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Sample records for macrophomina phaseolina propagules

  1. A Quantitative PCR Assay for Macrophomina phaseolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcoal rot of soybean is caused by Macrophomina phaseolina and crop damage may be considerable under conditions of high temperature or drought. This soilborne fungus has a wide host range, with numerous isolates infecting about 500 plant species in more than 100 families throughout the world. In...

  2. Reaction of Drought Tolerant Soybean Genotypes to Macrophomina phaseolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcoal rot caused by Macrophomina phaseolina is a common disease of soybean, and resistant genotypes are not available. Level of soybean genotype resistance and susceptibility to M. phaseolina is most frequently measured by determining colony forming units of M. phaseolina/g root, but using this ...

  3. Development of tools for Macrophomina phaseolina evaluation and for genetic improvement of resistance in common bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashy stem blight, caused by Macrophomina phaseolina, causes significant yield reduction in the tropics and subtropics, often in association with drought stress. In this study, a collection of Macrophomina phaseolina isolates was assembled in Puerto Rico for the study of pathogen diversity using sequ...

  4. An insight into the lignin peroxidase of Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Mohammed Touaha; Habib, Abdul Musaweer; Chowdhury, Dil Umme Salma; Bhuiyan, Md Iqbal Kaiser; Mostafa, Kazi Md Golam; Mondol, Sobuj; Mosleh, Ivan Mhai

    2013-01-01

    Macrophomina phaseolina is one of the deadliest necrotrophic fungal pathogens that infect more than 500 plant species including major food, fiber, and oil crops all throughout the globe. It secretes a cocktail of ligninolytic enzymes along with other hydrolytic enzymes for degrading the woody lignocellulosic plant cell wall and penetrating into the host tissue. Among them, lignin peroxidase has been reported only in Phanerochaete chrysosporium so far. But interestingly, a recent study has revealed a second occurrence of lignin peroxidase in M. phaseolina. However, lignin peroxidases are of much significance biotechnologically because of their potential applications in bio-remedial waste treatment and in catalyzing difficult chemical transformations. Besides, this enzyme also possesses agricultural and environmental importance on account of their role in lignin biodegradation. In the present work, different properties of the lignin peroxidase of M. phaseolina along with predicting the 3-D structure and its active sites were investigated by the use of various computational tools. The data from this study will pave the way for more detailed exploration of this enzyme in wet lab and thereby facilitating the strategies to be designed against such deadly weapons of Macrophomina phaseolina. Furthermore, the insight of such a ligninolytic enzyme will contribute to the assessment of its potentiality as a bioremediation tool.

  5. Microbial transformation of oxandrolone with Macrophomina phaseolina and Cunninghamella blakesleeana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Colin; Wahab, Atia-Tul-; Khan, Mahwish Shafi Ahmed; Ahmad, Malik Shoaib; Farran, Dina; Iqbal Choudhary, M; Baydoun, Elias

    2015-10-01

    Microbial transformation of oxandrolone (1) was carried out by using Cunninghamella blakesleeana and Macrophomina phaseolina. Biotransformation of 1 with M. phaseolina yielded four new metabolites, 11β,17β-dihydroxy-17α-(hydroxymethyl)-2-oxa-5α-androstan-3-one (2), 5α,11β,17β-trihydroxy-17α-methyl-2-oxa-androstan-3-one (3), 17β-hydroxy-17α-methyl-2-oxa-5α-androstan-3,11-dione (4), and 11β,17β-dihydroxy-17α-methyl-2-oxa-5α-androstan-3-one (5). Whereas a new metabolite, 12β,17β-dihydroxy-17α-methyl-2-oxa-5α-androstan-3-one (6), was obtained through the microbial transformation of oxandrolone (1) with C. blakesleeana. The structures of isolated metabolites were characterized on the basis of MS and NMR spectroscopic data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. BIOPESTICIDAL ACTIVITY OF Calotropis procera L. AGAINST Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waheed, Nidra; Jabeen, Khajista; Iqbal, Sumera; Javaid, Arshad

    2016-01-01

    Mungbean [Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek] is an important pulse crop globally. This imperative crop is severely affected by charcoal rot disease caused by Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid. In the present study, the leaves of Calotropis procera L. were tested for their antifungal potential against M. phaseolina. Various concentrations i.e. 1%, 2.5%, 4%, 5.5% and 7% of methanolic extract of C. procera leaves were prepared and their in vitro bioactivity was examined against the test fungus. Methnolic leaf extract was partitioned using n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol and antifungal activity of each fraction was evaluated. n-Hexane fraction was subjected to GC-MS analysis. The higher concentration of methanolic leaf extract (7%) caused maximum inhibition in the diameter of M. phaseolina i.e. 38%. The n-hexane fraction of methanolic leaf extract was found to be the most effective against M. phaseolina. Seven compounds belonging to classes of chlorocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon, azocompounds, aromatic carboxylic acids and fatty acids were identified in GC-MS analysis of n-hexane fraction. Antifungal activity of the methanolic leaf extract of C. procera might be due to the presence of the identified compounds in n-hexane fraction of methanolic leaf extract.

  7. Fungal keratitis caused by Macrophomina phaseolina – A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premamalini, T.; Ambujavalli, B.T.; Vijayakumar, R.; Rajyoganandh, S.V.; Kalpana, S.; Kindo, Anupma J

    2012-01-01

    A 70 year old female patient presented with complaints of pain, watering and swelling in the right eye. She gave a history of fall, as she was walking in the paddy field of her farm. Ophthalmological and Microbiological investigation revealed a fungal keratitis with an unusual fungus Macrophomina phaseolina which is primarily a plant pathogen, with a potential to cause human infections especially in immuno-compromised patients. The patient responded well to the antifungal treatment with Oral Voriconazole with absence of recurrence and dissemination. PMID:24371757

  8. Immobilised cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic enzymes from macrophomina phaseolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, P.K.; Roy, U.; Dube, D.K.

    1984-01-01

    Cellulolytic enzymes from Macrophomina phaseolina were immobilised in acrylamide polymer. The immobilised enzyme preparation showed activity towards filter paper and cotton. However, the degree of hydrolysis of highly organised cellulose, particularly cotton, appears to be low in comparison with that of soluble substrate. The kinetic studies of immobilised enzymes indicated the presence of diffusional limitations by the increase in Vmax as the particle size decreased. The operational studies suggested that the immobilised enzymes retained the original activities up to 25-29 times in the reuse cycle.

  9. Microsatellites from the charcoal rot fungus (Macrophomina phaseolina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Richard E; Wadl, Phillip A; Wang, Xinwang; Johnson, Denita H; Rinehart, Timothy A; Abbas, Hamed K; Shier, Thomas; Trigiano, Robert N

    2009-05-01

    Microsatellite loci were identified from the charcoal rot fungus (Macrophomina phaseolina). Primer pairs for 46 loci were developed, and of these, 13 were optimized and screened using genomic DNA from 55 fungal isolates collected predominantly from two soybean fields in Mississippi. Twelve of the optimized loci were polymorphic and the number of alleles per locus ranged from 6 to 22. These microsatellites will be useful in population and pathogenicity studies to correspond with development of potential disease-resistant soybean and other susceptible crops. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd. No claim to original US government works.

  10. Fungal keratitis caused by Macrophomina phaseolina - A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premamalini, T; Ambujavalli, B T; Vijayakumar, R; Rajyoganandh, S V; Kalpana, S; Kindo, Anupma J

    2012-01-01

    A 70 year old female patient presented with complaints of pain, watering and swelling in the right eye. She gave a history of fall, as she was walking in the paddy field of her farm. Ophthalmological and Microbiological investigation revealed a fungal keratitis with an unusual fungus Macrophomina phaseolina which is primarily a plant pathogen, with a potential to cause human infections especially in immuno-compromised patients. The patient responded well to the antifungal treatment with Oral Voriconazole with absence of recurrence and dissemination.

  11. Discriminating microsatellites from Macrophomina phaseolina and their potential association to biological functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fungal pathogen Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid. (=M. phaseoli [Maubl.] Ashby) causes charcoal rot disease in a vast number of plant species including soybean, cotton, sunflower and maize, resulting in significant economic losses. M. phaseolina exhibits apparent genetic adaptation to the p...

  12. Production of Macrophomina phaseolina conidia by multiple soybean isolates in culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid is the cause of charcoal rot of soybean, Glycine max (L.) (Merr.). Soybean resistance to M. phaseolina in commercial cultivars is not common, but is especially needed in locations where the disease is chronic and severe. The objective of this study was to develop...

  13. Genetic diversity in Macrophomina phaseolina, the causal agent of charcoal rot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarr, M.P.; Ndiaye, M.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Crous, P.W.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophomina phaseolina (Botryosphaeriaceae) is an important soil- and seed-borne pathogen. This pathogen has a broad geographic distribution, and a large host range. The aim of the present study was to determine the genetic variation among a global set of 189 isolates of M. phaseolina, isolated

  14. Meios de cultura semi-seletivos para Macrophomina phaseolina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Rogéria de Carvalho Nascimento

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi Golidanich é um fungo habitante do solo importante economicamente devido ao amplo número de espécies de plantas que infectam e da dificuldade do seu controle. Vários estudos envolvendo densidade de inóculo, taxonomia, sobrevivência, necessitam de meios de cultura seletivo ou semi-seletivo. O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar 16 meios de cultura quanto à especificidade a este patógeno, proporcionando maior porcentagem de detecção do seu crescimento e menor número de contaminações, para substituir o meio semi-seletivo RB modificado, rotineiramente utilizado em estudos deste patógeno. O meio semi-seletivo RB modificado é bastante eficiente e contém em sua composição o fungicida metalaxyl (inibidor de oomycetos, que atualmente não se encontra disponível comercialmente em formulação simples, sem adição do Mancozeb ou Clorotalonil que inibem o crescimento do fungo M. phaseolina. Os meios de cultura avaliados foram repicados com o inóculo do fungo produzido em substrato areno-orgânico, contido em bolsas de náilon, recuperados após 30 dias de um solo não autoclavado, contido em uma bandeja. Cada meio de cultura avaliado tiveram 7 repetições, representadas por uma placa de Petri. Para as comparações das médias das porcentagens do crescimento de M. phaseolina e do número de contaminantes foi utilizado o teste de Scott-knott a 5% de probabilidade e os valores em porcentagem foram transformados em arc sem (√/100. Dentre os meios de cultura avaliados os MSTP 1 [(BDA com tetraciclina 50 mg.L-1 mais propamocarb a 1 mL.L-1(Previcur N® 72,2% p.a.], MSRP 0,5 (BDA com rifampicina 100 mg.L-1 mais fungicida propamocarb a 0,5 mL.L-1 e MSRP 1 (BDA com rifampicina 100 mg.L-1 mais fungicida propamocarb a 1 mL.L-1 proporcionaram maior porcentagem e detecção do fungo M. phaseolina e menor número de contaminações por outros fungos e bactérias. Estes meios de cultura semi-seletivos podem ser

  15. Host Specialization in the Charcoal Rot Fungus, Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, G; Suh, S O; Schneider, R W; Russin, J S

    2001-02-01

    ABSTRACT To investigate host specialization in Macrophomina phaseolina, the fungus was isolated from soybean, corn, sorghum, and cotton root tissue and soil from fields cropped continuously to these species for 15 years in St. Joseph, LA. Chlorate phenotype of each isolate was determined after growing on a minimal medium containing 120 mM potassium chlorate. Consistent differences in chlorate sensitivity were detected among isolates from different hosts and from soil versus root. To further explore genetic differentiation among fungal isolates from each host, these isolates were examined by restriction fragment length polymorphism and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. No variations were observed among isolates in restriction patterns of DNA fragments amplified by polymerase chain reaction covering the internal transcribed spacer region, 5.8S rRNA and part of 25S rRNA, suggesting that M. phaseolina constitutes a single species. Ten random primers were used to amplify the total DNA of 45 isolates, and banding patterns resulting from RAPD analysis were compared with the neighbor-joining method. Isolates from a given host were genetically similar to each other but distinctly different from those from other hosts. Chlorate-sensitive isolates were distinct from chlorate-resistant isolates within a given host. In greenhouse tests, soybean, sorghum, corn, and cotton were grown separately in soil infested with individual isolates of M. phaseolina that were chosen based on their host of origin and chlorate phenotype. Root colonization and plant weight were measured after harvesting. More colonization of corn roots occurred when corn was grown in soil containing corn isolates compared with isolates from other hosts. However, there was no host specialization in isolates from soybean, sorghum, or cotton. More root colonization in soybean occurred with chlorate-sensitive than with chlorate-resistant isolates.

  16. A unique endoglucanase-encoding gene cloned from the phytopathogenic fungus Macrophomina phaseolina.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, H; Jones, R W

    1995-01-01

    The deduced amino acid sequence derived from a Macrophomina phaseolina beta-1,4-endoglucanase-encoding gene revealed 48% identity (over 119 amino acids) with egl1 from the phytopathogen Pseudomonas solanacearum. Its similarity to saprophyte endoglucanases was not significant. Its minimum substrate size, unlike that of any known saprophyte endoglucanase, was cellopentaose. The unique characteristics of M. phaseolina egl1-encoded endoglucanase suggest that it is phytopathogen specific.

  17. A unique endoglucanase-encoding gene cloned from the phytopathogenic fungus Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Jones, R W

    1995-05-01

    The deduced amino acid sequence derived from a Macrophomina phaseolina beta-1,4-endoglucanase-encoding gene revealed 48% identity (over 119 amino acids) with egl1 from the phytopathogen Pseudomonas solanacearum. Its similarity to saprophyte endoglucanases was not significant. Its minimum substrate size, unlike that of any known saprophyte endoglucanase, was cellopentaose. The unique characteristics of M. phaseolina egl1-encoded endoglucanase suggest that it is phytopathogen specific.

  18. Role of rhizobitoxine in protecting soybean roots from Macrophomina phaseolina infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, U; Purkayastha, R P

    1984-03-01

    Bacterization of soybean seeds or roots with Rhizobium japonicum significantly reduced charcoal rot disease caused by Macrophomina phaseolina . Rhizobium japonicum inhibited the growth of M. phaseolina on both liquid and solid media. Replacement of nutrient medium with culture filtrate of R. japonicum significantly reduced mycelial growth of M. phaseolina . Whole culture extracts of R. japonicum yielded a toxic substance which was identified as rhizobitoxine after chromatographic, ultraviolet, and infrared spectrophotometric analyses. This compound also was detected in the roots of soybean inoculated with either R. japonicum alone or in combination of R. japonicum and M. phaseolina . Dosage response curves with rhizobitoxine showed it to be antifungal. The possible role of rhizobitoxine in protecting soybean roots from M. phaseolina infection is discussed.

  19. Genetic Architecture of Charcoal Rot (Macrophomina phaseolina) Resistance in Soybean Revealed Using a Diverse Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcoal rot disease caused by Macrophomina phaseolina is responsible for significant yield losses in soybean production. Among the methodologies available for controlling this disease, breeding for resistance is the most promising. Progress in breeding efforts has been slow due to the insufficient ...

  20. Virulence of Macrophomina phaseolina isolates in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) genotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcoal rot caused by Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid, is an important disease in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) in the dry and warmer areas of Puerto Rico and in much of the tropics and subtropics worldwide. The virulence of three isolates from Isabela (Mph-ISA-TARS), Juana Diaz (Mph-JD) a...

  1. Cutaneous infection caused by Macrophomina phaseolina in a child with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Ashok; Wickes, Brian L; Romanelli, Anna M; Debelenko, Larisa; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E; Sutton, Deanna A; Thompson, Elizabeth H; Fothergill, Annette W; Rinaldi, Michael G; Hayden, Randall T; Shenep, Jerry L

    2009-06-01

    We report a case of Macrophomina phaseolina skin infection in an immunocompromised child with acute myeloid leukemia, which was treated successfully with posaconazole without recurrence after a hematopoietic stem cell transplant. The fungus was identified by DNA sequencing using both the internal transcribed spacer and D1/D2 region of the 28S ribosomal DNA gene.

  2. Cutaneous Infection Caused by Macrophomina phaseolina in a Child with Acute Myeloid Leukemia▿

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasan, Ashok; Wickes, Brian L.; Romanelli, Anna M.; Debelenko, Larisa; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Sutton, Deanna A.; Thompson, Elizabeth H.; Fothergill, Annette W.; Rinaldi, Michael G.; Hayden, Randall T.; Shenep, Jerry L.

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of Macrophomina phaseolina skin infection in an immunocompromised child with acute myeloid leukemia, which was treated successfully with posaconazole without recurrence after a hematopoietic stem cell transplant. The fungus was identified by DNA sequencing using both the internal transcribed spacer and D1/D2 region of the 28S ribosomal DNA gene.

  3. Cutaneous Infection Caused by Macrophomina phaseolina in a Child with Acute Myeloid Leukemia▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Ashok; Wickes, Brian L.; Romanelli, Anna M.; Debelenko, Larisa; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Sutton, Deanna A.; Thompson, Elizabeth H.; Fothergill, Annette W.; Rinaldi, Michael G.; Hayden, Randall T.; Shenep, Jerry L.

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of Macrophomina phaseolina skin infection in an immunocompromised child with acute myeloid leukemia, which was treated successfully with posaconazole without recurrence after a hematopoietic stem cell transplant. The fungus was identified by DNA sequencing using both the internal transcribed spacer and D1/D2 region of the 28S ribosomal DNA gene. PMID:19386841

  4. Relationships between microsclerotia content and hyperspectral reflectance data in soybean tissue infected by Macrophomina phaseolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alternative methods are needed to assess the severity of charcoal rot disease [Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid] in soybean [Glycine max (L.)] plant tissue. The objective of this study was to define the relationship between light reflectance properties and microsclerotia content of soybean stem...

  5. Morphological and Pathogenic Variability among Macrophomina phaseolina Isolates Associated with Mungbean (Vigna radiata L.) Wilczek from Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Umer Iqbal; Tariq Mukhtar

    2014-01-01

    Macrophomina phaseolina is a serious pathogen of many crops. In the present studies, 65 isolates of Macrophomina phaseolina from different agroecological regions of Punjab and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa provinces of Pakistan were analyzed for morphological and pathogenic variability. Regardless of their geographic origins, significant differences were detected among 65 isolates in their radial growth, sclerotial size, and weight as well as in pathogenicity. Sixteen isolates were rated as fast growing...

  6. Emerging phytopathogen Macrophomina phaseolina: biology, economic importance and current diagnostic trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Surinder; Dhillon, Gurpreet Singh; Brar, Satinder Kaur; Vallad, Gary Edward; Chand, Ramesh; Chauhan, Vijay Bahadur

    2012-05-01

    Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid. is an important phytopathogenic fungus, infecting a large number of plant species and surviving for up to 15 years in the soil as a saprophyte. Although considerable research related to the biology and ecology of Macrophomina has been conducted, it continues to cause huge economic losses in many crops. Research is needed to improve the identification and characterization of genetic variability within their epidemiological and pathological niches. Better understanding of the variability within the pathogen population for traits that influence fitness and soil survival will certainly lead to improved management strategies for Macrophomina. In this context, the present review discusses various biological aspects and distribution of M. phaseolina throughout the world and their importance to different plant species. Accurate identification of the fungus has been aided with the use of nucleic acid-based molecular techniques. The development of PCR-based methods for identification and detection of M. phaseolina are highly sensitive and specific. Early diagnosis and accurate detection of pathogens is an essential step in plant disease management as well as quarantine. The progress in the development of various molecular tools used for the detection, identification and characterization of Macrophomina isolates were also discussed.

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (GRC1) as a strong antagonist of Macrophomina phaseolina and Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, C P; Sharma, A; Dubey, R C; Maheshwari, D K

    1999-01-01

    A plant growth promotory bacterial strain, isolated from the potato rhizosphere, was characterized as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (GRC1). The isolate produced an hydroxamate type of siderophore after 48 h of incubation on tryptic soy medium under iron deficient conditions. The in vitro antifungal activity of P. aeruginosa was tested against two soil-borne plant pathogens, Macrophomina phaseolina and Fusarium oxysporum. The antagonistic behaviour of the isolate was tested by dual culture technique. The growth inhibition of M. phaseolina and F. oxysporum was 74.1% and 70.5%, respectively, after 5 days of incubation. The production of hydrocyanic acid and indole acetic acid was also recorded under normal growth conditions.

  8. Recovery of Extracellular Lipolytic Enzymes from Macrophomina phaseolina by Foam Fractionation with Air

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia Schinke; José Carlos Germani

    2013-01-01

    Macrophomina phaseolina was cultivated in complex and simple media for the production of extracellular lipolytic enzymes. Culture supernatants were batch foam fractionated for the recovery of these enzymes, and column design and operation included the use of P 2 frit (porosity 40 to 100  μ m), air as sparging gas at variable flow rates, and Triton X-100 added at the beginning or gradually in aliquots. Samples taken at intervals showed the progress of the kinetic and the efficiency parameters....

  9. Detection of double stranded RNA in phytopathogenic Macrophomina phaseolina causing charcoal rot in Cyamopsis tetragonoloba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Pooja; Dilbaghi, Neeraj; Chaudhury, Ashok

    2012-03-01

    One hundred one isolates of Macrophomina phaseolina from various hosts and eco-geographical locations were employed for elucidating relationships among genetic diversity and virulence. Highly pathogenic, moderately pathogenic, and hypovirulent cluster bean specific isolates were identified. In order to correlate respective phenotypes of plant pathogenic fungus multiple and complex patterns of dsRNA elements were analyzed. Double-stranded ribonucleic acids (dsRNA) are ubiquitous in all major groups and most of them have vast potential as biological control agents for fungi. Rate of virulence and its further association could ascertain by host plant and their fungal genotypes. Variability of the fungal genotypes decides the link between the complexity of dsRNA with different variants and the change in virulence pattern. Double-stranded RNA was identified in approximately 21.7% of M. phaseolina isolates from charcoal rot infected cluster bean varieties. After recurrent laboratory transfer on culture media, the preponderance of the isolates harboring dsRNAs developed degenerate culture phenotypes and showed reduced virulence (hypovirulence) to cluster bean. Macrophomina has successfully showed diversified and reproducible banding profile in dsRNA containing/free isolates. This is the first report of hypovirulence and detection of dsRNA in Macrophomina phaseolina isolates of cluster bean origin.

  10. Genetic differentiation of charcoal rot pathogen, Macrophomina phaseolina, into specific groups using URP-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, T K; Singh, N K; Koundal, K R; Sharma, T R

    2005-02-01

    Forty isolates of Macrophomina phaseolina, a pathogen causing charcoal dry root rot of soybean, cotton, and chickpea, were genetically characterized with universal rice primers (URP; primers derived from DNA repeat sequences in the rice genome) using polymerase chain reaction (URP-PCR). Out of 12 URPs used in this study, 5 primers were effective in producing polymorphic fingerprint patterns from the DNA of M. phaseolina isolates. Three primers (URP-2F, URP-6R, and URP-30F) were quite informative and produced high levels of polymorphism among the isolates of M. phaseolina. Analysis of the entire fingerprint profiles using unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic averages (UPGMA) clearly differentiated M. phaseolina isolates obtained from soybean, cotton, and chickpea hosts into specific groups. In this study, we found for the first time transferability and use of PCR primers derived from plant genomes to generate host-specific fingerprint profiles of M. phaseolina, a broad host range plant pathogenic fungus. These results demonstrate that URPs are sensitive and technically simple to use for assaying genetic variability in M. phaseolina populations.

  11. Biocontrol mechanisms of Trichoderma harzianum against soybean charcoal rot caused by Macrophomina phaseolina

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    Khaledi Nima

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the world, charcoal rot, caused by Macrophomina phaseolina, is one of the most destructive and widespread diseases of crop plants such as soybean. In this study, the biological control capability of 11 Trichoderma spp. isolates against M. phaseolina was investigated using screening tests. Among all the tested Trichoderma spp. isolates, inhibition varied from 20.22 to 58.67% in dual culture tests. Dual culture, volatile and non-volatile tests revealed that two isolates of Trichoderma harzianum (including the isolates T7 and T14 best inhibited the growth of M. phaseolina in vitro. Therefore, these isolates were selected for biocontrol of M. phaseolina in vivo. The results of greenhouse experiments revealed that disease severity in the seed treatment with T. harzianum isolates was significantly lower than that of the soil treatment. In most of the cases, though, soil treatment with T. harzianum resulted in higher plant growth parameters, such as root and shoot weight. The effects of T. harzianum isolates on the activity of peroxidase enzyme and phenolic contents of the soybean root in the presence and absence of M. phaseolina were determined in greenhouse conditions. Our results suggested that a part of the inhibitory effect of T. harzianum isolates on soybean charcoal rot might be related to the indirect influence on M. phaseolina. Plant defense responses were activated as an elicitor in addition to the direct effect on the pathogen growth.

  12. Molecular Identification and Genetic Characterization of Macrophomina phaseolina Strains Causing Pathogenicity on Sunflower and Chickpea

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    Ali N. Khan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Macrophomina phaseolina is the most devastating pathogen which causes charcoal rot and root rot diseases in various economically important crops. Three strains M. phaseolina 1156, M. phaseolina 1160, and M. phaseolina PCMC/F1 were tested for their virulence on sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. and chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.. The strains showed high virulence on both hosts with a disease score of 2 on chickpea and sunflower. The strains also increased the hydrogen per oxide (H2O2 content by 1.4- to 1.6-fold in root as well as shoot of chickpea and sunflower. A significant increase in antioxidant enzymes was observed in fungal infected plants which indicated prevalence of oxidative stress during pathogen propagation. The M. phaseolina strains also produced hydrolytic enzymes such as lipase, amylase, and protease with solubilization zone of 5–43 mm, 5–45 mm, and 12–35 mm, respectively. The M. phaseolina strains were identified by 18S rRNA and analyzed for genetic diversity by using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD markers. The findings based on RAPD markers and 18S rRNA sequence analysis clearly indicate genetic variation among the strains collected from different hosts. The genetically diverse strains were found to be pathogenic to sunflower and chickpea.

  13. Molecular Identification and Genetic Characterization of Macrophomina phaseolina Strains Causing Pathogenicity on Sunflower and Chickpea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ali N; Shair, Faluk; Malik, Kamran; Hayat, Zafar; Khan, Muhammad Ayub; Hafeez, Fauzia Yusuf; Hassan, Muhammad Nadeem

    2017-01-01

    Macrophomina phaseolina is the most devastating pathogen which causes charcoal rot and root rot diseases in various economically important crops. Three strains M. phaseolina 1156, M. phaseolina 1160, and M. phaseolina PCMC/F1 were tested for their virulence on sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.). The strains showed high virulence on both hosts with a disease score of 2 on chickpea and sunflower. The strains also increased the hydrogen per oxide (H2O2) content by 1.4- to 1.6-fold in root as well as shoot of chickpea and sunflower. A significant increase in antioxidant enzymes was observed in fungal infected plants which indicated prevalence of oxidative stress during pathogen propagation. The M. phaseolina strains also produced hydrolytic enzymes such as lipase, amylase, and protease with solubilization zone of 5-43 mm, 5-45 mm, and 12-35 mm, respectively. The M. phaseolina strains were identified by 18S rRNA and analyzed for genetic diversity by using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. The findings based on RAPD markers and 18S rRNA sequence analysis clearly indicate genetic variation among the strains collected from different hosts. The genetically diverse strains were found to be pathogenic to sunflower and chickpea.

  14. Genetical and biological control of cotton ashy stem caused by Macrophomina phaseolina in outdoor pot experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Elsalam, Kamel Ahmed

    2010-04-01

    Two outdoor pot experiments were carried out to evaluate the reaction of 11 commercial Egyptian cotton cultivars Macrophomina phaseolina, the incitant of ashy stem in cotton and to evaluate the antagonistic ability of 27 isolates of Trichoderma sp. against pathogen cotton cultivars Giza 85, Giza 87, Giza 89 and Giza 90 were resistant to M. phaseolina because both survival and plant height of these cultivars was not affected when the soil was infested with the pathogen. None of the cultivars were found to be immune to highly pathogenic of M. phaseolina isolate. Of the 27 isolate's of Trichoderma that were evaluated, the best antagonistic performance was given by isolates nos. 2, 10, and 16 were promising for commercialization because they significantly increased survival and improved plant height and dry weight of the surviving cotton seedlings.

  15. Tools to kill: genome of one of the most destructive plant pathogenic fungi Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Shahidul; Haque, Md Samiul; Islam, Mohammad Moinul; Emdad, Emdadul Mannan; Halim, Abdul; Hossen, Quazi Md Mosaddeque; Hossain, Md Zakir; Ahmed, Borhan; Rahim, Sifatur; Rahman, Md Sharifur; Alam, Md Monjurul; Hou, Shaobin; Wan, Xuehua; Saito, Jennifer A; Alam, Maqsudul

    2012-09-19

    Macrophomina phaseolina is one of the most destructive necrotrophic fungal pathogens that infect more than 500 plant species throughout the world. It can grow rapidly in infected plants and subsequently produces a large amount of sclerotia that plugs the vessels, resulting in wilting of the plant. We sequenced and assembled ~49 Mb into 15 super-scaffolds covering 92.83% of the M. phaseolina genome. We predict 14,249 open reading frames (ORFs) of which 9,934 are validated by the transcriptome. This phytopathogen has an abundance of secreted oxidases, peroxidases, and hydrolytic enzymes for degrading cell wall polysaccharides and lignocelluloses to penetrate into the host tissue. To overcome the host plant defense response, M. phaseolina encodes a significant number of P450s, MFS type membrane transporters, glycosidases, transposases, and secondary metabolites in comparison to all sequenced ascomycete species. A strikingly distinct set of carbohydrate esterases (CE) are present in M. phaseolina, with the CE9 and CE10 families remarkably higher than any other fungi. The phenotypic microarray data indicates that M. phaseolina can adapt to a wide range of osmotic and pH environments. As a broad host range pathogen, M. phaseolina possesses a large number of pathogen-host interaction genes including those for adhesion, signal transduction, cell wall breakdown, purine biosynthesis, and potent mycotoxin patulin. The M. phaseolina genome provides a framework of the infection process at the cytological and molecular level which uses a diverse arsenal of enzymatic and toxin tools to destroy the host plants. Further understanding of the M. phaseolina genome-based plant-pathogen interactions will be instrumental in designing rational strategies for disease control, essential to ensuring global agricultural crop production and security.

  16. Tools to kill: Genome of one of the most destructive plant pathogenic fungi Macrophomina phaseolina

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    Islam Md

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophomina phaseolina is one of the most destructive necrotrophic fungal pathogens that infect more than 500 plant species throughout the world. It can grow rapidly in infected plants and subsequently produces a large amount of sclerotia that plugs the vessels, resulting in wilting of the plant. Results We sequenced and assembled ~49 Mb into 15 super-scaffolds covering 92.83% of the M. phaseolina genome. We predict 14,249 open reading frames (ORFs of which 9,934 are validated by the transcriptome. This phytopathogen has an abundance of secreted oxidases, peroxidases, and hydrolytic enzymes for degrading cell wall polysaccharides and lignocelluloses to penetrate into the host tissue. To overcome the host plant defense response, M. phaseolina encodes a significant number of P450s, MFS type membrane transporters, glycosidases, transposases, and secondary metabolites in comparison to all sequenced ascomycete species. A strikingly distinct set of carbohydrate esterases (CE are present in M. phaseolina, with the CE9 and CE10 families remarkably higher than any other fungi. The phenotypic microarray data indicates that M. phaseolina can adapt to a wide range of osmotic and pH environments. As a broad host range pathogen, M. phaseolina possesses a large number of pathogen-host interaction genes including those for adhesion, signal transduction, cell wall breakdown, purine biosynthesis, and potent mycotoxin patulin. Conclusions The M. phaseolina genome provides a framework of the infection process at the cytological and molecular level which uses a diverse arsenal of enzymatic and toxin tools to destroy the host plants. Further understanding of the M. phaseolina genome-based plant-pathogen interactions will be instrumental in designing rational strategies for disease control, essential to ensuring global agricultural crop production and security.

  17. Characterization of Macrophomina phaseolina isolates by their response to different osmotic potentials and AFLP

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    Bárbara J. Gutiérrez Cedeño

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Charcoal rot of Phaseolus vulgaris is caused by the fungus Macrophomina phaseolina, the disease is associated with high temperature and water stress. The objective of this study was to characterize isolates of M. phaseolina by their response to different osmotic potentials and AFLP. The growth of 11 isolates was determined on potato dextrose agar at 48 and 72 h in a gradient of osmotic potential induced using NaCl as well as their effects on germination of sclerotia. Three water groups were statistically different indicating differential response to osmotic potential and all sclerotia grown under these conditions, germinated between 24 and 48h. There were groups of isolates that were tolerant to water stress induced. The AFLP genotyping allowed the formation of five genetic groups, showing a wide genetic variability. Of the nine starters CTA-AT showed a high degree of confidence in the identification of genotypes of M. phaseolina and CAA-AC had the lowest discriminatory power. These results show that M. phaseolina isolates responded differently to osmotic potential and are genetically different between them. Although there was a clear correspondence of genetic groups to water groups; these responses are important features in the search for alternative management in black bean pathosystem. Keywords: molecular marker, M. phaseolina, water deficit

  18. Molecular characterization of Macrophomina phaseolina and Fusarium species by a single primer RAPD technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Tarakanta; Sharma, Tilak R; Prasad, Ravulpalli D; Arora, Dilip K

    2003-01-01

    Charcoal root rot and wilt, are two economically important diseases of many crop plants in North and South America, Asia and Africa and some parts of Europe. Genetic variation in 43 isolates of Macrophomina phaseolina and 22 isolates of Fusarium species, collected from geographically distinct regions over a range of hosts, was studied using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. Initially, 210 arbitrary nucleotide (10-mer) primers were tested for amplification of genomic DNA of one M. phaseolina isolate, 70 primers amplified the genomic DNA of M. phaseolina. One primer OPA-13 (5'-CAGCACCCAC-3') produced fingerprint profiles, which clearly distinguished between the different isolates of M. phaseolina. UPGMA analysis classified these isolates into five major groups. By primer OPA-13, 22 isolates of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Fusarium species of different formae-speciales and races, were also distinguished from M. phaseolina. This marker is useful for distinguishing between these two important plant pathogens irrespective of hosts, virulence spectrum and races. This is the first report of reliable diagnosis of two soilborne pathogens (root/collar rot and wilt causing pathogens) at the level of isolates, formae-speciales and races by a single primer RAPD procedure with uniform PCR conditions.

  19. Interrelationships Among Macrophomina phaseolina, Criconemella xenoplax, and Tylenchorhynchus annulatus on Grain Sorghum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenefrida, I; McGawley, E C; Russin, J S

    1997-06-01

    Microplot experiments were established in 1992, 1993, and 1994 to investigate the relationships among Macrophomina phaseolina, Criconemella xenoplax, mad Tylenchorhynchus annulatus on grain sorghum in Louisiana. A factorial treatment arrangement of two grain sorghum hybrids (De Kalb DK 50 and Pioneer hybrid 8333), three levels of M. phaseolina (0, 10, and 100 colony-forming units (CFU)/g soil), and three nematode inoculum levels (0, 1x, and 2x) were used. Nematode inocula at 1x levels were 929, 1,139, and 1,445 C. xenoplax and T. annulatus/microplot in 1992, 1993, and 1994, respectively. Plants were harvested after 90-105 days. In all 3 years, grain sorghum root and head dry weights were suppressed as nematode inoculum level increased. These reductions were detected both in the absence and in the presence of M. phaseolina at 10 CFU/g. Reproduction of both nematode species was suppressed by M. phaseolina. Interactions between M. phaseolina and nematodes were antagonistic with regard to plant dry weights, yield, and nematode reproduction, so that combined effects were less than the sum of the effect of each pathogen alone.

  20. SSR-based detection of genetic variability in the charcoal root rot pathogen Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Tarakanta; Sharma, Tilak R; Singh, Nagendra K

    2005-01-01

    Macrophomina phaseolina, the causal agent of charcoal root or collar rot, is an important plant pathogen especially in soybean and cotton. Single primers of simple sequence repeats (SSR) or microsatellite markers have been used for the characterization of genetic variability of different populations of M. phaseolina obtained from soybean and cotton grown in India and the USA. Genetic similarity between isolates was calculated, and cluster analysis was used to generate a dendrogram showing relationships between isolates collected from the two hosts. Forty isolates could be clustered into three major groups corresponding to their hosts and geographical region. The wide distribution of microsatellites in M. phaseolina genome was assessed by agarose gel electrophoresis of the PCR products generated by direct amplification of inter SSR regions DNA. This is the first report of the use of microsatellite markers to characterize the charcoal root rot pathogen. The SSR fingerprints (0.25-3.5 kb) generated using DNA from different populations of M. phaseolina of two hosts indicated that these repeats are interspersed within the genome of this pathogen. The variability found within closely related isolates of M. phaseolina indicated that such microsatellites are useful in population studies and represents a step towards identification of potential isolate diagnostic markers specific to soybean and cotton.

  1. Antibiosis of Trichoderma spp strains native to northeastern Mexico against the pathogenic fungus Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, José Luis Hernández; Pérez, María Isabel Sánchez; Prieto, Juan Manuel González; Velásquez, Jesús DiCarlo Quiroz; Olivares, Jesús Gerardo García; Langarica, Homar Rene Gill

    2015-01-01

    Sampling of agricultural soils from the Mexican northeastern region was performed to detect Trichoderma spp., genetically characterize it, and assess its potential use as a biologic control agent against Macrophomina phaseolina. M. phaseolina is a phytopathogen that attacks over 500 species of cultivated plants and causes heavy losses in the regional sorghum crop. Sampling was performed immediately after sorghum or corn harvest in an area that was approximately 170 km from the Mexico-USA border. Sixteen isolates were obtained in total. Using colony morphology and sequencing the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) 1 and 4 of 18S rDNA, 14 strains were identified as Trichoderma harzianum, T. koningiopsis and T. virens. Subsequently, their antagonistic activity against M. phaseolina was evaluated in vitro, and 11 isolates showed antagonism by competition and stopped M. phaseolina growth. In 4 of these isolates, the antibiosis phenomenon was observed through the formation of an intermediate band without growth between colonies. One strain, HTE808, was identified as Trichoderma koningiopsis and grew rapidly; when it came into contact with the M. phaseolina colony, it continued to grow and sporulated until it covered the entire petri dish. Microscopic examination confirmed that it has a high level of hyperparasitism and is thus considered to have high potential for use in the control of this phytopathogen.

  2. A study on antifungal activity of water-soluble chitosan against Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sudipta; Chatterjee, Bishnu P; Guha, Arun K

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate antifungal effect of water-soluble chitosan (s-chitosan) on Macrophomina phaseolina (M. phaseolina) causing jute seedling infection and monitor the change in activity of released enzymes during infection. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of s-chitosan for M. phaseolina was found at 12.5g/l and s-chitosan exhibited fungistatic mode of action against this pathogen. The application of s-chitosan (12.5g/l) during infection of jute seedlings by M. phaseolina inhibited fungal infection and length of the seedlings was found almost similar to seedlings without infection. M. phaseolina infected jute seedlings showed length of 22mm over 10 days of incubation and it increased to 58mm in presence of s-chitosan (12.5g/l) during incubation for 10 days. TEM study indicated presence of hyphae in the cortical and epidermal cells of fungus infected jute seedlings indicating colonization by the fungus and it disappeared after treatment with s-chitosan. The changes in enzyme profiles of jute seedling during prevention of fungal infection using s-chitosan helped in proper understanding of mode of action of s-chitosan as antifungal agent. The activity of defense related enzymes like chitosanase and peroxidase in infected seedlings was observed to be enhanced after treatment with s-chitosan. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Antibiosis of Trichoderma spp strains native to northeastern Mexico against the pathogenic fungus Macrophomina phaseolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, José Luis Hernández; Pérez, María Isabel Sánchez; Prieto, Juan Manuel González; Velásquez, Jesús DiCarlo Quiroz; Olivares, Jesús Gerardo García; Langarica, Homar Rene Gill

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Sampling of agricultural soils from the Mexican northeastern region was performed to detect Trichoderma spp., genetically characterize it, and assess its potential use as a biologic control agent against Macrophomina phaseolina. M. phaseolina is a phytopathogen that attacks over 500 species of cultivated plants and causes heavy losses in the regional sorghum crop. Sampling was performed immediately after sorghum or corn harvest in an area that was approximately 170 km from the Mexico-USA border. Sixteen isolates were obtained in total. Using colony morphology and sequencing the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) 1 and 4 of 18S rDNA, 14 strains were identified as Trichoderma harzianum, T. koningiopsis and T. virens. Subsequently, their antagonistic activity against M. phaseolina was evaluated in vitro, and 11 isolates showed antagonism by competition and stopped M. phaseolina growth. In 4 of these isolates, the antibiosis phenomenon was observed through the formation of an intermediate band without growth between colonies. One strain, HTE808, was identified as Trichoderma koningiopsis and grew rapidly; when it came into contact with the M. phaseolina colony, it continued to grow and sporulated until it covered the entire petri dish. Microscopic examination confirmed that it has a high level of hyperparasitism and is thus considered to have high potential for use in the control of this phytopathogen. PMID:26691467

  4. [Morphological and molecular characterization of isolates of Macrophomina phaseolina associated with sugarcane in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva-Mir, Santos G; Velázquez-Martínez, Guadalupe C; Tlapal-Bolaños, Bertha; Tovar-Pedraza, Juan M; Rosas-Saito, Greta H; Alvarado-Gómez, Omar G

    2015-01-01

    Charcoal rot caused by Macrophomina phaseolina is an important disease of sugarcane in Mexico. This study was carried out to characterize isolates of M. phaseolina obtained from sugarcane by the combination of morphological and molecular analyses. The morphological characterization of 10 isolates was performed using scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy. To confirm the morphological identification, rDNA from two representative isolates was extracted, and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced using specific primers MpKF1 and MpKR1. Based on their morphological characteristics, all isolates were identified as M. phaseolina. Moreover, the analysis of two ITS sequences showed 100% similarity with the M. phaseolina sequences deposited in the GenBank. To our knowledge, this is the first study in the world aimed at characterizing isolates of M. phaseolina obtained from sugarcane. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Antibiosis of Trichoderma spp strains native to northeastern Mexico against the pathogenic fungus Macrophomina phaseolina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Hernández Mendoza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sampling of agricultural soils from the Mexican northeastern region was performed to detect Trichoderma spp., genetically characterize it, and assess its potential use as a biologic control agent against Macrophomina phaseolina. M. phaseolina is a phytopathogen that attacks over 500 species of cultivated plants and causes heavy losses in the regional sorghum crop. Sampling was performed immediately after sorghum or corn harvest in an area that was approximately 170 km from the Mexico-USA border. Sixteen isolates were obtained in total. Using colony morphology and sequencing the internal transcribed spacers (ITS 1 and 4 of 18S rDNA, 14 strains were identified as Trichoderma harzianum, T. koningiopsis and T. virens. Subsequently, their antagonistic activity against M. phaseolina was evaluated in vitro, and 11 isolates showed antagonism by competition and stopped M. phaseolina growth. In 4 of these isolates, the antibiosis phenomenon was observed through the formation of an intermediate band without growth between colonies. One strain, HTE808, was identified as Trichoderma koningiopsis and grew rapidly; when it came into contact with the M. phaseolina colony, it continued to grow and sporulated until it covered the entire petri dish. Microscopic examination confirmed that it has a high level of hyperparasitism and is thus considered to have high potential for use in the control of this phytopathogen.

  6. Competition Between Tylenchorhynchus annulatus and Mesocriconema xenoplax on Grain Sorghum as Influenced by Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenefrida, I; Russin, J S; McGawley, E C

    1998-12-01

    Greenhouse experiments were conducted to examine competition between Tylenchorhynchus annulatus and Mesocriconema xenoplax on grain sorghum roots that were colonized by the fungus Macrophomina phaseolina or free from fungus colonization. An incomplete factorial treatment design consisted of two levels of M. phaseolina (0 or 10 colony-forming units/g soil) and 12 T. annulatus:M. xenoplax ratios: 1,000:0; 750:0; 500:0; 250:0; 0:0; 0:250; 0:500; 0:750; 0:1,000; 750:250; 500:500; and 250:750. Plants were harvested after 105 days. Despite similar feeding habits, competition between these ectoparasitic nematode species was limited. Tylenchorhynchus annulatus was more susceptible to antagonism by M. xenoplax than the reverse, but susceptibility depended on initial inoculum ratio. Root colonization by M. phaseolina reduced competitive effects of T. annulatus on M. xenoplax but not the reverse. Both nematode species reduced shoot dry weight but only T. annulatus reduced root dry weight. Both plant weight parameters were reduced by M. phaseolina.

  7. Genetic diversity in Macrophomina phaseolina, the causal agent of charcoal rot

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    Mame P. SARR

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Macrophomina phaseolina (Botryosphaeriaceae is an important soil- and seed-borne pathogen. This pathogen has a broad geographic distribution, and a large host range. The aim of the present study was to determine the genetic variation among a global set of 189 isolates of M. phaseolina, isolated from 23 hosts and 30 soil samples in 15 countries. To achieve this goal a multi-gene DNA analysis was conducted for the following five loci, ITS, TEF, ACT, CAL and TUB. Based on these results two well-defined clusters could be delineated, one corresponding to M. phaseolina s. str., for which a suitable epitype is designated. The second clade corresponds to M. pseudophaseolina, a novel species occurring on Abelmoschus esculentus, Arachis hypogaea, Hibiscus sabdarifa and Vigna unguiculata in Senegal. No consistent correlation was found among genotype, host and geographic location, and both species could even occur on the same host at the same location. Although M. pseudophaseolina is presently only known from Senegal, further research is required to determine its virulence compared to M. phaseolina, and its geographic distribution.

  8. Hydrolysis of wheat bran, rice bran and jute powder by immobilized enzymes from Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, P K; Roy, U; Vora, V C

    1993-03-01

    The stability of cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic enzymes from Macrophomina phaseolina improved on immobilization and was 1.5 to 2-fold more active against pre-treated wheat bran, rice bran or jute powder. The hydrolysis efficiency of the catalyst increased with a decrease in its particle size. About 80% (w/v) of the sugar obtained from wheat bran was assimilated by Saccharomyces sp., whereas the corresponding values for rice bran and jute powder were about 70 and 50% (w/v), respectively.

  9. Effects of compost amendment and the biocontrol agent Clonostachys rosea on the development of charcoal rot (Macrophomina phaseolina) on cowpea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ndiaye, M.; Termorshuizen, A.J.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.

    2010-01-01

    Macrophomina phaseolina is a destructive pathogen causing charcoal rot of cowpea and other crops in the semi- arid areas of the Sahel (north-west Africa). Chemical management is not feasible in conditions of subsistence farming, and the plurivorous nature of the fungus limits the effectiveness of

  10. Variability of United States isolates of Macrophomina phaseolina based on simple sequence repeats and cross genus transferability to related Botryosphaeraceae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twelve simple sequence repeat (SSRs) loci were used to evaluate genetic diversity of 109 isolates of Macrophomina phaseolina collected from different geographical regions and host species throughout the United States (U.S.). Genetic diversity was assessed using Nei’s minimum genetic distance and th...

  11. Combined effects of solarization and organic amendment on charcoal rot caused by Macrophomina phaseolina in the Sahel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ndiaye, M.; Termorshuizen, A.J.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of soil solarization combined or not with millet residues or paunch contents amendments, on the survival ofMacrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid. and development of charcoal rot of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), were assessed in a naturally infested soil. Solarization increased the soil

  12. Incorporation of brassica seed meal soil amendment and wheat cultivation for control of macrophomina phaseolina in strawberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrophomina phaseolina is the cause of charcoal rot, a disease of emerging importance in strawberry production systems. Brassicaceae seed meals (SM) and prior cultivation of soils with wheat, were evaluated for the capacity to suppress charcoal rot of strawberry and to determine the relative contri...

  13. Registration of DT99-16864 soybean germplasm line with moderate resistance to charcoal rot [Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcoal rot, caused by Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goidanich, is a disease that is a world-wide problem in soybean production for which no highly resistant cultivars are currently available. Soybean germplasm line DT99-16864, a maturity group V line, was developed by the U.S. Department of Ag...

  14. Interactions of Heterodera glycines, Macrophomina phaseolina, and Mycorrhizal Fungi on Soybean in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, H E; Hetrick, B A; Todd, T C

    1994-12-01

    The impact of naturally occurring arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on soybean growth and their interaction with Heterodera glycines were evaluated in nematode-infested and uninfested fields in Kansas. Ten soybean cultivars from Maturity Groups III-V with differential susceptibility to H. glycines were treated with the fungicide benomyl to suppress colonization by naturally occurring mycorrhizal fungi and compared with untreated control plots. In H. glycines-infested soil, susceptible cultivars exhibited 39% lower yields, 28% lower colonization by mycorrhizal fungi, and an eightfold increase in colonization by the charcoal rot fungus, Macrophomina phaseolina, compared with resistant cultivars. In the absence of the nematode, susceptible cultivars exhibited 10% lower yields than resistant cultivars, root colonization of resistant vs. susceptible soybean by mycorrhizal fungi varied with sampling date, and there were no differences in colonization by M. phaseolina between resistant and susceptible cultivars. Benomyl application resulted in 19% greater root growth and 9% higher seed yields in H. glycines-infested soil, but did not affect soybean growth and yield in the absence of the nematode. Colonization of soybean roots by mycorrhizal fungi was negatively correlated with H. glycines population densities due to nematode antagonism to the mycorrhizal fungi rather than suppression of nematode populations. Soybean yields were a function of the pathogenic effects of H. glycines and M. phaseolina, and, to a lesser degree, the stimulatory effects of mycorrhizal fungi.

  15. Soybean charcoal rot disease fungus Macrophomina phaseolina in Mississippi produces the phytotoxin (-)-botryodiplodin but no detectable phaseolinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, Mohammad; Shier, W Thomas; Abbas, Hamed K; Tonos, Jennifer L; Baird, Richard E; Sciumbato, Gabriel L

    2007-01-01

    Research on charcoal rot disease in soybeans, and approximately 500 other plant diseases caused by the fungus Macrophomina phaseolina, has been severely hampered by unavailability of phaseolinone (1), an eremophilane sesquiterpenoid phytotoxin proposed to facilitate initial infection. Phytotoxin produced in cultures of disease-causing M. phaseolina isolated in Mississippi, and purified in a manner similar to that reported for 1, was shown to be (-)-botryodiplodin (2), a readily synthesized mycotoxin previously isolated from Botryodiplodia theobromae cultures. Phaseolinone was not detected, suggesting that 2 may be the phytotoxin that facilitates infection. The availability of 2 should facilitate studies on its role in plant disease.

  16. Recovery of Extracellular Lipolytic Enzymes from Macrophomina phaseolina by Foam Fractionation with Air

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    Claudia Schinke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophomina phaseolina was cultivated in complex and simple media for the production of extracellular lipolytic enzymes. Culture supernatants were batch foam fractionated for the recovery of these enzymes, and column design and operation included the use of P 2 frit (porosity 40 to 100 μm, air as sparging gas at variable flow rates, and Triton X-100 added at the beginning or gradually in aliquots. Samples taken at intervals showed the progress of the kinetic and the efficiency parameters. Best results were obtained with the simple medium supernatant by combining the stepwise addition of small amounts of the surfactant with the variation of the air flow rates along the separation. Inert proteins were foamed out first, and the subsequent foamate was enriched in the enzymes, showing estimated activity recovery (R, enrichment ratio (E, and purification factor (P of 45%, 34.7, and 2.9, respectively. Lipases were present in the enriched foamate.

  17. Biotransformation of dehydroepiandrosterone with Macrophomina phaseolina and β-glucuronidase inhibitory activity of transformed products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, M Iqbal; Zafar, Salman; Khan, Naik Tameen; Ahmad, Saeed; Noreen, Shagufta; Marasini, Bishnu P; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Atta-Ur-Rahman

    2012-06-01

    The biotransformation of dehydroepiandrosterone (1) with Macrophomina phaseolina was investigated. A total of eight metabolites were obtained which were characterized as androstane-3,17-dione (2), androst-4-ene-3,17-dione (3), androst-4-ene-17β-ol-3-one (4), androst-4,6-diene-17β-ol-3-one (5), androst-5-ene-3β,17β-diol (6), androst-4-ene-3β-ol-6,17-dione (7), androst-4-ene-3β,7β,17β-triol (8), and androst-5-ene-3β,7α,17β-triol (9). All the transformed products were screened for enzyme inhibition, among which four were found to inhibit the β-glucuronidase enzyme, while none inhibited the α-chymotrypsin enzyme.

  18. Metabolites of the fungistatic agent 2β-methoxyclovan-9α-ol by Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Najeeb, Asma; Ali, Rahat Azher; Ali, Abida Amir; Choudhary, Muhammad Iqbal

    2011-04-13

    Biotransformation of 2β-methoxyclovan-9α-ol (1), a fungistatic agent against Botrytis cinerea, was investigated with Macrophomina phaseolina. Demethoxylation, regioselective oxidation at C-9 and C-13, and inversion of the configuration at C-9 of compound 1 afforded six oxidative metabolites, 2β-methoxyclovan-9-one (2), clovan-2β,9β-diol (3), clovan-2β,9α-diol (4), clovan-2β,13-diol-9-one (5), 2β-methoxyclovan-9α,13-diol (6), and clovan-2β,9β,13-triol (7). Compounds 5-7 are described here for the first time, and their structures were deduced by different spectroscopic techniques. The antifungal activity of new metabolites 5-7 was also evaluated against B. cinerea.

  19. Recovery of Extracellular Lipolytic Enzymes from Macrophomina phaseolina by Foam Fractionation with Air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinke, Claudia; Germani, José Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Macrophomina phaseolina was cultivated in complex and simple media for the production of extracellular lipolytic enzymes. Culture supernatants were batch foam fractionated for the recovery of these enzymes, and column design and operation included the use of P 2 frit (porosity 40 to 100  μ m), air as sparging gas at variable flow rates, and Triton X-100 added at the beginning or gradually in aliquots. Samples taken at intervals showed the progress of the kinetic and the efficiency parameters. Best results were obtained with the simple medium supernatant by combining the stepwise addition of small amounts of the surfactant with the variation of the air flow rates along the separation. Inert proteins were foamed out first, and the subsequent foamate was enriched in the enzymes, showing estimated activity recovery (R), enrichment ratio (E), and purification factor (P) of 45%, 34.7, and 2.9, respectively. Lipases were present in the enriched foamate.

  20. Study of optical properties of Macrophomina phaseolina impregnated sol-gel derived silica matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sunita; Vandana; Ghoshal, S K; Arora, Pooja; Dilbaghi, Neeraj; Chaudhury, Ashok

    2009-11-01

    In the present frame of work, Macrophomina phaseolina is encapsulated in silica matrices at various concentrations by low temperature sol-gel technique using tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) as precursor. The optical and photophysical properties of these samples have been studied by second harmonics of Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm. UV-visible absorption spectra of samples have been recorded and it is found that the absorption increases with increase in concentration of fungus. Further, a decrease in output transmission intensity of the laser has been observed with increase in fungus concentration. The temporal response of these samples has also been examined. The results show that the fungus concentration can be measured within approximately 15-20 min. This method of optical sensing of fungus in test sample is faster than other techniques, such as the conventional colorimetric method which takes about 1 h.

  1. Product optimization, purification and characterization of a novel polygalacturonase produced by Macrophomina phaseolina

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    Saeed Aminzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Production of a novel polygalacturonase (PG active at pH = 3.0 and suitable to be used in fruit juice industries from Macrophomina phaseolina was evaluated. Suitable carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous forms were determined and the condition was optimized for higher PG production. Materials and methods: Macrophomina phaseolina was cultured in so called production medium. The secretome was separated from fungal cells and polygalacturonase was isolated via column chromatography. The biochemical activity of both secretome and isolated polygalacturonase were assayed calorimetrically. The production of polygalacturonase was optimized via changes in culture medium in terms of contents, pH and temperature and Taguchi analysis of data. Enzyme kinetics was partially performed followed by the determination of pH and temperature stability. Results: A range of sugars except glucose and chitin demonstrated to improve the PG production. Ammonium sulfate and peptone demonstrated to be suitable nitrogen sources. Amongst phosphorous sources, dipotassium hydrogen phosphate had the greatest effect. Taguchi’s orthogonal array demonstrated that pH, temperature, ammonium sulfate and trace elements had significant effect on PG production. Furthermore, mean comparisons showed that the optimum condition achieved at pH 6.0, 35 °C, 2 g.l-1 ammonium sulfate and 2 mg.l-1 trace elements. Discussion and conclusion: The purified PG with a relative molecular mass of 70 kDa was demonstrated its highest activity at pH = 3, and 30 °C. Amongst tested cations and chemicals, Fe2+ improved the enzyme activity by 2 fold, while the secretome responded differently.

  2. Biotransformation of androgenic steroid mesterolone with Cunninghamella blakesleeana and Macrophomina phaseolina.

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    Ahmad, Malik Shoaib; Zafar, Salman; Bibi, Marium; Bano, Saira; Atia-Tul-Wahab; Atta-Ur-Rahman; Iqbal Choudhary, M

    2014-04-01

    Fermentation of mesterolone (1) with Cunninghamella blakesleeana yielded four new metabolites, 1α-methyl-1β,11β,17β-trihydroxy-5α-androstan-3-one (2), 1α-methyl-7α,11β,17β-trihydroxy-5α-androstan-3-one (3), 1α-methyl-1β,6α,17β-trihydroxy-5α-androstan-3-one (4) and 1α-methyl-1β,11α,17β-trihydroxy-5α-androstan-3-one (5), along with three known metabolites, 1α-methyl-11α,17β-dihydroxy-5α-androstan-3-one (6), 1α-methyl-6α,17β-dihydroxy-5α-androstan-3-one (7) and 1α-methyl-7α,17β-dihydroxy-5α-androstan-3-one (8). Biotransformation of 1 with Macrophomina phaseolina also yielded a new metabolite, 1α-methyl, 17β-hydroxy-5α-androstan-3,6-dione (9). The isolated metabolites were subjected to various in vitro biological assays, such as anti-cancer, inhibition of α-glucosidase, and phosphodiesterase-5 enzymes and oxidative brust. However, no significant results were observed. This is the first report of biotransformation of 1 with C. blakesleeana and M. phaseolina. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Phytoalexins stimulation in the infected Sesamum indicum L. with fungus Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi Goid (Rot Disease

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    Sandhya Sharma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Plants respond to a wide variety of pathogen attack. They show the local response in originally attacked plant organ and systemic response in unaffected plant parts with the de novo production of phytochemical compounds. Phenolics (polyphenols play an important role in the defense mechanism of the plants. So, this study was carried out to analyze the metabolic modifications in Sesame plant after the infection with the pathogen (Macrophomina phaseolina by estimating the levels of polyphenol in 7 days and 14 days old Sesame plants. The polyphenol contents in infected plants are considerably exceeded in contrast to control plants. This in vivo study of M. phaseolina infection reveals the differences of resistance levels in Sesame against the pathogen. The obtained results give important information concerning the plant-pathogen interactions, in the defense response for Sesame improvement programs seeking the adaptation to the diverse range of fungal attack along with adverse environmental factors.International Journal of Environment Vol.4(4 2015: 1-18

  4. Control of charcoal rot fungus Macrophomina phaseolina by extracts of Datura metel.

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    Javaid, Arshad; Saddique, Amna

    2012-01-01

    Methanolic leaf and fruit extracts of Datura metel were found highly effective in suppressing against Macrophomina phaseolina, the cause of charcoal rot disease. These extracts were further subjected to successive fractionation with n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol. All the concentrations (3.125-200 mg mL⁻¹) of chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions of leaf extract, and n-hexane fraction of fruit extract completely inhibited the target fungal growth. Two compounds A and B from the n-hexane fraction of fruit extract and compound C from n-butanol fraction of leaf extract were obtained by TLC. Compound B exhibited the best antifungal activity with an MIC value of 7.81 µg mL⁻¹ that was at par with that of commercial fungicide mancozeb (80% w/w). This study concludes that M. phaseolina can be effectively controlled by natural antifungal compounds in n-hexane fraction of methanolic fruit extract of D. metel.

  5. Screening Brazilian Macrophomina phaseolina isolates for alkaline lipases and other extracellular hydrolases.

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    Schinke, Claudia; Germani, José C

    2012-03-01

    Macrophomina phaseolina, phylum Ascomycota, is a phytopathogenic fungus distributed worldwide in hot dry areas. There are few studies on its secreted lipases and none on its colony radial growth rate, an indicator of fungal ability to use nutrients for growth, on media other than potato-dextrose agar. In this study, 13 M. phaseolina isolates collected in different Brazilian regions were screened for fast-growth and the production of hydrolases of industrial interest, especially alkaline lipases. Hydrolase detection and growth rate determination were done on citric pectin, gelatin, casein, soluble starch, and olive oil as substrates. Ten isolates were found to be active on all substrates tested. The most commonly detected enzymes were pectinases, amylases, and lipases. The growth rate on pectin was significantly higher (P < 0.05), while the growth rates on the different media identified CMM 2105, CMM 1091, and PEL as the fastest-growing isolates. The lipase activity of four isolates grown on olive oil was followed for 4 days by measuring the activity in the cultivation broth. The specific lipolytic activity of isolate PEL was significantly higher at 96 h (130 mU mg protein(-1)). The broth was active at 37 °C, pH 8, indicating the potential utility of the lipases of this isolate in mild alkaline detergents. There was a strong and positive correlation (0.86) between radial growth rate and specific lipolytic activity.

  6. Soybean Planting Date and Maturity Effects on Heterodera glycines and Macrophomina phaseolina in Southeastern Kansas.

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    Todd, T C

    1993-12-01

    Heterodera glycines reproduction and damage potential were evaluated for H. glycines-resistant and -susceptible soybean cultivars from maturity groups (MG) III, IV, and V on two planting dates in each of two years (1990-1991). Infection by H. glycines reduced yields of late-planted susceptible cultivars to a lesser degree than early planted cultivars in 1990 but not in 1991. The MG V susceptible cultivar yielded better than earlier-maturing susceptible cultivars even when yields of resistant cultivars were similar across maturity groups. Soybean yields were a function of nematode densities on roots in 1990, and nematode soil densities and root colonization by the charcoal rot fungus, Macrophomina phaseolina, in 1991. Harvest densities of H. glycines were lower for late-planted than for early-planted susceptible soybeans in 1990; however, nematode population increase was more rapid on roots of late-planted soybeans in 1991. Soybean maturity group did not have a significant effect on nematode populations in either year of the study, but colonization rates of M. phaseolina were lower for MG V cultivars than for earlier-maturing cultivars. Delayed soybean planting and cultivar maturity selection do not appear to be viable management options for H. glycines in southeastern Kansas.

  7. A combination of biocontrol agents improves the management of dry root rot (Macrophomina phaseolina in greengram

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    R. Thilagavathi

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The biocontrol agents Trichoderma viride (strains Tv1 and Tv13, Pseudomonas fluorescens (Pf1 and Py15 and Bacillus subtilis (Bs16 were tested individually and in combination for their effectiveness against root rot of greengram caused by Macrophomina phaseolina. As regards the compatibility of the biocontrol agents with each other, T. viride strains were not compatible with B. subtilis (Bs16, but P. fluorescens strains were compatible with B. subtilis and T. viride. Of the biocontrol agents tested in vitro against M. phaseolina, combinations of P. fluorescens+T. viride (Pf1+Tv1, Pf1+Tv13 and Py15+Tv1 inhibited mycelial growth of the pathogen and they also promoted the growth of the greengram seedlings. A combination of Pf1+Tv1 was most effective in reducing root rot incidence under glass-house and field conditions as compared with other single or combined treatments or the untreated control. The activity of the defense-related enzymes peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase and phenyl alanine ammonia lyase was significantly greater in greengram plants treated with a talc based formulation containing Pf1+Tv1 followed by Pf1+Tv13 and Py15+Tv1, than in plants receiving other treatments or the untreated control. Moreover, a combination of Pf1+Tv1 followed by Pf1+Tv13 and Py15+Tv1 significantly increased yield under glass house and field conditions.

  8. Effect of different temperature and culture media on the growth of Macrophomina phaseolina.

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    Csöndes, I; Kadlicskó, S; Gáborjányi, R

    2007-01-01

    The charcoal root disease caused by Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goidanich may cause considerable damages in hot as well as in dry seasons. The effect of temperature and culture media were studied on the growing patterns of 35 M. phaseolina isolates, collected from different districts of Hungary. The isolates were grown at 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 degrees C temperatures respectively, and additionally at 25 degrees C on potato-dextrose-, malt-extract-, Czapek-Dox-, Sabouraud-glucose-, maize-flour- and watery agar media, using 90 mm Petri-dishes, 4 repetitions in each case. For all the isolates the most favourable temperature regime was 25 to 35 degrees C and the most advantageous media was the malt-extract-, Sabouraud-glucose- and potato-dextrose-agar media. At these conditions (temperatures and culture media) mycelia growth and the diameter of microsclerotial colonies reached the 90 mm at the 5th day. Mycelia growth of the pathogen was very low at 10, 15 and 40 degrees C, and did not form microsclerotia. On watery agar microsclerotial colony seldom developed, it needed 14 days, and no continuous mycelia developed even in a 8th months culture. Diameter of microsclerotia measured on different culture media varied between 39-308 microm.

  9. Purification and molecular characterization of a sialic acid specific lectin from the phytopathogenic fungus Macrophomina phaseolina.

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    Bhowal, Jayati; Guha, Arun Kumar; Chatterjee, Bishnu Pada

    2005-09-05

    A lectin was isolated and purified from the culture filtrate of the plant pathogenic fungus Macrophomina phaseolina by a combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation, affinity chromatography on fetuin-Sepharose 4B and ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-A 50. The lectin designated MPL was homogeneous by PAGE and HPLC and a monomeric protein with a molecular weight of approximately 34 kDa as demonstrated by SDS-PAGE. It is a glycoprotein and agglutinated human erythrocytes regardless of the human blood type. Neuraminidase treatment of erythrocytes reduced the agglutination activity of the lectin. It is thermally stable and exhibits maximum activity between pH 6 and 7.2. Its carbohydrate binding specificity was investigated both by hapten inhibition of hemagglutination and by enzyme-conjugated lectin inhibition assay. Although, M. phaseolina lectin bound sialic acid, it exhibited binding affinity towards neuraminyl oligosaccharides of N-linked glycoproteins, alpha-Neu5Ac-(2-->3)-beta-Gal-(1-->4)-GlcNAc being maximum.

  10. Motility and chemotactic response of Pseudomonas fluorescens toward chemoattractants present in the exudate of Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, T; Arora, D K

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strains (LAM1-hydrophilic) and (LAM2-hydrophobic) showed positive chemotaxis towards attractants (sugars, amino acids, polyols and organic acids) present in the exudate of Macrophomina phaseolina (a soil-borne plant pathogenic fungus). The varied response of motility traits such as speed, rate of change in direction (RCDI) and net to gross displacement ratio (NGDR) was observed for different chemoattractants. Swimming speed of the strains was highest in 10-fold diluted exudate or 100-1000 microM strength of different attractants, but further dilutions significantly decreased the swimming speed (P = 0.05). Chemotactic response of P fluorescens was positively correlated with swimming speed (P = 0.05; r = 0.76). Relative to control, the RCDI values decreased 1.5-fold in amino acids or sugars, and 1.2-fold in polyols or organic acids. With increase in swimming speed, the NGDR of both strains also increased, but the RCDI decreased. Both hydrophilic and hydrophobic strains did not show significant differences in their motility traits. The results demonstrate that M. phaseolina exudate contains chemical attractants that serve as signal for flagellar motility of P. fluorescens. Motile P fluorescens strains thus may consume fungal exudate as nutrients, and thus spores could offer a niche for these bacteria in soil.

  11. In-Vitro Efficacy of Trichoderma viride Against Sclerotium rolfsii and Macrophomina phaseolina

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    Khirood DOLEY

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The fungal pathogen causes serious widespread losses to agricultural crops worldwide. Therefore, economy of countries may worsen especially of developing countries. In addition, harmful chemical pesticides which are being used today for increasing crop production creates very serious health hazardous problems to human beings and ecosystem as a whole. The antagonistic potential of Trichoderma species which has been long known to control various soil-borne fungal pathogens in biological way may be utilized. The faster growth rates with which it competes with fungal pathogen mainly brings upon their antagonistic characteristics. An investigation was carried out in laboratory condition towards biological efficacy of T. viride on potato dextrose agar (PDA medium for the bio-control of soil-borne plant pathogens Sclerotium rolfsii and Macrophomina phaseolina in in-vitro condition. The dual culture technique was followed in which T. viride showed significant antifungal activities towards both the pathogens. T. viride significantly inhibited the mycelial radial growth of S. rolfsii by 75% and M. phaseolina by 71.42%. The results showed variable mycelial growth rate for all fungal isolates which was determined after 6 days of incubation in which T. viride showed minimum of 4.00 days to completely cover the petri-plates and S. rolfsii showed 4.33 days whereas M. phaseolina showed 6.33 days. Thus, T. viride showed encouraging results regarding their biopesticidal and biofungicidal potential against plant pathogens which may be endorsed to substitute harmful chemical supplements that exists in modern day agricultural practices.

  12. Relatedness of Macrophomina phaseolina isolates from tallgrass prairie, maize, soybean and sorghum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, A A; Ahmed, H U; Todd, T C; Travers, S E; Zeller, K A; Leslie, J F; Garrett, K A

    2010-01-01

    Agricultural and wild ecosystems may interact through shared pathogens such as Macrophomina phaseolina, a generalist clonal fungus with more than 284 plant hosts that is likely to become more important under climate change scenarios of increased heat and drought stress. To evaluate the degree of subdivision in populations of M. phaseolina in Kansas agriculture and wildlands, we compared 143 isolates from maize fields adjacent to tallgrass prairie, nearby sorghum fields, widely dispersed soybean fields and isolates from eight plant species in tallgrass prairie. Isolate growth phenotypes were evaluated on a medium containing chlorate. Genetic characteristics were analysed based on amplified fragment length polymorphisms and the sequence of the rDNA-internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region. The average genetic similarity was 58% among isolates in the tallgrass prairie, 71% in the maize fields, 75% in the sorghum fields and 80% in the dispersed soybean fields. The isolates were divided into four clusters: one containing most of the isolates from maize and soybean, two others containing isolates from wild plants and sorghum, and a fourth containing a single isolate recovered from Solidago canadensis in the tallgrass prairie. Most of the sorghum isolates had the dense phenotype on media containing chlorate, while those from other hosts had either feathery or restricted phenotypes. These results suggest that the tallgrass prairie supports a more diverse population of M. phaseolina per area than do any of the crop species. Subpopulations show incomplete specialization by host. These results also suggest that inoculum produced in agriculture may influence tallgrass prairie communities, and conversely that different pathogen subpopulations in tallgrass prairie can interact there to generate 'hybrids' with novel genetic profiles and pathogenic capabilities.

  13. Macrophomina phaseolina: density and longevity of microsclerotia in soybean root tissues and free on the soil, and competitive saprophytic ability

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    Erlei Melo Reis

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In field experiments, the density of Macrophomina phaseolina microsclerotia in root tissues of naturally colonized soybean cultivars was quantified. The density of free sclerotia on the soil was determined for plots of crop rotation (soybean-corn and soybean monoculture soon after soybean harvest. M. phaseolina natural infection was also determined for the roots of weeds grown in the experimental area. To verify the ability of M. phaseolina to colonize dead substrates, senesced stem segments from the main plant species representing the agricultural system of southern Brazil were exposed on naturally infested soil for 30 and 60 days. To quantify the sclerotia, the methodology of Cloud and Rupe (1991 and Mengistu et al. (2007 was employed. Sclerotium density, assessed based on colony forming units (CFU, ranged from 156 to 1,108/g root tissue. Sclerotium longevity, also assessed according to CFU, was 157 days for the rotation and 163 days for the monoculture system. M. phaseolina did not colonize saprophytically any dead stem segment of Avena strigosa,Avena sativa,Hordeum vulgare,Brassica napus,Gossypium hirsutum,Secale cereale,Helianthus annus,Triticosecalerimpaui, and Triticum aestivum. Mp was isolated from infected root tissues of Amaranthus viridis,Bidens pilosa,Cardiospermum halicacabum,Euphorbia heterophylla,Ipomoea sp., and Richardia brasiliensis. The survival mechanisms of M. phaseolina studied in this paper met the microsclerotium longevity in soybean root tissues, free on the soil, as well as asymptomatic colonization of weeds.

