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Sample records for macrophage infectivity potentiator

  1. A potential target gene for the host-directed therapy of mycobacterial infection in murine macrophages

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    Bao, Zhang; Chen, Ran; Zhang, Pei; Lu, Shan; Chen, Xing; Yao, Yake; Jin, Xiaozheng; Sun, Yilan; Zhou, Jianying

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), one of the major bacterial pathogens for lethal infectious diseases, is capable of surviving within the phagosomes of host alveolar macrophages; therefore, host genetic variations may alter the susceptibility to MTB. In this study, to identify host genes exploited by MTB during infection, genes were non-selectively inactivated using lentivirus-based antisense RNA methods in RAW264.7 macrophages, and the cells that survived virulent MTB infection were then screened. Following DNA sequencing of the surviving cell clones, 26 host genes affecting susceptibility to MTB were identified and their pathways were analyzed by bioinformatics analysis. In total, 9 of these genes were confirmed as positive regulators of collagen α-5(IV) chain (Col4a5) expression, a gene encoding a type IV collagen subunit present on the cell surface. The knockdown of Col4a5 consistently suppressed intracellular mycobacterial viability, promoting the survival of RAW264.7 macrophages following mycobacterial infection. Furthermore, Col4a5 deficiency lowered the pH levels of intracellular vesicles, including endosomes, lysosomes and phagosomes in the RAW264.7 cells. Finally, the knockdown of Col4a5 post-translationally increased microsomal vacuolar-type H+-ATPase activity in macrophages, leading to the acidification of intracellular vesicles. Our findings reveal a novel role for Col4a5 in the regulation of macrophage responses to mycobacterial infection and identify Col4a5 as a potential target for the host-directed anti-mycobacterial therapy. PMID:27432120

  2. Piperine metabolically regulates peritoneal resident macrophages to potentiate their functions against bacterial infection.

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    Pan, Hao; Xu, Li-Hui; Huang, Mei-Yun; Zha, Qing-Bing; Zhao, Gao-Xiang; Hou, Xiao-Feng; Shi, Zi-Jian; Lin, Qiu-Ru; Ouyang, Dong-Yun; He, Xian-Hui

    2015-10-20

    Pepper, a daily-used seasoning for promoting appetite, is widely used in folk medicine for treating gastrointestinal diseases. Piperine is the major alkaloid in pepper and possesses a wide range of pharmacological activities. However, the mechanism for linking metabolic and medicinal activities of piperine remains unknown. Here we report that piperine robustly boosts mTORC1 activity by recruiting more system L1 amino acid transporter (SLC7A5/SLC3A2) to the cell membrane, thus promoting amino acid metabolism. Piperine-induced increase of mTORC1 activity in resident peritoneal macrophages (pMΦs) is correlated with enhanced production of IL-6 and TNF-α upon LPS stimulation. Such an enhancement of cytokine production could be abrogated by inhibitors of the mTOR signaling pathway, indicating mTOR's action in this process. Moreover, piperine treatment protected resident pMΦs from bacterium-induced apoptosis and disappearance, and increased their bacterial phagocytic ability. Consequently, piperine administration conferred mice resistance against bacterial infection and even sepsis. Our data highlight that piperine has the capacity to metabolically reprogram peritoneal resident macrophages to fortify their innate functions against bacterial infection.

  3. SIV Infection of Lung Macrophages.

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    Yue Li

    Full Text Available HIV-1 depletes CD4+ T cells in the blood, lymphatic tissues, gut and lungs. Here we investigated the relationship between depletion and infection of CD4+ T cells in the lung parenchyma. The lungs of 38 Indian rhesus macaques in early to later stages of SIVmac251 infection were examined, and the numbers of CD4+ T cells and macrophages plus the frequency of SIV RNA+ cells were quantified. We showed that SIV infected macrophages in the lung parenchyma, but only in small numbers except in the setting of interstitial inflammation where large numbers of SIV RNA+ macrophages were detected. However, even in this setting, the number of macrophages was not decreased. By contrast, there were few infected CD4+ T cells in lung parenchyma, but CD4+ T cells were nonetheless depleted by unknown mechanisms. The CD4+ T cells in lung parenchyma were depleted even though they were not productively infected, whereas SIV can infect large numbers of macrophages in the setting of interstitial inflammation without depleting them. These observations point to the need for future investigations into mechanisms of CD4+ T cell depletion at this mucosal site, and into mechanisms by which macrophage populations are maintained despite high levels of infection. The large numbers of SIV RNA+ macrophages in lungs in the setting of interstitial inflammation indicates that lung macrophages can be an important source for SIV persistent infection.

  4. The Neisseria meningitidis Macrophage Infectivity Potentiator Protein Induces Cross-Strain Serum Bactericidal Activity and Is a Potential Serogroup B Vaccine Candidate ▿

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    Hung, Miao-Chiu; Salim, Omar; Williams, Jeannette N.; Heckels, John E.; Christodoulides, Myron

    2011-01-01

    A gene encoding a 29-kDa protein from Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B strain MC58 with homology to the macrophage infectivity potentiator (MIP) protein of Legionella pneumophila was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified soluble recombinant protein (rMIP) was used for immunization studies. Analysis of the predicted amino acid sequences of MIP from 13 well-characterized meningococcal strains, isolated from carriers or patients and differing in serogroup, serotype, and su...

  5. Mycobacterium leprae intracellular survival relies on cholesterol accumulation in infected macrophages: a potential target for new drugs for leprosy treatment

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    Mattos, Katherine A; Oliveira, Viviane C G; Berrêdo-Pinho, Marcia; Amaral, Julio J; Antunes, Luis Caetano M; Melo, Rossana C N; Acosta, Chyntia C D; Moura, Danielle F; Olmo, Roberta; Han, Jun; Rosa, Patricia S; Almeida, Patrícia E; Finlay, B Brett; Borchers, Christoph H; Sarno, Euzenir N; Bozza, Patricia T; Atella, Georgia C; Pessolani, Maria Cristina V

    2014-01-01

    We recently showed that Mycobacterium leprae (ML) is able to induce lipid droplet formation in infected macrophages. We herein confirm that cholesterol (Cho) is one of the host lipid molecules that accumulate in ML-infected macrophages and investigate the effects of ML on cellular Cho metabolism responsible for its accumulation. The expression levels of LDL receptors (LDL-R, CD36, SRA-1, SR-B1, and LRP-1) and enzymes involved in Cho biosynthesis were investigated by qRT-PCR and/or Western blot and shown to be higher in lepromatous leprosy (LL) tissues when compared to borderline tuberculoid (BT) lesions. Moreover, higher levels of the active form of the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcriptional factors, key regulators of the biosynthesis and uptake of cellular Cho, were found in LL skin biopsies. Functional in vitro assays confirmed the higher capacity of ML-infected macrophages to synthesize Cho and sequester exogenous LDL-Cho. Notably, Cho colocalized to ML-containing phagosomes, and Cho metabolism impairment, through either de novo synthesis inhibition by statins or depletion of exogenous Cho, decreased intracellular bacterial survival. These findings highlight the importance of metabolic integration between the host and bacteria to leprosy pathophysiology, opening new avenues for novel therapeutic strategies to leprosy. PMID:24552180

  6. Myeloid Growth Factors Promote Resistance to Mycobacterial Infection by Curtailing Granuloma Necrosis through Macrophage Replenishment.

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    Pagán, Antonio J; Yang, Chao-Tsung; Cameron, James; Swaim, Laura E; Ellett, Felix; Lieschke, Graham J; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2015-07-08

    The mycobacterial ESX-1 virulence locus accelerates macrophage recruitment to the forming tuberculous granuloma. Newly recruited macrophages phagocytose previously infected apoptotic macrophages to become new bacterial growth niches. Granuloma macrophages can then necrose, releasing mycobacteria into the extracellular milieu, which potentiates their growth even further. Using zebrafish with genetic or pharmacologically induced macrophage deficiencies, we find that global macrophage deficits increase susceptibility to mycobacterial infection by accelerating granuloma necrosis. This is because reduction in the macrophage supply below a critical threshold decreases granuloma macrophage replenishment to the point where apoptotic infected macrophages, failing to get engulfed, necrose. Reducing macrophage demand by removing bacterial ESX-1 offsets the susceptibility of macrophage deficits. Conversely, increasing macrophage supply in wild-type fish by overexpressing myeloid growth factors induces resistance by curtailing necrosis. These findings may explain the susceptibility of humans with mononuclear cytopenias to mycobacterial infections and highlight the therapeutic potential of myeloid growth factors in tuberculosis.

  7. The Neisseria meningitidis Macrophage Infectivity Potentiator Protein Induces Cross-Strain Serum Bactericidal Activity and Is a Potential Serogroup B Vaccine Candidate ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Miao-Chiu; Salim, Omar; Williams, Jeannette N.; Heckels, John E.; Christodoulides, Myron

    2011-01-01

    A gene encoding a 29-kDa protein from Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B strain MC58 with homology to the macrophage infectivity potentiator (MIP) protein of Legionella pneumophila was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified soluble recombinant protein (rMIP) was used for immunization studies. Analysis of the predicted amino acid sequences of MIP from 13 well-characterized meningococcal strains, isolated from carriers or patients and differing in serogroup, serotype, and subtype, showed that the protein was highly conserved (98 to 100%), with only three distinct sequence types (designated I, II, and III) found. Western blotting showed that the MIP protein was expressed at similar levels by all of these strains. Immunization of mice with type I MC58 rMIP in detergent micelles and liposomes containing monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) induced high levels of surface-reactive antibodies with serum bactericidal activity (SBA) titers of 1/1,024 against the homologous strain. Bactericidal antibodies were also induced with the protein in saline alone and liposomes alone (titers, 1/128) but not following adsorption to Al(OH)3. Significantly, antisera raised against type I rMIP administered in saline or liposomes killed strains of heterologous sequence types II and III with similar SBA titers (1/128 to 1/256). Taken together, these findings suggest that rMIP can provide cross-strain protection against meningococci and should be considered a potential antigen for inclusion in new vaccines against meningococcal infection. PMID:21708989

  8. The Neisseria meningitidis macrophage infectivity potentiator protein induces cross-strain serum bactericidal activity and is a potential serogroup B vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Miao-Chiu; Salim, Omar; Williams, Jeannette N; Heckels, John E; Christodoulides, Myron

    2011-09-01

    A gene encoding a 29-kDa protein from Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B strain MC58 with homology to the macrophage infectivity potentiator (MIP) protein of Legionella pneumophila was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified soluble recombinant protein (rMIP) was used for immunization studies. Analysis of the predicted amino acid sequences of MIP from 13 well-characterized meningococcal strains, isolated from carriers or patients and differing in serogroup, serotype, and subtype, showed that the protein was highly conserved (98 to 100%), with only three distinct sequence types (designated I, II, and III) found. Western blotting showed that the MIP protein was expressed at similar levels by all of these strains. Immunization of mice with type I MC58 rMIP in detergent micelles and liposomes containing monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) induced high levels of surface-reactive antibodies with serum bactericidal activity (SBA) titers of 1/1,024 against the homologous strain. Bactericidal antibodies were also induced with the protein in saline alone and liposomes alone (titers, 1/128) but not following adsorption to Al(OH)(3). Significantly, antisera raised against type I rMIP administered in saline or liposomes killed strains of heterologous sequence types II and III with similar SBA titers (1/128 to 1/256). Taken together, these findings suggest that rMIP can provide cross-strain protection against meningococci and should be considered a potential antigen for inclusion in new vaccines against meningococcal infection.

  9. Ameobal pathogen mimivirus infects macrophages through phagocytosis.

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    Eric Ghigo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Mimivirus, or Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APMV, a giant double-stranded DNA virus that grows in amoeba, was identified for the first time in 2003. Entry by phagocytosis within amoeba has been suggested but not demonstrated. We demonstrate here that APMV was internalized by macrophages but not by non-phagocytic cells, leading to productive APMV replication. Clathrin- and caveolin-mediated endocytosis pathways, as well as degradative endosome-mediated endocytosis, were not used by APMV to invade macrophages. Ultrastructural analysis showed that protrusions were formed around the entering virus, suggesting that macropinocytosis or phagocytosis was involved in APMV entry. Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases were required for APMV entry. Blocking macropinocytosis and the lack of APMV colocalization with rabankyrin-5 showed that macropinocytosis was not involved in viral entry. Overexpression of a dominant-negative form of dynamin-II, a regulator of phagocytosis, inhibited APMV entry. Altogether, our data demonstrated that APMV enters macrophages through phagocytosis, a new pathway for virus entry in cells. This reinforces the paradigm that intra-amoebal pathogens have the potential to infect macrophages.

  10. Recombinant Protein Truncation Strategy for Inducing Bactericidal Antibodies to the Macrophage Infectivity Potentiator Protein of Neisseria meningitidis and Circumventing Potential Cross-Reactivity with Human FK506-Binding Proteins

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    Bielecka, Magdalena K.; Devos, Nathalie; Gilbert, Mélanie; Hung, Miao-Chiu; Weynants, Vincent; Heckels, John E.; Christodoulides, Myron

    2014-01-01

    A recombinant macrophage infectivity potentiator (rMIP) protein of Neisseria meningitidis induces significant serum bactericidal antibody production in mice and is a candidate meningococcal vaccine antigen. However, bioinformatics analysis of MIP showed some amino acid sequence similarity to human FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs) in residues 166 to 252 located in the globular domain of the protein. To circumvent the potential concern over generating antibodies that could recognize human protein...

  11. The proinflammatory cytokine response to Chlamydia trachomatis elementary bodies in human macrophages is partly mediated by a lipoprotein, the macrophage infectivity potentiator, through TLR2/TLR1/TLR6 and CD14.

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    Bas, Sylvette; Neff, Laurence; Vuillet, Madeleine; Spenato, Ursula; Seya, Tsukasa; Matsumoto, Misako; Gabay, Cem

    2008-01-15

    Chlamydiae components and signaling pathway(s) responsible for the production of proinflammatory cytokines by human monocytes/macrophages are not clearly identified. To this aim, Chlamydia trachomatis-inactivated elementary bodies (EB) as well as the following seven individual Ags were tested for their ability to induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines by human monocytes/macrophages and THP-1 cells: purified LPS, recombinant heat shock protein (rhsp)70, rhsp60, rhsp10, recombinant polypeptide encoded by open reading frame 3 of the plasmid (rpgp3), recombinant macrophage infectivity potentiator (rMip), and recombinant outer membrane protein 2 (rOmp2). Aside from EB, rMip displayed the highest ability to induce release of IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-8. rMip proinflammatory activity could not be attributed to Escherichia coli LPS contamination as determined by the Limulus Amoebocyte lysate assay, insensitivity to polymyxin B (50 microg/ml), and different serum requirement. We have recently demonstrated that Mip is a "classical" bacterial lipoprotein, exposed at the surface of EB. The proinflammatory activity of EB was significantly attenuated in the presence of polyclonal Ab to rMip. Native Mip was able to induce TNF-alpha and IL-8 secretion, whereas a nonlipidated C20A rMip variant was not. Proinflammatory activity of rMip was unaffected by heat or proteinase K treatments but was greatly reduced by treatment with lipases, supporting a role of lipid modification in this process. Stimulating pathways appeared to involve TLR2/TLR1/TLR6 with the help of CD14 but not TLR4. These data support a role of Mip lipoprotein in pathogenesis of C. trachomatis-induced inflammatory responses.

  12. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor in Protozoan Infections

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    Marcelo T. Bozza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is a cytokine that plays a central role in immune and inflammatory responses. In the present paper, we discussed the participation of MIF in the immune response to protozoan parasite infections. As a general trend, MIF participates in the control of parasite burden at the expense of promoting tissue damage due to increased inflammation.

  13. Engineering attenuated virulence of a Theileria annulata-infected macrophage.

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    Nadia Echebli

    Full Text Available Live attenuated vaccines are used to combat tropical theileriosis in North Africa, the Middle East, India, and China. The attenuation process is empirical and occurs only after many months, sometimes years, of in vitro culture of virulent clinical isolates. During this extensive culturing, attenuated lines lose their vaccine potential. To circumvent this we engineered the rapid ablation of the host cell transcription factor c-Jun, and within only 3 weeks the line engineered for loss of c-Jun activation displayed in vitro correlates of attenuation such as loss of adhesion, reduced MMP9 gelatinase activity, and diminished capacity to traverse Matrigel. Specific ablation of a single infected host cell virulence trait (c-Jun induced a complete failure of Theileria annulata-transformed macrophages to disseminate, whereas virulent macrophages disseminated to the kidneys, spleen, and lungs of Rag2/γC mice. Thus, in this heterologous mouse model loss of c-Jun expression led to ablation of dissemination of T. annulata-infected and transformed macrophages. The generation of Theileria-infected macrophages genetically engineered for ablation of a specific host cell virulence trait now makes possible experimental vaccination of calves to address how loss of macrophage dissemination impacts the disease pathology of tropical theileriosis.

  14. Primary macrophages and J774 cells respond differently to infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

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    Andreu, Nuria; Phelan, Jody; de Sessions, Paola F.; Cliff, Jacqueline M.; Clark, Taane G.; Hibberd, Martin L.

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages play an essential role in the early immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and are the cell type preferentially infected in vivo. Primary macrophages and macrophage-like cell lines are commonly used as infection models, although the physiological relevance of cell lines, particularly for host-pathogen interaction studies, is debatable. Here we use high-throughput RNA-sequencing to analyse transcriptome dynamics of two macrophage models in response to M. tuberculosis infection. Specifically, we study the early response of bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages and cell line J774 to infection with live and γ-irradiated (killed) M. tuberculosis. We show that infection with live bacilli specifically alters the expression of host genes such as Rsad2, Ifit1/2/3 and Rig-I, whose potential roles in resistance to M. tuberculosis infection have not yet been investigated. In addition, the response of primary macrophages is faster and more intense than that of J774 cells in terms of number of differentially expressed genes and magnitude of induction/repression. Our results point to potentially novel processes leading to immune containment early during M. tuberculosis infection, and support the idea that important differences exist between primary macrophages and cell lines, which should be taken into account when choosing a macrophage model to study host-pathogen interactions. PMID:28176867

  15. Responses of macrophages against Salmonella infection compared with phagocytosis.

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    Hu, Maozhi; Yang, Yun; Meng, Chuang; Pan, Zhiming; Jiao, Xinan

    2013-12-01

    To explore the responses of host cell after infection with live Salmonella compared with phagocytosis to dead bacteria, the responses of mouse macrophage after infection with Salmonella enteritidis C50041 and the fixed C50041 (C50041-d) were analyzed. Results indicated that the cytotoxicity induced by C50041 was stronger than C50041-d. Similar changing trends of mitochondrial membrane potential, intracellular concentration of calcium ions, reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide were found between C50041 and C50041-d infection. But the cell responses against C50041 were earlier and stronger than C50041-d. LC3 expression of macrophage induced by C50041 was lower than C50041-d. C50041 significantly inhibited the production of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin (IL)-6. Whereas intracellular caspase-1 activation and IL-1β release induced by C50041 were stronger than C50041-d, caspase-1 activation and IL-1β release are the innate defense responses of macrophage. Therefore, it will be beneficial to explore the use of this pathway in the control of Salmonella infection.

  16. The macrophage in HIV-1 infection: From activation to deactivation?

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    Varin Audrey

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Macrophages play a crucial role in innate and adaptative immunity in response to microorganisms and are an important cellular target during HIV-1 infection. Recently, the heterogeneity of the macrophage population has been highlighted. Classically activated or type 1 macrophages (M1 induced in particular by IFN-γ display a pro-inflammatory profile. The alternatively activated or type 2 macrophages (M2 induced by Th-2 cytokines, such as IL-4 and IL-13 express anti-inflammatory and tissue repair properties. Finally IL-10 has been described as the prototypic cytokine involved in the deactivation of macrophages (dM. Since the capacity of macrophages to support productive HIV-1 infection is known to be modulated by cytokines, this review shows how modulation of macrophage activation by cytokines impacts the capacity to support productive HIV-1 infection. Based on the activation status of macrophages we propose a model starting with M1 classically activated macrophages with accelerated formation of viral reservoirs in a context of Th1 and proinflammatory cytokines. Then IL-4/IL-13 alternatively activated M2 macrophages will enter into the game that will stop the expansion of the HIV-1 reservoir. Finally IL-10 deactivation of macrophages will lead to immune failure observed at the very late stages of the HIV-1 disease.

  17. The macrophage in HIV-1 infection: from activation to deactivation?

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    Herbein, Georges; Varin, Audrey

    2010-04-09

    Macrophages play a crucial role in innate and adaptative immunity in response to microorganisms and are an important cellular target during HIV-1 infection. Recently, the heterogeneity of the macrophage population has been highlighted. Classically activated or type 1 macrophages (M1) induced in particular by IFN-gamma display a pro-inflammatory profile. The alternatively activated or type 2 macrophages (M2) induced by Th-2 cytokines, such as IL-4 and IL-13 express anti-inflammatory and tissue repair properties. Finally IL-10 has been described as the prototypic cytokine involved in the deactivation of macrophages (dM). Since the capacity of macrophages to support productive HIV-1 infection is known to be modulated by cytokines, this review shows how modulation of macrophage activation by cytokines impacts the capacity to support productive HIV-1 infection. Based on the activation status of macrophages we propose a model starting with M1 classically activated macrophages with accelerated formation of viral reservoirs in a context of Th1 and proinflammatory cytokines. Then IL-4/IL-13 alternatively activated M2 macrophages will enter into the game that will stop the expansion of the HIV-1 reservoir. Finally IL-10 deactivation of macrophages will lead to immune failure observed at the very late stages of the HIV-1 disease.

