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Sample records for macrophages ultrastructurally type

  1. HIV aspartyl peptidase inhibitors interfere with cellular proliferation, ultrastructure and macrophage infection of Leishmania amazonensis.

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    Lívia O Santos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leishmania is the etiologic agent of leishmanisais, a protozoan disease whose pathogenic events are not well understood. Current therapy is suboptimal due to toxicity of the available therapeutic agents and the emergence of drug resistance. Compounding these problems is the increase in the number of cases of Leishmania-HIV coinfection, due to the overlap between the AIDS epidemic and leishmaniasis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present report, we have investigated the effect of HIV aspartyl peptidase inhibitors (PIs on the Leishmania amazonensis proliferation, ultrastructure, interaction with macrophage cells and expression of classical peptidases which are directly involved in the Leishmania pathogenesis. All the HIV PIs impaired parasite growth in a dose-dependent fashion, especially nelfinavir and lopinavir. HIV PIs treatment caused profound changes in the leishmania ultrastructure as shown by transmission electron microscopy, including cytoplasm shrinking, increase in the number of lipid inclusions and some cells presenting the nucleus closely wrapped by endoplasmic reticulum resembling an autophagic process, as well as chromatin condensation which is suggestive of apoptotic death. The hydrolysis of HIV peptidase substrate by L. amazonensis extract was inhibited by pepstatin and HIV PIs, suggesting that an aspartyl peptidase may be the intracellular target of the inhibitors. The treatment with HIV PIs of either the promastigote forms preceding the interaction with macrophage cells or the amastigote forms inside macrophages drastically reduced the association indexes. Despite all these beneficial effects, the HIV PIs induced an increase in the expression of cysteine peptidase b (cpb and the metallopeptidase gp63, two well-known virulence factors expressed by Leishmania spp. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In the face of leishmaniasis/HIV overlap, it is critical to further comprehend the sophisticated interplays among Leishmania

  2. Skin ultrastructural findings in type 2 Gaucher disease: diagnostic implications.

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    Chan, Aegean; Holleran, Walter M; Ferguson, Tajh; Crumrine, Debra; Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Schiffmann, Raphael; Tayebi, Nahid; Ginns, Edward I; Elias, Peter M; Sidransky, Ellen

    2011-12-01

    Type 2 Gaucher disease is a rare and progressive subtype of this lysosomal storage disorder, marked by rapid, early-onset neurodegeneration. Distinguishing type 2 from types 1 and 3 Gaucher disease has remained challenging, due to the lack of a clear correlation between phenotype and enzymatic activity or genotype. β-glucocerebrosidase, the enzyme deficient in Gaucher disease, also has an essential role in maintaining epidermal permeability function, by regulating the ratio of ceramides to glucosylceramides in the stratum corneum of the skin. To further assess the diagnostic utility of epidermal evaluations in distinguishing patients with type 2 Gaucher disease in an expanded cohort. Epidermal samples were evaluated from twenty children with type 2, three patients with type 3 Gaucher disease and two adults with type 1 Gaucher disease with different clinical manifestations and genotypes. Electron microscopy on ruthenium tetroxide post-fixed tissue was performed. Compared to controls and subjects with type 1 and type 3 Gaucher disease, only patients with type 2 Gaucher disease displayed characteristic electron dense, non-lamellar clefts and immature-lamellar membranes. The appearance of characteristic alterations in epidermal ultrastructure provides an early and specific diagnostic tool to help in distinguishing type 2 from the other types of Gaucher disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Macrophage Polarization in Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes: Weighing Down our Understanding of Macrophage Function?

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    Michael James Kraakman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and type 2 diabetes are now recognized as chronic pro-inflammatory diseases. In the last decade, the role of the macrophage in particular has become increasingly implicated in their pathogenesis. Abundant literature now establishes that monocytes get recruited to peripheral tissues (ie pancreas, liver and adipose tissue to become resident macrophages and contribute to local inflammation, development of insulin resistance or even pancreatic dysfunction. Furthermore, an accumulation of evidence has established an important role for macrophage polarisation in the development of metabolic diseases. The general view in obesity is that there is an imbalance in the ratio of M1/M2 macrophages, with M1 pro-inflammatory macrophages being enhanced compared with M2 anti-inflammatory macrophages being down-regulated, leading to chronic inflammation and the propagation of metabolic dysfunction. However, there is emerging evidence revealing a more complex scenario with the spectrum of macrophage states exceeding well beyond the M1/M2 binary classification and confused further by human and animal models exhibiting different macrophage profiles. In this review we will discuss the recent findings regarding macrophage polarization in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  4. A biochemical and ultrastructural evaluation of the type 2 Gaucher mouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Willemsen (Rob); V. Tybulewicz (Victor); E. Sidransky (Ellen); W.K. Eliason (W.); B.M. Martin (B.); M.E. LaMarca (M.); A.J.J. Reuser (Arnold); M. Tremblay (M.); H. Westphal (H.); R.C. Mulligan; E.I. Ginns (E.)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractGaucher mice, created by targeted disruption of the glucocerebrosidase gene, are totally deficient in glucocerebrosidase and have a rapidly deteriorating clinical course analogous to the most severely affected type 2 human patients. An ultrastructural study of tissues from these mice rev

  5. Potential ultrastructural changes in rat epididymal cell types induced by Boswellia papyrifera and Boswellia carterii incense.

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    Ahmed, Mukhtar; Al-Daghri, Nasser; Harrath, Abdul Halim; Alokail, Majed S; Aladakatti, Ravindranath H; Ghodesawar, Mukhtar Ahmed G; Alwasel, Saleh

    2013-08-01

    Boswellia papyrifera and Boswellia carterii, known as Arabian incense, diffuses smoke, contaminating the air, which adversely affects human health. Therefore, this study was designed to ascertain the effect of these plants on histopathological and ultrastructure changes in cauda epididymis of Albino rats. Animals were exposed to 4 g/kg body weight of B. papyrifera and B. carterii daily for 120 days along with suitable controls. Our study indicates a significant reduction in epithelial heights. Cells showed signs of degeneration. The ultrastructural study revealed that the cauda epididymis was affected, including its cell types. Furthermore, a decrease in the size of mitochondria, Golgi complex, and both ERs was observed. In all treated groups, plasma fructose decreased considerably, indicating the sign of reduced energy, vital for motility and other sperm functions. The results of this study suggest that these plants systematically affect cauda epididymal cell types and its lumen through its potential toxicity.

  6. Ultrastructural characteristics of type A epithelioid cells during BCG-granulomatosis and treatment with lysosomotropic isoniazid.

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    Shkurupii, V A; Kozyaev, M A; Nadeev, A P

    2006-04-01

    We studied BCG-granulomas, their cellular composition, and ultrastructure of type A epithelioid cells in the liver of male BALB/c mice with spontaneous granulomatous inflammation. The animals received free isoniazid or isoniazid conjugated with lysosomotropic intracellularly prolonged matrix (dialdehyde dextran, molecular weight 65-75 kDa). Lysosomotropic isoniazid was accumulated in the vacuolar apparatus of epithelioid cells and produced a stimulatory effect on plastic processes in these cells.

  7. Dentinogenesis imperfecta type II: ultrastructure of teeth in sagittal sections.

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    Wieczorek, Aneta; Loster, Jolanta

    2013-01-01

    The morphological abnormalities of the teeth of patients affected by dentinogenesis imperfecta type 2 (DI-II) may underlie the difficulties with the clinical restoration of such teeth. We therefore performed a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study of four permanent first mandibular molars of four DI-II patients with periapical pathosis. The teeth were prepared for SEM evaluation by standard methods. In the crown, the enamel presented a highly irregular surface with a number of cracks and crevices. In some places, only granular remains of the enamel were found, while in other parts of the crown, the enamel was absent. SEM examination revealed the structural changes responsible for the lower enamel's hardness and resistance to attrition, and for tooth wear, while the structural changes in the dentin may explain the failure of some adhesive restorative materials. This SEM study thus revealed structural defects which underlie the problems of attrition and restoration loss found in patients with this genetic dental condition.

  8. Ultrastructural organization of muscle fiber types and their distribution in the rat superior rectus extraocular muscle.

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    Rashed, Rashed M; El-Alfy, Sherif H

    2012-05-01

    Extraocular muscles (EOMs) are unique as they show greater variation in anatomical and physiological properties than any other skeletal muscles. To investigate the muscle fiber types and to understand better the structure-function correlation of the extraocular muscles, the present study examined the ultrastructural characteristics of the superior rectus muscle of rat. The superior rectus muscle is organized into two layers: a central global layer of mainly large-diameter fibers and an outer C-shaped orbital layer of principally small-diameter fibers. Six morphologically distinct fiber types were identified within the superior rectus muscle. Four muscle fiber types, three single innervated fibers (SIFs) and one multiple innervated fiber (MIF), were recognized in the global layer. The single innervated fibers included red, white and intermediate fibers. They differed from one another with respect to diameter, mitochondrial size and distribution, sarcoplasmic reticulum and myofibrillar size. The orbital layer contained two distinct MIFs in addition to the red and intermediate SIFs. The orbital MIFs were categorized into low oxidative and high oxidative types according to their mitochondrial content and distribution. The highly specialized function of the superior rectus extraocular muscle is reflected in the multiplicity of its fiber types, which exhibit unique structural features. The unique ultrastructural features of the extraocular muscles and their possible relation to muscle function are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Ultrastructural Study of Alveolar Epithelial Type II Cells by High-Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation

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    Xiaofei Qin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar epithelial type II cells (AECIIs containing lamellar bodies (LBs are alveolar epithelial stem cells that have important functions in the repair of lung structure and function after lung injury. The ultrastructural changes in AECIIs after high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV with a high lung volume strategy or conventional ventilation were evaluated in a newborn piglet model with acute lung injury (ALI. After ALI with saline lavage, newborn piglets were randomly assigned into five study groups (three piglets in each group, namely, control (no mechanical ventilation, conventional ventilation for 24 h, conventional ventilation for 48 h, HFOV for 24 h, and HFOV for 48 h. The lower tissues of the right lung were obtained to observe the AECII ultrastructure. AECIIs with reduced numbers of microvilli, decreased LBs electron density, and vacuole-like LBs deformity were commonly observed in all five groups. Compared with conventional ventilation groups, the decrease in numbers of microvilli and LBs electron density, as well as LBs with vacuole-like appearance and polymorphic deformity, was less severe in HFOV with high lung volume strategy groups. AECIIs were injured during mechanical ventilation. HFOV with a high lung volume strategy resulted in less AECII damage than conventional ventilation.

  10. Dermal Ultrastructure in Low Beighton Score Members of 17 Families with Hypermobile-Type Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

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    Trinh Hermanns-Lê

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The distinction between the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobile type (EDSH and the benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS is unclear. The aim of the present study was to compare skin ultrastructural abnormalities of EDSH and BJHS among different families. Skin of 23 EDSH, 27 BJHS, and 41 asymptomatic subjects from 17 families was examined using transmission electron microscopy. Similar ultrastructural abnormalities were found irrespective of the Beighton score. Flower-like collagen fibrils represented the key change and elastic fibers were altered as well. Beighton score is a clinical parameter rating joint mobility that appeared unrelated to quantitative and qualitative collagen ultrastructural alterations in the skin. Some EDSH family members fit with BJHS diagnosis. BJHS possibly represents a mild variant of EDSH.

  11. Tendon's ultrastructure.

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    Tresoldi, Ilaria; Oliva, Francesco; Benvenuto, Monica; Fantini, Massimo; Masuelli, Laura; Bei, Roberto; Modesti, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The structure of a tendon is an important example of complexity of ECM three-dimensional organization. The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a macromolecular network with both structural and regulatory functions. ECM components belong to four major types of macromolecules: the collagens, elastin, proteoglycans, and noncollagenous glycoproteins. Tendons are made by a fibrous, compact connective tissue that connect muscle to bone designed to transmit forces and withstand tension during muscle contraction. Here we show the ultrastructural features of tendon's components.

  12. Macrophage galactose-type C-type lectin receptor for DC targeting of antitumor glycopeptide vaccines

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    Nuti, M; Zizzari, I; Napoletano, C;

    2011-01-01

    e13528 Background: Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen presenting cells and are employed in cancer vaccination. Several receptors are being studied in order to identif strategies to increase DCs activating capacity. The C-type lectin macrophage galactose type C-type lectin (MGL...... of IFNg and IL-2 secretion by both CD8 and CD4 T cells. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that MGL engagement profoundly affects DC plasticity inducing and directing a Th1 immune response. Moreover, MGL receptor expressed on human DC can be targeted by glycopeptide based vaccines with adjuvant...

  13. Deletion of Type 3 Adenylyl Cyclase Perturbs the Postnatal Maturation of Olfactory Sensory Neurons and Olfactory Cilium Ultrastructure in Mice

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    Zhang, Zhe; Yang, Dong; Zhang, Mengdi; Zhu, Ning; Zhou, Yanfen; Storm, Daniel R.; Wang, Zhenshan

    2017-01-01

    Type 3 adenylyl cyclase (Adcy3) is localized to the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) and is an essential component of the olfactory cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling pathway. Although the role of this enzyme in odor detection and axonal projection in OSNs was previously characterized, researchers will still have to determine its function in the maturation of postnatal OSNs and olfactory cilium ultrastructure. Previous studies on newborns showed that the anatomic structure of the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) of Adcy3 knockout mice (Adcy3-/-) is indistinguishable from that of their wild-type littermates (Adcy3+/+), whereas the architecture and associated composition of MOE are relatively underdeveloped at this early age. The full effects of sensory deprivation on OSNs may not also be exhibited in such age. In the present study, following a comparison of postnatal OSNs in seven-, 30-, and 90-day-old Adcy3-/- mice and wild-type controls (Adcy3+/+), we observed that the absence of Adcy3 leads to cumulative defects in the maturation of OSNs. Upon aging, Adcy3-/- OSNs exhibited increase in immature cells and reduction in mature cells along with elevated apoptosis levels. The density and ultrastructure of Adcy3-/- cilia were also disrupted in mice upon aging. Collectively, our results reveal an indispensable role of Adcy3 in postnatal maturation of OSNs and maintenance of olfactory cilium ultrastructure in mice through adulthood. PMID:28154525

  14. Macrophage PPARγ and impaired wound healing in type 2 diabetes.

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    Mirza, Rita E; Fang, Milie M; Novak, Margaret L; Urao, Norifumi; Sui, Audrey; Ennis, William J; Koh, Timothy J

    2015-08-01

    Macrophages undergo a transition from pro-inflammatory to healing-associated phenotypes that is critical for efficient wound healing. However, the regulation of this transition during normal and impaired healing remains to be elucidated. In our studies, the switch in macrophage phenotypes during skin wound healing was associated with up-regulation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ and its downstream targets, along with increased mitochondrial content. In the setting of diabetes, up-regulation of PPARγ activity was impaired by sustained expression of IL-1β in both mouse and human wounds. In addition, experiments with myeloid-specific PPARγ knockout mice indicated that loss of PPARγ in macrophages is sufficient to prolong wound inflammation and delay healing. Furthermore, PPARγ agonists promoted a healing-associated macrophage phenotype both in vitro and in vivo, even in the diabetic wound environment. Importantly, topical administration of PPARγ agonists improved healing in diabetic mice, suggesting an appealing strategy for down-regulating inflammation and improving the healing of chronic wounds.

  15. Pollen and microsporangium development in Hovenia dulcis (Rhamnaceae): a different type of tapetal cell ultrastructure.

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    Gotelli, Marina M; Galati, Beatriz G; Zarlavsky, Gabriela; Medan, Diego

    2016-07-01

    Despite that there is some literature on pollen morphology of Rhamnaceae, studies addressing general aspects of the microsporogenesis, microgametogenesis, and anther development are rare. The aim of this paper is to describe the ultrastructure of pollen grain ontogeny with special attention to tapetum cytology in Hovenia dulcis. Anthers at different stages of development were processed for transmission and scanning electron microscopy, bright-field microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy. Different histochemical reactions were carried out. The ultrastructural changes observed during the development of the tapetal cells and pollen grains are described. Large vesicles containing carbohydrates occur in the tapetal cell cytoplasm during the early stages of pollen development. Its origin and composition are described and discussed. This is the first report on the ontogeny and ultrastructure of the pollen grain and related sporophytic structures of H. dulcis.

  16. Exosome-like vesicles derived by Schistosoma japonicum adult worms mediates M1 type immune- activity of macrophage.

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    Wang, Lifu; Li, Zhitao; Shen, Jia; Liu, Zhen; Liang, Jinyi; Wu, Xiaoying; Sun, Xi; Wu, Zhongdao

    2015-05-01

    Exosomes are 30-100-nm membrane vesicles of endocytic origin that are released into the extracellular space upon fusion of the multi-vesicular bodies (MVB) with the plasma membrane, while initial studies described that the role of exosomes was a reticulocyte cargo-disposal mechanism allowing remodeling of the plasma membrane during the maturation of reticulocytes to erythrocytes. Recent studies indicate that exosomes are secreted by most cells and pathogens and play an important role in intercellular signaling and exert regulatory function by carrying bioactive molecules. As numerous pathogens, adult worm of Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) reside in mesenteric veins of definitive host including man and mammal animals. It was reported that the worms or the eggs also have specialized secretion systems to export effector proteins or other molecules into host target cells. However, the mechanisms involved remained unclear. This study investigated the isolation of the exosome-like vesicles secreted by S. japonicum adult worms and its immune activity on microphage in vitro. In this report, we identified exosome-based secretion as a new mechanism for protein secretion by S. japonicum. Electron microscopy tomography revealed the previously unidentified ultrastructural detail of exosome-like vesicles with high resolution; they were found to be typical spherical shape and to have a diverse population that varies in size of 30-100 nm. Exosome-like vesicles isolated from S. japonicum contained a significantly different protein compared with debris pelleted and the apoptosis body. We also demonstrate that macrophages were preferentially differentiated into the M1 subtype while being treated with S. japonicum exosome-like vesicles. This study reveals there are exosome-like vesicles derived by S. japonicum adult worms, and the exosome-like vesicles can mediate M1-type immune- activity of macrophage.

  17. Tumor-derived interleukin-1 promotes lymphangiogenesis and lymph node metastasis through M2-type macrophages.

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    Kosuke Watari

    Full Text Available Tumors formed by a highly metastatic human lung cancer cell line are characterized by activated signaling via vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-C through its receptor (VEGFR-3 and aggressive lymph node metastasis. In this study, we examined how these highly metastatic cancers acquired aggressive lymph node metastasis. Compared with their lower metastatic counterparts, the highly metastatic tumors formed by this cell line expressed higher amounts of interleukin (IL-1α, with similarly augmented expression of IL-1α and IL-1β by tumor stromal cells and of VEGF-A and VEGF-C by tumor-associated macrophages. These tumor-associated macrophages were mainly of the M2 type. Administration of a macrophage-targeting drug suppressed the production of these potent angiogenic and lymphangiogenic factors, resulting in decreased tumor growth, angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, and lymph node metastasis. In Matrigel plug assays, the highly metastatic cells formed tumors that were extensively infiltrated by M2-type macrophages and exhibited enhanced angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. All of these responses were suppressed by the IL-1 receptor (IL-1R antagonist anakinra. Thus, the IL-1α-driven inflammatory activation of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis seems to provide a highly metastatic tumor microenvironment favorable for lymph node metastasis through cross-talk with macrophages. Accordingly, the IL-1R/M2-type macrophage axis may be a good therapeutic target for patients with this form of lung cancer.

  18. Tumor-derived interleukin-1 promotes lymphangiogenesis and lymph node metastasis through M2-type macrophages.

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    Watari, Kosuke; Shibata, Tomohiro; Kawahara, Akihiko; Sata, Ken-ichi; Nabeshima, Hiroshi; Shinoda, Ai; Abe, Hideyuki; Azuma, Koichi; Murakami, Yuichi; Izumi, Hiroto; Takahashi, Takashi; Kage, Masayoshi; Kuwano, Michihiko; Ono, Mayumi

    2014-01-01

    Tumors formed by a highly metastatic human lung cancer cell line are characterized by activated signaling via vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C through its receptor (VEGFR-3) and aggressive lymph node metastasis. In this study, we examined how these highly metastatic cancers acquired aggressive lymph node metastasis. Compared with their lower metastatic counterparts, the highly metastatic tumors formed by this cell line expressed higher amounts of interleukin (IL)-1α, with similarly augmented expression of IL-1α and IL-1β by tumor stromal cells and of VEGF-A and VEGF-C by tumor-associated macrophages. These tumor-associated macrophages were mainly of the M2 type. Administration of a macrophage-targeting drug suppressed the production of these potent angiogenic and lymphangiogenic factors, resulting in decreased tumor growth, angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, and lymph node metastasis. In Matrigel plug assays, the highly metastatic cells formed tumors that were extensively infiltrated by M2-type macrophages and exhibited enhanced angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. All of these responses were suppressed by the IL-1 receptor (IL-1R) antagonist anakinra. Thus, the IL-1α-driven inflammatory activation of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis seems to provide a highly metastatic tumor microenvironment favorable for lymph node metastasis through cross-talk with macrophages. Accordingly, the IL-1R/M2-type macrophage axis may be a good therapeutic target for patients with this form of lung cancer.

  19. Suppression of lymphocyte proliferation by parainfluenza virus type 3-infected bovine alveolar macrophages.

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    Basaraba, R J; Brown, P R; Laegreid, W W; Silflow, R M; Evermann, J F; Leid, R W

    1993-06-01

    Lymphocytes stimulated with concanavalin A (Con A) or antigen in the presence of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV-3) infected bovine alveolar macrophages (BAM) or monocytes, had depressed [3H]thymidine incorporation. This failure of lymphocytes to incorporate radiolabel required live virus, was time dependent and was most pronounced when BAM were infected for 48 hr prior to the addition of lymphocytes. The rate of infection of alveolar macrophages and the release of infectious virus into culture supernatants paralleled suppression of lymphocyte mitogenesis by PIV-3. However, the peak titre of exogenous, live or inactivated virus was not suppressive when added to lymphocyte macrophage cultures just prior to Con A stimulation. Neither the loss of viable alveolar macrophages nor a shift in antigen or mitogen dose response in virally infected cultures could account for the deficit in [3H]thymidine incorporation by lymphocytes. Despite the presence of lymphocyte-associated virus antigen detected by direct immunofluorescence, no increase in PIV-3 titre above baseline was seen from infected lymphocytes, irrespective of mitogen stimulation. Likewise, lymphocytes did not contribute to the extracellular virus pool in lymphocyte-macrophage cultures as the increases in viral titre above basal levels in supernatants were equal to levels released by macrophages alone. The expression of viral antigen on lymphocytes stimulated in the presence of PIV-3-infected BAM suggests a non-productive or abortive infection of lymphocytes mediated through contact with infected macrophages.

  20. Ultrastructural appearance and cytoskeletal architecture of the clear, chromophilic, and chromophobe types of human renal cell carcinoma in vitro.

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    Gerharz, C D; Moll, R; Störkel, S; Ramp, U; Thoenes, W; Gabbert, H E

    1993-03-01

    The clear, chromophilic, and chromophobe types of human renal cell carcinoma have been defined as distinct morphological entities and can be clearly separated by differences of ultrastructural appearance, cytoskeletal architecture, enzyme synthesis, and cytogenetic aberrations. In this report, the cytomorphological aspects of these tumor types are compared in vitro, showing that essential ultrastructural and cytoskeletal characteristics of each tumor type are expressed even after prolonged in vitro cultivation. The pattern of intermediate filament proteins of each tumor type was preserved in vitro, permitting the separation of exclusively cytokeratin-positive chromophobe tumor cells from clear and chromophilic tumor cells with a co-expression of vimentin and cytokeratins. In vitro, the chromophobe tumor cells continued to exhibit abundant cytoplasmatic microvesicles and sparsely distributed "studded" vesicles, which are known to be characteristic features of this tumor type in vivo. This observation confirmed the structural similarity of the chromophobe cell to the 'intercalated cell' of the cortical collecting duct and provided further evidence for the histogenetic derivation of this tumor subtype from the collecting duct system.

  1. Macrophage-inducible C-type lectin underlies obesity-induced adipose tissue fibrosis.

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    Tanaka, Miyako; Ikeda, Kenji; Suganami, Takayoshi; Komiya, Chikara; Ochi, Kozue; Shirakawa, Ibuki; Hamaguchi, Miho; Nishimura, Satoshi; Manabe, Ichiro; Matsuda, Takahisa; Kimura, Kumi; Inoue, Hiroshi; Inagaki, Yutaka; Aoe, Seiichiro; Yamasaki, Sho; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2014-09-19

    In obesity, a paracrine loop between adipocytes and macrophages augments chronic inflammation of adipose tissue, thereby inducing systemic insulin resistance and ectopic lipid accumulation. Obese adipose tissue contains a unique histological structure termed crown-like structure (CLS), where adipocyte-macrophage crosstalk is known to occur in close proximity. Here we show that Macrophage-inducible C-type lectin (Mincle), a pathogen sensor for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is localized to macrophages in CLS, the number of which correlates with the extent of interstitial fibrosis. Mincle induces obesity-induced adipose tissue fibrosis, thereby leading to steatosis and insulin resistance in liver. We further show that Mincle in macrophages is crucial for CLS formation, expression of fibrosis-related genes and myofibroblast activation. This study indicates that Mincle, when activated by an endogenous ligand released from dying adipocytes, is involved in adipose tissue remodelling, thereby suggesting that sustained interactions between adipocytes and macrophages within CLS could be a therapeutic target for obesity-induced ectopic lipid accumulation.

  2. Platinum-Based Drugs Differentially Affect the Ultrastructure of Breast Cancer Cell Types

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    Al-Adawi, Kawther; Al-Nabhani, Abdurahman; Al-Kindi, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Although platinum-based drugs (PBDs) are effective anticancer agents, responsive patients eventually become resistant. While resistance of some cancers to PBDs has been explored, the cellular responses of BC cells are not studied yet. Therefore, we aim to assess the differential effects of PBDs on BC ultrastructure. Three representative cells were treated with different concentrations and timing of Cisplatin, Carboplatin, and Oxaliplatin. Changes on cell surface and ultrastructure were detected by scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). In SEM, control cells were semiflattened containing microvilli with extending lamellipodia while treated ones were round with irregular surface and several pores, indicating drug entry. Prolonged treatment resembled distinct apoptotic features such as shrinkage, membrane blebs, and narrowing of lamellipodia with blunt microvilli. TEM detected PBDs' deposits that scattered among cellular organelles inducing structural distortion, lumen swelling, chromatin condensation, and nuclear fragmentation. Deposits were attracted to fat droplets, explained by drug hydrophobic properties, while later they were located close to cell membrane, suggesting drug efflux. Phagosomes with destructed organelles and deposits were detected as defending mechanism. Understanding BC cells response to PBDs might provide new insight for an effective treatment.

  3. Cultured myoblasts from patients affected by myotonic dystrophy type 2 exhibit senescence-related features: ultrastructural evidence

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    M. Malatesta

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2 is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by the expansion of the tetranucleotidic repeat (CCTGn in the first intron of the Zinc Finger Protein-9 gene. In DM2 tissues, the expanded mutant transcripts accumulate in nuclear focal aggregates where splicing factors are sequestered, thus impairing the whole mRNA processing. Interestingly, the ultrastructural alterations in the splicing machinery observed in the myonuclei of DM2 skeletal muscles are reminiscent of the nuclear changes occurring in age-related muscle atrophy. Here, we investigated structural and functional features of satellite cell-derived myoblasts from biceps brachii, in the attempt to investigate cell senescence indices in DM2 patients by ultrastructural cytochemistry. We observed that in satellite cell-derived DM2 myoblasts, cell-senescence alterations and impairment of the pre-mRNA maturation pathways occur earlier than in myoblasts from healthy patients. This suggests that also in vivo the regeneration capability of satellite cells could be reduced in dystrophic muscles.

  4. Pleurotus ostreatus biofilm-forming ability and ultrastructure are significantly influenced by growth medium and support type.

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    Pesciaroli, L; Petruccioli, M; Federici, F; D'Annibale, A

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the effect of support and growth medium (GM) on Pleurotus ostreatus biofilm production, specific metabolic activity (SMA) and ultrastructure. Biofilms were developed on membranes covering a broad range of surface properties and, due to the applicative implications of mixed biofilms, on standard bacterial GM in stationary and shaken culture. Hydrophilic (glass fibre, Duran glass and hydroxyapatite) and mild hydrophobic (polyurethane, stainless steel, polycarbonate, nylon) supports were more adequate for biofilm attachment than the hydrophobic Teflon. Among the GM, sucrose-asparagine (SA) was more conducive to biofilm production than Luria-Bertani and M9. GM was more influential than support type on biofilm ultrastructure, and a high compactness was evident in biofilms developed on SA. Biofilms on Duran glass were more efficient than planktonic cultures in olive-mill wastewater treatment. The main effects of support and GM variables and their binary interactions on both biofilm production and SMA were all highly significant (P ostreatus biofilms. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to fill this gap, thus representing a basis for future studies. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Classically and alternatively activated bone marrow derived macrophages differ in cytoskeletal functions and migration towards specific CNS cell types

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    Dijkstra Christine D

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages play an important role in neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS and spinal cord injury (SCI, being involved in both damage and repair. The divergent effects of macrophages might be explained by their different activation status: classically activated (CA/M1, pro-inflammatory, macrophages and alternatively activated (AA/M2, growth promoting, macrophages. Little is known about the effect of macrophages with these phenotypes in the central nervous system (CNS and how they influence pathogenesis. The aim of this study was therefore to determine the characteristics of these phenotypically different macrophages in the context of the CNS in an in vitro setting. Results Here we show that bone marrow derived CA and AA macrophages have a distinct migratory capacity towards medium conditioned by various cell types of the CNS. AA macrophages were preferentially attracted by the low weight ( Conclusion In conclusion, since AA macrophages are more motile and are attracted by NCM, they are prone to migrate towards neurons in the CNS. CA macrophages have a lower motility and a stronger adhesion to ECM. In neuroinflammatory diseases the restricted migration and motility of CA macrophages might limit lesion size due to bystander damage.

  6. Obesity/Type II diabetes alters macrophage polarization resulting in a fibrotic tendon healing response.

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    Ackerman, Jessica E; Geary, Michael B; Orner, Caitlin A; Bawany, Fatima; Loiselle, Alayna E

    2017-01-01

    Type II Diabetes (T2DM) dramatically impairs the tendon healing response, resulting in decreased collagen organization and mechanics relative to non-diabetic tendons. Despite this burden, there remains a paucity of information regarding the mechanisms that govern impaired healing of diabetic tendons. Mice were placed on either a high fat diet (T2DM) or low fat diet (lean) and underwent flexor tendon transection and repair surgery. Healing was assessed via mechanical testing, histology and changes in gene expression associated with collagen synthesis, matrix remodeling, and macrophage polarization. Obese/diabetic tendons healed with increased scar formation and impaired mechanical properties. Consistent with this, prolonged and excess expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) components were observed in obese/T2DM tendons. Macrophages are involved in both inflammatory and matrix deposition processes during healing. Obese/T2DM tendons healed with increased expression of markers of pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages, and elevated and prolonged expression of M2 macrophages markers that are involved in ECM deposition. Here we demonstrate that tendons from obese/diabetic mice heal with increased scar formation and increased M2 polarization, identifying excess M2 macrophage activity and matrix synthesis as a potential mechanism of the fibrotic healing phenotype observed in T2DM tendons, and as such a potential target to improve tendon healing in T2DM.

  7. Burkholderia cenocepacia type VI secretion system mediates escape of type II secreted proteins into the cytoplasm of infected macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Rosales-Reyes

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic pathogen that survives intracellularly in macrophages and causes serious respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. We have previously shown that bacterial survival occurs in bacteria-containing membrane vacuoles (BcCVs resembling arrested autophagosomes. Intracellular bacteria stimulate IL-1β secretion in a caspase-1-dependent manner and induce dramatic changes to the actin cytoskeleton and the assembly of the NADPH oxidase complex onto the BcCV membrane. A Type 6 secretion system (T6SS is required for these phenotypes but surprisingly it is not required for the maturation arrest of the BcCV. Here, we show that macrophages infected with B. cenocepacia employ the NLRP3 inflammasome to induce IL-1β secretion and pyroptosis. Moreover, IL-1β secretion by B. cenocepacia-infected macrophages is suppressed in deletion mutants unable to produce functional Type VI, Type IV, and Type 2 secretion systems (SS. We provide evidence that the T6SS mediates the disruption of the BcCV membrane, which allows the escape of proteins secreted by the T2SS into the macrophage cytoplasm. This was demonstrated by the activity of fusion derivatives of the T2SS-secreted metalloproteases ZmpA and ZmpB with adenylcyclase. Supporting this notion, ZmpA and ZmpB are required for efficient IL-1β secretion in a T6SS dependent manner. ZmpA and ZmpB are also required for the maturation arrest of the BcCVs and bacterial intra-macrophage survival in a T6SS-independent fashion. Our results uncover a novel mechanism for inflammasome activation that involves cooperation between two bacterial secretory pathways, and an unanticipated role for T2SS-secreted proteins in intracellular bacterial survival.

  8. Macrophage involvement in mitral valve pathology in mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brands, Marion; Roelants, Jorine; de Krijger, Ronald; Bogers, Ad; Reuser, Arnold; van der Ploeg, Ans; Helbing, Wim

    2013-10-01

    Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis type VI) is a rare lysosomal storage disorder in which the pathologic storage of glycosaminoglycans in various tissues can lead to severe symptoms, including cardiomyopathy. We report on a child with Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome whose cardiac condition deteriorated and eventually led to cardiac failure at the age of 7 years due to severe mitral regurgitation. She received a mitral valve replacement and tricuspid repair with successful outcome. Histologic examination of the mitral valve showed abundant "clear" cells in both the leaflets and chordae tendineae. In Hurler disease (MPS I), similar cells have been identified as activated valvular interstitial cells (VICs, a myofibroblast like cell type). Here we report that the "clear" cells are CD68 positive, a frequently used marker of macrophage lineage. The "clear" cells remained unstained with the more specific macrophage marker CD14 while persistent staining of other cells demonstrated macrophage infiltration. From these observations, we infer that macrophages are involved in mitral valve pathology in MPS VI.

  9. Small early gastric cancer with special reference to macrophage infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, R A; Vitullo, P; Modesti, A; Inferrera, C

    1999-04-01

    The authors investigate the tumor-infiltrating cells in small early gastric cancer (EGC) (ultrastructural features and interactions of macrophages with tumor cells and other inflammatory cells. Sections from 20 small EGCs were stained by immunohistochemical methods for CD20, UCHL1, CD4, CD8, and CD68 (electron microscopic examination was used in 6 of the 20). In all of the tumors, CD68-positive macrophages accounted for most tumor-infiltrating cells, with UCHL1-positive T lymphocytes, eosinophils, and neutrophils being the next most frequent. We found only a few CD20-positive B lymphocytes. Electron microscopic analysis revealed macrophages with many phagocytic vesicles, cellular debris, and apoptotic bodies. These morphologic data show that macrophages are actively phagocytic. The tumor cells in contact with macrophages showed no cytopathic changes. These data do not support a macrophage-mediated cancer lysis like the ones reported in some systems in vitro. Contacts among macrophages and other inflammatory cells formed a recurrent ultrastructural hallmark and suggest a communication among varying inflammatory cell types during the precocious host response to gastric neoplasia.

  10. Type II Toxoplasma gondii induction of CD40 on infected macrophages enhances interleukin-12 responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Pedro; Sudarshana, Dattanand M; Gov, Lanny; Harker, Katherine S; Lam, Tonika; Casali, Paolo; Boyle, Jon P; Lodoen, Melissa B

    2014-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that can cause severe neurological disease in infected humans. CD40 is a receptor on macrophages that plays a critical role in controlling T. gondii infection. We examined the regulation of CD40 on the surface of T. gondii-infected bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMdMs). T. gondii induced CD40 expression both at the transcript level and on the cell surface, and interestingly, the effect was parasite strain specific: CD40 levels were dramatically increased in type II T. gondii-infected BMdMs compared to type I- or type III-infected cells. Type II induction of CD40 was specific to cells harboring intracellular parasites and detectable as early as 6 h postinfection (hpi) at the transcript level. CD40 protein expression peaked at 18 hpi. Using forward genetics with progeny from a type II × type III cross, we found that CD40 induction mapped to a region of chromosome X that included the gene encoding the dense granule protein 15 (GRA15). Using type I parasites stably expressing the type II allele of GRA15 (GRA15II), we found that type I GRA15II parasites induced the expression of CD40 on infected cells in an NF-κB-dependent manner. In addition, stable expression of hemagglutinin-tagged GRA15II in THP-1 cells resulted in CD40 upregulation in the absence of infection. Since CD40 signaling contributes to interleukin-12 (IL-12) production, we examined IL-12 from infected macrophages and found that CD40L engagement of CD40 amplified the IL-12 response in type II-infected cells. These data indicate that GRA15II induction of CD40 promotes parasite immunity through the production of IL-12. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Sustained Small Interfering RNA-Mediated Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Inhibition in Primary Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) can induce potent gene silencing by degradation of cognate mRNA. However, in dividing cells, the silencing lasts only 3 to 7 days, presumably because of siRNA dilution with cell division. Here, we investigated if sustained siRNA-mediated silencing of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is possible in terminally differentiated macrophages, which constitute an important reservoir of HIV in vivo. CCR5, the major HIV-1 coreceptor...

  12. Sustained small interfering RNA-mediated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 inhibition in primary macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Erwei; Lee, Sang-Kyung; Dykxhoorn, Derek M; Novina, Carl; Zhang, Dong; Crawford, Keith; Cerny, Jan; Sharp, Phillip A; Lieberman, Judy; Manjunath, N; Shankar, Premlata

    2003-07-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) can induce potent gene silencing by degradation of cognate mRNA. However, in dividing cells, the silencing lasts only 3 to 7 days, presumably because of siRNA dilution with cell division. Here, we investigated if sustained siRNA-mediated silencing of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is possible in terminally differentiated macrophages, which constitute an important reservoir of HIV in vivo. CCR5, the major HIV-1 coreceptor in macrophages, and the viral structural gene for p24 were targeted either singly or in combination. When transfected 2 days prior to infection, both CCR5 and p24 siRNAs effectively reduced HIV-1 infection for the entire 15-day period of observation, and combined targeting of both genes abolished infection. To investigate whether exogenously introduced siRNA is maintained stably in macrophages, we tested the kinetics of siRNA-mediated viral inhibition by initiating infections at various times (2 to 15 days) after transfection with CCR5 and p24 siRNAs. HIV suppression mediated by viral p24 siRNA progressively decreased and was lost by day 7 posttransfection. In contrast, viral inhibition by cellular CCR5 knockdown was sustained even when transfection preceded infection by 15 days, suggesting that the continued presence of target RNA may be needed for persistence of siRNA. The longer sustenance of CCR5 relative to p24 siRNA in uninfected macrophages was also confirmed by detection of internalized siRNA by modified Northern blot analysis. We also tested the potential of p24 siRNA to stably silence HIV in the setting of an established infection where the viral target gene is actively transcribed. Under these circumstances, long-term suppression of HIV replication could be achieved with p24 siRNA. Thus, siRNAs can induce potent and long-lasting HIV inhibition in nondividing cells such as macrophages.

  13. Contrasting Roles of Islet Resident Immunoregulatory Macrophages and Dendritic Cells in Experimental Autoimmune Type 1 Diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas B Thornley

    Full Text Available The innate immune system critically shapes diabetogenic adaptive immunity during type 1 diabetes (T1D pathogenesis. While the role of tissue-infiltrating monocyte-derived macrophages in T1D is well established, the role of their tissue-resident counterparts remains undefined. We now demonstrate that islet resident macrophages (IRMs from non-autoimmune mice have an immunoregulatory phenotype and powerfully induce FoxP3+ Tregs in vitro. The immunoregulatory phenotype and function of IRMs is compromised by TLR4 activation in vitro. Moreover, as T1D approaches in NOD mice, the immunoregulatory phenotype of IRMs is diminished as is their relative abundance compared to immunostimulatory DCs. Our findings suggest that maintenance of IRM abundance and their immunoregulatory phenotype may constitute a novel therapeutic strategy to prevent and/or cure T1D.

  14. Influence of Plasmid Type on the Replication of Rhodococcus equi in Host Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willingham-Lane, Jennifer M; Berghaus, Londa J; Giguère, Steeve; Hondalus, Mary K

    2016-01-01

    The soil-dwelling, saprophytic actinomycete Rhodococcus equi is a multihost, facultative intracellular pathogen of macrophages. When inhaled by susceptible foals, it causes severe bronchopneumonia. It is also a pathogen of pigs, which may develop submaxillary lymphadenitis upon exposure. R. equi isolates obtained from foals and pigs possess conjugative plasmids housing a pathogenicity island (PAI) containing a novel family of genes of unknown function called the virulence-associated protein or vap family. The PAI regions of the equine and swine plasmids differ in vap gene composition, with equine isolates possessing six vap genes, including the major virulence determinant vapA, while the PAIs of swine isolates house vapB and five other unique vap genes. Possession of the pVAPA-type virulence plasmid by equine isolates bestows the capacity for intramacrophage replication essential for disease development in vivo. Swine isolates of R. equi are largely unstudied. Here, we show that R. equi isolates from pigs, carrying pVAPB-type plasmids, are able to replicate in a plasmid-dependent manner in macrophages obtained from a variety of species (murine, swine, and equine) and anatomical locations. Similarly, equine isolates carrying pVAPA-type plasmids are capable of replication in swine macrophages. Plasmid swapping between equine and swine strains through conjugation did not alter the intracellular replication capacity of the parental strain, indicating that coevolution of the plasmid and chromosome is not crucial for this attribute. These results demonstrate that while distinct plasmid types exist among R. equi isolates obtained from equine and swine sources, this tropism is not determined by host species-specific intramacrophage replication capabilities. IMPORTANCE This work greatly advances our understanding of the opportunistic pathogen Rhodococcus equi, a disease agent of animals and immunocompromised people. Clinical isolates from diseased foals carry a

  15. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 endocytic trafficking through macrophage bridging conduits facilitates spread of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadiu, Irena; Gendelman, Howard E

    2011-12-01

    Bridging conduits (BC) sustain communication and homeostasis between distant tethered cells. These are also exploited commonly for direct cell-to-cell transfer of microbial agents. Conduits efficiently spread infection, effectively, at speeds faster than fluid phase exchange while shielding the microbe against otherwise effective humoral immunity. Our laboratory has sought to uncover the mechanism(s) for these events for human immunodeficiency virus type one (HIV-1) infection. Indeed, in our prior works HIV-1 Env and Gag antigen and fluorescent virus tracking were shown sequestered into endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi organelles but the outcomes for spreading viral infection remained poorly defined. Herein, we show that HIV-1 specifically traffics through endocytic compartments contained within BC and directing such macrophage-to-macrophage viral transfers. Following clathrin-dependent viral entry, HIV-1 constituents bypass degradation by differential sorting from early to Rab11(+) recycling endosomes and multivesicular bodies. Virus-containing endocytic viral cargoes propelled by myosin II through BC spread to neighboring uninfected cells. Disruption of endosomal motility with cytochalasin D, nocodasole and blebbistatin diminish intercellular viral spread. These data lead us to propose that HIV-1 hijacks macrophage endocytic and cytoskeletal machineries for high-speed cell-to-cell spread.

  16. Fcgamma receptor-mediated suppression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication in primary human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Bercoff, Danielle; David, Annie; Sudry, Hugues; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Pancino, Gianfranco

    2003-04-01

    Permissiveness of monocytes and macrophages to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is modulated by various stimuli. In this study we demonstrate that stimulation of primary monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) through the receptors for the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G (IgG) (FcgammaR) inhibits HIV type 1 (HIV-1) replication. Viral p24 production was decreased by 1.5 to 3 log units in MDM infected with both R5 and X4 HIV-1 strains upon stimulation by immobilized IgG but not upon stimulation by soluble IgG or by F(ab')(2) IgG fragments. Although MDM activation by immobilized IgG induced high levels of macrophage-derived chemokine secretion as well as a sustained down-regulation of CD4 and a transient decrease in CCR5 expression, these factors did not appear to play a major role in the suppression of HIV-1 replication. Single-cycle infection of FcgammaR-stimulated MDM with HIV-1 virions pseudotyped with either HIV-1 R5 or vesicular stomatitis virus G envelopes was inhibited, suggesting a postentry restriction of viral replication. PCR analyses of HIV-1 DNA intermediate replication forms suggested that reverse transcription is not affected by stimulation with immobilized human IgG, at least during the first replication cycle. The accumulation of PCR products corresponding to nuclear unintegrated two-long-terminal-repeat circles and the relative decrease of integrated HIV-1 DNA signals suggest an inhibition of proviral integration. Our data, showing that FcgammaR-mediated activation of MDM is a potent mechanism of HIV-1 suppression, raise the possibility that FcgammaR cross-linking by immune complexes may contribute to the control of viral replication in macrophages.

  17. Ultrastructure of the lung in the rat following exposure to crocidolite asbestos and quartz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K; Webster, I; Handfield, R I; Skikne, M I

    1978-01-01

    Lung tissue from rats that had inhaled U.I.C.C. crocidolite asbestos or quartz particles showed thickening of the interstitial tissue and the presence of collagen fibres. Aggregates of macrophages in the alveolar spaces were a dominant feature of all the sections examined from asbestos exposed rats. According to the ultrastructural studies described here, all the macrophages were mature cells, indicating that the ingested crocidolite asbestos was non-toxic. Lung sections of rats exposed to quartz particles were significantly different. Single cells were found in the alveolar spaces and many macrophages showed a characteristic pattern of vacuole formation. Other cells contained intracellular membranous lamellated bodies, similar to those found in Type II pneumocytes. Cells containing lamellated bodies were also found in the interstitial tissue. These findings suggest that the two mineral dusts have quite different biological effects on the macrophage and that the development of pulmonary fibrosis may, to some extent, be caused by a different mechanism in each instance.

  18. Activation of the Nlrp3 inflammasome in infiltrating macrophages by endocannabinoids mediates beta cell loss in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdan, Tony; Godlewski, Grzegorz; Cinar, Resat; Bertola, Adeline; Szanda, Gergő; Liu, Jie; Tam, Joseph; Han, Tiffany; Mukhopadhyay, Bani; Skarulis, Monica C; Ju, Cynthia; Aouadi, Myriam; Czech, Michael P; Kunos, George

    2013-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) progresses from compensated insulin resistance to beta cell failure resulting in uncompensated hyperglycemia, a process replicated in the Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rat. The Nlrp3 inflammasome has been implicated in obesity-induced insulin resistance and beta cell failure. Endocannabinoids contribute to insulin resistance through activation of peripheral CB1 receptors (CB₁Rs) and also promote beta cell failure. Here we show that beta cell failure in adult ZDF rats is not associated with CB₁R signaling in beta cells, but rather in M1 macrophages infiltrating into pancreatic islets, and that this leads to activation of the Nlrp3-ASC inflammasome in the macrophages. These effects are replicated in vitro by incubating wild-type human or rodent macrophages, but not macrophages from CB₁R-deficient (Cnr1(-/-)) or Nlrp3(-/-) mice, with the endocannabinoid anandamide. Peripheral CB₁R blockade, in vivo depletion of macrophages or macrophage-specific knockdown of CB₁R reverses or prevents these changes and restores normoglycemia and glucose-induced insulin secretion. These findings implicate endocannabinoids and inflammasome activation in beta cell failure and identify macrophage-expressed CB₁R as a therapeutic target in T2DM.

  19. Hereditary palmoplantar keratosis of the Gamborg Nielsen type. Clinical and ultrastructural characteristics of a new type of autosomal recessive palmoplantar keratosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastl, I; Anton-Lamprecht, I; Gamborg Nielsen, P

    1990-01-01

    A new kind of diffuse palmoplantar keratoderma with autosomal recessive inheritance and without associated symptoms was described in Norrbotten, Sweden by Gamborg Nielsen in 1985. Clinically, it ranges between the less severe dominant Unna-Thost type and the more severe recessive Meleda type, as it is milder than the latter. Skin biopsies of five patients from three different families with this new palmoplantar keratoderma, as well as five obligatory heterozygotes from one family, were investigated ultrastructurally in order to characterize this new entity and to differentiate it from the Meleda type. Several features are common to both autosomal recessive palmoplantar keratoses. They show a broadened granular layer, a transit region consisting of cells with a marginal envelope, and considerable hyperkeratosis. Morphologically, this transformation delay is less pronounced in the Gamborg Nielsen type than in the classical Meleda type. As is typical for ridged skin, both types of palmoplantar keratoses possess composite keratohyaline granules. In contrast to the normal appearance of keratohyaline granules in the Meleda type, the Gamborg Nielsen type also shows qualitative deviations of keratohyaline granules with different degrees of spongiosity and electron density and sometimes with a granular border. It seems that abnormal keratohyaline proteins are synthesized that behave differently. The sudden transformation of a granular into a horny cell is physiologically regulated by different enzymes. A delay in this process may be caused by a mutation that reduces or alters the enzymes concerned. We assume the palmoplantar keratoderma of the Gamborg Nielsen type to be a variant of the heterogeneous group of the Meleda type of palmoplantar keratoderma with autosomal recessive inheritance.

  20. Biochemical and ultrastructural studies of the C-type lectin bovine conglutinin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Nielsen, E H; Storgaard, P

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate the supramolecular organization of conglutinin (BK) with its primary and tertiary structure and to gain more knowledge of functionally important regions of the molecule. BK analyzed by SDS-PAGE under standard reducing conditions (40 mM DTT) showed a major band......-linked glycans of GalNAc and alpha (2-3) linked sialic acid type, whereas no N-linked glycans were demonstrated. Binding experiments with GlcNAc-gold suggested that multivalency is required for carbohydrate binding to BK. Electron microscopy showed mostly tetramers, 96 nm in diameter, but also mono-, di......-, and trimers were seen. The tetramers consisted of 40-nm strands, each with a peripheral globular head composed of subunits and connected to a common central lobe built from four ring-formed structures. The strands occasionally showed two bends, one close to the central lobe and another 25 nm from the lobe...

  1. Integrated metabolic modelling reveals cell-type specific epigenetic control points of the macrophage metabolic network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Maria Pires; John, Elisabeth; Kaoma, Tony; Heinäniemi, Merja; Nicot, Nathalie; Vallar, Laurent; Bueb, Jean-Luc; Sinkkonen, Lasse; Sauter, Thomas

    2015-10-19

    The reconstruction of context-specific metabolic models from easily and reliably measurable features such as transcriptomics data will be increasingly important in research and medicine. Current reconstruction methods suffer from high computational effort and arbitrary threshold setting. Moreover, understanding the underlying epigenetic regulation might allow the identification of putative intervention points within metabolic networks. Genes under high regulatory load from multiple enhancers or super-enhancers are known key genes for disease and cell identity. However, their role in regulation of metabolism and their placement within the metabolic networks has not been studied. Here we present FASTCORMICS, a fast and robust workflow for the creation of high-quality metabolic models from transcriptomics data. FASTCORMICS is devoid of arbitrary parameter settings and due to its low computational demand allows cross-validation assays. Applying FASTCORMICS, we have generated models for 63 primary human cell types from microarray data, revealing significant differences in their metabolic networks. To understand the cell type-specific regulation of the alternative metabolic pathways we built multiple models during differentiation of primary human monocytes to macrophages and performed ChIP-Seq experiments for histone H3 K27 acetylation (H3K27ac) to map the active enhancers in macrophages. Focusing on the metabolic genes under high regulatory load from multiple enhancers or super-enhancers, we found these genes to show the most cell type-restricted and abundant expression profiles within their respective pathways. Importantly, the high regulatory load genes are associated to reactions enriched for transport reactions and other pathway entry points, suggesting that they are critical regulatory control points for cell type-specific metabolism. By integrating metabolic modelling and epigenomic analysis we have identified high regulatory load as a common feature of metabolic

  2. [An ultrastructural study of the cervix epitelium infected with the human papillomavirus types 16 and 18 before and after treatment with contrasting thermo-laser therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manykin, A A; Ezhov, V V; Belov, S V; Danileĭko, Iu K; Saliuk, V A; Dymkovets, V P; Gushchina, E A; Lisitsyn, F V

    2014-01-01

    The results of the ultrastructural study of the epithelium of the patient cervix infected by the human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 before and after treatment by contrasting thermo-laser therapy (CTLT) are presented. It was shown in this work that 1.5 and 6 months after treatment HPV DNA was not detected in the biopsy and the smear of the cervix using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In the ultrathin sections, the structure of the epithelial cells from the biopsy after treatment corresponded to norm. There was effective elimination of HPV types 16 and 18 as Induces by CTLT method.

  3. Case report: Clinical, histological and ultrastructural characterization of type II dentinogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, C T; Martins, L D; Verli, F D; de Souza, M A L; Ramos-Jorge, M L

    2010-12-01

    Type II dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGIII) is an autosomal dominant dental development anomaly that affects both the primary and permanent dentition. This case report describes the clinical, radiographic and morphological characteristics of the teeth of a seven-year-old child with DGI-II determined by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. This consisted of extraction of the primary teeth with periapical lesions due to the advanced state of tooth resorption. Aesthetic restorations were performed on the mandibular anterior teeth and occlusal fissure sealants were applied to erupting teeth. A removable partial upper denture was made in order to return anterior aesthetic function and to aid mastication and speech. The child was examined at 3 month intervals. Over the following 3 years the prosthesis was replaced due to facial growth and fluoride was applied at each follow-up visit to all teeth. The patient remains in follow up and management. Individuals with DGI-II must not neglect their dental health. Early diagnosis, professional advice and treatment with periodic follow-up can help improve the quality of life of such patients.

  4. Eosinophils and type 2 cytokine signaling in macrophages orchestrate development of functional beige fat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yifu; Nguyen, Khoa D.; Odegaard, Justin I.; Cui, Xiaojin; Tian, Xiaoyu; Locksley, Richard M.; Palmiter, Richard D.; Chawla, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Beige fat, which expresses the thermogenic protein UCP1, provides a defense against cold and obesity. Although a cold environment is the physiologic stimulus for inducing beige fat in mice and humans, the events that lead from the sensing of cold to the development of beige fat remain poorly understood. Here, we identify the efferent beige fat thermogenic circuit, consisting of eosinophils, type 2 cytokines interleukin (IL)-4/13 and alternatively activated macrophages. Genetic loss of eosinophils or IL-4/13 signaling impairs cold-induced biogenesis of beige fat. Mechanistically, macrophages recruited to cold-stressed subcutaneous white adipose tissue (scWAT) undergo alternative activation to induce tyrosine hydroxylase expression and catecholamine production, factors required for browning of scWAT. Conversely, administration of IL-4 to thermoneutral mice increases beige fat mass and thermogenic capacity to ameliorate pre-established obesity. Together, our findings have uncovered the efferent circuit controlling biogenesis of beige fat and provide support for its targeting to treat obesity. PMID:24906148

  5. The macrophage Ox-LDL receptor, CD36 and its association with type II diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Sunaina; Banerjee, Monisha

    2011-04-01

    Type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a common and serious metabolic disorder worldwide. It is the third leading cause of death after cancer and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Over time, diabetes mellitus can lead to different complications like atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease and many micro- and macrovascular diseases. CD36 is a class B scavenger receptor whose expression is prevalent in vascular lesions. It has been shown that high plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL) levels become atherogenic when oxidized to modified LDL (Ox-LDL) by inducing foam cell formation via enhanced CD36 expression on macrophages. In addition to Ox-LDL, raised levels of glucose, insulin resistance, low HDL cholesterol, increased levels of free fatty acid (FFA) all result in increased expression of CD36, thereby contributing to T2DM and related atherosclerosis. Adipocytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), C-reactive protein (CRP), adiponectin, leptin, resistin along with peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) are important mediators in glucose homeostasis in association with CD36 and can be used as markers for T2DM and atherosclerosis. Several of these gene variants have shown association with lipid metabolism, T2DM and related complications. An attempt has been made to review the CD36 macrophage receptor and related molecules in association with T2DM.

  6. Secondary Metabolites from Fungal Endophytes of Echinacea purpurea Suppress Cytokine Secretion by Macrophage-Type Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Amninder; Oberhofer, Martina; Juzumaite, Monika; Raja, Huzefa A; Gulledge, Travis V; Kao, Diana; Faeth, Stanley H; Laster, Scott M; Oberlies, Nicholas H; Cech, Nadja B

    2016-01-01

    Botanical extracts of Echinacea purpurea have been widely used for the treatment of upper respiratory infections. We sought to chemically examine fungal endophytes inhabiting E. purpurea, and to identify compounds produced by these endophytes with in vitro cytokine-suppressive activity. Twelve isolates from surface sterilized seeds of E. purpurea were subjected to fractionation and major components were isolated. Sixteen secondary metabolites belonging to different structural classes were identified from these isolates based on NMR and mass spectrometry data. The compounds were tested for their influence on cytokine secretion by murine macrophage-type cells. Alternariol (1), O-prenylporriolide (4), porritoxin (10) β-zearalenol (13), and (S)-zearalenone (14) inhibited production of TNF-α from RAW 264.7 macrophages stimulated with LPS in the absence of any significant cytotoxicity. This is the first report of a cytokine-suppressive effect for 4. The results of this study are particularly interesting given that they show the presence of compounds with cytokine-suppressive activity in endophytes from a botanical used to treat inflammation. Future investigations into the role of fungal endophytes in the biological activity of E. purpurea dietary supplements may be warranted.

  7. Biogenesis and Ultrastructure of Carboxysomes from Wild Type and Mutants of Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7942.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orus, M. I.; Rodriguez, M. L.; Martinez, F.; Marco, E.

    1995-04-01

    Immature inclusions representing three progressive steps of carboxysome biogenesis have been identified in Synechococcus during the period of adaptation to low-CO2 conditions: (a) ring-shaped structures, (b) electron-translucent inclusions with the shape of a carboxysome and the internal orderly arrangement of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco) molecules, and (c) carboxysomes with an internal electron-translucent area, which seem to be the penultimate stage of carboxysome maturation. The ability to build up normal carboxysomes is impaired in three (M3, EK6, and D4) of four high-carbon-requiring mutants studied in this work. M3 and EK6 exhibit abundant immature electron-translucent carboxysomes but no mature ones. This finding supports the contention that an open reading frame located 7.5 kb upstream of the gene encoding the large subunit of Rubisco (altered in M3) is involved in the carboxysome composition and confirms the structural role of the small subunit of Rubisco (slightly modified in EK6) in the assembly of these structures. D4 shows few typical carboxysomes and frequent immature types, its genetic lesion affecting the apparently unrelated gene encoding a subunit of phosphoribosyl aminoamidazole carboxylase of the purine biosynthesis pathway. Revertants EK20 (EK6) and RK13 (D4) have normal carboxysomes, which means that the restoration of the ability to grow under low CO2 coincides with the proper assembling of these structures. N5, a transport mutant due to the alteration of the gene encoding subunit 2 of NADH dehydrogenase, shows an increase in the number and size of carboxysomes and frequent bar-shaped ones.

  8. Two different types of carcinoid tumors of the lung: immunohistochemical and ultrastructural investigation and their histogenetic consideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyung-Whan

    2013-02-01

    claimed to play an important role in the branching of bronchi and regeneration of bronchial epithelial cells following tissue injury. They are claimed to play an important function as a chemoreceptor apparatus related to oxygen tension of the breathing air. To test the hypothesis that histopathologic variability found in bronchial carcinoids may be related to the fact that lungs are endowed with more than one type of NEC, the author reviewed 36 cases of bronchial carcinoids and found 8 cases in which tumor cells varied significantly from typical carcinoids in cell shape and arrangement. Tumor cells tend to be spindly with frequent presence of S-100-positive sustentacular cells. The latter was designated as type II carcinoid and the rest as type I. Ultrastructurally, tumor cells in type I exhibited features more typical for epithelial cells. The tumor cells were usually polygonal, forming closely packed cell masses, and cell membranes were closely apposed with frequent primitive cell junctions. The membrane-bound dense-core granules were of variable size and appearance and larger than those seen in type II in which the size of granules ranged from 160 to 350 nm. In 2 cases of type I, frequent cells contained myelin bodies similar to those found in type II alveolar cells. In 14 cases of type I tumors, tumor cells formed lumens into which microvilli were converging. In 5 cases, some areas showed increased cell size exceeding the usual limit of pathologist's comfortable range of small cells. In 2 cases, the tumor contained areas of adenocarcinoma. Tumor cells in type II were rather oblong and closely packed without any intercellular spaces and the majority of tumor cells contained dense-core granules typical for so-called P granules. These cells seem to give out slender cell processes containing a few dense-core granules. In rare foci, groups of thin cell processes aggregate where profiles of processes cut at different angles can be seen. In such areas one can recognize the

  9. Protective Role of Toll-like Receptor 3-Induced Type I Interferon in Murine Coronavirus Infection of Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Navas-Martin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like Receptors (TLRs sense viral infections and induce production of type I interferons (IFNs, other cytokines, and chemokines. Viral recognition by TLRs and other pattern recognition receptors (PRRs has been proven to be cell-type specific. Triggering of TLRs with selected ligands can be beneficial against some viral infections. Macrophages are antigen-presenting cells that express TLRs and have a key role in the innate and adaptive immunity against viruses. Coronaviruses (CoVs are single-stranded, positive-sense RNA viruses that cause acute and chronic infections and can productively infect macrophages. Investigation of the interplay between CoVs and PRRs is in its infancy. We assessed the effect of triggering TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, and TLR7 with selected ligands on the susceptibility of the J774A.1 macrophage cell line to infection with murine coronavirus (mouse hepatitis virus, [MHV]. Stimulation of TLR2, TLR4, or TLR7 did not affect MHV production. In contrast, pre-stimulation of TLR3 with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C hindered MHV infection through induction of IFN-β in macrophages. We demonstrate that activation of TLR3 with the synthetic ligand poly I:C mediates antiviral immunity that diminishes (MHV-A59 or suppresses (MHV-JHM, MHV-3 virus production in macrophages.

  10. Plexus muscularis profundus and associated interstitial cells. II. Ultrastructural studies of mouse small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Thuneberg, L; Mikkelsen, H B

    1982-01-01

    The ultrastructure of plexus muscularis profundus (PMP) of the mouse small intestine was investigated subsequent to vascular perfusion with ruthenium red-containing and routine aldehyde fixatives. Four types of nerve terminals were revealed. Type I: numerous 500-A agranular vesicles and few 1,000-A...... A), synapse-like contacts to interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC-III). Presynaptic densities were frequent in type I endings. A direct innervation of muscle cells via PMP was only very occasionally suggested. ICC-III possessed a basal lamina and numerous caveolae associated with subsurface SER......, and the lack of caveolae and a basal lamina. FLC never participated in synaptic arrangements or gap junctions. Macrophage-like cells were occasionally encountered. It is concluded that possible efferent and afferent nerve terminals in PMP may chiefly, if not exclusively, innervate ICC-III, the ultrastructure...

  11. Targeting of macrophage galactose-type C-type lectin (MGL) induces DC signaling and activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Napoletano, Chiara; Zizzari, Ilaria G; Rughetti, Aurelia;

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) sense the microenvironment through several types of receptors recognizing pathogen-associated molecular patterns. In particular, C-type lectins, expressed by distinct subsets of DCs, recognize and internalize specific carbohydrate antigen in a Ca(2+) -dependent manner. Targe...

  12. Ultrastructural and immunocytochemical studies on the MLS-type basal apparatus in the sperm of Lygodium japonicum (pteridophyta)

    OpenAIRE

    Sakaushi, Shinji

    2004-01-01

    Spiral formation of the multiflagellated sperm in Lygodium japonicum(pteridophyte) was ultrastructurally and biochemically analyzed to consider evolution of the basal apparatus in the archegoniates.Differentiation of the spermatid (spermiogenesis) was investigated in detail by electron microscopy, immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy using anti-tubulin and anti-actin antibodies. At the mid stage of spermiogenesis, the MLS, a characteristic structure in the archegoniates and the C...

  13. Differential impact of diabetes mellitus type II and arterial hypertension on collateral artery growth and concomitant macrophage accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Wulf D; Lund, Natalie; Sager, Hendrik; Becker, Wiebke; Wenzel, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type II and arterial hypertension are major risk factors for peripheral arterial disease and have been considered to reduce collateral growth (arteriogenesis). Collateral growth proceeds through different stages. Vascular proliferation and macrophage accumulation are hallmarks of early collateral growth. We here compare the impact of arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus type II on collateral proliferation (Brdu incorporation) and macrophage accumulation (ED 2 staining) as well as collateral vessel function (collateral conductance) in a rat model of peripheral vascular disease (femoral artery occlusion), diabetes mellitus type II (Zucker fatty diabetic rats and Zucker lean rat controls) and arterial hypertension (induced via clip placement around the right renal arteriy). We furthermore tested the impact of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP‑1) on collateral proliferation and macrophage accumulation in these models Diabetic animals showed reduced vascular proliferation and macrophage accumulation, which however did not translate into a change of collateral conductance. Hypertensive animals on the contrary had reduced collateral conductances without altered macrophage accumulation and only a marginal reduction in collateral proliferation. Infusion of MCP‑1 only enhanced vascular proliferation in diabetic animals. These findings illustrate that impaired monocyte/macrophage recruitment is responsible for reduced collateral growth under diabetic conditions but not in arterial hypertension suggesting that diabetes mellitus in particular affects early stages of collateral growth whereas hypertension has its impact on later remodeling stages. Successful pro-arteriogenic treatment strategies in a patient population that presents with diabetes mellitus and arterial hypertension need to address different stages of collateral growth and thus different molecular and cellular targets simultaneously.

  14. Macrophage inducible C-type lectin (Mincle) recognizes glycosylated surface (S)-layer of the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinthamani, Sreedevi; Settem, Rajendra P.; Honma, Kiyonobu; Kay, Jason G.

    2017-01-01

    The oral pathogen Tannerella forsythia is implicated in the development of periodontitis, a common inflammatory disease that leads to the destruction of the gum and tooth supporting tissues, often leading to tooth loss. T. forsythia is a unique Gram-negative organism endowed with an elaborate protein O-glycosylation system that allows the bacterium to express a glycosylated surface (S)-layer comprising two high molecular weight glycoproteins modified with O-linked oligosaccharides. The T. forsythia S-layer has been implicated in the modulation of cytokine responses of antigen presenting cells, such as macrophages, that play a significant role during inflammation associated with periodontitis. The macrophage-inducible C-type lectin receptor (Mincle) is an FcRγ-coupled pathogen recognition receptor that recognizes a wide variety of sugar containing ligands from fungal and bacterial pathogens. In this study, we aimed to determine if Mincle might be involved in the recognition of T. forsythia S-layer and modulation of cytokine response of macrophages against the bacterium. Binding studies using recombinant Mincle-Fc fusion protein indicated a specific Ca2+-dependent binding of Mincle to T. forsythia S-layer. Subsequent experiments with Mincle-expressing and Mincle-knockdown macrophages revealed a role for Mincle/S-layer interaction in the induction of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine secretion in macrophages stimulated with T. forsythia as well as its S-layer. Together, these studies revealed Mincle as an important macrophage receptor involved in the modulation of cytokine responses of macrophages against T. forsythia, and thus may play a critical role in orchestrating the host immune response against the bacterium. PMID:28264048

  15. Macrophage inducible C-type lectin (Mincle) recognizes glycosylated surface (S)-layer of the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinthamani, Sreedevi; Settem, Rajendra P; Honma, Kiyonobu; Kay, Jason G; Sharma, Ashu

    2017-01-01

    The oral pathogen Tannerella forsythia is implicated in the development of periodontitis, a common inflammatory disease that leads to the destruction of the gum and tooth supporting tissues, often leading to tooth loss. T. forsythia is a unique Gram-negative organism endowed with an elaborate protein O-glycosylation system that allows the bacterium to express a glycosylated surface (S)-layer comprising two high molecular weight glycoproteins modified with O-linked oligosaccharides. The T. forsythia S-layer has been implicated in the modulation of cytokine responses of antigen presenting cells, such as macrophages, that play a significant role during inflammation associated with periodontitis. The macrophage-inducible C-type lectin receptor (Mincle) is an FcRγ-coupled pathogen recognition receptor that recognizes a wide variety of sugar containing ligands from fungal and bacterial pathogens. In this study, we aimed to determine if Mincle might be involved in the recognition of T. forsythia S-layer and modulation of cytokine response of macrophages against the bacterium. Binding studies using recombinant Mincle-Fc fusion protein indicated a specific Ca2+-dependent binding of Mincle to T. forsythia S-layer. Subsequent experiments with Mincle-expressing and Mincle-knockdown macrophages revealed a role for Mincle/S-layer interaction in the induction of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine secretion in macrophages stimulated with T. forsythia as well as its S-layer. Together, these studies revealed Mincle as an important macrophage receptor involved in the modulation of cytokine responses of macrophages against T. forsythia, and thus may play a critical role in orchestrating the host immune response against the bacterium.

  16. Botulinum neurotoxin type A induces TLR2-mediated inflammatory responses in macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Jeong Kim

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A is the most potent protein toxin and causes fatal flaccid muscle paralysis by blocking neurotransmission. Application of BoNT/A has been extended to the fields of therapeutics and biodefense. Nevertheless, the global response of host immune cells to authentic BoNT/A has not been reported. Employing microarray analysis, we performed global transcriptional profiling of RAW264.7 cells, a murine alveolar macrophage cell line. We identified 70 genes that were modulated following 1 nM BoNT/A treatment. The altered genes were mainly involved in signal transduction, immunity and defense, protein metabolism and modification, neuronal activities, intracellular protein trafficking, and muscle contraction. Microarray data were validated with real-time RT-PCR for seven selected genes including tlr2, tnf, inos, ccl4, slpi, stx11, and irg1. Proinflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα were induced in a dose-dependent manner in BoNT/A-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Increased expression of these factors was inhibited by monoclonal anti-Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 and inhibitors specific to intracellular proteins such as c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK. BoNT/A also suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced NO and TNFα production from RAW264.7 macrophages at the transcription level by blocking activation of JNK, ERK, and p38 MAPK. As confirmed by TLR2-/- knock out experiments, these results suggest that BoNT/A induces global gene expression changes in host immune cells and that host responses to BoNT/A proceed through a TLR2-dependent pathway, which is modulated by JNK, ERK, and p38 MAPK.

  17. A type I IFN-dependent DNA damage response regulates the genetic program and inflammasome activation in macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Abigail J; Carrero, Javier A; Hung, Putzer J; Tubbs, Anthony T; Andrews, Jared M; Edelson, Brian T; Calderon, Boris; Innes, Cynthia L; Paules, Richard S; Payton, Jacqueline E; Sleckman, Barry P

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages produce genotoxic agents, such as reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, that kill invading pathogens. Here we show that these agents activate the DNA damage response (DDR) kinases ATM and DNA-PKcs through the generation of double stranded breaks (DSBs) in murine macrophage genomic DNA. In contrast to other cell types, initiation of this DDR depends on signaling from the type I interferon receptor. Once activated, ATM and DNA-PKcs regulate a genetic program with diverse immune functions and promote inflammasome activation and the production of IL-1β and IL-18. Indeed, following infection with Listeria monocytogenes, DNA-PKcs-deficient murine macrophages produce reduced levels of IL-18 and are unable to optimally stimulate IFN-γ production by NK cells. Thus, genomic DNA DSBs act as signaling intermediates in murine macrophages, regulating innate immune responses through the initiation of a type I IFN-dependent DDR. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24655.001 PMID:28362262

  18. An ultrastructural and histochemical study of the flexor tibialis muscle fiber types in male and female stick insects (Eurycantha calcarata, L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilehvarian, Ali Asghar

    2015-10-01

    In this study the ultrastructural and histochemical characteristics of the flexor tibialis muscle fibers of the specialized metathoracic legs in the male and those of homologous and unspecialized ones in the female stick insects, Eurycantha calcarata, L, were examined. For the ultrastructural analysis, the muscle was divided longitudinally and vertically to produce a total of 12 sample parts e.g., anterior-dorsal-distal (ADD), posterior-ventral-medial (PVM) and so on. Light and electron microscopes were used to observe the muscle tissue. The methods for myosin adenosine triphosphatase (mATPase) and nicotine adenine dinucleotide- tetrazolium (NADH-TR) staining were modified from the methods of (Stokes et al., '79; Anttila et al., 2009; Anttila and Manttari, 2009). Sections with thickness of 22 μm, were cut from the anterior and the posterior surfaces of the muscle, using a cryostat. The histochemical and ultrastructural results showed that the muscles of both the male and the female were mixtures of physiological fiber types, with predominantly fast fibers. The muscles were composed of fibers with different staining properties for both mATPase and NADH-TR activities. The population of fibers within the muscles was heterogeneous. The differences between the population of the male and that of the female were significant. The means of most criteria e.g., mitochondrial amount and sarcoplasmic reticulum area predicted that the muscle of the male contained more fast fibers than the female. The histochemical examination also showed that the muscle of the male contained more fibers stained darkly for mATPase and lightly for NADH-TR.

