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Sample records for macrophages highly virulent

  1. Identification of genes preferentially expressed by highly virulent piscine Streptococcus agalactiae upon interaction with macrophages.

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    Chang-Ming Guo

    Full Text Available Streptococcus agalactiae, long recognized as a mammalian pathogen, is an emerging concern with regard to fish. In this study, we used a mouse model and in vitro cell infection to evaluate the pathogenetic characteristics of S. agalactiae GD201008-001, isolated from tilapia in China. This bacterium was found to be highly virulent and capable of inducing brain damage by migrating into the brain by crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB. The phagocytosis assays indicated that this bacterium could be internalized by murine macrophages and survive intracellularly for more than 24 h, inducing injury to macrophages. Further, selective capture of transcribed sequences (SCOTS was used to investigate microbial gene expression associated with intracellular survival. This positive cDNA selection technique identified 60 distinct genes that could be characterized into 6 functional categories. More than 50% of the differentially expressed genes were involved in metabolic adaptation. Some genes have previously been described as associated with virulence in other bacteria, and four showed no significant similarities to any other previously described genes. This study constitutes the first step in further gene expression analyses that will lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms used by S. agalactiae to survive in macrophages and to cross the BBB.

  2. Engineering attenuated virulence of a Theileria annulata-infected macrophage.

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    Nadia Echebli

    Full Text Available Live attenuated vaccines are used to combat tropical theileriosis in North Africa, the Middle East, India, and China. The attenuation process is empirical and occurs only after many months, sometimes years, of in vitro culture of virulent clinical isolates. During this extensive culturing, attenuated lines lose their vaccine potential. To circumvent this we engineered the rapid ablation of the host cell transcription factor c-Jun, and within only 3 weeks the line engineered for loss of c-Jun activation displayed in vitro correlates of attenuation such as loss of adhesion, reduced MMP9 gelatinase activity, and diminished capacity to traverse Matrigel. Specific ablation of a single infected host cell virulence trait (c-Jun induced a complete failure of Theileria annulata-transformed macrophages to disseminate, whereas virulent macrophages disseminated to the kidneys, spleen, and lungs of Rag2/γC mice. Thus, in this heterologous mouse model loss of c-Jun expression led to ablation of dissemination of T. annulata-infected and transformed macrophages. The generation of Theileria-infected macrophages genetically engineered for ablation of a specific host cell virulence trait now makes possible experimental vaccination of calves to address how loss of macrophage dissemination impacts the disease pathology of tropical theileriosis.

  3. Macrophage replication screen identifies a novel Francisella hydroperoxide resistance protein involved in virulence.

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    Anna C Llewellyn

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of tularemia. Recently, genome-wide screens have identified Francisella genes required for virulence in mice. However, the mechanisms by which most of the corresponding proteins contribute to pathogenesis are still largely unknown. To further elucidate the roles of these virulence determinants in Francisella pathogenesis, we tested whether each gene was required for replication of the model pathogen F. novicida within macrophages, an important virulence trait. Fifty-three of the 224 genes tested were involved in intracellular replication, including many of those within the Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI, validating our results. Interestingly, over one third of the genes identified are annotated as hypothetical, indicating that F. novicida likely utilizes novel virulence factors for intracellular replication. To further characterize these virulence determinants, we selected two hypothetical genes to study in more detail. As predicted by our screen, deletion mutants of FTN_0096 and FTN_1133 were attenuated for replication in macrophages. The mutants displayed differing levels of attenuation in vivo, with the FTN_1133 mutant being the most attenuated. FTN_1133 has sequence similarity to the organic hydroperoxide resistance protein Ohr, an enzyme involved in the bacterial response to oxidative stress. We show that FTN_1133 is required for F. novicida resistance to, and degradation of, organic hydroperoxides as well as resistance to the action of the NADPH oxidase both in macrophages and mice. Furthermore, we demonstrate that F. holarctica LVS, a strain derived from a highly virulent human pathogenic species of Francisella, also requires this protein for organic hydroperoxide resistance as well as replication in macrophages and mice. This study expands our knowledge of Francisella's largely uncharacterized intracellular lifecycle and

  4. Discovery of Salmonella virulence factors translocated via outer membrane vesicles to murine macrophages.

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    Yoon, Hyunjin; Ansong, Charles; Adkins, Joshua N; Heffron, Fred

    2011-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, an intracellular pathogen and leading cause of food-borne illness, encodes a plethora of virulence effectors. Salmonella virulence factors are translocated into host cells and manipulate host cellular activities, providing a more hospitable environment for bacterial proliferation. In this study, we report a new set of virulence factors that is translocated into the host cytoplasm via bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMV). PagK (or PagK1), PagJ, and STM2585A (or PagK2) are small proteins composed of ∼70 amino acids and have high sequence homology to each other (>85% identity). Salmonella lacking all three homologues was attenuated for virulence in a mouse infection model, suggesting at least partial functional redundancy among the homologues. While each homologue was translocated into the macrophage cytoplasm, their translocation was independent of all three Salmonella gene-encoded type III secretion systems (T3SSs)-Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) T3SS, SPI-2 T3SS, and the flagellar system. Selected methods, including direct microscopy, demonstrated that the PagK-homologous proteins were secreted through OMV, which were enriched with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and outer membrane proteins. Vesicles produced by intracellular bacteria also contained lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1), suggesting the possibility of OMV convergence with host cellular components during intracellular trafficking. This study identified novel Salmonella virulence factors secreted via OMV and demonstrated that OMV can function as a vehicle to transfer virulence determinants to the cytoplasm of the infected host cell.

  5. CK2 Secreted by Leishmania braziliensis Mediates Macrophage Association Invasion: A Comparative Study between Virulent and Avirulent Promastigotes

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    Ana Madeira Brito Zylbersztejn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CK2 is a protein kinase distributed in different compartments of Leishmania braziliensis: an externally oriented ecto-CK2, an intracellular CK2, and a secreted CK2. This latter form is constitutively secreted from the parasite (CsCK2, but such secretion may be highly enhanced by the association of specific molecules, including enzyme substrates, which lead to a higher enzymatic activity, called inductively secreted CK2 (IsCK2. Here, we examined the influence of secreted CK2 (sCK2 activity on the infectivity of a virulent L. braziliensis strain. The virulent strain presented 121-fold higher total CK2 activity than those found in an avirulent strain. The use of specific CK2 inhibitors (TBB, DRB, or heparin inhibited virulent parasite growth, whereas no effect was observed in the avirulent parasites. When these inhibitors were added to the interaction assays between the virulent L. braziliensis strain and macrophages, association index was drastically inhibited. Polyamines enhanced sCK2 activity and increased the association index between parasites and macrophages. Finally, sCK2 and the supernatant of the virulent strain increased the association index between the avirulent strain and macrophages, which was inhibited by TBB. Thus, the kinase enzyme CK2 seems to be important to invasion mechanisms of L. braziliensis.

  6. Macrophage and Galleria mellonella infection models reflect the virulence of naturally occurring isolates of B. pseudomallei, B. thailandensis and B. oklahomensis

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    Michell Stephen L

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a tropical disease of humans with a variable and often fatal outcome. In murine models of infection, different strains exhibit varying degrees of virulence. In contrast, two related species, B. thailandensis and B. oklahomensis, are highly attenuated in mice. Our aim was to determine whether virulence in mice is reflected in macrophage or wax moth larvae (Galleria mellonella infection models. Results B. pseudomallei strains 576 and K96243, which have low median lethal dose (MLD values in mice, were able to replicate and induce cellular damage in macrophages and caused rapid death of G. mellonella. In contrast, B. pseudomallei strain 708a, which is attenuated in mice, showed reduced replication in macrophages, negligible cellular damage and was avirulent in G. mellonella larvae. B. thailandensis isolates were less virulent than B. pseudomallei in all of the models tested. However, we did record strain dependent differences. B. oklahomensis isolates were the least virulent isolates. They showed minimal ability to replicate in macrophages, were unable to evoke actin-based motility or to form multinucleated giant cells and were markedly attenuated in G. mellonella compared to B. thailandensis. Conclusions We have shown that the alternative infection models tested here, namely macrophages and Galleria mellonella, are able to distinguish between strains of B. pseudomallei, B. thailandensis and B. oklahomensis and that these differences reflect the observed virulence in murine infection models. Our results indicate that B. oklahomensis is the least pathogenic of the species investigated. They also show a correlation between isolates of B. thailandensis associated with human infection and virulence in macrophage and Galleria infection models.

  7. The balance of apoptotic and necrotic cell death in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infected macrophages is not dependent on bacterial virulence.

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    Rachel E Butler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An important mechanism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis pathogenesis is the ability to control cell death pathways in infected macrophages: apoptotic cell death is bactericidal, whereas necrotic cell death may facilitate bacterial dissemination and transmission. METHODS: We examine M.tuberculosis control of spontaneous and chemically induced macrophage cell death using automated confocal fluorescence microscopy, image analysis, flow cytometry, plate-reader based vitality assays, and M.tuberculosis strains including H37Rv, and isogenic virulent and avirulent strains of the Beijing lineage isolate GC1237. RESULTS: We show that bacterial virulence influences the dynamics of caspase activation and the total level of cytotoxicity. We show that the powerful ability of M.tuberculosis to inhibit exogenously stimulated apoptosis is abrogated by loss of virulence. However, loss of virulence did not influence the balance of macrophage apoptosis and necrosis--both virulent and avirulent isogenic strains of GC1237 induced predominantly necrotic cell death compared to H37Rv which induced a higher relative level of apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS: This reveals that macrophage necrosis and apoptosis are independently regulated during M. tuberculosis infection of macrophages. Virulence affects the level of host cell death and ability to inhibit apoptosis but other strain-specific characteristics influence the ultimate mode of host cell death and alter the balance of apoptosis and necrosis.

  8. Discovery of Salmonella Virulence Factors Translocated via Outer Membrane Vesicles to Murine Macrophages.

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    Yoon, Hyunjin; Ansong, Charles; Adkins, Joshua N.; Heffron, Fred

    2011-06-01

    We have previously shown that the regulators SpvR, FruR, IHF, PhoP/PhoQ, SsrA/SsrB, SlyA, Hnr, RpoE, SmpB, CsrA, RpoS, Crp, OmpR/EnvZ, and Hfq are essential for Salmonella Typhimurium virulence in mice. Here we use quantitative LC-MS-based proteomics profiling of in-frame deletion mutants of these 14 regulators to identify proteins that are coordinately regulated by these virulence regulators and are thus presumably novel factors contributing to Salmonella pathogenesis. Putative candidate proteins from proteomics analysis were determined, which exhibited similar abundance profiles to those of Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI)-2 type III secretion system (TTSS) proteins. A subset of 5 proteins including STM0082, STM1548, PdgL, STM1633, and STM3595 was selected for further analysis. All 5 proteins were expressed inside macrophage cells and STM0082 (SrfN) was secreted into host cytoplasm. Furthermore, deletion of STM0082 attenuated virulence in mice when administered intraperitoneally as determined by competitive index. srfN transcription was positively regulated by SsrAB, however, secretion was independent of SPI-2 TTSS as well as SPI-1 TTSS and flagella. Proteins including PagK and STM2585A, which are positively regulated by PhoP/PhoQ, have sec signal peptides as predicted for SrfN and were secreted into macrophage cytoplasm regardless of SPI-2 TTSS. Isolation of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) revealed the presence of SrfN, PagK, and STM2585A inside vesicle compartments. This result is the first case showing delivery of virulence effectors via OMVs in S. Typhimurium. Moreover, Hfq regulation of SrfN translation suggests that small non-coding RNAs may be responsible for regulating effector protein expression.

  9. High-resolution transcriptome of human macrophages.

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    Marc Beyer

    Full Text Available Macrophages are dynamic cells integrating signals from their microenvironment to develop specific functional responses. Although, microarray-based transcriptional profiling has established transcriptional reprogramming as an important mechanism for signal integration and cell function of macrophages, current knowledge on transcriptional regulation of human macrophages is far from complete. To discover novel marker genes, an area of great need particularly in human macrophage biology but also to generate a much more thorough transcriptome of human M1- and M1-like macrophages, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq of human macrophages. Using this approach we can now provide a high-resolution transcriptome profile of human macrophages under classical (M1-like and alternative (M2-like polarization conditions and demonstrate a dynamic range exceeding observations obtained by previous technologies, resulting in a more comprehensive understanding of the transcriptome of human macrophages. Using this approach, we identify important gene clusters so far not appreciated by standard microarray techniques. In addition, we were able to detect differential promoter usage, alternative transcription start sites, and different coding sequences for 57 gene loci in human macrophages. Moreover, this approach led to the identification of novel M1-associated (CD120b, TLR2, SLAMF7 as well as M2-associated (CD1a, CD1b, CD93, CD226 cell surface markers. Taken together, these data support that high-resolution transcriptome profiling of human macrophages by RNA-seq leads to a better understanding of macrophage function and will form the basis for a better characterization of macrophages in human health and disease.

  10. Changes in macrophage phenotype after infection of pigs with Haemophilus parasuis strains with different levels of virulence.

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    Costa-Hurtado, Mar; Olvera, Alexandre; Martinez-Moliner, Verónica; Galofré-Milà, Nuria; Martínez, Paloma; Dominguez, Javier; Aragon, Virginia

    2013-07-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is a colonizer of healthy piglets and the etiological agent of Glässer's disease. Differences in virulence among strains of H. parasuis have been widely observed. In order to explore the host-pathogen interaction, snatch-farrowed colostrum-deprived piglets were intranasally infected with 4 strains of H. parasuis: reference virulent strain Nagasaki, reference nonvirulent strain SW114, field strain IT29205 (from a systemic lesion and virulent in a previous challenge), and field strain F9 (from the nasal cavity of a healthy piglet). At different times after infection, two animals of each group were euthanized and alveolar macrophages were analyzed for the expression of CD163, CD172a, SLA I (swine histocompatibility leukocyte antigen I), SLA II, sialoadhesin (or CD169), and CD14. At 1 day postinfection (dpi), virulent strains induced reduced expression of CD163, SLA II, and CD172a on the surfaces of the macrophages, while nonvirulent strains induced increased expression of CD163, both compared to noninfected controls. At 2 dpi, the pattern switched into a strong expression of CD172a, CD163, and sialoadhesin by the virulent strains, which was followed by a steep increase in interleukin 8 (IL-8) and soluble CD163 in serum at 3 to 4 dpi. The early increase in surface expression of CD163 induced by nonvirulent strains went along with higher levels of IL-8 in serum than those induced by virulent strains in the first 2 days of infection. Alpha interferon (IFN-α) induction was observed only in animals infected with nonvirulent strains. Overall, these results are compatible with a delay in macrophage activation by virulent strains, which may be critical for disease production.

  11. IroT/mavN, a new iron-regulated gene involved in Legionella pneumophila virulence against amoebae and macrophages.

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    Portier, Emilie; Zheng, Huaixin; Sahr, Tobias; Burnside, Denise M; Mallama, Celeste; Buchrieser, Carmen; Cianciotto, Nicholas P; Héchard, Yann

    2015-04-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a pathogenic bacterium commonly found in water. Eventually, it could be transmitted to humans via inhalation of contaminated aerosols. Iron is known as a key requirement for the growth of L. pneumophila in the environment and within its hosts. Many studies were performed to understand iron utilization by L. pneumophila but no global approaches were conducted. In this study, transcriptomic analyses were performed, comparing gene expression in L. pneumophila in standard versus iron restricted conditions. Among the regulated genes, a newly described one, lpp_2867, was highly induced in iron-restricted conditions. Mutants lacking this gene in L. pneumophila were not affected in siderophore synthesis or utilization. On the contrary, they were defective for growth on iron-depleted solid media and for ferrous iron uptake. A sequence analysis predicts that Lpp_2867 is a membrane protein, suggesting that it is involved in ferrous iron transport. We thus named it IroT, for iron transporter. Infection assays showed that the mutants are highly impaired in intracellular growth within their environmental host Acanthamoeba castellanii and human macrophages. Taken together, our results show that IroT is involved, directly or indirectly, in ferrous iron transport and is a key virulence factor for L. pneumophila.

  12. Reconstructing the highly virulent Classical Swine Fever Virus strain Koslov

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    Fahnøe, Ulrik; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Nielsen, Jens

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) may be highly virulent in pigs with a mortality rate close to 100%. The CSFV “Koslov strain” is known to be one of the most virulent CSFV, but so far a functional cloned cDNA of this strain has not been described. We suggest that this may be due to the error...

  13. Environmental Legionella spp. collected in urban test sites of South East Queensland, Australia, are virulent to human macrophages in vitro.

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    Lawrence, Amba; Eglezos, Sofroni; Huston, Wilhelmina

    2016-01-01

    Legionellae are frequent contaminants of potable water supplies, resulting in sporadic infections and occasional outbreaks. Isolates of Legionella were collected from urban test sites within South East Queensland and evaluated for their virulence potential in vitro. Two strains (from the species Legionella londiniensis and Legionella quinlivanii) were demonstrated to have the ability to infect human macrophages, while a strain from the species Legionella anisa did not maintain an infection over the same time course. This suggests that the spectrum of urban environmentally associated Legionella with potential to cause human disease might be greater than currently considered.

  14. Identification of differentially expressed proteins in porcine alveolar macrophages infected with virulent/attenuated strains of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

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    Yan-Jun Zhou

    Full Text Available The highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV is still a serious threat to the swine industry. However, the pathogenic mechanism of HP-PRRSV remains unclear. We infected host porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs with the virulent HuN4 strain and the attenuated HuN4-F112 strain and then utilized fluorescent two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE to screen for intracellular proteins that were differentially expressed in host cells infected with the two strains. There were 153 proteins with significant different expression (P<0.01 observed, 42 of which were subjected to mass spectrometry, and 24 proteins were identified. PAM cells infected with the virulent strain showed upregulated expression of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2, heat shock protein beta-1 (HSPB1, and proteasome subunit alpha type 6 (PSMA6, which were downregulated in cells infected with the attenuated strain. The upregulation of PKM2 provides sufficient energy for viral replication, and the upregulation of HSPB1 inhibits host cell apoptosis and therefore facilitates mass replication of the virulent strain, while the upregulation of PSMA6 facilitates the evasion of immune surveillance by the virus. Studying on those molecules mentioned above may be able to help us to understand some unrevealed details of HP-PRRSV infection, and then help us to decrease its threat to the swine industry in the future.

  15. Identification of Salmonella SPI-2 secretion system components required for SpvB-mediated cytotoxicity in macrophages and virulence in mice.

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    Browne, Sara H; Hasegawa, Patricia; Okamoto, Sharon; Fierer, Joshua; Guiney, Donald G

    2008-03-01

    The Salmonella SpvB protein possesses ADP-ribosyl transferase activity. SpvB, acting as an intracellular toxin, covalently modifies monomeric actin, leading to loss of F-actin filaments in Salmonella-infected human macrophages. Using defined Salmonella mutants, different functional components of the SPI-2 type three secretion system (TTSS), ssaV, spiC, sseB, sseC, and sseD, were found to be required for SpvB-mediated actin depolymerization in human macrophages. Expression of SpvB protein in Salmonella was not affected by any of the SPI-2 mutants and the effects of these loci were not due to reduced numbers of intracellular bacteria. Interestingly, the major SPI-2 virulence effector, SifA, is not required for SpvB action. Further, caspase-3 activation is an additional marker of cytotoxicity in Salmonella-infected human macrophages. Caspase-3 activity depended on SpvB and SPI-2 TTSS function, but not on SifA. These human macrophage cell culture results were corroborated by virulence studies in mice. Using competitive infection of mice with mixed inocula of single and double mutants, spvBmut1 mutation did not have an effect independent of ssaJ mutation, essential for SPI-2 TTSS function. In contrast, competitive infection studies in mice confirmed that SpvB and SifA have independent virulence effects, as predicted by the macrophage studies.

  16. Virulent and avirulent strains of Toxoplasma gondii which differ in their glycosylphosphatidylinositol content induce similar biological functions in macrophages.

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    Sebastian Niehus

    Full Text Available Glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs from several protozoan parasites are thought to elicit a detrimental stimulation of the host innate immune system aside their main function to anchor surface proteins. Here we analyzed the GPI biosynthesis of an avirulent Toxoplasma gondii type 2 strain (PTG by metabolic radioactive labeling. We determined the biological function of individual GPI species in the PTG strain in comparison with previously characterized GPI-anchors of a virulent strain (RH. The GPI intermediates of both strains were structurally similar, however the abundance of two of six GPI intermediates was significantly reduced in the PTG strain. The side-by-side comparison of GPI-anchor content revealed that the PTG strain had only ∼ 34% of the protein-free GPIs as well as ∼ 70% of the GPI-anchored proteins with significantly lower rates of protein N-glycosylation compared to the RH strain. All mature GPIs from both strains induced comparable secretion levels of TNF-α and IL-12p40, and initiated TLR4/MyD88-dependent NF-κBp65 activation in macrophages. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PTG and RH strains differ in their GPI biosynthesis and possess significantly different GPI-anchor content, while individual GPI species of both strains induce similar biological functions in macrophages.

  17. Virulent and Vaccine Strains of Streptococcus equi ssp. zooepidemicus Have Different Influences on Phagocytosis and Cytokine Secretion of Macrophages.

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    Jie, Peng; Zhe, Ma; Chengwei, Hua; Huixing, Lin; Hui, Zhang; Chengping, Lu; Hongjie, Fan

    2017-01-06

    Swine streptococcosis is a significant threat to the Chinese pig industry, and Streptococcus equi ssp. zooepidemicus (SEZ) is one of the major pathogens. SEZ ATCC35246 is a classical virulent strain, while SEZ ST171 is a Chinese attenuated vaccine strain. In this study, we employed stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to determine the differential response of macrophages to infection by these two strains. Eighty-seven upregulated proteins and 135 downregulated proteins were identified. The proteomic results were verified by real-time polymerase chain reaction for 10 chosen genes and Western blotting for three proteins. All differentially abundant proteins were analyzed for their Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes annotations. Certain downregulated proteins were associated with immunity functions, and the upregulated proteins were related to cytomembrane and cytoskeleton regulation. The phagocytosis rate and cytokine genes transcription in Raw264.7 cells during SEZ ATCC35246 and ST171 infection were detected to confirm the bioinformatics results. These results showed that different effects on macrophage phagocytosis and cytokine expression might explain the different phenotypes of SEZ ATCC35246 and ST171 infection. This research provided clues to the mechanisms of host immunity responses to SEZ ST171and SEZ ATCC35246, which could identify potential therapy and vaccine development targets.

  18. Expression of bacterial virulence factors and cytokines during in vitro macrophage infection by enteroinvasive Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri: a comparative study

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    Silvia Y Bando

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC and Shigellaspp cause bacillary dysentery in humans by invading and multiplying within epithelial cells of the colonic mucosa. Although EIEC and Shigellashare many genetic and biochemical similarities, the illness caused by Shigellais more severe. Thus, genomic and structure-function molecular studies on the biological interactions of these invasive enterobacteria with eukaryotic cells have focused on Shigella rather than EIEC. Here we comparatively studied the interactions of EIEC and of Shigella flexneriwith cultured J774 macrophage-like cells. We evaluated several phenotypes: (i bacterial escape from macrophages after phagocytosis, (ii macrophage death induced by EIEC and S. flexneri, (iii macrophage cytokine expression in response to infection and (iv expression of plasmidial (pINV virulence genes. The results showed thatS. flexneri caused macrophage killing earlier and more intensely than EIEC. Both pathogens induced significant macrophage production of TNF, IL-1 and IL-10 after 7 h of infection. Transcription levels of the gene invasion plasmid antigen-C were lower in EIEC than in S. flexneri throughout the course of the infection; this could explain the diminished virulence of EIEC compared to S. flexneri.

  19. Impact of plasmids, including those encodingVirB4/D4 type IV secretion systems, on Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg virulence in macrophages and epithelial cells.

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    Kuppan Gokulan

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg (S. Heidelberg can cause foodborne illness in humans following the consumption of contaminated meat and poultry products. Recent studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that certain S. Heidelberg isolated from food-animal sources harbor multiple transmissible plasmids with genes that encode antimicrobial resistance, virulence and a VirB4/D4 type-IV secretion system. This study examines the potential role of these transmissible plasmids in bacterial uptake and survival in intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages, and the molecular basis of host immune system modulation that may be associated with disease progression. A series of transconjugant and transformant strains were developed with different combinations of the plasmids to determine the roles of the individual and combinations of plasmids on virulence. Overall the Salmonella strains containing the VirB/D4 T4SS plasmids entered and survived in epithelial cells and macrophages to a greater degree than those without the plasmid, even though they carried other plasmid types. During entry in macrophages, the VirB/D4 T4SS encoding genes are up-regulated in a time-dependent fashion. When the potential mechanisms for increased virulence were examined using an antibacterial Response PCR Array, the strain containing the T4SS down regulated several host innate immune response genes which likely contributed to the increased uptake and survival within macrophages and epithelial cells.

  20. Impact of plasmids, including those encodingVirB4/D4 type IV secretion systems, on Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg virulence in macrophages and epithelial cells.

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    Gokulan, Kuppan; Khare, Sangeeta; Rooney, Anthony W; Han, Jing; Lynne, Aaron M; Foley, Steven L

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg (S. Heidelberg) can cause foodborne illness in humans following the consumption of contaminated meat and poultry products. Recent studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that certain S. Heidelberg isolated from food-animal sources harbor multiple transmissible plasmids with genes that encode antimicrobial resistance, virulence and a VirB4/D4 type-IV secretion system. This study examines the potential role of these transmissible plasmids in bacterial uptake and survival in intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages, and the molecular basis of host immune system modulation that may be associated with disease progression. A series of transconjugant and transformant strains were developed with different combinations of the plasmids to determine the roles of the individual and combinations of plasmids on virulence. Overall the Salmonella strains containing the VirB/D4 T4SS plasmids entered and survived in epithelial cells and macrophages to a greater degree than those without the plasmid, even though they carried other plasmid types. During entry in macrophages, the VirB/D4 T4SS encoding genes are up-regulated in a time-dependent fashion. When the potential mechanisms for increased virulence were examined using an antibacterial Response PCR Array, the strain containing the T4SS down regulated several host innate immune response genes which likely contributed to the increased uptake and survival within macrophages and epithelial cells.

  1. Comparison of use of Vero cell line and suspension culture of murine macrophage to attenuation of virulence of Neospora caninum.

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    Khordadmehr, Monireh; Namavari, Mehdi; Khodakaram-Tafti, Azizollah; Mansourian, Maryam; Rahimian, Abdollah; Daneshbod, Yahya

    2013-10-01

    In this study the tachyzoite yields of Neospora caninum were compared in two cell lines: Vero (African Green Monkey Kidney) and suspension culture of murine macrophage (J774) cell lines. Then, N. caninum were continuously passaged in these cell lines for 3 months and the effect of host cells on virulence of tachyzoites was assessed by broiler chicken embryonated eggs. Inoculation was performed in the chorioallantoic (CA) liquid of the embryonated eggs with different dilutions (0.5 × 10(4), 1.0 × 10(4), 1.5 × 10(4)) of tachtzoites isolated from these cell cultures. The mortality pattern and pathological changes of the dead embryos and hatched chickens were noted. Tissue samples of brain, liver and heart were examined by histopathological and detection of DNA of parasite by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Also, consecutive sections of the tissues examined histologically were used for immunohistochemical (IHC) examination. Embryos inoculated with tachyzoites derived from Vero cell line (group V) showed a higher mortality rate (100%) than the embryos that received tachyzoites derived from J774 cell line (group J) (10% mortality rate). The results of this study indicated that the culture of N. caninum in J774 cell led to a marked increase in the number of tachyzoite yields and rapid attenuation in comparison to Vero, so the results were confirmed by IHC and PCR. This study is the first report of the significant effect of host cell on the attenuation of virulence of N. caninum tachyzoites. These findings could potentially provide a practical approach in the mass production of N. caninum tachyzoites, and also in producing live attenuated vaccine.

  2. RNA-sequence analysis of primary alveolar macrophages after in vitro infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus strains of differing virulence.

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    Badaoui, Bouabid; Rutigliano, Teresa; Anselmo, Anna; Vanhee, Merijn; Nauwynck, Hans; Giuffra, Elisabetta; Botti, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) mainly infects porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs), resulting in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) in pigs. Most of the transcriptomic studies on PAMs infected with PRRSV conducted thus far have made use of microarray technology. Here, we investigated the transcriptome of PAMs in vitro at 12 h post-infection with two European PRRSV strains characterized by low (Lelystad, LV) and high (Lena) virulence through RNA-Seq. The expression levels of genes, isoforms, alternative transcription start sites (TSS) and differential promoter usage revealed a complex pattern of transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene regulation upon infection with the two strains. Gene ontology analysis confirmed that infection of PAMs with both the Lena and LV strains affected signaling pathways directly linked to the innate immune response, including interferon regulatory factors (IRF), RIG1-like receptors, TLRs and PKR pathways. The results confirmed that interferon signaling is crucial for transcriptional regulation during PAM infection. IFN-β1 and IFN-αω, but not IFN-α, were up-regulated following infection with either the LV or Lena strain. The down-regulation of canonical pathways, such as the interplay between the innate and adaptive immune responses, cell death and TLR3/TLR7 signaling, was observed for both strains, but Lena triggered a stronger down-regulation than LV. This analysis contributes to a better understanding of the interactions between PRRSV and PAMs and outlines the differences in the responses of PAMs to strains with different levels of virulence, which may lead to the development of new PRRSV control strategies.

  3. RNA-sequence analysis of primary alveolar macrophages after in vitro infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus strains of differing virulence.

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    Bouabid Badaoui

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV mainly infects porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs, resulting in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS in pigs. Most of the transcriptomic studies on PAMs infected with PRRSV conducted thus far have made use of microarray technology. Here, we investigated the transcriptome of PAMs in vitro at 12 h post-infection with two European PRRSV strains characterized by low (Lelystad, LV and high (Lena virulence through RNA-Seq. The expression levels of genes, isoforms, alternative transcription start sites (TSS and differential promoter usage revealed a complex pattern of transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene regulation upon infection with the two strains. Gene ontology analysis confirmed that infection of PAMs with both the Lena and LV strains affected signaling pathways directly linked to the innate immune response, including interferon regulatory factors (IRF, RIG1-like receptors, TLRs and PKR pathways. The results confirmed that interferon signaling is crucial for transcriptional regulation during PAM infection. IFN-β1 and IFN-αω, but not IFN-α, were up-regulated following infection with either the LV or Lena strain. The down-regulation of canonical pathways, such as the interplay between the innate and adaptive immune responses, cell death and TLR3/TLR7 signaling, was observed for both strains, but Lena triggered a stronger down-regulation than LV. This analysis contributes to a better understanding of the interactions between PRRSV and PAMs and outlines the differences in the responses of PAMs to strains with different levels of virulence, which may lead to the development of new PRRSV control strategies.

  4. Identification of secreted exoproteome fingerprints of highly-virulent and non-virulent Staphylococcus aureus strains.

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    Emilia eBonar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal inhabitant of skin and mucous membranes in nose vestibule but also an important opportunistic pathogen of humans and livestock. The extracellular proteome as a whole constitutes its major virulence determinant; however, the involvement of particular proteins is still relatively poorly understood. In this study, we compared the extracellular proteomes of poultry-derived S. aureus strains exhibiting a virulent (VIR and non-virulent (NVIR phenotype in a chicken embryo experimental infection model with the aim to identify proteomic signatures associated with the particular phenotypes. Despite significant heterogeneity within the analyzed proteomes, we identified alpha-haemolysin and bifunctional autolysin as indicators of virulence, whereas glutamylendopeptidase production was characteristic for non-virulent strains.Staphopain C (StpC was identified in both the VIR and NVIR proteomes and the latter fact contradicted previous findings suggesting its involvement in virulence. By supplementing NVIR, StpC-negative strains with StpC and comparing the virulence of parental and supplemented strains, we demonstrated that staphopain C alone does not affect staphylococcal virulence in a chicken embryo model.

  5. Identification of Secreted Exoproteome Fingerprints of Highly-Virulent and Non-Virulent Staphylococcus aureus Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, Emilia; Wojcik, Iwona; Jankowska, Urszula; Kedracka-Krok, Sylwia; Bukowski, Michal; Polakowska, Klaudia; Lis, Marcin W.; Kosecka-Strojek, Maja; Sabat, Artur J.; Dubin, Grzegorz; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Miedzobrodzki, Jacek; Dubin, Adam; Wladyka, Benedykt

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal inhabitant of skin and mucous membranes in nose vestibule but also an important opportunistic pathogen of humans and livestock. The extracellular proteome as a whole constitutes its major virulence determinant; however, the involvement of particular proteins is still relatively poorly understood. In this study, we compared the extracellular proteomes of poultry-derived S. aureus strains exhibiting a virulent (VIR) and non-virulent (NVIR) phenotype in a chicken embryo experimental infection model with the aim to identify proteomic signatures associated with the particular phenotypes. Despite significant heterogeneity within the analyzed proteomes, we identified alpha-haemolysin and bifunctional autolysin as indicators of virulence, whereas glutamylendopeptidase production was characteristic for non-virulent strains. Staphopain C (StpC) was identified in both the VIR and NVIR proteomes and the latter fact contradicted previous findings suggesting its involvement in virulence. By supplementing NVIR, StpC-negative strains with StpC, and comparing the virulence of parental and supplemented strains, we demonstrated that staphopain C alone does not affect staphylococcal virulence in a chicken embryo model. PMID:27242969

  6. Detection of virulent strains of Streptococcus suis type 2 and highly virulent strains of Streptococcus suis type 1 in tonsillar specimens of pigs by PCR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisselink, H.J.; Reek, F.H.; Vecht, U.; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N.; Smits, M.A.; Smith, H.E.

    1999-01-01

    We developed a PCR assay for the rapid and sensitive detection of virulent Streptococcus suis type 2 and highly virulent S. suis type 1 in tonsillar specimens from pigs. The PCR primers were based on the sequence of the gene encoding the EF-protein of virulent S. suis type 2 strains (MRP EF ) and hi

  7. Identification of Secreted Exoproteome Fingerprints of Highly-Virulent and Non-Virulent Staphylococcus aureus Strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonar, Emilia; Wojcik, Iwona; Jankowska, Urszula; Kedracka-Krok, Sylwia; Bukowski, Michal; Polakowska, Klaudia; Lis, Marcin W; Kosecka-Strojek, Maja; Sabat, Artur J; Dubin, Grzegorz; Friedrich, Alexander W; Miedzobrodzki, Jacek; Dubin, Adam; Wladyka, Benedykt

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal inhabitant of skin and mucous membranes in nose vestibule but also an important opportunistic pathogen of humans and livestock. The extracellular proteome as a whole constitutes its major virulence determinant; however, the involvement of particular proteins is s

  8. Identification of Secreted Exoproteome Fingerprints of Highly-Virulent and Non-Virulent Staphylococcus aureus Strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonar, Emilia; Wojcik, Iwona; Jankowska, Urszula; Kedracka-Krok, Sylwia; Bukowski, Michal; Polakowska, Klaudia; Lis, Marcin W; Kosecka-Strojek, Maja; Sabat, Artur J; Dubin, Grzegorz; Friedrich, Alexander W; Miedzobrodzki, Jacek; Dubin, Adam; Wladyka, Benedykt

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal inhabitant of skin and mucous membranes in nose vestibule but also an important opportunistic pathogen of humans and livestock. The extracellular proteome as a whole constitutes its major virulence determinant; however, the involvement of particular proteins is

  9. Virulence of the Pseudomonas fluorescens clinical strain MFN1032 towards Dictyostelium discoideum and macrophages in relation with type III secretion system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sperandio Daniel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas fluorescens biovar I MFN1032 is a clinical isolate able to grow at 37°C. This strain displays secretion-mediated hemolytic activity involving phospholipase C and cyclolipopeptides, and a cell-associated hemolytic activity distinct from the secreted hemolytic activity. Cell-associated hemolysis is independent of biosurfactant production and remains in a gacA mutant. Disruption of the hrpU-like operon (the basal part of type III secretion system from rhizospheric strains suppresses this activity. We hypothesized that this phenotype could reflect evolution of an ancestral mechanism involved in the survival of this species in its natural niche. In this study, we evaluated the hrpU-like operon’s contribution to other virulence mechanisms using a panel of Pseudomonas strains from various sources. Results We found that MFN1032 inhibited the growth of the amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum and that this inhibition involved the hrpU-like operon and was absent in a gacA mutant. MFN1032 was capable of causing macrophage lysis, if the hrpU-like operon was intact, and this cytotoxicity remained in a gacA mutant. Cell-associated hemolytic activity and macrophage necrosis were found in other P. fluorescens clinical isolates, but not in biocontrol P. fluorescens strains harbouring hrpU-like operon. The growth of Dictyostelium discoideum was inhibited to a different extent by P. fluorescens strains without correlation between this inhibition and hrpU-like operon sequences. Conclusions In P. fluorescens MFN1032, the basal part of type III secretion system plays a role in D. discoideum growth inhibition and macrophage necrosis. The inhibition of D. discoideum growth is dependent on the GacS/GacA system, while cell-associated hemolytic activity and macrophage lysis are not. Virulence against eukaryotic cells based on the hrpU-like operon may be more than just a stochastic evolution of a conserved system dedicated to survival in

  10. Expression of interferon gamma by a highly virulent strain of Newcastle disease virus decreases its pathogenicity in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susta, Leonardo; Cornax, Ingrid; Diel, Diego G; Garcia, Stivalis Cardenas; Miller, Patti J; Liu, Xiufan; Hu, Shunlin; Brown, Corrie C; Afonso, Claudio L

    2013-01-01

    The role of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) expression during Newcastle disease virus (NDV) infection in chickens is unknown. Infection of chickens with highly virulent NDV results in rapid death, which is preceded by increased expression of IFN-γ in target tissues. IFN-γ is a cytokine that has pleiotropic biological effects including intrinsic antiviral activity and immunomodulatory effects that may increase morbidity and mortality during infections. To better understand how IFN-γ contributes to NDV pathogenesis, the coding sequence of the chicken IFN-γ gene was inserted in the genome of the virulent NDV strain ZJ1 (rZJ1-IFNγ), and the effects of high levels of IFN-γ expression during infection were determined in vivo and in vitro. IFN-γ expression did not significantly affect NDV replication in fibroblast or in macrophage cell lines. However, it affected the pathogenesis of rZJ1-IFNγ in vivo. Relative to the virus expressing the green fluorescent protein (rZJ1-GFP) or lacking the IFN-γ insert (rZJ1-rev), expression of IFN-γ by rZJ1-IFNγ produced a marked decrease of pathogenicity in 4-week-old chickens, as evidenced by lack of mortality, decreased disease severity, virus shedding, and antigen distribution. These results suggest that early expression of IFN-γ had a significant protective role against the effects of highly virulent NDV infection in chickens, and further suggests that the level and timing of expression of this cytokine may be critical for the disease outcome. This is the first description of an in vivo attenuation of a highly virulent NDV by avian cytokines, and shows the feasibility to use NDV for cytokine delivery in chicken organs. This approach may facilitate the study of the role of other avian cytokines on the pathogenesis of NDV.

  11. Comparative proteomic analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ppGpp-deficient mutant to identify a novel virulence protein required for intracellular survival in macrophages

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    Kumagai Yoshinori

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The global ppGpp-mediated stringent response in pathogenic bacteria plays an important role in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium, several genes, including virulence genes, are regulated by ppGpp when bacteria are under the stringent response. To understand the control of virulence genes by ppGpp in S. Typhimurium, agarose 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE combined with mass spectrometry was used and a comprehensive 2-DE reference map of amino acid-starved S. Typhimurium strain SH100, a derivative of ATCC 14028, was established. Results Of the 366 examined spots, 269 proteins were successfully identified. The comparative analysis of the wild-type and ppGpp0 mutant strains revealed 55 proteins, the expression patterns of which were affected by ppGpp. Using a mouse infection model, we further identified a novel virulence-associated factor, STM3169, from the ppGpp-regulated and Salmonella-specific proteins. In addition, Salmonella strains carrying mutations in the gene encoding STM3169 showed growth defects and impaired growth within macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. Furthermore, we found that expression of stm3169 was controlled by ppGpp and SsrB, a response regulator of the two-component system located on Salmonella pathogenicity island 2. Conclusions A proteomic approach using a 2-DE reference map can prove a powerful tool for analyzing virulence factors and the regulatory network involved in Salmonella pathogenesis. Our results also provide evidence of a global response mediated by ppGpp in S. enterica.

  12. The balance of apoptotic and necrotic cell death in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infected macrophages is not dependent on bacterial virulence.

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An important mechanism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis pathogenesis is the ability to control cell death pathways in infected macrophages: apoptotic cell death is bactericidal, whereas necrotic cell death may facilitate bacterial dissemination and transmission. METHODS: We examine M.tuberculosis control of spontaneous and chemically induced macrophage cell death using automated confocal fluorescence microscopy, image analysis, flow cytometry, plate-reader based vitality assays, and ...

  13. Insufficient generation of mycobactericidal mediators and inadequate level of phagosomal maturation are related with susceptibility to virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in mouse macrophages

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    Hyo-Ji eLee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis, Mtb infection, and it remains major life-threatening infectious diseases worldwide. Although Mtb has infected one-third of the present human population, only 5-10% of immunocompetent individuals are genetically susceptible to tuberculosis. All inbred strains of mice are susceptible to tuberculosis; however, some mouse strains are much more susceptible than others. In a previous report, we showed that Th1-mediated immunity was not responsible for the differential susceptibility between mouse models. To examine whether these susceptibility differences between inbred mouse strains are due to the insufficient production of effector molecules in the early stage of innate immunity, we investigated mycobacteriostatic function of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs in resistant (BALB/c and C57BL/6 and susceptible strains (DBA/2 that were infected with virulent Mtb (H37Rv or attenuated Mtb (H37Ra. The growth rate of virulent Mtb in infected cells was significantly higher in DBA/2 BMDMs, whereas the growth of the attenuated strain was similar in the three inbred mouse BMDM strains. In addition, the death rate of Mtb-infected cells increased with the infectious dose when DBA/2 BMDMs were infected with H37Rv. The intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS level was lower in DBA/2 BMDMs that were infected with virulent Mtb at an early post-infection time point. The expression levels of phagosomal maturation markers, including early endosomal antigen-1 (EEA1 and lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1, were significantly decreased in DBA/2 BMDM that were infected with virulent Mtb, whereas IFNγ-treatment restored the phagosomal maturation activity. The nitric oxide (NO production levels were also significantly lower in DBA/2 BMDMs that were infected with virulent H37Rv at late post infection points; however, this was not observed with the attenuated H37Ra strain. Furthermore

  14. Virulence-related Mycobacterium avium subsp hominissuis MAV_2928 gene is associated with vacuole remodeling in macrophages

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    Vogt Steven

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacterium avium subsp hominissuis (previously Mycobacterium avium subsp avium is an environmental organism associated with opportunistic infections in humans. Mycobacterium hominissuis infects and replicates within mononuclear phagocytes. Previous study characterized an attenuated mutant in which the PPE gene (MAV_2928 homologous to Rv1787 was inactivated. This mutant, in contrast to the wild-type bacterium, was shown both to have impaired the ability to replicate within macrophages and to have prevented phagosome/lysosome fusion. Results MAV_2928 gene is primarily upregulated upon phagocytosis. The transcriptional profile of macrophages infected with the wild-type bacterium and the mutant were examined using DNA microarray, which showed that the two bacteria interact uniquely with mononuclear phagocytes. Based on the results, it was hypothesized that the phagosome environment and vacuole membrane of the wild-type bacterium might differ from the mutant. Wild-type bacterium phagosomes expressed a number of proteins different from those infected with the mutant. Proteins on the phagosomes were confirmed by fluorescence microscopy and Western blot. The environment in the phagosome of macrophages infected with the mutant differed from the environment of vacuoles with M. hominissuis wild-type in the concentration of zinc, manganese, calcium and potassium. Conclusion The results suggest that the MAV_2928 gene/operon might participate in the establishment of bacterial intracellular environment in macrophages.

  15. Chlamydial virulence determinants in atherogenesis: the role of chlamydial lipopolysaccharide and heat shock protein 60 in macrophage-lipoprotein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalayoglu, M V; Indrawati; Morrison, R P; Morrison, S G; Yuan, Y; Byrne, G I

    2000-06-01

    Data from a spectrum of epidemiologic, pathologic, and animal model studies show that Chlamydia pneumoniae infection is associated with coronary artery disease, but it is not clear how the organism may initiate or promote atherosclerosis. It is postulated that C. pneumoniae triggers key atherogenic events through specific virulence determinants. C. pneumoniae induces mononuclear phagocyte foam cell formation by chlamydial lipopolysaccharide (cLPS) and low-density lipoprotein oxidation by chlamydial hsp60 (chsp60). Thus, different chlamydial components may promote distinct events implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. Data implicating cLPS and chsp60 in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis are discussed and novel approaches are presented for attempting to elucidate how these putative virulence determinants signal mononuclear phagocytes to modulate lipoprotein influx and modification.

  16. Low-oxygen tensions found in Salmonella-infected gut tissue boost Salmonella replication in macrophages by impairing antimicrobial activity and augmenting Salmonella virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennewein, Jonas; Matuszak, Jasmin; Walter, Steffi; Felmy, Boas; Gendera, Kathrin; Schatz, Valentin; Nowottny, Monika; Liebsch, Gregor; Hensel, Michael; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich; Gerlach, Roman G; Jantsch, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    In Salmonella infection, the Salmonella pathogenicity island-2 (SPI-2)-encoded type three secretion system (T3SS2) is of key importance for systemic disease and survival in host cells. For instance, in the streptomycin-pretreated mouse model SPI-2-dependent Salmonella replication in lamina propria CD11c(-)CXCR1(-) monocytic phagocytes/macrophages (MΦ) is required for the development of colitis. In addition, containment of intracellular Salmonella in the gut critically depends on the antimicrobial effects of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase (PHOX), and possibly type 2 nitric oxide synthase (NOS2). For both antimicrobial enzyme complexes, oxygen is an essential substrate. However, the amount of available oxygen upon enteroinvasive Salmonella infection in the gut tissue and its impact on Salmonella-MΦ interactions was unknown. Therefore, we measured the gut tissue oxygen levels in a model of Salmonella enterocolitis using luminescence two-dimensional in vivo oxygen imaging. We found that gut tissue oxygen levels dropped from ∼78 Torr (∼11% O2) to values of ∼16 Torr (∼2% O2) during infection. Because in vivo virulence of Salmonella depends on the Salmonella survival in MΦ, Salmonella-MΦ interaction was analysed under such low oxygen values. These experiments revealed an increased intracellular replication and survival of wild-type and t3ss2 non-expressing Salmonella. These findings were paralleled by blunted nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and reduced Salmonella ROS perception. In addition, hypoxia enhanced SPI-2 transcription and translocation of SPI-2-encoded virulence protein. Neither pharmacological blockade of PHOX and NOS2 nor impairment of T3SS2 virulence function alone mimicked the effect of hypoxia on Salmonella replication under normoxic conditions. However, if t3ss2 non-expressing Salmonella were used, hypoxia did not further enhance Salmonella recovery in a PHOX and NOS2-deficient situation. Hence, these data suggest that

  17. Identification of Leptospira interrogans phospholipase C as a novel virulence factor responsible for intracellular free calcium ion elevation during macrophage death.

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    Jing-Fang Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leptospira-induced macrophage death has been confirmed to play a crucial role in pathogenesis of leptospirosis, a worldwide zoonotic infectious disease. Intracellular free Ca(2+ concentration ([Ca(2+]i elevation induced by infection can cause cell death, but [Ca(2+]i changes and high [Ca(2+]i-induced death of macrophages due to infection of Leptospira have not been previously reported. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We first used a Ca(2+-specific fluorescence probe to confirm that the infection of L. interrogans strain Lai triggered a significant increase of [Ca(2+]i in mouse J774A.1 or human THP-1 macrophages. Laser confocal microscopic examination showed that the [Ca(2+]i elevation was caused by both extracellular Ca(2+ influx through the purinergic receptor, P2X7, and Ca(2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum, as seen by suppression of [Ca(2+]i elevation when receptor-gated calcium channels were blocked or P2X7 was depleted. The LB361 gene product of the spirochete exhibited phosphatidylinositol phospholipase C (L-PI-PLC activity to hydrolyze phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2 into inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3, which in turn induces intracellular Ca(2+ release from endoplasmic reticulum, with the Km of 199 µM and Kcat of 8.566E-5 S(-1. Secretion of L-PI-PLC from the spirochete into supernatants of leptospire-macrophage co-cultures and cytosol of infected macrophages was also observed by Western Blot assay. Lower [Ca(2+]i elevation was induced by infection with a LB361-deficient leptospiral mutant, whereas transfection of the LB361 gene caused a mild increase in [Ca(2+]i. Moreover, PI-PLCs (PI-PLC-β3 and PI-PLC-γ1 of the two macrophages were activated by phosphorylation during infection. Flow cytometric detection demonstrated that high [Ca(2+]i increases induced apoptosis and necrosis of macrophages, while mild [Ca(2+]i elevation only caused apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrated that L

  18. The role of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway in Cryptococcus neoformans high temperature growth and virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gontijo, Fabiano Assis; Pascon, Renata C.; Fernandes, Larissa; Machado, Joel; Alspaugh, J. Andrew; Vallim, Marcelo A

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections are often difficult to treat due to the inherent similarities between fungal and animal cells and the resulting host toxicity from many antifungal compounds. Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen of humans that causes life-threatening disease, primarily in immunocompromised patients. Since antifungal therapy for this microorganism is limited, many investigators have explored novel drug targets aim at virulence factors, such as the ability to grow at mammalian physiological temperature (37°C). To address this issue, we used the Agrobacterium tumefaciens gene delivery system to create a random insertion mutagenesis library that was screened for altered growth at elevated temperatures. Among several mutants unable to grow at 37°C, we explored one bearing an interruption in the URA4 gene. This gene encodes dihydroorotase (DHOase) that is involved in the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine ribonucleotides. Loss of the C. neoformans Ura4 protein, by targeted gene interruption, resulted in an expected uracil/uridine auxotrophy and an unexpected high temperature growth defect. In addition, the ura4 mutant displayed phenotypic defects in other prominent virulence factors (melanin, capsule and phospholipase) and reduced stress response compared to wild type and reconstituted strains. Accordingly, this mutant had a decreased survival rate in macrophages and attenuated virulence in a murine model of cryptococcal infection. Quantitative PCR analysis suggests that this biosynthetic pathway is induced during the transition from 30°C to 37°C, and that transcriptional regulation of de novo and salvage pyrimidine pathway are under the control of the Ura4 protein. PMID:25011011

  19. A real-time impedance based method to assess Rhodococcus equi virulence.

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    Aleksandra A Miranda-CasoLuengo

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular pathogen of macrophages and the causative agent of foal pneumonia. R. equi virulence is usually assessed by analyzing intracellular growth in macrophages by enumeration of bacteria following cell lysis, which is time consuming and does not allow for a high throughput analysis. This paper describes the use of an impedance based real-time method to characterize proliferation of R. equi in macrophages, using virulent and attenuated strains lacking the vapA gene or virulence plasmid. Image analysis suggested that the time-dependent cell response profile (TCRP is governed by cell size and roundness as well as cytoxicity of infecting R. equi strains. The amplitude and inflection point of the resulting TCRP were dependent on the multiplicity of infection as well as virulence of the infecting strain, thus distinguishing between virulent and attenuated strains.

  20. A real-time impedance based method to assess Rhodococcus equi virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-CasoLuengo, Aleksandra A; Miranda-CasoLuengo, Raúl; Lieggi, Nora T; Luo, Haixia; Simpson, Jeremy C; Meijer, Wim G

    2013-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular pathogen of macrophages and the causative agent of foal pneumonia. R. equi virulence is usually assessed by analyzing intracellular growth in macrophages by enumeration of bacteria following cell lysis, which is time consuming and does not allow for a high throughput analysis. This paper describes the use of an impedance based real-time method to characterize proliferation of R. equi in macrophages, using virulent and attenuated strains lacking the vapA gene or virulence plasmid. Image analysis suggested that the time-dependent cell response profile (TCRP) is governed by cell size and roundness as well as cytoxicity of infecting R. equi strains. The amplitude and inflection point of the resulting TCRP were dependent on the multiplicity of infection as well as virulence of the infecting strain, thus distinguishing between virulent and attenuated strains.

  1. Genes encoding putative effector proteins of the type III secretion system of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 are required for bacterial virulence and proliferation in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensel, M; Shea, J E; Waterman, S R; Mundy, R; Nikolaus, T; Banks, G; Vazquez-Torres, A; Gleeson, C; Fang, F C; Holden, D W

    1998-10-01

    The type III secretion system of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2) is required for systemic infection of this pathogen in mice. Cloning and sequencing of a central region of SPI-2 revealed the presence of genes encoding putative chaperones and effector proteins of the secretion system. The predicted products of the sseB, sseC and sseD genes display weak but significant similarity to amino acid sequences of EspA, EspD and EspB, which are secreted by the type III secretion system encoded by the locus of enterocyte effacement of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli. The transcriptional activity of an sseA::luc fusion gene was shown to be dependent on ssrA, which is required for the expression of genes encoding components of the secretion system apparatus. Strains carrying nonpolar mutations in sseA, sseB or sseC were severely attenuated in virulence, strains carrying mutations in sseF or sseG were weakly attenuated, and a strain with a mutation in sseE had no detectable virulence defect. These phenotypes were reflected in the ability of mutant strains to grow within a variety of macrophage cell types: strains carrying mutations in sseA, sseB or sseC failed to accumulate, whereas the growth rates of strains carrying mutations in sseE, sseF or sseG were only modestly reduced. These data suggest that, in vivo, one of the functions of the SPI-2 secretion system is to enable intracellular bacterial proliferation.

  2. Endothelial lipase is highly expressed in macrophages in advanced human atherosclerotic lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Emil D; Nielsen, John E; Lindegaard, Marie Louise Skakkebæk

    2007-01-01

    RNA expression increased markedly when either type of monocytes was differentiated into macrophages. Upon further differentiation into foam cells EL mRNA decreased whereas protein levels remained high compared to monocytes. In conclusion, macrophages in advanced human atherosclerotic lesions display high levels...

  3. Divergence between the Highly Virulent Zoonotic Pathogen Helicobacter heilmannii and Its Closest Relative, the Low-Virulence “Helicobacter ailurogastricus” sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosten, Myrthe; Lindén, Sara; Rossi, Mirko; Skoog, Emma; Padra, Médea; Peters, Fanny; Perkins, Tim; Vandamme, Peter; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; D'Herde, Katharina; Van den Broeck, Wim; Flahou, Bram; Deforce, Dieter; Ducatelle, Richard; Marshall, Barry; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter heilmannii naturally colonizes the stomachs of dogs and cats and has been associated with gastric disorders in humans. Nine feline Helicobacter strains, classified as H. heilmannii based on ureAB and 16S rRNA gene sequences, were divided into a highly virulent and a low-virulence group. The genomes of these strains were sequenced to investigate their phylogenetic relationships, to define their gene content and diversity, and to determine if the differences in pathogenicity were associated with the presence or absence of potential virulence genes. The capacities of these helicobacters to bind to the gastric mucosa were investigated as well. Our analyses revealed that the low-virulence strains do not belong to the species H. heilmannii but to a novel, closely related species for which we propose the name Helicobacter ailurogastricus. Several homologs of H. pylori virulence factors, such as IceA1, HrgA, and jhp0562-like glycosyltransferase, are present in H. heilmannii but absent in H. ailurogastricus. Both species contain a VacA-like autotransporter, for which the passenger domain is remarkably larger in H. ailurogastricus than in H. heilmannii. In addition, H. ailurogastricus shows clear differences in binding to the gastric mucosa compared to H. heilmannii. These findings highlight the low-virulence character of this novel Helicobacter species. PMID:26527212

  4. Detection of virulence factors of Uropathoigenic Escherichia coli isolates from infertile women high vaginal swabs

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    Farhad Safarpourdehkourdi

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: The high vaginal Escherichia coli harbored certain virulence genes of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains. The urinary tract infections should be treated well to diminish its upstream transfer into vagina. Some more investigation should be perform for identifying the epidemiological aspects of uropathogenic Escherichia coli in high vaginal part of infertile women.

  5. Absence of all components of the flagellar export and synthesis machinery differentially alters virulence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in models of typhoid fever, survival in macrophages, tissue culture invasiveness, and calf enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, C K; Ikeda, J S; Darnell, S C; Watson, P R; Bispham, J; Wallis, T S; Weinstein, D L; Metcalf, E S; O'Brien, A D

    2001-09-01

    In this study, we constructed an flhD (the master flagellar regulator gene) mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and compared the virulence of the strain to that of the wild-type strain in a series of assays that included the mouse model of typhoid fever, the mouse macrophage survival assay, an intestinal epithelial cell adherence and invasion assay, and the calf model of enterocolitis. We found that the flhD mutant was more virulent than its parent in the mouse and displayed slightly faster net growth between 4 and 24 h of infection in mouse macrophages. Conversely, the flhD mutant exhibited diminished invasiveness for human and mouse intestinal epithelial cells, as well as a reduced capacity to induce fluid secretion and evoke a polymorphonuclear leukocyte response in the calf ligated-loop assay. These findings, taken with the results from virulence assessment assays done on an fljB fliC mutant of serovar Typhimurium that does not produce flagellin but does synthesize the flagellar secretory apparatus, indicate that neither the presence of flagella (as previously reported) nor the synthesis of the flagellar export machinery are necessary for pathogenicity of the organism in the mouse. Conversely, the presence of flagella is required for the full invasive potential of the bacterium in tissue culture and for the influx of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the calf intestine, while the flagellar secretory components are also necessary for the induction of maximum fluid secretion in that enterocolitis model. A corollary to this conclusion is that, as has previously been surmised but not demonstrated in a comparative investigation of the same mutant strains, the mouse systemic infection and macrophage assays measure aspects of virulence different from those of the tissue culture invasion assay, and the latter is more predictive of findings in the calf enterocolitis model.

  6. Virulence Factors and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates in Ready-to-Eat Foods: Detection of S. aureus Contamination and a High Prevalence of Virulence Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suat Moi Puah

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is one of the leading causes of food poisoning. Its pathogenicity results from the possession of virulence genes that produce different toxins which result in self-limiting to severe illness often requiring hospitalization. In this study of 200 sushi and sashimi samples, S. aureus contamination was confirmed in 26% of the food samples. The S. aureus isolates were further characterized for virulence genes and antibiotic susceptibility. A high incidence of virulence genes was identified in 96.2% of the isolates and 20 different virulence gene profiles were confirmed. DNA amplification showed that 30.8% (16/52 of the S. aureus carried at least one SE gene which causes staphylococcal food poisoning. The most common enterotoxin gene was seg (11.5% and the egc cluster was detected in 5.8% of the isolates. A combination of hla and hld was the most prevalent coexistence virulence genes and accounted for 59.6% of all isolates. Antibiotic resistance studies showed tetracycline resistance to be the most common at 28.8% while multi-drug resistance was found to be low at 3.8%. In conclusion, the high rate of S. aureus in the sampled sushi and sashimi indicates the need for food safety guidelines.

  7. Virulence Factors and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates in Ready-to-Eat Foods: Detection of S. aureus Contamination and a High Prevalence of Virulence Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puah, Suat Moi; Chua, Kek Heng; Tan, Jin Ai Mary Anne

    2016-02-05

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the leading causes of food poisoning. Its pathogenicity results from the possession of virulence genes that produce different toxins which result in self-limiting to severe illness often requiring hospitalization. In this study of 200 sushi and sashimi samples, S. aureus contamination was confirmed in 26% of the food samples. The S. aureus isolates were further characterized for virulence genes and antibiotic susceptibility. A high incidence of virulence genes was identified in 96.2% of the isolates and 20 different virulence gene profiles were confirmed. DNA amplification showed that 30.8% (16/52) of the S. aureus carried at least one SE gene which causes staphylococcal food poisoning. The most common enterotoxin gene was seg (11.5%) and the egc cluster was detected in 5.8% of the isolates. A combination of hla and hld was the most prevalent coexistence virulence genes and accounted for 59.6% of all isolates. Antibiotic resistance studies showed tetracycline resistance to be the most common at 28.8% while multi-drug resistance was found to be low at 3.8%. In conclusion, the high rate of S. aureus in the sampled sushi and sashimi indicates the need for food safety guidelines.

  8. High Incidence of Virulence Factors Among Clinical Enterococcus faecalis Isolates in Southwestern Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Hamid; Hasanpour, Somayeh; Ebrahim-Saraie, Hadi Sedigh

    2017-01-01

    Background Over the past two decades, enterococci have emerged as an important agent responsible for hospital acquired infection. Several virulence factors contribute to the adherence, colonization, evasion of the host immune response, and pathogenicity and severity of the infection. Enterococcus faecalis is the most common and virulent species causing infections in hospitalized patients. The aim of the present study was to examine the prevalence of genes encoding virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance patterns of E. faecalis strains isolated from hospitalized patients in Shiraz, south west of Iran. Materials and Methods A total of 51 E. faecalis isolates from the urine, blood, pleural fluid, peritoneal fluid, eye discharge, endotracheal tube (ETT) and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) specimens of patients were identified by phenotypic and genotypic methods. Antimicrobial sensitivity tests and detection of virulence factors were performed using standard methods. Results The efa and asa1 were the most frequently detected gene (100%) among the isolates, followed by esp (94.1%), ace (90.2%), gelE (80.4%), cylA (64.7%), and hyl (51%). More than half of the isolates (52.9%) were high level gentamicin resistant (HLGR). Vancomycin resistance was observed among 23 (45.1%) isolates. The lowest antimicrobial activity was related to erythromycin (3.9%), tetracycline (5.9%) and ciprofloxacin (9.8%). No isolate was found resistant to fosfomycin and linezolid. Conclusion Our data indicated a high incidence of virulence factors among E. faecalis strains isolated from clinical samples. Colonization of drug resistant virulent isolates in hospital environment may lead to life threatening infection in hospitalized patients. Therefore, infection control procedures should be performed.

  9. High salt reduces the activation of IL-4- and IL-13-stimulated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binger, Katrina J; Gebhardt, Matthias; Heinig, Matthias; Rintisch, Carola; Schroeder, Agnes; Neuhofer, Wolfgang; Hilgers, Karl; Manzel, Arndt; Schwartz, Christian; Kleinewietfeld, Markus; Voelkl, Jakob; Schatz, Valentin; Linker, Ralf A; Lang, Florian; Voehringer, David; Wright, Mark D; Hubner, Norbert; Dechend, Ralf; Jantsch, Jonathan; Titze, Jens; Müller, Dominik N

    2015-11-01

    A high intake of dietary salt (NaCl) has been implicated in the development of hypertension, chronic inflammation, and autoimmune diseases. We have recently shown that salt has a proinflammatory effect and boosts the activation of Th17 cells and the activation of classical, LPS-induced macrophages (M1). Here, we examined how the activation of alternative (M2) macrophages is affected by salt. In stark contrast to Th17 cells and M1 macrophages, high salt blunted the alternative activation of BM-derived mouse macrophages stimulated with IL-4 and IL-13, M(IL-4+IL-13) macrophages. Salt-induced reduction of M(IL-4+IL-13) activation was not associated with increased polarization toward a proinflammatory M1 phenotype. In vitro, high salt decreased the ability of M(IL-4+IL-13) macrophages to suppress effector T cell proliferation. Moreover, mice fed a high salt diet exhibited reduced M2 activation following chitin injection and delayed wound healing compared with control animals. We further identified a high salt-induced reduction in glycolysis and mitochondrial metabolic output, coupled with blunted AKT and mTOR signaling, which indicates a mechanism by which NaCl inhibits full M2 macrophage activation. Collectively, this study provides evidence that high salt reduces noninflammatory innate immune cell activation and may thus lead to an overall imbalance in immune homeostasis.

  10. Rescue of the highly virulent classical swine fever virus strain “Koslov” from cloned cDNA and first insights into genome variations relevant for virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahnøe, Ulrik; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Risager, Peter Christian

    2014-01-01

    -by-step, thereby producing genomes encoding the consensus amino acid sequence. Viruses rescued from the construct corresponding to the inferred parental form were highly virulent, when tested in pigs, with infected animals displaying pronounced clinical symptoms leading to high mortality. The reconstruction...

  11. Expression of interferon gamma by a highly virulent Newcastle disease virus decreases its pathogenicity in chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infection of chickens with highly virulent NDV results in rapid death, which is preceded by increased expression of interferon gamma (IFN-g) in target tissues. IFN-g is a cytokine that has pleiotropic biological effects including intrinsic antiviral activity and immunomodulatory effects. Here we a...

  12. Biofilm-Forming Capability of Highly Virulent, Multidrug-Resistant Candida auris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, Leighann; Ramage, Gordon; Kean, Ryan; Borman, Andrew; Johnson, Elizabeth M.; Richardson, Malcolm D.

    2017-01-01

    The emerging multidrug-resistant yeast pathogen Candida auris has attracted considerable attention as a source of healthcare–associated infections. We report that this highly virulent yeast has the capacity to form antifungal resistant biofilms sensitive to the disinfectant chlorhexidine in vitro. PMID:28098553

  13. Hunger for iron: the alternative siderophore iron scavenging systems in highly virulent Yersinia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eRakin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Low molecular weight siderophores are used by many living organisms to scavenge scarcely available ferric iron. Presence of at least a single siderophore-based iron acquisition system is usually acknowledged as a virulence-associated trait and a prerequisite to become an efficient and successful pathogen. Currently it is assumed that yersiniabactin (Ybt is the solely functional endogenous siderophore iron uptake system in highly virulent Yersinia (Yersinia pestis, Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. enterocolitica biotype 1B. Genes responsible for biosynthesis, transport and regulation of the yersiniabactin (ybt production are clustered on a mobile genetic element, the High Pathogenicity Island (HPI that is responsible for broad dissemination of the ybt genes in Enterobacteriaceae. However, the ybt gene cluster is absent from nearly half of Y. pseudotuberculosis O3 isolates and epidemic Y. pseudotuberculosis O1 isolates responsible for the Far East Scarlet-like Fever. Several potential siderophore-mediated iron uptake gene clusters are documented in Yersinia genomes, however neither of them have been proven to be functional. It has been suggested that at least two siderophores alternative to Ybt may operate in the highly virulent Yersinia pestis / Y. pseudotuberculosis group, and are referred to as pseudochelin (Pch and yersiniachelin (Ych. Furthermore, most sporadic Y. pseudotuberculosis O1 strains possess gene clusters encoding all three iron scavenging systems. Thus, the Ybt system appears not to be the sole endogenous siderophore iron uptake system in the highly virulent yersiniae and may be efficiently substituted and / or supplemented by alternative iron scavenging systems.

  14. Increase in chemokines CXCL10 and CCL2 in blood from pigs infected with high compared to low virulence African swine fever virus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishbourne, Emma; Hutet, Evelyne; Abrams, Charles; Cariolet, Roland; Le Potier, Marie-Frédérique; Takamatsu, Haru-H; Dixon, Linda K

    2013-10-01

    Modulation of the expression of chemokines and chemokine receptors in whole blood was compared following infection of pigs with high and low virulence isolates of African swine fever virus. Levels of mRNAs for CCL2, CCL3L1, CCL4, CXCL10, CCR1 and CCR5 were significantly increased in at least one time point following infection in two experiments and CCL5, CCR9 and CXCR4 mRNA were significantly increased in one of the experiments. The results showed that greatest fold increases in mRNAs for CXCL10 and CCL2 were observed following infection of pigs. CXCL10 mRNA was increased by up to 15 fold in infected compared to uninfected pigs. CXCL10 protein was also detected in serum from pigs infected with the high virulence Benin 97/1 isolate. Levels of CCL2 mRNA were increased in pigs infected with high virulence Benin 97/1 isolate compared to low virulence OURT88/3 isolate and this correlated with an increase of greater than 30 fold in levels of CCL2 protein detected in serum from pigs infected with this isolate. An increase in overall chemotaxis active compounds in defibrinated plasma samples from Benin 97/1 infected pigs was observed at 3 days post-infection (dpi) and a decrease by 7 dpi as measured by chemotaxis assay using normal pig leucocytes in vitro. Increased levels of CXCL10 may either contribute to the activation of lymphocyte priming toward the Th1 phenotype or induction of T lymphocyte apoptosis. Increased levels of CCL2, a chemoattractant for macrophages, may result in increased recruitment of monocytes from bone marrow thus increasing the pool of cells susceptible to infection.

  15. Mastitis Pathogens with High Virulence in a Mouse Model Produce a Distinct Cytokine Profile In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnzon, Carl-Fredrik; Artursson, Karin; Söderlund, Robert; Guss, Bengt; Rönnberg, Elin; Pejler, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Mastitis is a serious medical condition of dairy cattle. Here, we evaluated whether the degree of virulence of mastitis pathogens in a mouse model can be linked to the inflammatory response that they provoke. Clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) (strain 556 and 392) and Escherichia coli (E. coli) (676 and 127), and laboratory control strains [8325-4 (S. aureus) and MG1655 (E. coli)], were injected i.p. into mice, followed by the assessment of clinical scores and inflammatory parameters. As judged by clinical scoring, E. coli 127 exhibited the largest degree of virulence among the strains. All bacterial strains induced neutrophil recruitment. However, whereas E. coli 127 induced high peritoneal levels of CXCL1, G-CSF, and CCL2, strikingly lower levels of these were induced by the less virulent bacterial strains. High concentrations of these compounds were also seen in blood samples taken from animals infected with E. coli 127, suggesting systemic inflammation. Moreover, the levels of CXCL1 and G-CSF, both in the peritoneal fluid and in plasma, correlated with clinical score. Together, these findings suggest that highly virulent clinical mastitis isolates produce a distinct cytokine profile that shows a close correlation with the severity of the bacterial infection. PMID:27713743

  16. Proinsulin-producing, hyperglycemia-induced adipose tissue macrophages underlie insulin resistance in high fat-fed diabetic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adipose tissue macrophages play an important role in the pathogenesis of obese type 2 diabetes. High-fat diet-induced obesity has been shown to lead to adipose tissue macrophages accumulation in rodents;however, the impact of hyperglycemia on adipose tissue macrophages dynamics in high-fat diet-fed ...

  17. Telmisartan improves insulin resistance and modulates adipose tissue macrophage polarization in high-fat-fed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisaka, Shiho; Usui, Isao; Kanatani, Yukiko; Ikutani, Masashi; Takasaki, Ichiro; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Bukhari, Agussalim; Yamazaki, Yu; Suzuki, Hikari; Senda, Satoko; Aminuddin, Aminuddin; Nagai, Yoshinori; Takatsu, Kiyoshi; Kobayashi, Masashi; Tobe, Kazuyuki

    2011-05-01

    Diet-induced obesity is reported to induce a phenotypic switch in adipose tissue macrophages from an antiinflammatory M2 state to a proinflammatory M1 state. Telmisartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker and a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist, reportedly has more beneficial effects on insulin sensitivity than other angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers. In this study, we studied the effects of telmisartan on the adipose tissue macrophage phenotype in high-fat-fed mice. Telmisartan was administered for 5 wk to high-fat-fed C57BL/6 mice. Insulin sensitivity, macrophage infiltration, and the gene expressions of M1 and M2 markers in visceral adipose tissues were then examined. An insulin- or a glucose-tolerance test showed that telmisartan treatment improved insulin resistance, decreasing the body weight gain, visceral fat weight, and adipocyte size without affecting the amount of energy intake. Telmisartan reduced the mRNA expression of CD11c and TNF-α, M1 macrophage markers, and significantly increased the expressions of M2 markers, such as CD163, CD209, and macrophage galactose N-acetyl-galactosamine specific lectin (Mgl2), in a quantitative RT-PCR analysis. A flow cytometry analysis showed that telmisartan decreased the number of M1 macrophages in visceral adipose tissues. In conclusion, telmisartan improves insulin sensitivity and modulates adipose tissue macrophage polarization to an antiinflammatory M2 state in high-fat-fed mice.

  18. High salt primes a specific activation state of macrophages, M(Na)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wu-Chang; Zheng, Xiao-Jun; Du, Lin-Juan; Sun, Jian-Yong; Shen, Zhu-Xia; Shi, Chaoji; Sun, Shuyang; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Chen, Xiao-qing; Qin, Mu; Liu, Xu; Tao, Jun; Jia, Lijun; Fan, Heng-yu; Zhou, Bin; Yu, Ying; Ying, Hao; Hui, Lijian; Liu, Xiaolong; Yi, Xianghua; Liu, Xiaojing; Zhang, Lanjing; Duan, Sheng-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    High salt is positively associated with the risk of many diseases. However, little is known about the mechanisms. Here we showed that high salt increased proinflammatory molecules, while decreased anti-inflammatory and proendocytic molecules in both human and mouse macrophages. High salt also potentiated lipopolysaccharide-induced macrophage activation and suppressed interleukin 4-induced macrophage activation. High salt induced the proinflammatory aspects by activating p38/cFos and/or Erk1/2/cFos pathways, while inhibited the anti-inflammatory and proendocytic aspects by Erk1/2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 pathway. Consistent with the in vitro results, high-salt diet increased proinflammatory gene expression of mouse alveolar macrophages. In mouse models of acute lung injury, high-salt diet aggravated lipopolysaccharide-induced pulmonary macrophage activation and inflammation in lungs. These results identify a novel macrophage activation state, M(Na), and high salt as a potential environmental risk factor for lung inflammation through the induction of M(Na). PMID:26206316

  19. Impact of HLA-driven HIV adaptation on virulence in populations of high HIV seroprevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Rebecca; Muenchhoff, Maximilian; Mann, Jaclyn; Roberts, Hannah E; Matthews, Philippa; Adland, Emily; Hempenstall, Allison; Huang, Kuan-Hsiang; Brockman, Mark; Brumme, Zabrina; Sinclair, Marc; Miura, Toshiyuki; Frater, John; Essex, Myron; Shapiro, Roger; Walker, Bruce D; Ndung'u, Thumbi; McLean, Angela R; Carlson, Jonathan M; Goulder, Philip J R

    2014-12-16

    It is widely believed that epidemics in new hosts diminish in virulence over time, with natural selection favoring pathogens that cause minimal disease. However, a tradeoff frequently exists between high virulence shortening host survival on the one hand but allowing faster transmission on the other. This is the case in HIV infection, where high viral loads increase transmission risk per coital act but reduce host longevity. We here investigate the impact on HIV virulence of HIV adaptation to HLA molecules that protect against disease progression, such as HLA-B*57 and HLA-B*58:01. We analyzed cohorts in Botswana and South Africa, two countries severely affected by the HIV epidemic. In Botswana, where the epidemic started earlier and adult seroprevalence has been higher, HIV adaptation to HLA including HLA-B*57/58:01 is greater compared with South Africa (P = 7 × 10(-82)), the protective effect of HLA-B*57/58:01 is absent (P = 0.0002), and population viral replicative capacity is lower (P = 0.03). These data suggest that viral evolution is occurring relatively rapidly, and that adaptation of HIV to the most protective HLA alleles may contribute to a lowering of viral replication capacity at the population level, and a consequent reduction in HIV virulence over time. The potential role in this process played by increasing antiretroviral therapy (ART) access is also explored. Models developed here suggest distinct benefits of ART, in addition to reducing HIV disease and transmission, in driving declines in HIV virulence over the course of the epidemic, thereby accelerating the effects of HLA-mediated viral adaptation.