  14. Glyceollin is an important component of soybean plant defense against Phytophthora sojae and Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lygin, Anatoliy V; Zernova, Olga V; Hill, Curtis B; Kholina, Nadegda A; Widholm, Jack M; Hartman, Glen L; Lozovaya, Vera V

    2013-10-01

    The response of soybean transgenic plants, with suppressed synthesis of isoflavones, and nontransgenic plants to two common soybean pathogens, Macrophomina phaseolina and Phytophthora sojae, was studied. Transgenic soybean plants of one line used in this study were previously generated via bombardment of embryogenic cultures with the phenylalanine ammonia lyase, chalcone synthase, and isoflavone synthase (IFS2) genes in sense orientation driven by the cotyledon-preferable lectin promoter (to turn genes on in cotyledons), while plants of another line were newly produced using the IFS2 gene in sense orientation driven by the Cassava vein mosaic virus constitutive promoter (to turn genes on in all plant parts). Nearly complete inhibition of isoflavone synthesis was found in the cotyledons of young seedlings of transgenic plants transformed with the IFS2 transgene driven by the cotyledon-preferable lectin promoter compared with the untransformed control during the 10-day observation period, with the precursors of isoflavone synthesis being accumulated in the cotyledons of transgenic plants. These results indicated that the lectin promoter could be active not only during seed development but also during seed germination. Downregulation of isoflavone synthesis only in the seed or in the whole soybean plant caused a strong inhibition of the pathogen-inducible glyceollin in cotyledons after inoculation with P. sojae, which resulted in increased susceptibility of the cotyledons of both transgenic lines to this pathogen compared with inoculated cotyledons of untransformed plants. When stems were inoculated with M. phaseolina, suppression of glyceollin synthesis was found only in stems of transgenic plants expressing the transgene driven by a constitutive promoter, which developed more severe infection. These results provide further evidence that rapid glyceollin accumulation during infection contributes to the innate soybean defense response.

  15. Antifungal activity of various essential oils against Rhizoctonia solani and Macrophomina phaseolina as major bean pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaledi, N; Taheri, P; Tarighi, S

    2015-03-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of various essential oils (EOs) to decrease the activity of cell wall degrading enzymes (CWDEs) produced by fungal phytopathogens, which are associated with disease progress. Also, effect of seed treatment and foliar application of peppermint EO and its main constituent, menthol, on diseases caused by two necrotrophic pathogens on bean was investigated. Antifungal activity of EOs on Rhizoctonia solani and Macrophomina phaseolina, as bean pathogens, was evaluated. The EOs of Mentha piperita, Bunium persicum and Thymus vulgaris revealed the highest antifungal activity against fungi. The EO of M. piperita had the lowest minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for R. solani among the three EOs tested. This pathogen did not grow in the presence of M. piperita, B. persicum and T. vulgaris EOs at 850, 1200 and 1100 ppm concentrations, respectively. The B. persicum EO had the lowest MIC for M. phaseolina as this fungus did not grow in the presence of M. piperita, B. persicum and T. vulgaris EOs at concentrations of 975, 950 and 1150 ppm, respectively. Hyphae exposed to EOs showed structural changes. Activities of cellulase and pectinase, as main CWDEs of pathogens, decreased by EOs at low concentration without effect on fungal growth. Seed treatment and foliar application of peppermint EO and/or menthol significantly reduced the development of bean diseases caused by both fungi. Higher capability of menthol than peppermint EO in decreasing diseases on bean was observed. Reducing CDWEs activity is a mechanism of EOs' effect on fungi. Higher antifungal activity of menthol compared to peppermint EO was observed not only in vitro but also in vivo. Effect of EOs on CWDEs involved in pathogenesis is described in this study for the first time. Menthol can be used as a botanical fungicide to control destructive fungal diseases on bean. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Morphological and pathogenic variability among Macrophomina phaseolina isolates associated with mungbean (Vigna radiata L.) Wilczek from Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Umer; Mukhtar, Tariq

    2014-01-01

    Macrophomina phaseolina is a serious pathogen of many crops. In the present studies, 65 isolates of Macrophomina phaseolina from different agroecological regions of Punjab and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa provinces of Pakistan were analyzed for morphological and pathogenic variability. Regardless of their geographic origins, significant differences were detected among 65 isolates in their radial growth, sclerotial size, and weight as well as in pathogenicity. Sixteen isolates were rated as fast growing, 11 as slow growing, and the rest of the isolates as medium growing. Nine isolates were classified as large sized, 26 as small sized, and the remaining 30 isolates as medium sized. Thirty five isolates were ranked as heavy weight, 12 as low weight, and the rest of isolates were grouped as medium weight. Ten fungal isolates appeared to be least virulent, whereas eight isolates of diverse origin proved to be highly virulent against mungbean cultivars. The remaining isolates were regarded as moderately virulent. No relationship was found among the morphological characters and pathogenicity of the isolates. These morphological and pathogenic variations in various isolates of M. phaseolina may be considered important in disease management systems and will be useful in breeding programmes of mungbean cultivars resistant to charcoal rot.

  17. Morphological and Pathogenic Variability among Macrophomina phaseolina Isolates Associated with Mungbean (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek from Pakistan

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    Umer Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophomina phaseolina is a serious pathogen of many crops. In the present studies, 65 isolates of Macrophomina phaseolina from different agroecological regions of Punjab and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa provinces of Pakistan were analyzed for morphological and pathogenic variability. Regardless of their geographic origins, significant differences were detected among 65 isolates in their radial growth, sclerotial size, and weight as well as in pathogenicity. Sixteen isolates were rated as fast growing, 11 as slow growing, and the rest of the isolates as medium growing. Nine isolates were classified as large sized, 26 as small sized, and the remaining 30 isolates as medium sized. Thirty five isolates were ranked as heavy weight, 12 as low weight, and the rest of isolates were grouped as medium weight. Ten fungal isolates appeared to be least virulent, whereas eight isolates of diverse origin proved to be highly virulent against mungbean cultivars. The remaining isolates were regarded as moderately virulent. No relationship was found among the morphological characters and pathogenicity of the isolates. These morphological and pathogenic variations in various isolates of M. phaseolina may be considered important in disease management systems and will be useful in breeding programmes of mungbean cultivars resistant to charcoal rot.

  18. RAPD cluster analysis and chlorate sensitivity of some Indian isolates of Macrophomina phaseolina from sorghum and their relationships with pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, I K; Fakrudin, B; Arora, D K

    2008-01-01

    Charcoal rot caused by Macrophomina phaseolina is an economically important disease in sorghum grown during the post rainy season in India. Variations in random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) polymorphisms, chlorate sensitivity and pathogenicity were studied among sorghum isolates of M. phaseolina collected from different parts of India. RAPD data based on 14 random primers of Kit A and C (OPA and OPC) on 20 isolates showed a high degree of polymorphism (98.1%) in different isolates. UPGMA dendrogram on RAPD data produced 7 clusters at the level of 37% similarity. Isolates from the same locations showed a tendency to group closer, substantiating closer genetic relatedness. Sorghum infecting Macrophomina isolates showed a mixed response for sensitivity to potassium chlorate (120 mM). Chlorate-resistant isolates were predominant (>65% of the isolates) over sensitive isolates. Chlorate-sensitive isolates were found to be genetically closer among them than the resistant ones. For the first time it was shown that chlorate sensitivity in Macrophomina had some relations with charcoal rot severity in sorghum.

  19. Variation in Sensitivity Among Some Isolates of Macrophomina phaseolina Isolated from Cotton Roots to Flutolanil Fungicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Yehia A G; Aly, A A; Omar, M R; Ismail, Abdel-Wahab A

    2006-06-01

    Toxicity of the fungicide Flutolanil was in vitro tested against 20 isolates of Macrophomina phaseolina and cotton seedlings of ten commercial cotton cultivars. The isolates were recovered from roots of cotton plants obtained from different cotton-growing areas in Egypt. Most of the tested isolates were sensitive to Flutolanil; however, they varied in sensitivity. Twenty-five percent of the isolates were highly sensitive where IC50 ranged from 100 µg/ml. Flutolanil was very safe on both shoots and roots of the tested cultivars (IC50 > 100 µg/ml). Treating cotton seeds with Flutolanil resulted in highly significant (P < 0.01) reductions in pathogenicity of 18 isolates and a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in pathogenicity of isolate M29. M1 was the only isolate, which was insensitive to the application of Flutolanil. In vivo toxicity to Flutolanil was not correlated with its in vitro toxicity. However, a highly significant correlation (r = 0.60, P < 0.01) was observed between pathogenicity of isolates and the in vivo toxicity of the fungicide.

  20. Effect of mixture of Trichoderma isolates on biochemical parameters in leaf of Macrophomina phaseolina infected brinjal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S P; Singh, H B

    2014-09-01

    A mixture of Trichoderma harzianum NBRI-1055 (Fx) and T. harzianum BHU-99 (Th) was evaluated for their efficiency to induce systemic resistance during three way interaction among brinjal-Trichoderma-Macrophomina phaseolina. Total phenol content (TPC), defence related enzymes Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), Peroxidase (PO), Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and PR proteins (PR-2 and PR-3) were recorded. Total phenolic content was recorded 12.82 times and 1.8 times higher in Trichoderma mixture treated-pathogen challenge (Fx-Th-Pth) treatment than in untreated healthy control and untreated pathogen challenged (Pth) plants respectively after 72 hr pathogen inoculation (hapi). Defence related enzymes PAL 4.54 times higher, 48hapi, PO, 3.96 times higher, 72hapi and PPO 8.1 times higher, 72hapi in Fx-Th-Pth treatment than untreated healthy control, and the PR- proteins such as PR-2, 2.15 times and PR-3, 2.16 times higher, 72hapi than untreated healthy control. The results showed that a mixture of Trichoderma (Fx+Th) performed better than single isolate.

  1. Genetic Architecture of Charcoal Rot (Macrophomina phaseolina Resistance in Soybean Revealed Using a Diverse Panel

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    Sara M. Coser

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Charcoal rot (CR disease caused by Macrophomina phaseolina is responsible for significant yield losses in soybean production. Among the methods available for controlling this disease, breeding for resistance is the most promising. Progress in breeding efforts has been slow due to the insufficient information available on the genetic mechanisms related to resistance. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS enable unraveling the genetic architecture of resistance and identification of causal genes. The aims of this study were to identify new sources of resistance to CR in a collection of 459 diverse plant introductions from the USDA Soybean Germplasm Core Collection using field and greenhouse screenings, and to conduct GWAS to identify candidate genes and associated molecular markers. New sources for CR resistance were identified from both field and greenhouse screening from maturity groups I, II, and III. Five significant single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP and putative candidate genes related to abiotic and biotic stress responses are reported from the field screening; while greenhouse screening revealed eight loci associated with eight candidate gene families, all associated with functions controlling plant defense response. No overlap of markers or genes was observed between field and greenhouse screenings suggesting a complex molecular mechanism underlying resistance to CR in soybean with varied response to different environments; but our findings provide useful information for advancing breeding for CR resistance as well as the genetic mechanism of resistance.

  2. Antifungal activity of methanol and n-hexane extracts of three Chenopodium species against Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaid, Arshad; Amin, Muhammad

    2009-01-01

    Antifungal activity of methanol and n-hexane leaf, stem, root and inflorescence extracts (1, 2, 3 and 4% w/v) of three Chenopodium species (family Chenopodiaceae) namely Chenopodium album L., Chenopodium murale L. and Chenopodium ambrosioides L. was investigated against Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) G. Goid., a soil-borne fungal plant pathogen that has a broad host range and wide geographical distribution. All the extracts of the three Chenopodium species significantly suppressed the test fungal growth. However, there was marked variation among the various extract treatments. Methanol inflorescence extract of C. album exhibited highest antifungal activity resulting in up to 96% reduction in fungal biomass production. By contrast, methanol leaf extract of the same species exhibited least antifungal activity where 21-44% reduction in fungal biomass was recorded due to various employed extract concentrations. The various methanol extracts of C. murale and C. ambrosioides decreased fungal biomass by 62-90 and 50-84%, respectively. Similarly, various n-hexane extracts of C. album, C. murale and C. ambrosioides reduced fungal biomass by 60-94, 43-90 and 49-86%, respectively.

  3. Biocontrol potential and polyphasic characterization of novel native Trichoderma strains against Macrophomina phaseolina isolated from sorghum and common bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larralde-Corona, C P; Santiago-Mena, M R; Sifuentes-Rincón, A M; Rodríguez-Luna, I C; Rodríguez-Pérez, M A; Shirai, K; Narváez-Zapata, J A

    2008-08-01

    Native strains of Trichoderma isolated from sorghum and common bean crop soils were investigated to assess their biocontrol potential over the phytopathogenic fungus Macrophomina phaseolina, isolated from diseased plants. The Trichoderma strains were characterized with a polyphasic approach, which combined the analysis of their morphological characteristics, enzymatic activity, macro- and microculture test results, rDNA restriction patterns (AFLP), ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 rDNA sequences, and protein profiles. The integration of these data sets can be used to select new isolates as biological control agents against native fungal phytopathogens. In general, we observed a positive correlation between the secretion of beta-1,3-glucanase and N-acetylhexosaminidase, and the biocontrol capacities of all the Trichoderma isolates. Strains with the best hyperparasitic behavior against M. phaseolina isolated from diseased bean and sorghum were Trichoderma sp. (TCBG-2) and Trichoderma koningiopsis (TCBG-8), respectively.

  4. Métodos de inoculação de Rhizoctonia solani e Macrophomina phaseolina em meloeiro (Cucumis melo

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    Alexis Calafange Medeiros

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available RESUMOA utilização de métodos de inoculação constitui uma medida estratégica no estudo de resistência das cucurbitáceas. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar dois métodos de inoculação de Rhizoctonia solani e Macrophomina phaseolina em meloeiro, visando o estudo de resistência. O experimento foi conduzido em casa de vegetação na Universidade Federal Rural do Semiárido, em Mossoró-RN, Brasil. Foram avaliados 05 acessos: A-09, A-16, A-18, A-22 e A-33 para R. solani e A-09, A-16, A-24, MR-1 e 'Olimpic' para M. phaseolina. Foram estudados os métodos areno-orgânico e palito de dente. Utilizou-se o delineamento inteiramente casualizado, com 5 repetições. Os isolados utilizados foram: Me 242, Me 243, Me 244 de R. Solani e I-248, I-249 e I-250 de M. phaseolina. Os acessos de meloeiro foram avaliados quanto à severidade da doença por uma escala de nota de 1 a 5. O método do palito de dente foi o mais eficiente em discriminar acessos de melão resistentes e suscetíveis e os isolados de R. solani e M. phaseolina quanto à virulência.

  5. Effect of rotation of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) with fonio (Digitaria exilis) and millet (Pennisetum glaucum) on Macrophomina phaseolina densities and cowpea yield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ndiaye, M.; Termorshuizen, A.J.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.

    2008-01-01

    Macrophomina phaseolina, the causal agent of charcoal rot, causes great damage to cowpea in the Sahel. One of the few options to manage the disease is by cropping nonhosts that may reduce the soil inoculum below a damage threshold level. To test this, fonio (Digitaria exilis) and millet (Pennisetum

  6. Isolation and purification of fungal pathogen (Macrophomina phaseolina induced chitinase from moth beans (Phaseolus aconitifolius

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    Neelima Garg

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Chitinase (EC 3.2.1.14 is one of the major pathogenesis-related proteins, which is a polypeptide that accumulates extracellularly in infected plant tissue. An attempt was made to isolate and purify the chitanase enzyme using moth beans as an enzyme source. Materials and Method : The enzyme was isolated and purified from moth beans against the fungal pathogen Macrophomina phaseolina strain 2165. The isolation and purification was done in both in vitro and in vivo conditions. Purification of chitinase was carried out to obtain three fractions, viz. 50°C heated, ammonium sulfate precipitated and sephadex G-25 column-eluted fractions. The molecular mass of Chitinase was directly estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacryamide gel electroresis (SDS-PAGE. Result : The yield is sufficient for initial characterization studies of the enzyme. The molecular study of the enzyme shows the possibility of generating the defense mechanism in plants in which it cannot occur. Chitinase was purified by gel filtration chromatography with 20.75-fold and 32.78-fold purification in the in vitro and in vivo conditions, respectively. The enzyme shows a maximum activity after 90 min with 0.1 ml of colloidal chitin as a substrate and 0.4 ml of crude chitinase extract. The optimum pH of 5.0 and an optimum temperature of 40°C was found for maximal activity. The molecular weight of purified chitinase was estimated to be 30 kDa by SDS-PAGE. Conclusion : The chitinase isolated in both in vitro and in vivo conditions is stable andactive.

  7. Isolation and purification of fungal pathogen (Macrophomina phaseolina) induced chitinase from moth beans (Phaseolus aconitifolius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Neelima; Gupta, Himanshu

    2010-01-01

    Chitinase (EC 3.2.1.14) is one of the major pathogenesis-related proteins, which is a polypeptide that accumulates extracellularly in infected plant tissue. An attempt was made to isolate and purify the chitanase enzyme using moth beans as an enzyme source. The enzyme was isolated and purified from moth beans against the fungal pathogen Macrophomina phaseolina strain 2165. The isolation and purification was done in both in vitro and in vivo conditions. Purification of chitinase was carried out to obtain three fractions, viz. 50°C heated, ammonium sulfate precipitated and sephadex G-25 column-eluted fractions. The molecular mass of Chitinase was directly estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacryamide gel electroresis (SDS-PAGE). The yield is sufficient for initial characterization studies of the enzyme. The molecular study of the enzyme shows the possibility of generating the defense mechanism in plants in which it cannot occur. Chitinase was purified by gel filtration chromatography with 20.75-fold and 32.78-fold purification in the in vitro and in vivo conditions, respectively. The enzyme shows a maximum activity after 90 min with 0.1 ml of colloidal chitin as a substrate and 0.4 ml of crude chitinase extract. The optimum pH of 5.0 and an optimum temperature of 40°C was found for maximal activity. The molecular weight of purified chitinase was estimated to be 30 kDa by SDS-PAGE. The chitinase isolated in both in vitro and in vivo conditions is stable andactive.

  8. Active manipulation of resident biology to suppress Macrophomina phaseolina in strawberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. phaseolina is a pathogen of emerging importance in strawberry production systems. Brassicaceae seed meal amendments suppressed proliferation of M. phaseolina through soil systems, but optimal seed meal-induced pathogen suppression required a functional soil biology. Suppression of M. phaseolina ...

  9. In vitro biocontrol activity of halotolerant Streptomyces aureofaciens K20: A potent antagonist against Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, P; Kumar, R; Yandigeri, M S

    2017-01-01

    A halotolerant actinobacterial strain isolated from salinity affected soil of Eastern Indo-Gangetic plains (IGP), Uttar Pradesh, India, was characterised for its antagonistic potential against Macrophomina phaseolina by dual-culture assay. It was shown to effectively inhibit the growth of M. phaseolina with an inhibition zone of 27 ± 1.33 mm. Further the actinobacterial strain was evaluated for its plant growth promoting (PGP) properties and its ability to produce biocontrol related extracellular enzymes viz. amylase, protease, cellulase, chitinase, gelatinase and urease. The results revealed that the actinobacterial strain had PGP potential along with positive assay for amylase, chitinase and urease. The interaction study between antagonist strain and fungal pathogen, performed by scanning electron microscopy technique revealed that the actinobacterium was able to damage fungal mycelia may be due to chitinase, establishing its role as a potential antagonist against M. phaseolina. The actinobacterial isolate was characterised by 16S rDNA gene sequencing, and was identified as Streptomyces genera. The identified gene sequence was deposited to NCBI GenBank with an accession number KP331758.

  10. In vitro biocontrol activity of halotolerant Streptomyces aureofaciens K20: A potent antagonist against Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi Goid

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    P. Shrivastava

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A halotolerant actinobacterial strain isolated from salinity affected soil of Eastern Indo-Gangetic plains (IGP, Uttar Pradesh, India, was characterised for its antagonistic potential against Macrophomina phaseolina by dual-culture assay. It was shown to effectively inhibit the growth of M. phaseolina with an inhibition zone of 27 ± 1.33 mm. Further the actinobacterial strain was evaluated for its plant growth promoting (PGP properties and its ability to produce biocontrol related extracellular enzymes viz. amylase, protease, cellulase, chitinase, gelatinase and urease. The results revealed that the actinobacterial strain had PGP potential along with positive assay for amylase, chitinase and urease. The interaction study between antagonist strain and fungal pathogen, performed by scanning electron microscopy technique revealed that the actinobacterium was able to damage fungal mycelia may be due to chitinase, establishing its role as a potential antagonist against M. phaseolina. The actinobacterial isolate was characterised by 16S rDNA gene sequencing, and was identified as Streptomyces genera. The identified gene sequence was deposited to NCBI GenBank with an accession number KP331758.

  11. Pathogenic and Genetic Diversity among Iranian Isolates of Macrophomina phaseolina Diversidad Patogénica y Genética entre Aislamientos Iraníes de Macrophomina phaseolina

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    Siavosh Rayatpanah

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Charcoal rot, caused by Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi Goid., is an economically important disease of oilseed plants in Northern Iran. Seventy isolates of M. phaseolina were obtained from different hosts, including soybean (Glycine max L., and sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. in the northern oilseed planting regions of Iran. RAPD-PCR amplification profiles, by using of six random OPA primers (kit A showed polymorphisms among the isolates. The primer OPA-13 (5'_ CAGCACCCAC_3' amplified the genomic DNA of all isolates of M.phaseolina producing 4-12 bands of sizes between 0.25 and 2.3 kb. Unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA analysis classified the isolates into the nine major groups with 64% similarity. Pathogenicity of isolates was evaluated at seedling stage of soybean, sunflower, and maize (Zea mays L. plants under in vitro conditions. None of the isolates were pathogenic on corn, while all of the isolates infected soybean and sunflower seedlings. Isolates were more virulent on soybean than sunflower. The disease index on sunflower and soybean varied between 19-24 and 27-30 respectively. These results indicated a significant pathogenic and genetic variability within the Iranian isolates of M. phaseolina. Cultivation with crop rotation was probably tended to induce less diversity of the pathogen isolates.Pudrición carbonosa, causada por Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi Goid., es una enfermedad de importancia económica de las plantas de semillas oleaginosas en el norte de Irán. Setenta aislamientos de M. phaseolina se obtuvieron de diferentes hospederos, incluyendo soya (Glycine max L. y girasol (Helianthus annuus L. en las regiones de plantación de semillas oleaginosas del norte de Irán. Perfiles RAPD-PCR de amplificación, utilizando primers aleatorios de seis OPA (kit A mostraron polimorfismos entre los aislamientos. El primer OPA-13 (5'-CAGCACCCAC-3' amplificó el ADN genómico de todos los aislamientos de M. phaseolina

  12. Suppression of maize root diseases caused by Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium moniliforme and Fusarium graminearum by plant growth promoting rhizobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, K K; Tilak, K V; Saxena, A K; Dey, R; Singh, C S

    2001-01-01

    A plant growth-promoting isolate of a fluorescent Pseudomonas sp. EM85 and two bacilli isolates MR-11(2) and MRF, isolated from maize rhizosphere, were found strongly antagonistic to Fusarium moniliforme, Fusarium graminearum and Macrophomina phaseolina, causal agents of foot rots and wilting, collar rots/stalk rots and root rots and wilting, and charcoal rots of maize, respectively. Pseudomonas sp. EM85 produced antifungal antibiotics (Afa+), siderophore (Sid+), HCN (HCN+) and fluorescent pigments (Flu+) besides exhibiting plant growth promoting traits like nitrogen fixation, phosphate solubilization, and production of organic acids and IAA. While MR-11(2) produced siderophore (Sid+), antibiotics (Afa+) and antifungal volatiles (Afv+), MRF exhibited the production of antifungal antibiotics (Afa+) and siderophores (Sid+). Bacillus spp. MRF was also found to produce organic acids and IAA, solubilized tri-calcium phosphate and fixed nitrogen from the atmosphere. All three isolates suppressed the diseases caused by Fusarium moniliforme, Fusarium graminearum and Macrophomina phaseolina in vitro. A Tn5:: lacZ induced isogenic mutant of the fluorescent Pseudomonas EM85, M23, along with the two bacilli were evaluated for in situ disease suppression of maize. Results indicated that combined application of the two bacilli significantly (P = 0.05) reduced the Macrophomina-induced charcoal rots of maize by 56.04%. Treatments with the MRF isolate of Bacillus spp. and Tn5:: lacZ mutant (M23) of fluorescent Pseudomonas sp. EM85 significantly reduced collar rots, root and foot rots, and wilting of maize caused by Fusarium moniliforme and F. graminearum (P = 0.05) compared to all other treatments. All these isolates were found very efficient in colonizing the rhizotic zones of maize after inoculation. Evaluation of the population dynamics of the fluorescent Pseudomonas sp. EM85 using the Tn5:: lacZ marker and of the Bacillus spp. MRF and MR-11(2) using an antibiotic resistance

  13. Two pathogenesis-related peroxidases in greengram (Vigna radiata (L.) wilczek) leaves and cultured cells induced by Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid. and its elicitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, A; Vidhyasekaran, P; Samiyappan, R

    2001-01-01

    An elicitor has been isolated from Macrophomina phaseolina, the root rot and leaf blight pathogen of greengram. Suspension-cultured cells of greengram were established which responded to the fungal elicitor. When greengram leaves were inoculated with M. phaseolina two new peroxidases appeared. Similarly, two new peroxidases could be detected in suspension-cultured greengram cells when treated with the fungal elicitor. These peroxidases were purified by column chromatography and their molecular masses were 27 and 38 kDa. The new peroxidases detected in both leaves and cultured cells appear to be similar with the same molecular weights.

  14. Cloning, characterization and functional expression of an endoglucanase-encoding gene from the phytopathogenic fungus Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Jones, R W

    1995-05-26

    An endoglucanase-encoding clone (egl2) was isolated from the phytopathogenic soilborne deuteromycete fungus Macrophomina phaseolina (Mp). Clones were obtained from a cDNA library by functional expression in Escherichia coli. The egl2 clone hybridized to a 1.3-kb mRNA. Expression is induced by carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and repressed by glucose. The deduced amino acid (aa) sequence revealed strong similarity to the egl3 from Trichoderma reesei (Tr) (72% for identical residues and 81% with conservative substitution over a span of 324 aa). The Mp egl2 lacks the cellulose-binding domain and linker region found in the Tr egl3. Different codon usage between the two fungi resulted in a much shorter span of nucleotide homology. The Egl2 protein cleaves cellodextrins with continguous beta, 1-4 linkages of four and larger, and shows activity against CMC and birchwood xylan.

  15. [Biochemical basis of tolerance to osmotic stress in phytopathogenic fungus: The case of Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Villarreal, Rodolfo; Garza-Romero, Tamar S; Moreno-Medina, Víctor R; Hernández-Delgado, Sanjuana; Mayek-Pérez, Netzahualcoyotl

    Fungus Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid. is the causative agent of charcoal rot disease which causes significant yield losses in major crops such as maize, sorghum, soybean and common beans in Mexico. This fungus is a facultative parasite which shows broad ability to adapt itself to stressed environments where water deficits and/or high temperature stresses commonly occur. These environmental conditions are common for most cultivable lands throughout Mexico. Here we describe some basic facts related to the etiology and epidemiology of the fungus as well as to the importance of responses to stressed environments, particularly to water deficits, based on morphology and growth traits, as well as on physiology, biochemistry and pathogenicity of fungus M. phaseolina. To conclude, we show some perspectives related to future research into the genus, which emphasize the increasing need to improve the knowledge based on the application of both traditional and biotechnological tools in order to elucidate the mechanisms of resistance to environmental stress which can be extrapolated to other useful organisms to man. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification and structure elucidation of a novel antifungal compound produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PGPR2 against Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illakkiam, Devaraj; Ponraj, Paramasivan; Shankar, Manoharan; Muthusubramanian, Shanmugam; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy

    2013-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PGPR2 was found to protect mungbean plants from charcoal rot disease caused by Macrophomina phaseolina. Secondary metabolites from the culture supernatant of P. aeruginosa PGPR2 were extracted with ethyl acetate and the antifungal compound was purified by preparative HPLC using reverse phase chromatography. The purified compound showed antifungal activity against M. phaseolina and other phytopathogenic fungi (Fusarium sp., Rhizoctonia sp. Alternaria sp., and Aspergillus sp.). The structure of the purified compound was determined using (1)H, (13)C, 2D NMR spectra and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Spectral data suggest that the antifungal compound is 3,4-dihydroxy-N-methyl-4-(4-oxochroman-2-yl)butanamide, with the chemical formula C14H17NO5 and a molecular mass of 279. Though chemically synthesized chromanone derivatives have been shown to have antifungal activity, we report for the first time, the microbial production of a chromanone derivative with antifungal activity. This ability of P. aeruginosa PGPR2 makes it a suitable strain for biocontrol.

  17. Genetic diversity of Macrophomina phaseolina isolates from certain agro-climatic regions of India by using RAPD markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Bandamaravuri Kishore; Reddy, S S; Yadav, Mukesh K; Sukumar, M; Mishra, Vijendra; Saxena, A K; Arora, Dilip K

    2010-06-01

    Genetic diversity analysis of Macrophomina phaseolina isolates obtained from different host range and diverse geographical locations in India was carried out using RAPD fingerprinting. Of the thirteen 10-mer random primers used, primer OPB-08 gave the maximum polymorphism and the UPGMA clustering could separate 50 isolates in to ten groups at more than 65% similarity level. The ten clusters correlated well with the geographical locations with exceptions for isolates obtained from Eastern and Western Ghats. There was a segregation of isolates from these two geographical locations in to two clusters thus, distributing 10 genotypes in to eight geographical locations. All the isolates M. phaseolina irrespective of their host and geographical origin, exhibited two representative monomorphic bands at 250 bp and 1 kb, presence of these bands suggests that isolates might have evolved from a common ancestor but due to geographical isolation fallowed by natural selection and genetic drift might have segregated in to subpopulations. Genetic similarity in the pathogenic population reflects the dispersal of single lineage in all locations in India.

  18. Xyloglucan endotransglycosylase/hydrolase genes from a susceptible and resistant jute species show opposite expression pattern following Macrophomina phaseolina infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharmin, Sazia; Azam, Muhammad Shafiul; Islam, Md Shahidul; Sajib, Abu Ashfaqur; Mahmood, Niaz; Hasan, A M Mahedi; Ahmed, Razib; Sultana, Kishwar; Khan, Haseena

    2012-11-01

    Two of the most widely and intensively cultivated jute species, Corchorus capsularis and Corchorus olitorius, suffer severely from a stem rot disease caused by the fungus Macrophomina phaseolina. Wild jute species, C. trilocularis, shows resistance to this pathogenic fungus. In this study, the technique of differential display was applied to identify genes which are differentially expressed, under both infected and un-infected conditions, between C. trilocularis and C. olitorius var O-72. Two xyloglucan endotransglycosylase/hydrolase (XTH) genes designated CoXTH1 (from Corchorus olitorius) and CtXTH1 (from C.trilocularis) were identified from each of the two species which show different expression patterns upon fungal infection. A steady rise in the expression of CtXTH1 in response to infection was observed by quantitative real time PCR whereas the expression of CoXTH1 was found to be downregulated. Full length sequences of these two genes were determined using primer based gene walking and RACE PCR. This study confirms the involvement of XTH in molecular interactions between M. phaseolina and jute. However, it remains to be explored whether XTH is an essential component of the signaling pathway involved in plant-fungal interaction.

  19. Evaluation of Trichoderma isolates as potential biological control agent against soybean charcoal rot disease caused by Macrophomina phaseolina

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    Elham Khalili

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi Goid remains the prevailing causal agent of charcoal rot disease that significantly suppresses the yield of a variety of oilseed crops. Its wide host range and ability to survive under arid conditions, coupled with the ineffective use of fungicides against it, have spurred scientific endeavours for alternative avenues to control this phytopathogen. Hence, the present study aimed to provide empirical evidence of the efficacy of three fungal isolates (T2, T10 and T12 of Trichoderma harzianum as biological control agents against charcoal rot in soybean (Glycine max L.. The results of the in vitro studies revealed that all three fungal isolates significantly inhibited the growth of M. phaseolina phytopathogen, with T12 showing considerably higher inhibition effect than T2 and T10 isolates. T12 inhibited the growth of M. phaseolina in the dual culture (72.31% and volatile production (63.36% assays, and the hyperparasitism test indicated cell lysis following the interactions with T12 mycelia. T12 isolate was mostly effective in field experiments, observable in the attained minimum plant disease indices both in the soil incorporation (11.98% and seed inoculation (5.55% treatments, in comparison to isolates T2 and T10. Moreover, the stem and root lengths, as well as the seed weight, were considerably increased, as compared to the control. Hence, the findings reported in the present study supported the applicability of T12 isolate as possible alternative to fungicides for the control of charcoal rot in soybean.

  20. Efeito de coberturas do solo sobre a sobrevivência de Macrophomina phaseolina no feijão-caupi

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    Cheyla Magdala de Sousa Linhares

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO Com o objetivo de avaliar a sobrevivência de Macrophomina phaseolina em solo submetido a diferentes coberturas, conduziu-se dois experimentos em casa de vegetação, no delineamento inteiramente casualizado, em esquema fatorial 5 x 2, com cinco coberturas (Brachiaria brizantha, Pennisetum glaucum, Crotalaria spectabilis, solo coberto com filme de polietileno e solo sem cobertura e solo esterilizado e não esterilizado. No primeiro experimento, as plantas foram cultivadas em vasos e dessecadas, para posterior plantio do feijão-caupi e no segundo, a semeadura da cultura foi realizada em sucessão ao primeiro cultivo. Nos dois experimentos foram colocadas em cada vaso a 10 cm de profundidade, no dia do plantio da cultura, quatro bolsas de tecido contendo, cada uma, 10 gramas de inóculo de M. phaseolina, das quais, duas foram retiradas aos 30 dias após o plantio e duas no final do ciclo da cultura, para posterior plaqueamento e determinação da sobrevivência. Realizou-se também o monitoramento das temperaturas máximas e mínimas diárias do solo. Os tratamentos com solo coberto com material vegetal apresentaram menor elevação da temperatura em relação ao solo coberto com filme de polietileno e sem cobertura, que elevaram a temperatura em até 5,9 e 3,9 ºC, respectivamente, em relação ao solo coberto com palhada de P. glaucum. O solo coberto com filme de polietileno e sem cobertura apresentaram maiores taxas de sobrevivência de M. phaseolina e o solo coberto com palhada de P. glaucum a menor taxa. Maior sobrevivência foi observada no solo não esterilizado.

  1. Variability of United States isolates of Macrophomina phaseolina based on simple sequence repeats and cross genus transferability to related genera within botryosphaeriaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Richard E; Wadl, Phillip A; Allen, Thomas; McNeill, David; Wang, Xinwang; Moulton, John K; Rinehart, Timothy A; Abbas, Hamed K; Shier, Thomas; Trigiano, Robert N

    2010-09-01

    Twelve simple sequence repeat (SSRs) loci were used to evaluate genetic diversity of 109 isolates of Macrophomina phaseolina collected from different geographical regions and host species throughout the United States (US). Genetic diversity was assessed using Nei's minimum genetic distance, and the usefulness of each locus was determined by calculating the polymorphism information content (PIC). A total of 98 alleles were detected and of these 31 were unique to individual genotypes. Eight of twelve loci were highly informative with PIC values greater than 0.50. The majority of pairwise comparisons of genetic distance were greater than 0.60 indicating moderate to high genetic diversity. Dendrograms based on the genetic dissimilarities were created for the 109 isolates of which 79 were from soybean. Some clustering by host and geography was noted, but, the dendrograms generally grouped isolates independent of host or geography. Additionally, sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) for 10 isolates revealed that all of these isolates were 99% similar. Three SSR loci from M. phaseolina were cross amplified in other genera in the Botryosphaeriaceae. This was the first study of genotyping and assessing genetic diversity of M. phaseolina isolates collected from a widespread host and geographic range across the US with SSRs. With an additional 34 loci publically available for M. phaseolina, the results indicate that previously developed SSRs from one species can be used in future population, ecological, and genetic studies of M. phaseolina and other genera within the Botryosphaeriaceae.

  2. Quantitative real-time PCR assay for rapid detection of plant and human pathogenic Macrophomina phaseolina from field and environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Bandamaravuri Kishore; Mesapogu, Sukumar; Sharma, Anu; Somasani, Saida Reddy; Arora, Dilip K

    2011-01-01

    A real-time qPCR assay was developed to detect and quantify Macrophomina phaseolina abundance in rhizosphere soil and plant tissue. Both TaqMan and SYBR green techniques were targeted on ~ 1 kb sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) of M. phaseolina and two sets of specific primers were designed for SYBR green (MpSyK) and TaqMan (MpTqK) assays. No cross-hybridization and no fluorescent signal exceeding the baseline threshold was observed in TaqMan and SYBR green assays, respectively. The minimum detection limit or sensitivity of TaqMan assay was 30 fg/μL of M. phaseolina DNA and limit of quantification of M. phaseolina viable population was estimated as 0.66 × 10(5) CFU/g soil(-1) equivalent to 10 pg/μL of target DNA. This is the first report which demonstrated real-time qPCR assays with greater specificity and sensitivity to detect M. phaseolina population in soil and plant materials.

  3. Biological control of strawberry soil-borne pathogens Macrophomina phaseolina and Fusarium solani, using Trichoderma asperellum and Bacillus spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María PASTRANA

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In south-western Spain, Macrophomina phaseolina and Fusarium solani were found to be associated in strawberry plants with, respectively, charcoal rot, and crown and root rot symptoms. For management of both fungal diseases, the antagonistic effects of two commercial formulations, one based on Trichoderma asperellum T18 strain (Prodigy® and the other on Bacillus megaterium and B. laterosporus (Fusbact®, were evaluated in vitro and under controlled environment and field conditions. Two inoculation methods (root-dipping and soil application and two application times (pre- and post-pathogen inoculation, as preventive and curative treatments, respectively were assessed. Dual plate confrontation experiments demonstrated the antagonistic effects of T. asperellum and Bacillus spp. by inhibiting radial growth of M. phaseolina and F. solani by more than 36%. Preventive application of T. asperellum by root-dipping reduced the incidence of charcoal rot (up to 44% in a growth chamber and up to 65% under field conditions and also reduced disease progression, the percentage of crown necrosis, as well as the level of infection measured as ng of pathogen DNA g-1 plant by quantitative real-time PCR. This treatment was also the most effective for reduction of crown and root rot caused by F. solani (up to 100% in a greenhouse and up to 81% under field conditions. These results were nearly comparable with the control achieved using chemical fungicides. The Bacillus spp.-based formulation was also effective for control of charcoal rot and showed variable results for control of F. solani, depending on the growth conditions.

  4. Survival of resistance structures in Macrophomina phaseolina and Sclerotium rolfsii in a biologically treated soil =Sobrevivência de estrutura de resistência de Macrophomina phaseolina e Sclerotium rolfsii em solo tratado biologicamente

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    Selma Rogéria Carvalho Nascimento

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This aim of this study was to evaluate the effect in vitro of the fungus Trichoderma and of the product Compost Aid®, and on the survival of the fungi phaseolina Macrophomina and Sclerotium rolfsii in the soil. The treatments were Tricobiol® with a T. harzianum base, Triconemate® with a base of T. longibrachiatum from Biofungi Control Biológico®, Trichoderma viride (TR2; T. harzianum (T25; T. koningii (T15; T. Polysporum (SN11 and Compost Aid®. An evaluation of antagonism was determined from the score allotted to the percentage of growth of isolates of Trichoderma spp. in relation to the phyto-pathogenic fungi, as well as the percentage inhibition in pathogen growth in relation to the Compost Aid® product. The survival of resistance structures in the pathogenic fungi was evaluated 40 days after application of the treatments by plating onto a semiselective culture medium and BDA. For the experiment in vitro, all the treatments with Trichoderma produced a percentage inhibition greater than 50% for both phyto-pathogenic fungi. The commercial products Tricobiol® and Triconemate® gave the greatest percentage inhibition for the fungus S. rolfsii (62.5%. The Compost Aid® product gave 100% and 98.57% inhibition in the growth of the fungi M. phaseolin and S. rolfsii respectively. The treatments in the form of a mixture of Trichoderma and Tricobiol® had a median value of 100%, while Triconemate® resulted in a 96% inhibition in the growth of the microsclerotia of M. phaseolina recovered from the soil; however none of these treatments inhibited sclerotial germination in S. rolfsii. The product Compost Aid® resulted in a median of 100% and 0% growth in resistance structures for the M. phaseolina and S. rolfsii fungi respectively. = O presente estudo teve como objetivo avaliar o efeito do fungo Trichoderma e do produto Compost Aid® in vitro e na sobrevivência dos fungos Macrophomina phaseolina e Sclerotium rolfsii no solo. Os tratamentos foram

  5. Antagonistic effect of fluorescent pseudomonads against Macrophomina phaseolina that causes charcoal rot of groundnut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Shweta; Bhatia, Shivani; Dubey, R C; Maheshwari, D K

    2003-12-01

    Maximum colony growth inhibition was observed due to Pseudomonas PS2 (74%) as compared to PS1 (71%) on trypticase soy agar (TSM) plates after 5 days of incubation. Light and scanning electron microscopic examination showed hyphal coiling, vacuolation, coagulation and granulation of cytoplasm resulting in lysis of hyphae of M. phaseolina by pseudomonads. Cell free culture filtrates of strains PS1 and PS2 restricted the growth of mycelium of M. phaseolina. PS1 and PS2 caused maximum colony growth inhibition by 57 and 61% respectively at 20% concentration of culture filtrate after 4 days of incubation. Volatile substances produced by PS1 and PS2 also inhibited the colony growth of M. phaseolina by 25 and 32%, respectively. Inhibitory effect of volatile substances, however, decreased with advancing in incubation period. Colony growth of M. phaseolina was significantly decreased by PS1 and PS2 as compared to control both in iron- sufficient and iron-deficient conditions. PS2 showed higher antagonistic activity than PS1, as evidenced by pronounced colony growth inhibition.

  6. Status of Macrophomina phaseolina on strawberry in California and preliminary characterization of the pathogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrophomina crown and root rot has become a significant soilborne disease issue in California. For many locations in the state, the disease is associated with fields that are no longer pre-plant, flat field fumigated with methyl bromide + chloropicrin. Inoculation experiments indicated that some di...

  7. A simple method of DNA isolation from jute (Corchorus olitorius) seed suitable for PCR-based detection of the pathogen Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, C; Dey, P; Satpathy, S; Sarkar, S K; Bera, A; Mahapatra, B S

    2013-02-01

    A simple method was developed for isolating DNA from jute seed, which contains high amounts of mucilage and secondary metabolites, and a PCR protocol was standardized for detecting the seedborne pathogen Macrophomina phaseolina. The cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide method was modified with increased salt concentration and a simple sodium acetate treatment to extract genomic as well as fungal DNA directly from infected jute seed. The Miniprep was evaluated along with five other methods of DNA isolation in terms of yield and quality of DNA and number of PCR positive samples. The Miniprep consistently recovered high amounts of DNA with good spectral qualities at A260/A280. The DNA isolated from jute seed was found suitable for PCR amplification. Macrophomina phaseolina could be detected by PCR from artificially inoculated as well as naturally infected jute seeds. The limit of PCR-based detection of M. phaseolina in jute seed was determined to be 0·62 × 10(-7) CFU g(-1) seed. © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Genetic Variability of Macrophomina phaseolina Isolates from Dry Beans in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Yeşil

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Charcoal rot is a soil and seed borne, economically important fungal disease on dry bean in Turkey. Twenty bean isolates of M. phaseolina collected from different locations in Turkey during 2008 and 2012 years were studied for genetic variability using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD assay, chlorate sensitivity on medium supplemented with 120mM of potassium, phenotype of colony, and pathogenicity. Isolates were identified as M. phaseolina based on morhological features and PCR assays using species-specific primers (MPKF1and MPKR1. Isolates of M. phaseolina were analysed for their aggressiveness on the susceptible bean cv. Akman 98, by soil inoculation method. Isolates exhibiting a dense chlorate phenotype were chlorate-resistant, while those possessing feathery and restricted chlorate phenotypes were chlorate-sensitive. More than half of the isolates (55% were resistant to chlorate and produced dense phenotype, while 35% isolates showed feathery and two isolates (10% showed restricted growth. DNA from 20 isolates was subjected to genetic diversity analysis by the RAPD method using 14 randomly chosen 10-base random primers, and low genetic diversity (33.3% was observed among the tested isolates.

  9. The influence of mineral and carbon sources on biological control of charcoal rot fungus, Macrophomina phaseolina by fluorescent pseudomonads in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaukat, S S; Siddiqui, I A

    2003-01-01

    To determine the influence of various trace minerals and carbon source on the biocontrol performance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain IE-6S+ and P. fluorescens strain CHA0 against Macrophomina phaseolina. In dual culture plate assay, P. aeruginosa IE-6S+ and P. fluorescens CHA0 inhibited radial growth of M. phaseolina producing zones of inhibition. Czapek's dox agar medium amended with both zinc and glucose remarkably improved antifungal activities of the bacterial inoculants. Under glasshouse conditions, soil amendment with zinc and/or glucose alone did not reduce M. phaseolina infection in tomato roots but did reduce significantly when used in combination with IE-6S+ or CHA0. Soil amendments with zinc and/or glucose increased fresh shoot weights but zinc amendment greatly reduced bacterial populations in the rhizosphere. Mineral and carbon amendments enhance the biocontrol performance of fluorescent pseudomonads against M. phaseolina. Identification of mineral and carbon amendments that favour biocontrol of certain bacterial strains may provide clues to soil factors or components of nutrient solutions in hydroponic culture that will improve the level and reliability of control.

  10. Disseminated fungal infection in a renal transplant recipient involving Macrophomina phaseolina and Scytalidium dimidiatum: case report and review of taxonomic changes among medically important members of the Botryosphaeriaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Darrell H S; Sigler, Lynne; Gibas, Connie F C; Fong, Ignatius W

    2008-05-01

    We report the first case of human infection with the fungal plant pathogen Macrophomina phaseolina in a Sri Lankan-born Canadian man following a renal transplant in India. The patient subsequently succumbed to invasive infection with Scytalidium dimidiatum. Molecular sequence analysis confirmed the identification of both fungi and revealed that they are related species within the ascomycete family Botryosphaeriaceae. We review the rationale for the recent reclassification of S. dimidiatum as Neoscytalidium dimidiatum and of Nattrassia mangiferae (formerly considered a synanamorph of S. dimidiatum) as Neofusicoccum mangiferae. This and other recent cases illustrate the potential for plant pathogenic fungi to cause invasive human diseases which are refractory to antifungal therapy.

  11. Opportunistic invasive fungal pathogen Macrophomina phaseolina prognosis from immunocompromised humans to potential mitogenic RBL with an exceptional and novel antitumor and cytotoxic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, P; Dilbaghi, N; Chaudhury, A

    2012-02-01

    With the ever-increasing risk for fungal infections, one can no longer ignore fungi. It is imperative that clinical manifestations "presume fungus" with their epidemiologic and pathogenic features when evaluating a potentially infected patient. In the high-risk patient groups, fungi with intrinsic resistance to antifungal agents already exist, with a tendency to emerge as opportunistic pathogens. One of the smart pathogens is Macrophomina phaseolina, with the potential to disarm plant, animal, and human immunity. The response prophylaxis may vary from antifungal therapy and surgical measures to biochemical (Rhizoctonia bataticola lectin [RBL] with antitumor and cytotoxic nature) and gene therapeutics.

  12. An enzyme immunoassay of phaseolinone and its application in estimation of the amount of toxin in Macrophomina phaseolina-infected seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, D; Dhar, T K; Ali, E

    1992-01-01

    A microtiter plate-based enzyme immunoassay has been developed for phaseolinone, a phytotoxin isolated from the culture filtrate of the plant-pathogenic fungus Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid. The smallest amount of phaseolinone detectable by the method is 5 pg per well. The method is validated by comparison with high-performance liquid chromatography and used to confirm and estimate phaseolinone production in seeds infected with the fungus. The degree of seed inhibition correlated well with the amount of toxin produced in infected seeds, 50% inhibition being observed at a toxin concentration of 0.60 micrograms/g of wet tissue. PMID:1622272

  13. Biotransformation of perfumery terpenoids, (−-ambrox® by a fungal culture Macrophomina phaseolina and a plant cell suspension culture of Peganum harmala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musharraf Syed Ghulam

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biotransformation offers chemo enzymatic system to modify the compounds into their novel analogues which are difficult to synthesize by chemical methods. This paper describes the biotransformational studies of ambrox, one of the most important components of natural Ambergris (wale sperm with fungal and plant cell culture. Results Biotransformation of (−-ambrox (1 with a fungal cell culture of Macrophomina phaseolina and a plant cell suspension cultures of Peganum harmala yielded oxygenated products, 3β-hydroxyambrox (2, 6β-hydroxyambrox (3, 1α-hydroxy-3oxoambrox (4, 1α,3β-dihydroxyambrox (5, 13,14,15,16-tetranorlabdane-3-oxo-8,12-diol (6, 3-oxoambrox (7, 2α-hydroxyambrox (8, 3β-hydroxysclareolide (9, and 2α,3β-dihydroxyambrox (10. Metabolite 4 was found to be new compound. These metabolites were structurally characterized on the basis of spectroscopic studies. Conclusion Nine oxygenated metabolites of (−-ambrox (1 were obtained from Macrophomina phaseolina and Peganum harmala. Enzymatic system of screened organisms introduced hydroxyl and keto functionalities at various positions of compound 1 in a stereo- and regio-controlled manner.

  14. Biotransformation of perfumery terpenoids, (-)-ambrox® by a fungal culture Macrophomina phaseolina and a plant cell suspension culture of Peganum harmala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Naz, Sheeba; Najeeb, Asma; Khan, Saifullah; Choudhary, M Iqbal

    2012-08-05

    Biotransformation offers chemo enzymatic system to modify the compounds into their novel analogues which are difficult to synthesize by chemical methods. This paper describes the biotransformational studies of ambrox, one of the most important components of natural Ambergris (wale sperm) with fungal and plant cell culture. Biotransformation of (-)-ambrox (1) with a fungal cell culture of Macrophomina phaseolina and a plant cell suspension cultures of Peganum harmala yielded oxygenated products, 3β-hydroxyambrox (2), 6β-hydroxyambrox (3), 1α-hydroxy-3oxoambrox (4), 1α,3β-dihydroxyambrox (5), 13,14,15,16-tetranorlabdane-3-oxo-8,12-diol (6), 3-oxoambrox (7), 2α-hydroxyambrox (8), 3β-hydroxysclareolide (9), and 2α,3β-dihydroxyambrox (10). Metabolite 4 was found to be new compound. These metabolites were structurally characterized on the basis of spectroscopic studies. Nine oxygenated metabolites of (-)-ambrox (1) were obtained from Macrophomina phaseolina and Peganum harmala. Enzymatic system of screened organisms introduced hydroxyl and keto functionalities at various positions of compound 1 in a stereo- and regio-controlled manner.

  15. Biotransformation of perfumery terpenoids, (−)-ambrox® by a fungal culture Macrophomina phaseolina and a plant cell suspension culture of Peganum harmala

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Biotransformation offers chemo enzymatic system to modify the compounds into their novel analogues which are difficult to synthesize by chemical methods. This paper describes the biotransformational studies of ambrox, one of the most important components of natural Ambergris (wale sperm) with fungal and plant cell culture. Results Biotransformation of (−)-ambrox (1) with a fungal cell culture of Macrophomina phaseolina and a plant cell suspension cultures of Peganum harmala yielded oxygenated products, 3β-hydroxyambrox (2), 6β-hydroxyambrox (3), 1α-hydroxy-3oxoambrox (4), 1α,3β-dihydroxyambrox (5), 13,14,15,16-tetranorlabdane-3-oxo-8,12-diol (6), 3-oxoambrox (7), 2α-hydroxyambrox (8), 3β-hydroxysclareolide (9), and 2α,3β-dihydroxyambrox (10). Metabolite 4 was found to be new compound. These metabolites were structurally characterized on the basis of spectroscopic studies. Conclusion Nine oxygenated metabolites of (−)-ambrox (1) were obtained from Macrophomina phaseolina and Peganum harmala. Enzymatic system of screened organisms introduced hydroxyl and keto functionalities at various positions of compound 1 in a stereo- and regio-controlled manner. PMID:22863186

  16. Overexpression of Camellia sinensis thaumatin-like protein, CsTLP in potato confers enhanced resistance to Macrophomina phaseolina and Phytophthora infestans infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Karan; Pal, Awadhesh K; Gulati, Arvind; Kumar, Sanjay; Singh, Anil K; Ahuja, Paramvir S

    2013-06-01

    Thaumatin-like proteins (TLPs), a class of pathogenesis related proteins are induced in response to pathogens and exhibit antifungal property when overexpressed in transgenic plants. In the present study, we have raised transgenic potato plants overexpressing TLP gene of Camellia sinensis (CsTLP). Fungal resistance assays of transgenic potato elucidated the potential role of CsTLP in imparting tolerance to fungal pathogens, Macrophomina phaseolina (necrotrophic) and Phytophthora infestans (hemi-biotrophic). Transgenic tubers with higher resistance to M. phaseolina, showed a concomitant and significant increase in transcripts of StPAL, StLOX, and StTLP genes involved in phenylpropanoid, lipoxygenase, and general defense response pathway, respectively after infection. Importantly, leaves of CsTLP transgenic lines inoculated with P. infestans spores under in vitro conditions also showed a resistant phenotype. The resistant phenotype recorded for the two important fungal pathogens by CsTLP transgenic potato plants is remarkable, since no effective control methods and no resistant cv. against M. phaseolina has been identified so far in potato.

  17. Rapid Diagnosis of Soybean Seedling Blight Caused by Rhizoctonia solani and Soybean Charcoal Rot Caused by Macrophomina phaseolina Using LAMP Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chenchen; Song, Bi; Zhang, HaiFeng; Wang, YuanChao; Zheng, XiaoBo

    2015-12-01

    A new method of direct detection of pathogenic fungi in infected soybean tissues has been reported here. The method rapidly diagnoses soybean seedling blight caused by Rhizoctonia solani and soybean charcoal rot caused by Macrophomina phaseolina, and features loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). The primers were designed and screened using internal transcribed spacers (ITS) as target DNAs of both pathogens. An ITS-Rs-LAMP assay for R. solani and an ITS-Mp-LAMP assay for M. phaseolina that can detect the pathogen in diseased soybean tissues in the field have been developed. Both LAMP assays efficiently amplified the target genes over 60 min at 62°C. A yellow-green color (visible to the naked eye) or intense green fluorescence (visible under ultraviolet light) was only observed in the presence of R. solani or M. phaseolina after addition of SYBR Green I. The detection limit of the ITS-Rs-LAMP assay was 10 pg μl⁻¹ of genomic DNA; and that of the ITS-Mp-LAMP assay was 100 pg μl⁻¹ of genomic DNA. Using the two assays described here, we successfully and rapidly diagnosed suspect diseased soybean samples collected in the field from Jiangsu and Anhui provinces.

  18. Practical use of CMC-amended rhizobial inoculant for Mucuna pruriens cultivation to enhance the growth and protection against Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeron, Abhinav; Khare, Ekta; Kumar Arora, Naveen; Kumar Maheshwari, Dinesh

    2012-01-01

    In many parts of the world Mucuna pruriens is used as an important medicinal, forage and green manure crop. In the present investigation the effect of the addition of CMC in carrier during development of bioformulation on shelflife, plant growth promotive and biocontrol activity against Macrophomina phaseolina was screened taking M. pruriens as a test crop. Ensifer meliloti RMP6(Ery+Kan+) and Bradyrhizobium sp. BMP7(Tet+Kan+) (kanamycin resistance engineered by Tn5 transposon mutagenesis) used in the study showed production of siderophore, IAA, solubilizing phosphate and biocontrol of M. phaseolina. RMP6(Ery+Kan+) also showed ACC deaminase activity. The survival of both the strains in sawdust-based bioformulation was enhanced with an increase in the concentration of CMC from 0 to 1%. At 0% CMC Bradyrhizobium sp. BMP7(Tet+Kan+) showed more increase in nodule number/plant (500.00%) than E. meliloti RMP6(Ery+Kan+) (52.38%), over the control in M. phaseolina-infested soil. There was 185.94% and 59.52% enhancement in nodule number/plant by RMP6(Ery+Kan+) and BMP7(Tet+Kan+) with an increase in the concentration of CMC from 0% to 1% in the bioformulations. However further increase in concentration of CMC did not result in enhancement in survival of either the strains or nodule number/plant.

  19. Antagonistic potential of fluorescent pseudomonads and control of charcoal rot of chickpea caused by Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinod; Kumar, Anuj; Kharwar, R N

    2007-01-01

    The effectiveness of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria especially Pseudomonas fluorescens isolates were tested against charcoal rot of chickpea both in green house as well as in field conditions. Most of the isolates reduced charcoal rot disease and promoted plant growth in green house. A marked increase in shoot and root length was observed in P. fluorescens treated plants. Among all the P. fluorescens isolates Pf4-99, was found most effective in the improvement of chickpea crop in green house as well as in field. Pf4-99 effectively promoted plant growth and produced indole acetic acid in culture medium. This isolate also inhibited the mycelial growth of the M. phaseolina under in vitro conditions and reduced the disease severity Potential isolate (Pf4-99) also significantly increased the biomass of the chickpea plants, shoot length, root length and protein content of the chickpea seeds. A part from these, the total number of seeds per plant and their weight were also enhanced. The colonization of Pf4-99 reduced the incidence of seed mycoflora by which indirectly enhanced the seed germination and vigour index of seedlings. The observations revealed that isolate Pf4-99 is quite effective to reduce the charcoal rot disease both in field and greenhouse, and also increases seed yields significantly Therefore, this isolate appears to be an efficient biocontrol agent against charcoal rot disease as well as yield increasing rhizobacterium.

  20. Efecto de labranza, humedad y fertilización en el rendimiento de frijol y la patogenicidad de Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid Effects of tillage, moisture and fertilization on the yield of the common bean and the pathogenicity of Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid

    OpenAIRE

    Krystal Lira-Méndez; Jaime Roel Salinas-García; Arturo Díaz-Franco; Netzahualcóyotl Mayek-Pérez

    2012-01-01

    El hongo Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid. causa la 'pudrición carbonosa' en frijol común (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) y otros cultivos y afecta el crecimiento y el rendimiento de grano. En este trabajo se determinó el efecto de cuatro niveles de labranza (barbecho, destronque-bordeo, subsuelo-bordeo, cero), dos de humedad (temporal, riego) y dos de fertilización (química, 40-20-00 NPK; biológica con la micorriza Glomus intraradices) en el rendimiento de grano de la variedad Negro INIFAP en 20...

  1. In vitro growth and cell wall degrading enzyme production by Argentinean isolates of Macrophomina phaseolina, the causative agent of charcoal rot in corn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Araceli M; Gally, Marcela; Szapiro, Gala; Itzcovich, Tatiana; Carabajal, Maira; Levin, Laura

    Macrophomina phaseolina is a polyphagous phytopathogen, causing stalk rot on many commercially important species. Damages caused by this pathogen in soybean and maize crops in Argentina during drought and hot weather have increased due its ability to survive as sclerotia in soil and crop debris under non-till practices. In this work, we explored the in vitro production of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes [pectinases (polygalacturonase and polymethylgalacturonase); cellulases (endoglucanase); hemicellulases (endoxylanase) and the ligninolytic enzyme laccase] by several Argentinean isolates of M. phaseolina, and assessed the pathogenicity of these isolates as a preliminary step to establish the role of these enzymes in M. phaseolina-maize interaction. The isolates were grown in liquid synthetic medium supplemented with glucose, pectin, carboxymethylcellulose or xylan as carbon sources and/or enzyme inducers and glutamic acid as nitrogen source. Pectinases were the first cell wall-degrading enzymes detected and the activities obtained (polygalacturonase activity was between 0.4 and 1.3U/ml and polymethylgalacturonase between 0.15 and 1.3U/ml) were higher than those of cellulases and xylanases, which appeared later and in a lesser magnitude. This sequence would promote initial tissue maceration followed by cell wall degradation. Laccase was detected in all the isolates evaluated (activity was between 36U/l and 63U/l). The aggressiveness of the isolates was tested in maize, sunflower and watermelon seeds, being high on all the plants assayed. This study reports for the first time the potential of different isolates of M. phaseolina to produce plant cell wall-degrading enzymes in submerged fermentation. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Reação de genótipos de feijoeiro comum a Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli, Macrophomina phaseolina e Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli Behavior of dry bean genotypes to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli, Macrophomina phaseolina, and Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Maringoni

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Foi avaliado no presente trabalho o comportamento dos genótipos de feijoeiro (Phaseolus vulgaris L. PI 150414, PI 163117, PI 175829 branco, PI 175829 roxo, PI 175858, PI 197687, A 417, A 420, A 429, Xan 160, Xan 161, WISHBR 40 e IAC Carioca inoculados com Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli, Macrophomina phaseolina e Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli, sob condições de telado/casa de vegetação. Verificou-se que os genótipos Xan 160, PI 150414, A 417, PI 175829 roxo, Xan 161, A 420, PI 163117 e PI 175829 branco foram resistentes a F. oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli e somente o PI 175829 branco apresentou bom nível de resistência a M. phaseolina. Com relação ao comportamento desses genótipos a X. campestris pv. phaseoli, eles foram altamente suscetíveis ao isolado Feij-4 e apenas o genótipo Xan 161 apresentou nível moderado de resistência foliar ao isolado Feij-41.The behavior of dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. genotypes PI 150414, PI 163117, PI 175829 white, PI 175829 purple, PI 175858, PI 197687, A 417, A 420, A 429, Xan 160, Xan 161, WISHBR 40, and IAC Carioca inoculated with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli, Macrophomina phaseolina, and Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli was evaluated under greenhouse condition. The bean genotypes Xan 160, PI 150414, A 417, PI 175829 purple, Xan 161, A 420, PI 163117, and PI 175829 white were resistant to F. oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli, and only PI 155829 white had a good level of resistance to M. phaseolina. All bean genotypes were susceptible to Feij-4 strain, and only Xan 161 had some level of leaf resistance to Feij-41 strain of X. campestris pv. phaseoli.

  3. Avirulent mutants of Macrophomina phaseolina and Aspergillus fumigatus initiate infection in Phaseolus mungo in the presence of phaseo-linone; levamisole gives protection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suchandra Sett; Santosh K Mishra; Kazia I Siddiqui

    2000-03-01

    To evaluate the role of phaseolinone, a phytotoxin produced by Macrophomina phaseolina, in disease initiation, three nontoxigenic avirulent mutants of the fungus were generated by UV-mutagenesis. Two of them were able to initiate infection in germinating Phaseolus mungo seeds only in the presence of phaseolinone. The minimum dose of phaseolinone required for infection in 30% seedlings was 2·5 g/ml. A human pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus was also able to infect germinating seeds of P. mungo in the presence of 5 g/ml concentration of phaseolinone. Phaseolinone seemed to facilitate infection by A. fumigatus, which is not normally phytopathogenic, by reducing the immunity of germinating seedlings in a nonspecific way. Levamisole, a non-specific immunopotentiator gave protection against infection induced by A. fumigatus at an optimum dose of 50 g/ml. Sodium malonate prevented the effects of levamisole.

  4. Avirulent mutants of Macrophomina phaseolina and Aspergillus fumigatus initiate infection in Phaseolus mungo in the presence of phaseolinone; levamisole gives protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sett, S; Mishra, S K; Siddiqui, K A

    2000-03-01

    To evaluate the role of phaseolinone, a phytotoxin produced by Macrophomina phaseolina, in disease initiation, three nontoxigenic avirulent mutants of the fungus were generated by UV-mutagenesis. Two of them were able to initiate infection in germinating Phaseolus mungo seeds only in the presence of phaseolinone. The minimum dose of phaseoli-none required for infection in 30% seedlings was 2 5 mg/ml. A human pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus was also able to infect germinating seeds of P. mungo in the presence of 5 mg/ml concentration of phaseolinone. Phaseolinone seemed to facilitate infection by A. fumigatus, which is not normally phytopathogenic, by reducing the immunity of germinating seedlings in a nonspecific way. Levamisole, a non-specific immunopotentiator gave protection against infection induced by A. fumigatus at an optimum dose of 50 mg/ml. Sodium malonate prevented the effects of levamisole.

  5. Efecto de labranza, humedad y fertilización en el rendimiento de frijol y la patogenicidad de Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi Goid Effects of tillage, moisture and fertilization on the yield of the common bean and the pathogenicity of Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi Goid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystal Lira-Méndez

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available El hongo Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi Goid. causa la 'pudrición carbonosa' en frijol común (Phaseolus vulgaris L. y otros cultivos y afecta el crecimiento y el rendimiento de grano. En este trabajo se determinó el efecto de cuatro niveles de labranza (barbecho, destronque-bordeo, subsuelo-bordeo, cero, dos de humedad (temporal, riego y dos de fertilización (química, 40-20-00 NPK; biológica con la micorriza Glomus intraradices en el rendimiento de grano de la variedad Negro INIFAP en 2006 y 2007 en Río Bravo, México y en la patogenicidad de M. phaseolina. Los experimentos se establecieron en arreglo de tratamientos en parcelas subdivididas con tres repeticiones. Un aislamiento de M. phaseolina se obtuvo de plantas colectadas en cada unidad experimental y su patogenicidad se midió en semillas de cinco variedades de frijol (Azufrado Tapatío, Bayo Madero, Flor de Mayo Bajío, Negro Altiplano y Negro INIFAP. El riego y G. intraradices incrementaron el rendimiento de grano 144% y 12% respecto al temporal y la fertilización química, respectivamente. Los aislamientos de M. phaseolina de parcelas con riego, fertilización química, subsuelo-bordeo y barbecho fueron más agresivos en frijol. La aplicación de micorrizas y la labranza de conservación promueven la sostenibilidad del suelo y también podrían constituirse en medidas de manejo integrado de M. phaseolina en frijol.The fungus Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi Goid causes the 'charcoal rot' disease in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. and other crops and reduces plant growth and grain yield. In this work we determined the effects of four tillage levels (moldboard plow, shred-bedding, subsoil-bedding, no or zero tillage; two levels of soil moisture (rainfed, irrigated and two of fertilization (chemical, using the formula 40-20-00 NPK; biological, using the mycorrhiza Glomus intraradices in grain yield of the variety Negro INIFAP during 2006 and 2007 in Río Bravo, Mexico as well as

  6. A direct observation technique for evaluating sclerotium germination by Macrophomina phaseolina and effects of biocontrol materials on survival of sclerotia in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Robert G

    2006-08-01

    Germination of sclerotia of Macrophomina phaseolina was quantified by direct microscopic observation following application of experimental treatments in vitro and incubation of sclerotia in soil. To assay germination, pieces of agar containing sclerotia were macerated in dilute, liquid cornmeal agar on glass slides; thinly spread; and incubated in a saturated atmosphere for 18-22 h. Germinated sclerotia then were identified by morphological features of germ hyphae. Frequencies of germination were similar in three dilute agar media. Germination was not affected by air-drying sclerotia for 2 weeks, but it was significantly reduced after 4 weeks and greatly reduced or eliminated after 6 or 8 weeks. Survival of sclerotia for 14 days in soil was greatest at 50, 75, and 100% moisture-holding capacity, less at 0 and 25%, and least at 125% (flooded soil). Incorporation of ground poultry litter into soil at 5% by weight reduced survival of sclerotia after 13 days, and incorporation of litter at 10% nearly eliminated it. These results indicate that the direct-observation technique may be used to evaluate animal wastes and other agricultural byproducts for biocontrol activity against sclerotia of M. phaseolina in soil.

  7. Plant growth-promotion (PGP) activities and molecular characterization of rhizobacterial strains isolated from soybean (Glycine max L. Merril) plants against charcoal rot pathogen, Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, D K

    2011-11-01

    Charcoal rot disease, caused by the fungus Macrophomina phaseolina, leads to significant yield losses of soybean crops. One strategy to control charcoal rot is the use of antagonistic, root-colonizing bacteria. Rhizobacteria A(5)F and FPT(7)21 and Pseudomonas sp. strain GRP(3) were characterized for their plant growth-promotion activities against the pathogen. Rhizobacterium FPT(7)21 exhibited higher antagonistic activity against the pathogen on dual plate assay compared to strain A(5)F and GRP(3). FPT(7)21 and GRP(3) gave decreased disease intensity in terms of average number of pathogen-infested plants. Lipoxygenase (LOX), phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), and peroxidase (POD) activities were estimated in extracts of plants grown from seeds that were treated with rhizobacteria, and inoculated with spore suspension of M. phaseolina. The activity of these enzymes after challenge with the test pathogen increased. Strains FPT(7)21 and GRP(3) exhibited maximum increases in LOX, PAL and POD activity (U mg(-1) fresh leaf wt) compared to strain A(5)F.

  8. Physiologically stressed cells of fluorescent pseudomonas EKi as better option for bioformulation development for management of charcoal rot caused by Macrophomina phaseolina in field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Ekta; Arora, Naveen K

    2011-06-01

    Bioformulation that supports the inoculant under storage condition and on application to field is of prime importance for agroindustry. Pseudomonas strain EKi having biocontrol activity against Macrophomina phaseolina was used in the study. EKi cells were pretreated by carbon starvation, osmotic stress (NaCl), and freeze drying conditions, and talc-based bioformulation was developed. Combined pretreatment with carbon starvation and osmotic stress was given to Pseudomonas cells. Bioformulation of untreated, freeze dried (FD), carbon starved, osmotic stressed, and combined pre-treated cells showed 50.36, 44.76, 45.95, 34.82, and 27.27% reduction in CFU counts after 6 months of storage. The osmotic stressed cells showed one over-expressed protein (11.5 kDa) in common with carbon starved cells responsible for its better shelf life. The plant growth promotory activity of bioformulations was determined taking Cicer arietinum as a test crop in M. phaseolina infested field. Carbon starved + osmotic stressed cells showed maximum enhancement of dry weight (272.56%) followed by osmotic stressed (230.74%), untreated (155.70%), FD (88.93%), and carbon starved (59.34%) cells over uninoculated control. Carbon starved + osmotic stressed, osmotic stressed, untreated, FD, and carbon starved cells showed 156.60, 100, 75, 40, and 16.67% reduction of charcoal rot disease over uninoculated control. The results clearly showed that combined pretreatment by carbon starvation and osmotic stress provides the bacteria potential of rapid adaptation to different environment conditions.

