WorldWideScience

Sample records for macrophyte toxicity tests

  1. Haloacetic acids in the aquatic environment. Part I: macrophyte toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Mark L; Solomon, Keith R

    2004-08-01

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are contaminants of aquatic ecosystems with numerous sources, both anthropogenic and natural. The toxicity of HAAs to aquatic plants is generally uncharacterized. Laboratory tests were conducted with three macrophytes (Lemna gibba, Myriophyllum sibiricum and Myriophyllum spicatum) to assess the toxicity of five HAAs. Myriophyllum spp. has been proposed as required test species for pesticide registration in North America, but few studies have been conducted under standard test conditions. The HAAs in the present experiments were monochloroacetic acid (MCA), dichloroacetic acid (DCA), trichloroacetic acid (TCA), trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and chlorodifluoroacetic acid (CDFA). MCA was the most toxic to Myriophyllum spp. with EC50 values ranging from 8 to 12.4 mg/l depending on the endpoint, followed by DCA (EC50 range 62-722.5 mg/l), TCA (EC50 range 49.5-1702.6 mg/l), CDFA (EC50 range 105.3 to >10,000 mg/l) and with TFA (EC50 range 222.1 to 10,000 mg/l) the least toxic. Generally, L. gibba was less sensitive to HAA toxicity than Myriophyllum spp., with the difference in toxicity between them approximately threefold. The range of toxicity within Myriophyllum spp. was normally less than twofold. Statistically, plant length and node number were the most sensitive endpoints as they had the lowest observed coefficients of variation, but they were not the most sensitive to HAA toxicity. Toxicological sensitivity of endpoints varied depending on the measure of effect chosen and the HAA, with morphological endpoints usually an order of magnitude more sensitive than pigments for all plant species. Overall, mass and root measures tended to be the most sensitive indicators of HAA toxicity. The data from this paper were subsequently used in an ecological risk assessment for HAAs and aquatic plants. The assessment found HAAs to be of low risk to aquatic macrophytes and the results are described in the second manuscript of this series.

  2. A microcosm system to evaluate the toxicity of the triazine herbicide simazine on aquatic macrophytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vervliet-Scheebaum, Marco, E-mail: marco.vervliet@biologie.uni-freiburg.d [Plant Biotechnology, Faculty of Biology, University of Freiburg, Schaenzlestr. 1, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Straus, Alain [Plant Biotechnology, Faculty of Biology, University of Freiburg, Schaenzlestr. 1, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Tremp, Horst [Institute for Environmental Sciences, University Koblenz-Landau, Fortstr. 7, 76829 Landau (Germany); Hamer, Mick [Ecological Sciences, Syngenta Crop Protection AG, Jealott' s Hill International Research Centre, Bracknell, Berkshire RG42 6EY (United Kingdom); Maund, Stephen J. [Ecological Sciences, Syngenta Crop Protection AG, 4002 Basel (Switzerland); Wagner, Edgar [Plant Biotechnology, Faculty of Biology, University of Freiburg, Schaenzlestr. 1, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Schulz, Ralf [Institute for Environmental Sciences, University Koblenz-Landau, Fortstr. 7, 76829 Landau (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    This study evaluates the effects of the triazine herbicide simazine in an outdoor pond microcosm test system that contained two submerged rooted species (Myriophyllum spicatum and Elodea canadensis) and two emergent rooted species (Persicaria amphibia and Glyceria maxima) over a period of 84 days. Simazine was applied to the microcosms at nominal concentrations of 0.05, 0.5 and 5 mg/L. General biological endpoints and physiological endpoints were used to evaluate herbicide toxicity on macrophytes and the algae developing naturally in the system. Concentration-related responses of macrophytes and algae were obtained for the endpoints selected, resulting in a no observed ecologically adverse effect concentration (NOEAEC) at simazine concentrations of 0.05 mg active ingredient/L after 84 days. E. canadensis was the most negatively affected species based on length increase, which was consistently a very sensitive parameter for all macrophytes. The experimental design presented might constitute a suitable alternative to conventional laboratory single-species testing. - Simazine at concentrations of 0.05 mg/L does not cause long-term negative effects to aquatic macrophytes or algae.

  3. Phenol toxicity to the aquatic macrophyte Lemna paucicostata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji-Sook [Division of Life Science, University of Incheon, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Brown, Murray T. [School of Marine Science and Engineering, University of Plymouth, Plymouth, Devon PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Han, Taejun, E-mail: hanalgae@hanmail.net [Division of Life Science, University of Incheon, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Green Environmental Research, University of Incheon, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    Phenol is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant and a widely used reference toxicant for many bioassays. However, little information is available regarding the toxic effects of phenol on aquatic macrophytes. Seventy-two hour bioassays, with different end-points, were carried out to assess phenol toxicity in Lemna paucicostata. A concentration-dependent decline in frond multiplication and colony disintegration was observed, with 11.38 and 22.76 {mu}M phenol resulting in browning of fronds and colony disintegration, respectively. Growth of fronds, as measured by changes in surface area, was significantly inhibited with EC{sub 50} value of 2.70 {mu}M. When pulse amplitude modulated chlorophyll a (Chl a) fluorescence imaging (i-PAM) was employed, the maximum quantum yield of PS II (F{sub v}/F{sub m}) significantly declined with increasing phenol concentrations with resultant EC{sub 50} of 1.91 {mu}M and coefficients of variation (CVs) generated for the EC{sub 50} values of less than 4.7%. A gradual increase in fluorescence emissions from chlorophylls a and b and pheophytin up to a concentration of 2.85 {mu}M was found but declined markedly at higher concentrations. The significant correlation between the F{sub v}/F{sub m} and surface growth rate data implies that the former is an appropriate biomarker of whole plant toxicity. Using imaging Chl a fluorescence on L. paucicostata provides a rapid, sensitive and reliable method for assessing the toxic risks posed by phenol to aquatic ecosystems and has practical applications for municipal and industrial waste water management.

  4. Toxicity of Zinc on Growth of an Aquatic Macrophyte, Ipomoea Aquatica Forsk

    OpenAIRE

    Laitonjam Bedabati Chanu; Abhik Gupta

    2016-01-01

    The effects of different concentrations of Zn on growth of an aquatic macrophyte, Ipomoea aquatica Forsk. were studied. Fresh weight, dry weight, shoot length, root length, number of nodes, development of leaves, and chlorophyll and carotene contents were the different growth parameters considered. Toxicity symptoms like browning and decaying of roots could be observed in plants treated at 22.7 mg L-1 Zn as early as 3rd day of experiment while yellowing of older leaves appeared during the lat...

  5. Water hardness reduces the accumulation and toxicity of uranium in a freshwater macrophyte (Ceratophyllum demersum)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markich, Scott J., E-mail: smarkich@optusnet.com.au

    2013-01-15

    There is a lack of good quality data and mechanistic understanding on the effects of true water hardness (calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg)) on the bioavailability and toxicity of uranium (U) to freshwater biota. This study determined the effect of true water hardness (20, 75, 150, 275 and 400 mg CaCO{sub 3} L{sup −1}) on the cell surface binding affinity (log K), accumulation and toxicity (growth inhibition) of U in a submerged, rootless, macrophyte (Ceratophyllum demersum) in a synthetic freshwater with constant alkalinity (13 mg CaCO{sub 3} L{sup −1}) and pH (6.2) over 7 days. A 20-fold increase in water hardness resulted in a 4-fold decrease in U toxicity (median effect concentration (EC50) = 134 μg L{sup −1} U at 20 mg CaCO{sub 3} L{sup −1} hardness, increasing to 547 μg L{sup −1} U at 400 mg CaCO{sub 3} L{sup −1} hardness), cell surface binding affinity (log K = 6.25 at 20 mg CaCO{sub 3} L{sup −1} hardness, decreasing to log K = 5.64 at 400 mg CaCO{sub 3} L{sup −1} hardness) and accumulation (the concentration factor decreased from 63 at 20 mg CaCO{sub 3} L{sup −1} hardness to 15 at 400 mg CaCO{sub 3} L{sup −1} hardness) of U. Calcium provided a 4-fold greater protective effect against U accumulation and toxicity compared to Mg. Speciation calculations indicated negligible differences in the percentages of key U species (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, UO{sub 2}OH{sup +}, UO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}) over the range of water hardness tested. The inhibition of U binding at the cell surface, and subsequent uptake, by C. demersum, with increasing Ca and/or Mg concentration, may be explained in terms of (i) competition between Ca{sup 2+}/Mg{sup 2+} and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} (and/or UO{sub 2}OH{sup +}) for physiologically active sites at the cell surface, and/or (ii) reduced negative charge (electrical potential) at the cell surface, resulting in a decrease in the activity of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} (and/or UO{sub 2}OH{sup +}) at the plant/water interface (boundary layer

  6. Water hardness reduces the accumulation and toxicity of uranium in a freshwater macrophyte (Ceratophyllum demersum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markich, Scott J

    2013-01-15

    There is a lack of good quality data and mechanistic understanding on the effects of true water hardness (calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg)) on the bioavailability and toxicity of uranium (U) to freshwater biota. This study determined the effect of true water hardness (20, 75, 150, 275 and 400 mg CaCO(3) L(-1)) on the cell surface binding affinity (log K), accumulation and toxicity (growth inhibition) of U in a submerged, rootless, macrophyte (Ceratophyllum demersum) in a synthetic freshwater with constant alkalinity (13 mg CaCO(3) L(-1)) and pH (6.2) over 7 days. A 20-fold increase in water hardness resulted in a 4-fold decrease in U toxicity (median effect concentration (EC50)=134 μg L(-1)U at 20 mg CaCO(3 )L(-1) hardness, increasing to 547 μg L(-1) U at 400 mg CaCO(3) L(-1) hardness), cell surface binding affinity (log K=6.25 at 20 mg CaCO(3) L(-1) hardness, decreasing to log K=5.64 at 400 mg CaCO(3) L(-1) hardness) and accumulation (the concentration factor decreased from 63 at 20 mg CaCO(3) L(-1) hardness to 15 at 400 mg CaCO(3) L(-1) hardness) of U. Calcium provided a 4-fold greater protective effect against U accumulation and toxicity compared to Mg. Speciation calculations indicated negligible differences in the percentages of key U species (UO(2)(2+), UO(2)OH(+), UO(2)(OH)(2)) over the range of water hardness tested. The inhibition of U binding at the cell surface, and subsequent uptake, by C. demersum, with increasing Ca and/or Mg concentration, may be explained in terms of (i) competition between Ca(2+)/Mg(2+) and UO(2)(2+) (and/or UO(2)OH(+)) for physiologically active sites at the cell surface, and/or (ii) reduced negative charge (electrical potential) at the cell surface, resulting in a decrease in the activity of UO(2)(2+) (and/or UO(2)OH(+)) at the plant/water interface (boundary layer), and consequently, less U bound to physiologically active cell surface sites. In the absence of a biotic ligand model for U, the results of this study (together with

  7. AMEG: the new SETAC advisory group on aquatic macrophyte ecotoxicology

    OpenAIRE

    Arts, G.; Davies, J.; Dobbs, M.; Ebke, P.; Hanson, M.; Hommen, U.; Knauer, K.; Loutseti, S.; Maltby, L; Mohr, S; Poovey, A.; Poulsen, V.

    2010-01-01

    \\ud Introduction and background\\ud \\ud Primary producers play critical structural and functional roles in aquatic ecosystems; therefore, it is imperative that the potential risks of toxicants to aquatic plants are adequately assessed in the risk assessment of chemicals. The standard required macrophyte test species is the floating (non-sediment-rooted) duckweed Lemna spp. This macrophyte species might not be representative of all floating, rooted, emergent, and submerged macrophyte species be...

  8. AMEG: the new SETAC advisory group on auqatic macrophyte ecotoxicology

    OpenAIRE

    Arts, G.H.P.; Davies, J.; Dobbs, M.; Ebke, P.; Hanson, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    ntroduction and background Primary producers play critical structural and functional roles in aquatic ecosystems; therefore, it is imperative that the potential risks of toxicants to aquatic plants are adequately assessed in the risk assessment of chemicals. The standard required macrophyte test species is the floating (non-sediment-rooted) duckweed Lemna spp. This macrophyte species might not be representative of all floating, rooted, emergent, and submerged macrophyte species because of dif...

  9. AMEG: the new SETAC advisory group on aquatic macrophyte ecotoxicology

    OpenAIRE

    Arts, G.; Davies, J.; Dobbs, M.; Ebke, P.; Hanson, M; Hommen, U.; Knauer, K; Loutseti, S.; Maltby, L.; Mohr, S.; Poovey, A.; Poulsen, V.

    2010-01-01

    \\ud Introduction and background\\ud \\ud Primary producers play critical structural and functional roles in aquatic ecosystems; therefore, it is imperative that the potential risks of toxicants to aquatic plants are adequately assessed in the risk assessment of chemicals. The standard required macrophyte test species is the floating (non-sediment-rooted) duckweed Lemna spp. This macrophyte species might not be representative of all floating, rooted, emergent, and submerged macrophyte species be...

  10. AMEG: the new SETAC advisory group on aquatic macrophyte ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arts, Gertie; Davies, Jo; Dobbs, Michael; Ebke, Peter; Hanson, Mark; Hommen, Udo; Knauer, Katja; Loutseti, Stefania; Maltby, Lorraine; Mohr, Silvia; Poovey, Angela; Poulsen, Véronique

    2010-05-01

    Primary producers play critical structural and functional roles in aquatic ecosystems; therefore, it is imperative that the potential risks of toxicants to aquatic plants are adequately assessed in the risk assessment of chemicals. The standard required macrophyte test species is the floating (non-sediment-rooted) duckweed Lemna spp. This macrophyte species might not be representative of all floating, rooted, emergent, and submerged macrophyte species because of differences in the duration and mode of exposure; sensitivity to the specific toxic mode of action of the chemical; and species-specific traits (e.g., duckweed's very short generation time). These topics were addressed during the workshop entitled "Aquatic Macrophyte Risk Assessment for Pesticides" (AMRAP) where a risk assessment scheme for aquatic macrophytes was proposed. Four working groups evolved from this workshop and were charged with the task of developing Tier 1 and higher-tier aquatic macrophyte risk assessment procedures. Subsequently, a SETAC Advisory Group, the Macrophyte Ecotoxicology Group (AMEG) was formed as an umbrella organization for various macrophyte working groups. The purpose of AMEG is to provide scientifically based guidance in all aspects of aquatic macrophyte testing in the laboratory and field, including prospective as well as retrospective risk assessments for chemicals. As AMEG expands, it will begin to address new topics including bioremediation and sustainable management of aquatic macrophytes in the context of ecosystem services.

  11. Response of phytochelatins and their relationship with cadmium toxicity in a floating macrophyte Pistia stratiotes L. at environmentally relevant concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Wang, L Y; Sun, Q

    2010-02-01

    An indoor experiment was undertaken to investigate the response of phytochelatins and their relationship to cadmium toxicity in Pistia stratiotes L., a free-floating macrophyte, exposed to low concentrations of cadmium typically found in realistic environments. Cadmium concentrations of 0.01 to 0.08 microM had no toxic effects on the growth of this plant, as indicated by no significant changes in the fresh weights of leaves and roots and the slight induction of phytochelatins in plant tissues, whereas cadmium concentrations of 0.16 to 1 microM were toxic, and cadmium toxicity increased with the increase of cadmium concentrations in solutions, accompanied by the dramatic production of phytochelatins in plant tissues, especially in roots. There was a positive correction between root phytochelatin levels and cadmium toxicity, as measured by the growth inhibition rate of the root fresh weight. The results suggested that phytochelatins in aquatic macrophytes can serve as sensitive biomarkers for heavy metal toxicity in a moderately polluted water environment.

  12. Effects of the herbicide 2,4-D on the growth of nine aquatic macrophytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belgers, J.D.M.; Lieverloo, van R.J.; Pas, van der L.J.T.; Brink, van den P.J.

    2007-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effect of the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) on nine submersed macrophyte species. The first objective of the study was to investigate the sensitivity of various endpoints in macrophyte toxicity tests. A second objective was to investigate the

  13. A new mechanism of macrophyte mitigation: how submerged plants reduce malathion's acute toxicity to aquatic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogan, William R; Relyea, Rick A

    2014-08-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that aquatic plants can mitigate the toxicity of insecticides to sensitive aquatic animals. The current paradigm is that this ability is driven primarily by insecticide sorption to plant tissues, especially for hydrophobic compounds. However, recent work shows that submerged plants can strongly mitigate the toxicity of the relatively hydrophilic insecticide malathion, despite the fact that this compound exhibits a slow sorption rate to plants. To examine this disparity, we tested the hypothesis that the mitigating effect of submerged plants on malathion's toxicity is driven primarily by the increased water pH from plant photosynthesis causing the hydrolysis of malathion, rather than by sorption. To do this, we compared zooplankton (Daphnia magna) survival across five environmentally relevant malathion concentrations (0, 1, 4, 6, or 36 μg L(-1)) in test containers where we chemically manipulated water pH in the absence of plants or added the submerged plant (Elodea canadensis) but manipulated plant photosynthetic activity via shading or no shading. We discovered that malathion was equally lethal to Daphnia at all concentrations tested when photosynthetically inactive (i.e. shaded) plants were present (pH at time of dosing=7.8) or when pH was chemically decreased (pH=7.7). In contrast, when photosynthetically active (i.e. unshaded) plants were present (pH=9.8) or when pH was chemically increased (pH=9.5), the effects of 4 and 6 μg L(-1) of malathion on Daphnia were mitigated strongly and to an equal degree. These results demonstrate that the mitigating effect of submerged plants on malathion's toxicity can be explained entirely by a mechanism of photosynthesizing plants causing an increase in water pH, resulting in rapid malathion hydrolysis. Our findings suggest that current ecotoxicological models and phytoremediation strategies may be overlooking a critical mechanism for mitigating pesticides.

  14. AMEG: the new SETAC advisory group on auqatic macrophyte ecotoxicology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, G.H.P.; Davies, J.; Dobbs, M.; Ebke, P.; Hanson, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    ntroduction and background Primary producers play critical structural and functional roles in aquatic ecosystems; therefore, it is imperative that the potential risks of toxicants to aquatic plants are adequately assessed in the risk assessment of chemicals. The standard required macrophyte test

  15. AMEG: the new SETAC advisory group on auqatic macrophyte ecotoxicology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, G.H.P.; Davies, J.; Dobbs, M.; Ebke, P.; Hanson, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    ntroduction and background Primary producers play critical structural and functional roles in aquatic ecosystems; therefore, it is imperative that the potential risks of toxicants to aquatic plants are adequately assessed in the risk assessment of chemicals. The standard required macrophyte test spe

  16. Submerged macrophytes mitigate direct and indirect insecticide effects in freshwater communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R Brogan

    Full Text Available Understanding how ecological interactions mitigate the impacts of perturbations such as pesticides in biological communities is an important basic and applied question for ecologists. In aquatic ecosystems, new evidence from microcosm experiments suggests that submerged macrophytes can buffer cladocerans from pulse exposures to the widely used insecticide malathion, and that mitigation increases with macrophyte density. However, whether these results scale up to more complex aquatic communities where ecological interactions such as competition can alter toxicity is unknown. Further, macrophyte abilities to mitigate different insecticide exposure scenarios (i.e. single versus repeated pulses have never been tested. To address these gaps, we performed a factorial mesocosm experiment examining the influence of four macrophyte treatments (0, 10, 50, or 100 Elodea Canadensis shoots planted per mesocosm crossed with three malathion exposure scenarios (no insecticide, single pulse, repeated pulses on aquatic communities containing zooplankton, phytoplankton, periphyton, two snail species, and larval amphibians. In the absence of macrophytes, single malathion pulses caused short-term declines in cladoceran abundance followed by their rapid recovery, which precluded any indirect effects (i.e. trophic cascades. However, repeated malathion pulses caused cladoceran extinctions, resulting in persistent phytoplankton blooms and reduced abundance of one snail species. In contrast, with macrophytes present, even at low density, malathion had no effect on any taxa. We also discovered novel effects of macrophytes on the benthic food web. In the two highest macrophyte treatments, we observed trends of reduced periphyton biomass, decreased abundance of one snail species, and decreased amphibian time to and mass at metamorphosis. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of negative submerged macrophyte effects on amphibians, a taxa of global conservation concern

  17. Toxic Test Chambers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Hazardous material test facility Both facilities have 16,000 cubic foot chambers, equipped with 5000 CFM CBR filter systems with an air change...

  18. Toxicity testing using Caenorhabditis elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middendorf, P.J.; Dusenbery, D.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Williams, P.L. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a small free-living nematode that is representative of what may be the most abundant animal group. It has been promoted as a possible model organism for toxicity testing in the laboratory and in field evaluations in part because more is known about its biology than any other animal, Toxicity tests using C. elegans have been developed with lethality, reproduction, and behavior as end points. The tests have also been developed to varying degrees using standard laboratory media, water, and soil. The results of the tests when exposing C. elegans to a variety of metals, inorganic, and organic compounds indicate it is typically at least as sensitive as other species currently used, such as Daphnia and earthworms, and is generally much easier to maintain in the laboratory. The advantages and disadvantages of C. elegans and the state of development of the tests will be discussed.

  19. A Miniscale Algal Toxicity Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arensberg, Pia; Hemmingsen, Vicky H.; Nyholm, Niels

    1995-01-01

    A simple miniscale (approx. 1 - 2.5 ml) toxicity test procedure with the freshwater green algaSelenastrum capricornutum is described. The procedure fulfils the validity criteria of the ISO (International Association for Standardization) standard test protocol. Practically identical concentration...... facilitates CO2 mass transfer. Uniform illumination of the individual units of a minitest setup is obtained readily due to the small area that has to be illuminated. Using the rapidly growing green alga S. capricornutum as test organism, it is proposed generally to reduce the standard test duration from 3...... and test volumes (down to 1 ml) could also be used. Tissue culture treated polystyrene microplates were found toxic to algae and thus unusable. pH control is achieved more easily in the minitest than in larger size shake flasks due to greater turbulence and a larger surface/volume ratio which both...

  20. The Historical Development of Animal Toxicity Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Gertler, N

    1997-01-01

    This paper traces the historical development of animal toxicity testing, from its ancient origins through the period of standardization following World War II. It explores the roots of toxicity testing in physiology and experimental medicine, drug development, and the detection and identification of poisons. The discussion then turns to the shift in focus from acute to chronic toxicity which occurred around the turn of the century. The controversy over the potential toxicity of preservatives ...

  1. A macrophyte submodel for aquatic ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Carol Desormeau; Wlosinski, Joseph H.

    1989-01-01

    A macrophyte submodel has been incorporated and tested in CE-QUAL-R1, a one-dimensional, vertically averaged model of reservoir water quality. A quasi two-dimensional scheme was necessary to represent the spatial relationship of macrophytes in reservoirs adequately. The macrophyte processes modeled were photosynthesis, dark respiration, excretion and nonpredatory mortality. Process equations for photosynthesis as a function of light and temperature, and dark respiration as a function of temperature were tested using data from laboratory studies. The submodel was field tested, along with other components of CE-QUAL-R1, using data collected at Eau Galle Reservoir, WI, U.S.A.

  2. BIOEQUIVALENCE APPROACH FOR WHOLE EFFLUENT TOXICITY TESTING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased use of whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests in the regulatory arena has brought increased concern over the statistical analysis of WET test data and the determination of toxicity. One concern is the issue of statistical power. A number of WET tests may pass the current...

  3. Checklist of the Aquatic Macrophytes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The emergent macrophytes formed 93.3% of the total macrophyte .... accounted for 2.2% while emergent species with. 93.30% of ... proliferation of floating aquatic macrophytes like ..... Geoelectric Evalution of the Groundwater Potential of Parts.

  4. Predicting Changes in Macrophyte Community Structure from Functional Traits in a Freshwater Lake: A Test of Maximum Entropy Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hui; Zhong, Jiayou; Yuan, Guixiang; Guo, Chunjing; Lou, Qian; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Jun; Ni, Leyi; Xie, Ping; Cao, Te

    2015-01-01

    Trait-based approaches have been widely applied to investigate how community dynamics respond to environmental gradients. In this study, we applied a series of maximum entropy (maxent) models incorporating functional traits to unravel the processes governing macrophyte community structure along water depth gradient in a freshwater lake. We sampled 42 plots and 1513 individual plants, and measured 16 functional traits and abundance of 17 macrophyte species. Study results showed that maxent model can be highly robust (99.8%) in predicting the species relative abundance of macrophytes with observed community-weighted mean (CWM) traits as the constraints, while relative low (about 30%) with CWM traits fitted from water depth gradient as the constraints. The measured traits showed notably distinct importance in predicting species abundances, with lowest for perennial growth form and highest for leaf dry mass content. For tuber and leaf nitrogen content, there were significant shifts in their effects on species relative abundance from positive in shallow water to negative in deep water. This result suggests that macrophyte species with tuber organ and greater leaf nitrogen content would become more abundant in shallow water, but would become less abundant in deep water. Our study highlights how functional traits distributed across gradients provide a robust path towards predictive community ecology.

  5. Acute toxicity of metals and reference toxicants to a freshwater ostracod, Cypris subglobosa Sowerby, 1840 and correlation to EC{sub 50} values of other test models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khangarot, B.S., E-mail: bkhangarot@hotmail.com [Ecotoxicology Division, Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (Formerly: Industrial Toxicology Research Centre), Post Box No. 80, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226001 (India); Das, Sangita [Ecotoxicology Division, Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (Formerly: Industrial Toxicology Research Centre), Post Box No. 80, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226001 (India)

    2009-12-30

    The ostracod Cypris subglobosa Sowerby, 1840 static bioassay test on the basis of a 48 h of 50% of immobilization (EC{sub 50}) has been used to measure the toxicity of 36 metals and metalloids and 12 reference toxicants. Among the 36 metals and metalloids, osmium (Os) was found to be the most toxic in the test while boron (B), the least toxic. The EC{sub 50} values of this study revealed positive linear relationship with the established test models of cladoceran (Daphnia magna), sludge worm (Tubifex tubifex), chironomid larvae (Chironomus tentans), protozoan (Tetrahymena pyriformis), fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), and aquatic macrophyte duckweed (Lemna minor). Correlation coefficients (r{sup 2}) for 17 physicochemical properties of metals or metal ions and EC{sub 50}s (as pM) were examined by linear regression analysis. The electronegativity, ionization potential, melting point, solubility product of metal sulfides (pK{sub sp}), softness parameter and some other physicochemical characteristics were significantly correlated with EC{sub 50}s of metals to C. subglobosa. The reproducibility of toxicity test was determined using 12 reference toxicants. The coefficient of variability of the EC{sub 50}s ranged from 6.95% to 55.37% and variability was comparable to that noticed for D. magna and other aquatic test models. The study demonstrated the need to include crustacean ostracods in a battery of biotests to detect the presence of hazardous chemicals in soils, sewage sludges, sediments and aquatic systems.

  6. Biological assays for aquatic toxicity testing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Slabbert, JL

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available A number of aquatic toxicity tests have been established for South African use, which include fish and Daphnia lethality tests, microbiotests, and short-term chronic tests. Studies on effluents and surface waters showed that all the tests have a...

  7. A comparison of standard acute toxicity tests with rapid-screening toxicity tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toussaint, M.W. [Geo-Centers, Inc., Fort Washington, MD (United States); Shedd, T.R. [Army Biomedical Research and Development Lab., Frederick, MD (United States); Schalie, W.H. van der [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States); Leather, G.R. [Hood Coll., Frederick, MD (United States). Dept. of Biology

    1995-05-01

    This study compared the relative sensitivity of five inexpensive, rapid toxicity tests to the sensitivity of five standard aquatic acute toxicity tests through literature review and testing. The rapid toxicity tests utilized organisms that require little culturing or handling prior to testing: a freshwater rotifer (Branchionus calyciflorus); brine shrimp (Artemia salina); lettuce (Lactuca sativa); and two microbial tests (Photobacterium phosphoreum--Microtox{reg_sign} test, and a mixture of bacterial species--the Polytox{reg_sign} test). Standard acute toxicity test species included water fleas (Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia), green algae (Selenastrum capricornutum), fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), and mysid shrimp (Mysidopsis bahia). Sensitivity comparisons between rapid and standard acute toxicity tests were based on LC50/EC50 data from 11 test chemicals. Individually, the lettuce and rotifer tests ranked most similar in sensitivity to the standard tests, while Microtox fell just outside the range of sensitivities represented by the group of standard acute toxicity tests. The brine shrimp and Polytox tests were one or more orders of magnitude different from the standard acute toxicity tests for most compounds. The lettuce, rotifer, and Microtox tests could be used as a battery for preliminary toxicity screening of chemicals. Further evaluation of complex real-world environmental samples is recommended.

  8. Comparison of standard acute toxicity tests with rapid-screening toxicity tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toussaint, M.W.; Shedd, T.R.; VanDerSchal, W.H.; Leather, G.R.

    1995-10-01

    This study compared the relative sensitivity of five inexpensive, rapid toxicity tests to the sensitivity of five standard aquatic acute toxicity tests through literature review and testing. The rapid toxicity tests utilized organisms that require little culturing or handling prior to testing: a freshwater rotifer (Branchionus ccalyciflorus); brine shrimp (Artemia salina); lettuce (Lactuca sativa); and two microbial tests (Photo bacterium phosphoreum - Microtox test, and a mixture of bacterial species - the polytox test). Standard acute toxicity test species included water fleas (Daphnia magna and Ceriadaphnta dubia), green algae (Setenastrum capricarnutum), fathead minnows (Pimephalespromelas), and mysid shrimp (Mysidopsis bahia). Sensitivity comparisons between rapid and standard acute toxicity tests were based on LC5O/EC50 data from 11 test chemicals. Individually, the lettuce and rotifer tests ranked most similar in sensitivity to the standard tests, while Microtox fell just outside the range of sensitivities represented by the group of standard acute toxicity tests. The brine shrimp and Polytox tests were one or more orders of magnitude different from the standard acute toxicity tests for most compounds. The lettuce, rotifer, and Microtox tests could be used as a battery for preliminary toxicity screening of chemicals. Further evaluation of complex real-world environmental samples is recommended.

  9. Bioequivalence approach for whole effluent toxicity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, R.; Wang, Q.; Fulk, F.; Deng, C.; Denton, D.

    2000-01-01

    Increased use of whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests in the regulatory arena has brought increased concern over the statistical analysis of WET test data and the determination of toxicity. One concern is the issue of statistical power. A number of WET tests may pass the current hypothesis test approach because they lack statistical power to detect relevant toxic effects because of large within-test variability. Additionally, a number of WET tests may fail the current approach because they possess excessive statistical power, as a result of small within-test variability, and detect small differences that may not be biologically relevant. The strengths and limitations of both the traditional hypothesis test approach and the bioequivalence approach for use in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System program were evaluated. Data from 5,213 single-concentration, short-term chronic WET tests with Ceriodaphnia dubia provided the database for analysis. Comparison of results between the current approach and the bioequivalence approach indicates that the current approach to WET testing is generally sound but that adopting the proposed bioequivalence approach resolves concerns of statistical power. Specifically, within this data set, applying the bioequivalence approach resulted in failure for tests with relatively large test variability and a pass for tests with relatively small within-test variability.

  10. Implications of Animal Welfare on Toxicity Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Otto A.

    1993-01-01

    The testing strategy for chemical substances is discussed with regard to obtaining improved quality of data for health assessment while respecting the ethical responsibility for consideration of the welfare of the animals involved. Ensuring animal welfare without indulging too much...... in anthropomorphism leads to better research/testing. Current trends in toxicity testing will result in tests involving more sophisticated techniques, better quality of laboratory animals, and eventually the use of fewer animals....

  11. Draft Test Guideline: Fish Acute Toxicity Test, Freshwater And Marine

    Science.gov (United States)

    The following draft test guideline is part of a series of test guidelines that have been developed by EPA for use in the testing of pesticides and toxic substances, and the development of test data for submission to the Agency for review.

  12. Classifying aquatic macrophytes as indicators of eutrophication in European lakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penning, W.E.; Mjelde, M.; Dudley, B.; Hellsten, S.; Hanganu, J.; Kolada, A.; van den Berg, Marcel S.; Poikane, S.; Phillips, G.; Willby, N.; Ecke, F.

    2008-01-01

    Aquatic macrophytes are one of the biological quality elements in the Water Framework Directive (WFD) for which status assessments must be defined. We tested two methods to classify macrophyte species and their response to eutrophication pressure: one based on percentiles of occurrence along a phosp

  13. Animal alternatives for whole effluent toxicity testing ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since the 1940s, effluent toxicity testing has been utilized to varying degrees in many countries to assess potential ecological impacts and assist in determining necessary treatment options for environmental protection. However, it was only in the early 1980’s that toxicity based effluent assessments and subsequent discharge controls became globally important, when it was recognized that physical and chemical measurements alone did not protect the environment from potential impacts. Consequently, various strategies using different toxicity tests, whole effluent assessment techniques (incorporating bioaccumulation potential and persistence) plus supporting analytical tools have been developed over 30 years of practice. Numerous workshops and meetings have focused on effluent risk assessment through ASTM, SETAC, OSPAR, UK competent authorities, and EU specific country rules. Concurrent with this drive to improve effluent quality using toxicity tests, interest in reducing animal use has risen. The Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) organized and facilitated an international workshop in March 2016 to evaluate strategies for concepts, tools, and effluent assessments and update the toolbox of for effluent testing methods. The workshop objectives were to identify opportunities to use a suite of strategies for effluents, and to identify opportunities to reduce the reliance on animal tests and to determine barriers to implementation of new methodologie

  14. Animal alternatives for whole effluent toxicity testing ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since the 1940s, effluent toxicity testing has been utilized to varying degrees in many countries to assess potential ecological impacts and assist in determining necessary treatment options for environmental protection. However, it was only in the early 1980’s that toxicity based effluent assessments and subsequent discharge controls became globally important, when it was recognized that physical and chemical measurements alone did not protect the environment from potential impacts. Consequently, various strategies using different toxicity tests, whole effluent assessment techniques (incorporating bioaccumulation potential and persistence) plus supporting analytical tools have been developed over 30 years of practice. Numerous workshops and meetings have focused on effluent risk assessment through ASTM, SETAC, OSPAR, UK competent authorities, and EU specific country rules. Concurrent with this drive to improve effluent quality using toxicity tests, interest in reducing animal use has risen. The Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) organized and facilitated an international workshop in March 2016 to evaluate strategies for concepts, tools, and effluent assessments and update the toolbox of for effluent testing methods. The workshop objectives were to identify opportunities to use a suite of strategies for effluents, and to identify opportunities to reduce the reliance on animal tests and to determine barriers to implementation of new methodologie

  15. Toxicity test of a dental commercial composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce-Bravo, Santa; Martínez-Rivera, José-Luis; Garcés-Ortíz, Maricela

    2015-01-01

    Background International rules must be followed for testing biosecurity in dental materials. A new brand of restorative material appeared in the market and regulations indicated that it should be tested for toxicity. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the 90-day sub chronic toxicity of one triethylene glycol dimethacrylate containing composite (MEDENTAL Light-Cure Composite™) orally administered to rats according to Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development no. 48 guidelines and the requirements specified in the ISO 10993-11. Material and Methods Wistar rats ate the polymerized composite during 90 days and were observed to determine changes in their behavior, eye and skin signs and other attitudes such as aggressiveness, posture, walking and response to handling. After 90 days were sacrificed to ascertain blood alterations, we did special hematological tests and assessed microscopic slides from 33 different organs. Results We recorded no significant changes in clinical behavior of the animals. Microscopic review of the H&E stained slides obtained from the analyzed organs showed no abnormal inflammatory or cytological changes and all hematological special tests were within normal limits. Conclusions Results of this study show that under our experimental conditions the MEDENTAL Light-Cure Composite™ does not produce inflammatory or cytological changes suggestive of toxicity. Key words:Dental materials, composite resin, toxicity, inflammation, TEGDMA. PMID:26155348

  16. Leachates draining from controlled municipal solid waste landfill: Detailed geochemical characterization and toxicity tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavakala, Bienvenu K; Le Faucheur, Séverine; Mulaji, Crispin K; Laffite, Amandine; Devarajan, Naresh; Biey, Emmanuel M; Giuliani, Gregory; Otamonga, Jean-Paul; Kabatusuila, Prosper; Mpiana, Pius T; Poté, John

    2016-09-01

    Management of municipal solid wastes in many countries consists of waste disposal into landfill without treatment or selective collection of solid waste fractions including plastics, paper, glass, metals, electronic waste, and organic fraction leading to the unsolved problem of contamination of numerous ecosystems such as air, soil, surface, and ground water. Knowledge of leachate composition is critical in risk assessment of long-term impact of landfills on human health and the environment as well as for prevention of negative outcomes. The research presented in this paper investigates the seasonal variation of draining leachate composition and resulting toxicity as well as the contamination status of soil/sediment from lagoon basins receiving leachates from landfill in Mpasa, a suburb of Kinshasa in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Samples were collected during the dry and rainy seasons and analyzed for pH, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen, soluble ions, toxic metals, and were then subjected to toxicity tests. Results highlight the significant seasonal difference in leachate physicochemical composition. Affected soil/sediment showed higher values for toxic metals than leachates, indicating the possibility of using lagoon system for the purification of landfill leachates, especially for organic matter and heavy metal sedimentation. However, the ecotoxicity tests demonstrated that leachates are still a significant source of toxicity for terrestrial and benthic organisms. Therefore, landfill leachates should not be discarded into the environment (soil or surface water) without prior treatment. Interest in the use of macrophytes in lagoon system is growing and toxic metal retention in lagoon basin receiving systems needs to be fully investigated in the future. This study presents useful tools for evaluating landfill leachate quality and risk in lagoon systems which can be applied to similar environmental compartments.

  17. Microfluidics for Antibiotic Susceptibility and Toxicity Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Dai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The recent emergence of antimicrobial resistance has become a major concern for worldwide policy makers as very few new antibiotics have been developed in the last twenty-five years. To prevent the death of millions of people worldwide, there is an urgent need for a cheap, fast and accurate set of tools and techniques that can help to discover and develop new antimicrobial drugs. In the past decade, microfluidic platforms have emerged as potential systems for conducting pharmacological studies. Recent studies have demonstrated that microfluidic platforms can perform rapid antibiotic susceptibility tests to evaluate antimicrobial drugs’ efficacy. In addition, the development of cell-on-a-chip and organ-on-a-chip platforms have enabled the early drug testing, providing more accurate insights into conventional cell cultures on the drug pharmacokinetics and toxicity, at the early and cheaper stage of drug development, i.e., prior to animal and human testing. In this review, we focus on the recent developments of microfluidic platforms for rapid antibiotics susceptibility testing, investigating bacterial persistence and non-growing but metabolically active (NGMA bacteria, evaluating antibiotic effectiveness on biofilms and combinatorial effect of antibiotics, as well as microfluidic platforms that can be used for in vitro antibiotic toxicity testing.

  18. Mollusc reproductive toxicity tests - Development and validation of test guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ducrot, Virginie; Holbech, Henrik; Kinnberg, Karin Lund

    and stakeholders, this study aims to develop innovative partial life-cycle tests on the reproduction of the freshwater gastropods Potamopyrgus antipodarum and Lymnaea stagnalis, which are relevant candidate species for the standardization of mollusc apical toxicity tests assessing reprotoxic effects of chemicals...... with P. antipodarum and L. stagnalis exposed to Cd are thus very encouraging. Results for BPA highlighted issues in controlling exposure concentrations, and possibly BPA leaching from test equipment. This study also highlighted that factors, such as e.g., snail origin, temperature and test chemical...... stability in water, must be controlled in mollusc toxicity tests to avoid data dispersion which may impede the interpretation of effects. Applicability and limitations of the SOP proposed for L. stagnalis will be assessed after completion of the on-going pre-validation work. In both cases, optimization...

  19. Non-effect of water hardness on the accumulation and toxicity of copper in a freshwater macrophyte (Ceratophyllum demersum): how useful are hardness-modified copper guidelines for protecting freshwater biota?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markich, Scott J; King, Angus R; Wilson, Scott P

    2006-12-01

    Several nations have adopted hardness-modified copper (Cu) guidelines for protecting freshwater biota. However, there is a lack of good quality data and mechanistic understanding on the effects of true water hardness (calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg)) on the bioavailability and toxicity of Cu to freshwater biota, particularly macrophytes. This study determined the effect of true water hardness (35, 90 and 335 mg CaCO(3)/l, added as Ca and Mg chloride in a 1:1 mole ratio) on the cell surface binding affinity (log K), accumulation and toxicity (96 h growth (biomass and stem length) and photosynthetic pigment inhibition) of Cu in the free-floating submerged macrophyte, Ceratophyllum demersum, in a synthetic freshwater with constant alkalinity (16 mg CaCO(3)/l) and pH (7.0). There were no significant (P>0.05) differences in the cell surface binding affinity, accumulation or toxicity of Cu in C. demersum with a 10-fold increase in water hardness from 35 to 335 mg CaCO(3)/l. The mean 96 h EC(50) values (and 95% confidence intervals) for biomass, the most sensitive endpoint, were 8.4 (7.6-9.2), 8.9 (8.0-9.8) and 9.9 (9.1-10.7) microg/l Cu for 35, 90 and 335 mg CaCO(3)/l, respectively. Speciation calculations indicated only very small (1-6%) differences in the percentage distribution (i.e. bioavailability) of Cu over the hardness range. These collective results indicate no apparent competition between Cu and Ca/Mg for binding sites on the cell surface. Given that the mechanism of Cu uptake (via Cu-specific and Na-linked transporters) is fundamentally different to that of Cd, Ni, Pb and Zn (via Ca transporters), for which other hardness-dependent algorithms have been developed, it is doubtful whether a hardness-modified Cu guideline value will be sufficiently protective of sensitive freshwater biota, such as C. demersum, particularly in medium-hard fresh surface waters with low levels of dissolved organic carbon. The biotic ligand model offers a more flexible and mechanistic

  20. How TK-TD and population models for aquatic macrophytes could support the risk assessment for plant protection products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommen, Udo; Schmitt, Walter; Heine, Simon; Brock, Theo Cm; Duquesne, Sabine; Manson, Phil; Meregalli, Giovanna; Ochoa-Acuña, Hugo; van Vliet, Peter; Arts, Gertie

    2016-01-01

    This case study of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) workshop MODELINK demonstrates the potential use of mechanistic effects models for macrophytes to extrapolate from effects of a plant protection product observed in laboratory tests to effects resulting from dynamic exposure on macrophyte populations in edge-of-field water bodies. A standard European Union (EU) risk assessment for an example herbicide based on macrophyte laboratory tests indicated risks for several exposure scenarios. Three of these scenarios are further analyzed using effect models for 2 aquatic macrophytes, the free-floating standard test species Lemna sp., and the sediment-rooted submerged additional standard test species Myriophyllum spicatum. Both models include a toxicokinetic (TK) part, describing uptake and elimination of the toxicant, a toxicodynamic (TD) part, describing the internal concentration-response function for growth inhibition, and a description of biomass growth as a function of environmental factors to allow simulating seasonal dynamics. The TK-TD models are calibrated and tested using laboratory tests, whereas the growth models were assumed to be fit for purpose based on comparisons of predictions with typical growth patterns observed in the field. For the risk assessment, biomass dynamics are predicted for the control situation and for several exposure levels. Based on specific protection goals for macrophytes, preliminary example decision criteria are suggested for evaluating the model outputs. The models refined the risk indicated by lower tier testing for 2 exposure scenarios, while confirming the risk associated for the third. Uncertainties related to the experimental and the modeling approaches and their application in the risk assessment are discussed. Based on this case study and the assumption that the models prove suitable for risk assessment once fully evaluated, we recommend that 1) ecological scenarios be developed that are also

  1. Toxicity of Uranium Adsorbent Materials using the Microtox Toxicity Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jiyeon [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jeters, Robert T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gill, Gary A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kuo, Li-Jung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bonheyo, George T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Marine Sciences Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the toxicity of a diverse range of natural and synthetic materials used to extract uranium from seawater. The uranium adsorbent materials are being developed as part of the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Resources Program. The goal of this effort was to identify whether deployment of a farm of these materials into the marine environment would have any toxic effects on marine organisms.

  2. Extending one-dimensional models for deep lakes to simulate the impact of submerged macrophytes on water quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sachse, R.; Petzoldt, T.; Blumstock, M.; Moreira, S.; Pätzig, M.; Rücker, J.; Janse, J.H.; Mooij, W.M.; Hilt, S.

    2014-01-01

    Submerged macrophytes can stabilise clear water conditions in shallow lakes. However, many existing models for deep lakes neglect their impact. Here, we tested the hypothesis that submerged macrophytes can affect the water clarity in deep lakes. A one-dimensional, vertically resolved macrophyte mode

  3. Developmental and reproductive toxicity testing of vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Paul

    2012-03-01

    The majority of new preventative and therapeutic vaccines are now assessed for developmental toxicity according to guidelines issued by the FDA in 2006. Despite the absence of confirmed effects in humans, vaccines are frequently suspected of having adverse side-effects on the development of children. Such suspicions are perhaps unavoidable considering the extremely widespread use of vaccines. The preclinical developmental toxicology studies are designed to assess possible influences of each component of the vaccine formulation-and the induced antibodies-on the development of the conceptus, neonate and suckling organism. Immune modulation by a vaccine or an adjuvant could, for instance, affect the outcome of pregnancy by interfering with the natural shift in immune balance of the mother during gestation. Maternal immunoglobulins are transferred from the mother to the offspring in order to confer passive immunity during early life. This maternal antibody transport is prenatal in humans and monkeys, but tends to be delayed until after birth in other species. Therefore, a suitable model species needs to be chosen for preclinical studies in order to ensure exposure of the foetus to the induced maternal antibodies following vaccination. Rabbits are the best laboratory model for prenatal immunoglobulin transfer, but rodents are more practical for the necessary postnatal investigations. Non-human primates are the only appropriate models for the testing of vaccines that are not immunogenic in lower species. It is advisable to test new adjuvants separately according to the ICH S5(R2) guidelines. Preclinical paediatric investigations are not currently required for vaccines, even though most vaccines are given to children. Other areas of regulatory concern include developmental immunotoxicity and effects on the preimplantation embryo. Because of the limitations of the available animal models for developmental toxicity testing, pharmacovigilance is essential. Copyright © 2011

  4. Mollusc reproductive toxicity tests - Development and validation of test guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ducrot, Virginie; Holbech, Henrik; Kinnberg, Karin Lund

    and stakeholders, this study aims to develop innovative partial life-cycle tests on the reproduction of the freshwater gastropods Potamopyrgus antipodarum and Lymnaea stagnalis, which are relevant candidate species for the standardization of mollusc apical toxicity tests assessing reprotoxic effects of chemicals....... Draft standard operating procedures (SOPs) have been designed based upon literature and expert knowledge from project partners. Pre-validation studies have been implemented to validate the proposed test conditions and identify issues in performing the SOPs and analyzing test results. Pre-validation work...... with P. antipodarum and L. stagnalis exposed to Cd are thus very encouraging. Results for BPA highlighted issues in controlling exposure concentrations, and possibly BPA leaching from test equipment. This study also highlighted that factors, such as e.g., snail origin, temperature and test chemical...

  5. Macrophytes: Limitations of Using Them to Assess Reservoir Status According to the Water Framework Directive

    OpenAIRE

    Alaoui, Khadija Sossey; Galoux, Daniel; Rosillon, Francis

    2014-01-01

    Macrophytes are among the major groups of organisms that the Water Framework Directive (WFD) recommends should be used in assessing the status of natural lakes. The use of macrophytes in reservoir monitoring is still limited and further studies are needed on their inter-calibration and sources of variation. Many status assessment methods based on macrophyte communities have been defined for lakes. Nevertheless, few of them have been tested for reservoirs. The purpose of the study is to hig...

  6. Alternative testing strategies for predicting developmental toxicity of antifungal compound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, H.

    2016-01-01

    Determination of safe human exposure levels of chemicals in toxicological risk assessments largely relies on animal toxicity data. In these toxicity studies, the highest number of animals are used for reproductive and developmental toxicity testing. Because of economic and ethical reasons, there is

  7. Bacterial and enzymatic bioassays for toxicity testing in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitton, G; Koopman, B

    1992-01-01

    Microbioassays using bacteria or enzymes are increasingly applied to measure chemical toxicity in the environment. Attractive features of these assays may include low cost, rapid response to toxicants, high sample throughput, modest laboratory equipment and space requirements, low sample volume, portability, and reproducible responses. Enzymatic tests rely on measurement of either enzyme activity or enzyme biosynthesis. Dehydrogenases are the enzymes most used in toxicity testing. Assay of dehydrogenase activity is conveniently carried out using oxidoreduction dyes such as tetrazolium salts. Other enzyme activity tests utilize ATPases, esterases, phosphatases, urease, luciferase, beta-galactosidase, protease, amylase, or beta-glucosidase. Recently, the inhibition of enzyme (beta-galactosidase, tryptophanase, alpha-glucosidase) biosynthesis has been explored as a basis for toxicity testing. Enzyme biosynthesis was found to be generally more sensitive to organic chemicals than enzyme activity. Bacterial toxicity tests are based on bioluminescence, motility, growth, viability, ATP, oxygen uptake, nitrification, or heat production. An important aspect of bacterial tests is the permeability of cells to environmental toxicants, particularly organic chemicals of hydrophobic nature. Physical, chemical, and genetic alterations of the outer membrane of E. coli have been found to affect test sensitivity to organic toxicants. Several microbioassays are now commercially available. The names of the assays and their basis are: Microtox (bioluminescence), Polytox (respiration), ECHA Biocide Monitor (dehydrogenase activity), Toxi-Chromotest (enzyme biosynthesis), and MetPAD (enzyme activity). An important feature common to these tests is the provision of standardized cultures of bacteria in freeze-dried form. Two of the more recent applications of microbioassays are in sediment toxicity testing and toxicity reduction evaluation. Sediment pore water may be assayed directly or

  8. Status and applications of echinoid (phylum echinodermata) toxicity test methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bay, S.; Burgess, R.; Nacci, D.

    1993-01-01

    The use of echinoderms for toxicity testing has focused primarily on sea urchins and sand dollars (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, Arbacia punctulata, Lytechinus pictus, and Dendraster excentricus, for example). The status and relative sensitivity of various test methods are described. The most frequently used test methods consist of short-term exposures of sea urchin sperm or embryos; these tests can be easily conducted at all times of the year by using species with complementary spawning cycles or laboratory conditioned populations of a single species. Data from reference toxicant and effluent toxicity tests are summarized. Information on the precision and sensitivity of echinoid test methods are limited and preclude rigorous comparisons with other test methods. The available data indicate that the sensitivity and precision of these methods are comparable to short-term chronic methods for other marine invertebrates and fish. Recent application of the sperm test in toxicity identification evaluations (TIEs) and studies of effluent toxicity decay and sediment toxicity illustrate the versatility of this rapid (10 to 60 min exposure) test method. Embryo tests typically use a 48 to 96 h exposure period and measure the occurrence of embryo malformations. Most recent applications of the embryo test have been for the assessment of sediment elutriate toxicity. Adult echinoderms are not frequently used to assess effluent or receiving water toxicity. Recent studies have had success in using the adult life stage of urchins and sand dollars to assess the effects of contaminated sediment on growth, behavior, and bioaccumulation.

  9. Patterns of the aquatic macrophyte cover in Cachoeira Dourada Reservoir (GO-MG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M Bini

    Full Text Available The relationship between the aquatic macrophyte cover in upper segments of tributaries and this cover in these tributaries but near the reservoir's main body was tested. Sixteen taxa belonging to 12 families of aquatic macrophytes were recorded in Cachoeira Dourada Reservoir. The most frequent species were Eichhornia azurea (frequency of occurrence = 92%; n = 37 sites and E. crassipes (44%. Upper segments of the tributaries were the main areas colonized by these aquatic macrophytes. The positive relationship between the aquatic macrophyte cover between the upper and lower segments of tributaries indicates the importance of dispersion in the colonization of the arms and the reservoir's main body.

  10. Patterns of the aquatic macrophyte cover in Cachoeira Dourada Reservoir (GO-MG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bini, L M; Oliveira, L G; Souza, D C; Carvalho, P; Pinto, M P

    2005-02-01

    The relationship between the aquatic macrophyte cover in upper segments of tributaries and this cover in these tributaries but near the reservoir's main body was tested. Sixteen taxa belonging to 12 families of aquatic macrophytes were recorded in Cachoeira Dourada Reservoir. The most frequent species were Eichhornia azurea (frequency of occurrence=92%; n=37 sites) and E. crassipes (44%). Upper segments of the tributaries were the main areas colonized by these aquatic macrophytes. The positive relationship between the aquatic macrophyte cover between the upper and lower segments of tributaries indicates the importance of dispersion in the colonization of the arms and the reservoir's main body.

  11. Macrophyte species distribution, indices of biotic integrity and sampling intensity in isolated Florida marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study tested macrophyte condition metrics calculated after decreasing the effort and area of sampling by 33% to 66%, as tested in 74 emergent isolated wetlands. Four belted transects from wetland edge to center were established and rooted macrophytes were identified. The eff...

  12. Simple test guidelines for screening oilspill sorbents for toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blenkinsopp, S.A.; Sergy, G. [Environment Canada, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Doe, K.; Jackman, P. [Environment Canada, Moncton, NB (Canada); Huybers, A. [Harris Industrial Testing Services Ltd., Milford, NS (Canada)

    1998-09-01

    Environment Canada`s Emergencies Science Division has established a program to develop a standard test method suitable for evaluating the toxicity of common sorbent materials. Sorbents are used to absorb or adsorb spilled oil and other hazardous materials. They vary widely in composition and packaging. They are often treated with oleophilic and hydrophobic compounds to improve performance and have been used in large quantities during oil spills. Until now, their potential toxicity has never been considered. Three tests have been evaluated to determine how appropriate they are in screening the toxicity of sorbents. Seven toxicity test recommendations for sorbents were presented. 7 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs.

  13. Aquatic macrophyte community varies in urban reservoirs with different degrees of eutrophication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suelen Cristina Alves da Silva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Investigate spatial and temporal variation in the aquatic macrophyte community in four urban reservoirs located in Curitiba metropolitan region, Brazil. We tested the hypothesis that aquatic macrophyte community differ among reservoirs with different degrees of eutrophication. METHODS: The reservoirs selected ranged from oligotrophic/mesotrophic to eutrophic. Sampling occurred in October 2011, January 2012 and June 2012. Twelve aquatic macrophytes stands were sampled at each reservoir. Species were identified and the relative abundance of aquatic macrophytes was estimated. Differences among reservoirs and over sampling periods were analyzed: i through two‑way ANOVAs considering the stand extent (m and the stand biodiversity - species richness, evenness, Shannon-Wiener index and beta diversity (species variation along the aquatic macrophyte stand; and ii through PERMANOVA considering species composition. Indicator species that were characteristic for each reservoir were also identified. RESULTS: The aquatic macrophyte stand extent varied among reservoirs and over sampling periods. Species richness showed only temporal variation. On the other hand, evenness and Shannon-Wiener index varied only among reservoirs. The beta diversity of macrophyte stands did not vary among reservoirs or over time, meaning that species variability among aquatic macrophyte stands was independent of the stand extent and reservoir eutrophication. Community composition depended on the reservoir and sampling period. CONCLUSIONS: Our results support our initial expectation that reservoirs of different degrees of eutrophication have different aquatic macrophyte communities. As a consequence, each reservoir had particular indicator species. Therefore, monitoring and management efforts must be offered for each reservoir individually.

  14. Fluoride remediation using floating macrophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naba Kumar Mondal

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Six aquatic macrophytes, such as Pistia stratiotes, Ceratophyllum demersum, Nymphoides indica, Lemna major, Azolla pinnata,and Eichhornia crassipes were considered for remove fluoride from aqueous solution. Five different concentrations (10, 30, 50, and 100 ppm of fluoride solution were taken in 1 L plastic container. Fixed weight (20 g of macrophytes along with 500 ml fluoride solution was taken in each plastic container for 72 hours observation. Results demonstrated all the macrophytes show highest fluoride removal during 24 h to 48 h, but after 72 h their efficiency reduced drastically. The species N. indica showed better removal efficiency than other experimental macrophytes. In general, pigment measurement data indicated higher concentration at 72 h. However, Pistia sp. showed higher concentration of pigmentation at intermediate time interval (48 h. Higher level of dry weight to fresh weight ratio was recorded for L. major and A. pinnata at all concentrations, excepting at 10 ppm. In addition, all macrophytes showed lower RGR at higher concentration. Isotherm study indicated that macrophyte C. demersum is a good fitted with Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm whereas L. major with Langmuir isotherm during 24 hours.

  15. Toxicity Tests for Ensuring Succesful Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cěbere, B.; Faltiņa, E.; Zelčāns, N.; Kalniņa, D.

    2009-01-01

    Industrial wastewaters are complex and can be polluted by non-biodegradable end toxic organic compounds and are a serious threat to the environment. Chemical procedure alone cannot provide sufficient information. A complete evaluation of wastewaters should include ecotoxicological tests too, especially concerning the complex wastewaters. In the literature review the authors attempted to establish which is the more promising and suitable aquatic toxicology test for sewage treatment plant influent toxicity monitoring. A variety of types of organisms representing different trophic levels and many different species are used for aquatic toxicity testing. Toxicity characterization would be needed both for influents and effluents of wastewater treatment plant. For the purpose of screening biological wastewater treatment influent, toxicity to activated sludge microorganisms is important and toxicology tests here used are respirometry and bioluminescence toxicology tests. Respirometry toxicity tests are easy, fast and inexpensive compared to other approaches. Bioluminescence has been widely used, the most thoroughly investigated test system is the Microtox. The toxicity tests have also been compared by different authors. International, national and regional authorities use these tools to meet various regulatory and legislative requirements. Importance of biotesting has been emphasized also in EU legislation.

  16. Experimental Effects of Lime Application on Aquatic Macrophytes: 4. Growth Response of Three Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    James PURPOSE: This investigation examined the growth response of three macrophyte species ( Elodea canadensis, Stuckenia pectinata, and Vallisnaria...different macrophyte species. These hypotheses were tested using experimental mesocosms. METHODS: Elodea canadensis, Stuckenia pectinata, and...Snel, P. E. Zanstra, and R. J. Helder. 1982. The mechanism of bicarbonate assimilation by the polar leaves of Potamogeton and Elodea . CO2 concentrations

  17. Macrophytes shape trophic niche variation among generalist fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vejřík, Lukáš; Šmejkal, Marek; Čech, Martin; Sajdlová, Zuzana; Frouzová, Jaroslava; Kiljunen, Mikko; Peterka, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Generalist species commonly have a fundamental role in ecosystems as they can integrate spatially distinct habitats and food-web compartments, as well as control the composition, abundance and behavior of organisms at different trophic levels. Generalist populations typically consist of specialized individuals, but the potential for and hence degree of individual niche variation can be largely determined by habitat complexity. We compared individual niche variation within three generalist fishes between two comparable lakes in the Czech Republic differing in macrophyte cover, i.e. macrophyte-rich Milada and macrophyte-poor Most. We tested the hypothesis that large individual niche variation among generalist fishes is facilitated by the presence of macrophytes, which provides niches and predation shelter for fish and their prey items. Based on results from stable nitrogen (δ15N) and carbon (δ13C) isotopic mixing models, perch (Perca fluviatilis L.) and rudd (Scardinius erythrophthalmus (L.)) showed larger individual variation (i.e., variance) in trophic position in Milada as compared to Most, whereas no significant between-lake differences were observed for roach (Rutilus rutilus (L.)). Contrary to our hypothesis, all the three species showed significantly lower individual variation in the relative reliance on littoral food resources in Milada than in Most. Rudd relied significantly more whereas perch and roach relied less on littoral food resources in Milada than in Most, likely due to prevalent herbivory by rudd and prevalent zooplanktivory by perch and roach in the macrophyte-rich Milada as compared to macrophyte-poor Most. Our study demonstrates how the succession of macrophyte vegetation, via its effects on the physical and biological complexity of the littoral zone and on the availability of small prey fish and zooplankton, can strongly influence individual niche variation among generalist fishes with different ontogenetic trajectories, and hence the overall

  18. Rapid toxicity testing based on yeast respiratory activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haubenstricker, M.E. (Environmental Protection Agency, Ann Arbor, MI (USA)); Meier, P.G.; Mancy, K.H. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (USA)); Brabec, M.J. (Eastern Michigan Univ., Ypsilanti (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Rapid and economical techniques are needed to determine the effects of environmental contaminants. At present, the main methods to assess the impact of pollutants are based on chemical analysis of the samples. Invertebrate and vertebrate exposures have been used over the last two decades in assessing acute and chronic toxicities. However, these tests are labor intensive and require several days to complete. An alternative to whole organism exposure is to determine toxic effects in monocellular systems. Another approach for assessing toxicity is to monitor sensitive, nonspecific, subcellular target sites such as mitochondria. Changes in mitochondrial function which could indicate a toxic effect can be demonstrated readily after addition of a foreign substance. In initial assessments of various chemicals, rat liver mitochondria (RLM) were evaluated as a biological sensor of toxicity. False toxicity assessments will result if these ions are present even though they are generally considered nontoxic. Because of these disadvantages, an alternative mitochondrial system, such as found in bakers yeast, was evaluated.

  19. Reference toxicants for toxicity testing using Caenorhabditis elegans in aquatic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cressman, C.P. III; Williams, P.L. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    1997-09-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans aquatic toxicity assays were standardized with five common reference toxicants: CdCl{sub 2}, NaCl, KCl, sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), and sodium pentachlorophenate (PCP). Aquatic toxicity testing was conducted in 3 media: a standard C. elegans medium; EPA moderately hard reconstituted water; and EPA moderately hard mineral water. Test duration in each medium was 24h without a food source, and 24h and 48h with Escherichia coli strain OP50 as a food source. Each test was replicated three times with each replicate having 6 wells per concentration, 10 worms per well. LC{sub 50} values were calculated using probit analysis. The average LC{sub 50}s for each set of replications were compared to assess sensitivity and reproducibility of the data, identifying expected variation between replicate tests. These reference toxicants increase the database for C. elegans and provide a benchmark for further application.

  20. Bacterial and enzymatic bioassays for toxicity testing in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitton, G.; Koopman, B. (Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Microbioassays using bacteria or enzymes are increasingly applied to measure chemical toxicity in the environment. Attractive features of these assays may include low cost, rapid response to toxicants, high sample throughput, modest laboratory equipment and space requirements, low sample volume, portability, and reproducible responses. Enzymatic tests rely on measurement of either enzyme activity or enzyme biosynthesis. Dehydrogenases are the enzymes most used in toxicity testing. Assay of dehydrogenase activity is conveniently carried out using oxidoreduction dyes such as tetrazolium salts. Other enzyme activity tests utilize ATPases, esterases, phosphatases, urease, luciferase, beta-galactosidase, protease, amylase, or beta-glucosidase. Recently, the inhibition of enzyme (beta-galactosidase, tryptophanase, alpha-glucosidase) biosynthesis has been explored as a basis for toxicity testing. Enzyme biosynthesis was found to be generally more sensitive to organic chemicals than enzyme activity.107 references.

  1. Toxicity and Antioxidant Tests of Morinda citrifolia (noni Seed Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett J. West

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study was to evaluate Morinda citrifolia (noni seed extract, a food ingredient, for potential toxicity and antioxidant activity. Nitrates, nitrites, phytic acid, oxalic acid, as well as aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 and G2 were not detected in the extract. The extract was also non-cytoxic (LC50 > 1 mg/mL in the 24 and 40 h brine shrimp toxicity test. There were no symptoms of toxicity in a subacute (28 day oral toxicity test in Sprague-Dawley rats. Noni seed extract did not display any genotoxic potential in a primary DNA damage test in E. coli PQ37. The extract did exhibit significant antioxidant activity in the Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC and Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power (FRAP tests.

  2. Neutral red uptake cytotoxicity tests for estimating starting doses for acute oral toxicity tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, William S; Casati, Silvia; Strickland, Judy; Paris, Michael

    2008-05-01

    In vitro cytotoxicity assays can be used as alternative toxicity tests to reduce the total number of animals needed for acute oral toxicity tests. This unit describes two methods for determining the in vitro cytotoxicity of test substances using neutral red uptake (NRU) and using the in vitro data to determine starting doses for in vivo acute oral systemic toxicity tests, e.g., the up-and-down procedure or the acute toxic class method. The use of the NRU methods to determine starting doses for acute oral toxicity tests may reduce the number of animals required, and for relatively toxic substances, this approach may also reduce the number of animals that die or require humane euthanasia due to severe toxicity. An interlaboratory validation study has demonstrated that the methods are useful and reproducible for these purposes. Two standardized protocols provide details for performing NRU tests with rodent and human cells.

  3. Rapid Field Toxicity Test for Water Supplies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-28

    of trichothecenes (2). The correlation of the novel method with the Mysid trichothecenes paper described a perfect qualitative shrimp test, using fresh...test designed for human or animal consumption. organisms in a standard time LED light emitting diode CONCLUSION ml milliliter ppm parts per million A...potassium. of Trichothecenes ," Naval Research Laboratory Memorwdm Report 5738 (March 1986) Logistics dictate a day or so to test field samples in the

  4. Evaluating the zebrafish embryo toxicity test for pesticide hazard screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaberman, Scott; Padilla, Stephanie; Barron, Mace G

    2016-10-04

    Given the numerous chemicals used in society, it is critical to develop tools for accurate and efficient evaluation of potential risks to human and ecological receptors. Fish embryo acute toxicity tests are 1 tool that has been shown to be highly predictive of standard, more resource-intensive, juvenile fish acute toxicity tests. However, there is also evidence that fish embryos are less sensitive than juvenile fish for certain types of chemicals, including neurotoxicants. The utility of fish embryos for pesticide hazard assessment was investigated by comparing published zebrafish embryo toxicity data from pesticides with median lethal concentration 50% (LC50) data for juveniles of 3 commonly tested fish species: rainbow trout, bluegill sunfish, and sheepshead minnow. A poor, albeit significant, relationship (r(2 ) = 0.28; p zebrafish embryo and juvenile fish toxicity when pesticides were considered as a single group, but a much better relationship (r(2)  = 0.64; p pesticide mode of action was factored into an analysis of covariance. This discrepancy is partly explained by the large number of neurotoxic pesticides in the dataset, supporting previous findings that commonly used fish embryo toxicity test endpoints are particularly insensitive to neurotoxicants. These results indicate that it is still premature to replace juvenile fish toxicity tests with embryo-based tests such as the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Fish Embryo Acute Toxicity Test for routine pesticide hazard assessment, although embryo testing could be used with other screening tools for testing prioritization. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;9999:1-6. © 2016 SETAC.