  20. High Morphologic Plasticity of Microglia/Macrophages Following Experimental Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Sheng Yang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available As current efforts have limited effects on the clinical outcome of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH, the mechanisms including microglia/macrophages that involved inflammation need further investigation. Here, 0.4 units of collagenase VII were injected into the left caudate putamen (CPu to duplicate ICH rat models. In the brains of ICH rats, microglia/macrophages, the nearest cells to the hemorrhagic center, were observed as ameboid and Prussian-blue positive. Furthermore, the ameboid microglia/macrophages were differentiation (CD 68 and interleukin-1β (IL-1β positive, and neither CD206 nor chitinase3-like 3 (Ym1 positive, suggesting their strong abilities of phagocytosis and secretion of IL-1β. According to the distance to the hemorrhagic center, we selected four areas—I, II, III, and IV—to analyze the morphology of microglia/macrophages. The processes decreased successively from region I to region IV. Microglia/macrophages in region IV had no processes. The processes in region I were radially distributed, however, they showed obvious directivity towards the hemorrhagic center in regions II and III. Region III had the largest density of compactly arrayed microglia/macrophages. All these in vivo results present the high morphologic plasticity of microglia/macrophages and their functions in the pathogenesis of ICHs.

  1. High Virulence and Antifungal Resistance in Clinical Strains of Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Monroy-Pérez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antifungal resistance and virulence properties of Candida albicans are a growing health problem worldwide. To study the expression of virulence and azole resistance genes in 39 clinical strains of C. albicans, we used a model of infection of human vaginal epithelial cells with C. albicans strains isolated from Mexican women with vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC. The strains were identified by PCR amplification of the ITS1 and ITS2 regions of rRNA. The detection and expression of virulence genes and azole resistance genes MDR1 and CDR1 were performed using PCR and RT-PCR, respectively. All strains were sensitive to nystatin and 38 (97.4% and 37 (94.9% were resistant to ketoconazole and fluconazole, respectively. ALS1, SAP4–SAP6, LIP1, LIP2, LIP4, LIP6, LIP7, LIP9, LIP10, and PLB1-PLB2 were present in all strains; SAP1 was identified in 37 (94.8% isolates, HWP1 in 35 (89.7%, ALS3 in 14 (35.8%, and CDR1 in 26 (66.6%. In nearly all of the strains, ALS1, HWP1, SAP4–SAP6, LIP1–LIP10, PLB1, and PLB2 were expressed, whereas CDR1 was expressed in 20 (51.3% and ALS3 in 14 (35.8%. In our in vitro model of infection with C. albicans, the clinical strains showed different expression profiles of virulence genes in association with the azole resistance gene CDR1. The results indicate that the strains that infect Mexican patients suffering from VVC are highly virulent and virtually all are insensitive to azoles.

  2. High Virulence and Antifungal Resistance in Clinical Strains of Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroy-Pérez, Eric; Paniagua-Contreras, Gloria Luz; Rodríguez-Purata, Pamela; Vaca-Paniagua, Felipe; Vázquez-Villaseñor, Marco; Díaz-Velásquez, Clara; Uribe-García, Alina

    2016-01-01

    Antifungal resistance and virulence properties of Candida albicans are a growing health problem worldwide. To study the expression of virulence and azole resistance genes in 39 clinical strains of C. albicans, we used a model of infection of human vaginal epithelial cells with C. albicans strains isolated from Mexican women with vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC). The strains were identified by PCR amplification of the ITS1 and ITS2 regions of rRNA. The detection and expression of virulence genes and azole resistance genes MDR1 and CDR1 were performed using PCR and RT-PCR, respectively. All strains were sensitive to nystatin and 38 (97.4%) and 37 (94.9%) were resistant to ketoconazole and fluconazole, respectively. ALS1, SAP4–SAP6, LIP1, LIP2, LIP4, LIP6, LIP7, LIP9, LIP10, and PLB1-PLB2 were present in all strains; SAP1 was identified in 37 (94.8%) isolates, HWP1 in 35 (89.7%), ALS3 in 14 (35.8%), and CDR1 in 26 (66.6%). In nearly all of the strains, ALS1, HWP1, SAP4–SAP6, LIP1–LIP10, PLB1, and PLB2 were expressed, whereas CDR1 was expressed in 20 (51.3%) and ALS3 in 14 (35.8%). In our in vitro model of infection with C. albicans, the clinical strains showed different expression profiles of virulence genes in association with the azole resistance gene CDR1. The results indicate that the strains that infect Mexican patients suffering from VVC are highly virulent and virtually all are insensitive to azoles. PMID:28058052

  3. Lethal neonatal meningoencephalitis caused by multi-drug resistant, highly virulent Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Junaid; Dufendach, Kevin R; Wellons, John C; Kuba, Maria G; Nickols, Hilary H; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G; Wynn, James L

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal meningitis is a rare but devastating condition. Multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria represent a substantial global health risk. This study reports on an aggressive case of lethal neonatal meningitis due to a MDR Escherichia coli (serotype O75:H5:K1). Serotyping, MDR pattern and phylogenetic typing revealed that this strain is an emergent and highly virulent neonatal meningitis E. coli isolate. The isolate was resistant to both ampicillin and gentamicin; antibiotics currently used for empiric neonatal sepsis treatment. The strain was also positive for multiple virulence genes including K1 capsule, fimbrial adhesion fimH, siderophore receptors iroN, fyuA and iutA, secreted autotransporter toxin sat, membrane associated proteases ompA and ompT, type II polysaccharide synthesis genes (kpsMTII) and pathogenicity-associated island (PAI)-associated malX gene. The presence of highly-virulent MDR organisms isolated in neonates underscores the need to implement rapid drug resistance diagnostic methods and should prompt consideration of alternate empiric therapy in neonates with Gram negative meningitis.

  4. Baicalein attenuates the quorum sensing-controlled virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and relieves the inflammatory response in P. aeruginosa-infected macrophages by downregulating the MAPK and NFκB signal-transduction pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo J

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Jing Luo,* Jin-liang Kong,* Bi-ying Dong, Hong Huang, Ke Wang, Li-hong Wu, Chang-chun Hou, Yue Liang, Bing Li, Yi-qiang Chen Department of Respiratory Disease, First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Burgeoning antibiotic resistance and unfavorable outcomes of inflammatory injury after Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection have necessitated the development of novel agents that not only target quorum sensing (QS but also combat inflammatory injury with the least risk of resistance. This study aimed to assess the anti-QS and anti-inflammatory activities of baicalein, a traditional herbal medicine that is widely used in the People’s Republic of China, against P. aeruginosa infection. We found that subminimum inhibitory concentrations of baicalein efficiently interfered with the QS-signaling pathway of P. aeruginosa via downregulation of the transcription of QS-regulated genes and the translation of QS-signaling molecules. This interference resulted in the global attenuation of QS-controlled virulence factors, such as motility and biofilm formation, and the secretion into the culture supernatant of extracellular virulence factors, including pyocyanin, LasA protease, LasB elastase, and rhamnolipids. Moreover, we examined the anti-inflammatory activity of baicalein and its mode of action via a P. aeruginosa-infected macrophage model to address its therapeutic effect. Baicalein reduced the P. aeruginosa-induced secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNFα. In addition, baicalein suppressed P. aeruginosa-induced activation of the MAPK and NFκB signal-transduction pathways in cocultured macrophages; this may be the mechanism by which baicalein inhibits the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Therefore, our study demonstrates that baicalein represents a potential treatment for P. aeruginosa infection because it

  5. NLRP3 Inflammasome Expression and Signaling in Human Diabetic Wounds and in High Glucose Induced Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotian Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. To investigate the contribution and mechanism of NLRP3 inflammasome expression in human wounds in diabetes mellitus and in high glucose induced macrophages. Methods. In the present study, we compared the expression of NLRP3 inflammasome in debridement wound tissue from diabetic and nondiabetic patients. We also examined whether high glucose induces NLRP3 inflammasome expression in cultures THP-1-derived macrophages and the influence on IL-1β expression. Results. The expressions of NLRP3, caspase1, and IL-1β, at both the mRNA and protein level, were significantly higher in wounds of diabetic patients compared with nondiabetic wounds (P<0.05. High glucose induced a significant increase in NLRP3 inflammasome and IL-1β expression in THP-1-derived macrophages. M1 macrophage surface marker with CCR7 was significantly upregulated after high glucose stimulation. SiRNA-mediated silencing of NLRP3 expression downregulates the expression of IL-1β. Conclusion. The higher expression of NLRP3, caspase1, and secretion of IL-1β, signaling, and activation might contribute to the hyperinflammation in the human diabetic wound and in high glucose induced macrophages. It may be a novel target to treat the DM patients with chronic wound.

  6. Selective culling of high avidity antigen-specific CD4+ T cells after virulent Salmonella infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertelt, James M; Johanns, Tanner M; Mysz, Margaret A; Nanton, Minelva R; Rowe, Jared H; Aguilera, Marijo N; Way, Sing Sing

    2011-12-01

    Typhoid fever is a persistent infection caused by host-adapted Salmonella strains adept at circumventing immune-mediated host defences. Given the importance of T cells in protection, the culling of activated CD4+ T cells after primary infection has been proposed as a potential immune evasion strategy used by this pathogen. We demonstrate that the purging of activated antigen-specific CD4+ T cells after virulent Salmonella infection requires SPI-2 encoded virulence determinants, and is not restricted only to cells with specificity to Salmonella-expressed antigens, but extends to CD4+ T cells primed to expand by co-infection with recombinant Listeria monocytogenes. Unexpectedly, however, the loss of activated CD4+ T cells during Salmonella infection demonstrated using a monoclonal population of adoptively transferred CD4+ T cells was not reproduced among the endogenous repertoire of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells identified with MHC class II tetramer. Analysis of T-cell receptor variable segment usage revealed the selective loss and reciprocal enrichment of defined CD4+ T-cell subsets after Salmonella co-infection that is associated with the purging of antigen-specific cells with the highest intensity of tetramer staining. Hence, virulent Salmonella triggers the selective culling of high avidity activated CD4+ T-cell subsets, which re-shapes the repertoire of antigen-specific T cells that persist later after infection.

  7. A highly conserved metalloprotease effector enhances virulence in the maize anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum graminicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Martín, José M; Pacheco-Arjona, José Ramón; Bello-Rico, Víctor; Vargas, Walter A; Monod, Michel; Díaz-Mínguez, José M; Thon, Michael R; Sukno, Serenella A

    2016-09-01

    Colletotrichum graminicola causes maize anthracnose, an agronomically important disease with a worldwide distribution. We have identified a fungalysin metalloprotease (Cgfl) with a role in virulence. Transcriptional profiling experiments and live cell imaging show that Cgfl is specifically expressed during the biotrophic stage of infection. To determine whether Cgfl has a role in virulence, we obtained null mutants lacking Cgfl and performed pathogenicity and live microscopy assays. The appressorium morphology of the null mutants is normal, but they exhibit delayed development during the infection process on maize leaves and roots, showing that Cgfl has a role in virulence. In vitro chitinase activity assays of leaves infected with wild-type and null mutant strains show that, in the absence of Cgfl, maize leaves exhibit increased chitinase activity. Phylogenetic analyses show that Cgfl is highly conserved in fungi. Similarity searches, phylogenetic analysis and transcriptional profiling show that C. graminicola encodes two LysM domain-containing homologues of Ecp6, suggesting that this fungus employs both Cgfl-mediated and LysM protein-mediated strategies to control chitin signalling. © 2015 BSPP and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Strain-specific impact of the high-pathogenicity island on virulence in extra-intestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smati, Mounira; Magistro, Giuseppe; Adiba, Sandrine; Wieser, Andreas; Picard, Bertrand; Schubert, Sören; Denamur, Erick

    2017-01-01

    In order to clarify the role of the high-pathogenicity island (HPI) in the experimental virulence of Escherichia coli, we constructed different deletion mutants of the entire HPI and of three individual genes (irp2, fyuA and ybtA), encoding for three main functions within the HPI. Those mutants were constructed for three phylogroup B2 strains (536-STc127, CFT073-STc73, and NU14-STc95), representative of the main B2 subgroups causing extra-intestinal infections. Transcriptional profiles obtained for the selected HPI genes irp2, fyuA and ybtA revealed similar patterns for all strains, both under selective iron-deplete conditions and in intracellular bacterial communities in vitro, with a high expression of irp2. Deletion of irp2 and ybtA abrogated yersiniabactin production, whereas the fyuA knockout was only slightly impaired for siderophore synthesis. The experimental virulence of the strains was then tested in amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum and mouse septicaemia models. No effect of any HPI mutant was observed for the two more virulent strains 536 and CFT073. In contrast, the virulence of the less virulent NU14 strain was dramatically diminished by the complete deletion of the HPI and irp2 gene whereas a lesser reduction in virulence was observed for the fyuA and ybtA deletion mutants. The two experimental virulence models gave similar results. It appears that the role of the HPI in experimental virulence is depending on the genetic background of the strains despite similar inter-strain transcriptional patterns of HPI genes, as well as of the functional class of the studied gene. Altogether, these data indicate that the intrinsic extra-intestinal virulence in the E. coli species is multigenic, with epistatic interactions between the genes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. The S2 Gene of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Is a Highly Conserved Determinant of Viral Replication and Virulence Properties in Experimentally Infected Ponies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Leroux, Caroline; Craigo, Jodi K.; Cook, Sheila J.; Issel, Charles J.; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2000-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is genetically one of the simplest lentiviruses in that the viral genome encodes only three accessory genes, tat, rev, and S2. Although serological analyses demonstrate the expression of the S2 protein in persistently infected horses, the role of this viral gene remains undefined. We recently reported that the S2 gene is not essential for EIAV replication in primary equine macrophages, as EIAV mutants lacking the S2 gene replicate to levels similar to those of the parental virus (F. Li, B. A. Puffer, and R. C. Montelaro, J. Virol. 72:8344–8348, 1998). We now describe in vivo studies that examine the evolution and role of the S2 gene in ponies experimentally infected with EIAV. The results of these studies reveal for the first time that the S2 gene is highly conserved during persistent infection and that deletion of the S2 gene reduces viral virulence and virus replication levels compared to those of the parental virus containing a functional S2 gene. These data indicate that the EIAV S2 gene is in fact an important determinant of viral replication and pathogenic properties in vivo, despite the evident lack of S2 influence on viral replication levels in vitro. Thus, these observations suggest in vivo functions of EIAV S2 that are not adequately reflected in simple infections of cultured cells, including natural target macrophages. PMID:10590152

  10. High-level Multi-Resistant and Virulent Escherichia coli in Abeokuta, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinduti, Paul Akinniyi; Aboderin, Bukola W; Oloyede, Rasaq; Ogiogwa, Joseph I; Motayo, Babatunde O; Ejilude, Oluwaseun

    2016-01-01

    Multi-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains co-harboring virulence genes is a cause of high morbidity in Abeokuta, Nigeria. This study was designed to determine some virulent factors among enteropathogenic E. coli in Abeokuta, Nigeria. Approximately non-repetitive 102 isolates of E. coli were recovered from clinical samples from two health facilities in Abeokuta. Biotyping using API and antibiotic susceptibility was determined, and eae and flic genes were assayed by PCR. Antibiotic resistance relatedness was performed by DendroUPGMA. Results showed that 48.0% and 52.0 % were intestinal and extra-intestinal E. coli, ampicillin recorded 100% resistance, amoxycilli/clavulanic acid 64.7%, cotrimoxazole 57.8% and 56.8% resistance against cefotaxime, at MIC >16 ug/mL, 100%, 57.8%, and 50% have MIC50 to ampicillin, tetracycline, and ceftazidime, while 74.5% and 48.0% have MIC90 to ampicillin and ceftazidime. Significant rates of 4.9%, 7.8%, and 9.8% flic, eae, and flic/eae genes were found in intestinal isolates, while 2.9%, 2.0%, and 3.9% were found in extra-intestinal (P < 0.05). Two major clades of the resistant isolates reveal significant antibiotic relatedness among intestinal and extra-intestinal isolates, at 54% resistance similarities with very high multi-antibiotic resistance index of 1.0 (MARI). A high rate of undetected virulent E. coli pathotypes with high resistance could trigger unprecedented morbidity and mortality, mostly among children and the elderly.

  11. Virulence Associated Genes-Deleted Salmonella Montevideo Is Attenuated, Highly Immunogenic and Confers Protection against Virulent Challenge in Chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalsiamthara, Jonathan; Lee, John H.

    2016-01-01

    To construct a novel live vaccine against Salmonella enterica serovar Montevideo (SM) infection in chickens, two important bacterial regulatory genes, lon and cpxR, which are associated with invasion and virulence, were deleted from the wild type SM genome. Attenuated strains, JOL1625 (Δlon), JOL1597 (ΔcpxR), and JOL1599 (ΔlonΔcpxR) were thereby generated. Observations with scanning electron microscopy suggested that JOL1625 and JOL1599 cells showed increased ruffled surface which may be related to abundant extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production. JOL1597 depicted milder ruffled surface but showed increased surface corrugation. ConA affinity-based fluorometric quantification and fluorescence microscopy revealed significant increases in EPS production in JOL1625 and JOL1599. Four weeks old chickens were used for safety and immunological studies. The mutants were not observed in feces beyond day 3 nor in spleen and cecum beyond day 7, whereas wild type SM was detected for at least 2 weeks in spleen and cecum. JOL1599 was further evaluated as a vaccine candidate. Chickens immunized with JOL1599 showed strong humoral responses, as indicated by systemic IgG and secretory IgA levels, as well as strong cell-mediated immune response, as indicated by increased lymphocyte proliferation. JOL1599-immunized groups also showed significant degree of protection against wild type challenge. Our results indicate that Δlon- and/or ΔcpxR-deleted SM exhibited EPS-enhanced immunogenicity and attenuation via reduced bacterial cell intracellular replication, conferred increased protection, and possess safety qualities favorable for effective vaccine development against virulent SM infections. PMID:27785128

  12. Modulation of chemokine and chemokine receptor expression following infection of porcine macrophages with African swine fever virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishbourne, Emma; Abrams, Charles C; Takamatsu, Haru-H; Dixon, Linda K

    2013-03-23

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is the only member of the Asfarviridae, a large DNA virus family which replicates predominantly in the cytoplasm. Most isolates cause a fatal haemorrhagic disease in domestic pigs, although some low virulence isolates cause little or no mortality. The modulation of chemokine responses following infection of porcine macrophages with low and high virulence isolates was studied to indicate how this may be involved in the induction of pathogenesis and of effective immune responses. Infection with both low and high virulence isolates resulted in down-regulation of mRNA levels for chemokines CCL2, CCL3L, CXCL2 and chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR5, CXCR3, CXCR4 and up-regulation in expression of mRNAs for CCL4, CXCL10 and chemokine receptor CCR7. Levels of CCL4, CXCL8, CXCL10 mRNAs were higher in macrophages infected with low virulence isolate OURT88/3 compared to high virulence isolate Benin 97/1. Levels of CXCL8 and CCL2 protein were significantly reduced in supernatants from macrophages infected with Benin 97/1 isolate compared to OURT88/3 and mock-infected macrophages. There was also a decreased chemotactic response of donor cells exposed to supernatants from Benin 97/1 infected macrophages compared to those from OURT88/3 and mock-infected macrophages. The data show that infection of macrophages with the low virulence strain OURT88/3 induces higher expression of key inflammatory chemokines compared to infection with high virulence strain Benin 97/1. This may be important for the induction of effective protective immunity that has been observed in pigs immunised with the OURT88/3 isolate.

  13. Treatment of Highly Virulent Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli Pneumonia With Bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, Nicolas; Debarbieux, Laurent; Fromentin, Mélanie; Ricard, Jean-Damien

    2015-06-01

    To study the effect of bacteriophage treatment on highly virulent extraintestinal Escherichia coli pneumonia in mice and compare it with conventional antimicrobial treatment. Animal investigation. University research laboratory. Pathogen-free 8-week-old Balb/cJRj male mice. Two bacteriophages (536_P1 and 536_P7) were isolated from sewage using strain 536, a highly virulent extraintestinal E. coli. Their in vitro and in vivo efficacy against strain 536 and a ventilator-associated pneumonia E. coli were tested. The first group of mice were infected by intranasal instillation of bioluminescent strain 536 and received 536_P1 intranasally, ceftriaxone, or control. The second group of mice was infected with the ventilator-associated pneumonia strain and received 536_P7. Adaptation of 536_P7 to this clinical isolate was also evaluated in vitro and in vivo. In vivo efficacy of bacteriophage and antibiotic treatment were assessed by recording bioluminescence for short-time periods and by recording body weight and survival of mice for longer periods. Both treatments improved survival compared with control (100% vs 0%), and in vivo bioluminescence recordings showed a similar rapid decrease of emitted light, suggesting prompt bacterial clearance. The majority of mice infected by the ventilator-associated pneumonia strain were not rescued by treatment with 536_P7; however, in vitro adaptation of this bacteriophage toward the ventilator-associated pneumonia strain led to isolate a variant which significantly improved in vivo treatment efficacy (animal survival increased from 20% to 75%). Bacteriophage treatment was as effective as antibiotherapy to provide 100% survival rate in a lethal model of highly virulent E. coli pneumonia. Adaptation of a bacteriophage is a rapid solution to improve its efficacy toward specific strains. These results suggest that phage therapy could be a promising therapeutic strategy for ventilator-associated pneumonia.

  14. Protection by attenuated and polyvalent vaccines against highly virulent strains of Marek's disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witter, R L

    1982-01-01

    Tests confirmed that turkey herpesvirus (HVT) vaccine protected chickens poorly against challenge with the highly virulent Md5 strain of Marek's disease (MD) virus, especially in chickens with homologous HVT antibodies. The naturally avirulent SB-1 vaccine virus was likewise poorly protective against challenge with the Md5 strain. Homologous antibodies reduced the protective efficacy of both vaccines, but SB-1 was not affected by HVT antibodies. In order to provide better protection against strains of MD virus poorly protected against by HVT, such as Md5, the Md11 strain of MD virus was attenuated by 75 cell culture passages and evaluated for protective efficacy. This vaccine virus, designated Mdl 1/75C, provided good protection against challenge with Md5 and most other highly virulent MD viruses tested, but was less efficacious against challenge with the JM/102W strain, a prototype MD virus protected against well by HVT and SB-1 vaccines. Furthermore, its efficacy was consistently lower in chicks with HVT antibody. Thus, although HVT, SB-1, and Md11/75C were all efficacious against certain MD viruses, none of these vaccines protected optimally against all MD challenge viruses in all chickens. A polyvalent vaccine composed of Md11/75C, HVT and SB-1 viruses protected chickens better against a battery of five highly virulent MD challenge viruses, including three strains poorly protected against by HVT, than any single vaccine and was not influenced by HVT antibody. These data suggest that vaccinal immunity may be partially viral strain specific.

  15. [Immunosuppressive components of extracellular lipopolysaccharide highly virulent strain Salmonella typhimurium 1468].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molozhavaia, O S; Borisova, E V

    2002-01-01

    Immunosuppressive activity of culture liquid substrate (CFS) of highly virulent strain Salmonella typhimurium has been studied. A model of delayed hypersensitivity (DHS) to nonbacterial antigen in mice, a method of gel-filtration through the sephadex column G-200, immunosorbents were used. Three components with immunosuppressive activity: thermolabile component and thermostable one with direct immunosuppressive action and the third thermolabile component which manifested inductive immunosuppressive activity only after redox treatment have been revealed in the strain CFS. O-specific and lipid parts were found in the composition of all the components. This allowed them to be related to lipopolysaccharide.

  16. Discovering Molecules That Regulate Efferocytosis Using Primary Human Macrophages and High Content Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Santulli-Marotto

    Full Text Available Defective clearance of apoptotic cells can result in sustained inflammation and subsequent autoimmunity. Macrophages, the "professional phagocyte" of the body, are responsible for efficient, non-phlogistic, apoptotic cell clearance. Controlling phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by macrophages is an attractive therapeutic opportunity to ameliorate inflammation. Using high content imaging, we have developed a system for evaluating the effects of antibody treatment on apoptotic cell uptake in primary human macrophages by comparing the Phagocytic Index (PI for each antibody. Herein we demonstrate the feasibility of evaluating a panel of antibodies of unknown specificities obtained by immunization of mice with primary human macrophages and show that they can be distinguished based on individual PI measurements. In this study ~50% of antibodies obtained enhance phagocytosis of apoptotic cells while approximately 5% of the antibodies in the panel exhibit some inhibition. Though the specificities of the majority of antibodies are unknown, two of the antibodies that improved apoptotic cell uptake recognize recombinant MerTK; a receptor known to function in this capacity in vivo. The agonistic impact of these antibodies on efferocytosis could be demonstrated without addition of either of the MerTK ligands, Gas6 or ProS. These results validate applying the mechanism of this fundamental biological process as a means for identification of modulators that could potentially serve as therapeutics. This strategy for interrogating macrophages to discover molecules regulating apoptotic cell uptake is not limited by access to purified protein thereby increasing the possibility of finding novel apoptotic cell uptake pathways.

  17. Mutation of neutralizing/antibody-dependent enhancing epitope on spike protein and 7b gene of feline infectious peritonitis virus: influences of viral replication in monocytes/macrophages and virulence in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Tomomi; Tomiyama, Yoshika; Katoh, Yasuichiroh; Nakamura, Michiyo; Satoh, Ryoichi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2011-03-01

    We previously prepared neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MAb)-resistant (mar) mutant viruses using a laboratory strain feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) 79-1146 (Kida et al., 1999). Mar mutant viruses are mutated several amino acids of the neutralizing epitope of Spike protein, compared with the parent strain, FIPV 79-1146. We clarified that MAb used to prepare mar mutant viruses also lost its activity to enhance homologous mar mutant viruses, strongly suggesting that neutralizing and antibody-dependent enhancing epitopes are present in the same region in the strain FIPV 79-1146. We also discovered that amino acid mutation in the neutralizing epitope reduced viral replication in monocytes/macrophages. We also demonstrated that the mutation or deletion of two nucleotides in 7b gene abrogate the virulence of strain FIPV 79-1146.

  18. Dissemination of Metarhizium anisopliae of low and high virulence by mating behavior in Aedes aegypti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez-Perez Mario A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue is a viral disease transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. It is a threat for public health worldwide and its primary vector Aedes aegypti is becoming resistant to chemical insecticides. These factors have encouraged studies to evaluate entomopathogenic fungi against the vector. Here we evaluated mortality, infection, insemination and fecundity rates in A. aegypti females after infection by autodissemination with two Mexican strains of Metarhizium anisopliae. Methods Two M. anisopliae strains were tested: The Ma-CBG-1 least virulent (lv, and the Ma-CBG-2 highly virulent (hv strain. The lv was tested as non mosquito-passed (NMP, and mosquito-passed (MP, while the hv was examined only as MP version, therefore including the control four treatments were used. In the first bioassay virulence of fungal strains towards female mosquitoes was determined by indirect exposure for 48 hours to conidia-impregnated paper. In the second bioassay autodissemination of fungal conidia from fungus-contaminated males to females was evaluated. Daily mortality allowed computation of survival curves and calculation of the LT50 by the Kaplan-Meier model. All combinations of fungal sporulation and mating insemination across the four treatments were analyzed by χ2. The mean fecundity was analyzed by ANOVA and means contrasted with the Ryan test. Results Indirect exposure to conidia allowed a faster rate of mortality, but exposure to a fungal-contaminated male was also an effective method of infecting female mosquitoes. All females confined with the hv strain-contaminated male died in fifteen days with a LT50 of 7.57 (± 0.45 where the control was 24.82 (± 0.92. For the lv strain, it was possible to increase fungal virulence by passing the strain through mosquitoes. 85% of females exposed to hv-contaminated males became infected and of them just 10% were inseminated; control insemination was 46%. The hv strain reduced fecundity by up to 99%, and the lv

  19. Macrophages from chickens selected for high antibody response produced more nitric oxide and have greater phagocytic capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Marco Cesar Cunegundes; Guillermo, Landi Veivi Costilla; Matta, Marcos Fernando de Rezende; Soares, Sandro Gomes; DaMatta, Renato Augusto

    2011-04-15

    Macrophages are fundamental cells of the innate immune system, which, through phagocytosis and nitric oxide production, eliminate pathogens. The aim of the present study was to determine if macrophages from chicken families divergently selected to high and low antibodies response differ in nitric oxide production and phagocytic capacity. Blood monocytes derived macrophages were activated with lipopolysaccharide and supernatant from chicken spleen lymphocytes cultured with Concanavalin A (containing chicken interferon). Nitric oxide production was evaluated in culture supernatants. Phagocytic capacity of activated and non-activated macrophages was assayed using yeasts and IgY opsonized sheep red blood cells. Activated and non-activated macrophages from the high antibodies response family produced higher nitric oxide levels, internalized more yeast and significantly more opsonized sheep red blood cells than macrophages from the low antibodies response family. Moreover, activated macrophages became more elongated and widely spread. These findings indicate that macrophages from the high antibodies response family were more active suggesting that the differences in antibody response also depend on macrophage function.

  20. Virulence comparisons of high-temperature-adapted Heterorhabditis bacteriophora, Steinernema feltiae and S. carpocapsae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susurluk I. A.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs are environmentally safe alternative control agents. Nematodes in the Heterorhabditidae and Steinernematidae families are widely used in biological control frameworks, especially for soil-inhabiting insect pests. In this experiment, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora (Poinar, 1976, Steinernema feltiae (Filipjev, 1934 and S. carpocapsae (Weiser, 1955 adapted at high temperature were assessed in order to detect differences in virulence between adapted and non-adapted populations. All species were exposed to 38 °C for 2 h. After this treatment, live infective juveniles (IJs were used to infect to last instar Galleria mellonella (Linnaeus, 1758. larvae at the following doses: 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 IJs/larva. The LD50 and LD90 were obtained for these species. Non-adapted populations of the nematode species were used as controls for this experiment. The results indicated that differences in S. feltiae and S. carpocapsae virulence between the adapted and non-adapted populations were significant; no significant difference was observed between the adapted and non-adapted H. bacteriophora populations.

  1. High resolution preparation of monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM protein fractions for clinical proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivieri Oliviero

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages are involved in a number of key physiological processes and complex responses such as inflammatory, immunological, infectious diseases and iron homeostasis. These cells are specialised for iron storage and recycling from senescent erythrocytes so they play a central role in the fine tuning of iron balancing and distribution. The comprehension of the many physiological responses of macrophages implies the study of the related molecular events. To this regard, proteomic analysis, is one of the most powerful tools for the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms, in terms of changes in protein expression levels. Results Our aim was to optimize a protocol for protein fractionation and high resolution mapping using human macrophages for clinical studies. We exploited a fractionation protocol based on the neutral detergent Triton X-114. The 2D maps of the fractions obtained showed high resolution and a good level of purity. Western immunoblotting and mass spectrometry (MS/MS analysis indicated no fraction cross contamination. On 2D-PAGE mini gels (7 × 8 cm we could count more than five hundred protein spots, substantially increasing the resolution and the number of detectable proteins for the macrophage proteome. The fractions were also evaluated, with preliminary experiments, using Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS. Conclusion This relatively simple method allows deep investigation into macrophages proteomics producing discrete and accurate protein fractions, especially membrane-associated and integral proteins. The adapted protocol seems highly suitable for further studies of clinical proteomics, especially for the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis in normal and disease conditions.

  2. High Virulence and Antifungal Resistance in Clinical Strains of Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Monroy-Pérez, Eric; Paniagua-Contreras, Gloria Luz; Rodríguez-Purata, Pamela; Vaca-Paniagua, Felipe; Vázquez-Villaseñor, Marco; Díaz-Velásquez, Clara; Uribe-García, Alina; Vaca, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Antifungal resistance and virulence properties of Candida albicans are a growing health problem worldwide. To study the expression of virulence and azole resistance genes in 39 clinical strains of C. albicans, we used a model of infection of human vaginal epithelial cells with C. albicans strains isolated from Mexican women with vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC). The strains were identified by PCR amplification of the ITS1 and ITS2 regions of rRNA. The detection and expression of virulence genes...

  3. Repeated challenge with virulent Newcastle Disease Virus does not decrease the efficacy of vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the field, well-vaccinated birds may be repeatedly exposed to challenges with virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (vNDV), which may infect macrophages and cause damage to the immune system. In this study, we evaluated the hypothesis that daily challenges with high doses of vNDV may overwh...

  4. In vitro susceptibility of high virulence microorganisms isolated in heart valve banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalba, R; Solis, F; Fornés, G; Jimenez, A; Eisman, M; González, Ana I; Linares, M J; Casal, M; Gómez Villagrán, J L

    2012-08-01

    Storage preparation of human heart valves for implants generally includes incubation in an antimicrobial disinfection solution and cryopreservation. Changes in patterns of microorganisms susceptibility to antibiotics is a variable process of that promote its inefficiency. The aim of this study has been an evaluation of in vitro susceptibility of high virulence microorganisms isolated in our tissue bank for 14 years in order to evaluate the efficiency, and to promote changes for further antibiotics mixtures as well. Data presented in this study show that microorganisms isolates in valve banking display susceptibility patterns similar to those shown in other clinical circumstances, and the most commonly used antibiotics regimes are useful to date. An antibiotic cocktail containing aminoglicoside in addition to ciprofloxacin and vancomycin is an efficient mixture to be used in valve banking. Further studies will be necessary for monitoring patterns changes of in vitro susceptibility of microbiological isolates in tissue banking.

  5. Treatment with interferon-alpha delays disease in swine infected with a highly virulent CSFV strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Sainz, I; Ramanathan, P; O'Donnell, V; Diaz-San Segundo, F; Velazquez-Salinas, L; Sturza, D F; Zhu, J; de los Santos, T; Borca, M V

    2015-09-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFNα) can effectively inhibit or abort a viral infection within the host. It has been reported that IFN induction and production is hindered during classical swine fever virus (CSFV) infection. Most of those studies have been performed in vitro, making it difficult to elucidate the actual role of IFNs during CSFV infection in swine. Here, we report the effect of IFNα treatment (delivered by a replication defective recombinant human adenovirus type 5, Ad5) in swine experimentally infected with highly virulent CSFV strain Brescia. Treatment with two different subtypes of IFNα delayed the appearance of CSF-related clinical signs and virus replication although it did not prevent lethal disease. This is the first report describing the effect of IFNα treatment during CSFV infection in swine. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. NLRP3 Inflammasome Expression and Signaling in Human Diabetic Wounds and in High Glucose Induced Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaotian; Dai, Jiezhi; Li, Li

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. To investigate the contribution and mechanism of NLRP3 inflammasome expression in human wounds in diabetes mellitus and in high glucose induced macrophages. Methods. In the present study, we compared the expression of NLRP3 inflammasome in debridement wound tissue from diabetic and nondiabetic patients. We also examined whether high glucose induces NLRP3 inflammasome expression in cultures THP-1-derived macrophages and the influence on IL-1β expression. Results. The expressions of NLRP3, caspase1, and IL-1β, at both the mRNA and protein level, were significantly higher in wounds of diabetic patients compared with nondiabetic wounds (P CCR7 was significantly upregulated after high glucose stimulation. SiRNA-mediated silencing of NLRP3 expression downregulates the expression of IL-1β. Conclusion. The higher expression of NLRP3, caspase1, and secretion of IL-1β, signaling, and activation might contribute to the hyperinflammation in the human diabetic wound and in high glucose induced macrophages. It may be a novel target to treat the DM patients with chronic wound. PMID:28164132

  7. Targeting the Hemoglobin Scavenger receptor CD163 in Macrophages Highly Increases the Anti-inflammatory Potency of Dexamethasone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graversen, Jonas H; Svendsen, Pia; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    on the suppressed release of tumor-necrosis factor-α and other cytokines by macrophages at the sites of inflammation. We have now developed a new biodegradable anti-CD163 antibody-drug conjugate that specifically targets the glucocorticoid, dexamethasone to the hemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163 in macrophages....... The conjugate, that in average contains four dexamethasone molecules per antibody, exhibits retained high functional affinity for CD163. In vitro studies in rat macrophages and in vivo studies of Lewis rats showed a strong anti-inflammatory effect of the conjugate measured as reduced lipopolysaccharide...... apoptosis, body weight loss, and suppression of endogenous cortisol levels. In conclusion, the study shows antibody-drug conjugates as a future approach in anti-inflammatory macrophage-directed therapy. Furthermore, the data demonstrate CD163 as an excellent macrophage target for anti-inflammatory drug...

  8. Myeloid heme oxygenase-1 haploinsufficiency reduces high fat diet-induced insulin resistance by affecting adipose macrophage infiltration in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Yuan Huang

    Full Text Available Increased adipose tissue macrophages contribute to obesity-induced metabolic syndrome. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is a stress-inducible enzyme with potent anti-inflammatory and proangiogenic activities in macrophages. However, the role of macrophage HO-1 on obesity-induced adipose inflammation and metabolic syndrome remains unclear. Here we show that high-fat diet (HFD feeding in C57BL/6J mice induced HO-1 expression in the visceral adipose tissue, particularly the stromal vascular fraction. When the irradiated C57BL/6J mice reconstituted with wild-type or HO-1(+/- bone marrow were fed with HFD for over 24 weeks, the HO-1(+/- chimeras were protected from HFD-induced insulin resistance and this was associated with reduced adipose macrophage infiltration and angiogenesis, suggesting that HO-1 affects myeloid cell migration toward adipose tissue during obesity. In vivo and in vitro migration assays revealed that HO-1(+/- macrophages exhibited an impaired migration response. Chemoattractant-induced phosphorylation of p38 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK declined faster in HO-1(+/- macrophages. Further experiments demonstrated that carbon monoxide and bilirubin, the byproducts derived from heme degradation by HO-1, enhanced macrophage migration by increasing phosphorylation of p38 and FAK, respectively. These data disclose a novel role of hematopoietic cell HO-1 in promoting adipose macrophage infiltration and the development of insulin resistance during obesity.

  9. Palmitoleate Reverses High Fat-induced Proinflammatory Macrophage Polarization via AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kenny L; Pillon, Nicolas J; Sivaloganathan, Darshan M; Costford, Sheila R; Liu, Zhi; Théret, Marine; Chazaud, Benedicte; Klip, Amira

    2015-07-03

    A rise in tissue-embedded macrophages displaying "M1-like" proinflammatory polarization is a hallmark of metabolic inflammation during a high fat diet or obesity. Here we show that bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) from high fat-fed mice retain a memory of their dietary environment in vivo (displaying the elevated proinflammatory genes Cxcl1, Il6, Tnf, Nos2) despite 7-day differentiation and proliferation ex vivo. Notably, 6-h incubation with palmitoleate (PO) reversed the proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine secretion seen in BMDM from high fat-fed mice. BMDM from low fat-fed mice exposed to palmitate (PA) for 18 h ex vivo also showed elevated expression of proinflammatory genes (Cxcl1, Il6, Tnf, Nos2, and Il12b) associated with M1 polarization. Conversely, PO treatment increased anti-inflammatory genes (Mrc1, Tgfb1, Il10, Mgl2) and oxidative metabolism, characteristic of M2 macrophages. Therefore, saturated and unsaturated fatty acids bring about opposite macrophage polarization states. Coincubation of BMDM with both fatty acids counteracted the PA-induced Nos2 expression in a PO dose-dependent fashion. PO also prevented PA-induced IκBα degradation, RelA nuclear translocation, NO production, and cytokine secretion. Mechanistically, PO exerted its anti-inflammatory function through AMP-activated protein kinase as AMP kinase knockout or inhibition by Compound C offset the PO-dependent prevention of PA-induced inflammation. These results demonstrate a nutritional memory of BMDM ex vivo, highlight the plasticity of BMDM polarization in response to saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, and identify the potential to reverse diet- and saturated fat-induced M1-like polarization by administering palmitoleate. These findings could have applicability to reverse obesity-linked inflammation in metabolically relevant tissues.

  10. Complete genome sequence of the highly virulent Aeromonas hydrophila AL09-71 isolated from disease channel catfish from West Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    The highly virulent Aeromonas hydrophila isolate AL09-71 was cultured from infected channel catfish during the 2009 disease outbreak in West Alabama. The complete genome of this highly virulent Aeromonas hydrophila isolate AL09-71 is 5,023,861 bp in size. The genome has 4489 coding sequences, 11 cop...

  11. Effect of high glucose on the expression of CD36 and lipid accumulation in THP-1 macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭玉林

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of high glucose on regulating the expression of CD36 and lipid accumulation in THP-1 macrophages.Methods THP-1 macrophages were incubated with different concentrations of D-glucose(5.6,11,20,30 and 35 mmol/L),50 mg/L oxidized low density lipoprotein(ox-LDL),50 mg/L oxLDL+20 mmol/L D-glucose for 24 h.Total cholesterol content in THP-1 macrophages was determined by high performance liquid chromatography,the lipid accumulation was detected by oil red O stain.CD36 mRNA and

  12. Newcastle Disease Viruses Causing Recent Outbreaks Worldwide Show Unexpectedly High Genetic Similarity to Historical Virulent Isolates from the 1940s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Kiril M; Lee, Dong-Hun; Williams-Coplin, Dawn; Olivier, Timothy L; Miller, Patti J; Afonso, Claudio L

    2016-05-01

    Virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) cause Newcastle disease (ND), a devastating disease of poultry and wild birds. Phylogenetic analyses clearly distinguish historical isolates (obtained prior to 1960) from currently circulating viruses of class II genotypes V, VI, VII, and XII through XVIII. Here, partial and complete genomic sequences of recent virulent isolates of genotypes II and IX from China, Egypt, and India were found to be nearly identical to those of historical viruses isolated in the 1940s. Phylogenetic analysis, nucleotide distances, and rates of change demonstrate that these recent isolates have not evolved significantly from the most closely related ancestors from the 1940s. The low rates of change for these virulent viruses (7.05 × 10(-5) and 2.05 × 10(-5) per year, respectively) and the minimal genetic distances existing between these and historical viruses (0.3 to 1.2%) of the same genotypes indicate an unnatural origin. As with any other RNA virus, Newcastle disease virus is expected to evolve naturally; thus, these findings suggest that some recent field isolates should be excluded from evolutionary studies. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses show that these recent virulent isolates are more closely related to virulent strains isolated during the 1940s, which have been and continue to be used in laboratory and experimental challenge studies. Since the preservation of viable viruses in the environment for over 6 decades is highly unlikely, it is possible that the source of some of the recent virulent viruses isolated from poultry and wild birds might be laboratory viruses. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Comparison of high and low virulence serotypes of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae by quantitative real-time PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Kirstine Klitgaard; Angen, Øystein; Boye, Mette

    Until now, 15 different serotypes of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (Ap) have been described based upon differences in the capsular polysaccharides of the bacterium. The virulence of different serotypes of Ap has been experimentally determined and the differences in mortality and morbidity...

  14. Omega 3 fatty acids promote macrophage reverse cholesterol transport in hamster fed high fat diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Kasbi Chadli

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate macrophage reverse cholesterol transport (RCT in hamster, a CETP-expressing species, fed omega 3 fatty acids (ω3PUFA supplemented high fat diet (HFD. Three groups of hamsters (n = 6/group were studied for 20 weeks: 1 control diet: Control, 2 HFD group: HF and 3 HFD group supplemented with ω3PUFA (EPA and DHA: HFω3. In vivo macrophage-to-feces RCT was assessed after an intraperitoneal injection of (3H-cholesterol-labelled hamster primary macrophages. Compared to Control, HF presented significant (p<0.05 increase in body weight, plasma TG (p<0.01 and cholesterol (p<0.001 with an increase in VLDL TG and in VLDL and LDL cholesterol (p<0.001. Compared to HF, HFω3 presented significant decrease in body weight. HFω3 showed less plasma TG (p<0.001 and cholesterol (p<0.001 related to a decrease in VLDL TG and HDL cholesterol respectively and higher LCAT activity (p<0.05 compared to HF. HFω3 showed a higher fecal bile acid excretion (p<0.05 compared to Control and HF groups and higher fecal cholesterol excretion (p<0.05 compared to HF. This increase was related to higher gene expression of ABCG5, ABCA1 and SR-B1 in HFω3 compared to Control and HF groups (<0.05 and in ABCG1 and CYP7A1 compared to HF group (p<0.05. A higher plasma efflux capacity was also measured in HFω3 using (3H- cholesterol labeled Fu5AH cells. In conclusion, EPA and DHA supplementation improved macrophage to feces reverse cholesterol transport in hamster fed HFD. This change was related to the higher cholesterol and fecal bile acids excretion and to the activation of major genes involved in RCT.

  15. Infection of equine monocyte-derived macrophages with an attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) strain induces a strong resistance to the infection by a virulent EIAV strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian; Wang, Shan-Shan; Lin, Yue-Zhi; Liu, Hai-Fang; Liu, Qiang; Wei, Hua-Mian; Wang, Xue-Feng; Wang, Yu-Hong; Du, Cheng; Kong, Xian-Gang; Zhou, Jian-Hua; Wang, Xiaojun

    2014-08-09

    The Chinese attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine has successfully protected millions of equine animals from EIA disease in China. Given that the induction of immune protection results from the interactions between viruses and hosts, a better understanding of the characteristics of vaccine strain infection and host responses would be useful for elucidating the mechanism of the induction of immune protection by the Chinese attenuated EIAV strain. In this study, we demonstrate in equine monocyte-derived macrophages (eMDM) that EIAVFDDV13, a Chinese attenuated EIAV strain, induced a strong resistance to subsequent infection by a pathogenic strain, EIAVUK3. Further experiments indicate that the expression of the soluble EIAV receptor sELR1, Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and interferon β (IFNβ) was up-regulated in eMDM infected with EIAVFDDV13 compared with eMDM infected with EIAVUK3. Stimulating eMDM with poly I:C resulted in similar resistance to EIAV infection as induced by EIAVFDDV13 and was correlated with enhanced TLR3, sELR1 and IFNβ expression. The knock down of TLR3 mRNA significantly impaired poly I:C-stimulated resistance to EIAV, greatly reducing the expression of sELR1 and IFNβ and lowered the level of infection resistance induced by EIAVFDDV13. These results indicate that the induction of restraining infection by EIAVFDDV13 in macrophages is partially mediated through the up-regulated expression of the soluble viral receptor and IFNβ, and that the TLR3 pathway activation plays an important role in the development of an EIAV-resistant intracellular environment.

  16. Comparative study of the physiological roles of three peroxidases (NADH peroxidase, Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase and Thiol peroxidase) in oxidative stress response, survival inside macrophages and virulence of Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Carbona, Stephanie; Sauvageot, Nicolas; Giard, Jean-Christophe; Benachour, Abdellah; Posteraro, Brunella; Auffray, Yanick; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Hartke, Axel

    2007-12-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Enterococcus faecalis is well equipped with peroxidatic activities. It harbours three loci encoding a NADH peroxidase, an alkyl hydroperoxide reductase and a protein (EF2932) belonging to the AhpC/TSA family. We present results demonstrating that ef2932 does encode a thiol peroxidase (Tpx) and show that it is part of the regulon of the hydrogen peroxide regulator HypR. Characterization of unmarked deletion mutants showed that all three peroxidases are important for the defence against externally provided H(2)O(2). Exposure to internal generated H(2)O(2) by aerobic growth on glycerol, lactose, galactose or ribose showed that Npr was absolutely required for aerobic growth on glycerol and optimal growth on the other substrates. Growth on glycerol was also dependent on Ahp. Addition of catalase restored growth of the mutants, and therefore, extracellular H(2)O(2) concentrations have been determined. This showed that the time point of growth arrest of the Deltanpr mutant correlated with the highest H(2)O(2) concentration measured. Analysis of the survival of the different strains inside peritoneal macrophages revealed that Tpx was the most important antioxidant activity for protecting the cells against the hostile phagocyte environment. Finally, the Deltatpx and the triple mutant showed attenuated virulence in a mouse peritonitis model.

  17. Validation of a High-Throughput Multiplex Genetic Detection System for Helicobacter pylori Identification, Quantification, Virulence, and Resistance Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yanmei; Zhao, Fuju; Kong, Mimi; Wang, Shiwen; Nan, Li; Hu, Binjie; Olszewski, Michal A.; Miao, Yingxin; Ji, Danian; Jiang, Wenrong; Fang, Yi; Zhang, Jinghao; Chen, Fei; Xiang, Ping; Wu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is closely related to various gastroduodenal diseases. Virulence factors and bacterial load of H. pylori are associated with clinical outcomes, and drug-resistance severely impacts the clinical efficacy of eradication treatment. Existing detection methods are low-throughput, time-consuming and labor intensive. Therefore, a rapid and high-throughput method is needed for clinical diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring for H. pylori. High-throughput Multip...

  18. Skeletal muscle insulin resistance associated with cholesterol-induced activation of macrophages is prevented by high density lipoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew L Carey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Emerging evidence suggests that high density lipoprotein (HDL may modulate glucose metabolism through multiple mechanisms including pancreatic insulin secretion as well as insulin-independent glucose uptake into muscle. We hypothesized that HDL may also increase skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity via cholesterol removal and anti-inflammatory actions in macrophages associated with excess adiposity and ectopic lipid deposition. METHODS: Human primary and THP-1 macrophages were treated with vehicle (PBS or acetylated low density lipoprotein (acLDL with or without HDL for 18 hours. Treatments were then removed, and macrophages were incubated with fresh media for 4 hours. This conditioned media was then applied to primary human skeletal myotubes derived from vastus lateralis biopsies taken from patients with type 2 diabetes to examine insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. RESULTS: Conditioned media from acLDL-treated primary and THP-1 macrophages reduced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in primary human skeletal myotubes compared with vehicle (primary macrophages, 168±21% of basal uptake to 104±19%; THP-1 macrophages, 142±8% of basal uptake to 108±6%; P<0.05. This was restored by co-treatment of macrophages with HDL. While acLDL increased total intracellular cholesterol content, phosphorylation of c-jun N-terminal kinase and secretion of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines from macrophages, none were altered by co-incubation with HDL. Insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in human skeletal myotubes exposed to conditioned media was unaltered by either treatment condition. CONCLUSION: Inhibition of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in primary human skeletal myotubes by conditioned media from macrophages pre-incubated with acLDL was restored by co-treatment with HDL. However, these actions were not linked to modulation of common pro- or anti-inflammatory mediators or insulin signaling via Akt.

  19. Therapeutic vaccination against relevant high virulence clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, Crystal A; Ireton, Gregory C; Baldwin, Susan L; Coler, Rhea N; Reed, Steven G; Basaraba, Randall J; Orme, Ian M

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to attempt to develop therapeutic or post-exposure vaccines that could slow progressive disease in guinea pigs infected by low dose aerosol with very high virulence Beijing isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, currently classified as Category C biodefense pathogens by the NIH and CDC. After screening several candidates we focused on the use of three candidates; these were a pool of bacterial iron acquisition proteins, a pool of antigens recognized by T cells from chronically infected mice thought to represent proteins made by the bacillus in response to decreases in local oxygen tension, and a bacterial lipoprotein that is a potent TLR2 agonist. When delivered in a potent GLA-based adjuvant [targeting TLR4 and TLR9], in most cases we were unable to reduce the bacterial load in the lungs. However, the pathologic appearance of lungs from these animals showed that, while primary lesions were most unaffected and had become necrotic, the development of large, lung consolidating secondary lesions seemed to have been mostly prevented. In animals given both a priming vaccination and a boost the effects were prominent, and almost certainly contributed to significantly prolonged survival in these animals. In a biodefense situation, this prolonged survival would be potentially long enough to allow for the organism to be identified and a drug susceptibility profile determined.

  20. High osmolarity glycerol response PtcB phosphatase is important for Aspergillus fumigatus virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelströter, Lizziane K; Bom, Vinícius Leite Pedro; de Castro, Patrícia Alves; Ramalho, Leandra Naira Zambelli; Goldman, Maria Helena S; Brown, Neil Andrew; Rajendran, Ranjith; Ramage, Gordon; Bovier, Elodie; Dos Reis, Thaila Fernanda; Savoldi, Marcela; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Goldman, Gustavo H

    2015-04-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is a fungal pathogen that is capable of adapting to different host niches and to avoid host defenses. An enhanced understanding of how, and which, A. fumigatus signal transduction pathways are engaged in the regulation of these processes is essential for the development of improved disease control strategies. Protein phosphatases are central to numerous signal transduction pathways. To comprehend the functions of protein phosphatases in A. fumigatus, 32 phosphatase catalytic subunit encoding genes were identified. We have recognized PtcB as one of the phosphatases involved in the high osmolarity glycerol response (HOG) pathway. The ΔptcB mutant has both increased phosphorylation of the p38 MAPK (SakA) and expression of osmo-dependent genes. The ΔptcB strain was more sensitive to cell wall damaging agents, had increased chitin and β-1,3-glucan, and impaired biofilm formation. The ΔptcB strain was avirulent in a murine model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. These results stress the importance of the HOG pathway in the regulation of pathogenicity determinants and virulence in A. fumigatus.

  1. Association between high expression macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) alleles and West Nile virus encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rituparna; Loughran, Kerry; Murchison, Charles; Qian, Feng; Leng, Lin; Song, Yan; Montgomery, Ruth R; Loeb, Mark; Bucala, Richard

    2016-02-01

    Infection with mosquito-borne West Nile virus (WNV) is usually asymptomatic but can lead to severe WNV encephalitis. The innate cytokine, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), is elevated in patients with WNV encephalitis and promotes viral neuroinvasion and mortality in animal models. In a case-control study, we examined functional polymorphisms in the MIF locus in a cohort of 454 North American patients with neuroinvasive WNV disease and found patients homozygous for high-expression MIF alleles to be >20-fold (p=0.008) more likely to have WNV encephalitis. These data indicate that MIF is an important determinant of severity of WNV neuropathogenesis and may be a therapeutic target.

  2. Replication fitness determines high virulence of influenza A virus in mice carrying functional Mx1 resistance gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Daniel; Staeheli, Peter; Hufbauer, Martin; Koerner, Iris; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Solórzano, Alicia; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Haller, Otto; Kochs, Georg

    2007-04-17

    The IFN-induced resistance factor Mx1 is a critical component of innate immunity against influenza A viruses (FLUAV) in mice. Animals carrying a wild-type Mx1 gene (Mx1(+/+)) differ from regular laboratory mice (Mx1(-/-)) in that they are highly resistant to infection with standard FLUAV strains. We identified an extraordinary variant of the FLUAV strain, A/PR/8/34 (H1N1) (designated hvPR8), which is unusually virulent in Mx1(+/+) mice. hvPR8 was well controlled in Mx1(+/+) but not Mx1(-/-) mice provided that the animals were treated with IFN before infection, indicating that hvPR8 exhibits normal sensitivity to growth restriction by Mx1. hvPR8 multiplied much faster than standard PR8 early in infection because of highly efficient viral gene expression in infected cells. Studies with reassortant viruses containing defined genome segments of both hvPR8 and standard PR8 demonstrated that the HA, neuraminidase, and polymerase genes of hvPR8 all contributed to virulence, indicating that efficient host cell entry and early gene expression renders hvPR8 highly pathogenic. These results reveal a surprisingly simple concept of how influenza viruses may gain virulence and illustrate that high speed of virus growth can outcompete the antiviral response of the infected host.

  3. Dissemination of a highly virulent pathogen: tracking the early events that define infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo J Gonzalez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The series of events that occurs immediately after pathogen entrance into the body is largely speculative. Key aspects of these events are pathogen dissemination and pathogen interactions with the immune response as the invader moves into deeper tissues. We sought to define major events that occur early during infection of a highly virulent pathogen. To this end, we tracked early dissemination of Yersinia pestis, a highly pathogenic bacterium that causes bubonic plague in mammals. Specifically, we addressed two fundamental questions: (1 do the bacteria encounter barriers in disseminating to draining lymph nodes (LN, and (2 what mechanism does this nonmotile bacterium use to reach the LN compartment, as the prevailing model predicts trafficking in association with host cells. Infection was followed through microscopy imaging in addition to assessing bacterial population dynamics during dissemination from the skin. We found and characterized an unexpected bottleneck that severely restricts bacterial dissemination to LNs. The bacteria that do not pass through this bottleneck are confined to the skin, where large numbers of neutrophils arrive and efficiently control bacterial proliferation. Notably, bottleneck formation is route dependent, as it is abrogated after subcutaneous inoculation. Using a combination of approaches, including microscopy imaging, we tested the prevailing model of bacterial dissemination from the skin into LNs and found no evidence of involvement of migrating phagocytes in dissemination. Thus, early stages of infection are defined by a bottleneck that restricts bacterial dissemination and by neutrophil-dependent control of bacterial proliferation in the skin. Furthermore, and as opposed to current models, our data indicate an intracellular stage is not required by Y. pestis to disseminate from the skin to draining LNs. Because our findings address events that occur during early encounters of pathogen with the immune response

  4. A comprehensive insight into bacterial virulence in drinking water using 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kailong; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Shi, Peng; Wu, Bing; Ren, Hongqiang

    2014-11-01

    In order to comprehensively investigate bacterial virulence in drinking water, 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing were used to detect potential pathogenic bacteria and virulence factors (VFs) in a full-scale drinking water treatment and distribution system. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing revealed high bacterial diversity in the drinking water (441-586 operational taxonomic units). Bacterial diversity decreased after chlorine disinfection, but increased after pipeline distribution. α-Proteobacteria was the most dominant taxonomic class. Alignment against the established pathogen database showed that several types of putative pathogens were present in the drinking water and Pseudomonas aeruginosa had the highest abundance (over 11‰ of total sequencing reads). Many pathogens disappeared after chlorine disinfection, but P. aeruginosa and Leptospira interrogans were still detected in the tap water. High-throughput sequencing revealed prevalence of various pathogenicity islands and virulence proteins in the drinking water, and translocases, transposons, Clp proteases and flagellar motor switch proteins were the predominant VFs. Both diversity and abundance of the detectable VFs increased after the chlorination, and decreased after the pipeline distribution. This study indicates that joint use of 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina sequencing can comprehensively characterize environmental pathogenesis, and several types of putative pathogens and various VFs are prevalent in drinking water.

  5. Transient virulence of emerging pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolker, Benjamin M; Nanda, Arjun; Shah, Dharmini

    2010-05-06

    Should emerging pathogens be unusually virulent? If so, why? Existing theories of virulence evolution based on a tradeoff between high transmission rates and long infectious periods imply that epidemic growth conditions will select for higher virulence, possibly leading to a transient peak in virulence near the beginning of an epidemic. This transient selection could lead to high virulence in emerging pathogens. Using a simple model of the epidemiological and evolutionary dynamics of emerging pathogens, along with rough estimates of parameters for pathogens such as severe acute respiratory syndrome, West Nile virus and myxomatosis, we estimated the potential magnitude and timing of such transient virulence peaks. Pathogens that are moderately evolvable, highly transmissible, and highly virulent at equilibrium could briefly double their virulence during an epidemic; thus, epidemic-phase selection could contribute significantly to the virulence of emerging pathogens. In order to further assess the potential significance of this mechanism, we bring together data from the literature for the shapes of tradeoff curves for several pathogens (myxomatosis, HIV, and a parasite of Daphnia) and the level of genetic variation for virulence for one (myxomatosis). We discuss the need for better data on tradeoff curves and genetic variance in order to evaluate the plausibility of various scenarios of virulence evolution.

  6. Highly virulent strains of Pseudomonas solanacearum that are defective in extracellular-polysaccharide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Peilin; Iwata, Michiaki; Sequeira, L. (Dept. of Agriculture (USA)); Leong, S. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (USA))

    1990-07-01

    Extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) has long been regarded as one of the mos important factors involved in wilting of plants by Pseudomonas solanacearum. By means of transposon Tn5 mutagensis, the authors have isolated a class of mutants that have an afluidal colony morphology but retain the ability to cause severe wilting and death of tobacco plants. One such mutant, KD700, was studied in detail. By marker exchange mutagenesis, the altered colony morphology was shown to be the result of a single Tn5 insertion in a 14.3-kilobase EcoRI fragment. This defect could be corrected by introducing a homologous clone from a cosmid library of the wild-type, parental strain K60. The Tn5-containing fragment was introduced into other P. solanacearum wild-type strains by marker exchange, and these altered strains had the same afluidal phenotype as KD700. N-Acetylgalactosamine (GalNac), the major constituent of EPS of all wild-type strains of P. solanacearum, was not detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of vascular fluids from wilting plants infected by KD700. In contrast, GalNac was readily detected in similar fluids of plants infected by K60. Polysaccharides extracted from culture filtrates of KD700 contained approximately one-fifth of the GalNac present in polysaccharides from K60. No differences in growth rates in culture or in planta between the mutant and the parental strains were observed. Since strains that are deficient in EPS production can remain highly virulent to tobacco, they conclude that EPS, or at least its GalNac-containing component, may not be required for disease development by P. solanacearum.

  7. High frequency of virulence factor genes tdh, trh, and tlh in Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains isolated from a pristine estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez West, Casandra K; Klein, Savannah L; Lovell, Charles R

    2013-04-01

    Virulence factor genes encoding the thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh) and the thermostable direct hemolysin-related hemolysin (trh) are strongly correlated with virulence of the emergent human pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus. The gene encoding the thermolabile hemolysin (tlh) is also considered a signature molecular marker for the species. These genes are typically reported in very low percentages (1 to 2%) of nonclinical strains. V. parahaemolyticus strains were isolated from various niches within a pristine estuary (North Inlet, SC) and were screened for these genes using both newly designed PCR primers and more commonly used primers. DNA sequences of tdh and trh were recovered from 48% and 8.3%, respectively, of these North Inlet strains. The recovery of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus strains in such high proportions from an estuarine ecosystem that is virtually free of anthropogenic influences indicates the potential for additional, perhaps environmental roles of the tdh and trh genes.

  8. Brucella abortusΔcydCΔcydD and ΔcydCΔpurD double-mutants are highly attenuated and confer long-term protective immunity against virulent Brucella abortus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Quang Lam; Cho, Youngjae; Park, Soyeon; Kim, Kiju; Hahn, Tae-Wook

    2016-01-04

    We constructed double deletion (ΔcydCΔcydD and ΔcydCΔpurD) mutants from virulent Brucella abortus biovar 1 field isolate (BA15) by deleting the genes encoding an ATP-binding cassette-type transporter (cydC and cydD genes) and a phosphoribosylamine-glycine ligase (purD). Both BA15ΔcydCΔcydD and BA15ΔcydCΔpurD double-mutants exhibited significant attenuation of virulence when assayed in murine macrophages or in BALB/c mice. Both double-mutants were readily cleared from spleens by 4 weeks post-inoculation even when inoculated at the dose of 10(8) CFU per mouse. Moreover, the inoculated mice showed no splenomegaly, which indicates that the mutants are highly attenuated. Importantly, the attenuation of in vitro and in vivo growth did not impair the ability of these mutants to confer long-term protective immunity in mice against challenge with B. abortus strain 2308. Vaccination of mice with either mutant induced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, and provided significantly better protection than commercial B. abortus strain RB51 vaccine. These results suggest that highly attenuated BA15ΔcydCΔcydD and BA15ΔcydCΔpurD mutants can be used effectively as potential live vaccine candidates against bovine brucellosis.

  9. Myxomatosis: the virulence of field strains of myxoma virus in a population of wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus L.) with high resistance to myxomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, J W; Nolan, I F; Shepherd, R C; Gocs, A

    1975-06-01

    The virulence of field strains of myxoma virus is increasing in the Mallee region of Victoria where the resistance of the rabbit to myxomatosis is high. This suggests that the climax association will be a moderately severe disease.

  10. Myxomatosis: the virulence of field strains of myxoma virus in a population of wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus L.) with high resistance to myxomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, J. W.; Nolan, I. F.; Shepherd, R. C.; Gocs, A.

    1975-01-01

    The virulence of field strains of myxoma virus is increasing in the Mallee region of Victoria where the resistance of the rabbit to myxomatosis is high. This suggests that the climax association will be a moderately severe disease. PMID:1056963

  11. Bacillus cereus G9241 Makes Anthrax Toxin and Capsule like Highly Virulent B. anthracis Ames but Behaves like Attenuated Toxigenic Nonencapsulated B. anthracis Sterne in Rabbits and Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Microbiology. All Rights Reserved. Bacillus cereus G9241 Makes Anthrax Toxin and Capsule like Highly Virulent B. anthracis Ames but Behaves like...G9241 for mice requires the presence of both plasmids. The Bacillus cereus group, of which Bacillus anthracis, Bacil- lus thuringiensis , and B... Bacillus cereus G9241 Makes Anthrax Toxin and Capsule like Highly Virulent B. anthracis Ames but Behaves like Attenuated Toxigenic Nonencapsulated B

  12. Human macrophages infected with a high burden of ESAT-6-expressing M. tuberculosis undergo caspase-1- and cathepsin B-independent necrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Welin

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb infects lung macrophages, which instead of killing the pathogen can be manipulated by the bacilli, creating an environment suitable for intracellular replication and spread to adjacent cells. The role of host cell death during Mtb infection is debated because the bacilli have been shown to be both anti-apoptotic, keeping the host cell alive to avoid the antimicrobial effects of apoptosis, and pro-necrotic, killing the host macrophage to allow infection of neighboring cells. Since mycobacteria activate the NLRP3 inflammasome in macrophages, we investigated whether Mtb could induce one of the recently described inflammasome-linked cell death modes pyroptosis and pyronecrosis. These are mediated through caspase-1 and cathepsin-B, respectively. Human monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with virulent (H37Rv Mtb at a multiplicity of infection (MOI of 1 or 10. The higher MOI resulted in strongly enhanced release of IL-1β, while a low MOI gave no IL-1β response. The infected macrophages were collected and cell viability in terms of the integrity of DNA, mitochondria and the plasma membrane was determined. We found that infection with H37Rv at MOI 10, but not MOI 1, over two days led to extensive DNA fragmentation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, loss of plasma membrane integrity, and HMGB1 release. Although we observed plasma membrane permeabilization and IL-1β release from infected cells, the cell death induced by Mtb was not dependent on caspase-1 or cathepsin B. It was, however, dependent on mycobacterial expression of ESAT-6. We conclude that as virulent Mtb reaches a threshold number of bacilli inside the human macrophage, ESAT-6-dependent necrosis occurs, activating caspase-1 in the process.

  13. Mac Protein is not an Essential Virulence Factor for the Virulent Reference Strain Streptococcus suis P1/7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Genhui; Wu, Zongfu; Zhang, Shouming; Tang, Huanyu; Wang, Fengqiu; Lu, Chengping

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is a major pathogen of pigs and also an important zoonotic agent for humans. A S. suis protein containing Mac-1 domain (designated Mac) is a protective antigen, exclusively cleaves porcine IgM, and contributes to complement evasion with the presence of high titers of specific porcine anti-S. suis IgM, but its role in S. suis virulence has not been investigated in natural healthy host without specific IgM. In this study, a mac deletion mutant was constructed by homologous recombination in S. suis serotype 2 virulent reference strain P1/7. Deletion of mac did not significantly influence phagocytosis or intracellular survival within murine macrophages RAW264.7, or the oxidative-burst induction of RAW264.7 and murine neutrophils. Furthermore, the mutant is as virulent as the wild-type strain in pig, mouse, and zebrafish infection models. Our data suggest that Mac is not essential for S. suis virulence in strain P1/7 in natural healthy host without specific IgM, and the immunogenicity of Mac does not appear to correlate with its significance for virulence.

  14. Sensitivity of Francisella tularensis to ultrapure water and deoxycholate: implications for bacterial intracellular growth assay in macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalabaev, Sabina; Anderson, Christine A.; Onderdonk, Andrew B.; Kasper, Dennis L.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of Francisella tularensis to replicate in macrophages is critical for its pathogenesis, therefore intracellular growth assays are important tools for assessing virulence. We show that two lysis solutions commonly used in these assays, deionized water and deoxycholate in PBS, lead to highly inaccurate measurements of intracellular bacterial survival. PMID:21420447

  15. Yersinia pestis intracellular parasitism of macrophages from hosts exhibiting high and low severity of plague.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duraisamy Ponnusamy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Yersinia pestis causes severe disease in natural rodent hosts, but mild to inapparent disease in certain rodent predators such as dogs. Y. pestis initiates infection in susceptible hosts by parasitizing and multiplying intracellularly in local macrophages prior to systemic dissemination. Thus, we hypothesize that Y. pestis disease severity may depend on the degree to which intracellular Y. pestis overcomes the initial host macrophage imposed stress. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test this hypothesis, the progression of in vitro infection by Y. pestis KIM62053.1+ of mouse splenic and RAW264.7 tissue culture macrophages and dog peripheral blood-derived and DH82 tissue culture macrophages was studied using microscopy and various parameters of infection. The study showed that during the early stage of infection, intracellular Y. pestis assumed filamentous cellular morphology with multiple copies of the genome per bacterium in both mouse and dog macrophages. Later, in mouse macrophages, the infection elicited spacious vacuolar extension of Yersinia containing vacuoles (YCV, and the filamentous Y. pestis reverted to coccobacillary morphology with genomic equivalents approximately equaling colony forming units. In contrast, Y. pestis infected dog macrophages did not show noticeable extension of YCV, and intracellular Y. pestis retained the filamentous cellular morphology for the entire experiment in DH82 cells or were killed by blood-derived macrophages. In addition, during the later stage of infection, Y. pestis infected mouse macrophages exhibited cell lysis whereas dog macrophages did not. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Overall, these results support our hypothesis that Y. pestis in mouse macrophages can overcome the initial intracellular stress necessary for subsequent systemic infection. However, in dogs, failure of Y. pestis to overcome macrophage imposed stress may result in mild or in apparent disease in dogs.

  16. Morphometric Characterization of Rat and Human Alveolar Macrophage Cell Models and their Response to Amiodarone using High Content Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Ewelina; Patel, Aateka; Ball, Doug; Klapwijk, Jan; Millar, Val; Kumar, Abhinav; Martin, Abigail; Mahendran, Rhamiya; Dailey, Lea Ann; Forbes, Ben; Hutter, Victoria

    2017-05-24

    Progress to the clinic may be delayed or prevented when vacuolated or "foamy" alveolar macrophages are observed during non-clinical inhalation toxicology assessment. The first step in developing methods to study this response in vitro is to characterize macrophage cell lines and their response to drug exposures. Human (U937) and rat (NR8383) cell lines and primary rat alveolar macrophages obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage were characterized using high content fluorescence imaging analysis quantification of cell viability, morphometry, and phospholipid and neutral lipid accumulation. Cell health, morphology and lipid content were comparable (p content. Responses to amiodarone, a known inducer of phospholipidosis, required analysis of shifts in cell population profiles (the proportion of cells with elevated vacuolation or lipid content) rather than average population data which was insensitive to the changes observed. A high content image analysis assay was developed and used to provide detailed morphological characterization of rat and human alveolar-like macrophages and their response to a phospholipidosis-inducing agent. This provides a basis for development of assays to predict or understand macrophage vacuolation following inhaled drug exposure.

  17. A Fatal Case of Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by a Highly Virulent Escherichia coli Strain

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    Sadjia Bekal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a serious disease characterized by the necrosis of the subcutaneous tissues and fascia. E. coli as the etiologic agent of necrotizing fasciitis is a rare occurrence. A 66-year-old woman underwent total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. She rapidly developed necrotizing fasciitis which led to her death 68 hours following surgery. An E. coli strain was isolated from blood and fascia cultures. DNA microarray revealed the presence of 20 virulence genes.