  18. Inhibitory effects of Zanthoxylum rhoifolium Lam. (Rutaceae against the infection and infectivity of macrophages by Leishmania amazonensis

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    BERNARDO MELO NETO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Zanthoxylum rhoifolium Lam. (Rutaceae has been traditionally used in the treatment of microbial infections and parasitic diseases. In the present study, the antileishmanial effect induced by the ethanol extract of stem barks from Z. rhoifolium (ZR-EEtOH and its n-hexane fraction (ZR-FHEX on infection and infectivity of murine macrophages by promastigote forms of Leishmania amazonensis were investigated. In different set of experiments, macrophages or promastigotes were pretreated with ZR-EEtOH or ZR-FHEX at non-lethal concentrations for 24 hours, and then macrophages were submitted to infection by promastigotes. Moreover, their effects on activation of macrophages, as well as on the DNA content, size and number of promastigotes by flow cytometry were also evaluated. The infection rate and the number of internalized amastigote forms were markedly decreased after pretreatment of macrophages or promastigotes when compared with non-treated cells. The increase in phagocytic capability and nitrite content was also observed. Furthermore, the decrease of DNA content, size and number of promastigotes was also observed. In conclusion, ZR-EEtOH and ZR-FHEX promoted a markedly significant antileishmanial effect and reduction of infection of macrophages, probably underlying defense mechanisms activation in macrophages. These findings reinforce the potential application of Z. rhoifolium in the treatment of leishmaniasis.

  19. Inhibitory effects of Zanthoxylum rhoifolium Lam. (Rutaceae) against the infection and infectivity of macrophages by Leishmania amazonensis.

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    Melo, Bernardo; Leitão, Joseana M S R; Oliveira, Luciano G C; Santos, Sérgio E M; Carneiro, Sabrina M P; Rodrigues, Klinger A F; Chaves, Mariana H; Arcanjo, Daniel D R; Carvalho, Fernando A A

    2016-01-01

    Zanthoxylum rhoifolium Lam. (Rutaceae) has been traditionally used in the treatment of microbial infections and parasitic diseases. In the present study, the antileishmanial effect induced by the ethanol extract of stem barks from Z. rhoifolium (ZR-EEtOH) and its n-hexane fraction (ZR-FHEX) on infection and infectivity of murine macrophages by promastigote forms of Leishmania amazonensis were investigated. In different set of experiments, macrophages or promastigotes were pretreated with ZR-EEtOH or ZR-FHEX at non-lethal concentrations for 24 hours, and then macrophages were submitted to infection by promastigotes. Moreover, their effects on activation of macrophages, as well as on the DNA content, size and number of promastigotes by flow cytometry were also evaluated. The infection rate and the number of internalized amastigote forms were markedly decreased after pretreatment of macrophages or promastigotes when compared with non-treated cells. The increase in phagocytic capability and nitrite content was also observed. Furthermore, the decrease of DNA content, size and number of promastigotes was also observed. In conclusion, ZR-EEtOH and ZR-FHEX promoted a markedly significant antileishmanial effect and reduction of infection of macrophages, probably underlying defense mechanisms activation in macrophages. These findings reinforce the potential application of Z. rhoifolium in the treatment of leishmaniasis.

  20. Hemophagocytic macrophages harbor Salmonella enterica during persistent infection.

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    Rebecca N Nix

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica subspecies can establish persistent, systemic infections in mammals, including human typhoid fever. Persistent S. enterica disease is characterized by an initial acute infection that develops into an asymptomatic chronic infection. During both the acute and persistent stages, the bacteria generally reside within professional phagocytes, usually macrophages. It is unclear how salmonellae can survive within macrophages, cells that evolved, in part, to destroy pathogens. Evidence is presented that during the establishment of persistent murine infection, macrophages that contain S. enterica serotype Typhimurium are hemophagocytic. Hemophagocytic macrophages are characterized by the ingestion of non-apoptotic cells of the hematopoietic lineage and are a clinical marker of typhoid fever as well as certain other infectious and genetic diseases. Cell culture assays were developed to evaluate bacterial survival in hemophagocytic macrophages. S. Typhimurium preferentially replicated in macrophages that pre-phagocytosed viable cells, but the bacteria were killed in macrophages that pre-phagocytosed beads or dead cells. These data suggest that during persistent infection hemophagocytic macrophages may provide S. Typhimurium with a survival niche.

  1. Recombinant protein truncation strategy for inducing bactericidal antibodies to the macrophage infectivity potentiator protein of Neisseria meningitidis and circumventing potential cross-reactivity with human FK506-binding proteins.

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    Bielecka, Magdalena K; Devos, Nathalie; Gilbert, Mélanie; Hung, Miao-Chiu; Weynants, Vincent; Heckels, John E; Christodoulides, Myron

    2015-02-01

    A recombinant macrophage infectivity potentiator (rMIP) protein of Neisseria meningitidis induces significant serum bactericidal antibody production in mice and is a candidate meningococcal vaccine antigen. However, bioinformatics analysis of MIP showed some amino acid sequence similarity to human FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs) in residues 166 to 252 located in the globular domain of the protein. To circumvent the potential concern over generating antibodies that could recognize human proteins, we immunized mice with recombinant truncated type I rMIP proteins that lacked the globular domain and the signal leader peptide (LP) signal sequence (amino acids 1 to 22) and contained the His purification tag at either the N or C terminus (C-term). The immunogenicity of truncated rMIP proteins was compared to that of full (i.e., full-length) rMIP proteins (containing the globular domain) with either an N- or C-terminal His tag and with or without the LP sequence. By comparing the functional murine antibody responses to these various constructs, we determined that C-term His truncated rMIP (-LP) delivered in liposomes induced high levels of antibodies that bound to the surface of wild-type but not Δmip mutant meningococci and showed bactericidal activity against homologous type I MIP (median titers of 128 to 256) and heterologous type II and III (median titers of 256 to 512) strains, thereby providing at least 82% serogroup B strain coverage. In contrast, in constructs lacking the LP, placement of the His tag at the N terminus appeared to abrogate bactericidal activity. The strategy used in this study would obviate any potential concerns regarding the use of MIP antigens for inclusion in bacterial vaccines.

  2. Macrophages Subvert Adaptive Immunity to Urinary Tract Infection.

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    Gabriela Mora-Bau

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI is one of the most common bacterial infections with frequent recurrence being a major medical challenge. Development of effective therapies has been impeded by the lack of knowledge of events leading to adaptive immunity. Here, we establish conclusive evidence that an adaptive immune response is generated during UTI, yet this response does not establish sterilizing immunity. To investigate the underlying deficiency, we delineated the naïve bladder immune cell compartment, identifying resident macrophages as the most populous immune cell. To evaluate their impact on the establishment of adaptive immune responses following infection, we measured bacterial clearance in mice depleted of either circulating monocytes, which give rise to macrophages, or bladder resident macrophages. Surprisingly, mice depleted of resident macrophages, prior to primary infection, exhibited a nearly 2-log reduction in bacterial burden following secondary challenge compared to untreated animals. This increased bacterial clearance, in the context of a challenge infection, was dependent on lymphocytes. Macrophages were the predominant antigen presenting cell to acquire bacteria post-infection and in their absence, bacterial uptake by dendritic cells was increased almost 2-fold. These data suggest that bacterial uptake by tissue macrophages impedes development of adaptive immune responses during UTI, revealing a novel target for enhancing host responses to bacterial infection of the bladder.

  3. Networked T cell death following macrophage infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

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    Stephen H-F Macdonald

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Depletion of T cells following infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb impairs disease resolution, and interferes with clinical test performance that relies on cell-mediated immunity. A number of mechanisms contribute to this T cell suppression, such as activation-induced death and trafficking of T cells out of the peripheral circulation and into the diseased lungs. The extent to which Mtb infection of human macrophages affects T cell viability however, is not well characterised. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that lymphopenia (<1.5 × 10(9 cells/l was prevalent among culture-positive tuberculosis patients, and lymphocyte counts significantly improved post-therapy. We previously reported that Mtb-infected human macrophages resulted in death of infected and uninfected bystander macrophages. In the current study, we sought to examine the influence of infected human alveolar macrophages on T cells. We infected primary human alveolar macrophages (the primary host cell for Mtb or PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells with Mtb H37Ra, then prepared cell-free supernatants. The supernatants of Mtb-infected macrophages caused dose-dependent, caspase-dependent, T cell apoptosis. This toxic effect of infected macrophage secreted factors did not require TNF-α or Fas. The supernatant cytotoxic signal(s were heat-labile and greater than 50 kDa in molecular size. Although ESAT-6 was toxic to T cells, other Mtb-secreted factors tested did not influence T cell viability; nor did macrophage-free Mtb bacilli or broth from Mtb cultures. Furthermore, supernatants from Mycobacterium bovis Bacille de Calmette et Guerin (BCG- infected macrophages also elicited T cell death suggesting that ESAT-6 itself, although cytotoxic, was not the principal mediator of T cell death in our system. CONCLUSIONS: Mtb-Infected macrophages secrete heat-labile factors that are toxic to T cells, and may contribute to the immunosuppression seen in tuberculosis as well as

  4. Micro RNA in Exosomes from HIV-Infected Macrophages.

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    Roth, William W; Huang, Ming Bo; Addae Konadu, Kateena; Powell, Michael D; Bond, Vincent C

    2015-12-22

    Exosomes are small membrane-bound vesicles secreted by cells that function to shuttle RNA and proteins between cells. To examine the role of exosomal micro RNA (miRNA) during the early stage of HIV-1 infection we characterized miRNA in exosomes from HIV-infected macrophages, compared with exosomes from non-infected macrophages. Primary human monocytes from uninfected donors were differentiated to macrophages (MDM) which were either mock-infected or infected with the macrophage-tropic HIV-1 BaL strain. Exosomes were recovered from culture media and separated from virus particles by centrifugation on iodixanol density gradients. The low molecular weight RNA fraction was prepared from purified exosomes. After pre-amplification, RNA was hybridized to microarrays containing probes for 1200 miRNA species of known and unknown function. We observed 48 miRNA species in both infected and uninfected MDM exosomes. Additionally, 38 miRNAs were present in infected-cell exosomes but not uninfected-cell exosomes. Of these, 13 miRNAs were upregulated in exosomes from HIV-infected cells, including 4 miRNA species that were increased by more than 10-fold. Though numerous miRNA species have been identified in HIV-infected cells, relatively little is known about miRNA content in exosomes from these cells. In the future, we plan to investigate whether the upregulated miRNA species we identified are increased in exosomes from HIV-1-positive patients.

  5. Micro RNA in Exosomes from HIV-Infected Macrophages

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    William W. Roth

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are small membrane-bound vesicles secreted by cells that function to shuttle RNA and proteins between cells. To examine the role of exosomal micro RNA (miRNA during the early stage of HIV-1 infection we characterized miRNA in exosomes from HIV-infected macrophages, compared with exosomes from non-infected macrophages. Primary human monocytes from uninfected donors were differentiated to macrophages (MDM which were either mock-infected or infected with the macrophage-tropic HIV-1 BaL strain. Exosomes were recovered from culture media and separated from virus particles by centrifugation on iodixanol density gradients. The low molecular weight RNA fraction was prepared from purified exosomes. After pre-amplification, RNA was hybridized to microarrays containing probes for 1200 miRNA species of known and unknown function. We observed 48 miRNA species in both infected and uninfected MDM exosomes. Additionally, 38 miRNAs were present in infected-cell exosomes but not uninfected-cell exosomes. Of these, 13 miRNAs were upregulated in exosomes from HIV-infected cells, including 4 miRNA species that were increased by more than 10-fold. Though numerous miRNA species have been identified in HIV-infected cells, relatively little is known about miRNA content in exosomes from these cells. In the future, we plan to investigate whether the upregulated miRNA species we identified are increased in exosomes from HIV-1-positive patients.

  6. Astrocytes Resist HIV-1 Fusion but Engulf Infected Macrophage Material

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    Rebecca A. Russell

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 disseminates to diverse tissues and establishes long-lived viral reservoirs. These reservoirs include the CNS, in which macrophage-lineage cells, and as suggested by many studies, astrocytes, may be infected. Here, we have investigated astrocyte infection by HIV-1. We confirm that astrocytes trap and internalize HIV-1 particles for subsequent release but find no evidence that these particles infect the cell. Astrocyte infection was not observed by cell-free or cell-to-cell routes using diverse approaches, including luciferase and GFP reporter viruses, fixed and live-cell fusion assays, multispectral flow cytometry, and super-resolution imaging. By contrast, we observed intimate interactions between HIV-1-infected macrophages and astrocytes leading to signals that might be mistaken for astrocyte infection using less stringent approaches. These results have implications for HIV-1 infection of the CNS, viral reservoir formation, and antiretroviral therapy.

  7. 嗜肺军团菌mip基因重组质粒GFP-mip的构建及表达%The Construction and Expression of Recombinant Plasmid GFP -mip of Legionella Pneumophila Macrophage Infectivity Potentiator Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    惠英华; 曹秀琴; 杨志伟

    2011-01-01

    Objective To construct recombinant plasmid GFP - mip of Legionella pneumophila macrophage infectivity potentiator gene and observe its expression in the NIH3T3 cells. Methods The macrophage infectivity potentiator gene was amplified from DNA of Legionella pneumophila by polymerase chain reation ( PCR),then cloned into pEGFP - C1 vector. The recombinant plasmid was named as GFP - mip and was analyzed with restriction endonuclease XhoI and BarnHl digestion, PCR and DNA sequencing techniques. The NIH3T3 cell was transfected by recombinant plasmid GFP - mip with lipofection strategy. The stable expression products of macrophage infectivity petentiator gene were observed by the fluorescent microscope. Results 702bp mip gene was amplified . Under the fluorescent microscope, green fluorescent was observed in the cell cytoplasm and on the cell membrane. Conclusion The recombinant plasmid GFP - mip was constructed successfully and expressed in the NIH3T3 cells.%目的构建嗜肺军团菌mip基因的真核重组质粒GFP-mip,并观察其在NIH3T3细胞中的表达.方法 以嗜肺军团菌DNA为模版,通过PCR扩增获得mip基因,将其定向克隆到绿色荧光质粒pEGFP-C1中,构建真核重组质粒GFP-mip.经限制性核酸内切酶XhoI和BamHI酶切鉴定、PCR和核酸序列分析后,通过脂质体法转染到NIH3T3细胞中,利用荧光显微镜观察重组质粒的稳定表达.结果 扩增出了702bpmip基因,在细胞质和细胞膜观察到较强绿色荧光.结论 成功构建了真核重组质粒GFP-mip,并在NIH3T3细胞中得到了表达.

  8. Salmonella typhimurium Invasion Induces Apoptosis in Infected Macrophages

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    Monack, Denise M.; Raupach, Barbel; Hromockyj, Alexander E.; Falkow, Stanley

    1996-09-01

    Invasive Salmonella typhimurium induces dramatic cytoskeletal changes on the membrane surface of mammalian epithelial cells and RAW264.7 macrophages as part of its entry mechanism. Noninvasive S. typhimurium strains are unable to induce this membrane ruffling. Invasive S. typhimurium strains invade RAW264.7 macrophages in 2 h with 7- to 10-fold higher levels than noninvasive strains. Invasive S. typhimurium and Salmonella typhi, independent of their ability to replicate intracellularly, are cytotoxic to RAW264.7 macrophages and, to a greater degree, to murine bone marrow-derived macrophages. Here, we show that the macrophage cytotoxicity mediated by invasive Salmonella is apoptosis, as shown by nuclear morphology, cytoplasmic vacuolization, and host cell DNA fragmentation. S. typhimurium that enter cells causing ruffles but are mutant for subsequent intracellular replication also initiate host cell apoptosis. Mutant S. typhimurium that are incapable of inducing host cell membrane ruffling fail to induce apoptosis. The activation state of the macrophage plays a significant role in the response of macrophages to Salmonella invasion, perhaps indicating that the signal or receptor for initiating programmed cell death is upregulated in activated macrophages. The ability of Salmonella to promote apoptosis may be important for the initiation of infection, bacterial survival, and escape of the host immune response.

  9. IFN-λ Inhibits Drug-Resistant HIV Infection of Macrophages

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    Wang, Xu; Wang, He; Liu, Man-Qing; Li, Jie-Liang; Zhou, Run-Hong; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Yi-Zhong; Zhou, Wang; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2017-01-01

    Type III interferons (IFN-λs) have been demonstrated to inhibit a number of viruses, including HIV. Here, we further examined the anti-HIV effect of IFN-λs in macrophages. We found that IFN-λs synergistically enhanced anti-HIV activity of antiretrovirals [azidothymidine (AZT), efavirenz, indinavir, and enfuvirtide] in infected macrophages. Importantly, IFN-λs could suppress HIV infection of macrophages with the drug-resistant strains, including AZT-resistant virus (A012) and reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistant virus (TC49). Mechanistically, IFN-λs were able to induce the expression of several important anti-HIV cellular factors, including myxovirus resistance 2 (Mx2), a newly identified HIV post-entry inhibitor and tetherin, a restriction factor that blocks HIV release from infected cells. These observations provide additional evidence to support the potential use of IFN-λs as therapeutics agents for the treatment of HIV infection. PMID:28321215

  10. Antibiotic-Mediated Inhibition of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV Infection: A Novel Quinolone Function Which Potentiates the Antiviral Cytokine Response in MARC-145 Cells and Pig Macrophages

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    William A. Cafruny

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV is an economically significant agent for which there currently are no effective treatments. Development of antiviral agents for PRRSV as well as many other viruses has been limited by toxicity of known antiviral compounds. In contrast, antibiotics for non-virus microbial infections have been widely useful, in part because of their acceptable toxicity in animals. We report here the discovery that the quinolonecontaining compound Plasmocin™, as well as the quinolones nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin, have potent anti-PRRSV activity in vitro. PRRSV replication was inhibited by these antibiotics in both cultured MARC-145 cells and cultured primary alveolar porcine macrophages (PAMs. Furthermore, sub-optimal concentrations of nalidixic acid synergized with antiviral cytokines (AK-2 or IFN-γ to quantitatively and qualitatively inhibit PRRSV replication in MARC-145 cells or PAMs. The antiviral activity of Plasmocin and nalidixic acid correlated with reduced actin expression in MARC-145 cells. Replication of the related lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV was also inhibited in primary mouse macrophages by Plasmocin. These results are significant to the development of antiviral strategies with potentially reduced toxicity, and provide a model system to better understand regulation of arterivirus replication.

  11. Role of macrophages in early host resistance to respiratory Acinetobacter baumannii infection.

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    Hongyu Qiu

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging bacterial pathogen that causes nosocomial pneumonia and other infections. Although it is recognized as an increasing threat to immunocompromised patients, the mechanism of host defense against A. baumannii infection remains poorly understood. In this study, we examined the potential role of macrophages in host defense against A. baumannii infection using in vitro macrophage culture and the mouse model of intranasal (i.n. infection. Large numbers of A. baumannii were taken up by alveolar macrophages in vivo as early as 4 h after i.n. inoculation. By 24 h, the infection induced significant recruitment and activation (enhanced expression of CD80, CD86 and MHC-II of macrophages into bronchoalveolar spaces. In vitro cell culture studies showed that A. baumannii were phagocytosed by J774A.1 (J774 macrophage-like cells within 10 minutes of co-incubation, and this uptake was microfilament- and microtubule-dependent. Moreover, the viability of phagocytosed bacteria dropped significantly between 24 and 48 h after co-incubation. Infection of J774 cells by A. baumannii resulted in the production of large amounts of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and moderate amounts of nitric oxide (NO. Prior treatment of J774 cells with NO inhibitors significantly suppressed their bactericidal efficacy (P<0.05. Most importantly, in vivo depletion of alveolar macrophages significantly enhanced the susceptibility of mice to i.n. A. baumannii challenge (P<0.01. These results indicate that macrophages may play an important role in early host defense against A. baumannii infection through the efficient phagocytosis and killing of A. baumannii to limit initial pathogen replication and the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines for the rapid recruitment of other innate immune cells such as neutrophils.

  12. ISG15 regulates peritoneal macrophages functionality against viral infection.

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    Emilio Yángüez

    Full Text Available Upon viral infection, the production of type I interferon (IFN and the subsequent upregulation of IFN stimulated genes (ISGs generate an antiviral state with an important role in the activation of innate and adaptive host immune responses. The ubiquitin-like protein (UBL ISG15 is a critical IFN-induced antiviral molecule that protects against several viral infections, but the mechanism by which ISG15 exerts its antiviral function is not completely understood. Here, we report that ISG15 plays an important role in the regulation of macrophage responses. ISG15-/- macrophages display reduced activation, phagocytic capacity and programmed cell death activation in response to vaccinia virus (VACV infection. Moreover, peritoneal macrophages from mice lacking ISG15 are neither able to phagocyte infected cells nor to block viral infection in co-culture experiments with VACV-infected murine embryonic fibroblast (MEFs. This phenotype is independent of cytokine production and secretion, but clearly correlates with impaired activation of the protein kinase AKT in ISG15 knock-out (KO macrophages. Altogether, these results indicate an essential role of ISG15 in the cellular immune antiviral response and point out that a better understanding of the antiviral responses triggered by ISG15 may lead to the development of therapies against important human pathogens.

  13. Macrophage Activation by Ursolic and Oleanolic Acids during Mycobacterial Infection

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    Sonia López-García

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Oleanolic (OA and ursolic acids (UA are triterpenes that are abundant in vegetables, fruits and medicinal plants. They have been described as active moieties in medicinal plants used for the treatment of tuberculosis. In this study, we analyzed the effects of these triterpenes on macrophages infected in vitro with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB. We evaluated production of nitric oxide (NO, reactive oxygen species (ROS, and cytokines (TNF-α and TGF-β as well as expression of cell membrane receptors (TGR5 and CD36 in MTB-infected macrophages following treatment with OA and UA. Triterpenes caused reduced MTB growth in macrophages, stimulated production of NO and ROS in the early phase, stimulated TNF-α, suppressed TGF-β and caused over-expression of CD36and TGR5 receptors. Thus, our data suggest immunomodulatory properties of OA and UA on MTB infected macrophages. In conclusion, antimycobacterial effects induced by these triterpenes may be attributable to the conversion of macrophages from stage M2 (alternatively activated to M1 (classically activated.

