a potential to allow any scientist or students to design and print a catalyst or sensing material by the most conventional 3D printing machine which is commonly used around the world.

  18. Averaging problem in general relativity, macroscopic gravity and using Einstein's equations in cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalaletdinov, R. M.

    1998-04-01

    The averaging problem in general relativity is briefly discussed. A new setting of the problem as that of macroscopic description of gravitation is proposed. A covariant space-time averaging procedure is described. The structure of the geometry of macroscopic space-time, which follows from averaging Cartan's structure equations, is described and the correlation tensors present in the theory are discussed. The macroscopic field equations (averaged Einstein's equations) derived in the framework of the approach are presented and their structure is analysed. The correspondence principle for macroscopic gravity is formulated and a definition of the stress-energy tensor for the macroscopic gravitational field is proposed. It is shown that the physical meaning of using Einstein's equations with a hydrodynamic stress-energy tensor in looking for cosmological models means neglecting all gravitational field correlations. The system of macroscopic gravity equations to be solved when the correlations are taken into consideration is given and described.

  19. Microstructure and macroscopic properties of polydisperse systems of hard spheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogarko, V.

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation describes an investigation of systems of polydisperse smooth hard spheres. This includes the development of a fast contact detection algorithm for computer modelling, the development of macroscopic constitutive laws that are based on microscopic features such as the moments of the

  20. Repositioning the knee joint in human body FE models using a graphics-based technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Dhaval; Chawla, Anoop; Mukherjee, Sudipto; Goyal, Rahul; Vusirikala, Nataraju; Jayaraman, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    Human body finite element models (FE-HBMs) are available in standard occupant or pedestrian postures. There is a need to have FE-HBMs in the same posture as a crash victim or to be configured in varying postures. Developing FE models for all possible positions is not practically viable. The current work aims at obtaining a posture-specific human lower extremity model by reconfiguring an existing one. A graphics-based technique was developed to reposition the lower extremity of an FE-HBM by specifying the flexion-extension angle. Elements of the model were segregated into rigid (bones) and deformable components (soft tissues). The bones were rotated about the flexion-extension axis followed by rotation about the longitudinal axis to capture the twisting of the tibia. The desired knee joint movement was thus achieved. Geometric heuristics were then used to reposition the skin. A mapping defined over the space between bones and the skin was used to regenerate the soft tissues. Mesh smoothing was then done to augment mesh quality. The developed method permits control over the kinematics of the joint and maintains the initial mesh quality of the model. For some critical areas (in the joint vicinity) where element distortion is large, mesh smoothing is done to improve mesh quality. A method to reposition the knee joint of a human body FE model was developed. Repositions of a model from 9 degrees of flexion to 90 degrees of flexion in just a few seconds without subjective interventions was demonstrated. Because the mesh quality of the repositioned model was maintained to a predefined level (typically to the level of a well-made model in the initial configuration), the model was suitable for subsequent simulations.

  1. PREPARATION,COMPLEX MECHANISM AND STRUCTURE MODEL OF METALLOPHTHALOC- YANINE-Fe3O4 NANOPARTICLES COMPOSITE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    MPc-Fe3O4-nanoparticles composite(M=Co, Cu, Ni, Mn) have been prepared and the factors that influence their mean size have been studied. The mean size of the nanoparticles composite increase with the increase of complex temperature. The interaction of MPc with Fe3O4 nanoparticles has been studied. There are M-O covalent bonding and ionic bonding between MPc and Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The intensities of M-O bonding and ionic bonding are in vestigated .The complex mechanism of MPc with Fe3O4 nanoparticles have been studied. First, there are complex between MPc and all Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Then, Fe3O4 nanoparticles accumulate together to form the accumulators, MPc have the function of cohering Fe3O4 nanoparticles. A considerable number of MPc combine with Fe3O4 nanoparticles on the surface of the accumulators to form MPc-Fe3O4 nanoparticles composite. All the above proesses take place spontaneously. The structure model of MPc-Fe3O4 nanoparticles composite has also been investigated. Inside the MPc-Fe3O4 nanoparticles composite, Fe3O4 nanoparticles accumulate together without order, on the surface of the composite, MPc form molecular dispersion layer. The threshold of molecular dispersion layer are also investigated.

  2. Predictive modelling of Fe(III) precipitation in iron removal process for bioleaching circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurmi, Pauliina; Ozkaya, Bestamin; Kaksonen, Anna H; Tuovinen, Olli H; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2010-05-01

    In this study, the applicability of three modelling approaches was determined in an effort to describe complex relationships between process parameters and to predict the performance of an integrated process, which consisted of a fluidized bed bioreactor for Fe(3+) regeneration and a gravity settler for precipitative iron removal. Self-organizing maps were used to visually evaluate the associations between variables prior to the comparison of two different modelling methods, the multiple regression modelling and artificial neural network (ANN) modelling, for predicting Fe(III) precipitation. With the ANN model, an excellent match between the predicted and measured data was obtained (R (2) = 0.97). The best-fitting regression model also gave a good fit (R (2) = 0.87). This study demonstrates that ANNs and regression models are robust tools for predicting iron precipitation in the integrated process and can thus be used in the management of such systems.

  3. Cloud Macroscopic Organization: Order Emerging from Randomness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Tianle

    2011-01-01

    Clouds play a central role in many aspects of the climate system and their forms and shapes are remarkably diverse. Appropriate representation of clouds in climate models is a major challenge because cloud processes span at least eight orders of magnitude in spatial scales. Here we show that there exists order in cloud size distribution of low-level clouds, and that it follows a power-law distribution with exponent gamma close to 2. gamma is insensitive to yearly variations in environmental conditions, but has regional variations and land-ocean contrasts. More importantly, we demonstrate this self-organizing behavior of clouds emerges naturally from a complex network model with simple, physical organizing principles: random clumping and merging. We also demonstrate symmetry between clear and cloudy skies in terms of macroscopic organization because of similar fundamental underlying organizing principles. The order in the apparently complex cloud-clear field thus has its root in random local interactions. Studying cloud organization with complex network models is an attractive new approach that has wide applications in climate science. We also propose a concept of cloud statistic mechanics approach. This approach is fully complementary to deterministic models, and the two approaches provide a powerful framework to meet the challenge of representing clouds in our climate models when working in tandem.

  4. Reactive Transport Modeling of Microbe-mediated Fe (II) Oxidation for Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surasani, V.; Li, L.

    2011-12-01

    Microbially Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) aims to improve the recovery of entrapped heavy oil in depleted reservoirs using microbe-based technology. Reservoir ecosystems often contain diverse microbial communities those can interact with subsurface fluids and minerals through a network of nutrients and energy fluxes. Microbe-mediated reactions products include gases, biosurfactants, biopolymers those can alter the properties of oil and interfacial interactions between oil, brine, and rocks. In addition, the produced biomass and mineral precipitates can change the reservoir permeability profile and increase sweeping efficiency. Under subsurface conditions, the injection of nitrate and Fe (II) as the electron acceptor and donor allows bacteria to grow. The reaction products include minerals such as Fe(OH)3 and nitrogen containing gases. These reaction products can have large impact on oil and reservoir properties and can enhance the recovery of trapped oil. This work aims to understand the Fe(II) oxidation by nitrate under conditions relevant to MEOR. Reactive transport modeling is used to simulate the fluid flow, transport, and reactions involved in this process. Here we developed a complex reactive network for microbial mediated nitrate-dependent Fe (II) oxidation that involves both thermodynamic controlled aqueous reactions and kinetic controlled Fe (II) mineral reaction. Reactive transport modeling is used to understand and quantify the coupling between flow, transport, and reaction processes. Our results identify key parameter controls those are important for the alteration of permeability profile under field conditions.

  5. MODELLING CHALCOPYRITE LEACHING BY Fe+3 IONS WITH THE SHRINKING CORE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Rangel Porcaro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chalcopyrite leaching by ferric iron is considered a slow process with low copper recovery; a phenomenon ascribed to the passivation of the mineral surface during leaching. Thus, the current study investigated the leaching kinetics of a high purity chalcopyrite sample in the presence of ferric sulfate as oxidant. The effects of the stirring rate, temperature, Eh and Fe3+ concentration on copper extraction were assessed. The leaching data could be described by the shirking core model (SCM for particles of unchanging size and indicated diffusion in the ash layer as the rate-controlling step with a high activation energy (103.9±6.5kJ/mol; likely an outcome of neglecting the effect of particle size distribution (PSD on the kinetics equations. Both the application of the quasi-steady-state assumption to solid-liquid systems and the effect of the particle size distribution on the interpretation of kinetics data are also discussed.

  6. A single Markov-type kinetic model accounting for the macroscopic currents of all human voltage-gated sodium channel isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbi, Pietro; Massobrio, Paolo; Hellgren Kotaleski, Jeanette

    2017-09-01

    Modelling ionic channels represents a fundamental step towards developing biologically detailed neuron models. Until recently, the voltage-gated ion channels have been mainly modelled according to the formalism introduced by the seminal works of Hodgkin and Huxley (HH). However, following the continuing achievements in the biophysical and molecular comprehension of these pore-forming transmembrane proteins, the HH formalism turned out to carry limitations and inconsistencies in reproducing the ion-channels electrophysiological behaviour. At the same time, Markov-type kinetic models have been increasingly proven to successfully replicate both the electrophysiological and biophysical features of different ion channels. However, in order to model even the finest non-conducting molecular conformational change, they are often equipped with a considerable number of states and related transitions, which make them computationally heavy and less suitable for implementation in conductance-based neurons and large networks of those. In this purely modelling study we develop a Markov-type kinetic model for all human voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs). The model framework is detailed, unifying (i.e., it accounts for all ion-channel isoforms) and computationally efficient (i.e. with a minimal set of states and transitions). The electrophysiological data to be modelled are gathered from previously published studies on whole-cell patch-clamp experiments in mammalian cell lines heterologously expressing the human VGSC subtypes (from NaV1.1 to NaV1.9). By adopting a minimum sequence of states, and using the same state diagram for all the distinct isoforms, the model ensures the lightest computational load when used in neuron models and neural networks of increasing complexity. The transitions between the states are described by original ordinary differential equations, which represent the rate of the state transitions as a function of voltage (i.e., membrane potential). The

  7. Unidirectional high fiber content composites: Automatic 3D FE model generation and damage simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qing, Hai; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2009-01-01

    A new method and a software code for the automatic generation of 3D micromechanical FE models of unidirectional long-fiber-reinforced composite (LFRC) with high fiber volume fraction with random fiber arrangement are presented. The fiber arrangement in the cross-section is generated through random...

  8. Modeling the degradation mechanisms of C6/LiFePO4 batteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, D.; Danilov, D.L.; Zwikirsch, B.; Fichtner, M.; Yang, Y.; Eichel, R.A.; Notten, P.H.L.

    2018-01-01

    A fundamental electrochemical model is developed, describing the capacity fade of C6/LiFePO4 batteries as a function of calendar time and cycling conditions. At moderate temperatures the capacity losses are mainly attributed to Li immobilization in Solid-Electrolyte-Interface (SEI) layers at the

  9. Beating the macroscopic quantum tunneling limit by man-made magnetic dead layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ji; Chen, Kezheng

    2018-05-01

    Magnetic dead layers (MDLs) are always undesirable in practical applications due to their highly frustrated spin configurations and severe degradation of host magnetism. Here we provide new insights in MDLs and unravel their attractive prospect for ferrimagnetic hybrid of Fe3O4 and γ-Fe2O3 (denoted as Fe3O4@γ-Fe2O3 in the main text) to exhibit macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) phenomena in measureable kelvin range. The 3 nm-sized negatively-charged Fe3O4@γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were immersed in various metal chloride solutions containing Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Fe3+, and Fe2+ cations to form cationic MDLs via electrostatic attraction. These man-made MDLs, if being of positive enough zeta potentials, greatly disordered the magnetic dipole interactions among Fe3O4@γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles and induce extra energy barrier to yield pronounced MQT effect in Fe3O4@γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles even though they were dispersed neither in water nor in oil. Their crossover temperatures dividing MQT and purely thermal relaxation were found to be one order of magnitude higher than reported values in other MQT systems, and more strikingly, they could be tailored by altering the soak period in our facile and scalable route.

  10. Interplay between magnetism and energetics in Fe-Cr alloys from a predictive noncollinear magnetic tight-binding model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soulairol, R.; Barreteau, Cyrille; Fu, Chu-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Magnetism is a key driving force controlling several thermodynamic and kinetic properties of Fe-Cr systems. We present a tight-binding model for Fe-Cr, where magnetism is treated beyond the usual collinear approximation. A major advantage of this model consists in a rather simple fitting procedur...

  11. Numerical Model and Analysis of Peak Temperature Reduction in LiFePO4 Battery Packs Using Phase Change Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coman, Paul Tiberiu; Veje, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Numerical model and analysis of peak temperature reduction in LiFePO4 battery packs using phase change materials......Numerical model and analysis of peak temperature reduction in LiFePO4 battery packs using phase change materials...

  12. Accurate Wavelength Measurements and Modeling of Fe XV to Fe XIX Spectra Recorded in High-Density Plasmas between 13.5 and 17 Å

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, M. J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Dunn, J.; Jordan, N.; Hansen, S. B.; Osterheld, A. L.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Flora, F.; Bollanti, S.; Di Lazzaro, P.; Murra, D.; Reale, A.; Reale, L.; Tomassetti, G.; Ritucci, A.; Francucci, M.; Martellucci, S.; Petrocelli, G.

    2005-06-01

    Iron spectra have been recorded from plasmas created at three different laser plasma facilities: the Tor Vergata University laser in Rome (Italy), the Hercules laser at ENEA in Frascati (Italy), and the Compact Multipulse Terawatt (COMET) laser at LLNL in California (USA). The measurements provide a means of identifying dielectronic satellite lines from Fe XVI and Fe XV in the vicinity of the strong 2p-->3d transitions of Fe XVII. About 80 Δn>=1 lines of Fe XV (Mg-like) to Fe XIX (O-like) were recorded between 13.8 and 17.1 Å with a high spectral resolution (λ/Δλ~4000) about 30 of these lines are from Fe XVI and Fe XV. The laser-produced plasmas had electron temperatures between 100 and 500 eV and electron densities between 1020 and 1022 cm-3. The Hebrew University Lawrence Livermore Atomic Code (HULLAC) was used to calculate the atomic structure and atomic rates for Fe XV-XIX. HULLAC was used to calculate synthetic line intensities at Te=200 eV and ne=1021 cm-3 for three different conditions to illustrate the role of opacity: optically thin plasmas with no excitation-autoionization/dielectronic recombination (EA/DR) contributions to the line intensities, optically thin plasmas that included EA/DR contributions to the line intensities, and optically thick plasmas (optical depth ~200 μm) that included EA/DR contributions to the line intensities. The optically thick simulation best reproduced the recorded spectrum from the Hercules laser. However, some discrepancies between the modeling and the recorded spectra remain.

  13. A new animal model for the imaging of melanoma: correlation of FDG PET with clinical outcome, macroscopic aspectand histological classification in Melanoblastoma-bearing Libechov Minipigs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boisgard, R.; Naulleau, S. V.; Leplat, J. J.; Bouet, S.; Chalony, C.; Tricaud, Y.; Horák, Vratislav; Geffrotin, C.; Frelat, G.; Tavitian, B.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 6 (2003), s. 826-834 ISSN 1619-7070 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/01/0162 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5045916 Keywords : melanoma * MeLiM swinw model Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.324, year: 2003

  14. Macroscopic transport by synthetic molecular machines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berna, J; Leigh, DA; Lubomska, M; Mendoza, SM; Perez, EM; Rudolf, P; Teobaldi, G; Zerbetto, F

    Nature uses molecular motors and machines in virtually every significant biological process, but demonstrating that simpler artificial structures operating through the same gross mechanisms can be interfaced with - and perform physical tasks in - the macroscopic world represents a significant hurdle

  15. Macroscopic quantum waves in non local theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventura, I.

    1979-01-01

    By means of an expansion in the density, it is shown that Macroscopic Quantum Waves also apear in non local theories. This result reinforces the conjecture that these waves should exist in liquid 4 He. (Author) [pt

  16. Macroscopic quantum waves in non local theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventura, I.

    1979-01-01

    By means of an expansion in the density, it is shown that Macroscopic Quantum Waves also appear in non local theories. This result reinforces the conjecture that these waves should exist in liquid 4 He [pt

  17. Macroscopic models for vehicular flows and crowd dynamics theory and applications classical and non–classical advanced mathematics for real life applications

    CERN Document Server

    Rosini, Massimiliano Daniele

    2013-01-01

    This monograph  presents a systematic treatment of the theory for hyperbolic conservation laws and their applications to vehicular traffics and crowd dynamics. In the first part of the book, the author presents very basic considerations and gradually introduces the mathematical tools necessary to describe and understand the mathematical models developed in the following parts focusing on vehicular and pedestrian traffic. The book is a self-contained valuable resource for advanced courses in mathematical modeling, physics and civil engineering. A number of examples and figures facilitate a better understanding of the underlying concepts and motivations for the students. Important new techniques are presented, in particular the wave front tracking algorithm, the operator splitting approach, the non-classical theory of conservation laws and the constrained problems. This book is the first to present a comprehensive account of these fundamental new mathematical advances.  

  18. Assessments of macroscopicity for quantum optical states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laghaout, Amine; Neergaard-Nielsen, Jonas Schou; Andersen, Ulrik Lund

    2015-01-01

    With the slow but constant progress in the coherent control of quantum systems, it is now possible to create large quantum superpositions. There has therefore been an increased interest in quantifying any claims of macroscopicity. We attempt here to motivate three criteria which we believe should...... enter in the assessment of macroscopic quantumness: The number of quantum fluctuation photons, the purity of the states, and the ease with which the branches making up the state can be distinguished. © 2014....

  19. Nuclear fission as a macroscopic quantum tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takigawa, N.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss nuclear fission from the point of view of a macroscopic quantum tunneling, one of whose major interests is to study the effects of environments on the tunneling rate of a macroscopic variable. We show that a vibrational excitation of the fissioning nucleus significantly enhances the fission rate. We show this effect by two different methods. The one is to treat the vibrational excitation as an environmental degree of freedom, the other treats the fission as a two dimensional quantum tunneling. (author)

  20. Thermal modeling of cylindrical LiFePO4 batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Shadman Rad, M.; Danilov, D.L.; Baghalha, M.; Kazemeini, M.; Notten, P.H.L.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal management of Li-ion batteries is important because of the high energy content and the risk of rapid temperature development in the high current range. Reliable and safe operation of these batteries is seriously endangered by high temperatures. It is important to have a simple but accurate model to evaluate the thermal behavior of batteries under a variety of operating conditions and be able to predict the internal temperature as well. To achieve this goal, a radial-axial model is dev...

  1. Role of stochastic fluctuations in the charge on macroscopic particles in dusty plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaulina, O.S.; Nefedov, A.P.; Petrov, O.F.; Khrapak, S.A.

    1999-01-01

    The currents which charge a macroscopic particle placed in a plasma consist of discrete charges; hence, the charge can undergo random fluctuations about its equilibrium value. These random fluctuations can be described by a simple model which, if the mechanisms for charging of macroscopic particles are known, makes it possible to determine the dependence of the temporal and amplitude characteristics of the fluctuations on the plasma parameters. This model can be used to study the effect of charge fluctuations on the dynamics of the macroscopic particles. The case of so-called plasma-dust crystals (i.e., highly ordered structures which develop because of strong interactions among macroscopic particles) in laboratory gaseous discharge plasmas is considered as an example. The molecular dynamics method shows that, under certain conditions, random fluctuations in the charge can effectively heat a system of macroscopic particles, thereby impeding the ordering process

  2. Effect of the Plasmid-DNA Vaccination on Macroscopic and Microscopic Damage Caused by the Experimental Chronic Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in the Canine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Rodríguez-Morales

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The dog is considered the main domestic reservoir for Trypanosoma cruzi infection and a suitable experimental animal model to study the pathological changes during the course of Chagas disease (CD. Vaccine development is one of CD prevention methods to protect people at risk. Two plasmids containing genes encoding a trans-sialidase protein (TcSP and an amastigote-specific glycoprotein (TcSSP4 were used as DNA vaccines in a canine model. Splenomegaly was not found in either of the recombinant plasmid-immunized groups; however, cardiomegaly was absent in animals immunized only with the plasmid containing the TcSSP4 gene. The inflammation of subendocardial and myocardial tissues was prevented only with the immunization with TcSSP4 gene. In conclusion, the vaccination with these genes has a partial protective effect on the enlargement of splenic and cardiac tissues during the chronic CD and on microscopic hearth damage, since both plasmids prevented splenomegaly but only one avoided cardiomegaly, and the lesions in heart tissue of dog immunized with plasmid containing the TcSSP4 gene covered only subepicardial tissue.

  3. Effects of combined hydroxyapatite and human platelet rich plasma on bone healing in rabbit model: radiological, macroscopical, hidtopathological and biomechanical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oryan, A; Meimandi Parizi, A; Shafiei-Sarvestani, Z; Bigham, A S

    2012-12-01

    Hydroxyapatite is an osteoconductive material used as a bone graft extender and exhibits excellent biocompatibility with soft tissues such as skin, muscle and gums, making it an ideal candidate for orthopedic and dental implants or components of implants. Synthetic hydroxyapatite has been widely used in repair of hard tissues, and common uses include bone repair, bone augmentation, as well as coating of implants or acting as fillers in bone or teeth. On the other hand, human platelet rich plasma (hPRP) has been used as a source of osteoinductive factor. A combination of hPRP and hydroxyapatite is expected to create a composite with both osteoconductive and osteoinductive properties. This study examined the effect of a combination of hydroxyapatite and hPRP on osteogenesis in vivo, using rabbit model bone healing. A critical size defect of 10 mm long was created in the radial diaphysis of 36 rabbit and either supplied with hydroxyapatite-human PRP or hydroxyapatite or was left empty (control group). Radiographs of each forelimb were taken postoperatively on 1st day and then at the 2nd, 4th, 6th and 8th weeks post injury to evaluate bone formation, union and remodeling of the defect. The operated radiuses of half of the animals in each group were removed on 56th postoperative day and were grossly and histopathologically evaluated. In addition, biomechanical test was conducted on the operated and normal forearms of the other half of the animals of each group. This study demonstrated that hydroxyapatite-humanPRP, could promote bone regeneration in critical size defects with a high regenerative capacity. The results of the present study demonstrated that hydroxyapatite-hPRP could be an attractive alternative for reconstruction of the major diaphyseal defects of the long bones in animal models.

  4. Kinetic Model of LiFePO4 Formation Using Non-Isothermal Thermogravimetric Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Halim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The formation reaction of LiFePO4 from decomposition of precursors LiOH, FeSO4.7H2O and (NH42HPO4 with mol ratio of Li:Fe:P=1:1:1 was investigated. The experiment was carried out by thermogravimetric differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA method using nitrogen as atmosfer at a constant heating rate to obtain kinetic constant parameters. Several heating rates were selected, there are 5, 7, 10, 15, 17.5, 22.5 and 25 °C/min. Activation energy, pre-exponential factor and reaction order were taken using Kissinger method and obtained respectively 56.086 kJ/mol, 6.95×108 min-1, and 1.058. Based on fitting result between reaction model and experiment were obtained that reaction obeyed the three dimension diffusion model. © 2014 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 19th September 2013; Revised: 9th December 2013; Accepted: 23rd January 2014 [How to Cite: Halim, A., Widiyastuti, W., Setyawan, H., Winardi, S. (2014. Kinetic of LiFePO4 For-mation Using Non-isothermal Thermogravimetric Analysis. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 9 (1: 60-65. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.9.1.5508.60-65][Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.9.1.5508.60-65] 

  5. Effect of Organic Fe-Ligands, Released by Emiliania huxleyi, on Fe(II Oxidation Rate in Seawater Under Simulated Ocean Acidification Conditions: A Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Samperio-Ramos

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The potential effect of ocean acidification on the exudation of organic matter by phytoplankton and, consequently, on the iron redox chemistry is largely unknown. In this study, the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi was exposed to different pCO2 conditions (225–900 μatm, in order to determine the role of natural organic ligands on the Fe(II oxidation rate. Oxidation kinetics of Fe(II were studied as a function of pH (7.75–8.25 and dissolved organic carbon levels produced (0–141.11 μmol C L−1 during the different growth stages. The Fe(II oxidation rate always decreased in the presence of exudates as compared to that in the exudates-free seawater. The organic ligands present in the coccolithophorid exudates were responsible for this decrease. The oxidation of Fe(II in artificial seawater was also investigated at nanomolar levels over a range of pH (7.75–8.25 at 25°C in the presence of different glucuronic acid concentrations. Dissolved uronic acids (DUA slightly increased the experimental rate compared to control artificial seawater (ASW which can be ascribed to the stabilization of the oxidized form by chelation. This behavior was a function of the Fe(II:DUA ratio and was a pH dependent process. A kinetic model in ASW, with a single organic ligand, was applied for computing the equilibrium constant (log KFeCHO+ = 3.68 ± 0.81 M−1 and the oxidation rate (log kFeCHO+ = 3.28 ± 0.41 M−1 min−1 for the Fe(II-DUA complex (FeCHO+, providing an excellent description of data obtained over a wide range of DUA concentrations and pH conditions. Considering the Marcus theory the Fe(III complexing constant with DUA was limited to between 1013 and 1016. For the seawater enriched with exudates of E. huxleyi a second kinetic modeling approach was carried out for fitting the Fe(II speciation, and the contribution of each Fe(II species to the overall oxidation rate as a function of the pH/pCO2 conditions. The influence of organic ligands in the

  6. The catalytic ozonization of model lignin compounds in the presence of Fe(III) ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben'ko, E. M.; Mukovnya, A. V.; Lunin, V. V.

    2007-05-01

    The ozonization of several model lignin compounds (guaiacol, 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, phenol, and vanillin) was studied in acid media in the presence of iron(III) ions. It was found that Fe3+ did not influence the initial rate of the reactions between model phenols and ozone but accelerated the oxidation of intermediate ozonolysis products. The metal concentration dependences of the total ozone consumption and effective rate constants of catalytic reaction stages were determined. Data on reactions in the presence of oxalic acid as a competing chelate ligand showed that complex formation with Fe3+ was the principal factor that accelerated the ozonolysis of model phenols at the stage of the oxidation of carboxylic dibasic acids and C2 aldehydes formed as intermediate products.

  7. Modelling phase separation in Fe-Cr system using different atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castin, N.; Bonny, G.; Terentyev, D.; Lavrentiev, M.Yu.; Nguyen-Manh, D.

    2011-01-01

    Atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (AKMC) simulations were performed to study α-α' phase separation in Fe-Cr alloys. Two different energy models and two approaches to estimate the local vacancy migration barriers were used. The energy models considered are a two-band model Fe-Cr potential and a cluster expansion, both fitted to ab initio data. The classical Kang-Weinberg decomposition, based on the total energy change of the system, and an Artificial Neural Network (ANN), employed as a regression tool were used to predict the local vacancy migration barriers 'on the fly'. The results are compared with experimental thermal annealing data and differences between the applied AKMC approaches are discussed. The ability of the ANN regression method to accurately predict migration barriers not present in the training list is also addressed by performing cross-check calculations using the nudged elastic band method.

  8. Macroscopic quantum phenomena from the large N perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, C H; Hu, B L; Subasi, Y

    2011-01-01

    Macroscopic quantum phenomena (MQP) is a relatively new research venue, with exciting ongoing experiments and bright prospects, yet with surprisingly little theoretical activity. What makes MQP intellectually stimulating is because it is counterpoised against the traditional view that macroscopic means classical. This simplistic and hitherto rarely challenged view need be scrutinized anew, perhaps with much of the conventional wisdoms repealed. In this series of papers we report on a systematic investigation into some key foundational issues of MQP, with the hope of constructing a viable theoretical framework for this new endeavour. The three major themes discussed in these three essays are the large N expansion, the correlation hierarchy and quantum entanglement for systems of 'large' sizes, with many components or degrees of freedom. In this paper we use different theories in a variety of contexts to examine the conditions or criteria whereby a macroscopic quantum system may take on classical attributes, and, more interestingly, that it keeps some of its quantum features. The theories we consider here are, the O(N) quantum mechanical model, semiclassical stochastic gravity and gauge / string theories; the contexts include that of a 'quantum roll' in inflationary cosmology, entropy generation in quantum Vlasov equation for plasmas, the leading order and next-to-leading order large N behaviour, and hydrodynamic / thermodynamic limits. The criteria for classicality in our consideration include the use of uncertainty relations, the correlation between classical canonical variables, randomization of quantum phase, environment-induced decoherence, decoherent history of hydrodynamic variables, etc. All this exercise is to ask only one simple question: Is it really so surprising that quantum features can appear in macroscopic objects? By examining different representative systems where detailed theoretical analysis has been carried out, we find that there is no a priori

  9. Thermodynamic Modelling of Fe-Cr-Ni-Spinel Formation at the Light-Water Reactor Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurepin, V. A.; Kulik, D. A.; Hitpold, A.; Nicolet, M.

    2002-03-01

    In the light water reactors (LWR), the neutron activation and transport of corrosion products is of concern in the context of minimizing the radiation doses received by the personnel during maintenance works. A practically useful model for transport and deposition of the stainless steel corrosion products in LWR can only be based on an improved understanding of chemical processes, in particular, on the attainment of equilibrium in this hydrothermal system, which can be described by means of a thermodynamic solid-solution -aqueous-solution (SSAS) model. In this contribution, a new thermodynamic model for a Fe-Cr-Ni multi-component spinel solid solutions was developed that considers thermodynamic consequences of cation interactions in both spinel sub-Iattices. The obtained standard thermodynamic properties of two ferrite and two chromite end-members and their mixing parameters at 90 bar pressure and 290 *c temperature predict a large miscibility gap between (Fe,Ni) chromite and (Fe,Ni) ferrite phases. Together with the SUPCRT92-98 thermo- dynamic database for aqueous species, the 'spinel' thermodynamic dataset was applied to modeling oxidation of austenitic stainless steel in hydrothermal water at 290*C and 90 bar using the Gibbs energy minimization (GEM) algorithm, implemented in the GEMS-PSI code. Firstly, the equilibrium compositions of steel oxidation products were modelIed as function of oxygen fugacity .fO 2 by incremental additions of O 2 in H 2 O-free system Cr-Fe- Ni-O. Secondly, oxidation of corrosion products in the Fe-Cr-Ni-O-H aquatic system was modelIed at different initial solid/water ratios. It is demonstrated that in the transition region from hydrogen regime to oxygen regime, the most significant changes in composition of two spinel-oxide phases (chromite and ferrite) and hematite must take place. Under more reduced conditions, the Fe-rich ferrite (magnetite) and Ni-poor chromite phases co-exist at equilibrium with a metal Ni phase, maintaining

  10. Hydrogen Activation by Biomimetic [NiFe]-Hydrogenase Model Containing Protected Cyanide Cofactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manor, Brian C.; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Described are experiments that allow incorporation of cyanide cofactors and hydride substrate into active site models [NiFe]-hydrogenases (H2ases). Complexes of the type (CO)2(CN)2Fe(pdt)Ni(dxpe), (dxpe = dppe, 1; dxpe = dcpe, 2) bind the Lewis acid B(C6F5)3 (BArF3) to give the adducts (CO)2(CNBArF3)2Fe(pdt)Ni(dxpe), (1(BArF3)2, 2(BArF3)2). Upon decarbonylation using amine oxides, these adducts react with H2 to give hydrido derivatives Et4N[(CO)(CNBArF3)2Fe(H)(pdt)Ni(dxpe)], (dxpe = dppe, Et4N[H3(BArF3)2]; dxpe = dcpe, Et4N[H4(BArF3)2]). Crystallographic analysis shows that Et4N[H3(BArF3)2] generally resembles the active site of the enzyme in the reduced, hydride-containing states (Ni-C/R). The Fe-H…Ni center is unsymmetrical with rFe-H = 1.51(3) and rNi-H = 1.71(3) Å. Both crystallographic and 19F NMR analysis show that the CNBArF3− ligands occupy basal and apical sites. Unlike cationic Ni-Fe hydrides, [H3(BArF3)2]− and [H4(BArF3)2]− oxidize at mild potentials, near the Fc+/0 couple. Electrochemical measurements indicate that in the presence of base, [H3(BArF3)2]− catalyzes the oxidation of H2. NMR evidence indicates dihydrogen bonding between these anionic hydrides and ammonium salts, which is relevant to the mechanism of hydrogenogenesis. In the case of Et4N[H3(BArF3)2], strong acids such as HCl induce H2 release to give the chloride Et4N[(CO)(CNBArF3)2Fe(pdt)(Cl)Ni(dppe)]. PMID:23899049

  11. Experimental Investigation and Thermodynamic Modeling of the B2O3-FeO-Fe2O3-Nd2O3 System for Recycling of NdFeB Magnet Scrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsson, Lars Klemet; Tranell, Gabriella; Jung, In-Ho

    2017-02-01

    NdFeB magnet scrap is an alternative source of neodymium that could have a significantly lower impact on the environment than current mining and extraction processes. Neodymium can be readily oxidized in the presence of oxygen, which makes it easy to recover neodymium in oxide form. Thermochemical data and phase diagrams for neodymium oxide containing systems is, however, very limited. Thermodynamic modeling of the B2O3-FeO-Fe2O3-Nd2O3 system was hence performed to obtain accurate phase diagrams and thermochemical properties of the system. Key phase diagram experiments were also carried out for the FeO-Nd2O3 system in saturation with iron to improve the accuracy of the present modeling. The modified quasichemical model was used to describe the Gibbs energy of the liquid oxide phase. The Gibbs energy functions of the liquid phase and the solids were optimized to reproduce all available and reliable phase diagram data, and thermochemical properties of the system. Finally the optimized database was applied to calculate conditions for selective oxidation of neodymium from NdFeB magnet waste.

  12. Searching for the nanoscopic–macroscopic boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velásquez, E.A. [GICM and GES Groups, Instituto de Física-FCEN, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21 Medellín (Colombia); Grupo de Investigación en Modelamiento y Simulación Computacional, Universidad de San Buenaventura Sec. Medellín, A.A. 5222, Medellín (Colombia); Altbir, D. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), CEDENNA, Santiago (Chile); Mazo-Zuluaga, J. [GICM and GES Groups, Instituto de Física-FCEN, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21 Medellín (Colombia); Duque, L.F. [GICM and GES Groups, Instituto de Física-FCEN, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21 Medellín (Colombia); Grupo de Física Teórica, Aplicada y Didáctica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Aplicadas Instituto Tecnológico Metropolitano, Medellín (Colombia); Mejía-López, J., E-mail: jmejia@puc.cl [Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, CEDENNA, Santiago (Chile)

    2013-12-15

    Several studies have focused on the size-dependent properties of elements, looking for a unique definition of the nanoscopic–macroscopic boundary. By using a novel approach consisting of an energy variational method combined with a quantum Heisenberg model, here we address the size at which the ordering temperature of a magnetic nanoparticle reaches its bulk value. We consider samples with sizes in the range 1–500 nm, as well as several geometries and crystalline lattices and observe that, contrarily to what is commonly argued, the nanoscopic-microscopic boundary depends on both factors: shape and crystalline structure. This suggests that the surface-to-volume ratio is not the unique parameter that defines the behavior of a nanometric sample whenever its size increases reaching the bulk dimension. Comparisons reveal very good agreement with experimental evidence with differences less than 2%. Our results have broad implications for practical issues in measurements on systems at the nanometric scale. - Highlights: • A novel quantum-Heisenberg variational energy method is implemented. • The asymptotic behavior toward the thermodynamic limit is explored. • An important dependence of the nano-bulk boundary on the geometry is found. • And also an important dependence on the crystalline lattice. • We obtain a very good agreement with experimental evidence with differences <2%.

  13. Theory of superfluidity macroscopic quantum waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventura, I.

    1978-10-01

    A new description of superfluidity is proposed, based upon the fact that Bogoliubov's theory of superfluidity exhibits some so far unsuspected macroscopic quantum waves (MQWs), which have a topological nature and travel within the fluid at subsonic velocities. To quantize the bounded quasi-particles the field theoretic version of the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization rule, is employed and also resort to a variational computation. In an instantaneous configuration the MQWs cut the condensate into blocks of phase, providing, by analogy with ferromagnetism, a nice explanation of what could be the lambda-transition. A crude estimate of the critical temperature gives T sub(c) approximately equal to 2-4K. An attempt is made to understand Tisza's two-fluid model in terms of the MQWs, and we rise the conjecture that they play an important role in the motion of second. We present also a qualitative prediction concerning to the behavior of the 'phononroton' peak below 1.0K, and propose two experiments to look for MQWs [pt

  14. Model's sparse representation based on reduced mixed GMsFE basis methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Lijian, E-mail: ljjiang@hnu.edu.cn [Institute of Mathematics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Li, Qiuqi, E-mail: qiuqili@hnu.edu.cn [College of Mathematics and Econometrics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a model's sparse representation based on reduced mixed generalized multiscale finite element (GMsFE) basis methods for elliptic PDEs with random inputs. A typical application for the elliptic PDEs is the flow in heterogeneous random porous media. Mixed generalized multiscale finite element method (GMsFEM) is one of the accurate and efficient approaches to solve the flow problem in a coarse grid and obtain the velocity with local mass conservation. When the inputs of the PDEs are parameterized by the random variables, the GMsFE basis functions usually depend on the random parameters. This leads to a large number degree of freedoms for the mixed GMsFEM and substantially impacts on the computation efficiency. In order to overcome the difficulty, we develop reduced mixed GMsFE basis methods such that the multiscale basis functions are independent of the random parameters and span a low-dimensional space. To this end, a greedy algorithm is used to find a set of optimal samples from a training set scattered in the parameter space. Reduced mixed GMsFE basis functions are constructed based on the optimal samples using two optimal sampling strategies: basis-oriented cross-validation and proper orthogonal decomposition. Although the dimension of the space spanned by the reduced mixed GMsFE basis functions is much smaller than the dimension of the original full order model, the online computation still depends on the number of coarse degree of freedoms. To significantly improve the online computation, we integrate the reduced mixed GMsFE basis methods with sparse tensor approximation and obtain a sparse representation for the model's outputs. The sparse representation is very efficient for evaluating the model's outputs for many instances of parameters. To illustrate the efficacy of the proposed methods, we present a few numerical examples for elliptic PDEs with multiscale and random inputs. In particular, a two-phase flow model in

  15. Gibbs energy modelling of the driving forces and calculation of the fcc/hcp martensitic transformation temperatures in Fe-Mn and Fe-Mn-Si alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotes, S.; Fernandez Guillermet, A.; Sade, M.

    1999-01-01

    Very recent, accurate dilatometric measurements of the fcc hcp martensitic transformation (MT) temperatures are used to develop a new thermodynamic description of the fcc and hcp phases in the Fe-Mn-Si system, based on phenomenological models for the Gibbs energy function. The composition dependence of the driving forces for the fcc→hcp and the hcp→fcc MTs is established. Detailed calculations of the MT temperatures are reported, which are used to investigate the systematic effects of Si additions upon the MT temperatures of Fe-Mn alloys. A critical comparison with one of the most recent thermodynamic analyses of the Fe-Mn-Si system, which is due to Forsberg and Agren, is also presented. (orig.)

  16. Nickel-centred proton reduction catalysis in a model of [NiFe] hydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazzolotto, Deborah; Gennari, Marcello; Queyriaux, Nicolas; Simmons, Trevor R.; Pécaut, Jacques; Demeshko, Serhiy; Meyer, Franc; Orio, Maylis; Artero, Vincent; Duboc, Carole

    2016-11-01

    Hydrogen production through water splitting is one of the most promising solutions for the storage of renewable energy. [NiFe] hydrogenases are organometallic enzymes containing nickel and iron centres that catalyse hydrogen evolution with performances that rival those of platinum. These enzymes provide inspiration for the design of new molecular catalysts that do not require precious metals. However, all heterodinuclear NiFe models reported so far do not reproduce the Ni-centred reactivity found at the active site of [NiFe] hydrogenases. Here, we report a structural and functional NiFe mimic that displays reactivity at the Ni site. This is shown by the detection of two catalytic intermediates that reproduce structural and electronic features of the Ni-L and Ni-R states of the enzyme during catalytic turnover. Under electrocatalytic conditions, this mimic displays high rates for H2 evolution (second-order rate constant of 2.5 × 104 M-1 s-1 turnover frequency of 250 s-1 at 10 mM H+ concentration) from mildly acidic solutions.

  17. Fe and Mn Transport and Settling Modelling in the Upper Course of the Lerma River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Aragón Juan Antonio

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A metal transport and deposition model together with concentration measurements of Fe and Mn was developed in the Upper Course of the Lerma River, Mexico State. The hydraulic sections of 27.9 km of the Lerma River were measured in the field in order to supply the numerical model. A general mass balance equation considering full mixing in selected reaches of the Lerma River was developed and solved using the finite-difference method. At the same time a sampling campaign of water and sediment allowed us to obtain Fe and Mn concentrations in each phase. Metal concentrations were obtained by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Method (EDXRF. Partition coefficients for water and suspended sediment and for water and deposited sediment were calculated. Well defined periods and areas of deposition of Fe and Mn were obtained by the transport model and the spatial variation of the partition coefficients agree with the pattern obtained in the simulation. It is concluded that the current practice of constant values of the partition coefficients could not be used in modelling transport and deposition of metals if we are dealing with hydrologic extreme events and river sediment deposition areas.