  19. Viscoelastic and ultrastructural characteristics of whole blood and plasma in Alzheimer-type dementia, and the possible role of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bester, Janette; Soma, Prashilla; Kell, Douglas B.; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer-type dementia (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder and the most common form of dementia. Patients typically present with neuro- and systemic inflammation and iron dysregulation, associated with oxidative damage that reflects in hypercoagulability. Hypercoagulability is closely associated with increased fibrin(ogen) and in AD patients fibrin(ogen) has been implicated in the development of neuroinflammation and memory deficits. There is still no clear reason precisely why (a) this hypercoagulable state, (b) iron dysregulation and (c) increased fibrin(ogen) could together lead to the loss of neuronal structure and cognitive function. Here we suggest an alternative hypothesis based on previous ultrastructural evidence of the presence of a (dormant) blood microbiome in AD. Furthermore, we argue that bacterial cell wall components, such as the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram-negative strains, might be the cause of the continuing and low-grade inflammation, characteristic of AD. Here, we follow an integrated approach, by studying the viscoelastic and ultrastructural properties of AD plasma and whole blood by using scanning electron microscopy, Thromboelastography (TEG®) and the Global Thrombosis Test (GTT®). Ultrastructural analysis confirmed the presence and close proximity of microbes to erythrocytes. TEG® analysis showed a hypercoagulable state in AD. TEG® results where LPS was added to naive blood showed the same trends as were found with the AD patients, while the GTT® results (where only platelet activity is measured), were not affected by the added LPS, suggesting that LPS does not directly impact platelet function. Our findings reinforce the importance of further investigating the role of LPS in AD. PMID:26462180

  20. Characterization of HIV-1 Infection and Innate Sensing in Different Types of Primary Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth A. Diget

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages play an important role in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV pathogenesis and contribute to establishment of a viral reservoir responsible for continuous virus production and virus transmission to T cells. In this study, we investigated the differences between various monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs generated through different differentiation protocols and evaluated different cellular, immunological, and virological properties. We found that elevated and persistent HIV-1 pWT/BaL replication could be obtained only in MDMs grown in RPMI containing macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF. Interestingly, this MDM type was also most responsive to toll-like receptor stimulation. By contrast, all MDM types were activated to a comparable extent by intracellular DNA, and the macrophage serum-free medium-(Mac-SFM-differentiated MDMs responded strongly to membrane fusion through expression of CXCL10. Finally, we found that HIV infection of RPMI/M-CSF-differentiated MDMs induced low-grade expression of two interferon-stimulated genes in some donors. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the differentiation protocol used greatly influences the ability of MDMs to activate innate immune reactions and support HIV-1 replication. Paradoxically, the data show that the MDMs with the strongest innate immune response were also the most permissive for HIV-1 replication.

  1. Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei stimulate differential inflammatory responses from human alveolar type II cells (ATII and macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard eLu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar type II pneumocytes (ATII and alveolar macrophages (AM play a crucial role in the lung’s innate immune response. Burkholderia pseudomallei (BP and Burkholderia mallei (BM are facultative Gram-negative bacilli that cause melioidosis and glanders, respectively. The inhalation of these pathogens can cause lethal disease and death in humans. We sought to compare the pathogenesis of and host responses to BP and BM through contact with human primary ATII cells and monocytes-derived macrophages (MDM. We hypothesized that because BP and BM induce different disease outcomes, each pathogen would induce distinct, unique host immune responses from resident pulmonary cells. Our findings showed that BP adhered readily to ATII cells compared to BM. BP, but not BM, was rapidly internalized by macrophages where it replicated to high numbers. Further, BP induced significantly higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion from ATII cells (IL-6, IL-8 and macrophages (IL-6, TNFα at 6h post-infection compared to BM (p<0.05. Interestingly, BM induced the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, in ATII cells and macrophages at 6h post-infection, with delayed induction of inflammatory cytokines at 24h post-infection. Because BP is flagellated and produces LPS, we confirmed that it stimulated both Toll-like receptor (TLR 4 and TLR5 via NF-κb activation while the non-flagellated BM stimulated only TLR4. These data show the differences in BP and BM pathogenicity in the lung when infecting human ATII cells and macrophages and demonstrate the ability of these pathogens to elicit distinct immune responses from resident lung cells which may open new targets for therapeutic intervention to fight against these pathogens.

  2. Start of insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus promotes the influx of macrophages into subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, H J; Stienstra, R; van Diepen, J A; Hijmans, A; van der Laak, J A; Vervoort, G M M; Tack, C J

    2013-12-01

    Insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus is accompanied by weight gain characterised by an increase in abdominal fat mass. The expansion of adipose tissue mass is generally paralleled by profound morphological and inflammatory changes. We hypothesised that the insulin-associated increase in fat mass would also result in changes in the morphology of human subcutaneous adipose tissue and in increased inflammation, especially when weight gain was excessive. We investigated the effects of weight gain on adipocyte size, macrophage influx, and mRNA expression and protein levels of key inflammatory markers within the adipose tissue in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus before and 6 months after starting insulin therapy. As expected, insulin therapy significantly increased body weight. At the level of the subcutaneous adipose tissue, insulin treatment led to an influx of macrophages. When comparing patients gaining no or little weight with patients gaining >4% body weight after 6 months of insulin therapy, both subgroups displayed an increase in macrophage influx. However, individuals who had gained weight had higher protein levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, TNF-α and IL-1β after 6 months of insulin therapy compared with those who had not gained weight. We conclude that insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus improved glycaemic control but also induced body weight gain and an influx of macrophages into the subcutaneous adipose tissue. In patients characterised by a pronounced insulin-associated weight gain, the influx of macrophages into the adipose tissue was accompanied by a more pronounced inflammatory status. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00781495. The study was funded by European Foundation for the Study of Diabetes and the Dutch Diabetes Research Foundation.

  3. The Macrophage Galactose-Type C-Type Lectin (MGL Modulates Regulatory T Cell Functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Grazia Zizzari

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs are physiologically designed to prevent autoimmune disease and maintain self-tolerance. In tumour microenvironments, their presence is related to a poor prognosis, and they influence the therapeutic outcome due to their capacity to suppress the immune response by cell-cell contact and to release immunosuppressive cytokines. In this study, we demonstrate that Treg immunosuppressive activity can be modulated by the cross-linking between the CD45RA expressed by Tregs and the C-type lectin MGL. This specific interaction strongly decreases the immunosuppressive activity of Tregs, restoring the proliferative capacity of co-cultured T lymphocytes. This effect can be attributed to changes in CD45RA and TCR signalling through the inhibition of Lck and inactivation of Zap-70, an increase in the Foxp3 methylation status and, ultimately, the reduced production of suppressive cytokines. These results indicate a role of MGL as an immunomodulator within the tumour microenvironment interfering with Treg functions, suggesting its possible use in the design of anticancer vaccines.

  4. TNF-alpha, produced by feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV)-infected macrophages, upregulates expression of type II FIPV receptor feline aminopeptidase N in feline macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Tomomi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu; Toda, Ayako; Tanabe, Maki; Koyama, Hiroyuki

    2007-07-20

    The pathogenicity of feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) is known to depend on macrophage tropism, and this macrophage infection is enhanced by mediation via anti-S antibody (antibody-dependent enhancement, ADE). In this study, we found that TNF-alpha production was increased with viral replication in macrophages inoculated with a mixture of FIPV and anti-S antibody, and demonstrated that this culture supernatant had feline PBMC apoptosis-inducing activity. We also demonstrated that the expression level of the FIPV virus receptor, feline aminopeptidase N (fAPN), was increased in macrophages of FIP cats. For upregulation of TNF-alpha and fAPN in macrophages, viral replication in macrophages is necessary, and their expressions were increased by ADE of FIPV infection. It was demonstrated that a heat-resistant fAPN-inducing factor was present in the culture supernatant of FIPV-infected macrophages, and this factor was TNF-alpha: fAPN expression was upregulated in recombinant feline TNF-alpha-treated macrophages, and FIPV infectivity was increased in these macrophages. These findings suggested that FIPV replication in macrophages increases TNF-alpha production in macrophages, and the produced TNF-alpha acts and upregulates fAPN expression, increasing FIPV sensitivity.

  5. Macrophage Inducible C-Type Lectin As a Multifunctional Player in Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel C. Patin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The macrophage-inducible C-type lectin (Mincle is an innate immune receptor on myeloid cells sensing diverse entities including pathogens and damaged cells. Mincle was first described as a receptor for the mycobacterial cell wall glycolipid, trehalose-6,6′-dimycolate, or cord factor, and the mammalian necrotic cell-derived alarmin histone deacetylase complex unit Sin3-associated protein 130. Upon engagement by its ligands, Mincle induces secretion of innate cytokines and other immune mediators modulating inflammation and immunity. Since its discovery more than 25 years ago, the understanding of Mincle’s immune function has made significant advances in recent years. In addition to mediating immune responses to infectious agents, Mincle has been linked to promote tumor progression, autoimmunity, and sterile inflammation; however, further studies are required to completely unravel the complex role of Mincle in these distinct host responses. In this review, we discuss recent findings on Mincle’s biology with an emphasis on its diverse functions in immunity.

  6. The role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in obesity-associated type 2 diabetes in mice

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    Saksida Tamara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is implicated in the pathogenesis of several inflammationrelated diseases, including obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D. However, MIF deficiency itself promotes obesity and glucose intolerance in mice. Here we show that the introduction of a high-fat diet (HFD further aggravates the parameters of obesity-associated T2D: weight gain and glucose intolerance. Furthermore, in contrast to MIF-KO mice on standard chow, HFD-fed MIF-KO mice develop insulin resistance. Although the clinical signs of obesity-associated T2D are upgraded, inflammation in MIF-deficient mice on HFD is significantly lower. These results imply that MIF possesses a complex role in glucose metabolism and the development of obesity-related T2D. However, the downregulation of inflammation upon MIF inhibition could be a useful tool in short-term T2D therapy for preventing pancreatic islet deterioration. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173013

  7. Tendon’s ultrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresoldi, Ilaria; Oliva, Francesco; Benvenuto, Monica; Fantini, Massimo; Masuelli, Laura; Bei, Roberto; Modesti, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Summary The structure of a tendon is an important example of complexity of ECM three-dimensional organization. The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a macromolecular network with both structural and regulatory functions. ECM components belong to four major types of macromolecules: the collagens, elastin, proteoglycans, and noncollagenous glycoproteins. Tendons are made by a fibrous, compact connective tissue that connect muscle to bone designed to transmit forces and withstand tension during muscle contraction. Here we show the ultrastructural features of tendon’s components. PMID:23885339

  8. Egr-1 Mediates SiO2-driven Transcription of Membrane Type Ⅰ Matrix Metalloproteinase in Macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG Fei; BAI Ming; JIN Yang; MA Wanli; XIN Jianbao

    2007-01-01

    The up-regulation mechanism of membrane type Ⅰ matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) in macrophages stimulated by silica in vitro and the contribution of early growth response 1 (Egr-1) transcription factor in the gene expression pathway were investigated. Macrophages stimulated by silica were treated with Egr-1 antibody or Egr-1 decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN). The levels of MT1-MMP proteins were determined by Western blot and the expression of MT1-MMP mRNAs was detected by RT-PCR. The results showed as compared with control macrophages, silica-stimulated group showed up-regulated gene expression of MT1-MMP via Egr-1 (P<0.01). Compared with silica-stimulated macrophages untreated with antibody, the cells treated with 5 μg/mL Egr-1 antibody were associated with reduced expression of MTI-MMP protein (P<0.01) and mRNA (P<0.01). Compared with silica-stimulated untransfected group, the Egr-1 "decoy" ODN group was associated with reduction in the expression of MT1-MMP protein and mRNA (P<0.01). It was concluded gene expression of MT1-MMP which may play a critical role in silicosis was up-regulated by silica in macrophages. Egr-1 participated in the expression of MT1-MMP and positively regulated the expression. Both Egr-1 antibody and Egr-1 decoy ODN suppressed the expression of MT1-MMP through the Egr-1 pathway and may become a potential therapeutic tool in the management of silicosis in the future.

  9. Correlation between the decrease of cholesterol efflux from macrophages in patients with type II diabetes mellitus and down-regulated CYP7A1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, L D; Li, C Q; Peng, R; Ren, X H; Ma, R L; Wang, Y; Lv, H J

    2015-07-31

    The purpose of this study was to examine the changes of cellular cholesterol efflux from macrophages in patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM), and to determine the expression of CYP7A1, ABCG5, and LXRβ therein. We recruited 30 patients with type II DM (including 15 patients complicated with coronary heart disease and 15 patients with DM only) and 15 normal controls for this study. Peripheral blood monocytes were isolated for macrophage culture. The mRNA and protein expression levels of CYP7A1, ABCG5, and LXRβ were determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot. The macrophage cholesterol efflux rate was determined with 10% autoserum and standard serum as receptors. We determined that the expression levels of macrophage CYP7A1 mRNA and protein in the type II DM group were significantly lower than those in the control group, but no differences were found in the ABCG5 and LXRβ expression levels between the groups. The macrophage cholesterol efflux rate in the patients with type II DM was also significantly decreased compared with that of the normal control subjects (P CYP7A1 mRNA expression and macrophage cholesterol efflux rate were significantly positively correlated. In summary, this study demonstrated that the macrophage cholesterol efflux in patients with type II DM was significantly reduced, and that this reduction was associated with the down-regulation of CYP7A1 expression.

  10. M1- and M2-type macrophage responses are predictive of adverse outcomes in human atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica De Gaetano

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease caused by endothelial injury, lipid deposition and oxidative stress. This progressive disease can be converted into an acute clinical event by plaque rupture and thrombosis. In the context of atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of myocardial infarction and stroke, macrophages uniquely possess a dual functionality, regulating lipid accumulation and metabolism and sustaining the chronic inflammatory response, two of the most well documented pathways associated with the pathogenesis of the disease. Macrophages are heterogeneous cell populations and it is hypothesized that, during the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, macrophages in the developing plaque can switch from a pro-inflammatory (MΦ1 to an anti-inflammatory (MΦ2 phenotype and vice versa, depending on the microenvironment. The aim of this study was to identify changes in macrophage subpopulations in the progression of human atherosclerotic disease. Established atherosclerotic plaques from symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with existing coronary artery disease undergoing carotid endarterectomy were recruited to the study. Comprehensive histological and immunohistochemical analyses were performed to quantify the cellular content and macrophage subsets of atherosclerotic lesion. In parallel, expression of MΦ1 and MΦ2 macrophage markers were analysed by real time-PCR and Western blot analysis.Gross analysis and histological staining demonstrated that symptomatic plaques presented greater haemorrhagic activity and the internal carotid was the most diseased segment, based on the predominant prevalence of fibrotic and necrotic tissue, calcifications and haemorrhagic events. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that both MΦ1 and MΦ2 macrophages are present in human plaques. However, MΦ2 macrophages are localised to more stable locations within the lesion. Importantly, gene and protein expression analysis of MΦ1/ MΦ2 markers evidenced that MΦ1

  11. The Macrophage Galactose-Type Lectin-1 (MGL1 Recognizes Taenia crassiceps Antigens, Triggers Intracellular Signaling, and Is Critical for Resistance to This Infection

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    Daniel Montero-Barrera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available C-type lectins are multifunctional sugar-binding molecules expressed on dendritic cells (DCs and macrophages that internalize antigens for processing and presentation. Macrophage galactose-type lectin 1 (MGL1 recognizes glycoconjugates expressing Lewis X structures which contain galactose residues, and it is selectively expressed on immature DCs and macrophages. Helminth parasites contain large amounts of glycosylated components, which play a role in the immune regulation induced by such infections. Macrophages from MGL1−/− mice showed less binding ability toward parasite antigens than their wild-type (WT counterparts. Exposure of WT macrophages to T. crassiceps antigens triggered tyrosine phosphorylation signaling activity, which was diminished in MGL1−/− macrophages. Following T. crassiceps infection, MGL1−/− mice failed to produce significant levels of inflammatory cytokines early in the infection compared to WT mice. In contrast, MGL1−/− mice developed a Th2-dominant immune response that was associated with significantly higher parasite loads, whereas WT mice were resistant. Flow cytometry and RT-PCR analyses showed overexpression of the mannose receptors, IL-4Rα, PDL2, arginase-1, Ym1, and RELM-α on MGL1−/− macrophages. These studies indicate that MGL1 is involved in T. crassiceps recognition and subsequent innate immune activation and resistance.

  12. The macrophage galactose-type lectin-1 (MGL1) recognizes Taenia crassiceps antigens, triggers intracellular signaling, and is critical for resistance to this infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Barrera, Daniel; Valderrama-Carvajal, Héctor; Terrazas, César A; Rojas-Hernández, Saúl; Ledesma-Soto, Yadira; Vera-Arias, Laura; Carrasco-Yépez, Maricela; Gómez-García, Lorena; Martínez-Saucedo, Diana; Becerra-Díaz, Mireya; Terrazas, Luis I

    2015-01-01

    C-type lectins are multifunctional sugar-binding molecules expressed on dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages that internalize antigens for processing and presentation. Macrophage galactose-type lectin 1 (MGL1) recognizes glycoconjugates expressing Lewis X structures which contain galactose residues, and it is selectively expressed on immature DCs and macrophages. Helminth parasites contain large amounts of glycosylated components, which play a role in the immune regulation induced by such infections. Macrophages from MGL1(-/-) mice showed less binding ability toward parasite antigens than their wild-type (WT) counterparts. Exposure of WT macrophages to T. crassiceps antigens triggered tyrosine phosphorylation signaling activity, which was diminished in MGL1(-/-) macrophages. Following T. crassiceps infection, MGL1(-/-) mice failed to produce significant levels of inflammatory cytokines early in the infection compared to WT mice. In contrast, MGL1(-/-) mice developed a Th2-dominant immune response that was associated with significantly higher parasite loads, whereas WT mice were resistant. Flow cytometry and RT-PCR analyses showed overexpression of the mannose receptors, IL-4Rα, PDL2, arginase-1, Ym1, and RELM-α on MGL1(-/-) macrophages. These studies indicate that MGL1 is involved in T. crassiceps recognition and subsequent innate immune activation and resistance.

  13. Histochemical and ultrastructural studies of the mosquito Aedes aegypti fat body: effects of aging and diet type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Gustavo Ferreira; Serrão, José Eduardo; Ramalho-Ortigão, José Marcelo; Pimenta, Paulo Filemon Paolucci

    2011-11-01

    Aedes aegypti is the principal vector of dengue world wide and a major vector of urban yellow fever. Despite its epidemiological importance, not much is known regarding cellular and structural changes in the fat body in this mosquito. Here, we applied light and transmission electron microscopies to investigate structural changes in the fat body of three groups of A. aegypti females: newly emerged, 18-day-old sugar-fed, and 18-day-old blood-fed. The fat body consists of a layer of cells attached to the abdomen integument, formed by trophocytes and oenocytes. Trophocytes are strongly positive for carbohydrates, while oenocytes are strongly positive for proteins and lipids. Ultrastructural analyses of trophocytes from newly emerged and 18-day-old blood-fed indicate that these cells are rich in glycogen and free ribosomes. Many lipid droplets and protein granules, which are broken down after the blood meal, are also detected. In 18-day-old sugar-fed, trophocytes display a disorganized cytoplasm filled with lipid droplets, and reduced numbers of free ribosomes, glycogen, rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) and mitochondria. Following a blood meal, the RER and mitochondria display enlarged sizes, suggestive of increased activity. With regard to oenocytes, these cells display an electron-dense cytoplasm and plasma membrane infoldings facing the hemolymph. As the A. aegypti female ages, trophocyte and oenocyte cell nuclei become larger but decrease in diameter after blood feeding. Our findings suggest that the trophocytes and oenocytes remodeling is likely involved in functional changes of fat body that take place during aging and following a blood meal in A. aegypti females. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. SPI-1-encoded type III secretion system of Salmonella enterica is required for the suppression of porcine alveolar macrophage cytokine expression

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    Pavlova Barbora

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genes localized at Salmonella pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1 are involved in Salmonella enterica invasion of host non-professional phagocytes. Interestingly, in macrophages, SPI-1-encoded proteins, in addition to invasion, induce cell death via activation of caspase-1 which also cleaves proIL-1β and proIL-18, precursors of 2 proinflammatory cytokines. In this study we were therefore interested in whether SPI-1-encoded type III secretion system (T3SS may influence proinflammatory response of macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we infected primary porcine alveolar macrophages with wild-type S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis and their isogenic SPI-1 deletion mutants. ΔSPI1 mutants of both serovars invaded approx. 5 times less efficiently than the wild-type strains and despite this, macrophages responded to the infection with ΔSPI1 mutants by increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-8, TNFα, IL-23α and GM-CSF. Identical macrophage responses to that induced by the ΔSPI1 mutants were also observed to the infection with sipB but not the sipA mutant. The hilA mutant exhibited an intermediate phenotype between the ΔSPI1 mutant and the wild-type S. Enteritidis. Our results showed that the SPI-1-encoded T3SS is required not only for cell invasion but in macrophages also for the suppression of early proinflammatory cytokine expression.

  15. [The ultrastructural study of bonding interface between two adhesive systems and three types of dental hard tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Chun-zi; Jiang, Yong; Li, Shi-yang; Lin, Yuan; Fan, Xiao-min; Yu, Qing

    2011-06-01

    To compare of the morphological ultrastructure of the 7th generation self-etching adhesive Adper Easy One and two-step total etch adhesive Adper Singlebond 2 after being bonded with the composite resin. Buccal and lingual box-like holes were made in 20 isolated human molars (5mm in diameter, 3mm in depth), and cuted to pieces from surface of middle part of root (5mm in length, 3mm in width). They were equally divided into 2 groups with 10 root slices and 10 crowns each. The cavities of crown and root pieces were respectively bonded with adhesives of Adper Singlebond 2 and Adper Easy One, and were vertically cuted open from the midline after filling with composite resin to get 20 specimens in each group. Ten specimens of root and crown were randomly selected from each group for 5000 times of thermocycling, and the remaining specimens were soaked in distilled water at room temperature for 1 month. Then all the specimens were polished with sand paper, fixed dehydrated, vacuum dried and sprayed, and the bonding interfaces of the filling edge of profile were scanned by scanning electron microscope(SEM). SEM photos showed that in the group of total etching Adper Singlebond 2 bonding placed at room temperature, the enamel, cementum and the resin bonded closely with the adhesive after thermocycling. In the group of self etching Adper Easy One bonding placed at room temperature, the adhesive bonded to the enamel, small cracks were occasionally seen, and resin penetration blend within the resin in dentinal tubules, and enamel bonded well to the cementum. The specimens after thermocycling bonded enamel loosely with distinct cracks,while the dentinal tubules and resin penetration integrated and cementum bonded well to the dentin. Ultra-micro structure observation by SEM shows that Adper Singlebond 2 total etch adhesive has better bonding to enamel than the self-etching adhesive Adper Easy One, but the bonding to dentin and cementum has no significant difference.

  16. The Loss of Macrophages from Peritoneal Exudates following the Injection of Antigens into Guinea-Pigs with Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, D. S.; Boyden, S. V.

    1963-01-01

    Exudates were induced in the peritoneal cavities of guinea-pigs by the injection of glycogen. The cell content of these exudates was examined after 4 days in normal and hypersensitive animals. In animals uninjected with antigens, the exudates contained a high proportion of macrophages, together with lymphocytes and polymorphs. In BCG-vaccinated animals, with delayed-type hypersensitivity to tuberculin, subcutaneous, intravenous or intraperitoneal injection of tuberculin resulted in a profound fall in the macrophage content of the exudates. This effect was apparent within an hour of intraperitoneal injection and occurred with very small doses of tuberculin. No such effect occurred after the intraperitoneal injection of tuberculin into guinea-pigs with Arthus hypersensitivity to tuberculin. Ovalbumin injected intraperitoneally into guinea-pigs with mixed delayed-type and Arthus hypersensitivity to ovalbumin also resulted in a marked fall in the macrophage content of peritoneal exudates, but had no effect on the peritoneal macrophages of animals with pure Arthus hypersensitivity. Bacterial endotoxin injected intraperitoneally caused a similar fall in the macrophage content of exudates of both normal and BCG-vaccinated animals. It is concluded that this loss of macrophages from peritoneal exudates after the injection of antigen is the consequence of an immunological reaction which is a manifestation of a state of delayed-type hypersensitivity. PMID:13938030

  17. The Histone Methyltransferase MLL1 Directs Macrophage-Mediated Inflammation in Wound Healing and Is Altered in a Murine Model of Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Andrew S; Joshi, Amrita; Carson, William F; Boniakowski, Anna E; Schaller, Matthew; Allen, Ronald; Bermick, Jennifer; Davis, Frank M; Henke, Peter K; Burant, Charles F; Kunkel, Steve L; Gallagher, Katherine A

    2017-09-01

    Macrophages are critical for the initiation and resolution of the inflammatory phase of wound repair. In diabetes, macrophages display a prolonged inflammatory phenotype in late wound healing. Mixed-lineage leukemia-1 (MLL1) has been shown to direct gene expression by regulating nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-mediated inflammatory gene transcription. Thus, we hypothesized that MLL1 influences macrophage-mediated inflammation in wound repair. We used a myeloid-specific Mll1 knockout (Mll1(f/f)Lyz2(Cre+) ) to determine the function of MLL1 in wound healing. Mll1(f/f)Lyz2(Cre+) mice display delayed wound healing and decreased wound macrophage inflammatory cytokine production compared with control animals. Furthermore, wound macrophages from Mll1(f/f)Lyz2(Cre+) mice demonstrated decreased histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) (activation mark) at NF-κB binding sites on inflammatory gene promoters. Of note, early wound macrophages from prediabetic mice displayed similarly decreased MLL1, H3K4me3 at inflammatory gene promoters, and inflammatory cytokines compared with controls. Late wound macrophages from prediabetic mice demonstrated an increase in MLL1, H3K4me3 at inflammatory gene promoters, and inflammatory cytokines. Prediabetic macrophages treated with an MLL1 inhibitor demonstrated reduced inflammation. Finally, monocytes from patients with type 2 diabetes had increased Mll1 compared with control subjects without diabetes. These results define an important role for MLL1 in regulating macrophage-mediated inflammation in wound repair and identify a potential target for the treatment of chronic inflammation in diabetic wounds. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  18. Involvement of viral envelope GP2 in Ebola virus entry into cells expressing the macrophage galactose-type C-type lectin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usami, Katsuaki [Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Molecular Immunology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Matsuno, Keita; Igarashi, Manabu [Department of Global Epidemiology, Hokkaido University Research Center for Zoonosis Control, Sapporo 001-0020 (Japan); Denda-Nagai, Kaori [Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Molecular Immunology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Takada, Ayato [Department of Global Epidemiology, Hokkaido University Research Center for Zoonosis Control, Sapporo 001-0020 (Japan); Irimura, Tatsuro, E-mail: irimura@mol.f.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Molecular Immunology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2011-04-01

    Highlights: {yields} Ebola virus infection is mediated by binding to and fusion with the target cells. {yields} Structural feature of the viral glycoprotein determines the infectivity. {yields} Surface C-type lectin, MGL, of macrophages and dendritic cells mediate the infection. {yields} GP2, one of glycoprotein subunits, plays an essential role in MGL-mediated infection. {yields} There is a critical amino acid residue involved in high infectivity. -- Abstract: Ebola virus (EBOV) infection is initiated by the interaction of the viral surface envelope glycoprotein (GP) with the binding sites on target cells. Differences in the mortality among different species of the Ebola viruses, i.e., Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV) and Reston ebolavirus (REBOV), correspond to the in vitro infectivity of the pseudo-typed virus constructed with the GPs in cells expressing macrophage galactose-type calcium-type lectin (MGL/CD301). Through mutagenesis of GP2, the transmembrane-anchored subunit of GP, we found that residues 502-527 of the GP2 sequence determined the different infectivity between VSV-ZEBOV GP and -REBOV GP in MGL/CD301-expressing cells and a histidine residue at position 516 of ZEBOV GP2 appeared essential in the differential infectivity. These findings may provide a clue to clarify a molecular basis of different pathogenicity among EBOV species.

  19. Altered Polarization, Morphology, and Impaired Innate Immunity Germane to Resident Peritoneal Macrophages in Mice with Long-Term Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Fang Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D is associated with perturbed innate immunity. Macrophages, bridging innate immunity and metabolic disturbances, play important roles in controlling immune homeostasis. However, the effect of long-term diabetic milieu (DM on the functions and phenotypes of macrophages is still not clear. In this study, we used resident peritoneal macrophages (RPMs from 5-month-old db/db mice to investigate the changes of macrophages. It was found that RPMs in db/db mice significantly reduced phagocytosis and adhesion capacity. After standardization with body weight, the number of F4/80+ RPMs markedly reduced in db/db mice, and, furthermore, the macrophages skewed to M2-polarizated macrophages. The results of morphology found that the RPMs shape of db/db mice was nearly round, but the RPMs shape of control mice was spindle-shaped and irregular. In this study, we found the cell numbers, morphology, and innate immunity functions of RPMs in 5-month-old type 2 diabetic mice (db/db mice obtained by abdominal cavity lavage were significantly altered. Importantly, we also found the remarkably increased M2-RPMs in diabetic mice for the first time.

  20. VgrG2 of type VI secretion system 2 of Vibrio parahaemolyticus induces autophagy in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying eYu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Type VI secretion system (T6SS is a macromolecular transenvelope machine encoded within the genomes of several proteobacteria species. Vibrio parahaemolyticus contains two putative T6SS systems, VpT6SS1 and VpT6SS2, both contributing to adherence to Caco-2 and/or HeLa cells. However, it remains unknown if these systems are involved in cellular responses. In order to exclude the effects of other virulence factors known to induce cytotoxicity or autophagy, a triple deletion mutant dTTT (with deletion of tdh, and T3SS1 and T3SS2 structural protein genes was used as the parent strain to construct deletion mutants of T6SS genes. The mutant dTTT-icmF2, but not dTTT-icmF1, reduced autophagic response upon 4 h of infection of the macrophage. Further attempt was made to search for the possible effector proteins that might be responsible for direct induction of autophagy by deletion of the genes encoding Hcp2 and VgrG2, two putative translocons of T6SS2 of V. parahaemolyticus. Deletion of either hcp2 or vgrG2 did reduce the autophagic response. However, increased LC3-II lipidation was seen only in the macrophage cells transfected with pVgrG2, but not with pHcp2. Chloroquinine treatment increased accumulation of LC3-II, suggesting that VgrG2 enhanced autophagic flux. The fact that vgrG2 deletion led to reduced level of intracellular cAMP suggests a possible role of cAMP signaling in autophagic responses to the bacterium. We conclude that VgrG2 of V. parahaemolyticus induces autophagy in macrophages.

  1. CCR2 deficiency leads to increased eosinophils, alternative macrophage activation, and type 2 cytokine expression in adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolus, W Reid; Gutierrez, Dario A; Kennedy, Arion J; Anderson-Baucum, Emily K; Hasty, Alyssa H

    2015-10-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) inflammation during obesity is mediated by immune cells and closely correlates with systemic insulin resistance. In lean AT, eosinophils are present in low but significant numbers and capable of promoting alternative macrophage activation in an IL-4/IL-13-dependent manner. In WT mice, obesity causes the proportion of AT eosinophils to decline, concomitant with inflammation and classical activation of AT macrophages. In this study, we show that CCR2 deficiency leads to increased eosinophil accumulation in AT. Furthermore, in contrast to WT mice, the increase in eosinophils in CCR2(-/-) AT is sustained and even amplified during obesity. Interestingly, a significant portion of eosinophils is found in CLSs in AT of obese CCR2(-/-) mice, which is the first time eosinophils have been shown to localize to these inflammatory hot spots. CCR2(-/-) bone marrow precursors displayed increased expression of various key eosinophil genes during in vitro differentiation to eosinophils, suggesting a potentially altered eosinophil phenotype in the absence of CCR2. In addition, the proportion of eosinophils in AT positively correlated with local expression of Il5, a potent eosinophil stimulator. The increase in eosinophils in CCR2(-/-) mice was detected in all white fat pads analyzed and in the peritoneal cavity but not in bone marrow, blood, spleen, or liver. In AT of CCR2(-/-) mice, an increased eosinophil number positively correlated with M2-like macrophages, expression of the Treg marker Foxp3, and type 2 cytokines, Il4, Il5, and Il13. This is the first study to link CCR2 function with regulation of AT eosinophil accumulation.

  2. Ultrastructural characteristics of novel epithelial cell types identified in human pathologic liver specimens with chronic ductular reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, R; Desmet, V

    1992-06-01

    Previous immunohistochemical studies on human liver biopsies with chronic ductular reaction revealed the presence of "small cells" with bile-duct type cytokeratin profile in the periportal area. This study identified similar cells by electron microscopy. The authors studied 13 human liver specimens with various liver diseases, but all characterized by chronic ductular reaction. In all specimens, variable numbers of "small cells" with common epithelial characteristics were identified in the periportal area. They could be classified into three types. Type I cells showed an oval cell shape and oval nucleus, early or established formation of junctional complexes with adjacent cells, a full assortment of cytoplasmic organelles, and bundles of tonofilaments. Type II cells showed features of bile-duct cell differentiation, including lateral interdigitations, apical microvilli, basal pinocytotic vacuoles, and basement membrane formation. In contrast, type III cells displayed additional features indicating hepatocellular differentiation, such as a more prominent nucleus, formation of a hemicanaliculus, and glycogen rosettes. It is concluded that these small cells of epithelial nature display variable differentiation characteristics of either bile-duct type cells or hepatocytes. These findings support the existence of bipotential progenitor epithelial cells in human liver. They may have implications for liver regeneration and carcinogenesis.

  3. Role of ACAT1-positive late endosomes in macrophages: cholesterol metabolism and therapeutic applications for Niemann-Pick disease type C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakashita, Naomi; Lei, XiaoFeng; Kamikawa, Masashi; Nishitsuji, Kazuchika

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages in hyperlipidemic conditions accumulate cholesterol esters and develop into foamy transformed macrophages. During this transformation, macrophages demonstrate endoplasmic reticulum fragmentation and consequently produce acyl coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase 1 (ACAT1)-positive late endosomes (ACAT1-LE). ACAT1-LE-positive macrophages effectively esterify modified or native low-density lipoprotein-derived free cholesterol, which results in efficient cholesterol esterification as well as atherosclerotic plaque formation. These macrophages show significant cholesterol ester formation even when free cholesterol egress from late endosomes is impaired, which indicates that free cholesterol is esterified at ACAT1-LE. Genetic blockade of cholesterol egress from late endosomes causes Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC), an inherited lysosomal storage disease with progressive neurodegeneration. Induction of ACAT1-LE in macrophages with the NPC phenotype led to significant recovery of cholesterol esterification. In addition, in vivo ACAT1-LE induction significantly extended the lifespan of mice with the NPC phenotype. Thus, ACAT1-LE not only regulates intracellular cholesterol metabolism but also ameliorates NPC pathophysiology.

  4. Ultra-estrutura dos mastócitos de diferentes tipos histológicos de mastocitoma em cães Mast cell ultrastructure in different types of canine mast cell tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.A.R. Sueiro

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve por objetivo estudar as diferenças ultraestruturais de mastócitos neoplásicos de diferentes tipos histológicos de mastocitoma em cães, usando microscopia eletrônica de transmissão Os resultados mostraram que o núcleo e os grânulos citoplasmáticos são as estruturas mais indicadas para se avaliar o grau de anaplasia celular e o estádio de indiferenciação do tumor.The objective of this work was study the ultrastructural differences among the different histologic types of mast cell tumors in dogs collected in vivo. The ultrastructural analyses showed that the nuclei and cytoplasmic granules characteristics are the best structures to be appointed on evaluating the undifferentiation stage of this tumor.

  5. Ultrastructural characteristics of novel epithelial cell types identified in human pathologic liver specimens with chronic ductular reaction.

    OpenAIRE

    De Vos, R; Desmet, V

    1992-01-01

    Previous immunohistochemical studies on human liver biopsies with chronic ductular reaction revealed the presence of "small cells" with bile-duct type cytokeratin profile in the periportal area. This study identified similar cells by electron microscopy. The authors studied 13 human liver specimens with various liver diseases, but all characterized by chronic ductular reaction. In all specimens, variable numbers of "small cells" with common epithelial characteristics were identified in the pe...

  6. Chronic endocannabinoid system stimulation induces muscle macrophage and lipid accumulation in type 2 diabetic mice independently of metabolic endotoxaemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Geurts

    Full Text Available AIMS: Obesity and type 2 diabetes are characterised by low-grade inflammation, metabolic endotoxaemia (i.e., increased plasma lipopolysaccharides [LPS] levels and altered endocannabinoid (eCB-system tone. The aim of this study was to decipher the specific role of eCB-system stimulation or metabolic endotoxaemia in the onset of glucose intolerance, metabolic inflammation and altered lipid metabolism. METHODS: Mice were treated with either a cannabinoid (CB receptor agonist (HU210 or low-dose LPS using subcutaneous mini-pumps for 6 weeks. After 3 weeks of the treatment under control (CT diet, one-half of each group of mice were challenged with a high fat (HF diet for the following 3-week period. RESULTS: Under basal conditions (control diet, chronic CB receptor agonist treatment (i.e., 6 weeks induced glucose intolerance, stimulated metabolic endotoxaemia, and increased macrophage infiltration (CD11c and F4/80 expression in the muscles; this phenomenon was associated with an altered lipid metabolism (increased PGC-1α expression and decreased CPT-1b expression in this tissue. Chronic LPS treatment tended to increase the body weight and fat mass, with minor effects on the other metabolic parameters. Challenging mice with an HF diet following pre-treatment with the CB agonist exacerbated the HF diet-induced glucose intolerance, the muscle macrophage infiltration and the muscle's lipid content without affecting the body weight or the fat mass. CONCLUSION: Chronic CB receptor stimulation under basal conditions induces glucose intolerance, stimulates metabolic inflammation and alters lipid metabolism in the muscles. These effects worsen following the concomitant ingestion of an HF diet. Here, we highlight the central roles played by the eCB system and LPS in the pathophysiology of several hallmarks of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  7. Sustained inflammasome activity in macrophages impairs wound healing in type 2 diabetic humans and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Rita E; Fang, Milie M; Weinheimer-Haus, Eileen M; Ennis, William J; Koh, Timothy J

    2014-03-01

    The hypothesis of this study was that sustained activity of the Nod-like receptor protein (NLRP)-3 inflammasome in wounds of diabetic humans and mice contributes to the persistent inflammatory response and impaired healing characteristic of these wounds. Macrophages (Mp) isolated from wounds on diabetic humans and db/db mice exhibited sustained inflammasome activity associated with low level of expression of endogenous inflammasome inhibitors. Soluble factors in the biochemical milieu of these wounds are sufficient to activate the inflammasome, as wound-conditioned medium activates caspase-1 and induces release of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18 in cultured Mp via a reactive oxygen species-mediated pathway. Importantly, inhibiting inflammasome activity in wounds of db/db mice using topical application of pharmacological inhibitors improved healing of these wounds, induced a switch from proinflammatory to healing-associated Mp phenotypes, and increased levels of prohealing growth factors. Furthermore, data generated from bone marrow-transfer experiments from NLRP-3 or caspase-1 knockout to db/db mice indicated that blocking inflammasome activity in bone marrow cells is sufficient to improve healing. Our findings indicate that sustained inflammasome activity in wound Mp contributes to impaired early healing responses of diabetic wounds and that the inflammasome may represent a new therapeutic target for improving healing in diabetic individuals.

  8. Ultrastructural evidence for pre- and postsynaptic localization of Cav1.2 L-type Ca2+ channels in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippens, Alyssa L; Pare, Jean-Francois; Langwieser, Nicole; Moosmang, Sven; Milner, Teresa A; Smith, Yoland; Lee, Amy

    2008-02-01

    In the hippocampal formation, Ca(v)1.2 (L-type) voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels mediate Ca(2+) signals that can trigger long-term alterations in synaptic efficacy underlying learning and memory. Immunocytochemical studies indicate that Ca(v)1.2 channels are localized mainly in the soma and proximal dendrites of hippocampal pyramidal neurons, but electrophysiological data suggest a broader distribution of these channels. To define the subcellular substrates underlying Ca(v)1.2 Ca(2+) signals, we analyzed the localization of Ca(v)1.2 in the hippocampal formation by using antibodies against the pore-forming alpha(1)-subunit of Ca(v)1.2 (alpha(1)1.2). By light microscopy, alpha(1)1.2-like immunoreactivity (alpha(1)1.2-IR) was detected in pyramidal cell soma and dendritic fields of areas CA1-CA3 and in granule cell soma and fibers in the dentate gyrus. At the electron microscopic level, alpha(1)1.2-IR was localized in dendrites, but also in axons, axon terminals, and glial processes in all hippocampal subfields. Plasmalemmal immunogold particles representing alpha(1)1.2-IR were more significant for small- than large-caliber dendrites and were largely associated with extrasynaptic regions in dendritic spines and axon terminals. These findings provide the first detailed ultrastructural analysis of Ca(v)1.2 localization in the brain and support functionally diverse roles of these channels in the hippocampal formation. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Ultrastructure of interstitial cells in subserosa of human colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, Jüri Johannes; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Hansen, Alastair;

    2013-01-01

    We studied the ultrastructure of interstitial cells in the subserosal/adventitial layer in human colon. An interstitial cell type with an ultrastructure intermediate between fibroblast-like cells (FLC) and interstitial cells of Cajal was identified (IC-SS). IC-SS had thin and flattened branching...

  10. DMPD: C-type lectin receptors in antifungal immunity. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18160296 C-type lectin receptors in antifungal immunity. Willment JA, Brown GD. Tre...nds Microbiol. 2008 Jan;16(1):27-32. Epub 2007 Dec 21. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show C-type lectin receptors in anti...fungal immunity. PubmedID 18160296 Title C-type lectin receptors in antifungal immunity. Author

  11. DMPD: Type I interferon receptors: biochemistry and biological functions. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17502368 Type I interferon receptors: biochemistry and biological functions. de Wee...(.html) (.csml) Show Type I interferon receptors: biochemistry and biological functions. PubmedID 17502368 T...itle Type I interferon receptors: biochemistry and biological functions. Authors

  12. DMPD: Signalling pathways mediating type I interferon gene expression. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17904888 Signalling pathways mediating type I interferon gene expression. Edwards M...csml) Show Signalling pathways mediating type I interferon gene expression. PubmedID 17904888 Title Signalli...ng pathways mediating type I interferon gene expression. Authors Edwards MR, Slat

  13. Basilar artery of the capybara (Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris): an ultrastructural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, S; Ribeiro, A A C M; Loesch, A

    2004-04-01

    The present study investigated the ultrastructural features of the basilar artery of the largest rodent species, the capybara. The study suggests that the general ultrastructural morphological organization of the basilar artery of the capybara is similar to that of small rodents. However, there are some exceptions. The basilar artery of the capybara contains a subpopulation of 'granular' vascular smooth muscle cells resembling monocytes and/or macrophages. The possibility cannot be excluded that the presence of these cells reflects the remodelling processes of the artery due to animal maturation and the regression of the internal carotid artery. To clarify this issue, more systemic studies are required involving capybaras of various ages.

  14. Histology and Ultrastructure of Incompatible Combination Between Puccinia striiformis and Wheat Cultivars with Low Reaction Type Resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Zhen-sheng; WANG Yao; HUANG Li-li; WEI Guo-rong; ZHAO Jie

    2003-01-01

    The incompatible combinations between races of Puccinia striiformis and wheat cuitivars withlow reaction type resistance were examined by means of fluorescent microscopy, differential interference con-trast microscopy and electron microscopy. The incompatible combinations consisted of wheat cultivar Niuzhuteplus CY28, Hybrid46 plus CY29 and Tianxuan882 plus CY29, while the compatible combination was wheatcultivar Huixianhong plus CY28. The observation revealed a striking difference in the fungal development andthe host responses between susceptible and resistant wheat cuitivars following infection by the pathogen. Themain histological manifestation of the pathogen development in the resistant wheat cultivars include inhibitionof hyphal growth, delay of hyphal branching and colony formation, decrease of formation of haustorial mothercells and haustoria, and occurrence of host cell necrosis. The observation by electron microscopy demonstratedthat a series of abnormal changes occurred in intercellular hyphae, haustorial mother cells and haustoria dur-ing pathogen development in the resistant wheat cultivars. The cytoplasm became more electron-dense and vac-uoles in the cytoplasm increased in number and size. The cell walls of hyphae, haustorial mother cells werethickened irregularly. The organeiles were disorderly distributed in the cytoplasm and the haustorial mothercells and haustoria lost their physiological function. In the final stage of the pathogen development, the inter-cellular hyphae, haustorial mother cells and haustoria became necrotic and collapsed. The structural defensereactions such as formation of cell wall apposition, collar and encasement of haustorium were essentially morepronounced in the infected wheat leaves of the resistant cultivars than in the susceptible one. In addition, therelationship between the host resistance expression and the histological and cytological features occurred in theincompatible combination was discussed in this paper.

  15. Vitamin D inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in macrophages through the induction of autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant R Campbell

    Full Text Available Low vitamin D levels in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV infected persons are associated with more rapid disease progression and increased risk for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. We have previously shown that 1α,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25D3, the active form of vitamin D, inhibits HIV replication in human macrophages through the induction of autophagy. In this study, we report that physiological concentrations of 1,25D3 induce the production of the human cathelicidin microbial peptide (CAMP and autophagic flux in HIV and M. tuberculosis co-infected human macrophages which inhibits mycobacterial growth and the replication of HIV. Using RNA interference for Beclin-1 and the autophagy-related 5 homologue, combined with the chemical inhibitors of autophagic flux, bafilomycin A₁, an inhibitor of autophagosome-lysosome fusion and subsequent acidification, and SID 26681509 an inhibitor of the lysosome hydrolase cathepsin L, we show that the 1,25D3-mediated inhibition of HIV replication and mycobacterial growth during single infection or dual infection is dependent not only upon the induction of autophagy, but also through phagosomal maturation. Moreover, through the use of RNA interference for CAMP, we demonstrate that cathelicidin is essential for the 1,25D3 induced autophagic flux and inhibition of HIV replication and mycobacterial growth. The present findings provide a biological explanation for the benefits and importance of vitamin D sufficiency in HIV and M. tuberculosis-infected persons, and provide new insights into novel approaches to prevent and treat HIV infection and related opportunistic infections.

  16. Cloning, expression and characterisation of a type II cystatin from Schistosoma japonicum, which could regulate macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Liu, Ju; Yue, Yuan; Chen, Wei; Song, Man; Zhan, Ximei; Wu, Zhongkai

    2014-11-01

    Cystatin play an important role in parasite immune evasion. It is involved in many immune responses processes regulations such as inhibiting antigen presentation, modifying cytokines production and macrophage polarization. In recent years, more and more cystatins were used in treating some inflammatory diseases such as asthma and inflammation bowel diseases; however, cystatins from Schistosoma japonicum were rarely studied. In the present study, we have cloned a cystatin from the adult stage of Schistosoma japonicum, named as SjCystatin, and its sequence shares conserved domains with other type II family cystatins. It was further verified by enzyme inhibition assays. SjCystatin retained its inhibitory activity under a wide range of pH values and temperatures, can maintain its inhibitory activity at pH 6.5-7.5 and 37 °C, respectively. Then, we investigated the effects of SjCystatin on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activated RAW264.7. Results showed that SjCystatin inhibit LPS-induced nitric oxide production in a dose-dependent manner. LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 production began to be inhibited at least 6 h after SjCystatin stimulation. SjCystatin significantly increased IL-10 production at 6 h after stimulation and its effect on IL-10 production diminished quickly. These results imply that SjCystatin can induce M2 macrophage polarization and can be expected to serve as a potential drug source for the medication of inflammatory disorders like other cystatins.

  17. Immunophenotypic and Ultrastructural Analysis of Mast Cells in Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome Type-1: A Possible Connection to Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold S Kirshenbaum

    Full Text Available Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome type-1 (HPS-1 is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in HPS1 which result in reduced expression of the HPS-1 protein, defective lysosome-related organelle (LRO transport and absence of platelet delta granules. Patients with HPS-1 exhibit oculocutaneous albinism, colitis, bleeding and pulmonary fibrosis postulated to result from a dysregulated immune response. The effect of the HPS1 mutation on human mast cells (HuMCs is unknown. Since HuMC granules classify as LROs along with platelet granules and melanosomes, we set out to determine if HPS-1 cutaneous and CD34+ culture-derived HuMCs have distinct granular and cellular characteristics. Cutaneous and cultured CD34+-derived HuMCs from HPS-1 patients were compared with normal cutaneous and control HuMCs, respectively, for any morphological and functional differences. One cytokine-independent HPS-1 culture was expanded, cloned, designated the HP proMastocyte (HPM cell line and characterized. HPS-1 and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF alveolar interstitium showed numerous HuMCs; HPS-1 dermal mast cells exhibited abnormal granules when compared to healthy controls. HPS-1 HuMCs showed increased CD63, CD203c and reduced mediator release following FcɛRI aggregation when compared with normal HuMCs. HPM cells also had the duplication defect, expressed FcɛRI and intracytoplasmic proteases and exhibited less mediator release following FcɛRI aggregation. HPM cells constitutively released IL-6, which was elevated in patients' serum, in addition to IL-8, fibronectin-1 (FN-1 and galectin-3 (LGALS3. Transduction with HPS1 rescued the abnormal HPM morphology, cytokine and matrix secretion. Microarray analysis of HPS-1 HuMCs and non-transduced HPM cells confirmed upregulation of differentially expressed genes involved in fibrogenesis and degranulation. Cultured HPS-1 HuMCs appear activated as evidenced by surface activation marker expression, a decrease in mediator

  18. Immunophenotypic and Ultrastructural Analysis of Mast Cells in Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome Type-1: A Possible Connection to Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshenbaum, Arnold S.; Cruse, Glenn; Desai, Avanti; Bandara, Geethani; Leerkes, Maarten; Lee, Chyi-Chia R.; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; O’Brien, Kevin J.; Gochuico, Bernadette R.; Stone, Kelly; Gahl, William A.; Metcalfe, Dean D.

    2016-01-01

    Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome type-1 (HPS-1) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in HPS1 which result in reduced expression of the HPS-1 protein, defective lysosome-related organelle (LRO) transport and absence of platelet delta granules. Patients with HPS-1 exhibit oculocutaneous albinism, colitis, bleeding and pulmonary fibrosis postulated to result from a dysregulated immune response. The effect of the HPS1 mutation on human mast cells (HuMCs) is unknown. Since HuMC granules classify as LROs along with platelet granules and melanosomes, we set out to determine if HPS-1 cutaneous and CD34+ culture-derived HuMCs have distinct granular and cellular characteristics. Cutaneous and cultured CD34+-derived HuMCs from HPS-1 patients were compared with normal cutaneous and control HuMCs, respectively, for any morphological and functional differences. One cytokine-independent HPS-1 culture was expanded, cloned, designated the HP proMastocyte (HPM) cell line and characterized. HPS-1 and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) alveolar interstitium showed numerous HuMCs; HPS-1 dermal mast cells exhibited abnormal granules when compared to healthy controls. HPS-1 HuMCs showed increased CD63, CD203c and reduced mediator release following FcɛRI aggregation when compared with normal HuMCs. HPM cells also had the duplication defect, expressed FcɛRI and intracytoplasmic proteases and exhibited less mediator release following FcɛRI aggregation. HPM cells constitutively released IL-6, which was elevated in patients’ serum, in addition to IL-8, fibronectin-1 (FN-1) and galectin-3 (LGALS3). Transduction with HPS1 rescued the abnormal HPM morphology, cytokine and matrix secretion. Microarray analysis of HPS-1 HuMCs and non-transduced HPM cells confirmed upregulation of differentially expressed genes involved in fibrogenesis and degranulation. Cultured HPS-1 HuMCs appear activated as evidenced by surface activation marker expression, a decrease in mediator content and

  19. Colony-stimulating factor-1 mediates macrophage-related neural damage in a model for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groh, Janos; Weis, Joachim; Zieger, Hanna; Stanley, E Richard; Heuer, Heike; Martini, Rudolf

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that in models for three distinct forms of the inherited and incurable nerve disorder, Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy, low-grade inflammation implicating phagocytosing macrophages mediates demyelination and perturbation of axons. In the present study, we focus on colony-stimulating factor-1, a cytokine implicated in macrophage differentiation, activation and proliferation and fostering neural damage in a model for Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy 1B. By crossbreeding a model for the X-linked form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy with osteopetrotic mice, a spontaneous null mutant for colony-stimulating factor-1, we demonstrate a robust and persistent amelioration of demyelination and axon perturbation. Furthermore, functionally important domains of the peripheral nervous system, such as juxtaparanodes and presynaptic terminals, were preserved in the absence of colony-stimulating factor-1-dependent macrophage activation. As opposed to other Schwann cell-derived cytokines, colony-stimulating factor-1 is expressed by endoneurial fibroblasts, as revealed by in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry and detection of β-galactosidase expression driven by the colony-stimulating factor-1 promoter. By both light and electron microscopic studies, we detected extended cell-cell contacts between the colony-stimulating factor-1-expressing fibroblasts and endoneurial macrophages as a putative prerequisite for the effective and constant activation of macrophages by fibroblasts in the chronically diseased nerve. Interestingly, in human biopsies from patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1, we also found frequent cell-cell contacts between macrophages and endoneurial fibroblasts and identified the latter as main source for colony-stimulating factor-1. Therefore, our study provides strong evidence for a similarly pathogenic role of colony-stimulating factor-1 in genetically mediated demyelination in mice and Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1

  20. Colony-stimulating factor-1 mediates macrophage-related neural damage in a model for Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groh, Janos; Weis, Joachim; Zieger, Hanna; Stanley, E. Richard; Heuer, Heike

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that in models for three distinct forms of the inherited and incurable nerve disorder, Charcot–Marie–Tooth neuropathy, low-grade inflammation implicating phagocytosing macrophages mediates demyelination and perturbation of axons. In the present study, we focus on colony-stimulating factor-1, a cytokine implicated in macrophage differentiation, activation and proliferation and fostering neural damage in a model for Charcot–Marie–Tooth neuropathy 1B. By crossbreeding a model for the X-linked form of Charcot–Marie–Tooth neuropathy with osteopetrotic mice, a spontaneous null mutant for colony-stimulating factor-1, we demonstrate a robust and persistent amelioration of demyelination and axon perturbation. Furthermore, functionally important domains of the peripheral nervous system, such as juxtaparanodes and presynaptic terminals, were preserved in the absence of colony-stimulating factor-1-dependent macrophage activation. As opposed to other Schwann cell-derived cytokines, colony-stimulating factor-1 is expressed by endoneurial fibroblasts, as revealed by in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry and detection of β-galactosidase expression driven by the colony-stimulating factor-1 promoter. By both light and electron microscopic studies, we detected extended cell–cell contacts between the colony-stimulating factor-1-expressing fibroblasts and endoneurial macrophages as a putative prerequisite for the effective and constant activation of macrophages by fibroblasts in the chronically diseased nerve. Interestingly, in human biopsies from patients with Charcot–Marie–Tooth type 1, we also found frequent cell–cell contacts between macrophages and endoneurial fibroblasts and identified the latter as main source for colony-stimulating factor-1. Therefore, our study provides strong evidence for a similarly pathogenic role of colony-stimulating factor-1 in genetically mediated demyelination in mice and Charcot

  1. Disruption of the phagosomal membrane and egress of Legionella pneumophila into the cytoplasm during the last stages of intracellular infection of macrophages and Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molmeret, Maëlle; Bitar, Dina M; Han, Lihui; Kwaik, Yousef Abu

    2004-07-01

    Although the early stages of intracellular infection by Legionella pneumophila are well established at the ultrastructural level, a detailed ultrastructural analysis of late stages of intracellular replication has never been done. Here we show that the membrane of the L. pneumophila-containing phagosome (LCP) is intact for up to 8 h postinfection of macrophages and Acanthamoeba polyphaga. At 12 h, 71 and 74% of the LCPs are disrupted within macrophages and A. polyphaga, respectively, while the plasma membrane remains intact. At 18 and 24 h postinfection, cytoplasmic elements such as mitochondria, lysosomes, vesicles, and amorphous material are dispersed among the bacteria and these bacteria are considered cytoplasmic. At 18 h, 77% of infected macrophages and 32% of infected A. polyphaga amoebae harbor cytoplasmic bacteria. At 24 h, 99 and 78% of infected macrophages and amoebae, respectively, contain cytoplasmic bacteria. On the basis of lysosomal acid phosphatase staining of infected macrophages and A. polyphaga, the lysosomal enzyme is present among the bacteria when host vesicles are dispersed among bacteria. Our data indicate that bacterial replication proceeds despite physical disruption of the phagosomal membrane. We also show that an lspG mutant that is defective in the type II secretion system and therefore does not secrete the hydrolytic enzymes metalloprotease, p-nitrophenol phosphorylcholine hydrolase, lipase, phospholipase A, and lysophospholipase A is as efficient as the wild-type strain in disruption of the LCP. Therefore, L. pneumophila disrupts the phagosomal membrane and becomes cytoplasmic at the last stages of infection in both macrophages and A. polyphaga. Lysosomal elements, mitochondria, cytoplasmic vesicles, and amorphous material are all dispersed among the bacteria, after phagosomal disruption, within both human macrophages and A. polyphaga. The disruption of the LCP is independent of the hydrolytic enzymes exported by the type II secretion

  2. Impact of plasmids, including those encodingVirB4/D4 type IV secretion systems, on Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg virulence in macrophages and epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuppan Gokulan

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg (S. Heidelberg can cause foodborne illness in humans following the consumption of contaminated meat and poultry products. Recent studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that certain S. Heidelberg isolated from food-animal sources harbor multiple transmissible plasmids with genes that encode antimicrobial resistance, virulence and a VirB4/D4 type-IV secretion system. This study examines the potential role of these transmissible plasmids in bacterial uptake and survival in intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages, and the molecular basis of host immune system modulation that may be associated with disease progression. A series of transconjugant and transformant strains were developed with different combinations of the plasmids to determine the roles of the individual and combinations of plasmids on virulence. Overall the Salmonella strains containing the VirB/D4 T4SS plasmids entered and survived in epithelial cells and macrophages to a greater degree than those without the plasmid, even though they carried other plasmid types. During entry in macrophages, the VirB/D4 T4SS encoding genes are up-regulated in a time-dependent fashion. When the potential mechanisms for increased virulence were examined using an antibacterial Response PCR Array, the strain containing the T4SS down regulated several host innate immune response genes which likely contributed to the increased uptake and survival within macrophages and epithelial cells.

  3. Impact of plasmids, including those encodingVirB4/D4 type IV secretion systems, on Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg virulence in macrophages and epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokulan, Kuppan; Khare, Sangeeta; Rooney, Anthony W; Han, Jing; Lynne, Aaron M; Foley, Steven L

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg (S. Heidelberg) can cause foodborne illness in humans following the consumption of contaminated meat and poultry products. Recent studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that certain S. Heidelberg isolated from food-animal sources harbor multiple transmissible plasmids with genes that encode antimicrobial resistance, virulence and a VirB4/D4 type-IV secretion system. This study examines the potential role of these transmissible plasmids in bacterial uptake and survival in intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages, and the molecular basis of host immune system modulation that may be associated with disease progression. A series of transconjugant and transformant strains were developed with different combinations of the plasmids to determine the roles of the individual and combinations of plasmids on virulence. Overall the Salmonella strains containing the VirB/D4 T4SS plasmids entered and survived in epithelial cells and macrophages to a greater degree than those without the plasmid, even though they carried other plasmid types. During entry in macrophages, the VirB/D4 T4SS encoding genes are up-regulated in a time-dependent fashion. When the potential mechanisms for increased virulence were examined using an antibacterial Response PCR Array, the strain containing the T4SS down regulated several host innate immune response genes which likely contributed to the increased uptake and survival within macrophages and epithelial cells.

  4. Type I interferons and interferon regulatory factors regulate TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL in HIV-1-infected macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlong Huang

    Full Text Available TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL is a member of the TNF family that participates in HIV-1 pathogenesis through the depletion of CD4+ T cells. TRAIL is expressed on the cell membrane of peripheral immune cells and can be cleaved into a soluble, secreted form. The regulation of TRAIL in macrophages during HIV-1 infection is not completely understood. In this study, we investigated the mechanism(s of TRAIL expression in HIV-1-infected macrophages, an important cell type in HIV-1 pathogenesis. A human monocyte-derived macrophage (MDM culture system was infected with macrophage-tropic HIV-1(ADA, HIV-1(JR-FL, or HIV-1(BAL strains. TRAIL, predominantly the membrane-bound form, increased following HIV-1 infection. We found that HIV-1 infection also induced interferon regulatory factor (IRF-1, IRF-7 gene expression and signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1 activation. Small interfering RNA knockdown of IRF-1 or IRF-7, but not IRF-3, reduced STAT1 activation and TRAIL expression. Furthermore, the upregulation of IRF-1, IRF-7, TRAIL, and the activation of STAT1 by HIV-1 infection was reduced by the treatment of type I interferon (IFN-neutralizing antibodies. In addition, inhibition of STAT1 by fludarabine abolished IRF-1, IRF-7, and TRAIL upregulation. We conclude that IRF-1, IRF-7, type I IFNs, and STAT1 form a signaling feedback loop that is critical in regulating TRAIL expression in HIV-1-infected macrophages.

  5. Dysregulated Type I Interferon and Inflammatory Monocyte-Macrophage Responses Cause Lethal Pneumonia in SARS-CoV-Infected Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channappanavar, Rudragouda; Fehr, Anthony R; Vijay, Rahul; Mack, Matthias; Zhao, Jincun; Meyerholz, David K; Perlman, Stanley

    2016-02-10

    Highly pathogenic human respiratory coronaviruses cause acute lethal disease characterized by exuberant inflammatory responses and lung damage. However, the factors leading to lung pathology are not well understood. Using mice infected with SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome)-CoV, we show that robust virus replication accompanied by delayed type I interferon (IFN-I) signaling orchestrates inflammatory responses and lung immunopathology with diminished survival. IFN-I remains detectable until after virus titers peak, but early IFN-I administration ameliorates immunopathology. This delayed IFN-I signaling promotes the accumulation of pathogenic inflammatory monocyte-macrophages (IMMs), resulting in elevated lung cytokine/chemokine levels, vascular leakage, and impaired virus-specific T cell responses. Genetic ablation of the IFN-αβ receptor (IFNAR) or IMM depletion protects mice from lethal infection, without affecting viral load. These results demonstrate that IFN-I and IMM promote lethal SARS-CoV infection and identify IFN-I and IMMs as potential therapeutic targets in patients infected with pathogenic coronavirus and perhaps other respiratory viruses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mouse macrophage galactose-type lectin (mMGL) is critical for host resistance against Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Alicia; Ruiz-Rosado, Juan de Dios; Terrazas, Luis I; Juárez, Imelda; Gomez-Garcia, Lorena; Calleja, Elsa; Camacho, Griselda; Chávez, Ana; Romero, Miriam; Rodriguez, Tonathiu; Espinoza, Bertha; Rodriguez-Sosa, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    The C-type lectin receptor mMGL is expressed exclusively by myeloid antigen presenting cells (APC) such as dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages (Mφ), and it mediates binding to glycoproteins carrying terminal galactose and α- or β-N-acetylgalactosamine (Gal/GalNAc) residues. Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) expresses large amounts of mucin (TcMUC)-like glycoproteins. Here, we show by lectin-blot that galactose moieties are also expressed on the surface of T. cruzi. Male mMGL knockout (-/-) and wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice were infected intraperitoneally with 10(4) T. cruzi trypomastigotes (Queretaro strain). Following T. cruzi infection, mMGL-/- mice developed higher parasitemia and higher mortality rates compared with WT mice. Although hearts from T. cruzi-infected WT mice presented few amastigote nests, mMGL-/- mice displayed higher numbers of amastigote nests. Compared with WT, Mφ from mMGL-/- mice had low production of nitric oxide (NO), interleukin (IL)-12 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in response to soluble T. cruzi antigens (TcAg). Interestingly, upon in vitro T. cruzi infection, mMGL-/- Mφ expressed lower levels of MHC-II and TLR-4 and harbored higher numbers of parasites, even when mMGL-/- Mφ were previously primed with IFN-γ or LPS/IFN-γ. These data suggest that mMGL plays an important role during T. cruzi infection, is required for optimal Mφ activation, and may synergize with TLR-4-induced pathways to produce TNF-α, IL-1β and NO during the early phase of infection.

  7. Effect of the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 type III secretion system on Salmonella survival in activated chicken macrophage-like HD11 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L S Wisner

    Full Text Available In order to better identify the role of the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2 type III secretion system (T3SS in chickens, we used the well-known gentamicin protection assay with activated HD11 cells. HD11 cells are a macrophage-like chicken cell line that can be stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA to exhibit more macrophage-like morphology and greater production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Activated HD11 cells were infected with a wild-type Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium strain, a SPI-2 mutant S. Typhimurium strain, a wild-type Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis strain, a SPI-2 mutant S. Enteritidis strain, or a non-pathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli strain. SPI-2 mutant strains were found to survive as well as their parent strain at all time points post-uptake (PU by the HD11 cells, up to 24 h PU, while the E. coli strain was no longer recoverable by 3 h PU. We can conclude from these observations that the SPI-2 T3SS of S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis is not important for survival of Salmonella in the activated macrophage-like HD11 cell line, and that Salmonella must employ other mechanisms for survival in this environment, as E. coli is effectively eliminated.

  8. Deletion of 12/15-lipoxygenase alters macrophage and islet function in NOD-Alox15(null mice, leading to protection against type 1 diabetes development.

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    Shamina M Green-Mitchell

    Full Text Available AIMS: Type 1 diabetes (T1D is characterized by autoimmune depletion of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. We showed previously that deletion of the 12/15-lipoxygenase enzyme (12/15-LO, Alox15 gene in NOD mice leads to nearly 100 percent protection from T1D. In this study, we test the hypothesis that cytokines involved in the IL-12/12/15-LO axis affect both macrophage and islet function, which contributes to the development of T1D. METHODS: 12/15-LO expression was clarified in immune cells by qRT-PCR, and timing of expression was tested in islets using qRT-PCR and Western blotting. Expression of key proinflammatory cytokines and pancreatic transcription factors was studied in NOD and NOD-Alox15(null macrophages and islets using qRT-PCR. The two mouse strains were also assessed for the ability of splenocytes to transfer diabetes in an adoptive transfer model, and beta cell mass. RESULTS: 12/15-LO is expressed in macrophages, but not B and T cells of NOD mice. In macrophages, 12/15-LO deletion leads to decreased proinflammatory cytokine mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, splenocytes from NOD-Alox15(null mice are unable to transfer diabetes in an adoptive transfer model. In islets, expression of 12/15-LO in NOD mice peaks at a crucial time during insulitis development. The absence of 12/15-LO results in maintenance of islet health with respect to measurements of islet-specific transcription factors, markers of islet health, proinflammatory cytokines, and beta cell mass. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that 12/15-LO affects islet and macrophage function, causing inflammation, and leading to autoimmunity and reduced beta cell mass.

  9. Ultrastructural findings in lymph nodes from pigs suffering from naturally occurring postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Cariño, C; Segalés, J

    2009-07-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate ultrastructural lesions in lymph nodes from postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS)-affected pigs and to correlate these alterations with detection of viral-like particles (VLPs). Samples of lymph nodes were taken from 4 PMWS-affected pigs and 2 healthy animals and processed by transmission electron microscopy. Significant ultrastructural alterations were only noted in PMWS-affected pigs, mainly in histiocytes and rarely in other cell types. Histiocytes showed severe swelling and proliferation of mitochondria, and proliferation and dilation of rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex. Infected histiocytes contained large numbers of intracytoplasmic inclusion (ICI) bodies with VLPs; some histiocytes also had intranuclear inclusions (INIs). Small inclusions were surrounded by double membrane, with a granular appearance or containing paracrystalline arrays; icosahedral VLPs were 8-17 nm in diameter. Large ICIs were double-membrane bounded or not and contained VLPs usually forming paracrystalline arrays. ICIs were often found next to mitochondria with severe swelling, and also inside them. INIs were not surrounded by membranes and contained virions of 10-13 nm diameter. Lymphocyte depletion was a striking finding of lymph nodes from PMWS-affected pigs. The inclusion bodies containing VLPs referred to in the present study should be classified as viral factories, suggesting that viral replication is probably a frequent event in macrophages, in which mitochondria might play a role.

  10. Macrophage-like cells in the muscularis externa of mouse small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, H B; Thuneberg, L; Rumessen, J J;

    1985-01-01

    In muscularis externa of mouse small intestine, cells with ultrastructural features of macrophages were invariably observed in three layers: in the subserosal layer, between the circular and longitudinal muscle layers, and in association with the deep circular plexus. These macrophage-like cells...