  9. Evaluation of bacteria isolated from rice rhizosphere for biological control of charcoal rot of sorghum caused by Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Subramaniam; Humayun, Pagidi; Kiran, Bandru Keerthi; Kannan, Iyer Girish Kumar; Vidya, Meesala Sree; Deepthi, Kanala; Rupela, Om

    2011-06-01

    A total of 360 bacteria, isolated from the rhizospheres of a system of rice intensification (SRI) fields, were characterized for the production of siderophore, fluorescence, indole acetic acid (IAA), hydrocyanic acid (HCN) and solubilization of phosphorus. Of them, seven most promising isolates (SRI-156, -158, -178, -211, -229, -305 and -360) were screened for their antagonistic potential against Macrophomina phaseolina (causes charcoal rot in sorghum) by dual culture assay, blotter paper assay and in greenhouse. All the seven isolates inhibited M. phaseolina in dual culture assay, whereas six isolates solubilized phosphorous (except SRI-360), all seven produced siderophore, four produced fluorescence (except SRI-178, -229 and -305), six produced IAA (except SRI-305) and five produced HCN (except SRI-158 and -305). In the blotter paper assay, no charcoal rot infection was observed in SRI-156-treated sorghum roots, indicating complete inhibition of the pathogen, while the roots treated with the other isolates showed 49-76% lesser charcoal rot infection compared to the control. In the antifungal activity test (in green house on sorghum), all the isolates increased shoot dry mass by 15-23% and root dry mass by 15-20% (except SRI-158 and -360), over the control. In order to confirm the plant growth-promoting (PGP) traits of the isolates, the green house experiment was repeated but, in the absence of M. phaseolina. The results further confirmed the PGP traits of the isolates as evidenced by increases in shoot and root dry mass, 22-100% and 5-20%, respectively, over the control. The sequences of 16S rDNA gene of the isolates SRI-156, -158, -178, -211, -229, -305 and -360 were matched with Pseudomonas plecoglossicida, Brevibacterium antiquum, Bacillus altitudinis, Enterobacter ludwigii, E. ludwigii, Acinetobacter tandoii and P. monteilii, respectively in BLAST analysis. This study indicates that the selected bacterial isolates have the potential for PGP and control of

  10. Genic SNP markers and legume synteny reveal candidate genes underlying QTL for Macrophomina phaseolina resistance and maturity in cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L) Walp.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muchero, Wellington; Ehlers, Jeffrey D; Close, Timothy J; Roberts, Philip A

    2011-01-05

    Macrophomina phaseolina is an emerging and devastating fungal pathogen that causes significant losses in crop production under high temperatures and drought stress. An increasing number of disease incidence reports highlight the wide prevalence of the pathogen around the world and its contribution toward crop yield suppression. In cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L) Walp.], limited sources of low-level host resistance have been identified, the genetic basis of which is unknown. In this study we report on the identification of strong sources of host resistance to M. phaseolina and the genetic mapping of putative resistance loci on a cowpea genetic map comprised of gene-derived single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs). Nine quantitative trait loci (QTLs), accounting for between 6.1 and 40.0% of the phenotypic variance (R2), were identified using plant mortality data taken over three years in field experiments and disease severity scores taken from two greenhouse experiments. Based on annotated genic SNPs as well as synteny with soybean (Glycine max) and Medicago truncatula, candidate resistance genes were found within mapped QTL intervals. QTL Mac-2 explained the largest percent R2 and was identified in three field and one greenhouse experiments where the QTL peak co-located with a SNP marker derived from a pectin esterase inhibitor encoding gene. Maturity effects on the expression of resistance were indicated by the co-location of Mac-6 and Mac-7 QTLs with maturity-related senescence QTLs Mat-2 and Mat-1, respectively. Homologs of the ELF4 and FLK flowering genes were found in corresponding syntenic soybean regions. Only three Macrophomina resistance QTLs co-located with delayed drought-induced premature senescence QTLs previously mapped in the same population, suggesting that largely different genetic mechanisms mediate cowpea response to drought stress and Macrophomina infection. Effective sources of host resistance were

  11. Genic SNP markers and legume synteny reveal candidate genes underlying QTL for Macrophomina phaseolina resistance and maturity in cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L Walp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehlers Jeffrey D

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophomina phaseolina is an emerging and devastating fungal pathogen that causes significant losses in crop production under high temperatures and drought stress. An increasing number of disease incidence reports highlight the wide prevalence of the pathogen around the world and its contribution toward crop yield suppression. In cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L Walp.], limited sources of low-level host resistance have been identified, the genetic basis of which is unknown. In this study we report on the identification of strong sources of host resistance to M. phaseolina and the genetic mapping of putative resistance loci on a cowpea genetic map comprised of gene-derived single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs. Results Nine quantitative trait loci (QTLs, accounting for between 6.1 and 40.0% of the phenotypic variance (R2, were identified using plant mortality data taken over three years in field experiments and disease severity scores taken from two greenhouse experiments. Based on annotated genic SNPs as well as synteny with soybean (Glycine max and Medicago truncatula, candidate resistance genes were found within mapped QTL intervals. QTL Mac-2 explained the largest percent R2 and was identified in three field and one greenhouse experiments where the QTL peak co-located with a SNP marker derived from a pectin esterase inhibitor encoding gene. Maturity effects on the expression of resistance were indicated by the co-location of Mac-6 and Mac-7 QTLs with maturity-related senescence QTLs Mat-2 and Mat-1, respectively. Homologs of the ELF4 and FLK flowering genes were found in corresponding syntenic soybean regions. Only three Macrophomina resistance QTLs co-located with delayed drought-induced premature senescence QTLs previously mapped in the same population, suggesting that largely different genetic mechanisms mediate cowpea response to drought stress and Macrophomina infection

  12. Caracterización morfológica y molecular de aislados de Macrophomina phaseolina asociados a caña de azúcar en México

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    Santos G Leyva-Mir

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available La pudrición carbonosa, causada por Macrophomina phaseolina, es una enfermedad importante de la caña de azúcar en México. Este estudio se realizó con el objetivo de caracterizar aislados de M. phaseolina obtenidos de caña de azúcar mediante análisis morfológicos y moleculares. La caracterización morfológica de 10 aislados se llevó a cabo con el uso de microscopia electrónica de barrido y microscopia de luz. Para confirmar la identificación, se extrajo el ADNr de 2 aislados representativos, y la región del espaciador interno transcrito (ITS se amplificó mediante la reacción en cadena de la polimerasa y se secuenció usando los iniciadores específicos MpKF1 y MpKR1. Los aislados se identificaron como M. phaseolina con base en la morfología. El análisis de secuencias ITS mostró 100 % de similitud con las secuencias de M. phaseolina depositadas en el GenBank. Para nuestro conocimiento, este es el primer estudio del mundo enfocado a caracterizar aislados de M. phaseolina obtenidos de caña de azúcar.

  13. Biotransformation of anabolic compound methasterone with Macrophomina phaseolina, Cunninghamella blakesleeana, and Fusarium lini, and TNF-α inhibitory effect of transformed products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Malik Shoaib; SammerYousuf; Atia-Tul-Wahab; Jabeen, Almas; Atta-Ur-Rahman; Choudhary, M Iqbal

    2017-04-09

    Microbial transformation of methasterone (1) was investigated with Macrophomina phaseolina, Cunninghamella blakesleeana, and Fusarium lini. Biotransformation of 1 with M. phaseolina yielded metabolite 2, while metabolites 3-7 were obtained from the incubation of 1 with C. blakesleeana. Metabolites 8-13 were obtained through biotransformation with F. lini. All metabolites, except 13, were found to be new. Methasterone (1) and its metabolites 2-6, 9, 10, and 13 were then evaluated for their immunomodulatory effects against TNF-α, NO , and ROS production. Among all tested compounds, metabolite 6 showed a potent inhibition of proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α (IC50 = 8.1 ± 0.9 µg/mL), as compared to pentoxifylline used as a standard (IC50 = 94.8± 2.1 µg/mL). All metabolites were also evaluated for the inhibition of NO production at concentration of 25 µg/mL. Metabolites 6 (86.7 ± 2.3%) and 13 (62.5 ± 1.5%) were found to be the most potent inhibitors of NO as compared to the standard N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine acetate (65.6 ± 1.1%). All metabolites were found to be non-toxic against PC3, HeLa, and 3T3 cell lines. Observed inhibitory potential of metabolites 6 and 13 against pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α, as well as NO production makes them interesting leads for further studies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Genetic diversity and effect of temperature and pH on the growth of Macrophomina phaseolina isolates from sunflower fields in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csöndes, Izabella; Cseh, András; Taller, János; Poczai, Péter

    2012-03-01

    The effects of temperature and pH on the growth of 45 Hungarian Macrophomina phaseolina isolates from different locations and hosts were compared on the basis of their genetic diversity. One Spanish and two Serbian isolates were also included in the experiment. The most favourable temperature regimes for the development of the isolates ranged between 25 and 35 °C. The optimal pH for the pathogen varied between 4.0 and 6.0, but growth was observed on potato dextrose agar even at pH values of 3.0, 7.0 and 8.0. RAPD analysis with 13 different primer pairs generated 148 unambiguous bands. RFLP analysis involving 8 different restriction endonucleases was performed on a 1550 bp fragment of the rDNA region containing internal transcribed spacers (ITS1, ITS2), the 5.8S rDNA and part of the 25S rDNA. The greatest genetic distance values were obtained for three isolates, two from Hungary and one from Spain, which had similar values, but were quite distinct from all the others. A strong positive correlation was observed between the genetic distances and the growth parameters measured at various temperatures, and between the geographical data and the growth data sets at different pH values, but the correlation was less strong in the latter case. While Hungarian M. phaseolina populations are thought to reproduce clonally, the present results indicate the coexistence of different haplotypes in this area, and besides the geographical dominance of a given haplotype it was found that a closer genetic relationship might exist between spatially distinct haplotypes.

  15. Nanotechnology enabled enhancement of enzyme activity and thermostability: study on impaired pectate lyase from attenuated Macrophomina phaseolina in presence of hydroxyapatite nanoparticle.

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    Nalok Dutta

    Full Text Available In this paper we show that hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (NP can not only act as a chaperon (by imparting thermostability but can serve as a synthetic enhancer of activity of an isolated extracellular pectate lyase (APL with low native state activity. The purified enzyme (an attenuated strain of Macrophomina phaseolina showed feeble activity at 50°C and pH 5.6. However, on addition of 10.5 µg/ml of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (NP, APL activity increased 27.7 fold with a 51 fold increase in half-life at a temperature of 90°C as compared to untreated APL. The chaperon like activity of NP was evident from entropy-enthalpy compensation profile of APL. The upper critical temperature for such compensation was elevated from 50°C to 90°C in presence of NP. This dual role of NP in enhancing activity and conferring thermostability to a functionally impaired enzyme is reported for the first time.

  16. Green synthesis of protein capped silver nanoparticles from phytopathogenic fungus Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid with antimicrobial properties against multidrug-resistant bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Supriyo; Basu, Arpita; Kundu, Surekha

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, green synthesis of nanoparticles, i.e., synthesizing nanoparticles using biological sources like bacteria, algae, fungus, or plant extracts have attracted much attention due to its environment-friendly and economic aspects. The present study demonstrates an eco-friendly and low-cost method of biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using cell-free filtrate of phytopathogenic fungus Macrophomina phaseolina. UV-visible spectrum showed a peak at 450 nm corresponding to the plasmon absorbance of silver nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the presence of spherical silver nanoparticles of the size range 5 to 40 nm, most of these being 16 to 20 nm in diameter. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrum of the nanoparticles exhibited 2 θ values corresponding to silver nanoparticles. These nanoparticles were found to be naturally protein coated. SDS-PAGE analysis showed the presence of an 85-kDa protein band responsible for capping and stabilization of the silver nanoparticles. Antimicrobial activities of the silver nanoparticles against human as well as plant pathogenic multidrug-resistant bacteria were assayed. The particles showed inhibitory effect on the growth kinetics of human and plant bacteria. Furthermore, the genotoxic potential of the silver nanoparticles with increasing concentrations was evaluated by DNA fragmentation studies using plasmid DNA.

  17. Nanotechnology enabled enhancement of enzyme activity and thermostability: study on impaired pectate lyase from attenuated Macrophomina phaseolina in presence of hydroxyapatite nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Nalok; Mukhopadhyay, Arka; Dasgupta, Anjan Kr; Chakrabarti, Krishanu

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we show that hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (NP) can not only act as a chaperon (by imparting thermostability) but can serve as a synthetic enhancer of activity of an isolated extracellular pectate lyase (APL) with low native state activity. The purified enzyme (an attenuated strain of Macrophomina phaseolina) showed feeble activity at 50°C and pH 5.6. However, on addition of 10.5 µg/ml of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (NP), APL activity increased 27.7 fold with a 51 fold increase in half-life at a temperature of 90°C as compared to untreated APL. The chaperon like activity of NP was evident from entropy-enthalpy compensation profile of APL. The upper critical temperature for such compensation was elevated from 50°C to 90°C in presence of NP. This dual role of NP in enhancing activity and conferring thermostability to a functionally impaired enzyme is reported for the first time.

  18. Green synthesis of protein capped silver nanoparticles from phytopathogenic fungus Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid with antimicrobial properties against multidrug-resistant bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, green synthesis of nanoparticles, i.e., synthesizing nanoparticles using biological sources like bacteria, algae, fungus, or plant extracts have attracted much attention due to its environment-friendly and economic aspects. The present study demonstrates an eco-friendly and low-cost method of biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using cell-free filtrate of phytopathogenic fungus Macrophomina phaseolina. UV-visible spectrum showed a peak at 450 nm corresponding to the plasmon absorbance of silver nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the presence of spherical silver nanoparticles of the size range 5 to 40 nm, most of these being 16 to 20 nm in diameter. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrum of the nanoparticles exhibited 2θ values corresponding to silver nanoparticles. These nanoparticles were found to be naturally protein coated. SDS-PAGE analysis showed the presence of an 85-kDa protein band responsible for capping and stabilization of the silver nanoparticles. Antimicrobial activities of the silver nanoparticles against human as well as plant pathogenic multidrug-resistant bacteria were assayed. The particles showed inhibitory effect on the growth kinetics of human and plant bacteria. Furthermore, the genotoxic potential of the silver nanoparticles with increasing concentrations was evaluated by DNA fragmentation studies using plasmid DNA. PMID:25114655

  19. Relación entre el Vigor Inicial del Frijol Común (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) con la Resistencia a Sequía y a Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goidanich

    OpenAIRE

    Netzahualcóyotl Mayek Pérez; Jorge Alberto Acosta Gallegos; Cándido López Castañeda

    2002-01-01

    Se estableció un experimento para determinar la relación entre el vigor inicial de la planta de frijol común (Phaseolus vulgaris) y las características responsables de la resistencia a la pudrición carbonosa causada por el hongo Macrophomina phaseolina, bajo condiciones de deficiencia hídrica en invernadero. Las semillas de la línea BAT 477 (resistente, 230 ± 5 mg de peso promedio) y de la variedad Pinto UI-114 (susceptible, 250 ± 5 mg de peso promedio) se sembraron en macetas con suelo inocu...

  20. Antagonistic effects of Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis and B. amyloliquefaciens against Macrophomina phaseolina: SEM study of fungal changes and UV-MALDI-TOF MS analysis of their bioactive compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, M J; Brandan, C Pérez; Petroselli, G; Erra-Balsells, R; Audisio, M C

    2016-01-01

    The antifungal effect of Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis PGPMori7 and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens PGPBacCA1 was evaluated against Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid. Cell suspension (CS), cell-free supernatant (CFS) and the lipopeptide fraction (LF) of PGPMori7 and PGPBacCA1 were screened against three different M. phaseolina strains. CS exhibited the highest inhibitory effect (around 50%) when compared to those of CFS and LF, regardless of the fungal strain studied. The synthesis of lipopeptides was studied by UV-MALDI TOF. Chemical analysis of Bacillus metabolite synthesis revealed that surfactin and iturin were mainly produced in liquid medium. Potential fengycin was also co-produced when both Bacillus were cultivated in solid medium. In co-culture assays, the bacterial colony-fungal mycelium interface at the inhibition zone was evaluated by both scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and UV-MALDI TOF, the former to determine the structural changes on M. phaseolina cells and the latter to identify the main bioactive molecules involved in the inhibitory effect. PGPBacCA1 produced surfactin, iturin and fengycin in the inhibition zone while PGPMori7 only produced these metabolites within its colony and not in the narrow inhibition zone. Interestingly, SEM revealed that PGPBacCA1 induced damage in M. phaseolina sclerotia, generating a fungicidal effect as no growth was observed when normal growth conditions were reestablished. In turn, PGPMori7 inhibited the growth of the Macrophomina mycelium without fungal injury, resulting only in a fungistatic activity. From these results, it was determined that the two bacilli significantly inhibited the growth of an important phytopathogenic fungus by at least two different mechanisms: lipopeptide synthesis and competition among microorganisms.

  1. Horizontal and vertical movement of Pseudomonas fluorescens toward exudate of Macrophomina phaseolina in soil: influence of motility and soil properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tanuja; Srivastava, Alok K; Arora, Dilip K

    2002-01-01

    The role of motility and cell surface hydrophobicity in transport and dispersal of Pseudomonas fluorescens strains LAM1-hydrophilic, LAM2-hydrophobic and LAM(NM) (non-motile mutant of LAM2) under different soil conditions was studied. Maximum adhesion was recorded for LAM2 in clay loam (70%), followed by sandy loam (68%) and sandy soil (40%). Vertical migration of P fluorescens isolates in soils was recorded at 5 and 25 cm flow of wafer or M. phaseolina exudate. In all the treatments, LAM1 exhibited maximum migration followed, by LAM2 and LAM(NM). The rate of migration of such isolates was lowered in water irrigated soils compared to those irrigated with M. phaseolina exudate. In sandy soil, cells of LAM1 migrated up to 13 cm in comparison to LAM2 (11 cm) and LAN(NM) (9 cm) at 5 cm flow of fungal exudate. Population of LAM1, LAM2 and LAM(NM) was 5.7, 5.68 and 5.61 log cfu g(-1) soil at 1 cm depth, but it decreased to 2.56, 2.21 and 1.99 log cfu during migration up to 11 cm in sandy soil at 5 cm flow of fungal exudate. Greater motility was observed in sandy soil irrigated with water or fungal exudate, followed by sandy loam and clay loam. In general, filtration coefficient (lambda) of P. fluorescens was higher in soils irrigated with 5 cm of water or exudate than with 25 cm of irrigation. The horizontal movement of P. fluorescens strains in sandy soil adjusted at different psi m showed marked reduction with decrease in psi m. The non-motile LAN(NM) did not show chemotactic response and migrated up to a maximum of 3 mm in saturated soils (0 kPa). After 96 h, LAM1 and LAM2 migrated upto 35 and 29 mm respectively in sandy soil. Motile isolates had significantly greater colonization of M. phaseolina sclerotia over the non-motile mutant.

  2. Biotransformation of a potent anabolic steroid, mibolerone, with Cunninghamella blakesleeana, C. echinulata, and Macrophomina phaseolina, and biological activity evaluation of its metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Mahwish; Ahmad, Malik Shoaib; Wahab, Atia-Tul-; Yousuf, Sammer; Fatima, Narjis; Naveed Shaikh, Nimra; Rahman, Atta-Ur-; Choudhary, M Iqbal

    2017-01-01

    Seven metabolites were obtained from the microbial transformation of anabolic-androgenic steroid mibolerone (1) with Cunninghamella blakesleeana, C. echinulata, and Macrophomina phaseolina. Their structures were determined as 10β,17β-dihydroxy-7α,17α-dimethylestr-4-en-3-one (2), 6β,17β-dihydroxy-7α,17α-dimethylestr-4-en-3-one (3), 6β,10β,17β-trihydroxy-7α,17α-dimethylestr-4-en-3-one (4), 11β,17β-dihydroxy-(20-hydroxymethyl)-7α,17α-dimethylestr-4-en-3-one (5), 1α,17β-dihydroxy-7α,17α-dimethylestr-4-en-3-one (6), 1α,11β,17β-trihydroxy-7α,17α-dimethylestr-4-en-3-one (7), and 11β,17β-dihydroxy-7α,17α-dimethylestr-4-en-3-one (8), on the basis of spectroscopic studies. All metabolites, except 8, were identified as new compounds. This study indicates that C. blakesleeana, and C. echinulata are able to catalyze hydroxylation at allylic positions, while M. phaseolina can catalyze hydroxylation of CH2 and CH3 groups of substrate 1. Mibolerone (1) was found to be a moderate inhibitor of β-glucuronidase enzyme (IC50 = 42.98 ± 1.24 μM) during random biological screening, while its metabolites 2-4, and 8 were found to be inactive. Mibolerone (1) was also found to be significantly active against Leishmania major promastigotes (IC50 = 29.64 ± 0.88 μM). Its transformed products 3 (IC50 = 79.09 ± 0.06 μM), and 8 (IC50 = 70.09 ± 0.05 μM) showed a weak leishmanicidal activity, while 2 and 4 were found to be inactive. In addition, substrate 1 (IC50 = 35.7 ± 4.46 μM), and its metabolite 8 (IC50 = 34.16 ± 5.3 μM) exhibited potent cytotoxicity against HeLa cancer cell line (human cervical carcinoma). Metabolite 2 (IC50 = 46.5 ± 5.4 μM) also showed a significant cytotoxicity, while 3 (IC50 = 107.8 ± 4.0 μM) and 4 (IC50 = 152.5 ± 2.15 μM) showed weak cytotoxicity against HeLa cancer cell line. Compound 1 (IC50 = 46.3 ± 11.7 μM), and its transformed products 2 (IC50 = 43.3 ± 7.7 μM), 3 (IC50 = 65.6 ± 2.5 μM), and 4 (IC50 = 89.4 ± 2.7

  3. Nitric oxide production by necrotrophic pathogen Macrophomina phaseolina and the host plant in charcoal rot disease of jute: complexity of the interplay between necrotroph-host plant interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuhin Subhra Sarkar

    Full Text Available M. phaseolina, a global devastating necrotrophic fungal pathogen causes charcoal rot disease in more than 500 host plants. With the aim of understanding the plant-necrotrophic pathogen interaction associated with charcoal rot disease of jute, biochemical approach was attempted to study cellular nitric oxide production under diseased condition. This is the first report on M. phaseolina infection in Corchorus capsularis (jute plants which resulted in elevated nitric oxide, reactive nitrogen species and S nitrosothiols production in infected tissues. Time dependent nitric oxide production was also assessed with 4-Amino-5-Methylamino-2',7'-Difluorofluorescein Diacetate using single leaf experiment both in presence of M. phaseolina and xylanases obtained from fungal secretome. Cellular redox status and redox active enzymes were also assessed during plant fungal interaction. Interestingly, M. phaseolina was found to produce nitric oxide which was detected in vitro inside the mycelium and in the surrounding medium. Addition of mammalian nitric oxide synthase inhibitor could block the nitric oxide production in M. phaseolina. Bioinformatics analysis revealed nitric oxide synthase like sequence with conserved amino acid sequences in M. phaseolina genome sequence. In conclusion, the production of nitric oxide and reactive nitrogen species may have important physiological significance in necrotrophic host pathogen interaction.

  4. Nitric oxide production by necrotrophic pathogen Macrophomina phaseolina and the host plant in charcoal rot disease of jute: complexity of the interplay between necrotroph-host plant interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Tuhin Subhra; Biswas, Pranjal; Ghosh, Subrata Kumar; Ghosh, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    M. phaseolina, a global devastating necrotrophic fungal pathogen causes charcoal rot disease in more than 500 host plants. With the aim of understanding the plant-necrotrophic pathogen interaction associated with charcoal rot disease of jute, biochemical approach was attempted to study cellular nitric oxide production under diseased condition. This is the first report on M. phaseolina infection in Corchorus capsularis (jute) plants which resulted in elevated nitric oxide, reactive nitrogen species and S nitrosothiols production in infected tissues. Time dependent nitric oxide production was also assessed with 4-Amino-5-Methylamino-2',7'-Difluorofluorescein Diacetate using single leaf experiment both in presence of M. phaseolina and xylanases obtained from fungal secretome. Cellular redox status and redox active enzymes were also assessed during plant fungal interaction. Interestingly, M. phaseolina was found to produce nitric oxide which was detected in vitro inside the mycelium and in the surrounding medium. Addition of mammalian nitric oxide synthase inhibitor could block the nitric oxide production in M. phaseolina. Bioinformatics analysis revealed nitric oxide synthase like sequence with conserved amino acid sequences in M. phaseolina genome sequence. In conclusion, the production of nitric oxide and reactive nitrogen species may have important physiological significance in necrotrophic host pathogen interaction.

  5. Nitric Oxide Production by Necrotrophic Pathogen Macrophomina phaseolina and the Host Plant in Charcoal Rot Disease of Jute: Complexity of the Interplay between Necrotroph–Host Plant Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Tuhin Subhra; Biswas, Pranjal; Ghosh, Subrata Kumar; Ghosh, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    M. phaseolina, a global devastating necrotrophic fungal pathogen causes charcoal rot disease in more than 500 host plants. With the aim of understanding the plant-necrotrophic pathogen interaction associated with charcoal rot disease of jute, biochemical approach was attempted to study cellular nitric oxide production under diseased condition. This is the first report on M. phaseolina infection in Corchorus capsularis (jute) plants which resulted in elevated nitric oxide, reactive nitrogen species and S nitrosothiols production in infected tissues. Time dependent nitric oxide production was also assessed with 4-Amino-5-Methylamino-2′,7′-Difluorofluorescein Diacetate using single leaf experiment both in presence of M. phaseolina and xylanases obtained from fungal secretome. Cellular redox status and redox active enzymes were also assessed during plant fungal interaction. Interestingly, M. phaseolina was found to produce nitric oxide which was detected in vitro inside the mycelium and in the surrounding medium. Addition of mammalian nitric oxide synthase inhibitor could block the nitric oxide production in M. phaseolina. Bioinformatics analysis revealed nitric oxide synthase like sequence with conserved amino acid sequences in M. phaseolina genome sequence. In conclusion, the production of nitric oxide and reactive nitrogen species may have important physiological significance in necrotrophic host pathogen interaction. PMID:25208092

  6. Reacción de germoplasma de frijol común a macrophomina phaseolina en condiciones de riego-secano en Veracruz, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Netzahualcoyotl Mayek

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Reacción de germoplasma de frijol común a Macro phomina phaseolina en condiciones de riego-secano en Veracruz, México. Se establecieron cuatro experimentos en Isla y Cotaxtla, Veracruz, México con los objetivos de determinar la reacción de 56 genotipos de frijol común a M. phaseolina bajo condiciones de riego-secano y para identificar germoplasma resistente al hongo y con estabilidad del rendimiento bajo condiciones de deficiencia hídrica. El germoplasma evaluado incluyó diferentes orígenes, razas genéticas, colores de la testa de la semilla, variedades y líneas experimentales. Se aleatorizó en diseños experimentales látice 7x8 cultivado bajo condiciones de riego y de secano (suspensión del riego en la fase reproductiva. El déficit de humedad adelantó la madurez fisiológica e incrementó la severidad de la pudrición carbonosa; además de reducir el rendimiento de grano. En promedio de los cuatro experimentos, TLP20/NT81, NGO 99165, Negro Veracruz, A 774 y BAT 477 mostraron los mayores rendimientos de grano (más de 1000 kg/ha y los promedios menores de severidad de la pudrición carbonosa; mientras que Negro Otomí, 9457-43, NGO 99176, CNC 2 y VAX 2 exhibieron un comportamiento inverso. La intensidad de la sequía en cada experimento fue variable y los valores mayores se observaron en Isla (0,53 y 0,38 en 2000 y 2001, respectivamente. No hubo asociación clara entre el índice de susceptibilidad a la sequía y la severidad de la pudrición carbonosa o rendimiento de grano, aunque si relación negativa entre rendimiento de grano y severidad de la pudrición carbonosa (r = -0,26* en promedio. No obstante lo anterior, el germoplasma con menores daños por M. phaseolina y mayores rendimientos de grano mostró, en general, valores menores de índice de susceptibilidad a la sequía.

  7. LOCI DE CARACTERES CUANTITATIVOS LIGADOS CON LA RESISTENCIA A MACROPHOMINA PHASEOLINA, FUSARIUM SP. Y SEQUÍA EN FRIJOL COMÚN.

    OpenAIRE

    MÉNDEZ AGUILAR, REINALDO

    2015-01-01

    El frijol común es originario de México. Es la fuente de proteínas más importante y constituye junto con el maíz la base de la alimentación de los mexicanos con menores ingresos. La sequía es la causa principal en la reducción de la producción de este grano básico seguido por las enfermedades entre las cuales destacan principalmente dos géneros de hongos causantes de pudriciones de la raíz y el tallo: Macrophomina y Fusarium. En la actualidad, con las herramientas de la biología molecular tal...

  8. Evaluación de la susceptibilidad a Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi Goid en diferentes variedades e híbridos comerciales de sorgo en Sinaloa, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás Moreno Gallegos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del presente trabajo fue evaluar la reacción a M. phaseolina de tres variedades experimentales y siete variedades d e polinización libre del INIFAP, así como 14 híbridos comerciales de sorgo, con la finalidad de identificar variedades e híbridos que puedan presentar tolerancia o menor susceptibilidad a esta enfermedad. Los experimentos se establecieron en Culiacán, Sina loa, México, durante los ciclos Primavera - Verano de 2010 y 2011, bajo condiciones de campo en temporal. Se utilizó un diseño de bloques al azar en cada experimento con tres repeticiones y un análisis combinado para los dos ciclos agrícolas. La parcela expe rimental consistió en inocular 10 plantas con mondadientes infectados del hongo. El análisis de varianza detecto diferencias significativas (p<0.05 en longitud de lesión ocasionada por el hongo entre años. En el ciclo 2010, se observó una longitud de lesi ón promedio significativamente mayor (10.10 cm en comparación con el ciclo 2011 (5.79 cm. Los genotipos con menor longitud de lesión en promedio de los dos ambientes fueron: Fortuna y Mazatlán - 16 (3.5 y 4.95 cm, respectivamente . L os genotipos con mayor longitud de lesión fueron Kilate, G - STAR - 7402 y G - STAR - 7205 (13.2, 15.7 y 16.65 cm, respectivamente. No existió correlación entre la longitud de lesión y rendimiento de grano. Las variedades Fortuna y Mazatlán - 16 mostraron menor daño a M. phaseolina , por lo cual se sugieren para siembras de temporal y como progenitores en la formación de híbridos de sorgo tolerantes a esta enfermedad.

  9. Роль водного стресса в формировании микросклероциев Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid. В тканях сои

    OpenAIRE

    Саенко, Г.; Зеленцов, С.; Пивень, В.

    2008-01-01

    It is shown, that in favorable conditions for development of the disease excitant the fungus M. phaseolina gets into a plant at the earliest stages of its development, without cells destruction. Caused by water deficiency increase of concentration of soybean cellular juice at any stage of ontogenesis defines development of a physiological drought for pathogen mycelium. Osmotrophic malnutrition of pathogen at any ontogenesis stage of soybean causes fungus microsclerotium formation in mycelium ...

  10. First Report of Macrophomina phaseolina Causing Leaf and Stem Blight of Tropical Soda Apple in Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In August 2006 progressive leaf necrosis was observed in tropical soda apple (SOLVI ) plants in Fort Pierce, FL. Leaves of the five month old plants presented progressive necrosis, then dried out and dropped. Necrosis progressed quickly from petioles through the stems and caused entire stems to di...

  11. Neem (Azadirachta indica) in the management of Macrophomina phaseolina, the causal pathogen of charcoal rot

    OpenAIRE

    C. Devakumar; Usha Dev

    2011-01-01

    (Abstract selected from presentation in National Conference on Biodiversity of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants: Collection, Characterization and Utilization, held at Anand, India during November 24-25, 2010)   Neem has been hailed as the kalpataru of modern times and a tree for solving global problems. Ten neem products comprising of hexane-extracted neem seed kernel oil (HENSK), cold-pressed neem oil, dewaxed oil, odour-free oil, neem fat, unsaturated fraction of the oil, steam volatil...

  12. Association mapping analysis of the response to Macrophomina phaseolina in the Andean Diversity Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Andean Diversity Panel was evaluated for response to inoculation with charcoal rot in a field trial in Isabela, Puerto Rico in 2012. The trial was inoculated with backpack sprayers at flowering and a visual evaluation was conducted three weeks later. There was a broad range of response, with abo...

  13. Properties of the Macrophomina phaseolina endoglucanase (EGL 1) gene product in bacterial and yeast expression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Jones, R W

    1999-09-01

    Functional expression of a beta-D-1,4 glucanase-encoding gene (egl1) from a filamentous fungus was achieved in both Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a modified version of pRS413. Optimal activity of the E. coli-expressed enzyme was found at incubation temperatures of 60 degrees C, whereas the enzyme activity was optimal at 40 degrees C when expressed by S. cerevisiae. Enzyme activity at different pH levels was similar for both bacteria and yeast, being highest at 5.0. Yeast expression resulted in a highly glycosylated protein of approx 60 kDa, compared to bacterial expression, which resulted in a protein of 30 kDa. The hyperglycosylated protein had reduced enzyme activity, indicating that E. coli is a preferred vehicle for production scale-up.

  14. Response of sweet sorghum lines to stalk pathogens fusarium thapsinum and macrophomina phaseolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] has potential for bioenergy. It is adapted to a variety of U.S. locations and the extracted juice can be directly fermented into ethanol. However, little research on fungal stalk rots has been reported, even though these diseases pose serious constraints f...

  15. Proteolytic enzyme mediated antagonistic potential of Pseudomonas aeruginosa against Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illakkiam, Devaraj; Anuj, Nishanth Lipton; Ponraj, Paramasivan; Shankar, Manoharan; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy

    2013-11-01

    A new antagonistic bacterial strain PGPR2 was isolated from the mungbean rhizosphere and documented for the production of hydrolytic enzymes with antifungal activity. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence and phenotyping, this strain was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Maximum protease activity (235 U/mL) was obtained at 24 h of fermentation. The protease was purified to homogeneity in three steps: ammonium sulphate precipitation, anion exchange chromatography on DEAE- cellulose resin and gel filtration chromatography using P6 column. The purified enzyme had a molecular weight of -33 kDa. The purified protease exhibited maximum activity at pH 6.0 and retained 80% of activity in a pH range of 5.0 - 9.0. Proteolytic activity was maximum in a temperature range of 40-70 degrees C. However, the enzyme was stable at 40 degrees C for 60 min. Among the metals tested, Mg2+ enhanced the protease activity. Internal amino acid sequence of the protease obtained by MALDI -ToF and subsequent Mascot database search showed maximum similarity to the HtpX protease of P. aeruginosa strain PA7. Thus, by virtue of its early production time, thermostability and effective antifungal ability, the protease purified and characterized from P. aeruginosa PGPR2 has several potential applications as fungicidal agents in agriculture.

  16. Ecology and management of charcoal rot (Macrophomina phaseolina) on cowpea in the Sahel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ndiaye, M.

    2007-01-01

    Keywords: Senegal/Niger/rotation/millet/isolate characterization/fonio/compost amendment / bioagent/ Clonostachysrosea /solarizationCowpea ( Vignaunguiculata Walp.) is the most important pulse crop in

  17. Glyceollin is an important component of soybean plant defense against Phytophthora sojae and Macrophomina phaseolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic soybean plants were generated using bombardment of embryogenic cultures with the PAL5 (phenylalanine ammonia lyase), CHS6 (chalcone synthase) and IFS2 (isoflavone synthase) genes in sense orientation, driven by the cotyledon-preferable lectin promoter, or with the IFS2 (isoflavone synthas...

  18. Ecology and management of charcoal rot (Macrophomina phaseolina) on cowpea in the Sahel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ndiaye, M.

    2007-01-01

    Keywords: Senegal/Niger/rotation/millet/isolate characterization/fonio/compost amendment / bioagent/ Clonostachysrosea /solarizationCowpea ( Vignaunguiculata Walp.) is the most important pulse crop in the

  19. The role of wind in hydrochorous mangrove propagule dispersal

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    T. Van der Stocken

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although wind has been recognized to be an important factor in the dispersal of hydrochorous mangrove propagules, and hence in the quantification of (metapopulation dynamics, the species-specific sensitivity to wind effects have not been studied. We combined observations from a controlled experiment (flume tank and in situ experiments to understand wind and water current contributions to dispersal potential as well as to estimate real dispersal ranges due to immediate response to tidal currents (two outgoing tides. This was done for 5 species with propagules differing in morphological and buoyancy properties (i.e. Rhizophora mucronata, Ceriops tagal, Heritiera littoralis and Xylocarpus granatum. The flume experiments revealed that the influence of wind depends on the density of a propagule (and hence its buoyancy characteristics and that typical morphological characteristics of the dispersal unit are additionally important. H. littoralis propagules were influenced most, because on the one hand their low density (613.58 g l−1; n=10 enables them to float on top of the water surface, and on the other hand their "sailboat-like" structure provides a relatively large surface area. The X. granatum fruits appeared to be the least influenced by ambient wind conditions, explained by the smooth surface and spherical shape of which, because of the fruit's high density (890.05 g l−1; n=1, only a small part sticks above the water surface. Although the seeds of X. granatum are of a similar size class than H. littoralis propagules, they are (like the X. granatum fruits largely submerged due to their high density (870.66 g l−1; n=8, hence catching less wind than H. littoralis propagules. The influence of wind on the dispersal of the horizontally floating C. tagal and R. mucronata dispersal units was strong, comparable to that of

  20. Impact of landscape structure on propagule dispersal in mangrove forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Stocken, T.; De Ryck, D.J.R.; Vanschoenwinkel, B.; Deboelpaep, E.; Bouma, T.J.; Dahdouh-Guebas, F.; Koedam, N.

    2015-01-01

    Although many riparian and semi-aquatic plant species disperse via water currents, little is known about how this process interacts with the landscape matrix. In mangroves, the dense aerial root network could act as a strong dispersal barrier for the morphologically diverse propagules found in these

  1. Relative Efficacy of On-Farm Weeds as Soil-Amendement for Managing Dry Root Rot of Clusterbean in an Arid Environment

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    R. Mawar

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of certain on-farm weeds as soil amendments was ascertained against Macrophomina phaseolina, a soil-borne pathogen causing dry root rot of crops grown under rainfed conditions in arid regions. Population changes in M. phaseolina were determined in soils amended separately with residues (1%, w:w of Aerva persica, Celosia argentea, Corchorus depressus, Euphorbia hirta, Heliotropium subulatum and Polycarpaea corymbosa, for a period of 90 days. Significant reductions by 90.4–100% in the population of M. phaseolina were achieved with all the weed residues except P. corymbosa. Celosia and Euphorbia residues completely eradicated viable propagules of M. phaseolina. A strong increase (44–61% in the population of antagonistic actinomycetes was also found in soil amended with Corchorus and Euphorbia. In field tests, soil amended (50 g m2 with Euphorbia, Aerva and Celosia residues significantly reduced dry root rot incidence on clusterbean and also reduced M. phaseolina propagules in the soil. However, dry root rot incidence in Polycarpaea-amended soil (5.8–24.6% was not significantly different from that in non-amended soil (4.3–25.3% in both years of the experiment. P. corymbosa also increased the number of propagules of M. phaseolina in the soil. The results demonstrate that dry root rot of rainfed-cultivated annual crops in arid land can be managed with certain weeds as a soil amendment.

  2. a -Difluoromethylornithine Inhibits the Growth of Fungus Macrophomina phaseoli

    OpenAIRE

    PALAVAN-ÜNSAL, Narçin

    2014-01-01

    a -Difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), a specific enzyme activated inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), significantly inhibited the mycelial growth of the fungus Macrophomina phaseoli (Tassi) Goidanich. Putrescine (Put), when added to the nutrient medium at a concentration of 0.25 mM, decreased the inhibitory effect of DFMO. These results suggest that polyamines (PAs) are essential for the growth of fungi and that DFMO is applicable to the alleviation or prevention of crop losses due to ph...

  3. Modelling drivers of mangrove propagule dispersal and restoration of abandoned shrimp farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Di Nitto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Propagule dispersal of four mangrove species Rhizophora mucronata, R. apiculata, Ceriops tagal and Avicennia officinalis in the Pambala-Chilaw Lagoon Complex (Sri Lanka was studied by combining a hydrodynamic model with species-specific knowledge on propagule dispersal behaviour. Propagule transport was simulated using a finite-volume advection-diffusion model to investigate the effect of dispersal vectors (tidal flow, freshwater discharge and wind, trapping agents (retention by vegetation and seed characteristics (buoyancy on propagule dispersal patterns. Sensitivity analysis showed that smaller propagules, like the oval-shaped propagules of Avicennia officinalis, dispersed over larger distances and were most sensitive to changing values of retention by mangrove vegetation compared to larger, torpedo-shaped propagules of Rhizophora spp. and C. tagal. Directional propagule dispersal in this semi-enclosed lagoon with a small tidal range was strongly concentrated towards the edges of the lagoon and channels. Short distance dispersal appeared to be the main dispersal strategy for all four studied species, with most of the propagules being retained within the vegetation. Only a small proportion (max. 5% of propagules left the lagoon through a channel connecting the lagoon with the open sea. Wind significantly influenced dispersal distance and direction once propagules entered the lagoon or adjacent channels. Implications of these findings for mangrove restoration were tested by simulating partial removal in the model of dikes around abandoned shrimp ponds to restore tidal hydrology and facilitate natural recolonisation by mangroves. The specific location of dike removal, (with respect to the vicinity of mangroves and independently suitable hydrodynamic flows, was found to significantly affect the resultant quantities and species of inflowing of propagules and hence the potential effectiveness of natural

  4. Modelling drivers of mangrove propagule dispersal and restoration of abandoned shrimp farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Di Nitto

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Propagule dispersal of four mangrove species Rhizophora mucronata, R. apiculata, Ceriops tagal and Avicennia officinalis in the Pambala–Chilaw Lagoon Complex (Sri Lanka was studied by combining a hydrodynamic model with species-specific knowledge on propagule dispersal behaviour. Propagule transport was simulated using a finite-volume advection-diffusion model to investigate the effect of dispersal vectors (tidal flow, freshwater discharge and wind, trapping agents (retention by vegetation and seed characteristics (buoyancy on propagule dispersal patterns. Sensitivity analysis showed that smaller propagules, like the oval-shaped propagules of Avicennia officinalis, dispersed over larger distances and were most sensitive to changing values of retention by mangrove vegetation compared to larger, torpedo-shaped propagules of Rhizophora spp. and C. tagal. Directional propagule dispersal in this semi-enclosed lagoon with a small tidal range was strongly concentrated towards the edges of the lagoon and channels. Short distance dispersal appeared to be the main dispersal strategy for all four studied species, with most of the propagules being retained within the vegetation. Only a small proportion (max. 5% of propagules left the lagoon through a channel connecting the lagoon with the open sea. Wind significantly influenced dispersal distance and direction once propagules entered the lagoon or adjacent channels. Implications of these findings for mangrove restoration were tested by simulating partial removal in the model of dikes around abandoned shrimp ponds to restore tidal hydrology and facilitate natural recolonisation by mangroves. The specific location of dike removal, (with respect to the vicinity of mangroves and independently suitable hydrodynamic flows, was found to significantly affect the resultant quantities and species of inflowing propagules and hence the potential effectiveness of natural regeneration. These results demonstrate the

  5. Morphogenesis of propagules in viviparous species Bryophyllum daigremontianum and B. calycinum

    OpenAIRE

    T. B. Batygina; E. A. Bragina; TITOVA, G. E.

    2014-01-01

    The propagule development in two viviparous Bryophyllum species: B. daigremontianum and B. calycinum (Crassulaceae) has been found to proceed via embryoidogenesis (somatic embryo). In both species, all propagule organs arise from the dormant meristem derivatives, but there are morphogenetic differences at the latest developmental stages (in adventitious root initiation). In both species, the propagule genesis proceeds through the "globular", heartshaped and torpedoshaped stages. Comparative m...

  6. Vegetative Propagule Pressure and Water Depth Affect Biomass and Evenness of Submerged Macrophyte Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Li; Wang, Yong-Yang; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Pu; Zhang, Ming-Xiang; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2015-01-01

    Vegetative propagule pressure may affect the establishment and structure of aquatic plant communities that are commonly dominated by plants capable of clonal growth. We experimentally constructed aquatic communities consisting of four submerged macrophytes (Hydrilla verticillata, Ceratophyllum demersum, Elodea nuttallii and Myriophyllum spicatum) with three levels of vegetative propagule pressure (4, 8 and 16 shoot fragments for communities in each pot) and two levels of water depth (30 cm and 70 cm). Increasing vegetative propagule pressure and decreasing water level significantly increased the growth of the submerged macrophyte communities, suggesting that propagule pressure and water depth should be considered when utilizing vegetative propagules to re-establish submerged macrophyte communities in degraded aquatic ecosystems. However, increasing vegetative propagule pressure and decreasing water level significantly decreased evenness of the submerged macrophyte communities because they markedly increased the dominance of H. verticillata and E. nuttallii, but had little impact on that of C. demersum and M. spicatum. Thus, effects of vegetative propagule pressure and water depth are species-specific and increasing vegetative propagule pressure under lower water level can facilitate the establishment success of submerged macrophyte communities.

  7. 'Prepackaged symbioses': propagules on roots of the myco-heterotrophic plant Arachnitis uniflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Laura; Sérsic, Alicia; Melville, Lewis; Peterson, R Larry

    2006-01-01

    Arachnitis uniflora, a myco-heterotrophic plant species, has fleshy tuberous roots colonized by the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal genus Glomus (Phylum Glomeromycota). These roots produce apical and lateral propagules, both reported here for the first time. The objective of the study was to characterize the ontogeny and structure of the propagules, and to determine their function. Scanning electron microscopy, laser scanning confocal microscopy and light microscopy were used to study the ontogeny and structure of the propagules. Propagules developed either from cortical parenchyma cells or from cells immediately beneath the root cap; they developed a shoot meristem and cells in the basal region which were colonized by various fungal structures including hyphae and vesicles. These propagules may detach from the roots, establishing new plants.

  8. Morphogenesis of propagules in viviparous species Bryophyllum daigremontianum and B. calycinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. B. Batygina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The propagule development in two viviparous Bryophyllum species: B. daigremontianum and B. calycinum (Crassulaceae has been found to proceed via embryoidogenesis (somatic embryo. In both species, all propagule organs arise from the dormant meristem derivatives, but there are morphogenetic differences at the latest developmental stages (in adventitious root initiation. In both species, the propagule genesis proceeds through the "globular", heartshaped and torpedoshaped stages. Comparative morphological and embryological analysis of propagules in the species in question and sexual embryos revealed a strong similarity in their developmental patterns not with standing their morphological variability. It has been suggested that two Bryophyllum species carry the "dormancy" gene. The present study has confirmed that vegetative propagules of the flowering plants can be either embryoids or buds.

  9. Photosynthetic planulae and planktonic hydroids: contrasting strategies of propagule survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Pagliara

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Settlement delays can be important to prevent propagule waste when proper settling substrates are not immediately available. Under laboratory conditions, the planulae of Clytia viridicans underwent two alternative developmental patterns. Some settled on the bottom, forming a hydranth-gonotheca complex that produced up to four medusae and later either degenerated or gave rise to a hydroid colony. Other planulae settled right below the air-water interface, forming floating colonies that eventually fell to the bottom and settled. Halecium nanum released planulae with a rich population of symbiotic zooxanthellae that survived into a rearing jar for three months. After a long period of apparent quiescence (possibly fuelled by photosynthetic activities of zooxanthellae the planulae produced new colonies. Both photosynthetic planulae and settlement at the interface air-water allow a delay in the passage from a planktonic to a fully functional benthic life.

  10. Saltmarsh boundary modulates dispersal of mangrove propagules: implications for mangrove migration with sea-level rise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jennifer M; Bell, Susan S

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have empirically examined the suite of mechanisms that underlie the distributional shifts displayed by organisms in response to changing climatic condition. Mangrove forests are expected to move inland as sea-level rises, encroaching on saltmarsh plants inhabiting higher elevations. Mangrove propagules are transported by tidal waters and propagule dispersal is likely modified upon encountering the mangrove-saltmarsh ecotone, the implications of which are poorly known. Here, using an experimental approach, we record landward and seaward dispersal and subsequent establishment of mangrove propagules that encounter biotic boundaries composed of two types of saltmarsh taxa: succulents and grasses. Our findings revealed that propagules emplaced within saltmarsh vegetation immediately landward of the extant mangrove fringe boundary frequently dispersed in the seaward direction. However, propagules moved seaward less frequently and over shorter distances upon encountering boundaries composed of saltmarsh grasses versus succulents. We uniquely confirmed that the small subset of propagules dispersing landward displayed proportionately higher establishment success than those transported seaward. Although impacts of ecotones on plant dispersal have rarely been investigated in situ, our experimental results indicate that the interplay between tidal transport and physical attributes of saltmarsh vegetation influence boundary permeability to propagules, thereby directing the initial phase of shifting mangrove distributions. The incorporation of tidal inundation information and detailed data on landscape features, such as the structure of saltmarsh vegetation at mangrove boundaries, should improve the accuracy of models that are being developed to forecast mangrove distributional shifts in response to sea-level rise.

  11. Soil propagule banks of ectomycorrhizal fungi share many common species along an elevation gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yumiko; Nara, Kazuhide

    2016-04-01

    We conducted bioassay experiments to investigate the soil propagule banks of ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi in old-growth forests along an elevation gradient and compared the elevation pattern with the composition of EM fungi on existing roots in the field. In total, 150 soil cores were collected from three forests on Mt. Ishizuchi, western Japan, and subjected to bioassays using Pinus densiflora and Betula maximowicziana. Using molecular analyses, we recorded 23 EM fungal species in the assayed propagule banks. Eight species (34.8 %) were shared across the three sites, which ranged from a warm-temperate evergreen mixed forest to a subalpine conifer forest. The elevation pattern of the assayed propagule banks differed dramatically from that of EM fungi on existing roots along the same gradient, where only a small proportion of EM fungal species (3.5 %) were shared across sites. The EM fungal species found in the assayed propagule banks included many pioneer fungal species and composition differed significantly from that on existing roots. Furthermore, only 4 of 23 species were shared between the two host species, indicating a strong effect of bioassay host identity in determining the propagule banks of EM fungi. These results imply that the assayed propagule bank is less affected by climate compared to EM fungal communities on existing roots. The dominance of disturbance-dependent fungal species in the assayed propagule banks may result in higher ecosystem resilience to disturbance even in old-growth temperate forests.

  12. Saltmarsh boundary modulates dispersal of mangrove propagules: implications for mangrove migration with sea-level rise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M Peterson

    Full Text Available Few studies have empirically examined the suite of mechanisms that underlie the distributional shifts displayed by organisms in response to changing climatic condition. Mangrove forests are expected to move inland as sea-level rises, encroaching on saltmarsh plants inhabiting higher elevations. Mangrove propagules are transported by tidal waters and propagule dispersal is likely modified upon encountering the mangrove-saltmarsh ecotone, the implications of which are poorly known. Here, using an experimental approach, we record landward and seaward dispersal and subsequent establishment of mangrove propagules that encounter biotic boundaries composed of two types of saltmarsh taxa: succulents and grasses. Our findings revealed that propagules emplaced within saltmarsh vegetation immediately landward of the extant mangrove fringe boundary frequently dispersed in the seaward direction. However, propagules moved seaward less frequently and over shorter distances upon encountering boundaries composed of saltmarsh grasses versus succulents. We uniquely confirmed that the small subset of propagules dispersing landward displayed proportionately higher establishment success than those transported seaward. Although impacts of ecotones on plant dispersal have rarely been investigated in situ, our experimental results indicate that the interplay between tidal transport and physical attributes of saltmarsh vegetation influence boundary permeability to propagules, thereby directing the initial phase of shifting mangrove distributions. The incorporation of tidal inundation information and detailed data on landscape features, such as the structure of saltmarsh vegetation at mangrove boundaries, should improve the accuracy of models that are being developed to forecast mangrove distributional shifts in response to sea-level rise.

  13. Microclimate and propagule availability are equally important for rehabilitation of dryland N-fixing lichens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, M.A.; Belnap, J.; Davidson, D.W.

    2010-01-01

    In some arid regions, rehabilitation of whole system N-fixation may be strongly facilitated by the recovery of populations of the lichen genus Collema. Identification of the limits to recovery of Collema in apparently suitable habitat should inform selection of rehabilitation techniques. We simultaneously tested the relative importance of three hypothetical limits to Collema recovery: active erosion, resource limitation, and propagule scarcity. We found that in our experimental system, active erosion had no effect on short-term establishment of Collema, whereas propagule addition did enhance recovery and microhabitat (a resource availability gradient) also exerted a strong influence. It is possible that attempts to improve N cycling via re-establishment of Collema might be best served by developing economical means of simulating moister, cooler microhabitats, e.g., sloping soil or creating partial shade, which would favor the establishment of naturally dispersed propagules, rather than introducing propagules. ?? 2009 Society for Ecological Restoration International.

  14. Temporal variation of diatom benthic propagules in a monsoon-influenced tropical estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patil, J.S.; Anil, A

    Temporal variations in the diatom benthic propagule (DBP) community and their role in the phytoplankton community in a monsoon-affected tropical estuary, Zuari estuary, Goa (India) are presented. The DBP from the sediments was enumerated using...

  15. Propagule pressure and stream characteristics influence introgression: Cutthroat and rainbow trout in British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, S.N.; Olson, J.R.; Kershner, J.L.; Corbett, P.

    2010-01-01

    Hybridization and introgression between introduced and native salmonids threaten the continued persistence of many inland cutthroat trout species. Environmental models have been developed to predict the spread of introgression, but few studies have assessed the role of propagule pressure. We used an extensive set of fish stocking records and geographic information system (GIS) data to produce a spatially explicit index of potential propagule pressure exerted by introduced rainbow trout in the Upper Kootenay River, British Columbia, Canada. We then used logistic regression and the information-theoretic approach to test the ability of a set of environmental and spatial variables to predict the level of introgression between native westslope cutthroat trout and introduced rainbow trout. Introgression was assessed using between four and seven co-dominant, diagnostic nuclear markers at 45 sites in 31 different streams. The best model for predicting introgression included our GIS propagule pressure index and an environmental variable that accounted for the biogeoclimatic zone of the site (r2 = 0.62). This model was 1.4 times more likely to explain introgression than the next-best model, which consisted of only the propagule pressure index variable. We created a composite model based on the model-averaged results of the seven top models that included environmental, spatial, and propagule pressure variables. The propagule pressure index had the highest importance weight (0.995) of all variables tested and was negatively related to sites with no introgression. This study used an index of propagule pressure and demonstrated that propagule pressure had the greatest influence on the level of introgression between a native and introduced trout in a human-induced hybrid zone. ?? 2010 by the Ecological Society of America.

  16. Green synthesis of protein capped silver nanoparticles from phytopathogenic fungus Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid with antimicrobial properties against multidrug-resistant bacteria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chowdhury, Supriyo; Basu, Arpita; Kundu, Surekha

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, green synthesis of nanoparticles, i.e., synthesizing nanoparticles using biological sources like bacteria, algae, fungus, or plant extracts have attracted much attention due to its environment-friendly and economic aspects...

  17. Pathogenicity of Macrophomina phaseoli on Jute in the Presence of Meloidogyne incognita and Hoplolaimus indicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, M D; Mukhopadhyaya, M C

    1979-10-01

    Seedlings of Corchorus capsularis (cv. C4444) were inoculated with Meloidogyne incognita, Hoplolaimus indicus, and a fungus pathogen of jute, Macrophomina phaseoli, separately and in all possible combinations. The significant damage of jute plants caused individually by the pathogens was aggravated when the fungus was associated with either of the nematode species. M. incognita alone caused greater damage than either H. indicus or Macrophomina phaseoli alone. Plants inoculated with M. incognita and Macrophomina phaseoli were more severely damaged than plants inoculated with H. indicus and the fungus. Plant growth was minimum and disease symptoms were maximum when all pathogens acted together. In the presence of the fungus, M. incognita produced fewer galls. The reproduction of H. indicus was not influenced by the other organisms.

  18. Soil propagule banks of ectomycorrhizal fungi along forest development stages after mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian; Nara, Kazuhide; Zong, Kun; Lian, Chunlan

    2015-05-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungal (EMF) propagules play an important role in seedling establishment following disturbance. However, little is known about how the EMF propagule community changes with forest development. In this study, EMF propagules were examined using seedling bioassays in rhizosphere soils collected from a recently closed Pb-Zn tailing (Taolin Pb-Zn tailing (TLT)), a Cu tailing (Dexing Cu No. 2 tailing (DXT)) that had undergone 21 years of restoration, and a mature Masson pine (Pinus massoniana) forest (DXC) outside the Cu mining areas. The corresponding EMF communities colonizing Masson pine at each site were also investigated for comparison. After 8 months of running bioassays, ectomycorrhizal colonization was poor for seedlings grown in TLT (9.0 % ± 14.9 %) and DXT soils (22.4 % ± 17.7 %), while DXC seedlings were well colonized (47.5 % ± 24.9 %). Internal transcribed spacer sequencing revealed that EMF species richness increased with forest development in both the propagule bank (TLT, 6; DXT, 7; DXC, 12) and in the field (TLT, 8; DXT, 14; DXC, 26), though richness was lower in propagule banks. Several lineages, such as Cenococcum, Rhizopogon, Inocybe, Suillus, and Atheliaceae, were frequently encountered in propagule communities, but species assemblages were different among the three sites. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that several soil parameters, i.e., N, EC, Cu, Pb, Zn, etc., were responsible for the distribution of EMF in the field and bioassay seedlings. The highest overlap in EMF species composition between the propagule bank and the field community was observed at the recently closed tailing (Morisita-Horn similarity = 0.71 for TLT), whereas the lowest overlap occurred at the mature forest (0.26 for DXC). These results indicate that EMF propagules in soil are less frequent and diverse in early primary succession and become more frequent and diverse along forest development, due mainly to the accumulation of

  19. Radiosensitivity of two propagules of citrus; Radiossensibilidade de dois tipos de propagulos de citros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzaga, Daniela Loschtschagina; Latado, Rodrigo Rocha; Pio, Rose Mary, E-mail: rodrigo@centrodecitricultura.b [Instituto Agronomico de Campinas, Cordeiropolis, SP (Brazil). Centro Avancado de Pesquisa Tecnologica do Agronegocio de Citros Sylvio Moreira; Tulmann Neto, Augusto [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Studies have shown that the radiosensitivity in plants varies depending on the varieties and the propagules used in mutagenic treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiosensitivity of two types of propagules (buds and in vitro segments of epicotyl) in 'Murcott' tangor, 'Thomas' and 'Fremont' mandarins and 'Rangpur' lime (only in vitro segments of epicotyl) and to compare the gamma-rays sensitivity among propagules and among varieties. The following doses were used: 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 Gy of gamma-rays. The parameters shoot mortality and shoot height, for experiment of bud irradiation, and number of regenerated shoots per explant and percentage of responsive explants, for experiment of epicotyl segments irradiation were evaluated after 60 days. The mutagenic doses tested in buds caused significant reduction in shoot height of all varieties. In the experiment of irradiation of in vitro segments of epicotyl, only 'Murcott' tangor and 'Rangpur' lime showed significant reduction in the number of regenerated shoots per explant, due to the increase of mutagen doses. Results indicate that radiosensitivity of in vitro (segments of epicotyl) and in vivo (buds) propagules is variable depending on the variety. Also, in some cases the in vitro propagules are more sensitive, to irradiation and in other cases, there is no differential sensibility (author)

  20. Assessing Dispersal Patterns of Fish Propagules from an Effective Mediterranean Marine Protected Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Franco, Antonio; Coppini, Giovanni; Pujolar, José Martin; De Leo, Giulio A.; Gatto, Marino; Lyubartsev, Vladyslav; Melià, Paco; Zane, Lorenzo; Guidetti, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Successfully enforced marine protected areas (MPAs) have been widely demonstrated to allow, within their boundaries, the recovery of exploited species and beyond their boundaries, the spillover of juvenile and adult fish. Little evidence is available about the so-called ‘recruitment subsidy’, the augmented production of propagules (i.e. eggs and larvae) due to the increased abundance of large-sized spawners hosted within effective MPAs. Once emitted, propagules can be locally retained and/or exported elsewhere. Patterns of propagule retention and/or export from MPAs have been little investigated, especially in the Mediterranean. This study investigated the potential for propagule production and retention/export from a Mediterranean MPA (Torre Guaceto, SW Adriatic Sea) using the white sea bream, Diplodus sargus sargus, as a model species. A multidisciplinary approach was used combining 1) spatial distribution patterns of individuals (post-settlers and adults) assessed through visual census within Torre Guaceto MPA and in northern and southern unprotected areas, 2) Lagrangian simulations of dispersal based on an oceanographic model of the region and data on early life-history traits of the species (spawning date, pelagic larval duration) and 3) a preliminary genetic study using microsatellite loci. Results show that the MPA hosts higher densities of larger-sized spawners than outside areas, potentially guaranteeing higher propagule production. Model simulations and field observation suggest that larval retention within and long-distance dispersal across MPA boundaries allow the replenishment of the MPA and of exploited populations up to 100 km down-current (southward) from the MPA. This pattern partially agrees with the high genetic homogeneity found in the entire study area (no differences in genetic composition and diversity indices), suggesting a high gene flow. By contributing to a better understanding of propagule dispersal patterns, these findings provide

  1. Assessing dispersal patterns of fish propagules from an effective mediterranean marine protected area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Di Franco

    Full Text Available Successfully enforced marine protected areas (MPAs have been widely demonstrated to allow, within their boundaries, the recovery of exploited species and beyond their boundaries, the spillover of juvenile and adult fish. Little evidence is available about the so-called 'recruitment subsidy', the augmented production of propagules (i.e. eggs and larvae due to the increased abundance of large-sized spawners hosted within effective MPAs. Once emitted, propagules can be locally retained and/or exported elsewhere. Patterns of propagule retention and/or export from MPAs have been little investigated, especially in the Mediterranean. This study investigated the potential for propagule production and retention/export from a Mediterranean MPA (Torre Guaceto, SW Adriatic Sea using the white sea bream, Diplodus sargus sargus, as a model species. A multidisciplinary approach was used combining 1 spatial distribution patterns of individuals (post-settlers and adults assessed through visual census within Torre Guaceto MPA and in northern and southern unprotected areas, 2 Lagrangian simulations of dispersal based on an oceanographic model of the region and data on early life-history traits of the species (spawning date, pelagic larval duration and 3 a preliminary genetic study using microsatellite loci. Results show that the MPA hosts higher densities of larger-sized spawners than outside areas, potentially guaranteeing higher propagule production. Model simulations and field observation suggest that larval retention within and long-distance dispersal across MPA boundaries allow the replenishment of the MPA and of exploited populations up to 100 km down-current (southward from the MPA. This pattern partially agrees with the high genetic homogeneity found in the entire study area (no differences in genetic composition and diversity indices, suggesting a high gene flow. By contributing to a better understanding of propagule dispersal patterns, these findings

  2. Assessing dispersal patterns of fish propagules from an effective mediterranean marine protected area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Franco, Antonio; Coppini, Giovanni; Pujolar, José Martin; De Leo, Giulio A; Gatto, Marino; Lyubartsev, Vladyslav; Melià, Paco; Zane, Lorenzo; Guidetti, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Successfully enforced marine protected areas (MPAs) have been widely demonstrated to allow, within their boundaries, the recovery of exploited species and beyond their boundaries, the spillover of juvenile and adult fish. Little evidence is available about the so-called 'recruitment subsidy', the augmented production of propagules (i.e. eggs and larvae) due to the increased abundance of large-sized spawners hosted within effective MPAs. Once emitted, propagules can be locally retained and/or exported elsewhere. Patterns of propagule retention and/or export from MPAs have been little investigated, especially in the Mediterranean. This study investigated the potential for propagule production and retention/export from a Mediterranean MPA (Torre Guaceto, SW Adriatic Sea) using the white sea bream, Diplodus sargus sargus, as a model species. A multidisciplinary approach was used combining 1) spatial distribution patterns of individuals (post-settlers and adults) assessed through visual census within Torre Guaceto MPA and in northern and southern unprotected areas, 2) Lagrangian simulations of dispersal based on an oceanographic model of the region and data on early life-history traits of the species (spawning date, pelagic larval duration) and 3) a preliminary genetic study using microsatellite loci. Results show that the MPA hosts higher densities of larger-sized spawners than outside areas, potentially guaranteeing higher propagule production. Model simulations and field observation suggest that larval retention within and long-distance dispersal across MPA boundaries allow the replenishment of the MPA and of exploited populations up to 100 km down-current (southward) from the MPA. This pattern partially agrees with the high genetic homogeneity found in the entire study area (no differences in genetic composition and diversity indices), suggesting a high gene flow. By contributing to a better understanding of propagule dispersal patterns, these findings provide

  3. Local adaptation of the pondweed Potamogeton pectinatus to contrasting substrate types mediated by changes in propagule provisioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hangelbroek, H.H.; Santamaria, L.; De Boer, T.

    2003-01-01

    We studied local adaptation to substrate type within a population of the clonal aquatic macrophyte Potamogeton pectinatus and the role that genotypic variation in propagule-provisioning plays therein. P. pectinatus reproduces mainly by means of subterranean asexual propagules (tubers), whose

  4. Microbial cargo: do bacteria on symbiotic propagules reinforce the microbiome of lichens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschenbrenner, Ines Aline; Cardinale, Massimiliano; Berg, Gabriele; Grube, Martin

    2014-12-01

    According to recent research, bacteria contribute as recurrent associates to the lichen symbiosis. Yet, the variation of the microbiomes within species and across geographically separated populations remained largely elusive. As a quite common dispersal mode, lichens evolved vertical transmission of both fungal and algal partners in specifically designed mitotic propagules. Bacteria, if co-transmitted with these symbiotic propagules, could contribute to a geographical structure of lichen-associated microbiomes. The lung lichen was sampled from three localities in eastern Austria to analyse their associated bacterial communities by bar-coded pyrosequencing, network analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization. For the first time, bacteria were documented to colonize symbiotic propagules of lichens developed for short-distance transmission of the symbionts. The propagules share the overall bacterial community structure with the thalli at class level, except for filamentous Cyanobacteria (Nostocophycideae), and with Alphaproteobacteria as predominant group. All three sampling sites share a core fraction of the microbiome. Bacterial communities of lichen thalli from the same sampling site showed higher similarity than those of distant populations. This variation and the potential co-dispersal of a microbiome fraction with structures of the host organism contribute new aspects to the 'everything is everywhere' hypothesis. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. In vitro comparative analysis of monocrotophos degrading potential of Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium pallidoroseum and Macrophomina sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rachna; Garg, Veena; Yadav, Deepak

    2014-06-01

    Fungal degradation is emerging as a new powerful tool for the removal of potent neurotoxin pesticide, monocrotophos. Therefore, the present study is aimed at comparative characterization of monocrotophos degrading ability of three different fungal strains. Fungal strains were isolated from local agricultural soil by enrichment culture method, screened by gradient culture and identified as Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium pallidoroseum and Macrophomina sp. Growth kinetics revealed a direct positive influence of monocrotophos on the viability of fungal isolates. Fungal degradation was studied in phosphorus free liquid culture medium supplemented with 150 mg L(-1) concentration of monocrotophos for a period of 15 days under optimized culture conditions. Degradation of MCP followed first order kinetics with kdeg of 0.007, 0.002 and 0.005 day(-1) and half life (t1/2) of 4.21, 12.64 and 6.32 days for A. flavus, F. pallidoroseum and Macrophomina sp. respectively. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first report signifying the potential of monocrotophos degradation by Fusarium and Macrophomina sp. The results were further confirmed by HPTLC and FTIR which indicates disappearance of monocrotophos by hydrolytic cleavage of vinyl phosphate bond. Degradation of monocrotophos by fungal isolates was accompanied by the release of extracellular alkaline phosphatases, inorganic phosphates and ammonia. The overall comparative analysis followed the order of A. flavus > Macrophomina sp. > F. pallidoroseum. Therefore, it could be concluded from the study that these three different fungal strains could be effectively used as a potential candidate for the removal of monocrotophos from contaminated sites.

  6. Interaction of Meloidogyne javanica and Macrophomina phaseoli in Kenaf Root Rot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, C C; Cheng, Y H

    1971-01-01

    Incidence and severity of root-rot caused by the fungus Macrophomina phaseoli was increased in screenhouse-grown kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) seedlings simultaneously infected by the nematode Meloidogyne javanica. In seedlings inoculated at 5, 10 and 15 days of age, root rot lesions increased 70.3, 44.1 and 21.8%, and nematode penetration increased 49.0, 36.7, and 12.3% when both fungus and nematode were present.

  7. Propagules of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in a secondary dry forest of Oaxaca, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadarrama, Patricia; Castillo-Argüero, Silvia; Ramos-Zapata, José A; Camargo-Ricalde, Sara L; Alvarez-Sánchez, Javier

    2008-03-01

    Plant cover loss due to changes in land use promotes a decrease in spore diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), viable mycelium and, therefore, in AMF colonization, this has an influence in community diversity and, as a consequence, in its recovery. To evaluate different AMF propagules, nine plots in a tropical dry forest with secondary vegetation were selected: 0, 1, 7, 10, 14, 18, 22, 25, and 27 years after abandonment in Nizanda, Oaxaca, Mexico. The secondary vegetation with different stages of development is a consequence of slash and burn agriculture, and posterior abandonment. Soil samples (six per plot) were collected and percentage of AMF field colonization, extrarradical mycelium, viable spore density, infectivity and most probable number (MPN) ofAMF propagules were quantified through a bioassay. Means for field colonization ranged between 40% and 70%, mean of total mycelium length was 15.7 +/- 1.88 mg(-1) dry soil, with significant differences between plots; however, more than 40% of extracted mycelium was not viable, between 60 and 456 spores in 100 g of dry soil were recorded, but more than 64% showed some kind of damage. Infectivity values fluctuated between 20% and 50%, while MPN showed a mean value of 85.42 +/- 44.17 propagules (100 g dry soil). We conclude that secondary communities generated by elimination of vegetation with agricultural purposes in a dry forest in Nizanda do not show elimination of propagules, probably as a consequence of the low input agriculture practices in this area, which may encourage natural regeneration.

  8. Spatial Assortment of Mixed Propagules Explains the Acceleration of Range Expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Andriamihaja Ramanantoanina; Aziz Ouhinou; Cang Hui

    2014-01-01

    Range expansion of spreading organisms has been found to follow three types: (i) linear expansion with a constant rate of spread; (ii) bi-phase expansion with a faster linear expansion following a slower linear expansion; and (iii) accelerating expansion with a continuously increasing rate of spread. To date, no overarching formula exists that can be applied to all three types of range expansion. We investigated how propagule pressure, i.e., the initial number of individuals and their composi...

  9. No increase in colonization rate of boreal bryophytes close to propagule sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylander, Kristoffer

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of the process of recolonization, and which temporal and spatial scale it operates on, is central to our understanding of species distributions, metapopulation dynamics, regional extinction risks, and ecosystem resilience. In this study the recolonization pattern of boreal forest bryophytes was investigated in stands that had been clear-cut approximately 50 years ago. Species known to be sensitive to clear-cutting were inventoried in 23 mature forest stands and in adjacent young stands at 10, 20, 40, and 80 m from the former forest-clear-cut edge. Based on previous studies showing that bryophytes tend to be dispersal limited at local population levels, it was hypothesized that the recolonizaton of many bryophyte species should be higher closer to the mature forest edge. It was also hypothesized that some species would show full recovery, while for others the young stands would still be inhospitable. All these patterns were found for individual species, but the main pattern was, however, quite different. Most species had started to recolonize the young stands (i.e., little or much, depending on species), but without any tendency of a higher colonization rate close to the mature stands. Possible explanations for the limited signs of positive influence of local propagule sources might be microsite limitation or that the local propagule availability displays a rapid decline from its sources and is masked by a higher regional propagule rain. For organisms with light propagules able to build up a regional background level, the role of mature forest stands in the recolonization process of the matrix may rather be to contribute to the regional background level of spores in the landscape than to affect the adjacent stands directly.