  14. Dynamics of Salmonella infection of macrophages at the single cell level.

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    Gog, Julia R; Murcia, Alicia; Osterman, Natan; Restif, Olivier; McKinley, Trevelyan J; Sheppard, Mark; Achouri, Sarra; Wei, Bin; Mastroeni, Pietro; Wood, James L N; Maskell, Duncan J; Cicuta, Pietro; Bryant, Clare E

    2012-10-07

    Salmonella enterica causes a range of diseases. Salmonellae are intracellular parasites of macrophages, and the control of bacteria within these cells is critical to surviving an infection. The dynamics of the bacteria invading, surviving, proliferating in and killing macrophages are central to disease pathogenesis. Fundamentally important parameters, however, such as the cellular infection rate, have not previously been calculated. We used two independent approaches to calculate the macrophage infection rate: mathematical modelling of Salmonella infection experiments, and analysis of real-time video microscopy of infection events. Cells repeatedly encounter salmonellae, with the bacteria often remain associated with the macrophage for more than ten seconds. Once Salmonella encounters a macrophage, the probability of that bacterium infecting the cell is remarkably low: less than 5%. The macrophage population is heterogeneous in terms of its susceptibility to the first infection event. Once infected, a macrophage can undergo further infection events, but these reinfection events occur at a lower rate than that of the primary infection.

  15. Effects of macrophages In Resistance to Murine Cytomegalovirus Infection

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    M. Aminzedeh

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available In a preliminary experiment. the protective effects of ' peritoneal macrophages was shown by transferring macroph. ages fr-om adult mice to newborn and to 7 and 14 days old mice. It suckling mice from intraperitoneal infection with MCMV by reducing the mortality rate from 100% to 27%.was demontrated that such transplentatton protect

  16. Effects of macrophages In Resistance to Murine Cytomegalovirus Infection

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    M. Aminzedeh

    1978-06-01

    Full Text Available In a preliminary experiment. the protective effects of ' peritoneal macrophages was shown by transferring macroph. ages fr-om adult mice to newborn and to 7 and 14 days old mice. It suckling mice from intraperitoneal infection with MCMV by reducing the mortality rate from 100% to 27%.was demontrated that such transplentatton protect

  17. Inlfammatory response of macrophages in infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Zhang; Cheng-Cai Wang

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Macrophages  are  widely-distributed  innate immune cells playing diverse roles in various physiological and pathological processes. The primary function of macrophages is to phagocytize and clear invading pathogens. DATA SOURCES: A systematic search of PubMed was performed to identify relevant studies in English language literature using the key words such as macrophage and inlfammation. A total of 122 articles related to inlfammatory response of macrophages in infection were systematically reviewed. RESULTS: The  inlfammatory  responses  of  macrophages triggered  by  infection  comprise  four  interrelated  phases: recognition  of  pathogen-associated  molecular  patterns  by pattern-recognition receptors expressed on/in macrophages; enrichment  of  quantity  of  macrophages  in  local  infected tissue  by  recruitment  of  circulating  monocytes  and/or  in situ  proliferation;  macrophage-mediation  of  microbicidal activity and conversion to anti-inlfammatory phenotype to terminate anti-infectious response and to promote tissue repair. Complicated regulation of macrophage activation at molecular level recognized in the past decade is also reviewed, including intracellular multiple signaling molecules, membrane molecules, microRNAs and even epigenetic-associated molecules. CONCLUSION: The inlfammatory response of macrophages in infection is an orderly and complicated process under elaborate regulation at molecular level.

  18. Arginase in Parasitic Infections: Macrophage Activation, Immunosuppression, and Intracellular Signals

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    Cinthia C. Stempin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A type 1 cytokine-dependent proinflammatory response inducing classically activated macrophages (CaMϕs is crucial for parasite control during protozoan infections but can also contribute to the development of immunopathological disease symptoms. Type 2 cytokines such as IL-4 and IL-13 antagonize CaMϕs inducing alternatively activated macrophages (AaMϕs that upregulate arginase-1 expression. During several infections, induction of arginase-1-macrophages was showed to have a detrimental role by limiting CaMϕ-dependent parasite clearance and promoting parasite proliferation. Additionally, the role of arginase-1 in T cell suppression has been explored recently. Arginase-1 can also be induced by IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β or even directly by parasites or parasite components. Therefore, generation of alternative activation states of macrophages could limit collateral tissue damage because of excessive type 1 inflammation. However, they affect disease outcome by promoting parasite survival and proliferation. Thus, modulation of macrophage activation may be instrumental in allowing parasite persistence and long-term host survival.

  19. Ubiquitination by SAG regulates macrophage survival/death and immune response during infection.

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    Chang, S C; Ding, J L

    2014-09-01

    The checkpoint between the life and death of macrophages is crucial for the host's frontline immune defense during acute phase infection. However, the mechanism as to how the immune cell equilibrates between apoptosis and immune response is unclear. Using in vitro and ex vivo approaches, we showed that macrophage survival is synchronized by SAG (sensitive to apoptosis gene), which is a key member of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). When challenged by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), we observed a reciprocal expression profile of pro- and antiapoptotic factors in macrophages. However, SAG knockdown disrupted this balance. Further analysis revealed that ubiquitination of Bax and SARM (sterile α- and HEAT/armadillo-motif-containing protein) by SAG-UPS confers survival advantage to infected macrophages. SAG knockdown caused the accumulation of proapoptotic Bax and SARM, imbalance of Bcl-2/Bax in the mitochondria, induction of cytosolic cytochrome c and activation of caspase-9 and -3, all of which led to disequilibrium between life and death of macrophages. In contrast, SAG-overexpressing macrophages challenged with PAMPs exhibited upregulation of protumorigenic cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α), and downregulation of antitumorigenic cytokine (IL-12p40) and anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10). This suggests that SAG-dependent UPS is a key switch between immune defense and apoptosis or immune overactivation and tumorigenesis. Altogether, our results indicate that SAG-UPS facilitates a timely and appropriate level of immune response, prompting future development of potential immunomodulators of SAG-UPS.

  20. Pyrimidinergic Receptor Activation Controls Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Macrophages.

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    Aline Cristina Abreu Moreira-Souza

    Full Text Available Infection by the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is highly prevalent worldwide and may have serious clinical manifestations in immunocompromised patients. T. gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that infects almost any cell type in mammalian hosts, including immune cells. The immune cells express purinergic P2 receptors in their membrane--subdivided into P2Y and P2X subfamilies--whose activation is important for infection control. Here, we examined the effect of treatment with UTP and UDP in mouse peritoneal macrophages infected with T. gondii tachyzoites. Treatment with these nucleotides reduced parasitic load by 90%, but did not increase the levels of the inflammatory mediators NO and ROS, nor did it modulate host cell death by apoptosis or necrosis. On the other hand, UTP and UDP treatments induced early egress of tachyzoites from infected macrophages, in a Ca2+-dependent manner, as shown by scanning electron microscopy analysis, and videomicroscopy. In subsequent infections, prematurely egressed parasites had reduced infectivity, and could neither replicate nor inhibit the fusion of lysosomes to the parasitophorous vacuole. The use of selective agonists and antagonists of the receptor subtypes P2Y2 and P2Y4 and P2Y6 showed that premature parasite egress may be mediated by the activation of these receptor subtypes. Our results suggest that the activity of P2Y host cell receptors controls T. gondii infection in macrophages, highlighting the importance of pyrimidinergic signaling for innate immune system response against infection. Finally the P2Y receptors should be considered as new target for the development of drugs against T. gondii infection.

  1. Resident alveolar macrophages are susceptible to and permissive of Coxiella burnetii infection.

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    Matthew Calverley

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever, is a zoonotic disease with potentially life-threatening complications in humans. Inhalation of low doses of Coxiella bacteria can result in infection of the host alveolar macrophage (AM. However, it is not known whether a subset of AMs within the heterogeneous population of macrophages in the infected lung is particularly susceptible to infection. We have found that lower doses of both phase I and phase II Nine Mile C. burnetii multiply and are less readily cleared from the lungs of mice compared to higher infectious doses. We have additionally identified AM resident within the lung prior to and shortly following infection, opposed to newly recruited monocytes entering the lung during infection, as being most susceptible to infection. These resident cells remain infected up to twelve days after the onset of infection, serving as a permissive niche for the maintenance of bacterial infection. A subset of infected resident AMs undergo a distinguishing phenotypic change during the progression of infection exhibiting an increase in surface integrin CD11b expression and continued expression of the surface integrin CD11c. The low rate of phase I and II Nine Mile C. burnetii growth in murine lungs may be a direct result of the limited size of the susceptible resident AM cell population.

  2. Modulation of macrophage antitumor potential by apoptotic lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Jorine J L P; Ford, Catriona A; Petrova, Sofia; Melville, Lynsey; Paterson, Margaret; Pound, John D; Holland, Pam; Giotti, Bruno; Freeman, Tom C; Gregory, Christopher D

    2017-06-01

    drive key oncogenic mechanisms in NHL. These findings have important implications for anticancer therapeutic approaches aimed at polarizing macrophages towards an antitumor state and identify galectin-3 as a potentially important novel target in aggressive NHL.

  3. Small ruminant macrophage polarization may play a pivotal role on lentiviral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Helena; Bertolotti, Luigi; Juganaru, Magda; Glaria, Idoia; de Andrés, Damián; Amorena, Beatriz; Rosati, Sergio; Reina, Ramsés

    2013-09-26

    Small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV) infect the monocyte/macrophage lineage inducing a long-lasting infection affecting body condition, production and welfare of sheep and goats all over the world. Macrophages play a pivotal role on the host's innate and adaptative immune responses against parasites by becoming differentially activated. Macrophage heterogeneity can tentatively be classified into classically differentiated macrophages (M1) through stimulation with IFN-γ displaying an inflammatory profile, or can be alternatively differentiated by stimulation with IL-4/IL-13 into M2 macrophages with homeostatic functions. Since infection by SRLV can modulate macrophage functions we explored here whether ovine and caprine macrophages can be segregated into M1 and M2 populations and whether this differential polarization represents differential susceptibility to SRLV infection. We found that like in human and mouse systems, ovine and caprine macrophages can be differentiated with particular stimuli into M1/M2 subpopulations displaying specific markers. In addition, small ruminant macrophages are plastic since M1 differentiated macrophages can express M2 markers when the stimulus changes from IFN-γ to IL-4. SRLV replication was restricted in M1 macrophages and increased in M2 differentiated macrophages respectively according to viral production. Identification of the infection pathways in macrophage populations may provide new targets for eliciting appropriate immune responses against SRLV infection.

  4. IFN-λ3 inhibits HIV infection of macrophages through the JAK-STAT pathway.

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    Man-Qing Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interferon lambda 3 (IFN-λ3 is a newly identified cytokine with antiviral activity, and its single nucleotide polymorphisms are strongly associated with the treatment effectiveness and development of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. We thus examined the potential of IFN-λ3 to inhibit HIV replication and the possible mechanisms of the anti-HIV action by IFN-λ3 in human macrophages. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Under different conditions (before, during, and after HIV infection, IFN-λ3 significantly inhibited viral replication in macrophages, which was associated with the induction of multiple antiviral cellular factors (ISG56, MxA, OAS-1, A3G/F and tetherin and IFN regulatory factors (IRF-1, 3, 5, 7 and 9. This anti-HIV action of IFN-λ3 could be compromised by the JAK-STAT inhibitor. In addition, IFN-λ3 treatment of macrophages induced the expression of toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3 and two key adaptors (MyD88 and TRIF in type I IFN pathway activation. However, HIV infection compromised IFN-λ3-mediated induction of the key elements in JAK-STAT signaling pathway. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that IFN-λ3 exerts its anti-HIV function by activating JAK-STAT pathway-mediated innate immunity in macrophages. Future in vivo studies are necessary in order to explore the potential for developing IFN-λ3-based therapy for HIV disease.

  5. Sulforaphane Inhibits HIV Infection of Macrophages through Nrf2.

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    Andrea Kinga Marias Furuya

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Marburg virus, the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV and Dengue virus all activate, and benefit from, expression of the transcription regulator nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2. The impact of Nrf2 activation on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection has not been tested. Sulforaphane (SFN, produced in cruciferous vegetables after mechanical damage, mobilizes Nrf2 to potently reprogram cellular gene expression. Here we show for the first time that SFN blocks HIV infection in primary macrophages but not in primary T cells. Similarly SFN blocks infection in PMA-differentiated promonocytic cell lines, but not in other cell lines tested. siRNA-mediated depletion of Nrf2 boosted HIV infectivity in primary macrophages and reduced the anti-viral effects of SFN treatment. This supports a model in which anti-viral activity is mediated through Nrf2 after it is mobilized by SFN. We further found that, like the type I interferon-induced cellular anti-viral proteins SAMHD1 and MX2, SFN treatment blocks infection after entry, but before formation of 2-LTR circles. Interestingly however, neither SAMHD1 nor MX2 were upregulated. This shows for the first time that Nrf2 action can potently block HIV infection and highlights a novel way to trigger this inhibition.

  6. Downregulation of vimentin in macrophages infected with live Mycobacterium tuberculosis is mediated by Reactive Oxygen Species.

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    Mahesh, P P; Retnakumar, R J; Mundayoor, Sathish

    2016-02-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis persists primarily in macrophages after infection and manipulates the host defence pathways in its favour. 2D gel electrophoresis results showed that vimentin, an intermediate filament protein, is downregulated in macrophages infected with live Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv when compared to macrophages infected with heat- killed H37Rv. The downregulation was confirmed by Western blot and quantitative RT-PCR. Besides, the expression of vimentin in avirulent strain, Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra- infected macrophages was similar to the expression in heat-killed H37Rv- infected macrophages. Increased expression of vimentin in H2O2- treated live H37Rv-infected macrophages and decreased expression of vimentin both in NAC and DPI- treated heat-killed H37Rv-infected macrophages showed that vimentin expression is positively regulated by ROS. Ectopic expression of ESAT-6 in macrophages decreased both the level of ROS and the expression of vimentin which implies that Mycobacterium tuberculosis-mediated downregulation of vimentin is at least in part due to the downregulation of ROS by the pathogen. Interestingly, the incubation of macrophages with anti-vimentin antibody increased the ROS production and decreased the survival of H37Rv. In addition, we also showed that the pattern of phosphorylation of vimentin in macrophages by PKA/PKC is different from monocytes, emphasizing a role for vimentin phosphorylation in macrophage differentiation.

  7. Brucella infection inhibits macrophages apoptosis via Nedd4-dependent degradation of calpain2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Guimei; Wei, Pan; Zhao, Yuxi; Guan, Zhenhong; Yang, Li; Sun, Wanchun; Wang, Shuangxi; Peng, Qisheng

    2014-11-07

    The calcium-dependent protease calpain2 is involved in macrophages apoptosis. Brucella infection-induced up-regulation of intracellular calcium level is an essential factor for the intracellular survival of Brucella within macrophages. Here, we hypothesize that calcium-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase Nedd4 ubiquitinates calpain2 and inhibits Brucella infection-induced macrophage apoptosis via degradation of calpain2.Our results reveal that Brucella infection induces increases in Nedd4 activity in an intracellular calcium dependent manner. Furthermore, Brucella infection-induced degradation of calpain2 is mediated by Nedd4 ubiquitination of calpain2. Brucella infection-induced calpain2 degradation inhibited macrophages apoptosis. Treatment of Brucella infected macrophages with calcium chelator BAPTA or Nedd4 knock-down decreased Nedd4 activity, prevented calpain2 degradation, and resulted in macrophages apoptosis.

  8. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulatory factor enhances the pro-inflammatory response of interferon-γ-treated macrophages to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

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    Sonali Singh

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause severe infections at compromised epithelial surfaces, such those found in burns, wounds, and in lungs damaged by mechanical ventilation or recurrent infections, particularly in cystic fibrosis (CF patients. CF patients have been proposed to have a Th2 and Th17-biased immune response suggesting that the lack of Th1 and/or over exuberant Th17 responses could contribute to the establishment of chronic P. aeruginosa infection and deterioration of lung function. Accordingly, we have observed that interferon (IFN-γ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from CF patients positively correlated with lung function, particularly in patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa. In contrast, IL-17A levels tended to correlate negatively with lung function with this trend becoming significant in patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa. These results are in agreement with IFN-γ and IL-17A playing protective and detrimental roles, respectively, in CF. In order to explore the protective effect of IFN-γ in CF, the effect of IFN-γ alone or in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, on the ability of human macrophages to control P. aeruginosa growth, resist the cytotoxicity induced by this bacterium or promote inflammation was investigated. Treatment of macrophages with IFN-γ, in the presence and absence of GM-CSF, failed to alter bacterial growth or macrophage survival upon P. aeruginosa infection, but changed the inflammatory potential of macrophages. IFN-γ caused up-regulation of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and TNF-α and down-regulation of IL-10 expression by infected macrophages. GM-CSF in combination with IFN-γ promoted IL-6 production and further reduction of IL-10 synthesis. Comparison of TNF-α vs. IL-10 and IL-6 vs. IL-10 ratios revealed the following hierarchy in regard to the pro-inflammatory potential of human

  9. Apoptotic killing of HIV-1-infected macrophages is subverted by the viral envelope glycoprotein.

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    Simon Swingler

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Viruses have evolved strategies to protect infected cells from apoptotic clearance. We present evidence that HIV-1 possesses a mechanism to protect infected macrophages from the apoptotic effects of the death ligand TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand. In HIV-1-infected macrophages, the viral envelope protein induced macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF. This pro-survival cytokine downregulated the TRAIL receptor TRAIL-R1/DR4 and upregulated the anti-apoptotic genes Bfl-1 and Mcl-1. Inhibition of M-CSF activity or silencing of Bfl-1 and Mcl-1 rendered infected macrophages highly susceptible to TRAIL. The anti-cancer agent Imatinib inhibited M-CSF receptor activation and restored the apoptotic sensitivity of HIV-1-infected macrophages, suggesting a novel strategy to curtail viral persistence in the macrophage reservoir.

  10. Regulation of Viral Replication, Apoptosis and Pro-Inflammatory Responses by 17-AAG during Chikungunya Virus Infection in Macrophages

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    Tapas K. Nayak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV infection has re-emerged as a major public health concern due to its recent worldwide epidemics and lack of control measures. Although CHIKV is known to infect macrophages, regulation of CHIKV replication, apoptosis and immune responses towards macrophages are not well understood. Accordingly, the Raw264.7 cells, a mouse macrophage cell line, were infected with CHIKV and viral replication as well as new viral progeny release was assessed by flow cytometry and plaque assay, respectively. Moreover, host immune modulation and apoptosis were studied through flow cytometry, Western blot and ELISA. Our current findings suggest that expression of CHIKV proteins were maximum at 8 hpi and the release of new viral progenies were remarkably increased around 12 hpi. The induction of Annexin V binding, cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9 and cleaved caspase-8 in CHIKV infected macrophages suggests activation of apoptosis through both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. The pro-inflammatory mediators (TNF and IL-6 MHC-I/II and B7.2 (CD86 were also up-regulated during infection over time. Further, 17-AAG, a potential HSP90 inhibitor, was found to regulate CHIKV infection, apoptosis and pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine productions of host macrophages significantly. Hence, the present findings might bring new insight into the therapeutic implication in CHIKV disease biology.

  11. Regulation of Viral Replication, Apoptosis and Pro-Inflammatory Responses by 17-AAG during Chikungunya Virus Infection in Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Tapas K.; Mamidi, Prabhudutta; Kumar, Abhishek; Singh, Laishram Pradeep K.; Sahoo, Subhransu S.; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis

    2017-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection has re-emerged as a major public health concern due to its recent worldwide epidemics and lack of control measures. Although CHIKV is known to infect macrophages, regulation of CHIKV replication, apoptosis and immune responses towards macrophages are not well understood. Accordingly, the Raw264.7 cells, a mouse macrophage cell line, were infected with CHIKV and viral replication as well as new viral progeny release was assessed by flow cytometry and plaque assay, respectively. Moreover, host immune modulation and apoptosis were studied through flow cytometry, Western blot and ELISA. Our current findings suggest that expression of CHIKV proteins were maximum at 8 hpi and the release of new viral progenies were remarkably increased around 12 hpi. The induction of Annexin V binding, cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9 and cleaved caspase-8 in CHIKV infected macrophages suggests activation of apoptosis through both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. The pro-inflammatory mediators (TNF and IL-6) MHC-I/II and B7.2 (CD86) were also up-regulated during infection over time. Further, 17-AAG, a potential HSP90 inhibitor, was found to regulate CHIKV infection, apoptosis and pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine productions of host macrophages significantly. Hence, the present findings might bring new insight into the therapeutic implication in CHIKV disease biology. PMID:28067803

  12. Altered sialylation of alveolar macrophages in HIV-1-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, C; Giordanengo, V; Bannwarth, S; Blaive, B; Lefebvre, J C

    1997-10-01

    In previous studies, we have demonstrated that O-glycans at the surface of HIV-1-infected cell lines were hyposialylated. Moreover, we and others have shown that HIV+ individuals produced autoantibodies that react with hyposialylated CD43, on T cell lines. Since the autoantigen responsible for this abnormal immune response was not easily found in the peripheral blood cells of corresponding patients, we searched for its possible presence in other sites. Using fluorescence staining of alveolar macrophages with various lectins, we show that the binding of the PNA lectin specific for asialo O-glycans is much more efficient on cells from HIV-1-infected individuals. Moreover, the degree of reactivity of PNA is correlated with the clinical stage of the illness.

  13. Sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK-1 regulates Mycobacterium smegmatis infection in macrophages.