  5. Organophosphorus insecticides: Toxic effects and bioanalytical tests for evaluating toxicity during degradation processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čolović Mirjana B.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphorus insecticides have been the most applied group of insecticides for the last two decades. Their main toxic effects are related to irreversible inactivation of acetylcholinesterase (AChE. Actually, they covalently bind to serine OH group in the enzyme active site forming phosphorylated enzyme that cannot hydrolyze acetylcholine. Organophosphorus insecticides in the environment undergo the natural degradation pathway including mainly homogeneous and heterogeneous hydrolysis (especially at high pH generating non-inhibiting products. Additionally, thio organophosphates are easily oxidized by naturally present oxidants and UV light, forming more toxic and stable oxons. Thus, oxidative degradation procedures, generally referred as advanced oxidation processes (AOP, have been applied for their efficient removal from contaminated waters. The most applied bioassays to monitor the organophosphate toxicity i.e. the detoxification degree during AOP are Vibrio fischeri and AChE bioassays. Vibrio fischeri toxicity test exploits bioluminescence as the measure of luciferase activity of this marine bacterium, whereas AChE bioassay is based on AChE activity inhibition. Both bioanalytical techniques are rapid (several minutes, simple, sensitive and reproducible. Vibrio fischeri test seems to be a versatile indicator of toxic compounds generated in AOP for organophosphorus insecticides degradation. However, detection of neurotoxic AChE inhibitors, which can be formed in AOP of some organophosphates, requires AChE bioassays. Therefore, AChE toxicity test is more appropriate for monitoring the degradation processes of thio organophosphates, because more toxic oxo organophosphates might be formed and overlooked by Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence inhibition. In addition, during organophosphates removal by AOP, compounds with strong genotoxic potential may be formed, which cannot be detected by standard toxicity tests. For this reason, determination of

  6. PIXE analysis of chromium phytoaccumulation by the aquatic macrophytes Eicchornia crassipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza-Quiñones, F. R.; Rizzutto, M. A.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M. H.; Módenes, A. N.; Palácio, S. M.; Silva, E. A.; Rossi, F. L.; Martin, N.; Szymanski, N.

    2009-04-01

    The uptake of hexavalent chromium in free living floating aquatic macrophytes Eicchornia crassipes cultivated in non-toxic chromium-doped hydroponic solutions is presented. A Cr-uptake bioaccumulation experiment was carried out using healthy macrophytes grown in a temperature controlled greenhouse. Six samples of nutrient media and plants were collected during the 23 day experiment. Roots and leaves were acid digested with the addition of an internal Gallium standard, for thin film sample preparation and quantitative Cr analysis by PIXE method. The Cr 6+ mass uptake by the macrophytes reached up to 70% of the initial concentration, comparable to former results and literature data. The Cr-uptake data were described using a non-structural first order kinetic model. Due to low cost and high removal efficiency, living aquatic macrophytes E. crassipes are a viable biosorbent in an artificial wetland of a water effluent treatment plant.

  7. PIXE analysis of chromium phytoaccumulation by the aquatic macrophytes Eicchornia crassipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinoza-Quinones, F.R. [Department of Chemical Engineering - Postgraduate Program - NBQ, West Parana State University, Rua da Faculdade, 645, Jardim Santa Maria, 85903-000 Toledo, Parana (Brazil)], E-mail: f.espinoza@terra.com.br; Rizzutto, M.A.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M.H. [Physics Institute, University of Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao s/n, Travessa R 187, 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Modenes, A.N.; Palacio, S.M.; Silva, E.A.; Rossi, F.L.; Martin, N.; Szymanski, N. [Department of Chemical Engineering - Postgraduate Program - NBQ, West Parana State University, Rua da Faculdade, 645, Jardim Santa Maria, 85903-000 Toledo, Parana (Brazil)

    2009-04-15

    The uptake of hexavalent chromium in free living floating aquatic macrophytes Eicchornia crassipes cultivated in non-toxic chromium-doped hydroponic solutions is presented. A Cr-uptake bioaccumulation experiment was carried out using healthy macrophytes grown in a temperature controlled greenhouse. Six samples of nutrient media and plants were collected during the 23 day experiment. Roots and leaves were acid digested with the addition of an internal Gallium standard, for thin film sample preparation and quantitative Cr analysis by PIXE method. The Cr{sup 6+} mass uptake by the macrophytes reached up to 70% of the initial concentration, comparable to former results and literature data. The Cr-uptake data were described using a non-structural first order kinetic model. Due to low cost and high removal efficiency, living aquatic macrophytes E. crassipes are a viable biosorbent in an artificial wetland of a water effluent treatment plant.

  8. A Mini-Nitrification Test for Toxicity Screening, Minntox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvin, Erik; Dyreborg, Søren; Menck, C.

    1994-01-01

    There is a high demand for a rapid, simple, and inexpensive test for screening of the toxicity of wastewater, polluted groundwater and chemicals in order to protect sewage treatment plants and aquatic and terrestrial recipients. The mini-nitrification test, MINNTOX, presented here, fulfils...

  9. Use of blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) embryos for toxicity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, R.; O`Malley, K. [Skidaway Inst. of Oceanography, Savannah, GA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    After fertilization, blue crab embryos develop in egg sacs attached to the female pleopods, often referred to as the sponge. Lipovitellin and lipid droplets in the egg sacs provide energy and nutrition for the developing embryos. Embryos were removed from the sponge and transferred to 24 well culture plates containing sea water with or without toxicants, Each well contained 10 embryos. After 7 to 10 days, embryos hatched to swimming zoea. The effects of toxicants at various concentrations on hatching were determined and the EC{sub 50} calculated. For example, the EC{sub 50} for tributyltin, fenvalerate and mercuric chloride were 50, 30 and 90 ng/liter, respectively. The hatching success of control embryos ranged from 95 to 98%. Formation of the heart, eyespot formation, appendage formation and utilization rate of lipovitellin were also effected by exposure to toxicants. At a low concentration of mercuric ion (30ng/liter) the heart formed, but there was no heart beat. Eyespot formation was abnormal in the presence of high concentrations of cadmium (2 {micro}g/liter) and zinc (5 {micro}g/liter), Crab embryos offer many advantages for toxicity testing of pure compounds or mixtures in water, including toxicity testing of sediment pore water. The crab embryos may also serve as models to understand the effect of specific toxicants on the heart and eye spots of crustaceans.

  10. Functional toxicology: tools to advance the future of toxicity testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon David Gaytán

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The increased presence of chemical contaminants in the environment is an undeniable concern to human health and ecosystems. Historically, by relying heavily upon costly and laborious animal-based toxicity assays, the field of toxicology has often neglected examinations of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of toxicity for the majority of compounds – information that, if available, would strengthen risk assessment analyses. Functional toxicology, where cells or organisms with gene deletions or depleted proteins are used to assess genetic requirements for chemical tolerance, can advance the field of toxicity testing by contributing data regarding chemical mechanisms of toxicity. Functional toxicology can be accomplished using available genetic tools in yeasts, other fungi and bacteria, and eukaryotes of increased complexity, including zebrafish, fruit flies, rodents, and human cell lines. Underscored is the value of using less complex systems such as yeasts to direct further studies in more complex systems such as human cell lines. Functional techniques can yield (1 novel insights into chemical toxicity; (2 pathways and mechanisms deserving of further study; and (3 candidate human toxicant susceptibility or resistance genes.

  11. Concurrent removal and accumulation of heavy metals by the three aquatic macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Virendra Kumar; Tripathi, B D

    2008-10-01

    Under the present investigation effectiveness of three aquatic macrophytes Pistia stratiotes L. (water lettuce), Spirodela polyrrhiza W. Koch (duckweed) and Eichhornia crassipes were tested for the removal of five heavy metals (Fe, Zn, Cu, Cr and Cd). These plants were grown at three different concentrations (1.0, 2.0 and 5.0mgl(-1)) of metals in laboratory experiment. Result revealed high removal (>90%) of different metals during 15 days experiment. Highest removal was observed on 12th day of experiment, thereafter it decreased. Results revealed E. crassipes as the most efficient for the removal of selected heavy metals followed by P. stratiotes and S. polyrrhiza. Results from analysis confirmed the accumulation of different metals within the plant and a corresponding decrease of metals in the water. Significant correlations between metal concentration in final water and macrophytes were obtained. Plants have accumulated heavy metals in its body without the production of any toxicity or reduction in growth. Selected plants shown a wide range of tolerance to all of the selected metals and therefore can be used for large scale removal of heavy metals from waste water.

  12. Scanning respirometer for toxicity tests using micro-organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min-Quan; Li, Xiang-Ming; Wong, Yuk-Shan; Kwan, FolkYear

    1995-09-01

    A novel respirometer is developed for microbial toxicity tests. The respirometer is based on luminescent quenching of oxygen to measure the concentration of dissolved oxygen in cell vessels and evaluate the toxicity of chemicals by monitoring the effect of toxicants on cell respiration of micro-organisms. The oxygen sensing element is ruthenium complex absorbed on the surface of silica particles followed by immobilizing on a silicone rubber film. The oxygen sensing film is coated on the inner bottom of a transparent cell vessel. A sensing device scanning under the cell vessel is used for remote monitoring of the oxygen concentration inside the cell vessels so that a large number of samples can be handled in one batch. The sensing device includes the excitation light sources and an optical cable connected to a filter and a photomultiplier tube for detecting the luminescence in the cell vessel which can then be related to the dissolved oxygen concentration inside the cell vessel. The movement of the sensing device and data acquisition are controlled by a personal computer. The toxicity of heavy metals to activated sludge, soil bacteria and E. coli were tested using the present device. The scanning respirometer provides a new alternative for fast and large scale screening and monitoring of toxicants using micro-organisms.

  13. How TK-TD and population models for aquatic macrophytes could support the risk assessment for plant protection products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hommen, U.; Schmitt, W.; Heine, S.; Brock, T.C.M.; Duquesne, S.; Manson, P.; Meregali, G.; Ochoa-Acuna, H.; Vliet, van P.; Arts, G.H.P.

    2016-01-01

    This case study of the SETAC workshop MODELINK demonstrates the potential use of mechanistic effects models for macrophytes to extrapolate from effects of a plant protection product observed in laboratory tests to effects resulting from dynamic exposure on macrophyte populations in edge-of-field wat

  14. Production in aquatic macrophyte communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binzer, Thomas; Sand-Jensen, Kaj

    2002-01-01

    Many terrestrial plant canopies regulate spatial patterns in leaf density and leaf inclination to distribute light evenly between the photosynthetic tissue and to optimize light utilization efficiency. Sessile aquatic macrophytes, however, cannot maintain the same well-defined three......-dimensional structure because of the strong drag and shear forces of moving water. This difference in canopy structure has been suggested to account for the three- to fivefold higher gross production rates in terrestrial than aquatic communities. To evaluate the effect of community structure in aquatic habitats, we...... was markedly enhanced by a vertical orientation of thalli when absorptance and community density were both high. This result implies that aquatic macrophytes of high thallus absorptance and community density exposed to high light are limited in attaining high gross production rates because of their inability...

  15. Production in aquatic macrophyte communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binzer, Thomas; Sand-Jensen, Kaj

    2002-01-01

    -dimensional structure because of the strong drag and shear forces of moving water. This difference in canopy structure has been suggested to account for the three- to fivefold higher gross production rates in terrestrial than aquatic communities. To evaluate the effect of community structure in aquatic habitats, we...... to distribute photons evenly between the photosynthetic tissues. As scattering and attenuation in the water column increase, the effect of thallus structure on production declines and thin transparent macrophytes are more efficient at utilizing light than thick opaque macrophytes. The results confirm...... combined a simple mechanistic model and empirical measurements on artificially structured macroalgal communities (Ulva lactuca) with varying thallus absorptance and community density. Predicted and measured values corresponded closely and revealed that gross production in high-light environments...

  16. Freshwater toxicity testing using rehydrated Philodina sp. (Rotifera) as test animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Terry W; Johnston, Rachel K; Matthews, Amelia B

    2017-10-01

    Rotifers have become widely used in aquatic toxicology as a rapid screening test for toxicity. The commercial availability of diapausing embryos (cysts) have facilitated their popularity because test animals can be obtained without having to master the details of culturing. Other rotifer species have life stages capable of surviving desiccation and also could be used in non-culture systems for toxicity assessment. In this article, we describe a system for toxicity testing in freshwater based on rehydrating desiccated bdelloid rotifers in the genus Philodina. These animals can remain in this anhydrobiotic state for more than one year and then rehydrate within hours to provide animals for toxicity tests. We describe three endpoints: a 1.5 h ingestion test, a 24 h mortality test, and a five day reproductive test. The latter test requires feeding and a method using a dried commercial product is explained. Using desiccated rotifers and dried food in toxicity tests make this system especially attractive because of its flexibility and low threshold of biological expertise required to execute the tests. The use of the Philodina toxicity test is illustrated with four metals: copper, lead, mercury and cadmium. Reproduction generally was the most sensitive endpoint, with EC50s of 0.33, 0.44, 0.60, and 0.12 mg/L, respectively. Ingestion was a close second with EC50s of 0.13, 1.64, 0.64, and 6.26 mg/L, respectively. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The impact of toxicity testing costs on nanomaterial regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Young; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Kandlikar, Milind

    2009-05-01

    Information about the toxicity of nanoparticles is important in determining how nanoparticles will be regulated. In the U.S., the burden of collecting this information and conducting risk assessment is placed on regulatory agencies without the budgetary means to carry out this mandate. In this paper, we analyze the impact of testing costs on society's ability to gather information about nanoparticle toxicity and whether such costs can reasonably be borne by an emerging industry. We show for the United States that costs for testing existing nanoparticles ranges from $249 million for optimistic assumptions about nanoparticle hazards (i.e., they are primarily safe and mainly require simpler screening assays) to $1.18 billion for a more comprehensive precautionary approach (i.e., all nanomaterials require long-term in vivo testing). At midlevel estimates of total corporate R&D spending, and assuming plausible levels of spending on hazard testing, the time taken to complete testing is likely to be very high (34-53 years) if all existing nanomaterials are to be thoroughly tested. These delays will only increase with time as new nanomaterials are introduced. The delays are considerably less if less-stringent yet risk-averse perspectives are used. Our results support a tiered risk-assessment strategy similar to the EU's REACH legislation for regulating toxic chemicals.

  18. Use of neomysis mercedis (crustacea: mysidacea) for estuarine toxicity tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, O.M.; Fujimura, R.W.; Finlayson, B.J. (Aquatic Toxicology Laboratory, Elk Grove, CA (United States))

    1993-03-01

    The mysid Neomysis mercedis was examined as a test organism for use in acute toxicity tests at intermediate salinities characteristic of estuarine waters. Several sensitive invertebrate species are available for marine assessments (mysids) and freshwater tests (cladocerans), but few are available for estuarine toxicity tests. Observations in the laboratory indicate that Neomysis mercedis can be reared successfully at a temperature of 17[degrees]C, a salinity of 2%, and a population density less than 5/L. Brine shrimp nauplii Artemia salina, algae, and commercial foods were used to sustain mysid cultures. Neomysis mercedis is vivaparous and can complete its life cycle in 3-4 months. Neomysis mercedis is as sensitive as or more sensitive to toxicants than the marine mysid Mysidopsis bahia and the freshwater cladocerans Daphnia magna, Ceriodaphnia dubia, and Simocephalus serrulatus. The mean 96-h LC50 values (concentrations lethal to half the test animals) for N. mercedis, in increasing order, were 0.20 [mu]g/L for thiobencarb, and for malathion, 14 [mu]g/L for carbofuran, 150 [mu]g/L for copper sulfate, 280 [mu]g/L for thiobencarb, and 1,600 [mu]g/L for molinate. Neonates (5 d postrelease) were generally more sensitive than older juveniles. Coefficients of variation (100[center dot]SD/mean) of LC50 values varied from 21 to 35%. 37 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. Rapid testing methods for food contaminants and toxicants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiachi Chiou; Arthur Ho Hon Leung; Hang Wai Lee; Wing-tak Wong

    2015-01-01

    Food safety is one of the major concerns in every country regardless of the economic and social development. The frequent occurrence of food scandals in the world has led the Chinese government to implement several strategies to fortify the food supply system to a high food safety standard. This relies heavily on laboratory testing services but conventional methods for detection of food contaminants and toxicants are limited by sophisticated sample preparation procedures, long analysis time, large instruments and professional personnel to meet the increasing demands. In this review, we have incorporated most of the current and potential rapid detection methods for many notorious food contaminants and toxicants including microbial agents, toxic ions, pesticides, veterinary drugs and preservatives, as wel as detection of geneticaly modiifed food genes and adulterated edible oil. Development of rapid, accurate, easy-to-use and affordable testing methods could urge food handlers and the public to actively screen for food contaminants and toxicants instead of passively relying on monitoring by the government examination facility. This review also provides several recommendations including how to encourage the public to engage in the food safety management system and provide optimal education and ifnancial assistance that may improve the current Chinese food safety control system.

  20. Antioxidant, Antimicrobial Activity and Toxicity Test of Pilea microphylla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Modarresi Chahardehi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 9 plant extracts were tested, using two different kinds of extracting methods to evaluate the antioxidant and antimicrobial activities from Pilea microphylla (Urticaceae family and including toxicity test. Antioxidant activity were tested by using DPPH free radical scavenging, also total phenolic contents and total flavonoid contents were determined. Toxicity assay carried out by using brine shrimps. Methanol extract of method I (ME I showed the highest antioxidant activity at 69.51±1.03. Chloroform extract of method I (CE I showed the highest total phenolic contents at 72.10±0.71 and chloroform extract of method II (CE II showed the highest total flavonoid contents at 60.14±0.33. The antimicrobial activity of Pilea microphylla extract was tested in vitro by using disc diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC. The Pilea microphylla extract showed antibacterial activity against some Gram negative and positive bacteria. The extracts did not exhibit antifungal and antiyeast activity. The hexane extract of method I (HE I was not toxic against brine shrimp (LC50 value was 3880 μg/ml. Therefore, the extracts could be suitable as antimicrobial and antioxidative agents in food industry.

  1. Amiodarone lung toxicity: role of pulmonary function tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foresti, V; Carini, L; Lovagnini-Scher, C A; Parisio, E; Scolari, N; Pozzi, G; Clini, V

    1987-01-01

    Forty-three patients treated with amiodarone hydrochloride with an average daily dose of 204.7 +/- 79.4 mg/day for a mean period of 37.1 +/- 25.3 months, were studied by clinical examination, chest roentgenograms, pulmonary function tests and blood gas analyses. The habits of cigarette smoking were also recorded and expressed as cigarette pack/years. Pulmonary function tests did not show any differences from control subjects and no correlation was found between exposure to drug and lung function. However, one patient developed abnormalities in the chest X-ray (interstitial type) and a reduction of carbon monoxide diffusion capacity as a possible manifestation of amiodarone lung toxicity. Nine patients (22%) had a 20% decrease from normal in carbon monoxide diffusion capacity and three (7%) had a 15% decrease in total lung capacity. More treated patients had interstitial abnormalities in the chest X-ray (14%) than controls (5.5%). Although pulmonary function test abnormalities could be detected in patients taking amiodarone, they were not usually severe enough to interfere with gas exchange. Our results confirm the rarity of amiodarone lung toxicity when a low dosage is used, and suggest the advisability of periodical monitoring, including clinical examination, chest X-ray and pulmonary function tests in order to detect the earliest signs of amiodarone lung toxicity.

  2. Non-animal Replacements for Acute Toxicity Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker-Treasure, Carol; Coll, Kevin; Belot, Nathalie; Longmore, Chris; Bygrave, Karl; Avey, Suzanne; Clothier, Richard

    2015-07-01

    Current approaches to predicting adverse effects in humans from acute toxic exposure to cosmetic ingredients still heavily necessitate the use of animals under EU legislation, particularly in the context of the REACH system, when cosmetic ingredients are also destined for use in other industries. These include the LD50 test, the Up-and-Down Procedure and the Fixed Dose Procedure, which are regarded as having notable scientific deficiencies and low transferability to humans. By expanding on previous in vitro tests, such as the animal cell-based 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake (NRU) assay, this project aims to develop a truly animal-free predictive test for the acute toxicity of cosmetic ingredients in humans, by using human-derived cells and a prediction model that does not rely on animal data. The project, funded by Innovate UK, will incorporate the NRU assay with human dermal fibroblasts in animal product-free culture, to generate an in vitro protocol that can be validated as an accepted replacement for the currently available in vivo tests. To date, the project has successfully completed an assessment of the robustness and reproducibility of the method, by using sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) as a positive control, and displaying analogous results to those of the original studies with mouse 3T3 cells. Currently, the testing of five known ingredients from key groups (a surfactant, a preservative, a fragrance, a colour and an emulsifier) is under way. The testing consists of initial range-finding runs followed by three valid runs of a main experiment with the appropriate concentration ranges, to generate IC50 values. Expanded blind trials of 20 ingredients will follow. Early results indicate that this human cell-based test holds the potential to replace aspects of in vivo animal acute toxicity testing, particularly with reference to cosmetic ingredients. 2015 FRAME.

  3. Macrophytes: Freshwater Forests of Lakes and Rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermid, Karla J.; Naiman, Robert J.

    1983-01-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological effects on macrophytes (aquatic plants) on the freshwater ecosystem are discussed. Research questions and issues related to these organisms are also discussed, including adaptations for survival in a wet environment, ecological consequences of large-scale macrophyte eradication, seasonal changes in plant…

  4. Undetected Toxicity Risk in Pharmacogenetic Testing for Dihydropyrimidine Dehydrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicia Stefania Falvella

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluoropyrimidines, the mainstay agents for the treatment of colorectal cancer, alone or as a part of combination therapies, cause severe adverse reactions in about 10%–30% of patients. Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD, a key enzyme in the catabolism of 5-fluorouracil, has been intensively investigated in relation to fluoropyrimidine toxicity, and several DPD gene (DPYD polymorphisms are associated with decreased enzyme activity and increased risk of fluoropyrimidine-related toxicity. In patients carrying non-functional DPYD variants (c.1905+1G>A, c.1679T>G, c.2846A>T, fluoropyrimidines should be avoided or reduced according to the patients’ homozygous or heterozygous status, respectively. For other common DPYD variants (c.496A>G, c.1129-5923C>G, c.1896T>C, conflicting data are reported and their use in clinical practice still needs to be validated. The high frequency of DPYD polymorphism and the lack of large prospective trials may explain differences in studies’ results. The epigenetic regulation of DPD expression has been recently investigated to explain the variable activity of the enzyme. DPYD promoter methylation and its regulation by microRNAs may affect the toxicity risk of fluoropyrimidines. The studies we reviewed indicate that pharmacogenetic testing is promising to direct personalised dosing of fluoropyrimidines, although further investigations are needed to establish the role of DPD in severe toxicity in patients treated for colorectal cancer.

  5. Field assessments in conjunction with whole effluent toxicity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Point, T.W.; Waller, W.T.

    2000-01-01

    Whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests are widely used to assess potential effects of wastewater discharges on aquatic life. This paper represents a summary of chapters in a 1996 Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry-sponsored workshop and a literature review concerning linkages between WET testing and associated field biomonitoring. Most published studies thus far focus primarily on benthic macroinvertebrates and on effluent-dominated stream systems in which effluents demonstrate little or no significant acute toxicity. Fewer studies examine WET test predictability in other aquatic ecosystems (e.g., wetlands, estuaries, large rivers) or deal with instream biota such as fish and primary producers. Published results indicate that standards for the usual WET freshwater test species, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas, may not always protect most of the species inhabiting a receiving stream. Although WET tests are useful in predicting aquatic individual responses, they are not meant to directly measure natural population or community responses. Further, they do not address bioconcentration or bioaccumulation of hydrophobic compounds; do not assess eutrophication effects in receiving systems; and lastly, do not reflect genotoxic effects or function to test for endocrine-disrupting chemicals. Consequently, a more direct evaluation of ecosystem health, using bioassessment techniques, may be needed to properly evaluate aquatic systems affected by wastewater discharges.

  6. Integral toxicity test of sea waters by an algal biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonnina, Daniele; Campanella, Luigi; Sammartino, Maria Pia; Visco, Giovanni

    2002-04-01

    An integral toxicity test, based on an algal biosensor and suitable to be used in sea water, is presented. The biosensor was designed and built by coupling a Clark oxygen electrode as transducer and the marine alga Spirulina subsalsa as biological mediator; it constitutes the "core" in a lab-scale prototype of a flow apparatus suitable to continuously monitor, in sea water, the photosynthetic activity of the alga and, from its variation, the marine pollution from the toxicological point of view. Inorganic pollutants (heavy metals) were tested in previous researches while organic ones (chlorophenols, pesticides and surfactants) are the object of the present paper.

  7. The study of aquatic macrophytes in Neotropics: a scientometrical view of the main trends and gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padial, A A; Bini, L M; Thomaz, S M

    2008-11-01

    Aquatic macrophytes comprises a diverse group of organisms including angiosperms, ferns, mosses, liverworts and some macroalgae that occur in seasonally or permanently wet environments. Among other implications, aquatic macrophytes are highly productive and with an important structuring role on aquatic environments. Ecological studies involving aquatic plants substantially increased in the last years. However, a precise view of researches devoted to aquatic macrophytes in Neotropics is necessary to reach a reliable evaluation of the scientific production. In the current study, we performed a scientometrics analysis of the scientific production devoted to Neotropical macrophytes in an attempt to find the main trends and gaps of researches concerning this group. The publication devoted to macrophytes in Neotropics increased conspicuously in the last two decades. Brazil, Argentina, Mexico and Chile were the most productive among Neotropical countries. Our analyses showed that the studies dealt mostly with the influences of aquatic macrophytes on organisms and abiotic features. Studies with a predictive approach or aiming to test ecological hypothesis are scarce. In addition, researches aiming to describe unknown species are still necessary. This is essential to support conservation efforts and to subsidize further investigations testing ecological hypotheses.

  8. TRACKING PYRETHROID TOXICITY IN SURFACE WATER SAMPLES: EXPOSURE DYNAMICS AND TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION TOOLS FOR LABORATORY TESTS WITH HYALELLA AZTECA (AMPHIPODA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deanovic, Linda A; Stillway, Marie; Hammock, Bruce G; Fong, Stephanie; Werner, Inge

    2017-09-09

    Pyrethroid insecticides are commonly used in pest control and are present at toxic concentrations in surface waters of agricultural and urban areas worldwide. Monitoring is challenging due to their high hydrophobicity and low toxicity thresholds, which often fall below the detection limits of analytical methods. Standard daphnid bioassays used in surface water monitoring are not sensitive enough to protect more susceptible invertebrate species such as the amphipod, Hyalella azteca, and chemical loss during toxicity testing is of concern. In this study, we quantified toxicity loss during storage and testing, using both natural and synthetic water, and present a tool to enhance toxic signal strength for improved sensitivity of H. azteca toxicity tests. The average half-life during storage in LDPE cubitainers at 4°C of five pyrethroids (permethrin, bifenthrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, cyfluthrin, esfenvalerate) and one organophosphate (chlorpyrifos; used as reference) was 1.4 d, and piperonyl butoxide (PBO) proved an effective tool to potentiate toxicity. We conclude that toxicity tests on ambient water samples containing these hydrophobic insecticides are likely to underestimate toxicity present in the field, and mimic short pulse rather than continuous exposures. Where these chemicals are of concern, the addition of PBO during testing can yield valuable information on their presence or absence. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of methodology for community level toxicity testing using the fathead minnow seven day survival-growth impairment test

    OpenAIRE

    Lauth, John Robert

    1990-01-01

    Single species toxicity tests are widely used to assess the potential effects of a toxicant on aquatic life. Increasingly, it is necessary to understand how the results of these tests relate to toxicant effects in natural communities. This dissertation presents the methodology and validation for a community level toxicity test that bridges the gap between single species tests and natutal community responses. The research involved control of environmental parameters, improvement...

  10. Establishing relative sensitivities of various toxicity testing organisms to ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karle, L.M.; Mayhew, H.L.; Barrows, M.E.; Karls, R.K. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The toxicity of ammonia to various organisms was examined to develop a baseline for mortality in several commonly used testing species. This baseline data will assist in choosing the proper test species and in interpreting results as they pertain to ammonia. Responses for two juvenile fish species, three marine amphipods, and two species of mysid shrimp were compared for their sensitivity to levels of ammonia. All mortality caused by ammonia in the bottom-dwelling Citharichthys stigmaeus occurred within 24 h of exposure, whereas mortality in the silverside, Menidia beryllina, occurred over the entire 96-h test duration. Responses to ammonia varied among the amphipods Rhepoxynius abronius, Ampelisca abdita, and Eohaustorius estuarius. R. abronius and A. abdita showed similar sensitivity to ammonia at lower concentrations; A. abdita appeared more sensitive than R. abronius at levels above 40 mg/L. Concentrations of ammonia required to produce significant mortality in the amphipod E. estuarius were far higher than the other species examined (> 100 mg/L NH{sub 3}). A comparison of ammonia toxicity with two commonly used invertebrates, Holmesimysis sculpts and Mysidopsis bahia, suggest that these two species of mysid have similar sensitivities to ammonia. Further studies with ammonia that examine sensitivity of different organisms should be conducted to assist regulatory and environmental agencies in determining appropriate test species and in interpreting toxicological results as they may be affected by levels of ammonia.

  11. Growth rate, protein:RNA ratio and stoichiometric homeostasis of submerged macrophytes under eutrophication stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing W.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth rate hypothesis (GRH and stoichiometric homeostasis of photoautotrophs have always been questioned. However, little is known about GRH and stoichiometric homeostasis of aquatic plants, especially submerged macrophytes. Therefore, we aim to test the GRH and explore stoichiometric homeostasis of four freshwater submerged macrophytes under eutrophication stress. At the single species level and the multi-species level, N:P ratios of Potamogeton maackianus, Myriophyllum spicatum, Vallisneria natans and Ceratophyllum demersum had no consistent trends with growth rates. However, protein:RNA ratios of P. maackianus, M. spicatum and V. natans all correlated negatively with growth rates, demonstrating GRH can apply to freshwater submerged macrophytes, even though they are threatening by eutrophication stress. Protein:RNA ratios positively correlated with N:P ratios in culture media and tissues in submerged macrophytes except in P. maackianus (30d, suggesting effects of varying N:P ratios in culture media on protein:RNA ratios are basically in concert with tissue N:P ratios under short-time eutrophication stress. Stoichiometric homeostasis coefficients (HN:P indicated submerged macrophytes have weak homeostasis. Stoichiometric homeostasis of V. natans was stronger than those of P. maackianus, M. spicatum and C. demersum. The differences in GRH and homeostasis of the four submerged macrophytes may be due to species traits.

  12. Combinatorial QSAR modeling of chemical toxicants tested against Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hao; Tropsha, Alexander; Fourches, Denis; Varnek, Alexandre; Papa, Ester; Gramatica, Paola; Oberg, Tomas; Dao, Phuong; Cherkasov, Artem; Tetko, Igor V

    2008-04-01

    Selecting most rigorous quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) approaches is of great importance in the development of robust and predictive models of chemical toxicity. To address this issue in a systematic way, we have formed an international virtual collaboratory consisting of six independent groups with shared interests in computational chemical toxicology. We have compiled an aqueous toxicity data set containing 983 unique compounds tested in the same laboratory over a decade against Tetrahymena pyriformis. A modeling set including 644 compounds was selected randomly from the original set and distributed to all groups that used their own QSAR tools for model development. The remaining 339 compounds in the original set (external set I) as well as 110 additional compounds (external set II) published recently by the same laboratory (after this computational study was already in progress) were used as two independent validation sets to assess the external predictive power of individual models. In total, our virtual collaboratory has developed 15 different types of QSAR models of aquatic toxicity for the training set. The internal prediction accuracy for the modeling set ranged from 0.76 to 0.93 as measured by the leave-one-out cross-validation correlation coefficient ( Q abs2). The prediction accuracy for the external validation sets I and II ranged from 0.71 to 0.85 (linear regression coefficient R absI2) and from 0.38 to 0.83 (linear regression coefficient R absII2), respectively. The use of an applicability domain threshold implemented in most models generally improved the external prediction accuracy but at the same time led to a decrease in chemical space coverage. Finally, several consensus models were developed by averaging the predicted aquatic toxicity for every compound using all 15 models, with or without taking into account their respective applicability domains. We find that consensus models afford higher prediction accuracy for the

  13. Beryllium toxicity testing in the suspension culture of mouse fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rössner, P; Bencko, V

    1980-01-01

    Suspension culture of mouse fibroblast cell line L-A 115 was used to test beryllium toxicity in the presence of magnesium ions. Beryllium added to the MEM cultivation medium was bound in a complex with sulphosalicylic acid BeSSA complex, because the use of beryllium chloride turned out to yield ineffective beryllium phosphate that formed macroscopically detectable insoluble opacities. The BeSSA complex was used in the concentration range: 10(-3)--10(-9)M, magnesium was used in 3 concentrations: 10(-1)M, 5 x 10(-2)M and 10(-2)M. Growth curve analysis revealed pronounced beryllium toxicity at the concentration of 10(-3)M, magnesium-produced toxic changes were observed only at the concentration of 10(-1)M. No competition between the beryllium and magnesium ions was recorded. It is assumed that the possible beryllium-magnesium competition was significantly modified by the use of BeSSA complex-bound beryllium.

  14. In situ toxicity testing of Lake Orta sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica BELTRAMI

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of in situ assays, which was initially proposed by Nebeker et al. (1984, is presently recognised as an effective tool to study the effects of contaminated sediments (Burton 1992. The placement of caged organisms to study short-term effects of exposure to contaminated environments has been employed for a number of aquatic species, both fish and invertebrate. This paper describes the application of this techniques to study the toxicity of Lake Orta sediments using both resident (Daphnia obtusa, D. longispina and non-resident (D. magna, Echinogammarus stammeri invertebrate species. In each of the selected stations, a group of four chambers, each containing 10 individuals, were deployed by scuba divers at 10 m depth and collected after 48 h. For each chamber, the surviving animals were counted, transferred to the laboratory and kept in Lake Orta water until their death. The number of neonates produced by each female in the laboratory was recorded daily in order to determine if the short exposure period could affect the reproductive behaviour of the animals. The technique and results reported here indicate the utility of in situ testing and suggest that, under certain conditions, this method of testing may yield results which are more representative of actual environmental conditions by avoiding the sample manipulation required for traditional laboratory toxicity tests.

  15. International Conference on Harmonisation; guidance on the duration of chronic toxicity testing in animals (rodent and nonrodent toxicity testing); availability. Notice. Food and Drug Administration, HHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-25

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is publishing a guidance entitled "S4A Duration of Chronic Toxicity Testing in Animals (Rodent and Nonrodent Toxicity Testing)." The guidance was prepared under the auspices of the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH) and is intended to provide guidance on the duration of chronic toxicity testing in rodents and nonrodents as part of the safety evaluation of a drug product. FDA is also noting circumstances in which it may accept durations of chronic toxicity testing in nonrodents that differ from the duration generally recommended by ICH.

  16. Acute toxicity testing of chemicals-Opportunities to avoid redundant testing and use alternative approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creton, Stuart; Dewhurst, Ian C; Earl, Lesley K; Gehen, Sean C; Guest, Robert L; Hotchkiss, Jon A; Indans, Ian; Woolhiser, Michael R; Billington, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of the acute systemic oral, dermal, and inhalation toxicities, skin and eye irritancy, and skin sensitisation potential of chemicals is required under regulatory schemes worldwide. In vivo studies conducted to assess these endpoints can sometimes be associated with substantial adverse effects in the test animals, and their use should always be scientifically justified. It has been argued that while information obtained from such acute tests provides data needed to meet classification and labelling regulations, it is of limited value for hazard and risk assessments. Inconsistent application of in vitro replacements, protocol requirements across regions, and bridging principles also contribute to unnecessary and redundant animal testing. Assessment of data from acute oral and dermal toxicity testing demonstrates that acute dermal testing rarely provides value for hazard assessment purposes when an acute oral study has been conducted. Options to waive requirements for acute oral and inhalation toxicity testing should be employed to avoid unnecessary in vivo studies. In vitro irritation models should receive wider adoption and be used to meet regulatory needs. Global requirements for sensitisation testing need continued harmonisation for both substance and mixture assessments. This paper highlights where alternative approaches or elimination of tests can reduce and refine animal use for acute toxicity requirements.

  17. TOXICITY TESTING IN THE 21ST CENTURY: A VISION AND A STRATEGY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krewski, D.; Acosta, D.; Andersen, M.

    2010-01-01

    With the release of the landmark report Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and a Strategy, the U. S. National Academy of Sciences, in 2007, precipitated a major change in the way toxicity testing is conducted. It envisions increased efficiency in toxicity testing and decreased animal ...

  18. Non-animal methodologies within biomedical research and toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory animal models are limited by scientific constraints on human applicability, and increasing regulatory restrictions, driven by social concerns. Reliance on laboratory animals also incurs marked - and in some cases, prohibitive - logistical challenges, within high-throughput chemical testing programmes, such as those currently underway within Europe and the US. However, a range of non-animal methodologies is available within biomedical research and toxicity testing. These include: mechanisms to enhance the sharing and assessment of existing data prior to conducting further studies, and physicochemical evaluation and computerised modelling, including the use of structure-activity relationships and expert systems. Minimally-sentient animals from lower phylogenetic orders or early developmental vertebral stages may be used, as well as microorganisms and higher plants. A variety of tissue cultures, including immortalised cell lines, embryonic and adult stem cells, and organotypic cultures, are also available. In vitro assays utilising bacterial, yeast, protozoal, mammalian or human cell cultures exist for a wide range of toxic and other endpoints. These may be static or perfused, and may be used individually, or combined within test batteries. Human hepatocyte cultures and metabolic activation systems offer potential assessment of metabolite activity and organ-organ interaction. Microarray technology may allow genetic expression profiling, increasing the speed of toxin detection, well prior to more invasive endpoints. Enhanced human clinical trials utilising micro- dosing, staggered dosing, and more representative study populations and durations, as well as surrogate human tissues, advanced imaging modalities and human epidemiological, sociological and psycho- logical studies, may increase our understanding of illness aetiology and pathogenesis, and facilitate the development of safe and effective pharmacologic interventions. Particularly when human tissues

  19. Photosynthesis tests as an alternative to growth tests for hazard assessment of toxicant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, S.; Kusk, Kresten Ole

    2000-01-01

    Acute (3- and 6-h) toxic responses toward Cu, linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS), and tributyltin (TBT) of lightsaturated and unsaturated photosynthesis were investigated for Rhodomonas salina and Skeletonema costatum obtained from exponentially growing batch cultures and from chemostat cultures...... limited by either nitrogen or phosphorus. The sensitivity of the photosynthesis tests were compared to standardized growth tests applied to the same species and toxicants. For Cu and S. costatum the photosynthesis test was up to 300 times more sensitive at light saturation than at light limitation....... For the remaining photosynthesis tests no dependence on light condition were found. The photosynthesis tests with Cu and S. costatum were up to 10 times as sensitive as the growth test and most sensitive when the algae were obtained from a phosphatelimited chemostate. For the other photosynthesis tests...

  20. Testing procedures to determine the toxicity of blast fumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbonel, P.; Bigourd, J. (Centre d' Etudes et Recherches des Charbonnages de France (CERCHAR), 60 - Verneuil-en-Halatte:

    1980-05-01

    Several methods are available in CERCHAR to determine the production of toxic gases from a shot of explosives: blasting of 50 g or 100 g of explosives in a 115 l bomb usually in the presence of sand and in a nitrogen atmosphere, blasting from 0.5 kg to 1 kg of explosive in a 15 m/sup 3/ chamber in the presence of air, under variable confinement (suspended charge or charge in a test mortar with or without stemming and possibly with a sheath). The test results show that the production of toxic gases depends to a great extent on the blasting conditions: type of detonation of the explosive, work done by the fumes, possible reactions of the fumes with atmospheric oxygen or with materials in contact with the explosive (cartridge material, stemming, sheath). It appears that the method consisting in blasting of explosives in a steel mortar with stemming in the 15 m/sup 3/ chamber gives results most closely related to those obtained in underground blasting. Therefore this method seems prefereble.

  1. Statistical testing and distribution for lead chloride toxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John H. Lange

    2005-01-01

    @@ Dear Sir, Graca et al. [1] provided an interesting investigation on the toxicity of lead chloride and sperm development in mice. However, I would like to make a comment on the statistical analysis presented. Table 1 and its results suggest that a comparison of treated (experiment) and control mice were undertaken using the t-test. The authors indicate that they used the t-test along with complementation of ANOVA analysis. It appears that the t-test was used for analysis in Table 1 and ANOVA, as indicated,for Table 2. Use of t-test for comparing three of more groups is not appropriate since this may result in a multiple comparison problem (increasing the type I error rate)[2, 3]. Multiple comparisons can result in the reporting of a P value that is significant (or of lower value) when in actuality it is not. It is better to use, for example, a one-way ANOVA followed by a post-test (post-hoc)which can take into account all comparisons. Other statistical testing can also be employed to control the overall type I error, such as Tukey-HSD (honest significant difference), Scheffe's and Bonferroni-Dunn methods [2].

  2. Aquatic toxicity testing for hazard identification of engineered nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Sara Nørgaard

    in aqueous media. Moreover, ENPs undergo time-dependent transformation processes of agglomeration, dissolution, sedimentation, and interactions with organisms and their exudates. Together, these processes challenge the establishment of traditional concentration-response data by affecting both the exposure...... to exposure control and response mechanisms in aquatic toxicity tests with ENPs are addressed through: 1) Exposure timing measures to minimize the transformation processes of ENPs during test incubation, and 2) Multi-dimensional approaches including investigations of other organisms responses than...... the traditionally applied, and determination of different exposure fractions such as the concentration of dissolved ions from ENPs and body burdens. Although these approaches are scientifically exploratory by nature, the aim is to generate data applicable for regulatory hazard identification of ENPs. The focus has...

  3. Temporal trends and effects of diversity on occurrence of exotic macrophytes in a large reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomaz, Sidinei Magela; Carvalho, Priscilla; Mormul, Roger Paulo; Ferreira, Fernando Alves; Silveira, Márcio José; Michelan, Thaísa Sala

    2009-09-01

    Two exotic invasive macrophyte species (the emergent Urochloa subquadripara - tenner-grass - and the submersed Hydrilla verticillata - hydrilla) were investigated in a large sub-tropical reservoir. We analyzed their occurrences over an extended period and tested the hypothesis that macrophyte richness decreases their invasibility. The alternative hypothesis that the occurrence of these exotics is affected by fetch and underwater radiation (important determinants of macrophyte assemblage composition in this reservoir) was also tested. Incidence data (presence/absence) was obtained over 9.5 years at 235 stations. Logistic regression was applied to test whether the likelihood of occurrence of these two species was affected by macrophyte richness, fetch or underwater radiation. Tenner-grass was recorded at a high frequency and quickly recovered from disturbances caused by water drawdown. In contrast, H. verticillata was first recorded in 3 sites in January 2007, but it spread quickly, reaching 30.5% of the sites 19 months later. The main channel of the Paraná River was the main source of propagules for this species. The likelihood of occurrence of tenner-grass was positively affected by macrophyte richness but negatively affected by fetch. Thus, wave disturbance is probably more important than diversity in preventing invasion by this species. Hydrilla, by contrast, was negatively affected by macrophyte richness and positively affected by fetch and underwater radiation. Although this result might indicate that macrophyte diversity prevents hydrilla invasion, this is probably not true because hydrilla colonized deeper sites where few species of plant exist. Resistance to disturbances caused by water drawdown (tenner-grass) and waves (hydrilla) as well as persistency of tenner-grass and fast spread of hydrilla make these exotic species a cause for concern because of their potential impacts on water uses and maintenance of diversity.

  4. Community photosynthesis of aquatic macrophytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binzer, T.; Sand-Jensen, K.; Middelboe, A. L.

    2006-01-01

    We compared 190 photosynthesis-irradiance (P-E) experiments with single- and multispecies communities of macroalgae and vascular plants from freshwater and marine habitats. We found a typical hyperbolic P-E relation in all communities and no sign of photosaturation or photoinhibition of photosynt......We compared 190 photosynthesis-irradiance (P-E) experiments with single- and multispecies communities of macroalgae and vascular plants from freshwater and marine habitats. We found a typical hyperbolic P-E relation in all communities and no sign of photosaturation or photoinhibition...... of photosynthesis at the highest irradiances of about 2,000 mmol m22 s21. Macrophyte communities displayed much higher maximum gross production (GPmax), respiration, and light compensation point than separate phytoelements because of the multilayered structure and extensive self-shading in the communities, whereas...

  5. Community photosynthesis of aquatic macrophytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binzer, T.; Sand-Jensen, K.; Middelboe, A. L.

    2006-01-01

    We compared 190 photosynthesis-irradiance (P-E) experiments with single- and multispecies communities of macroalgae and vascular plants from freshwater and marine habitats. We found a typical hyperbolic P-E relation in all communities and no sign of photosaturation or photoinhibition of photosynt......We compared 190 photosynthesis-irradiance (P-E) experiments with single- and multispecies communities of macroalgae and vascular plants from freshwater and marine habitats. We found a typical hyperbolic P-E relation in all communities and no sign of photosaturation or photoinhibition...... of photosynthesis at the highest irradiances of about 2,000 mmol m22 s21. Macrophyte communities displayed much higher maximum gross production (GPmax), respiration, and light compensation point than separate phytoelements because of the multilayered structure and extensive self-shading in the communities, whereas...

  6. Biosolid Soil Application: Toxicity Tests under Laboratory Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintya Ap. Christofoletti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A large volume of generated sewage sludge makes its disposal a problem. The usage of sludge in agriculture is highlighted by a number of advantages. However, heavy metals and other toxic compounds may exercise harmful effects to soil organisms. This study evaluated the possible toxic effects of a biosolid sample, under laboratory conditions, for 30 days, using diplopods Rhinocricus padbergi and plants Allium cepa (onion as test organisms. The data obtained demonstrated that the biosolid raw sample had genotoxic potential for Allium cepa root tip cells. In the diplopods exposed to biosolid sample, epithelium disorganization in the midgut and a reduction of the volume of the hepatic cells were observed after 7 days of exposure. After 30 days, the animals still showed a reduction of the volume of the hepatic cells, but in minor intensity. Allium cepa analysis showed genotoxicity, but this effect was reduced after 30 days of bioprocessing by diplopods. This study was important to know the effects as well as to determine how this waste could be applied concerning the soil living organisms and plants.

  7. Macrophytes: ecosystem engineers in UK urban rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, H.; Gurnell, A.; Heppell, K.; Spencer, K.

    2012-04-01

    Macrophytes act as ecosystem engineers within river channels in that they have the ability to cause geomorphological and ecological change. They induce reductions in flow velocity and associated sediment accumulation, and their system of underground roots and rhizomes also reinforces the accumulated sediment reducing sediment erosion and resuspension and creating habitats. As sediments, particularly finer-grained, store contaminants including metals, this engineering means that in the specific context of urban rivers where sediments are more likely to be contaminated, macrophytes trap and hold contaminated sediments creating a potentially important sink of metals. However, depending on the ability for the macrophyte to reinforce the sediment and reduce erosion and resuspension, there is the potential for the sink to turn in to a source and metals to be released in to the overlying water. This research therefore looks at the ecosystem engineering ability of common macrophytes in UK urban rivers by looking at: (i) the effect upon flow velocity and sediment accumulation of Sparganium erectum (branched bur-reed); (ii) the sediment reinforcement ability of both S. erectum, Typha latifolia (bulrush) and Phalaris arundinacea (reed canary grass); and, (iii) the storage of metals within the sediment, overlying water and the macrophytes. Research was undertaken on the River Blackwater, an urban river in Surrey, UK which has extensive macrophyte growth. Flow velocity measurements and fine sediment depths were recorded both within and outside of dense stands of S. erectum. The uprooting resistance (as an indicator of sediment reinforcement) was measured for three species: S. erectum, T. latifolia and P. arundinacea. Additionally, some preliminary sampling was undertaken of the sediment, overlying water and the macrophytes to determine metal storage. Lower flow velocities and greater volumes of fine sediment were recorded within the stands of S. erectum as opposed to the

  8. Custom-designed nanomaterial libraries for testing metal oxide toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Suman; Nel, André E; Mädler, Lutz

    2013-03-19

    Advances in aerosol technology over the past 10 years have enabled the generation and design of ultrafine nanoscale materials for many applications. A key new method is flame spray pyrolysis (FSP), which produces particles by pyrolyzing a precursor solution in the gas phase. FSP is a highly versatile technique for fast, single-step, scalable synthesis of nanoscale materials. New innovations in particle synthesis using FSP technology, including variations in precursor chemistry, have enabled flexible, dry synthesis of loosely agglomerated, highly crystalline ultrafine powders (porosity ≥ 90%) of binary, ternary, and mixed-binary-and-ternary oxides. FSP can fulfill much of the increasing demand, especially in biological applications, for particles with specific material composition, high purity, and high crystallinity. In this Account, we describe a strategy for creating nanoparticle libraries (pure or Fedoped ZnO or TiO₂) utilizing FSP and using these libraries to test hypotheses related to the particles' toxicity. Our innovation lies in the overall integration of the knowledge we have developed in the last 5 years in (1) synthesizing nanomaterials to address specific hypotheses, (2) demonstrating the electronic properties that cause the material toxicity, (3) understanding the reaction mechanisms causing the toxicity, and (4) extracting from in vitro testing and in vivo testing in terrestrial and marine organisms the essential properties of safe nanomaterials. On the basis of this acquired knowledge, we further describe how the dissolved metal ion from these materials (Zn²⁺ in this Account) can effectively bind with different cell constituents, causing toxicity. We use Fe-S protein clusters as an example of the complex chemical reactions taking place after free metal ions migrate into the cells. As a second example, TiO₂ is an active material in the UV range that exhibits photocatalytic behavior. The induction of electron-hole (e⁻/h⁺) pairs followed by

  9. Effects of high nitrogen concentrations on the growth of submersed macrophytes at moderate phosphorus concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qing; Wang, Hong-Zhu; Li, Yan; Shao, Jian-Chun; Liang, Xiao-Min; Jeppesen, Erik; Wang, Hai-Jun

    2015-10-15

    Eutrophication of lakes leading to loss of submersed macrophytes and higher turbidity is a worldwide phenomenon, attributed to excessive loading of phosphorus (P). However, recently, the role of nitrogen (N) for macrophyte recession has received increasing attention. Due to the close relationship between N and P loading, disentanglement of the specific effects of these two nutrients is often difficult, and some controversy still exists as to the effects of N. We studied the effects of N on submersed macrophytes represented by Vallisneria natans (Lour.) Hara in pots positioned at three depths (0.4 m, 0.8 m, and 1.2 m to form a gradient of underwater light conditions) in 10 large ponds having moderate concentrations of P (TP 0.03 ± 0.04 mg L(-1)) and five targeted concentrations of total nitrogen (TN) (0.5, 2, 10, 20, and 100 mg L(-1)), there were two ponds for each treatment. To study the potential shading effects of other primary producers, we also measured the biomass of phytoplankton (ChlaPhyt) and periphyton (ChlaPeri) expressed as chlorophyll a. We found that leaf length, leaf mass, and root length of macrophytes declined with increasing concentrations of TN and ammonium, while shoot number and root mass did not. All the measured growth indices of macrophytes declined significantly with ChlaPhyt, while none were significantly related to ChlaPeri. Neither ChlaPhyt nor ChlaPeri were, however, significantly negatively related to the various N concentrations. Our results indicate that shading by phytoplankton unrelated to the variation in N loading and perhaps toxic stress exerted by high nitrogen were responsible for the decline in macrophyte growth.

  10. Developmental toxicity, acute toxicity and mutagenicity testing in freshwater snails Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca: Gastropoda) exposed to chromium and water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallarico, Lenita de Freitas; Borrely, Sueli Ivone; Hamada, Natália; Grazeffe, Vanessa Siqueira; Ohlweiler, Fernanda Pires; Okazaki, Kayo; Granatelli, Amanda Tosatte; Pereira, Ivana Wuo; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Bragança; Nakano, Eliana

    2014-12-01

    A protocol combining acute toxicity, developmental toxicity and mutagenicity analysis in freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata for application in ecotoxicological studies is described. For acute toxicity testing, LC50 and EC50 values were determined; dominant lethal mutations induction was the endpoint for mutagenicity analysis. Reference toxicant potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7) was used to characterize B. glabrata sensitivity for toxicity and cyclophosphamide to mutagenicity testing purposes. Compared to other relevant freshwater species, B. glabrata showed high sensitivity: the lowest EC50 value was obtained with embryos at veliger stage (5.76mg/L). To assess the model applicability for environmental studies, influent and effluent water samples from a wastewater treatment plant were evaluated. Gastropod sensitivity was assessed in comparison to the standardized bioassay with Daphnia similis exposed to the same water samples. Sampling sites identified as toxic to daphnids were also detected by snails, showing a qualitatively similar sensitivity suggesting that B. glabrata is a suitable test species for freshwater monitoring. Holding procedures and protocols implemented for toxicity and developmental bioassays showed to be in compliance with international standards for intra-laboratory precision. Thereby, we are proposing this system for application in ecotoxicological studies.

  11. Toxicity testing: the search for an in vitro alternative to animal testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, J E; Xu, J; Morse, H R; Avent, N D; Donaldson, C

    2009-01-01

    Prior to introduction to the clinic, pharmaceuticals must undergo rigorous toxicity testing to ensure their safety. Traditionally, this has been achieved using in vivo animal models. However, besides ethical reasons, there is a continual drive to reduce the number of animals used for this purpose due to concerns such as the lack of concordance seen between animal models and toxic effects in humans. Adequate testing to ensure any toxic metabolites are detected can be further complicated if the agent is administered in a prodrug form, requiring a source of cytochrome P450 enzymes for metabolism. A number of sources of metabolic enzymes have been utilised in in vitro models, including cell lines, primary human tissue and liver extracts such as S9. This review examines current and new in vitro models for toxicity testing, including a new model developed within the authors' laboratory utilising HepG2 liver spheroids within a co-culture system to examine the effects of chemotherapeutic agents on other cell types.

  12. Dredged Material Evaluations: Review of Zooplankton Toxicity Test Methods for Marine Water Quality Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    for elutriate toxicity tests are fish , invertebrates (crustaceans), and zooplankton. Freshwater evaluations (following CWA regulations) use standard...is not a limiting factor in cultures. However, it is appropriate to investigate lower feeding rations, or absence of food, in toxicity testing to...2012. Standard guide for selection of resident species as test organisms for aquatic and sediment toxicity tests. Designation: E1850 − 04.West

  13. Towards Deriving Renewable Energy from Aquatic Macrophytes Polluting Water Bodies in Niger Delta Region of Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badmus Abdurrahman Adeleye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to derive methane rich biogas from biomass of harvested water hyacinth polluting water bodies in selected rivers of the Niger delta region of Nigeria. Field visits were undertaken on selected rivers in the Niger Delta region in which aquatic macrophytes were collected and inventorized. Also different types of aquatic macrophytes were surveyed. Control by harvesting macrophytes and deriving energy (methane-rich biogas from biomass of one (water hyacinth was successfully carried out in this study. An initial test was conducted to evaluate methane rich biogas production from water hyacinth collected from the wild. After a successful production of combustible biogas, laboratory experiments aimed at generating biogas from harvested biomass of aquatic mycrophyte (water hyacinth cultivated under eutrophic and oligotrophic conditions were undertaken in the laboratory. The result of the study showed highest biogas yield of 22 L over a 40 day retention time for water hyacinth raised under eutrophic conditions. Biogas yield for water hyacinth raised under oligotrophic conditions recorded the highest yield of 53L over an 11 day retention time. The conversion of the biomass of harvested aquatic macrophyte (water hyacinth from the Niger Delta into renewable energy, that is combustible biogas, demonstrated an inevitable option for the control and management of environmental pollution associated with aquatic macrophytes and their usability for poverty alleviation in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria.

  14. Methods For Collecting , Culturing And Performing Toxicity Tests With Daphnia ambigua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Specht, Winona L.

    2005-07-01

    Toxicity tests conducted on water collected from impacted locations in SRS streams often failed chronic toxicity tests and sometimes failed acute toxicity tests (Specht 1995). These findings prompted SRS to determine the cause of the failures. Some SRS NPDES outfalls were also failing chronic toxicity tests, even though no toxicant could be identified and when TIEs were performed, none of the TIE treatments removed the toxicity. Ultimately, it was determined that the failures were due to the low hardness of SRS surface waters, rather than to the presence of a toxicant. The species of cladoceran that the EPA recommends for toxicity testing, Ceriodaphnia dubia, is stressed by the very low hardness of SRS waters. SRS developed an alternate species toxicity test that is similar to the EPA test, but uses an indigenous cladoceran, Daphnia ambigua (Specht and Harmon, 1997; Harmon et al., 2003). In 2001, SCDHEC approved the use of D. ambigua for toxicity testing at SRS, contingent upon approval by EPA Region 4. In 2002, EPA Region 4 approved the use of this species for compliance toxicity testing at SRS. Ultimately, the use of this species demonstrated that SRS effluents were not toxic, and most toxicity testing requirements were removed from the NPDES permit that was issued in December 2003, with the exception of one round of chronic definitive testing on outfalls A-01, A-11, and G-10 just before the next NPDES permit application is submitted to SCDHEC. Although the alternate species test was developed at SRS (1996-1998), the culture was transferred to a contract toxicity testing lab (ETT Environmental) located in Greer, SC in 1998. ETT Environmental became certified by SCDHEC to perform toxicity tests using D. ambigua in 2002, and at this time is the only laboratory certified by SCDHEC to perform tests with this species. Because of the expense associated with maintaining the D. ambigua culture for several years when no toxicity testing is required, SRS decided to suspend

  15. Implementing Lecane quadridentata acute toxicity tests to assess the toxic effects of selected metals (Al, Fe and Zn).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Félix Torres; González, Francisco Javier Avelar; Martínez, Roberto Rico

    2010-03-01

    An environmental study revealed that three metals (Al, Fe and Zn) are common in the San Pedro River (SPR) (Aguascalientes, Mexico). Regrettably, in many samples the concentrations of these metals exceeded the maximum allowed toxicant concentrations levels as defined in by Mexican legislation. The highest concentrations of the three metals were found during the 2005 dry season, with elevated Al concentrations present along the entire river. Not surprisingly, the highest concentrations for all three metals came from locations adjacent to industrial areas. Estimates of the contribution of these metals to total toxicity revealed that these three metals are important contaminants of the river and responsible for most of the lethal toxicity found in environmental samples. To assess the importance of these reports, we conducted acute toxicity tests to determine LC50 for Al, Fe and Zn on the freshwater rotifer Lecane quadridentata. This permitted us to estimate the contribution of these metals to total toxicity during 2005-2006. Based on LC50 values, all three metals should be considered very toxic, with the zinc LC50 value (0.12 mg L(-1)) making it the most toxic metal for L. quadridentata. This approach can be applied to other sites with similar concentrations of these metals. (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Optimizing the design of a reproduction toxicity test with the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charles, Sandrine; Ducrot, Virginie; Azam, Didier

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results from two ring-tests addressing the feasibility, robustness and reproducibility of a reproduction toxicity test with the freshwater gastropod Lymnaea stagnalis (RENILYS strain). Sixteen laboratories (from inexperienced to expert laboratories in mollusc testing) from...

  17. Ammonia-oxidizing Bacteria and Archaea in the Rhizosphere of Freshwater Macrophytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Martina; Schramm, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    measurements revealed clear differences in ammonia oxidation rates. The diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) was assessed using the ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene as functional marker. Both AOA and AOB could be detected in the rhizosphere of all three plant......AMMONIA-OXIDIZING ARCHAEA AND BACTERIA IN THE RHIZOSPHERE OF FRESHWATER MACROPHYTES Martina Herrmann and Andreas Schramm Department of Biological Sciences, Microbiology, University of Aarhus, Denmark Aquatic macrophytes such as Littorella uniflora and Lobelia dortmanna release oxygen from......-specific microbial community distinct from that of unvegetated sediment and (ii) that aquatic macrophytes have an impact on abundance and activity of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria in freshwater sediment. The goal of this study was to test these hypotheses for the key functional group for coupled nitrification...

  18. OECD validation study to assess intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility of the zebrafish embryo toxicity test for acute aquatic toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquet, François; Strecker, Ruben; Rawlings, Jane M; Belanger, Scott E; Braunbeck, Thomas; Carr, Gregory J; Cenijn, Peter; Fochtman, Przemyslaw; Gourmelon, Anne; Hübler, Nicole; Kleensang, André; Knöbel, Melanie; Kussatz, Carola; Legler, Juliette; Lillicrap, Adam; Martínez-Jerónimo, Fernando; Polleichtner, Christian; Rzodeczko, Helena; Salinas, Edward; Schneider, Katharina E; Scholz, Stefan; van den Brandhof, Evert-Jan; van der Ven, Leo T M; Walter-Rohde, Susanne; Weigt, Stefan; Witters, Hilda; Halder, Marlies

    2014-08-01

    The OECD validation study of the zebrafish embryo acute toxicity test (ZFET) for acute aquatic toxicity testing evaluated the ZFET reproducibility by testing 20 chemicals at 5 different concentrations in 3 independent runs in at least 3 laboratories. Stock solutions and test concentrations were analytically confirmed for 11 chemicals. Newly fertilised zebrafish eggs (20/concentration and control) were exposed for 96h to chemicals. Four apical endpoints were recorded daily as indicators of acute lethality: coagulation of the embryo, lack of somite formation, non-detachment of the tail bud from the yolk sac and lack of heartbeat. Results (LC50 values for 48/96h exposure) show that the ZFET is a robust method with a good intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility (CV30%) for some very toxic or volatile chemicals, and chemicals tested close to their limit of solubility. The ZFET is now available as OECD Test Guideline 236. Considering the high predictive capacity of the ZFET demonstrated by Belanger et al. (2013) in their retrospective analysis of acute fish toxicity and fish embryo acute toxicity data, the ZFET is ready to be considered for acute fish toxicity for regulatory purposes. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids: Testing for Toxic Constituents of Comfrey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, John J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the possibilities of toxins present in medicinal herbs. Describes an experiment in which toxic constituents can be selectively detected by thin-layer chromatography and NMR spectroscopy. (TW)

  20. Toxicity test of xanthone from mangosteen on zebrafish embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordin, Muhammad Akram Mohd; Noor, Mahanem Mat; Kamaruddin, Wan Mohd Aizat Wan; Lazim, Azwan Mat; Fazry, Shazrul

    2016-11-01

    Xanthone is a chemical compound identified in mangosteen pericarp. A previous study showed that xanthone has anti-proliferating effect on cancer cells. In this study we investigate the toxicity level of xanthone in zebrafish embryo to for future reference on other animal model. We employed Fish Embryo Toxicity (FET) assay to determine the toxicity level of different concentrations of xanthone. Embryos were observed at 24, 48 and 72 hours post fertilization (hpf) under microscope at 4× magnification. The extract showed toxicity effect on embryo at concentrations of 250, 125 and 62.5 µg/mL. Concentrations at 15.63, 7.81 and 3.91 µg / mL of xanthone did not harm the embryos and showed 100% of survival.

  1. Applicability of ambient toxicity testing to national or regional water-quality assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, John F.

    1990-01-01

    Comprehensive assessment of the quality of natural waters requires a multifaceted approach. Descriptions of existing conditions may be achieved by various kinds of chemical and hydrologic analyses, whereas information about the effects of such conditions on living organisms depends on biological monitoring. Toxicity testing is one type of biological monitoring that can be used to identify possible effects of toxic contaminants. Based on experimentation designed to monitor responses of organisms to environmental stresses, toxicity testing may have diverse purposes in water-quality assessments. These purposes may include identification of areas that warrant further study because of poor water quality or unusual ecological features, verification of other types of monitoring, or assessment of contaminant effects on aquatic communities. Toxicity-test results are most effective when used as a complement to chemical analyses, hydrologic measurements, and other biological monitoring. However, all toxicity-testing procedures have certain limitations that must be considered in developing the methodology and applications of toxicity testing in any large-scale water-quality-assessment program. A wide variety of toxicity-test methods have been developed to fulfill the needs of diverse applications. The methods differ primarily in the selections made relative to four characteristics: (1) test species, (2) endpoint (acute or chronic), (3) test-enclosure type, and (4) test substance (toxicant) that functions as the environmental stress. Toxicity-test approaches vary in their capacity to meet the needs of large-scale assessments of existing water quality. Ambient testing, whereby the test organism is exposed to naturally occurring substances that contain toxicant mixtures in an organic or inorganic matrix, is more likely to meet these needs than are procedures that call for exposure of the test organisms to known concentrations of a single toxicant. However, meaningful

  2. A test strategy for the assessment of additive attributed toxicity of tobacco products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienhuis, Anne S; Staal, Yvonne C M; Soeteman-Hernández, Lya G; van de Nobelen, Suzanne; Talhout, Reinskje

    2016-08-01

    The new EU Tobacco Product Directive (TPD) prohibits tobacco products containing additives that are toxic in unburnt form or that increase overall toxicity of the product. This paper proposes a strategy to assess additive attributed toxicity in the context of the TPD. Literature was searched on toxicity testing strategies for regulatory purposes from tobacco industry and governmental institutes. Although mainly traditional in vivo testing strategies have been applied to assess toxicity of unburnt additives and increases in overall toxicity of tobacco products due to additives, in vitro tests combined with toxicogenomics and validated using biomarkers of exposure and disease are most promising in this respect. As such, tests are needed that are sensitive enough to assess additive attributed toxicity above the overall toxicity of tobacco products, which can associate assay outcomes to human risk and exposure. In conclusion, new, sensitive in vitro assays are needed to conclude whether comparable testing allows for assessment of small changes in overall toxicity attributed to additives. A more pragmatic approach for implementation on a short-term is mandated lowering of toxic emission components. Combined with risk assessment, this approach allows assessment of effectiveness of harm reduction strategies, including banning or reducing of additives.