  11. Type I Interferon Induced Epigenetic Regulation of Macrophages Suppresses Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Acute Respiratory Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroetz, Danielle N; Allen, Ronald M; Schaller, Matthew A; Cavallaro, Cleyton; Ito, Toshihiro; Kunkel, Steven L

    2015-12-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is an airborne pathogen that causes significant morbidity and mortality each year. Macrophages (Mϕ) are the first immune population to encounter IAV virions in the lungs and are required to control infection. In the present study, we explored the mechanism by which cytokine signaling regulates the phenotype and function of Mϕ via epigenetic modification of chromatin. We have found that type I interferon (IFN-I) potently upregulates the lysine methyltransferase Setdb2 in murine and human Mϕ, and in turn Setdb2 regulates Mϕ-mediated immunity in response to IAV. The induction of Setdb2 by IFN-I was significantly impaired upon inhibition of the JAK-STAT signaling cascade, and chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that both STAT1 and interferon regulatory factor 7 bind upstream of the transcription start site to induce expression. The generation of Setdb2LacZ reporter mice revealed that IAV infection results in systemic upregulation of Setdb2 in myeloid cells. In the lungs, alveolar Mϕ expressed the highest level of Setdb2, with greater than 70% lacZ positive on day 4 post-infection. Silencing Setdb2 activity in Mϕ in vivo enhanced survival in lethal IAV infection. Enhanced host protection correlated with an amplified antiviral response and less obstruction to the airways. By tri-methylating H3K9, Setdb2 silenced the transcription of Mx1 and Isg15, antiviral effectors that inhibit IAV replication. Accordingly, a reduced viral load in knockout mice on day 8 post-infection was linked to elevated Isg15 and Mx1 transcript in the lungs. In addition, Setdb2 suppressed the expression of a large number of other genes with proinflammatory or immunomodulatory function. This included Ccl2, a chemokine that signals through CCR2 to regulate monocyte recruitment to infectious sites. Consistently, knockout mice produced more CCL2 upon IAV infection and this correlated with a 2-fold increase in the number of inflammatory monocytes and alveolar Mϕ in the

  12. Type I Interferon Induced Epigenetic Regulation of Macrophages Suppresses Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Acute Respiratory Viral Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle N Kroetz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV is an airborne pathogen that causes significant morbidity and mortality each year. Macrophages (Mϕ are the first immune population to encounter IAV virions in the lungs and are required to control infection. In the present study, we explored the mechanism by which cytokine signaling regulates the phenotype and function of Mϕ via epigenetic modification of chromatin. We have found that type I interferon (IFN-I potently upregulates the lysine methyltransferase Setdb2 in murine and human Mϕ, and in turn Setdb2 regulates Mϕ-mediated immunity in response to IAV. The induction of Setdb2 by IFN-I was significantly impaired upon inhibition of the JAK-STAT signaling cascade, and chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that both STAT1 and interferon regulatory factor 7 bind upstream of the transcription start site to induce expression. The generation of Setdb2LacZ reporter mice revealed that IAV infection results in systemic upregulation of Setdb2 in myeloid cells. In the lungs, alveolar Mϕ expressed the highest level of Setdb2, with greater than 70% lacZ positive on day 4 post-infection. Silencing Setdb2 activity in Mϕ in vivo enhanced survival in lethal IAV infection. Enhanced host protection correlated with an amplified antiviral response and less obstruction to the airways. By tri-methylating H3K9, Setdb2 silenced the transcription of Mx1 and Isg15, antiviral effectors that inhibit IAV replication. Accordingly, a reduced viral load in knockout mice on day 8 post-infection was linked to elevated Isg15 and Mx1 transcript in the lungs. In addition, Setdb2 suppressed the expression of a large number of other genes with proinflammatory or immunomodulatory function. This included Ccl2, a chemokine that signals through CCR2 to regulate monocyte recruitment to infectious sites. Consistently, knockout mice produced more CCL2 upon IAV infection and this correlated with a 2-fold increase in the number of inflammatory monocytes and

  13. Observation of the Ultrastructure in Syphilitic Chancres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiaodong(张晓东); ZHOU Jing(周晶); WANG Dequan(王德权); WU Haiyan(吴海燕); SONG Fangji(宋芳吉)

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To study the occurrence and development of primary syphilis from a morphological and structural aspect.Method: The ultrastructural pathological changes of syphilitic chancre were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM).Results: The pathological changes of syphilitic chancre occur mainly in the dermal layer, manifested as partial thinning or lysis of the capillary basal membrane,proliferation of capillary endothelial cells, thickening of some collagen fibers and rupture of collagen fibers surrounding T.pallidum, structural disruption of the axous of terminal nerves,disarrangement of the sheath of the myelinated nerve fibers with separation of laminae and the attachment of T. Pallidum on its outer membrane, appearance of slightly swollen T.pallidum in the plasma of the capillary endothelial cells and fibroblasts, and infiltration of neutrophils, macrophages and plasma cells containing T. Pallidum and its debris frequently lined by a clear sheath.Conclusion: The pathogenesis and injury of mechanism in primary syphilis can be explained morphologically by its characteristic ultrastructural pathological changes.

  14. OxLDL up-regulates Niemann-Pick type C1 expression through ERK1/2/COX-2/ PPARα-signaling pathway in macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohua yu; Chaoke Tang; Xiaoxu Li; Guojun Zhao; Ji Xiao; Zhongcheng Mo; Kai Yin; Zhisheng Jiang; Yuchang Fu; Xiaohui Zha

    2012-01-01

    The Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) is located mainly in the membranes of the late endosome/lysosome and controls the intracellular cholesterol trafficking from the late endosome/lysosome to the plasma membrane.It has been reported that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) can up-regulate NPC1 expression.However,the detailed mechanisms are not fully understood.In this study,we investigated the effect of oxLDL stimulation on NPC1 expression in THP-1 macrophages.Our results showed that oxLDL up-regulated NPC1 expression at both mRNA and protein levels in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner.In addition,oxLDL also induced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2).Treatment with oxLDL significantly increased cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)mRNA and protein expression in the macrophages,and these increases were suppressed by the ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 or ERK1/2 small interfering RNA (siRNA) treatment.OxLDL up-regulated the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) at the mRNA and protein levels,which could be abolished by COX-2 siRNA or COX-2 inhibitor NS398 treatment in these macrophages.OxLDL dramatically elevated cellular cholesterol efflux,which was abrogated by inhibiting ERK1/2 and/or COX-2.In addition,oxLDL-induced NPC1 expression and cellular cholesterol effiux were reversed by PPARα siRNA or GW6471,an antagonist of PPARα.Taken together,these results provide the evidence that oxLDL can up-regulate the expression of the NPC1 through ERK1/2/COX-2/PPARα-signaling pathway in macrophages.

  15. PRESENCE OF MYCOBACTERIA IN OTHER CELLS OF LUNG AND LIVER EXEPT IN MACROPHAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrina Kazachka

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are the key cells for invading and replication of mycobacteria in the host and they play principal role in the pathogenesis of the tuberculosis. The aim of the present study was to reveal if mycobacterium invade other cells except these of immune defense and macrophages fi rst of all as a common feature. The results of ultrastructural studies of lungs of Mycobacterium bovis intraperitonealy infected rabbits and livers of Mycobacterium avium subcutaneously infected chickens showed the presence of mycobacteria into the cytoplasm of pneumocytes II type and capillary endothelial cells of rabbit lungs as well as in the cytoplasm of chicken liver parenchyma cells. On the base of these results and in particular invading of pneumocytes II type as a producers of the surfactant it was suggested that the surfactant or some of his components likely enhance phagocytosis of mycobacteria by macrophages. It could be a reason for mycobacterium affi nity to invade pneumocyte II type and to manipulate quality and quantity of the surfactant or some of his components. These results show that M. bovis invaded pneumocytes II type in vivo and it is an important step may be in the investigation of the possibility role of these cells in the pathogenesis of lung infection.

  16. Regulation of L-type Voltage Gated Calcium Channel CACNA1S in Macrophages upon Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Cecil; Mehto, Subhash; Tiwari, Brijendra K; Singh, Yogendra; Natarajan, Krishnamurthy

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated earlier the inhibitory role played by Voltage Gated Calcium Channels (VGCCs) in regulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) survival and pathogenesis. In this report, we investigated mechanisms and key players that regulate the surface expression of VGCC-CACNA1S by Rv2463 and M. tb infection in macrophages. Our earlier work identified Rv2463 to be expressed at early times post infection in macrophages that induced suppressor responses to dendritic cells and macrophages. Our results in this study demonstrate a role of MyD88 independent TLR pathway in mediating CACNA1S expression. Dissecting the role for second messengers, we show that calcium homeostasis plays a key role in CACNA1S expression during M. tb infection. Using siRNAs against molecular sensors of calcium regulation, we show an involvement of ER associated Stromal Interaction Molecules 1 and 2 (STIM1 and STIM2), and transcription factor pCREB, towards CACNA1S expression that also involved the MyD88 independent pathway. Interestingly, reactive oxygen species played a negative role in M. tb mediated CACNA1S expression. Further, a cross-regulation of ROS and pCREB was noted that governed CACNA1S expression. Characterizing the mechanisms governing CACNA1S expression would improve our understanding of the regulation of VGCC expression and its role in M. tb pathogenesis during M. tb infection.

  17. Macrophage Inflammatory Protein 1α Inhibits Postentry Steps of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection via Suppression of Intracellular Cyclic AMP

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) predominantly use chemokine receptor CCR5 to enter target cells. The natural ligands of CCR5, the β-chemokines macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α), MIP-1β, and RANTES, interfere with HIV-1 binding to CCR5 receptors and decrease the amount of virions entering cells. Although the inhibition of HIV-1 entry by β-chemokines is well documented, their effects on postentry steps of the viral life cycle and on host cell components...

  18. 先天性肺囊性腺瘤样畸形的超微结构与组织分型对照分析%Comparative analysis in ultrastructure and histological types for congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪淳; 俞钢; 张佳立; 郭雪贞

    2016-01-01

    目的 通过了解先天性肺囊性腺瘤样畸形(CCAM)的超微结构特征,探讨其影像分型与病理分型及电镜下超微结构之间的关系.方法 选取广东省妇幼保健院2014年5月至11月间的CCAM病例,应用增强肺部CT进行影像学分型;将手术标本进行HE染色,并利用电镜技术,对比观察各分型的组织结构.结果 选取8例CCAM作为研究对象,其中男5例,女3例;手术年龄(5.4±1.1)个月.影像学分型中,大囊型(Ⅰ型)(直径>2 cm)2例;小囊型(Ⅱ型)(直径≤2 cm)3例;微囊型(Ⅲ型)3例.病理分型Ⅰ型1例,Ⅱ型4例,Ⅲ型3例.其中1例CT分型为Ⅰ型,病理分型为Ⅱ型;其余均一致.电镜下普遍显示为肺泡腔扩大,肺泡细胞减少,板层小体少,不成熟;微绒毛减少.从电镜角度分析,Ⅰ、Ⅱ型之间,并非有着明显区别.Ⅰ、Ⅱ型共同的特点包括了肺泡腔多以扩大为主,在扩大的肺泡腔之间存在少数受压缩小的肺泡腔;肺泡细胞均出现数量少、不成熟的表现,纤维组织增生.结论 CCAM超微结构分析与临床病理分型存在差异,提示了电镜超微结构分析与病理的结合对于CCAM分型的重要性.需要进一步进行光镜-电镜的对照分型;并结合随访作出相关的预测模型.%Objective To explore relationship between imaging classification and pathological type,and the electron microscopic ultrastructure by observing the ultrastructural features of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM).Methods Children with CCAM in the Guangdong Women and Children Hospital from May 2014 to November 2014,were analyzed,imaging classification was performed according to enhanced Computed Tomography (CT) scanning,and the surgical specimens were stained by HE and scanning electron microscope was used to observe the tissue structures of various of CCAM.Results Eight cases were enrolled in this research (5 boys and 3 girls),and the mean age of surgery was (5.4 ± 1.1) month old.According to the

  19. Virulence of the Pseudomonas fluorescens clinical strain MFN1032 towards Dictyostelium discoideum and macrophages in relation with type III secretion system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sperandio Daniel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas fluorescens biovar I MFN1032 is a clinical isolate able to grow at 37°C. This strain displays secretion-mediated hemolytic activity involving phospholipase C and cyclolipopeptides, and a cell-associated hemolytic activity distinct from the secreted hemolytic activity. Cell-associated hemolysis is independent of biosurfactant production and remains in a gacA mutant. Disruption of the hrpU-like operon (the basal part of type III secretion system from rhizospheric strains suppresses this activity. We hypothesized that this phenotype could reflect evolution of an ancestral mechanism involved in the survival of this species in its natural niche. In this study, we evaluated the hrpU-like operon’s contribution to other virulence mechanisms using a panel of Pseudomonas strains from various sources. Results We found that MFN1032 inhibited the growth of the amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum and that this inhibition involved the hrpU-like operon and was absent in a gacA mutant. MFN1032 was capable of causing macrophage lysis, if the hrpU-like operon was intact, and this cytotoxicity remained in a gacA mutant. Cell-associated hemolytic activity and macrophage necrosis were found in other P. fluorescens clinical isolates, but not in biocontrol P. fluorescens strains harbouring hrpU-like operon. The growth of Dictyostelium discoideum was inhibited to a different extent by P. fluorescens strains without correlation between this inhibition and hrpU-like operon sequences. Conclusions In P. fluorescens MFN1032, the basal part of type III secretion system plays a role in D. discoideum growth inhibition and macrophage necrosis. The inhibition of D. discoideum growth is dependent on the GacS/GacA system, while cell-associated hemolytic activity and macrophage lysis are not. Virulence against eukaryotic cells based on the hrpU-like operon may be more than just a stochastic evolution of a conserved system dedicated to survival in

  20. Altered Macrophage and Dendritic Cell Response in Mif−/− Mice Reveals a Role of Mif for Inflammatory-Th1 Response in Type 1 Diabetes

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    Yuriko Itzel Sánchez-Zamora

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (Mif is highly expressed in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. However, there is limited information about how Mif influences the activation of macrophages (Mφ and dendritic cells (DC in T1DM. To address this issue, we induced T1DM by administering multiple low doses of streptozotocin (STZ to Mif−/− or wild-type (Wt BALB/c mice. We found that Mif−/− mice treated with STZ (Mif−/−STZ developed lower levels of hyperglycemia, inflammatory cytokines, and specific pancreatic islet antigen- (PIAg- IgG and displayed reduced cellular infiltration into the pancreatic islets compared to Wt mice treated with STZ (WtSTZ. Moreover, Mφ and DC from Mif−/−STZ displayed lower expression of MHC-II, costimulatory molecules CD80, CD86, and CD40, Toll-like receptor- (TLR- 2, and TLR-4 than WtSTZ. These changes were associated with a reduced capacity of Mφ and DC from Mif−/−STZ to induce proliferation in ovalbumin-specific T cells. All the deficiencies observed in Mif−/−STZ were recovered by exogenous administration of recombinant Mif. These findings suggest that Mif plays a role in the molecular mechanisms of Mφ and DC activation and drives T cell responses involved in the pathology of T1DM. Therefore, Mif is a potential therapeutic target to reduce the pathology of T1DM.

  1. Altered Macrophage and Dendritic Cell Response in Mif−/− Mice Reveals a Role of Mif for Inflammatory-Th1 Response in Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Mendoza, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (Mif) is highly expressed in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). However, there is limited information about how Mif influences the activation of macrophages (Mφ) and dendritic cells (DC) in T1DM. To address this issue, we induced T1DM by administering multiple low doses of streptozotocin (STZ) to Mif−/− or wild-type (Wt) BALB/c mice. We found that Mif−/− mice treated with STZ (Mif−/−STZ) developed lower levels of hyperglycemia, inflammatory cytokines, and specific pancreatic islet antigen- (PIAg-) IgG and displayed reduced cellular infiltration into the pancreatic islets compared to Wt mice treated with STZ (WtSTZ). Moreover, Mφ and DC from Mif−/−STZ displayed lower expression of MHC-II, costimulatory molecules CD80, CD86, and CD40, Toll-like receptor- (TLR-) 2, and TLR-4 than WtSTZ. These changes were associated with a reduced capacity of Mφ and DC from Mif−/−STZ to induce proliferation in ovalbumin-specific T cells. All the deficiencies observed in Mif−/−STZ were recovered by exogenous administration of recombinant Mif. These findings suggest that Mif plays a role in the molecular mechanisms of Mφ and DC activation and drives T cell responses involved in the pathology of T1DM. Therefore, Mif is a potential therapeutic target to reduce the pathology of T1DM. PMID:27699180

  2. ORF2 protein of porcine circovirus type 2 promotes phagocytic activity of porcine macrophages by inhibiting proteasomal degradation of complement component 1, q subcomponent binding protein (C1QBP) through physical interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chang-Yong; Oh, Hae-Na; Lee, Suk Jun; Chun, Taehoon

    2015-11-01

    Defining how each ORF of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) manipulates the host immune system may be helpful to understand the disease progression of post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome. In this study, we demonstrated a direct interaction between the PCV2 ORF2 and complement component 1, q subcomponent binding protein (C1QBP) within the cytoplasm of host macrophages. The physical interaction between PCV2 ORF2 and C1QBP inhibited ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation of C1QBP in macrophages. Increased stability of C1QBP by the interaction with PCV2 ORF2 further enhanced the phagocytic activity of porcine macrophages through the phosphoinositol 3-kinase signalling pathway. This may explain the molecular basis of how PCV2 ORF2 enhances the phagocytic activity of host macrophages.

  3. Role of protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 7 in the regulation of TNF-α production in RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Huiyun; Lee, In-Seon; Park, Jae Eun; Park, Sung Goo; Lee, Do Hee; Park, Byoung Chul; Cho, Sayeon

    2013-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases play key roles in a diverse range of cellular processes such as differentiation, cell proliferation, apoptosis, immunological signaling, and cytoskeletal function. Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 7 (PTPN7), a member of the phosphatase family, specifically inactivates mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Here, we report that PTPN7 acts as a regulator of pro-inflammatory TNF-α production in RAW 264.7 cells that are stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that acts as an endotoxin and elicits strong immune responses in animals. Stimulation of RAW 264.7 cells with LPS leads to a transient decrease in the levels of PTPN7 mRNA and protein. The overexpression of PTPN7 inhibits LPS-stimulated production of TNF-α. In addition, small interfering RNA (siRNA) analysis showed that knock-down of PTPN7 in RAW 264.7 cells increased TNF-α production. PTPN7 has a negative regulatory function to extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38 that increase LPS-induced TNF-α production in macrophages. Thus, our data presents PTPN7 as a negative regulator of TNF-α expression and the inflammatory response in macrophages.

  4. Role of protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 7 in the regulation of TNF-α production in RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyun Seo

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatases play key roles in a diverse range of cellular processes such as differentiation, cell proliferation, apoptosis, immunological signaling, and cytoskeletal function. Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 7 (PTPN7, a member of the phosphatase family, specifically inactivates mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs. Here, we report that PTPN7 acts as a regulator of pro-inflammatory TNF-α production in RAW 264.7 cells that are stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS that acts as an endotoxin and elicits strong immune responses in animals. Stimulation of RAW 264.7 cells with LPS leads to a transient decrease in the levels of PTPN7 mRNA and protein. The overexpression of PTPN7 inhibits LPS-stimulated production of TNF-α. In addition, small interfering RNA (siRNA analysis showed that knock-down of PTPN7 in RAW 264.7 cells increased TNF-α production. PTPN7 has a negative regulatory function to extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 and p38 that increase LPS-induced TNF-α production in macrophages. Thus, our data presents PTPN7 as a negative regulator of TNF-α expression and the inflammatory response in macrophages.

  5. The abcEDCBA-Encoded ABC Transporter and the virB Operon-Encoded Type IV Secretion System of Brucella ovis Are Critical for Intracellular Trafficking and Survival in Ovine Monocyte-Derived Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auricelio A Macedo

    Full Text Available Brucella ovis infection is associated with epididymitis, orchitis and infertility in rams. Most of the information available on B. ovis and host cell interaction has been generated using murine macrophages or epithelial cell lines, but the interaction between B. ovis and primary ovine macrophages has not been studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the B. ovis abcEDCBA-encoded ABC transporter and the virB operon-encoded Type IV Secretion System (T4SS during intracellular survival of B. ovis in ovine peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages. ΔabcBA and ΔvirB2 mutant strains were unable to survive in the intracellular environment when compared to the WT B. ovis at 48 hours post infection (hpi. In addition, these mutant strains cannot exclude the lysosomal marker LAMP1 from its vacuolar membrane, and their vacuoles do not acquire the endoplasmic reticulum marker calreticulin, which takes place in the WT B. ovis containing vacuole. Higher levels of nitric oxide production were observed in macrophages infected with WT B. ovis at 48 hpi when compared to macrophages infected with the ΔabcBA or ΔvirB2 mutant strains. Conversely, higher levels of reactive oxygen species were detected in macrophages infected with the ΔabcBA or ΔvirB2 mutant strains at 48 hpi when compared to macrophages infected with the WT strain. Our results demonstrate that B. ovis is able to persist and multiply in ovine macrophages, while ΔabcBA and ΔvirB2 mutations prevent intracellular multiplication, favor phagolysosome fusion, and impair maturation of the B. ovis vacuole towards an endoplasmic reticulum-derived compartment.

  6. Ultrastructural changes in non-specific duodenitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Xin Wang; Li-Jiang Liu; Jing Guan; Xiao-Ling Zhao

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the ultrastructural and morphological changes of non-specific duodenitis (NSD) in an attempt to grade them according to the extent of the lesions.METHODS: Biopsies were taken from the mucosa of duodenal bulb of 44 patients selected from the patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for epigastric discomforts. From each patient, two pinch biopsies on the same area were obtained from duodenal bulb. One was for scanning electron microscopy and the other was stained with hematoxylin-eosin, Warthin-Starry silver and both were then examined under light microscope. A total of 12 specimens (three from each degree of the normal and Ⅰ-Ⅲ of NSD diagnosed and graded by histology) selected from the 44patients were dehydrated, critical point dried, coated with gold palladium and examined under a JEOL JSM-30 scanning electron microscope (SEM) at 20 kV.RESULTS: According to the ultrastructural morphologic changes, non-specific duodenitis was divided into normal (as control group), mild, moderate and severe degrees according to results of SEM. The normal villi of duodenal bulb were less than 0.2 mm. There were inflammation cells,occasionally red blood cells and macrophages on the mucosal epithelial surface. Erosion and desquamation of epithelium could be seen. Three cases (25%, 3/12) had gastric metaplasia and Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) infection could be found in 5 cases (41.67%, 5/12) in duodenal bulb mucosa. The most distinctive feature was the ulcer-like defect on the surface of epithelial cells.CONCLUSION: Non-specific duodenitis is a separate entity disease caused by different factors. SEM is of value as an aid in the diagnosis of mucosal diseases of duodenum.

  7. Lassa virus nucleoprotein mutants generated by reverse genetics induce a robust type I interferon response in human dendritic cells and macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnec, Xavier; Baize, Sylvain; Reynard, Stéphanie; Diancourt, Laure; Caro, Valérie; Tordo, Noel; Bouloy, Michèle

    2011-11-01

    Lassa virus (LASV; Arenaviridae) is responsible for severe hemorrhagic fevers in Africa. LASV nucleoprotein (NP) plays important roles in regulating viral transcription and replication and in inhibiting type I interferon (IFN) production. The NP C-terminal domain contains a 3'-to-5' exonuclease activity involved in suppressing IFN induction. We have established a murine polymerase (Pol) I reverse genetics system for LASV, showing that residues D389 and G392 of NP were critical for LASV viability, while the D389A/G392A and D389T/392A double mutants were severely altered in the ability to suppress IFN in macrophages and dendritic cells. Assessing their attenuation in vivo may open new perspectives in vaccinology.

  8. 25(OH) vitamin D suppresses macrophage adhesion and migration by downregulation of ER stress and scavenger receptor A1 in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riek, Amy E; Oh, Jisu; Darwech, Isra; Moynihan, Clare E; Bruchas, Robin R; Bernal-Mizrachi, Carlos

    2014-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Vitamin D deficiency is not only more prevalent in diabetics but also doubles the risk of developing CVD. However, it is unknown whether 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D3] replacement slows monocyte adhesion and migration, critical mechanisms involved in atherosclerosis progression. In this study, monocytes from vitamin D-deficient diabetic patients were cultured either in the patient's serum or in vitamin D-deficient media with or without 25(OH)D3 treatment. Adding 25(OH)D3 to monocytes cultured in vitamin D-deficient serum or media decreased monocyte adhesion to fibronectin and migration stimulated by monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1). Accordingly, 25(OH)D3 decreased adhesion marker β1- and β2-integrin expression and migration receptor chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2 (CCR2) expression. 25(OH)D3 treatment downregulated monocyte endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and scavenger receptor class A, type 1 (SR-A1) expression. The absence of SR-A1 prevented the increased macrophage adhesion and migration induced by vitamin D deficiency. Moreover, the absence of SR-A1 prevented the induction of adhesion and migration and expression of their associated membrane receptors by Thapsigargin, an ER stress inducer. These results identify cellular activation of monocyte/macrophage vitamin D signaling through 25(OH)D3 as a potential mechanism that could modulate adhesion and migration in diabetic subjects. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '16th Vitamin D Workshop'. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. From blood to brain: amoeboid microglial cell, a nascent macrophage and its functions in developing brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Charanjit KAUR; S Thameem DHEEN; Eng-ang LING

    2007-01-01

    Amoeboid microglial cells (AMC) in the developing brain are active macrophages.The macrophagic nature of these cells has been demonstrated by many methods,such as the localization of various hydrolytic enzymes and the presence of comple-ment type 3 surface receptors in them. More importantly is the direct visualization of these cells engaged in the phagocytosis of degenerating cells at the ultrastruc-tural level. Further evidence of them being active macrophages is the avid inter-nalization of tracers administered by the intravenous or intraperitoneal routes in developing rats. The potential involvement of AMC in immune functions is sup-ported by the induced expression of major histocompatibility complex class Ⅰ and Ⅱ antigens on them when challenged by lipopolysaccharide or interferon-γ. Im-munosuppressive drugs, such as glucocorticoids and immune function-enhanc-ing drugs like melatonin, affect the expression of surface receptors and antigens and the release of cytokines by AMC. Recent studies in our laboratory have shown the expression of insulin-like growth factors, endothelins, 21,31-cyclic nucle-otide 31-phosphodiesterase, and N-methyl-D-asparate receptors. This along with the release of chemokines, such as stromal derived factor-la and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, suggests multiple functional roles of AMC in early brain development.

  10. DMPD: RAPping production of type I interferon in pDCs through mTOR. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18800159 RAPping production of type I interferon in pDCs through mTOR. Costa-Mattio...li M, Sonenberg N. Nat Immunol. 2008 Oct;9(10):1097-9. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show RAPping production... of type I interferon in pDCs through mTOR. PubmedID 18800159 Title RAPping production of type I interferon

  11. Dexamethasone palmitate ameliorates macrophages-rich graft-versus-host disease by inhibiting macrophage functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Nishiwaki

    Full Text Available Macrophage infiltration of skin GVHD lesions correlates directly with disease severity, but the mechanisms underlying this relationship remain unclear and GVHD with many macrophages is a therapeutic challenge. Here, we characterize the macrophages involved in GVHD and report that dexamethasone palmitate (DP, a liposteroid, can ameliorate such GVHD by inhibiting macrophage functions. We found that host-derived macrophages could exacerbate GVHD in a mouse model through expression of higher levels of pro-inflammatory TNF-α and IFN-γ, and lower levels of anti-inflammatory IL-10 than resident macrophages in mice without GVHD. DP significantly decreased the viability and migration capacity of primary mouse macrophages compared to conventional dexamethasone in vitro. DP treatment on day 7 and day 14 decreased macrophage number, and attenuated GVHD score and subsequent mortality in a murine model. This is the first study to provide evidence that therapy for GVHD should be changed on the basis of infiltrating cell type.

  12. Ultrastructure and Large Subunit rDNA-Based Phylogeny of Sphaerodinium cracoviense, an Unusual Freshwater Dinoflagellate with a Novel Type of Eyespot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craveiro, S.C.; Moestrup, Øjvind; Daugbjerg, N.;

    2010-01-01

    Sphaerodinium cracoviense was collected near Cracow, Poland, and analysed by light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and serial-section transmission electron microscopy. Thecae showed a peridinioid type of plate arrangement with unusual numbers in the anterior intercalary and postcingular...

  13. [Molecular mechanisms regulating the activity of macrophages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoprienko, L V

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews modern concepts of the most common types of macrophage activation: classical, alternative, and type II. Molecular mechanisms of induction and regulation of these three types of activation are discussed. Any population of macrophages was shown to change its properties depending on its microenvironment and concrete biological situation (the "functional plasticity of macrophages"). Many intermediate states of macrophages were described along with the most pronounced and well-known activation types (classical activation, alternative activation, and type II activation). These intermediate states are characterized by a variety of combinations of their biological properties, including elements of the three afore mentioned types of activation. Macrophage activity is regulated by a complex network of interrelated cascade mechanisms.

  14. Quantitative GPCR and ion channel transcriptomics in primary alveolar macrophages and macrophage surrogates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groot-Kormelink Paul J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alveolar macrophages are one of the first lines of defence against invading pathogens and play a central role in modulating both the innate and acquired immune systems. By responding to endogenous stimuli within the lung, alveolar macrophages contribute towards the regulation of the local inflammatory microenvironment, the initiation of wound healing and the pathogenesis of viral and bacterial infections. Despite the availability of protocols for isolating primary alveolar macrophages from the lung these cells remain recalcitrant to expansion in-vitro and therefore surrogate cell types, such as monocyte derived macrophages and phorbol ester-differentiated cell lines (e.g. U937, THP-1, HL60 are frequently used to model macrophage function. Methods The availability of high throughput gene expression technologies for accurate quantification of transcript levels enables the re-evaluation of these surrogate cell types for use as cellular models of the alveolar macrophage. Utilising high-throughput TaqMan arrays and focussing on dynamically regulated families of integral membrane proteins, we explore the similarities and differences in G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR and ion channel expression in alveolar macrophages and their widely used surrogates. Results The complete non-sensory GPCR and ion channel transcriptome is described for primary alveolar macrophages and macrophage surrogates. The expression of numerous GPCRs and ion channels whose expression were hitherto not described in human alveolar macrophages are compared across primary macrophages and commonly used macrophage cell models. Several membrane proteins known to have critical roles in regulating macrophage function, including CXCR6, CCR8 and TRPV4, were found to be highly expressed in macrophages but not expressed in PMA-differentiated surrogates. Conclusions The data described in this report provides insight into the appropriate choice of cell models for

  15. Ultrastructural comparison of Bonamia spp (Haplosporidia) infecting ostreid oysters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hine, P.M.; Carnegie, R.B.; Kroeck, M.A.; Villalba, A.; Engelsma, M.Y.; Burreson, E.M.

    2014-01-01

    The ultrastructure of Bonamia from Ostrea angasi from Australia, Crassostrea ariakensis from the USA, O. puelchana from Argentina and O. edulis from Spain was compared with described Bonamia spp. All appear conspecific with B. exitiosa. The Bonamia sp. from Chile had similarities to the type B. exit

  16. DMPD: Type I interferon [corrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily of transcription factors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16979567 Type I interferon [corrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily...ng) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Type I interferon [corrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily...orrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily of transcription factors. Authors Honda K

  17. Autoradiographic and ultrastructural studies on the human fibro-atheromatous plaque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villaschi, S.; Spagnoli, L.G. (Universita degli Studi, Rome (Italy). Istituto di Anatomia ed Istologia Patologica)

    1983-07-01

    Foam cells, either myogenic or macrophagic, are commonly detected in experimental and human fibro-atheromatous plaques. Their role in human atherosclerosis is not yet understood. This paper reports on a preliminary autoradiographic study combined with ultrastructural observations in the human fibro-atheromatous plaque. Most of the autoradiographic silver grains appeared on foam cells and monocytelike cells, thus suggesting a local proliferation of these cells.

  18. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor Type 1 Signaling Prevents Delayed Wound Healing in Diabetes by Attenuating the Production of IL-1β by Recruited Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okizaki, Shin-Ichiro; Ito, Yoshiya; Hosono, Kanako; Oba, Kazuhito; Ohkubo, Hirotoki; Kojo, Ken; Nishizawa, Nobuyuki; Shibuya, Masabumi; Shichiri, Masayoshi; Majima, Masataka

    2016-06-01

    The persistence of proinflammatory macrophages, which are recruited to the granulation tissue, impairs the healing of diabetic wounds. Herein, we examined the role of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 1 (VEGFR1) signaling in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic wound healing. Angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, and the healing of full-thickness skin wounds were impaired in STZ-treated wild-type (WT) mice compared with vehicle-treated WT mice, with attenuated recruitment of VEGFR1-positive macrophages expressing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, VEGF-C, and VEGF-D to the wound granulation tissue. These phenomena were even more prevalent in STZ-treated VEGFR1 tyrosine kinase knockout mice (VEGFR1 TK(-/-) mice). STZ-treated WT mice, but not STZ-treated VEGFR1 TK(-/-) mice, showed accelerated wound healing when treated with placenta growth factor. Compared with that of STZ-treated WT mice, the wound granulation tissue of STZ-treated VEGFR1 TK(-/-) mice contained more VEGFR1-positive cells expressing IL-1β [a classic (M1) activated macrophage marker] and fewer VEGFR1-positive cells expressing the mannose receptor [CD206; an alternatively activated (M2) macrophage marker]. Treatment of STZ-treated VEGFR1 TK(-/-) mice with an IL-1β-neutralizing antibody restored impaired wound healing and angiogenesis/lymphangiogenesis and induced macrophages in the wound granulation tissue to switch to an M2 phenotype. Taken together, these results suggest that VEGFR1 signaling plays a role in regulating the balance between macrophage phenotypes in STZ-induced diabetic wounds, prevents impaired diabetic wound healing, and promotes angiogenesis/lymphangiogenesis.

  19. Role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and associated hepatic co-morbidities: a comprehensive review of human and rodent studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine Claire Morrison

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with a chronic low-grade inflammatory state that drives the development of obesity-related co-morbidities such as insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and cardiovascular disease. This metabolic inflammation is thought to originate in the adipose tissue, which becomes inflamed and insulin resistant when it is no longer able to expand in response to excess caloric and nutrient intake. The production of inflammatory mediators by dysfunctional adipose tissue is thought to drive the development of more complex forms of disease such as type 2 diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. An important factor that may contribute to metabolic inflammation is the cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF. Increasing evidence suggests that MIF is released by adipose tissue in obesity and that it is also involved in metabolic and inflammatory processes that underlie the development of obesity-related pathologies. This review provides a comprehensive summary of our current knowledge on the role of MIF in obesity, its production by adipose tissue, and its involvement in the development of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. We discuss the main findings from recent clinical studies in obese subjects and weight-loss intervention studies as well as results from clinical studies in patients with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, we summarize findings from experimental disease models studying the contribution of MIF in obesity and insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and hepatic lipid accumulation and fibrosis. Although many of the findings support a pro-inflammatory role of MIF in disease development, recent reports also provide indications that MIF may exert protective effects under certain conditions.

  20. DMPD: The role of type I interferon production by dendritic cells in host defense. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17544561 The role of type I interferon production by dendritic cells in host defens...e. Fitzgerald-Bocarsly P, Feng D. Biochimie. 2007 Jun-Jul;89(6-7):843-55. Epub 2007 May 8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The rol...e of type I interferon production by dendritic cells in host defense. PubmedID 17544561 Title The role

  1. Is mammary not otherwise specified-type sarcoma with CD10 expression a distinct entity? A rare case report with immunohistochemical and ultrastructural study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Guang-Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mammary sarcoma is extremely rare and the diagnosis is established only after metaplastic carcinomas and malignant phyllodes tumours are excluded. A rare case of not otherwise specified-type sarcoma with CD10 expression in the left breast in a 45-year-old female was presented. It was a high-grade tumour composed of spindle cells histologically. The immunohistochemical results showed that CD10, vimentin and EGFR were positive diffusely and SMA presented focally, whereas epithelial markers and other myoepithelial or myogenic markers were all negative. The electron microscope investigation demonstrated fibroblast-like features. The exact entity of the tumour remains to be studied because it resembles undifferentiated sarcoma or sarcomatoid metaplastic carcinoma to some degree, as well as high-grade malignant phyllodes tumour in particular. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/9019879588725702

  2. Comparative sperm ultrastructure in Nemertea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Döhren, J; Beckers, P; Vogeler, R; Bartolomaeus, T

    2010-07-01

    Although the monophyly of Nemertea is strongly supported by unique morphological characters and results of molecular phylogenetic studies, their ingroup relationships are largely unresolved. To contribute solving this problem we studied sperm ultrastructure of 12 nemertean species that belong to different subtaxa representing the commonly recognized major monophyletic groups. The study yielded a set of 26 characters with an unexpected variation among species of the same genus (Tubulanus and Procephalothrix species), whereas other species varied in metric values or only one character state (Ramphogordius). In some species, the sperm nucleus has grooves (Zygonemertes virescens, Amphiporus imparispinosus) that may be twisted and give a spiral shape to the sperm head (Paranemertes peregrina, Emplectonema gracile). To make the characters from sperm ultrastructure accessible for further phylogenetic analyses, they were coded in a character matrix. Published data for eight species turned out to be sufficiently detailed to be included. Comparative evaluation of available information on the sperm ultrastructure suggests that subtaxa of Heteronemertea and Hoplonemertea are supported as monophyletic by sperm morphology. However, the data do not provide information on the existing contradictions regarding the internal relationships of "Palaeonemertea." Nevertheless, our study provides evidence that sperm ultrastructure yields numerous potentially informative characters that will be included in upcoming phylogenetic analyses.

  3. Role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and associated hepatic co-morbidities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morrison, M.C.; Kleemann, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with a chronic low-grade inflammatory state that drives the -development of obesity-related co-morbidities such as insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and cardiovascular disease. This metabolic inflammation is thought to originate i

  4. Start of insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus promotes the influx of macrophages into subcutaneous adipose tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, H.J.; Stienstra, R.; Diepen, van J.A.; Hijmans, A.; Laak, van der J.A.; Vervoort, G.M.; Tack, C.J.

    2013-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus is accompanied by weight gain characterised by an increase in abdominal fat mass. The expansion of adipose tissue mass is generally paralleled by profound morphological and inflammatory changes. We hypothesised that the

  5. Role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and associated hepatic co-morbidities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morrison, M.C.; Kleemann, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with a chronic low-grade inflammatory state that drives the -development of obesity-related co-morbidities such as insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and cardiovascular disease. This metabolic inflammation is thought to originate i

  6. Role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and associated hepatic co-morbidities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morrison, M.C.; Kleemann, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with a chronic low-grade inflammatory state that drives the -development of obesity-related co-morbidities such as insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and cardiovascular disease. This metabolic inflammation is thought to originate

  7. Start of insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus promotes the influx of macrophages into subcutaneous adipose tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, H.J.; Stienstra, R.; Diepen, J.A. van; Hijmans, A.; Laak, J.A.W.M. van der; Vervoort, G.M.M.; Tack, C.J.J.

    2013-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus is accompanied by weight gain characterised by an increase in abdominal fat mass. The expansion of adipose tissue mass is generally paralleled by profound morphological and inflammatory changes. We hypothesised that the

  8. Constructive tissue remodeling of biologic scaffolds: A phenomenon associated with scaffold characteristics and distinctive macrophage phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Bryan Nicklaus

    Scaffolds composed of extracellular matrix (ECM) have been shown to promote formation of site-specific, functional host tissue following implantation in a number of preclinical and clinical settings. However, the exact mechanisms by which ECM scaffolds are able to promote this type of "constructive tissue remodeling" are unknown. Further, the ability of ECM scaffolds to promote constructive tissue remodeling appears to be dependent on the methods used in their production and the applications in which they are utilized. Therefore, a comprehensive understanding of ECM scaffold characteristics and their effects upon the host response and subsequent tissue remodeling outcome is essential to the design of intelligent scaffolds for specific clinical applications. The present work investigated the effects of tissue source and chemical cross-linking upon the resulting ECM scaffolds, showing that ECM scaffold materials have distinct ultrastructural and compositional characteristics which are dependant on the anatomic location from which the scaffolds are derived and the methods used in their production. These characteristics were associated with distinct patterns of cell behavior in vitro. Distinct tissue remodeling outcomes were observed following implantation of a subset of these scaffold materials in a rat abdominal wall musculature reconstruction model. Acellular, non-cross-linked ECM was associated with constructive tissue remodeling while scaffolds that contained cellular components or were chemically cross-linked resulted in dense connective tissue deposition or encapsulation, respectively. Despite differences in the tissue remodeling outcome, a histologically similar population of macrophages was observed following implantation in each of these cases. Therefore, the phenotype of the macrophage population participating in the host response was investigated. It was shown that scaffolds which resulted in constructive tissue remodeling were associated with an increase

  9. Genes encoding putative effector proteins of the type III secretion system of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 are required for bacterial virulence and proliferation in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensel, M; Shea, J E; Waterman, S R; Mundy, R; Nikolaus, T; Banks, G; Vazquez-Torres, A; Gleeson, C; Fang, F C; Holden, D W

    1998-10-01

    The type III secretion system of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2) is required for systemic infection of this pathogen in mice. Cloning and sequencing of a central region of SPI-2 revealed the presence of genes encoding putative chaperones and effector proteins of the secretion system. The predicted products of the sseB, sseC and sseD genes display weak but significant similarity to amino acid sequences of EspA, EspD and EspB, which are secreted by the type III secretion system encoded by the locus of enterocyte effacement of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli. The transcriptional activity of an sseA::luc fusion gene was shown to be dependent on ssrA, which is required for the expression of genes encoding components of the secretion system apparatus. Strains carrying nonpolar mutations in sseA, sseB or sseC were severely attenuated in virulence, strains carrying mutations in sseF or sseG were weakly attenuated, and a strain with a mutation in sseE had no detectable virulence defect. These phenotypes were reflected in the ability of mutant strains to grow within a variety of macrophage cell types: strains carrying mutations in sseA, sseB or sseC failed to accumulate, whereas the growth rates of strains carrying mutations in sseE, sseF or sseG were only modestly reduced. These data suggest that, in vivo, one of the functions of the SPI-2 secretion system is to enable intracellular bacterial proliferation.

  10. Inhibition of DC-SIGN-mediated transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 by Toll-like receptor 3 signalling in breast milk macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Yukie; Watanabe, Eri; Watari, Eiji; Shinya, Eiji; Satomi, Misao; Takeshita, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Hidemi

    2010-01-01

    The majority of cells in early/colostrum milk are breast milk macrophages (BrMMø) expressing dendritic cell (DC)-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3 (ICAM3) grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), and the expression level of DC-SIGN on BrMMø will determine cell-to-cell human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmissibility. Thus, one of the strategies to prevent vertical transmission of HIV-1 through breast-feeding is to find a way to suppress DC-SIGN expression on BrMMø. As for the expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in BrMMø, TLR3 was always seen in BrMMø but not in peripheral blood monocytes (PBMo). Also, the expression of TLR3 was slightly enhanced in BrMMø when the cells were treated with interleukin (IL)-4. Moreover, when TLR3 was stimulated with its specific ligand, the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) poly(I:C), DC-SIGN expression on BrMMø was reduced even in the IL-4-mediated enhanced state. Some reduction may be caused by type I interferons (IFNs), such as IFN-α/β, secreted from BrMMø. Indeed, both IFNs, particularly IFN-β, showed a strong capacity to suppress the enhancement of DC-SIGN expression on IL-4-treated BrMMø and such TLR3-mediated DC-SIGN suppression was partially abrogated by the addition of anti-IFN-α/β-receptor-specific antibodies. As expected, DC-SIGN-mediated HIV-1 transmission to CD4-positive cells by BrMMø was inhibited by either poly(I:C) stimulation or by treatment with type I IFNs. These findings suggest a possible strategy for preventing mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV-1 via breast-feeding through TLR3 signalling. PMID:20406303

  11. Ameobal pathogen mimivirus infects macrophages through phagocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Ghigo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Mimivirus, or Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APMV, a giant double-stranded DNA virus that grows in amoeba, was identified for the first time in 2003. Entry by phagocytosis within amoeba has been suggested but not demonstrated. We demonstrate here that APMV was internalized by macrophages but not by non-phagocytic cells, leading to productive APMV replication. Clathrin- and caveolin-mediated endocytosis pathways, as well as degradative endosome-mediated endocytosis, were not used by APMV to invade macrophages. Ultrastructural analysis showed that protrusions were formed around the entering virus, suggesting that macropinocytosis or phagocytosis was involved in APMV entry. Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases were required for APMV entry. Blocking macropinocytosis and the lack of APMV colocalization with rabankyrin-5 showed that macropinocytosis was not involved in viral entry. Overexpression of a dominant-negative form of dynamin-II, a regulator of phagocytosis, inhibited APMV entry. Altogether, our data demonstrated that APMV enters macrophages through phagocytosis, a new pathway for virus entry in cells. This reinforces the paradigm that intra-amoebal pathogens have the potential to infect macrophages.

  12. Molecular Characterization of E-Type Prostanoid Receptor 4 (EP4 from Ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis and Its Functional Analysis in the Monocytes/Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye-Jing Rong

    Full Text Available Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 plays an important role in a broad spectrum of physiological and pathological processes by interacting with E-type prostanoid receptors (EPs. EP4 is one of four EP subtypes known to mediate the immune response in mammalian monocytes/macrophages. However, the precise function and characteristics of EP4 in fish remain unclear. In this study, we characterized a novel EP4-like (PaEP4L gene from ayu, Plecoglossus altivelis. The cDNA sequence of PaEP4L is 2781 nucleotides (nts in length, encoding a polypeptide of 459 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular weight of 51.17 kDa. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic tree analysis showed that PaEP4L shared 76% amino acid identity with that of the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar. PaEP4L mRNA was detected by real-time quantitative PCR (QPCR in all tested tissues and head kidney-derived monocytes/macrophages (MO/MФ. It varied greatly in liver, spleen and MO/MФ upon Vibrio anguillarum infection. Western blot analysis revealed a significant increase of PaEP4L in cell homogenates from ayu MO/MФ upon V. anguillarum infection. Moreover, anti-PaEP4L IgG reversed the down-regulation of interleukin 1β (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α mRNA expression as well as phagocytosis in ayu MO/MФ caused by PGE2. There were no significant differences in the respiratory burst response between PGE2 treated and untreated cells. We further found that cAMP mediated PGE2/PaEP4L signal in ayu MO/MФ. In conclusion, our results indicate that PaEP4L mediates PGE2 effects on ayu MO/MФ function, revealing that EP4 also plays a role in the modulation of cells of the fish's innate immune system.

  13. Lipoid proteinosis: clinical, histologic, and ultrastructural investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muda, A O; Paradisi, M; Angelo, C; Mostaccioli, S; Atzori, F; Puddu, P; Faraggiana, T

    1995-10-01

    The case of a 12-year-old boy with lipoid proteinosis is reported. Physical examination revealed long-standing varicella-like scars and areas of hyperpigmentation on the face and upper limbs with no evidence of photosensitivity, hoarseness, small papules along the free margins of eyelids, tongue firmness with short frenulum, and widespread papular lesions of the oral cavity. Histologic and ultrastructural examination revealed the characteristic skin changes: pink, hyaline-like, strongly periodic acid-Schiff-positive material in the dermis, surrounding blood vessels, and sweat glands; thin (30 to 35 nm) collagen fibrils interspersed in abundant amorphous material; blood vessels surrounded by thickened, multilayered basement membranes, in which layers of typical, homogeneous basement membrane material were alternating with electronlucent areas filled by various amounts of thin, cross-striated fibrils, arranged perpendicularly. These findings are of great interest since they show a complex relationship between type IV and type III-like collagen components.

  14. 巨噬细胞极化在2型糖尿病和心血管疾病中的作用%The function of macrophage polarization in type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈竹夏; 段胜仲

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages are categorized into phenotypic subtypes. Classically activated macrophages (Ml) and alternatively activated macrophages (M2) are the two extremes of the full spectrum of macrophage heterogeneity. They are activated by Thl and Th2 cytokines respectively. Surface markers, cytokine and chemokine production, and functions are distinctly different between Ml and M2 macrophages. Macrophage polarization is tightly regulated by a variety of molecules, among which transcription factors are one of the most important group. Polarized macrophages exist in different microenvironments and play different roles. The metabolic status of the body is largely determined by the crosstalk between polarized macrophages and adipocytes, hepatocytes, and skeletal myocytes. Furthermore, such crosstalk plays important roles in the development of type 2 diabetes. The interactions between polarized macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, and possibly cardiomyocytes contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease. The outcome of these interactions indicates that in general anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages play protective roles in type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. These studies have tremendously advanced our appreciation of the function of macrophage polarization in physiology and pathology and presented numerous therapeutic opportunities.%巨噬细胞具有多种亚型.经典激活的巨噬细胞(M1)和替代激活的巨噬细胞(M2)是巨噬细胞不均一性的两种极端分类,分别由Th1和Th2细胞因子激活.M1和M2巨噬细胞的表面标志物、产生的细胞因子和趋化因子及其功能都有明显不同.巨噬细胞的极化由多种分子调控,转录因子是其中最重要的群体之一.极化的巨噬细胞存在于不同的微环境中,扮演着不同角色.身体的代谢状态在很大程度上取决于极化的巨噬细胞和脂肪细胞、肝细胞、骨骼肌细胞之间的相互作用.这些相互作用对2

  15. Utility of sodium hypochlorite for ultrastructure study of bacterial spore integuments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, L J; Williams, M G

    1966-12-01

    Rode, L. J. (The University of Texas, Austin), and M. Glenn Williams. Utility of sodium hypochlorite for ultrastructure study of bacterial spore integuments. J. Bacteriol. 92:1772-1778. 1966.-Spores of Bacillus megaterium are partially dissolved by sodium hypochlorite. Spore integuments become visible during the dissolution, and ultrastructural features may be detected. Three distinct integument types are described for B. megaterium QM B1551 with the use of this technique. Since a variety of microbial cells are affected by sodium hypochlorite, its use may be applicable to ultrastructure study of cells other than bacterial spores.

  16. Inflammation and Cell Death in Age-Related Macular Degeneration: An Immunopathological and Ultrastructural Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher P. Ardeljan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD remains elusive despite the characterization of many factors contributing to the disease in its late-stage phenotypes. AMD features an immune system in flux, as shown by changes in macrophage polarization with age, expression of cytokines and complement, microglial accumulation with age, etc. These point to an allostatic overload, possibly due to a breakdown in self vs. non-self when endogenous compounds and structures acquire the appearance of non-self over time. The result is inflammation and inflammation-mediated cell death. While it is clear that these processes ultimately result in degeneration of retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptor, the prevalent type of cell death contributing to the various phenotypes is unknown. Both molecular studies as well as ultrastructural pathology suggest pyroptosis, and perhaps necroptosis, are the predominant mechanisms of cell death at play, with only minimal evidence for apoptosis. Herein, we attempt to reconcile those factors identified by experimental AMD models and integrate these data with pathology observed under the electron microscope—particularly observations of mitochondrial dysfunction, DNA leakage, autophagy, and cell death.

  17. Cholesteryl ester hydrolase activity is abolished in HSL-/- macrophages but unchanged in macrophages lacking KIAA1363.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchebner, Marlene; Pfeifer, Thomas; Rathke, Nora; Chandak, Prakash G; Lass, Achim; Schreiber, Renate; Kratzer, Adelheid; Zimmermann, Robert; Sattler, Wolfgang; Koefeler, Harald; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Kostner, Gerhard M; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Chiang, Kyle P; Haemmerle, Guenter; Zechner, Rudolf; Levak-Frank, Sanja; Cravatt, Benjamin; Kratky, Dagmar

    2010-10-01

    Cholesteryl ester (CE) accumulation in macrophages represents a crucial event during foam cell formation, a hallmark of atherogenesis. Here we investigated the role of two previously described CE hydrolases, hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and KIAA1363, in macrophage CE hydrolysis. HSL and KIAA1363 exhibited marked differences in their abilities to hydrolyze CE, triacylglycerol (TG), diacylglycerol (DG), and 2-acetyl monoalkylglycerol ether (AcMAGE), a precursor for biosynthesis of platelet-activating factor (PAF). HSL efficiently cleaved all four substrates, whereas KIAA1363 hydrolyzed only AcMAGE. This contradicts previous studies suggesting that KIAA1363 is a neutral CE hydrolase. Macrophages of KIAA1363(-/-) and wild-type mice exhibited identical neutral CE hydrolase activity, which was almost abolished in tissues and macrophages of HSL(-/-) mice. Conversely, AcMAGE hydrolase activity was diminished in macrophages and some tissues of KIAA1363(-/-) but unchanged in HSL(-/-) mice. CE turnover was unaffected in macrophages lacking KIAA1363 and HSL, whereas cAMP-dependent cholesterol efflux was influenced by HSL but not by KIAA1363. Despite decreased CE hydrolase activities, HSL(-/-) macrophages exhibited CE accumulation similar to wild-type (WT) macrophages. We conclude that additional enzymes must exist that cooperate with HSL to regulate CE levels in macrophages. KIAA1363 affects AcMAGE hydrolase activity but is of minor importance as a direct CE hydrolase in macrophages.

  18. The Alternative Faces of Macrophage Generate Osteoclasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Lampiasi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of how osteoclasts are generated and whether they can be altered by inflammatory stimuli is a topic of particular interest for osteoclastogenesis. It is known that the monocyte/macrophage lineage gives rise to osteoclasts (OCs by the action of macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF and receptor activator of nuclear factor-kB ligand (RANKL, which induce cell differentiation through their receptors, c-fms and RANK, respectively. The multinucleated giant cells (MGCs generated by the engagement of RANK/RANKL are typical OCs. Nevertheless, very few studies have addressed the question of which subset of macrophages generates OCs. Indeed, two main subsets of macrophages are postulated, the inflammatory or classically activated type (M1 and the anti-inflammatory or alternatively activated type (M2. It has been proposed that macrophages can be polarized in vitro towards a predominantly M1 or M2 phenotype with the addition of granulocyte macrophage- (GM- CSF or M-CSF, respectively. Various inflammatory stimuli known to induce macrophage polarization, such as LPS or TNF-α, can alter the type of MGC obtained from RANKL-induced differentiation. This review aims to highlight the role of immune-related stimuli and factors in inducing macrophages towards the osteoclastogenesis choice.

  19. Reptilian spermatogenesis: A histological and ultrastructural perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Gribbins, Kevin M

    2011-01-01

    Until recently, the histology and ultrastructural events of spermatogenesis in reptiles were relatively unknown. Most of the available morphological information focuses on specific stages of spermatogenesis, spermiogenesis, and/or of the mature spermatozoa. No study to date has provided complete ultrastructural information on the early events of spermatogenesis, proliferation and meiosis in class Reptilia. Furthermore, no comprehensive data set exists that describes the ultrastructure of the ...

  20. Ultrastructural aspects of oogenesis and oocyte primary growth in Serrasalmus spilopleura (Teleostei, Characiformes, Characidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, A C; Quagio-Grassiotto, I

    2001-06-01

    The ultrastructural characteristics of the organelles present in Serrasalmus spilopleura oogonia and oocytes undergoing primary growth were described in detail, considering its role in the nuclear and cytoplasmic metabolic processes that occur in these cell types. Even though these cells do not significantly differ from those similar to them that are found in other teleost groups, the analysis of their ultrastructure makes available new data on the reproductive biology of Characiformes.

  1. Myeloid Growth Factors Promote Resistance to Mycobacterial Infection by Curtailing Granuloma Necrosis through Macrophage Replenishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagán, Antonio J; Yang, Chao-Tsung; Cameron, James; Swaim, Laura E; Ellett, Felix; Lieschke, Graham J; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2015-07-08

    The mycobacterial ESX-1 virulence locus accelerates macrophage recruitment to the forming tuberculous granuloma. Newly recruited macrophages phagocytose previously infected apoptotic macrophages to become new bacterial growth niches. Granuloma macrophages can then necrose, releasing mycobacteria into the extracellular milieu, which potentiates their growth even further. Using zebrafish with genetic or pharmacologically induced macrophage deficiencies, we find that global macrophage deficits increase susceptibility to mycobacterial infection by accelerating granuloma necrosis. This is because reduction in the macrophage supply below a critical threshold decreases granuloma macrophage replenishment to the point where apoptotic infected macrophages, failing to get engulfed, necrose. Reducing macrophage demand by removing bacterial ESX-1 offsets the susceptibility of macrophage deficits. Conversely, increasing macrophage supply in wild-type fish by overexpressing myeloid growth factors induces resistance by curtailing necrosis. These findings may explain the susceptibility of humans with mononuclear cytopenias to mycobacterial infections and highlight the therapeutic potential of myeloid growth factors in tuberculosis.

  2. [Changes of ultrastructure of the capillary endotheliocytes of ischemized and nonaffected muscular tissue after transplantation of human hemopoietic stem cells of fetal liver in experiment in vivo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliutin, R V; Zadorozhna, T D; Medvets'kyĭ, E B; Driuk, M F; Petrenko, A Iu

    2010-04-01

    In experiment was investigated ultrastructure of the capillaries endothelial cells and histological peculiarities of muscular tissue on various stages after transplantation of hemopoietic stem cells of fetal liver (HSCFL). There was proved, that in ischemic environment HSCFL stimulate processes of angiogenesis, and in the case of transplantation into intact muscular tissue they are differentiating into the tissue macrophages, not interfering with muscular tissue structure.

  3. Macrophage inflammatory protein 1alpha inhibits postentry steps of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection via suppression of intracellular cyclic AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amella, Carol-Ann; Sherry, Barbara; Shepp, David H; Schmidtmayerova, Helena

    2005-05-01

    Primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) predominantly use chemokine receptor CCR5 to enter target cells. The natural ligands of CCR5, the beta-chemokines macrophage inflammatory protein 1alpha (MIP-1alpha), MIP-1beta, and RANTES, interfere with HIV-1 binding to CCR5 receptors and decrease the amount of virions entering cells. Although the inhibition of HIV-1 entry by beta-chemokines is well documented, their effects on postentry steps of the viral life cycle and on host cell components that control the outcome of infection after viral entry are not well defined. Here, we show that all three beta-chemokines, and MIP-1alpha in particular, inhibit postentry steps of the HIV-1 life cycle in primary lymphocytes, presumably via suppression of intracellular levels of cyclic AMP (cAMP). Productive HIV-1 infection of primary lymphocytes requires cellular activation. Cell activation increases intracellular cAMP, which is required for efficient synthesis of proviral DNA during early steps of viral infection. Binding of MIP-1alpha to cognate receptors decreases activation-induced intracellular cAMP levels through the activation of inhibitory G proteins. Furthermore, inhibition of one of the downstream targets of cAMP, cAMP-dependent PKA, significantly inhibits synthesis of HIV-1-specific DNA without affecting virus entry. These data reveal that beta-chemokine-mediated inhibition of virus replication in primary lymphocytes combines inhibitory effects at the entry and postentry levels and imply the involvement of beta-chemokine-induced signaling in postentry inhibition of HIV-1 infection.

  4. In vivo rescue of alveolar macrophages from SP-A knockout mice with exogenous SP-A nearly restores a wild type intracellular proteome; actin involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floros Joanna

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mice lacking surfactant protein-A (SP-A-/-; knockout; KO exhibit increased vulnerability to infection and injury. Although many bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL protein differences between KO and wild-type (WT are rapidly reversed in KO after infection, their clinical course is still compromised. We studied the impact of SP-A on the alveolar macrophage (AM proteome under basal conditions. Male SP-A KO mice were SP-A-treated (5 micrograms/mouse and sacrificed in 6 or 18 hr. The AM proteomes of KO, SP-A-treated KO, and WT mice were studied by 2D-DIGE coupled with MALDI-ToF/ToF and AM actin distribution was examined by phalloidon staining. Results We observed: a significant differences from KO in WT or exogenous SP-A-treated in 45 of 76 identified proteins (both increases and decreases. These included actin-related/cytoskeletal proteins (involved in motility, phagocytosis, endocytosis, proteins of intracellular signaling, cell differentiation/regulation, regulation of inflammation, protease/chaperone function, and proteins related to Nrf2-mediated oxidative stress response pathway; b SP-A-induced changes causing the AM proteome of the KO to resemble that of WT; and c that SP-A treatment altered cell size and F-actin distribution. Conclusions These differences are likely to enhance AM function. The observations show for the first time that acute in vivo SP-A treatment of KO mice, under basal or unstimulated conditions, affects the expression of multiple AM proteins, alters F-actin distribution, and can restore much of the WT phenotype. We postulate that the SP-A-mediated expression profile of the AM places it in a state of "readiness" to successfully conduct its innate immune functions and ensure lung health.

  5. Matrine displayed antiviral activity in porcine alveolar macrophages co-infected by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and porcine circovirus type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Na; Sun, Panpan; Lv, Haipeng; Sun, Yaogui; Guo, Jianhua; Wang, Zhirui; Luo, Tiantian; Wang, Shaoyu; Li, Hongquan

    2016-04-15

    The co-infection of porcine reproductive respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is quite common in clinical settings and no effective treatment to the co-infection is available. In this study, we established the porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) cells model co-infected with PRRSV/PCV2 with modification in vitro, and investigated the antiviral activity of Matrine on this cell model and further evaluated the effect of Matrine on virus-induced TLR3,4/NF-κB/TNF-α pathway. The results demonstrated PAM cells inoculated with PRRSV followed by PCV2 2 h later enhanced PRRSV and PCV2 replications. Matrine treatment suppressed both PRRSV and PCV2 infection at 12 h post infection. Furthermore, PRRSV/PCV2 co- infection induced IκBα degradation and phosphorylation as well as the translocation of NF-κB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus indicating that PRRSV/PCV2 co-infection induced NF-κB activation. Matrine treatment significantly down-regulated the expression of TLR3, TLR4 and TNF-α although it, to some extent, suppressed p-IκBα expression, suggesting that TLR3,4/NF-κB/TNF-α pathway play an important role of Matrine in combating PRRSV/PCV2 co-infection. It is concluded that Matrine possesses activity against PRRSV/PCV2 co-infection in vitro and suppression of the TLR3,4/NF-κB/TNF-α pathway as an important underlying molecular mechanism. These findings warrant Matrine to be further explored for its antiviral activity in clinical settings.

  6. Interferon-alpha mediates restriction of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 replication in primary human macrophages at an early stage of replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly M Cheney

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFNα and β are induced directly in response to viral infection, resulting in an antiviral state for the cell. In vitro studies have shown that IFNα is a potent inhibitor of viral replication; however, its role in HIV-1 infection is incompletely understood. In this study we describe the ability of IFNα to restrict HIV-1 infection in primary human macrophages in contrast to peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Inhibition to HIV-1 replication in cells pretreated with IFNα occurred at an early stage in the virus life cycle. Late viral events such as budding and subsequent rounds of infection were not affected by IFNα treatment. Analysis of early and late HIV-1 reverse transcripts and integrated proviral DNA confirmed an early post entry role for IFNα. First strand cDNA synthesis was slightly reduced but late and integrated products were severely depleted, suggesting that initiation or the nucleic acid intermediates of reverse transcription are targeted. The depletion of integrated provirus is disproportionally greater than that of viral cDNA synthesis suggesting the possibility of a least an additional later target. A role for either cellular protein APOBEC3G or tetherin in this IFNα mediated restriction has been excluded. Vpu, previously shown by others to rescue a viral budding restriction by tetherin, could not overcome this IFNα induced effect. Determining both the viral determinants and cellular proteins involved may lead to novel therapeutic approaches. Our results add to the understanding of HIV-1 restriction by IFNα.

  7. Nicotine can skew the characterization of the macrophage type-1 (M{Phi}1) phenotype differentiated with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor to the M{Phi}2 phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagita, Manabu; Kobayashi, Ryohei [Department of Periodontology, Division of Oral Biology and Disease Control, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Murakami, Shinya, E-mail: ipshinya@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Periodontology, Division of Oral Biology and Disease Control, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2009-10-09

    Macrophages (M{Phi}s) exhibit functional heterogeneity and plasticity in the local microenvironment. Recently, it was reported that M{Phi}s can be divided into proinflammatory M{Phi}s (M{Phi}1) and anti-inflammatory M{Phi}s (M{Phi}2) based on their polarized functional properties. Here, we report that nicotine, the major ingredient of cigarette smoke, can modulate the characteristics of M{Phi}1. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-driven M{Phi}1 with nicotine (Ni-M{Phi}1) showed the phenotypic characteristics of M{Phi}2. Like M{Phi}2, Ni-M{Phi}1 exhibited antigen-uptake activities. Ni-M{Phi}1 suppressed IL-12, but maintained IL-10 and produced high amounts of MCP-1 upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation compared with M{Phi}1. Moreover, we observed strong proliferative responses of T cells to lipopolysaccharide-stimulated M{Phi}1, whereas Ni-M{Phi}1 reduced T cell proliferation and inhibited IFN-{gamma} production by T cells. These results suggest that nicotine can change the functional characteristics of M{Phi} and skew the M{Phi}1 phenotype to M{Phi}2. We propose that nicotine is a potent regulator that modulates immune responses in microenvironments.

  8. 生地、丹参对2型糖尿病大鼠腹主动脉中膜超微结构的影响%Effect of Radix Rehmanniae and Salvia miltiorrhiza on abdominal aortic membrane ultrastructure in type 2 diabetes rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐年亚; 张岳

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To observe effects of Radix Rehmanniae and Salvia miltiorrhiza on abdominal aortic membrane ultrastructure in type 2 diabetes rat. Methods: Streptozotocin (STZ) and hyperthermia high sugar and high fat diet were used to make animal model of type 2 diabetes. T2DM rat abdominal aortic membrane ultrastructure was observed by transmissionn electron microscope Hitachi H-600.Results:Vascular smooth muscle (VSMC) the Radix Rehman-niae group T2DM and the Salvia miltiorrhiza group T2DM rat abdominal aorta in membrane, collagen fibers (CF), elastic fibers (EF) the extent of the damage and matrix significantly decreased than the model group. Conclusions: the R-adix Rehmanniae and Salvia miltiorrhiza have protective effects on abdominal aortic membrane ultrastructure in different levels of T2DM.%目的:观察生地、丹参对2型糖尿病(T2DM)大鼠腹主动脉中膜超微结构的影响。方法:采用链脲佐菌素(STZ)加高热高糖高脂饮食制作2型糖尿病动物模型。用日立H-600透射电镜观察T2DM大鼠腹主动脉中膜超微结构。结果:生地、丹参组 T2DM 大鼠腹主动脉中膜平滑肌(VSMC)、胶原纤维(cf)、弹性纤维(ef)和基质的损坏程度比模型组明显减轻。结论:生地、丹参均对T2DM大鼠腹主动脉中膜超微结构有不同程度的保护作用。

  9. Ultrastructure of Four Types of Antennal Sensilla in Locusta migratoria manilensis (Insecta, Orthoptera)%东亚飞蝗四种类型的触角感受器超微结构(昆虫纲,直翅目)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金鑫; 张善干; 张龙

    2004-01-01

    The ultrastructures of different types of antennal sensilla in Locusta migratoria manilensis were investigated by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. There are four types of sensilla on its antenna: namely, sensilla basiconica, sensilla trichodea,sensilla coeloconica and sensilla chaetica. Sensilla basiconica have two subtypes: subtype A has thin cuticular wall perforated by numerous pores and more than 100 dendritic branchings, each of which contains 1~5 microtubules. Subtype B has also thin wall but much fewer(less than 6) dendritic branchings. Sensilla trichodea are single-walled and grooved. There are relatively few pores on the wall. More than 20 dendrites, each of which contains 1~5 microtubules, can be found in the sensillar lumen. Sensilla coeloconica are situated in pits on the antennal surface and divided into two subtypes: subtype A has grooved surface and double sensillar walls perforated by radial pores and 6~7 dendrites. Subtype B contains 4 dendrites with non-grooved, non-porous single wall. Sensilla chaetica have a thick non-porous wall and contain 5 dendrites sent to a terminal pore. The functions of four types of sensilla were discussed that sensilla basiconica and sensilla trichodea are olfactory sensilla; sensilla coeloconica may be respond to chemo-, hygroand thermostimulation and sensilla chaetica are possibly gustatory or mechanoreceptors.%利用扫描电镜和透射电镜观察了东亚飞蝗(Locusta migratoria manilensis)不同类型触角感受器的超微结构.在触角上存在4种类型的感受器:锥形感受器、毛形感受器、腔锥形感受器和刺形感受器.锥形感受器分为两个亚型:A亚型壁薄多孔,有100多个树突分枝,每个分枝有l~5个微管;B亚型壁薄,只有少于6个树突分枝.毛形感受器单壁,壁上有沟和小孔,孔数相对较少.对感受器腔中有超过20个的树突,每一树突中含有1~5个微管.腔锥形感受器位于触角表皮凹陷当中,含两个亚

  10. Imaging and measuring the biophysical properties of Fc gamma receptors on single macrophages using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Mi [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, Lianqing, E-mail: lqliu@sia.cn [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Xi, Ning [Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Wang, Yuechao [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Xiao, Xiubin [Department of Lymphoma, Affiliated Hospital of Military Medical Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100071 (China); Zhang, Weijing, E-mail: zhangwj3072@163.com [Department of Lymphoma, Affiliated Hospital of Military Medical Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100071 (China)

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Nanoscale cellular ultra-structures of macrophages were observed. •The binding affinities of FcγRs were measured directly on macrophages. •The nanoscale distributions of FcγRs were mapped on macrophages. -- Abstract: Fc gamma receptors (FcγR), widely expressed on effector cells (e.g., NK cells, macrophages), play an important role in clinical cancer immunotherapy. The binding of FcγRs to the Fc portions of antibodies that are attached to the target cells can activate the antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) killing mechanism which leads to the lysis of target cells. In this work, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to observe the cellular ultra-structures and measure the biophysical properties (affinity and distribution) of FcγRs on single macrophages in aqueous environments. AFM imaging was used to obtain the topographies of macrophages, revealing the nanoscale cellular fine structures. For molecular interaction recognition, antibody molecules were attached onto AFM tips via a heterobifunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG) crosslinker. With AFM single-molecule force spectroscopy, the binding affinities of FcγRs were quantitatively measured on single macrophages. Adhesion force mapping method was used to localize the FcγRs, revealing the nanoscale distribution of FcγRs on local areas of macrophages. The experimental results can improve our understanding of FcγRs on macrophages; the established approach will facilitate further research on physiological activities involved in antibody-based immunotherapy.

  11. Monocyte and Macrophage Plasticity in Tissue Repair and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Amitava; Sinha, Mithun; Datta, Soma; Abas, Motaz; Chaffee, Scott; Sen, Chandan K.; Roy, Sashwati

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity and high versatility are the characteristic features of the cells of monocyte-macrophage lineage. The mononuclear phagocyte system, derived from the bone marrow progenitor cells, is primarily composed of monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. In regenerative tissues, a central role of monocyte-derived macrophages and paracrine factors secreted by these cells is indisputable. Macrophages are highly plastic cells. On the basis of environmental cues and molecular mediators, these cells differentiate to proinflammatory type I macrophage (M1) or anti-inflammatory or proreparative type II macrophage (M2) phenotypes and transdifferentiate into other cell types. Given a central role in tissue repair and regeneration, the review focuses on the heterogeneity of monocytes and macrophages with current known mechanisms of differentiation and plasticity, including microenvironmental cues and molecular mediators, such as noncoding RNAs. PMID:26118749

  12. Considerations on the ultrastructural particularities of the dental pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolea, H; Deva, V; Bogdan, Fl; Moraru, Iren; Pancă, Oana-Adina; Caraivan, O

    2008-01-01

    We realized an ultrastructural study of the cells of the dental pulp, having in view their particularities relative to other types of conjunctive tissue. For this purpose, we selected five cases represented by teeth without subjective or objective symptomatology. Within the paper there are exposed the morphological aspects observed by means of electron microscopy. The results are then discussed in relation with a series of observations made by other researchers regarding the particularities of the pulp cells structures.

  13. Ultrastructural researches on rabbit myxomatosis. Lymphnodal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcato, P S; Simoni, P

    1977-07-01

    Ultrastructural examination of head and neck lymph nodes in rabbits with spontaneous subacute myxomatosis showed fusion of immature reticuloendothelial cells which lead to the formation of polykarocytes. There was no ultrastructural evidence of viral infection of these polykaryocytes. Histiosyncytial lymphadenitis can be considered a specific lesion of myxomatosis.

  14. Ultrastructural basis of acute renal allograft rejection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.D. Vuzevski (Vojislav)

    1976-01-01

    textabstractAn attempt was made: I. to demonstrate the evolution and the time of onset of the ultrastructural morphological changes in the renal parenchyma and blood vessels, as well as the ultrastructural feature of the interstitial cellular infiltration in acute rejection of kidney allografts; 2.

  15. Oncocytic carcinoid of lung: an ultrastructural analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharifker, D; Marchevsky, A

    1981-02-01

    A 52-year-old man with a typical carcinoid tumor of the lung in which the tumor cells displayed marked oncocytic metaplasia is presented. The clinicopathologic and ultrastructural differences with so-called oncocytic of the lung are discussed. The potential of Kulchitsky cell derivatives to undergo oncocytic metaplasma is documented ultrastructurally.