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    Hridayesh Prakash

    Full Text Available Sphingosine kinase-1 is known to mediate Mycobacterium smegmatis induced inflammatory responses in macrophages, but its role in controlling infection has not been reported to date. We aimed to unravel the significance of SphK-1 in controlling M. smegmatis infection in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Our results demonstrated for the first time that selective inhibition of SphK-1 by either D, L threo dihydrosphingosine (DHS; a competitive inhibitor of Sphk-1 or Sphk-1 siRNA rendered RAW macrophages sensitive to M. smegmatis infection. This was due to the reduction in the expression of iNOs, p38, pp-38, late phagosomal marker, LAMP-2 and stabilization of the RelA (pp-65 subunit of NF-kappaB. This led to a reduction in the generation of NO and secretion of TNF-alpha in infected macrophages. Congruently, overexpression of SphK-1 conferred resistance in macrophages to infection which was due to enhancement in the generation of NO and expression of iNOs, pp38 and LAMP-2. In addition, our results also unraveled a novel regulation of p38MAPK by SphK-1 during M. smegmatis infection and generation of NO in macrophages. Enhanced NO generation and expression of iNOs in SphK-1++ infected macrophages demonstrated their M-1(bright phenotype of these macrophages. These findings thus suggested a novel antimycobacterial role of SphK-1 in macrophages.

  14. HIV-1-infection of T lymphocytes and macrophages affects their migration via Nef

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    Christel eVérollet

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 disseminates in the body and is found in several organs and tissues. While HIV-1 mainly targets both CD4+ T lymphocytes and macrophages, it has contrasting effects between these cell populations. HIV-1 infection namely reduces the viability of CD4+ T cells, whereas infected macrophages are long-lived. In addition, the migration of T cells is reduced by the infection, while HIV-1 differentially modulates the migration modes of macrophages. In 2-dimensions (2D assays, infected macrophages are less motile compared to the control counterparts. In 3D environments, macrophages use two migration modes that are dependent on the matrix architecture: amoeboid and mesenchymal migration. HIV-1 infected macrophages exhibit a reduced amoeboid migration but an enhanced mesenchymal migration, via the viral protein Nef. Indeed, the mesenchymal migration involves podosomes, and Nef stabilizes these cell structures through the activation of the tyrosine kinase Hck, which in turn phosphorylates the Wiskott Aldrich Syndrome Protein (WASP. WASP is a key player in actin remodeling and cell migration. The reprogramed motility of infected macrophages observed in vitro correlates in vivo with enhanced macrophage infiltration in experimental tumors in Nef-transgenic mice compared to control mice.In conclusion, HIV infection of host target cells modifies their migration capacity; we infer that HIV-1 enhances virus spreading in confined environments by reducing T cells migration, and facilitates virus dissemination into different organs and tissues of the human body by enhancing macrophage mesenchymal migration.

  15. Identification of Francisella novicida mutants that fail to induce prostaglandin E2 synthesis by infected macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Woolard, Matthew D.; Barrigan, Lydia M.; Fuller, James R.; Buntzman, Adam S.; Bryan, Joshua; Manoil, Colin; Kawula, Thomas H.; Frelinger, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of tularemia. We have previously shown that infection with F. tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) induces macrophages to synthesize prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Synthesis of PGE2 by F. tularensis infected macrophages results in decreased T cell proliferation in vitro and increased bacterial survival in vivo. Although we understand some of the biological consequences of F. tularensis induced PGE2 synthesis by macrophages, we do not understand the cell...

  16. Identification of Francisella novicida mutants that fail to induce prostaglandin E2 synthesis by infected macrophages.

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew Dale Woolard; Barrigan, Lydia M.; Fuller, James R.; Buntzman, Adam S.; Joshua eBryan; Colin eManoil; Tom eKawula; Frelinger, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of tularemia. We have previously shown that infection with F. tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) induces macrophages to synthesize prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Synthesis of PGE2 by F. tularensis infected macrophages results in decreased T cell proliferation in vitro and increased bacterial survival in vivo. Although we understand some of the biological consequences of F. tularensis induced PGE2 synthesis by macrophages, we do not understand the ce...

  17. Analysis of the bovine monocyte-derived macrophage response to Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection using RNA-seq

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    Maura E Casey

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Johne’s disease, caused by infection with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, (MAP, is a chronic intestinal disease of ruminants with serious economic consequences for cattle production in the United States and elsewhere. During infection, MAP bacilli are phagocytosed and subvert host macrophage processes, resulting in subclinical infections that can lead to immunopathology and dissemination of disease. Analysis of the host macrophage transcriptome during infection can therefore shed light on the molecular mechanisms and host-pathogen interplay associated with Johne’s disease. Here we describe results of an in vitro study of the bovine monocyte-derived macrophage (MDM transcriptome response during MAP infection using RNA-seq. MDM were obtained from seven age- and sex-matched Holstein-Friesian cattle and were infected with MAP across a six-hour infection time course with non-infected controls. We observed 245 and 574 differentially expressed genes in MAP-infected versus non-infected control samples (adjusted P value ≤ 0.05 at 2 and 6 hours post-infection, respectively. Functional analyses of these differentially expressed genes, including biological pathway enrichment, highlighted potential functional roles for genes that have not been previously described in the host response to infection with MAP bacilli. In addition, differential expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine genes, such as those associated with the IL-10 signaling pathway, and other immune-related genes that encode proteins involved in the bovine macrophage response to MAP infection emphasize the balance between protective host immunity and bacilli survival and proliferation. Systematic comparisons of RNA-seq gene expression results with Affymetrix® microarray data generated from the same experimental samples also demonstrated that RNA-seq represents a superior technology for studying host transcriptional responses to intracellular infection.

  18. SIV vpx is essential for macrophage infection but not for development of AIDS.

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    Susan V Westmoreland

    Full Text Available Analysis of rhesus macaques infected with a vpx deletion mutant virus of simian immunodeficiency virus mac239 (SIVΔvpx demonstrates that Vpx is essential for efficient monocyte/macrophage infection in vivo but is not necessary for development of AIDS. To compare myeloid-lineage cell infection in monkeys infected with SIVΔvpx compared to SIVmac239, we analyzed lymphoid and gastrointestinal tissues from SIVΔvpx-infected rhesus (n = 5, SIVmac239-infected rhesus with SIV encephalitis (7 SIV239E, those without encephalitis (4 SIV239noE, and other SIV mutant viruses with low viral loads (4 SIVΔnef, 2 SIVΔ3. SIV+ macrophages and the percentage of total SIV+ cells that were macrophages in spleen and lymph nodes were significantly lower in rhesus infected with SIVΔvpx (2.2% compared to those infected with SIV239E (22.7%, SIV239noE (8.2%, and SIV mutant viruses (10.1%. In colon, SIVΔvpx monkeys had fewer SIV+ cells, no SIV+ macrophages, and lower percentage of SIV+ cells that were macrophages than the other 3 groups. Only 2 SIVΔvpx monkeys exhibited detectable virus in the colon. We demonstrate that Vpx is essential for efficient macrophage infection in vivo and that simian AIDS and death can occur in the absence of detectable macrophage infection.

  19. Suppression of lymphocyte proliferation by parainfluenza virus type 3-infected bovine alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basaraba, R J; Brown, P R; Laegreid, W W; Silflow, R M; Evermann, J F; Leid, R W

    1993-06-01

    Lymphocytes stimulated with concanavalin A (Con A) or antigen in the presence of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV-3) infected bovine alveolar macrophages (BAM) or monocytes, had depressed [3H]thymidine incorporation. This failure of lymphocytes to incorporate radiolabel required live virus, was time dependent and was most pronounced when BAM were infected for 48 hr prior to the addition of lymphocytes. The rate of infection of alveolar macrophages and the release of infectious virus into culture supernatants paralleled suppression of lymphocyte mitogenesis by PIV-3. However, the peak titre of exogenous, live or inactivated virus was not suppressive when added to lymphocyte macrophage cultures just prior to Con A stimulation. Neither the loss of viable alveolar macrophages nor a shift in antigen or mitogen dose response in virally infected cultures could account for the deficit in [3H]thymidine incorporation by lymphocytes. Despite the presence of lymphocyte-associated virus antigen detected by direct immunofluorescence, no increase in PIV-3 titre above baseline was seen from infected lymphocytes, irrespective of mitogen stimulation. Likewise, lymphocytes did not contribute to the extracellular virus pool in lymphocyte-macrophage cultures as the increases in viral titre above basal levels in supernatants were equal to levels released by macrophages alone. The expression of viral antigen on lymphocytes stimulated in the presence of PIV-3-infected BAM suggests a non-productive or abortive infection of lymphocytes mediated through contact with infected macrophages.

  20. Potential of surface-eroding poly(ethylene carbonate) for drug delivery to macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohr, Adam; Water, Jorrit J; Wang, Yingya; Arnfast, Lærke; Beck-Broichsitter, Moritz

    2016-09-25

    Films composed of poly(ethylene carbonate) (PEC), a biodegradable polymer, were compared with poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) films loaded with and without the tuberculosis drug rifampicin to study the characteristics and performance of PEC as a potential carrier for controlled drug delivery to macrophages. All drug-loaded PLGA and PEC films were amorphous indicating good miscibility of the drug in the polymers, even at high drug loading (up to 50wt.%). Polymer degradation studies showed that PLGA degraded slowly via bulk erosion while PEC degraded more rapidly and near-linearly via enzyme mediated surface erosion (by cholesterol esterase). Drug release studies performed with polymer films indicated a diffusion/erosion dependent delivery behavior for PLGA while an almost zero-order drug release profile was observed from PEC due to the controlled polymer degradation process. When exposed to polymer degradation products the murine macrophage cell line J774A.1 showed less susceptibility to PEC than to PLGA. However, when seeding the macrophages on PLGA and PEC films no relevant difference in cell proliferation/growth kinetics was observed. Overall, this study emphasizes that PEC is an attractive polymer for controlled drug release and could provide superior performance to PLGA for some drug delivery applications including the treatment of macrophage infections.

  1. Changes in Macrophage Gene Expression Associated with Leishmania (Viannia braziliensis Infection.

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    Clemencia Ovalle-Bracho

    Full Text Available Different Leishmania species cause distinct clinical manifestations of the infectious disease leishmaniasis. It is fundamentally important to understand the mechanisms governing the interaction between Leishmania and its host cell. Little is known about this interaction between Leishmania (Viannia braziliensis and human macrophages. In this study, we aimed to identify differential gene expression between non-infected and L. (V braziliensis-infected U937-derived macrophages. We deployed a whole human transcriptome microarray analysis using 72 hours post-infection samples and compared those samples with their non-infected counterparts. We found that 218 genes were differentially expressed between infected and non-infected macrophages. A total of 71.6% of these genes were down-regulated in the infected macrophages. Functional enrichment analyses identified the steroid and sterol/cholesterol biosynthetic processes between regulatory networks down-regulated in infected macrophages. RT-qPCR further confirmed this down-regulation in genes belonging to these pathways. These findings contrast with those from studies involving other Leishmania species at earlier infection stages, where gene up-regulation for this metabolic pathway has been reported. Sterol biosynthesis could be an important biological process associated with the expression profile of macrophages infected by L. (V. braziliensis. Differential transcriptional results suggest a negative regulation of the genetic regulatory network involved in cholesterol biosynthesis.

  2. Inhibitory effects of Zanthoxylum rhoifolium Lam. (Rutaceae) against the infection and infectivity of macrophages by Leishmania amazonensis

    OpenAIRE

    BERNARDO MELO NETO; JOSEANA M.S.R. LEITÃO; OLIVEIRA,LUCIANO G.C.; SANTOS,SÉRGIO E.M.; SABRINA M.P. CARNEIRO; Rodrigues, Klinger A. F.; Chaves, Mariana H.; DANIEL D.R. ARCANJO; CARVALHO,FERNANDO A.A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Zanthoxylum rhoifolium Lam. (Rutaceae) has been traditionally used in the treatment of microbial infections and parasitic diseases. In the present study, the antileishmanial effect induced by the ethanol extract of stem barks from Z. rhoifolium (ZR-EEtOH) and its n-hexane fraction (ZR-FHEX) on infection and infectivity of murine macrophages by promastigote forms of Leishmania amazonensis were investigated. In different set of experiments, macrophages or promastigotes were pretreated ...

  3. Extracellular vesicles from Leishmania-infected macrophages confer an anti-infection cytokine-production profile to naïve macrophages.

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    André Cronemberger-Andrade

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are structures with phospholipid bilayer membranes and 100-1000 nm diameters. These vesicles are released from cells upon activation of surface receptors and/or apoptosis. The production of EVs by dendritic cells, mast cells, macrophages, and B and T lymphocytes has been extensively reported in the literature. EVs may express MHC class II and other membrane surface molecules and carry antigens. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of EVs from Leishmania-infected macrophages as immune modulatory particles.In this work it was shown that BALB/c mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages, either infected in vitro with Leishmania amazonensis or left uninfected, release comparable amounts of 50-300 nm-diameter extracellular vesicles (EVs. The EVs were characterized by flow cytometry and electron microscopy. The incubation of naïve macrophages with these EVs for 48 hours led to a statistically significant increase in the production of the cytokines IL-12, IL-1β, and TNF-α.EVs derived from macrophages infected with L. amazonensis induce other macrophages, which in vivo could be bystander cells, to produce the proinflammatory cytokines IL-12, IL-1β and TNF-α. This could contribute both to modulate the immune system in favor of a Th1 immune response and to the elimination of the Leishmania, leading, therefore, to the control the infection.

  4. Low Dose BCG Infection as a Model for Macrophage Activation Maintaining Cell Viability

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    Leslie Chávez-Galán

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the current vaccine against tuberculosis, is ingested by macrophages promoting the development of effector functions including cell death and microbicidal mechanisms. Despite accumulating reports on M. tuberculosis, mechanisms of BCG/macrophage interaction remain relatively undefined. In vivo, few bacilli are sufficient to establish a mycobacterial infection; however, in vitro studies systematically use high mycobacterium doses. In this study, we analyze macrophage/BCG interactions and microenvironment upon infection with low BCG doses and propose an in vitro model to study cell activation without affecting viability. We show that RAW macrophages infected with BCG at MOI 1 activated higher and sustained levels of proinflammatory cytokines and transcription factors while MOI 0.1 was more efficient for early stimulation of IL-1β, MCP-1, and KC. Both BCG infection doses induced iNOS and NO in a dose-dependent manner and maintained nuclear and mitochondrial structures. Microenvironment generated by MOI 1 induced macrophage proliferation but not MOI 0.1 infection. In conclusion, BCG infection at low dose is an efficient in vitro model to study macrophage/BCG interactions that maintains macrophage viability and mitochondrial structures. This represents a novel model that can be applied to BCG research fields including mycobacterial infections, cancer immunotherapy, and prevention of autoimmunity and allergies.

  5. TNF-alpha, produced by feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV)-infected macrophages, upregulates expression of type II FIPV receptor feline aminopeptidase N in feline macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Tomomi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu; Toda, Ayako; Tanabe, Maki; Koyama, Hiroyuki

    2007-07-20

    The pathogenicity of feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) is known to depend on macrophage tropism, and this macrophage infection is enhanced by mediation via anti-S antibody (antibody-dependent enhancement, ADE). In this study, we found that TNF-alpha production was increased with viral replication in macrophages inoculated with a mixture of FIPV and anti-S antibody, and demonstrated that this culture supernatant had feline PBMC apoptosis-inducing activity. We also demonstrated that the expression level of the FIPV virus receptor, feline aminopeptidase N (fAPN), was increased in macrophages of FIP cats. For upregulation of TNF-alpha and fAPN in macrophages, viral replication in macrophages is necessary, and their expressions were increased by ADE of FIPV infection. It was demonstrated that a heat-resistant fAPN-inducing factor was present in the culture supernatant of FIPV-infected macrophages, and this factor was TNF-alpha: fAPN expression was upregulated in recombinant feline TNF-alpha-treated macrophages, and FIPV infectivity was increased in these macrophages. These findings suggested that FIPV replication in macrophages increases TNF-alpha production in macrophages, and the produced TNF-alpha acts and upregulates fAPN expression, increasing FIPV sensitivity.

  6. Porphyromonas gingivalis-mediated signaling through TLR4 mediates persistent HIV infection of primary macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosto, Luis M.; Hirnet, Juliane B.; Michaels, Daniel H.; Shaik-Dasthagirisaheb, Yazdani B.; Gibson, Frank C.; Viglianti, Gregory; Henderson, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal infections contribute to HIV-associated co-morbidities in the oral cavity and provide a model to interrogate the dysregulation of macrophage function, inflammatory disease progression, and HIV replication during co-infections. We investigated the effect of Porphyromonas gingivalis on the establishment of HIV infection in monocyte-derived macrophages. HIV replication in macrophages was significantly repressed in the presence of P. gingivalis. This diminished viral replication was due partly to a decrease in the expression of integrated HIV provirus. HIV repression depended upon signaling through TLR4 as knock-down of TLR4 with siRNA rescued HIV expression. Importantly, HIV expression was reactivated upon removal of P. gingivalis. Our observations suggest that exposure of macrophages to Gram-negative bacteria influence the establishment and maintenance of HIV persistence in macrophages through a TLR4-dependent mechanism. PMID:27639573

  7. MicroRNA-155 in exosomes secreted from helicobacter pylori infection macrophages immunomodulates inflammatory response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianjun; Deng, Zhiyong; Wang, Zeyou; Wu, Jianhong; Gu, Tao; Jiang, Yibiao; Li, Guangxin

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes containing microRNA-155 act as molecule carriers during immune cell-cell communication and play an important role in the inflammatory response of H. pylori infection macrophages. Previous reports have found that miR-155 was over-expressed in H. pylori infection macrophages, but the significance of which is still unknown. In this study, we analyzed the impact of miR-155 loaded in exosomes derived from macrophages to the inflammatory response of H. pylori infection macrophages and possible mechanisms. We found that miR-155 promoted the expression of inflammatory cytokines including TNF-a, IL-6, IL-23, but also increased the expression of CD40, CD63, CD81, and MCH-I. Meanwhile, inflammatory signal pathways proteins, such as MyD88, NF-κB in H. pylori infection macrophages were down-regulated due to the over-expression of miR-155. Experiments in vitro or in vivo revealed that miR-155 promoted macrophages to inhibit or kill H. pylori by regulating the inflammatory response of cells to prevent the gastritis caused by H. pylori infection. These findings contribute to the understanding of miR-155 contained in exosomes in inflammatory responses of H. pylori infection macrophages. PMID:27725852

  8. Viral infection of human lung macrophages increases PDL1 expression via IFNβ.

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    Karl J Staples

    Full Text Available Lung macrophages are an important defence against respiratory viral infection and recent work has demonstrated that influenza-induced macrophage PDL1 expression in the murine lung leads to rapid modulation of CD8+ T cell responses via the PD1 receptor. This PD1/PDL1 pathway may downregulate acute inflammatory responses to prevent tissue damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of PDL1 regulation by human macrophages in response to viral infection. Ex-vivo viral infection models using influenza and RSV were established in human lung explants, isolated lung macrophages and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM and analysed by flow cytometry and RT-PCR. Incubation of lung explants, lung macrophages and MDM with X31 resulted in mean cellular infection rates of 18%, 18% and 29% respectively. Viral infection significantly increased cell surface expression of PDL1 on explant macrophages, lung macrophages and MDM but not explant epithelial cells. Infected MDM induced IFNγ release from autologous CD8+ T cells, an effect enhanced by PDL1 blockade. We observed increases in PDL1 mRNA and IFNβ mRNA and protein release by MDM in response to influenza infection. Knockdown of IFNβ by siRNA, resulted in a 37.5% reduction in IFNβ gene expression in response to infection, and a significant decrease in PDL1 mRNA. Furthermore, when MDM were incubated with IFNβ, this cytokine caused increased expression of PDL1 mRNA. These data indicate that human macrophage PDL1 expression modulates CD8+ cell IFNγ release in response to virus and that this expression is regulated by autologous IFNβ production.