  18. Transformation impacts of dissolved and solid phase Fe(II) on trichloroethylene (TCE) reduction in an iron-reducing bacteria (IRB) mixed column system: a mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Yeunook; Kim, Dooil; Cho, Hyun-Hee; Singhal, Naresh; Park, Jae-Woo

    2012-12-01

    In this research, we conducted trichloroethylene (TCE) reduction in a column filled with iron and iron-reducing bacteria (IRB) and developed a mathematical model to investigate the critical reactions between active species in iron/IRB/contaminant systems. The formation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) in this system with IRB and zero-valent iron (ZVI, Fe(0)) coated with a ferric iron (Fe(III)) crust significantly affected TCE reduction and IRB respiration in various ways. This study presents a new framework for transformation property and reducing ability of both dissolved (Fe(II)(dissolved)) and solid form ferrous iron (Fe(II)(solid)). Results showed that TCE reduction was strongly depressed by Fe(II)(solid) rather than by other inhibitors (e.g., Fe(III) and lactate), suggesting that Fe(II)(solid) might reduce IRB activation due to attachment to IRB cells. Newly exposed Fe(0) from the released Fe(II)(dissolved) was a strong contributor to TCE reduction compared to Fe(II)(solid). In addition, our research confirmed that less Fe(II)(solid) production strongly supported long-term TCE reduction because it may create an easier TCE approach to Fe(0) or increase IRB growth. Our findings will aid the understanding of the contributions of iron media (e.g., Fe(II)(solid), Fe(II)(dissolved), Fe(III), and Fe(0)) to IRB for decontamination in natural groundwater systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Macroscopic modelling of solid-state fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogschagen, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Solid-state fermentation is different from the more well known process of liquid fermentation because no free flowing water is present. The technique is primarily used in Asia. Well-known products are the foods tempe, soy sauce and saké. In industrial solid-state fermentation, the substrate usually

  20. Fe-oxide Nanoparticles: a natural playground for testing the ISP model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allia, P

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic dipolar interaction plays a major role in systems of ferrimagnetic Fe-oxide nanoparticles. Dipolar interaction plays a role over a wide range of temperatures above blocking temperature and results in the onset of the Interacting Superparamagnetic (ISP) regime. In this paper, distinctive aspects and basic issues of the ISP model are discussed by exploiting the experimental data obtained in well-characterized magnetite nanoparticles

  1. FE Modeling of Human Vocal Tract Acoustics. Part I: Production of Czech Vowels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vampola, T.; Horáček, Jaromír; Švec, J. G.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 3 (2008), s. 433-447 ISSN 1610-1928 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/04/1025 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514; CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : biomechanics of voice * FE models of human vocaltract * acoustic modal analysis Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 0.538, year: 2008

  2. Conversion of light into macroscopic helical motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iamsaard, Supitchaya; Aßhoff, Sarah J.; Matt, Benjamin; Kudernac, Tibor; Cornelissen, Jeroen J. L. M.; Fletcher, Stephen P.; Katsonis, Nathalie

    2014-03-01

    A key goal of nanotechnology is the development of artificial machines capable of converting molecular movement into macroscopic work. Although conversion of light into shape changes has been reported and compared to artificial muscles, real applications require work against an external load. Here, we describe the design, synthesis and operation of spring-like materials capable of converting light energy into mechanical work at the macroscopic scale. These versatile materials consist of molecular switches embedded in liquid-crystalline polymer springs. In these springs, molecular movement is converted and amplified into controlled and reversible twisting motions. The springs display complex motion, which includes winding, unwinding and helix inversion, as dictated by their initial shape. Importantly, they can produce work by moving a macroscopic object and mimicking mechanical movements, such as those used by plant tendrils to help the plant access sunlight. These functional materials have potential applications in micromechanical systems, soft robotics and artificial muscles.

  3. Nonequilibrium work relation in a macroscopic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sughiyama, Yuki; Ohzeki, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    We reconsider a well-known relationship between the fluctuation theorem and the second law of thermodynamics by evaluating stochastic evolution of the density field (probability measure valued process). In order to establish a bridge between microscopic and macroscopic behaviors, we must take the thermodynamic limit of a stochastic dynamical system following the standard procedure in statistical mechanics. The thermodynamic path characterizing a dynamical behavior in the macroscopic scale can be formulated as an infimum of the action functional for the stochastic evolution of the density field. In our formulation, the second law of thermodynamics can be derived only by symmetry of the action functional without recourse to the Jarzynski equality. Our formulation leads to a nontrivial nonequilibrium work relation for metastable (quasi-stationary) states, which are peculiar in the macroscopic system. We propose a prescription for computing the free energy for metastable states based on the resultant work relation. (paper)

  4. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Accident Tolerant Fuels High Impact Problem: Coordinate Multiscale FeCrAl Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, K. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hales, J. D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Y. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Andersson, D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Capolungo, L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wirth, B. D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2017-07-26

    Since the events at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 significant research has unfolded at national laboratories, universities and other institutions into alternative materials that have potential enhanced ac- cident tolerance when compared to traditional UO2 fuel zircaloy clad fuel rods. One of the potential replacement claddings are iron-chromium-alunimum (FeCrAl) alloys due to their increased oxidation resistance [1–4] and higher strength [1, 2]. While the oxidation characteristics of FeCrAl are a benefit for accident tolerance, the thermal neu- tron absorption cross section of FeCrAl is about ten times that of Zircaloy. This neutronic penalty necessitates thinner cladding. This allows for slightly larger pellets to give the same cold gap width in the rod. However, the slight increase in pellet diameter is not sufficient to compensate for the neutronic penalty and enriching the fuel beyond the current 5% limit appears to be necessary [5]. Current estimates indicate that this neutronic penalty will impose an increase in fuel cost of 15-35% [1, 2]. In addition to the neutronic disadvantage, it is anticipated that tritium release to the coolant will be larger because the permeability of hydrogen in FeCrAl is about 100 times higher than in Zircaloy [6]. Also, radiation-induced hardening and embrittlement of FeCrAl need to be fully characterized experimentally [7]. Due to the aggressive development schedule for inserting some of the potential materials into lead test assemblies or rods by 2022 [8] multiscale multiphysics modeling approaches have been used to provide insight into these the use of FeCrAl as a cladding material. The purpose of this letter report is to highlight the multiscale modeling effort for iron-chromium-alunimum (FeCrAl) cladding alloys as part of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program through its Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) High Impact Problem (HIP). The approach taken throughout the HIP is to

  5. Modelling of radiation induced segregation in austenitic Fe alloys at the atomistic level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piochaud, Jean-Baptiste

    2013-01-01

    In pressurized water reactors, under irradiation internal structures are subject of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking which is influenced by radiation induced segregation (RIS). In this work RIS of 316 stainless steels is modelled considering a model ternary Fe-10Ni-20Cr alloy. For this purpose we have built an Fe-Ni-Cr pair interaction model to simulate RIS at the atomistic level using an atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo approach. The pair interactions have been deduced from density functional theory (DFT) data available in the pure fcc systems but also from DFT calculations we have performed in the Fe-10Ni-20Cr target alloy. Point defect formation energies were calculated and found to depend strongly on the local environment of the defect. As a consequence, a rather good estimation of these energies can be obtained from the knowledge of the number and respective positions of the Ni and Cr atoms in the vicinity of the defect. This work shows that a model based only on interaction parameters between elements positioned in perfect lattice sites (solute atoms and vacancy) cannot capture alone both the thermodynamic and the kinetic aspect of RIS. A more accurate of estimating the barriers encountered by the diffusing species is required than the one used in our model, which has to depend on the saddle point environment. This study therefore shows thus the need to estimate point defect migration energies using the DFT approach to calibrate a model that can be used in the framework of atomic kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. We also found that the reproduction by our pair interaction model of DFT data for the self-interstitial atoms was found to be incompatible with the modelling of RIS under electron irradiation. (author)

  6. Macroscopic effects in attosecond pulse generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruchon, T; Varju, K; Mansten, E; Swoboda, M; L'Huillier, A; Hauri, C P; Lopez-Martens, R

    2008-01-01

    We examine how the generation and propagation of high-order harmonics in a partly ionized gas medium affect their strength and synchronization. The temporal properties of the resulting attosecond pulses generated in long gas targets can be significantly influenced by macroscopic effects, in particular by the intensity in the medium and the degree of ionization which control the dispersion. Under some conditions, the use of gas targets longer than the absorption length can lead to the generation of compressed attosecond pulses. We show these macroscopic effects experimentally, using a 6 mm-long argon-filled gas cell as the generating medium

  7. Macroscopic effects in attosecond pulse generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruchon, T; Varju, K; Mansten, E; Swoboda, M; L' Huillier, A [Department of Physics, Lund University, PO Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Hauri, C P; Lopez-Martens, R [Laboratoire d' Optique Appliquee, Ecole Nationale Superieure des Techniques Avancees (ENSTA)-Ecole Polytechnique CNRS UMR 7639, 91761 Palaiseau (France)], E-mail: anne.lhuillier@fysik.lth.se

    2008-02-15

    We examine how the generation and propagation of high-order harmonics in a partly ionized gas medium affect their strength and synchronization. The temporal properties of the resulting attosecond pulses generated in long gas targets can be significantly influenced by macroscopic effects, in particular by the intensity in the medium and the degree of ionization which control the dispersion. Under some conditions, the use of gas targets longer than the absorption length can lead to the generation of compressed attosecond pulses. We show these macroscopic effects experimentally, using a 6 mm-long argon-filled gas cell as the generating medium.

  8. Macroscopic treatment of nuclear dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiatecki, W.J.

    1984-05-01

    A qualitative classification of nucleus-nucleus reactions into four types is described, a consequence of the existence of up to three milestone configurations that a fusing system may be faced with. These considerations lead to phenomenological formulae for fusion and compound-nucleus cross-sections that may be compared with experiments by the use of rectilinear cross section plots. Examples of more specific model calculations of nuclear reactions employing the Chaotic Regime Dynamics are described. Some misunderstandings regarding the Wall and Wall-and-Window formulae, underlying this type of dynamics, are discussed in the appendix. 23 references

  9. From Microscopic to Macroscopic Descriptions of Cell Migration on Growing Domains

    KAUST Repository

    Baker, Ruth E.; Yates, Christian A.; Erban, Radek

    2009-01-01

    are studied, and correspondence with a macroscopic-level PDE describing the evolution of cell density is demonstrated. The individual-based models are formulated in terms of random walkers on a lattice. Domain growth provides an extra mathematical challenge

  10. What are the mesoscopic magnetic inhomogeneities in the dilute PdFeMn alloy? Polarized neutron study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordeev, G.; Axelrod, L.; Zabenkin, V.; Lazebnik, I.; Grigoriev, S.; Wagner, V.; Eckerlebe, H

    2003-07-01

    The 3D analysis of neutron depolarization was carried out for different thermomagnetic treatment of the dilute PdFeMn alloy versus temperature and magnetic field applied in magnetizing/demagnetizing cycles. Both the macroscopic magnetization and the mean fluctuation of local magnetization behavior were subtracted from experimental data. A complicated behavior of the latter was observed. The hysteresis of local magnetization fluctuations is found out but that of macroscopic magnetization is practically absent. The effort to apply the simple model for the description of magnetic inhomogeneities was made in order to understand the mesostructure of this alloy.

  11. Thermomagnetic writing in Tb-Fe: Modeling and comparison with experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suits, J.C.; Rugar, D.; Lin, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    Computer model calculations and experimental comparison are presented for thermomagnetic writing in TbFe media. Two models are discussed which are appropriate for two observed types of writing behavior. A ''bubble'' type writing model is found to give good experimental agreement when wall motion processes dominate and the laser-written marks exhibit single-domain behavior. This model accurately accounts for the writing behavior of Tb/sub 0.23/Fe/sub 0.77/. The gradient of the domain-wall energy is found to be an important factor in the writing process and can cause nucleation to be delayed until some cooling has occurred. This results in written domain sizes which are a strong function of the applied bias field. For compositions which exhibit multiple domain writing behavior, a ''nucleation field'' model is found to be appropriate. This model predicts the observed weak dependence of mark size on applied bias field. In addition, the nucleation field model is used to calculate the bias fields which correspond to the onset of writing (onset field) and single-domain mark formation (saturation field)

  12. Modeling of structural and thermodynamics properties of sigma-phase for the Fe-Cr system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udovskya A.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The three- sub-lattice model (3SLM for description of atom’s distribution of two components with different coordination numbers (12, 14 and 15, into s-phase structure depended on composition and temperature is depictured in this paper. Energetic parameters of 3SLM were calculated by fitting procedure fixed to results obtained by ab-initio calculations conducted for paramagnetic states of differently ordered complexes stayed at the sigma-phase’s crystal structure for Fe-Cr system at 0 K. Respective algorithm and computer program have allowed to calculate an atom distribution of components upon the sub-lattices of s-phase at 300 - 1100 K. There is satisfactory agreement between calculated results and the experimental data obtained by neutron and structural research methods. Obtained results demonstrate satisfactory agreement between calculated and experimental data of BCC solutions and sigma - phase of the Fe-Cr system stayed at an equilibrium state.

  13. Reaction pathways of model compounds of biomass-derived oxygenates on Fe/Ni bimetallic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Weiting; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2015-10-01

    Controlling the activity and selectivity of converting biomass-derivatives to fuels and valuable chemicals is critical for the utilization of biomass feedstocks. There are primarily three classes of non-food competing biomass, cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. In the current work, glycolaldehyde, furfural and acetaldehyde are studied as model compounds of the three classes of biomass-derivatives. Monometallic Ni(111) and monolayer (ML) Fe/Ni(111) bimetallic surfaces are studied for the reaction pathways of the three biomass surrogates. The ML Fe/Ni(111) surface is identified as an efficient surface for the conversion of biomass-derivatives from the combined results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments. A correlation is also established between the optimized adsorption geometry and experimental reaction pathways. These results should provide helpful insights in catalyst design for the upgrading and conversion of biomass.

  14. Atomistic modeling of L10 FePt: path to HAMR 5Tb/in2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tianran; Benakli, Mourad; Rea, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) is a promising approach for increasing the storage density of hard disk drives. To increase data density, information must be written in small grains, which requires materials with high anisotropy energy such as L10 FePt. On the other hand, high anisotropy implies high coercivity, making it difficult to write the data with existing recording heads. This issue can be overcome by the technique of HAMR, where a laser is used to heat the recording medium to reduce its coercivity while retaining good thermal stability at room temperature due to the large anisotropy energy. One of the keys to the success of HAMR is the precise control of writing process. In this talk, I will propose a Monte Carlo simulation, based on an atomistic model, that would allow us to study the magnetic properties of L10 FePt and dynamics of spin reversal for the writing process in HAMR.

  15. Microstructure and mechanical properties of ultrafine-grained Fe-14Cr and ODS Fe-14Cr model alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auger, M.A., E-mail: mauger@fis.uc3m.es [Departamento de Fisica-IAAB, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911-Leganes (Spain); Leguey, T., E-mail: leguey@fis.uc3m.es [Departamento de Fisica-IAAB, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911-Leganes (Spain); Munoz, A., E-mail: amunoz@fis.uc3m.es [Departamento de Fisica-IAAB, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911-Leganes (Spain); Monge, M.A., E-mail: mmonge@fis.uc3m.es [Departamento de Fisica-IAAB, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911-Leganes (Spain); Castro, V. de, E-mail: vanessa.decastro@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Fernandez, P., E-mail: pilar.fernandez@ciemat.es [National Fusion Laboratory-CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Garces, G., E-mail: ggarces@cenim.csic.es [Departamento de Metalurgia Fisica, CENIM (CSIC), Avda. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pareja, R., E-mail: rpp@fis.uc3m.es [Departamento de Fisica-IAAB, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911-Leganes (Spain)

    2011-10-01

    Reduced activation ferritic Fe-14 wt%Cr and Fe-14 wt%Cr-0.3 wt%Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} alloys were produced by mechanical alloying and hot isostatic pressing followed by forging and heat treating. The alloy containing Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} developed a submicron-grained structure with homogeneous dispersion of oxide nanoparticles that enhanced the tensile properties in comparison to the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} free alloy. Strengthening induced by the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion appears to be effective up to 873 K, at least. A uniform distribution of Cr-rich precipitates, stable upon a heat treatment at 1123 K for 2 h, was also found in both alloys.

  16. Microstructure and mechanical properties of ultrafine-grained Fe-14Cr and ODS Fe-14Cr model alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auger, M.A.; Leguey, T.; Munoz, A.; Monge, M.A.; Castro, V. de; Fernandez, P.; Garces, G.; Pareja, R.

    2011-01-01

    Reduced activation ferritic Fe-14 wt%Cr and Fe-14 wt%Cr-0.3 wt%Y 2 O 3 alloys were produced by mechanical alloying and hot isostatic pressing followed by forging and heat treating. The alloy containing Y 2 O 3 developed a submicron-grained structure with homogeneous dispersion of oxide nanoparticles that enhanced the tensile properties in comparison to the Y 2 O 3 free alloy. Strengthening induced by the Y 2 O 3 dispersion appears to be effective up to 873 K, at least. A uniform distribution of Cr-rich precipitates, stable upon a heat treatment at 1123 K for 2 h, was also found in both alloys.

  17. Calibrating and validating a FE model for long-term behavior of RC beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tošić Nikola D.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the research carried out in finding an optimal finite element (FE model for calculating the long-term behavior of reinforced concrete (RC beams. A multi-purpose finite element software DIANA was used. A benchmark test in the form of a simply supported beam loaded in four point bending was selected for model calibration. The result was the choice of 3-node beam elements, a multi-directional fixed crack model with constant stress cut-off, nonlinear tension softening and constant shear retention and a creep and shrinkage model according to CEB-FIP Model Code 1990. The model was then validated on 14 simply supported beams and 6 continuous beams. Good agreement was found with experimental results (within ±15%.

  18. Towards a measurement of the half-life of {sup 60}Fe for stellar and early Solar System models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostdiek, K.; Anderson, T. [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Bauder, W. [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Bowers, M.; Collon, P. [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Dressler, R. [Paul Scherrer Institute – Laboratory for Radiochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Greene, J. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Kutschera, W. [Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator Laboratory, Waehringer Strasse 17, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Lu, W. [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Paul, M. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Robertson, D. [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Schumann, D. [Paul Scherrer Institute – Laboratory for Radiochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Skulski, M. [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Wallner, A. [The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2015-10-15

    Radioisotopes, produced in stars and ejected into the Interstellar Medium, are important for constraining stellar and early Solar System (ESS) models. In particular, the half-life of the radioisotope, {sup 60}Fe, can have an impact on calculations for the timing for ESS events, the distance to nearby Supernovae, and the brightness of individual, non-steady-state {sup 60}Fe gamma ray sources in the Galaxy. A half-life measurement has been undertaken at the University of Notre Dame and measurements of the {sup 60}Fe/{sup 56}Fe concentration of our samples using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry has begun. This result will be coupled with an activity measurement of the isomeric decay in {sup 60}Co, which is the decay product of {sup 60}Fe. Preliminary half-life estimates of (2.53 ± 0.24) × 10{sup 6} years seem to confirm the recent measurement by Rugel et al. (2009).

  19. Macroscopic optical response and photonic bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez-Huerta, J S; Luis Mochán, W; Ortiz, Guillermo P; Mendoza, Bernardo S

    2013-01-01

    We develop a formalism for the calculation of the macroscopic dielectric response of composite systems made of particles of one material embedded periodically within a matrix of another material, each of which is characterized by a well-defined dielectric function. The nature of these dielectric functions is arbitrary, and could correspond to dielectric or conducting, transparent or opaque, absorptive and dispersive materials. The geometry of the particles and the Bravais lattice of the composite are also arbitrary. Our formalism goes beyond the long-wavelength approximation as it fully incorporates retardation effects. We test our formalism through the study of the propagation of electromagnetic waves in two-dimensional photonic crystals made of periodic arrays of cylindrical holes in a dispersionless dielectric host. Our macroscopic theory yields a spatially dispersive macroscopic response which allows the calculation of the full photonic band structure of the system, as well as the characterization of its normal modes, upon substitution into the macroscopic field equations. We can also account approximately for the spatial dispersion through a local magnetic permeability and analyze the resulting dispersion relation, obtaining a region of left handedness. (paper)

  20. Berkeley Experiments on Superfluid Macroscopic Quantum Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packard, Richard

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides a brief history of the evolution of the Berkeley experiments on macroscopic quantum effects in superfluid helium. The narrative follows the evolution of the experiments proceeding from the detection of single vortex lines to vortex photography to quantized circulation in 3He to Josephson effects and superfluid gyroscopes in both 4He and 3He

  1. Macroscopic sizes of field of superrelativistic charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strel'tsov, V.N.

    1995-01-01

    Based on the equation of Lienard-Wiechert equipotentials, it is shown that the field of superrelativistic charges reaches macroscopic sizes (e.g., R || = 2 m at E e = 50 GeV). This phenomenon serves an initial cause of the known considerable growth of formation length at high energies. 3 refs., 1 tab

  2. On quantum mechanics for macroscopic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primas, H.

    1992-01-01

    The parable of Schroedinger's cat may lead to several up-to date questions: how to treat open systems in quantum theory, how to treat thermodynamically irreversible processes in the quantum mechanics framework, how to explain, following the quantum theory, the existence, phenomenologically evident, of classical observables, what implies the predicted existence by the quantum theory of non localized macroscopic material object ?

  3. Equation-Free Analysis of Macroscopic Behavior in Traffic and Pedestrian Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marschler, Christian; Sieber, Jan; Hjorth, Poul G.

    2014-01-01

    Equation-free methods make possible an analysis of the evolution of a few coarse-grained or macroscopic quantities for a detailed and realistic model with a large number of fine-grained or microscopic variables, even though no equations are explicitly given on the macroscopic level. This will fac......Equation-free methods make possible an analysis of the evolution of a few coarse-grained or macroscopic quantities for a detailed and realistic model with a large number of fine-grained or microscopic variables, even though no equations are explicitly given on the macroscopic level....... This will facilitate a study of how the model behavior depends on parameter values including an understanding of transitions between different types of qualitative behavior. These methods are introduced and explained for traffic jam formation and emergence of oscillatory pedestrian counter flow in a corridor...

  4. EIT image reconstruction based on a hybrid FE-EFG forward method and the complete-electrode model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadinia, M; Jafari, R; Soleimani, M

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the application of the hybrid finite element-element free Galerkin (FE-EFG) method for the forward and inverse problems of electrical impedance tomography (EIT). The proposed method is based on the complete electrode model. Finite element (FE) and element-free Galerkin (EFG) methods are accurate numerical techniques. However, the FE technique has meshing task problems and the EFG method is computationally expensive. In this paper, the hybrid FE-EFG method is applied to take both advantages of FE and EFG methods, the complete electrode model of the forward problem is solved, and an iterative regularized Gauss-Newton method is adopted to solve the inverse problem. The proposed method is applied to compute Jacobian in the inverse problem. Utilizing 2D circular homogenous models, the numerical results are validated with analytical and experimental results and the performance of the hybrid FE-EFG method compared with the FE method is illustrated. Results of image reconstruction are presented for a human chest experimental phantom.

  5. Simultaneous influence of gas mixture composition and process temperature on Fe2O3->FeO reduction kinetics: neural network modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Piotrowski

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of Fe2O3->FeO reaction was investigated. The thermogravimetric (TGA data covered the reduction of hematite both by pure species (nitrogen diluted CO or H2 and by their mixture. The conventional analysis has indicated that initially the reduction of hematite is a complex, surface controlled process, however once a thin layer of lower oxidation state iron oxides (magnetite, wüstite is formed on the surface, it changes to diffusion control. Artificial Neural Network (ANN has proved to be a convenient tool for modeling of this complex, heterogeneous reaction runs within the both (kinetic and diffusion regions, correctly considering influence of temperature and gas composition effects and their complex interactions. ANN's model shows the capability to mimic some extreme (minimum of the reaction rate within the determined temperature window, while the Arrhenius dependency is of limited use.

  6. A physics-based crystallographic modeling framework for describing the thermal creep behavior of Fe-Cr alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Wei [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Capolungo, Laurent [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Patra, Anirban [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tome, Carlos [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-02

    This Report addresses the Milestone M2MS-16LA0501032 of NEAMS Program (“Develop hardening model for FeCrAl cladding), with a deadline of 09/30/2016. Here we report a constitutive law for thermal creep of FeCrAl. This Report adds to and complements the one for Milestone M3MS-16LA0501034 (“Interface hardening models with MOOSE-BISON”), where we presented a hardening law for irradiated FeCrAl. The last component of our polycrystal-based constitutive behavior, namely, an irradiation creep model for FeCrAl, will be developed as part of the FY17 Milestones, and the three regimes will be coupled and interfaced with MOOSE-BISON.

  7. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of n-irradiated Fe-Cr Model Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matijasevic, Milena; Al Mazouzi, Abderrahim

    2008-01-01

    High chromium ( 9-12 wt %) ferritic/martensitic steels are candidate structural materials for future fusion reactors and other advanced systems such as accelerator driven systems (ADS). Their use for these applications requires a careful assessment of their mechanical stability under high energy neutron irradiation and in aggressive environments. In particular, the Cr concentration has been shown to be a key parameter to be optimized in order to guarantee the best corrosion and swelling resistance, together with the least embrittlement. In this work, the characterization of the neutron irradiated Fe-Cr model alloys with different Cr % with respect to microstructure and mechanical tests will be presented. The behavior of Fe-Cr alloys have been studied using tensile tests at different temperature range ( from -160 deg. C to 300 deg. C). Irradiation-induced microstructure changes have been studied by TEM for two different irradiation doses at 300 deg. C. The density and the size distribution of the defects induced have been determined. The tensile test results indicate that Cr content affects the hardening behavior of Fe-Cr binary alloys. Hardening mechanisms are discussed in terms of Orowan type of approach by correlating TEM data to the measured irradiation hardening. (authors)

  8. Stochastic and Macroscopic Thermodynamics of Strongly Coupled Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Jarzynski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop a thermodynamic framework that describes a classical system of interest S that is strongly coupled to its thermal environment E. Within this framework, seven key thermodynamic quantities—internal energy, entropy, volume, enthalpy, Gibbs free energy, heat, and work—are defined microscopically. These quantities obey thermodynamic relations including both the first and second law, and they satisfy nonequilibrium fluctuation theorems. We additionally impose a macroscopic consistency condition: When S is large, the quantities defined within our framework scale up to their macroscopic counterparts. By satisfying this condition, we demonstrate that a unifying framework can be developed, which encompasses both stochastic thermodynamics at one end, and macroscopic thermodynamics at the other. A central element in our approach is a thermodynamic definition of the volume of the system of interest, which converges to the usual geometric definition when S is large. We also sketch an alternative framework that satisfies the same consistency conditions. The dynamics of the system and environment are modeled using Hamilton’s equations in the full phase space.

  9. Modelling phosphorus (P), sulphur (S) and iron (Fe) interactions during the simulation of anaerobic digestion processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flores-Alsina, Xavier; Solon, Kimberly; Kazadi-Mbamba, Christian

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of different model formulations when describing sludge stabilization processes in wastewater treatment plants by the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1). The proposed model extensions describe the interactions amongst phosphorus (P), sulfur (S), iron (Fe......) and their potential effect on total biogas production (CO2, CH4, H2 and H2S). The ADM1 version, implemented in the plant-wide context provided by the Benchmark Simulation Model No. 2 (BSM2), is used as the basic platform (A0). Four (A1 – A4) different model extensions are implemented, simulated and evaluated......2) as the electron donor. Finally, the last evaluated approach (A4) is based on accounting for Multiple Mineral Precipitation. The ADM1 thereby switches from a 2-phase (aqueous-gas) to a 3-phase (aqueous-gas-solid) system. Simulation results show that the implementations of A1 and A2 lead...

  10. Immobilization of uranium in the presence of Fe0(s): Model development and simulation of contrasting experimental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yong; Salvage, Karen

    2005-01-01

    A geochemical model is developed for the immobilization of U in the presence of metallic Fe. Zero-valent iron (ZVI) serves as a reducing agent inducing the reductive-precipitation of U, and ZVI corrosion products can serve as absorbing agents for U. The numerical model developed allows the complex interactions of U in solution in differing concentrations to be examined, under variable pH and redox conditions, with or without carbonate, in the presence of ZVI of different size and surface area. It incorporates Fe corrosion, Fe(II) and Fe(III) corrosion product formation, reductive-precipitation of U from the soluble U(VI) valence to the poorly soluble U(IV) valence, adsorption/de-sorption of U onto the Fe oxide corrosion products, and aqueous speciation. The processes of Fe corrosion and reductive precipitation of U are simulated as non-equilibrium, an improvement over other geochemical models. The reductive-precipitation process may use either ZVI or Fe(II) as the reducing agent. The model is calibrated using 3 separate sets of experimental data from published literature that cover a wide range of redox conditions. Sensitivity of the model predictions to variations in input parameters is examined. The simulation results show that the different published experimental results can be explained by different solution chemistries in the studies, specifically O 2 and CO 2 availability and pH, and the amount and surface area of the metallic Fe. With this numerical model the behavior of U in ZVI containing systems over a range of conditions realistic for groundwater can be investigated. By synthesizing observations across several experimental studies, it will lead to a broader understanding of the processes controlling U immobilization under varied geochemical conditions

  11. Microscopic and Macroscopic Structures of Carbon Nanotubes Produced by Pyrolysis of Iron Phthalocyanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Shaoming; Dai Liming

    2002-01-01

    By pyrolysis of iron phthalocyanine (FePc), either in a patterned or non-patterned fashion, under an Ar/H 2 atmosphere, we have demonstrated the large-scale production of aligned carbon nanotubes perpendicular to the substrate surface useful for building devices with three-dimensional structures. Depending on the particular pyrolytic conditions used, carbon nanotubes with a wide range of microscopic structures having curved, helical, coiled, branched, and tube-within-tube shapes have also been prepared by the pyrolysis of FePc. This, coupled with several microfabrication methods (photolithography, soft-lithography, self-assembling, micro-contact transfer, etc.), has enabled us to produce carbon nanotube arrays of various macroscopic architectures including polyhedral, flower-like, dendritic, circular, multilayered, and micropatterned geometries. In this article, we summarize our work on the preparation of FePc-generated carbon nanotubes with the large variety of microscopic and macroscopic structures and give a brief overview on the perspectives of making carbon nanotubes with tailor-made microscopic/macroscopic structures, and hence well-defined physicochemical properties, for specific applications

  12. Experiments, constitutive modeling and FE simulations of the impact behavior of Molybdenum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiser, Geremy; Revil-Baudard, Benoit

    For polycrystalline high-purity molybdenum the feasibility of a Taylor test is questionable because the very large tensile stresses generated at impact would result in disintegration of the specimen. We report an experimental investigation and new model to account simultaneously for the experimentally observed anisotropy, tension-compression asymmetry and strain-rate sensitivity of this material. To ensure high-fidelity predictions, a fully-implicit algorithm was used for implementing the new model in the FE code ABAQUS. Based on model predictions, the impact velocity range was established for which specimens may be recovered. Taylor impact tests in this range (140-165 m/s) were successfully conducted for different specimen taken along the rolling direction (RD), the transverse direction and 45o to the RD. Comparison between the measured profiles of impact specimens and FE model predictions show excellent agreement. Furthermore, simulations were performed to gain understanding of the dynamic event: time evolution of the pressure, the extent of plastic deformation, distribution of plastic strain rates, and transition to quasi-stable deformation occurs.

  13. Model many-body Stoner Hamiltonian for binary FeCr alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Manh, D.; Dudarev, S. L.

    2009-09-01

    We derive a model tight-binding many-body d -electron Stoner Hamiltonian for FeCr binary alloys and investigate the sensitivity of its mean-field solutions to the choice of hopping integrals and the Stoner exchange parameters. By applying the local charge-neutrality condition within a self-consistent treatment we show that the negative enthalpy-of-mixing anomaly characterizing the alloy in the low chromium concentration limit is due entirely to the presence of the on-site exchange Stoner terms and that the occurrence of this anomaly is not specifically related to the choice of hopping integrals describing conventional chemical bonding between atoms in the alloy. The Bain transformation pathway computed, using the proposed model Hamiltonian, for the Fe15Cr alloy configuration is in excellent agreement with ab initio total-energy calculations. Our investigation also shows how the parameters of a tight-binding many-body model Hamiltonian for a magnetic alloy can be derived from the comparison of its mean-field solutions with other, more accurate, mean-field approximations (e.g., density-functional calculations), hence stimulating the development of large-scale computational algorithms for modeling radiation damage effects in magnetic alloys and steels.

  14. Skull Thickness Morphing for an Age and Sex Specific FE Model of the Skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Derek A; Urban, Jillian E; Lillie, Elizabeth M; Stitzel, Joel D

    2015-01-01

    Skull deformation is believed to be a contributing factor in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Furthermore, skull thickness is thought to be an important factor governing deformation of the skull and its susceptibility to fracture. Although many studies have been done to understand the mechanisms of brain injury and skull fracture, the majority of the cadaveric and finite element (FE) modeling efforts are comprised of older males and 50th percentile male skulls, respectively, which do not accurately represent the population as a whole. This study employed a set of skull table thickness regressions defined at homologous landmarks on the skull which were calculated from 123 pre-existing head CT scans (ages 20-100) using a cortical density-based algorithm. A method was developed to morph the Global Human Body Models Consortium (GHBMC) 50th percentile male skull model to age and gender specific geometries based on the full thickness regressions using a Thin Plate Spline algorithm. A quantitative measure of morphing error was devised and measured using the morphed and desired full thickness values at the homologous landmark locations. This methodology can be used to create gender and age-specific FE models of the skull and will ultimately be used to understand the relationship between cortical thickness, skull deformation, and head injury.

  15. Thermodynamic Modelling of Fe-Cr-Ni-Spinel Formation at the Light-Water Reactor Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurepin, V.A.; Kulik, D.A.; Hitpold, A.; Nicolet, M

    2002-03-01

    In the light water reactors (LWR), the neutron activation and transport of corrosion products is of concern in the context of minimizing the radiation doses received by the personnel during maintenance works. A practically useful model for transport and deposition of the stainless steel corrosion products in LWR can only be based on an improved understanding of chemical processes, in particular, on the attainment of equilibrium in this hydrothermal system, which can be described by means of a thermodynamic solid-solution -aqueous-solution (SSAS) model. In this contribution, a new thermodynamic model for a Fe-Cr-Ni multi-component spinel solid solutions was developed that considers thermodynamic consequences of cation interactions in both spinel sub-Iattices. The obtained standard thermodynamic properties of two ferrite and two chromite end-members and their mixing parameters at 90 bar pressure and 290 *c temperature predict a large miscibility gap between (Fe,Ni) chromite and (Fe,Ni) ferrite phases. Together with the SUPCRT92-98 thermo- dynamic database for aqueous species, the 'spinel' thermodynamic dataset was applied to modeling oxidation of austenitic stainless steel in hydrothermal water at 290*C and 90 bar using the Gibbs energy minimization (GEM) algorithm, implemented in the GEMS-PSI code. Firstly, the equilibrium compositions of steel oxidation products were modelIed as function of oxygen fugacity .fO{sub 2} by incremental additions of O{sub 2} in H{sub 2}O-free system Cr-Fe- Ni-O. Secondly, oxidation of corrosion products in the Fe-Cr-Ni-O-H aquatic system was modelIed at different initial solid/water ratios. It is demonstrated that in the transition region from hydrogen regime to oxygen regime, the most significant changes in composition of two spinel-oxide phases (chromite and ferrite) and hematite must take place. Under more reduced conditions, the Fe-rich ferrite (magnetite) and Ni-poor chromite phases co-exist at equilibrium with a metal Ni

  16. Controls of Ca/Mg/Fe activity ratios in pore water chemistry models of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerouge, C.; Grangeon, S.; Wille, G.; Flehoc, C.; Gailhanou, H.; Gaucher, E.C.; Tournassat, C. [BRGM av. Claude Guillemin BP6009 45060 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Vinsot, A. [ANDRA Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground research Laboratory (URL), RD 960, 55290 Bure (France); Made, B.; Altmann, S. [ANDRA - Parc de la Croix Blanche, 1-7 rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France)

    2013-07-01

    In the pore water chemistry model of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation, the divalent cations Ca, Mg, and Fe are controlled by equilibrium reactions with pure carbonates: calcite for Ca, dolomite for Mg, and siderite for Fe. Results of a petrological study and computing of the Ca/Mg and Ca/Fe activity ratios based on natural pore water chemistry provide evidence that equilibrium with pure calcite and pure dolomite is a reasonable assumption for undisturbed pore waters; on the other hand, siderite cannot be considered at equilibrium with pore waters at the formation scale. (authors)

  17. Controls of Ca/Mg/Fe activity ratios in pore water chemistry models of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerouge, C.; Grangeon, S.; Wille, G.; Flehoc, C.; Gailhanou, H.; Gaucher, E.C.; Tournassat, C.; Vinsot, A.; Made, B.; Altmann, S.

    2013-01-01

    In the pore water chemistry model of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation, the divalent cations Ca, Mg, and Fe are controlled by equilibrium reactions with pure carbonates: calcite for Ca, dolomite for Mg, and siderite for Fe. Results of a petrological study and computing of the Ca/Mg and Ca/Fe activity ratios based on natural pore water chemistry provide evidence that equilibrium with pure calcite and pure dolomite is a reasonable assumption for undisturbed pore waters; on the other hand, siderite cannot be considered at equilibrium with pore waters at the formation scale. (authors)

  18. [NiFe] hydrogenase structural and functional models: new bio-inspired catalysts for hydrogen evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oudart, Y.

    2006-09-01

    Hydrogenase enzymes reversibly catalyze the oxidation and production of hydrogen in a range close to the thermodynamic potential. The [NiFe] hydrogenase active site contains an iron-cyano-carbonyl moiety linked to a nickel atom which is in an all sulphur environment. Both the active site originality and the potential development of an hydrogen economy make the synthesis of functional and structural models worthy. To take up this challenge, we have synthesised mononuclear ruthenium models and more importantly, nickel-ruthenium complexes, mimicking some structural features of the [NiFe] hydrogenase active site. Ruthenium is indeed isoelectronic to iron and some of its complexes are well-known to bear hydrides. The compounds described in this study have been well characterised and their activity in proton reduction has been successfully tested. Most of them are able to catalyze this reaction though their electrocatalytic potentials remain much more negative compared to which of platinum. The studied parameters point out the importance of the complexes electron richness, especially of the nickel environment. Furthermore, the proton reduction activity is stable for several hours at good rates. The ruthenium environment seems important for this stability. Altogether, these compounds represent the very first catalytically active [NiFe] hydrogenase models. Important additional results of this study are the synergetic behaviour of the two metals in protons reduction and the evidence of a protonation step as the limiting step of the catalytic cycle. We have also shown that a basic site close to ruthenium improves the electrocatalytic potential of the complexes. (author)

  19. Constructing reservoir-scale 3D geomechanical FE-models. A refined workflow for model generation and calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, K.; Henk, A. [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften

    2013-08-01

    The tectonic stress field strongly affects the optimal exploitation of conventional and unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs. Amongst others, wellbore stability, orientation of hydraulically induced fractures and - particularly in fractured reservoirs - permeability anisotropies depend on the magnitudes and orientations of the recent stresses. Geomechanical reservoir models can provide unique insights into the tectonic stress field revealing the local perturbations resulting from faults and lithological changes. In order to provide robust predictions, such numerical models are based on the finite element (FE) method and account for the complexities of real reservoirs with respect to subsurface geometry, inhomogeneous material distribution and nonlinear rock mechanical behavior. We present a refined workflow for geomechanical reservoir modeling which allows for an easier set-up of the model geometry, high resolution submodels and faster calculation times due to element savings in the load frame. Transferring the reservoir geometry from the geological subsurface model, e.g., a Petrel {sup registered} project, to the FE model represents a special challenge as the faults are discontinuities in the numerical model and no direct interface exists between the two software packages used. Point clouds displaying faults and lithostratigraphic horizons can be used for geometry transfer but this labor-intensive approach is not feasible for complex field-scale models with numerous faults. Instead, so-called Coon's patches based on horizon lines, i.e. the intersection lines between horizons and faults, are well suited to re-generate the various surfaces in the FE software while maintaining their topology. High-resolution submodels of individual fault blocks can be incorporated into the field-scale model. This allows to consider both a locally refined mechanical stratigraphy and the impact of the large-scale fault pattern. A pressure load on top of the model represents the

  20. Macroscopic Quantum Resonators (MAQRO): 2015 update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaltenbaek, Rainer; Aspelmeyer, Markus; Kiesel, Nikolai; Barker, Peter F.; Bose, Sougato; Bassi, Angelo; Bateman, James; Bongs, Kai; Cruise, Adrian Michael; Braxmaier, Claus; Brukner, Caslav; Christophe, Bruno; Rodrigues, Manuel; Chwalla, Michael; Johann, Ulrich; Cohadon, Pierre-Francois; Heidmann, Antoine; Lambrecht, Astrid; Reynaud, Serge; Curceanu, Catalina; Dholakia, Kishan; Mazilu, Michael; Diosi, Lajos; Doeringshoff, Klaus; Peters, Achim; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst M.; Gieseler, Jan; Novotny, Lukas; Rondin, Loic; Guerlebeck, Norman; Herrmann, Sven; Laemmerzahl, Claus; Hechenblaikner, Gerald; Hossenfelder, Sabine; Kim, Myungshik; Milburn, Gerard J.; Mueller, Holger; Paternostro, Mauro; Pikovski, Igor; Pilan Zanoni, Andre; Riedel, Charles Jess; Roura, Albert; Schleich, Wolfgang P.; Schmiedmayer, Joerg; Schuldt, Thilo; Schwab, Keith C.; Tajmar, Martin; Tino, Guglielmo M.; Ulbricht, Hendrik; Ursin, Rupert; Vedral, Vlatko

    2016-01-01

    Do the laws of quantum physics still hold for macroscopic objects - this is at the heart of Schroedinger's cat paradox - or do gravitation or yet unknown effects set a limit for massive particles? What is the fundamental relation between quantum physics and gravity? Ground-based experiments addressing these questions may soon face limitations due to limited free-fall times and the quality of vacuum and microgravity. The proposed mission Macroscopic Quantum Resonators (MAQRO) may overcome these limitations and allow addressing such fundamental questions. MAQRO harnesses recent developments in quantum optomechanics, high-mass matter-wave interferometry as well as state-of-the-art space technology to push macroscopic quantum experiments towards their ultimate performance limits and to open new horizons for applying quantum technology in space. The main scientific goal is to probe the vastly unexplored 'quantum-classical' transition for increasingly massive objects, testing the predictions of quantum theory for objects in a size and mass regime unachievable in ground-based experiments. The hardware will largely be based on available space technology. Here, we present the MAQRO proposal submitted in response to the 4th Cosmic Vision call for a medium-sized mission (M4) in 2014 of the European Space Agency (ESA) with a possible launch in 2025, and we review the progress with respect to the original MAQRO proposal for the 3rd Cosmic Vision call for a medium-sized mission (M3) in 2010. In particular, the updated proposal overcomes several critical issues of the original proposal by relying on established experimental techniques from high-mass matter-wave interferometry and by introducing novel ideas for particle loading and manipulation. Moreover, the mission design was improved to better fulfill the stringent environmental requirements for macroscopic quantum experiments. (orig.)