  16. Heme oxygenase-1 induction alters chemokine regulation and ameliorates human immunodeficiency virus-type-1 infection in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Zhao-Hua [Division of Monoclonal Antibodies, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kumari, Namita; Nekhai, Sergei [Center for Sickle Cell Disease, Department of Medicine, Howard University, Washington, DC (United States); Clouse, Kathleen A. [Division of Monoclonal Antibodies, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Wahl, Larry M. [National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Yamada, Kenneth M. [Laboratory of Cell and Development Biology, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Dhawan, Subhash, E-mail: subhash.dhawan@fda.hhs.gov [Viral Immunology Section, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, Division of Emerging and Transfusion Transmitted Diseases, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •Lipopolysaccharide stimulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) ameliorated HIV-1 infection of primary human macrophages. •The partial protection by HO-1 against HIV infection was associated with induction of chemokines such as MIP1α and MIP1β. •This mechanism explains lipopolysaccharide-stimulated HO-1-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 infection of macrophages. -- Abstract: We have elucidated a putative mechanism for the host resistance against HIV-1 infection of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We show that LPS-activated MDM both inhibited HIV-1 entry into the cells and were refractory to post-entry productive viral replication. LPS-treated cells were virtually negative for mature virions as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. LPS activation of MDM markedly enhanced the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a potent inducible cytoprotective enzyme. Increased HO-1 expression was accompanied by elevated production of macrophage inflammatory chemokines (MIP1α and MIP1β) by LPS-activated MDM, significantly decreased surface chemokine receptor-5 (CCR-5) expression, and substantially reduced virus replication. Treatment of cells with HO-1 inhibitor SnPP IX (tin protoporphyrin IX) attenuated the LPS-mediated responses, HIV-1 replication and secretion of MIP1α, MIP1β, and LD78β chemokines with little change in surface CCR-5 expression. These results identify a novel role for HO-1 in the modulation of host immune response against HIV infection of MDM.

  17. SseK1 and SseK3 Type III Secretion System Effectors Inhibit NF-κB Signaling and Necroptotic Cell Death in Salmonella-Infected Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günster, Regina A.; Matthews, Sophie A.; Holden, David W.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Within host cells such as macrophages, Salmonella enterica translocates virulence (effector) proteins across its vacuolar membrane via the SPI-2 type III secretion system. Previously, it was shown that when expressed ectopically, the effectors SseK1 and SseK3 inhibit tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-induced NF-κB activation. In this study, we show that ectopically expressed SseK1, SseK2, and SseK3 suppress TNF-α-induced, but not Toll-like receptor 4- or interleukin-induced, NF-κB activation. Inhibition required a DXD motif in SseK1 and SseK3, which is essential for the transfer of N-acetylglucosamine to arginine residues (arginine-GlcNAcylation). During macrophage infection, SseK1 and SseK3 inhibited NF-κB activity in an additive manner. SseK3-mediated inhibition of NF-κB activation did not require the only known host-binding partner of this effector, the E3-ubiquitin ligase TRIM32. SseK proteins also inhibited TNF-α-induced cell death during macrophage infection. Despite SseK1 and SseK3 inhibiting TNF-α-induced apoptosis upon ectopic expression in HeLa cells, the percentage of infected macrophages undergoing apoptosis was SseK independent. Instead, SseK proteins inhibited necroptotic cell death during macrophage infection. SseK1 and SseK3 caused GlcNAcylation of different proteins in infected macrophages, suggesting that these effectors have distinct substrate specificities. Indeed, SseK1 caused the GlcNAcylation of the death domain-containing proteins FADD and TRADD, whereas SseK3 expression resulted in weak GlcNAcylation of TRADD but not FADD. Additional, as-yet-unidentified substrates are likely to explain the additive phenotype of a Salmonella strain lacking both SseK1 and SseK3. PMID:28069818

  18. Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Type 2 Impairs Macrophage Responsiveness to Toll-Like Receptor Ligation with the Exception of Toll-Like Receptor 7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G Schaut

    Full Text Available Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV is a member of the Flaviviridae family. BVDV isolates are classified into two biotypes based on the development of cytopathic (cp or non-cytopathic (ncp effects in epithelial cell culture. BVDV isolates are further separated into species, BVDV1 and 2, based on genetic differences. Symptoms of BVDV infection range from subclinical to severe, depending on strain virulence, and may involve multiple organ systems and induction of a generalized immunosuppression. During BVDV-induced immune suppression, macrophages, critical to innate immunity, may have altered pathogen recognition receptor (PRR signaling, including signaling through toll-like receptors (TLRs. Comparison of BVDV 2 strains with different biotypes and virulence levels is valuable to determining if there are differences in host macrophage cellular responses between viral phenotypes. The current study demonstrates that cytopathic (cp, noncytopathic (ncp, high (hv or low virulence (lv BVDV2 infection of bovine monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMΦ result in differential expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines compared to uninfected MDMΦ. A hallmark of cp BVDV2 infection is IL-6 production. In response to TLR2 or 4 ligation, as might be observed during secondary bacterial infection, cytokine secretion was markedly decreased in BVDV2-infected MDMΦ, compared to non-infected MDMΦ. Macrophages were hyporesponsive to viral TLR3 or TLR8 ligation. However, TLR7 stimulation of BVDV2-infected MDMΦ induced cytokine secretion, unlike results observed for other TLRs. Together, these data suggest that BVDV2 infection modulated mRNA responses and induced a suppression of proinflammatory cytokine protein responses to TLR ligation in MDMΦ with the exception of TLR7 ligation. It is likely that there are distinct differences in TLR pathways modulated following BVDV2 infection, which have implications for macrophage responses to secondary infections.

  19. Bi- to tetravalent glycoclusters presenting GlcNAc/GalNAc as inhibitors: from plant agglutinins to human macrophage galactose-type lectin (CD301) and galectins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Sabine; O'Sullivan, Shane; Koller, Christiane; Murphy, Paul V; Gabius, Hans-Joachim

    2015-04-14

    Emerging insights into the functional spectrum of tissue lectins leads to identification of new targets for the custom-made design of potent inhibitors, providing a challenge for synthetic chemistry. The affinity and selectivity of a carbohydrate ligand for a lectin may immensely be increased by a number of approaches, which includes varying geometrical or topological features. This perspective leads to the design and synthesis of glycoclusters and their testing using assays of physiological relevance. Herein, hydroquinone, resorcinol, benzene-1,3,5-triol and tetra(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethene have been employed as scaffolds and propargyl derivatives obtained. The triazole-containing linker to the α/β-O/S-glycosides of GlcNAc/GalNAc presented on these scaffolds was generated by copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. This strategy was used to give a panel of nine glycoclusters with bi-, tri- and tetravalency. Maintained activity for lectin binding after conjugation was ascertained for both sugars in solid-phase assays with the plant agglutinins WGA (GlcNAc) and DBA (GalNAc). Absence of cross-reactivity excluded any carbohydrate-independent reactivity of the bivalent compounds, allowing us to proceed to further testing with a biomedically relevant lectin specific for GalNAc. Macrophage galactose(-binding C)-type lectin, involved in immune defence by dendritic cells and in virus uptake, was produced as a soluble protein without/with its α-helical coiled-coil stalk region. Binding to ligands presented on a matrix and on cell surfaces was highly susceptible to the presence of the tetravalent inhibitor derived from the tetraphenylethene-containing scaffold, and presentation of GalNAc with an α-thioglycosidic linkage proved favorable. Cross-reactivity of this glycocluster to human galectins-3 and -4, which interact with Tn-antigen-presenting mucins, was rather small. Evidently, the valency and spatial display of α-GalNAc residues is a key factor to design potent and

  20. Sun and shade leaves? Cuticle ultrastructure of Jurassic Komlopteris nordenskioeldii (Nathorst) Barbacka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guignard, G; Bóka, K; Barbacka, M

    2001-04-01

    An ultrastructural transmission electron microscope (TEM) study of fossil leaf cuticles from the Jurassic pteridosperm Komlopteris nordenskioeldii (Nathorst) Barbacka from the Mecsek Mountains (South Hungary) was conducted. Remnants of cuticles of leaves originating from so-called "sun and shade" environments were sectioned with a diamond knife, transversally as well as longitudinally. Although the present study showed a simple type of cuticle in this pteridosperm, differences were observed in the occurrence of its components, such as electron lucent amorphous material and various densities of granules, which give rise to different zones. The included fibrilous elements appeared to be made of aggregated and aligned granules, equivalent in size and electron density to nearby non-fibrilous granular regions. The combinations of these ultrastructural features allow distinctions between four types of cuticle: sun upper, sun lower, shade upper and shade lower. Considering the distinction made earlier in two types of cuticle and supposed to be related to sun and shade on the basis of macroscopical and microscopical features, four types only on the basis of differences in thickness, the present study reinforces the distinctions with ultrastructural microcharacteristics. As this study shows the variations in ultrastructure of cuticle among the four types, the differences observed may reveal the great sensitivity of some plants to environment. At the same time, it points out the importance, in ultrastructural studies of cuticles, of studying a number of samples for one taxon.

  1. Ultrastructure of spermatogenesis in the testis of Paragonimus heterotremus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uabundit, Nongnut; Kanla, Pipatphong; Puthiwat, Phongphithak; Arunyanart, Channarong; Chaiciwamongkol, Kowit; Maleewong, Wanchai; Intapan, Pewpan M; Iamsaard, Sitthichai; Hipkaeo, Wiphawi

    2013-12-01

    Lung fluke, Paragonimus heterotremus, is a flatworm causing pulmonary paragonimiasis in cats, dogs, and humans in Southeast Asia. We examined the ultrastructure of the testis of adult P. heterotremus with special attention to spermatogenesis and spermiogenesis using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The full sequence of spermatogenesis and spermiogenesis, from the capsular basal lamina to the luminal surface, was demonstrated. The sequence comprises spermatogonia, spermatocytes with obvious nuclear synaptonemal complexes, spermatids, and eventual spermatozoa. Moreover, full steps of spermatid differentiation were shown which consisted of 1) early stage, 2) differentiation stage representing the flagella, intercentriolar body, basal body, striated rootlets, and electron dense nucleus of thread-like lamellar configuration, and 3) growing spermatid flagella. Detailed ultrastructure of 2 different types of spermatozoa was also shown in this study.

  2. Nanofiber of ultra-structured aluminum and zirconium oxide hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hae-Won; Kim, Hyoun-Ee

    2006-02-01

    An internally ultrastructured Al- and Zr-oxide hybrid was developed into a nanofiber. As a precursor for the generation of nanofiber, a hybridized sol was prepared using the Pechini-type sol-gel process, whereby the Al- and Zr-metallic ions were to be efficiently distributed and stabilized within the polymeric network. The hybridized sol was subsequently electrospun and heat treated to a nanofiber with diameters of tens to hundreds of nanometers. The internal structure of the nanofiber was organized at the molecular level, with the Al- and Zr-oxide regions being interspaced at distances of less than ten nanometers. This ultrastructured Al- and Zr-oxide hybrid nanofiber is considered to be potentially applicable in numerous fields.

  3. Seeding specificity and ultrastructural characteristics of infectious recombinant prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piro, Justin R; Wang, Fei; Walsh, Daniel J; Rees, Judy R; Ma, Jiyan; Supattapone, Surachai

    2011-08-23

    Infectious mouse prions can be produced from a mixture of bacterially expressed recombinant prion protein (recPrP), palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylglycerol (POPG), and RNA [Wang, F.; et al. (2010) Science 327, 1132]. In contrast, amyloid fibers produced from pure recPrP without POPG or RNA (recPrP fibers) fail to infect wild type mice [Colby, D.W.; et al. (2010) PLoS Pathog. 387, e1000736]. We compared the seeding specificity and ultrastructural features of infectious recombinant prions (recPrP(Sc)) with those of recPrP fibers. Our results indicate that PrP fibers are not able to induce the formation of PrP(Sc) molecules from wild type mouse brain homogenate substrate in serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification (sPMCA) reactions. Conversely, recPrP(Sc) molecules did not accelerate the formation of amyloid in vitro, under conditions that produce recPrP fibers spontaneously. Ultrastructurally, recombinant prions appear to be small spherical aggregates rather than elongated fibers, as determined by atomic force and electron microscopy. Taken together, our results show that recPrP(Sc) molecules and PrP fibers have different ultrastructural features and seeding specificities, suggesting that prion infectivity may be propagated by a specific and unique assembly pathway facilitated by cofactors.

  4. Hypothesized evolutionary trends in zoospore ultrastructural characters in Chytridiales (Chytridiomycota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letcher, Peter M; Powell, Martha J

    2014-01-01

    Chytridiales is an order of zoosporic fungi currently comprising species representing 19 genera. Although morphologically and genetically diverse, these taxa have in common a zoospore with a suite of ultrastructural characters unique among Chytridiomycota. However, multiple states have been reported for almost every character that defines the Chytridiales zoospore. Two zoospore types have been recognized, each corresponding to a family. Here we examine zoospore ultrastructure of 52 isolates in Chytridiales and assess states for six characters to hypothesize evolutionary trends, using parsimony ancestral state reconstruction for evolutionary analysis. Based on suites of character states, we describe four additional zoospore types in Chytridiales. Five of the six characters ([i] location of the nucleus, [ii] morphology of the kinetosome-associated structure, [iii] complexity of the microtubular root, [iv] microbody-lipid globule complex cisterna structure and [v] thickness of the flagellar plug) revealed ancestral and derived states. The sixth character, structure of the paracrystalline inclusion, did not resolve ancestral and derived states. In each of the lineages within Chytridiales, the evolutionary trend appears to have been from a more complex zoospore to a less complex zoospore with reduced features. As we isolate and analyze additional taxa, we discover new ultrastructural character states that assist in taxon delineation and phylogenetic interpretation. © 2014 by The Mycological Society of America.

  5. Macrophage phenotype modulation by CXCL4 in vascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Albert Gleissner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During atherogenesis, blood monocytes transmigrate into the subendothelial space and differentiate towards macrophages and foam cells. The major driver of this differentiation process is macrophage colony-stimulation factor (M-CSF. M-CSF-induced macrophages are important promoters of atherogenesis as demonstrated in M-CSF and M-CSF receptor knock out mice. However, M-CSF is not the only relevant promoter of macrophage differentiation. The platelet chemokine CXCL4 prevents monocyte apoptosis and promotes macrophage differentiation in vitro. It is secreted from activated platelets and has effects on various cell types relevant in atherogenesis. Knocking out the Pf4 gene coding for CXCL4 in Apoe-/- mice leads to reduced atherogenesis. Thus, it seems likely that CXC4-induced macrophages may have specific pro-atherogenic capacities. We have studied CXC4-induced differentiation of human macrophages using gene chips, systems biology and functional in vitro and ex vivo experiments. Our data indicate that CXCL4-induced macrophages are distinct from both their M-CSF-induced counterparts and other known macrophage polarizations like M1 macrophages (induced by LPS and interferon-gamma or M2 macrophages (induced by interleukin-4. CXCL4-induced macrophages have distinct phenotypic and functional characteristics, e.g. the complete loss of the hemoglobin-haptoglobin (Hb-Hp scavenger receptor CD163 which is necessary for effective hemoglobin clearance after plaque hemorrhage. Lack of CD163 is accompanied by the inability to upregulate the atheroprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 in response to Hb-Hp complexes.This review covers the current knowledge about CXCL4-induced macrophages, which based on their unique properties we have suggested to call these macrophages M4. CXCL4 may represent an important driver of macrophage heterogeneity within atherosclerotic lesions. Further dissecting its effects on macrophage differentiation may help to identify novel

  6. Functional differentiation of the anterior pituitary cells in the fetal pig. An ultrastructural immunocytochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacheux, F

    1984-01-01

    The fetal porcine pituitary was investigated by means of ultrastructural immunocytochemistry (1) to identify the first cells synthesizing the adenohypophyseal hormones, (2) to follow their differentiation during fetal development, and (3) to compare their ultrastructural characteristics with those of mature adult cells. The first ACTH-cells, which produced and stored ACTH, beta-LPH, beta-MSH, and alpha- and beta-endorphin in the same granules, were very numerous at day 34 and displayed a uniform morphology. At day 50 and thereafter, until the end of gestation, the ACTH-cells differed in their appearance probably reflecting various stages of differentiation of one cell type. The GH-cells gained rapidly ultrastructural features comparable to those of mature GH-cells. In contrast, in the case of PRL-cells, which appeared only at the end of the gestation period as immature elements containing very small secretory granules, the morphological maturation seemed to take place only after birth. The first cells synthesizing the glycoprotein hormones (LH alpha, LH beta, FSH and TSH) displayed ultrastructural features of immature cells. At day 50, their ultrastructural organization started to show a different pattern. At the end of gestation, the TSH-cells and the gonadotropic cells displayed the ultrastructural features of mature cells.

  7. Comparative effects of type I interferon (hulFN-α and ovIFN-τ) and type Ⅱ interferon (huIFN-γ) on the tryptophan-to-kynurenine pathway in human uninfected or HIV-1-in-fected macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BenjaminMANEGLIER; ChristineROGEZ-KREUZ; OdileSPREUX-VAROQUAUX; NathalieDEREUDDRE-BOSQUET; JacquesMARTAL; PatriceTHERONDl; CharlesADVENIER; DominiqueDORMONT; PascalCLAYETTE

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Ovine type I IFN-τ displays the same antiretroviral properties than human IFN-α but is less toxic in vitro and in vivo. Clinical use of type I IFN is associated with severe neuropsychiatric side effects, in part linked to a stimulation of the kynurenine pathway. Activated macrophages and microglia are apparently the only cells capable of catabolizing tryptophan to quinolinic acid via the kynurenine pathway in the central nervous

  8. HISTOCHEMICAL AND ELECTRON-MICROSCOPIC CHARACTERIZATION OF HEPATIC MACROPHAGE SUBFRACTIONS ISOLATED FROM NORMAL AND LIPOSOMAL MURAMYL DIPEPTIDE TREATED RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOEDEMAKERS, RMJ; ATMOSOERODJOBRIGGS, JE; MORSELT, HWM; DAEMEN, T; SCHERPHOF, GL; HARDONK, MJ

    1995-01-01

    Subfractions of the hepatic macrophage population, differing in cell size, were isolated from normal rats and rats treated with liposomal muramyl dipeptide (lipMDP) and analyzed histochemically and by ultrastructural peroxidase cytochemistry. The majority of cells in all subfractions of control rats

  9. The macrophage in HIV-1 infection: From activation to deactivation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varin Audrey

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Macrophages play a crucial role in innate and adaptative immunity in response to microorganisms and are an important cellular target during HIV-1 infection. Recently, the heterogeneity of the macrophage population has been highlighted. Classically activated or type 1 macrophages (M1 induced in particular by IFN-γ display a pro-inflammatory profile. The alternatively activated or type 2 macrophages (M2 induced by Th-2 cytokines, such as IL-4 and IL-13 express anti-inflammatory and tissue repair properties. Finally IL-10 has been described as the prototypic cytokine involved in the deactivation of macrophages (dM. Since the capacity of macrophages to support productive HIV-1 infection is known to be modulated by cytokines, this review shows how modulation of macrophage activation by cytokines impacts the capacity to support productive HIV-1 infection. Based on the activation status of macrophages we propose a model starting with M1 classically activated macrophages with accelerated formation of viral reservoirs in a context of Th1 and proinflammatory cytokines. Then IL-4/IL-13 alternatively activated M2 macrophages will enter into the game that will stop the expansion of the HIV-1 reservoir. Finally IL-10 deactivation of macrophages will lead to immune failure observed at the very late stages of the HIV-1 disease.

  10. The macrophage in HIV-1 infection: from activation to deactivation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbein, Georges; Varin, Audrey

    2010-04-09

    Macrophages play a crucial role in innate and adaptative immunity in response to microorganisms and are an important cellular target during HIV-1 infection. Recently, the heterogeneity of the macrophage population has been highlighted. Classically activated or type 1 macrophages (M1) induced in particular by IFN-gamma display a pro-inflammatory profile. The alternatively activated or type 2 macrophages (M2) induced by Th-2 cytokines, such as IL-4 and IL-13 express anti-inflammatory and tissue repair properties. Finally IL-10 has been described as the prototypic cytokine involved in the deactivation of macrophages (dM). Since the capacity of macrophages to support productive HIV-1 infection is known to be modulated by cytokines, this review shows how modulation of macrophage activation by cytokines impacts the capacity to support productive HIV-1 infection. Based on the activation status of macrophages we propose a model starting with M1 classically activated macrophages with accelerated formation of viral reservoirs in a context of Th1 and proinflammatory cytokines. Then IL-4/IL-13 alternatively activated M2 macrophages will enter into the game that will stop the expansion of the HIV-1 reservoir. Finally IL-10 deactivation of macrophages will lead to immune failure observed at the very late stages of the HIV-1 disease.

  11. Induction of bone-type alkaline phosphatase in human vascular smooth muscle cells: roles of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and oncostatin M derived from macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shioi, Atsushi; Katagi, Miwako; Okuno, Yasuhisa; Mori, Katsuhito; Jono, Shuichi; Koyama, Hidenori; Nishizawa, Yoshiki

    2002-07-12

    Inflammatory cells such as macrophages and T lymphocytes play an important role in vascular calcification associated with atherosclerosis and cardiac valvular disease. In particular, macrophages activated with cytokines derived from T lymphocytes such as interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) may contribute to the development of vascular calcification. Moreover, we have shown the stimulatory effect of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) on in vitro calcification through increasing the expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), an ectoenzyme indispensable for bone mineralization, in vascular smooth muscle cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that macrophages may induce calcifying phenotype, especially the expression of ALP in human vascular smooth muscle cells (HVSMCs) in the presence of IFN-gamma and 1,25(OH)2D3. To test this hypothesis, we used cocultures of HVSMCs with human monocytic cell line (THP-1) or peripheral blood monocytes (PBMCs) in the presence of IFN-gamma and 1,25(OH)2D3. THP-1 cells or PBMCs induced ALP activity and its gene expression in HVSMCs and the cells with high expression of ALP calcified their extracellular matrix by the addition of beta-glycerophosphate. Thermostability and immunoassay showed that ALP induced in HVSMCs was bone-specific enzyme. We further identified tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and oncostatin M (OSM) as major factors inducing ALP in HVSMCs in the culture supernatants of THP-1 cells. TNF-alpha and OSM, only when applied together, increased ALP activities and in vitro calcification in HVSMCs in the presence of IFN-gamma and 1,25(OH)2D3. These results suggest that macrophages may contribute to the development of vascular calcification through producing various inflammatory mediators, especially TNF-alpha and OSM.

  12. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) on tumor-associated macrophages is a marker of poor prognosis in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illemann, Martin; Laerum, Ole Didrik; Hasselby, Jane Preuss

    2014-01-01

    Patients were identified from a population-based prospective study of 4990 individuals with symptoms associated with colorectal cancer (CRC). A total of 244 CRC tissue samples were available for immunohistochemical staining of uPAR, semiquantitatively scored at the invasive front, and in the tumor...... core on cancer cells, macrophages, and myofibroblasts. In addition, the levels of the intact and cleaved uPAR-forms in blood from the same patients are evaluated in this study. In a univariate analysis, the number of uPAR-positive versus uPAR-negative macrophages (HR = 2.26, [95% CI: 1.39-3.66, P = 0.......0009]) and cancer cells (HR=1.49, [95% CI: 1.01-2.20, P = 0.047]) located in the tumor core were significantly associated to overall survival. In a multivariate analysis, uPAR-positive versus uPAR-negative macrophages located in the tumor core showed the best separation of patients with positive score associated...

  13. Macrophage-inducible C-type lectin is associated with anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies-positive rheumatoid arthritis in men

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xin-yu; GUO Jian-ping; YIN Fang-rui; LU Xiao-lan; LI Ru; HE Jing; LIU Xu; LI Zhan-guo

    2012-01-01

    Background Macrophage-inducible C-type lectin (MINCLE) is an important member of C-type lectin superfamily,which has been shown evidence for susceptibility to arthritis in animal models.We aimed to investigate the possible association of MINCLE with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) susceptibility in Chinese Hart population.Methods Haplotypes from HapMap database (Chinese Hart Beijing,CHB) were used to select tag-single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (r2=0.8) residing in MINCLE gene.A total of 563 patients with RA and 404 healthy controls were TagMan genotyped for SNP rs10841845.Association analyses were performed on the whole data set and on RA subsets based on gender difference and the status of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibody in RA patients.Association statistics were calculated by age and sex adjusted logistic regression.Results Overall,MINCLE SNP rs10841845 was not associated with susceptibility to RA.However,following anti-CCP stratification,rs10841845 GG genotypes conferred a significantly protective effects against anti-CCP-positive RA (OR 0.65,95% CI 0.430-0.995,P=0.048).Following gender stratification,SNP rs10841845 G allele appeared to insert its RA protective effect only in male patients,both at allele level (G vs.A OR 0.66,95% CI 0.46-0.93,P=0.018) and at genotype level (GG vs.AA+AG,OR 0.429,95% CI 0.20-0.95,P=0.036).Notably,the male RA protective effect of rs10841845 G allele was only seen in anti-CCP-positive RA (G vs.A:OR 0.64,95% CI 0.43-0.96,P=0.029; GG vs.AA+AG:OR 0.375,95% Cl 0.14-0.94,P=0.038).Furthermore,we observed a significant reduction of Disease Activity Score (DAS) 28 score (3.91±0.70 vs.5.66±0.31,P=0.022) and serum C-reactive protein levels (31.64±24.13 vs.91.80±12.02,P=0.012)in male anti-CCP-positive RA patients carrying rs10841845 GG genotype,compared with patients carrying AA+AG genotypes.Conclusions Our study provides the evidence for a gender specific association between MINCLE rs10841845 and RA

  14. Kaempferol suppresses lipid accumulation in macrophages through the downregulation of cluster of differentiation 36 and the upregulation of scavenger receptor class B type I and ATP-binding cassette transporters A1 and G1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiu-Ying; Kong, Ling-Xi; Li, Juan; He, Hai-Xia; Zhou, Yuan-Da

    2013-02-01

    The accumulation of foam cells in atherosclerotic lesions is a hallmark of early-stage atherosclerosis. Kaempferol has been shown to inhibit oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) uptake by macrophages; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not yet fully investigated. In this study, we shown that treatment with kaempferol markedly suppresses oxLDL-induced macrophage foam cell formation, which occurs due to a decrease in lipid accumulation and an increase in cholesterol efflux from THP-1-derived macrophages. Additionally, the kaempferol treatment of macrophages led to the downregulation of cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) protein levels, the upregulation of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter A1 (ABCA1), scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) and ABCG1 protein levels, while no effects on scavenger receptor A (SR-A) expression were observed. Kaempferol had similar effects on the mRNA and protein expression of ABCA1, SR-BI, SR-A, CD36 and ABCG1. The reduced CD36 expression following kaempferol treatment involved the inhibition of c-Jun-activator protein-1 (AP-1) nuclear translocation. The inhibition of AP-1 using the inhibitor, SP600125, confirmed this involvement, as the AP-1 inhibition significantly augmented the kaempferol-induced reduction in CD36 expression. Accordingly, the kaempferol-mediated suppression of lipid accumulation in macrophages was also augmented by SP600125. The increased expression of ABCA1, SR-BI and ABCG1 following kaempferol treatment was accompanied by the enhanced protein expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). This increase was reversed following the knockdown of the HO-1 gene using small hairpin RNA (shRNA). Moreover, the kaempferol-mediated attenuation of lipid accumulation and the promotion of cholesterol efflux was also inhibited by HO-1 shRNA. In conclusion, the c-Jun-AP‑1-dependent downregulation of CD36 and the HO-1-dependent upregulation of ABCG1, SR-BI and ABCA1 may mediate the beneficial effects of

  15. New research progress on the ultrastructure of tectonically deformed coals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yiwen Ju; Xiaoshi Li

    2009-01-01

    The structure of tectonically deformed coals shows some characteristics and regulations on the ultra-scale when influenced by different factors such as temperature, pressure and directional stress. Deformations of the macromolecular structure may induce changes in the nano-scale pore structure, which are very important for gas adsorption and pervasion. The geological impact of different mechanisms of deformation on different types of ultrastructure of tectonically deformed coals is not only of significance as a topic for scientific research, but also in studying environments of metamorphism-deformation at differing metamorphic stages. This research is also very important in studying the accumulation and occurrence conditions of coalbed methane gas, mechanisms of coal and gas outbursts, predictions of coalbed methane resources and dangers of coal and gas outbursts. This paper analyzes current research, within China and other coun-tries, in the ultrastructure of tectonically deformed coals. The research includes (1) structural models of tectonically deformed coals; (2) the relationship between ultrastructure and stress; (3) the structure of tectonically deformed coals and its strain environment. These results are also based on our own experiments including vitirnite reflectance (R_(o,max)), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and nuclear magnetic res-onance (NMR (CP/MAS+TOSS)). We discuss the important effects of the structure of tectonically deformed coals and their physical properties, and then point out some problems concerning the research progress of tectonically deformed coals.

  16. Light microscopical and ultrastructural studies on the vas deferens of the lizard Mabuya carinata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranha, I; Bhagya, M; Yajurvedi, H N; Sagar, B K Chandrashekar

    2004-01-01

    Adult male lizards (Mabuya carinata) were studied during breeding and non breeding seasons to determine the regional and seasonal differences if any in the vas deferens and to compare ultrastructural features of luminal epithelial cells with those of endotherms. The vas deferens of the lizard is a convoluted tube extending from the epididymis to the hemipenis passing over the kidney. Based on morphometric data of luminal diameter and epithelial cell height three distinct regions viz; proximal, middle and distal regions were identified in the vas deferens. The epithelium is surrounded by a thin layer of lamina propria, many layers of circular smooth muscle fibers and an outer layer of visceral pleuro peritoneum. Based on cell and nuclear morphology and ultrastructure, five different cell types viz; principal cell, basal cell, mitochondria rich cell, halo cell and narrow cell were identified in the epithelium during both breeding and non breeding season. Principal cells and basal cells were more abundant in both seasons. The types of luminal epithelial cells of vas deferens of M. carinata and their ultrastructural features are similar to those of mammals. Further, vas deferens of M. carinata differs from mammals in having only circular smooth muscles in contrast to circular and longitudinal muscles of mammalian vas deferens. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report describing cell types of vas deferens, their ultrastructure and ultrastructural seasonal variations in reptiles.

  17. Ultrastructural study of the epithelial mucous cells in lizards (Lacertilia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Lacave, I; Montero, C; López-Muñoz, J M; López-Campos, J L; Galera, H

    1982-01-01

    An ultrastructural study of the mucous cells of the intestinal epithelium of four lacertilian species (Lacerta lepida, Lacerta hispanica, Psammodromus algirus and Acanthodactylus erythrurus) is here reported. Two types of mucous cells have been found in these species: common mucous cells and granular mucous cells. Immature and mature forms of both types have been observed. The common mucous cells or typical goblet cells have the same characteristics in all four species. The granules of the granular mucous cells of the two species of lacerta are similar but differ from those of the other two species.

  18. HIV-1 Latency in Monocytes/Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 targets CD4+ T cells and cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. HIV pathogenesis is characterized by the depletion of T lymphocytes and by the presence of a population of cells in which latency has been established called the HIV-1 reservoir. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has significantly improved the life of HIV-1 infected patients. However, complete eradication of HIV-1 from infected individuals is not possible without targeting latent sources of infection. HIV-1 establishes latent infection in resting CD4+ T cells and findings indicate that latency can also be established in the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. Monocyte/macrophage lineage includes among others, monocytes, macrophages and brain resident macrophages. These cells are relatively more resistant to apoptosis induced by HIV-1, thus are important stable hideouts of the virus. Much effort has been made in the direction of eliminating HIV-1 resting CD4+ T-cell reservoirs. However, it is impossible to achieve a cure for HIV-1 without considering these neglected latent reservoirs, the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. In this review we will describe our current understanding of the mechanism of latency in monocyte/macrophage lineage and how such cells can be specifically eliminated from the infected host.

  19. 肠道菌群重构Ⅱ型糖尿病大鼠胰腺细胞线粒体电镜观察%The ultrastructural changes in mitochondria of pancreatic cells from strptozotocin-induced type-2 diabetic rat remodeled intestinal flora

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶祝华; 曾爱兵; 任晓丽; 周燕; 朱一力; 郑刚; 李伟莉; 林蓉; 金嵘; 陈龙

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the ultrastructure changes in mitochondrion of pancreatic cells from streptozotocin - induced type - 2 diabetic rat remodeled intestinal flora. Methods: 64 male SD rats were randomly divided into four groups, including control group, type - 2 - diabetic - modeling group, probiotic group and depollutional group. All groups were fed with high -fat diet and inoculated Streptozotocin( 30mg/ml ) by intraperitoneal injection one time except control group. Results: Fasting blood glucose increased significantly comparing with control group, while there were no significant differences among those three groups (P >0.05 ). Mitochondria were significantly impaired in probiotic group revealed by TEM, while the impairment in depollutional group was relatively light. Conclusion: Remodeling intestinal flora resulted in more severe ultrastructural pathology of mitochondria in pancreatic cells from streptozotocin - induced type - 2 diabetic rats.%目的:观察肠道菌群重构Ⅱ型糖尿病大鼠胰腺细胞线粒体的超微结构变化.方法:将64只SD雄性大鼠随机分为对照组、造模组、益生组、去污组.采用高糖高脂喂养,亚致病剂量(30 mg/ml)链脲佐菌素腹腔一次性注射造模,在2周、4周测空腹血糖并处死大鼠取胰尾做电镜切片观察.结果:各组出现的血糖升高无显著性差异(P>0.05);益生组线粒体受损明显,去污组相对较轻.结论:肠道菌群改变后导致Ⅱ型糖尿病大鼠线粒体损伤超微病理改变程度有所不同.

  20. Trichomonas tenax: ultrastructure of giant forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribaux, C L; Joffre, A; Magloire, H

    1988-03-01

    Trichomonas tenax is a parasitic flagellate of the human mouth. The morphology and the ultrastructure of the protozoan are identical to those of other trichomonads. Giant forms suddenly appeared in a strain maintained in culture for two years. The structure and the ultrastructure of these abnormal forms were studied at the light and electron microscope level. Several nuclei, groups of flagella, undulating membranes and Golgi complexes were observed. The significance of these forms is still unknown.

  1. Macrophages in cardiac homeostasis, injury responses and progenitor cell mobilisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander R. Pinto

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are an immune cell type found in every organ of the body. Classically, macrophages are recognised as housekeeping cells involved in the detection of foreign antigens and danger signatures, and the clearance of tissue debris. However, macrophages are increasingly recognised as a highly versatile cell type with a diverse range of functions that are important for tissue homeostasis and injury responses. Recent research findings suggest that macrophages contribute to tissue regeneration and may play a role in the activation and mobilisation of stem cells. This review describes recent advances in our understanding of the role played by macrophages in cardiac tissue maintenance and repair following injury. We examine the involvement of exogenous and resident tissue macrophages in cardiac inflammatory responses and their potential activity in regulating cardiac regeneration.

  2. Functional ultrastructure of the plant nucleolus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stępiński, Dariusz

    2014-11-01

    Nucleoli are nuclear domains present in almost all eukaryotic cells. They not only specialize in the production of ribosomal subunits but also play roles in many fundamental cellular activities. Concerning ribosome biosynthesis, particular stages of this process, i.e., ribosomal DNA transcription, primary RNA transcript processing, and ribosome assembly proceed in precisely defined nucleolar subdomains. Although eukaryotic nucleoli are conservative in respect of their main function, clear morphological differences between these structures can be noticed between individual kingdoms. In most cases, a plant nucleolus shows well-ordered structure in which four main ultrastructural components can be distinguished: fibrillar centers, dense fibrillar component, granular component, and nucleolar vacuoles. Nucleolar chromatin is an additional crucial structural component of this organelle. Nucleolonema, although it is not always an unequivocally distinguished nucleolar domain, has often been described as a well-grounded morphological element, especially of plant nucleoli. The ratios and morphology of particular subcompartments of a nucleolus can change depending on its metabolic activity which in turn is correlated with the physiological state of a cell, cell type, cell cycle phase, as well as with environmental influence. Precise attribution of functions to particular nucleolar subregions in the process of ribosome biosynthesis is now possible using various approaches. The presented description of plant nucleolar morphology summarizes previous knowledge regarding the function of nucleoli as well as of their particular subdomains not only in the course of ribosome biosynthesis.

  3. Spermatozoon ultrastructure in two monorchiid digeneans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann Quilichini

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Spermatological characteristics of species from two monorchiid genera, Opisthomonorchis and Paramonorcheides, have been investigated, for the first time, by means of transmission electron microscopy. The ultrastructural study reveals that the mature spermatozoon of Opisthomonorchis dinema and Paramonorcheides selaris share several characters such as the presence of two axonemes of different lengths showing the 9+“1” pattern of the Trepaxonemata, a nucleus, two mitochondria, two bundles of parallel cortical microtubules, external ornamentation of the plasma membrane, spine-like bodies, granules of glycogen and similar morphologies of the anterior and posterior extremities. The slight differences between the male gamete of O. dinema and P. selaris are the length of the first axoneme and the position of the second mitochondrion. This study also elucidates the general morphology of the spermatozoon in all monorchiid species described so far, which corresponds to a unique spermatozoon type. Other interesting finds concern the spermatological similarities between monorchiid spermatozoa and the mature spermatozoon reported in the apocreadiid Neoapocreadium chabaudi. These similarities allow us to suggest a close phylogenetical relationship between the Monorchiidae and the Apocreadiidae, although more studies are needed, especially in the unexplored taxa.

  4. Friedelane-type triterpenoids as selective anti-inflammatory agents by regulation of differential signaling pathways in LPS-stimulated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar-Lorenzo, Andrea; Ardiles, Alejandro E; Arroba, Ana I; Hernández-Jiménez, Enrique; Pardo, Virginia; López-Collazo, Eduardo; Jiménez, Ignacio A; Bazzocchi, Isabel L; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; Valverde, Ángela M

    2016-12-15

    A series of 31 pentacyclic triterpenoids isolated from the root barks of Celastrus vulcanicola and Maytenus jelskii were tested for cytotoxicity and inhibitory activity against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) production in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Compounds 18 (C18) and 25 (C25) exhibited significant inhibition of LPS-induced NO release at 50 and 25μM concentrations, respectively, and decreased mRNAs of pro-inflammatory cytokines. At the molecular level, C18 neither inhibited LPS-mediated phosphorylation of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) nor nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa beta (NFκB). Instead, C18 enhanced and prolonged nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and increased the expression of its target genes including hemeoxigenase 1 (HO1). C25 efficiently inhibited LPS-mediated phosphorylation of JNK, p38 and ERK, without affecting NFκB or Nrf2 signaling pathways. Both compounds reduced LPS-mediated processing of caspase-1 and the cleavage of interleukin 1β (IL1β) proform, reflecting their ability to target the inflammasome. C25 also counteracted LPS effects on iNOS expression and pro-inflammatory cytokines mRNA levels in Bv-2 microglial cells. The anti-inflammatory effect of both compounds was also assessed in human macrophages. Our results suggest that triterpenoids C18 and C25 possess anti-inflammatory effects, which may be therapeutically relevant for diseases linked to inflammation.

  5. Antitumor and antimetastatic activities of rhamnogalacturonan-II-type polysaccharide isolated from mature leaves of green tea via activation of macrophages and natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye-Ryung; Hwang, Dahyun; Suh, Hyung-Joo; Yu, Kwang-Won; Kim, Tae Young; Shin, Kwang-Soon

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the antitumor and antimetastatic polysaccharide from the mature leaves of green tea, GTE-II was purified using size exclusion chromatography. GTE-II consisted of 15 different sugars including rarely observed sugars such as 2-O-methyl-fucose, 2-O-methyl-xylose, apiose, aceric acid, 3-deoxy-d-manno-2-octulosonic acid, and 3-deoxy-d-lyxo-2-heptulosaric acid, which were characteristics of pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan-II. Treatment of peritoneal macrophages with GTE-II not only increased interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-12 production, but also had significantly increased tumoricidal activity against Yac-1 tumor cells than those obtained from untreated mice. In an assay of natural killer (NK) cell activity, intravenous administration of GTE-II significantly stimulated NK cytotoxicity against Yac-1 tumor cells. Furthermore, the depletion of NK cells by injection of rabbit anti-asialo GM1 serum eliminated the inhibitory effect of GTE-II on B16BL6 melanoma cells. These data suggest that GTE-II inhibits tumor metastasis, and its antitumor effect is associated with activation of macrophages and NK cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. IQGAP1 is important for activation of caspase-1 in macrophages and is targeted by Yersinia pestis type III effector YopM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Lawton K; Philip, Naomi H; Schmidt, Valentina A; Koller, Antonius; Strowig, Till; Flavell, Richard A; Brodsky, Igor E; Bliska, James B

    2014-07-01

    YopM is a leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-containing effector in several Yersinia species, including Yersinia pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis. Different Yersinia strains encode distinct YopM isoforms with variable numbers of LRRs but conserved C-terminal tails. A 15-LRR isoform in Y. pseudotuberculosis YPIII was recently shown to bind and inhibit caspase-1 via a YLTD motif in LRR 10, and attenuation of YopM(-) YPIII was reversed in mice lacking caspase-1, indicating that caspase-1 inhibition is a major virulence function of YopM(YPIII). To determine if other YopM proteins inhibit caspase-1, we utilized Y. pseudotuberculosis strains natively expressing a 21-LRR isoform lacking the YLTD motif (YopM(32777)) or ectopically expressing a Y. pestis 15-LRR version with a functional (YopM(KIM)) or inactivated (YopM(KIM) D271A) YLTD motif. Results of mouse and macrophage infections with these strains showed that YopM(32777), YopM(KIM), and YopM(KIM) D271A inhibit caspase-1 activation, indicating that the YLTD motif is dispensable for this activity. Analysis of YopM(KIM) deletion variants revealed that LRRs 6 to 15 and the C-terminal tail are required to inhibit caspase-1 activation. YopM(32777), YopM(KIM), and YopM(KIM) deletion variants were purified, and binding partners in macrophage lysates were identified. Caspase-1 bound to YopM(KIM) but not YopM(32777). Additionally, YopM(KIM) bound IQGAP1 and the use of Iqgap1(-/-) macrophages revealed that this scaffolding protein is important for caspase-1 activation upon infection with YopM(-) Y. pseudotuberculosis. Thus, while multiple YopM isoforms inhibit caspase-1 activation, their variable LRR domains bind different host proteins to perform this function and the LRRs of YopM(KIM) target IQGAP1, a novel regulator of caspase-1, in macrophages. Importance: Activation of caspase-1, mediated by macromolecular complexes termed inflammasomes, is important for innate immune defense against pathogens. Pathogens can, in turn, subvert

  7. Anti-inflammatory effect of a selective 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 inhibitor via the stimulation of heme oxygenase-1 in LPS-activated mice and J774.1 murine macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Bum Park

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available 11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1 converts inactive cortisone to the active cortisol. 11β-HSD1 may be involved in the resolution of inflammation. In the present study, we investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of 2-(3-benzoyl-4-hydroxy-1,1-dioxo-2H-1,2-benzothiazine-2-yl-1-phenylethanone (KR-66344, a selective 11β-HSD1 inhibitor, in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-activated C57BL/6J mice and macrophages. LPS increased 11β-HSD1 activity and expression in macrophages, which was inhibited by KR-66344. In addition, KR-66344 increased survival rate in LPS treated C57BL/6J mice. HO-1 mRNA expression level was increased by KR-66344, and this effect was reversed by the HO competitive inhibitor, ZnPP, in macrophages. Moreover, ZnPP reversed the suppression of ROS formation and cell death induced by KR-66344. ZnPP also suppressed animal survival rate in LPS plus KR-66344 treated C57BL/6J mice. In the spleen of LPS-treated mice, KR-66344 prevented cell death via suppression of inflammation, followed by inhibition of ROS, iNOS and COX-2 expression. Furthermore, LPS increased NFκB-p65 and MAPK phosphorylation, and these effects were abolished by pretreatment with KR-66344. Taken together, KR-66344 protects against LPS-induced animal death and spleen injury by inhibition of inflammation via induction of HO-1 and inhibition of 11β-HSD1 activity. Thus, we concluded that the selective 11β-HSD1 inhibitor may provide a novel strategy in the prevention/treatment of inflammatory disorders in patients.

  8. Macrophage Polarization in Metabolism and Metabolic Disease

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    Anna Meiliana

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is now recognized as the main cause of the worldwide epidemic of type 2 diabetes. Obesity-associated chronic inflammation is a contributing key factor for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Numbers of studies have clearly demonstrated that the immune system and metabolism are highly integrated. CONTENT: Macrophages are an essential component of innate immunity and play a central role in inflammation and host defense. Moreover, these cells have homeostatic functions beyond defense, including tissue remodeling in ontogenesis and orchestration of metabolic functions. Diversity and plasticity are hallmarks of cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage. In response to interferons (IFNs, toll-like receptor (TLR, or interleukin (IL-4/IL-13 signals, macrophages undergo M1 (classical or M2 (alternative activation. Progress has now been made in defining the signaling pathways, transcriptional networks, and epigenetic mechanisms underlying M1, M2 or M2-like polarized activation. SUMMARY: In response to various signals, macrophages may undergo classical M1 activation (stimulated by TLR ligands and IFN-γ or alternative M2 activation (stimulated by IL-4/IL-13; these states mirror the T helper (Th1–Th2 polarization of T cells. Pathology is frequently associated with dynamic changes in macrophage activation, with classically activated M1 cells implicate in initiating and sustaining inflammation, meanwhile M2 or M2-like activated cells associated with resolution or smoldering chronic inflammation. Identification of the mechanisms and molecules that are associated with macrophage plasticity and polarized activation provides a basis for macrophage centered diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. KEYWORDS: obesity, adipose tissue, inflammation, macrophage polarization.

  9. BMP pathway regulation of and by macrophages.

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    Megha Talati

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a disease of progressively increasing pulmonary vascular resistance, associated with mutations of the type 2 receptor for the BMP pathway, BMPR2. The canonical signaling pathway for BMPR2 is through the SMAD family of transcription factors. BMPR2 is expressed in every cell type, but the impact of BMPR2 mutations affecting SMAD signaling, such as Bmpr2delx4+, had only previously been investigated in smooth muscle and endothelium. In the present study, we created a mouse with universal doxycycline-inducible expression of Bmpr2delx4+ in order to determine if broader expression had an impact relevant to the development of PAH. We found that the most obvious phenotype was a dramatic, but patchy, increase in pulmonary inflammation. We crossed these double transgenic mice onto an NF-κB reporter strain, and by luciferase assays on live mice, individual organs and isolated macrophages, we narrowed down the origin of the inflammatory phenotype to constitutive activation of tissue macrophages. Study of bone marrow-derived macrophages from mutant and wild-type mice suggested a baseline difference in differentiation state in Bmpr2 mutants. When activated with LPS, both mutant and wild-type macrophages secrete BMP pathway inhibitors sufficient to suppress BMP pathway activity in smooth muscle cells (SMC treated with conditioned media. Functionally, co-culture with macrophages results in a BMP signaling-dependent increase in scratch closure in cultured SMC. We conclude that SMAD signaling through BMP is responsible, in part, for preventing macrophage activation in both live animals and in cells in culture, and that activated macrophages secrete BMP inhibitors in sufficient quantity to cause paracrine effect on vascular smooth muscle.

  10. Evaluation of in vitro anti-inflammatory effects of crude ginger and rosemary extracts obtained through supercritical CO2 extraction on macrophage and tumor cell line: the influence of vehicle type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justo, Oselys Rodriguez; Simioni, Patricia Ucelli; Gabriel, Dirce Lima; Tamashiro, Wirla Maria da Silva Cunha; Rosa, Paulo de Tarso Vieira; Moraes, Ângela Maria

    2015-10-29

    highest anti-inflammatory activity on the tumor cell line. Controversially, rosemary extract dispersed on DMSO induced a more significant IL-1 and TNF-α reduction than ginger extract in primary macrophages. Amongst the tested delivery vehicles, DMSO was the most suitable, presenting reduced cytotoxicity, followed by Pluronic F-68 and liposomes, provably due to differences in their form of absorption, distribution and cellular metabolism. Co-administration of liposomes and plant extracts may cause death of macrophages cells and induction of NO production. It can be concluded that some of the beneficial effects attributed to extracts of ginger and rosemary may be associated with the inhibition of inflammatory mediators due to their high antioxidant activity. However, these effects were influenced by the type of delivery vehicle.

  11. Thymoquinone from nutraceutical black cumin oil activates Neu4 sialidase in live macrophage, dendritic, and normal and type I sialidosis human fibroblast cells via GPCR Galphai proteins and matrix metalloproteinase-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, Trisha M; Jayanth, Preethi; Amith, Schammim Ray; Gilmour, Alanna; Guzzo, Christina; Gee, Katrina; Beyaert, Rudi; Szewczuk, Myron R

    2010-04-01

    Anti-inflammatory activities of thymoquinone (TQ) have been demonstrated in in vitro and in vivo studies. However, the precise mechanism(s) of TQ in these anti-inflammatory activities is not well understood. Using a newly developed assay to detect sialidase activity in live macrophage cells (Glycoconj J doi: 10.1007/s10719-009-9239-8 ), here we show that TQ has no inhibitory effect on endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced sialidase activity in live BMC-2 macrophage cells. In contrast, the parent black seed oil (BSO) and another constituent of BSO para-cymene (p-CY) completely block LPS induced sialidase activity. All of these compounds had no effect on cell viability. On the other hand, TQ induces a vigorous sialidase activity in live BMC-2 macrophage cells in a dose dependent manner as well in live DC-2.4 dendritic cells, HEK-TLR4/MD2, HEK293, SP1 mammary adenocarcinoma cells, human WT and 1140F01 and WG0544 type I sialidosis fibroblast cells. Tamiflu (oseltamivir phosphate) inhibits TQ-induced sialidase activity in live BMC-2 cells with an IC(50) of 0.0194 microM compared to an IC(50) of 19.1 microM for neuraminidase inhibitor DANA (2-deoxy-2,3-dehydro-N-acetylneuraminic acid). Anti-Neu1, -2 and -3 antibodies have no inhibition of TQ-induced sialidase activity in live BMC-2 and human THP-1 macrophage cells but anti-Neu4 antibodies completely block this activity. There is a vigorous sialidase activity associated with TQ treated live primary bone marrow (BM) macrophage cells derived from WT and hypomorphic cathepsin A mice with a secondary Neu1 deficiency (NeuI KD), but not from Neu4 knockout (Neu4 KO) mice. Pertussis toxin (PTX), a specific inhibitor of Galphai proteins of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and the broad range inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) galardin and piperazine applied to live BMC-2, THP-1 and primary BM macrophage cells completely block TQ-induced sialidase activity. These same inhibitory effects are not observed with the GM1

  12. Interstitial cells of Cajal, macrophages and mast cells in the gut musculature: morphology, distribution, spatial and possible functional interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Hanne B

    2010-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are recognized as pacemaker cells for gastrointestinal movement and are suggested to be mediators of neuromuscular transmission. Intestinal motility disturbances are often associated with a reduced number of ICC and/or ultrastructural damage, sometimes associated...... with immune cells. Macrophages and mast cells in the intestinal muscularis externa of rodents can be found in close spatial contact with ICC. Macrophages are a constant and regularly distributed cell population in the serosa and at the level of Auerbach's plexus (AP). In human colon, ICC are in close contact...... with macrophages at the level of AP, suggesting functional interaction. It has therefore been proposed that ICC and macrophages interact. Macrophages and mast cells are considered to play important roles in the innate immune defence by producing pro-inflammatory mediators during classical activation, which may...

  13. Skin wound healing modulation by macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodero, Mathieu P; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash

    2010-07-25

    Skin wound healing is a multi stage phenomenon that requires the activation, recruitment or activity of numerous cell types as keratinocytes, endothelial cells, fibroblast and inflammatory cells. Among the latter, macrophages appear to be central to this process. They colonize the wound at its very early stage and in addition to their protective immune role seem to organize the activity of other cell types at the following stages of the healing. Their benefit to this process is however controversial, as macrophages are described to promote the speed of healing but may also favour the fibrosis resulting from it in scars. Moreover wound healing defects are associated with abnormalities in the inflammatory phase. In this review, we summarise our knowledge on what are the Wound Associated Macrophages, and how they interact with the other cell types to control the reepithelisation, angiogenesis and the extracellular matrix remodelling. We believe this knowledge may open new avenues for therapeutic intervention on skin wounds.

  14. Ultrastructure of free-ending nerve fibres in oesophageal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Chillida, E M; Rodrigo, J; Mayo, I; Arnedo, A; Gómez, A

    1981-01-01

    For the first time, at the ultrastructural level, the existence of free-ending, intraepithelial nerve fibres has been demonstrated in the oesophagus wall of adult cats and monkeys. Their form, the way they penetrate the epithelium, their location within the epithelium and their relationships with neighbouring cells have been established. A sensory function is suggested for this type of ending. Images Figs. 1-4 Figs. 5-6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Figs. 14-15 Figs. 16-17 PMID:7333951

  15. Ultrastructure and mitochondrial numbers in pre- and postpubertal pig oocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Hanne Skovsgaard; Callesen, Henrik; Løvendahl, Peter

    2016-01-01

    with different diameters from pre- and postpubertal pigs. The ultrastructure of smaller prepubertal immature oocytes indicated active cells in close contact with cumulus cells. The postpubertal oocytes were more quiescent cell types. The small prepubertal oocytes had a lower total mitochondrial number......, but no differences were observed in mitochondrial densities between groups. Mature postpubertal oocytes adhered to the following characteristics: presence of metaphase II, lack of contact between cumulus cells and oocyte, absence of rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complexes, peripheral location of cortical...

  16. Glutamine Modulates Macrophage Lipotoxicity

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    Li He

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and diabetes are associated with excessive inflammation and impaired wound healing. Increasing evidence suggests that macrophage dysfunction is responsible for these inflammatory defects. In the setting of excess nutrients, particularly dietary saturated fatty acids (SFAs, activated macrophages develop lysosome dysfunction, which triggers activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and cell death. The molecular pathways that connect lipid stress to lysosome pathology are not well understood, but may represent a viable target for therapy. Glutamine uptake is increased in activated macrophages leading us to hypothesize that in the context of excess lipids glutamine metabolism could overwhelm the mitochondria and promote the accumulation of toxic metabolites. To investigate this question we assessed macrophage lipotoxicity in the absence of glutamine using LPS-activated peritoneal macrophages exposed to the SFA palmitate. We found that glutamine deficiency reduced lipid induced lysosome dysfunction, inflammasome activation, and cell death. Under glutamine deficient conditions mTOR activation was decreased and autophagy was enhanced; however, autophagy was dispensable for the rescue phenotype. Rather, glutamine deficiency prevented the suppressive effect of the SFA palmitate on mitochondrial respiration and this phenotype was associated with protection from macrophage cell death. Together, these findings reveal that crosstalk between activation-induced metabolic reprogramming and the nutrient microenvironment can dramatically alter macrophage responses to inflammatory stimuli.

  17. Ultrastructure of the spermatozoon of the digenean Plagiorchis elegans (Rudolphi, 1802) (Plagiorchioidea, Plagiorchiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, Papa Ibnou; Quilichini, Yann; Tkach, Vasyl V; Greiman, Stephen E; Bâ, Cheikh Tidiane; Marchand, Bernard

    2013-09-01

    The ultrastructure of the mature spermatozoon of the type genus of the Plagiorchiidae Plagiorchis elegans (Rudolphi, 1802), a parasite of the Golden hamster, Mesocricetus auratus is described. This study is the first ultrastructural study of the spermatozoon of a Plagiorchis, the second of a plagiorchiid species and only the third in the Plagiorchioidea. Previously data on spermatozoon ultrastructure existed only for the plagiorchiid Enodiotrema reductum and the omphalometrid Rubenstrema exasperatum. The mature spermatozoon of P. elegans exhibited the general pattern described in most digenean species, namely two axonemes of the 9 + "1" Trepaxonemata pattern, nucleus, mitochondria, external ornamentation of the plasma membrane, spine-like bodies, and glycogen granules. However, the rather typical expansion of the plasma membrane is not found in P. elegans. Another peculiarity of the spermatozoon of P. elegans is the presence of a structure called thin cytoplasm termination. Spermatozoon ultrastructure of P. elegans is compared with that of E. reductum and R. exasperatum. Spermatozoon of P. elegans conforms to the general pattern described in E. reductum. Thus, this study further expands our knowledge on the spermatozoon ultrastructure among the members of the Plagiorchioidea, one of the most phylogenetically derived groups of the digenea.

  18. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor primes interleukin-13 production by macrophages via protease-activated receptor-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Manabu; Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Ono, Tomomichi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2015-04-01

    Chronic inflammation is often linked to the presence of type 2-polarized macrophages, which are induced by the T helper type 2 cytokines interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 (IL-13). IL-13 is a key mediator of tissue fibrosis caused by T helper type 2-based inflammation. Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. This study investigated the priming effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on IL-13 expression by macrophages stimulated with HNE. Adherent macrophages were obtained from primary cultures of human mononuclear cells. Expression of IL-13 mRNA and protein by GM-CSF-dependent macrophages was investigated after stimulation with HNE, using the polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. GM-CSF had a priming effect on IL-13 mRNA and protein expression by macrophages stimulated with HNE, while this effect was not observed for various other cytokines. GM-CSF-dependent macrophages showed a significant increase in the expression of protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) mRNA and protein. The response of IL-13 mRNA to HNE was significantly decreased by pretreatment with alpha1-antitrypsin, a PAR-2 antibody (SAM11), or a PAR-2 antagonist (ENMD-1068). These findings suggest that stimulation with HNE can induce IL-13 production by macrophages, especially GM-CSF-dependent macrophages. Accordingly, neutrophil elastase may have a key role in fibrosis associated with chronic inflammation.

  19. Macrophage migration and invasion is regulated by MMP10 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Y Murray

    Full Text Available This study was designed to identify metalloproteinase determinants of macrophage migration and led to the specific hypothesis that matrix metalloproteinase 10 (MMP10/stromelysin-2 facilitates macrophage migration. We first profiled expression of all MMPs in LPS-stimulated primary murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and Raw264.7 cells and found that MMP10 was stimulated early (3 h and down-regulated later (24 h. Based on this pattern of expression, we speculated that MMP10 plays a role in macrophage responses, such as migration. Indeed, using time lapse microscopy, we found that RNAi silencing of MMP10 in primary macrophages resulted in markedly reduced migration, which was reversed with exogenous active MMP10 protein. Mmp10 (-/- bone marrow-derived macrophages displayed significantly reduced migration over a two-dimensional fibronectin matrix. Invasion of primary wild-type macrophages into Matrigel supplemented with fibronectin was also markedly impaired in Mmp10 (-/- cells. MMP10 expression in macrophages thus emerges as an important moderator of cell migration and invasion. These findings support the hypothesis that MMP10 promotes macrophage movement and may have implications in understanding the control of macrophages in several pathologies, including the abnormal wound healing response associated with pro-inflammatory conditions.

  20. Macrophages - silent enemies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świdrowska-Jaros, Joanna; Orczyk, Krzysztof; Smolewska, Elżbieta

    2016-07-06

    The inflammatory response by secretion of cytokines and other mediators is postulated as one of the most significant factors in the pathophysiology of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The effect of macrophage action depends on the type of their activation. Classically activated macrophages (M1) are responsible for release of molecules crucial for joint inflammation. Alternatively activated macrophages (M2) may recognize self antigens by scavenger receptors and induce the immunological reaction leading to autoimmune diseases such as JIA. Molecules essential for JIA pathophysiology include: TNF-α, the production of which precedes synovial inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis; IL-1 as a key mediator of synovial damage; chemotactic factors for macrophages IL-8 and MCP-1; IL6, the level of which correlates with the radiological joint damage; MIF, promoting the secretion of TNF-α and IL-6; CCL20 and HIF, significant for the hypoxic synovial environment in JIA; GM-CSF, stimulating the production of macrophages; and IL-18, crucial for NK cell functions. Recognition of the role of macrophages creates the potential for a new therapeutic approach.

  1. Reptilian spermatogenesis: A histological and ultrastructural perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribbins, Kevin M

    2011-07-01

    Until recently, the histology and ultrastructural events of spermatogenesis in reptiles were relatively unknown. Most of the available morphological information focuses on specific stages of spermatogenesis, spermiogenesis, and/or of the mature spermatozoa. No study to date has provided complete ultrastructural information on the early events of spermatogenesis, proliferation and meiosis in class Reptilia. Furthermore, no comprehensive data set exists that describes the ultrastructure of the entire ontogenic progression of germ cells through the phases of reptilian spermatogenesis (mitosis, meiosis and spermiogenesis). The purpose of this review is to provide an ultrastructural and histological atlas of spermatogenesis in reptiles. The morphological details provided here are the first of their kind and can hopefully provide histological information on spermatogenesis that can be compared to that already known for anamniotes (fish and amphibians), birds and mammals. The data supplied in this review will provide a basic model that can be utilized for the study of sperm development in other reptiles. The use of such an atlas will hopefully stimulate more interest in collecting histological and ultrastructural data sets on spermatogenesis that may play important roles in future nontraditional phylogenetic analyses and histopathological studies in reptiles.

  2. Ultrastructural investigation of human sperm from asthenozoospermic men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sh. Khayat

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ultrastructure of the flagellum is highly conserved and is composed of a number of cytoskeletal elements whose proper assembly is critical for sperm motility. Ultrastructural mechanisms damage as cause of asthenozoospermia development are discussed.

  3. Ultrastructural investigation of human sperm from asthenozoospermic men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sh. Khayat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrastructure of the flagellum is highly conserved and is composed of a number of cytoskeletal elements whose proper assembly is critical for sperm motility. Ultrastructural mechanisms damage as cause of asthenozoospermia development are discussed.

  4. Lack of RNase L attenuates macrophage functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yi

    Full Text Available Macrophages are one of the major cell types in innate immunity against microbial infection. It is believed that the expression of proinflammatory genes such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, and cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2 by macrophages is also crucial for activation of both innate and adaptive immunities. RNase L is an interferon (IFN inducible enzyme which is highly expressed in macrophages. It has been demonstrated that RNase L regulates the expression of certain inflammatory genes. However, its role in macrophage function is largely unknown.Bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs were generated from RNase L(+/+and (-/- mice. The migration of BMMs was analyzed by using Transwell migration assays. Endocytosis and phagocytosis of macrophages were assessed by using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-Dextran 40,000 and FITC-E. coli bacteria, respectively. The expression of inflammatory genes was determined by Western Blot and ELISA. The promoter activity of Cox-2 was measured by luciferase reporter assays.Lack of RNase L significantly decreased the migration of BMMs induced by M-CSF, but at a less extent by GM-CSF and chemokine C-C motif ligand-2 (CCL2. Interestingly, RNase L deficient BMMs showed a significant reduction of endocytic activity to FITC-Dextran 40,000, but no any obvious effect on their phagocytic activity to FITC-bacteria under the same condition. RNase L impacts the expression of certain genes related to cell migration and inflammation such as transforming growth factor (TGF-β, IL-1β, IL-10, CCL2 and Cox-2. Furthermore, the functional analysis of the Cox-2 promoter revealed that RNase L regulated the expression of Cox-2 in macrophages at its transcriptional level. Taken together, our findings provide direct evidence showing that RNase L contributes to innate immunity through regulating macrophage functions.

  5. The midgut of Cephalotes ants (Formicidae: Myrmicinae): ultrastructure of the epithelium and symbiotic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bution, Murillo L; Caetano, F H

    2010-07-01

    The ultrastructural analysis of the midgut of Cephalotes atratus, C. clypeatus, and C. pusillus reveled that the midgut epithelium lays on a basal lamina and is composed basically of three cell types: digestive cells, regenerative cells, and goblet cells. In these ants, the rough endoplasmic reticulum, in addition to producing digestive enzymes, is involved in the formation of concretions and ion storage in specialized vacuoles present in the midgut. These concretions are spherocrystals and may contribute to stabilize the pH and to maintain symbiotic bacteria found between microvilli. The ultrastructure analysis of these bacteria revealed the presence of a double envelope typical of gram-negative bacteria. For the three species examined, the ultrastructure similarities are conspicuous, suggesting that this may be the pattern for the genus Cephalotes. Details of the relationship between bacteria and microvilli were examined. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Spermatozoon ultrastructure of Gyliauchen sp. (Digenea: Gyliauchenidae), an intestinal parasite of Siganus fuscescens (Pisces: Teleostei).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilichini, Y; Foata, J; Justine, J-L; Bray, R A; Marchand, B

    2011-10-01

    The ultrastructure of the mature spermatozoon of Gyliauchen sp., a parasite of the dusky rabbitfish Siganus fuscescens, was studied by transmission electron microscopy. The spermatozoon possesses two axonemes of the 9+"1" pattern of Trepaxonemata, four attachment zones, one mitochondrion, a nucleus, cortical microtubules, external ornamentation of the plasma membrane, and spine-like bodies. The main characteristics of this spermatozoon are the presence of one mitochondrion, spine-like bodies not associated with the external ornamentation, and a posterior extremity of type 3 that is characterized by the following sequence: posterior extremity of the nucleus then posterior extremity of the second axoneme. Numerous other ultrastructural features are also discussed and compared to the digenean spermatology literature. This is the first study of a member of the Gyliauchenidae and the fourth within the Lepocreadioidea. The results show that many ultrastructural characters are variable within this superfamily and could be useful for phylogeny.

  7. Protection of ultrastructure in chilling-stressed banana leaves by salicylic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Guo-zhang; WANG Zheng-xun; XIA Kuai-fei; SUN Gu-chou

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Chilling tolerance of salicylic acid (SA) in banana seedlings (Musa acuminata cv., Williams 8818) was investigated by changes in ultrastructure in this study. Methods: Light and electron microscope observation. Results: Pretreatment with 0.5 mmol/L SA under normal growth conditions (30/22 ℃) by foliar spray and root irrigation resulted in many changes in ultrastructure of banana cells, such as cells separation from palisade parenchymas, the appearance of crevices in cell walls, the swelling of grana and stromal thylakoids, and a reduction in the number of starch granules. These results implied that SA treatment at 30/22 ℃ could be a type of stress. During 3 d of exposure to 7 ℃ chilling stress under low light, however, cell ultrastructure of SA-pretreated banana seedlings showed less deterioration than those of control seedlings (distilled water-pretreated). Conclusion:SA could provide some protection for cell structure of chilling-stressed banana seedling.

  8. Oxygen Tension Regulates the Expression of Angiogenesis Factor by Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knighton, David R.; Hunt, Thomas K.; Scheuenstuhl, Heinz; Halliday, Betty J.; Werb, Zena; Banda, Michael J.

    1983-09-01

    When cultured in a hypoxic environment similar to that found in the center of a wound, macrophages secreted active angiogenesis factor into the medium. Under conditions similar to those of well-oxygenated tissue, macrophages did not secrete active angiogenesis factor. Macrophages that secreted the factor at hypoxic conditions stopped secreting it when returned to room air. Thus the control of angiogenesis in wound healing may be the result of macrophages responding to tissue oxygen tension without the necessity of interacting with other cell types or biochemical signals.

  9. Oxygen tension regulates the expression angiogenesis factor by macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knighton, D.R.; Hunt, T.K.; Scheuenstuhl, H.; Halliday, B.J.; Werb, Z.; Banda, M.J.

    1983-09-23

    When cultured in a hypoxic environment similar to that found in the center of a wound, macrophages secreted active angiogenesis factor into the medium. Under conditions similar to those of well-oxygenated tissue, macrophages did not secrete active angiogenesis factor. Macrophages that secreted the factor at hyposic conditions stopped secreting it when returned to room air. Thus the control of angiogenesis in wound healing may be the result of macrophages responding to tissue oxygen tension without the necessity of interacting with other cell types or biochemical signals.

  10. Oxygen tension regulated the expression of angiogenesis factor by macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knighton, D.R.; Hunt, T.K.; Scheuenstuhl, H.; Halliday, B.J.; Werb, Z.; Banda, M.J.

    1983-09-23

    When cultured in a hypoxic environment similar to that found in the center of a wound, macrophages secreted active angiogenesis factor into the medium. Under conditions similar to those of well-oxygenated tissue, macrophages did not secrete active angiogenesis factor. Macrophages that secreted the factor at hypoxic conditions stopped secreting it when returned to room air. Thus the control of angiogenesis in wound healing may be the result of macrophages responding to tissue oxygen tension without the necessity of interacting with other cell types or biochemical signals.

  11. [Ultrastructural study of chronic gastritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, A D; Picatoste, R; del Valle, A; Díaz Flores, L

    1977-06-01

    A study of gastric biopsies with optical and electronical microscope from patients with gastritis in different stages of evolution was realized. The ultraestructural results consist in phenomenal alterations at the epitelium level, apparition of bodies of mielinic aspects in the inside of the Oxintcs cells, reduction of the number of this and the peptic cells and even the disappearance of the last. There is an increase of the mucous cells with mitotic changes, notable hyperplasia of the arget cells and intestinal metaplasia in the advanced cases. In the stroma is demonstrative the infiltration of plasmatic cells having a endoplasmatic reticule in different stages of activity, linphocytes and macrophagous full of primary and secondary lysosomas. A very important fact is the increase of the argentofilous cells and its probably relation with the appearing of the gastritis. The presence of the plasma cells and lynphocyts mark the role that takes the immunitary reaction in this process.