  18. Targeting the Hemoglobin Scavenger receptor CD163 in Macrophages Highly Increases the Anti-inflammatory Potency of Dexamethasone

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    Graversen, Jonas H; Svendsen, Pia; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik; Dal, Jakob; Anton, Gabriele; Etzerodt, Anders; Petersen, Mikkel D; Christensen, Peter A; Møller, Holger J; Moestrup, Søren K

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic glucocorticoids are potent anti-inflammatory drugs but serious side effects such as bone mobilization, muscle mass loss, immunosuppression, and metabolic alterations make glucocorticoid therapy a difficult balance. The therapeutic anti-inflammatory effect of glucocorticoids relies largely on the suppressed release of tumor-necrosis factor-α and other cytokines by macrophages at the sites of inflammation. We have now developed a new biodegradable anti-CD163 antibody-drug conjugate that specifically targets the glucocorticoid, dexamethasone to the hemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163 in macrophages. The conjugate, that in average contains four dexamethasone molecules per antibody, exhibits retained high functional affinity for CD163. In vitro studies in rat macrophages and in vivo studies of Lewis rats showed a strong anti-inflammatory effect of the conjugate measured as reduced lipopolysaccharide-induced secretion of tumor-necrosis factor-α. The in vivo potency of conjugated dexamethasone was about 50-fold that of nonconjugated dexamethasone. In contrast to a strong systemic effect of nonconjugated dexamethasone, the equipotent dose of the conjugate had no such effect, measured as thymus lymphocytes apoptosis, body weight loss, and suppression of endogenous cortisol levels. In conclusion, the study shows antibody-drug conjugates as a future approach in anti-inflammatory macrophage-directed therapy. Furthermore, the data demonstrate CD163 as an excellent macrophage target for anti-inflammatory drug delivery. PMID:22643864

  19. Proteomic analysis of swine serum following highly virulent classical swine fever virus infection

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    Guo Huan-cheng

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classical swine fever virus (CSFV belongs to the genus Pestivirus within the family Flaviviridae. Virulent strains of classical swine fever virus (CSFV cause severe disease in pigs characterized by immunosuppression, thrombocytopenia and disseminated intravascular coagulation, which causes significant economic losses to the pig industry worldwide. Methods To reveal proteomic changes in swine serum during the acute stage of lethal CSFV infection, 5 of 10 pigs were inoculated with the virulent CSFV Shimen strain, the remainder serving as uninfected controls. A serum sample was taken at 3 days post-infection from each swine, at a stage when there were no clinical symptoms other than increased rectal temperatures (≥40°C. The samples were treated to remove serum albumin and immunoglobulin (IgG, and then subjected to two-dimension differential gel electrophoresis. Results Quantitative intensity analysis revealed 17 protein spots showing at least 1.5-fold quantitative alteration in expression. Ten spots were successfully identified by MALDI-TOF MS or LTQ MS. Expression of 4 proteins was increased and 6 decreased in CSFV-infected pigs. Functions of these proteins included blood coagulation, anti-inflammatory activity and angiogenesis. Conclusion These proteins with altered expression may have important implications in the pathogenesis of classical swine fever and provide a clue for identification of biomarkers for classical swine fever early diagnosis.

  20. Genomic characterization of Haemophilus parasuis SH0165, a highly virulent strain of serovar 5 prevalent in China.

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    Zhuofei Xu

    Full Text Available Haemophilus parasuis can be either a commensal bacterium of the porcine respiratory tract or an opportunistic pathogen causing Glässer's disease, a severe systemic disease that has led to significant economical losses in the pig industry worldwide. We determined the complete genomic sequence of H. parasuis SH0165, a highly virulent strain of serovar 5, which was isolated from a hog pen in North China. The single circular chromosome was 2,269,156 base pairs in length and contained 2,031 protein-coding genes. Together with the full spectrum of genes detected by the analysis of metabolic pathways, we confirmed that H. parasuis generates ATP via both fermentation and respiration, and possesses an intact TCA cycle for anabolism. In addition to possessing the complete pathway essential for the biosynthesis of heme, this pathogen was also found to be well-equipped with different iron acquisition systems, such as the TonB system and ABC-type transport complexes, to overcome iron limitation during infection and persistence. We identified a number of genes encoding potential virulence factors, such as type IV fimbriae and surface polysaccharides. Analysis of the genome confirmed that H. parasuis is naturally competent, as genes related to DNA uptake are present. A nine-mer DNA uptake signal sequence (ACAAGCGGT, identical to that found in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and Mannheimia haemolytica, followed by similar downstream motifs, was identified in the SH0165 genome. Genomic and phylogenetic comparisons with other Pasteurellaceae species further indicated that H. parasuis was closely related to another swine pathogenic bacteria A. pleuropneumoniae. The comprehensive genetic analysis presented here provides a foundation for future research on the metabolism, natural competence and virulence of H. parasuis.

  1. L-glutamine Induces Expression of Listeria monocytogenes Virulence Genes

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    Lobel, Lior; Burg-Golani, Tamar; Sigal, Nadejda; Rose, Jessica; Livnat-Levanon, Nurit; Lewinson, Oded; Herskovits, Anat A.

    2017-01-01

    The high environmental adaptability of bacteria is contingent upon their ability to sense changes in their surroundings. Bacterial pathogen entry into host poses an abrupt and dramatic environmental change, during which successful pathogens gauge multiple parameters that signal host localization. The facultative human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes flourishes in soil, water and food, and in ~50 different animals, and serves as a model for intracellular infection. L. monocytogenes identifies host entry by sensing both physical (e.g., temperature) and chemical (e.g., metabolite concentrations) factors. We report here that L-glutamine, an abundant nitrogen source in host serum and cells, serves as an environmental indicator and inducer of virulence gene expression. In contrast, ammonia, which is the most abundant nitrogen source in soil and water, fully supports growth, but fails to activate virulence gene transcription. We demonstrate that induction of virulence genes only occurs when the Listerial intracellular concentration of L-glutamine crosses a certain threshold, acting as an on/off switch: off when L-glutamine concentrations are below the threshold, and fully on when the threshold is crossed. To turn on the switch, L-glutamine must be present, and the L-glutamine high affinity ABC transporter, GlnPQ, must be active. Inactivation of GlnPQ led to complete arrest of L-glutamine uptake, reduced type I interferon response in infected macrophages, dramatic reduction in expression of virulence genes, and attenuated virulence in a mouse infection model. These results may explain observations made with other pathogens correlating nitrogen metabolism and virulence, and suggest that gauging of L-glutamine as a means of ascertaining host localization may be a general mechanism. PMID:28114430

  2. Phagocytic uptake of oxidized heme polymer is highly cytotoxic to macrophages.

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    Rohitas Deshmukh

    Full Text Available Apoptosis in macrophages is responsible for immune-depression and pathological effects during malaria. Phagocytosis of PRBC causes induction of apoptosis in macrophages through release of cytosolic factors from infected cells. Heme polymer or β-hematin causes dose-dependent death of macrophages with LC50 of 132 µg/ml and 182 µg/ml respectively. The toxicity of hemin or heme polymer was amplified several folds in the presence of non-toxic concentration of methemoglobin. β-hematin uptake in macrophage through phagocytosis is crucial for enhanced toxicological effects in the presence of methemoglobin. Higher accumulation of β-hematin is observed in macrophages treated with β-hematin along with methemoglobin. Light and scanning electron microscopic observations further confirm accumulation of β-hematin with cellular toxicity. Toxicological potentiation of pro-oxidant molecules toward macrophages depends on generation of H2O2 and independent to release of free iron from pro-oxidant molecules. Methemoglobin oxidizes β-hematin to form oxidized β-hematin (βH* through single electron transfer mechanism. Pre-treatment of reaction mixture with spin-trap Phenyl-N-t-butyl-nitrone dose-dependently reverses the β-hematin toxicity, indicates crucial role of βH* generation with the toxicological potentiation. Acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining and DNA fragmentation analysis indicate that macrophage follows an oxidative stress dependent apoptotic pathway to cause death. In summary, current work highlights mutual co-operation between methemoglobin and different pro-oxidant molecules to enhance toxicity towards macrophages. Hence, methemoglobin peroxidase activity can be probed for subduing cellular toxicity of pro-oxidant molecules and it may in-turn make up for host immune response against the malaria parasite.

  3. A nonluminescent and highly virulent Vibrio harveyi strain is associated with "bacterial white tail disease" of Litopenaeus vannamei shrimp.

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    Zhou, Junfang; Fang, Wenhong; Yang, Xianle; Zhou, Shuai; Hu, Linlin; Li, Xincang; Qi, Xinyong; Su, Hang; Xie, Layue

    2012-01-01

    Recurrent outbreaks of a disease in pond-cultured juvenile and subadult Litopenaeus vannamei shrimp in several districts in China remain an important problem in recent years. The disease was characterized by "white tail" and generally accompanied by mass mortalities. Based on data from the microscopical analyses, PCR detection and 16S rRNA sequencing, a new Vibrio harveyi strain (designated as strain HLB0905) was identified as the etiologic pathogen. The bacterial isolation and challenge tests demonstrated that the HLB0905 strain was nonluminescent but highly virulent. It could cause mass mortality in affected shrimp during a short time period with a low dose of infection. Meanwhile, the histopathological and electron microscopical analysis both showed that the HLB0905 strain could cause severe fiber cell damages and striated muscle necrosis by accumulating in the tail muscle of L. vannamei shrimp, which led the affected shrimp to exhibit white or opaque lesions in the tail. The typical sign was closely similar to that caused by infectious myonecrosis (IMN), white tail disease (WTD) or penaeid white tail disease (PWTD). To differentiate from such diseases as with a sign of "white tail" but of non-bacterial origin, the present disease was named as "bacterial white tail disease (BWTD)". Present study revealed that, just like IMN and WTD, BWTD could also cause mass mortalities in pond-cultured shrimp. These results suggested that some bacterial strains are changing themselves from secondary to primary pathogens by enhancing their virulence in current shrimp aquaculture system.

  4. A nonluminescent and highly virulent Vibrio harveyi strain is associated with "bacterial white tail disease" of Litopenaeus vannamei shrimp.

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    Junfang Zhou

    Full Text Available Recurrent outbreaks of a disease in pond-cultured juvenile and subadult Litopenaeus vannamei shrimp in several districts in China remain an important problem in recent years. The disease was characterized by "white tail" and generally accompanied by mass mortalities. Based on data from the microscopical analyses, PCR detection and 16S rRNA sequencing, a new Vibrio harveyi strain (designated as strain HLB0905 was identified as the etiologic pathogen. The bacterial isolation and challenge tests demonstrated that the HLB0905 strain was nonluminescent but highly virulent. It could cause mass mortality in affected shrimp during a short time period with a low dose of infection. Meanwhile, the histopathological and electron microscopical analysis both showed that the HLB0905 strain could cause severe fiber cell damages and striated muscle necrosis by accumulating in the tail muscle of L. vannamei shrimp, which led the affected shrimp to exhibit white or opaque lesions in the tail. The typical sign was closely similar to that caused by infectious myonecrosis (IMN, white tail disease (WTD or penaeid white tail disease (PWTD. To differentiate from such diseases as with a sign of "white tail" but of non-bacterial origin, the present disease was named as "bacterial white tail disease (BWTD". Present study revealed that, just like IMN and WTD, BWTD could also cause mass mortalities in pond-cultured shrimp. These results suggested that some bacterial strains are changing themselves from secondary to primary pathogens by enhancing their virulence in current shrimp aquaculture system.

  5. A novel high-affinity sucrose transporter is required for virulence of the plant pathogen Ustilago maydis.

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    Ramon Wahl

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant pathogenic fungi cause massive yield losses and affect both quality and safety of food and feed produced from infected plants. The main objective of plant pathogenic fungi is to get access to the organic carbon sources of their carbon-autotrophic hosts. However, the chemical nature of the carbon source(s and the mode of uptake are largely unknown. Here, we present a novel, plasma membrane-localized sucrose transporter (Srt1 from the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis and its characterization as a fungal virulence factor. Srt1 has an unusually high substrate affinity, is absolutely sucrose specific, and allows the direct utilization of sucrose at the plant/fungal interface without extracellular hydrolysis and, thus, without the production of extracellular monosaccharides known to elicit plant immune responses. srt1 is expressed exclusively during infection, and its deletion strongly reduces fungal virulence. This emphasizes the central role of this protein both for efficient carbon supply and for avoidance of apoplastic signals potentially recognized by the host.

  6. Highly frequent mutations in negative regulators of multiple virulence genes in group A streptococcal toxic shock syndrome isolates.

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    Ikebe, Tadayoshi; Ato, Manabu; Matsumura, Takayuki; Hasegawa, Hideki; Sata, Tetsutaro; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Watanabe, Haruo

    2010-04-01

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) is a severe invasive infection characterized by the sudden onset of shock and multiorgan failure; it has a high mortality rate. Although a number of studies have attempted to determine the crucial factors behind the onset of STSS, the responsible genes in group A Streptococcus have not been clarified. We previously reported that mutations of csrS/csrR genes, a two-component negative regulator system for multiple virulence genes of Streptococcus pyogenes, are found among the isolates from STSS patients. In the present study, mutations of another negative regulator, rgg, were also found in clinical isolates of STSS patients. The rgg mutants from STSS clinical isolates enhanced lethality and impaired various organs in the mouse models, similar to the csrS mutants, and precluded their being killed by human neutrophils, mainly due to an overproduction of SLO. When we assessed the mutation frequency of csrS, csrR, and rgg genes among S. pyogenes isolates from STSS (164 isolates) and non-invasive infections (59 isolates), 57.3% of the STSS isolates had mutations of one or more genes among three genes, while isolates from patients with non-invasive disease had significantly fewer mutations in these genes (1.7%). The results of the present study suggest that mutations in the negative regulators csrS/csrR and rgg of S. pyogenes are crucial factors in the pathogenesis of STSS, as they lead to the overproduction of multiple virulence factors.

  7. Rapid acquisition of polymorphic virulence markers during adaptation of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N8 virus in the mouse

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    Choi, Won-Suk; Baek, Yun Hee; Kwon, Jin Jung; Jeong, Ju Hwan; Park, Su-Jin; Kim, Young-il; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Hwang, Jungwon; Kim, Myung Hee; Kim, Chul-Joong; Webby, Richard J.; Choi, Young Ki; Song, Min-Suk

    2017-01-01

    Emergence of a highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N8 virus in Asia and its spread to Europe and North America has caused great concern for human health. Although the H5N8 virus has been only moderately pathogenic to mammalian hosts, virulence can still increase. We evaluated the pathogenic potential of several H5N8 strains via the mouse-adaptation method. Two H5N8 viruses were sequentially passaged in BALB/c mice and plaque-purified from lung samples. The viruses rapidly obtained high virulence (MLD50, up to 0.5 log10 PFU/mL) within 5 passages. Sequence analysis revealed the acquisition of several virulence markers, including the novel marker P708S in PB1 gene. Combinations of markers synergistically enhanced viral replication and polymerase activity in human cell lines and virulence and multiorgan dissemination in mice. These results suggest that H5N8 viruses can rapidly acquire virulence markers in mammalian hosts; thus, rapid spread as well as repeated viral introduction into the hosts may significantly increase the risk of human infection and elevate pandemic potential. PMID:28094780

  8. The molecular epidemiology of the highly virulent ST93 Australian community Staphylococcus aureus strain.

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    Geoffrey W Coombs

    Full Text Available In Australia the PVL-positive ST93-IV [2B], colloquially known as "Queensland CA-MRSA" has become the dominant CA-MRSA clone. First described in the early 2000s, ST93-IV [2B] is associated with skin and severe invasive infections including necrotizing pneumonia. A singleton by multilocus sequence typing (MLST eBURST analysis ST93 is distinct from other S. aureus clones. To determine if the increased prevalence of ST93-IV [2B] is due to the widespread transmission of a single strain of ST93-IV [2B] the genetic relatedness of 58 S. aureus ST93 isolated throughout Australia over an extended period were studied in detail using a variety of molecular methods including pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, spa typing, MLST, microarray DNA, SCCmec typing and dru typing. Identification of the phage harbouring the lukS-PV/lukF-PV Panton Valentine leucocidin genes, detection of allelic variations in lukS-PV/lukF-PV, and quantification of LukF-PV expression was also performed. Although ST93-IV [2B] is known to have an apparent enhanced clinical virulence, the isolates harboured few known virulence determinants. All PVL-positive isolates carried the PVL-encoding phage ΦSa2USA and the lukS-PV/lukF-PV genes had the same R variant SNP profile. The isolates produced similar expression levels of LukF-PV. Although multiple rearrangements of the spa sequence have occurred, the core genome in ST93 is very stable. The emergence of ST93-MRSA is due to independent acquisitions of different dru-defined type IV and type V SCCmec elements in several spa-defined ST93-MSSA backgrounds. Rearrangement of the spa sequence in ST93-MRSA has subsequently occurred in some of these strains. Although multiple ST93-MRSA strains were characterised, little genetic diversity was identified for most isolates, with PVL-positive ST93-IVa [2B]-t202-dt10 predominant across Australia. Whether ST93-IVa [2B] t202-dt10 arose from one PVL-positive ST93-MSSA-t202, or by independent acquisitions of

  9. Leishmania donovani lacking the Golgi GDP-Man transporter LPG2 exhibit attenuated virulence in mammalian hosts

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    Gaur, Upasna; Showalter, Melissa; Hickerson, Suzanne; Dalvi, Rahul; Turco, Salvatore J.; Wilson, Mary E.; Beverley, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    Surface phosophoglycans such as lipophosphoglycan (LPG) or proteophosphoglycan (PPG) and glycosylinositol phospholipids (GIPLs) modulate essential interactions between Leishmania and mammalian macrophages. Phosphoglycan synthesis depends on the Golgi GDP-mannose transporter encoded by LPG2. LPG2-null (lpg2−) L. major cannot establish macrophage infections or induce acute pathology, whereas lpg2− L. mexicana retain virulence. lpg2− L. donovani has been reported to survive poorly in cultured macrophages but in vivo survival has not been explored. Herein we discovered that, similar to lpg2− L. major, lpg2− L. donovani promastigotes exhibited diminished virulence in mice, but persisted at consistently low levels. lpg2− L. donovani promastigotes could not establish infections macrophages and could not transiently inhibit phagolysosomal fusion. Furthermore, lpg2− promastigotes of L. major, L. donovani and L. mexicana were highly susceptible to complement mediated lysis. We conclude that phosphoglycan assembly and expression mediated by L. donovani LPG2 are important for promastigote and amastigote virulence, unlike L. mexicana but similar to L. major. PMID:19328787

  10. Differences in virulence of Naegleria fowleri.

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    De Jonckheere, J

    1979-10-01

    All pathogenic Naegleria fowleri isolated from the environment were highly virulent to mice when instilled intranasally. Axenic cultivation gradually decreased virulence of highly virulent strains. This decrease was most pronounced in environmental isolates and of minor importance in N. fowleri isolated from human cerebrospinal fluid. The low virulent strains obtained by continuous axenic cultivation appeared after clonation to consist of individuals with different virulence. Virulence could be enhanced in low virulent strains by brain passage and passages in Vero cell cultures, but could not be induced by these methods in nonvirulent strains isolated from the environment. Different mice strains showed different sensitivities to infection with pathogenic Naegleria. In addition, older mice were less sensitive than younger animals to low virulent strains.

  11. G-CSF preferentially supports the generation of gut-homing Gr-1high macrophages in M-CSF-treated bone marrow cells.

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    Meshkibaf, Shahab; Gower, Mark William; Dekaban, Gregory A; Kim, Sung Ouk

    2014-10-01

    The G-CSF is best known for its activity in the generation and activation of neutrophils. In addition, studies on G-CSF(-/-) or G-CSFR(-/-) mice and BMC cultures suggested a role of G-CSF in macrophage generation. However, our understanding on the role of G-CSF in macrophage development is limited. Here, using in vitro BMC models, we demonstrated that G-CSF promoted the generation of Gr-1(high)/F4/80(+) macrophage-like cells in M-BMCs, likely through suppressing cell death and enhancing generation of Gr-1(high)/F4/80(+) macrophage-like cells. These Gr-1(high) macrophage-like cells produced "M2-like" cytokines and surface markers in response to LPS and IL-4/IL-13, respectively. Adoptive transfer of EGFP-expressing (EGFP(+)) M-BMCs showed a dominant, gut-homing phenotype. The small intestinal lamina propria of G-CSFR(-/-) mice also harbored significantly reduced numbers of Gr-1(high)/F4/80(+) macrophages compared with those of WT mice, but levels of Gr-1(+)/F4/80(-) neutrophil-like cells were similar between these mice. Collectively, these results suggest a novel function of G-CSF in the generation of gut-homing, M2-like macrophages.

  12. Nanoliposomal Buparvaquone Immunomodulates Leishmania (L.) infantum-infected Macrophages and is Highly Effective in Murine Model.

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    da Costa-Silva, Thais Alves; Galisteo, Andrés Jimenez; Lauletta Lindoso, José Angelo; Barbosa, Leandro R S; Tempone, Andre Gustavo

    2017-02-06

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a fatal parasitic neglected disease affecting 1.5 million people worldwide. Based on the drug repositioning approach, the aim of this work was to investigate the in vitro immunomodulatory potential of buparvaquone (BPQ) and to stablish a safe regimen to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of BPQ entrapped into negatively charged nanoliposomes (BPQ-LP) in Leishmania (L.) infantum infected hamsters. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and ζ-potential were applied in order to study the influence of BPQ on the liposome structure. Our data revealed that BPQ was located in the polar/apolar interface, snorkeling the polar region, protected against aggregation inside the lipophiplic region. The presence of BPQ also decreased the Z-average hydrodynamic diameter and increased the surface charge. Compared to intravenous and intramuscular administration, the subcutaneous (sc) route as the most effective for BPQ-LP; at 0.4 mg/kg it reduced by 98% and 96% the infection in spleen and liver, respectively. The treatment for 5 days resulted in limited efficacy, but 10 days of treatment resulted in similar efficacy to a 15 days regimen. The nanoliposomal drug was highly effective with a mean ED50 value of 0.25 mg/kg, reducing the parasite load in bone marrow by 80% as detected in qPCR analysis. In addition, flow cytometry studies showed that BPQ upregulated cytokines as TNF, MCP-1, IL-10 and IL-6 in Leishmania-infected macrophages, eliminating the parasites via a nitric oxide-independent mechanism. This new formulation demonstrated a safe and effective treatment of murine leishmaniasis and could be a useful candidate against VL.

  13. A LysR-family transcriptional regulator required for virulence in Brucella abortus is highly conserved among the α-proteobacteria.

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    Sheehan, Lauren M; Budnick, James A; Blanchard, Catlyn; Dunman, Paul M; Caswell, Clayton C

    2015-10-01

    Small RNAs are principal elements of bacterial gene regulation and physiology. Two small RNAs in Brucella abortus, AbcR1 and AbcR2, are required for wild-type virulence. Examination of the abcR loci revealed the presence of a gene encoding a LysR-type transcriptional regulator flanking abcR2 on chromosome 1. Deletion of this lysR gene (bab1_1517) resulted in the complete loss of abcR2 expression while no difference in abcR1 expression was observed. The B. abortus bab1_1517 mutant strain was significantly attenuated in macrophages and mice, and bab1_1517 was subsequently named vtlR for virulence-associated transcriptional LysR-family regulator. Microarray analysis revealed three additional genes encoding small hypothetical proteins also under the control of VtlR. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that VtlR binds directly to the promoter regions of abcR2 and the three hypothetical protein-encoding genes, and DNase I footprint analysis identified the specific nucleotide sequence in these promoters that VtlR binds to and drives gene expression. Strikingly, orthologs of VtlR are encoded in a wide range of host-associated α-proteobacteria, and it is likely that the VtlR genetic system represents a common regulatory circuit critical for host-bacterium interactions.

  14. Highly frequent mutations in negative regulators of multiple virulence genes in group A streptococcal toxic shock syndrome isolates.

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    Tadayoshi Ikebe

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS is a severe invasive infection characterized by the sudden onset of shock and multiorgan failure; it has a high mortality rate. Although a number of studies have attempted to determine the crucial factors behind the onset of STSS, the responsible genes in group A Streptococcus have not been clarified. We previously reported that mutations of csrS/csrR genes, a two-component negative regulator system for multiple virulence genes of Streptococcus pyogenes, are found among the isolates from STSS patients. In the present study, mutations of another negative regulator, rgg, were also found in clinical isolates of STSS patients. The rgg mutants from STSS clinical isolates enhanced lethality and impaired various organs in the mouse models, similar to the csrS mutants, and precluded their being killed by human neutrophils, mainly due to an overproduction of SLO. When we assessed the mutation frequency of csrS, csrR, and rgg genes among S. pyogenes isolates from STSS (164 isolates and non-invasive infections (59 isolates, 57.3% of the STSS isolates had mutations of one or more genes among three genes, while isolates from patients with non-invasive disease had significantly fewer mutations in these genes (1.7%. The results of the present study suggest that mutations in the negative regulators csrS/csrR and rgg of S. pyogenes are crucial factors in the pathogenesis of STSS, as they lead to the overproduction of multiple virulence factors.

  15. Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 controls type I IFN induction in chicken macrophage HD-11 cells: a polygenic trait that involves NS1 and the polymerase complex

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    Liniger Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza A viruses are well characterized to antagonize type I IFN induction in infected mammalian cells. However, limited information is available for avian cells. It was hypothesised that avian influenza viruses (AIV with distinct virulence may interact differently with the avian innate immune system. Therefore, the type I IFN responses induced by highly virulent and low virulent H5N1 AIV and reassortants thereof were analysed in chicken cells. Results The highly pathogenic (HP AIV A/chicken/Yamaguchi/7/04 (H5N1 (Yama did not induce type I IFN in infected chicken HD-11 macrophage-like cells. This contrasted with an NS1 mutant Yama virus (Yama-NS1A144V and with the attenuated H5N1 AIV A/duck/Hokkaido/Vac-1/04 (Vac carrying the haemagglutinin (HA of the Yama virus (Vac-Yama/HA, that both induced type I IFN in these cells. The substitution of the NS segment from Yama with that from Vac in the Yama backbone resulted in induction of type I IFN secretion in HD-11 cells. However, vice versa, the Yama NS segment did not prevent type I IFN induction by the Vac-Yama/HA virus. This was different with the PB1/PB2/PA segment reassortant Yama and Vac-Yama/HA viruses. Whereas the Yama virus with the Vac PB1/PB2/PA segments induced type I IFN in HD-11 cells, the Vac-Yama/HA virus with the Yama PB1/PB2/PA segments did not. As reported for mammalian cells, the expression of H5N1 PB2 inhibited the activation of the IFN-β promoter in chicken DF-1 fibroblast cells. Importantly, the Yama PB2 was more potent at inhibiting the IFN-β promoter than the Vac PB2. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that the NS1 protein and the polymerase complex of the HPAIV Yama act in concert to antagonize chicken type I IFN secretion in HD-11 cells. PB2 alone can also exert a partial inhibitory effect on type I IFN induction. In conclusion, the control of type I IFN induction by H5N1 HPAIV represents a complex phenotype that involves a particular viral

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of the Highly Virulent Aeromonas schubertii Strain WL1483, Isolated from Diseased Snakehead Fish (Channa argus) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lihui; Li, Ningqiu; Zhang, Defeng; Fu, Xiaozhe; Shi, Cunbin; Lin, Qiang; Hao, Guijie

    2016-01-21

    We sequenced the complete genome of the highly virulent Aeromonas schubertii strain WL1483, which was isolated from diseased snakehead fish (Channa argus) in China. The full genome sequence of A. schubertii WL1483 is 4,400,034 bp, which encodes 4,376 proteins and contains 195 predicted RNA genes.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus aureus 6850, a Highly Cytotoxic and Clinically Virulent Methicillin-Sensitive Strain with Distant Relatedness to Prototype Strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraunholz, Martin; Bernhardt, Jörg; Schuldes, Jörg; Daniel, Rolf; Hecker, Michael; Sinha, Bhanu

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent human commensal bacterium and pathogen. Here we report the complete genome sequence of strain 6850 (spa type t185; sequence type 50 [ST50]), a highly cytotoxic and clinically virulent methicillin-sensitive strain from a patient with complicated S. aureus bacteremi

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis STIR-GUS-F2f7, a Highly Virulent Strain Recovered from Diseased Red Nile Tilapia Farmed in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Pär; Wehner, Stefanie; Bekaert, Michaël; Öhrman, Caroline; Metselaar, Matthijs; Thompson, Kimberly Dawn; Richards, Randolph Harvey; Penman, David James; Adams, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A highly virulent strain of Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis, STIR-GUS-F2f7, was isolated from moribund red Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) farmed in Europe. In this communication, the complete genome sequencing of this bacterium is reported. PMID:28302784

  19. The pathogenesis of highly virulent African Swine Fever virus in domestic pigs exposed via intraoropharyngeal, intranasopharyngeal, and intramuscular inoculation, and by direct contact with infected pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to optimize novel systems for African Swine Fever Virus (ASFV) vaccine development, domestic pigs were challenged with the highly virulent ASFV-Malawi strain via intraoropharyngeal (IOP), intranasopharyngeal (INP), intramuscular (IM), and direct contact (DC) routes. Direct challenge doses ...

  20. In vitro interactions between bacteria, osteoblast-like cells and macrophages in the pathogenesis of biomaterial-associated infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbiahdoss, Guruprakash; Fernández, Isabel C Saldarriaga; Domingues, Joana F da Silva; Kuijer, Roel; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2011-01-01

    Biomaterial-associated infections constitute a major clinical problem that is difficult to treat and often necessitates implant replacement. Pathogens can be introduced on an implant surface during surgery and compete with host cells attempting to integrate the implant. The fate of a biomaterial implant depends on the outcome of this race for the surface. Here we studied the competition between different bacterial strains and human U2OS osteoblast-like cells (ATCC HTB-94) for a poly(methylmethacrylate) surface in the absence or presence of macrophages in vitro using a peri-operative contamination model. Bacteria were seeded on the surface at a shear rate of 11 1/s prior to adhesion of U2OS cells and macrophages. Next, bacteria, U2OS cells and macrophages were allowed to grow simultaneously under low shear conditions (0.14 1/s). The outcome of the competition between bacteria and U2OS cells for the surface critically depended on bacterial virulence. In absence of macrophages, highly virulent Staphylococcus aureus or Pseudomonas aeruginosa stimulated U2OS cell death within 18 h of simultaneous growth on a surface. Moreover, these strains also caused cell death despite phagocytosis of adhering bacteria in presence of murine macrophages. Thus U2OS cells are bound to loose the race for a biomaterial surface against S. aureus or P. aeruginosa, even in presence of macrophages. In contrast, low-virulent Staphylococcus epidermidis did not cause U2OS cell death even after 48 h, regardless of the absence or presence of macrophages. Clinically, S. aureus and P. aeruginosa are known to yield acute and severe biomaterial-associated infections in contrast to S. epidermidis, mostly known to cause more low-grade infection. Thus it can be concluded that the model described possesses features concurring with clinical observations and therewith has potential for further studies on the simultaneous competition for an implant surface between tissue cells and pathogenic bacteria in

  1. Prevalence of virulence genes associated with pathogenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from domestically harvested rainwater during low- and high-rainfall periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowsky, P H; van Deventer, A; De Kwaadsteniet, M; Ndlovu, T; Khan, S; Cloete, T E; Khan, W

    2014-03-01

    The possible health risks associated with the consumption of harvested rainwater remains one of the major obstacles hampering its large-scale implementation in water limited countries such as South Africa. Rainwater tank samples collected on eight occasions during the low- and high-rainfall periods (March to August 2012) in Kleinmond, South Africa, were monitored for the presence of virulence genes associated with Escherichia coli. The identity of presumptive E. coli isolates in rainwater samples collected from 10 domestic rainwater harvesting (DRWH) tanks throughout the sampling period was confirmed through universal 16S rRNA PCR with subsequent sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Species-specific primers were also used to routinely screen for the virulent genes, aggR, stx, eae, and ipaH found in enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), and enteroinvasive E. coli, respectively, in the rainwater samples. Of the 92 E. coli strains isolated from the rainwater using culture based techniques, 6% were presumptively positively identified as E. coli O157:H7 using 16S rRNA. Furthermore, virulent pathogenic E. coli genes were detected in 3% (EPEC and EHEC) and 16% (EAEC) of the 80 rainwater samples collected during the sampling period from the 10 DRWH tanks. This study thus contributes valuable information to the limited data available regarding the ongoing prevalence of virulent pathotypes of E. coli in harvested rainwater during a longitudinal study in a high-population-density, periurban setting.

  2. Lipid mediators in innate immunity against tuberculosis: opposing roles of PGE2 and LXA4 in the induction of macrophage death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minjian; Divangahi, Maziar; Gan, Huixian; Shin, Daniel S J; Hong, Song; Lee, David M; Serhan, Charles N; Behar, Samuel M; Remold, Heinz G

    2008-11-24

    Virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) induces a maladaptive cytolytic death modality, necrosis, which is advantageous for the pathogen. We report that necrosis of macrophages infected with the virulent Mtb strains H37Rv and Erdmann depends on predominant LXA(4) production that is part of the antiinflammatory and inflammation-resolving action induced by Mtb. Infection of macrophages with the avirulent H37Ra triggers production of high levels of the prostanoid PGE(2), which promotes protection against mitochondrial inner membrane perturbation and necrosis. In contrast to H37Ra infection, PGE(2) production is significantly reduced in H37Rv-infected macrophages. PGE(2) acts by engaging the PGE(2) receptor EP2, which induces cyclic AMP production and protein kinase A activation. To verify a role for PGE(2) in control of bacterial growth, we show that infection of prostaglandin E synthase (PGES)(-/-) macrophages in vitro with H37Rv resulted in significantly higher bacterial burden compared with wild-type macrophages. More importantly, PGES(-/-) mice harbor significantly higher Mtb lung burden 5 wk after low-dose aerosol infection with virulent Mtb. These in vitro and in vivo data indicate that PGE(2) plays a critical role in inhibition of Mtb replication.

  3. Myeloid Growth Factors Promote Resistance to Mycobacterial Infection by Curtailing Granuloma Necrosis through Macrophage Replenishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagán, Antonio J; Yang, Chao-Tsung; Cameron, James; Swaim, Laura E; Ellett, Felix; Lieschke, Graham J; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2015-07-08

    The mycobacterial ESX-1 virulence locus accelerates macrophage recruitment to the forming tuberculous granuloma. Newly recruited macrophages phagocytose previously infected apoptotic macrophages to become new bacterial growth niches. Granuloma macrophages can then necrose, releasing mycobacteria into the extracellular milieu, which potentiates their growth even further. Using zebrafish with genetic or pharmacologically induced macrophage deficiencies, we find that global macrophage deficits increase susceptibility to mycobacterial infection by accelerating granuloma necrosis. This is because reduction in the macrophage supply below a critical threshold decreases granuloma macrophage replenishment to the point where apoptotic infected macrophages, failing to get engulfed, necrose. Reducing macrophage demand by removing bacterial ESX-1 offsets the susceptibility of macrophage deficits. Conversely, increasing macrophage supply in wild-type fish by overexpressing myeloid growth factors induces resistance by curtailing necrosis. These findings may explain the susceptibility of humans with mononuclear cytopenias to mycobacterial infections and highlight the therapeutic potential of myeloid growth factors in tuberculosis.

  4. Antagonistic competition moderates virulence in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbutt, Jennie; Bonsall, Michael B; Wright, Denis J; Raymond, Ben

    2011-08-01

    Classical models of the evolution of virulence predict that multiple infections should select for elevated virulence, if increased competitiveness arises from faster growth. However, diverse modes of parasite competition (resource-based, antagonism, immunity manipulation) can lead to adaptations with different implications for virulence. Using an experimental evolution approach we investigated the hypothesis that selection in mixed-strain infections will lead to increased antagonism that trades off against investment in virulence. Selection in mixed infections led to improved suppression of competitors in the bacterial insect pathogen Bacillus thuringiensis. Increased antagonism was associated with decreased virulence in three out of four selected lines. Moreover, mixed infections were less virulent than single-strain infections, and between-strain competition tended to decrease pathogen growth in vivo and in vitro. Spiteful interactions among these bacteria may be favoured because of the high metabolic costs of virulence factors and the high risk of mixed infections.

  5. Differences in Virulence of Marine and Freshwater Isolates of Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus In Vivo Correlate with In Vitro Ability To Infect Gill Epithelial Cells and Macrophages of Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brudeseth, Bjørn E.; Skall, Helle Frank; Evensen, Øystein

    2008-01-01

    Two strains of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) with known different virulence characteristics in vivo were studied ( by a time course approach) for their abilities to infect and translocate across a primary culture of gill epithelial cells (GEC) of rainbow trout (RBT; Oncorhynchus mykis...

  6. Therapeutic vaccine using a monoclonal antibody against a 70-kDa glycoprotein in mice infected with highly virulent Sporothrix schenckii and Sporothrix brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, José Roberto Fogaça; Kaihami, Gilberto Hideo; Jannuzzi, Grasielle Pereira; de Almeida, Sandro Rogerio

    2015-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a chronic granulomatous mycosis caused by the dimorphic fungi that comprise the Sporothrix complex. The latter are widely distributed in nature, developing a saprophytic mycelial form on plant debris and soil. Formerly, the S. schenckii species was thought to be the only species capable of causing sporotrichosis. However, in recent years, the existence of a group of highly genotypically and phenotypically variable species has been reported as etiologic agents of this mycosis. Recently, it has become important to study aspects such as virulence and the immune response against key members of the Sporothrix complex and to observe the presence of glycoprotein (gp) 70 and efficacy of the P6E7 monoclonal antibody against more virulent strains. The data presented here demonstrate that the strain isolated from a case of feline sporotrichosis, that is, strain 5110 (American Type Culture Collection MYA-4823) is the most virulent and the only one able to secrete gp70. This glycoprotein is apparently an important factor in the virulence of Sporothrix spp. because treatment with MAb P6E7 resulted in the reduction of fungal burden in the analyzed organs. Additional studies of the role of gp70 in modulating the immune response of the host are needed to understand the pathology of sporotrichosis.

  7. The macrophages in rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laria A

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Antonella Laria, Alfredomaria Lurati , Mariagrazia Marrazza , Daniela Mazzocchi, Katia Angela Re, Magda Scarpellini Rheumatology Unit, Fornaroli Hospital, Magenta, Italy Abstract: Macrophages belong to the innate immune system giving us protection against pathogens. However it is known that they are also involved in rheumatic diseases. Activated macrophages have two different phenotypes related to different stimuli: M1 (classically activated and M2 (alternatively activated. M1 macrophages release high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, reactive nitrogen and oxygen intermediates killing microorganisms and tumor cells; while M2 macrophages are involved in resolution of inflammation through phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils, reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and increased synthesis of mediators important in tissue remodeling, angiogenesis, and wound repair. The role of macrophages in the different rheumatic diseases is different according to their M1/M2 macrophages phenotype. Keywords: macrophage, rheumatic diseases

  8. Candida albicans SUR7 contributes to secretion, biofilm formation, and macrophage killing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Stella M

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Candida albicans SUR7 has been shown to be required for plasma membrane organization and cell wall synthesis, but its role in virulence is not known. Using a bioinformatics strategy, we previously identified several novel putative secretion pathway proteins potentially involved in virulence, including the C. albicans homolog of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae endocytosis-related protein Sur7p. We therefore generated a C. albicans sur7Δ null mutant and examined its contribution to key virulence attributes. Results Structurally, the C. albicans sur7Δ mutant was impaired in response to filamentation-inducing conditions, and formed aberrant hyphae with extensive accumulation of plasma membrane-derived structures within the cell. Absence of SUR7 resulted in a temperature-sensitive growth defect at high temperatures (42°C, which was partially rescued by addition of NaCl. We next examined the role of the SUR7 paralog C. albicans FMP45 in this temperature-sensitive phenotype. Analysis of C. albicans Fmp45p-GFP demonstrated co-localization of Fmp45p with Sur7p and increased fluorescence in the plasma membrane in the presence of high salt. We next focused on key virulence-related phenotypes. The C. albicans sur7Δ null mutant exhibited secretory defects: reduced lipase secretion, and increased levels of secreted Sap2p. The null mutant was hyper-susceptible to sub-inhibitory concentrations of caspofungin, but not amphotericin B and 5-fluorocytosine. Functionally, the sur7Δ mutant demonstrated increased adhesion to polystyrene and of note, was markedly defective in biofilm formation. In an in vitro macrophage model of virulence, the sur7Δ mutant was impaired in macrophage killing. Conclusions Plasma membrane and cell wall organization are important for cell morphology, and alterations of these structures contributed to impairment of several key virulence-associated phenotypes in the C. albicans sur7Δ mutant.

  9. Visualization of Macrophage Recruitment to Inflammation Lesions using Highly Sensitive and Stable Radionuclide-Embedded Gold Nanoparticles as a Nuclear Bio-Imaging Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Bong; Lee, Ho Won; Singh, Thoudam Debraj; Li, Yinghua; Kim, Sang Kyoon; Cho, Sung Jin; Lee, Sang-Woo; Jeong, Shin Young; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol; Choi, Sangil; Lee, In-Kyu; Lim, Dong-Kwon; Lee, Jaetae; Jeon, Yong Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Reliable and sensitive imaging tools are required to track macrophage migration and provide a better understating of their biological roles in various diseases. Here, we demonstrate the possibility of radioactive iodide-embedded gold nanoparticles (RIe-AuNPs) as a cell tracker for nuclear medicine imaging. To demonstrate this utility, we monitored macrophage migration to carrageenan-induced sites of acute inflammation in living subjects and visualized the effects of anti-inflammatory agents on this process. Macrophage labeling with RIe-AuNPs did not alter their biological functions such as cell proliferation, phenotype marker expression, or phagocytic activity. In vivo imaging with positron-emission tomography revealed the migration of labeled macrophages to carrageenan-induced inflammation lesions 3 h after transfer, with highest recruitment at 6 h and a slight decline of radioactive signal at 24 h; these findings were highly consistent with the data of a bio-distribution study. Treatment with dexamethasone (an anti-inflammation drug) or GSK5182 (an ERRγ inverse agonist) hindered macrophage recruitment to the inflamed sites. Our findings suggest that a cell tracking strategy utilizing RIe-AuNPs will likely be highly useful in research related to macrophage-related disease and cell-based therapies.

  10. Effect of high-fructose corn syrup on Streptococcus mutans virulence gene expression and on tooth demineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Minmin; Kang, Qiongyi; Li, Tingting; Huang, Lili; Jiang, Yuntao; Xia, Wenwei

    2014-06-01

    High-fructose corn syrup-55 (HFCS-55) has been widely welcomed in recent years as a substitute for sucrose on the basis of its favourable properties and price. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of HFCS-55 on the expression of Streptococcus mutans UA159 virulence genes and on tooth demineralization. Real-time reverse-transcription PCR (real-time RT-PCR) and microhardness evaluations were performed to examine gene expression and enamel demineralization, respectively, after treatment with HFCS-55 and/or sucrose. Significant up-regulation of glucosyltransferase B (gtfB) by HFCS-55 was found. A mixture of HFCS-55 and sucrose could positively enhance expression of glucan-binding protein (gbp) genes. Regarding acidogenicity, expression of the lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) gene was unaffected by HFCS-55. A notable finding in this study was that 5% HFCS-55 significantly enhanced expression of the intracellular response gene of the two-component VicRK signal transduction system (vicR). Demineralization testing showed that the microhardness of teeth decreased by a greater extent in response to HFCS-55 than in response to sucrose. The results indicate that HFCS-55 can enhance S. mutans biofilm formation indirectly in the presence of sucrose and that HFCS-55 has a more acidogenic potential than does sucrose. Summing up the real-time PCR and demineralization results, HFCS-55 appears to be no less cariogenic than sucrose in vitro - at least, not under the conditions of our experiments.

  11. High-virulence CMY-2- and CTX-M-2-producing avian pathogenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from commercial turkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Ketrin Cristina; Cunha, Marcos Paulo Vieira; Cerdeira, Louise; de Oliveira, Maria Gabriela Xavier; de Oliveira, Mirela Caroline Vilela; Gomes, Cleise Ribeiro; Lincopan, Nilton; Knöbl, Terezinha; Moreno, Andrea Micke

    2017-01-01

    This study reports the high-virulence phylogenetic backgrounds of CMY-2- and CTX-M-2-producing avian pathogenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from turkeys sent to slaughter and condemned by airsacculitis in Brazil. Among 300 air sac samples, seven E. coli strains produced plasmid-mediated CMY-2-type AmpC, of which three carried also the blaCTX-M-2 Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase encoding gene. Interestingly, the transfer of the blaCMY-2 gene was positive for three E. coli strains, being associated with the presence of IncI1 plasmids. The complete sequence of the representative pJB10 plasmid revealed that the blaCMY-2 gene was within a transposon-like element in the classical genetic environment consisting of tnpA-blaCMY-2-blc-sugE structure. This plasmid with 94-kb belonged to the sequence type (ST) 12 among IncI1 plasmids, which has been associated with the worldwide spread of blaCMY-2 among Salmonella enterica and E. coli. Furthermore, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first complete sequence of a CMY-2-encoding plasmid derived from an Escherichia coli isolated from food-producing animals in Latin America.

  12. Rice-Infecting Pseudomonas Genomes Are Highly Accessorized and Harbor Multiple Putative Virulence Mechanisms to Cause Sheath Brown Rot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quibod, Ian Lorenzo; Grande, Genelou; Oreiro, Eula Gems; Borja, Frances Nikki; Dossa, Gerbert Sylvestre; Mauleon, Ramil; Cruz, Casiana Vera; Oliva, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Sheath rot complex and seed discoloration in rice involve a number of pathogenic bacteria that cannot be associated with distinctive symptoms. These pathogens can easily travel on asymptomatic seeds and therefore represent a threat to rice cropping systems. Among the rice-infecting Pseudomonas, P. fuscovaginae has been associated with sheath brown rot disease in several rice growing areas around the world. The appearance of a similar Pseudomonas population, which here we named P. fuscovaginae-like, represents a perfect opportunity to understand common genomic features that can explain the infection mechanism in rice. We showed that the novel population is indeed closely related to P. fuscovaginae. A comparative genomics approach on eight rice-infecting Pseudomonas revealed heterogeneous genomes and a high number of strain-specific genes. The genomes of P. fuscovaginae-like harbor four secretion systems (Type I, II, III, and VI) and other important pathogenicity machinery that could probably facilitate rice colonization. We identified 123 core secreted proteins, most of which have strong signatures of positive selection suggesting functional adaptation. Transcript accumulation of putative pathogenicity-related genes during rice colonization revealed a concerted virulence mechanism. The study suggests that rice-infecting Pseudomonas causing sheath brown rot are intrinsically diverse and maintain a variable set of metabolic capabilities as a potential strategy to occupy a range of environments.

  13. Zinc deficiency augments leptin production and exacerbates macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-Jie; Bao, Shengying; Bolin, Eric R; Burris, Dara L; Xu, Xiaohua; Sun, Qinghua; Killilea, David W; Shen, Qiwen; Ziouzenkova, Ouliana; Belury, Martha A; Failla, Mark L; Knoell, Daren L

    2013-07-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency and obesity are global public health problems. Zn deficiency is associated with obesity and comorbid conditions that include insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. However, the function of Zn in obesity remains unclear. Using a mouse model of combined high-fat and low-Zn intake (0.5-1.5 mg/kg), we investigated whether Zn deficiency exacerbates the extent of adiposity as well as perturbations in metabolic and immune function. C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to receive either a high-fat diet (HFD) or a control (C) diet for 6 wk, followed by further subdivision into 2 additional groups fed Zn-deficient diets (C-Zn, HFD-Zn), along with a C diet and an HFD, for 3 wk (n = 8-9 mice/group). The extent of visceral fat, insulin resistance, or systemic inflammation was unaffected by Zn deficiency. Strikingly, Zn deficiency significantly augmented circulating leptin concentrations (HFD-Zn vs. HFD: 3.15 ± 0.16 vs. 2.59 ± 0.12 μg/L, respectively) and leptin signaling in the liver of obese mice. Furthermore, gene expression of macrophage-specific markers ADAM8 (A disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 8) and CD68 (cluster of differentiation 68) was significantly greater in adipose tissue in the HFD-Zn group than in the HFD group, as confirmed by CD68 protein analysis, indicative of increased macrophage infiltration. Inspection of Zn content and mRNA profiles of all Zn transporters in the adipose tissue revealed alterations of Zn metabolism to obesity and Zn deficiency. Our results demonstrate that Zn deficiency increases leptin production and exacerbates macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue in obese mice, indicating the importance of Zn in metabolic and immune dysregulation in obesity.

  14. Treatment with interferon-alpha delays disease in swine infected with a highly virulent CSFV strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is an economically significant, highly contagious swine disease. The etiological agent, CSF virus (CSFV), is an enveloped virus with a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genome, classified as a member of the genus Pestivirus within the family Flaviviridae (Becher et al.,...

  15. High Affinity Iron Permease is Required for Virulence of Rhizopus oryzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhizopus oryzae is the most common cause of mucormycosis. Clinical and animal model data clearly demonstrate that the presence of elevated available serum iron predisposes the host to develop mucormycosis. The high affinity iron permease gene (rFTR1) is required for R. oryzae iron transport in iro...

  16. Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene Reinforced with Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes: In Vitro Biocompatibility Study Using Macrophage-Like Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayeli Camacho

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes are highly versatile materials; new applications using them are continuously being developed. Special attention is being dedicated to the possible use of multiwall carbon nanotubes in biomaterials contacting with bone. This study describes the response of murine macrophage-like Raw 264.7 cells after two and six days of culture in contact with artificially generated particles from both, ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene polymer and the composite (multiwall carbon nanotubes and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene. This novel composite has superior wear behavior, having thus the potential to reduce the number of revision knee arthroplasty surgeries required by wear failure of tibial articulating component and diminish particle-induced osteolysis. The results of an in vitro study of viability, and interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha production suggest good cytocompatibility, similar to that of conventional ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene.

  17. Evaluation of the cytotoxicity of organic dust components on THP1 monocytes-derived macrophages using high content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramery, Eve; O'Brien, Peter J

    2014-03-01

    Organic dust contains pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) which can induce significant airway diseases following chronic exposure. Mononuclear phagocytes are key protecting cells of the respiratory tract. Several studies have investigated the effects of PAMPs and mainly endotoxins, on cytokine production. However the sublethal cytotoxicity of organic dust components on macrophages has not been tested yet. The novel technology of high content analysis (HCA) is already used to assess subclinical drug-induced toxicity. It combines the capabilities of flow cytometry, intracellular fluorescence probes, and image analysis and enables rapid multiple analyses in large numbers of samples. In this study, HCA was used to investigate the cytotoxicity of the three major PAMPs contained in organic dust, i.e., endotoxin (LPS), peptidoglycan (PGN) and β-glucans (zymosan) on THP-1 monocyte-derived macrophages. LPS was used at concentrations of 0.005, 0.01, 0.02, 0.05, 0.1, and 1 μg/mL; PGN and zymosan were used at concentrations of 1, 5, 10, 50, 100, and 500 μg/mL. Cells were exposed to PAMPs for 24 h. In addition, the oxidative burst and the phagocytic capabilities of the cells were tested. An overlap between PGN intrinsic fluorescence and red/far-red fluorescent dyes occurred, rendering the evaluation of some parameters impossible for PGN. LPS induced sublethal cytotoxicity at the lowest dose (from 50 ng/mL). However, the greatest cytotoxic changes occurred with zymosan. In addition, zymosan, but not LPS, induced phagosome maturation and oxidative burst. Given the fact that β-glucans can be up to 100-fold more concentrated in organic dust than LPS, these results suggest that β-glucans could play a major role in macrophage impairment following heavy dust exposure and will merit further investigation in the near future.

  18. Molecular screening of virulence genes in high-level gentamicin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolated from clinical specimens in Northwest Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Hasani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present study screened clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium to determine the prevalence of high-level gentamicin-resistant enterococci and the potential virulence genes among them. Materials and Methods: Clinical enterococcal isolates were obtained from three university teaching hospitals in Northwest Iran. Isolated enterococci were identified phenotypically followed by antibiotic susceptibility testing. Multiplex PCR was performed for the detection of genus, species-specific targets, gentamicin resistance, and potential virulence genes. Results: Of 220 enterococcal isolates, 133 (60.45% isolates were identified as high-level gentamicin-resistant. Of these isolates, 79 (59.4% and 54 (40.6% were E. faecalis and E. faecium, respectively. All high-level gentamicin-resistant strains carried aac(6′Ie-aph(2″Ia. Of 220 isolates, 65.9% were positive for gelE, and 55%, 53.6%, 51.8%, and 49.5% of isolates were positive for cpd, asa1, ace, and esp, respectively. Phenotypically detected β-haemolytic strains (19.54% were found to possess cylL ls MAB. Conclusion: The study revealed that high-level gentamicin-resistance was related to the presence of aac(6′Ie-aph(2″Ia. Isolated enterococci harboured potential virulence determinants, which were more common among E. faecalis than among E. faecium strains.

  19. The Glucose Sensor-Like Protein Hxs1 Is a High-Affinity Glucose Transporter and Required for Virulence in Cryptococcus neoformans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Gregory M.; Fahmy, Hany; Jiang, Linghuo; Xue, Chaoyang

    2013-01-01

    Cryptococcus is a major fungal pathogen that frequently causes systemic infection in patients with compromised immunity. Glucose, an important signal molecule and the preferred carbon source for Cryptococcus, plays a critical role in fungal development and virulence. Cryptococcus contains more than 50 genes sharing high sequence homology with hexose transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, there is no report on their function in glucose sensing or transport. In this study, we investigated two hexose transporter-like proteins (Hxs1 and Hxs2) in Cryptococcus that share the highest sequence identity with the glucose sensors Snf3 and Rgt2 in S. cerevisiae. The expression of HXS1 is repressed by high glucose, while the HXS2 expression is not regulated by glucose. Functional studies showed that Hxs1 is required for fungal resistance to oxidative stress and fungal virulence. The hxs1Δ mutant exhibited a significant reduction in glucose uptake activity, indicating that Hxs1 is required for glucose uptake. Heterologous expression of Cryptococcus HXS1 rendered the S. cerevisiae mutant lacking all 20 hexose transporters a high glucose uptake activity, demonstrating that Hxs1 functions as a glucose transporter. Heterologous expression of HXS1 in the snf3Δ rgt2Δ double mutant did not complement its growth in YPD medium containing the respiration inhibitor antimycin A, suggesting that Hxs1 may not function as a glucose sensor. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Hxs1 is a high-affinity glucose transporter and required for fungal virulence. PMID:23691177

  20. The dominant Australian community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone ST93-IV [2B] is highly virulent and genetically distinct.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyra Y L Chua

    Full Text Available Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA USA300 has spread rapidly across North America, and CA-MRSA is also increasing in Australia. However, the dominant Australian CA-MRSA strain, ST93-IV [2B] appears distantly related to USA300 despite strikingly similar clinical and epidemiological profiles. Here, we compared the virulence of a recent Australian ST93 isolate (JKD6159 to other MRSA, including USA300, and found that JKD6159 was the most virulent in a mouse skin infection model. We fully sequenced the genome of JKD6159 and confirmed that JKD6159 is a distinct clone with 7616 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs distinguishing this strain from all other S. aureus genomes. Despite its high virulence there were surprisingly few virulence determinants. However, genes encoding α-hemolysin, Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL and α-type phenol soluble modulins were present. Genome comparisons revealed 32 additional CDS in JKD6159 but none appeared to encode new virulence factors, suggesting that this clone's enhanced pathogenicity could lie within subtler genome changes, such as SNPs within regulatory genes. To investigate the role of accessory genome elements in CA-MRSA epidemiology, we next sequenced three additional Australian non-ST93 CA-MRSA strains and compared them with JKD6159, 19 completed S. aureus genomes and 59 additional S. aureus genomes for which unassembled genome sequence data was publicly available (82 genomes in total. These comparisons showed that despite its distinctive genotype, JKD6159 and other CA-MRSA clones (including USA300 share a conserved repertoire of three notable accessory elements (SSCmecIV, PVL prophage, and pMW2. This study demonstrates that the genetically distinct ST93 CA-MRSA from Australia is highly virulent. Our comparisons of geographically and genetically diverse CA-MRSA genomes suggest that apparent convergent evolution in CA-MRSA may be better explained by the rapid

  1. Is the high virulence of HIV-1 an unfortunate coincidence of primate lentiviral evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhoff, Frank

    2009-06-01

    In the subset of primate lentiviruses that contain a vpu gene - HIV-1 and its simian precursors - the Nef protein has lost the ability to down-modulate CD3, block T cell activation and suppress programmed death. Vpu counteracts a host restriction factor induced by the inflammatory cytokine interferon-alpha. I propose that the acquisition of vpu may have allowed the viral lineage that gave rise to HIV-1 to evolve towards greater pathogenicity by removing the selective pressure for a protective Nef function that prevents damagingly high levels of immune activation.

  2. Greater virulence of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus in cats than in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heui Man; Park, Eun Hye; Yum, Jung; Kim, Hyun Soo; Seo, Sang Heui

    2015-01-01

    Highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus continues to infect animals and humans. We compared the infectivity and pathogenesis of H5N1 virus in domestic cats and dogs to find out which animal is more susceptible to H5N1 influenza virus. When cats and dogs were infected with the H5N1 virus, cats suffered from severe outcomes including death, whereas dogs did not show any mortality. Viruses were shed in the nose and rectum of cats and in the nose of dogs. Viruses were detected in brain, lung, kidney, intestine, liver, and serum in the infected cats, but only in the lung in the infected dogs. Genes encoding inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, Toll-like receptors, and apoptotic factors were more highly expressed in the lungs of cats than in those of dogs. Our results suggest that the intensive monitoring of dogs is necessary to prevent human infection by H5N1 influenza virus, since infected dogs may not show clear clinical signs, in contrast to infected cats.

  3. The Measurement of High-Density Lipoprotein Mediated Cholesterol Efflux from Macrophage Cells by Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry

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    Mo Wang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies have shown a negative association between macrophage cholesterol efflux and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (CVD. However, the current methods for measuring cholesterol efflux require a radioactive tracer and involve a variety of cell treatments, making the measurement of macrophage cholesterol efflux impractical for use in clinical laboratories. In this study, we developed a non-radioactive and precise LC/MS/MS method for the measurement of high-density lipoprotein (HDL mediated cholesterol efflux from J774 macrophages. Methods: J774 cells were seeded on 12-well plates at a density of 1.5×105 cells/ml in H-DMEM medium, and when the cells were approximately 80% confluent, they were incubated with H-DMEM medium containing 2% FBS, 0.5 μg/ml ACAT inhibitor Sandoz 58-035, and 20 μg/ml [3,4-13C]cholesterol for 6 h. After washing and equilibrating the cells, HDL samples were added at a final concentration of 7% and incubated for 8 h. The cells were lysed, and [3,4-13C]cholesterol and cholesterol were measured by LC/MS/MS. Cholesterol efflux was expressed as the percent decrease of cell [3,4-13C]cholesterol mass during the incubation. Results: When incubated with [3,4-13C]cholesterol enriched J774 cells, HDL mediated higher cell cholesterol efflux than influx compared to serum and isolated LDL; therefore, HDL was used as the extracellular acceptor. The results from healthy volunteers showed that the rate of cholesterol efflux was negatively correlated with weight, BMI, blood pressure, and FERHDL and positively correlated with HDL-C, HDL2-C, and apoAI levels. Conclusions: A LC/MS/MS method for the measurement of HDL mediated cholesterol efflux from macrophage cells has been established. This method is non-radioactive, precise and reliable and is potentially useful for the assessment of HDL function and cardiovascular disease risks.

  4. A Highly Conserved Bacterial D-Serine Uptake System Links Host Metabolism and Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, James P R; Gabrielsen, Mads; Goldstone, Robert J; Grinter, Rhys; Wang, Dai; Cogdell, Richard J; Walker, Daniel; Smith, David G E; Roe, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    The ability of any organism to sense and respond to challenges presented in the environment is critically important for promoting or restricting colonization of specific sites. Recent work has demonstrated that the host metabolite D-serine has the ability to markedly influence the outcome of infection by repressing the type III secretion system of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) in a concentration-dependent manner. However, exactly how EHEC monitors environmental D-serine is not understood. In this work, we have identified two highly conserved members of the E. coli core genome, encoding an inner membrane transporter and a transcriptional regulator, which collectively help to "sense" levels of D-serine by regulating its uptake from the environment and in turn influencing global gene expression. Both proteins are required for full expression of the type III secretion system and diversely regulated prophage-encoded effector proteins demonstrating an important infection-relevant adaptation of the core genome. We propose that this system acts as a key safety net, sampling the environment for this metabolite, thereby promoting colonization of EHEC to favorable sites within the host.

  5. A Highly Conserved Bacterial D-Serine Uptake System Links Host Metabolism and Virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P R Connolly

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability of any organism to sense and respond to challenges presented in the environment is critically important for promoting or restricting colonization of specific sites. Recent work has demonstrated that the host metabolite D-serine has the ability to markedly influence the outcome of infection by repressing the type III secretion system of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC in a concentration-dependent manner. However, exactly how EHEC monitors environmental D-serine is not understood. In this work, we have identified two highly conserved members of the E. coli core genome, encoding an inner membrane transporter and a transcriptional regulator, which collectively help to "sense" levels of D-serine by regulating its uptake from the environment and in turn influencing global gene expression. Both proteins are required for full expression of the type III secretion system and diversely regulated prophage-encoded effector proteins demonstrating an important infection-relevant adaptation of the core genome. We propose that this system acts as a key safety net, sampling the environment for this metabolite, thereby promoting colonization of EHEC to favorable sites within the host.

  6. Macrophage Responses to Silica Nanoparticles are Highly Conserved Across Particle Sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, Katrina M.; Masiello, Lisa M.; Zangar, Richard C.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Karin, Norman J.; Quesenberry, Ryan D.; Bandyopadhyay, Somnath; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Pounds, Joel G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2009-02-03

    Concerns about the potential adverse health effects of engineered nanoparticles stems in part from the possibility that some materials display unique chemical and physical properties at nanoscales which could exacerbate their biological activity. However, studies that have assessed the effect of particle size across a comprehensive set of biological responses have not been reported. Using a macrophage cell model, we demonstrate that the ability of unopsonized amorphous silica particles to stimulate inflammatory protein secretion and induce macrophage cytotoxicity scales closely with the total administered particle surface area across a wide range of particle diameters (7-500 nm). Whole genome microarray analysis of the early gene expression changes induced by 10 nm and 500 nm particles showed that the magnitude of change for the majority of genes affected correlated more tightly with particle surface area than either particle mass or number. Gene expression changes that were particle size-specific were also identified. However, the overall biological processes represented by all gene expression changes were nearly identical, irrespective of particle diameter. Direct comparison of the cell processes represented in the 10 nm and 500 nm particle gene sets using gene set enrichment analysis revealed that among 1009 total biological processes, none were statistically enriched in one particle size group over the other. The key mechanisms involved in silica nanoparticle-mediated gene regulation and cytotoxicity have yet to be established. However, our results suggest that on an equivalent nominal surface area basis, common biological modes of action are expected for nano- and supranano-sized silica particles.

  7. Susceptibility of juvenile Macrobrachium rosenbergii to different doses of high and low virulence strains of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corteel, Mathias; Dantas-Lima, João J; Tuan, Vo Van; Thuong, Khuong Van; Wille, Mathieu; Alday-Sanz, Victoria; Pensaert, Maurice B; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2012-09-12

    As some literature on the susceptibility of different life stages of Macrobrachium rosenbergii to white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is conflicting, the pathogenesis, infectivity and pathogenicity of 2 WSSV strains (Thai-1 and Viet) were investigated here in juveniles using conditions standardized for Penaeus vannamei. As with P. vannamei, juvenile M. rosenbergii (2 to 5 g) injected with a low dose of WSSV-Thai-1 or a high dose of WSSV-Viet developed comparable clinical pathology and numbers of infected cells within 1 to 2 d post-infection. In contrast, a low dose of WSSV-Viet capable of causing mortality in P. vannamei resulted in no detectable infection in M. rosenbergii. Mean prawn infectious dose 50% endpoints (PID₅₀ ml⁻¹) determined in M. rosenbergii were in the order of 100-fold higher for WSSV-Thai-1 (105.3 ± 0.4 PID₅₀ ml⁻¹) than for WSSV-Viet (103.2 ± 0.2 PID₅₀ ml⁻¹), with each of these being about 20-fold and 400-fold lower, respectively, than found previously in P. vannamei. The median lethal dose (LD₅₀ ml⁻¹) determined in M. rosenbergii was also far higher (~1000-fold) for WSSV-Thai-1 (105.4 ± 0.4 LD₅₀ ml⁻¹) than for WSSV-Viet (102.3 ± 0.3 LD₅₀ ml⁻¹). Based on these data, it is clear that juvenile M. rosenbergii are susceptible to WSSV infection, disease and mortality. In comparison to P. vannamei, however, juvenile M. rosenbergii appear more capable of resisting infection and disease, particularly in the case of a WSSV strain with lower apparent virulence.

  8. Newcastle disease viruses causing recent outbreaks worldwide show unexpectedly high genetic similarity with historical virulent isolates from the 1940s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) cause Newcastle disease (ND), a devastating disease of poultry and wild birds. Phylogenetic analyses clearly distinguish historical isolates (obtained prior to 1960) from currently circulating viruses of class II genotypes V, VI, VII, and XII throug...

  9. Nsp9 and Nsp10 contribute to the fatal virulence of highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus emerging in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Atypical porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS, which is caused by the Chinese highly pathogenic PRRS virus (HP-PRRSV, has resulted in large economic loss to the swine industry since its outbreak in 2006. However, to date, the region(s within the viral genome that are related to the fatal virulence of HP-PRRSV remain unknown. In the present study, we generated a series of full-length infectious cDNA clones with swapped coding regions between the highly pathogenic RvJXwn and low pathogenic RvHB-1/3.9. Next, the in vitro and in vivo replication and pathogenicity for piglets of the rescued chimeric viruses were systematically analyzed and compared with their backbone viruses. First, we swapped the regions including the 5'UTR+ORF1a, ORF1b, and structural proteins (SPs-coding region between the two viruses and demonstrated that the nonstructural protein-coding region, ORF1b, is directly related to the fatal virulence and increased replication efficiency of HP-PRRSV both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we substituted the nonstructural protein (Nsp 9-, Nsp10-, Nsp11- and Nsp12-coding regions separately; or Nsp9- and Nsp10-coding regions together; or Nsp9-, Nsp10- and Nsp11-coding regions simultaneously between the two viruses. Our results indicated that the HP-PRRSV Nsp9- and Nsp10-coding regions together are closely related to the replication efficiency in vitro and in vivo and are related to the increased pathogenicity and fatal virulence for piglets. Our findings suggest that Nsp9 and Nsp10 together contribute to the fatal virulence of HP-PRRSV emerging in China, helping to elucidate the pathogenesis of this virus.

  10. Previous infection with virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus reduces highly pathogenic avian influenza virus replication, disease, and mortality in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Hurtado, Mar; Afonso, Claudio L; Miller, Patti J; Shepherd, Eric; Cha, Ra Mi; Smith, Diane; Spackman, Erica; Kapczynski, Darrell R; Suarez, David L; Swayne, David E; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J

    2015-09-23

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are two of the most important viruses affecting poultry worldwide and produce co-infections especially in areas of the world where both viruses are endemic; but little is known about the interactions between these two viruses. The objective of this study was to determine if co-infection with NDV affects HPAIV replication in chickens. Only infections with virulent NDV strains (mesogenic Pigeon/1984 or velogenic CA/2002), and not a lentogenic NDV strain (LaSota), interfered with the replication of HPAIV A/chicken/Queretaro/14588-19/95 (H5N2) when the H5N2 was given at a high dose (10(6.9) EID50) two days after the NDV inoculation, but despite this interference, mortality was still observed. However, chickens infected with the less virulent mesogenic NDV Pigeon/1984 strain three days prior to being infected with a lower dose (10(5.3-5.5) EID50) of the same or a different HPAIV, A/chicken/Jalisco/CPA-12283-12/2012 (H7N3), had reduced HPAIV replication and increased survival rates. In conclusion, previous infection of chickens with virulent NDV strains can reduce HPAIV replication, and consequently disease and mortality. This interference depends on the titer of the viruses used, the virulence of the NDV, and the timing of the infections. The information obtained from these studies helps to understand the possible interactions and outcomes of infection (disease and virus shedding) when HPAIV and NDV co-infect chickens in the field.

  11. Chronic Heat Stress Weakened the Innate Immunity and Increased the Virulence of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus H5N1 in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Jin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic heat stress (CHS can negatively affect immune response in animals. In this study we assessed the effects of CHS on host innate immunity and avian influenza virus H5N1 infection in mice. Mice were divided into two groups: CHS and thermally neutral (TN. The CHS treatment group exhibited reduced local immunity in the respiratory tract, including the number of pulmonary alveolar macrophages and lesions in the nasal mucosa, trachea, and lungs. Meanwhile, CHS retarded dendritic cells (DCs maturation and reduced the mRNA levels of IL-6 and IFN-β significantly (P<.05. After the CHS treatment, mice were infected with H5N1 virus. The mortality rate and viral load in the lungs of CHS group were higher than those of TN group. The results suggest that the CHS treatment could suppress local immunity in the respiratory tract and innate host immunity in mice significantly and moderately increased the virulence in H5N1-infected mice.

  12. Pathogenic Mycobacterium bovis strains differ in their ability to modulate the proinflammatory activation phenotype of macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade Marcelle RM

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Mycobacterium bovis, remains one of the leading infectious diseases worldwide. The ability of mycobacteria to rapidly grow in host macrophages is a factor contributing to enhanced virulence of the bacteria and disease progression. Bactericidal functions of phagocytes are strictly dependent on activation status of these cells, regulated by the infecting agent and cytokines. Pathogenic mycobacteria can survive the hostile environment of the phagosome through interference with activation of bactericidal responses. To study the mechanisms employed by highly virulent mycobacteria to promote their intracellular survival, we investigated modulating effects of two pathogenic M. bovis isolates and a reference M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain, differing in their ability to multiply in macrophages, on activation phenotypes of the cells primed with major cytokines regulating proinflammatory macrophage activity. Results Bone marrow- derived macrophages obtained from C57BL/6 mice were infected by mycobacteria after a period of cell incubation with or without treatment with IFN-γ, inducing proinflammatory type-1 macrophages (M1, or IL-10, inducing anti-inflammatory type-2 cells (M2. Phenotypic profiling of M1 and M2 was then evaluated. The M. bovis strain MP287/03 was able to grow more efficiently in the untreated macrophages, compared with the strains B2 or H37Rv. This strain induced weaker secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, coinciding with higher expression of M2 cell markers, mannose receptor (MR and arginase-1 (Arg-1. Treatment of macrophages with IFN-γ and infection by the strains B2 and H37Rv synergistically induced M1 polarization, leading to high levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS expression, and reduced expression of the Arg-1. In contrast, the cells infected with the strain MP287/03 expressed high levels of Arg-1 which competed with iNOS for the common substrate

  13. Gpr97 is dispensable for metabolic syndrome but is involved in macrophage inflammation in high-fat diet-induced obesity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jueping; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Shaoying; Wang, Jinjin; Du, Bing; Wang, Zhugang; Liu, Mingyao; Jiang, Wenzheng; Qian, Min; Ren, Hua

    2016-04-19

    Local inflammation in tissues is one of primary causes in development of metabolic disorder in obesity. The accumulation of macrophages in some tissues can induce inflammatory reactions in obesity. Gpr97 is highly expressed in some immunocytes, but its potential role in inflammatory regulation has not been revealed clearly. In our research, we investigated Gpr97 in regulating macrophage inflammation and metabolic dysfunction in the high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. The major metabolic phenotyping were not different after Gpr97 knockout in HFD-fed mice. Similar pathological alterations in adipose tissue, liver, and kidney were observed in Gpr97(-/-) HFD mice compared with WT-HFD mice. In white adipose tissue, loss of Gpr97 reduced the ratio of M1-macrophages and increased the M2-macrophage ratio, which was opposite to that seen in the wild-type HFD mice. More macrophages invaded in the liver and kidney after Gpr97 knockout in HFD mice. Furthermore, the levels of TNF-α were higher in the liver and kidney of Gpr97(-/-) HFD mice compared to those in wild-type HFD mice. The data indicate that Gpr97 might be required for local inflammation development in obesity-relative tissues, but does not play a role in metabolic disorder in HFD-induced obesity.

  14. PPARγ ligands switched high fat diet-induced macrophage M2b polarization toward M2a thereby improving intestinal Candida elimination.

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    Lise Lefèvre

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with a chronic low-grade inflammation that predisposes to insulin resistance and the development of type 2 diabetes. In this metabolic context, gastrointestinal (GI candidiasis is common. We recently demonstrated that the PPARγ ligand rosiglitazone promotes the clearance of Candida albicans through the activation of alternative M2 macrophage polarization. Here, we evaluated the impact of high fat diet (HFD-induced obesity and the effect of rosiglitazone (PPARγ ligand or WY14643 (PPARα ligand both on the phenotypic M1/M2 polarization of peritoneal and cecal tissue macrophages and on the outcome of GI candidiasis. We demonstrated that the peritoneal macrophages and the cell types present in the cecal tissue from HF fed mice present a M2b polarization (TNF-α(high, IL-10(high, MR, Dectin-1. Interestingly, rosiglitazone induces a phenotypic M2b-to-M2a (TNF-α(low, IL-10(low, MR(high, Dectin-1(high switch of peritoneal macrophages and of the cells present in the cecal tissue. The incapacity of WY14643 to switch this polarization toward M2a state, strongly suggests the specific involvement of PPARγ in this mechanism. We showed that in insulin resistant mice, M2b polarization of macrophages present on the site of infection is associated with an increased susceptibility to GI candidiasis, whereas M2a polarization after rosiglitazone treatment favours the GI fungal elimination independently of reduced blood glucose. In conclusion, our data demonstrate a dual benefit of PPARγ ligands because they promote mucosal defence mechanisms against GI candidiasis through M2a macrophage polarization while regulating blood glucose level.

  15. High density lipoprotein suppresses lipoprotein associated phospholipase A2 in human monocytes-derived macrophages through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Guan-ping; REN Jing-yi; QIN Li; SONG Jun-xian; WANG Lan; CHEN Hong

    2012-01-01

    Background Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) is mainly secreted by macrophages,serving as a specific marker of atherosclerotic plaque and exerting pro-atherogenic effects.It is known that high-density lipoprotein (HDL) plays an important role against atherosclerosis by inhibiting pro-inflammatory factors,however,the relationship between HDL and Lp-PLA2 remains elusive.Methods In this study,reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR),Western blotting,and a platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase assay were performed to determine the Lp-PLA2 mRNA level,protein expression and activity in human monocyte-derived macrophages upon HDL treatment of different concentrations and durations.To investigate the underlying mechanism of HDL-induced Lp-PLA2 action,pioglitazone,a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-y (PPARy) ligand,was introduced to human monocyte-derived macrophages and mRNA and protein levels of Lp-PLA2,as well as its activity,were determined.Results Lp-PLA2 mRNA levels,protein expression and activity were significantly inhibited in response to HDL treatment in a dose and time dependent manner in human monocyte-derived macrophages.Pioglitazone treatment (1-10 ng/ml) upregulated the Lp-PLA2 mRNA level,protein expression and activity in human monocyte-derived macrophages,while the effects were markedly reversed by HDL.In addition,pioglitazone resulted in a significant increase in PPARY phosphorylation in human monocyte-derived macrophages,which could be inhibited by HDL.Conclusion These findings indicate that HDL suppresses the expression and activity of Lp-PLA2 in human monocyte-derived macrophages,and the underlying mechanisms may be mediated through the PPARY pathway.