  3. Anodonta imbecillis copper sulfate reference toxicant test, Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    Reference toxicant testing using juvenile freshwater mussels was conducted as part of the CR-ERP biomonitoring study of Clinch River sediments to assess the sensitivity of test organisms and the overall performance of the test. Tests were conducted using moderately hard synthetic water spiked with known concentrations of copper as copper sulfate. Toxicity testing of copper sulfate reference toxicant was conducted from May 12-21, 1993. The organisms used for testing were juvenile fresh-water mussels (Anodonta imbecillis). Results from this test showed an LC{sub 50} value of 1.12 mg Cu/L which is lower than the value of 2.02 mg Cu/L obtained in a previous test. Too few tests have been conducted with copper as the toxicant to determine a normal range of values.

  4. Allium-test as a tool for toxicity testing of environmental radioactive-chemical mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudalova, A. A.; Geras'kin, S. A.; Dikareva, N. S.; Pyatkova, S. V.

    2017-01-01

    Bioassay-based approaches have been propagated to assess toxicity of unknown mixtures of environmental contaminants, but it was rarely applied in cases of chemicals with radionuclides combinations. Two Allium-test studies were performed to assess environmental impact from potential sources of combined radioactive-chemical pollution. Study sites were located at nuclear waste storage facilities in European and in Far-Eastern parts of Russia. As environmental media under impact, waters from monitor wells and nearby water bodies were tested. Concentrations of some chemicals and radionuclides in the samples collected enhanced the permitted limits. Cytogenetic and cytotoxic effects were used as biological endpoints, namely, frequency and spectrum of chromosome aberrations and mitotic abnormalities in anatelophase cells as well as mitotic activity in Allium root tips. Sample points were revealed where waters have an enhanced mutagenic potential. The findings obtained could be used to optimize monitoring system and advance decision making on management and rehabilitation of industrial sites. The Allium-test could be recommended and applied as an effective tool for toxicity testing in case of combined contamination of environmental compartments with radionuclides and chemical compounds.

  5. Enhancing the applicability and predictability of the embryonic stem cell test for developmental toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, E.

    2012-01-01

    Within the full risk assessment of a chemical, developmental toxicity testing is one of the endpoints that require the highest percentage of experimental animals. With the high number of experimental animals, cost and time involved in in vivo developmental toxicity testing there is an urgent need

  6. The Adverse Outcome Pathway: A conceptual framework to support toxicity testing in the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    The field of regulatory toxicity testing is at a turning point. The U.S. National Research Council (NRC) envisioned a shift away from traditional toxicity testing and towards a focused effort to explore and understand pathways perturbed by biologically active substances or their ...

  7. Acute toxicity of copper oxide nanoparticles to Daphnia magna under different test conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thit, Amalie; Huggins, Krista; Selck, Henriette

    2017-01-01

    The acute toxicity of monodispersed 6 nm and Daphnia magna was assessed using 48 h immobilization tests. CuSO4 was used as a reference. Four different exposure conditions were tested, to study whether the toxicity of the nanoparticle...

  8. Improving toxicity assessment of pesticide mixtures: the use of polar passive sampling devices extracts in microalgae toxicity tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra KIM TIAM

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Complexity of contaminants exposure needs to be taking in account for an appropriate evaluation of risks related to mixtures of pesticides released in the ecosystems. Toxicity assessment of such mixtures can be made through a variety of toxicity tests reflecting different level of biological complexity. This paper reviews the recent developments of passive sampling techniques for polar compounds, especially Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Samplers (POCIS and Chemcatcher® and the principal assessment techniques using microalgae in laboratory experiments. The progresses permitted by the coupled use of such passive samplers and ecotoxicology testing as well as their limitations are presented. Case studies combining passive sampling devices (PSD extracts and toxicity assessment toward microorganisms at different biological scales from single organisms to communities level are presented. These case studies, respectively aimed i at characterizing the toxic potential of waters using dose-response curves, and ii at performing microcosm experiments with increased environmental realism in the toxicant exposure in term of cocktail composition and concentration. Finally perspectives and limitations of such approaches for future applications in the area of environmental risk assessment are discussed.

  9. Improving Toxicity Assessment of Pesticide Mixtures: The Use of Polar Passive Sampling Devices Extracts in Microalgae Toxicity Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim Tiam, Sandra; Fauvelle, Vincent; Morin, Soizic; Mazzella, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Complexity of contaminants exposure needs to be taking in account for an appropriate evaluation of risks related to mixtures of pesticides released in the ecosystems. Toxicity assessment of such mixtures can be made through a variety of toxicity tests reflecting different level of biological complexity. This paper reviews the recent developments of passive sampling techniques for polar compounds, especially Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Samplers (POCIS) and Chemcatcher® and the principal assessment techniques using microalgae in laboratory experiments. The progresses permitted by the coupled use of such passive samplers and ecotoxicology testing as well as their limitations are presented. Case studies combining passive sampling devices (PSD) extracts and toxicity assessment toward microorganisms at different biological scales from single organisms to communities level are presented. These case studies, respectively, aimed (i) at characterizing the “toxic potential” of waters using dose-response curves, and (ii) at performing microcosm experiments with increased environmental realism in the toxicant exposure in term of cocktail composition and concentration. Finally perspectives and limitations of such approaches for future applications in the area of environmental risk assessment are discussed. PMID:27667986

  10. 78 FR 69414 - Toxic Substances Control Act Chemical Testing; Receipt of Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-19

    ... pigments; Toxicity to Algae; Acute emulsion polymerization in Inhalation Toxicity in paper, textile, fiber, and Rats; Bacterial Reverse adhesives industries. Mutation; In Vitro Mammalian Chromosome...

  11. Developing a list of reference chemicals for testing alternatives to whole fish toxicity tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmer, Kristin; Tanneberger, Katrin; Kramer, Nynke I; Völker, Doris; Scholz, Stefan; Hafner, Christoph; Lee, Lucy E J; Bols, Niels C; Hermens, Joop L M

    2008-11-11

    This paper details the derivation of a list of 60 reference chemicals for the development of alternatives to animal testing in ecotoxicology with a particular focus on fish. The chemicals were selected as a prerequisite to gather mechanistic information on the performance of alternative testing systems, namely vertebrate cell lines and fish embryos, in comparison to the fish acute lethality test. To avoid the need for additional experiments with fish, the U.S. EPA fathead minnow database was consulted as reference for whole organism responses. This database was compared to the Halle Registry of Cytotoxicity and a collation of data by the German EPA (UBA) on acute toxicity data derived from zebrafish embryos. Chemicals that were present in the fathead minnow database and in at least one of the other two databases were subject to selection. Criteria included the coverage of a wide range of toxicity and physico-chemical parameters as well as the determination of outliers of the in vivo/in vitro correlations. While the reference list of chemicals now guides our research for improving cell line and fish embryo assays to make them widely applicable, the list could be of benefit to search for alternatives in ecotoxicology in general. One example would be the use of this list to validate structure-activity prediction models, which in turn would benefit from a continuous extension of this list with regard to physico-chemical and toxicological data.

  12. Toxicity testing in the 21 century: defining new risk assessment approaches based on perturbation of intracellular toxicity pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudin Bhattacharya

    Full Text Available The approaches to quantitatively assessing the health risks of chemical exposure have not changed appreciably in the past 50 to 80 years, the focus remaining on high-dose studies that measure adverse outcomes in homogeneous animal populations. This expensive, low-throughput approach relies on conservative extrapolations to relate animal studies to much lower-dose human exposures and is of questionable relevance to predicting risks to humans at their typical low exposures. It makes little use of a mechanistic understanding of the mode of action by which chemicals perturb biological processes in human cells and tissues. An alternative vision, proposed by the U.S. National Research Council (NRC report Toxicity Testing in the 21(st Century: A Vision and a Strategy, called for moving away from traditional high-dose animal studies to an approach based on perturbation of cellular responses using well-designed in vitro assays. Central to this vision are (a "toxicity pathways" (the innate cellular pathways that may be perturbed by chemicals and (b the determination of chemical concentration ranges where those perturbations are likely to be excessive, thereby leading to adverse health effects if present for a prolonged duration in an intact organism. In this paper we briefly review the original NRC report and responses to that report over the past 3 years, and discuss how the change in testing might be achieved in the U.S. and in the European Union (EU. EU initiatives in developing alternatives to animal testing of cosmetic ingredients have run very much in parallel with the NRC report. Moving from current practice to the NRC vision would require using prototype toxicity pathways to develop case studies showing the new vision in action. In this vein, we also discuss how the proposed strategy for toxicity testing might be applied to the toxicity pathways associated with DNA damage and repair.

  13. Tests for bioequivalence of control media and test media in studies of toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, W.P.; McDonald, L.L. [Western EcoSystems Technology, Inc., Cheyenne, WY (United States)

    1995-07-01

    Statistical tests of the classical (null) hypothesis--that there is no difference in effects of control media and tested--are commonly used to make statistical inferences toward the no-observed-adverse-effect concentration. However, failing to rejects this hypothesis is not considered as scientific proof the hypothesis is true. An effect may exist, but high variation due to inadequate replication, variation in experimental units, or imprecise measurement techniques may yield data for which the hypothesis is not rejected. An experiment may also be too precise, yielding effects that are statistically significant but not biologically important. The authors propose the use of tests of bioequivalence of control media and test media to alleviate these unsatisfactory characteristics of tests and of the classical hypotheses for regulatory decisions. They review and illustrate the test for bioequivalence using acute and chronic toxicity data. They also define a procedure for determining the level of effect at which there will be high power to refute the hypothesis that there is a lack of bioequivalence if in fact the biological response in the control media is identical to the responses in the test media.

  14. Toxicity tests in the ecological risk assessment (ERA) process: Is there ecological relevance?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saban, L.B. [Roy F. Weston, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    There are a number of ways to evaluate risks to potential receptors. Screening level assessments often compare toxicity reference values from the literature to doses or concentrations from a particular site. Toxicity testing and biological monitoring are also performed to further evaluate potential effects. In many situations, a ``weight-of-evidence`` approach is used to determine deleterious ecological effects. Much of the time the results are often contradictory, further complicating the decision process and adding uncertainty to the risk estimate. There are many factors that contribute to this uncertainty, including physical parameters, organism and species sensitivity, bioavailability, power, and test conditions. These factors are evaluated from multiple case studies to provide a means to decrease the uncertainty associated with toxicity testing. This discussion focuses on the results of sediment toxicity testing, variability within and between tests, relating cause to effect, and applicability of toxicity testing to the ecological risk assessment process. Recommendations are given to reduce uncertainty in relating toxicity testing to ERA`s and to increase the ecological relevance associated with toxicity testing.

  15. Study on the mechanism of allelopathic influence on cyanobacteria and chlorophytes by submerged macrophyte (Myriophyllum spicatum) and its secretion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Junying [State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430072 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Liu Biyun [State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430072 (China); Wang Jing; Gao Yunni [State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430072 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Wu Zhenbin, E-mail: wuzb@ihb.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430072 (China)

    2010-06-10

    For revealing the mechanism of allelopathic influence on phytoplankton by aquatic macrophytes, the growth and photosynthetic activities of cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa and the chlorophyte Selenastrum capricornutum were investigated when they coexisted with submerged macrophyte Myriophyllum spicatum and were exposed to allelopathic polyphenols: pyrogallic acid (PA), gallic acid (GA), ellagic acid (EA) and (+)-catechin (CA). According to the results of coexistence assays, the non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) and effective quantum efficiency (YII) of M. aeruginosa were affected earlier and more rapidly than the cell density. However, the influence of M. spicatum on S. capricornutum was not found. When the Toxicity Index (TI) was applied to evaluate the combined effects of binary and multiple mixtures of polyphenols, it was found that the four tested polyphenols with the proportion identified in the M. spicatum-cultured solution were observed to present synergistic effect (0.36-0.49) according to the cell density, NPQ and YII of M. aeruginosa. With the combined effects of polyphenols on S. capricornutum, only additive action (0.52-1.62) was found. On the other hand, PA (2.97 mg L{sup -1}), GA (2.65 mg L{sup -1}) caused significant reductions of photosystem II (PSII) and whole electron transport chain activities of M. aeruginosa by 71.43 and 18.37%, 70.95 and 40.77% (P < 0.05), respectively, after 24-h exposure, but no inhibition effect was found in S. capricornutum. The dark respiration and photosystem I (PSI) activities of M. aeruginosa were significantly increased by exposure to PA and GA (P < 0.05). Nevertheless, EA and CA had no influence on the electron transport activities of the tested organisms. These results indicate that the reduction in photosynthetic activity of M. aeruginosa and the synergistic effect of allelochemicals may be two important causes for the inhibition of undesired phytoplankton by submersed macrophytes in natural aquatic ecosystems

  16. Concentration-time data in toxicity tests and resulting relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilado, C. J.; Brauer, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    Periodic analyses for carbon monoxide and methane in the animal exposure chamber during pyrolysis of polyethylene at 800 C without forced air flow showed that the concentrations of these compounds increased with exposure time. These observations, and similar observations for polyurethane flexible foam, permitted the calculation of carbon monoxide toxicity in terms of a DP (Death Product Concentration) value, in addition to flammability in terms of HC (Hydro Carbon) value. Observed DP values exceeding the critical DP(CO) value of 47,200 ppm-min for carbon monoxide may indicate that lethal exposures were reached earlier but not immediately manifested because of the time delay involved in physiological processes. On the basis of this DP(CO) value, carbon monoxide could have been the sole toxicant in the case of polyethylene, polypropylene, polyoxymethylene, polystyrene, polycarbonate, ethylene propylene diene rubber, and wood.

  17. Development of a Chronic Toxicity Testing Method for Daphnia pulex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    handling (Lewis 1985). Both acute and chronic Daphnia exposures have been used to determine the short-term toxicity of many aquatic contaminants, and...sublethal effects. Vincon vinyl clear tubing (1/4 in. inside diameter) (Pentair Aquatic Ecosystems, Part # TP30, Apopka, FL) was used to siphon the D...pipette. Exercise care not to damage the organism by minimizing turbulence. When transferring the organism to the fresh beaker, the tip ERDC/EL SR

  18. Gamma Radiation Reduced Toxicity of Azoxystrobin Tested on Artemia franciscana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, P; Zdarsky, M; Benova, K; Falis, M; Tomko, M

    2016-06-01

    Fungicide azoxystrobin toxicity was monitored by means of a 96-h biotest with Artemia franciscana nauplius stages after exposure to solutions with concentrations of 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 mg L(-1) irradiated with (60)Co gamma radiation with doses of 1, 2.5, 5 and 10 kGy. The effects of ionization radiation on azoxystrobin toxicity were mainly manifested by a statistically significant reduction of lethality after 72- and 96-h exposure. A maximum reduction of lethality of 72 % was achieved using doses of 1-5 kGy for an azoxystrobin initial concentration of 0.4 mg L(-1) and after 72 h of exposure. At a 96-h exposure, a difference of lethal effects reached up to 70 % for a dose of 10 kGy. The observed effect of gamma ionizing radiation on azoxystrobin toxicity suggest that this approach can be applied as an alternative for a reduction of azoxystrobin residua in food.

  19. The embryonic stem cell test combined with toxicogenomics as an alternative testing model for the assessment of developmental toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dartel, Dorien A M; Piersma, Aldert H

    2011-09-01

    One of the most studied in vitro alternative testing methods for identification of developmental toxicity is the embryonic stem cell test (EST). Although the EST has been formally validated, the applicability domain as well as the predictability of the model needs further study to allow successful implementation of the EST as an alternative testing method in regulatory toxicity testing. Genomics technologies have already provided a proof of principle of their value in identification of toxicants such as carcinogenic compounds. Also within the EST, gene expression profiling has shown its value in the identification of developmental toxicity and in the evaluation of factors critical for risk assessment, such as dose and time responses. It is expected that the implementation of genomics into the EST will provide a more detailed end point evaluation as compared to the classical morphological scoring of differentiation cultures. Therefore, genomics may contribute to improvement of the EST, both in terms of definition of its applicability domain as well as its predictive capacity. In the present review, we present the progress that has been made with regard to the prediction of developmental toxicity using the EST combined with transcriptomics. Furthermore, we discuss the developments of additional aspects required for further optimization of the EST, including kinetics, the use of human embryonic stem cells (ESC) and computational toxicology. Finally, the current and future use of the EST model for prediction of developmental toxicity in testing strategies and in regulatory toxicity evaluations is discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of a New Toxicity Test Method Using a Bio-dipstick

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-12

    For this reason, most toxicity test methods cannot be performed in the petroleum laboratory. The bio -dipstick is a formation of agar medium and was...designed to monitoring of microbial contamination in various industrial environments. Recently, this bio -dipstick has been also successfully used for...was studied using a bio -dipstick. The test results showed that the proposed test method was able to differentiate the toxicity level of lubricants and

  1. Passive Dosing in Chronic Toxicity Tests with the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Fabian; Böhm, Leonard; Höss, Sebastian; Möhlenkamp, Christel; Claus, Evelyn; Düring, Rolf-Alexander; Schäfer, Sabine

    2016-09-01

    In chronic toxicity tests with Caenorhabditis elegans, it is necessary to feed the nematode with bacteria, which reduces the freely dissolved concentration (Cfree) of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs), leading to poorly defined exposure with conventional dosing procedures. We examined the efficacy of passive dosing of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) using silicone O-rings to control exposure during C. elegans toxicity testing and compared the results to those obtained with solvent spiking. Solid-phase microextraction and liquid-liquid extraction were used to measure Cfree and the chemicals taken up via ingestion. During toxicity testing, Cfree decreased by up to 89% after solvent spiking but remained constant with passive dosing. This led to a higher apparent toxicity on C. elegans exposed by passive dosing than by solvent spiking. With increasing bacterial cell densities, Cfree of solvent-spiked PAHs decreased while being maintained constant with passive dosing. This resulted in lower apparent toxicity under solvent spiking but an increased apparent toxicity with passive dosing, probably as a result of the higher chemical uptake rate via food (CUfood). Our results demonstrate the utility of passive dosing to control Cfree in routine chronic toxicity testing of HOCs. Moreover, both chemical uptake from water or via food ingestion can be controlled, thus enabling the discrimination of different uptake routes in chronic toxicity studies.

  2. In vitro developmental toxicity test detects inhibition of stem cell differentiation by silica nanoparticles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, M.V.; Annema, W.; Salvati, A.; Lesniak, A.; Elsaesser, A.; Barnes, C.; McKerr, G.; Howard, C.; Lynch, I.; Dawson, K.; Piersma, A.H.; de Jong, W.H.

    2009-01-01

    While research into the potential toxic properties of nanomaterials is now increasing, the area of developmental toxicity has remained relatively uninvestigated. The embryonic stem cell test is an in vitro screening assay used to investigate the embryotoxic potential of chemicals by determining

  3. In vitro developmental toxicity test detects inhibition of stem cell differentiation by silica nanoparticles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, M.V.; Annema, W.; Salvati, A.; Lesniak, A.; Elsaesser, A.; Barnes, C.; McKerr, G.; Howard, C.; Lynch, I.; Dawson, K.; Piersma, A.H.; de Jong, W.H.

    2009-01-01

    While research into the potential toxic properties of nanomaterials is now increasing, the area of developmental toxicity has remained relatively uninvestigated. The embryonic stem cell test is an in vitro screening assay used to investigate the embryotoxic potential of chemicals by determining thei

  4. Application of Neomysis awatschensis as a standard marine toxicity test organism in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Tian; ZHOU Ming-jiang; TAN Zhi-jun; LI Zheng-yan; LI Jun; YU Ren-cheng; WANG Li-ping

    2003-01-01

    The small mysid crustacean Neomysis awatschensis was collected in the west coast of Jiaozhou Bay, Qingdao, China in 1992 and acclimated and cultured in laboratory conditions since then. Standard acute toxicity tests using 4-6 d juvenile mysids of this species were conducted and the results were compared with Mysidopsis bahia, a standard toxicity test organism used in the US in terms of their sensitivities to reference toxins, as well as their taxonomy, morphology and geographic distributions. Because of its wide distribution along the Chinese coast, similar sensitivity to pollutants as M. bahia, short life history, small size and the ease of handling, this study intended to use N.awatschensis as one of the standard marine organisms for toxicity testing in China. The species were applied to acute toxicity evaluations of drilling fluid and its additives, organotin TPT and toxic algae, and to chronic ( life cycle) toxicity assays of organotin TPT and a toxic dinofalgellate Alexandrium tamarense, respectively. Using N. awatschensis as a standard toxicity testing organism in marine pollution assessment in China is suggested.

  5. Toxicity Tests of Whole Sediment Samples Using the Hyallella (H. azteca) Survival and Growth Tests (ASTM E 1283-93)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — 10-day toxicity tests using Hyalella azteca were conducted with sediment samples collected by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Bloomington, Indiana facility to...

  6. Field evidence of the influence of aquatic macrophytes on water quality in a shallow eutrophic lake over a 13-year period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edélti Faria Albertoni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: The main objective of this work is to describe the changes in water characteristics of a shallow subtropical lake, in periods with and without growing of macrophytes, related to periods of clear-macrophyte dominance and turbid-phytoplankton dominance states. METHODS: The study was conducted in Biguás Lake, in the south coastal plain of Brazil (32° 04' 43" S and 52° 10' 03" W. Samplings were carried out monthly between October 2000 and November 2013. The limnological variables measured in the water column were dissolved oxygen (DO, water temperature, pH, electrical conductivity (EC, chlorophyll-a, total nitrogen (TN, total phosphorous (TP and suspended material (SM. Data were grouped according to periods with macrophyte growth dominance (MD and without macrophytes, with phytoplankton dominance (PD, and applied t- tests among TP, TN, Chlorophyll-a and SM. During macrophyte growth we estimated the coverage (% and biomass variation of plants. RESULTS: Over the 13 years, the lake was well oxygenated, alkaline, and with a temperature variation according to subtropical seasonality. The lower values of all of the limnological variables were verified during periods of macrophyte growth, characterizing periods of clear and turbid waters. CONCLUSIONS: The influence of aquatic macrophytes in improving water quality in this shallow lake during the studied period, reducing nutrient concentrations, chlorophyll-a and suspended material in water, favoring the maintenance of a clear water state, was verified.

  7. Promoting the 3Rs to enhance the OECD fish toxicity testing framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Thomas H; Wheeler, James R; Gourmelon, Anne; Burden, Natalie

    2016-04-01

    Fish toxicity testing has been conducted since the 1860's in order to help define safe levels of chemical contaminants in lakes, rivers and coastal waters. The historical emphasis on acute lethality testing of chemicals has more recently focussed on long term sublethal effects of chemicals on fish and their prey species. Fish toxicity testing is now embedded in much environment legislation on chemical safety while it is recognized that animal use should be Replaced, Reduced and Refined (the 3Rs) where possible. The OECD Fish Toxicity Testing Framework provides a useful structure with which to address the needs of environmental safety assessment whilst implementing the 3Rs. This commentary aims to promote the implementation of the recommendations of the OECD Fish Toxicity Testing Framework. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Assessing the Legacy of Red Mud Pollution in a Shallow Freshwater Lake: Arsenic Accumulation and Speciation in Macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewska, Justyna P; Meharg, Andrew A; Heal, Kate V; Carey, Manus; Gunn, Iain D M; Searle, Kate R; Winfield, Ian J; Spears, Bryan M

    2016-09-06

    Little is known about long-term ecological responses in lakes following red mud pollution. Among red mud contaminants, arsenic (As) is of considerable concern. Determination of the species of As accumulated in aquatic organisms provides important information about the biogeochemical cycling of the element and transfer through the aquatic food-web to higher organisms. We used coupled ion chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to assess As speciation in tissues of five macrophyte taxa in Kinghorn Loch, U.K., 30 years following the diversion of red mud pollution from the lake. Toxic inorganic As was the dominant species in the studied macrophytes, with As species concentrations varying with macrophyte taxon and tissue type. The highest As content measured in roots of Persicaria amphibia (L.) Gray (87.2 mg kg(-1)) greatly exceeded the 3-10 mg kg(-1) range suggested as a potential phytotoxic level. Accumulation of toxic As species by plants suggested toxicological risk to higher organisms known to utilize macrophytes as a food source.

  9. Use of low-altitude aerial photography to identify submersed aquatic macrophytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloesser, Donald W.; Manny, Bruce A.; Brown, Charles L.; Jaworski, Eugene

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of using low-altitude aerial photography to identify beds of submersed macrophytes is demonstrated. True color aerial photos and collateral ground survey information for submersed aquatic macrophyte beds at 10 sites in the St.Clair-Detroit River system were obtained in September 1978. Using the photos and collateral ground survey information, a dichotomous key was developed for the identification of six classes - beds of five genera of macrophytes and one substrate type. A test was prepared to determine how accurately photo interpreters could identify the six classes. The test required an interpreter to examine an unlabeled, outlined area on photographs and identify it using the key. Six interpreters were tested. One pair of interpreters was trained in the interpretation of a variety of aerial photos, a second pair had field experience in the collection and identification of submersed macrophytes in the river system, and a third pair had neither training in the interpretation of aerial photos nor field experience. The criteria that we developed were applied equally well by the interpretors, regardless of their training or experience. Overall accuracy (i.e., omission errors) of all six classes combined was 68% correct, whereas, overall accuracy of individual classes ranged from 50 to 100% correct. Mapping accuracy (i.e. omission and commission errors) of individual classes ranged from 36 to 75%. Although the key developed for this study has only limited application outside the context of the data and sites examined in this study, it is concluded that low-altitude aerial photography, together with limited amounts of collateral ground survey information, can be used to economically identify beds of submersed macrophytes in the St. Clair-Detroit River system and other similar water bodies.

  10. TPK Sarimukti, Cipatat, West Bandung compost toxicity test using Allium test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardini, Trimurti Hesti; Notodarmojo, Peni Astrini

    2015-09-01

    TPK Sarimukti, Cipatat, West Bandung produced 2 kinds of compost from traditional market waste, liquid and solid compost. The aim of this research is to evaluate toxicity of compost produced in TPK Sarimukti using shallots (Allium cepa). Tests carried out by treated shallots with liquid compost (2,5%, 5%, 10% and 12,5% (w/v)) or solid compost (25%, 50%, 75% and 100% (w/v)) for 48 hours. Results showed reduced root growth rate and mitotic index (MI) in accordance with increased concentrations of compost. Sub lethal concentrations are liquid compost 5% and 10% and solid compost 75%. Lethal concentrations are liquid compost 12,5 % and solid compost 100%. Micronuclei (MN) increased with increase in liquid compost concentration. MN found at very high frequencies in highest solid compost concentration (100%), but very low at lower concentrations. Cells with binuclei and cell necrosis increased with increasing concentrations of given compost. Nuclear anomalies (NA) found in high frequency in 75% and 100% solid compost. Based on research, we can conclude that liquid compost is more toxic because it can reduce MI and root growth rate at lower concentrations than solid compost. Both types of compost have genotoxic properties because it can induce chromosome aberration (CA), MN, binuclei and NA formation.

  11. TPK Sarimukti, Cipatat, West Bandung compost toxicity test using Allium test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wardini, Trimurti Hesti; Notodarmojo, Peni Astrini [Biology Study Program, School of Life Science and Technology, Bandung Institute of Technology (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    TPK Sarimukti, Cipatat, West Bandung produced 2 kinds of compost from traditional market waste, liquid and solid compost. The aim of this research is to evaluate toxicity of compost produced in TPK Sarimukti using shallots (Allium cepa). Tests carried out by treated shallots with liquid compost (2,5%, 5%, 10% and 12,5% (w/v)) or solid compost (25%, 50%, 75% and 100% (w/v)) for 48 hours. Results showed reduced root growth rate and mitotic index (MI) in accordance with increased concentrations of compost. Sub lethal concentrations are liquid compost 5% and 10% and solid compost 75%. Lethal concentrations are liquid compost 12,5 % and solid compost 100%. Micronuclei (MN) increased with increase in liquid compost concentration. MN found at very high frequencies in highest solid compost concentration (100%), but very low at lower concentrations. Cells with binuclei and cell necrosis increased with increasing concentrations of given compost. Nuclear anomalies (NA) found in high frequency in 75% and 100% solid compost. Based on research, we can conclude that liquid compost is more toxic because it can reduce MI and root growth rate at lower concentrations than solid compost. Both types of compost have genotoxic properties because it can induce chromosome aberration (CA), MN, binuclei and NA formation.

  12. Toxicity tests of soil contaminated by recycling of scrap plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, M H; Chui, V W

    1990-03-01

    The present investigation studied the toxicity of soil contaminated by untreated discharge from a factory that recycles used plastics. The nearby agricultural areas and freshwater fish ponds were polluted with high concentrations of Cu, Ni, and Mn. Water extracts from the contaminated soil retarded root growth of Brassica chinensis (Chinese white cabbage) and Cynodon dactylon (Bermuda grass) where their seeds were obtained commercially. The contaminated populations of C. dactylon, Panicum repen (panic grass), and Imperata cylindrica (wooly grass) were able to withstand higher concentrations of Cu, Ni, and Mn, especially C. dactylon, when compared with their uncontaminated counterparts.

  13. The assessment of sewage sludge gasification by-products toxicity by ecotoxicologial test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werle, Sebastian; Dudziak, Mariusz

    2015-08-01

    The process of gasification of sewage sludge generates by-products, which may be contaminated with toxic and hazardous substances, both organic and inorganic. It is therefore important to assess the environmental risk associated with this type of waste. The feasibility of using an ecotoxicological tests for this purpose was determined in the presented study. The applied tests contained indicator organisms belonging to various biological groups (bacteria, crustaceans, plants). The subject of the study were solid (ash, char) and liquid (tar) by-products generated during gasification (in a fixed bed reactor) of dried sewage sludge from various wastewater treatment systems. The tested samples were classified based on their toxic effect. The sensitivity of the indicator organisms to the tested material was determined. In-house procedures for the preparation for toxicity analysis of both sewage sludge and by-products generated during the gasification were presented. The scope of work also included the determination of the effect of selected process parameters (temperature, amount of gasifying agent) on the toxicity of gasification by-products depending on the sewage sludge source. It was shown that both the type of sewage sludge and the parameters of the gasification process affects the toxicity of the by-products of gasification. However, the results of toxicity studies also depend on the type of ecotoxicological test used, which is associated with a different sensitivity of the indicator organisms. Nevertheless, it may be concluded that the by-products formed during the gasification of the low toxicity sewage sludge can be regarded as non-toxic or low toxic. However, the results analysis of the gasification of the toxic sludge were not conclusive, which leads to further research needs in this area. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Whole sediment toxicity tests for metal risk assessments: on the importance of equilibration and test design to increase ecological relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandegehuchte, Michiel B; Nguyen, Lien T H; De Laender, Frederik; Muyssen, Brita T A; Janssen, Colin R

    2013-04-01

    Current laboratory-based approaches for predicting metal toxicity in sediments exhibit a number of limitations. The most important are (1) a lack of sufficient equilibration resulting in unrealistically low pH values or unnaturally high porewater metal concentrations and (2) an inadequate test design regarding the metal concentrations selected for spiking. The present study illustrates that by explicitly accounting for these limitations, one obtains reliable and environmentally realistic toxicity data, thus advancing the metal risk assessments of sediments. To this end, a toxicity test design with natural sediments was developed in which the administered metal concentrations were selected to comprise a range of the difference between the molar concentration of simultaneously extracted metals and acid volatile sulfides (SEM-AVS) closely surrounding zero. In addition, the test design presented includes a 35- or 40-d equilibration period with overlying water renewal during which conductivity, pH, and metal concentrations in the overlying water are monitored. This allows toxicity testing to start after equilibrium for these parameters has been reached. This test design was applied to Ephoron virgo (Olivier, 1791), Gammarus pulex (Linnaeus, 1758), and Lumbriculus variegatus (Mueller, 1774) exposed to Zn and Pb. These tests indicated that the general concept of absence of toxicity when SEM-AVS<0 could not be rejected. However, the onset of Zn toxicity occurred at lower concentrations than generally assumed.

  15. Developmental toxicity testing for safety assessment: new approaches and technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Thomas B; Kavlock, Robert J; Daston, George P; Stedman, Donald; Hixon, Mary; Kim, James H

    2011-10-01

    The ILSI Health and Environmental Sciences Institute's Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Technical Committee held a 2-day workshop entitled "Developmental Toxicology-New Directions" in April 2009. The fourth session of this workshop focused on new approaches and technologies for the assessment of developmental toxicology. This session provided an overview of the application of genomics technologies for developmental safety assessment, the use of mouse embryonic stem cells to capture data on developmental toxicity pathways, dynamical cell imaging of zebrafish embryos, the use of computation models of development pathways and systems, and finally, high-throughput in vitro approaches being utilized by the EPA ToxCast program. Issues discussed include the challenges of anchoring in vitro predictions to relevant in vivo endpoints and the need to validate pathway-based predictions with targeted studies in whole animals. Currently, there are 10,000 to 30,000 chemicals in world-wide commerce in need of hazard data for assessing potential health risks. The traditional animal study designs for assessing developmental toxicity cannot accommodate the evaluation of this large number of chemicals, requiring that alternative technologies be utilized. Though a daunting task, technologies are being developed and utilized to make that goal reachable. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Interlaboratory Evaluation of Hyalella Azteca and Chironomus Tentans Short-term and Long-term Sediment Toxicity Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents the results of interlaboratory toxicity tests on sediment toxicity methods for use in routine testing and this data has been presented in an EPA report and this is a summary of that data.

  17. Interlaboratory Evaluation of Hyalella Azteca and Chironomus Tentans Short-term and Long-term Sediment Toxicity Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents the results of interlaboratory toxicity tests on sediment toxicity methods for use in routine testing and this data has been presented in an EPA report and this is a summary of that data.

  18. Diaspore bank of aquatic macrophytes maintaining species diversity in a Neotropical pond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Alves Ferreira

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The diaspore bank is an important component of biological diversity acting mainly as storage and source of diaspores, which also indicate dynamics and patterns of maintenance of plant diversity. We tested the hypothesis that the diaspore bank would be the responsible factor for the maintenance of the aquatic plant species, used two techniques to evaluate the diaspore bank: seedling emergence and direct counting of field samples. Density and richness of the diaspore bank were correlated with plant cover of the aquatic macrophyte communities and also with the euphotic zone radiation in different phases of the hydrological cycle. The diaspore bank is a key factor in maintenance of aquatic macrophyte assemblages in this pond. Nymphaea amazonum was one of the dominant species in the pond and presented temporally peaks of plant cover. Furthermore, depth allowed induction of germination of stored diaspores. Therefore, the diaspore bank may predict which species colonizes a site when environmental characteristics are favorable and allows inferring which processes are linked to changes in structure of aquatic macrophyte assemblages. These mechanisms are the means for recovery of macrophyte species under natural disturbances, represented by water level oscillations in floodplains.

  19. Physiological response of the three submerged macrophytes to the five cadmium concentrations%3种沉水植物对镉的生理特性响应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易冕; 张饮江; 董悦; 刘晓培; 李岩; 金晶; 段婷; 张乐亭

    2013-01-01

    This research is aimed at providing a theoretical guidance and experimental basis for the application of submerged macrophytes to treat the effects of heavy-metal sewage pollution on the five concentrations of cadmium(Cd) to the biomass, the growth rate, the chlorophyll content, the chlorophyll activities and the soluable protein of Ceratophyllum demersum L. , Elodea nuttallii and Vallisneria natans through imitating the static and shallow water environment. For our research purpose, we have chosen the well grown Ceratophyllum demersum L. , Elodea nuttallii and Vallisneria natans as the material to be tested, with the 1/4 Hoagland liquid as the culture medium on the basis for determinating the Cd test concentration in the preliminary tests. We have conducted our formal tests lasting for 40 days in hoping to find the biomass, relative growth rate, the chlorophyll content and chlorophyll activity of the above said three submerged macro-phytes under different Cd stresses. The results show that the effects for treating turn to be different due to the different concentrations of cadmium (Cd) used and the different sampling times. It was found that the biomass, the relative growth rate and the chlorophyll contents of the three submerged macrophytes prove to noticeably decrease with the increase of cadmium (Cd) concentration, but the chlorophyll activity and the soluble protein content tend to increase first and then decrease. We have also found that the chlorophyll activities and soluble protein content of Ceratophyllum Demersum L. would reach the highest point with the Cd concentration being 10 μg/L and 5 μg/L respectively, but the Elodea nuttallii being the same as Ceratophyllum Demersum L. . Moreover, when the chlorophyll activity and the soluble protein content of Vallisneria natans reached the highest degree with the Cd concentration being 5 μg/L and 10 μg/L respectively, the concentration change of cadmium(Cd) was supposed to affect the growth of the three

  20. Dissolved organic carbon release by marine macrophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Barrón

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Estimates of dissolved organic carbon (DOC release by marine macrophyte communities (seagrass meadows and macroalgal beds were obtained experimentally using in situ benthic chambers. The effect of light availability on DOC release by macrophyte communities was examined in two communities both by comparing net DOC release under light and dark, and by examining the response of net DOC release to longer-term (days experimental shading of the communities. All most 85% of the seagrass communities and almost all of macroalgal communities examined acted as net sources of DOC. There was a weak tendency for higher DOC fluxes under light than under dark conditions in seagrass meadow. There is no relationship between net DOC fluxes and gross primary production (GPP and net community production (NCP, however, this relationship is positive between net DOC fluxes and community respiration. Net DOC fluxes were not affected by shading of a T. testudinum community in Florida for 5 days, however, shading of a mixed seagrass meadow in the Philippines led to a significant reduction on the net DOC release when shading was maintained for 6 days compared to only 2 days of shading. Based on published and unpublished results we also estimate the global net DOC production by marine macrophytes. The estimated global net DOC flux, and hence export, from marine macrophyte is about 0.197 ± 0.015 Pg C yr−1 or 0.212 ± 0.016 Pg C yr−1 depending if net DOC flux by seagrass meadows was estimated by taking into account the low or high global seagrass area, respectively.

  1. Evaluation of the sensitivity of freshwater organisms used in toxicity tests of wastewater from explosives company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Elaine Nolasco; da Silva, Flávio Teixeira; de Paiva, Teresa Cristina Brazil

    2012-10-01

    Explosives industries are a source of toxic discharge. The aim of this study was to compare organisms sensitivity (Daphnia similis, Danio rerio, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida) in detecting acute toxicity in wastewater from two explosives, 2,4,6-TNT (TNT) and nitrocellulose. The samples were collected from an explosives company in the Paraiba Valley, São Paulo, Brazil. The effluents from TNT and nitrocellulose production were very toxic for tested organisms. Statistical tests indicated that D. similis and D. rerio were the most sensitive organisms for toxicity detection in effluents from 2,4,6-TNT and nitrocellulose production. The P. putida bacteria was the organism considered the least sensitive in indicating toxicity in effluents from nitrocellulose.

  2. Development and application of a marine sediment pore-water toxicity test using Ulva fasciata zoospores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooten, R.L.; Carr, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    An acute (96 h) pore-water toxicity test protocol using germination and growth of Ulva fasciata zoospores as endpoints was developed to test the toxicity of marine and estuarine sediment pore-water samples. Tests with an organic toxicant (sodium dodecyl sulfate; SDS), three metals (Cd, Cu, and Zn), and ammonia (NH3) were conducted to determine zoospore sensitivity. Zoospore germination and gametophyte growth were as sensitive to SDS as sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) fertilization and embryological development. Zoospore sensitivity to metals was greater than or comparable to that of adult macroalgae. Zoospores were less sensitive to NH3 than were other commonly used toxicity test organisms. Test results using this algal assay with sediment pore-water samples with high NH3 concentrations were compared with results from sea urchin fertilization and embryological development tests for the same samples. Ulva fasciata zoospore germination was not affected by samples with high NH3 concentrations that were toxic in both sea urchin tests. Zoospore tolerance of NH3 and sensitivity to other contaminants indicate that their response may be useful in toxicity identification evaluation studies with pore-water samples that contain high concentrations of unionized NH3.

  3. Modifying Foods and Feeding Regimes to Optimize the Performance of Hyalella azteca during Chronic Toxicity Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    The amphipod Hyalella azteca is commonly used to assess the toxicity of sediments and waters. However, laboratories have reported varying success in maintaining healthy cultures and in obtaining consistent growth and reproduction (where applicable), especially during tests...

  4. Modifying Foods and Feeding Regimes to Optimize the Performance of Hyalella azteca during Chronic Toxicity Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    The amphipod Hyalella azteca is commonly used to assess the toxicity of sediments and waters. However, laboratories have reported varying success in maintaining healthy cultures and in obtaining consistent growth and reproduction (where applicable), especially during tests...

  5. Toxic Substances Control Act Test Submissions 2.0 (TSCATS 2.0)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxic Substances Control Act Test Submissions 2.0 (TSCATS 2.0) tracks the submissions of health and safety data submitted to the EPA either as required or...

  6. Suboptimal performance on neuropsychological tests in patients with suspected chronic toxic encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hout, MSE; Schmand, B; Wekking, EM; Hageman, G; Deelman, BG

    2003-01-01

    Suboptimal performance during neuropsychological testing can seriously complicate assessment in behavioral neurotoxicology. We present data on the prevalence of suboptimal performance in a group of Dutch patients with suspected chronic toxic encephalopathy (CTE) after long-term occupational exposure

  7. Comparative use of bacterial, algal and protozoan tests to study toxicity of azo- and anthraquinone dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotný, Cenek; Dias, Nicolina; Kapanen, Anu; Malachová, Katerina; Vándrovcová, Marta; Itävaara, Merja; Lima, Nelson

    2006-06-01

    Toxicity of two azo dyes (Reactive Orange 16 (RO16); Congo Red (CR)) and two anthraquinone dyes (Remazol Brilliant Blue R (RBBR); Disperse Blue 3 (DB3)) were compared using bacterium Vibrio fischeri, microalga Selenastrum capricornutum and ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis. The following respective endpoints were involved: acute toxicity measured as bacterial luminescence inhibition, algal growth inhibition, and the effects on the protozoa including viability, growth inhibition, grazing effect and morphometric effects. In addition, mutagenicity of the dyes was determined using Ames test with bacterium Salmonella typhimurium His(-). DB3 dye was the most toxic of all dyes in the bacterial, algal and protozoan tests. In contrast to other dyes, DB3 exhibited mutagenic effects after metabolic activation in vitro in all S. typhimurium strains used. Of the methods applied, the algal test was the most sensitive to evaluate toxicity of the dyes tested.

  8. EP-toxicity test of saturated GT-73 resin and resin in grout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibler, J.P.

    1985-04-24

    The results of EP-toxicity tests on mercury saturated Duolite{reg_sign} GT-73 cation exchange resin clarify options for the ultimate disposal of spent resin. Samples of GT-73 saturated with mercury passed the EP-toxicity test, indicating that fully spent resin may be classifed as ``solid``-not``hazardous``-waste and stored or disposed-of as such. Samples of GT-73 resin saturated with mercury and then incorporated into Portland Type 1 cement did not pass the EP-toxicity test and fall into the ``hazardous waste`` category. Samples of GT-73 resin less-than-saturated with mercury which were in corporated in Portland Type 1 cement passed the EP-toxicity test and may be classified as ``solid waste.`` Other commercially available materials are being investigated for incorporating fully spent GT-73 resin in a solid waste form.

  9. COMPOSTING AQUATIC MACROPHYTES: SALVINIA AURICULATA AND EICHHORNIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Kleiber Pessoa Borges

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available High population growth and densities in urban areas and the consumerism present in modern societies have pronounced effect on the generation of organic waste, which may become an environmental problem. Aerobic composting is one of the best known alternatives to treating these wastes. This study aimed to evaluate the applicability of composting as an alternative to the disposal of organic wastes from aquatic macrophytes Eichhornia crassipes and Salvinia auriculata collected in the reservoir UHE Luis Eduardo Magalhães, Tocantins, Brazil and also produce an organic compound from different combinations of macrophytes, prunning residues and organic waste generated by the Campus of Palmas of UFT, TO. The study was conducted in an area of 80m² in unprotected environment at the experimental station of the Campus of Palmas. The experiments were done as three replications in the dry season (from 18.09.2008 to 11.21.2008 and rainy season (from 03.09.2009 to 05.04.2009 and the parameters temperature, pH, total nitrogen and carbon, and organic matter were monitored along with counts of microorganisms. It was possible to produce compost from the combinations of organic wastes within 65 days of composting during the dry season and 55 days in the rainy season. The aquatic macrophytes resulted in a good raw material for composting, since there is not a destination for the excess plant materials removed by the cleaning process of the reservoir.

  10. Review of alien marine macrophytes in Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. R. SGHAIER

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the list of alien marine macrophytes introduced into Tunisia was updated in the light of available data and new observations. A total of 27 alien marine macrophytes have been recorded so far from Tunisia: 18 Rhodophyta, 3 Ochrophyta, 5 Chlorophyta and 1 Magnoliophyta. For each species, the locality (-ies, the year (or period and the source of the first observation in Tunisia are given. The distribution and the status (casual, cryptogenic, established or questionable of species in Tunisia were evaluated and, where appropriate, discussed. Among them, Hypnea cornuta is reported for the first time from Tunisia. Fourteen alien marine macrophytes are established, whereas seven cryptogenic and two casual species require further investigation. Eleven species are considered as invasive or potentially invasive in the Mediterranean Sea: Acrothamnion preissii, Asparagopsis armata, A. taxiformis Indo-Pacific lineage, Hypnea cornuta, Lophocladia lallemandii, Womersleyella setacea, Caulerpa chemnitzia, C. cylindracea, C. taxifolia, Codium fragile subsp. fragile and Halophila stipulacea. Finally, the case of four questionable species is also discussed.

  11. Revolutionizing Toxicity Testing For Predicting Developmental Outcomes (DNT4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Characterizing risk from environmental chemical exposure currently requires extensive animal testing; however, alternative approaches are being researched to increase throughput of chemicals screened, decrease reliance on animal testing, and improve accuracy in predicting adverse...

  12. Integrating the fish embryo toxicity test as triad element for sediment toxicity assessment based on the water framework directive approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartzke, Mariana [Dept. Aquatic Ecotoxicology, Goethe Univ. Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Gobio GmbH, Aarbergen/Kettenbach (Germany); Dept. Bioanalytical Ecotoxicology, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, UFZ, Leipzig (Germany); Delov, Vera [Dept. Aquatic Ecotoxicology, Goethe Univ. Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Gobio GmbH, Aarbergen/Kettenbach (Germany); Ecotoxicology, Fraunhofer Inst. for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology IME, Aachen (Germany); Stahlschmidt-Allner, Petra; Allner, Bernhard [Gobio GmbH, Aarbergen/Kettenbach (Germany); Oehlmann, Joerg [Dept. Aquatic Ecotoxicology, Goethe Univ. Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to complement analyses according to the European Union Water Framework Directive (WFD) with a sediment toxicity analysis as part of an integrated river assessment. To this end, Hessian water courses were analyzed using the sediment quality triad concept according to Chapman with chemical analyses, in situ effect evaluations, and ecotoxicological assessments. For the ecotoxicological assessment (fish embryo toxicity test with Danio rerio), a new evaluation scheme was developed, the fish teratogenicity index (FTI), that allows for a classification of sediments into ecological quality classes compliant to the WFD. Materials and methods sediment and macrozoobenthos samples were taken from tributaries of the rivers Fulda and Lahn. Sediments were characterized regarding particle size, carbon, heavy metals, and polyaromatic hydrocarbon content. Macroinvertebrate samples were taken via multi-habitat sampling. The fish embryo toxicity test with D. rerio was conducted as a contact assay on the basis of DIN 38415-6. Results and discussion The integrated assessment indicated a significant influence of heavy metals and carbon content on macroinvertebrate communities. The bioaccessibility of sediment pollutants were clearly demonstrated by the FTI, which showed a wide range of adverse effects. A significant linear relationship between metals and the FTI was detected. However, there was no statistically significant evidence that macroinvertebrate communities were affected by the hydromorphological quality clements at the sampling sites. Conclusions The new scheme for the assessment of fish embryo toxicity test was successfully applied. The results suggest that sediment compounds impact macroinvertebrate communities and early development of fish. It demonstrates that the quality of sediments should be evaluated on a routine basis as part of an integrated river assessment. (orig.)

  13. 40 CFR 797.1050 - Algal acute toxicity test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... concentration may be pooled into one sample. An aliquot of the pooled sample may then be taken and the... centrifuging or filtering the remaining pooled sample and measure the test substance concentration in the algal... perform this test include: a growth chamber or a controlled environment room that can hold the test...

  14. 40 CFR 797.1400 - Fish acute toxicity test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... handled and stored in a manner which minimizes loss of test substance through microbial degradation... solution. Glass or stainless steel filter holders are best for organic test substances, while plastic... concentration range to be used in the test. (D) An analytical method is not acceptable if likely degradation...

  15. Comparison of toxicity values across zebrafish early life stages and mammalian studies: Implications for chemical testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducharme, Nicole A; Reif, David M; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Bondesson, Maria

    2015-08-01

    With the high cost and slow pace of toxicity testing in mammals, the vertebrate zebrafish has become a tractable model organism for high throughput toxicity testing. We present here a meta-analysis of 600 chemicals tested for toxicity in zebrafish embryos and larvae. Nineteen aggregated and 57 individual toxicity endpoints were recorded from published studies yielding 2695 unique data points. These data points were compared to lethality and reproductive toxicology endpoints analyzed in rodents and rabbits and to exposure values for humans. We show that although many zebrafish endpoints did not correlate to rodent or rabbit acute toxicity data, zebrafish could be used to accurately predict relative acute toxicity through the rat inhalation, rabbit dermal, and rat oral exposure routes. Ranking of the chemicals based on toxicity and teratogenicity in zebrafish, as well as human exposure levels, revealed that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), benzo(a)pyrene, and chlorpyrifos ranked in the top nine of all chemicals for these three categories, and as such should be considered high priority chemicals for testing in higher vertebrates.

  16. Acute toxicity tests on raw leachate from a Malaysian dumping site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujá, Fatihah; Yusof, Arij; Osman, Md Anuar

    2010-01-01

    Leachate samples collected from the Ampar Tenang open dumping site at Dengkil, Malaysia, were analyzed for acute toxicity. Two in vivo toxicity tests, Acute Oral Toxicity (AOT) and Primary Skin Irritation (PSI), were performed using Sprague Dawley rats and New Zealand Albino rabbits, respectively. The leachate samples were also analyzed chemically for nitrate and phosphate, ammonia-nitrogen, Kjeldahl-nitrogen and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD). Results from both the AOT and PSI tests showed that the leachate did not contribute to acute toxicity. The AOT test yielded a negative result: no effect was observed in at least half of the rat population. The PSI test on rabbits produced effects only at a leachate concentration of 100%. However, the skin irritation was minor, and the test returned a negative result. The four chemical tests showed high levels of nutrient pollution in the leachate. The nitrate and phosphate concentrations were 2.1 mg/L and 23.6 mg/L, respectively. Further, the ammonia-nitrogen concentration was 1,000 mg NH(3)-N/L the Kjeldahl-nitrogen level was 446 mg NH(3)-N/L, and the Chemical Oxygen Demand was 1,300 mg/L. The in vivo toxicity and chemical analyses showed that the leachate is polluted but not acutely toxic to organisms.

  17. On the possibility of using biological toxicity tests to monitor the work of wastewater treatment plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorić Jelena

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to ascertain the possibility of using biological toxicity tests to monitor influent and effluent wastewaters of wastewater treatment plants. The information obtained through these tests is used to prevent toxic pollutants from entering wastewater treatment plants and discharge of toxic pollutants into the recipient. Samples of wastewaters from the wastewater treatment plants of Kragujevac and Gornji Milanovac, as well as from the Lepenica and Despotovica Rivers immediately before and after the influx of wastewaters from the plants, were collected between October 2004 and June 2005. Used as the test organism in these tests was the zebrafish Brachydanio rerio Hamilton - Buchanon (Cyprinidae. The acute toxicity test of 96/h duration showed that the tested samples had a slight acutely toxic effect on B. rerio, except for the sample of influent wastewater into the Cvetojevac wastewater treatment plant, which had moderately acute toxicity, indicating that such water should be prevented from entering the system in order to eliminate its detrimental effect on the purification process.

  18. Alternative methods for toxicity assessments in fish: comparison of the fish embryo toxicity and the larval growth and survival tests in zebrafish and fathead minnows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Marlo K Sellin; Stultz, Amy E; Smith, Austin W; Rawlings, Jane M; Belanger, Scott E; Oris, James T

    2014-11-01

    An increased demand for chemical toxicity evaluations has resulted in the need for alternative testing strategies that address animal welfare concerns. The fish embryo toxicity (FET) test developed for zebrafish (Danio rerio) is one such alternative, and the application of the FET test to other species such as the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) has been proposed. In the present study, the performances of the FET test and the larval growth and survival (LGS; a standard toxicity testing method) test in zebrafish and fathead minnows were evaluated. This required that testing methods for the fathead minnow FET and zebrafish LGS tests be harmonized with existing test methods and that the performance of these testing strategies be evaluated by comparing the median lethal concentrations of 2 reference toxicants, 3,4-dicholoraniline and ammonia, obtained via each of the test types. The results showed that procedures for the zebrafish FET test can be adapted and applied to the fathead minnow. Differences in test sensitivity were observed for 3,4-dicholoraniline but not ammonia; therefore, conclusions regarding which test types offer the least or most sensitivity could not be made. Overall, these results show that the fathead minnow FET test has potential as an alternative toxicity testing strategy and that further analysis with other toxicants is warranted in an effort to better characterize the sensitivity and feasibility of this testing strategy. © 2014 SETAC.

  19. Alternative methods in toxicity testing: the current approach

    OpenAIRE

    Araújo,Gabrielle Luck de; Campos,Maria Augusta Amaral; Valente,Maria Anete Santana; Silva,Sarah Cristina Teixeira; França,Flávia Dayrell; Chaves,Miriam Martins; Tagliati, Carlos Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Alternative methods are being developed to reduce, refine, and replace (3Rs) animals used in experiments, aimed at protecting animal welfare. The present study reports alternative tests which are based on the principles of the 3Rs and the efforts made to validate these tests. In Europe, several methodologies have already been implemented, such as tests of irritability, cell viability, and phototoxicity as well as in vitro mathematical models together with the use of in silico tools. This is a...

  20. Assessment of Jatropha curcas L. biodiesel seed cake toxicity using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo toxicity (ZFET) test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallare, Arnold V; Ruiz, Paulo Lorenzo S; Cariño, J C Earl D

    2014-05-01

    Consequent to the growing demand for alternative sources of energy, the seeds from Jatropha curcas remain to be the favorite for biodiesel production. However, a significant volume of the residual organic mass (seed cake) is produced during the extraction process, which raises concerns on safe waste disposal. In the present study, we assessed the toxicity of J. curcas seed cake using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryotoxicity test. Within 1-h post-fertilization (hpf), the fertilized eggs were exposed to five mass concentrations of J. curcas seed cake and were followed through 24, 48, and 72 hpf. Toxicity was evaluated based on lethal endpoints induced on zebrafish embryos namely egg coagulation, non-formation of somites, and non-detachment of tail. The lowest concentration tested, 1 g/L, was not able to elicit toxicity on embryos whereas 100 % mortality (based also on lethal endpoints) was recorded at the highest concentration at 2.15 g/L. The computed LC50 for the J. curcas seed cake was 1.61 g/L. No further increase in mortality was observed in the succeeding time points (48 and 72 hpf) indicating that J. curcas seed cake exerted acute toxicity on zebrafish embryos. Sublethal endpoints (yolk sac and pericardial edema) were noted at 72 hpf in zebrafish embryos exposed to higher concentrations. The observed lethal endpoints induced on zebrafish embryos were discussed in relation to the active principles, notably, phorbol esters that have remained in the seed cake even after extraction.

  1. Field Validation of Toxicity Tests to Evaluate the Potential for Beneficial Use of Produced Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph Bidwell; Jonathan Fisher; Naomi Cooper

    2008-03-31

    This study investigated potential biological effects of produced water contamination derived from occasional surface overflow and possible subsurface intrusion at an oil production site along the shore of Skiatook Lake, Oklahoma. We monitored basic chemistry and acute toxicity to a suite of standard aquatic test species (fathead minnow-Pimephales promelas, Daphnia pulex, Daphnia magna, and Ceriodaphnia dubia) in produced water and in samples taken from shallow groundwater wells on the site. Toxicity identification evaluations and ion toxicity modeling were used to identify toxic constituents in the samples. Lake sediment at the oil production site and at a reference site were also analyzed for brine intrusion chemically and by testing sediment toxicity using the benthic invertebrates, Chironomus dilutus, and Hyallela azteca. Sediment quality was also assessed with in situ survival and growth studies with H. azteca and the Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea, and by benthic macroinvertebrate community sampling. The produced water was acutely toxic to the aquatic test organisms at concentrations ranging from 1% to 10% of the whole produced water sample. Toxicity identification evaluation and ion toxicity modeling indicated major ion salts and hydrocarbons were the primary mixture toxicants. The standardized test species used in the laboratory bioassays exhibited differences in sensitivity to these two general classes of contaminants, which underscores the importance of using multiple species when evaluating produced water toxicity. Toxicity of groundwater was greater in samples from wells near a produced water injection well and an evaporation pond. Principle component analyses (PCA) of chemical data derived from the groundwater wells indicated dilution by lake water and possible biogeochemical reactions as factors that ameliorated groundwater toxicity. Elevated concentrations of major ions were found in pore water from lake sediments, but toxicity from these ions was

  2. Cross-Sector Review of Drivers and Available 3Rs Approaches for Acute Systemic Toxicity Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidle, Troy; Robinson, Sally; Holmes, Tom; Creton, Stuart; Prieto, Pilar; Scheel, Julia; Chlebus, Magda

    2010-01-01

    Acute systemic toxicity studies are carried out in many sectors in which synthetic chemicals are manufactured or used and are among the most criticized of all toxicology tests on both scientific and ethical grounds. A review of the drivers for acute toxicity testing within the pharmaceutical industry led to a paradigm shift whereby in vivo acute toxicity data are no longer routinely required in advance of human clinical trials. Based on this experience, the following review was undertaken to identify (1) regulatory and scientific drivers for acute toxicity testing in other industrial sectors, (2) activities aimed at replacing, reducing, or refining the use of animals, and (3) recommendations for future work in this area. PMID:20484382

  3. PAH toxicity at aqueous solubility in the fish embryo test with Danio rerio using passive dosing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernqvist, Margit; Mayer, Philipp; Smith, Kilian

    2014-01-01

    As part of the risk assessment process within REACh, prior to manufacturing and distribution of chemical substances their (eco)toxicological impacts have to be investigated. The fish embryo toxicity test (FET) with the zebrafish Danio rerio has gained a high significance as an in vitro alternative...... to animal testing in (eco)toxicology. However, for hydrophobic organic chemicals it remains a technical challenge to ensure constant freely dissolved concentration at the maximum exposure level during such biotests. Passive dosing with PDMS silicone was thus applied to control the freely dissolved...... further data to support the close relationship between the chemical activity and the toxicity of hydrophobic organic compounds. Passive dosing from PDMS silicone enabled reliable toxicity testing of (highly) hydrophobic substances at aqueous solubility, providing a practical way to control toxicity...

  4. Ecotoxicity of engineered nanoparticles to aquatic invertebrates: a brief review and recommendations for future toxicity testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baun, Anders; Hartmann, Nanna Isabella Bloch; Grieger, Khara Deanne

    2008-01-01

    Based on a literature review and an overview of toxic effects of engineered nanoparticles in aquatic invertebrates, this paper proposes a number of recommendations for the developing field of nanoecotoxicology by highlighting the importance of invertebrates as sensitive and relevant test organisms...... Daphnia magna as the test organism. To date, the limited number of studies has indicated acute toxicity in the low mgl(-1) range and higher of engineered nanoparticles to aquatic invertebrates, although some indications of chronic toxicity and behavioral changes have also been described at concentrations...... in the high mu gl(-1) range. Nanoparticles have also been found to act as contaminant carriers of co-existing contaminants and this interaction has altered the toxicity of specific chemicals towards D. magna. We recommend that invertebrate testing is used to advance the level of knowledge in nanoecotoxicology...

  5. 40 CFR 797.1930 - Mysid shrimp acute toxicity test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... exposure over a specified period of time. (4) “Loading” means the ratio of test organisms biomass (grams... as hydrolysis and oxidation products, give positive or negative interferences which cannot be..., pH, etc.) and a description of any pretreatment. (2) Detailed information about the test...

  6. 40 CFR 797.1300 - Daphnid acute toxicity test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ratio of daphnid biomass (grams, wet weight) to the volume (liters) of test solution in a test chamber... oxidation products, give positive or negative interferences which cannot be systematically identified and...., conductivity, hardness, pH, etc.) and a description of any pretreatment. (4) Detailed information about...

  7. 40 CFR 797.1950 - Mysid shrimp chronic toxicity test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) “Loading” means the ratio of test organism biomass (gram, wet weight) to the volume (liters) of test... substance, such as hydrolysis and oxidation products, give positive or negative interferences which cannot... characteristics (e.g., salinity, pH, etc.) and a description of any pretreatment. (2) Detailed information...

  8. Toxicity assessing for chlorpyrifos-contaminated soil with three different earthworm test methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Shi-ping; DUAN Chang-qun; FU Hui; CHEN Yu-hui; WANG Xue-hua; YU Ze-fen

    2007-01-01

    Earthworm toxicity tests are useful tools for terrestrial risk assessment but require a hierarchy of test designs that differ in effect levels (behavior, sublethal, lethal). In this study, the toxicity of chlorpyrifos contaminated soil on earthworms was assessed. In addition to the acute and chronic tests, an avoidance response test was applied. Earthworms were exposed to sublethal and lethal concentration of chlorpyrifos, and evaluated for acute toxicity, growth, fecundity and avoidance response after a certain exposure period. The test methods covered all important ecological relevant endpoints (acute, chronic, behavioral). Concentration of 78.91 mg/kg, chlorpyrifos caused significant toxic effects in all test methods, but at lower test concentrations, only significant chronic toxic effects could be observed. In the present study, chlorpyrifos had adverse effect on growth and fecundity in earthworm exposed to 5 mg/kg chlorpyrifos after eight weeks. The avoidance response test, however, showed significant repellent effects concentration of 40 mg/kg chlorpyrifos. For chlorpyrifos, concentration affecting avoidance response was far greater than growth and fecundity, it seemed likely that earthworms were not able to escape from pesticide-contaminated soil into the clean soil in field and hence were exposed continuously to elevated concentrations of pesticides.

  9. Assigning ethical weights to clinical signs observed during toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringblom, Joakim; Törnqvist, Elin; Hansson, Sven Ove; Rudén, Christina; Öberg, Mattias

    2017-01-01

    Reducing the number of laboratory animals used and refining experimental procedures to enhance animal welfare are fundamental questions to be considered in connection with animal experimentation. Here, we explored the use of cardinal ethical weights for clinical signs and symptoms in rodents by conducting trade-off interviews with members of Swedish Animal Ethics Committees in order to derive such weights for nine typical clinical signs of toxicity. The participants interviewed represent researchers, politically nominated political nominees and representatives of animal welfare organizations. We observed no statistically significant differences between these groups with respect to the magnitude of the ethical weights assigned, though the political nominees tended to assign lower weights. Overall, hunched posture was considered the most severe clinical sign and body weight loss the least severe. The ethical weights assigned varied considerably between individuals, from zero to infinite value, indicating discrepancies in prioritization of reduction and refinement. Cardinal ethical weights may be utilized to include both animal welfare refinement and reduction of animal use in designing as well as in retrospective assessment of animal experiments. Such weights may also be used to estimate ethical costs of animal experiments.