  10. Modeling of wind-initiated liberation of fungal propagules from host plant leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalinajec, Trevor

    2014-11-01

    Successful airborne propagule dispersal must begin with liberation into the air. The physical shedding mechanism of airborne propagules in the 100--250 μm size range are not well understood. Many fungal plant pathogens have propagules in this size range that are shed from the bottom of infected leaves. If turbulent air flow is sufficient to liberate the sporocarps of fungi from leaves then the aerodynamic forces exerted must be sufficient to overcome adhesive forces. In this study I have sought to quantify the magnitude and direction of these aerodynamic forces and their causal flow fields with dynamically scaled physical models. I chose a genus of powdery mildew because maturation of the sporocarp entails morphological changes that lever the sporocarp further away from the leaf surface and out of the viscous boundary layer. Consequently I varied the sporocarp morphology, the boundary layer thickness, and the flow velocity as forces on models were measured with a transducer. Additionally I analyzed the fluid velocity around the models using PIV, which allowed for quantification of the relative importance of shear forces and pressure-gradient forces. The results suggest that forces from steady and unsteady wind alike are insufficient to explain liberation.

  11. Wind pollination and propagule formation in Rhizophora mangle L. (Rhizophoraceae): resource or pollination limitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadia, Tarcila L; Machado, Isabel C

    2014-03-01

    Rhizophora mangle is considered as a self-compatible mangrove, and is pollinated by wind and insects. However, there is no information about fruit production by autogamy and agamospermy and on the foraging behavior of its flower visitors. Hence, the present study analyzed the pollination and reproductive systems of R. mangle in a mangrove community in northern Pernambuco, Brazil. Floral morphology, sequence of anthesis, and behavior of flower visitors were described; the proportion of flowers that resulted in mature propagules was also recorded. Autogamy, agamospermy, and wind pollination tests were performed, and a new anemophily index is proposed. The flowers of R. mangle are hermaphrodite, protandric, and have high P/O rate. Flies were observed on flowers only during the male phase, probably feeding on mites that consume pollen. Rhizophora mangle is not agamospermic and its fruit production rate by spontaneous self-pollination is low (2.56%) compared to wind pollination (19.44%). The anemophily index was high 0.98, and thus it was considered as a good indicator. Only 13.79% of the flowers formed mature propagules. The early stages of fruit development are the most critical and susceptible to predation. Rhizophora mangle is, therefore, exclusively anemophilous in the study area and the propagule dispersal seems to be limited by herbivory.

  12. Effects of temperature on the germination of green algae micro-propagules in coastal waters of the Subei Shoal, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Peng, Keqin; Xiao, Jie; Li, Yan; Wang, Zongling; Liu, Xiangqing; Fu, Mingzhu; Fan, Shiliang; Zhu, Mingyuan; Li, Ruixiang

    2015-09-01

    Since 2007, large-scale green tides that primarily consisted of Ulva prolifera have consecutively invaded the coast of Qingdao (36°06'N, 120°25'E, PR China) in summer. The germination of green algae micro-propagules in the Subei Shoal played a significant role in the formation of these green tides. The change in sea temperature might be the key factor that affects the germination of the micro-propagules because the other environmental factors varied only slightly according to previous studies. This study was designed to investigate the effects of temperature on the germination of micro-propagules via laboratory experiments. The results showed the following: (1) five types of green algae micro-propagules, including U. prolifera, U. linza, U. compressa, Ulva sp. (Clade 6) and Blidingia sp., were detected in the seawater samples collected from the Subei Shoal; (2) at 5 °C, germinated micro-propagules were not detected in any of the samples; at 10 °C, the micro-propagules began to germinate, and the germination quantity markedly changed between 10 °C and 30 °C; (3) the germination numbers of U. prolifera, U. linza, Ulva sp. (Clade 6) and Blidingia sp. were maximized at 15 °C, 10 °C, 25 °C and 20 °C, respectively. This study indicated that the sea temperature played a significant role in the germination of green algae micro-propagules in water and could partly explain the community succession phenomenon of the attached green algae in the Subei Shoal.

  13. The role of propagule pressure, genetic diversity and microsite availability for Senecio vernalis invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Erfmeier

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity is supposed to support the colonization success of expanding species, in particular in situations where microsite availability is constrained. Addressing the role of genetic diversity in plant invasion experimentally requires its manipulation independent of propagule pressure. To assess the relative importance of these components for the invasion of Senecio vernalis, we created propagule mixtures of four levels of genotype diversity by combining seeds across remote populations, across proximate populations, within single populations and within seed families. In a first container experiment with constant Festuca rupicola density as matrix, genotype diversity was crossed with three levels of seed density. In a second experiment, we tested for effects of establishment limitation and genotype diversity by manipulating Festuca densities. Increasing genetic diversity had no effects on abundance and biomass of S. vernalis but positively affected the proportion of large individuals to small individuals. Mixtures composed from proximate populations had a significantly higher proportion of large individuals than mixtures composed from within seed families only. High propagule pressure increased emergence and establishment of S. vernalis but had no effect on individual growth performance. Establishment was favoured in containers with Festuca, but performance of surviving seedlings was higher in open soil treatments. For S. vernalis invasion, we found a shift in driving factors from density dependence to effects of genetic diversity across life stages. While initial abundance was mostly linked to the amount of seed input, genetic diversity, in contrast, affected later stages of colonization probably via sampling effects and seemed to contribute to filtering the genotypes that finally grew up. In consequence, when disentangling the mechanistic relationships of genetic diversity, seed density and microsite limitation in colonization of

  14. Field study on changes in viability of airborne fungal propagules exposed to UV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulevicius, V; Peciulyte, D; Lugauskas, A; Andriejauskiene, J

    2004-08-01

    The responses of airborne fungi to UV-B under natural conditions were investigated at the coastal station in Preila, Lithuania. Results of this investigation demonstrated that solar radiation has a marked lethal effect on outdoor airborne fungi. Sensitivity to solar radiation was the highest for the fungal propagules collected late in the evening (relative recovery 6.2%) and early morning (25.3%). The lowest sensitivity to solar radiation was observed for fungal propagules collected at midday (50.0%) and in the afternoon (53.0%). The reason for the lethal effect is thought to be elimination of the sensitive fraction of the night-time fungal populations as solar radiation gradually increases beginning at dawn. Among 356 fungus strains isolated during the investigations, 128 can be characterized as potential pathogens, and 21 strains among those most common in fungal populations belonging to plant, animal, and human pathogen groups. The collected fungal populations were exposed to solar UV-B irradiation for 2 h (from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m.). Fungal communities in the air samples were composed of saprotrophs, some of which are regarded as potential phytopathogens (Alternaria, Cladosporium, and Fusarium) or as entomopathogens (Beauveria, Paecilomyces, and Metarhizium). The airborne fungal species identified after exposure to solar radiation were predominantly: Aspergillus niger, Alternaria alternata, Cladosporium cladosporioides, Arthrinium phaerosporum, and dematiaceous sterile mycelium.

  15. Comparative performance of two air samplers for monitoring airborne fungal propagules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.G.F. Távora

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have attempted to evaluate the importance of airborne fungi in the development of invasive fungal infection, especially for immunocompromised hosts. Several kinds of instruments are available to quantitate fungal propagule levels in air. We compared the performance of the most frequently used air sampler, the Andersen sampler with six stages, with a portable one, the Reuter centrifugal sampler (RCS. A total of 84 samples were analyzed, 42 with each sampler. Twenty-eight different fungal genera were identified in samples analyzed with the Andersen instrument. In samples obtained with the RCS only seven different fungal genera were identified. The three most frequently isolated genera in samples analyzed with both devices were Penicillium, Aspergillus and Cladophialophora. In areas supplied with a high efficiency particulate air filter, fungal spore levels were usually lower when compared to areas without these filters. There was a significant correlation between total fungal propagule measurements taken with both devices on each sampling occasion (Pearson coefficient = 0.50. However, the Andersen device recovered a broader spectrum of fungi. We conclude that the RCS can be used for quantitative estimates of airborne microbiological concentrations. For qualitative studies, however, this device cannot be recommended.

  16. Factors influencing survival of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza propagules during topsoil storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.M.; Carnes, B.A.; Moorman, T.B.

    1985-01-01

    The survival dynamics of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi were determined, (using a bioassay procedure) for soils stored from 0.5 to 6.0 years in topsoil stockpiles associated with a coal surface-mine in the western United States. Propagule mortality could best be related to in situ soil moisture potential using a piecewise regression model (R/sup 2/ = 0.57; P less than or equal to 0.001) with the breaking point occurring at -2 MPa. The addition of length of storage time was found to contribute significantly to the accuracy of the model (R/sup 2/ = 0.70; P less than or equal to 0.001). In addition, the piece-wise nature of the data suggested two separate populations of VAM fungi - those propagules found in soils with moisture potentials less than -2 MPa and those occurring in soils with moisture potentials greater than -2 MPa. Soil moisture and length of storage time had differing effects on each of these populations. When water potential was less than -2 MPa, moisture was an important predictor of inoculum (P < 0.001), while length of storage had little predictive capability (P = 0.17). However, when water potentials were greater than -2 MPa, the predictive importance of soil moisture (P = 0.86) and length of storage (P = 0.04) were reversed. The significance of these findings to topsoil replacement and subsequent plant community development are discussed. 28 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  17. Spatial assortment of mixed propagules explains the acceleration of range expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanantoanina, Andriamihaja; Ouhinou, Aziz; Hui, Cang

    2014-01-01

    Range expansion of spreading organisms has been found to follow three types: (i) linear expansion with a constant rate of spread; (ii) bi-phase expansion with a faster linear expansion following a slower linear expansion; and (iii) accelerating expansion with a continuously increasing rate of spread. To date, no overarching formula exists that can be applied to all three types of range expansion. We investigated how propagule pressure, i.e., the initial number of individuals and their composition in terms of dispersal ability, affects the spread of a population. A system of integrodifference equations was then used to model the spatiotemporal dynamics of the population. We studied the dynamics of dispersal ability as well as the instantaneous and asymptotic rate of spread. We found that individuals with different dispersal abilities were spatially sorted with the stronger dispersers situated at the expanding range front, causing the velocity of expansion to accelerate. The instantaneous rate of spread was found to be fully determined by the growth and dispersal abilities of the population at the advancing edge of the invasion. We derived a formula for the asymptotic rate of spread under different scenarios of propagule pressure. The results suggest that data collected from the core of the invasion may underestimate the spreading rate of the population. Aside from better managing of invasive species, the derived formula could conceivably also be applied to conservation management of relocated, endangered or extra-limital species.

  18. Spatial assortment of mixed propagules explains the acceleration of range expansion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andriamihaja Ramanantoanina

    Full Text Available Range expansion of spreading organisms has been found to follow three types: (i linear expansion with a constant rate of spread; (ii bi-phase expansion with a faster linear expansion following a slower linear expansion; and (iii accelerating expansion with a continuously increasing rate of spread. To date, no overarching formula exists that can be applied to all three types of range expansion. We investigated how propagule pressure, i.e., the initial number of individuals and their composition in terms of dispersal ability, affects the spread of a population. A system of integrodifference equations was then used to model the spatiotemporal dynamics of the population. We studied the dynamics of dispersal ability as well as the instantaneous and asymptotic rate of spread. We found that individuals with different dispersal abilities were spatially sorted with the stronger dispersers situated at the expanding range front, causing the velocity of expansion to accelerate. The instantaneous rate of spread was found to be fully determined by the growth and dispersal abilities of the population at the advancing edge of the invasion. We derived a formula for the asymptotic rate of spread under different scenarios of propagule pressure. The results suggest that data collected from the core of the invasion may underestimate the spreading rate of the population. Aside from better managing of invasive species, the derived formula could conceivably also be applied to conservation management of relocated, endangered or extra-limital species.

  19. Effect of 2,4diacetylphloroglucinol of Pythium: cellular responses and variation in sensitivity among propagules and species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza, J.T.; Arnould, C.; Deulvot, C.; Lemanceau, P.; Gianinazzi-Pearson, V.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (2,4-DAPG) plays an important role in the suppression of plant pathogens by several strains of Pseudomonas spp. Based on the results of this study, there is variation within and among Pythium spp. to 2,4-DAPG. Also, various propagules of Pythium ultimum var.

  20. The evolutionary time machine: forecasting how populations can adapt to changing environments using dormant propagules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsini, Luisa; Schwenk, Klaus; De Meester, Luc; Colbourne, John K.; Pfrender, Michael E.; Weider, Lawrence J.

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary changes are determined by a complex assortment of ecological, demographic and adaptive histories. Predicting how evolution will shape the genetic structures of populations coping with current (and future) environmental challenges has principally relied on investigations through space, in lieu of time, because long-term phenotypic and molecular data are scarce. Yet, dormant propagules in sediments, soils and permafrost are convenient natural archives of population-histories from which to trace adaptive trajectories along extended time periods. DNA sequence data obtained from these natural archives, combined with pioneering methods for analyzing both ecological and population genomic time-series data, are likely to provide predictive models to forecast evolutionary responses of natural populations to environmental changes resulting from natural and anthropogenic stressors, including climate change. PMID:23395434

  1. Groups travel further: pelagic metamorphosis and polyp clustering allow higher dispersal potential in sun coral propagules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Damián; Navarrete, Sergio A.; Flores, Augusto A. V.

    2014-06-01

    We report that planulae produced by Tubastraea coccinea can metamorphose and aggregate in groups of up to eight polyps in the water column, without previous settlement on benthic substrate. We also evaluated the survival of propagules to test whether different levels of aggregation allowed for longer planktonic life and, therefore, higher dispersal potential. Our results show that pelagic polyps live longer than planulae, probably because they can feed and meet the presumably high-energy demands of swimming. Clusters of two or more individuals lived longer than solitary polyps. However, mortality did not differ between small (2-3 polyps) and large (4-8 polyps) clusters, suggesting the existence of an upper limit to cluster size. Most swimming clusters (80 %) remained alive after 6 months, suggesting that pelagic metamorphosis and cluster formation can be a key life-history feature increasing dispersal potential, population connectivity, and the colonization of new habitats in this invasive species.

  2. Propagules of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in a secondary dry forest of Oaxaca, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Guadarrama

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Plant cover loss due to changes in land use promotes a decrease in spore diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF, viable mycelium and, therefore, in AMF colonization, this has an influence in community diversity and, as a consequence, in its recovery. To evaluate different AMF propagules, nine plots in a tropical dry forest with secondary vegetation were selected: 0, 1, 7, 10, 14, 18, 22, 25, and 27 years after abandonment in Nizanda, Oaxaca, Mexico. The secondary vegetation with different stages of development is a consequence of slash and burn agriculture, and posterior abandonment. Soil samples (six per plot were collected and percentage of AMF field colonization, extrarradical mycelium, viable spore density, infectivity and most probable number (MPN of AMF propagules were quantified through a bioassay. Means for field colonization ranged between 40 % and 70 %, mean of total mycelium length was 15.7 ± 1.88 mg-1 dry soil, with significant differences between plots; however, more than 40 % of extracted mycelium was not viable, between 60 and 456 spores in 100 g of dry soil were recorded, but more than 64 % showed some kind of damage. Infectivity values fluctuated between 20 % and 50 %, while MPN showed a mean value of 85.42 ± 44.17 propagules (100 g dry soil. We conclude that secondary communities generated by elimination of vegetation with agricultural purposes in a dry forest in Nizanda do not show elimination of propagules, probably as a consequence of the low input agriculture practices in this area, which may encourage natural regeneration. Rev. Biol. Trop. 56 (1: 269-277. Epub 2008 March 31.La vegetación secundaria con diferentes grados de desarrollo es consecuencia de prácticas agrícolas de roza-tumba-quema y su posterior abandono. La remoción de la vegetación por cambios de uso de suelo promueve una disminución en la diversidad de esporas, micelio viable y por lo tanto de la colonización de los hongos micorriz

  3. Sediment burial stimulates the growth and propagule production of Spartina alterniflora Loisel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zifa; An, Shuqing; Zhao, Congjiao; Chen, Lin; Zhou, Changfang; Zhi, Yingbiao; Li, Hongli

    2008-03-01

    Spartina alterniflora Loisel., an extensively invasive species on the Chinese coast, is a focus of increasing management concern due to its high expansion rate in estuaries and tidal zone, and the significant damage it causes to native ecosystems. In order to understand the processes and mechanisms of invasion of S. alterniflora in China, the impact of three sediment types (sand, sand-loam mixture and loam) and five buried patterns (unburied, 50% burial of initial plant height, 75% burial of initial plant height, complete burial and repeated burial) on the growth of seedlings or ramets was investigated. Results showed that each of the three factors (sediment types, burial pattern and plant materials) and interactions between/among them, significantly affected height and clonal growth, and biomass accumulation and allocation. Plant height, total biomass and number of new vegetative propagules significantly increased with progressive burial treatments. However, the complete burial treatment resulted in the death of all plant materials, and the maximum values of three parameters were found in the 50% burial or repeated burial treatments. Plant responses were determined by the instantaneous thickness of sediment of each time burial rather than by the total quantity of repeated burial. The growth of S. alterniflora was not shown to be dependent on specific types of sediment in sedimentation environment. In contrast to the unburied control, the proportion of primary tillers produced directly from initial individuals and the ratio between the aboveground and belowground biomass were greater under burial treatments. Seedlings produced more new vegetative propagules than vegetative offspring in all experimental treatments, and the former were apt to produce ramets from rhizomes rather than primary tillers. It is concluded that under various sedimentation environments, the clonal spread efficiency of seedlings was higher than that of vegetative offspring, and there is a

  4. CAPACIDAD ANTAGONISTA DE HONGOS CELULOLÍTICOS FRENTE A Fusarium sp. Y Macrophomina sp.

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    Néstor Leopoldo Tarazona Meza

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de esta investigación fue evaluar la capacidad antagónica de ocho hongos celulolíticos nativos frente a los hongos fitopatógenos Fusarium sp. y Macrophomina sp. En primera instancia se determinó la cepa promisoria del hongo celulolítico, para lo cual, en caja Petri se colocó un disco de agar de 4 mm de diámetro con micelio de una cepa antagonista y en el extremo opuesto, a una distancia de cinco centímetros aproximadamente, otro disco de 4 mm con micelio de un patógeno. La capacidad antagónica se determinó por el grado de micoparasitismo y la competencia por nutrientes y espacios, registrando el porcentaje de inhibición del crecimiento radial. Con la cepa del hongo celulolítico que tuvo el mejor comportamiento antagonista se realizó un cocultivo independiente con cada patógeno, aquí se evalúo las UFC, crecidas en medio PDA. También se inoculó junto a las cepas fitopatógenas en plantas de pimiento para conocer el nivel de antagonismo en macetas. En la evaluación cualitativa, la cepa A.O-5 mostró una invasión y esporulación total en la superficie en ambos patógenos; mientras que en el cocultivo inhibe el crecimiento de los patógenos a las 96 h. Igualmente demostró su acción antagonista frente a Fusarium y Macrophomina en las plántulas de pimiento. Por lo encontrado, se estima que la cepa A.O-5 es un potencial agente antagonista de los fitopatógenos evaluados.

  5. Propagule pressure-invasibility relationships: testing the influence of soil fertility and disturbance with Lespedeza cuneata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseman, Gregory R; Foster, Bryan L; Brassil, Chad E

    2014-02-01

    Although invasion risk is expected to increase with propagule pressure (PP), it is unclear whether PP-invasibility relationships follow an asymptotic or some other non-linear form and whether such relationships vary with underlying environmental conditions. Using manipulations of PP, soil fertility and disturbance, we tested how each influence PP-invasibility relationships for Lespedeza cuneata in a Kansas grassland and use recruitment curve models to determine how safe sites may contribute to plant invasions. After three growing seasons, we found that the PP-invasibility relationships best fit an asymptotic model of invasion reflecting a combination of density-independent and density-dependent processes and that seeds were aggregated within the plant community despite efforts to uniformly sow seeds. Consistent with some models, community invasibility decreased with enhanced soil fertility or reduced levels of disturbance in response to changes in the fraction of safe sites. Our results illustrate that disturbance and soil fertility can be a useful organizing principle for predicting community invasibility, asymptotic models are a reasonable starting point for modeling invasion, and new modeling techniques—coupled with classic experimental approaches—can enhance our understanding of the invasion process.

  6. Propagule pressure and climate contribute to the displacement of Linepithema humile by Pachycondyla chinensis.

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    Eleanor Spicer Rice

    Full Text Available Identifying mechanisms governing the establishment and spread of invasive species is a fundamental challenge in invasion biology. Because species invasions are frequently observed only after the species presents an environmental threat, research identifying the contributing agents to dispersal and subsequent spread are confined to retrograde observations. Here, we use a combination of seasonal surveys and experimental approaches to test the relative importance of behavioral and abiotic factors in determining the local co-occurrence of two invasive ant species, the established Argentine ant (Linepithema humile Mayr and the newly invasive Asian needle ant (Pachycondyla chinensis Emery. We show that the broader climatic envelope of P. chinensis enables it to establish earlier in the year than L. humile. We also demonstrate that increased P. chinensis propagule pressure during periods of L. humile scarcity contributes to successful P. chinensis early season establishment. Furthermore, we show that, although L. humile is the numerically superior and behaviorally dominant species at baits, P. chinensis is currently displacing L. humile across the invaded landscape. By identifying the features promoting the displacement of one invasive ant by another we can better understand both early determinants in the invasion process and factors limiting colony expansion and survival.

  7. Propagule pressure and climate contribute to the displacement of Linepithema humile by Pachycondyla chinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer Rice, Eleanor; Silverman, Jules

    2013-01-01

    Identifying mechanisms governing the establishment and spread of invasive species is a fundamental challenge in invasion biology. Because species invasions are frequently observed only after the species presents an environmental threat, research identifying the contributing agents to dispersal and subsequent spread are confined to retrograde observations. Here, we use a combination of seasonal surveys and experimental approaches to test the relative importance of behavioral and abiotic factors in determining the local co-occurrence of two invasive ant species, the established Argentine ant (Linepithema humile Mayr) and the newly invasive Asian needle ant (Pachycondyla chinensis Emery). We show that the broader climatic envelope of P. chinensis enables it to establish earlier in the year than L. humile. We also demonstrate that increased P. chinensis propagule pressure during periods of L. humile scarcity contributes to successful P. chinensis early season establishment. Furthermore, we show that, although L. humile is the numerically superior and behaviorally dominant species at baits, P. chinensis is currently displacing L. humile across the invaded landscape. By identifying the features promoting the displacement of one invasive ant by another we can better understand both early determinants in the invasion process and factors limiting colony expansion and survival.

  8. Genetic evidence for high propagule pressure and long-distance dispersal in monk parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus) invasive populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves da Silva, Anders; Eberhard, Jessica R; Wright, Timothy F; Avery, Michael L; Russello, Michael A

    2010-08-01

    The monk parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus) is a successful invasive species that does not exhibit life history traits typically associated with colonizing species (e.g., high reproductive rate or long-distance dispersal capacity). To investigate this apparent paradox, we examined individual and population genetic patterns of microsatellite loci at one native and two invasive sites. More specifically, we aimed at evaluating the role of propagule pressure, sexual monogamy and long-distance dispersal in monk parakeet invasion success. Our results indicate little loss of genetic variation at invasive sites relative to the native site. We also found strong evidence for sexual monogamy from patterns of relatedness within sites, and no definite cases of extra-pair paternity in either the native site sample or the examined invasive site. Taken together, these patterns directly and indirectly suggest that high propagule pressure has contributed to monk parakeet invasion success. In addition, we found evidence for frequent long-distance dispersal at an invasive site (approximately 100 km) that sharply contrasted with previous estimates of smaller dispersal distance made in the native range (approximately 2 km), suggesting long-range dispersal also contributes to the species' spread within the United States. Overall, these results add to a growing body of literature pointing to the important role of propagule pressure in determining, and thus predicting, invasion success, especially for species whose life history traits are not typically associated with invasiveness.

  9. Naturalization of central European plants in North America: species traits, habitats, propagule pressure, residence time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyšek, Petr; Manceur, Ameur M; Alba, Christina; McGregor, Kirsty F; Pergl, Jan; Stajerová, Katerina; Chytrý, Milan; Danihelka, Jiří; Kartesz, John; Klimesova, Jitka; Lucanova, Magdalena; Moravcová, Lenka; Nishino, Misako; Sadlo, Jiri; Suda, Jan; Tichy, Lubomir; Kühn, Ingolf

    2015-03-01

    The factors that promote invasive behavior in introduced plant species occur across many scales of biological and ecological organization. Factors that act at relatively small scales, for example, the evolution of biological traits associated with invasiveness, scale up to shape species distributions among different climates and habitats, as well as other characteristics linked to invasion, such as attractiveness for cultivation (and by extension propagule pressure). To identify drivers of invasion it is therefore necessary to disentangle the contribution of multiple factors that are interdependent. To this end, we formulated a conceptual model describing the process of invasion of central European species into North America based on a sequence of "drivers." We then used confirmatory path analysis to test whether the conceptual model is supported by a statistical model inferred from a comprehensive database containing 466 species. The path analysis revealed that naturalization of central European plants in North America, in terms of the number of North American regions invaded, most strongly depends on residence time in the invaded range and the number of habitats occupied by species in their native range. In addition to the confirmatory path analysis, we identified the effects of various biological traits on several important drivers of the conceptualized invasion process. The data supported a model that included indirect effects of biological traits on invasion via their effect on the number of native range habitats occupied and cultivation in the native range. For example, persistent seed banks and longer flowering periods are positively correlated with number of native habitats, while a stress-tolerant life strategy is negatively correlated with native range cultivation. However, the importance of the biological traits is nearly an order of magnitude less than that of the larger scale drivers and highly dependent on the invasion stage (traits were associated

  10. Invasibility of a nutrient-poor pasture through resident and non-resident herbs is controlled by litter, gap size and propagule pressure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Lutz Eckstein

    Full Text Available Since inference concerning the relative effects of propagule pressure, biotic interactions, site conditions and species traits on the invasibility of plant communities is limited, we carried out a field experiment to study the role of these factors for absolute and relative seedling emergence in three resident and three non-resident confamilial herb species on a nutrient-poor temperate pasture. We set up a factorial field experiment with two levels each of the factors litter cover (0 and 400 g m(-2, gap size (0.01 and 0.1 m(2 and propagule pressure (5 and 50 seeds and documented soil temperature, soil water content and relative light availability. Recruitment was recorded in spring and autumn 2010 and in spring 2011 to cover initial seedling emergence, establishment after summer drought and final establishment after the first winter. Litter alleviated temperature and moisture conditions and had positive effects on proportional and absolute seedling emergence during all phases of recruitment. Large gaps presented competition-free space with high light availability but showed higher temperature amplitudes and lower soil moisture. Proportional and absolute seedling recruitment was significantly higher in large than in small gaps. In contrast, propagule pressure facilitated absolute seedling emergence but had no effects on proportional emergence or the chance for successful colonisation. Despite significantly higher initial seedling emergence of resident than non-resident species, seed mass and other species-specific traits may be better predictors for idiosyncratic variation in seedling establishment than status. Our data support the fluctuating resource hypothesis and demonstrate that the reserve effect of seeds may facilitate seedling emergence. The direct comparison of propagule pressure with other environmental factors showed that propagule pressure affects absolute seedling abundance, which may be crucial for species that depend on other

  11. Virulence testing and extracellular subtilisin-like (Pr1) and trypsin-like (Pr2) activity during propagule production of Paecilomyces fumosoroseus isolates from whiteflies (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos-Moguel, Judith; González-Barajas, Margarita; Mier, Teresa; Reyes-Montes, María Del Rocío; Aranda, Eduardo; Toriello, Conchita

    2007-03-01

    To properly characterize several isolates of Paecilomyces fumosoroseus, a fungal entomopathogen of whiteflies (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) and other insect pests for biocontrol purposes, virulence towards Trialeurodes vaporariorum, and subtilisin-like (Pr1) and trypsin-like (Pr2) protease activity during propagule production were investigated in monospore cultures (MCs). The virulence of three MCs towards second instar whiteflies was measured and expressed as lethal median concentration (LC50). Number and widthlength ratio of propagules (blastospores, hyphal bodies, short hyphae, submerged conidia) and extracellular proteolytic activity was determined simultaneously in liquid medium. Total protease activity was assayed with azocasein, Pr1 and Pr2 activity was determined with the substrates N-Succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide and N-Benzoyl-Phe-Val-Arg-pnitroanilide, respectively. Natural variability in virulence, propagule production and cuticle-degrading proteases among isolates was observed. Bioassays showed a LC50 of 1.1 x 1,000, 2.5 x 10,000 and 7.6 x 10,000 conidia/ml for MCs EH-506/3, EH-503/3 and EH-520/3, respectively, EH-506/3 being the most virulent isolate. Isolate EH-503/3 produced the highest yield of propagules (7.7 x 10000000 propagules/ml), followed by EH-520/3 with 6.4 x 10000000 and EH-506/3 with 1.0 x 10000000 propagules/ml. Subtilisin-like (Pr1) and trypsin-like (Pr2) activity was present in the three MCs. Subtilisin-like (Pr1) activity was highest (745.7 UPr1/ml at 120 h) in the most virulent isolate, EH-506/3, pointing at Pr1 as a phenotypic marker of virulence for P. fumosoroseus. EH-506/3 appears to be a good candidate for whitefly biocontrol due to its high virulence, Pr1 concentration and rapid transition to blastospores in submerged liquid medium.

  12. The current situations of green macroalgae and micro-propagules inPyropia aquaculture of the Subei Shoal in spring of 2013

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiangqing; WANG Zongling; FAN Shiliang; XIAO Jie; LI Yan; ZHANG Xuelei; LI Ruixiang; WANG Xiaona

    2016-01-01

    To discover the distribution of green algal micro-propagules in the Subei Shoal and clarify the growth of green macroalgae attached onPyropia aquaculture rafts, an integrated investigation inPyropia aquaculture area and one cruise in the coastal area of the Subei Shoal were carried out from March to May in 2013. The results showed that green algal micro-propagules were discovered in seawater and sediment during March to May. The average quantity of micro-propagules was 267 ind./L in surface seawater and 43 ind./g in sediment. The biomass of attached green macroalgae increased inPyropia aquaculture from March to May. Three species, includingUlva prolifera, Ulva linza andBlidingia sp. were found inPyropia aquaculture rafts. The dominant specie wasBlidingia sp. and the second wasU. prolifera in spring. This study indicated that the micro-propagules and macroalgae were existed in the coastal area of the Subei Shoal at the early stage of green tide. This was the key point to the governance of green tide in China.

  13. Removal of oseltamivir (Tamiflu) and other selected pharmaceuticals from wastewater using a granular bioplastic formulation entrapping propagules of Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accinelli, Cesare; Saccà, Maria Ludovica; Batisson, Isabelle; Fick, Jerker; Mencarelli, Mariangela; Grabic, Roman

    2010-09-01

    The capacity of the ligninolytic fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium to degrade a wide variety of environmentally persistent xenobiotics has been largely reported in the literature. Beside other factors, one barrier to a wider use of this bioremediation fungus is the availability of effective formulations that ensure easy preparation, handling and application. In this series of laboratory experiments, we evaluated the efficiency of a granular bioplastic formulation entrapping propagules of P. chrysosporium for removal of four selected pharmaceuticals from wastewater samples. Addition of inoculated granules to samples of the wastewater treatment plant of Bologna significantly increased the removal of the antiviral drug oseltamivir (Tamiflu), and the antibiotics, erythromycin, sulfamethoxazol, and ciprofloxacin. Similar effects were also observed in effluent water. Oseltamivir was the most persistent of the four active substances. After 30d of incubation, approximately two times more oseltamivir was removed in bioremediated wastewater than controls. The highest removal efficiency of the bioplastic formulation was observed with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin. Microbiological DNA-based analysis showed that the bioplastic matrix supported the growth of P. chrysosporium, thus facilitating its adaptation to unusual environment such as wastewater.

  14. Frankia and Alnus rubra canopy roots: an assessment of genetic diversity, propagule availability, and effects on soil nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Peter G; Schouboe, Jesse L; Rogers, Rachel H; Weber, Marjorie G; Nadkarni, Nalini M

    2010-02-01

    The ecological importance of microbial symbioses in terrestrial soils is widely recognized, but their role in soils that accumulate in forest canopies is almost entirely unknown. To address this gap, this study investigated the Frankia-Alnus rubra symbiosis in canopy and forest floor roots at Olympic National Park, WA, USA. Sixteen mature A. rubra trees were surveyed and Frankia genetic diversity in canopy and forest floor nodules was assessed with sequence-based nifH analyses. A seedling bioassay experiment was conducted to determine Frankia propagule availability in canopy and forest floor soils. Total soil nitrogen from both environments was also quantified. Nodules were present in the canopies of nine of the 16 trees sampled. Across the study area, Frankia canopy and forest floor assemblages were similar, with both habitats containing the same two genotypes. The composition of forest floor and canopy genotypes on the same tree was not always identical, however, suggesting that dispersal was not a strictly local phenomenon. Frankia seedling colonization was similar in canopy soils regardless of the presence of nodules as well as in forest floor soils, indicating that dispersal was not likely to be a major limiting factor. The total soil nitrogen of canopy soils was higher than that of forest floor soils, but the presence of Frankia nodules in canopy soils did not significantly alter soil nitrogen levels. Overall, this study indicates that the Frankia-A. rubra symbiosis is similar in canopy and forest floor environments. Because canopy roots are exposed to different environmental conditions within very small spatial areas and because those areas can be easily manipulated (e.g., fertilizer or watering treatments), they present microbial ecologists with a unique arena to examine root-microbe interactions.

  15. Analysis and simulation of propagule dispersal and salinity intrusion from storm surge on the movement of a marsh–mangrove ecotone in South Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiang; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Anderson, Gordon H.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Coastal mangrove–freshwater marsh ecotones of the Everglades represent transitions between marine salt-tolerant halophytic and freshwater salt-intolerant glycophytic communities. It is hypothesized here that a self-reinforcing feedback, termed a “vegetation switch,” between vegetation and soil salinity, helps maintain the sharp mangrove–marsh ecotone. A general theoretical implication of the switch mechanism is that the ecotone will be stable to small disturbances but vulnerable to rapid regime shifts from large disturbances, such as storm surges, which could cause large spatial displacements of the ecotone. We develop a simulation model to describe the vegetation switch mechanism. The model couples vegetation dynamics and hydrologic processes. The key factors in the model are the amount of salt-water intrusion into the freshwater wetland and the passive transport of mangrove (e.g., Rhizophora mangle) viviparous seeds or propagules. Results from the model simulations indicate that a regime shift from freshwater marsh to mangroves is sensitive to the duration of soil salinization through storm surge overwash and to the density of mangrove propagules or seedlings transported into the marsh. We parameterized our model with empirical hydrologic data collected from the period 2000–2010 at one mangrove–marsh ecotone location in southwestern Florida to forecast possible long-term effects of Hurricane Wilma (24 October 2005). The model indicated that the effects of that storm surge were too weak to trigger a regime shift at the sites we studied, 50 km south of the Hurricane Wilma eyewall, but simulations with more severe artificial disturbances were capable of causing substantial regime shifts.

  16. Understanding the biological invasion risk posed by the global wildlife trade: propagule pressure drives the introduction and establishment of Nearctic turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Díaz, Pablo; Ross, Joshua V; Ayres, César; Cassey, Phillip

    2015-03-01

    Biological invasions are a key component of human-induced global change. The continuing increase in global wildlife trade has raised concerns about the parallel increase in the number of new invasive species. However, the factors that link the wildlife trade to the biological invasion process are still poorly understood. Moreover, there are analytical challenges in researching the role of global wildlife trade in biological invasions, particularly issues related to the under-reporting of introduced and established populations in areas with reduced sampling effort. In this work, we use high-quality data on the international trade in Nearctic turtles (1999-2009) coupled with a statistical modelling framework, which explicitly accounts for detection, to investigate the factors that influence the introduction (release, or escape into the wild) of globally traded Nearctic turtles and the establishment success (self-sustaining exotic populations) of slider turtles (Trachemys scripta), the most frequently traded turtle species. We found that the introduction of a species was influenced by the total number of turtles exported to a jurisdiction and the age at maturity of the species, while the establishment success of slider turtles was best associated with the propagule number (number of release events), and the number of native turtles in the jurisdiction of introduction. These results indicate both a direct and indirect association between the wildlife trade and the introduction of turtles and establishment success of slider turtles, respectively. Our results highlight the existence of gaps in the number of globally recorded introduction events and established populations of slider turtles, although the expected bias is low. We emphasize the importance of researching independently the factors that affect the different stages of the invasion pathway. Critically, we observe that the number of traded individuals might not always be an adequate proxy for propagule pressure

  17. Temporal Genetic Variance and Propagule-Driven Genetic Structure Characterize Naturalized Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) from a Patagonian Lake Impacted by Trout Farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeb, Lisa W.; Seeb, James E.; Arismendi, Ivan; Hernández, Cristián E.; Gajardo, Gonzalo; Galleguillos, Ricardo; Cádiz, Maria I.; Musleh, Selim S.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about the genetic underpinnings of invasions—a theme addressed by invasion genetics as a discipline—is still scarce amid well documented ecological impacts of non-native species on ecosystems of Patagonia in South America. One of the most invasive species in Patagonia’s freshwater systems and elsewhere is rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). This species was introduced to Chile during the early twentieth century for stocking and promoting recreational fishing; during the late twentieth century was reintroduced for farming purposes and is now naturalized. We used population- and individual-based inference from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to illuminate three objectives related to the establishment and naturalization of Rainbow Trout in Lake Llanquihue. This lake has been intensively used for trout farming during the last three decades. Our results emanate from samples collected from five inlet streams over two seasons, winter and spring. First, we found that significant intra- population (temporal) genetic variance was greater than inter-population (spatial) genetic variance, downplaying the importance of spatial divergence during the process of naturalization. Allele frequency differences between cohorts, consistent with variation in fish length between spring and winter collections, might explain temporal genetic differences. Second, individual-based Bayesian clustering suggested that genetic structure within Lake Llanquihue was largely driven by putative farm propagules found at one single stream during spring, but not in winter. This suggests that farm broodstock might migrate upstream to breed during spring at that particular stream. It is unclear whether interbreeding has occurred between “pure” naturalized and farm trout in this and other streams. Third, estimates of the annual number of breeders (Nb) were below 73 in half of the collections, suggestive of genetically small and recently founded populations that might experience

  18. Experimental tests of priority effects and light availability on relative performance of Myriophyllum spicatum and Elodea nuttallii propagules in artificial stream channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily P Zefferman

    Full Text Available Submersed macrophytes have important ecological functions in many streams, but fostering growth of beneficial native species while suppressing weedy invasives may be challenging. Two approaches commonly used in management of terrestrial plant communities may be useful in this context: (1 altering resource availability and (2 establishing desirable species before weeds can invade (priority effects. However, these approaches are rarely used in aquatic systems, despite widespread need for sustainable solutions to aquatic weed problems. In artificial stream channels in California, USA, I conducted experiments with asexual propagules of non-native invasive Myriophyllum spicatum (Eurasian watermilfoil and native Elodea nuttallii (western waterweed to address the questions: (1 How does light availability affect relative performance of the two species?; (2 Does planting the native earlier than the invasive decrease survival or growth rate of the invasive?; and (3 Do light level and priority effects interact? The relative performance between E. nuttallii and M. spicatum had an interesting and unexpected pattern: M. spicatum had higher growth rates than E. nuttallii in the zero and medium shade levels, but had similar performance in the low and high shade levels. This pattern is most likely the result of E. nutallii's sensitivity to both very low and very high light, and M. spicatum's sensitivity to very low light only. Native priority did not significantly affect growth rate or survival of M. spicatum, possibly because of unexpectedly poor growth of the E. nuttallii planted early. This study suggests that altering light levels could be effective in reducing growth of an invasive macrophyte, and for changing the competitive balance between a native and a non-native species in the establishment phase. Further investigations into the use of priority effects and resource alteration for submersed macrophyte management are warranted, given their mixed results

  19. Experimental Tests of Priority Effects and Light Availability on Relative Performance of Myriophyllum spicatum and Elodea nuttallii Propagules in Artificial Stream Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zefferman, Emily P.

    2015-01-01

    Submersed macrophytes have important ecological functions in many streams, but fostering growth of beneficial native species while suppressing weedy invasives may be challenging. Two approaches commonly used in management of terrestrial plant communities may be useful in this context: (1) altering resource availability and (2) establishing desirable species before weeds can invade (priority effects). However, these approaches are rarely used in aquatic systems, despite widespread need for sustainable solutions to aquatic weed problems. In artificial stream channels in California, USA, I conducted experiments with asexual propagules of non-native invasive Myriophyllum spicatum (Eurasian watermilfoil) and native Elodea nuttallii (western waterweed) to address the questions: (1) How does light availability affect relative performance of the two species?; (2) Does planting the native earlier than the invasive decrease survival or growth rate of the invasive?; and (3) Do light level and priority effects interact? The relative performance between E. nuttallii and M. spicatum had an interesting and unexpected pattern: M. spicatum had higher growth rates than E. nuttallii in the zero and medium shade levels, but had similar performance in the low and high shade levels. This pattern is most likely the result of E. nutallii’s sensitivity to both very low and very high light, and M. spicatum’s sensitivity to very low light only. Native priority did not significantly affect growth rate or survival of M. spicatum, possibly because of unexpectedly poor growth of the E. nuttallii planted early. This study suggests that altering light levels could be effective in reducing growth of an invasive macrophyte, and for changing the competitive balance between a native and a non-native species in the establishment phase. Further investigations into the use of priority effects and resource alteration for submersed macrophyte management are warranted, given their mixed results in other

  20. Influence of simulated acidic rain on root-infecting fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafer, S.R.

    1983-01-01

    Influences of the acidity of simulated rain on root-infecting fungi were investigated. Effects of rain acidity on Phytophthora cinnamomi were studied. Propagule densities in soil depended upon the acidity (pH 5.6, 4.0, 3.2, or 2.4) of simulated rain and soil depth (1, 2, 4, or 8 cm). Lowest densities occurred in 1 to 2 cm soil layers exposed to rains at pH 3.2 or 2.4. Sporangium production on radicles of Lupinus angustifolius in Lakeland sand moistened with rain solution at pH 2.4 was 47% less than production with solution at pH 5.6. A linear response to solution acidity was exhibited. Infection of L. angustifolius roots by zoospores demonstrated a linear response to acidity of rain. Approximately 44% fewer lesions occurred on roots of seedlings exposed to rain at pH 2.4 than on roots of seedlings exposed to rain at pH 5.6. The acidity (pH 5.6, 4.0, 3.2, or 2.4) of repeated rains had no consistent effect on disease progress among L. augustifolius seedlings planted in infested soil. The formation of ectomycorrhizae on Pinus taeda seedlings exhibited a quadratic response to acidity of repeated rains. The percentage of short roots that were ectomycorrhizal was greatest among seedlings exposed to rains at pH 2.4 and least among seedlings exposed to rains at pH 4.0. The density of Macrophomina phaseolina propagules in Lakeland sand exposed to repeated rains at pH 2.4 was an average of 20% less than densities associated with rains at pH 5.6, 4.0, or 3.2.

  1. Advancing our understanding of charcoal rot in soybeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcoal rot (Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid ) of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], is an important but commonly misidentified disease, and very few summary articles exist on this pathosystem. Research conducted over the last 10 years has improved our understanding of the environment conducive...

  2. Working with anaerobic soil disinfestation for control of key soil-borne pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) has been shown to be effective in reducing Verticillium dahliae in soil and to be able to provide marketable fruit yields compatible to fumigation in California strawberry systems. However the effect of ASD on charcoal rot caused by Macrophomina phaseolina in Cali...

  3. Identification of diverse mycoviruses through metatranscriptomics characterization of the viromes of five major fungal plant pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infection of plant pathogenic fungi by mycoviruses can attenuate their virulence on plants and vigor in culture. In this study, we described the viromes of 275 isolates of five widely dispersed plant pathogenic fungal species (Colletotrichum truncatum, Macrophomina phaseolina, Phomopsis longicolla, ...

  4. Increases in snap bean and soybean seedling diseases associated with a chloride salt and changes in the micro-partitioning of tap root calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a series of field experiments from 1995 through 2010, the incidence of seedling diseases of snap bean and soybean caused by Rhizoctonia solani, Macrophomina phaseolina, Pythium spp., and Fusarium spp. was greater with an application of KCl than with K2SO4 applied at 93 kg K/ha. To determine if th...

  5. Evaluation of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) response to charcoal rot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcoal rot in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), caused by Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Gold. (Mph), is an endemic disease in the prevailing hot and dry conditions in southern Puerto Rico. This study evaluated the 120 bean genotypes that compose the BASE 120 panel under screenhouse conditio...

  6. Evaluation of soybean genotypes for resistance to charcoal rot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcoal rot caused by Macrophomina phaseolina causes more yield loss in soybean than most other diseases in the southern U.S.A. There are no commercial genotypes marketed as resistant to charcoal rot of soybean. Reactions of 27 maturity group (MG) III, 29 Early MG IV, 34 Late MG IV, and 59 MG V gen...

  7. Seasonal progress of charcoal rot and its impact on soybean productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of charcoal rot caused by Macrophomina phaseolina on yield of soybean were evaluated in the field using two genotypes each in maturity groups III and IV. Four separate experiments were established in an area of a field fumigated with methyl bromide. The experiments were: 1) artificiall...

  8. Anaerobic soil disinfestation disease control performance in strawberry as influenced by environmental variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustainability of the California strawberry industry is challenged by soil-borne diseases caused by Fusarium oxysporum (Fo), Macrophomina phaseolina (Mp) and Verticillium dahliae (Vd). Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) has been studied as a non-fumigant measure for control of these diseases. This ...

  9. Banks of microscopic forms and survival to darkness of propagules and microscopic stages of macroalgae Bancos de formas microscópicas y supervivencia a la oscuridad de propágulos y formas microscópicas de macroalgas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BERNABÉ SANTELICES

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have found that the number of species conforming a bank of microscopic forms in tide pools in central Chile accounted only for half the number of species present in the macroscopic vegetation around the pools. An elemental condition for survival in these banks is the ability of microscopic forms to tolerate darkness or very low irradiances for extended periods. To test this ability, spores of 17 green, brown and red algal species, present and absent from the bank, were incubated at different combinations of irradiances and day lengths. Propagules of 47 % of the species tested (eight species germinated in total darkness while the propagules of the other nine species germinated under conditions of very low irradiance (2-10 µmol m-2 s-1. In most species, microforms showed a higher tolerance to darkness than the propagules. Some survived for over a year and one species (Gelidium lingulatum could live under complete darkness for 500 days. The ability to survive in total darkness did not relate to presence or absence of a species in the banks of microscopic forms previously studied, to phylogenetic relatedness, life history style, propagule size, morphology of microscopic forms or to successional status (fugitive versus late successional. Thus, tolerance to darkness appears to be common to propagules and microscopic stages of most benthic algae. The growth patterns exhibited by the microforms of Lessonia nigrescens, Chaetomorpha firma and Glossophora kunthii suggest high irradiances on these recruits might determine the shallower limits of distribution of these speciesEstudios previos han encontrado que el número de especies formando un banco de formas microscópicas en pozas de mareas de Chile central incluyó sólo la mitad del número de especies presentes en la vegetación macroscópica en las cercanías de las pozas intermareales. Una primera condición para sobrevivir en estos bancos radica en la capacidad de las formas

  10. Propagules removal in fragments of native forest and in reforested areas in an Araucaria Forest region of Paraná State Remoção de propágulos em fragmento de floresta nativa e reflorestamentos numa região de Floresta Ombrófila Mista do estado do Paraná

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Rafael Bovolenta

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A question that has been discussed is the role that reforestations with exotic species in native fauna and several studies have shown that removal of propagules is lower in these environments. This study compared the removal rate of propagules (araucaria seeds, peanuts, corn from areas of native forest (FN, reforestations of Pinus taeda L. (RP, Eucalyptus saligna Sm. (RE and Araucaria angustifolia (Bertol Kuntze (RA. In FN all propagules were removed. There was no difference in the removal of araucaria seeds between FN and RA, and removal rate in both areas differ from the removal rate in the RP and RE. In RP there was high removal of peanuts, while the RE showed the lowest value of removal of the three propagules. The low removal rates in reforestation of pine and eucalyptus reflect the decreased exploitation of these habitats for wildlife, which may be related to a poorly structured understory. Uma questão que tem sido discutida é o papel das monoculturas florestais exóticas na manutenção da fauna nativa e vários estudos têm mostrado que a remoção de propágulos é menor nesses ambientes. O presente trabalho comparou a taxa de remoção de propágulos (pinhão, amendoim, milho entre áreas de Floresta Nativa (FN, Reflorestamentos de Pinus taeda L. (RP, de Eucalyptus saligna Sm. (RE e Araucaria angustifolia (Bertol Kuntze (RA. Na FN, todos os propágulos foram removidos e não houve diferença significativa na remoção de pinhão entre a FN e o RA. A remoção de propágulos nessas áreas diferiu da remoção no RP e RE. No RP, houve alta remoção de amendoim, enquanto que o RE apresentou os menores valores de remoção dos três propágulos. As baixas taxas de remoção nos reflorestamentos de pinus e eucalipto refletem a menor exploração desses habitas pela fauna, o que pode estar relacionado com um subosque pouco estruturado.

  11. Greenhouse evaluation of rhizobia as biocontrol agent of root-infecting fungi in okra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Siddiqui

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Nine rhizobial strains isolated from the root nodules of Cicer arietinum, Vigna radiata, V. mungo, Samania saman, Sesbania sesban, Leucinia sp., Prosopis cineraria and Medicago sativa were used to study their effects on root-infecting fungi viz., Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium solani and Rhizoctonia solani. In dual culture plate assay, strains of Bradyrhizobium sp., and R. meliloti were found to inhibit radial growth of M. phaseolina, F. solani and R. solani producing zones of inhibition. Bradyrhizobium sp., and R. meliloti either used as seed dressing or as soil drench significantly suppressed root-rot infection caused by M. phaseolina, F. solani and R. solani in okra, a non-1eguminous crop under greenhouse conditions. Biomass of plants was also higher in the presence of rhizobia.

  12. Isolation and identification of allelochemicals produced by B. sonorensis for suppression of charcoal rot of Arachis hypogaea L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Urja; Saraf, Meenu

    2015-05-01

    Bacillus sonorensis MBCU2 isolated from vermicompost-amended soil from Gujarat, India showed most antagonistic activity against Macrophomina phaseolina by dual culture screening. The culture supernatant of MBCU2 completely suppressed the mycelia growth of pathogen, indicating that suppression was due to the presence of allelochemicals in the culture filtrate. Results of scanning electron microscopy revealed that MBCU2 caused morphological alteration in mycelia of M. phaseolina as evident by hyphal lysis and perforation. Lipopeptides (iturin A and surfactin) produced by MBCU2 were detected and identified by MALDI-TOF-MS as well as liquid chromatography coupled with ESI-MS/MS. Pot trial studies conducted by seed bacterization with MBCU2 resulted in statistically significant increase in Arachis hypogaea L. vegetative growth parameters such as root length (91%), shoot length (252%), fresh weight (71%), dry weight (57%), number of pod (128%), and number of seed (290%) in M. phaseolina infested soil over control as well as decreased M. phaseolina disease severity. We suggest that allelochemicals production can be linked to the mechanism of protection of A. hypogaea L. from M. phaseolina by B. sonorensis MBCU2. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Propágulos de fungos micorrízicos arbusculares em solos deficientes em fósforo sob diferentes usos, da região semi-arida no nordeste do Brasil Propagules of arbuscular mycorrhizae in p-deficient soils under different land uses, in semi-arid NE Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Lúcia Félix de Aguiar Lima

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available A conversão de áreas de caatinga em agricultura e pecuária de subsistência é uma das características marcantes da região semi-árida do Nordeste do Brasil. O presente estudo investigou o efeito dessa conversão sobre os propágulos de fungos micorrízicos arbusculares (FMA em 10 locais diferentes, distribuídos nos Estados da Paraíba e de Pernambuco. Cada local consistiu de uma área de vegetação nativa (caatinga contígua com uma área cultivada, na mesma posição de encosta. Amostras de solo foram coletadas a intervalos de 20-30 m, nas profundidades de 0-7,5 e 7,5-15 cm (10 locais x 2 usos do solo x 2 profundidades com 4 pontos amostrais ao longo de uma transecção que cruzava as áreas contíguas. As raízes (The conversion of tropical dry forest into areas used for subsistence agriculture or livestock production is a common feature of the semi-arid region of NE Brazil. Our study looked into the effect of these land use changes on propagules of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF at ten sites distributed in the states of Paraíba and Pernambuco. Each site consisted of an area under native vegetation (Dry-Forest adjacent to a cultivated area in the same slope position. Soil samples were taken at distance intervals of 20-30 m from two depths (0-7.5 and 7.5-15 cm along a transect crossing the adjacent areas (10 sites x 2 land uses x 2 depths x 4 sampling points. Roots (< 2 mm found in the soil samples (n = 160 were stained with trypan blue to assess the percentage of AMF colonization as well as the type of fungal structures. The AMF spores were separated from soil by wet sieving, incubated in iodonitrotetrazolium chloride (INT solution and counted; those stained with INT were considered viable. Soil samples were analyzed for resin-extractable P and total organic carbon (TOC. For data analysis, the 10 areas under dry forest were separated in two sub-groups: Undisturbed-Dry-Forest (UDF, n = 6 and Disturbed-Dry-Forest (DDF, n = 4, owing

  14. La marchitez tardía del maíz (Zea mays L.) causada por Cephalosporium maydis en la Península Ibérica, y otros hongos asociados

    OpenAIRE

    Carmen Maria Ortiz-Bustos; García-Carneros, Ana B.; Leire Molinero-Ruiz

    2015-01-01

    Las especies de hongos de suelo asociadas a Cephalosporium maydis como agente causal de la marchitez tardía del maíz en la Península Ibérica se identificaron muestreando 19 campos con síntomas de marchitez en las principales zonas de cultivo entre 2011 y 2012. En el 47% de los campos no se identificó C. maydis, pero sí Fusarium graminearum, F. verticillioides, F. equiseti, F. proliferatum, Macrophomina phaseolina, Rhizoctonia solani y Trichoderma harzianum infectando las plantas de maíz. En l...

  15. Tree planters` notes, Volume 45, Number 3, Summer 1994. Quarterly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangold, R.; Nisley, R.

    1995-07-01

    ;Tables of Contents: Comments: Let`s Hear From You; Technical Tips: The Effect of Containerless Transportation on Desert Shrubs; Nantucket Pine Tip Moth Infests Longleaf Pine Seedlings in a North Carolina Nursery; Insects and Diseases of Oak Seedlings Grown in Tree Shelters; Peer-Reviewed and Refereed Articles: An Evaluation of Dazomet and Metam-Sodium Soil Fumigants for Control of Macrophomina phaseolina in a Florida Nursery; Sprouting and Growth of Paulownia tomentosa Root Cuttings; Fungicide Treatment Increases Sprouting Percent and Sprout Growth for Paulownia tomentosa Root Cuttings; Atlantic White-Cedar Propagation by Seed and Cuttings in New Jersey.

  16. Effect of ageing on survival of benthic diatom propagules

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anil, A.C.; Mitbavkar, S.; DeSilva, M.S.; Hegde, S.; DeCosta, P.M.; Meher, S.S.; Banerjee, D.

    for conservation of diatom and dinoflagellate resting stages in Kolj? Fjord (McQuoid et al., 2002). However, the present study area is an intertidal sandflat with minimum chances of anoxic zones occurring in sediment. Thus a minimum amount of metabolic activity... unfavorable for vegetative growth, many diatoms form resting stages to survive cell degradation or death (Anderson, 1975; Malone, 1980; Hargraves and French, 1983; Fryxell, 1990). Various external factors like availability of nutrients (N, P, Fe, Si...

  17. Stable carbon isotope changes during artificial charring of propagules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poole, I.J.; Braadbaart, F.; Boon, J.J.; Bergen, P.F. van

    2002-01-01

    Charred organic remains are ubiquitous in the archaeological and fossil record and are often used to interpret past environments and climate. This study focuses on the physical and chemical alteration that takes place during heating (i.e. charring). Modifications to the internal and external morphol

  18. Yield and nutritive components of taro as a function of propagule type in a hydromorfic soil of South Mato Grosso Pantanal/ Produção e composição nutritiva de taro em função do propágulo, em solo hidromórfico do Pantanal Sul-Mato-Grossense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Aiko Hiane

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine yield and nutritive components of taro rhizomes in hydromorfic soil conditions of South Mato Grosso Pantanal. Chinês and Macaquinho taros were evaluated. They were propagated by rhizomes of big and small classes, as whole and half types, arranged as 2 x 2 x 2 factorial scheme in randomized block experimental design, with four replications. Final population, plant height and fresh mass of leaves and of corms of Chinês taro were significantly superior than ‘Macaquinho’. Regarding to propagule classes used for propagation, big rhizome was the best. The use of whole rhizomes was significantly better than cut rhizomes regarding to final population and yield of fresh mass of corms (RM and it was similar for plant height and yield of fresh mass of leaves and of cormels (RF. In relation to nutritive compound of rhizomes, RM and RF had contents which were characteristics of the clone. RM and RF of both two clones showed higher contents of fix mineral residue, proteins and carbohydrates and they have smaller contents of lipids and of fibers, as well of total caloric value, than of corn. RM and RF of both two clones had smaller contents of lipids, carbohydrates and TCV in relation to wheat flour.O objetivo do trabalho foi determinar a produtividade e a composição nutritiva dos rizomas de taro, em condições de solo hidromórfico do pantanal sul-mato-grossense. Foram avaliados os taros Chinês e Macaquinho, propagados por rizomas das classes grande e pequena, como tipos inteiros e cortados no meio, arranjados em esquema fatorial 2x2x2, no delineamento experimental de blocos casualizados, com quatro repetições. A população final, altura das plantas e massa fresca das folhas e dos rizomas-mãe do taro Chinês foi significativamente superior à do Macaquinho. Quanto às classes de propágulos utilizados para a propagação, foi melhor o uso de rizomas grandes. O uso de rizomas inteiros foi

  19. Synthesis of chitosan based nanoparticles and their in vitro evaluation against phytopathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saharan, Vinod; Mehrotra, Akanksha; Khatik, Rajesh; Rawal, Pokhar; Sharma, S S; Pal, Ajay

    2013-11-01

    The main aim of present study was to prepare chitosan, chitosan-saponin and Cu-chitosan nanoparticles to evaluate their in vitro antifungal activities. Various nanoparticles were prepared using ionic gelation method by interaction of chitosan, sodium tripolyphosphate, saponin and Cu ions. Their particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential and structures were confirmed by DLS, FTIR, TEM and SEM. The antifungal properties of nanoparticles against phytopathogenic fungi namely Alternaria alternata, Macrophomina phaseolina and Rhizoctonia solani were investigated at various concentrations ranging from 0.001 to 0.1%. Among the various formulations of nanoparticles, Cu-chitosan nanoparticles were found most effective at 0.1% concentration and showed 89.5, 63.0 and 60.1% growth inhibition of A. alternata, M. phaseolina and R. solani, respectively in in vitro model. At the same concentration, Cu-chitosan nanoparticles also showed maximum of 87.4% inhibition rate of spore germination of A. alternata. Chitosan nanoparticles showed the maximum growth inhibitory effects (87.6%) on in vitro mycelial growth of M. phaseolina at 0.1% concentration. From our study it is evident that chitosan based nanoparticles particularly chitosan and Cu-chitosan nanoparticles have tremendous potential for further field screening towards crop protection.

  20. Arbuscular mycorrhiza detoxifying response against arsenic and pathogenic fungus in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnoletti, Federico N; Balestrasse, Karina; Lavado, Raúl S; Giacometti, Romina

    2016-11-01

    Uptake of Arsenic (As) in plant tissues can affect metabolism, causing physiological disorders, even death. As toxicity, but also pathogen infections trigger a generalised stress response called oxidative stress; however knowledge on the response of soybean (Glycine max L.) under multiple stressors is limited so far. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) enhance the tolerance of host plants to abiotic and biotic stress. Thus, we investigated the effects of the AMF Rhizophagus intraradices on soybean grown in As-contaminated soils as well as in the presence of the pathogen Macrophomina phaseolina (charcoal rot of the stem). Plant parameters and degree of mycorrhizal colonization under the different assessed treatments were analyzed. Content of As in roots and leaves was quantified. Increasing As level in the soil stopped plant growth, but promoted plant As uptake. Inoculation of soybean plants with M. phaseolina accentuated As effect at all physiological levels. In the presence of mycorrhizal symbiosis biomass dramatically increased, and significantly reduced the As concentration in plant tissues. Mycorrhization decreased oxidative damage in the presence of both As and the pathogen. Furthermore, transcription analysis revealed that the high-affinity phosphate transporter from R. intraradices RiPT and the gene encoding a putative arsenic efflux pump RiArsA were up-regulated under higher As doses. These results suggest that R. intraradices is most likely to get involved in the defense response against M. phaseolina, but also in the reduction of arsenate to arsenite as a possible detoxification mechanism in AMF associations in soybean. R. intraradices actively participates in the soybean antioxidant defense response against arsenic stress and M. phaseolina infection. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Pathogenesis-related gene, JcPR-10a from Jatropha curcas exhibit RNase and antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Parinita; Bhatt, Vacha; Singh, Rekha; Das, Mamali; Sopory, Sudhir K; Chikara, Jitendra

    2013-06-01

    The pathogenesis-related proteins have a broad spectrum of roles, ranging from seed germination, development to resistance. The PR-10 is a multigene family differing from other PR proteins in being intracellular, small and acidic with similar 3D structures. We have isolated JcPR-10a cDNA with an ORF of 483 bp from J. curcas, an important biofuel crop grown in the wastelands of India. JcPR-10a gets clustered with dicots in phylogenetic tree. The genomic organisation analysis of JcPR-10a revealed the presence of an intron at conserved 185 bp position. Transcript expression of JcPR-10a was upregulated in response to different stimuli such as NaCl, salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate and M. phaseolina. In response to SA and Macrophomina the transcript was found increased at 48 h, however, in case of NaCl and MeJa a strong induction was observed at 12 h which decreased at 48 h. We first time report the transcript up regulation of PR-10 gene by Macrophomina, a pathogen causing collar rot in Jatropha. The recombinant E. coli cells showed better growth in LB medium supplemented with NaCl, whereas growth of recombinant cells was inhibited in LB medium supplemented with KCl, mannitol, sorbitol, methyl jasmonate and salicylic acid. The JcPR-10a protein was overexpressed in E. coli cells, and was purified to homogeneity, the purified protein exhibited RNase and DNase activity. Furthermore, the protein also showed antifungal activity against Macrophomina, indicating that JcPR-10a can serve as an important candidate to engineer stress tolerance in Jatropha as well as other plants susceptible to collar rot by Macrophomina.

  2. Ação do óleo essencial de Syzygium aromaticum (L. Merr. & L.M.Perry sobre as hifas de alguns fungos fitopatogênicos Action of Syzygium aromaticum (L. Merr. & L.M.Perry essential oil on the hyphae of some phytopathogenic fungi

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    A.R.T Costa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Atualmente o uso de métodos alternativos para o controle de doenças e pragas na agricultura, visando minimizar os danos ao meio ambiente e à saúde pública é uma prática reconhecida e necessária. Este trabalho objetivou investigar a ação do óleo essencial de Syzygium aromaticum (L. Merr. & L.M.Perry sobre o crescimento micelial in vitro dos fungos fitopatogênicos Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium solani, Fusarium oxysporum e Macrophomina phaseolina. A análise por cromatografia gasosa acoplada com espectrometria de massa possibilitou a identificação de eugenol (83,6%, acetato de eugenila (11,6% e cariofileno (4,2%. A avaliação microscópica dos micélios dos fungos evidenciou diversas alterações morfológicas, como a presença de vacúolos, desorganização dos conteúdos celulares, diminuição na nitidez da parede celular, intensa fragmentação e menor turgência das hifas. O óleo essencial de cravo apresentou atividade fungicida na concentração de 0,15% sobre o crescimento de R. solani, F. oxysporum e F. solani, entretanto não demonstrou essa atividade sobre M. phaseolina. Esses resultados indicam perspectivas favoráveis para posterior uso do óleo de cravo no controle desses fitopatógenos na agricultura.Currently, the use of alternative methods to control diseases and pests in agriculture has been a recognized and necessary practice to minimize damages to the environment and public health. This study aimed to investigate the action of clove [Syzygium aromaticum (L. Merr. & L.M.Perry] essential oil on the in vitro mycelial growth of the phytopathogenic fungi Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium solani, Fusarium oxysporum and Macrophomina phaseolina. Analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry allowed the identification of eugenol (83.6%, eugenyl acetate (11.6% and caryophyllene (4.2%. Microscopic evaluation of mycelia showed several morphological changes such as presence of vacuoles, cell content disorganization, decreased

  3. Tandem mass spectrometry approach for the investigation of the steroidal metabolism: structure-fragmentation relationship (SFR) in anabolic steroids and their metabolites by ESI-MS/MS analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Ali, Arslan; Khan, Naik Tameem; Yousuf, Maria; Choudhary, Muhammad Iqbal; Atta-ur-Rahman

    2013-02-01

    Electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) was used to investigate the effect of different substitutions introduced during metabolism on fragmentation patterns of four anabolic steroids including methyltestosterone, methandrostenolone, cis-androsterone and adrenosterone, along with their metabolites. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) analysis was performed to correlate the major product ions of 19 steroids with structural features. The analysis is done to portray metabolic alteration, such as incorporation or reduction of double bonds, hydroxylations, and/or oxidation of hydroxyl moieties to keto functional group on steroidal skeleton which leads to drastically changed product ion spectra from the respective classes of steroids, therefore, making them difficult to identify. The comparative ESI-MS/MS study also revealed some characteristic peaks to differentiate different steroidal metabolites and can be useful for the unambiguous identification of anabolic steroids in biological fluid. Moreover, LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of fermented extract of methyltestosterone, obtained by Macrophomina phaseolina was also investigated.

  4. Characterization of an antifungal compound produced by Bacillus sp. strain A(5) F that inhibits Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ankit; Saini, Sandeep; Wray, Victor; Nimtz, Manfred; Prakash, Anil; Johri, B N

    2012-12-01

    A potential antagonist, Bacillus sp. strain A(5) F was isolated from soybean rhizosphere following in vitro dual plate screening. The bacterium displayed strong inhibitory activity in vitro against soybean stem rot pathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. The culture supernatant of strain A(5) F completely suppressed the mycelial growth of the pathogen, indicating that suppression was due to the presence of antifungal compounds in the culture filtrate. The culture filtrate also suppressed other phytopathogenic fungi including Fusarium oxysporum and Macrophomina phaseolina, in vitro suggesting a broad spectrum antagonistic activity against fungal pathogens. Chemical extraction followed by chromatographic analysis resulted in two antifungal fractions. The high resolution-electron spin ionization-mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-MS) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1D and 2D(1) H) spectra of these antifungal fractions revealed the presence of antifungal compounds, one of which showed similarity to bacillomycin D.

  5. Endophytic filamentous fungi from a Catharanthus roseus: Identification and its hydrolytic enzymes

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    Farah Wahida Ayob

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reported on the various filamentous fungi strains that were isolated from a wild grown Catharanthus roseus. Based on the morphological characteristics and molecular technique through a Polymerase Chain Reaction and DNA sequencing method using internal transcribed spacer (ITS, these fungi had been identified as a Colletotrichum sp., Macrophomina phaseolina, Nigrospora sphaerica and Fusarium solani. The ultrastructures of spores and hyphae were observed under a Scanning Electron Microscope. The hydrolytic enzyme test showed that all strains were positive in secreting cellulase. Colletotrichum sp. and F. solani strains also gave a positive result for amylase while only F. solani was capable to secrete protease. These fungi were putatively classified as endophytic fungi since they produced extracellular enzymes that allow them to penetrate plant cell walls and colonize with symbiotic properties.

  6. Effect of systemic fungicides on the efficacy of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Schroeter migula in the control of root-infecting fungi of wheat

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    I. A. Siddiqui

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Effect of various fungicides on the efficacy of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium in the control of root-infecting fungi such as Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium oxysporum and F.solani on four different varieties of wheat was evaluated under field conditions. Bayleton (a.i. triadimephon, Bavistin (a.i. carbendazym and Topsin-M (a.i. thiophanate-methyl reduced bacterial survival on wheat seeds whereas Benlate (a.i. benomyl was not effective in this respect. P.aeruginosa used in combination with Benlate showed effective control of soilborne root-infecting fungi along with the enhancement of growth and grain yield of wheat.

  7. Use of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR and soil organic amendments for the management of root diseases complex of uridbean

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    I. A. Siddiqui

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Efficacy of two strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa-5 and IE-2 and Bacillus subtilis isolate alone or in conjunction with neem cake or Datura fastuosa was tested for the management of three soilbrne root-infecting fungi including Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium solani and Rhizoctonia solani and the root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne javanica on uridbean. Biocontrol bacteria used in combination with either neem cake or D.fastuosa gave better control of the root-rot and root-knot infection with the enhancement of growth of uridbean compared to the use ofeither component alone. Neem cake l% w/w mixed with P.aeruginosa strain IE-2 caused greatest inhibition of the root-knot development due to M.javanica, P.aeruginosa and B.subtilis used with organic amendment also increased Bradyrhizobium-nodules in the root system.

  8. Mn(II) and Cu(II) complexes of a bidentate Schiff's base ligand: Spectral, thermal, molecular modelling and mycological studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Monika; Chandra, Sulekh; Tyagi, Prateek

    2014-01-01

    Complexes of manganese(II) and copper(II) of general composition M(L)2X2 have been synthesized [L = 2-acetyl thiophene thiosemicarbazone and X = Cl- and NO3-]. The elemental analysis, molar conductance measurements, magnetic susceptibility measurements, mass, IR, UV, NMR and EPR spectral studies of the compounds led to the conclusion that the ligand acts as a bidentate manner. The Schiff's base ligand forms hexacoordinated complexes having octahedral geometry for Mn(II) and tetragonal geometry for Cu(II) complexes. The thermal studies suggested that the complexes are more stable as compared to ligand. In molecular modelling the geometries of Schiff's base and metal complexes were fully optimized with respect to the energy using the 6-31g(d,p) basis set. The mycological studies of the compounds were examined against the plant pathogenic fungi i.e. Rhizoctonia bataticola, Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium odum.

  9. Control of the root-rot and root-knot disease complex by Pseudomonas aeruginosa: impact of bacterial rhizosphere colonization

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    I. A. Siddiqui

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The potential of 3 Pseudomonas aeriuginosa strains as biocontrol agents of rootinfecting fungi Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium solani and Rhizoctonia solani and the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne javanica was tested on chili and uridbean under greenhouse conditions. All the three strains significantly reduced nematode populations in soil, invasion, multiplication and gall formation due to M.javanica. Root infection by fungi was also effectively suppressed following P.aeruginosa application. Bacterial antagonists exhibited better biocontrol and growth promoting activity in 15-day-old plants than did those harvested at 30 or 45 days. Population of the bacterium in the rhizosphere declined rapidly after 15 days of nematode inoculation. Strain Pa-5 showed maximum nodulation in 15-day-old samplings while strain Pa-7 showed highest number of nodules in 30 and 45-day-old uridbean plants.

  10. Optimization for rapid synthesis of silver nanoparticles and its effect on phytopathogenic fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaraj, C.; Ramachandran, R.; Mohan, K.; Kalaichelvan, P. T.