  16. Contribution of fucose-containing capsules in Klebsiella pneumoniae to bacterial virulence in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, June Hsieh; Wu, Albert M; Tsai, Cheng Gie; Chang, Xin-Yu; Tsai, Shih-Feng; Wu, Ting-Shu

    2008-01-01

    Bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP) contains a prominent capsule. Clinical infections usually are associated with pneumonia or urinary tract infection (UTI). Emerging evidence implicates KP in severe liver abscess especially in diabetic patients. The goal of this study was to investigate the capsular polysaccharides from KP of liver abscess (hepatic-KP) and of UTI-KP. The composition of capsular polysaccharides was analyzed by capillary high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, Dionex system). The terminal sugars were assayed by binding ability to lectins. The results showed that the capsule of a hepatic KP (KpL1) from a diabetic patient contained fucose, while the capsule from UTI-KP (KpU1) did not. The absence of fucose was verified by the absence of detectable polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragment for fucose synthesis genes, gmd and wcaG in KpU1. Mice infected with the KpL1 showed high fatality, whereas those infected with the KpU1 showed high survival rate. The KpL1 capsule was reactive to lectins AAA and AAL, which detect fucose, while the KpU1 capsule was reactive to lectin GNA, which detects mannose. Phagocytosis experiment in mouse peritoneal cavity indicated that the peritoneal macrophages could interact with KpU1, while rare association of KpL1 with macrophages was observed. This study revealed that different polysaccharides were displayed on the bacterial capsules of virulent KpL1 as compared with the less virulent KpU1. Interaction of KpU1 with mice peritoneal macrophages was more prominent than that of KpL1. The possession of fucose might contribute to KpL1 virulence by avoiding phagocytosis since fucose on bacteria had been implicated in immune evasion.

  17. Glioma-associated microglia/macrophages display an expression profile different from M1 and M2 polarization and highly express Gpnmb and Spp1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Szulzewsky

    Full Text Available Malignant glioma belong to the most aggressive neoplasms in humans with no successful treatment available. Patients suffering from glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the highest-grade glioma, have an average survival time of only around one year after diagnosis. Both microglia and peripheral macrophages/monocytes accumulate within and around glioma, but fail to exert effective anti-tumor activity and even support tumor growth. Here we use microarray analysis to compare the expression profiles of glioma-associated microglia/macrophages and naive control cells. Samples were generated from CD11b+ MACS-isolated cells from naïve and GL261-implanted C57BL/6 mouse brains. Around 1000 genes were more than 2-fold up- or downregulated in glioma-associated microglia/macrophages when compared to control cells. A comparison with published data sets of M1, M2a,b,c-polarized macrophages revealed a gene expression pattern that has only partial overlap with any of the M1 or M2 gene expression patterns. Samples for the qRT-PCR validation of selected M1 and M2a,b,c-specific genes were generated from two different glioma mouse models and isolated by flow cytometry to distinguish between resident microglia and invading macrophages. We confirmed in both models the unique glioma-associated microglia/macrophage phenotype including a mixture of M1 and M2a,b,c-specific genes. To validate the expression of these genes in human we MACS-isolated CD11b+ microglia/macrophages from GBM, lower grade brain tumors and control specimens. Apart from the M1/M2 gene analysis, we demonstrate that the expression of Gpnmb and Spp1 is highly upregulated in both murine and human glioma-associated microglia/macrophages. High expression of these genes has been associated with poor prognosis in human GBM, as indicated by patient survival data linked to gene expression data. We also show that microglia/macrophages are the predominant source of these transcripts in murine and human GBM. Our

  18. The Multibasic Cleavage Site of the Hemagglutinin of Highly Pathogenic A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (H5N1) Avian Influenza Virus Acts as a Virulence Factor in a Host-Specific Manner in Mammals

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses of the H5 and H7 subtypes typically possess multiple basic amino acids around the cleavage site (MBS) of their hemagglutinin (HA) protein, a recognized virulence motif in poultry. To determine the importance of the H5 HA MBS as a virulence factor in mammals, recombinant wild-type HPAI A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (H5N1) viruses that possessed (H5N1) or lacked (ΔH5N1) the H5 HA MBS were generated and evaluated for their virulence in BALB/c mice, ferrets,...

  19. Imaging of macrophage-related lung diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marten, Katharina; Hansell, David M. [Royal Brompton Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-01

    Macrophage-related pulmonary diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by macrophage accumulation, activation or dysfunction. These conditions include smoking-related interstitial lung diseases, metabolic disorders such as Niemann-Pick or Gaucher disease, and rare primary lung tumors. High-resolution computed tomography abnormalities include pulmonary ground-glass opacification secondary to infiltration by macrophages, centrilobular nodules or interlobular septal thickening reflecting peribronchiolar or septal macrophage accumulation, respectively, emphysema caused by macrophage dysfunction, and honeycombing following macrophage-related lung matrix remodeling. (orig.)

  20. Pro-inflammatory macrophages increase in skeletal muscle of high fat-fed mice and correlate with metabolic risk markers in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Lisbeth N; Costford, Sheila R; Lee, Yun S; Jensen, Thomas E; Bilan, Philip J; Oberbach, Andreas; Blüher, Matthias; Olefsky, Jerrold M; Sams, Anette; Klip, Amira

    2014-03-01

    In obesity, immune cells infiltrate adipose tissue. Skeletal muscle is the major tissue of insulin-dependent glucose disposal, and indices of muscle inflammation arise during obesity, but whether and which immune cells increase in muscle remain unclear. Immune cell presence in quadriceps muscle of wild type mice fed high-fat diet (HFD) was studied for 3 days to 10 weeks, in CCL2-KO mice fed HFD for 1 week, and in human muscle. Leukocyte presence was assessed by gene expression of lineage markers, cyto/chemokines and receptors; immunohistochemistry; and flow cytometry. After 1 week HFD, concomitantly with glucose intolerance, muscle gene expression of Ly6b, Emr1 (F4/80), Tnf, Ccl2, and Ccr2 rose, as did pro- and anti-inflammatory markers Itgax (CD11c) and Mgl2. CD11c+ proinflammatory macrophages in muscle increased by 76%. After 10 weeks HFD, macrophages in muscle increased by 47%. Quadriceps from CCL2-KO mice on HFD did not gain macrophages and maintained insulin sensitivity. Muscle of obese, glucose-intolerant humans showed elevated CD68 (macrophage marker) and ITGAX, correlating with poor glucose disposal and adiposity. Mouse and human skeletal muscles gain a distinct population of inflammatory macrophages upon HFD or obesity, linked to insulin resistance in humans and CCL2 availability in mice. © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  1. pH-Dependent Toxicity of High Aspect Ratio ZnO Nanowires in Macrophages Due to Intracellular Dissolution

    KAUST Repository

    H. Müller, Karin

    2010-11-23

    High-aspect ratio ZnO nanowires have become one of the most promising products in the nanosciences within the past few years with a multitude of applications at the interface of optics and electronics. The interaction of zinc with cells and organisms is complex, with both deficiency and excess causing severe effects. The emerging significance of zinc for many cellular processes makes it imperative to investigate the biological safety of ZnO nanowires in order to guarantee their safe economic exploitation. In this study, ZnO nanowires were found to be toxic to human monocyte macrophages (HMMs) at similar concentrations as ZnCl2. Confocal microscopy on live cells confirmed a rise in intracellular Zn2+ concentrations prior to cell death. In vitro, ZnO nanowires dissolved very rapidly in a simulated body fluid of lysosomal pH, whereas they were comparatively stable at extracellular pH. Bright-field transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed a rapid macrophage uptake of ZnO nanowire aggregates by phagocytosis. Nanowire dissolution occurred within membrane-bound compartments, triggered by the acidic pH of the lysosomes. ZnO nanowire dissolution was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. Deposition of electron-dense material throughout the ZnO nanowire structures observed by TEM could indicate adsorption of cellular components onto the wires or localized zinc-induced protein precipitation. Our study demonstrates that ZnO nanowire toxicity in HMMs is due to pH-triggered, intracellular release of ionic Zn2+ rather than the high-aspect nature of the wires. Cell death had features of necrosis as well as apoptosis, with mitochondria displaying severe structural changes. The implications of these findings for the application of ZnO nanowires are discussed. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  2. High host density favors greater virulence: a model of parasite-host dynamics based on multi-type branching processes

    CERN Document Server

    Borovkov, Konstantin; Rice, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    We use a multitype continuous time Markov branching process model to describe the dynamics of the spread of parasites of two types that can mutate into each other in a common host population. Instead of using a single virulence characteristic which is typical of most mathematical models for infectious diseases, our model uses a combination of two characteristics: lethality and transmissibility. This makes the model capable of reproducing the empirically observed fact that the increase in the host density can lead to the prevalence of the more virulent pathogen type. We provide some numerical illustrations and discuss the effects of the size of the enclosure containing the host population on the encounter rate in our model that plays the key role in determining what pathogen type will eventually prevail. We also present a multistage extension of the model to situations where there are several populations and parasites can be transmitted from one of them to another.

  3. A Multilocus Sequence Typing System (MLST) reveals a high level of diversity and a genetic component to Entamoeba histolytica virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The outcome of an Entamoeba histolytica infection is variable and can result in either asymptomatic carriage, immediate or latent disease (diarrhea/dysentery/amebic liver abscess). An E. histolytica multilocus genotyping system based on tRNA gene-linked arrays has shown that genetic differences exist among parasites isolated from patients with different symptoms however, the tRNA gene-linked arrays cannot be located in the current assembly of the E. histolytica Reference genome (strain HM-1:IMSS) and are highly variable. Results To probe the population structure of E. histolytica and identify genetic markers associated with clinical outcome we identified in E. histolytica positive samples selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by multiplexed massive parallel sequencing. Profile SNPs were selected which, compared to the reference strain HM-1:IMSS sequence, changed an encoded amino acid at the SNP position, and were present in independent E. histolytica isolates from different geographical origins. The samples used in this study contained DNA isolated from either xenic strains of E. histolytica trophozoites established in culture or E. histolytica positive clinical specimens (stool and amebic liver abscess aspirates). A record of the SNPs present at 16 loci out of the original 21 candidate targets was obtained for 63 of the initial 84 samples (63% of asymptomatically colonized stool samples, 80% of diarrheal stool, 73% of xenic cultures and 84% of amebic liver aspirates). The sequences in all the 63 samples both passed sequence quality control metrics and also had the required greater than 8X sequence coverage for all 16 SNPs in order to confidently identify variants. Conclusions Our work is in agreement with previous findings of extensive diversity among E. histolytica isolates from the same geographic origin. In phylogenetic trees, only four of the 63 samples were able to group in two sets of two with greater than 50% confidence. Two SNPs in the

  4. Characterization of an avirulent FCV strain with a broad serum cross-neutralization profile and protection against challenge of a highly virulent vs feline calicivirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Sing; Lowery, David; Floyd-Hawkins, Kim; King, Vickie

    2014-08-08

    Highly virulent, systemic strains of Feline calicivirus (vs FCV) have been described in recent years. These vs FCV isolates cause severe edema, cutaneous ulcers, lameness and other upper respiratory and oral clinical signs typically associated with FCV infection in cats. Vs FCV isolates can cause high mortality even in cats vaccinated with currently available commercial vaccines. This study reports identification and characterization of an avirulent FCV strain (FCV 21). This strain offers a broader serum cross-neutralization profile in comparison with the commonly used vaccine strain (FCV F9), as tested with two separate viral panels of FCV isolates. The first viral panel consists of 45 FCV strains isolated around 1993. The second viral panel consists of 26 FCV strains with most isolated around 2003. The potential of using this strain as a vaccine, in a 3-way (FCV+FHV+FPV) or 4-way (FCV+FHV+FPV+FCp) format, was tested by using a highly virulent vs FCV strain (FCV-33585) as a challenge virus. The mortality induced by this vs FCV in unvaccinated control cats was 78% (7 out of 9 cats). The mortality decreased to 44% (4 out of 9 cats) in cats vaccinated with a 4-way vaccine containing FCV F9. However, when this novel FCV vaccine strain (FCV 21) was used, either in combination with FCV F9 or by itself, the mortality decreased to 0% (0 out of 10 cats). The 3-way vaccine (FCV+FHV+FPV) that contained both FCV 21 and FCV F9 also had mortality of 0% (0 out of 10 cats). The clinical scores, as calculated taking into consideration the frequency and severity of various clinical signs, correlated with mortality data. The results suggested this FCV vaccine has the potential to be broadly protective against newly emergent FCV isolates, including complete protection against challenge with a highly virulent vs FCV 33585. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Conjugal transfer of a virulence plasmid in the opportunistic intracellular actinomycete Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, V N; Harding, W C; Willingham-Lane, J M; Hondalus, M K

    2012-12-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular, Gram-positive, soilborne actinomycete which can cause severe pyogranulomatous pneumonia with abscessation in young horses (foals) and in immunocompromised people, such as persons with AIDS. All strains of R. equi isolated from foals and approximately a third isolated from humans contain a large, ~81-kb plasmid which is essential for the intramacrophage growth of the organism and for virulence in foals and murine in vivo model systems. We found that the entire virulence plasmid could be transferred from plasmid-containing strains of R. equi (donor) to plasmid-free R. equi strains (recipient) at a high frequency and that plasmid transmission reestablished the capacity for intracellular growth in macrophages. Plasmid transfer required living cells and cell-to-cell contact and was unaffected by the presence of DNase, factors pointing to conjugation as the major means of genetic transfer. Deletion of a putative relaxase-encoding gene, traA, located in the proposed conjugative region of the plasmid, abolished plasmid transfer. Reversion of the traA mutation restored plasmid transmissibility. Finally, plasmid transmission to other Rhodococcus species and some additional related organisms was demonstrated. This is the first study showing a virulence plasmid transfer in R. equi, and it establishes a mechanism by which the virulence plasmid can move among bacteria in the soil.

  6. Leishmania major CorA-like magnesium transporters play a critical role in parasite development and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Davis, Antony; Smith, Brian J; Curtis, Joan; Handman, Emanuela

    2009-05-01

    Establishment of infection by Leishmania depends on the transformation of the invading metacyclic promastigotes into the obligatory intracellular amastigotes, and their subsequent survival in the macrophage phagolysosome, which is low in magnesium. We show that two Leishmania major proteins designated MGT1 and MGT2, which play a critical role in these processes, belong to the two-transmembrane domain (2-TM-GxN) cation transporter family and share homology with the major bacterial magnesium transporter CorA. Although both are present in the endoplasmic reticulum throughout the life cycle of the parasite, MGT1 is more highly expressed in the infectious metacyclic parasites, while MGT2 is enriched in the immature procyclic stages. The two proteins, although predicted to be structurally similar, have features that suggest different regulatory or gating mechanisms. The two proteins may also be functionally distinct, since only MGT1 complements an Escherichia coli DeltaCorA mutant. In addition, deletion of one mgt1 allele from L. major led to increased virulence, while deletion of one allele of mgt2 resulted in slower growth and total loss of virulence in vitro and in vivo. This loss of virulence may be due to an impaired transformation of the parasites into amastigotes. Deletion of both mgt1 alleles in the hemizygous MGT2 knockdown parasites reversed the growth defect and partially restored virulence. Our data indicate that the MGTs play a critical role in parasite growth, development and virulence.

  7. High density lipoprotein (HDL)-associated sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) inhibits macrophage apoptosis by stimulating STAT3 activity and survivin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerborn, Renata; Becker, Susen; Potì, Francesco; Nagel, Petra; Brodde, Martin; Schmidt, Harmut; Christoffersen, Christina; Ceglarek, Uta; Burkhardt, Ralph; Nofer, Jerzy-Roch

    2017-02-01

    Macrophage apoptosis is critically involved in atherosclerosis. We here examined the effect of anti-atherogenic high density lipoprotein (HDL) and its component sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) on apoptosis in RAW264.7 murine macrophages. Mitochondrial or endoplasmic reticulum-dependent apoptosis was induced by exposure of macrophages to etoposide or thapsigargin/fukoidan, respectively. Cell death induced by these compounds was inhibited by S1P as inferred from reduced annexin V binding, TUNEL staining, and caspase 3, 9 and 12 activities. S1P induced expression of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family proteins cIAP1, cIAP2 and survivin, but only the inhibitor of survivin expression YM155 and not the cIAP1/2 blocker GDC0152 reversed the inhibitory effect of S1P on apoptosis. Moreover, S1P activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and the stimulatory effect of S1P on survivin expression and inhibitory effects on apoptosis were attenuated by STAT3 or JAK2 inhibitors, S3I-201 or AG490, respectively. The effects of S1P on STAT3 activation, survivin expression and macrophage apoptosis were emulated by HDL, HDL lipids, and apolipoprotein (apo) M-containing HDL, but not by apoA-I or HDL deprived of S1P or apoM. In addition, JTE013 and CAY10444, S1P receptor 2 and 3 antagonists, respectively, compromised the S1P and HDL capacities to stimulate STAT3 activation and survivin expression, and to inhibit apoptosis. HDL-associated S1P inhibits macrophage apoptosis by stimulating STAT3 activity and survivin expression. The suppression of macrophage apoptosis may represent a novel mechanism utilized by HDL to exert its anti-atherogenic effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Low Virulence and Lack of Airborne Transmission of the Dutch Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus H5N8 in Ferrets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathilde Richard

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N8 viruses that emerged in poultry in East Asia spread to Europe and North America by late 2014. Here we show that the European HPAI H5N8 viruses differ from the Korean and Japanese HPAI H5N8 viruses by several amino acids and that a Dutch HPAI H5N8 virus had low virulence and was not transmitted via the airborne route in ferrets. The virus did not cross-react with sera raised against pre-pandemic H5 vaccine strains. This data is useful for public health risk assessments.

  9. Modulation of behaviour and virulence of a high alginate expressing Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain from cystic fibrosis by oral commensal bacterium Streptococcus anginosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Richard D; Qureshi, Muhammad R; Whiley, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) airways harbour complex and dynamic polymicrobial communities that include many oral bacteria. Despite increased knowledge of CF airway microbiomes the interaction between established CF pathogens and other resident microbes and resulting impact on disease progression is poorly understood. Previous studies have demonstrated that oral commensal streptococci of the Anginosus group (AGS) can establish chronic pulmonary infections and become numerically dominant in CF sputa indicating that they play an important role in CF microbiome dynamics. In this study a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (DWW2) of the mucoid alginate overproducing phenotype associated with chronic CF airway infection and a strain of the oral commensal AGS species Streptococcus anginosus (3a) from CF sputum were investigated for their ability to co-exist and their responses to biofilm co-culture. Bacteria in biofilms were quantified, pyocyanin expression by DWW2 was measured and the effect of AGS strain 3a on reversion of DWW2 to a non-mucoidal phenotype investigated. The virulence of DWW2, 3a and colony variant phenotypes of DWW2 in mono- and co-culture were compared in a Galleria mellonella infection model. Co-culture biofilms were formed in normoxic, hypercapnic (10% CO2) and anoxic atmospheres with the streptococcus increasing in number in co-culture, indicating that these bacteria would be able to co-exist and thrive within the heterogeneous microenvironments of the CF airway. The streptococcus caused increased pyocyanin expression by DWW2 and colony variants by stimulating reversion of the mucoid phenotype to the high pyocyanin expressing non-mucoid phenotype. The latter was highly virulent in the infection model with greater virulence when in co-culture with the streptococcus. The results of this study demonstrate that the oral commensal S. anginosus benefits from interaction with P. aeruginosa of the CF associated mucoid phenotype and modulates the behaviour of the

  10. Proteomics analysis of differentially expressed proteins in chicken trachea and kidney after infection with the highly virulent and attenuated coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Zhongzan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV is first to be discovered coronavirus which is probably endemic in all regions with intensive impact on poultry production. In this study, we used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE and two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2-DIGE, coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS, to explore the global proteome profiles of trachea and kidney tissues from chicken at different stages infected in vivo with the highly virulent ck/CH/LDL/97I P5 strain of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV and the embryo-passaged, attenuated ck/CH/LDL/97I P115 strain. Results Fifty-eight differentially expressed proteins were identified. Results demonstrated that some proteins which had functions in cytoskeleton organization, anti-oxidative stress, and stress response, showed different change patterns in abundance from chicken infected with the highly virulent ck/CH/LDL/97I P5 strain and those given the embryo-passaged, attenuated P115 stain. In addition, the dynamic transcriptional alterations of 12 selected proteins were analyzed by the real-time RT-PCR, and western blot analysis confirmed the change in abundance of heat shock proteins (HSP beta-1, annexin A2, and annexin A5. Conclusions The proteomic alterations described here may suggest that these changes to protein expression correlate with IBV virus' virulence in chicken, hence provides valuable insights into the interactions of IBV with its host and may also assist with investigations of the pathogenesis of IBV and other coronavirus infections.

  11. Quercetin improves macrophage reverse cholesterol transport in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice fed a high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yingjie; Hou, Pengbo; Li, Fahui; Liu, Qinghua; Qin, Shucun; Zhou, Guanghai; Xu, Xuelian; Si, Yanhong; Guo, Shoudong

    2017-01-14

    Quercetin, one of the most widely distributed flavonoids in plants, has been demonstrated to reduce hyperlipidaemia and atherosclerotic lesion formation. Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) plays a crucial role in exporting cholesterol from peripheral cells, which is one mechanism utilized in the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis. The aim of this study is to investigate whether quercetin reduces lipid accumulation by improving RCT in vivo. Apolipoprotein E-deficient mice fed a high-fat diet were used to investigate the effect of quercetin on RCT by an isotope tracing method, and the underlying mechanisms were clarified by molecular techniques. These novel results demonstrated that quercetin significantly improved [(3)H]-cholesterol transfer from [(3)H]-cholesterol-loaded macrophages to the plasma (approximately 34% increase), liver (30% increase), and bile (50% increase) and finally to the feces (approximately 40% increase) for excretion in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice fed a high-fat diet. Furthermore, quercetin markedly increased the cholesterol accepting ability of plasma and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and dramatically decreased the content of malondialdehyde in plasma and oxidized phosphocholine carried by HDL. Therefore, the underlying mechanisms of quercetin in improving RCT may be partially due to the elevated cholesterol accepting ability of HDL, the increased expression levels of proteins related to RCT, such as ATP-binding cassettes (ABC) A1 and G1, and the improved antioxidant activity of HDL. Quercetin accelerates RCT in an atherosclerosis model, which is helpful in clarifying the lipid-lowering effect of quercetin.

  12. Intraepithelial macrophage infiltration is related to a high number of regulatory T cells and promotes a progressive course of HPV-induced vulvar neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Esch, Edith M G; van Poelgeest, Mariette I E; Trimbos, J Baptist M Z; Fleuren, Gert Jan; Jordanova, Ekaterina S; van der Burg, Sjoerd H

    2015-02-15

    Human papilloma virus (HPV)-induced usual-type vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (uVIN) is infiltrated by myeloid cells but the type and role of these cells is unclear. We used triple immunofluorescent confocal microscopy to locate, identify and quantify myeloid cells based on their staining pattern for CD14, CD33 and CD163 in a cohort of 43 primary and 20 recurrent uVIN lesions, 21 carcinomas and 26 normal vulvar tissues. The progressive course of uVIN is characterized by an increase in both intraepithelial and stromal mature M1 and M2 macrophages. While the M2 macrophages outnumber M1 macrophages in healthy controls and uVIN, they are matched in number by M1 macrophages in cancer. Importantly, uVIN patients with a dense intraepithelial infiltration with mature CD14+ macrophages (irrespective of M1 or M2 type) displayed approximately a six times higher risk to develop a recurrence and a high number of these cells constituted an independent prognostic factor for recurrence. In addition, a dense intraepithelial CD14+ cell infiltration was associated with high numbers of intraepithelial CD4+ Tregs and low numbers of stromal CD8+TIM3+ T cells. Patients with low numbers of intraepithelial CD14+ cells and high numbers of stromal CD8+TIM3+ cells showed the best recurrence-free survival. These data clearly show the importance of the local immune response in HPV-induced vulvar neoplasia and may be of help in predicting the prognosis of patients or their response to immunotherapy.

  13. SIV Infection of Lung Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Li

    Full Text Available HIV-1 depletes CD4+ T cells in the blood, lymphatic tissues, gut and lungs. Here we investigated the relationship between depletion and infection of CD4+ T cells in the lung parenchyma. The lungs of 38 Indian rhesus macaques in early to later stages of SIVmac251 infection were examined, and the numbers of CD4+ T cells and macrophages plus the frequency of SIV RNA+ cells were quantified. We showed that SIV infected macrophages in the lung parenchyma, but only in small numbers except in the setting of interstitial inflammation where large numbers of SIV RNA+ macrophages were detected. However, even in this setting, the number of macrophages was not decreased. By contrast, there were few infected CD4+ T cells in lung parenchyma, but CD4+ T cells were nonetheless depleted by unknown mechanisms. The CD4+ T cells in lung parenchyma were depleted even though they were not productively infected, whereas SIV can infect large numbers of macrophages in the setting of interstitial inflammation without depleting them. These observations point to the need for future investigations into mechanisms of CD4+ T cell depletion at this mucosal site, and into mechanisms by which macrophage populations are maintained despite high levels of infection. The large numbers of SIV RNA+ macrophages in lungs in the setting of interstitial inflammation indicates that lung macrophages can be an important source for SIV persistent infection.

  14. IcgA is a virulence factor of Rhodococcus equi that modulates intracellular growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Coulson, Garry B; Miranda-Casoluengo, Aleksandra A; Miranda-Casoluengo, Raúl; Hondalus, Mary K; Meijer, Wim G

    2014-05-01

    Virulence of the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi depends on a 21.3-kb pathogenicity island located on a conjugative plasmid. To date, the only nonregulatory pathogenicity island-encoded virulence factor identified is the cell envelope-associated VapA protein. Although the pathogenicity islands from porcine and equine R. equi isolates have undergone major rearrangements, the virR operon (virR-icgA-vapH-orf7-virS) is highly conserved in both, suggesting these genes play an important role in pathogenicity. VirR and VirS are transcriptional regulators controlling expression of pathogenicity island genes, including vapA. Here, we show that while vapH and orf7 are dispensable for intracellular growth of R. equi, deletion of icgA, formerly known as orf5, encoding a major facilitator superfamily transport protein, elicited an enhanced growth phenotype in macrophages and a significant reduction in macrophage viability, while extracellular growth in broth remained unaffected. Transcription of virS, located downstream of icgA, and vapA was not affected by the icgA deletion during growth in broth or in macrophages, showing that the enhanced growth phenotype caused by deletion of icgA was not mediated through abnormal transcription of these genes. Transcription of icgA increased 6-fold within 2 h following infection of macrophages and remained significantly higher 48 h postinfection compared to levels at the start of the infection. The major facilitator superfamily transport protein IcgA is the first factor identified in R. equi that negatively affects intracellular replication. Aside from VapA, it is only the second pathogenicity island-encoded structural protein shown to play a direct role in intracellular growth of this pathogenic actinomycete.

  15. Impact of Leishmania metalloprotease GP63 on macrophage signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Isnard, Amandine; Shio, Marina T.; Olivier, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The intramacrophage protozoan parasites of Leishmania genus have developed sophisticated ways to subvert the innate immune response permitting their infection and propagation within the macrophages of the mammalian host. Several Leishmania virulence factors have been identified and found to be of importance for the development of leishmaniasis. However, recent findings are now further reinforcing the critical role played by the zinc-metalloprotease GP63 as a virulence factor that greatly infl...

  16. Virulence determinants of equine infectious anemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Susan L; Fuller, Frederick J

    2010-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a macrophage-tropic lentivirus that rapidly Induces disease in experimentally infected horses. Because EIAV infection and replication is centered on the monocyte/macrophage and has a pronounced acute disease stage, it is a useful model system for understanding the contribution of monocyte/macrophages to other lentivirus-induced diseases. Genetic mapping studies utilizing chimeric proviruses in which parental viruses are acutely virulent or avirulent have allowed the identification of important regions that influence acute virulence. U3 regions in the viral LTR, surface envelope (SU) protein and the accessory S2 gene strongly influence acute disease expression. While the chimeric proviruses provide insight into genes or genome regions that affect viral pathogenesis, it is then necessary to further dissect those regions to focus on specific virus-host mechanisms that lead to disease expression. The V6 region of the viral env protein is an example of one identified region that may interact with the ELR-1 receptor in an important way and we are currently identifying S2 protein motifs required for disease expression.

  17. Proteinases as virulence factors in Leishmania spp. infection in mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva-Almeida Mariana

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Leishmania parasites cause human tegumentary and visceral infections that are commonly referred to as leishmaniasis. Despite the high incidence and prevalence of cases, leishmaniasis has been a neglected disease because it mainly affects developing countries. The data obtained from the analysis of patients’ biological samples and from assays with animal models confirm the involvement of an array of the parasite’s components in its survival inside the mammalian host. These components are classified as virulence factors. In this review, we focus on studies that have explored the role of proteinases as virulence factors that promote parasite survival and immune modulation in the mammalian host. Additionally, the direct involvement of proteinases from the host in lesion evolution is analyzed. The gathered data shows that both parasite and host proteinases are involved in the clinical manifestation of leishmaniasis. It is interesting to note that although the majority of the classes of proteinases are present in Leishmania spp., only cysteine-proteinases, metalloproteinases and, to a lesser scale, serine-proteinases have been adequately studied. Members from these classes have been implicated in tissue invasion, survival in macrophages and immune modulation by parasites. This review reinforces the importance of the parasite proteinases, which are interesting candidates for new chemo or immunotherapies, in the clinical manifestations of leishmaniasis.

  18. Phagocytosis of IgG‐Coated Polystyrene Beads by Macrophages Induces and Requires High Membrane Order

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Magenau, Astrid; Benzing, Carola; Proschogo, Nicholas; Don, Anthony S; Hejazi, Leila; Karunakaran, Denuja; Jessup, Wendy; Gaus, Katharina

    2011-01-01

    ...)‐coated polystyrene particles. We found that the plasma membrane undergoes rapid actin‐independent condensation to form highly ordered phagosomal membranes, the biophysical hallmark of lipid rafts...

  19. Transcriptome analysis of rainbow trout infected with high and low virulence strains of Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Marjara, Inderjit Singh; Batts, William; Kurath, Gael; Hansen, John D.

    2010-01-01

    There are three main genetic lineages or genogroups of Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in N. America. Strains representing the M genogroup are more virulent in rainbow trout relative to the U genogroup. In this study, we used microarray analysis to evaluate potential mechanisms responsible for host-specific virulence in rainbow trout that were given intraperitoneal injections of buffer or a representative M or U type virus strain. Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) was used to assess viral load and gene expression of select immune genes. Viral load was significantly higher in trout infected with the M virus starting at 24 h post-infection (p.i.) and continuing until 72 h p.i. Microarray analysis of the 48 h time point revealed 153 up-regulated and 248 down-regulated features in response to M virus infection but only 62 up-regulated and 49 down-regulated features following U virus infection. Translation and transcription features were among the most frequent down-regulated features in response to M virus infection and may be associated with the host cell shutoff phenomenon. A greater host cell shutoff response by the M virus may facilitate subversion of the host cell transcriptional machinery and enhance viral replication, suggesting the M virus may be better optimized to manipulate the rainbow trout transcriptional and translational machinery. Anti-viral associated features were the most commonly up-regulated features. A common set of features were up-regulated in both the M and U infection groups, but were induced to a higher magnitude in the M infection group. Gene expression of the anti-viral genes Mx-1 and Vig-1 was correlated but not entirely dependent on viral load in the anterior kidney. Slower replication of the U virus may allow the host more time to induce protective anti-viral immune mechanisms.

  20. Interference competition and high temperatures reduce the virulence of fig wasps and stabilize a fig-wasp mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui-Wu; Ridley, Jo; Sun, Bao-Fa; Zheng, Qi; Dunn, Derek W; Cook, James; Shi, Lei; Zhang, Ya-Ping; Yu, Douglas W

    2009-11-12

    Fig trees are pollinated by fig wasps, which also oviposit in female flowers. The wasp larvae gall and eat developing seeds. Although fig trees benefit from allowing wasps to oviposit, because the wasp offspring disperse pollen, figs must prevent wasps from ovipositing in all flowers, or seed production would cease, and the mutualism would go extinct. In Ficus racemosa, we find that syconia ('figs') that have few foundresses (ovipositing wasps) are underexploited in the summer (few seeds, few galls, many empty ovules) and are overexploited in the winter (few seeds, many galls, few empty ovules). Conversely, syconia with many foundresses produce intermediate numbers of galls and seeds, regardless of season. We use experiments to explain these patterns, and thus, to explain how this mutualism is maintained. In the hot summer, wasps suffer short lifespans and therefore fail to oviposit in many flowers. In contrast, cooler temperatures in the winter permit longer wasp lifespans, which in turn allows most flowers to be exploited by the wasps. However, even in winter, only in syconia that happen to have few foundresses are most flowers turned into galls. In syconia with higher numbers of foundresses, interference competition reduces foundress lifespans, which reduces the proportion of flowers that are galled. We further show that syconia encourage the entry of multiple foundresses by delaying ostiole closure. Taken together, these factors allow fig trees to reduce galling in the wasp-benign winter and boost galling (and pollination) in the wasp-stressing summer. Interference competition has been shown to reduce virulence in pathogenic bacteria. Our results show that interference also maintains cooperation in a classic, cooperative symbiosis, thus linking theories of virulence and mutualism. More generally, our results reveal how frequency-dependent population regulation can occur in the fig-wasp mutualism, and how a host species can 'set the rules of the game' to ensure

  1. Interference competition and high temperatures reduce the virulence of fig wasps and stabilize a fig-wasp mutualism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Wu Wang

    Full Text Available Fig trees are pollinated by fig wasps, which also oviposit in female flowers. The wasp larvae gall and eat developing seeds. Although fig trees benefit from allowing wasps to oviposit, because the wasp offspring disperse pollen, figs must prevent wasps from ovipositing in all flowers, or seed production would cease, and the mutualism would go extinct. In Ficus racemosa, we find that syconia ('figs' that have few foundresses (ovipositing wasps are underexploited in the summer (few seeds, few galls, many empty ovules and are overexploited in the winter (few seeds, many galls, few empty ovules. Conversely, syconia with many foundresses produce intermediate numbers of galls and seeds, regardless of season. We use experiments to explain these patterns, and thus, to explain how this mutualism is maintained. In the hot summer, wasps suffer short lifespans and therefore fail to oviposit in many flowers. In contrast, cooler temperatures in the winter permit longer wasp lifespans, which in turn allows most flowers to be exploited by the wasps. However, even in winter, only in syconia that happen to have few foundresses are most flowers turned into galls. In syconia with higher numbers of foundresses, interference competition reduces foundress lifespans, which reduces the proportion of flowers that are galled. We further show that syconia encourage the entry of multiple foundresses by delaying ostiole closure. Taken together, these factors allow fig trees to reduce galling in the wasp-benign winter and boost galling (and pollination in the wasp-stressing summer. Interference competition has been shown to reduce virulence in pathogenic bacteria. Our results show that interference also maintains cooperation in a classic, cooperative symbiosis, thus linking theories of virulence and mutualism. More generally, our results reveal how frequency-dependent population regulation can occur in the fig-wasp mutualism, and how a host species can 'set the rules of the

  2. Transcriptome analysis of rainbow trout infected with high and low virulence strains of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Maureen K; Marjara, Inderjit Singh; Batts, William; Kurath, Gael; Hansen, John D

    2011-01-01

    There are three main genetic lineages or genogroups of Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in N. America. Strains representing the M genogroup are more virulent in rainbow trout relative to the U genogroup. In this study, we used microarray analysis to evaluate potential mechanisms responsible for host-specific virulence in rainbow trout that were given intraperitoneal injections of buffer or a representative M or U type virus strain. Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) was used to assess viral load and gene expression of select immune genes. Viral load was significantly higher in trout infected with the M virus starting at 24h post-infection (p.i.) and continuing until 72 h p.i. Microarray analysis of the 48 h time point revealed 153 up-regulated and 248 down-regulated features in response to M virus infection but only 62 up-regulated and 49 down-regulated features following U virus infection. Translation and transcription features were among the most frequent down-regulated features in response to M virus infection and may be associated with the host cell shutoff phenomenon. A greater host cell shutoff response by the M virus may facilitate subversion of the host cell transcriptional machinery and enhance viral replication, suggesting the M virus may be better optimized to manipulate the rainbow trout transcriptional and translational machinery. Anti-viral associated features were the most commonly up-regulated features. A common set of features were up-regulated in both the M and U infection groups, but were induced to a higher magnitude in the M infection group. Gene expression of the anti-viral genes Mx-1 and Vig-1 was correlated but not entirely dependent on viral load in the anterior kidney. Slower replication of the U virus may allow the host more time to induce protective anti-viral immune mechanisms.

  3. The application of high-content analysis in the study of targeted particulate delivery systems for intracellular drug delivery to alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlor, Ciaran; O'Sullivan, Mary P; Sivadas, Neera; O'Leary, Seonadh; Gallagher, Paul J; Keane, Joseph; Cryan, Sally-Ann

    2011-08-01

    With an ever increasing number of particulate drug delivery systems being developed for the intracellular delivery of therapeutics a robust high-throughput method for studying particle-cell interactions is urgently required. Current methods used for analyzing particle-cell interaction include spectrofluorimetry, flow cytometry, and fluorescence/confocal microscopy, but these methods are not high throughput and provide only limited data on the specific number of particles delivered intracellularly to the target cell. The work herein presents an automated high-throughput method to analyze microparticulate drug delivery system (DDS) uptake byalveolar macrophages. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles were prepared in a range of sizes using a solvent evaporation method. A human monocyte cell line (THP-1) was differentiated into macrophage like cells using phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and cells were treated with microparticles for 1 h and studied using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), spectrofluorimetry and a high-content analysis (HCA). PLGA microparticles within the size range of 0.8-2.1 μm were found to be optimal for macrophage targeting (p quantitative data on the influence of carrier design on cell targeting that can be gathered in a high-throughput format and therefore has great potential in the screening of intracellularly targeted DDS.

  4. Comparative Genomic Characterization of the Highly Persistent and Potentially Virulent Cronobacter sakazakii ST83, CC65 Strain H322 and Other ST83 Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah R. Chase

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cronobacter (C. sakazakii is an opportunistic pathogen and has been associated with serious infections with high mortality rates predominantly in pre-term, low-birth weight and/or immune compromised neonates and infants. Infections have been epidemiologically linked to consumption of intrinsically and extrinsically contaminated lots of reconstituted powdered infant formula (PIF, thus contamination of such products is a challenging task for the PIF producing industry. We present the draft genome of C. sakazakii H322, a highly persistent sequence type (ST 83, clonal complex (CC 65, serotype O:7 strain obtained from a batch of non-released contaminated PIF product. The presence of this strain in the production environment was traced back more than 4 years. Whole genome sequencing (WGS of this strain together with four more ST83 strains (PIF production environment-associated confirmed a high degree of sequence homology among four of the five strains. Phylogenetic analysis using microarray (MA and WGS data showed that the ST83 strains were highly phylogenetically related and MA showed that between 5 and 38 genes differed from one another in these strains. All strains possessed the pESA3-like virulence plasmid and one strain possessed a pESA2-like plasmid. In addition, a pCS1-like plasmid was also found. In order to assess the potential in vivo pathogenicity of the ST83 strains, each strain was subjected to infection studies using the recently developed zebrafish embryo model. Our results showed a high (90–100% zebrafish mortality rate for all of these strains, suggesting a high risk for infections and illness in neonates potentially exposed to PIF contaminated with ST83 C. sakazakii strains. In summary, virulent ST83, CC65, serotype CsakO:7 strains, though rarely found intrinsically in PIF, can persist within a PIF manufacturing facility for years and potentially pose significant quality assurance challenges to the PIF manufacturing industry.

  5. Structure of the virulence-associated protein VapD from the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittingham, Jean L.; Blagova, Elena V. [University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Finn, Ciaran E.; Luo, Haixia; Miranda-CasoLuengo, Raúl [University College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Turkenburg, Johan P.; Leech, Andrew P.; Walton, Paul H. [University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Murzin, Alexey G. [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Francis Crick Avenue, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom); Meijer, Wim G. [University College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Wilkinson, Anthony J., E-mail: tony.wilkinson@york.ac.uk [University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-01

    VapD is one of a set of highly homologous virulence-associated proteins from the multi-host pathogen Rhodococcus equi. The crystal structure reveals an eight-stranded β-barrel with a novel fold and a glycine rich ‘bald’ surface. Rhodococcus equi is a multi-host pathogen that infects a range of animals as well as immune-compromised humans. Equine and porcine isolates harbour a virulence plasmid encoding a homologous family of virulence-associated proteins associated with the capacity of R. equi to divert the normal processes of endosomal maturation, enabling bacterial survival and proliferation in alveolar macrophages. To provide a basis for probing the function of the Vap proteins in virulence, the crystal structure of VapD was determined. VapD is a monomer as determined by multi-angle laser light scattering. The structure reveals an elliptical, compact eight-stranded β-barrel with a novel strand topology and pseudo-twofold symmetry, suggesting evolution from an ancestral dimer. Surface-associated octyl-β-d-glucoside molecules may provide clues to function. Circular-dichroism spectroscopic analysis suggests that the β-barrel structure is preceded by a natively disordered region at the N-terminus. Sequence comparisons indicate that the core folds of the other plasmid-encoded virulence-associated proteins from R. equi strains are similar to that of VapD. It is further shown that sequences encoding putative R. equi Vap-like proteins occur in diverse bacterial species. Finally, the functional implications of the structure are discussed in the light of the unique structural features of VapD and its partial structural similarity to other β-barrel proteins.

  6. Quantitative GPCR and ion channel transcriptomics in primary alveolar macrophages and macrophage surrogates

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    Groot-Kormelink Paul J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alveolar macrophages are one of the first lines of defence against invading pathogens and play a central role in modulating both the innate and acquired immune systems. By responding to endogenous stimuli within the lung, alveolar macrophages contribute towards the regulation of the local inflammatory microenvironment, the initiation of wound healing and the pathogenesis of viral and bacterial infections. Despite the availability of protocols for isolating primary alveolar macrophages from the lung these cells remain recalcitrant to expansion in-vitro and therefore surrogate cell types, such as monocyte derived macrophages and phorbol ester-differentiated cell lines (e.g. U937, THP-1, HL60 are frequently used to model macrophage function. Methods The availability of high throughput gene expression technologies for accurate quantification of transcript levels enables the re-evaluation of these surrogate cell types for use as cellular models of the alveolar macrophage. Utilising high-throughput TaqMan arrays and focussing on dynamically regulated families of integral membrane proteins, we explore the similarities and differences in G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR and ion channel expression in alveolar macrophages and their widely used surrogates. Results The complete non-sensory GPCR and ion channel transcriptome is described for primary alveolar macrophages and macrophage surrogates. The expression of numerous GPCRs and ion channels whose expression were hitherto not described in human alveolar macrophages are compared across primary macrophages and commonly used macrophage cell models. Several membrane proteins known to have critical roles in regulating macrophage function, including CXCR6, CCR8 and TRPV4, were found to be highly expressed in macrophages but not expressed in PMA-differentiated surrogates. Conclusions The data described in this report provides insight into the appropriate choice of cell models for

  7. Kupffer cells ameliorate hepatic insulin resistance induced by high-fat diet rich in monounsaturated fatty acids: the evidence for the involvement of alternatively activated macrophages

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    Papackova Zuzana

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Resident macrophages (Kupffer cells, KCs in the liver can undergo both pro- or anti-inflammatory activation pathway and exert either beneficiary or detrimental effects on liver metabolism. Until now, their role in the metabolically dysfunctional state of steatosis remains enigmatic. Aim of our study was to characterize the role of KCs in relation to the onset of hepatic insulin resistance induced by a high-fat (HF diet rich in monounsaturated fatty acids. Methods Male Wistar rats were fed either standard (SD or high-fat (HF diet for 4 weeks. Half of the animals were subjected to the acute GdCl3 treatment 24 and 72 hrs prior to the end of the experiment in order to induce the reduction of KCs population. We determined the effect of HF diet on activation status of liver macrophages and on the changes in hepatic insulin sensitivity and triacylglycerol metabolism imposed by acute KCs depletion by GdCl3. Results We found that a HF diet rich in MUFA itself triggers an alternative but not the classical activation program in KCs. In a steatotic, but not in normal liver, a reduction of the KCs population was associated with a decrease of alternative activation and with a shift towards the expression of pro-inflammatory activation markers, with the increased autophagy, elevated lysosomal lipolysis, increased formation of DAG, PKCε activation and marked exacerbation of HF diet-induced hepatic insulin resistance. Conclusions We propose that in the presence of a high MUFA content the population of alternatively activated resident liver macrophages may mediate beneficial effects on liver insulin sensitivity and alleviate the metabolic disturbances imposed by HF diet feeding and steatosis. Our data indicate that macrophage polarization towards an alternative state might be a useful strategy for treating type 2 diabetes.

  8. The sensor kinase MprB is required for Rhodococcus equi virulence.

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    MacArthur, Iain; Parreira, Valeria R; Lepp, Dion; Mutharia, Lucy M; Vazquez-Boland, José A; Prescott, John F

    2011-01-10

    Rhodococcus equi is a soil bacterium and, like Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a member of the mycolata. Through possession of a virulence plasmid, it has the ability to infect the alveolar macrophages of foals, resulting in pyogranulomatous bronchopneumonia. The virulence plasmid has an orphan two-component system (TCS) regulatory gene, orf8, mutation of which completely attenuates virulence. This study attempted to find the cognate sensor kinase (SK) of orf8. Annotation of the R. equi strain 103 genome identified 23 TCSs encoded on the chromosome, which were used in a DNA microarray to compare TCS gene transcription in murine macrophage-like cells to growth in vitro. This identified six SKs as significantly up-regulated during growth in macrophages. Mutants of these SKs were constructed and their ability to persist in macrophages was determined with one SK, MprB, found to be required for intracellular survival. The attenuation of the mprB- mutant, and its complementation, was confirmed in a mouse virulence assay. In silico analysis of the R. equi genome sequence identified an MprA binding box motif homologous to that of M. tuberculosis, on mprA, pepD, sigB and sigE. The results of this study also show that R. equi responds to the macrophage environment differently from M. tuberculosis. MprB is the first SK identified as required for R. equi virulence and intracellular survival. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Drosophila pupal macrophages--a versatile tool for combined ex vivo and in vivo imaging of actin dynamics at high resolution.

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    Sander, Moritz; Squarr, Anna Julia; Risse, Benjamin; Jiang, Xiaoyi; Bogdan, Sven

    2013-01-01

    Molecular understanding of actin dynamics requires a genetically traceable model system that allows live cell imaging together with high-resolution microscopy techniques. Here, we used Drosophila pupal macrophages that combine many advantages of cultured cells with a genetic in vivo model system. Using structured illumination microscopy together with advanced spinning disk confocal microscopy we show that these cells provide a powerful system for single gene analysis. It allows forward genetic screens to characterize the regulatory network controlling cell shape and directed cell migration in a physiological context. We knocked down components regulating lamellipodia formation, including WAVE, single subunits of Arp2/3 complex and CPA, one of the two capping protein subunits and demonstrate the advantages of this model system by imaging mutant macrophages ex vivo as well as in vivo upon laser-induced wounding.

  10. Listeria monocytogenes isolated from food samples from a Romanian black market show distinct virulence profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciolacu, Luminita; Nicolau, Anca Ioana; Wagner, Martin; Rychli, Kathrin

    2015-09-16

    Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular foodborne pathogen responsible for listeriosis. In a recent study, in which we investigated neglected exogenous routes of transmission of foodborne pathogens into the European Union, we have isolated 15 L. monocytogenes strains in food products, which were imported from the Republic of Moldavia to Romania and illegally sold at a local market. The aim of this study was to characterize the subtype and virulence potential of these 15 L. monocytogenes strains. Multilocus sequence typing revealed that these L. monocytogenes strains belong to six different sequence types (ST2, ST8, ST9, ST20, ST121 and ST155). In addition, in vitro virulence assays using human intestinal epithelial Caco2 and macrophage-like THP1 cells showed a high strain variability regarding the invasion efficiency in Caco2 cells (0.98-2.78%) and the intracellular growth rate in both cell types. Both ST121 strains and the ST9 isolate were unable to invade Caco2 cells, and all ST155 strains showed no proliferation inside macrophages and revealed low cytotoxicity. Furthermore we performed sequence analysis of three main virulence factors: PrfA, internalin A (InlA) and listeriolysin O (LLO). The Romanian food isolates showed a high diversity in the InlA and LLO amino acid sequences, whereas the amino acid sequence of PrfA of all strains was identical. Overall, the amino acid sequences of PrfA, InlA and LLO were identical for strains belonging to the same ST. We detected in total 30 different amino acid substitutions, resulting in seven different InlA variants, two of which have not yet been described. The three strains, which were unable to invade Caco2 cells, harboured a premature stop codon resulting in truncated InlA. Furthermore, we detected four different amino acid substitutions in the LLO sequence, which are present in four variants. The number of LLO mutations correlates negatively with intracellular growth in Caco2 and THP1 cells and

  11. Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Type 2 Impairs Macrophage Responsiveness to Toll-Like Receptor Ligation with the Exception of Toll-Like Receptor 7.

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    Robert G Schaut

    Full Text Available Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV is a member of the Flaviviridae family. BVDV isolates are classified into two biotypes based on the development of cytopathic (cp or non-cytopathic (ncp effects in epithelial cell culture. BVDV isolates are further separated into species, BVDV1 and 2, based on genetic differences. Symptoms of BVDV infection range from subclinical to severe, depending on strain virulence, and may involve multiple organ systems and induction of a generalized immunosuppression. During BVDV-induced immune suppression, macrophages, critical to innate immunity, may have altered pathogen recognition receptor (PRR signaling, including signaling through toll-like receptors (TLRs. Comparison of BVDV 2 strains with different biotypes and virulence levels is valuable to determining if there are differences in host macrophage cellular responses between viral phenotypes. The current study demonstrates that cytopathic (cp, noncytopathic (ncp, high (hv or low virulence (lv BVDV2 infection of bovine monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMΦ result in differential expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines compared to uninfected MDMΦ. A hallmark of cp BVDV2 infection is IL-6 production. In response to TLR2 or 4 ligation, as might be observed during secondary bacterial infection, cytokine secretion was markedly decreased in BVDV2-infected MDMΦ, compared to non-infected MDMΦ. Macrophages were hyporesponsive to viral TLR3 or TLR8 ligation. However, TLR7 stimulation of BVDV2-infected MDMΦ induced cytokine secretion, unlike results observed for other TLRs. Together, these data suggest that BVDV2 infection modulated mRNA responses and induced a suppression of proinflammatory cytokine protein responses to TLR ligation in MDMΦ with the exception of TLR7 ligation. It is likely that there are distinct differences in TLR pathways modulated following BVDV2 infection, which have implications for macrophage responses to secondary infections.

  12. Identification and Characterization of msf, a Novel Virulence Factor in Haemophilus influenzae.

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    Kress-Bennett, Jennifer M; Hiller, N Luisa; Eutsey, Rory A; Powell, Evan; Longwell, Mark J; Hillman, Todd; Blackwell, Tenisha; Byers, Barbara; Mell, Joshua C; Post, J Christopher; Hu, Fen Z; Ehrlich, Garth D; Janto, Benjamin A

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is an opportunistic pathogen. The emergence of virulent, non-typeable strains (NTHi) emphasizes the importance of developing new interventional targets. We screened the NTHi supragenome for genes encoding surface-exposed proteins suggestive of immune evasion, identifying a large family containing Sel1-like repeats (SLRs). Clustering identified ten SLR-containing gene subfamilies, each with various numbers of SLRs per gene. Individual strains also had varying numbers of SLR-containing genes from one or more of the subfamilies. Statistical genetic analyses of gene possession among 210 NTHi strains typed as either disease or carriage found a significant association between possession of the SlrVA subfamily (which we have termed, macrophage survival factor, msf) and the disease isolates. The PittII strain contains four chromosomally contiguous msf genes. Deleting all four of these genes (msfA1-4) (KO) resulted in a highly significant decrease in phagocytosis and survival in macrophages; which was fully complemented by a single copy of the msfA1 gene. Using the chinchilla model of otitis media and invasive disease, the KO strain displayed a significant decrease in fitness compared to the WT in co-infections; and in single infections, the KO lost its ability to invade the brain. The singly complemented strain showed only a partial ability to compete with the WT suggesting gene dosage is important in vivo. The transcriptional profiles of the KO and WT in planktonic growth were compared using the NTHi supragenome array, which revealed highly significant changes in the expression of operons involved in virulence and anaerobiosis. These findings demonstrate that the msfA1-4 genes are virulence factors for phagocytosis, persistence, and trafficking to non-mucosal sites.

  13. The Highly Conserved Bacterial RNase YbeY Is Essential in Vibrio cholerae, Playing a Critical Role in Virulence, Stress Regulation, and RNA Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercruysse, Maarten; Köhrer, Caroline; Davies, Bryan W.; Arnold, Markus F. F.; Mekalanos, John J.; RajBhandary, Uttam L.; Walker, Graham C.

    2014-01-01

    YbeY, a highly conserved protein, is an RNase in E. coli and plays key roles in both processing of the critical 3′ end of 16 S rRNA and in 70 S ribosome quality control under stress. These central roles account for YbeY's inclusion in the postulated minimal bacterial genome. However, YbeY is not essential in E. coli although loss of ybeY severely sensitizes it to multiple physiological stresses. Here, we show that YbeY is an essential endoribonuclease in Vibrio cholerae and is crucial for virulence, stress regulation, RNA processing and ribosome quality control, and is part of a core set of RNases essential in most representative pathogens. To understand its function, we analyzed the rRNA and ribosome profiles of a V. cholerae strain partially depleted for YbeY and other RNase mutants associated with 16 S rRNA processing; our results demonstrate that YbeY is also crucial for 16 S rRNA 3′ end maturation in V. cholerae and that its depletion impedes subunit assembly into 70 S ribosomes. YbeY's importance to V. cholerae pathogenesis was demonstrated by the complete loss of mice colonization and biofilm formation, reduced cholera toxin production, and altered expression levels of virulence-associated small RNAs of a V. cholerae strain partially depleted for YbeY. Notably, the ybeY genes of several distantly related pathogens can fully complement an E. coli ΔybeY strain under various stress conditions, demonstrating the high conservation of YbeY's activity in stress regulation. Taken together, this work provides the first comprehensive exploration of YbeY's physiological role in a human pathogen, showing its conserved function across species in essential cellular processes. PMID:24901994

  14. The highly conserved bacterial RNase YbeY is essential in Vibrio cholerae, playing a critical role in virulence, stress regulation, and RNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercruysse, Maarten; Köhrer, Caroline; Davies, Bryan W; Arnold, Markus F F; Mekalanos, John J; RajBhandary, Uttam L; Walker, Graham C

    2014-06-01

    YbeY, a highly conserved protein, is an RNase in E. coli and plays key roles in both processing of the critical 3' end of 16 S rRNA and in 70 S ribosome quality control under stress. These central roles account for YbeY's inclusion in the postulated minimal bacterial genome. However, YbeY is not essential in E. coli although loss of ybeY severely sensitizes it to multiple physiological stresses. Here, we show that YbeY is an essential endoribonuclease in Vibrio cholerae and is crucial for virulence, stress regulation, RNA processing and ribosome quality control, and is part of a core set of RNases essential in most representative pathogens. To understand its function, we analyzed the rRNA and ribosome profiles of a V. cholerae strain partially depleted for YbeY and other RNase mutants associated with 16 S rRNA processing; our results demonstrate that YbeY is also crucial for 16 S rRNA 3' end maturation in V. cholerae and that its depletion impedes subunit assembly into 70 S ribosomes. YbeY's importance to V. cholerae pathogenesis was demonstrated by the complete loss of mice colonization and biofilm formation, reduced cholera toxin production, and altered expression levels of virulence-associated small RNAs of a V. cholerae strain partially depleted for YbeY. Notably, the ybeY genes of several distantly related pathogens can fully complement an E. coli ΔybeY strain under various stress conditions, demonstrating the high conservation of YbeY's activity in stress regulation. Taken together, this work provides the first comprehensive exploration of YbeY's physiological role in a human pathogen, showing its conserved function across species in essential cellular processes.

  15. Virulence characterisation of Salmonella enterica isolates of differing antimicrobial resistance recovered from UK livestock and imported meat samples.

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    Roderick eCard

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is a foodborne zoonotic pathogen of significant public health concern. We have characterised the virulence and antimicrobial resistance gene content of 95 Salmonella isolates from 11 serovars by DNA microarray recovered from UK livestock or imported meat. Genes encoding resistance to sulphonamides (sul1, sul2, tetracycline (tet(A, tet(B, streptomycin (strA, strB, aminoglycoside (aadA1, aadA2, beta-lactam (blaTEM, and trimethoprim (dfrA17 were common. Virulence gene content differed between serovars; S. Typhimurium formed two subclades based on virulence plasmid presence. Thirteen isolates were selected by their virulence profile for pathotyping using the Galleria mellonella pathogenesis model. Infection with a chicken invasive S. Enteritidis or S. Gallinarum isolate, a multidrug resistant S. Kentucky, or a S. Typhimurium DT104 isolate resulted in high mortality of the larvae; notably presence of the virulence plasmid in S. Typhimurium was not associated with increased larvae mortality. Histopathological examination showed that infection caused severe damage to the Galleria gut structure. Enumeration of intracellular bacteria in the larvae 24 hours post-infection showed increases of up to 7 log above the initial inoculum and transmission electron microscopy (TEM showed bacterial replication in the haemolymph. TEM also revealed the presence of vacuoles containing bacteria in the haemocytes, similar to Salmonella containing vacuoles observed in mammalian macrophages; although there was no evidence from our work of bacterial replication within vacuoles. This work shows that microarrays can be used for rapid virulence genotyping of S. enterica and that the Galleria animal model replicates some aspects of Salmonella infection in mammals. These procedures can be used to help inform on the pathogenicity of isolates that may be antibiotic resistant and have scope to aid the assessment of their potential public and animal health risk.

  16. Cytotoxic mechanism of cytolethal distending toxin in nontyphoidal Salmonella serovar (Salmonella Javiana) during macrophage infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Katherine; Gokulan, Kuppan; Shelman, Diamond; Akiyama, Tatsuya; Khan, Ashraf; Khare, Sangeeta

    2015-02-01

    Cytolethal distending toxin B (cdtB) is a conserved virulence factor in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. Here we report the presence and functionality of cdtB in some nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars, including Salmonella Javiana (cdtB+wt S. Javiana), isolated from imported food. To understand the role of cdtB in NTS serovars, a deletion mutant (cdtB(-)ΔS. Javiana) was constructed. Macrophages were infected with cdtB+wt S. Javiana (wild type), cdtB(-)Δ S. Javiana (mutant), and cdtB-negative NTS serovar (S. Typhimurium). Cytotoxic activity and transcription level of genes involved in cell death (apoptosis, autophagy, and necrosis) were assessed in infected macrophages. The cdtB+wt S. Javiana caused cellular distension as well as high degree of vacuolization and presence of the autophagosome marker LC3 in infected macrophages as compared with cdtB(-)ΔS. Javiana. The mRNA expression of genes involved in the induction of autophagy in response to toxin (Esr1 and Pik3C3) and coregulators of autophagy and apoptosis (Bax and Cyld) were significantly upregulated in cdtB(+)wt S. Javiana-infected macrophages. As autophagy destroys internalized pathogens in addition to the infected cell, it may reduce the spread of infection.

  17. Kin selection and the evolution of virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckling, A; Brockhurst, M A

    2008-05-01

    Social interactions between conspecific parasites are partly dependent on the relatedness of interacting parasites (kin selection), which, in turn, is predicted to affect the extent of damage they cause their hosts (virulence). High relatedness is generally assumed to favour less competitive interactions, but the relationship between relatedness and virulence is crucially dependent on the social behaviour in question. Here, we discuss the rather limited body of experimental work that addresses how kin-selected social behaviours affect virulence. First, if prudent use of host resources (a form of cooperation) maximizes the transmission success of the parasite population, decreased relatedness is predicted to result in increased host exploitation and virulence. Experimental support for this well-established theoretical result is surprisingly limited. Second, if parasite within-host growth rate is a positive function of cooperation (that is, when individuals need to donate public goods, such as extracellular enzymes), virulence is predicted to increase with increasing relatedness. The limited studies testing this hypothesis are broadly consistent with this prediction. Finally, there is some empirical evidence supporting theory that suggests that spiteful behaviours are maximized at intermediate degrees of relatedness, which, in turn, leads to minimal virulence because of the reduced growth rate of the infecting population. We highlight the need for further thorough experimentation on the role of kin selection in the evolution of virulence and identify additional biological complexities to these simple frameworks.

  18. Plasmid required for virulence of Agrobacterium tumefaciens

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    Watson, B.; Currier, T.C.; Gordon, M.P.; Chilton, M.D.; Nester, E.W.

    1975-07-01

    The irreversible loss of crown gall-inducing ability of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain C-58 during growth at 37/sup 0/C is shown to be due to loss of a large plasmid (1.2 x 10/sup 8/ daltons). The gene responsible for this high rate of plasmid loss at elevated temperatures seems to be located on the plasmid. In addition, another spontaneous avirulent variant, A. tumefaciens strain IIBNV6, is shown to lack the virulence plasmid which its virulent sibling strain, IIBV7, possesses. Deoxyribonucleic acid reassociation measurements prove that the plasmid is eliminated, not integrated into the chromosome, in both of the avirulent derivatives. Transfer of virulence from donor strain C-58 to avirulent recipient strain A136 results from the transfer of a plasmid, which appears identical to the donor plasmid by deoxyribonucleic acid reassociation measurements. The transfer of virulence in another cross, K27 x A136, was also shown to result from the transfer of a large plasmid. These findings establish unequivocally that the large plasmid determines virulence. Two additional genetic determinants have been located on the virulence plasmid of A. tumefaciens strain C-58: the ability to utilize nopaline and sensitivity to a bacteriocin produced by strain 84. The latter trait can be exploited for selection of avirulent plasmid-free derivatives of strain C-58. The trait of nopaline utilization appears to be on the virulence plasmid also in strains IIBV7 and K27.

  19. Surface modification of biomaterials based on high-molecular polylactic acid and their effect on inflammatory reactions of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages: perspective for personalized therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankevich, Ksenia S; Gudima, Alexandru; Filimonov, Victor D; Klüter, Harald; Mamontova, Evgeniya M; Tverdokhlebov, Sergei I; Kzhyshkowska, Julia

    2015-06-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA) based implants can cause inflammatory complications. Macrophages are key innate immune cells that control inflammation. To provide higher biocompatibility of PLA-based implants with local innate immune cells their surface properties have to be improved. In our study surface modification technique for high-molecular PLA (MW=1,646,600g/mol) based biomaterials was originally developed and successfully applied. Optimal modification conditions were determined. Treatment of PLA films with toluene/ethanol=3/7 mixture for 10min with subsequent exposure in 0.001M brilliant green dye (BGD) solution allows to entrap approximately 10(-9)mol/cm(2) model biomolecules. The modified PLA film surface was characterized by optical microscopy, SERS, FT-IR, UV and TG/DTA/DSC analysis. Tensile strain of modified films was determined as well. The effect of PLA films modified with BGD on the inflammatory reactions of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages was investigated. We developed in vitro test-system by differentiating primary monocyte-derived macrophages on a coating material. Type 1 and type 2 inflammatory cytokines (TNFα, CCL18) secretion and histological biomarkers (CD206, stabilin-1) expression were analyzed by ELISA and confocal microscopy respectively. BGD-modified materials have improved thermal stability and good mechanical properties. However, BGD modifications induced additional donor-specific inflammatory reactions and suppressed tolerogenic phenotype of macrophages. Therefore, our test-system successfully demonstrated specific immunomodulatory effects of original and modified PLA-based biomaterials, and can be further applied for the examination of improved coatings for implants and identification of patient-specific reactions to implants.

  20. Amoeba provide insight into the origin of virulence in pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadevall, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    Why are some fungi pathogenic while the majority poses no threat to humans or other hosts? Of the more than 1.5 million fungal species only about 150-300 are pathogenic for humans, and of these, only 10-15 are relatively common pathogens. In contrast, fungi are major pathogens for plants and insects. These facts pose several fundamental questions including the mechanisms responsible for the origin of virulence among the few pathogenic species and the high resistance of mammals to fungal diseases. This essay explores the origin of virulences among environmental fungi with no obvious requirement for animal association and proposes that selection pressures by amoeboid predators led to the emergence of traits that can also promote survival in mammalian hosts. In this regard, analysis of the interactions between the human pathogenic funges Cryptococcus neoformans and amoeba have shown a remarkable similarity with the interaction of this fungus with macrophages. Hence the virulence of environmental pathogenic fungi is proposed to originate from a combination of selection by amoeboid predators and perhaps other soil organism with thermal tolerance sufficient to allow survival in mammalian hosts.

  1. Bioassay and Scanning Electron Microscopic Observations Reveal High Virulence of Entomopathogenic Fungus, Beauveria bassiana, on the Onion Maggot (Diptera: Anthomyiidae) Adults.

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    Zhang, Hui; Wu, Shengyong; Xing, Zhenlong; Wang, Xiaoqing; Lei, Zhongren

    2016-12-01

    When flies were dipped in 1 × 10(8) conidia/ml conidia suspensions and then kept in the incubator (22 ± 1 °C, 70 ± 5% RH), scanning electron microscope observations revealed that, at 2 h, the majority of adhering Beauveria bassiana conidia were attached to either the wing surface or the interstitial area between the macrochaetae on the thorax and abdomen of the onion maggot adults. Germ tubes were being produced and had oriented toward the cuticle by 18 h. Penetration of the insect cuticle had occurred by 36 h, and by 48 h, germ tubes had completely penetrated the cuticle. Fungal mycelia had emerged from the insect body and were proliferating after 72 h. The superficial area and structure of the wings and macrochaetae may facilitate the attachment of conidia and enable effective penetration. The susceptibility of adults to 12 isolates, at a concentration of 1 × 10(7) conidia/ml, was tested in laboratory experiments. Eight of the more potent strains caused in excess of 85% adult mortality 8 d post inoculation, while the median lethal time (LT50) of these strains was <6 d. The virulence of the more effective strains was further tested, and the median lethal concentrations (LC50) were calculated by exposing adults to doses ranging from 10(3)-10(7) conidia/ml. The lowest LC50 value, found in the isolate XJWLMQ-32, for the adults was 3.87 × 10(3) conidia/ml. These results demonstrate that some B. bassiana strains are highly virulent to onion maggot adults and should be considered as potential biocontrol agents against the adult flies.

  2. Highly virulent Beauveria bassiana strains against the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, show no pathogenicity against five phytoseiid mite species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shengyong; Xie, Haicui; Li, Maoye; Xu, Xuenong; Lei, Zhongren

    2016-12-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi and predatory mites can independently contribute to suppressing the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch. It is important to assess the risk of possible fungal infections in predators when a combination of them are being considered as a tandem control strategy for suppressing T. urticae. The first part of this study tested 12 Beauveria bassiana isolates for virulence in T. urticae. Strains SCWJ-2, SDDZ-9, LNSZ-26, GZGY-1-3 and WLMQ-32 were found to be the most potent, causing 37.6-49.5% adult corrected mortality at a concentration of 1 × 10(7) m/L conidia 4 days post-treatment. The second part evaluated the pathogenicity of these five strains in five species of predatory phytoseiid mites. The bioassay results indicated that all adult predatory mite mortalities ranged from 7.5 to 9.1% 4 days post-treatment. No viable fungal hyphae were found on predator cadavers. Observations with scanning electron microscopy revealed that conidia were attached to the cuticle of predatory mites within 2-12 h after spraying with strain LNSZ-26, and had germinated within 24-36 h. After 48 h, conidia had gradually been shed from the mites, after none of the conidia had penetrated the cuticular surfaces. In contrast, the germinated conidia successfully penetrated the cuticle of T. urticae, and within 60 h the fungus colonized the mite's body. Our study demonstrated that although several B. bassiana strains displayed a high virulence in T. urticae there was no evident pathogenicity to phytoseiid mites. These findings support the potential use of entomopathogenic fungus in combination with predatory mites in T. urticae control programs.

  3. Plasma Levels of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor and d-Dopachrome Tautomerase Show a Highly Specific Profile in Early Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Thierry; Schlapbach, Luregn J.; Schneider, Anina; Weier, Manuela; Wellmann, Sven; Marquis, Patrick; Vermijlen, David; Sweep, Fred C. G. J.; Leng, Lin; Bucala, Richard; Calandra, Thierry; Giannoni, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a pleiotropic, constitutively expressed, pro-inflammatory cytokine and an important regulator of immune responses. d-dopachrome tautomerase (DDT), a newly described member of the MIF protein superfamily, shares sequence homology and biological activities with MIF. We recently reported that high expression levels of MIF sustain innate immune responses in newborns. Here, we elected to further characterize age-dependent MIF expression and to define whether DDT shares a similar expression profile with MIF. Therefore, we delineated the circulating concentrations of MIF and DDT throughout life using a large cohort of 307 subjects including fetuses, newborns, infants, children, and adults. Compared to levels measured in healthy adults (median: 5.7 ng/ml for MIF and 16.8 ng/ml for DDT), MIF and DDT plasma concentrations were higher in fetuses (median: 48.9 and 29.6 ng/ml), increased further at birth (median: 82.6 and 52.0 ng/ml), reached strikingly elevated levels on postnatal day 4 (median: 109.5 and 121.6 ng/ml), and decreased to adult levels during the first months of life. A strong correlation was observed between MIF and DDT concentrations in all age groups (R = 0.91, P < 0.0001). MIF and DDT levels correlated with concentrations of vascular endothelial growth factor, a protein upregulated under low oxygen tension and implicated in vascular and lung development (R = 0.70, P < 0.0001 for MIF and R = 0.65, P < 0.0001 for DDT). In very preterm infants, lower levels of MIF and DDT on postnatal day 6 were associated with an increased risk of developing bronchopulmonary dysplasia and late-onset neonatal sepsis. Thus, MIF and DDT plasma levels show a highly specific developmental profile in early life, supporting an important role for these cytokines during the neonatal period. PMID:28179905

  4. Evolution of virulence when transmission occurs before disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osnas, Erik E; Dobson, Andrew P

    2010-08-23

    Most models of virulence evolution assume that transmission and virulence are constant during an infection. In many viral (HIV and influenza), bacterial (TB) and prion (BSE and CWD) systems, disease-induced mortality occurs long after the host becomes infectious. Therefore, we constructed a model with two infected classes that differ in transmission rate and virulence in order to understand how the evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) depends on the relative difference in transmission and virulence between classes, on the transition rate between classes and on the recovery rate from the second class. We find that ESS virulence decreases when expressed early in the infection or when transmission occurs late in an infection. When virulence occurred relatively equally in each class and there was disease recovery, ESS virulence increased with increased transition rate. In contrast, ESS virulence first increased and then decreased with transition rate when there was little virulence early in the infection and a rapid recovery rate. This model predicts that ESS virulence is highly dependent on the timing of transmission and pathology after infection; thus, pathogen evolution may either increase or decrease virulence after emergence in a new host.

  5. Gamma-tocotrienol attenuates high-fat diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance by inhibiting adipose inflammation and M1 macrophage recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L; Kang, I; Fang, X; Wang, W; Lee, M A; Hollins, R R; Marshall, M R; Chung, S

    2015-03-01

    We have previously demonstrated that gamma tocotrienol (γT3) potently inhibits adipocyte hyperplasia in human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs). In this study, our objective was to investigate the γT3 effects on early-onset obesity, inflammation and insulin resistance in vivo. Young C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat (HF) diet supplemented with 0.05% γT3 for 4 weeks. The concentrations of γT3 in plasma and adipose tissue were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. Effects of γT3 on body weight gain, adipose volume, plasma levels of fasting glucose, insulin (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)), proinflammatory cytokines (mouse cytokine array), insulin signaling (western blotting) and gene expression (quantitative real-time PCR, qPCR) in the liver and adipose tissue were examined. Influences of γT3 on [3H]-2-deoxyglucose uptake and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated NFκB signaling (western blotting) were assessed in hASCs. Effects of γT3 on macrophage M1/M2 activation were investigated using qPCR in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages. After a 4-week treatment, γT3 accumulated in adipose tissue and reduced HF diet-induced weight gain in epididymal fat, mesenteric fat and the liver. Compared with HF diet-fed mice, HF+γT3-fed mice were associated with (1) decreased plasma levels of fasting glucose, insulin and proinflammatory cytokines, (2) improved glucose tolerance and (3) enhanced insulin signaling in adipose tissue. There were substantial decreases in macrophage specific markers, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, indicating that γT3 reduced the recruitment of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs). In addition, γT3 treatment in human adipocytes resulted in (1) activation of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and (2) a significant suppression of MAP kinase and NFκB activation. In parallel, γT3 treatment led to a reduction of LPS-mediated M1 macrophage polarization. Our results demonstrated that γT3 ameliorates HF diet

  6. A novel CD14(high) CD16(high) subset of peritoneal macrophages from cirrhotic patients is associated to an increased response to LPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Alcaraz, Antonio José; Tapia-Abellán, Ana; Fernández-Fernández, María Dolores; Tristán-Manzano, María; Hernández-Caselles, Trinidad; Sánchez-Velasco, Eduardo; Miras-López, Manuel; Martínez-Esparza, María; García-Peñarrubia, Pilar

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize monocyte-derived macrophages (M-DM) from blood and ascites of cirrhotic patients comparatively with those obtained from blood of healthy controls. The phenotypic profile based on CD14/CD16 expression was analyzed by flow cytometry. Cells were isolated and stimulated in vitro with LPS and heat killed Candida albicans. Phosphorylation of ERK, c-Jun, p38 MAPK, and PKB/Akt was analyzed by Western blotting. A novel CD14(high)CD16(high) M-DM subpopulation is present in ascites (∼33%). The CD14(++)CD16(+) intermediate subset is increased in the blood of cirrhotic patients (∼from 4% to 11%) and is predominant in ascites (49%), while the classical CD14(++)CD16(-) subpopulation is notably reduced in ascites (18%). Basal hyperactivation of ERK and JNK/c-Jun pathways observed in ascites M-DM correlates with CD14/CD16 high expressing subsets, while PI3K/PKB does it with the CD16 low expressing cells. In vitro LPS treatment highly increases ERK1/2, PKB/Akt and c-Jun phosphorylation, while that of p38 MAPK is decreased in M-DM from ascites compared to control blood M-DM. Stimulation of healthy blood M-DM with LPS and C. albicans induced higher phosphorylation levels of p38 than those from ascites. Regarding cytokines secretion, in vitro activated M-DM from ascites of cirrhotic patients produced significantly higher amounts of IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α, and lower levels of IL-1β and IL-12 than control blood M-DM. In conclusion, a new subpopulation of CD14(high)CD16(high) peritoneal M-DM has been identified in ascites of cirrhotic patients, which is very sensitive to LPS stimulation.