  9. In vitro interactions between bacteria, osteoblast-like cells and macrophages in the pathogenesis of biomaterial-associated infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbiahdoss, Guruprakash; Fernández, Isabel C Saldarriaga; Domingues, Joana F da Silva; Kuijer, Roel; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2011-01-01

    Biomaterial-associated infections constitute a major clinical problem that is difficult to treat and often necessitates implant replacement. Pathogens can be introduced on an implant surface during surgery and compete with host cells attempting to integrate the implant. The fate of a biomaterial implant depends on the outcome of this race for the surface. Here we studied the competition between different bacterial strains and human U2OS osteoblast-like cells (ATCC HTB-94) for a poly(methylmethacrylate) surface in the absence or presence of macrophages in vitro using a peri-operative contamination model. Bacteria were seeded on the surface at a shear rate of 11 1/s prior to adhesion of U2OS cells and macrophages. Next, bacteria, U2OS cells and macrophages were allowed to grow simultaneously under low shear conditions (0.14 1/s). The outcome of the competition between bacteria and U2OS cells for the surface critically depended on bacterial virulence. In absence of macrophages, highly virulent Staphylococcus aureus or Pseudomonas aeruginosa stimulated U2OS cell death within 18 h of simultaneous growth on a surface. Moreover, these strains also caused cell death despite phagocytosis of adhering bacteria in presence of murine macrophages. Thus U2OS cells are bound to loose the race for a biomaterial surface against S. aureus or P. aeruginosa, even in presence of macrophages. In contrast, low-virulent Staphylococcus epidermidis did not cause U2OS cell death even after 48 h, regardless of the absence or presence of macrophages. Clinically, S. aureus and P. aeruginosa are known to yield acute and severe biomaterial-associated infections in contrast to S. epidermidis, mostly known to cause more low-grade infection. Thus it can be concluded that the model described possesses features concurring with clinical observations and therewith has potential for further studies on the simultaneous competition for an implant surface between tissue cells and pathogenic bacteria in

  10. Functional activity of monocytes and macrophages in HTLV-1 infected subjects.

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    Camila F Amorim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Human T lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1 infects predominantly T cells, inducing proliferation and lymphocyte activation. Additionally, HTLV-1 infected subjects are more susceptible to other infections caused by other intracellular agents. Monocytes/macrophages are important cells in the defense against intracellular pathogens. Our aims were to determine the frequency of monocytes subsets, expression of co-stimulatory molecules in these cells and to evaluate microbicidal ability and cytokine and chemokine production by macrophages from HTLV-1 infected subjects. Participants were 23 HTLV-1 carriers (HC, 22 HAM/TSP patients and 22 healthy subjects (HS not infected with HTLV-1. The frequencies of monocyte subsets and expression of co-stimulatory molecules were determined by flow cytometry. Macrophages were infected with L. braziliensis or stimulated with LPS. Microbicidal activity of macrophages was determined by optic microscopy. Cytokines/chemokines from macrophage supernatants were measured by ELISA. HAM/TSP patients showed an increase frequency of intermediate monocytes, but expression of co-stimulatory molecules was similar between the groups. Macrophages from HTLV-1 infected individuals were infected with L. braziliensis at the same ratio than macrophages from HS, and all the groups had the same ability to kill Leishmania parasites. However, macrophages from HTLV-1 infected subjects produced more CXCL9 and CCL5, and less IL-10 than cells from HS. While there was no correlation between IFN-γ and cytokine/chemokine production by macrophages, there was a correlation between proviral load and TNF and CXCL10. These data showed a dissociation between the inflammatory response and microbicidal ability of macrophages from HTLV-1 infected subjects. While macrophages ability to kill an intracellular pathogen did not differ among HTLV-1 infected subjects, these cells secreted high amount of chemokines even in unstimulated cultures. Moreover the

  11. Monocyte / macrophage inflammatory response pathways to combat Francisella infection: possible therapeutic targets?

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    Devyn D Gillette

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis can bypass and suppress host immune responses, even to the point of manipulating immune cell phenotypes and intercellular inflammatory networks. Strengthening these responses such that immune cells more readily identify and destroy the bacteria is likely to become a viable (and perhaps necessary strategy for combating infections with Francisella, especially given the likelihood of antibiotic resistance in the foreseeable future. Monocytes and macrophages offer a niche wherein Francisella can invade and replicate, resulting in substantially higher bacterial load that can overcome the host. As such, understanding their responses to Francisella may uncover potential avenues of therapy that could promote a lowering of bacterial burden and clearance of infection. These response pathways include Toll-like Receptor 2 (TLR2, the caspase-1 inflammasome, Interferons, NADPH oxidase, Phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K and the Ras pathway. In this review we summarize the literature pertaining to the roles of these pathways during Francisella infection, with an emphasis on monocyte / macrophage responses. The therapeutic targeting of one or more such pathways may ultimately become a valuable tool for the treatment of tularemia, and several possibilities are discussed.

  12. SIV Encephalitis Lesions Are Composed of CD163+ Macrophages Present in the Central Nervous System during Early SIV Infection and SIV-Positive Macrophages Recruited Terminally with AIDS

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    Nowlin, Brian T.; Burdo, Tricia H.; Midkiff, Cecily C.; Salemi, Marco; Alvarez, Xavier; Williams, Kenneth C.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage recruitment to the central nervous system (CNS) during AIDS pathogenesis is poorly understood. We measured the accumulation of brain perivascular (CD163+) and inflammatory (MAC387+) macrophages in SIV-infected monkeys. Monocyte progenitors were 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labeled in bone marrow, and CNS macrophages were labeled serially with fluorescent dextrans injected into the cisterna magna. MAC387+ macrophages accumulated in the meninges and choroid plexus in early inflammation and in the perivascular space and SIV encephalitis (SIVE) lesions late. CD163+ macrophages accumulated in the perivascular space and SIVE lesions with late inflammation. Most of the BrdU+ cells were MAC387+; however, CD163+BrdU+ macrophages were present in the meninges and choroid plexus with AIDS. Most (81.6% ± 1.8%) of macrophages in SIVE lesions were present in the CNS before SIVE lesion formation. There was a 2.9-fold increase in SIVp28+ macrophages entering the CNS late compared with those entering early (P CD163+ macrophage recruitment to the CNS inversely correlated with time to death (P CD163 correlated with CD163+ macrophage recruitment (P = 0.02). Most perivascular macrophages that comprise SIVE lesions and multinucleated giant cells are present in the CNS early, before SIVE lesions are formed. Most SIV-infected macrophages traffic to the CNS terminally with AIDS. PMID:25963554

  13. SIV encephalitis lesions are composed of CD163(+) macrophages present in the central nervous system during early SIV infection and SIV-positive macrophages recruited terminally with AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowlin, Brian T; Burdo, Tricia H; Midkiff, Cecily C; Salemi, Marco; Alvarez, Xavier; Williams, Kenneth C

    2015-06-01

    Macrophage recruitment to the central nervous system (CNS) during AIDS pathogenesis is poorly understood. We measured the accumulation of brain perivascular (CD163(+)) and inflammatory (MAC387(+)) macrophages in SIV-infected monkeys. Monocyte progenitors were 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labeled in bone marrow, and CNS macrophages were labeled serially with fluorescent dextrans injected into the cisterna magna. MAC387(+) macrophages accumulated in the meninges and choroid plexus in early inflammation and in the perivascular space and SIV encephalitis (SIVE) lesions late. CD163(+) macrophages accumulated in the perivascular space and SIVE lesions with late inflammation. Most of the BrdU(+) cells were MAC387(+); however, CD163(+)BrdU(+) macrophages were present in the meninges and choroid plexus with AIDS. Most (81.6% ± 1.8%) of macrophages in SIVE lesions were present in the CNS before SIVE lesion formation. There was a 2.9-fold increase in SIVp28(+) macrophages entering the CNS late compared with those entering early (P CD163(+) macrophage recruitment to the CNS inversely correlated with time to death (P CD163 correlated with CD163(+) macrophage recruitment (P = 0.02). Most perivascular macrophages that comprise SIVE lesions and multinucleated giant cells are present in the CNS early, before SIVE lesions are formed. Most SIV-infected macrophages traffic to the CNS terminally with AIDS. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. From amoeba to macrophages: exploring the molecular mechanisms of Legionella pneumophila infection in both hosts.

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    Escoll, Pedro; Rolando, Monica; Gomez-Valero, Laura; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative bacterium and the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. It replicates within amoeba and infects accidentally human macrophages. Several similarities are seen in the L. pneumophila-infection cycle in both hosts, suggesting that the tools necessary for macrophage infection may have evolved during co-evolution of L. pneumophila and amoeba. The establishment of the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) within the host cytoplasm requires the remodeling of the LCV surface and the hijacking of vesicles and organelles. Then L. pneumophila replicates in a safe intracellular niche in amoeba and macrophages. In this review we will summarize the existing knowledge of the L. pneumophila infection cycle in both hosts at the molecular level and compare the factors involved within amoeba and macrophages. This knowledge will be discussed in the light of recent findings from the Acanthamoeba castellanii genome analyses suggesting the existence of a primitive immune-like system in amoeba.

  15. Alteration of human macrophages microRNA expression profile upon infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

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    Lucinda Furci

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: This study signifies the miRNA host response upon intracellular mycobacterial infection in macrophages, providing new aspects of regulation in host-pathogen interactions, at post-transcriptional levels.

  16. Neutrophil Migration into the Infected Uroepithelium Is Regulated by the Crosstalk between Resident and Helper Macrophages

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    Kristina Zec

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The antibacterial defense against infections depends on the cooperation between distinct phagocytes of the innate immune system, namely macrophages and neutrophils. However, the mechanisms driving this cooperation are incompletely understood. In this study we describe the crosstalk between Ly6C+ and Ly6C− macrophage-subtypes and neutrophils in the context of urinary tract infection (UTI with uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC. Ly6C− macrophages acted as tissue resident sentinels and attracted circulating phagocytes by chemokines. Ly6C+ macrophages produced tumor necrosis factor (TNF that licensed Ly6C− macrophages to release preformed CXCL2, which in turn caused matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-9 secretion by neutrophils to enable transepithelial migration.

  17. Listeria monocytogenes infection of HD11, chicken macrophage-like cells.

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    Jarvis, N A; Donaldson, J R; O'Bryan, C A; Ricke, S C; Crandall, P G

    2017-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes can be carried by and infect poultry, although the clinical disease in birds is rare. Escape from macrophage phagocytosis is a key step in pathogenesis for L. monocytogenes. Therefore, we investigated the infection of the chicken macrophage-like cell line HD11 with 2 strains of L. monocytogenes EGD-e and Scott A. After infection, L. monocytogenes was quantified by spread plating and HD11 was quantified with trypan blue exclusion stain before enumeration. The standard macrophage killing protocols require washing the cell monolayers 3 times with PBS, which was found to negatively influence HD11 monolayers. Maximum bacterial densities within macrophages were not different between the 2 Listeria strains. HD11 required more than 11 h to effectively reduce intracellular L. monocytogenes Scott A, and Scott A was more susceptible to HD11 killing than EGD-e. It appears that Listeria infection initially causes attenuation of HD11 growth, and infected HD11 cells do not begin to lyse until at least 11 h post infection. These results suggest that there are subtle strain to strain differences in response to HD11 macrophage phagocytosis. The long lead-time required for HD11 to kill L. monocytogenes cells means that there is sufficient time available for chicken macrophages to circulate in the blood and transfer the intracellular Listeria to multiple tissues. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  18. Transcriptional immunoresponse of tissue-specific macrophages in swine after infection with African swine fever virus

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    Kowalczyk Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages and cytokines are important in the control of inflammation and regulation of the immune response. However, they can also contribute to immunopathology in the host after viral infection and the regulatory network can be subverted by infectious agents, including viruses, some of which produce cytokine analogues or have mechanisms that inhibit cytokine function. African swine fever virus (ASFV encodes a number of proteins which modulate cytokine and chemokine induction, host transcription factor activation, stress responses, and apoptosis. The aim of this review is to elucidate the mechanisms of immune responses to ASFV in different subpopulations of porcine macrophages. A transcriptional immune response in different resident tissue macrophages following ASFV infection was presented in many publications. ASFV-susceptible porcine macrophages can be of several origins, such as peripheral blood, lungs, bone marrow, etc. blood monocytes, blood macrophages, and lung macrophages have demonstrated a modulation of phenotype. Monocyte-derived macrophages could express surface markers not found on their monocyte precursors. Moreover, they can undergo further differentiation after infection and during inflammation. When viruses infect such cells, immunological activity can be seriously impaired or modified.

  19. Inhibition of mouse peritoneal macrophage DNA synthesis by infection with the Arenavirus Pichinde. Interim report

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    Friedlander, A.M.; Jahrling, P.B.; Merrill, P.; Tobery, S.

    1983-01-19

    Macrophage DNA synthesis and proliferation occur during the development of cell-mediated immunity and in the early non-specific reaction to infection. Arenaviruses have a predilection for infection of cells of the reticuloendothelial system and in this study we have examined the effect of the arenavirus Pichinde on macrophage DNA synthesis. We have found that infection of mouse peritoneal macrophages with Pichinde caused a profound dose dependent inhibition of the DNA synthesis induced by macrophage growth factor/colony stimulating factor. At a multiplicity of inoculum of five there is a 75-95% inhibition of DNA synthesis. Viable virus is necessary for inhibition since Pichinde inactivated by heat or cobalt irradiation had no effect. Similarly, virus pre-treated with an antiserum to Pichinde was without inhibitory effect. Inhibition was demonstrated by measuring DNA synthesis spectrofluorometrically as well as by 3H-thymidine incorporation. The inhibition of DNA synthesis was not associated with any cytopathology. There was no evidence that the inhibition was due to soluble factors, such as prostaglandins or interferon, released by infected cells. These studies demonstrate, for the first time in vitro, a significant alteration in macrophage function caused by infection with an arenavirus. It is possible that inhibition of macrophage proliferation represents a mechanism by which some microorganisms interfere with host resistance.

  20. Tacaribe virus but not junin virus infection induces cytokine release from primary human monocytes and macrophages.

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    Allison Groseth

    Full Text Available The mechanisms underlying the development of disease during arenavirus infection are poorly understood. However, common to all hemorrhagic fever diseases is the involvement of macrophages as primary target cells, suggesting that the immune response in these cells may be of paramount importance during infection. Thus, in order to identify features of the immune response that contribute to arenavirus pathogenesis, we have examined the growth kinetics and cytokine profiles of two closely related New World arenaviruses, the apathogenic Tacaribe virus (TCRV and the hemorrhagic fever-causing Junin virus (JUNV, in primary human monocytes and macrophages. Both viruses grew robustly in VeroE6 cells; however, TCRV titres were decreased by approximately 10 fold compared to JUNV in both monocytes and macrophages. Infection of both monocytes and macrophages with TCRV also resulted in the release of high levels of IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α, while levels of IFN-α, IFN-β and IL-12 were not affected. However, we could show that the presence of these cytokines had no direct effect on growth of either TCRV of JUNV in macrophages. Further analysis also showed that while the production of IL-6 and IL-10 are dependent on viral replication, production of TNF-α also occurs after exposure to UV-inactivated TCRV particles and is thus independent of productive virus infection. Surprisingly, JUNV infection did not have an effect on any of the cytokines examined indicating that, in contrast to other viral hemorrhagic fever viruses, macrophage-derived cytokine production is unlikely to play an active role in contributing to the cytokine dysregulation observed in JUNV infected patients. Rather, these results suggest that an early, controlled immune response by infected macrophages may be critical for the successful control of infection of apathogenic viruses and prevention of subsequent disease, including systemic cytokine dysregulation.

  1. Integrated microRNA-mRNA-analysis of human monocyte derived macrophages upon Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis infection.

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    Jutta Sharbati

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many efforts have been made to understand basal mechanisms of mycobacterial infections. Macrophages are the first line of host immune defence to encounter and eradicate mycobacteria. Pathogenic species have evolved different mechanisms to evade host response, e.g. by influencing macrophage apoptotic pathways. However, the underlying molecular regulation is not fully understood. A new layer of eukaryotic regulation of gene expression is constituted by microRNAs. Therefore, we present a comprehensive study for identification of these key regulators and their targets in the context of host macrophage response to mycobacterial infections. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed microRNA as well as mRNA expression analysis of human monocyte derived macrophages infected with several Mycobacterium avium hominissuis strains by means of microarrays as well as quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR. The data revealed the ability of all strains to inhibit apoptosis by transcriptional regulation of BCL2 family members. Accordingly, at 48 h after infection macrophages infected with all M. avium strains showed significantly decreased caspase 3 and 7 activities compared to the controls. Expression of let-7e, miR-29a and miR-886-5p were increased in response to mycobacterial infection at 48 h. The integrated analysis of microRNA and mRNA expression as well as target prediction pointed out regulative networks identifying caspase 3 and 7 as potential targets of let-7e and miR-29a, respectively. Consecutive reporter assays verified the regulation of caspase 3 and 7 by these microRNAs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show for the first time that mycobacterial infection of human macrophages causes a specific microRNA response. We furthermore outlined a regulatory network of potential interactions between microRNAs and mRNAs. This study provides a theoretical concept for unveiling how distinct mycobacteria could manipulate host cell response

  2. Central neuroinvasion and demyelination by inflammatory macrophages after peripheral virus infection is controlled by SHP-1.

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    Christophi, George P; Massa, Paul T

    2009-12-01

    SHP-1 is a protein tyrosine phosphatase that negatively regulates cytokine signaling and inflammatory gene expression. Mice genetically lacking SHP-1 (me/me) display severe inflammatory demyelinating disease following intracranial inoculation with the BeAn strain of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) compared to infected wild-type mice. Furthermore, SHP-1-deficient mice show a profound and predominant infiltration of blood-derived macrophages into the CNS following intracerebral injection of TMEV, and these macrophages are concentrated in areas of demyelination in brain and spinal cord. In the present study we investigated the role of SHP-1 in controlling CNS inflammatory demyelination following a peripheral instead of an intracerebral inoculation of TMEV. Surprisingly, we found that while wild-type mice were entirely refractory to intraperitoneal (IP) infection by TMEV, in agreement with previous studies, all SHP-1-deficient mice displayed profound macrophage neuroinvasion and macrophage-mediated inflammatory demyelination. Moreover, SHP-1 deficiency led to increased expression of inflammatory molecules in macrophages, serum, and CNS following IP infection with TMEV. Importantly, pharmacological depletion of peripheral macrophages significantly decreased both paralysis and CNS viral loads in SHP-1-deficient mice. In addition, peripheral MCP-1 neutralization attenuated disease severity, decreased macrophage infiltration into the CNS, and decreased monocyte numbers in the blood of SHP-1-deficient mice, implicating MCP-1 as an important mediator of monocyte migration between multiple tissues. These results demonstrate that peripheral TMEV infection results in a unique evolution of macrophage-mediated demyelination in SHP-1-deficient mice, implicating SHP-1 in the control of neuroinvasion of inflammatory macrophages and neurotropic viruses into the CNS.

  3. Macrophages and lymphocytes differentially modulate the ability of RANTES to inhibit HIV-1 infection.

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    Gross, Eleanore; Amella, Carol A; Pompucci, Lorena; Franchin, Giovanni; Sherry, Barbara; Schmidtmayerova, Helena

    2003-11-01

    The beta-chemokines MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta, and RANTES inhibit HIV-1 infection of CD4+ T cells by inhibiting interactions between the virus and CCR5 receptors. However, while beta-chemokine-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 infection of primary lymphocytes is well documented, conflicting results have been obtained using primary macrophages as the virus target. Here, we show that the beta-chemokine RANTES inhibits virus entry into both cellular targets of the virus, lymphocytes and macrophages. However, while virus entry is inhibited at the moment of infection in both cell types, the amount of virus progeny is lowered only in lymphocytes. In macrophages, early-entry restriction is lost during long-term cultivation, and the amount of virus produced by RANTES-treated macrophages is similar to the untreated cultures, suggesting an enhanced virus replication. We further show that at least two distinct cellular responses to RANTES treatment in primary lymphocytes and macrophages contribute to this phenomenon. In lymphocytes, exposure to RANTES significantly increases the pool of inhibitory beta-chemokines through intracellular signals that result in increased production of MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta, thereby amplifying the antiviral effects of RANTES. In macrophages this amplification step does not occur. In fact, RANTES added to the macrophages is efficiently cleared from the culture, without inducing synthesis of beta-chemokines. Our results demonstrate dichotomous effects of RANTES on HIV-1 entry at the moment of infection, and on production and spread of virus progeny in primary macrophages. Since macrophages serve as a reservoir of HIV-1, this may contribute to the failure of endogenous chemokines to successfully eradicate the virus.

  4. Estradiol reduces susceptibility of CD4+ T cells and macrophages to HIV-infection.

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    Marta Rodriguez-Garcia

    Full Text Available The magnitude of the HIV epidemic in women requires urgent efforts to find effective preventive methods. Even though sex hormones have been described to influence HIV infection in epidemiological studies and regulate different immune responses that may affect HIV infection, the direct role that female sex hormones play in altering the susceptibility of target cells to HIV-infection is largely unknown. Here we evaluated the direct effect of 17-β-estradiol (E2 and ethinyl estradiol (EE in HIV-infection of CD4(+ T-cells and macrophages. Purified CD4(+ T-cells and monocyte-derived macrophages were generated in vitro from peripheral blood and infected with R5 and X4 viruses. Treatment of CD4(+ T-cells and macrophages with E2 prior to viral challenge reduced their susceptibility to HIV infection in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of E2 2 h after viral challenge however did not result in reduced infection. In contrast, EE reduced infection in macrophages to a lesser extent than E2 and had no effect on CD4(+ T-cell infection. Reduction of HIV-infection induced by E2 in CD4(+ T-cells was not due to CCR5 down-regulation, but was an entry-mediated mechanism since infection with VSV-G pseudotyped HIV was not modified by E2. In macrophages, despite the lack of an effect of E2 on CCR5 expression, E2-treatment reduced viral entry 2 h after challenge and increased MIP-1β secretion. These results demonstrate the direct effect of E2 on susceptibility of HIV-target cells to infection and indicate that inhibition of target cell infection involves cell-entry related mechanisms.

  5. Responses of murine and human macrophages to leptospiral infection: a study using comparative array analysis.

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    Feng Xue

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is a re-emerging tropical infectious disease caused by pathogenic Leptospira spp. The different host innate immune responses are partially related to the different severities of leptospirosis. In this study, we employed transcriptomics and cytokine arrays to comparatively calculate the responses of murine peritoneal macrophages (MPMs and human peripheral blood monocytes (HBMs to leptospiral infection. We uncovered a series of different expression profiles of these two immune cells. The percentages of regulated genes in several biological processes of MPMs, such as antigen processing and presentation, membrane potential regulation, and the innate immune response, etc., were much greater than those of HBMs (>2-fold. In MPMs and HBMs, the caspase-8 and Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD-like apoptosis regulator genes were significantly up-regulated, which supported previous results that the caspase-8 and caspase-3 pathways play an important role in macrophage apoptosis during leptospiral infection. In addition, the key component of the complement pathway, C3, was only up-regulated in MPMs. Furthermore, several cytokines, e.g. interleukin 10 (IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha, were differentially expressed at both mRNA and protein levels in MPMs and HBMs. Some of the differential expressions were proved to be pathogenic Leptospira-specific regulations at mRNA level or protein level. Though it is still unclear why some animals are resistant and others are susceptible to leptospiral infection, this comparative study based on transcriptomics and cytokine arrays partially uncovered the differences of murine resistance and human susceptibility to leptospirosis. Taken together, these findings will facilitate further molecular studies on the innate immune response to leptospiral infection.