  1. Macroscopic Quantum Resonators (MAQRO): 2015 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaltenbaek, Rainer [University of Vienna, Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, Vienna (Austria); Aspelmeyer, Markus; Kiesel, Nikolai [University of Vienna, Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, Vienna (Austria); Barker, Peter F.; Bose, Sougato [University College London, Department of Physics and Astronomy, London (United Kingdom); Bassi, Angelo [University of Trieste, Department of Physics, Trieste (Italy); INFN - Trieste Section, Trieste (Italy); Bateman, James [University of Swansea, Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea (United Kingdom); Bongs, Kai; Cruise, Adrian Michael [University of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Braxmaier, Claus [University of Bremen, Center of Applied Space Technology and Micro Gravity (ZARM), Bremen (Germany); Institute of Space Systems, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Bremen (Germany); Brukner, Caslav [University of Vienna, Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, Vienna (Austria); Austrian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Quantum Optics and Quantum Information (IQOQI), Vienna (Austria); Christophe, Bruno; Rodrigues, Manuel [The French Aerospace Lab, ONERA, Chatillon (France); Chwalla, Michael; Johann, Ulrich [Airbus Defence and Space GmbH, Immenstaad (Germany); Cohadon, Pierre-Francois; Heidmann, Antoine; Lambrecht, Astrid; Reynaud, Serge [ENS-PSL Research University, Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, UPMC-Sorbonne Universites, CNRS, College de France, Paris (France); Curceanu, Catalina [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Dholakia, Kishan; Mazilu, Michael [University of St. Andrews, School of Physics and Astronomy, St. Andrews (United Kingdom); Diosi, Lajos [Wigner Research Center for Physics, P.O. Box 49, Budapest (Hungary); Doeringshoff, Klaus; Peters, Achim [Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Institut fuer Physik, Berlin (Germany); Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst M. [Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hannover (Germany); Gieseler, Jan; Novotny, Lukas; Rondin, Loic [ETH Zuerich, Photonics Laboratory, Zuerich (Switzerland); Guerlebeck, Norman; Herrmann, Sven; Laemmerzahl, Claus [University of Bremen, Center of Applied Space Technology and Micro Gravity (ZARM), Bremen (Germany); Hechenblaikner, Gerald [Airbus Defence and Space GmbH, Immenstaad (Germany); European Southern Observatory (ESO), Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Hossenfelder, Sabine [KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, Nordita, Stockholm (Sweden); Kim, Myungshik [Imperial College London, QOLS, Blackett Laboratory, London (United Kingdom); Milburn, Gerard J. [University of Queensland, ARC Centre for Engineered Quantum Systems, Brisbane (Australia); Mueller, Holger [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Paternostro, Mauro [Queen' s University, Centre for Theoretical Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Belfast (United Kingdom); Pikovski, Igor [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, ITAMP, Cambridge, MA (United States); Pilan Zanoni, Andre [Airbus Defence and Space GmbH, Immenstaad (Germany); CERN - European Organization for Nuclear Research, EN-STI-TCD, Geneva (Switzerland); Riedel, Charles Jess [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Roura, Albert [Universitaet Ulm, Institut fuer Quantenphysik, Ulm (Germany); Schleich, Wolfgang P. [Universitaet Ulm, Institut fuer Quantenphysik, Ulm (Germany); Texas A and M University Institute for Advanced Study (TIAS), Institute for Quantum Science and Engineering (IQSE), and Department of Physics and Astronomy, College Station, TX (United States); Schmiedmayer, Joerg [Vienna University of Technology, Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, Institute of Atomic and Subatomic Physics, Vienna (Austria); Schuldt, Thilo [Institute of Space Systems, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Bremen (Germany); Schwab, Keith C. [California Institute of Technology, Applied Physics, Pasadena, CA (United States); Tajmar, Martin [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Luft- und Raumfahrttechnik, Dresden (Germany); Tino, Guglielmo M. [Universita di Firenze, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia and LENS, INFN, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Ulbricht, Hendrik [University of Southampton, Physics and Astronomy, Southampton (United Kingdom); Ursin, Rupert [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Quantum Optics and Quantum Information (IQOQI), Vienna (Austria); Vedral, Vlatko [University of Oxford, Atomic and Laser Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, Oxford (United Kingdom); National University of Singapore, Center for Quantum Technologies, Singapore (SG)

    2016-12-15

    Do the laws of quantum physics still hold for macroscopic objects - this is at the heart of Schroedinger's cat paradox - or do gravitation or yet unknown effects set a limit for massive particles? What is the fundamental relation between quantum physics and gravity? Ground-based experiments addressing these questions may soon face limitations due to limited free-fall times and the quality of vacuum and microgravity. The proposed mission Macroscopic Quantum Resonators (MAQRO) may overcome these limitations and allow addressing such fundamental questions. MAQRO harnesses recent developments in quantum optomechanics, high-mass matter-wave interferometry as well as state-of-the-art space technology to push macroscopic quantum experiments towards their ultimate performance limits and to open new horizons for applying quantum technology in space. The main scientific goal is to probe the vastly unexplored 'quantum-classical' transition for increasingly massive objects, testing the predictions of quantum theory for objects in a size and mass regime unachievable in ground-based experiments. The hardware will largely be based on available space technology. Here, we present the MAQRO proposal submitted in response to the 4th Cosmic Vision call for a medium-sized mission (M4) in 2014 of the European Space Agency (ESA) with a possible launch in 2025, and we review the progress with respect to the original MAQRO proposal for the 3rd Cosmic Vision call for a medium-sized mission (M3) in 2010. In particular, the updated proposal overcomes several critical issues of the original proposal by relying on established experimental techniques from high-mass matter-wave interferometry and by introducing novel ideas for particle loading and manipulation. Moreover, the mission design was improved to better fulfill the stringent environmental requirements for macroscopic quantum experiments. (orig.)

  2. Special relativity - the foundation of macroscopic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, W.G.

    1978-01-01

    This book aims to show that an understanding of the basic laws of macroscopic systems can be gained more easily within relativistic physics than within Newtonian physics. The unity of dynamics, thermodynamics and electromagnetism under the umbrella of special relativity is examined under chapter headings entitled: the physics of space and time, affine spaces in mathematics and physics, foundations of dynamics, relativistic simple fluids, and, electrodynamics of polarizable fluids. (U.K.)

  3. Testing quantum behaviour at the macroscopic level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghirardi, G.C.

    1994-07-01

    We reconsider recent proposals to test macro realism versus quantum mechanics in experiments involving noninvasive measurement processes on a Squid. In spite of the fact that we are able to prove that the proposed experiments do not represent a test of macro realism but simply of macroscopic quantum coherence we call attention to their extreme conceptual relevance. We also discuss some recent criticisms which have been raised against the considered proposal and we show that they are not relevant. (author). 12 refs

  4. Macroscopic behaviour of a charged Boltzmann gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banyai, L.; Gartner, P.; Protopopescu, V.

    1980-08-01

    We consider a classical charged gas (with self-consistent Coulomb interaction) described by a solvable linearized Boltzman equation with thermaljzation on unifopmly distributed scatterers. It is shown that jf one scales the time t, the reciprocal space coordinate k vector and the Debye length l as lambda 2 t, k vector/lambda, lambda l respectively, in the lambda→infinity limit the charge density is equal to the solution of the corresponding diffusion-conduction (macroscopic) equation. (author)

  5. Active Polar Two-Fluid Macroscopic Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleiner, Harald; Svensek, Daniel; Brand, Helmut R.

    2014-03-01

    We study the dynamics of systems with a polar dynamic preferred direction. Examples include the pattern-forming growth of bacteria (in a solvent, shoals of fish (moving in water currents), flocks of birds and migrating insects (flying in windy air). Because the preferred direction only exists dynamically, but not statically, the macroscopic variable of choice is the macroscopic velocity associated with the motion of the active units. We derive the macroscopic equations for such a system and discuss novel static, reversible and irreversible cross-couplings connected to this second velocity. We find a normal mode structure quite different compared to the static descriptions, as well as linear couplings between (active) flow and e.g. densities and concentrations due to the genuine two-fluid transport derivatives. On the other hand, we get, quite similar to the static case, a direct linear relation between the stress tensor and the structure tensor. This prominent ``active'' term is responsible for many active effects, meaning that our approach can describe those effects as well. In addition, we also deal with explicitly chiral systems, which are important for many active systems. In particular, we find an active flow-induced heat current specific for the dynamic chiral polar order.

  6. Macroscopic nonclassical-state preparation via postselection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro, Víctor; Coto, Raúl; Eremeev, Vitalie; Orszag, Miguel

    2017-11-01

    Macroscopic quantum superposition states are fundamental to test the classical-quantum boundary and present suitable candidates for quantum technologies. Although the preparation of such states has already been realized, the existing setups commonly consider external driving and resonant interactions, predominantly by considering Jaynes-Cummings-like and beam-splitter-like interactions, as well as the nonlinear radiation pressure interaction in cavity optomechanics. In contrast to previous works on the matter, we propose a feasible probabilistic scheme to generate a macroscopic mechanical qubit, as well as phononic Schrödinger's cat states with no need of any energy exchange with the macroscopic mechanical oscillator. Essentially, we investigate an open dispersive spin-mechanical system in the absence of any external driving under nonideal conditions, such as the detrimental effects due to the oscillator and spin energy losses in a thermal bath at nonzero temperature. In our work, we show that the procedure to generate the mechanical qubit state is solely based on spin postselection in the weak to moderate coupling regime. Finally, we demonstrate that the mechanical superposition is related to the amplification of the mean values of the mechanical quadratures as they maximize the quantum coherence.

  7. Scanner-based macroscopic color variation estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chunghui; Lai, Di; Zeise, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Flatbed scanners have been adopted successfully in the measurement of microscopic image artifacts, such as granularity and mottle, in print samples because of their capability of providing full color, high resolution images. Accurate macroscopic color measurement relies on the use of colorimeters or spectrophotometers to provide a surrogate for human vision. The very different color response characteristics of flatbed scanners from any standard colorimetric response limits the utility of a flatbed scanner as a macroscopic color measuring device. This metamerism constraint can be significantly relaxed if our objective is mainly to quantify the color variations within a printed page or between pages where a small bias in measured colors can be tolerated as long as the color distributions relative to the individual mean values is similar. Two scenarios when converting color from the device RGB color space to a standardized color space such as CIELab are studied in this paper, blind and semi-blind color transformation, depending on the availability of the black channel information. We will show that both approaches offer satisfactory results in quantifying macroscopic color variation across pages while the semi-blind color transformation further provides fairly accurate color prediction capability.

  8. Periodic Properties of 1D FE Discrete Models in High Frequency Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Żak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Finite element discrete models of various engineering 1D structures may be considered as structures of certain periodic characteristics. The source of this periodicity comes from the discontinuity of stress/strain field between the elements. This behaviour remains unnoticeable, when low frequency dynamics of these structures is investigated. At high frequency regimes, however, its influence may be strong enough to dominate calculated structural responses distorting or even falsifying them completely. In this paper, certain computational aspects of structural periodicity of 1D FE discrete models are discussed by the authors. In this discussion, the authors focus their attention on an exemplary problem of 1D rod modelled according to the elementary theory.

  9. Grain boundary segregation in FeCrNi model alloys; Korngrenzensegregation in FeCrNi-Modellegierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlueter, B.; Schneider, F.; Mummert, K. [Institut fuer Festkoerper- und Werkstofforschung Dresden e.V. (Germany); Muraleedharan, P. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Div. of Metallurgy

    1998-12-31

    P and S segregate at the grain boundaries and thus increase susceptibility to intergranular corrosion at those sites. This could be proven by means of nitric acid-chromate tests and potentiostatic etching tests. There is a direct connection between loss in mass, mean depth of intergranular corrosion attacks, dissolution current density, and level of segregation-induced concentration of P and S at the grain boundaries. The segregation effect at these sites was found to be most evident in specimens of the examined Fe-Cr-Ni steel which had been heat-treated for 1000 hours at 550 C. However, segregation occurs also in materials that received a heat treatment of 400 C/5000 hours, while intergranular corrosion is observed only after heat treatment of 500 C/1000 hours. Apart from segregation of P, formation of Cr-rich phosphides is observed, which leads to depletion of Cr at the precipitates. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] P und S segregieren an die KG und erhoehen dort die IK-Anfaelligkeit. Dies konnte mit Hilfe von Salpetersaeure-Chromat- und Potentiostatischem Aetztest nachgewiesen werden. Es besteht ein direkter Zusammenhang zwischen Masseverlust, mittlerer IK-Angriffstiefe, Aufloesungsstromdichte und Hoehe der segregationsbedingten Anreicherungen von P und S an den KG. Der KG-Segregationseffekt am untersuchten Fe-Cr-Ni-Stahl ist im Waermebehandlungszustand 550 C/1000 h am deutlichsten ausgepraegt. Aber auch bereits bei 400 C/5000 h findet Segregation statt. IKSpRK tritt nur im Waermebehandlungszustand 550 C/1000 h auf. Neben der P-Segregation wird die Bildung Cr-reicher Phosphide beobachtet, die zur Abreicherung von Cr an den Ausscheidungen fuehrt. (orig.)

  10. Pathways toward understanding Macroscopic Quantum Phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, B L; Subaşi, Y

    2013-01-01

    Macroscopic quantum phenomena refer to quantum features in objects of 'large' sizes, systems with many components or degrees of freedom, organized in some ways where they can be identified as macroscopic objects. This emerging field is ushered in by several categories of definitive experiments in superconductivity, electromechanical systems, Bose-Einstein condensates and others. Yet this new field which is rich in open issues at the foundation of quantum and statistical physics remains little explored theoretically (with the important exception of the work of A J Leggett [1], while touched upon or implied by several groups of authors represented in this conference. Our attitude differs in that we believe in the full validity of quantum mechanics stretching from the testable micro to meso scales, with no need for the introduction of new laws of physics.) This talk summarizes our thoughts in attempting a systematic investigation into some key foundational issues of quantum macroscopic phenomena, with the goal of ultimately revealing or building a viable theoretical framework. Three major themes discussed in three intended essays are the large N expansion [2], the correlation hierarchy [3] and quantum entanglement [4]. We give a sketch of the first two themes and then discuss several key issues in the consideration of macro and quantum, namely, a) recognition that there exist many levels of structure in a composite body and only by judicious choice of an appropriate set of collective variables can one give the best description of the dynamics of a specific level of structure. Capturing the quantum features of a macroscopic object is greatly facilitated by the existence and functioning of these collective variables; b) quantum entanglement, an exclusively quantum feature [5], is known to persist to high temperatures [6] and large scales [7] under certain conditions, and may actually decrease with increased connectivity in a quantum network [8]. We use entanglement as a

  11. ALTERATIONS OF FE HOMEOSTASIS IN RAT CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE MODELS AND ITS CONTRIBUTION TO CARDIOPULMONARY TOXICITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Fe homeostasis can be disrupted in human cardiovascular diseases (CVD). We addressed how dysregulation of Fe homeostasis affected the pulmonary inflammation/oxidative stress response and disease progression after exposure to Libby amphibole (LA), an asbestifonn mine...

  12. Multiscale Investigation on Biofilm Distribution and Its Impact on Macroscopic Biogeochemical Reaction Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhifeng; Liu, Chongxuan; Liu, Yuanyuan; Bailey, Vanessa L.

    2017-11-01

    Biofilms are critical locations for biogeochemical reactions in the subsurface environment. The occurrence and distribution of biofilms at microscale as well as their impacts on macroscopic biogeochemical reaction rates are still poorly understood. This paper investigated the formation and distributions of biofilms in heterogeneous sediments using multiscale models and evaluated the effects of biofilm heterogeneity on local and macroscopic biogeochemical reaction rates. Sediment pore structures derived from X-ray computed tomography were used to simulate the microscale flow dynamics and biofilm distribution in the sediment column. The response of biofilm formation and distribution to the variations in hydraulic and chemical properties was first examined. One representative biofilm distribution was then utilized to evaluate its effects on macroscopic reaction rates using nitrate reduction as an example. The results revealed that microorganisms primarily grew on the surfaces of grains and aggregates near preferential flow paths where both electron donor and acceptor were readily accessible, leading to the heterogeneous distribution of biofilms in the sediments. The heterogeneous biofilm distribution decreased the macroscopic rate of biogeochemical reactions as compared with those in homogeneous cases. Operationally considering the heterogeneous biofilm distribution in macroscopic reactive transport models such as using dual porosity domain concept can significantly improve the prediction of biogeochemical reaction rates. Overall, this study provided important insights into the biofilm formation and distribution in soils and sediments as well as their impacts on the macroscopic manifestation of reaction rates.

  13. The Two-Time Interpretation and Macroscopic Time-Reversibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakir Aharonov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The two-state vector formalism motivates a time-symmetric interpretation of quantum mechanics that entails a resolution of the measurement problem. We revisit a post-selection-assisted collapse model previously suggested by us, claiming that unlike the thermodynamic arrow of time, it can lead to reversible dynamics at the macroscopic level. In addition, the proposed scheme enables us to characterize the classical-quantum boundary. We discuss the limitations of this approach and its broad implications for other areas of physics.

  14. A simple vibrating sample magnetometer for macroscopic samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Dominguez, V.; Quesada, A.; Guzmán-Mínguez, J. C.; Moreno, L.; Lere, M.; Spottorno, J.; Giacomone, F.; Fernández, J. F.; Hernando, A.; García, M. A.

    2018-03-01

    We here present a simple model of a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The system allows recording magnetization curves at room temperature with a resolution of the order of 0.01 emu and is appropriated for macroscopic samples. The setup can be mounted with different configurations depending on the requirements of the sample to be measured (mass, saturation magnetization, saturation field, etc.). We also include here examples of curves obtained with our setup and comparison curves measured with a standard commercial VSM that confirms the reliability of our device.

  15. Experimental demonstration of macroscopic quantum coherence in Gaussian states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marquardt, C.; Andersen, Ulrik Lund; Leuchs, G.

    2007-01-01

    We witness experimentally the presence of macroscopic coherence in Gaussian quantum states using a recently proposed criterion [E. G. Cavalcanti and M. D. Reid, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97 170405 (2006)]. The macroscopic coherence stems from interference between macroscopically distinct states in phase...

  16. Estimating minimum polycrystalline aggregate size for macroscopic material homogeneity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovac, M.; Simonovski, I.; Cizelj, L.

    2002-01-01

    During severe accidents the pressure boundary of reactor coolant system can be subjected to extreme loadings, which might cause failure. Reliable estimation of the extreme deformations can be crucial to determine the consequences of severe accidents. Important drawback of classical continuum mechanics is idealization of inhomogenous microstructure of materials. Classical continuum mechanics therefore cannot predict accurately the differences between measured responses of specimens, which are different in size but geometrical similar (size effect). A numerical approach, which models elastic-plastic behavior on mesoscopic level, is proposed to estimate minimum size of polycrystalline aggregate above which it can be considered macroscopically homogeneous. The main idea is to divide continuum into a set of sub-continua. Analysis of macroscopic element is divided into modeling the random grain structure (using Voronoi tessellation and random orientation of crystal lattice) and calculation of strain/stress field. Finite element method is used to obtain numerical solutions of strain and stress fields. The analysis is limited to 2D models.(author)

  17. Modeling the degradation mechanisms of C6/LiFePO4 batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongjiang; Danilov, Dmitri L.; Zwikirsch, Barbara; Fichtner, Maximilian; Yang, Yong; Eichel, Rüdiger-A.; Notten, Peter H. L.

    2018-01-01

    A fundamental electrochemical model is developed, describing the capacity fade of C6/LiFePO4 batteries as a function of calendar time and cycling conditions. At moderate temperatures the capacity losses are mainly attributed to Li immobilization in Solid-Electrolyte-Interface (SEI) layers at the anode surface. The SEI formation model presumes the availability of an outer and inner SEI layers. Electron tunneling through the inner SEI layer is regarded as the rate-determining step. The model also includes high temperature degradation. At elevated temperatures, iron dissolution from the positive electrode and the subsequent metal sedimentation on the negative electrode influence the capacity loss. The SEI formation on the metal-covered graphite surface is faster than the conventional SEI formation. The model predicts that capacity fade during storage is lower than during cycling due to the generation of SEI cracks induced by the volumetric changes during (dis)charging. The model has been validated by cycling and calendar aging experiments and shows that the capacity loss during storage depends on the storage time, the State-of-Charge (SoC), and temperature. The capacity losses during cycling depend on the cycling current, cycling time, temperature and cycle number. All these dependencies can be explained by the single model presented in this paper.

  18. The macroscopic harmonic oscillator and quantum measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayward, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    A quantum mechanical description of a one-dimensional macroscopic harmonic oscillator interacting with its environment is given. Quasi-coherent states are introduced to serve as convenient basis states for application of a density matrix formalism to characterize the system. Attention is given to the pertinent quantum limits to the precision of measurement of physical observables that may provide some information on the nature of a weak classical force interacting with the oscillator. A number of ''quantum nondemolition'' schemes proposed by various authors are discussed. (Auth.)

  19. Macroscopic quantum tunneling of the magnetic moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada, J.; Hernandez, J. M.; del Barco, E.

    1999-05-01

    In this paper we review the work done on magnetic relaxation during the last 10 years on both single-domain particles and magnetic molecules and its contribution to the discovery of quantum tunneling of the magnetic moment (Chudnovsky and Tejada, Macroscopic Quantum tunneling of the Magnetic moment, Cambridge University press, Cambridge, 1998). We present first the theoretical expressions and their connection to quantum relaxation and secondly, we show and discuss the experimental results. Finally, we discuss very recent hysteresis data on Mn 12Ac molecules at extremely large sweeping rate for the external magnetic field which suggest the existence of quantum spin—phonon avalanches.

  20. Compressor Has No Moving Macroscopic Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, Max

    1995-01-01

    Compressor containing no moving macroscopic parts functions by alternating piston and valve actions of successive beds of magnetic particles. Fabricated easily because no need for precisely fitting parts rotating or sliding on each other. Also no need for lubricant fluid contaminating fluid to be compressed. Compressor operates continuously, eliminating troublesome on/off cycling of other compressors, and decreasing consumption of energy. Phased cells push fluid from bottom to top, adding increments of pressure. Each cell contains magnetic powder particles loose when electromagnet coil deenergized, but tightly packed when coil energized.

  1. Macroscopic polarization in crystalline dielectrics: the geometric phase approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resta, R.

    1994-01-01

    The macroscopic electric polarization of a crystal is often defined as the dipole of a unit cell. In fact, such a dipole moment is ill defined, and the above definition is incorrect. Looking more closely, the quantity generally measured is differential polarization, defined with respect to a ''reference state'' of the same material. Such differential polarizations include either derivatives of the polarization (dielectric permittivity, Born effective charges, piezoelectricity, pyroelectricity) or finite differences (ferroelectricity). On the theoretical side, the differential concept is basic as well. Owing to continuity, a polarization difference is equivalent to a macroscopic current, which is directly accessible to the theory as a bulk property. Polarization is a quantum phenomenon and cannot be treated with a classical model, particularly whenever delocalized valence electrons are present in the dielectric. In a quantum picture, the current is basically a property of the phase of the wave functions, as opposed to the charge, which is a property of their modulus. An elegant and complete theory has recently been developed by King-Smith and Vanderbilt, in which the polarization difference between any two crystal states--in a null electric field--takes the form of a geometric quantum phase. This gives a comprehensive account of this theory, which is relevant for dealing with transverse-optic phonons, piezoelectricity, and ferroelectricity. Its relation to the established concepts of linear-response theory is also discussed. Within the geometric phase approach, the relevant polarization difference occurs as the circuit integral of a Berry connection (or ''vector potential''), while the corresponding curvature (or ''magnetic field'') provides the macroscopic linear response

  2. A Physically-Based Equivalent Circuit Model for the Impedance of a LiFePO4/Graphite 26650 Cylindrical Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scipioni, Roberto; Jørgensen, Peter Stanley; Graves, Christopher R.

    2017-01-01

    In this work an Equivalent Circuit Model (ECM) is developed and used to model impedance spectra measured on a commercial 26650 LiFePO4/Graphite cylindrical cell. The ECM is based on measurements and modeling of impedance spectra recorded separately on cathode (LiFePO4) and anode (Graphite) samples...

  3. Optical model calculation for the unresolved/resolved resonance region of Fe-56

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Toshihiko [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Froehner, F.H.

    1997-03-01

    We have studied optical model fits to total neutron cross sections of structural materials using the accurate data base for {sup 56}Fe existing in the resolved and unresolved resonance region. Averages over resolved resonances were calculated with Lorentzian weighting in Reich-Moore (reduced R matrix) approximation. Starting from the best available optical potentials we found that adjustment of the real and imaginary well depths does not work satisfactorily with the conventional weak linear energy dependence of the well depths. If, however, the linear dependences are modified towards low energies, the average total cross sections can be fitted quite well, from the resolved resonance region up to 20 MeV and higher. (author)

  4. Multi-scale Modelling of bcc-Fe Based Alloys for Nuclear Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malerba, Lorenzo

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the basic mechanisms that determine microstructure changes in neutron irradiated steels is vital for a safe lifetime management of existing nuclear reactors and a safe design of future nuclear options. Low-alloyed ferritic steels containing Cu, Ni, Mn and Si as principal solute atoms are used as structural materials for current reactor vessels. The microstructural evolution under irradiation in alloys is decided by the interplay between defect formation and thermodynamic driving forces, together determining the appearance of phase transformations (precipitation, segregation,...) and favouring or delaying the nucleation and growth of point-defect clusters, their diffusion and their mutual recombination or removal at sinks. A reliable description of the production, evolution and accumulation of radiation damage must therefore start from the atomic level and requires being able to describe multicomponent systems for timescales ranging from few picoseconds to years. This goal demands firstly the fabrication of interatomic potentials for alloys that must be both consistent with the thermodynamic properties of the system and capable of reproducing correctly the characteristic solute-point defect interactions, versus ab initio or experimental data. Secondly the performance of extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to grasp the main mechanisms of defect production, diffusion, mutual interaction, and interaction with solute atoms and impurities. Thirdly, the development of simulation tools capable of describing the microstructure evolution beyond the time-frame and length-scale of MD, while reproducing as much as possible the atomic-level origin of the mechanisms governing the evolution of the system, including phase changes. In this presentation the results of recent efforts made in this direction in the case of Fe-Cu, Fe-Cr and Fe-Ni alloys, as basic model alloys for the description of steels of technological relevance, are highlighted. In particular

  5. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in Mn12-acetat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiter, J.; Reissner, M.; Hilscher, G.; Steiner, W.; Pajic, D.; Zadro, K.; Bartel, M.; Linert, W.

    2004-01-01

    Molecules provide the exciting opportunity to study magnetism on the passage from atomic to macroscopic level. One of the most interesting effects in such mesoscopic systems is the appearance of quantum tunnelling of magnetization (MQT) at low temperatures. In the last decade molecular chemistry has had a large impact in this field by providing new single molecule magnets. They consist of small clusters exhibiting superparamagnetic behavior, similar to that of conventional nanomagnetic particles. The advantage of these new materials is that they form macroscopic samples consisting of regularly arranged small identical high-spin clusters which are widely separated by organic molecules. The lack of distributions in size and shape of the magnetic clusters and the very weak intercluster interaction lead in principle to only one barrier for the spin reversal. We present detailed magnetic investigations on a Mn 12 -ac single crystal. In this compound the tetragonal ordered clusters consist of a central tetrahedron of four Mn 4+ (S = 3/2) atoms surrounded by eight Mn 3+ (S = 2) atoms with antiparallel oriented spins, leading to an overall spin moment of S = 10. In the hysteresis loops nine different jumps at regularly spaced fields are identified in the investigated temperature range (1.5 < T < 3 K). At these fields the relaxation of moment due to thermal activation is superimposed by strong quantum tunnelling. In lowering the temperature the time dependence changes from thermally activated to thermally assisted tunnelling. (author)

  6. Macroscopic effects of the quantum trace anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottola, Emil; Vaulin, Ruslan

    2006-01-01

    The low energy effective action of gravity in any even dimension generally acquires nonlocal terms associated with the trace anomaly, generated by the quantum fluctuations of massless fields. The local auxiliary field description of this effective action in four dimensions requires two additional scalar fields, not contained in classical general relativity, which remain relevant at macroscopic distance scales. The auxiliary scalar fields depend upon boundary conditions for their complete specification, and therefore carry global information about the geometry and macroscopic quantum state of the gravitational field. The scalar potentials also provide coordinate invariant order parameters describing the conformal behavior and divergences of the stress tensor on event horizons. We compute the stress tensor due to the anomaly in terms of its auxiliary scalar potentials in a number of concrete examples, including the Rindler wedge, the Schwarzschild geometry, and de Sitter spacetime. In all of these cases, a small number of classical order parameters completely determine the divergent behaviors allowed on the horizon, and yield qualitatively correct global approximations to the renormalized expectation value of the quantum stress tensor

  7. A multiscale and multiphysics numerical framework for modelling of hygrothermal ageing in laminated composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barcelos Carneiro M Rocha, Iuri; van der Meer, F.P.; Nijssen, RPL; Sluijs, Bert

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a numerical framework for modelling of hygrothermal ageing in laminated composites is proposed. The model consists of a macroscopic diffusion analysis based on Fick's second law coupled with a multiscale FE2 stress analysis in order to take microscopic degradation

  8. Structure and magnetism in Co/X, Fe/Si, and Fe/(FeSi) multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Michael Ray

    Previous studies have shown that magnetic behavior in multilayers formed by repeating a bilayer unit comprised of a ferromagnetic layer and a non-magnetic spacer layer can be affected by small structural differences. For example, a macroscopic property such as giant magnetoresistance (GMR) is believed to depend significantly upon interfacial roughness. In this study, several complimentary structural probes were used to carefully characterize the structure of several sputtered multilayer systems-Co/Ag, Co/Cu, Co/Mo, Fe/Si, and Fe//[FeSi/]. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were used to examine the long-range structural order of the multilayers perpendicular to the plane of the layers. Transmission electron diffraction (TED) studies were used to probe the long-range order parallel to the layer plane. X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) studies were used to determine the average local structural environment of the ferromagnetic atoms. For the Co/X systems, a simple correlation between crystal structure and saturation magnetization is discovered for the Co/Mo system. For the Fe/X systems, direct evidence of an Fe-silicide is found for the /[FeSi/] spacer layer but not for the Si spacer layer. Additionally, differences were observed in the magnetic behavior between the Fe in the nominally pure Fe layer and the Fe contained in the /[FeSi/] spacer layers.

  9. Modelling reaustenitisation in Fe-C steels with concentration-dependent diffusivity of carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mancini, R.

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available A finite difference method used to model reaustenitisation from a ferrite/cementite mixture in Fe-C steels is presented in this paper. Concentration-dependent carbon diffusivity in austenite is taken into account in order to generalize our earlier numerical model. We select some parameters, such as cementite dissolution time, and compare their values as calculated by different approximations available in the literature (in particular at steady state for planar and spherical geometries. When the dependence of diffusivity on concentration or temperature is increased, the steady state approximation fails to predict correctly the above mentioned parameters and the use of numerical techniques becomes indispensable.

    En este trabajo se presenta un método numérico de diferencias finitas para modelar la reaustenización en aceros Fe-C a partir de una distribución inicial de ferrita y cementita. Se tiene en cuenta la dependencia de la difusividad en la austenita con la concentración de carbono, a fin de generalizar el propio modelo numérico previo. Se han seleccionado algunos parámetros, como el tiempo de disolución de la cementita, para comparar los valores obtenidos en este caso con los calculados con diferentes aproximaciones (en particular con la de estado estacionario para los casos de geometrías plana y esférica. Los resultados obtenidos muestran que, cuando la difusividad depende fuertemente de la concentración, la aproximación de estado estacionario no predice correctamente los parámetros calculados y se hace imprescindible la aplicación de métodos numéricos.

  10. Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B and Pr{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B magnets characterisation and modelling for cryogenic permanent magnet undulator applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benabderrahmane, C., E-mail: chamseddine.benabderrahmane@synchrotron-soleil.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, St Aubin (France); Berteaud, P.; Valleau, M.; Kitegi, C.; Tavakoli, K.; Bechu, N.; Mary, A.; Filhol, J.M.; Couprie, M.E. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, St Aubin (France)

    2012-03-21

    Cryogenic permanent magnet undulators take benefit from improved magnetic properties of RE{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B (Rare Earth based magnets) at cryogenic temperatures for achieving short period high magnetic field. In particular, using Praseodymium instead of Neodymium generally employed for insertion devices avoids limitation due to Spin Reorientation Transition phenomenon. Magnetic properties of magnet samples (Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B and Pr{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B) versus temperature have been investigated and applied to a 20 mm period Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B (BH50) and to a 18 mm period Pr{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B (CR53) systems. Four period undulators have been built, characterised and compared to the models.

  11. A model of Fe speciation and biogeochemistry at the Tropical Eastern North Atlantic Time-Series Observatory site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Y.; Völker, C.; Wolf-Gladrow, D. A.

    2009-10-01

    A one-dimensional model of Fe speciation and biogeochemistry, coupled with the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM) and a NPZD-type ecosystem model, is applied for the Tropical Eastern North Atlantic Time-Series Observatory (TENATSO) site. Among diverse processes affecting Fe speciation, this study is focusing on investigating the role of dust particles in removing dissolved iron (DFe) by a more complex description of particle aggregation and sinking, and explaining the abundance of organic Fe-binding ligands by modelling their origin and fate. The vertical distribution of different particle classes in the model shows high sensitivity to changing aggregation rates. Using the aggregation rates from the sensitivity study in this work, modelled particle fluxes are close to observations, with dust particles dominating near the surface and aggregates deeper in the water column. POC export at 1000 m is a little higher than regional sediment trap measurements, suggesting further improvement of modelling particle aggregation, sinking or remineralisation. Modelled strong ligands have a high abundance near the surface and decline rapidly below the deep chlorophyll maximum, showing qualitative similarity to observations. Without production of strong ligands, phytoplankton concentration falls to 0 within the first 2 years in the model integration, caused by strong Fe-limitation. A nudging of total weak ligands towards a constant value is required for reproducing the observed nutrient-like profiles, assuming a decay time of 7 years for weak ligands. This indicates that weak ligands have a longer decay time and therefore cannot be modelled adequately in a one-dimensional model. The modelled DFe profile is strongly influenced by particle concentration and vertical distribution, because the most important removal of DFe in deeper waters is colloid formation and aggregation. Redissolution of particulate iron is required to reproduce an observed DFe profile at TENATSO site

  12. Macroscopic Theory for Evolving Biological Systems Akin to Thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Kunihiko; Furusawa, Chikara

    2018-05-20

    We present a macroscopic theory to characterize the plasticity, robustness, and evolvability of biological responses and their fluctuations. First, linear approximation in intracellular reaction dynamics is used to demonstrate proportional changes in the expression of all cellular components in response to a given environmental stress, with the proportion coefficient determined by the change in growth rate as a consequence of the steady growth of cells. We further demonstrate that this relationship is supported through adaptation experiments of bacteria, perhaps too well as this proportionality is held even across cultures of different types of conditions. On the basis of simulations of cell models, we further show that this global proportionality is a consequence of evolution in which expression changes in response to environmental or genetic perturbations are constrained along a unique one-dimensional curve, which is a result of evolutionary robustness. It then follows that the expression changes induced by environmental changes are proportionally reduced across different components of a cell by evolution, which is akin to the Le Chatelier thermodynamics principle. Finally, with the aid of a fluctuation-response relationship, this proportionality is shown to hold between fluctuations caused by genetic changes and those caused by noise. Overall, these results and support from the theoretical and experimental literature suggest a formulation of cellular systems akin to thermodynamics, in which a macroscopic potential is given by the growth rate (or fitness) represented as a function of environmental and evolutionary changes.

  13. Structural analysis of reactor buildings with help of complete FE models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, B.E.; Vaz, L.E.; Martha, L.F.R.; Costa, E.

    1984-01-01

    The reinforced concrete structures located within the steel containment shell of a Reactor Building are formed by highly complex structures subjected to a large amount of actions due to different causes. The analysis of this complex structure can be performed with help of small models, each one representing a part of the global structure. The interaction effects among the partial models are accounted for in approximate way. This approach has been used previously with entire success in the design of 1300 MW PWR nuclear power plants. However a new and entire different approach can be used in the design of these structures. The entire assembly of structural elements of the building is represented and analyzed with help of a single and very large FE model. This paper will present the main characteristics of this type of analysis as well as all the necessary procedures, which must be implemented for the proper data processing of the forces and the automatic reinforced concrete design of the structural elements of the Reactor Building. (Author) [pt

  14. Fundamental dynamic characteristics of human skull : Part II - Measurement and FE modeling of stress wave propagation after impact loading

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáček, Jaromír; Trnka, Jan; Pešek, Luděk; Veselý, Eduard

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 3 (2004), s. 177-190 ISSN 1210-2717 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV106/98/K019 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2076919 Keywords : biomechanics of human head * bone conduction * skull FE model Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  15. Hydrothermal Fe cycling and deep ocean organic carbon scavenging: Model-based evidence for significant POC supply to seafloor sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    German, C.R.; Legendre, L.L.; Sander, S.G.;; Niquil, N.; Luther-III, G.W.; LokaBharathi, P.A.; Han, X.; LeBris, N.

    by more than ~10% over background values, what the model does indicate is that scavenging of carbon in association with Fe-rich hydrothermal plume particles should play a significant role in the delivery of particulate organic carbon to deep ocean...

  16. Study of irradiated F82H steel and its model Fe-Cr alloy by Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, S.S.; Kitao, S.; Xu, Q.; Sato, K.; Yoshiie, T.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, Moessbauer spectroscopy which is a super-precision tool was conducted on F82H and its model Fe-Cr alloys before and after irradiation to take a further look on the interaction between carbides and point defects and Cr effect on microstructural evolution during irradiation in void incubation period. (J.P.N.)

  17. Thermodynamic modeling of ternary and quaternary (liquid + liquid) systems containing water, FeCl3, HCl and diisopropyl ether

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milosevic, M.; Hendriks, I.; Smits, R.E.R.; Schuur, B.; Haan, de A.B.

    2013-01-01

    Liquid–liquid extraction using ethers as solvents is a potentially energy saving alternative for the concentration of aqueous ferric chloride solutions. Adequate thermodynamic models that describe the behavior of the resulting quaternary systems (FeCl3, ether, acid and water) are not available in

  18. Dimeric Fe (II, III) complex of quinoneoxime as functional model of PAP enzyme: Mössbauer, magneto-structural and DNA cleavage studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salunke-Gawali, Sunita; Ahmed, Khursheed; Varret, François; Linares, Jorge; Zaware, Santosh; Date, Sadgopal; Rane, Sandhya

    2008-07-01

    Purple acid phosphatase, ( PAP), is known to contain dinuclear Fe2 + 2, + 3 site with characteristic Fe + 3 ← Tyr ligand to metal charge transfer in coordination. Phthiocoloxime (3-methyl-2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone-1-oxime) ligand L, mimics (His/Tyr) ligation with controlled and unique charge transfers resulting in valence tautomeric coordination with mixed valent diiron site in model compound Fe-1: [μ-OH-Fe2 + 2, + 3 ( o-NQCH3ox) ( o-NSQCH3ox)2 (CAT) H2O]. Fe-2: [Fe + 3( o-NQCH3ox) ( p-NQCH3ox)2]2 a molecularly associated dimer of phthiocoloxime synthesized for comparison of charge transfer. 57Fe Mössbauer studies was used to quantitize unusual valences due to ligand in dimeric Fe-1 and Fe-2 complexes which are supported by EPR and SQUID studies. 57Fe Mössbauer spectra for Fe-1 at 300 K indicates the presence of two quadrupole split asymmetric doublets due to the differences in local coordination geometries of [Fe + 3]A and [Fe + 2]B sites. The hyperfine interaction parameters are δ A = 0.152, (Δ E Q)A = 0.598 mm/s with overlapping doublet at δ B = 0.410 and (Δ E Q)B = 0.468 mm/s. Due to molecular association tendency of ligand, dimer Fe-2 possesses 100% Fe + 3(h.s.) hexacoordinated configuration with isomer shift δ = 0.408 mm/s. Slightly distorted octahedral symmetry created by NQCH3ox ligand surrounding Fe + 3(h.s.) state generates small field gradient indicated by quadrupole split Δ E Q = 0.213 mm/s. Decrease of isomer shifts together with variation of quadrupole splits with temperature in Fe-1 dimer compared to Fe-2 is result of charge transfers in [Fe2 + 2, + 3 SQ] complexes. EPR spectrum of Fe-1 shows two strong signals at g 1 = 4.17 and g 2 = 2.01 indicative of S = 3/2 spin state with an intermediate spin of Fe + 3(h.s.) configuration. SQUID data of χ _m^{corr} .T were best fitted by using HDVV spin pair model S = 2, 3/2 resulting in antiferromagnetic exchange ( J = -13.5 cm - 1 with an agreement factor of R = 1.89 × 10 - 5). The lower J

  19. Partitioning a macroscopic system into independent subsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delle Site, Luigi; Ciccotti, Giovanni; Hartmann, Carsten

    2017-08-01

    We discuss the problem of partitioning a macroscopic system into a collection of independent subsystems. The partitioning of a system into replica-like subsystems is nowadays a subject of major interest in several fields of theoretical and applied physics. The thermodynamic approach currently favoured by practitioners is based on a phenomenological definition of an interface energy associated with the partition, due to a lack of easily computable expressions for a microscopic (i.e. particle-based) interface energy. In this article, we outline a general approach to derive sharp and computable bounds for the interface free energy in terms of microscopic statistical quantities. We discuss potential applications in nanothermodynamics and outline possible future directions.