  7. Differential bacterial survival, replication, and apoptosis-inducing ability of Salmonella serovars within human and murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwan, W R; Huang, X Z; Hu, L; Kopecko, D J

    2000-03-01

    the apoptotic response of distinct Salmonella serovars residing in human macrophage cells. These studies suggest that nonopsonized serovar Typhimurium enters, multiplies within, and causes considerable, acute death of macrophages, leading to a highly virulent infection in mice (resulting in death within 14 days). In striking contrast, nonopsonized serovar Typhi survives silently and chronically within human macrophages, causing little cell death, which allows for intrahost dissemination and typhoid fever (low host mortality). The type of disease associated with any particular serovar of Salmonella is linked to the ability of that serovar both to persist within and to elicit damage in a specific host's macrophage cells.

  8. Identification of a Denitrase Activity Against Calmodulin in Activated Macrophages Using High-Field Liquid Chromatography - FTICR Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smallwood, Heather S.; Lourette, Natacha M.; Boschek, Curt B.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Smith, Richard D.; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana; Squier, Thomas C.

    2007-09-18

    We have identified a denitrase activity in macrophages that is upregulated following macrophage activation, which is shown by mass spectrometry to recognize nitrotyrosines in the calcium signaling protein calmodulin (CaM) and convert them to their native tyrosine structure without the formation of any aminotyrosine. Comparable extents of methionine sulfoxide reduction are also observed that are catalyzed by endogenous methionine sulfoxide reductases. Competing with repair processes, oxidized CaM is a substrate for a peptidase activity that results in the selective cleavage of the C-terminus lysine (i.e., Lys148) that is expected to diminish CaM function. Thus, competing repair and peptidase activities define the abundances and functionality of CaM to modulate cellular metabolism in response to oxidative stress, where the presence of the truncated CaM species provides a useful biomarker for the transient appearance of oxidized CaM.

  9. Bacterial proteases and virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frees, Dorte; Brøndsted, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for variety of purposes during the infection process. In the cytosol, the main proteolytic players are the conserved Clp and Lon proteases that directly contribute to virulence through the timely degradation of virulence regulators and indirectly by providing....... These extracellular proteases are activated in complex cascades involving auto-processing and proteolytic maturation. Thus, proteolysis has been adopted by bacterial pathogens at multiple levels to ensure the success of the pathogen in contact with the human host....

  10. Yersinia pestis and host macrophages: immunodeficiency of mouse macrophages induced by YscW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yujing; Du, Zongmin; Han, Yanping; Guo, Zhaobiao; Tan, Yafang; Zhu, Ziwen; Yang, Ruifu

    2009-09-01

    The virulence of the pathogenic Yersinia species depends on a plasmid-encoded type III secretion system (T3SS) that transfers six Yersinia outer protein (Yop) effector proteins into the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, leading to disruption of host defence mechanisms. It is shown in this study that Yersinia pestis YscW, a protein of the T3SS injectisome, contributes to the induction of a deficiency in phagocytosis in host macrophages and a reduction in their antigen-presenting capacity. A Y. pestis strain lacking yscW had no effect on uptake by host macrophages. In mice infected with wild-type Y. pestis, the yscW mutant or a complement strain, immunodeficiency was observed in host macrophages compared with those from uninfected mice. However, the phagocytosis and antigen presenting capacities of macrophages infected by yscW mutant strain both in vivo and in vitro were significantly higher than those by wild type strain. Consistent with this finding, when YscW was expressed in the RAW264.7 macrophage cell line, phagocytosis and antigen-presenting capacities were significantly lower than those of the control groups. These results indicate that Y. pestis YscW may directly induce immunodeficiency in murine macrophages by crippling their phagocytosis and antigen-presenting capacities. These data provide evidences to Y. pestis pathogenesis that some proteins in T3SS injectisome, such as YscW protein, might play independent roles in disrupting host defense apart from their known functions.

  11. A novel chalcone derivative attenuates the diabetes-induced renal injury via inhibition of high glucose-mediated inflammatory response and macrophage infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Qilu [Chemical Biology Research Center, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zhao, Leping [Department of Pharmacy, the Affiliated Yueqing Hospital, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China); Wang, Yi; Zhang, Yali [Chemical Biology Research Center, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China); Li, Zhaoyu [Department of International High School, Shanghai Jiaotong University Nanyang Affiliated (Kunshan) School, Minhang District, Shanghai (China); Pan, Yong; Kanchana, Karvannan; Wang, Jingying; Tong, Chao [Chemical Biology Research Center, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China); Li, Dan, E-mail: yqyyld@163.com [Department of Nephrology, the Affiliated Yueqing Hospital, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China); Liang, Guang, E-mail: wzmcliangguang@163.com [Chemical Biology Research Center, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China)

    2015-01-15

    Inflammation plays a central role in the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Researches on novel anti-inflammatory agents may offer new opportunities for the treatment of DN. We previously found a chalcone derivative L6H21 could inhibit LPS-induced cytokine release from macrophages. The aim of this study was to investigate whether L6H21 could ameliorate the high glucose-mediated inflammation in NRK-52E cells and attenuate the inflammation-mediated renal injury. According to the results, L6H21 showed a great inhibitory effect on the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, cell adhesion molecules, chemokines, and macrophage adhesion via down-regulation of NF-κB/MAPKs activity in high glucose-stimulated renal NRK-52E cells. Further, in vivo oral administration with L6H21 at a dosage of 20 mg/kg/2 days showed a decreased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, cell adhesion molecules, which subsequently contributed to the inhibition on renal macrophage infiltration, the reduction of serum creatinine and BUN levels, and the improvement on the fibrosis and pathological changes in the renal tissues of diabetic mice. These findings provided that chalcone derived L6H21 may be a promising anti-inflammatory agent and have the potential in the therapy of diabetic nephropathy, and importantly, MAPK/NF-κB signaling system may be a novel therapeutic target for human DN in the future. - Highlights: • Inflammation plays a central role in the development of diabetic nephropathy. • Compound L6H21 reduced the high glucose-mediated inflammation in NRK-52E cells. • Compound L6H21 attenuated the inflammation-mediated renal injury. • L6H21 exhibited anti-inflammatory effects via inactivation of NF-κB/MAPKs. • MAPKs/NF-κB may be a novel therapeutic target in diabetic nephropathy treatment.

  12. MAP kinase phosphatase 2 regulates macrophage-adipocyte interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huipeng Jiao

    Full Text Available Inflammation is critical for the development of obesity-associated metabolic disorders. This study aims to investigate the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 2 (MKP-2 in inflammation during macrophage-adipocyte interaction.White adipose tissues (WAT from mice either on a high-fat diet (HFD or normal chow (NC were isolated to examine the expression of MKP-2. Murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 stably expressing MKP-2 was used to study the regulation of MKP-2 in macrophages in response to saturated free fatty acid (FFA and its role in macrophage M1/M2 activation. Macrophage-adipocyte co-culture system was employed to investigate the role of MKP-2 in regulating inflammation during adipocyte-macrophage interaction. c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK- and p38-specific inhibitors were used to examine the mechanisms by which MKP-2 regulates macrophage activation and macrophage-adipocytes interaction.HFD changed the expression of MKP-2 in WAT, and MKP-2 was highly expressed in the stromal vascular cells (SVCs. MKP-2 inhibited the production of proinflammatory cytokines in response to FFA stimulation in macrophages. MKP-2 inhibited macrophage M1 activation through JNK and p38. In addition, overexpression of MKP-2 in macrophages suppressed inflammation during macrophage-adipocyte interaction.MKP-2 is a negative regulator of macrophage M1 activation through JNK and p38 and inhibits inflammation during macrophage-adipocyte interaction.

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis nuoG is a virulence gene that inhibits apoptosis of infected host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamalakannan Velmurugan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The survival and persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis depends on its capacity to manipulate multiple host defense pathways, including the ability to actively inhibit the death by apoptosis of infected host cells. The genetic basis for this anti-apoptotic activity and its implication for mycobacterial virulence have not been demonstrated or elucidated. Using a novel gain-of-function genetic screen, we demonstrated that inhibition of infection-induced apoptosis of macrophages is controlled by multiple genetic loci in M. tuberculosis. Characterization of one of these loci in detail revealed that the anti-apoptosis activity was attributable to the type I NADH-dehydrogenase of M. tuberculosis, and was mainly due to the subunit of this multicomponent complex encoded by the nuoG gene. Expression of M. tuberculosis nuoG in nonpathogenic mycobacteria endowed them with the ability to inhibit apoptosis of infected human or mouse macrophages, and increased their virulence in a SCID mouse model. Conversely, deletion of nuoG in M. tuberculosis ablated its ability to inhibit macrophage apoptosis and significantly reduced its virulence in mice. These results identify a key component of the genetic basis for an important virulence trait of M. tuberculosis and support a direct causal relationship between virulence of pathogenic mycobacteria and their ability to inhibit macrophage apoptosis.

  14. Automated processing of label-free Raman microscope images of macrophage cells with standardized regression for high-throughput analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, Robert J; Kumagai, Yutaro; Fujita, Katsumasa; Standley, Daron M; Smith, Nicholas I

    2010-11-19

    Macrophages represent the front lines of our immune system; they recognize and engulf pathogens or foreign particles thus initiating the immune response. Imaging macrophages presents unique challenges, as most optical techniques require labeling or staining of the cellular compartments in order to resolve organelles, and such stains or labels have the potential to perturb the cell, particularly in cases where incomplete information exists regarding the precise cellular reaction under observation. Label-free imaging techniques such as Raman microscopy are thus valuable tools for studying the transformations that occur in immune cells upon activation, both on the molecular and organelle levels. Due to extremely low signal levels, however, Raman microscopy requires sophisticated image processing techniques for noise reduction and signal extraction. To date, efficient, automated algorithms for resolving sub-cellular features in noisy, multi-dimensional image sets have not been explored extensively. We show that hybrid z-score normalization and standard regression (Z-LSR) can highlight the spectral differences within the cell and provide image contrast dependent on spectral content. In contrast to typical Raman imaging processing methods using multivariate analysis, such as single value decomposition (SVD), our implementation of the Z-LSR method can operate nearly in real-time. In spite of its computational simplicity, Z-LSR can automatically remove background and bias in the signal, improve the resolution of spatially distributed spectral differences and enable sub-cellular features to be resolved in Raman microscopy images of mouse macrophage cells. Significantly, the Z-LSR processed images automatically exhibited subcellular architectures whereas SVD, in general, requires human assistance in selecting the components of interest. The computational efficiency of Z-LSR enables automated resolution of sub-cellular features in large Raman microscopy data sets without

  15. The Multibasic Cleavage Site of the Hemagglutinin of Highly Pathogenic A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (H5N1) Avian Influenza Virus Acts as a Virulence Factor in a Host-Specific Manner in Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suguitan, Amorsolo L.; Matsuoka, Yumiko; Lau, Yuk-Fai; Santos, Celia P.; Vogel, Leatrice; Cheng, Lily I.; Orandle, Marlene

    2012-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses of the H5 and H7 subtypes typically possess multiple basic amino acids around the cleavage site (MBS) of their hemagglutinin (HA) protein, a recognized virulence motif in poultry. To determine the importance of the H5 HA MBS as a virulence factor in mammals, recombinant wild-type HPAI A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (H5N1) viruses that possessed (H5N1) or lacked (ΔH5N1) the H5 HA MBS were generated and evaluated for their virulence in BALB/c mice, ferrets, and African green monkeys (AGMs) (Chlorocebus aethiops). The presence of the H5 HA MBS was associated with lethality, significantly higher virus titers in the respiratory tract, virus dissemination to extrapulmonary organs, lymphopenia, significantly elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and inflammation in the lungs of mice and ferrets. In AGMs, neither H5N1 nor ΔH5N1 virus was lethal and neither caused clinical symptoms. The H5 HA MBS was associated with mild enhancement of replication and delayed virus clearance. Thus, the contribution of H5 HA MBS to the virulence of the HPAI H5N1 virus varies among mammalian hosts and is most significant in mice and ferrets and less remarkable in nonhuman primates. PMID:22205751

  16. High-Throughput, Signature-Tagged Mutagenic Approach To Identify Novel Virulence Factors of Yersinia pestis CO92 in a Mouse Model of Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Fitts, Eric C.; Erova, Tatiana E.; Kozlova, Elena V.; Kirtley, Michelle L.; Tiner, Bethany L.; Andersson, Jourdan A.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of new virulence factors in Yersinia pestis and understanding their molecular mechanisms during an infection process are necessary in designing a better vaccine or to formulate an appropriate therapeutic intervention. By using a high-throughput, signature-tagged mutagenic approach, we created 5,088 mutants of Y. pestis strain CO92 and screened them in a mouse model of pneumonic plague at a dose equivalent to 5 50% lethal doses (LD50) of wild-type (WT) CO92. From this screen, we obtained 118 clones showing impairment in disseminating to the spleen, based on hybridization of input versus output DNA from mutant pools with 53 unique signature tags. In the subsequent screen, 20/118 mutants exhibited attenuation at 8 LD50 when tested in a mouse model of bubonic plague, with infection by 10/20 of the aforementioned mutants resulting in 40% or higher survival rates at an infectious dose of 40 LD50. Upon sequencing, six of the attenuated mutants were found to carry interruptions in genes encoding hypothetical proteins or proteins with putative functions. Mutants with in-frame deletion mutations of two of the genes identified from the screen, namely, rbsA, which codes for a putative sugar transport system ATP-binding protein, and vasK, a component of the type VI secretion system, were also found to exhibit some attenuation at 11 or 12 LD50 in a mouse model of pneumonic plague. Likewise, among the remaining 18 signature-tagged mutants, 9 were also attenuated (40 to 100%) at 12 LD50 in a pneumonic plague mouse model. Previously, we found that deleting genes encoding Braun lipoprotein (Lpp) and acyltransferase (MsbB), the latter of which modifies lipopolysaccharide function, reduced the virulence of Y. pestis CO92 in mouse models of bubonic and pneumonic plague. Deletion of rbsA and vasK genes from either the Δlpp single or the Δlpp ΔmsbB double mutant augmented the attenuation to provide 90 to 100% survivability to mice in a pneumonic plague model at 20

  17. High-throughput, signature-tagged mutagenic approach to identify novel virulence factors of Yersinia pestis CO92 in a mouse model of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Fitts, Eric C; Sha, Jian; Erova, Tatiana E; Kozlova, Elena V; Kirtley, Michelle L; Tiner, Bethany L; Andersson, Jourdan A; Chopra, Ashok K

    2015-05-01

    The identification of new virulence factors in Yersinia pestis and understanding their molecular mechanisms during an infection process are necessary in designing a better vaccine or to formulate an appropriate therapeutic intervention. By using a high-throughput, signature-tagged mutagenic approach, we created 5,088 mutants of Y. pestis strain CO92 and screened them in a mouse model of pneumonic plague at a dose equivalent to 5 50% lethal doses (LD50) of wild-type (WT) CO92. From this screen, we obtained 118 clones showing impairment in disseminating to the spleen, based on hybridization of input versus output DNA from mutant pools with 53 unique signature tags. In the subsequent screen, 20/118 mutants exhibited attenuation at 8 LD50 when tested in a mouse model of bubonic plague, with infection by 10/20 of the aforementioned mutants resulting in 40% or higher survival rates at an infectious dose of 40 LD50. Upon sequencing, six of the attenuated mutants were found to carry interruptions in genes encoding hypothetical proteins or proteins with putative functions. Mutants with in-frame deletion mutations of two of the genes identified from the screen, namely, rbsA, which codes for a putative sugar transport system ATP-binding protein, and vasK, a component of the type VI secretion system, were also found to exhibit some attenuation at 11 or 12 LD50 in a mouse model of pneumonic plague. Likewise, among the remaining 18 signature-tagged mutants, 9 were also attenuated (40 to 100%) at 12 LD50 in a pneumonic plague mouse model. Previously, we found that deleting genes encoding Braun lipoprotein (Lpp) and acyltransferase (MsbB), the latter of which modifies lipopolysaccharide function, reduced the virulence of Y. pestis CO92 in mouse models of bubonic and pneumonic plague. Deletion of rbsA and vasK genes from either the Δlpp single or the Δlpp ΔmsbB double mutant augmented the attenuation to provide 90 to 100% survivability to mice in a pneumonic plague model at 20

  18. Brucella abortus mutants lacking ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins are highly attenuated in virulence and confer protective immunity against virulent B. abortus challenge in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Quang Lam; Cho, Youngjae; Park, Soyeon; Park, Bo-Kyoung; Hahn, Tae-Wook

    2016-06-01

    Brucella abortus RB51 is an attenuated vaccine strain that has been most frequently used for bovine brucellosis. Although it is known to provide good protection in cattle, it still has some drawbacks including resistance to rifampicin, residual virulence and pathogenicity in humans. Thus, there has been a continuous interest on new safe and effective bovine vaccine candidates. In the present study, we have constructed unmarked mutants by deleting singly cydD and cydC genes, which encode ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins, from the chromosome of the virulent Brucella abortus isolate from Korean cow (referred to as IVK15). Both IVK15ΔcydD and ΔcydC mutants showed increased sensitivity to metal ions, hydrogen peroxide and acidic pH, which are mimic to intracellular environment during host infection. Additionally, the mutants exhibited a significant growth defect in RAW264.7 cells and greatly attenuated in mice. Vaccination of mice with either IVK15ΔcydC or IVK15ΔcydD mutant could elicit an anti-Brucella specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgG subclass responses as well as enhance the secretion of interferon-gamma, and provided better protection against challenge with B. abortus strain 2308 than with the commercial B. abortus strain RB51 vaccine. Collectively, these results suggest that both IVK15ΔcydC and IVK15ΔcydD mutants could be an attenuated vaccine candidate against B. abortus.

  19. Identification of highly connected hub genes in the protective response program of human macrophages and microglia activated by alpha B-crystallin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtman, Inge R; Bsibsi, Malika; Gerritsen, Wouter H; Boddeke, Hendrikus W G M; Eggen, Bart J L; van der Valk, Paul; Kipp, Markus; van Noort, Johannes M; Amor, Sandra

    2017-03-01

    The glial stress protein alpha B-crystallin (HSPB5) is an endogenous agonist for Toll-like receptor 2 in CD14(+) cells. Following systemic administration, HSPB5 acts as a potent inhibitor of neuroinflammation in animal models and reduces lesion development in multiple sclerosis patients. Here, we show that systemically administered HSPB5 rapidly crosses the blood-brain barrier, implicating microglia as additional targets for HSPB5 along with peripheral monocytes and macrophages. To compare key players in the HSPB5-induced protective response of human macrophages and microglia, we applied weighted gene co-expression network analysis on transcript expression data obtained 1 and 4 h after activation. This approach identified networks of genes that are co-expressed in all datasets, thus reducing the complexity of the nonsynchronous waves of transcripts that appear after activation by HSPB5. In both cell types, HSPB5 activates a network of highly connected genes that appear to be functionally equivalent and consistent with the therapeutic effects of HSPB5 in vivo, since both networks include factors that suppress apoptosis, the production of proinflammatory factors, and the development of adaptive immunity. Yet, hub genes at the core of the network in either cell type were strikingly different. They prominently feature the well-known tolerance-promoting programmed-death ligand 1 as a key player in the macrophage response to HSPB5, and the immune-regulatory enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in that of microglia. This latter finding indicates that despite its reputation as a potential target for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, microglial COX-2 plays a central role in the therapeutic effects of HSPB5 during neuroinflammation. GLIA 2017;65:460-473.

  20. Opuntia ficus-indica seed attenuates hepatic steatosis and promotes M2 macrophage polarization in high-fat diet-fed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung-Woo; Shin, Jun-Kyu; Koh, Eun-Ji; Ryu, Hyojeong; Kim, Hyoung Ja; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2016-04-01

    Opuntia ficus-indica (L.) is a popular edible plant that possesses considerable nutritional value and exhibits diverse biological actions including anti-inflammatory and antidiabetic activities. In this study, we hypothesized that DWJ504, an extract of O ficus-indica seed, would ameliorate hepatic steatosis and inflammation by regulating hepatic de novo lipogenesis and macrophage polarization against experimental nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Mice were fed a normal diet or a high-fat diet (HFD) for 10 weeks. DWJ504 (250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg) or vehicle (0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose) were orally administered for the last 4 weeks of the 10-week HFD feeding period. DWJ504 treatment remarkably attenuated HFD-induced increases in hepatic lipid content and hepatocellular damage. DWJ504 attenuated increases in sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 and carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein expression and a decrease in carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A. Although DWJ504 augmented peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α protein expression, it attenuated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ expression. Moreover, DWJ504 promoted hepatic M2 macrophage polarization as indicated by attenuation of the M1 marker genes and enhancement of M2 marker genes. Finally, DWJ504 attenuated expression of toll-like receptor 4, nuclear factor κB, tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 6, TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon β, and interferon β levels. Our results demonstrate that DWJ504 prevented intrahepatic lipid accumulation, induced M2 macrophage polarization, and suppressed the toll-like receptor 4-mediated inflammatory signaling pathway. Thus, DWJ504 has therapeutic potential in the prevention of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

  1. Liver macrophages in healthy and diseased liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Zeinab; Knolle, Percy A

    2017-04-01

    Kupffer cells, the largest tissue resident macrophage population, are key for the maintenance of liver integrity and its restoration after injury and infections, as well as the local initiation and resolution of innate and adaptive immunity. These important roles of Kupffer cells were recently identified in healthy and diseased liver revealing diverse functions and phenotypes of hepatic macrophages. High-level phenotypic and genomic analysis revealed that Kupffer cells are not a homogenous population and that the hepatic microenvironment actively shapes both phenotype and function of liver macrophages. Compared to macrophages from other organs, hepatic macrophages bear unique properties that are instrumental for their diverse roles in local immunity as well as liver regeneration. The diverse and, in part, contradictory roles of hepatic macrophages in anti-tumor and inflammatory immune responses as well as regulatory and regenerative processes have been obscured by the lack of appropriate technologies to specifically target or ablate Kupffer cells or monocyte-derived hepatic macrophages. Future studies will need to dissect the exact role of the hepatic macrophages with distinct functional properties linked to their differentiation status and thereby provide insight into the functional plasticity of hepatic macrophages.

  2. Molecular diversity and high virulence of Legionella pneumophila strains isolated from biofilms developed within a warm spring of a thermal spa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaabna Zineddine

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several cases of legionellosis have been diagnosed in the same French thermal spa in 1986, 1994 and 1997. L. pneumophila serogroup 1 (Lp1 strains have been isolated from several patients, but the source of contamination was not identified despite the presence of different Lp1 in water samples of the three natural springs feeding the spa at this period. Results Our strategy was to investigate L. pneumophila (Lp strains from natural biofilms developed in a sulphur-rich warm spring of this contaminated site. Biofilm analysis revealed the presence of three Lp serogroups (Lp1, Lp10 and Lp12. Surprisingly, Lp10 and Lp12 were not reported in the previous described studies from water samples. Besides, the new seven Lp1 we isolated exhibit a high molecular diversity and have been differentiated in five classes according to their DNA genome patterns obtained by PFGE and mip sequences. It must be noted that these DNA patterns are original and unknown in databases. Interestingly, the 27 Lp environmental strains we isolated display a higher cytotoxicity and virulence towards the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii than those of known Lp1 epidemic strains. Conclusion The characteristics of Legionella pneumophila Lp1 strains isolated from the warm spring are in agreement with their presence in biofilms and their probable long-term persistence in this ecosystem.

  3. Pathogenesis of highly virulent African swine fever virus in domestic pigs exposed via intraoropharyngeal, intranasopharyngeal, and intramuscular inoculation, and by direct contact with infected pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howey, Erin B; O'Donnell, Vivian; de Carvalho Ferreira, Helena C; Borca, Manuel V; Arzt, Jonathan

    2013-12-26

    To investigate the pathogenesis of African swine fever virus (ASFV), domestic pigs (n=18) were challenged with a range (10(2)-10(6) 50% hemadsorbing doses (HAD50)) of the highly virulent ASFV-Malawi strain by inoculation via the intraoropharyngeal (IOP), intranasopharyngeal (INP), or intramuscular (IM) routes. A subsequent contact challenge experiment was performed in which six IOP-inoculated donor pigs were allowed to have direct contact (DC) with six naïve pigs for exposure times that varied from 24 to 72 h. All challenge routes resulted in clinical progression and postmortem lesions similar to those previously described in experimental and natural infection. The onset of clinical signs occurred between 1 and 7 days post inoculation (dpi) and included pyrexia with variable progression to obtundation, hematochezia, melena, moribundity and death with a duration of 4-11 days. Viremia was first detected between 4 and 5 dpi in all inoculation groups whereas ASFV shedding from the nasal cavity and tonsil was first detected at 3-9 dpi. IM and DC were the most consistent modes of infection, with 12/12 (100%) of pigs challenged by these routes becoming infected. Several clinical and virological parameters were significantly different between IM and DC groups indicating dissimilarity between these modes of infection. Amongst the simulated natural routes, INP inoculation resulted in the most consistent progression of disease across the widest range of doses whilst preserving simulation of natural exposure and therefore may provide a superior system for pathogenesis and vaccine efficacy investigation.

  4. Cyclophilin A enhances macrophage differentiation and lipid uptake in high glucose conditions: a cellular mechanism for accelerated macro vascular disease in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Surya; Vinitha, Anandan; Kartha, Cheranellore Chandrasekharan

    2016-11-03

    Vascular disease in diabetes is initiated by monocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium, transmigration and formation of foam cells. Increasing clinical evidence supports a role for the secretory protein, cyclophilin A in diabetic vascular disease. The means by which cyclophilin A contributes to vascular lesion development in diabetes is however largely unknown. In this study we investigated using THP1 cells and human monocytes whether cyclophilin A under hyperglycemic conditions, functions in the inflammatory cascade as a chemoattractant and increases lipid uptake by formation of foam cells invitro. We developed an invitro model of monocytes cultured in 20 mm glucose (high glucose) equivalent to 360 mg/dL of plasma glucose levels. These monocytes were then differentiated into macrophages using PMA and subsequently transformed to lipid laden foam cells using oxidized low density lipoproteins in the presence and absence of cyclophilin A. This cellular model was used to study monocyte to macrophage differentiation, transmigration and foam cell formation. A similar cellular model using siRNA mediated transient elimination of the cyclophilin A gene as well as chemical inhibitors were used to further confirm the role of cyclophilin A in the differentiation and foam cell formation process. Cyclophilin A effectively increased migration of high glucose treated monocytes to the endothelial cell monolayer (p diabetes mellitus.

  5. Regulation and function of the Salmonella MgtC virulence protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jang-Woo; Lee, Eun-Jin

    2015-10-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium produces many virulence proteins to cause diseases. The Salmonella MgtC protein is one of such virulence proteins specially required for intracellular proliferation inside macrophages and mouse virulence. In this review, we will cover how the mgtC gene is turned on or off and what the signals required for mgtC expression are. Later in this review, we will discuss a recent understanding of MgtC function in Salmonella pathogenesis by identifying its target proteins.

  6. Impaired macrophage autophagy increases the immune response in obese mice by promoting proinflammatory macrophage polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kun; Zhao, Enpeng; Ilyas, Ghulam; Lalazar, Gadi; Lin, Yu; Haseeb, Muhammad; Tanaka, Kathryn E; Czaja, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence that excessive lipid accumulation can decrease cellular levels of autophagy and that autophagy regulates immune responsiveness suggested that impaired macrophage autophagy may promote the increased innate immune activation that underlies obesity. Primary bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) and peritoneal macrophages from high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice had decreased levels of autophagic flux indicating a generalized impairment of macrophage autophagy in obese mice. To assess the effects of decreased macrophage autophagy on inflammation, mice with a Lyz2-Cre-mediated knockout of Atg5 in macrophages were fed a HFD and treated with low-dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Knockout mice developed systemic and hepatic inflammation with HFD feeding and LPS. This effect was liver specific as knockout mice did not have increased adipose tissue inflammation. The mechanism by which the loss of autophagy promoted inflammation was through the regulation of macrophage polarization. BMDM and Kupffer cells from knockout mice exhibited abnormalities in polarization with both increased proinflammatory M1 and decreased anti-inflammatory M2 polarization as determined by measures of genes and proteins. The heightened hepatic inflammatory response in HFD-fed, LPS-treated knockout mice led to liver injury without affecting steatosis. These findings demonstrate that autophagy has a critical regulatory function in macrophage polarization that downregulates inflammation. Defects in macrophage autophagy may underlie inflammatory disease states such as the decrease in macrophage autophagy with obesity that leads to hepatic inflammation and the progression to liver injury.

  7. A novel eight amino acid insertion contributes to the hemagglutinin cleavability and the virulence of a highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H7N3) virus in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xiangjie; Belser, Jessica A.; Tumpey, Terrence M., E-mail: tft9@cdc.gov

    2016-01-15

    In 2012, an avian influenza A H7N3 (A/Mexico/InDRE7218/2012; Mx/7218) virus was responsible for two confirmed cases of human infection and led to the death or culling of more than 22 million chickens in Jalisco, Mexico. Interestingly, this virus acquired an 8-amino acid (aa)-insertion (..PENPK-DRKSRHRR-TR/GLF) near the hemagglutinin (HA) cleavage site by nonhomologous recombination with host rRNA. It remains unclear which specific residues at the cleavage site contribute to the virulence of H7N3 viruses in mammals. Using loss-of-function approaches, we generated a series of cleavage site mutant viruses by reverse genetics and characterized the viruses in vitro and in vivo. We found that the 8-aa insertion and the arginine at position P4 of the Mx/7218 HA cleavage site are essential for intracellular HA cleavage in 293T cells, but have no effect on the pH of membrane fusion. However, we identified a role for the histidine residue at P5 position in viral fusion pH. In mice, the 8-aa insertion is required for Mx/7218 virus virulence; however, the basic residues upstream of the P4 position are dispensable for virulence. Overall, our study provides the first line of evidence that the insertion in the Mx/7218 virus HA cleavage site confers its intracellular cleavability, and consequently contributes to enhanced virulence in mice. - Highlights: • An avian influenza H7N3 virus acquired a unique 8-amino acid (aa) insertion. • The role of specific basic residues in the HA insertion in viral pathogenesis was determined. • In mice, the 8-aa insertion is required for H7N3 virus virulence. • The R residue at position P4 is essential for HA intracellular cleavage and virus virulence.

  8. A Red Blood Cell Membrane-Camouflaged Nanoparticle Counteracts Streptolysin O-Mediated Virulence Phenotypes of Invasive Group A Streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Escajadillo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Group A Streptococcus (GAS, an important human-specific Gram-positive bacterial pathogen, is associated with a broad spectrum of disease, ranging from mild superficial infections such as pharyngitis and impetigo, to serious invasive infections including necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. The GAS pore-forming streptolysin O (SLO is a well characterized virulence factor produced by nearly all GAS clinical isolates. High level expression of SLO is epidemiologically linked to intercontinental dissemination of hypervirulent clonotypes and poor clinical outcomes. SLO can trigger macrophage and neutrophil cell death and/or the inactivation of immune cell functions, and promotes tissue injury and bacterial survival in animal models of infection. In the present work, we describe how the pharmacological presentation of red blood cell (RBC derived biomimetic nanoparticles (“nanosponges” can sequester SLO and block the ability of GAS to damage host cells, thereby preserving innate immune function and increasing bacterial clearance in vitro and in vivo. Nanosponge administration protected human neutrophils, macrophages, and keratinocytes against SLO-mediated cytotoxicity. This therapeutic intervention prevented SLO-induced macrophage apoptosis and increased neutrophil extracellular trap formation, allowing increased GAS killing by the respective phagocytic cell types. In a murine model of GAS necrotizing skin infection, local administration of the biomimetic nanosponges was associated with decreased lesion size and reduced bacterial colony-forming unit recovery. Utilization of a toxin decoy and capture platform that inactivates the secreted SLO before it contacts the host cell membrane, presents a novel virulence factor targeted strategy that could be a powerful adjunctive therapy in severe GAS infections where morbidity and mortality are high despite antibiotic treatment.

  9. Interaction of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia with Acanthamoeba castellanii parallels macrophage-fungus interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Waeyenberghe, Lieven; Baré, Julie; Pasmans, Frank; Claeys, Myriam; Bert, Wim; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Houf, Kurt; Martel, An

    2013-12-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus and free-living amoebae are common inhabitants of soil. Mechanisms of A. fumigatus to circumvent the amoeba's digestion may facilitate overcoming the vertebrate macrophage defence mechanisms. We performed co-culture experiments using A. fumigatus conidia and the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii. Approximately 25% of the amoebae ingested A. fumigatus conidia after 1 h of contact. During intra-amoebal passage, part of the ingested conidia was able to escape the food vacuole and to germinate inside the cytoplasm of A. castellanii. Fungal release into the extra-protozoan environment by exocytosis of conidia or by germination was observed with light and transmission electron microscopy. These processes resulted in structural changes in A. castellanii, leading to amoebal permeabilization without cell lysis. In conclusion, A. castellanii internalizes A. fumigatus conidia, resulting in fungal intracellular germination and subsequent amoebal death. As such, this interaction highly resembles that of A. fumigatus with mammalian and avian macrophages. This suggests that A. fumigatus virulence mechanisms to evade macrophage killing may be acquired by co-evolutionary interactions among A. fumigatus and environmental amoebae.

  10. Biofilm-Forming Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Survive in Kupffer Cells and Exhibit High Virulence in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuto Oyama

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Although Staphylococcus aureus is part of the normal body flora, heavy usage of antibiotics has resulted in the emergence of methicillin-resistant strains (MRSA. MRSA can form biofilms and cause indwelling foreign body infections, bacteremia, soft tissue infections, endocarditis, and osteomyelitis. Using an in vitro assay, we screened 173 clinical blood isolates of MRSA and selected 20 high-biofilm formers (H-BF and low-biofilm formers (L-BF. These were intravenously administered to mice and the general condition of mice, the distribution of bacteria, and biofilm in the liver, lung, spleen, and kidney were investigated. MRSA count was the highest in the liver, especially within Kupffer cells, which were positive for acid polysaccharides that are associated with intracellular biofilm. After 24 h, the general condition of the mice worsened significantly in the H-BF group. In the liver, bacterial deposition and aggregation and the biofilm-forming spot number were all significantly greater for H-BF group than for L-BF. CFU analysis revealed that bacteria in the H-BF group survived for long periods in the liver. These results indicate that the biofilm-forming ability of MRSA is a crucial factor for intracellular persistence, which could lead to chronic infections.

  11. Burkholderia pseudomallei virulence: definition, stability and association with clonality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulett, G C; Currie, B J; Clair, T W; Mayo, M; Ketheesan, N; Labrooy, J; Gal, D; Norton, R; Smith, C A; Barnes, J; Warner, J; Hirst, R G

    2001-07-01

    Clinical presentations of melioidosis, caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei are protean, but the mechanisms underlying development of the different forms of disease remain poorly understood. In murine melioidosis, the level of virulence of B. pseudomallei is important in disease pathogenesis and progression. In this study, we used B. pseudomallei-susceptible BALB/c mice to determine the virulence of a library of clinical and environmental B. pseudomallei isolates from Australia and Papua New Guinea. Among 42 non-arabinose-assimilating (ara(-)) isolates, LD(50) ranged from 10 to > 10(6) CFU. There were numerous correlations between virulence and disease presentation in patients; however, this was not a consistent observation. Virulence did not correlate with isolate origin (i.e. clinical vs environmental), since numerous ara(-) environmental isolates were highly virulent. The least virulent isolate was a soil isolate from Papua New Guinea, which was arabinose assimilating (ara(+)). Stability of B. pseudomallei virulence was investigated by in vivo passage of isolates through mice and repetitive in vitro subculture. Virulence increased following in vivo exposure in only one of eight isolates tested. In vitro subculture on ferric citrate-containing medium caused attenuation of virulence, and this correlated with changes in colony morphology. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA typing demonstrated that selected epidemiologically related isolates that had variable clinical outcomes and different in vivo virulence were clonal strains. No molecular changes were observed in isolates after in vivo or in vitro exposure despite changes in virulence. These results indicate that virulence of selected B. pseudomallei isolates is variable, being dependent on factors such as iron bioavailability. They also support the importance of other variables such as inoculum size and host risk factors in determining the clinical severity of melioidosis.

  12. Cryptococcus neoformans growth and protection from innate immunity are dependent on expression of a virulence-associated DEAD-box protein, Vad1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jin; Olszewski, Michal A; Williamson, Peter R

    2013-03-01

    The fungus Cryptococcus neoformans has emerged as a major cause of meningoencephalitis worldwide. Host response to the fungus involves both innate and adaptive immunity, but fungal genes that modulate these processes are poorly understood. Previous studies demonstrated attenuated virulence of a mutant of a virulence-associated DEAD-box protein (VAD1) in mice, despite normal growth at host temperatures, suggesting modulation of the immune response. In the present study, the Δvad1 mutant demonstrated progressive clearance from lung and was unable to induce pathological lesions or to cause extrapulmonary disease, despite retaining its ability to grow in mouse serum and a J774.16 macrophage cell line. Pulmonary clearance occurred with a minimal cellular infiltrate, marked by reduced CD4 cells, CD11b(+) Ly6C(high) monocytes, and F4/80(+) macrophages, but the mutant strain retained recruitment of CD8 cells, compared to infections with wild-type fungi. Adaptive cytokine responses were reduced, including Th1, Th2, and Th17 cytokines; however, early gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) responses were retained while nonprotective interleukin 4 (IL-4) and IL-5 were diminished. Furthermore, the Δvad1 mutant was controlled in lungs despite CD4/CD8 cell depletion. These data, along with improved phagocytosis by macrophages and increases in early/innate IL-1α, IFN-γ, and chemokines elicited in the lungs within 3 days of infection with the Δvad1 mutant, indicate that VAD1 expression reduces innate recognition of C. neoformans, rendering the yeast resistant to elimination by the innate mechanisms of host defense. Thus, our studies define a novel role of the cryptococcal Vad1 protein as a central regulator of cryptococcal virulence and illustrate that Vad1 promotes microbe resistance to innate host defenses.

  13. Mycobacteria clumping increase their capacity to damage macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Brambilla

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The rough morphotypes of non-tuberculous mycobacteria have been associated with the most severe illnesses in humans. This idea is consistent with the fact that Mycobacterium tuberculosis presents a stable rough morphotype. Unlike smooth morphotypes, the bacilli of rough morphotypes grow close together, leaving no spaces among them and forming large aggregates (clumps. Currently, the initial interaction of macrophages with clumps remains unclear. Thus, we infected J774 macrophages with bacterial suspensions of rough morphotypes of Mycobacterium abscessus containing clumps and suspensions of smooth morphotypes, primarily containing isolated bacilli. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy and electron microscopy, we observed clumps of at least 5 rough-morphotype bacilli inside the phagocytic vesicles of macrophages at 3 hours post-infection. These clumps grew within the phagocytic vesicles, killing 100% of the macrophages at 72 hours post-infection, whereas the proliferation of macrophages infected with smooth morphotypes remained unaltered at 96 hours post-infection. Thus, macrophages phagocytose large clumps, exceeding the bactericidal capacities of these cells. Furthermore, proinflammatory cytokines and granuloma-like structures were only produced by macrophages infected with rough morphotypes. Thus, the present study provides a foundation for further studies that consider mycobacterial clumps as virulence factors.

  14. Mycobacteria Clumping Increase Their Capacity to Damage Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Cecilia; Llorens-Fons, Marta; Julián, Esther; Noguera-Ortega, Estela; Tomàs-Martínez, Cristina; Pérez-Trujillo, Miriam; Byrd, Thomas F.; Alcaide, Fernando; Luquin, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The rough morphotypes of non-tuberculous mycobacteria have been associated with the most severe illnesses in humans. This idea is consistent with the fact that Mycobacterium tuberculosis presents a stable rough morphotype. Unlike smooth morphotypes, the bacilli of rough morphotypes grow close together, leaving no spaces among them and forming large aggregates (clumps). Currently, the initial interaction of macrophages with clumps remains unclear. Thus, we infected J774 macrophages with bacterial suspensions of rough morphotypes of M. abscessus containing clumps and suspensions of smooth morphotypes, primarily containing isolated bacilli. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy and electron microscopy, we observed clumps of at least five rough-morphotype bacilli inside the phagocytic vesicles of macrophages at 3 h post-infection. These clumps grew within the phagocytic vesicles, killing 100% of the macrophages at 72 h post-infection, whereas the proliferation of macrophages infected with smooth morphotypes remained unaltered at 96 h post-infection. Thus, macrophages phagocytose large clumps, exceeding the bactericidal capacities of these cells. Furthermore, proinflammatory cytokines and granuloma-like structures were only produced by macrophages infected with rough morphotypes. Thus, the present study provides a foundation for further studies that consider mycobacterial clumps as virulence factors. PMID:27757105

  15. Systemic Approach to Virulence Gene Network Analysis for Gaining New Insight into Cryptococcal Virulence

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    Antoni N Malachowski

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans is pathogenic yeast, responsible for highly lethal infections in compromised patients around the globe. C. neoformans typically initiates infections in mammalian lung tissue and subsequently disseminates to the central nervous system where it causes significant pathologies. Virulence genes of C. neoformans are being characterized at an increasing rate, however, we are far from a comprehensive understanding of their roles and genetic interactions. Some of these reported virulence genes are scattered throughout different databases, while others are not yet included. This study gathered and analyzed 150 reported virulence associated factors (VAFs of C. neoformans. Using the web resource STRING database, our study identified different interactions between the total VAFs and those involved specifically in lung and brain infections and identified a new strain specific virulence gene, sho1, involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. As predicted by our analysis, sho1 expression enhanced C. neoformans virulence in a mouse model of pulmonary infection, contributing to enhanced non-protective immune Th2 bias and progressively enhancing fungal growth in the infected lungs. Sequence analysis indicated 77.4% (116 of total studied VAFs are soluble proteins, and 22.7% (34 are transmembrane proteins. Motifs involved in regulation and signaling such as protein kinases and transcription factors are highly enriched in Cryptococcus VAFs. Altogether, this study represents a pioneering effort in analysis of the virulence composite network of C. neoformans using a systems biology approach.

  16. Bacterial determinants of importance in the virulence of Gallibacterium anatis in poultry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Gry; Bojesen, Anders Miki

    2015-01-01

    studied virulence determinants is a large RTX-like toxin (GtxA), which has been demonstrated to induce a strong leukotoxic effect on avian macrophages. A number of fimbria of different sizes and shapes has been described. Particularly fimbriae belonging to the F17-like family appears to be common...

  17. The pleiotropic CymR regulator of Staphylococcus aureus plays an important role in virulence and stress response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Soutourina

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We have characterized a novel pleiotropic role for CymR, the master regulator of cysteine metabolism. We show here that CymR plays an important role both in stress response and virulence of Staphylococcus aureus. Genes involved in detoxification processes, including oxidative stress response and metal ion homeostasis, were differentially expressed in a DeltacymR mutant. Deletion of cymR resulted in increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide-, disulfide-, tellurite- and copper-induced stresses. Estimation of metabolite pools suggests that this heightened sensitivity could be the result of profound metabolic changes in the DeltacymR mutant, with an increase in the intracellular cysteine pool and hydrogen sulfide formation. Since resistance to oxidative stress within the host organism is important for pathogen survival, we investigated the role of CymR during the infectious process. Our results indicate that the deletion of cymR promotes survival of S. aureus inside macrophages, whereas virulence of the DeltacymR mutant is highly impaired in mice. These data indicate that CymR plays a major role in virulence and adaptation of S. aureus for survival within the host.

  18. Targeting aphA : a new high-throughput screening assay identifies compounds that reduce prime virulence factors of Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolger, Galina; Roy, Sambit; Zapol'skii, Viktor A; Kaufmann, Dieter E; Schnürch, Michael; Mihovilovic, Marko D; Nandy, Ranjan K; Tegge, Werner

    2016-07-01

    A high-throughput screening (HTS) assay was developed for identifying compounds with inhibitory effect on aphA, one of the key regulators positively controlling Vibrio cholerae pathogenesis. An inhibitory effect on aphA was expected to lead to attenuation in the secretion of the major pathogenicity factors of V. cholerae, cholera toxin and toxin co-regulated pilus. The plasmid construct pAKSB was developed with a kanamycin resistance (KmR) gene under the control of the aphA -like promoter for conferring a KmR phenotype under aphA -expressing conditions. The HTS assay was performed to identify compounds with inhibitory effect on the growth of O139 V. cholerae MO10 carrying the construct pAKSB in growth medium containing Km (30 g ml-1), but not in its absence. Of 20 338 compounds screened, six compounds were identified to inhibit the pAKSB-induced KmR phenotype and these compounds caused transcriptional inhibition of aphA in V. cholerae O139 strain MO10 as well as variant V. cholerae O1 El Tor strain NM06-058. Of the three most active substances, compound 53760866 showed lowest half-maximal cytotoxicity in a eukaryotic cell viability assay and was characterized further. Compound 53760866 caused reduction in cholera toxin secretion and expression of TcpA in vitro. The in vitro virulence attenuation corroborated well in a suckling mouse model in vivo, which showed reduction of colonization by V. cholerae NM06-058 when co-administered with 53760866. The screening method and the compounds may lead to new preventive strategies for cholera by reducing the pathogenicity of V. cholerae .

  19. A Japanese encephalitis virus genotype 5 molecular clone is highly neuropathogenic in a mouse model: impact of the structural protein region on virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wispelaere, Mélissanne; Frenkiel, Marie-Pascale; Desprès, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) strains can be separated into 5 genotypes (g1 to g5) based on sequence similarity. JEV g5 strains have been rarely isolated and are poorly characterized. We report here the full characterization of a g5 virus generated using a cDNA-based technology and its comparison with a widely studied g3 strain. We did not observe any major differences between those viruses when their infectious cycles were studied in various cell lines in vitro. Interestingly, the JEV g5 strain was highly pathogenic when inoculated to BALB/c mice, which are known to be largely resistant to JEV g3 infection. The study of chimeric viruses between JEV g3 and g5 showed that there was a poor viral clearance of viruses that express JEV g5 structural proteins in BALB/c mice blood, which correlated with viral invasion of the central nervous system and encephalitis. In addition, using an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier, we were able to show that JEV g5 does not have an enhanced capacity for entering the central nervous system, compared to JEV g3. Overall, in addition to providing a first characterization of the understudied JEV g5, our work highlights the importance of sustaining an early viremia in the development of JEV encephalitis. Genotype 5 viruses are genetically and serologically distinct from other JEV genotypes and can been associated with human encephalitis, which warrants the need for their characterization. In this study, we characterized the in vitro and in vivo properties of a JEV g5 strain and showed that it was more neuropathogenic in a mouse model than a well-characterized JEV g3 strain. The enhanced virulence of JEV g5 was associated with poor viral clearance but not with enhanced crossing of the blood-brain barrier, thus providing new insights into JEV pathogenesis. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Fine mapping of Co-x, an anthracnose resistance gene to a highly virulent strain of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum in common bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Manon M S; Pflieger, Stéphanie; Sévignac, Mireille; Thareau, Vincent; Blanchet, Sophie; Li, Yupeng; Jackson, Scott A; Geffroy, Valérie

    2014-07-01

    The Co - x anthracnose R gene of common bean was fine-mapped into a 58 kb region at one end of chromosome 1, where no canonical NB-LRR-encoding genes are present in G19833 genome sequence. Anthracnose, caused by the phytopathogenic fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, is one of the most damaging diseases of common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris. Various resistance (R) genes, named Co-, conferring race-specific resistance to different strains of C. lindemuthianum have been identified. The Andean cultivar JaloEEP558 was reported to carry Co-x on chromosome 1, conferring resistance to the highly virulent strain 100. To fine map Co-x, 181 recombinant inbred lines derived from the cross between JaloEEP558 and BAT93 were genotyped with polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based markers developed using the genome sequence of the Andean genotype G19833. Analysis of RILs carrying key recombination events positioned Co-x at one end of chromosome 1 to a 58 kb region of the G19833 genome sequence. Annotation of this target region revealed eight genes: three phosphoinositide-specific phospholipases C (PI-PLC), one zinc finger protein and four kinases, suggesting that Co-x is not a classical nucleotide-binding leucine-rich encoding gene. In addition, we identified and characterized the seven members of common bean PI-PLC gene family distributed into two clusters located at the ends of chromosomes 1 and 8. Co-x is not a member of Co-1 allelic series since these two genes are separated by at least 190 kb. Comparative analysis between soybean and common bean revealed that the Co-x syntenic region, located at one end of Glycine max chromosome 18, carries Rhg1, a major QTL contributing to soybean cyst nematode resistance. The PCR-based markers generated in this study should be useful in marker-assisted selection for pyramiding Co-x with other R genes.

  1. Sporangiospore size dimorphism is linked to virulence of Mucor circinelloides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles H Li

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Mucor circinelloides is a zygomycete fungus and an emerging opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised patients, especially transplant recipients and in some cases otherwise healthy individuals. We have discovered a novel example of size dimorphism linked to virulence. M. circinelloides is a heterothallic fungus: (+ sex allele encodes SexP and (- sex allele SexM, both of which are HMG domain protein sex determinants. M. circinelloides f. lusitanicus (Mcl (- mating type isolates produce larger asexual sporangiospores that are more virulent in the wax moth host compared to (+ isolates that produce smaller less virulent sporangiospores. The larger sporangiospores germinate inside and lyse macrophages, whereas the smaller sporangiospores do not. sexMΔ mutants are sterile and still produce larger virulent sporangiospores, suggesting that either the sex locus is not involved in virulence/spore size or the sexP allele plays an inhibitory role. Phylogenetic analysis supports that at least three extant subspecies populate the M. circinelloides complex in nature: Mcl, M. circinelloides f. griseocyanus, and M. circinelloides f. circinelloides (Mcc. Mcc was found to be more prevalent among clinical Mucor isolates, and more virulent than Mcl in a diabetic murine model in contrast to the wax moth host. The M. circinelloides sex locus encodes an HMG domain protein (SexP for plus and SexM for minus mating types flanked by genes encoding triose phosphate transporter (TPT and RNA helicase homologs. The borders of the sex locus between the three subspecies differ: the Mcg sex locus includes the promoters of both the TPT and the RNA helicase genes, whereas the Mcl and Mcc sex locus includes only the TPT gene promoter. Mating between subspecies was restricted compared to mating within subspecies. These findings demonstrate that spore size dimorphism is linked to virulence of M. circinelloides species and that plasticity of the sex locus and adaptations in

  2. Low prevalence of rmpA and high tendency of rmpA mutation correspond to low virulence of extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wen-Liang; Lee, Mei-Feng; Tang, Hung-Jen; Chang, Ming-Chung; Chuang, Yin-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Invasive syndrome caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP), including liver abscess, is mainly caused by community-acquired strains with characteristics of positive hypermucoviscosity (HV) phenotype and regulator of mucoid phenotype A (rmpA) and transcriptional activator (rmpA2) genes. Extended- spectrum β-lactamase-producing KP (ESBL-KP) is commonly nosocomial and rarely HV-positive. We aimed to explore the reasons of the rarer prevalence of HV phenotype, rmpA and rmpA2 as well as the virulence phenotype among the ESBL-KP isolates from clinical specimens than those non-ESBL isolates. The β-lactamase genes, rmpA, rmpA2 and genes for K capsule serotype of 440 KP isolates were analyzed. The virulence of the isolates was characterized by the mouse lethality experiments. The prevalence rates of HV phenotype (∼ 50% vs. 5 × 10(7) CFU). The mutation rates might significantly differ among KP isolates from various sources. Virulence was dependent on rmpA-related HV phenotype. In conclusion, ESBL-KP isolates were less hypermucoviscous and less virulent than non-ESBL KP isolates, mostly due to concurrently lower carriage and higher mutation rates of the rmpA and rmpA2 genes.

  3. Multidrug resistance and high virulence genotype in uropathogenic Escherichia coli due to diffusion of ST131 clonal group producing CTX-M-15: an emerging problem in a Tunisian hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferjani, Sana; Saidani, Mabrouka; Ennigrou, Samir; Hsairi, Mohamed; Slim, Amine Faouzi; Ben Boubaker, Ilhem Boutiba

    2014-05-01

    A collection of 201 Escherichia coli strains isolated from urine of patients in a Tunisian hospital between January 2006 and July 2008 was studied. Microbial identification was done by conventional methods, and antibiotic susceptibility with disk diffusion method was performed according to the Clinical Laboratory and Standards Institute guidelines. Detection of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) was performed by double-disk synergy test (DDST) and identification was done by PCR and sequencing. ESBL-producing isolates were subjected to molecular typing by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and ST131 detection by PCR. Four phylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2 and D), 18 virulence genes and CTX-M group were individualized using PCR. Statistical analysis was done by Pearson χ2 test and Mann-Whitney U test. The strains were recovered primarily from urology (28%), maternity (19%) and medicine (16%) wards. Antibiotic resistance rates were ampicilin (72.1%), nalidixic acid (41.8%), ciprofloxacin (38.8%), gentamicin (23.9%) and cefotaxime (17.4%). Thirty-one of cefotaxime-resistant isolates (n = 35) had a positive DDST and harboured bla CTX-M-15 gene. Twenty of them (64.5%) belonged to the ST131 clone and showed the same RAPD DNA profile. Ciprofloxacin- and cotrimoxazole-susceptible isolates were significantly associated with phylogenetic group B2, whereas isolates that were resistant to these molecules were associated with B1 and D phylogenetic groups, respectively. Virulence genes were significantly more frequent among ciprofloxacin- and cotrimoxazole-susceptible strains than those resistant to these antibiotics. However, CXT-M-15-producing isolates were associated with many virulence genes. Isolates concomitantly susceptible to the three antimicrobials agents (ciprofloxacin, cefotaxime and cotrimoxazole) were significantly associated with group B2 and high virulence score, whereas isolates with resistance patterns especially those including resistance to

  4. A peptide factor secreted by Staphylococcus pseudintermedius exhibits properties of both bacteriocins and virulence factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wladyka, Benedykt; Piejko, Marcin; Bzowska, Monika; Pieta, Piotr; Krzysik, Monika; Mazurek, Łukasz; Guevara-Lora, Ibeth; Bukowski, Michał; Sabat, Artur J.; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Bonar, Emilia; Międzobrodzki, Jacek; Dubin, Adam; Mak, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a common commensal bacterium colonizing the skin and mucosal surfaces of household animals. However, it has recently emerged as a dangerous opportunistic pathogen, comparable to S. aureus for humans. The epidemiological situation is further complicated by the increasing number of methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius infections and evidence of gene transmission driving antibiotic resistance between staphylococci colonizing human and zoonotic hosts. In the present study, we describe a unique peptide, BacSp222, that possesses features characteristic of both bacteriocins and virulence factors. BacSp222 is secreted in high quantities by S. pseudintermedius strain 222 isolated from dog skin lesions. This linear, fifty-amino-acid highly cationic peptide is plasmid-encoded and does not exhibit significant sequence similarities to any other known peptides or proteins. BacSp222 kills gram-positive bacteria (at doses ranging from 0.1 to several micromol/l) but also demonstrates significant cytotoxic activities towards eukaryotic cells at slightly higher concentrations. Moreover, at nanomolar concentrations, the peptide also possesses modulatory properties, efficiently enhancing interferon gamma-induced nitric oxide release in murine macrophage-like cell lines. BacSp222 appears to be one of the first examples of multifunctional peptides that breaks the convention of splitting bacteriocins and virulence factors into two unrelated groups. PMID:26411997

  5. A peptide factor secreted by Staphylococcus pseudintermedius exhibits properties of both bacteriocins and virulence factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wladyka, Benedykt; Piejko, Marcin; Bzowska, Monika; Pieta, Piotr; Krzysik, Monika; Mazurek, Łukasz; Guevara-Lora, Ibeth; Bukowski, Michał; Sabat, Artur J; Friedrich, Alexander W; Bonar, Emilia; Międzobrodzki, Jacek; Dubin, Adam; Mak, Paweł

    2015-09-28

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a common commensal bacterium colonizing the skin and mucosal surfaces of household animals. However, it has recently emerged as a dangerous opportunistic pathogen, comparable to S. aureus for humans. The epidemiological situation is further complicated by the increasing number of methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius infections and evidence of gene transmission driving antibiotic resistance between staphylococci colonizing human and zoonotic hosts. In the present study, we describe a unique peptide, BacSp222, that possesses features characteristic of both bacteriocins and virulence factors. BacSp222 is secreted in high quantities by S. pseudintermedius strain 222 isolated from dog skin lesions. This linear, fifty-amino-acid highly cationic peptide is plasmid-encoded and does not exhibit significant sequence similarities to any other known peptides or proteins. BacSp222 kills gram-positive bacteria (at doses ranging from 0.1 to several micromol/l) but also demonstrates significant cytotoxic activities towards eukaryotic cells at slightly higher concentrations. Moreover, at nanomolar concentrations, the peptide also possesses modulatory properties, efficiently enhancing interferon gamma-induced nitric oxide release in murine macrophage-like cell lines. BacSp222 appears to be one of the first examples of multifunctional peptides that breaks the convention of splitting bacteriocins and virulence factors into two unrelated groups.

  6. The Rhodococcus equi virulence protein VapA disrupts endolysosome function and stimulates lysosome biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofe, Adam P; Davis, Luther J; Whittingham, Jean L; Latimer-Bowman, Elizabeth C; Wilkinson, Anthony J; Pryor, Paul R

    2017-04-01

    Rhodococcus equi (R. equi) is an important pulmonary pathogen in foals that often leads to the death of the horse. The bacterium harbors a virulence plasmid that encodes numerous virulence-associated proteins (Vaps) including VapA that is essential for intracellular survival inside macrophages. However, little is known about the precise function of VapA. Here, we demonstrate that VapA causes perturbation to late endocytic organelles with swollen endolysosome organelles having reduced Cathepsin B activity and an accumulation of LBPA, LC3 and Rab7. The data are indicative of a loss of endolysosomal function, which leads cells to upregulate lysosome biogenesis to compensate for the loss of functional endolysosomes. Although there is a high degree of homology of the core region of VapA to other Vap proteins, only the highly conserved core region of VapA, and not VapD of VapG, gives the observed effects on endolysosomes. This is the first demonstration of how VapA works and implies that VapA aids R. equi survival by reducing the impact of lysosomes on phagocytosed bacteria. © 2016 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis after macrophage cell death leads to serial killing of host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahamed, Deeqa; Boulle, Mikael; Ganga, Yashica; Mc Arthur, Chanelle; Skroch, Steven; Oom, Lance; Catinas, Oana; Pillay, Kelly; Naicker, Myshnee; Rampersad, Sanisha; Mathonsi, Colisile; Hunter, Jessica; Wong, Emily B; Suleman, Moosa; Sreejit, Gopalkrishna; Pym, Alexander S; Lustig, Gila; Sigal, Alex

    2017-01-28

    A hallmark of pulmonary tuberculosis is the formation of macrophage-rich granulomas. These may restrict Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) growth, or progress to central necrosis and cavitation, facilitating pathogen growth. To determine factors leading to Mtb proliferation and host cell death, we used live cell imaging to track Mtb infection outcomes in individual primary human macrophages. Internalization of Mtb aggregates caused macrophage death, and phagocytosis of large aggregates was more cytotoxic than multiple small aggregates containing similar numbers of bacilli. Macrophage death did not result in clearance of Mtb. Rather, it led to accelerated intracellular Mtb growth regardless of prior activation or macrophage type. In contrast, bacillary replication was controlled in live phagocytes. Mtb grew as a clump in dead cells, and macrophages which internalized dead infected cells were very likely to die themselves, leading to a cell death cascade. This demonstrates how pathogen virulence can be achieved through numbers and aggregation states.

  8. Immune modulation mediated by cryptococcal laccase promotes pulmonary growth and brain dissemination of virulent Cryptococcus neoformans in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yafeng Qiu

    Full Text Available C. neoformans is a leading cause of fatal mycosis linked to CNS dissemination. Laccase, encoded by the LAC1 gene, is an important virulence factor implicated in brain dissemination yet little is known about the mechanism(s accounting for this observation. Here, we investigated whether the presence or absence of laccase altered the local immune response in the lungs by comparing infections with the highly virulent strain, H99 (which expresses laccase and mutant strain of H99 deficient in laccase (lac1Δ in a mouse model of pulmonary infection. We found that LAC1 gene deletion decreased the pulmonary fungal burden and abolished CNS dissemination at weeks 2 and 3. Furthermore, LAC1 deletion lead to: 1 diminished pulmonary eosinophilia; 2 increased accumulation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells; 3 increased Th1 and Th17 cytokines yet decreased Th2 cytokines; and 4 lung macrophage shifting of the lung macrophage phenotype from M2- towards M1-type activation. Next, we used adoptively transferred CD4+ T cells isolated from pulmonary lymph nodes of mice infected with either lac1Δ or H99 to evaluate the role of laccase-induced immunomodulation on CNS dissemination. We found that in comparison to PBS treated mice, adoptively transferred CD4+ T cells isolated from lac1Δ-infected mice decreased CNS dissemination, while those isolated from H99-infected mice increased CNS dissemination. Collectively, our findings reveal that immune modulation away from Th1/Th17 responses and towards Th2 responses represents a novel mechanism through which laccase can contribute to cryptococcal virulence. Furthermore, our data support the hypothesis that laccase-induced changes in polarization of CD4+ T cells contribute to CNS dissemination.

  9. Transfer of the virulence-associated protein a-bearing plasmid between field strains of virulent and avirulent Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoughton, W; Poole, T; Kuskie, K; Liu, M; Bishop, K; Morrissey, A; Takai, S; Cohen, N

    2013-01-01

    Virulent and avirulent isolates of Rhodococcus equi coexist in equine feces and the environment and are a source of infection for foals. The extent to which plasmid transfer occurs among field strains is ill-defined and this information is important for understanding the epidemiology of R. equi infections of foals. To estimate the frequency of transfer of the virulence plasmid between virulent and avirulent strains of R. equi derived from foals and their environment. None. In vitro study; 5 rifampin-susceptible, virulent R. equi isolates obtained from clinically affected foals or air samples from a farm with a history of recurrent R. equi foal pneumonia were each mixed with 5 rifampin-resistant, avirulent isolates derived from soil samples, using solid medium, at a ratio of 10 donor cells (virulent) per recipient cell. Presumed transconjugates were detected by plating on media with rifampin and colony immunoblotting to detect the presence of the virulence-associated protein A. Three presumed transconjugates were detected among 2,037 recipient colonies, indicating an overall estimated transfer frequency of 0.15% (95% CI, 0.03–0.43%). All 3 transconjugates were associated with a single donor and 2 recipient strains. Genotyping and multiplex PCR of presumed transconjugates demonstrated transfer of the virulence-associated protein A-bearing plasmid between virulent and avirulent R. equi. Transfer of the virulence plasmid occurs with relatively high frequency. These findings could impact strategies to control or prevent R. equi through environmental management.

  10. Extracellular mycobacterial DnaK polarizes macrophages to the M2-like phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael L Lopes

    Full Text Available Macrophages are myeloid cells that play an essential role in inflammation and host defense, regulating immune responses and maintaining tissue homeostasis. Depending on the microenvironment, macrophages can polarize to two distinct phenotypes. The M1 phenotype is activated by IFN-γ and bacterial products, and displays an inflammatory profile, while M2 macrophages are activated by IL-4 and tend to be anti-inflammatory or immunosupressive. It was observed that DnaK from Mycobacterium tuberculosis has immunosuppressive properties, inducing a tolerogenic phenotype in dendritic cells and MDSCs, contributing to graft acceptance and tumor growth. However, its role in macrophage polarization remains to be elucidated. We asked whether DnaK was able to modulate macrophage phenotype. Murine macrophages, derived from bone marrow, or from the peritoneum, were incubated with DnaK and their phenotype compared to M1 or M2 polarized macrophages. Treatment with DnaK leads macrophages to present higher arginase I activity, IL-10 production and FIZZ1 and Ym1 expression. Furthermore, DnaK increased surface levels of CD206. Importantly, DnaK-treated macrophages were able to promote tumor growth in an allogeneic melanoma model. Our results suggest that DnaK polarizes macrophages to the M2-like phenotype and could constitute a virulence factor and is an important immunomodulator of macrophage responses.

  11. Mutations of Francisella novicida that alter the mechanism of its phagocytosis by murine macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-He Lai

    Full Text Available Infection with the bacterial pathogen Francisella tularensis tularensis (F. tularensis causes tularemia, a serious and debilitating disease. Francisella tularensis novicida strain U112 (abbreviated F. novicida, which is closely related to F. tularensis, is pathogenic for mice but not for man, making it an ideal model system for tularemia. Intracellular pathogens like Francisella inhibit the innate immune response, thereby avoiding immune recognition and death of the infected cell. Because activation of inflammatory pathways may lead to cell death, we reasoned that we could identify bacterial genes involved in inhibiting inflammation by isolating mutants that killed infected cells faster than the wild-type parent. We screened a comprehensive transposon library of F. novicida for mutant strains that increased the rate of cell death following infection in J774 macrophage-like cells, as compared to wild-type F. novicida. Mutations in 28 genes were identified as being hypercytotoxic to both J774 and primary macrophages of which 12 were less virulent in a mouse infection model. Surprisingly, we found that F. novicida with mutations in four genes (lpcC, manB, manC and kdtA were taken up by and killed macrophages at a much higher rate than the parent strain, even upon treatment with cytochalasin D (cytD, a classic inhibitor of macrophage phagocytosis. At least 10-fold more mutant bacteria were internalized by macrophages as compared to the parent strain if the bacteria were first fixed with formaldehyde, suggesting a surface structure is required for the high phagocytosis rate. However, bacteria were required to be viable for macrophage toxicity. The four mutant strains do not make a complete LPS but instead have an exposed lipid A. Interestingly, other mutations that result in an exposed LPS core were not taken up at increased frequency nor did they kill host cells more than the parent. These results suggest an alternative, more efficient macrophage

  12. Impact of alginate-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa on alveolar macrophage apoptotic cell clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaslin, Charles A; Petrusca, Daniela N; Poirier, Christophe; Serban, Karina A; Anderson, Gregory G; Petrache, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is a hallmark of lung disease in cystic fibrosis. Acute infection with P. aeruginosa profoundly inhibits alveolar macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis) via direct effect of virulence factors. During chronic infection, P. aeruginosa evades host defense by decreased virulence, which includes the production or, in the case of mucoidy, overproduction of alginate. The impact of alginate on innate immunity, in particular on macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells is not known. We hypothesized that P. aeruginosa strains that exhibit reduced virulence impair macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells and we investigated if the polysaccharide alginate produced by mucoid P. aeruginosa is sufficient to inhibit alveolar macrophage efferocytosis. Rat alveolar or human peripheral blood monocyte (THP-1)-derived macrophage cell lines were exposed in vitro to exogenous alginate or to wild type or alginate-overproducing mucoid P. aeruginosa prior to challenge with apoptotic human Jurkat T-lymphocytes. The importance of LPS contamination and that of structural integrity of alginate polymers was tested using alginate of different purities and alginate lyase, respectively. Alginate inhibited alveolar macrophage efferocytosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This effect was augmented but not exclusively attributed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) present in alginates. Alginate-producing P. aeruginosa inhibited macrophage efferocytosis by more than 50%. A mannuronic-specific alginate lyase did not restore efferocytosis inhibited by exogenous guluronic-rich marine alginate, but had a marked beneficial effect on efferocytosis of alveolar macrophages exposed to mucoid P. aeruginosa. Despite decreased virulence, mucoid P. aeruginosa may contribute to chronic airway inflammation through significant inhibition of alveolar clearance of apoptotic cells and debris. The mechanism by which mucoid bacteria inhibit efferocytosis may involve alginate

  13. Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum CECT 7765 Reduces Obesity-Associated Inflammation by Restoring the Lymphocyte-Macrophage Balance and Gut Microbiota Structure in High-Fat Diet-Fed Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Moya-Pérez

    Full Text Available The role of intestinal dysbiosis in obesity-associated systemic inflammation via the cross-talk with peripheral tissues is under debate. Our objective was to decipher the mechanisms by which intervention in the gut ecosystem with a specific Bifidobacterium strain reduces systemic inflammation and improves metabolic dysfunction in obese high-fat diet (HFD fed mice.Adult male wild-type C57BL-6 mice were fed either a standard or HFD, supplemented with placebo or Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum CECT 7765, for 14 weeks. Lymphocytes, macrophages and cytokine/chemokine concentrations were quantified in blood, gut, liver and adipose tissue using bead-based multiplex assays. Biochemical parameters in serum were determined by ELISA and enzymatic assays. Histology was assessed by hematoxylin-eosin staining. Microbiota was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR.B. pseudocatenulatum CECT 7765 reduced obesity-associated systemic inflammation by restoring the balance between regulatory T cells (Tregs and B lymphocytes and reducing pro-inflammatory cytokines of adaptive (IL-17A and innate (TNF-α immunity and endotoxemia. In the gut, the bifidobacterial administration partially restored the HFD-induced alterations in microbiota, reducing abundances of Firmicutes and of LPS-producing Proteobacteria, paralleled to reductions in B cells, macrophages, and cytokines (IL-6, MCP-1, TNF-α, IL-17A, which could contribute to systemic effects. In adipose tissue, bifidobacterial administration reduced B cells whereas in liver the treatment increased Tregs and shifted different cytokines (MCP-1 plus ILP-10 in adipose tissue and INF-γ plus IL-1β in liver. In both tissues, the bifidobacteria reduced pro-inflammatory macrophages and, TNF-α and IL-17A concentrations. These effects were accompanied by reductions in body weight gain and in serum cholesterol, triglyceride, glucose and insulin levels and improved oral glucose tolerance and insulin

  14. Development of a High Resolution Virulence Allelic Profiling (HReVAP Approach Based on the Accessory Genome of Escherichia coli to Characterize Shiga-toxin Producing E. coli (STEC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria eMichelacci

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC strains possess a large accessory genome composed of virulence genes existing in multiple allelic variants, which sometimes segregate with specific STEC subpopulations. We analyzed the allelic variability of 91 virulence genes of STEC by Real Time PCR followed by melting curves analysis in 713 E. coli strains including 358 STEC. The 91 genes investigated were located on the LEE, OI-57 and OI-122 pathogenicity islands and displayed a total of 476 alleles in the study population. The combinations of the 91 alleles of each strain were termed allelic signatures and used to perform cluster analyses. We termed such an approach High Resolution Virulence Allelic Profiling (HReVAP and used it to investigate the phylogeny of STEC of multiple serogroups. The dendrograms obtained identified groups of STEC segregating approximately with the serogroups and allowed the identification of subpopulations within the single groups. The study of the allelic signatures provided further evidence of the coevolution of the LEE and OI-122, reflecting the occurrence of their acquisition through a single event. The HReVAP analysis represents a sensitive tool for studying the evolution of LEE-positive STEC.

  15. Development of a High Resolution Virulence Allelic Profiling (HReVAP) Approach Based on the Accessory Genome of Escherichia coli to Characterize Shiga-Toxin Producing E. coli (STEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelacci, Valeria; Orsini, Massimiliano; Knijn, Arnold; Delannoy, Sabine; Fach, Patrick; Caprioli, Alfredo; Morabito, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains possess a large accessory genome composed of virulence genes existing in multiple allelic variants, which sometimes segregate with specific STEC subpopulations. We analyzed the allelic variability of 91 virulence genes of STEC by Real Time PCR followed by melting curves analysis in 713 E. coli strains including 358 STEC. The 91 genes investigated were located on the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), OI-57, and OI-122 pathogenicity islands and displayed a total of 476 alleles in the study population. The combinations of the 91 alleles of each strain were termed allelic signatures and used to perform cluster analyses. We termed such an approach High Resolution Virulence Allelic Profiling (HReVAP) and used it to investigate the phylogeny of STEC of multiple serogroups. The dendrograms obtained identified groups of STEC segregating approximately with the serogroups and allowed the identification of subpopulations within the single groups. The study of the allelic signatures provided further evidence of the coevolution of the LEE and OI-122, reflecting the occurrence of their acquisition through a single event. The HReVAP analysis represents a sensitive tool for studying the evolution of LEE-positive STEC. PMID:26941726

  16. Toxoplasma gondii sexual cross in a single naturally infected feline host: Generation of highly mouse-virulent and avirulent clones, genotypically different from clonal types I, II and III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrmann Daland C

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tachyzoite clones obtained from a single Toxoplasma gondii oocyst field sample were genotyped and characterized regarding mouse virulence. PCR-RFLP genotyping of tachyzoites initially isolated from interferon-γ-knockout (GKO mice, BALB/c mice and VERO cell culture using the nine independent, unlinked genetic markers nSAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1 and Apico revealed mixed T. gondii infections showing combinations of type II and type III alleles at different loci. Forty-five individual clones were obtained from all mixed T. gondii tachyzoite cell cultures by limiting dilution. Sixteen T. gondii clones showed type III alleles at all loci and 29 clones displayed a combination of type II and type III alleles at different loci. Five clone groups were identified in total, four of which include T. gondii clones that showed a non-canonical allele pattern and have never been described in natural infections before. All tested clones, except two, were highly virulent in BALB/c mice. The isolation of different non-canonical T. gondii clones originating from an oocyst sample of a single naturally infected cat demonstrate that sexual recombination as well as re-assortment of chromosomes via a sexual cross of T. gondii occur under natural conditions and result in the emergence of clones with increased virulence in mice.