  10. Acute toxicity testing with the tropical marine copepod Acartia sinjiensis: optimisation and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gissi, F; Binet, M T; Adams, M S

    2013-11-01

    Globally there is limited toxicity data for tropical marine species, and there has been a call for further research and development in the area of tropical marine ecotoxicology. An increase in developmental pressures in northern tropical Australia is causing a higher demand for toxicity test protocols with ecologically relevant species. Copepods are a diverse group of zooplankton that are major components of marine food webs. The calanoid copepod Acartia sinjiensis is widely distributed across tropical and sub-tropical brackish to marine waters of Australia and was identified in a recent comprehensive review of marine tropical toxicity testing in Australia as a suitable test organism. Through a number of optimisation steps including feeding trials, changes to culture and test conditions; a 48-h acute toxicity test with A. sinjiensis was modified to become a highly reliable and reproducible standard test protocol. Control mobility was improved significantly, and the sensitivity of A. sinjiensis to copper (EC50 of 33µg/L), ammonia (EC50 of 10mg/L) and phenol (EC50 of 13mg/L) fell within the ranges of those reported previously, indicating that the modifications did not alter its sensitivity. In a comprehensive literature search we found that this species was the most sensitive to copper out of a range of marine copepods. The test was also successfully applied in toxicity assessments of four environmental samples: two produced formations waters (PFWs) and two mine tailing liquors (MTLs). The toxicity assessments utilised toxicity data from a suite of marine organisms (bacteria, microalgae, copepods, sea urchins, oysters, prawns, and fish). For the PFWs, which were predominantly contaminated with organic chemicals, A. sinjiensis was the most sensitive species (EC50 value 2-17 times lower than for any other test species). For the predominantly metal-contaminated mine tailing liquors, its sensitivity was similar to that of other test species used. The modified 48-h acute

  11. Establishment of quality assurance procedures for aquatic toxicity testing with the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, M.N.; Marse, T.J.; Williams, P.L. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Environmental Health Science Program

    1998-12-31

    In this study initial data were generated to develop laboratory control charts for aquatic toxicity testing using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Tests were performed using two reference toxicants: CdCl{sub 2} and CuCl{sub 2}. All tests were performed for 24 h without a food source and of 48 h with a food source in a commonly used nematode aquatic medium. Each test was replicated 6 times with each replicate having 6 wells per concentration with 10 {+-} 1 worms per well. Probit analysis was used to estimate LC{sub 50} values for each test. The data were used to construct a mean ({bar x}) laboratory control chart for each reference toxicant. The coefficient of variation (CV) for three of the four reference toxicant tests was less than 20%, which demonstrates an excellent degree of reproducibility. These CV values are well within suggested standards for determination of organism sensitivity and overall test system credibility. A standardized procedure for performing 24 h and 48 h aquatic toxicity studies with C. elegans is proposed.

  12. Phytoremediation of heavy metals from aqueous solutions by two aquatic macrophytes, Ceratophyllum demersum and Lemna gibba L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Maha Ahmed Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Wetland plants are being used successfully for the phytoremediation of trace elements in natural and constructed wetlands. Under the present investigation, two aquatic macrophytes, Ceratophyllum demersum and Lemna gibba, were tested for their effectiveness at removing two toxic metals (Pb and Cr). These plants were grown at four different concentrations in single-metal solutions of the two metals and were separately harvested after 2, 4, 6, 9 and 12 days in a laboratory experiment. These plants performed extremely well at removing the chromium and lead from their solutions and were capable of removing up to 95% of lead and 84% of chromium during the 12-day incubation period. The removal continued through the 12 days and up to the highest value on the 12th day of the experiment. The results revealed that, of the two species, L. gibba was the most efficient for the removal of selected heavy metals. The plants accumulated heavy metals without the production of any toxicity or reduction in growth.

  13. Recreating the seawater mixture composition of HOCs in toxicity tests with Artemia franciscana by passive dosing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojo-Nieto, E., E-mail: elisa.rojo@uca.es [Andalusian Centre of Marine Science and Technology (CACYTMAR), Department of Environmental Technologies, University of Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real (Spain); Smith, K.E.C. [Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Perales, J.A. [Andalusian Centre of Marine Science and Technology (CACYTMAR), Department of Environmental Technologies, University of Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real (Spain); Mayer, P. [Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark)

    2012-09-15

    The toxicity testing of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in aquatic media is generally challenging, and this is even more problematic for mixtures. The hydrophobic properties of these compounds make them difficult to dissolve, and subsequently to maintain constant exposure concentrations. Evaporative and sorptive losses are highly compound-specific, which can alter not only total concentrations, but also the proportions between the compounds in the mixture. Therefore, the general aim of this study was to explore the potential of passive dosing for testing the toxicity of a PAH mixture that recreates the mixture composition found in seawater from a coastal area of Spain, the Bay of Algeciras. First, solvent spiking and passive dosing were compared for their suitability to determine the acute toxicity to Artemia franciscana nauplii of several PAHs at their respective solubility limits. Second, passive dosing was applied to recreate the seawater mixture composition of PAHs measured in a Spanish monitoring program, to test the toxicity of this mixture at different levels. HPLC analysis was used to confirm the reproducibility of the dissolved exposure concentrations for the individual PAHs and mixtures. This study shows that passive dosing has some important benefits in comparison with solvent spiking for testing HOCs in aquatic media. These include maintaining constant exposure concentrations, leading to higher reproducibility and a relative increase in toxicity. Passive dosing is also able to faithfully reproduce real mixtures of HOCs such as PAHs, in toxicity tests, reproducing both the levels and proportions of the different compounds. This provides a useful approach for studying the toxicity of environmental mixtures of HOCs, both with a view to investigating their toxicity but also for determining safety factors before such mixtures result in detrimental effects.

  14. Richness and composition of macrophyte assemblages in four Amazonian lakes - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v35i3.11602

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidinei Magela Thomaz

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic macrophytes are an important component in the structure of lakes in Neotropical floodplains, for example, because they support a high diversity of invertebrates and vertebrates. In this paper, we tested whether or not the variability of macrophyte assemblages is lower in spatially close quadrats than among quadrats of different lakes. The study was carried in four lakes in a large Amazonian floodplain (Purus river, where floating meadows were investigated. A total of 49 taxa of macrophytes were found. Five species dominated and three species were rare. Taxa richness, composition and beta diversity differed more between than within lakes. Because high beta diversity was found among the lakes, they should be considered individually important for maintaining the gamma diversity of macrophytes within the Purus River floodplain, and this should be considered in plans of lake management.  

  15. Controlling silver nanoparticle exposure in algal toxicity testing - A matter of timing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Sara Nørgaard; Baun, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The aquatic ecotoxicity testing of nanoparticles is complicated by unstable exposure conditions resulting from various transformation processes of nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions. In this study, we investigated the influence of exposure timing on the algal test response to silver nanoparticles......) in a standard algal growth inhibition test (ISO 8692:2004) for 48 h and a short-term (2 h) 14C-assimilation test. For AgNO3, similar responses were obtained in the two tests, whereas freshly prepared suspensions of citrate stabilized AgNPs were less toxic in the 2-h tests compared to the 48-h tests. The 2-h...... and reproducibility increased. Prolonged aging to 48 h increased toxicity in the 2-h tests whereas aging beyond 48 h reduced toxicity. Our results demonstrate that the outcome of algal toxicity testing of AgNPs is highly influenced not only by the test duration, but also by the time passed from the moment Ag...

  16. Alternative approaches for identifying acute systemic toxicity: Moving from research to regulatory testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Jon; Sullivan, Kristie; Clippinger, Amy J; Strickland, Judy; Bell, Shannon; Bhhatarai, Barun; Blaauboer, Bas; Casey, Warren; Dorman, David; Forsby, Anna; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Gehen, Sean; Graepel, Rabea; Hotchkiss, Jon; Lowit, Anna; Matheson, Joanna; Reaves, Elissa; Scarano, Louis; Sprankle, Catherine; Tunkel, Jay; Wilson, Dan; Xia, Menghang; Zhu, Hao; Allen, David

    2017-06-01

    Acute systemic toxicity testing provides the basis for hazard labeling and risk management of chemicals. A number of international efforts have been directed at identifying non-animal alternatives for in vivo acute systemic toxicity tests. A September 2015 workshop, Alternative Approaches for Identifying Acute Systemic Toxicity: Moving from Research to Regulatory Testing, reviewed the state-of-the-science of non-animal alternatives for this testing and explored ways to facilitate implementation of alternatives. Workshop attendees included representatives from international regulatory agencies, academia, nongovernmental organizations, and industry. Resources identified as necessary for meaningful progress in implementing alternatives included compiling and making available high-quality reference data, training on use and interpretation of in vitro and in silico approaches, and global harmonization of testing requirements. Attendees particularly noted the need to characterize variability in reference data to evaluate new approaches. They also noted the importance of understanding the mechanisms of acute toxicity, which could be facilitated by the development of adverse outcome pathways. Workshop breakout groups explored different approaches to reducing or replacing animal use for acute toxicity testing, with each group crafting a roadmap and strategy to accomplish near-term progress. The workshop steering committee has organized efforts to implement the recommendations of the workshop participants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 78 FR 66700 - Toxic Substances Control Act Chemical Testing; Receipt of Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    ... Mammals; Bacterial Reverse Mutation Assay; Chromosomal Aberrations; Combined Repeated Dose Toxicity with... heat set, cold Study in Zebra Fish set, and sheet-fed (Brachydanio rerio). applications. Acute Toxicity Study in Daphnia Magna with C.I. Pigment Blue 61 (Static). Fresh Water Algal Growth 0442,...

  18. Phytotoxicity testing of winery wastewater for constructed wetland treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arienzo, Michele; Christen, Evan W; Quayle, Wendy C

    2009-09-30

    Rapid and inexpensive phytotoxicity bioassays for winery wastewater (WW) are important when designing winery wastewater treatment systems involving constructed wetlands. Three macrophyte wetland species (Phragmites australis, Schoenoplectus validus and Juncus ingens) were tested using a pot experiment simulating a wetland microcosm. The winery wastewater concentration was varied (0.5%, 5%, 10%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%) and pH was corrected for some concentrations using lime as an amendment. The tolerance of the three aquatic macrophytes species to winery wastewater was studied through biomass production, total chlorophyll and nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium tissue concentrations. The results showed that at greater than 25% wastewater concentration all the macrophytes died and that Phragmites was the least hardy species. At less than 25% wastewater concentration the wetland microcosms were effective in reducing chemical oxygen demand, phenols and total soluble solids. We also evaluated the performance of two laboratory phytotoxicity assays; (1) Garden Cress (Lepidium sativum), and (2) Onion (Allium coepa). The results of these tests revealed that the effluent was highly toxic with effective concentration, EC(50), inhibition values, as low as 0.25%. Liming the WW increased the EC(50) by 10 fold. Comparing the cress and onion bioassays with the wetland microcosm results indicated that the thresholds for toxicity were of the same order of magnitude. As such we suggest that the onion and cress bioassays could be effectively used in the wine industry for rapid wastewater toxicity assessment.

  19. Toxics testing performance evaluation for GB and GD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Neill, H.J.; Schneider, J.F.; Brubaker, K.L.; Kimmell, T.A.; Anderson, A.W.

    1997-10-01

    Residues resulting from demilitarization, treatment, cleanup, and testing of military chemical agents at Dugway Proving Ground (DPG), Utah, are currently listed as hazardous wastes by the State of Utah Department of Environmental Quality. The US Army Test and Evaluation Command believes that certain categories of waste generated at DPG are not hazardous. To demonstrate this, analytical methods capable of quantitatively measuring the concentrations of chemical agents, including GB and GD, in the different waste media must be available. Argonne National Laboratory has developed methods to analyze metal substrate, spent hypochlorite decontamination fluid, and soil matrices for GB and GD. These methods involve the use of sorbent cartridge preconcentration and thermal desorption combined with gas chromatography using flame photometric detection to achieve the desired sensitivity and specificity. This report describes the methods and presents results for these three common waste matrices. The test results indicate that these methods can be used to quantitatively determine concentrations of GB and GD in the low parts-per-billion range in all sample media tested.

  20. 40 CFR 797.1330 - Daphnid chronic toxicity test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... daphnids except for minor activity of the appendages. (7) Loading means the ratio of daphnid biomass (grams... acceptable if likely degradation products of the test substance, such as hydrolysis and oxidation products..., pH), and a description of any pretreatment. (4) Detailed information about the daphnids used...

  1. NMSBA: Aken Technologies Final Report: Toxicity Testing of Liquidoff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruffing, Anne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jensen, Travis [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Strickland, Lucas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-01

    To determine the effect of Liquidoff on bacteria, three bacterial strains were tested: Escherichia coli DH5α, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. E. coli DH5α is a Gram-negative, aerobic bacterium that is often found in normal gut flora and is commonly used the laboratory due to its fast growth rate. Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 and S. elongatus PCC 7942 are Gram-negative, aquatic, autophototrophic cyanobacteria. Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 is a marine cyanobacterium isolated from ‘fish pens’ on Magueyes Island, Puerto Rico in 1962, while S. elongatus PCC 7942 is a freshwater cyanobacterium. It should be noted that no Gram-positive bacterium was tested in this study.

  2. NMSBA: Aken Technologies. Final Report: Toxicity Testing of Liquidoff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruffing, Anne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jensen, Travis J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Strickland, Lucas Marshall [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rader, Nadeya C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Carson, Bryan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    To determine the effect of Liquidoff on bacteria, three bacterial strains were tested: Escherichia coli DH5α, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. E. coli DH5α is a Gramnegative, aerobic bacterium that is often found in normal gut flora and is commonly used the laboratory due to its fast growth rate. Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 and S. elongatus PCC 7942 are Gram-negative, aquatic, autophototrophic cyanobacteria. Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 is a marine cyanobacterium isolated from ‘fish pens’ on Magueyes Island, Puerto Rico in 1962, while S. elongatus PCC 7942 is a freshwater cyanobacterium. It should be noted that no Gram-positive bacterium was tested in this study.

  3. Anaerobic degradation and toxicity of commercial cationic surfactants in anaerobic screening tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, M T; Campos, E; Sánchez-Leal, J; Ribosa, I

    2000-09-01

    Anaerobic biodegradability and toxicity on anaerobic bacteria of di(hydrogenated tallow) dimethyl ammonium chloride (DHTDMAC) and two esterquats have been investigated. A batch test system containing municipal digester solids as a source of anaerobic bacteria, based on the method proposed by the ECETOC, has been applied. To evaluate the potential toxicity of such surfactants on anaerobic sludge, a co-substrate, an easily biodegradable compound in anaerobic conditions, has been added to the samples to test and the effects on biogas production have been determined. For the esterquats studied high biodegradation levels were obtained and no toxic effects on anaerobic bacteria were observed even at the highest concentrations tested, 100 and 200 mg C/l, respectively. On the contrary, DHTDMAC was not degradated at the same test conditions. However, no inhibitory effects on the biogas production were detected for this surfactant at concentrations <100 mg C/l.

  4. The Use of Physarum for Testing of Toxicity/Mutagenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-19

    Salmonella-mammalian microsome mutagenicity test. Mutat, Res. 31, 347-364. Anderson, R. 1977. A plasmodial colour mutation in the myxomycete Physarum... myxomycete Physarum polycephalum. Genet. Res., Camb. 29, 21-34. Arescaldino, I. 1968. Determination de l’age optimum d’aptitude a la sporula- tion chez... Myxomycetes ) au cours de la sporulation. Comptes Rendus, Ser. D., 273, 398-401. Back, K. C., and A. A. Thomas. 1964. A study of the mechanism of

  5. Dispersed oil toxicity tests with biological species indigenous to the Gulf of Mexico. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fucik, K.W.; Carr, K.A.; Balcom, B.J.

    1994-08-01

    Static and flowthrough aquatic acute toxicity testing protocols were utilized on eggs and larvae of seven commercially important invertebrates and fishes from the Gulf of Mexico. Test organisms were exposed to Central and Western Gulf oils, dispersed oil, and Corexit 9527. Species included brown shrimp (Penaeus aztecus), white shrimp (Penaeus setiferus), blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica), red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus), inland silverside (Menidia berylina), and spot (Leiosomus xanthurus). Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus) was also tested because gulf menhaden were not available. Mysids (Mysidopsis bahia) were evaluated as part of a chronic toxicity assessment.

  6. Consensus report on the future of animal-free systemic toxicity testing

    OpenAIRE

    Leist, Marcel; Hasiwa, Nina; Rovida, Costanza; Daneshian, Mardas; Basketter, David; Kimber, Ian; Clewell, Harvey; Gocht, Tilman; Goldberg, Alan; Busquet, Francois; Rossi, Anna-Maria; Schwarz, Michael; Stephens, Martin; Taalman, Rob; Knudsen, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    Since March 2013, animal use for cosmetics testing for the European market has been banned. This requires a renewed view on risk assessment in this field. However, in other fields as well, traditional animal experimentation does not always satisfy requirements in safety testing, as the need for human-relevant information is ever increasing. A general strategy for animal-free test approaches was outlined by the US National Research Council`s vision document for Toxicity Testing in the 21st Cen...

  7. Acute aquatic toxicity of heavy fuel oils. Summary of relevant test data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comber, M.I.H.; Den Haan, K.; Djemel, N.; Eadsforth, C.V.; King, D.; Parkerton, T.; Paumen, M.L.; Dmytrasz, B.

    2011-12-15

    This report describes the experimental procedures and results obtained in acute ecotoxicity tests on several heavy fuel oil (HFO) samples. Water accommodated fractions (WAFs) of these samples were tested for toxicity to the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), the crustacean zooplankter (Daphnia magna) and green algae (Selenastrum capricornutum). These results assist in determining the environmental hazard from heavy fuel oil.

  8. Acute and chronic aquatic toxicity of aromatic extracts. Summary of relevant test data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comber, M.I.H.; Den Haan, K.; Djemel, N.; Eadsforth, C.V.; King, D.; Parkerton, T.; Leon Paumen, M.; Dmytrasz, B.; Del Castillo, F.

    2013-09-15

    This report describes the experimental procedures and the results obtained in acute and chronic ecotoxicity tests on several aromatic extracts samples. The samples were tested for toxicity to the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), the crustacean zooplankter, Daphnia magna and the algae, Selenastrum capricornutum using water accommodated fractions. These results assist in determining the environmental hazard posed by aromatic extracts.

  9. Evaluation of an alternative in vitro test battery for detecting reproductive toxicants in a grouping context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroese, E. Dinant; Bosgra, Sieto; Buist, Harrie E.; Lewin, Geertje; van der Linden, Sander C.; Man, Hai-yen; Piersma, Aldert H.; Rorije, Emiel; Schulpen, Sjors H. W.; Schwarz, Michael; Uibel, Frederik; van Vugt-Lussenburg, Barbara M. A.; Wolterbeek, Andre P. M.; van der Burg, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Previously we showed a battery consisting of CALUX transcriptional activation assays, the ReProGlo assay, and the embryonic stem cell test, and zebrafish embryotoxicity assay as 'apical' tests to correctly predict developmental toxicity for 11 out of 12 compounds, and to explain the one false negati

  10. Acute marine sediment toxicity: a potential new test with the amphipod Gammarus locusta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, F O; Correia, A D; Costa, M H

    1998-01-01

    Although amphipod toxicity tests have been successfully used in the United States to assess coastal sediment toxicity, few tests have been developed with European species. The authors have been working with the amphipod Gammarus locusta, a widely spread species along European coastal areas that is particularly abundant in the Portuguese Sado estuary. This amphipod fulfills the most important requirements of a test species. It can be easily reproduced in laboratory and it is tolerant to a broad range of sediment types. A series of tests demonstrated its sensitivity to copper and gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (lindane) in the sediment (LC50 = 6.8 mg Cu/dry kg, 0.9% total volatile solids; LC50 = 60.5 micrograms HCH/dry kg, 2% total volatile solids) and to some heavily contaminated field sediments. After assessment of the species sensitivity to several noncontaminant variables, an experimental protocol was designed to conduct acute sediment toxicity tests that are briefly described. Proposed is a 10-day static toxicity test at 15 degrees C and 33-34/1000 salinity, with laboratory-produced juveniles and mortality as the endpoint. General assay performance is identical to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard for sediment toxicity tests with marine and estuarine amphipods. The results previously obtained revealed a strong potential for this amphipod to be used in toxicological testing. Considering the wide geographic distribution of this species and its amenability for culturing, it may be an alternative or complementary test for ecotoxicological studies in other European coastal systems where the existing tests cannot be applied or do not offer a definitive solution.

  11. Toxicity Testing of Pristine and Aged Silver Nanoparticles in Real Wastewaters Using Bioluminescent Pseudomonas putida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Mallevre

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Impact of aging on nanoparticle toxicity in real matrices is scarcely investigated due to a lack of suitable methodologies. Herein, the toxicity of pristine and aged silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs to a bioluminescent Pseudomonas putida bioreporter was measured in spiked crude and final wastewater samples (CWs and FWs, respectively collected from four wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs. Results showed lower toxicity of pristine Ag NPs in CWs than in FWs. The effect of the matrix on the eventual Ag NP toxicity was related to multiple physico-chemical parameters (biological oxygen demand (BOD, chemical oxygen demand (COD, total suspended solids (TSS pH, ammonia, sulfide and chloride based on a multivariate analysis. However, no collection site effect was concluded. Aged Ag NPs (up to eight weeks were found less toxic than pristine Ag NPs in CWs; evident increased aggregation and decreased dissolution were associated with aging. However, Ag NPs exhibited consistent toxicity in FWs despite aging; comparable results were obtained in artificial wastewater (AW simulating effluent. The study demonstrates the potency of performing nanoparticle acute toxicity testing in real and complex matrices such as wastewaters using relevant bacterial bioreporters.

  12. Boar spermatozoa successfully predict mitochondrial modes of toxicity: implications for drug toxicity testing and the 3R principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Carrillo, A; Edebert, I; Garside, H; Cotgreave, I; Rigler, R; Loitto, V; Magnusson, K E; Rodríguez-Martínez, H

    2015-04-01

    Replacement of animal testing by in vitro methods (3-R principles) requires validation of suitable cell models, preferably obtained non-invasively, defying traditional use of explants. Ejaculated spermatozoa are highly dependent on mitochondrial production and consumption of ATP for their metabolism, including motility display, thus becoming a suitable model for capturing multiple modes of action of drugs and other chemicals acting via mitochondrial disturbance. In this study, a hypothesis was tested that the boar spermatozoon is a suitable cell type for toxicity assessment, providing a protocol for 3R-replacement of animals for research and drug-testing. Boar sperm kinetics was challenged with a wide variety of known frank mito-toxic chemicals with previously shown mitochondrial effects, using a semi-automated motility analyser allied with real-time fluorescent probing of mitochondrial potential (MitoTracker & JC-1). Output of this sperm assay (obtained after 30 min) was compared to cell viability (ATP-content, data obtained after 24-48 h) of a hepatome-cell line (HepG2). Results of compound effects significantly correlated (Psperm variables and for most variables in (HepG2). Dose-dependent decreases of relative ATP content in HepG2 cells correlated to sperm speed (r=0.559) and proportions of motile (r=0.55) or progressively motile (r=0.53) spermatozoa. The significance of the study relies on the objectivity of computerized testing of sperm motility inhibition which is comparable albeit of faster output than somatic cell culture models. Sperm suspensions, easily and painlessly obtained from breeding boars, are confirmed as suitable biosensors for preclinical toxicology screening and ranking of lead compounds in the drug development processes.

  13. Embryonic stem cells: An alternative approach to developmental toxicity testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Tandon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells in the body have a unique ability to renew themselves and give rise to more specialized cell types having functional commitments. Under specified growth conditions, these cell types remain unspecialized but can be triggered to become specific cell type of the body such as heart, nerve, or skin cells. This ability of embryonic stem cells for directed differentiation makes it a prominent candidate as a screening tool in revealing safer and better drugs. In addition, genetic variations and birth defects caused by mutations and teratogens affecting early human development could also be studied on this basis. Moreover, replacement of animal testing is needed because it involves ethical, legal, and cost issues. Thus, there is a strong requirement for validated and reliable, if achievable, human stem cell-based developmental assays for pharmacological and toxicological screening.

  14. Embryonic stem cells: An alternative approach to developmental toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, S; Jyoti, S

    2012-04-01

    Stem cells in the body have a unique ability to renew themselves and give rise to more specialized cell types having functional commitments. Under specified growth conditions, these cell types remain unspecialized but can be triggered to become specific cell type of the body such as heart, nerve, or skin cells. This ability of embryonic stem cells for directed differentiation makes it a prominent candidate as a screening tool in revealing safer and better drugs. In addition, genetic variations and birth defects caused by mutations and teratogens affecting early human development could also be studied on this basis. Moreover, replacement of animal testing is needed because it involves ethical, legal, and cost issues. Thus, there is a strong requirement for validated and reliable, if achievable, human stem cell-based developmental assays for pharmacological and toxicological screening.

  15. Consensus report on the future of animal-free systemic toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leist, Marcel; Hasiwa, Nina; Rovida, Costanza; Daneshian, Mardas; Basketter, David; Kimber, Ian; Clewell, Harvey; Gocht, Tilman; Goldberg, Alan; Busquet, Francois; Rossi, Anna-Maria; Schwarz, Michael; Stephens, Martin; Taalman, Rob; Knudsen, Thomas B; McKim, James; Harris, Georgina; Pamies, David; Hartung, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Since March 2013, animal use for cosmetics testing for the European market has been banned. This requires a renewed view on risk assessment in this field. However, in other fields as well, traditional animal experimentation does not always satisfy requirements in safety testing, as the need for human-relevant information is ever increasing. A general strategy for animal-free test approaches was outlined by the US National Research Council`s vision document for Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century in 2007. It is now possible to provide a more defined roadmap on how to implement this vision for the four principal areas of systemic toxicity evaluation: repeat dose organ toxicity, carcinogenicity, reproductive toxicity and allergy induction (skin sensitization), as well as for the evaluation of toxicant metabolism (toxicokinetics) (Fig. 1). CAAT-Europe assembled experts from Europe, America and Asia to design a scientific roadmap for future risk assessment approaches and the outcome was then further discussed and refined in two consensus meetings with over 200 stakeholders. The key recommendations include: focusing on improving existing methods rather than favoring de novo design; combining hazard testing with toxicokinetics predictions; developing integrated test strategies; incorporating new high content endpoints to classical assays; evolving test validation procedures; promoting collaboration and data-sharing of different industrial sectors; integrating new disciplines, such as systems biology and high throughput screening; and involving regulators early on in the test development process. A focus on data quality, combined with increased attention to the scientific background of a test method, will be important drivers. Information from each test system should be mapped along adverse outcome pathways. Finally, quantitative information on all factors and key events will be fed into systems biology models that allow a probabilistic risk assessment with flexible

  16. Inhalation method for delivery of nanoparticles to the Drosophila respiratory system for toxicity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posgai, Ryan; Ahamed, Maqusood [Department of Biology, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH, 45469-2320 (United States); Hussain, Saber M. [Applied Biotechnology Branch, Human Effectiveness Directorate Air Force Research Laboratory/RHBP, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH, 45433 (United States); Rowe, John J. [Department of Biology, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH, 45469-2320 (United States); Nielsen, Mark G., E-mail: Mark.Nielsen@notes.udayton.edu [Department of Biology, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH, 45469-2320 (United States)

    2009-12-20

    The growth of the nanotechnology industry and subsequent proliferation of nanoparticle types present the need to rapidly assess nanoparticle toxicity. We present a novel, simple and cost-effective nebulizer-based method to deliver nanoparticles to the Drosophila melanogaster respiratory system, for the purpose of toxicity testing. FluoSpheres (registered) , silver, and CdSe/ZnS nanoparticles of different sizes were effectively aerosolized, showing the system is capable of functioning with a wide range of nanoparticle types and sizes. Red fluorescent CdSe/ZnS nanoparticles were successfully delivered to the fly respiratory system, as visualized by fluorescent microscopy. Silver coated and uncoated nanoparticles were delivered in a toxicity test, and induced Hsp70 expression in flies, confirming the utility of this model in toxicity testing. This is the first method developed capable of such delivery, provides the advantage of the Drosophila health model, and can serve as a link between tissue culture and more expensive mammalian models in a tiered toxicity testing strategy.

  17. Critical evaluation of current developmental toxicity testing strategies: a case of babies and their bathwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Edward W; Ellis, Amy L; Tyl, Rochelle W; Foster, Paul M D; Scialli, Anthony R; Thompson, Kary; Kim, James

    2011-10-01

    This review is the second in a series of four papers emanating from a workshop entitled "Developmental Toxicology-New Directions," which was sponsored by the ILSI Health and Environmental Sciences Institute's (HESI) Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Technical Committee. The present review analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of current developmental safety testing approaches in an effort to identify those strengths that should be retained in the future versus the weaknesses that should be eliminated. Workshop participants considered the following to be key strengths of current testing approaches: the integrated biology of pregnant animal models including pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic processes, the ability to detect low incidence malformations as well as maternally mediated toxicity, and the long history of use coupled with extensive historical data. A number of weaknesses were related to the resource-intensive nature of developmental toxicity testing (e.g., large number of animals, high costs, low throughput, the inability to keep pace with the demand for more toxicity data). Other weaknesses included the use of very high dose levels that often far exceed human exposure levels, the confounding influence of maternal toxicity, sparse understanding of basic developmental mechanisms and genetics of standard animal models relative to mouse or lower organisms, difficulties interpreting low incidence findings, and issues surrounding the interpretation of minor skeletal variations. An appreciation of these strengths and weaknesses is critical for the design of new approaches to developmental toxicity testing in the 21st century. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A limitation of the Microtox{reg_sign} test for toxicity measurements of nonionic surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherrard, K.B.; Marriott, P.J.; McCormick, M.J. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech. (Australia). Dept. of Applied Chemistry; Millington, K. [CSIRO, Belmont (Australia). Div. of Wool Technology

    1996-07-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the components of wastewaters is a necessary step towards determining the nature of aqueous effluents. However, toxicity levels of the effluents and receiving waters should also be determined to obtain a more comprehensive understanding of the effects the discharges may have on aquatic environments. The Microtox{reg_sign} test was successfully used to measure EC50 values of nonionic polyethoxylate surfactants. However, toxicity measurements of real samples that contain surfactants above a particular concentration, termed the critical toxicity concentration (CTC) are not valid. These samples require dilution before the test is performed, and because the relationship between toxicity and concentration is not linear above the CTC, the EC50 cannot be extrapolated back to give the toxicity of the original concentrated sample and a true estimation of toxicity is therefore not possible. This phenomenon may be related to the minimum surface tension requirement of the bacteria or other physical properties of the surfactant such as the tendency to assemble at interfaces and surfaces and the tendency to form micelles.

  19. Quick, portable toxicity testing of marine or terrigenous fluids, sediments, or chemicals with bioluminescent organism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabate, R.W.; Stiffey, A.V.; Dewailly, E.L. [Lumitox Gulf L.C., New Orleans, LA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A hand-held, battery-operated instrument, which measures bioluminescence inhibition of the microscopic marine dinoflagellate Pyrocystis lunula, is capable of field-testing substances for toxicity. The organism is sensitive to ppb of strong toxicants. It tolerates some solvents in concentrations necessary for testing lipophylic samples. A test consumes only micrograms of sample. This method requires no adjustments for salinity, pH, color, or turbidity. It has been used successfully to test oil-well drilling fluids, brines produced with oil, waters and sediments from streams and lakes and petroleum-plant effluents containing contaminants such as benzene. The test is non-specific; however, if the substance is known, the end-point effects a direct measurement of its concentration. One-hour toxicity screening tests in the field produce results comparable to the standard four-hour laboratory test. Keeping the sample in the dark during incubation and testing, together with shortness of the overall procedure, eliminates anomalies from light-sensitive substances. Day-to-day variation, as well as among test replicates, is less than 10%. This quick method yields results comparable with a quick test that uses Photobacterium phosphoria, and with 96-hour tests that use Mysidopsis bahia, Artemia salina, Gonyaulax polyedra, Pimephales promelas, Ceriodaphnia dubia, and Cyprinodon variegatus.

  20. Marine microalgae toxicity test for linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) and alkylphenol ethoxylate (APEO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Garrido, I; Hampel, M; Lubián, L M; Blasco, J

    2001-10-01

    Different microalgal species have been used in growth-inhibition tests to determine the toxic concentrations of anionic and non-ionic surfactants to phytoplankton. The species used were selected from different taxonomic groups, all of considerable ecological relevance to marine environments. The toxicity of the C13 LAS homologue to the microalgal species selected was usually one order of magnitude greater than that of the C11 homologue. The toxicity of a commercial LAS mixture to different microalgal species was also checked. For this material and C. gracilis, cellular counting by means of a Neubauer chamber and by use of a flow cytometer were compared; differences between the two methods were insignificant. The toxicity of decaethoxylated nonylphenol non-ionic surfactant to C. gracilis was also checked; the EC50 value for this compound was 1.0 mg L(-1).

  1. User’s Guide for T.E.S.T. (version 4.2) (Toxicity Estimation Software Tool) A Program to Estimate Toxicity from Molecular Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    The user's guide describes the methods used by TEST to predict toxicity and physical properties (including the new mode of action based method used to predict acute aquatic toxicity). It describes all of the experimental data sets included in the tool. It gives the prediction res...

  2. Handbook of acute toxicity of chemicals to fish and aquatic invertebrates : summaries of toxicity tests conducted at Columbia National Fisheries Research Laboratory, 1965-78

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. Waynon; Finley, Mack T.

    1980-01-01

    Acute toxicity is a major subject of research at Columbia National Fisheries Research Laboratory for evaluating the impact of toxic chemicals on fishery resources. The Laboratory has played a leading role in developing research technology for toxicity testing and data interpretation. In 1965-78, more than 400 chemicals were tested against a variety of invertebrates and fish species representative of both cold- and warm-water climates.The use of acute toxicity tests for assessing the potential hazard of chemical contaminants to aquatic organisms is well documented (Boyd 1957; Henderson et al. 1960; Sanders and Cope 1966; Macek and McAllister 1970). Static acute toxicity tests provide rapid and (within limits) reproducible concentration-response curves for estimating toxic effects of chemicals on aquatic organisms. These tests provide a database for determining relative toxicity of a large number of chemicals to a variety of species and for estimating acute effects of chemical spills on natural aquatic systems; they also assist in determining priority and design of additional toxicity studies.Acute toxicity tests usually provide estimates of the exposure concentration causing 50% mortality (LC50) to test organisms during a specified period of time. For certain invertebrates, the effective concentration is based on immobilization, or some other identifiable endpoint, rather than on lethality. The application of the LC50 has gained acceptance among toxicologists and is generally the most highly rated test for assessing potential adverse effects of chemical contaminants to aquatic life (Brungs and Mount 1978; American Institute for Biological Sciences 1978a).The literature contains numerous papers dealing with the acute toxicity of chemicals to freshwater organisms. However, there is a tremendous need for a concise compendium of toxicity data covering a large variety of chemicals and test species. This Handbook is a compilation of a large volume of acute toxicity data

  3. A Lymnaea stagnalis Embryo Test for Toxicity Bioindication of Acidification and Ammonia Pollution in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Mazur

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a study leading to a new acute toxicity test on embryonic and juvenile organisms of the great pond snail (Lymnaea stagnalis Linnaeus. Sulfuric acid, nitric acid, and ammonium hydroxide were used as waterborne toxicants in laboratory experiments. The exposure time was 24 h. Tests were conducted in 5–10 replications for each toxicant. The toxicity of the substances was classified according to different scales and the test’s sensitivity was compared to that of the commonly used bioindicator Daphnia magna Straus. The assessment of toxicity impact was supported by microscopic observations. The probit method was used as a parametric statistical procedure to estimate LC50 and the associated 95% confidence interval. Our study showed that the early developmental stages of Lymnaea stagnalis are very sensitive bioindicators, making it possible to detect even very low levels of the above-mentioned water toxicants. The highest toxicity is shown by ammonium hydroxide with LC50/24h values, respectively, 24.27 for embryos and 24.72 for juvenile forms, and the lowest is shown by nitric acid ions with LC50/24h values, respectively, 105.19 for embryos and 170.47 for juvenile forms. It is highly cost-effective due to simple and efficient breeding and the small size of the organisms in the bioassay population. Compared with Daphnia magna, relatively low concentrations of toxicants caused a lethal effect on embryonic and juvenile organisms of the great pond snail. Owing to their common occurrence and sensitivity, early developmental forms of Lymnaea stagnalis can be a valuable new tool in biomonitoring of the freshwater environment.

  4. Differential toxicity of Disperse Red 1 and Disperse Red 13 in the Ames test, HepG2 cytotoxicity assay, and Daphnia acute toxicity test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, E R A; Umbuzeiro, G A; de-Almeida, G; Caloto-Oliveira, A; Chequer, F M D; Zanoni, M V B; Dorta, D J; Oliveira, D P

    2011-10-01

    Azo dyes are of environmental concern due to their degradation products, widespread use, and low-removal rate during conventional treatment. Their toxic properties are related to the nature and position of the substituents with respect to the aromatic rings and amino nitrogen atom. The dyes Disperse Red 1 and Disperse Red 13 were tested for Salmonella mutagenicity, cell viability by annexin V, and propidium iodide in HepG2 and by aquatic toxicity assays using daphnids. Both dyes tested positive in the Salmonella assay, and the suggestion was made that these compounds induce mainly frame-shift mutations and that the enzymes nitroreductase and O-acetyltransferase play an important role in the observed effect. In addition, it was shown that the presence of the chlorine substituent in Disperse Red 13 decreased the mutagenicity about 14 times when compared with Disperse Red 1, which shows the same structure as Disperse Red 13, but without the chlorine substituent. The presence of this substituent did not cause cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells, but toxicity to the water flea Daphnia similis increased in the presence of the chlorine substituent. These data suggest that the insertion of a chlorine substituent could be an alternative in the design of dyes with low-mutagenic potency, although the ecotoxicity should be carefully evaluated.

  5. Biomass production by freshwater and marine macrophytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    North, W.J.; Gerard, V.A.; Kuwabara, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    Research on aquatic macrophytes as producers of biomass has been undertaken at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) on the east coast and on the west coast by a group of collaborators in a joint effort known as the Marine Biomass Project. Studies at WHOI have focused on estuarine and coastal situations with some attention recently to freshwater plants. The Marine Farm Project has primarily been concerned with oceanic biomass production. A group at WHOI has undertaken a wide variety of studies concerning aquatic macrophytes including nutrient uptake, growth, yields, and environmental factors affecting yields. Aquatic biomass production systems have been surveyed on a worldwide basis and currently the role of carbon as a potential limiting nutrient in biomass culturing is being examined. The Marine Farm Project is presently attempting to grow giant kelp in offshore waters off southern California. Other work related to aquatic biomass production includes an investigation at the University of California, Berkeley, of microalgae in ponds. This paper will emphasize discussion of the kelp production phases of the Marine Farm Project. Activities by the WHOI are briefly summarized.

  6. An optimisation approach for shallow lake restoration through macrophyte management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z. H.; Yin, X. A.; Yang, Z. F.

    2014-06-01

    Lake eutrophication is a serious global environmental issue. Phytoremediation is a promising, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly technology for water quality restoration. However, besides nutrient removal, macrophytes also deeply affect the hydrologic cycle of a lake system through evapotranspiration. Changes in hydrologic cycle caused by macrophytes have a great influence on lake water quality restoration. As a result of the two opposite effects of macrophytes on water quality restoration (i.e. an increase in macrophytes can increase nutrient removal and improve water quality while also increasing evapotranspiration, reducing water volume and consequently decreasing water quality), rational macrophyte control through planting and harvest is very important. In this study, a new approach is proposed to optimise the initial planting area and monthly harvest scheme of macrophytes for water quality restoration. The month-by-month effects of macrophyte management on lake water quality are considered. Baiyangdian Lake serves as a case study, using the common reed. It was found that water quality was closest to Grade III on the Chinese water quality scale when the reed planting area was 123 km2 (40% of the lake surface area) and most reeds would be harvested at the end of June. The optimisation approach proposed in this study will be a useful reference for lake restoration.

  7. An optimisation approach for shallow lake restoration through macrophyte management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. H. Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lake eutrophication is a serious global environmental issue. Phytoremediation is a promising, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly technology for water quality restoration. However, besides nutrient removal, macrophytes also deeply affect the hydrologic cycle of lake system through evapotranspiration. Changes in hydrologic cycle caused by macrophytes have a great influence on lake water quality restoration. As a result of the two opposite effects of macrophytes on water quality restoration (i.e. an increase in macrophytes can increase nutrient removal and improve water quality while also increasing evapotranspiration, reducing water volume and consequently decreasing water quality, rational macrophyte control through planting and harvest is very important. In this study, a new approach is proposed to optimise the initial planting area and monthly harvest scheme of macrophytes for water quality restoration. The month-by-month effects of macrophyte management on lake water quality are considered. Baiyangdian Lake serves as a case study, using the common reed. It was found that water quality was closest to Grade III on the Chinese water quality scale when the reed planting area was 123 km2 (40% of the lake surface area and most reeds would be harvested at the end of June. The optimisation approach proposed in this study will be a useful reference for lake restoration.

  8. Earthworm nano‐ecotoxicology: Towards an integrated approach in toxicity testing of metal nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayashi, Yuya; Pedersen, Henrik; Wang, Jing

    Manufactured nanoparticles (NPs) belong to an emerging class of potential environmental pollutants. Of particular interest are the characteristics of NP toxicity under different exposure conditions e.g. cell culture, aquatic or soil media. NPs are thought to behave differently depending...... are versatile indicator organisms that can be tested in a wide range of different exposure media providing the possibility for a mechanistic insight into exposure testing of NPs. Here we report characterisation of Ag-NPs and their toxicity to the earthworm Eisenia fetida based on soil and aquatic exposures...

  9. Review of the use of Ceramium tenuicorne growth inhibition test for testing toxicity of substances, effluents, products sediment and soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Britta

    2017-08-01

    A growth inhibition test has been developed based on two clones of the red macroalga Ceramium tenuicorne, one originating from 7 PSU and the other from 20 PSU. The species can be adapted to different salinities and the test can be carried out between 4 and 32 PSU. This test became an ISO standard in 2010 (ISO 107 10) for testing of chemicals and water effluents. In this study new and published data has been compiled on toxicity of single substances, waste waters from pulp mills, leachates from antifouling paints, harbour sediments and soil used for maintenance of leisure boats. The results show that the alga is sensitive to both metals and organic compounds and to biocides used in antifouling paints. By testing leachates from antifouling paints these could be ranked according to their toxicity. Similarly, the toxicity of waste waters from pulp mills was determined and the efficiency of secondary treatment evaluated. Further, the test method proved useful to test the toxicity in sediment samples. Sediments from small town harbours and ship lanes were shown to be harmful and compounds originating from antifouling paints were responsible for a large part of the inhibiting effect. The alga proved to be sensitive to contaminants leaking from boat yard soil. The growth inhibition test is a robust test that has high repeatability and reproducibility and easily can be applied on water, soil and sediment samples without being too costly. The species is found worl-wide in temperate waters, which makes the results relevant for large areas. In the Baltic Sea C. tenuicorne is the most common red alga species and is thus particularly relevant for this area. The overall results show that contaminants from boat activities and the use of antifouling paints in particular pose a threat to the environment.

  10. Stable nitrogen isotope ratios of macrophytes and associated periphyton along a nitrate gradient in two subtropical, spring-fed streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Brabandere, Loreto; Frazer, Thomas K.; Montoya, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    , macrophytes and periphyton as a consequence of isotopic fractionation associated with preferential use of 14NO3-. This hypothesis was tested in two spring-fed river systems, the Chassahowitzka and Homosassa rivers, along Florida’s central Gulf of Mexico coast. 3. In general, d15N values of nitrate...

  11. Toxicity of Aqueous Fullerene nC60 to Activated Sludge: Nitrification Inhibition and Microtox Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongkui Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing production and use of fullerene nanomaterials raised their exposure potential to the activated sludge during biological wastewater treatment process. In this study, the toxicity of aqueous nanoscaled C60 (nC60 to activated sludge was investigated using nitrification inhibition and Microtox test. The test solutions of nC60 were prepared using two methods: long stirring (Stir/nC60 and toluene exchange (Tol/nC60. The nC60 aggregation in test medium was also evaluated for toxicity assessment. The results showed that the nC60 aggregation behaved differently in two test mediums during the incubation periods. The nC60 toxicity was greatly influenced by the preparation method. Stir/nC60 presented no significant toxicity to both the nitrification sludge and bioluminescent bacteria at the maximum concentration studied. In contrast, the EC20 of Tol/nC60 was obtained to be 4.89 mg/L (3 h for the nitrification inhibition and 3.44 mg/L (30 min for Microtox test, respectively.

  12. Earthworm nano‐ecotoxicology: Towards an integrated approach in toxicity testing of metal nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayashi, Yuya; Pedersen, Henrik; Wang, Jing

    Manufactured nanoparticles (NPs) belong to an emerging class of potential environmental pollutants. Of particular interest are the characteristics of NP toxicity under different exposure conditions e.g. cell culture, aquatic or soil media. NPs are thought to behave differently depending on the me......Manufactured nanoparticles (NPs) belong to an emerging class of potential environmental pollutants. Of particular interest are the characteristics of NP toxicity under different exposure conditions e.g. cell culture, aquatic or soil media. NPs are thought to behave differently depending...... are versatile indicator organisms that can be tested in a wide range of different exposure media providing the possibility for a mechanistic insight into exposure testing of NPs. Here we report characterisation of Ag-NPs and their toxicity to the earthworm Eisenia fetida based on soil and aquatic exposures...

  13. PAH toxicity at aqueous solubility in the fish embryo test with Danio rerio using passive dosing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seiler, Thomas-Benjamin; Best, Nina; Fernqvist, Margit Møller

    2014-01-01

    to animal testing in (eco)toxicology. However, for hydrophobic organic chemicals it remains a technical challenge to ensure constant freely dissolved concentration at the maximum exposure level during such biotests. Passive dosing with PDMS silicone was thus applied to control the freely dissolved...... further data to support the close relationship between the chemical activity and the toxicity of hydrophobic organic compounds. Passive dosing from PDMS silicone enabled reliable toxicity testing of (highly) hydrophobic substances at aqueous solubility, providing a practical way to control toxicity...... without direct contact to the silicone surface showed similar mortalities as those exposed with direct contact to the silicone. Silicone oil overlaying the water phase as a novel passive dosing phase had no observable effects on the development of the fish embryos until hatching. This study provides...

  14. Artemia salina as test organism for assessment of acute toxicity of leachate water from landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, B M; Mathiasson, L; Mårtensson, L; Bergström, S

    2005-03-01

    Artemia salina has, for the first time, been used as test organism for acute toxicity of leachate water from three landfills (the municipal landfills at Kristianstad, Sweden and Siauliai, Lithuania, and an industrial landfill at Stena fragmenting AB, Halmstad, as well as for leachate from Kristianstad treated in different ways in a pilot plan). Artemia can tolerate the high concentrations of chloride ions found in such waters. Large differences in toxicities were found, the leachate from Siauliai being the most toxic one. To increase the selectivity in the measurements, a fractionation was done by using ion exchange to separate ammonium/ammonia and metal ions from the leachate, and activated carbon adsorbents for organic pollutants. The influence of some metals and phenol compounds on the toxicity was investigated separately. It was found that most of the toxicity emanated from the ammonium/ammonia components in the leachate. However, there was also a significant contribution n from organic pollutants, other than phenol compounds, since separate experiments had in this latter case indicated negligible impact. The concentrations of metals were at a level, shown by separate experiments, where only small contribution to the toxicity could be expected.

  15. Acute toxicity tests and meta-analysis identify gaps in tropical ecotoxicology for amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Sonia L; Donnelly, Maureen A; Kerby, Jacob; Whitfield, Steven M

    2014-09-01

    Amphibian populations are declining worldwide, particularly in tropical regions where amphibian diversity is highest. Pollutants, including agricultural pesticides, have been identified as a potential contributor to decline, yet toxicological studies of tropical amphibians are very rare. The present study assesses toxic effects on amphibians of 10 commonly used commercial pesticides in tropical agriculture using 2 approaches. First, the authors conducted 8-d toxicity assays with formulations of each pesticide using individually reared red-eyed tree frog (Agalychnis callidryas) tadpoles. Second, they conducted a review of available data for the lethal concentration to kill 50% of test animals from the US Environmental Protection Agency's ECOTOX database to allow comparison with their findings. Lethal concentration estimates from the assays ranged over several orders of magnitude. The nematicides terbufos and ethoprophos and the fungicide chlorothalonil were very highly toxic, with evident effects within an order of magnitude of environmental concentrations. Acute toxicity assays and meta-analysis show that nematicides and fungicides are generally more toxic than herbicides yet receive far less research attention than less toxic herbicides. Given that the tropics have a high diversity of amphibians, the findings emphasize the need for research into the effects of commonly used pesticides in tropical countries and should help guide future ecotoxicological research in tropical regions.

  16. Development of methods for laboratory culture and toxicity testing of the endangered desert pupfish, Cyprinodon macularius, and evaluation of the acute toxicity of selenium

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We conducted a series of studies to evaluate methods for laboratory culture and toxicity testing with the endangered desert pupfish, Cyprinodon macularius. This...

  17. Static renewal tests using Anodonta imbecillus (freshwater mussels). Anodonta imbecillis copper sulfate reference toxicant test, Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    Reference toxicant testing using juvenile freshwater mussels was conducted as part of the CR-ERP biomonitoring study of Clinch River sediments to assess the sensitivity of test organisms and the overall performance of the test. Tests were conducted using moderately hard synthetic water spiked with known concentrations of copper as copper sulfate. Toxicity testing of copper sulfate reference toxicant was conducted from May 12--21, 1993. The organisms used for testing were juvenile fresh-water mussels (Anodonta imbecillis). Results from this test showed an LC{sub 50} value of 1.12 mg Cu/L which is lower than the value of 2.02 mg Cu/L obtained in a previous test. Too few tests have been conducted with copper as the toxicant to determine a normal range of values. Attachments to this report include: Toxicity test bench sheets and statistical analyses; Copper analysis request and results; and Personnel training documentation.

  18. Predicting aquatic toxicities of chemical pesticides in multiple test species using nonlinear QSTR modeling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basant, Nikita; Gupta, Shikha; Singh, Kunwar P

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we established nonlinear quantitative-structure toxicity relationship (QSTR) models for predicting the toxicities of chemical pesticides in multiple aquatic test species following the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) guidelines. The decision tree forest (DTF) and decision tree boost (DTB) based QSTR models were constructed using a pesticides toxicity dataset in Selenastrum capricornutum and a set of six descriptors. Other six toxicity data sets were used for external validation of the constructed QSTRs. Global QSTR models were also constructed using the combined dataset of all the seven species. The diversity in chemical structures and nonlinearity in the data were evaluated. Model validation was performed deriving several statistical coefficients for the test data and the prediction and generalization abilities of the QSTRs were evaluated. Both the QSTR models identified WPSA1 (weighted charged partial positive surface area) as the most influential descriptor. The DTF and DTB QSTRs performed relatively better than the single decision tree (SDT) and support vector machines (SVM) models used as a benchmark here and yielded R(2) of 0.886 and 0.964 between the measured and predicted toxicity values in the complete dataset (S. capricornutum). The QSTR models applied to six other aquatic species toxicity data yielded R(2) of >0.92 (DTF) and >0.97 (DTB), respectively. The prediction accuracies of the global models were comparable with those of the S. capricornutum models. The results suggest for the appropriateness of the developed QSTR models to reliably predict the aquatic toxicity of chemicals and can be used for regulatory purpose.

  19. COMPARISON OF METHODS TO DETECT ALLELOPATHIC EFFECTS OF SUBMERGED MACROPHYTES ON GREEN ALGAE(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilt Nee Körner, Sabine; Beutler, Eike; Bauer, Nadine

    2012-02-01

    Detecting allelopathic inhibition of phytoplankton by submerged macrophytes in an ecologically meaningful way is not easy. Multiple-approach investigations from a laboratory scale to the ecosystem level have been recommended to overcome the shortcomings of individual methods. Whether results of different methods are qualitatively or quantitatively comparable has not yet been tested. Here, we compare the sensitivity of the green algae Desmodesmus subspicatus (Chodat) E. Hegewald et Ant. Schmidt and Stigeoclonium helveticum Vischer to the allelopathic effect of the submerged macrophyte Myriophyllum verticillatum L. The following three approaches were used: (i) coincubation of algae in dialysis membrane tubes in a lake inside and outside a M. verticillatum stand, (ii) coincubation of algae in dialysis membrane tubes in aquaria with and without M. verticillatum, and (iii) single additions of tannic acid (TA), an allelopathically active polyphenol present in this macrophyte, to the algae cultures. For each method, fluorescence-based (chl a, PSII activity) and particle-based (cell count, biovolume) parameters were compared after 48 h of incubation. Results revealed quantitative and qualitative differences between methods. Algae incubated in dialysis membrane tubes in aquaria showed a strong decrease in all parameters under the influence of macrophytes. In situ measurements were influenced by adverse growth conditions for the test algae and only detected significant reductions for biovolume. Single additions of TA induced a strong reduction of fluorescence-based parameters similar to aquarium results, but an increase in the cell count. Even the qualitative transfer of laboratory results to field conditions thus requires caution and a proper selection of parameters.

  20. Do Amplitudes of Water Level Fluctuations Affect the Growth and Community Structure of Submerged Macrophytes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mo-Zhu; Liu, Zheng-Yuan; Luo, Fang-Li; Lei, Guang-Chun; Li, Hong-Li

    2016-01-01

    Submerged macrophytes are subjected to potential mechanical stresses associated with fluctuating water levels in natural conditions. However, few experimental studies have been conducted to further understand the effects of water level fluctuating amplitude on submerged macrophyte species and their assemblages or communities. We designed a controlled experiment to investigate the responses of three submerged macrophyte species (Hydrilla verticillata, Ceratophyllum demersum and Elodea nuttallii) and their combinations in communities to three amplitudes (static, ± 30 cm, ± 60 cm) of water level fluctuations. Results showed that water level fluctuating amplitude had little effects on the community performance and the three tested species responded differently. H. verticillata exhibited more growth in static water and it was negatively affected by either of the water level fluctuations amplitude, however, growth parameters of H. verticillata in two fluctuating water level treatments (i.e., ± 30 cm, ± 60 cm) were not significantly different. On the other hand, the growth of C. demersum was not significantly correlated with different amplitude treatments. However, it became more abundant when water levels fluctuated. E. nuttallii was inhibited by the two fluctuating water level treatments, and was less in growth parameters compared to the other species especially in water level fluctuating conditions. The inherent differences in the adaptive capabilities of the tested species indicate that C. demersum or other species with similar responses may be dominant species to restore submerged macrophyte communities with great fluctuating water levels. Otherwise, H. verticillata, E. nuttallii or other species with similar responses could be considered for constructing the community in static water conditions.

  1. Different strategies of cadmium detoxification in the submerged macrophyte Ceratophyllum demersum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Elisa; Mattusch, Jürgen; Wellenreuther, Gerd; Thomas, George; Arroyo Abad, Uriel; Küpper, Hendrik

    2013-10-01

    The heavy metal cadmium (Cd) is highly toxic to plants. To understand the mechanisms of tolerance and resistance to Cd, we treated the rootless, submerged macrophyte Ceratophyllum demersum L. with sub-micromolar concentrations of Cd under environmentally relevant conditions. X-ray fluorescence measurements revealed changing distribution patterns of Cd and Zn at non-toxic (0.2 nM, 2 nM), moderately toxic (20 nM) and highly toxic (200 nM) levels of Cd. Increasing Cd concentrations led to enhanced sequestration of Cd into non-photosynthetic tissues like epidermis and vein. At toxic Cd concentrations, Zn was redistributed and mainly found in the vein. Cd treatment induced the synthesis of phytochelatins (PCs) in the plants, with a threshold of induction already at 20 nM Cd for PC3. In comparison, in plants treated with Cu, elevated PC levels were detected only at the highest concentrations (100-200 nM Cu). Our results show that also non-accumulators like C. demersum store toxic metals in tissues where the heavy metal interferes least with metabolic pathways, but remaining toxicity interferes with micronutrient distribution. Furthermore, we found that the induction of phytochelatins is not proportional to metal concentration, but has a distinct threshold, specific for each PC species. Finally we could show that 20 nM Cd, which was previously regarded as non-toxic to most plants, already induces detoxifying mechanisms.

  2. Studies with the USF/NASA toxicity screening test method - Exercise wheels and oxygen replenishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    Continuing efforts to improve the University of San Francisco/NASA toxicity screening test method have included the addition of exercise wheels to provide a different measure of incapacitation, and oxygen replenishment to offset any effect of oxygen depletion by the test animals. The addition of exercise wheels limited the number of animals in each test and doubled the required number of tests without any significant improvement in reproducibility. Oxygen replenishment appears to have an effect on survival in the last 5 minutes of the 30-minute test, but the effect is expected to be similar for most materials.

  3. A high throughput passive dosing format for the Fish Embryo Acute Toxicity test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vergauwen, Lucia; Nørgaard Schmidt, Stine; Stinckens, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    High throughput testing according to the Fish Embryo Acute Toxicity (FET) test (OECD Testing Guideline 236) is usually conducted in well plates. In the case of hydrophobic test substances, sorptive and evaporative losses often result in declining and poorly controlled exposure conditions. Therefore......, our objective was to improve exposure conditions in FET tests by evaluating a passive dosing format using silicone O-rings in standard 24-well polystyrene plates. We exposed zebrafish embryos to a series of phenanthrene concentrations until 120 h post fertilization (hpf), and obtained a linear...

  4. Animal alternatives for whole effluent toxicity testing: Perspectives from a global workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since the 1940’s, effluent toxicity testing has been utilized to varying degrees in many countries to assess potential ecological impacts and assist in determining necessary treatment options for environmental protection. However, it was only in the early 1980’s that ...

  5. Animal alternatives for whole effluent toxicity testing: Perspectives from a global workshop (presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since the 1940s, effluent toxicity testing has been utilized to varying degrees in many countries to assess potential ecological impacts and assist in determining necessary treatment options for environmental protection. However, it was only in the early 1980’s that toxicit...

  6. Aquatic toxicity testing of liquid hydrophobic chemicals – Passive dosing exactly at the saturation limit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stibany, Felix; Nørgaard Schmidt, Stine; Schäffer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The aims of the present study were (1) to develop a passive dosing approach for aquatic toxicity testing of liquid substances with very high Kow values and (2) to apply this approach to the model substance dodecylbenzene (DDB, Log Kow = 8.65). The first step was to design a new passive dosing for...

  7. Animal alternatives for whole effluent toxicity testing: Perspectives from a global workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since the 1940’s, effluent toxicity testing has been utilized to varying degrees in many countries to assess potential ecological impacts and assist in determining necessary treatment options for environmental protection. However, it was only in the early 1980’s that ...

  8. Animal alternatives for whole effluent toxicity testing: Perspectives from a global workshop (presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since the 1940s, effluent toxicity testing has been utilized to varying degrees in many countries to assess potential ecological impacts and assist in determining necessary treatment options for environmental protection. However, it was only in the early 1980’s that toxicit...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix 2 to Subpart A of... - Drilling Fluids Toxicity Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... System, Cary, North Carolina, 1982) was used to analyze these data. The 96-hour LC50 adjusted for the... are designed to minimize sample contamination and alteration of the physical or chemical properties of... toxicity testing provided that proper containers are used and proper condition are maintained. II...

  10. Development of a standard acute dietary toxicity test for the silkworm (Bombyx mori L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, X.; Valk, H.; Jiang, H.; Wang, X.; Yuan, S.; Zhang, Y.; Roessink, I.; Gao, X.

    2012-01-01

    Larvae of the silkworm (Bombyx mod L.) may be exposed to pesticide residues on the leaves of their food plant, the mulberry tree (Morus spp.), which can lead to adverse effects on silk production. A new acute dietary toxicity test method was evaluated as the basis for pesticide risk assessment. A se

  11. 40 CFR 799.9355 - TSCA reproduction/developmental toxicity screening test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true TSCA reproduction/developmental toxicity screening test. 799.9355 Section 799.9355 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... developmental defects should not be used. Healthy virgin animals, not subjected to previous...

  12. ISSUES IN DEVELOPING A TWO-GENERATION AVIAN TOXICITY TEST WITH JAPANESE QUAIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    As a subgroup of the OECD Expert Group on Assessment of Endocrine Disrupting Effects in Birds, we reviewed unresolved methodological issures important for the development of a two-generation toxicity test, discussed advantages and disadvantages of alternative approaches, and prop...

  13. Compound-specific effects of diverse neurodevelopmental toxicants on global gene expression in the neural embryonic stem cell test (ESTn)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theunissen, P.T.; Robinson, J.F.; Pennings, J.L.A.; van Herwijnen, M.; Kleinjans, J.C.S.; Piersma, A.H.

    2012-01-01

    Alternative assays for developmental toxicity testing are needed to reduce animal use in regulatory toxicology. The in vitro murine neural embryonic stem cell test (ESTn) was designed as an alternative for neurodevelopmental toxicity testing. The integration of toxicogenomic-based approaches may fur

  14. Effect of paclobutrazol on three different aquatic macrophytes under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    2013-09-25

    Sep 25, 2013 ... macrophytes under in vitro monoculture or polyculture conditions ... provide many beneficial ecological services, but they could also be problematic .... addition, it was also important to remove all the leaves from the explants.

  15. Comprehensive In Vitro Toxicity Testing of a Panel of Representative Oxide Nanomaterials: First Steps towards an Intelligent Testing Strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian Farcal

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials (NMs display many unique and useful physico-chemical properties. However, reliable approaches are needed for risk assessment of NMs. The present study was performed in the FP7-MARINA project, with the objective to identify and evaluate in vitro test methods for toxicity assessment in order to facilitate the development of an intelligent testing strategy (ITS. Six representative oxide NMs provided by the EC-JRC Nanomaterials Repository were tested in nine laboratories. The in vitro toxicity of NMs was evaluated in 12 cellular models representing 6 different target organs/systems (immune system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal system, reproductive organs, kidney and embryonic tissues. The toxicity assessment was conducted using 10 different assays for cytotoxicity, embryotoxicity, epithelial integrity, cytokine secretion and oxidative stress. Thorough physico-chemical characterization was performed for all tested NMs. Commercially relevant NMs with different physico-chemical properties were selected: two TiO2 NMs with different surface chemistry - hydrophilic (NM-103 and hydrophobic (NM-104, two forms of ZnO - uncoated (NM-110 and coated with triethoxycapryl silane (NM-111 and two SiO2 NMs produced by two different manufacturing techniques - precipitated (NM-200 and pyrogenic (NM-203. Cell specific toxicity effects of all NMs were observed; macrophages were the most sensitive cell type after short-term exposures (24-72h (ZnO>SiO2>TiO2. Longer term exposure (7 to 21 days significantly affected the cell barrier integrity in the presence of ZnO, but not TiO2 and SiO2, while the embryonic stem cell test (EST classified the TiO2 NMs as potentially 'weak-embryotoxic' and ZnO and SiO2 NMs as 'non-embryotoxic'. A hazard ranking could be established for the representative NMs tested (ZnO NM-110 > ZnO NM-111 > SiO2 NM-203 > SiO2 NM-200 > TiO2 NM-104 > TiO2 NM-103. This ranking was different in the case of embryonic tissues, for which TiO2

  16. Evaluation of ability of reference toxicity tests to identify stress in laboratory populations of the amphipod Hyalella azteca

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, E.W.; Dwyer, F.J.; Ellersieck, Mark R.; Greer, E.I.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Rabeni, C.F.

    1999-01-01

    Standard methods for conducting toxicity tests imply that the condition of test organisms can be established using reference toxicity tests. However, only a limited number of studies have evaluated whether reference toxicity tests can actually be used to determine if organisms are in good condition at the start of a test. We evaluated the ability of reference toxicants to identify stress associated with starvation in laboratory populations of the amphipod Hyalella azteca using acute toxicity tests and four reference toxicants: KCl, CdCl2, sodium pentachlorophenate (NaPCP), and carbaryl. Stress associated with severe starvation was observed with exposure of amphipods to carbaryl or NaPCP but not with exposure to KCl or CdCl2 (i.e., lower LC50 with severe starvation). Although the LC50s for NaPCP and carbaryl were statistically different between starved and fed amphipods, this difference may not be biologically significant given the variability expected in acute lethality tests. Stress associated with sieving, heat shock, or cold shock of amphipods before the start of a test was not evident with exposure to carbaryl or KCl as reference toxicants. The chemicals evaluated in this study provided minimal information about the condition of the organisms used to start a toxicity test. Laboratories should periodically perform reference toxicity tests to assess the sensitivity of life stages or strains of test organisms. However, use of other test acceptability criteria required in standard methods such as minimum survival, growth, or reproduction of organisms in the control treatment at the end of a test, provides more useful information about the condition of organisms used to start a test compared to data generated from reference toxicity tests.

  17. Evaluation of ability of reference toxicity tests to identify stress in laboratory populations of the amphipod Hyalella azteca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNulty, E.W.; Ellersieck, M.R.; Rabeni, C.F. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Dwyer, F.J.; Greer, E.I.; Ingersoll, C.G. [Geological Survey, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Environmental Research Center

    1999-03-01

    Standard methods for conducting toxicity tests imply that the condition of test organisms can be established using reference toxicity tests. However, only a limited number of studies have evaluated whether reference toxicity tests can actually be used to determine if organisms are in good condition, at the start of a test. The authors evaluated the ability of reference toxicants to identify stress associated with starvation in laboratory populations of the amphipod Hyalella azteca using acute toxicity tests and four reference toxicants: KCl, CdCl{sub 2}, sodium pentachlorophenate (NaPCP), and carbaryl. Stress associated with severe starvation was observed with exposure of amphipods to carbaryl or NaPCP but not with exposure to KCl or CdCl{sub 2} (i.e., lower LC50 with severe starvation). Although the LC50s for NaPCP and carbaryl were statistically different between starved and fed amphipods, this difference may not be biologically significant given the variability expected in acute lethality tests. Stress associated with sieving, heat shock, or cold shock of amphipods before the start of a test was not evident with exposure to carbaryl or KCl as reference toxicants. The chemicals evaluated in this study provided minimal information about the condition of the organisms used to start a toxicity test. Laboratories should periodically perform reference toxicity tests to assess the sensitivity of life stages or strains of test organisms. However, use of other test acceptability criteria required in standard methods, such as minimum survival, growth, or reproduction of organisms in the control treatment at the end of a test, provides more useful information about the condition of organisms used to start a test compared to data generated from reference toxicity tests.