  20. Quantum teleportation between stationary macroscopic objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Xiao-Hui; Yuan, Zhen-Sheng; Pan, Jian-Wei [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany); Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China); Xu, Xiao-Fan [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany); Li, Che-Ming [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Physics, National Center for Theoretical Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan (China)

    2010-07-01

    Quantum teleportation is a process to transfer a quantum state of an object without transferring the state carrier itself. So far, most of the teleportation experiments realized are within the photonic regime. For the teleportation of stationary states, the largest system reported is a single ion. We are now performing an experiment to teleport the state of an macroscopic atomic cloud which consists about 10{sup 6} single atoms. In our experiment two atomic ensembles are utilized. In the first ensemble A we prepare the collective atomic state to be teleported using the quantum feedback technique. The second ensemble B is utilized to generate entanglement between it collective state with a scattered single-photon. Teleportation is realized by converting the atomic state of A to a single-photon and making a Bell state measurement with the scattered single-photon from ensemble B.

  1. Three-dimensional geologic model of the southeastern Espanola Basin, Santa Fe County, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantea, Michael P.; Hudson, Mark R.; Grauch, V.J.S.; Minor, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    This multimedia model and report show and describe digital three-dimensional faulted surfaces and volumes of lithologic units that confine and constrain the basin-fill aquifers within the Espanola Basin of north-central New Mexico. These aquifers are the primary groundwater resource for the cities of Santa Fe and Espanola, six Pueblo nations, and the surrounding areas. The model presented in this report is a synthesis of geologic information that includes (1) aeromagnetic and gravity data and seismic cross sections; (2) lithologic descriptions, interpretations, and geophysical logs from selected drill holes; (3) geologic maps, geologic cross sections, and interpretations; and (4) mapped faults and interpreted faults from geophysical data. Modeled faults individually or collectively affect the continuity of the rocks that contain the basin aquifers; they also help define the form of this rift basin. Structure, trend, and dip data not previously published were added; these structures are derived from interpretations of geophysical information and recent field observations. Where possible, data were compared and validated and reflect the complex relations of structures in this part of the Rio Grande rift. This interactive geologic framework model can be used as a tool to visually explore and study geologic structures within the Espanola Basin, to show the connectivity of geologic units of high and low permeability between and across faults, and to show approximate dips of the lithologic units. The viewing software can be used to display other data and information, such as drill-hole data, within this geologic framework model in three-dimensional space.

  2. Application of a three-feature dispersed-barrier hardening model to neutron-irradiated Fe-Cr model alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergner, F.; Pareige, C.; Hernández-Mayoral, M.; Malerba, L.; Heintze, C.

    2014-05-01

    An attempt is made to quantify the contributions of different types of defect-solute clusters to the total irradiation-induced yield stress increase in neutron-irradiated (300 °C, 0.6 dpa), industrial-purity Fe-Cr model alloys (target Cr contents of 2.5, 5, 9 and 12 at.% Cr). Former work based on the application of transmission electron microscopy, atom probe tomography, and small-angle neutron scattering revealed the formation of dislocation loops, NiSiPCr-enriched clusters and α‧-phase particles, which act as obstacles to dislocation glide. The values of the dimensionless obstacle strength are estimated in the framework of a three-feature dispersed-barrier hardening model. Special attention is paid to the effect of measuring errors, experimental details and model details on the estimates. The three families of obstacles and the hardening model are well capable of reproducing the observed yield stress increase as a function of Cr content, suggesting that the nanostructural features identified experimentally are the main, if not the only, causes of irradiation hardening in these model alloys.

  3. Numerical fatigue 3D-FE modeling of indirect composite-restored posterior teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausiello, Pietro; Franciosa, Pasquale; Martorelli, Massimo; Watts, David C

    2011-05-01

    In restored teeth, stresses at the tooth-restoration interface during masticatory processes may fracture the teeth or the restoration and cracks may grow and propagate. The aim was to apply numerical methodologies to simulate the behavior of a restored tooth and to evaluate fatigue lifetimes before crack failure. Using a CAD-FEM procedure and fatigue mechanic laws, the fatigue damage of a restored molar was numerically estimated. Tessellated surfaces of enamel and dentin were extracted by applying segmentation and classification algorithms, to sets of 2D image data. A user-friendly GUI, which enables selection and visualization of 3D tessellated surfaces, was developed in a MatLab(®) environment. The tooth-boundary surfaces of enamel and dentin were then created by sweeping operations through cross-sections. A class II MOD cavity preparation was then added into the 3D model and tetrahedral mesh elements were generated. Fatigue simulation was performed by combining a preliminary static FEA simulation with classical fatigue mechanical laws. Regions with the shortest fatigue-life were located around the fillets of the class II MOD cavity, where the static stress was highest. The described method can be successfully adopted to generate detailed 3D-FE models of molar teeth, with different cavities and restorative materials. This method could be quickly implemented for other dental or biomechanical applications. Copyright © 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Macroscopic Magnetization Control by Symmetry Breaking of Photoinduced Spin Reorientation with Intense Terahertz Magnetic Near Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Takayuki; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Makoto; Karube, Shutaro; Oto, Kenichi; Otani, YoshiChika; Suemoto, Tohru

    2018-03-01

    We exploit an intense terahertz magnetic near field combined with femtosecond laser excitation to break the symmetry of photoinduced spin reorientation paths in ErFeO3 . We succeed in aligning macroscopic magnetization reaching up to 80% of total magnetization in the sample to selectable orientations by adjusting the time delay between terahertz and optical pump pulses. The spin dynamics are well reproduced by equations of motion, including time-dependent magnetic potential. We show that the direction of the generated magnetization is determined by the transient direction of spin tilting and the magnetic field at the moment of photoexcitation.

  5. Refinement of Modeled Aqueous-Phase Sulfate Production via the Fe- and Mn-Catalyzed Oxidation Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syuichi Itahashi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We refined the aqueous-phase sulfate (SO42− production in the state-of-the-art Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ model during the Japanese model inter-comparison project, known as Japan’s Study for Reference Air Quality Modeling (J-STREAM. In Japan, SO42− is the major component of PM2.5, and CMAQ reproduces the observed seasonal variation of SO42− with the summer maxima and winter minima. However, CMAQ underestimates the concentration during winter over Japan. Based on a review of the current modeling system, we identified a possible reason as being the inadequate aqueous-phase SO42− production by Fe- and Mn-catalyzed O2 oxidation. This is because these trace metals are not properly included in the Asian emission inventories. Fe and Mn observations over Japan showed that the model concentrations based on the latest Japanese emission inventory were substantially underestimated. Thus, we conducted sensitivity simulations where the modeled Fe and Mn concentrations were adjusted to the observed levels, the Fe and Mn solubilities were increased, and the oxidation rate constant was revised. Adjusting the concentration increased the SO42− concentration during winter, as did increasing the solubilities and revising the rate constant to consider pH dependencies. Statistical analysis showed that these sensitivity simulations improved model performance. The approach adopted in this study can partly improve model performance in terms of the underestimation of SO42− concentration during winter. From our findings, we demonstrated the importance of developing and evaluating trace metal emission inventories in Asia.

  6. 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy used to develop understanding of a diamond preservation index model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yambissa, M. T.; Forder, S. D.; Bingham, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    57 Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy has provided precise and accurate iron redox ratios Fe 2+ /Fe 3+ in ilmenite, FeTiO 3 , found within kimberlite samples from the Catoca and Camatxia kimberlite pipes from N.E. Angola. Ilmenite is one of the key indicator minerals for diamond survival and it is also one of the iron-bearing minerals with iron naturally occurring in one or both of the oxidation states Fe 3+ and Fe 2+ . For this reason it is a good indicator for studying oxygen fugacities (fO 2 ) in mineral samples, which can then be related to iron redox ratios, Fe 2+ /Fe 3+ . In this paper we demonstrate that the oxidation state of the ilmenite mineral inclusion from sampled kimberlite rock is a key indicator of the oxidation state of the host kimberlite assemblage, which in turn determines the genesis of diamond, grade variation and diamond quality. Ilmenite samples from the two different diamondiferous kimberlite localities (Catoca and Camatxia) in the Lucapa graben, N.E. Angola, were studied using Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-Ray Diffractometry, in order to infer the oxidation state of their source regions in the mantle, oxygen partial pressure and diamond preservation conditions. The iron redox ratios, obtained using Mössbauer spectroscopy, show that the Catoca diamond kimberlite is more oxidised than kimberlite found in the Camatxia pipe, which is associated within the same geological tectonic structure. Here we demonstrate that 57 Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy can assist geologists and mining engineers to effectively evaluate and determine whether kimberlite deposits are economically feasible for diamond mining.

  7. Thermodynamic modeling of ternary and quaternary (liquid + liquid) systems containing water, FeCl3, HCl and diisopropyl ether

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosevic, Miran; Hendriks, Ilse; Smits, Ralph E.R.; Schuur, Boelo; Haan, André B. de

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Literature data from various sources was validated experimentally. • Ternary and quaternary (liquid + liquid) systems were successfully described with the NRTL model. • Some deflection at higher HCl concentrations between model and data. • Additional data verification proved correctness of the literature data. -- Abstract: Liquid–liquid extraction using ethers as solvents is a potentially energy saving alternative for the concentration of aqueous ferric chloride solutions. Adequate thermodynamic models that describe the behavior of the resulting quaternary systems (FeCl 3 , ether, acid and water) are not available in the literature. In this paper, the development of an equilibrium description applying the NRTL-model is presented, including experimental validation and fitting of the NRTL-parameters on the validated data. Equilibrium experiments were performed for the ternary systems (water + HCl + DiPE) and (water + FeCl 3 + DiPE) and the obtained data is in good agreement with the results from Maljkovic et al.[37] and Cambell et al.[39]. Experimental data of the quaternary system is taken from Maljkovic et al.[37]. The obtained binary interaction parameters to describe the (liquid + liquid) quaternary system (water + FeCl 3 + HCl + DiPE) and the constituting ternaries by the NRTL model are presented. Model predictions are in good agreement with the experimental data

  8. Heterogeneous disease progression and treatment response in a C3HeB/FeJ mouse model of tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Lanoix

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mice are the most commonly used species for non-clinical evaluations of drug efficacy against tuberculosis (TB. Unlike commonly used strains, C3HeB/FeJ mice develop caseous necrosis in the lung, which might alter the representation of drug efficacy in a way that is more like human TB. Because the development of such pathology requires time, we investigated the effect of infection incubation period on the activity of six drugs in C3HeB/FeJ and BALB/c mice. Mice were aerosol infected and held for 6, 10 or 14 weeks before receiving therapy with rifampin (RIF, rifapentine (RPT, pyrazinamide (PZA, linezolid (LZD, sutezolid (PNU or metronidazole (MTZ for 4-8 weeks. Outcomes included pathological assessments, pH measurements of liquefied caseum and assessment of colony-forming unit (CFU counts from lung cultures. Remarkable heterogeneity in the timing and extent of disease progression was observed in C3HeB/FeJ mice, largely independent of incubation period. Likewise, drug efficacy in C3HeB/FeJ mice was not affected by incubation period. However, for PZA, LZD and PNU, dichotomous treatment effects correlating with the presence or absence of large caseous lesions were observed. In the case of PZA, its poor activity in the subset of C3HeB/FeJ mice with large caseous lesions might be explained by the pH of 7.36±0.09 measured in liquefied caseum. This study highlights the potential value of C3HeB/FeJ mice for non-clinical efficacy testing, especially for investigating the interaction of lesion pathology and drug effect. Careful use of this model could enhance the bridging of non-clinical results with clinical outcomes.

  9. Multi-scale modelling of radiation damage in Fe-Cr based on ab initio electronic structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, Paer

    2004-04-01

    The efficiency of fast neutron reactors, such as for fusion, breeding and transmutation, depend strongly on the neutron radiation resistance of the materials used in the reactors. The binary Fe-Cr alloy, which has many attractive properties in this regard, is the base for the best steels of today which are, however, still not up to the required standards. Therefore, substantial effort has been devoted to finding new materials that can cope with the demands better. Experimental studies must be complemented with extensive theoretical modelling in order to understand the effects that different alloying elements has on the resistance properties of materials. To this end, the first steps of multi-scale modelling has been taken, starting out with ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of the complete concentration range range of the disordered binary Fe-C alloy. The mixing enthalpy of Fe-Cr has been quantitatively predicted and has, together with data from literature, been used in order to fit two sets of interatomic potentials for the purpose of simulating defect evolution with molecular dynamics and kinetic Monte-Carlo codes. These dedicated Fe-Cr alloy potentials are new and represent important additions to the pure element potentials that can be found in literature

  10. Multi-scale modelling of radiation damage in Fe-Cr based on ab initio electronic structure calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Paer

    2004-04-01

    The efficiency of fast neutron reactors, such as for fusion, breeding and transmutation, depend strongly on the neutron radiation resistance of the materials used in the reactors. The binary Fe-Cr alloy, which has many attractive properties in this regard, is the base for the best steels of today which are, however, still not up to the required standards. Therefore, substantial effort has been devoted to finding new materials that can cope with the demands better. Experimental studies must be complemented with extensive theoretical modelling in order to understand the effects that different alloying elements has on the resistance properties of materials. To this end, the first steps of multi-scale modelling has been taken, starting out with ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of the complete concentration range range of the disordered binary Fe-C alloy. The mixing enthalpy of Fe-Cr has been quantitatively predicted and has, together with data from literature, been used in order to fit two sets of interatomic potentials for the purpose of simulating defect evolution with molecular dynamics and kinetic Monte-Carlo codes. These dedicated Fe-Cr alloy potentials are new and represent important additions to the pure element potentials that can be found in literature.

  11. FEM modeling on the compaction of Fe and Al composite powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The compaction process of Fe and Al composite powders subjected to single action die compaction was numerically modeled by FEM method. The relationship between the overall relative density and compaction pressure of the compacts with various Al contents was firstly identified, and the influences of Al content on the local relative density, stress, and their distributions were studied. Then the compaction pressure effects on the above properties with fixed Al content were discussed. Furthermore, detailed flow behaviors of the composite powders during compaction and the relationship between the compaction pressure and the ejection force/spring back of the compact were analyzed. The results show that: (1 With each compaction pressure, higher relative density can be realized with the increase of Al content and the relative density distribution tends to be uniform; (2 When the Al content is fixed, higher compaction pressure can lead to composite compact with higher relative density, and the equivalent Von Mises stress in the central part of the compact increases gradually; (3 Convective flow occurs at the top and bottom parts of the compact close to the die wall, each indicates a different flow behavior; (4 The larger the compaction pressure for each case, the higher the residual elasticity, and the larger the ejection force needed.

  12. Estimation of macroscopic elastic characteristics for hierarchical anisotropic solids based on probabilistic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolina, Irina Yu.

    2015-10-01

    Mechanical properties of a cable are of great importance in design and strength calculation of flexible cables. The problem of determination of elastic properties and rigidity characteristics of a cable modeled by anisotropic helical elastic rod is considered. These characteristics are calculated indirectly by means of the parameters received from statistical processing of experimental data. These parameters are considered as random quantities. With taking into account probable nature of these parameters the formulas for estimation of the macroscopic elastic moduli of a cable are obtained. The calculating expressions for macroscopic flexural rigidity, shear rigidity and torsion rigidity using the macroscopic elastic characteristics obtained before are presented. Statistical estimations of the rigidity characteristics of some cable grades are adduced. A comparison with those characteristics received on the basis of deterministic approach is given.

  13. Linearized Flux Evolution (LiFE): A technique for rapidly adapting fluxes from full-physics radiative transfer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Crisp, David

    2018-05-01

    Solar and thermal radiation are critical aspects of planetary climate, with gradients in radiative energy fluxes driving heating and cooling. Climate models require that radiative transfer tools be versatile, computationally efficient, and accurate. Here, we describe a technique that uses an accurate full-physics radiative transfer model to generate a set of atmospheric radiative quantities which can be used to linearly adapt radiative flux profiles to changes in the atmospheric and surface state-the Linearized Flux Evolution (LiFE) approach. These radiative quantities describe how each model layer in a plane-parallel atmosphere reflects and transmits light, as well as how the layer generates diffuse radiation by thermal emission and by scattering light from the direct solar beam. By computing derivatives of these layer radiative properties with respect to dynamic elements of the atmospheric state, we can then efficiently adapt the flux profiles computed by the full-physics model to new atmospheric states. We validate the LiFE approach, and then apply this approach to Mars, Earth, and Venus, demonstrating the information contained in the layer radiative properties and their derivatives, as well as how the LiFE approach can be used to determine the thermal structure of radiative and radiative-convective equilibrium states in one-dimensional atmospheric models.

  14. Ab initio and Atomic kinetic Monte Carlo modelling of segregation in concentrated FeCrNi alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piochaud, J. B.; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.

    2014-06-01

    Internal structure of pressurised water reactors are made of austenitic materials. Under irradiation, the microstructure of these concentrated alloys evolves and solute segregation on grain boundaries or irradiation defects such as dislocation loops are observed to take place. In order to model and predict the microstructure evolution, a multiscale modelling approach needs to be developed, which starts at the atomic scale. Atomic Kinetic Monte Carlo (AKMC) modelling is the method we chose to provide an insight on defect mediated diffusion under irradiation. In that approach, we model the concentrated commercial steel as a FeCrNi alloy (γ-Fe70Cr20Ni10). As no reliable empirical potential exists at the moment to reproduce faithfully the phase diagram and the interactions of the elements and point defects, we have adjusted a pair interaction model on large amount of DFT calculations. The point defect properties in the Fe70Cr20Ni10, and more precisely, how their formation energy depends on the local environment will be presented and some AKMC results on thermal non equilibrium segregation and radiation induce segregation will be presented. The effect of Si on the segregation will also be discussed.

  15. Ab initio and atomic kinetic Monte Carlo modelling of segregation in concentrated FeCrNi alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piochaud, J.B.; Becquart, C.S.; Domain, C.

    2013-01-01

    Internal structure of pressurised water reactors are made of austenitic materials. Under irradiation, the microstructure of these concentrated alloys evolves and solute segregation on grain boundaries or irradiation defects such as dislocation loops are observed to take place. In order to model and predict the microstructure evolution, a multi-scale modelling approach needs to be developed, which starts at the atomic scale. Atomic Kinetic Monte Carlo (AKMC) modelling is the method we chose to provide an insight on defect mediated diffusion under irradiation. In that approach, we model the concentrated commercial steel as a FeCrNi alloy (γ-Fe 70 Cr 20 Ni 10 ). As no reliable empirical potential exists at the moment to reproduce faithfully the phase diagram and the interactions of the elements and point defects, we have adjusted a pair interaction model on large amount of DFT (Density Functional Theory) calculations. The point defect properties in the Fe 70 Cr 20 Ni 10 , and more precisely, how their formation energy depends on the local environment will be presented and some AKMC results on thermal non equilibrium segregation (TNES) and radiation induce segregation will be presented. The effect of Si on the segregation will also be discussed. Preliminary results show that it is the solute- grain boundaries interactions which drive TNES

  16. Setup of a Parameterized FE Model for the Die Roll Prediction in Fine Blanking using Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanke, J.; Trauth, D.; Feuerhack, A.; Klocke, F.

    2017-09-01

    Die roll is a morphological feature of fine blanked sheared edges. The die roll reduces the functional part of the sheared edge. To compensate for the die roll thicker sheet metal strips and secondary machining must be used. However, in order to avoid this, the influence of various fine blanking process parameters on the die roll has been experimentally and numerically studied, but there is still a lack of knowledge on the effects of some factors and especially factor interactions on the die roll. Recent changes in the field of artificial intelligence motivate the hybrid use of the finite element method and artificial neural networks to account for these non-considered parameters. Therefore, a set of simulations using a validated finite element model of fine blanking is firstly used to train an artificial neural network. Then the artificial neural network is trained with thousands of experimental trials. Thus, the objective of this contribution is to develop an artificial neural network that reliably predicts the die roll. Therefore, in this contribution, the setup of a fully parameterized 2D FE model is presented that will be used for batch training of an artificial neural network. The FE model enables an automatic variation of the edge radii of blank punch and die plate, the counter and blank holder force, the sheet metal thickness and part diameter, V-ring height and position, cutting velocity as well as material parameters covered by the Hensel-Spittel model for 16MnCr5 (1.7131, AISI/SAE 5115). The FE model is validated using experimental trails. The results of this contribution is a FE model suitable to perform 9.623 simulations and to pass the simulated die roll width and height automatically to an artificial neural network.

  17. Adiabatic process reversibility: microscopic and macroscopic views

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anacleto, Joaquim; Pereira, Mario G

    2009-01-01

    The reversibility of adiabatic processes was recently addressed by two publications. In the first (Miranda 2008 Eur. J. Phys. 29 937-43), an equation was derived relating the initial and final volumes and temperatures for adiabatic expansions of an ideal gas, using a microscopic approach. In that relation the parameter r accounts for the process reversibility, ranging between 0 and 1, which corresponds to the free and reversible expansion, respectively. In the second (Anacleto and Pereira 2009 Eur. J. Phys. 30 177-83), the authors have shown that thermodynamics can effectively and efficiently be used to obtain the general law for adiabatic processes carried out by an ideal gas, including compressions, for which r≥1. The present work integrates and extends the aforementioned studies, providing thus further insights into the analysis of the adiabatic process. It is shown that Miranda's work is wholly valid for compressions. In addition, it is demonstrated that the adiabatic reversibility coefficient given in terms of the piston velocity and the root mean square velocity of the gas particles is equivalent to the macroscopic description, given just by the quotient between surroundings and system pressure values. (letters and comments)

  18. Investigation of dissipative forces near macroscopic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, R.S.

    1982-12-01

    The interaction of classical charged particles with the fields they induce in macroscopic dielectric media is investigated. For 10- to 1000-eV electrons, the angular perturbation of the trajectory by the image potential for surface impact parameters of 50 to 100 A is shown to be of the order of 0.001 rads over a distance of 100 A. The energy loss incurred by low-energy particles due to collective excitations such as surface plasmons is shown to be observable with a transition probability of 0.01 to 0.001 (Becker, et al., 1981b). The dispersion of real surface plasmon modes in planar and cylindrical geometries is discussed and is derived for pinhole geometry described in terms of a single-sheeted hyperboloid of revolution. An experimental apparatus for the measurement of collective losses for medium-energy electrons translating close to a dielectric surface is described and discussed. Data showing such losses at electron energies of 500 to 900 eV in silver foils containing many small apertures are presented and shown to be in good agreement with classical stopping power calculations and quantum mechanical calculations carried out in the low-velocity limit. The data and calculations are compared and contrasted with earlier transmission and reflection measurements, and the course of further investigation is discussed

  19. The Proell Effect: A Macroscopic Maxwell's Demon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauen, Kenneth M.

    2011-12-01

    Maxwell's Demon is a legitimate challenge to the Second Law of Thermodynamics when the "demon" is executed via the Proell effect. Thermal energy transfer according to the Kinetic Theory of Heat and Statistical Mechanics that takes place over distances greater than the mean free path of a gas circumvents the microscopic randomness that leads to macroscopic irreversibility. No information is required to sort the particles as no sorting occurs; the entire volume of gas undergoes the same transition. The Proell effect achieves quasi-spontaneous thermal separation without sorting by the perturbation of a heterogeneous constant volume system with displacement and regeneration. The classical analysis of the constant volume process, such as found in the Stirling Cycle, is incomplete and therefore incorrect. There are extra energy flows that classical thermo does not recognize. When a working fluid is displaced across a regenerator with a temperature gradient in a constant volume system, complimentary compression and expansion work takes place that transfers energy between the regenerator and the bulk gas volumes of the hot and cold sides of the constant volume system. Heat capacity at constant pressure applies instead of heat capacity at constant volume. The resultant increase in calculated, recyclable energy allows the Carnot Limit to be exceeded in certain cycles. Super-Carnot heat engines and heat pumps have been designed and a US patent has been awarded.

  20. Atom exchange between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe in clay minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Anke; Wu, Lingling; Li, Weiqiang; Beard, Brian L; Johnson, Clark M; Rosso, Kevin M; Frierdich, Andrew J; Scherer, Michelle M

    2015-03-03

    Due to their stability toward reductive dissolution, Fe-bearing clay minerals are viewed as a renewable source of Fe redox activity in diverse environments. Recent findings of interfacial electron transfer between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe in clay minerals and electron conduction in octahedral sheets of nontronite, however, raise the question whether Fe interaction with clay minerals is more dynamic than previously thought. Here, we use an enriched isotope tracer approach to simultaneously trace Fe atom movement from the aqueous phase to the solid ((57)Fe) and from the solid into the aqueous phase ((56)Fe). Over 6 months, we observed a significant decrease in aqueous (57)Fe isotope fraction, with a fast initial decrease which slowed after 3 days and stabilized after about 50 days. For the aqueous (56)Fe isotope fraction, we observed a similar but opposite trend, indicating that Fe atom movement had occurred in both directions: from the aqueous phase into the solid and from the solid into aqueous phase. We calculated that 5-20% of structural Fe in clay minerals NAu-1, NAu-2, and SWa-1 exchanged with aqueous Fe(II), which significantly exceeds the Fe atom layer exposed directly to solution. Calculations based on electron-hopping rates in nontronite suggest that the bulk conduction mechanism previously demonstrated for hematite1 and suggested as an explanation for the significant Fe atom exchange observed in goethite2 may be a plausible mechanism for Fe atom exchange in Fe-bearing clay minerals. Our finding of 5-20% Fe atom exchange in clay minerals indicates that we need to rethink how Fe mobility affects the macroscopic properties of Fe-bearing phyllosilicates and its role in Fe biogeochemical cycling, as well as its use in a variety of engineered applications, such as landfill liners and nuclear repositories.

  1. The SMC (Short Model Coil) Nb$_{3}$Sn Program: FE Analysis with 3D Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Kokkinos, C; Guinchard, M; Karppinen, M; Manil, P; Perez, J C; Regis, F

    2012-01-01

    The SMC (Short Model Coil) project aims at testing superconducting coils in racetrack configuration, wound with Nb$_{3}$Sn cable. The degradation of the magnetic properties of the cable is studied by applying different levels of pre-stress. It is an essential step in the validation of procedures for the construction of superconducting magnets with high performance conductor. Two SMC assemblies have been completed and cold tested in the frame of a European collaboration between CEA (FR), CERN and STFC (UK), with the technical support from LBNL (US). The second assembly showed remarkable good quench results, reaching a peak field of 12.5T. This paper details the new 3D modeling method of the SMC, implemented using the ANSYS® Workbench environment. Advanced computer-aided-design (CAD) tools are combined with multi-physics Finite Element Analyses (FEA), in the same integrated graphic interface, forming a fully parametric model that enables simulation driven development of the SMC project. The magnetic and struct...

  2. Macroscopic quantum tunnelling in a current biased Josephson junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinis, J.M.; Devoret, M.H.; Clarke, J.; Urbina, C.

    1984-11-01

    We discuss in this work an attempt to answer experimentally the question: do macroscopic variables obey quantum mechanics. More precisely, this experiment deals with the question of quantum-mechanical tunnelling of a macroscopic variable, a subject related to the famous Schrodinger's cat problem in the theory of measurement

  3. Non-LTE line formation of Fe in late-type stars - IV. Modelling of the solar centre-to-limb variation in 3D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, K.; Amarsi, A. M.; Asplund, M.

    2017-01-01

    Our ability to model the shapes and strengths of iron lines in the solar spectrum is a critical test of the accuracy of the solar iron abundance, which sets the absolute zero-point of all stellar metallicities. We use an extensive 463-level Fe atom with new photoionization cross-sections for Fe I...

  4. Macroscopic Description of Pressure-anisotropy-driven Collective Instability in Intense Charged Particle Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strasburg, Sean; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2000-01-01

    The macroscopic warm-fluid model developed by Lund and Davidson [Phys.Plasmas 5, 3028 (1998)] is used in the smooth-focusing approximation to investigate detailed stability properties of an intense charged particle beam with pressure anisotropy, assuming small-amplitude electrostatic perturbations about a waterbag equilibrium

  5. Energetic macroscopic representation and inversion-based control of a CVT-based HEV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chouhou, M.; Grée, F.; Jivan, C.; Bouscayrol, A.; Hofman, T.

    2014-01-01

    A Continuous Variable Transmission (CVT) is introduced in the simulation model of a Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV). The CVT-based vehicle simulation and its control are deduced from the Energetic Macroscopic Representation (EMR). Simulations are provided to show the interest of the CVT in term of

  6. Energetic macroscopic representation and inversion- based control of a CVT-based HEV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chouhou, M.; Grée, F.; Jivan, C.; Bouscayrol, A.; Hofman, T.

    2013-01-01

    A Continuous Variable Transmission (CVT) is introduced in the simulation model of a Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV). The CVT-based vehicle simulation and its control are deduced from the Energetic Macroscopic Representation (EMR). Simulations are provided to show the interest of the CVT in term of

  7. Self-similar drag reduction in plug-flow of suspensions of macroscopic fibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gillissen, J.J.J.; Hoving, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Pipe flow experiments show that turbulent drag reduction in plug-flow of concentrated suspensions of macroscopic fibers is a self-similar function of the wall shear stress over the fiber network yield stress. We model the experimental observations, by assuming a central fiber network plug, whose

  8. Are the toroidal shapes of heavy-ion reactions seen in macroscopic drop collisions?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menchaca R, A.; Borunda, M.; Hidalgo, S.S.; Huidobro, F.; Michaelian, K.; Perez, A.; Rodriguez, V.

    1996-01-01

    Experiments involving the collisions of water, and mineral oil, drops are reported. The aim is to search for toroidal configurations predicted by, both, macroscopic fluid dynamic and nuclear models. Instead, we find the formation of thin liquid sheets surrounded by a somewhat thicker rim presenting a fingering instability. (Author)

  9. Macroscopic networks in the human brain: mapping connectivity in healthy and damaged brains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, E.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    The human brain contains a network of interconnected neurons. Recent advances in functional and structural in-vivo magnetic resonance neuroimaging (MRI) techniques have provided opportunities to model the networks of the human brain on a macroscopic scale. This dissertation investigates the

  10. Fe-bentonite. Experiments and modelling of the interactions of bentonites with iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbert, Horst-Juergen; Xie, Mingliang [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Koeln (Germany); Kasbohm, Joern; Lan, Nguyen T. [Greifswald Univ. (Germany); Hoang Thi Minh Thao [Hanoi Univ. of Science (Viet Nam)

    2011-11-15

    The main objectives of this study were to enhance the understanding of the interactions of bentonites with steel containers in the near field of a repository in salt formations and to determine missing experimental thermo-hydraulical-chemical and mineralogical data needed for the THC modelling of the interactions of bentonites with iron. At the beginning of this project a literature review helped to clarify the state of the art regarding the above mentioned objectives prior to the start of the experimental work. In the following experimental programme the hydraulic changes in the pore space of compacted MX80 bentonites containing metallic iron powder and in contact with three solutions of different ionic strength containing different concentrations of Fe{sup 2+} have been investigated. The alterations of MX80 and several other bentonites have been assessed in contact with the low ionic strength Opalinus Clay Pore Water (OCPW) and the saturated salt solutions NaCl solution and IP21 solution. Under repository relevant boundary conditions we determined on compacted MX80 samples with the raw density of 1.6 g/cm{sup 3} simultaneously interdependent properties like swelling pressures, hydraulic parameters (permeabilities and porosities), mineralogical data (changes of the smectite composition and iron corrosion products), transport parameters (diffusion coefficients) and thermal data (temperature dependent reaction progresses). The information and data resulting from the experiments have been used in geochemical modelling calculations and the existing possibilities and limitations to simulate these very complex near field processes were demonstrated. The main conclusion of this study is that the alteration of bentonites in contact with iron is accentuated and accelerated. Alterations in contact with solutions of different ionic strength identified by the authors in previous studies were found be much more intensive in contact with metallic iron and at elevated

  11. State-space based analysis and forecasting of macroscopic road safety trends in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, Constantinos; Yannis, George

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, macroscopic road safety trends in Greece are analyzed using state-space models and data for 52 years (1960-2011). Seemingly unrelated time series equations (SUTSE) models are developed first, followed by richer latent risk time-series (LRT) models. As reliable estimates of vehicle-kilometers are not available for Greece, the number of vehicles in circulation is used as a proxy to the exposure. Alternative considered models are presented and discussed, including diagnostics for the assessment of their model quality and recommendations for further enrichment of this model. Important interventions were incorporated in the models developed (1986 financial crisis, 1991 old-car exchange scheme, 1996 new road fatality definition) and found statistically significant. Furthermore, the forecasting results using data up to 2008 were compared with final actual data (2009-2011) indicating that the models perform properly, even in unusual situations, like the current strong financial crisis in Greece. Forecasting results up to 2020 are also presented and compared with the forecasts of a model that explicitly considers the currently on-going recession. Modeling the recession, and assuming that it will end by 2013, results in more reasonable estimates of risk and vehicle-kilometers for the 2020 horizon. This research demonstrates the benefits of using advanced state-space modeling techniques for modeling macroscopic road safety trends, such as allowing the explicit modeling of interventions. The challenges associated with the application of such state-of-the-art models for macroscopic phenomena, such as traffic fatalities in a region or country, are also highlighted. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that it is possible to apply such complex models using the relatively short time-series that are available in macroscopic road safety analysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A model of Fe speciation and biogeochemistry at the Tropical Eastern North Atlantic Time-Series Observatory site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ye

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A one-dimensional model of Fe speciation and biogeochemistry, coupled with the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM and a NPZD-type ecosystem model, is applied for the Tropical Eastern North Atlantic Time-Series Observatory (TENATSO site. Among diverse processes affecting Fe speciation, this study is focusing on investigating the role of dust particles in removing dissolved iron (DFe by a more complex description of particle aggregation and sinking, and explaining the abundance of organic Fe-binding ligands by modelling their origin and fate.

    The vertical distribution of different particle classes in the model shows high sensitivity to changing aggregation rates. Using the aggregation rates from the sensitivity study in this work, modelled particle fluxes are close to observations, with dust particles dominating near the surface and aggregates deeper in the water column. POC export at 1000 m is a little higher than regional sediment trap measurements, suggesting further improvement of modelling particle aggregation, sinking or remineralisation.

    Modelled strong ligands have a high abundance near the surface and decline rapidly below the deep chlorophyll maximum, showing qualitative similarity to observations. Without production of strong ligands, phytoplankton concentration falls to 0 within the first 2 years in the model integration, caused by strong Fe-limitation. A nudging of total weak ligands towards a constant value is required for reproducing the observed nutrient-like profiles, assuming a decay time of 7 years for weak ligands. This indicates that weak ligands have a longer decay time and therefore cannot be modelled adequately in a one-dimensional model.

    The modelled DFe profile is strongly influenced by particle concentration and vertical distribution, because the most important removal of DFe in deeper waters is colloid formation and aggregation. Redissolution of particulate iron is required to reproduce an

  13. Towards a theory of macroscopic gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalaletdinov, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    By averaging out Cartan's structure equations for a four-dimensional Riemannian space over space regions, the structure equations for the averaged space have been derived with the procedure being valid on an arbitrary Riemannian space. The averaged space is characterized by a metric, Riemannian and non-Riemannian curvature 2-forms, and correlation 2-, 3- and 4-forms, an affine deformation 1-form being due to the non-metricity of one of two connection 1-forms. Using the procedure for the space-time averaging of the Einstein equations produces the averaged ones with the terms of geometric correction by the correlation tensors. The equations of motion for averaged energy momentum, obtained by averaging out the coritracted Bianchi identifies, also include such terms. Considering the gravitational induction tensor to be the Riemannian curvature tensor (the non-Riemannian one is then the field tensor), a theorem is proved which relates the algebraic structure of the averaged microscopic metric to that of the induction tensor. It is shown that the averaged Einstein equations can be put in the form of the Einstein equations with the conserved macroscopic energy-momentum tensor of a definite structure including the correlation functions. By using the high-frequency approximation of Isaacson with second-order correction to the microscopic metric, the self-consistency and compatibility of the equations and relations obtained are shown. Macrovacuum turns out to be Ricci non-flat, the macrovacuum source being defined in terms of the correlation functions. In the high-frequency limit the equations are shown to become Isaacson's ones with the macrovacuum source becoming Isaacson's stress tensor for gravitational waves. 17 refs

  14. Macroscopic local-field effects on photoabsorption processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xiaoguang; Gong Yubing; Wang Meishan; Wang Dehua

    2008-01-01

    The influence of the local-field effect on the photoabsorption cross sections of the atoms which are embedded in the macroscopic medium has been studied by a set of alternative expressions in detail. Some notes on the validity of some different local-field models used to study the photoabsorption cross sections of atoms in condensed matter have been given for the first time. Our results indicate that the local fields can have substantial and different influence on the photoabsorption cross section of atoms in condensed matter for different models. Clausius-Mossotti model and Onsager model have proved to be more reasonable to describe the local field in gas, liquid, or even some simple solid, while Glauber-Lewenstein model probably is wrong in these conditions except for the ideal gas. A procedure which can avoid the errors introduced by Kramers-Kronig transformation has been implemented in this work. This procedure can guarantee that the theoretical studies on the local field effects will not be influenced by the integral instability of the Kramers-Kronig transformation

  15. Macroscopic sessile tumor architecture is a pathologic feature of biologically aggressive upper tract urothelial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsche, Hans-Martin; Novara, Giacomo; Burger, Maximilian; Gupta, Amit; Matsumoto, Kazumasa; Kassouf, Wassim; Sircar, Kanishka; Zattoni, Filiberto; Walton, Tom; Tritschler, Stefan; Baba, Shiro; Bastian, Patrick J; Martínez-Salamanca, Juan I; Seitz, Christian; Otto, Wolfgang; Wieland, Wolf Ferdinand; Karakiewicz, Pierre I; Ficarra, Vincenzo; Hartmann, Arndt; Shariat, Shahrokh F

    2012-09-01

    Macroscopic sessile tumor architecture was associated with adverse outcomes after radical nephroureterectomy (RNU) for upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC). Before inclusion in daily clinical decision-making, the prognostic value of tumor architecture needs to be validated in an independent, external dataset. We tested whether macroscopic tumor architecture improves outcome prediction in an international cohort of patients. We retrospectively studied 754 patients treated with RNU for UTUC without neoadjuvant chemotherapy at 9 centers located in Asia, Canada, and Europe. Tumor architecture was macroscopically categorized as either papillary or sessile. Univariable and multivariable Cox regression analyses were used to address recurrence-free (RFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) estimates. Macroscopic sessile architecture was present in 20% of the patients. Its prevalence increased with advancing pathologic stage and it was significantly associated with established features of biologically aggressive UTUC, such as tumor grade, lymph node metastasis, lymphovascular invasion, and concomitant CIS (all P values architecture were 85% and 90%, compared with 58% and 66% for those with macroscopic sessile architecture, respectively (P values architecture was an independent predictor of both RFS (hazard ratio {HR}: 1.5; P = 0.036) and CSS (HR: 1.5; P = 0.03). We confirmed the independent prognostic value of macroscopic tumor architecture in a large, independent, multicenter UTUC cohort. It should be reported in every pathology report and included in post-RNU predictive models in order to refine current clinical decision making regarding follow-up protocol and adjuvant therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A Hybrid MCDM Model for New Product Development: Applied on the Taiwanese LiFePO4 Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chin Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent years, since problems with respect to atmosphere pollution hasten countries to accentuate green-related policy regarding the sustainable energy, the lithium-iron phosphate (LiFePO4 battery has been appealed to the world. However, more and more firms invest the LiFePO4 batteries production that has launched a fierce competition. Successful new product development (NPD processes have been considered the key for LiFePO4 battery firms to increase their competitive advantage. Firms must make correct decision faster due to the rapid development of technology and the decreasing product life cycle. This study proposes a hybrid multiple criteria decision making (MCDM model based on the literature review and consultation with the experts, interpretive structural modeling (ISM, and fuzzy analytic network process (FANP for evaluating various strategies for NPD. First of all, reviewing of literature and meeting with the experts are used to screen factors and select the criteria. Then, an ISM is managed to determine the feedback and interdependency of those factors in a network. Finally, a fuzzy theory is applied to resolve the linguistic hedges and an ANP is adopted to obtain the weights of all the factors. A case study is undertaken to validate the model in a Taiwanese company that provides professional packing and design for lithium-iron phosphate battery.