  17. Comparative assessment of Vibrio virulence in marine fish larvae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønneseth, A.; Castillo, D.; D'Alvise, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Vibrionaceae infections are a major obstacle for marine larviculture; however, little is known about virulence differences of Vibrio strains. The virulence of Vibrio strains, mostly isolated from vibriosis outbreaks in farmed fish, was tested in larval challenge trials with cod (Gadus morhua), tu....... Castillo, P.W. D'Alvise, M. Middelboe & L. Gram, unpublished data) and most of the high-virulent strains had acquired virulence genes from other pathogenic Vibrio....

  18. RNAi-Based Functional Genomics Identifies New Virulence Determinants in Mucormycosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchis, Marta; Lopez-Fernandez, Loida; Torres-Martínez, Santiago; Garre, Victoriano; Ruiz-Vázquez, Rosa María

    2017-01-01

    Mucorales are an emerging group of human pathogens that are responsible for the lethal disease mucormycosis. Unfortunately, functional studies on the genetic factors behind the virulence of these organisms are hampered by their limited genetic tractability, since they are reluctant to classical genetic tools like transposable elements or gene mapping. Here, we describe an RNAi-based functional genomic platform that allows the identification of new virulence factors through a forward genetic approach firstly described in Mucorales. This platform contains a whole-genome collection of Mucor circinelloides silenced transformants that presented a broad assortment of phenotypes related to the main physiological processes in fungi, including virulence, hyphae morphology, mycelial and yeast growth, carotenogenesis and asexual sporulation. Selection of transformants with reduced virulence allowed the identification of mcplD, which encodes a Phospholipase D, and mcmyo5, encoding a probably essential cargo transporter of the Myosin V family, as required for a fully virulent phenotype of M. circinelloides. Knock-out mutants for those genes showed reduced virulence in both Galleria mellonella and Mus musculus models, probably due to a delayed germination and polarized growth within macrophages. This study provides a robust approach to study virulence in Mucorales and as a proof of concept identified new virulence determinants in M. circinelloides that could represent promising targets for future antifungal therapies. PMID:28107502

  19. Monocyte and Macrophage Plasticity in Tissue Repair and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Amitava; Sinha, Mithun; Datta, Soma; Abas, Motaz; Chaffee, Scott; Sen, Chandan K.; Roy, Sashwati

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity and high versatility are the characteristic features of the cells of monocyte-macrophage lineage. The mononuclear phagocyte system, derived from the bone marrow progenitor cells, is primarily composed of monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. In regenerative tissues, a central role of monocyte-derived macrophages and paracrine factors secreted by these cells is indisputable. Macrophages are highly plastic cells. On the basis of environmental cues and molecular mediators, these cells differentiate to proinflammatory type I macrophage (M1) or anti-inflammatory or proreparative type II macrophage (M2) phenotypes and transdifferentiate into other cell types. Given a central role in tissue repair and regeneration, the review focuses on the heterogeneity of monocytes and macrophages with current known mechanisms of differentiation and plasticity, including microenvironmental cues and molecular mediators, such as noncoding RNAs. PMID:26118749

  20. Mutation in fucose synthesis gene of Klebsiella pneumoniae affects capsule composition and virulence in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Po-Chang; Chen, Hui-Wen; Wu, Po-Kuan; Wu, Yu-Yang; Lin, Chun-Hung; Wu, June H

    2011-02-01

    The emerging pathogenicity of Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP) is evident by the increasing number of clinical cases of liver abscess (LA) due to KP infection. A unique property of KP is its thick mucoid capsule. The bacterial capsule has been found to contain fucose in KP strains causing LA but not in those causing urinary tract infections. The products of the gmd and wcaG genes are responsible for converting mannose to fucose in KP. A KP strain, KpL1, which is known to have a high death rate in infected mice, was mutated by inserting an apramycin-resistance gene into the gmd. The mutant expressed genes upstream and downstream of gmd, but not gmd itself, as determined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The DNA mapping confirmed the disruption of the gmd gene. This mutant decreased its ability to kill infected mice and showed decreased virulence in infected HepG2 cells. Compared with wild-type KpL1, the gmd mutant lost fucose in capsular polysaccharides, increased biofilm formation and interacted more readily with macrophages. The mutant displayed morphological changes with long filament forms and less uniform sizes. The mutation also converted the serotype from K1 of wild-type to K2 and weak K3. The results indicate that disruption of the fucose synthesis gene affected the pathophysiology of this bacterium and may be related to the virulence of this KpL1 strain.

  1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis blocks annexin-1 crosslinking and thus apoptotic envelope completion on infected cells to maintain virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Huixian; Lee, Jinhee; Ren, Fucheng; Chen, Minjian; Kornfeld, Hardy; Remold, Heinz G.

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages infected with attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Ra become apoptotic, limiting bacterial replication and facilitating antigen presentation. Here, we demonstrate that cells infected with H37Ra became apoptotic after formation of an apoptotic envelope on their surface was complete. This process required exposure of phosphatidylserine on the cell surface followed by deposition of the phospholipid-binding protein annexin-1 and then transglutaminase-mediated crosslinking of annexin-1 via its N-terminal domain. In macrophages infected with virulent strain H37Rv, in contrast, the N-terminal domain of annexin-1 was removed by proteolysis thus preventing completion of the apoptotic envelope, which results in macrophage death by necrosis. Host defense of virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis thus occurs by failure to form the apoptotic envelope, which leads to macrophage necrosis and dissemination of infection in the lung. PMID:18794848

  2. Expansion and Evolution of a Virulent, Extensively Drug-Resistant (Polymyxin B-Resistant), QnrS1-, CTX-M-2-, and KPC-2-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae ST11 International High-Risk Clone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Lúcia; Gaspar, Gilberto Gambero; Bellissimo-Rodrigues, Fernando; Martinez, Roberto; Darini, Ana Lúcia Costa

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we report the early expansion, evolution, and characterization of a multiresistant Klebsiella pneumoniae clone that was isolated with increasing frequency from inpatients in a tertiary-care university hospital in Brazil. Seven carbapenem- and quinolone-resistant and polymyxin B-susceptible or -resistant K. pneumoniae isolates isolated between December 2012 and February 2013 were investigated. Beta-lactamase- and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR)-encoding genes and the genetic environment were investigated using PCR, sequencing, and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Clonal relatedness was established using XbaI–pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and phylogenetic group characterization. Plasmid analyses included PCR-based replicon typing (PBRT) and hybridization of the S1-PFGE product, plasmid MLST, and conjugation experiments. Virulence potential was assessed by PCR by searching for 10 virulence factor-encoding genes (ureA, fimH, kfuBC, uge, wabG, magA, mrkD, allS, rmpA, and cf29a) and by phenotypic tests to analyze the hypermucoviscous phenotype. The genetic context of a multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant K. pneumoniae ST11-KpI clone harboring IncFIIk-Tn4401a-blaKPC-2, qnrS1, and blaCTX-M-2 was found. Moreover, three isolates displayed high resistance to polymyxin B (MICs = 32, 32, and 128 mg/liter) as well as mucous and hypermucoviscous phenotypes. These bacteria also harbored ureA, fimH, uge, wabG, and mrkD, which code for virulence factors associated with binding, biofilm formation, and the ability to colonize and escape from phagocytosis. Our study describes the association of important coresistance and virulence factors in the K. pneumoniae ST11 international high-risk clone, which makes this pathogen successful at infections and points to the quick expansion and evolution of this multiresistant and virulent clone, leading to a pandrug-resistant phenotype and

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Highly Virulent Race 4/Biovar 3 of Ralstonia solanacearum CaRs_Mep Causing Bacterial Wilt in Zingiberaceae Plants in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munjal, Vibhuti; Sheoran, Neelam; Prameela, Thekkan Puthiyaveedu; Suseelabhai, Rajamma; Aggarwal, Rashmi; Jain, Rakesh Kumar; Eapen, Santhosh J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genome of Ralstonia solanacearum CaRs_Mep, a race 4/biovar 3/phylotype I bacterium causing wilt in small cardamom and other Zingiberaceae plants, was sequenced. Analysis of the 5.7-Mb genome sequence will aid in better understanding of the genetic determinants of host range, host jump, survival, pathogenicity, and virulence of race 4 of R. solanacearum. PMID:28057749

  4. Generation of an infectious clone of VR-2332, a highly virulent North American type isolate of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H.S.; Liu, G.; Nielsen, Jens

    2003-01-01

    -2332 strain. However, the cloned virus was clearly distinguishable from the parental VR-2332 strain by an engineered marker, a BstZ171 restriction site. The full-length cDNA clone had 11 nucleotide changes, 2 of which affected coding, compared to the parental VR-2332 strain. Additionally...... mechanisms behind PRRSV virulence and attenuation, which might in turn allow the production of second-generation, genetically engineered PRRSV vaccines....

  5. Fine tuning inflammation at the front door: macrophage complement receptor 3-mediates phagocytosis and immune suppression for Francisella tularensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shipan Dai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Complement receptor 3 (CR3, CD11b/CD18 is a major macrophage phagocytic receptor. The biochemical pathways through which CR3 regulates immunologic responses have not been fully characterized. Francisella tularensis is a remarkably infectious, facultative intracellular pathogen of macrophages that causes tularemia. Early evasion of the host immune response contributes to the virulence of F. tularensis and CR3 is an important receptor for its phagocytosis. Here we confirm that efficient attachment and uptake of the highly virulent Type A F. tularensis spp. tularensis strain Schu S4 by human monocyte-derived macrophages (hMDMs requires complement C3 opsonization and CR3. However, despite a>40-fold increase in uptake following C3 opsonization, Schu S4 induces limited pro-inflammatory cytokine production compared with non-opsonized Schu S4 and the low virulent F. novicida. This suggests that engagement of CR3 by opsonized Schu S4 contributes specifically to the immune suppression during and shortly following phagocytosis which we demonstrate by CD11b siRNA knockdown in hMDMs. This immune suppression is concomitant with early inhibition of ERK1/2, p38 MAPK and NF-κB activation. Furthermore, TLR2 siRNA knockdown shows that pro-inflammatory cytokine production and MAPK activation in response to non-opsonized Schu S4 depends on TLR2 signaling providing evidence that CR3-TLR2 crosstalk mediates immune suppression for opsonized Schu S4. Deletion of the CD11b cytoplasmic tail reverses the CR3-mediated decrease in ERK and p38 activation during opsonized Schu-S4 infection. The CR3-mediated signaling pathway involved in this immune suppression includes Lyn kinase and Akt activation, and increased MKP-1, which limits TLR2-mediated pro-inflammatory responses. These data indicate that while the highly virulent F. tularensis uses CR3 for efficient uptake, optimal engagement of this receptor down-regulates TLR2-dependent pro-inflammatory responses by inhibiting

  6. The killing of macrophages by Corynebacterium ulcerans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Elena; Ott, Lisa; Schulze-Luehrmann, Jan; Lührmann, Anja; Wiesmann, Veit; Wittenberg, Thomas; Burkovski, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium ulcerans is an emerging pathogen transmitted by a zoonotic pathway with a very broad host spectrum to humans. Despite rising numbers of infections and potentially fatal outcomes, data on the molecular basis of pathogenicity are scarce. In this study, the interaction of 2 C. ulcerans isolates - one from an asymptomatic dog, one from a fatal case of human infection - with human macrophages was investigated. C. ulcerans strains were able to survive in macrophages for at least 20 hours. Uptake led to delay of phagolysosome maturation and detrimental effects on the macrophages as deduced from cytotoxicity measurements and FACS analyses. The data presented here indicate a high infectious potential of this emerging pathogen.

  7. CD8 T cells are involved in skeletal muscle regeneration through facilitating MCP-1 secretion and Gr1(high) macrophage infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Xiao, Zhicheng; Qu, Chao; Cui, Wei; Wang, Xiaonan; Du, Jie

    2014-11-15

    Inflammatory microenvironments play a key role in skeletal muscle regeneration. The infiltration of CD8 T cells into injured muscle has been reported. However, the role of CD8 T cells during skeletal muscle regeneration remains unclear. In this study, we used cardiotoxin-induced mouse skeletal muscle injury/regeneration model to investigate the role of CD8 T cells. Muscle regeneration was impaired and matrix deposit was increased in CD8α-deficient mice compared with wild-type (WT) mice whose CD8 T cells were infiltrated into damaged muscle after cardiotoxin injection. Adoptive transfer of CD8 T cells to CD8α-deficient mice improved muscle regeneration and inhibited matrix remodeling. Compared with WT mice, CD8α deficiency limited the recruitment of Gr1(high) macrophages (MPs) into muscle, resulting in the reduction of satellite cell number. The expression of MCP-1 (MCP-1/CCL2), which regulates the migration of Gr1(high) MPs, was reduced in CD8α-deficient mice compared with WT mice. Coculture CD8 T cells with MPs promoted MCP-1 secretion. The i.m. injection of MCP-1 markedly promoted the recruitment of Gr1(high) MPs and improved muscle regeneration in CD8α-deficient mice. We conclude that CD8 T cells are involved in skeletal muscle regeneration by regulating the secretion of MCP-1 to recruit Gr1(high) MPs, which facilitate myoblast proliferation.

  8. Correlation of Klebsiella pneumoniae comparative genetic analyses with virulence profiles in a murine respiratory disease model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramy A Fodah

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae is a bacterial pathogen of worldwide importance and a significant contributor to multiple disease presentations associated with both nosocomial and community acquired disease. ATCC 43816 is a well-studied K. pneumoniae strain which is capable of causing an acute respiratory disease in surrogate animal models. In this study, we performed sequencing of the ATCC 43816 genome to support future efforts characterizing genetic elements required for disease. Furthermore, we performed comparative genetic analyses to the previously sequenced genomes from NTUH-K2044 and MGH 78578 to gain an understanding of the conservation of known virulence determinants amongst the three strains. We found that ATCC 43816 and NTUH-K2044 both possess the known virulence determinant for yersiniabactin, as well as a Type 4 secretion system (T4SS, CRISPR system, and an acetonin catabolism locus, all absent from MGH 78578. While both NTUH-K2044 and MGH 78578 are clinical isolates, little is known about the disease potential of these strains in cell culture and animal models. Thus, we also performed functional analyses in the murine macrophage cell lines RAW264.7 and J774A.1 and found that MGH 78578 (K52 serotype was internalized at higher levels than ATCC 43816 (K2 and NTUH-K2044 (K1, consistent with previous characterization of the antiphagocytic properties of K1 and K2 serotype capsules. We also examined the three K. pneumoniae strains in a novel BALB/c respiratory disease model and found that ATCC 43816 and NTUH-K2044 are highly virulent (LD50<100 CFU while MGH 78578 is relatively avirulent.

  9. A Yersinia effector with enhanced inhibitory activity on the NF-κB pathway activates the NLRP3/ASC/caspase-1 inflammasome in macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zheng

    2011-04-01

    -inflammatory form of apoptosis may represent an early innate immune response to highly virulent pathogens such as Y. pestis KIM that have evolved an enhanced ability to inhibit host signaling pathways.

  10. Role of pathogenicity determinant protein C (PdpC in determining the virulence of the Francisella tularensis subspecies tularensis SCHU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko Uda

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis subspecies tularensis, the etiological agent of tularemia, is highly pathogenic to humans and animals. However, the SCHU strain of F. tularensis SCHU P0 maintained by passaging in artificial media has been found to be attenuated. To better understand the molecular mechanisms behind the pathogenicity of F. tularensis SCHU, we attempted to isolate virulent bacteria by serial passages in mice. SCHU P5 obtained after 5th passages in mice remained avirulent, while SCHU P9 obtained after 9th passages was completely virulent in mice. Moreover, SCHU P9 grew more efficiently in J774.1 murine macrophages compared with that in the less pathogenic SCHU P0 and P5. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of the whole genomes of SCHU P0, P5, and P9 revealed only 1 nucleotide difference among P0, P5 and P9 in 1 of the 2 copies of pathogenicity determinant protein C (pdpC gene. An adenine residue deletion was observed in the pdpC1 gene of SCHU P0, P5, and P9 and in the pdpC2 gene of SCHU P0, and P5, while P9 was characterized by the wild type pdpC2 gene. Thus, SCHU P0 and P5 expressed only truncated forms of PdpC protein, while SCHU P9 expressed both wild type and truncated versions. To validate the pathogenicity of PdpC, both copies of the pdpC gene in SCHU P9 have been inactivated by Targetron mutagenesis. SCHU P9 mutants with inactivated pdpC gene showed low intracellular growth in J774.1 cells and did not induce severe disease in experimentally infected mice, while virulence of the mutants was restored by complementation with expression of the intact PdpC. These results demonstrate that PdpC is crucial in determining the virulence of F. tularensis SCHU.

  11. HIV-1 Latency in Monocytes/Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 targets CD4+ T cells and cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. HIV pathogenesis is characterized by the depletion of T lymphocytes and by the presence of a population of cells in which latency has been established called the HIV-1 reservoir. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has significantly improved the life of HIV-1 infected patients. However, complete eradication of HIV-1 from infected individuals is not possible without targeting latent sources of infection. HIV-1 establishes latent infection in resting CD4+ T cells and findings indicate that latency can also be established in the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. Monocyte/macrophage lineage includes among others, monocytes, macrophages and brain resident macrophages. These cells are relatively more resistant to apoptosis induced by HIV-1, thus are important stable hideouts of the virus. Much effort has been made in the direction of eliminating HIV-1 resting CD4+ T-cell reservoirs. However, it is impossible to achieve a cure for HIV-1 without considering these neglected latent reservoirs, the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. In this review we will describe our current understanding of the mechanism of latency in monocyte/macrophage lineage and how such cells can be specifically eliminated from the infected host.

  12. Impact of caspase-1/11, -3, -7, or IL-1β/IL-18 deficiency on rabies virus-induced macrophage cell death and onset of disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kip, E; Nazé, F; Suin, V; Vanden Berghe, T; Francart, A; Lamoral, S; Vandenabeele, P; Beyaert, R; Van Gucht, S; Kalai, M

    2017-01-01

    Rabies virus is a highly neurovirulent RNA virus, which causes about 59000 deaths in humans each year. Previously, we described macrophage cytotoxicity upon infection with rabies virus. Here we examined the type of cell death and the role of specific caspases in cell death and disease development upon infection with two laboratory strains of rabies virus: Challenge Virus Standard strain-11 (CVS-11) is highly neurotropic and lethal for mice, while the attenuated Evelyn–Rotnycki–Abelseth (ERA) strain has a broader cell tropism, is non-lethal and has been used as an oral vaccine for animals. Infection of Mf4/4 macrophages with both strains led to caspase-1 activation and IL-1β and IL-18 production, as well as activation of caspases-3, -7, -8, and -9. Moreover, absence of caspase-3, but not of caspase-1 and -11 or -7, partially inhibited virus-induced cell death of bone marrow-derived macrophages. Intranasal inoculation with CVS-11 of mice deficient for either caspase-1 and -11 or -7 or both IL-1β and IL-18 led to general brain infection and lethal disease similar to wild-type mice. Deficiency of caspase-3, on the other hand, significantly delayed the onset of disease, but did not prevent final lethal outcome. Interestingly, deficiency of caspase-1/11, the key executioner of pyroptosis, aggravated disease severity caused by ERA virus, whereas wild-type mice or mice deficient for either caspase-3, -7, or both IL-1β and IL-18 presented the typical mild symptoms associated with ERA virus. In conclusion, rabies virus infection of macrophages induces caspase-1- and caspase-3-dependent cell death. In vivo caspase-1/11 and caspase-3 differently affect disease development in response to infection with the attenuated ERA strain or the virulent CVS-11 strain, respectively. Inflammatory caspases seem to control attenuated rabies virus infection, while caspase-3 aggravates virulent rabies virus infection. PMID:28280602

  13. TGF-β2 induces Grb2 to recruit PI3-K to TGF-RII that activates JNK/AP-1-signaling and augments invasiveness of Theileria-transformed macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidar, Malak; Whitworth, Jessie; Noé, Gaelle; Liu, Wang Qing; Vidal, Michel; Langsley, Gordon

    2015-10-29

    Theileria-infected macrophages display many features of cancer cells such as heightened invasive capacity; however, the tumor-like phenotype is reversible by killing the parasite. Moreover, virulent macrophages can be attenuated by multiple in vitro passages and so provide a powerful model to elucidate mechanisms related to transformed macrophage virulence. Here, we demonstrate that in two independent Theileria-transformed macrophage cell lines Grb2 expression is down-regulated concomitant with loss of tumor virulence. Using peptidimer-c to ablate SH2 and SH3 interactions of Grb2 we identify TGF-receptor II and the p85 subunit of PI3-K, as Grb2 partners in virulent macrophages. Ablation of Grb2 interactions reduces PI3-K recruitment to TGF-RII and decreases PIP3 production, and dampens JNK phosphorylation and AP-1-driven transcriptional activity down to levels characteristic of attenuated macrophages. Loss of TGF-R>PI3-K>JNK>AP-1 signaling negatively impacts on virulence traits such as reduced JAM-L/ITG4A and Fos-B/MMP9 expression that contribute to virulent macrophage adhesion and invasiveness.

  14. Entamoeba histolytica: oxygen resistance and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Martínez, Espiridión; Olivos-García, Alfonso; Saavedra, Emma; Nequiz, Mario; Sánchez, Ernesto C; Tello, Eusebio; El-Hafidi, Mohamed; Saralegui, Andrés; Pineda, Erika; Delgado, José; Montfort, Irmgard; Pérez-Tamayo, Ruy

    2009-05-01

    Entamoeba histolytica virulence has been attributed to several amoebic molecules such as adhesins, amoebapores and cysteine proteinases, but supporting evidence is either partial or indirect. In this work we compared several in vitro and in vivo features of both virulent E. histolytica (vEh) and non-virulent E. histolytica (nvEh) axenic HM-1 IMSS strains, such as complement resistance, proteinase activity, haemolytic, phagocytic and cytotoxic capacities, survival in mice caecum, and susceptibility to O(2). The only difference observed was a higher in vitro susceptibility of nvEh to O(2). The molecular mechanism of that difference was analyzed in both groups of amoebae after high O(2) exposure. vEh O(2) resistance correlated with: (i) higher O(2) reduction (O(2)(-) and H(2)O(2) production); (ii) increased H(2)O(2) resistance and thiol peroxidase activity, and (iii) reversible pyruvate: ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) inhibition. Despite the high level of carbonylated proteins in nvEh after O(2) exposure, membrane oxidation by reactive oxygen species was not observed. These results suggest that the virulent phenotype of E. histolytica is related to the greater ability to reduce O(2) and H(2)O(2) as well as PFOR reactivation, whereas nvEh undergoes irreversible PFOR inhibition resulting in metabolic failure and amoebic death.

  15. Semiautomatic High-Content Analysis of Complex Images from Cocultures of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells and Macrophages: A CellProfiler Showcase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeper, Matthias; Braun-Dullaeus, Ruediger C; Weinert, Sönke

    2017-08-01

    Automatization in microscopy, cell culture, and the ease of digital imagery allow obtainment of more information from single samples and upscaling of image-based analysis to high-content approaches. Simple segmentation algorithms of biological imagery are nowadays widely spread in biomedical research, but processing of complex sample structures, for example, variable sample compositions, cell shapes, and sizes, and rare events remains a difficult task. As there is no perfect method for image segmentation and fully automatic image analysis of complex content, we aimed to succeed by identification of unique and reliable features within the sample. Through exemplary use of a coculture of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and macrophages (MPs), we demonstrate how rare interactions within this highly variable sample type can be analyzed. Because of limitations in immunocytochemistry in our specific setup, we developed a semiautomatic approach to examine the interaction of lipid-laden MPs with VSMCs under hypoxic conditions based on nuclei morphology by high-content analysis using the open-source software CellProfiler ( www.cellprofiler.org ). We provide evidence that, in comparison with fully automatic analysis, a low threshold within the analysis workflow and subsequent manual control save time, while providing more objective and reliable results.

  16. Caspase-9/-3 activation and apoptosis are induced in mouse macrophages upon ingestion and digestion of Escherichia coli bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häcker, Hans; Fürmann, Christine; Wagner, Hermann; Häcker, Georg

    2002-09-15

    A number of highly virulent, intracellular bacteria are known to induce cell death by apoptosis in infected host cells. In this work we demonstrate that phagocytosis of bacteria from the Escherichia coli laboratory strain K12 DH5alpha is a potent cell death stimulus for mouse macrophages. RAW264.7 mouse macrophages took up bacteria and digested them within 2-4 h as investigated with green fluorescent protein-expressing bacteria. No evidence of apoptosis was seen at 8 h postexposure, but at 24 h approximately 70% of macrophages displayed an apoptotic phenotype by a series of parameters. Apoptosis was blocked by inhibition of caspases or by forced expression of the apoptosis-inhibiting protein Bcl-2. Processing of caspase-3 and caspase-9 but not caspase-8 was seen suggesting that the mitochondrial branch of the apoptotic pathway was activated. Active effector caspases could be detected in two different assays. Because the adapter molecule myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) has been implicated in apoptosis, involvement of the Toll-like receptor pathway was investigated. In RAW264.7 cells, heat-treated bacteria were taken up poorly and failed to induce significant apoptosis. However, cell activation was almost identical between live and heat-inactivated bacteria as measured by extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation, generation of free radicals, and TNF secretion. Furthermore, primary bone marrow-derived macrophages from wild-type as well as from MyD88-deficient mice underwent apoptosis upon phagocytosis of bacteria. These results show that uptake and digestion of bacteria leads to MyD88-independent apoptosis in mouse macrophages. This form of cell death might have implications for the generation of the immune response.

  17. Filopodia and membrane blebs drive efficient matrix invasion of macrophages transformed by the intracellular parasite Theileria annulata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Ma

    Full Text Available Recent technical advances have broadened our understanding of processes that govern mammalian cell migration in health and disease but many of the molecular and morphological alterations that precede and accompany movement of cells - in particular in three-dimensional (3D environments - are still incompletely understood. In this manuscript, using high-resolution and time-lapse microscopy imaging approaches, we describe morphodynamic processes during rounded/amoeboid cell invasion and molecules associated with the cellular invasion structures. We used macrophages infected with the intracellular protozoan parasite Theileria annulata, which causes Tropical Theileriosis in susceptible ruminants such as domestic cattle. T. annulata transforms its host cell that, as a result, acquires many characteristics of human cancer cells including a markedly increased potential to migrate, disseminate and expand in the body of the host animal. Hence, virulence of the disease is associated with the capability of infected cells to disseminate inside the host. Using T. annulata-transformed macrophages as a model system, we described a novel mode of rounded/amoeboid macrophage migration. We show that filopodia-like membrane extensions at the leading edge lead the way and further evolve in blebbing membrane protrusions to promote progressive expansion of the matrix. Associated with focal invasion structures we detected ezrin, radixin, moesin-family proteins and their regulatory kinase MAP4K4. Furthermore, we linked Rho-kinase activity to contractile force generation, which is essential for infected cell motility. Thus, the motility mode of these parasite-transformed macrophages contrasts with those described so far in human macrophages such as the tunneling or mesenchymal modes, which require engulfment, compaction and ingestion of matrix or proteolytic matrix degradation, respectively. Together, our data reveal protrusion dynamics at the leading edge of invading

  18. Establishment of an In vitro System to Study Intracellular Behavior of Candida glabrata in Human THP-1 Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Maruti Nandan; Borah, Sapan; Gorityala, Neelima; Kaur, Rupinder

    2013-01-01

    A cell culture model system, if a close mimic of host environmental conditions, can serve as an inexpensive, reproducible and easily manipulatable alternative to animal model systems for the study of a specific step of microbial pathogen infection. A human monocytic cell line THP-1 which, upon phorbol ester treatment, is differentiated into macrophages, has previously been used to study virulence strategies of many intracellular pathogens including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Here, we discuss a protocol to enact an in vitro cell culture model system using THP-1 macrophages to delineate the interaction of an opportunistic human yeast pathogen Candida glabrata with host phagocytic cells. This model system is simple, fast, amenable to high-throughput mutant screens, and requires no sophisticated equipment. A typical THP-1 macrophage infection experiment takes approximately 24 hr with an additional 24-48 hr to allow recovered intracellular yeast to grow on rich medium for colony forming unit-based viability analysis. Like other in vitro model systems, a possible limitation of this approach is difficulty in extrapolating the results obtained to a highly complex immune cell circuitry existing in the human host. However, despite this, the current protocol is very useful to elucidate the strategies that a fungal pathogen may employ to evade/counteract antimicrobial response and survive, adapt, and proliferate in the nutrient-poor environment of host immune cells. PMID:24378622

  19. Inhibition of Cronobacter sakazakii Virulence Factors by Citral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chao; Sun, Yi; Liu, Zhiyuan; Guo, Du; Sun, Huihui; Sun, Zheng; Chen, Shan; Zhang, Wenting; Wen, Qiwu; Peng, Xiaoli; Xia, Xiaodong

    2017-01-01

    Cronobacter sakazakii is a foodborne pathogen associated with fatal forms of necrotizing enterocolitis, meningitis and sepsis in neonates and infants. The aim of this study was to determine whether citral, a major component of lemongrass oil, could suppress putative virulence factors of C. sakazakii that contribute to infection. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of citral significantly decreased motility, quorum sensing, biofilm formation and endotoxin production. Citral substantially reduced the adhesion and invasion of C. sakazakii to Caco-2 cells and decreased bacterial survival and replication within the RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. Citral also repressed the expression of eighteen genes involved in the virulence. These findings suggest that citral has potential to be developed as an alternative or supplemental agent to mitigate the infections caused by C. sakazakii. PMID:28233814

  20. Metabolism of the vacuolar pathogen Legionella and implications for virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eManske

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a ubiquitous environmental bacterium that thrives in fresh water habitats, either as planktonic form or as part of biofilms. The bacteria also grow intracellularly in free-living protozoa as well as in mammalian alveolar macrophages, thus triggering a potentially fatal pneumonia called Legionnaires’ disease. To establish its intracellular niche termed the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV, L. pneumophila employs a type IV secretion system and translocates ~300 different effector proteins into host cells. The pathogen switches between two distinct forms to grow in its extra- or intracellular niches: transmissive bacteria are virulent for phagocytes, and replicative bacteria multiply within their hosts. The switch between these forms is regulated by different metabolic cues that signal conditions favorable for replication or transmission, respectively, causing a tight link between metabolism and virulence of the bacteria.Amino acids represent the prime carbon and energy source of extra- or intracellularly growing L. pneumophila. Yet, the genome sequences of several Legionella spp. as well as transcriptome and proteome data and metabolism studies indicate that the bacteria possess broad catabolic capacities and also utilize carbohydrates such as glucose. Accordingly, L. pneumophila mutant strains lacking catabolic genes show intracellular growth defects, and thus, intracellular metabolism and virulence of the pathogen are intimately connected. In this review we will summarize recent findings on the extra- and intracellular metabolism of L. pneumophila using genetic, biochemical and cellular microbial approaches. Recent progress in this field sheds light on the complex interplay between metabolism, differentiation and virulence of the pathogen.

  1. Metabolism of the vacuolar pathogen Legionella and implications for virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manske, Christian; Hilbi, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a ubiquitous environmental bacterium that thrives in fresh water habitats, either as planktonic form or as part of biofilms. The bacteria also grow intracellularly in free-living protozoa as well as in mammalian alveolar macrophages, thus triggering a potentially fatal pneumonia called "Legionnaires' disease." To establish its intracellular niche termed the "Legionella-containing vacuole" (LCV), L. pneumophila employs a type IV secretion system and translocates ~300 different "effector" proteins into host cells. The pathogen switches between two distinct forms to grow in its extra- or intracellular niches: transmissive bacteria are virulent for phagocytes, and replicative bacteria multiply within their hosts. The switch between these forms is regulated by different metabolic cues that signal conditions favorable for replication or transmission, respectively, causing a tight link between metabolism and virulence of the bacteria. Amino acids represent the prime carbon and energy source of extra- or intracellularly growing L. pneumophila. Yet, the genome sequences of several Legionella spp. as well as transcriptome and proteome data and metabolism studies indicate that the bacteria possess broad catabolic capacities and also utilize carbohydrates such as glucose. Accordingly, L. pneumophila mutant strains lacking catabolic genes show intracellular growth defects, and thus, intracellular metabolism and virulence of the pathogen are intimately connected. In this review we will summarize recent findings on the extra- and intracellular metabolism of L. pneumophila using genetic, biochemical and cellular microbial approaches. Recent progress in this field sheds light on the complex interplay between metabolism, differentiation and virulence of the pathogen.

  2. Drug Trafficking into Macrophages via the Endocytotic Receptor CD163.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2015-06-23

    In inflammatory diseases, macrophages are a main producer of a range of cytokines regulating the inflammatory state. This also includes inflammation induced by tumor growth, which recruits so-called tumor-associated macrophages supporting tumor growth. Macrophages are therefore relevant targets for cytotoxic or phenotype-modulating drugs in the treatment of inflammatory and cancerous diseases. Such targeting of macrophages has been tried using the natural propensity of macrophages to non-specifically phagocytose circulating foreign particulate material. In addition, the specific targeting of macrophage-expressed receptors has been used in order to obtain a selective uptake in macrophages and reduce adverse effects of off-target delivery of drugs. CD163 is a highly expressed macrophage-specific endocytic receptor that has been studied for intracellular delivery of small molecule drugs to macrophages using targeted liposomes or antibody drug conjugates. This review will focus on the biology of CD163 and its potential role as a target for selective macrophage targeting compared with other macrophage targeting approaches.

  3. Nanomedicine engulfed by macrophages for targeted tumor therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Siwen; Feng, Song; Ding, Li; Liu, Yuxi; Zhu, Qiuyun; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages, exhibiting high intrinsic accumulation and infiltration into tumor tissues, are a novel drug vehicle for directional drug delivery. However, the low drug-loading (DL) capacity and the drug cytotoxicity to the cell vehicle have limited the application of macrophages in tumor therapy. In this study, different drugs involving small molecular and nanoparticle drugs were loaded into intrinsic macrophages to find a better way to overcome these limitations. Their DL capacity and cytotoxicity to the macrophages were first compared. Furthermore, their phagocytic ratio, dynamic distributions, and tumoricidal effects were also investigated. Results indicated that more lipid-soluble molecules and DL particles can be phagocytized by macrophages than hydrophilic ones. In addition, the N-succinyl-N′-octyl chitosan (SOC) DL particles showed low cytotoxicity to the macrophage itself, while the dynamic biodistribution of macrophages engulfed with different particles/small molecules showed similar profiles, mainly excreted from liver to intestine pathway. Furthermore, macrophages loaded with SOC–paclitaxel (PTX) particles exhibited greater therapeutic efficacies than those of macrophages directly carrying small molecular drugs such as doxorubicin and PTX. Interestingly, macrophages displayed stronger targeting ability to the tumor site hypersecreting chemokine in immunocompetent mice in comparison to the tumor site secreting low levels of chemokine in immunodeficiency mice. Finally, results demonstrated that macrophages carrying SOC–PTX are a promising pharmaceutical preparation for tumor-targeted therapy. PMID:27601898

  4. Drug Trafficking into Macrophages via the Endocytotic Receptor CD163

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2015-01-01

    In inflammatory diseases, macrophages are a main producer of a range of cytokines regulating the inflammatory state. This also includes inflammation induced by tumor growth, which recruits so-called tumor-associated macrophages supporting tumor growth. Macrophages are therefore relevant targets for cytotoxic or phenotype-modulating drugs in the treatment of inflammatory and cancerous diseases. Such targeting of macrophages has been tried using the natural propensity of macrophages to non-specifically phagocytose circulating foreign particulate material. In addition, the specific targeting of macrophage-expressed receptors has been used in order to obtain a selective uptake in macrophages and reduce adverse effects of off-target delivery of drugs. CD163 is a highly expressed macrophage-specific endocytic receptor that has been studied for intracellular delivery of small molecule drugs to macrophages using targeted liposomes or antibody drug conjugates. This review will focus on the biology of CD163 and its potential role as a target for selective macrophage targeting compared with other macrophage targeting approaches. PMID:26111002

  5. Macrophage subsets and microglia in multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Along with microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages, macrophages in the perivascular space, choroid plexus, and meninges are the principal effector cells in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. These phagocytes are highly heterogeneous cells displaying spatial- and temporal-dependent identities in the healthy, injured, and inflamed CNS. In the last decade, researchers have debated on whether phagocytes subtypes and phenotypes are pathogenic or protective in CNS pathologies. In...

  6. Association between high levels of blood macrophage migration inhibitory factor, inappropriate adrenal response, and early death in patients with severe sepsis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emonts, M.; Sweep, C.G.J.; Grebenchtchikov, N.I.; Geurts-Moespot, A.; Knaup, M.; Chanson, A.L.; Erard, V.; Renner, P.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Hazelzet, J.A.; Calandra, T.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Identification of new therapeutic targets remains an imperative goal to improve the morbidity and mortality associated with severe sepsis and septic shock. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a proinflammatory cytokine and counterregulator of glucocorticoids, has recently

  7. Interactions between neutrophils and macrophages promote macrophage killing of rat muscle cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hal X.; Tidball, James G.

    2003-01-01

    Current evidence indicates that the physiological functions of inflammatory cells are highly sensitive to their microenvironment, which is partially determined by the inflammatory cells and their potential targets. In the present investigation, interactions between neutrophils, macrophages and muscle cells that may influence muscle cell death are examined. Findings show that in the absence of macrophages, neutrophils kill muscle cells in vitro by superoxide-dependent mechanisms, and that low concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) protect against neutrophil-mediated killing. In the absence of neutrophils, macrophages kill muscle cells through a NO-dependent mechanism, and the presence of target muscle cells causes a three-fold increase in NO production by macrophages, with no change in the concentration of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Muscle cells that are co-cultured with both neutrophils and macrophages in proportions that are observed in injured muscle show cytotoxicity through a NO-dependent, superoxide-independent mechanism. Furthermore, the concentration of myeloid cells that is necessary for muscle killing is greatly reduced in assays that use mixed myeloid cell populations, rather than uniform populations of neutrophils or macrophages. These findings collectively show that the magnitude and mechanism of muscle cell killing by myeloid cells are modified by interactions between muscle cells and neutrophils, between muscle cells and macrophages and between macrophages and neutrophils.

  8. High virulence differences among phylogenetically distinct isolates of the fish rhabdovirus viral hemorrhagic septicaemia virus are not explained by variability of the surface glycoprotein G or the non-virion protein Nv

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einer-Jensen, Katja; Harmache, Abdallah; Biacchesi, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) is an important viral pathogen in European rainbow trout farming. Isolates from wild marine fish and freshwater trout farms show highly different virulence profiles: isolates from marine fish species cause little or no mortality in rainbow trout following......-related novirhabdovirus [infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV)], four chimaeric IHNV–VHSV recombinant viruses were generated. These chimaeric viruses included substitution of the IHNV glyco- (G) or non-structural (Nv) protein with their counterparts from either a trout-derived or a marine VHSV strain...

  9. The influence of molecular weight, crosslinking and counterface roughness on TNF-alpha production by macrophages in response to ultra high molecular weight polyethylene particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Joanne Helen; Stone, Martin; Fisher, John; Ingham, Eileen

    2004-08-01

    The response of murine macrophages to clinically relevant polyethylene wear particles generated from different polyethylenes at various time points and volumetric doses in vitro was evaluated. Clinically relevant ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) wear debris was generated in vitro in a lubricant of RPMI 1640 supplemented with 25% (v/v) foetal calf serum using a multi-directional pin-on-plate wear rig under sterile conditions. Wear debris was cultured with C3H murine peritoneal macrophages at various particle volume (microm(3)): cell number ratios. The secretion of TNF-alpha was determined by ELISA. Initially the effect of molecular weight of UHMWPE was considered. Higher molecular weight GUR415HP was shown to have a lower wear rate than the lower molecular weight GUR1120, however a greater volume of the wear debris produced by the high molecular weight GUR415HP was in the 0.1-1.0 microm size range. Wear debris from GUR415HP produced significant levels of TNF-alpha at a concentration of 1 microm(3)/cell while at least 10 microm(3)/cell of GUR1120 wear debris per cell was needed to produce significant levels of TNF-alpha. Secondly the effects of crosslinking GUR1050 was examined when worn against a scratched counterface. The wear rate of the material was shown to decrease as the level of crosslinking increased. However the materials crosslinked with 5 and 10 Mrad of gamma irradiation produced higher percentages of 0.1-1.0 microm size wear particles than the non-crosslinked material. While the crosslinked material was able to stimulate cells to produce significantly elevated TNF-alpha levels at a particle concentration of just 0.1 microm(3)/cell only concentrations of 10 microm(3)/cell and above of the non-crosslinked wear debris were stimulatory. When the counterface was changed from scratched to smooth the wear rate for all three GUR1050 materials was further reduced. For the first time nanometre size wear particles were observed from polyethylene

  10. Macrophage polarisation: an immunohistochemical approach for identifying M1 and M2 macrophages.

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    Mário Henrique M Barros

    Full Text Available Macrophage polarization is increasingly recognised as an important pathogenetic factor in inflammatory and neoplastic diseases. Proinflammatory M1 macrophages promote T helper (Th 1 responses and show tumoricidal activity. M2 macrophages contribute to tissue repair and promote Th2 responses. CD68 and CD163 are used to identify macrophages in tissue sections. However, characterisation of polarised macrophages in situ has remained difficult. Macrophage polarisation is regulated by transcription factors, pSTAT1 and RBP-J for M1, and CMAF for M2. We reasoned that double-labelling immunohistochemistry for the detection of macrophage markers together with transcription factors may be suitable to characterise macrophage polarisation in situ. To test this hypothesis, we have studied conditions associated with Th1- and Th2-predominant immune responses: infectious mononucleosis and Crohn's disease for Th1 and allergic nasal polyps, oxyuriasis, wound healing and foreign body granulomas for predominant Th2 response. In all situations, CD163+ cells usually outnumbered CD68+ cells. Moreover, CD163+ cells, usually considered as M2 macrophages, co-expressing pSTAT1 and RBP-J were found in all conditions examined. The numbers of putative M1 macrophages were higher in Th1- than in Th2-associated diseases, while more M2 macrophages were seen in Th2- than in Th1 related disorders. In most Th1-related diseases, the balance of M1 over M2 cells was shifted towards M1 cells, while the reverse was observed for Th2-related conditions. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed two distinct clusters: cluster I included Th1 diseases together with cases with high numbers of CD163+pSTAT1+, CD68+pSTAT1+, CD163+RBP-J+ and CD68+RBP-J+ macrophages; cluster II comprised Th2 conditions together with cases displaying high numbers of CD163+CMAF+ and CD68+CMAF+ macrophages. These results suggest that the detection of pSTAT1, RBP-J, and CMAF in the context of CD68 or CD163 expression is a

  11. High Intracellular Concentrations of Posaconazole Do Not Impact on Functional Capacities of Human Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils and Monocyte-Derived Macrophages In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farowski, Fedja; Cornely, Oliver A; Hartmann, Pia

    2016-06-01

    Posaconazole is a commonly used antifungal for the prophylaxis and treatment of invasive fungal infections. We previously demonstrated that the intracellular concentration of posaconazole in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) was greatly increased compared to the plasma concentration. As these professional phagocytes are crucial to combat fungal infections, we set out to investigate if and how, beneficial or deleterious, this high loading of intracellular posaconazole impacts the functional capacities of these cells. Here, we show that high intracellular concentrations of posaconazole do not significantly impact PMN and monocyte-derived macrophage function in vitro In particular, killing capacity and cytoskeletal features of PMN, such as migration, are not affected, indicating that these cells serve as vehicles for posaconazole to the site of infection. Moreover, since posaconazole as such slowed the germination of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia, infected neutrophils released less reactive oxygen species (ROS). Based on these findings, we propose that the delivery of posaconazole by neutrophils to the site of Aspergillus species infection warrants control of the pathogen and preservation of tissue integrity at the same time.

  12. Glutamine Modulates Macrophage Lipotoxicity

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    Li He

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and diabetes are associated with excessive inflammation and impaired wound healing. Increasing evidence suggests that macrophage dysfunction is responsible for these inflammatory defects. In the setting of excess nutrients, particularly dietary saturated fatty acids (SFAs, activated macrophages develop lysosome dysfunction, which triggers activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and cell death. The molecular pathways that connect lipid stress to lysosome pathology are not well understood, but may represent a viable target for therapy. Glutamine uptake is increased in activated macrophages leading us to hypothesize that in the context of excess lipids glutamine metabolism could overwhelm the mitochondria and promote the accumulation of toxic metabolites. To investigate this question we assessed macrophage lipotoxicity in the absence of glutamine using LPS-activated peritoneal macrophages exposed to the SFA palmitate. We found that glutamine deficiency reduced lipid induced lysosome dysfunction, inflammasome activation, and cell death. Under glutamine deficient conditions mTOR activation was decreased and autophagy was enhanced; however, autophagy was dispensable for the rescue phenotype. Rather, glutamine deficiency prevented the suppressive effect of the SFA palmitate on mitochondrial respiration and this phenotype was associated with protection from macrophage cell death. Together, these findings reveal that crosstalk between activation-induced metabolic reprogramming and the nutrient microenvironment can dramatically alter macrophage responses to inflammatory stimuli.

  13. Brucella, nitrogen and virulence.

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    Ronneau, Severin; Moussa, Simon; Barbier, Thibault; Conde-Álvarez, Raquel; Zuniga-Ripa, Amaia; Moriyon, Ignacio; Letesson, Jean-Jacques

    2016-08-01

    The brucellae are α-Proteobacteria causing brucellosis, an important zoonosis. Although multiplying in endoplasmic reticulum-derived vacuoles, they cause no cell death, suggesting subtle but efficient use of host resources. Brucellae are amino-acid prototrophs able to grow with ammonium or use glutamate as the sole carbon-nitrogen source in vitro. They contain more than twice amino acid/peptide/polyamine uptake genes than the amino-acid auxotroph Legionella pneumophila, which multiplies in a similar vacuole, suggesting a different nutritional strategy. During these two last decades, many mutants of key actors in nitrogen metabolism (transporters, enzymes, regulators, etc.) have been described to be essential for full virulence of brucellae. Here, we review the genomic and experimental data on Brucella nitrogen metabolism and its connection with virulence. An analysis of various aspects of this metabolism (transport, assimilation, biosynthesis, catabolism, respiration and regulation) has highlighted differences and similarities in nitrogen metabolism with other α-Proteobacteria. Together, these data suggest that, during their intracellular life cycle, the brucellae use various nitrogen sources for biosynthesis, catabolism and respiration following a strategy that requires prototrophy and a tight regulation of nitrogen use.

  14. Macrophages Are Required For Inflammasome-Dependent Host Defense In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, William J.B.; Freisinger, Christina M.; Lam, Pui-ying; Huttenlocher, Anna; Sauer, John-Demian

    2016-01-01

    Summary The inflammasome is an innate immune complex whose rapid inflammatory outputs play a critical role in controlling infection, however the host cells that mediate inflammasome responses in vivo are not well defined. Using zebrafish larvae, we examined the cellular immune responses to inflammasome activation during infection. We compared the host responses to two Listeria monocytogenes strains: wild type and Lm-pyro, a strain engineered to activate the inflammasome via ectopic expression of flagellin. Infection with Lm-pyro led to activation of the inflammasome, macrophage pyroptosis, and ultimately attenuation of virulence. Depletion of caspase A, the zebrafish caspase-1 homolog, restored Lm-pyro virulence. Inflammasome activation specifically recruited macrophages to infection sites, whereas neutrophils were equally recruited to WT and Lm-pyro infections. Similar to caspase A depletion, macrophage deficiency rescued Lm-pyro virulence to wild type levels, while defective neutrophils had no specific effect. Neutrophils were however important for general clearance of L. monocytogenes, as both wild type and Lm-pyro were more virulent in larvae with defective neutrophils. This study characterizes a novel model for inflammasome studies in an intact host, establishes the importance of macrophages during inflammasome responses, and adds importance to the role of neutrophils in controlling L. monocytogenes infections. PMID:26468080

  15. Deep-sequencing analysis of the mouse transcriptome response to infection with Brucella melitensis strains of differing virulence.

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    Fangkun Wang

    Full Text Available Brucella melitensis is an important zoonotic pathogen that causes brucellosis, a disease that affects sheep, cattle and occasionally humans. B. melitensis strain M5-90, a live attenuated vaccine cultured from B. melitensis strain M28, has been used as an effective tool in the control of brucellosis in goats and sheep in China. However, the molecular changes leading to attenuated virulence and pathogenicity in B. melitensis remain poorly understood. In this study we employed the Illumina Genome Analyzer platform to perform genome-wide digital gene expression (DGE analysis of mouse peritoneal macrophage responses to B. melitensis infection. Many parallel changes in gene expression profiles were observed in M28- and M5-90-infected macrophages, suggesting that they employ similar survival strategies, notably the induction of anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic factors. Moreover, 1019 differentially expressed macrophage transcripts were identified 4 h after infection with the different B. melitensis strains, and these differential transcripts notably identified genes involved in the lysosome and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways. Further analysis employed gene ontology (GO analysis: high-enrichment GOs identified endocytosis, inflammatory, apoptosis, and transport pathways. Path-Net and Signal-Net analysis highlighted the MAPK pathway as the key regulatory pathway. Moreover, the key differentially expressed genes of the significant pathways were apoptosis-related. These findings demonstrate previously unrecognized changes in gene transcription that are associated with B. melitensis infection of macrophages, and the central signaling pathways identified here merit further investigation. Our data provide new insights into the molecular attenuation mechanism of strain M5-90 and will facilitate the generation of new attenuated vaccine strains with enhanced efficacy.

  16. Deep-sequencing analysis of the mouse transcriptome response to infection with Brucella melitensis strains of differing virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangkun; Hu, Sen; Liu, Wenxing; Qiao, Zujian; Gao, Yuzhe; Bu, Zhigao

    2011-01-01

    Brucella melitensis is an important zoonotic pathogen that causes brucellosis, a disease that affects sheep, cattle and occasionally humans. B. melitensis strain M5-90, a live attenuated vaccine cultured from B. melitensis strain M28, has been used as an effective tool in the control of brucellosis in goats and sheep in China. However, the molecular changes leading to attenuated virulence and pathogenicity in B. melitensis remain poorly understood. In this study we employed the Illumina Genome Analyzer platform to perform genome-wide digital gene expression (DGE) analysis of mouse peritoneal macrophage responses to B. melitensis infection. Many parallel changes in gene expression profiles were observed in M28- and M5-90-infected macrophages, suggesting that they employ similar survival strategies, notably the induction of anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic factors. Moreover, 1019 differentially expressed macrophage transcripts were identified 4 h after infection with the different B. melitensis strains, and these differential transcripts notably identified genes involved in the lysosome and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. Further analysis employed gene ontology (GO) analysis: high-enrichment GOs identified endocytosis, inflammatory, apoptosis, and transport pathways. Path-Net and Signal-Net analysis highlighted the MAPK pathway as the key regulatory pathway. Moreover, the key differentially expressed genes of the significant pathways were apoptosis-related. These findings demonstrate previously unrecognized changes in gene transcription that are associated with B. melitensis infection of macrophages, and the central signaling pathways identified here merit further investigation. Our data provide new insights into the molecular attenuation mechanism of strain M5-90 and will facilitate the generation of new attenuated vaccine strains with enhanced efficacy.

  17. Typification of virulent and low virulence Babesia bigemina clones by 18S rRNA and rap-1c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, C; Baravalle, M E; Valentini, B; Mangold, A; Torioni de Echaide, S; Ruybal, P; Farber, M; Echaide, I

    2014-06-01

    The population structure of original Babesia bigemina isolates and reference strains with a defined phenotypic profile was assessed using 18S rRNA and rap-1c genes. Two reference strains, BbiS2P-c (virulent) and BbiS1A-c (low virulence), were biologically cloned in vitro. The virulence profile of the strains and clones was assessed in vivo. One fully virulent and one low-virulence clone were mixed in identical proportions to evaluate their growth efficiency in vitro. Each clone was differentiated by two microsatellites and the gene gp45. The 18S rRNA and rap-1c genes sequences from B. bigemina biological clones and their parental strains, multiplied exclusively in vivo or in vitro, were compared with strain JG-29. The virulence of clones derived from the BbiS2P-c strain was variable. Virulent clone Bbi9P1 grew more efficiently in vitro than did the low-virulence clone Bbi2A1. The haplotypes generated by the nucleotide polymorphism, localized in the V4 region of the 18S rRNA, allowed the identification of three genotypes. The rap-1c haplotypes allowed defining four genotypes. Parental and original strains were defined by multiple haplotypes identified in both genes. The rap-1c gene, analyzed by high-resolution melting (HRM), allowed discrimination between two genotypes according to their phenotype, and both were different from JG-29. B. bigemina biological clones made it possible to define the population structure of isolates and strains. The polymorphic regions of the 18S rRNA and rap-1c genes allowed the identification of different subpopulations within original B. bigemina isolates by the definition of several haplotypes and the differentiation of fully virulent from low virulence clones.

  18. Comparative assessment of Vibrio virulence in marine fish larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rønneseth, A; Castillo, D; D'Alvise, P; Tønnesen, Ø; Haugland, G; Grotkjaer, T; Engell-Sørensen, K; Nørremark, L; Bergh, Ø; Wergeland, H I; Gram, L

    2017-10-01

    Vibrionaceae infections are a major obstacle for marine larviculture; however, little is known about virulence differences of Vibrio strains. The virulence of Vibrio strains, mostly isolated from vibriosis outbreaks in farmed fish, was tested in larval challenge trials with cod (Gadus morhua), turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) and halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) using a multiwell dish assays with single-egg/larvae cultures. The strains differed significantly in virulence as some caused a high mortality of larva reaching 100% mortality after a few days, while others had no or only marginal effects on survival. Some Vibrio strains were pathogenic in all of the larva species, while some caused disease only in one of the species. Twenty-nine of the Vibrio anguillarum strains increased the mortality of larvae from at least one fish species; however, pathogenicity of the strains differed markedly. Other Vibrio species had no or less pronounced effects on larval mortalities. Iron uptake has been related to V. anguillarum virulence; however, the presence or absence of the plasmid pJM1 encoding anguibactin did not correlate with virulence. The genomes of V. anguillarum were compared (D. Castillo, P.W. D'Alvise, M. Middelboe & L. Gram, unpublished data) and most of the high-virulent strains had acquired virulence genes from other pathogenic Vibrio. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The high-affinity phosphodiesterase BcPde2 has impact on growth, differentiation and virulence of the phytopathogenic ascomycete Botrytis cinerea.

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    Karin Harren

    Full Text Available Components of the cAMP signaling pathway, such as the adenylate cyclase Bac and the protein kinase A (PKA were shown to affect growth, morphogenesis and differentiation as well as virulence of the phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea. While loss of Bac caused drastically reduced intracellular cAMP levels, deletion of the PKA resulted in extremely increased cAMP concentrations. To regulate the intracellular level of the second messenger cAMP, a balance between its biosynthesis through adenylate cyclase activity and its hydrolysis by phosphodiesterases (PDEs is crucial. Here, we report the functional characterization of the two PDEs in the ascomycete B. cinerea, BcPde1 and BcPde2. While deletion of bcpde2 resulted in severely affected vegetative growth, conidiation, germination and virulence, the bcpde1 deletion strain displayed a wild-type-like phenotype. However, the double bcpde1/2 deletion mutant exhibited an even stronger phenotype. Localization studies revealed that BcPde2 accumulates at the plasma membrane, but is also localized in the cytoplasm. BcPde1 was shown to be distributed in the cytoplasm as well, but also accumulates in so far unknown mobile vesicles. Overexpression of bcpde1 in the Δbcpde2 background rescued the deletion phenotype, and in addition an increased transcript level of bcpde1 in the Δbcpde2 strain was observed, indicating redundant functions of both PDEs and an interdependent gene expression.

  20. Analysis of transcriptional activities of the Meq proteins present in highly virulent Marek's disease virus strains, RB1B and Md5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Shiro; Okada, Tsukasa; Kano, Rika; Hayashi, Yuko; Hashiguchi, Tomoyuki; Onuma, Misao; Konnai, Satoru; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2011-08-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is an oncogenic herpesvirus that causes malignant lymphomas in chickens. Recent field isolates of MDV have tended to exhibit increasing virulence, and MDV strains are currently classified into four categories based on their relative virulence. Meq, a putative MDV oncoprotein, resembles the Jun/Fos family of basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors and can regulate the expression of viral and cellular genes as a homodimer or as a heterodimer with a variety of bZIP family proteins. MDV isolates display distinct diversity and point mutations in Meq, which may contribute to changes in the transcriptional activities of Meq and subsequently, to observed increases in MDV oncogenicity. In this study, we introduced mutations into the meq gene and used dual luciferase reporter assays to analyze the transcriptional activities of the resulting Meq proteins to determine whether distinct mutations in Meq could be responsible for differences in transcriptional activity among MDV strains. A proline-to-alanine substitution at position 217, the second position of one of the proline direct repeats in the transactivation domain, enhanced the transactivation activity of Meq. In addition, we found that two substitutions at positions 283 and 320 affected transactivation activity. These results suggest that the distinct diversity of and point mutations in the Meq proteins are responsible for differences in transactivation activity among MDV strains.

  1. MspA-Mycobacterium tuberculosis-transformant with reduced virulence: the "unbirthday paradigm".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamrabet, Otmane; Ghigo, Eric; Mège, Jean-Louis; Lepidi, Hubert; Nappez, Claude; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2014-11-01

    Expressing mspA porin gene from Mycobacterium smegmatis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis attenuated this pathogen. Intracellular growth of the transformants into free-living amoeba and murine and human macrophages decreased. Furthermore, transformants decreased the microbicidal program of human monocyte-derived macrophages. BALB/c mice inoculated with transformants exhibited higher weights, lower histological lesions and lower M. tuberculosis inoculum in the liver, spleen and lungs than control mice challenged with wild-type M. tuberculosis. Preliminary evaluation indicated that mice inoculated with this transformant showed higher weights and lower numbers of lung nodules and tissular mycobacteria than control mice when challenged with wild-type M. tuberculosis. Similar to the paradoxical "unbirthday" gift coined by Lewis Carroll in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, adding mspA gene reduced the virulence of M. tuberculosis and yielded a protective effect. Lost of non-virulence genes is a mechanism for virulence in mycobacteria. Engineering non-virulence genes in M. tuberculosis may yield strains with decreased virulence and increased immunogenicity.

  2. Molecular characterization of transcriptome-wide interactions between highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and porcine alveolar macrophages in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ping; Zhai, Shanli; Zhou, Xiang; Lin, Ping; Jiang, Tengfei; Hu, Xueying; Jiang, Yunbo; Wu, Bin; Zhang, Qingde; Xu, Xuewen; Li, Jin-Ping; Liu, Bang

    2011-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infects mainly the porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) and causes porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS). Previous studies have analyzed the global gene expression profiles of lung tissue in vivo and PAMs in vitro following infection with PRRSV, however, transcriptome-wide understanding of the interaction between highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) and PAMs in vivo has not yet been established. In this study, we employed Affymetrix microarrays to investigate the gene expression patterns of PAMs isolated from Tongcheng piglets (a Chinese indigenous breed) after infection with HP-PRRSV. During the infection, Tongcheng piglets exhibited typical clinical signs, e.g. fever, asthma, coughing, anorexia, lethargy and convulsion, but displayed mild regional lung damage at 5 and 7 dpi. Microarray analysis revealed that HP-PRRSV infection has affected PAMs in expression of the important genes involved in cytoskeleton and exocytosis organization, protein degradation and folding, intracellular calcium and zinc homeostasis. Several potential antiviral strategies might be employed in PAMs, including upregulating IFN-induced genes and increasing intracellular zinc ion concentration. And inhibition of the complement system likely attenuated the lung damage during HP-PRRSV infection. Transcriptomic analysis of PAMs in vivo could lead to a better understanding of the HP-PRRSV-host interaction, and to the identification of novel antiviral therapies and genetic components of swine tolerance/susceptibility to HP-PRRS.

  3. Blocking IL-6 trans-signaling prevents high-fat diet-induced adipose tissue macrophage recruitment but does not improve insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraakman, Michael J; Kammoun, Helene L; Allen, Tamara L; Deswaerte, Virginie; Henstridge, Darren C; Estevez, Emma; Matthews, Vance B; Neill, Bronwyn; White, David A; Murphy, Andrew J; Peijs, Lone; Yang, Christine; Risis, Steve; Bruce, Clinton R; Du, Xiao-Jun; Bobik, Alex; Lee-Young, Robert S; Kingwell, Bronwyn A; Vasanthakumar, Ajithkumar; Shi, Wei; Kallies, Axel; Lancaster, Graeme I; Rose-John, Stefan; Febbraio, Mark A

    2015-03-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) plays a paradoxical role in inflammation and metabolism. The pro-inflammatory effects of IL-6 are mediated via IL-6 "trans-signaling," a process where the soluble form of the IL-6 receptor (sIL-6R) binds IL-6 and activates signaling in inflammatory cells that express the gp130 but not the IL-6 receptor. Here we show that trans-signaling recruits macrophages into adipose tissue (ATM). Moreover, blocking trans-signaling with soluble gp130Fc protein prevents high-fat diet (HFD)-induced ATM accumulation, but does not improve insulin action. Importantly, however, blockade of IL-6 trans-signaling, unlike complete ablation of IL-6 signaling, does not exacerbate obesity-induced weight gain, liver steatosis, or insulin resistance. Our data identify the sIL-6R as a critical chemotactic signal for ATM recruitment and suggest that selectively blocking IL-6 trans-signaling may be a more favorable treatment option for inflammatory diseases, compared with current treatments that completely block the action of IL-6 and negatively impact upon metabolic homeostasis.

  4. Molecular Characterization of Transcriptome-wide Interactions between Highly Pathogenic Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus and Porcine Alveolar Macrophages in vivo

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    Ping Zhou, Shanli Zhai, Xiang Zhou, Ping Lin, Tengfei Jiang, Xueying Hu, Yunbo Jiang, Bin Wu, Qingde Zhang, Xuewen Xu, Jin-ping Li, Bang Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV infects mainly the porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs and causes porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS. Previous studies have analyzed the global gene expression profiles of lung tissue in vivo and PAMs in vitro following infection with PRRSV, however, transcriptome-wide understanding of the interaction between highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV and PAMs in vivo has not yet been established. In this study, we employed Affymetrix microarrays to investigate the gene expression patterns of PAMs isolated from Tongcheng piglets (a Chinese indigenous breed after infection with HP-PRRSV. During the infection, Tongcheng piglets exhibited typical clinical signs, e.g. fever, asthma, coughing, anorexia, lethargy and convulsion, but displayed mild regional lung damage at 5 and 7 dpi. Microarray analysis revealed that HP-PRRSV infection has affected PAMs in expression of the important genes involved in cytoskeleton and exocytosis organization, protein degradation and folding, intracellular calcium and zinc homeostasis. Several potential antiviral strategies might be employed in PAMs, including upregulating IFN-induced genes and increasing intracellular zinc ion concentration. And inhibition of the complement system likely attenuated the lung damage during HP-PRRSV infection. Transcriptomic analysis of PAMs in vivo could lead to a better understanding of the HP-PRRSV-host interaction, and to the identification of novel antiviral therapies and genetic components of swine tolerance/susceptibility to HP-PRRS.

  5. Phenotypic differences in virulence and immune response in closely related clinical isolates of influenza A 2009 H1N1 pandemic viruses in mice.

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    Jeremy V Camp

    Full Text Available To capture the possible genotypic and phenotypic differences of the 2009 influenza A virus H1N1 pandemic (H1N1pdm strains circulating in adult hospitalized patients, we isolated and sequenced nine H1N1pdm viruses from patients hospitalized during 2009-2010 with severe influenza pneumonia in Kentucky. Each viral isolate was characterized in mice along with two additional H1N1 pandemic strains and one seasonal strain to assess replication and virulence. All isolates showed similar levels of replication in nasal turbinates and lung, but varied in their ability to cause morbidity. Further differences were identified in cytokine and chemokine responses. IL-6 and KC were expressed early in mice infected with strains associated with higher virulence. Strains that showed lower pathogenicity in mice had greater IFNγ, MIG, and IL-10 responses. A principal component analysis (PCA of the cytokine and chemokine profiles revealed 4 immune response phenotypes that correlated with the severity of disease. A/KY/180/10, which showed the greatest virulence with a rapid onset of disease progression, was compared in additional studies with A/KY/136/09, which showed low virulence in mice. Analyses comparing a low (KY/136 versus a high (KY/180 virulent isolate showed a significant difference in the kinetics of infection within the lower respiratory tract and immune responses. Notably by 4 DPI, virus titers within the lung, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALf, and cells within the BAL (BALc revealed that the KY/136 replicated in BALc, while KY/180 replication persisted in lungs and BALc. In summary, our studies suggest four phenotypic groups based on immune responses that result in different virulence outcomes in H1N1pdm isolates with a high degree of genetic similarity. In vitro studies with two of these isolates suggested that the more virulent isolate, KY/180, replicates productively in macrophages and this may be a key determinant in tipping the response toward a

  6. The impact of pneumolysin on the macrophage response to Streptococcus pneumoniae is strain-dependent.

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    Richard M Harvey

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is the world's leading cause of pneumonia, bacteremia, meningitis and otitis media. A major pneumococcal virulence factor is the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin, which has the defining property of forming pores in cholesterol-containing membranes. In recent times a clinically significant and internationally successful serotype 1 ST306 clone has been found to express a non-cytolytic variant of Ply (Ply306. However, while the pneumococcus is a naturally transformable organism, strains of the ST306 clonal group have to date been virtually impossible to transform, severely restricting efforts to understand the role of non-cytolytic Ply in the success of this clone. In this study isogenic Ply mutants were constructed in the D39 background and for the first time in the ST306 background (A0229467 to enable direct comparisons between Ply variants for their impact on the immune response in a macrophage-like cell line. Strains that expressed cytolytic Ply were found to induce a significant increase in IL-1β release from macrophage-like cells compared to the non-cytolytic and Ply-deficient strains in a background-independent manner, confirming the requirement for pore formation in the Ply-dependent activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. However, cytolytic activity in the D39 background was found to induce increased expression of the genes encoding GM-CSF (CSF2, p19 subunit of IL-23 (IL23A and IFNβ (IFNB1 compared to non-cytolytic and Ply-deficient D39 mutants, but had no effect in the A0229467 background. The impact of Ply on the immune response to the pneumococcus is highly dependent on the strain background, thus emphasising the importance of the interaction between specific virulence factors and other components of the genetic background of this organism.

  7. Pathogenicity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is expressed by regulating metabolic thresholds of the host macrophage.

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    Parul Mehrotra

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The success of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a pathogen derives from its facile adaptation to the intracellular milieu of human macrophages. To explore this process, we asked whether adaptation also required interference with the metabolic machinery of the host cell. Temporal profiling of the metabolic flux, in cells infected with differently virulent mycobacterial strains, confirmed that this was indeed the case. Subsequent analysis identified the core subset of host reactions that were targeted. It also elucidated that the goal of regulation was to integrate pathways facilitating macrophage survival, with those promoting mycobacterial sustenance. Intriguingly, this synthesis then provided an axis where both host- and pathogen-derived factors converged to define determinants of pathogenicity. Consequently, whereas the requirement for macrophage survival sensitized TB susceptibility to the glycemic status of the individual, mediation by pathogen ensured that the virulence properties of the infecting strain also contributed towards the resulting pathology.

  8. Pathogenicity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is expressed by regulating metabolic thresholds of the host macrophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Parul; Jamwal, Shilpa V; Saquib, Najmuddin; Sinha, Neeraj; Siddiqui, Zaved; Manivel, Venkatasamy; Chatterjee, Samrat; Rao, Kanury V S

    2014-07-01

    The success of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a pathogen derives from its facile adaptation to the intracellular milieu of human macrophages. To explore this process, we asked whether adaptation also required interference with the metabolic machinery of the host cell. Temporal profiling of the metabolic flux, in cells infected with differently virulent mycobacterial strains, confirmed that this was indeed the case. Subsequent analysis identified the core subset of host reactions that were targeted. It also elucidated that the goal of regulation was to integrate pathways facilitating macrophage survival, with those promoting mycobacterial sustenance. Intriguingly, this synthesis then provided an axis where both host- and pathogen-derived factors converged to define determinants of pathogenicity. Consequently, whereas the requirement for macrophage survival sensitized TB susceptibility to the glycemic status of the individual, mediation by pathogen ensured that the virulence properties of the infecting strain also contributed towards the resulting pathology.

  9. Prevention of Tracheal High-Dose Tolerance Induction by Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor- Dependent Restoration of Antigen-Presenting Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanna Haneda

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The intrusion of airborne allergens into airways elicits eosinophilic inflammation, as represented by bronchial asthma. It has been shown that excessive amounts of allergen in murine trachea lead to an unexpected evasion of deleterious eosinophilic inflammation by inducing T cell tolerance. In the present study, the mechanisms of tracheal high-dose tolerance are examined with regard to accessory cell functions and the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines on tolerance. Antigen-induced tracheal eosinophilia was suppressed on instillation of high doses of antigen into the trachea, while concurrent instillation of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF with the antigen restored the diminished responses. The restoration of eosinophilic infiltration by GM-CSF occurred in parallel with an increase in interleukin (IL-4 production by CD4+ T cells from the mediastinal lymph nodes. This was found to reflect the empowerment of antigen-presenting cells by GM-CSF, because the impaired ability of Ia+ cells from the tolerant mice to stimulate IL-4-producing T cells is restored by GM-CSF administration. The prevention of tolerance by up-regulating accessory cell functions is a feature unique to GM-CSF, because another pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-iβ, failed to empower antigen-presenting cells. Thus, besides the induction of transforming growth factor-β-secreting CD4+ T cells, high-dose tolerance in the trachea includes an impairment of the accessory cell functions that support IL-4 production from T cells, which was reversed by GM-CSF. This report is the first demonstration that GM-CSF breaks the T cell tolerance of IL-4-producing T helper cells.

  10. High level of expression of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor in transgenic rice cell suspension culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, Yun-Ji; Hong, Shin-Young; Kwon, Tae-Ho;

    2003-01-01

    this problem, we sought an expression system in which heterologous gene expression could be induced at high levels. We selected a rice amylase expression system in which the promoter Ramy3D is induced to express recombinant protein by sucrose starvation. This induction system was found to give good yield...

  11. Neutralization of Yersinia pestis-mediated macrophage cytotoxicity by anti-LcrV antibodies and its correlation with protective immunity in a mouse model of bubonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zauberman, Ayelet; Cohen, Sara; Levy, Yinon; Halperin, Gideon; Lazar, Shirley; Velan, Baruch; Shafferman, Avigdor; Flashner, Yehuda; Mamroud, Emanuelle

    2008-03-20

    Plague is a life-threatening disease caused by Yersinia pestis, for which effective-licensed vaccines and reliable predictors of in vivo immunity are lacking. V antigen (LcrV) is a major Y. pestis virulence factor that mediates translocation of the cytotoxic Yersinia protein effectors (Yops). It is a well-established protective antigen and a part of currently tested plague subunit vaccines. We have developed a highly sensitive in vitro macrophage cytotoxicity neutralization assay which is mediated by anti-LcrV antibodies; and studied the potential use of these neutralizing antibodies as an in vitro correlate of plague immunity in mice. The assay is based on a Y. pestis strain with enhanced cytotoxicity to macrophages in which endogenous yopJ was replaced by the more effectively translocated yopP of Y. enterocolitica O:8. Mice passively immunized with rabbit anti-LcrV IgG or actively immunized with recombinant LcrV were protected against lethal doses of a virulent Y. pestis strain, in a mouse model of bubonic plague. This protection significantly correlated with the in vitro neutralizing activity of the antisera but not with their corresponding ELISA titers. In actively immunized mice, a cutoff value for serum neutralizing activity, above which survival was assured with high degree of confidence, could be established for different vaccination regimes. The impact of overall findings on the potential use of serum neutralizing activity as a correlate of protective immunity is discussed.

  12. Lipids Derived from Virulent Francisella tularensis Broadly Inhibit Pulmonary Inflammation via Toll-Like Receptor 2 and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Deborah D.; Ireland, Robin; Alinger, Joshua B.; Small, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen that causes an acute lethal respiratory disease in humans. The heightened virulence of the pathogen is linked to its unique ability to inhibit Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated inflammatory responses. The bacterial component and mechanism of this inhibition are unknown. Here we show that lipids isolated from virulent but not attenuated strains of F. tularensis are not detected by host cells, inhibit production of proinflammatory cytokines by primary macrophages in response to known TLR ligands, and suppress neutrophil recruitment in vivo. We further show that lipid-mediated inhibition of inflammation is dependent on TLR2, MyD88, and the nuclear hormone and fatty acid receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). Pathogen lipid-mediated interference with inflammatory responses through the engagement of TLR2 and PPARα represents a novel manipulation of host signaling pathways consistent with the ability of highly virulent F. tularensis to efficiently evade host immune responses. PMID:23925884

  13. Lack of RNase L attenuates macrophage functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yi

    Full Text Available Macrophages are one of the major cell types in innate immunity against microbial infection. It is believed that the expression of proinflammatory genes such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, and cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2 by macrophages is also crucial for activation of both innate and adaptive immunities. RNase L is an interferon (IFN inducible enzyme which is highly expressed in macrophages. It has been demonstrated that RNase L regulates the expression of certain inflammatory genes. However, its role in macrophage function is largely unknown.Bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs were generated from RNase L(+/+and (-/- mice. The migration of BMMs was analyzed by using Transwell migration assays. Endocytosis and phagocytosis of macrophages were assessed by using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-Dextran 40,000 and FITC-E. coli bacteria, respectively. The expression of inflammatory genes was determined by Western Blot and ELISA. The promoter activity of Cox-2 was measured by luciferase reporter assays.Lack of RNase L significantly decreased the migration of BMMs induced by M-CSF, but at a less extent by GM-CSF and chemokine C-C motif ligand-2 (CCL2. Interestingly, RNase L deficient BMMs showed a significant reduction of endocytic activity to FITC-Dextran 40,000, but no any obvious effect on their phagocytic activity to FITC-bacteria under the same condition. RNase L impacts the expression of certain genes related to cell migration and inflammation such as transforming growth factor (TGF-β, IL-1β, IL-10, CCL2 and Cox-2. Furthermore, the functional analysis of the Cox-2 promoter revealed that RNase L regulated the expression of Cox-2 in macrophages at its transcriptional level. Taken together, our findings provide direct evidence showing that RNase L contributes to innate immunity through regulating macrophage functions.