    In this present study, silver nanoparticles were synthesized by green chemistry approach using Acalypha indica leaf extract as reducing agents. The reaction medium employed in the synthesis process was optimized to attain better yield, controlled size and stability. Further, the biosynthesized silver nanoparticles were conformed through UV-vis spectrum, XRD and HR-TEM analyses. Different concentration of silver nanoparticles were tested to know the inhibitory effect of fungal plant pathogens namely Alternaria alternata, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Macrophomina phaseolina, Rhizoctonia solani, Botrytis cinerea and Curvularia lunata. Interestingly, 15 mg concentration of silver nanoparticles showed excellent inhibitory activity against all the tested pathogens. Thus, the obtained results clearly suggest that silver nanoparticles may have important applications in controlling various plant diseases caused by fungi.

  11. A Survey of Phytopathogenic Fungi and Oomycetes in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

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    Arya Widyawan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A survey of phytopathogenic fungi and Oomyceteswas conducted in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia duringOctober 2008 – May 2009. Total of 223 samples were collectedfrom four regions; Al-Kharj, Oyaynah, Old Diriyah, and Al Amariyah. Isolation was done using Potato Dextrose Agar(PDA. Infected parts were cut then sterilized in chlorox(10%, then were put in petridish that contain PDA andincubated at 25-27 °C. A total twelve genera of fungi andsingle genera of Oomycetes were isolated from the infectedplants and identifi ed as Fusarium spp., Alternaria spp.,Helmintosphorium (Bipolaris spp., Sclerotium spp., Rhizoctoniaspp., Cladosporium spp., Mauginiella scattae, Erysiphe spp.,Leveillula spp., Macrophomina phaseolina, Ustilago spp.,Ulocladium spp., and Phytium spp.

  12. Effects of cell suspension and cell·free culture filtrate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the control of root rot-root kont disease complex of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.

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    I. A. Siddiqui

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain IE-6 was tested for antagonistic activity towards Meloidogyne javanica, the root-knot nematode and soilbome root-infecting fungi viz., Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium solani and Rhizoctonia solani under laboratory and greenhouse conditions. Cell-free culture filtrate of the bacterium caused significant reduction in egg hatching of M.javanica and inhibited radial growth of fungi in vitro. Cell-free culture filtrate also caused lyses in mycelium of F.solani. Under greenhouse conditions, soil drenches with the aqueous cell suspension or cell-free culture resulted in a considerable reduction in nematode population densities in soil and subsequent root-knot development due to M.javanica. In addition to nematode control, rhizobacterium application also inhibited root-infection caused by soilborne root~infecting fungi with significant enhancement of growth of tomato seedlings.

  13. Soil amendment with Aerva javanica (Burm. F. Juss. ex Schult. in the control of root rot fungi of cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp.] and mung bean [Vigna radiata (L.

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    Naheed Ikram

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Root rot fungi cause severe losses of crop plants, so the present work was carried out to determine the effect of Aerva javanica parts powder on root infecting fungi of mung bean (Vigna radiata (L. and cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp.. A. javanica parts (stem, leaves and flower were used as soil amendments at 0.1, 1 and 5% to check the effectiveness on growth parameters. All the plant parts showed a significant reduction in root rot fungi like Fusarium spp., Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn, and Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi Goid. It was noted that germination percentage, fresh weight, leaf area and number of nodules were significantly higher and the inhibitory effect on root rot fungi increased when the soil was amended with A. javanica leaves at 1%. Thus, among all the treatments, A. javanica leaves at 1% were found to be the most effective against root rot fungi.

  14. Synthesis, spectral studies and biological evaluation of 2-aminonicotinic acid metal complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Muhammad; Abbasi, Muhammad Waseem; Hisaindee, Soleiman; Zaki, Muhammad Javed; Abbas, Hira Fatima; Mengting, Hu; Ahmed, M. Arif

    2016-05-01

    We synthesized 2-aminonicotinic acid (2-ANA) complexes with metals such as Co(II), Fe(III), Ni(II), Mn(II), Zn(II), Ag(I),Cr(III), Cd(II) and Cu(II) in aqueous media. The complexes were characterized and elucidated using FT-IR, UV-Vis, a fluorescence spectrophotometer and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). TGA data showed that the stoichiometry of complexes was 1:2 metal/ligand except for Ag(I) and Mn(II) where the ratio was 1:1. The metal complexes showed varied antibacterial, fungicidal and nematicidal activities. The silver and zinc complexes showed highest activity against Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus licheniformis respectively. Fusarium oxysporum was highly susceptible to nickel and copper complexes whereas Macrophomina phaseolina was completely inert to the complexes. The silver and cadmium complexes were effective against the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne javanica.

  15. Evaluation of Chenopodium ambrosioides oil as a potential source of antifungal, antiaflatoxigenic and antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Dubey, N K; Tripathi, Y B

    2007-04-10

    Essential oil extracted from the leaves of Chenopodium ambrosioides Linn. (Chenopodiaceae) was tested against the aflatoxigenic strain of test fungus Aspergillus flavus Link. The oil completely inhibited the mycelial growth at 100 microg/ml. The oil exhibited broad fungitoxic spectrum against Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus fumigatus, Botryodiplodia theobromae, Fusarium oxysporum, Sclerotium rolfsii, Macrophomina phaseolina, Cladosporium cladosporioides, Helminthosporium oryzae and Pythium debaryanum at 100 microg/ml. The oil showed significant efficacy in inhibiting the aflatoxin B1 production by the aflatoxigenic strain of A. flavus. During in vivo investigation it protected stored wheat from different storage fungi for one year. Chenopodium oil also exhibited potent antioxidant activity when tested by ABTS method. All these observations suggest the possible exploitation of the Chenopodium oil as potential botanical fungitoxicant in ecofriendly control of post harvest biodeterioration of food commodities from storage fungi.

  16. Antimicrobial screening of selected flora of Pakistan

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    Zia-Ul-Haq M.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethanolic extracts of Ferula assafoetida resin, Grewia asiatica leaves, Ipomoea hederacea seeds, Lepidium sativum seeds, Nigella sativa seeds and Terminalia chebula fruits were tested in vitro for their antibacterial and antifungal activities. The antibacterial study performed against eight bacterial species viz., Escherichia coli, Citrobacter, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, Micrococcus luteus, Proteus mirabilis and Bacillus subtilis indicated that the investigated plants have potent activity against all the tested microorganisms. The antifungal activity of these extracts was performed against nine fungal strains, viz., Aspergillus parasiticus, Aspergillus niger, Yersinia aldovae, Candida albicans, Aspergillus effusus, Fusarium solani, Macrophomina phaseolina, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Trichophyton rubrum. The extracts showed moderate as well as significant activity against the different fungal strains.

  17. Occurrence of Root Rot and Vascular Wilt Diseases in Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) in Upper Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Naglaa; Shimizu, Masafumi; Hyakumachi, Mitsuro

    2014-03-01

    Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) family Malvaceae is an important crop used in food, cosmetics and pharmaceutics industries. Roselle is cultivated mainly in Upper Egypt (Qena and Aswan governorates) producing 94% of total production. Root rot disease of roselle is one of the most important diseases that attack both seedlings and adult plants causing serious losses in crop productivity and quality. The main objective of the present study is to identify and characterize pathogens associated with root rot and wilt symptoms of roselle in Qena, Upper Egypt and evaluate their pathogenicity under greenhouse and field condition. Fusarium oxysporum, Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium solani, Fusarium equiseti and Fusarium semitectum were isolated from the natural root rot diseases in roselle. All isolated fungi were morphologically characterized and varied in their pathogenic potentialities. They could attack roselle plants causing damping-off and root rot/wilt diseases in different pathogenicity tests. The highest pathogenicity was caused by F. oxysporum and M. phaseolina followed by F. solani. The least pathogenic fungi were F. equiseti followed by F. semitectum. It obviously noted that Baladi roselle cultivar was more susceptible to infection with all tested fungi than Sobhia 17 under greenhouse and field conditions. This is the first report of fungal pathogens causing root rot and vascular wilt in roselle in Upper Egypt.

  18. Trigonella foenum-graecum (fenugreek-mediated suppression of Meloidogyne javanica in mungbean

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    Tayyaba Zia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil amendments with powdered seeds of Trigonella foenum - graecum (fenugreek caused soil suppressiveness against Meloidogyne javanica. Decomposed seeds of fenugreek caused marked reduction in nematode population densities and subsequent root-knot development as compared to the aqueous extract of the seeds indicating that some indirect factors are involved in the suppression of root-knot nematode. Both decomposed seeds and aqueous extracts enhanced plant height and fresh weights of shoot whereas root growth remained uninfluenced. Changes in fungal communities associated with nematode control were studied by comparing population numbers of fungi in the soil and in internal root tissues (endorhiza in non-amended and fenugreekamended soils. Acremonium sp., Chaetomium globosum, Fusarium solani, Macrophomina phaseolina and Rhizoctonia solani were found to colonize inner root tissues of mungbean. Acremonium sp., C. globosum and F.solani were isolated in a relatively higher frequency from roots growing in the amended soils while M. phaseolina and R. solani colonized greatly in roots growing in non-amended soil. Of the fungi isolated from soils, Penicillium brefaldianum caused maximum juvenile mortality of M.javanica whereas F.solani caused greatest inhibition of egg hatch.

  19. Antagonism of Microsporum species by soil fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, I; Dixit, A K; Kushwaha, R K S

    2010-01-01

    Eighteen fungi isolated from soil by hair bating method were tested against soil inhabiting Microsporum equinum, Microsporum fulvum, Microsporum gypseum and Microsporum racemosum for their antagonistic interactions. Colony inhibition during dual cultures showed inhibition of all the four Microsporum species. The maximum inhibition of M. equinum, M. fulvum, M. gypseum and M. racemosum was caused by Chrysosporium keratinophilum, Chrysosporium tropicum, Curvularia lunata and Chrysosporium lucknowense in dual cultures. On the other hand, M. fulvum showed maximum inhibition of Macrophomina phaseolina (70.1%) while M. equinum, M. gypseum and M. racemosum showed maximum inhibition of Colletotrichum gloeosporoides. Staling products of C. lucknowense accelerated growth of all Microsporum species, C. keratinophilum 3 and Chrysosporium evolceaunui and M. phaseolina accelerated growth of two species of Microsporum. Staling product of Alternaria alternata was most inhibitory. Culture filtrates of Trichophyton vanbreseughemii accelerated the growth of all the four Microsporum species and C. tropicum, C. lucknowense accelerated growth of two species, while Botryotrichum piluliferum accelerated growth of three species of Microsporum. Volatiles showed inhibition of all the Microsporum species ranging from 0.33 to 57.2% except in case of M. fulvum. Lysis of Microsporum mycelium was the most common feature.

  20. Synthesis, antifungal activity and structure-activity relationships of vanillin oxime-N-O-alkanoates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Vivek; Garg, Nandini; Kumar, Birendra; Walia, Suresh; Sati, Om P

    2012-12-01

    Vanillin oxime-N-O-alkanoates were synthesized following reaction of vanillin with hydroxylamine hydrochloride, followed by reaction of the resultant oxime with acyl chlorides. The structures of the compounds were confirmed by IR, 1H, 13C NMR and mass spectral data. The test compounds were evaluated for their in vitro antifungal activity against three phytopathogenic fungi Macrophomina phaseolina, Rhizoctonia solani and Sclerotium rolfsii by the poisoned food technique. The moderate antifungal activity of vanillin was slightly increased following its conversion to vanillin oxime, but significantly increased after conversion of the oxime to oxime-N-O-alkanoates. While vanillin oxime-N-O-dodecanoate with an EC50 value 73.1 microg/mL was most active against M. phaseolina, vanillin oxime-N-O-nonanoate with EC50 of value 66.7 microg/mL was most active against R. solani. The activity increased with increases in the acyl chain length and was maximal with an acyl chain length of nine carbons.

  1. Feijão-de-porco (Canavalia ensiformis no controle da podridão radicular do meloeiro causada por associação de patógenos

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    Maria Alice Formiga Porto

    Full Text Available RESUMO A ocorrência de doenças radiculares representa uma das principais causas de perda de rendimento na cultura do melão, com destaque para patógenos causadores das podridões de raízes e colos, como os fungos Fusarium solani, Macrophomina phaseolina e Rhizoctonia solani, observados no meloeiro tanto de forma isolada quanto associada. A utilização de material vegetal e restos de culturas, além de melhorar as propriedades físicas do solo e favorecer a atividade microbiana neste ambiente, pode interferir negativamente sobre a população de patógenos. Portanto, o objetivo deste trabalho foi verificar o efeito da utilização do Feijão-de-porco [Canavalia ensiformis (L. DC] no manejo da podridão radicular do meloeiro (Cucumis melo L. causada pelos patógenos F. solani, M. phaseolina e R. solani, quando sozinhos ou associados. O experimento foi realizado em casa de vegetação no delineamento de blocos casualizados, com esquema fatorial 8 x 4, sendo 8 tipos de fungos/associações e 4 formas de manejo, com 4 repetições. As características avaliadas foram: incidência de podridão radicular das plantas de melão no final do ciclo, prevalência dos patógenos e a massa da matéria seca do meloeiro. O feijão-de-porco em cobertura proporciona menor incidência de podridão radicular no meloeiro quando Fusarium solani está sozinho. Macrophomina phaseolina é o fungo que prevalece na maioria das associações nas quais está presente. Aumento na massa da matéria seca do meloeiro foi observado quando aplicado o mulch (filme de polietileno preto nos tratamentos com associação de F. solani + R. solani e no solo não infestado.

  2. Survival of pathogens on soybean debris under no-tillage and conventional tillage systems Sobrevivência de patógenos em restos de cultura de soja mantidos em sistema de semeadura direta e convencional

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    Álvaro Manuel Rodrigues Almeida

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted in the subtropical area of Southern Brazil to determine the survival of pathogens in soybean residues under conventional and no-tillage cultivation systems from March to September of 1998 and 1999. The pathogens most frequently isolated were Colletotrichum truncatum, Phomopsis spp., Cercospora kikuchii, Fusarium spp., Macrophomina phaseolina, and Rhizoctonia solani. Other fungi isolated were Myrothecium roridum, Penicillium sp., Chaetomium sp., Epicoccum sp., Corynespora cassiicola and Trichoderma sp. The percent of survival of each pathogen varied according to the month and the year. Survival of C. truncatum, Phomopsis spp. and C. kikuchii were significantly reduced (pAvaliou-se a sobrevivência de patógenos em restos de soja, em sistema de semeadura direta e convencional, entre março e setembro de 1998 e 1999, em Londrina, PR. Os patógenos mais freqüentemente isolados foram Colletotrichum truncatum, Phomopsis spp., Cercospora kikuchii, Fusarium spp., Macrophomina phaseolina e Rhizoctonia solani. Outros fungos isolados foram Myrothecium roridum, Penicillium sp., Chaetomium sp., Epicoccum sp., Corynespora cassiicola e Trichoderma sp. A porcentagem de sobrevivência variou com o mês e o ano. A sobrevivência de C. truncatum, Phomopsis spp. e C. kikuchii foi significativamente reduzida (P<0,05 entre a primeira e última avaliação nos resíduos mantidos sobre ou sob o solo. M. phaseolina e Fusarium spp. não foram afetados, ou foram favorecidos pelo enterro dos resíduos. A freqüência de isolamento de Fusarium spp. aumentou em resíduos enterrados no solo. A perda de biomassa mostrou redução de 44,4% no sistema convencional e 34,9% no sistema de semeadura direta, em 1998, quando a distribuição de chuvas foi mais regular. Em 1999, a redução foi de 48,2% e 39,0% para os sistemas convencional e de semeadura direta, respectivamente.

  3. Fungal propagules and DNA in feces of two detritus-feeding amphipods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Kandikere Ramaiah; Beaton, Margaret; Bärlocher, Felix

    2011-01-01

    Aquatic shredders (leaf-eating invertebrates) preferentially ingest and digest leaves colonized by aquatic hyphomycetes (fungi). This activity destroys leaf-associated fungal biomass and detritial resources in streams. Fungal counter-adaptations may include the ability to survive passage through the invertebrate's digestive tract. When fecal pellets of Gammarus tigrinus and Hyalella azteca were incubated with sterile leaves, spores of nine (G. tigrinus) and seven (H. azteca) aquatic hyphomycete species were subsequently released from the leaves, indicating the presence of viable fungal structures in the feces. Extraction, amplification, and sequencing of DNA from feces revealed numerous fungal phylotypes, two of which could be assigned unequivocally to an aquatic hyphomycete. The estimated contributions of major fungal groups varied depending on whether 18S or ITS sequences were amplified and cloned. We conclude that a variable proportion of fungal DNA in the feces of detritivores may originate from aquatic hyphomycetes. Amplified DNA may be associated with metabolically active, dormant, or dead fungal cells.

  4. Propagule size and dispersal costs mediate establishment success of an invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Rolanda; Marshall, Dustin J

    2016-03-01

    Bio-invasions depend on the number and frequency of invaders arriving in new habitats. Yet, as is often the case, it is not only quantity that counts, but also quality. The process of dispersal can change disperser quality and establishment success. Invasions are a form of extra-range dispersal, so that invaders often experience changes in quality through dispersal. To study effects of dispersal on invader quality, and its interactions with quantity on invasion success, we manipulated both in a field experiment using an invasive marine invertebrate. Establishment success increased with the number of individuals arriving in a new habitat. Prolonged larval durations--our manipulation of prolonged dispersal--decreased individual quality and establishment success. Groups of invaders with prolonged larval durations contributed only a third of the offspring relative to invaders that settled immediately. We also found an interaction between the quality and quantity of invaders on individual growth: only within high-quality cohorts did individuals experience density-dependent effects on growth. Our findings highlight that dispersal not only affects the quantity of invaders arriving in a new habitat but also their quality, and both mediate establishment success.

  5. [Physical and chemical methods for eliminating propagules of indigenous mycorrhizal fungi from soil samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covacevich, Fernanda; Castellari, Claudia C; Echeverría, Hernán E

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate methods to eliminate or reduce the number of indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) from soil samples without affecting their edaphic or microbiological properties. At an early trial we evaluated moist heat (autoclaving), dry heat (oven), sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) and formaldehyde at a range of 100.0-3.3μl/g and 16.7-3.3μl/g respectively. There was no germination in plants of ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) sown on substrates receiving NaClO (100.0-33.3μl/g), whereas autoclaving significantly increased the available soil phosphorous content. Both treatments failed to eradicate AMF colonization at 9 weeks; therefore, they were discarded. In a second trial, oven and formaldehyde (10.0μl/g) treatments were analyzed to assess the effects of seed decontamination and AMF reinoculation. Both procedures were effective in reducing or eliminating indigenous AMF at a range of soil P availability of 12-29mg/kg. However, the time between soil treatment and AMF multiplication and safety requirements were greater in the case of formaldehyde application. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. The interaction between propagule pressure, habitat suitablility and density-dependent reproduction in species invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert J. II Warren; Bahn Volker; Mark A. Bradford

    2011-01-01

    Seedling recruitment limitations create a demographic bottleneck that largely determines the viability and structure of plant populations and communities, and pose a core restriction on the colonization of novel habitat. We use a shade tolerant, invasive grass, Microstegium vimineum, to examine the interplay between seed and establishment limitations – phenomena that...

  7. The trade-off between vegetative and generative reproduction among angiosperms influences regional hydrochorous propagule pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boedeltje, Ger; Ozinga, Wim A.; Prinzing, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Aim Local communities are subject to spatiotemporal contingencies of landscape processes; community assembly is thus often considered to be unpredictable and idiosyncratic. However, evolved trade-offs of species' life histories may set distinct constraints on the assembly of species communities. In

  8. The trade-off between vegetative and generative reproduction among angiosperms influences regional hydrochorous propagule pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boedeltje, G.; Ozinga, W.A.; Prinzing, A.

    2008-01-01

    Aim Local communities are subject to spatiotemporal contingencies of landscape processes; community assembly is thus often considered to be unpredictable and idiosyncratic. However, evolved trade-offs of species¿ life histories may set distinct constraints on the assembly of species communities. In

  9. Controle de fitopatógenos do solo com materiais vegetais associados à solarização Control of soil-borne phytopathogenic fungi by the association between materials vegetable materials and solarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Michelle de Queiroz Ambrósio

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A incorporação de material orgânico associada à solarização do solo é uma técnica promissora no controle de patógenos de plantas. O trabalho consistiu na prospecção de materiais vegetais promissores na produção de voláteis fungitóxicos capazes de inviabilizar as estruturas de resistência de fitopatógenos do solo. Em condição de campo foram incorporados 3 Kg/m² de folhas e ramos de brócolos, eucalipto, mamona e mandioca brava, associada ou não à solarização, visando o controle de Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici raça 2; Macrophomina phaseolina; Rhizoctonia solani AG-4 HGI e Sclerotium rolfsii. O controle foi avaliado por meio da sobrevivência das estruturas, em meios semi-seletivo específicos, aos 7, 14, 21 e 28 dias do início do experimento. Foram monitoradas as temperaturas do solo e do ar por um DataLogger Tipo CR23X (Campbell Scientific e a porcentagem de CO2 e de O2 pelo equipamento analisador de gases (Testo 325-1. A associação da incorporação dos materiais vegetais com a solarização do solo inativou F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici raça 2, M. phaseolina e R. solani. O fungo S. rolfsii foi o único que não apresentou 100% de controle com solarização mais mamona durante o período estudado. A incorporação de mandioca seguido de solarização propiciou o controle de todos os fungos estudados com menos de sete dias da instalação do experimento, sendo tão eficiente quanto o brócolos na erradicação dos fitopatógenos veiculados pelo sol.The association between previous incorporation of vegetable material and soil solarization is a promising technique for control of several phytopathogens. The objective of this work consisted in the investigation of materials vegetable that are promising to produce fungitoxic volatiles capable of inactivating the resistence structures of soil plant pathogens. Three Kg/m² of vegetable materials were incorporated under field conditions, and the survival of four

  10. Preservação de fungos fitopatogênicos habitantes do solo Storage of soilborne phytopathogenic fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César J. Bueno

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available A preservação de fungos fitopatogênicos por longos períodos de tempo é importante para que pesquisas possam ser realizadas a qualquer momento. Os fungos habitantes do solo são organismos que podem produzir estruturas de resistência em face de situações adversas, tais como ausência de hospedeiros e ou condições climáticas desfavoráveis para a sua sobrevivência. O objetivo deste trabalho foi desenvolver metodologias de preservação de estruturas de resistência para os fungos Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici raça 2, Macrophomina phaseolina, Rhizoctonia solani AG4 HGI, Sclerotium rolfsii, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum e Verticillium dahliae. O delineamento foi inteiramente casualizado, com um método de produção de estruturas para cada fungo, submetido a três tratamentos [temperatura ambiente de laboratório (28±2ºC, de geladeira (5ºC e de freezer (-20ºC] e com dois frascos por temperatura. Mensalmente, e por um período de um ano, a sobrevivência e o vigor das colônias de cada patógeno foram avaliadas em meios de cultura específicos. Testes de patogenicidade foram realizados após um ano de preservação, com as estruturas que sobreviveram aos melhores tratamentos (temperatura para todos os fungos. As melhores temperaturas (tratamentos para preservar os fungos foram: a F. oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici em temperatura de refrigeração e de freezer (5,2 e 2,9 x 10³ufc.g-1 de talco, respectivamente; b M. phaseolina em temperatura de refrigeração [100% de sobrevivência (S e índice 3 de vigor (V] e S. rolfsii em temperatura ambiente (74,4% S e 1 V e c S. sclerotiorum e V. dahliae, ambos em temperatura de freezer (100% S e 3 V. Após um ano de preservação, somente V. dahliae perdeu a patogenicidade na metodologia desenvolvida.Preservation of soilborne phytopathogenic fungi for long periods of time is important so that researches can be followed up at any moment. Soilborne phytopathogenic fungi are organisms that can

  11. Caracterización molecular y agronómica de aislados de Trichoderma spp nativos del noreste de México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Hernández Mendoza

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false ES-CO X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Título en ingles: Molecular and agronomic characterization of Trichoderma spp natives of northeastern Mexico  Resumen Trichoderma sp es un hongo frecuentemente usado en actividades agrícolas, pues actúa como antagonista de diversas especies de hongos fitopatógenos. En este estudio se realizó el aislamiento de cuatro cepas de Trichoderma sp nativas del noreste de México, las cuales fueron identificadas a nivel molecular mediante la secuenciación del ITS 1. Además se evaluó su capacidad antagonista en contra los hongos fitopatógenos Macrophomina phaseolina y Fusarium oxysporum, que afectan severamente cultivos de sorgo, maíz y fríjol en el noreste de México. La identificación se realizó de acuerdo al grado de concordancia con secuencias reportadas y corresponden a las especies T. hammatum (HK701;  T. koningiopsis (HK702; T. asperellum (HK703 y Trichoderma sp (HK704. Por otra parte, las pruebas de antagonismo muestran que los aislados HK701, HK703 y HK704 inhiben por competencia el crecimiento de M. phaseolina y F. oxysporum, mientras que HK702 tiene la capacidad para hiperparasitar dichos fitopatógenos. Finalmente, se evaluó la promoción de crecimiento de T. asperellum HK703, en maíz (Pionner 30P49®, usando para ello concentraciones de tratamiento de 1x10e2 hasta 1x10e6 esp/mL. En estos ensayos se midió la producción de biomasa. Los resultados muestran que en concentraciones intermedias se tiene el mayor incremento en altura de plantas y mayor producción de peso seco en follaje y raíz. Entre los parámetros antes mencionados existen diferencias significativas. Palabras clave: control biológico, antagonismo, biofertilizantes, Zea maiz, Sorghum bicolor. Abstract Trichoderma sp is a fungus often used in agricultural activities, because it acts as an antagonist of several species of plant pathogenic fungi. In this study four strains of Trichoderma

  12. Sinaloense-202, nueva variedad de sorgo para el estado de Sinaloa Sinaloense-202, new sorghum cultivar for the State of Sinaloa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Hernández Espinal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available La nueva variedad de sorgo Sinaloense-202 fue desarrollado en el Campo Experimental Valle de Culiacán del Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales Agrícolas y Pecuarias y registrado con el número 2204-SOG-528-090209/C en el Catálogo de Variedades Factibles de Certificación de México. Esta variedad se adapta a las áreas productoras de sorgo para el estado de Sinaloa. Sinaloense-202 es una variedad de grano crema y se recomienda para condiciones de riego y temporal. El rendimiento promedio de la variedad es de 3 210 kg ha-1 de grano y 28 608 kg ha-1 de forraje verde, supera en promedio 8% y 18.1% respectivamente; el rendimiento de híbridos comerciales de compañías privadas, que se cultivan en la región bajo las mismas condiciones. Sinaloense-202 tiene mejor calidad bromatológica que los híbridos comerciales en el forraje, con un 8.3% de proteína y 59% de digestibilidad, supera en promedio 1.1% y 10% respectivamente, a los híbridos comerciales. Es tolerante a enfermedades que se presentan en la región, como son: ergot (Claviceps african, antracnosis (Colletotrichum graminícola, tizón de la panoja (Fusarium moniliforme y pudrición carbonosa del tallo (Macrophomina phaseolina.The new sorghum variety Sinaloense-202 was developed in the Culiacán Valley Experiment Station of the National Forestry, Agriculture and Livestock Research Institute and was registered with the number 2204-SOG-528-090209/C in the Catalogue of Feasible Varieties of Certification in México. This variety is adapted to sorghum-producing areas in State of Sinaloa, Mexico. The variety Sinaloense-202 has cream grain and is recommended either for irrigation and rainfall areas. The average yield of the variety is 3 210 kg ha-1 of grain and 28 608 kg ha-1 of green forage, which is 8% and 18.1%respectively; higher than the grain and fresh forage yield of commercial hybrids from private companies cultivated in the region. Sinaloense-202 has better bromatologic

  13. Perla-101: nueva variedad de sorgo para el estado de Sinaloa Perla-101: new sorghum cultivar for the state of Sinaloa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Hernández Espinal

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available La nueva variedad de sorgo Perla-101 fue desarrollado en el Campo Experimental Valle de Culiacán (CEVACU, del Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales Agrícolas y Pecuarias (INIFAP y registrado con el número: 1355-SOG-466-121200/C en el Catálogo de Variedades Factibles de Certificación (CVC de México; esta variedad se adapta a las áreas productoras de sorgo para el estado de Sinaloa. Perla-101, es una variedad de grano crema y se recomienda para condiciones de riego y temporal; el rendimiento promedio de la variedad es de 3 470 kg ha-1 de grano y 22 500 kg ha-1 de forraje verde, supera en promedio 14% y 10% respectivamente, el rendimiento de híbridos comerciales de compañías privadas, que se cultivan en la región bajo las mismas condiciones. Perla-101 tiene mejor calidad bromatológica que los híbridos comerciales en el forraje, con 9.7% de proteína y 66% de digestibilidad, supera en promedio 3.2% y 8% respectivamente, a los híbridos comerciales. Es tolerante a enfermedades que se presentan en la región, como son: ergot (Claviceps african, antracnosis (Colletotrichum graminícola, tizón de la panoja (Fusarium moniliforme y pudrición carbonosa del tallo (Macrophomina phaseolina.The new variety of sorghum Perla-101 was developed in the Valle de Culiacan Experimental Field (CEVACU, of the National Research Institute for Forestry, Agriculture and Livestock (INIFAP and registered with the number: 1355-SOG-466-121200/C in the Catalogue of Varieties Feasible of Certification (CVC of Mexico; this variety is adapted to the sorghum-producing areas of the State of Sinaloa. Perla-101, is a creamy-grain variety and is recommended for irrigated and rainfed conditions; its average yield is 3 470 kg ha-1 of grain and 22 500 kg ha-1 of green fodder, it exceeds on average in 14% and 10% respectively, the yield of commercial hybrids from private companies that are grown in the region under the same conditions. Perla-101, has better

  14. Scorpion toxins modify phytopathogenic fungus physiology. A possible source of new fungicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joya, Galax; D'Suze, Gina; Salazar, Víctor; Rosales, Arnaldo; Sevcik, Carlos; Visbal, Gonzalo; Ferreira, André T S; Perales, Jonas

    2011-06-08

    Seven toxins (F1-F7) were purified from Tityus discrepans scorpion venom on a C18 HPLC column. The compounds were fungitoxic on Macrophomina phaseolina. The molecular masses of F1-F7 were (Da) 1061.1, 7328.8, 7288.3, 7268.5, 7104.6, 6924.6, and 6823.3, respectively. It is not known if F1 is a small peptide or some other kind of organic molecule. Compounds F2-F7 were peptides. The most potent was F7, with a minimal inhibition concentration of 0.4 μg/μL and a concentration for 50% inhibition of 0.13 μg/μL. Fungal esterase activity was abolished by F2, F3, and F5 and inhibited by 89, 60, 58, and 54% by F4, F6, F7, and F1, respectively. F1, F2, F5, and F7 induced an increase on hyphae chitin wall and septum thickness. Peptides F3-F6 induced efflux of the fluorescent dye Na-CoroNa Red complex from hyphae. Only F5 and F6 were inhibited by the prokaryote sodium channel blockers amiloride and mibefradil. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis suggested that F1, F5, F6, and F7 altered sterol biosynthesis either by inhibiting ergosterol biosynthesis or by producing ergosterol analogues. The peptides affect M. phaseolina viability by three mechanisms: decreasing esterase activity, altering Na(+) membrane permeability, and altering wall sterol biosynthesis. It seems that interfering with sterol synthesis is an important mechanism behind the effect of the fungicideal toxins. However, the antifungal effects at short times are indicative of a direct esterase inhibition, which, with the increased membrane leakiness to Na(+), makes the fungus inviable.

  15. Biotransformation of dianabol with the filamentous fungi and β-glucuronidase inhibitory activity of resulting metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Naik T; Zafar, Salman; Noreen, Shagufta; Al Majid, Abdullah M; Al Othman, Zeid A; Al-Resayes, Saud Ibrahim; Atta-ur-Rahman; Choudhary, M Iqbal

    2014-07-01

    Biotransformation of the anabolic steroid dianabol (1) by suspended-cell cultures of the filamentous fungi Cunninghamella elegans and Macrophomina phaseolina was studied. Incubation of 1 with C. elegans yielded five hydroxylated metabolites 2-6, while M. phaseolina transformed compound 1 into polar metabolites 7-11. These metabolites were identified as 6β,17β-dihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (2), 15α,17β-dihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (3), 11α,17β-dihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (4), 6β,12β,17β-trihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (5), 6β,15α,17β-trihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (6), 17β-hydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3,6-dione (7), 7β,17β,-dihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (8), 15β,17β-dihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (9), 17β-hydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3,11-dione (10), and 11β,17β-dihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (11). Metabolite 3 was also transformed chemically into diketone 12 and oximes 13, and 14. Compounds 6 and 12-14 were identified as new derivatives of dianabol (1). The structures of all transformed products were deduced on the basis of spectral analyses. Compounds 1-14 were evaluated for β-glucuronidase enzyme inhibitory activity. Compounds 7, 13, and 14 showed a strong inhibition of β-glucuronidase enzyme, with IC50 values between 49.0 and 84.9 μM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Impact of management strategies in the basal rot, charcoal rots epidemiology and Phaseolus vulgaris L. yield.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulacio Osorio Dilcia

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of chemical, physical, biologycal and cultural strategies individually or combinated were evaluated in the epidemiology of the basal rot (Sclerotium rolfsii, charcoal rot (Macrophomina phaseolina and the Phaseolus vulgaris cv Tacarigua yield at Barinas state from Venezuela. In the experiment, Tebuconazole (Teb was applicated at seed (1 L/Ton and at soil, a los 30 y 60 days after of the sow (1 L/ha; Trichoderma harzianum (Tri was applicated at seed (15 g for each 1.5 k and to 15, 30, 45 y 60 days after of the sow (30 g/10 L of water. On the other hand, soil was solarizated (Sol during 15 days and calcium nitrate (Ca (60 g/10 L of water was applicated each 15 days until 60 days of growth of cultivated plants. Basal rot was registered as far as 42 days after of the sow, showing less of 5.3% in Teb y the combination SolTeb. The hightest incidence of this disease was observed in the treatment Tri with 28.5%, being highter that control (14.5%. Last to 42 days predominated the charcoal rot in the rest of the plants for a total of 100% of incidente in everything the treatments. Nevertheless, Teb showed the hightest yield with 555 k/ha, being different estatistically at treatment TriCa, which showed the lowest yield with 31 k/ha, however, the roots not formed nodules nitrogen uptake in these replications with the fungicide and Ca. It is concluded that S. rolfsii was sensible at action of some of the treatments; but not M. phaseolina; nevertheless, the plants were capables to produce seeds health apparently in treatments in which observed less severity of charcoal rot.

  17. Combined effects of biocontrol agents and soil amendments on soil microbial populations, plant growth and incidence of charcoal rot of cowpea and wilt of cumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijeta SINGH

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Field experiments were conducted for 2 years to determine the effectiveness of combined use of two biocontrol agents, Bacillus firmus and Aspergillus versicolor for control of Macrophomina phaseolina induced charcoal rot of cowpea and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cumini induced wilt of cumin. The lowest level of plant mortality (3‒4% due to charcoal rot of cowpea was recorded when bacterium coated seeds were sown in radish compost amended soil compared to the non-amended soil (13.8‒20.5%, but this was not significantly better than some other treatments. Cowpea roots from B. firmus coated seeds had better nodulation than any of the individual A. versicolor treatments. Although B. firmus coated seeds + A. versicolor + farmyard manure resulted in maximum nodulation this was not significantly different to B. firmus seed coating. Root colonization by the combined biocontrol agent treatments was better than the individual biocontrol agent treatments. Combining A. versicolor with farmyard manure supported the maximum populations of total fungi and actinomycetes. In both winter seasons, the lowest incidence of wilt (1.0‒5.2% on cumin was recorded when A. versicolor was amended with neem compost compared to the non-amended soil (5.7‒10.5%. Maximum colonization of A. versicolor on roots was observed in B. firmus + A. versicolor + farmyard manure amended plots. During both years, the treatment combination of A. versicolor in neem compost amended plots resulted in maximum populations of fungi, bacteria and A. versicolor in the soil, which was greater than in the non-amended soil. Significant increases in disease control were not recorded after single or repeated delivery of A. versicolor. These results suggest that combining B. firmus as seed coatings with A. versicolor as soil applications gives improved control of M. phaseolina and Fusarium induced diseases on legume and seed spice crops in arid soils.

  18. Yellow-cedar in vitro clonal production and evaluation of propagules for reforestation. FRDA research memo No. 211

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Technical note describing a project that was part of an ongoing effort to develop micropropagation techniques on an operation scale and to investigate their possible use in producing genetically improved stock for planting. The project developed a commercially viable process that uses organogenic micropropagation to produce yellow-cedar stock for operational reforestation; evaluated the techniques for developing genetically improved clones; and established demonstration plots of mircopropagules.

  19. Analysis of propagule pressure and genetic diversity in the invasibility of a freshwater apex predator: the peacock bass (genus Cichla)

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Uma importante etapa na biologia da invasão é acessar variáveis biológicas que podem predizer o sucesso de invasão. O estudo da genética, evolução e interações entre invasores e espécies nativas no ambiente invadido pode prover uma oportunidade única para o estudo dos processos em genética de populações e a capacidade de uma espécie ampliar seu habitat. Nesse trabalho, nos utilizamos dados de marcadores de DNA microssatélites para testar se a variação genética é relacionada a pressão de propá...

  20. Quantification of propagules of the laurel wilt fungus and other mycangial fungi from the redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, T C; Fraedrich, S W

    2010-10-01

    The laurel wilt pathogen, Raffaelea lauricola, is a fungal symbiont of the redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus, which is native to Asia and was believed to have brought R. lauricola with it to the southeastern United States. Individual X. glabratus beetles from six populations in South Carolina and Georgia were individually macerated in glass tissue grinders and serially diluted to quantify the CFU of fungal symbionts. Six species of Raffaelea were isolated, with up to four species from an individual adult beetle. The Raffaelea spp. were apparently within the protected, paired, mandibular mycangia because they were as numerous in heads as in whole beetles, and surface-sterilized heads or whole bodies yielded as many or more CFU as did nonsterilized heads or whole beetles. R. lauricola was isolated from 40 of the 41 beetles sampled, and it was isolated in the highest numbers, up to 30,000 CFU/beetle. Depending on the population sampled, R. subalba or R. ellipticospora was the next most frequently isolated species. R. arxii, R. fusca, and R. subfusca were only occasionally isolated. The laurel wilt pathogen apparently grows in a yeast phase within the mycangia in competition with other Raffaelea spp.

  1. Production and Field Planting of Vegetative Propagules for Restoration of Redhead Grass and Sago Pondweed in Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    1997). Most SAV species reproduce both sexually (flower, pollen , fruit, and seed) and asexually (clonally) for population expansion and long-term...perfoliatus produce abundant seeds (e.g., Yeo 1966; Ailstock and Shafer 2004), seed viability and germination success tend to be relatively low under most...technical note describes techniques for restoring P. perfoliatus and S. pecti- nata in the mesohaline region of Chesapeake Bay through the use of over

  2. The effect of mangroves amendments to soil on root rot and root knot of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marium Tariq

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Leaves, stem and pneumatophore of Avicennia marina and leaves and stem of Rhizophora mucronata were used as the organic amendments at 0.1, 1 and 5% concentrations in the control of root rot fungi like (Fusarium spp., Rhizoctonia solani and Macrophomina phasoelina and root knot nematode Meloidogyne javanica on potato. In pot experiments, germination of seeds, shoot length, shoot weight, root length, root weight and number of knots were significantly increased when plant parts like leaves, stem and pneumatophore of A. marina and R. mucronata were used at 1 and 5% concentrations. There was a complete suppression in infection of R. solani and M. phaseolina when A. marina and R. mucronata were used at 5% concentration on potato. Maximum inhibition of knots of M. javanica was observed when powder made from mangrove plant parts was used at 1 and 5% concentrations. Powder from all plant parts, like leaves, stem and pneumatophore, was effective in suppression of root infecting fungi and root knot nematode.

  3. ZYMOGRAPHIC IDENTIFICATION AND BIOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF CHITINASE AGAINST PHYTOFUNGAL PATHOGENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urja Pandya

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available An endospore forming Gram positive bacterium (MBCU4 was isolated from a vermicompost amended soil, and confirmed as Bacillus subtilis through the 16S rRNA sequence analysis. An extracellular chitinase was detected from this strain of B. subtilis under specific environmental condition. An attempt was made to purify the enzyme by ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by DEAE sepharose CL-6B column chromatography. The purified enzyme was demonstrated as a single band, having the molecular weight 31kDa on SDS PAGE analysis and its activity in the gel was determined by clear zone on zymogram. Further characterization of the isolated enzymes has showed that this enzyme is most active at pH 6.0 and at the optimized temperature of 50 0C. The purified chitinase exhibited high degree of antifungal activity particularly by degrading their cell wall components of plant pathogens Macrophomina phaseolina (69.0% and Rhizoctonia solani (52.0%. It infers that the chitinase produced by B. subtilis could play an important role for biopesticidal activity.

  4. Effects of different irrigation methods on pepper yield and soilborne diseases incidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seral YÜCEL

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of different irrigation strategies and irrigation methods on yields and the incidence of wilt (Fusarium oxysporum and root rot (Fusarium solani and Macrophomina phaseolina diseases causing significant yield losses on field grown processing red pepper is determined. Experiments were carried out at Topçu Station of the Soil and Water Resources Research Institute of Tarsus in 2010 and 2011. Karaisalı processing pepper (Capsicum annuum L. was used in the experiments. Three furrows and five drip irrigation treatments were used in the study. The disease incidence rates were found 8.0-18.2% in furrow irrigation plots and 4.5-10.0% in drip irrigation plots in 2010, while it was 3.4-9.7% in furrow irrigation plots and 2.2-4.5% in drip irrigation plots in 2011. Pepper yields ranged from 3 416 to 4 417 kg da-1 and 3 376 to 4 779 kg da-1 in drip irrigated plots in 2010 and 2011, respectively. However, yields varied between 3 172-3 559 kg da-1 and 2 932-4 150 kg da-1 in furrow irrigated plots in 2010 and 2011 growing seasons.

  5. Expression in Escherichia coli, purification, refolding and antifungal activity of an osmotin from Solanum nigrum

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    Magalhães Cláudio P

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heterologous protein expression in microorganisms may contribute to identify and demonstrate antifungal activity of novel proteins. The Solanum nigrum osmotin-like protein (SnOLP gene encodes a member of pathogenesis-related (PR proteins, from the PR-5 sub-group, the last comprising several proteins with different functions, including antifungal activity. Based on deduced amino acid sequence of SnOLP, computer modeling produced a tertiary structure which is indicative of antifungal activity. Results To validate the potential antifungal activity of SnOLP, a hexahistidine-tagged mature SnOLP form was overexpressed in Escherichia coli M15 strain carried out by a pQE30 vector construction. The urea solubilized His6-tagged mature SnOLP protein was affinity-purified by immobilized-metal (Ni2+ affinity column chromatography. As SnOLP requires the correct formation of eight disulfide bonds, not correctly formed in bacterial cells, we adapted an in vitro method to refold the E. coli expressed SnOLP by using reduced:oxidized gluthatione redox buffer. This method generated biologically active conformations of the recombinant mature SnOLP, which exerted antifungal action towards plant pathogenic fungi (Fusarium solani f. sp.glycines, Colletotrichum spp., Macrophomina phaseolina and oomycete (Phytophthora nicotiana var. parasitica under in vitro conditions. Conclusion Since SnOLP displays activity against economically important plant pathogenic fungi and oomycete, it represents a novel PR-5 protein with promising utility for biotechnological applications.

  6. Incorporation of plant materials in the control of root pathogens in muskmelon

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    Andréa Mirne de Macêdo Dantas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of plant materials[Sunn Hemp (Crotalaria juncea, Castor Bean (Ricinus communis L., Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz and Neem (Azadirachta indica] and the times of incorporation of these materials in regards to the incidence of root rot in melon was evaluated in Ceará state, Brazil. The experiment was conducted in a commercial area with a history of root pathogens in cucurbitaceae. The randomized block design was used, in a 5 x 3 factorial arrangement with four repetitions. The treatments consisted of a combination of four plant materials (sunn hemp, castor beans, cassava and neem and a control with no soil incorporation of plant material and three times of incorporation (28, 21, and 14 days before the transplanting of the seedlings. Lower incidence of root rot was observed in practically all of the treatments where materials were incorporated at different times, with variation between the materials, corresponding with the time of incorporation, in relation to the soil without plant material. The pathogens isolated from the symptomatic muskmelon plants were Fusarium solani, Macrophomina phaseolina, Monosporascus cannonballus and Rhizoctonia solani, F. solani being encountered most frequently.

  7. Etiology, development and reaction of muskmelon to vine decline under arid conditions of Oman

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    Qais Saif Al-MAWAALI

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Muskmelon vine decline is considered the most important factor limiting muskmelon production in Oman. This study was conducted to characterize incidence, development, causal agents and response of muskmelon cultivars to this disease. A survey showed that incidence of the disease ranged from 0 to 15% (mean 5% in spring 2011, 1 to 80% (mean 18% in autumn 2011 and 0 to15% (mean 10% in spring 2012. Isolations from 168 affected plants yielded Pythium aphanidermatum (56% of diseased plants sampled, Fusarium spp. (46%, Monosporascus cannonballus (27%, Rhizoctonia solani (22% and Macrophomina phaseolina (1%. In pathogenicity tests, R. solani, M. cannonballus and P. aphanidermatum were found to be pathogenic to muskmelon. In another experiment over three seasons, M. cannonballus, P. aphanidermatum and R. solani were consistently isolated from muskmelon plants on a weekly basis from 14 days after sowing until the end of the season. However, symptom development only began with the onset of fruiting, which suggests that fruiting stress may be a factor in vine decline disease development. Field assessment of 11 muskmelon cultivars showed that ‘Shahd F1’ was one of the cultivars least susceptible to vine decline and was relatively high yielding. This is the first record of M. cannonballus as a causal agent of muskmelon vine decline in Oman.

  8. CUANTIFICACIÓN DE ENFERMEDADES EN LÍNEAS PROMISORIAS Y VARIEDADES DE FRÉJOL EN QUEVEDO, ECUADOR

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    FELIPE RAFAEL GARCÉS-FIALLOS

    Full Text Available El rendimiento del cultivo de fréjol (Phaseolus vulgaris L. es disminuido por el ataque de las enfermedades a lo largo del ciclo del cultivo, disminuyendo los ingresos de los agricultores en la zona central del Litoral Ecuatoriano. El objetivo de la investigación fue identificar cuales son las enfermedades que se presentan, y cuantificar las mismas en 21 materiales genéticos de fréjol en el cantón Quevedo. Se describieron los agentes causales de la muerte de plántulas luego de la emergencia, así como las enfermedades presentes en el agroecosistema de fréjol. También se cuantificó la severidad (% de enfermedades foliares en plantas y por parcela, roya (Uromyces appendiculatus, mustia hilachosa (Rhizoctonia solani, así como la incidencia (% de virosis y pudriciones radiculares. Fueron encontrados patógenos causantes de la muerte de plántulas (Fusarium spp., R. solani y Macrophomina phaseolina, enfermedades foliares predominantes (U. appendiculatus y R. solani, la presencia de virosis y finalmente los microorganismos promotores de pudriciones radiculares (fusariosis, pudrición de rhizoctonia y macrofomina. Fue evidenciado comportamiento diferenciado entre los cultivares evaluados. Los materiales que obtuvieron una menor intensidad de problemas fitosanitarios fueron el CAL - 96, EVG - 06 - 103, Cf4 0-0-4-8, INIAP-473 y Cf4 0-0-12-5

  9. Modern spectroscopic technique in the characterization of biosensitive macrocyclic Schiff base ligand and its complexes: Inhibitory activity against plantpathogenic fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Monika; Chandra, Sulekh; Akhtar, Jameel; Chand, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    Complexes of the type [M(L)Cl2], where M = Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) have been synthesized with a macrocyclic Schiff base ligand (1,4,5,7,10,11,12,15-octaaza,5,11,16,18-tetraphenyl, 3,4,12,13-tetramethyl cyclo-octadecane) derived from Schiff base (obtained by the condensation of 4-aminoantipyrine and dibenzoyl methane) and ethylenediamine. The ligand was characterized on the basis of elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR, EI Mass and molecular modeling studies while the complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance measurements, magnetic susceptibility measurements, IR, electronic and EPR spectral studies. All the complexes are non-electrolyte in nature. The covalency factor (β) and coefficient factor (α) suggest the covalent nature of the complexes. The ligand and its metal complexes have shown antifungal activity with their LD50 values determined by probit analysis against two economically important fungal plant pathogens i.e. Macrophomina phaseolina and Fusarium solani.

  10. Expression in Escherichia coli, purification, refolding and antifungal activity of an osmotin from Solanum nigrum

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    Campos, Magnólia de A; Silva, Marilia S; Magalhães, Cláudio P; Ribeiro, Simone G; Sarto, Rafael PD; Vieira, Eduardo A; Grossi de Sá, Maria F

    2008-01-01

    Background Heterologous protein expression in microorganisms may contribute to identify and demonstrate antifungal activity of novel proteins. The Solanum nigrum osmotin-like protein (SnOLP) gene encodes a member of pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins, from the PR-5 sub-group, the last comprising several proteins with different functions, including antifungal activity. Based on deduced amino acid sequence of SnOLP, computer modeling produced a tertiary structure which is indicative of antifungal activity. Results To validate the potential antifungal activity of SnOLP, a hexahistidine-tagged mature SnOLP form was overexpressed in Escherichia coli M15 strain carried out by a pQE30 vector construction. The urea solubilized His6-tagged mature SnOLP protein was affinity-purified by immobilized-metal (Ni2+) affinity column chromatography. As SnOLP requires the correct formation of eight disulfide bonds, not correctly formed in bacterial cells, we adapted an in vitro method to refold the E. coli expressed SnOLP by using reduced:oxidized gluthatione redox buffer. This method generated biologically active conformations of the recombinant mature SnOLP, which exerted antifungal action towards plant pathogenic fungi (Fusarium solani f. sp.glycines, Colletotrichum spp., Macrophomina phaseolina) and oomycete (Phytophthora nicotiana var. parasitica) under in vitro conditions. Conclusion Since SnOLP displays activity against economically important plant pathogenic fungi and oomycete, it represents a novel PR-5 protein with promising utility for biotechnological applications. PMID:18334031

  11. Control of Root Rot and Wilt Diseases of Roselle under Field Conditions

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    Hassan, Naglaa; Elsharkawy, Mohsen Mohamed; Shimizu, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) is one of the most important medicinal crops in many parts of the world. In this study, the effects of microelements, antioxidants, and bioagents on Fusarium oxysporum, F. solani, and Macrophomina phaseolina, the causal pathogens of root rot and wilt diseases in roselle, were examined under field conditions. Preliminary studies were carried out in vitro in order to select the most effective members to be used in field control trials. Our results showed that microelements (copper and manganese), antioxidants (salicylic acid, ascorbic acid, and EDTA), a fungicide (Dithane M45) and biological control agents (Trichoderma harzianum and Bacillus subtilis) were significantly reduced the linear growth of the causal pathogens. Additionally, application of the previous microelements, antioxidants, a fungicide and biological control agents significantly reduced disease incidence of root rot and wilt diseases under field conditions. Copper, salicylic acid, and T. harzianum showed the best results in this respect. In conclusion, microelements, antioxidants, and biocontrol agents could be used as alternative strategies to fungicides for controlling root rot and wilt diseases in roselle. PMID:25606010

  12. Sugarbeet root rot in drought conditions

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    Jasnić Stevan M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years several types of sugarbeet root rot have occurred in our country causing significant economic damage. The most frequent symptoms are leaf chlorosis and brown-black wet necrosis of the root. The necrosis spread through the entire root and vascular strands. In the course of this study F. oxysporum was the most frequently isolated from infected sugar beet roots. The incidence of other fungi (Fusarium solani, Rhizoctonia solani and Macrophomina phaseolina was much lower and it depended on weather conditions. High temperatures occurring during dry years encourage the development of F. oxysporum, the causer of sugar beet root rot. In 2000, an extremely dry year, plant vitality was satisfactory in the experiment with irrigation and the average root rot incidence was low (2,91%. In the nonirrigated variant the average incidence was high (71,02%. It may be concluded on the basis of the results from five years (2000-2004 that the major causal agents of sugarbeet root rot in our country are species from genus Fusarium, especially F. oxysporum. Fusarium wilt and root rot are due to the increased frequency of dry and warm years.

  13. Use of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the control od root-knot disease complex in tomato: the effects of different inoculum levels of Meloidogyne javanica and Rhizoctonia solani

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    I. A. Siddiqui

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The potential impact of Pseudomons aeruginosa strain IE-6 as a biological control agent against Meloidogyne javanica at four inoculum densities (0, 250, 500 and 1000 eggs/plant and Rhizoctonia solani at three inoeulum levels (0, 1 and 3 ml culture suspension/kg of soil was examined on tomato in the greenhouse experiments. The biocontrol bacterium suppressed root infection caused by R. solani and M. javanica on tomato in both sterilized and non-sterilized soils. Root-rot infection increased with the increase in pathogen(s concentration. P. aeruginosa showed better biocontrol effects at low population levels of M.javanica and R. solani than at higher population densities of the pathogen(s. Root-rot disease severity was more pronounced in sterilized soil compared to the non-sterilized one. Soil infested with high population densities ofR. solani (3 ml /kg of soil and M. javanica (2000 eggs/pot resulted in complete mortality of tomato seedlings in sterilized soil, whereas some plants were found to survive in non-stenlized soil. There seems to be a correlation between population density of M. javanica and root colonization by R. solani. Root colonization by other three root-infecting fungi including Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium oxysporum and Fusarium solani was also lower in the presence of P. aeruginosa in non-sterilized soil. P. aeruginosa enhanced plant growth in both types of soil.

  14. QUALIDADE FISIOLÓGICA E INCIDÊNCIA DE FUNGOS EM SEMENTES DE FEIJÃO CAUPI PRODUZIDAS DO ESTADO DO CEARÁ

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    Delineide Pereira Gomes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This work had the purpose evaluate physiological quality and incidence of fungi in twelve cowpea seeds cultivars, produced in the state of Ceará, Brazil, in 2005. The physiological quality was evaluated through the germination standard and vigour tests (First germination count and sanity quality was evaluated through the method paper filter (blotter test being used four repetitions of 100 seeds. In relation physiological potential of cultivars, it was observed that the cultivars presented low vigour, like Galanjão (0 %, Costela de Vaca (11,49 % and Parambú (16,6 %. The germination index were low too, except Sempre Verde with 70,33 % the germination of seedlings normal. In respect the incidence of fungi in the seeds, the Fusarium spp. was detected in 0,5 a 0,6 %, Colletotrichum only in Corujinha (0,5 %, Pingo de Ouro 3 (2 % and Macrophomina phaseolina was detected only in Costela de vaca and Pingo de ouro (0,5 % and Galanjão (7 %. The incidence of Aspergillus spp. was verified in all you cultivars and Penicillium sp. was detected only in Galanjão, Pingo de Ouro and Costela de Vaca (12 %. Others fungi like Curvularia sp., Phoma sp., Trichoderma sp. and Alternaria sp. were detected in low incidence. The seeds evaluated shown a low physiological quality and the most frequent fungi were those of storage.

  15. Antimicrobial activity screening of isolated flavonoids from Azadirachta indica leaves

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    QUDSIA KANWAL

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activities of two flavonoids, namely genistein 7-O-glucoside (1 and (–-epi-catechin (2, isolated from Azadirachta indica A. Juss (neem leaves, were evaluated against five fungal species, viz: Alternaria alternata (Fr. Keissler, Aspergillus fumigatus Fresenius, Aspergillus niger van Tieghem, Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi Goid. and Penicillium citrii, and four bacterial species, viz. Lactobacillus sp., Escherichia coli, Azospirillium lipoferum and Bacillus sp. Six concentrations, viz. 100, 300, 500, 700, 900 and 1000 ppm of each of the two flavonoids were employed using malt extract agar medium. All the concentrations of both the test compounds significantly suppressed fungal as well as bacterial growth. The highest concentration (1000 ppm of both fractions 1 and 2 reduced the growth of the different test fungal species by 83–99 % and 82–95 %, respectively. Compound 1 was highly effective against Lactobacillus sp., against which its various concentrations reduced the bacterial growth by 52–99.8 %. Compound 2 was highly effective against A. lipoferum and Bacillus sp., resulting in 94–100 % and 73–99% reduction in bacterial growth, respectively.

  16. Control of Root Rot and Wilt Diseases of Roselle under Field Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Naglaa; Elsharkawy, Mohsen Mohamed; Shimizu, Masafumi; Hyakumachi, Mitsuro

    2014-12-01

    Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) is one of the most important medicinal crops in many parts of the world. In this study, the effects of microelements, antioxidants, and bioagents on Fusarium oxysporum, F. solani, and Macrophomina phaseolina, the causal pathogens of root rot and wilt diseases in roselle, were examined under field conditions. Preliminary studies were carried out in vitro in order to select the most effective members to be used in field control trials. Our results showed that microelements (copper and manganese), antioxidants (salicylic acid, ascorbic acid, and EDTA), a fungicide (Dithane M45) and biological control agents (Trichoderma harzianum and Bacillus subtilis) were significantly reduced the linear growth of the causal pathogens. Additionally, application of the previous microelements, antioxidants, a fungicide and biological control agents significantly reduced disease incidence of root rot and wilt diseases under field conditions. Copper, salicylic acid, and T. harzianum showed the best results in this respect. In conclusion, microelements, antioxidants, and biocontrol agents could be used as alternative strategies to fungicides for controlling root rot and wilt diseases in roselle.

  17. Bioprospecting of plant growth promoting psychrotrophic Bacilli from the cold desert of north western Indian Himalayas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ajar Nath; Sachan, Shashwati Ghosh; Verma, Priyanka; Saxena, Anil Kumar

    2016-02-01

    The plant growth promoting psychrotrophic Bacilli were investigated from different sites in north western Indian Himalayas. A total of 247 morphotypes were obtained from different soil and water samples and were grouped into 43 clusters based on 16S rDNA-RFLP analysis with three restriction endonucleases. Sequencing of representative isolates has revealed that these 43 Bacilli belonged to different species of 11 genera viz., Desemzia, Exiguobacterium, Jeotgalicoccus, Lysinibacillus, Paenibacillus, Planococcus, Pontibacillus, Sinobaca, Sporosarcina, Staphylococcus and Virgibacillus. With an aim to develop microbial inoculants that can perform efficiently at low temperatures, all representative isolates were screened for different plant growth promoting traits at low temperatures (5-15 degrees C). Among the strains, variations were observed for production (%) of indole-3-acetic acid (20), ammonia (19), siderophores (11), gibberellic acid (4) and hydrogen cyanide (2); solubilisation (%) of zinc (14), phosphate (13) and potassium (7); 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase activity (6%) and biocontrol activity (4%) against Rhizoctonia solani and Macrophomina phaseolina. Among all the strains, Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus muralis, Desemzia incerta, Paenibacillus tylopili and Sporosarcina globispora were found to be potent candidates to be developed as inoculants as they exhibited multiple PGP traits at low temperature.

  18. Feeding and maturation by soybean looper (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larvae on soybean affected by weed, fungus, and nematode pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter-Wientjes, Carol H; Russin, John S; Boethel, David J; Griffin, James L; McGawley, Eduward C

    2004-02-01

    Feeding and maturation by the soybean looper, Pseudoplusia includens (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), were investigated in a 2-yr study on 'Davis' soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr., grown alone and combined with the weed hemp sesbania, Sesbania exaltata (Raf.) Rybd. ex. A. W. Hill, the root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid & White) Chitwood, and the charcoal rot fungus, Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid. Of the three pests, hemp sesbania had the greatest effects on plant growth and insect feeding and maturation. When fed foliage from soybean stressed by hemp sesbania, soybean looper larvae remained longer in feeding stages, consumed more foliage, and showed altered weight gain compared with larvae fed control foliage. Results suggest that nutrient (s) critical for proper development of larvae may have been limited in weed-stressed soybean foliage. Less dramatic results were observed when larvae fed on foliage from soybean with roots colonized by the charcoal rot fungus. Such larvae consumed more foliage, weighed more, and showed a slight increase in larval feeding period, but only in 1 yr of the study. Colonization of soybean roots by the root-knot nematode had no consistent effects on either the soybean host or insect.

  19. Xanthine oxidase/tyrosinase inhibiting, antioxidant, and antifungal oxindole alkaloids from Isatis costata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ijaz; Ijaz, Fozia; Fatima, Itrat; Ahmad, Nisar; Chen, Shilin; Afza, Nighat; Malik, Abdul

    2010-06-01

    Phytochemical investigations on the ethyl acetate soluble fraction of the whole plant of Isatis costata Linn. (Brassicaseae) led to the isolation of the oxindole alkaloids costinones A (1), B (2), isatinones A (3), B (4), indirubin (5), and trisindoline (6). Compounds 1-6 displayed significant to moderate inhibition against xanthine oxidase enzyme with IC50 values ranging from 90.3+/-0.06 to 179.6+/-0.04 microM, whereas the standard inhibitor of xanthine oxidase (allopurinol) had an IC(50) value of 7.4+/-0.07 microM. Compounds 1 (IC50 7.21+/-0.05 microM), 2 (IC50 9.40+/-0.03 microM), 3 (IC50 11.51+/-0.07 microM), 4 (IC50 12.53+/-0.06 microM), 5 (IC50 14.29+/-0.09 microM), and 6 (IC50 17.34+/-0.04 microM) exhibited pronounced activities when compared with the standard tyrosinase inhibitor L-mimosine (IC50 3.70+/-0.03 microM), along with DPPH radical scavenging activity with IC50 226, 270, 300, 320, 401, and 431 microM, respectively. The crude extract and compounds 1, 2, 5, and 6 showed significant antifungal activity against Trichophyton schoen leinii, Aspergillus niger, Candida albicans, Trichophyton simii, and Macrophomina phaseolina.

  20. Root rot diseases of sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L as affected by defloliation intensity

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    Karadimos Dimitros A.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the effect of sugar beet re-growth after water stress defoliation on root rots of three cultivars (Europa, Rival Corsica, which were spring sown in Thessaly, central Greece, for two growing seasons (2003-04. At the beginning of July, sugar beets were subjected to water deficit with irrigation withholding. A month later, three defoliation levels (control - C, moderate - MD, severe - SD and irrigation were applied. Thus, sugar beets were forced to re-grow and three harvests (15, 30 and 40 days after defoliation - DAD were conducted. Rotted roots per hectare were counted and pathogens were identified. Data were analyzed as a four-factor randomized complete block design with years, defoliation levels, sampling times and cultivars as main factors. The number of rotted roots was increased with the defoliation level and was significantly higher for SD sugar beets (3748 roots ha–1. No significant differences were found between C and MD treatments (1543 and 2116 roots ha–1, respectively. Rival was the most susceptible cultivar to root rots. Sugar beets were more susceptible to rotting 15 and 40 DAD (2778 and 2998 roots ha–1. The causal agents of root rots were the fungi, Fusarium spp., Rhizopus stolonifer, Macrophomina phaseolina and Rhizoctonia solani.

  1. Genome Sequencing of a Mung Bean Plant Growth Promoting Strain of P. aeruginosa with Biocontrol Ability

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    Devaraj Illakkiam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa PGPR2 is a mung bean rhizosphere strain that produces secondary metabolites and hydrolytic enzymes contributing to excellent antifungal activity against Macrophomina phaseolina, one of the prevalent fungal pathogens of mung bean. Genome sequencing was performed using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine generating 1,354,732 reads (6,772,433 sequenced bases achieving ~25-fold coverage of the genome. Reference genome assembly using MIRA 3.4.0 yielded 198 contigs. The draft genome of PGPR2 encoded 6803 open reading frames, of which 5314 were genes with predicted functions, 1489 were genes of known functions, and 80 were RNA-coding genes. Strain specific and core genes of P. aeruginosa PGPR2 that are relevant to rhizospheric habitat were identified by pangenome analysis. Genes involved in plant growth promoting function such as synthesis of ACC deaminase, indole-3-acetic acid, trehalose, mineral scavenging siderophores, hydrogen cyanide, chitinases, acyl homoserine lactones, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, and phytases were identified. In addition, niche-specific genes such as phosphate solubilising 3-phytase, adhesins, pathway-specific transcriptional regulators, a diguanylate cyclase involved in cellulose synthesis, a receptor for ferrienterochelin, a DEAD/DEAH-box helicase involved in stress tolerance, chemotaxis/motility determinants, an HtpX protease, and enzymes involved in the production of a chromanone derivative with potent antifungal activity were identified.

  2. Efeito de lodo de esgoto sobre patógenos habitantes do solo e severidade de oídio da soja Effect of sewage sludge in soil-borne pathogens and powdery mildew severity in soybean

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    Fabio Fernando de Araújo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available O lodo de esgoto, atendendo as exigências ambientais, apresenta potencial para disposição em solos agrícolas. Sua incorporação altera as propriedades químicas, físicas e biológicas do solo, pois é rico em macro e micronutrientes e matéria orgânica. Estas alterações podem proporcionar benefícios como aumento da disponibilidade de nutrientes às culturas, indução de supressividade a fitopatógenos habitantes do solo e de resistência às doenças da parte aérea. Por outro lado, pode influenciar negativamente o equilíbrio biológico e químico no solo, devido à presença de contaminantes. O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar os efeitos da incorporação de lodo de esgoto ao solo sobre a severidade de oídio (Erysiphe diffusa e na supressividade a Rhizoctonia solani e a Macrophomina phaseolina da soja (Glycine max. Para tanto, foram utilizados solos que receberam quatro aplicações (1999 a 2001 sucessivas de lodos de esgoto originários das Estações de Tratamento de Esgoto de Barueri e de Franca, SP, nas concentrações de 0, 1, 2, 4 e 8 vezes (0N a 8N a dose de N recomendada para a cultura do milho. Os estudos com oídio foram realizados em casa de vegetação com inoculação natural em dois cultivos sucessivos de soja. Também foi estudado o efeito de substrato produzido com 0%, 2,5%, 5% 10%, 15% e 20% de lodo de Franca sobre a emergência de plântulas e sobre a severidade de oídio da soja em três e dois ciclos, respectivamente. Nos estudos com R. solani e M. phaseolina, os solos foram artificialmente infestados com os patógenos e posteriormente cultivados com soja por dois ciclos, sendo avaliado o tombamento e a severidade das doenças. A aplicação de lodo de esgoto no solo aumentou a atividade eliciadora de fitoalexinas em soja e a severidade do oídio foi inversamente proporcional às concentrações do lodo, tanto no estudo com o solo de campo, como com o substrato obtido com o lodo de Franca. A emergência das pl

  3. Resistencia a sequía terminal en frijol negro tropical Comportamiento de variedades de maíz normal y con alta calidad de proteína para la región Golfo de México

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    Mark Frahm

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Con el objetivo de identificar cultivares de frijol negro tropical con resistencia a sequía y adaptación a la región Centroamericana, se diseñó un proyecto piloto colaborativo entre los programas de frijol de Zamorano, Honduras; Veracruz, México y la Universidad Estatal de Michigan (MSU; EE.UU, en el año 2002. Se desarrollaron dos poblaciones de líneas endog ámicas recombinantes (RILs derivadas de cruces entre la lí- nea resistente a sequía B98311 de MSU con TLP 19 y VAX 5, dos líneas mejoradas del CIAT con resistencia a enfermedades y adaptadas a las condiciones de América Central y México. Ambas poblaciones se evaluaron bajo riego y sequía terminal en Zamorano, Honduras y Veracruz, México. Los rendimientos se vieron reducidos por la sequía y por Macrophomina phaseolina, hongo causal de la pudrición carbonosa. El estrés por sequía, la presión de la enfermedad y los bajos rendimientos, contribuyeron a la obtención de altos coeficientes de variación, lo que hizo difícil la identificación y selecci ón de líneas superiores. La selección se basó en la posici ón de la media geométrica del rendimiento (MG calculada para cada línea con los datos de ambos tratamientos, riego y sequía. La línea L88-63 ocupó el primer lugar en la MG del rendimiento en ambas localidades. Evaluaciones posteriores conducidas en Honduras y Michigan, confirmaron el alto potencial de rendimiento y amplia adaptación de la línea L88- 63. El mejoramiento de la resistencia a la sequía en ambientes del trópico bajo, requiere la incorporación adicional de resistencia a M. phaseolina en las nuevas líneas consideradas para liberarse como nuevas variedades en esta región.

  4. Efeitos da simulação da solarização do solo com materiais vegetais sobre o crescimento micelial de fungos fitopatogênicos habitantes do solo

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    Marco Antonio Basseto

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A incorporação de materiais vegetais específicos associados à solarização do solo tem sido um avanço promissor no controle de fungos fitopatogênicos habitantes do solo. O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar determinados efeitos da incorporação e decomposição de brócolis, mamona, mandioca brava e mansa, no solo, em condições de microcosmo mantido em BOD (37±2ºC, sobre o micélio de Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici Raça 2, Macrophomina phaseolina, Rhizoctonia solani AG-4 HGI e de Sclerotium rolfsii. Assim, quatro ensaios idênticos foram instalados em conjunto de microcosmos, com cinco tratamentos e quatro períodos de tempo diferentes e independentes (7, 14, 21 e 28 dias. O parâmetro avaliado foi os efeitos inócuo, fungistático e fungicida dos tratamentos sobre o micélio dos fungos. Verificou-se efeito fungistático e fungicida no crescimento micelial de F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici Raça 2, R. solani AG-4 HGI e de S. rolfsii. Os fungos que apresentaram efeito fungistático apresentaram uma velocidade média de crescimento micelial inferior ao controle geral, que consistiu na incubação dos fungos em temperatura de 25±2ºC. O efeito fungicida ocorreu aos 21 dias de incubação para F. oxysporum e R. solani e aos 28 dias para S. rolfsii. Para M. phaseolina, observou-se apenas efeito inócuo. Associação da temperatura de 37±2ºC mais o período de tempo dos tratamentos foi o fator responsável pelos efeitos fungistático e fungicida no micélio dos fitopatógenos estudados. Essa associação também interferiu na velocidade do crescimento micelial dos fungos que apresentaram efeito fungistático.