  17. Magneto-elastic coupling in La(Fe, Mn, Si)13Hy within the Bean-Rodbell model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neves Bez, Henrique; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Norby, Poul

    2016-01-01

    , due to high internal stresses. A promising magnetocaloric material is La(Fe, Mn, Si)13Hy, where the transition temperature can be controlled through the Mn amount. In this work we use XRD measurements to evaluate the temperature dependence of the unit cell volume with a varying Mn amount. The system...... is modelled using the Bean-Rodbell model, which is based on the assumption that the spin-lattice coupling depends linearly on the unit cell volume. This coupling is defined by the model parameter η, where for η > 1 the material undergoes a first order transition and for η ≤ 1 a second order transition. We...

  18. Application of UV-irradiated Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (UV-Fe(III)NTA) and UV-NTA-Fenton systems to degrade model and natural occurring naphthenic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Chelme-Ayala, Pamela; Klamerth, Nikolaus; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2017-07-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are a highly complex mixture of organic compounds naturally present in bitumen and identified as the primary toxic constituent of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW). This work investigated the degradation of cyclohexanoic acid (CHA), a model NA compound, and natural occurring NAs during the UV photolysis of Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (UV-Fe(III)NTA) and UV-NTA-Fenton processes. The results indicated that in the UV-Fe(III)NTA process at pH 8, the CHA removal increased with increasing NTA dose (0.18, 0.36 and 0.72 mM), while it was independent of the Fe(III) dose (0.09, 0.18 and 0.36 mM). Moreover, the three Fe concentrations had no influence on the photolysis of the Fe(III)NTA complex. The main responsible species for the CHA degradation was hydroxyl radical (OH), and the role of dissolved O 2 in the OH generation was found to be negligible. Real OSPW was treated with the UV-Fe(III)NTA and UV-NTA-Fenton advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). The removals of classical NAs (O 2 -NAs), oxidized NAs with one additional oxygen atom (O 3 -NAs) and with two additional oxygen atoms (O 4 -NAs) were 44.5%, 21.3%, and 25.2% in the UV-Fe(III)NTA process, respectively, and 98.4%, 86.0%, and 81.0% in the UV-NTA-Fenton process, respectively. There was no influence of O 2 on the NA removal in these two processes. The results also confirmed the high reactivity of the O 2 -NA species with more carbons and increasing number of rings or double bond equivalents. This work opens a new window for the possible treatment of OSPW at natural pH using these AOPs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Multiscale modeling of the influence of Fe content in a Al-Si-Cu alloy on the size distribution of intermetallic phases and micropores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Junsheng; Lee, Peter D.; Li Mei; Allison, John

    2010-01-01

    A multiscale model was developed to simulate the formation of Fe-rich intermetallics and pores in quaternary Al-Si-Cu-Fe alloys. At the microscale, the multicomponent diffusion equations were solved for multiphase (liquid-solid-gas) materials via a finite difference framework to predict microstructure formation. A fast and robust decentered plate algorithm was developed to simulate the strong anisotropy of the solid/liquid interfacial energy for the Fe-rich intermetallic phase. The growth of porosity was controlled by local pressure drop due to solidification and interactions with surrounding solid phases, in addition to hydrogen diffusion. The microscale model was implemented as a subroutine in a commercial finite element package, producing a coupled multiscale model. This allows the influence of varying casting conditions on the Fe-rich intermetallics, the pores, and their interactions to be predicted. Synchrotron x-ray tomography experiments were performed to validate the model by comparing the three-dimensional morphology and size distribution of Fe-rich intermetallics as a function of Fe content. Large platelike Fe-rich β intermetallics were successfully simulated by the multiscale model and their influence on pore size distribution in shape castings was predicted as a function of casting conditions.

  20. A binuclear Fe(III)Dy(III) single molecule magnet. Quantum effects and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferbinteanu, Marilena; Kajiwara, Takashi; Choi, Kwang-Yong; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Nakamoto, Akio; Kojima, Norimichi; Cimpoesu, Fanica; Fujimura, Yuichi; Takaishi, Shinya; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2006-07-19

    The binuclear [FeIII(bpca)(mu-bpca)Dy(NO3)4], having Single Molecule Magnet (SMM) properties, belonging to a series of isostructural FeIIILnIII complexes (Ln = Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho) and closely related FeIILnIII chain structures, was characterized in concise experimental and theoretical respects. The low temperature magnetization data showed hysteresis and tunneling. The anomalous temperature dependence of Mössbauer spectra is related to the onset of magnetic order, consistent with the magnetization relaxation time scale resulting from AC susceptibility measurements. The advanced ab initio calculations (CASSCF and spin-orbit) revealed the interplay of ligand field, spin-orbit, and exchange effects and probed the effective Ising nature of the lowest states, involved in the SMM and tunneling effects.

  1. The Partial Molar Volume and Compressibility of the FeO Component in Model Basalts (Mixed CaAl2Si2O8-CaMgSi2O6-CaFeSi2O6 Liquids) at 0 GPa: evidence of Fe2+ in 6-fold coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, X.; Lange, R. A.; Ai, Y.

    2010-12-01

    FeO is an important component in magmatic liquids and yet its partial molar volume at one bar is not as well known as that for Fe2O3 because of the difficulty of performing double-bob density measurements under reducing conditions. Moreover, there is growing evidence from spectroscopic studies that Fe2+ occurs in 4, 5, and 6-fold coordination in silicate melts, and it is expected that the partial molar volume and compressibility of the FeO component will vary accordingly. We have conducted both density and relaxed sound speed measurements on four liquids in the An-Di-Hd (CaAl2Si2O8-CaMgSi2O6-CaFeSi2O6) system: (1) Di-Hd (50:50), (2) An-Hd (50:50), (3) An-Di-Hd (33:33:33) and (4) Hd (100). Densities were measured between 1573 and 1838 K at one bar with the double-bob Archimedean method using molybdenum bobs and crucibles in a reducing gas (1%CO-99%Ar) environment. The sound speeds were measured under similar conditions with a frequency-sweep acoustic interferometer, and used to calculate isothermal compressibility. All the density data for the three multi-component (model basalt) liquids were combined with density data on SiO2-Al2O3-CaO-MgO-K2O-Na2O liquids (Lange, 1997) in a fit to a linear volume equation; the results lead to a partial molar volume (±1σ) for FeO =11.7 ± 0.3(±1σ) cm3/mol at 1723 K. This value is similar to that for crystalline FeO at 298 K (halite structure; 12.06 cm3/mol), which suggests an average Fe2+ coordination of ~6 in these model basalt compositions. In contrast, the fitted partial molar volume of FeO in pure hedenbergite liquid is 14.6 ± 0.3 at 1723 K, which is consistent with an average Fe2+ coordination of 4.3 derived from EXAFS spectroscopy (Rossano, 2000). Similarly, all the compressibility data for the three multi-component liquids were combined with compressibility data on SiO2-Al2O3-CaO-MgO liquids (Ai and Lange, 2008) in a fit to an ideal mixing model for melt compressibility; the results lead to a partial molar

  2. Modeling the effect of the stress demagnetization phenomenon on the magnetic properties in a no Fe-Si 3% sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakhlef Malika

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is the modeling of the stress demagnetization effect on the magnetic properties in a non-oriented Fe-Si 3% sheet under different external stresses. The magneto-mechanical model used for magnetic hysteresis is based on a model originally formulated by Sablik-Jiles-Atherthon (S.J.A.. This latter has been modified by including both the stress demagnetization factor and the eddy current effects. The influence of the stress demagnetization term SDT on the magnetostrictive behavior of the material is also modeled. The proposed model has been validated by extensive simulations at different stresses, namely compressive and tensile stresses. Simulation results obtained by this model are very close to those published in the literature. Using the proposed model, very satisfactory performance has been achieved.

  3. Evaluation on the Effect of Composition on Radiation Hardening and Embrittlement in Model FeCrAl Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Briggs, Samuel A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Edmondson, Philip [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hu, Xunxiang [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Littrell, Kenneth C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Richard [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Parish, Chad M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-18

    This report details the findings of post-radiation mechanical testing and microstructural characterization performed on a series of model and commercial FeCrAl alloys to assist with the development of a cladding technology with enhanced accident tolerance. The samples investigated include model alloys with simple ferritic grain structure and two commercial alloys with minor solute additions. These samples were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) up to nominal doses of 7.0 dpa near or at Light Water Reactor (LWR) relevant temperatures (300-400 C). Characterization included a suite of techniques including small angle neutron scattering (SANS), atom probe tomography (APT), and transmission based electron microscopy techniques. Mechanical testing included tensile tests at room temperature on sub-sized tensile specimens. The goal of this work was to conduct detailed characterization and mechanical testing to begin establishing empirical and/or theoretical structure-property relationships for radiation-induced hardening and embrittlement in the FeCrAl alloy class. Development of such relationships will provide insight on the performance of FeCrAl alloys in an irradiation environment and will enable further development of the alloy class for applications within a LWR environment. A particular focus was made on establishing trends, including composition and radiation dose. The report highlights in detail the pertinent findings based on this work. This report shows that radiation hardening in the alloys is primarily composition dependent due to the phase separation in the high-Cr FeCrAl alloys. Other radiation induced/enhanced microstructural features were less dependent on composition and when observed at low number densities, were not a significant contributor to the observed mechanical responses. Pre-existing microstructure in the alloys was found to be important, with grain boundaries and pre-existing dislocation

  4. Modeling of the removal of arsenic species from simulated groundwater containing As, Fe, and Mn: a neural network based approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondal, Prasenjit; Mohanty, Bikash; Balomajumder, Chandrajit [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee, Uttrakhand (India); Saraswati, Samir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Motital Nehru National Institute of Technology, Allahabad, Uttar Pradesh (India)

    2012-03-15

    The present paper deals with the modeling of the removal of total arsenic As(T), trivalent arsenic As(III), and pentavalent arsenic As(V) from synthetic solutions containing total arsenic (0.167-2.0 mg/L), Fe (0.9-2.7 mg/L), and Mn (0.2-0.6 mg/L) in a batch reactor using Fe impregnated granular activated charcoal (GAC-Fe). Mass ratio of As(III) and As(V) in the solution was 1:1. Multi-layer neural network (MLNN) has been used and full factorial design technique has been applied for the selection of input data set. The developed models are able to predict the adsorption of arsenic species with an error limit of -0.3 to +1.7%. Combination of MLNN with design of experiment has been able to generalize the MLNN with less number of experimental points. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Multiscale Investigation on Biofilm Distribution and Its Impact on Macroscopic Biogeochemical Reaction Rates: BIOFILM DISTRIBUTION AND RATE SCALING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Zhifeng [Institute of Surface-Earth System Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin China; Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Liu, Chongxuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen China; Liu, Yuanyuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; School of Earth Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing China; Bailey, Vanessa L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA

    2017-11-01

    Biofilms are critical locations for biogeochemical reactions in the subsurface environment. The occurrence and distribution of biofilms at microscale as well as their impacts on macroscopic biogeochemical reaction rates are still poorly understood. This paper investigated the formation and distributions of biofilms in heterogeneous sediments using multiscale models, and evaluated the effects of biofilm heterogeneity on local and macroscopic biogeochemical reaction rates. Sediment pore structures derived from X-ray computed tomography were used to simulate the microscale flow dynamics and biofilm distribution in the sediment column. The response of biofilm formation and distribution to the variations in hydraulic and chemical properties was first examined. One representative biofilm distribution was then utilized to evaluate its effects on macroscopic reaction rates using nitrate reduction as an example. The results revealed that microorganisms primarily grew on the surfaces of grains and aggregates near preferential flow paths where both electron donor and acceptor were readily accessible, leading to the heterogeneous distribution of biofilms in the sediments. The heterogeneous biofilm distribution decreased the macroscopic rate of biogeochemical reactions as compared with those in homogeneous cases. Operationally considering the heterogeneous biofilm distribution in macroscopic reactive transport models such as using dual porosity domain concept can significantly improve the prediction of biogeochemical reaction rates. Overall, this study provided important insights into the biofilm formation and distribution in soils and sediments as well as their impacts on the macroscopic manifestation of reaction rates.

  6. Feedback Gating Control for Network Based on Macroscopic Fundamental Diagram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YangBeibei Ji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Empirical data from Yokohama, Japan, showed that a macroscopic fundamental diagram (MFD of urban traffic provides for different network regions a unimodal low-scatter relationship between network vehicle density and network space-mean flow. This provides new tools for network congestion control. Based on MFD, this paper proposed a feedback gating control policy which can be used to mitigate network congestion by adjusting signal timings of gating intersections. The objective of the feedback gating control model is to maximize the outflow and distribute the allowed inflows properly according to external demand and capacity of each gating intersection. An example network is used to test the performance of proposed feedback gating control model. Two types of background signalization types for the intersections within the test network, fixed-time and actuated control, are considered. The results of extensive simulation validate that the proposed feedback gating control model can get a Pareto improvement since the performance of both gating intersections and the whole network can be improved significantly especially under heavy demand situations. The inflows and outflows can be improved to a higher level, and the delay and queue length at all gating intersections are decreased dramatically.

  7. Measurement-Induced Macroscopic Superposition States in Cavity Optomechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoff, Ulrich Busk; Kollath-Bönig, Johann; Neergaard-Nielsen, Jonas Schou

    2016-01-01

    A novel protocol for generating quantum superpositions of macroscopically distinct states of a bulk mechanical oscillator is proposed, compatible with existing optomechanical devices operating in the bad-cavity limit. By combining a pulsed optomechanical quantum nondemolition (QND) interaction...

  8. Thermodynamical properties and thermoelastic coupling of complex macroscopic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabbri, M.; Sacripanti, A.

    1996-11-01

    Gross qualitative/quantitative analysis about thermodynamical properties and thermoelastic coupling (or elastocaloric effect) of complex macroscopic structure (running shoes) is performed by infrared camera. The experimental results showed the achievability of a n industrial research project

  9. Mathematical modelling of frequency-dependent hysteresis and energy loss of FeBSiC amorphous alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koprivica, Branko; Milovanovic, Alenka; Mitrovic, Nebojsa

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a novel mathematical model of frequency-dependent magnetic hysteresis. The major hysteresis loop in this model is represented by the ascending and descending curve over an arctangent function. The parameters of the hysteresis model have been calculated from a measured hysteresis loop of the FeBSiC amorphous alloy sample. A number of measurements have been performed with this sample at different frequencies of the sinusoidal excitation magnetic field. A variation of the coercive magnetic field with the frequency has been observed and used in the modelling of frequency-dependent hysteresis with the proposed model. A comparison between measured and modelled hysteresis loops has been presented. Additionally, the areas of the obtained hysteresis loops, representing the energy loss per unit volume, have been calculated and the dependence of the energy loss on the frequency is shown. Furthermore, two models of the frequency dependence of the coercivity and two models of the energy loss separation have been used for fitting the experimental and simulation results. The relations between these models and their parameters have been observed and analysed. Also, the relations between parameters of the hysteresis model and the parameters of the energy loss separation models have been analysed and discussed. - Highlights: • A mathematical model of frequency-dependent hysteresis is proposed. • Dependence of coercivity and energy loss per unit volume on frequency is modelled. • Equivalence between models and relation between model parameters are presented.

  10. Micro- and macroscopic photonic control of matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabtsev, Anton

    parameters. In order for measurements not to be skewed, these interactions need to be taken into account and mitigated at the time of the experiment or handled later in data analysis and simulations. Experimental results are presented in four chapters. Chapter 2 describes two topics: (1) single-shot real-time monitoring and correction of spectral phase drifts, which commonly originate from temperature and pointing fluctuations inside the laser cavity when the pulses are generated; (2) an all-optical method for controlling the dispersion of femtosecond pulses using other pulses. Chapter 3 focuses on the effects of the propagation media--how intense laser pulses modify media and how, in turn, the media modifies them back--and how these effects can be counteracted. Self-action effects in fused silica are discussed, along with some interesting and unexpected results. A method is then proposed for mitigating self-action processes using binary modulation of the spectral phases of laser pulses. Chapter 4 outlines the design of two laser systems, which are specifically tailored for particular spectroscopic applications and incorporate the comprehensive pulse control described in previous chapters. Chapter 5 shows how control of spatial beam characteristics can be applied to measurements of the mechanical motion of microscale particles and how it can potentially be applied to molecular motion. It also describes an experiment on laser-induced flow in air in which attempts were made to control the macroscopic molecular rotation of gases. My research, with a pulse shaper as the enabling tool, provides important insights into ultrafast scientific studies by making femtosecond laser research more predictable, reliable and practical for measurement and control. In the long term, some of the research methods in this thesis may help the transition of femtosecond lasers from the laboratory environment into clinics, factories, airports, and other everyday settings.

  11. Modelling the Peak Elongation of Nylon6 and Fe Powder Based Composite Wire for FDM Feedstock Filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Harish Kumar; Singh, Rupinder

    2017-10-01

    In the present work, to increase the application domain of fused deposition modelling (FDM) process, Nylon6-Fe powder based composite wire has been prepared as feed stock filament. Further for smooth functioning of feed stock filament without any change in the hardware and software of the commercial FDM setup, the mechanical properties of the newly prepared composite wire must be comparable/at par to the existing material i.e. ABS, P-430. So, keeping this in consideration; an effort has been made to model the peak elongation of in house developed feedstock filament comprising of Nylon6 and Fe powder (prepared on single screw extrusion process) for commercial FDM setup. The input parameters of single screw extruder (namely: barrel temperature, temperature of the die, speed of the screw, speed of the winding machine) and rheological property of material (melt flow index) has been modelled with peak elongation as the output by using response surface methodology. For validation of model the result of peak elongation obtained from the model equation the comparison was made with the results of actual experimentation which shows the variation of ±1 % only.

  12. Polymersomes containing iron sulfide (FeS) as primordial cell model : for the investigation of energy providing redox reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpermann, Theodor; Rüdel, Kristin; Rüger, Ronny; Steiniger, Frank; Nietzsche, Sandor; Filiz, Volkan; Förster, Stephan; Fahr, Alfred; Weigand, Wolfgang

    2011-04-01

    According to Wächtershäuser's "Iron-Sulfur-World" one major requirement for the development of life on the prebiotic Earth is compartmentalization. Vesicles spontaneously formed from amphiphilic components containing a specific set of molecules including sulfide minerals may have lead to the first autotrophic prebiotic units. The iron sulfide minerals may have been formed by geological conversions in the environment of deep-sea volcanos (black smokers), which can be observed even today. Wächtershäuser postulated the evolution of chemical pathways as fundamentals of the origin of life on earth. In contrast to the classical Miller-Urey experiment, depending on external energy sources, the "Iron-Sulfur-World" is based on the catalytic and energy reproducing redox system FeS+H2S-->FeS2+H2. The energy release out of this redox reaction (∆RG°=-38 kJ/mol, pH 0) could be the cause for the subsequent synthesis of complex organic molecules and the precondition for the development of more complex units similar to cells known today. Here we show the possibility for precipitating iron sulfide inside vesicles composed of amphiphilic block-copolymers as a model system for a first prebiotic unit. Our findings could be an indication for a chemoautotrophic FeS based origin of life.

  13. [NiFe] hydrogenase structural and functional models: new bio-inspired catalysts for hydrogen evolution; Modeles structuraux et fonctionnels du site actif des hydrogenases [NiFe]: de nouveaux catalyseurs bio-inspires pour la production d'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oudart, Y

    2006-09-15

    Hydrogenase enzymes reversibly catalyze the oxidation and production of hydrogen in a range close to the thermodynamic potential. The [NiFe] hydrogenase active site contains an iron-cyano-carbonyl moiety linked to a nickel atom which is in an all sulphur environment. Both the active site originality and the potential development of an hydrogen economy make the synthesis of functional and structural models worthy. To take up this challenge, we have synthesised mononuclear ruthenium models and more importantly, nickel-ruthenium complexes, mimicking some structural features of the [NiFe] hydrogenase active site. Ruthenium is indeed isoelectronic to iron and some of its complexes are well-known to bear hydrides. The compounds described in this study have been well characterised and their activity in proton reduction has been successfully tested. Most of them are able to catalyze this reaction though their electrocatalytic potentials remain much more negative compared to which of platinum. The studied parameters point out the importance of the complexes electron richness, especially of the nickel environment. Furthermore, the proton reduction activity is stable for several hours at good rates. The ruthenium environment seems important for this stability. Altogether, these compounds represent the very first catalytically active [NiFe] hydrogenase models. Important additional results of this study are the synergetic behaviour of the two metals in protons reduction and the evidence of a protonation step as the limiting step of the catalytic cycle. We have also shown that a basic site close to ruthenium improves the electrocatalytic potential of the complexes. (author)

  14. Nonlinear FE Analysis for PCCV 1/4 Model using NUCAS Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hong-Pyo; Song, Young-Chul; Choun, Young Sun

    2007-01-01

    During the several years, ultimate pressure analysis as well as failure mode evaluations of containment building in nuclear power plant have been carried out in KAERI. In this point of view, the program NUCAS (NUclear Containment Analysis System) code, which is FE (Finite Element) program with the sole purpose of evaluating ultimate pressure capacity of PSC containment building, was developed to predict nonlinear behavior. The main objective of this paper is to verify the performance of the program's solid element

  15. Kinetic modelling of bentonite - canister interaction. Implications for Cu, Fe and Pb corrosion in a repository for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wersin, P.; Bruno, J.; Spahiu, K.

    1993-06-01

    The chemical corrosion of three potential canister materials, Fe, Cu, and Pb is reviewed in terms of their thermodynamic and kinetic behavior in a repository. Thermodynamic predictions which are compatible with sedimentological observations indicate that for all three metals, chemical corrosion is expected at any time in a repository. From the kinetic information obtained by experimental and archeological data, long-term corrosion rates are assessed. In the case of Fe, the selected data allow extrapolation to repository conditions with a tolerable degree of uncertainty except for the possible effect of local corrosion in the initial oxic phase, For the other two metals, the scarcity of consistent experimental and archeological data limits the feasibility of this approach. In view of this shortcoming, a kinetic, single-box model, based on the STEADYQL code, is presented for quantitative prediction of long-term canister-bentonite interaction. The model is applied to the corrosion of Cu under anoxic conditions and upper and lower limits of corrosion rates are derived. The possibilities of extending this single-box model to a multi-box, diffusion-extended version are discussed. Finally, further potentials of STEADYQL for future applications of near field modelling are highlighted. 32 refs

  16. Thermodynamical Properties of 56Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavukcu, E.; Becker, J.A.; Bernstein, L.A.; Garrett, P.E.; Guttormsen, M.; Mitchell, G.E.; Rekstad, J.; Schiller, A.; Siem, S.; Voinov, A.; Younes, W.

    2002-01-01

    Average nuclear level densities close to the nuclear binding energy in 56 Fe and 57 Fe are extracted from primary γ-ray spectra. Thermal properties of 56 Fe are studied within the statistical canonical ensemble. The experimental heat capacity is compared with the theoretical heat capacity calculated within the shell model Monte Carlo approach

  17. Defects spectroscopy by means of the simple trapping model of the Fe78Si9B13 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez M, A.; Cabral P, A.; Garcia S, S.F.

    2007-01-01

    In this work it is analyzed quantitatively the results of the positron annihilation in the Fe 78 Si 9 B 13 alloy by means of the simple trapping model. From this analysis its are derived: a reason of positron trapping in the defects (K), the defects concentration (C d ) and the electronic density associated to the defect (n d ); both first parameters, (K, C d ) its increase and n d diminishes when increasing the alloy temperature. From this analysis it is also inferred that the defect consists of a multi vacancy of between 15 and 20 mono vacancies. (Author)

  18. Prediction of powerplant vibration using FRF data of FE model; Dentatsu kansu wo mochiita power plant shindo yosoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, T; Tsukahara, M; Sakaguchi, M; Takahashi, Y [Honda R and D Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    For the purpose of shortening the development period, the estimation of powerplant vibration has become more important in the early design stage, and eigenvalue analysis by FEM is commonly used to solve this problem. Eigenvalue Analysis cannot directly predict vibration levels under running conditions that affect the durability of each component and the vibration of a car body. This paper presents a new approach using FRF data from FE models for accurate prediction of engine vibration under running conditions. By applying this approach to an in-line four cylinder engine, the predicted vibration is reasonably comparable with experimental results. 3 refs., 8 figs.

  19. From Microscopic to Macroscopic Descriptions of Cell Migration on Growing Domains

    KAUST Repository

    Baker, Ruth E.

    2009-10-28

    Cell migration and growth are essential components of the development of multicellular organisms. The role of various cues in directing cell migration is widespread, in particular, the role of signals in the environment in the control of cell motility and directional guidance. In many cases, especially in developmental biology, growth of the domain also plays a large role in the distribution of cells and, in some cases, cell or signal distribution may actually drive domain growth. There is an almost ubiquitous use of partial differential equations (PDEs) for modelling the time evolution of cellular density and environmental cues. In the last 20 years, a lot of attention has been devoted to connecting macroscopic PDEs with more detailed microscopic models of cellular motility, including models of directional sensing and signal transduction pathways. However, domain growth is largely omitted in the literature. In this paper, individual-based models describing cell movement and domain growth are studied, and correspondence with a macroscopic-level PDE describing the evolution of cell density is demonstrated. The individual-based models are formulated in terms of random walkers on a lattice. Domain growth provides an extra mathematical challenge by making the lattice size variable over time. A reaction-diffusion master equation formalism is generalised to the case of growing lattices and used in the derivation of the macroscopic PDEs. © 2009 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  20. Determination of the macroscopic chloride diffusivity in cementitious by porous materials coupling periodic homogenization of Nernst-Planck equation with experimental protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Millet

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a macroscopic migration model for cementitious porous media obtained from periodic homogenization technique. The dimensional analysis of Nernst-Planck equation leads to dimensionless numbers characterizing the problem. According to the order of magnitude of the dimensionless numbers, the homogenization of Nernst-Planck equation leads at the leading order to a macroscopic model where several rates can be coupled or not. For a large applied electrical field accelerating the transfer of ionic species, we obtain a macroscopic model only involving migration. A simple experimental procedure of measurement of the homogenized chlorides diffusivity is then proposed for cement-based materials.

  1. Theory and feasibility tests for a seismic scanning tunnelling macroscope

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.

    2012-09-01

    We propose a seismic scanning tunnelling macroscope (SSTM) that can detect subwavelength scatterers in the near-field of either the source or the receivers. Analytic formulas for the time reverse mirror (TRM) profile associated with a single scatterer model show that the spatial resolution limit to be, unlike the Abbe limit of λ/2, independent of wavelength and linearly proportional to the source-scatterer separation as long as the scatterer is in the near-field region. This means that, as the scatterer approaches the source, imaging of the scatterer with super-resolution can be achieved. Acoustic and elastic simulations support this concept, and a seismic experiment in an Arizona tunnel shows a TRM profile with super-resolution adjacent to the fault location. The SSTM is analogous to the optical scanning tunnelling microscopes having subwavelength resolution. Scaled to seismic frequencies, it is theoretically possible to extract 100 Hz information from 20 Hz data by the imaging of near-field seismic energy.

  2. Three lectures on macroscopic aspects of nuclear dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiatecki, W.J.

    1979-03-01

    These lectures concentrate on macroscopic aspects of nuclear dynamics, those aspects that come into prominence when the number of nucleons, A, is large, A >> 1. An attempt is made to set up a theory of the dynamics of nuclear shape changes, for small (sub-sonic) collective velocities. To set up the equations of motion one needs three forces: conservative, dissipative, and inertial. The first lecture deals with statics, i.e., it discusses methods of treating the Potential Energy Function of nuclear systems. From the Potential Energy the conservative forces that drive the time evolution of a nuclear configuration can be deduced. The division of the underlying potential energy into Local, Proximity, and Global terms is stressed. The second lecture deals with dynamical aspects, especially with the nuclear Dissipation Function, which describes how dissipative frictional forces oppose the conservative driving forces. The underlying physics is the approximate validity of the Independent-Particle model. This, combined with the Randomization Hypothesis, leads to simple formulas that suggest that dissipative forces may often overshadow the inertial forces. The third lecture outlines the kind of dynamics that results from the balance of these forces, and describes a number of applications to nuclear fission and heavy-ion collisions of this New Dynamics. Particularly simple equations of motion are set up, and some of the consequences are explored. 18 references, 31 figures, 3 tables

  3. Thermodynamical properties of 56Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavukcu, E.; Becker, J. A.; Bernstein, L. A.; Garrett, P. E.; Younes, W.; Guttormsen, M.; Rekstad, J.; Siem, S.; Mitchell, G. E.; Schiller, A.; Voinov, A.

    2003-01-01

    Average nuclear level densities close to the nuclear binding energy in 56Fe and 57Fe are extracted from primary γ-ray spectra. A step structure is observed in the level density for both isotopes, and is interpreted as breaking of Cooper pairs. Thermal properties of 56Fe are studied within the statistical canonical ensemble. The experimental heat capacity in 56Fe is compared with the theoretical heat capacity calculated within the shell model Monte Carlo approach

  4. Simple concentration-dependent pair interaction model for large-scale simulations of Fe-Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levesque, Maximilien; Martinez, Enrique; Fu, Chu-Chun; Nastar, Maylise; Soisson, Frederic

    2011-01-01

    This work is motivated by the need for large-scale simulations to extract physical information on the iron-chromium system that is a binary model alloy for ferritic steels used or proposed in many nuclear applications. From first-principles calculations and the experimental critical temperature we build a new energetic rigid lattice model based on pair interactions with concentration and temperature dependence. Density functional theory calculations in both norm-conserving and projector augmented-wave approaches have been performed. A thorough comparison of these two different ab initio techniques leads to a robust parametrization of the Fe-Cr Hamiltonian. Mean-field approximations and Monte Carlo calculations are then used to account for temperature effects. The predictions of the model are in agreement with the most recent phase diagram at all temperatures and compositions. The solubility of Cr in Fe below 700 K remains in the range of about 6 to 12%. It reproduces the transition between the ordering and demixing tendency and the spinodal decomposition limits are also in agreement with the values given in the literature.

  5. A procedure for calibration and validation of FE modelling of laser-assisted metal to polymer direct joining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambiase, F.; Genna, S.; Kant, R.

    2018-01-01

    The quality of the joints produced by means of Laser-Assisted Metal to Polymer direct joining (LAMP) is strongly influenced by the temperature field produced during the laser treatment. The main phenomena including the adhesion of the plastic to the metal sheet and the development of bubbles (on the plastic surface) depend on the temperature reached by the polymer at the interface. Such a temperature should be higher than the softening temperature, but lower than the degradation temperature of the polymer. However, the temperature distribution is difficult to be measured by experimental tests since the most polymers (which are transparent to the laser radiation) are often opaque to the infrared wavelength. Thus, infrared analysis involving pyrometers and infrared camera is not suitable for this purpose. On the other hand, thermocouples are difficult to be placed at the interface without influencing the temperature conditions. In this paper, an integrated approach involving both experimental measurements and a Finite Element (FE) model were used to perform such an analysis. LAMP of Polycarbonate and AISI304 stainless steel was performed by means of high power diode laser and the main process parameters i.e. laser power and scanning speed were varied. Comparing the experimental measurements and the FE model prediction of the thermal field, a good correspondence was achieved proving the suitability of the developed model and the proposed calibration procedure to be ready used for process design and optimization.

  6. Modeling of High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of FeCrAl Alloy by using Artificial Neural Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Joon; Ryu, Ho Jin [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Refractory alloys are candidate materials for replacing current zirconium-base cladding of light water reactors and they retain significant creep resistance and mechanical strength at high temperatures up to 1500 ℃ due to their high melting temperature. Thermal neutron cross sections of refractory metals are higher than that of zirconium, however the loss of neutron can be overcome by reducing cladding thickness which can be facilitated with enhanced mechanical properties. However, most refractory metals show the poor oxidation resistance at a high temperature. Oxidation behaviors of the various compositions of FeCrAl alloys in high temperature conditions were modeled by using Bayesian neural network. The automatic relevance determination (ARD) technique represented the influence of the composition of alloying elements on the oxidation resistance of FeCrAl alloys. This model can be utilized to understand the tendency of oxidation behavior along the composition of each element and prove the applicability of neural network modeling for the development of new cladding material of light water reactors.

  7. Performance of Glottal Inverse Filtering as Tested by Aeroelastic Modelling of Phonation and FE Modelling of Vocal Tract

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alku, P.; Horáček, Jaromír; Airas, M.; Griffond-Boitier, F.; Laukkanen, A. M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 5 (2006), s. 717-724 ISSN 1610-1928 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA2076401 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : biomechanics of voice * numerical simulation of vocal fold vibration * FE simulation of fonation Subject RIV: JU - Aeronautics, Aerodynamics, Aircrafts Impact factor: 0.523, year: 2006

  8. The fundamental diagram : a macroscopic traffic flow model. Paper and shortened version presented to the OECD Symposium on Methods for determining geometric road design standards 1976, Helsingor, Denmark, 10-12 May 1976.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botma, H.

    1976-01-01

    In the theory and models of traffic-flow the emphasis lies on the interaction between vehicles, based on the characteristics of the road, the drivers and vehicles, and not on the interaction between a single vehicle and the road. Three levels of models, arranged in the order of increasing detail can

  9. Modeling of full-Heusler alloys within tight-binding approximation: Case study of Fe2MnAl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, A.; Majidi, M. A.; Nanto, D.

    2017-07-01

    Heusler alloys have been known for about a century, and predictions of magnetic moment values using Slater-Pauling rule have been successful for many such materials. However, such a simple counting rule has been found not to always work for all Heusler alloys. For instance, Fe2CuAl has been found to have magnetic moment of 3.30 µB per formula unit although the Slater-Pauling rule suggests the value of 2 µB. On the other hand, a recent experiment shows that a non-stoichiometric Heusler compound Fe2Mn0.5Cu0.5Al possesses magnetic moment of 4 µB, closer to the Slater-Pauling prediction for the stoichiometric compound. Such discrepancies signify that the theory to predict the magnetic moment of Heusler alloys in general is still far from being complete. Motivated by this issue, we propose to do a theoretical study on a full-Heusler alloy Fe2MnAl to understand the formation of magnetic moment microscopically. We model the system by constructing a density-functional-theory-based tight-binding Hamiltonian and incorporating Hubbard repulsive as well as spin-spin interactions for the electrons occupying the d-orbitals. Then, we solve the model using Green's function approach, and treat the interaction terms within the mean-field approximation. At this stage, we aim to formulate the computational algorithm for the overall calculation process. Our final goal is to compute the total magnetic moment per unit cell of this system and compare it with the experimental data.

  10. Mesoscopic modeling and parameter estimation of a lithium-ion battery based on LiFePO4/graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokar, Ali; Désilets, Martin; Lacroix, Marcel; Zaghib, Karim

    2018-03-01

    A novel numerical model for simulating the behavior of lithium-ion batteries based on LiFePO4(LFP)/graphite is presented. The model is based on the modified Single Particle Model (SPM) coupled to a mesoscopic approach for the LFP electrode. The model comprises one representative spherical particle as the graphite electrode, and N LFP units as the positive electrode. All the SPM equations are retained to model the negative electrode performance. The mesoscopic model rests on non-equilibrium thermodynamic conditions and uses a non-monotonic open circuit potential for each unit. A parameter estimation study is also carried out to identify all the parameters needed for the model. The unknown parameters are the solid diffusion coefficient of the negative electrode (Ds,n), reaction-rate constant of the negative electrode (Kn), negative and positive electrode porosity (εn&εn), initial State-Of-Charge of the negative electrode (SOCn,0), initial partial composition of the LFP units (yk,0), minimum and maximum resistance of the LFP units (Rmin&Rmax), and solution resistance (Rcell). The results show that the mesoscopic model can simulate successfully the electrochemical behavior of lithium-ion batteries at low and high charge/discharge rates. The model also describes adequately the lithiation/delithiation of the LFP particles, however, it is computationally expensive compared to macro-based models.

  11. A review of macroscopic ductile failure criteria.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corona, Edmundo; Reedlunn, Benjamin

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this work was to describe several of the ductile failure criteria com- monly used to solve practical problems. The following failure models were considered: equivalent plastic strain, equivalent plastic strain in tension, maximum shear, Mohr- Coulomb, Wellman's tearing parameter, Johnson-Cook and BCJ MEM. The document presents the main characteristics of each failure model as well as sample failure predic- tions for simple proportional loading stress histories in three dimensions and in plane stress. Plasticity calculations prior to failure were conducted with a simple, linear hardening, J2 plasticity model. The resulting failure envelopes were plotted in prin- cipal stress space and plastic strain space, where the dependence on stress triaxiality and Lode angle are clearly visible. This information may help analysts select a ductile fracture model for a practical problem and help interpret analysis results.

  12. Workshop on geologic data requirements for radioactive waste management assessment models, Santa Fe, New Mexico, June 28--July 1, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-09-01

    Exchange of information is needed among persons working in two broad categories of studies concerned with terminal storage of radioactive waste. These two categories are: (1) investigations of several types of geologic formations in a number of locations to determine suitability for use with various emplacement techniques, and (2) development of models for the ERDA, NRC, and EPA, for the general purpose of assessing the long term safety of terminal storage facilities. The Workshop held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, June 28-July 1, 1976, sponsored by the Office of Waste Isolation and arranged by The University of New Mexico addressed this need. Presentations covered background topics of: geologic studies being made, methods for risk analysis, assessment models being developed, and descriptions of field observations of radionuclide migration. During vigorous discussion periods, a list of items to be jointly attacked by geologists and modelers was worked out

  13. FE Model Updating on an In-Service Self-Anchored Suspension Bridge with Extra-Width Using Hybrid Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyuan Xia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, many more bridges with extra-width have been needed for vehicle throughput. In order to obtain a precise finite element (FE model of those complex bridge structures, the practical hybrid updating method by integration of Gaussian mutation particle swarm optimization (GMPSO, Kriging meta-model and Latin hypercube sampling (LHS was proposed. By demonstrating the efficiency and accuracy of the hybrid method through the model updating of a damaged simply supported beam, the proposed method was applied to the model updating of a self-anchored suspension bridge with extra-width which showed great necessity considering the results of ambient vibration test. The results of bridge model updating showed that both of the mode frequencies and shapes had relatively high agreement between the updated model and experimental structure. The successful model updating of this bridge fills in the blanks of model updating of a complex self-anchored suspension bridge. Moreover, the updating process enables other model updating issues for complex bridge structures

  14. A multiscale MD-FE model of diffusion in composite media with internal surface interaction based on numerical homogenization procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojic, M; Milosevic, M; Kojic, N; Kim, K; Ferrari, M; Ziemys, A

    2014-02-01

    Mass transport by diffusion within composite materials may depend not only on internal microstructural geometry, but also on the chemical interactions between the transported substance and the material of the microstructure. Retrospectively, there is a gap in methods and theory to connect material microstructure properties with macroscale continuum diffusion characteristics. Here we present a new hierarchical multiscale model for diffusion within composite materials that couples material microstructural geometry and interactions between diffusing particles and the material matrix. This model, which bridges molecular dynamics (MD) and the finite element (FE) method, is employed to construct a continuum diffusion model based on a novel numerical homogenization procedure. The procedure is general and robust for evaluating constitutive material parameters of the continuum model. These parameters include the traditional bulk diffusion coefficients and, additionally, the distances from the solid surface accounting for surface interaction effects. We implemented our models to glucose diffusion through the following two geometrical/material configurations: tightly packed silica nanospheres, and a complex fibrous structure surrounding nanospheres. Then, rhodamine 6G diffusion analysis through an aga-rose gel network was performed, followed by a model validation using our experimental results. The microstructural model, numerical homogenization and continuum model offer a new platform for modeling and predicting mass diffusion through complex biological environment and within composite materials that are used in a wide range of applications, like drug delivery and nanoporous catalysts.

  15. A multiscale MD–FE model of diffusion in composite media with internal surface interaction based on numerical homogenization procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojic, M.; Milosevic, M.; Kojic, N.; Kim, K.; Ferrari, M.; Ziemys, A.

    2014-01-01

    Mass transport by diffusion within composite materials may depend not only on internal microstructural geometry, but also on the chemical interactions between the transported substance and the material of the microstructure. Retrospectively, there is a gap in methods and theory to connect material microstructure properties with macroscale continuum diffusion characteristics. Here we present a new hierarchical multiscale model for diffusion within composite materials that couples material microstructural geometry and interactions between diffusing particles and the material matrix. This model, which bridges molecular dynamics (MD) and the finite element (FE) method, is employed to construct a continuum diffusion model based on a novel numerical homogenization procedure. The procedure is general and robust for evaluating constitutive material parameters of the continuum model. These parameters include the traditional bulk diffusion coefficients and, additionally, the distances from the solid surface accounting for surface interaction effects. We implemented our models to glucose diffusion through the following two geometrical/material configurations: tightly packed silica nanospheres, and a complex fibrous structure surrounding nanospheres. Then, rhodamine 6G diffusion analysis through an aga-rose gel network was performed, followed by a model validation using our experimental results. The microstructural model, numerical homogenization and continuum model offer a new platform for modeling and predicting mass diffusion through complex biological environment and within composite materials that are used in a wide range of applications, like drug delivery and nanoporous catalysts. PMID:24578582

  16. Finite-element three-dimensional ground-water (FE3DGW) flow model - formulation, program listings and users' manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.K.; Cole, C.R.; Bond, F.W.