  18. Developmental toxicity of thyroid-active compounds in a zebrafish embryotoxicity test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomaa, Barae; Hermsen, Sanne A B; Kessels, Maurijn Y; van den Berg, Johannes H J; Peijnenburg, Ad A C M; Aarts, Jac M M J G; Piersma, Aldert H; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish embryos were exposed to concentration ranges of selected thyroid-active model compounds in order to assess the applicability of zebrafish-based developmental scoring systems withinan alternative testing strategy to detect the developmental toxicity ofthyroid-active compounds. Model compounds tested included triiodothyronine (T3), propylthiouracil (PTU), methimazole (MMI), sodium perchlorate (NaClO4) and amiodarone hydrochloride (AMI), selected to represent different modes of action affecting thyroid activity. Tested time windows included 48-120 hours post fertilization (hpf), 0-72 hpf and 0-120 hpf. All tested compounds resulted in developmental changes, with T3 being the most potent. The developmental parameters affected included reflective iridophores, beat and glide swimming, inflated swim bladders, as well as resorbed yolk sacs. These effects are only evident by 120 hpf and therefore an existing General Morphology Score (GMS) system was extended to create a General Developmental Score(GDS) that extends beyond the 72 hpfscoring limit of GMS and includes additional parameters that are affected by exposure to model thyroid-active compounds. Moreover, the GDS is cumulative as it includes not only the scoring of developmental morphologies but also integrates developmental dysmorphologies. Exposures from 48-120 hpf did not provide additional information to exposures from 0-120 hpf. The results indicate that the zebrafish GDS can detect the developmental toxicity of thyroid toxicants and may be of use in an integrated testing strategy to reduce, refine and in certain cases replace animal testing.

  19. Toxicity testing with constant or decreasing concentrations of chemically dispersed oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiesser, S.L.; Fleishmann, M.L.; McQuerry, D.L.; Riley, R.G.

    1982-10-01

    An exposure system and method of quantitating toxicity have been developed to provide an estimate of the effects of dispersed oil on marine organisms under a variety of exposure conditions. Results of constant concentration exposures (for hours or days) can be compared to those of diluting exposures (decreasing to zero in 8 or 24 h) on a basis of the ''toxicity index.'' This index is equal to the total exposure when time in hours or days is multiplied by the concentration at each hour (ppm h or ppm days). Tests have been conducted with shrimp (Pandalus danae), two oils (Prudhoe Bay crude and a light Arabian crude), and two dispersants. There is a seasonal pattern to the tolerance of the shrimp. Tests in the colder months (fall/winter) produce toxicity indices approximately three times higher than summer/spring values. During tests in summer, there was also little difference observed when the toxicity of the light Arabian oil was compared to that of Prudhoe Bay crude (2.3 and 3.4 ppm days, respectively). The usefulness of our methods is that in addition to the comparisons already noted, it is possible to predict the outcome of dispersant application under varying environmental conditions.

  20. Oligochaeta (Annelida: Clitellata) associated to aquatic macrophytes in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Nathalie Aparecida de Oliveira Sanches; Marina Gulo Alcorinte; Lucas Henrique Sahm; Guilherme Rossi Gorni; Maria Lúcia Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    Oligochaeta are still characterized as a poorly studied group among the aquatic macroinvertebrates and few studies about their ecology were conducted in Brazil. Thus, our study aimed to provide an overview of the association between Oligochaeta and macrophytes, in Brazilian continental aquatic environments, by means of a literature review along with an inventory of species associated to aquatic macrophytes on marginal lagoons in the reservoir Ribeirão das Anhumas (Américo Brasiliense, São Pau...

  1. Aquatic macrophyte diversity of the Pantanal wetland and upper basin

    OpenAIRE

    VJ. Pott; Pott, A; LCP. Lima; SN. Moreira; AKM Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    This is a short review of the state of the art concerning diversity of aquatic macrophytes and the main aquatic vegetation types in the Brazilian Pantanal wetland and upper watershed. There are ca. 280 species of aquatic macrophytes on the Pantanal floodplain, with scarce endemism. On the upper watershed, Cerrado wetlands (veredas) and limestone springs have a distinct flora from the Pantanal, with twice the species richness. As a representative case of aquatic habitats influenced by river fl...

  2. Native macrophyte density and richness affect the invasiveness of a tropical poaceae species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaisa S Michelan

    Full Text Available The role of the native species richness and density in ecosystem invasibility is a matter of concern for both ecologists and managers. We tested the hypothesis that the invasiveness of Urochloa arrecta (non-native in the Neotropics is negatively affected by the species richness and abundance of native aquatic macrophytes in freshwater ecosystems. We first created four levels of macrophyte richness in a greenhouse (richness experiment, and we then manipulated the densities of the same native species in a second experiment (density experiment. When the native macrophytes were adults, fragments of U. arrecta were added, and their growth was assessed. Our results from the richness experiment corroborated the hypothesis of a negative relationship between the native species richness and the growth of U. arrecta, as measured by sprout length and root biomass. However, the resistance to invasion was not attributed to the presence of a particular native species with a greater competitive ability. In the density experiment, U. arrecta growth decreased significantly with an increased density of all five of the native species. Density strongly affected the performance of the Poaceae in a negative manner, suggesting that patches that are densely colonized by native macrophytes and less subject to disturbances will be more resistant to invasion than those that are poorly colonized and more commonly subjected to disturbances. Our density experiment also showed that some species exhibit a higher competitive ability than others (sampling effect. Although native richness and abundance clearly limit the colonization and establishment of U. arrecta, these factors cannot completely prevent the invasion of aquatic ecosystems by this Poaceae species.

  3. Native macrophyte density and richness affect the invasiveness of a tropical poaceae species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelan, Thaisa S; Thomaz, Sidinei M; Bini, Luis M

    2013-01-01

    The role of the native species richness and density in ecosystem invasibility is a matter of concern for both ecologists and managers. We tested the hypothesis that the invasiveness of Urochloa arrecta (non-native in the Neotropics) is negatively affected by the species richness and abundance of native aquatic macrophytes in freshwater ecosystems. We first created four levels of macrophyte richness in a greenhouse (richness experiment), and we then manipulated the densities of the same native species in a second experiment (density experiment). When the native macrophytes were adults, fragments of U. arrecta were added, and their growth was assessed. Our results from the richness experiment corroborated the hypothesis of a negative relationship between the native species richness and the growth of U. arrecta, as measured by sprout length and root biomass. However, the resistance to invasion was not attributed to the presence of a particular native species with a greater competitive ability. In the density experiment, U. arrecta growth decreased significantly with an increased density of all five of the native species. Density strongly affected the performance of the Poaceae in a negative manner, suggesting that patches that are densely colonized by native macrophytes and less subject to disturbances will be more resistant to invasion than those that are poorly colonized and more commonly subjected to disturbances. Our density experiment also showed that some species exhibit a higher competitive ability than others (sampling effect). Although native richness and abundance clearly limit the colonization and establishment of U. arrecta, these factors cannot completely prevent the invasion of aquatic ecosystems by this Poaceae species.

  4. Critique on the use of the standardized avian acute oral toxicity test for first generation anticoagulant rodenticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Nimish B.; Rattner, Barnett A.

    2012-01-01

    Avian risk assessments for rodenticides are often driven by the results of standardized acute oral toxicity tests without regards to a toxicant's mode of action and time course of adverse effects. First generation anticoagulant rodenticides (FGARs) generally require multiple feedings over several days to achieve a threshold concentration in tissue and cause adverse effects. This exposure regimen is much different than that used in the standardized acute oral toxicity test methodology. Median lethal dose values derived from standardized acute oral toxicity tests underestimate the environmental hazard and risk of FGARs. Caution is warranted when FGAR toxicity, physiological effects, and pharmacokinetics derived from standardized acute oral toxicity testing are used for forensic confirmation of the cause of death in avian mortality incidents and when characterizing FGARs' risks to free-ranging birds.

  5. Toxicological assessment of heavy straight run naphtha in a repeated dose/reproductive toxicity screening test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Richard H; Steup, David; Schreiner, Ceinwen; Podhasky, Paula; Malley, Linda A; Roberts, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Gasoline blending stocks (naphthas) are comprised of normal, iso- and cycloparaffins and aromatic hydrocarbons with carbon numbers ranging from C4 to C12. Heavy straight run naphtha (HSRN, CAS number 64741-41-9) was selected for toxicity screening because substances of this type contain relatively high levels (28%) of cycloparaffins by comparison to other naphtha streams and the data complement toxicity information on other gasoline blending streams. Rats were exposed by inhalation to wholly vaporized material at levels of approximately 100, 500, or 3000 parts per million (ppm) daily to screen the potential for systemic toxicity, neurotoxicity, reproductive toxicity, and developmental effects to postnatal day 4. All animals survived the treatment period. Principal effects of repeated exposure included increased liver weights in males and females, increased kidney weights in males, and histological changes in the thyroid, secondary to liver enzyme induction. These changes were not considered to be toxicologically meaningful and are not relevant to humans. There were no treatment-related effects in functional observation tests or motor activity; no significant reductions in fertility or changes in other reproductive parameters; and no evidence of developmental toxicity in offspring. The overall no observed adverse effect concentration was 3000 ppm (approximately 13, 600 mg/m(3)). In conclusion the HSRN effects on liver and kidney are consistent with the results of other studies of volatile fractions or other naphthas or formulated gasoline, and there were no HSRN effects on neurological developmental or reproductive parameters.

  6. Acute toxicity assessment of ANAMMOX substrates and antibiotics by luminescent bacteria test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Shuang; Wu, Junwei; Zhang, Meng; Lu, Huifeng; Mahmood, Qaisar; Zheng, Ping

    2015-12-01

    Acute toxicities of anaerobic ammonia oxidation (ANAMMOX) substrates and four antibiotics from pharmaceutical wastewaters on ANAMMOX process were reported. Individual and joint acute toxicity assays were performed using 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50). Results showed that IC50 values and their 95% confidence interval of ammonium chloride (A), sodium nitrite (B), penicillin G-Na (C), polymyxin B sulfate (D), chloramphenicol (E) and kanamycin sulfate (F) were 2708.9 (2247.9-3169.9), 1475.4 (1269.9-1680.9), 5114.4 (4946.4-5282.4), 10.2 (1.8-18.6), 409.9 (333.7-486.1) and 5254.1 (3934.4-6573.8) mgL(-1) respectively, suggesting toxicities were in the order of D>E>B>A>C>F. Joint acute toxicities of bicomponent mixtures A and B, C and D, C and F, D and F were independent; D and E, E and F were additive while C and E were synergistic. Joint acute toxicities of multicomponent mixtures were synergistic or additive. Luminescent bacteria test is an easy and robust method for forecasting the feasibility of ANAMMOX process for pharmaceutical wastewater treatment.

  7. Oligochaeta (Annelida: Clitellata associated to aquatic macrophytes in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Aparecida de Oliveira Sanches

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Oligochaeta are still characterized as a poorly studied group among the aquatic macroinvertebrates and few studies about their ecology were conducted in Brazil. Thus, our study aimed to provide an overview of the association between Oligochaeta and macrophytes, in Brazilian continental aquatic environments, by means of a literature review along with an inventory of species associated to aquatic macrophytes on marginal lagoons in the reservoir Ribeirão das Anhumas (Américo Brasiliense, São Paulo, Brazil. In the review, we analyzed 10 articles, where we obtained data on 41 species. We also sampled 5 macrophyte genera, Egeria, Salvinia, Utricularia, Eleocharis, and Ceratophyllum, in August and December 2012 and in March and April 2013, in the reservoir Ribeirão das Anhumas. We registered 21 Oligochaeta species associated to these macrophytes. With the data obtained in the review along with the inventory of the reservoir Ribeirão das Anhumas, we found a total of 41 species associated to aquatic macrophytes, with a higher richness of the Naididae family (93.33%, followed by Opistocystidae (4.44%, and Alluroididae (2.22%. Our study inventoried about 48% of the Oligochaeta diversity registered in continental ecosystems in Brazil, thus highlighting the significance of macrophytes as a resource for these invertebrates, mainly for the Naididae family.

  8. Comparison of feeding strategies in acute toxicity tests of crude oil and commercial bioremediation agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavender, R.C.; Cherry, D.S.; Yeager, M.M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Biology Dept.; Bidwell, J.R. [Univ. of South Australia, Adelaide (Australia). School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences

    1995-12-31

    Proposed modifications to the National Oil and Hazardous Substance Pollution Contingency Plan have prompted examinations of the methodology used in toxicity testing of the water soluble fraction (WSF) of oil, commercial bioremediation agents (CBA), and a combination of the two. The organisms currently used in acute (96 hr) testing of these agents are the inland silverside, Menidia beryllina, and an estuarine mysid, Mysidopsis bahia. The mysid is a carnivorous species that must be fed during a test in order to prevent predation within the test chambers. Currently proposed methodology for silverside testing also includes feeding. The high oxygen demand of CBAs and the WSF of oil causes dissolved oxygen to be a factor in toxicity. This effect can be intensified by the addition of brine shrimp (Artemia sp.) to the test chambers. The purpose of this study was to compare the toxicity of CBAs in combination with the WSF of oil to silversides with and without the addition of food. Tests were conducted using both 24-hour and 14-day spinning times for the CBA/WSF mixture. With the 24-hour spinning time, LC50 values from each day of the 4-day test were consistently lower in the Artemia fed test (47.8--22.6%) as compared to the unfed test (72.1--43.0%). A similar trend was seen in the 24 and 48 hour LC50`s in the 14-day spinning time. Overall, low dissolved oxygen was found to be most relevant at the highest CBA/WSF concentrations where D.O. dropped below 2 mg/l in Artemia fed tests.

  9. Toxicity of uranium, molybdenum, nickel, and arsenic to Hyalella azteca and Chironomus dilutus in water-only and spiked-sediment toxicity tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liber, Karsten; Doig, Lorne E; White-Sobey, Suzanne L

    2011-07-01

    A series of laboratory spiked-sediment toxicity tests with the amphipod Hyalella azteca and the midge Chironomus dilutus were undertaken to determine acute and chronic toxicity thresholds for uranium (U), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), and arsenic (As) based on both whole-sediment (total) and pore water exposure concentrations. Water-only toxicity data were also generated from separate experiments to determine the toxicities of these metals/metalloids under our test conditions and to help evaluate the hypothesis that pore water metal concentrations are better correlated with sediment toxicity to benthic organisms than whole-sediment metal concentrations. The relative toxicity of the four elements tested differed depending on which test species was used and whether whole-sediment or pore water metal concentrations were correlated with effects. Based on measured whole-sediment concentrations, Ni and As were the two most acutely toxic elements to H. azteca with 10-d LC50s of 521 and 532 mg/kg d.w., respectively. Measured pore water concentrations indicated that U and Ni were the two most acutely toxic elements, with 10-d LC50s to H. azteca of 2.15 and 2.05 mg/L, respectively. Based on pore water metal concentrations, the no-observed-effect concentrations (NOECs) for growth were (H. azteca and C. dilutus, respectively) 0.67 and 0.21 mg/L for U, azteca and C. dilutus, respectively) 2.99 and 0.48 mg/L for U, 0.37 and 2.33 mg/L for Ni, and 58.99 and 0.42 mg/L for As. For U and Ni, results from 96-h water-only acute toxicity tests correlated well with pore water metal concentrations in acutely toxic metal-spiked sediment. This was not true for As where metalloid concentrations in overlying water (diffusion from sediment) may have contributed to toxicity. The lowest whole-sediment LOEC reported here for As was 6.6- and 4-fold higher than the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment interim sediment quality guideline and the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC

  10. Toxicity testing and chemical analyses of recycled fibre-based paper for food contact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, Mona-Lise; Pedersen, Gitte Alsing; Vinggaard, Anne

    2002-01-01

    Food-contact materials, including paper, have to comply with a basic set of criteria concerning safety. This means that paper for food contact should not give rise to migration of components, which can endanger human health. The objectives of this pilot study were, first, to compare paper...... of different qualities as food-contact materials and to Perform a preliminary evaluation of their suitability from a safety point of view, and, second, to evaluate the use of different in vitro toxicity tests for screening of paper and board. Paper produced from three different categories of recycled fibres (B......-D) and a raw material produced from virgin fibres (A) were obtained from industry, and extracts were examined by chemical analyses and diverse in vitro toxicity test systems. The products tested were either based on different raw materials or different treatments were applied. Paper category B was made from 40...

  11. Application of the tukey trend test procedure to assess developmental and reproductive toxicity. I. Measurement data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonello, J M; Clark, R L; Heyse, J F

    1993-07-01

    Developmental and reproductive (DAR) toxicity studies typically include a series of increasing doses of a compound and a zero dose control. Given this framework, Tukey et al. (Biometrics, 41, 295-301, 1985) proposed a procedure (referred to as either the Tukey trend or TCH test procedure) for detecting a nonzero trend in response to increasing doses of the test compound. The procedure considers three candidate dosage scalings to ensure high power against relatively common dose-response patterns and appreciable power against most reasonable patterns. For toxicologic effects with near monotonic dose-response patterns, simulation studies have shown the TCH test to be overall more powerful than pairwise comparison procedures. The TCH test can be applied sequentially, eliminating the highest dose each time a statistically significant trend is observed, until a no-statistical-significance-of-trend dose is reached. This is the highest dose through which there is no statistically trustworthy evidence of the compound's impact on the response. Since DAR toxicity usually exhibits a progressive (monotonic) dose-response, we advocate routine use of Tukey's trend test for the evaluation of treatment effects in these studies. In this article, we discuss the procedure in detail and apply it to fetal body weight, a continuous measurement variable, from a developmental toxicity study.

  12. Measurement and reduction of porewater ammonia in 10-day sediment toxicity tests with marine amphipods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, N.P.; Karls, R.K.; Barrows, M.E. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Ammonia is recognized as a potential contributor to amphipod toxicity in sediment bioassays, such as those required for dredged material testing. Measurement of ammonia in sediment porewater prior to testing and monitoring of ammonia during testing have not been routinely performed. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) have recently provided guidance for reducing sediment porewater ammonia by aeration and by exchange of overlying water prior to introducing test animals. In this study, two amphipod species, Rhepoxynius abronius and Eohaustorius estuarius, were exposed to eight sediment treatments in 10-day solid-phase static bioassays. Ammonia in sediment porewater was measured prior to testing; treatments with > 70 mg/L total ammonia were manipulated to reduce porewater ammonia in the test chambers to {<=}30 mg/L, following procedures in a memorandum by EPA and USACE. Porewater ammonia was also measured {approximately}24 h after test set up (when animals would normally be added), each day of manipulation before animals were added, and also on Days 5 and 9 for the E. estuarius test. The treatment with the highest porewater ammonia concentration was tested with and without manipulation. Reduction of porewater ammonia required up to 2 days. Toxicity was reduced in the manipulated sediments, but was statistically significant relative to control and reference treatments.

  13. Toxicity Testing of Restorative Dental Materials Using Brine Shrimp Larvae (Artemia salina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manar M. Milhem

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of extracts of different composites, glass ionomer cement (GICs and compomers on the viability of brine shrimp larvae. Ethanolic extracts of four dental composites (Z-100; Solitaire 2; Filtek P60 and Synergy, a conventional GIC (Ketac-Fil, a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer, two compomers (F2000; Dyract AP, and a flowable compomer (Dyract Flow were prepared from each material. Following evaporation of the ethanol, the extracts were resuspended in distilled water, which was then used to test the effects on the viability of brine shrimp larvae. For the composites, the extract of Synergy was the least toxic (88% viability followed by the extracts of Solitaire 2, Z100 and P60 (75%, 67.5% and 50% viability, respectively. One-way ANOVA revealed highly significant differences between the resin composite materials (p<0.001. Follow-up comparison between the composite groups by Tukey's pairwise multiple-comparison test (α =0.05 showed that the extract of Synergy was significantly less toxic than the extracts of all the other materials except that of Solitaire 2. The compomers showed 100% lethality, while the percentage of viable larvae for the extracts of Ketac-Fil, and Vitremer were 32.3%, and 37.0%, respectively. One-way ANOVA revealed highly significant differences between the groups of materials (p<0.001. Follow-up comparison between the groups by Tukey's test (α = 0.05 showed that the toxic effect of the extracts of the compomers were significantly greater than that of Ketac-Fil, and Vitremer. The differences in the toxic effects of Vitremer and Ketac-Fil were not statistically significant. In conclusion, the toxicity of composite materials varied according to their chemical composition. Compomers were the most lethal materials to brine shrimp larvae followed by GICs and then composites.

  14. Optimizing the performance of Hyalella azteca in chronic toxicity tests: Results of feeding studies with various foods and feeding regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca is a common organism used for sediment toxicity testing in the United States and elsewhere. Standard methods for 10-d and 42-d toxicity tests with H. azteca were last revised and published by USEPA/ASTM in 2000. Under the methods in the man...

  15. Optimizing the performance of Hyalella azteca in chronic toxicity tests: Results of feeding studies with various foods and feeding regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca is a common organism used for sediment toxicity testing in the United States and elsewhere. Standard methods for 10-d and 42-d toxicity tests with H. azteca were last revised and published by USEPA/ASTM in 2000. Under the methods in the man...

  16. Modified whole effluent toxicity test to assess and decouple wastewater effects from environmental gradients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Sauco

    Full Text Available Environmental gradients and wastewater discharges produce aggregated effects on marine populations, obscuring the detection of human impact. Classical assessment methods do not include environmental effects in toxicity tests designs, which could lead to incorrect conclusions. We proposed a modified Whole Effluent Toxicity test (mWET that includes environmental gradients in addition to effluent dilutions, together with the application of Generalized Linear Mixed Models (GLMM to assess and decouple those effects. We tested this approach, analyzing the lethal effects of wastewater on a marine sandy beach bivalve affected by an artificial canal freshwater discharge used for rice crops irrigation. To this end, we compared bivalve mortality between canal water dilutions (CWd and salinity controls (SC: without canal water. CWd were prepared by diluting the water effluent (sampled during the pesticide application period with artificial marine water. The salinity gradient was included in the design by achieving the same final salinities in both CWd and SC, allowing us to account for the effects of salinity by including this variable as a random factor in the GLMM. Our approach detected significantly higher mortalities in CWd, indicating potential toxic effects of the effluent discharge. mWET represents an improvement over the internationally standardized WET tests, since it considers environmental variability and uses appropriate statistical analyses.

  17. Trace element concentrations in freshwater mussels and macrophytes as related to those in their environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Maria BEONE

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was primarily designed to contribute to the debate "Do accumulator species reflect the element contamination level of their environment?" This research was carried out: 1 to know the distribution of 15 trace elements and calcium in shell and soft tissues of three species of freshwater mussels and macrophytes; 2 to compare the accumulation capacity of each trace element by mussels and by eight species of macrophytes and 3 to test the relationships between the metal concentrations in the mussels and macrophytes and those in water and sediments. The variability of element residues in the mussels is the major limit to accumulator monitoring. The most important causes are: seasonal cycle, physical environment and biological factors such as the size, age and growth rate. This research was designed to eliminate the consequence of variability deriving from the season and the environment. To this end the mussels and macrophytes were collected at the same time from the same habitat: Ranco Bay, Lago Maggiore, Northern Italy. In addition, the element concentrations in more size-classes of the most abundant mussel species (Unio pictorum and Dreissena polymorpha were measured. Trace elements were analyzed by Inductive Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS. By arranging the data in sequences of decreasing element concentrations in the organisms as well as in water and sediments, we were able to compare the accumulating ability of the tested species and evaluate their capacity to reflect environmental availability. Neither the sequences in the shell nor those in the tissues were similar to the sequence in the water. The differences between the sequences of the mussel tissues and those of the sediments were less striking than those between shells and sediments. Similar results were obtained by macrophytes. In conclusion, the results of this study (which mimics the monitoring practice prove that bioaccumulators cannot be used to evaluate the

  18. Handbook of acute toxicity of chemicals to fish and aquatic invertebrates : summaries of toxicity tests conducted at Columbia National Fisheries Research Laboratory, 1965-78

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. Waynon; Finley, Mack T.

    1980-01-01

    Acute toxicity is a major subject of research at Columbia National Fisheries Research Laboratory for evaluating the impact of toxic chemicals on fishery resources. The Laboratory has played a leading role in developing research technology for toxicity testing and data interpretation. In 1965-78, more than 400 chemicals were tested against a variety of invertebrates and fish species representative of both cold- and warm-water climates. The use of acute toxicity tests for assessing the potential hazard of chemical contaminants to aquatic organisms is well documented (Boyd 1957; Henderson et al. 1960; Sanders and Cope 1966; Macek and McAllister 1970). Static acute toxicity tests provide rapid and (within limits) reproducible concentration-response curves for estimating toxic effects of chemicals on aquatic organisms. These tests provide a database for determining relative toxicity of a large number of chemicals to a variety of species and for estimating acute effects of chemical spills on natural aquatic systems; they also assist in determining priority and design of additional toxicity studies. Acute toxicity tests usually provide estimates of the exposure concentration causing 50% mortality (LC50) to test organisms during a specified period of time. For certain invertebrates, the effective concentration is based on immobilization, or some other identifiable endpoint, rather than on lethality. The application of the LC50 has gained acceptance among toxicologists and is generally the most highly rated test for assessing potential adverse effects of chemical contaminants to aquatic life (Brungs and Mount 1978; American Institute for Biological Sciences 1978a). The literature contains numerous papers dealing with the acute toxicity of chemicals to freshwater organisms. However, there is a tremendous need for a concise compendium of toxicity data covering a large variety of chemicals and test species. This Handbook is a compilation of a large volume of acute toxicity

  19. Is There a Space-Based Technology Solution to Problems with Preclinical Drug Toxicity Testing?

    OpenAIRE

    Hammond, Timothy; Allen, Patricia; Birdsall, Holly

    2016-01-01

    Even the finest state-of-the art preclinical drug testing, usually in primary hepatocytes, remains an imperfect science. Drugs continue to be withdrawn from the market due to unforeseen toxicity, side effects, and drug interactions. The space program may be able to provide a lifeline. Best known for rockets, space shuttles, astronauts and engineering, the space program has also delivered some serious medical science. Optimized suspension culture in NASA’s specialized suspension culture device...

  20. A New Way in Deciding NOAEL Based on the Findings from GLP-Toxicity Test

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Yeong-Chul; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2011-01-01

    The FDA guidance focuses on the use of the NOAEL to establish the maximum recommended starting dose. The majority of NOAEL has been described inaccurately or incompletely in final reports for 90-days repeated dose toxicity test based on GLP (good laboratory practice) regulation. This is the most serious one of reasons for why most pharmaceutical companies targeting global markets have disregarded the final report produced from GLP facilities in Korea. The problems in deciding NOAEL reflected ...

  1. Statistical studies of animal response data from USF toxicity screening test method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilado, C. J.; Machado, A. M.

    1978-01-01

    Statistical examination of animal response data obtained using Procedure B of the USF toxicity screening test method indicates that the data deviate only slightly from a normal or Gaussian distribution. This slight departure from normality is not expected to invalidate conclusions based on theoretical statistics. Comparison of times to staggering, convulsions, collapse, and death as endpoints shows that time to death appears to be the most reliable endpoint because it offers the lowest probability of missed observations and premature judgements.

  2. Methods used for testing toxicity of industrial chemicals and the need of their international unification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyskocil, A; Tusl, M

    1989-01-01

    The work presented here provides a demonstration of approaches in testing chemical substances in the world, comparison of various guidelines, shows differences in them with the aim to unify them as much as possible and thus to achieve their international comparability. First chapter includes a comparison of American and European approaches to Good Laboratory Practice (GLP). Some parts of American GLP seem to be specific for the USA only and thus they are not suitable for application on the international level where countries having different systems of government and various levels of their economy would have to observe them. GLP published in OECD and ECETOC guidelines seem to be most beneficial for needs of socialist countries. OECD, EEC, EPA/FIFRA, EPA/TSCA, Japan/MAFF and UK/HSC guidelines are compared in subsequent chapters and recommendations given by ECETOC and the authors of this work for unification of the guidelines are presented as well. Some parts of OECD guidelines are specified in detail there especially those which are most suitable for CMEA countries. Differences or supplements contained in CMEA recommendations are presented in the end of each chapter. Acute, subchronic and chronic toxicity tests were compared as well as carcinogenicity, combined carcinogenicity/chronic toxicity studies and reproductive toxicity tests.

  3. SORPTION PERFORMANCE OF QUERCUS CERRIS CORK WITH POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND TOXICITY TESTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Àngels Olivella

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Quercus cerris is an important oak species extended in large areas of Eastern Europe and Minor Asia that has a thick bark which is not utilized at all. The sorption performance of cork from Quercus cerris bark with four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs (acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene, and anthracene was investigated. Quercus cerris cork was characterized for elemental analysis, acidic groups, and summative chemical composition, and the results were compared with Quercus suber cork. A Microtox® test was carried out to test for the release of any toxic compounds into the solution. All isotherms fit the Freundlich model and displayed linear n values. Quercus cerris exhibited a high efficiency for sorption of PAHs for the studied concentrations (5 to 50 µg/L with 80-96% removal, while the desorption isotherms showed a very low release of the adsorbed PAHs (<2%. In relation to Quercus suber cork, KF values of Quercus cerris cork are about three times lower. The quantity of Quercus cerris cork required to reduce water pollution by PAHs was estimated to be less than twice the quantity of other adsorbents such as aspen wood and leonardite. Toxicity tests indicated that non-toxic compounds were released into the solution by the Quercus cerris and Quercus suber cork samples. Overall the results indicate the potential use of Quercus cerris cork and of Quercus suber cork as effective and economical biosorbents for the treatment of PAH-contaminated waters.

  4. Estuarine sediment acute toxicity testing with the European amphipod Corophium multisetosum Stock, 1952.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ré, Ana; Freitas, Rosa; Sampaio, Leandro; Rodrigues, Ana Maria; Quintino, Victor

    2009-09-01

    This study assessed the use of the European amphipod Corophium multisetosum Stock [Stock, J.H., 1952. Some notes on the taxonomy, the distribution and the ecology of four species of the genus Corophium (Crustacea, Malacostraca). Beaufortia 21, 1-10] in estuarine sediment acute toxicity testing. The sensitivity of adults to the reference toxicant CdCl(2) was determined in water-only 96 h exposures in salinity 2. LC(50) values ranged from 0.33mgCd(2+)L(-1) at 22 degrees C to 0.57mgCd(2+)L(-1) at 15 degrees C. Adult survival was studied in control sediment with water salinity from 0 to 36 and with fine particles content (Tagus Estuary, western Portugal. A major flood event in winter 2000-2001 induced detectable alterations in sediment baseline descriptors (grain-size, redox potential and total volatile solids), organic contaminants (PAHs, PCBs, DDT metabolites and gamma-HCH) and the macrofauna benthic community. Mortality of the amphipod diminished significantly from the before to the after flood period, in close agreement with diminishing sediment contamination and increasing benthic fauna diversity, in the same time period. C. multisetosum is suitable to conduct acute sediment toxicity tests and presents good potential for the development of a full life-cycle sediment test, due to its amenability to laboratory culture and high survival in the control sediment.

  5. Toxicity minimization of pipelines hydrostatic tests fluids, stage I: laboratory essays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, Jorge A.S.; Penna, Monica de O.; Portela, Daniele B.; Christino, Fernando P.; Silva, Joao L.B. da; Geraldo, Lucia M.L. [Petroleo do Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Mota, Vanessa V.C. [Fundacao Gorceix, Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil); Cravo Junior, Walter [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents the results of the laboratory essays stage of the project for toxicity minimization of pipelines hydrostatic tests fluids. The hydrostatic-hibernation fluid composition most used by PETROBRAS in offshore operations is seawater added with sodium bis sulfite, fluorescein, alquildimetilbenzilamonium chloride, and tetrakis-hydroxymethyl-phosphonium sulfate (THPS). In order to reduce the toxicity of the fluid used in hydrostatic tests, the use of lesser concentrations of THPS was attempted with UV radiation application as a disinfection technique prior to the adding of the fluid's components. The compositions were evaluated in different conditions of temperature use of UV radiation or not and oxygen scavenger adding (presence and absence). The fluids were kept hibernating for 120 days. All the parameters tested after hibernation were compared to fresh from preparation samples (zero time samples). The fluid's characteristics were evaluated by microbiological control and toxicity as well as the THPS residual. Results showed that the UV treatment was more effective in the absence of oxygen scavenger. The temperature acts as a microbial growth control agent, as expected. To large scale operations, a water quality monitoring must be performed previously to any field operations, in order to determinate the best treatment to be used in each case. (author)

  6. Evaluation of the toxicity of Araribá (Centrolobium tomentosum using brine Shrimp test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Carlos de Sá Silva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the dawn of medicine, man has used natural products for the treatment of disease. There has been a recent increase in studies of the therapeutic characteristics plants in popular use in many places of the world. In this context, the species Centrolobium tomentosum, Fabaceae, known popularly as Araribá or Araruva, is used in Brazilian folk medicine as an astringent for wound treatment and bruises due to the large amount of tannins contained in the bark. This work used toxicity tests to assess the biological activity of ethanolic extracts from C. tomentosum with the specific objectives of obtaining concentrated extracts from the bark and wood of this species and determining the total phenols and tannins present in these extracts. We collected araribá samples in order to obtain ethanolic extracts through the percolation process. We then made a qualitative chemical identification of hydrolysable tannins and condensed tannins. We used the Folin-Ciocalteu method for the phenols quantification and the casein precipitation method for the tannins determination. The toxicity of extracts was evaluated using the brine shrimp bioassay (Artemia salina, in which the C. tomentosum bark extract showed moderate toxicity, with estimated LC50 = 416 μg.ml-1, whereas the leaves and wood extracts of this species showed low toxicity with LC50 = 537 μg.ml-1 and 826 μg.ml-1, respectively.

  7. Monitoring the effectiveness of remediation techniques using sediment toxicity tests with the amphipod Eohaustorius estuarius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doe, K.G.; Jackman, P.M. [Environment Canada, Moncton, NB (Canada); Lee, K. [Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Dartmouth, NS (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    The results of a controlled oil release experiment of weathered crude oil was presented. The released oil was applied to a tidal saltwater marsh at Conrod's Beach, Nova Scotia, Canada. The study included 3 replicate blocks which included 2 unoiled treatments and 4 oiled treatments for each block. One unoiled site had no treatment, the second unoiled site had nutrient addition to examine the effect of nutrients. The oiled treatments included natural attenuation, nutrient addition, nutrient addition with plants, and nutrient addition with a garden aerator to introduce oxygen. A standard lab procedure was used to analyze the sediments to determine the effectiveness of the technique as well as the toxic effects on the survival of the amphipod Eohaustorius estuarius. Test results indicated that the unoiled sites were non-toxic, with a slight decrease in survival in the treatment with nutrient addition. All the oiled sites were very toxic at first, but toxicity decreased gradually with time. Treatment with nutrient addition with a garden aerator proved to be the most complete and fastest detoxification method. 8 refs., 4 tabs., 2 figs.

  8. Major Phytochemical as γ-Sitosterol Disclosing and Toxicity Testing in Lagerstroemia Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirikhansaeng, Prapaparn

    2017-01-01

    Medicinal plants in genus Lagerstroemia were investigated for phytochemical contents by GC-MS and HPLC with ethanol and hexane extracts and their toxicity MTT and comet assay on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). γ-Sitosterol is the major component found in all species at 14.70–34.44%. All of the extracts, except for L. speciosa ethanol extract, showed high percentages of cell viability. The IC50 value, 0.24 mg/mL, of ethanol L. speciosa extract predicted an LD50 of 811.78 mg/kg, which belongs to WHO Class III of toxic chemicals. However, in-depth toxicity evaluation by the comet assay showed that the four tested species induced significant (p < 0.05) DNA damage in PBMCs. γ-Sitosterol was previously reported to possess antihyperglycemic activity by increasing insulin secretion in response to glucose. Nonetheless, consumers should consider its toxicity, and the amount of consumption should be of concern.

  9. Current strategies to minimize toxicity of oxaliplatin: selection of pharmacogenomic panel tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Francia, Raffaele; Siesto, Raffaella Stefania; Valente, Daniela; Del Buono, Andrea; Pugliese, Sergio; Cecere, Sabrina; Cavaliere, Carla; Nasti, Guglielmo; Facchini, Gaetano; Berretta, Massimiliano

    2013-11-01

    Oxaliplatin is an anticancer drug routinely used to treat colorectal, gastroesophageal, ovarian, breast, head/neck, and genitourinary cancers. Discontinuation of oxaliplatin treatment is mostly because of peripheral neuropathy, more often than for tumor progression, potentially compromising patient benefit. Several strategies to prevent neurotoxicity have so far been investigated. To overcome this life-threatening side effect, while taking advantage of the antineoplastic activities of oxaliplatin, we describe in detail recent findings on the underlying mechanisms of genetic variants associated with toxicity and resistance to oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in colorectal cancer. A comprehensive panel of eight polymorphisms, previously validated as significant markers related to oxaliplatin toxicity, is proposed and discussed. In addition, the most common available strategies or methods to prevent/minimize the toxicity were described in detail. Moreover, an early outline evaluation of the genotyping costs and methods was taken in consideration. With the availability of individual pharmacogenomic profiles, the oncologists will have new means to make treatment decisions for their patients that maximize benefit and minimize toxicity. With this purpose in mind, the clinician and lab manager should cooperate to evaluate the advantages and limitations, in terms of costs and applicability, of the most appropriate pharmacogenomic tests for routine incorporation into clinical practice.

  10. Assessment of heavy metal accumulation in macrophyte, agricultural soil, and crop plants adjacent to discharge zone of sponge iron factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S.; Nayek, S.; Saha, R. N.; Satpati, S.

    2008-08-01

    contaminated soil. Further research work on in situ toxicity test will be necessary in order to identify the most resistive variety on this particular type of contaminated site.

  11. Investigation of Darwin’s naturalization hypothesis in invaded macrophyte communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although native macrophytes are beneficial in aquatic ecosystems, invasive macrophytes can cause significant ecological and economic harm. Numerous studies have attributed invasiveness to species’ characteristics, whereas others attribute invasion to biotic and abiotic characteristics of the invaded...

  12. Assessment of the Potential Biological Activity of Low Molecular Weight Metabolites of Freshwater Macrophytes with QSAR

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kurashov, Evgeny A; Fedorova, Elena V; Krylova, Julia V; Mitrukova, Galina G

    2016-01-01

    ... (Prediction of Activity Spectra for Substances) for the major components of three macrophytes widespread in the Holarctic species of freshwater, emergent macrophyte with floating leaves, Nuphar lutea (L.) Sm...

  13. Effect of removal of free-floating macrophytes on zooplankton habitat in shallow wetland

    OpenAIRE

    Choi Jong-Yun; Jeong Kwang-Seuk; La Geung-Hwan; Joo Gea-Jae

    2014-01-01

    Submerged macrophytes improve the structural heterogeneity of microhabitats in aquatic ecosystems, often providing an important habitat for zooplankton. However, excessive development of free-floating macrophytes on the water surface can reduce the biomass of submerged macrophytes and result in a relatively simple habitat structure. We hypothesized that controlling the development of free-floating macrophytes would result in a more complex habitat structure by promoting the development of sub...

  14. Toxicity test using medaka (Oryzias latipes) early fry and concentrated sample water as an index of aquatic habitat condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, H; Haribowo, R; Sekine, M; Oda, N; Kanno, A; Shimono, Y; Shitao, W; Higuchi, T; Imai, T; Yamamoto, K

    2011-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to show a relationship between toxicity of 100-fold concentrated water and aquatic habitat conditions. Environmental waters are 100-fold concentrated with solid-phase extraction. Medaka early fry was exposed in these waters for 48 h. The number of death and disorder was counted at 1, 2, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h; toxicity was expressed using inverse median effect time and median lethal time (ET (50)(-1), LT (50)(-1)). Average score per taxon (ASPT) for benthic animals and Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) for fish were applied as indices of aquatic habitat conditions. The results of toxicity test were compared using ASPT and IBI. The different levels of toxicity were detected in the seawater of Japan. At the Husino River area, toxicity cannot be detected. In rivers, high toxicity appeared at urban districts without sewerage. By Spearman coefficient, the relationship between toxicity and high biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) were obtained. BOD household wastewater contains hydrophobic toxic matters; otherwise, seawater in industrial area does not show clear relationship between toxicity and chemical oxygen demand. Gas chromatography to mass spectrometry simultaneous analysis database may give an answer for the source of toxicity, but further test is required. Ratio of clear stream benthic animal sharply decreased over 0.25 of LT (50)(-1) or 0.5 of ET (50)(-1). Tolerant fish becomes dominant over 0.3 of LT (50)(-1) or 0.5-1.0 of ET (50)(-1). By Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient, correlation coefficient between toxicity and ASPT was obtained at -0.773 (ET (50)(-1)) and -0.742 (LT (50)(-1)) at 1 % level of significance with a high negative correlation. Toxicity (LT (50)(-1) ) has strong correlation with the ratio of tolerant species. By Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient, correlation coefficient between toxicity and IBI obtained were -0.155 (ET (50)(-1)) and -0.190 (LT (50)(-1)) at 1 % level of significance and has a

  15. Resolving the influence of nitrogen abundances on sediment organic matter in macrophyte-dominated lakes, using fluorescence spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Yao; Shengrui Wang; Lixin Jiao; Caihong Yan; Xiangcan Jin

    2015-01-01

    A controlled experiment was designed to resolve the influence of nitrogen abundance on sediment organic matters in macrophyte-dominated lakes using fluorescence analysis.Macrophyte biomass showed coincident growth trends with time,but different variation rates with nitrogen treatment.All plant growth indexes with nitrogen addition (N,NH4Cl 100,200,400 mg/kg,respectively) were lower than those of the control group.Four humiclike components,two autochthonous tryptophan-like components,and one autochthonous tyrosine-like component were identified using the parallel factor analysis model.The results suggested that the relative component changes of fluorescence in the colonized sediments were in direct relation to the change of root biomass with time.In the experiment,the root formation parameters of the plants studied were significantly affected by adding N in sediments,which may be related to the reason that the root growth was affected by N addition.Adding a low concentration of N to sediments can play a part in supplying nutrients to the plants.However,the intensive uptake of NH~ may result in an increase in the intracellular concentration of ammonia,which is highly toxic to the plant cells.Hence,our experiment results manifested that organic matter cycling in the macrophyte-dominated sediment was influenced by nitrogen enrichment through influencing vegetation and relevant microbial activity.

  16. Contrasting patterns of free-living bacterioplankton diversity in macrophyte-dominated versus phytoplankton blooming regimes in Dianchi Lake, a shallow lake in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujing; Li, Huabing; Xing, Peng; Wu, Qinglong

    2016-04-01

    Freshwater shallow lakes typically exhibit two alternative stable states under certain nutrient loadings: macrophyte-dominated and phytoplankton-dominated water regimes. An ecosystem regime shift from macrophytes to phytoplankton blooming typically reduces the number of species of invertebrates and fishes and results in the homogenization of communities in freshwater lakes. We investigated how microbial biodiversity has responded to a shift of the ecosystem regime in Dianchi Lake, which was previously fully covered with submerged macrophytes but currently harbors both ecological states. We observed marked divergence in the diversity and community composition of bacterioplankton between the two regimes. Although species richness, estimated as the number of operational taxonomic units and phylogenetic diversity (PD), was higher in the phytoplankton dominated ecosystem after this shift, the dissimilarity of bacterioplankton community across space decreased. This decrease in beta diversity was accompanied by loss of planktonic bacteria unique to the macrophyte-dominated ecosystem. Mantel tests between bacterioplankton community distances and Euclidian distance of environmental parameters indicated that this reduced bacterial community diff erentiation primarily reflected the loss of environmental niches, particularly in the macrophyte regime. The loss of this small-scale heterogeneity in bacterial communities should be considered when assessing long-term biodiversity changes in response to ecosystem regime conversions in freshwater lakes.

  17. Use of sublethal endpoints in sediment toxicity tests with the amphipod Hyalella azteca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Chris G.; Brunson, Eric L.; Dwyer, F. James; Hardesty, Douglas K.; Kemble, Nile E.

    1998-01-01

    Short-term sediment toxicity tests that only measure effects on survival can be used to identify high levels of contamination but may not be able to identify marginally contaminated sediments. The objective of the present study was to develop a method for determining the potential sublethal effects of contaminants associated with sediment on the amphipod Hyalella azteca (e.g., reproduction). Exposures to sediment were started with 7- to 8-d-old amphipods. On day 28, amphipods were isolated from the sediment and placed in water-only chambers where reproduction was measured on day 35 and 42. Typically, amphipods were first in amplexus at about day 21 to 28 with release of the first brood between day 28 to 42. Endpoints measured included survival (day 28, 35, and 42), growth (as length and weight on day 28 and 42), and reproduction (number of young/female produced from day 28 to 42). This method was used to evaluate a formulated sediment and field-collected sediments with low to moderate concentrations of contaminants. Survival of amphipods in these sediments was typically >85% after the 28-d sediment exposures and the 14-d holding period in water to measure reproduction. Reproduction was more variable than growth; hence, more replicates might be needed to establish statistical differences among treatments. Previous studies have demonstrated that growth of H. azteca in sediment tests often provides unique information that can be used to discriminate toxic effects of exposure to contaminants. Either length or weight can be measured in sediment tests with H. azteca. However, additional statistical options are available if length is measured on individual amphipods, such as nested analysis of variance that can account for variance in length within replicates. Ongoing water-only studies testing select contaminants will provide additional data on the relative sensitivity and variability of sublethal endpoints in toxicity tests with H. azteca.

  18. Some biological aspects of Mysidopsis juniae (Crustacea:Mysidacea) and its use in chronic toxicity tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badaro-Pedroso, C. [USP, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] Nipper, M.G. [NIWA, Hamilton (New Zealand)

    1995-12-31

    As part of the joint effort to develop marine toxicity tests with organisms abundant at the Brazilian coast, some aspects for the laboratory culture of M. juniae and its sensitivity to single chemicals were studied. Organisms fed a mixture of brine shrimp (Artemia sp.) nauplii and the microalgae Isochrysis galbana reached sexual maturity 10 days before animals fed brine shrimp nauplii only. Under best conditions, sexual maturity was reached on the 9th--11th day and newborn mysids hatched on the 16th--18th day, Short-term chronic toxicity tests were initiated with 7-day old mysids and exposure time was 11 days, with growth (length and dry weight) as test endpoints. Experiments were undertaken with zinc, copper, and ammonia. Zinc did not affect the organisms at concentrations between 0.018 and 0.1 mg/L, which were one order of magnitude lower than the average 96-h; LC50 value. The NOEC and LOEC values were the same for length and weight in some tests with copper and ammonia (Cu: 0.006 and 0.015 mg/L; NH{sub 3}: 0.32 and 0.87 mg/L, respectively), but revealed length as a more sensitive endpoint than weight in others (length NOEC and LOEC: 0.23 and 0.53 mgNH{sub 3}/L; weight: 0.53 and 0.99 mgNH{sub 3}/L, respectively). The authors speculate that this could be caused by time-dependent variations in the lipid content of the organisms. Length would be a steadier and more reliable endpoint for chronic toxicity tests with M. juniae. The results show that the method has potential applications for the evaluation and monitoring of contaminated marine systems along the Brazilian coast.

  19. Tolerance of freshwater test organisms to formulated sediments for use as control materials in whole-sediment toxicity tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemble, N.E.; Dwyer, F.J.; Ingersoll, C.G. [Geological Survey, Columbia, MO (United States). Environmental and Contaminants Research Center; Dawson, T.D. [Integrated Laboratory Systems, Duluth, MN (United States); Norberg-King, T.J. [Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN (United States). Mid-Continent Ecological Div.

    1999-02-01

    A method is described for preparing formulated sediments for use in toxicity testing. Ingredients used to prepare formulated sediments included commercially available silt, clay, sand, humic acid, dolomite, and {alpha}-cellulose (as a source of organic carbon). {alpha}-Cellulose was selected as the source of organic carbon because it is commercially available, consistent from batch to batch, and low in contaminant concentrations. The tolerance of freshwater test organisms to formulated sediments for use as control materials in whole-sediment toxicity testing was evaluated. Sediment exposures were conducted for 10 d with the amphipod Hyalella azteca, the midges Chironomus riparius and C. tentans, and the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus and for 28 d with H. azteca. Responses of organisms in formulated sediments was compared with a field-collected control sediment that has routinely been used to determine test acceptability. Tolerance of organisms to formulated sediments was evaluated by determining responses to varying levels of {alpha}-cellulose, to varying levels of grain size, to evaluation of different food types, or to evaluation of different sources of overlying water. In the 10-d exposures, survival of organisms exposed to the formulated sediments routinely met or exceeded the responses of test organisms exposed to the control sediment and routinely met test acceptability criteria required in standard methods. Growth of amphipods and oligochaetes in 10-d exposures with formulated sediment was often less than growth of organisms in the field-collected control sediment. Additional research is needed, using the method employed to prepare formulated sediment, to determine if conditioning formulated sediments before starting 10-d tests would improve the growth of amphipods. In the 28-d exposures, survival of H. azteca was low when reconstituted water was used as the source of overlying water. However, when well water was used as the source of overlying water in

  20. Characterization of sewage sludge and the use of brine shrimp for toxicity test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pun, K.C.; Cheung, R.Y.H. [City Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong). Dept. of Biology and Chemistry; Wong, M.H. [Hong Kong Baptist Univ. (Hong Kong). Dept. of Biology

    1995-12-31

    Heavy metal contents (Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni and Zn) of digested sludges, collected from 4 sewage treatment works in Hong Kong were analyzed using atomic absorption spectrophotometry, after sequentially extracted by 1 M KNO{sub 3}, 0.5 M KF, 0.1 M Na{sub 4}, P{sub 2}, O{sub 7} 0.1 M EDTA and 6 M HNO{sub 3} It was found that the major forms of Cu, Pb, Ni and Zn were in the sulfide phase, organically bound phase, adsorbed phase and carbonate phase respectively. Nauplii larvae of brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) was then used as bioindicator to test the toxicity, of the digested sludges. 20 individuals were placed into 1 liter seawater containing whole sample of the types of digested sludges at different concentrations, The toxicity of the 4 sludges, according to 48h-LC 50, were ranked as follows YL > TP > ST > SWH.

  1. Toxicity tests with crustaceans for detecting sublethal effects of potential endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wollenberger, Leah

    /antagonistic activity with the ecdysteroid-responsive Drosophila melanogaster BII cell line 6) to draft an OECD guideline proposal for testing of chemicals based on the experimental work performed within this study In preliminary investigations with A. tonsa were studied various parameters related to processes...... regulated by hormones such as growth, molting, sexual maturation and reproduction. The primary endpoints were larval development ratio, egg production and sex ratio. Exposure experiments were conducted with naturally occurring and synthetic vertebrate and invertebrate hormones as well as compounds known...... contribution of the present work with BFRs was to establish data on their (sub)chronic toxicity towards marine copepods. To discriminate between general toxicological and endocrine-mediated toxic effects, the model compounds were assessed in vitro for ecdysteroid agonistic/antagonistic activity using...

  2. Relative sensitivities of toxicity test protocols with the amphipods Eohaustorius estuarius and Ampelisca abdita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brian S; Lowe, Sarah; Phillips, Bryn M; Hunt, John W; Vorhees, Jennifer; Clark, Sara; Tjeerdema, Ronald S

    2008-01-01

    A series of dose-response experiments was conducted to compare the relative sensitivities of toxicity test protocols using the amphipods Ampelisca abdita and Eohaustorius estuarius. A. abdita is one of the dominant infaunal species in the San Francisco Estuary, and E. estuarius is the primary sediment toxicity species used in the San Francisco Estuary Regional Monitoring Program. Experiments were conducted with a formulated sediment spiked with copper, fluoranthene, chlorpyrifos, and the three pyrethroid pesticides permethrin, bifenthrin, and cypermethrin, all chemicals of concern in this Estuary. The results showed that the protocol with A. abdita was more sensitive to fluoranthene and much more sensitive to copper, while E. estuarius was more sensitive to chlorpyrifos, and much more sensitive to the pyrethroid pesticides. These results, considered in conjunction with those from previous spiking studies [Weston, D.P., 1995. Further development of a chronic Ampelisca abdita bioassay as an indicator of sediment toxicity: summary and conclusions. In: Regional Monitoring Program for Trace Substances Annual Report. San Francisco Estuary Institute, Oakland, CA, pp 108-115; DeWitt, T.E., Swartz, R.C., Lamberson, J.O., 1989. Measuring the acute toxicity of estuarine sediments. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 8: 1035-1048; DeWitt, T.H.E., Pinza, M.R., Niewolny, L.A., Cullinan, V.I., Gruendell, B.D., 1997. Development and evaluation of a standard marine/estuarine chronic sediment toxicity method using Leptocheirus plumulosus. Draft report prepared for the US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Science and Technology, Washington DC, under contract DE-AC06-76RLO 1830 by Batelle Marine Science Laboratory, Battelle Memorial Institute, Pacific Northwest Division, Richland, WA], suggest that, in general, A. abdita is more sensitive to metals, E. estuarius is more sensitive to pesticides, and both protocols have roughly comparable sensitivities to hydrocarbons. The preponderance of

  3. Comprehensive In Vitro Toxicity Testing of a Panel of Representative Oxide Nanomaterials: First Steps towards an Intelligent Testing Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farcal, Lucian; Torres Andón, Fernando; Di Cristo, Luisana; Rotoli, Bianca Maria; Bussolati, Ovidio; Bergamaschi, Enrico; Mech, Agnieszka; Hartmann, Nanna B.; Rasmussen, Kirsten; Riego-Sintes, Juan; Ponti, Jessica; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka; Rossi, François; Oomen, Agnes; Bos, Peter; Chen, Rui; Bai, Ru; Chen, Chunying; Rocks, Louise; Fulton, Norma; Ross, Bryony; Hutchison, Gary; Tran, Lang; Mues, Sarah; Ossig, Rainer; Schnekenburger, Jürgen; Campagnolo, Luisa; Vecchione, Lucia; Pietroiusti, Antonio; Fadeel, Bengt

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) display many unique and useful physico-chemical properties. However, reliable approaches are needed for risk assessment of NMs. The present study was performed in the FP7-MARINA project, with the objective to identify and evaluate in vitro test methods for toxicity assessment in order to facilitate the development of an intelligent testing strategy (ITS). Six representative oxide NMs provided by the EC-JRC Nanomaterials Repository were tested in nine laboratories. The in vitro toxicity of NMs was evaluated in 12 cellular models representing 6 different target organs/systems (immune system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal system, reproductive organs, kidney and embryonic tissues). The toxicity assessment was conducted using 10 different assays for cytotoxicity, embryotoxicity, epithelial integrity, cytokine secretion and oxidative stress. Thorough physico-chemical characterization was performed for all tested NMs. Commercially relevant NMs with different physico-chemical properties were selected: two TiO2 NMs with different surface chemistry – hydrophilic (NM-103) and hydrophobic (NM-104), two forms of ZnO – uncoated (NM-110) and coated with triethoxycapryl silane (NM-111) and two SiO2 NMs produced by two different manufacturing techniques – precipitated (NM-200) and pyrogenic (NM-203). Cell specific toxicity effects of all NMs were observed; macrophages were the most sensitive cell type after short-term exposures (24-72h) (ZnO>SiO2>TiO2). Longer term exposure (7 to 21 days) significantly affected the cell barrier integrity in the presence of ZnO, but not TiO2 and SiO2, while the embryonic stem cell test (EST) classified the TiO2 NMs as potentially ‘weak-embryotoxic’ and ZnO and SiO2 NMs as ‘non-embryotoxic’. A hazard ranking could be established for the representative NMs tested (ZnO NM-110 > ZnO NM-111 > SiO2 NM-203 > SiO2 NM-200 > TiO2 NM-104 > TiO2 NM-103). This ranking was different in the case of embryonic tissues, for

  4. Microbial community-level toxicity testing of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates in aquatic microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Kristian K; Jørgensen, Niels O G; Nielsen, Tommy H; Winding, Anne

    2004-08-01

    Complex microbial communities may serve as ideal and ecologically relevant toxicity indicators. We here report an assessment of frequently used methods in microbial ecology for their feasibility to detect toxic effects of the environmentally important surfactant linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) on microbial communities in lake water and treated waste water. The two microbial communities were evaluated for changes in community structure and function over a period of 7 weeks in replicated aquatic microcosms amended with various levels of LAS (0, 0.1, 1, 10 or 100 mg l(-1)) and inorganic nutrients. In general, the two communities behaved similarly when challenged with LAS. Following lag periods of 1-3 weeks, LAS was degraded to non-toxic substances. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rRNA gene fragments and [3H]leucine incorporation were the most sensitive assays with effect levels of 0-1 and 1-10 mg LAS l(-1), respectively. Community-level physiological profiles and pollution-induced community tolerance determinations using Biolog microplates demonstrated less sensitivity with effect levels of 10-100 mg LAS l(-1). Total cell counts and net uptake of inorganic N and P were unaffected even at 100 mg LAS l(-1). Interestingly, different microbial communities developed in some replicate microcosms, indicating the importance of stochastic events for community succession. We conclude that microbial community-level toxicity testing holds great promise and suggest a polyphasic approach involving a range of independent methods targeting both the structure and function of the tested microbial communities.

  5. Aquatic toxicity testing of silver nanoparticles – a matter of timing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Sara Nørgaard; Owsianiak, Mikolaj; Engelbrekt, Christian

    In recent years, the ecotoxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) has been studied intensively due to their high toxicity and extensive use in consumer products. However, the field of aquatic nanotoxicology is generally challenged by poor reproducibility, lack of dose-response relationships......, and difficulties in controlling and/or describing the characteristics of the tested NPs. These issues may be related to the widespread approach of using freshly prepared stock solutions for ecotoxicity testing, as the introduction of NPs into aqueous media initiates time-dependent processes that possibly interfere......NPs with a nominal size of 30 nm, the resulting dose-response relationships from tests without (A) and with (B) the pre-suspension step are illustrated in figure 1. Without the pre-suspension step, poorly reproducible results were obtained and it was not possible to produce comparable EC50 values from the three test...

  6. Toxicity of sediments from lead-zinc mining areas to juvenile freshwater mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea) compared to standard test organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, John M; Ingersoll, Christopher G; Brumbaugh, William G; Kemble, Nile E; May, Thomas W; Wang, Ning; MacDonald, Donald D; Roberts, Andrew D

    2015-03-01

    Sediment toxicity tests compared chronic effects on survival, growth, and biomass of juvenile freshwater mussels (28-d exposures with Lampsilis siliquoidea) to the responses of standard test organisms-amphipods (28-d exposures with Hyalella azteca) and midges (10-d exposures with Chironomus dilutus)-in sediments from 2 lead-zinc mining areas: the Tri-State Mining District and Southeast Missouri Mining District. Mussel tests were conducted in sediments sieved to toxic responses (reduced 10% or more relative to reference sites) in Tri-State sediments was greatest for amphipod survival (25% of samples), midge biomass (20%), and mussel survival (14%). In southeast Missouri sediments, the frequency of highly toxic samples was greatest for mussel biomass (25%) and amphipod biomass (13%). Thresholds for metal toxicity to mussels, expressed as hazard quotients based on probable effect concentrations, were lower for southeast Missouri sediments than for Tri-State sediments. Southeast Missouri sites with toxic sediments had 2 or fewer live mussel taxa in a concurrent mussel population survey, compared with 7 to 26 taxa at reference sites. These results demonstrate that sediment toxicity tests with juvenile mussels can be conducted reliably by modifying existing standard methods; that the sensitivity of mussels to metals can be similar to or greater than standard test organisms; and that responses of mussels in laboratory toxicity tests are consistent with effects on wild mussel populations.

  7. Use of power analysis to develop detectable significance criteria for sea urchin toxicity tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, R.S.; Biedenbach, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    When sufficient data are available, the statistical power of a test can be determined using power analysis procedures. The term “detectable significance” has been coined to refer to this criterion based on power analysis and past performance of a test. This power analysis procedure has been performed with sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) fertilization and embryological development data from sediment porewater toxicity tests. Data from 3100 and 2295 tests for the fertilization and embryological development tests, respectively, were used to calculate the criteria and regression equations describing the power curves. Using Dunnett's test, a minimum significant difference (MSD) (β = 0.05) of 15.5% and 19% for the fertilization test, and 16.4% and 20.6% for the embryological development test, for α ≤ 0.05 and α ≤ 0.01, respectively, were determined. The use of this second criterion reduces type I (false positive) errors and helps to establish a critical level of difference based on the past performance of the test.

  8. Development and validation of OECD test guidelines on mollusc reproductive toxicity tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagadic, Laurent; Holbech, Henrik; hutchinson, tom

    Framework. The guideline project is led by a consortium of experts (Germany/United- Kingdom/France/Denmark) from academia, industry and government stakeholders. To date, expert knowledge has been gathered and formed the basis of draft standard operating procedures (SOPs) for the culture and test...... in 2014 for both species based upon the consolidated SOPs....

  9. Antimicrobial PVK:SWNT nanocomposite coated membrane for water purification: performance and toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Farid; Santos, Catherine M; Mangadlao, Joey; Advincula, Rigoberto; Rodrigues, Debora F

    2013-08-01

    This study demonstrated that coated nitrocellulose membranes with a nanocomposite containing 97% (wt%) of polyvinyl-N-carbazole (PVK) and 3% (wt%) of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) (97:3 wt% ratio PVK:SWNT) achieve similar or improved removal of bacteria when compared with 100% SWNTs coated membranes. Membranes coated with the nanocomposite exhibited significant antimicrobial activity toward Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (≈ 80-90%); and presented a virus removal efficiency of ≈ 2.5 logs. Bacterial cell membrane damage was considered a possible mechanism of cellular inactivation since higher efflux of intracellular material (Deoxyribonucleic acid, DNA) was quantified in the filtrate of PVK-SWNT and SWNT membranes than in the filtrate of control membranes. To evaluate possible application of these membrane filters for drinking water treatment, toxicity of PVK-SWNT was tested against fibroblast cells. The results demonstrated that PVK-SWNT was non toxic to fibroblast cells as opposed to pure SWNT (100%). These results suggest that it is possible to synthesize antimicrobial nitrocellulose membranes coated with SWNT based nanocomposites for drinking water treatment. Furthermore, membrane filters coated with the nanocomposite PVK-SWNT (97:3 wt% ratio PVK:SWNT) will produce more suitable coated membranes for drinking water than pure SWNTs coated membranes (100%), since the reduced load of SWNT in the nanocomposite will reduce the use of costly and toxic SWNT nanomaterial on the membranes.

  10. Genotoxicity test and subchronic toxicity study with Superba™ krill oil in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Robertson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The safety of krill oil was assessed in a subchronic toxicity study and in a genotoxicity test. In a 13-week study, rats were fed krill oil or control diets. There were no differences noted in body weight, food consumption or in the functional observation battery parameters in either gender. Differences in both haematology and clinical chemistry values were noted in the krill oil-treated groups. However these findings were of no toxicological significance. Significant decreases in absolute and covariant heart weight in some krill oil-treated animals were noted although no corresponding histological changes were observed. In addition, periportal microvesicular hepatocyte vacuolation was noted histologically in males fed 5% krill oil. This finding was not associated with other indications of hepatic dysfunction. Given that the effects of the 13-week toxicity study were non-toxic in nature, the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL for the conditions of this study was considered to be 5% krill oil. The genotoxicity experiments documented no mutagenicity of krill oil in bacteria.

  11. Green Tea Protects Testes against Atrazine-induced Toxicity in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Kheirandish

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atrazine (ATZ is a common herbicide in agriculture for control of grass and broad-leaved weeds. It persists in the environment and causes reproductive problems in both human and animals. The present study was aimed at protective effect of green tea against ATZ toxicity in the reproductive system of male rats. Methods: The present study was performed in Veterinary School, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman in 2016. ATZ and treatment groups received ATZ daily 200 mg/kg BW orally for 14 d. In addition, 0.2% methanolic green tea extract was administrated in the treatment group. Results: In histopathologic investigation, number of germinal layers reduced in the most seminiferous tubules in the ATZ group and spermatids were absence. Necrotic spermatocytes, spermatids, and spermatozoa were evident in the testicular tubules. In the morphometric measurements, tubular diameter, germinal epithelium height, and meiosis index decreased significantly. Conclusion: Green tea extract had reduced testicular toxicity of atrazine significantly. ATZ induces toxicity through oxidative damage and green tea extract can protect the testes due to antioxidant activity of its polyphenols especially flavonoids.

  12. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy as a novel approach to providing effect-based endpoints in duckweed toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Li-Xin; Ying, Guang-Guo; Chen, Xiao-Wen; Huang, Guo-Yong; Liu, You-Sheng; Jiang, Yu-Xia; Pan, Chang-Gui; Tian, Fei; Martin, Francis L

    2017-02-01

    Traditional duckweed toxicity tests only measure plant growth inhibition as an endpoint, with limited effects-based data. The present study aimed to investigate whether Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy could enhance the duckweed (Lemna minor L.) toxicity test. Four chemicals (Cu, Cd, atrazine, and acetochlor) and 4 metal-containing industrial wastewater samples were tested. After exposure of duckweed to the chemicals, standard toxicity endpoints (frond number and chlorophyll content) were determined; the fronds were also interrogated using FTIR spectroscopy under optimized test conditions. Biochemical alterations associated with each treatment were assessed and further analyzed by multivariate analysis. The results showed that comparable x% of effective concentration (ECx) values could be achieved based on FTIR spectroscopy in comparison with those based on traditional toxicity endpoints. Biochemical alterations associated with different doses of toxicant were mainly attributed to lipid, protein, nucleic acid, and carbohydrate structural changes, which helped to explain toxic mechanisms. With the help of multivariate analysis, separation of clusters related to different exposure doses could be achieved. The present study is the first to show successful application of FTIR spectroscopy in standard duckweed toxicity tests with biochemical alterations as new endpoints. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:346-353. © 2016 SETAC.