  5. Effect of composts on microbial dynamics and activity, dry root rot severity and seed yield of cowpea in the Indian arid region

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    Meenu BAREJA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutrient-deficient sandy soil, having poor moisture retention, favors  Macrophomina phaseolina, a soil-borne plant pathogen, occurring in severe form on many important crops grown in the Indian arid region. In a 2-year field experiment, five composts (4 ton/ha prepared from residues of Calotropis procera, Prosopis juliflora, Azadirachta indica, Acacia nilotica, and on-farm weeds were tested on cowpea (Vigna unguiculata to determine their effectiveness in limiting the  severity of charcoal rot caused by M. phaseolina in relation to the microbial population dynamics, microbial activity and the seed yield of cowpea.  In general, compost-amended plots retained 8.9% higher moisture than unamended plots. The microbial population increased in amended plots during the crop season. Populations of total fungi and actinomycetes were heighest in Calotropis compost-amended soil, while total bacteria were maximum in weed- compost amended soil. Microbial activity in amended plots was  26.3% higher than in unamended plots. Among trace elements,  uptake of Zn, Mn, Fe and Cu was  heighest  in plants grown in weed-compost amended soil followed by A. nilotica compost-amended soil. Soil amendment with the composts significantly reduced  plant mortality due to charcoal rot. The lowest mortality was recorded in plants amended with A. nilotica compost (5.5% followed by P. juliflora compost (5.8, while the  highest plant mortality (11.5% from charcoal rot occurred in the unamended control on the basis of the pooled average of two years. There was a significant inverse correlation between microbial activity and charcoal rot incidence in cowpea at 20 days after planting. Composts also had a beneficial effect on yield, with a 28.3% increase in seed yield in P. juliflora compost-amended plots. These results suggest that in resource-deficient farming , certain on-farm wastes can be effectively utilized for managing soil-borne pathogens, as well as  for

  6. Improvement of Biocontrol of Damping-off and Root Rot/Wilt of Faba Bean by Salicylic Acid and Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Monaim, Montaser Fawzy

    2013-03-01

    Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium solani, F. oxysporum, and Macrophomina phaseolina were found to be associated with root rott and wilt symptoms of faba bean plants collected from different fieldes in New Valley governorate, Egypt. All the obtained isolates were able to attack faba bean plants (cv. Giza 40) causing damping-off and root rot/wilt diseases. R. solani isolates 2 and 5, F. solani isolate 8, F. oxysporum isolate 12 and M. phaseolina isolate 14 were the more virulent ones in the pathogenicity tests. Biocontrol agents (Trichoderma viride and Bacillus megaterium) and chemical inducers (salicylic acid [SA] and hydrogen peroxide) individually or in combination were examined for biological control of damping-off and root rot/wilt and growth promoting of faba bean plants in vitro and in vivo. Both antagonistic biocontrol agents and chemical inducers either individually or in combination inhibited growth of the tested pathogenic fungi. Biocontrol agents combined with chemical inducers recorded the highest inhibited growth especially in case SA + T. viride and SA + B. megaterium. Under green house and field conditions, all treatments significantly reduced damping-off and root rot/wilt severity and increased of survival plants. Also, these treatments increased fresh and weights of the survival plants in pots compared with control. The combination between biocontrol agents and chemical inducers were more effective than used of them individually and SA + T. viride was the best treatment in this respect. Also, under field conditions, all these treatments significantly increased growth parameters (plant height and number of branches per plant) and yield components (number of pods per plant and number of seeds per plant, weight of 100 seeds and total yield per feddan) and protein content in both seasons (2010~2011 and 2011~2012). Faba bean seeds soaked in SA + T. viride and SA + B. megaterium were recorded the highest growth parameters and yield components. Generally, the

  7. Sobrevivência de fungos fitopatogênicos habitantes do solo, em microcosmo, simulando solarização com prévia incorporação de materiais orgânicos Survival of soilborne plant pathogenic fungi in soil solarization simulation (microcosm associated with the incorporation of organic materials

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    Márcia Michelle de Queiroz Ambrósio

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Os fungos fitopatogênicos habitantes do solo podem sobreviver por vários anos nesse ambiente por meio de estruturas de resistência, causando perdas em muitas culturas, por vezes, inviabilizando o pleno aproveitamento de vastas áreas agrícolas. O uso de materiais orgânicos no solo consorciado com a técnica de solarização propicia a retenção de compostos voláteis fungitóxicos emanados da rápida degradação dos materiais e que são letais a vários fitopatógenos. O objetivo deste experimento foi à prospecção de novos materiais orgânicos que produzissem voláteis fungitóxicos capazes de controlar fungos fitopatogênicos habitantes do solo, em condições de associação com a simulação da técnica de solarização (microcosmo. Portanto, o presente trabalho consistiu de seis tratamentos (Solarizado; Solarizado+Brócolos; Solarizado+Eucalipto; Solarizado+Mamona; Solarizado+Mandioca e Laboratório e cinco períodos (0, 7, 14, 21 e 28 dias para avaliar a sobrevivência de quatro fungos de solo (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici Raça 2; Macrophomina phaseolina; Rhizoctonia solani AG-4 HGI e Sclerotium rolfsii. Em cada uma das duas câmaras de vidro (microcosmo por dia avaliado continha uma bolsa de náilon contendo as estruturas de resistência de cada fitopatógeno. Estruturas dos fitopatógenos foram mantidas também em condições de laboratório como referencial de controle. Todos os materiais quando associados à simulação da solarização propiciaram o controle de todos os fitopatógenos estudados, entretanto, foi observado variação no controle dos fungos. O tratamento que apenas simulou a solarização não controlou nenhum fitopatógeno.Soilborne phytopathogenic fungi can survive for several years in Laboratory and five periods (0, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days to evaluate soil through resistance structures and it causes losses in several crops the survival of four soil fungi (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici making

  8. Gavatero-203, nueva variedad de sorgo forrajero para el estado de Sinaloa Gavatero-203, new sorghum forage cultivar for the State of Sinaloa

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    Luis Alberto Hernández Espinal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available La nueva variedad de sorgo Gavatero-203, fue desarrollado en el Campo Experimental Valle de Culiacán del INIFAP y registrado con el número 2205-SOG-529-090209/C en el catálogo de variedades factibles de certificación de México. Esta variedad se adapta a las áreas productoras de sorgo para el estado de Sinaloa. Gavatero-203 es una variedad de grano rojo y se recomienda para condiciones de riego y temporal. El rendimiento promedio de la variedad es de 2 849 kg ha-1 de grano y 35 367 kg ha-1 de forraje verde, supera en promedio 18.5% y 15.4% respectivamente al rendimiento de híbridos comerciales de compañías privadas, que se cultivan en la región bajo las mismas condiciones. Gavatero-203 tiene mejor calidad bromatológica que los híbridos comerciales en el forraje, con un 7.3% de proteína y 66.4% de digestibilidad, supera en promedio 1% y 6% respectivamente, a los híbridos comerciales. Es tolerante a enfermedades que se presentan en la región, como son: ergot (Claviceps african, antracnosis (Colletotrichum graminícola, tizón de la panoja (Fusarium moniliforme y pudrición carbonosa del tallo (Macrophomina phaseolina. El forraje de sorgo Gavatero-203, se recomienda como un material de doble propósito en prácticas de conservación de forraje como henificado y ensilaje.The new sorghum variety Gavatero-203 was developed at Culiacán Valley Experiment Station of the National Research Forestry, Agriculture and Livestock Institute (INIFAP and was registered with the number 2205-SOG-529-090209/C in the Catalogue of Feasible Varieties of Certification in Mexico. This variety is adapted to sorghum-producing areas in State of Sinaloa, Mexico.The variety Gavatero-203 has red grain and is recommended either for irrigation and rainfall areas. The average yield of the variety is 2 849 kg ha-1 of grain and 35 367 kg ha-1 of green forage, which is 18.5% and 15.4% higher than the grain and fresh forage yield of commercial hybrids from private

  9. Costeño-201: nueva variedad de sorgo de temporal de doble propósito para Sinaloa Costeño-201: a new variety of rianfed sorghum of dual purpose in Sinaloa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Hernández Espinal

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available La nueva variedad de sorgo Costeño-201, fue desarrollado en el Campo Experimental Valle de Culiacán (CEVACU del Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agrícolas y Pecuarias (INIFAP, con número de registro SOG-200389-182 en el Catálogo de Variedades Factibles de Certificación (CVC de México. Esta variedad se adapta a las áreas productoras de sorgo para el estado de Sinaloa. Costeño-201 es una variedad de grano crema y se recomienda para condiciones de riego y temporal. El rendimiento promedio de la variedad es de 3 292 kg ha-1 de grano y 25 517 kg ha-1 de forraje verde, supera en rendimiento promedio de 8.8% y 12.4% respectivamente a híbridos comerciales de compañías privadas, que se cultivan en la región bajo las mismas condiciones. Costeño-201 tiene mejor calidad bromatológica que los híbridos comerciales en el forraje, con 9.5% de proteína y 64% de digestibilidad, supera en promedio 2.7% y 5% respectivamente a híbridos comerciales. Es tolerante a enfermedades que se presentan en la región, como son: ergot (Claviceps african, antracnosis (Colletotrichum graminícola, tizón de la panoja (Fusarium moniliforme y pudrición carbonosa del tallo (Macrophomina phaseolina. El forraje de sorgo Costeño-201, se recomienda como un material de doble propósito en prácticas de conservación del forraje como henificado y ensilaje.The new sorghum variety Costeño-201 was developed in the Experimental Field Culiacan (CEVACU of the National Research Institute for Forestry, Agriculture and Livestock (INIFAP, with the registration number SOG-200389-182 in the Catalog of Feasible Certification Varieties (CVC of Mexico. This variety is adapted to the sorghum-producing areas of Sinaloa State. Costeño-201, is a cream-grain variety and is recommended for irrigated and rainfed conditions. The average yield of the variety is 3 292 kg ha-1 grain and 25 517 kg ha-1 of green fodder, it outperforms on average of 8.8% and 12.4% respectively

  10. Método do rolo de papel toalha modificado para a detecção de Sclerotinia sclerotiorum em sementes de feijão Modification of the paper towel seed health test for the detection of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in bean seeds (Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João José Dias Parisi

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available O mofo branco do feijoeiro, causado pelo fungo Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib. de Bary, é uma das principais doenças da cultura. O patógeno pode ser disseminado por sementes infectadas, que têm um importante papel na infestação de novas áreas de plantio e no estabelecimento da doença no início do ciclo da cultura. Este trabalho apresenta uma adaptação do método do rolo de papel toalha, originalmente desenvolvido para a detecção de Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, com o objetivo de detectar a presença de S. sclerotiorum em sementes de feijão. Neste método, as sementes foram incubadas por 7 dias a 20 ºC em rolos de papel toalha para germinação, sendo mantidas sob condições de 100% de umidade relativa. Após esse período, as plântulas infeccionadas e as sementes mortas, circundadas por micélio característico de S. sclerotiorum, foram transportadas para caixas tipo gerbox, sobre duas folhas de papel de filtro umedecido. Após 3 a 4 dias de incubação a 20 ºC e sob regime de 12 horas de luz por 12 horas de escuro, os escleródios foram observados nas sementes e plântulas. O método foi relativamente rápido, simples e barato, além de apresentar a vantagem de possibilitar a detecção simultânea de S. sclerotiorum e de outros importantes patógenos transmitidos por sementes de feijão, como C. lindemuthianum, Macrophomina phaseolina e Rhizoctonia solani.White mold, caused by the fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib. is one of the most damaging diseases of beans. Dissemination of the pathogen by infected seeds is important because it can infest new planting areas and the disease may establish in the beginning of the crop cycle. The present work describes an adaptation of the seed health test using the germination paper towel method, originally developed for the detection of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, for assessing the presence of S. sclerotiorum in bean seeds. The test consisted of placing bean seeds in germination paper

  11. Culturable diversity and functional annotation of psychrotrophic bacteria from cold desert of Leh Ladakh (India).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ajar Nath; Sachan, Shashwati Ghosh; Verma, Priyanka; Tyagi, Satya Prakash; Kaushik, Rajeev; Saxena, Anil K

    2015-01-01

    To study culturable bacterial diversity under subzero temperature conditions and their possible functional annotation, soil and water samples from Leh Ladakh region were analysed. Ten different nutrient combinations were used to isolate the maximum possible culturable morphotypes. A total of 325 bacterial isolates were characterized employing 16S rDNA-Amplified Ribosomal DNA Restriction Analysis with three restriction endonucleases AluI, MspI and HaeIII, which led to formation of 23-40 groups for the different sites at 75 % similarity index, adding up to 175 groups. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing led to the identification of 175 bacteria, grouped in four phyla, Firmicutes (54 %), Proteobacteria (28 %), Actinobacteria (16 %) and Bacteroidetes (3 %), and included 29 different genera with 57 distinct species. Overall 39 % of the total morphotypes belonged to the Bacillus and Bacillus derived genera (BBDG) followed by Pseudomonas (14 %), Arthrobacter (9 %), Exiguobacterium (8 %), Alishewanella (4 %), Brachybacterium, Providencia, Planococcus (3 %), Janthinobacterium, Sphingobacterium, Kocuria (2 %) and Aurantimonas, Citricoccus, Cellulosimicrobium, Brevundimonas, Desemzia, Flavobacterium, Klebsiella, Paracoccus, Psychrobacter, Sporosarcina, Staphylococcus, Sinobaca, Stenotrophomonas, Sanguibacter, Vibrio (1 %). The representative isolates from each cluster were screened for their plant growth promoting characteristics at low temperature (5-15 °C). Variations were observed among strains for production of ammonia, hydrogen cyanide, indole-3-acetic acid and siderophore, solubilisation of phosphate, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase activity and biocontrol activity against Rhizoctonia solani and Macrophomina phaseolina. Cold adapted microbes may have application as inoculants and biocontrol agents in crops growing at high altitudes under cold climate condition.

  12. Native isolate of Trichoderma: a biocontrol agent with unique stress tolerance properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, N; Khan, S S; Sundari, S Krishna

    2016-08-01

    Species of Trichoderma are widely recognized for their biocontrol abilities, but seldom studied collectively, for their plant growth promotion, abiotic stress tolerance and bioremediation properties. Our study is a concentrated effort to establish the potential of native isolate Trichoderma harzianum KSNM (T103) to tolerate biotic (root pathogens) and abiotic stresses [high salt (100-1000 mM); heavy metal (chromium, nickel and zinc: 1-10 mM); pesticides: malathion (100-600 ppm), carbofuran (100-600 ppb)], along with its ability to support plant growth. In vitro growth promotion assays with T103 treated Vigna radiata, Vigna mungo and Hordeum vulgare confirmed 'non-species specific' growth promotion effects of T103. At lower metal concentration, T103 treatment was found to completely negate the impact of metal stress [60 % increase in radicle length (RL) with no significant decrease in %germination (%G)]. Even at 10 mM metal, T103 inoculation gave 80 % increase in %G and >50 % increase in RL. In vitro experiments confirmed high metal reduction capacity (47 %-Cr, 35 %-Ni and 42 %-Zn) of T103 at concentrations as high as 4 mM. At maximum residual concentrations of malathion (440 ppm) and carbofuran (100 ppb) reported in agricultural soils, T103 maintained 80 and 100 % survivability, respectively. T103 treatment has improved %G and RL in all three hosts challenged with pesticide. Isolate T103 was found to effectively suppress growth of three major root pathogens: Macrophomina phaseolina (65.83 %) followed by Sclerotium rolfsii (19.33 %) and Fusarium oxysporum (19.18 %). In the light of these observations, native T. harzianum (T103) seems to be a competent biocontrol agent for tropical agricultural soils contaminated with residual pesticides and heavy metals.

  13. Efeitos da rotação de culturas na incidência de podridões radiciais e na produtividade da soja

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    Erlei Melo Reis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Em experimentos conduzidos no campo, no sistema plantio direto, nas safras de verão de 2003/04, 2004/05 e 2005/06 foram avaliados os efeitos de culturas de inverno, da rotação e da monocultura sobre a emergência de plântulas, na incidência de podridões radiciais e no rendimento de grãos da soja. Demonstrou-se não haver efeitos das culturas de inverno sobre a emergência de plântulas da soja. Quanto à incidência de podridões radiciais em monocultura foi registrada uma intensidade de até 99,2%. O maior rendimento de grãos foi obtido na soja cultivada em rotação com uma safra com milho. Os fungos isolados do sistema radicial de plantas infectadas foram, Macrophomina phaseolina, Phomopsis sp., Fusarium spp. e Colletotrichum truncata. O solo da área experimental pode ser considerado supressivo aos fatores que reduzem a germinação, a emergência de plântulas e de morte de plântulas/plantas de soja. Quanto ao seu efeito em reduzir as podridões radiciais, ainda não se detectou efeito supressivo, porém a rotação da soja com o milho reduziu a incidência de podridões radiciais e aumentou o rendimento de grãos da soja.

  14. ENFERMEDADES Y COMPONENTES DE RENDIMIENTO EN LÍNEAS DE FRÉJOL BAJO TRES DENSIDADES DE SIEMBRA

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    Felipe Rafael Garc\\u00E9s-Fiallos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo fue evaluar las enfermedades, el rendimiento y sus componen - tes en líneas de fréjol bajo tres distanciamientos de siembra. El trabajo se realizó durante la época seca del año 2011, en la Universidad Técnica Estatal de Quevedo (UTEQ, Quevedo, Ecuador. Se determinó la incidencia y severidad de la roya ( Uromyces appendiculatus y mustia hilachosa ( Rizoctonia solani en los estadíos R7 (formación en legumbres y R8 (llenado de legumbres, y después de la cosecha la incidencia de las pudriciones radiculares ( Macrophomina phaseolina y R. solani . Los componentes de rendimiento (número de nudos, legumbres, granos, granos por legumbre, legumbres estériles y granos por planta y peso de granos. Se empleó un Diseño de Bloques Completos al Azar (DBCA con doce tratamientos y tres repeticiones, con arreglo factorial de 4 (líneas promisorias x 3 (planta/m. Para la comparación entre las medias de los tratamientos se empleó la prueba de Tukey al 5% de probabilidad del error. Las líneas promisorias de fréjol EVG 06-103 y SER-03 presentaron menor intensidad de enfermedades. Un aumento en la densidad poblacional causó un acrecentamiento en la intensidad de la roya. Las líneas SER-08 y SER-03 obtuvieron la mayor productividad según la mayoría de componentes de rendimiento y peso de granos. Finalmente, el incremento de la densidad de plantas promovió reducción significativa en el número de legumbres, granos y granos por legumbre por planta, contrario al aumento observado en el peso de granos

  15. Rhizoctonia root rot (Rhizoctoni solani K ü h n of sugar beet in province Vojvodina

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    Stojšin Vera B.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sugar beet root rot appears regularly each year, but its intensity depends on agro ecological conditions. The predominant causers of root rot in Vojvodina are fungi from Fusarium genus and species Macrophomina phaseolina. Over the last couple of years, more intense occurrence of Rhizoctonia root rot has been observed. Rhizoctonia solani, the causal agent of root rot is present in sugar beet fields. During 2000-2005, on the territory of Vojvodina, the frequency of Rhizoctonia solani in phytopathological isolations from rotted sugar beet roots was between 0,0-18,2%. The intensity of the disease depends on localities, agro ecological conditions and genotypes. Symptoms of Rhizoctonia root rot were registered at some localities in all regions of Vojvodina: Srem, Banat and Bačka. The disease appearance is above all local. It occurs in small patches, on heavy, non-structured soil and on depressed wet parts of plots. Individual diseased plants can be found during July. Brown rot appears on sugar beet roots, with dried tissue on surface, which is present on the tail as well as on the middle part and the head of root. Tissues with described symptoms are deeper regarding the healthy part of root. On vertical root section, the necrotic changes are clearly visible comparing to tissue section without symptoms. The heavily infected tissue forms fissures on roots in most cases. Besides the above-mentioned symptoms on roots, the plant wilting and leaf handle necrosis as well as leaf dying are also observed. When rot spreads to the whole root head, plants quickly die.

  16. Banana peel culture as an indigenous medium for easy identification of late-sporulation human fungal pathogens

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    A J Kindo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Fungi are increasing in incidence as human pathogens and newer and rarer species are continuously being encountered. Identifying these species from growth on regular culture media may be challenging due to the absence of typical features. An indigenous and cheap medium, similar to the natural substrate of these fungi, was standardised in our laboratory as an aid to species identification in a conventional laboratory setting. Materials and Methods: Ripe banana peel pieces, sterilised in an autoclave at 121°C temperature and 15 lbs pressure for 15 min promoted good growth of hyphae and pycnidia or acervuli in coelomycetes, flabelliform and medusoid fruiting bodies of basidiomycetes and fruit bodies such as cleistothecium in ascomycetes. The growth from the primary isolation medium was taken and inoculated onto the pieces of double-autoclaved ripe banana peel pieces in a sterile glass Petri dish with some moisture (sprinkles of sterile distilled water. A few sterile coverslips were placed randomly inside the Petri dish for the growing fungus to stick on to it. The plates were kept at room temperature and left undisturbed for 15–20 days. At a time, one coverslip was taken out and placed on a slide with lactophenol cotton blue and focused under the microscope to look for fruit bodies. Results: Lasiodiplodia theobromae, Macrophomina phaseolina, Nigrospora sphaerica, Chaetomium murorum, Nattrassia mangiferae and Schizophyllum commune were identified by characteristic features from growth on banana peel culture. Conclusions: Banana peel culture is a cheap and effective medium resembling the natural substrate of fungi and is useful for promoting characteristic reproductive structures that aid identification.

  17. Genome-Wide Association Study on Resistance to Stalk Rot Diseases in Grain Sorghum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyanju, Adedayo; Little, Christopher; Yu, Jianming; Tesso, Tesfaye

    2015-04-16

    Stalk rots are important biotic constraints to sorghum production worldwide. Several pathogens may be associated with the disease, but Macrophomina phaseolina and Fusarium thapsinum are recognized as the major causal organisms. The diseases become more aggressive when drought and high-temperature stress occur during grain filling. Progress in genetic improvement efforts has been slow due to lack of effective phenotyping protocol and the strong environmental effect on disease incidence and severity. Deployment of modern molecular tools is expected to accelerate efforts to develop resistant hybrids. This study was aimed at identifying genomic regions associated with resistance to both causal organisms. A sorghum diversity panel consisting of 300 genotypes assembled from different parts of the world was evaluated for response to infection by both pathogens. Community resources of 79,132 single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) markers developed on the panel were used in association studies using a multi-locus mixed model to map loci associated with stalk rot resistance. Adequate genetic variation was observed for resistance to both pathogens. Structure analysis grouped the genotypes into five subpopulations primarily based on the racial category of the genotypes. Fourteen loci and a set of candidate genes appear to be involved in connected functions controlling plant defense response. However, each associated SNP had relatively small effect on the traits, accounting for 19-30% of phenotypic variation. Linkage disequilibrium analyses suggest that significant SNPs are genetically independent. Estimation of frequencies of associated alleles revealed that durra and caudatum subpopulations were enriched for resistant alleles, but the results suggest complex molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to both pathogens. Copyright © 2015 Adeyanju et al.

  18. Molecular docking simulation studies on potent butyrylcholinesterase inhibitors obtained from microbial transformation of dihydrotestosterone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Biotransformation is an effective technique for the synthesis of libraries of bioactive compounds. Current study on microbial transformation of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) (1) was carried out to produce various functionalized metabolites. Results Microbial transformation of DHT (1) by using two fungal cultures resulted in potent butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitors. Biotransformation with Macrophomina phaseolina led to the formation of two known products, 5α-androstan-3β,17β-diol (2), and 5β-androstan-3α,17β-diol (3), while biotransformation with Gibberella fujikuroi yielded six known metabolites, 11α,17β-dihydroxyandrost-4-en-3-one (4), androst-1,4-dien-3,17-dione (5), 11α-hydroxyandrost-4-en-3,17-dione (6), 11α-hydroxyandrost-1,4-dien-3,17-dione (7), 12β-hydroxyandrost-1,4-dien-3,17-dione (8), and 16α-hydroxyandrost-1,4-dien-3,17-dione (9). Metabolites 2 and 3 were found to be inactive, while metabolite 4 only weakly inhibited the enzyme. Metabolites 5–7 were identified as significant inhibitors of BChE. Furthermore, predicted results from docking simulation studies were in complete agreement with experimental data. Theoretical results were found to be helpful in explaining the possible mode of action of these newly discovered potent BChE inhibitors. Compounds 8 and 9 were not evaluated for enzyme inhibition activity both in vitro and in silico, due to lack of sufficient quantities. Conclusion Biotransformation of DHT (1) with two fungal cultures produced eight known metabolites. Metabolites 5–7 effectively inhibited the BChE activity. Cholinesterase inhibition is among the key strategies in the management of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The experimental findings were further validated by in silico inhibition studies and possible modes of action were deduced. PMID:24103815

  19. Microbial transformation of anti-cancer steroid exemestane and cytotoxicity of its metabolites against cancer cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Microbial transformation of steroids has been extensively used for the synthesis of steroidal drugs, that often yield novel analogues, not easy to obtain by chemical synthesis. We report here fungal transformation of a synthetic steroidal drug, exemestane, used for the treatment of breast cancer and function through inhibition of aromatase enzyme. Results Microbial transformation of anti-cancer steroid, exemestane (1), was investigated by using two filamentous fungi. Incubation of 1 with fungi Macrophomina phaseolina, and Fusarium lini afforded three new, 11α-hydroxy-6-methylene-androsta-1, 4-diene-3,17-dione (2), 16β, 17β-dihydroxy-6-methylene-androsta-1, 4-diene-3-one (3), and 17β-hydroxy-6-methylene-androsta-1, 4-diene-3, 16-dione (4), and one known metabolites, 17β-hydroxy-6-methylene-androsta-1, 4-diene-3-one (5). Their structures were deduced spectroscopically. Compared to 1 (steroidal aromatase inactivator), the transformed metabolites were also evaluated for cytotoxic activity by using a cell viability assay against cancer cell lines (HeLa and PC3). Metabolite 2 was found to be moderately active against both the cell lines. Conclusions Biotransformation of exemestane (1) provides an efficient method for the synthesis of new analogues of 1. The metabolites were obtained as a result of reduction of double bond and hydroxylation. The transformed product 2 exhibited a moderate activity against cancer cell lines (HeLa and PC3). These transformed products can be studied for their potential as drug candidates. PMID:23537428

  20. Occurrence and identification of the etiologic agents of plant diseases in cactus (Opuntia ficus-indica Mill. in the semi-arid region of Paraiba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Evelyne Franco de Souza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cactus forage (Opuntia ficus-indica Mill., intensely cultivated in dry regions of northeast Brazil, although well adapted to the harsh semi-arid climate is affected by major problems such as pests and diseases, responsible for significant losses in production. This study aimed to investigate the occurrence and diversity of the etiologic agents of diseases of cactus cultivated in 38 municipalities in the semi-arid region of Paraiba. The analyses were conducted and processed at the Laboratory of Phytopathology of the Centro de Ciências Agrárias da Universidade Federal da Paraíba, in Areia - PB. Starting from sick cladodes isolations, multiplications and identifications of the found microorganisms were made. The identification of the microorganisms was achieved through observations of the macro and micromorphological characteristics of the cultures and tests of Gram and pathogenicity. Great incidence and diversity of microorganisms was verified in the cacti researched, but the highest occurrence was mainly that of fungus. The fungi of widest occurrence were: Scytallidium lignicola, Alternate tenuis, Macrophomina phaseolina, Cladosporium cladosporides, Lasiodiplodia theobromae, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. opuntiarum, Curvularia lunata, Aspergillus niger, Nigrospora sphaerica, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Exserohilum turcicum, Pestalotia pitospora, Rhizopus stolonifer, Rhizoctonia solani and Sphaceloma protearum. A bacterium was also detected that was suspected to belong to the Erwinia sp. strain. Satisfaction of the Postulates of Koch proved the infectious nature of the detected microorganisms. High occurrence of the fungus S. lignicola, an agent of scale rot disease in 100% of the places researched, was observed. This fact is of great concern, since the progression of the disease can cause significant losses in production.

  1. Seed-storage Mycoflora of Peanut Cultivars Grown in Nigerian Savanna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nwankiti, AO.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Storage of peanut is increasingly becoming important both among growers and users of the crop in Nigerian savanna. The aim is to sell the produce and maximize benefits accruing from the crops during scarcity. Very often, these envisaged advantages fail due to unfavourable market forces, thus compelling them to sell at a loss or store them across seasons for periods ranging from one to two years. However, information on fungi associated with storage of such peanuts in Nigerian savanna and its attendant problems are yet to be investigated. Thus, the seed mycoflora and viability seven common peanut cultivars stored under conditions similar to traditional settings were investigated using different isolating techniques. The peanut cultivars were RMP 12, RMP 91, RRB, 48-115B, M554-76, 55-437 Ex-Dakar and a local cultivar. None of these cultivars possessed resistance to in vitro colonization by fungi. Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus and Rhizopus stolonifer were consistently isolated from all the cultivars from almost all isolating techniques. Other fungi were Fusarium chlamydosporium, F. roseum, F. oxysporium, Penicillium spp., Curvularia spp., Botryodiplodia theobromae, Macrophomina phaseolina and Sclerotium rolfsii. Relative percentages, however, varied with individual fungi and peanut cultivars. The test with seven different types of growth media gave the highest fungi recovery rate than the blotter paper technique. Seed viability was lower with peanut seeds stored for two years. Also, the relative percentage occurrence of individual fungi was significantly higher with seeds stored for two years. While we recommend the use of growth media for recovery and study of seed mycoflora, peanut seeds should not be stored for more than one year.

  2. Effect of seed pelleting with biocontrol agents on growth and colonisation of roots of mungbean by root-infecting fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramzan, Nadia; Noreen, Nayara; Perveen, Zahida; Shahzad, Saleem

    2016-08-01

    Mungbean (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek) is a leguminous pulse crop that is a major source of proteins, vitamins and minerals. Root-infecting fungi produce severe plant diseases like root rot, charcoal rot, damping-off and stem rot. The soil-borne pathogens can be controlled by chemicals, but these chemicals have several negative effects. Use of microbial antagonist such as fungi and bacteria is a safe, effective and eco-friendly method for the control of many soil-borne pathogens. Biological control agents promote plant growth and develop disease resistance. Application of bacteria and fungi as seed dressing suppressed the root-infecting fungi on leguminous crops. Seeds of mungbean were pelleted with different biocontrol agents to determine their effect on plant growth and colonisation of roots by root-infecting fungi, viz. Fusarium solani, Macrophomina phaseolina, Pythium aphanidermatum, Rhizoctonia solani and Sclerotium rolfsii. Treatment of mungbean seeds with fungal antagonists showed more shoot and root length as compared to bacterial antagonists, whereas seed treated with bacterial antagonists showed maximum shoot and root weight. Trichoderma harzianum and Bacillus subtilis were the best among all the biocontrol agents since they provided the highest plant growth and greater reduction in root colonisation by all root-infecting fungi. Bacillus cereus, Trichoderma virens, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Micrococcus varians were also effective against root-infecting fungi but to a lesser extent. T. harzianum, T. virens, B. subtilis and P. fluorescens were found to be best among all biocontrol agents. The root-infecting fungi can be controlled by pelleting seeds with biocontrol agents as it is safe and effective method. Additionally, plant growth was promoted more by this method. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Seedborne Pathogenic Fungi in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris cv. INTA Rojo) in Nicaragua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcenaro, Delfia; Valkonen, Jari P T

    2016-01-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is an important legume with high nutritional value. In Nicaragua, certified healthy seeds of local bean varieties are not available, and seedborne fungi have gained little attention. Here, were surveyed seedborne pathogenic fungi in an important local bean cultivar, 'INTA Rojo'. Beans grown in the four main production areas in Nicaragua (Boaco, Carazo, Estelí, Matagalpa) for future use as seed stock were sampled from four seed storehouses and six seed lots. A total of 133 fungal strains were isolated from surface-sterilized beans and inoculated to healthy lima beans (Phaseolus lunatus) under controlled conditions. Eighty-seven isolates caused symptoms of varying severity in the seedlings, including discoloration, necrotic lesions, cankers, rot, and lethal necrosis. Pathogenic isolates were divided into eight phenotypically distinguishable groups based on morphology and growth characteristics on artificial growth medium, and further identified by analysis of the internal transcribed spacer sequences (ITS1 and ITS2) of the ribosomal RNA genes. The pathogenic isolates belonged to eight genera. Fusarium spp. (F. chlamydosporum, F. equiseti, F. incarnatum), Lasiodiplodia theobromae, Macrophomina phaseolina, and Penicillium citrinum were the most damaging and common fungi found in the seed lots. Furthermore, Corynespora cassiicola, Colletotrichum capsisi, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Aspergillus flavus, and Diaporthe sp. (Phomopsis) were seedborne in cultivar 'INTA Rojo' and found to be pathogenic to bean seedlings. This study reveals, for the first time, many seedborne pathogenic fungi in beans in Nicaragua; furthermore, prior to this study, little information was available concerning F. equiseti, F. incarnatum, L. theobromae, C. cassiicola, and Diaporthe spp. as seedborne pathogens of common bean. Our results lay the basis for developing diagnostic tools for seed health inspection and for further study of the epidemiology

  4. Halogenated coumarin derivatives as novel seed protectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, N; Windorski, J; Bluml, E

    2008-01-01

    Development of new and improved antifungal compounds that are target-specific is backed by a strong Federal, public and commercial mandate. Many plant-derived chemicals have proven fungicidal properties, including the coumarins (1,2-Benzopyrone) found in a variety of plants such as clover, sweet woodruff and grasses. Preliminary research has shown the coumarins to be a highly active group of molecules with a wide range of antimicrobial activity against both fungi and bacteria. It is believed that these cyclic compounds behave as natural pesticidal defence molecules for plants and they represent a starting point for the exploration of new derivative compounds possessing a range of improved antifungal activity. Within this study, derivatives of coumarin that were modified with halogenated side groups were screened for their antifungal activity against a range of soil-borne plant pathogenic fungi. Fungi included in this in vitro screen included Macrophomina phaseolina (charcoal rot), Phytophthora spp. (damping off and seedling rot), Rhizoctonia spp. (damping off and root rot) and Pythium spp. (seedling blight), four phylogenetically diverse and economically important plant pathogens. Studies indicate that these halogenated coumarin derivatives work very effectively in vitro to inhibit fungal growth and some coumarin derivatives have higher antifungal activity and stability as compared to the original coumarin compound alone. The highly active coumarin derivatives are brominated, iodinated and chlorinated compounds and results suggest that besides being highly active, very small amounts can be used to achieve LD100 rates. In addition to the in vitro fungal inhibition assays, results of polymer seed coating compatibility and phytotoxicity testing using these compounds as seed treatments will also be reported. These results support additional research in this area of natural pesticide development.

  5. Microflora en semillas de frijol

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    Jos\\u00E9 B. Membre\\u00F1o

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Microflora en semillas de frijol (Phaseolus vulgaris L.. Se estudió la microflora bacteriana presente en semillas de frijol y su relación con Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli (Xcp, en 118 genotipos procedentes de VIDAC-98, INTA- Nicaragua, TARS-USDA e Isabela-P.R. Se utilizaron cinco métodos de aislamiento: semilla desinfectada con hipoclorito de sodio, semilla en caldo nutritivo refrigerada por una hora, dispersión de 0,1 ml de suspensión de semillas en medio sólido, siembra líquida de 1 ml de suspensión y semilla en caldo nutritivo, agitado y refrigerado por 24 horas. Se aislaron 104 colonias amarillas de 41 genotipos. Treinta y seis colonias fueron KOH positivo (Gram negativo, 68 negativo (Gram positivo y 34 hidrolizaron almidón. Las colonias de pigmentación amarilla resultaron no patogénicas bajo condiciones de invernadero. Estas se identificaron con el sistema BIOLOG como: Pantoea agglomerans (25, Xanthomonas campestris (2, Enterobacter agglomerans (2, Sphingomonas paucimobilis (2, Pseudomonas fluorescens y Flavimonas oryzihabitans. En adición, los genotipos portaron colonias con pigmentación distinta a la amarilla. En las pruebas de antagonismo se identificaron colonias con actividad de deoxyribonucleasa y de antibiosis a Xcp. De éstas, 15 colonias inhibieron a Xcp significativamente. Se identificaron los hongos Rhizoctonia solani, Penicillium spp., Fusarium spp., Aspergillus flavus, Rhizopus nigricans y Macrophomina phaseolina en un 52,9 % del total de genotipos evaluados

  6. Occurrence and identification of the etiologic agents of plant diseases in cactus (Opuntia ficus-indica Mill. in the semi-arid region of Paraiba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Evelyne Franco de Souza

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Cactus forage (Opuntia ficus-indica Mill., intensely cultivated in dry regions of northeast Brazil, although well adapted to the harsh semi-arid climate is affected by major problems such as pests and diseases, responsible for significant losses in production. This study aimed to investigate the occurrence and diversity of the etiologic agents of diseases of cactus cultivated in 38 municipalities in the semi-arid region of Paraiba. The analyses were conducted and processed at the Laboratory of Phytopathology of the Centro de Ciências Agrárias da Universidade Federal da Paraíba, in Areia – PB. Starting from sick cladodes isolations, multiplications and identifications of the found microorganisms were made. The identification of the microorganisms was achieved through observations of the macro and micromorphological characteristics of the cultures and tests of Gram and pathogenicity. Great incidence and diversity of microorganisms was verified in the cacti researched, but the highest occurrence was mainly that of fungus. The fungi of widest occurrence were: Scytallidium lignicola, Alternate tenuis, Macrophomina phaseolina, Cladosporium cladosporides, Lasiodiplodia theobromae, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. opuntiarum, Curvularia lunata, Aspergillus niger, Nigrospora sphaerica, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Exserohilum turcicum, Pestalotia pitospora, Rhizopus stolonifer, Rhizoctonia solani and Sphaceloma protearum. A bacterium was also detected that was suspected to belong to the Erwinia sp. strain. Satisfaction of the Postulates of Koch proved the infectious nature of the detected microorganisms. High occurrence of the fungus S. lignicola, an agent of scale rot disease in 100% of the places researched, was observed. This fact is of great concern, since the progression of the disease can cause significant losses in production.

  7. Evaluation of genetic variability in micropropagated propagules of ornamental pineapple [Ananas comosus var. bracteatus (Lindley) Coppens and Leal] using RAPD markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M D M; Buso, G C S; Torres, A C

    2008-10-21

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the genetic variability in micropropagated plantlets of ornamental pineapple, after the fourth period of subculture. The basal culture medium consisted of MS salts, vitamins, 3% sucrose, liquid formulation, supplemented with 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) at concentrations of 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg/L. The addition of BAP influenced the occurrence of genetic variation revealed using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. Of a total of 520 primers tested, 44 were selected and amplified; 402 monomorphic bands (97.2%) and 18 polymorphic bands (2.8%) resulted among regenerated plantlets. The polymorphic fragments were produced by 12 primers (OPA-01, OPA-20, OPB-01, OPB-19, OPC-19, OPF-13, OPL-17, OPM-13, OPP-16, OPT-07, OPV-19, and OPX-03). Among the primers that identified polymorphism, OPA-01, OPA-20, OPB-19, OPC-19, OPL-17, OPP-16, and OPX-3 each showed, one polymorphic band and OPF-13 amplified a maximum of three bands. In this study, the RAPD technique was effective in showing the occurrence of somaclonal variations that occur during the micropropagation process of ornamental pineapple cultivation in BAP-supplemented medium, and it is possible to detect the presence of genetic variation in early stages of plant development.

  8. Mass development of monospecific submerged macrophyte vegetation after the restoration of shallow lakes: roles of light, sediment nutrient levels, and propagule density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhofstad, M.J.J.M.; Alirangues, Marta Maria; Reichman, Erik; van Donk, E.; Lamers, L.P.M.; Bakker, E.S.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract After restoration, eutrophicated shallow freshwaters may show mass development of only one or two submerged macrophyte species, lowering biodiversity and hampering recreation. It is unclear which environmental factors govern this high percentage of the volume inhabited (PVI11 PVI: The perce

  9. Root rot of sugarbeet in the Vojvodina Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojšin Vera B.

    2006-01-01

    identified in recent years as the agent of root rot, but its importance was much lower. Charcoal root rot and plant wilting (Macrophomina phaseolina have caused extensive damages in sugar beets, especially under the conditions of severe drought and high temperatures in summer. In some years, it was the dominant agent of root rot. Mixed infections caused by fungi from the genera Fusarium and M. phaseolina were encountered frequently. The extent of damage caused by these diseases was reduced by improved pro- duction technology. Rhizomania of sugar beet (caused by beet necrotic yellow vein virus was identified in Serbia in the 1970s. Results of recent investigations have shown that BNYVV is widespread in Vojvodina, since the virus was found on 36,7% (24,674 ha of acreages from 67,213 ha of total sugar beet acreages inspected on incidence of BNYVV in the period from 1997 to 2004 year. In the last few years, the occurrence of Rhizoctonia root rot (Rhizoctonia solani was registered in some localities in Vojvodina.

  10. La marchitez tardía del maíz (Zea mays L. causada por Cephalosporium maydis en la Península Ibérica, y otros hongos asociados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Maria Ortiz-Bustos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Las especies de hongos de suelo asociadas a Cephalosporium maydis como agente causal de la marchitez tardía del maíz en la Península Ibérica se identificaron muestreando 19 campos con síntomas de marchitez en las principales zonas de cultivo entre 2011 y 2012. En el 47% de los campos no se identificó C. maydis, pero sí Fusarium graminearum, F. verticillioides, F. equiseti, F. proliferatum, Macrophomina phaseolina, Rhizoctonia solani y Trichoderma harzianum infectando las plantas de maíz. En los campos restantes, junto a C. maydis se identificaron otros hongos de suelo en porcentajes apreciables: F. verticillioides (19%, F. proliferatum (19%, F.equiseti (9%, F. oxysporum (9% y Pythium oligandrum (9%. El crecimiento vascular de C. maydis y de otras especies fúngicas en plantas de maíz se confirmó analizando plantas con marchitez procedentes de tres campos diferentes. Tanto C. maydis como F. graminearum, F. equiseti, F. proliferatum y T. harzianum se aislaron de la inserción entre la raíz y tallo y a 10 cm de altura en el tallo de las plantas. El efecto de la infección por C. maydis sobre la producción de las plantas de maíz se cuantificó en macetas y condiciones seminaturales en el 2011. En plantas inoculadas se obtuvo una reducción del peso de las mazorcas del 54%, además de pesos de raíz y de parte aérea (tallo y hojas significativamente menores en comparación con el control no inoculado, lo que sugiere el gran impacto económico que puede tener la marchitez tardía en condiciones naturales. Asimismo este trabajo pone de manifiesto el grado de complejidad de la etiología de la marchitez tardía, que debería ser estudiado mediante la confirmación de la patogenicidad de los hongos de suelo identificados en maíz, con el fin de determinar el papel que puede jugar cada una de estas especies en el desarrollo de la enfermedad y/o severidad de los síntomas.

  11. Synthesis of some potent immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory metabolites by fungal transformation of anabolic steroid oxymetholone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Naik Tameen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biotransformation of organic compounds by using microbial whole cells provides an efficient approach to obtain novel analogues which are often difficult to synthesize chemically. In this manuscript, we report for the first time the microbial transformation of a synthetic anabolic steroidal drug, oxymetholone, by fungal cell cultures. Results Incubation of oxymetholone (1 with Macrophomina phaseolina, Aspergillus niger, Rhizopus stolonifer, and Fusarium lini produced 17β-hydroxy-2-(hydroxy-methyl-17α-methyl-5α-androstan-1-en-3-one (2, 2α,17α-di(hydroxyl-methyl-5α-androstan-3β,17β-diol (3, 17α-methyl-5α-androstan-2α,3β,17β-triol (4, 17β-hydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl-17α-methyl-androst-1,4-dien-3-one (5, 17β-hydroxy-2α-(hydroxy-methyl-17α-methyl-5α-androstan-3-one (6, and 2α-(hydroxymethyl-17α-methyl-5α-androstan-3β-17β-diol (7. Their structures were deduced by spectral analyses, as well as single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Compounds 2–5 were identified as the new metabolites of 1. The immunomodulatory, and anti-inflammatory activities and cytotoxicity of compounds 1–7 were evaluated by observing their effects on T-cell proliferation, reactive oxygen species (ROS production, and normal cell growth in MTT assays, respectively. These compounds showed immunosuppressant effect in the T-cell proliferation assay with IC50 values between 31.2 to 2.7 μg/mL, while the IC50 values for ROS inhibition, representing anti-inflammatory effect, were in the range of 25.6 to 2.0 μg/mL. All the compounds were found to be non-toxic in a cell-based cytotoxicity assay. Conclusion Microbial transformation of oxymetholone (1 provides an efficient method for structural transformation of 1. The transformed products were obtained as a result of de novo stereoselective reduction of the enone system, isomerization of double bond, insertion of double bond and hydroxylation. The transformed products, which showed significant

  12. Solarização em microcosmo: efeito de materiais vegetais na sobrevivência de fitopatógenos de solo e na produção de voláteis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Basseto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Além das brassicaceas associadas à solarização do solo, novos materiais vegetais como a mandioca e a mamona têm apresentado potencial no controle de fitopatógenos de solo. Assim, objetivou-se verificar os efeitos da incorporação e decomposição de parte aérea de brócolis, mamona e mandioca brava e mansa, associadas à solarização, em conjuntos de microcosmos, sob condições de ambiente controlado, na sobrevivência das estruturas de resistência de Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici Raça 2, Macrophomina phaseolina, Rhizoctonia solani AG-4 HGI e Sclerotium rolfsii; e identificar e apontar o(s volátil(eis emanado(s pela decomposição dos materiais, que poderia(m estar correlacionado(s com a inativação dos fitopatógenos. Quanto à sobrevivência dos patógenos, quatro ensaios idênticos foram instalados nos microcosmos, com quatro períodos de exposição independentes (7, 14, 21 e 28 dias. A identificação dos voláteis contou com ensaios realizados sob as mesmas condições da sobrevivência, mas em frascos âmbar e com cromatografia gasosa com detectores por espectrometria de massas (GC-MS e por ionização em chama (GC-FID, utilizando a técnica de Microextração em Fase Sólida - SPME. Os tratamentos solo+materiais vegetais, ao longo dos períodos testados, reduziram a sobrevivência das estruturas de resistência de todos os fungos. No geral, destacaram-se o brócolis e a mandioca brava, além da mandioca mansa para S. rolfsii. Os voláteis identificados foram oriundos da decomposição de brócolis, mamona e mandioca mansa. Foram identificados 26, 37 e 29 compostos voláteis para brócolis, mamona e mandioca mansa, respectivamente. Correlações positivas e negativas foram observadas entre alguns voláteis e a média dos compostos com a sobrevivência das estruturas de resistência dos fitopatogênicos.

  13. Synthesis of some potent immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory metabolites by fungal transformation of anabolic steroid oxymetholone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Biotransformation of organic compounds by using microbial whole cells provides an efficient approach to obtain novel analogues which are often difficult to synthesize chemically. In this manuscript, we report for the first time the microbial transformation of a synthetic anabolic steroidal drug, oxymetholone, by fungal cell cultures. Results Incubation of oxymetholone (1) with Macrophomina phaseolina, Aspergillus niger, Rhizopus stolonifer, and Fusarium lini produced 17β-hydroxy-2-(hydroxy-methyl)-17α-methyl-5α-androstan-1-en-3-one (2), 2α,17α-di(hydroxyl-methyl)-5α-androstan-3β,17β-diol (3), 17α-methyl-5α-androstan-2α,3β,17β-triol (4), 17β-hydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl)-17α-methyl-androst-1,4-dien-3-one (5), 17β-hydroxy-2α-(hydroxy-methyl)-17α-methyl-5α-androstan-3-one (6), and 2α-(hydroxymethyl)-17α-methyl-5α-androstan-3β-17β-diol (7). Their structures were deduced by spectral analyses, as well as single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Compounds 2–5 were identified as the new metabolites of 1. The immunomodulatory, and anti-inflammatory activities and cytotoxicity of compounds 1–7 were evaluated by observing their effects on T-cell proliferation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and normal cell growth in MTT assays, respectively. These compounds showed immunosuppressant effect in the T-cell proliferation assay with IC50 values between 31.2 to 2.7 μg/mL, while the IC50 values for ROS inhibition, representing anti-inflammatory effect, were in the range of 25.6 to 2.0 μg/mL. All the compounds were found to be non-toxic in a cell-based cytotoxicity assay. Conclusion Microbial transformation of oxymetholone (1) provides an efficient method for structural transformation of 1. The transformed products were obtained as a result of de novo stereoselective reduction of the enone system, isomerization of double bond, insertion of double bond and hydroxylation. The transformed products, which showed significant

  14. Yields and resistance of strawberry cultivars to crown and root diseases in the field, and cultivar responses to pathogens under controlled environment conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangling FANG

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Devastating outbreaks of crown and root diseases have impacted severely on commercial strawberry production in Western Australia (W.A.. Studies were conducted to evaluate the yields, and resistance of three commercial strawberry cultivars to crown and root diseases, both in fumigated and non-fumigated field beds, and to determine the responses of eight commercial cultivars to individual pathogens under controlled conditions. In the field, cv. Camino Real showed the greatest fruit yield both in fumigated and non-fumigated beds, and was the most disease-resistant cultivar. Each cultivar had a greater fruit yield and a lower amount of plant decline in fumigated beds, compared with non-fumigated beds. Both for fumigated and non-fumigated beds, the amount of plant decline increased from August to November, particularly in non-fumigated beds. Under controlled conditions, cv. Festival was most resistant and cv. Camarosa most susceptible to wilt-causing Fusarium oxysporum. Against binucleate Rhizoctonia AG-A, Cylindrocarpon destructans and Phoma exigua, cv. Festival was most resistant and cv. Aromas most susceptible. Cultivar Camino Real was the most resistant to Gnomonia fructicola and Phytophthora cactorum and cv. Festival most resistant to Pythium ultimum. Against Macrophomina phaseolina, cv. Albion was the most resistant with cv. Camarosa the most susceptible. Cultivar Camarosa, the most widely grown cultivar in W.A., was most susceptible to F. oxysporum, while cv. Camino Real was resistant to F. oxysporum both in the field and the controlled environment conditions. Cultivar Festival is the most resistant cultivar to F. oxysporum and a range of different pathogens. The Australian bred cv. Juliette was as susceptible as cv. Camarosa to F. oxysporum, but relatively resistant to binucleate Rhizoctonia AG-A. This is the first study, not only to define the relative yield potentials of different cultivars in a situation where crown and root disease

  15. PCR-based specific techniques used for detecting the most important pathogens on strawberry: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirmajlessi, Seyed Mahyar; Destefanis, Marialaura; Gottsberger, Richard Alexander; Mänd, Marika; Loit, Evelin

    2015-01-15

    Strawberry diseases are a major limiting factor that severely impact plant agronomic performance. Regarding limitations of traditional techniques for detection of pathogens, researchers have developed specific DNA-based tests as sensitive and specific techniques. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods used for detection or quantification of the most widespread strawberry pathogens, such as Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. fragariae, Phytophthora fragariae, Colletotrichum acutatum, Verticillium dahliae, Botrytis cinerea, Macrophomina phaseolina, and Xanthomonas fragariae. An updated and detailed list of published PCR protocols is presented and discussed, aimed at facilitating access to information that could be particularly useful for diagnostic laboratories in order to develop a rapid, cost-effective, and reliable monitoring technique. The study design was a systematic review of PCR-based techniques used for detection and quantification of strawberry pathogens. Using appropriate subject headings, AGRICOLA, AGRIS, BASE, Biological Abstracts, CAB Abstracts, Google Scholar, Scopus, Web of Knowledge, and SpringerLink databases were searched from their inception up to April 2014. Two assessors independently reviewed the titles, abstracts, and full articles of all identified citations. Selected articles were included if one of the mentioned strawberry pathogens was investigated based on PCR methods, and a summary of pre-analytical requirements for PCR was provided. A total of 259 titles and abstracts were reviewed, of which 22 full texts met all the inclusion criteria. Our systematic review identified ten different protocols for X. fragariae, eight for P. fragariae, four for B. cinerea, six for C. acutatum, three for V. dahlia, and only one for F. oxysporum. The accuracy and sensitivity of PCR diagnostic methods is the focus of most studies included in this review. However, a large proportion of errors in laboratories

  16. Potencial de óleos essenciais de plantas medicinais no controle de fitopatógenos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C.M. FONSECA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Além do valor como recurso terapêutico, plantas medicinais também possuem potencial para serem utilizadas como fonte de princípios ativos contra fitopatógenos. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito de óleos essenciais das espécies medicinais Baccharis dracunculifolia (alecrim-do-campo, Schinus terebinthifolius (aroeirinha e Porophyllum ruderale (arnica-brasileira sobre o crescimento dos fungos fitopatogênicos Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli (Fop, F. solani f. sp. phaseoli (Fsp, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Ss, S. minor (Sm, Rhizoctonia solani (Rs, Sclerotium rolfsii (Sr e Macrophomina phaseolina (Mp. Avaliou-se em placas de Petri o crescimento radial desses fungos em meio batata-dextrose-ágar (BDA com cinco concentrações (0, 250, 500, 1000 e 3000 mg L-1 dos óleos essenciais. Discos de micélio (5 mm de diâmetro de cada fungo em crescimento foram transferidos para placas de Petri que foram mantidas a 23°C no escuro por 48 horas. O óleo essencial de alecrim-do-campo foi o mais eficiente na redução do crescimento micelial de todos os fungos, com inibição completa quando se utilizou a concentração de 3000 mg L-1. A redução de crescimento variou de 29% (Fs a 80% (Rs a 250 mg L-1 do óleo essencial de alecrim-do-campo; a 500 mg L-1, variou de 29% (Fs a 98% (Sr; e a 1000 mg L-1, de 41% (Fs a 100% (Sr. A redução do crescimento dos fungos pelo óleo de aroeirinha na concentração de 3000 mg L-1 variou de 27% (Fsp a 74% (Rs. Nessa concentração, o óleo de arnica-brasileira reduziu o crecimento micelial de Ss em 72%, o de Rs em 80% e o de Mp em 82%, sem efeitos significativos sobre o crescimento micelial de Fsp e Fop. Conclui-se que os óleos essenciais de alecrim-do-campo, aroeirinha e arnica-brasileira possuem potencial para o controle dos fungos fitopatogênicos estudados, com destaque para o óleo de alecrim-do-campo.

  17. Deterioration and spoilage of peanuts and desiccated coconuts from two sub-Saharan tropical East African countries due to the associated mycobiota and their degradative enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, M A

    2001-01-01

    A broad variety of fungi (84 species belonging to 36 genera) were identified with more taxa infesting peanut seed samples from two tropical countries (29 genera and 61 species) compared to those found in desiccated coconuts (20 genera and 55 species) on both DRBC and DG18 media. This may be due to the higher moisture levels in peanuts (5.07-7.97%) compared with coconuts (1.5-4.17%). More taxa and propagules were recovered on DG18 in both cases. The dominant fungi from both substrates on both isolation media were Aspergillus and Penicillium, with other fungi from only one substrate/medium. The aflatoxigenic species (A. flavus) dominated Kenyan samples more so than Ugandan samples on both substrates. However only 71.5% and 87.5% of the peanut kernels, on DRBC and DG18, respectively, were found to be infested with fungi. The aflatoxigenic species (A. flavus/parasiticus) were found in 75% of the samples, however only 15.75% and 13% of the kernels analyzed were infested. The most frequently isolated species from peanuts were A. niger followed by A. flavus and M. phaseolina. E. repens, E. amstelodami, E. rubrum and E. chevalieri dominated peanut seeds on DG18, and R. stolonifer, A. parasiticus, F. solani, L. theobromae and P. chrysogenum on DRBC. The mean count of fungal propagules in coconut samples were approximately 0.7 x 10(3) and 0.8 x 10(3) on DRBC and DG18, respectively, with a high proportion of those propagules recorded for the aflatoxigenic species (about 0. 17 x 10(3) and 0.25 x 10(3) colonies/g). The mycobiota of desiccated coconut was dominated by A. niger, A. flavus and P. chrysogenum. Also A. ochraceus, P. waksmanii, Paecilomyces variotii, P. islandicum and R. mucilaginosa were more frequent on DRBC, while, species of Cladosporium. Chrysosporium and Eurotium were more frequent on DG18. Enzyme indices (or the activities) for each specific strain, when determined after 5 and 8 days of incubation, proved to be similar. A recommendation is given. The

  18. Fungos associados às sementes de ipê-amarelo (Tabebuia serratifolia e ipê-roxo (Tabebuia impetiginosa: incidência, efeito na germinação e transmissão para as plântulas Fungi associated to the seeds of ipê-amarelo (Tabebuia serratifolia and ipê-roxo (Tabebuia impetiginosa: incidence, germination effect and seedlings transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana da Silva Botelho

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivos fazer um levantamento dos fungos presentes em oito amostras de sementes de ipê-amarelo (Tabebuia serratifolia e ipê-roxo (T. impetiginosa coletadas nas regiões de Piracicaba, Mogi-Guaçu e sul de Minas Gerais (Lavras, Ijaci e Itumirim e determinar os possíveis prejuízos na produção de mudas dessas espécies. O método utilizado para o teste de sanidade foi o de papel de filtro e, para o de germinação, utilizou-se caixa tipo gerbox com substrato de papel à temperatura de 30ºC sob regime de luz constante. As sementes, tanto no teste de sanidade quanto no de germinação, foram subdivididas sendo uma parte submetidas à assepsia superficial com hipoclorito de sódio e a outra não. Avaliou-se a transmissão dos fungos através de lesões encontradas nas plântulas, durante o teste de germinação. Foram identificados e quantificados dezesseis fungos: Cladosporium sp., Alternaria alternata, Epicoccum sp., Phoma sp., Geotrichum sp., Penicillium sp., Trichothecium sp., Phomopsis sp., Drechslera sp., Aspergillus spp., Curvularia sp., Fusarium spp., Macrophomina phaseolina, Nigrospora sp., Lasiodiplodia theobromae e Septoria sp. De maneira geral, a assepsia proporcionou redução drástica na incidência de todos os fungos, em ambas espécies, com uma taxa média de 90%, podendo-se inferir que a maioria dos fungos estava contaminando as sementes. Os fungos não interferiram diretamente na porcentagem de plântulas normais e a assepsia reduziu a germinação em 64%, demonstrando ser fitotóxica. Na transmissão observou-se, em média, 17% e 10% de plântulas com sintomas, nas amostras sem assepsia e com assepsia, respectivamente. Os fungos mais freqüentes transmitidos pelas sementes de ipê-amarelo e roxo foram: Alternaria alternata, Fusarium spp., Aspergillus spp., Phoma sp. e Phomopsis sp.The aim of this research was to check out what kind of fungi was present in eight samples of ipê-amarelo seeds

  19. What restoration ecology can tell us about mycorrhiza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    Research is summarized on how different topsoil handling procedures influence mycorrhizal propagule survival. The relationship of mycorrhiza to plant establishment and survival is also discussed. (ACR)

  20. Dispersão de diásporos e ecologia morfofuncional de plântulas de espécies de um fragmento de Floresta Atlântica em Dois Irmãos, Recife–PE. Propagule dispersion and morphofunctional seedling ecology of species in an Atlantic Forest fragment in Dois Irmãos, Recife–PE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogenes José Gusmão COUTINHO

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Trabalhos sobre dispersão de frutos e sementes e aspectos morfofuncionais de plântulas podem fornecer informações essenciais no esclarecimento de questões ligadas à sucessão ecológica, além de contribuir nos trabalhos de inventário, conservação e regeneração de ecossistemas naturais, uma vez que contribuem para a compreensão das funções das estruturas morfológicas nos processos de desenvolvimento e estabelecimento das plantas. Diante do exposto, a presente investigação objetivou levantar as síndromes de dispersão e a morfofuncionalidade de plântulas de espécies de fanerógamos de um fragmento de Floresta Atlântica em Dois Irmãos, Recife–PE. O levantamento das espécies e coleta de material fértil foi feito pelo método do caminhamento, entre o período de janeiro de 2008 e agosto de 2011. As espécies foram demarcadas com fitas e acompanhadas quanto à produção de frutos e sementes para determinação da síndrome de dispersão e posterior germinação, visando à obtenção das plântulas. Também foram feitas observações de campo para identificação das sementes germinadas e plântulas encontradas na serrapilheira. A caracterização da síndrome de dispersão e morfofuncionalidade de plântulas foram feitas através de observações em campo e literatura. Foram levantadas 85 espécies, distribuídas em 19 famílias e 60 gêneros. Quanto ao hábito, 63,85% das espécies são árvores, 16,86% são arbustos, 14,45% são trepadeiras e 7,22% são ervas. A síndrome de dispersão mais frequente foi a zoocoria (66,66%, seguida da autocoria (18,84% e anemocoria (13,05%. O padrão de morfofuncionalidade de plântulas predominantes foi o fanerocotiledonar-epígeo com cotilédones do tipo foliáceo, semelhante ao padrão descrito na literatura para as florestas tropicais úmidas não inundáveis. Papers on fruit and seed dispersal and seedling morphofunctional aspects can provide essential information to clarify issues related to ecological succession, besides contributing in the work of inventory, conservation and regeneration of natural ecosystems, since they contribute to understanding the functions of the structures morphological development processes and plant establishment. The present investigation aimed to raise the dispersal syndromes and morphofunctional seedling species phanerogams a fragment of Atlantic Forest in Dois Irmãos, Recife–PE. The survey of species and fertile material collection was done by the method of traversal, between January 2008 and August 2011. The species were marked with ribbons and monitored for the production of fruits and seeds to determine the dispersion syndrome and subsequent germination, aiming to obtain seedlings. Field observations were also made to identify the seeds germinated and seedlings found in the litter. The characterization of dispersal and seedling morphofunctional were made through field observations and literature. Eighty-five species in 60 genera and 19 families were surveyed. Corcerning to the habit, 63.85% of the species are trees, 16.86% are shrubs, 14.45% are climbers and 7.22% are herbs. The the most frequent syndrome of dispersal was zoochory (66.66% followed by autocory (18.84% and anemochory (13.05%. The standard morphofunctional seedling was the predominant phanerocotylar-epigeal with foliaceous cotyledons type, similar to the pattern described in the literature for tropical rainforests not flooded.

  1. Passive internal transport of aquatic organisms by waterfowl in Doñana, south-west Spain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Figuerola, J.; Green, J.; Santamaria, L.

    2003-01-01

    Aim Waterbirds may play an important role in the maintenance of aquatic ecosystem biodiversity by transporting plants and invertebrate propagules between different wetlands. The aim of this study is to provide the first quantitative analysis of the transport of plant and animal propagules by a commu

  2. Passive internal transport of aquatic organisms by waterfowl in Doñana, south-west Spain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Figuerola, J.; Green, J.; Santamaria, L.

    2003-01-01

    Aim Waterbirds may play an important role in the maintenance of aquatic ecosystem biodiversity by transporting plants and invertebrate propagules between different wetlands. The aim of this study is to provide the first quantitative analysis of the transport of plant and animal propagules by a

  3. Feeding Choice and the Fate of Organic Materials Consumed by Sesarma Crabs Perisesarma bidens (De Haan When Offered Different Diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam S. S. Mchenga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The feeding preference of the sesarmid crab Perisesarma bidens was investigated when offered different diets: Enteromorpha intestinalis (algae, Kandelia obovata leaves, and propagules. Nutritional value of food, its assimilation, and fates were evaluated using a combination approach of the fatty acids (FAs and C/N ratios. When offered a mixed diet, male crabs preferred algae than leaves and/or propagules, while a female preference was equally for leaves and algae but less than propagules. The nutritional value of algae was higher as indicated by low C : N ratios and high ω3/ω6 ratios than leaves and propagules. FAs comparison of tissues and faeces indicated that crabs efficiently assimilate essential fatty acids (EFAs from a given diet in the order of algae greater than leaves and propagules. Despite of sesarmid crabs being a mangrove leaf-eater, E. intestinalis can potentially be important source of nitrogen supplement for P. bidens under mangrove forests.

  4. Role of Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Trichoderma spp. in the control of root rot disease of soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Ehteshamul-Haque

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Seed treatment of soybean with Bndyrhizobium japonicum, Trichoderma harzianum, T. viride, T. hamatum, T. koningii and T. pseudokoningii significantly controlled the infection of 30-day-old seedlingsby Maerophomina phaseolina, Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium spp. In 60-day-old plants Trichoderma spp.. and B. japonicum inhibited the grouth of R. solani and Fusarium spp., whereas the use of B. japonicum (TAL-102 with T. harzianum. T. viride, T. koningii and T. pseudokoningii controlled the infection by M. phaseolina. Greater grain yield was recorded when B. japonium (TAI-102 was used with T. hamatum.

  5. 1997-2001 Mangrove Restoration Areas in Salt River Bay National Historical Park and Ecological Preserve, St. Croix, USVI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Apart from two 100 m test plots, mangrove restoration activities were conducted between 1997 and 2001. Each year, thousands of red mangrove propagules were planted...

  6. Genetic diversity and antifungal susceptibility profiles in causative agents of sporotrichosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; de Hoog, G Sybren; de Cássia Pires, Débora; Brihante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Sidrim, José Júlio da Costa; Gadelha, Marcos Fabio; Colombo, Arnaldo Lopes; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sporotrichosis is a chronic subcutaneous mycosis of humans and animals, which is typically acquired by traumatic inoculation of plant material contaminated with Sporothrix propagules, or via animals, mainly felines. Sporothrix infections notably occur in outbreaks, with large epidemics c

  7. The Safety of Dark, Moulded Casava Flour Compared with White - a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Safety of Dark, Moulded Casava Flour Compared with White - a Comparison ... split into segments to obtain pieces with similar levels of cyanogenic glucosides. ... pH, brightness, aflatoxins and the number and genus of fungal propagules.

  8. escape and naturalization of tagetes patula in western ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    preferred customer

    Key Words /Phrases: Fire, invasive species, propagules, soil seed bank. * Author to ... Bazely, 2003). Fire may cause extinction of .... and South America and Africa are its diversity ... The dry heat treatment was chosen here for comparison.

  9. Mangrove Restoration Areas in Salt River Bay National Historical Park and Ecological Preserve

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Apart from two 100 m test plots, mangrove restoration activities were conducted between 1999 and 2001. Each year, thousands of red mangrove propagules were planted...

  10. Genetic diversity and antifungal susceptibility profiles in agents of sporotrichosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Messias Rodrigues; G.S. de Hoog; D. de Cássia Pires; R.S. Nogueira Brihante; J.J. da Costa Sidrim; M.F. Gadelha; A. Lopes Colombo; Z. Pires de Camargo

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sporotrichosis is a chronic subcutaneous mycosis of humans and animals, which is typically acquired by traumatic inoculation of plant material contaminated with Sporothrix propagules, or via animals, mainly felines. Sporothrix infections notably occur in outbreaks, with large epidemics c

  11. Propagation Techniques for Highland Bamboo (Arundinaria alpina ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    larger scale plantation, six types of vegetative propagation materials ... (10 new shoots per propagule), along its stem length (at the upper, middle and butt ..... can be used to get starting materials for macro-propagation purposes so that mass.

  12. 77 FR 75622 - Notice of Intent to Grant an Exclusive License of the United States; Patent No. 6,569,807

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    ..., Mycoleptodiscus terrestris, to produce survival propagules termed microsclerotia in fermentation broth culture... aquatic plant control. Brenda S. Bowen, Army Federal Register Liaison Officer. BILLING CODE 3720-58-P...

  13. The curse of the pharaoh hypothesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Gandon, S.

    1998-01-01

    The 'curse of the pharaoh' has been used as a metaphor for the hypothesis that higher parasite propagule survival selects for higher virulence. Indeed, the mysterious death of Lord Carnavon after entering the tomb of the Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamen could potentially be explained by an infection with a highly virulent and very long-lived pathogen. In this paper, I investigate whether parasite virulence increases with high propagule survival. In this respect, I derive an analytic expression of...

  14. BIOLOGICAL CONTRAOL OF PHYTOPATHOGENS USING ANTAGONIST TRICHODERMA VIRIDE

    OpenAIRE

    D.S.R. RAJENDRA SINGH; SHAIK SAYEED; K. BRUNDA EVI; B. BHADRAIAH

    2006-01-01

    Antagonistic fungus i.e. Trichoderma viride was tested in vitro against seven phytopathogens viz., Aspergillus niger, A. fumigatus, Macrophimina phaseolina, Fusarium oxysporum, F. solani, Paecilomyces varoti and sclerotium rolfsii. Trichoderma viride exhibited the antagonistic effect against these phytopathogens. Under dual culture the hyphal growth of the phytopathogens was inhibited at the zone of contact with the hyphae of the antagonist. Microscopic examination revealed that hyphal tips o...

  15. Bacteria associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi within roots of plants growing in a soil highly contaminated with aliphatic and aromatic petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iffis, Bachir; St-Arnaud, Marc; Hijri, Mohamed

    2014-09-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) belong to phylum Glomeromycota, an early divergent fungal lineage forming symbiosis with plant roots. Many reports have documented that bacteria are intimately associated with AMF mycelia in the soil. However, the role of these bacteria remains unclear and their diversity within intraradical AMF structures has yet to be explored. We aim to assess the bacterial communities associated within intraradical propagules (vesicles and intraradical spores) harvested from roots of plant growing in the sediments of an extremely petroleum hydrocarbon-polluted basin. Solidago rugosa roots were sampled, surface-sterilized, and microdissected. Eleven propagules were randomly collected and individually subjected to whole-genome amplification, followed by PCRs, cloning, and sequencing targeting fungal and bacterial rDNA. Ribotyping of the 11 propagules showed that at least five different AMF OTUs could be present in S. rugosa roots, while 16S rRNA ribotyping of six of the 11 different propagules showed a surprisingly high bacterial richness associated with the AMF within plant roots. Most dominant bacterial OTUs belonged to Sphingomonas sp., Pseudomonas sp., Massilia sp., and Methylobacterium sp. This study provides the first evidence of the bacterial diversity associated with AMF propagules within the roots of plants growing in extremely petroleum hydrocarbon-polluted conditions.

  16. Evaluation of the mycoflora and aflatoxins from the pre-harvest to storage of peanuts: a case study doi: 10.4025/actasciagron.v36i1.16972

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxins are carcinogens produced by Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus and A. nomius. In the present study, peanut samples were collected at different phenological stages of the plant during the 2007/2008 and 2008/2009 seasons and from stored peanuts harvested in 2007/2008. The mycoflora and aflatoxins in the peanuts were evaluated. The results showed the presence of Fusarium spp., Macrophomina spp., Trichoderma spp., Aspergillus spp. and Cladosporium spp. during the period of peanut matur...

  17. Evaluation of the mycoflora and aflatoxins from the pre-harvest to storage of peanuts: a case study

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxins are carcinogens produced by Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus and A. nomius. In the present study, peanut samples were collected at different phenological stages of the plant during the 2007/2008 and 2008/2009 seasons and from stored peanuts harvested in 2007/2008. The mycoflora and aflatoxins in the peanuts were evaluated. The results showed the presence of Fusarium spp., Macrophomina spp., Trichoderma spp., Aspergillus spp. and Cladosporium spp. during the period of peanut matur...

  18. Effect of an organophosphate pesticide, monocrotophos, on phosphate-solubilizing efficiency of soil fungal isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rachna; Garg, Veena; Saxena, Jyoti

    2015-01-01

    Soil is a sink of pesticide residues as well as microorganisms. Fungi are well known for solubilization of inorganic phosphates, and this activity of fungal isolates may be affected by the presence of pesticide residues in the soil. In the present study, five generically different fungal isolates, viz. Aspergillus niger JQ660373, Aspergillus flavus, Penicillium aculeatum JQ660374, Fusarium pallidoroseum and Macrophomina sp., were tested and compared for their phosphate-solubilizing ability in the absence and presence of monocrotophos (500 mg L(-1)). After 168 h of incubation, four times high amount of tricalcium phosphate was solubilized by isolates in the growth medium containing monocrotophos in comparison to control (without monocrotophos). Concurrently, 78 % of the applied monocrotophos was degraded by these fungal isolates. Kinetics of phosphate solubilization shifted from logarithmic to power model in the presence of monocrotophos. Similarly, the phosphatase activity was also found significantly high in the presence of monocrotophos. The combined order of phosphate solubilization as well as monocrotophos degradation was found to be A. niger JQ660373 > P. aculeatum JQ660374 > A. flavus > F. pallidoroseum > Macrophomina sp. On the contrary, phosphate solubilization negatively correlated with the pH of the growth medium. Hence, it could be concluded that these fungal species efficiently solubilize inorganic phosphates and monocrotophos poses a positive effect on their ability and in turn degraded by them. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on P solubilization by Macrophomina sp. and F. pallidoroseum.