  12. M2 polarization enhances silica nanoparticle uptake by macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica eHoppstädter

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available While silica nanoparticles have enabled numerous industrial and medical applications, their toxicological safety requires further evaluation. Macrophages are the major cell population responsible for nanoparticle clearance in vivo. The prevailing macrophage phenotype largely depends on the local immune status of the host. Whereas M1-polarized macrophages are considered as pro-inflammatory macrophages involved in host defense, M2 macrophages exhibit anti-inflammatory and wound-healing properties, but also promote tumor growth.We employed different models of M1 and M2 polarization: GM-CSF/LPS/IFN-gamma was used to generate primary human M1 cells and M-CSF/IL-10 to differentiate M2 monocyte-derived macrophages. PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells were polarized towards an M1 type by LPS/IFN-gamma and towards M2 by IL-10. Uptake of fluorescent silica nanoparticles (Ø 26 and 41 nm and microparticles (Ø 1.75 µm was quantified. At the concentration used (50 µg/ml, silica nanoparticles did not influence cell viability as assessed by MTT assay. Nanoparticle uptake was enhanced in M2-polarized primary human monocyte-derived macrophages compared with M1 cells, as shown by flow cytometric and microscopic approaches. In contrast, the uptake of microparticles did not differ between M1 and M2 phenotypes. M2 polarization was also associated with increased nanoparticle uptake in the macrophage-like THP-1 cell line. In accordance, in vivo polarized M2-like primary human tumor-associated macrophages (TAM obtained from lung tumors took up more nanoparticles than M1-like alveolar macrophages isolated from the surrounding lung tissue.In summary, our data indicate that the M2 polarization of macrophages promotes nanoparticle internalization. Therefore, the phenotypical differences between macrophage subsets should be taken into consideration in future investigations on nanosafety, but might also open up therapeutic perspectives allowing to specifically target M2

  13. Glassy droplet inclusions within the cytoplasm of Kupffer cells: A novel ultrastructural feature for the diagnosis of pediatric autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotowska, Joanna Maria; Sobaniec-Lotowska, Maria Elzbieta; Daniluk, Urszula; Lebensztejn, Dariusz Marek

    2017-08-01

    Since Kupffer cells/macrophages (KCs/MPs) may be involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), this pioneer study was undertaken to evaluate KCs/MPs in pediatric AIH in transmission-electron microscope. Ultrastructural analyses were performed using liver biopsies from 14 children with clinicopathologically diagnosed AIH. In all AIH children, ultrastructural findings revealed changes in the cells lining sinusoidal vessels, especially KCs/MPs and endothelial cells. KCs/MPs showed increased phagocytic activity and damaged mitochondria, frequently with accompanying intense fibrosis. In 10/14 AIH patients, the cytoplasm of sinusoidal KCs/MPs contained characteristic glassy droplet inclusions. They were round, sharply circumscribed, and contained homogeneous material and distinct translucent fields. Their ultrastructure was identical with the Russel bodies of plasma cells, which were also found in liver biopsies in the same patients. Ultrastructural identification of characteristic cytoplasmic droplets with glassy appearance in KCs/MPs, never before described in AIH, provides a useful novel morphological feature in the diagnosis of this disease. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Yersinia pestis and host macrophages: immunodeficiency of mouse macrophages induced by YscW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yujing; Du, Zongmin; Han, Yanping; Guo, Zhaobiao; Tan, Yafang; Zhu, Ziwen; Yang, Ruifu

    2009-09-01

    The virulence of the pathogenic Yersinia species depends on a plasmid-encoded type III secretion system (T3SS) that transfers six Yersinia outer protein (Yop) effector proteins into the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, leading to disruption of host defence mechanisms. It is shown in this study that Yersinia pestis YscW, a protein of the T3SS injectisome, contributes to the induction of a deficiency in phagocytosis in host macrophages and a reduction in their antigen-presenting capacity. A Y. pestis strain lacking yscW had no effect on uptake by host macrophages. In mice infected with wild-type Y. pestis, the yscW mutant or a complement strain, immunodeficiency was observed in host macrophages compared with those from uninfected mice. However, the phagocytosis and antigen presenting capacities of macrophages infected by yscW mutant strain both in vivo and in vitro were significantly higher than those by wild type strain. Consistent with this finding, when YscW was expressed in the RAW264.7 macrophage cell line, phagocytosis and antigen-presenting capacities were significantly lower than those of the control groups. These results indicate that Y. pestis YscW may directly induce immunodeficiency in murine macrophages by crippling their phagocytosis and antigen-presenting capacities. These data provide evidences to Y. pestis pathogenesis that some proteins in T3SS injectisome, such as YscW protein, might play independent roles in disrupting host defense apart from their known functions.

  15. Macrophages: Regulators of the Inflammatory Microenvironment during Mammary Gland Development and Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Nicholas J; Chuntova, Pavlina; Schwertfeger, Kathryn L

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are critical mediators of inflammation and important regulators of developmental processes. As a key phagocytic cell type, macrophages evolved as part of the innate immune system to engulf and process cell debris and pathogens. Macrophages produce factors that act directly on their microenvironment and also bridge innate immune responses to the adaptive immune system. Resident macrophages are important for acting as sensors for tissue damage and maintaining tissue homeostasis. It is now well-established that macrophages are an integral component of the breast tumor microenvironment, where they contribute to tumor growth and progression, likely through many of the mechanisms that are utilized during normal wound healing responses. Because macrophages contribute to normal mammary gland development and breast cancer growth and progression, this review will discuss both resident mammary gland macrophages and tumor-associated macrophages with an emphasis on describing how macrophages interact with their surrounding environment during normal development and in the context of cancer.

  16. Oxygenated fixation demonstrates novel and improved ultrastructural features of the human endolymphatic sac

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Caye-Thomasen, Per; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    in the intraosseous part of the sac: mitochondria-rich cells, ribosome-rich cells, and nonclassifiable cells. A fourth cell type was found in the extraosseous part. Novel ultrastructural features of the epithelial lining and the subepithelial layer are described and discussed. CONCLUSIONS: The results in the present...

  17. Pulmonary blastoma: an ultrastructural study emphasizing intestinal differentiation in lung tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, P B; Dieb, T M; Martin, J H

    1982-05-01

    Features of intestinal differentiation, including the presence of brush borders, have been described previously in a pulmonary blastoma following xenotransplantation in athymic nude mice. This paper reports similar findings in a pulmonary blastoma subjected directly to electron microscopic study. Ultrastructural manifestations of intestinal differentiation in other types of primary lung tumors are also discussed.

  18. Macrophage mannose receptor-specific gene delivery vehicle for macrophage engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Gui-Xin; Chen, Yu-Zhe; Yao, Xing-Lei; Du, Anariwa; Tang, Gu-Ping; Shen, You-Qing; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2014-05-01

    Macrophages are the most plastic cells in the hematopoietic system and they exhibit great functional diversity. They have been extensively applied in anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic and anti-cancer therapies. However, the application of macrophages is limited by the efficiency of their engineering. The macrophage mannose receptor (MMR, CD206), a C-type lectin receptor, is ubiquitously expressed on macrophages and has a high affinity for mannose oligosaccharides. In the present study, we developed a novel non-viral vehicle with specific affinity for MMR. Mannan was cationized with spermine at a grafted ratio of ∼12% to deliver DNA and was characterized as a stable system for delivery. This spermine-mannan (SM)-based delivery system was evaluated as a biocompatible vehicle with superior transfection efficiency on murine macrophages, up to 28.5-fold higher than spermine-pullulan, 11.5-fold higher than polyethylenimine and 3.0-fold higher than Lipofectamine™ 2000. We confirmed that the SM-based delivery system for macrophages transfection was MMR-specific and we described the intracellular transport of the delivery system. To our knowledge, this is the first study using SM to demonstrate a mannose receptor-specific gene delivery system, thereby highlighting the potential of a novel specific non-viral delivery vehicle for macrophage engineering.

  19. Resident macrophages influence stem cell activity in the mammary gland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gyorki, D.E.; Asselin-Labat, M.L.; Rooijen, van N.; Lindeman, G.J.; Visvader, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Macrophages in the mammary gland are essential for morphogenesis of the ductal epithelial tree and have been implicated in promoting breast tumor metastasis. Although it is well established that macrophages influence normal mammopoiesis, the mammary cell types that these accessory cells

  20. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Curvularin-Type Metabolites from a Marine-Derived Fungal Strain Penicillium sp. SF-5859 in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced RAW264.7 Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Tran Minh; Ko, Wonmin; Lee, Seung Jun; Kim, Youn-Chul; Son, Jae-Young; Sohn, Jae Hak; Yim, Joung Han; Oh, Hyuncheol

    2017-09-02

    Chemical study on the extract of a marine-derived fungal strain Penicillium sp. SF-5859 yielded a new curvularin derivative (1), along with eight known curvularin-type polyketides (2-9). The structures of these metabolites (1-9) were established by comprehensive spectroscopic analyses, including 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry (MS). In vitro anti-inflammatory effects of these metabolites were evaluated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. Among these metabolites, 3-9 were shown to strongly inhibit LPS-induced overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) with IC50 values ranging from 1.9 μM to 18.1 μM, and from 2.8 μM to 18.7 μM, respectively. In the further evaluation of signal pathways involved in these effects, the most active compound, (10E,15S)-10,11-dehydrocurvularin (8) attenuated the expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. Furthermore, compound 8 was shown to suppress the upregulation of pro-inflammatory mediators and cytokines via the inhibition of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway, but not through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Based on the comparisons of the different magnitude of the anti-inflammatory effects of these structurally-related metabolites, it was suggested that the opening of the 12-membered lactone ring in curvularin-type metabolites and blocking the phenol functionality led to the significant decrease in their anti-inflammatory activity.

  1. Pathogenic prion protein fragment (PrP106–126) promotes human immunodeficiency virus type-1 infection in peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacot, Silvia M.; Feldman, Gerald M.; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Dhawan, Subhash

    2017-01-01

    Transfusion of blood and blood products contaminated with the pathogenic form of prion protein Prpsc, thought to be the causative agent of variant a Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (vCJD), may result in serious consequences in recipients with a compromised immune system, for example, as seen in HIV-1 infection. In the present study, we demonstrate that treatment of peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) with PrP106–126, a synthetic domain of PrPsc that has intrinsic functional activities related to the full-length protein, markedly increased their susceptibility to HIV-1 infection, induced cytokine secretion, and enhanced their migratory behavior in response to N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (fMLP). Live-cell imaging of MDM cultured in the presence of PrP106–126 showed large cell clusters indicative of cellular activation. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor STI-571, protein kinase C inhibitor K252B, and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor olomoucine attenuated PrP106–126-induced altered MDM functions. These findings delineate a previously undefined functional role of PrP106–126-mediated host cell response in promoting HIV-1 pathogenesis. PMID:25589240

  2. Ultrastructure of autophagy in plant cells: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Doorn, Wouter G; Papini, Alessio

    2013-12-01

    Just as with yeasts and animal cells, plant cells show several types of autophagy. Microautophagy is the uptake of cellular constituents by the vacuolar membrane. Although microautophagy seems frequent in plants it is not yet fully proven to occur. Macroautophagy occurs farther away from the vacuole. In plants it is performed by autolysosomes, which are considerably different from the autophagosomes found in yeasts and animal cells, as in plants these organelles contain hydrolases from the onset of their formation. Another type of autophagy in plant cells (called mega-autophagy or mega-autolysis) is the massive degradation of the cell at the end of one type of programmed cell death (PCD). Furthermore, evidence has been found for autophagy during degradation of specific proteins, and during the internal degeneration of chloroplasts. This paper gives a brief overview of the present knowledge on the ultrastructure of autophagic processes in plants.

  3. Toxicity of mercury in macrophages. Structure and function of macrophages after experimental mercury exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, M.M.

    1995-12-31

    Mercury is recognized as an environmental heavy metal pollutant with a toxic effect on living organisms. The toxicity of this heavy metal at cellular level is described for many types of cells. Macrophages are ubiquitous in the organism and play a central role in the non-specific defence barrier against intruding micro-organisms. As a first line of defence, macrophages are crucial for the course of generalized infection, for instance with herpes simplex virus. Functions such as phagocytosis, migration, activation during infection and cytokine production are important in this context. Mercury, detectable by auto metallography, is found in the lysosomes of macrophages and this accumulation is dependent upon dose and length of time of mercury exposure. But higher concentrations cause auto interference, which indicates that mercury accumulation is dependent on lysosome functional integrity and that mercury inhibits lysosome functions. In mice intraperitoneally exposed to mercury chloride, mercury is found localized in the lysosomes of macrophages in the spleen, thymus, lymph nodes and liver as well as in peritoneal macrophages. The effect of mercury on a virus infection was examined in studies of the course of infection in mice treated with mercury and infected with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) under further exposure to mercury. To further elucidate aspects of interactions between heavy metals and macrophages and their eventual significance for the antiviral effect of macrophages, the effect of mercury on cell respiratory burst capacity and the influence of mercury on cell production of and reaction to cytokines was examined. This thesis shows that mercury is immunotoxic in that it affects macrophages both with regard to the viability and function of the cells. This is also valid for mercury concentrations that do not result in apparent pathological changes. (EG) 98 refs.

  4. Porcine circovirus type 2 activates PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK pathways to promote interleukin-10 production in macrophages via Cap interaction of gC1qR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qian; Huang, Yong; Wang, Tongtong; Zhang, Xiujuan; Chen, Yu; Cui, Beibei; Li, Delong; Zhao, Xiaomin; Zhang, Wenlong; Chang, Lingling; Tong, Dewen

    2016-04-05

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) infection caused PCV2-associated diseases (PCVAD) is one of the major emerging immunosuppression diseases in pig industry. In this study, we investigated how PCV2 inoculation increases interleukin (IL)-10 expression in porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs). PCV2 inoculation significantly upregulated IL-10 expression compared with PCV1. Upon initial PCV2 inoculation, PI3K/Akt cooperated with NF-κB pathways to promote IL-10 transcription via p50, CREB and Ap1 transcription factors, whereas inhibition of PI3K/Akt activation blocked Ap1 and CREB binding to the il10 promoter, and decreased the binding level of NF-κB1 p50 with il10 promoter, leading to great reduction in early IL-10 transcription. In the later phase of inoculation, PCV2 further activated p38 MAPK and ERK pathways to enhance IL-10 production by promoting Sp1 binding to the il10 promoter. For PCV2-induced IL-10 production in macrophages, PCV2 capsid protein Cap, but not the replicase Rep or ORF3, was the critical component. Cap activated PI3K/Akt, p38 MAPK, and ERK signaling pathways to enhance IL-10 expression. In the whole process, gC1qR mediated PCV2-induced PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK activation to enhance IL-10 induction by interaction with Cap. Depletion of gC1qR blocked PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK activation, resulting in significant decrease in IL-10 production in PCV2-inoculated cells. Thus, gC1qR might be a critical functional receptor for PCV2-induced IL-10 production. Taken together, these data demonstrated that Cap protein binding with host gC1qR induction of PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK signalings activation is a critical process in enhancing PCV2-induced IL-10 production in porcine alveolar macrophages.

  5. Ultrastructure of sporulation in Haplosporidium armoricanum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hine, P.M.; Engelsma, M.Y.; Wakefield, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    An ultrastructural study was carried out on the tissues of an oyster (Ostrea edulis), heavily infected with Haplosporidium armoricanum (van Banning, 1977), that had been fixed in Carson¿s fixative. The well-fixed tissues revealed details of sporulation and of the spores, which had not been previousl

  6. Ultrastructural differences between diabetic and idiopathic gastroparesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faussone-Pellegrini, Maria Simonetta; Grover, Madhusudan; Pasricha, Pankaj J.; Bernard, Cheryl E.; Lurken, Matthew S.; Smyrk, Thomas C.; Parkman, Henry P.; Abell, Thomas L.; Snape, William J.; Hasler, William L.; Uenalp-Arida, Aynur; Nguyen, Linda; Koch, Kenneth L.; Calles, Jorges; Lee, Linda; Tonascia, James; Hamilton, Frank A.; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2012-01-01

    The ultrastructural changes in diabetic and idiopathic gastroparesis are not well studied and it is not known whether there are different defects in the two disorders. As part of the Gastroparesis Clinical Research Consortium, full thickness gastric body biopsies from 20 diabetic and 20 idiopathic g

  7. Ultrastructure of sporulation in Haplosporidium armoricanum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hine, P.M.; Engelsma, M.Y.; Wakefield, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    An ultrastructural study was carried out on the tissues of an oyster (Ostrea edulis), heavily infected with Haplosporidium armoricanum (van Banning, 1977), that had been fixed in Carson¿s fixative. The well-fixed tissues revealed details of sporulation and of the spores, which had not been

  8. Ultrastructure and chaetotaxy of sensory eeceptors in the cercaria of a species of Allopodocotyle Pritchard, 1966 (Digenea: Opecoelidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Bogéa

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous investigations of sensory systems in opecoelid cercariae have focused on chaetotaxy and ultrastructure of sensory receptors. They revealed chaetotaxic patterns within family, genus, and species as well as different receptors. Chaetotaxic and ultrastructural observations have rarely been combined. We investigated the ultrastructure of cercarial sensory receptors in conjunction with chaetotaxy and neuromorphology in a species of Allopodocotyle. Cercariae were treated with acetylthiocholine iodide and silver nitrate, and some were processed for light, scanning (SEM, and transmission (TEM electron microscopy. Five nerve regions were distinguished. Chaetotaxy was consistent with that of other opecoelids. Five types of receptors were distinguished with SEM. Types differed in number of cilium-like structures (one or more, length of cilium-like structure (short, moderately long, or long, presence or absence of a tegumentary collar, and length of tegumentary collar (low, moderately low, or very high. Internal ultrastructure of some types revealed unsheathed cilium-like structures, basal body, and thickened nerve collars. Possible subtegumentary and sheathed receptors are introduced. Some receptor types were site-specific. For example, receptors with multiple cilium-like structures were concentrated on cephalic region whereas receptors with short cilium-like structure were widespread throughout most regions. Ultrastructure and site-specificity observations suggest that most receptors are mechanoreceptors.

  9. Chronic murine myocarditis due to Trypanosoma cruzi: an ultrastructural study and immunochemical characterization of cardiac interstitial matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia G. Andrade

    1986-03-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to define the mouse-model for chronic Chagas' disease, a serological, histopathological and ultrastructural study as well as immunotyping of myocardium collagenic matrix were performed on Swiss mice, chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi strains: 21 SF and mambaí (Type II; PMN and Bolivia (Type III, spontaneously surviving after 154 to 468 days of infection. Haemagglutination and indirect immunofluorescence tests showed high titres of specific antibodies. The ultrastructural study disclosed the cellular constitution of the inflammatory infiltrate showing the predominance of monocytes, macrophages with intense phagocytic activity, fibroblasts, myofibroblasts and abundant collagen matrix suggesting the association of the inflammatory process with fibrogenesis in chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy. Artertolar and blood capillary alterations together with dissociation of cardiac cells from the capillary wall by edema and inflammation were related to ultrastructural lesions of myocardial cells. Rupture of parasitized cardiac myocells contribute to intensify the inflammatory process in focal areas. Collagen immunotyping showed the predominance of Types III and IV collagen. Collagen degradation and phagocytosis were present suggesting a reversibility of the fibrous process. The mouse model seems to be valuable in the study of the pathogenetic mechanisms in Chagas cardiomyopathy, providing that T. cruzi strains of low virulence and high pathogenecity are used.Utilizando o modelo experimental do camundongo, foi realizado um estudo sorológico, histopatológico e ultraestrutural bem como a imunotipagem do colágeno na matriz conjuntiva do miocárdio em camundongos suiços cronicamente infectados com as cepas 21 SF e Mambaí (Tipo II PMN e Bolívia (Tipo III por períodos de 154 a 468 dias. Os testes sorológicos e de imunofluorescência indireta mostraram altos títulos de anticorpos específicos. O estudo estrutural definiu melhor a

  10. ROS play a critical role in the differentiation of alternatively activated macrophages and the occurrence of tumor-associated macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Zhang; Swati Choksi; Kun Chen; Yelena Pobezinskaya; Ilona Linnoila; Zheng-Gang Liu

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation to different types of macrophages determines their distinct functions.Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) promote tumorigenesis owing to their proangiogenic and immune-suppressive functions similar to those of alternatively activated (M2) macrophages.We report that reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is critical for macrophage differentiation and that inhibition of superoxide (O2-) production specifically blocks the differentiation of M2 macrophages.We found that when monocytes are triggered to differentiate,O2-is generated and is needed for the biphasic ERK activation,which is critical for macrophage differentiation.We demonstrated that ROS elimination by butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and other ROS inhibitors blocks macrophage differentiation.However,the inhibitory effect of ROS elimination on macrophage differentiation is overcome when cells are polarized to classically activated (M1),but not M2,macrophages.More importantly,the continuous administration of the ROS inhibitor BHA efficiently blocked the occurrence of TAMs and markedly suppressed tumorigenesis in mouse cancer models.Targeting TAMs by blocking ROS can be a potentially effective method for cancer treatment.

  11. Overexpression of IL-10 in C2D macrophages promotes a macrophage phenotypic switch in adipose tissue environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Linglin; Fu, Qiang; Ortega, Teresa M; Zhou, Lun; Rasmussen, Dane; O'Keefe, Jacy; Zhang, Ke K; Chapes, Stephen K

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue macrophages are a heterogeneous collection of classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. Interleukin 10 (IL-10) is an anti-inflammatory cytokine, secreted by a variety of cell types including M2 macrophages. We generated a macrophage cell line stably overexpressing IL-10 (C2D-IL10) and analyzed the C2D-IL10 cells for several macrophage markers after exposure to adipocytes compared to C2D cells transfected with an empty vector (C2D-vector). C2D-IL10 macrophage cells expressed more CD206 when co-cultured with adipocytes than C2D-vector cells; while the co-cultured cell mixture also expressed higher levels of Il4, Il10, Il1β and Tnf. Since regular C2D cells traffic to adipose tissue after adoptive transfer, we explored the impact of constitutive IL-10 expression on C2D-IL10 macrophages in adipose tissue in vivo. Adipose tissue-isolated C2D-IL10 cells increased the percentage of CD206(+), CD301(+), CD11c(-)CD206(+) (M2) and CD11c(+)CD206(+) (M1b) on their cell surface, compared to isolated C2D-vector cells. These data suggest that the expression of IL-10 remains stable, alters the C2D-IL10 macrophage cell surface phenotype and may play a role in regulating macrophage interactions with the adipose tissue.

  12. The role of Kupffer cells in the morphogenesis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis - ultrastructural findings. The first report in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotowska, Joanna Maria; Sobaniec-Lotowska, Maria Elzbieta; Lebensztejn, Dariusz Marek

    2013-03-01

    Until now studies concerning the involvement of hepatic nonparenchymal cells (NPCs), particularly Kupffer cells/macrophages (KCs/MPs), in the pathogenesis of human nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) have been limited to adult patients; there are no similar reports referring to children. This study aimed to explore, based on ultrastructural analysis, the role of KCs/MPs in the morphogenesis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in children. Ultrastructural investigations of KCs were conducted on liver bioptates obtained from 10 children, aged 2-14 years, with clinicopathologically diagnosed NASH. Bioptatic material was fixed in solution of paraformaldehyde and glutaraldehyde in cacodylate buffer, routinely processed for transmission-electron microscopic analysis and examined using an Opton EM microscope. The current ultrastructural study revealed within the hepatic sinusoids the presence of numerous enlarged KCs with increased phagocytic activity, which reduced or blocked vascular lumen. Interestingly, the activated KCs not only contained primary and secondary lysosomes, altered mitochondria, and well-developed Golgi apparatus, but also absorbed fragments of erythrocytes. Such macrophages were frequently seen very close to the transformed hepatic stellate cells (T-HSCs) and progenitor/oval cells. Intensive fibrosis was observed in the vicinity of activated KCs/MPs. Bundles of collagen fibers were seen directly adhering to these cells and to other NPCs, especially T-HSCs. KCs are involved in the morphogenesis and development of pediatric NASH. Engulfment of erythrocytes by hepatic macrophages may lead to the accumulation of iron derived from hemoglobin in liver and play a role in triggering the generation of oxidative stress in the disease course.

  13. Ultrastructural and Cytochemical Properties of Peripheral Blood Cells of Piebald Naked Carp (Gymnocypris eckloni).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Z X; Tang, Y; Fang, J; Peng, X; Fan, J D; Cui, H M; Yang, L Z

    2017-02-01

    The ultrastructural and cytochemical properties of peripheral blood cells of Gymnocypris eckloni were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and a range of cytochemical techniques to provide clear insight into the structure and function of blood cells from this fish. Ultrastructurally, erythrocytes, leucocytes (neutrophils, eosinophils, lymphocytes, monocytes), thrombocytes and plasma cells were identified in the peripheral blood of G. eckloni. The most special ultrastructural characteristics of blood cells in this fish were that neutrophils exhibited only one type of cytoplasmic granules containing an eccentric, spherical or oval electron-dense core, and eosinophils presented two types of granules with non-uniform electronic density and without crystalloids in their cytoplasm. Neutrophils, eosinophils, lymphocytes, monocytes and thrombocytes were positive for periodic acid-Schiff and α-naphthyl acetate esterase staining. Intense peroxidase positive staining was observed in neutrophils and monocytes, but not in eosinophils, lymphocytes and thrombocytes. Neutrophils, eosinophils and monocytes were stained positively for acid phosphatase, whereas lymphocytes and thrombocytes did not stain. Leucocytes and thrombocytes were negative for alkaline phosphatase and Sudan black B staining. Erythrocytes were negative for all cytochemical staining. The cytochemical and ultrastructural features of peripheral blood cells of G. eckloni were similar to those of other fish species. However, some important differences were identified in G. eckloni.

  14. Ultrastructure of spermatogenesis in the short-tailed fruit bat, Carollia perspicillata (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae: Carollinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beguelini, Mateus R; Bueno, Larissa M; Caun, Dianelli L; Taboga, Sebastião R; Morielle-Versute, Eliana

    2014-01-01

    Among species of the Chiroptera, spermatogenesis and the fully differentiated spermatozoa differ in morphological and ultrastructural detail. This study therefore aimed to ultrastructurally characterize the spermatogenesis and the spermatozoa of Carollia perspicillata (Phyllostomidae) and compare the process with other species of bats and mammals. The differentiation of spermatogonia is similar to other bats and to Primates, with three main spermatogonia types: Ad, Ap, and B. Meiotic divisions proceed similarly to those of most mammals and spermiogenesis is clearly divided into 12 steps, in the middle of the range of developmental steps for bats (9-16 steps). The process of acrosome formation is similar to that found in Platyrrhinus lineatus, with the acrosome formed by two different types of proacrosomal vesicles. The ultrastructure of the spermatozoon is similar to other bats already described and resembles the typical mammalian sperm model; however, its morphology differs from other mammals such as marsupials and rodents, on account of a simpler spermatozoon head morphology, which indicates a pattern that is more closely related to the sperm cells of humans and other primates. Our data demonstrated that spermatogenesis in C. perspicillata presents great ultrastructural similarities to P. lineatus. This pattern is not surprising, because both species belong to the same family (Phyllostomidae); however, it is observed that C. perspicillata presents some characteristics that are more closely related to phylogenetically distant species, such as Myotis nigricans (Vespertilionidae), which is a fact that deserves attention.

  15. Collyricloides massanae (Digenea, Collyriclidae: spermatozoon ultrastructure and phylogenetic importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhoum Abdoulaye Jacque

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The spermatological characteristics of Collyricloides massanae (Digenea: Collyriclidae, a parasite of Apodemus sylvaticus caught in France, were studied by means of transmission electron microscopy. The mature sperm of C. massanae presents two axonemes of different lengths with the 9 + “1” pattern of the Trepaxonemata, two bundles of parallel cortical microtubules, external ornamentation of the plasma membrane, spine-like bodies, one mitochondrion, a nucleus and granules of glycogen. An analysis of spermatological organisation emphasised some differences between the mature spermatozoon of C. massanae and those reported in the Gorgoderoidea species studied to date, specially belonging to the families Dicrocoeliidae, Paragonimidae and Troglotrematidae. The ultrastructural criteria described in C. massanae such as the morphology of both anterior and posterior spermatozoon extremities, the association “external ornamentation + cortical microtubules”, the type 2 of external ornamentation and the spine-like bodies would allow us to bring closer the Collyriclidae to Microphalloidea. However, further ultrastructural and molecular studies are needed particularly in the unexplored taxa in order to fully resolve the phylogenetic position of the Collyriclidae.

  16. [Macrophages in asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina Avalos, M A; Orea Solano, M

    1997-01-01

    Every time they exist more demonstrations of the paper than performs the line monocytes-macrophage in the patogenesis of the bronchial asthma. The mononuclear phagocytes cells, as the alveolar macrophages, also they can be activated during allergic methods. The monocytes macrophages are possible efficient inductors of the inflammation; this due to the fact that they can secrete inflammatory mediators, between those which are counted the pre-forming granules of peptides, metabolites of oxidation activation, activator of platelets activator and metabolites of the arachidonic acid. The identification of IL-1 in the liquidate of the bronchial ablution of sick asthmatic, as well as the identification of IL-1 in the I bronchioalveolar washing of places of allergens cutaneous prick, supports the activation concept mononuclear of phagocytic cells in allergic sufferings.

  17. Macrophages and Iron Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Miguel P; Hamza, Iqbal

    2016-03-15

    Iron is a transition metal that due to its inherent ability to exchange electrons with a variety of molecules is essential to support life. In mammals, iron exists mostly in the form of heme, enclosed within an organic protoporphyrin ring and functioning primarily as a prosthetic group in proteins. Paradoxically, free iron also has the potential to become cytotoxic when electron exchange with oxygen is unrestricted and catalyzes the production of reactive oxygen species. These biological properties demand that iron metabolism is tightly regulated such that iron is available for core biological functions while preventing its cytotoxic effects. Macrophages play a central role in establishing this delicate balance. Here, we review the impact of macrophages on heme-iron metabolism and, reciprocally, how heme-iron modulates macrophage function.

  18. Macrophage-Mediated Lymphangiogenesis: The Emerging Role of Macrophages as Lymphatic Endothelial Progenitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ran, Sophia, E-mail: sran@siumed.edu; Montgomery, Kyle E. [Department of Medical Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, 801 N. Rutledge, Springfield, IL 62794 (United States)

    2012-06-27

    It is widely accepted that macrophages and other inflammatory cells support tumor progression and metastasis. During early stages of neoplastic development, tumor-infiltrating macrophages (TAMs) mount an immune response against transformed cells. Frequently, however, cancer cells escape the immune surveillance, an event that is accompanied by macrophage transition from an anti-tumor to a pro-tumorigenic type. The latter is characterized by high expression of factors that activate endothelial cells, suppress immune response, degrade extracellular matrix, and promote tumor growth. Cumulatively, these products of TAMs promote tumor expansion and growth of both blood and lymphatic vessels that facilitate metastatic spread. Breast cancers and other epithelial malignancies induce the formation of new lymphatic vessels (i.e., lymphangiogenesis) that leads to lymphatic and subsequently, to distant metastasis. Both experimental and clinical studies have shown that TAMs significantly promote tumor lymphangiogenesis through paracrine and cell autonomous modes. The paracrine effect consists of the expression of a variety of pro-lymphangiogenic factors that activate the preexisting lymphatic vessels. The evidence for cell-autonomous contribution is based on the observed tumor mobilization of macrophage-derived lymphatic endothelial cell progenitors (M-LECP) that integrate into lymphatic vessels prior to sprouting. This review will summarize the current knowledge of macrophage-dependent growth of new lymphatic vessels with specific emphasis on an emerging role of macrophages as lymphatic endothelial cell progenitors (M-LECP)

  19. Cell elasticity determines macrophage function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naimish R Patel

    Full Text Available Macrophages serve to maintain organ homeostasis in response to challenges from injury, inflammation, malignancy, particulate exposure, or infection. Until now, receptor ligation has been understood as being the central mechanism that regulates macrophage function. Using macrophages of different origins and species, we report that macrophage elasticity is a major determinant of innate macrophage function. Macrophage elasticity is modulated not only by classical biologic activators such as LPS and IFN-γ, but to an equal extent by substrate rigidity and substrate stretch. Macrophage elasticity is dependent upon actin polymerization and small rhoGTPase activation, but functional effects of elasticity are not predicted by examination of gene expression profiles alone. Taken together, these data demonstrate an unanticipated role for cell elasticity as a common pathway by which mechanical and biologic factors determine macrophage function.

  20. Simulation of Blast Loading on an Ultrastructurally-based Computational Model of the Ocular Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    public release; distribution unlimited The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not be...cells) is stressed by the passing shock wave. Traumatic cataract can result in a partially or fully clouded lens, complete dislo- cation of the lens...CSLM), and type IV collagen ultrastructure in lens capsule using cyro- electron tomography: 6b - On as-received porcine lens capsules, image type IV

  1. Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 controls type I IFN induction in chicken macrophage HD-11 cells: a polygenic trait that involves NS1 and the polymerase complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liniger Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza A viruses are well characterized to antagonize type I IFN induction in infected mammalian cells. However, limited information is available for avian cells. It was hypothesised that avian influenza viruses (AIV with distinct virulence may interact differently with the avian innate immune system. Therefore, the type I IFN responses induced by highly virulent and low virulent H5N1 AIV and reassortants thereof were analysed in chicken cells. Results The highly pathogenic (HP AIV A/chicken/Yamaguchi/7/04 (H5N1 (Yama did not induce type I IFN in infected chicken HD-11 macrophage-like cells. This contrasted with an NS1 mutant Yama virus (Yama-NS1A144V and with the attenuated H5N1 AIV A/duck/Hokkaido/Vac-1/04 (Vac carrying the haemagglutinin (HA of the Yama virus (Vac-Yama/HA, that both induced type I IFN in these cells. The substitution of the NS segment from Yama with that from Vac in the Yama backbone resulted in induction of type I IFN secretion in HD-11 cells. However, vice versa, the Yama NS segment did not prevent type I IFN induction by the Vac-Yama/HA virus. This was different with the PB1/PB2/PA segment reassortant Yama and Vac-Yama/HA viruses. Whereas the Yama virus with the Vac PB1/PB2/PA segments induced type I IFN in HD-11 cells, the Vac-Yama/HA virus with the Yama PB1/PB2/PA segments did not. As reported for mammalian cells, the expression of H5N1 PB2 inhibited the activation of the IFN-β promoter in chicken DF-1 fibroblast cells. Importantly, the Yama PB2 was more potent at inhibiting the IFN-β promoter than the Vac PB2. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that the NS1 protein and the polymerase complex of the HPAIV Yama act in concert to antagonize chicken type I IFN secretion in HD-11 cells. PB2 alone can also exert a partial inhibitory effect on type I IFN induction. In conclusion, the control of type I IFN induction by H5N1 HPAIV represents a complex phenotype that involves a particular viral

  2. Ultrastructural Characteristics of Rat Hepatic Oval Cells and Their Intercellular Contacts in the Model of Biliary Fibrosis: New Insights into Experimental Liver Fibrogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Maria Lotowska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Recently, it has been emphasized that hepatic progenitor/oval cells (HPCs are significantly involved in liver fibrogenesis. We evaluated the multipotential population of HPCs by transmission electron microscope (TEM, including relations with adherent hepatic nonparenchymal cells (NPCs in rats with biliary fibrosis induced by bile duct ligation (BDL. Methods. The study used 6-week-old Wistar Crl: WI(Han rats after BDL for 1, 6, and 8 weeks. Results. Current ultrastructural analysis showed considerable proliferation of HPCs in experimental intensive biliary fibrosis. HPCs formed proliferating bile ductules and were scattered in periportal connective tissue. We distinguished 4 main types of HPCs: 0, I, II (bile duct-like cells; most common, and III (hepatocyte-like cells. We observed, very seldom presented in literature, cellular interactions between HPCs and adjacent NPCs, especially commonly found transitional hepatic stellate cells (T-HSCs and Kupffer cells/macrophages. We showed the phenomenon of penetration of the basement membrane of proliferating bile ductules by cytoplasmic processes sent by T-HSCs and the formation of direct cell-cell contact with ductular epithelial cells related to HPCs. Conclusions. HPC proliferation induced by BDL evidently promotes portal fibrogenesis. Better understanding of the complex cellular interactions between HPCs and adjacent NPCs, especially T-HSCs, may help develop antifibrotic therapies in the future.

  3. Ultrastructural Characteristics of Rat Hepatic Oval Cells and Their Intercellular Contacts in the Model of Biliary Fibrosis: New Insights into Experimental Liver Fibrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotowska, Joanna Maria; Sobaniec-Lotowska, Maria Elzbieta; Lebensztejn, Dariusz Marek; Daniluk, Urszula; Sobaniec, Piotr; Sendrowski, Krzysztof; Daniluk, Jaroslaw; Reszec, Joanna; Debek, Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    Recently, it has been emphasized that hepatic progenitor/oval cells (HPCs) are significantly involved in liver fibrogenesis. We evaluated the multipotential population of HPCs by transmission electron microscope (TEM), including relations with adherent hepatic nonparenchymal cells (NPCs) in rats with biliary fibrosis induced by bile duct ligation (BDL). The study used 6-week-old Wistar Crl: WI(Han) rats after BDL for 1, 6, and 8 weeks. Current ultrastructural analysis showed considerable proliferation of HPCs in experimental intensive biliary fibrosis. HPCs formed proliferating bile ductules and were scattered in periportal connective tissue. We distinguished 4 main types of HPCs: 0, I, II (bile duct-like cells; most common), and III (hepatocyte-like cells). We observed, very seldom presented in literature, cellular interactions between HPCs and adjacent NPCs, especially commonly found transitional hepatic stellate cells (T-HSCs) and Kupffer cells/macrophages. We showed the phenomenon of penetration of the basement membrane of proliferating bile ductules by cytoplasmic processes sent by T-HSCs and the formation of direct cell-cell contact with ductular epithelial cells related to HPCs. HPC proliferation induced by BDL evidently promotes portal fibrogenesis. Better understanding of the complex cellular interactions between HPCs and adjacent NPCs, especially T-HSCs, may help develop antifibrotic therapies in the future.

  4. Atomic force microscopy based investigations of anti-inflammatory effects in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Jiang; Cai, Huaihong; Yang, Fen; Jin, Hua; Liu, Jianxin; Yang, Peihui; Cai, Jiye

    2016-01-01

    A new method based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of drugs on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. The LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage cell line is a widely used in vitro cell model for the screening of anti-inflammatory drugs or the study of anti-inflammatory mechanisms. In this work, the inhibitory effects of dexamethasone and quercetin on LPS-CD14 receptor binding in RAW264.7 macrophages was probed by LPS-functionalized tips for the first time. Both dexamethasone and quercetin were found to inhibit LPS-induced NO production, iNOS expression, IκBα phosphorylation, and IKKα/β phosphorylation in RAW264.7 macrophages. The morphology and ultrastructure of RAW264.7 macrophages were determined by AFM, which indicated that dexamethasone and quercetin could inhibit LPS-induced cell surface particle size and roughness increase in RAW264.7 macrophages. The binding of LPS and its receptor in RAW264.7 macrophages was determined by LPS-functionalized AFM tips, which demonstrated that the binding force and binding probability between LPS and CD14 receptor on the surface of RAW264.7 macrophages were also inhibited by dexamethasone or quercetin treatment. The obtained results imply that AFM, which is very useful for the investigation of potential targets for anti-inflammatory drugs on native macrophages and the enhancement of our understanding of the anti-inflammatory effects of drugs, is expected to be developed into a promising tool for the study of anti-inflammatory drugs.

  5. Ultrastructure of preimplantation genetic diagnosis-derived human blastocysts grown in a coculture system after vitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribá, María-José; Escobedo-Lucea, Carmen; Mercader, Amparo; de los Santos, María-José; Pellicer, Antonio; Remohí, José

    2006-09-01

    To evaluate ultrastructural features of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) blastocysts before and after vitrification. Descriptive study of both vitrified and fresh hatching blastocysts. PGD program at the Instituto Universitario, Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad. Patients undergoing PGD donated their abnormal embryos for research (n = 26). Biopsied embryos were cultured in the presence of human endometrial cells until day 6. Sixteen blastocysts were vitrified. A total of 11 high-scored hatching blastocysts, 6 warmed and 5 fresh, were fixed for ultrastructure. The cytoskeleton structure, type of intercellular junctions, and basic intracellular organelles in trophoectoderm cells and the inner cell mass were analyzed. Ten of 16 blastocysts (62%) survived the warming process. Six of these showed no signs of cell degeneration and light microscopy revealed similar ultrastructural characteristics to those of controls. However, in trophoectoderm cells from both fresh and cryopreserved blastocysts, a reduced number of tight junctions and the presence of degradation bodies were detected. The particular ultrastructural features observed in PGD-derived blastocysts could be related to embryo manipulation and culture conditions. Vitrification does not seem to alter blastocysts, as those that survive hatching do not display detectable cellular alterations when observed through electron microscopy.

  6. Skeletal growth, ultrastructure and composition of the azooxanthellate scleractinian coral Balanophyllia regia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmi, C.; Meibom, A.; Smith, D. C.; Stolarski, J.; Auzoux-Bordenave, S.; Nouet, J.; Doumenc, D.; Djediat, C.; Domart-Coulon, I.

    2010-03-01

    The biomineralization process and skeletal growth dynamics of azooxanthellate corals are poorly known. Here, the growth rate of the shallow-water dendrophyllid scleractinian coral Balanophyllia regia was evaluated with calcein-labeling experiments that showed higher lateral than vertical extension. The structure, mineralogy and trace element composition of the skeleton were characterized at high spatial resolution. The epitheca and basal floor had the same ultrastructural organization as septa, indicating a common biological control over their formation. In all of these aragonitic skeletal structures, two main ultrastructural components were present: “centers of calcification” (COC) also called rapid accretion deposits (RAD) and “fibers” (thickening deposits, TD). Heterogeneity in the trace element composition, i.e., the Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca ratios, was correlated with the ultrastructural organization: magnesium was enriched by a factor three in the rapid accretion deposits compared with the thickening deposits. At the interface with the skeleton, the skeletogenic tissue (calicoblastic epithelium) was characterized by heterogeneity of cell types, with chromophile cells distributed in clusters regularly spaced between calicoblasts. Cytoplasmic extensions at the apical surface of the calicoblastic epithelium created a three-dimensional organization that could be related to the skeletal surface microarchitecture. Combined measurements of growth rate and skeletal ultrastructural increments suggest that azooxanthellate shallow-water corals produce well-defined daily growth steps.

  7. Morphological and ultrastructural studies of some acritarchs from the Lower Cambrian Lükati Formation, Estonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talyzina; Moczydowska

    2000-10-01

    Six acritarch species from the Lükati Formation were studied using a combination of techniques, including transmitted light, scanning electron (SEM) and transmission electron (TEM) microscopy. New details of wall ultrastructure, surface microsculpture and internal morphology of the vesicle and processes significantly add to the previously known morphological features and increase the understanding of the form-genera Archaeodiscina, Globosphaeridium, Comasphaeridium, Skiagia, Tasmanites and Leiosphaeridia. Examination of microfossils using TEM revealed a substantial variation in wall ultrastructure among acritarchs. The diversity includes four structural types of vesicle wall in addition to their single- and multi-layered structure and the variable thickness of the wall. These are: electron-tenuous and fibrous; electron-dense and homogeneous; electron-dense and homogeneous but perforated by radial canals; and composite laminated structure. Morphologically recognised groupings of acritarchs (acanthomorphic, disphaeromorphic, sphaeromorphic) and tasmanitid taxa appear to be characterised by particular features of the wall structure, although the wall structure in itself may not be directly indicative of systematic relationships. Structurally diverse vesicle walls are observed in Tasmanites and Leiosphaeridia, taxa that both have been interpreted, based on other lines of evidence, to be of prasinophycean (green algal) affinities. The distinct wall ultrastructure of the Leiosphaeridia studied is similar to that of extant green algal genera, which provides evidence that some Cambrian leiosphaerids were chlorophycean algae, probably related to the Order Chlorococcales. Previous research and interpretations of the wall ultrastructure are also briefly discussed.

  8. The pathology of severe dengue in multiple organs of human fatal cases: histopathology, ultrastructure and virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago F Póvoa

    Full Text Available Dengue is a public health problem, with several gaps in understanding its pathogenesis. Studies based on human fatal cases are extremely important and may clarify some of these gaps. In this work, we analyzed lesions in different organs of four dengue fatal cases, occurred in Brazil. Tissues were prepared for visualization in optical and electron microscopy, with damages quantification. As expected, we observed in all studied organ lesions characteristic of severe dengue, such as hemorrhage and edema, although other injuries were also detected. Cases presented necrotic areas in the liver and diffuse macro and microsteatosis, which were more accentuated in case 1, who also had obesity. The lung was the most affected organ, with hyaline membrane formation associated with mononuclear infiltrates in patients with pre-existing diseases such as diabetes and obesity (cases 1 and 2, respectively. These cases had also extensive acute tubular necrosis in the kidney. Infection induced destruction of cardiac fibers in most cases, with absence of nucleus and loss of striations, suggesting myocarditis. Spleens revealed significant destruction of the germinal centers and atrophy of lymphoid follicles, which may be associated to decrease of T cell number. Circulatory disturbs were reinforced by the presence of megakaryocytes in alveolar spaces, thrombus formation in glomerular capillaries and loss of endothelium in several tissues. Besides histopathological and ultrastructural observations, virus replication were investigated by detection of dengue antigens, especially the non-structural 3 protein (NS3, and confirmed by the presence of virus RNA negative strand (in situ hybridization, with second staining for identification of some cells. Results showed that dengue had broader tropism comparing to what was described before in literature, replicating in hepatocytes, type II pneumocytes and cardiac fibers, as well as in resident and circulating monocytes/macrophages

  9. The pathology of severe dengue in multiple organs of human fatal cases: histopathology, ultrastructure and virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Póvoa, Tiago F; Alves, Ada M B; Oliveira, Carlos A B; Nuovo, Gerard J; Chagas, Vera L A; Paes, Marciano V

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is a public health problem, with several gaps in understanding its pathogenesis. Studies based on human fatal cases are extremely important and may clarify some of these gaps. In this work, we analyzed lesions in different organs of four dengue fatal cases, occurred in Brazil. Tissues were prepared for visualization in optical and electron microscopy, with damages quantification. As expected, we observed in all studied organ lesions characteristic of severe dengue, such as hemorrhage and edema, although other injuries were also detected. Cases presented necrotic areas in the liver and diffuse macro and microsteatosis, which were more accentuated in case 1, who also had obesity. The lung was the most affected organ, with hyaline membrane formation associated with mononuclear infiltrates in patients with pre-existing diseases such as diabetes and obesity (cases 1 and 2, respectively). These cases had also extensive acute tubular necrosis in the kidney. Infection induced destruction of cardiac fibers in most cases, with absence of nucleus and loss of striations, suggesting myocarditis. Spleens revealed significant destruction of the germinal centers and atrophy of lymphoid follicles, which may be associated to decrease of T cell number. Circulatory disturbs were reinforced by the presence of megakaryocytes in alveolar spaces, thrombus formation in glomerular capillaries and loss of endothelium in several tissues. Besides histopathological and ultrastructural observations, virus replication were investigated by detection of dengue antigens, especially the non-structural 3 protein (NS3), and confirmed by the presence of virus RNA negative strand (in situ hybridization), with second staining for identification of some cells. Results showed that dengue had broader tropism comparing to what was described before in literature, replicating in hepatocytes, type II pneumocytes and cardiac fibers, as well as in resident and circulating monocytes/macrophages and

  10. The Pathology of Severe Dengue in Multiple Organs of Human Fatal Cases: Histopathology, Ultrastructure and Virus Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Póvoa, Tiago F.; Alves, Ada M. B.; Oliveira, Carlos A. B.; Nuovo, Gerard J.; Chagas, Vera L. A.; Paes, Marciano V.

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is a public health problem, with several gaps in understanding its pathogenesis. Studies based on human fatal cases are extremely important and may clarify some of these gaps. In this work, we analyzed lesions in different organs of four dengue fatal cases, occurred in Brazil. Tissues were prepared for visualization in optical and electron microscopy, with damages quantification. As expected, we observed in all studied organ lesions characteristic of severe dengue, such as hemorrhage and edema, although other injuries were also detected. Cases presented necrotic areas in the liver and diffuse macro and microsteatosis, which were more accentuated in case 1, who also had obesity. The lung was the most affected organ, with hyaline membrane formation associated with mononuclear infiltrates in patients with pre-existing diseases such as diabetes and obesity (cases 1 and 2, respectively). These cases had also extensive acute tubular necrosis in the kidney. Infection induced destruction of cardiac fibers in most cases, with absence of nucleus and loss of striations, suggesting myocarditis. Spleens revealed significant destruction of the germinal centers and atrophy of lymphoid follicles, which may be associated to decrease of T cell number. Circulatory disturbs were reinforced by the presence of megakaryocytes in alveolar spaces, thrombus formation in glomerular capillaries and loss of endothelium in several tissues. Besides histopathological and ultrastructural observations, virus replication were investigated by detection of dengue antigens, especially the non-structural 3 protein (NS3), and confirmed by the presence of virus RNA negative strand (in situ hybridization), with second staining for identification of some cells. Results showed that dengue had broader tropism comparing to what was described before in literature, replicating in hepatocytes, type II pneumocytes and cardiac fibers, as well as in resident and circulating monocytes/macrophages and

  11. Notch Regulates Macrophage-Mediated Inflammation in Diabetic Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Andrew S; Joshi, Amrita D; Boniakowski, Anna E; Schaller, Matthew; Chung, Jooho; Allen, Ronald; Bermick, Jennifer; Carson, William F; Henke, Peter K; Maillard, Ivan; Kunkel, Steve L; Gallagher, Katherine A

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages are essential immune cells necessary for regulated inflammation during wound healing. Recent studies have identified that Notch plays a role in macrophage-mediated inflammation. Thus, we investigated the role of Notch signaling on wound macrophage phenotype and function during normal and diabetic wound healing. We found that Notch receptor and ligand expression are dynamic in wound macrophages during normal healing. Mice with a myeloid-specific Notch signaling defect (DNMAML(floxed)Lyz2(Cre+) ) demonstrated delayed early healing (days 1-3) and wound macrophages had decreased inflammatory gene expression. In our physiologic murine model of type 2 diabetes (T2D), Notch receptor expression was significantly increased in wound macrophages on day 6, following the initial inflammatory phase of wound healing, corresponding to increased inflammatory cytokine expression. This increase in Notch1 and Notch2 was also observed in human monocytes from patients with T2D. Further, in prediabetic mice with a genetic Notch signaling defect (DNMAML(floxed)Lyz2(Cre+) on a high-fat diet), improved wound healing was seen at late time points (days 6-7). These findings suggest that Notch is critical for the early inflammatory phase of wound healing and directs production of macrophage-dependent inflammatory mediators. These results identify that canonical Notch signaling is important in directing macrophage function in wound repair and define a translational target for the treatment of non-healing diabetic wounds.

  12. Of macrophages and red blood cells; a complex love story.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djuna Zoe de Back

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages tightly control the production and clearance of red blood cells (RBC. During steady state haematopoiesis, approximately 1010 red blood cells are produced per hour within erythroblastic islands in humans. In these erythroblastic islands, resident bone marrow macrophages provide erythroblasts with interactions that are essential for erythroid development. New evidence suggests that not only under homeostasis but also under stress conditions, macrophages play an important role in promoting erythropoiesis. Once RBC have matured, these cells remain in circulation for about 120 days. At the end of their life span, RBC are cleared by macrophages residing in the spleen and the liver. Current theories about the removal of senescent RBC and the essential role of macrophages will be discussed as well as the role of macrophages in facilitating the removal of damaged cellular content from the RBC. In this review we will provide an overview on the role of macrophages in the regulation of RBC production, maintenance and clearance. In addition, we will discuss the interactions between these two cell types during transfer of immune complexes and pathogens from RBC to macrophages.

  13. Notch Regulates Macrophage-Mediated Inflammation in Diabetic Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S. Kimball

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are essential immune cells necessary for regulated inflammation during wound healing. Recent studies have identified that Notch plays a role in macrophage-mediated inflammation. Thus, we investigated the role of Notch signaling on wound macrophage phenotype and function during normal and diabetic wound healing. We found that Notch receptor and ligand expression are dynamic in wound macrophages during normal healing. Mice with a myeloid-specific Notch signaling defect (DNMAMLfloxedLyz2Cre+ demonstrated delayed early healing (days 1–3 and wound macrophages had decreased inflammatory gene expression. In our physiologic murine model of type 2 diabetes (T2D, Notch receptor expression was significantly increased in wound macrophages on day 6, following the initial inflammatory phase of wound healing, corresponding to increased inflammatory cytokine expression. This increase in Notch1 and Notch2 was also observed in human monocytes from patients with T2D. Further, in prediabetic mice with a genetic Notch signaling defect (DNMAMLfloxedLyz2Cre+ on a high-fat diet, improved wound healing was seen at late time points (days 6–7. These findings suggest that Notch is critical for the early inflammatory phase of wound healing and directs production of macrophage-dependent inflammatory mediators. These results identify that canonical Notch signaling is important in directing macrophage function in wound repair and define a translational target for the treatment of non-healing diabetic wounds.

  14. A lipidomic perspective on inflammatory macrophage eicosanoid signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Paul C; Dennis, Edward A

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are central to essential physiological processes including the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity, but they are also central to a number of inflammatory disease states. These immune cells also possess remarkable plasticity and display various shades of functionalities based on changes in the surrounding molecular environment. Macrophage biology has defined various phenotypes and roles in inflammation based primarily on cytokine and chemokine profiles of cells in different activation states. Importantly, macrophages are elite producers of eicosanoids and other related lipid mediators during inflammation, but specific roles of these molecules have not generally been incorporated into the larger context of macrophage biology. In this review, we discuss the current classification of macrophage types and their roles in inflammation and disease, along with the practical challenges of studying biologically relevant phenotypes ex vivo. Using the latest advances in eicosanoid lipidomics, we highlight several key studies from our laboratory that provide a comprehensive understanding of how eicosanoid metabolism differs between macrophage phenotypes, along with how this metabolism is altered by changes in membrane fatty acid distribution and varied durations of Toll-like receptor (TLR) priming. In conclusion, we summarize several examples of the benefit of macrophage plasticity to develop accurate cellular mechanisms of lipid metabolism, and insights from lipidomic analyses about the differences in eicosanoid pathway enzyme activity in vitro vs. in cells ex vivo. Examples of new techniques to further understand the role of macrophage eicosanoid signaling in vivo are also discussed.

  15. Plantar fibromatosis: an immunohistochemical and ultrastructural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Palma, L; Santucci, A; Gigante, A; Di Giulio, A; Carloni, S

    1999-04-01

    The analogies between plantar fibromatosis and Dupuytren's disease (palmar fibromatosis) are well known. The latter is clinically more frequent and has been the object of extensive immunohistochemical and ultrastructural studies, with a view to investigating its pathogenesis. By contrast, such data on plantar fibromatosis are quite scarce. A histochemical, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural study was performed on nodule tissue from six patients who were subjected to total fasciectomy for plantar fibromatosis. The study of myofibroblasts revealed features suggestive of their fibroblastic origin and evidenced a cytoskeleton and an extracellular filamentous system that could enable myofibroblasts to generate and exert the intracellular forces that contribute to the contraction of the aponeurosis. These aspects are similar to those observed in Dupuytren's disease and seem to lend support to the theory that the two diseases are expressions of the same disorder.

  16. DMPD: TICAM-1 and TICAM-2: toll-like receptor adapters that participate in inductionof type 1 interferons. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15618008 TICAM-1 and TICAM-2: toll-like receptor adapters that participate in induc... Mar;37(3):524-9. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show TICAM-1 and TICAM-2: toll-like receptor adapters that p...articipate in inductionof type 1 interferons. PubmedID 15618008 Title TICAM-1 and TIC

  17. Role of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor in Obesity, Insulin Resistance, Type 2 Diabetes, and Associated Hepatic Co-Morbidities: A Comprehensive Review of Human and Rodent Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morrison, M.C.; Kleemann, R.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with a chronic low-grade inflammatory state that drives the -development of obesity-related co-morbidities such as insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and cardiovascular disease. This metabolic inflammation is thought to originate in t

  18. Role of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor in Obesity, Insulin Resistance, Type 2 Diabetes, and Associated Hepatic Co-Morbidities: A Comprehensive Review of Human and Rodent Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morrison, M.C.; Kleemann, R.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with a chronic low-grade inflammatory state that drives the -development of obesity-related co-morbidities such as insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and cardiovascular disease. This metabolic inflammation is thought to originate in

  19. Ultrastructure of the mouse spinal cord ependyma.

    OpenAIRE

    Bjugn, R; Haugland, H K; Flood, P R

    1988-01-01

    This study was done in order to investigate the normal ultrastructure of well-preserved mouse spinal canal ependyma using light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The ependymal lining was found to consist of a simple, cuboidal epithelium essentially similar to the unspecialized cuboidal ependyma of the brain ventricles. Apart from great variation in kinociliary density, no intracellular difference was noted between the ependymal cells. In contrast to earlier findings, indications...

  20. Nematodes ultrastructure: complex systems and processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basyoni, Maha M A; Rizk, Enas M A

    2016-12-01

    Nematode worms are among the most ubiquitous organisms on earth. They include free-living forms as well as parasites of plants, insects, humans and other animals. Recently, there has been an explosion of interest in nematode biology, including the area of nematode ultrastructure. Nematodes are round with a body cavity. They have one way guts with a mouth at one end and an anus at the other. They have a pseudocoelom that is lined on one side with mesoderm and on the other side with endoderm. It appears that the cuticle is a very complex and evolutionarily plastic feature with important functions involving protection, body movement and maintaining shape. They only have longitudinal muscles so; they seem to thrash back and forth. While nematodes have digestive, reproductive, nervous and excretory systems, they do not have discrete circulatory or respiratory systems. Nematodes use chemosensory and mechanosensory neurons embedded in the cuticle to orient and respond to a wide range of environmental stimuli. Adults are made up of roughly 1000 somatic cells and hundreds of those cells are typically associated with the reproductive systems. Nematodes ultrastructure seeks to provide studies which enable their use as models for diverse biological processes including; human diseases, immunity, host-parasitic interactions and the expression of phylogenomics. The latter has, however, not been brought into a single inclusive entity. Consequently, in the current review we tried to provide a comprehensive approach to the current knowledge available for nematodes ultrastructures.

  1. Transcriptional Regulation and Macrophage Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, David A; Summers, Kim M; Rehli, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are professional phagocytes that occupy specific niches in every tissue of the body. Their survival, proliferation, and differentiation are controlled by signals from the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (CSF-1R) and its two ligands, CSF-1 and interleukin-34. In this review, we address the developmental and transcriptional relationships between hematopoietic progenitor cells, blood monocytes, and tissue macrophages as well as the distinctions from dendritic cells. A huge repertoire of receptors allows monocytes, tissue-resident macrophages, or pathology-associated macrophages to adapt to specific microenvironments. These processes create a broad spectrum of macrophages with different functions and individual effector capacities. The production of large transcriptomic data sets in mouse, human, and other species provides new insights into the mechanisms that underlie macrophage functional plasticity.

  2. The macrophages in rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laria A

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Antonella Laria, Alfredomaria Lurati , Mariagrazia Marrazza , Daniela Mazzocchi, Katia Angela Re, Magda Scarpellini Rheumatology Unit, Fornaroli Hospital, Magenta, Italy Abstract: Macrophages belong to the innate immune system giving us protection against pathogens. However it is known that they are also involved in rheumatic diseases. Activated macrophages have two different phenotypes related to different stimuli: M1 (classically activated and M2 (alternatively activated. M1 macrophages release high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, reactive nitrogen and oxygen intermediates killing microorganisms and tumor cells; while M2 macrophages are involved in resolution of inflammation through phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils, reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and increased synthesis of mediators important in tissue remodeling, angiogenesis, and wound repair. The role of macrophages in the different rheumatic diseases is different according to their M1/M2 macrophages phenotype. Keywords: macrophage, rheumatic diseases

  3. Ultrastructural localization of intravenously injected carbon nanohorns in tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsumura S

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sachiko Matsumura,1 Ryota Yuge,2 Shigeo Sato,3 Akihiro Tomida,3 Toshinari Ichihashi,2 Hiroshi Irie,4 Sumio Iijima,2,5,6 Kiyotaka Shiba,1 Masako Yudasaka6 1Cancer Institute, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo, Japan; 2Smart Energy Research Laboratories, NEC Corporation, Tsukuba, Japan; 3Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Koto-ku, Tokyo, Japan; 4Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 5Faculty of Science and Technology, Meijo University, Tenpaku, Nagoya, Japan; 6Nanotube Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Higashi, Tsukuba, Japan Abstract: Nanocarbons have many potential medical applications. Drug delivery, diagnostic imaging, and photohyperthermia therapy, especially in the treatment of tumors, have attracted interest. For the further advancement of these application studies, the microscopic localization of nanocarbons in tumor tissues and cells is a prerequisite. In this study, carbon nanohorns (CNHs with sizes of about 100 nm were intravenously injected into mice having subcutaneously transplanted tumors, and the CNHs in tumor tissue were observed with optical and electron microscopy. In the tumor tissue, the CNHs were found in macrophages and endothelial cells within the blood vessels. Few CNHs were found in tumor cells or in the region away from blood vessels, suggesting that, under these study conditions, the enhanced permeability of tumor blood vessels was not effective for the movement of CNHs through the vessel walls. The CNHs in normal skin tissue were similarly observed. The extravasation of CNHs was not so obvious in tumor but was easily found in normal skin, which was probably due to their vessel wall structure difference. Proper understanding of the location of CNHs in tissues is helpful in the development of the medical uses of CNHs. Keywords: ultrastructural localization, carbon nanohorn, tumor, in vivo, extravasation

  4. Inflammatory reaction in experimental hepatic amebiasis. An ultrastructural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, V.; Martinez-Palomo, A.

    1988-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of tissue necrosis produced by the human protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica, the causative agent of human amebiasis, appeared to be the lack of inflammatory reaction to the invading trophozoites. Recent evidence suggests, however, that inflammatory cells do appear during early stages of amebic destructive lesions and that they contribute to the establishment of foci of tissue necrosis in intestinal and liver lesions. The present analysis of the fine-structural changes that take place during early stages of amebic liver abscesses induced in hamsters after the intraportal inoculation of axenic amebas has shown that large numbers of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) are recruited around invading amebas. These leukocytes lyse as a consequence of contact-mediated damage induced by the trophozoites. Amebas were also capable of ingesting apparently intact PMNs. Macrophages and eosinophils were also recruited at the foci of inflammation. At all times examined, trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica survived in spite of being in close contact with PMNs or degranulating eosinophils. The ultrastructural observations have also shown the lack of direct contact between amebas and liver parenchymal cells during the initial stages of the focal liver necrosis induced by the parasite, therefore supporting the view that hepatic damage may be effected indirectly through lysis of inflammatory cells. The results also provide a basis for the understanding of the induction of experimental protective immunity against invasive amebiasis, a process which seems to be mostly dependent on cellular mechanisms. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:3337207

  5. The role of viruses, inflammation and myocardial macrophages in the development of idiopathic arrhythmia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebenkova, M.; Gombozhapova, A.; Shurupov, V.; Rogovskaya, Yu.; Botalov, R.; Ryabov, V.; Popov, S.; Karpov, R.

    2015-11-01

    We studied viral antigens, inflammation, and macrophages in the endomyocardial biopsies of patients with idiopathic arrhythmias. Immunohistological study was performed to identify the antigens of cardiotropic viruses and the types of lymphocytes and macrophages. We observed the presence of viral antigens in the myocardium of patients with and without histological criteria of myocarditis. Heart failure and ventricular arrhythmias were associated with small focal infiltration of the myocardium with macrophages. The presence of viral antigens in the myocardium was associated with fewer number of myocardial M2 macrophages. Severity of myocardial interstitial fibrosis correlated with small-focal infiltration of M2 macrophages.

  6. Lycopene modulates cellular proliferation, glycolysis and hepatic ultrastructure during hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Prachi; Bhatia, Nisha; Bansal, Mohinder Pal; Koul, Ashwani

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effect of lycopene extracted from tomatoes (LycT) on ultrastructure, glycolytic enzymes, cell proliferation markers and hypoxia during N-Nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA)-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. METHODS Female BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups: The Control, NDEA (200 mg NDEA/kg b.w. given i.p.), LycT (5 mg/kg b.w. given orally on alternate days) and LycT + NDEA group. The mRNA and protein expression of various cell proliferation markers (PCNA, Cyclin D1, and p21) were assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The ultrastructure of hepatic tissue was analyzed using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The enzymatic activity of glycolytic enzymes was estimated using standardized protocols, while glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity level was estimated using a kit obtained from Reckon Diagnostic P. Ltd. (India). RESULTS Uncontrolled proliferation in the liver of NDEA (P ≤ 0.001) mice was evident from the high expression of cell-proliferation associated genes (PCNA, Cyclin D1, and p21) when compared to control and LycT mice. In addition, enhanced activities of hexokinase, phosphoglucoisomerase, aldolase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α were observed in NDEA mice as compared to control (P ≤ 0.001) and LycT (P ≤ 0.001) mice. The alterations in hepatic ultrastructure observed in the NDEA group correlated with the changes in the above parameters. LycT pre-treatment in NDEA-challenged mice ameliorated the investigated pathways disrupted by NDEA treatment. Moreover, hepatic electron micrographs from the LycT + NDEA group showed increased macrophages, apoptotic bodies and well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in comparison to undifferentiated HCC as observed in the NDEA treated group. CONCLUSION This study demonstrates that dietary supplementation with LycT has a multidimensional role in preventing

  7. Micromorphology and ultrastructure of trichomes of Libyan Salvia fruticosa Mill.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Sheef Beleed Najat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Micromorphological and ultrastructural analyses of the leaf trichomes of Salvia fruticosa Mill. were performed by light and electron microscopy. The leaves bear numerous non-glandular unbranched trichomes, and peltate, capitate and digitiform glandular trichomes. Very elongated flagelliform non-glandular trichomes densely covered the leaf surfaces, with especially abundance on the leaf margins. Peltate trichomes consist of a basal epidermal cell, a very short stalk cell and a large round head of eight secretory cells arranged in a circle. Capitate trichomes can be divided into two main types, short-stalked and long-stalked, and further into five subtypes according to the number of stalk cells, morphology and number of glandular head cells. Digitiform trichomes consist of one basal cell, one or two stalk cells and one apical secretory cell, which are of similar diameter and approximately equal length. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173029 i br. 173015

  8. Ultrastructural observations reveal the presence of channels between cork cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Rita Teresa; Pereira, Helena

    2009-12-01

    The ultrastructure of phellem cells of Quercus suber L. (cork oak) and Calotropis procera (Ait) R. Br. were analyzed using electron transmission microscopy to determine the presence or absence of plasmodesmata (PD). Different types of Q. suber cork samples were studied: one year shoots; virgin cork (first periderm), reproduction cork (traumatic periderm), and wet cork. The channel structures of PD were found in all the samples crossing adjacent cell walls through the suberin layer of the secondary wall. Calotropis phellem also showed PD crossing the cell walls of adjacent cells but in fewer numbers compared to Q. suber. In one year stems of cork oak, it was possible to follow the physiologically active PD with ribosomic accumulation next to the aperture of the channel seen in the phellogen cells to the completely obstructed channels in the dead cells that characterize the phellem tissue.

  9. Porcine circovirus type 2 increases IL-1β and IL-10 production via the MyD88-NF-κB signaling pathway in porcine alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Junyuan; Zhang, Shuxia; Zhang, Yaqun; Chen, Mengmeng; Lv, Yingjun

    2016-07-25

    Porcine alveolar macrophages represent the first line of defense in the porcine lung after infection with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) via the respiratory tract. However, PCV2 infection impairs the microbicidal capability of PAMs and alters cytokine production and/or secretion. Currently, the reason for the imbalance of cytokines has not been fully elucidated and the regulatory mechanisms involved are not clear. Here, we investigated the expression levels and regulation of IL-1β and IL-10 in PAMs following incubation with PCV2 in vitro. Both levels of IL-1β and IL-10 increased in PAM supernatants, and the distribution of NF-κB p65 staining in the nucleus, the expression of MyD88 and p-IκB in the cytoplasm and the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB increased after incubation with PCV2, while the expression of p65 in the cytoplasm of PAMs decreased. However, when PAMs were co-incubated with PCV2 and small interfering RNA targeting MyD88, these effects were reversed. Additionally, mRNA expression levels of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2, -3, -4, -7, -8 and -9 were increased when PAMs were incubated with PCV2. These findings showed that PCV2 induced increased IL-1β and IL-10 production in PAMs, and these changes in expression were relative to the TLR-MyD88-NF-κB signaling pathway.

  10. Delineating binding modes of Gal/GalNAc and structural elements of the molecular recognition of tumor-associated mucin glycopeptides by the human macrophage galactose-type lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelo, Filipa; Garcia-Martin, Fayna; Matsushita, Takahiko; Sardinha, João; Coelho, Helena; Oude-Vrielink, Anneloes; Koller, Christiane; André, Sabine; Cabrita, Eurico J; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Cañada, F Javier

    2014-12-01

    The human macrophage galactose-type lectin (MGL) is a key physiological receptor for the carcinoma-associated Tn antigen (GalNAc-α-1-O-Ser/Thr) in mucins. NMR and modeling-based data on the molecular recognition features of synthetic Tn-bearing glycopeptides by MGL are presented. Cognate epitopes on the sugar and matching key amino acids involved in the interaction were identified by saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy. Only the amino acids close to the glycosylation site in the peptides are involved in lectin contact. Moreover, control experiments with non-glycosylated MUC1 peptides unequivocally showed that the sugar residue is essential for MGL binding, as is Ca(2+) . NMR data were complemented with molecular dynamics simulations and Corcema-ST to establish a 3D view on the molecular recognition process between Gal, GalNAc, and the Tn-presenting glycopeptides and MGL. Gal and GalNAc have a dual binding mode with opposite trend of the main interaction pattern and the differences in affinity can be explained by additional hydrogen bonds and CH-π contacts involving exclusively the NHAc moiety.

  11. Ultrastructural and Molecular Changes in the Developing Small Intestine of the Toad Bufo regularis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Sakr

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ontogenetic development of the small intestine of the toad Bufo regularis was investigated using twofold approaches, namely, ultrastructural and molecular. The former has been done using transmission electron microscope and utilizing the developmental stages 42, 50, 55, 60, 63, and 66. The most prominent ultrastructural changes were recorded at stage 60 and were more evident at stage 63. These included the appearance of apoptotic bodies/nuclei within the larval epithelium, the presence of macrophages, swollen mitochondria, distorted rough endoplasmic reticulum, chromatin condensation, and irregular nuclear envelop, and the presence of large vacuoles and lysosomes. The molecular investigation involved examining DNA content and fragmentation. The results showed that the DNA content decreased significantly during the metamorphic stages 60 and 63 compared with both larval (50 and 55 and postmetamorphic (66 stages. The metamorphic stages (60 and 63 displayed extensive DNA laddering compared with stages 50, 55, and 66. The percentage of DNA damage was 0.00%, 12.91%, 57.26%, 45.48%, and 4.43% for the developmental stages 50, 55, 60, 63, and 66, respectively. In conclusion, the recorded remodeling of the small intestine represents a model for clarifying the mechanism whereby cell death and proliferation are controlled.

  12. Unique proteomic signatures distinguish macrophages and dendritic cells.

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    Lev Becker

    Full Text Available Monocytes differentiate into heterogeneous populations of tissue macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs that regulate inflammation and immunity. Identifying specific populations of myeloid cells in vivo is problematic, however, because only a limited number of proteins have been used to assign cellular phenotype. Using mass spectrometry and bone marrow-derived cells, we provided a global view of the proteomes of M-CSF-derived macrophages, classically and alternatively activated macrophages, and GM-CSF-derived DCs. Remarkably, the expression levels of half the plasma membrane proteins differed significantly in the various populations of cells derived in vitro. Moreover, the membrane proteomes of macrophages and DCs were more distinct than those of classically and alternatively activated macrophages. Hierarchical cluster and dual statistical analyses demonstrated that each cell type exhibited a robust proteomic signature that was unique. To interrogate the phenotype of myeloid cells in vivo, we subjected elicited peritoneal macrophages harvested from wild-type and GM-CSF-deficient mice to mass spectrometric and functional analysis. Unexpectedly, we found that peritoneal macrophages exhibited many features of the DCs generated in vitro. These findings demonstrate that global analysis of the membrane proteome can help define immune cell phenotypes in vivo.

  13. Heme oxygenase-2 deletion impairs macrophage function: implication in wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellner, Lars; Marrazzo, Giuseppina; van Rooijen, Nico; Dunn, Michael W; Abraham, Nader G; Schwartzman, Michal L

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-2 deficiency impairs wound healing and exacerbates inflammation following injury. We examine the impact of HO-2 deficiency on macrophage function and the contribution of macrophage HO-2 to inflammatory and repair responses to injury. Corneal epithelial debridement was performed in control and macrophage-depleted HO-2(-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice and in bone marrow chimeras. Peritoneal macrophages were collected for determination of phagocytic activity and classically activated macrophage (M1)-alternatively activated macrophage (M2) polarization. Depletion of macrophages delayed corneal healing (13.2%) and increased neutrophil infiltration (54.1%) by day 4 in WT mice, whereas in HO-2(-/-) mice, it did not worsen the already impaired wound healing and exacerbated inflammation. HO-2(-/-) macrophages displayed an altered M1 phenotype with no significant expression of M2 or M2-like activated cells and a 31.3% reduction in phagocytic capacity that was restored by inducing HO-1 activity or supplementing biliverdin. Macrophage depletion had no effect, whereas adoptive transfer of WT bone marrow improved wound healing (34% on day 4) but did not resolve the exaggerated inflammatory response in HO-2(-/-) mice. These findings indicate that HO-2-deficient macrophages are dysfunctional and that macrophage HO-2 is required for proper macrophage function but is insufficient to correct the impaired healing of the HO-2(-/-) cornea, suggesting that corneal epithelial expression of HO-2 is a key to resolution and repair in wound healing.