  13. Implementation and implications of macrophyte reconfiguration in hydraulic river modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschoren, Veerle; Schoelynck, Jonas; Buis, Kerst; Meire, Dieter; Bal, Kris; Meire, Patrick; Temmerman, Stijn

    2014-05-01

    In lowland rivers, abundant macrophyte growth can often be observed. The aquatic vegetation has an impact on the flow by creating friction which results in increased water levels and decreased flow velocities. At the same time submerged macrophytes are susceptible to hydrodynamic forces of the water. Their morphology is therefore often flexible and streamlined so that it enables reconfiguration (i.e. bending of macrophytes with water flow) and decreases potential damage at high flow velocities. Knowledge of these mutual interactions is crucial in order to model water flow in vegetated rivers. A correct estimation of flow velocity and water height is indispensable for the calculation of hydraulic, ecological and geomorphological parameters. The total resistance to water flow in a river can be described by a Manning coefficient. This value is influenced by river characteristics as well as by the presence of macrophytes. In this study a simple method is developed to quantify the resistance created by macrophytes after reconfiguration of their canopy. In order to achieve this we derive model formulations and plant parameters for three different macrophyte species and compare model simulation with measured flow velocity data for two case studies. Furthermore, the effect of macrophyte reconfiguration is investigated by modeling the same case studies with and without the implementation of macrophyte reconfiguration. It was found that the local resistance created by the vegetation was overestimated when reconfiguration was not considered. This resulted in an overestimation of stream velocity adjacent to the vegetation and an underestimation of the stream velocity within and behind the vegetation. Another effect was a higher water level gradient and consequently a higher Manning coefficient in the scenario without reconfiguration compared to the scenario with reconfiguration. Reconfiguration had also an influence on ecological and geomorphological parameters. It was found

  14. Antibacterial, antioxidant and acute toxicity tests on flavonoids extracted from some medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akroum Souâd

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids are well-known for their many therapeutic and pharmaceutical effects. In this study, we tested the antibacterial activity of 11 flavonoids extracted from some medicinal plants by the agar diffusion method. Then, we measured their antioxidant activity using the DPPH (2,2′-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical assay and we also tested their acute toxicity effect on mice. The results showed that apigenin-7-O-glucoside was more active against the Gram-positive bacteria and quercetin was more active against the Gram-negative ones. Also, quercetin and diosmin showed the best antioxidant activity. Quercetin, apigenin-7-O-glucoside, luteolin-7-O-glucoside and luteolin-3′-O-glucuronide gave the best acute toxicity values. It can be concluded that quercetin was the most interesting compound for all the tested activities. Also, we observed that the presence or the absence of substitutions in flavonoids influenced significantly the results obtained, whereas the substitution type had a low impact.

  15. Microfluidic devices for stem-cell cultivation, differentiation and toxicity testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Holger; Hansen-Hagge, Thomas; Kurtz, Andreas; Mrowka, Ralf; Wölfl, Stefan; Gärtner, Claudia

    2017-02-01

    The development of new drugs is time-consuming, extremely expensive and often promising drug candidates fail in late stages of the development process due to the lack of suitable tools to either predict toxicological effects or to test drug candidates in physiologically relevant environments prior to clinical tests. We therefore try to develop diagnostic multiorgan microfluidic chips based on patient specific induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) technology to explore liver dependent toxic effects of drugs on individual human tissues such as liver or kidney cells. Based initially on standardized microfluidic modules for cell culture, we have developed integrated microfluidic devices which contain different chambers for cell/tissue cultivation. The devices are manufactured using injection molding of thermoplastic polymers such as polystyrene or cyclo-olefin polymer. In the project, suitable surface modification methods of the used materials had to be explored. We have been able to successfully demonstrate the seeding, cultivation and further differentiation of modified iPS, as shown by the use of differentiation markers, thus providing a suitable platform for toxicity testing and potential tissue-tissue interactions.

  16. Low malathion concentrations influence metabolism in Chironomus sancticaroli (Diptera, Chironomidae in acute and chronic toxicity tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Rebechi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Low malathion concentrations influence metabolism in Chironomus sancticaroli (Diptera, Chironomidae in acute and chronic toxicity tests. Organophosphate compounds are used in agro-systems, and in programs to control pathogen vectors. Because they are continuously applied, organophosphates often reach water sources and may have an impact on aquatic life. The effects of acute and chronic exposure to the organophosphate insecticide malathion on the midge Chironomus sancticaroli are evaluated. To that end, three biochemical biomarkers, acetylcholinesterase (AChE, alpha (EST-α and beta (EST-β esterase were used. Acute bioassays with five concentrations of malathion, and chronic bioassays with two concentrations of malathion were carried out. In the acute exposure test, AChE, EST-α and EST-β activities declined by 66, 40 and 37%, respectively, at 0.251 µg L-1 and more than 80% at 1.37, 1.96 and 2.51 µg L-1. In chronic exposure tests, AChE and EST-α activities declined by 28 and 15% at 0.251 µg L-1. Results of the present study show that low concentrations of malathion can influence larval metabolism, indicating high toxicity for Chironomus sancticaroli and environmental risk associated with the use of organophosphates.

  17. Toxicity tests with crustaceans for detecting sublethal effects of potential endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wollenberger, Leah

    of effective concentrations (ECx). After having demonstrated that larval development of A. tonsa was a very sensitive endpoint for evaluating effects of chemicals that might interfere with the endocrine system of crustaceans, the larval development test has been applied to two groups of emerging environmental...... of in vitro assays and (sub)chronic copepod tests, as applied in this study, is a valuable tool when screening chemicals suspected to be specifically toxic, in particular, to interfere with the endocrine system. The results of the experimental work as well as the literature survey demonstrated clearly......New and updated test methods to detect and characterise endocrine disrupting chemicals are urgently needed for the purpose of environmental risk assessment. Although endocrine disruption in invertebrates has not been studied as extensive as in vertebrates, in particular in fish, numerous reports...

  18. Toxicity tests based on predator-prey and competitive interactions between freshwater macroinvertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, E.J.; Blockwell, S.J.; Pascoe, D. [Univ. of Wales Coll. of Cardiff (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    Simple multi-species toxicity tests based on the predation of Daphnia magna Straus by Hydra oligactis (Pallas) and competition between Gammarus pulex (L.) and Asellus aquaticus (L.) were used to determine the effects of three reference chemicals. Criteria examined included functional responses; time to first captures; handling times (predator/prey systems) and co-existence and growth. The tests which proved most practicable and sensitive (lowest observed effects 0.1, 21, and 80 {micro}g/l for lindane, copper and 3,4 dichloroaniline, respectively) were: (1) predator-prey tests: determining changes in the size-structure of predated D. magna populations and (2) competition tests: measuring the feeding rate of G. pulex competing with A. aquaticus, using a bioassay based on the time-response analysis of the consumption of Artemia salina eggs. The concentration of a chemical which affected particular response criteria was fond to depend on the test system employed. Results of the tests indicated that effects were often not dose-related and that a given criterion could be variously affected by different test concentrations. The complex pattern of responses may be explained in terms of the differential sensitivity of the interacting species and perhaps subtle alteration in strategies. The sensitivity of the bioassay endpoints is compared to those of a range of single species tests, and their value for predicting the impact pollutants may have upon natural freshwater ecosystems is discussed.

  19. Effect of removal of free-floating macrophytes on zooplankton habitat in shallow wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Jong-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Submerged macrophytes improve the structural heterogeneity of microhabitats in aquatic ecosystems, often providing an important habitat for zooplankton. However, excessive development of free-floating macrophytes on the water surface can reduce the biomass of submerged macrophytes and result in a relatively simple habitat structure. We hypothesized that controlling the development of free-floating macrophytes would result in a more complex habitat structure by promoting the development of submerged macrophytes. After applying three experimental treatments (NR, no removal; IR, intermediate removal; CR, complete removal of free-floating macrophytes, we found that CR of free-floating macrophytes improved the growth and development of submerged macrophytes and supported a large zooplankton assemblage. However, the largest zooplankton assemblage (in terms of abundance and diversity was recorded after the IR treatment. Although submerged macrophytes were abundant in the CR treatment, the number, abundance, and density of zooplankton species were much lower than those in the IR treatment. Preferential selection of different macrophyte types by zooplankton presumably led to variation in plant utilization of niches, and the simultaneous presence of different macrophyte life forms created a complex microhabitat structure that induced high species diversity and zooplankton density.

  20. Refining methods for conducting long-term sediment and water toxicity tests with Chironomus dilutus: Formation of a midge chronic testing work group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standard methods have been established by USEPA, ASTM International, Environment Canada and Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development for conducting sediment toxicity tests with various species of midges including Chironomus dilutus. Short-term 10-day exposures are ty...

  1. Assessment of Grape, Plum and Orange Synthetic Food Flavourings Using in vivo Acute Toxicity Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ila Monize Sousa Sales

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluates the acute toxicity of synthetic grape, plum and orange flavourings in root meristem cells of Allium cepa at the doses of 3.5, 7.0 and 14.0 mL/kg and exposure times of 24 and 48 h, and in bone marrow erythrocytes of mice treated orally for seven days with 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 5.0 and 10.0 mL/kg of flavouring. The results of the plant test showed that grape, plum and orange flavourings, at both exposure times, inhibited cell division and promoted the formation of a significant number of micronuclei and mitotic spindle changes. These alterations were observed in at least one exposure time analysed, demonstrating a significant cytotoxic, genotoxic and mutagenic activity. In mouse bioassay, animals treated with 2.0, 5.0 and 10.0 mL/kg of flavouring died before the seventh day of treatment. The amounts of 0.5 and 1.0 mL/kg of the three additives were cytotoxic to erythrocytes, and treatment with the grape flavouring significantly induced the formation of micronucleated cells in the bone marrow of animals. Therefore, under the study conditions, the grape, plum and orange flavouring additives promoted significant toxicity to cells of the test systems used.

  2. Field and laboratory tests on acute toxicity of cadmium to freshwater crayfish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-09-01

    Environmental regulatory standards for cadmium (EPA 1980), like those for most pollutants, are based on acute, laboratory toxicity tests of single species. Such tests can be conducted rapidly and inexpensively in comparison to acute or chronic field studies, but their validity has often been questioned. Laboratory-based criteria are subject to two criticisms: (1) chemical and physical conditions differ greatly in degree and variability from laboratory to field, and (2) species are not isolated, but live in an ecosystem of interacting taxa and biofeedback. To investigate the validity of basing field toxicity standards on laboratory data, the authors subjected the freshwater crayfish Orconectes immunis for 96 h to various levels of cadmium in laboratory aquaria and experimental ponds. The study was designed to evaluate in part the first criticism of lab-based criteria. The studies were conducted concurrently with similar short-term experiments on the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, and coincided with studies of chronic cadmium stress on fathead minnows in experimental ponds.

  3. Laboratory Rodent Diets Contain Toxic Levels of Environmental Contaminants: Implications for Regulatory Tests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Mesnage

    Full Text Available The quality of diets in rodent feeding trials is crucial. We describe the contamination with environmental pollutants of 13 laboratory rodent diets from 5 continents. Measurements were performed using accredited methodologies. All diets were contaminated with pesticides (1-6 out of 262 measured, heavy metals (2-3 out of 4, mostly lead and cadmium, PCDD/Fs (1-13 out of 17 and PCBs (5-15 out of 18. Out of 22 GMOs tested for, Roundup-tolerant GMOs were the most frequently detected, constituting up to 48% of the diet. The main pesticide detected was Roundup, with residues of glyphosate and AMPA in 9 of the 13 diets, up to 370 ppb. The levels correlated with the amount of Roundup-tolerant GMOs. Toxic effects of these pollutants on liver, neurodevelopment, and reproduction are documented. The sum of the hazard quotients of the pollutants in the diets (an estimator of risk with a threshold of 1 varied from 15.8 to 40.5. Thus the chronic consumption of these diets can be considered at risk. Efforts toward safer diets will improve the reliability of toxicity tests in biomedical research and regulatory toxicology.

  4. Design, construction and testing of a system for detection of toxic gases based on piezoelectric crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva, J A; de Cisneros, J L; de Barreda, D G; Becerra, A J

    1994-01-01

    A system for static operation of toxic gas sensors based on piezoelectric crystals was constructed as a preliminary step in the development of this type of sensor. The sensing part of the setup consists of a twin oscillating circuit assembled from commercially available electronic parts mounted on a motherboard. The oscillating circuits can accommodate two piezoelectric crystals, of which one or both can be coated with different materials, or a single one, as required. The sensing assembly (crystals plus oscillating circuits) is placed in a customized test chamber that allows one to control and reproduce its internal environment. Once assembled and fine-tuned, the proposed setup was used to test a commercially available piezoelectric crystal for sensing formaldehyde in order to expand available information on this type of sensor.

  5. An abbreviated repeat dose and reproductive/developmental toxicity test for high production volume chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scala, R.A.; Bevan, C.; Beyer, B.K. (Exxon Biomedical Sciences, Inc., East Millstone, NJ (United States))

    1992-08-01

    A novel protocol is described for obtaining preliminary data on repeated dose systemic effects and reproductive/developmental toxicity. The test protocol was developed by a group of experts at the request of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use as part of a Screening Information Data Set on high production volume chemicals. Interest in this protocol is shared by several regulatory agencies, including the Organization for Economic Cooperation, the European Community, and the EPA. To validate the study protocol, ethylene glycol monomethyl ether (EGME) was used. After a dosing period of approximately 6 weeks, EGME showed both systemic and reproductive/developmental effects similar to those previously reported using standard protocols. Thus, this test protocol may be used as a screening tool for high production volume chemicals.

  6. Anodonta imbecillis copper sulfate reference toxicant/food test, Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    Reference toxicant testing using juvenile freshwater mussels was conducted as part of the CR-ERP biomonitoring study of Clinch River sediments to assess the sensitivity of test organisms and the overall performance of the test. Tests were conducted using moderately hard synthetic water spiked with known concentrations of copper as copper sulfate. Two different foods, phytoplankton and YCT-Selenastrum (YCT-S), were tested in side by side tests to compare food quality. Toxicity testing of copper sulfate reference toxicant was conducted from July 6-15, 1993. The organisms used for testing were juvenile fresh-water mussels (Anodonta imbecillis). Results from this test showed LC{sub 50} values of 0.97 and 0.84 mg Cu/L for phytoplankton and YCT-S, respectively. Previously obtained values for phytoplankton tests are 2.02 and 1.12 mg Cu/L. Too few tests have been conducted with copper as the toxicant to determine a normal range of values. Although significant reduction in growth, compared to the phytoplankton control, was seen in all treatments, including the YCT-S Control, the consequence of this observation has not been established. Ninety-day testing of juvenile mussels exhibited large variations in growth within treatment and replicate groups.

  7. Toxicity of two imidazolium ionic liquids, [bmim][BF4] and [omim][BF4], to standard aquatic test organisms: Role of acetone in the induced toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsarpali, Vasiliki; Dailianis, Stefanos

    2015-07-01

    The main goal of this study was to investigate the toxicity of the imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs), [bmim][BF4] (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate) and [omim][BF4] (1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate), in battery of standard aquatic toxicity test organisms. Specifically, exposure of the algae Scenedesmus rubescens, crustaceans Thamnocephalus platyurus and Artemia franciscana, rotifers Brachionus calyciflorus and Brachionus plicatilis and bivalve Mytilus galloprovincialis to different concentrations of [bmim][BF4], [omim][BF4] and/or a binary mixture of [bmim][BF4]-[omim][BF4] (1:1) with or without acetone (carrier solvent), revealed that solvent can differentially mediate ILs' toxic profile. Acetone's ability to differentially affect ILs' cation's alkyl chain length, as well as the hydrolysis of [BF4(-)] anions was evident. Given that the toxic potency of the tested ILs seemed to be equal or even higher (in some cases) than those of conventional organic solvents, the present study revealed that the characterization of imidazolium-based ILs as "green solvents" should not be generalized, at least in case of their natural occurrence in mixtures with organic solvents, such as acetone.

  8. [Twenty-eight days repeated dose toxicity test of N-(fluorodichloromethylthio)phthalimide in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Y; Tsuda, M; Naito, K; Saitoh, M; Isama, K; Ikarashi, Y; Kawasaki, Y; Momma, J; Kitajima, S; Kaniwa, M

    1995-01-01

    N-(Fluorodichloromethylthio)phthalimide (Fluor-folpet) has been widely used as an anti-mold and anti-bacterial agent. In this study, 28 days repeated-dose oral toxicity study of fluor-folpet was carried out in Slc:Wistar rats. An oral toxicity study for fluor-folpet, the twenty-eight days test, repeated-dose, oral administration, was performed as follows: Five week-old rats, male and female, 10 rats, each/group, were treated with intragastric administration of fluor-folpet with a dose of 0 (1% Sodium CMC, control), 20, 80 and 320 mg/kg, body weight. Recovery test, for 14 days after the last treatment, was examined for the control and the 320 mg/kg groups. The 320 mg/kg groups, both males and females, showed significantly reduced their body-weight gain compared with the control group. In the 320 mg/kg group, five out of 20 male rats and four out of 20 female rats died from dyspnea during the treatment period. In the female rats in the 320 mg/kg group, serum ChE level was decreased to 50% of control level and gamma-GT was increased in a dose-dependent manner, but these serum levels recovered after 14 days non-treatment period. No histopathological change, relating to the treatment, in liver was observed. Increased weight of the kidney and vacuolation in renal tubules were found in both sexes of 320 mg/kg group. Hyperkeratosis and hyperplasia of the stomach epithelium were observed at the dose more than 80 mg/kg in male, and more than 20 mg/kg in female. A supplemental study, repeated-dose, oral administration in rats carried out to examine the dyspnea revealed that severe acute toxic damages in epithelium of nasal cavity and meatus nasopharyngeus were induced by intragastric administration of fluor-folpet. Fluor-folpet is shown to be cytotoxic. In conclusion, the no-observed-effect level (NOEL) for fluor-folpet was not found under the experimental conditions employed in this repeated-dose toxicity study.

  9. Chemical warfare in freshwater. Allelpathic effects of macrophytes on phytoplankton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulderij, G.

    2006-01-01

    Aquatic macrophytes can excrete chemical substances into their enviroment and these compounds may inhibit the growth of phytoplankton. This process is defined as allelopathy: one organism has effects on another via the excretion of a (mixture of) chemical substance(s). With laboratory and field expe

  10. Experiments on growth interactions between two invasive macrophyte species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrat-Segretain, M-H.; Elger, A.F.

    2004-01-01

    The success of invasive species has been attributed to the ability to displace other species by direct competition. We studied growth and possible competition between the two macrophyte species Elodea nuttallii and E. canadensis, because the former has been observed to replace the latter in the

  11. Macrophytes in estuarine gradients: flow through flexible vegetation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, J.T.

    2012-01-01

    Aquatic plants –or macrophytes- are an important part of coastal, estuarine and freshwater ecosystems worldwide, both from an ecological and an engineering viewpoint. Their meadows provide a wide range of ecosystem services: forming a physical protection of the shoreline, enhancing water quality and

  12. African Journal of Science and Technology (AJST) MACROPHYTES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    opiyo

    MACROPHYTES ET GROUPEMENTS VÉGÉTAUX AQUATIQUES. ET AMPHIBIES DE LA ... plaine d'inondation indique que le marnage demeure important et la salinité des terres reste encore élevée. ..... The Journal of Ecology, vol. 54, n° 3 ...

  13. Macrophyte presence and growth form influence macroinvertebrate community structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walker, P.D.; Wijnhoven, S.; van der Velde, G.

    2013-01-01

    Multivariate analysis demonstrated that macroinvertebrate assemblages of macrophyte-dominated sub-habitats within a small eutrophic pond differed markedly from those of Bottom substrate and Open water habitats. Certain habitats (e.g. Nymphaea and Phragmites) appeared to be quite similar in their

  14. Herbivory on freshwater and marine macrophytes : A review and perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Elisabeth S.; Wood, Kevin A.; Pages, Jordi F.; Veen, G. F. (Ciska); Christianen, Marjolijn J. A.; Santamaria, Luis; Nolet, Bart A.; Hilt, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Until the 1990s, herbivory on aquatic vascular plants was considered to be of minor importance, and the predominant view was that freshwater and marine macrophytes did not take part in the food web: their primary fate was the detritivorous pathway. In the last 25 years, a substantial body of

  15. Herbivory on freshwater and marine macrophytes : A review and perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Elisabeth S.; Wood, Kevin A.; Pages, Jordi F.; Veen, G. F. (Ciska); Christianen, Marjolijn J. A.; Santamaria, Luis; Nolet, Bart A.; Hilt, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Until the 1990s, herbivory on aquatic vascular plants was considered to be of minor importance, and the predominant view was that freshwater and marine macrophytes did not take part in the food web: their primary fate was the detritivorous pathway. In the last 25 years, a substantial body of evidenc

  16. Species pool versus site limitations of macrophytes in urban waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermonden, K.; Leuven, R.S.E.W.; van der Velde, G.

    2010-01-01

    Biodiversity in urban areas is affected by a multitude of stressors. In addition to physico-chemical stress factors, the native regional species pool can be greatly reduced in highly urbanized landscapes due to area loss and fragmentation. In this study, we investigated how macrophyte composition...

  17. Chemical warfare in freshwater. Allelpathic effects of macrophytes on phytoplankton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulderij, G.

    2006-01-01

    Aquatic macrophytes can excrete chemical substances into their enviroment and these compounds may inhibit the growth of phytoplankton. This process is defined as allelopathy: one organism has effects on another via the excretion of a (mixture of) chemical substance(s). With laboratory and field

  18. A chronic toxicity test for the tropical marine snail Nassarius dorsatus to assess the toxicity of copper, aluminium, gallium, and molybdenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenfield, Melanie A; van Dam, Joost W; Harford, Andrew J; Parry, David; Streten, Claire; Gibb, Karen; van Dam, Rick A

    2016-07-01

    Chronic toxicity test methods for assessing the toxicity of contaminants to tropical marine organisms are generally lacking. A 96-h chronic growth rate toxicity test was developed for the larval stage of the tropical dogwhelk, Nassarius dorsatus. Growth rates of N. dorsatus larvae were assessed following exposures to copper (Cu), aluminium (Al), gallium (Ga), and molybdenum (Mo). Exposure to Cu at 28 °C validated the sensitivity of the test method, with 10% (EC10) and 50% (EC50) effect concentrations of 4.2 μg/L and 7.3 μg/L Cu, respectively. The EC10 and EC50 values for Al (toxicity of Cu and Al was also assessed at 24 °C and 31 °C, representing average year-round water temperatures for subtropical and tropical Australian coastal environments. At 24 °C, the growth rate of control larvae was reduced by 52% compared with the growth rate at 28 °C and there was an increase in sensitivity to Cu (EC50 = 4.7 μg/L) but a similar sensitivity to Al (EC50 = 180 μg/L). At 31 °C the control growth rate increased by 35% from that measured at 28 °C and there was reduced sensitivity to both Cu and Al (EC50s = 8.5 μg/L and 642 μg/L, respectively). There was minimal toxicity resulting from Ga (EC50 = 4560 μg/L) and Mo (no effect at ≤7000 μg/L Mo). Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1788-1795. © 2015 SETAC.

  19. Importance of nutrient competition and allelopathic effects in suppression of the green alga. Scenedesmus obliquus by the macrophytes Chara, Elodea and Myriophyllum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lürling, M.F.L.L.W.; Geest, van G.J.; Scheffer, M.

    2006-01-01

    Possible allelopathic effects of substances released from the macrophytes Chara globularis, Elodea canadensis, Myriophyllum spicatum on the common green alga Scenedesmus obliquus were tested in the laboratory with plastic plants and untreated medium as controls. A two-phase approach was used in whic

  20. Testing of the estrogenic activity and toxicity of Stephania venosa herb in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomuttapong, Sarawoot; Pewphong, Rangsima; Choeisiri, Sucha; Jaroenporn, Sukanya; Malaivijitnond, Suchinda

    2012-07-01

    Stephania venosa Spreng is a traditional herb which has been used for cancer treatment as well as an aphrodisiac. The scientific literature strongly supports its in vitro antiproliferative effects on cancer cell lines and has suggested developing this plant as a potential anticancer drug. However, the in vivo steroidogenic activity and toxicity of this plant have never been tested. We analyzed the levels of five key isoflavones in the plant extract by quantitative HPLC and then evaluated the in vivo estrogenic activity and toxicity in ovariectomized rats, in comparison with the phytoestrogen-rich plant, Pueraria mirifica. Twenty rats were first ovariectomized, and then seven days later divided into four groups and gavaged daily with 0, 10 and 100 mg/kg body weight/day of S. venosa, or 100 mg/kg body weight/day of P. mirifica for 28 days. A trace amount of puerarin, daidzin and daidzein with a subtle amount of genistein and genistin were isolated from the S. venosa tuber extract. S. venosa tuber powder, at both doses, did not exhibit any detectable estrogenic activity in ovariectomized rats, as assessed by the vaginal cytology and uterotropic assays, whilst P. mirifica induced a remarkable vaginal and uterine proliferation. S. venosa induced a toxicological effect on the hematological values and histopathological appearance of metabolic organs. Taken together, these results suggest that S. venosa has no discernable estrogenic activity but that it is toxic, at least to ovariectomized rats. Thus, the use of this plant for anticancer treatment needs to be reassessed or used with caution.

  1. Toxicity testing of NCSRP priority substances for the development of soil quality criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cureton, P.M. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Evaluation and Interpretation Branch; Balch, G.; Lintott, D.; Poirrier, K.; Goudey, S. [HydroQual Labs. Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    The effects of 14 National Contaminated Sites Remediation Program (NCSRP) priority substances was measured on emergence and root elongation in lettuce (Lactuca saliva) and radish (Raphanus saliva) and on survival of the earthworm Eisenia foetida. The worm and seedling emergence tests were conducted in an artificial soil mixture composed of 10% peat moss, 20% kaolinite clay, and 70% silica sand (70 mesh) spiked with the contaminant. The root elongation tests were conducted on filter paper moistened with the contaminant solution. The following endpoints were derived on nominal and measured concentrations: NOEC, LOEC, the LC{sub 50} and LC{sub 25} for earthworm mortality and the EC{sub 50} and EC{sub 25} for emergence and root elongation. The contaminants tested included: arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, zinc, vanadium, benzo(a)pyrene, cyanide, naphthalene, ethylene glycol, pentachlorophenol, and phenol. Each test was repeated three times using different batches of freshly prepared soil, seed lots and worm cultures. The authors will present the findings and discuss the application of toxicity test results in developing generic soil quality criteria.

  2. Alternative acute inhalation toxicity testing by determination of the concentration-time-mortality relationship : experimental comparison with standard LC50 testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwart, A.; Arts, J.H.E.; Berge, W.F. ten; Appelman, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    A new design for acute inhalation toxicity testing was evaluated and compared with results obtained according to OECD guideline 403. The new design consists of a range-finding test, which is compatible with a conventional limit test, and can be followed by determination of a

  3. Studies with the USF/NASA toxicity screening test method - Effect of air flow and effect of fabric dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilado, C. J.; Lopez, M. T.

    1976-01-01

    One sample each of commercial polyurethane and polychloroprene flexible foams were evaluated using the USF/NASA toxicity screening test method. Air flow rates of 0, 0.16, 16, and 48 ml/sec were used to determine the effect of air flow on relative toxicity. Time to first sign of incapacitation and time to death were substantially reduced with both polyurethane and polychloroprene flexible foams by the introduction of 16 to 48 ml/sec air flow. The relative toxicity rankings of these materials were not altered by changes in air flow. Under these test conditions, the polyurethane foam consistently appeared more toxic than the polychloroprene foam. Samples of six different colors from the same fabric were evaluated separately, using the USF/NASA toxicity screening test method, to determine the effect of fabric dye, if any. The material was an upholstery fabric, consisting of 46 percent cotton, 33 percent wool, and 21 percent nylon. There appeared to be no significant effect of fabric dye on relative toxicity, for this material under these test conditions.

  4. A field assessment of long-term laboratory sediment toxicity tests with the amphipod Hyalella azteca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Wang, Ning; Hayward, Jeannie M. R.; Jones, John R.; Jones, Susan B.; Ireland, D. Scott

    2005-01-01

    Response of the amphipod Hyalella azteca exposed to contaminated sediments for 10 to 42 d in laboratory toxicity tests was compared to responses observed in controlled three-month invertebrate colonization exposures conducted in a pond. Sediments evaluated included a sediment spiked with dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDD) or dilutions of a field sediment collected from the Grand Calumet River (GCR) in Indiana (USA) (contaminated with organic compounds and metals). Consistent effects were observed at the highest exposure concentrations (400 ??g DDD/goc [DDD concentrations normalized to grams of organic carbon (goc) in sedimentl or 4% GCR sediment) on survival, length, and reproduction of amphipods in the laboratory and on abundance of invertebrates colonizing sediments in the field. Effect concentrations for DDD observed for 10-d length and 42-d reproduction of amphipods (e.g., chronic value [ChV] of 66 ??g DDD/goc and 25% inhibition concentration [IC25] of 68 ??g DDD/goc for reproduction) were similar to the lowest effect concentrations for DDD measured on invertebrates colonizing sediment the field. Effect concentrations for GCR sediment on 28-d survival and length and 42-d reproduction and length of amphipods (i.e., ChVs of 0.20-0.66% GCR sediment) provided more conservative effect concentrations compared to 10-d survival or length of amphipods in the laboratory or the response of invertebrates colonizing sediment in the field (e.g., ChVs of 2.2% GCR sediment). Results of this study indicate that use of chronic laboratory toxicity tests with H. azteca and benthic colonization studies should be used to provide conservative estimates of impacts on benthic communities exposed to contaminated sediments. Bioaccumulation of DDD by oligochaetes colonizing the DDD-spiked sediment was similar to results of laboratory sediment tests previously conducted with the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegates, confirming that laboratory exposures can be used to estimate

  5. Furan toxicity on testes and protective role of lycopene in diabetic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Özlem; Baş, Hatice; Pandır, Dilek

    2016-01-01

    Objective Furan (C4H4O) is a heat-induced food contaminant that is utilized as an industrial chemical agent. Lycopene is a natural substance that is produced by plants and tomatoes. We aimed to evaluate the toxicity of furan on testes and the protective effect of lycopene in diabetic rats. Material and Methods Male Wistar albino rats were divided into five groups: Group 1 (control group) received 1 mL/kg corn oil. Group 2 (diabetic control group) received 55 mg/kg STZ and 1 mL/kg corn oil. Group 3 (diabetic lycopene group) received 55 mg/kg STZ and 4 mg/kg lycopene. Group 4 (diabetic furan group) received 55 mg/kg STZ and 40 mg/kg furan. Group 5 (diabetic furan + lycopene group) received 55 mg/kg STZ, 40 mg/kg furan, and 4 mg/kg lycopene. After 28 days, the testes were extirpated in all groups. In the testicular tissue samples, the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activities of catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and reducted glutathione (GST) were studied. Serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and testosterone levels were measured. Histopathologic examination was performed by light microscope. Results The MDA level and the activities of CAT, GPx, SOD, and GST were found to be higher in the furan group than in the control and diabetic control groups (p<0.05). The MDA level and the activities of CAT, GPx, SOD, and GST were significantly lower in the furan + lycopene group than in the furan group (p<0.05). Conclusion The low blood testosterone level in the rats who received furan suggested the presence of endocrinological defects and cellular degenerative changes. Lycopene may be effective to reverse furan toxicity in diabetic rat testes. PMID:27990087

  6. An Exploratory Analysis of Stream Teratogenicity and Human Health Using Zebrafish Whole-Sediment Toxicity Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Dellinger

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates a novel application of effect-based toxicity testing for streams that may provide indications of co-perturbation to ecological and human health. For this study, a sediment contact assay using zebrafish (Danio rerio embryos was adapted to serve as an indicator of teratogenic stress within river sediments. Sediment samples were collected from Lake Michigan tributary watersheds. Sediment contact assay responses were then compared to prevalence of congenital heart disease (CHD and vital statistic birth indicators aggregated from civil divisions associated with the watersheds. Significant risk relationships were detected between variation in early life-stage (ELS endpoints of zebrafish embryos 72 h post-fertilization and the birth prevalence of human congenital heart disease, low birthweight and infant mortality. Examination of principal components of ELS endpoints suggests that variance related to embryo heart and circulatory malformations is most closely associated with human CHD prevalence. Though toxicity assays are sometimes used prospectively, this form of investigation can only be conducted retrospectively. These results support the hypothesis that bioassays normally used for ecological screening can be useful as indicators of environmental stress to humans and expand our understanding of environmental–human health linkages.

  7. The SOS-LUX-TOXICITY-Test on the International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbow, Elke; Stojicic, Nevena; Walrafen, David; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Rettberg, Petra; Schulze-Varnholt, Dirk; Franz, Markus; Reitz, Günther

    2006-01-01

    For the safety of astronauts and to ensure the stability and integrity of the genome of microorganisms and plants used in bioregenerative life support systems, it is important to improve our knowledge of the combined action of (space) radiation and microgravity. The SOS-LUX-TOXICITY test, as part of the TRIPLE-LUX project (accepted for flight at Biolab in Columbus on the International Space Station, (ISS)), will provide an estimation of the health risk resulting from exposure of astronauts to the radiation environment of space in microgravity. The project will: (i) increase our knowledge of biological/health threatening action of space radiation and enzymatic DNA repair; (ii) uncover cellular mechanisms of synergistic interaction of microgravity and space radiation; (iii) provide specified biosensors for spacecraft milieu examination; and (iv) provide experimental data on stability and integrity of bacterial DNA in spacecrafts. In the bacterial biosensor "SOS-LUX-Test" developed at DLR (patent), bacteria are transformed with the pBR322-derived plasmid pPLS-1 or the similar, advanced plasmid SWITCH, both carrying the promoterless lux operon of Photobacterium leiognathi as the reporter element controlled by a DNA damage-dependent SOS promoter as sensor element. A short description of the space experiment is given, and the current status of adaptation of the SOS-LUX-Test to the ISS, i.e. first results of sterilization, biocompatibility and functional tests performed with the already available hardware and bread board model of the automated space hardware under development, is described here.

  8. Thermal Stress and Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elevating ambient temperature above thermoneutrality exacerbates toxicity of most air pollutants, insecticides, and other toxic chemicals. On the other hand, safety and toxicity testing of toxicants and drugs is usually performed in mice and rats maintained at subthermoneutral te...

  9. Toxicity testing of restorative dental materials using brine shrimp larvae (Artemia salina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milhem, Manar M; Al-Hiyasat, Ahmad S; Darmani, Homa

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of extracts of different composites, glass ionomer cement (GIC)s and compomers on the viability of brine shrimp larvae. Ethanolic extracts of four dental composites (Z-100; Solitaire 2; Filtek P60 and Synergy), a conventional GIC (Ketac-Fil), a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer), two compomers (F2000; Dyract AP), and a flowable compomer (Dyract Flow) were prepared from each material. Following evaporation of the ethanol, the extracts were resuspended in distilled water, which was then used to test the effects on the viability of brine shrimp larvae. For the composites, the extract of Synergy was the least toxic (88% viability) followed by the extracts of Solitaire 2, Z100 and P60 (75%, 67.5% and 50% viability, respectively). One-way ANOVA revealed highly significant differences between the resin composite materials (pbrine shrimp larvae followed by GICs and then composites.

  10. Static renewal tests using Anodonta imbecillis (freshwater mussels). Anodonta imbecillis copper sulfate reference toxicant/food test, Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    Reference toxicant testing using juvenile freshwater mussels was conducted as part of the CR-ERP biomonitoring study of Clinch River sediments to assess the sensitivity of test organisms and the overall performance of the test. Tests were conducted using moderately hard synthetic water spiked with known concentrations of copper as copper sulfate. Two different foods, phytoplankton and YCT-Selenastrum (YCT-S), were tested in side by side tests to compare food quality. Toxicity testing of copper sulfate reference toxicant was conducted from July 6--15, 1993. The organisms used for testing were juvenile fresh-water mussels (Anodonta imbecillis). Although significant reduction in growth, compared to the phytoplankton control, was seen in all treatments, including the YCT-S Control, the consequence of this observation has not been established. Ninety-day testing of juvenile mussels exhibited large variations in growth within treatment and replicate groups. Attachments to this report include: Toxicity test bench sheets and statistical analyses; and Copper analysis request and results.

  11. Bio-testing integral toxicity of corrosion inhibitors, biocides and oil hydrocarbons in oil-and gas-processing industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chugunov, V.A.; Kholodenko, V.P.; Irkhina, I.A.; Fomchenkov, V.M.; Novikov, I.A. [State Research Center for Applied Microbiology, Obolensk, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    In recent years bioassays have been widely used for assessing levels of contamination of the environment. This is due to the fact that test-organisms provide a general response to toxicants present in samples. Based on microorganisms as test objects, it is possible to develop cheap, sensitive and rapid assays to identify environmental xenobiotics and toxicants. The objective of the research was to develop different microbiological assays for assessing integral toxicity of water environments polluted with corrosion inhibitors, biocides and hydrocarbons in oil- and gas-processing industry. Bio-luminescent, electro-orientational, osmo-optic and microorganism reducing activity assays were used for express evaluation of integral toxicity. They are found to determine promptly integral toxicity of water environments containing various pollutants (oil, oil products, corrosion inhibitors, biocides). Results conclude that the assays may be used for analyzing integral toxicity of water polluted with hydrocarbons, as well as for monitoring of water changes as a result of biodegradation of pollutants by microorganisms and their associations. Using a kit of different assays, it is also possible to evaluate ecological safety of biocides, corrosion inhibitors, and their compositions. Bioassays used as a kit are more effective than each assay individually, allowing one to get complete characterization of a reaction of bacterial test organisms to different environments. (authors)

  12. The SOS-LUX-LAC-FLUORO-Toxicity-test on the International Space Station (ISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbow, E.; Rettberg, P.; Baumstark-Khan, C.; Horneck, G.

    In the 21 st century, an increasing number of astronauts will visit the International Space Station (ISS) for prolonged times. Therefore it is of utmost importance to provide necessary basic knowledge concerning risks to their health and their ability to work on the station and during extravehicular activities (EVA) in free space. It is the aim of one experiment of the German project TRIPLE-LUX (to be flown on the ISS) to provide an estimation of health risk resulting from exposure of the astronauts to the radiation in space inside the station as well as during extravehicular activities on one hand, and of exposure of astronauts to unavoidable or as yet unknown ISS-environmental genotoxic substances on the other. The project will (i) provide increased knowledge of the biological action of space radiation and enzymatic repair of DNA damage, (ii) uncover cellular mechanisms of synergistic interaction of microgravity and space radiation and (iii) examine the space craft milieu with highly specific biosensors. For these investigations, the bacterial biosensor SOS-LUX-LAC-FLUORO-Toxicity-test will be used, combining the SOS-LUX-Test invented at DLR Germany (Patent) with the commercially available LAC-FLUORO-Test. The SOS-LUX-Test comprises genetically modified bacteria transformed with the pBR322-derived plasmid pPLS-1. This plasmid carries the promoterless lux operon of Photobacterium leiognathi as a reporter element under control of the DNA-damage dependent SOS promoter of ColD as sensor element. This system reacts to radiation and other agents that induce DNA damages with a dose dependent measurable emission of bioluminescence of the transformed bacteria. The analogous LAC-FLUORO-Test has been developed for the detection of cellular responses to cytotoxins. It is based on the constitutive expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) mediated by the bacterial protein expression vector pGFPuv (Clontech, Palo Alto, USA). In response to cytotoxic agents, this system

  13. Rapid and cost-effective multiparameter toxicity tests for soil microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, G; Pablos, M V; García, P; Ramos, C; Sánchez, P; Fernández, C; Tarazona, J V

    2000-03-20

    Three biochemical parameters, DNA quantification in soil samples and two enzymatic activities, beta-galactosidase and dehydrogenase have been assessed as potential end-points for the use in cost-effective toxicity tests on soil microorganisms. The assessment included the development of a classical dose-response 24-h assay and the incorporation of measurements of the effects on microbial activities in soil column leaching studies and multispecies miniaturised terrestrial systems (MTS). Four different chemicals, copper, a new herbicide, thiabendazole and fenthion were studied. A rapid fluorescence DNA quantification technique did not produce adequate responses. The efforts to quantify DNA after extraction and clean-up procedures failed due to the presence of humic acids. From the protocol of the technique one could see that the technical procedure is time-consuming and expensive and, for this reason, not suitable for use as a parameter in rapid and cost-effective tests. However, the enzymatic activities showed their potential as toxicity end-points. Copper produced a concentration/response inhibition of beta-galactosidase and dehydrogenase with EC50 values of 78.39 and 24.77 mg Cu/kg soil, respectively. In the soil column study, these endpoints allowed the measurement of the microbial activities through the column. The effects of the new herbicide on beta-galactosidase and dehydrogenase activities were statistically significant for the highest application dose (40 g/ha). Thiabendazole affected the microbial activity when mixed within the soil, but no effects were observed when this fungicide was applied on the soil surface. Fenthion produced effects when applied either in the soil or on the soil surface. These results can be explained by the low mobility of thiabendazole. The results show the capabilities of these biochemical parameters to be included as endpoints in cost-effective bioassays.

  14. A roadmap for the development of alternative (non-animal) methods for systemic toxicity testing - t4 report*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basketter, David A; Clewell, Harvey; Kimber, Ian; Rossi, Annamaria; Blaauboer, Bas; Burrier, Robert; Daneshian, Mardas; Eskes, Chantra; Goldberg, Alan; Hasiwa, Nina; Hoffmann, Sebastian; Jaworska, Joanna; Knudsen, Thomas B; Landsiedel, Robert; Leist, Marcel; Locke, Paul; Maxwell, Gavin; McKim, James; McVey, Emily A; Ouédraogo, Gladys; Patlewicz, Grace; Pelkonen, Olavi; Roggen, Erwin; Rovida, Costanza; Ruhdel, Irmela; Schwarz, Michael; Schepky, Andreas; Schoeters, Greet; Skinner, Nigel; Trentz, Kerstin; Turner, Marian; Vanparys, Philippe; Yager, James; Zurlo, Joanne; Hartung, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Systemic toxicity testing forms the cornerstone for the safety evaluation of substances. Pressures to move from traditional animal models to novel technologies arise from various concerns, including: the need to evaluate large numbers of previously untested chemicals and new products (such as nanoparticles or cell therapies), the limited predictivity of traditional tests for human health effects, duration and costs of current approaches, and animal welfare considerations. The latter holds especially true in the context of the scheduled 2013 marketing ban on cosmetic ingredients tested for systemic toxicity. Based on a major analysis of the status of alternative methods (Adler et al., 2011) and its independent review (Hartung et al., 2011), the present report proposes a roadmap for how to overcome the acknowledged scientific gaps for the full replacement of systemic toxicity testing using animals. Five whitepapers were commissioned addressing toxicokinetics, skin sensitization, repeated-dose toxicity, carcinogenicity, and reproductive toxicity testing. An expert workshop of 35 participants from Europe and the US discussed and refined these whitepapers, which were subsequently compiled to form the present report. By prioritizing the many options to move the field forward, the expert group hopes to advance regulatory science.

  15. Influence of developmental stage, salts and food presence on various end points using Caenorhabditis elegans for aquatic toxicity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donkin, S.G.; Williams, P.L. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    This study used a randomized block design to investigate the importance of several variables in using the free-living soil nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, for aquatic toxicity testing. Concentration-response data were obtained on nematodes of various developmental stages exposed to four metals (Cd, Pb, Cu, and Hg) and a water-soluble organic toxicant, sodium pentachlorophenate (PCP), under conditions of varied solvent medium (with or without salts and with or without a bacterial food source). The end points measured were 24- and 96-h mortality LC50 value, as well as development of larval stages to adulthood and evidence of reproduction. The results suggest that nematodes of various ages respond similarity to a given toxicant for all end points measured, although adults cultured from eggs appeared more sensitive than adults cultured from dauer larvae. The most important environmental variable in determining toxicity was the medium in which the tests were conducted. The presence of potassium and sodium salts in the medium significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the toxicity of many test samples. The presence of bacteria had little effect on 24-h tests with salts, but was important in 96-h survival and development. Based on sensitivity and ease of handling, adults cultured from eggs are recommended in both 24h and 96-h tests.

  16. Leach and EP (extraction procedure) toxicity tests on grouted waste from Tank 106-AN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R.J.; Martin, W.J.; Lokken, R.O.; LeGore, V.L.; Lindenmeier, C.W.; Martin, P.F.C.

    1989-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is conducting laboratory experiments to produce leach rate data for various waste species that will be contained in grout at Hanford. In the work reported here, grout made from Tank 106-AN liquid waste was used to produce empirical leach rate data for several radionuclides ({sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, {99}Tc, {129}I, {137}Cs, and {sup 241}Am), stable major components (NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}, F, Cl, and Na), and trace metals (Cr, Mo, and Ni). Two types of tests were used to produce leach rate data: an intermittent replacement leach test (ANS 16.1 leach test) and a static leach test. Measured effective diffusivities of key species are as follows: 4 to 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} cm{sup 2}/sec for {sup 99}Tc, 3 to 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} cm{sup 2}/sec for {sup 129}I, 4 to 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} cm{sup 2}/sec for nitrate, and 6 to 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} cm{sup 2}/sec for nitrite. The leach indices of all species studied are above (more favorable than) the waste form criteria. The leach indices for {sup 99}Tc and {sup 129}I are 7.4 {plus minus} 1.2 and 7.6 {plus minus} 0.4, respectively, and are being further investigated in continuing studies of double-shell slurry feed grouts. An Extraction Procedure (EP) toxicity test was also conducted and the grouted water is considered nontoxic per this test protocol. 19 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs.

  17. Effect-based interpretation of toxicity test data using probability and comparison with alternative methods of analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gully, J.R.; Baird, R.B.; Markle, P.J.; Bottomley, J.P.

    2000-01-01

    A methodology is described that incorporates the intra- and intertest variability and the biological effect of bioassay data in evaluating the toxicity of single and multiple tests for regulatory decision-making purposes. The single- and multiple-test regulatory decision probabilities were determined from t values (n {minus} 1, one-tailed) derived from the estimated biological effect and the associated standard error at the critical sample concentration. Single-test regulatory decision probabilities below the selected minimum regulatory decision probability identify individual tests as noncompliant. A multiple-test regulatory decision probability is determined by combining the regulatory decision probability of a series of single tests. A multiple-test regulatory decision probability is determined by combining the regulatory decision probability of a series of single tests. A multiple-test regulatory decision probability below the multiple-test regulatory decision minimum identifies groups of tests in which the magnitude and persistence of the toxicity is sufficient to be considered noncompliant or to require enforcement action. Regulatory decision probabilities derived from the t distribution were compared with results based on standard and bioequivalence hypothesis tests using single- and multiple-concentration toxicity test data from an actual national pollutant discharge incorporated the precision of the effect estimate into regulatory decisions at a fixed level of effect. Also, probability-based interpretation of toxicity tests provides incentive to laboratories to produce, and permit holders to use, high-quality, precise data, particularly when multiple tests are used in regulatory decisions. These results are contrasted with standard and bioequivalence hypothesis tests in which the intratest precision is a determining factor in setting the biological effect used for regulatory decisions.

  18. Replacing animal experiments in developmental toxicity testing of phenols by combining in vitro assays with physiologically based kinetic (PBK) modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strikwold, Marije

    2016-01-01

    Many efforts have been undertaken over the past decades to develop in vitro tests for a wide range of toxicological endpoints as an alternative to animal testing. The principle application of in vitro toxicity assays still lies in the hazard assessment and the prioritisation of chemicals for further

  19. Using a Sequence Homology-Based Predictive Strategy to Address Current Demands for Focused Toxicity Testing in Ecological Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    The lack of resources available for comprehensive toxicity testing, international interest in limiting the quantity of animals used in testing, and a mounting list of anthropogenic chemicals produced world-wide have led to the exploration of innovative means for identifying chemi...

  20. Distribution of aquatic macrophytes in contrasting river systems: a critique of compositional-based assessment of water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demars, Benoît O L; Edwards, Anthony C

    2009-01-01

    A brief summary of the historical developments relating to plant distribution and aquatic macrophyte-nutrient indices provided a means of assessing the general context and validity of previous assumptions. This has particular current relevance because of the prominent use of bioindicators for defining nutrient enrichment. A survey of 161 sites distributed across two broadly contrasting groups of rivers (circum-neutral versus alkaline) recorded 110 species of aquatic macrophytes and these have been statistically analyzed to (i) rank and separate the individual effects of local environmental conditions and spatial isolation on species distribution in the two contrasting groups of sites; (ii) calculate a macrophyte index based on plant cover and species indicator values (Mean Trophic Rank, MTR); and finally (iii) investigate the implications for biomonitoring. Chemical, physical and hydrological site attributes together with spatial isolation, each explained a significant and at least partially independent influence over plant species distribution. It was extremely difficult, however, to separate the single effects of different site attributes on plant distribution. While some plant species are more restricted to certain environmental conditions, many appeared indifferent to the range of those being tested. The role played by nutrients (nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P)) were either mostly indistinguishable from other site attributes (e.g., nitrate from conductivity) or subordinate (e.g., soluble reactive phosphorus, ammonium). It is therefore very unlikely that macrophyte species composition could provide a reliable bioindicator of the surrounding nutrient (N, P) status. The calculation of the plant index illustrated this unreliability by showing that strong correlations existed with many environmental variables, not just inorganic N and P.

  1. An assessment of Hyalella azteca burrowing activity under laboratory sediment toxicity testing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doig, Lorne E; Liber, Karsten

    2010-09-01

    Burrowing of the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca was evaluated under laboratory conditions similar to those recommended for standard sediment toxicity testing in Canada (EPS 1/RM/33; Environment Canada, 1997) and the United States (EPA/600/R-99/064; US EPA, 2000). Sediment type, time of day (light versus dark), size of animal, and the presence or absence of food were varied to assess their effects on burrowing activity. Hyalella azteca were found to burrow rapidly in fine, organic-rich sediments, but were slower to burrow in a sandy sediment. There was no increase in the number of animals occupying the sediment surface of a fine, organic-rich sediment after 4h of darkness compared to the previous 4h of light. Over a 9- to 10-d duration, a higher percentage of animals occupied the surface of the sandy sediment. The addition of food promoted burrowing in sandy sediment, as did using smaller animals. Overall, longer-duration tests involving older animals and coarse sediments may require formal observation to confirm burrowing and ensure adequate sediment exposure. The addition of food during a test may promote the burrowing of larger animals in coarse sediments, but may not be necessary in field-collected sediments that are not excessively sandy.

  2. Status of the SOS-LUX-Toxicity-Test on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbow, E.; Rettberg, Petra; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Schulze-Varnholt, Dirk; Franz, Markus; Reitz, Gunther

    2005-08-01

    For the safety of astronauts and to ensure stability and integrity of the genome of microorganisms and plants used in bioregenerative life support systems it is important to improve our knowledge on the combined action of (space) radiation and microgravity. The SOS-LUX- Toxicity Test as part of the TRIPLE-LUX project (accepted for flight in Biolab in Columbus on ISS) will provide an estimation of the health risk resulting from exposure of astronauts to the radiation environment of space in microgravity. The project will (i) increase knowledge of biological/health threatening action of space radiation and enzymatic DNA repair, (ii) uncover cellular mechanisms of synergistic interaction of microgravity and space radiation, (iii) provide specified biosensors for spacecraft milieu examination and (iv) provide experimental data on stability and integrity of bacterial DNA in spacecrafts. In the bacterial biosensor "SOS-LUX-Test" developed at DLR (patent), bacteria are transformed with the pBR322- derived plasmid pPLS-1 or the similar advanced plasmid Switch, both carrying the promoterless lux operon of Photobacterium leiognathi as reporter element controlled by a DNA-damage dependent SOS promoter as sensor element. A short description of the space experiment and first results of tests with the bread board model of the automated space hardware under development are given.

  3. Tolerance and hyperaccumulation of a mixture of heavy metals (Cu, Pb, Hg, and Zn) by four aquatic macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Hernández, Jorge Alberto; Amaya-Chávez, Araceli; Balderas-Hernández, Patricia; Roa-Morales, Gabriela; González-Rivas, Nelly; Balderas-Plata, Miguel Ángel

    2017-03-04

    In the present investigation, four macrophytes, namely Typha latifolia (L.), Lemna minor (L.), Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms-Laubach, and Myriophyllum aquaticum (Vell.) Verdc, were evaluated for their heavy metal (Cu, Pb, Hg, and Zn) hyperaccumulation potential under laboratory conditions. Tolerance analyses were performed for 7 days of exposure at five different treatments of the metals mixture (Cu(+2), Hg(+2), Pb(+2), and Zn(+2)). The production of chlorophyll and carotenoids was determined at the end of each treatment. L. minor revealed to be sensitive, because it did not survive in all the tested concentrations after 72 hours of exposure. E. crassipes and M. aquaticum displayed the highest tolerance to the metals mixture. For the most tolerant species of aquatic macrophytes, The removal kinetics of E. crassipes and M. aquaticum was carried out, using the following mixture of metals: Cu (0.5 mg/L) and Hg, Pb, and Zn 0.25 mg/L. The obtained results revealed that E. crassipes can remove 99.80% of Cu, 97.88% of Pb, 99.53% of Hg, and 94.37% of Zn. M. aquaticum withdraws 95.2% of Cu, 94.28% of Pb, 99.19% of Hg, and 91.91% of Zn. The obtained results suggest that these two species of macrophytes could be used for the phytoremediation of this mixture of heavy metals from the polluted water bodies.

  4. Amphipod and Sea Urchin tests to assess the toxicity of Mediterranean sediments: the case of Portmán Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cesar

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The sediment formed by the tailings of an abandoned mine, which discharged into Portmán Bay, Murcia, SE-Spain, was tested to establish a possible gradient of heavy metals. The results were compared with tolerance limits of what was calculated from control sites. Whole sediment toxicity tests were performed on two amphipod species, Gammarus aequicauda and Microdeutopus gryllotalpa, while sediment-water interface and porewater toxicity tests were performed on three sea urchins species, Arbacia lixula, Paracentrotus lividus and Sphaerechinus granularis. The sensitivity of these marine organisms was evaluated by exposure tests using the reference substances: ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, cadmium chloride (CdCl2, potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7, sodium dodecyl sulfate (C12H25NaO4S and zinc sulfate (ZnSO4. The concentration of heavy metals decreased along the pollution gradient. Amphipod 10 day acute toxicity tests clearly demonstrated the gradient of toxicity. The sediment-water interface tests conducted with sea urchins also pointed to a pollution gradient and were more sensitive than the tests involving amphipods.

  5. Automated Lab-on-a-Chip Technology for Fish Embryo Toxicity Tests Performed under Continuous Microperfusion (μFET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feng; Wigh, Adriana; Friedrich, Timo; Devaux, Alain; Bony, Sylvie; Nugegoda, Dayanthi; Kaslin, Jan; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2015-12-15

    The fish embryo toxicity (FET) biotest has gained popularity as one of the alternative approaches to acute fish toxicity tests in chemical hazard and risk assessment. Despite the importance and common acceptance of FET, it is still performed in multiwell plates and requires laborious and time-consuming manual manipulation of specimens and solutions. This work describes the design and validation of a microfluidic Lab-on-a-Chip technology for automation of the zebrafish embryo toxicity test common in aquatic ecotoxicology. The innovative device supports rapid loading and immobilization of large numbers of zebrafish embryos suspended in a continuous microfluidic perfusion as a means of toxicant delivery. Furthermore, we also present development of a customized mechatronic automation interface that includes a high-resolution USB microscope, LED cold light illumination, and miniaturized 3D printed pumping manifolds that were integrated to enable time-resolved in situ analysis of developing fish embryos. To investigate the applicability of the microfluidic FET (μFET) in toxicity testing, copper sulfate, phenol, ethanol, caffeine, nicotine, and dimethyl sulfoxide were tested as model chemical stressors. Results obtained on a chip-based system were compared with static protocols performed in microtiter plates. This work provides evidence that FET analysis performed under microperfusion opens a brand new alternative for inexpensive automation in aquatic ecotoxicology.

  6. Variability of sediment-contact tests in freshwater sediments with low-level anthropogenic contamination - Determination of toxicity thresholds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoess, S., E-mail: hoess@ecossa.d [Ecossa, Giselastr. 6, 82319 Starnberg (Germany); Institute of Biodiversity - Network (IBN), Dreikronengasse 2, 93047 Regensburg (Germany); Ahlf, W., E-mail: ahlf@tu-harburg.d [Institute of Environmental Technology and Energy Economics, Technical University Hamburg-Harburg, Eissendorfer Str. 40, 21071 Hamburg (Germany); Fahnenstich, C. [Institute of Environmental Technology and Energy Economics, Technical University Hamburg-Harburg, Eissendorfer Str. 40, 21071 Hamburg (Germany); Gilberg, D., E-mail: d-gilberg@ect.d [ECT Oekotoxikologie, Boettgerstr. 2-14, 65439 Floersheim (Germany); Hollert, H., E-mail: henner.hollert@bio5.rwth-aachen.d [Department of Ecosystem Analysis, Institute for Environmental Research (Biology 5), RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Melbye, K. [Dr. Fintelmann and Dr. Meyer, Mendelssohnstr. 15D, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Meller, M., E-mail: m-meller@ecotox-consult.d [ECT Oekotoxikologie, Boettgerstr. 2-14, 65439 Floersheim (Germany); Hammers-Wirtz, M., E-mail: hammers-wirtz@gaiac.rwth-aachen.d [Research Institute for Ecosystem Analysis and Assessment (gaiac), RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 1, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Heininger, P., E-mail: heininger@bafg.d [Federal Institute of Hydrology (BfG), Am Mainzer Tor 1, 56070 Koblenz (Germany); Neumann-Hensel, H., E-mail: hensel@fintelmann-meyer.d [Dr. Fintelmann and Dr. Meyer, Mendelssohnstr. 15D, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Ottermanns, R., E-mail: ottermanns@bio5.rwth-aachen.d [Chair for Environmental Biology and Chemodynamics, Institute for Environmental Research (Biology 5), RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Ratte, H.-T., E-mail: toni.ratte@bio5.rwth-aachen.d [Chair for Environmental Biology and Chemodynamics, Institute for Environmental Research (Biology 5), RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    Freshwater sediments with low levels of anthropogenic contamination and a broad range of geochemical properties were investigated using various sediment-contact tests in order to study the natural variability and to define toxicity thresholds for the various toxicity endpoints. Tests were performed with bacteria (Arthrobacter globiformis), yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans), oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus), higher plants (Myriophyllum aquaticum), and the eggs of zebrafish (Danio rerio). The variability in the response of some of the contact tests could be explained by particle size distribution and organic content. Only for two native sediments could a pollution effect not be excluded. Based on the minimal detectable difference (MDD) and the maximal tolerable inhibition (MTI), toxicity thresholds (% inhibition compared to the control) were derived for each toxicity parameter: >20% for plant growth and fish-egg survival, >25% for nematode growth and oligochaete reproduction, >50% for nematode reproduction and >60% for bacterial enzyme activity. - Sediment-contact tests require toxicity thresholds based on their variability in native sediments with low-level contamination.

  7. Colorimetric Evaluation of the Viability of the Microalga Dunaliella Salina as a Test Tool for Nanomaterial Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubev, Alexander A; Prilepskii, Artur Y; Dykman, Lev A; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G; Bogatyrev, Vladimir A

    2016-05-01

    A diagnostic test system was developed to determine the toxicity of nanomaterials to the saltwater microalga Dunaliella salina through evaluation of cell death and changes in the culture growth rate at various toxicant concentrations, providing LC50 and other toxicological metrics. The viability of cells was shown to decrease with decreasing chlorophyll absorption of red light by damaged cells. This correlation was confirmed by independent fluorescence microscopic measurements of live and dead cells in the population. Two standard colorless pollutants, hydrogen peroxide and formaldehyde, were used to validate the colorimetric method. The method's performance is exemplified with three Ag-containing preparations (Ag nitrate, Ag proteinate, and 20-nm Ag nanoparticles) and with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) mixed with colloidal 15-nm Au and 20-nm Ag nanoparticles. The toxicity of the Ag-containing preparations to D. salina decreased in the order Ag nitrate ≥ Ag proteinate ≫ colloidal Ag. The toxicity of colloidal Au-CTAB mixtures was found to depend mostly on the content of free CTAB. The toxicity of colloidal Ag increased substantially in the presence of CTAB. The results suggest that our D. salina-based colorimetric test system can be used for simple and rapid preliminary screening of the toxicity of different nanomaterials.

  8. Estimation of bisphenol A-Human toxicity by 3D cell culture arrays, high throughput alternatives to animal tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Woo; Oh, Woo-Yeon; Yi, Sang Hyun; Ku, Bosung; Lee, Moo-Yeal; Cho, Yoon Hee; Yang, Mihi

    2016-09-30

    Bisphenol A (BPA) has been widely used for manufacturing polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins and has been extensively tested in animals to predict human toxicity. In order to reduce the use of animals for toxicity assessment and provide further accurate information on BPA toxicity in humans, we encapsulated Hep3B human hepatoma cells in alginate and cultured them in three dimensions (3D) on a micropillar chip coupled to a panel of metabolic enzymes on a microwell chip. As a result, we were able to assess the toxicity of BPA under various metabolic enzyme conditions using a high-throughput and micro assay; sample volumes were nearly 2,000 times less than that required for a 96-well plate. We applied a total of 28 different enzymes to each chip, including 10 cytochrome P450s (CYP450s), 10 UDP-glycosyltransferases (UGTs), 3 sulfotransferases (SULTs), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2). Phase I enzyme mixtures, phase II enzyme mixtures, and a combination of phase I and phase II enzymes were also applied to the chip. BPA toxicity was higher in samples containing CYP2E1 than controls, which contained no enzymes (IC50, 184±16μM and 270±25.8μM, respectively, panimal testing for estimating BPA toxicity via human metabolic systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Temporal and habitat distribution of macrophytes in lowland eutrophic reservoir Gruža in Serbia

    OpenAIRE

    Topuzović, Marina; Pavlović, Dragana; Ostojić, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The research in this paper are based on the study of the distribution in time and space of macrophytes along the different parts of shoreline of Gruža Reservoir and emphasize the importance of establishing relations between distribution, diversity and mass of macrophytes and the ecological conditions of the environment. Development diversity of macrophytes needs to be constantly monitored and their regulation is necessary for Reservoir conservation, especially because...

  10. Temporal and spatial distribution of macrophytes in the Gruža Reservoir (Serbia)

    OpenAIRE

    Topuzović Marina; Pavlović Dragana; Ostojić A.

    2009-01-01

    A survey of aquatic macrophytes in the Gruža Reservoir (Serbia) was conducted during the period 2007-2008. Detailed data on the actual condition of macrophytes were established and compared between four parts of the reservoir. The distributions of most aquatic macrophytes of the Gruža Reservoir are heterogeneous, with different values of the MMT and MMO indices and low values of the distribution ratio. Quantitative analysis indicates that the greatest diversity and abundance of species can be...

  11. Response of littoral macrophytes to water level fluctuations in a storage reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    Krolová M.; Čížková H.; Hejzlar J.; Poláková S.

    2013-01-01

    Lakes and reservoirs that are used for water supply and/or flow regulations have usually poorly developed littoral macrophyte communities, which impairs ecological potential in terms of the EU Water Framework Directive. The aim of our study was to reveal controlling factors for the growth of littoral macrophytes in a storage reservoir with fluctuating water level (Lipno Reservoir, Czech Republic). Macrophytes occurred in this reservoir only in the eulittoral zone i.e., the shoreline region be...

  12. Response of littoral macrophytes to water level fluctuations in a storage reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    Krolová M.; Čížková H.; Hejzlar J.; Poláková S.

    2013-01-01

    Lakes and reservoirs that are used for water supply and/or flow regulations have usually poorly developed littoral macrophyte communities, which impairs ecological potential in terms of the EU Water Framework Directive. The aim of our study was to reveal controlling factors for the growth of littoral macrophytes in a storage reservoir with fluctuating water level (Lipno Reservoir, Czech Republic). Macrophytes occurred in this reservoir only in the eulittoral zone i.e., the shoreline region be...

  13. Temporal and habitat distribution of macrophytes in lowland eutrophic reservoir Gruža in Serbia

    OpenAIRE

    Topuzović, Marina; Pavlović, Dragana; Ostojić, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The research in this paper are based on the study of the distribution in time and space of macrophytes along the different parts of shoreline of Gruža Reservoir and emphasize the importance of establishing relations between distribution, diversity and mass of macrophytes and the ecological conditions of the environment. Development diversity of macrophytes needs to be constantly monitored and their regulation is necessary for Reservoir conservation, especially because ...