  6. Chronic filarial infection provides protection against bacterial sepsis by functionally reprogramming macrophages.

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    Fabian Gondorf

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Helminths immunomodulate their hosts and induce a regulatory, anti-inflammatory milieu that prevents allergies and autoimmune diseases. Helminth immunomodulation may benefit sepsis outcome by preventing exacerbated inflammation and severe pathology, but the influence on bacterial clearance remains unclear. To address this, mice were chronically infected with the filarial nematode Litomosoides sigmodontis (L.s. and the outcome of acute systemic inflammation caused by i.p. Escherichia coli injection was determined. L.s. infection significantly improved E. coli-induced hypothermia, bacterial clearance and sepsis survival and correlated with reduced concentrations of associated pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines and a less pronounced pro-inflammatory macrophage gene expression profile. Improved sepsis outcome in L.s.-infected animals was mediated by macrophages, but independent of the alternatively activated macrophage subset. Endosymbiotic Wolbachia bacteria that are present in most human pathogenic filariae, as well as L.s., signal via TLR2 and modulate macrophage function. Here, gene expression profiles of peritoneal macrophages from L.s.-infected mice revealed a downregulation of genes involved in TLR signaling, and pulsing of macrophages in vitro with L.s. extract reduced LPS-triggered activation. Subsequent transfer improved sepsis outcome in naïve mice in a Wolbachia- and TLR2-dependent manner. In vivo, phagocytosis was increased in macrophages from L.s.-infected wild type, but not TLR2-deficient animals. In association, L.s. infection neither improved bacterial clearance in TLR2-deficient animals nor ameliorated E. coli-induced hypothermia and sepsis survival. These results indicate that chronic L.s. infection has a dual beneficial effect on bacterial sepsis, reducing pro-inflammatory immune responses and improving bacterial control. Thus, helminths and their antigens may not only improve the outcome of autoimmune and allergic diseases

  7. Immune reaction and survivability of salmonella typhimurium and salmonella infantis after infection of primary avian macrophages.

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    Braukmann, Maria; Methner, Ulrich; Berndt, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella serovars are differentially able to infect chickens. The underlying causes are not yet fully understood. Aim of the present study was to elucidate the importance of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 and 2 (SPI-1 and -2) for the virulence of two non-host-specific, but in-vivo differently invasive, Salmonella serovars in conjunction with the immune reaction of the host. Primary avian splenic macrophages were inoculated with Salmonella enterica sub-species enterica serovar (S.) Typhimurium and S. Infantis. The number and viability of intracellular bacteria and transcription of SPI-1 and -2 genes by the pathogens, as well as transcription of immune-related proteins, surface antigen expression and nitric oxide production by the macrophages, were compared at different times post inoculation. After infection, both of the Salmonella serovars were found inside the primary macrophages. Invasion-associated SPI-1 genes were significantly higher transcribed in S. Infantis- than S. Typhimurium-infected macrophages. The macrophages counteracted the S. Infantis and S. Typhimurium infection with elevated mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), interleukin (IL)-12, IL-18 and lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha factor (LITAF) as well as with an increased synthesis of nitric oxide. Despite these host cell attacks, S. Typhimurium was better able than S. Infantis to survive within the macrophages and transcribed higher rates of the SPI-2 genes spiC, ssaV, sifA, and sseA. The results showed similar immune reactions of primary macrophages after infection with both of the Salmonella strains. The more rapid and stronger transcription of SPI-2-related genes by intracellular S. Typhimurium compared to S. Infantis might be responsible for its better survival in avian primary macrophages.

  8. Immune reaction and survivability of salmonella typhimurium and salmonella infantis after infection of primary avian macrophages.

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    Maria Braukmann

    Full Text Available Salmonella serovars are differentially able to infect chickens. The underlying causes are not yet fully understood. Aim of the present study was to elucidate the importance of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 and 2 (SPI-1 and -2 for the virulence of two non-host-specific, but in-vivo differently invasive, Salmonella serovars in conjunction with the immune reaction of the host. Primary avian splenic macrophages were inoculated with Salmonella enterica sub-species enterica serovar (S. Typhimurium and S. Infantis. The number and viability of intracellular bacteria and transcription of SPI-1 and -2 genes by the pathogens, as well as transcription of immune-related proteins, surface antigen expression and nitric oxide production by the macrophages, were compared at different times post inoculation. After infection, both of the Salmonella serovars were found inside the primary macrophages. Invasion-associated SPI-1 genes were significantly higher transcribed in S. Infantis- than S. Typhimurium-infected macrophages. The macrophages counteracted the S. Infantis and S. Typhimurium infection with elevated mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, interleukin (IL-12, IL-18 and lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha factor (LITAF as well as with an increased synthesis of nitric oxide. Despite these host cell attacks, S. Typhimurium was better able than S. Infantis to survive within the macrophages and transcribed higher rates of the SPI-2 genes spiC, ssaV, sifA, and sseA. The results showed similar immune reactions of primary macrophages after infection with both of the Salmonella strains. The more rapid and stronger transcription of SPI-2-related genes by intracellular S. Typhimurium compared to S. Infantis might be responsible for its better survival in avian primary macrophages.

  9. Role of Macrophages in the Repair Process during the Tissue Migrating and Resident Helminth Infections

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    Faz-López, Berenice

    2016-01-01

    The Th1/Th2/Th17 balance is a fundamental feature in the regulation of the inflammatory microenvironment during helminth infections, and an imbalance in this paradigm greatly contributes to inflammatory disorders. In some cases of helminthiasis, an initial Th1 response could occur during the early phases of infection (acute), followed by a Th2 response that prevails in chronic infections. During the late phase of infection, alternatively activated macrophages (AAMs) are important to counteract the inflammation caused by the Th1/Th17 response and larval migration, limiting damage and repairing the tissue affected. Macrophages are the archetype of phagocytic cells, with the primary role of pathogen destruction and antigen presentation. Nevertheless, other subtypes of macrophages have been described with important roles in tissue repair and immune regulation. These types of macrophages challenge the classical view of macrophages activated by an inflammatory response. The role of these subtypes of macrophages during helminthiasis is a controversial topic in immunoparasitology. Here, we analyze some of the studies regarding the role of AAMs in tissue repair during the tissue migration of helminths. PMID:27648452

  10. TREM-2 promotes macrophage survival and lung disease after respiratory viral infection

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    Wu, Kangyun; Byers, Derek E.; Jin, Xiaohua; Agapov, Eugene; Alexander-Brett, Jennifer; Patel, Anand C.; Cella, Marina; Gilfilan, Susan; Colonna, Marco; Kober, Daniel L.; Brett, Tom J.

    2015-01-01

    Viral infections and type 2 immune responses are thought to be critical for the development of chronic respiratory disease, but the link between these events needs to be better defined. Here, we study a mouse model in which infection with a mouse parainfluenza virus known as Sendai virus (SeV) leads to long-term activation of innate immune cells that drive IL-13–dependent lung disease. We find that chronic postviral disease (signified by formation of excess airway mucus and accumulation of M2-differentiating lung macrophages) requires macrophage expression of triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-2 (TREM-2). Analysis of mechanism shows that viral replication increases lung macrophage levels of intracellular and cell surface TREM-2, and this action prevents macrophage apoptosis that would otherwise occur during the acute illness (5–12 d after inoculation). However, the largest increases in TREM-2 levels are found as the soluble form (sTREM-2) long after clearance of infection (49 d after inoculation). At this time, IL-13 and the adapter protein DAP12 promote TREM-2 cleavage to sTREM-2 that is unexpectedly active in preventing macrophage apoptosis. The results thereby define an unprecedented mechanism for a feed-forward expansion of lung macrophages (with IL-13 production and consequent M2 differentiation) that further explains how acute infection leads to chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:25897174

  11. Transcriptomic Analysis of Yersinia enterocolitica Biovar 1B Infecting Murine Macrophages Reveals New Mechanisms of Extracellular and Intracellular Survival.

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    Bent, Zachary W; Poorey, Kunal; Brazel, David M; LaBauve, Annette E; Sinha, Anupama; Curtis, Deanna J; House, Samantha E; Tew, Karen E; Hamblin, Rachelle Y; Williams, Kelly P; Branda, Steven S; Young, Glenn M; Meagher, Robert J

    2015-07-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is typically considered an extracellular pathogen; however, during the course of an infection, a significant number of bacteria are stably maintained within host cell vacuoles. Little is known about this population and the role it plays during an infection. To address this question and to elucidate the spatially and temporally dynamic gene expression patterns of Y. enterocolitica biovar 1B through the course of an in vitro infection, transcriptome sequencing and differential gene expression analysis of bacteria infecting murine macrophage cells were performed under four distinct conditions. Bacteria were first grown in a nutrient-rich medium at 26 °C to establish a baseline of gene expression that is unrelated to infection. The transcriptomes of these bacteria were then compared to bacteria grown in a conditioned cell culture medium at 37 °C to identify genes that were differentially expressed in response to the increased temperature and medium but not in response to host cells. Infections were then performed, and the transcriptomes of bacteria found on the extracellular surface and intracellular compartments were analyzed individually. The upregulated genes revealed potential roles for a variety of systems in promoting intracellular virulence, including the Ysa type III secretion system, the Yts2 type II secretion system, and the Tad pilus. It was further determined that mutants of each of these systems had decreased virulence while infecting macrophages. Overall, these results reveal the complete set of genes expressed by Y. enterocolitica in response to infection and provide the groundwork for future virulence studies.

  12. Macrophage pro-inflammatory response to Francisella novicida infection is regulated by SHIP.

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    Kishore V L Parsa

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis, a Gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen infecting principally macrophages and monocytes, is the etiological agent of tularemia. Macrophage responses to F. tularensis infection include the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL-12, which is critical for immunity against infection. Molecular mechanisms regulating production of these inflammatory mediators are poorly understood. Herein we report that the SH2 domain-containing inositol phosphatase (SHIP is phosphorylated upon infection of primary murine macrophages with the genetically related F. novicida, and negatively regulates F. novicida-induced cytokine production. Analyses of the molecular details revealed that in addition to activating the MAP kinases, F. novicida infection also activated the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt pathway in these cells. Interestingly, SHIP-deficient macrophages displayed enhanced Akt activation upon F. novicida infection, suggesting elevated PI3K-dependent activation pathways in absence of SHIP. Inhibition of PI3K/Akt resulted in suppression of F. novicida-induced cytokine production through the inhibition of NFkappaB. Consistently, macrophages lacking SHIP displayed enhanced NFkappaB-driven gene transcription, whereas overexpression of SHIP led to decreased NFkappaB activation. Thus, we propose that SHIP negatively regulates F. novicida-induced inflammatory cytokine response by antagonizing the PI3K/Akt pathway and suppressing NFkappaB-mediated gene transcription. A detailed analysis of phosphoinositide signaling may provide valuable clues for better understanding the pathogenesis of tularemia.

  13. Intracellular pathogens within alveolar macrophages in a patient with HIV infection: diagnostic challenge

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    Takashi Shinha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In HIV-infected individuals, macrophages, the key defense effector cells, manifest defective activity in their interactions with a wide variety of opportunistic pathogens, including fungi and protozoa. Understanding the morphological characteristics of intracellular opportunistic pathogens in addition to their pathogenesis is of critical importance to provide optimal therapy, thereby decreasing morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected patients. We herein present a case of disseminated histoplasmosis confused with disseminated visceral leishmaniasis in an HIV-infected individual from Guyana who developed intracellular organisms within alveolar macrophages

  14. Transcriptomic analysis of responses to infectious salmon anemia virus infection in macrophage-like cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aquatic orthomyxovirus infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) is an important pathogen for salmonid aquaculture, however little is known about protective and pathological host responses to infection. We have investigated intracellular responses during cytopathic ISAV infection in the macrophage-l...

  15. Macrophage activation associated with chronic murine cytomegalovirus infection results in more severe experimental choroidal neovascularization.

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    Scott W Cousins

    Full Text Available The neovascular (wet form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD leads to vision loss due to choroidal neovascularization (CNV. Since macrophages are important in CNV development, and cytomegalovirus (CMV-specific IgG serum titers in patients with wet AMD are elevated, we hypothesized that chronic CMV infection contributes to wet AMD, possibly by pro-angiogenic macrophage activation. This hypothesis was tested using an established mouse model of experimental CNV. At 6 days, 6 weeks, or 12 weeks after infection with murine CMV (MCMV, laser-induced CNV was performed, and CNV severity was determined 4 weeks later by analysis of choroidal flatmounts. Although all MCMV-infected mice exhibited more severe CNV when compared with control mice, the most severe CNV developed in mice with chronic infection, a time when MCMV-specific gene sequences could not be detected within choroidal tissues. Splenic macrophages collected from mice with chronic MCMV infection, however, expressed significantly greater levels of TNF-α, COX-2, MMP-9, and, most significantly, VEGF transcripts by quantitative RT-PCR assay when compared to splenic macrophages from control mice. Direct MCMV infection of monolayers of IC-21 mouse macrophages confirmed significant stimulation of VEGF mRNA and VEGF protein as determined by quantitative RT-PCR assay, ELISA, and immunostaining. Stimulation of VEGF production in vivo and in vitro was sensitive to the antiviral ganciclovir. These studies suggest that chronic CMV infection may serve as a heretofore unrecognized risk factor in the pathogenesis of wet AMD. One mechanism by which chronic CMV infection might promote increased CNV severity is via stimulation of macrophages to make pro-angiogenic factors (VEGF, an outcome that requires active virus replication.

  16. Vpr Promotes Macrophage-Dependent HIV-1 Infection of CD4+ T Lymphocytes.

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    David R Collins

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Vpr is a conserved primate lentiviral protein that promotes infection of T lymphocytes in vivo by an unknown mechanism. Here we demonstrate that Vpr and its cellular co-factor, DCAF1, are necessary for efficient cell-to-cell spread of HIV-1 from macrophages to CD4+ T lymphocytes when there is inadequate cell-free virus to support direct T lymphocyte infection. Remarkably, Vpr functioned to counteract a macrophage-specific intrinsic antiviral pathway that targeted Env-containing virions to LAMP1+ lysosomal compartments. This restriction of Env also impaired virological synapses formed through interactions between HIV-1 Env on infected macrophages and CD4 on T lymphocytes. Treatment of infected macrophages with exogenous interferon-alpha induced virion degradation and blocked synapse formation, overcoming the effects of Vpr. These results provide a mechanism that helps explain the in vivo requirement for Vpr and suggests that a macrophage-dependent stage of HIV-1 infection drives the evolutionary conservation of Vpr.

  17. Chronic Opisthorchis viverrini infection and associated hepatobiliary disease is associated with iron loaded M2-like macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bility, Moses T; Sripa, Banchob

    2014-12-01

    Chronic Opisthorchis viverrini-induced hepatobiliary disease is associated with significant leukocyte infiltration, including activated macrophages; however, the polarization of infiltrating macrophages remains to be fully characterized. In this study, we characterized macrophage polarization and phenotype in chronic O. viverrini-induced hepatobiliary disease in humans and hamsters using gene expression and histochemical analysis. Chronic O. viverrini infection and associated hepatobiliary diseases were associated with iron loaded M2-like macrophages in both humans and hamsters. This study provides suggestive evidence that iron loaded M2-like macrophages promote hepatobiliary disease in chronic O. viverrini infection.

  18. Macrophage and T-cell gene expression in a model of early infection with the protozoan Leishmania chagasi.

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    Nicholas A Ettinger

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Visceral leishmaniasis is a potentially fatal infectious disease caused by the protozoan parasite Leishmania infantum/chagasi in the New World, or by L. donovani or L. infantum/chagasi in the Old World. Infection leads to a variety of outcomes ranging from asymptomatic infection to active disease, characterized by fevers, cachexia, hepatosplenomegaly and suppressed immune responses. We reasoned that events occurring during the initial few hours when the parasite encounters cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems are likely to influence the eventual immune response that develops. Therefore, we performed gene expression analysis using Affymetrix U133Plus2 microarray chips to investigate a model of early infection with human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs challenged with wild-type L. chagasi parasites, with or without subsequent co-culture with Leishmania-naïve, autologous T-cells. Microarray data generated from total RNA were analyzed with software from the Bioconductor Project and functional clustering and pathway analysis were performed with DAVID and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA, respectively. Many transcripts were down-regulated by infection in cultures containing macrophages alone, and the pattern indicated a lack of a classically activated phenotype. By contrast, the addition of autologous Leishmania-naïve T cells to infected macrophages resulted in a pattern of gene expression including many markers of type 1 immune cytokine activation (IFN-gamma, IL-6, IL-1alpha, IL-1beta. There was simultaneous up-regulation of a few markers of immune modulation (IL-10 cytokine accumulation; TGF-beta Signaling Pathway. We suggest that the initial encounter between L. chagasi and cells of the innate and adaptive immune system stimulates primarily type 1 immune cytokine responses, despite a lack of classical macrophage activation. This local microenvironment at the site of parasite inoculation may determine the initial course of immune T

  19. Proteomic Investigation of the Time Course Responses of RAW 264.7 Macrophages to Infection with Salmonella enterica

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    Shi, Liang; Chowdhury, Saiful M.; Smallwood, Heather S.; Yoon, Hyunjin; Mottaz-Brewer, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; McDermott, Jason E.; Clauss, Therese RW; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2009-08-01

    Macrophages plan important roles in controlling Salmonella-mediated systemic infection. To investigate the responses of macrophages to Salmonella infection, we infected RAW 264.7 macrophages with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (STM) and then performed a comparative liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry [LC-MS(/MS)]-based proteomics analysis of the infected macrophages. A total of 1006 macrophage and 115 STM proteins were indentified from this study. Most of STM proteins were found at late stage of the time course of infection, consistent with the fact that STM proliferates inside RAW 264.7 macrophages. Majority of the identified macrophage proteins were house keeping-related, including cytoplasmic superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), whose peptide abundances were relatively constant during the time course of infection. Compared to those in no infection control, the peptide abundances of 244 macrophage proteins (or 24% of total indentified macrophage proteins) changed considerably after STM infection. The functions of these STM infection-affected macrophage proteins were diverse and ranged from production of antibacterial nitric oxide (i.e., inducible nitric oxide synthase or iNOS) or production of prostaglandin H2 (i.e., prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2, also know as cyclooxygenase-2 or COX-2) to regulation of intracellular traffic (e.g., sorting nexin or SNX 5, 6 and 9), demonstrating a global impact of STM infection on macrophage proteome. Western-blot analysis not only confirmed the LC-MS(/MS) results of SOD1, COX-2 and iNOS, but also revealed that the protein abundances of mitochondrial SOD2 increased after STM infection, indicating an infection-induced oxidative stress in mitochondria.

  20. Dynamics of lung macrophage activation in response to helminth infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most of our understanding of the development and phenotype of alternatively activated macrophages (AAM) has been obtained from studies investigating the response of bone marrow- and peritoneal-derived cells to IL-4 or IL-13 stimulation. Comparatively little is known about the development of the AAM...

  1. Brain Macrophages in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected, Antiretroviral-Suppressed Macaques: a Functional Latent Reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos, Claudia R; Abreu, Celina M; Queen, Suzanne E; Li, Ming; Price, Sarah; Shirk, Erin N; Engle, Elizabeth L; Forsyth, Ellen; Bullock, Brandon T; Mac Gabhann, Feilim; Wietgrefe, Stephen W; Haase, Ashley T; Zink, M Christine; Mankowski, Joseph L; Clements, Janice E; Gama, Lucio

    2017-08-15

    A human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection cure requires an understanding of the cellular and anatomical sites harboring virus that contribute to viral rebound upon treatment interruption. Despite antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) are reported in HIV-infected individuals on ART. Biomarkers for macrophage activation and neuronal damage in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of HIV-infected individuals demonstrate continued effects of HIV in brain and suggest that the central nervous system (CNS) may serve as a viral reservoir. Using a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/macaque model for HIV encephalitis and AIDS, we evaluated whether infected cells persist in brain despite ART. Eight SIV-infected pig-tailed macaques were virally suppressed with ART, and plasma and CSF viremia levels were analyzed longitudinally. To assess whether virus persisted in brain macrophages (BrMΦ) in these macaques, we used a macrophage quantitative viral outgrowth assay (MΦ-QVOA), PCR, and in situ hybridization (ISH) to measure the frequency of infected cells and the levels of viral RNA and DNA in brain. Viral RNA in brain tissue of suppressed macaques was undetectable, although viral DNA was detected in all animals. The MΦ-QVOA demonstrated that the majority of suppressed animals contained latently infected BrMΦ. We also showed that virus produced in the MΦ-QVOAs was replication competent, suggesting that latently infected BrMΦ are capable of reestablishing productive infection upon treatment interruption. This report provides the first confirmation of the presence of replication-competent SIV in BrMΦ of ART-suppressed macaques and suggests that the highly debated issue of viral latency in macrophages, at least in brain, has been addressed in SIV-infected macaques treated with ART.IMPORTANCE Resting CD4(+) T cells are currently the only cells that fit the definition of a latent reservoir. However, recent evidence suggests that HIV/SIV-infected

  2. Comparative Evaluation of Permissiveness to Dengue Virus Serotype 2 Infection in Primary Rodent Macrophages

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    Jeanette Prada-Arismendy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection with dengue virus presents a broad clinical spectrum, which can range from asymptomatic cases to severe cases that are characterised by haemorrhagic syndrome and/or shock. The reason for such variability remains unknown. This work evaluated the in vitro permissiveness of mouse, rat, hamster and guinea pig macrophages to infection by dengue virus 2 (DENV2. The results established that macrophages derived from the BALB/c mouse strain showed higher permissiveness to DENV2 infection than macrophages from other rodent species, although all rodent species studied had the C820T mutation in the oligoadenylate synthetase 1b gene, indicating no relationship to the different in vitro susceptibilities of mouse cells at this locus. Other molecular mechanisms related to flavivirus susceptibility remain to be explored.