    1979-12-01

    The Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program is developing and applying the methodology for assessing the far-field, long-term post-closure safety of deep geologic nuclear waste repositories. AEGIS is being performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under contract with the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (OWNI) for the Department of Energy (DOE). One task within AEGIS is the development of methodology for analysis of the consequences (water pathway) from loss of repository containment as defined by various release scenarios. Analysis of the long-term, far-field consequences of release scenarios requires the application of numerical codes which simulate the hydrologic systems, model the transport of released radionuclides through the hydrologic systems to the biosphere, and, where applicable, assess the radiological dose to humans. Hydrologic and transport models are available at several levels of complexity or sophistication. Model selection and use are determined by the quantity and quality of input data. Model development under AEGIS and related programs provides three levels of hydrologic models, two levels of transport models, and one level of dose models (with several separate models). This document consists of the description of the FE3DGW (Finite Element, Three-Dimensional Groundwater) Hydrologic model third level (high complexity) three-dimensional, finite element approach (Galerkin formulation) for saturated groundwater flow

  17. Sequential Monte Carlo filter for state estimation of LiFePO4 batteries based on an online updated model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiahao; Klee Barillas, Joaquin; Guenther, Clemens; Danzer, Michael A.

    2014-02-01

    Battery state monitoring is one of the key techniques in battery management systems e.g. in electric vehicles. An accurate estimation can help to improve the system performance and to prolong the battery remaining useful life. Main challenges for the state estimation for LiFePO4 batteries are the flat characteristic of open-circuit-voltage over battery state of charge (SOC) and the existence of hysteresis phenomena. Classical estimation approaches like Kalman filtering show limitations to handle nonlinear and non-Gaussian error distribution problems. In addition, uncertainties in the battery model parameters must be taken into account to describe the battery degradation. In this paper, a novel model-based method combining a Sequential Monte Carlo filter with adaptive control to determine the cell SOC and its electric impedance is presented. The applicability of this dual estimator is verified using measurement data acquired from a commercial LiFePO4 cell. Due to a better handling of the hysteresis problem, results show the benefits of the proposed method against the estimation with an Extended Kalman filter.

  18. Cross-sectional neck response of a total human body FE model during simulated frontal and side automobile impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Nicholas A; Moreno, Daniel P; Gayzik, F Scott; Stitzel, Joel D

    2015-01-01

    Human body finite element (FE) models are beginning to play a more prevalent role in the advancement of automotive safety. A methodology has been developed to evaluate neck response at multiple levels in a human body FE model during simulated automotive impacts. Three different impact scenarios were simulated: a frontal impact of a belted driver with airbag deployment, a frontal impact of a belted passenger without airbag deployment and an unbelted side impact sled test. Cross sections were created at each vertebral level of the cervical spine to calculate the force and moment contributions of different anatomical components of the neck. Adjacent level axial force ratios varied between 0.74 and 1.11 and adjacent level bending moment ratios between 0.55 and 1.15. The present technique is ideal for comparing neck forces and moments to existing injury threshold values, calculating injury criteria and for better understanding the biomechanical mechanisms of neck injury and load sharing during sub-injurious and injurious loading.

  19. Observation and modelling of the Fe XXI line profile observed by IRIS during the impulsive phase of flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polito, V.; Testa, P.; De Pontieu, B.; Allred, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    The observation of the high temperature (above 10 MK) Fe XXI 1354.1 A line with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) has provided significant insights into the chromospheric evaporation process in flares. In particular, the line is often observed to be completely blueshifted, in contrast to previous observations at lower spatial and spectral resolution, and in agreement with predictions from theoretical models. Interestingly, the line is also observed to be mostly symmetric and with a large excess above the thermal width. One popular interpretation for the excess broadening is given by assuming a superposition of flows from different loop strands. In this work, we perform a statistical analysis of Fe XXI line profiles observed by IRIS during the impulsive phase of flares and compare our results with hydrodynamic simulations of multi-thread flare loops performed with the 1D RADYN code. Our results indicate that the multi-thread models cannot easily reproduce the symmetry of the line and that some other physical process might need to be invoked in order to explain the observed profiles.

  20. Report on fundamental modeling of irradiation-induced swelling and creep in FeCrAl alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohnert, Aaron A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dasgupta, Dwaipayan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wirth, Brian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Linton, Kory D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-23

    In order to improve the accident tolerance of light water reactor (LWR) fuel, alternative cladding materials have been proposed to replace zirconium (Zr)-based alloys. Of these materials, there is a particular focus on iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys due to much slower oxidation kinetics in high-temperature steam than Zr-alloys. This should decrease the energy release due to oxidation and allow the cladding to remain integral longer in the presence of high temperature steam, making accident mitigation more likely. As a continuation of the development for these alloys, the material response must be demonstrated to provide suitable radiation stability, in order to ensure that there will not be significant dimensional changes (e.g., swelling), as well as quantifying the radiation hardening and radiation creep behavior. In this report, we describe the use of cluster dynamics modeling to evaluate the defect physics and damage accumulation behavior of FeCrAl alloys subjected to neutron irradiation, with a particular focus on irradiation-induced swelling and defect fluxes to dislocations that are required to model irradiation creep behavior.

  1. Microstructural characterization of Y2O3 ODS-Fe-Cr model alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, V. de; Leguey, T.; Munoz, A.; Monge, M.A.; Pareja, R.; Marquis, E.A.; Lozano-Perez, S.; Jenkins, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Two Fe-12 wt% Cr alloys, one containing 0.4 wt% Y 2 O 3 and the other Y 2 O 3 -free, have been produced by mechanical alloying followed by hot isostatic pressing. These oxide dispersion strengthened and reference alloys were characterized both in the as-HIPed state and after tempering by transmission electron microscopy and atom-probe tomography. The as-HIPed alloys exhibited the characteristic microstructure of lath martensite and contained a high density of dislocations. Small voids with sizes 3 C and M 23 C 6 carbides (M = Cr, Fe) probably as a result of C ingress during milling. After tempering at 1023 K for 4 h the microstructures had partially recovered. In the recovered regions, martensite laths were replaced by equiaxed grains in which M 23 C 6 carbides decorated the grain boundaries. In the ODS alloy nanoparticles containing Y were commonly observed within grains, although they were also present at grain boundaries and adjacent to large carbides.

  2. Impact on the Fe redox cycling of organic ligands released by Synechococcus PCC 7002, under different iron fertilization scenarios. Modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samperio-Ramos, Guillermo; González-Dávila, Melchor; Santana-Casiano, J. Magdalena

    2018-06-01

    The kinetics of Fe redox transformations are of crucial importance in determining the bioavailability of iron, due to inorganic Fe(II) and Fe weakly organic complexes being the most easily assimilated species by phytoplankton. The role played by the natural organic ligands excreted by the cyanobacteria Synecococcus PCC 7002 on the iron redox chemistry was studied at different stages of growth, considering changes in the organic exudation of the cyanobacteria, associated with growth under two different scenarios of iron availability. The oxidation/reduction processes of iron were studied at nanomolar levels and under different physicochemical conditions of pH (7.2- 8.2), temperature (5- 35 °C) and salinity (10- 37). The presence of natural organic exudates of Synechococcus affected the redox behavior of iron. A pH-dependent and photo-induced Fe(III) reduction process was detected in the presence of exudates produced under Fe-Low conditions. Photolytic reactions also modified the reactivity of those exudates with respect to Fe(II), increasing its lifetime in seawater. Without light mediated processes, organic ligands excreted under iron deficient conditions intensified the Fe(II) oxidation at pH redox constants between iron and the major ligands present in solution. Two organic type ligands for the exudates of Synechococcus PCC 7002, with different iron-chelation properties were included in the model. The Fe(II) speciation was radically affected when organic ligands were considered. The individual contributions to the overall Fe(II) oxidation rate demonstrated that these organic ligands played a key role in the oxidation process, although their contributions were dependent on the prescribed iron conditions. The study, therefore, suggests that the variability in the composition and nature of organic exudates released, due to iron availability conditions, might determine the redox behaviour of iron in seawater.

  3. Nanostructure evolution under irradiation of Fe(C)MnNi model alloys for reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiapetto, M., E-mail: mchiapet@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Unité Matériaux Et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Université de Lille 1, ENSCL, F-59600 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Becquart, C.S. [Unité Matériaux Et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Université de Lille 1, ENSCL, F-59600 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Laboratoire commun EDF-CNRS Etude et Modélisation des Microstructures pour le Vieillissement des Matériaux (EM2VM) (France); Domain, C. [EDF R& D, Département Matériaux et Mécanique des Composants, Les Renardières, F-77250 Moret sur Loing (France); Laboratoire commun EDF-CNRS Etude et Modélisation des Microstructures pour le Vieillissement des Matériaux (EM2VM) (France); Malerba, L. [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2015-06-01

    Radiation-induced embrittlement of bainitic steels is one of the most important lifetime limiting factors of existing nuclear light water reactor pressure vessels. The primary mechanism of embrittlement is the obstruction of dislocation motion produced by nanometric defect structures that develop in the bulk of the material due to irradiation. The development of models that describe, based on physical mechanisms, the nanostructural changes in these types of materials due to neutron irradiation are expected to help to better understand which features are mainly responsible for embrittlement. The chemical elements that are thought to influence most the response under irradiation of low-Cu RPV steels, especially at high fluence, are Ni and Mn, hence there is an interest in modelling the nanostructure evolution in irradiated FeMnNi alloys. As a first step in this direction, we developed sets of parameters for object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulations that allow this to be done, under simplifying assumptions, using a “grey alloy” approach that extends the already existing OKMC model for neutron irradiated Fe–C binary alloys [1]. Our model proved to be able to describe the trend in the buildup of irradiation defect populations at the operational temperature of LWR (∼300 °C), in terms of both density and size distribution of the defect cluster populations, in FeMnNi model alloys as compared to Fe–C. In particular, the reduction of the mobility of point-defect clusters as a consequence of the presence of solutes proves to be key to explain the experimentally observed disappearance of detectable point-defect clusters with increasing solute content.

  4. Extended Macroscopic Study of Dilute Gas Flow within a Microcavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Hssikou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour of monatomic and dilute gas is studied in the slip and early transition regimes using the extended macroscopic theory. The gas is confined within a two-dimensional microcavity where the longitudinal sides are in the opposite motion with constant velocity ±Uw. The microcavity walls are kept at the uniform and reference temperature T0. Thus, the gas flow is transported only by the shear stress induced by the motion of upper and lower walls. From the macroscopic point of view, the regularized 13-moment equations of Grad, R13, are solved numerically. The macroscopic gas proprieties are studied for different values of the so-called Knudsen number (Kn, which gives the gas-rarefaction degree. The results are compared with those obtained using the classical continuum theory of Navier-Stokes and Fourier (NSF.

  5. Bell-inequality tests with macroscopic entangled states of light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stobinska, M. [Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Erlangen (Germany); Institute for Theoretical Physics II, Erlangen-Nuernberg University, Erlangen (Germany); Sekatski, P.; Gisin, N. [Group of Applied Physics, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Buraczewski, A. [Faculty of Electronics and Information Technology, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Leuchs, G. [Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Erlangen (Germany); Institute for Optics, Information and Photonics, Erlangen-Nuernberg University, Erlangen (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Quantum correlations may violate the Bell inequalities. Most experimental schemes confirming this prediction have been realized in all-optical Bell tests suffering from the detection loophole. Experiments which simultaneously close this loophole and the locality loophole are highly desirable and remain challenging. An approach to loophole-free Bell tests is based on amplification of the entangled photons (i.e., on macroscopic entanglement), for which an optical signal should be easy to detect. However, the macroscopic states are partially indistinguishable by classical detectors. An interesting idea to overcome these limitations is to replace the postselection by an appropriate preselection immediately after the amplification. This is in the spirit of state preprocessing revealing hidden nonlocality. Here, we examine one of the possible preselections, but the presented tools can be used for analysis of other schemes. Filtering methods making the macroscopic entanglement useful for Bell tests and quantum protocols are the subject of an intensive study in the field nowadays.

  6. A Preisach approach to modeling partial phase transitions in the first order magnetocaloric material MnFe(P,As)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moos, L. von, E-mail: lmoo@dtu.dk [Department of Energy Conversion and Storage, Technical University of Denmark, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Bahl, C.R.H.; Nielsen, K.K.; Engelbrecht, K. [Department of Energy Conversion and Storage, Technical University of Denmark, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Küpferling, M.; Basso, V. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, 10135 Torino (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    Magnetic refrigeration is an emerging technology that could provide energy efficient and environmentally friendly cooling. Magnetocaloric materials in which a structural phase transition is found concurrently with the magnetic phase transition are often termed first order magnetocaloric materials. Such materials are potential candidates for application in magnetic refrigeration devices. However, the first order materials often have adverse properties such as hysteresis, making actual performance troublesome to quantify, a subject not thoroughly studied within this field. Here we investigate the behavior of MnFe(P,As) under partial phase transitions, which is similar to what materials experience in actual magnetic refrigeration devices. Partial phase transition curves, in the absence of a magnetic field, are measured using calorimetry and the experimental results are compared to simulations of a Preisach-type model. We show that this approach is applicable and discuss what experimental data is required to obtain a satisfactory material model.

  7. Statistical thermodynamics understanding the properties of macroscopic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Fai, Lukong Cornelius

    2012-01-01

    Basic Principles of Statistical PhysicsMicroscopic and Macroscopic Description of StatesBasic PostulatesGibbs Ergodic AssumptionGibbsian EnsemblesExperimental Basis of Statistical MechanicsDefinition of Expectation ValuesErgodic Principle and Expectation ValuesProperties of Distribution FunctionRelative Fluctuation of an Additive Macroscopic ParameterLiouville TheoremGibbs Microcanonical EnsembleMicrocanonical Distribution in Quantum MechanicsDensity MatrixDensity Matrix in Energy RepresentationEntropyThermodynamic FunctionsTemperatureAdiabatic ProcessesPressureThermodynamic IdentityLaws of Th

  8. Plasmonic direct writing lithography with a macroscopical contact probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuerong; Liu, Ling; Wang, Changtao; Chen, Weidong; Liu, Yunyue; Li, Ling

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we design a plasmonic direct writing lithography system with a macroscopical contact probe to achieve nanometer scale spots. The probe with bowtie-shaped aperture array adopts spring hinge and beam deflection method (BDM) to realize near-field lithography. Lithography results show that a macroscopical plasmonic contact probe can achieve a patterning resolution of around 75 nm at 365 nm wavelength, and demonstrate that the lithography system is promising for practical applications due to beyond the diffraction limit, low cost, and simplification of system configuration. CST calculations provide a guide for the design of recording structure and the arrangement of placing polarizer.

  9. Fluctuations in macroscopically agitated plasma:quasiparticles and effective temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sosenko, P.P.; Gresillon, D.

    1994-01-01

    Fluctuations in the plasma, in which macroscopic fluid-like motion is agitated due to large-scale and low-frequency electro-magnetic fields, are studied. Such fields can be produced by external factors or internally, for example due to turbulence. Fluctuation spectral distributions are calculated with regard to the renormalization of the transition probability for a test-particle and of the test-particle shielding. If the correlation length for the random fluid-like motion is large as compared to the fluctuation scale lengths, then the fluctuation spectral distributions can be explained in terms of quasiparticles originating from macroscopic plasma agitation and of an effective temperature

  10. Macroscopic and radiographic examination of proximal root surface caries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordenram, G.; Bergvist, A.; Johnson, G.; Henriksen, C.O.; Anneroth, G.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare macroscopic and radiographic examination of proximal root surface caries of extracted teeth from patients aged 65-95 years. Although the study conditions for macroscopic and radiographic diagnosis favored more sensitive evaluations than routine clinical conditions, there was a 24% disagreement in diagnosis. This finding indicates that under routine clinical conditions it is difficult to register with certainty all superficial root carious lesions. Even in the absence of clinically detectable root surface caries, preventive measures should be considered for elderly people with exposed root surfaces

  11. Towards a Predictive Thermodynamic Model of Oxidation States of Uranium Incorporated in Fe (hydr) oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagus, Paul S. [Univ. of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The theoretical research in this project has been directed toward the interpretation of core-level spectroscopies for systems relevant to the project. For the initial efforts, the focus of our theoretical simulations has been the interpretation of laboratory and synchrotron X-Ray Photoemission Spectra, XPS. In more recent efforts, an increasing emphasis has been placed on developing transparent understandings of X-Ray Adsorption Spectra, XAS . For the XAS, the principal concern is for the near-edge features, either just below or just above, an ionization limit or edge, which are described as Near-Edge X-Ray Adsorption Fine Structure, NEXAFS. In particular, a priority has involved the analysis and interpretation of XPS and NEXAFS spectra, especially of Fe and U systems, as measured by our PNNL collaborators. The overall objective of our theoretical studies is to establish connections between features of the spectra and their origin in the electronic structure of the materials. The efforts for the analysis of XPS have been reviewed in a paper by the PI, C. J. Nelin, and E. S. Ilton from PNNL on “The interpretation of XPS spectra: Insights into materials properties”, Surf. Sci. Reports, 68, 273 (2013). Two materials properties of special interest have been the degree of ionicity and the character of the covalent bonding in a range of oxides formed with transition metal, lanthanide, and actinide cations. Since the systems treated have electrons in open shells, it has been necessary to determine the energetics and the character of the angular momentum coupling of the open shell electrons. In particular, we have established methods for the treatment of the “intermediate coupling” which arises when the system is between the limit of Russell-Saunders multiplets, and the limit of j-j coupling where the spin-orbit splittings of single electrons dominate. A recent paper by the PI, and M. J. Sassi, and K. M. Rosso, (both at PNNL) “Intermediate Coupling For Core

  12. Macroscopic dynamics of thermal nuclear excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastrukov, S.I.; Deak, F.; Kiss, A.; Seres, Z.

    1989-11-01

    The concept of kinetic temperature as a local dynamical variable of thermal nuclear collective motion is formulated using long-mean-free-path approach based on the Landau-Vlasov kinetic equation. In the Fermi drop model the thermal fluid dynamics of the spherical nucleus is analyzed. It is shown that in a compressible Fermi liquid the temperature pulses propagate in the form of spherical wave in phase with the acoustic wave. The thermal and compressional excitations are caused by the isotropic harmonic oscillations of the Fermi sphere in momentum space. (author) 25 refs.; 2 figs

  13. A Model Study on the Possible Effects of an External Electrical Field on Enzymes Having Dinuclear Iron Cluster [2Fe-2S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemi Türker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogenases which catalyze the H2 ↔ 2H+ + 2e− reaction are metalloenzymes that can be divided into two classes, the NiFe and Fe enzymes, on the basis of their metal content. Iron-sulfur clusters [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] are common in ironhydrogenases. In the present model study, [2Fe-2S] cluster has been considered to visualize the effect of external electric field on various quantum chemical properties of it. In the model, all the cysteinyl residues are in the amide form. The PM3 type semiempirical calculations have been performed for the geometry optimization of the model structure in the absence and presence of the external field. Then, single point DFT calculations (B3LYP/6-31+G(d have been carried out. Depending on the direction of the field, the chemical reactivity of the model enzyme varies which suggests that an external electric field could, under proper conditions, improve the enzymatic hydrogen production.

  14. Optical approaches to macroscopic and microscopic engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartolo, Paulo Jorge da Silva

    2001-01-01

    This research investigates the theoretical basis of a new photo-fabrication system. By this system, optical and thermal effects are used, together or separately, to locally induce a phase change in a liquid resin. This phase change phenomena is used to 'write' three-dimensional shapes. In addition, a thermal-kinetic model has been developed to correctly simulate the physical and chemical changes that occur in the bulk (and surroundings) of the material directly exposed to radiation and/or heat, and the rates at which these changes occur. Through this model, the law of conservation of energy describing the heat transfer phenomena is coupled with a kinetic model describing in detail the cure kinetics in both chemical and diffusion-controlled regimes. The thermal-kinetic model has been implemented using the finite element method. Linear rectangular elements have been considered and the concept of isoparametric formulation used. The Cranck-Nicolson algorithm has been used to integrate the system of equations, resulting from the finite element discretisation, with respect to time. Three different photo-fabrication processes were investigated. The first process uses ultraviolet radiation to cure a thermosetting polymer containing a certain amount of photo-initiator. The radiation generates free radicals by cleavage the initiator molecules, starting the chemical reaction. The second one uses ultraviolet radiation to start the curing reaction of a liquid thermosetting polymer containing a certain amount of photo-initiator. In this case, a heat source is also used to increase the temperature, and consequently, to increase the rate of gel formation and the fractional conversion, decreasing the necessary exposure time. Finally, the third system uses a thermosetting material containing small amounts of both thermal and photo-initiators. In this case ultraviolet radiation and heat are used to simultaneously start two types of chemical reactions: thermal-initiated and photo

  15. About the choice of Gibbs' potential for modelling of FCC ↔ HCP transformation in FeMnSi-based shape memory alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evard, Margarita E.; Volkov, Aleksandr E.; Belyaev, Fedor S.; Ignatova, Anna D.

    2018-05-01

    The choice of Gibbs' potential for microstructural modeling of FCC ↔ HCP martensitic transformation in FeMn-based shape memory alloys is discussed. Threefold symmetry of the HCP phase is taken into account on specifying internal variables characterizing volume fractions of martensite variants. Constraints imposed on model constants by thermodynamic equilibrium conditions are formulated.

  16. Artificial neural networks as a multivariate calibration tool: modelling the Fe-Cr-Ni system in X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, A.; Bos, A.; Bos, M.; van der Linden, W.E.

    1993-01-01

    The performance of artificial neural networks (ANNs) for modeling the Cr---Ni---Fe system in quantitative x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy was compared with the classical Rasberry-Heinrich model and a previously published method applying the linear learning machine in combination with singular value

  17. Macroscopic plasma properties and stability theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakanaka, P.H.

    1981-01-01

    1. Two-fluid equations: (a) Boltzmann equation: complete set of equations; collision models - Vlasov, BGK, Fokker-Planck-Landau, Boltzmann. (b) Moments of the Boltzmann equation: problem of closure. (c) Two-fluid equations. 2. One-fluid equation: (a) One-fluid variables. (b) One-fluid equations: quasi-neutrality. (c) Resistive MHD equations. (d) Ideal MHD equations: one-adiabatic approximation; double-adiabatic approximation - CGL. 3. MHD stability problem - energy principle: (a) Linearized ideal MHD equations: force-operator equation. (b) Boundary conditions. (c) Self-adjointness of force operator. (d) The energy principle. 4. Stability problems: application of the energy principle; stability of sharp-boundary plasmas. 5. Thermodynamic approach for stability of plasmas: Newcomb and Rosenbluth's stability criteria. (author)

  18. Feasibility Study on Tension Estimation Technique for Hanger Cables Using the FE Model-Based System Identification Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu-Sik Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hanger cables in suspension bridges are partly constrained by horizontal clamps. So, existing tension estimation methods based on a single cable model are prone to higher errors as the cable gets shorter, making it more sensitive to flexural rigidity. Therefore, inverse analysis and system identification methods based on finite element models are suggested recently. In this paper, the applicability of system identification methods is investigated using the hanger cables of Gwang-An bridge. The test results show that the inverse analysis and systemic identification methods based on finite element models are more reliable than the existing string theory and linear regression method for calculating the tension in terms of natural frequency errors. However, the estimation error of tension can be varied according to the accuracy of finite element model in model based methods. In particular, the boundary conditions affect the results more profoundly when the cable gets shorter. Therefore, it is important to identify the boundary conditions through experiment if it is possible. The FE model-based tension estimation method using system identification method can take various boundary conditions into account. Also, since it is not sensitive to the number of natural frequency inputs, the availability of this system is high.

  19. A model for plasticity kinetics and its role in simulating the dynamic behavior of Fe at high strain rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colvin, J D; Minich, R W; Kalantar, D H

    2007-03-29

    The recent diagnostic capability of the Omega laser to study solid-solid phase transitions at pressures greater than 10 GPa and at strain rates exceeding 10{sup 7} s{sup -1} has also provided valuable information on the dynamic elastic-plastic behavior of materials. We have found, for example, that plasticity kinetics modifies the effective loading and thermodynamic paths of the material. In this paper we derive a kinetics equation for the time-dependent plastic response of the material to dynamic loading, and describe the model's implementation in a radiation-hydrodynamics computer code. This model for plasticity kinetics incorporates the Gilman model for dislocation multiplication and saturation. We discuss the application of this model to the simulation of experimental velocity interferometry data for experiments on Omega in which Fe was shock compressed to pressures beyond the {alpha}-to-{var_epsilon} phase transition pressure. The kinetics model is shown to fit the data reasonably well in this high strain rate regime and further allows quantification of the relative contributions of dislocation multiplication and drag. The sensitivity of the observed signatures to the kinetics model parameters is presented.

  20. The behaviour of concrete at high temperatures and triaxial stress - FE model based on the concrete structure; Betonverhalten bei hohen Temperaturen und triaxialer Beanspruchung - FE-Modell auf der Basis der Betonstruktur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ameler, J.

    1997-12-31

    In this work, an analytical material model was developed, based on the finite element (FE) method, with which the material behaviour of a normal quartzite concrete under temperature stress can be described. Starting from natural fires, the short term area and temperatures between the normal temperature and about 800 C are of special interest. Altogether, it was found that important processes reducing the strength, which occur in high temperature stresses of concrete, can be directly traced back to the additive or the mortar phase, while others are due to the interaction between the two partners. In this attempted model, the compound material concrete is therefore regarded as a system consisting of two components, the additive and the mortar matrix. The mortar matrix is defined as the part consisting of the cement, the water and the fine proportion of the additive (diameter{<=}4 mm). (orig./MM) [Deutsch] In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurde ein analytisches Werkstoffmodell auf der Basis der FE-Methode entwickelt, mit dem das Werkstoffverhalten eines quarzitischen Normalbetons unter einer Temperaturbeanspruchung beschrieben werden kann. Ausgehend vom natuerlichen Brandgeschehen, interessieren besonders der Kurzzeitbereich und Temperaturen zwischen Normaltemperatur und ca. 800 C. In der Summe zeichnet sich ab, dass wesentliche festigkeitsmindernde Prozesse, die sich bei einer Hochtemperaturbeanspruchung von Beton abspielen, direkt dem Zuschlag bzw. der Moertelphase zugeordnet werden koennen, waehrend andere auf die Interaktion zwischen den beiden Partnern zurueckzufuehren sind. Im vorliegenden Modellansatz wird der Verbundwerkstoff Beton deshalb als ein aus zwei Komponenten bestehendes System betrachtet, dem Zuschlag und der Moertelmatrix. Die Moertelmatrix wird als der aus dem Zement, dem Wasser und dem Feinanteil des Zuschlags (Durchmesser{<=}4 mm) zusammengesetzte Teil definiert. (orig./MM)

  1. Ab initio molecular dynamics model for density, elastic properties and short range order of Co-Fe-Ta-B metallic glass thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hostert, C; Music, D; Schneider, J M; Bednarcik, J; Keckes, J; Kapaklis, V; Hjörvarsson, B

    2011-01-01

    Density, elastic modulus and the pair distribution function of Co-Fe-Ta-B metallic glasses were obtained by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and measured for sputtered thin films using x-ray reflectivity, nanoindentation and x-ray diffraction using high energy photons. The computationally obtained density of 8.19 g cm -3 for Co 43 Fe 20 Ta 5.5 B 31.5 and 8.42 g cm -3 for Co 45.5 Fe 24 Ta 6 B 24.5 , as well as the Young’s moduli of 273 and 251 GPa, respectively, are consistent with our experiments and literature data. These data, together with the good agreement between the theoretical and the experimental pair distribution functions, indicate that the model established here is useful to describe the density, elasticity and short range order of Co-Fe-Ta-B metallic glass thin films. Irrespective of the investigated variation in chemical composition, (Co, Fe)-B cluster formation and Co-Fe interactions are identified by density-of-states analysis. Strong bonds within the structural units and between the metallic species may give rise to the comparatively large stiffness. (paper)

  2. Macroscopic Refrigeration Using Superconducting Tunnel Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Peter; O'Neil, Galen; Underwood, Jason; Zhang, Xiaohang; Ullom, Joel

    2014-03-01

    Sub-kelvin temperatures are often a prerequisite for modern scientific experiments, such as quantum information processing, astrophysical missions looking for dark energy signatures and tabletop time resolved x-ray spectroscopy. Existing methods of reaching these temperatures, such as dilution refrigerators, are bulky and costly. In order to increase the accessibility of sub-Kelvin temperatures, we have developed a new method of refrigeration using normal-metal/insulator/superconductor (NIS) tunnel junctions. NIS junctions cool the electrons in the normal metal since the hottest electrons selectively tunnel from the normal metal into the superconductor. By extending the normal metal onto a thermally isolated membrane, the cold electrons can cool the phonons through the electron-phonon coupling. When these junctions are combined with a pumped 3He system, they provide a potentially inexpensive method of reaching these temperatures. Using only three devices, each with a junction area of approximately 3,500 μm2, we have cooled a 2 cm3 Cu plate from 290 mK to 256 mK. We will present these experimental results along with recent modeling predictions that strongly suggest that further refinements will allow cooling from 300 mK to 120 mK. This work is supported by the NASA APRA program.

  3. Macroscopic Spacetime Shortcuts in the Manyfold Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Loup, F

    2004-01-01

    Recently the idea of a Manyfold Universe was proposed by some authors to explain Dark Matter . In this study we assume that the Standard Model(SM) of particles and fields with gravity propagating in the Higher Dimensional Spacetime(Bulk) while other interactions are confined to 3+1 Einsteinian spacetime(Brane) is not due to open strings and closed loops but instead is due to the capability of gravity as the weakest and "smallest" interaction to penetrate these small Bulk size ($10^{-31}$m to $10^{-35}$m) while protons,neutrons and other interactions stronger and "larger" than gravity do not "fits" in the size of the Bulk and remains trapped on the Brane and we present a equation to justify this point of view. Our picture relies over the geometrical beauty of the Manyfold Universe proposal that Dark Matter is chemically identical to ordinary matter but lies on other Folds. Also the geometrical point of view for the small size of the Bulk eliminates the need of trapping mechanisms to confine matter in the Brane...

  4. Macroscopic quantum systems and gravitational phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikovski, I.

    2014-01-01

    Low-energy quantum systems are studied theoretically in light of possible experiments to test the interplay between quantum theory and general relativity. The research focus in this thesis is on quantum systems which can be controlled with very high precision and which allow for tests of quantum theory at novel scales in terms of mass and size. The pulsed regime of opto-mechanics is explored and it is shown how short optical pulses can be used to prepare and characterize quantum states of a massive mechanical resonator, and how some phenomenological models of quantum gravity can be probed. In addition, quantum interferometry with photons and matter-waves in the presence of gravitational time dilation is considered. It is shown that time dilation causes entanglement between internal states and the center-of-mass position and that it leads to decoherence of all composite quantum systems. The results of the thesis show that the interplay between quantum theory and general relativity affects even low-energy quantum systems and that it offers novel phenomena which can be probed in experiments. (author) [de

  5. Vascular flora and macroscopic fauna on the Fernow Experimental Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlene M. Madarish; Jane L. Rodrigue; Mary Beth Adams

    2002-01-01

    This report is the first comprehensive inventory of the vascular flora and macroscopic fauna known to occur within the Fernow Experimental Forest in north-central West Virignia. The compendium is based on information obtained from previous surveys, current research, and the personal observations of USDA Forest Service personnel and independent scientists. More than 750...

  6. On the problem of contextuality in macroscopic magnetization measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soeda, Akihito; Kurzyński, Paweł; Ramanathan, Ravishankar; Grudka, Andrzej; Thompson, Jayne; Kaszlikowski, Dagomir

    2013-01-01

    We show that sharp measurements of total magnetization cannot be used to reveal contextuality in macroscopic many-body systems of spins of arbitrary dimension. We decompose each such measurement into set of projectors corresponding to well-defined value of total magnetization. We then show that such sets of projectors are too restricted to construct Kochen–Specker sets.

  7. Photoinduced macroscopic chiral structures in a series of azobenzene copolyesters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedelchev, L.; Nikolova, L.; Matharu, A.

    2002-01-01

    A study of the propagation of elliptically polarized light and the resulting formation of macroscopic chiral structures in a series of azobenzene side-chain copolyesters, in which the morphology is varied from liquid crystalline to amorphous, is reported. Real-time measurements are presented...

  8. Modification of the Charlesby law. Pt. 2. Macroscopic sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiltz, A.; Weil, A.; Paniez, P.

    1984-01-01

    In part II, results are presented showing that for doses below macroscopic sensitivity, Qsub(sm), degradation due to fluence of the particles seems to be non-uniform over the entire area. In the light of this, a modification of the Charlesby's law is proposed providing a solution to the problems considered in part I [fr

  9. Charge of a macroscopic particle in a plasma sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samarian, A.A.; Vladimirov, S.V.

    2003-01-01

    Charging of a macroscopic body levitating in a rf plasma sheath is studied experimentally and theoretically. The nonlinear charge vs size dependence is obtained. The observed nonlinearity is explained on the basis of an approach taking into account different plasma conditions for the levitation positions of different particles. The importance of suprathermal electrons' contribution to the charging process is demonstrated

  10. Macroscopic Fundamental Diagram for pedestrian networks : Theory and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendoorn, S.P.; Daamen, W.; Knoop, V.L.; Steenbakkers, Jeroen; Sarvi, Majid

    2017-01-01

    The Macroscopic Fundamental diagram (MFD) has proven to be a powerful concept in understanding and managing vehicular network dynamics, both from a theoretical angle and from a more application-oriented perspective. In this contribution, we explore the existence and the characteristics of the

  11. Emergence of an urban traffic macroscopic fundamental diagram

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranjan, Abhishek; Fosgerau, Mogens; Jenelius, Erik

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines mild conditions under which a macroscopic fundamental diagram (MFD) emerges, relating space-averaged speed to occupancy in some area. These conditions are validated against empirical data. We allow local speedoccupancy relationships and, in particular, require no equilibrating...

  12. Stereodynamics: From elementary processes to macroscopic chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasai, Toshio [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Graduate School of Science, Department of Chemistry, Osaka University, Toyonaka, 560-0043 Osaka (Japan); Che, Dock-Chil [Graduate School of Science, Department of Chemistry, Osaka University, Toyonaka, 560-0043 Osaka (Japan); Tsai, Po-Yu [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemistry, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Lin, King-Chuen [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Palazzetti, Federico [Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Chimica Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Aquilanti, Vincenzo [Dipartimento di Chimica Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Istituto di Struttura della Materia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Roma (Italy); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador (Brazil)

    2015-12-31

    This paper aims at discussing new facets on stereodynamical behaviors in chemical reactions, i.e. the effects of molecular orientation and alignment on reactive processes. Further topics on macroscopic processes involving deviations from Arrhenius behavior in the temperature dependence of chemical reactions and chirality effects in collisions are also discussed.

  13. Macroscopic realism and quantum measurement: measurers as a natural kind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, Gregg

    2014-01-01

    The notion of macroscopic realism has been used in attempts to achieve consistency between physics and everyday experience and to locate some boundary between the realms of classical mechanics and quantum meachanics. Its ostensibly underlying conceptual components, realism and macroscopicity, have most often appeared in the foundations of physics in relation to quantum measurement: reality became a prominent topic of discussion in quantum physics after the notion of element of reality was defined and used by Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen in that context, and macroscopicity is often explicitly assumed to be an essential property of any measuring apparatus. However, macroscopicity turns out to be a rather vaguer and less consistently understood notion than typically assumed by physicists who have not explicitly explored the notion themselves. For this reason, it behooves those investigating the foundations of quantum mechanics from a realist perspective to look for alternative notions for grounding quantum measurement. Here, the merits of treating the measuring instrument as a ‘natural kind’ as a means of avoiding anthropocentrism in the foundations of quantum measurement are pointed out as a means of advancing quantum measurement theory. (paper)

  14. Macroscopic domain formation in the platelet plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bali, Rachna; Savino, Laura; Ramirez, Diego A.

    2009-01-01

    There has been ample debate on whether cell membranes can present macroscopic lipid domains as predicted by three-component phase diagrams obtained by fluorescence microscopy. Several groups have argued that membrane proteins and interactions with the cytoskeleton inhibit the formation of large d...

  15. Macroscopic charge quantization in single-electron devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burmistrov, I.S.; Pruisken, A.M.M.

    2010-01-01

    In a recent paper by the authors [I. S. Burmistrov and A. M. M. Pruisken, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 056801 (2008)] it was shown that single-electron devices (single-electron transistor or SET) display "macroscopic charge quantization" which is completely analogous to the quantum Hall effect observed on

  16. Estimation of (Cl-Mn) /Fe flux ratio at relativistic energies using steady-state leaky-box model modified for re accelerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, R.; Basu, B.; Bhattacharyya, D.P.

    1997-01-01

    The (Cl-Mn) /Fe flux ratio at the top of the atmosphere has been estimated from source composition. The authors have adopted the SSLB model modified for weak shocks to estimate the enhancement of (Cl-Mn) /Fe flux ratio due to re acceleration. The observed active detector results of Lezniak and Webber, Caldwell, Orth et al., Engelmann et al., and our passive detector results are fairly supported by the expected results from the SSLB model modified with re acceleration after Ferrando for energies ≤ 100 GeV / n

  17. Calculations of the magnetic properties of R{sub 2}M{sub 14}B intermetallic compounds (R=rare earth, M=Fe, Co)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Masaaki, E-mail: masaaki.ito@neel.cnrs.fr [CNRS, Institut Néel, 25 rue des Martyrs, BP166, 38042 Grenoble (France); University Grenoble Alpes, Institut Néel, 38042 Grenoble (France); Advanced Material Engineering Division, Toyota Motor Corporation, Susono 410-1193 (Japan); Yano, Masao [Advanced Material Engineering Division, Toyota Motor Corporation, Susono 410-1193 (Japan); Dempsey, Nora M. [CNRS, Institut Néel, 25 rue des Martyrs, BP166, 38042 Grenoble (France); University Grenoble Alpes, Institut Néel, 38042 Grenoble (France); Givord, Dominique [CNRS, Institut Néel, 25 rue des Martyrs, BP166, 38042 Grenoble (France); University Grenoble Alpes, Institut Néel, 38042 Grenoble (France); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2016-02-15

    The hard magnetic properties of “R–M–B” (R=rare earth, M=mainly Fe) magnets derive from the specific intrinsic magnetic properties encountered in Fe-rich R{sub 2}M{sub 14}B compounds. Exchange interactions are dominated by the 3d elements, Fe and Co, and may be modeled at the macroscopic scale with good accuracy. Based on classical formulae that relate the anisotropy coefficients to the crystalline electric field parameters and exchange interactions, a simple numerical approach is used to derive the temperature dependence of anisotropy in various R{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compounds (R=Pr, Nd, Dy). Remarkably, a unique set of crystal field parameters give fair agreement with the experimentally measured properties of all compounds. This implies reciprocally that the properties of compounds that incorporate a mixture of different rare-earth elements may be predicted accurately. This is of special interest for material optimization that often involves the partial replacement of Nd with another R element and also the substitution of Co for Fe. - Highlights: • Anisotropy constants derived from CEF parameters of R{sub 2}M{sub 14}B compounds (M=Fe, Co). • Anisotropy constants of all R{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compounds using unique set of CEF parameters. • Moment non-collinearity in magnetization processes under B{sub app} along hard axis.

  18. Calculations of the magnetic properties of R2M14B intermetallic compounds (R=rare earth, M=Fe, Co)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Masaaki; Yano, Masao; Dempsey, Nora M.; Givord, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    The hard magnetic properties of “R–M–B” (R=rare earth, M=mainly Fe) magnets derive from the specific intrinsic magnetic properties encountered in Fe-rich R 2 M 14 B compounds. Exchange interactions are dominated by the 3d elements, Fe and Co, and may be modeled at the macroscopic scale with good accuracy. Based on classical formulae that relate the anisotropy coefficients to the crystalline electric field parameters and exchange interactions, a simple numerical approach is used to derive the temperature dependence of anisotropy in various R 2 Fe 14 B compounds (R=Pr, Nd, Dy). Remarkably, a unique set of crystal field parameters give fair agreement with the experimentally measured properties of all compounds. This implies reciprocally that the properties of compounds that incorporate a mixture of different rare-earth elements may be predicted accurately. This is of special interest for material optimization that often involves the partial replacement of Nd with another R element and also the substitution of Co for Fe. - Highlights: • Anisotropy constants derived from CEF parameters of R 2 M 14 B compounds (M=Fe, Co). • Anisotropy constants of all R 2 Fe 14 B compounds using unique set of CEF parameters. • Moment non-collinearity in magnetization processes under B app along hard axis.

  19. Modeling copper precipitation hardening and embrittlement in a dilute Fe-0.3at.%Cu alloy under neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xian-Ming; Ke, Huibin; Zhang, Yongfeng; Spencer, Benjamin W.

    2017-11-01

    Neutron irradiation in light water reactors can induce precipitation of nanometer sized Cu clusters in reactor pressure vessel steels. The Cu precipitates impede dislocation gliding, leading to an increase in yield strength (hardening) and an upward shift of ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (embrittlement). In this work, cluster dynamics modeling is used to model the entire Cu precipitation process (nucleation, growth, and coarsening) in a Fe-0.3at.%Cu alloy under neutron irradiation at 300°C based on the homogenous nucleation mechanism. The evolution of the Cu cluster number density and mean radius predicted by the modeling agrees well with experimental data reported in literature for the same alloy under the same irradiation conditions. The predicted precipitation kinetics is used as input for a dispersed barrier hardening model to correlate the microstructural evolution with the radiation hardening and embrittlement in this alloy. The predicted radiation hardening agrees well with the mechanical test results in the literature. Limitations of the model and areas for future improvement are also discussed in this work.