  14. Invasive crayfish threaten the development of submerged macrophytes in lake restoration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica E M van der Wal

    Full Text Available Submerged macrophytes enhance water transparency and aquatic biodiversity in shallow water ecosystems. Therefore, the return of submerged macrophytes is the target of many lake restoration projects. However, at present, north-western European aquatic ecosystems are increasingly invaded by omnivorous exotic crayfish. We hypothesize that invasive crayfish pose a novel constraint on the regeneration of submerged macrophytes in restored lakes and may jeopardize restoration efforts. We experimentally investigated whether the invasive crayfish (Procambarus clarkii Girard affects submerged macrophyte development in a Dutch peat lake where these crayfish are expanding rapidly. Seemingly favourable abiotic conditions for macrophyte growth existed in two 0.5 ha lake enclosures, which provided shelter and reduced turbidity, and in one lake enclosure iron was added to reduce internal nutrient loading, but macrophytes did not emerge. We transplanted three submerged macrophyte species in a full factorial exclosure experiment, where we separated the effect of crayfish from large vertebrates using different mesh sizes combined with a caging treatment stocked with crayfish only. The three transplanted macrophytes grew rapidly when protected from grazing in both lake enclosures, demonstrating that abiotic conditions for growth were suitable. Crayfish strongly reduced biomass and survival of all three macrophyte species while waterfowl and fish had no additive effects. Gut contents showed that crayfish were mostly carnivorous, but also consumed macrophytes. We show that P. clarkii strongly inhibit macrophyte development once favourable abiotic conditions for macrophyte growth are restored. Therefore, expansion of invasive crayfish poses a novel threat to the restoration of shallow water bodies in north-western Europe. Prevention of introduction and spread of crayfish is urgent, as management of invasive crayfish populations is very difficult.

  15. The Influence of Test Conditions on the Performance of Chironomus dilutus and Hyalella azteca in Sediment Toxicity Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    In most all sediment toxicity assessments, the performance of organisms in control sediments is a key parameter in defining sediment toxicity, whether through direct statistical comparison to control or by normalizing to control performance to compare results across sites or batc...

  16. The Influence of Test Conditions on the Performance of Chironomus dilutus and Hyalella azteca in Sediment Toxicity Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    In most all sediment toxicity assessments, the performance of organisms in control sediments is a key parameter in defining sediment toxicity, whether through direct statistical comparison to control or by normalizing to control performance to compare results across sites or batc...

  17. Multi-parameter in vitro toxicity testing of crizotinib, sunitinib, erlotinib, and nilotinib in human cardiomyocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doherty, Kimberly R., E-mail: kimberly.doherty@quintiles.com [Quintiles, 777 Oakmont Lane Suite 100, Westmont, IL 60559 (United States); Wappel, Robert L.; Talbert, Dominique R.; Trusk, Patricia B.; Moran, Diarmuid M. [Quintiles, 777 Oakmont Lane Suite 100, Westmont, IL 60559 (United States); Kramer, James W.; Brown, Arthur M. [ChanTest Corporation, 14656 Neo Parkway, Cleveland, OH 44128 (United States); Shell, Scott A.; Bacus, Sarah [Quintiles, 777 Oakmont Lane Suite 100, Westmont, IL 60559 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKi) have greatly improved the treatment and prognosis of multiple cancer types. However, unexpected cardiotoxicity has arisen in a subset of patients treated with these agents that was not wholly predicted by pre-clinical testing, which centers around animal toxicity studies and inhibition of the human Ether-à-go-go-Related Gene (hERG) channel. Therefore, we sought to determine whether a multi-parameter test panel assessing the effect of drug treatment on cellular, molecular, and electrophysiological endpoints could accurately predict cardiotoxicity. We examined how 4 FDA-approved TKi agents impacted cell viability, apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, metabolic status, impedance, and ion channel function in human cardiomyocytes. The 3 drugs clinically associated with severe cardiac adverse events (crizotinib, sunitinib, nilotinib) all proved to be cardiotoxic in our in vitro tests while the relatively cardiac-safe drug erlotinib showed only minor changes in cardiac cell health. Crizotinib, an ALK/MET inhibitor, led to increased ROS production, caspase activation, cholesterol accumulation, disruption in cardiac cell beat rate, and blockage of ion channels. The multi-targeted TKi sunitinib showed decreased cardiomyocyte viability, AMPK inhibition, increased lipid accumulation, disrupted beat pattern, and hERG block. Nilotinib, a second generation Bcr-Abl inhibitor, led to increased ROS generation, caspase activation, hERG block, and an arrhythmic beat pattern. Thus, each drug showed a unique toxicity profile that may reflect the multiple mechanisms leading to cardiotoxicity. This study demonstrates that a multi-parameter approach can provide a robust characterization of drug-induced cardiomyocyte damage that can be leveraged to improve drug safety during early phase development. - Highlights: • TKi with known adverse effects show unique cardiotoxicity profiles in this panel. • Crizotinib increases ROS, apoptosis, and

  18. Preparation and characterization of nickel-spiked freshwater sediments for toxicity tests: toward more environmentally realistic nickel partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumbaugh, William G.; Besser, John M.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; May, Thomas W.; Ivey, Chris D.; Schlekat, Christian E.; Garman, Emily R.

    2013-01-01

    Two spiking methods were compared and nickel (Ni) partitioning was evaluated during a series of toxicity tests with 8 different freshwater sediments having a range of physicochemical characteristics. A 2-step spiking approach with immediate pH adjustment by addition of NaOH at a 2:1 molar ratio to the spiked Ni was effective in producing consistent pH and other chemical characteristics across a range of Ni spiking levels. When Ni was spiked into sediment having a high acid-volatile sulfide and organic matter content, a total equilibration period of at least 10 wk was needed to stabilize Ni partitioning. However, highest spiking levels evidently exceeded sediment binding capacities; therefore, a 7-d equilibration in toxicity test chambers and 8 volume-additions/d of aerobic overlying water were used to avoid unrealistic Ni partitioning during toxicity testing. The 7-d pretest equilibration allowed excess spiked Ni and other ions from pH adjustment to diffuse from sediment porewater and promoted development of an environmentally relevant, 0.5- to 1-cm oxic/suboxic sediment layer in the test chambers. Among the 8 different spiked sediments, the logarithm of sediment/porewater distribution coefficient values (log Kd) for Ni during the toxicity tests ranged from 3.5 to 4.5. These Kd values closely match the range of values reported for various field Ni-contaminated sediments, indicating that testing conditions with our spiked sediments were environmentally realistic.

  19. Is There a Space-Based Technology Solution to Problems with Preclinical Drug Toxicity Testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Timothy; Allen, Patricia; Birdsall, Holly

    2016-07-01

    Even the finest state-of-the art preclinical drug testing, usually in primary hepatocytes, remains an imperfect science. Drugs continue to be withdrawn from the market due to unforeseen toxicity, side effects, and drug interactions. The space program may be able to provide a lifeline. Best known for rockets, space shuttles, astronauts and engineering, the space program has also delivered some serious medical science. Optimized suspension culture in NASA's specialized suspension culture devices, known as rotating wall vessels, uniquely maintains Phase I and Phase II drug metabolizing pathways in hepatocytes for weeks in cell culture. Previously prohibitively expensive, new materials and 3D printing techniques have the potential to make the NASA rotating wall vessel available inexpensively on an industrial scale. Here we address the tradeoffs inherent in the rotating wall vessel, limitations of alternative approaches for drug metabolism studies, and the market to be addressed. Better pre-clinical drug testing has the potential to significantly reduce the morbidity and mortality of one of the most common problems in modern medicine: adverse events related to pharmaceuticals.

  20. Body-on-a-chip systems for animal-free toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Gretchen J; Esch, Mandy B; Stokol, Tracy; Hickman, James J; Shuler, Michael L

    2016-10-01

    Body-on-a-chip systems replicate the size relationships of organs, blood distribution and blood flow, in accordance with human physiology. When operated with tissues derived from human cell sources, these systems are capable of simulating human metabolism, including the conversion of a prodrug to its effective metabolite, as well as its subsequent therapeutic actions and toxic side-effects. The system also permits the measurement of human tissue electrical and mechanical reactions, which provide a measure of functional response. Since these devices can be operated with human tissue samples or with in vitro tissues derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS), they can play a significant role in determining the success of new pharmaceuticals, without resorting to the use of animals. By providing a platform for testing in the context of human metabolism, as opposed to animal models, the systems have the potential to eliminate the use of animals in preclinical trials. This article will review progress made and work achieved as a direct result of the 2015 Lush Science Prize in support of animal-free testing. 2016 FRAME.

  1. Aquatic macrophyte diversity of the Pantanal wetland and upper basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pott, V J; Pott, A; Lima, L C P; Moreira, S N; Oliveira, A K M

    2011-04-01

    This is a short review of the state of the art concerning diversity of aquatic macrophytes and the main aquatic vegetation types in the Brazilian Pantanal wetland and upper watershed. There are ca. 280 species of aquatic macrophytes on the Pantanal floodplain, with scarce endemism. On the upper watershed, Cerrado wetlands (veredas) and limestone springs have a distinct flora from the Pantanal, with twice the species richness. As a representative case of aquatic habitats influenced by river flood, some primary data are presented for the Pantanal Matogrossense National Park and associated Acurizal Preserve, analysing the floristic similarity among aquatic vegetation types. We comment on problems of conservation and observe that Panicum elephantipes Nees is one of the few natives to compete with the invasive Urochloa arrecta (Hack. ex T. Durand & Schinz) Morrone & Zuloaga.

  2. Aquatic macrophyte diversity of the Pantanal wetland and upper basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VJ. Pott

    Full Text Available This is a short review of the state of the art concerning diversity of aquatic macrophytes and the main aquatic vegetation types in the Brazilian Pantanal wetland and upper watershed. There are ca. 280 species of aquatic macrophytes on the Pantanal floodplain, with scarce endemism. On the upper watershed, Cerrado wetlands (veredas and limestone springs have a distinct flora from the Pantanal, with twice the species richness. As a representative case of aquatic habitats influenced by river flood, some primary data are presented for the Pantanal Matogrossense National Park and associated Acurizal Preserve, analysing the floristic similarity among aquatic vegetation types. We comment on problems of conservation and observe that Panicum elephantipes Nees is one of the few natives to compete with the invasive Urochloa arrecta (Hack. ex T. Durand & Schinz Morrone & Zuloaga.

  3. The influence of aquatic macrophytes on distribution and feeding habit of two Asplanchna species (A. priodonta and A. herrickii in shallow wetlands, South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Yun Choi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We tested the hypothesis that the spatial distribution and diet composition of Asplanchna species might be affected by the presence of aquatic macrophytes in 33 wetlands in South Korea. We estimated the densities of Asplanchna and other rotifer and crustacean, together with environmental parameters, in both vegetated and open water zones, from May to June 2011. In the present study, two species of Asplanchna, A. priodonta and A. herrickii, were observed and significantly more abundant in open water zones lacking macrophytes. In particular, the density of A. priodonta was higher than that of A. herrickii, and the density of A. priodonta was strongly positively correlated with the area of open water. In addition, gut content analysis was used to determine their dietary preferences, with the finding that there was apparent differentiation in food source utilisation between the two Asplanchna species; A. priodonta consumed some protozoa, phytoplankton, and exclusively pelagic rotifer, while A. herrickii consumed primarily Euglena. In particular, Keratella and Polyarthra were most commonly consumed by A. priodonta in open water. Macrophytes represent a suitable habitat for epiphytic rotifer but not for pelagic rotifer; this characteristic drives pelagic rotifer such as Asplanchna towards open water and may be responsible for the significant negative correlation that we observed between macrophyte and Asplanchna densities.

  4. Laboratory culture of the freshwater benthic gastropod Bellamya aeruginosa (Reeve) and its utility as a test species for sediment toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Taowu; Gong, Shuangjiao; Zhou, Ke; Zhu, Cheng; Deng, Kaidong; Luo, Qinghua; Wang, Zijian

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to develop original laboratory culture and sediment toxicity testing protocols for the freshwater gastropod Bellamya aeruginosa (Reeve), a new potential species for sediment toxicity testing. B. aeruginosa was successfully cultured with an effective culture system under proposed laboratory conditions. Optimal ad libitum feeding levels for larvae, juveniles, and adults were 2.0, 6.0, and 16.0 mg fish food/(snail x day), respectively. Mean survival rates of juveniles were higher than 90%. The snails could be sexed at 9 weeks of age, and their generation time is approximately 4 months. Reproduction continued all year around; the mean fecundity was 0.55 newborn/(female x day). The utility of this species for bioassays was evaluated in both 10-day and 28-day case studies with artificial sediments. The 10-day LC50 of Cu for larvae was 480 gg/g dry weight (dw), and the lowest observed effects concentration of Cu for survival and growth of larvae was 195 microg/g dw. Survival and growth are reliable indicators of acute toxicity. Larvae accumulated more Cu than adults. B. aeruginosa exhibited a higher sensitivity to Cu exposure than standard test species (Hyalella azteca and Chironomus tentans). The 28-day test of sediment toxicity with adults showed that fecundity was a robust endpoint indicator of reproductive toxicity, and the biochemical endpoints of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione could be used as sensitive biomarkers for Cu-induced oxidative damage. B. aeruginosa can be therefore recommended as a candidate for the standardization of the freshwater sediment toxicity test protocol.

  5. Use of butterflies as nontarget insect test species and the acute toxicity and hazard of mosquito control insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Tham C; Pryor, Rachel L; Rand, Gary M; Frakes, Robert A

    2011-04-01

    Honeybees are the standard insect test species used for toxicity testing of pesticides on nontarget insects for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) under the Federal Insecticide Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA). Butterflies are another important insect order and a valued ecological resource in pollination. The current study conducted acute toxicity tests with naled, permethrin, and dichlorvos on fifth larval instar (caterpillars) and adults of different native Florida, USA, butterfly species to determine median lethal doses (24-h LD50), because limited acute toxicity data are available with this major insect group. Thorax- and wing-only applications of each insecticide were conducted. Based on LD50s, thorax and wing application exposures were acutely toxic to both caterpillars and adults. Permethrin was the most acutely toxic insecticide after thorax exposure to fifth instars and adult butterflies. However, no generalization on acute toxicity (sensitivity) of the insecticides could be concluded based on exposures to fifth instars versus adult butterflies or on thorax versus wing exposures of adult butterflies. A comparison of LD50s of the butterflies from this study (caterpillars and adults) with honeybee LD50s for the adult mosquito insecticides on a µg/organism or µg/g basis indicates that several butterfly species are more sensitive to these insecticides than are honeybees. A comparison of species sensitivity distributions for all three insecticides shows that permethrin had the lowest 10th percentile. Using a hazard quotient approach indicates that both permethrin and naled applications in the field may present potential acute hazards to butterflies, whereas no acute hazard of dichlorvos is apparent in butterflies. Butterflies should be considered as potential test organisms when nontarget insect testing of pesticides is suggested under FIFRA. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  6. Arsenic rich iron plaque on macrophyte roots - an ecotoxicological risk?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taggart, M.A. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Cruickshank Bld, St Machar Drive, Aberdeen, AB24 3UU (United Kingdom); Instituto de Investigacion en Recursos Cinegeticos, IREC (CSIC-UCLM-JCCM), Ronda de Toledo s/n, 13005 Ciudad Real (Spain)], E-mail: mark.taggart@uclm.es; Mateo, R. [Instituto de Investigacion en Recursos Cinegeticos, IREC (CSIC-UCLM-JCCM), Ronda de Toledo s/n, 13005 Ciudad Real (Spain); Charnock, J.M.; Bahrami, F. [Synchrotron Radiation Department, CCLRC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Green, A.J. [Department of Wetland Ecology, Estacion Biologica de Donana, CSIC, Pabellon del Peru, Avenida Maria Luisa s/n, 41013 Seville (Spain); Meharg, A.A. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Cruickshank Bld, St Machar Drive, Aberdeen, AB24 3UU (United Kingdom)

    2009-03-15

    Arsenic is known to accumulate with iron plaque on macrophyte roots. Three to four years after the Aznalcollar mine spill (Spain), residual arsenic contamination left in seasonal wetland habitats has been identified in this form by scanning electron microscopy. Total digestion has determined arsenic concentrations in thoroughly washed 'root + plaque' material in excess of 1000 mg kg{sup -1}, and further analysis using X-ray absorption spectroscopy suggests arsenic exists as both arsenate and arsenite. Certain herbivorous species feed on rhizomes and bulbs of macrophytes in a wide range of global environments, and the ecotoxicological impact of consuming arsenic rich iron plaque associated with such food items remains to be quantified. Here, greylag geese which feed on Scirpus maritimus rhizome and bulb material in areas affected by the Aznalcollar spill are shown to have elevated levels of arsenic in their feces, which may originate from arsenic rich iron plaque. - Accumulation of metals with iron plaque on macrophyte roots in wetlands poses an ecotoxicological risk to certain herbivores.

  7. Vulnerabilities of macrophytes distribution due to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Kaizar; Yadav, Sarita; Quaik, Shlrene; Pant, Gaurav; Maruthi, A. Y.; Ismail, Norli

    2017-08-01

    The rise in the earth's surface and water temperature is part of the effect of climatic change that has been observed for the last decade. The rates of climate change are unprecedented, and biological responses to these changes have also been prominent in all levels of species, communities and ecosystems. Aquatic-terrestrial ecotones are vulnerable to climate change, and degradation of the emergent aquatic macrophyte zone would have contributed severe ecological consequences for freshwater, wetland and terrestrial ecosystems. Most researches on climate change effects on biodiversity are contemplating on the terrestrial realm, and considerable changes in terrestrial biodiversity and species' distributions have been detected in response to climate change. This is unfortunate, given the importance of aquatic systems for providing ecosystem goods and services. Thus, if researchers were able to identify early-warning indicators of anthropogenic environmental changes on aquatic species, communities and ecosystems, it would certainly help to manage and conserve these systems in a sustainable way. One of such early-warning indicators concerns the expansion of emergent macrophytes in aquatic-terrestrial ecotones. Hence, this review highlights the impact of climatic changes towards aquatic macrophytes and their possible environmental implications.

  8. Microphyte and macrophyte-based lagooning in tropical regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noumsi, I M K; Nya, J; Akoa, A; Eteme, R A; Ndikefor, A; Fonkou, T; Brissaud, F

    2005-01-01

    A 720 m2 plant made of 8 ponds in series, set in Yaounde (Cameroon), was successively operated as a macrophyte-based system (type M) from November 1997 to October 98, a microphyte-based system (type m) from October 1999 to September 2000 and a combination of macrophyte and microphyte ponds (type M + m) from May to July 2001. Average applied loads varied over the years; from 420 kg. BOD5 ha(-1)d(-1) on the year 1997/98, the loads reached 510 kg BOD5 ha(-1)d(-1) in 1999/2000 and 500 in 2001. Though the system became more and more overloaded and sludge accumulated rapidly in the first ponds, it provided average removals of SS, BOD5 and COD that were always higher than 90% whatever the type of lagooning. Performances in the removal of SS, organic matter and the abatement of N-NH4+ and PO4(3-) did not significantly differ according to the type of lagooning and the applied load. Macrophyte lagooning did not show any definitive superiority as to nutrient removal when compared to microphyte lagooning. Microphyte lagooning was the most effective process in faecal indicators removal.

  9. Vulnerabilities of macrophytes distribution due to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Kaizar; Yadav, Sarita; Quaik, Shlrene; Pant, Gaurav; Maruthi, A. Y.; Ismail, Norli

    2016-06-01

    The rise in the earth's surface and water temperature is part of the effect of climatic change that has been observed for the last decade. The rates of climate change are unprecedented, and biological responses to these changes have also been prominent in all levels of species, communities and ecosystems. Aquatic-terrestrial ecotones are vulnerable to climate change, and degradation of the emergent aquatic macrophyte zone would have contributed severe ecological consequences for freshwater, wetland and terrestrial ecosystems. Most researches on climate change effects on biodiversity are contemplating on the terrestrial realm, and considerable changes in terrestrial biodiversity and species' distributions have been detected in response to climate change. This is unfortunate, given the importance of aquatic systems for providing ecosystem goods and services. Thus, if researchers were able to identify early-warning indicators of anthropogenic environmental changes on aquatic species, communities and ecosystems, it would certainly help to manage and conserve these systems in a sustainable way. One of such early-warning indicators concerns the expansion of emergent macrophytes in aquatic-terrestrial ecotones. Hence, this review highlights the impact of climatic changes towards aquatic macrophytes and their possible environmental implications.

  10. Autoclave sterilization produces acrylamide in rodent diets: implications for toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twaddle, Nathan C; Churchwell, Mona I; McDaniel, L Patrice; Doerge, Daniel R

    2004-06-30

    Acrylamide (AA) is a neurotoxic and carcinogenic contaminant that is formed during the cooking of starchy foods. Assessment of human risks from toxicants is routinely performed using laboratory rodents, and such testing requires careful control of unintended exposures, particularly through the diet. This study describes an analytical method based on liquid chromatography with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry that was used to measure endogenous AA in rodent diets and to survey a number of commercial products for contamination. Method sensitivity permitted accurate quantification of endogenous levels of AA in raw diets below 20 ppb. Autoclaving a standard rodent diet (NIH-31) increased the AA content 14-fold, from 17 to 240 ppb. A nutritionally equivalent diet that was sterilized by irradiation was found to contain approximately 10 ppb of AA (NIH-31IR). A toxicokinetic study of AA and its epoxide metabolite, glycidamide, was performed by switching mice from NIH-31IR to the autoclaved diet for a 30 min feeding period (average AA dose administered was 4.5 microg/kg of body weight). The concentrations of AA and glycidamide were measured in serum collected at various times. The elimination half-lives and the areas under the respective concentration-time curves were similar for AA and glycidamide. Mice maintained on autoclaved NIH-31 diet, but otherwise untreated, showed elevated steady state levels of a glycidamide-derived DNA adduct in liver relative to mice maintained on the irradiated diet. This study demonstrates that a heat sterilization procedure used in laboratory animal husbandry (i.e., autoclaving) can lead to the formation of significant levels of AA in basal diets used for toxicity testing. AA in rodent diets is bioavailable, is distributed to tissues, and is metabolically activated to a genotoxic metabolite, which produces quantifiable cumulative DNA damage. Although the contribution of endogenous AA to the incidence of tumors in multiple organs of

  11. Efficiency and mechanism of the phytoremediation of decabromodiphenyl ether-contaminated sediments by aquatic macrophyte Scirpus validus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liangyuan; Jiang, Jinhui; Chen, Chuanhong; Zhan, Shuie; Yang, Jiaoyan; Yang, Shao

    2017-05-01

    Phytoremediation is an economic and promising technique for removing toxic pollutants from the environment. Freshwater sediments are regarded as the ultimate sink of the widely used PBDE congener decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) in the environment. In the study, the aquatic macrophyte Scirpus validus was selected to remove BDE-209 from three types of sediments (silt, clay, and sand) at an environmentally relevant concentration. After 18 months of phytoremediation experiment, S. validus significantly enhanced the dissipation rates of BDE-209 in all the sediments compared to the controls. Average removal rates of BDE-209 in the three treatments of silt, clay, and sandy sediments with S. validus were respectively 92.84, 84.04, and 72.22%, which were 148, 197, and 233% higher than that in the control sediments without S. validus. In the phytoremediation process, the macrophyte-rhizosphere microbe combined degradation was the main pathway of BDE-209 removal. Sixteen lower brominated PBDE congeners (di- to nona-) were detected in the sediments and plant tissues, confirming metabolic debromination of BDE-209 in S. validus. A relatively higher proportion of penta- and di-BDE congeners among the metabolites in plant tissues than that in the sediments indicated further debromination of PBDEs within plants. The populations and activities of microorganisms in the sediments were greatly promoted by S. validus. Bacterial community structure in BDE-209-contaminated rhizosphere sediments was different from that in the control rhizosphere sediment, as indicated by the dominant proportions of β-proteobacteria, δ-proteobacteria, α-proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Chloroflexi in the microbial flora. All these results suggested that S. validus was effective in phytoremediation of BDE-209 by the macrophyte-rhizosphere microbe combined degradation in aquatic sediments.

  12. Using aquatic macroinvertebrate species traits to build test batteries for sediment toxicity assessment: accounting for the diversity of potential biological responses to toxicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducrot, Virginie; Usseglio-Polatera, Philippe; Péry, T Alexandre R R; Mouthon, Jacques; Lafont, Michel; Roger, Marie-Claude; Garric, Jeanne; Férard, Jean-François

    2005-09-01

    An original species-selection method for the building of test batteries is presented. This method is based on the statistical analysis of the biological and ecological trait patterns of species. It has been applied to build a macroinvertebrate test battery for the assessment of sediment toxicity, which efficiently describes the diversity of benthic macroinvertebrate biological responses to toxicants in a large European lowland river. First, 109 potential representatives of benthic communities of European lowland rivers were selected from a list of 479 taxa, considering 11 biological traits accounting for the main routes of exposure to a sediment-bound toxicant and eight ecological traits providing an adequate description of habitat characteristics used by the taxa. Second, their biological and ecological trait patterns were compared using coinertia analysis. This comparison allowed the clustering of taxa into groups of organisms that exhibited similar life-history characteristics, physiological and behavioral features, and similar habitat use. Groups exhibited various sizes (7-35 taxa), taxonomic compositions, and biological and ecological features. Main differences among group characteristics concerned morphology, substrate preferendum and habitat utilization, nutritional features, maximal size, and life-history strategy. Third, the best representatives of the mean biological and ecological characteristics of each group were included in the test battery. The final selection was composed of Chironomus riparius (Insecta: Diptera), Branchiura sowerbyi (Oligochaeta: Tubificidae), Lumbriculus variegatus (Oligochaeta: Lumbriculidae), Valvata piscinalis (Gastropoda: Valvatidae), and Sericostoma personatum (Trichoptera: Sericostomatidae). This approach permitted the biological and ecological variety of the battery to be maximized. Because biological and ecological traits of taxa determine species sensitivity, such maximization should permit the battery to better account

  13. Standardizing acute toxicity data for use in ecotoxicology models: influence of test type, life stage, and concentration reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondo, Sandy; Vivian, Deborah N; Barron, Mace G

    2009-10-01

    Ecotoxicological models generally have large data requirements and are frequently based on existing information from diverse sources. Standardizing data for toxicological models may be necessary to reduce extraneous variation and to ensure models reflect intrinsic relationships. However, the extent to which data standardization is necessary remains unclear, particularly when data transformations are used in model development. An extensive acute toxicity database was compiled for aquatic species to comprehensively assess the variation associated with acute toxicity test type (e.g., flow-through, static), reporting concentrations as nominal or measured, and organism life stage. Three approaches were used to assess the influence of these factors on log-transformed acute toxicity: toxicity ratios, log-linear models of factor groups, and comparison of interspecies correlation estimation (ICE) models developed using either standardized test types or reported concentration type. In general, median ratios were generally less than 2.0, the slopes of log-linear models were approximately one for well-represented comparisons, and ICE models developed using data from standardized test types or reported concentrations did not differ substantially. These results indicate that standardizing test data by acute test type, reported concentration type, or life stage may not be critical for developing ecotoxicological models using large datasets of log-transformed values.

  14. The effects of copper toxicity on histopathological and morphometrical changes of the rat testes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Homayoon Babaei; Reza Kheirandish; Laya Ebrahimi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Exposure to environmental toxicants such as copper has been suggested to have adverse effects on male reproduction. Therefore, our aim in the present study was to investigate morphometrical changes of rat testes following long term consumption. Methods: Animals were divided into three experimental groups. Two different doses of copper sulfate were applied once a day for 8 weeks by gavage. The first treatment group received copper sulfate at a dose of 100 mg/kg (Cu100 group) and the second treatment group was given copper sulfate at a dose of 200 mg/kg (Cu200 group). Control animals received normal saline using the same method. Testes from five cases of 15 animals of each group were removed for histopathological examinations on days 14, 28 and 56. Morphometrically, seminiferous tubules diameter, spermatogonial cells nuclei diameter, sertoli cells nuclei diameter and epithelial height were measured in the experimental groups. Meiotic index and the percentage of spermatogenesis were also calculated.Results: The mean values of about mentioned morphometrical parameters in copper treated groups showed significant decrease on 14th day compared to the control group. Copper administration caused a significant damage to morphometrical parameters on 28th day compared to the day 14. Also, in some parameters further decreases were observed specially in the Cu200 group on 56th day such as the diameter of seminiferous tubules, spermatogonial and sertoli cells nuclei and epithelial height of germinal layer (P<0.05). Conclusions: The results show that exposure to copper has the deleterious effects on morphometrical structure of testes which are appeared as early as two weeks.

  15. Benefits and limits of sediment toxicity tests as an aid to decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volatier, L; Clément, B; Devaux, A; Durrieu, C; Bedell, J P; Perrodin, Y

    2009-07-01

    With respect to the management of dredged sediments, a crucial issue is whether the removed materials (watered and/or processed) are disposed of or reused in an environmentally sound manner. In this context, the number of studies dealing with hazard or risk assessment has exponentially increased. This emphasis has resulted in the promotion and application of a very large variety of ecotoxicological tests. As a consequence, there is a clear need to highlight the scope and limitations of these tests for their appropriate selection and interpretation. In this paper we discuss the choice, implementation and interpretation of laboratory tests carried out on aquatic organisms at various levels of biological organization. We examine some experimental tools and methods in order to determine how suitable they are in regard to the objectives for which they are employed. To make this discussion more consistent our paper is based on results from research programmes conducted for governmental organizations and industrial partners. The Laboratoire des Sciences de l'Environnement (LSE) was involved with Cemagref de Lyon in a first methodological programme on risk assessment of scenarios of dredged sediment deposition. Another programme for a chemical company was implemented to assess the benefits of a physico-chemical treatment applied to contaminated dredged sediments in a scenario of reuse or deposit in gravel pits. Currently, the LSE is working on a programme of risk assessment for road sediments in valorization scenarios. From these programmes, we expose how single-species tests, as well as more complex bioassays and microcosm tests, can be used in an iterative step of risk assessment. Concerning microcosm tests, we also introduce a more realistic system that has been designed to simulate natural hydraulic conditions of gravel pits to assess the effects of toxicants on gravel pit aquatic biota during the sediment immersion phase and the sediment post-deposition phase (paper

  16. Bioactivity effect of two macrophyte extracts on growth performance of two bloom-forming cyanophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.G. Ghobrial

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Allelopathy is a biological phenomenon by which an organism produces one or more biochemicals that influence the growth, survival, and reproduction of other organisms. These biochemicals are known as allelochemicals and can have beneficial (positive allelopathy or detrimental (negative allelopathy effects on the target organisms. The current research aims at using selected brackish water adapted submerged aquatic macrophytes allelopathy to combat bloom-forming cyanophytes, in laboratory bioassay experiments. Dry matters of macrophytes were extracted in solvents and the initial cyanophytes inoculum, derived from unialgal culture media, was used. Therefore, aqueous extracts with 50% and 100% acetone and ethanol solvents of two freshwater macrophytes; Potamogeton pectinatus and Ceratophyllum demersum were used to test their growth performance exhibited on two bloom-forming cyanophytes, Microcystis aeruginosa and Oscillatoria tenuis. The results revealed insignificant difference between the overall total average growth performance at treatment with 50% and 100% Ceratophyllum acetone extracts expressed by optical density (OD as well as chlorophyll a (chl a. Results showed, also, stimulation of M. aeruginosa growth. The highest growth increase in 100 μl/100 ml treatment with 50% acetone extract had a percentage rate (R of 94.66. On the contrary, treatment with ethanol extract recorded the highest inhibitory effect, thus in 1.5 μl/100 ml treatment with 50% Ceratophyllum ethanol extract R recorded −87.54, sustaining LC50 value of 1.12 μl/100 ml. The highest stimulating effect in 105 μl/100 ml treatment with 50% Ceratophyllum acetone extracts against O. tenuis was; R, 169.4. The highest inhibition in 1500 μl/100 ml treatment with 50% Ceratophyllum ethanol extracts against O. tenuis was; R −74.32, with LC50 0.830 μl/100 ml. While, the highest inhibition by 50% and 100% Potamogeton acetone or ethanol extracts against M. aeruginosa was

  17. Compound-specific effects of diverse neurodevelopmental toxicants on global gene expression in the neural embryonic stem cell test (ESTn)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theunissen, P.T., E-mail: Peter.Theunissen@rivm.nl [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Robinson, J.F. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Pennings, J.L.A. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Herwijnen, M.H. van [Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Kleinjans, J.C.S. [Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Piersma, A.H. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-08-01

    Alternative assays for developmental toxicity testing are needed to reduce animal use in regulatory toxicology. The in vitro murine neural embryonic stem cell test (ESTn) was designed as an alternative for neurodevelopmental toxicity testing. The integration of toxicogenomic-based approaches may further increase predictivity as well as provide insight into underlying mechanisms of developmental toxicity. In the present study, we investigated concentration-dependent effects of six mechanistically diverse compounds, acetaldehyde (ACE), carbamazepine (CBZ), flusilazole (FLU), monoethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP), penicillin G (PENG) and phenytoin (PHE), on the transcriptome and neural differentiation in the ESTn. All compounds with the exception of PENG altered ESTn morphology (cytotoxicity and neural differentiation) in a concentration-dependent manner. Compound induced gene expression changes and corresponding enriched gene ontology biological processes (GO–BP) were identified after 24 h exposure at equipotent differentiation-inhibiting concentrations of the compounds. Both compound-specific and common gene expression changes were observed between subsets of tested compounds, in terms of significance, magnitude of regulation and functionality. For example, ACE, CBZ and FLU induced robust changes in number of significantly altered genes (≥ 687 genes) as well as a variety of GO–BP, as compared to MEHP, PHE and PENG (≤ 55 genes with no significant changes in GO–BP observed). Genes associated with developmentally related processes (embryonic morphogenesis, neuron differentiation, and Wnt signaling) showed diverse regulation after exposure to ACE, CBZ and FLU. In addition, gene expression and GO–BP enrichment showed concentration dependence, allowing discrimination of non-toxic versus toxic concentrations on the basis of transcriptomics. This information may be used to define adaptive versus toxic responses at the transcriptome level.

  18. Compound-specific effects of diverse neurodevelopmental toxicants on global gene expression in the neural embryonic stem cell test (ESTn).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theunissen, P T; Robinson, J F; Pennings, J L A; van Herwijnen, M H; Kleinjans, J C S; Piersma, A H

    2012-08-01

    Alternative assays for developmental toxicity testing are needed to reduce animal use in regulatory toxicology. The in vitro murine neural embryonic stem cell test (ESTn) was designed as an alternative for neurodevelopmental toxicity testing. The integration of toxicogenomic-based approaches may further increase predictivity as well as provide insight into underlying mechanisms of developmental toxicity. In the present study, we investigated concentration-dependent effects of six mechanistically diverse compounds, acetaldehyde (ACE), carbamazepine (CBZ), flusilazole (FLU), monoethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP), penicillin G (PENG) and phenytoin (PHE), on the transcriptome and neural differentiation in the ESTn. All compounds with the exception of PENG altered ESTn morphology (cytotoxicity and neural differentiation) in a concentration-dependent manner. Compound induced gene expression changes and corresponding enriched gene ontology biological processes (GO-BP) were identified after 24h exposure at equipotent differentiation-inhibiting concentrations of the compounds. Both compound-specific and common gene expression changes were observed between subsets of tested compounds, in terms of significance, magnitude of regulation and functionality. For example, ACE, CBZ and FLU induced robust changes in number of significantly altered genes (≥ 687 genes) as well as a variety of GO-BP, as compared to MEHP, PHE and PENG (≤ 55 genes with no significant changes in GO-BP observed). Genes associated with developmentally related processes (embryonic morphogenesis, neuron differentiation, and Wnt signaling) showed diverse regulation after exposure to ACE, CBZ and FLU. In addition, gene expression and GO-BP enrichment showed concentration dependence, allowing discrimination of non-toxic versus toxic concentrations on the basis of transcriptomics. This information may be used to define adaptive versus toxic responses at the transcriptome level.

  19. Estimation of the critical effect level for pollution prevention based on oyster embryonic development toxicity test: the search for reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz, A C S; Couto, B C; Nascimento, I A; Pereira, S A; Leite, M B N L; Bertoletti, E; Zagatto, P

    2007-05-01

    In spite of the consideration that toxicity testing is a reduced approach to measure the effects of pollutants on ecosystems, the early-life-stage (ELS) tests have evident ecological relevance because they reflect the possible reproductive impairment of the natural populations. The procedure and validation of Crassostrea rhizophorae embryonic development test have shown that it meets the same precision as other U.S. EPA tests, where EC(50) is generally used as a toxicological endpoint. However, the recognition that EC(50) is not the best endpoint to assess contaminant effects led U.S. EPA to recently suggest EC(25) as an alternative to estimate xenobiotic effects for pollution prevention. To provide reliability to the toxicological test results on C. rhizophorae embryos, the present work aimed to establish the critical effect level for this test organism, based on its reaction to reference toxicants, by using the statistical method proposed by Norberg-King (Inhibition Concentration, version 2.0). Oyster embryos were exposed to graded series of reference toxicants (ZnSO(4) x 7H(2)O; AgNO(3); KCl; CdCl(2)H(2)O; phenol, 4-chlorophenol and dodecyl sodium sulphate). Based on the obtained results, the critical value for C. rhizophorae embryonic development test was estimated as EC(15). The present research enhances the emerging consensus that ELS tests data would be adequate for estimating the chronic safe concentrations of pollutants in the receiving waters. Based on recommended criteria and on the results of the present research, zinc sulphate and 4-chlorophenol have been pointed out, among the inorganic and organic compounds tested, as the best reference toxicants for C. rhizophorae ELS-test.

  20. Chromium Toxicity Test for Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Using Hanford Site Groundwater: Onsite Early Life-Stage Toxicity Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patton, Gregory W.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Chamness, Michele A.; Abernethy, Cary S.; McKinstry, Craig A.

    2001-07-10

    The objective of this study was to evaluate site-specific effects for early life-stage (eyed eggs to free swimming juveniles) fall chinook salmon that might be exposed to hexavalent chromium from Hanford groundwater sources. Our exposure conditions included hexavalent chromium obtained from Hanford groundwater wells near the Columbia River, Columbia River water as the diluent, and locally adapted populations of fall chinook salmon. This report describes both a 96-hr pretest using rainbow trout eggs and an early life-stage test beginning with chinook salmon eggs.

  1. Bioassays with unicellular algae: deviations from exponential growth and its implications for toxicity test results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenburger, Rolf; Schmitt-Jansen, Mechthild; Riedl, Janet

    2008-01-01

    Growth assays with unicellular green algae are an established tool in ecotoxicological effect assessment for chemicals and environmental samples. From an ecological perspective it seems appropriate to use the growth rate as a process variable rather than a measure of biomass gain for calculating inhibitory effects of contaminants. The notion of simple exponential growth for the description of the population increase in undisturbed suspension cultures of unicellular green algae, however, seems to be an oversimplification. Experimental findings describe the increase in biomass, cell number, the development of cell volume distributions of populations, and the relationship between cell size and chlorophyll content for individual cells over one generation at a time resolution of 2-h intervals. It was observed that algal populations of Desmodesmus subspicatus show a time pattern of cell size growth; the average cell volume increases about sixfold, without corresponding increase in population size. This is followed by a distinct cell division phase with little gain in biomass. This synchronous growth behavior despite continuous illumination may be explained by the multiple fission characteristic of unicellular green algae which is an adaptation to cyclic light-dark changes in the environment. It might be controlled by an independent cell cycle clock. For routine regulatory testing fluorescence-based measurements rather than cell counting minimizes the confounding effect on toxicity determination. For investigations of time-dependent effects, e.g., by pulsed exposure, an alternative mechanistically based growth function for unicellular algae is proposed that accommodates for the observed growth pattern.

  2. Xenobiotic biotransformation in livestock: comparison to other species commonly used in toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, J B; Klaassen, C D

    1986-09-01

    Wildlife, domesticated animals and humans are exposed daily to myriad chemicals present in our environment. The risk posed by these chemicals to one species is often determined by extrapolation from data gathered from another species. Several extensive studies have examined the capability of the liver to biotransform xenobiotics in animals commonly used in toxicity testing and in livestock. The present paper is a compilation of these data into a single source to permit comprehensive examination of inter-species variation in rates of hepatic biotransformation. Several substrates were studied for each enzyme system, including cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenases, epoxide hydrolases, UDP-glucuronosyltransferases, N-acetyltransferases, glutathione S-transferases and sulfotransferases. The numerous differences in substrate specificity for an individual enzymatic pathway reflect the apparent multiplicity of these enzymes in all 11 species studied. Several hundred- to several thousand-fold differences between species in enzymatic activities for certain substrates under well-defined conditions emphasize the need for caution and the risk of error in extrapolation of xenobiotic metabolism from one species to another. In spite of these uncertainties, knowledge of the rate of biotransformation may help us predict the fate of new chemicals in various species.

  3. A roadmap for the development of alternative (non-animal) methods for systemic toxicity testing - t4 report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basketter, D.A.; Clewell, H.; Kimber, I.; Rossi, A.; Blaauboer, B.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068359802; Burrier, R.; Daneshian, M.; Eskes, C.; Goldberg, A.; Hasiwa, N.

    2012-01-01

    Systemic toxicity testing forms the cornerstone for the safety evaluation of substances. Pressures to move from traditional animal models to novel technologies arise from various concerns, including: the need to evaluate large numbers of previously untested chemicals and new products (such as

  4. A roadmap for the development of alternative (non-animal) methods for systemic toxicity testing - t4 report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basketter, D.A.; Clewell, H.; Kimber, I.; Rossi, A.; Blaauboer, B.J.; Burrier, R.; Daneshian, M.; Eskes, C.; Goldberg, A.; Hasiwa, N.

    2012-01-01

    Systemic toxicity testing forms the cornerstone for the safety evaluation of substances. Pressures to move from traditional animal models to novel technologies arise from various concerns, including: the need to evaluate large numbers of previously untested chemicals and new products (such as nanopa

  5. An evaluation of the osmole gap as a screening test for toxic alcohol poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu-Laban Riyad B

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The osmole gap is used routinely as a screening test for the presence of exogenous osmotically active substances, such as the toxic alcohols ethylene glycol and methanol, particularly when the ability to measure serum concentrations of the substances is not available. The objectives of this study were: 1 to measure the diagnostic accuracy of the osmole gap for screening for ethylene glycol and methanol exposure, and 2 to identify whether a recently proposed modification of the ethanol coefficient affects the diagnostic accuracy. Methods Electronic laboratory records from two tertiary-care hospitals were searched to identify all patients for whom a serum ethylene glycol and methanol measurement was ordered between January 1, 1996 and March 31, 2002. Cases were eligible for analysis if serum sodium, blood urea nitrogen, glucose, ethanol, ethylene glycol, methanol, and osmolality were measured simultaneously. Serum molarity was calculated using the Smithline and Gardner equation and ethanol coefficients of 1 and 1.25 mOsm/mM. The diagnostic accuracy of the osmole gap was evaluated for identifying patients with toxic alcohol levels above the recommended threshold for antidotal therapy and hemodialysis using receiver-operator characteristic curves, likelihood ratios, and positive and negative predictive values. Results One hundred and thirty-one patients were included in the analysis, 20 of whom had ethylene glycol or methanol serum concentrations above the threshold for antidotal therapy. The use of an ethanol coefficient of 1.25 mOsm/mM yielded higher specificities and positive predictive values, without affecting sensitivity and negative predictive values. Employing an osmole gap threshold of 10 for the identification of patients requiring antidotal therapy resulted in a sensitivity of 0.9 and 0.85, and a specificity of 0.22 and 0. 5, with equations 1 and 2 respectively. The sensitivity increased to 1 for both equations for the

  6. Study of four week repeated dose toxic test of Sweet Bee Venom in Beagle Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Seuk Park

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was performed to analyse four week repeated dose toxicity of Sweet Bee Venom(Sweet BV extracted from the bee venom in Beagle dogs. Methods: All experiments were conducted under the regulations of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP at Biotoxtech Company, a non-clinical study authorized institution. Male and female Beagle dogs of 5-6 months old were chosen for the pilot study of four week repeated dose toxicity of Sweet BV which was administered at the level of 0.56㎎/㎏ body weight which is eighty times higher than the clinical application dosage as the high dosage, followed by 0.28 and 0.14㎎/㎏ as midium and low dosage, respectively. Equal amount of excipient(normal saline to the Sweet BV experiment groups was administered as the control group every day for four weeks. Results: 1. No mortality was witnessed in all of the experiment groups. 2. All experiment groups were appealed pain sense in the treating time compared to the control group, and hyperemia and movement disorder were observed around the area of administration in all experiment groups, and higher occurrence in the higher dosage treatment. 3. For weight measurement, Neither male nor female groups showed significant changes. 4. In the urine analysis, CBC and biochemistry didn't show any significant changes in the experiment groups compared with control group. 5. For weight measurement of organs, experiment groups didn't show any significant changes compared with control group. 6. To verify abnormalities of organs and tissues, thigh muscle which treated with Sweet BV, cerebrum, liver, lung, kidney, and spinal cords were removed and conducted histologocal observation with H-E staining. In the histologocal observation of thigh muscle, cell infiltration, inflammatory, degeneration, necrosis of muscle fiber, and fibrosis were found in both thigh tissue. And the changes were depend on the dose of Sweet BV. But another organs were not detected in any abnormalities. 7

  7. Spatio-temporal distribution of Diaphanosoma brachyurum (Cladocera: Sididae in freshwater reservoir ecosystems: importance of maximum water depth and macrophyte beds for avoidance of fish predation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Yun Choi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In empirical studies, Cladocera is commonly utilized as a primary food source for predators such as fish, thus, predator avoidance are important strategies to sustain their population in freshwater ecosystems. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that water depth is an important factor in determining the spatial distribution of Diaphanosoma brachyurum Liévin, 1848 in response to fish predation. Quarterly monitoring was implemented at three water layers (i.e., water surface and middle and bottom layers in 21 reservoirs located in the southeastern part of South Korea. D. brachyurum individuals were frequently observed at the study sites and exhibited different spatial patterns of distribution in accordance with the maximum depth of the reservoirs. In the reservoirs with a maximum depth of more than 6 m, high densities of D. brachyurum were observed in the bottom layers; however, in the shallower reservoirs (maximum depth <6 m, D. brachyurum were concentrated in the surface layer. Moreover, during additional surveys, we observed a trend in which D. brachyurum densities increased as the maximum depth or macrophyte biomass increased. Gut contents analysis revealed that predatory fishes in each reservoir frequently consumed D. brachyurum; however, the consumption rate abruptly decreased in reservoirs where the maximum depth was more than 11 m or in the shallow reservoirs supporting a macrophyte bed. Interestingly, the reservoirs more than 11-m depth supported high densities of D. brachyurum in the bottom layer and in the surface macrophyte bed. Based on these results, reservoirs with a maximum depth of more than 11 m or those with a macrophyte bed may provide a refuge for D. brachyurum to avoid fish predation. Compared with other cladoceran species, D. brachyurum readily exploits various types of refugia (in this study, the deep layer or surface macrophyte bed, which may help explain why this species is abundant in various types of reservoirs.

  8. A roadmap for the development of alternative (non-animal) methods for systemic toxicity testing - t4 report

    OpenAIRE

    Basketter, D. A.; Clewell, H.; Kimber, I; De Rossi, A.; Blaauboer, B.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068359802; Burrier, R.; Daneshian, M.; Eskes, C.; Goldberg, A.; Hasiwa, N

    2012-01-01

    Systemic toxicity testing forms the cornerstone for the safety evaluation of substances. Pressures to move from traditional animal models to novel technologies arise from various concerns, including: the need to evaluate large numbers of previously untested chemicals and new products (such as nanoparticles or cell therapies), the limited predictivity of traditional tests for human health effects, duration and costs of current approaches, and animal welfare considerations. The latter holds esp...

  9. Physico-chemical assessment of paper mill effluent and its heavy metal remediation using aquatic macrophytes--a case study at JK Paper mill, Rayagada, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Swayamprabha; Mohanty, Monalisa; Pradhan, Chinmay; Patra, Hemanta Kumar; Das, Ritarani; Sahoo, Santilata

    2013-05-01

    The present investigation aims to assess the phytoremediation potential of six aquatic macrophytes, viz. Eichhornia crassipes, Hydrilla verticillata, Jussiaea repens, Lemna minor, Pistia stratiotes and Trapa natans grown in paper mill effluent of JK Paper mill of Rayagada, Orissa, for remediation of heavy metals. The experiment was designed in pot culture experiments. Assessment of physico-chemical parameters of paper mill effluent showed significant decrease in pH, conductivity, total dissolved solids, total suspended solids, chlorine, sulphur, biological and chemical oxygen demand after growth of macrophytes for 20 days. Phytoremediation ability of these aquatic macrophytic species for copper (Cu) and mercury (Hg) was indicated by assessing the decrease in the levels of heavy metals from effluent water. Maximum reduction (66.5 %) in Hg content of untreated paper mill effluent was observed using L. minor followed by T. natans (64.8 %). L. minor showed highest reduction (71.4 %) of Cu content from effluent water followed by E. crassipes (63.6 %). Phytoextraction potential of L. minor was remarkable for Hg and Cu, and bioaccumulation was evident from bioconcentration factor values, i.e. 0.59 and 0.70, respectively. The present phytoremediation approach was considered more effective than conventional chemical treatment method for removing toxic contaminants from paper mill effluent.

  10. Combining polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) with toxicity testing to evaluate pesticide mixture effects on natural phototrophic biofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesce, Stephane, E-mail: stephane.pesce@cemagref.fr [Cemagref, UR MALY, 3 bis quai Chauveau - CP 220, F-69336 Lyon (France); Morin, Soizic, E-mail: soizic.morin@cemagref.fr [Cemagref, UR REBX, 50 av. de Verdun, F-33612 Cestas Cedex (France); Lissalde, Sophie, E-mail: sophie.lissalde@cemagref.fr [Cemagref, UR REBX, 50 av. de Verdun, F-33612 Cestas Cedex (France); Montuelle, Bernard, E-mail: bernard.montuelle@cemagref.fr [Cemagref, UR MALY, 3 bis quai Chauveau - CP 220, F-69336 Lyon (France); INRA, UMR CARRTEL, 75 av. de Corzent - BP 511, F-74203 Thonon Cedex (France); Mazzella, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.mazzella@cemagref.fr [Cemagref, UR REBX, 50 av. de Verdun, F-33612 Cestas Cedex (France)

    2011-03-15

    Polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) are valuable tools in passive sampling methods for monitoring polar organic pesticides in freshwaters. Pesticides extracted from the environment using such methods can be used to toxicity tests. This study evaluated the acute effects of POCIS extracts on natural phototrophic biofilm communities. Our results demonstrate an effect of POCIS pesticide mixtures on chlorophyll a fluorescence, photosynthetic efficiency and community structure. Nevertheless, the range of biofilm responses differs according to origin of the biofilms tested, revealing spatial variations in the sensitivity of natural communities in the studied stream. Combining passive sampler extracts with community-level toxicity tests offers promising perspectives for ecological risk assessment. - Research highlights: > Polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) were used for monitoring polar organic pesticides in a contaminated river. > The acute effects of POCIS extracts were tested on natural phototrophic biofilm communities. > POCIS pesticide mixtures affected chlorophyll a fluorescence, photosynthetic efficiency and community structure. > Biofilm responses differed according to origin of the biofilms tested, revealing variations in the sensitivity of natural communities. > Combining passive sampler extracts with community-level toxicity tests offers promising perspectives for ecological risk assessment. - Pesticide mixtures extracted from POCIS can affect chl a fluorescence, photosynthetic efficiency and community structure of natural biofilms.

  11. The chick embryo test as used in the study of the toxicity of certain dithiocarbamates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gebhardt, D.O.E.; Logten, M.J. van

    1968-01-01

    The toxicities of six dithiocarbamates: bis(dimethyl thiocarbamoyl) disulfide (thiram), zinc dimethyldithiocarbamate (ziram), ferric dimethyldithiocarbamate (ferbam), bis(dimethyl thiocarbamoyl) ethylene bis(dithiocarbamate) (triaram), sodium diethyl dithiocarbamate (NaDEDC), and sodium ethylene bis

  12. Restoring macrophyte diversity in shallow temperate lakes: biotic versus abiotic constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, E.S.; Sarneel, J.M.; Gulati, R.D.; Liu, Z.; Van Donk, E.

    2013-01-01

    Although many lake restoration projects have led to decreased nutrient loads and increased water transparency, the establishment or expansion of macrophytes does not immediately follow the improved abiotic conditions and it is often unclear whether vegetation with high macrophyte diversity will retu

  13. Macrophyte-phytoplankton interactions: the relative importance of allelopathy versus other factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulderij, G.; Nes, van E.H.; Donk, van E.

    2007-01-01

    Submerged aquatic macrophytes are important in shallow aquatic ecosystems because they stabilize the macrophyte-dominated state by increasing water transparency in various ways. One of these is the excretion of allelopathic substances inhibitory to phytoplankton, but it is still controversial whethe

  14. Macrophyte-phytoplankton interactions: the relative importance of allelopathy versus other factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulderij, G.; van Nes, E.H.; Van Donk, E.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Submerged aquatic macrophytes are important in shallow aquatic ecosystems because they stabilize the macrophyte-dominated state by increasing water transparency in various ways. One of these is the excretion of allelopathic substances inhibitory to phytoplankton, but it is still controversi

  15. Competition between free-floating and submerged macrophytes in a future of climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netten, J.J.C.

    2011-01-01


    This research was about the asymmetric competition between free-floating and submerged macrophytes in shallow freshwater ecosystems. I studied the effect of climate change on the dominance of free-floating macrophytes in temperate regions. The research approach was a combination of outdoor me

  16. Competition between free-floating and submerged macrophytes in a future of climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netten, J.J.C.

    2011-01-01


    This research was about the asymmetric competition between free-floating and submerged macrophytes in shallow freshwater ecosystems. I studied the effect of climate change on the dominance of free-floating macrophytes in temperate regions. The research approach was a combination of outdoor

  17. Invertebrate grazing during the regenerative phase affects the ultimate structure of macrophyte communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elger, A.F.; Willby, N.; Cabello-Martinez, M.

    2009-01-01

    1. Although the biomass of freshwater macrophytes consumed by invertebrate herbivores (excluding crayfish) is usually low, there is growing evidence that invertebrates do exert a structuring effect on macrophyte communities. To explain this, we postulated that the effect of invertebrates may be conc

  18. First steps in the Central-Baltic intercalibration exercise on lake macrophytes: where do we start?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tóth, L.G.; Poikane, S.; Penning, W.E.; Free, G.; Mäemets, H.; Kolada, A.; Hanganu, J.

    2008-01-01

    The Water Framework Directive (WFD 2000) defines macrophytes as one of the biological groups required for the ecological assessment of European surface waters. Several indices for macrophyte assessment have been proposed or are currently in use by different European states. As a first step towards p

  19. Macrophyte-phytoplankton interactions: the relative importance of allelopathy versus other factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulderij, G.; van Nes, E.H.; Van Donk, E.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Submerged aquatic macrophytes are important in shallow aquatic ecosystems because they stabilize the macrophyte-dominated state by increasing water transparency in various ways. One of these is the excretion of allelopathic substances inhibitory to phytoplankton, but it is still

  20. Macrophyte-phytoplankton interactions: the relative importance of allelopathy versus other factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulderij, G.; Nes, van E.H.; Donk, van E.

    2007-01-01

    Submerged aquatic macrophytes are important in shallow aquatic ecosystems because they stabilize the macrophyte-dominated state by increasing water transparency in various ways. One of these is the excretion of allelopathic substances inhibitory to phytoplankton, but it is still controversial

  1. Toxicity testing of heavy-metal-polluted soils with algae Selenastrum capricornutum: a soil suspension assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruoja, Villem; Kurvet, Imbi; Dubourguier, Henri-Charles; Kahru, Anne

    2004-08-01

    A small-scale Selenastrum capricornutum (Rhapidocelis subcapitata) growth inhibition assay was applied to the toxicity testing of suspensions of heavy-metal-polluted soils. The OECD 201 standard test procedure was followed, and algal biomass was measured by the fluorescence of extracted chlorophyll. The soils, which contained up to (per kilogram) 1390 mg of Zn, 20 mg of Cd, and 1050 mg of Pb were sampled around lead and zinc smelters in northern France. The water extractability of the metals in suspensions (1 part soil/99 parts water w/v) was not proportional to the pollution level, as extractability was lower for soil samples that were more polluted. Thus, the same amount of metals could be leached out of soils of different levels of pollution, showing that total concentrations of heavy metals in soil (currently used for risk assessment purposes) are poor predictors of the real environmental risk via the soil-water path. Despite high concentrations of water-extracted zinc (0.6-1.4 mg/L of Zn in the test), exceeding by approximately 10-fold the EC(50) value for S. capricornutum (0.1 mg Zn/L), 72-h algal growth in the soil extracts was comparable or better than growth in the standard control OECD mineral medium. The soil suspension stimulated the growth of algae up to eightfold greater than growth using the OECD control medium. Growth stimulation of algae was observed even when soil suspensions contained up to 12.5 mg Zn/L and could not be explained by supplementary nitrogen, phosphorous, and carbonate leached from the soil. However, if the growth of algae in suspensions of clean and polluted soils was compared, a dose-dependent inhibitory effect of metals on algal growth was demonstrated. Thus, as soil contains nutrients/supplements that mask the adverse effect of heavy metals, a clean soil that has properties similar to the polluted soils should be used instead of mineral salt solution as a control for analysis of the ecotoxicity of soils. Copyright 2004 Wiley

  2. Evaluation of some in vitro tests to reduce and replace the sub-acute animal toxicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Rajendra S; Ress, Nancy B; Harbell, John W; Curren, Rodger D

    2004-06-01

    The toxicologic and carcinogenic potential of chemicals is usually determined through a sequence of acute, sub-acute (14-day), sub-chronic (90-day) and chronic (two-year) studies in rats and mice of both sexes. The US National Toxicology Program (NTP) does not conduct acute toxicity studies. Dose levels for 14-day toxicity studies are typically estimated from information in the literature, if available. The toxicology information obtained from 14-day studies is used in the selection of doses for 90-day studies. The protocol for 14-day studies consists of five doses and control groups and five animals per group of each sex and species, resulting in the use of 120 animals per study. At present, in addition to refining the current testing protocols, the NTP is evaluating the potential for in vitro test methods to partially or completely avoid the need for 14-day toxicity studies, especially for chemicals where the dermal route of exposure is used. The in vitro assays used were the EpiDerm bioassay to estimate dermal irritation, the neutral red uptake (NRU) bioassay to estimate systemic toxicity and the primary rat hepatocyte cytotoxicity (PRHC) assay to estimate hepatotoxicity. The purpose of using these assays was to assess their potential for predicting relative in vivo toxicity and to support dose selection decisions for 90-day studies. In general, based on these limited number of studies, the EpiDerm and NRU tests were predictive of the responses observed in in vivo studies. However, a larger comparative database is needed to derive definitive conclusions regarding the value of in vitro tests in the prediction of in vivo effects.

  3. Including Bioconcentration Kinetics for the Prioritization and Interpretation of Regulatory Aquatic Toxicity Tests of Highly Hydrophobic Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jung-Hwan; Lee, So-Young; Kang, Hyun-Joong; Mayer, Philipp; Escher, Beate I

    2016-11-01

    Worldwide, regulations of chemicals require short-term toxicity data for evaluating hazards and risks of the chemicals. Current data requirements on the registration of chemicals are primarily based on tonnage and do not yet consider properties of chemicals. For example, short-term ecotoxicity data are required for chemicals with production volume greater than 1 or 10 ton/y according to REACH, without considering chemical properties. Highly hydrophobic chemicals are characterized by low water solubility and slow bioconcentration kinetics, which may hamper the interpretation of short-term toxicity experiments. In this work, internal concentrations of highly hydrophobic chemicals were predicted for standard acute ecotoxicity tests at three trophic levels, algae, invertebrate, and fish. As demonstrated by comparison with maximum aqueous concentrations at water solubility, chemicals with an octanol-water partition coefficient (Kow) greater than 10(6) are not expected to reach sufficiently high internal concentrations for exerting effects within the test duration of acute tests with fish and invertebrates, even though they might be intrinsically toxic. This toxicity cutoff was explained by the slow uptake, i.e., by kinetics, not by thermodynamic limitations. Predictions were confirmed by data entries of the OECD's screening information data set (SIDS) (n = 746), apart from a few exceptions concerning mainly organometallic substances and those with inconsistency between water solubility and Kow. Taking error propagation and model assumptions into account, we thus propose a revision of data requirements for highly hydrophobic chemicals with log Kow > 7.4: Short-term toxicity tests can be limited to algae that generally have the highest uptake rate constants, whereas the primary focus of the assessment should be on persistence, bioaccumulation, and long-term effects.

  4. Evaluating the suitability of Hydrobia ulvae as a test species for sediment metal toxicity testing applying a tissue residue approach to metal mixtures in laboratory and field exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, Olivia; Rodríguez, Antonio; Blasco, Julián

    2013-05-01

    A major weakness in evaluating the suitability of a biomonitor organism is the poor ability to predict the variability of the bioavailability of metals from measured environmental concentrations. In this study, the intertidal gastropod Hydrobia ulvae was used to evaluate its suitability as a test organism for assessing sediment metal toxicity. Toxicity tests were run with sediments spiked with copper, cadmium and zinc applied both as single metal and as a mixture to investigate toxicological interactions evaluating different lethal and sublethal effects. Dose-response relationships were constructed based both on tissue residue approach and particulate metal concentrations. Because metal-spiked sediments used in routine toxicity tests often do not exhibit the same adsorption/desorption kinetics as the natural sediments, the laboratory results were compared to 10-d bioassays conducted with natural field sediments collected from the Guadalete estuary (SW Spain). Highly significant correlations between tissue residue concentrations and particulate metal concentrations were found for all metal-spiked or field-collected and demonstrated that: (i) H. ulvae readily accumulated copper and cadmium in response to contamination and (ii) dietary uptake was determined to be the most significant route of metal exposure. The comparison of the modeled tissue residue-response curve developed from the mixture tests was in good agreement with the results from the bioassay conducted with field sediments and strongly demonstrated that H. ulvae is also a suitable test organism for assessing copper sediment toxicity. In contrast, the dose-response curve expressed as a function of total particulate metal concentrations would fail in predicting effect, erroneously assessing higher metal toxicity.

  5. Combining polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) with toxicity testing to evaluate pesticide mixture effects on natural phototrophic biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, Stéphane; Morin, Soizic; Lissalde, Sophie; Montuelle, Bernard; Mazzella, Nicolas

    2011-03-01

    Polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) are valuable tools in passive sampling methods for monitoring polar organic pesticides in freshwaters. Pesticides extracted from the environment using such methods can be used to toxicity tests. This study evaluated the acute effects of POCIS extracts on natural phototrophic biofilm communities. Our results demonstrate an effect of POCIS pesticide mixtures on chlorophyll a fluorescence, photosynthetic efficiency and community structure. Nevertheless, the range of biofilm responses differs according to origin of the biofilms tested, revealing spatial variations in the sensitivity of natural communities in the studied stream. Combining passive sampler extracts with community-level toxicity tests offers promising perspectives for ecological risk assessment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The possibility of using macrophytes in lake Palić sediment remediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petričević J.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lake Palić is a typical, shallow Pannonian plain lake, with thick sediment layers and high content of phosphorus and nitrogen. The thick layers are the result of accelerated eutrophication, and cause biodiversity loss and disruption of the ecosystem. Numerous methods can be used to overcome the problem of accelerated eutrophication, (sediment removal, phosphorus inactivation etc.. However, these methods have many deficiencies. Lately, using macrophytes as a way to resolve this problem is becoming more and more popular. The aim of this work was to examine the germination possibilities of white mustard (Sinapis alba L., alfalfa (Medicago sativa L., oats (Avena sativa L. and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. on Lake Palić’s sediment, as a prescreening test for their suitability for further phytoremediation. The results show that plant species can germinate and grow in early stages in such substrates, so they can be recommended for sediment phytoremediation. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 31080

  7. Carbonic anhydrase levels and internal lacunar CO/sub 2/ concentrations in aquatic macrophytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, C.I.

    1979-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase levels were examined in a variety of aquatic macrophytes from different habitats. In general, carbonic anhydrase levels increased across the habitat gradient such that activities were low in submersed aquatic macrophytes and high in emergent macrophytes with floating-leaved and free-floating plants exhibiting intermediate activities. Internal lacunar CO/sub 2/ concentrations were analyzed in relation to carbonic anhydrase activities. There was no correlation between these two parameters. Internal CO/sub 2/ concentrations ranged from low to high in submersed macrophytes, but were low in floating-leaved and emergent macrophytes. The observed internal CO/sub 2/ concentrations are discussed in relation to the individual morphologies of the plants and the environments in which they occurred.

  8. Effects of altered estuarine submerged macrophyte bed cover on the omnivorous Cape stumpnose Rhabdosargus holubi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, J N; Whitfield, A K; Cowley, P D; Hill, J M

    2012-03-01

    The ecological importance of submerged macrophyte beds to fishes within estuaries was investigated through the example of the ubiquitous Cape stumpnose Rhabdosargus holubi, an omnivorous, vegetation and estuary-dependent species, using stable-isotope techniques and long-term abundance (catch-per-unit-effort) data from the East Kleinemonde Estuary, South Africa. Outputs from a Bayesian mixing model using δ(13) C and δ(15) N signatures indicated that the submerged macrophytes Ruppia cirrhosa and Potamogeton pectinatus were not a primary source of nutrition for R. holubi, confirming previous work that revealed that macrophytes are consumed but not digested. Long-term seine netting data showed reduced abundance of R. holubi during a prolonged period of macrophyte senescence, suggesting that submerged macrophyte habitats provide shelter that reduces mortality (predation risk) and a food-rich foraging area. © 2012 SAIAB. Journal of Fish Biology © 2012 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  9. Development of an embryo toxicity test with the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis using the model substance tributyltin and common solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandow, Cornelia; Weltje, Lennart

    2012-10-01

    The development of a chronic mollusc toxicity test is a current work item on the agenda of the OECD. The freshwater pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis is one of the candidate snail species for such a test. This paper presents a 21-day chronic toxicity test with L. stagnalis, focussing on embryonic development. Eggs were collected from freshly laid egg masses and exposed individually until hatching. The endpoints were hatching success and mean hatching time. Tributyltin (TBT), added as TBT-chloride, was chosen as model substance. The selected exposure concentrations ranged from 0.03 to 10 μg TBT/L (all as nominal values) and induced the full range of responses. The embryos were sensitive to TBT (the NOEC for mean hatching time was 0.03 μg TBT/L and the NOEC for hatching success was 0.1 μg TBT/L). In addition, data on maximum limit concentrations of seven common solvents, recommended in OECD aquatic toxicity testing guidelines, are presented. Among the results, further findings as average embryonic growth and mean hatching time of control groups are provided. In conclusion, the test presented here could easily be standardised and is considered useful as a potential trigger to judge if further studies, e.g. a (partial) life-cycle study with molluscs, should be conducted.