  14. Macrophage Polarization in Metabolism and Metabolic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is now recognized as the main cause of the worldwide epidemic of type 2 diabetes. Obesity-associated chronic inflammation is a contributing key factor for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Numbers of studies have clearly demonstrated that the immune system and metabolism are highly integrated. CONTENT: Macrophages are an essential component of innate immunity and play a central role in inflammation and host defense. Moreover, these cells have homeostatic functions beyond defense, including tissue remodeling in ontogenesis and orchestration of metabolic functions. Diversity and plasticity are hallmarks of cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage. In response to interferons (IFNs, toll-like receptor (TLR, or interleukin (IL-4/IL-13 signals, macrophages undergo M1 (classical or M2 (alternative activation. Progress has now been made in defining the signaling pathways, transcriptional networks, and epigenetic mechanisms underlying M1, M2 or M2-like polarized activation. SUMMARY: In response to various signals, macrophages may undergo classical M1 activation (stimulated by TLR ligands and IFN-γ or alternative M2 activation (stimulated by IL-4/IL-13; these states mirror the T helper (Th1–Th2 polarization of T cells. Pathology is frequently associated with dynamic changes in macrophage activation, with classically activated M1 cells implicate in initiating and sustaining inflammation, meanwhile M2 or M2-like activated cells associated with resolution or smoldering chronic inflammation. Identification of the mechanisms and molecules that are associated with macrophage plasticity and polarized activation provides a basis for macrophage centered diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. KEYWORDS: obesity, adipose tissue, inflammation, macrophage polarization.

  15. The putative thiosulfate sulfurtransferases PspE and GlpE contribute to virulence of Salmonella Typhimurium in the mouse model of systemic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallrodt, Inke; Jelsbak, Lotte; Thorndahl, Lotte;

    2013-01-01

    contribute to S. Typhimurium virulence, as a glpE and pspE double deletion strain showed significantly decreased virulence in a mouse model of systemic infection. However, challenge of cultured epithelial cells and macrophages did not reveal any virulence-associated phenotypes. We hypothesized...... that their contribution to virulence could be in sulfur metabolism or by contributing to resistance to nitric oxide, oxidative stress, or cyanide detoxification. In vitro studies demonstrated that glpE but not pspE was important for resistance to H2O2. Since the double mutant, which was the one affected in virulence......, was not affected in this assay, we concluded that resistance tooxidative stress and the virulence phenotype was most likely not linked. The two genes did not contribute to nitric oxide stress, to synthesis of essential sulfur containing amino acids, nor to detoxification of cyanide. Currently, the precise...

  16. The causes and consequences of changes in virulence following pathogen host shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longdon, Ben; Hadfield, Jarrod D; Day, Jonathan P; Smith, Sophia C L; McGonigle, John E; Cogni, Rodrigo; Cao, Chuan; Jiggins, Francis M

    2015-03-01

    Emerging infectious diseases are often the result of a host shift, where the pathogen originates from a different host species. Virulence--the harm a pathogen does to its host-can be extremely high following a host shift (for example Ebola, HIV, and SARs), while other host shifts may go undetected as they cause few symptoms in the new host. Here we examine how virulence varies across host species by carrying out a large cross infection experiment using 48 species of Drosophilidae and an RNA virus. Host shifts resulted in dramatic variation in virulence, with benign infections in some species and rapid death in others. The change in virulence was highly predictable from the host phylogeny, with hosts clustering together in distinct clades displaying high or low virulence. High levels of virulence are associated with high viral loads, and this may determine the transmission rate of the virus.

  17. Further characterization of a highly attenuated Yersinia pestis CO92 mutant deleted for the genes encoding Braun lipoprotein and plasminogen activator protease in murine alveolar and primary human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lier, Christina J; Tiner, Bethany L; Chauhan, Sadhana; Motin, Vladimir L; Fitts, Eric C; Huante, Matthew B; Endsley, Janice J; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Sha, Jian; Chopra, Ashok K

    2015-03-01

    We recently characterized the Δlpp Δpla double in-frame deletion mutant of Yersinia pestis CO92 molecularly, biologically, and immunologically. While Braun lipoprotein (Lpp) activates toll-like receptor-2 to initiate an inflammatory cascade, plasminogen activator (Pla) protease facilitates bacterial dissemination in the host. The Δlpp Δpla double mutant was highly attenuated in evoking bubonic and pneumonic plague, was rapidly cleared from mouse organs, and generated humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to provide subsequent protection to mice against a lethal challenge dose of wild-type (WT) CO92. Here, we further characterized the Δlpp Δpla double mutant in two murine macrophage cell lines as well as in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages to gauge its potential as a live-attenuated vaccine candidate. We first demonstrated that the Δpla single and the Δlpp Δpla double mutant were unable to survive efficiently in murine and human macrophages, unlike WT CO92. We observed that the levels of Pla and its associated protease activity were not affected in the Δlpp single mutant, and, likewise, deletion of the pla gene from WT CO92 did not alter Lpp levels. Further, our study revealed that both Lpp and Pla contributed to the intracellular survival of WT CO92 via different mechanisms. Importantly, the ability of the Δlpp Δpla double mutant to be phagocytized by macrophages, to stimulate production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6, and to activate the nitric oxide killing pathways of the host cells remained unaltered when compared to the WT CO92-infected macrophages. Finally, macrophages infected with either the WT CO92 or the Δlpp Δpla double mutant were equally efficient in their uptake of zymosan particles as determined by flow cytometric analysis. Overall, our data indicated that although the Δlpp Δpla double mutant of Y. pestis CO92 was highly attenuated, it retained the ability to elicit innate and subsequent acquired immune

  18. MiR-155 induction by F. novicida but not the virulent F. tularensis results in SHIP down-regulation and enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Cremer

    Full Text Available The intracellular gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis causes the disease tularemia and is known for its ability to subvert host immune responses. Previous work from our laboratory identified the PI3K/Akt pathway and SHIP as critical modulators of host resistance to Francisella. Here, we show that SHIP expression is strongly down-regulated in monocytes and macrophages following infection with F. tularensis novicida (F.n.. To account for this negative regulation we explored the possibility that microRNAs (miRs that target SHIP may be induced during infection. There is one miR that is predicted to target SHIP, miR-155. We tested for induction and found that F.n. induced miR-155 both in primary monocytes/macrophages and in vivo. Using luciferase reporter assays we confirmed that miR-155 led to down-regulation of SHIP, showing that it specifically targets the SHIP 3'UTR. Further experiments showed that miR-155 and BIC, the gene that encodes miR-155, were induced as early as four hours post-infection in primary human monocytes. This expression was dependent on TLR2/MyD88 and did not require inflammasome activation. Importantly, miR-155 positively regulated pro-inflammatory cytokine release in human monocytes infected with Francisella. In sharp contrast, we found that the highly virulent type A SCHU S4 strain of Francisella tularensis (F.t. led to a significantly lower miR-155 response than the less virulent F.n. Hence, F.n. induces miR-155 expression and leads to down-regulation of SHIP, resulting in enhanced pro-inflammatory responses. However, impaired miR-155 induction by SCHU S4 may help explain the lack of both SHIP down-regulation and pro-inflammatory response and may account for the virulence of Type A Francisella.

  19. Global regulation of virulence and the stress response by CsrA in the highly adapted human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnard, F.M.; Loughlin, M.F.; Fainberg, H.P.

    2004-01-01

    -induced transcriptional responses of napA and ahpC, the acid induction of napA, cagA, vacA, the urease operon, and fur, as well as the heat shock responses of napA, groESL and hspR. Although the level of napA transcript was higher in the csrA mutant, its stability was similar in the wild-type and mutant strains, and less...... NapA protein was produced in the mutant strain. Finally, H. pylori strains deficient in the production of CsrA were significantly attenuated for virulence in a mouse model of infection. This work provides evidence that CsrA has a broad role in regulating the physiology of H. pylori in response...

  20. Effect of diluting Marek's disease vaccines on the outcomes of Marek's disease virus infection when challenged with highly virulent Marek's disease viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno, Isabel M; Cortes, Aneg L; Montiel, Enrique R; Lemiere, Stephane; Pandiri, Arun K R

    2011-06-01

    Dilution of Marek's disease (MD) vaccines is a common practice in the field to reduce the cost associated with vaccination. In this study we have evaluated the effect of diluting MD vaccines on the protection against MD, vaccine and challenge MD virus (MDV) kinetics, and body weight when challenged with strains Md5 (very virulent MDV) and 648A (very virulent plus MDV) by contact at day of age. The following four vaccination protocols were evaluated in meat-type chickens: turkey herpesvirus (HVT) at manufacturer-recommended full dose; HVT diluted 1:10; HVT + SB-1 at the manufacturer-recommended full dose; and HVT + SB-1 diluted 1:10 for HVT and 1:5 for SB-1. Vaccine was administered at hatch subcutaneously. One-day-old chickens were placed in floor pens and housed together with ten 15-day-old chickens that had been previously inoculated with 500 PFU of either Md5 or 648A MDV strains. Chickens were individually identified with wing bands, and for each chicken samples of feather pulp and blood were collected at 1, 3, and 8 wk posthatch. Body weights were recorded at 8 wk for every chicken. Viral DNA load of wild-type MDV, SB-1, and HVT were evaluated by real time-PCR. Our results showed that dilution of MD vaccines can lead to reduced MD protection, reduced relative body weights, reduced vaccine DNA during the first 3 wk, and increased MDV DNA load. The detrimental effect of vaccine dilution was more evident in females than in males and was more evident when the challenge virus was 648A. However, lower relative body weights and higher MDV DNA load could be detected in chickens challenged with strain Md5, even in the absence of obvious differences in protection.

  1. Regulation of Francisella tularensis Virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shipan eDai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is one of the most virulent bacteria known and a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Category A select agent. It is able to infect a variety of animals and insects and can persist in the environment, thus Francisella spp. must be able to survive in diverse environmental niches. However, F. tularensis has a surprising dearth of sensory and regulatory factors. Recent advancements in the field have identified new functions of encoded transcription factors and greatly expanded our understanding of virulence gene regulation. Here we review the current knowledge of environmental adaptation by F. tularensis, its transcriptional regulators and their relationship to animal virulence.

  2. Short-term high-fat feeding induces islet macrophage infiltration and β-cell replication independently of insulin resistance in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodland, David C; Liu, Wei; Leong, Jacky; Sears, Mallory L; Luo, Ping; Chen, Xiaojuan

    2016-10-01

    Short-term high-fat consumption stimulates mouse islet β-cell replication through unknown mechanisms. Resident macrophages (MΦs) are capable of secreting various factors involved in islet development and tissue remodeling. We hypothesized that a short-term high-fat diet (HFD) promotes MΦ infiltration in pancreatic islets and that MΦs serve as a regulator of β-cell replication. To test these hypotheses and dissect mechanisms involved in HFD-induced β-cell replication, adult C57BL/6J mice were fed a HFD for 7 days with or without administration of clodronate-containing liposomes, an MΦ-depleting agent. Mouse body and epididymal fat pad weights, and nonfasting blood glucose and fasting serum insulin levels were measured, and pancreatic islet β-cell replication, oxidative stress, and MΦ infiltration were examined. Short-term HFD promoted an increase in body and epididymal fat pad weight and blood glucose levels, along with an increased fasting serum insulin concentration. β-Cell replication, islet MΦ infiltration, and the percentage of inducible NO synthase positive MΦs in the islets increased significantly in mice fed the HFD. Immunofluorescence staining for 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine or activated caspase-3 revealed no significant induction of DNA damage or apoptosis, respectively. In addition, no change in stromal-derived factor 1-expressing cells was found induced by HFD. Despite continuous elevation of nonfasting blood glucose and fasting serum insulin levels, depletion of MΦs through treatments of clodronate abrogated HFD-induced β-cell replication. These findings demonstrated that HFD-induced MΦ infiltration is responsible for β-cell replication. This study suggests the existence of MΦ-mediated mechanisms in β-cell replication that are independent of insulin resistance. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Analysis of macrophage apoptosis induced by Brucella melitensis and the effects of caspases 3,8 and 9

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任晓莉

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the difference of macrophage RAW264.7 apoptosis induced by Brucella melitensis virulent strain 16M and attenuated strain M5-90 and elucidate the regulatory role of caspases 3,8 and 9.Methods The best multiplicity of infection (MOI) was determined through kinetic analysis of Brucella melitensis strain 16M and M5-90 induced mouse macrophages apop-

  4. [Genetic virulence markers of opportunistic bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, V M

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of opportunistic bacteria phenotypic and genetic virulence markers indicates that pathogenicity formation is based on a structural modification of bacterial DNA which is linked with migration of interbacterial pathogenicity "islands" genetic determinants. Structural organization features of these mobile genetic elements determine high expression probability, and PCR detection of pathogenicity "islands" determinants that control adhesins, invasins, cytotoxic and cytolitic toxines synthesis may indicate etiopathogenetic significance of clinical isolates.

  5. Macrophage mannose receptor-specific gene delivery vehicle for macrophage engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Gui-Xin; Chen, Yu-Zhe; Yao, Xing-Lei; Du, Anariwa; Tang, Gu-Ping; Shen, You-Qing; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2014-05-01

    Macrophages are the most plastic cells in the hematopoietic system and they exhibit great functional diversity. They have been extensively applied in anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic and anti-cancer therapies. However, the application of macrophages is limited by the efficiency of their engineering. The macrophage mannose receptor (MMR, CD206), a C-type lectin receptor, is ubiquitously expressed on macrophages and has a high affinity for mannose oligosaccharides. In the present study, we developed a novel non-viral vehicle with specific affinity for MMR. Mannan was cationized with spermine at a grafted ratio of ∼12% to deliver DNA and was characterized as a stable system for delivery. This spermine-mannan (SM)-based delivery system was evaluated as a biocompatible vehicle with superior transfection efficiency on murine macrophages, up to 28.5-fold higher than spermine-pullulan, 11.5-fold higher than polyethylenimine and 3.0-fold higher than Lipofectamine™ 2000. We confirmed that the SM-based delivery system for macrophages transfection was MMR-specific and we described the intracellular transport of the delivery system. To our knowledge, this is the first study using SM to demonstrate a mannose receptor-specific gene delivery system, thereby highlighting the potential of a novel specific non-viral delivery vehicle for macrophage engineering.

  6. Macrophages in cardiac homeostasis, injury responses and progenitor cell mobilisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander R. Pinto

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are an immune cell type found in every organ of the body. Classically, macrophages are recognised as housekeeping cells involved in the detection of foreign antigens and danger signatures, and the clearance of tissue debris. However, macrophages are increasingly recognised as a highly versatile cell type with a diverse range of functions that are important for tissue homeostasis and injury responses. Recent research findings suggest that macrophages contribute to tissue regeneration and may play a role in the activation and mobilisation of stem cells. This review describes recent advances in our understanding of the role played by macrophages in cardiac tissue maintenance and repair following injury. We examine the involvement of exogenous and resident tissue macrophages in cardiac inflammatory responses and their potential activity in regulating cardiac regeneration.

  7. Mobilization of peripheral blood progenitor cells by chemotherapy and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor for hematologic support after high-dose intensification for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, A D; Ayash, L; Anderson, K C; Hunt, M; Wheeler, C; Schwartz, G; Tepler, I; Mazanet, R; Lynch, C; Pap, S

    1992-06-01

    High-dose therapy with autologous marrow support results in durable complete remissions in selected patients with relapsed lymphoma and leukemia who cannot be cured with conventional dose therapy. However, substantial morbidity and mortality result from the 3- to 6-week period of marrow aplasia until the reinfused marrow recovers adequate hematopoietic function. Hematopoietic growth factors, particularly used after chemotherapy, can increase the number of peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPCs) present in systemic circulation. The reinfusion of PBPCs with marrow has recently been reported to reduce the time to recovery of adequate marrow function. This study was designed to determine whether granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-mobilized PBPCs alone (without marrow) would result in rapid and reliable hematopoietic reconstitution. Sixteen patients with metastatic breast cancer were treated with four cycles of doxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil, and methotrexate (AFM induction). Patients responding after the first two cycles were administered GM-CSF after the third and fourth cycles to recruit PBPCs for collection by two leukapheresis per cycle. These PBPCs were reinfused as the sole source of hematopoietic support after high doses of cyclophosphamide, thiotepa, and carboplatin. No marrow or hematopoietic cytokines were used after progenitor cell reinfusion. Granulocytes greater than or equal to 500/microL was observed on a median of day 14 (range, 8 to 57). Transfusion independence of platelets greater than or equal to 20,000/microL occurred on a median day of 12 (range, 8 to 134). However, three patients required the use of a reserve marrow for slow platelet engraftment. In retrospect, these patients were characterized by poor baseline bone marrow cellularity and poor platelet recovery after AFM induction therapy. When compared with 29 historical control patients who had received the same high-dose intensification chemotherapy using autologous

  8. Incremental replacement of saturated fats by n-3 fatty acids in high-fat, high-cholesterol diets reduces elevated plasma lipid levels and arterial lipoprotein lipase, macrophages and atherosclerosis in LDLR-/- mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chuchun L; Torrejon, Claudia; Jung, Un Ju; Graf, Kristin; Deckelbaum, Richard J

    2014-06-01

    Effects of progressive substitution of dietary n-3 fatty acids (FA) for saturated FA (SAT) on modulating risk factors for atherosclerosis have not been fully defined. Our previous reports demonstrate that SAT increased, but n-3 FA decreased, arterial lipoprotein lipase (LpL) levels and arterial LDL-cholesterol deposition early in atherogenesis. We now questioned whether incremental increases in dietary n-3 FA can counteract SAT-induced pro-atherogenic effects in atherosclerosis-prone LDL-receptor knockout (LDLR-/-) mice and have identified contributing mechanisms. Mice were fed chow or high-fat diets enriched in SAT, n-3, or a combination of both SAT and n-3 in ratios of 3:1 (S:n-3 3:1) or 1:1 (S:n-3 1:1). Each diet resulted in the expected changes in fatty acid composition in blood and aorta for each feeding group. SAT-fed mice became hyperlipidemic. By contrast, n-3 inclusion decreased plasma lipid levels, especially cholesterol. Arterial LpL and macrophage levels were increased over 2-fold in SAT-fed mice but these were decreased with incremental replacement with n-3 FA. n-3 FA partial inclusion markedly decreased expression of pro-inflammatory markers (CD68, IL-6, and VCAM-1) in aorta. SAT diets accelerated advanced atherosclerotic lesion development, whereas all n-3 FA-containing diets markedly slowed atherosclerotic progression. Mechanisms whereby dietary n-3 FA may improve adverse cardiovascular effects of high-SAT, high-fat diets include improving plasma lipid profiles, increasing amounts of n-3 FA in plasma and the arterial wall. Even low levels of replacement of SAT by n-3 FA effectively reduce arterial lipid deposition by decreasing aortic LpL, macrophages and pro-inflammatory markers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Macrophage ABCG1 deletion disrupts lipid homeostasis in alveolar macrophages and moderately influences atherosclerotic lesion development in LDL receptor-deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Out, Ruud; Hoekstra, Menno; Hildebrand, Reeni B.; Kruit, Janine K.; Meurs, Illiana; Li, Zhaosha; Kuipers, Folkert; Van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Van Eck, Miranda

    2006-01-01

    Objective - ABCG1 has recently been identified as a facilitator of cellular cholesterol and phospholipid efflux to high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Its expression in macrophages is induced during cholesterol uptake in macrophages and by liver X receptor (LXR). The role of macrophage ABCG1 in

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis expressing phospholipase C subverts PGE2 synthesis and induces necrosis in alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assis, Patricia A; Espíndola, Milena S; Paula-Silva, Francisco W G; Rios, Wendy M; Pereira, Priscilla A T; Leão, Sylvia C; Silva, Célio L; Faccioli, Lúcia H

    2014-05-19

    Phospholipases C (PLCs) are virulence factors found in several bacteria. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) they exhibit cytotoxic effects on macrophages, but the mechanisms involved in PLC-induced cell death are not fully understood. It has been reported that induction of cell necrosis by virulent Mtb is coordinated by subversion of PGE2, an essential factor in cell membrane protection. Using two Mtb clinical isolates carrying genetic variations in PLC genes, we show that the isolate 97-1505, which bears plcA and plcB genes, is more resistant to alveolar macrophage microbicidal activity than the isolate 97-1200, which has all PLC genes deleted. The isolate 97-1505 also induced higher rates of alveolar macrophage necrosis, and likewise inhibited COX-2 expression and PGE2 production. To address the direct effect of mycobacterial PLC on cell necrosis and PGE2 inhibition, both isolates were treated with PLC inhibitors prior to macrophage infection. Interestingly, inhibition of PLCs affected the ability of the isolate 97-1505 to induce necrosis, leading to cell death rates similar to those induced by the isolate 97-1200. Finally, PGE2 production by Mtb 97-1505-infected macrophages was restored to levels similar to those produced by 97-1200-infected cells. Mycobacterium tuberculosis bearing PLCs genes induces alveolar macrophage necrosis, which is associated to subversion of PGE2 production.

  11. Dynamic M2-like remodeling phenotypes of CD11c+ adipose tissue macrophages during high fat diet-induced obesity in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic inflammation is a pathogenic factor in obesity complications, in particular insulin resistance (IR). A significant advance in our understanding of obesity-associated inflammation and insulin resistance has been the recognition of the underlying role of adipose tissue macrophages (ATM's). The...

  12. High density lipoprotein (HDL)-associated sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) inhibits macrophage apoptosis by stimulating STAT3 activity and survivin expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feuerborn, Renata; Becker, Susen; Potì, Francesco;

    2016-01-01

    reticulum-dependent apoptosis was induced by exposure of macrophages to etoposide or thapsigargin/fukoidan, respectively. RESULTS: Cell death induced by these compounds was inhibited by S1P as inferred from reduced annexin V binding, TUNEL staining, and caspase 3, 9 and 12 activities. S1P induced expression...

  13. A highly conserved Toxo1 haplotype directs resistance to toxoplasmosis and its associated caspase-1 dependent killing of parasite and host macrophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavailles, Pierre; Flori, Pierre; Papapietro, Olivier; Bisanz, Cordelia; Lagrange, Dominique; Pilloux, Ludovic; Massera, Céline; Cristinelli, Sara; Jublot, Delphine; Bastien, Olivier; Loeuillet, Corinne; Aldebert, Delphine; Touquet, Bastien; Fournié, Gilbert J; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie France

    2014-04-01

    Natural immunity or resistance to pathogens most often relies on the genetic make-up of the host. In a LEW rat model of refractoriness to toxoplasmosis, we previously identified on chromosome 10 the Toxo1 locus that directs toxoplasmosis outcome and controls parasite spreading by a macrophage-dependent mechanism. Now, we narrowed down Toxo1 to a 891 kb interval containing 29 genes syntenic to human 17p13 region. Strikingly, Toxo1 is included in a haplotype block strictly conserved among all refractory rat strains. The sequencing of Toxo1 in nine rat strains (5 refractory and 4 susceptible) revealed resistant-restricted conserved polymorphisms displaying a distribution gradient that peaks at the bottom border of Toxo1, and highlighting the NOD-like receptor, Nlrp1a, as a major candidate. The Nlrp1 inflammasome is known to trigger, upon pathogen intracellular sensing, pyroptosis programmed-cell death involving caspase-1 activation and cleavage of IL-1β. Functional studies demonstrated that the Toxo1-dependent refractoriness in vivo correlated with both the ability of macrophages to restrict T. gondii growth and a T. gondii-induced death of intracellular parasites and its host macrophages. The parasite-induced cell death of infected macrophages bearing the LEW-Toxo1 alleles was found to exhibit pyroptosis-like features with ROS production, the activation of caspase-1 and IL1-β secretion. The pharmacological inactivation of caspase-1 using YVAD and Z-VAD inhibitors prevented the death of both intravacuolar parasites and host non-permissive macrophages but failed to restore parasite proliferation. These findings demonstrated that the Toxo1-dependent response of rat macrophages to T. gondii infection may trigger two pathways leading to the control of parasite proliferation and the death of parasites and host macrophages. The NOD-like receptor NLRP1a/Caspase-1 pathway is the best candidate to mediate the parasite-induced cell death. These data represent new insights

  14. Streptococcal 5'-Nucleotidase A (S5nA), a Novel Streptococcus pyogenes Virulence Factor That Facilitates Immune Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lisa; Khemlani, Adrina; Lorenz, Natalie; Loh, Jacelyn M S; Langley, Ries J; Proft, Thomas

    2015-12-25

    Streptococcus pyogenes is an important human pathogen that causes a wide range of diseases. Using bioinformatics analysis of the complete S. pyogenes strain SF370 genome, we have identified a novel S. pyogenes virulence factor, which we termed streptococcal 5'-nucleotidase A (S5nA). A recombinant form of S5nA hydrolyzed AMP and ADP, but not ATP, to generate the immunomodulatory molecule adenosine. Michaelis-Menten kinetics revealed a Km of 169 μm and a Vmax of 7550 nmol/mg/min for the substrate AMP. Furthermore, recombinant S5nA acted synergistically with S. pyogenes nuclease A to generate macrophage-toxic deoxyadenosine from DNA. The enzyme showed optimal activity between pH 5 and pH 6.5 and between 37 and 47 °C. Like other 5'-nucleotidases, S5nA requires divalent cations and was active in the presence of Mg(2+), Ca(2+), or Mn(2+). However, Zn(2+) inhibited the enzymatic activity. Structural modeling combined with mutational analysis revealed a highly conserved catalytic dyad as well as conserved substrate and cation-binding sites. Recombinant S5nA significantly increased the survival of the non-pathogenic bacterium Lactococcus lactis during a human whole blood killing assay in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting a role as an S. pyogenes virulence factor. In conclusion, we have identified a novel S. pyogenes enzyme with 5'-nucleotidase activity and immune evasion properties.

  15. Mycobacterium abscessus phospholipase C expression is induced during coculture within amoebae and enhances M. abscessus virulence in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakala N'Goma, Jean Claude; Le Moigne, Vincent; Soismier, Nathalie; Laencina, Laura; Le Chevalier, Fabien; Roux, Anne-Laure; Poncin, Isabelle; Serveau-Avesque, Carole; Rottman, Martin; Gaillard, Jean-Louis; Etienne, Gilles; Brosch, Roland; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Canaan, Stéphane; Girard-Misguich, Fabienne

    2015-02-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is a pathogenic, rapidly growing mycobacterium involved in pulmonary and cutaneo-mucous infections worldwide, to which cystic fibrosis patients are exquisitely susceptible. The analysis of the genome sequence of M. abscessus showed that this bacterium is endowed with the metabolic pathways typically found in environmental microorganisms that come into contact with soil, plants, and aquatic environments, where free-living amoebae are frequently present. M. abscessus also contains several genes that are characteristically found only in pathogenic bacteria. One of them is MAB_0555, encoding a putative phospholipase C (PLC) that is absent from most other rapidly growing mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium chelonae and Mycobacterium smegmatis. Here, we report that purified recombinant M. abscessus PLC is highly cytotoxic to mouse macrophages, presumably due to hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids. We further showed by constructing and using an M. abscessus PLC knockout mutant that loss of PLC activity is deleterious to M. abscessus intracellular survival in amoebae. The importance of PLC is further supported by the fact that M. abscessus PLC was found to be expressed only in amoebae. Aerosol challenge of mice with M. abscessus strains that were precultured in amoebae enhanced M. abscessus lung infectivity relative to M. abscessus grown in broth culture. Our study underlines the importance of PLC for the virulence of M. abscessus. Despite the difficulties of isolating M. abscessus from environmental sources, our findings suggest that M. abscessus has evolved in close contact with environmental protozoa, which supports the argument that amoebae may contribute to the virulence of opportunistic mycobacteria.

  16. Investigating the ?Trojan Horse? Mechanism of Yersinia pestis Virulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCutchen-Maloney, S L; Fitch, J P

    2005-02-08

    Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of plague, is a Gram-negative, highly communicable, enteric bacterium that has been responsible for three historic plague pandemics. Currently, several thousand cases of plague are reported worldwide annually, and Y. pestis remains a considerable threat from a biodefense perspective. Y. pestis infection can manifest in three forms: bubonic, septicemic, and pneumonic plague. Of these three forms, pneumonic plague has the highest fatality rate ({approx}100% if left untreated), the shortest intervention time ({approx}24 hours), and is highly contagious. Currently, there are no rapid, widely available vaccines for plague and though plague may be treated with antibiotics, the emergence of both naturally occurring and potentially engineered antibiotic resistant strains makes the search for more effective therapies and vaccines for plague of pressing concern. The virulence mechanism of this deadly bacterium involves induction of a Type III secretion system, a syringe-like apparatus that facilitates the injection of virulence factors, termed Yersinia outer membrane proteins (Yops), into the host cell. These virulence factors inhibit phagocytosis and cytokine secretion, and trigger apoptosis of the host cell. Y. pestis virulence factors and the Type III secretion system are induced thermally, when the bacterium enters the mammalian host from the flea vector, and through host cell contact (or conditions of low Ca{sup 2+} in vitro). Apart from the temperature increase from 26 C to 37 C and host cell contact (or low Ca{sup 2+} conditions), other molecular mechanisms that influence virulence induction in Y. pestis are largely uncharacterized. This project focused on characterizing two novel mechanisms that regulate virulence factor induction in Y. pestis, immunoglobulin G (IgG) binding and quorum sensing, using a real-time reporter system to monitor induction of virulence. Incorporating a better understanding of the mechanisms of virulence

  17. [Macrophages in asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina Avalos, M A; Orea Solano, M

    1997-01-01

    Every time they exist more demonstrations of the paper than performs the line monocytes-macrophage in the patogenesis of the bronchial asthma. The mononuclear phagocytes cells, as the alveolar macrophages, also they can be activated during allergic methods. The monocytes macrophages are possible efficient inductors of the inflammation; this due to the fact that they can secrete inflammatory mediators, between those which are counted the pre-forming granules of peptides, metabolites of oxidation activation, activator of platelets activator and metabolites of the arachidonic acid. The identification of IL-1 in the liquidate of the bronchial ablution of sick asthmatic, as well as the identification of IL-1 in the I bronchioalveolar washing of places of allergens cutaneous prick, supports the activation concept mononuclear of phagocytic cells in allergic sufferings.

  18. Macrophages and Iron Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Miguel P; Hamza, Iqbal

    2016-03-15

    Iron is a transition metal that due to its inherent ability to exchange electrons with a variety of molecules is essential to support life. In mammals, iron exists mostly in the form of heme, enclosed within an organic protoporphyrin ring and functioning primarily as a prosthetic group in proteins. Paradoxically, free iron also has the potential to become cytotoxic when electron exchange with oxygen is unrestricted and catalyzes the production of reactive oxygen species. These biological properties demand that iron metabolism is tightly regulated such that iron is available for core biological functions while preventing its cytotoxic effects. Macrophages play a central role in establishing this delicate balance. Here, we review the impact of macrophages on heme-iron metabolism and, reciprocally, how heme-iron modulates macrophage function.

  19. The high prevalence of some uropathogenic Escherichia coli clonal groups with enhanced virulence and antimicrobial resistance%尿道致病性大肠埃希菌克隆株毒力和耐药性的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董敏; 郑书发; 余斐; 陈晓; 杨青; 孔海深; 俞小忠; 黄龑; 陈瑜

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the prevalence,virulence and antimicrobial resistance of uropathogenic Escherichia coli gene types in the area.Methods Fifty Escherichia coli clinical isolated from outpatients and inpatients with urinary tract infection in the First Affiliated Hospital,College of Medicine,Zhejiang University from July 2011 to June 2012 were chosen.All isolates were assessed for phylogenetic group,sequence type,46 virulence genes and antimicrobial resistance.Virulence scores were compared between groups by Rank-sum test,while the rates of groups were compared by Chi-square test or Fisher exact test.Results The 55 isolates were divided into phylogenetic group A,B1,B2 and D,accounting for 9.1%,5.5%,43.6% and 41.8%,respectively.The virulence scores (number of virulence genes) P50 were 6,7,14 and 9,respectively.The virulence scores of group A,B1 and D were significantly different from that of group B2 (P <0.001,0.005 and <0.001 respectively).ST73,ST95 and ST493 isolates (9,16.4%) belonging to group B2,exhibited virulence genes up 15 to 20.B2-ST131 was the most common isolate,accounting for 20.0% of the overall isolates.The ST131 isolates exhibited higher antimicrobial resistance to 13 kinds of antimicrobials than non-ST131 isolates.The resistance rate to ciprofloxacin of the ST131 isolates was 90.9% (10/11).Conclusions It is important to pay attention to high prevalence of some UPEC clonal groups with enhanced virulence and(or) antimicrobial resistance in the area.And larger range of surveillance should be emphasized.%目的 了解杭州地区尿道致病性大肠埃希菌(UPEC)基因型的构成以及毒力和耐药性.方法 收集浙江大学医学院附属第一医院2011年7月至2012年6月从尿路感染患者尿液中分离的55株UPEC,对其开展系统分群和多位点序列分型,筛查46种毒力基因,采用纸片扩散法开展药敏试验.毒力分数组间比较采用秩和检验,率的组间比较采

  20. Tim-3 blocking rescue macrophage and T cell function against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in HIV+ patients

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    Isabel Sada-Ovalle

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (Tim 3 and programmed death 1 (PD-1 are co-inhibitory receptors involved in the so-called T cell exhaustion, and in vivo blockade of these molecules restores T cell dysfunction. High expression of Tim-3 and PD-1 is induced after chronic antigen-specific stimulation of T cells during HIV infection. We have previously demonstrated that the interaction of Tim-3 with its ligand galectin-9 induces macrophage activation and killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our aim in this study was to analyze the Tim-3 expression profile before and after six months of antiretroviral therapy and the impact of Tim-3 and PD-1 blocking on immunity against M. tuberculosis. Materials and methods: HIV+ patients naïve to anti-retroviral therapy (ART were followed up for six months. Peripheral immune-cell phenotype (CD38/HLA-DR/galectin-9/Tim-3 and PD-1 was assessed by flow cytometry. Supernatants were analyzed with a multiplex cytokine detection system (human Th1/Th2 cytokine Cytometric Bead Array by flow cytometry. Control of bacterial growth was evaluated by using an in vitro experimental model in which virulent M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages were cultured with T cells in the presence or absence of Tim-3 and PD-1 blocking antibodies. Interleukin-1 beta treatment of infected macrophages was evaluated by enumerating colony-forming units. Results: We showed that HIV+ patients had an increased expression of Tim-3 in T cells and were able to control bacterial growth before ART administration. By blocking Tim-3 and PD-1, macrophages and T cells recovered their functionality and had a higher ability to control bacterial growth; this result was partially dependent on the restitution of cytokine production. Conclusions: In this study, we demonstrated that increased Tim-3 expression can limit the ability of the immune system to control the infection of intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. The use of ART and

  1. Tim-3 blocking rescue macrophage and T cell function against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in HIV+ patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sada-Ovalle, Isabel; Ocaña-Guzman, Ranferi; Pérez-Patrigeón, Santiago; Chávez-Galán, Leslie; Sierra-Madero, Juan; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; Addo, Marylyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (Tim) 3 and programmed death 1 (PD-1) are co-inhibitory receptors involved in the so-called T cell exhaustion, and in vivo blockade of these molecules restores T cell dysfunction. High expression of Tim-3 and PD-1 is induced after chronic antigen-specific stimulation of T cells during HIV infection. We have previously demonstrated that the interaction of Tim-3 with its ligand galectin-9 induces macrophage activation and killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our aim in this study was to analyze the Tim-3 expression profile before and after six months of antiretroviral therapy and the impact of Tim-3 and PD-1 blocking on immunity against M. tuberculosis. Materials and methods HIV+ patients naïve to anti-retroviral therapy (ART) were followed up for six months. Peripheral immune-cell phenotype (CD38/HLA-DR/galectin-9/Tim-3 and PD-1) was assessed by flow cytometry. Supernatants were analyzed with a multiplex cytokine detection system (human Th1/Th2 cytokine Cytometric Bead Array) by flow cytometry. Control of bacterial growth was evaluated by using an in vitro experimental model in which virulent M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages were cultured with T cells in the presence or absence of Tim-3 and PD-1 blocking antibodies. Interleukin-1 beta treatment of infected macrophages was evaluated by enumerating colony-forming units. Results We showed that HIV+ patients had an increased expression of Tim-3 in T cells and were able to control bacterial growth before ART administration. By blocking Tim-3 and PD-1, macrophages and T cells recovered their functionality and had a higher ability to control bacterial growth; this result was partially dependent on the restitution of cytokine production. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrated that increased Tim-3 expression can limit the ability of the immune system to control the infection of intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. The use of ART and the in vitro

  2. Expression of chicken interleukin-2 by a highly virulent strain of Newcastle disease virus leads to decreased systemic viral load but does not significantly affect mortality in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susta, Leonardo; Diel, Diego G; Courtney, Sean; Cardenas-Garcia, Stivalis; Sundick, Roy S; Miller, Patti J; Brown, Corrie C; Afonso, Claudio L

    2015-08-08

    In mammals, interleukin 2 (IL-2) has been shown to decrease replication or attenuate pathogenicity of numerous viral pathogens (herpes simplex virus, vaccinia virus, human respiratory syncytial virus, human immunodeficiency virus) by activating natural killer cells (NK), cytotoxic T lymphocytes and expanding subsets of memory cells. In chickens, IL-2 has been shown to activate T cells, and as such it might have the potential to affect replication and pathogenesis of Newcastle disease virus (NDV). To assess the effect of IL-2 during NDV infection in chickens, we produced a recombinant virulent NDV strain expressing chicken IL-2 (rZJ1-IL2). The effects of IL-2 expression were investigated in vivo using the intracerebral pathogenicity index (ICPI) in day-old chicks and pathogenesis experiments in 4-week-old chickens. In these studies, rZJ1-IL2 was compared to a control virus expressing the green fluorescent protein (rZJ1-GFP). Assessed parameters included survival curves, detailed histological and immunohistochemical grading of lesions in multiple organs, and virus isolation in blood, spleen and mucosal secretions of infected birds. At the site of infection (eyelid), expression of IL-2 was demonstrated in areas of rZJ-IL2 replication, confirming IL-2 production in vivo. Compared to rZJ1-GFP strain, rZJ1-IL2 caused milder lesions and displayed decreased viral load in blood, spleen and mucosal secretions of infected birds. In the rZJ1-IL2-infected group, virus level in the blood peaked at day 4 post-infection (pi) (10(3.46) EID50 /0.1 ml) and drastically decreased at day 5 pi (10(0.9) EID50/0.1 ml), while in the rZJ1-GFP-infected group virus levels in the blood reached 10(5.35) EID50/0.1 ml at day 5. However, rZJ1-IL2-infected groups presented survival curves similar to control birds infected with rZJ1-GFP, with comparable clinical signs and 100 % mortality. Further, expression of IL-2 did not significantly affect the ICPI scores, compared to rZJ1-GFP strain. Increased

  3. Cholesterol Oxidase Binds TLR2 and Modulates Functional Responses of Human Macrophages

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    Katarzyna Bednarska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol oxidase (ChoD is considered to be an important virulence factor for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, but its influence on macrophage activity is unknown. Here we used Nocardia erythropolis ChoD, which is very similar to the Mtb enzyme (70% identity at the amino-acid level, to evaluate the impact of bacterial ChoD on the activity of THP-1-derived macrophages in vitro. We found that ChoD decreased the surface expression of Toll-like receptor type 2 (TLR2 and complement receptor 3 (CR3 on these macrophages. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy showed that ChoD competed with lipoteichoic acid for ligand binding sites on TLR2 but not on CR3, suggesting that ChoD signaling is mediated via TLR2. Binding of ChoD to the membrane of macrophages had diverse effects on the activity of macrophages, activating p38 mitogen activated kinase and stimulating production of a large amount of interleukin-10. Moreover, ChoD primed macrophages to enhance the production of reactive oxygen species in response to the phorbol myristate acetate, which was reduced by “switching off” TLR-derived signaling through interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinases 1 and 4 inhibition. Our study revealed that ChoD interacts directly with macrophages via TLR2 and influences the biological activity of macrophages during the development of the initial response to infection.

  4. In vivo imaging of macrophages during the early-stages of abdominal aortic aneurysm using high resolution MRI in ApoE mice.

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    Yuyu Yao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Angiotensin II (ANG II promotes vascular inflammation and induces abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA in hyperlipidemic apolipoprotein E knock-out (apoE(-/- mice. The aim of the present study was to detect macrophage activities in an ANG II-induced early-stage AAA model using superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO as a marker. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Twenty-six male apoE(-/- mice received saline or ANG II (1000 or 500 ng/kg/min infusion for 14 days. All animals underwent MRI scanning following administration of SPIO with the exception of three mice in the 1000 ng ANG II group, which were scanned without SPIO administration. MR imaging was performed using black-blood T2 to proton density -weighted multi-spin multi-echo sequence. In vivo MRI measurement of SPIO uptake and abdominal aortic diameter were obtained. Prussian blue, CD68,α-SMC and MAC3 immunohistological stains were used for the detection of SPIO, macrophages and smooth muscle cells. ANG II infusion with 1000 ng/kg/min induced AAA in all of the apoE(-/- mice. ANG II infusion exhibited significantly higher degrees of SPIO uptake, which was detected using MRI as a distinct loss of signal intensity. The contrast-to-noise ratio value decreased in proportion to an increase in the number of iron-laden macrophages in the aneurysm. The aneurysmal vessel wall in both groups of ANG II treated mice contained more iron-positive macrophages than saline-treated mice. However, the presence of cells capable of phagocytosing haemosiderin in mural thrombi also induced low-signal-intensities via MRI imaging. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: SPIO is taken up by macrophages in the shoulder and the outer layer of AAA. This alters the MRI signaling properties and can be used in imaging inflammation associated with AAA. It is important to compare images of the aorta before and after SPIO injection.

  5. Cell elasticity determines macrophage function.

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    Naimish R Patel

    Full Text Available Macrophages serve to maintain organ homeostasis in response to challenges from injury, inflammation, malignancy, particulate exposure, or infection. Until now, receptor ligation has been understood as being the central mechanism that regulates macrophage function. Using macrophages of different origins and species, we report that macrophage elasticity is a major determinant of innate macrophage function. Macrophage elasticity is modulated not only by classical biologic activators such as LPS and IFN-γ, but to an equal extent by substrate rigidity and substrate stretch. Macrophage elasticity is dependent upon actin polymerization and small rhoGTPase activation, but functional effects of elasticity are not predicted by examination of gene expression profiles alone. Taken together, these data demonstrate an unanticipated role for cell elasticity as a common pathway by which mechanical and biologic factors determine macrophage function.

  6. Nanomedicine engulfed by macrophages for targeted tumor therapy

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    Li S

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Siwen Li,1,* Song Feng,1,* Li Ding,1 Yuxi Liu,1 Qiuyun Zhu,1 Zhiyu Qian,2 Yueqing Gu1 1Department of Biomedical Engineering, China Pharmaceutical University, 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Automation, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Macrophages, exhibiting high intrinsic accumulation and infiltration into tumor tissues, are a novel drug vehicle for directional drug delivery. However, the low drug-loading (DL capacity and the drug cytotoxicity to the cell vehicle have limited the application of macrophages in tumor therapy. In this study, different drugs involving small molecular and nanoparticle drugs were loaded into intrinsic macrophages to find a better way to overcome these limitations. Their DL capacity and cytotoxicity to the macrophages were first compared. Furthermore, their phagocytic ratio, dynamic distributions, and tumoricidal effects were also investigated. Results indicated that more lipid-soluble molecules and DL particles can be phagocytized by macrophages than hydrophilic ones. In addition, the N-succinyl-N'-octyl chitosan (SOC DL particles showed low cytotoxicity to the macrophage itself, while the dynamic biodistribution of macrophages engulfed with different particles/small molecules showed similar profiles, mainly excreted from liver to intestine pathway. Furthermore, macrophages loaded with SOC–paclitaxel (PTX particles exhibited greater therapeutic efficacies than those of macrophages directly carrying small molecular drugs such as doxorubicin and PTX. Interestingly, macrophages displayed stronger targeting ability to the tumor site hypersecreting chemokine in immunocompetent mice in comparison to the tumor site secreting low levels of chemokine in immunodeficiency mice. Finally, results demonstrated that macrophages carrying SOC–PTX are a promising pharmaceutical preparation

  7. 紫外线诱变选育苜蓿叶象甲高毒力白僵菌%Screening Highly Virulent Strains of Beauveria bassiana to Hypera postica Gyllenhal by UV Mutagenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩慧; 吴小虎; 李益; 李克梅; 赵莉

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The purpose of this program was to screen out highly virulent strains of Beauveria bassiana to Hypera postica Cyllenhal. [Method] Ultraviolet irradiating was used to irradiate Beauveria bassiana strain for 10 min and 30 min in order to select high chitinase mutant, and then 3 stage larvae of Hypera postica underwent the virulence test with the Beauveria bassiana before and after UV mutagenesis. [Result]The results of the test indicated that corrected mortality of the stain Bb - 10 - 12 was 100% , corrected mortality of the stain Bb -30- 14 was 77.78%, and corrected mortality of wild type strain was 62.97% in 9 days later. [Conclusion] A more virulent strain Bb - 10 - 12 of Beauveria bassiana to Hypera postica was obtained by UV mutagenesis.%[目的]选育出对苜蓿叶象甲高毒力的白僵菌.[方法]利用紫外线对前期筛选出的白僵菌菌株照射10和30min进行诱变,选出高几丁质酶突变株,再用诱变前后的白僵菌对苜蓿叶象甲3龄幼虫进行毒力测定.[结果]用诱变前后的白僵菌对苜蓿叶象甲3龄幼虫室内毒力测定:处理9d后,诱导菌株Bb- 10- 12校正死亡率为100%,Bb - 30 - 14校正死亡率为77.78%,而朱经紫外线照射的野生型菌株校正死亡率为62.97%.[结论]通过室内毒力测定法,获得了经10 min紫外线照射诱变对苜蓿叶象甲更高毒力的1株白僵菌菌株.

  8. The highly virulent 2006 Norwegian EHEC O103:H25 outbreak strain is related to the 2011 German O104:H4 outbreak strain.

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    Trine M L'Abée-Lund

    Full Text Available In 2006, a severe foodborne EHEC outbreak occured in Norway. Seventeen cases were recorded and the HUS frequency was 60%. The causative strain, Esherichia coli O103:H25, is considered to be particularly virulent. Sequencing of the outbreak strain revealed resemblance to the 2011 German outbreak strain E. coli O104:H4, both in genome and Shiga toxin 2-encoding (Stx2 phage sequence. The nucleotide identity between the Stx2 phages from the Norwegian and German outbreak strains was 90%. During the 2006 outbreak, stx(2-positive O103:H25 E. coli was isolated from two patients. All the other outbreak associated isolates, including all food isolates, were stx-negative, and carried a different phage replacing the Stx2 phage. This phage was of similar size to the Stx2 phage, but had a distinctive early phage region and no stx gene. The sequence of the early region of this phage was not retrieved from the bacterial host genome, and the origin of the phage is unknown. The contaminated food most likely contained a mixture of E. coli O103:H25 cells with either one of the phages.

  9. A role for the RNA chaperone Hfq in controlling adherent-invasive Escherichia coli colonization and virulence.

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    Karina T Simonsen

    Full Text Available Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC has been linked with the onset and perpetuation of inflammatory bowel diseases. The AIEC strain LF82 was originally isolated from an ileal biopsy from a patient with Crohn's disease. The pathogenesis of LF82 results from its abnormal adherence to and subsequent invasion of the intestinal epithelium coupled with its ability to survive phagocytosis by macrophages once it has crossed the intestinal barrier. To gain further insight into AIEC pathogenesis we employed the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as an in vivo infection model. We demonstrate that AIEC strain LF82 forms a persistent infection in C. elegans, thereby reducing the host lifespan significantly. This host killing phenotype was associated with massive bacterial colonization of the nematode intestine and damage to the intestinal epithelial surface. C. elegans killing was independent of known LF82 virulence determinants but was abolished by deletion of the LF82 hfq gene, which encodes an RNA chaperone involved in mediating posttranscriptional gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs. This finding reveals that important aspects of LF82 pathogenesis are controlled at the posttranscriptional level by riboregulation. The role of Hfq in LF82 virulence was independent of its function in regulating RpoS and RpoE activity. Further, LF82Δhfq mutants were non-motile, impaired in cell invasion and highly sensitive to various chemical stress conditions, reinforcing the multifaceted function of Hfq in mediating bacterial adaptation. This study highlights the usefulness of simple non-mammalian infection systems for the identification and analysis of bacterial virulence factors.

  10. Increased virulence of Marek's disease virus field isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witter, R L

    1997-01-01

    The continuation of an apparent evolutionary trend of Marek's disease virus (MDV) towards greater virulence may explain recent increased losses from Marek's disease (MD) in vaccinated flocks. To address this question, the virulence of 31 isolates of serotype 1 MDV obtained from layer or broiler flocks between 1987 and 1995 were characterized. Each isolate was cultured in duck embryo fibroblasts for four to six passages, and ascertained to be free from contamination with avian retroviruses, chicken anemia virus, and MDVs of other serotypes. The viruses, along with prototype viruses JM/102W and Md5, were tested for virulence by inoculation at 6 days of age into laboratory strain 15I5 x 7(1) chickens of three types: nonvaccinated, vaccinated with turkey herpesvirus (HVT) and bivalent (HVT + SB-1)-vaccinated. The results showed that three isolates did not differ from JM/102W and were classified in the virulent (vMDV) pathotype. Twenty-one isolates produced significantly higher levels of MD in HVT-vaccinated chickens than did the JM/102W control and were classified in the very virulent (vvMDV) pathotype. Seven isolates, five of which were isolated in 1994 or 1995, produced significantly higher levels of MD in bivalent-vaccinated chickens than did the Md5 (vvMDV) control. These isolates, provisionally designated as the vv+MDV pathotype, appeared to be at the high end of a virulence continuum. Several MD response parameters, including lymphoma mortality, early mortality with bursal/thymic atrophy, and frequency of visceral lymphomas or ocular lesions in nonvaccinated chickens were positively correlated with virulence. These findings support the continued evolution of MDV towards greater virulence.

  11. The genetic basis of Escherichia coli pathoadaptation to macrophages.

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    Migla Miskinyte

    Full Text Available Antagonistic interactions are likely important driving forces of the evolutionary process underlying bacterial genome complexity and diversity. We hypothesized that the ability of evolved bacteria to escape specific components of host innate immunity, such as phagocytosis and killing by macrophages (MΦ, is a critical trait relevant in the acquisition of bacterial virulence. Here, we used a combination of experimental evolution, phenotypic characterization, genome sequencing and mathematical modeling to address how fast, and through how many adaptive steps, a commensal Escherichia coli (E. coli acquire this virulence trait. We show that when maintained in vitro under the selective pressure of host MΦ commensal E. coli can evolve, in less than 500 generations, virulent clones that escape phagocytosis and MΦ killing in vitro, while increasing their pathogenicity in vivo, as assessed in mice. This pathoadaptive process is driven by a mechanism involving the insertion of a single transposable element into the promoter region of the E. coli yrfF gene. Moreover, transposition of the IS186 element into the promoter of Lon gene, encoding an ATP-dependent serine protease, is likely to accelerate this pathoadaptive process. Competition between clones carrying distinct beneficial mutations dominates the dynamics of the pathoadaptive process, as suggested from a mathematical model, which reproduces the observed experimental dynamics of E. coli evolution towards virulence. In conclusion, we reveal a molecular mechanism explaining how a specific component of host innate immunity can modulate microbial evolution towards pathogenicity.

  12. APOPTOSIS INDUCTION IN THE PHAGOCYTIC CELLS BY MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSISWITH DIFFERENT VIRULENCE

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    Zubriychuk OM

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of phagocytic cells apoptosis induced in vitro and in vivo by Mycobacterium tuberculosis with different virulence. For this aim the main feachers of apoptosis of peritoneal macrophages, neutrophyles, monocytes, induced in vitro by living and dead MBT H37Rv and BCG in intact animals, healthy subjects and patients with tuberculosis were expected, as well as features of apoptosis of neutrophils and peritoneal macrophages of animals infected with MBT H37Rv and BCG. It was found that the virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis have a powerful apoptogenic effect on phagocytic cells, and the loss of pathogen viability and virulence causes its weakening. It was demonstrated that the induction of apoptosis by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is realised both directly and indirectly, probably through their influence on the production of cell interaction mediators. It was detected that in order to limit excessive loss of phagocytes due to apoptosis, virulent mycobacteria use mechanisms that prevent infection of these cells.

  13. Genome-wide DNA microarray analysis of Francisella tularensis strains demonstrates extensive genetic conservation within the species but identifies regions that are unique to the highly virulent F. tularensis subsp. tularensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekhuijsen, M.P.; Larsson, P.; Johansson, A.; Byström, M.; Eriksson, U.; Larsson, E.; Prior, R.G.; Sjöstedt, A.; Titball, R.W.; Forsman, M.

    2003-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a potent pathogen and a possible bioterrorism agent. Little is known, however, to explain the molecular basis for its virulence and the distinct differences in virulence found between the four recognized subspecies, F. tularensis subsp. tularensis, F. tularensis subsp. medi

  14. Biochemical, structural and molecular dynamics analyses of the potential virulence factor RipA from Yersinia pestis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Torres

    Full Text Available Human diseases are attributed in part to the ability of pathogens to evade the eukaryotic immune systems. A subset of these pathogens has developed mechanisms to survive in human macrophages. Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of the bubonic plague, is a predominately extracellular pathogen with the ability to survive and replicate intracellularly. A previous study has shown that a novel rip (required for intracellular proliferation operon (ripA, ripB and ripC is essential for replication and survival of Y. pestis in postactivated macrophages, by playing a role in lowering macrophage-produced nitric oxide (NO levels. A bioinformatics analysis indicates that the rip operon is conserved among a distally related subset of macrophage-residing pathogens, including Burkholderia and Salmonella species, and suggests that this previously uncharacterized pathway is also required for intracellular survival of these pathogens. The focus of this study is ripA, which encodes for a protein highly homologous to 4-hydroxybutyrate-CoA transferase; however, biochemical analysis suggests that RipA functions as a butyryl-CoA transferase. The 1.9 Å X-ray crystal structure reveals that RipA belongs to the class of Family I CoA transferases and exhibits a unique tetrameric state. Molecular dynamics simulations are consistent with RipA tetramer formation and suggest a possible gating mechanism for CoA binding mediated by Val227. Together, our structural characterization and molecular dynamic simulations offer insights into acyl-CoA specificity within the active site binding pocket, and support biochemical results that RipA is a butyryl-CoA transferase. We hypothesize that the end product of the rip operon is butyrate, a known anti-inflammatory, which has been shown to lower NO levels in macrophages. Thus, the results of this molecular study of Y. pestis RipA provide a structural platform for rational inhibitor design, which may lead to a greater understanding of the

  15. Three-dimensional structures of virulence proteins of Legionella establish targets for new antibacterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guido Hansen; Rolf Hilgenfeld

    2012-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila,the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease,has been recognized as a major health problem responsible for an estimated number of 15 000-30 000 cases of severe pneumonia per year in Germany alone.Despite of the high clinical relevance,many aspects of the intracellular life cycle of Legionella,especially details on interactions with host cells,are not well understood.Structural information on virulence proteins helps unravel basal pathogenicity mechanisms and is a prerequisite for the rational development of effective drug molecules.Here we discuss structures of three important virulence proteins ofLegionella that have been determined in our laboratory.The structure of the macrophage infectivity potentiator (Mip) protein of Legionella pneumophila is the first of a novel subgroup within the family of FK506-binding protein (FKBP) peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases.On the basis of the Mip structure,promising antibacterial agents are being designed.Recently,structures of two equally exciting Legionella proteins have been reported.The ferrous iron transport protein FeoB is a transmembrane protein responsible for Fe2+ aquisition after entry of the pathogen into the host cell.The structure of the cytoplasmic domain of FeoB provides insights into the family of prokaryotic G proteins and allows a detailed comparison with structures of related FeoBs.Furthermore,the characterization of DegQ,a periplasmatic chaperone-protease involved in protein quality control represents an intriguing example of how enzymatic activity is regulated by oligomerization as well as by an intrinsic loop activation cascade,depending on subtle conformational rearrangements.

  16. Promotion of colonization and virulence by cholera toxin is dependent on neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queen, Jessica; Satchell, Karla J F

    2013-09-01

    The innate immune response to Vibrio cholerae infection is poorly understood, but this knowledge is critical for the design of safe, effective vaccines. Using an adult mouse intestinal infection model, this study examines the contribution of neutrophils to host immunity, as well as the effect of cholera toxin and other secreted factors on this response. Depletion of neutrophils from mice with anti-Ly6G IA8 monoclonal antibody led to similar survival rates of mice infected with low or moderate doses of toxigenic V. cholerae El Tor O1. At a high dose, neutropenic mice showed increased rates of survival compared to neutrophil-replete animals. Expression of cholera toxin was found to be protective to the neutropenic host, and this phenotype can be replicated by the administration of purified toxin. Neutrophils do not effectively clear colonizing bacteria from the small intestine, nor do they alter induction of early immune-modulating signals. In both neutropenic and neutrophil-replete animals, the local response to infection is characterized by expression of interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-10, and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 alpha (MIP-2). Overall, these data indicate that the innate immune response to toxigenic V. cholerae infection differs dramatically from the host response to nontoxigenic infection or vaccination, where neutrophils are protective to the host. In the absence of neutrophils, cholera toxin induces immunomodulatory effects that increase host survival. In cholera toxin-producing strains, similar to nontoxigenic infection, accessory toxins are critical to virulence, indicating that cholera toxin and the other secreted toxins modulate the host response by different mechanisms, with both contributing to bacterial persistence and virulence.

  17. Macrophage-Mediated Lymphangiogenesis: The Emerging Role of Macrophages as Lymphatic Endothelial Progenitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ran, Sophia, E-mail: sran@siumed.edu; Montgomery, Kyle E. [Department of Medical Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, 801 N. Rutledge, Springfield, IL 62794 (United States)

    2012-06-27

    It is widely accepted that macrophages and other inflammatory cells support tumor progression and metastasis. During early stages of neoplastic development, tumor-infiltrating macrophages (TAMs) mount an immune response against transformed cells. Frequently, however, cancer cells escape the immune surveillance, an event that is accompanied by macrophage transition from an anti-tumor to a pro-tumorigenic type. The latter is characterized by high expression of factors that activate endothelial cells, suppress immune response, degrade extracellular matrix, and promote tumor growth. Cumulatively, these products of TAMs promote tumor expansion and growth of both blood and lymphatic vessels that facilitate metastatic spread. Breast cancers and other epithelial malignancies induce the formation of new lymphatic vessels (i.e., lymphangiogenesis) that leads to lymphatic and subsequently, to distant metastasis. Both experimental and clinical studies have shown that TAMs significantly promote tumor lymphangiogenesis through paracrine and cell autonomous modes. The paracrine effect consists of the expression of a variety of pro-lymphangiogenic factors that activate the preexisting lymphatic vessels. The evidence for cell-autonomous contribution is based on the observed tumor mobilization of macrophage-derived lymphatic endothelial cell progenitors (M-LECP) that integrate into lymphatic vessels prior to sprouting. This review will summarize the current knowledge of macrophage-dependent growth of new lymphatic vessels with specific emphasis on an emerging role of macrophages as lymphatic endothelial cell progenitors (M-LECP)

  18. A comparison of computational methods for identifying virulence factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu-Lu Zheng

    Full Text Available Bacterial pathogens continue to threaten public health worldwide today. Identification of bacterial virulence factors can help to find novel drug/vaccine targets against pathogenicity. It can also help to reveal the mechanisms of the related diseases at the molecular level. With the explosive growth in protein sequences generated in the postgenomic age, it is highly desired to develop computational methods for rapidly and effectively identifying virulence factors according to their sequence information alone. In this study, based on the protein-protein interaction networks from the STRING database, a novel network-based method was proposed for identifying the virulence factors in the proteomes of UPEC 536, UPEC CFT073, P. aeruginosa PAO1, L. pneumophila Philadelphia 1, C. jejuni NCTC 11168 and M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Evaluated on the same benchmark datasets derived from the aforementioned species, the identification accuracies achieved by the network-based method were around 0.9, significantly higher than those by the sequence-based methods such as BLAST, feature selection and VirulentPred. Further analysis showed that the functional associations such as the gene neighborhood and co-occurrence were the primary associations between these virulence factors in the STRING database. The high success rates indicate that the network-based method is quite promising. The novel approach holds high potential for identifying virulence factors in many other various organisms as well because it can be easily extended to identify the virulence factors in many other bacterial species, as long as the relevant significant statistical data are available for them.

  19. Specific and functional diversity of endophytic bacteria from pine wood nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus with different virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao-Qin; Yuan, Wei-Min; Tian, Xiao-Jing; Fan, Ben; Fang, Xin; Ye, Jian-Ren; Ding, Xiao-Lei

    2013-01-01

    Pine wilt disease (PWD) caused by the pine wood nematode (PWN), Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, is one of the most devastating diseases of Pinus spp. The PWN was therefore listed as one of the most dangerous forest pests in China meriting quarantine. Virulence of the PWN is closely linked with the spread of PWD. However, main factors responsible for the virulence of PWNs are still unclear. Recently epiphytic bacteria carried by PWNs have drawn much attention. But little is known about the relationship between endophytic bacteria and virulence of B. xylophilus. In this research, virulence of ten strains of B. xylophilus from different geographical areas in six provinces of China and four pine species were tested with 2-year-old seedlings of Pinus thunbergii. Endophytic bacteria were isolated from PWNs with different virulence to investigate the relationship between the bacteria and PWN virulence. Meanwhile, the carbon metabolism of endophytic bacteria from highly and low virulent B. xylophilus was analyzed using Biolog plates (ECO). The results indicated that ten strains of PWNs showed a wide range of virulence. Simultaneously, endophytic bacteria were isolated from 90% of the B. xylophilus strains. The dominant endophytic bacteria in the nematodes were identified as species of Stenotrophomonas, Achromobacter, Ewingella, Leifsonia, Rhizobium, and Pseudomonas using molecular and biochemical methods. Moreover, S. maltophilia, and A. xylosoxidans subsp. xylosoxidans were the predominant strains. Most of the strains (80%) from P. massoniana contained either S. maltophilia, A. xylosoxidans, or both species. There was a difference between the abilities of the endophytic bacteria to utilize carbon sources. Endophytic bacteria from highly virulent B. xylophilus had a relatively high utilization rate of carbohydrate and carboxylic acids, while bacteria from low virulent B. xylophilus made better use of amino acids. In conclusion, endophytic bacteria widely exist in B. xylophilus

  20. Transcriptional Regulation and Macrophage Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, David A; Summers, Kim M; Rehli, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are professional phagocytes that occupy specific niches in every tissue of the body. Their survival, proliferation, and differentiation are controlled by signals from the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (CSF-1R) and its two ligands, CSF-1 and interleukin-34. In this review, we address the developmental and transcriptional relationships between hematopoietic progenitor cells, blood monocytes, and tissue macrophages as well as the distinctions from dendritic cells. A huge repertoire of receptors allows monocytes, tissue-resident macrophages, or pathology-associated macrophages to adapt to specific microenvironments. These processes create a broad spectrum of macrophages with different functions and individual effector capacities. The production of large transcriptomic data sets in mouse, human, and other species provides new insights into the mechanisms that underlie macrophage functional plasticity.

  1. Paradoxical growth of Candida albicans in the presence of caspofungin is associated with multiple cell wall rearrangements and decreased virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, Cristina; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Zaragoza, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, echinocandins have emerged as an important family of antifungal drugs because of their fungicidal activity against Candida spp. Echinocandins inhibit the enzyme β-1,3-d-glucan synthase, encoded by the FKS genes, and resistance to echinocandins is associated with mutations in this gene. In addition, echinocandin exposure can produce paradoxical growth, defined as the ability to grow at high antifungal concentrations but not at intermediate concentrations. In this work, we have demonstrated that paradoxical growth of Candida albicans in the presence of caspofungin is not due to antifungal degradation or instability. Media with high caspofungin concentrations recovered from wells where C. albicans showed paradoxical growth inhibited the growth of a Candida krusei reference strain. Cells exhibiting paradoxical growth at high caspofungin concentrations showed morphological changes such as enlarged size, abnormal septa, and absence of filamentation. Chitin content increased from the MIC to high caspofungin concentrations. Despite the high chitin levels, around 23% of cells died after treatment with caspofungin, indicating that chitin is required but not sufficient to protect the cells from the fungicidal effect of caspofungin. Moreover, we found that after paradoxical growth, β-1,3-glucan was exposed at the cell wall surface. Cells grown at high caspofungin concentrations had decreased virulence in the invertebrate host Galleria mellonella. Cells grown at high caspofungin concentrations also induced a proinflammatory response in murine macrophages compared to control cells. Our work highlights important aspects about fungal adaptation to caspofungin, and although this adaptation is associated with reduced virulence, the clinical implications remain to be elucidated.

  2. Beryllium-stimulated apoptosis in macrophage cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, R T; Fadok, V A; Kittle, L A; Maier, L A; Newman, L S

    2000-08-21

    In vitro stimulation of bronchoalveolar lavage cells from patients with chronic beryllium disease (CBD) induces the production of TNF-alpha. We tested the hypothesis that beryllium (Be)-stimulated TNF-alpha might induce apoptosis in mouse and human macrophage cell lines. These cell lines were selected because they produce a range of Be-stimulated TNF-alpha. The mouse macrophage cell line H36.12j produces high levels of Be-stimulated TNF-alpha. The mouse macrophage cell line P388D.1 produces low, constitutive, levels of TNF-alpha and does not up-regulate Be-stimulated TNF-alpha production. The DEOHS-1 human CBD macrophage cell line does not produce constitutive or Be-stimulated TNF-alpha. Apoptosis was determined by microscopic observation of propidium iodide stained fragmented nuclei in unstimulated and BeSO(4)-stimulated macrophage cell lines. BeSO(4) induced apoptosis in all macrophage cell lines tested. Beryllium-stimulated apoptosis was dose-responsive and maximal after 24 h of exposure to 100 microM BeSO(4). In contrast, unstimulated and Al(2)(SO(4))(3)-stimulated macrophage cell lines did not undergo apoptosis. The general caspase inhibitor BD-fmk inhibited Be-stimulated macrophage cell line apoptosis at concentrations above 50 microM. Our data show that Be-stimulated macrophage cell line apoptosis was caspase-dependent and not solely dependent on Be-stimulated TNF-alpha levels. We speculate that the release of Be-antigen from apoptotic macrophages may serve to re-introduce Be material back into the lung microenvironment, make it available for uptake by new macrophages, and thereby amplify Be-stimulated cytokine production, promoting ongoing inflammation and granuloma maintenance in CBD.

  3. Oxidative stress response genes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: role of ahpC in resistance to peroxynitrite and stage-specific survival in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Master, S S; Springer, B; Sander, P; Boettger, E C; Deretic, V; Timmins, G S

    2002-10-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis ahpC gene, encoding the mycobacterial orthologue of alkylhydroperoxide reductase, undergoes an unusual regulatory cycle. The levels of AhpC alternate between stages of expression silencing in virulent strains grown as aerated cultures, secondary to a natural loss of the regulatory oxyR function in all strains of the tubercle bacillus, and expression activation in static bacilli by a yet undefined mechanism. The reasons for this unorthodox regulatory cycle controlling expression of an antioxidant factor are currently not known. In this work, M. tuberculosis H37Rv and Mycobacterium smegmatis mc(2)155 ahpC knockout mutants were tested for sensitivity to reactive nitrogen intermediates, in particular peroxynitrite, a highly reactive combinatorial product of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species, and sensitivity to bactericidal mechanisms in resting and activated macrophages. Both M. tuberculosis ahpC::Km(r) and M. smegmatis ahpC::Km(r) showed increased susceptibility to peroxynitrite. In contrast, inactivation of ahpC in M. tuberculosis did not cause increased sensitivity to donors of NO alone. M. tuberculosis ahpC::Km(r) also showed decreased survival in unstimulated macrophages, but the effect was no longer detectable upon IFNgamma activation. These studies establish a specific role for ahpC in antioxidant defences involving peroxynitrite and most likely additional cidal mechanisms in macrophages, with the regulatory cycle likely contributing to survival upon coming out of the stationary phase during dormancy (latent infection) or upon transmission to a new host.

  4. Polyglucose nanoparticles with renal elimination and macrophage avidity facilitate PET imaging in ischaemic heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keliher, Edmund J.; Ye, Yu-Xiang; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R.; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Tricot, Benoit; Senders, Max L.; Groenen, Hannah; Fay, Francois; Perez-Medina, Carlos; Calcagno, Claudia; Carlucci, Giuseppe; Reiner, Thomas; Sun, Yuan; Courties, Gabriel; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Kim, Hye-Yeong; Wang, Cuihua; Chen, John W.; Swirski, Filip K.; Wey, Hsiao-Ying; Hooker, Jacob; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Tissue macrophage numbers vary during health versus disease. Abundant inflammatory macrophages destruct tissues, leading to atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction and heart failure. Emerging therapeutic options create interest in monitoring macrophages in patients. Here we describe positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 18F-Macroflor, a modified polyglucose nanoparticle with high avidity for macrophages. Due to its small size, Macroflor is excreted renally, a prerequisite for imaging with the isotope flourine-18. The particle's short blood half-life, measured in three species, including a primate, enables macrophage imaging in inflamed cardiovascular tissues. Macroflor enriches in cardiac and plaque macrophages, thereby increasing PET signal in murine infarcts and both mouse and rabbit atherosclerotic plaques. In PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments, Macroflor PET imaging detects changes in macrophage population size while molecular MRI reports on increasing or resolving inflammation. These data suggest that Macroflor PET/MRI could be a clinical tool to non-invasively monitor macrophage biology. PMID:28091604

  5. Microarray-based detection of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium transposon mutants that cannot survive in macrophages and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kaman; Kim, Charles C; Falkow, Stanley

    2005-09-01

    DNA microarrays provide an opportunity to combine the principles of signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) with microarray technology to identify potentially important bacterial virulence genes. The scope of DNA microarrays allows for less laborious screening on a much larger scale than possible by STM alone. We have adapted a microarray-based transposon tracking strategy for use with a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium cDNA microarray in order to identify genes important for survival and replication in RAW 264.7 mouse macrophage-like cells or in the spleens of BALB/cJ mice. A 50,000-CFU transposon library of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain SL1344 was serially passaged in cultured macrophages or intraperitoneally inoculated into BALB/cJ mice. The bacterial genomic DNA was isolated and processed for analysis on the microarray. The novel application of this approach to identify mutants unable to survive in cultured cells resulted in the identification of components of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI2), which is known to be critical for intracellular survival and replication. In addition, array results indicated that a number of SPI1-associated genes, currently not associated with intracellular survival, are negatively selected. However, of the SPI1-associated mutants individually tested for intracellular survival, only a sirA mutant exhibited reduced numbers relative to those of wild-type bacteria. Of the mutants unable to survive in mice, significant proportions are either components of the SPI2 pathogenicity island or involved in lipopolysaccharide synthesis. This observation is in agreement with results obtained in the original S. enterica serovar Typhimurium STM screen, illustrating the utility of this approach for the high-throughput identification of virulence factors important for survival in the host.

  6. Intracellular survival of Clostridium chauvoei in bovine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Prhiscylla Sadanã; Santos, Renato Lima; da Paixão, Tatiane Alves; de Oliveira Bernardes, Laura Cristina; de Macêdo, Auricélio Alves; Gonçalves, Luciana Aramuni; de Oliveira Júnior, Carlos Augusto; Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria

    2017-02-01

    Clostridium chauvoei is the etiological agent of blackleg, a severe disease of domestic ruminants, causing myonecrosis and serious toxemia with high mortality. Despite the known importance of this agent, studies evaluating its pathogenesis of blackleg are scarce, and many are based on an unproven hypothesis that states that macrophages are responsible for carrying C. chauvoei spores from the intestines to muscles in the early stages of blackleg. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the survival of C. chauvoei vegetative cells or spores after phagocytosis by a murine macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7) and bovine monocyte-derived macrophages and to profile inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine transcripts of bovine macrophages infected with C. chauvoei vegetative cells or spores. Both vegetative cells and spores of C. chauvoei remain viable after internalization by murine and bovine macrophages. Bovine macrophages infected with vegetative cells showed a pro-inflammatory profile, while those infected with spores displayed an anti-inflammatory profile. Together, these results corroborate the classical hypothesis that macrophages may play a role in the early pathogenesis of blackleg. Moreover, this is the first study to evaluate the infection kinetics and cytokine profile of bovine monocyte-derived macrophages infected with a Clostridium species.