  14. G Protein-Dependent CCR5 Signaling Is Not Required for Efficient Infection of Primary T Lymphocytes and Macrophages by R5 Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Isolates

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    The requirement of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-induced CCR5 activation for infection by R5 HIV type 1 (HIV-1) strains remains controversial. Ectopic CCR5 expression in CD4+-transformed cells or pharmacological inhibition of Gαi proteins coupled to CCR5 left unsolved whether CCR5-dependent cell activation is necessary for the HIV life cycle. In this study, we investigated the role played by HIV-induced CCR5-dependent cell signaling during infection of primary CD4-expressing leukocytes. ...

  15. Ultrastructure of the endolymphatic sac in rat with a proposal for a new cell nomenclature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvortrup, Klaus; Rostgaard, Jørgen; Bretlau, P.

    1994-01-01

    Anatomy, endolymphatic sac, ultrastructure, rat, nomenclature, methods, tubulocisternal endoplasmic reticulum......Anatomy, endolymphatic sac, ultrastructure, rat, nomenclature, methods, tubulocisternal endoplasmic reticulum...

  16. Phenotypic diversity and emerging new tools to study macrophage activation in bacterial infectious diseases

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    Jean-Louis eMege

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage polarization is a concept that has been useful to describe the different features of macrophage activation related to specific functions. Macrophage polarization is responsible for a dichotomic approach (killing versus repair of the host response to bacteria: M1-type conditions are protective, whereas M2-type conditions are associated with bacterial persistence. The use of the polarization concept to classify the features of macrophage activation in infected patients using transcriptional and/or molecular data and to provide biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis has most often been unsuccessful. The confrontation of polarization with different clinical situations in which monocytes/macrophages encounter bacteria obliged us to reappraise this concept. With the exception of M2-type infectious diseases such as leprosy and Whipple’s disease, most acute (sepsis or chronic (Q fever, tuberculosis infectious diseases do not exhibit polarized monocytes/macrophages. This is also the case for commensals that shape the immune response and for probiotics that alter the immune response independent of macrophage polarization. We propose that the type of myeloid cells (monocytes vs. macrophages and the kinetics of the immune response (early vs. late responses are critical variables for understanding macrophage activation in human infectious diseases. Explorating the role of these new markers will provide important tools to better understand complex macrophage physiology.

  17. 高强度周期性静水压对人软骨细胞超微结构及II 型胶原分泌的影响%Effects of high-intensity cyclical hydrostatic pressures on the ultrastructure and type II collagen expression of chondrocytes of knee joint in human

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鑫; 白倩; 徐奎; 裘秀春; 范清宇; 马保安

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of high-intensity cyclic hydrostatic pressures on the ultrastructure and type II collagen contents of chondrocytes of the knee joint cultured in vitro in human. Methods The normal chondrocytes of human knee joint were isolated and cultured in vitro. The 3rd generation of chondrocytes were treated with high-intensity cyclical hydrostatic pressures ( 10.0 mPa ) by the multifunctional thermostatic high-insensitive hydrostatic pressure loading device for 2 h per day lasting for 5 days. Toluidine blue staining and immunohistochemical staining of type II collagen were employed to identify the chondrocytes. Cell morphology was observed by light microscopy. The ultrastructure of chondrocytes were observed by transmission electron microscopy ( TEM ). Type II collagen immunohistochemical staining and semi-quantitative analysis were performed to measure contents and expression of type II collagen of chondrocytes in 2 groups. Results Compared with the control group, cell morphology changed from irregular polygon into long spindle, membrane and cytoplasm retracted, the number of cells was reduced significantly and grew sparsely in the 10.0 mPa group. TEM showed that various apoptosis indications such as uneven distribution and margination of chromosomes in the 10.0 mPa group. Collagen type II immunohistochemistry and semi-quantitative analysis showed that the percent of stained area of control group and 10.0 mPa group was ( 61.64 ± 6.19 ) % and ( 43.76 ± 5.61 ) %, compared with the control group, the stained area and extent of chondrocytes were significantly decreased in the 10.0 mPa group ( P < 0.05 ). Conclusions The high-intensity pressure over human physiological range can be regarded as a mechanical injury to result in cell apoptosis, morphology and intracellular ultrastructural changes of human chondrocytes, and also decrease protein expression of human chondrocytes. These data provide the experimental basis for studying the

  18. FoxO1 regulates allergic asthmatic inflammation through regulating polarization of the macrophage inflammatory phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sangwoon; Lee, Tae Jin; Reader, Brenda F; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Yong Gyu; Park, Gye Young; Karpurapu, Manjula; Ballinger, Megan N; Qian, Feng; Rusu, Luiza; Chung, Hae Young; Unterman, Terry G; Croce, Carlo M; Christman, John W

    2016-04-05

    Inflammatory monocyte and tissue macrophages influence the initiation, progression, and resolution of type 2 immune responses, and alveolar macrophages are the most prevalent immune-effector cells in the lung. While we were characterizing the M1- or M2-like macrophages in type 2 allergic inflammation, we discovered that FoxO1 is highly expressed in alternatively activated macrophages. Although several studies have been focused on the fundamental role of FoxOs in hematopoietic and immune cells, the exact role that FoxO1 plays in allergic asthmatic inflammation in activated macrophages has not been investigated. Growing evidences indicate that FoxO1 acts as an upstream regulator of IRF4 and could have a role in a specific inflammatory phenotype of macrophages. Therefore, we hypothesized that IRF4 expression regulated by FoxO1 in alveolar macrophages is required for established type 2 immune mediates allergic lung inflammation. Our data indicate that targeted deletion of FoxO1 using FoxO1-selective inhibitor AS1842856 and genetic ablation of FoxO1 in macrophages significantly decreases IRF4 and various M2 macrophage-associated genes, suggesting a mechanism that involves FoxO1-IRF4 signaling in alveolar macrophages that works to polarize macrophages toward established type 2 immune responses. In response to the challenge of DRA (dust mite, ragweed, and Aspergillus) allergens, macrophage specific FoxO1 overexpression is associated with an accentuation of asthmatic lung inflammation, whereas pharmacologic inhibition of FoxO1 by AS1842856 attenuates the development of asthmatic lung inflammation. Thus, our study identifies a role for FoxO1-IRF4 signaling in the development of alternatively activated alveolar macrophages that contribute to type 2 allergic airway inflammation.

  19. Macrophage microvesicles induce macrophage differentiation and miR-223 transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Noura; Wang, Yijie; Dakhlallah, Duaa; Moldovan, Leni; Agarwal, Kitty; Batte, Kara; Shah, Prexy; Wisler, Jon; Eubank, Tim D; Tridandapani, Susheela; Paulaitis, Michael E; Piper, Melissa G; Marsh, Clay B

    2013-02-07

    Microvesicles are small membrane-bound particles comprised of exosomes and various-sized extracellular vesicles. These are released by several cell types. Microvesicles have a variety of cellular functions from communication to mediating growth and differentiation. Microvesicles contain proteins and nucleic acids. Previously, we showed that plasma microvesicles contain microRNAs (miRNAs). Based on our previous report, the majority of peripheral blood microvesicles are derived from platelets, while mononuclear phagocytes, including macrophages, are the second most abundant population. Here, we characterized macrophage-derived microvesicles and explored their role in the differentiation of naive monocytes. We also identified the miRNA content of the macrophage-derived microvesicles. We found that RNA molecules contained in the macrophage-derived microvesicles were transported to target cells, including mono cytes, endothelial cells, epithelial cells, and fibroblasts. Furthermore, we found that miR-223 was transported to target cells and was functionally active. Based on our observations, we hypothesize that microvesicles bind to and activate target cells. Furthermore, we find that microvesicles induce the differentiation of macrophages. Thus, defining key components of this response may identify novel targets to regulate host defense and inflammation.

  20. Effect of exogenous prolactin on ultrastructure of pinealocyte in female pigs during puberty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Przybylska, B.; Dusza, L.; Lewczuk, B.; Ciesielska-Myszka, L. [Akademia Rolniczo-Technicza, Olsztyn (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    Influence of the administration of prolactin to female swine during puberty on the ultrastructure of pinealocytes has been examined by means of morphometric analysis. Prolactin administration for 15 consecutive days resulted in a decrease in the cytoplasmic dense bodies type MBB-2, lysosomes and multivesicular bodies. Some differences in structure of pinealocytes were also observed. Prolactin appeared to stimulate the process of transformation of cytoplasmic dense bodies. (author). 28 refs, 5 figs.

  1. Ultrastructure of the midgut endocrine cells in Melipona quadrifasciata anthidioides (Hymenoptera, Apidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Neves

    Full Text Available In this study we describe the ultrastructure of the endocrine cells observed in the midgut of M. quadrifasciata anthidioides. This bee has two types of endocrine cells, which are numerous on the posterior midgut region. Cells of the closed type are smaller and have irregular secretory granules with lower electrondensity than those of the open cell type. The open cell type has elongated mitochondria mainly on the basal area, where most of the secretory granules are also found. Besides the secretion granules and mitochondria, endocrine cells in this species have well-developed autophagic vacuoles and Golgi complex elements.

  2. Host hindrance to HIV-1 replication in monocytes and macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pancino Gianfranco

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Monocytes and macrophages are targets of HIV-1 infection and play critical roles in multiple aspects of viral pathogenesis. HIV-1 can replicate in blood monocytes, although only a minor proportion of circulating monocytes harbor viral DNA. Resident macrophages in tissues can be infected and function as viral reservoirs. However, their susceptibility to infection, and their capacity to actively replicate the virus, varies greatly depending on the tissue localization and cytokine environment. The susceptibility of monocytes to HIV-1 infection in vitro depends on their differentiation status. Monocytes are refractory to infection and become permissive upon differentiation into macrophages. In addition, the capacity of monocyte-derived macrophages to sustain viral replication varies between individuals. Host determinants regulate HIV-1 replication in monocytes and macrophages, limiting several steps of the viral life-cycle, from viral entry to virus release. Some host factors responsible for HIV-1 restriction are shared with T lymphocytes, but several anti-viral mechanisms are specific to either monocytes or macrophages. Whilst a number of these mechanisms have been identified in monocytes or in monocyte-derived macrophages in vitro, some of them have also been implicated in the regulation of HIV-1 infection in vivo, in particular in the brain and the lung where macrophages are the main cell type infected by HIV-1. This review focuses on cellular factors that have been reported to interfere with HIV-1 infection in monocytes and macrophages, and examines the evidences supporting their role in vivo, highlighting unique aspects of HIV-1 restriction in these two cell types.

  3. Macrophages, Dendritic Cells, and Regression of Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E. Feig

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is the number one cause of death in the Western world. It results from the interaction between modified lipoproteins and monocyte-derived cells such as macrophages, dendritic cells, T cells, and other cellular elements of the arterial wall. This inflammatory process can ultimately lead to the development of complex lesions, or plaques, that protrude into the arterial lumen. Ultimately, plaque rupture and thrombosis can occur leading to the clinical complications of myocardial infarction or stroke. Although each of the cell types plays roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, in this review, the focus will be primarily on the monocyte derived cells- macrophages and dendritic cells. The roles of these cell types in atherogenesis will be highlighted. Finally, the mechanisms of atherosclerosis regression as it relates to these cells will be discussed.

  4. Mechanisms of macrophage activation in obesity-induced insulin resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Odegaard, Justin I.; Chawla, Ajay

    2008-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is now recognized as a key step in the pathogenesis of obesity-induced insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This low-grade inflammation is mediated by the inflammatory (classical) activation of recruited and resident macrophages that populate metabolic tissues, including adipose tissue and liver. These findings have led to the concept that infiltration and activation of adipose tissue macrophages is causally linked to obesity-induced insulin resistance. Studie...

  5. Proinsulin-producing, hyperglycemia-induced adipose tissue macrophages underlie insulin resistance in high fat-fed diabetic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adipose tissue macrophages play an important role in the pathogenesis of obese type 2 diabetes. High-fat diet-induced obesity has been shown to lead to adipose tissue macrophages accumulation in rodents;however, the impact of hyperglycemia on adipose tissue macrophages dynamics in high-fat diet-fed ...

  6. Ultrastructural observations of the early and late stages of gorgonian coral (Junceella juncea) oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Sujune; Jhuang, Yating; Spikings, Emma; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Lin, Chiahsin

    2014-08-01

    The developmental oogenesis of gorgonian coral was investigated at the histological level. The objective of this study was to examine and improve the understanding of Junceella juncea oogenesis using ultrastructural methods, such as histological sectioning and transmission electron microscopy. At least three types of yolk materials were observed in this study: yolk body, lipid granules and cortical alveoli. Some of the complex yolk materials were encompassed by concentric or arched layers of smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi complex in early stage oocytes. Different types of vesicles were found in both early and late stage oocytes and some granules could be seen inside the empty vesicles. This may be a possible method for elaborating complex yolk materials. Homogeneous yolks from different types of inclusions were abundant and the autosynthesis of yolk may be a major mechanism in J. juncea oocytes. This is the first report of the ultrastructural observation of oogenesis in gorgonian coral species using transmission electron microscopy. Our study obtained relatively detailed information at the ultrastructural level, and it provides an overview of the oocyte ultrastucture of the gorgonian coral J. juncea.

  7. Ultrastructure of spermatogenesis, spermatozoon and processes of testicular regression and recrudescence in Eptesicus furinalis (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Larissa M; Beguelini, Mateus R; Comelis, Manuela T; Taboga, Sebastião R; Morielle-Versute, Eliana

    2014-08-01

    Studies have shown that the annual reproductive cycle of Eptesicus furinalis includes at least one period of total testicular regression. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate their reproductive cycle ultrastructurally. The annual reproductive cycle was divided into four periods: active, regressing, regressed and recrudescence. The active period was similar to that of other bats, including the completion of spermatogenesis with three main types of spermatogonia (Ad, Ap and B) and 12 steps in the process of spermatid differentiation. However, its spermatozoa differed in that outer dense fibers 1, 5, 6 and 9 are larger than the others and due to the presence of what is likely a probably genera-specific bulging in the anterior portion. In the regressing period, Sertoli cell nuclei migrate to the basal compartment with the nuclei close to the basal lamina. The basal compartment had a more compact appearance than the adluminal compartment, with relaxed cellular connections. In the regressed period, spermatogenesis ceased; the seminiferous epithelium was composed only of Sertoli cells and three types of spermatogonia: types Ad, 1 and 2. In the recrudescence period, spermatogenesis restarted, with the process of reactivation divided into three phases: early, medial and late recrudescence. In conclusion, our study described the process of spermatogenesis and the ultrastructure of the spermatozoa and confirmed the presence of a process of total testicular regression in the annual cycle of E. furinalis. We characterize distinct morphologic variations in the ultrastructure of the testicular cells during the four different periods of the annual reproductive cycle.

  8. Ultrastructural changes of chorioretinal complex under sub-threshold laser exposure at wavelengths of 0.81 and 0.532 μm (experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Fedoruk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To reveal ultrastructural changes of chorioretinal complex and their possible reversibility under sub-threshold laser exposure at wavelengths of 0.81 and 0.532 μm in 1, 8 and 30 days. Methods: Experimental study was performed on 16 chinchilla rabbits (32 eyes using laser at wavelengths of 0.532 and 0.81 μm in CW, micropulse, and transpupillary thermotherapy modes. Transmission electron microscope EM-10C (Opton, Oberkochen, Germany was used to perform ultrastructural study of retina following laser exposure. Results: In a day after sub-threshold laser exposure, ultrastructural changes were mainly detected in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE, choriocapillaries, and photoreceptors. In 8 days, intracellular regeneration of RPE and partial restoration of choriocapillary blood flow and RPE macrophages were observed. In 30 days, RPE morphology, the number and the structure of photoreceptor outer segments were re-established. Mitochondria of photoreceptor inner segments regenerated as well. Conclusion: Ultrastructural changes of chorioretinal complex following sub-threshold laser radiation were reversible. Intracellular regeneration provided almost complete recovery of chorioretinal complex structure by day 30.

  9. Ultrastructural changes of chorioretinal complex under sub-threshold laser exposure at wavelengths of 0.81 and 0.532 μm (experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Fedoruk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To reveal ultrastructural changes of chorioretinal complex and their possible reversibility under sub-threshold laser exposure at wavelengths of 0.81 and 0.532 μm in 1, 8 and 30 days. Methods: Experimental study was performed on 16 chinchilla rabbits (32 eyes using laser at wavelengths of 0.532 and 0.81 μm in CW, micropulse, and transpupillary thermotherapy modes. Transmission electron microscope EM-10C (Opton, Oberkochen, Germany was used to perform ultrastructural study of retina following laser exposure. Results: In a day after sub-threshold laser exposure, ultrastructural changes were mainly detected in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE, choriocapillaries, and photoreceptors. In 8 days, intracellular regeneration of RPE and partial restoration of choriocapillary blood flow and RPE macrophages were observed. In 30 days, RPE morphology, the number and the structure of photoreceptor outer segments were re-established. Mitochondria of photoreceptor inner segments regenerated as well. Conclusion: Ultrastructural changes of chorioretinal complex following sub-threshold laser radiation were reversible. Intracellular regeneration provided almost complete recovery of chorioretinal complex structure by day 30.

  10. Inter-relationships of haplosporidians deduced from ultrastructural studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hine, P.M.; Carnegie, R.B.; Burreson, E.M.; Engelsma, M.Y.

    2009-01-01

    We reviewed papers reporting haplosporidian ultrastructure to compare inter-relationships based on ultrastructure with those based on molecular data, to identify features that may be important in haplosporidian taxonomy, and to consider parasite taxonomy in relation to host taxonomy. There were link

  11. Ultrastructural changes in goat interspecies and intraspecies reconstructed early embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tao, Yong; Gheng, Lizi; Zhang, Meiling

    2008-01-01

    The low efficiency of somatic cell nuclear transfer may be related to the ultrastructural deviations of reconstructed embryos. The present study investigated ultrastructural differences between in vivo-produced and cloned goat embryos, including intra- and interspecies embryos. Goat ear fibroblast...

  12. Selective inhibition of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway regulates autophagy of macrophage and vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaque.

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    Chungang Zhai

    Full Text Available Macrophage infiltration contributes to the instability of atherosclerotic plaques. In the present study, we investigated whether selective inhibition of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway can enhance the stability of atherosclerotic plaques by activation of macrophage autophagy. In vitro study, selective inhibitors or siRNA of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathways were used to treat the rabbit's peritoneal primary macrophage cells. Inflammation related cytokines secreted by macrophages were measured. Ultrastructure changes of macrophages were examined by transmission electron microscope. mRNA or protein expression levels of autophagy related gene Beclin 1, protein 1 light chain 3 II dots (LC3-II or Atg5-Atg12 conjugation were assayed by quantitative RT-PCR or Western blot. In vivo study, vulnerable plaque models were established in 40 New Zealand White rabbits and then drugs or siRNA were given for 8 weeks to inhibit the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS was performed to observe the plaque imaging. The ultrastructure of the abdominal aortic atherosclerosis lesions were analyzed with histopathology. RT-PCR or Western blot methods were used to measure the expression levels of corresponding autophagy related molecules. We found that macrophage autophagy was induced in the presence of Akt inhibitor, mTOR inhibitor and mTOR-siRNA in vitro study, while PI3K inhibitor had the opposite role. In vivo study, we found that macrophage autophagy increased significantly and the rabbits had lower plaque rupture incidence, lower plaque burden and decreased vulnerability index in the inhibitors or siRNA treated groups. We made a conclusion that selective inhibition of the Akt/mTOR signal pathway can reduce macrophages and stabilize the vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques by promoting macrophage autophagy.

  13. Role of the tumor suppressor ARF in macrophage polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz, Sandra; Través, Paqui G.; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2012-01-01

    The ARF locus is frequently inactivated in human cancer. The oncosuppressor ARF has indeed been described as a general sensor for different situation of cellular stress. We have previously demonstrated that ARF deficiency severely impairs inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo, establishing a role for ARF in the regulation of innate immunity. The aim of the present work was to get further insights into the immune functions of ARF and to evaluate its possible contribution to the polarization of macrophages toward the M1 or M2 phenotype. Our results demonstrate that resting Arf−/− macrophages express high levels of Ym1 and Fizz-1, two typical markers of alternatively-activated macrophages (M2). Additionally, Arf−/− peritoneal macrophages showed an impaired response to lipopolysaccharide (a classical inducer of M1 polaryzation) and a reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines. Moreover, upon stimulation with interleukin-4 (IL-4), an inducer of the M2 phenotype, well established M2 markers such as Fizz-1, Ym1 and arginase-1 were upregulated in Arf−/− as compared with wild type macrophages. Accordingly, the cytokine and chemokine profile associated with the M2 phenotype was significantly overexpressed in Arf−/− macrophages responding to IL-4. In addition, multiple pro-angiogenic factors such as VEGF and MMP-9 were also increased. In summary, these results indicate that ARF contributes to the polarization and functional plasticity of macrophages. PMID:23243586

  14. Macrophages in neuroinflammation: role of the renin-angiotensin-system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Anna; Stegbauer, Johannes; Linker, Ralf A

    2017-04-01

    Macrophages are essential players of the innate immune system which are involved in the initiation and progression of various inflammatory and autoimmune diseases including neuroinflammation. In the past few years, it has become increasingly clear that the regulation of macrophage responses by the local tissue milieu is also influenced by mediators which were first discovered as regulators in the nervous or also cardiovascular system. Here, the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a major focus of current research. Besides its classical role in blood pressure control, body fluid, and electrolyte homeostasis, the RAS may influence (auto)immune responses, modulate T cells, and particularly act on macrophages via different signaling pathways. Activation of classical RAS pathways including angiotensin (Ang) II and AngII type 1 (AT1R) receptors may drive pro-inflammatory macrophage responses in neuroinflammation via regulation of chemokines. More recently, alternative RAS pathways were described, such as binding of Ang-(1-7) to its receptor Mas. Signaling via Mas pathways may counteract some of the AngII/AT1R-mediated effects. In macrophages, the Ang-(1-7)/Mas exerts beneficial effects on neuroinflammation via modulating macrophage polarization, migration, and T cell activation in vitro and in vivo. These data delineate a pivotal role of the RAS in inflammation of the nervous system and identify RAS modulation as a potential new target for immunotherapy with a special focus on macrophages.

  15. Ultrastructural studies of the gray platelet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J G

    1979-05-01

    The gray platelet syndrome (GPS) is a rare inherited disorder in which peripheral blood platelets are relatively large, vacuolated, and almost devoid of cytoplasmic granulation. In the present study we have evaluated the ultrastructure and cytochemistry of platelets from 2 patients with the GPS to determine precisely which organelles are missing from their cells. The findings indicate that gray platelets contain normal numbers of mitochondria, dense bodies, peroxisomes, and lysosomes but specifically lack alpha-granules. Preliminary studies of megakaryocytes from 1 of the 2 patients suggest that the defect in granule formation may lie at the level of the Golgi zone.

  16. Bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunmei; Levin, Michael; Kaplan, David L.

    2016-02-01

    Macrophages play a critical role in regulating wound healing and tissue regeneration by changing their polarization state in response to local microenvironmental stimuli. The native roles of polarized macrophages encompass biomaterials and tissue remodeling needs, yet harnessing or directing the polarization response has been largely absent as a potential strategy to exploit in regenerative medicine to date. Recent data have revealed that specific alteration of cells’ resting potential (Vmem) is a powerful tool to direct proliferation and differentiation in a number of complex tissues, such as limb regeneration, craniofacial patterning and tumorigenesis. In this study, we explored the bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization by targeting ATP sensitive potassium channels (KATP). Glibenclamide (KATP blocker) and pinacidil (KATP opener) treatment not only affect macrophage polarization, but also influence the phenotype of prepolarized macrophages. Furthermore, modulation of cell membrane electrical properties can fine-tune macrophage plasticity. Glibenclamide decreased the secretion and gene expression of selected M1 markers, while pinacidil augmented M1 markers. More interestingly, glibencalmide promoted macrophage alternative activation by enhancing certain M2 markers during M2 polarization. These findings suggest that control of bioelectric properties of macrophages could offer a promising approach to regulate macrophage phenotype as a useful tool in regenerative medicine.

  17. SIRT2 ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ae Sin; Jung, Yu Jin; Kim, Dal; Nguyen-Thanh, Tung [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Kyung Pyo [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sik [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Kwang [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Won, E-mail: kwon@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Knockout of SIRT2 attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced iNOS expression. • Lipopolysaccharide-induced NO production is decreased in SIRT2 KO macrophage. • SIRT2 deficiency suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced ROS production in macrophage. • M1-macrophage related factors are decreased in SIRT2 deficient cells. • SIRT2 deficiency decreases lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of NFκB. - Abstract: Introduction: SIRT2 is a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylases and associated with numerous processes such as infection, carcinogenesis, DNA damage and cell cycle regulation. However, the role of SIRT2 in inflammatory process in macrophage remains unclear. Materials and methods: In the present study, we have evaluated the regulatory effects of SIRT2 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages isolated from SIRT2 knockout (KO) and wild type (WT) mice or Raw264.7 macrophage cells. As inflammatory parameters, expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), the productions of nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and M1-macrophage-related factors were evaluated. We also examined the effects of SIRT2 on activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NFκB) signaling. Results: SIRT2 deficiency inhibits LPS-induced iNOS mRNA and protein expression in bone marrow derived macrophages. SIRT2-siRNA transfection also suppressed LPS-induced iNOS expression in Raw264.7 macrophage cells. Bone marrow derived macrophages isolated from SIRT2 KO mice produced lower nitric oxide and expressed lower levels of M1-macrophage related markers including iNOS and CD86 in response to LPS than WT mice. Decrease of SIRT2 reduced the LPS-induced reactive oxygen species production. Deficiency of SIRT2 resulted in inhibition of NFκB activation through reducing the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα. The phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of p65 was significantly decreased in SIRT2-deficient macrophages after LPS stimulation. Discussion: Our data suggested that

  18. Different Cell Types In the Lower Respiratory Tract of the Reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus L. - A Transmission Electron Microscopical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seppo A.m. Saari

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available The epithelium of the trachea and distal airways of 12 healthy adult reindeer were studied with transmission electron microscopy. The ultrastructure of the reindeer respiratory tract corresponded to the findings of previous investigators studying other mammalian species. The epithelium of the trachea and bronchi, down to the level of the distal bronchioli, was composed of three main types of cell: ciliated, goblet, and basal. In the distal brochioli, non-ciliated cells similar to those known as Clara cells were predominant. Numerous electron-dense granules and the cell organelle pattern resembled the Clara cell type observed in laboratory rodents, rabbit, sheep, pig, horse, and llama. Pneumocyte 1 and pneumocyte 2 cells were readily identified in the alveoli. The pneumocyte 2 cells possessed short microvilli and granules with lamellar content. Micropinocytotic vesicles were very numerous in the alveolar wall, and a small number of alveolar macrophages occasionally seen in the alveolar lumen.

  19. Tumor-associated Tn-MUC1 glycoform is internalized through the macrophage galactose-type C-type lectin and delivered to the HLA class I and II compartments in dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Napoletano, Chiara; Rughetti, Aurelia; Agervig Tarp, Mads P

    2007-01-01

    The type of interaction between tumor-associated antigens and specialized antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DCs) is critical for the type of immunity that will be generated. MUC1, a highly O-glycosylated mucin, is overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated in several tumor histotyp...

  20. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia nurse-like cells express hepatocyte growth factor receptor (c-MET) and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and display features of immunosuppressive type 2 skewed macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoni, Paolo; Pietra, Gabriella; Travaini, Giorgia; Quarto, Rodolfo; Shyti, Genti; Benelli, Roberto; Ottaggio, Laura; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Zupo, Simona; Cutrona, Giovanna; Pierri, Ivana; Balleari, Enrico; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Calvaruso, Marco; Tripodo, Claudio; Ferrarini, Manlio; de Totero, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor, produced by stromal and follicular dendritic cells, and present at high concentrations in the sera of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, prolongs the survival of leukemic B cells by interacting with their receptor, c-MET. It is, however, unknown whether hepatocyte growth factor influences microenvironmental cells, such as nurse-like cells, which deliver survival signals to the leukemic clone. We evaluated the expression of c-MET on nurse-like cells and monocytes from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and searched for phenotypic/functional features supposed to be influenced by the hepatocyte growth factor/c-MET interaction. c-MET is expressed at high levels on nurse-like cells and at significantly higher levels than normal on monocytes from patients. Moreover, the hepatocyte growth factor/c-MET interaction activates STAT3TYR705 phosphorylation in nurse-like cells. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, an enzyme modulating T-cell proliferation and induced on normal monocytes after hepatocyte growth factor treatment, was detected together with interleukin-10 on nurse-like cells, and on freshly-prepared patients’ monocytes. Immunohistochemical/immunostaining analyses demonstrated the presence of c-MET+ and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase+ cells in lymph node biopsies, co-expressed with CD68 and vimentin. Furthermore nurse-like cells and chronic lymphocytic monocytes significantly inhibited T-cell proliferation, prevented by anti-transforming growth factor beta and interleukin-10 antibodies and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase inhibitors, and supported CD4+CD25high+/FOXP3+ T regulatory cell expansion. We suggest that nurse-like cells display features of immunosuppressive type 2 macrophages: higher hepatocyte growth factor levels, produced by leukemic or other microenvironmental surrounding cells, may cooperate to induce M2 polarization. Hepatocyte growth factor may thus have a dual pathophysiological role: directly through enhancement of

  1. Characterization of macrophage-like cells in the external layers of human small and large intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, H B; Rumessen, J J

    1992-01-01

    -DR-positive (expressing the MHC class-II antigen), in contrast to macrophage-like cells in the subserosa and submucosa. Macrophage-like cells in the external muscle layer were mostly acid phosphatase-negative, and at the electron-microscopic level they were found to have features of macrophages: primary lysosomes, coated...... vesicles and pits. However, very few secondary lysosomes were present. Birbeck granules were not observed. It is concluded that in the external muscle layer of human small and large intestine numerous macrophages of a special type are present. It is discussed whether this cell type plays a role...

  2. HIV-1 activates macrophages independent of Toll-like receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph N Brown

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Macrophages provide an interface between innate and adaptive immunity and are important long-lived reservoirs for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 (HIV-1. Multiple genetic networks involved in regulating signal transduction cascades and immune responses in macrophages are coordinately modulated by HIV-1 infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To evaluate complex interrelated processes and to assemble an integrated view of activated signaling networks, a systems biology strategy was applied to genomic and proteomic responses by primary human macrophages over the course of HIV-1 infection. Macrophage responses, including cell cycle, calcium, apoptosis, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK, and cytokines/chemokines, to HIV-1 were temporally regulated, in the absence of cell proliferation. In contrast, Toll-like receptor (TLR pathways remained unaltered by HIV-1, although TLRs 3, 4, 7, and 8 were expressed and responded to ligand stimulation in macrophages. HIV-1 failed to activate phosphorylation of IRAK-1 or IRF-3, modulate intracellular protein levels of Mx1, an interferon-stimulated gene, or stimulate secretion of TNF, IL-1beta, or IL-6. Activation of pathways other than TLR was inadequate to stimulate, via cross-talk mechanisms through molecular hubs, the production of proinflammatory cytokines typical of a TLR response. HIV-1 sensitized macrophage responses to TLR ligands, and the magnitude of viral priming was related to virus replication. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HIV-1 induced a primed, proinflammatory state, M1(HIV, which increased the responsiveness of macrophages to TLR ligands. HIV-1 might passively evade pattern recognition, actively inhibit or suppress recognition and signaling, or require dynamic interactions between macrophages and other cells, such as lymphocytes or endothelial cells. HIV-1 evasion of TLR recognition and simultaneous priming of macrophages may represent a strategy for viral survival, contribute

  3. Testis of the lizard Mabuya carinata: a light microscopic and ultrastructural seasonal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranha, I; Bhagya, M; Yajurvedi, H N

    2006-01-01

    Histomorphology and ultrastructure of the testis during breeding and nonbreeding phases of the reproductive cycle of the lizard Mabuya carinata are studied. Observations of the ultrastructural features of the testis during breeding and nonbreeding phases of the reproductive cycle reveal a prenuptial type of spermatogenesis and a clearcut discontinuous spermatogenic cycle. Seminiferous tubules are enlarged and there is active spermatogenesis as shown by the presence of all the stages of spermatogenesis (spermatogonia to spermatids) and spermatozoa during the breeding phase (November). During the nonbreeding phase (April) only spermatogonia and Sertoli cells are seen in the shrunken seminiferous tubules. Leydig cells and Sertoli cells show distinct changes in the morphological appearance with hypertrophy of the cells in breeding phase and atrophy of the cells in the nonbreeding phase of the reproductive cycle. The present study suggests that Sertoli cells and Leydig cells functions are synchronous in the lizard M. carinata.

  4. The area acustico-vestibularis of Discoglossus pictus. I. Cytoarchitecture and ultrastructure features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, A; Muñoz, M

    1988-01-01

    The cytoarchitecture of the area acustico-vestibularis (AAV) in Discoglossus pictus is studied by means of normal stained material. In addition, the main ultrastructural features of the cells in the AAV are described. Basically, three different components are found: the dorsal, ventral and medial cell columns. While the two former are made up by the dorsal and ventral nuclei respectively, the medial column is formed by a rostrally located cerebellar nucleus and a caudal nucleus, which extends up to the obex level. The ultrastructure of the neurons in the AAV reveals a typical cell organization similar to that of other cell types in the anuran brain. Resemblances with vestibular cells of other vertebrates, together with certain own peculiarities are discussed. The most common synapses in the AAV are also commented.

  5. Ultrastructure of the spermatogenesis of the cockle Anadara granosa L. (Bivalvia: Arcidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwanjarat, J.

    1999-11-01

    In this paper spermatogenesis and sperm ultrastructure of the cockle Anadara granosa are studied using transmission electron microscopy. The spermatocyte presents electron-dense vesicles and the arising axoneme that begins to form the flagellum. During spermatid differentiation, proacrosomal vesicles appear to migrate towards the presumptive anterior pole of the nucleus; eventually these vesicles become acrosome. The spermatozoon of Anadara granosa is of the primitive type. The acrosome, situated at the apex of the nucleus, is cap-shaped and deeply invaginated at the inner side. The spherical nucleus of the spermatozoon contains dense granular chromatin and shows invagination at the posterior poles. The centriole shows the classic nine triplets of microtubules. The middle piece consists of the centriolar complex surrounded by five giant mitochondria. It is shown that the ultrastructure of spermatozoa and spermiogenesis of Anadara granosa reveals a number of features that are common among bivalves.

  6. Ultrastructure of quiescent oocytes of Cebus albifrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, B R; Hertig, A T

    1975-11-01

    Quiescent oocytes of the monkey Cebus albifrons were examined with the electron microscope. In many respects the ultrastructure of these cells was similar to that of other mammalian species. Elongate and oval mitochondria, lamellar Golgi complexes, small profiles of smooth endoplasmic reticulum, and vacuolar organelles were randomly distributed around a round nucleus which usually contained a nucleolus and clumps of heterochromatin. Among the unusual morphological characteristics of these oocytes are 'membranous aggregates', membrane-bound organelles containing a complex of convoluted membranes, some very dense rod-like structures and a droplet of moderate density which resembles lipid. A similar droplet is frequently found in mitochondria. Rough endoplasmic reticulum is abundant in many of these oocytes, forming parallel arrays and concentric rings around the nucleus. Folded membrane complexes, apparent elaborations of smooth endoplasmic reticulum, are frequently found in the cytoplasm in continuity with cisternae of smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum and associated with vesicles which often contain flocculent material. The morphology of Cebus oocytes suggests a greater rate of steroid and protein synthesis, transport, and storage than is usually indicated by the ultrastructure of other mammalian oocytes.

  7. Ultrastructure, biology, and phylogenetic relationships of kinorhyncha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Birger; Higgins, Robert P

    2002-07-01

    The article summarizes current knowledge mainly about the (functional) morphology and ultrastructure, but also about the biology, development, and evolution of the Kinorhyncha. The Kinorhyncha are microscopic, bilaterally symmetrical, exclusively free-living, benthic, marine animals and ecologically part of the meiofauna. They occur throughout the world from the intertidal to the deep sea, generally in sediments but sometimes associated with plants or other animals. From adult stages 141 species are known, but 38 species have been described from juvenile stages. The trunk is arranged into 11 segments as evidenced by cuticular plates, sensory spots, setae or spines, nervous system, musculature, and subcuticular glands. The ultrastructure of several organ systems and the postembryonic development are known for very few species. Almost no data are available about the embryology and only a single gene has been sequenced for a single species. The phylogenetic relationships within Kinorhyncha are unresolved. Priapulida, Loricifera, and Kinorhyncha are grouped together as Scalidophora, but arguments are found for every possible sistergroup relationship within this taxon. The recently published Ecdysozoa hypothesis suggests a closer relationship of the Scalidophora, Nematoda, Nematomorpha, Tardigrada, Onychophora, and Arthropoda.

  8. Cytological and ultrastructural studies on root tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, R. D.; Gaynor, J. J.; Galston, A. W.

    1984-01-01

    The anatomy and fine structure of roots from oat and mung bean seedlings, grown under microgravity conditions for 8 days aboard the Space Shuttle, was examined and compared to that of roots from ground control plants grown under similar conditions. Roots from both sets of oat seedlings exhibited characteristic monocotyledonous tissue organization and normal ultrastructural features, except for cortex cell mitochondria, which exhibited a 'swollen' morphology. Various stages of cell division were observed in the meristematic tissues of oat roots. Ground control and flight-grown mung bean roots also showed normal tissue organization, but root cap cells in the flight-grown roots were collapsed and degraded in appearance, especially at the cap periphery. At the ultrastructural level, these cells exhibited a loss of organelle integrity and a highly-condensed cytoplasm. This latter observation perhaps suggests a differing tissue sensitivity for the two species to growth conditions employed in space flight. The basis for abnormal root cap cell development is not understood, but the loss of these putative gravity-sensing cells holds potential significance for long term plant growth orientation during space flight.

  9. Ultrastructural changes in LGMD1F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenacchi, Giovanna; Peterle, Enrico; Fanin, Marina; Papa, Valentina; Salaroli, Roberta; Angelini, Corrado

    2013-06-01

    A large Italo-Spanish kindred with autosomal-dominant inheritance has been reported with proximal limb and axial muscle weakness. Clinical, histological and genetic features have been described. A limb girdle muscular dystrophy 1F (LGMD1F) disease locus at chromosome 7q32.1-32.2 has been previously identified. We report a muscle pathological study of two patients (mother and daughter) from this family. Muscle morphologic findings showed increased fiber size variability, fiber atrophy, and acid-phosphatase-positive vacuoles. Immunofluorescence against desmin, myotilin, p62 and LC3 showed accumulation of myofibrils, ubiquitin binding protein aggregates and autophagosomes. The ultrastructural study confirmed autophagosomal vacuoles. Many alterations of myofibrillar component were detected, such as prominent disarray, rod-like structures with granular aspect, and occasionally, cytoplasmic bodies. Our ultrastructural data and muscle pathological features are peculiar to LGMD1F and support the hypothesis that the genetic defect leads to a myopathy phenotype associated with disarrangement of the cytoskeletal network. © 2012 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  10. Ultrastructural Morphology of Sperm from Human Globozoospermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Ricci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Globozoospermia is a rare disorder characterized by the presence of sperm with round head, lacking acrosome. Coiling tail around the nucleus has been reported since early human studies, but no specific significance has conferred it. By contrast, studies on animal models suggest that coiling tail around the nucleus could represent a crucial step of defective spermatogenesis, resulting in round-headed sperm. No observations, so far, support the transfer of this hypothesis to human globozoospermia. The purpose of this work was to compare ultrastructural morphology of human and mouse model globozoospermic sperm. Sperm have been investigated by using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The images that we obtained show significant similarities to those described in GOPC knockout mice, an animal model of globozoospermia. By using this model as reference, we were able to identify the probable steps of the tail coiling process in human globozoospermia. Although we have no evidence that there is the same pathophysiology in man and knocked-out mouse, the similarities between these ultrastructural observations in human and those in the experimental model are very suggestive. This is the first demonstration of the existence of relevant morphological homologies between the tail coiling in animal model and human globozoospermia.

  11. Ultrastructural Morphology of Sperm from Human Globozoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Giuseppe; Andolfi, Laura; Zabucchi, Giuliano; Luppi, Stefania; Boscolo, Rita; Martinelli, Monica; Zweyer, Marina; Trevisan, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    Globozoospermia is a rare disorder characterized by the presence of sperm with round head, lacking acrosome. Coiling tail around the nucleus has been reported since early human studies, but no specific significance has conferred it. By contrast, studies on animal models suggest that coiling tail around the nucleus could represent a crucial step of defective spermatogenesis, resulting in round-headed sperm. No observations, so far, support the transfer of this hypothesis to human globozoospermia. The purpose of this work was to compare ultrastructural morphology of human and mouse model globozoospermic sperm. Sperm have been investigated by using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The images that we obtained show significant similarities to those described in GOPC knockout mice, an animal model of globozoospermia. By using this model as reference, we were able to identify the probable steps of the tail coiling process in human globozoospermia. Although we have no evidence that there is the same pathophysiology in man and knocked-out mouse, the similarities between these ultrastructural observations in human and those in the experimental model are very suggestive. This is the first demonstration of the existence of relevant morphological homologies between the tail coiling in animal model and human globozoospermia.

  12. Ultrastructural features of human adipose-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manea, Claudiu Marius; Rusu, Mugurel Constantin; Constantin, Daniel; Mănoiu, Valentina Mariana; Moldovan, Lucia; Jianu, Adelina Maria

    2014-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MMSCs) are plastic-adherent cells with a well-established phenotype. Equine, but not human, adipose MMSCs have been characterized ultrastructurally. The purpose of our study was to evaluate ultrastructurally the adipose-derived human MMSCs. Cell cultures were prepared from human lipoaspirate. The flow cytometry evaluation of surface markers of cultured cells confirmed the expected profile of MMSCs, that were positive for CD73, CD90 and CD105, and negative for CD34 and CD45. We examined these human adipose-derived MMSCs in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) by Epon en-face embedding the fixed MMSCs. The main ultrastructural features of MMSCs were the extremely rich content of endosomal/vesicular elements, long mitochondria, dilated RER (rough endoplasmic reticulum) cisternae, and abundant intermediate filaments and microtubules. We found two types of MMSCS prolongations: (a) thick processes, with opposite, vesicular and filaments-rich, sides and (b) slender processes (pseudopodes and filopodes), with occasional proximal dilated segments housing mitochondria, vesicles and secretory granules. These TEM features of MMSCs characterized an in vitro cell population and could use to distinguish between different cell types in culture.

  13. Ultra-structure of adipocytes in the digital cushion of ostrich (Stuthio Camelus foot pad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira Eid Derbalah

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The ultra-structural examination of adipocytes in the digital cushion of ostrich foot pad was performed to reveal the structural adaptation of adipocytes and elastic fibers of digital cushion to accommodate with fast movement of this unique bird. Two types of adipocytes were found, the first type was typical signet ring cells which had large fat droplets whose dimension dwarfed the cell organelles. The second type was diffused form with oval shaped adipocytes. Microfibillar aggregates of elastic fibers were closely packed and appeared to bead in a regular fashion. Some of this microfibrillar was reshaping adipocytes by making invagination of their plasma membrane.

  14. Molecular mechanisms that regulate the macrophage M1/M2 polarization balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan eWang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available As an essential component of innate immunity, macrophages have multiple functions in both inhibiting or promoting cell proliferation and tissue repair. Diversity and plasticity are hallmarks of macrophages. Classical M1 and alternative M2 activation of macrophages, mirroring the Th1–Th2 polarization of T cells, represent two extremes of a dynamic changing state of macrophage activation. M1-type macrophages release cytokines that inhibit the proliferation of surrounding cells and damage contiguous tissue, and M2-type macrophages release cytokines that promote the proliferation of contiguous cells and tissue repair. M1-M2 polarization of macrophage is a tightly controlled process entailing a set of signaling pathways, transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulatory networks. An imbalance of macrophage M1-M2 polarization is often associated with various diseases or inflammatory conditions. Therefore identification of the molecules associated with the dynamic changes of macrophage polarization and understanding their interactions is crucial for elucidating the molecular basis of disease progression and designing novel macrophage-mediated therapeutic strategies.

  15. Effector mechanisms of the anti-cancer immune responses of macrophages in SR/CR mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Amy M; Willingham, Mark C; Du, Wei; Pang, Changlee S; Old, Lloyd J; Cui, Zheng

    2006-10-31

    SR/CR (spontaneous regression/complete resistance) mice resist multiple types of cancer cells injected at numbers that are lethal to wild type (WT) mice. When the anti-tumor response was examined, leukocytes of the innate immune system, including neutrophils (PMN), macrophages and NK cells, infiltrated the tumor site for a multipronged killing response. Each cell type had independent killing activity against the cancer cells. A second aspect of this multipronged response was that cancer cells could be killed either via necrosis in vivo or via apoptosis by purified macrophages. Lymphoid cells displayed perforin (pfp) and granzymes (gzm) as effector molecules, but macrophages produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and secreted serine proteases to kill the cancer cells. However, SR/CR macrophages did not use the well-studied tumoricidal mechanism of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) production. We previously demonstrated that macrophages tightly bound cancer cells in rosettes, and we show here that macrophages required contact with the target cells in order to unleash their cytotoxic mechanisms. Once SR/CR mice survived challenge with cancer cells, they produced antibodies that recognized the cancer cells. However, the antibodies were not required for killing by SR/CR macrophages through antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and did not enable wild type macrophages to kill target cells. In summary, purified SR/CR macrophages killed cancer cells in a non-ADCC manner via apoptosis induced by ROS and serine proteases.

  16. SIV Infection of Lung Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Li

    Full Text Available HIV-1 depletes CD4+ T cells in the blood, lymphatic tissues, gut and lungs. Here we investigated the relationship between depletion and infection of CD4+ T cells in the lung parenchyma. The lungs of 38 Indian rhesus macaques in early to later stages of SIVmac251 infection were examined, and the numbers of CD4+ T cells and macrophages plus the frequency of SIV RNA+ cells were quantified. We showed that SIV infected macrophages in the lung parenchyma, but only in small numbers except in the setting of interstitial inflammation where large numbers of SIV RNA+ macrophages were detected. However, even in this setting, the number of macrophages was not decreased. By contrast, there were few infected CD4+ T cells in lung parenchyma, but CD4+ T cells were nonetheless depleted by unknown mechanisms. The CD4+ T cells in lung parenchyma were depleted even though they were not productively infected, whereas SIV can infect large numbers of macrophages in the setting of interstitial inflammation without depleting them. These observations point to the need for future investigations into mechanisms of CD4+ T cell depletion at this mucosal site, and into mechanisms by which macrophage populations are maintained despite high levels of infection. The large numbers of SIV RNA+ macrophages in lungs in the setting of interstitial inflammation indicates that lung macrophages can be an important source for SIV persistent infection.

  17. Evolutionary conservation of alternative activation of macrophages: structural and functional characterization of arginase 1 and 2 in carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joerink, M.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Wiegertjes, G.F.

    2006-01-01

    Classically activated macrophages (caMF) play an important role in type-I immune responses and alternatively activated macrophages (aaMF) function in type-II immune responses. While the classical activation of fish macrophages has been well described, the existence of aaMF has not yet been described

  18. Ultra-Structure database design methodology for managing systems biology data and analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemminger Bradley M

    2009-08-01

    Ultra-Structure offers substantial benefits for biological information systems, the largest being the integration of diverse information sources into a common framework. This facilitates systems biology research by integrating data from disparate high-throughput techniques. It also enables us to readily incorporate new data types, sources, and domain knowledge with no change to the database structure or associated computer code. Ultra-Structure may be a significant step towards solving the hard problem of data management and integration in the systems biology era.

  19. Modulation of macrophage activation by prostaglandins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sautebin

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of prostaglandtn E2, iloprost and cAMP on both nitric oxide and tumour necrosis factor-α release in J774 macrophages has been studied. Both prostaglandin E2 and iloprost inhibited, in a concentration-dependent fashion, the lipopolysaccharide-induced generation of nitric oxide and tumour necrosis factor-α. The inhibitory effect of these prostanoids seems to be mediated by an increase of the second messenger cAMP since it was mimicked by dibutyryl cAMP and potentiated by the selective type IV phosphodiesterase inhibitor RO-20-1724. Our results suggest that the inhibition of nitric oxide release by prostaglandin E2 and iloprost in lipopolysaccharide-activated J774 macrophages may be secondary to the inhibition of tumour necrosis factor-α generation, which in turn is likely to be mediated by cAMP.

  20. Modulation of macrophage antitumor potential by apoptotic lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Jorine J L P; Ford, Catriona A; Petrova, Sofia; Melville, Lynsey; Paterson, Margaret; Pound, John D; Holland, Pam; Giotti, Bruno; Freeman, Tom C; Gregory, Christopher D

    2017-06-01

    In aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), constitutive apoptosis of a proportion of the tumor cell population can promote net tumor growth. This is associated with the accumulation of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) that clear apoptotic cells and exhibit pro-oncogenic transcriptional activation profiles characteristic of reparatory, anti-inflammatory and angiogenic programs. Here we consider further the activation status of these TAMs. We compare their transcriptomic profile with that of a range of other macrophage types from various tissues noting especially their expression of classically activated (IFN-γ and LPS) gene clusters - typically antitumor - in addition to their previously described protumor phenotype. To understand the impact of apoptotic cells on the macrophage activation state, we cocultured apoptotic lymphoma cells with classically activated macrophages (M(IFN-γ/LPS), also known as M1, macrophages). Although untreated and M(IFN-γ/LPS) macrophages were able to bind apoptotic lymphoma cells equally well, M(IFN-γ/LPS) macrophages displayed enhanced ability to phagocytose them. We found that direct exposure of M(IFN-γ/LPS) macrophages to apoptotic lymphoma cells caused switching towards a protumor activation state (often referred to as M2-like) with concomitant inhibition of antitumor activity that was a characteristic feature of M(IFN-γ/LPS) macrophages. Indeed, M(IFN-γ/LPS) macrophages exposed to apoptotic lymphoma cells displayed increased lymphoma growth-promoting activities. Antilymphoma activity by M(IFN-γ/LPS) macrophages was mediated, in part, by galectin-3, a pleiotropic glycoprotein involved in apoptotic cell clearance that is strongly expressed by lymphoma TAMs but not lymphoma cells. Intriguingly, aggressive lymphoma growth was markedly impaired in mice deficient in galectin-3, suggesting either that host galectin-3-mediated antilymphoma activity is required to sustain net tumor growth or that additional functions of galectin-3

  1. Medroxyprogesterone acetate drives M2 macrophage differentiation toward a phenotype of decidual macrophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yung-Chieh; Tseng, Joseph T; Wang, Chia-Yih; Su, Mei-Tsz; Huang, Jyun-Yuan; Kuo, Pao-Lin

    2017-09-05

    M1 macrophage differentiation plays a crucial role in enhanced inflammation during pregnancy, which may lead to pregnancy complications. Therefore, modulation of macrophage differentiation toward the M2 phenotype is desirable to ensure a successful pregnancy. Medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) is a potent progestin with an anti-inflammatory property, but its effect on macrophage differentiation is unknown. This study aimed to examine whether MPA can induce an M2 macrophage differentiation by using the human monocytes cell line THP-1 or primary monocytes. THP-1 cells were primed with phorbol-12-myristate-13 acetate (PMA) to initiate macrophage differentiation. By incubating with MPA, the cells (denoted as MPA-pTHP-1) underwent M2 macrophage differentiation with downregulations of CD11c, IL-1β and TNF-α, and upregulations of CD163 and IL-10; while cells incubated with progesterone (P4) did not show the M2 phenotype. Primary monocytes treated with MPA also had the same M2 phenotype. Moreover, M1 macrophages derived from IFN-γ/LPS-treated THP-1 cells, which had high levels of IL-1b and iNOS, and low levels of IL-10 and IDO, were reversed to the M2 phenotype by the MPA treatment. We also found that the MPA-pTHP-1 promoted the decidualization of endometrial stromal cells and the invasion of trophoblast cells. To mimic conditions of exposure to various pathogens, MPA-pTHP-1 cells were stimulated by different types of TLR ligands. We found they produced lower levels of IL-1β and TNF-α, as well as a higher level of IL-10, compared to untreated cells. Finally, we found the level of phosphorylated ERK in the MPA-pTHP-1 cells was increased, but its IL-10 production was suppressed by either the progesterone/glucocorticoid antagonist (Mifepristone) or MEK inhibitor (U0126). Taken together, MPA could drive monocyte differentiation toward an M2 phenotype that mimics decidual macrophages. This finding holds great potential to combat chronic endometrial inflammation

  2. Loss of CD73 prevents accumulation of alternatively activated macrophages and the formation of prefibrotic macrophage clusters in irradiated lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leve, Simone; Wirsdörfer, Florian; Cappuccini, Federica; Schütze, Alexandra; Meyer, Alina V; Röck, Katharina; Thompson, Linda F; Fischer, Jens W; Stuschke, Martin; Jendrossek, Verena

    2017-07-01

    While radiotherapy is a mainstay for cancer therapy, pneumonitis and fibrosis constitute dose-limiting side effects of thorax and whole body irradiation. So far, the contribution of immune cells to disease progression is largely unknown. Here we studied the role of ecto-5'-nucelotidase (CD73)/adenosine-induced changes in the myeloid compartment in radiation-induced lung fibrosis. C57BL/6 wild-type or CD73(-/-) mice received a single dose of whole thorax irradiation (WTI, 15 Gy). Myeloid cells were characterized in flow cytometric, histologic, and immunohistochemical analyses as well as RNA analyses. WTI induced a pronounced reduction of alveolar macrophages in both strains that recovered within 6 wk. Fibrosis development in wild-type mice was associated with a time-dependent deposition of hyaluronic acid (HA) and increased expression of markers for alternative activation on alveolar macrophages. These include the antiinflammatory macrophage mannose receptor and arginase-1. Further, macrophages accumulated in organized clusters and expressed profibrotic mediators at ≥25 wk after irradiation (fibrotic phase). Irradiated CD73(-/-) mice showed an altered regulation of components of the HA system and no clusters of alternatively activated macrophages. We speculate that accumulation of alternatively activated macrophages in organized clusters represents the origins of fibrotic foci after WTI and is promoted by a cross-talk between HA, CD73/adenosine signaling, and other profibrotic mediators.-De Leve, S., Wirsdörfer, F., Cappuccini, F., Schütze, A., Meyer, A. V., Röck, K., Thompson, L. F., Fischer, J. W., Stuschke, M., Jendrossek, V. Loss of CD73 prevents accumulation of alternatively activated macrophages and the formation of prefibrotic macrophage clusters in irradiated lungs. © FASEB.

  3. Interstitial cells of Cajal, macrophages and mast cells in the gut musculature: morphology, distribution, spatial and possible functional interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Hanne B

    2010-04-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are recognized as pacemaker cells for gastrointestinal movement and are suggested to be mediators of neuromuscular transmission. Intestinal motility disturbances are often associated with a reduced number of ICC and/or ultrastructural damage, sometimes associated with immune cells. Macrophages and mast cells in the intestinal muscularis externa of rodents can be found in close spatial contact with ICC. Macrophages are a constant and regularly distributed cell population in the serosa and at the level of Auerbach's plexus (AP). In human colon, ICC are in close contact with macrophages at the level of AP, suggesting functional interaction. It has therefore been proposed that ICC and macrophages interact. Macrophages and mast cells are considered to play important roles in the innate immune defence by producing pro-inflammatory mediators during classical activation, which may in itself result in damage to the tissue. They also take part in alternative activation which is associated with anti-inflammatory mediators, tissue remodelling and homeostasis, cancer, helminth infections and immunophenotype switch. ICC become damaged under various circumstances - surgical resection, possibly post-operative ileus in rodents - where innate activation takes place, and in helminth infections - where alternative activation takes place. During alternative activation the muscularis macrophage can switch phenotype resulting in up-regulation of F4/80 and the mannose receptor. In more chronic conditions such as Crohn's disease and achalasia, ICC and mast cells develop close spatial contacts and piecemeal degranulation is possibly triggered.

  4. [Advancement in the research of the role of macrophages in wound healing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Liang; Liu, Xu-sheng

    2013-02-01

    Macrophages play important roles in all stages of wound healing. Changes in micro-environment leads to transformation of macrophages type I and type II, thereby playing a role in wound healing. During the early inflammatory phase, type I macrophages exert pro-inflammatory function such as antigen-presenting, phagocytosis, and the production of inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. While during the wound healing phase, macrophages were transformed into type II, which stimulate the proliferation of fibroblasts, keratinocytes, and endothelial cells by expressing growth factors. This results in the formation of granulation tissue, angiogenesis, and the formation of ECM, so as to promote wound healing. This review summarizes the function and change in phenotype of macrophages in different stages of wound healing.

  5. A defect in the inflammation-primed macrophage-activation cascade in osteopetrotic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, N; Lindsay, D D; Naraparaju, V R; Ireland, R A; Popoff, S N

    1994-05-15

    Macrophages were activated by administration of lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-Pc) or dodecylglycerol (DDG) to wild-type rats but not in osteopetrotic (op) mutant rats. In vitro treatment of wild-type rat peritoneal cells with lyso-Pc or DDG efficiently activated macrophages whereas treatment of op mutant rat peritoneal cells with lyso-Pc or DDG did not activate macrophages. The inflammation-primed macrophage activation cascade in rats requires participation of B lymphocytes and vitamin D binding protein (DBP). Lyso-Pc-inducible beta-galactosidase of wild-type rat B lymphocytes can convert DBP to the macrophage-activating factor (MAF), whereas B lymphocytes of the op mutant rats were shown to be deficient in lyso-Pc-inducible beta-galactosidase. DBP is conserved among mammalian species. Treatment of human DBP (Gc1 protein) with commercial glycosidases yields an extremely high titrated MAF as assayed on mouse and rat macrophages. Because the enzymatically generated MAF (GcMAF) bypasses the role of lymphocytes in macrophage activation, the op mutant rat macrophages were efficiently activated by administration of a small quantity (100 pg/rat) of GcMAF. Likewise, in vitro treatment of op rat peritoneal cells with as little as 40 pg GcMAF/ml activated macrophages.

  6. DMPD: Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potentialregulators of macrophage inflammatory activities. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12472665 Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potential...:545-53. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase:... potentialregulators of macrophage inflammatory activities. PubmedID 12472665 Title Macrophage-stimulatin

  7. The effect of age on mitochondrial ultrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, P D; Franks, L M

    1975-01-01

    The ultrastructure of perfused livers and of mitochondrial fractions from 6-month-old and 30-month-old C57/BL mice were studied. In old mice the liver cell mitochondria were enlarged and rounded with a light 'foamy', vacuolated matrix, short cristae and a loss of dense granules. Quantitative studies showed a 60% increase in the mean size and an increased proportion of larger mitochondria in intact 30-month-old perfused livers. Endothelial and Kupffer cell mitochondria were smaller than those of the parenchymal cells. Mitochondria in pellets prepared from 6- and 30-month-old livers were rounded and condensed, although there were a few larger and 'foamy' mitochondria in the preparations from old mice. Up to 47% of large mitochondria in the old livers were lost during cell fractionation.

  8. Ultrastructure and phylogeny of Ustilago coicis *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing-ze; Guan, Pei-gang; Tao, Gang; Ojaghian, Mohammad Reza; Hyde, Kevin David

    2013-01-01

    Ustilago coicis causes serious smut on Coix lacryma-jobi in Dayang Town, Jinyun County, Zhejiang Province of China. In this paper, ultrastructural assessments on fungus-host interactions and teliospore development are presented, and molecular phylogenetic analyses have been done to elucidate the phylogenetic placement of the taxon. Hyphal growth within infected tissues was both intracellular and intercellular and on the surface of fungus-host interaction, and the fungal cell wall and the invaginated host plasma membrane were separated by a sheath comprising two distinct layers between the fungal cell wall and the invaginated host plasma membrane. Ornamentation development of teliospore walls was unique as they appeared to be originated from the exosporium. In addition, internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and large subunit (LSU) sequence data showed that U. coicis is closely related to Ustilago trichophora which infects grass species of the genus Echinochloa (Poaceae). PMID:23549851

  9. Ultrastructure and phylogeny of Ustilago coicis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-ze ZHANG; Pei-gang GUAN; Gang TAO; Mohammad Reza OJAGHIAN; Kevin David HYDE

    2013-01-01

    Ustilago coicis causes serious smut on Coix lacryma-jobi in Dayang Town,Jinyun County,Zhejiang Province of China.In this paper,ultrastructural assessments on fungus-host interactions and teliospore development are presented,and molecular phylogenetic analyses have been done to elucidate the phylogenetic placement of the taxon.Hyphal growth within infected tissues was both intracellular and intercellular and on the surface of fungus-host interaction,and the fungal cell wall and the invaginated host plasma membrane were separated by a sheath comprising two distinct layers between the fungal cell wall and the invaginated host plasma membrane.Ornamentation development of teliospore walls was unique as they appeared to be originated from the exosporium.In addition,internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and large subunit (LSU) sequence data showed that U.coicis is closely related to Ustilago trichophora which infects grass species of the genus Echinochloa (Poaceae).

  10. Spermatological characteristics of the genus Taenia inferred from the ultrastructural study on Taenia hydatigena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquel, Jordi; Khallaayoune, Khalid; Azzouz-Maache, Samira; Pétavy, Anne-Françoise

    2015-01-01

    The present study attempts to establish the sperm ultrastructure baseline for Taenia hydatigena, which is essential for the future research on the location of specific proteins involved in spermatogenesis in this species. Thus, the ultrastructural organisation of the mature spermatozoon is described by means of transmission electron microscopy. Live tapeworms were obtained from an experimentally infected dog in the Department of Pathology and Public Health of the Agronomic and Veterinary Institute Hassan II of Rabat (Morocco). The spermatozoon of T. hydatigena is a filiform cell, which is tapered at both extremities and lacks mitochondria. It exhibits all the characteristics of type VII spermatozoon of tapeworms, namely a single axoneme, a crested body, spiralled cortical microtubules and nucleus, a periaxonemal sheath and intracytoplasmic walls. Other interesting characteristics are the presence of a 2000 nm long apical cone in its anterior extremity and only the axoneme in its posterior extremity. The ultrastructural characters of the spermatozoon of T. hydatigena are compared with those of other cestodes studied to date, with particular emphasis on representatives of the genus Taenia.

  11. Osmoregulatory and tegumental ultrastructural damages to protoscoleces of hydatid cysts Echinococcus granulosus induced by fungal endophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vijay C; Gangwar, Mayank; Nath, Gopal

    2014-12-01

    Characteristic ultrastructural changes were observed when protoscoleces of hydatid cysts Echinococcus granulosus was treated with extract of endophytic fungi Eupenicillium and Chaetomium sp. isolated from Azadirachta indica and Piper longum plants respectively. A sharp decrease in viability of protoscoleces was observed after 6 h of incubation with fungal extracts. The ultrastructural changes included rosteller disorganization, loss of hooks and shedding of the microtriches of scolex region. The formation of digitiform projections on tegument layer which, increased in size as prolong incubation with extract and get burst, leading to a osmoregulatory damage into tegumental layers of parasite. This osmoregulatory damages caused the loss of turgidity due to leakage of cell contents, which might be the major cause of the mortality in treated parasites. It is remarkable, since very similar type of ultrastructural changes were observed with some pyrazinoisoquinoline derivatives, as praziquantel. Our initial results indicate that extract of endophytic Eupenicillium and Chaetomium spp. are having significant anti-cestodal activity and have selective activity on tegument layer. Further chemical prospection is required through rigorous bioassay guided fractionation coupled with robust high resolution mass spectrometric analysis to get final stereo-structures responsible for the parasiticidal activity. This initial strain selection outcome will serve a platform for isolation and characterization of new drug lead that can be useful in tailoring novel, safe and effective anthelmintics.

  12. Ultrastructural and immunocytochemical characterization of interstitial cells in pre- and postnatal developing sheep pineal gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Redondo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Pineal gland interstitial cells from 32 sheep embryos (from day 54 of gestation until birth and 18 sheep (from 1 month to >2 years were analysed using ultrastructural and immunohistochemical techniques. From day 98 of gestation and throughout postnatal development, a second cell type was observed in addition to pinealocytes; these cells displayed uniform ultrastructural features similar to those of CNS astrocytes. Ultrastructural homogeneity was not matched by the results of histochemical and immunohistochemical analysis. Expression of phosphotungstic acid hematoxylin, glial fibrillary acidic protein and vimentin indicates that the second cell population in the developing ovine pineal gland is, in fact, a combination of glial-astrocyte cells at varying stages of maturity. Pineal interstitial cells started to show signs of functional activity evident in vascular tropism; such activity, evident from around day 98 of gestation, appeared to relate to the exchange of substances between the pineal parenchyma and blood vessels and, though it continued throughout postnatal development, was most evident in animals slaughtered between 9 months and 2 years of age (group II. Morphologically, functional activi- ty in interstitial cells in this age-group was apparent in: 1, formation of specific contact sites between interstitial cells and nerve fibres in the perivascular space; and 2, the presence of numerous gap junctions between the bulbous endings of cytoplasmic processes.

  13. Large-scale tissue clearing (PACT): Technical evaluation and new perspectives in immunofluorescence, histology, and ultrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neckel, Peter H.; Mattheus, Ulrich; Hirt, Bernhard; Just, Lothar; Mack, Andreas F.

    2016-01-01

    Novel techniques, like CLARITY and PACT, render large tissue specimens transparent and thereby suitable for microscopic analysis. We used these techniques to evaluate their potential in the intestine as an exemplary organ with a complex tissue composition. Immunohistochemistry, light sheet-, and confocal scanning-microscopy enabled us to follow complex three-dimensional structures, like nerve fibers, vessels, and epithelial barriers throughout the entire organ. Moreover, in a systematic electron microscopic study, we analyzed the morphology and preservation of tissue on ultrastructural level during the clearing process. We also connect tissue clearing with classical histology and demonstrate that cleared tissues can be stained with Hematoxylin-Eosin and Heidenhain’s Azan stain, suggesting potential use in histopathology. These experiments showed that a neutral pH during the clearing process results in much better preservation of tissue ultrastructure and standard stainability. Volume changes of specimens were monitored and quantified during the course of the protocol. Additionally, we employed the technique to visualize the enteric nervous system and the epithelial barrier in post mortem human gut preparations. Our data show the high potential of tissue clearing throughout different tissue types supporting its usefulness in research and diagnosis, and contribute to the technical discussion of ultrastructural tissue-retention. PMID:27680942

  14. Zoospore ultrastructure and phylogenetic position of Phlyctochytrium aureliae Ajello is revealed (Chytridiaceae, Chytridiales, Chytridiomycota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letcher, Peter M; Powell, Martha J; Picard, Kathryn T

    2012-01-01

    From forest soils in Scotland Phlyctochytrium aureliae was observed and brought into pure culture. Previously included in a molecular phylogenetic study of Chytridiales as Phlyctochytrium sp. KP 061, the organism groups with Phlyctochytrium planicorne, P. bullatum, Chytridium olla and C. lagenaria in the family Chytridiaceae. Thallus morphology and development as well as zoospore ultrastructure are detailed herein. The sporangium is epibiotic, spherical or subspherical, apophysate or non-apophysate, and ornamented with dentate enations. The overall zoospore ultrastructural features are consistent with the Group II type zoospore that characterizes family Chytridiaceae in the Chytridiales, although the zoospore also has two character states unique to this taxon: the MLC cisterna fenestrations are one-third to one-half the diameter of fenestrations in other Chytridiaceae zoospores and an accumulation of electron-dense material (a kinetosome-associated structure, or KAS) proximal to the kinetosome and non-flagellated centriole is extensive and unique. This study verifies that zoospore ultrastructure of P. aureliae zoospores places this species in the Chytridiales and Chytridiaceae, as indicated in a previous molecular phylogenetic study.

  15. Ultrastructure of spore development in Scutellospora heterogama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Peter; Robinson-Boyer, Louisa; Rice, Paul; Newsam, Ray J; Dodd, John C

    2007-07-01

    The ultrastructural detail of spore development in Scutellospora heterogama is described. Although the main ontogenetic events are similar to those described from light microscopy, the complexity of wall layering is greater when examined at an ultrastructural level. The basic concept of a rigid spore wall enclosing two inner, flexible walls still holds true, but there are additional zones within these three walls distinguishable using electron microscopy, including an inner layer that is involved in the formation of the germination shield. The spore wall has three layers rather than the two reported previously. An outer, thin ornamented layer and an inner, thicker layer are both derived from the hyphal wall and present at all stages of development. These layers differentiate into the outer spore layer visible at the light microscope level. A third inner layer unique to the spore develops during spore swelling and rapidly expands before contracting back to form the second wall layer visible by light microscopy. The two inner flexible walls also are more complex than light microscopy suggests. The close association with the inner flexible walls with germination shield formation consolidates the preferred use of the term 'germinal walls' for these structures. A thin electron-dense layer separates the two germinal walls and is the region in which the germination shield forms. The inner germinal wall develops at least two sub-layers, one of which has an appearance similar to that of the expanding layer of the outer spore wall. An electron-dense layer is formed on the inner surface of the inner germinal wall as the germination shield develops, and this forms the wall surrounding the germination shield as well as the germination tube. At maturity, the outer germinal wall develops a thin, striate layer within its substructure.

  16. Wound administration of M2-polarized macrophages does not improve murine cutaneous healing responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetten, Nadine; Roumans, Nadia; Gijbels, Marion J; Romano, Andrea; Post, Mark J; de Winther, Menno P J; van der Hulst, Rene R W J; Xanthoulea, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages play a crucial role in all stages of cutaneous wound healing responses and dysregulation of macrophage function can result in derailed wound repair. The phenotype of macrophages is influenced by the wound microenvironment and evolves during healing from a more pro-inflammatory (M1) profile in early stages, to a less inflammatory pro-healing (M2) phenotype in later stages of repair. The aim of the current study was to investigate the potential of exogenous administration of M2 macrophages to promote wound healing in an experimental mouse model of cutaneous injury. Bone marrow derived macrophages were stimulated in-vitro with IL-4 or IL-10 to obtain two different subsets of M2-polarized cells, M2a or M2c respectively. Polarized macrophages were injected into full-thickness excisional skin wounds of either C57BL/6 or diabetic db/db mice. Control groups were injected with non-polarized (M0) macrophages or saline. Our data indicate that despite M2 macrophages exhibit an anti-inflammatory phenotype in-vitro, they do not improve wound closure in wild type mice while they delay healing in diabetic mice. Examination of wounds on day 15 post-injury indicated delayed re-epithelialization and persistence of neutrophils in M2 macrophage treated diabetic wounds. Therefore, topical application of ex-vivo generated M2 macrophages is not beneficial and contraindicated for cell therapy of skin wounds.

  17. IL-4 dependent alternatively-activated macrophages have a distinctive in vivo gene expression phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiliano David

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background "Alternatively-activated" macrophages are found in Th2-mediated inflammatory settings such as nematode infection and allergic pulmonary inflammation. Due in part to a lack of markers, these cells have not been well characterized in vivo and their function remains unknown. Results We have used murine macrophages elicited by nematode infection (NeMφ as a source of in vivo derived alternatively activated macrophages. Using three distinct yet complementary molecular approaches we have established a gene expression profile of alternatively activated macrophages and identified macrophage genes that are regulated in vivo by IL-4. First, genes abundantly expressed were identified by an expressed sequence tag strategy. Second, an array of 1176 known mouse genes was screened for differential expression between NeMφ from wild type or IL-4 deficient mice. Third, a subtractive library was screened to identify novel IL-4 dependent macrophage genes. Differential expression was confirmed by real time RT-PCR analysis. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that alternatively activated macrophages generated in vivo have a gene expression profile distinct from any macrophage population described to date. Several of the genes we identified, including those most abundantly expressed, have not previously been associated with macrophages and thus this study provides unique new information regarding the phenotype of macrophages found in Th2-mediated, chronic inflammatory settings. Our data also provide additional in vivo evidence for parallels between the inflammatory processes involved in nematode infection and allergy.