  19. Insect pollination and self-planting seed dispersal strategy in the true viviparous mangrove tree species Ceriops tagal (Perr. C.B. Robinson (Rhizophoraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.H. Jonathan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Ceriops tagal is a seaward and high salt-tolerant specialist mangrove species. It flowers during the winter season. The flowers have an explosive pollen release mechanism and are adapted for tripping by flies and honey bees. The tripped flowers achieve self or cross-pollination. High winds can also trip flowers, but this only contributes to autogamy. The plant is viviparous; most propagules fall off and settle near the mother plant. We have observed that such propagules do not show healthy growth, hence the establishment of successive offspring in the same habitat is doubtful. These results suggest that C. tagal requires introduction of propagules from other mangrove forests to promote gene flow and maintain sufficient genetic diversity for the successful establishment and expansion of populations.

  20. Enhancement of local species richness in tundra by seed dispersal through guts of muskox and barnacle goose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Hans Henrik; Lundgren, Rebekka; Philipp, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    The potential contribution of vertebrate-mediated seed rain to the maintenance of plant community richness in a High Arctic ecosystem was investigated. We analyzed viable seed content in dung of the four numerically most important terrestrial vertebrates in Northeast Greenland - muskox (Ovibos...... moschatus), barnacle goose (Branta leucopsis), Arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) and Arctic hare (Lepus arcticus). High numbers of plant propagules were found in the dung of muskox and barnacle goose. Seeds of many plant species were found in the faeces of one vertebrate species only. Propagule composition...... indices), and dung deposition, especially by muskox, often brought new species to the receiving community. The results suggest that endozoochorous propagule dispersal in the Arctic has a great potential in the generation and maintenance of local species richness, albeit being little specialized...

  1. Genomic evidence of rapid, global-scale gene flow in a Sulfolobus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Dominic; Grogan, Dennis

    2012-08-01

    Local populations of Sulfolobus islandicus diverge genetically with geographical separation, and this has been attributed to restricted transfer of propagules imposed by the unfavorable spatial distribution of acidic geothermal habitat. We tested the generality of genetic divergence with distance in Sulfolobus species by analyzing genomes of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius drawn from three populations separated by more than 8000 km. In sharp contrast to S. islandicus, the geographically diverse S. acidocaldarius genomes proved to be nearly identical. We could not link the difference in genome conservation between the two species to a corresponding difference in genome stability or ecological factors affecting propagule dispersal. The results provide the first evidence that genetic isolation of local populations does not result primarily from properties intrinsic to Sulfolobus and the severe discontinuity of its geothermal habitat, but varies with species, and thus may reflect biotic interactions that act after propagule dispersal.

  2. Dynamics of an experimental microbial invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Francisco; Zamor, Richard M; Najar, Fares Z; Roe, Bruce A; Hambright, K David

    2015-09-15

    The ecological dynamics underlying species invasions have been a major focus of research in macroorganisms for the last five decades. However, we still know little about the processes behind invasion by unicellular organisms. To expand our knowledge of microbial invasions, we studied the roles of propagule pressure, nutrient supply, and biotic resistance in the invasion success of a freshwater invasive alga, Prymnesium parvum, using microcosms containing natural freshwater microbial assemblages. Microcosms were subjected to a factorial design with two levels of nutrient-induced diversity and three levels of propagule pressure, and incubated for 7 d, during which P. parvum densities and microbial community composition were tracked. Successful invasion occurred in microcosms receiving high propagule pressure whereas nutrients or community diversity played no role in invasion success. Invaded communities experienced distinctive changes in composition compared with communities where the invasion was unsuccessful. Successfully invaded microbial communities had an increased abundance of fungi and ciliates, and decreased abundances of diatoms and cercozoans. Many of these changes mirrored the microbial community changes detected during a natural P. parvum bloom in the source system. This role of propagule pressure is particularly relevant for P. parvum in the reservoir-dominated southern United States because this species can form large, sustained blooms that can generate intense propagule pressures for downstream sites. Human impact and global climate change are currently causing widespread environmental changes in most southern US freshwater systems that may facilitate P. parvum establishment and, when coupled with strong propagule pressure, could put many more systems at risk for invasion.

  3. Vegetative propagation of Bambusa vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Malfitano Braga

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bamboo is an important source of raw material of multiple uses. The development of simple techniques for its propagation is a practical way to enable its implementation in ownership of low technology. The present work had the objective of evaluating artisanal propagation methods for Bambusa vulgaris. Two types of propagules were tested, with buds budded or not, and three relative positions to the removal of vegetative material on the culm. The best propagule was with only one node, extracted from the lower thirds of the stem, presenting 72% of rooting. This result demonstrates its potential for seedling production of this species under low tech.

  4. Epidemiology of Botrytis spotting on gerbera and rose flowers grown under glass.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerssies, A.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments described in this thesis were performed to improve the knowledge on the epidemiology of Botrytis cinerea in glasshouses, with gerbera and rose as model systems. B. cinerea is an airborne fungus, with conidia as the most important propagules in glasshouses. Conidia of B. cinerea are alway

  5. Building resilience in organic and low-input farming systems - an ecological geneticist's vision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warren, John; Topping, Christopher John

    was investigated. Mutations in life history traits were allowed to occur in 1 of 500 propagules. In simulation 1, diversity was allowed to evolve under intense grazing. In simulation 2, the community of species that had evolved at the end of each of the first set of simulations were transplanted into a fertile...

  6. Book review: Bayesian analysis for population ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Brian Dennis described the field of ecology as “fertile, uncolonized ground for Bayesian ideas.” He continued: “The Bayesian propagule has arrived at the shore. Ecologists need to think long and hard about the consequences of a Bayesian ecology. The Bayesian outlook is a successful competitor, but is it a weed? I think so.” (Dennis 2004)

  7. Dispersal potential in plant communities depends on environmental conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozinga, W.A.; Bekker, R.M.; Schaminée, J.H.J.; Groenendael, van J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Local plant communities can only function within a metacommunity context if they are connected by appropriate dispersal vectors, accommodating the transport of propagules between sites. The capacity for long-distance dispersal may be a key factor in the survival of local populations, especially in f

  8. Dispersal potential in plant communities depends on environmental conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozinga, W.A.; Bekker, R.M.; Schaminée, J.H.J.; Groenendael, J.M. van

    2004-01-01

    1 Local plant communities can only function within a metacommunity context if they are connected by appropriate dispersal vectors, accommodating the transport of propagules between sites. The capacity for long-distance dispersal may be a key factor in the survival of local populations, especially in

  9. The mechanism for explosive seed dispersal in Cardamine hirsuta (Brassicceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many highly successful weed species have the ability to disperse their propagules through the ballistic discharge of their seeds either at ripening or when disturbed by an herbivore. However, very little is known of how ballistic seed dispersal is achieved. Bittercress (Cardamine hirsuta L.) is a we...

  10. Mycorrhizae of poplars

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. C. Schultz; J. G. Isebrands; P. P. Kormanik

    1983-01-01

    Poplar hybrids, being screened for short-rotation intensive culture, can form ecto-, endo-, or ectendo-mycorrhizae or may be autotrophic. Different sections of the genus Populus tend to be selective in the type of mycorrhizae formed. Knowledge of which types are formed influences the kinds of propagule production, site preparation, and herbicide...

  11. Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhiza and Growth in Barley - Effects of Irradiation and Heating of Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Iver; Andersen, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    propagules. Mycorrhiza developed more slowly after inoculation in irradiated soils than in untreated soils. This could have been due to the small amounts of inoculum used, but the high concentrations of nutrients released by irradiation of the soil were probably of greater significance particularly...

  12. Emerging sporotrichosis driven by clonal and recombinant Sporothrix species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, A.M.; de Hoog, G.S.; Zhang, Y.; Pires de Camargo, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Sporotrichosis, caused by agents of the fungal genus Sporothrix, occurs worldwide, but the infectious species are not evenly distributed. Sporothrix propagules usually gain entry into the warm-blooded host through minor trauma to the skin from contaminated plant debris or through scratches or bites

  13. Prunus serotina unleashed: invader dominance after 70 years of forest development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanhellemont, M.; Wauters, L.; Baeten, L.; Bijlsma, R.J.; Frenne, De P.; Hermy, M.; Verheyen, K.

    2010-01-01

    Propagule pressure and disturbance have both been found to facilitate invasion. Therefore, knowledge on the history of introduction and disturbance is vital for understanding an invasion process, and research should focus on areas in which the invasive species has not been deliberately introduced or

  14. Aquatic plant shows flexible avoidance by escape from tuber predation by swans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hidding, B.; Klaassen, M.R.J.; De Boer, T.; De Vries, P.P.; Nolet, B.A.

    2012-01-01

    Deeper burial of bulbs and tubers has been suggested as an escape against below-ground herbivory by vertebrates, but experimental evidence is lacking. As deep propagule burial can incur high costs of emergence after dormancy, burial depth may represent a trade-off between sprouting survival and

  15. 16 CFR 18.0 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... greenhouse plants solely for inside culture or use and annual vegetable plants. Industry members. Any person... seeds, cuttings, callus or other plant tissue, spores or other propagules under a controlled environment..., small fruit plants, shrubs, vines, ornamentals, herbaceous annuals, biennials and perennials,...

  16. Halosulfuron reduced purple nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus) tuber production and viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeds persist and cause economic losses in agricultural systems because they exploit an underutilized portion of that system. Reducing the impact of weeds on agroecosystems begins with minimizing the number of propagules (e.g, seeds and tubers) that are produced and returned to the soil. Purple nu...

  17. Biosynthesis of archetypal plant self-defensive oxylipins by an endophytic fungus residing in mangrove embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ling; Peschel, Gundela; Hertweck, Christian

    2012-12-21

    A tree's travel companion: a fungal endophyte (Fusarium incarnatum) isolated from a viviparous propagule (embryo) of a mangrove tree produces typical plant defense oxylipins. Stable-isotope labeling experiments revealed that the endophyte biosynthesizes coriolic acid, didehydrocoriolic acid, and an epoxy fatty acid derived from linoleic acid by a process involving Δ(15)-desaturation and 13-lipoxygenation.

  18. Effects of experimental snowmelt and rain on dispersal of six plant species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarneel, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Water flows affect dispersal of propagules of many plant species, and rivers and streams are therefore very important dispersal vectors. However, small water flows such as trough rain and snowmelt are much more common, but their effects on dispersal are barely studied. The importance of this form of

  19. Differentiating Phytophthora ramorum and P. kernoviae from other species isolated from foliage of rhododendrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytophthora species are among plant pathogens that are the most threatening to agriculture. After the discovery of P. ramorum, surveys have identified new species and new reports on Rhododendrons. Based upon propagule production and characteristics and colony growth, a dichotomous key was produce...

  20. Landscape genetics and limiting factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel A. Cushman; Andrew J. Shirk; Erin L. Landguth

    2013-01-01

    Population connectivity is mediated by the movement of organisms or propagules through landscapes. However, little is known about how variation in the pattern of landscape mosaics affects the detectability of landscape genetic relationships. The goal of this paper is to explore the impacts of limiting factors on landscape genetic processes using simulation...

  1. Invasion success in Cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica): A population genetic approach exploring genetic diversity and historical introductions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rima D. Lucardi; Lisa E. Wallace; Gary N. Ervin

    2014-01-01

    Propagule pressure significantly contributes to and limits the potential success of a biological invasion, especially during transport, introduction, and establishment. Events such as multiple introductions of foreign parent material and gene flow among them can increase genetic diversity in founding populations, often leading to greater invasion success. We applied...

  2. The role of animal seed dispersal in accelerating native forest regeneration on degraded tropical lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.M. Wunderle Jr.

    1997-01-01

    this paper reviews the characteristicas of animal seed dispersal. relevant to tropical forest restoration efforts and discusses their managment implication. In many tropical regions seed dispersal by animals is the predominant form of dissemination of propagules and has a potential to facilitate recolonization of native vegetation on degraded sites.

  3. Dispersal phenology of hydrochorous plants in relation to discharge, seed release time and buoyancy of seeds: the flood pulse concept supported

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boedeltje, G.; Bakker, J.P.; Brinke, A. Ten; Groenendael, J.M. van; Soesbergen, M.

    2004-01-01

    1 Restored floodplains and backwaters lacking a viable propagule bank, may need flood pulses to facilitate inward dispersal of diaspores. Temporal patterns of hydrochorous plant dispersal are, however, not well known. 2 Diversity and abundance of diaspores dispersed in a water body over 12 months

  4. Dispersal phenology of hydrochorous plants in relation to discharge, seed release time and buoyancy of seeds : the flood pulse concept supported

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boedeltje, G; Bakker, JP; Ten Brinke, A; Van Groenendael, JM; Soesbergen, M

    2004-01-01

    1 Restored floodplains and backwaters lacking a viable propagule bank, may need flood pulses to facilitate inward dispersal of diaspores. Temporal patterns of hydrochorous plant dispersal are, however, not well known. 2 Diversity and abundance of diaspores dispersed in a water body over 12 months

  5. First report of Phakopsora pachyrhizi causing rust on soybean in Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean rust (SBR), caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, has rapidly become established in Africa since the first report in Uganda in 1996. The urediniospores, as windborne propagules, have infested new regions of Africa, initiating SBR in many countries, including Ghana and Democratic Republic of the C...

  6. Micoinseticidas e Micoacaricidas no Brasil: Como estamos?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mycoinsecticides and mycoacaricides can be defined as biopesticide products based on living propagules of entomopathogenic fungi developed for inundative and inoculative biological control of insects and mites. Based on recently published data on global use of entomopathogenic fungi and a proposal f...

  7. Application of an inexpensive and high-throughput genomic DNA extraction method for the molecular ecology of zooplanktonic diapausing eggs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montero-Pau, Javier; Gómez, Africa; Muñoz, Joaquin

    2008-01-01

    We describe the application of a simple, low-cost, and effective method of DNA extraction (hot sodium hydroxide and Tris, HotSHOT) to the diapausing propagules of continental aquatic invertebrates for its use in PCR amplification. We illustrate the use of the technique in cladocerans, rotifers...

  8. The curse of the pharaoh hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandon, S

    1998-08-22

    The 'curse of the pharaoh' has been used as a metaphor for the hypothesis that higher parasite propagule survival selects for higher virulence. Indeed, the mysterious death of Lord Carnavon after entering the tomb of the Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamen could potentially be explained by an infection with a highly virulent and very long-lived pathogen. In this paper, I investigate whether parasite virulence increases with high propagule survival. In this respect, I derive an analytic expression of the evolutionarily stable level of parasite virulence as a function of propagule survival rate when the host-parasite system has reached a stable ecological equilibrium. This result shows that, if multiple infection occurs, higher propagule survival generally increases parasite virulence. This effect is enhanced when parasite dispersal coevolves with parasite virulence. In a more general perspective, the model shows the importance of taking into account the combination of direct and indirect effects (which I call inclusive effects) of higher transmission ability on the evolution of parasite virulence. The recognition of these effects has several practical implications for virulence management.

  9. Fungal Entomopathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fungal entomopathogens are important biological control agents worldwide and have been the subject of intense research for more than100 years. They exhibit both sexual and asexual reproduction and produce different types of infective propagules. Their mode of action against insects involves attachme...

  10. On the asexual reproduction of Plagiochila pluma Steph.

    OpenAIRE

    Piippo, Sinikka

    1992-01-01

    Four types of asexual reproduction in Plagiochila and the Plagiochilaceae are known: propagules, caducous leaves, gemmae and cladia. Plagiochila pluma Steph. has caducous leaves and teeth with regenerants. The terms for asexual reproduction modes in liverworts are briefly discussed and new definitions proposed.

  11. A decrease in bulk water and mannitol and accumulation of trehalose and trehalose-based oligosaccharides define a two-stage maturation process towards extreme stress resistance in ascospores of Neosartorya fischeri (Aspergillus fischeri)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wyatt, T.T.; Golovina, E.A.; Leeuwen, van R.; Wösten, H.A.B.; Dijksterhuis, J.

    2015-01-01

    Fungal propagules survive stresses better than vegetative cells. Neosartorya fischeri, an Aspergillus teleomorph, forms ascospores that survive high temperatures or drying followed by heat. Not much is known about maturation and development of extreme stress resistance in fungal cells. This study pr

  12. The identification and remote detection of alien invasive plants in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kabir Peerbhay

    This paper reviews remote sensing techniques that have been used in ... plant substrates, soil properties, the microclimate, water relations, density and height of vegetation ... the distribution of alien plant invader propagules in support of controlling the spread of alien .... Additionally, a precise weed detection system.

  13. The composition of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities differs among the roots, spores and extraradical mycelia associated with five Mediterranean plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela-Cervero, Sara; Vasar, Martti; Davison, John; Barea, José Miguel; Öpik, Maarja; Azcón-Aguilar, Concepción

    2015-08-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are essential constituents of most terrestrial ecosystems. AMF species differ in terms of propagation strategies and the major propagules they form. This study compared the AMF community composition of different propagule fractions - colonized roots, spores and extraradical mycelium (ERM) - associated with five Mediterranean plant species in Sierra de Baza Natural Park (Granada, Spain). AMF were identified using 454 pyrosequencing of the SSU rRNA gene. A total of 96 AMF phylogroups [virtual taxa (VT)] were detected in the study site, including 31 novel VT. After per-sample sequencing depth standardization, 71 VT were recorded from plant roots, and 47 from each of the spore and ERM fractions. AMF communities differed significantly among the propagule fractions, and the root-colonizing fraction differed among host plant species. Indicator VT were detected for the root (13 Glomus VT), spore (Paraglomus VT281, VT336, Pacispora VT284) and ERM (Diversispora VT62) fractions. This study provides detailed evidence from a natural system that AMF taxa are differentially allocated among soil mycelium, soil spores and colonized root propagules. This has important implications for interpreting AMF diversity surveys and designing applications of AMF in vegetation restoration.

  14. Microbiological quality of retail fresh fish fillets in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mossel, D.A.A.; Broek, M.J.M. van den; Mol, H.

    1984-01-01

    A total of 242 samples of ready-for-sale fish fillets of validated good sensory quality was examined for colony counts at 20, 30 and 37°C, Enterobacteriaceae at 37°C, Escherichia coli, Salmonella and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in l0 g aliquots, Staphylococcus aureus and yeast and mould propagules. Gram

  15. Fungistasis and general soil biostasis - A new synthesis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garbeva, P.V.; Hol, W.H.G.; Termorshuizen, A.J.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; De Boer, W.

    2011-01-01

    In most soils, fungal propagules are restricted to a certain extent in their ability to grow or germinate. This phenomenon, known as soil fungistasis, has received considerable attention for more than five decades, mostly due to its association with the general suppression of soil-borne fungal

  16. Mortality risk from entomopathogenic fungi affects oviposition behavior in the parasitoid wasp Trybliographa rapae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rännbäck, Linda-Marie; Cotes, Belen; Anderson, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    brunneum isolate KVL 04-57 and Beauveria bassiana isolate KVL 03-90. Furthermore, T. rapae oviposition behavior was assessed in the presence of these entomopathogenic fungi either as infected hosts or as infective propagules in the environment. Both fungi were pathogenic to D. radicum larvae and T. rapae...

  17. Germination of Phytophthora ramorum chlamydospores: a comparison of separation method and chlamydospore age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justin P. Shaffer; Jennifer L. Parke

    2013-01-01

    Phytophthora ramorum characteristically produces large amounts of chlamydospores in vitro, but the role of these propagules in the disease cycle remains unclear. Germination is difficult to observe and quantify if chlamydospores are not free of mycelium, and the low frequency of germination commonly reported suggests that...

  18. Prevalence and residential determinants of fungi within homes in Melbourne, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmage, S; Bailey, M; Raven, J; Mitakakis, T; Thien, F; Forbes, A; Guest, D; Abramson, M; Walters, E H

    1999-11-01

    Recent epidemiological studies suggest that the adverse respiratory health effects caused by the inhalation of fungal propagules are substantial. Knowledge of the prevalence and environmental determinants of indoor fungal levels is essential in designing effective avoidance measures. To investigate the prevalence of fungi and the influence of residential characteristics on levels of fungi within homes in Melbourne, Australia. Floor dust and air samples were collected from bedrooms in 485 houses over 1 year. The dust was analysed for ergosterol, a marker of cumulative fungal biomass exposure. Total and genera-specific fungal propagules were identified in air samples. Details of the relevant residential characteristics were documented using a questionnaire. Independent predictors (P houses had viable fungal propagules exceeding 500 CFU/m3. Cladosporium and Penicillium were identified as the most prevalent and abundant fungal genera in indoor air. The median ergosterol level in bedroom floor was 3.8 microg/g of dust. Multivariate analysis showed that total fungal propagules in indoor air were lower in bedrooms with a ceiling fan, without visible mould, and those that were more frequently vacuumed, had a solid fuel fire, had windows closed at the time of the sampling or lacked pets. The presence of more than one cat had the greatest effect on total fungal propagules. Ergosterol levels were significantly lower in homes without old fitted carpets, visible mould or pets and those with frequent airing and regular use of an extractor fan in the kitchen. Old wall-to-wall carpets had the greatest effect on ergosterol. High indoor fungal exposures were associated with infrequent ventilation or vacuuming, presence of pets, visible mould and old carpets.

  19. Influence of Arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi (AMF on drought tolerance and charcoal rot disease of cowpea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.O. Oyewole

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of Arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi (AMF (Glomus deserticola and Gigaspora gigantea were evaluated on drought tolerance and charcoal rot disease of cowpea genotypes: IT90K-277-2, IT84S-2246-4 and IT06K123-1. IT90K-277-2 and IT84S-2246-4 were sown in 3 kg of sterilized soil for drought experiment with five treatments. Treatment was established thirty days after germination with inoculation of G. deserticola, the mycorrhizal treated cowpea withstand the water stress and produced high yield. Biocontrol experiment had 2 kg sterilized soil potted into bags with cultivars IT90K-277-2 and IT06K123-1, fourteen treatments were established with soil drenched before planting and simultaneous inoculation. Soil drenched with AMF before planting and inoculation of M. phaseolina after 10 days of germination recorded higher growth parameters, while the simultaneous inoculated plant was the most effective in reducing disease severity. However, simultaneous treatment of G. deserticola, G. gigantea and M. phaseolina were most effective for both growth parameters and reduction of disease severity.

  20. Screening of Azotobacter isolates for PGP properties and antifungal activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjelić Dragana Đ.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Аmong 50 bacterial isolates obtained from maize rhizospherе, 13 isolates belonged to the genus Azotobacter. Isolates were biochemically characterized and estimated for pH and halo tolerance ability and antibiotic resistance. According to characterization, the six representative isolates were selected and further screened in vitro for plant growth promoting properties: production of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, siderophores, hydrogen cyanide (HCN, exopolysaccharides, phosphate solubilization and antifungal activity (vs. Helminthosporium sp., Macrophomina sp., Fusarium sp.. Beside HCN production, PGP properties were detected for all isolates except Azt7. All isolates produced IAA in the medium without L-tryptophan and the amount of produced IAA increased with concentration of precursor in medium. The highest amount of IAA was produced by isolates Azt4 (37.69 and 45.86 μg ml-1 and Azt5 (29.44 and 50.38 μg ml-1 in the medium with addition of L-tryptophan (2.5 and 5 mM. The isolates showed the highest antifungal activity against Helminthosporium sp. and the smallest antagonistic effect on Macrophomina sp. Radial Growth Inhibition (RGI obtained by the confrontation of isolates with tested phytopathogenic fungi, ranged from 10 to 48%. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 31073

  1. Spatiotemporal trends in Canadian domestic wild boar production and habitat predict wild pig distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Nicole; Laforge, Michel; van Beest, Floris

    2017-01-01

    improved the fit and predictive ability of the habitat-based model, and the number of boar farms in adjacent rural municipalities had a relative variable importance of 0.84. Our results support the propagule pressure hypothesis, which states that establishment success is linked to source dynamics. Although......Understanding source dynamics of invasive species is crucial to their management. Free-ranging wild pigs (Sus scrofa) have caused considerable ecological and agricultural damage throughout their global range, including Canada. Objectives were to assess the spatial and temporal patterns in domestic...... wild boar and test the propagule pressure hypothesis to improve predictive ability of an existing habitat-based model of wild pigs. We reviewed spatiotemporal patterns in domestic wild boar production across ten Canadian provinces during 1991–2011 and evaluated the ability of wild boar farm...

  2. Dispersal and colonisation of plants in lowland streams: success rates and bottlenecks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Tenna

    2008-01-01

    Plant dispersal and colonisation, including rates of dispersal, retention, colonisation and survival of dispersed propagules (shoots and seeds), were studied in a 300-m stream reach in a macrophyte-rich lowland stream during one growing season. Relationships between colonisation processes...... and seeds, due in part to low retention success (1% of the dispersed shoots per 100-m reach) and to unsuccessful colonisation of retained shoots (3.4% of retained shoots colonised). The number of drifting shoots and seeds per day during the growing season were 650-6,950 and 2,970-62,780, respectively...... and simple flow parameters were tested. Each fortnight during a growing season, the number of dispersed plant propagules and the number of new and lost plant colonisations since the last sampling day were recorded. The retention of dispersing shoots was tested on two occasions during the growing season...

  3. Sporothrix schenckii sensu stricto isolated from soil in an armadillo's burrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; Bagagli, Eduardo; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires; Bosco, Sandra de Moraes Gimenes

    2014-04-01

    Sporotrichosis is a polymorphic disease of man and animals caused by traumatic implantation of propagules into the skin and subcutaneous tissue. Pathogenic species includes S. brasiliensis, S. schenckii, S. globosa and S. luriei. The disease is remarkable for its occurrence as sapronoses and/or zoonosis outbreaks in tropical and subtropical areas; although, the ecology of the clinical clade is still puzzling. Here, we describe an anamorphic Sporothrix strain isolated from soil in an armadillo's burrow, which was located in a hyper endemic area of Paracoccidioidomycosis in Brazil. This isolate was identified as S. schenckii sensu stricto (Clade IIa) based on morphological and physiological characteristics and phylogenetic analyses of calmodulin sequences. We then discuss the role of the nine-banded armadillo Dasypus novemcinctus as a natural carrier of Sporothrix propagules to better understand Sporothrix sources in nature and reveal essential aspects about the pathogen's eco-epidemiology.

  4. Developmental morphology of branching flowers in Nymphaea prolifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, Valentin; Moline, Philip; Pfeifer, Evelin; Novelo, Alejandro R; Rutishauser, Rolf

    2006-11-01

    Nymphaea and Nuphar (Nymphaeaceae) share an extra-axillary mode of floral inception in the shoot apical meristem (SAM). Some leaf sites along the ontogenetic spiral are occupied by floral primordia lacking a subtending bract. This pattern of flower initiation in leaf sites is repeated inside branching flowers of Nymphaea prolifera (Central and South America). Instead of fertile flowers this species usually produces sterile tuberiferous flowers that act as vegetative propagules. N. prolifera changes the meristem identity from reproductive to vegetative or vice versa repeatedly. Each branching flower first produces some perianth-like leaves, then it switches back to the vegetative meristem identity of the SAM with the formation of foliage leaves and another set of branching flowers. This process is repeated up to three times giving rise to more than 100 vegetative propagules. The developmental morphology of the branching flowers of N. prolifera is described using both microtome sections and scanning electron microscopy.

  5. On a record of two alien fish species (Teleostei: Osphronemidae from the natural waters of Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.D. Marcus Knight

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aquarium trade has been the source of many alien species being introduced into the natural waters of Chennai.  Trichopsis vittata and Macropodus opercularis are being reported for the first from Chennai. However,  contrary to the propagule pressure theory both these species are not common in the aquarium trade, raising speculations of inter-basin water transfer playing a role in introducing non-native species into an ecosystem.  

  6. An ecocultural model predicts Neanderthal extinction through competition with modern humans

    OpenAIRE

    Gilpin, William; Marcus W Feldman; Aoki, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Ecocultural niche modeling and radiocarbon dating suggest a causal role for interspecific competition in the extinction of Neanderthals. Most archaeologists argue that the advantage to modern humans lay in a higher culture level (a sizable minority dispute this view). Competition between the two species may have occurred when a modern human propagule entered a region occupied by a larger Neanderthal population. We present a model for this replacement, stressing the importance of the founder e...

  7. Low plant density enhances gene dispersal in the Amazonian understory herb Heliconia acuminata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côrtes, Marina C; Uriarte, María; Lemes, Maristerra R; Gribel, Rogério; Kress, W John; Smouse, Peter E; Bruna, Emilio M

    2013-11-01

    In theory, conservation genetics predicts that forest fragmentation will reduce gene dispersal, but in practice, genetic and ecological processes are also dependent on other population characteristics. We used Bayesian genetic analyses to characterize parentage and propagule dispersal in Heliconia acuminata L. C. Richard (Heliconiaceae), a common Amazonian understory plant that is pollinated and dispersed by birds. We studied these processes in two continuous forest sites and three 1-ha fragments in Brazil's Biological Dynamics of Forest Fragments Project. These sites showed variation in the density of H. acuminata. Ten microsatellite markers were used to genotype flowering adults and seedling recruits and to quantify realized pollen and seed dispersal distances, immigration of propagules from outside populations, and reproductive dominance among parents. We tested whether gene dispersal is more dependent on fragmentation or density of reproductive plants. Low plant densities were associated with elevated immigration rates and greater propagule dispersal distances. Reproductive dominance among inside-plot parents was higher for low-density than for high-density populations. Elevated local flower and fruit availability is probably leading to spatially more proximal bird foraging and propagule dispersal in areas with high density of reproductive plants. Nevertheless, genetic diversity, inbreeding coefficients and fine-scale spatial genetic structure were similar across populations, despite differences in gene dispersal. This result may indicate that the opposing processes of longer dispersal events in low-density populations vs. higher diversity of contributing parents in high-density populations balance the resulting genetic outcomes and prevent genetic erosion in small populations and fragments.

  8. Cryptosexuality and the Genetic Diversity Paradox in Coffee Rust, Hemileia vastatrix

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Roberto de Carvalho; Ronaldo C Fernandes; Guilherme Mendes Almeida Carvalho; Barreto, Robert W.; Evans, Harry C.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite the fact that coffee rust was first investigated scientifically more than a century ago, and that the disease is one of the major constraints to coffee production--constantly changing the socio-economic and historical landscape of the crop--critical aspects of the life cycle of the pathogen, Hemileia vastatrix, remain unclear. The asexual urediniospores are regarded as the only functional propagule: theoretically, making H. vastatrix a clonal species. However, the well-doc...

  9. Dispersal of aquatic organisms by waterbirds: a review of past research and priorities for future studies

    OpenAIRE

    Figuerola, Jordi; Green, Andy J.

    2002-01-01

    1. Inland wetlands constitute ecological islands of aquatic habitat often isolated by huge areas of non-suitable terrestrial habitats. Although most aquatic organisms lack the capacity to disperse by themselves to neighbouring catchments, many species present widespread distributions consistent with frequent dispersal by migratory waterbirds. 2. A literature review indicates that bird-mediated passive transport of propagules of aquatic invertebrates and plants is a frequent pr...

  10. Convergent and contingent community responses to grass source and dominance during prairie restoration across a longitudinal gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopf, Ryan P; Baer, Sara G; Gibson, David J

    2014-02-01

    Restoring prairie on formerly cultivated land begins by selecting propagule seed sources and the diversity of species to reintroduce. This study examined the effects of dominant grass propagule source (cultivar vs. non-cultivar) and sown propagule diversity (grass:forb sowing ratio) on plant community structure. Two field experiments were established in Kansas and Illinois consisting of identical split plot designs. Dominant grass source was assigned as the whole-plot factor, and sown dominance of grasses (five levels of seeded grass dominance) as the subplot factor. Species density, cover, and diversity were quantified for 5 years. The effect of dominant grass source on the cover of focal grasses, sown species, and volunteer species was contingent upon location, with variation between dominant grass sources observed exclusively in Kansas. Species density and diversity showed regionally convergent patterns in response to dominant grass source. Contrary to our hypotheses, total species density and diversity were not lower in the presence of grass cultivars, the grass source we had predicted would be more competitive. Sown grass dominance effects on the cover of the focal grass species were contingent upon location resulting from establishment corresponding better to the assigned treatments in Illinois. All other cover groups showed regionally convergent patterns, with lower cover of volunteers and higher cover of sown forbs, diversity, and species density in the lowest sown grass dominance treatment in both sites. Thus, decisions regarding the diversity of propagules to reintroduce had more consequence for plant community structure than cultivar or non-cultivar source of dominant grasses.

  11. Translocation of threatened plants as a conservation measure in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Ren, Hai; Liu, Qiang; Wen, XiangYing; Maunder, Michael; Gao, JiangYun

    2015-12-01

    We assessed the current status of plant conservation translocation efforts in China, a topic poorly reported in recent scientific literature. We identified 222 conservation translocation cases involving 154 species, of these 87 were Chinese endemic species and 101 (78%) were listed as threatened on the Chinese Species Red List. We categorized the life form of each species and, when possible, determined for each case the translocation type, propagule source, propagule type, and survival and reproductive parameters. A surprisingly large proportion (26%) of the conservation translocations in China were conservation introductions, largely implemented in response to large-scale habitat destruction caused by the Three-Gorge Dam and another hydropower project. Documentation and management of the translocations varied greatly. Less than half the cases had plant survival records. Statistical analyses showed that survival percentages were significantly correlated with plant life form and the type of planting materials. Thirty percent of the cases had records on whether or not individuals flowered or fruited. Results of information theoretic model selection indicated that plant life form, translocation type, propagule type, propagule source, and time since planting significantly influenced the likelihood of flowering and fruiting on the project level. We suggest that the scientific-based application of species conservation translocations should be promoted as part of a commitment to species recovery management. In addition, we recommend that the common practice of within and out of range introductions in nature reserves to be regulated more carefully due to its potential ecological risks. We recommend the establishment of a national office and database to coordinate conservation translocations in China. Our review effort is timely considering the need for a comprehensive national guideline for the newly announced nation-wide conservation program on species with extremely

  12. Continent-wide risk assessment for the establishment of nonindigenous species in Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chown, Steven L; Huiskes, Ad H L; Gremmen, Niek J M; Lee, Jennifer E; Terauds, Aleks; Crosbie, Kim; Frenot, Yves; Hughes, Kevin A; Imura, Satoshi; Kiefer, Kate; Lebouvier, Marc; Raymond, Ben; Tsujimoto, Megumu; Ware, Chris; Van de Vijver, Bart; Bergstrom, Dana Michelle

    2012-03-27

    Invasive alien species are among the primary causes of biodiversity change globally, with the risks thereof broadly understood for most regions of the world. They are similarly thought to be among the most significant conservation threats to Antarctica, especially as climate change proceeds in the region. However, no comprehensive, continent-wide evaluation of the risks to Antarctica posed by such species has been undertaken. Here we do so by sampling, identifying, and mapping the vascular plant propagules carried by all categories of visitors to Antarctica during the International Polar Year's first season (2007-2008) and assessing propagule establishment likelihood based on their identity and origins and on spatial variation in Antarctica's climate. For an evaluation of the situation in 2100, we use modeled climates based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Special Report on Emissions Scenarios Scenario A1B [Nakićenović N, Swart R, eds (2000) Special Report on Emissions Scenarios: A Special Report of Working Group III of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK)]. Visitors carrying seeds average 9.5 seeds per person, although as vectors, scientists carry greater propagule loads than tourists. Annual tourist numbers (∼33,054) are higher than those of scientists (∼7,085), thus tempering these differences in propagule load. Alien species establishment is currently most likely for the Western Antarctic Peninsula. Recent founder populations of several alien species in this area corroborate these findings. With climate change, risks will grow in the Antarctic Peninsula, Ross Sea, and East Antarctic coastal regions. Our evidence-based assessment demonstrates which parts of Antarctica are at growing risk from alien species that may become invasive and provides the means to mitigate this threat now and into the future as the continent's climate changes.

  13. Assessment of mycorrhizal colonisation and soil nutrients in unmanaged fire-impacted soils from two target restoration sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, J. M.; Oliveira, R. S.; Franco, A. R.; Ritz, K.; Nunan, N.; Castro, P. M. L.

    2010-07-01

    The mycorrhizal colonisation of plants grown in unmanaged soils from two restoration sites with a fire history in Northern Portugal was evaluated from the perspective of supporting restoration programmes. To promote restoration of original tree stands, Quercus ilex L. and Pinus pinaster Ait. were used as target species on two sites, denoted Site 1 and 2 respectively. The aim of the study was to assess whether mycorrhizal propagules that survived fire episodes could serve as in situ inoculum sources, and to analyse the spatial distribution of soil nutrients and mycorrhizal parameters. In a laboratory bioassay, P. pinaster and Q. ilex seedlings were grown on soils from the target sites and root colonisation by ectomycorrhizal (ECM) and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi was determined. The ECM root colonisation levels found indicated that soil from Site 2 contained sufficient ECM propagules to serve as a primary source of inoculum for P. pinaster. The low levels of ECM and AM colonisation obtained on the roots of plants grown in soil from Site 1 indicated that the existing mycorrhizal propagules might be insufficient for effective root colonisation of Q. ilex. Different ECM morphotypes were found in plants grown in soil from the two sites. At Site 2 mycorrhizal parameters were found to be spatially structured, with significant differences in ECM colonisation and soil P concentrations between regions of either side of an existing watercourse. The spatial distribution of mycorrhizal propagules was related to edaphic parameters (total C and extractable P), and correlations between soil nutrients and mycorrhizal parameters were found. (Author) 31 refs.

  14. Red mangrove life history variables along latitudinal and anthropogenic stress gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proffitt, C Edward; Travis, Steven

    2014-06-01

    Mangroves migrate northward in Florida and colonize marshes historically dominated by salt marsh species. In theory, this migration should be facilitated by greater numbers of propagules stemming from increased reproductive activity and greater genetic variability caused by outcrossing. We aimed to determine if stand reproduction and % outcrossing were affected by cold stress (stress increases with latitude), anthropogenic stress (human population density as a proxy), and years since a major hurricane. Further, we wished to determine if mutation rate varied with the stressors and if that affected stand reproduction. Both coasts of Florida from the southern Florida Keys to Tampa Bay on the Gulf of Mexico coast, and Merritt Island on the Atlantic coast. We conducted field surveys of frequency of reproducing trees (104,211 trees surveyed in 102 forested stands), incidence of trees showing albinism in propagules, and% outcrossing estimated from the ratio of albino:normal propagules. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test a conceptual model that served as a multivariate hypothesis. Reproductive frequencies varied by site and increased with latitude although more strongly on the Gulf coast. Our SEM results indicate that outcrossing increases in this predominately selfing species under conditions of cold and anthropogenic stress, and that this increases reproductive output in the population. Further, we find that increased mutation rates suppress stand reproductive output but there is no significant relationship between outcrossing and mutation rate. Tree size responded to stressors but did not affect stand reproduction. Reproduction increased with years since major hurricane. Potential for colonization of northern Florida salt marshes by mangroves is enhanced by increased reproductive rates that provides more propagules and outcrossing that should enhance genetic variation thereby promoting adaptation to novel environmental conditions. Natural (cold) stress

  15. Caractérisation phénotypique et génétique du carabique Merizodus soledadinus le long du gradient de son invasion aux Îles Kerguelen

    OpenAIRE

    Ouisse, Tiphaine

    2016-01-01

    Global trade and human movements increase the likelihood of long-distance transportation of propagules and their subsequent introduction into new geographic regions. In some instances, newly established species can become dominant in invaded communities, at the expense of native species. Besides threatening invaded communities and ecosystem functions, biological invasions constitute natural experiments that allow to study eco-evolutionary processes in real time, including the occurrence of ne...

  16. Sweep-net sampling acorns in forested wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitch D. Weegman; Richard M. Kaminski; Guiming Wang; Michael L. Schummer; Andrew W. Ezell; Theodor D. Leininger

    2010-01-01

    We are unaware of any previous studies to evaluate using a sweep net to estimate abundance of red oak acorns (Quercus spp.) after they fall from tree crowns, sink to the ground in flooded bottomlands (i.e., sound acorns), and become potential food for animals or propagules for seedlings. We placed known numbers of white-painted red oak acorns of 3 size classes and used...

  17. The role of hydrochory in structuring riparian and wetland vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Christer; Brown, Rebecca L; Jansson, Roland; Merritt, David M

    2010-11-01

    Hydrochory, or the passive dispersal of organisms by water, is an important means of propagule transport, especially for plants. During recent years, knowledge about hydrochory and its ecological consequences has increased considerably and a substantial body of literature has been produced. Here, we review this literature and define the state of the art of the discipline. A substantial proportion of species growing in or near water have propagules (fruits, seeds or vegetative units) able to disperse by water, either floating, submerged in flowing water, or with the help of floating vessels. Hydrochory can enable plants to colonize sites out of reach with other dispersal vectors, but the timing of dispersal and mechanisms of establishment are important for successful establishment. At the population level, hydrochory may increase the effective size and longevity of populations, and control their spatial configuration. Hydrochory is also an important source of species colonizing recruitment-limited riparian and wetland communities, contributing to maintenance of community species richness. Dispersal by water may even influence community composition in different landscape elements, resulting in landscape-level patterns. Genetically, hydrochory may reduce spatial aggregation of genetically related individuals, lead to high gene flow among populations, and increase genetic diversity in populations receiving many propagules. Humans have impacted hydrochory in many ways. For example, dams affect hydrochory by reducing peak flows and hence dispersal capacity, altering the timing of dispersal, and by presenting physical barriers to dispersal, with consequences for riverine plant communities. Hydrochory has been inferred to be an important vector for the spread of many invasive species, but there is also the potential for enhancing ecosystem restoration by improving or restoring water dispersal pathways. Climate change may alter the role of hydrochory by modifying the

  18. Undercover predators: Vegetation mediates foraging, trophic cascades, and biological control by omnivorous weed seed predators

    OpenAIRE

    Blubaugh, Carmen K

    2015-01-01

    Weed pressure is the most costly challenge that vegetable growers face, requiring more labor investment than other production inputs. Vertebrate and invertebrate seed predators destroy a large percentage of weed propagules on the soil surface, and their ecosystem services may ease labor requirements for farmers in herbicide-free systems. Cover provided by living vegetation is an important predictor of seed predator activity, and my dissertation takes a comprehensive approach to understanding ...

  19. Coastal Habitats in Puget Sound: A Research Plan in Support of the Puget Sound Nearshore Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    an increased threat of alien and invasive plant and animal species such as four species of Spartina (cordgrass), Sargassum , green crab, and dozens...surfgrass (Phyllospadix spp.) and native eelgrass (Zostera marina). Non-indigenous vegetation (Zostera japonica, Sargassum muticum, and Spartina...Contaminant species change and uptake • Food web ○ Primary production and reproduction ○ Production of seeds and other propagules ○ Primary

  20. Sexual and Asexual Reproduction of Salix sitchensis and the Influence of Beaver (Castor canadensis) Herbivory on Reproductive Success

    OpenAIRE

    Travis G. Gerwing; Alyssa M. Allen Gerwing; Rapaport, Eric; Alström-Rapaport, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    The influence of beaver (Castor canadensis Kuhl) herbivory on Salix reproduction, specifically the stimulation of asexual reproduction via browsed stem fragments, is relatively unknown. This study aimed to determine if beaver herbivory stimulates asexual reproduction of riparian willows and results in mature populations dominated by clones. The survival of seedlings and asexual propagules produced by beaver browse in populations of the riparian willow Salix sitchensis (Sanson in Bongard) were...

  1. Asexual Reproduction of Phytophthora capsici as Affected by Extracts from Agricultural and Nonagricultural Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanogo, S

    2007-07-01

    ABSTRACT Formation of sporangia and zoospores in species of Phytophthora is known to be influenced by soil microbial and chemical composition. In Phytophthora capsici, the study of the relationship of soil chemical composition to production of sporangia and zoospores has been limited. P. capsici is a soilborne pathogen of a wide array of vegetable crops, including chile pepper (Capsicum annuum) in New Mexico. Production of sporangia and zoospores by P. capsici was evaluated in extracts of soils from three different environments in New Mexico: (i) agricultural environments with a long history of chile pepper cropping and occurrence of P. capsici (CP), (ii) agricultural environments with no history of chile pepper cropping and no occurrence of P. capsici (Non-CP), and (iii) nonagricultural environments consisting of forests and rangelands (Non-Ag). There was a significant difference in production of P. capsici asexual propagules, expressed as natural log (number of sporangia x number of zoospores), among the three environments (P = 0.0298). Production of propagules was 9 to 13% greater in Non-Ag than in CP or Non-CP environments. Stepwise multiple discriminant analysis and canonical discriminant analysis identified the edaphic variables Na, pH, P, organic matter content, and asexual propagule production as contributing the most to the separation of the three environments. Two significant (P < 0.0001) canonical discriminant functions were derived with the first function, accounting for approximately 75% of the explained variance. Based on the two discriminant functions, approximately 93, 86, and 89% of observations in CP, Non-CP, and Non-Ag environments, respectively, were classified correctly. Soils from agricultural and nonagricultural environments differentially influence production of sporangia and zoospores in P. capsici, and soil samples could be effectively classified into agricultural and nonagricultural environments based on soil chemical properties and the

  2. Cryopreservation of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.)

    OpenAIRE

    da Silva, J. A. T.; Engelmann, Florent

    2017-01-01

    Oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.), a tropical plant, is the leading source of edible oil. This review deals with the cryopreservation of oil palm as a way to preserve this important tropical germplasm. Somatic embryos have been the most popular source of material for cryopreservation as they are propagules that are effectively produced during micropropagation. In contrast, fewer studies exist on the cryopreservation of pollen, zygotic embryos, seeds, kernels and embryogenic cell suspensions....

  3. Alien plant invasions in South Africa: driving forces and the human dimension

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Le Maitre, David C

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available secondary driving forces ? Human population growth and migration Population increases lead to greater demands for food and materials. These demands are met by increasing productivity throughfertilization,adoptionofnewspecies,andbyincreasing the area under... production.1,35,37,48 Where demands cannot be met, people tend to migrate, taking propagules of their custom- ary food and medicinal plant species with them31,49 and inadver- tently carrying invasive species. ? Expanding network of international trade...

  4. Relative seed and fruit toxicity of the Australian cycads Macrozamia miquelii and Cycas ophiolitica: further evidence for a megafaunal seed dispersal syndrome in cycads, and its possible antiquity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J A; Walter, G H

    2014-08-01

    An apparent contradiction in the ecology of cycad plants is that their seeds are known to be highly poisonous, and yet they seem well adapted for seed dispersal by animals, as shown by their visually conspicuous seed cones and large seeds presented within a brightly colored fleshy "fruit" of sarcotesta. We tested if this sarcotesta could function as a reward for cycad seed dispersal fauna, by establishing if the toxic compound cycasin, known from the seeds, is absent from the sarcotesta. The Australian cycads Macrozamia miquelii and Cycas ophiolitica were tested (N = 10 individuals per species) using gas chromatography / mass spectrometry. Cycasin was detected at 0.34 % (fresh weight) in seed endosperm of M. miquelii and 0.28 % (fresh weight) in seed endosperm of C. ophiolitica. Cycasin was absent from the sarcotesta of the same propagules (none detected in the case of M. miquelii, and trace quantities detected in sarcotesta of only four of the ten C. ophiolitica propagules). This laboratory finding was supported by field observations of native animals eating the sarcotesta of these cycads but discarding the toxic seed intact. These results suggest cycads are adapted for dispersal fauna capable of swallowing the large, heavy propagules whole, digesting the non-toxic sarcotesta flesh internally, and then voiding the toxic seed intact. Megafauna species such as extant emus or cassowaries, or extinct Pleistocene megafauna such as Genyornis, are plausible candidates for such dispersal. Cycads are an ancient lineage, and the possible antiquity of their megafaunal seed dispersal adaptations are discussed.

  5. Inconsistencies among secondary sources of Chukar Partridge (Alectoris chukar introductions to the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Moulton

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The propagule pressure hypothesis asserts that the number of individuals released is the key determinant of whether an introduction will succeed or not. It remains to be shown whether propagule pressure is more important than either species-level or site-level factors in determining the fate of an introduction. Studies claiming to show that propagule pressure is the primary determinant of introduction success must assume that the historical record as reported by secondary sources is complete and accurate. Here, examine a widely introduced game bird, the Chukar (Alectoris chukar, to the USA. We compare the records reported by two secondary sources (Long, 1981; Lever, 1987 to those in a primary source (Christensen, 1970 and to a recent study by Sol et al. (2012. Numerous inconsistencies exist in the records reported by Sol et al. (2012, Long (1981 and Lever (1987 when compared to the primary record of Christensen (1970. As reported by Christensen (1970, very large numbers of Chukars were released unsuccessfully in some states. Our results strongly imply that factors other than sheer numbers are more important. Site-to-site differences are the most likely explanation for the variation in success.

  6. Restoration potential of sedge meadows in hand-cultivated soybean fields in northeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guodong; Middleton, Beth; Jiang, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Sedge meadows can be difficult to restore from farmed fields if key structural dominants are missing from propagule banks. In hand-cultivated soybean fields in northeastern China, we asked if tussock-forming Carex and other wetland species were present as seed or asexual propagules. In the Sanjiang Plain, China, we compared the seed banks, vegetative propagules (below-ground) and standing vegetation of natural and restored sedge meadows, and hand-cultivated soybean fields in drained and flooded conditions. We found that important wetland species survived cultivation as seeds for some time (e.g. Calamogrostis angustifolia and Potamogeton crispus) and as field weeds (e.g. C. angustifolia and Phragmites australis). Key structural species were missing in these fields, for example, Carex meyeriana. We also observed that sedge meadows restored without planting or seeding lacked tussock-forming sedges. The structure of the seed bank was related to experimental water regime, and field environments of tussock height, thatch depth, and presence of burning as based on Nonmetric Multidimensional Scaling analysis. To re-establish the structure imposed by tussock sedges, specific technologies might be developed to encourage the development of tussocks in restored sedge meadows.

  7. Effects of flooding on the spatial distribution of soil seed and spore banks of native grasslands of the Pantanal wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Carla de Oliveira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTTo better understand the role that flooding plays in shaping plant communities of native floodable grasslands of the Pantanal and to characterize the spatial distribution of plants, we present the results of a survey of soil seed and spore banks using the seedling emergence method. We hypothesized that terrain subjected to the deepest and longest flooding should have higher propagule abundance and richness. The species composition and distribution of seeds and spores in the soil were assessed at five sites using three sampling positions at each according to inundation intensity. In each sample position 2cm-thick soil samples were collected in quadrats to a depth of 10cm. Litter was also collected as an independent layer. Sample monitoring in the greenhouse resulted in the emergence of 5489 seedlings, or 6353 propagules.m-2. Both the litter layer and the deepest soil layer had low abundances. A total of forty-four morphospecies (16 families were recorded. Both seedling abundance and species richness were concentrated in the more floodable center sections. Isoetes pedersenii, Eleocharis minima, Sagittaria guayanensis, Rotala mexicana, Eleocharis plicarhachis, and Panicum laxum were the most abundant species. The species composition and spatial distribution of the propagule bank suggests that flooding plays a crucial role in seasonal vegetation dynamics in Pantanal wetlands, mediated by the ability of the soil to host seeds and spores during dry season.

  8. Dispersal of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and plants during succession

    Science.gov (United States)

    García de León, David; Moora, Mari; Öpik, Maarja; Jairus, Teele; Neuenkamp, Lena; Vasar, Martti; Bueno, C. Guillermo; Gerz, Maret; Davison, John; Zobel, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are important root symbionts that enhance plant nutrient uptake and tolerance to pathogens and drought. While the role of plant dispersal in shaping successional vegetation is well studied, there is very little information about the dispersal abilities of AM fungi. We conducted a trap-box experiment in a recently abandoned quarry at 10 different distances from the quarry edge (i.e. the potential propagule source) over eleven months to assess the short term, within-year, arrival of plant and AM fungal assemblages and hence their dispersal abilities. Using DNA based techniques we identified AM fungal taxa and analyzed their phylogenetic diversity. Plant diversity was determined by transporting trap soil to a greenhouse and identifying emerging seedlings. We recorded 30 AM fungal taxa. These contained a high proportion of ruderal AM fungi (30% of taxa, 79% of sequences) but the richness and abundance of AM fungi were not related to the distance from the presumed propagule source. The number of sequences of AM fungi decreased over time. Twenty seven plant species (30% of them ruderal) were recorded from the soil seed traps. Plant diversity decreased with distance from the propagule source and increased over time. Our data show that AM fungi with ruderal traits can be fast colonizers of early successional habitats.

  9. Temporal modelling of ballast water discharge and ship-mediated invasion risk to Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Robert C.; Prowse, Thomas A. A.; Ross, Joshua V.; Wittmann, Talia A.; Cassey, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    Biological invasions have the potential to cause extensive ecological and economic damage. Maritime trade facilitates biological invasions by transferring species in ballast water, and on ships' hulls. With volumes of maritime trade increasing globally, efforts to prevent these biological invasions are of significant importance. Both the International Maritime Organization and the Australian government have developed policy seeking to reduce the risk of these invasions. In this study, we constructed models for the transfer of ballast water into Australian waters, based on historic ballast survey data. We used these models to hindcast ballast water discharge over all vessels that arrived in Australian waters between 1999 and 2012. We used models for propagule survival to compare the risk of ballast-mediated propagule transport between ecoregions. We found that total annual ballast discharge volume into Australia more than doubled over the study period, with the vast majority of ballast water discharge and propagule pressure associated with bulk carrier traffic. As such, the ecoregions suffering the greatest risk are those associated with the export of mining commodities. As global marine trade continues to increase, effective monitoring and biosecurity policy will remain necessary to combat the risk of future marine invasion events. PMID:26064643

  10. Feeding and asexual reproduction of the jellyfish Sarsia gemmifera in response to resource enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stibor, Herwig; Tokle, Nils

    2003-04-01

    Jellyfish are ubiquitous predators in marine pelagic environments and can sometimes control their zooplankton prey populations. Recent considerations of the fertilization of entire food webs in coastal areas make it important to investigate the response of jellyfish to resource enrichment. We investigated feeding, assimilation and life history parameters in the hydromedusa species Sarsia gemmifera. S. gemmifera was able to ingest up to 3 micro g carbon per hour, which corresponds to a daily carbon ingestion that exceeds the individual's body weight (carbon). Conversion of ingested carbon into tissue was less than 30%. The assimilated carbon was allocated such that approximately 65% was used for growth and the remainder for asexual reproduction. Carbon from food was allocated to asexually produced offspring within hours. The numerical response of S. gemmifera reached saturation at prey levels of 100 or more copepods per liter. Propagule quality was influenced by maternal effects: higher net production of the mothers in higher food environments resulted in higher carbon content of individual propagules. Starvation resistance of propagules was therefore positively related to food density in the maternal environment. The food concentrations which S. gemmifera normally experiences in the field are much lower than the food levels at which this species had its maximum asexual reproductive output in the laboratory. Therefore, S. gemmifera may potentially benefit from food web perturbations which increase crustacean zooplankton densities.

  11. Differential invasion success of salmonids in southern Chile: patterns and hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arismendi, Ivan; Penaluna, Brooke E.; Dunham, Jason B.; García de Leaniz, Carlos; Soto, Doris; Fleming, Ian A.; Gomez-Uchidam, Daniel; Gajardo, Gonzalo; Vargas, Pamela V.; León-Muñoz, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Biological invasions create complex ecological and societal issues worldwide. Most of the knowledge about invasions comes only from successful invaders, but less is known about which processes determine the differential success of invasions. In this review, we develop a framework to identify the main dimensions driving the success and failure of invaders, including human influences, characteristics of the invader, and biotic interactions. We apply this framework by contrasting hypotheses and available evidence to explain variability in invasion success for 12 salmonids introduced to Chile. The success of Oncorhynchus mykiss and Salmo trutta seems to be influenced by a context-specific combination of their phenotypic plasticity, low ecosystem resistance, and propagule pressure. These well-established invaders may limit the success of subsequently introduced salmonids, with the possible exception of O. tshawytscha, which has a short freshwater residency and limited spatial overlap with trout. Although propagule pressure is high for O. kisutch and S. salar due to their intensive use in aquaculture, their lack of success in Chile may be explained by environmental resistance, including earlier spawning times than in their native ranges, and interactions with previously established and resident Rainbow Trout. Other salmonids have also failed to establish, and they exhibit a suite of ecological traits, environmental resistance, and limited propagule pressure that are variably associated with their lack of success. Collectively, understanding how the various drivers of invasion success interact may explain the differential success of invaders and provide key guidance for managing both positive and negative outcomes associated with their presence.

  12. Boulders increase resistance to clear-cut logging but not subsequent recolonization rates of boreal bryophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalholz, Martin; Hylander, Kristoffer

    2011-12-01

    The extent to which a plant assemblage might recolonize a disturbed system is in general related to the availability of propagule sources and sites with appropriate conditions for establishment. Both these factors might be sensitive to aspects of spatial heterogeneity. Microtopographic variation may enhance initial resistance by reducing the impact of the disturbance and facilitating establishment of incoming propagules by providing shaded "safe-sites". This study explores the influence of microtopographic heterogeneity (caused by variation in surface boulder cover) on the recolonization of closed-canopy forest floor bryophytes using a chronosequence of 75 spruce-dominated forests in south-central Sweden (2-163 years after clear-cutting). We found that high boulder cover did increase survival and subsequent persistence in young forests at both investigated scales (i.e. 1,000 and 100 m(2)), although this pattern became less evident on the smaller spatial scale. Species accumulation in boulder-poor subplots was not different when surrounded by boulder-rich compared with boulder-poor subplots suggesting short-distance recolonization from boulder-created refugia to be of little importance during recolonization. To conclude, it seems that boulders increase initial resistance to clear-cutting for this bryophyte guild, but that the subsequent recolonization process is more likely to depend on external propagule sources and factors affecting establishment such as the microclimate in the developing stand.

  13. Factors influencing the local scale colonisation and change in density of a widespread invasive plant species, Lantana camara, in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharath Sundaram

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Identifying factors that underlie invasive species colonisation and change in density could provide valuable insights into the mechanisms of biological invasions and for invasive species management. We examined a suite of factors potentially influencing the landscape-level invasion of Lantana camara L., one of the most ubiquitous invasive species in South Asia. These factors included disturbance factors like forest fires, historical habitat modification, and edge effects, in addition to factors like propagule pressure and habitat suitability. We examined the relative importance of these factors on the colonisation and change in density of L. camara in the Biligiri Rangaswamy Temple Tiger Reserve, Western Ghats, India. We used extensive (1997–2008 datasets tracking the presence and abundance of L. camara and combined these with corresponding data on disturbances, propagule pressure, and habitat suitability. We used an information-theoretic model selection approach to determine the relative importance of each factor on the colonisation and change in density of L. camara. Colonisation was mainly a function of proximity to already established populations (i.e. propagule pressure, whereas increase in L. camara density appeared to be constrained by high fire frequency. Research and management efforts need to recognize the multi-dimensional nature of mechanisms underlying L. camara’s success during different invasion phases when strategizing interventions to mitigate its effects.

  14. Landscape management and domestication of Stenocereus pruinosus (Cactaceae in the Tehuacán Valley: human guided selection and gene flow

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    Parra Fabiola

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of plant resources and ecosystems practiced by indigenous peoples of Mesoamerica commonly involves domestication of plant populations and landscapes. Our study analyzed interactions of coexisting wild and managed populations of the pitaya Stenocereus pruinosus, a columnar cactus used for its edible fruit occurring in natural forests, silviculturally managed in milpa agroforestry systems, and agriculturally managed in homegardens of the Tehuacán Valley, Mexico. We aimed at analyzing criteria of artificial selection and their consequences on phenotypic diversity and differentiation, as well as documenting management of propagules at landscape level and their possible contribution to gene flow among populations. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted to 83 households of the region to document perception of variation, criteria of artificial selection, and patterns of moving propagules among wild and managed populations. Morphological variation of trees from nine wild, silviculturally and agriculturally managed populations was analyzed for 37 characters through univariate and multivariate statistical methods. In addition, indexes of morphological diversity (MD per population and phenotypic differentiation (PD among populations were calculated using character states and frequencies. Results People recognized 15 pitaya varieties based on their pulp color, fruit size, form, flavor, and thorniness. On average, in wild populations we recorded one variety per population, in silviculturally managed populations 1.58 ± 0.77 varieties per parcel, and in agriculturally managed populations 2.19 ± 1.12 varieties per homegarden. Farmers select in favor of sweet flavor (71% of households interviewed and pulp color (46% mainly red, orange and yellow. Artificial selection is practiced in homegardens and 65% of people interviewed also do it in agroforestry systems. People obtain fruit and branches from different population

  15. Root rot diseases of sugar beet

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    Jacobsen Barry J.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Root rot diseases of sugar beet caused by Rhizoctonia solani (AG 2-2 IIIB and AG 2-2 IV, R. crocorum, Aphanomyces cochlioides, Phoma betae, Macrophomina phaeseolina, Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. radicis-betae, Pythium aphanidermatum Phytophthora drechsleri, Rhizopus stolonifer, R. arrhizus and Sclerotium rolfsii cause significant losses wherever sugar beets are grown. However, not all these soil-borne pathogens have been reported in all sugar beet production areas. Losses include reduced harvestable tonnage and reduced white sugar recovery. Many of these pathogens also cause post harvest losses in storage piles. Control for diseases caused by these pathogens include disease resistant cultivars, avoidance of stresses, cultural practices such as water management and the use of fungicides.

  16. ANTIFUNGAL AND CYTOTOXIC ACTIVITIES OF FIVE TRADITIONALLY USED INDIAN MEDICINAL PLANTS

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    Adhikarimayum Haripyaree

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Hexane, Methanol and Distilled water extracts of five Indian Medicinal plants viz., Mimosa pudica L, Vitex trifolia Linn, Leucas aspera Spreng, Centella asiatica (L Urban and Plantago major Linn belonging to different families were subjected to preliminary antimicrobial screening against six standard organisms viz., Ceratocystis paradoxa, Aspergillus niger, Penicillium citrinum, Macrophomina phaseoli, Trichoderma viride and Rhizopus nigricans. To evaluate antifungal activity agar well diffusion method was used. In addition LD50 of the same plant extracts were determined by using Range test on Mus musculus for cytotoxic activity. Methanolic extract of M. pudica showed the highest and significant inhibitory effect against some fungal species. Again, methanolic extract of M. pudica displayed the greatest cytotoxic activity.

  17. Novedades en Especies de Vigna e Inga (Leguminosae para la Argentina Novelties on species of Vigna and Inga (Leguminosae from Argentina

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    Patricia S. Hoc

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Durante el estudio de la subtribu Phaseolinae (Papilionoideae y de la tribu Ingeae (Mimosoideae para la Flora de Jujuy hemos encontrado colecciones que permiten ampliar la distribución de: Vigna candida (Vell. Maréchal, Mascherpa & Stainier, a las primeras estribaciones de las Selvas de Transición jujeñas, en la Provincia Fitogeográfica de las Yungas; Vigna luteola (Jacq. Benth., a las provincias de Jujuy, Salta, Santiago del Estero y Córdoba, posiblemente, por su carácter ruderal e Inga saltensis hasta la provincia de Jujuy, ampliando, además, las dimensiones del fruto.During the study of the subtribe Phaseolinae (Leguminosae, Phaseoleae and the tribe Ingeae (Leguminosae, Mimosoideae for the Flora of Jujuy we detected the existence of collections which confirm that: 1 Vigna candida (Vell. Maréchal, Mascherpa & Stainier, till now, known growing in the Paraná basin with the southern limit of distribution in the province of Misiones, now is reported as a component of the first slopes of Yungas rain forest at the province of Jujuy. 2 Vigna luteola (Jacq. Benth., a species of african origin and dispersed over the pantropical areas, was known in our country, growing in the marginal forests of the Paraná and Uruguay basins southern to Buenos Aires. The studied collections allow us to amplify the distribution of the species to the provinces of Jujuy, Salta, Santiago del Estero and Córdoba, perhaps introduced by humans. 3 Inga saltensis Burkart was described growing in the south of Bolivia and in the province of Salta (Argentina with its southern limit of distribution in the Capricorn tropic. A recent collection allow us to extend the distribution of the species southern to the north of the province of Jujuy, also, the fruit dimension is modified.

  18. Effects of nematicides on cotton root mycobiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, R E; Carling, D E; Watson, C E; Scruggs, M L; Hightower, P

    2004-02-01

    Baseline information on the diversity and population densities of fungi collected from soil debris and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) roots was determined. Samples were collected from Tifton, GA, and Starkville, MS containing cotton field soil treated with the nematicides 1,3-dichloroproprene (fumigant) and aldicarb (granules). A total of 10,550 and 13,450 fungal isolates were collected from these two study sites, respectively. Of this total, 34 genera of plant pathogenic or saprophytic species were identified. Pathogenic root fungi included Fusarium spp. (40% of all isolations), Macrophomina, Pythium, Rhizoctonia, and Sclerotium. Fusarium and Rhizoctonia were the most common fungal species identified and included F. oxysporum, F. verticillioides and F. solani, the three Fusarium species pathogenic on cotton plants. Population densities of Fusarium were not significantly different among locations or tissue types sampled. Macrophomina was isolated at greater numbers near the end of the growing seasons. Anastomosis groups of R. solani isolated from roots and soil debris included AG-3, -4, -7, 2-2, and -13 and anastomosis groups of binucleate Rhizoctonia included CAG-2, -3, and -5. Occurrences and frequency of isolations among sampling dates were not consistent. Fluctuations in the frequency of isolation of Rhizoctonia did not correspond with changes in frequency of isolation of the biological control fungus, Trichoderma. When individual or pooled frequencies of the mycobiota were compared to nematicide treatments, no specific trends occurred between treatments, application methods or rates. Results from this study show that use of 1,3-D and aldicarb in cotton fields does not significantly impact plant pathogenic fungi or saprophytic fungal populations. Thus cotton producers need not adjust seedling disease control measures when these two nematicides are used.

  19. A new and fast method to obtain in vitro cultures of Huperzia selago (Huperziaceae sporophytes, a club moss which is a source of huperzine A

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    Wojciech J. Szypuła

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a protocol for a fast and effective in vitro axenic culture of Huperzia selago (Huperziaceae Rothm. sporophytes, a club moss which is a source of huperzine A, an alkaloid of a considerable therapeutic potential extensively investigated for its uses as treatment for some neurodegenerative diseases. The proposed procedure allowed approximately tenfold shortening of the species developmental stages with the omission of the gametophyte stage while the sporophyte mass could be increased tenfold within a 6-month period. The cultures were established using vegetative propagules (bulbils procured from sporophytes growing in the wild without degrading the habitats of this endangered plant species. Explants underwent surface and internal disinfection to eliminate the epiphytic and endophytic bacteria and fungi. In in vitro cultures, the optimum results were achieved using Moore (Mr medium without growth regulators or supplemented with 0.015 mg/l IBA and 0.3 mg/l kinetin. These media ensured both viability of the propagules and their further development. The biomass growth index for H. selago sporophytes grown from propagules, determined at 3 months of culture (1 passage on Mr medium with IBA and kinetin was 650%. At 6 months, the biomass growth index increased to 1114%. Vigorous growth of adventitious roots, especially on Mr medium with the addition of 0.25 mg/l NAA, and callus formation on shoot apices were observed. At 6 months of culture, some sporophytes obtained from the bulbils were used as the initiating material for shoot subcultures, which developed best on Mr medium with IBA and kinetin.

  20. Plants promote mating and dispersal of the human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Rajinikanth; Heitman, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Infections due to Cryptococcus are a leading cause of fungal infections worldwide and are acquired as a result of environmental exposure to desiccated yeast or spores. The ability of Cryptococcus to grow, mate, and produce infectious propagules in association with plants is important for the maintenance of the genetic diversity and virulence factors important for infection of animals and humans. In the Western United States and Canada, Cryptococcus has been associated with conifers and tree species other than Eucalyptus; however, to date Cryptococcus has only been studied on live Arabidopsis thaliana, Eucalyptus sp., and Terminalia catappa (almond) seedlings. Previous research has demonstrated the ability of Cryptococcus to colonize live plants, leaves, and vasculature. We investigated the ability of Cryptococcus to grow on live seedlings of the angiosperms, A. thaliana, Eucalyptus camaldulensis, Colophospermum mopane, and the gymnosperms, Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas fir), and Tsuga heterophylla (Western hemlock). We observed a broad-range ability of Cryptococcus to colonize both traditional infection models as well as newly tested conifer species. Furthermore, C. neoformans, C. deneoformans, C. gattii (VGI), C. deuterogattii (VGII) and C. bacillisporus (VGIII) were able to colonize live plant leaves and needles but also undergo filamentation and mating on agar seeded with plant materials or in saprobic association with dead plant materials. The ability of Cryptococcus to grow and undergo filamentation and reproduction in saprobic association with both angiosperms and gymnosperms highlights an important role of plant debris in the sexual cycle and exposure to infectious propagules. This study highlights the broad importance of plants (and plant debris) as the ecological niche and reservoirs of infectious propagules of Cryptococcus in the environment. PMID:28212396

  1. Detection and quantification of Cladosporium in aerosols by real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qing-Yin; Westermark, Sven-Olof; Rasmuson-Lestander, Asa; Wang, Xiao-Ru

    2006-01-01

    Cladosporium is one of the most common airborne molds found in indoor and outdoor environments. Cladosporium spores are important aeroallergens, and prolonged exposure to elevated spore concentrations can provoke chronic allergy and asthma. To accurately quantify the levels of Cladosporium in indoor and outdoor environments, two real-time PCR systems were developed in this study. The two real-time PCR systems are highly specific and sensitive for Cladosporium detection even in a high background of other fungal DNAs. These methods were employed to quantify Cladosporium in aerosols of five different indoor environments. The investigation revealed a high spore concentration of Cladosporium (10(7) m(-3)) in a cow barn that accounted for 28-44% of the airborne fungal propagules. In a countryside house that uses firewood for heating and in a paper and pulp factory, Cladosporium was detected at 10(4) spores m(-3), which accounted for 2-6% of the fungal propagules in the aerosols. The concentrations of Cladosporium in these three indoor environments far exceeded the medical borderline level (3000 spores m(-3)). In a power station and a fruit and vegetable storage, Cladosporium was found to be a minor component in the aerosols, accounted for 0.01-0.1% of the total fungal propagules. These results showed that monitoring Cladosporium in indoor environments is more important than in outdoor environments from the public health point of view. Cladosporium may not be the dominant fungi in some indoor environments, but its concentration could still be exceeding the threshold value for clinical significance. The methods developed in this study could facilitate accurate detection and quantification of Cladosporium for public health related risk assessment.