  7. Notch Regulates Macrophage-Mediated Inflammation in Diabetic Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Andrew S; Joshi, Amrita D; Boniakowski, Anna E; Schaller, Matthew; Chung, Jooho; Allen, Ronald; Bermick, Jennifer; Carson, William F; Henke, Peter K; Maillard, Ivan; Kunkel, Steve L; Gallagher, Katherine A

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages are essential immune cells necessary for regulated inflammation during wound healing. Recent studies have identified that Notch plays a role in macrophage-mediated inflammation. Thus, we investigated the role of Notch signaling on wound macrophage phenotype and function during normal and diabetic wound healing. We found that Notch receptor and ligand expression are dynamic in wound macrophages during normal healing. Mice with a myeloid-specific Notch signaling defect (DNMAML(floxed)Lyz2(Cre+) ) demonstrated delayed early healing (days 1-3) and wound macrophages had decreased inflammatory gene expression. In our physiologic murine model of type 2 diabetes (T2D), Notch receptor expression was significantly increased in wound macrophages on day 6, following the initial inflammatory phase of wound healing, corresponding to increased inflammatory cytokine expression. This increase in Notch1 and Notch2 was also observed in human monocytes from patients with T2D. Further, in prediabetic mice with a genetic Notch signaling defect (DNMAML(floxed)Lyz2(Cre+) on a high-fat diet), improved wound healing was seen at late time points (days 6-7). These findings suggest that Notch is critical for the early inflammatory phase of wound healing and directs production of macrophage-dependent inflammatory mediators. These results identify that canonical Notch signaling is important in directing macrophage function in wound repair and define a translational target for the treatment of non-healing diabetic wounds.

  8. Notch Regulates Macrophage-Mediated Inflammation in Diabetic Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S. Kimball

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are essential immune cells necessary for regulated inflammation during wound healing. Recent studies have identified that Notch plays a role in macrophage-mediated inflammation. Thus, we investigated the role of Notch signaling on wound macrophage phenotype and function during normal and diabetic wound healing. We found that Notch receptor and ligand expression are dynamic in wound macrophages during normal healing. Mice with a myeloid-specific Notch signaling defect (DNMAMLfloxedLyz2Cre+ demonstrated delayed early healing (days 1–3 and wound macrophages had decreased inflammatory gene expression. In our physiologic murine model of type 2 diabetes (T2D, Notch receptor expression was significantly increased in wound macrophages on day 6, following the initial inflammatory phase of wound healing, corresponding to increased inflammatory cytokine expression. This increase in Notch1 and Notch2 was also observed in human monocytes from patients with T2D. Further, in prediabetic mice with a genetic Notch signaling defect (DNMAMLfloxedLyz2Cre+ on a high-fat diet, improved wound healing was seen at late time points (days 6–7. These findings suggest that Notch is critical for the early inflammatory phase of wound healing and directs production of macrophage-dependent inflammatory mediators. These results identify that canonical Notch signaling is important in directing macrophage function in wound repair and define a translational target for the treatment of non-healing diabetic wounds.

  9. Immunological impact of magnetic nanoparticles (Ferucarbotran) on murine peritoneal macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Chen-Hao [National Taiwan University, Department of Horticulture (China); Hsiao, Jong-Kai [National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, Department of Medical Imaging (China); Wang, Jaw-Lin [National Taiwan University, Institute of Biomedical Engineering (China); Sheu, Fuu, E-mail: fsheu@ntu.edu.t [National Taiwan University, Department of Horticulture (China)

    2010-01-15

    Ferucarbotran, a clinically used superparamagnetic iron oxide, is widely developed as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent and has the potential to improve the monitoring of macrophage recirculation in vivo. However, the biological effect of Ferucarbotran or magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) on macrophage is not clearly understood yet. This study is aimed to examine the immunological impact of Ferucarbotran toward murine peritoneal macrophages. Cells treated with Ferucarbotran demonstrated a dose-responsive increase of granularity in the cytoplasm. After 24 h of incubation, viability and cytotoxicity in macrophages treated with 200 {mu}g Fe/mL of Ferucarbotran were not affected. Macrophages loaded with Ferucarbotran above 100 {mu}g Fe/mL showed a significant (p < 0.01) increase in cytokine (TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, IL-6) secretion and mRNA expression, followed by nitric oxide (NO) secretion and iNOS mRNA expression. Chemotactic responses of Ferucarbotran-preloaded macrophages toward CX3CL1 were significantly (p < 0.05) lower than those of untreated macrophages. Taking together, Ferucarbotran at high dose (100 {mu}g Fe/mL) could induce murine peritoneal macrophages activation in pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion and NO production.

  10. Involvement of a 1-Cys peroxiredoxin in bacterial virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Hideo Kaihami

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The killing of bacterial pathogens by macrophages occurs via the oxidative burst and bacteria have evolved to overcome this challenge and survive, using several virulence and defense strategies, including antioxidant mechanisms. We show here that the 1-Cys peroxiredoxin LsfA from the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is endowed with thiol-dependent peroxidase activity that protects the bacteria from H(2O(2 and that this protein is implicated in pathogenicity. LsfA belongs to the poorly studied Prx6 subfamily of peroxiredoxins. The function of these peroxiredoxins has not been characterized in bacteria, and their contribution to host-pathogen interactions remains unknown. Infection of macrophages with the lsfA mutant strains resulted in higher levels of the cytokine TNF-α production due to the activation of the NF-kB and MAPK pathways, that are partially inhibited by the wild-type P. aeruginosa strain. A redox fluorescent probe was more oxidized in the lsfA mutant-infected macrophages than it was in the macrophages infected with the wild-type strain, suggesting that the oxidative burst was overstimulated in the absence of LsfA. Although no differences in the phagocytosis rates were observed when macrophages were infected with wild-type and mutant bacteria in a gentamicin exclusion assay, a higher number of wild-type bacterial cells was found in the supernatant. This difference was not observed when macrophages were pre-treated with a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, confirming the role of LsfA in the bacterial resistance to ROS generated via NADPH oxidase. In an acute pneumonia model, mice infected with the mutant strains presented higher cytokine release in the lungs and increased activated neutrophil recruitment, with reduced bacterial burden and improved survival rates compared to mice infected with the wild-type bacteria. LsfA is the first bacterial 1-Cys Prx shown to modulate host immune responses and its characterization will allow a

  11. Insights into Entamoeba histolytica virulence modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Vaca, F; Anaya-Velázquez, F

    2010-08-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is able to invade human tissues by means of several molecules and biological properties related to the virulence. Pathogenic amebas use three major virulence factors, Gal/GalNAc lectin, amebapore and proteases, for lyse, phagocytose, kill and destroy a variety of cells and tissues in the host. Responses of the parasite to host components such as mucins and bacterial flora influence the behavior of pathogenic amebas altering their expression of virulence factors. The relative virulence of different strains of E. histolytica has been shown to vary as a consequence of changes in conditions of in vitro cultivation which implies substantial changes in basic metabolic aspects and factors directly and indirectly related to amebic virulence. Comparison of E. histolytica strains with different virulence phenotypes and under different conditions of growth will help to identify new virulence factor candidates and define the interplay between virulence factors and invasive phenotype. Virulence attenuate mutants of E. histolytica are useful also to uncover novel virulence determinants. The comparison of biological properties and virulence factors between E. histolytica and E. dispar, a non-pathogenic species, has been a useful approach to investigate the key factors involved in the experimental presentation of amebiasis and its complex regulation. The molecular mechanisms that regulate these variations in virulence are not yet known. Their elucidation will help us to better understand the gene expression plasticity that enables the effective adaptation of the ameba to changes in growth culture conditions and host factors.

  12. Aureusimines in Staphylococcus aureus are not involved in virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recently, dipeptide aureusimines were reported to activate expression of staphylococcal virulence genes, such as alpha-hemolysin, and increase S. aureus virulence. Surprisingly, most of the virulence genes affected by aureusimines form part of the regulon of the SaeRS two component system (TCS, raising the possibility that SaeRS might be directly or indirectly involved in the aureusimine-dependent signaling process. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using HPLC analyses, we confirmed that a transposon mutant of ausA, the gene encoding the aureusimine dipeptide synthesis enzyme, does not produce dipeptides. However, the transposon mutant showed normal hemolysis activity and alpha-hemolysin/SaeP production. Furthermore, the P1 promoter of the sae operon, one of the targets of the SaeRS TCS, showed normal transcription activity. Moreover, in contrast to the original report, the ausA transposon mutant did not exhibit attenuated virulence in an animal infection model. DNA sequencing revealed that the ausA deletion mutant used in the original study has an 83 nt-duplication in saeS. Hemolysis activity of the original mutant was restored by a plasmid carrying the sae operon. A mutant of the sae operon showed elevated resistance to chloramphenicol and erythromycin, two antibiotics widely used during staphylococcal mutagenesis. At 43°C in the presence of erythromycin and aeration, the conditions typically employed for staphylococcal mutagenesis, an saeR transposon mutant grew much faster than a control mutant and the saeR mutant was highly enriched in a mixed culture experiment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show that the previously reported roles of aureusimines in staphylococcal gene regulation and virulence were due to an unintended mutation in saeS, which was likely selected due to elevated resistance of the mutant to environmental stresses. Thus, there is no evidence indicating that the dipeptide aureusimines play a role in sae

  13. Virulence type and tissue tropism of Staphylococcus strains originating from Hungarian rabbit farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Német, Zoltán; Albert, Ervin; Nagy, Krisztina; Csuka, Edit; Dán, Ádám; Szenci, Ottó; Hermans, Katleen; Balka, Gyula; Biksi, Imre

    2016-09-25

    Staphylococcosis has a major economic impact on rabbit farming worldwide. Previous studies described a highly virulent variant, which is disseminated across Europe. Such strains are reported to be capable of inducing uncontrollable outbreaks. The authors describe a survey conducted on 374 Staphylococcus strains isolated from rabbit farms, mostly from Hungary, between 2009 and 2014, from a variety of pathological processes. The virulence type of the strains was determined using a multiplex PCR system. 84.2% of the strains belonged to a previously rarely isolated atypical highly virulent type. Only 6.1% belonged to the typical highly virulent genotype. Even low virulent strains were present at a higher percentage (6.4%). For a small group of strains (3.2%) the detection of the femA gene failed, indicating that these strains probably do not belong to the Staphylococcus aureus species. The results reveal the possibility of the asymptomatic presence of highly virulent strains on rabbit farms. "Non-aureus" Staphylococcus sp. can also have a notable role in the etiology of rabbit staphylococcosis. An association with the lesions and the virulence type was demonstrated. Statistical analysis of data on organotropism showed a significant correlation between septicaemia and the highly virulent genotype. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Educated Macrophages Are a Distinct High IL-6-Producing Subset that Confer Protection in Graft-versus-Host-Disease and Radiation Injury Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchlaka, Myriam N; Moffitt, Andrea B; Kim, Jaehyup; Kink, John A; Bloom, Debra D; Love, Cassandra; Dave, Sandeep; Hematti, Peiman; Capitini, Christian M

    2017-02-28

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have immunosuppressive and tissue repair properties, but clinical trials using MSCs to prevent or treat graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) have shown mixed results. Macrophages (MØs) are important regulators of immunity and can promote tissue regeneration and remodeling. We have previously shown that MSCs can educate MØs toward a unique anti-inflammatory immunophenotype (MSC-educated macrophages [MEMs]); however, their implications for in vivo models of inflammation have not been studied yet. We now show that in comparison with MØs, MEMs have increased expression of the inhibitory molecules PD-L1, PD-L2, in addition to markers of alternatively activated macrophages: CD206 and CD163. RNA-Seq analysis of MEMs, as compared with MØs, show a distinct gene expression profile that positively correlates with multiple pathways important in tissue repair. MEMs also show increased expression of IL-6, transforming growth factor-β, arginase-1, CD73, and decreased expression of IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor-α. We show that IL-6 secretion is controlled in part by the cyclo-oxygenase-2, arginase, and JAK1/STAT1 pathway. When tested in vivo, we show that human MEMs significantly enhance survival from lethal GVHD and improve survival of mice from radiation injury. We show these effects could be mediated in part through suppression of human T cell proliferation and may have attenuated host tissue injury in part by enhancing murine fibroblast proliferation. MEMs are a unique MØ subset with therapeutic potential for the management of GVHD and/or protection from radiation-induced injury.

  15. Helicobacter pylori virulence factors in duodenal ulceration: A primary cause or a secondary infection causing chronicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Frank I Tovey; Michael Hobsley; John Holton

    2006-01-01

    Reports from countries with a high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection do not show a proportionately high prevalence of duodenal ulceration,suggesting the possibility that H pylori cannot be a primary cause of duodenal ulceration. It has been mooted that this discrepancy might be explained by variations in the prevalence of virulence factors in different populations. The aim of this paper is to determine whether the published literature gives support to this possibility. The relevant literature was reviewed and analyzed separately for countries with a high and low prevalence of H pylori infection and virulence factors. Although virulent strains of H pylori were significantly more often present in patients with duodenal ulcer than without the disease in countries with a low prevalence of H pyloriinfection in the population, there was no difference in the prevalence of virulence factors between duodenal ulcer, non- ulcer dyspepsia or normal subjects in many countries, where the prevalence of both H pylori infection and of virulence factors was high.In these countries, the presence of virulence factors was not predictive the clinical outcome. To explain the association between virulence factors and duodenal ulcer in countries where H pylori prevalence is low,only two papers were found that give little support to the usual model proposed, namely that organisms with the virulence factors are more likely than those without them to initiate a duodenal ulcer. We offer an alternative hypothesis that suggests virulence factors are more likely to interfere with the healing of a previously produced ulcer. The presence of virulence factors only correlates with the prevalence of duodenal ulcer in countries where the prevalence of H pylori is low. There is very little evidence that virulence factors initiate duodenal ulceration, but they may be related to failure of the ulcer to heal.

  16. Systems analysis of multiple regulator perturbations allows discovery of virulence factors in Salmonella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hyunjin; Ansong, Charles; McDermott, Jason E.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Smith, Richard D.; Heffron, Fred; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2011-06-28

    Background: Systemic bacterial infections are highly regulated and complex processes that are orchestrated by numerous virulence factors. Genes that are coordinately controlled by the set of regulators required for systemic infection are potentially required for pathogenicity. Results: In this study we present a systems biology approach in which sample-matched multi-omic measurements of fourteen virulence-essential regulator mutants were coupled with computational network analysis to efficiently identify Salmonella virulence factors. Immunoblot experiments verified network-predicted virulence factors and a subset was determined to be secreted into the host cytoplasm, suggesting that they are virulence factors directly interacting with host cellular components. Two of these, SrfN and PagK2, were required for full mouse virulence and were shown to be translocated independent of either of the type III secretion systems in Salmonella or the type III injectisome-related flagellar mechanism. Conclusions: Integrating multi-omic datasets from Salmonella mutants lacking virulence regulators not only identified novel virulence factors but also defined a new class of translocated effectors involved in pathogenesis. The success of this strategy at discovery of known and novel virulence factors suggests that the approach may have applicability for other bacterial pathogens.

  17. Diversities in virulence, antifungal activity, pigmentation and DNA fingerprint among strains of Burkholderia glumae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Hari S; Shrestha, Bishnu K; Han, Jae Woo; Groth, Donald E; Barphagha, Inderjit K; Rush, Milton C; Melanson, Rebecca A; Kim, Beom Seok; Ham, Jong Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia glumae is the primary causal agent of bacterial panicle blight of rice. In this study, 11 naturally avirulent and nine virulent strains of B. glumae native to the southern United States were characterized in terms of virulence in rice and onion, toxofalvin production, antifungal activity, pigmentation and genomic structure. Virulence of B. glumae strains on rice panicles was highly correlated to virulence on onion bulb scales, suggesting that onion bulb can be a convenient alternative host system to efficiently determine the virulence of B. glumae strains. Production of toxoflavin, the phytotoxin that functions as a major virulence factor, was closely associated with the virulence phenotypes of B. glumae strains in rice. Some strains of B. glumae showed various levels of antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani, the causal agent of sheath blight, and pigmentation phenotypes on casamino acid-peptone-glucose (CPG) agar plates regardless of their virulence traits. Purple and yellow-green pigments were partially purified from a pigmenting strain of B. glumae, 411gr-6, and the purple pigment fraction showed a strong antifungal activity against Collectotrichum orbiculare. Genetic variations were detected among the B. glumae strains from DNA fingerprinting analyses by repetitive element sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) for BOX-A1R-based repetitive extragenic palindromic (BOX) or enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) sequences of bacteria; and close genetic relatedness among virulent but pigment-deficient strains were revealed by clustering analyses of DNA fingerprints from BOX-and ERIC-PCR.

  18. Diversities in virulence, antifungal activity, pigmentation and DNA fingerprint among strains of Burkholderia glumae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari S Karki

    Full Text Available Burkholderia glumae is the primary causal agent of bacterial panicle blight of rice. In this study, 11 naturally avirulent and nine virulent strains of B. glumae native to the southern United States were characterized in terms of virulence in rice and onion, toxofalvin production, antifungal activity, pigmentation and genomic structure. Virulence of B. glumae strains on rice panicles was highly correlated to virulence on onion bulb scales, suggesting that onion bulb can be a convenient alternative host system to efficiently determine the virulence of B. glumae strains. Production of toxoflavin, the phytotoxin that functions as a major virulence factor, was closely associated with the virulence phenotypes of B. glumae strains in rice. Some strains of B. glumae showed various levels of antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani, the causal agent of sheath blight, and pigmentation phenotypes on casamino acid-peptone-glucose (CPG agar plates regardless of their virulence traits. Purple and yellow-green pigments were partially purified from a pigmenting strain of B. glumae, 411gr-6, and the purple pigment fraction showed a strong antifungal activity against Collectotrichum orbiculare. Genetic variations were detected among the B. glumae strains from DNA fingerprinting analyses by repetitive element sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR for BOX-A1R-based repetitive extragenic palindromic (BOX or enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC sequences of bacteria; and close genetic relatedness among virulent but pigment-deficient strains were revealed by clustering analyses of DNA fingerprints from BOX-and ERIC-PCR.

  19. Systems analysis of multiple regulator perturbations allows discovery of virulence factors in Salmonella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heffron Fred

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic bacterial infections are highly regulated and complex processes that are orchestrated by numerous virulence factors. Genes that are coordinately controlled by the set of regulators required for systemic infection are potentially required for pathogenicity. Results In this study we present a systems biology approach in which sample-matched multi-omic measurements of fourteen virulence-essential regulator mutants were coupled with computational network analysis to efficiently identify Salmonella virulence factors. Immunoblot experiments verified network-predicted virulence factors and a subset was determined to be secreted into the host cytoplasm, suggesting that they are virulence factors directly interacting with host cellular components. Two of these, SrfN and PagK2, were required for full mouse virulence and were shown to be translocated independent of either of the type III secretion systems in Salmonella or the type III injectisome-related flagellar mechanism. Conclusions Integrating multi-omic datasets from Salmonella mutants lacking virulence regulators not only identified novel virulence factors but also defined a new class of translocated effectors involved in pathogenesis. The success of this strategy at discovery of known and novel virulence factors suggests that the approach may have applicability for other bacterial pathogens.

  20. Diversities in Virulence, Antifungal Activity, Pigmentation and DNA Fingerprint among Strains of Burkholderia glumae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Hari S.; Shrestha, Bishnu K.; Han, Jae Woo; Groth, Donald E.; Barphagha, Inderjit K.; Rush, Milton C.; Melanson, Rebecca A.; Kim, Beom Seok; Ham, Jong Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia glumae is the primary causal agent of bacterial panicle blight of rice. In this study, 11 naturally avirulent and nine virulent strains of B. glumae native to the southern United States were characterized in terms of virulence in rice and onion, toxofalvin production, antifungal activity, pigmentation and genomic structure. Virulence of B. glumae strains on rice panicles was highly correlated to virulence on onion bulb scales, suggesting that onion bulb can be a convenient alternative host system to efficiently determine the virulence of B. glumae strains. Production of toxoflavin, the phytotoxin that functions as a major virulence factor, was closely associated with the virulence phenotypes of B. glumae strains in rice. Some strains of B. glumae showed various levels of antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani, the causal agent of sheath blight, and pigmentation phenotypes on casamino acid-peptone-glucose (CPG) agar plates regardless of their virulence traits. Purple and yellow-green pigments were partially purified from a pigmenting strain of B. glumae, 411gr-6, and the purple pigment fraction showed a strong antifungal activity against Collectotrichum orbiculare. Genetic variations were detected among the B. glumae strains from DNA fingerprinting analyses by repetitive element sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) for BOX-A1R-based repetitive extragenic palindromic (BOX) or enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) sequences of bacteria; and close genetic relatedness among virulent but pigment-deficient strains were revealed by clustering analyses of DNA fingerprints from BOX-and ERIC-PCR. PMID:23028972

  1. Phenotypic characterization of a novel virulence-factor deletion strain of Burkholderia mallei that provides partial protection against inhalational glanders in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel A. Bozue

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia mallei (Bm is a highly infectious intracellular pathogen classified as a category B biological agent by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. After respiratory exposure, Bm establishes itself within host macrophages before spreading into major organ systems, which can lead to chronic infection, sepsis, and death. Previously, we combined computational prediction of host-pathogen interactions with yeast two-hybrid experiments and identified novel virulence factor genes in Bm, including BMAA0553, BMAA0728 (tssN, and BMAA1865. In the present study, we used recombinant allelic exchange to construct deletion mutants of BMAA0553 and tssN (ΔBMAA0553 and ΔTssN, respectively and showed that both deletions completely abrogated virulence at doses of >100 times the LD50 of the wild-type Bm strain. Analysis of ΔBMAA0553- and ΔTssN-infected mice showed starkly reduced bacterial dissemination relative to wild-type Bm, and subsequent in vitro experiments characterized pathogenic phenotypes with respect to intracellular growth, macrophage uptake and phagosomal escape, actin-based motility, and multinucleated giant cell formation. Based on observed in vitro and in vivo phenotypes, we explored the use of ΔTssN as a candidate live-attenuated vaccine. Mice immunized with aerosolized ΔTssN showed a 21-day survival rate of 67% after a high-dose aerosol challenge with the wild-type Bm ATCC 23344 strain, compared to a 0% survival rate for unvaccinated mice. However, analysis of histopathology and bacterial burden showed that while the surviving vaccinated mice were protected from acute infection, Bm was still able to establish a chronic infection. Vaccinated mice showed a modest IgG response, suggesting a limited potential of ΔTssN as a vaccine candidate, but also showed prolonged elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, underscoring the role of cellular and innate immunity in mitigating acute infection in inhalational glanders.

  2. Phenotypic Characterization of a Novel Virulence-Factor Deletion Strain of Burkholderia mallei That Provides Partial Protection against Inhalational Glanders in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozue, Joel A.; Chaudhury, Sidhartha; Amemiya, Kei; Chua, Jennifer; Cote, Christopher K.; Toothman, Ronald G.; Dankmeyer, Jennifer L.; Klimko, Christopher P.; Wilhelmsen, Catherine L.; Raymond, Jolynn W.; Zavaljevski, Nela; Reifman, Jaques; Wallqvist, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei (Bm) is a highly infectious intracellular pathogen classified as a category B biological agent by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. After respiratory exposure, Bm establishes itself within host macrophages before spreading into major organ systems, which can lead to chronic infection, sepsis, and death. Previously, we combined computational prediction of host-pathogen interactions with yeast two-hybrid experiments and identified novel virulence factor genes in Bm, including BMAA0553, BMAA0728 (tssN), and BMAA1865. In the present study, we used recombinant allelic exchange to construct deletion mutants of BMAA0553 and tssN (ΔBMAA0553 and ΔTssN, respectively) and showed that both deletions completely abrogated virulence at doses of >100 times the LD50 of the wild-type Bm strain. Analysis of ΔBMAA0553- and ΔTssN-infected mice showed starkly reduced bacterial dissemination relative to wild-type Bm, and subsequent in vitro experiments characterized pathogenic phenotypes with respect to intracellular growth, macrophage uptake and phagosomal escape, actin-based motility, and multinucleated giant cell formation. Based on observed in vitro and in vivo phenotypes, we explored the use of ΔTssN as a candidate live-attenuated vaccine. Mice immunized with aerosolized ΔTssN showed a 21-day survival rate of 67% after a high-dose aerosol challenge with the wild-type Bm ATCC 23344 strain, compared to a 0% survival rate for unvaccinated mice. However, analysis of histopathology and bacterial burden showed that while the surviving vaccinated mice were protected from acute infection, Bm was still able to establish a chronic infection. Vaccinated mice showed a modest IgG response, suggesting a limited potential of ΔTssN as a vaccine candidate, but also showed prolonged elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, underscoring the role of cellular and innate immunity in mitigating acute infection in inhalational glanders. PMID:26955620

  3. Phenotypic Characterization of a Novel Virulence-Factor Deletion Strain of Burkholderia mallei That Provides Partial Protection against Inhalational Glanders in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozue, Joel A; Chaudhury, Sidhartha; Amemiya, Kei; Chua, Jennifer; Cote, Christopher K; Toothman, Ronald G; Dankmeyer, Jennifer L; Klimko, Christopher P; Wilhelmsen, Catherine L; Raymond, Jolynn W; Zavaljevski, Nela; Reifman, Jaques; Wallqvist, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei (Bm) is a highly infectious intracellular pathogen classified as a category B biological agent by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. After respiratory exposure, Bm establishes itself within host macrophages before spreading into major organ systems, which can lead to chronic infection, sepsis, and death. Previously, we combined computational prediction of host-pathogen interactions with yeast two-hybrid experiments and identified novel virulence factor genes in Bm, including BMAA0553, BMAA0728 (tssN), and BMAA1865. In the present study, we used recombinant allelic exchange to construct deletion mutants of BMAA0553 and tssN (ΔBMAA0553 and ΔTssN, respectively) and showed that both deletions completely abrogated virulence at doses of >100 times the LD50 of the wild-type Bm strain. Analysis of ΔBMAA0553- and ΔTssN-infected mice showed starkly reduced bacterial dissemination relative to wild-type Bm, and subsequent in vitro experiments characterized pathogenic phenotypes with respect to intracellular growth, macrophage uptake and phagosomal escape, actin-based motility, and multinucleated giant cell formation. Based on observed in vitro and in vivo phenotypes, we explored the use of ΔTssN as a candidate live-attenuated vaccine. Mice immunized with aerosolized ΔTssN showed a 21-day survival rate of 67% after a high-dose aerosol challenge with the wild-type Bm ATCC 23344 strain, compared to a 0% survival rate for unvaccinated mice. However, analysis of histopathology and bacterial burden showed that while the surviving vaccinated mice were protected from acute infection, Bm was still able to establish a chronic infection. Vaccinated mice showed a modest IgG response, suggesting a limited potential of ΔTssN as a vaccine candidate, but also showed prolonged elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, underscoring the role of cellular and innate immunity in mitigating acute infection in inhalational glanders.

  4. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis reveals potential virulence factors of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya; Li, Jingtao; Zhang, Anding; Zhu, Weifeng; Zhang, Qiang; Xu, Zhongmin; Yan, Shuxian; Sun, Xiaomei; Chen, Huanchun; Jin, Meilin

    2017-03-08

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a ubiquitous pathogen that has caused considerable economic losses to pig farmers. However, the mechanisms of E. rhusiopathiae pathogenesis remain unclear. To identify new virulence-associated factors, the differentially abundant cell wall-associated proteins (CWPs) between high- and low-virulence strains were investigated through isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) combined with liquid chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In total, 100 CWPs showed significant differences in abundance. Selected differences were verified by western blotting to support the iTRAQ data. Among the differential proteins, the proteins with higher abundance in the high-virulence strain were mostly ABC transporter proteins and adhesion proteins, and the proteins with lower abundance in the high-virulence strain were mainly stress-response proteins. The more abundant proteins in the high-virulence strain may be related to bacterial virulence. The iTRAQ results showed that the abundance of the sugar ABC transporter substrate-binding protein Sbp (No. 5) was higher by 1.73-fold. We further constructed an sbp-deletion mutant. Experiments in animal models showed that the sbp-deletion mutant caused decreased mortality. Together, our data indicated that transporter proteins and adhesion proteins may play important roles in E. rhusiopathiae virulence and confirmed that sbp contributed to the virulence of E. rhusiopathiae.

  5. Virulence of two strains of Mycobacterium bovis in cattle following aerosol infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background Over the past two decades, highly virulent strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis have emerged and spread rapidly in humans, suggesting a selective advantage based upon virulence. A similar scenario has not been described for Mycobacterium bovis infection in cattle (i.e., Bovine Tuberculos...

  6. Induction of ER stress in macrophages of tuberculosis granulomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracie A Seimon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress pathway known as the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR is an adaptive survival pathway that protects cells from the buildup of misfolded proteins, but under certain circumstances it can lead to apoptosis. ER stress has been causally associated with macrophage apoptosis in advanced atherosclerosis of mice and humans. Because atherosclerosis shares certain features with tuberculosis (TB with regard to lesional macrophage accumulation, foam cell formation, and apoptosis, we investigated if the ER stress pathway is activated during TB infection. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that ER stress markers such as C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP; also known as GADD153, phosphorylated inositol-requiring enzyme 1 alpha (Ire1α and eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α, and activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3 are expressed in macrophage-rich areas of granulomas in lungs of mice infected with virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb. These areas were also positive for numerous apoptotic cells as assayed by TUNEL. Microarray analysis of human caseous TB granulomas isolated by laser capture microdissection reveal that 73% of genes involved in the UPR are upregulated at the mRNA transcript level. The expression of two ER stress markers, ATF3 and CHOP, were also increased in macrophages of human TB granulomas when assayed by immunohistochemistry. CHOP has been causally associated with ER stress-induced macrophage apoptosis. We found that apoptosis was more abundant in granulomas as compared to non-granulomatous tissue isolated from patients with pulmonary TB, and apoptosis correlated with CHOP expression in areas surrounding the centralized areas of caseation. CONCLUSIONS: In summary, ER stress is induced in macrophages of TB granulomas in areas where apoptotic cells accumulate in mice and humans. Although macrophage apoptosis is generally thought to be beneficial in initially protecting the host from Mtb

  7. [The correction action of Phosprenyl and Gamavit on the functional activity of mouse peritoneal macrophages in response to high doses of Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaĭtseva, L G; Bekhalo, V A; Vasil'ev, I K; Godunov, R S; Kireeva, I V; Kozhevnikova, T N; Nagurskaia, E V; Narovlianskiĭ, A N; Ozherelkov, S V; Pronin, A V; Sanin, A V

    2005-01-01

    The study of the functional activity of peritoneal macrophages of BALB/c mice at different stages of the toxic action caused by S. aureus alpha-toxin (ST) was carried out. The analysis of the dynamics of toxic reaction revealed the main critical points of triggering necrotic processes: the first hour and day 2. One hour after the injection of large doses of ST a sharp increase in the process of antigen binding with its subsequent sharp decrease. Simultaneously, a decrease in the activity of the lysosomal enzymes cathepsin D and acidic phosphatase was established, which was indicative of the destabilization of both lysosomal and cellular macrophage membranes. The increase of oxygen metabolism on day 2, together with the release of lysosomal proteases into the extracellular area, correlated with the maximum death rate of mice and served as the main index of the development of necrosis. The prophylactic and therapeutic use of the preparations Gamavit and Phosprenyl revealed their antitoxic activity and capacityfor stimulating the level of natural body resistance.

  8. Bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunmei; Levin, Michael; Kaplan, David L.

    2016-02-01

    Macrophages play a critical role in regulating wound healing and tissue regeneration by changing their polarization state in response to local microenvironmental stimuli. The native roles of polarized macrophages encompass biomaterials and tissue remodeling needs, yet harnessing or directing the polarization response has been largely absent as a potential strategy to exploit in regenerative medicine to date. Recent data have revealed that specific alteration of cells’ resting potential (Vmem) is a powerful tool to direct proliferation and differentiation in a number of complex tissues, such as limb regeneration, craniofacial patterning and tumorigenesis. In this study, we explored the bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization by targeting ATP sensitive potassium channels (KATP). Glibenclamide (KATP blocker) and pinacidil (KATP opener) treatment not only affect macrophage polarization, but also influence the phenotype of prepolarized macrophages. Furthermore, modulation of cell membrane electrical properties can fine-tune macrophage plasticity. Glibenclamide decreased the secretion and gene expression of selected M1 markers, while pinacidil augmented M1 markers. More interestingly, glibencalmide promoted macrophage alternative activation by enhancing certain M2 markers during M2 polarization. These findings suggest that control of bioelectric properties of macrophages could offer a promising approach to regulate macrophage phenotype as a useful tool in regenerative medicine.

  9. 东北地区土壤中高毒力虫生真菌菌株的筛选%Screening of High Virulent Strains of Entomogenous Fungi in Soil of Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王爽; 李新民; 刘春来; 夏吉星; 杨帆; 王克勤; 刘兴龙

    2015-01-01

    为筛选具有应用价值的高毒力虫生真菌菌株,利用大蜡螟诱集土样中虫生真菌。结果表明:采自中国东北不同生态类型的36份土样中,每份土样3~4龄诱虫30头,14 d共有454头感菌,其中克东腾家围子地区土样感菌率最高达80%。虫尸上分离纯化出301份菌株,其中多数为白僵菌,很少数为绿僵菌及其它菌株。其中的41份菌株进行了桃蚜和小菜蛾的室内生物测定,每菌株浓度为1.0×107孢子・m L‐1,菌株JS J‐10、QG1‐1、MBD‐2、BEE‐15、HYD‐11、MLX‐1和FN‐9对桃蚜具高毒力,喷雾7 d后的校正死亡率分别为96.6%、96.6%、96.1%、93.2%、92.8%、87.6%和82.8%;而绿僵菌菌株W M S‐12、M BD‐1对小菜蛾具高毒力,浸后5 d试虫的校正死亡率分别为83.3%和69.3%。%In order to screen high virulence fungus strains ,using baiting soil samples with larvae of Galleria mellonella ,thirty‐six soil samples were collected from different ecotype areas in Northeast China .Each soil sample was baited with 30 larvae of third or fourth instar ,fourteen days later ,a total of 454 larvae which had been infected .The occurrence frequency of entomopathogenic fungi in high density area was 80% in Tengjia‐weizi of Kedong county .There were 301 fungus isolated from the cadavers ,most isolates were Beauveriabassi‐ana ,a little Metarrhizium anisopliae and others ,there were 41 fungus isolated ,they were tested under labora‐tory conditions against Myzus persicae and Plutella xylostella .Each isolate was bioassayed under the concen‐trated standard spray of 1 .0 × 107 conidia・mL‐1 .Isolates of JSJ‐10、QG1‐1、MBD‐2、BEE‐15、HYD‐11、MLX‐1 and FN‐9 were more virulent to Myzus persicae ,causing a corrected mortality of 96 .6% 、96 .6% 、96 .1% 、93 .2% 、92 .8% 、87 .6% and 82 .8% after spraying 7 d .As for Plutella xylostella ,isolates of WMS‐12 and MBD

  10. The link between morphotype transition and virulence in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linqi Wang

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans is a ubiquitous human fungal pathogen. This pathogen can undergo morphotype transition between the yeast and the filamentous form and such morphological transition has been implicated in virulence for decades. Morphotype transition is typically observed during mating, which is governed by pheromone signaling. Paradoxically, components specific to the pheromone signaling pathways play no or minimal direct roles in virulence. Thus, the link between morphotype transition and virulence and the underlying molecular mechanism remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that filamentation can occur independent of pheromone signaling and mating, and both mating-dependent and mating-independent morphotype transition require the transcription factor Znf2. High expression of Znf2 is necessary and sufficient to initiate and maintain sex-independent filamentous growth under host-relevant conditions in vitro and during infection. Importantly, ZNF2 overexpression abolishes fungal virulence in murine models of cryptococcosis. Thus, Znf2 bridges the sex-independent morphotype transition and fungal pathogenicity. The impacts of Znf2 on morphological switch and pathogenicity are at least partly mediated through its effects on cell adhesion property. Cfl1, a Znf2 downstream factor, regulates morphogenesis, cell adhesion, biofilm formation, and virulence. Cfl1 is the first adhesin discovered in the phylum Basidiomycota of the Kingdom Fungi. Together with previous findings in other eukaryotic pathogens, our findings support a convergent evolution of plasticity in morphology and its impact on cell adhesion as a critical adaptive trait for pathogenesis.

  11. The link between morphotype transition and virulence in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linqi; Zhai, Bing; Lin, Xiaorong

    2012-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a ubiquitous human fungal pathogen. This pathogen can undergo morphotype transition between the yeast and the filamentous form and such morphological transition has been implicated in virulence for decades. Morphotype transition is typically observed during mating, which is governed by pheromone signaling. Paradoxically, components specific to the pheromone signaling pathways play no or minimal direct roles in virulence. Thus, the link between morphotype transition and virulence and the underlying molecular mechanism remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that filamentation can occur independent of pheromone signaling and mating, and both mating-dependent and mating-independent morphotype transition require the transcription factor Znf2. High expression of Znf2 is necessary and sufficient to initiate and maintain sex-independent filamentous growth under host-relevant conditions in vitro and during infection. Importantly, ZNF2 overexpression abolishes fungal virulence in murine models of cryptococcosis. Thus, Znf2 bridges the sex-independent morphotype transition and fungal pathogenicity. The impacts of Znf2 on morphological switch and pathogenicity are at least partly mediated through its effects on cell adhesion property. Cfl1, a Znf2 downstream factor, regulates morphogenesis, cell adhesion, biofilm formation, and virulence. Cfl1 is the first adhesin discovered in the phylum Basidiomycota of the Kingdom Fungi. Together with previous findings in other eukaryotic pathogens, our findings support a convergent evolution of plasticity in morphology and its impact on cell adhesion as a critical adaptive trait for pathogenesis.

  12. HP1330 Contributes to Streptococcus suis Virulence by Inducing Toll-Like Receptor 2- and ERK1/2-Dependent Pro-inflammatory Responses and Influencing In Vivo S. suis Loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Huang, Jingjing; Yu, Junping; Xu, Zhongmin; Liu, Liang; Song, Yajing; Sun, Xiaomei; Zhang, Anding; Jin, Meilin

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus suis 2 (SS2) has evolved into a highly invasive pathogen responsible for two large-scale outbreaks of streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome (STSLS) in China. Excessive inflammation stimulated by SS2 is considered a hallmark of STSLS, even it also plays important roles in other clinical symptoms of SS2-related disease, including meningitis, septicemia, and sudden death. However, the mechanism of SS2-caused excessive inflammation remains poorly understood. Here, a novel pro-inflammatory protein was identified (HP1330), which could induce robust expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, MCP-1, and IL-1β) in RAW264.7 macrophages. To evaluate the role of HP1330 in SS2 virulence, an hp1330-deletion mutant (Δhp1330) was constructed. In vitro, hp1330 disruption led to a decreased pro-inflammatory ability of SS2 in RAW 264.7 macrophages. In vivo, Δhp1330 showed reduced lethality, pro-inflammatory activity, and bacterial loads in mice. To further elucidate the mechanism of HP1330-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production, antibody blocking and gene-deletion experiments with macrophages were performed. The results revealed that the pro-inflammatory activity of HP1330 depended on the recognition of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Furthermore, a specific inhibitor of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) pathways could significantly decrease HP1330-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and western blot analysis showed that HP1330 could induce activation of the ERK1/2 pathway. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that HP1330 contributes to SS2 virulence by inducing TLR2- and ERK1/2-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine production and influencing in vivo bacterial loads, implying that HP1330 may be associated with STSLS caused by SS2.

  13. HP1330 Contributes to Streptococcus suis Virulence by Inducing Toll-Like Receptor 2- and ERK1/2-Dependent Pro-inflammatory Responses and Influencing In Vivo S. suis Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus suis 2 (SS2 has evolved into a highly invasive pathogen responsible for two large-scale outbreaks of streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome (STSLS in China. Excessive inflammation stimulated by SS2 is considered a hallmark of STSLS, even it also plays important roles in other clinical symptoms of SS2-related disease, including meningitis, septicemia, and sudden death. However, the mechanism of SS2-caused excessive inflammation remains poorly understood. Here, a novel pro-inflammatory protein was identified (HP1330, which could induce robust expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, MCP-1, and IL-1β in RAW264.7 macrophages. To evaluate the role of HP1330 in SS2 virulence, an hp1330-deletion mutant (Δhp1330 was constructed. In vitro, hp1330 disruption led to a decreased pro-inflammatory ability of SS2 in RAW 264.7 macrophages. In vivo, Δhp1330 showed reduced lethality, pro-inflammatory activity, and bacterial loads in mice. To further elucidate the mechanism of HP1330-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production, antibody blocking and gene-deletion experiments with macrophages were performed. The results revealed that the pro-inflammatory activity of HP1330 depended on the recognition of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2. Furthermore, a specific inhibitor of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 pathways could significantly decrease HP1330-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and western blot analysis showed that HP1330 could induce activation of the ERK1/2 pathway. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that HP1330 contributes to SS2 virulence by inducing TLR2- and ERK1/2-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine production and influencing in vivo bacterial loads, implying that HP1330 may be associated with STSLS caused by SS2.

  14. Erythritol triggers expression of virulence traits in Brucella melitensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Erik; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Sanakkayala, Neelima; Eskra, Linda; Harms, Jerome; Splitter, Gary

    2013-06-01

    Erythritol is a four-carbon sugar preferentially utilized by Brucella spp. The presence of erythritol in the placentas of goats, cows, and pigs has been used to explain the localization of Brucella to these sites and the subsequent accumulation of large amounts of bacteria, eventually leading to abortion. Here we show that Brucella melitensis will also localize to an artificial site of erythritol within a mouse, providing a potential model system to study the pathogenesis of Brucella abortion. Immunohistological staining of the sites of erythritol within infected mice indicated a higher than expected proportion of extracellular bacteria. Ensuing experiments suggested intracellular B. melitensis was unable to replicate within macrophages in the presence of erythritol and that erythritol was able to reach the site of intracellular bacteria. The intracellular inhibition of growth was found to encourage the bacteria to replicate extracellularly rather than intracellularly, a particularly interesting development in Brucella pathogenesis. To determine the effect of erythritol on expression of B. melitensis genes, bacteria grown either with or without erythritol were analyzed by microarray. Two major virulence pathways were up-regulated in response to exposure to erythritol (the type IV secretion system VirB and flagellar proteins), suggesting a role for erythritol in virulence.

  15. Rapid, High-Throughput Identification of Anthrax-Causing and Emetic Bacillus cereus Group Genome Assemblies via BTyper, a Computational Tool for Virulence-Based Classification of Bacillus cereus Group Isolates by Using Nucleotide Sequencing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Laura M.; Miller, Rachel A.; Wiedmann, Martin

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Bacillus cereus group comprises nine species, several of which are pathogenic. Differentiating between isolates that may cause disease and those that do not is a matter of public health and economic importance, but it can be particularly challenging due to the high genomic similarity within the group. To this end, we have developed BTyper, a computational tool that employs a combination of (i) virulence gene-based typing, (ii) multilocus sequence typing (MLST), (iii) panC clade typing, and (iv) rpoB allelic typing to rapidly classify B. cereus group isolates using nucleotide sequencing data. BTyper was applied to a set of 662 B. cereus group genome assemblies to (i) identify anthrax-associated genes in non-B. anthracis members of the B. cereus group, and (ii) identify assemblies from B. cereus group strains with emetic potential. With BTyper, the anthrax toxin genes cya, lef, and pagA were detected in 8 genomes classified by the NCBI as B. cereus that clustered into two distinct groups using k-medoids clustering, while either the B. anthracis poly-γ-d-glutamate capsule biosynthesis genes capABCDE or the hyaluronic acid capsule hasA gene was detected in an additional 16 assemblies classified as either B. cereus or Bacillus thuringiensis isolated from clinical, environmental, and food sources. The emetic toxin genes cesABCD were detected in 24 assemblies belonging to panC clades III and VI that had been isolated from food, clinical, and environmental settings. The command line version of BTyper is available at https://github.com/lmc297/BTyper. In addition, BMiner, a companion application for analyzing multiple BTyper output files in aggregate, can be found at https://github.com/lmc297/BMiner. IMPORTANCE Bacillus cereus is a foodborne pathogen that is estimated to cause tens of thousands of illnesses each year in the United States alone. Even with molecular methods, it can be difficult to distinguish nonpathogenic B. cereus group isolates from their

  16. Rapid, high-throughput identification of anthrax-causing and emetic Bacillus cereus group genome assemblies using BTyper, a computational tool for virulence-based classification of Bacillus cereus group isolates using nucleotide sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Laura M; Kovac, Jasna; Miller, Rachel A; Wiedmann, Martin

    2017-06-16

    The Bacillus cereus group comprises nine species, several of which are pathogenic. Differentiating between isolates that may cause disease and those that do not is a matter of public health and economic importance, but can be particularly challenging due to the high genomic similarity of the group. To this end, we have developed BTyper, a computational tool that employs a combination of (i) virulence gene-based typing, (ii) multi-locus sequence typing (MLST), (iii) panC clade typing, and (iv) rpoB allelic typing to rapidly classify B. cereus group isolates using nucleotide sequencing data. BTyper was applied to a set of 662 B. cereus group genome assemblies to (i) identify anthrax-associated genes in non-B. anthracis members of the B. cereus group, and (iI) identify assemblies from B. cereus group strains with emetic potential. With BTyper, anthrax toxin genes cya, lef and pagA were detected in 8 genomes classified in NCBI as B. cereus that clustered into two distinct groups using k-medoids clustering, while B. anthracis poly-γ-D-glutamate capsule biosynthesis genes capABCDE or hyaluronic acid capsule gene hasA were detected in an additional 16 assemblies classified as either B. cereus or B. thuringiensis isolated from clinical, environmental, and food sources. Emetic toxin genes cesABCD were detected in 24 assemblies belonging to panC clades III and VI that had been isolated from food, clinical, and environmental settings. The command line version of BTyper is available at https://github.com/lmc297/BTyper In addition, BMiner, a companion application for analyzing multiple BTyper output files in aggregate, can be found at https://github.com/lmc297/BMinerImportanceBacillus cereus is a foodborne pathogen that is estimated to cause tens of thousands of illnesses each year in the United States alone. Even with molecular methods, it can be difficult to distinguish non-pathogenic B. cereus group isolates from their pathogenic counterparts, including the human pathogen B

  17. Dimerization is not a determining factor for functional high affinity human plasminogen binding by the group A streptococcal virulence factor PAM and is mediated by specific residues within the PAM a1a2 domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sarbani; Liang, Zhong; Quek, Adam J; Ploplis, Victoria A; Law, Ruby; Castellino, Francis J

    2014-08-01

    A emm53 subclass of Group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) interacts tightly with human plasma plasminogen (hPg) and plasmin (hPm) via the kringle 2 (K2hPg) domain of hPg/hPm and the N-terminal a1a2 regions of a GAS coiled-coil M-like protein (PAM). Previous studies have shown that a monomeric PAM fragment, VEK30 (residues 97-125 + Tyr), interacted specifically with isolated K2hPg. However, the binding strength of VEK30 (KD = 56 nm) was ∼60-fold weaker than that of full-length dimeric PAM (KD = 1 nm). To assess whether this attenuated binding was due to the inability of VEK30 to dimerize, we defined the minimal length of PAM required to dimerize using a series of peptides with additional PAM residues placed at the NH2 and COOH termini of VEK30. VEK64 (PAM residues 83-145 + Tyr) was found to be the smallest peptide that adopted an α-helical dimer, and was bound to K2hPg with nearly the same affinity as PAM (KD = 1-2 nm). However, addition of two PAM residues (Arg(126)-His(127)) to the COOH terminus of VEK30 (VEK32) maintained a monomeric peptidic structure, but exhibited similar K2hPg binding affinity as full-length dimeric PAM. We identified five residues in a1a2 (Arg(113), His(114), Glu(116), Arg(126), His(127)), mutation of which reduced PAM binding affinity for K2hPg by ∼ 1000-fold. Replacement of these critical residues by Ala in the GAS genome resulted in reduced virulence, similar to the effects of inactivating the PAM gene entirely. We conclude that rather than dimerization of PAM, the five key residues in the binding domain of PAM are essential to mediate the high affinity interaction with hPg, leading to increased GAS virulence.

  18. Virulence of Renibacterium salmoninarum to salmonids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starliper, C.E.; Smith, D.R.; Shatzer, T.

    1997-01-01

    Virulence of Renibacterium salmoninarum isolates representing five origins was evaluated in eight salmonid hosts; four origins were of Lake Michigan and the fifth was of the Pacific Northwest. The species type strain, ATCC (American Type Culture Collection) 33209, was also included. Each isolate was grown in a kidney disease medium (KDM2) supplemented with 1 % ATCC 33209 culture metabolite; serial 10-fold dilutions were prepared, and groups of fish were challenged by intraperitoneal injection with 0.1 mL of each dilution. A 70-d observation period followed, and bacterial kidney disease (BKD) was diagnosed by the fluorescent antibody technique. Virulence of isolates was quantified as a dose lethal to 50% of fish (LD50) for each host–isolate challenge. In the first set of experiments, 23 isolates were used to challenge groups of brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis. The mean LD50 was 1.087 x 106 colony-forming units per milliliter (cfu/mL; SD = 2.022 x 106), and the LD50 values ranged from 8.457 x 106 to 2.227 x 104 cfu/mL. Analysis of variance to evaluate the effect of isolate origin on virulence in brook trout revealed no significant difference (F = 1.502; P = 0.243). Susceptibilities of the other salmonid hosts were evaluated by challenge with six isolates of R. salmoninarum representing each origin and the species type strain. For many of the host–isolate challenge combinations, time to death was highly dependent on the dilution (number of bacteria) injected. In general, the isolates MCO4M, B26, and A34 (all of Lake Michigan origin) tended to be more virulent. Also, LD50 values were dispersed throughout a wider range among the more susceptible hosts. Lake trout Salvelinus namaycush, rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, and brook trout were relatively resistant to challenge with the strains, whereas coho salmon O. kisutch, domestic Atlantic salmon Saltno salar, and chinook salmon O. tshawytscha were relatively susceptible. Another challenge evaluated the effect of

  19. Characterization of virulence properties in the C. parapsilosis sensu lato species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Németh

    Full Text Available The C. parapsilosis sensu lato group involves three closely related species, C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis. Although their overall clinical importance is dramatically increasing, there are few studies regarding the virulence properties of the species of the psilosis complex. In this study, we tested 63 C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, 12 C. metapsilosis and 18 C. orthopsilosis isolates for the ability to produce extracellular proteases, secrete lipases and form pseudohyphae. Significant differences were noted between species, with the C. metapsilosis strains failing to secrete lipase or to produce pseudohyphae. Nine different clinical isolates each of C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis were co-cultured with immortalized murine or primary human macrophages. C. parapsilosis sensu stricto isolates showed a significantly higher resistance to killing by primary human macrophages compared to C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis isolates. In contrast, the killing of isolates by J774.2 mouse macrophages did not differ significantly between species. However, C. parapsilosis sensu stricto isolates induced the most damage to murine and human macrophages, and C. metapsilosis strains were the least toxic. Furthermore, strains that produced lipase or pseudohyphae were most resistant to macrophage-mediated killing and produced the most cellular damage. Finally, we used 9 isolates of each of the C. parapsilosis sensus lato species to examine their impact on the survival of Galleriamellonella larvae. The mortality rate of G. mellonella larvae infected with C. metapsilosis isolates was significantly lower than those infected with C. parapsilosis sensu stricto or C. orthopsilosis strains. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that C. metapsilosis is indeed the least virulent member of the psilosis group, and also highlight the importance of pseudohyphae and secreted lipases during fungal

  20. Characterization of virulence properties in the C. parapsilosis sensu lato species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Tibor; Tóth, Adél; Szenzenstein, Judit; Horváth, Péter; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Grózer, Zsuzsanna; Tóth, Renáta; Papp, Csaba; Hamari, Zsuzsanna; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Gácser, Attila

    2013-01-01

    The C. parapsilosis sensu lato group involves three closely related species, C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis. Although their overall clinical importance is dramatically increasing, there are few studies regarding the virulence properties of the species of the psilosis complex. In this study, we tested 63 C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, 12 C. metapsilosis and 18 C. orthopsilosis isolates for the ability to produce extracellular proteases, secrete lipases and form pseudohyphae. Significant differences were noted between species, with the C. metapsilosis strains failing to secrete lipase or to produce pseudohyphae. Nine different clinical isolates each of C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis were co-cultured with immortalized murine or primary human macrophages. C. parapsilosis sensu stricto isolates showed a significantly higher resistance to killing by primary human macrophages compared to C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis isolates. In contrast, the killing of isolates by J774.2 mouse macrophages did not differ significantly between species. However, C. parapsilosis sensu stricto isolates induced the most damage to murine and human macrophages, and C. metapsilosis strains were the least toxic. Furthermore, strains that produced lipase or pseudohyphae were most resistant to macrophage-mediated killing and produced the most cellular damage. Finally, we used 9 isolates of each of the C. parapsilosis sensus lato species to examine their impact on the survival of Galleriamellonella larvae. The mortality rate of G. mellonella larvae infected with C. metapsilosis isolates was significantly lower than those infected with C. parapsilosis sensu stricto or C. orthopsilosis strains. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that C. metapsilosis is indeed the least virulent member of the psilosis group, and also highlight the importance of pseudohyphae and secreted lipases during fungal-host interactions.

  1. Infection of type I interferon receptor-deficient mice with various old world arenaviruses: a model for studying virulence and host species barriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Rieger

    Full Text Available Lassa virus causes hemorrhagic Lassa fever in humans, while the related Old World arenaviruses Mopeia, Morogoro, and Mobala are supposedly apathogenic to humans and cause only inapparent infection in non-human primates. Here, we studied whether the virulence of Old World arenaviruses in humans and non-human primates is reflected in type I interferon receptor deficient (IFNAR(-/- mice by testing several strains of Lassa virus vs. the apathogenic viruses Mopeia, Morogoro, and Mobala. All Lassa virus strains tested-Josiah, AV, BA366, and Nig04-10-replicated to high titers in blood, lung, kidney, heart, spleen, brain, and liver and caused disease as evidenced by weight loss and elevation of aspartate and alanine aminotransferase (AST and ALT levels with a high AST/ALT ratio. Lassa fever-like pathology included acute hepatitis, interstitial pneumonia, and pronounced disturbance of splenic cytoarchitecture. Infiltrations of activated monocytes/macrophages expressing inducible nitric oxide synthase and T cells were found in liver and lung. In contrast, Mopeia, Morogoro, and Mobala virus replicated poorly in the animals and acute inflammatory alterations were not noted. Depletion of CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells strongly enhanced susceptibility of IFNAR(-/- mice to the apathogenic viruses. In conclusion, the virulence of Old World arenaviruses in IFNAR(-/- mice correlates with their virulence in humans and non-human primates. In addition to the type I interferon system, T cells seem to regulate whether or not an arenavirus can productively infect non-host rodent species. The observation that Lassa virus overcomes the species barrier without artificial depletion of T cells suggests it is able to impair T cell functionality in a way that corresponds to depletion.

  2. Infection of type I interferon receptor-deficient mice with various old world arenaviruses: a model for studying virulence and host species barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Toni; Merkler, Doron; Günther, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Lassa virus causes hemorrhagic Lassa fever in humans, while the related Old World arenaviruses Mopeia, Morogoro, and Mobala are supposedly apathogenic to humans and cause only inapparent infection in non-human primates. Here, we studied whether the virulence of Old World arenaviruses in humans and non-human primates is reflected in type I interferon receptor deficient (IFNAR(-/-)) mice by testing several strains of Lassa virus vs. the apathogenic viruses Mopeia, Morogoro, and Mobala. All Lassa virus strains tested-Josiah, AV, BA366, and Nig04-10-replicated to high titers in blood, lung, kidney, heart, spleen, brain, and liver and caused disease as evidenced by weight loss and elevation of aspartate and alanine aminotransferase (AST and ALT) levels with a high AST/ALT ratio. Lassa fever-like pathology included acute hepatitis, interstitial pneumonia, and pronounced disturbance of splenic cytoarchitecture. Infiltrations of activated monocytes/macrophages expressing inducible nitric oxide synthase and T cells were found in liver and lung. In contrast, Mopeia, Morogoro, and Mobala virus replicated poorly in the animals and acute inflammatory alterations were not noted. Depletion of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells strongly enhanced susceptibility of IFNAR(-/-) mice to the apathogenic viruses. In conclusion, the virulence of Old World arenaviruses in IFNAR(-/-) mice correlates with their virulence in humans and non-human primates. In addition to the type I interferon system, T cells seem to regulate whether or not an arenavirus can productively infect non-host rodent species. The observation that Lassa virus overcomes the species barrier without artificial depletion of T cells suggests it is able to impair T cell functionality in a way that corresponds to depletion.

  3. The evolution of tuberculosis virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sanjay; Galvani, Alison P

    2009-07-01

    The evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis presents several challenges for public health. HIV and resistance to antimycobacterial medications have evolutionary implications for how Mycobacterium tuberculosis will evolve, as these factors influence the host environment and transmission dynamics of tuberculosis strains. We present an evolutionary invasion analysis of tuberculosis that characterizes the direction of tuberculosis evolution in the context of different natural and human-driven selective pressures, including changes in tuberculosis treatment and HIV prevalence. We find that the evolution of tuberculosis virulence can be affected by treatment success rates, the relative transmissibility of emerging strains, the rate of reactivation from latency among hosts, and the life expectancy of hosts. We find that the virulence of tuberculosis strains may also increase as a consequence of rising HIV prevalence, requiring faster case detection strategies in areas where the epidemics of HIV and tuberculosis collide.

  4. Campylobacter virulence and survival factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Declan J

    2015-06-01

    Despite over 30 years of research, campylobacteriosis is the most prevalent foodborne bacterial infection in many countries including in the European Union and the United States of America. However, relatively little is known about the virulence factors in Campylobacter or how an apparently fragile organism can survive in the food chain, often with enhanced pathogenicity. This review collates information on the virulence and survival determinants including motility, chemotaxis, adhesion, invasion, multidrug resistance, bile resistance and stress response factors. It discusses their function in transition through the food processing environment and human infection. In doing so it provides a fundamental understanding of Campylobacter, critical for improved diagnosis, surveillance and control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Viability and Virulence of Entomopathogenic Nematodes Exposed to Ultraviolet Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro-Ilan, David I; Hazir, Selcuk; Lete, Luis

    2015-09-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) can be highly effective biocontrol agents, but their efficacy can be reduced due to exposure to environmental stress such as from ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Our objectives were to 1) compare UV tolerance among a broad array of EPN species, and 2) investigate the relationship between reduced nematode viability (after exposure to UV) and virulence. Nematodes exposed to a UV radiation (254 nm) for 10 or 20 min were assessed separately for viability (survival) and virulence to Galleria mellonella. We compared 9 different EPN species and 15 strains: Heterorhabditis bacteriophora (Baine, fl11, Oswego, and Vs strains), H. floridensis (332), H. georgiana (Kesha), H. indica (HOM1), H. megidis (UK211), Steinernema carpocapsae (All, Cxrd, DD136, and Sal strains), S. feltiae (SN), S. rarum (17C&E), and S. riobrave (355). In viability assessments, steinernematids, particularly strains of S. carpocapsae, generally exhibited superior UV tolerance compared with the heterorhabditids. However, some heterorhabditids tended to be more tolerant than others, e.g., H. megidis and H. bacteriophora (Baine) were most susceptible and H. bacteriophora (Vs) was the only heterorhabditid that did not exhibit a significant effect after 10 min of exposure. All heterorhabditids experienced reduced viability after 20 min exposure though several S. carpocapsae strains did not. In total, after 10 or 20 min exposure, the viability of seven nematode strains did not differ from their non-UV exposed controls. In virulence assays, steinernematids (particularly S. carpocapsae strains) also tended to exhibit higher UV tolerance. However, in contrast to the viability measurements, all nematodes experienced a reduction in virulence relative to their controls. Correlation analysis revealed that viability among nematode strains is not necessarily related to virulence. In conclusion, our results indicate that the impact of UV varies substantially among EPNs, and viability alone

  6. Obesity induces a phenotypic switch in adipose tissue macrophage polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Lumeng, Carey N.; Bodzin, Jennifer L.; Alan R Saltiel

    2007-01-01

    Adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) infiltrate adipose tissue during obesity and contribute to insulin resistance. We hypothesized that macrophages migrating to adipose tissue upon high-fat feeding may differ from those that reside there under normal diet conditions. To this end, we found a novel F4/80+CD11c+ population of ATMs in adipose tissue of obese mice that was not seen in lean mice. ATMs from lean mice expressed many genes characteristic of M2 or “alternatively activated” macrophages, i...

  7. A Systematic Approach to Identify Markers of Distinctly Activated Human Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayan eSudan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Polarization has been a useful concept for describing activated macrophage phenotypes and gene expression profiles. However, macrophage activation status within tumors and other settings are often inferred based on only a few markers. Complicating matters for relevance to human biology, many of the best studied macrophage activation markers have been best characterized in mice and sometimes are not similarly regulated in human macrophages. To identify novel markers of activated human macrophages, gene expression profiles for human macrophages of a single donor subjected to 33 distinct activating conditions were obtained and a set of putative activation markers were subsequently evaluated in macrophages from multiple donors using integrated fluidic circuit (IFC-based RT-PCR. Using unsupervised hierarchical clustering of the microarray screen, highly-altered transcripts (>4-fold change in expression sorted the macrophage transcription profiles into two major and 13 minor clusters. Among the 1874 highly-altered transcripts, over 100 were uniquely altered in one major or two related minor clusters. IFC PCR-derived data confirmed the microarray results and to show the kinetics of expression of potential macrophage activation markers. Transcripts encoding chemokines, cytokines, and cell surface were prominent in our analyses. The activation markers identified by this study could be used to better characterize tumor-associated macrophages from biopsies as well as other macrophage populations collected from human clinical samples.

  8. 杨扇舟蛾幼虫高毒力绿僵菌菌株筛选研究%Studies on the screening of high virulent Metarhizium anisopliae against Clostera anachoreta larva

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘永胜; 徐福元; 韩正敏

    2012-01-01

    The growth rate and sporulation quantity of 21 Metarhizium anisopliae strains were measured in this paper,indicating that Metarhizium anisopliae1(Ma1,Ma42,Ma788,Ma789)had high yield of spore.And the germination percentage with different temperatures in water bath treatment and toxicity of different M.anisopliae strains against Clostera anachoreta were measured.The results showed that Ma789 was the most virulent one.%测定了21株绿僵菌的平板单菌落生长和产孢量情况,证明(Ma1,Ma42,Ma788,Ma789)4菌株产孢量高,通过对这4株绿僵菌菌株的不同温度水浴处理,发现了孢子的萌发条件;并开展了4菌株对杨扇舟蛾幼虫的毒力测定,筛选出Ma789菌株的致病力较强。

  9. Analysis of mRNA expression for genes associated with regulatory T lymphocytes (CD25, FoxP3, CTLA4, and IDO) after experimental infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus of low or high virulence in beef calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomares, Roberto A; Hurley, David J; Woolums, Amelia R; Parrish, Jacqueline E; Brock, Kenny V

    2014-12-01

    Immunosuppression caused by bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) has been associated with lymphocyte depletion, leukopenia and impairment of leukocyte function; however, no work has been done on the relationship between BVDV and regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs). The objective of this study was to compare the mRNA expression of genes associated with Tregs (CD25, FoxP3, CTLA4, and IDO), after experimental infection of beef calves with low (LV) or high (HV) virulence BVDV. Thirty BVDV-naïve calves were randomly assigned to three groups. Calves were intra-nasally inoculated with LV (n=10, strain SD-1) or HV (n=10, strain 1373) BVDV or BVDV-free cell culture medium (control, n=10). Quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine the expression of target genes in tracheo-bronchial lymph nodes and spleen on day 5 post-infection. The mRNA expression of CD25 was up-regulated in tracheo-bronchial lymph nodes of LV (Pviral strains, or differences in viral infectivity of the host cells.

  10. Acute infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus of low or high virulence leads to depletion and redistribution of WC1(+) γδ T cells in lymphoid tissues of beef calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomares, Roberto A; Sakamoto, Kaori; Walz, Heather L; Brock, Kenny V; Hurley, David J

    2015-10-15

    The objective of this study was to determine the abundance and distribution of γδ T lymphocytes in lymphoid tissue during acute infection with high (HV) or low virulence (LV) non-cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) in beef calves. This study was performed using tissue samples from a previous experiment in which thirty beef calves were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: LV [n=10; animals inoculated intranasally (IN) with LV BVDV-1a (strain SD-1)], HV [n=10; animals inoculated IN with HV BVDV-2 (strain 1373)], and control (n=10; animals inoculated with cell culture medium). On day 5 post inoculation, animals were euthanized, and samples from spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) were collected to assess the abundance of WC1(+) γδ T cells. A higher proportion of calves challenged with BVDV showed signs of apoptosis and cytophagy in MLN and spleen samples compared to the control group. A significantly lower number of γδ T cells was observed in spleen and MLN from calves in HV and LV groups than in the control calves (P<0.05). In conclusion, acute infection with HV or LV BVDV resulted in depletion of WC1(+) γδ T cells in mucosal and systemic lymphoid tissues at five days after challenge in beef calves. This reduction in γδ T cells in the studied lymphoid tissues could be also due to lymphocyte trafficking to other tissues.

  11. 玉米螟高毒力生防菌株筛选与发酵工艺研究%Screening of Bacillus thuringiensis with High Virulence to Pyrausta nubilalis and Its Fermentation Processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周荣华; 廖先清; 刘芳; 张志刚; 饶犇

    2015-01-01

    以玉米螟(Pyrausta nubilalis)为对象筛选出一株高毒力生防菌株苏云金芽孢杆菌(Bacillus thuringiensis)NBIC380。通过培养基优化,获得适宜的培养基配方D。补料发酵研究的结果表明,固定氮源浓度为80 g/L,发酵前期补料效果明显,补料速率为根据发酵不同阶段进行调整,可以取得更好的发酵结果,有利于提高产量,降低生产成本。%A biocontrol strain Bacillus thuringiensis NBIC380 with high virulence to Pyrausta nubilalis was obtained. Accord-ing to this strain, appropriate media formulations D was obtained by medium optimization. Fed-batch fermentation experiments showed fermentation pre-feeding effect was obvious by using 80 g/L nitrogen concentration. Feeding rate was adjusted accord-ing to the different stages of fermentation. This strategy could improve production and reduce production costs.

  12. Virulence Mechanisms of Enteroinvasive Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    enteroinvasive strain to initiate infection, it does abortion and death can also result from inges- not address other determinants of virulence. For tion of... abortions in domestic imal models have been used in the study of animals. Humans are the natural reservoirs of enteroinvasive pathogens. The ability of...clinical manifestation rier encountered by shigellae which are invad- is dysentery (36). These data suggest that an ing the colonic mucosa. The effectiveness

  13. Salmonella-secreted Virulence Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heffron, Fred; Niemann, George; Yoon, Hyunjin; Kidwai, Afshan S.; Brown, Roslyn N.; McDermott, Jason E.; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2011-05-01

    In this short review we discuss secreted virulence factors of Salmonella, which directly affect Salmonella interaction with its host. Salmonella secretes protein to subvert host defenses but also, as discussed, to reduce virulence thereby permitting the bacteria to persist longer and more successfully disperse. The type III secretion system (TTSS) is the best known and well studied of the mechanisms that enable secretion from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm. Other secretion systems include outer membrane vesicles, which are present in all Gram-negative bacteria examined to date, two-partner secretion, and type VI secretion will also be addressed. Excellent reviews of Salmonella secreted effectors have focused on themes such as actin rearrangements, vesicular trafficking, ubiquitination, and the activities of the virulence factors themselves. This short review is based on S. Typhimurium infection of mice because it is a model of typhoid like disease in humans. We have organized effectors in terms of events that happen during the infection cycle and how secreted effectors may be involved.

  14. Increasing clinical virulence in two decades of the Italian HIV epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Viktor; Maggiolo, Franco; Suter, Fredy; Ladisa, Nicoletta; De Luca, Andrea; Antinori, Andrea; Sighinolfi, Laura; Quiros-Roldan, Eugenia; Carosi, Giampiero; Torti, Carlo

    2009-05-01

    The recent origin and great evolutionary potential of HIV imply that the virulence of the virus might still be changing, which could greatly affect the future of the pandemic. However, previous studies of time trends of HIV virulence have yielded conflicting results. Here we used an established methodology to assess time trends in the severity (virulence) of untreated HIV infections in a large Italian cohort. We characterized clinical virulence by the decline slope of the CD4 count (n = 1423 patients) and the viral setpoint (n = 785 patients) in untreated patients with sufficient data points. We used linear regression models to detect correlations between the date of diagnosis (ranging 1984-2006) and the virulence markers, controlling for gender, exposure category, age, and CD4 count at entry. The decline slope of the CD4 count and the viral setpoint displayed highly significant correlation with the date of diagnosis pointing in the direction of increasing virulence. A detailed analysis of riskgroups revealed that the epidemics of intravenous drug users started with an apparently less virulent virus, but experienced the strongest trend towards steeper CD4 decline among the major exposure categories. While our study did not allow us to exclude the effect of potential time trends in host factors, our findings are consistent with the hypothesis of increasing HIV virulence. Importantly, the use of an established methodology allowed for a comparison with earlier results, which confirmed that genuine differences exist in the time trends of HIV virulence between different epidemics. We thus conclude that there is not a single global trend of HIV virulence, and results obtained in one epidemic cannot be extrapolated to others. Comparison of discordant patterns between riskgroups and epidemics hints at a converging trend, which might indicate that an optimal level of virulence might exist for the virus.

  15. Intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis after macrophage cell death leads to serial killing of host cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahamed, Deeqa; Boulle, Mikael; Ganga, Yashica; Mc Arthur, Chanelle; Skroch, Steven; Oom, Lance; Catinas, Oana; Pillay, Kelly; Naicker, Myshnee; Rampersad, Sanisha; Mathonsi, Colisile; Hunter, Jessica; Sreejit, Gopalkrishna; Pym, Alexander S; Lustig, Gila; Sigal, Alex

    2017-01-01

    A hallmark of pulmonary tuberculosis is the formation of macrophage-rich granulomas. These may restrict Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) growth, or progress to central necrosis and cavitation, facilitating pathogen growth. To determine factors leading to Mtb proliferation and host cell death, we used live cell imaging to track Mtb infection outcomes in individual primary human macrophages. Internalization of Mtb aggregates caused macrophage death, and phagocytosis of large aggregates was more cytotoxic than multiple small aggregates containing similar numbers of bacilli. Macrophage death did not result in clearance of Mtb. Rather, it led to accelerated intracellular Mtb growth regardless of prior activation or macrophage type. In contrast, bacillary replication was controlled in live phagocytes. Mtb grew as a clump in dead cells, and macrophages which internalized dead infected cells were very likely to die themselves, leading to a cell death cascade. This demonstrates how pathogen virulence can be achieved through numbers and aggregation states. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22028.001 PMID:28130921

  16. Role of the tumor suppressor ARF in macrophage polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz, Sandra; Través, Paqui G.; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2012-01-01

    The ARF locus is frequently inactivated in human cancer. The oncosuppressor ARF has indeed been described as a general sensor for different situation of cellular stress. We have previously demonstrated that ARF deficiency severely impairs inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo, establishing a role for ARF in the regulation of innate immunity. The aim of the present work was to get further insights into the immune functions of ARF and to evaluate its possible contribution to the polarization of macrophages toward the M1 or M2 phenotype. Our results demonstrate that resting Arf−/− macrophages express high levels of Ym1 and Fizz-1, two typical markers of alternatively-activated macrophages (M2). Additionally, Arf−/− peritoneal macrophages showed an impaired response to lipopolysaccharide (a classical inducer of M1 polaryzation) and a reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines. Moreover, upon stimulation with interleukin-4 (IL-4), an inducer of the M2 phenotype, well established M2 markers such as Fizz-1, Ym1 and arginase-1 were upregulated in Arf−/− as compared with wild type macrophages. Accordingly, the cytokine and chemokine profile associated with the M2 phenotype was significantly overexpressed in Arf−/− macrophages responding to IL-4. In addition, multiple pro-angiogenic factors such as VEGF and MMP-9 were also increased. In summary, these results indicate that ARF contributes to the polarization and functional plasticity of macrophages. PMID:23243586

  17. Origin, fate and dynamics of macrophages at CNS interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, Tobias; Jordão, Marta Joana Costa; Wieghofer, Peter; Prutek, Fabiola; Hagemeyer, Nora; Frenzel, Kathrin; Staszewski, Ori; Kierdorf, Katrin; Amann, Lukas; Krueger, Martin; Locatelli, Giuseppe; Hochgarner, Hannah; Zeiser, Robert; Epelman, Slava; Geissmann, Frederic; Priller, Josef; Rossi, Fabio; Bechmann, Ingo; Kerschensteiner, Martin; Linnarsson, Sten; Jung, Steffen; Prinz, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Perivascular, meningeal and choroid plexus macrophages are non-parenchymal macrophages that mediate immune responses at brain boundaries. Although the origin of parenchymal microglia has recently been elucidated, much less is known about the precursors, the underlying transcriptional program and the dynamics of the other macrophages in the central nervous system (CNS). It has been assumed that they have a high turnover with blood-borne monocytes. However, large scale single-cell RNA-sequencing reveals a striking molecular overlap between perivascular macrophages and microglia but not monocytes. Using several fate mapping approaches and parabiosis we demonstrate that CNS macrophages arise from yolk sac precursors during embryonic development and remain a stable population. Notably, the generation of CNS macrophages relies on the transcription factor Pu.1 whereas myb, Batf3 and Nr4a1 are not required. Upon autoimmune inflammation, macrophages undergo extensive self-renewal by local proliferation. Our data provide challenging new insights into brains innate immune system. PMID:27135602

  18. Jacalin-Activated Macrophages Exhibit an Antitumor Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danella Polli, Cláudia; Pereira Ruas, Luciana; Chain Veronez, Luciana; Herrero Geraldino, Thais; Rossetto de Morais, Fabiana; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina; Pereira-da-Silva, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have an ambiguous and complex role in the carcinogenic process, since these cells can be polarized into different phenotypes (proinflammatory, antitumor cells or anti-