  18. Inflammation and wound healing: The role of the macrophage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Timothy J.; DiPietro, Luisa Ann

    2013-01-01

    The macrophage is a prominent inflammatory cell in wounds, but its role in healing remains incompletely understood. Macrophages have been described to have many functions in wounds, including host defense, the promotion and resolution of inflammation, the removal of apoptotic cells, and the support of cell proliferation and tissue restoration following injury. Recent studies suggest that macrophages exist in several different phenotypic states within the healing wound, and that the influence of these cells on each stage of repair varies with the specific phenotypes. While the macrophage is beneficial to the repair of normally healing wounds, this pleotropic cell type may promote excessive inflammation and/or fibrosis in certain circumstances. Emerging evidence suggests that macrophage dysfunction is a component of the pathogenesis of non-healing and poorly healing wounds. Due to advances in the understanding of this multi-functional cell, the macrophage continues to be an attractive therapeutic target both to reduce fibrosis and scarring, and to improve healing of chronic wounds. PMID:21740602

  19. Macrophages and depression - a misalliance or well-arranged marriage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Adam; Kreiner, Grzegorz; Nalepa, Irena

    2013-01-01

    Depression is a severe medical condition with multiple manifestations and diverse, largely unknown etiologies. The immune system, particularly macrophages, plays an important role in the pathology of the illness. Macrophages represent a heterogeneous population of immune cells that is dispersed throughout the body. The central nervous system is populated by several types of macrophages, including microglia, perivascular cells, meningeal and choroid plexus macrophages and pericytes. These cells occupy different brain compartments and have various functions. Under basal conditions, brain macrophages support the proper function of neural cells, organize and preserve the neuronal network and maintain homeostasis. As cells of the innate immune system, they recognize and react to any disturbances in homeostasis, eliminating pathogens or damaged cells, terminating inflammation and proceeding to initiate tissue reconstruction. Disturbances in these processes result in diverse pathologies. In particular, tissue stress or malfunction, both in the brain and in the periphery, produce sustained inflammatory states, which may cause depression. Excessive release of proinflammatory mediators is responsible for alterations of neurotransmitter systems and the occurrence of depressive symptoms. Almost all antidepressive drugs target monoamine or serotonin neurotransmission and also have anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive properties. In addition, non-pharmacological treatments, such as electroconvulsive shock, can also exert anti-inflammatory effects. Recent studies have shown that antidepressive therapies can affect the functional properties of peripheral and brain macrophages and skew them toward the anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype. Because macrophages can affect outcome of inflammatory diseases, alleviate sickness behavior and improve cognitive function, it is possible that the effects of antidepressive treatments may be, at least in part, mediated by changes in macrophage

  20. Arginase in Parasitic Infections: Macrophage Activation, Immunosuppression, and Intracellular Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinthia C. Stempin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A type 1 cytokine-dependent proinflammatory response inducing classically activated macrophages (CaMϕs is crucial for parasite control during protozoan infections but can also contribute to the development of immunopathological disease symptoms. Type 2 cytokines such as IL-4 and IL-13 antagonize CaMϕs inducing alternatively activated macrophages (AaMϕs that upregulate arginase-1 expression. During several infections, induction of arginase-1-macrophages was showed to have a detrimental role by limiting CaMϕ-dependent parasite clearance and promoting parasite proliferation. Additionally, the role of arginase-1 in T cell suppression has been explored recently. Arginase-1 can also be induced by IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β or even directly by parasites or parasite components. Therefore, generation of alternative activation states of macrophages could limit collateral tissue damage because of excessive type 1 inflammation. However, they affect disease outcome by promoting parasite survival and proliferation. Thus, modulation of macrophage activation may be instrumental in allowing parasite persistence and long-term host survival.

  1. [Multicentric reticulohistiocytosis: clinical and ultrastructural study of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteiro, C; Fernández-Redondo, V; Zulaica, A; Caeiro, J L; Beiras, A; Toribio, J

    1987-01-01

    A case of multicentric reticulohistiocytosis associated with bilateral Dupuytren's disease and xanthelasmas of the eyelids is described. Ultrastructural examination showed electron-dense intracytoplasmic granules, collagen entrapment and interdigitation of adjacent cytoplasmic membranes.

  2. Ultrastructural characteristics of the synovial membrane in osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkgraaf, LC; Liem, RSB; deBont, LGM

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study analyzed the ultrastructural characteristics of the synovial membrane in various stages of osteoarthritis (OA) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), and developed a classification of this involvement based on these morphologic characteristics. Patients and Methods: Synovial membr

  3. Ultrastructure of monoaminergic terminals in the intermediolateral nucleus of the cat spinal cord.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizukawa,Kiminao

    1988-02-01

    Full Text Available Monoaminergic innervation of the intermediolateral nucleus of the cat spinal cord was investigated by fluorescence histochemistry and electron microscopy. Large numbers of monoaminergic terminals were labeled by prior administration of the false neurotransmitter 5-hydroxydopamine (5-OHDA. Ultrastructurally, 5-OHDA-labeled terminals fell into three types. Type I, which made up 55% of the labeled terminals, contained abundant, large and densely labeled vesicles and only a few small and unlabeled vesicles. This type was "bouton de passage". Type II, which made up 40% of the terminals, made asymmetrical synaptic contacts with typical postsynaptic structures. This type contained many small vesicles, some of which were labeled, and a few large dense-core vesicles. Type III, which made up 5% of the terminals, made close contact with presynaptic nerve endings containing abundant small unlabeled clear vesicles. The type III terminals contained many large and densely labeled vesicles and a few small flattened vesicles, most of which were unlabeled.

  4. Identification of polyethylene glycol-resistant macrophages on stealth imaging in vitro using fluorescent organosilica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Michihiro; Hayashi, Koichiro; Nakano, Mutsuki; Kanadani, Takafumi; Miyamoto, Kazue; Kori, Toshinari; Horikawa, Kazuki

    2015-02-24

    An in vitro imaging system to evaluate the stealth function of nanoparticles against mouse macrophages was established using fluorescent organosilica nanoparticles. Surface-functionalized organosilica nanoparticles with polyethylene glycol (PEG) were prepared by a one-step process, resulting in a brush-type PEG layer. A simultaneous dual-particle administration approach enabled us to evaluate the stealth function of nanoparticles with respect to single cells using time-lapse fluorescent microscopic imaging and flow cytometry analyses. Single-cell imaging and analysis revealed various patterns and kinetics of bare and PEGylated nanoparticle uptake. The PEGylated nanoparticles revealed a stealth function against most macrophages (PEG-sensitive macrophages); however, a stealth function against certain macrophages (PEG-insensitive macrophages) was not observed. We identified and characterized the PEG-resistant macrophages that could take up PEGylated nanoparticles at the same level as bare nanoparticles.

  5. IRF8 is the target of SIRT1 for the inflammation response in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yanhui; Han, Shichao; Li, Jun; Wang, Hongtao; Liu, Jiaqi; Li, Na; Yang, Xuekang; Shi, Jihong; Han, Juntao; Li, Yan; Bai, Xiaozhi; Su, Linlin; Hu, Dahai

    2017-02-01

    The type III histone deacetylase SIRT1 has recently emerged as a critical immune regulator by suppressing T-cell immunity and macrophage activation during inflammation, but its mechanism in regulating inflammatory response in macrophages remains unclear. Here we show that the expression of SIRT1 in macrophage cells decreased following the release of inflammation cytokines when the cells were stimulated with LPS. IRF8, an important regulator in monocyte differentiation and macrophage polarization, showed the opposite trend, with SIRT1 expression levels increasing after the cells treated with LPS. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence experiments showed that SIRT1 could not only interact with IRF8, but also deacetylate it. LPS treatment had no effect on the expression of IRF8 in macrophage cells in which sirt1 was specifically deleted. Our results show that IRF8 may be the target of histone deacetylase SIRT1 to regulate the inflammation in the macrophage cells.

  6. Intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis after macrophage cell death leads to serial killing of host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahamed, Deeqa; Boulle, Mikael; Ganga, Yashica; Mc Arthur, Chanelle; Skroch, Steven; Oom, Lance; Catinas, Oana; Pillay, Kelly; Naicker, Myshnee; Rampersad, Sanisha; Mathonsi, Colisile; Hunter, Jessica; Wong, Emily B; Suleman, Moosa; Sreejit, Gopalkrishna; Pym, Alexander S; Lustig, Gila; Sigal, Alex

    2017-01-28

    A hallmark of pulmonary tuberculosis is the formation of macrophage-rich granulomas. These may restrict Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) growth, or progress to central necrosis and cavitation, facilitating pathogen growth. To determine factors leading to Mtb proliferation and host cell death, we used live cell imaging to track Mtb infection outcomes in individual primary human macrophages. Internalization of Mtb aggregates caused macrophage death, and phagocytosis of large aggregates was more cytotoxic than multiple small aggregates containing similar numbers of bacilli. Macrophage death did not result in clearance of Mtb. Rather, it led to accelerated intracellular Mtb growth regardless of prior activation or macrophage type. In contrast, bacillary replication was controlled in live phagocytes. Mtb grew as a clump in dead cells, and macrophages which internalized dead infected cells were very likely to die themselves, leading to a cell death cascade. This demonstrates how pathogen virulence can be achieved through numbers and aggregation states.

  7. Severe myalgia in familial Mediterranean fever: clinical and ultrastructural aspects.

    OpenAIRE

    Schapira, D; Ludatscher, R; Nahir, M.; M. Lorber; Scharf, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Severe myalgia is an uncommon feature of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). A patient is presented in whom acute myalgia and high fever were the sole clinical findings during an FMF attack. The ultrastructural picture of the muscle tissue during the acute stage was characterised by a large deposition of collagen fibrils. The myalgia subsided during colchicine treatment. The clinical and ultrastructural features of myalgia in FMF are discussed in the light of the relevant literature.

  8. Macrophage models of Gaucher disease for evaluating disease pathogenesis and candidate drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflaki, Elma; Stubblefield, Barbara K; Maniwang, Emerson; Lopez, Grisel; Moaven, Nima; Goldin, Ehud; Marugan, Juan; Patnaik, Samarjit; Dutra, Amalia; Southall, Noel; Zheng, Wei; Tayebi, Nahid; Sidransky, Ellen

    2014-06-11

    Gaucher disease is caused by an inherited deficiency of glucocerebrosidase that manifests with storage of glycolipids in lysosomes, particularly in macrophages. Available cell lines modeling Gaucher disease do not demonstrate lysosomal storage of glycolipids; therefore, we set out to develop two macrophage models of Gaucher disease that exhibit appropriate substrate accumulation. We used these cellular models both to investigate altered macrophage biology in Gaucher disease and to evaluate candidate drugs for its treatment. We generated and characterized monocyte-derived macrophages from 20 patients carrying different Gaucher disease mutations. In addition, we created induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived macrophages from five fibroblast lines taken from patients with type 1 or type 2 Gaucher disease. Macrophages derived from patient monocytes or iPSCs showed reduced glucocerebrosidase activity and increased storage of glucocerebroside and glucosylsphingosine in lysosomes. These macrophages showed efficient phagocytosis of bacteria but reduced production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and impaired chemotaxis. The disease phenotype was reversed with a noninhibitory small-molecule chaperone drug that enhanced glucocerebrosidase activity in the macrophages, reduced glycolipid storage, and normalized chemotaxis and production of reactive oxygen species. Macrophages differentiated from patient monocytes or patient-derived iPSCs provide cellular models that can be used to investigate disease pathogenesis and facilitate drug development.

  9. The opportunistic pathogen Enterococcus faecalis resists phagosome acidification and autophagy to promote intracellular survival in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jun; Shankar, Nathan

    2016-06-01

    While many strains of Enterococcus faecalis have been reported to be capable of surviving within macrophages for extended periods, the exact mechanisms involved are largely unknown. In this study, we found that after phagocytosis by macrophages, enterococci-containing vacuoles resist acidification, and E. faecalis is resistant to low pH. Ultrastructural examination of the enterococci-containing vacuole by transmission electron microscopy revealed a single membrane envelope, with no evidence of the classical double-membraned autophagosomes. Western blot analysis further confirmed that E. faecalis could trigger inhibition of the production of LC3-II during infection. By employing cells transfected with RFP-LC3 plasmid and infected with GFP-labelled E. faecalis, we also observed that E. faecalis was not delivered into autophagosomes during macrophage infection. While these observations indicated no role for autophagy in elimination of intracellular E. faecalis, enhanced production of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide were keys to this process. Stimulation of autophagy suppressed the intracellular survival of E. faecalis in macrophages in vitro and decreased the burden of E. faecalis in vivo. In summary, the results from this study offer new insights into the interaction of E. faecalis with host cells and may provide a new approach to treatment of enterococcal infections.

  10. HIV-1 buds predominantly at the plasma membrane of primary human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Welsch

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 assembly and release are believed to occur at the plasma membrane in most host cells with the exception of primary macrophages, for which exclusive budding at late endosomes has been reported. Here, we applied a novel ultrastructural approach to assess HIV-1 budding in primary macrophages in an immunomarker-independent manner. Infected macrophages were fed with BSA-gold and stained with the membrane-impermeant dye ruthenium red to identify endosomes and the plasma membrane, respectively. Virus-filled vacuolar structures with a seemingly intracellular localization displayed intense staining with ruthenium red, but lacked endocytosed BSA-gold, defining them as plasma membrane. Moreover, HIV budding profiles were virtually excluded from gold-filled endosomes while frequently being detected on ruthenium red-positive membranes. The composition of cellular marker proteins incorporated into HIV-1 supported a plasma membrane-derived origin of the viral envelope. Thus, contrary to current opinion, the plasma membrane is the primary site of HIV-1 budding also in infected macrophages.

  11. Endothelial lipase is highly expressed in macrophages in advanced human atherosclerotic lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Emil D; Nielsen, John E; Lindegaard, Marie Louise Skakkebæk

    2007-01-01

    RNA expression increased markedly when either type of monocytes was differentiated into macrophages. Upon further differentiation into foam cells EL mRNA decreased whereas protein levels remained high compared to monocytes. In conclusion, macrophages in advanced human atherosclerotic lesions display high levels...

  12. Grape juice concentrate (G8000(®) ) intake mitigates testicular morphological and ultrastructural damage following cadmium intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamas, Celina A; Gollücke, Andrea P B; Dolder, Heidi

    2015-10-01

    Cadmium is a well-known testicular toxicant, and parts of the world population are exposed chronically by inhalation or by food and water intake. Grape products have been highlighted as important sources of bioactive compounds, having anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and metal chelating properties. Since maintenance of tissue morphology is essential for testicular sperm development and hence male fertility, we analysed the protective effect of grape juice concentrate (GJC) (G8000(®) ) consumption on testicular morphology in rats exposed to cadmium. Thus, four groups of male Wistar rats (n = 6 per group), 50 days old, ingested either water or G8000(®) (2 g/kg/day) until they had completed one spermatogenic cycle in adult life (136 days old). Cadmium (1.2 mg / kg) was injected intraperitoneally when the animals were 80 days old into one of the water and one of the G8000 groups; intraperitoneal saline was used as a control in the other two groups. Animals anaesthetised and exsanguinated at 136 days and then perfused with Karnovsky's fixative and then the testes were collected for morphological analysis. We describe evident disruption of testicular morphology by cadmium, with alteration in tissue component proportions, reduced Leydig cells volume and initial signs of an inflammatory process. Ultrastructural analysis showed greater damage, suggesting spermatogenesis disruption. G8000(®) ingestion allowed tissue architecture to be re-established, as was corroborated by our stereological and morphometric findings. Animals from the group where G8000(®) had been administered together with cadmium revealed a significant reduction in macrophages and blood vessel volume, suggesting diminished inflammation, when compared to animals that received only cadmium. Moreover, smaller number of ultrastructural alterations was noted, revealing fewer areas of degeneration and disorganized interstitium. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that GJC consumption prevented the

  13. Ultrastructural and Molecular Characterisation of an Heterosporis-Like Microsporidian in Australian Sea Snakes (Hydrophiinae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber K Gillett

    Full Text Available Four sea snakes (two Hydrophis major, one Hydrophis platurus, one Hydrophis elegans were found washed ashore on different beaches in the Sunshine Coast region and Fraser Island in Queensland, Australia between 2007-2013. Each snake had multiple granulomas and locally extensive regions of pallor evident in the hypaxial and intercostal musculature along the body. Lesions in two individuals were also associated with vertebral and rib fractures. Histological examination revealed granulomas scattered throughout skeletal muscle, subcutaneous adipose tissue and fractured bone. These were composed of dense aggregates of microsporidian spores surrounded by a mantle of macrophages. Sequences (ssrRNA were obtained from lesions in three sea snakes and all revealed 99% similarity with Heterosporis anguillarum from the Japanese eel (Anguillarum japonica. However, ultrastructural characteristics of the organism were not consistent with those of previous descriptions. Electron microscopic examination of skeletal muscle revealed large cysts (not xenomas bound by walls of fibrillar material (Heterosporis-like sporophorocyst walls were not detected. The cysts contained numerous mature microsporidian spores arranged in small clusters, sometimes apparently within sporophorous vesicles. The microspores were monomorphic, oval and measured 2.5-3.0 μm by 1.6-1.8 μm. They contained isofilar polar filaments with 11 (infrequently 9-12 coils arranged in two ranks. This is the first published report of a microsporidian infection in hydrophiid sea snakes. This discovery shows microsporidia with molecular affinities to Heterosporis anguillarum but ultrastructural characters most consistent with the genus Pleistophora (but no hitherto described species. Further studies are required to determine whether the microsporidian presented here belongs to the genus Heterosporis, or to a polymorphic species group as suggested by the recognition of a robust Pleistophora

  14. The Effectiveness of Natural Diarylheptanoids against Trypanosoma cruzi: Cytotoxicity, Ultrastructural Alterations and Molecular Modeling Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueth-Santiago, Vitor; Moraes, Julliane de B. B.; Sobral Alves, Eliomara Sousa; Vannier-Santos, Marcos André; Freire-de-Lima, Célio G.; Castro, Rosane N.; Mendes-Silva, Gustavo Peron; Del Cistia, Catarina de Nigris; Magalhães, Luma Godoy; Andricopulo, Adriano Defini; Sant´Anna, Carlos Mauricio R.; Decoté-Ricardo, Debora; Freire de Lima, Marco Edilson

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin (CUR) is the major constituent of the rhizomes of Curcuma longa and has been widely investigated for its chemotherapeutic properties. The well-known activity of CUR against Leishmania sp., Trypanosoma brucei and Plasmodium falciparum led us to investigate its activity against Trypanosoma cruzi. In this work, we tested the cytotoxic effects of CUR and other natural curcuminoids on different forms of T. cruzi, as well as the ultrastructural changes induced in epimastigote form of the parasite. CUR was verified as the curcuminoid with more significant trypanocidal properties (IC50 10.13 μM on epimastigotes). Demethoxycurcumin (DMC) was equipotent to CUR (IC50 11.07 μM), but bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC) was less active (IC50 45.33 μM) and cyclocurcumin (CC) was inactive. In the experiment with infected murine peritoneal macrophages all diarylheptanoids were more active than the control in the inhibition of the trypomastigotes release. The electron microscopy images showed ultrastructural changes associated with the cytoskeleton of the parasite, indicating tubulin as possible target of CUR in T. cruzi. The results obtained by flow cytometry analysis of DNA content of the parasites treated with natural curcuminoids suggested a mechanism of action on microtubules related to the paclitaxel`s mode of action. To better understand the mechanism of action highlighted by electron microscopy and flow cytometry experiments we performed the molecular docking of natural curcuminoids on tubulin of T. cruzi in a homology model and the results obtained showed that the observed interactions are in accordance with the IC50 values found, since there CUR and DMC perform similar interactions at the binding site on tubulin while BDMC do not realize a hydrogen bond with Lys163 residue due to the absence of methoxyl groups. These results indicate that trypanocidal properties of CUR may be related to the cytoskeletal alterations. PMID:27658305

  15. Ultrastructural and Molecular Characterisation of an Heterosporis-Like Microsporidian in Australian Sea Snakes (Hydrophiinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, Amber K; Ploeg, Richard; O'Donoghue, Peter J; Chapman, Phoebe A; Webb, Richard I; Flint, Mark; Mills, Paul C

    2016-01-01

    Four sea snakes (two Hydrophis major, one Hydrophis platurus, one Hydrophis elegans) were found washed ashore on different beaches in the Sunshine Coast region and Fraser Island in Queensland, Australia between 2007-2013. Each snake had multiple granulomas and locally extensive regions of pallor evident in the hypaxial and intercostal musculature along the body. Lesions in two individuals were also associated with vertebral and rib fractures. Histological examination revealed granulomas scattered throughout skeletal muscle, subcutaneous adipose tissue and fractured bone. These were composed of dense aggregates of microsporidian spores surrounded by a mantle of macrophages. Sequences (ssrRNA) were obtained from lesions in three sea snakes and all revealed 99% similarity with Heterosporis anguillarum from the Japanese eel (Anguillarum japonica). However, ultrastructural characteristics of the organism were not consistent with those of previous descriptions. Electron microscopic examination of skeletal muscle revealed large cysts (not xenomas) bound by walls of fibrillar material (Heterosporis-like sporophorocyst walls were not detected). The cysts contained numerous mature microsporidian spores arranged in small clusters, sometimes apparently within sporophorous vesicles. The microspores were monomorphic, oval and measured 2.5-3.0 μm by 1.6-1.8 μm. They contained isofilar polar filaments with 11 (infrequently 9-12) coils arranged in two ranks. This is the first published report of a microsporidian infection in hydrophiid sea snakes. This discovery shows microsporidia with molecular affinities to Heterosporis anguillarum but ultrastructural characters most consistent with the genus Pleistophora (but no hitherto described species). Further studies are required to determine whether the microsporidian presented here belongs to the genus Heterosporis, or to a polymorphic species group as suggested by the recognition of a robust Pleistophora/Heterosporis clade by

  16. Ultra-structural morphology of long-term cultivated white adipose tissue-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Ivan; Miko, Michal; Oravcová, Lenka; Bačkayová, Tatiana; Koller, Ján; Danišovič, Ľuboš

    2015-12-01

    White adipose tissue was long perceived as a passive lipid storage depot but it is now considered as an active and important endocrine organ. It also harbours not only adipocytes and vascular cells but also a wide array of immunologically active cells, including macrophages and lymphocytes, which may induce obesity-related inflammation. Recently, adipose tissue has been reported as a source of adult mesenchymal stem cells with wide use in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Their relatively non-complicated procurement and collection (often performed as liposuction during aesthetic surgery) and grand plasticity support this idea even more. We focused our research on exploring the issues of isolation and long-term cultivation of mesenchymal stem cells obtained from adipose tissue. Ultra-structural morphology of the cells cultivated in vitro has been studied and analysed in several cultivation time periods and following serial passages--up to 30 passages. In the first passages they had ultra-structural characteristics of cells with high proteosynthetic activity. Within the cytoplasm, big number of small lipid droplets and between them, sparsely placed, small and inconspicuous, electron-dense, lamellar bodies, which resembled myelin figures were observed. The cells from the later passages contained high number of lamellar electron-dense structures, which filled out almost the entire cytoplasm. In between, mitochondria were often found. These bodies were sometimes small and resembled myelin figures, but several of them reached huge dimensions (more than 1 µm) and their lamellar structure was not distinguishable. We did not have an answer to the question about their function, but they probably represented the evidence of active metabolism of lipids present in the cytoplasm of these cells or represented residual bodies, which arise after the breakdown of cellular organelles, notably mitochondria during long-term cultivation.

  17. Macrophage Infiltration and Alternative Activation during Wound Healing Promote MEK1-Induced Skin Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Christine; Telerman, Stephanie B; Reimer, Andreas S; Sequeira, Ines; Liakath-Ali, Kifayathullah; Arwert, Esther N; Watt, Fiona M

    2016-02-15

    Macrophages are essential for the progression and maintenance of many cancers, but their role during the earliest stages of tumor formation is unclear. To test this, we used a previously described transgenic mouse model of wound-induced skin tumorigenesis, in which expression of constitutively active MEK1 in differentiating epidermal cells results in chronic inflammation (InvEE mice). Upon wounding, the number of epidermal and dermal monocytes and macrophages increased in wild-type and InvEE skin, but the increase was greater, more rapid, and more sustained in InvEE skin. Macrophage ablation reduced tumor incidence. Furthermore, bioluminescent imaging in live mice to monitor macrophage flux at wound sites revealed that macrophage accumulation was predictive of tumor formation; wounds with the greatest number of macrophages at day 5 went on to develop tumors. Gene expression profiling of flow-sorted monocytes, macrophages, and T cells from InvEE and wild-type skin showed that as wound healing progressed, InvEE macrophages altered their phenotype. Throughout wound healing and after wound closure, InvEE macrophages demonstrated sustained upregulation of several markers implicated in alternative macrophage activation including arginase-1 (ARG1) and mannose receptor (CD206). Notably, inhibition of ARG1 activity significantly reduced tumor formation and epidermal proliferation in vivo, whereas addition of L-arginase to cultured keratinocytes stimulated proliferation. We conclude that macrophages play a key role in early, inflammation-mediated skin tumorigenesis, with mechanistic evidence suggesting that ARG1 secretion drives tumor development by stimulating epidermal cell proliferation. These findings highlight the importance of cancer immunotherapies aiming to polarize tumor-associated macrophages toward an antitumor phenotype.

  18. LOX-1 in macrophage migration in response to ox-LDL and the involvement of calpains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianwei; Ding, Zufeng; Lin, Juntang; Guo, Zhikun; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2015-11-06

    Previous studies have shown that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) inhibits macrophage migration, but the precise mechanisms remain unclear. Lectin-like ox-LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) is a scavenger receptor that is expressed in macrophages and binds ox-LDL. Calpains, a family of calcium-dependent proteases, influence several aspects of cell migration. In this study, we investigated the role of LOX-1 in macrophage migration in response to ox-LDL and the involvement of calpains in this process. Peritoneal macrophages from wild type C57BL/6 mice were exposed to different concentrations of ox-LDL (1-20 μg/mL), and expression of LOX-1 and calpain-1 and -2, cell migration and intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)in) were measured. Our results showed that ox-LDL stimulated LOX-1 and calpain-2 expression, and inhibited calpain-1 expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Further, ox-LDL inhibited macrophage migration and increased Ca(2+)in concentration in macrophages. To further elucidate the role of LOX-1 in ox-LDL-impaired macrophage migration, we isolated peritoneal macrophages from LOX-1 knockout mice, and treated them with ox-LDL. Interestingly, calpain-1 expression was much higher, and calpain-2 expression was lower in LOX-1 knockout macrophages than in wild-type macrophages following exposure to ox-LDL. LOX-1 deletion significantly improved macrophage migration and decreased Ca(2+)in concentration. These data indicate that LOX-1 is, at least in part, responsible for the inhibitory effect of ox-LDL on macrophage migration and this process involves calpain-1 and -2.

  19. Ultrastructural changes in the uterine luminal and glandular epithelium during the oestrous cycle of the marsupial Monodelphis domestica (grey short-tailed opossum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wick, Regula; Kress, Annetrudi

    2002-01-01

    Ultrastructural changes in the endometrium associated with the oestrous cycle were studied in the South American marsupial Monodelphis domestica. The most conspicuous changes include the height and the differentiation of the uterine luminal and glandular epithelium, which consists of ciliated and non-ciliated cells. The glandular epithelium attains its maximum development during oestrus, the luminal epithelium at postoestrus. A distinct increase in the number of ciliated cells can be observed during pro-oestrus, reaching a maximum number at oestrus; this is followed by a process of deciliation. The presence of solitary cilia on the apices of non-ciliated cells is very conspicuous during all oestrous stages and can best be seen on the luminal epithelium. These findings differ from the observations in eutherian mammals, where solitary cilia are only found in the immature uterus or after ovariectomy. The secretory activity of non-ciliated cells of the luminal epithelium is hardly noticeable along the apical membrane and stains only very faintly with Alcian blue. The glandular epithelium cells are filled apically with exocytotic vesicles at oestrus and early postoestrus. However, in contrast to the cervical gland cells, they hardly stain with Alcian blue, indicating that mucins of a different type must be present. Mechanisms for the remodelling of the luminal and glandular epithelium are especially conspicuous at metoestrus and early pro-oestrus and include the presence of autolysosomes, residual bodies and apoptotic bodies. In the endometrial stroma, around the uterine glands, macrophages accumulate and attain a typical oestrous stage-dependent appearance during their phagocytotic activities.

  20. Structural and Ultrastructural Analysis of the Cervical Discs of Young and Elderly Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Braganca de Vasconcellos Fontes

    Full Text Available Several studies describing the ultrastructure and extracellular matrix (ECM of intervertebral discs (IVDs involve animal models and specimens obtained from symptomatic individuals during surgery for degenerative disease or scoliosis, which may not necessarily correlate to changes secondary to normal aging in humans. These changes may also be segment-specific based on different load patterns throughout life. Our objective was to describe the ECM and collagen profile of cervical IVDs in young (G1 - 65 years presumably-asymptomatic individuals. Thirty cervical discs per group were obtained during autopsies of presumably-asymptomatic individuals. IVDs were analyzed with MRI, a morphological grading scale, light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and immunohistochemistry (IHC for collagen types I, II, III, IV, V, VI, IX and X. Macroscopic degenerative features such as loss of annulus-nucleus distinction and fissures were found in both groups and significantly more severe in G2 as expected. MRI could not detect all morphological changes when compared even with simple morphological inspection. The loose fibrocartilaginous G1 matrix was replaced by a denser ECM in G2 with predominantly cartilaginous characteristics, chondrocyte clusters and absent elastic fibers. SEM demonstrated persistence of an identifiable nucleus and Sharpey-type insertion of cervical annulus fibers even in highly-degenerated G2 specimens. All collagen types were detected in every disc sector except for collagen X, with the largest area stained by collagens II and IV. Collagen detection was significantly decreased in G2: although significant intradiscal differences were rare, changes may occur faster or earlier in the posterior annulus. These results demonstrate an extensive modification of the ECM with maintenance of basic ultrastructural features despite severe macroscopic degeneration. Collagen analysis supports there is not a "pathologic" collagen type and changes

  1. Molecular phylogenetic and zoospore ultrastructural analyses of Chytridium olla establish the limits of a monophyletic Chytridiales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vélez, Carlos G; Letcher, Peter M; Schultz, Sabina; Powell, Martha J; Churchill, Perry F

    2011-01-01

    Chytridium olla A. Braun, the first described chytrid and an obligate algal parasite, is the type for the genus and thus the foundation of family Chytridiaceae, order Chytridiales, class Chytridiomycetes and phylum Chytridiomycota. Chytridium olla was isolated in coculture with its host, Oedogonium capilliforme. DNA was extracted from the coculture, and 18S, 28S and ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 rDNA were amplified with universal fungal primers. Free swimming zoospores and zoospores in mature sporangia were examined with electron microscopy. Molecular analyses placed C. olla in a clade in Chytridiales with isolates of Chytridium lagenaria and Phlyctochytrium planicorne. Ultrastructural analysis revealed C. olla to have a Group II-type zoospore, previously described for Chytridium lagenaria and Phlyctochytrium planicorne. On the basis of zoospore ultrastructure, family Chytridiaceae is emended to include the type of Chytridium and other species with a Group II-type zoospore, and the new family Chytriomycetaceae is delineated to include members of Chytridiales with a Group I-type zoospore.

  2. Plastid ultrastructure and photosynthesis in greening petaloid hypsophylls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, M; Franz, A; Napp-Zinn, K

    1985-02-01

    The ultrastructural and biochemicalphysiological aspects of postfloral greening have been studied in hypsophylls of Heliconia aurantiaca Ghiesbr., Guzmania cf. x magnifica Richter and Spathiphyllum wallisii Regel. In all three species the greening of the hypsophylls is due to plastid transformation, chloroplast formation proceeding from the initially different types of plastids. The degradation process of the original plastid structures and the mode of thylakoid formation are distinct in each case. In none of the species do the transformed plastids look identical to the chloroplasts of the corresponding foliage leaves. On a chlorophyll basis, the rate of photosynthesis of the greened hypsophylls surpasses the rate of the leaves considerably in Spathiphyllum, but is much lower in Heliconia (no data for Guzmania). In all species, anatomy, plastid structure, pigments, 77° K-fluorescence emission, ribulose-1,5-bis-phosphate carboxylase activities and short-term photosynthesis (14)CO2-assimilation patterns prove the greened hypsophylls to be capable of providing additional carbon to the developing fruits, thus supplementing the import of organic matter from the foliage leaves.

  3. DMPD: Monocyte/macrophage traffic in HIV and SIV encephalitis. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12960230 Monocyte/macrophage traffic in HIV and SIV encephalitis. Kim WK, Corey S, ...Show Monocyte/macrophage traffic in HIV and SIV encephalitis. PubmedID 12960230 Title Monocyte/macrophage traffic

  4. Interleukin 27 inhibits atherosclerosis via immunoregulation of macrophages in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirase, Tetsuaki; Hara, Hiromitsu; Miyazaki, Yoshiyuki; Ide, Noriko; Nishimoto-Hazuku, Ai; Fujimoto, Hirokazu; Saris, Christiaan J M; Yoshida, Hiroki; Node, Koichi

    2013-08-01

    Chronic inflammation in arterial wall that is driven by immune cells and cytokines plays pivotal roles in the development of atherosclerosis. Interleukin 27 (IL-27) is a member of the IL-12 family of cytokines that consists of IL-27p28 and Epstein-Barr virus induced gene 3 (EBI3) and has anti-inflammatory properties that regulate T cell polarization and cytokine production. IL-27-deficient (Ldlr-/-Ebi3-/-) and IL-27 receptor-deficient (Ldlr-/-WSX-1-/-) Ldlr-/- mice were generated and fed with a high-cholesterol diet to induce atherosclerosis. Roles of bone marrow-derived cells in vivo and macrophages in vitro were studied using bone marrow reconstitution by transplantation and cultured peritoneal macrophages, respectively. We demonstrate that mice lacking IL-27 or IL-27 receptor are more susceptible to atherosclerosis compared with wild type due to enhanced accumulation and activation of macrophages in arterial walls. The number of circulating proinflammatory Ly6C(hi) monocytes showed no significant difference between wild-type mice and mice lacking IL-27 or IL-27 receptor. Administration of IL-27 suppressed the development of atherosclerosis in vivo and macrophage activation in vitro that was indicated by increased uptake of modified low-density lipoprotein and augmented production of proinflammatory cytokines. These findings define a novel inhibitory role for IL-27 in atherosclerosis that regulates macrophage activation in mice.

  5. First ultrastructural observations on gastritis caused by Physaloptera clausa (Spirurida: Physalopteridae) in hedgehogs (Erinaceus europeaus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgani-Firouzjaee, T; Farshid, A A; Naem, S

    2015-10-01

    Ultrastructural changes of gastritis due to infection with Physaloptera clausa in 12 fresh carcasses of euthanized European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) collected from different part of Urmia, Iran, in which they were highly populated with this animal, six females and six males were subjected to detail necropsy with special reference to the stomach. Macroscopic changes of stomach were recorded and some of the worms collected. Based on number of parasites present in the stomach, they were divided into light infection, mild infection, and severe infection. Parasites were collected, and worms identification of the species was confirmed on the basis of light microscope examination with reference to keys. Tissues fixed in 3% glutaraldehyde, post-fixed in 1% osmium tetroxide and processed and plastic embedded; ultrathin sections of 60-70 nm were cut and stained with uranyl acetate and lead citrate; electron microscopic observations showed that, in light infection some changes were observed in gastric cells such as dilatation and vesiculation of the endoplasmic reticulum, large numbers of lipid granules, mitochondrial swelling, nuclear chromatin margination, and some nucleus showed washed out appearance. Other cells showed some alterations in mitochondria, dilatation of smooth endoplasmic reticulum, loss of both free and bound ribosomes, vesiculation in cytoplasm, and increase Golgi apparatus and secretory vesicles. The inflammatory cells including lymphocytes, macrophages, mast cells, and predominantly eosinophils were identified. In moderate infection, the cellular pattern of gastric mucosa replaced with inflammatory cells. The marked increase of macrophages and other inflammatory cell was observed. A particular finding in our study was the presence of globule leukocyte in the moderate stage. Moreover, scant formation and distribution of collagen fibers as well as fibroblasts were also noted. In severe infection, the most obvious observation was marked distribution

  6. Ultrastructural changes and Toll-like receptor mRNA expression in type 2 diabetic lung tissue%2型糖尿病肺脏超微结构变化及TLR2/4表达的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈兴平; 李娟; 陈守惠; 殷平

    2012-01-01

    目的 观察2型糖尿病大鼠早期肺脏超微结构变化及TLR2/4样受体表达状况,探讨糖尿病易并发呼吸道感染的机制.方法 采用电子显微镜、免疫组织化学及逆转录-聚合酶链反应(reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction,RT-PCR)方法,观察2型糖尿病大鼠早期肺脏超微结构变化及TLR2/4样受体表达.结果 2型糖尿病大鼠2周时见肺泡上皮细胞及毛细血管内皮细胞间基板轻度增厚;4周时见粗面内质网轻度扩张,8周时较多Ⅱ型肺泡上皮细胞核同缩、线粒体和板层小体空泡化、粗面内质网扩张明显.糖尿病大鼠2周时,TLR4在支气管纤毛上皮、血管内皮细胞和平滑肌细胞表达,8周时在细支气管肺泡上皮、肺泡上皮及血管平滑肌细胞均有表达,糖尿病2周起肺组织TLR4及mRNA表达水平明显高于对照组(P<0.05).糖尿病大鼠4周时,TLR2在大鼠肺细支气管肺泡上皮表达,8周时在血管内皮细胞明显表达,糖尿病6周起肺组织TLR2及mRNA表达水平明显高于对照组(P<0.05).结论 早期2型糖尿病大鼠肺脏存在超微结构改变和TLR2/4样受体表达异常,可能与2型糖尿病易并发呼吸道感染有关.%We aimed to observe the early changes in lung ultrastructure and TLR2/4 expression in type 2 diabetic rats and to explore the mechanism underlying their predisposition to respiratory tract infections. By using electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), we observed a mild thickening of the basal lamina between the alveolar epithelial cells and capillary endothelial cells 2 weeks after the onset of diabetes. Four weeks after the onset, mild dilation of rough endoplasmie reticulum was observed; eight weeks after the onset, shrinkage of the nuclei, vacuolation of the mitochondria and lamellar bodies, and dilation of the rough endoplasmie reticulum were observed. On the other hand, TLR4 expression was detected

  7. Enhanced fatty acid oxidation in adipocytes and macrophages reduces lipid-induced triglyceride accumulation and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malandrino, Maria Ida; Fucho, Raquel; Weber, Minéia; Calderon-Dominguez, María; Mir, Joan Francesc; Valcarcel, Lorea; Escoté, Xavier; Gómez-Serrano, María; Peral, Belén; Salvadó, Laia; Fernández-Veledo, Sonia; Casals, Núria; Vázquez-Carrera, Manuel; Villarroya, Francesc; Vendrell, Joan J; Serra, Dolors; Herrero, Laura

    2015-05-01

    Lipid overload in obesity and type 2 diabetes is associated with adipocyte dysfunction, inflammation, macrophage infiltration, and decreased fatty acid oxidation (FAO). Here, we report that the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A), the rate-limiting enzyme in mitochondrial FAO, is higher in human adipose tissue macrophages than in adipocytes and that it is differentially expressed in visceral vs. subcutaneous adipose tissue in both an obese and a type 2 diabetes cohort. These observations led us to further investigate the potential role of CPT1A in adipocytes and macrophages. We expressed CPT1AM, a permanently active mutant form of CPT1A, in 3T3-L1 CARΔ1 adipocytes and RAW 264.7 macrophages through adenoviral infection. Enhanced FAO in palmitate-incubated adipocytes and macrophages reduced triglyceride content and inflammation, improved insulin sensitivity in adipocytes, and reduced endoplasmic reticulum stress and ROS damage in macrophages. We conclude that increasing FAO in adipocytes and macrophages improves palmitate-induced derangements. This indicates that enhancing FAO in metabolically relevant cells such as adipocytes and macrophages may be a promising strategy for the treatment of chronic inflammatory pathologies such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  8. Macrophage reprogramming: influence of latex beads with various functional groups on macrophage phenotype and phagocytic uptake in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akilbekova, Dana; Philiph, Rachel; Graham, Austin; Bratlie, Kaitlin M

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages play a crucial role in initiating immune responses with various functions ranging from wound healing to antimicrobial actions. The type of biomaterial is suggested to influence macrophage phenotype. Here, we show that exposing M1- and M2-activated macrophages to polystyrene latex beads bearing different functional groups can alter secretion profiles, providing a possible method for altering the course of the host response. Macrophages were stimulated with either lipopolysaccharide or interleukin (IL) 4 and cultured for 24 h with 10 different latex beads. Proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α, monocyte chemotactic protein 1) and nitrite served as markers for the M1 phenotype and proangiogenic cytokine (IL-10) and arginase activity for M2 cells. The ability of the macrophages to phagocytize Escherichia coli particles and water contact angles of the polymers were also assessed. Different patterns of cytokine expression and phagocytosis activity were induced by the various particles. Particles did not polarize the cells toward one specific phenotype versus another, but rather induced changes in both pro- and anti-inflammatory markers. Our results suggest a dependence of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and phagocytic activities on material type and cytokine stimuli. These data also illustrate how biomaterials can be exploited to alter host responses for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications.

  9. A histological study of testis development and ultrastructural features of spermatogenesis in cultured Acrossocheilus fasciatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Su-Yan; Jiang, Jian-Hu; Yang, Wan-Xi; Zhu, Jun-Quan

    2016-02-01

    Testis development and ultrastructural features of spermatogenesis in Acrossocheilus fasciatus (Cypriniformes, Barbinae), a commercial stream fish, were studied using light and electron microscopy. The reproduction cycle in A. fasciatus testes is classified into six successive stages from Stage I to Stage VI. Based on an analysis of previous results, May to July can be confirmed as the best breeding season for A. fasciatus males. During this time, the A. fasciatus testes are in Stage V and the sperm in males is most abundant. In the first reproductive cycle, sexually mature male testes return to Stage III in October, subsequently overwintering at this stage. In the lobular-type testes of A. fasciatus, cystic type spermatogenesis occurs with restricted spermatogonia. All spermatogenic cells at different stages are distributed along the seminiferous lobules, which contain spermatogonia, spermatocytes, spermatids and spermatozoa. At the end of spermatogenesis, spermatogenic cysts open to release spermatozoa into the lobule lumen. Ultrastructural observation of A. fasciatus spermiogenesis reveals that electron-dense substances appear at the different stages of germ cells, from primary spermatogonia to secondary spermatocytes. We have termed these dense substances as "nuage" when free in the cytoplasm or adjacent to the nuclear envelope, while those close to the mitochondria are called inter-mitochondrial cement. The spermatozoa in A. fasciatus can be classified as type I due to the presence of nuclear rotation. Although the nuclear chromatin in the head of sperm was highly condensed, no acrosome was formed. The cytoplasmic canal, a common ultrastructural feature of Teleostei spermatozoa, was also present in the midpiece. In addition, numerous fused mitochondria were observed. The distal centriole and proximal centriole constituting the centriolar complex were oriented incompletely perpendicular to each other. The flagellum showed a typical 9+2 arrangement pattern

  10. Ultrastructural Changes and Death of Leishmania infantum Promastigotes Induced by Morinda citrifolia Linn. Fruit (Noni Juice Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Almeida-Souza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The search for new treatments against leishmaniasis has increased due to high frequency of drug resistance registered in endemics areas, side effects, and complications caused by coinfection with HIV. Morinda citrifolia Linn., commonly known as Noni, has a rich chemical composition and various therapeutic effects have been described in the literature. Studies have shown the leishmanicidal activity of M. citrifolia; however, its action on the parasite has not yet been elucidated. In this work, we analyzed leishmanicidal activity and ultrastructural changes in Leishmania infantum promastigotes caused by M. citrifolia fruit juice treatment. M. citrifolia fruit extract showed a yield of 6.31% and high performance liquid chromatography identified phenolic and aromatic compounds as the major constituents. IC50 values were 260.5 µg/mL for promastigotes and 201.3 µg/mL for intracellular amastigotes of L. infantum treated with M. citrifolia. Cytotoxicity assay with J774.G8 macrophages showed that M. citrifolia fruit juice was not toxic up to 2 mg/mL. Transmission electron microscopy showed cytoplasmic vacuolization, lipid inclusion, increased exocytosis activity, and autophagosome-like vesicles in L. infantum promastigotes treated with M. citrifolia fruit juice. M. citrifolia fruit juice was active against L. infantum in the in vitro model used here causing ultrastructural changes and has a future potential for treatment against leishmaniasis.

  11. Ultrastructural Changes and Death of Leishmania infantum Promastigotes Induced by Morinda citrifolia Linn. Fruit (Noni) Juice Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida-Souza, Fernando; Taniwaki, Noemi Nosomi; Amaral, Ana Cláudia Fernandes; de Souza, Celeste da Silva Freitas; Calabrese, Kátia da Silva; Abreu-Silva, Ana Lúcia

    2016-01-01

    The search for new treatments against leishmaniasis has increased due to high frequency of drug resistance registered in endemics areas, side effects, and complications caused by coinfection with HIV. Morinda citrifolia Linn., commonly known as Noni, has a rich chemical composition and various therapeutic effects have been described in the literature. Studies have shown the leishmanicidal activity of M. citrifolia; however, its action on the parasite has not yet been elucidated. In this work, we analyzed leishmanicidal activity and ultrastructural changes in Leishmania infantum promastigotes caused by M. citrifolia fruit juice treatment. M. citrifolia fruit extract showed a yield of 6.31% and high performance liquid chromatography identified phenolic and aromatic compounds as the major constituents. IC50 values were 260.5 µg/mL for promastigotes and 201.3 µg/mL for intracellular amastigotes of L. infantum treated with M. citrifolia. Cytotoxicity assay with J774.G8 macrophages showed that M. citrifolia fruit juice was not toxic up to 2 mg/mL. Transmission electron microscopy showed cytoplasmic vacuolization, lipid inclusion, increased exocytosis activity, and autophagosome-like vesicles in L. infantum promastigotes treated with M. citrifolia fruit juice. M. citrifolia fruit juice was active against L. infantum in the in vitro model used here causing ultrastructural changes and has a future potential for treatment against leishmaniasis.

  12. Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma complicated by Kasabach-Merritt phenomenon: ultrastructural observation and immunohistochemistry staining reveal the trapping of blood components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Si-Ming; Hong, Zhi-Jian; Chen, Hai-Ni; Shen, Wei-Min; Zhou, Xiao-Jun

    2013-12-01

    Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma (KHE), a borderline tumor of endothelial origin, is associated with Kasabach-Merritt phenomenon, characterized by profound thrombocytopenia and consumptive coagulopathy resulting from the localized intravascular coagulation (LIC) in the tumor. Previous studies have suggested that the trapping of blood components, including platelets, may underlie the LIC in KHE. However, more evidence is needed to support this hypothesis. In this study, one case of a Chinese infant with a KHE in the left arm was complicated by Kasabach-Merritt phenomenon. The tumor was partially resected and the sample was used for ultrastructural observation and immunohistochemistry staining of Glut-1. Ultrastructural observation found the trapping of erythrocytes, platelets, macrophages, and lymphocytes in the slit-like channels of the tumor nodules, and phagocytic vesicles in the cytoplasm of neoplastic cells. Immunohistochemistry staining further showed numerous Glut-1(+) erythrocytes in the channels. In conclusion, our results provided compelling morphological evidence of the trapping of blood components in KHE, which may interpret the LIC in the tumor and subsequent consumptive coagulopathy.

  13. Ultrastructural Changes and Death of Leishmania infantum Promastigotes Induced by Morinda citrifolia Linn. Fruit (Noni) Juice Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida-Souza, Fernando; Taniwaki, Noemi Nosomi; Amaral, Ana Cláudia Fernandes; de Souza, Celeste da Silva Freitas; Calabrese, Kátia da Silva; Abreu-Silva, Ana Lúcia

    2016-01-01

    The search for new treatments against leishmaniasis has increased due to high frequency of drug resistance registered in endemics areas, side effects, and complications caused by coinfection with HIV. Morinda citrifolia Linn., commonly known as Noni, has a rich chemical composition and various therapeutic effects have been described in the literature. Studies have shown the leishmanicidal activity of M. citrifolia; however, its action on the parasite has not yet been elucidated. In this work, we analyzed leishmanicidal activity and ultrastructural changes in Leishmania infantum promastigotes caused by M. citrifolia fruit juice treatment. M. citrifolia fruit extract showed a yield of 6.31% and high performance liquid chromatography identified phenolic and aromatic compounds as the major constituents. IC50 values were 260.5 µg/mL for promastigotes and 201.3 µg/mL for intracellular amastigotes of L. infantum treated with M. citrifolia. Cytotoxicity assay with J774.G8 macrophages showed that M. citrifolia fruit juice was not toxic up to 2 mg/mL. Transmission electron microscopy showed cytoplasmic vacuolization, lipid inclusion, increased exocytosis activity, and autophagosome-like vesicles in L. infantum promastigotes treated with M. citrifolia fruit juice. M. citrifolia fruit juice was active against L. infantum in the in vitro model used here causing ultrastructural changes and has a future potential for treatment against leishmaniasis. PMID:27313649

  14. Food restriction modifies ultrastructure of hippocampal synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babits, Réka; Szőke, Balázs; Sótonyi, Péter; Rácz, Bence

    2016-04-01

    Consumption of high-energy diets may compromise health and may also impair cognition; these impairments have been linked to tasks that require hippocampal function. Conversely, food restriction has been shown to improve certain aspects of hippocampal function, including spatial memory and memory persistence. These diet-dependent functional changes raise the possibility that the synaptic structure underlying hippocampal function is also affected. To examine how short-term food restriction (FR) alters the synaptic structure of the hippocampus, we used quantitative electron microscopy to analyze the organization of neuropil in the CA1 stratum radiatum of the hippocampus in young rats, consequent to reduced food. While four weeks of FR did not modify the density, size, or shape of postsynaptic spines, the synapses established by these spines were altered, displaying increased mean length, and more frequent perforations of postsynaptic densities. That the number of perforated synapses (believed to be an indicator of synaptic enhancement) increased, and that the CA1 spine population had on average significantly longer PSDs suggests that synaptic efficacy of axospinous synapses also increased in the CA1. Taken together, our ultrastructural data reveal previously unrecognized structural changes at hippocampal synapses as a function of food restriction, supporting a link between metabolic balance and synaptic plasticity.

  15. Ultrastructural Characterization of Zika Virus Replication Factories

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    Mirko Cortese

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A global concern has emerged with the pandemic spread of Zika virus (ZIKV infections that can cause severe neurological symptoms in adults and newborns. ZIKV is a positive-strand RNA virus replicating in virus-induced membranous replication factories (RFs. Here we used various imaging techniques to investigate the ultrastructural details of ZIKV RFs and their relationship with host cell organelles. Analyses of human hepatic cells and neural progenitor cells infected with ZIKV revealed endoplasmic reticulum (ER membrane invaginations containing pore-like openings toward the cytosol, reminiscent to RFs in Dengue virus-infected cells. Both the MR766 African strain and the H/PF/2013 Asian strain, the latter linked to neurological diseases, induce RFs of similar architecture. Importantly, ZIKV infection causes a drastic reorganization of microtubules and intermediate filaments forming cage-like structures surrounding the viral RF. Consistently, ZIKV replication is suppressed by cytoskeleton-targeting drugs. Thus, ZIKV RFs are tightly linked to rearrangements of the host cell cytoskeleton.

  16. [Leaf epidermis ultrastructure of Zeugites (Poaceae: Panicoideae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Ana María; Terrazas, Teresa; Dávila, Patricia

    2011-06-01

    The genus Zeugites comprises eleven species of neotropical grasses and it is principally distributed in Mexico, with some species extending to the Caribbean region, Central and South America. In this work, leaf epidermis ultrastructure of 11 species is described by the use of scanning electron microscopy. At least three specimens per species, that included herbarium and collected specimens, were used. An identification key and specific descriptions are included, in which the distinctive epidermal features are highlighted. The taxonomic valuable characters found were the following: presence or absence of prickles and macrohairs, intercostals short cells form and silica body form. Based on leaf epidermis characteristics, Zeugites species can be arranged into three groups: (1) species that lack prickles (Z. americana, Z. mexicana, Z. pringlei, Z. munroana and Z. sagittata); and lack macro hairs, with the exception of Z. pringlei; (2) species that have prickles (Z. latifolia and Z. smilacifolia); (3) species that have both, prickles and macrohairs (Z. capillaris, Z. hackelii, Z. pittieri and Z. sylvatica). The morphological features of leaf epidermis, support the relationship between the tribes Centotheceae and Paniceae.

  17. Ultrastructural morphogenesis of salmonid alphavirus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herath, T K; Ferguson, H W; Thompson, K D; Adams, A; Richards, R H

    2012-11-01

    Studies on the ultrastructural morphogenesis of viruses give an insight into how the host cell mechanisms are utilized for new virion synthesis. A time course examining salmonid alphavirus 1 (SAV 1) assembly was performed by culturing the virus on Chinook salmon embryo cells (CHSE-214). Different stages of viral replication were observed under electron microscopy. Virus-like particles were observed inside membrane-bound vesicles as early as 1 h following contact of the virus with the cells. Membrane-dependent replication complexes were observed in the cytoplasm of the cells, with spherules found at the periphery of late endosome-like vacuoles. The use of intracellular membranes for RNA replication is similar to other positive-sense single-stranded RNA (+ssRNA) viruses. The number of Golgi apparatus and associated vacuoles characterized by 'fuzzy'-coated membranes was greater in virus-infected cells. The mature enveloped virions started to bud out from the cells at approximately 24 h post-infection. These observations suggest that the pathway used by SAV 1 for the generation of new virus particles in vitro is comparable to viral replication observed with mammalian alphaviruses but with some interesting differences.

  18. Effect of androgen deprivation on penile ultrastructure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou-JunSHEN; Xie-LaiZHOU; Ying-LiLU; Zhao-DianCHEN

    2003-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the ultrastructural changes of penile corpus cavernosum and tunica albuginea in rats treated with castration or finasteride.Methods:Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats of nine weeks old were randomly divided into three groups with 6 rats each,Group A served as the control,Group B was castrated and Group C,treated with finasteride,Four weeks later,rats were anesthetized and blood samples obtained for the determination of serum testosterone(T)and dihydrotestosterone(DHT) levels;penile tissues were taken for scanning electron microscopy.Results:The T,free T and DHT levels in Group B and the DHT level in Group C were significantly lower than those in Group A(P0.05).Elastic fibers in the tunica albuginea of Group A were very rich and arranged regularly and undulatedly,but in Group B,most of the elastic fibers were replaced by collagenous fibers.In Group C,the tunica albuginea was mainly composed of thick and irregular-arranged collagenous fibers.In Group A,there were abundant smooth muscle fibers in the trabeculae of corpus cavernosum,but they were much less in Group C and scarce or even disappeared in Group B.In Groups B and C,the diminished/disappeared smooth muscle fibers were replaced by irregularly arranged collagenous fibers.Conclusion:In rats,androgen is essential for maintaining the normal structure of penile tunica albuginea and corpus carvenosum.

  19. Macrophage Plasticity and the Role of Inflammation in Skeletal Muscle Repair

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    Yacine Kharraz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective repair of damaged tissues and organs requires the coordinated action of several cell types, including infiltrating inflammatory cells and resident cells. Recent findings have uncovered a central role for macrophages in the repair of skeletal muscle after acute damage. If damage persists, as in skeletal muscle pathologies such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, macrophage infiltration perpetuates and leads to progressive fibrosis, thus exacerbating disease severity. Here we discuss how dynamic changes in macrophage populations and activation states in the damaged muscle tissue contribute to its efficient regeneration. We describe how ordered changes in macrophage polarization, from M1 to M2 subtypes, can differently affect muscle stem cell (satellite cell functions. Finally, we also highlight some of the new mechanisms underlying macrophage plasticity and briefly discuss the emerging implications of lymphocytes and other inflammatory cell types in normal versus pathological muscle repair.

  20. Glucagon-like peptide 1 improves insulin resistance in vitro through anti-inflammation of macrophages

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    C. Guo

    Full Text Available Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1, a kind of gut hormone, is used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D. Emerging evidence indicates that GLP-1 has anti-inflammatory activity. Chronic inflammation in the adipose tissue of obese individuals is a cause of insulin resistance and T2D. We hypothesized that GLP-1 analogue therapy in patients with T2D could suppress the inflammatory response of macrophages, and therefore inhibit insulin resistance. Our results showed that GLP-1 agonist (exendin-4 not only attenuated macrophage infiltration, but also inhibited the macrophage secretion of inflammatory cytokines including TNF-β, IL-6, and IL-1β. Furthermore, we observed that lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced macrophage conditioned media could impair insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. This effect was compensated by treatment with the conditioned media from macrophages treated with the combination of LPS and exendin-4. It was also observed that exendin-4 directly inhibited the activation of NF-κB in macrophages. In conclusion, our results indicated that GLP-1 improved inflammatory macrophage-derived insulin resistance by inhibiting NF-κB pathway and secretion of inflammatory cytokines in macrophages. Furthermore, our observations suggested that the anti-inflammatory effect of GLP-1 on macrophages can contribute to GLP-1 analogue therapy of T2D.

  1. Depletion of tumor associated macrophages slows the growth of chemically-induced mouse lung adenocarcinomas

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    Jason M. Fritz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation is a risk factor for lung cancer, and low dose aspirin intake reduces lung cancer risk. However, the roles that specific inflammatory cells and their products play in lung carcinogenesis have yet to be fully elucidated. In mice, alveolar macrophage numbers increase as lung tumors progress, and pulmonary macrophage programming changes within 2 weeks of carcinogen exposure. To examine how macrophages specifically affect lung tumor progression, they were depleted in mice bearing urethane-induced lung tumors using clodronate-encapsulated liposomes. Alveolar macrophage populations decreased to ≤ 50% of control levels after 4-6 weeks of liposomal clodronate treatment. Tumor burden decreased by 50% compared to vehicle treated mice, and tumor cell proliferation, as measured by Ki67 staining, was also attenuated. Pulmonary fluid levels of IGF-I, CXCL1, IL-6 and CCL2 diminished with clodronate liposome treatment. Tumor associated macrophages expressed markers of both M1 and M2 programming in vehicle and clodronate liposome treated mice. Mice lacking CCR2 (the receptor for macrophage chemotactic factor CCL2 had comparable numbers of alveolar macrophages and showed no difference in tumor growth rates when compared to similarly treated wild-type mice suggesting that while CCL2 may recruit macrophages to lung tumor microenvironments, redundant pathways can compensate when CCL2/CCR2 signaling is inactivated. Depletion of pulmonary macrophages rather than inhibition of their recruitment may be an advantageous strategy for attenuating lung cancer progression.

  2. Staphylococcus aureus exhibit similarities in their interactions with Acanthamoeba and ThP1 macrophage-like cells.

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    Cardas, Mihaela; Khan, Naveed Ahmed; Alsam, Selwa

    2012-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of nosocomial infections. Haematogenous spread is a pre-requisite but it is not clear how S. aureus survive the onslaught of macrophages. Acanthamoeba is a protozoan pathogen that is remarkably similar to macrophages, particularly in their cellular structure (morphological and ultra-structural features), molecular motility, biochemical physiology, ability to capture prey by phagocytosis and interactions with microbial pathogens. Thus, we hypothesize that S. aureus exhibit similarities in their interactions with Acanthamoeba and ThP1 macrophage-like cells. Here, we studied interactions of methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (SE) with Acanthamoeba castellanii belonging to the T4 genotype and macrophage-like cells (ThP1). The findings revealed that both MRSA and MSSA exhibited similarities in their binding/association and invasion of A. castellanii and ThP1 cells. Long-term incubation showed that MRSA and MSSA can survive intracellularly of both Acanthamoeba and ThP1 cells. Overall, these findings suggest that Acanthamoeba exhibit similar characteristics with ThP1 macrophage-like cells in their interaction with MRSA and MSSA. Additionally it was shown that bacteria survive inside Acanthamoeba during the encystment process as evidenced by bacterial recovery from mature cysts. Given that Acanthamoeba cysts are airborne, these findings suggest that cysts may act as "Trojan horse" to help spread MRSA to susceptible hosts.

  3. Ultrastructural analysis and identification of membrane proteins in the free-living amoeba Difflugia corona.

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    Silva-Briano, Marcelo; Martínez-Hernández, Sandra Luz; Adabache-Ortíz, Araceli; Ventura-Juárez, Javier; Salinas, Eva; Quintanar, J Luis

    2007-08-01

    Syntaxin-1 and 25-kDa Synaptosome-associated Protein (SNAP-25) are present in the plasma membrane of several different secretory cell types and are involved in the exocytosis process. In this work, the free-living amoeba Difflugia corona was studied in relation to ultrastructure, structural membrane proteins, and proteins such as Syntaxin-1 and SNAP-25. Our results obtained by scanning electron microscopy in the amoeba without its theca, showed many membrane projections and several pore-like structures. Using immunocytochemistry, we found structural proteins Syntaxin-1 and SNAP-25.

  4. Real space flight travel is associated with ultrastructural changes, cytoskeletal disruption and premature senescence of HUVEC.

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    Kapitonova, M Y; Muid, S; Froemming, G R A; Yusoff, W N W; Othman, S; Ali, A M; Nawawi, H M

    2012-12-01

    Microgravity, hypergravity, vibration, ionizing radiation and temperature fluctuations are major factors of outer space flight affecting human organs and tissues. There are several reports on the effect of space flight on different human cell types of mesenchymal origin while information regarding changes to vascular endothelial cells is scarce. Ultrastructural and cytophysiological features of macrovascular endothelial cells in outer space flight and their persistence during subsequent culturing were demonstrated in the present investigation. At the end of the space flight, endothelial cells displayed profound changes indicating cytoskeletal lesions and increased cell membrane permeability. Readapted cells of subsequent passages exhibited persisting cytoskeletal changes, decreased metabolism and cell growth indicating cellular senescence.

  5. p47phox Directs Murine Macrophage Cell Fate Decisions

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    Yi, Liang; Liu, Qi; Orandle, Marlene S.; Sadiq-Ali, Sara; Koontz, Sherry M.; Choi, Uimook; Torres-Velez, Fernando J.; Jackson, Sharon H.

    2012-01-01

    Macrophage differentiation and function are pivotal for cell survival from infection and involve the processing of microenvironmental signals that determine macrophage cell fate decisions to establish appropriate inflammatory balance. NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2)–deficient chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) mice that lack the gp91phox (gp91phox−/−) catalytic subunit show high mortality rates compared with wild-type mice when challenged by infection with Listeria monocytogenes (Lm), whereas p47phox-deficient (p47phox−/−) CGD mice show survival rates that are similar to those of wild-type mice. We demonstrate that such survival results from a skewed macrophage differentiation program in p47phox−/− mice that favors the production of higher levels of alternatively activated macrophages (AAMacs) compared with levels of either wild-type or gp91phox−/− mice. Furthermore, the adoptive transfer of AAMacs from p47phox−/− mice can rescue gp91phox−/− mice during primary Lm infection. Key features of the protective function provided by p47phox−/− AAMacs against Lm infection are enhanced production of IL-1α and killing of Lm. Molecular analysis of this process indicates that p47phox−/− macrophages are hyperresponsive to IL-4 and show higher Stat6 phosphorylation levels and signaling coupled to downstream activation of AAMac transcripts in response to IL-4 stimulation. Notably, restoring p47phox protein expression levels reverts the p47phox-dependent AAMac phenotype. Our results indicate that p47phox is a previously unrecognized regulator for IL-4 signaling pathways that are important for macrophage cell fate choice. PMID:22222227

  6. [Significance of macrophage and cytokines in expression of stone matrix].

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    Ito, T

    1996-05-01

    (BACKGROUND). Urinary calculus consists of inorganic substances as a major component and organic substances as a minor component. In this study, the organic substances playing an important role in the formation of calculus, such as osteopontin, calprotectin, macrophage and cytokines, are investigated for their significance in the calculus formation mechanism. (METHODS). Using renal tissues of rats having intraperitoneal glyoxylic acid-induced calculus, mode of the expression of osteopontin was examined by in situ hybridization method, immunohistological staining and northern blot method. Then human renal tissues obtained from the nephrectomy specimen conducted for a renal calculus were subjected to immunohistological staining by an enzyme antibody method using antibodies against osteopontin, calprotectin, macrophage and cytokines. (RESULTS). In rats, while the expression of osteopontin mRNA was observed in renal distal tubular cells, no expression was observed in glomerulus or renal interstitial tissues. The level of osteopontin mRNA expression in calculus forming rats was higher than in control rats by northern blot method. In human tissues, all of osteopontin, calprotectin, macrophage exhibited positive results in the renal distal tubular cells and in the calculus nucleus in the renal distal tubular cavity. Calprotectin and macrophage exhibited positive result also in the renal interstitial tissues. Cytokines exhibited positive results for interleukin-1,6, tumor necrosis factor alpha and transforming growth factor beta. Cytokines exhibited positive results in the distal tubular cells. Negative results were observed for interleukin-2,4 and 5. (CONCLUSION). Based on the findings described above, it is concluded that accumulation of macrophage in the renal interstitial tissues takes place and then one type of cytokines sensitive to macrophage is secreted. Subsequently, in the renal distal tubular cells stimulated with macrophage and cytokines, the expression of

  7. Effect of cytokines on Siglec-1 and HIV-1 entry in monocyte-derived macrophages: the importance of HIV-1 envelope V1V2 region.

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    Jobe, Ousman; Trinh, Hung V; Kim, Jiae; Alsalmi, Wadad; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Ehrenberg, Philip K; Peachman, Kristina K; Gao, Guofen; Thomas, Rasmi; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Alving, Carl R; Rao, Venigalla B; Rao, Mangala

    2016-06-01

    Monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages express relatively low levels of CD4. Despite this, macrophages can be effectively infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Macrophages have a critical role in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmission; however, the mechanism or mechanisms of virus infection are poorly understood. We report that growth factors, such as granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and macrophage colony-stimulating factor affect the phenotypic profile and permissiveness of macrophages to human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of monocyte-derived macrophages derived from granulocyte macrophage and macrophage colony-stimulating factors was predominantly facilitated by the sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin-1. The number of sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin receptors on macrophage colony-stimulating factor-derived monocyte-derived macrophages was significantly greater than on granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor-derived monocyte-derived macrophages, and correspondingly, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection was greater in the macrophage colony-stimulating factor-derived monocyte-derived macrophages. Single-genome analysis and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed that the differences in infectivity was not due to differences in viral fitness or in viral variants with differential infectivity but was due to reduced viral entry into the granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor-derived monocyte-derived macrophages. Anti-sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin, trimeric glycoprotein 145, and scaffolded V1V2 proteins were bound to sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin and significantly reduced human immunodeficiency virus type 1 entry and infection. Furthermore, sialic acid residues present in the V1V2 region of the envelope protein mediated human immunodeficiency virus type 1

  8. Imaging of macrophage-related lung diseases

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    Marten, Katharina; Hansell, David M. [Royal Brompton Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-01

    Macrophage-related pulmonary diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by macrophage accumulation, activation or dysfunction. These conditions include smoking-related interstitial lung diseases, metabolic disorders such as Niemann-Pick or Gaucher disease, and rare primary lung tumors. High-resolution computed tomography abnormalities include pulmonary ground-glass opacification secondary to infiltration by macrophages, centrilobular nodules or interlobular septal thickening reflecting peribronchiolar or septal macrophage accumulation, respectively, emphysema caused by macrophage dysfunction, and honeycombing following macrophage-related lung matrix remodeling. (orig.)

  9. Distinct macrophage phenotypes in allergic and nonallergic lung inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robbe, Patricia; Draijer, Christina; Rebelo Borg, Thiago; Luinge, Marjan; Timens, Wim; Wouters, Inge M.; Melgert, Barbro N.; Hylkema, Machteld N.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic exposure to farm environments is a risk factor for nonallergic lung disease. In contrast to allergic asthma, in which type 2 helper T cell (Th2) activation is dominant, exposure to farm dust extracts (FDE) induces Th1/Th17 lung inflammation, associated with neutrophil infiltration. Macrophag

  10. Genetic deletion of low density lipoprotein receptor impairs sterol-induced mouse macrophage ABCA1 expression. A new SREBP1-dependent mechanism.

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    Zhou, Xiaoye; He, Wei; Huang, Zhiping; Gotto, Antonio M; Hajjar, David P; Han, Jihong

    2008-01-25

    Low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) mutations cause familial hypercholesterolemia and early atherosclerosis. ABCA1 facilitates free cholesterol efflux from peripheral tissues. We investigated the effects of LDLR deletion (LDLR(-/-)) on ABCA1 expression. LDLR(-/-) macrophages had reduced basal levels of ABCA1, ABCG1, and cholesterol efflux. A high fat diet increased cholesterol in LDLR(-/-) macrophages but not wild type cells. A liver X receptor (LXR) agonist induced expression of ABCA1, ABCG1, and cholesterol efflux in both LDLR(-/-) and wild type macrophages, whereas expression of LXRalpha or LXRbeta was similar. Interestingly, oxidized LDL induced more ABCA1 in wild type macrophages than LDLR(-/-) cells. LDL induced ABCA1 expression in wild type cells but inhibited it in LDLR(-/-) macrophages in a concentration-dependent manner. However, lipoproteins regulated ABCG1 expression similarly in LDLR(-/-) and wild type macrophages. Cholesterol or oxysterols induced ABCA1 expression in wild type macrophages but had little or inhibitory effects on ABCA1 expression in LDLR(-/-) macrophages. Active sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1a (SREBP1a) inhibited ABCA1 promoter activity in an LXRE-dependent manner and decreased both macrophage ABCA1 expression and cholesterol efflux. Expression of ABCA1 in animal tissues was inversely correlated to active SREBP1. Oxysterols inactivated SREBP1 in wild type macrophages but not in LDLR(-/-) cells. Oxysterol synergized with nonsteroid LXR ligand induced ABCA1 expression in wild type macrophages but blocked induction in LDLR(-/-) cells. Taken together, our studies suggest that LDLR is critical in the regulation of cholesterol efflux and ABCA1 expression in macrophage. Lack of the LDLR impairs sterol-induced macrophage ABCA1 expression by a sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1-dependent mechanism that can result in reduced cholesterol efflux and lipid accumulation in macrophages under hypercholesterolemic conditions.