  20. Progress towards an effective model for FeSe from high-accuracy first-principles quantum Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busemeyer, Brian; Wagner, Lucas K.

    While the origin of superconductivity in the iron-based materials is still controversial, the proximity of the superconductivity to magnetic order is suggestive that magnetism may be important. Our previous work has suggested that first-principles Diffusion Monte Carlo (FN-DMC) can capture magnetic properties of iron-based superconductors that density functional theory (DFT) misses, but which are consistent with experiment. We report on the progress of efforts to find simple effective models consistent with the FN-DMC description of the low-lying Hilbert space of the iron-based superconductor, FeSe. We utilize a procedure outlined by Changlani et al.[1], which both produces parameter values and indications of whether the model is a good description of the first-principles Hamiltonian. Using this procedure, we evaluate several models of the magnetic part of the Hilbert space found in the literature, as well as the Hubbard model, and a spin-fermion model. We discuss which interaction parameters are important for this material, and how the material-specific properties give rise to these interactions. U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program under Award No. FG02-12ER46875, as well as the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program.

  1. Modelling and characterization of chi-phase grain boundary precipitation during aging of Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, W.; San Martin, D.; Rivera Diaz del Castillo, P.E.J.; Zwaag, S. van der

    2007-01-01

    High molybdenum stainless steels may contain the chi-phase precipitate (χ, Fe 36 Cr 12 Mo 10 ) which may lead to undesirable effects on strength, toughness and corrosion resistance. In the present work, specimens of a 12Cr-9Ni-4Mo wt% steel are heat treated at different temperatures and times, and the average particle size and particle size distribution of chi-phase precipitate are studied quantitatively. A computer model based on the KWN framework has been developed to describe the evolution of chi-phase precipitation. The kinetic model takes advantage of the KWN model to describe the precipitate particle size distribution, and is coupled with the thermodynamic software ThermoCalc for calculating the instantaneous local thermodynamic equilibrium condition at the interface and the driving force for nucleation. A modified version of Zener's theory accounting for capillarity effects at early growth stages is implemented in this model. The prediction of the model for chi-phase precipitation at a grain boundary is compared to experimental results and both the average particle size and the particle size distribution are found to be in good agreement with experimental observations at late precipitation stages

  2. The origins of macroscopic quantum coherence in high temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, Philip; Nottale, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We propose a new theoretical approach to superconductivity in p-type cuprates. • Electron pairing mechanisms in the superconducting and pseudogap phases are proposed. • A scale free network of dopants is key to macroscopic quantum coherence. - Abstract: A new, theoretical approach to macroscopic quantum coherence and superconductivity in the p-type (hole doped) cuprates is proposed. The theory includes mechanisms to account for e-pair coupling in the superconducting and pseudogap phases and their inter relations observed in these materials. Electron pair coupling in the superconducting phase is facilitated by local quantum potentials created by static dopants in a mechanism which explains experimentally observed optimal doping levels and the associated peak in critical temperature. By contrast, evidence suggests that electrons contributing to the pseudogap are predominantly coupled by fractal spin waves (fractons) induced by the fractal arrangement of dopants. On another level, the theory offers new insights into the emergence of a macroscopic quantum potential generated by a fractal distribution of dopants. This, in turn, leads to the emergence of coherent, macroscopic spin waves and a second associated macroscopic quantum potential, possibly supported by charge order. These quantum potentials play two key roles. The first involves the transition of an expected diffusive process (normally associated with Anderson localization) in fractal networks, into e-pair coherence. The second involves the facilitation of tunnelling between localized e-pairs. These combined effects lead to the merger of the super conducting and pseudo gap phases into a single coherent condensate at optimal doping. The underlying theory relating to the diffusion to quantum transition is supported by Coherent Random Lasing, which can be explained using an analogous approach. As a final step, an experimental program is outlined to validate the theory and suggests a new

  3. A model description of the first-order phase transition in MnFeP1-x As x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tegus, O.; Lin, G.X.; Dagula, W.; Fuquan, B.; Zhang, L.; Brueck, E.; Boer, F.R. de; Buschow, K.H.J.

    2005-01-01

    We present a description of the critical behavior at the first-order phase transition in MnFeP 1- x As x system in terms of the Bean-Rodbell model. Within the molecular-field approximation, the Gibbs free energy of the system is expressed in terms of the exchange interaction, the elastic energy, the entropy term, the pressure term and the Zeeman energy. A magnetic-state equation has been obtained by minimizing the Gibbs free energy with respect to the volume and the magnetization. The characteristic parameters for the phase transition observed in this system have been obtained by fitting our experimental data. The results show that the magnetoelastic coupling plays a very important role in the mechanism of the phase transition

  4. Order by Quenched Disorder in the Model Triangular Antiferromagnet RbFe (MoO4 )2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, A. I.; Soldatov, T. A.; Petrenko, O. A.; Takata, A.; Kida, T.; Hagiwara, M.; Shapiro, A. Ya.; Zhitomirsky, M. E.

    2017-07-01

    We observe a disappearance of the 1 /3 magnetization plateau and a striking change of the magnetic configuration under a moderate doping of the model triangular antiferromagnet RbFe (MoO4 )2 . The reason is an effective lifting of degeneracy of mean-field ground states by a random potential of impurities, which compensates, in the low-temperature limit, the fluctuation contribution to free energy. These results provide a direct experimental confirmation of the fluctuation origin of the ground state in a real frustrated system. The change of the ground state to a least collinear configuration reveals an effective positive biquadratic exchange provided by the structural disorder. On heating, doped samples regain the structure of a pure compound, thus allowing for an investigation of the remarkable competition between thermal and structural disorder.

  5. Conduction Mechanism by Using CBH Model in Fe3+ and Mn3+ Ion Modified Pb(Zr0.65−xAxTi0.35O3 (A = Mn3+/Fe3+ Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niranjan Sahu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycrystalline samples of manganese and iron substituted lead zirconium titanate (PZT with general formula Pb(Zr0.65−xAxTi0.35O3 (A = Mn3+ and Fe3+ ceramics have been synthesized by high temperature solid state reaction technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD patterns were recorded at room temperature to study the crystal structure. All the patterns could be refined by employing the Rietveld method to R3c space group with rhombohedral symmetry. Microstructural properties of the materials were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM, and compositional analysis was carried out by energy dispersive spectrum (EDS measurements. All the materials exhibit ferroelectric to paraelectric transition. The variation of dielectric constant and loss tangent with temperature and frequency is investigated. The decrease of activation energy and increases of AC conductivity with the Fe3+ or Mn3+ ion concentration have been observed. The AC conductivity has been analyzed by the power law. The frequency exponent with the function of temperature has been analyzed by assuming that the AC conduction mechanism is the correlated barrier hopping (CBH model. The conduction in the present sample is found to be of bipolaron type for Mn3+ ion-doped sample. However, the conduction mechanism could not be explained by CBH model for Fe3+ ion-doped sample.

  6. Removal of Crystal Violet by Using Reduced-Graphene-Oxide-Supported Bimetallic Fe/Ni Nanoparticles (rGO/Fe/Ni): Application of Artificial Intelligence Modeling for the Optimization Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Wenqian; Hu, Jiwei; Qi, Jimei; Hou, Yu; Cao, Rensheng; Wei, Xionghui

    2018-05-22

    Reduced-graphene-oxide-supported bimetallic Fe/Ni nanoparticles were synthesized in this study for the removal of crystal violet (CV) dye from aqueous solutions. This material was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), Raman spectroscopy, N₂-sorption, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The influence of independent parameters (namely, initial dye concentration, initial pH, contact time, and temperature) on the removal efficiency were investigated via Box⁻Behnken design (BBD). Artificial intelligence (i.e., artificial neural network, genetic algorithm, and particle swarm optimization) was used to optimize and predict the optimum conditions and obtain the maximum removal efficiency. The zero point of charge (pH ZPC ) of rGO/Fe/Ni composites was determined by using the salt addition method. The experimental equilibrium data were fitted well to the Freundlich model for the evaluation of the actual behavior of CV adsorption, and the maximum adsorption capacity was estimated as 2000.00 mg/g. The kinetic study discloses that the adsorption processes can be satisfactorily described by the pseudo-second-order model. The values of Gibbs free energy change (Δ G ⁰), entropy change (Δ S ⁰), and enthalpy change (Δ H ⁰) demonstrate the spontaneous and endothermic nature of the adsorption of CV onto rGO/Fe/Ni composites.

  7. Removal of Crystal Violet by Using Reduced-Graphene-Oxide-Supported Bimetallic Fe/Ni Nanoparticles (rGO/Fe/Ni: Application of Artificial Intelligence Modeling for the Optimization Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqian Ruan

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Reduced-graphene-oxide-supported bimetallic Fe/Ni nanoparticles were synthesized in this study for the removal of crystal violet (CV dye from aqueous solutions. This material was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, Raman spectroscopy, N2-sorption, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The influence of independent parameters (namely, initial dye concentration, initial pH, contact time, and temperature on the removal efficiency were investigated via Box–Behnken design (BBD. Artificial intelligence (i.e., artificial neural network, genetic algorithm, and particle swarm optimization was used to optimize and predict the optimum conditions and obtain the maximum removal efficiency. The zero point of charge (pHZPC of rGO/Fe/Ni composites was determined by using the salt addition method. The experimental equilibrium data were fitted well to the Freundlich model for the evaluation of the actual behavior of CV adsorption, and the maximum adsorption capacity was estimated as 2000.00 mg/g. The kinetic study discloses that the adsorption processes can be satisfactorily described by the pseudo-second-order model. The values of Gibbs free energy change (ΔG0, entropy change (ΔS0, and enthalpy change (ΔH0 demonstrate the spontaneous and endothermic nature of the adsorption of CV onto rGO/Fe/Ni composites.

  8. Triboelectricity: macroscopic charge patterns formed by self-arraying ions on polymer surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgo, Thiago A L; Ducati, Telma R D; Francisco, Kelly R; Clinckspoor, Karl J; Galembeck, Fernando; Galembeck, Sergio E

    2012-05-15

    Tribocharged polymers display macroscopically patterned positive and negative domains, verifying the fractal geometry of electrostatic mosaics previously detected by electric probe microscopy. Excess charge on contacting polyethylene (PE) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) follows the triboelectric series but with one caveat: net charge is the arithmetic sum of patterned positive and negative charges, as opposed to the usual assumption of uniform but opposite signal charging on each surface. Extraction with n-hexane preferentially removes positive charges from PTFE, while 1,1-difluoroethane and ethanol largely remove both positive and negative charges. Using suitable analytical techniques (electron energy-loss spectral imaging, infrared microspectrophotometry and carbonization/colorimetry) and theoretical calculations, the positive species were identified as hydrocarbocations and the negative species were identified as fluorocarbanions. A comprehensive model is presented for PTFE tribocharging with PE: mechanochemical chain homolytic rupture is followed by electron transfer from hydrocarbon free radicals to the more electronegative fluorocarbon radicals. Polymer ions self-assemble according to Flory-Huggins theory, thus forming the experimentally observed macroscopic patterns. These results show that tribocharging can only be understood by considering the complex chemical events triggered by mechanical action, coupled to well-established physicochemical concepts. Patterned polymers can be cut and mounted to make macroscopic electrets and multipoles.

  9. 2016 KIVA-hpFE Development: A Robust and Accurate Engine Modeling Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrington, David Bradley [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Waters, Jiajia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory and its collaborators are facilitating engine modeling by improving accuracy and robustness of the modeling, and improving the robustness of software. We also continue to improve the physical modeling methods. We are developing and implementing new mathematical algorithms, those that represent the physics within an engine. We provide software that others may use directly or that they may alter with various models e.g., sophisticated chemical kinetics, different turbulent closure methods or other fuel injection and spray systems.

  10. 1D Atmosphere Models from Inversion of Fe i 630 nm Observations with an Application to Solar Irradiance Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristaldi, Alice; Ermolli, Ilaria, E-mail: alice.cristaldi@oaroma.inaf.it [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via Frascati 33, Monte Porzio Catone, I-00078 (Italy)

    2017-06-01

    Present-day semi-empirical models of solar irradiance (SI) variations reconstruct SI changes measured on timescales greater than a day by using spectra computed in one dimensional atmosphere models (1D models), which are representative of various solar surface features. Various recent studies have pointed out, however, that the spectra synthesized in 1D models do not reflect the radiative emission of the inhomogenous atmosphere revealed by high-resolution solar observations. We aimed to derive observation-based atmospheres from such observations and test their accuracy for SI estimates. We analyzed spectropolarimetric data of the Fe i 630 nm line pair in photospheric regions that are representative of the granular quiet-Sun pattern (QS) and of small- and large-scale magnetic features, both bright and dark with respect to the QS. The data were taken on 2011 August 6, with the CRisp Imaging Spectropolarimeter at the Swedish Solar Telescope, under excellent seeing conditions. We derived atmosphere models of the observed regions from data inversion with the SIR code. We studied the sensitivity of results to spatial resolution and temporal evolution, and discuss the obtained atmospheres with respect to several 1D models. The atmospheres derived from our study agree well with most of the 1D models we compare our results with, both qualitatively and quantitatively (within 10%), except for pore regions. Spectral synthesis computations of the atmosphere obtained from the QS observations return an SI between 400 and 2400 nm that agrees, on average, within 2.2% with standard reference measurements, and within −0.14% with the SI computed on the QS atmosphere employed by the most advanced semi-empirical model of SI variations.

  11. A novel modeling methodology of open circuit voltage hysteresis for LiFePO4 batteries based on an adaptive discrete Preisach model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Letao; Sun, Zechang; Dai, Haifeng; Wei, Xuezhe

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • An adaptive discrete Preisach model (ADPM) of OCV–SOC hysteresis is proposed. • The measured current is used to adjust the weight vector in the proposed ADPM. • A deformation algorithm of ADPM is developed for the accidental current errors. • The performance of ADPM under uncertainty of measured current is investigated. • The performance of ADPM under uncertainty of OCV is investigated. - Abstract: The relationship of open circuit voltage (OCV) versus state of charge (SOC) is critical for many techniques such as accurate battery modeling and reliable SOC estimation. However, the hysteresis existing in OCV–SOC curves of lithium-ion batteries complicates this relationship especially for lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO 4 ) batteries which exhibit a very flat OCV–SOC hysteretic feature. This paper aims at modeling the OCV–SOC hysteresis for LiFePO 4 batteries. The modeling approach is a novel adaptive discrete Preisach model (ADPM) based on the classic Preisach model and the least mean square (LMS) theory. To enhance the performance, the ADPM uses the measured current at each time step to adjust the weight vector. This method significantly decreases the errors (<1%) between the model predicted SOC and the true SOC acquired from experiments. A deformation algorithm of ADPM is further proposed to guarantee the performance even when large errors appear in the measured current. For further applications of the proposed ADPM such as SOC estimation, the robust performance of ADPM is also discussed when considering OCV input errors and measurement current errors. The results show that the maximum SOC calculation errors are about 6% and 5% respectively against uncertain OCV input and measured current which indicate the enormous potential of ADPM in battery management systems

  12. Macroscopic discontinuity modeling for multiclass multilane traffic flow operations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngoduy, D.

    2006-01-01

    Congestion in traffic networks causes severe problems in and around large cities. It is the source of important economic inefficiencies, both on the level of individual persons and of the society as a whole. However, societal and environmental constraints prohibit large-scale extensions of the

  13. Macroscopic Models of Clique Tree Growth for Bayesian Networks

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In clique tree clustering, inference consists of propagation in a clique tree compiled from a Bayesian network. In this paper, we develop an analytical approach to...

  14. Microstructural Characterization of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} ODS-Fe-Cr Model Alloy s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Castro, V.; Jenkins, M.L. [Oxford Univ., Dept. of Materials (United Kingdom); Leguey, T.; Mufioz, A.; Pareja, R.; Monge, M.A. [Madrid Univ. Carlos 3, Dept. de Fisica (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels with Cr contents ranging between 9-12 wt% are promising candidates for use as structural materials in future fusion reactors. They are likely to be superior to austenitic steels because of their better thermal properties and higher swelling resistance. A major concern of these materials is their maximum service temperature, as this determines the overall efficiency of the reactor. It has been demonstrated that one way to increase this temperature is to homogeneously disperse hard nano-sized oxide particles, such as Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, into the steel matrix. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels produced by mechanical milling and hot isostatic pressing (HIP ) are considered as potential structural materials for fusion reactors. In Europe, efforts have been focused on the ODS-RAFM-9CrW steel EUROFER. These ODS steels show good tensile and creep properties, acceptable ductility, but poor impact properties. Microstructural characterization of real steels, especially of the structures of oxide/steel matrix interfaces which play an important role in the performance of the material, is a difficult task. In the present work we have fabricated and characterised a simpler model ODS system based on a Fe-Cr binary alloy, in the belief that this will help us better to understand complex ODS-RAFM steels. Two Fe-12wt% Cr batches, one containing 0.3 wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and the other Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} free have been produced by milling plus compaction by HIP. These materials are being characterized by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and atom probe field ion microscopy. Results will be compared with those obtained for ODS-EUROFER produced under the same conditions. (authors)

  15. New insights into the short pitch corrugation development enigma based on 3D-FE dynamic vehicle-track coupled modelling in frictional rolling contact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, S.; Li, Z.; Nunez Vicencio, Alfredo; Dollevoet, R.P.B.J.

    2017-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) dynamic frictional rolling contact model is presented for the study of short pitch corrugation that considers direct and instantaneous coupling between the contact mechanics and the structural dynamics in a vehicle-track system. In this study, we examine

  16. HPC Institutional Computing Project: W15_lesreactiveflow KIVA-hpFE Development: A Robust and Accurate Engine Modeling Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrington, David Bradley [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Waters, Jiajia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-05

    KIVA-hpFE is a high performance computer software for solving the physics of multi-species and multiphase turbulent reactive flow in complex geometries having immersed moving parts. The code is written in Fortran 90/95 and can be used on any computer platform with any popular complier. The code is in two versions, a serial version and a parallel version utilizing MPICH2 type Message Passing Interface (MPI or Intel MPI) for solving distributed domains. The parallel version is at least 30x faster than the serial version and much faster than our previous generation of parallel engine modeling software, by many factors. The 5th generation algorithm construction is a Galerkin type Finite Element Method (FEM) solving conservative momentum, species, and energy transport equations along with two-equation turbulent model k-ω Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) model and a Vreman type dynamic Large Eddy Simulation (LES) method. The LES method is capable modeling transitional flow from laminar to fully turbulent; therefore, this LES method does not require special hybrid or blending to walls. The FEM projection method also uses a Petrov-Galerkin (P-G) stabilization along with pressure stabilization. We employ hierarchical basis sets, constructed on the fly with enrichment in areas associated with relatively larger error as determined by error estimation methods. In addition, when not using the hp-adaptive module, the code employs Lagrangian basis or shape functions. The shape functions are constructed for hexahedral, prismatic and tetrahedral elements. The software is designed to solve many types of reactive flow problems, from burners to internal combustion engines and turbines. In addition, the formulation allows for direct integration of solid bodies (conjugate heat transfer), as in heat transfer through housings, parts, cylinders. It can also easily be extended to stress modeling of solids, used in fluid structure interactions problems, solidification, porous media

  17. Monitoring, field experiments, and geochemical modeling of Fe(II) oxidation kinetics in a stream dominated by net-alkaline coal-mine drainage, Pennsylvania, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravotta,, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Watershed-scale monitoring, field aeration experiments, and geochemical equilibrium and kinetic modeling were conducted to evaluate interdependent changes in pH, dissolved CO2, O2, and Fe(II) concentrations that typically take place downstream of net-alkaline, circumneutral coal-mine drainage (CMD) outfalls and during aerobic treatment of such CMD. The kinetic modeling approach, using PHREEQC, accurately simulates observed variations in pH, Fe(II) oxidation, alkalinity consumption, and associated dissolved gas concentrations during transport downstream of the CMD outfalls (natural attenuation) and during 6-h batch aeration tests on the CMD using bubble diffusers (enhanced attenuation). The batch aeration experiments demonstrated that aeration promoted CO2 outgassing, thereby increasing pH and the rate of Fe(II) oxidation. The rate of Fe(II) oxidation was accurately estimated by the abiotic homogeneous oxidation rate law −d[Fe(II)]/dt = k1·[O2]·[H+]−2·[Fe(II)] that indicates an increase in pH by 1 unit at pH 5–8 and at constant dissolved O2 (DO) concentration results in a 100-fold increase in the rate of Fe(II) oxidation. Adjusting for sample temperature, a narrow range of values for the apparent homogeneous Fe(II) oxidation rate constant (k1′) of 0.5–1.7 times the reference value of k1 = 3 × 10−12 mol/L/min (for pH 5–8 and 20 °C), reported by Stumm and Morgan (1996), was indicated by the calibrated models for the 5-km stream reach below the CMD outfalls and the aerated CMD. The rates of CO2 outgassing and O2ingassing in the model were estimated with first-order asymptotic functions, whereby the driving force is the gradient of the dissolved gas concentration relative to equilibrium with the ambient atmosphere. Although the progressive increase in DO concentration to saturation could be accurately modeled as a kinetic function for the conditions evaluated, the simulation of DO as an instantaneous equilibrium process did not affect the

  18. Problems related to macroscopic electric fields in the magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faelthammar, C.

    1977-01-01

    The macroscopic electric fields in the magnetosphere originate from internal as well as external sources. The fields are intimately coupled with the dynamics of magnetospheric plasma convection. They also depend on the complicated electrical properties of the hot collisionless plasma. Macroscopic electric fields are responsible for some important kinds of energization of charged particles that take place in the magnetosphere and affect not only particles of auroral energy but also, by multistep processes, trapped high-energy particles. A particularly interesting feature of magnetospheric electric fields is that they can have substantial components along the geomagnetic field, as has recently been confirmed by observations. Several physical mechanisms have been identified by which such electric fields can be supported even when collisions between particles are negligible. Comments are made on the magnetic mirror effect, anomalous resistivity, the collisionless thermoelectric effect, and electric double layers, emphasizing key features and differences and their significance in the light of recent observational data

  19. Incorporation of composite defects from ultrasonic NDE into CAD and FE models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingol, Onur Rauf; Schiefelbein, Bryan; Grandin, Robert J.; Holland, Stephen D.; Krishnamurthy, Adarsh

    2017-02-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites are widely used in aerospace industry due to their combined properties of high strength and low weight. However, owing to their complex structure, it is difficult to assess the impact of manufacturing defects and service damage on their residual life. While, ultrasonic testing (UT) is the preferred NDE method to identify the presence of defects in composites, there are no reasonable ways to model the damage and evaluate the structural integrity of composites. We have developed an automated framework to incorporate flaws and known composite damage automatically into a finite element analysis (FEA) model of composites, ultimately aiding in accessing the residual life of composites and make informed decisions regarding repairs. The framework can be used to generate a layer-by-layer 3D structural CAD model of the composite laminates replicating their manufacturing process. Outlines of structural defects, such as delaminations, are automatically detected from UT of the laminate and are incorporated into the CAD model between the appropriate layers. In addition, the framework allows for direct structural analysis of the resulting 3D CAD models with defects by automatically applying the appropriate boundary conditions. In this paper, we show a working proof-of-concept for the composite model builder with capabilities of incorporating delaminations between laminate layers and automatically preparing the CAD model for structural analysis using a FEA software.

  20. Macroscopic phase separation in high-temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Hai-Hu

    2000-01-01

    High-temperature superconductivity is recovered by introducing extra holes to the Cu-O planes, which initially are insulating with antiferromagnetism. In this paper I present data to show the macroscopic electronic phase separation that is caused by either mobile doping or electronic instability in the overdoped region. My results clearly demonstrate that the electronic inhomogeneity is probably a general feature of high-temperature superconductors. PMID:11027323

  1. Negative heat capacity at phase-separation in macroscopic systems

    OpenAIRE

    Gross, D. H. E.

    2005-01-01

    Systems with long-range as well with short-range interactions should necessarily have a convex entropy S(E) at proper phase transitions of first order, i.e. when a separation of phases occurs. Here the microcanonical heat capacity c(E)= -\\frac{(\\partial S/\\partial E)^2}{\\partial^2S/\\partial E^2} is negative. This should be observable even in macroscopic systems when energy fluctuations with the surrounding world can be sufficiently suppressed.

  2. Extension of Seismic Scanning Tunneling Macroscope to Elastic Waves

    KAUST Repository

    Tarhini, Ahmad

    2017-11-06

    The theory for the seismic scanning tunneling macroscope is extended from acoustic body waves to elastic body-wave propagation. We show that, similar to the acoustic case, near-field superresolution imaging from elastic body waves results from the O(1/R) term, where R is the distance between the source and near-field scatterer. The higher-order contributions R−n for n>1 are cancelled in the near-field region for a point source with normal stress.

  3. Extension of Seismic Scanning Tunneling Macroscope to Elastic Waves

    KAUST Repository

    Tarhini, Ahmad; Guo, Bowen; Dutta, Gaurav; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2017-01-01

    The theory for the seismic scanning tunneling macroscope is extended from acoustic body waves to elastic body-wave propagation. We show that, similar to the acoustic case, near-field superresolution imaging from elastic body waves results from the O(1/R) term, where R is the distance between the source and near-field scatterer. The higher-order contributions R−n for n>1 are cancelled in the near-field region for a point source with normal stress.

  4. Toward a superconducting quantum computer. Harnessing macroscopic quantum coherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jaw-Shen

    2010-01-01

    Intensive research on the construction of superconducting quantum computers has produced numerous important achievements. The quantum bit (qubit), based on the Josephson junction, is at the heart of this research. This macroscopic system has the ability to control quantum coherence. This article reviews the current state of quantum computing as well as its history, and discusses its future. Although progress has been rapid, the field remains beset with unsolved issues, and there are still many new research opportunities open to physicists and engineers.

  5. Pseudo-Goldstone bosons and new macroscopic forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, C.T.; Ross, G.G.

    1988-01-01

    Pseudoscalar Goldstone bosons may readily be associated with weakly, explicitly broken symmetries giving them mixed CP quantum numbers. In general this leads to scalar couplings to nucleons and leptons, which produces coherent long range forces. This can naturally accommodate detectable long range macroscopic forces mediated by bosons completely consistent with conventional cosmological limits, e.g., new interactions with the range of present 'fifth force' searches which probe a scale of new physics of f ≅ 10 14 GeV. (orig.)

  6. Macroscopic quantum electrodynamics of high-Q cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanbekyan, Mikayel

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis macroscopic quantum electrodynamics in linear media was applied in order to develop an universally valid quantum theory for the description of the interaction of the electromagnetic field with atomic sources in high-Q cavities. In this theory a complete description of the characteristics of the emitted radiation is given. The theory allows to show the limits of the applicability of the usually applied theory. In order to establish an as possible generally valid theory first the atom-field interaction was studied in the framework of macroscopic quantum electrodynamics in dispersive and absorptive media. In order to describe the electromagnetic field from Maxwell's equations was started, whereby the noise-current densities, which are connected with the absorption of the medium, were included. The solution of these equations expresses the electromagnetic field variables by the noise-current densities by means of Green's tensor of the macroscopic Maxwell equations. The explicit quantization is performed by means of the noise-current densities, whereby a diagonal Hamiltonian is introduced, which then guarantees the time development according to Maxwell's equation and the fulfillment of the fundamental simultaneous commutation relations of the field variables. In the case of the interaction of the medium-supported field with atoms the Hamiltonian must be extended by atom-field interactions energies, whereby the canonical coupling schemes of the minimal or multipolar coupling can be used. The dieelectric properties of the material bodies as well as their shape are coded in the Green tensor of the macroscopic Maxwell equations. As preparing step first the Green tensor was specified in order to derive three-dimensional input-output relations for the electromagnetic field operators on a plane multilayer structure. Such a general dewscription of the electromagnetic field allows the inclusion both of dispersion and absorption of the media and the possible

  7. Polymorphic phase transitions: Macroscopic theory and molecular simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Jamshed; Zahn, Dirk

    2017-08-01

    Transformations in the solid state are of considerable interest, both for fundamental reasons and because they underpin important technological applications. The interest spans a wide spectrum of disciplines and application domains. For pharmaceuticals, a common issue is unexpected polymorphic transformation of the drug or excipient during processing or on storage, which can result in product failure. A more ambitious goal is that of exploiting the advantages of metastable polymorphs (e.g. higher solubility and dissolution rate) while ensuring their stability with respect to solid state transformation. To address these issues and to advance technology, there is an urgent need for significant insights that can only come from a detailed molecular level understanding of the involved processes. Whilst experimental approaches at best yield time- and space-averaged structural information, molecular simulation offers unprecedented, time-resolved molecular-level resolution of the processes taking place. This review aims to provide a comprehensive and critical account of state-of-the-art methods for modelling polymorph stability and transitions between solid phases. This is flanked by revisiting the associated macroscopic theoretical framework for phase transitions, including their classification, proposed molecular mechanisms, and kinetics. The simulation methods are presented in tutorial form, focusing on their application to phase transition phenomena. We describe molecular simulation studies for crystal structure prediction and polymorph screening, phase coexistence and phase diagrams, simulations of crystal-crystal transitions of various types (displacive/martensitic, reconstructive and diffusive), effects of defects, and phase stability and transitions at the nanoscale. Our selection of literature is intended to illustrate significant insights, concepts and understanding, as well as the current scope of using molecular simulations for understanding polymorphic

  8. Macroscopic quantum mechanics: theory and experimental concepts of optomechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yanbei

    2013-01-01

    Rapid experimental progress has recently allowed the use of light to prepare macroscopic mechanical objects into nearly pure quantum states. This research field of quantum optomechanics opens new doors towards testing quantum mechanics, and possibly other laws of physics, in new regimes. In the first part of this article, I will review a set of techniques of quantum measurement theory that are often used to analyse quantum optomechanical systems. Some of these techniques were originally designed to analyse how a classical driving force passes through a quantum system, and can eventually be detected with an optimal signal-to-noise ratio—while others focus more on the quantum-state evolution of a mechanical object under continuous monitoring. In the second part of this article, I will review a set of experimental concepts that will demonstrate quantum mechanical behaviour of macroscopic objects—quantum entanglement, quantum teleportation and the quantum Zeno effect. Taking the interplay between gravity and quantum mechanics as an example, I will review a set of speculations on how quantum mechanics can be modified for macroscopic objects, and how these speculations—and their generalizations—might be tested by optomechanics. (invited review)

  9. Macroscopic phase-resetting curves for spiking neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Grégory; Ermentrout, G. Bard; Gutkin, Boris

    2017-10-01

    The study of brain rhythms is an open-ended, and challenging, subject of interest in neuroscience. One of the best tools for the understanding of oscillations at the single neuron level is the phase-resetting curve (PRC). Synchronization in networks of neurons, effects of noise on the rhythms, effects of transient stimuli on the ongoing rhythmic activity, and many other features can be understood by the PRC. However, most macroscopic brain rhythms are generated by large populations of neurons, and so far it has been unclear how the PRC formulation can be extended to these more common rhythms. In this paper, we describe a framework to determine a macroscopic PRC (mPRC) for a network of spiking excitatory and inhibitory neurons that generate a macroscopic rhythm. We take advantage of a thermodynamic approach combined with a reduction method to simplify the network description to a small number of ordinary differential equations. From this simplified but exact reduction, we can compute the mPRC via the standard adjoint method. Our theoretical findings are illustrated with and supported by numerical simulations of the full spiking network. Notably our mPRC framework allows us to predict the difference between effects of transient inputs to the excitatory versus the inhibitory neurons in the network.

  10. Macroscopic phase-resetting curves for spiking neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Grégory; Ermentrout, G Bard; Gutkin, Boris

    2017-10-01

    The study of brain rhythms is an open-ended, and challenging, subject of interest in neuroscience. One of the best tools for the understanding of oscillations at the single neuron level is the phase-resetting curve (PRC). Synchronization in networks of neurons, effects of noise on the rhythms, effects of transient stimuli on the ongoing rhythmic activity, and many other features can be understood by the PRC. However, most macroscopic brain rhythms are generated by large populations of neurons, and so far it has been unclear how the PRC formulation can be extended to these more common rhythms. In this paper, we describe a framework to determine a macroscopic PRC (mPRC) for a network of spiking excitatory and inhibitory neurons that generate a macroscopic rhythm. We take advantage of a thermodynamic approach combined with a reduction method to simplify the network description to a small number of ordinary differential equations. From this simplified but exact reduction, we can compute the mPRC via the standard adjoint method. Our theoretical findings are illustrated with and supported by numerical simulations of the full spiking network. Notably our mPRC framework allows us to predict the difference between effects of transient inputs to the excitatory versus the inhibitory neurons in the network.

  11. Macroscopic description of the limb muscles of Tupinambis merianae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Barbosa Casals

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Tegu lizard (Tupinambis merianae belongs to the Teiidae family. It is distributed throughout the Americas, with many species, including Brazilian ones. They are from the Tupinambis genus, the largest representatives of the Teiidae family. For this study three animals (run over coming from donation were used. The dissected lizards were fixed in 10%, formaldehyde, and the macroscopic analysis was carried out in a detailed and photo documented way, keeping the selected structures “in situ”. This paper had as its main aim contributing to the macroscopic description of the chest myology, as well as the thoracic and pelvic limbs of the lizard T. merianae. The results obtained from this research were compared to authors who have studied animals from the same Reptilia class. Thus, we conclude that our macroscopic results are similar to those already described by the researchers Hildebrand (1995, Moro and Abdala (2004 and Abdala and Diogo (2010. We should highlight that the knowledge on anatomy has importance and applications to various areas within Biology, contributing in a substantial way to the areas of human health and technology.

  12. Atomistic modeling determination of placeholder binding energy of Ti, C, and N atoms on a-Fe (100) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, X J; Liu, Y P; Han, S P

    2015-01-01

    A Fe(100) surface containing Ti, C, and N was constructed and optimized to study the placeholder binding energy of the Ti, C, and N surface atoms; this was achieved by searching the transition state with the LST (linear synchronous transit) method of the CASTEP (Cambridge Serial Total Energy Package) module. Also, the authors analyzed electron structures to determine how Ti, C, and N atoms strengthen the Fe(100) surface. The results show that when Ti, C, or N atoms take placeholder alone, or simultaneously at the Fe(100) surface, the structure stability is at its best. When including Ti, C, and N as solid solutions on the Fe(100) surface, orbital electrons of Fe3d, Ti3d, C2p, and N2p hybridize near the Fermi level; the number of electronic bonding peaks increase and bonding capacity enhances. Also, a large amount of covalent bonds formed. Covalent bonds and metallic bond coexisted. (paper)

  13. Modeling local structure using crystal field and spin Hamiltonian parameters: the tetragonal FeK3+-OI2- defect center in KTaO3 crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnutek, P; Rudowicz, C; Yang, Z Y

    2009-01-01

    The local structure and the spin Hamiltonian (SH) parameters, including the zero-field-splitting (ZFS) parameters D and (a+2F/3), and the Zeeman g factors g || and g perpendicular , are theoretically investigated for the Fe K 3+ -O I 2- center in KTaO 3 crystal. The microscopic SH (MSH) parameters are modeled within the framework of the crystal field (CF) theory employing the CF analysis (CFA) package, which also incorporates the MSH modules. Our approach takes into account the spin-orbit interaction as well as the spin-spin and spin-other-orbit interactions omitted in previous studies. The superposition model (SPM) calculations are carried out to provide input CF parameters for the CFA/MSH package. The combined SPM-CFA/MSH approach is used to consider various structural models for the Fe K 3+ -O I 2- defect center in KTaO 3 . This modeling reveals that the off-center displacement of the Fe 3+ ions, Δ 1 (Fe 3+ ), combined with an inward relaxation of the nearest oxygen ligands, Δ 2 (O 2- ), and the existence of the interstitial oxygen O I 2- give rise to a strong tetragonal crystal field. This finding may explain the large ZFS experimentally observed for the Fe K 3+ -O I 2- center in KTaO 3 . Matching the theoretical MSH predictions with the available structural data as well as electron magnetic resonance (EMR) and optical spectroscopy data enables predicting reasonable ranges of values of Δ 1 (Fe 3+ ) and Δ 2 (O 2- ) as well as the possible location of O I 2- ligands around Fe 3+ ions in KTaO 3 . The defect structure model obtained using the SPM-CFA/MSH approach reproduces very well the ranges of the experimental SH parameters D, g || and g perpendicular and importantly yields not only the correct magnitude of D but also the sign, unlike previous studies. More reliable predictions may be achieved when experimental data on (a+2F/3) and/or crystal field energy levels become available. Comparison of our results with those arising from alternative models existing

  14. Macroscopic description of complex adaptive networks coevolving with dynamic node states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedermann, Marc; Donges, Jonathan F.; Heitzig, Jobst; Lucht, Wolfgang; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    In many real-world complex systems, the time evolution of the network's structure and the dynamic state of its nodes are closely entangled. Here we study opinion formation and imitation on an adaptive complex network which is dependent on the individual dynamic state of each node and vice versa to model the coevolution of renewable resources with the dynamics of harvesting agents on a social network. The adaptive voter model is coupled to a set of identical logistic growth models and we mainly find that, in such systems, the rate of interactions between nodes as well as the adaptive rewiring probability are crucial parameters for controlling the sustainability of the system's equilibrium state. We derive a macroscopic description of the system in terms of ordinary differential equations which provides a general framework to model and quantify the influence of single node dynamics on the macroscopic state of the network. The thus obtained framework is applicable to many fields of study, such as epidemic spreading, opinion formation, or socioecological modeling.

  15. Model Identification and FE Simulations: Effect of Different Yield Loci and Hardening Laws in Sheet Forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, P.; Duchêne, L.; Lelotte, T.; Bouffioux, C.; El Houdaigui, F.; Van Bael, A.; He, S.; Duflou, J.; Habraken, A. M.

    2005-08-01

    The bi-axial experimental equipment developed by Flores enables to perform Baushinger shear tests and successive or simultaneous simple shear tests and plane-strain tests. Such experiments and classical tensile tests investigate the material behavior in order to identify the yield locus and the hardening models. With tests performed on two steel grades, the methods applied to identify classical yield surfaces such as Hill or Hosford ones as well as isotropic Swift type hardening or kinematic Armstrong-Frederick hardening models are explained. Comparison with the Taylor-Bishop-Hill yield locus is also provided. The effect of both yield locus and hardening model choice will be presented for two applications: Single Point Incremental Forming (SPIF) and a cup deep drawing.

  16. Model Identification and FE Simulations: Effect of Different Yield Loci and Hardening Laws in Sheet Forming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, P.; Lelotte, T.; Bouffioux, C.; El Houdaigui, F.; Habraken, A.M.; Duchene, L.; Bael, A. van; He, S.; Duflou, J.

    2005-01-01

    The bi-axial experimental equipment developed by Flores enables to perform Baushinger shear tests and successive or simultaneous simple shear tests and plane-strain tests. Such experiments and classical tensile tests investigate the material behavior in order to identify the yield locus and the hardening models. With tests performed on two steel grades, the methods applied to identify classical yield surfaces such as Hill or Hosford ones as well as isotropic Swift type hardening or kinematic Armstrong-Frederick hardening models are explained. Comparison with the Taylor-Bishop-Hill yield locus is also provided. The effect of both yield locus and hardening model choice will be presented for two applications: Single Point Incremental Forming (SPIF) and a cup deep drawing

  17. Micromechanical study of macroscopic friction and dissipation in idealised granular materials: the effect of interparticle friction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, Nicolaas P.; Gutkowski, Witold; Rothenburg, L.; Kowalewski, Tomasz A.

    2004-01-01

    Using Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulations with varying interparticle friction coefficient, the relation between interparticle friction coefficient and macroscopic continuum friction and dissipation is investigated. As expected, macroscopic friction and dilatancy increase with interparticle

  18. Solvable Quantum Macroscopic Motions and Decoherence Mechanisms in Quantum Mechanics on Nonstandard Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tsunehiro

    1996-01-01

    Quantum macroscopic motions are investigated in the scheme consisting of N-number of harmonic oscillators in terms of ultra-power representations of nonstandard analysis. Decoherence is derived from the large internal degrees of freedom of macroscopic matters.

  19. On monogamy of non-locality and macroscopic averages: examples and preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Soares Barbosa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We explore a connection between monogamy of non-locality and a weak macroscopic locality condition: the locality of the average behaviour. These are revealed by our analysis as being two sides of the same coin. Moreover, we exhibit a structural reason for both in the case of Bell-type multipartite scenarios, shedding light on but also generalising the results in the literature [Ramanathan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 060405 (2001; Pawlowski & Brukner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 030403 (2009]. More specifically, we show that, provided the number of particles in each site is large enough compared to the number of allowed measurement settings, and whatever the microscopic state of the system, the macroscopic average behaviour is local realistic, or equivalently, general multipartite monogamy relations hold. This result relies on a classical mathematical theorem by Vorob'ev [Theory Probab. Appl. 7(2, 147-163 (1962] about extending compatible families of probability distributions defined on the faces of a simplicial complex – in the language of the sheaf-theoretic framework of Abramsky & Brandenburger [New J. Phys. 13, 113036 (2011], such families correspond to no-signalling empirical models, and the existence of an extension corresponds to locality or non-contextuality. Since Vorob'ev's theorem depends solely on the structure of the simplicial complex, which encodes the compatibility of the measurements, and not on the specific probability distributions (i.e. the empirical models, our result about monogamy relations and locality of macroscopic averages holds not just for quantum theory, but for any empirical model satisfying the no-signalling condition. In this extended abstract, we illustrate our approach by working out a couple of examples, which convey the intuition behind our analysis while keeping the discussion at an elementary level.