  10. A comparative study on characterization of textile wastewaters (untreated and treated) toxicity by chemical and biological tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, K P; Sharma, S; Sharma, Subhasini; Singh, P K; Kumar, S; Grover, R; Sharma, P K

    2007-08-01

    Toxicity of textile wastewaters (untreated and treated) and their ingredient chemicals was quantified in terms of their chemical characteristics, fish (Gambusia affinis) mortality and end point growth responses of duckweed (Lemna aequinoctialis) in short-term bioassays. Other parameters of fish bioassay were erythrocyte morphology and its counts. Despite of a definite correlation between data of biological tests (LC/EC(50) values) with that of chemical tests, biological tests were found to be relatively more sensitive to both wastewaters and ingredient chemicals. Amongst all the examined parameters of test organisms, fish RBCs (morphology and counts) sensitivity to pollutants in the wastewaters was usually maximum and therefore, their study should be included in the routine fish bioassay. Other advantage of biological test such as on Lemna is even detection of eutrophic potential of wastewaters, as noted at their higher dilutions. The ingredient chemicals (major) contributing maximum toxicity to textile dye wastewater were, acids (HCl and H(2)SO(4)), alkali (Na(2)O SiO(2)), salt (NaNO(2)) and heavy metal (Cu), whereas dyes (4) were relatively less toxic.

  11. Rapid bioassessment methods for assessing vegetation toxicity at the Savannah River Site - germination tests and root elongation trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Specht, W.L.; Klaine, S.J.; Hook, D.D. [and others

    1996-01-01

    Plants form the basis of all ecosystems including wetlands. Although they are the most abundant life form and are the primary producers for all other organisms, they have received the least attention when it comes to environmental matters. Higher plants have rarely been used in ecotoxicity testing and may not respond in the same manner as algae, which have been used more frequently. The introduction of hazardous waste materials into wetland areas has the potential to alter and damage the ecological processes in these ecosystems. Measuring the impact of these contaminants on higher plants is therefore important and needs further research. Higher plants are useful for detecting both herbicidal toxicity and heavy metal toxicity. For phytotoxicity tests to be practical they must be simple, inexpensive, yet sensitive to a variety of contaminants. A difference between seed germination and root elongation tests is that seed germination tests measure toxicity associated with soils directly, while root elongation tests consider the indirect effects of water-soluble constituents that may be present in site samples.

  12. Toxicity of sediments potentially contaminated by coal mining and natural gas extraction to unionid mussels and commonly tested benthic invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Ingersoll, Christopher G; Kunz, James L; Brumbaugh, William G; Kane, Cindy M; Evans, R Brian; Alexander, Steven; Walker, Craig; Bakaletz, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Sediment toxicity tests were conducted to assess potential effects of contaminants associated with coal mining or natural gas extraction activities in the upper Tennessee River basin and eastern Cumberland River basin in the United States. Test species included two unionid mussels (rainbow mussel, Villosa iris, and wavy-rayed lampmussel, Lampsilis fasciola, 28-d exposures), and the commonly tested amphipod, Hyalella azteca (28-d exposure) and midge, Chironomus dilutus (10-d exposure). Sediments were collected from seven test sites with mussel communities classified as impacted and in proximity to coal mining or gas extraction activities, and from five reference sites with mussel communities classified as not impacted and no or limited coal mining or gas extraction activities. Additional samples were collected from six test sites potentially with high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and from a test site contaminated by a coal ash spill. Mean survival, length, or biomass of one or more test species was reduced in 10 of 14 test samples (71%) from impacted areas relative to the response of organisms in the five reference samples. A higher proportion of samples was classified as toxic to mussels (63% for rainbow mussels, 50% for wavy-rayed lampmussels) compared with amphipods (38%) or midge (38%). Concentrations of total recoverable metals and total PAHs in sediments did not exceed effects-based probable effect concentrations (PECs). However, the survival, length, or biomasses of the mussels were reduced significantly with increasing PEC quotients for metals and for total PAHs, or with increasing sum equilibrium-partitioning sediment benchmark toxic units for PAHs. The growth of the rainbow mussel also significantly decreased with increasing concentrations of a major anion (chloride) and major cations (calcium and magnesium) in sediment pore water. Results of the present study indicated that (1) the findings from laboratory tests were generally

  13. Toxicity of sediments potentially contaminated by coal mining and natural gas extraction to unionid mussels and commonly tested benthic invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Kunz, James L.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Kane, Cindy M.; Evans, R. Brian; Alexander, Steven; Walker, Craig; Bakaletz, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Sediment toxicity tests were conducted to assess potential effects of contaminants associated with coal mining or natural gas extraction activities in the upper Tennessee River basin and eastern Cumberland River basin in the United States. Test species included two unionid mussels (rainbow mussel, Villosa iris, and wavy-rayed lampmussel, Lampsilis fasciola, 28-d exposures), and the commonly tested amphipod, Hyalella azteca (28-d exposure) and midge, Chironomus dilutus (10-d exposure). Sediments were collected from seven test sites with mussel communities classified as impacted and in proximity to coal mining or gas extraction activities, and from five reference sites with mussel communities classified as not impacted and no or limited coal mining or gas extraction activities. Additional samples were collected from six test sites potentially with high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and from a test site contaminated by a coal ash spill. Mean survival, length, or biomass of one or more test species was reduced in 10 of 14 test samples (71%) from impacted areas relative to the response of organisms in the five reference samples. A higher proportion of samples was classified as toxic to mussels (63% for rainbow mussels, 50% for wavy-rayed lampmussels) compared with amphipods (38%) or midge (38%). Concentrations of total recoverable metals and total PAHs in sediments did not exceed effects-based probable effect concentrations (PECs). However, the survival, length, or biomasses of the mussels were reduced significantly with increasing PEC quotients for metals and for total PAHs, or with increasing sum equilibrium-partitioning sediment benchmark toxic units for PAHs. The growth of the rainbow mussel also significantly decreased with increasing concentrations of a major anion (chloride) and major cations (calcium and magnesium) in sediment pore water. Results of the present study indicated that (1) the findings from laboratory tests were generally

  14. Comparison of three marine screening tests and four Oslo and Paris Commission procedures to evaluate toxicity of offshore chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weideborg, M.; Vik, E.A.; Oefjord, G.D.; Kjoennoe, O. [Aquateam-Norwegian Water Technology Centre A/S, Oslo (Norway)

    1997-02-01

    The results from the screening toxicity tests Artemia salina, Microtox{reg_sign}, and Mitochondria RET test were compared with those obtained from OSPAR (Oslo and Paris Commissions)-authorized procedures for testing of offshore chemicals (Skeletonema costatum, Acartia tonsa, Abra alba, and Corophium volutator). In this study 82 test substances (26 non-water soluble) were included. The Microtox test was found to be the most sensitive of the three screening tests. Microtox and Mitochondria RET test results showed good correlation with results from Acartia and Skeletonema testing, and it was concluded that the Microtox test was a suitable screening test as a base for assessment of further testing, especially regarding water-soluble chemicals. Sensitivity of Artemia salina to the tested chemicals was too low for it to be an appropriate bioassay organism for screening testing. A very good correlation was found between the results obtained with the Skeletonema and Acartia tests. The results indicated no need for more than one of the Skeletonema or Acartia tests if the Skeletonema median effective concentration or Acartia median lethal concentration was greater than 200 mg/L. The sediment-reworker tests (A. Alba or C. volutator) for chemicals that are likely to end up in the sediments (non-water soluble or surfactants) should be performed, independent of results from screening tests and other OSPAR species.

  15. Role of macrophyte life forms in driving periphytic microalgal assemblages in a Brazilian reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubirajara L. Fernandes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Macrophytes play several roles in aquatic ecosystems, including the provision of habitat for many aquatic organisms, especially the periphyton. The aims of this study were to characterize the structure of periphytic microalgal assemblages on different aquatic macrophyte life forms in order to establish similarities between assemblages from nearby sampling sites. We hypothesized that i aquatic macrophytes with different life forms and morphological characteristics could differently influence the structure of the periphyton and that ii the greatest similarity in periphyton composition should be observed among macrophytes that occupy the same sampling site. The study was conducted from 2006 to 2008 in the Thomaz Osterne de Alencar reservoir (Crato City, Ceará State, Brazil and involved the taxonomic surveying of microalgae attached to five different macrophytes with the application of structural descriptors (richness, abundance, frequency, diversity and equitability. A total of 127 taxa, of which 44% belonged to the Chlorophyta, were identified. The microalgae assemblages showed high species richness on Salvinia auriculata Aubl., a free-floating macrophyte, and large abundance on Apalanthe granatensis (Humb. & Bonpl. Planch., a submerged anchored macrophyte. ANOVA indicated that periphyton significantly varied among the macrophytes investigated, and nearby sampling sites showed no structural similarities in microalgal assemblages. In general, we can conclude that the structure of periphyton assemblages is influenced by the substrate (i.e., macrophyte organ, as this can not only promote high diversity and equitability but can also be a predictor of dissimilarity in the distribution and frequency of occurrence of microalgae. These results reinforce the findings of other studies that have shown that macrophytes play an important role in structuring the periphyton assemblages.

  16. Review of titanium dioxide nanoparticle phototoxicity: Developing a phototoxicity ratio to correct the endpoint values of toxicity tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, Boris

    2015-05-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles are photoactive and produce reactive oxygen species under natural sunlight. Reactive oxygen species can be detrimental to many organisms, causing oxidative damage, cell injury, and death. Most studies investigating TiO2 nanoparticle toxicity did not consider photoactivation and performed tests either in dark conditions or under artificial lighting that did not simulate natural irradiation. The present study summarizes the literature and derives a phototoxicity ratio between the results of nano-titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2 ) experiments conducted in the absence of sunlight and those conducted under solar or simulated solar radiation (SSR) for aquatic species. Therefore, the phototoxicity ratio can be used to correct endpoints of the toxicity tests with nano-TiO2 that were performed in absence of sunlight. Such corrections also may be important for regulators and risk assessors when reviewing previously published data. A significant difference was observed between the phototoxicity ratios of 2 distinct groups: aquatic species belonging to order Cladocera, and all other aquatic species. Order Cladocera appeared very sensitive and prone to nano-TiO2 phototoxicity. On average nano-TiO2 was 20 times more toxic to non-Cladocera and 1867 times more toxic to Cladocera (median values 3.3 and 24.7, respectively) after illumination. Both median value and 75% quartile of the phototoxicity ratio are chosen as the most practical values for the correction of endpoints of nano-TiO2 toxicity tests that were performed in dark conditions, or in the absence of sunlight.

  17. Physical and chemical properties of substrates produced using macrophytes aquatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walda Monteiro Farias

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic macrophytes are widely used as bioindicators of water quality because their proliferation usually occurs in eutrophic water sources and has hit several parts of Brazil and the world, restricted the multiple uses of aquatic ecosystems. However, this group of plants is able to retain considerable amounts of nutrients, presenting high productivity and high growth rate, thus, a good source of biomass for use in the production of substrates. In order to evaluate the potential of aquatic macrophytes water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes Solms., water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes L. and cattail (Typha domingensis Pers. in the production of substrates was performed in this work, the physical and chemical characterization and evaluation of the degree of humification. The treatments were arranged in a 3 × 4 factorial, completely randomized design with three replications. All substrates produced with 100% macrophyte density present within the limits of 400 kg m-3, considered ideal. The composite substrates with water hyacinth and water lettuce are with the electrical conductivity of 0,79 a 2,49 dS m-1 within recommended. organic compounds produced are considered mature and have high levels of nitrogen phosphorus and potassium; The substrate produced with 70% water lettuce +30 % dung and 70% composed of cattail manure +20% +10% topsoil and 70 +30% cattail manure have C/N ratio within the considered ideal; the humification ratio and humification index, except for the four treatments (70 % water lettuce manure +30%, 5 (100% water hyacinth and 8 (70% water hyacinth manure +30% are within the considered ideal, the percentage of humic acids and polymerization rate, except for treatments 1 (100% water lettuce and 12 (100% cattail, are shown below the ideal.

  18. Optimizing the performance of the amphipod, Hyalella azteca, in chronic toxicity tests: Results of feeding studies with various foods and feeding regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The freshwater amphipod, Hyalella azteca, is a common organism used for sediment toxicity testing. Standard methods for 10-d and 42-d sediment toxicity tests with H. azteca were last revised and published by USEPA/ASTM in 2000. While Hyalella azteca methods exist for sediment tox...

  19. Optimizing the performance of the amphipod, Hyalella azteca, in chronic toxicity tests: Results of feeding studies with various foods and feeding regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The freshwater amphipod, Hyalella azteca, is a common organism used for sediment toxicity testing. Standard methods for 10-d and 42-d sediment toxicity tests with H. azteca were last revised and published by USEPA/ASTM in 2000. While Hyalella azteca methods exist for sediment tox...

  20. Testing strategies for embryo-fetal toxicity of human pharmaceuticals. Animal models vs. in vitro approaches: a workshop report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Laan, Jan Willem; Chapin, Robert E; Haenen, Bert; Jacobs, Abigail C; Piersma, Aldert

    2012-06-01

    Reproductive toxicity testing is characterized by high animal use. For registration of pharmaceutical compounds, developmental toxicity studies are usually conducted in both rat and rabbits. Efforts have been underway for a long time to design alternatives to animal use. Implementation has lagged, partly because of uncertainties about the applicability domain of the alternatives. The reproductive cycle is complex and not all mechanisms of development can be mimicked in vitro. Therefore, efforts are underway to characterize the available alternative tests with regard to the mechanism of action they include. One alternative test is the mouse embryonic stem cell test (EST), which has been studied since the late 1990s. It is a genuine 3R "alternative" assay as it is essentially animal-free. A meeting was held to review the state-of-the-art of various in vitro models for prediction of developmental toxicity. Although the predictivity of individual assays is improving, a battery of several assays is likely to have even higher predictivity, which is necessary for regulatory acceptance. The workshop concluded that an important first step is a thorough survey of the existing rat and rabbit studies, to fully characterize the frequency of responses and the types of effects seen. At the same time, it is important to continue the optimization of in vitro assays. As more experience accumulates, the optimal conditions, assay structure, and applicability of the alternative assays are expected to emerge. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Uptake route and resulting toxicity of silver nanoparticles in Eisenia fetida earthworm exposed through Standard OECD Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Velasco, Nerea; Gandariasbeitia, Maite; Irizar, Amaia; Soto, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Despite the increasing interest in silver nanoparticles toxicity still few works dealt with the hazards of nanosized Ag in soils (either dissolved in pore water or coupled to colloids) although disposal of biosolids in landfills has been reported as the major source of silver nanoparticles in terrestrial environments. Presently, Eisenia fetida was used to assess the toxicity of 5 nm sized PVP-PEI coated silver nanoparticles in soil through the implementation of different exposure media Standard Toxicity Tests (Paper Contact and Artificial Soil -OECD-207- and Reproduction -OECD-222- Tests) together with cellular biomarkers measured in extruded coelomocytes. In order to decipher the mode of action of silver nanoparticles in soil and the uptake routes in earthworms, special attention was given to the Ag accumulation and distribution in tissues. High Ag accumulation rates, weight loss, and mortality due to the disruption of the tegument could be the result of a dermal absorption of Ag ions released from silver nanoparticles (Paper Contact Test). However, autometallography showed metals mainly localized in the digestive tract after Artificial Soil Test, suggesting that Ag uptake occurred mostly through soil ingestion. That is, silver nanoparticles attached to soil colloids seemed to be internalized in earthworms after ingestion of soil and transferred to the digestive gut epithelium where at high doses they have triggered severe effects at different levels of biological complexity.

  2. Predicting the future: opportunities and challenges for the chemical industry to apply 21st-century toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settivari, Raja S; Ball, Nicholas; Murphy, Lynea; Rasoulpour, Reza; Boverhof, Darrell R; Carney, Edward W

    2015-03-01

    Interest in applying 21st-century toxicity testing tools for safety assessment of industrial chemicals is growing. Whereas conventional toxicology uses mainly animal-based, descriptive methods, a paradigm shift is emerging in which computational approaches, systems biology, high-throughput in vitro toxicity assays, and high-throughput exposure assessments are beginning to be applied to mechanism-based risk assessments in a time- and resource-efficient fashion. Here we describe recent advances in predictive safety assessment, with a focus on their strategic application to meet the changing demands of the chemical industry and its stakeholders. The opportunities to apply these new approaches is extensive and include screening of new chemicals, informing the design of safer and more sustainable chemical alternatives, filling information gaps on data-poor chemicals already in commerce, strengthening read-across methodology for categories of chemicals sharing similar modes of action, and optimizing the design of reduced-risk product formulations. Finally, we discuss how these predictive approaches dovetail with in vivo integrated testing strategies within repeated-dose regulatory toxicity studies, which are in line with 3Rs principles to refine, reduce, and replace animal testing. Strategic application of these tools is the foundation for informed and efficient safety assessment testing strategies that can be applied at all stages of the product-development process.

  3. Performance of pilot-scale vertical flow constructed wetlands with and without the emergent macrophyte Spartina alterniflora treating mariculture effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Treger Zydowicz Sousa

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Vertical flow constructed wetlands, planted with and without Spartina alterniflora, were tested for the treatment of mariculture wastewater. Wetlands with and without the emergent macrophyte produced reductions of 89 and 71% for inorganic solids, 82 and 96% for organic solids, 51 and 63% for total nitrogen, 82 and 92% for ammoniacal nitrogen, 64 and 59% for orthophosphate, and 81 and 89% for turbidity, respectively. Wetlands with S. alterniflora showed denitrification tendencies, while wetlands without S. alterniflora had higher oxygen levels leading to nitrification. The results suggest the fundamental role of oxygen controlling the purification processes as well as the potential of constructed wetlands to treat mariculture effluents.

  4. Biocompatibility study of two diblock copolymeric nanoparticles for biomedical applications by in vitro toxicity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goñi-de-Cerio, Felipe [GAIKER Technology Centre (Spain); Mariani, Valentina [European Commission, Nanobiosciences Unit, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre (Italy); Cohen, Dror [Dead Sea Laboratories, AHAVA (Israel); Madi, Lea [Tel-Aviv University, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Sackler School of Medicine (Israel); Thevenot, Julie; Oliveira, Hugo [ENSCPB, Université de Bordeaux (France); Uboldi, Chiara; Giudetti, Guido; Coradeghini, Rosella [European Commission, Nanobiosciences Unit, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre (Italy); Garanger, Elisabeth [ENSCPB, Université de Bordeaux (France); Rossi, François [European Commission, Nanobiosciences Unit, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre (Italy); Portugal-Cohen, Meital; Oron, Miriam [Dead Sea Laboratories, AHAVA (Israel); Korenstein, Rafi [Tel-Aviv University, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Sackler School of Medicine (Israel); Lecommandoux, Sébastien [ENSCPB, Université de Bordeaux (France); Ponti, Jessica [European Commission, Nanobiosciences Unit, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre (Italy); Suárez-Merino, Blanca; Heredia, Pedro, E-mail: heredia@gaiker.es [GAIKER Technology Centre (Spain)

    2013-11-15

    Drugs used for chemotherapy normally carry out adverse, undesired effects. Nanotechnology brings about new horizons to tackle cancer disease with a different strategy. One of the most promising approaches is the use of nanocarriers to transport active drugs. These nanocarriers need to have special properties to avoid immune responses and toxicity, and it is critical to study these effects. Nanocarriers may have different nature, but polypeptide-based copolymers have attracted considerable attention for their biocompatibility, controlled and slow biodegradability as well as low toxicity. Little has been done regarding specific nanocarriers toxicity. In this study, we performed a thorough toxicological study of two different block copolymer nanoparticles (NPs); poly(trimethylene carbonate)-block–poly(l-glutamic acid) (PTMC-b–PGA) and poly(ethylene glycol)-block–poly(γ-benzyl-l-glutamate) (PEG-b–PBLG) with sizes between 113 and 131 nm. Low blood–serum–protein interaction was observed. Moreover, general toxicity assays and other endpoints (apoptosis or necrosis) showed good biocompatibility for both NPs. Reactive oxygen species increased in only two cell lines (HepG2 and TK6) in the presence of PTMC-b–PGA. Cytokine production study showed cytokine induction only in one cell line (A549). We also performed the same assays on human skin organ culture before and after UVB light treatment, with a moderate toxicity after treatment independent of NPs presence or absence. Interleukin 1 induction was also observed due to the combined effect of PEG-b–PBLG and UVB light irradiation. Future in vivo studies for biocompatibility and toxicity will provide more valuable information, but, so far, the findings presented here suggest the possibility of using these two NPs as nanocarriers for nanomedical applications, always taking into account the application procedure and the way in which they are implemented.

  5. Biocompatibility study of two diblock copolymeric nanoparticles for biomedical applications by in vitro toxicity testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goñi-de-Cerio, Felipe; Mariani, Valentina; Cohen, Dror; Madi, Lea; Thevenot, Julie; Oliveira, Hugo; Uboldi, Chiara; Giudetti, Guido; Coradeghini, Rosella; Garanger, Elisabeth; Rossi, François; Portugal-Cohen, Meital; Oron, Miriam; Korenstein, Rafi; Lecommandoux, Sébastien; Ponti, Jessica; Suárez-Merino, Blanca; Heredia, Pedro

    2013-11-01

    Drugs used for chemotherapy normally carry out adverse, undesired effects. Nanotechnology brings about new horizons to tackle cancer disease with a different strategy. One of the most promising approaches is the use of nanocarriers to transport active drugs. These nanocarriers need to have special properties to avoid immune responses and toxicity, and it is critical to study these effects. Nanocarriers may have different nature, but polypeptide-based copolymers have attracted considerable attention for their biocompatibility, controlled and slow biodegradability as well as low toxicity. Little has been done regarding specific nanocarriers toxicity. In this study, we performed a thorough toxicological study of two different block copolymer nanoparticles (NPs); poly(trimethylene carbonate)- block-poly( l-glutamic acid) (PTMC- b-PGA) and poly(ethylene glycol)- block-poly( γ-benzyl- l-glutamate) (PEG- b-PBLG) with sizes between 113 and 131 nm. Low blood-serum-protein interaction was observed. Moreover, general toxicity assays and other endpoints (apoptosis or necrosis) showed good biocompatibility for both NPs. Reactive oxygen species increased in only two cell lines (HepG2 and TK6) in the presence of PTMC- b-PGA. Cytokine production study showed cytokine induction only in one cell line (A549). We also performed the same assays on human skin organ culture before and after UVB light treatment, with a moderate toxicity after treatment independent of NPs presence or absence. Interleukin 1 induction was also observed due to the combined effect of PEG- b-PBLG and UVB light irradiation. Future in vivo studies for biocompatibility and toxicity will provide more valuable information, but, so far, the findings presented here suggest the possibility of using these two NPs as nanocarriers for nanomedical applications, always taking into account the application procedure and the way in which they are implemented.

  6. Water quality assessment in piracicamirim creek upstream and downstream a sugar and ethanol industry through toxicity tests with cladocerans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Grossi Botelho

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available An environmental impact study was conducted to determine the Piracicamirim's creek water quality in order to assess the influence of effluents from a sugar industry in this water body. For this, toxicity tests were performed with a water sample upstream and downstream the industry using the microcrustaceans Daphnia magna, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Ceriodaphnia silvestrii as test organisms, as well as physical and chemical analysis of water. Results showed that physical and chemical parameters did not change during the sampling period, except for the dissolved oxygen. No toxicity was observed for D. magna and reproduction of C. dubia and C. silvestrii in both sampling points. Thus, the industry was not negatively impacting the quality of this water body.

  7. Developmental toxicity testing in the 21st century: the sword of Damocles shattered by embryonic stem cell assays?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Andrea; Oelgeschläger, Michael; Liebsch, Manfred; Pirow, Ralph; Riebeling, Christian; Tralau, Tewes; Luch, Andreas

    2011-11-01

    Modern society faces an inherent dilemma. In our globalized society, we are spoilt for choice by an ever-increasing number of products, many of which are made of new materials and compound mixtures. At the same time, as consumers we got accustomed to the idea of a life minimized for risk, including our own exposure to chemicals from the environment or to compounds present in and released from everyday products. Chemical safety testing bridges these obviously diverging interests, and the corresponding legislation has hence been tremendously extended (e.g., introduction of the European legislation REACH in 2007). However, the underlying regulatory toxicology still relies mainly on animal testing, which is relatively slow, expensive, and ethically arguable. Meanwhile, recent years have seen a surge in efforts to develop alternative testing systems and strategies. Expectations are particularly high for the applicability of stem cells as test systems especially for developmental toxicity testing in vitro. For the first time in history, test systems can be based on differentiating cells and tissue progenitors in culture, thus bringing the 'vision of toxicity testing in the 21st century' a step closer.

  8. A toxicity test in artificial soil based on the life-history strategy of the nematode Plectus acuminatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kammenga, J.E.; Van Koert, P.H.G.; Riksen, J.A.G.; Korthals, G.W.; Bakker, J. [Wageningen Agricultural Univ. (Netherlands)

    1996-05-01

    The ecological risk assessment of toxicants in soil requires reproducible and relevant test systems using a wide range of species. To supplement present test methods from the Organisation of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) in artificial soil with earthworms and springtails, a toxicity test in OECD artificial soil has been developed using the bacterivorous nematode Plectus acuminatus (Bastian, 1865) (Nematoda; Plectidae). The juvenile to adult ratio was used as a test parameter since previous life-cycle studies pointed out that fitness of P. acuminatus was strongly determined by changes in both reproduction and juvenile survival. Optimal conditions for the performance of nematodes in OECD artificial soil were determined (pH{sub KCl} = 5.5, temperature = 20C, and a moisture content of 70% dry wt. artificial soil), and tests were conducted with cadmium, copper, and pentachlorophenol. After an exposure period of 3 weeks the EC50 for cadmium was 321.0 {+-} 1.7 mg/kg dry wt., and the no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC) was 32 mg/kg dry wt. The EC50 for pentachlorophenol was 47.9 {+-} 1.2 mg/kg dry wt., and the NOEC was <10 mg/kg dry wt. For copper the EC50 was 162 {+-} 0.2 mg/kg dry wt., and the NOEC was 32 mg/kg dry wt. It is concluded that the nematode test may well supplement current coil test systems using earthworms and springtails.

  9. Selection of wild macrophytes for use in constructed wetlands for phytoremediation of contaminant mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guittonny-Philippe, Anna; Petit, Marie-Eléonore; Masotti, Véronique; Monnier, Yogan; Malleret, Laure; Coulomb, Bruno; Combroux, Isabelle; Baumberger, Teddy; Viglione, Julien; Laffont-Schwob, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Constructed wetlands (CWs) offer an alternative to traditional industrial wastewater treatment systems that has been proved to be efficient, cost-effective and environmentally friendly. Most of the time, CWs are planted with proliferative species such as Phragmites australis or with plants originating from nurseries, both representing a risk for the natural biodiversity conservation of aquatic ecosystems located downstream of the CWs. For the removal of metals and organic pollutant mixtures present in industrial effluents, it is necessary to select tolerant plant species that are able to produce a high aboveground biomass and to develop a healthy belowground system. Wild plant species growing in aquatic bodies at industrial outfalls could constitute suitable tolerant species to use in CWs for industrial effluent treatment. To test this hypothesis, we assessed, under laboratory conditions (using an experimental design), the tolerance to mixtures of metals (Al, As, Cd, Cu, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sn, Zn) or/and organic pollutants (THC, PHE, PYR, LAS) of five European sub-cosmopolitan native macrophytes (Alisma lanceolatum, Carex cuprina, Epilobium hirsutum, Iris pseudacorus and Juncus inflexus) that had been collected in a polluted Mediterranean wetland, after a field study (crossing ecological relevés and analyses of contaminant concentrations in water and sediments). Our results demonstrated that research on phytoremediation of industrial effluents should focus much more on the use of native macrophytes growing at short distances from industrial discharges (such as C. cuprina in this study), and that root/shoot ratio, aerial height and proportion of green leaves are good and cost-effective indicators of plant tolerance to metals and organic pollutant mixtures in laboratory studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Testing a Microarray to Detect and Monitor Toxic Microalgae in Arcachon Bay in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Jessica U; Del Amo, Yolanda; Costes, Laurence; Medlin, Linda K

    2013-03-05

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) occur worldwide, causing health problems and economic damages to fisheries and tourism. Monitoring agencies are therefore essential, yet monitoring is based only on time-consuming light microscopy, a level at which a correct identification can be limited by insufficient morphological characters. The project MIDTAL (Microarray Detection of Toxic Algae)-an FP7-funded EU project-used rRNA genes (SSU and LSU) as a target on microarrays to identify toxic species. Furthermore, toxins were detected with a newly developed multiplex optical Surface Plasmon Resonance biosensor (Multi SPR) and compared with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In this study, we demonstrate the latest generation of MIDTAL microarrays (version 3) and show the correlation between cell counts, detected toxin and microarray signals from field samples taken in Arcachon Bay in France in 2011. The MIDTAL microarray always detected more potentially toxic species than those detected by microscopic counts. The toxin detection was even more sensitive than both methods. Because of the universal nature of both toxin and species microarrays, they can be used to detect invasive species. Nevertheless, the MIDTAL microarray is not completely universal: first, because not all toxic species are on the chip, and second, because invasive species, such as Ostreopsis, already influence European coasts.

  11. The pH dependent toxicity and bioaccumulation of chloroquine tested on S. viminalis (basket willow)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rendal, Cecilie; Trapp, Stefan; Legind, Charlotte Nielsen

    2010-01-01

    only been investigated sparingly in practical laboratory experiments leaving limited data with which to confirm the accuracy of current modeling efforts in the area. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of pH on the the bioaccumulation and toxicity of the malaria drug chloroquine (a...

  12. Advances in the development and use of human tissue-based techniques for drug toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clotworthy, Margaret; Archibald, Kathy

    2013-09-01

    Unacceptable failure rates in clinical trials are largely responsible for the high costs of bringing successful drugs to market - costs that are passed on to patients, insurers or healthcare providers. Furthermore, failures in clinical trials deny patients much-needed new drugs and potentially expose them to unnecessary risk. With so many medicines reaching their patent expiry date, pressure is on the pharmaceutical industry to not only increase its output of effective medicines but also improve its ability to minimise safety issues. This review focuses on the availability and use of human tissues and their derivatives to explore potential toxicity problems of new drugs. The growth in the number and quality of human material-based assays and enabling technologies is reviewed, followed by a discussion of the application of such assays to identify specific toxicities, using specific examples. Although human tissues are now beginning to be seen as playing an important role in evaluating the potential for toxicity of new drugs in the clinic, their importance deserves to be more widely recognised and their use in the identification of toxicity issues as early as possible in the drug development life cycle should be significantly increased.

  13. Testing a Microarray to Detect and Monitor Toxic Microalgae in Arcachon Bay in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda K. Medlin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Harmful algal blooms (HABs occur worldwide, causing health problems and economic damages to fisheries and tourism. Monitoring agencies are therefore essential, yet monitoring is based only on time-consuming light microscopy, a level at which a correct identification can be limited by insufficient morphological characters. The project MIDTAL (Microarray Detection of Toxic Algae—an FP7-funded EU project—used rRNA genes (SSU and LSU as a target on microarrays to identify toxic species. Furthermore, toxins were detected with a newly developed multiplex optical Surface Plasmon Resonance biosensor (Multi SPR and compared with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. In this study, we demonstrate the latest generation of MIDTAL microarrays (version 3 and show the correlation between cell counts, detected toxin and microarray signals from field samples taken in Arcachon Bay in France in 2011. The MIDTAL microarray always detected more potentially toxic species than those detected by microscopic counts. The toxin detection was even more sensitive than both methods. Because of the universal nature of both toxin and species microarrays, they can be used to detect invasive species. Nevertheless, the MIDTAL microarray is not completely universal: first, because not all toxic species are on the chip, and second, because invasive species, such as Ostreopsis, already influence European coasts.

  14. The toxicity test and hypothetical model of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa helix4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU; Yanhui(苏彦辉); QU; Hong(曲红); Vachon; Vincent; LUO; Jingchu(罗静初); ZHANG; Jie(张杰); Laprade; Raynald; ZHU; Yuxian(朱玉贤)

    2002-01-01

    Development of targeted biological agents against agricultural insect pests is of prime importance for the elaboration and implementation of integrated pest management strategies that are environment-friendly, respectful of bio-diversity and safer to human health through reduced use of chemical pesticides. A major goal to understand how Bt toxins work is to elucidate the functions of their three domains. Domains II and III are involved in binding specificity and structural integrity, but the function of Domain I remains poorly understood. Using a Manduca sexta BBMV (brush border membrane vesicles) system, we analyzed its responses to Cry1Aa 15 single-point mutations with altered Domain I helix 4 residues. Light scattering assay showed that toxicity was almost lost in 3 mutants, and we observed significantly reduced toxicity in other 7 mutants. However, 5 mutants retained wild-type toxicity. Using computer software, we simulated the three-dimensional structures of helix 4. Both experimental and bioinformatic analysis showed that residues in Cry1Aa Domain I helix 4 were involved in the formation of ion channels that is critical for its insect toxicity.

  15. Toxicity testing of chitosan from tiger prawn shell waste on cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maretaningtias Dwi Ariani

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: A biomaterial used in oral cavity should not become toxic, irritant, carcinogenic, and allergenic. Chitosan represents a new biomaterial in dentistry. Purpose: To examine the toxicity of chitosan from tiger prawn shell waste on cell culture with MTT assay. Methods: Chitosan with concentration of 0.25%, 0.5%, 0.75% and 1% was used in this experiment. Each sample was immersed on eppendorf microtubes containing media culture. After 24 hours, the immersion of media culture was used to examine the toxicity effects on BHK-21 cell based on MTT assay method. The density of optic formazan indicates the number of living cells. All data were then statistically analyzed by one-way Anava. Results: The number of living cells in chitosan from tiger prawn shell waste was 93.16%; 85.07%; 78.48%; 75.66%. Thus, there was no significant difference among groups. Conclusion: Chitosan with 0.25%, 0.5%, 0.75% and 1% concentrations from tiger prawn shell waste were not toxic for BHK-21 cell culture when using parameter CD50.

  16. The extended statistical analysis of toxicity tests using standardised effect sizes (SESs: a comparison of nine published papers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F W Festing

    Full Text Available The safety of chemicals, drugs, novel foods and genetically modified crops is often tested using repeat-dose sub-acute toxicity tests in rats or mice. It is important to avoid misinterpretations of the results as these tests are used to help determine safe exposure levels in humans. Treated and control groups are compared for a range of haematological, biochemical and other biomarkers which may indicate tissue damage or other adverse effects. However, the statistical analysis and presentation of such data poses problems due to the large number of statistical tests which are involved. Often, it is not clear whether a "statistically significant" effect is real or a false positive (type I error due to sampling variation. The author's conclusions appear to be reached somewhat subjectively by the pattern of statistical significances, discounting those which they judge to be type I errors and ignoring any biomarker where the p-value is greater than p = 0.05. However, by using standardised effect sizes (SESs a range of graphical methods and an over-all assessment of the mean absolute response can be made. The approach is an extension, not a replacement of existing methods. It is intended to assist toxicologists and regulators in the interpretation of the results. Here, the SES analysis has been applied to data from nine published sub-acute toxicity tests in order to compare the findings with those of the author's. Line plots, box plots and bar plots show the pattern of response. Dose-response relationships are easily seen. A "bootstrap" test compares the mean absolute differences across dose groups. In four out of seven papers where the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL was estimated by the authors, it was set too high according to the bootstrap test, suggesting that possible toxicity is under-estimated.

  17. The ToxBank Data Warehouse: Supporting the Replacement of In Vivo Repeated Dose Systemic Toxicity Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohonen, Pekka; Benfenati, Emilio; Bower, David; Ceder, Rebecca; Crump, Michael; Cross, Kevin; Grafström, Roland C; Healy, Lyn; Helma, Christoph; Jeliazkova, Nina; Jeliazkov, Vedrin; Maggioni, Silvia; Miller, Scott; Myatt, Glenn; Rautenberg, Michael; Stacey, Glyn; Willighagen, Egon; Wiseman, Jeff; Hardy, Barry

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the SEURAT-1 (Safety Evaluation Ultimately Replacing Animal Testing-1) research cluster, comprised of seven EU FP7 Health projects co-financed by Cosmetics Europe, is to generate a proof-of-concept to show how the latest technologies, systems toxicology and toxicogenomics can be combined to deliver a test replacement for repeated dose systemic toxicity testing on animals. The SEURAT-1 strategy is to adopt a mode-of-action framework to describe repeated dose toxicity, combining in vitro and in silico methods to derive predictions of in vivo toxicity responses. ToxBank is the cross-cluster infrastructure project whose activities include the development of a data warehouse to provide a web-accessible shared repository of research data and protocols, a physical compounds repository, reference or "gold compounds" for use across the cluster (available via wiki.toxbank.net), and a reference resource for biomaterials. Core technologies used in the data warehouse include the ISA-Tab universal data exchange format, REpresentational State Transfer (REST) web services, the W3C Resource Description Framework (RDF) and the OpenTox standards. We describe the design of the data warehouse based on cluster requirements, the implementation based on open standards, and finally the underlying concepts and initial results of a data analysis utilizing public data related to the gold compounds. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Construction of the Database of Rat Repeated-dose Toxicity Tests of Pesticides for the Toxicological Characterization of Hepatocyte Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Akane; Masuda, Miyabi; Kawano, Takuya; Kitsunai, Yoko; Nakayama, Haruka; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Kitamura, Shigeyuki; Uramaru, Naoto; Hosaka, Takuomi; Sasaki, Takamitsu; Yoshinari, Kouichi

    2017-01-01

     Liver and hepatocyte hypertrophy can be induced by exposure to chemical compounds, but the mechanisms and toxicological characteristics of these phenomena have not yet been investigated extensively. In particular, it remains unclear whether the hepatocyte hypertrophy induced by chemical compounds should be judged as an adaptive response or an adverse effect. Thus, understanding of the toxicological characteristics of hepatocyte hypertrophy is of great importance to the safety evaluation of pesticides and other chemical compounds. To this end, we have constructed a database of potentially toxic pesticides. Using risk assessment reports of pesticides that are publicly available from the Food Safety Commission of Japan, we extracted all observations/findings that were based on 90-day subacute toxicity tests and 2-year chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity tests in rats. Analysis of the database revealed that hepatocyte hypertrophy was observed for 37-47% of the pesticides investigated (varying depending on sex and testing period), and that centrilobular hepatocyte hypertrophy was the most frequent among the various types of hepatocyte hypertrophy in both the 90-day and 2-year studies. The database constructed in this study enables us to investigate the relationships between hepatocyte hypertrophy and other toxicological observations/findings, and thus will be useful for characterizing hepatocyte hypertrophy.

  19. Toxicity effect of dichlorvos on loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus) assessed by micronucleus test, hepatase activity analysis and comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Ping; Yan, Shuaiguo; Li, Li; Chen, Jianjun; Du, Qiyan; Chang, Zhongjie

    2015-06-01

    Pesticides and other chemicals at environmental concentrations often have detrimental effects. Many aquatic species are particularly threatened because of their susceptibility and also because water environment are often polluted. This study preliminarily evaluated the toxicity effect of dichlorvos (DDVP) on loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus) using the methods of micronucleus (MN) test, hepatase activity and comet assay. The tested results showed that indeed very little DDVP had strong toxicity effect on loach and its 50% lethal concentration (LC50) at 24 h, 48 h and 96 h was 8.38 μg l(-1), 7.168 μg l(-1) and 6.411 μg l(-1), respectively; The glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT) and glutamic-oxalacetic transaminase (GOT) activity of loach liver decreased; meanwhile, the GPT and GOT activity of loach serum, the MN rate (‰) and three comet parameters of tested fish increased with the increase in the treatment concentration and treatment time of DDVP, and there was significant difference between control group and each treatment group (p < 0.05). These results suggested that DDVP residues might become toxic chemical contaminant in environment and would threaten aquatic and other organisms.

  20. Comparison of Toxicity of Sediments from Rivers with Different Levels of Anthropogenic Load (Middle Volga Region, Russia Based on Elutriate and Whole Sediment Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.Yu. Stepanova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Description of chemical characteristics and toxicity testing of whole sediment and elutri-ate have been performed with 35 samples taken during the monitoring of rivers in the Middle Volga region (Tatarstan, Russia in 2013. The locations analyzed are sites associated with agriculture, forestry, and petroleum hydrocarbons (oil production. The toxicity tests include: (1 Chlorella vulgaris (algal elutriate test, (2 Paramecium caudatum (ciliate elutriate test, (3 Daphnia magna (cladoceran whole sediment toxicity test, and (4 Heterocypris incongruens (ostracod whole sediment toxicity test. The concentrations of metals in 43% of sediment samples have been found to exceed probable effect concentration sediment quality guidelines (SQGs. However, the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs and organochlorine pesticides have turned out to be below SQGs in most sites. The correlation analysis has shown metal toxicity to daphnid reproduction and ostracod growth (R2 = 0.34–0.64 and ammonia (R2 = 0.49–0.54. A higher percentage of samples have shown toxicity in the whole sediment tests (86% compared to the elutriate tests (54%. A total of 91% of samples have demonstrated toxicity for at least one species. Toxicity has been most frequently observed for daphnid reproduction (83% of samples and ostracod growth (56% of samples compared to daphnid (23% survival, ostracod (11% survival, and ciliate reproduction (54% or algal growth (54%. The most polluted sediments have been registered in the area of oil production. The comparison of toxicity of the samples from different types of areas has indicated that 100% of samples from the oil production area, 94% of samples from the agricultural area, and 50% of samples from the forest area were toxic to at least one test organism.

  1. Comparing the effectiveness of chronic water column tests with the crustaceans Hyalella azteca (order: Amphipoda) and Ceriodaphnia dubia (order: Cladocera) in detecting toxicity of current-use insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deanovic, Linda A; Markiewicz, Dan; Stillway, Marie; Fong, Stephanie; Werner, Inge

    2013-03-01

    Standard U.S. Environmental Protection Agency laboratory tests are used to monitor water column toxicity in U.S. surface waters. The water flea Ceriodaphnia dubia is among the most sensitive test species for detecting insecticide toxicity in freshwater environments.Its usefulness is limited, however, when water conductivity exceeds 2,000 µS/cm (approximately 1 ppt salinity) and test effectiveness is insufficient. Water column toxicity tests using the euryhaline amphipod Hyalella azteca could complement C. dubia tests; however, standard chronic protocols do not exist. The present study compares the effectiveness of two water column toxicity tests in detecting the toxicity of two organophosphate (OP) and two pyrethroid insecticides: the short-term chronic C. dubia test, which measures mortality and fecundity, and a 10-d H. azteca test, which measures mortality and growth. Sensitivity was evaluated by comparing effect data, and end point variability was evaluated by comparing minimum significant differences. Tests were performed in synthetic water and filtered ambient water to quantify the influence of water matrix on effect concentrations. The H. azteca test detected pyrethroid toxicity far more effectively, while the C. dubia test was more sensitive to OPs. Among endpoints, H. azteca mortality was most robust. The results demonstrate that the H. azteca test is preferable when conductivity of water samples is 2,000 to 10,000 µS/cm or if contaminants of concern include pyrethroid insecticides.

  2. Plant based phosphorus recovery from wastewater via algae and macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilton, Andrew N; Powell, Nicola; Guieysse, Benoit

    2012-12-01

    At present, resource recovery by irrigation of wastewater to plants is usually driven by the value of the water resource rather than phosphorus recovery. Expanded irrigation for increased phosphorus recovery may be expected as the scarcity and price of phosphorus increases, but providing the necessary treatment, storage and conveyance comes at significant expense. An alternative to taking the wastewater to the plants is instead to take the plants to the wastewater. Algal ponds and macrophyte wetlands are already in widespread use for wastewater treatment and if harvested, would require less than one-tenth of the area to recover phosphorus compared to terrestrial crops/pastures. This area could be further decreased if the phosphorus content of the macrophytes and algae biomass was tripled from 1% to 3% via luxury uptake. While this and many other opportunities for plant based recovery of phosphorus exist, e.g. offshore cultivation, much of this technology development is still in its infancy. Research that enhances our understanding of how to maximise phosphorus uptake and harvest yields; and further add value to the biomass for reuse would see the recovery of phosphorus via plants become an important solution in the future.

  3. Efficiency of aquatic macrophytes to treat Nile tilapia pond effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry-Silva Gustavo Gonzaga

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The effluents from fish farming can increase the quantity of suspended solids and promote the enrichment of nitrogen and phosphorus in aquatic ecosystems. In this context, the aim of this work was to evaluate the efficiency of three species of floating aquatic macrophytes (Eichhornia crassipes, Pistia stratiotes and Salvinia molesta to treat effluents from Nile tilapia culture ponds. The effluent originated from a 1,000-m² pond stocked with 2,000 male Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus. The treatment systems consisted of 12 experimental tanks, three tanks for each macrophyte species, and three control tanks (without plants. Water samples were collected from the: (i fish pond source water, (ii effluent from fish pond and (iii effluents from the treatment tanks. The following water variables were evaluated: turbidity, total and dissolved nitrogen, ammoniacal-N, nitrate-N, nitrite-N, total phosphorus and dissolved phosphorus. E. crassipes and P. stratiotes were more efficient in total phosphorus removal (82.0% and 83.3%, respectively and total nitrogen removal (46.1% and 43.9%, respectively than the S. molesta (72.1% total phosphorus and 42.7% total nitrogen and the control (50.3% total phosphorus and 22.8% total nitrogen, indicating that the treated effluents may be reused in the aquaculture activity.

  4. Monitoring the dynamics of an invasive emergent macrophyte community using operational remote sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, T.P.; Ode, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    Potamogeton crispus L. (curly pondweed) is a cosmopolitan aquatic macrophyte considered invasive in North America and elsewhere. Its range is expanding and, on individual water bodies, its coverage can be dynamic both within and among years. In this study, we evaluate the use of free and low-cost satellite remote sensing data to monitor a problematic emergent macrophyte community dominated by P. crispus. Between 2000 and 2006, we acquired eight satellite images of 24,000-ha Lake Sharpe, South Dakota (USA). During one of the dates for which satellite imagery was acquired, we sampled the lake for P. crispus and other emergent macrophytes using GPS and photography for documentation. We used cluster analysis to assist in classification of the satellite imagery and independently validated results using the field data. Resulting estimates of emergent macrophyte coverage ranged from less than 20 ha in 2002 to 245 ha in 2004. Accuracy assessment indicated 82% of image pixels were correctly classified, with errors being primarily due to failure to identify emergent macrophytes. These results emphasize the dynamic nature of P. crispus-dominated macrophyte communities and show how they can be effectively monitored over large areas using low-cost remote sensing imagery. While results may vary in other systems depending on water quality and local flora, such an approach could be applied elsewhere and for a variety of macrophyte communities. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010.

  5. Effect of olive mill wastewaters on the oxygen consumption by activated sludge microorganisms: an acute toxicity test method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paixão, S M; Anselmo, A M

    2002-01-01

    The test for inhibition of oxygen consumption by activated sludge (ISO 8192-1986 (E)) was evaluated as a tool for assessing, the acute toxicity of olive mill wastewaters (OMW). According to the ISO test, information generated by this method may be helpful in estimating the effect of a test material on bacterial communities in the aquatic environment, especially in aerobic biological treatment systems. However, the lack of standardized bioassay methodology for effluents imposed that the test conditions were modified and adapted. The experiments were conducted in the presence or absence of an easily biodegradable carbon source (glucose) with different contact times (20 min and 24 h). The results obtained showed a remarkable stimulatory effect of this effluent to the activated sludge microorganisms. In fact, the oxygen uptake rate values increase with increasing effluent concentrations and contact times up to 0.98 microl O(2) h(-1) mg(-1) dry weight for a 100% OMW sample, 24 h contact time, with blanks exhibiting an oxygen uptake rate of ca. 1/10 of this value (0.07-0.10). It seems that the application of the ISO test as an acute toxicity test for effluents should be reconsidered, with convenient adaptation for its utilization as a method of estimating the effect on bacterial communities present in aerobic biological treatment systems.

  6. Human Health Risk Assessment Based on Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure and Simple Bioaccessibility Extraction Test of Toxic Metals in Urban Street Dust of Tianjin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Binbin; Wang, Yu; Zhou, Qixing

    2014-01-01

    The potential ecological and human health risk related with urban street dust from urban areas of Tianjin, China was quantitatively analyzed using the method of toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and simple bioaccessibility extraction test (SBET). In the study, Hakason index, Nemerow index (P), the hazard index (HI) and the cancer risk index (RI) were calculated to assess the potential risk. The sequence of potential ecological risk based on Hakason index was arsenic (As) > cadmium (Cd) > lead (Pb) > copper (Cu) > chromium (Cr), in particular, As and Cd were regarded as high polluted metals. While the results of extraction of TCLP were assessed using P, the sequence was As > Pb > Cd > Cr > Cu, which mean that As and Pb should be low polluted, and Cd, Cr and Cu would barely not polluted. For human health, total carcinogenic risk for children and adults was 2.01×10−3 and 1.05×10−3, respectively. This could be considered to be intolerable in urban street dust exposure. The sequence in the hazard quotient (HQ) of each element was As > Cr > Pb > Cu > Cd. The HI value of these toxic metals in urban street dust for children and adults was 5.88×10−1 and 2.80×10−1, respectively. According to the characters of chemistry, mobility, and bioavailability of metals in urban street dust, we estimated the hazards on the environment and human health, which will help us to get more reasonable information for risk management of metals in urban environment. PMID:24651129

  7. Human health risk assessment based on toxicity characteristic leaching procedure and simple bioaccessibility extraction test of toxic metals in urban street dust of Tianjin, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binbin Yu

    Full Text Available The potential ecological and human health risk related with urban street dust from urban areas of Tianjin, China was quantitatively analyzed using the method of toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP and simple bioaccessibility extraction test (SBET. In the study, Hakason index, Nemerow index (P, the hazard index (HI and the cancer risk index (RI were calculated to assess the potential risk. The sequence of potential ecological risk based on Hakason index was arsenic (As > cadmium (Cd > lead (Pb > copper (Cu > chromium (Cr, in particular, As and Cd were regarded as high polluted metals. While the results of extraction of TCLP were assessed using P, the sequence was As > Pb > Cd > Cr > Cu, which mean that As and Pb should be low polluted, and Cd, Cr and Cu would barely not polluted. For human health, total carcinogenic risk for children and adults was 2.01 × 10(-3 and 1.05 × 10(-3, respectively. This could be considered to be intolerable in urban street dust exposure. The sequence in the hazard quotient (HQ of each element was As > Cr > Pb > Cu > Cd. The HI value of these toxic metals in urban street dust for children and adults was 5.88 × 10(-1 and 2.80 × 10(-1, respectively. According to the characters of chemistry, mobility, and bioavailability of metals in urban street dust, we estimated the hazards on the environment and human health, which will help us to get more reasonable information for risk management of metals in urban environment.

  8. Responses of aquatic macrophyte cover and productivity to flooding variability on the Amazon floodplain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Thiago S F; Melack, John M; Novo, Evlyn M L M

    2013-11-01

    Macrophyte net primary productivity (NPP) is a significant but understudied component of the carbon budget in large Amazonian floodplains. Annual NPP is determined by the interaction between stem elongation (vertical growth) and plant cover changes (horizontal expansion), each affected differently by flood duration and amplitude. Therefore, hydrological changes as predicted for the Amazon basin could result in significant changes in annual macrophyte NPP. This study investigates the responses of macrophyte horizontal expansion and vertical growth to flooding variability, and its possible effects on the contribution of macrophytes to the carbon budget of Amazonian floodplains. Monthly macrophyte cover was estimated using satellite imagery for the 2003-2004 and 2004-2005 hydrological years, and biomass was measured in situ between 2003 and 2004. Regression models between macrophyte variables and river-stage data were used to build a semiempirical model of macrophyte NPP as a function of water level. Historical river-stage records (1970-2011) were used to simulate variations in NPP, as a function of annual flooding. Vertical growth varied by a factor of ca. 2 over the simulated years, whereas minimum and maximum annual cover varied by ca. 3.5 and 1.5, respectively. Results suggest that these processes act in opposite directions to determine macrophyte NPP, with larger sensitivity to changes in vertical growth, and thus maximum flooding levels. Years with uncommonly large flooding amplitude resulted in the highest NPP values, as both horizontal expansion and vertical growth were enhanced under these conditions. Over the simulated period, annual NPP varied by ca. 1.5 (1.06-1.63 TgC yr(-1) ). A small increasing trend in flooding amplitude, and by extension NPP, was observed for the studied period. Variability in growth rates caused by local biotic and abiotic factors, and the lack of knowledge on macrophyte physiological responses to extreme hydrological conditions

  9. Reproductive toxicity of bisphenol A and cadmium in Potamopyrgus antipodarum and modulation of bisphenol A effects by different test temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sieratowicz, Agnes, E-mail: A.Sieratowicz@bio.uni-frankfurt.de [Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Department of Aquatic Ecotoxicology, Siesmayerstrasse 70, 60323 Frankfurt (Germany); Stange, Daniela, E-mail: stange@bio.uni-frankfurt.de [Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Department of Aquatic Ecotoxicology, Siesmayerstrasse 70, 60323 Frankfurt (Germany); Schulte-Oehlmann, Ulrike, E-mail: schulte-oehlmann@bio.uni-frankfurt.de [Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Department of Aquatic Ecotoxicology, Siesmayerstrasse 70, 60323 Frankfurt (Germany); Oehlmann, Joerg, E-mail: oehlmann@bio.uni-frankfurt.de [Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Department of Aquatic Ecotoxicology, Siesmayerstrasse 70, 60323 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    An OECD initiative for the development of mollusc-based toxicity tests for endocrine disrupters and other chemicals has recommended three test species with respective test designs for further standardisation. Preparing a subsequent pre-validation study we performed a reproduction test with Potamopyrgus antipodarum, determining the concentration range of the selected test substances, bisphenol A (BPA) and cadmium (Cd). At 16 deg. C, the recommended test temperature, the number of embryos in the brood pouch was increased by BPA and decreased by Cd (NOEC: 20 {mu}g BPA/L and 1 {mu}g Cd/L). Coinstantaneous BPA tests at 7 deg. C and 25 deg. C demonstrated a temperature dependency of the response, resulting in lower NOECs (5 {mu}g/L respectively). As expected, reproduction in control groups significantly varied depending on temperature. Additional observations of the brood stock showed seasonal fluctuations in reproduction under constant laboratory conditions. The recommended temperature range and test conditions have to be further investigated. - Highlights: > We performed a reproduction test with the mollusc Potamopyrgus antipodarum. > We defined the test substance concentration range for a pre-validation study. > The bisphenol A effect (increased reproduction) depends on the test temperature. > Reproduction of control groups significantly varies depending on temperature. > The brood stock shows seasonal fluctuations in reproduction at constant conditions. - A reproduction test with Potamopyrgus antipodarum with 2 substances for subsequent pre-validation is presented and bisphenol A effects show a temperature dependency.

  10. In-vitro methods for testing dermal absorption and penetration of toxic gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Sharyn; Pisaniello, Dino; Edwards, John W; Bromwich, David; Reed, Sue; Logan, Michael; Baxter, Christina

    2014-01-01

    This technical note provides details of an experimental technique for in-vitro skin studies with atmospheric chemical challenge. There appear to be major evidence gaps in relation to dermal exposure of gases. We describe a modification of standard OECD protocols for an atmospheric delivery system which can be used to understand interaction of toxic gases and the skin. The system can be used to examine the mechanisms by which skin uptake occurs. Auxiliary components which allow for parameter variation such as temperature and relative humidity are also described. Methodology presented in this technical note uses examples of gas challenges (ammonia, chlorine) to illustrate its application to gases of differing physicochemical properties. This adapted protocol can be applied in the context of HAZMAT scenarios involving atmospheric toxic chemical release and dermal absorption potential under variable exposure conditions.

  11. Temporal and spatial distribution of macrophytes in the Gruža Reservoir (Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topuzović Marina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A survey of aquatic macrophytes in the Gruža Reservoir (Serbia was conducted during the period 2007-2008. Detailed data on the actual condition of macrophytes were established and compared between four parts of the reservoir. The distributions of most aquatic macrophytes of the Gruža Reservoir are heterogeneous, with different values of the MMT and MMO indices and low values of the distribution ratio. Quantitative analysis indicates that the greatest diversity and abundance of species can be found in those parts of the reservoir with the shallowest water and greatest indentation of the shoreline.

  12. Should oral gavage be abandoned in toxicity testing of endocrine disruptors?

    OpenAIRE

    Vandenberg, Laura N; Welshons, Wade V.; Frederick S vom Saal; Toutain, Pierre-Louis

    2014-01-01

    For decades, hazard assessments for environmental chemicals have used intra-gastric gavage to assess the effects of ‘oral’ exposures. It is now widely used – and in some cases required – by US federal agencies to assess potential toxicity of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). In this review we enumerate several reasons why gavage is not appropriate for the assessment of EDCs using bisphenol A (BPA) as a main example. First, whereas human dietary exposures interact with the oral mucosa, ga...

  13. A rapid phenol toxicity test based on photosynthesis and movement of the freshwater flagellate, Euglena agilis Carter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kottuparambil, Sreejith [Institute of Green Environmental Research Center, Incheon National University, Incheon 406 840 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Youn-Jung [Institute of Green Environmental Research Center, Incheon National University, Incheon 406 840 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Marine Science, Incheon National University, Incheon 406 840 (Korea, Republic of); Green-Pioneer (Ltd.), Incheon National University, Incheon 406 840 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hoon; Kim, Mi-Sung; Park, Areum; Park, Jihae [Institute of Green Environmental Research Center, Incheon National University, Incheon 406 840 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Woongghi [Department of Biology, Chungnam University, Daejeon 306 764 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Taejun, E-mail: hanalgae@hanmail.net [Institute of Green Environmental Research Center, Incheon National University, Incheon 406 840 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Marine Science, Incheon National University, Incheon 406 840 (Korea, Republic of); Green-Pioneer (Ltd.), Incheon National University, Incheon 406 840 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Rapid phenol toxicity tests (1 h) were developed based on Chl a fluorescence and the movement parameters of Euglena agilis. • Phenol significantly reduced F{sub v}/F{sub m} of PS II and rETRmax with EC50 values of 8.94 and 4.67 mM, respectively. • Among the movement parameters tested, velocity was the most sensitive biomarker with an EC50 of 3.17 mM. • The EC50 values for F{sub v}/F{sub m}, motility, and velocity appear to overlap the environmental permissible levels of phenol. - Abstract: Phenol, a monosubstituted aromatic hydrocarbon with various commercial uses, is a major organic constituent in industrial wastewaters. The ecotoxic action of phenol for aquatic environment is well known. In this study, rapid phenol toxicity tests (1 h) were developed based on chlorophyll a (Chl a) fluorescence and the movement parameters of the freshwater flagellate, Euglena agilis Carter. Phenol significantly reduced the maximum quantum yield (F{sub v}/F{sub m}) of photosystem II (PS II) and the maximum photosynthetic electron transport rate (rETR{sub max}) with median effective concentration (EC{sub 50}) values of 8.94 and 4.67 mM, respectively. Phenol reduced the motility and triggered change in the swimming velocity of the test organism. Among the parameters tested, velocity was the most sensitive biomarker with an EC{sub 50} of 3.17 mM. The EC{sub 50} values for F{sub v}/F{sub m}, motility, and velocity appear to overlap the permitted levels of phenol. In conclusion, the photosynthesis and movement of E. agilis can be fast and sensitive risk assessment parameters for the evaluation of phenol toxicity in municipal and industrial effluents.

  14. Guidance on the selection of cohorts for the extended one-generation reproduction toxicity study (OECD test guideline 443).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Nigel P; Beekhuijzen, Manon; Boogaard, Peter J; Foreman, Jennifer E; North, Colin M; Palermo, Christine; Schneider, Steffen; Strauss, Volker; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Poole, Alan

    2016-10-01

    The extended one-generation reproduction toxicity study (EOGRTS; OECD test guideline 433) is a new and technically complex design to evaluate the putative effects of chemicals on fertility and development, including effects upon the developing nervous and immune systems. In addition to offering a more comprehensive assessment of developmental toxicity, the EOGRTS offers important improvements in animal welfare through reduction and refinement in a modular study design. The challenge to the practitioner is to know how the modular aspects of the study should be triggered on the basis of prior knowledge of a particular chemical, or on earlier findings in the EOGRTS itself, requirements of specific regulatory frameworks notwithstanding. The purpose of this document is to offer guidance on science-based triggers for these extended evaluations.

  15. Albendazole causes stage-dependent developmental toxicity and is deactivated by a mammalian metabolization system in a modified zebrafish embryotoxicity test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Anna; Ullerås, Erik; Patring, Johan; Oskarsson, Agneta

    2012-08-01

    The zebrafish embryotoxicity test has previously been combined with an external metabolic activation system (MAS) to assess developmental toxicity of metabolites produced by maternal metabolism. Due to toxicity of MAS the exposure was limited to one early and short period. We have modified the method and included additional testing time points with extended exposure durations. Using the anthelmintic drug albendazole as a model substance, we demonstrated stage-dependent toxic effects at three windows of zebrafish embryo development, i.e. 2-3, 12-14 and 24-28h post fertilization, and showed that MAS, by metabolic deactivation, reduced the toxicity of albendazole at all time points. Chemical analysis confirmed that albendazole was efficiently metabolized by MAS to the corresponding sulfoxide and sulfone, which are non-toxic to zebrafish embryos. To conclude, the modified zebrafish embryotoxicity test with MAS can be expanded for assessment of metabolites at different developmental stages.

  16. Sensitivity of microscale ecotoxicity tests and their suitability to measure toxicity of environmental samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaal MA; Folkerts AJ; ECO

    1998-01-01

    Aquatic microbiotests were selected and evaluated for their potential usefulness in measuring ecotoxicity in monitoring programs. Microbiotests are tests with aquatic invertebrates that demand a shorter exposure period and a smaller test volume than conventional aquatic ecotoxicity test methods. Mi

  17. Application of macrophytes as biosorbents for radioactive liquid waste treatment; Aplicacao de macrofitas como biossorventes no tratamento de rejeitos radioativos liquidos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Ludmila Cabreira

    2016-07-01

    Radioactive waste as any other type of waste should be treated and disposed adequately. It is necessary to consider its physical, chemical and radiological characteristics for choosing the appropriate action for the treatment and final disposal. Many treatment techniques currently used are economically costly, often invalidating its use and favoring the study of other treatment techniques. One of these techniques is biosorption, which demonstrates high potential when applied to radioactive waste. This technology uses materials of biological origin for removing metals. Among potential biosorbents found, macrophyte aquatics are useful because they may remove uranium present in the liquid radioactive waste at low cost. This study aims to evaluate the biosorption capacity of macrophyte aquatics Pistia stratiotes, Limnobium laevigatum, Lemna sp and Azolla sp in the treatment of liquid radioactive waste. This study was divided into two stages, the first one is characterization and preparation of biosorption and the other is tests, carried out with uranium solutions and real samples. The biomass was tested in its raw form and biosorption assays were performed in polypropylene vials containing 10 ml of solution of uranium or 10ml of radioactive waste and 0.20g of biomass. The behavior of biomass was evaluated by sorption kinetics and isotherm models. The highest sorption capacities found was 162.1 mg / g for the macrophyte Lemna sp and 161.8 mg / g for the Azolla sp. The equilibrium times obtained were 1 hour for Lemna sp, and 30 minutes for Azolla sp. With the real waste, the macrophyte Azolla sp presented a sorption capacity of 2.6 mg / g. These results suggest that Azolla sp has a larger capacity of biosorption, therefore it is more suitable for more detailed studies of treatment of liquid radioactive waste. (author)

  18. The effect of pH on the uptake and toxicity of the bivalent weak base chloroquine tested on Salix viminalis and Daphnia magna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rendal, Cecilie; Kusk, Kresten Ole; Trapp, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    , and therefore a higher toxicity can be expected. The current study examines the pHdependent toxicity and bioaccumulation of the bivalent weak base chloroquine (pKa: 10.47 and 6.33, log KOW 4.67) tested on Salix viminalis (basket willow) and Daphnia magna (water flea). The transpiration rates of hydroponically...

  19. Assessing variability in chemical acute toxicity of unionid mussels: Influence of intra- and inter-laboratory testing, life stage, and species - SETAC Abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    We developed a toxicity database for unionid mussels to examine the extent of intra- and inter-laboratory variability in acute toxicity tests with mussel larvae (glochidia) and juveniles; the extent of differential sensitivity of the two life stages; and the variation in sensitiv...

  20. Assessing variability in chemical acute toxicity of unionid mussels: Influence of intra- and inter-laboratory testing, life stage, and species

    Science.gov (United States)

    The authors developed a toxicity database for unionid mussels to examine the extent of intra- and interlaboratory variability in acute toxicity tests with mussel larvae (glochidia) and juveniles; the extent of differential sensitivity of the 2 life stages; and the variation in se...