  2. Adaptive introductions: How multiple experiments and comparisons to wild populations provide insights into requirements for long-term introduction success of an endangered shrub

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric S. Menges

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Recovery of an imperiled plant species may require augmentation of existing populations or creation of new ones. Hundreds of such projects have been conducted over the last few decades, but there is a bias in the literature favoring successes over failures. In this paper, we evaluate a series of introductions that experimentally manipulated microhabitat and fire in an adaptive introduction framework. Between 2002 and 2012, we (and our collaborators carried out ten introductions and augmentations of Florida ziziphus Pseudoziziphus (Condalia, Ziziphus celata, a clonal shrub limited to very small populations and narrowly endemic to pyrogenic central Florida sandhills. Six of the introductions were designed as experiments to test hypotheses about how demographic performance was affected by microhabitat, fire, and propagule type. Introduced transplants had high survival (<90% annually, inconsistent growth, and little transition to reproduction, while introduced seeds had low germination and survival. Transplants were more efficient than seeds as translocation propagules. Shaded (vs. open sites supported generally higher transplant and seedling survival and seed germination percentages, but growth responses varied among experiments. Supplemental irrigation increased transplant survival and seed germination, but otherwise seedling and plant survival and growth were not significantly affected. Contrary to expectations based on wild populations, introduced propagules have not been more successful in unshaded sites, suggesting that Florida ziziphus has broader microhabitat preferences than hypothesized. Compared to wild plants, introduced plants had similar survival and responses to fire, slower growth, and more delayed flowering. Introduced plants had no clonal spread. While no introduced population has demonstrated a capacity for long-term viability, one augmented population has flowered and produced viable fruits. Given that Florida ziziphus genets are

  3. Plants promote mating and dispersal of the human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Deborah J; Mohan, Rajinikanth; Heitman, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Infections due to Cryptococcus are a leading cause of fungal infections worldwide and are acquired as a result of environmental exposure to desiccated yeast or spores. The ability of Cryptococcus to grow, mate, and produce infectious propagules in association with plants is important for the maintenance of the genetic diversity and virulence factors important for infection of animals and humans. In the Western United States and Canada, Cryptococcus has been associated with conifers and tree species other than Eucalyptus; however, to date Cryptococcus has only been studied on live Arabidopsis thaliana, Eucalyptus sp., and Terminalia catappa (almond) seedlings. Previous research has demonstrated the ability of Cryptococcus to colonize live plants, leaves, and vasculature. We investigated the ability of Cryptococcus to grow on live seedlings of the angiosperms, A. thaliana, Eucalyptus camaldulensis, Colophospermum mopane, and the gymnosperms, Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas fir), and Tsuga heterophylla (Western hemlock). We observed a broad-range ability of Cryptococcus to colonize both traditional infection models as well as newly tested conifer species. Furthermore, C. neoformans, C. deneoformans, C. gattii (VGI), C. deuterogattii (VGII) and C. bacillisporus (VGIII) were able to colonize live plant leaves and needles but also undergo filamentation and mating on agar seeded with plant materials or in saprobic association with dead plant materials. The ability of Cryptococcus to grow and undergo filamentation and reproduction in saprobic association with both angiosperms and gymnosperms highlights an important role of plant debris in the sexual cycle and exposure to infectious propagules. This study highlights the broad importance of plants (and plant debris) as the ecological niche and reservoirs of infectious propagules of Cryptococcus in the environment.

  4. Visibility from roads predict the distribution of invasive fishes in agricultural ponds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshikazu Kizuka

    Full Text Available Propagule pressure and habitat characteristics are important factors used to predict the distribution of invasive alien species. For species exhibiting strong propagule pressure because of human-mediated introduction of species, indicators of introduction potential must represent the behavioral characteristics of humans. This study examined 64 agricultural ponds to assess the visibility of ponds from surrounding roads and its value as a surrogate of propagule pressure to explain the presence and absence of two invasive fish species. A three-dimensional viewshed analysis using a geographic information system quantified the visual exposure of respective ponds to humans. Binary classification trees were developed as a function of their visibility from roads, as well as five environmental factors: river density, connectivity with upstream dam reservoirs, pond area, chlorophyll a concentration, and pond drainage. Traditional indicators of human-mediated introduction (road density and proportion of urban land-use area were alternatively included for comparison instead of visual exposure. The presence of Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus was predicted by the ponds' higher visibility from roads and pond connection with upstream dam reservoirs. Results suggest that fish stocking into ponds and their dispersal from upstream sources facilitated species establishment. Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides distribution was constrained by chlorophyll a concentration, suggesting their lower adaptability to various environments than that of Bluegill. Based on misclassifications from classification trees for Bluegill, pond visual exposure to roads showed greater predictive capability than traditional indicators of human-mediated introduction. Pond visibility is an effective predictor of invasive species distribution. Its wider use might improve management and mitigate further invasion. The visual exposure of recipient ecosystems to humans is important for many

  5. Pollination biology of the crypto-viviparous Avicennia species (Avicenniaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J.S. Raju

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Floral biology, sexual system, breeding system, pollinators, fruiting and propagule dispersal ecology of crypto-viviparous Avicennia alba Bl., A. marina (Forsk. Vierh. and A. officinalis L. (Avicenniaceae were studied in Godavari mangrove forests of Andhra Pradesh State, India. All the three plant species initiate flowering following the first monsoon showers in June and cease flowering in late August. The flowers are hermaphroditic, nectariferous, protandrous, self-compatible and exhibit mixed breeding system. Self-pollination occurs even without pollen vector but fruit set in this mode is negligible. In all, the flowers are strictly entomophilous and the seedlings disperse through self-planting and stranding strategies.

  6. Development of a selective culture medium for Fusarium moniliforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellá, G; Bragulat, M R; Rubiales, M V; Cabañes, F J

    1997-12-01

    Nash and Snyder medium and malachite green agar 2.5 ppm medium, a new selective culture medium designed in our laboratory, were challenged with pure cultures of Fusarium moniliforme strains and two different mixed-conidium suspensions, which included rapidly spreading fungi, for their utility in the isolation and enumeration of F. moniliforme. From the results of this comparative study, malachite green agar 2.5 ppm allowed only the selective growth of F. moniliforme whereas Nash and Snyder medium allowed both the growth of F. moniliforme and other species not belonging to Fusarium spp. The enumeration of F. moniliforme propagules was similar in both culture media.

  7. Field Variability of Invading Populations of Spartina densiflora Brong. in Different Habitats of the Odiel Marshes (SW Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieva, F. J. J.; Díaz-Espejo, A.; Castellanos, E. M.; Figueroa, M. E.

    2001-04-01

    Spartina densiflora is a species of South American origin that has invaded the marshes of the Gulf of Cádiz, in many of which it has become the most abundant plant. This work studies six populations of S. densiflora representative of the physiographic positions most commonly occupied by the species. The aspects considered are redox potential, conductivity and pH of the sediment, below- and above-ground biomass, stem density, rates of flowering and production of vegetative propagules. Eh and conductivity values vary greatly, responding to differences in tidal effect. The below-ground biomass (in particular, live rhizomes) is accumulated mostly in the first centimetres of the soil; mean values of total below-ground biomass are between 6961 and 30 696 g DW m -2. Above-ground biomass levels for the populations ranges between 419 and 15 251 g DW m -2. The stem density within the tussocks is high, between 3985 and 10 513 stems m -2, with higher percentages of live stems on low and brackish marshes compared with those on higher topographic levels. This accumulation of dead and live intratussock biomass is important for the ability to exclude competitors. The flowering rates vary depending on topographic position, with maximum values being recorded in the low marsh (37·6%) and minima in the high marsh (0·1 to 0·3%). Besides the production of ramets from below-ground rhizomes (common to all species of the genus), S. densiflora presents another mode of asexual reproduction, in which extravaginal tillers are originated from the nodes of senescent ramets; populations on the higher levels of the marshes present higher densities of these propagules, with a negative correlation between rate of flowering and rate of propagule production. Nevertheless, the contribution of these propagules to the total stem population is very small. Our results show a high tolerance of S. densiflora to different environmental factors, an intense occupation of the available below-ground and above

  8. Combining mechanical rhizome removal and cover crops for Elytrigia repens control in organic barley systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melander, B; Nørremark, M; Kristensen, E F

    2013-01-01

    of vegetative propagules located within the plough layer to allow for quick re-establishment of a plant cover. A field experiment comparing the effects of conventional practices (stubble cultivation) with different combinations of rotary cultivation (One, Two or four passes) and cover crops (none vs. rye......-vetch-mustard mixture) on Elytrigia repens rhizome removal, shoot growth and suppression of a subsequent barley crop was examined in two growing seasons. Four passes with a modified rotary cultivator, where each pass was followed by rhizome removal, reduced E. repens shoot growth in barley by 84% and 97%. In general...

  9. Cryopreservation of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Engelmann, Florent

    2017-08-01

    Oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.), a tropical plant, is the leading source of edible oil. This review deals with the cryopreservation of oil palm as a way to preserve this important tropical germplasm. Somatic embryos have been the most popular source of material for cryopreservation as they are propagules that are effectively produced during micropropagation. In contrast, fewer studies exist on the cryopreservation of pollen, zygotic embryos, seeds, kernels and embryogenic cell suspensions. This review highlights the ideal protocols, in detail, in a bid to offer guidance for further advances in oil palm cryopreservation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparative study on the sensitivity of turions and active fronds of giant duckweed (Spirodela polyrhiza (L.) Schleiden) to heavy metal treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oláh, Viktor; Hepp, Anna; Mészáros, Ilona

    2015-08-01

    Standard ecotoxicological test procedures use only active forms of aquatic plants. The potential effects of toxicants on vegetative propagules, which play an important role in the survival of several aquatic plant species, is not well understood. Because turion-like resting propagules overwinter on the water bottom in temperate regions, they could be exposed to contaminants for longer periods than active plants. Due to its turion producing capability, giant duckweed (Spirodela polyrhiza) is widely used in studying morphogenesis, dormancy, and activation mechanisms in plants. It is also suitable for ecotoxicological purposes. The present work aims to compare the growth inhibition sensitivity of active (normal frond) and overwintering (turion) forms of S. polyrhiza to concentrations of nickel (Ni), cadmium (Cd) and hexavalent chromium (Cr) ranging from 0 to 100mgL(-1). The results indicated that in general, resting turions have higher heavy metal tolerance than active fronds. Cd proved to be the most toxic heavy metal to S. polyrhiza active frond cultures because it induced rapid turion formation. In contrast, the toxicity of Ni and Cr were found to be similar but lower than the effects of Cd. Cr treatments up to 10mgL(-1) did not result in any future negative effects on turion activation. Turions did not survive heavy metal treatments at higher concentrations of Cr. Cd and Ni treatments affected both the floating-up and germination of turions but did not significantly affect the vigor of sprouts. Higher concentrations (of 100mgL(-1)) Cd completely inhibited germination.

  11. Biological Control of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cumini with Aspergillus versicolor

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    S. Israel

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available A native heat-tolerant strain of Aspergillus versicolor (Vuill. Tirab. highly antagonistic to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cumini (Foc was isolated from arid soils. In tests performed to ascertain its antagonistic activity against Foc as compared to Trichoderma harzianum, a 99.2 and 96.4% reduction in Foc propagules was achieved in A. versicolor and T. harzianum infested soil respectively. The reduction of Foc propagules in Foc and A. versicolorinfested soil was also determined. In a liquid-culture test, even at a low concentration of 0.5 ml cell-free filtrate, A. versicolor inhibited mycelial growth of Foc. Population changes of A. versicolor were examined at different soil moisture gradients, where maximum survival and multiplication of A. versicolor was estimated at 50% of moisture holding capacity. In general, with increasing concentrations of A. versicolor inoculum, soil population densities of Foc went down. Studies on thermal resistance showed that A. versicolor survived and multiplied even at 65°C. Soil amended with A. versicolor alone, or with a combination of T. harzianum and Verbisina enceloides residues was significantly better at reducing Foc than was non-amended control soil. A marked increase in the root length of cumin was observed in soil amended with A. versicolor or T. harzianum or both. The results suggest that A. versicolor has a potential value for use against Fusarium in hot arid soils because it can survive under dry and high-temperature conditions.

  12. Gene flow from glyphosate-resistant crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallory-Smith, Carol; Zapiola, Maria

    2008-04-01

    Gene flow from transgenic glyphosate-resistant crops can result in the adventitious presence of the transgene, which may negatively impact markets. Gene flow can also produce glyphosate-resistant plants that may interfere with weed management systems. The objective of this article is to review the gene flow literature as it pertains to glyphosate-resistant crops. Gene flow is a natural phenomenon not unique to transgenic crops and can occur via pollen, seed and, in some cases, vegetative propagules. Gene flow via pollen can occur in all crops, even those that are considered to be self-pollinated, because all have low levels of outcrossing. Gene flow via seed or vegetative propagules occurs when they are moved naturally or by humans during crop production and commercialization. There are many factors that influence gene flow; therefore, it is difficult to prevent or predict. Gene flow via pollen and seed from glyphosate-resistant canola and creeping bentgrass fields has been documented. The adventitious presence of the transgene responsible for glyphosate resistance has been found in commercial seed lots of canola, corn and soybeans. In general, the glyphosate-resistant trait is not considered to provide an ecological advantage. However, regulators should consider the examples of gene flow from glyphosate-resistant crops when formulating rules for the release of crops with traits that could negatively impact the environment or human health.

  13. Characterization of a Pseudomonas fluorescens strain from tomato rhizosphere and its use for integrated management of tomato damping-off

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayaraj, J; Parthasarathi, T.; Radhakrishnan, N.V. [Annamalai University, Annamalainagar (India). Faculty of Agriculture

    2007-10-15

    A highly antagonistic Pseudomonas fluorescens strain was isolated from tomato rhizosphere and characterized for its in vitro and in vivo biocontrol potential against Pythium aphanidermatum. The identified Pseudomonas fluorescens strain (PfT-8) was capable of producing high levels of chitinase, beta-1,3-glucanase, cellulase, fungitoxic metabolites and siderophores. Seven different carrier formulations including a talc-based powder, lignite-based powder, peat-based powder, lignite + fly ash-based powder, wettable powder, bentonite-paste and polyethylene glycol (PEG) paste were prepared utilizing PfT-8. Shelf life was evaluated for up to 6 months of storage at ambient room temperature (28{sup o}C). Biocontrol efficacy of formulations was studied under greenhouse and field conditions. Among the formulations, peat, lignite, lignite+fly-ash and bentonite paste based formulations maintained higher propagule number than others and also showed greater biocontrol potential. However, propagule number gradually decreased with time. Soil incorporation of organic amendments and specifically poultry manure and FYM, significantly reduced damping-off incidence and also augmented the rhizosphere population of the marked P. fluorescens strain that was resistant to streptomycin and rifampicin.

  14. Heavy metal contamination in a vulnerable mangrove swamp in South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yutao; Qiu, Qiu; Xin, Guorong; Yang, Zhongyi; Zheng, Jing; Ye, Zhihong; Li, Shaoshan

    2013-07-01

    Concentrations of six heavy metals (Cu, Ni, Zn, Cd, Cr, and Pb) in sediments and fine roots, thick roots, branches, and leaves of six mangrove plant species collected from the Futian mangrove forest, South China were measured. The results show that both the sediments and plants in Futian mangrove ecosystem are moderately contaminated by heavy metals, with the main contaminants being Zn and Cu. All investigated metals showed very similar distribution patterns in the sediments, implying that they had the same anthropogenic source(s). High accumulations of the heavy metals were observed in the root tissues, especially the fine roots, and much lower concentrations in the other organs. This indicates that the roots strongly immobilize the heavy metals and (hence) that mangrove plants possess mechanisms that limit the upward transport of heavy metals and exclude them from sensitive tissues. The growth performance of propagules and 6-month-old seedlings of Bruguiera gymnorhiza in the presence of contaminating Cu and Cd was also examined. The results show that this plant is not sufficiently sensitive to heavy metals after its propagule stage for its regeneration and growth to be significantly affected by heavy metal contamination in the Futian mangrove ecosystem. However, older mangrove seedlings appeared to be more metal-tolerant than the younger seedlings due to their more efficient exclusion mechanism. Thus, the effects of metal contamination on young seedlings should be assessed when evaluating the risks posed by heavy metals in an ecosystem.

  15. A laboratory simulation of the carbonization of sunflower achenes and seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braadbaart, F. [FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Kruislaan 407, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Earth Sciences-Geochemistry, Faculty of Geosciences, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80021, 3058 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); Wright, P.J. [Department of Anthropology, University of Missouri-St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63121 (United States); Horst, J. van der; Boon, J.J. [FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Kruislaan 407, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2007-03-15

    The current project describes physical and chemical alterations that result from the thermal exposure of sunflower achenes and seeds. Specifically, achenes and seeds were heated at temperatures ranging from 130 to 600 C under anoxic conditions for 60 min. Changes were measured in mass, relative percentages of C and N, internal and external morphology, molecular composition by direct temperature-resolved mass spectrometry (DTMS) under EI conditions, and the reflectance on polished specimens. The main constituents of sunflower seeds are lipids and protein, while the pericarps or hulls enclosing the seeds have a ligno-cellulosic structure. The morphology of achenes and seeds remains intact following exposure which makes the identification of the residues possible. The results of the sunflower experiments were compared to previous experiments conducted with peas and wheat grains. Up to approximately 340 C, the molecular conversion of polysaccharide and protein rich peas and wheat grains follow similar pathways, while the lignin present in sunflower achenes follows its own unique pathway, resulting in a different molecular composition. At higher temperatures the molecular composition of the three propagules becomes identical. In addition the reflectance of the three propagules is identical confirming the similarity in molecular composition. Lipids show a different behaviour compared to the other three biopolymers; from 370 C no oils are observed in the heated specimens and the DTMS-EI measurements show no lipid markers. Apart from evaporation of the triacylglycerides it is suggested that steroids have a high resistance against thermal degradation and are converted into aromatic moieties. (author)

  16. Conservation Strategies for the Threatened Quercus Semecarpifolia Sm. A Himalayan Timberline Oak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemlata BISHT

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Quercus semecarpifolia Sm. is a temperate, timberline, multipurpose oak species. It plays an important role in the Himalayan ecosystem. Human pressure, predation, short-lived acorns, failure of good seed crop every year, poor regeneration, desiccation, frost sensitivity and climate change may lead to complete extinction of the species in a near future. Immediate attention to conservation and restoration measures of the Himalayan ecosystem, in which this species grows, is required. Thus, an experiment was designed to analyze the role of planting stock and micro-sites for the regeneration of Q. semecarpifolia in-situ. For that purpose, 16 microsites with presence/absence of litter, canopy and sunlight were identified, where seeds/propagules were planted. The presence of litter, canopy and sunlight influenced the seedling production, mainly impairing the processes, leading to the expansion in diameter of the radicle, causing shoot/root emergence. Radicle emergence took place in all the seeds immediately after shedding but only 20% of seedlings recovered; however, when the stored seeds were sown as soon as the emerging radicle attained 10-15cm in length and 2-3cm in diameter, 80% of seedlings were recovered. Surprisingly, after being detached from the seed the swollen radicle acted as a propagule and produced 80% seedlings irrespective of the microsites; however, radicles detached prior to diameter expansion failed to produce seedlings which is a crucial insight for promoting seedling production.

  17. Survival of plant pathogens in static piles of ground green waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downer, A J; Crohn, D; Faber, B; Daugovish, O; Becker, J O; Menge, J A; Mochizuki, M J

    2008-05-01

    Ground green waste is used as mulch in ornamental landscapes and for tree crops such as avocados. Survival of Armillaria mellea, Phytophthora cinnamomi, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, and Tylenchulus semipenetrans was assessed for 8 weeks within unturned piles of either recently ground or partially composted green waste. S. sclerotiorum survived at the pile surface and at 10, 30, and 100 cm within the pile for the entire 8 weeks in both fresh green waste (FGW) and aged green waste (AGW). A. mellea and T. semipenetrans did not survive more than 2 days in FGW, while P. cinnamomi persisted for over 21 days in FGW. AGW was less effective in reducing pathogen viability than FGW, most likely because temperatures in AGW peaked at 45 degrees C compared with 70 degrees C in FGW. Survival modeling curves based on pile temperatures indicate the time to inactivate 10 propagules of pathogens was 11, 30, 363, and 50 days for A. mellea, P. cinnamomi, S. sclerotiorum, and T. semipenetrans, respectively. Sclerotia-forming pathogens pose the greatest risk for escape; to ensure eradication of persistent fungi, green waste stockpiles should be turned intermittently to mix pile contents and move pathogen propagules to a location within the pile where they are more likely to be killed by heat, microbial attack, or chemical degradation.

  18. In vitro propagation of sacaca (Croton cajucara: insights about difficulties for developing micropropagation protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiane Loureiro da Silva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sacaca is a medicinal plant from the Amazonian biome and it has been regarded as a substitute for rosewood (Aniba roseaodora to produce linalool. This paper aimed to evaluate in vitro vegetative propagation of sacaca, including the establishment of propagules from the field, decontamination protocols, and determination of multiplication rates, besides describing limiting aspects for the culture during in vitro experiments. We used 1.0 cm microcuttings with an axillary bud, collected from adult plants in the field. Disinfestation treatments were tested in the establishment, and there is an evaluation of the collecting month influence on the contamination rates. After disinfestation, microcuttings were placed in test tubes containing MS medium, added with BAP (0, 1, 2 and 3 mg L-1 and GA3 (0 and 0.5 mg L-1. In vitro establishment of sacaca with 41.9% of sprouted microcuttings was obtained. The contamination rate reached 58.1% (65.4% caused by fungi and 34.6% by bacteria, with greater occurrence when propagules were collected between October and January, the rainiest months in the Amazon region. The increased BAP and GA3 concentrations in the culture medium provided significant improvements in the material multiplication rates. In spite of the results obtained, the species shows peculiarities and limitations to in vitro cultivation that were identified and described in this paper.

  19. Determinants of plant establishment success in a multispecies introduction experiment with native and alien species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempel, Anne; Chrobock, Thomas; Fischer, Markus; Rohr, Rudolf Philippe; van Kleunen, Mark

    2013-07-30

    Determinants of plant establishment and invasion are a key issue in ecology and evolution. Although establishment success varies substantially among species, the importance of species traits and extrinsic factors as determinants of establishment in existing communities has remained difficult to prove in observational studies because they can be confounded and mask each other. Therefore, we conducted a large multispecies field experiment to disentangle the relative importance of extrinsic factors vs. species characteristics for the establishment success of plants in grasslands. We introduced 48 alien and 45 native plant species at different seed numbers into multiple grassland sites with or without experimental soil disturbance and related their establishment success to species traits assessed in five independent multispecies greenhouse experiments. High propagule pressure and high seed mass were the most important factors increasing establishment success in the very beginning of the experiment. However, after 3 y, propagule pressure became less important, and species traits related to biotic interactions (including herbivore resistance and responses to shading and competition) became the most important drivers of success or failure. The relative importance of different traits was environment-dependent and changed over time. Our approach of combining a multispecies introduction experiment in the field with trait data from independent multispecies experiments in the greenhouse allowed us to detect the relative importance of species traits for early establishment and provided evidence that species traits--fine-tuned by environmental factors--determine success or failure of alien and native plants in temperate grasslands.

  20. Stand structure, phenology and litterfall dynamics of a subtropical mangrove Bruguiera gymnorrhiza

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Md Kamruzzaman; Mouctar Kamara; Sahadev Sharma; Akio Hagihara

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the phenology and litterfall dynamics of the mangrove Bruguiera gymnorrhiza (L.) Lamk along the Okukubi River, Okinawa Island, Japan. Over 3 years, this species showed the highest litterfall of leaves and stipules in summer and the lowest litterfall in winter. From Kendall’s coefficient of concordance, the monthly changes in leaf, stipule, and branch were strongly and significantly concordant among years. Leaf and stipule litterfall could be governed by monthly maximum wind speed, monthly day length, and monthly mean air tem-perature. Branch litterfall depended on monthly maximum wind speed and monthly rainfall, and increased exponen-tially with increasing monthly maximum wind speed. Mean total litterfall was 11.8 Mg ha-1 yr-1, with the largest component being leaf litterfall (65.8%). Annual leaf lit-terfall per plot was almost constant regardless of the tree density of the plot. Mean leaf longevity was 18 months. Flower and mature propagule litterfall might be influenced by monthly mean air temperature, monthly day length and monthly mean air temperature. The average development periods from flower buds to flowers and flower buds to mature propagules were 1 and 8 months, respectively. Except for leaf and branch, all vegetative and reproductive organ litterfall had clear annual cycles. B. gymnorrhiza showed a positive correlation between leaf production and reproductive organ production.

  1. The age of island-like habitats impacts habitat specialist species richness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsák, Michal; Hájek, Michal; Spitale, Daniel; Hájková, Petra; Díte, Daniel; Nekola, Jeffrey C

    2012-05-01

    While the effects of contemporaneous local environment on species richness have been repeatedly documented, much less is known about historical effects, especially over large temporal scales. Using fen sites in the Western Carpathian Mountains with known radiocarbon-dated ages spanning Late Glacial to modern times (16 975-270 cal years before 2008), we have compiled richness data from the same plots for three groups of taxa with contrasting dispersal modes: (1) vascular plants, which have macroscopic propagules possessing variable, but rather low, dispersal abilities; (2) bryophytes, which have microscopic propagules that are readily transported long distances by air; and (3) terrestrial and freshwater mollusks, which have macroscopic individuals with slow active migration rates, but which also often possess high passive dispersal abilities. Using path analysis we tested the relationships between species richness and habitat age, area, isolation, and altitude for these groups. When only matrix-derived taxa were considered, no significant positive relation was noted between species richness and habitat size or age. When only calcareous-fen specialists were considered, however, habitat age was found to significantly affect vascular plant richness and, marginally, also bryophyte richness, whereas mollusk richness was significantly affected by habitat area. These results suggest that in inland insular systems only habitat specialist (i.e., interpatch disperser and/or relict species) richness is influenced by habitat age and/or area, with habitat age becoming more important as species dispersal ability decreases.

  2. Inferring differential evolutionary processes of plant persistence traits in Northern Hemisphere Mediterranean fire-prone ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pausas, J.G.; Keeley, J.E.; Verdu, M.

    2006-01-01

    1 Resprouting capacity (R) and propagule-persistence (P) are traits that are often considered to have evolved where there are predictable crown fires. Because several indicators suggest a stronger selective pressure for such traits in California than in the Mediterranean Basin, we hypothesize that plant species should have evolved to become R+ and P+ more frequently in California than in the Mediterranean Basin. 2 To test this hypothesis we studied the phylogenetic association between R and P states in both California and the Mediterranean Basin using published molecular phylogenies. 3 The results suggest that R and P evolved differently in the two regions. The occurrence of the states differs significantly between regions for trait P, but not for trait R. The different patterns (towards R+ and P+ in California and towards R+ and P- in the Mediterranean Basin) are reflected in the higher abundance and the wider taxonomic distribution of species with both persistence traits (R+P+ species) in California. 4 The differential acquisition of fire persistence mechanisms at the propagule level (P+) supports the idea that fire selective pressures has been higher in California than in the Mediterranean Basin. 5 Our comparative phylogenetic-informed analysis contributes to an understanding of the differential role of the Quaternary climate in determining fire persistence traits in different Mediterranean-type ecosystems and, thus, to the debate on the evolutionary convergence of traits. ?? 2006 British Ecological Society.

  3. Reevaluating geographic variation in life-history traits of a widespread Nearctic amphibian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Jon M.; Hossack, Blake R.

    2016-01-01

    Animals from cold environments are usually larger than animals from warm environments, which often produce clines in body size. Because variation in body size can lead to trade-offs between growth and reproduction, life-history traits should also vary across climatic gradients. To determine if life-history traits of wood frogs Rana sylvatica vary with climate, we examined female and male body length, clutch size, and ovum size from 37 locations across an unprecedented 32° of latitude. In conflict with recent research, body size, and ovum size decreased in cold climates and at higher latitudes. Clutch size did not vary with climate or latitude, but reproductive effort (clutch size:female size) did, suggesting selection for a life-history traits that favors maximizing propagule number over propagule size in cold climates. With accelerating climate change that will expose populations to novel environmental conditions, it is important to identify the limits of adaptation, which can be informed by greater understanding of variation in life-history traits.

  4. Amplified recruitment pressure of biofouling organisms in commercial salmon farms: potential causes and implications for farm management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloecher, Nina; Floerl, Oliver; Sunde, Leif Magne

    2015-01-01

    The development of biofouling on finfish aquaculture farms presents challenges for the industry, but the factors underlying nuisance growths are still not well understood. Artificial settlement surfaces were used to examine two possible explanations for high rates of biofouling in Norwegian salmon farms: (1) increased propagule release during net cleaning operations, resulting in elevated recruitment rates; and (2) potential reservoir effects of farm surfaces. The presence of salmon farms was associated with consistently and substantially (up to 49-fold) elevated recruitment rates. Temporal patterns of recruitment were not driven by net cleaning. Resident populations of biofouling organisms were encountered on all submerged farm surfaces. Calculations indicate that a resident population of the hydroid Ectopleura larynx, a major biofouling species, could release between 0.3 × 10(9) and 4.7 × 10(9) larvae per farm annually. Such resident populations could form propagule reservoirs and be one explanation for the elevated recruitment pressure at salmon farms.

  5. A preliminary study of airborne microbial biodiversity over Peninsular Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, K A; McCartney, H A; Lachlan-Cope, T A; Pearce, D A

    2004-07-01

    This study used PCR-based molecular biological identification techniques to examine the biodiversity of air sampled over Rothera Point (Antarctic Peninsula). 16S rDNA fragments of 132 clones were sequenced and identified to reveal a range of microorganisms, including cyanobacteria, actinomycetes, diatom plastids and other uncultivated bacterial groups. Matches for microorganisms that would be considered evidence of human contamination were not found. The closest matches for many of the sequences were from Antarctic clones already in the databases or from other cold environments. Whilst the majority of the sequences are likely to be of local origin, back trajectory calculations showed that the sampled air may have travelled over the Antarctic Peninsula immediately prior to reaching the sample site. As a result, a proportion of the detected biota may be of non-local origin. Conventional identification methods based on propagule morphology or culture are often inadequate due to poor preservation of characteristic features or loss of viability during airbome transfer. The application of molecular biological techniques in describing airbome microbial biodiversity represents a major step forward in the study of airborne biota over Antarctica and in the distribution of microorganisms and propagules in the natural environment.

  6. Great cormorants reveal overlooked secondary dispersal of plants and invertebrates by piscivorous waterbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Casper H A; Lovas-Kiss, Ádám; Ovegård, Maria; Green, Andy J

    2017-10-01

    In wetland ecosystems, birds and fish are important dispersal vectors for plants and invertebrates, but the consequences of their interactions as vectors are unknown. Darwin suggested that piscivorous birds carry out secondary dispersal of seeds and invertebrates via predation on fish. We tested this hypothesis in the great cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo L.). Cormorants regurgitate pellets daily, which we collected at seven European locations and examined for intact propagules. One-third of pellets contained at least one intact plant seed, with seeds from 16 families covering a broad range of freshwater, marine and terrestrial habitats. Of 21 plant species, only two have an endozoochory dispersal syndrome, compared with five for water and eight for unassisted dispersal syndromes. One-fifth of the pellets contained at least one intact propagule of aquatic invertebrates from seven taxa. Secondary dispersal by piscivorous birds may be vital to maintain connectivity in meta-populations and between river catchments, and in the movement of plants and invertebrates in response to climate change. Secondary dispersal pathways associated with complex food webs must be studied in detail if we are to understand species movements in a changing world. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. Distribution and association between environmental and clinical isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans in Bogotá-Colombia, 2012-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vélez, Norida; Escandón, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    The propagules of the fungal species Cryptococcus neoformans and C. gattii, whose varieties are distributed world wide, are the primary cause of cryptococcosis, a life threatening disease. The study of environmental and clinical isolates of Cryptococcosis is an important contribution to the epidemiology and ecology of the fungus. The aim of this work was to determine the presence of C. neoformans and C. gattii in the environment in Bogotá, Colombia’s capital city and to establish the relation between clinical and environmental isolates in the period 2012-2015. From a total of 4.116 environmental samples collected between October 2012 - March 2014, 35 were positive for C. neoformans var. grubii. From 55 cryptococcosis cases reported in Bogotá during 2012-2015, 49 isolates were recovered. From those, 94% were identified as C. neoformans var. grubii molecular type VNI; 4% as VNII and 1,2% as C. neoformans var neoformans VNIV. The 84 detected clinical and environmental isolates studied had a similarity between 49-100% according with molecular typing. The correlation between environmental and clinical samples confirms the hypothesis that patients acquire the disease from environmental exposure to the fungal propagules. PMID:27706379

  8. The movement ecology of seagrasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Kathryn; van Dijk, Kor-Jent; Ruiz-Montoya, Leonardo; Kendrick, Gary A; Krauss, Siegfried L; Waycott, Michelle; Verduin, Jennifer; Lowe, Ryan; Statton, John; Brown, Eloise; Duarte, Carlos

    2014-11-22

    A movement ecology framework is applied to enhance our understanding of the causes, mechanisms and consequences of movement in seagrasses: marine, clonal, flowering plants. Four life-history stages of seagrasses can move: pollen, sexual propagules, vegetative fragments and the spread of individuals through clonal growth. Movement occurs on the water surface, in the water column, on or in the sediment, via animal vectors and through spreading clones. A capacity for long-distance dispersal and demographic connectivity over multiple timeframes is the novel feature of the movement ecology of seagrasses with significant evolutionary and ecological consequences. The space-time movement footprint of different life-history stages varies. For example, the distance moved by reproductive propagules and vegetative expansion via clonal growth is similar, but the timescales range exponentially, from hours to months or centuries to millennia, respectively. Consequently, environmental factors and key traits that interact to influence movement also operate on vastly different spatial and temporal scales. Six key future research areas have been identified.

  9. The effect of consumers and mutualists of Vaccinium membranaceum at Mount St. Helens: dependence on successional context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suann Yang

    Full Text Available In contrast to secondary succession, studies of terrestrial primary succession largely ignore the role of biotic interactions, other than plant facilitation and competition, despite the expectation that simplified interaction webs and propagule-dependent demographics may amplify the effects of consumers and mutualists. We investigated whether successional context determined the impact of consumers and mutualists by quantifying their effects on reproduction by the shrub Vaccinium membranaceum in primary and secondary successional sites at Mount St. Helens (Washington, USA, and used simulations to explore the effects of these interactions on colonization. Species interactions differed substantially between sites, and the combined effect of consumers and mutualists was much more strongly negative for primary successional plants. Because greater local control of propagule pressure is expected to increase successional rates, we evaluated the role of dispersal in the context of these interactions. Our simulations showed that even a small local seed source greatly increases population growth rates, thereby balancing strong consumer pressure. The prevalence of strong negative interactions in the primary successional site is a reminder that successional communities will not exhibit the distribution of interaction strengths characteristic of stable communities, and suggests the potential utility of modeling succession as the consequence of interaction strengths.

  10. The analysis of the quality of red fermented rice (RFR product with Monascus purpureus 3090

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DJUMHAWAN R. PERMANA

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of red fermented rice product with Monascus purpureus 3090 was conducted on monascus floor product (MFP-264, MFP-244 and rice monascus product (RMP. Evaluation of microbiological, pigment intensity and lovastatine content analysis result was aimed to see quality differences on each production of 5 kg rice raw material. Of both product types (MFP-264, RMP which only oven dried compare to MFP-244 which is sterilized in autoclave showed a significantly difference of population level on total microorganism colonies, that is mould 26x106 propagule/ml, bacteria 13x106 cell/ml (MFP-264, mould 85x106 propagule/ml, bacteria 265x106 cell/ml (RMP. The MFP-244 produced highest absorption spectra 0.3513-0.4050 compare to MFP-264 0.3110-0.3324, rice monascus product (RMP 0.3343-0.3663. Pigment biosynthesis seems occurred at sexual developmental stage or conidia formation of M. purpureus 3090, which is produced color changes of yellow pigment, orange pigment, and red pigment. Lovastatine content of MFP-264 has Rf value 0.84 MFP-244 Rf 0.83 and RMP Rf 0.82 showed higher value compare to Rf 0.81 of the lovastatine standard solution.

  11. Growth in liverworts of the Marchantiales is promoted by epiphytic methylobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutschera, U.; Koopmann, V.

    2005-07-01

    Liverworts, the most basal lineage of extant land plants, have been used as model systems in the reconstruction of adaptations to life on land. In this study, we used gemmae (specialized propagules) that were isolated from mature gemma cups of two distantly related species of liverworts, Marchantia polymorpha L. and Lunularia cruciata L. (order Marchantiales). We show that methylobacteria (genus Methylobacterium), microbes that inhabit the surfaces of land plants where they secrete phytohormones (cytokinines), promote the growth of isolated gemmae cultivated on agar plates. As a control, two species of higher plants, maize (Zea mays L.) and sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) were raised aseptically from sterile seeds (i.e., caryopses, achenes). Inoculation of these propagules with methylobacteria was without effect on growth in the above-ground phytosphere (expansion of stems and leaves). We conclude that normal development in Marchantia and Lunularia is dependent on (and possibly regulated by) epiphytic methylobacteria, whereas representative higher plants grow at optimal rates in the absence of these prokaryotic epiphytes.

  12. Incidência de fungos e germinação de sementes de feijão-caupi (Vigna unguiculata L. (Walp tratadas com óleo de nim (Azadirachta indica A. Juss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.C. Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho avaliou-se o efeito do óleo de nim no controle de fungos associados às sementes de feijão caupi e a influência deste produto na germinação de três cultivares (Serrinha, BR 17, e Maranhão. Foram preparadas diluições de 0,5; 1,0; 2,0; 4,0 g dm 3-do óleo de nim em água destilada e testemunha, só com água. Os fungos foram identificados pelo método do papel de filtro e a germinação das sementes foi avaliada considerando as informações das Regras para Análise de Sementes. Foram utilizadas sementes de três cultivares de feijão-caupi: a cultivar Serrinha, proveniente da cidade de Timon-MA, a cultivar Maranhão, da cidade de Viana - MA, e a cultivar BR 17, obtida junto à Embrapa Meio Norte, na cidade de Teresina-PI. O crescimento de Fusarium sp. nas cultivares Maranhão e Serrinha foi reduzido em 52 e 53%, respectivamente e o índice de redução de Aspergillus sp. foi de 14 e 20% nas mesmas cultivares. Em relação aos fungos M. phaseolina e Phoma sp., observa-se que não foram inibidos em nenhuma das três cultivares. No que se refere à germinação das sementes nota-se que na cultivar Maranhão houve aumento no índice da germinação de 13 e 17,5% em relação à testemunha e, na cultivar Serrinha, somente a concentração 0,5% diferiu da testemunha com redução no índice de germinação de 6,49%. Conclui-se que o óleo de nim reduz a incidência de Fusarium sp. e Aspergillus sp. e é indiferente na redução de M. phaseolina e Phoma sp. O índice de germinação aumentou na cultivar Maranhão e diminuiu na cultivar Serrinha.

  13. Fungal Endophyte Diversity and Bioactivity in the Indian Medicinal Plant Ocimum sanctum Linn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanika Chowdhary

    Full Text Available Endophytic mycopopulation isolated from India's Queen of herbs Tulsi (Ocimum sanctum were explored and investigated for their diversity and antiphytopathogenic activity against widespread plant pathogens Botrytis cinerea, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium oxysporum. 90 fungal isolates, representing 17 genera were recovered from 313 disease-free and surface sterilised plant segments (leaf and stem tissues from three different geographic locations (Delhi, Hyderabad and Mukteshwar during distinct sampling times in consequent years 2010 and 2011 in India. Fungal endophytes were subjected to molecular identification based on rDNA ITS sequence analysis. Plant pathogens such as F. verticillioides, B. maydis, C. coarctatum, R. bataticola, Hypoxylon sp., Diaporthe phaseolorum, Alternaria tenuissima and A. alternata have occurred as endophyte only during second sampling (second sampling in 2011 in the present study. Bi-plot generated by principal component analysis suggested tissue specificity of certain fungal endophytes. Dendrogram revealed species abundance as a function of mean temperature of the location at the time of sampling. Shannon diversity in the first collection is highest in Hyderabad leaf tissues (H' = 1.907 whereas in second collection it was highest from leaf tissues of Delhi (H' = 1.846. Mukteshwar (altitude: 7500 feet reported least isolation rate in second collection. Nearly 23% of the total fungal isolates were considered as potent biocontrol agent. Hexane extract of M. phaseolina recovered from Hyderabad in first collection demonstrated highest activity against S. sclerotiorum with IC50 value of 0.38 mg/ml. Additionally, its components 2H-pyran-2-one, 5,6-dihydro-6-pentyl and palmitic acid, methyl ester as reported by GC-MS Chromatogram upon evaluation for their antiphytopathogenic activity exhibited IC50 value of 1.002 and 0.662 against respectively S. sclerotiorum indicating their significant role in

  14. Fungi Associated with Capororoca (Myrsine ferruginea Myrsinaceae Fruits and Seeds Fungos Associados aos Frutos e Sementes de Capororoca (Myrsine ferruginea Myrsinaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suelen Santos Rego

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to identify the fungi associated with capororoca (Myrsine ferruginea Spreng fruits and seeds from different lots and check the incidence of fungi between green and ripe fruits and
    seeds from these fruits. For fungi detection Blotter test (BT method was utilized, being 400 fruits and 400 seeds each sample, and incubated at 20 ºC ±1 ºC, 12 h dark light/12 h complete dark, for seven days, followed by the evaluation of the fungi incidence (%. It was possible to verify the transmission of the fungus Alternaria sp., Cladosporium sp., Colletotrichum sp., Fusarium sp., Macrophomina sp. and Pestalotia sp. fruit for seeds. Evaluated in three lots, Pestalotia sp. had the highest percentage of incidence in the seeds. The fungal contamination in fruits were higher than in seeds, indicating that the seed treatment reduces the appearance of fungi. There were differences in the occurrence of fungi among the lots evaluated, and the lot from Colombo County had higher incidence of fungi.

    doi: 10.4336/2009.pfb.58.87

    Os objetivos neste trabalho foram identificar os fungos associados aos frutos e sementes de capororoca (Myrsine ferruginea Spreng obtidos de diferentes lotes e verificar a incidência de fungos entre frutos verdes e maduros e nas sementes obtidas destes frutos. Para a detecção de fungos utilizou-se o método de papel-filtro (PF, sendo 400 frutos e 400 sementes para cada amostra, incubadas sob 12 horas luz negra/12 horas escuro, na temperatura de 20 ºC ± 1 ºC durante sete dias, avaliando-se a incidência (% de fungos. Pôde-se verificar a possível transmissão dos fungos Alternaria sp., Cladosporium sp., Colletotrichum sp., Fusarium sp., Macrophomina sp. e Pestalotia sp. dos frutos para as sementes. Nos três lotes avaliados, Pestalotia sp. apresentou a maior percentagem de incidência nas sementes. A contaminação fúngica nos frutos foi maior que nas sementes, indicando que o

  15. Modeling forest development after fire disturbance: Climate, soil organic layer, and nitrogen jointly affect forest canopy species and long-term ecosystem carbon accumulation in the North American boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trugman, A. T.; Fenton, N.; Bergeron, Y.; Xu, X.; Welp, L.; Medvigy, D.

    2015-12-01

    Soil organic layer dynamics strongly affect boreal forest development after fire. Field studies show that soil organic layer thickness exerts a species-specific control on propagule establishment in the North American boreal forest. On organic soils thicker than a few centimeters, all propagules are less able to recruit, but broadleaf trees recruit less effectively than needleleaf trees. In turn, forest growth controls organic layer accumulation through modulating litter input and litter quality. These dynamics have not been fully incorporated into models, but may be essential for accurate projections of ecosystem carbon storage. Here, we develop a data-constrained model for understanding boreal forest development after fire. We update the ED2 model to include new aspen and black spruce species-types, species-specific propagule survivorship dependent on soil organic layer depth, species-specific litter decay rates, dynamically accumulating moss and soil organic layers, and nitrogen fixation by cyanobacteria associated with moss. The model is validated against diverse observations ranging from monthly to centennial timescales and spanning a climate gradient in Alaska, central Canada, and Quebec. We then quantify differences in forest development that result from changes in organic layer accumulation, temperature, and nitrogen. We find that (1) the model accurately reproduces a range of observations throughout the North American boreal forest; (2) the presence of a thick organic layer results in decreased decomposition and decreased aboveground productivity, effects that can increase or decrease ecosystem carbon uptake depending on location-specific attributes; (3) with a mean warming of 4°C, some forests switch from undergoing succession to needleleaf forests to recruiting multiple cohorts of broadleaf trees, decreasing ecosystem accumulation by ~30% after 300 years; (4) the availability of nitrogen regulates successional dynamics such than broadleaf species are

  16. Urbanized landscapes favored by fig-eating birds increase invasive but not native juvenile strangler fig abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughlin, Trevor; Wheeler, Jessica H; Jankowski, Jill; Lichstein, Jeremy W

    2012-07-01

    Propagule pressure can determine the success or failure of invasive plant range expansion. Range expansion takes place at large spatial scales, often encompassing many types of land cover, yet the effect of landscape context on propagule pressure remains largely unknown. Many studies have reported a positive correlation between invasive plant abundance and human land use; increased propagule pressure in these landscapes may be responsible for this correlation. We tested the hypothesis that increased rates of seed dispersal by fig-eating birds, which are more common in urban habitats, result in an increase in invasive strangler fig abundance in landscapes dominated by human land use. We quantified abundance of an invasive species (Ficus microcarpa) and a native species (F. aurea) of strangler fig in plots spanning the entire range of human land use in South Florida, USA, from urban parking lots to native forest. We then compared models that predicted juvenile fig abundance based on distance to adult fig seed sources and fig-eating bird habitat quality with models that lacked one or both of these terms. The best model for juvenile invasive fig abundance included both distance to adult and fig-eating bird habitat terms, suggesting that landscape effects on invasive fig abundance are mediated by seed-dispersing birds. In contrast, the best model for juvenile native fig abundance included only presence/absence of adults, suggesting that distance from individual adult trees may have less effect on seed limitation for a native species compared to an invasive species undergoing range expansion. However, models for both species included significant effects of adult seed sources, implying that juvenile abundance is limited by seed arrival. This result was corroborated by a seed addition experiment that indicated that both native and invasive strangler figs were strongly seed limited. Understanding how landscape context affects the mechanisms of plant invasion may lead to

  17. Gravity regulation in tuber-bearing moss Leptobryum pyriforme (Hedw.) Wilson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobachevska, Oksana

    Considerable number of moss species is propagated asexually, and asexual reproduction is the key factor of their life strategy and effective mechanism of rapid population and attaching plants to habitats with great environmental fluctuations (Velde et al., 2001; Frey, Kűrshner, 2010). It has been shown for the first time for gravisensitive species Leptobryum pyriforme (Hedw.) Wilson that the development of propagules as organs of vegetative reproduction and accumulation of nutrient substances is gravidependent phenomenon. L. pyriforme differs from other moss species in higher growth and development rate. In darkness the greatest bundle of gravisensitive negatively gravitropic filaments (above 50 filaments) of both caulonemal and chloronemal type arised from 1 protonemal ball of moss. Perhaps, it is caused by high protonema gravisensitivity and morphogenetic effectiveness of gravitation force. It has been shown that propagules of L. pyriforme are formed much faster in darkness and their number is twice higher than on light. After five-day clinorotation of the L. pyriforme turfs the number of propagules is lower in darkness compared to gravistimulated turfs and higher than on the light. Thus, vegetative reproduction of L. pyriforme is the gravidependent process and gravitation force has stimulating influence on the formation of propagula. In L. pyriforme rhizoid tubers from round to oval (93-116 x ({) } ({х) } 120-148 muμm) are formed from 5-6 big cells (70 x ({) } ({х) } 80 muμm). Due to small capsules, L{it pyriforme }does not have a lot of big spores which are spread to insignificant distances, the mass formation of brood organs promotes moss survival and its preservation. The results of investigation prove the participation of rhizoids and rhizoid tubers as imperceptible but important phase of vital cycle of moss species - settlers in realization of vital tolerance strategy to extreme conditions of temporarily available habitats: due to rapid method of

  18. Potential biocontrol actinobacteria: Rhizospheric isolates from the Argentine Pampas lowlands legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solans, Mariana; Scervino, Jose Martin; Messuti, María Inés; Vobis, Gernot; Wall, Luis Gabriel

    2016-11-01

    Control of fungal plant diseases by using naturally occurring non-pathogenic microorganisms represents a promising approach to biocontrol agents. This study reports the isolation, characterization, and fungal antagonistic activity of actinobacteria from forage soils in the Flooding Pampa, Argentina. A total of 32 saprophytic strains of actinobacteria were obtained by different isolation methods from rhizospheric soil of Lotus tenuis growing in the Salado River Basin. Based on physiological traits, eight isolates were selected for their biocontrol-related activities such as production of lytic extracellular enzymes, siderophores, hydrogen cyanide (HCN), and antagonistic activity against Cercospora sojina, Macrophomia phaseolina, Phomopsis sp., Fusarium oxysporum, and Fusarium verticilloides. These actinobacteria strains were characterized morphologically, physiologically, and identified by using molecular techniques. The characterization of biocontrol-related activities in vitro showed positive results for exoprotease, phospholipase, fungal growth inhibition, and siderophore production. However, none of the strains was positive for the production of hydrogen cyanide (HCN). Streptomyces sp. MM140 presented the highest index for biocontrol, and appear to be promising pathogenic fungi biocontrol agents. These results show the potential capacity of actinobacteria isolated from forage soils in the Argentine Pampas lowlands as promising biocontrol agents, and their future agronomic applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. JLT-408 A New High Yielding Sesame Variety for Maharashtra State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Jadhav, G.B.Chaudhari,T. R. Patil, and S. C. Patil

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sesame variety JLT-408 is developed through hybridization followed by advance generation selection from the cross Padma x Yuzhi-8 by pedigree method at Oilseeds Research Station, Jalgaon. This variety gave 29.9 % and 20.8% higher yield than checks JLT-7 and JLT-26, respectively. It has medium maturity period (81-85 days, white bold seed and found superior in quality viz. high oil content (53.2%, low in free fatty acid (1.46% and its Iodine value is 107.0. This new variety is moderately resistant to major diseases like Phyllody, Cercospora leaf spot, Alternaria leaf spot, Powdery mildew and Macrophomina stem/ root rot and it is moderately tolerant to leaf roller /capsule borer and tolerant to gall fly under field conditions. Considering merits in respect of yield, oil content and quality parameters JLT-408 has been released for cultivation in kharif season in North Maharashtra and adjoining areas of Vidarbha and Marathwada regions in Maharashtra.

  20. Improved shoot regeneration, salinity tolerance and reduced fungal susceptibility in transgenic tobacco constitutively expressing PR-10a gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parinita eAgarwal

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Plants in ecosystems are simultaneously exposed to abiotic and biotic stresses, which restrict plant growth and development. The complex responses to these stresses are largely regulated by plant hormones, which in turn, orchestrate the different biochemical and molecular pathways to manoeuvre stress tolerance. The PR-10 protein family is reported to be involved in defence regulation, stress response and plant growth and development. The JcPR-10a overexpression resulted in increased number of shoot buds in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum, which could be due to high cytokinin to auxin ratio in the transgenics. The docking analysis shows the binding of three BAP molecules at the active sites of JcPR-10a protein. JcPR-10a transgenics showed enhanced salt tolerance, as was evident by increased germination rate, shoot and root length, relative water content, proline, soluble sugar and amino acid content under salinity. Interestingly, the transgenics also showed enhanced endogenous cytokinin level as compared to WT, which, further increased with salinity. Exposure of gradual salinity resulted in increased stomatal conductance, water use efficiency, photosynthesis rate and reduced transpiration rate. Furthermore, the transgenics also showed enhanced resistance against Macrophomina fungus. Thus, JcPR-10a might be working in co-ordination with cytokinin signalling in mitigating the stress induced damage by regulating different stress signalling pathways, leading to enhanced stress tolerance.

  1. QUALIDADE FISIOLÓGICA E SANITÁRIA DE SEMENTES DE MELÃO UTILIZADAS NO PÓLO AGRÍCOLA ASSU-BARAÚNA-MOSSORÓ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreya Kalyana de Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted to evaluate the physiological and sanity quality of melon (Cucumis melo L. seeds used in agricultural region Assu-Baraúna-Mosssó in the Rio Grande do Norte. For seed lots each from the hybrids Goldex and Vereda were used. Research was conducted at the Seed Analysis Laboratory and Irrigation Agricultural of the Department of Crop Science of the UFERSA from August 2006 to July 2007. The physiological quality was evaluated by the germination, first count germination, accelerated aging, emergence speed index, electrical conductivity and seedling emergence, beyond the seed moisture content. The sanity was determinated by the method of filter paper with freezer, in four replications with 100 seeds per lot and completly randomized design. From the results obtained, it was concluded that first count germination, accelerated aging, electrical conductivity and seedling emergence tests only identified low and high seed lot from the hybrids Goldex and Vereda. The electrical conductivity test is most indicated to estimation of melon seed physiological potential, it was also possible to reduce the imbibition period of seeds prior this test. The pathogens associated with melon seeds were Aspergillus spp., Fusarium sp. and Macrophomina sp. and the physiological quality of seeds was not affected with the microrganisms presence.

  2. Rhizobia: a potential biocontrol agent for soilborne fungal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Krishnashis; Prasanna, Radha; Saxena, Anil Kumar

    2017-03-12

    Rhizobia are a group of organisms that are well known for their ability to colonize root surfaces and form symbiotic associations with legume plants. They not only play a major role in biological nitrogen fixation but also improve plant growth and reduce disease incidence in various crops. Rhizobia are known to control the growth of many soilborne plant pathogenic fungi belonging to different genera like Fusarium, Rhizoctonia, Sclerotium, and Macrophomina. Antagonistic activity of rhizobia is mainly attributed to production of antibiotics, hydrocyanic acid (HCN), mycolytic enzymes, and siderophore under iron limiting conditions. Rhizobia are also reported to induce systemic resistance and enhance expression of plant defense-related genes, which effectively immunize the plants against pathogens. Seed bacterization with appropriate rhizobial strain leads to elicitation and accumulation of phenolic compounds, isoflavonoid phytoalexins, and activation of enzymes like L-phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), chalcone synthase (CHS), peroxidase (POX), polyphenol oxidase (PPO), and others involved in phenylpropanoid and isoflavonoid pathways. Development of Rhizobium inoculants with dual attributes of nitrogen fixation and antagonism against phytopathogens can contribute to increased plant growth and productivity. This compilation aims to bring together the available information on the biocontrol facet of rhizobia and identify research gaps and effective strategies for future research in this area.

  3. Evaluation of the mycoflora and aflatoxins from the pre-harvest to storage of peanuts: a case study doi: 10.4025/actasciagron.v36i1.16972

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Ferreira Souza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxins are carcinogens produced by Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus and A. nomius. In the present study, peanut samples were collected at different phenological stages of the plant during the 2007/2008 and 2008/2009 seasons and from stored peanuts harvested in 2007/2008. The mycoflora and aflatoxins in the peanuts were evaluated. The results showed the presence of Fusarium spp., Macrophomina spp., Trichoderma spp., Aspergillus spp. and Cladosporium spp. during the period of peanut maturation (39.8, 17.9, 8.2, 2.7 and 1.7%, respectively and storage (49.8, 27.8, 12.5, 8.8 and 1.0%, respectively. However, aflatoxins were not detected in the samples. Of the 25 Aspergillus spp. isolates, 24 (96% were producers of aflatoxin B1 (96%, 10 (40% of aflatoxin B2, 17 (68% of aflatoxin G1, and 10 (40% of aflatoxin G2. The isolation of Aspergillus spp. during storage was not influenced by the temperature, relative humidity or water activity (p > 0.05. The detection of aflatoxin-producing Aspergillus spp. in the samples analysed at different phenological stages, aerial gynophore, pod filling (seeds, mature fruits (pod, and dry fruits (harvest, indicates the importance of good agricultural practices from the cultivation to storage of peanuts in southern Brazil.

  4. Isolation and screening of endophytic fungi from three plants used in traditional medicine in Nigeria for antimicrobial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Abass Tolulope

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endophytes represent a promising source of biologically active metabolites for pharmaceutical and agricultural applications. Objective: This study was aimed to investigate the endophytic fungi diversity and the antimicrobial potential of three popular medicinal plants (Alstonia boonei-Ahun, Enantia chlorantha-Awopa and Kigelia africana-Pandoro that have ethnobotanical history in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: The stem barks were used for isolation of endophytic fungi and fermented, and the cell free fermentation broths were subjected to antimicrobial screening against six human pathogens; Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi and Candida albicans by using standard agar well diffusion method. Results: A total of ten endophytic fungi were isolated from the stem bark of the plants. Seven of these fungi were identified, which include; Aspergillus niger, Macrophomina spp., Trichoderma spp. and four different Penicillium species, while three of the isolated endophytes remained unknown. Furthermore, nine of the isolated endophytes showed potential antimicrobial activity against at least one of the six tested pathogens. Conclusion: This study shows that endophytic fungi inhabiting the inner tissue of medicinal plants studied may be the source of the curative properties of the plants.

  5. Utilization of emergent aquatic plants for biomass-energy-systems development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kresovich, S.; Wagner, C.K.; Scantland, D.A.; Groet, S.S.; Lawhon, W.T.

    1982-02-01

    A review was conducted of the available literature pertaining to the following aspects of emergent aquatic biomass: identification of prospective emergent plant species for management; evaluation of prospects for genetic manipulation; evaluation of biological and environmental tolerances; examination of current production technologies; determination of availability of seeds and/or other propagules, and projections for probable end-uses and products. Species identified as potential candidates for production in biomass systems include Arundo donax, Cyperus papyrus, Phragmites communis, Saccharum spontaneum, Spartina alterniflora, and Typha latifolia. If these species are to be viable candidates in biomass systems, a number of research areas must be further investigated. Points such as development of baseline yield data for managed systems, harvesting conceptualization, genetic (crop) improvement, and identification of secondary plant products require refinement. However, the potential pay-off for developing emergent aquatic systems will be significant if development is successful.

  6. Understanding the recurrent large-scale green tide in the Yellow Sea: temporal and spatial correlations between multiple geographical, aquacultural and biological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Pang, Shaojun; Chopin, Thierry; Gao, Suqin; Shan, Tifeng; Zhao, Xiaobo; Li, Jing

    2013-02-01

    The coast of Jiangsu Province in China - where Ulva prolifera has always been firstly spotted before developing into green tides - is uniquely characterized by a huge intertidal radial mudflat. Results showed that: (1) propagules of U. prolifera have been consistently present in seawater and sediments of this mudflat and varied with locations and seasons; (2) over 50,000 tons of fermented chicken manure have been applied annually from March to May in coastal animal aquaculture ponds and thereafter the waste water has been discharged into the radial mudflat intensifying eutrophication; and (3) free-floating U. prolifera could be stranded in any floating infrastructures in coastal waters including large scale Porphyra farming rafts. For a truly integrated management of the coastal zone, reduction in nutrient inputs, and control of the effluents of the coastal pond systems, are needed to control eutrophication and prevent green tides in the future.

  7. Glyphosate herbicide affects belowground interactions between earthworms and symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi in a model ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaller, Johann G.; Heigl, Florian; Ruess, Liliane; Grabmaier, Andrea

    2014-07-01

    Herbicides containing glyphosate are widely used in agriculture and private gardens, however, surprisingly little is known on potential side effects on non-target soil organisms. In a greenhouse experiment with white clover we investigated, to what extent a globally-used glyphosate herbicide affects interactions between essential soil organisms such as earthworms and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). We found that herbicides significantly decreased root mycorrhization, soil AMF spore biomass, vesicles and propagules. Herbicide application and earthworms increased soil hyphal biomass and tended to reduce soil water infiltration after a simulated heavy rainfall. Herbicide application in interaction with AMF led to slightly heavier but less active earthworms. Leaching of glyphosate after a simulated rainfall was substantial and altered by earthworms and AMF. These sizeable changes provide impetus for more general attention to side-effects of glyphosate-based herbicides on key soil organisms and their associated ecosystem services.

  8. Faunal impact on vegetation structure and ecosystem function in mangrove forests: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cannicci, S.; Burows, D.; Fratini, S.

    2008-01-01

    that older techniques used to assess herbivory rates by insects strongly underestimate their impact, both in case of leaf eating and wood boring species and that herbivorous insects can potentially play a strong role in many aspects of mangrove ecology. Moreover, researchers only recently realized that ant...... engineers, change particle size distribution and enhance soil aeration. Our understanding of the strong impact of gastropods, by means of high intake rates of mangrove products and differential consumption of propagules, has changed only recently. The role of insects must also be stressed. It is now clear......-plant interactions may form an important contribution to our understanding of insect-plant dynamics in these habitats. Ants seem to be able to relieve mangroves from important herbivores such as many insects and sesarmid crabs. It thus seems likely that ants have positive effects on mangrove performance.  ...

  9. Faunal impact on vegetation structure and ecosystem function in mangrove forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cannicci, S.; Burrows, Damien; Fratini, Sara

    2008-01-01

    that older techniques used to assess herbivory rates by insects strongly underestimate their impact, both in case of leaf eating and wood boring species and that herbivorous insects can potentially play a strong role in many aspects of mangrove ecology. Moreover, researchers only recently realized that ant...... engineers, change particle size distribution and enhance soil aeration. Our understanding of the strong impact of gastropods, by means of high intake rates of mangrove products and differential consumption of propagules, has changed only recently. The role of insects must also be stressed. It is now clear......–plant interactions may form an important contribution to our understanding of insect–plant dynamics in these habitats. Ants seem to be able to relieve mangroves from...

  10. Resilience to climate change in coastal marine ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Joanna R; Leslie, Heather M

    2013-01-01

    Ecological resilience to climate change is a combination of resistance to increasingly frequent and severe disturbances, capacity for recovery and self-organization, and ability to adapt to new conditions. Here, we focus on three broad categories of ecological properties that underlie resilience: diversity, connectivity, and adaptive capacity. Diversity increases the variety of responses to disturbance and the likelihood that species can compensate for one another. Connectivity among species, populations, and ecosystems enhances capacity for recovery by providing sources of propagules, nutrients, and biological legacies. Adaptive capacity includes a combination of phenotypic plasticity, species range shifts, and microevolution. We discuss empirical evidence for how these ecological and evolutionary mechanisms contribute to the resilience of coastal marine ecosystems following climate change-related disturbances, and how resource managers can apply this information to sustain these systems and the ecosystem services they provide.

  11. On models for landscape connectivity:a case study of the new-born wetland of the Yellow River Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The models for landscape connectivity are distinguished into models for line connectivity,vertex connectivity, network connectivity and patch connectivity separately. Because the models for line connectivity, for vertex connectivity, and for network connectivity have long been studied and have become ripe, the model for patch connectivity is paid special attention in this paper. The patch connectivity is defined as the average movement efficiency (minimizing movement distance) of animal migrants or plant propagules in patches of a region under consideration. According to this definition, a model for landscape connectivity is mathematically deduced to apply to GIS data. The application of model for patch connectivity in the new-bom wetland of the Yellow River Delta shows patch connectivity has a negative interrelation with human impact intensity and landscape diversity.

  12. Symbioses of grasses with seedborne fungal endophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schardl, Christopher L; Leuchtmann, Adrian; Spiering, Martin J

    2004-01-01

    Grasses (family Poaceae) and fungi of the family Clavicipitaceae have a long history of symbiosis ranging in a continuum from mutualisms to antagonisms. This continuum is particularly evident among symbioses involving the fungal genus Epichloe (asexual forms = Neotyphodium spp.). In the more mutualistic symbiota, the epichloe endophytes are vertically transmitted via host seeds, and in the more antagonistic symbiota they spread contagiously and suppress host seed set. The endophytes gain shelter, nutrition, and dissemination via host propagules, and can contribute an array of host fitness enhancements including protection against insect and vertebrate herbivores and root nematodes, enhancements of drought tolerance and nutrient status, and improved growth particularly of the root. In some systems, such as the tall fescue N. coenophialum symbioses, the plant may depend on the endophyte under many natural conditions. Recent advances in endophyte molecular biology promise to shed light on the mechanisms of the symbioses and host benefits.

  13. Polymerase chain reaction assay for rapid, sensitive detection, and identification of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides causing greater yam anthracnose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Mithun; Jeeva, M L; Hegde, V; Vidyadharan, Pravi; Archana, P V; Senthil alias Sankar, M; Nath, S Vishnu

    2012-11-01

    Anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides is an economically important disease which affects greater yam (Dioscorea alata L.) worldwide. Apart from airborne conidia, the pathogen propagules surviving in soil and planting material are the major sources of inoculum. A nested PCR assay has been developed for specific detection of C. gloeosporioides in soil and planting material. In conventional (single-round) PCR, the limit of detection was 20 pg, whereas in nested PCR the detection limit increased to 0.2 pg of DNA. The primers designed were found to be highly specific and could be used for accurate identification of the pathogen up to species level. The protocol was standardized for detection of the pathogen in artificially and naturally infected field samples.

  14. Reduction of bacterial growth by a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus in the rhizosphere of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H.; Jakobsen, I.

    1993-01-01

    with adhering soil, bulk soil, and soil from unplanted tubes were sampled after 4 weeks. Samples were labelled with [H-3]-thymidine and bacteria in different size classes were measured after staining by acridine orange. The presence of VAM decreased the rate of bacterial DNA synthesis, decreased the bacterial......Cucumber was grown in a partially sterilized sand-soil mixture with the vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungus Glomus fasciculatum or left uninoculated. Fresh soil extract was places in polyvinyl chloride tubes without propagules of mycorrhizal fungi. Root tips and root segments...... biomass, and changed the spatial pattern of bacterial growth compared to non-mycorrhizal cucumbers. The [H-3]-thymidine incorporation was significantly higher on root tips in the top of tubes, and on root segments and bulk soil in the center of tubes on non-mycorrhizal plants compared to mycorrhizal...

  15. All aboard! A biological survey of ballast water onboard vessels spanning the North Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steichen, Jamie L; Schulze, Anja; Brinkmeyer, Robin; Quigg, Antonietta

    2014-10-15

    Global movement of nonindigenous species, within ballast water tanks across natural barriers, threatens coastal and estuarine ecosystem biodiversity. In 2012, the Port of Houston ranked 10th largest in the world and 2nd in the US (waterborne tonnage). Ballast water was collected from 13 vessels to genetically examine the eukaryotic microorganism diversity being discharged into the Port of Houston, Texas (USA). Vessels took ballast water onboard in North Atlantic Ocean between the Port of Malabo, Africa and Port of New Orleans, Louisiana, (USA). Twenty genera of Protists, Fungi and Animalia were identified from at least 10 phyla. Dinoflagellates were the most diverse and dominant identified (Alexandrium, Exuviaella, Gyrodinium, Heterocapsa, Karlodinium, Pfiesteria and Scrippsiella). We are reporting the first detection of Picobiliphytes, Apusozoa (Amastigomonas) and Sarcinomyces within ballast water. This study supports that global commerce by shipping contributes to long-distance transportation of eukaryotic microorganisms, increasing propagule pressure and invasion supply on ecosystems.

  16. Discoloured seeds of amaranth plant infected by Alternaria alternata: physiological, histopathological alterations and fungal secondary metabolites associated or registered

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelting María Cristina

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present study the aspects of discolouration that could influence both the production and consumption of amaranth were analyzed with the objectives to identify the presence of Alternaria alternata on seeds, to analyze possible changes in the anatomy of seed tissues and to detect the presence of fungal secondary metabolites. Component plating, histopathological and mycological analyses on discoloured seeds allowed i location of propagules of A. alternata in all seminal components; ii observation of hypertrophies in perisperm and embryo and iii determination of several fungal secondary metabolites, mainly high concentrations of tenuazonic acid. To our knowledge, the information presented in this paper, related to physiological, histopathological changes and fungal secondary metabolites on discoloured seeds of (Amaranthus mantegazzianus syn. A. caudatus subsp. mantegazzianus (Pass Hanelt affected by A. alternata, is the first worldwide record.

  17. Unisexual reproduction enhances fungal competitiveness by promoting habitat exploration via hyphal growth and sporulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phadke, Sujal S; Feretzaki, Marianna; Heitman, Joseph

    2013-08-01

    Unisexual reproduction is a novel homothallic sexual cycle recently discovered in both ascomycetous and basidiomycetous pathogenic fungi. It is a form of selfing that induces the yeast-to-hyphal dimorphic transition in isolates of the α mating type of the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. Unisexual reproduction may benefit the pathogen by facilitating sexual reproduction in the absence of the opposite a mating type and by generating infectious propagules called basidiospores. Here, we report an independent potential selective advantage of unisexual reproduction beyond genetic exchange and recombination. We competed a wild-type strain capable of undergoing unisexual reproduction with mutants defective in this developmental pathway and found that unisexual reproduction provides a considerable dispersal advantage through hyphal growth and sporulation. Our results show that unisexual reproduction may serve to facilitate access to both nutrients and potential mating partners and may provide a means to maintain the capacity for dimorphic transitions in the environment.

  18. Características anatômicas de mudas de morangueiro micropropagadas com diferentes fontes de silício Anatomical characteristics of the strawberry seedlings micropropagated using different sources of silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francyane Tavares Braga

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito de diferentes fontes de silício, utilizadas na micropropagação, nas características anatômicas de mudas de morangueiro (Fragaria x ananassa. Foram utilizados propágulos da cv. Oso Grande cultivados em meio Murashige e Skoog (MS, acrescido de 30 gL-1 de sacarose, 6 gL-1 de ágar e 1 mgL-1 de 6-benzilaminopurina. Os tratamentos consistiram da adição ao meio MS dos silicatos de cálcio, de sódio e de potássio, na dosagem de 1 gL-1. O tratamento testemunha foi o meio MS sem fonte de silício. Odelineamento experimental foi o inteiramente ao acaso, com dez repetições. Os propágulos foram mantidos por 45 dias em sala de crescimento, em condições controladas. Avaliaram-se características fitotécnicas e anatômicas dos propágulos in vitro. Verificou-se que o aumento da massa de matéria fresca e seca dos propágulos de morangueiro ocorreu na presença de silicato de sódio. Asuplementação do meio de cultura com silício proporcionou maior teor de clorofila. Aadição de silicato de sódio ao meio MS resultou em aumento da espessura dos tecidos do limbo foliar e da deposição de cera epicuticular e na formação de depósito de silício nas células.The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of different silicon sources, used in micropropagation, on the anatomical characteristics of strawberry's (Fragaria x ananassa seedlings. Propagules of cv.Oso Grande were cultivated on a Murashige and Skoog (MS medium containing 30 gL-1 of sucrose, 6 gL-1 of agar and 1mgL-1 of 6-benzylamino purine. The treatments consisted of calcium, sodium, or potassium silicates added to the MS medium, at the dosage of 1 gL-1. The MS medium without added silicon was the check treatment. The experimental design was completely randomized with ten replications. The propagules were maintained during 45days in a growth chamber, under controlled conditions. Developmental and anatomical characteristics of the

  19. Two new fern chloroplasts and decelerated evolution linked to the long generation time in tree ferns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Bojian; Fong, Richard; Collins, Lesley J; McLenachan, Patricia A; Penny, David

    2014-04-30

    We report the chloroplast genomes of a tree fern (Dicksonia squarrosa) and a "fern ally" (Tmesipteris elongata), and show that the phylogeny of early land plants is basically as expected, and the estimates of divergence time are largely unaffected after removing the fastest evolving sites. The tree fern shows the major reduction in the rate of evolution, and there has been a major slowdown in the rate of mutation in both families of tree ferns. We suggest that this is related to a generation time effect; if there is a long time period between generations, then this is probably incompatible with a high mutation rate because otherwise nearly every propagule would probably have several lethal mutations. This effect will be especially strong in organisms that have large numbers of cell divisions between generations. This shows the necessity of going beyond phylogeny and integrating its study with other properties of organisms.

  20. The fast expansion of Pyropia aquaculture in ;Sansha; regions should be mainly responsible for the Ulva blooms in Yellow Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianheng; Zhao, Peng; Huo, Yuanzi; Yu, Kefeng; He, Peimin

    2017-04-01

    Massive Ulva blooms became an environmental disaster in the Yellow Sea from 2007 to 2015. In this study, field shipboard observations indicated that Ulva blooms originated in Pyropia aquaculture area, and the morphology of initial floating Ulva seaweed have the structure of rhizoid, which is similar with the attached Ulva on the Pyropia rafts. The spatial distribution of Ulva microscopic propagules in the southern Yellow Sea also supported that the blooms originated in the Pyropia aquaculture area. Besides, numerical model was used in this study, showing the origin of macroalgal blooms was traced to ;Sansha; regions which accounted for almost 70% of the total Pyropia aquaculture area. We conclude that the significant biomass (4252 tons) of Ulva species on the Pyropia rafts during the harvesting season in ;Sansha; regions played an important role in the early rapid development of blooms in the Yellow Sea.