  20. Biogeochemical speciation of Fe in ocean water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2006-01-01

    The biogeochemical speciation of Fe in seawater has been evaluated using the consistent Non-Ideal Competitive Adsorption model (NICA¿Donnan model). Two types of data sets were used, i.e. Fe-hydroxide solubility data and competitive ligand equilibration/cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE/CSV) Fe

  1. Experimental study and thermodynamic modelling of the B-Fe-Mn ternary system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Repovský, P.; Homolová, V.; Čiripová, L.; Kroupa, Aleš; Zemanová, Adéla

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 55, DEC (2016), s. 252-259 ISSN 0364-5916 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-15576S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : thermodynamic modelling * phase diagram * borides Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamic s Impact factor: 1.600, year: 2016

  2. Modelling phosphorus (P), sulfur (S) and iron (Fe) interactions for dynamic simulations of anaerobic digestion processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flores Alsina, Xavier; Solon, Kimberly; Kazadi Mbamba, Christian

    2016-01-01

    (SSO4) reduction by XSRB and storage of XPHA by XPAO; and, (2) decrease of acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis due to ZH2S inhibition. Model A3 shows the potential for iron to remove free SIS (and consequently inhibition) and instead promote iron sulfide (XFeS) precipitation. It also...

  3. A Novel Hysteresis Model of Magnetic Field Strength Determined by Magnetic Induction Intensity for Fe-3% Si Electrical Steel Applied in Cigarette Making Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hysteresis characteristics of grain-oriented electrical steel were studied through the hysteresis loop. Existing hysteresis fitting simulation methods were summarized, and new Fe-3% Si grain-oriented electrical steel hysteresis loop model was proposed. Undetermined coefficients of the magnetic field intensity and magnetic flux density were determined by both the fixed angle method and the least squares method, and the hysteresis loop model was validated with high fitting degree by experimental data.

  4. Macroscopic effects in electromagnetically-induced transparency in a Doppler-broadened system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei Li-Ya; Qu Yi-Zhi; Niu Jin-Yan; Wang Ru-Quan; Wu Ling-An; Fu Pan-Ming; Zuo Zhan-Chun

    2015-01-01

    We study the electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT) in a Doppler-broadened cascaded three-level system. We decompose the susceptibility responsible for the EIT resonance into a linear and a nonlinear part, and the EIT resonance reflects mainly the characteristics of the nonlinear susceptibility. It is found that the macroscopic polarization interference effect plays a crucial role in determining the EIT resonance spectrum. To obtain a Doppler-free spectrum there must be polarization interference between atoms of different velocities. A dressed-state model, which analyzes the velocities at which the atoms are in resonance with the dressed states through Doppler frequency shifting, is employed to explain the results. (paper)

  5. Ballistic and diffusive dynamics in a two-dimensional ideal gas of macroscopic chaotic Faraday waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Kyle J; Hastings-Hauss, Isaac; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer; Corwin, Eric I

    2014-04-01

    We have constructed a macroscopic driven system of chaotic Faraday waves whose statistical mechanics, we find, are surprisingly simple, mimicking those of a thermal gas. We use real-time tracking of a single floating probe, energy equipartition, and the Stokes-Einstein relation to define and measure a pseudotemperature and diffusion constant and then self-consistently determine a coefficient of viscous friction for a test particle in this pseudothermal gas. Because of its simplicity, this system can serve as a model for direct experimental investigation of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics, much as the ideal gas epitomizes equilibrium statistical mechanics.

  6. Quantum laws of the microworld and the wealth of macroscopic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noga, M.

    2000-01-01

    The reasons are highlighted why classical physics was unable to explain the formation of any collective self-organized arrangement such as magnetism and how the wealth of macroscopic self-organized structures emerges spontaneously from quantum theory applied to the given physical system. This is demonstrated on the simplest multi-electron system, viz. the model of a metal as electron gas with Coulomb interaction with a background of homogeneously distributed positive charge possessing a constant density so as to ensure charge neutrality of the system

  7. Application of FE software Elmer to the modeling of crustal-scale processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maierová, Petra; Guy, Alexandra; Lexa, Ondrej; Cadek, Ondrej

    2010-05-01

    We extended Elmer (the open source finite element software for multiphysical problems, http://www.csc.fi/english/pages/elmer) by user-written procedures for the two-dimensional modeling of crustal-scale processes. The standard version of Elmer is an appropriate tool for modeling of thermomechanical convection with non-linear viscous rheology. In geophysics, it might be suitable for some type of mantle convection modeling. Unlike the mantle, the crust is very heterogeneous. It consists of materials with distinct rheological properties that are subject to highly varied conditions: low pressure and temperature near the surface of the Earth and relatively high pressure and temperature at a depth of several tens of kilometers. Moreover, the deformation in the upper crust is mostly brittle and the strain is concentrated into narrow shear zones and thrusts. In order to simulate the brittle behavior of the crust, we implemented pressure-dependent visco-plastic rheology. The material heterogeneity and chemical convection is implemented in terms of active markers. Another special feature of the crust, the moving free surface, is already included in Elmer by means of a moving computational grid. Erosion can easily be added in this scheme. We tested the properties of our formulation of plastic flow on several numerical experiments simulating the deformation of material under compressional and extensional stresses. In the first step, we examined angles of shear zones that form in a plastically deforming material for different material parameters and grid resolutions. A more complex setting of "sandbox-type" experiments containing heterogeneous material, strain-softening and boundary friction was considered as a next testing case. To illustrate the abilities of the extended Elmer software in crustal deformation studies, we present two models of geological processes: diapirism of the lower crust and a channel flow forced by indentation. Both these processes are assumed to take

  8. {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy used to develop understanding of a diamond preservation index model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yambissa, M. T.; Forder, S. D.; Bingham, P. A., E-mail: p.a.bingham@shu.ac.uk [Sheffield Hallam University, Materials and Engineering Research Institute Faculty of Arts, Computing, Engineering and Sciences (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-15

    {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy has provided precise and accurate iron redox ratios Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} in ilmenite, FeTiO{sub 3}, found within kimberlite samples from the Catoca and Camatxia kimberlite pipes from N.E. Angola. Ilmenite is one of the key indicator minerals for diamond survival and it is also one of the iron-bearing minerals with iron naturally occurring in one or both of the oxidation states Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+}. For this reason it is a good indicator for studying oxygen fugacities (fO{sub 2}) in mineral samples, which can then be related to iron redox ratios, Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+}. In this paper we demonstrate that the oxidation state of the ilmenite mineral inclusion from sampled kimberlite rock is a key indicator of the oxidation state of the host kimberlite assemblage, which in turn determines the genesis of diamond, grade variation and diamond quality. Ilmenite samples from the two different diamondiferous kimberlite localities (Catoca and Camatxia) in the Lucapa graben, N.E. Angola, were studied using Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-Ray Diffractometry, in order to infer the oxidation state of their source regions in the mantle, oxygen partial pressure and diamond preservation conditions. The iron redox ratios, obtained using Mössbauer spectroscopy, show that the Catoca diamond kimberlite is more oxidised than kimberlite found in the Camatxia pipe, which is associated within the same geological tectonic structure. Here we demonstrate that{sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy can assist geologists and mining engineers to effectively evaluate and determine whether kimberlite deposits are economically feasible for diamond mining.

  9. Microcracking and macroscopic failure in intermetallic titanium aluminides; Mikrorissbildung und makroskopisches Versagen in intermetallischen Titanaluminiden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesand-Valk, B. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofforschung

    2000-07-01

    This paper deals with the correlations between microstructural disorder, that means statistical distribution of phases and local material properties, and macroscopic failure of disordered multiphase materials. On a microscopic level the microstructural disorder leads to randomly distributed local damage before failure (in brittle materials to microcracks) and eventually to localisation of damage. On a macroscopic level the value and scatter of fracture strength and its dependence on specimen size are essentially determined by the microstructural disorder. The failure behaviour is treated by using the discrete chain-of-bundles-model, which treats the details of the microstructure not explicitly but as locally distributed fluctuations of characteristical material parameters. The model has been verified by comparing with experimental results for four intermetallic titanium aluminides and its validity has been demonstrated. (orig.) [German] Die Arbeit behandelt die Zusammenhaenge zwischen der Stochastizitaet des Gefueges, das heisst, einer statistischen Verteilung von Phasen und lokalen Materialeigenschaften und dem makroskopischen Versagen von ungeordneten mehrphasigen Werkstoffen. Auf mikroskopischer Ebene fuehrt die Stochastizitaet des Gefueges vor dem Versagen zu lokalen Schaedigungen (in sproeden Werkstoffen zu Mikrorissen) und schliesslich (abhaengig vom Grad der Unordnung) zur Lokalisierung des Bruchgeschehens. Makroskopisch werden die Groesse und Streuung von Bruchfestigkeitswerten und ihre Probengroessenabhaengigkeit durch die mikrostrukturelle Unordnung wesentlich bestimmt. Dieses Versagensverhalten wird in dem diskreten Chain-of-Bundles-Modell beschrieben, das die Details der Mikrostruktur nicht explizit sondern als lokale statistische Schwankungen von charakteristischen Werkstoffparametern erfasst. Am Beispiel von vier ausgewaehlten Titan-Aluminiden wird das Modell validiert und verifiziert. (orig.)

  10. Fine element (F.E.) modelling of hydrogen migration and blister formation in PHWR coolant channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, P.S.; Dutta, B.K.; Sinha, R.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Mahajan, S.C.; Kakodkar, A.

    1995-01-01

    The formation of a cold spot in pressure tube due to its contact with calandria tube of PHWR coolant results in the migration of Hydrogen in pressure tube towards contact zone from its surrounding material. A 3-D finite element code SPARSH is developed to model the hydrogen redistribution and consequent hydride blister formation due to thermal and Hydrogen concentration gradients. In the present paper, the details and performance of this code are presented. (author). 6 refs., 2 figs

  11. Statistical model and first-principles simulation on concentration of HenV cluster and He bubble formation in α-Fe and W

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yue-Lin; Yu, Yang; Dai, Zhen-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the stabilities of He and He n -vacancy (He n V) clusters in α-Fe and W. Vacancy formation energies are 2.08 eV in α-Fe and 3.11 eV in W, respectively. Single He in both α-Fe and W prefers to occupy the tetrahedral interstitial site. We recalculated the He solution energy considering the effect of zero-point energy (ZPE). The ZPEs of He in α-Fe and W at the tetrahedral (octahedral) interstitial site are 0.072 eV (0.031 eV) and 0.078 eV (0.034 eV), respectively. The trapping energies of single He at vacancy in α-Fe and W are −2.39 eV and −4.55 eV, respectively. By sequentially adding He into vacancy, a monovacancy trap up to 10 He atoms distributing in the vacancy vicinity. Based on the above results combined with statistical model, we evaluate the concentrations of all relevant He n V clusters as a function of He chemical potential. The critical He n V concentration is found to be ∼10 −40 (atomic) at the critical temperature T = 600 K in α-Fe and T = 1600 K in W, respectively. Beyond the critical He n V concentrations, considerable He n V aggregate to form He n V m clusters. By further growing of He n V m , the He n V m clusters grow bigger resulting in the larger He bubble formation

  12. Statistical model and first-principles simulation on concentration of HenV cluster and He bubble formation in α-Fe and W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yue-Lin; Yu, Yang; Dai, Zhen-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the stabilities of He and Hen-vacancy (HenV) clusters in α-Fe and W. Vacancy formation energies are 2.08 eV in α-Fe and 3.11 eV in W, respectively. Single He in both α-Fe and W prefers to occupy the tetrahedral interstitial site. We recalculated the He solution energy considering the effect of zero-point energy (ZPE). The ZPEs of He in α-Fe and W at the tetrahedral (octahedral) interstitial site are 0.072 eV (0.031 eV) and 0.078 eV (0.034 eV), respectively. The trapping energies of single He at vacancy in α-Fe and W are -2.39 eV and -4.55 eV, respectively. By sequentially adding He into vacancy, a monovacancy trap up to 10 He atoms distributing in the vacancy vicinity. Based on the above results combined with statistical model, we evaluate the concentrations of all relevant HenV clusters as a function of He chemical potential. The critical HenV concentration is found to be ∼10-40 (atomic) at the critical temperature T = 600 K in α-Fe and T = 1600 K in W, respectively. Beyond the critical HenV concentrations, considerable HenV aggregate to form HenVm clusters. By further growing of HenVm, the HenVm clusters grow bigger resulting in the larger He bubble formation.

  13. Statistical model and first-principles simulation on concentration of He{sub n}V cluster and He bubble formation in α-Fe and W

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yue-Lin, E-mail: liuyuelin@ss.buaa.edu.cn; Yu, Yang; Dai, Zhen-Hong

    2015-01-15

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the stabilities of He and He{sub n}-vacancy (He{sub n}V) clusters in α-Fe and W. Vacancy formation energies are 2.08 eV in α-Fe and 3.11 eV in W, respectively. Single He in both α-Fe and W prefers to occupy the tetrahedral interstitial site. We recalculated the He solution energy considering the effect of zero-point energy (ZPE). The ZPEs of He in α-Fe and W at the tetrahedral (octahedral) interstitial site are 0.072 eV (0.031 eV) and 0.078 eV (0.034 eV), respectively. The trapping energies of single He at vacancy in α-Fe and W are −2.39 eV and −4.55 eV, respectively. By sequentially adding He into vacancy, a monovacancy trap up to 10 He atoms distributing in the vacancy vicinity. Based on the above results combined with statistical model, we evaluate the concentrations of all relevant He{sub n}V clusters as a function of He chemical potential. The critical He{sub n}V concentration is found to be ∼10{sup −40} (atomic) at the critical temperature T = 600 K in α-Fe and T = 1600 K in W, respectively. Beyond the critical He{sub n}V concentrations, considerable He{sub n}V aggregate to form He{sub n}V{sub m} clusters. By further growing of He{sub n}V{sub m}, the He{sub n}V{sub m} clusters grow bigger resulting in the larger He bubble formation.

  14. High performance liquid chromatography of substituted aromatics with the metal-organic framework MIL-100(Fe): Mechanism analysis and model-based prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Weiwei; Silvestre, Martin Eduardo; Li, Yongli; Franzreb, Matthias

    2016-02-05

    Metal-organic framework (MOF) MIL-100(Fe) with well-defined thickness was homogenously coated onto the outer surface of magnetic microparticles via a liquid-phase epitaxy method. The as-synthesized MIL-100(Fe) was used as stationary phase for high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and separations of two groups of mixed aromatic hydrocarbons (toluene, styrene and p-xylene; acetanilide, 2-nirtoaniline and 1-naphthylamine) using methanol/water as mobile phase were performed to evaluate its performance. Increasing water content of the mobile phase composition can greatly improve the separations on the expense of a longer elution time. Stepwise elution significantly shortens the elution time of acetanilide, 2-nirtoaniline and 1-naphthylamine mixtures, while still achieving a baseline separation. Combining the experimental results and in-depth modeling using a recently developed chromatographic software (ChromX), adsorption equilibrium parameters, including the affinities and maximum capacities, for each analyte toward the MIL-100(Fe) are obtained. In addition, the pore diffusivity of aromatic hydrocarbons within MIL-100(Fe) was determined to be 5×10(-12)m(2)s(-1). While the affinities of MIL-100(Fe) toward the analyte molecules differs much, the maximum capacities of the analytes are in a narrow range with q*MOFmax,toluene=3.55molL(-1), q*MOFmax,styrene or p-xylene=3.53molL(-1), and q*MOFmax,anilines=3.12molL(-1) corresponding to approximately 842 toluene and 838 styrene or p-xylene, and 740 aniline molecules per MIL-100(Fe) unit cell, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. In regard to the question of macroscopic differential diagnosis of alcoholic and dilated cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Sokolova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The differential diagnosis of alcoholic and dilated cardiomyopathy according to the macroscopic data is represented in the article. The identity of macroscopic changes of heart, related to alcoholic and dilated cardiomyopathy, cannot diagnose these diseases based on the macroscopic characteristics; especially if there are no other visceral manifestations typical for chronic alcoholism.

  16. Modelling the active site of NiFe hydrogenases: new catalysts for the electro-production of H2 and mechanistic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canaguier, S.

    2009-01-01

    NiFe hydrogenases are unique metalloenzymes that catalyze H + /H 2 interconversion with remarkable efficiency close to the thermodynamic potential. Their active site consists of a hetero-bimetallic complex containing a nickel ion in a sulphur-rich environment connected by two thiolate bridges to an organometallic cyano-carbonyl iron moiety. In order to improve the understanding of the enzymatic mechanism and to obtain new base-metal electrocatalysts for H 2 production, we synthesized a series of bio-inspired low molecular weight model complexes with the butterfly structure Ni(μ-S 2 )M (M= Ru, Mn and Fe). All these compounds displayed a catalytic activity of hydrogen production. Modulating the electronic and steric properties of the ruthenium center allowed optimizing the catalytic performances of these compounds in terms of stability, catalytic rate and overpotential. Mechanistic studies of the catalytic cycle of the Ni-Ru complexes have also been carried out. They allowed us to suggest a bio-relevant bridging hydride as the catalytic intermediate. Finally, we synthesized one of the first Ni-Fe complexes that is both a structural and a functional model of NiFe hydrogenase. (author) [fr

  17. 3D implicit modeling of the Sishen Mine: new resolution of the geometry and origin of Fe mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoch, B.; Anthonissen, C. J.; McCall, M.-J.; Basson, I. J.; Deacon, J.; Cloete, E.; Botha, J.; Britz, J.; Strydom, M.; Nel, D.; Bester, M.

    2017-12-01

    The Sishen deposit is one of the largest iron ore concentrations in current production. Hematite mineralization occurs along a strike length of 14 km, with a width of 3.2 km and a maximum vertical extent of 400 m below the original surface. The 986-Mt reserve incorporates a suite of individual orebodies, beneath a locally preserved tectonized unconformity, with a wide range of geometries, depths, and orientations. Fully constrained, implicit 3D modeling of the entire mining volume (> 70 km3), was undertaken to the original, pre-mining topography. The model incorporates 5287 mapping points and > 21,000 drillholes and provides exceptional insight into the original configuration of ore and its relationship to contacts, unconformities, and structures in the enclosing country rock. The bulk of ore occurs to the west of a strike-extensive, partially inverted normal fault (Sloep Fault), within an asymmetrical synclinal structure on its western flank. This linear, N-S distribution of deep, thick ore is punctuated by palaeosinkholes, wherein base-of-ore dips of greater than 45°, are concentrically arranged. Localized ore volumes also occur along faults and in fault-bounded, downthrown blocks, to the north of NW-SE- and NE-SW-trending strike-slip faults that show relatively minor uplift to the south, probably due to the Lomanian Namaqua-Natal Orogeny. The revised model demonstrates the proximity of ore to a tectonized unconformity and highlights the structural control on ore volumes, implying that Fe mineralization at Sishen cannot be exclusively attributed to supergene enrichment and concentric palaeosinkhole formation.

  18. Post-cracking tensile behaviour of steel-fibre-reinforced roller-compacted-concrete for FE modelling and design purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafarifar, N.; Pilakoutas, K.; Angelakopoulos, H.; Bennett, T.

    2017-01-01

    Fracture of steel-fibre-reinforced-concrete occurs mostly in the form of a smeared crack band undergoing progressive microcracking. For FE modelling and design purposes, this crack band could be characterised by a stress-strain (σ-ε) relationship. For industrially-produced steel fibres, existing methodologies such as RILEM TC 162-TDF (2003) propose empirical equations to predict a trilinear σ-ε relationship directly from bending test results. This paper evaluates the accuracy of these methodologies and their applicability for roller-compacted-concrete and concrete incorporating steel fibres recycled from post-consumer tyres. It is shown that the energy absorption capacity is generally overestimated by these methodologies, sometimes up to 60%, for both conventional and roller-compacted concrete. Tensile behaviour of fibre-reinforced-concrete is estimated in this paper by inverse analysis of bending test results, examining a variety of concrete mixes and steel fibres. A multilinear relationship is proposed which largely eliminates the overestimation problem and can lead to safer designs. [es

  19. Fatigue crack initiation in nickel-based superalloys studied by microstructure-based FE modeling and scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fried M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work stage I crack initiation in polycrystalline nickel-based superalloys is investigated by analyzing anisotropic mechanical properties, local stress concentrations and plastic deformation on the microstructural length scale. The grain structure in the gauge section of fatigue specimens was characterized by EBSD. Based on the measured data, a microstructure-based FE model could be established to simulate the strain and stress distribution in the specimens during the first loading cycle of a fatigue test. The results were in fairly good agreement with experimentally measured local strains. Furthermore, the onset of plastic deformation was predicted by identifying shear stress maxima in the microstructure, presumably leading to activation of slip systems. Measurement of plastic deformation and observation of slip traces in the respective regions of the microstructure confirmed the predicted slip activity. The close relation between micro-plasticity, formation of slip traces and stage I crack initiation was demonstrated by SEM surface analyses of fatigued specimens and an in-situ fatigue test in a large chamber SEM.

  20. FE Modelling of the Seismic Behavior of Wide Beam-Column Joints Strengthened with CFRP Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Santarsiero

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A large share of reinforced concrete (RC framed buildings is provided with wide beams being a type of beam allowing greater freedom in the architectural arrangement of interiors, beyond further advantage due to fewer formworks needed during the construction. Nevertheless, little attention has been devoted to the seismic vulnerability of this kind of framed RC buildings as well as to the study of strengthening systems purposely developed for wide beams and wide beam-column connections. Under these premises, this paper proposes simple strengthening solutions made by Fibre Reinforced Polymers (FRP systems able to effectively improve seismic capacity through feasible arrangement suitable in case a wide beam is present. On the basis of wide beam-column joints previously tested without strengthening system, detailed nonlinear finite element models were calibrated. Then, an FRP strengthening intervention based on a brand new arrangement was modeled in order to perform additional simulations under seismic actions. This way, the effectiveness of the strengthening intervention was assessed finding out that significant strength and ductility increments were achieved with a relatively simple and cheap strengthening arrangement. Additional research would be desirable in the form of experimental tests on the simulated wide beam-column joints.

  1. Alternative solution model for the ternary carbonate system CaCO3 - MgCO3 - FeCO3 - I. A ternary Bragg-Williams ordering model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSwiggen, P.L.

    1993-01-01

    The minerals of the ternary carbonate system CaCO3 - MgCO3 - FeCO3 represent a complex series of solid solutions and ordering states. An understanding of those complexities requires a solution model that can both duplicate the subsolidus phase relationships and generate correct values for the activities. Such a solution model must account for the changes in the total energy of the system resulting from a change in the ordering state of the individual constituents. Various ordering models have been applied to binary carbonate systems, but no attempts have previously been made to model the ordering in the ternary system. This study derives a new set of equations that allow for the equilibrium degree of order to be calculated for a system involving three cations mixing on two sites, as in the case of the ternary carbonates. The method is based on the Bragg-Williams approach. From the degree of order, the mole fractions of the three cations in each of the two sites can be determined. Once the site occupancies have been established, a Margules-type mixing model can be used to determine the free energy of mixing in the solid solution and therefore the activities of the various components. ?? 1993 Springer-Verlag.

  2. Analysis of lithium deinsertion/insertion in Li{sub y}FePO{sub 4} with a simple mathematical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delacourt, C., E-mail: charles.delacourt@u-picardie.fr [Laboratoire de Reactivite et de Chimie des Solides, CNRS UMR 6007, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne (France); Safari, M. [Laboratoire de Reactivite et de Chimie des Solides, CNRS UMR 6007, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne (France)

    2011-05-30

    Highlights: > An analysis of the onsets of charge/discharge curves of Li{sub y}FePO{sub 4} is performed by means of a mathematical model. > It reveals a dependence of the apparent 'particle radius' on the current density. > The mosaic model, introduced some years ago for lithium insertion/deinsertion in Li{sub y}FePO{sub 4}, is invoked to account for this unusual dependence. - Abstract: The onset of experimental galvanostatic charge/discharge data of Li{sub y}FePO{sub 4} at low current density and at room temperature is analyzed using a single-particle mathematical model. The model contains only two adjustable parameters, namely one related to solid-state diffusion in the active particle and another one related to the surface resistance of the particle. The analysis reveals that these two parameters depend on the current density in a similar manner, meaning that there exists a correlation between them. An immediate consequence is that the onset of the experimental charge/discharge curves is properly modeled with the particle radius as a unique parameter depending on the current density. Hypotheses are made to shed light on this unusual dependence.

  3. Analysis of crashes using FE vehicle models. Relations between vehicle types and crash characteristics; Yugen yoso model wo mochiita sharyo no shototsu kaiseki. Sharyo type to shototsu tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takatori, O. [Japan Automobile Research Institute Inc., Tsukuba (Japan)

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the crash characteristics of vehicles under the condition of real-world accidents. This paper pays attention to the differences in the crash characteristics of a vehicle colliding with a vehicle which is a different type. Vehicles on the market can be divided broadly into two vehicle structures, monocoque structure and frame structure. Monocoque structure is mainly used for passenger vehicles and frame structure is for recreational vehicles (RV). In recent years, RV has been a large seller on the market. So accidents between passenger vehicles and a RVs occur frequently. The analysis of experimental data and computer simulation, which is predicated on the experimental data, was carried out for this study. In the analysis of experimental data, barrier force data from the New Car Assessment Program (NCAP) were analyzed. The FE passenger vehicle model which is based on systematic validation tests was used for the computer simulation of car-to-car collisions. (author)

  4. Detailed Simulation of Complex Hydraulic Problems with Macroscopic and Mesoscopic Mathematical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Biscarini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The numerical simulation of fast-moving fronts originating from dam or levee breaches is a challenging task for small scale engineering projects. In this work, the use of fully three-dimensional Navier-Stokes (NS equations and lattice Boltzmann method (LBM is proposed for testing the validity of, respectively, macroscopic and mesoscopic mathematical models. Macroscopic simulations are performed employing an open-source computational fluid dynamics (CFD code that solves the NS combined with the volume of fluid (VOF multiphase method to represent free-surface flows. The mesoscopic model is a front-tracking experimental variant of the LBM. In the proposed LBM the air-gas interface is represented as a surface with zero thickness that handles the passage of the density field from the light to the dense phase and vice versa. A single set of LBM equations represents the liquid phase, while the free surface is characterized by an additional variable, the liquid volume fraction. Case studies show advantages and disadvantages of the proposed LBM and NS with specific regard to the computational efficiency and accuracy in dealing with the simulation of flows through complex geometries. In particular, the validation of the model application is developed by simulating the flow propagating through a synthetic urban setting and comparing results with analytical and experimental laboratory measurements.

  5. Macroscopic electrical field distribution and field-induced surface stresses of needle-shaped field emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moy, Charles K.S., E-mail: charles.moy@sydney.edu.au [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Ranzi, Gianluca [ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Petersen, Timothy C. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Ringer, Simon P. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2011-05-15

    One major concern since the development of the field ion microscope is the mechanical strength of the specimens. The macroscopic shape of the imaging tip greatly influences field-induced stresses and there is merit in further study of this phenomenon from a classical perspective. Understanding the geometrical, as opposed to localized electronic, factors that affect the stress might improve the quality and success rate of atom probe experiments. This study uses macroscopic electrostatic principles and finite element modelling to investigate field-induced stresses in relation to the shape of the tip. Three two-dimensional idealized models are considered, namely hyperbolic, parabolic and sphere-on-orthogonal-cone; the shapes of which are compared to experimental tips prepared by electro-polishing. Three dimensional morphologies of both a nano-porous and single-crystal aluminium tip are measured using electron tomography to quantitatively test the assumption of cylindrical symmetry for electro-polished tips. The porous tip was prepared and studied to demonstrate a fragile specimen for which such finite element studies could determine potential mechanical failure, prior to any exhaustive atom probe investigation. -- Research highlights: {yields} We use electrostatic principles and finite element to model field-induced stresses. {yields} We study two-dimensional idealized needle-shaped field emitters. {yields} Stress distribution of hyperbolic, parabolic and sphere-on-orthogonal-cone tips mapped. {yields} Electron tomography to obtain the morphology of three-dimensional aluminium tips. {yields} Studies of the morphology of the porous tip demonstrate a fragile specimen.

  6. Spiral CT scanning plan to generate accurate Fe models of the human femur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zannoni, C.; Testi, D.; Capello, A.

    1999-01-01

    In spiral computed tomography (CT), source rotation, patient translation, and data acquisition are continuously conducted. Settings of the detector collimation and the table increment affect the image quality in terms of spatial and contrast resolution. This study assessed and measured the efficacy of spiral CT in those applications where the accurate reconstruction of bone morphology is critical: custom made prosthesis design or three dimensional modelling of the mechanical behaviour of long bones. Results show that conventional CT grants the highest accuracy. Spiral CT with D=5 mm and P=1,5 in the regions where the morphology is more regular, slightly degrades the image quality but allows to acquire at comparable cost an higher number of images increasing the longitudinal resolution of the acquired data set. (author)

  7. Multiscale modeling of radiation damage in Fe-based alloys in the fusion environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth, B.D.; Odette, G.R.; Marian, J.; Ventelon, L.; Young-Vandersall, J.A.; Zepeda-Ruiz, L.A.

    2004-01-01

    Ferritic alloys represent a technologically important class of candidate materials for fusion first wall and blanket structures. A detailed understanding of the mechanisms of defect accumulation and microstructure evolution, and the corresponding effects on mechanical properties is required to predict their in-service structural performance limits. The physical processes involved in radiation damage, and its effects on mechanical properties, are inherently multiscale and hierarchical, spanning length and time scales from the atomic nucleus to meters and picosecond to decades. In this paper, we present a multiscale modeling methodology to describe radiation effects within the fusion energy environment. Selected results from atomic scale investigation are presented, focusing on (i) the mechanisms of self-interstitial dislocation loop formation with Burgers vector of a in iron relative to vanadium, (ii) helium transport and (iii) the interaction between helium and small self-interstitial clusters in iron, and (iv) dislocation-helium bubble interactions in fcc aluminum

  8. Multiscale Modeling of the Active Site of [Fe] Hydrogenase: The H2 Binding Site in Open and Closed Protein Conformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegård, Erik D.; Kongsted, Jacob; Ryde, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    A series of QM/MM optimizations of the full protein of [Fe] hydrogenase were performed. The FeGP cofactor has been optimized in the water-bound resting state (1), with a side-on bound dihydrogen (2), or as a hydride intermediate (3). For inclusion of H4MPT in the closed structure, advanced multis...... that hydride transfer from 3 has a significantly higher barrier than found in previous studies neglecting the full protein environment....

  9. A thermodynamic model for solid solutions and its application to the C-Fe-Co, C-Fe-Ni and Mn-Cr-Pt solid dilutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, D.P.

    2004-01-01

    Based on the free volume theory and the lattice model, the partition functions of pure solids and their mixtures were expressed. This resulted in the establishment of a thermodynamic model for solid solutions. The model naturally combines the excess entropy and excess enthalpy of a solution by means of new expressions of the configurational partition functions of solids and their mixtures derived from statistical thermodynamics, which is approximate to real solid solutions, that is S E ≠0 (V E ≠0) and H E ≠0. It can describe the thermodynamic properties of partially miscible systems and predict the thermodynamic properties in a multicomponent solid solution system using only the related binary infinite dilute activity coefficients. The predicted activity coefficients from the model are in good agreement with the experimental data of the ternary solid dilutions. This shows that the prediction effect of the proposed model is of better stability and reliability because it has a good physical basis

  10. Macroscopic influence on the spontaneous symmetry breaking in quantum field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirzhnitz, D.A.

    1977-01-01

    Major results of investigations concerning macroscopic influence (heating, compression, external field and current) on elementary particle systems with spontaneous symmetry breaking are briefly reviewed. The study of this problem has been stimulated by recent progress in the unified renormalizable theory of elementary particles. Typically it appears that at some values of external parameters a phase transition with symmetry restoration takes place. There exists a profound and far going analogy with phase transition in many-body physics especially with superconductivity phenomenon. Some applications to cosmology are also considered

  11. Macroscopic relationship in primal-dual portfolio optimization problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinzato, Takashi

    2018-02-01

    In the present paper, using a replica analysis, we examine the portfolio optimization problem handled in previous work and discuss the minimization of investment risk under constraints of budget and expected return for the case that the distribution of the hyperparameters of the mean and variance of the return rate of each asset are not limited to a specific probability family. Findings derived using our proposed method are compared with those in previous work to verify the effectiveness of our proposed method. Further, we derive a Pythagorean theorem of the Sharpe ratio and macroscopic relations of opportunity loss. Using numerical experiments, the effectiveness of our proposed method is demonstrated for a specific situation.

  12. Seismic scanning tunneling macroscope - Elastic simulations and Arizona mine test

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2012-01-01

    Elastic seismic simulations and field data tests are used to validate the theory of a seismic scanning tunneling macroscope (SSTM). For nearfield elastic simulation, the SSTM results show superresolution to be better than λ/8 if the only scattered data are used as input data. If the direct P and S waves are muted then the resolution of the scatterer locations are within about λ/5. Seismic data collected in an Arizona tunnel showed a superresolution limit of at least λ/19. These test results are consistent with the theory of the SSTM and suggest that the SSTM can be a tool used by geophysicists as a probe for near-field scatterers.

  13. GRUCAL, a computer program for calculating macroscopic group constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woll, D.

    1975-06-01

    Nuclear reactor calculations require material- and composition-dependent, energy averaged nuclear data to describe the interaction of neutrons with individual isotopes in material compositions of reactor zones. The code GRUCAL calculates these macroscopic group constants for given compositions from the material-dependent data of the group constant library GRUBA. The instructions for calculating group constants are not fixed in the program, but will be read at the actual execution time from a separate instruction file. This allows to accomodate GRUCAL to various problems or different group constant concepts. (orig.) [de

  14. Conductance fluctuations in a macroscopic 3-dimensional Anderson insulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanquer, M.

    1990-01-01

    We report magnetoconductance experiment on a amorphous Y x -Si 1-x alloy (∼0.3). which is an Anderson insulator where spin-orbit scattering is strong. Two principal and new features emerge from the data: the first one is an halving of the localization length by the application of a magnetic field of about 2.5 Teslas. This effect is predicted by a new approach of transport in Anderson insulators where basic symetry considerations are the most important ingredient. The second one is the observation of reproducible conductance fluctuations at very low temperature in this macroscopic 3 D amorphous material

  15. Magnetic reversal processes and critical thickness in FePt/α-Fe/FePt trilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, N.L.; Zhao, G.P.; Zhang, H.W.; Zhou, X.L.; Deng, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic reversal processes of a FePt/α-Fe/FePt trilayer system with in-plane easy axes have been investigated within a micromagnetic approach. It is found that the magnetic reversal process consists of three steps: nucleation of a prototype of domain wall in the soft phase, the evolution as well as the motion of the domain wall from the soft to the hard phase and finally, the magnetic reversal of the hard phase. For small soft layer thickness L s , the three steps are reduced to one single step, where the magnetizations in the two phases reverses simultaneously and the hysteresis loops are square with nucleation as the coercivity mechanism. As L s increases, both nucleation and pinning fields decrease. In the meantime, the single-step reversal expands to a standard three-step one and the coercivity mechanism changes from nucleation to pinning. The critical thickness where the coercivity mechanism alters, could be derived analytically, which is found to be inversely proportional to the square root of the crystalline anisotropy of the hard phase. Such a scaling law might provide an easy way to test the present theory. Further increase of L s leads to the change of the coercivity mechanism from pinning to nucleation. - Highlights: → Analytical critical thickness scales with square root of anisotropy of hard phase. → Reversal process determined nucleation, motion and depinning of domain walls. → Coercivity mechanism is nucleation and pinning for thin and thick soft layers. → Microscopic and macroscopic hysteresis loops calculated.

  16. Dynamic 3D FE modelling of the human temporomandibular joint during whiplash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez del Palomar, A; Doblaré, M

    2008-07-01

    Rear-end impacts account for more than one-third of vehicle accidents, and nearly 40% of these accidents produce whiplash injuries. Whiplash injury to the neck has often been considered a significant risk factor for the development of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The objective of this study was to simulate the dynamic response of the temporomandibular joint during two types of impacts: a rear end and a frontal impact. To understand the dynamic forces acting on the joint, we extended a previous human temporomandibular joint model and analyzed the stress distributions in the soft elements of the joint. In the rear-end impact, it could be appreciated that the inertia of the mandible caused it to move posteriorly slower than the head, and this resulted in downward and forward displacements of the disc-condyle complex relative to the cranial base. Consequently, a rapid and big mouth opening occurs. In contrast, during the frontal impact, the mouth hardly opened, because the superior maxilla pushed the mandible to move together. There was not differential movement between bony components of the joint and therefore the soft tissues of the joint were not subjected to high loads. From these results, and despite the limitations of the simulations performed, we could conclude that neither a rear-end impact at low-velocity nor a frontal impact would produce damage to the soft tissues of the joint.

  17. A parametric FE modeling of brake for non-linear analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed,Ibrahim; Fatouh, Yasser [Automotive and Tractors Technology Department, Faculty of Industrial Education, Helwan University, Cairo (Egypt); Aly, Wael [Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Technology Department, Faculty of Industrial Education, Helwan University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2013-07-01

    A parametric modeling of a drum brake based on 3-D Finite Element Methods (FEM) for non-contact analysis is presented. Many parameters are examined during this study such as the effect of drum-lining interface stiffness, coefficient of friction, and line pressure on the interface contact. Firstly, the modal analysis of the drum brake is also studied to get the natural frequency and instability of the drum to facilitate transforming the modal elements to non-contact elements. It is shown that the Unsymmetric solver of the modal analysis is efficient enough to solve this linear problem after transforming the non-linear behavior of the contact between the drum and the lining to a linear behavior. A SOLID45 which is a linear element is used in the modal analysis and then transferred to non-linear elements which are Targe170 and Conta173 that represent the drum and lining for contact analysis study. The contact analysis problems are highly non-linear and require significant computer resources to solve it, however, the contact problem give two significant difficulties. Firstly, the region of contact is not known based on the boundary conditions such as line pressure, and drum and friction material specs. Secondly, these contact problems need to take the friction into consideration. Finally, it showed a good distribution of the nodal reaction forces on the slotted lining contact surface and existing of the slot in the middle of the lining can help in wear removal due to the friction between the lining and the drum. Accurate contact stiffness can give a good representation for the pressure distribution between the lining and the drum. However, a full contact of the front part of the slotted lining could occur in case of 20, 40, 60 and 80 bar of piston pressure and a partially contact between the drum and lining can occur in the rear part of the slotted lining.

  18. A DFT-Based Model on the Adsorption Behavior of H2O, H+, Cl−, and OH− on Clean and Cr-Doped Fe(110 Planes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Hu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of four typical adsorbates, namely H2O, H+, Cl−, and OH−, on three different planes, namely, Fe(110, Cr(110 and Cr-doped Fe(110, was investigated by using a density functional theory (DFT-based model. It is verified by the adsorption mechanism of the abovementioned four adsorbates that the Cr-doped Fe(110 plane is the most stable facet out of the three. As confirmed by the adsorption energy and electronic structure, Cr doping will greatly enhance the electron donor ability of neighboring Fe atoms, which in turn prompts the adsorption of the positively charged H+. Meanwhile, the affinity of Cr to negatively charged adsorbates (e.g., Cl− and O of H2O, OH− is improved due to the weakening of its electron donor ability. On the other hand, the strong bond between surface atoms and the adsorbates can also weaken the bond between metal atoms, which results in a structure deformation and charge redistribution among the native crystal structure. In this way, the crystal becomes more vulnerable to corrosion.

  19. Can We Advance Macroscopic Quantum Systems Outside the Framework of Complex Decoherence Theory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezinski, Mark E; Rupnick, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Macroscopic quantum systems (MQS) are macroscopic systems driven by quantum rather than classical mechanics, a long studied area with minimal success till recently. Harnessing the benefits of quantum mechanics on a macroscopic level would revolutionize fields ranging from telecommunication to biology, the latter focused on here for reasons discussed. Contrary to misconceptions, there are no known physical laws that prevent the development of MQS. Instead, they are generally believed universally lost in complex systems from environmental entanglements (decoherence). But we argue success is achievable MQS with decoherence compensation developed, naturally or artificially, from top-down rather current reductionist approaches. This paper advances the MQS field by a complex systems approach to decoherence. First, why complex system decoherence approaches (top-down) are needed is discussed. Specifically, complex adaptive systems (CAS) are not amenable to reductionist models (and their master equations) because of emergent behaviour, approximation failures, not accounting for quantum compensatory mechanisms, ignoring path integrals, and the subentity problem. In addition, since MQS must exist within the context of the classical world, where rapid decoherence and prolonged coherence are both needed. Nature has already demonstrated this for quantum subsystems such as photosynthesis and magnetoreception. Second, we perform a preliminary study that illustrates a top-down approach to potential MQS. In summary, reductionist arguments against MQS are not justifiable. It is more likely they are not easily detectable in large intact classical systems or have been destroyed by reductionist experimental set-ups. This complex systems decoherence approach, using top down investigations, is critical to paradigm shifts in MQS research both in biological and non-biological systems. PMID:29200743

  20. Seed coat removal improves Fe bioavailability in cooked lentils: studies using an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell culture model

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study examined the range of Fe concentration and relative Fe bioavailability of 24 varieties of cooked lentils, as well as the impact of seed coat removal on lentil Fe nutritional quality. Relative Fe bioavailability was assessed by the in vitro/Caco-2 cell culture method. While Fe concentrat...