  3. Listeria monocytogenes infection in macrophages induces vacuolar-dependent host miRNA response.

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    Anna K D Schnitger

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a gram-positive facultative intracellular pathogen, causing serious illness in immunocompromised individuals and pregnant women. Upon detection by macrophages, which are key players of the innate immune response against infection, L. monocytogenes induces specific host cell responses which need to be tightly controlled at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Here, we ask whether and how host miRNAs, which represent an important mechanism of post-transcriptional regulation in a wide array of biological processes, are altered by a model pathogen upon live infection of murine bone marrow derived macrophages. We first report that L. monocytogenes subverts the host genome-wide miRNA profile of macrophages in vitro. Specifically, we show that miR-155, miR-146a, miR-125a-3p/5p and miR-149 were amongst the most significantly regulated miRNAs in infected macrophages. Strikingly, these miRNAs were highly upregulated upon infection with the Listeriolysin-deficient L. monocytogenes mutant Δhly, that cannot escape from the phagosome thus representing a vacuolar-contained infection. The vacuolar miRNA response was significantly reduced in macrophages deficient for MyD88. In addition, miR-146a and miR-125a-3p/5p were regulated at transcriptional levels upon infection, and miR-125a-3p/5p were found to be TLR2 responsive. Furthermore, miR-155 transactivation in infection was regulated by NF-κB p65, while miR-146a and miR-125a-3p/5p expression was unaffected in p65-deficient primary macrophages upon L. monocytogenes infection. Our results demonstrate that L. monocytogenes promotes significant changes in the miRNA expression profile in macrophages, and reveal a vacuolar-dependent miRNA signature, listeriolysin-independent and MyD88-dependent. These miRNAs are predicted to target immune genes and are therefore most likely involved in regulation of the macrophage innate immune response against infection at post

  4. Antiviral activity of derivatized dextrans on HIV-1 infection of primary macrophages and blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddiki, N; Mbemba, E; Letourneur, D; Ylisastigui, L; Benjouad, A; Saffar, L; Gluckman, J C; Jozefonvicz, J; Gattegno, L

    1997-11-28

    The present study demonstrates at the molecular level that dextran derivatives carboxymethyl dextran benzylamine (CMDB) and carboxymethyl dextran benzylamine sulfonate (CMDBS), characterized by a statistical distribution of anionic carboxylic groups, hydrophobic benzylamide units, and/or sulfonate moieties, interact with HIV-1 LAI gp120 and V3 consensus clades B domain. Only limited interaction was observed with carboxy-methyl dextran (CMD) or dextran (D) under the same conditions. CMDBS and CMDB (1 microM) strongly inhibited HIV-1 infection of primary macrophages and primary CD4+ lymphocytes by macrophage-tropic and T lymphocyte-tropic strains, respectively, while D or CMD had more limited effects on M-tropic infection of primary macrophages and exert no inhibitory effect on M- or T-tropic infection of primary lymphocytes. CMDBS and CMDB (1 microM) had limited but significant effect on oligomerized soluble recombinant gp120 binding to primary macrophages while they clearly inhibit (> 50%) such binding to primary lymphocytes. In conclusion, the inhibitory effect of CMDB and the CMDBS, is observed for HIV M- and T-tropic strain infections of primary lymphocytes and macrophages which indicates that these compounds interfere with steps of HIV replicative cycle which neither depend on the virus nor on the cell.

  5. Microglia activation by SIV-infected macrophages: alterations in morphology and cytokine secretion

    OpenAIRE

    Renner, Nicole A.; Sansing, Hope A.; Morici, Lisa A.; Inglis, Fiona M.; Lackner, Andrew A.; Andrew G. MacLean

    2012-01-01

    HIV infection in brain and the resultant encephalitis affects approximately one-third of individuals infected with HIV, regardless of treatment with antiretroviral drugs. Microglia are the resident phagocytic cell type in the brain, serving as a “first responder” to neuroinvasion by pathogens. The early events of the microglial response to productively-infected monocyte/macrophages entering the brain can best be investigated using in vitro techniques. We hypothesized that activation of microg...

  6. Tissue-resident macrophages can contain replication-competent virus in antiretroviral-naive, SIV-infected Asian macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiNapoli, Sarah R.; Ortiz, Alexandra M.; Wu, Fan; Matsuda, Kenta; Hirsch, Vanessa M.; Knox, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    SIV DNA can be detected in lymphoid tissue–resident macrophages of chronically SIV-infected Asian macaques. These macrophages also contain evidence of recently phagocytosed SIV-infected CD4+ T cells. Here, we examine whether these macrophages contain replication-competent virus, whether viral DNA can be detected in tissue-resident macrophages from antiretroviral (ARV) therapy–treated animals and humans, and how the viral sequences amplified from macrophages and contemporaneous CD4+ T cells compare. In ARV-naive animals, we find that lymphoid tissue–resident macrophages contain replication-competent virus if they also contain viral DNA in ARV-naive Asian macaques. The genetic sequence of the virus within these macrophages is similar to those within CD4+ T cells from the same anatomic sites. In ARV-treated animals, we find that viral DNA can be amplified from lymphoid tissue–resident macrophages of SIV-infected Asian macaques that were treated with ARVs for at least 5 months, but we could not detect replication-competent virus from macrophages of animals treated with ARVs. Finally, we could not detect viral DNA in alveolar macrophages from HIV-infected individuals who received ARVs for 3 years and had undetectable viral loads. These data demonstrate that macrophages can contain replication-competent virus, but may not represent a significant reservoir for HIV in vivo.

  7. Cytotoxic mechanism of cytolethal distending toxin in nontyphoidal Salmonella serovar (Salmonella Javiana) during macrophage infection.

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    Williams, Katherine; Gokulan, Kuppan; Shelman, Diamond; Akiyama, Tatsuya; Khan, Ashraf; Khare, Sangeeta

    2015-02-01

    Cytolethal distending toxin B (cdtB) is a conserved virulence factor in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. Here we report the presence and functionality of cdtB in some nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars, including Salmonella Javiana (cdtB+wt S. Javiana), isolated from imported food. To understand the role of cdtB in NTS serovars, a deletion mutant (cdtB(-)ΔS. Javiana) was constructed. Macrophages were infected with cdtB+wt S. Javiana (wild type), cdtB(-)Δ S. Javiana (mutant), and cdtB-negative NTS serovar (S. Typhimurium). Cytotoxic activity and transcription level of genes involved in cell death (apoptosis, autophagy, and necrosis) were assessed in infected macrophages. The cdtB+wt S. Javiana caused cellular distension as well as high degree of vacuolization and presence of the autophagosome marker LC3 in infected macrophages as compared with cdtB(-)ΔS. Javiana. The mRNA expression of genes involved in the induction of autophagy in response to toxin (Esr1 and Pik3C3) and coregulators of autophagy and apoptosis (Bax and Cyld) were significantly upregulated in cdtB(+)wt S. Javiana-infected macrophages. As autophagy destroys internalized pathogens in addition to the infected cell, it may reduce the spread of infection.

  8. Trypanosoma cruzi Needs a Signal Provided by Reactive Oxygen Species to Infect Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goes, Grazielle R.; Rocha, Peter S.; Diniz, Aline R. S.; Aguiar, Pedro H. N.; Machado, Carlos R.; Vieira, Leda Q.

    2016-01-01

    Background During Trypanosoma cruzi infection, macrophages produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a process called respiratory burst. Several works have aimed to elucidate the role of ROS during T. cruzi infection and the results obtained are sometimes contradictory. T. cruzi has a highly efficiently regulated antioxidant machinery to deal with the oxidative burst, but the parasite macromolecules, particularly DNA, may still suffer oxidative damage. Guanine (G) is the most vulnerable base and its oxidation results in formation of 8-oxoG, a cellular marker of oxidative stress. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to investigate the contribution of ROS in T. cruzi survival and infection, we utilized mice deficient in the gp91phox (Phox KO) subunit of NADPH oxidase and parasites that overexpress the enzyme EcMutT (from Escherichia coli) or TcMTH (from T. cruzi), which is responsible for removing 8-oxo-dGTP from the nucleotide pool. The modified parasites presented enhanced replication inside murine inflammatory macrophages from C57BL/6 WT mice when compared with control parasites. Interestingly, when Phox KO macrophages were infected with these parasites, we observed a decreased number of all parasites when compared with macrophages from C57BL/6 WT. Scavengers for ROS also decreased parasite growth in WT macrophages. In addition, treatment of macrophages or parasites with hydrogen peroxide increased parasite replication in Phox KO mice and in vivo. Conclusions Our results indicate a paradoxical role for ROS since modified parasites multiply better inside macrophages, but proliferation is significantly reduced when ROS is removed from the host cell. Our findings suggest that ROS can work like a signaling molecule, contributing to T. cruzi growth inside the cells. PMID:27035573

  9. Global Dynamics of HIV Infection of CD4+ T Cells and Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    A. M. Elaiw; A. S. Alsheri

    2013-01-01

    We study the global dynamics of an HIV infection model describing the interaction of the HIV with CD4+ T cells and macrophages. The incidence rate of virus infection and the growth rate of the uninfected CD4+ T cells and macrophages are given by general functions. We have incorporated two types of distributed delays into the model to account for the time delay between the time the uninfected cells are contacted by the virus particle and the time for the emission of infectious (matures) virus ...

  10. Moxibustion Activates Macrophage Autophagy and Protects Experimental Mice against Bacterial Infection

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    Xiaojuan Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Moxibustion is one of main therapies in traditional Chinese medicine and uses heat stimulation on the body surface from the burning of moxa to release pain or treat diseases. Emerging studies have shown that moxibustion can generate therapeutic effects by activating a series of signaling pathways and neuroendocrine-immune activities. Here we show moxibustion promoted profound macrophage autophagy in experimental Kunming mice, with reduced Akt phosphorylation and activated eIF2α phosphorylation. Consequently, moxibustion promoted bacterial clearance by macrophages and protected mice from mortality due to bacterial infection. These results indicate that moxibustion generates a protective response by activating autophagy against bacterial infections.

  11. Human macrophages infected with a high burden of ESAT-6-expressing M. tuberculosis undergo caspase-1- and cathepsin B-independent necrosis.

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    Amanda Welin

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb infects lung macrophages, which instead of killing the pathogen can be manipulated by the bacilli, creating an environment suitable for intracellular replication and spread to adjacent cells. The role of host cell death during Mtb infection is debated because the bacilli have been shown to be both anti-apoptotic, keeping the host cell alive to avoid the antimicrobial effects of apoptosis, and pro-necrotic, killing the host macrophage to allow infection of neighboring cells. Since mycobacteria activate the NLRP3 inflammasome in macrophages, we investigated whether Mtb could induce one of the recently described inflammasome-linked cell death modes pyroptosis and pyronecrosis. These are mediated through caspase-1 and cathepsin-B, respectively. Human monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with virulent (H37Rv Mtb at a multiplicity of infection (MOI of 1 or 10. The higher MOI resulted in strongly enhanced release of IL-1β, while a low MOI gave no IL-1β response. The infected macrophages were collected and cell viability in terms of the integrity of DNA, mitochondria and the plasma membrane was determined. We found that infection with H37Rv at MOI 10, but not MOI 1, over two days led to extensive DNA fragmentation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, loss of plasma membrane integrity, and HMGB1 release. Although we observed plasma membrane permeabilization and IL-1β release from infected cells, the cell death induced by Mtb was not dependent on caspase-1 or cathepsin B. It was, however, dependent on mycobacterial expression of ESAT-6. We conclude that as virulent Mtb reaches a threshold number of bacilli inside the human macrophage, ESAT-6-dependent necrosis occurs, activating caspase-1 in the process.

  12. Autophagy in Macrophages: Impacting Inflammation and Bacterial Infection

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    Ali Vural

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are on the front line of host defense. They possess an array of germline-encoded pattern recognition receptors/sensors (PRRs that recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and which activate downstream effectors/pathways to help mediate innate immune responses and host defense. Innate immune responses include the rapid induction of transcriptional networks that trigger the production of cytokines, chemokines, and cytotoxic molecules; the mobilization of cells including neutrophils and other leukocytes; the engulfment of pathogens by phagocytosis and their delivery to lysosome for degradation; and the induction of autophagy. Autophagy is a catabolic process that normally maintains cellular homeostasis in a lysosome-dependent manner, but it also functions as a cytoprotective response that intersects with a variety of general stress-response pathways. This review focuses on the intimately linked molecular mechanisms that help govern the autophagic pathway and macrophage innate immune responses.

  13. HIV infection of macrophages is enhanced in the presence of increased expression of CD163 induced by substance P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuluc, Florin; Meshki, John; Spitsin, Sergei; Douglas, Steven D

    2014-07-01

    Activation of NK1R by SP contributes to increased HIV-1 infection in macrophages. The scavenger receptor CD163 is expressed on cells of monocyte-macrophage origin. Our main goal was to determine if there is interplay among SP, CD163 expression, and HIV infection in macrophages. We showed that SP triggers intracellular calcium elevation and increased CD163 expression in human monocytes in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The role of CD163 on HIV infection was examined by RT-PCR in sorted monocytes (CD163(low) and CD163(high)) and in macrophages having CD163 knocked down using siRNA. We found that the productivity of HIV infection was higher in CD163(high) cells. Additionally, in macrophages with CD163 expression knocked down, we found a significant decrease of HIV infection. Furthermore, Hb-Hp complexes, which function as an endogenous ligand for CD163, decreased HIV infection in macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, we demonstrate that SP induces higher levels of CD163 in monocytes and that high expression of CD163 is associated with increases HIV infection in macrophages. Thus, in addition to being a prognostic marker of HIV infection, the expression of CD163 on macrophages may be critical in HIV immunopathogenesis. © 2014 Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  14. Inhibition of ecto-ATPase activities impairs HIV-1 infection of macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachter, Julieta; Delgado, Kelly Valcárcel; Barreto-de-Souza, Victor; Bou-Habib, Dumith Chequer; Persechini, Pedro Muanis; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2015-05-01

    Nucleotides and nucleosides are secreted into extracellular media at different concentrations as a consequence of different physiologic and pathological conditions. Ecto-nucleotidases, enzymes present on the surface of most cells, hydrolyze these extracellular nucleotides and reduce the concentration of them, thus affecting the activation of different nucleotide and nucleoside receptors. Also, ecto-nucleotidases are present in a number of microorganisms and play important roles in host-pathogen interactions. Here, we characterized the ecto-ATPase activities present on the surface of HIV-1 particle and human macrophages as well. We found that the kinetic properties of HIV-1 and macrophage ecto-ATPases are similar, suggesting that the enzyme is the same. This ecto-ATPase activity was increased in macrophages infected in vitro with HIV-1. Using three different non-related ecto-ATPase inhibitors-POM-1, ARL67156 and BG0-we showed that the inhibition of these macrophage and viral ecto-ATPase activities impairs HIV-1 infection. In addition, we also found that elevated extracellular concentrations of ATP inhibit HIV-1 production by infected macrophages. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. IL-17A promotes intracellular growth of Mycobacterium by inhibiting apoptosis of infected macrophages

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    Andrea eCruz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The fate of infected macrophages is a critical aspect of immunity to mycobacteria. By depriving the pathogen of its intracellular niche, apoptotic death of the infected macrophage has been shown to be an important mechanism to control bacterial growth. Here we show that IL-17 inhibits apoptosis of Mycobacterium bovis BCG- or M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages thus hampering their ability to control bacterial growth. Mechanistically, we show that IL-17 inhibits p53, and impacts on the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, by increasing the Bcl2 and decreasing Bax expression, decreasing cytochrome c release from the mitochondria, and inhibiting caspase-3 activation. The same effect of IL-17 was observed in infected macrophages upon blockade of p53 nuclear translocation. These results reveal a previously unappreciated role for the IL-17/p53 axis in the regulation of mycobacteria-induced apoptosis and can have important implications in a broad spectrum of diseases where apoptosis of the infected cell is an important host defense mechanism. .

  16. Macrophages are required for dendritic cell uptake of respiratory syncytial virus from an infected epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugonna, Kelechi; Bingle, Colin D; Plant, Karen; Wilson, Kirsty; Everard, Mark L

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that the respiratory syncytial virus [RSV] can productively infect monocyte derived dendritic cells [MoDC] and remain dormant within the same cells for prolonged periods. It is therefore possible that infected dendritic cells act as a reservoir within the airways of individuals between annual epidemics. In the present study we explored the possibility that sub-epithelial DCs can be infected with RSV from differentiated bronchial epithelium and that in turn RSV from DCs can infect the epithelium. A dual co-culture model was established in which a differentiated primary airway epithelium on an Air Liquid Interface (ALI) was cultured on a transwell insert and MoDCs were subsequently added to the basolateral membrane of the insert. Further experiments were undertaken using a triple co-culture model in which in which macrophages were added to the apical surface of the differentiated epithelium. A modified RSV [rr-RSV] expressing a red fluorescent protein marker of replication was used to infect either the MoDCs or the differentiated epithelium and infection of the reciprocal cell type was assessed using confocal microscopy. Our data shows that primary epithelium became infected when rr-RSV infected MoDCs were introduced onto the basal surface of the transwell insert. MoDCs located beneath the epithelium did not become infected with virus from infected epithelial cells in the dual co-culture model. However when macrophages were present on the apical surface of the primary epithelium infection of the basal MoDCs occurred. Our data suggests that RSV infected dendritic cells readily transmit infection to epithelial cells even when they are located beneath the basal layer. However macrophages appear to be necessary for the transmission of infection from epithelial cells to basal dendritic cells.

  17. Microvesicles secreted by macrophages shuttle invasion-potentiating microRNAs into breast cancer cells

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    Lin Ling

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs are alternatively activated cells induced by interleukin-4 (IL-4-releasing CD4+ T cells. TAMs promote breast cancer invasion and metastasis; however, the mechanisms underlying these interactions between macrophages and tumor cells that lead to cancer metastasis remain elusive. Previous studies have found microRNAs (miRNAs circulating in the peripheral blood and have identified microvesicles, or exosomes, as mediators of cell-cell communication. Therefore, one alternative mechanism for the promotion of breast cancer cell invasion by TAMs may be through macrophage-secreted exosomes, which would deliver invasion-potentiating miRNAs to breast cancer cells. Results We utilized a co-culture system with IL-4-activated macrophages and breast cancer cells to verify that miRNAs are transported from macrophages to breast cancer cells. The shuttling of fluorescently-labeled exogenous miRNAs from IL-4-activated macrophages to co-cultivated breast cancer cells without direct cell-cell contact was observed. miR-223, a miRNA specific for IL-4-activated macrophages, was detected within the exosomes released by macrophages and was significantly elevated in the co-cultivated SKBR3 and MDA-MB-231 cells. The invasiveness of the co-cultivated breast cancer cells decreased when the IL-4-activated macrophages were treated with a miR-223 antisense oligonucleotide (ASO that would inhibit miR-223 expression. Furthermore, results from a functional assay revealed that miR-223 promoted the invasion of breast cancer cells via the Mef2c-β-catenin pathway. Conclusions We conclude that macrophages regulate the invasiveness of breast cancer cells through exosome-mediated delivery of oncogenic miRNAs. Our data provide insight into the mechanisms underlying the metastasis-promoting interactions between macrophages and breast cancer cells.

  18. Identification of Francisella novicida mutants that fail to induce prostaglandin E2 synthesis by infected macrophages.

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    Matthew Dale Woolard

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of tularemia. We have previously shown that infection with F. tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS induces macrophages to synthesize prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. Synthesis of PGE2 by F. tularensis infected macrophages results in decreased T cell proliferation in vitro and increased bacterial survival in vivo. Although we understand some of the biological consequences of F. tularensis induced PGE2 synthesis by macrophages, we do not understand the cellular pathways (neither host nor bacterial that result in up-regulation of the PGE2 biosynthetic pathway in F. tularensis infected macrophages. We took a genetic approach to begin to understand the molecular mechanisms of bacterial induction of PGE2 synthesis from infected macrophages. To identify F. tularensis genes necessary for the induction of PGE2 in primary macrophages, we infected cells with individual mutants from the closely related strain Francisella tularensis subspecies novicida U112 (U112 two allele mutant library. Twenty genes were identified that when disrupted resulted in U112 mutant strains unable to induce the synthesis of PGE2 by infected macrophages. Fourteen of the genes identified are located within the Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI. Genes in the FPI are required for F. tularensis to escape from the phagosome and replicate in the cytosol, which might account for the failure of U112 with transposon insertions within the FPI to induce PGE2. This implies that U112 mutant strains that do not grow intracellularly would also not induce PGE2. We found that U112 clpB::Tn grows within macrophages yet fails to induce PGE2, while U112 pdpA::Tn does not grow yet does induce PGE2. We also found that U112 iglC::Tn neither grows nor induces PGE2. These findings indicate that there is dissociation between intracellular growth and the ability of F. tularensis to induce PGE2 synthesis. These mutants provide a critical entrée into the pathways used

  19. M2 macrophages or IL-33 treatment attenuate ongoing Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeros, A. R.; Campos, L. W.; Fonseca, D. M.; Bertolini, T. B.; Gembre, A. F.; Prado, R. Q.; Alves-Filho, J. C.; Ramos, S. G.; Russo, M.; Bonato, V. L. D.

    2017-01-01

    The protective effects of mycobacterial infections on lung allergy are well documented. However, the inverse relationship between tuberculosis and type 2 immunity is still elusive. Although type 1 immunity is essential to protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis it might be also detrimental to the host due to the induction of extensive tissue damage. Here, we determined whether lung type 2 immunity induced by allergen sensitization and challenge could affect the outcome of M. tuberculosis infection. We used two different protocols in which sensitization and allergen challenge were performed before or after M. tuberculosis infection. We found an increased resistance to M. tuberculosis only when allergen exposure was given after, but not before infection. Infected mice exposed to allergen exhibited lower bacterial load and cellular infiltrates in the lungs. Enhanced resistance to infection after allergen challenge was associated with increased gene expression of alternatively activated macrophages (M2 macrophages) and IL-33 levels. Accordingly, either adoptive transfer of M2 macrophages or systemic IL-33 treatment was effective in attenuating M. tuberculosis infection. Notably, the enhanced resistance induced by allergen exposure was dependent on IL-33 receptor ST2. Our work indicates that IL-33 might be an alternative therapeutic treatment for severe tuberculosis. PMID:28128217

  20. Cell-to-cell spread and massive vacuole formation after Cryptococcus neoformans infection of murine macrophages

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    Casadevall Arturo

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interaction between macrophages and Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn is critical for containing dissemination of this pathogenic yeast. However, Cn can either lyse macrophages or escape from within them through a process known as phagosomal extrusion. Both events result in live extracellular yeasts capable of reproducing and disseminating in the extracellular milieu. Another method of exiting the intracellular confines of cells is through host cell-to-cell transfer of the pathogen, and this commonly occurs with the human immuno-deficiency virus (HIV and CD4+ T cells and macrophages. In this report we have used time-lapse imaging to determine if this occurs with Cn. Results Live imaging of Cryptococcus neoformans interactions with murine macrophages revealed cell-to-cell spread of yeast cells from infected donor cells to uninfected cells. Although this phenomenon was relatively rare its occurrence documents a new capacity for this pathogen to infect adjacent cells without exiting the intracellular space. Cell-to-cell spread appeared to be an actin-dependent process. In addition, we noted that cryptococcal phagosomal extrusion was followed by the formation of massive vacuoles suggesting that intracellular residence is accompanied by long lasting damage to host cells. Conclusion C. neoformans can escape the intracellular confines of macrophages in an actin dependent manner by cell-to-cell transfer of the yeast leading to infection of adjacent cells. In addition, complete extrusion of internalized Cn cells can lead to the formation of a massive vacuole which may be a sign of damage to the host macrophage. These observations document new outcomes for the interaction of C. neoformans with host cells that provide precedents for cell biological effects that may contribute to the pathogenesis of cryptococcal infections.