  11. Macrophage-to-Myofibroblast Transition Contributes to Interstitial Fibrosis in Chronic Renal Allograft Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-Ying; Jiang, Hong; Pan, Jun; Huang, Xiao-Ru; Wang, Yu-Cheng; Huang, Hong-Feng; To, Ka-Fai; Nikolic-Paterson, David J; Lan, Hui-Yao; Chen, Jiang-Hua

    2017-02-16

    Interstitial fibrosis is an important contributor to graft loss in chronic renal allograft injury. Inflammatory macrophages are associated with fibrosis in renal allografts, but how these cells contribute to this damaging response is not clearly understood. Here, we investigated the role of macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition in interstitial fibrosis in human and experimental chronic renal allograft injury. In biopsy specimens from patients with active chronic allograft rejection, we identified cells undergoing macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition by the coexpression of macrophage (CD68) and myofibroblast (α-smooth muscle actin [α-SMA]) markers. CD68(+)/α-SMA(+) cells accounted for approximately 50% of the myofibroblast population, and the number of these cells correlated with allograft function and the severity of interstitial fibrosis. Similarly, in C57BL/6J mice with a BALB/c renal allograft, cells coexpressing macrophage markers (CD68 or F4/80) and α-SMA composed a significant population in the interstitium of allografts undergoing chronic rejection. Fate-mapping in Lyz2-Cre/Rosa26-Tomato mice showed that approximately half of α-SMA(+) myofibroblasts in renal allografts originated from recipient bone marrow-derived macrophages. Knockout of Smad3 protected against interstitial fibrosis in renal allografts and substantially reduced the number of macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition cells. Furthermore, the majority of macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition cells in human and experimental renal allograft rejection coexpressed the M2-type macrophage marker CD206, and this expression was considerably reduced in Smad3-knockout recipients. In conclusion, our studies indicate that macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition contributes to interstitial fibrosis in chronic renal allograft injury. Moreover, the transition of bone marrow-derived M2-type macrophages to myofibroblasts in the renal allograft is regulated via a Smad3-dependent mechanism.

  12. Macrophages as APC and the dendritic cell myth.

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    Hume, David A

    2008-11-01

    Dendritic cells have been considered an immune cell type that is specialized for the presentation of Ag to naive T cells. Considerable effort has been applied to separate their lineage, pathways of differentiation, and effectiveness in Ag presentation from those of macrophages. This review summarizes evidence that dendritic cells are a part of the mononuclear phagocyte system and are derived from a common precursor, responsive to the same growth factors (including CSF-1), express the same surface markers (including CD11c), and have no unique adaptation for Ag presentation that is not shared by other macrophages.

  13. Macrophage plasticity in experimental atherosclerosis.

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    Jamila Khallou-Laschet

    Full Text Available As in human disease, macrophages (MØ are central players in the development and progression of experimental atherosclerosis. In this study we have evaluated the phenotype of MØ associated with progression of atherosclerosis in the apolipoprotein E (ApoE knockout (KO mouse model.We found that bone marrow-derived MØ submitted to M1 and M2 polarization specifically expressed arginase (Arg II and Arg I, respectively. This distinct arginase expression was used to evaluate the frequency and distribution of M1 and M2 MØ in cross-sections of atherosclerotic plaques of ApoE KO mice. Early lesions were infiltrated by Arg I(+ (M2 MØ. This type of MØ favored the proliferation of smooth muscle cells, in vitro. Arg II(+ (M1 MØ appeared and prevailed in lesions of aged ApoE KO mice and lesion progression was correlated with the dominance of M1 over the M2 MØ phenotype. In order to address whether the M2->M1 switch could be due to a phenotypic switch of the infiltrated cells, we performed in vitro repolarization experiments. We found that fully polarized MØ retained their plasticity since they could revert their phenotype. The analysis of the distribution of Arg I- and Arg II-expressing MØ also argued against a recent recruitment of M1 MØ in the lesion. The combined data therefore suggest that the M2->M1 switch observed in vivo is due to a conversion of cells already present in the lesion. Our study suggests that interventional tools able to revert the MØ infiltrate towards the M2 phenotype may exert an atheroprotective action.

  14. Diagnosis by ultrastructural study of primary ciliary dyskinesia

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    Melgarejo-Moreno P

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD, also known as ciliary immotility (SIC syndrome is an inherited disorder that includes a group of diseases in which respiratory cilia are immobile, ciliary movement is dyskinetic and ineffective or no cilia . The aim of this study is to determine the ciliary ultrastructure in patients with suspected DCP. Method: In 8 patients with suspected DCP nasal mucosa biopsy is performed with endoscopy at the inferior turbinate in the middle third by the ENT service under local anesthesia. Results: Of the 8 cases studied in 2 cases no ciliary ultrastructural level defects were found. In two cases with abnormal ciliary ultrastructure is present Kartagener syndrome. In a case no cilia were observed in the nasal mucosa. Discussion: The DCP and SIC are synonymous terms from clinical and pathogenetic view: immobility and dyskinesia lead to an absence of mucociliary transport, stasis of respiratory secretions with their consequences: chronic infections of lower respiratory tract and from birth . The most common ultrastructural defect is the total or partial absence of dynein. Conclusions: The ultrastructural study allows the diagnosis of PCD because genetic diagnosis is complicated and therefore get an early diagnosis of this condition which serves to improve the morbidity and mortality of these patients.

  15. Comparative analysis of the internalization of the macrophage receptor sialoadhesin in human and mouse primary macrophages and cell lines.

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    De Schryver, Marjorie; Leemans, Annelies; Pintelon, Isabel; Cappoen, Davie; Maes, Louis; Caljon, Guy; Cos, Paul; Delputte, Peter L

    2016-11-21

    Sialoadhesin (Sn) is a surface receptor expressed on resident macrophages with the ability to bind with sialic acids. During inflammation, an upregulation of Sn is observed. Upon binding of monoclonal antibodies to Sn, the receptor becomes internalized and this has been observed in multiple species. The latter characteristic, combined with the strong upregulation of Sn on inflammatory macrophages and the fact that Sn-positive macrophages contribute to certain inflammatory diseases, makes Sn an interesting entry portal for phenotype-modulating or cytotoxic drugs. Such drugs or toxins can be linked to Sn-specific antibodies which should enable their targeted uptake by macrophages. However, the activity of such drugs depends not only on their internalization but also on the intracellular trafficking and final fate in the endolysosomal system. Although information is available for porcine Sn, the detailed mechanisms of human and mouse Sn internalization and subsequent intracellular trafficking are currently unknown. To allow development of Sn-targeted therapies, differences across species and cellular background need to be characterized in more detail. In the current report, we show that internalization of human and mouse Sn is dynamin-dependent and clathrin-mediated, both in primary macrophages and CHO cell lines expressing a recombinant Sn. In primary macrophages, internalized Sn-specific F(ab')2 fragments are located mostly in the early endosomes. With Fc containing Sn-specific antibodies, there is a slight shift towards lysosomal localization in mouse macrophages, possibly because of an interaction with Fc receptors. Surprisingly, in CHO cell lines expressing Sn, there is a predominant lysosomal localization. Our results show that the mechanism of Sn internalization and intracellular trafficking is concurrent in the tested species. The cellular background in which Sn is expressed and the type of antibody used can affect the intracellular fate, which in turn can

  16. Macrophage Apoptosis Triggered by IpaD from Shigella flexneri.

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    Arizmendi, Olivia; Picking, William D; Picking, Wendy L

    2016-06-01

    Shigellosis, a potentially severe bacillary dysentery, is an infectious gastrointestinal disease caused by Shigella spp. Shigella invades the human colonic epithelium and avoids clearance by promoting apoptosis of resident immune cells in the gut. This process is dependent on the Shigella type III secretion system (T3SS), which injects effector proteins into target cells to alter their normal cellular functions. Invasion plasmid antigen D (IpaD) is a structural component that forms a complex at the tip of the T3SS apparatus needle. Recently, IpaD has also been shown to indirectly induce apoptosis in B lymphocytes. In this study, we explored the cytotoxicity profile during macrophage infection by Shigella and discovered that the pathogen induces macrophage cell death independent of caspase-1. Our results demonstrate that IpaD triggers apoptosis in macrophages through activation of host caspases accompanied by mitochondrial disruption. Additionally, we found that the IpaD N-terminal domain is necessary for macrophage killing and SipD, a structural homologue from Salmonella, was found to promote similar cytotoxicity. Together, these findings indicate that IpaD is a contributing factor to macrophage cell death during Shigella infection.

  17. Dopamine Receptor Activation Increases HIV Entry into Primary Human Macrophages

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    Gaskill, Peter J.; Yano, Hideaki H.; Kalpana, Ganjam V.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Berman, Joan W.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers. PMID:25268786

  18. Alternatively activated macrophages produce catecholamines to sustain adaptive thermogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khoa D.; Qiu, Yifu; Cui, Xiaojin; Goh, Y.P. Sharon; Mwangi, Julia; David, Tovo; Mukundan, Lata; Brombacher, Frank; Locksley, Richard M.; Chawla, Ajay

    2011-01-01

    All homeotherms utilize thermogenesis to maintain core body temperature, ensuring that cellular functions and physiologic processes can ensue in cold environments1-3. In the prevailing model, when the hypothalamus senses cold temperatures, it triggers sympathetic discharge, resulting in the release of noradrenaline in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT)4,5. Acting via the β3-adrenergic receptors, noradrenaline induces lipolysis in white adipocytes6, whereas it stimulates the expression of thermogenic genes, such as PPARγ coactivator 1a (Ppargc1a), uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1), and acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 1 (Acsl1), in brown adipocytes7-9. However, the precise nature of all the cell types involved in this efferent loop is not well established. Here we report an unexpected requirement for the interleukin 4 (IL4)-stimulated program of alternative macrophage activation in adaptive thermogenesis. Cold exposure rapidly promoted alternative activation of adipose tissue macrophages, which secrete catecholamines to induce thermogenic gene expression in BAT and lipolysis in WAT. Absence of alternatively activated macrophages impaired metabolic adaptations to cold, whereas administration of IL4 increased thermogenic gene expression, fatty acid mobilization, and energy expenditure, all in a macrophage-dependent manner. We have thus discovered a surprising role for alternatively activated macrophages in the orchestration of an important mammalian stress response, the response to cold. PMID:22101429

  19. Dopamine receptor activation increases HIV entry into primary human macrophages.

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    Peter J Gaskill

    Full Text Available Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers.

  20. CDDO-Me Redirects Activation of Breast Tumor Associated Macrophages.

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    Michael S Ball

    Full Text Available Tumor-associated macrophages can account for up to 50% of the tumor mass in breast cancer patients and high TAM density is associated with poor clinical prognosis. Because TAMs enhance tumor growth, development, and metastatic potential, redirection of TAM activation may have significant therapeutic benefit. Our studies in primary human macrophages and murine breast TAMs suggest that the synthetic oleanane triterpenoid CDDO-methyl ester (CDDO-Me reprograms the activation profile of TAMs from tumor-promoting to tumor-inhibiting. We show that CDDO-Me treatment inhibits expression of IL-10 and VEGF in stimulated human M2 macrophages and TAMs but increases expression of TNF-α and IL-6. Surface expression of CD206 and CD163, which are characteristic of M2 activation, is significantly attenuated by CDDO-Me. In contrast, CDDO-Me up-regulates surface expression of HLA-DR and CD80, which are markers of M1 activation, and importantly potentiates macrophage activation of autologous T cells but inhibits endothelial cell vascularization. These results show for the first time that CDDO-Me redirects activation of M2 macrophages and TAMs from immune-suppressive to immune-stimulatory, and implicate a role for CDDO-Me as an immunotherapeutic in the treatment of breast and potentially other types of cancer.

  1. Disruption of mTORC1 in Macrophages Decreases Chemokine Gene Expression and Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Ding; Jiang, Hongfeng; Westerterp, Marit; Murphy, Andrew J.; Wang, Mi; Ganda, Anjali; Abramowicz, Sandra; Welch, Carrie; Almazan, Felicidad; Zhu, Yi; Miller, Yury I; Tall, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibitor, rapamycin, has been shown to decrease atherosclerosis, even while increasing plasma LDL levels. This suggests an anti-atherogenic effect possibly mediated by modulation of inflammatory responses in atherosclerotic plaques. Objective To assess the role of macrophage mTORC1 in atherogenesis. Methods and Results We transplanted bone marrow from mice in which a key mTORC1 adaptor, Raptor, was deleted in macrophages by Cre/loxP recombination (Mac-RapKO mice) into Ldlr-/- mice and then fed them the Western-type diet (WTD). Atherosclerotic lesions from Mac-RapKO mice showed decreased infiltration of macrophages, lesion size and chemokine gene expression compared with control mice. Treatment of macrophages with minimally modified LDL (mmLDL) resulted in increased levels of chemokine mRNAs and STAT3 phosphorylation; these effects were reduced in Mac-RapKO macrophages. While wild-type and Mac-RapKO macrophages showed similar STAT3 phosphorylation on Tyr705, Mac-RapKO macrophages showed decreased STAT3 Ser727 phosphorylation in response to mmLDL treatment and decreased Ccl2 promoter binding of STAT3. Conclusions The results demonstrate cross-talk between nutritionally-induced mTORC1 signaling and mmLDL-mediated inflammatory signaling via combinatorial phosphorylation of STAT3 in macrophages, leading to increased STAT3 activity on the CCL2 (MCP-1)promoter with pro-atherogenic consequences. PMID:24687132

  2. Oxygenated fixation demonstrates novel and improved ultrastructural features of the human endolymphatic sac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Caye-Thomasen, Per; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of the present study is to describe in detail the ultrastructure of the human endolymphatic sac using a new and improved method of fixation as well as a refined surgical approach in obtaining specimens. Transmission electron microscopy of the human endolymphatic sac, employing an oxygenated fixative. Eighteen tissue samples of the human endolymphatic sac were obtained during surgery for vestibular schwannoma using the translabyrinthine approach. The specimens were fixed in 2% glutaraldehyde in an oxygenated fluorocarbon blood substitute vehicle before preparation by routine methods for transmission electron microscopy. We focused on the epithelial cell layer, subepithelial tissue, intraluminal content, and vascular tissue in both the intra- and extraosseous part of the endolymphatic sac. We observed well-defined endolymphatic sac epithelial cell lining in all 18 specimens. In general, we found very well-preserved specimens with well-defined intracellular structures. In contrast to the results in former studies, a minimum of fixation artifacts was observed in the present study. Three different cell types were observed in the intraosseous part of the sac: mitochondria-rich cells, ribosome-rich cells, and nonclassifiable cells. A fourth cell type was found in the extraosseous part. Novel ultrastructural features of the epithelial lining and the subepithelial layer are described and discussed. The results in the present study indicate an improvement in obtaining human tissue with optimal fixation for ultrastructural analysis and provide several novel morphologic observations. The potential functions of the endolymphatic sac are discussed with reference to former studies. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  3. TNF Counterbalances the Emergence of M2 Tumor Macrophages

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    Franz Kratochvill

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer can involve non-resolving, persistent inflammation where varying numbers of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs infiltrate and adopt different activation states between anti-tumor M1 and pro-tumor M2 phenotypes. Here, we resolve a cascade causing differential macrophage phenotypes in the tumor microenvironment. Reduction in TNF mRNA production or loss of type I TNF receptor signaling resulted in a striking pattern of enhanced M2 mRNA expression. M2 gene expression was driven in part by IL-13 from eosinophils co-recruited with inflammatory monocytes, a pathway that was suppressed by TNF. Our data define regulatory nodes within the tumor microenvironment that balance M1 and M2 populations. Our results show macrophage polarization in cancer is dynamic and dependent on the balance between TNF and IL-13, thus providing a strategy for manipulating TAMs.

  4. TNF counterbalances the emergence of M2 tumor macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratochvill, Franz; Neale, Geoffrey; Haverkamp, Jessica M.; de Velde, Lee-Ann Van; Smith, Amber M.; Kawauchi, Daisuke; McEvoy, Justina; Roussel, Martine F.; Dyer, Michael A.; Qualls, Joseph E.; Murray, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a form of non-resolving, persistent inflammation where varying numbers of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) infiltrate and adopt different activation states between anti-tumor M1 and pro-tumor M2 phenotypes. Here we resolve a cascade causing differential macrophage phenotypes in the tumor microenvironment. Reduction in TNF mRNA production or loss of Type I TNF receptor signaling resulted in a striking pattern of enhanced M2 mRNA expression. M2 gene expression was driven in part by IL-13 from eosinophils co-recruited with inflammatory monocytes, a pathway that was suppressed by TNF. Our data define regulatory nodes within the tumor microenvironment that balance M1 and M2 populations. Our results show macrophage polarization in cancer is dynamic and dependent on the balance between TNF and IL-13, thus providing a strategy for manipulating TAMs. PMID:26365184

  5. Structure and Ultrastructure of the Endodermal Region of the Alimentary Tract in the Freshwater Shrimp Neocaridina heteropoda (Crustacea, Malacostraca.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Sonakowska

    Full Text Available The freshwater shrimp Neocaridina heteropoda (Crustacea, Malacostraca, Decapoda originates from Asia and is one of the species that is widely available all over the world because it is the most popular shrimp that is bred in aquaria. The structure and the ultrastructure of the midgut have been described using X-ray microtomography, transmission electron microscopy, light and fluorescence microscopes. The endodermal region of the alimentary system in N. heteropoda consists of an intestine and a hepatopancreas. No differences were observed in the structure and ultrastructure of males and females of the shrimp that were examined. The intestine is a tube-shaped organ and the hepatopancreas is composed of two large diverticles that are divided into the blind-end tubules. Hepatopancreatic tubules have three distinct zones - proximal, medial and distal. Among the epithelial cells of the intestine, two types of cells were distinguished - D and E-cells, while three types of cells were observed in the epithelium of the hepatopancreas - F, B and E-cells. Our studies showed that the regionalization in the activity of cells occurs along the length of the hepatopancreatic tubules. The role and ultrastructure of all types of epithelial cells are discussed, with the special emphasis on the function of the E-cells, which are the midgut regenerative cells. Additionally, we present the first report on the existence of an intercellular junction that is connected with the E-cells of Crustacea.

  6. Structure and Ultrastructure of the Endodermal Region of the Alimentary Tract in the Freshwater Shrimp Neocaridina heteropoda (Crustacea, Malacostraca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonakowska, Lidia; Włodarczyk, Agnieszka; Poprawa, Izabela; Binkowski, Marcin; Śróbka, Joanna; Kamińska, Karolina; Kszuk-Jendrysik, Michalina; Chajec, Łukasz; Zajusz, Bartłomiej; Rost-Roszkowska, Magdalena Maria

    2015-01-01

    The freshwater shrimp Neocaridina heteropoda (Crustacea, Malacostraca, Decapoda) originates from Asia and is one of the species that is widely available all over the world because it is the most popular shrimp that is bred in aquaria. The structure and the ultrastructure of the midgut have been described using X-ray microtomography, transmission electron microscopy, light and fluorescence microscopes. The endodermal region of the alimentary system in N. heteropoda consists of an intestine and a hepatopancreas. No differences were observed in the structure and ultrastructure of males and females of the shrimp that were examined. The intestine is a tube-shaped organ and the hepatopancreas is composed of two large diverticles that are divided into the blind-end tubules. Hepatopancreatic tubules have three distinct zones - proximal, medial and distal. Among the epithelial cells of the intestine, two types of cells were distinguished - D and E-cells, while three types of cells were observed in the epithelium of the hepatopancreas - F, B and E-cells. Our studies showed that the regionalization in the activity of cells occurs along the length of the hepatopancreatic tubules. The role and ultrastructure of all types of epithelial cells are discussed, with the special emphasis on the function of the E-cells, which are the midgut regenerative cells. Additionally, we present the first report on the existence of an intercellular junction that is connected with the E-cells of Crustacea.

  7. An inflammatory gene signature distinguishes neurofibroma Schwann cells and macrophages from cells in the normal peripheral nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kwangmin; Komurov, Kakajan; Fletcher, Jonathan S.; Jousma, Edwin; Cancelas, Jose A.; Wu, Jianqiang; Ratner, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    Neurofibromas are benign peripheral nerve tumors driven by NF1 loss in Schwann cells (SCs). Macrophages are abundant in neurofibromas, and macrophage targeted interventions may have therapeutic potential in these tumors. We generated gene expression data from fluorescence-activated cell sorted (FACS) SCs and macrophages from wild-type and mutant nerve and neurofibroma to identify candidate pathways involved in SC-macrophage cross-talk. While in 1-month-old Nf1 mutant nerve neither SCs nor macrophages significantly differed from their normal counterparts, both macrophages and SCs showed significantly altered cytokine gene expression in neurofibromas. Computationally reconstructed SC-macrophage molecular networks were enriched for inflammation-associated pathways. We verified that neurofibroma SC conditioned medium contains macrophage chemo-attractants including colony stimulation factor 1 (CSF1). Network analysis confirmed previously implicated pathways and predict novel paracrine and autocrine loops involving cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. Network analysis also predicted a central role for decreased type-I interferon signaling. We validated type-I interferon expression in neurofibroma by protein profiling, and show that treatment of neurofibroma-bearing mice with polyethylene glycolyated (PEGylated) type-I interferon-α2b reduces the expression of many cytokines overexpressed in neurofibroma. These studies reveal numerous potential targetable interactions between Nf1 mutant SCs and macrophages for further analyses. PMID:28256556

  8. Ultrastructure of Oogenesis in Dryopteris crassirhizoma Nakai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Mei BAO; Qun HE; Quan-Xi WANG; Guo-Wei TIAN; Jian-Guo CAO

    2005-01-01

    The ultrastructure of oogenesis in Dryopteris crassirhizoma Nakai has been investigated using transmission electron microscopy. The nucleus in the young egg is rounded with an uneven outline. As it develops, it becomes amoeboid and extends nuclear protrusions that are not only sac-like nuclear evaginations like those often seen in the oogenesis of other ferns, but also mushroom-like and finger-like, with an opening at their end allowing the nucleolus material to flow out from the openings. This has not been observed previously. The nuclear protrusions differ from Dryopteris filix-mas (L.) Schott. in the absence of sheets of nuclear membrane in the form of a closed ring. As the egg matures, the nucleus transforms into a tuber-like structure with a smooth surface, lying transversely in the egg cell. In the immature egg, vesicles almost encircle the nucleus twice and are most remarkable. In the maturing egg, the vesicles are distributed at the periphery, except for at the top of the egg, and affect the formation of the separation cavity and extra egg membrane. Simultaneously, vesicles from the venter canal cell move to the egg and take part in the formation of separation cavity and extra egg membrane. In the mature egg, a large number of small vesicles containing fragments of lamellae or osmiophilic material emerge from the cytoplasm. The origin of these vesicles is obscure. Irregular plastids containing a cylindrical starch grain dedifferentiated progressively.Mitochondria seem to have been undeveloped during the process, but return to normal at later stages of oogenesis. There is a high frequency of ribosomes in the mature egg. Microtubules, rarely seen in the eggs ofD. filix-mas (L.) Schott. and Pteridium aquilinum (L.) Kuhn, have been observed inside the plasmalemma of the maturing egg in D. crassirhizoma.

  9. [Asteroid hyalopathy. Ultrastructural study of 3 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adenis, J P; Leboutet, M J; Loubet, R

    1984-01-01

    The vitreous of three patients with asteroïd hyalosis (average age: 57 years) was obtained by a two-hand closed pars plana vitrectomy. Asteroïd hyalosis was associated with alcoholic neuropathy in the first case, long standing retinal detachment in the second case, and diabetes mellitus in the third case. The visual acuity before and after the surgical procedure improved from 1.2/6 to 6/6 in the first case, from light perception to 0.3/6 in the second case, from 0.6/6 to 4.8/6 in the third case. The vitreous was studied by different ultrastructural technics : transmission electron microscopy (T.E.M.) scanning electron microscopy (S.E.M.) and electron diffraction X ray analysis (E.D.A.X.). By S.E.M. the asteroïd bodies appeared as rounded structures with an irregular surface connected to each other by fibrous strands among sodium chloride crystals. No cellular remnants were observed. By T.E.M. the asteroïd bodies were composed of interwinned ribbons of multilaminar membranes with a periodicity (10 to 60 A) characteristic of complex lipids, especially phospholipids. At the edge of the ribbons there were dots and sometimes clumps of opaque material that tended to crack out of the specimen with the heat of the electron beam. T.E.M. study disclosed the irregular disposition of the calcific bodies. By E.D.A.X. the calcific composition of the rounded structures could be determined : calcium and phosphorus were the main elements detectable in asteroïd bodies of all sizes for all three patients. The average calcium counts for the three successive cases were : 18, 30, 43 and for phosphorus : 9, 14, 26. Potassium was found in the first case, and sulfur in the third case.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Ultrastructure and morphogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, M; Goto, T

    1996-08-01

    The ultrastructure and morphogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were elucidated by observation with several techniques including immunoelectron microscopy and cryo-microscopy. The virus particle consists of an envelope, a core and matrix. The virus particles were observed extracellularly as having one of three profiles: (1) a centric or an eccentric electron-dense core, (2) rod-shaped electron-dense core, and (3) doughnut-shaped. HIV-1 particles in the hydrated state were observed by high resolution electron cryo-microscopy to be globular, and the lipid membrane was clearly resolved as a bilayer. Many projections around the circumference were seen to be knob-like. The shapes and sizes of the projections, especially head parts, were found to vary in each projection. By isolation with Nonidet P40 and glutaraldehyde, HIV-1 cores were confirmed to consist of p24 protein by immunogold labeling. When the virus enters the cell, two entry modes were found: membrane fusion and endocytosis. No structures resembling virus particles could be seen in the cytoplasm after viral entry. In HIV-1-infected cells, positive reactions by immuno-labeling suggest that HIV-1 Gag may be produced in membrane-bound structures and transported to the cell surface by cytoskeletons. Then a crescent electron-dense layer was first formed underneath the cell membrane. Finally, the virus particle was released from the cell surface. Several cell clones producing defective particles were isolated from MT-4/HIV-1 cells. Among them, doughnut-shaped or teardrop-shaped particles were seen to be produced in the extracellular space. In the doughnut-shaped particles, Gag p17 and p24 proteins faced each other against the inner electron dense ring, suggesting that the inner ring consists of a precursor Gag protein.

  11. Gliocyte and synapse analyses in cerebral ganglia of the Chinese mitten crab, Eriocheir sinensis: ultrastructural study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis is an economically important aquatic species in China. Many studies on gene structure, breeding, and diseases of the crab have been reported. However, knowledge about the organization of the nerve system of the crab remains largely unknown. To study the ultrastructure of the cerebral ganglia of E. sinensis and to compare the histological findings regarding the nerve systems of crustaceans, the cerebral ganglia were observed by transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that four types of gliocytes, including type I, II, III, and IV gliocytes were located in the cerebral ganglia. In addition, three types of synapses were present in the cerebral ganglia, including unidirectional synapses, bidirectional synapses, and combined type synapses. 

  12. Isolation and culture of murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, John Q; Gordon, Siamon

    2005-01-01

    The two most convenient sources of primary murine macrophages are the bone marrow and the peritoneal cavity. Resident peritoneal macrophages can readily be harvested from mice and purified by adherence to tissue culture plastic. The injection of Bio-Gel polyacrylamide beads or thioglycollate broth into the peritoneal cavity produces an inflammatory response allowing the purification of large numbers of elicited macrophages. The production of an activated macrophage population can be achieved by using Bacillus-Calmette-Guerin as the inflammatory stimulus. Resident bone marrow macrophages can be isolated following enzymatic separation of cells from bone marrow plugs and enrichment on 30% fetal calf serum containing medium or Ficoll-Hypaque gradients. Bone marrow-derived macrophages can be produced by differentiating nonadherent macrophage precursors with medium containing macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

  13. HIV-1 assembly in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benaroch Philippe

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The molecular mechanisms involved in the assembly of newly synthesized Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV particles are poorly understood. Most of the work on HIV-1 assembly has been performed in T cells in which viral particle budding and assembly take place at the plasma membrane. In contrast, few studies have been performed on macrophages, the other major target of HIV-1. Infected macrophages represent a viral reservoir and probably play a key role in HIV-1 physiopathology. Indeed macrophages retain infectious particles for long periods of time, keeping them protected from anti-viral immune response or drug treatments. Here, we present an overview of what is known about HIV-1 assembly in macrophages as compared to T lymphocytes or cell lines. Early electron microscopy studies suggested that viral assembly takes place at the limiting membrane of an intracellular compartment in macrophages and not at the plasma membrane as in T cells. This was first considered as a late endosomal compartment in which viral budding seems to be similar to the process of vesicle release into multi-vesicular bodies. This view was notably supported by a large body of evidence involving the ESCRT (Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport machinery in HIV-1 budding, the observation of viral budding profiles in such compartments by immuno-electron microscopy, and the presence of late endosomal markers associated with macrophage-derived virions. However, this model needs to be revisited as recent data indicate that the viral compartment has a neutral pH and can be connected to the plasma membrane via very thin micro-channels. To date, the exact nature and biogenesis of the HIV assembly compartment in macrophages remains elusive. Many cellular proteins potentially involved in the late phases of HIV-1 cycle have been identified; and, recently, the list has grown rapidly with the publication of four independent genome-wide screens. However, their respective

  14. Ultrastructural alterations of the hepatopancreas in Porcellio scaber under stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Znidaršič, Nada; Strus, Jasna; Drobne, Damjana

    2003-04-01

    Cellular ultrastructure varies in accordance with physiological processes, also reflecting responses to environmental stress factors. Ultrastructural changes of the hepatopancreatic cells in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber exposed to sublethal concentrations of zinc or cadmium in their food were identified by transmission electron microscopy. The exclusive structural characteristic of the hepatopancreas of animals exposed to metal-dosed food was grain-like electrondense deposits (EDD) observed in the intercellular spaces and in vesicles of B cells. In addition, hepatopancreatic cells of metal-exposed animals displayed non-specific, stress-indicating alterations such as cellular disintegration, the reduction of energetic reserves (lipid droplets, glycogen), electron dense cytoplasm, ultrastructural alterations of granular endoplasmic reticulum (GER), the Golgi complex and mitochondria.

  15. Cell Ultrastructure of Kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis) Shoot Tips During Cryopreservation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xiao-biao; CAI Zi-guo; GU Qing-qing; ZHANG Qiu-ming

    2006-01-01

    The changes in the cell ultrastructure of in vitro cultured shoot tips from dwarf genotype of kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis Ganmi 5) during cryopreservation were investigated. Shoot tips were preserved in liquid nitrogen using vitrification, and the cell ultrastructure was examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The regular ultrastructure of the cell wall, cell membrane and nucleus of shoot tips could be damaged during the freezing and thawing associated with preservation using liquid nitrogen. The cell plasmolysis was increased and freezing tolerance was improved after preculturing and dehydrating in a preservation and vitrification solution (PVS2 ) (30% glycerol (Gly)+ 15% ethylene glycol (EG)+ 15% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) + 0.4 mol L-1 sucrose). The structure of some cells with low degree of injury and reversible damage was similar to that of the control and they could undergo normal cell division and differentiation. Besides, they could recover automatically and regenerate after their reculture.

  16. THE ULTRASTRUCTURE OF SEPARATED AND CULTURED CELL OF PORPHYRA YEZOENSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    There are many reports that cells (protoplasts) separated from the thallus of Porphyra by enzyme can develop to normal leafy thalli in the same way as monospores. But there are few investigations on the subcellular structure of the isolated vegetative cell for comparison with the subcellular structure of monospores. To clarify whether the separated and cultured cells undergo the same or similar ultrastructure changes during culture and germination as monospores undergo in their formation and germination, we observed their ultrastructure, compared them with those of the monospore and found that the ultrastructure of separated and cultured cells did not have the characteristic feature as that of monospore formation, such as production of small and large fibrous vesicles, but was accompanied by vacuolation and starch mobilization like that in monospore germination. The paper also discusses the relations between monospores and separated and cultured cells.

  17. [Tegumental ultrastructures of Paragonimus iloktsuenensis according to the developmental stages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S H; Kim, S J; Chai, J Y; Sohn, W M

    1989-03-01

    A scanning electron microscopic study was performed to observe the tegumental ultrastructures of Paragonimus iloktsuenensis according to its developmental stages. The metacercariae were obtained from the liver of the brackish water crab, Sesarma dehaani. Juvenile and adult P. iloktsuenensis were recovered from the experimental rats on 2, 4 and 8 weeks after infection. The findings were summarized as follows: 1. The excysted metacercariae were characteristically gourd-shape, with their whole body surface beset with numerous spade-shape spines. The large, type II sensory papillae (non-ciliated round swellings) were arranged along the rim of the oral and ventral suckers, 11-12 and 6-8 in numbers respectively. 2. Two-week old juvenile worms, recovered chiefly from the liver of the experimental rats, were slender in body shape, with their ventral sucker near the anterior one-third level. The distribution of tegumental spines was less dense than in the excysted metacercariae. The spines were with 1-2 pointed tips and 3-4 longitudinal splits. Numerous ciliated knob-like, type I papillae were observed in both sides of the oral sucker, and 6 large, type II papillae were arranged along the rim of the ventral sucker. 3. Four-week old worms, recovered from the thoracic cavity and/or lung parenchyme of the experimental rats, were thicker than wide in body configuration, and their ventral sucker was located near the anterior one-fourth level. The tegumental spines at ventral surface were grouped, each group with 3-5 aggregated ones. The type I and type II papillae (small-sized) were distributed chiefly around the rim of two suckers. 4. Adult (eight-week old) worms, recovered from the capsules in the lung parenchyme, were very stout, and covered densely with bearfoot-like spines. At dorsal surface, cobblestone-like cytoplasmic processes were well-developed, with many tegumental spines embedded in them. It was observed in this study that the tegument of P. iloktsuenesis continued

  18. Pancreatic involvement in co-infection visceral leishmaniasis and HIV: histological and ultrastructural aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEHTER Ethel Zimberg

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of the gastrointestinal tract in the co-infection of HIV and Leishmania is rarely reported. We report the case of an HIV-infected adult man co-infected with a disseminated form of leishmaniasis involving the liver, lymph nodes, spleen and, as a feature reported for the first time in the English literature, the pancreas. Light microscopy showed amastigote forms of Leishmania in pancreatic macrophages and immunohistochemical staining revealed antigens for Leishmania and also for HIV p24. Microscopic and ultrastructural analysis revealed severe acinar atrophy, decreased zymogen granules in the acinar cytoplasm and also nuclear abnormalities such as pyknosis, hyperchromatism and thickened chromatin. These findings might correspond to the histologic pattern of protein-energy malnutrition in the pancreas as shown in our previous study in pancreas with AIDS and no Leishmania. In this particular case, the protein-energy malnutrition may be due to cirrhosis, or, Leishmania or HIV infection or all mixed. We believe that this case represents the morphologic substratum of the protein energy malnutrition in pancreas induced by the HIV infection. Further studies are needed to elucidate these issues.

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Induced Polarization of Human Macrophage Orchestrates the Formation and Development of Tuberculous Granulomas In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zikun Huang

    Full Text Available The tuberculous granuloma is an elaborately organized structure and one of the main histological hallmarks of tuberculosis. Macrophages, which are important immunologic effector and antigen-presenting cells, are the main cell type found in the tuberculous granuloma and have high plasticity. Macrophage polarization during bacterial infection has been elucidated in numerous recent studies; however, macrophage polarization during tuberculous granuloma formation and development has rarely been reported. It remains to be clarified whether differences in the activation status of macrophages affect granuloma formation. In this study, the variation in macrophage polarization during the formation and development of tuberculous granulomas was investigated in both sections of lung tissues from tuberculosis patients and an in vitro tuberculous granuloma model. The roles of macrophage polarization in this process were also investigated. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis infection was found to induce monocyte-derived macrophage polarization. In the in vitro tuberculous granuloma model, macrophage transformation from M1 to M2 was observed over time following M. tuberculosis infection. M2 macrophages were found to predominate in both necrotic and non-necrotic granulomas from tuberculosis patients, while both M1 and M2 polarized macrophages were found in the non-granulomatous lung tissues. Furthermore, it was found that M1 macrophages promote granuloma formation and macrophage bactericidal activity in vitro, while M2 macrophages inhibit these effects. The findings of this study provide insights into the mechanism by which M. tuberculosis circumvents the host immune system as well as a theoretical foundation for the development of novel tuberculosis therapies based on reprogramming macrophage polarization.

  20. [Morphological and Ultrastructural Features in the Characterization of Microsporidia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaman, Mustafa; Algı, Gönül; Güner, Beyza Gonca

    2015-03-01

    The members of the Microsporidia are single-celled, eukaryotic, obligate intracellular parasites. They infect a wide range of invertebrate and vertebrate hosts. The studies on Microsporidia are of considerable interest because of that they cause desirable and undesirable infections in different animals. That situation requires identification of these organisms correctly. The identification of Microsporidia needs relatively more complex studies. Morphological and ultrastructural studies play important role in the identification of these organisms. In the present study, a working knowledge on the morphological and ultrastructural features of Microsporidia are given.

  1. Synaptic ultrastructure changes in trigeminocervical complex posttrigeminal nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, John; Trinh, Van Nancy; Sears-Kraxberger, Ilse; Li, Kang-Wu; Steward, Oswald; Luo, Z David

    2016-02-01

    Trigeminal nerves collecting sensory information from the orofacial area synapse on second-order neurons in the dorsal horn of subnucleus caudalis and cervical C1/C2 spinal cord (Vc/C2, or trigeminocervical complex), which is critical for sensory information processing. Injury to the trigeminal nerves may cause maladaptive changes in synaptic connectivity that plays an important role in chronic pain development. Here we examined whether injury to the infraorbital nerve, a branch of the trigeminal nerves, led to synaptic ultrastructural changes when the injured animals have developed neuropathic pain states. Transmission electron microscopy was used to examine synaptic profiles in Vc/C2 at 3 weeks postinjury, corresponding to the time of peak behavioral hypersensitivity following chronic constriction injury to the infraorbital nerve (CCI-ION). Using established criteria, synaptic profiles were classified as associated with excitatory (R-), inhibitory (F-), and primary afferent (C-) terminals. Each type was counted within the superficial dorsal horn of the Vc/C2 and the means from each rat were compared between sham and injured animals; synaptic contact length was also measured. The overall analysis indicates that rats with orofacial pain states had increased numbers and decreased mean synaptic length of R-profiles within the Vc/C2 superficial dorsal horn (lamina I) 3 weeks post-CCI-ION. Increases in the number of excitatory synapses in the superficial dorsal horn of Vc/C2 could lead to enhanced activation of nociceptive pathways, contributing to the development of orofacial pain states. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Spermatozoon ultrastructure and semen parameters of Brycon vermelha (Characiformes, Characidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustino, F; Silva, R C; Hilbig, C C; Makino, L C; Senhorini, J A; Ninhaus-Silveira, A; Nakaghi, L S O

    2015-06-01

    This study analyzed semen parameters and the ultrastructure of spermatozoa of Brycon vermelha. The semen was white and viscous, with a mean volume of 5.0±2.6 mL/kg body weight and mean spermatozoon concentration of 4.3±0.8×10(10) spermatozoa/mL. The estimated motility rate was 90%, with 50% of spermatozoa motile at 35.0±0.1 s and 100% immotile by 46.5±0.1 s. The spermatozoon of B. vermelha had a distinct head, midpiece, and flagellum. The ovoid head measured 1.9±0.2 μm by 1.3±0.1 μm, with its volume almost completely occupied by the nucleus, and was enveloped by an irregular nuclear membrane, with no acrosome vesicle. The nuclear fossa held the centriole complex and the initial segment of flagellum. The midpiece was symmetrical and measured 1.3±0.3μm. Mitochondria were scarce and restricted to the anterior region, while vesicles were absent. The posterior region of the midpiece was characterized by the absence of mitochondria and the presence of the cytoplasmic sheath. The flagellum, enclosed by the flagellar membrane, measured 29.6±3.4 μm, and possessed an axial filament containing a 9+2 microtubule pattern. The spermatozoa of B. vermelha appeared similar in structure to those of fish that breed through external fertilization, thus classifying them as uniflagellate anacrosomal aquasperm, or Type 1 aquasperm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Ultrastructural Observation of Fallopian Tubes in Patients with Pelvic Congestion Syndrome after Oviductal Ligation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张瑜; 蔡光宗; 刘健; 魏家芳

    1997-01-01

    The morphological basis of bilateral lower abdominal pain was studied by means of ultrastructural observation in patients with pelvic congestion syndrome after oviductal Iigation. Fallopian tubes of 14 cases were collected during opera tion. Of them, 10 patients suffered from pelvic congestion syndrome, 4 cases were normal used as control, the 8 small segments from the tubal isthmus were removed during tigation. The essential changes of the fallopian tubes in patients with this syndrome were the marked swelling of the C type unmyeIinated nerve fibers, the decrease in density of axoplasm and in number of microtutbules and microfitaments. The Schwann's cells were swollen as welt. Furthermore, the mitochondria revealed mild to moderate swelling, their cristae decreased and shortened. However, the changes of the endings of efferent nerve fibers were not obvious.The ultrastructural changes of C-type unmyeIinated nerve fibers except the endings of efferent nerve fibers were closely related to the bilateral lower abdominal pain in patients with this syndrome.

  4. Ultrastructural study of the blood cells of the coelacanth Latimeria chalumnae (Rhipidistia: Coelacanthini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarial, M S

    2005-04-01

    The blood cells in the renal capillaries of the coelacanth Latimeria chalumnae Smith were studied by transmission electron microscopic methods. On the basis of ultrastructural similarities of cytoplasmic granules of the leukocytes and by comparison with those of the fish and mammalian cells, erythrocytes and three types of granular leukocytes, namely neutrophils, eosinophils and basophils, and three types of agranular leukocytes, i.e., lymphocytes, monocytes and thrombocytes are characterized. The presence of granular and agranular leukocytes in the blood of Latimeria suggests that these cells appeared early in vertebrate evolution. The display of nuclear blebs on the cytoplasmic phase of the nuclear membrane and the presence of nuclear fragments in the cytoplasm of some erythrocytes suggest that these cells undergo apoptosis in order to delete older erythrocytes from the blood stream. The relatively small size of its nucleated erythrocytes and the striking resemblance of the ultrastructural features of its leukocytes to those of higher vertebrate leukocytes support the view that Latimeria is a close living relative of tetrapods.

  5. Ultrastructural and physiological changes induced by different stress conditions on the human parasite Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Morales, Deyanira; Hernández, Karla Daniela Rodríguez; Martínez, Ignacio; Agredano-Moreno, Lourdes Teresa; Jiménez-García, Luis Felipe; Espinoza, Bertha

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease. The life cycle of this protozoan parasite is digenetic because it alternates its different developmental forms through two hosts, a vector insect and a vertebrate host. As a result, the parasites are exposed to sudden and drastic environmental changes causing cellular stress. The stress response to some types of stress has been studied in T. cruzi, mainly at the molecular level; however, data about ultrastructure and physiological state of the cells in stress conditions are scarce or null. In this work, we analyzed the morphological, ultrastructural, and physiological changes produced on T. cruzi epimastigotes when they were exposed to acid, nutritional, heat, and oxidative stress. Clear morphological changes were observed, but the physiological conditions varied depending on the type of stress. The maintenance of the physiological state was severely affected by heat shock, acidic, nutritional, and oxidative stress. According to the surprising observed growth recovery after damage by stress alterations, different adaptations from the parasite to these harsh conditions were suggested. Particular cellular death pathways are discussed.

  6. Cytochemical characterization and ultrastructural organization in calluses of the agarophyte Gracilariopsis tenuifrons (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzon, Zenilda Laurita; Schmidt, Eder Carlos; Almeida, Ana Carolina de; Yokoya, Nair S; Oliveira, Mariana Cabral de; Chow, Fungyi

    2011-01-01

    The culture and physiology of red macroalgae calluses are well documented. To date, however, no report has either performed a cytochemical analysis or characterized the ultrastructural organization of calluses at different stages of development and under the effect of plant growth regulators. Therefore, to undertake such analyses, this work studied the red seaweed Gracilariopsis tenuifrons (Bird et Oliveira) Fredericq et Hommersand. Morphology studies suggested three types of calluses: a) terminal callus having an irregular amorphous shape and filamentous projections originating from the cortical region of the thallus; b) apical callus growing on apical branches and having an elongated semispherical shape; and c) intercalary callus developing along the intermediary region of the thallus and having the appearance of small declivities with irregular edges. The abundance of intercalary calluses over terminal and apical calluses is most likely a result of a major cortical surface that would support the cellular growth required to generate calluses. Callus development was initially observed as a matrix of cellular disorganization with filamentous projections; then, the cellular mass seemed to become more compact with spherical uncolored aspect. The presence of starch grains in the inner part of the explant could be explained by absorption from the culture medium and by proper biosynthesis during callus development. Cell wall reaction to staining suggested cellulose and agar composition with acidic polysaccharides. Results suggest that none of the three morphological types of calluses showed any significant differences on the basis of either cytochemistry or ultrastructural organization.

  7. Ultrastructural comparative analysis on the adhesive papillae of the swimming larvae of three ascidian species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Dolcemascolo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a preliminary report on the papillae of the swimming larvae of three ascidian species: Ascidia malaca, Phallusia mammillata and Ciona intestinalis. The investigations, carried out at ultrastructural level and at confocal laser microscope, have evidenced, in the adhesive papillae of the three studied species, three different cell-types: axial columnar cells, collocytes, sensory cells respectively. The adhesive papillae of A. malaca and P. mammillata show central axial columnar cells with long microvilli emerging from the apical edge and extending throughout the hyaline cap. Collocytes are elongated secreting cells, lying in middle-lateral side. Sensory cells have a cilium at the apical side and an axon proceeding from the basal side. The adhesive papillae of C. intestinalis present some differences in the ultrastructure of the axial columnar cells, which bear a big digitiform protrusion, extending throughout the hyaline cap and a lot of microtubules along the cell axis. The investigations, carried out at confocal microscopy, have evidentiated a clear fluorescence in the papillae of the three studied species and a network of nervous fibers projecting from the papillar base up to cerebral vesicle of the cephalenteron. The characteristic of simple and coniforme type and the adhesive and sensorial functions of adhesive papillae of three ascidian species examined are confirmed.

  8. Macrophage responsiveness to light therapy

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    Young, S.; Bolton, P.; Dyson, M.; Harvey, W.; Diamantopoulos, C. (United Medical School, London (England))

    1989-01-01

    Macrophages are a source of many important mediators of wound repair. It was the purpose of this study to see if light could stimulate the release of these mediators. In this study an established macrophage-like cell line (U-937) was used. The cells were exposed in culture to the following wavelengths of light: 660 nm, 820 nm, 870 nm, and 880 nm. The 820-nm source was coherent and polarised, and the others were non-coherent. Twelve hours after exposure the macrophage supernatant was removed and placed on 3T3 fibroblast cultures. Fibroblast proliferation was assessed over a 5-day period. The results showed that 660-nm, 820-nm, and 870-nm wavelengths encouraged the macrophages to release factors that stimulated fibroblast proliferation above the control levels, whereas the 880-nm wavelength either inhibited the release of these factors or encouraged the release of some inhibitory factors of fibroblast proliferation. These results suggest that light at certain wavelengths may be a useful therapeutic agent by providing a means of either stimulating or inhibiting fibroblast proliferation where necessary. At certain wavelengths coherence is not essential.

  9. Impaired differentiation of macrophage lineage cells attenuates bone remodeling and inflammatory angiogenesis in Ndrg1 deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Kosuke; Shibata, Tomohiro; Nabeshima, Hiroshi; Shinoda, Ai; Fukunaga, Yuichi; Kawahara, Akihiko; Karasuyama, Kazuyuki; Fukushi, Jun-Ichi; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Kuwano, Michihiko; Ono, Mayumi

    2016-01-18

    N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is a responsible gene for a hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy-Lom (Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4D). This is the first study aiming to assess the contribution of NDRG1 to differentiation of macrophage lineage cells, which has important implications for bone remodeling and inflammatory angiogenesis. Ndrg1 knockout (KO) mice exhibited abnormal curvature of the spine, high trabecular bone mass, and reduced number of osteoclasts. We observed that serum levels of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and macrophage-related cytokines were markedly decreased in KO mice. Differentiation of bone marrow (BM) cells into osteoclasts, M1/M2-type macrophages and dendritic cells was all impaired. Furthermore, KO mice also showed reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis by cancer cells, accompanied by decreased infiltration of tumor-associated macrophages. The transfer of BM-derived macrophages from KO mice into BM-eradicated wild type (WT) mice induced much less tumor angiogenesis than observed in WT mice. Angiogenesis in corneas in response to inflammatory stimuli was also suppressed with decreased infiltration of macrophages. Taken together, these results indicate that NDRG1 deficiency attenuates the differentiation of macrophage lineage cells, suppressing bone remodeling and inflammatory angiogenesis. This study strongly suggests the crucial role of NDRG1 in differentiation process for macrophages.

  10. Activation of TLR3/interferon signaling pathway by bluetongue virus results in HIV inhibition in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ming; Wang, Xu; Li, Jie-Liang; Zhou, Yu; Sang, Ming; Liu, Jin-Biao; Wu, Jian-Guo; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2015-12-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV), a nonenveloped double-stranded RNA virus, is a potent inducer of type Ι interferons in multiple cell systems. In this study, we report that BTV16 treatment of primary human macrophages induced both type I and III IFN expression, resulting in the production of multiple antiviral factors, including myxovirus resistance protein A, 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase, and the IFN-stimulated gene 56. Additionally, BTV-treated macrophages expressed increased HIV restriction factors (apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide 3 G/F/H) and CC chemokines (macrophage inflammatory protein 1-α, macrophage inflammatory protein 1-β, regulated on activation of normal T cell expressed and secreted), the ligands for HIV entry coreceptor CC chemokine receptor type 5. BTV16 also induced the expression of tetherin, which restricts HIV release from infected cells. Furthermore, TLR3 signaling of macrophages by BTV16 resulted in the induction of several anti-HIV microRNAs (miRNA-28, -29a, -125b, -150, -223, and -382). More importantly, the induction of antiviral responses by BTV resulted in significant suppression of HIV in macrophages. These findings demonstrate the potential of BTV-mediated TLR3 activation in macrophage innate immunity against HIV.

  11. Physalis angulata induces in vitro differentiation of murine bone marrow cells into macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Bruno José Martins; Rodrigues, Ana Paula D; Farias, Luis Henrique S; Hage, Amanda Anastácia P; Do Nascimento, Jose Luiz M; Silva, Edilene O

    2014-10-03

    The bone marrow is a hematopoietic tissue that, in the presence of cytokines and growth factors, generates all of the circulating blood cells. These cells are important for protecting the organism against pathogens and for establishing an effective immune response. Previous studies have shown immunomodulatory effects of different products isolated from plant extracts. This study aimed to evaluate the immunomodulatory properties of aqueous Physalis angulata (AEPa) extract on the differentiation of bone marrow cells. Increased cellular area, higher spreading ability and several cytoplasmatic projections were observed in the treated cells, using optical microscopy, suggesting cell differentiation. Furthermore, AEPa did not promote the proliferation of lymphocytes and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, however promotes increased the number of macrophages in the culture. The ultrastructural analysis by Transmission Electron Microscopy of treated cells showed spreading ability, high number of cytoplasmatic projections and increase of autophagic vacuoles. Moreover, a high level of LC3b expression by treated cells was detected by flow cytometry, suggesting an autophagic process. Cell surface expression of F4/80 and CD11b also indicated that AEPa may stimulate differentiation of bone marrow cells mainly into macrophages. In addition, AEPa did not differentiate cells into dendritic cells, as assessed by CD11c analysis. Furthermore, no cytotoxic effects were observed in the cells treated with AEPa. Results demonstrate that AEPa promotes the differentiation of bone marrow cells, particularly into macrophages and may hold promise as an immunomodulating agent.

  12. Structural and ultrastructural features of the agouti tongue (Dasyprocta aguti Linnaeus, 1766).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciena, Adriano Polican; de Sousa Bolina, Cristina; de Almeida, Sonia Regina Yokomizo; Rici, Rose Eli Grassi; de Oliveira, Moacir Franco; da Silva, Marcelo Cavenaghi Pereira; Miglino, Maria Angélica; Watanabe, Ii-sei

    2013-08-01

    The agouti (Dasyprocta aguti Linnaeus, 1766) is a wild rodent belonging to the family Dasyproctidae that is found throughout Brazil and feeds on fruits and seeds. The aim of the present study was to describe the following features of the tongue of agouti: its morphological structures, the three-dimensional characteristics of the lingual papillae surface, the connective tissue cores (CTCs) and the epithelial cell ultrastructure. Four types of papillae were observed on the dorsal surface of the tongue with a triangular shape: filiform, fungiform, foliate and vallate. Filiform papillae were distributed throughout the tongue surface, and removal of the epithelial surface revealed conical CTCs and multifilaments. Fungiform papillae were observed in the rostral and middle regions, whereas foliate papillae developed in pairs on the lateral margin of the caudal region. Removal of the epithelium in these regions revealed CTCs with parallel laminar conformation. Vallate papillae were arranged in a V-shape in the caudal region, and their CTCs ranged in shape from elongate to ovoid. The ultrastructural components of the dorsal epithelium were the basal, spinous, granular and keratinised layers. A broad area with cytoplasmic projections was identified in the interface region between the lamina propria and the basal layer. Flattened cells with intermediate filaments were observed in the transitional region between spinous and granular layers. The keratinised layer was composed of superimposed epithelial cells where desmosomes and cell-surface microridges were observed. These structural features, including the three-dimensional aspects of the lingual papillae, the CTCs and the epithelial ultrastructure, indicate that when compared with other animals, particularly other rodent species, the morphological features of the tongue of agouti are relatively well developed, especially regarding foliate and vallate papillae.

  13. Ultrastructural study of the male gamete of Pleurogonius truncatus Prudhoe, 1944 (Platyhelminthes, Digenea, Pronocephalidae) parasite of Eretmochelys imbricata (Linnaeus, 1766).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, Papa Ibnou; Quilichini, Yann; Sène, Aminata; Tkach, Vasyl V; Bâ, Cheikh Tidiane; Marchand, Bernard

    2012-04-01

    In Pronocephaloidea, the spermatozoa of only two species have been studied today. Because of this, we present in this work data concerning to a third specie, Pleurogonius truncatus Prudhoe, 1944. The mature spermatozoon of P. truncatus possesses two axonemes with the 9+"1" pattern typical of Trepaxonemata, mitochondrion, nucleus, parallel cortical microtubules, spinelike bodies, cytoplasmic expansion and an external ornamentation of the plasma membrane. A particularity of the spermatozoon of P. truncatus is in the ultrastructure of the anterior spermatozoon extremity with only cortical microtubules and ornamentation of the plasma membrane. This type of anterior extremity has never been described until today in Pronocephaloidea. On the other hand, the ultrastructure of the posterior extremity of the spermatozoon confirms that already described in Pronocephalidae.

  14. Ultrastructural, histochemical, and biochemical studies of two cases with amylase, ACTH, and beta-MSH producing tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomi, K; Kameya, T; Tsumuraya, M; Shimosato, Y; Zeze, F; Abe, K; Yoneyama, T

    1976-10-01

    Two cases of intrathoracic tumor, different in histology and accompanied by hyperamylasemia, were studied ultrastructurally, histochemically, and biochemically. The ultrastructure of the tumor cell cytoplasm showed many zymogen granules in case 1 and smaller cored granules in addition to zymogen granules in case 2. Both tumors contained not only a large amount of amylase, which was electrophoretically of saliva type with three components, but also significant amounts of immunoreactive ACTH and beta-MSH. Starch film and immunofluorescence showed that the tumor cells stored amylase. It was concluded from these findings that the tumor cells ectopically producing amylase, which showed differentiation toward the cells with zymogen production, could differentiate toward the cells of ACTH-MSH system at the same time.

  15. Primary macrophages and J774 cells respond differently to infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu, Nuria; Phelan, Jody; de Sessions, Paola F.; Cliff, Jacqueline M.; Clark, Taane G.; Hibberd, Martin L.

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages play an essential role in the early immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and are the cell type preferentially infected in vivo. Primary macrophages and macrophage-like cell lines are commonly used as infection models, although the physiological relevance of cell lines, particularly for host-pathogen interaction studies, is debatable. Here we use high-throughput RNA-sequencing to analyse transcriptome dynamics of two macrophage models in response to M. tuberculosis infection. Specifically, we study the early response of bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages and cell line J774 to infection with live and γ-irradiated (killed) M. tuberculosis. We show that infection with live bacilli specifically alters the expression of host genes such as Rsad2, Ifit1/2/3 and Rig-I, whose potential roles in resistance to M. tuberculosis infection have not yet been investigated. In addition, the response of primary macrophages is faster and more intense than that of J774 cells in terms of number of differentially expressed genes and magnitude of induction/repression. Our results point to potentially novel processes leading to immune containment early during M. tuberculosis infection, and support the idea that important differences exist between primary macrophages and cell lines, which should be taken into account when choosing a macrophage model to study host-pathogen interactions. PMID:28176867

  16. Cholesterol Oxidase Binds TLR2 and Modulates Functional Responses of Human Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Bednarska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol oxidase (ChoD is considered to be an important virulence factor for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, but its influence on macrophage activity is unknown. Here we used Nocardia erythropolis ChoD, which is very similar to the Mtb enzyme (70% identity at the amino-acid level, to evaluate the impact of bacterial ChoD on the activity of THP-1-derived macrophages in vitro. We found that ChoD decreased the surface expression of Toll-like receptor type 2 (TLR2 and complement receptor 3 (CR3 on these macrophages. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy showed that ChoD competed with lipoteichoic acid for ligand binding sites on TLR2 but not on CR3, suggesting that ChoD signaling is mediated via TLR2. Binding of ChoD to the membrane of macrophages had diverse effects on the activity of macrophages, activating p38 mitogen activated kinase and stimulating production of a large amount of interleukin-10. Moreover, ChoD primed macrophages to enhance the production of reactive oxygen species in response to the phorbol myristate acetate, which was reduced by “switching off” TLR-derived signaling through interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinases 1 and 4 inhibition. Our study revealed that ChoD interacts directly with macrophages via TLR2 and influences the biological activity of macrophages during the development of the initial response to infection.

  17. Tumor suppressor ARF regulates tissue microenvironment and tumor growth through modulation of macrophage polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-García, Lidia; Herranz, Sandra; Higueras, María Angeles; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2016-10-11

    Tumor microenvironment has been described to play a key role in tumor growth, progression, and metastasis. Macrophages are a major cellular constituent of the tumor stroma, and particularly tumor associated macrophages (TAMs or M2-like macrophages) exert important immunosuppressive activity and a pro-tumoral role within the tumor microenvironment. Alternative-reading frame (ARF) gene is widely inactivated in human cancer. We have previously demonstrated that ARF deficiency severely impairs inflammatory response establishing a new role for ARF in the regulation of innate immunity. On the basis of these observations, we hypothesized that ARF may also regulates tumor growth through recruitment and modulation of the macrophage phenotype in the tumor microenvironment. Xenograft assays of B16F10 melanoma cells into ARF-deficient mice resulted in increased tumor growth compared to those implanted in WT control mice. Tumors from ARF-deficient mice exhibited significantly increased number of TAMs as well as microvascular density. Transwell assays showed crosstalk between tumor cells and macrophages. On the one hand, ARF-deficient macrophages modulate migratory ability of the tumor cells. And on the other, tumor cells promote the skewing of ARF-/- macrophages toward a M2-type polarization. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that ARF deficiency facilitates the infiltration of macrophages into the tumor mass and favors their polarization towards a M2 phenotype, thus promoting tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth. This work provides novel information about the critical role of ARF in the modulation of tumor microenvironment.

  18. Selective and specific macrophage ablation is detrimental to wound healing in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Rita; DiPietro, Luisa A; Koh, Timothy J

    2009-12-01

    Macrophages are thought to play important roles during wound healing, but definition of these roles has been hampered by our technical inability to specifically eliminate macrophages during wound repair. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that specific depletion of macrophages after excisional skin wounding would detrimentally affect healing by reducing the production of growth factors important in the repair process. We used transgenic mice that express the human diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor under the control of the CD11b promoter (DTR mice) to specifically ablate macrophages during wound healing. Mice without the transgene are relatively insensitive to DT, and administration of DT to wild-type mice does not alter macrophage or other inflammatory cell accumulation after injury and does not influence wound healing. In contrast, treatment of DTR mice with DT prevented macrophage accumulation in healing wounds but did not affect the accumulation of neutrophils or monocytes. Such macrophage depletion resulted in delayed re-epithelialization, reduced collagen deposition, impaired angiogenesis, and decreased cell proliferation in the healing wounds. These adverse changes were associated with increased levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and reduced levels of transforming growth factor-beta1 and vascular endothelial growth factor in the wound. In summary, macrophages seem to promote both wound closure and dermal healing, in part by regulating the cytokine environment of the healing wound.

  19. Polysaccharide of Dendrobium huoshanense activates macrophages via toll-like receptor 4-mediated signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Song-Zi; Hao, Ran; Zha, Xue-Qiang; Pan, Li-Hua; Liu, Jian; Luo, Jian-Ping

    2016-08-01

    The present work aimed at investigating the pattern recognition receptor (PRR) and immunostimulatory mechanism of a purified Dendrobium huoshanense polysaccharide (DHP). We found that DHP could bind to the surface of macrophages and stimulate macrophages to secrete NO, TNF-α and IL-1β. To unravel the mechanism for the binding of DHP to macrophages, flow cytometry, confocal laser-scanning microscopy, affinity electrophoresis, SDS-PAGE and western blotting were employed to verify the type of PRR responsible for the recognition of DHP by RAW264.7 macrophages and peritoneal macrophages of C3H/HeN and C3H/HeJ macrophages. Results showed that toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) was an essential receptor for macrophages to directly bind DHP. Further, the phosphorylation of ERK, JNK, Akt and p38 were observed to be time-dependently promoted by DHP, as well as the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65. These results suggest that DHP activates macrophages via its direct binding to TLR4 to trigger TLR4 signaling pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde complexity of the macrophage response in disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twum, Danielle Y F; Burkard-Mandel, Lauren; Abrams, Scott I

    2017-08-01

    Macrophages comprise a highly diverse cell population expressing a continuum of biologic activities dictated by exposure to a plethora of inflammatory cues. Moreover, in contrast to most other hematopoietic populations, macrophages can arise from multiple sites-namely, the bone marrow or yolk sac, adding to the complexity of macrophage biology during health and disease. Nonetheless, it is this very type of diversity that is indispensable for macrophages to respond effectively to pathologic insults. Most of the interest in macrophage biology has been devoted to bone marrow-derived populations, but it is now becoming clearer that tissue-resident populations, which arise from distinct hematopoietic compartments, serve critical roles in host defense, including protection against neoplastic disease. Depending on the inflammatory milieu, macrophages can behave as a "two-edged sword," playing either host-protective (i.e., antitumor) or host-destructive (i.e., protumor) roles. Accordingly, we review herein the mechanisms that instruct macrophage functional diversity within their microenvironments, with special emphasis on transcriptional regulation, which is less understood. Given their polarizing positions in disease processes, we will also provide an overview of strategies that target macrophages or their effector mechanisms for therapeutic purposes. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  1. Adipose tissue macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutens, Lily; Stienstra, Rinke

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation originating from the adipose tissue is considered to be one of the main driving forces for the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in obese individuals. Although a plethora of different immune cells shapes adipose tissue inflammation, this review is specifically

  2. Adipose tissue macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutens, Lily; Stienstra, Rinke

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation originating from the adipose tissue is considered to be one of the main driving forces for the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in obese individuals. Although a plethora of different immune cells shapes adipose tissue inflammation, this review is specifically foc

  3. Adipose tissue macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutens, Lily; Stienstra, Rinke

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation originating from the adipose tissue is considered to be one of the main driving forces for the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in obese individuals. Although a plethora of different immune cells shapes adipose tissue inflammation, this review is specifically foc

  4. Nucleosome loss facilitates the chemotactic response of macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Toma, I; Rossetti, G; Zambrano, S; Bianchi, M E; Agresti, A

    2014-11-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a small nuclear protein with two functions. In the nucleus, it helps to wrap DNA around nucleosomes. When secreted, it recruits inflammatory cells and induces cytokine production. Before HMGB1 is secreted from inflammatory cells, it relocates to the cytoplasm, which partially or totally depletes cell nuclei of HMGB1. We previously showed that cells lacking HMGB1 contain 20% fewer nucleosomes and 30% more RNA transcripts levels genome-wide. We hypothesized that the depletion of nuclear HMGB1 plays a role in inflammation that can enhance or complement the role of extracellular HMGB1. We analysed the transcriptional profile of wild-type and Hmgb1-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) as a proxy for cells that have lost HMGB1 from their nuclei. We explored the transcriptome of wild-type and Hmgb1-/- macrophages differentiated in the presence of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, before and after exposure to LPS/IFN-γ. In the same cells, histones and nuclear HMGB1 were quantified. We found that Hmgb1-/- MEFs show a transcriptional profile associated with stress and inflammation responses. Moreover, wild-type macrophages that have secreted HMGB1 because of LPS/IFN-γ exposure rapidly reduce their histone content as much as cells that genetically lack HMGB1. Importantly, unstimulated Hmgb1-/- macrophages activate transcriptional pathways associated with cell migration and chemotaxis. We suggest that nucleosome loss is an early event that facilitates transcriptional responses of macrophages to inflammation, particularly chemotaxis. HMGB1's dual roles in the nucleus and in the extracellular space appear to be complementary. © 2014 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  5. Identification of polarized macrophage subsets in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Chi, Mai; Laplace-Builhe, Béryl; Travnickova, Jana; Luz-Crawford, Patricia; Tejedor, Gautier; Phan, Quang Tien; Duroux-Richard, Isabelle; Levraud, Jean-Pierre; Kissa, Karima; Lutfalla, Georges; Jorgensen, Christian; Djouad, Farida

    2015-07-08

    While the mammalian macrophage phenotypes have been intensively studied in vitro, the dynamic of their phenotypic polarization has never been investigated in live vertebrates. We used the zebrafish as a live model to identify and trail macrophage subtypes. We generated a transgenic line whose macrophages expressing tumour necrosis factor alpha (tnfa), a key feature of classically activated (M1) macrophages, express fluorescent proteins Tg(mpeg1:mCherryF/tnfa:eGFP-F). Using 4D-confocal microscopy, we showed that both aseptic wounding and Escherichia coli inoculation triggered macrophage recruitment, some of which started to express tnfa. RT-qPCR on Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS)-sorted tnfa(+) and tnfa(-) macrophages showed that they, respectively, expressed M1 and alternatively activated (M2) mammalian markers. Fate tracing of tnfa(+) macrophages during the time-course of inflammation demonstrated that pro-inflammatory macrophages converted into M2-like phenotype during the resolution step. Our results reveal the diversity and plasticity of zebrafish macrophage subsets and underline the similarities with mammalian macrophages proposing a new system to study macrophage functional dynamic.

  6. The Role of Macrophages in Tumor Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerben J. van der Bij

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages constitute a large proportion of the immune cell infiltrate, which is present in many tumors. Activation state of macrophages is greatly influenced by their environment, leading to different macrophage subsets with diverse functions. Although previously regarded as potent immune cells that are capable of destroying tumor cells, recent literature focuses on the ability of macrophages to promote tumor development due to secretion of mediators, like growth and angiogenic factors. It is now becoming increasingly clear that a complicated synergistic relationship exists between macrophages and malignant cells whereby tumor cells can affect macrophage phenotype, and vice versa. As such, macrophages and their contribution in cancer development are currently subject of debate.

  7. Macrophages in Tissue Repair, Regeneration, and Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Thomas A; Vannella, Kevin M

    2016-03-15

    Inflammatory monocytes and tissue-resident macrophages are key regulators of tissue repair, regeneration, and fibrosis. After tissue injury, monocytes and macrophages undergo marked phenotypic and functional changes to play critical roles during the initiation, maintenance, and resolution phases of tissue repair. Disturbances in macrophage function can lead to aberrant repair, such that uncontrolled production of inflammatory mediators and growth factors, deficient generation of anti-inflammatory macrophages, or failed communication between macrophages and epithelial cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and stem or tissue progenitor cells all contribute to a state of persistent injury, and this could lead to the development of pathological fibrosis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms that instruct macrophages to adopt pro-inflammatory, pro-wound-healing, pro-fibrotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic, pro-resolving, and tissue-regenerating phenotypes after injury, and we highlight how some of these mechanisms and macrophage activation states could be exploited therapeutically.

  8. Alveolar Macrophage Polarisation in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh A. Almatroodi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of alveolar macrophages in lung cancer is multifaceted and conflicting. Alveolar macrophage secretion of proinflammatory cytokines has been found to enhance antitumour functions, cytostasis (inhibition of tumour growth, and cytotoxicity (macrophage-mediated killing. In contrast, protumour functions of alveolar macrophages in lung cancer have also been indicated. Inhibition of antitumour function via secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 as well as reduced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and reduction of mannose receptor expression on alveolar macrophages may contribute to lung cancer progression and metastasis. Alveolar macrophages have also been found to contribute to angiogenesis and tumour growth via the secretion of IL-8 and VEGF. This paper reviews the evidence for a dual role of alveolar macrophages in lung cancer progression.

  9. Surface ultrastructure of third-instar Megaselia scalaris (Diptera: Phoridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukontason Kabkaew L

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe some ultrastructure of the third-instar Megaselia scalaris (Diptera: Phoridae using scanning electron microscopy, with the cephalic segment, anterior spiracle and posterior spiracle being emphasized. This study provides the taxonomic information of this larval species, which may be useful to differentiate from other closely-related species.

  10. Tissue section AFM: In situ ultrastructural imaging of native biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Helen K.; Hodson, Nigel W.; Hoyland, Judith A.; Millward-Sadler, Sarah J.; Garrod, David; Scothern, Anthea; Griffiths, Christopher E.M.; Watson, Rachel E.B.; Cox, Thomas R.; Erler, Janine T.; Trafford, Andrew W.; Sherratt, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Conventional approaches for ultrastructural high-resolution imaging of biological specimens induce profound changes in bio-molecular structures. By combining tissue cryo-sectioning with non-destructive atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging we have developed a methodology that may be applied by the non-specialist to both preserve and visualize bio-molecular structures (in particular extracellular matrix assemblies) in situ. This tissue section AFM technique is capable of: i) resolving nm–µm scale features of intra- and extracellular structures in tissue cryo-sections; ii) imaging the same tissue region before and after experimental interventions; iii) combining ultrastructural imaging with complimentary microscopical and micromechanical methods. Here, we employ this technique to: i) visualize the macro-molecular structures of unstained and unfixed fibrillar collagens (in skin, cartilage and intervertebral disc), elastic fibres (in aorta and lung), desmosomes (in nasal epithelium) and mitochondria (in heart); ii) quantify the ultrastructural effects of sequential collagenase digestion on a single elastic fibre; iii) correlate optical (auto fluorescent) with ultrastructural (AFM) images of aortic elastic lamellae. PMID:20144712

  11. Ulcerative colitis: ultrastructure of interstitial cells in myenteric plexus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Vanderwinden, J-M; Horn, T

    2010-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are key regulatory cells in the gut. In the colon of patients with severe ulcerative colitis (UC), myenteric ICC had myoid ultrastructural features and were in close contact with nerve terminals. In all patients as opposed to controls, some ICC profiles showed...

  12. Early studies of placental ultrastructure by electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, A M; Enders, A C

    2016-01-01

    many other scientists to Washington University in St. Louis. Work on human placental ultrastructure was initiated at Cambridge and Kyoto whilst domestic animals were initially studied by Björkman in Stockholm and electron micrographs of bat placenta were published by Wimsatt of Cornell University...

  13. Ultrastructure of platelets in Bernard-Soulier syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, J E; Gilchrist, G S; Brigden, L P; Bowie, E J

    1975-07-01

    The platelets of a patient with the Bernard-Soulier syndrome were studied by electron microscopy. The main abnormalities were the presence of giant and often round platelets, hypertrophic and frequently widely dilated open canalicular system, disorganized microtubules, and platelets with sparse or absent granulation. Although well defined, these ultrastructural morphologic aberrations are not considered diagnostic or pathognomonic of the syndrome.

  14. Ultrastructure of Proechinophthirus zumpti (Anoplura, Echinophthiriidae by scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D