  1. Identification of porcine alveolar macrophage glycoproteins involved in infection of porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissink, E.H.J.; Wijk, van H.A.R.; Pol, J.M.A.; Godeke, G.J.; Rijn, van P.A.; Rottier, P.J.M.; Meulenberg, J.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the receptor(s) for PRRSV on porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) by producing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against these cells. Hybridoma supernatants were selected for their ability to block PRRSV infection. Four MAbs, 1-8D2, 9.4C7, 9.9F2, and 3-3H2 inhibited i

  2. Suppression of Mcl-1 induces apoptosis in mouse peritoneal macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei-Yu; Wang, Xin-Min; Wang, Chan; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Yu-Qing; Wu, Jiang-Dong; Wu, Fang; Zhang, Wan-Jiang; Zhang, Le

    2016-04-01

    The effect of myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) inhibition on apoptosis of peritoneal macrophages in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis was investigated and the primary signaling pathway associated with the transcriptional regulation of Mcl-1 was identified. Real-time PCR and western blotting indicated that Mcl-1 transcript and protein expression are upregulated during infection with virulent M. tuberculosis H37Rv and Xinjiang strains but not with attenuated M. tuberculosis strain H37Ra or Bacillus Calmette-Guérin. Mcl-1 transcript and protein expression were downregulated by specific inhibitors of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways (AG490, PD98059 and LY294002, respectively). The strongest inhibitor of Mcl-1 expression was PD98059, the MAPK inhibitor. Flow cytometry demonstrated that the rate of apoptosis in peritoneal macrophages is significantly higher in mice infected with M. tuberculosis and the rate of apoptosis is correlated with the virulence of the strain of M. tuberculosis. Apoptosis was found to be upregulated by AG490, PD98059 and LY294002, whereas inhibition of the MAPK pathway sensitized the infected macrophages to apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggest that specific downregulation of Mcl-1 significantly increases apoptosis of peritoneal macrophages and that the MAPK signaling pathway is the primary mediator of Mcl-1 expression.

  3. Degranulating Neutrophils Promote Leukotriene B4 Production by Infected Macrophages To Kill Leishmania amazonensis Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Natália; Afonso, Lilian; Suarez, Martha; Ampuero, Mariana; Prates, Deboraci Brito; Araújo-Santos, Théo; Barral-Netto, Manoel; DosReis, George A; Borges, Valéria Matos; Brodskyn, Cláudia

    2016-02-15

    Neutrophils mediate early responses against pathogens, and they become activated during endothelial transmigration toward the inflammatory site. In the current study, human neutrophils were activated in vitro with immobilized extracellular matrix proteins, such as fibronectin (FN), collagen, and laminin. Neutrophil activation by FN, but not other extracellular matrix proteins, induces the release of the granules' contents, measured as matrix metalloproteinase 9 and neutrophil elastase activity in culture supernatant, as well as reactive oxygen species production. Upon contact with Leishmania amazonensis-infected macrophages, these FN-activated neutrophils reduce the parasite burden through a mechanism independent of cell contact. The release of granule proteases, such as myeloperoxidase, neutrophil elastase, and matrix metalloproteinase 9, activates macrophages through TLRs, leading to the production of inflammatory mediators, TNF-α and leukotriene B4 (LTB4), which are involved in parasite killing by infected macrophages. The pharmacological inhibition of degranulation reverted this effect, abolishing LTB4 and TNF production. Together, these results suggest that FN-driven degranulation of neutrophils induces the production of LTB4 and TNF by infected macrophages, leading to the control of Leishmania infection.

  4. MicroRNA expression profile in human macrophages in response to Leishmania major infection.

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    Julien Lemaire

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leishmania (L. are intracellular protozoan parasites able to survive and replicate in the hostile phagolysosomal environment of infected macrophages. They cause leishmaniasis, a heterogeneous group of worldwide-distributed affections, representing a paradigm of neglected diseases that are mainly embedded in impoverished populations. To establish successful infection and ensure their own survival, Leishmania have developed sophisticated strategies to subvert the host macrophage responses. Despite a wealth of gained crucial information, these strategies still remain poorly understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, an evolutionarily conserved class of endogenous 22-nucleotide non-coding RNAs, are described to participate in the regulation of almost every cellular process investigated so far. They regulate the expression of target genes both at the levels of mRNA stability and translation; changes in their expression have a profound effect on their target transcripts. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report in this study a comprehensive analysis of miRNA expression profiles in L. major-infected human primary macrophages of three healthy donors assessed at different time-points post-infection (three to 24 h. We show that expression of 64 out of 365 analyzed miRNAs was consistently deregulated upon infection with the same trends in all donors. Among these, several are known to be induced by TLR-dependent responses. GO enrichment analysis of experimentally validated miRNA-targeted genes revealed that several pathways and molecular functions were disturbed upon parasite infection. Finally, following parasite infection, miR-210 abundance was enhanced in HIF-1α-dependent manner, though it did not contribute to inhibiting anti-apoptotic pathways through pro-apoptotic caspase-3 regulation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that alteration in miRNA levels likely plays an important role in regulating macrophage functions following L. major

  5. Infiltrating macrophages are key to the development of seizures following virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusick, Matthew F; Libbey, Jane E; Patel, Dipan C; Doty, Daniel J; Fujinami, Robert S

    2013-02-01

    Viral infections of the central nervous system (CNS) can trigger an antiviral immune response, which initiates an inflammatory cascade to control viral replication and dissemination. The extent of the proinflammatory response in the CNS and the timing of the release of proinflammatory cytokines can lead to neuronal excitability. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), two proinflammatory cytokines, have been linked to the development of acute seizures in Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced encephalitis. It is unclear the extent to which the infiltrating macrophages versus resident CNS cells, such as microglia, contribute to acute seizures, as both cell types produce TNF-α and IL-6. In this study, we show that following infection a significantly higher number of microglia produced TNF-α than did infiltrating macrophages. In contrast, infiltrating macrophages produced significantly more IL-6. Mice treated with minocycline or wogonin, both of which limit infiltration of immune cells into the CNS and their activation, had significantly fewer macrophages infiltrating the brain, and significantly fewer mice had seizures. Therefore, our studies implicate infiltrating macrophages as an important source of IL-6 that contributes to the development of acute seizures.

  6. Modulation of Stat-1 in Human Macrophages Infected with Different Species of Intracellular Pathogenic Bacteria

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    Giuditta Fiorella Schiavano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The infection of human macrophages by pathogenic bacteria induces different signaling pathways depending on the type of cellular receptors involved in the microorganism entry and on their mechanism(s of survival and replication in the host cell. It was reported that Stat proteins play an important role in this process. In the present study, we investigate the changes in Stat-1 activation (phosphorylation in p-tyr701 after uptake of two Gram-positive (Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus and two Gram-negative bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium and Legionella pneumophila characterized by their varying abilities to enter, survive, and replicate in human macrophages. Comparing the results obtained with Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, Stat-1 activation in macrophages does not seem to be related to LPS content. The p-tyr701Stat-1 expression levels were found to be independent of the internalized bacterial number and IFN-γ release. On the contrary, Jak/Stat-1 pathway activation only occurs when an active infection has been established in the host macrophage, and it is plausible that the differences in the expression levels of p-tyr701Stat-1 could be due to different survival mechanisms or to differences in bacteria life cycles within macrophages.

  7. The Role of Mcl-1 in S. aureus-Induced Cytoprotection of Infected Macrophages

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    Joanna Koziel

    2013-01-01

    cytoprotection of infected cells leading to apoptosis. Increased MCL1 expression in infected cells was associated with enhanced NFκB activation and subsequent IL-6 secretion, since the inhibition of both NFκB and IL-6 signalling pathways abrogated Mcl-1 induction and cytoprotection. Finally, we confirmed our observation in vivo in murine model of septic arthritis showing the association between the severity of arthritis and Mcl-1 expression. Therefore, we propose that S. aureus is hijacking the Mcl-1-dependent inhibition of apoptosis to prevent the elimination of infected host cells, thus allowing the intracellular persistence of the pathogen, its dissemination by infected macrophages, and the progression of staphylococci diseases.

  8. Forkhead Box O1 Regulates Macrophage Polarization Following Staphylococcus aureus Infection: Experimental Murine Data and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Chen; Ma, Hong-Di; Yin, Xue-Ying; Wang, Yin-Hu; Liu, Qing-Zhi; Yang, Jing-Bo; Shi, Qing-Hua; Sun, Baolin; Gershwin, M Eric; Lian, Zhe-Xiong

    2016-12-01

    The functions of macrophages that lead to effective host responses are critical for protection against Staphylococcus aureus. Deep tissue-invading S. aureus initially countered by macrophages trigger macrophage accumulation and induce inflammatory responses through surface receptors, especially toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Here, we found that macrophages formed sporadic aggregates in the liver during infection. Within those aggregates, macrophages co-localized with T cells and were indispensable for their infiltration. In addition, we have focused on the mechanisms underlying the polarization of macrophages in Forkhead box transcription factor O1 (FoxO1) conditional knockout Lys (Cre/+) FoxO1 (fl/fl) mice following S. aureus infection and report herein that macrophage M1-M2 polarization via TLR2 is intrinsically regulated by FoxO1. Indeed, for effective FoxO1 activity, stimulation of TLR2 is essential. However, following S. aureus challenge, there was a decrease in macrophage FoxO1, with increased phosphorylation of FoxO1 because of TLR2-mediated activation of PI3K/Akt and c-Raf/MEK/ERK pathway. Following infection in Lys (Cre/+) FoxO1 (fl/fl) mice, mice became more susceptible to S. aureus with reduced macrophage aggregation in the liver and attenuated Th1 and Th17 responses. FoxO1 abrogation reduced M1 pro-inflammatory responses triggered by S. aureus and enhanced M2 polarization in macrophages. In contrast, overexpression of FoxO1 in macrophages increased pro-inflammatory mediators and functional surface molecule expression. In conclusion, macrophage FoxO1 is critical to promote M1 polarization and maintain a competent T cell immune response against S. aureus infection in the liver. FoxO1 regulates macrophage M1-M2 polarization downstream of TLR2 dynamically through phosphorylation.

  9. MicroRNA Response of Primary Human Macrophages to Arcobacter Butzleri Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    zur Bruegge, Jennifer; Backes, Christina; Gölz, Greta; Hemmrich-Stanisak, Georg; Scharek-Tedin, Lydia; Franke, Andre; Alter, Thomas; Einspanier, Ralf; Keller, Andreas; Sharbati, Soroush

    2016-01-01

    The role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in infectious diseases is becoming more and more apparent, and the use of miRNAs as a diagnostic tool and their therapeutic application has become the major focus of investigation. The aim of this study was to identify miRNAs involved in the immune signaling of macrophages in response to Arcobacter (A.) butzleri infection, an emerging foodborne pathogen causing gastroenteritis. Therefore, primary human macrophages were isolated and infected, and miRNA expression was studied by means of RNAseq. Analysis of the data revealed the expression of several miRNAs, which were previously associated with bacterial infections such as miR-155, miR-125, and miR-212. They were shown to play a key role in Toll-like receptor signaling where they act as fine-tuners to establish a balanced immune response. In addition, miRNAs which have yet not been identified during bacterial infections such as miR-3613, miR-2116, miR-671, miR-30d, and miR-629 were differentially regulated in A. butzleri-infected cells. Targets of these miRNAs accumulated in pathways such as apoptosis and endocytosis – processes that might be involved in A. butzleri pathogenesis. Our study contributes new findings about the interaction of A. butzleri with human innate immune cells helping to understand underlying regulatory mechanisms in macrophages during infection. PMID:27429792

  10. Platelet-activating factor increases reactive oxygen species-mediated microbicidal activity of human macrophages infected with Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Arissa Felipe; Morato, Camila Imai; Gomes, Rodrigo Saar; Dorta, Miriam Leandro; de Oliveira, Milton Adriano Pelli; Ribeiro-Dias, Fátima

    2017-09-29

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is produced by macrophages during inflammation and infections. We evaluated whether PAF is able to modulate the infection of human macrophages by Leishmania braziliensis, the main Leishmania sp. in Brazil. Monocyte-derived macrophages were incubated with promastigote forms in absence or presence of exogenous PAF. We observed that the treatment of macrophages with low concentrations of PAF prior to infection increased the phagocytosis of L. braziliensis. More importantly, exogenous PAF reduced the parasitism when it was added before, during or after infection. In addition, treatment with a PAF antagonist (PCA 4248) resulted in a significant increase of macrophage infection in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting that endogenous PAF is important to control L. braziliensis infection. Mechanistically, while exogenous PAF increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) treatment with PCA 4248 reduced oxidative burst during L. braziliensis infection. The microbicidal effects of exogenous PAF were abolished when macrophages were treated with apocynin, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor. The data show that PAF promotes the production of ROS induced by L. braziliensis, suggesting that this lipid mediator may be relevant to control L. braziliensis infection in human macrophages. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. [Inclusion Bodies are Formed in SFTSV-infected Human Macrophages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Cong; Song, Jingdong; Han, Ying; Li, Chuan; Qiu, Peihong; Liang, Mifang

    2016-01-01

    The severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) is a new member in the genus Phlebovirus of the family Bunyaviridae identified in China. The SFTSV is also the causative pathogen of an emerging infectious disease: severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome. Using immunofluorescent staining and confocal microscopy, the intracellular distribution of nucleocapsid protein (NP) in SFTSV-infected THP-1 cells was investigated with serial doses of SFTSV at different times after infection. Transmission electron microscopy was used to observe the ultrafine intracellular structure of SFTSV-infected THP-1 cells at different times after infection. SFTSV NP could form intracellular inclusion bodies in infected THP-1 cells. The association between NP-formed inclusion bodies and virus production was analyzed: the size of the inclusion body formed 3 days after infection was correlated with the viral load in supernatants collected 7 days after infection. These findings suggest that the inclusion bodies formed in SFTSV-infected THP-1 cells could be where the SFTSV uses host-cell proteins and intracellular organelles to produce new viral particles.

  12. Microarray studies on effects of Pneumocystis carinii infection on global gene expression in alveolar macrophages

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    Liao Chung-Ping

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumocystis pneumonia is a common opportunistic disease in AIDS patients. The alveolar macrophage is an important effector cell in the clearance of Pneumocystis organisms by phagocytosis. However, both the number and phagocytic activity of alveolar macrophages are decreased in Pneumocystis infected hosts. To understand how Pneumocystis inactivates alveolar macrophages, Affymetrix GeneChip® RG-U34A DNA microarrays were used to study the difference in global gene expression in alveolar macrophages from uninfected and Pneumocystis carinii-infected Sprague-Dawley rats. Results Analyses of genes that were affected by Pneumocystis infection showed that many functions in the cells were affected. Antigen presentation, cell-mediated immune response, humoral immune response, and inflammatory response were most severely affected, followed by cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, immunological disease, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, cell death, organ injury and abnormality, cell signaling, infectious disease, small molecular biochemistry, antimicrobial response, and free radical scavenging. Since rats must be immunosuppressed in order to develop Pneumocystis infection, alveolar macrophages from four rats of the same sex and age that were treated with dexamethasone for the entire eight weeks of the study period were also examined. With a filter of false-discovery rate less than 0.1 and fold change greater than 1.5, 200 genes were found to be up-regulated, and 144 genes were down-regulated by dexamethasone treatment. During Pneumocystis pneumonia, 115 genes were found to be up- and 137 were down-regulated with the same filtering criteria. The top ten genes up-regulated by Pneumocystis infection were Cxcl10, Spp1, S100A9, Rsad2, S100A8, Nos2, RT1-Bb, Lcn2, RT1-Db1, and Srgn with fold changes ranging between 12.33 and 5.34; and the top ten down-regulated ones were Lgals1, Psat1, Tbc1d23, Gsta1, Car5b, Xrcc5, Pdlim1, Alcam

  13. Nanoliposomal Buparvaquone Immunomodulates Leishmania (L.) infantum-infected Macrophages and is Highly Effective in Murine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa-Silva, Thais Alves; Galisteo, Andrés Jimenez; Lauletta Lindoso, José Angelo; Barbosa, Leandro R S; Tempone, Andre Gustavo

    2017-02-06

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a fatal parasitic neglected disease affecting 1.5 million people worldwide. Based on the drug repositioning approach, the aim of this work was to investigate the in vitro immunomodulatory potential of buparvaquone (BPQ) and to stablish a safe regimen to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of BPQ entrapped into negatively charged nanoliposomes (BPQ-LP) in Leishmania (L.) infantum infected hamsters. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and ζ-potential were applied in order to study the influence of BPQ on the liposome structure. Our data revealed that BPQ was located in the polar/apolar interface, snorkeling the polar region, protected against aggregation inside the lipophiplic region. The presence of BPQ also decreased the Z-average hydrodynamic diameter and increased the surface charge. Compared to intravenous and intramuscular administration, the subcutaneous (sc) route as the most effective for BPQ-LP; at 0.4 mg/kg it reduced by 98% and 96% the infection in spleen and liver, respectively. The treatment for 5 days resulted in limited efficacy, but 10 days of treatment resulted in similar efficacy to a 15 days regimen. The nanoliposomal drug was highly effective with a mean ED50 value of 0.25 mg/kg, reducing the parasite load in bone marrow by 80% as detected in qPCR analysis. In addition, flow cytometry studies showed that BPQ upregulated cytokines as TNF, MCP-1, IL-10 and IL-6 in Leishmania-infected macrophages, eliminating the parasites via a nitric oxide-independent mechanism. This new formulation demonstrated a safe and effective treatment of murine leishmaniasis and could be a useful candidate against VL.

  14. Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol treatment during human monocyte differentiation reduces macrophage susceptibility to HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Julie C; Appelberg, Sofia; Goldberger, Bruce A; Klein, Thomas W; Sleasman, John W; Goodenow, Maureen M

    2014-06-01

    The major psychoactive component of marijuana, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), also acts to suppress inflammatory responses. Receptors for THC, CB1, CB2, and GPR55, are differentially expressed on multiple cell types including monocytes and macrophages, which are important modulators of inflammation in vivo and target cells for HIV-1 infection. Use of recreational and medicinal marijuana is increasing, but the consequences of marijuana exposure on HIV-1 infection are unclear. Ex vivo studies were designed to investigate effects on HIV-1 infection in macrophages exposed to THC during or following differentiation. THC treatment of primary human monocytes during differentiation reduced HIV-1 infection of subsequent macrophages by replication competent or single cycle CCR5 using viruses. In contrast, treatment of macrophages with THC immediately prior to or continuously following HIV-1 exposure failed to alter infection. Specific receptor agonists indicated that the THC effect during monocyte differentiation was mediated primarily through CB2. THC reduced the number of p24 positive cells with little to no effect on virus production per infected cell, while quantitation of intracellular viral gag pinpointed the THC effect to an early event in the viral life cycle. Cells treated during differentiation with THC displayed reduced expression of CD14, CD16, and CD163 and donor dependent increases in mRNA expression of selected viral restriction factors, suggesting a fundamental alteration in phenotype. Ultimately, the mechanism of THC suppression of HIV-1 infection was traced to a reduction in cell surface HIV receptor (CD4, CCR5 and CXCR4) expression that diminished entry efficiency.

  15. Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol treatment during human monocyte differentiation reduces macrophage susceptibility to HIV-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Julie C.; Appelberg, Sofia; Goldberger, Bruce A.; Klein, Thomas W.; Sleasman, John W.; Goodenow, Maureen M.

    2014-01-01

    The major psychoactive component of marijuana, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), also acts to suppress inflammatory responses. Receptors for THC, CB1, CB2, and GPR55, are differentially expressed on multiple cell types including monocytes and macrophages, which are important modulators of inflammation in vivo and target cells for HIV-1 infection. Use of recreational and medicinal marijuana is increasing, but the consequences of marijuana exposure on HIV-1 infection are unclear. Ex vivo studies were designed to investigate effects on HIV-1 infection in macrophages exposed to THC during or following differentiation. THC treatment of primary human monocytes during differentiation reduced HIV-1 infection of subsequent macrophages by replication competent or single cycle CCR5 using viruses. In contrast, treatment of macrophages with THC immediately prior to or continuously following HIV-1 exposure failed to alter infection. Specific receptor agonists indicated that the THC effect during monocyte differentiation was mediated primarily through CB2. THC reduced the number of p24 positive cells with little to no effect on virus production per infected cell, while quantitation of intracellular viral gag pinpointed the THC effect to an early event in the viral life cycle. Cells treated during differentiation with THC displayed reduced expression of CD14, CD16, and CD163 and donor dependent increases in mRNA expression of selected viral restriction factors, suggesting a fundamental alteration in phenotype. Ultimately, the mechanism of THC suppression of HIV-1 infection was traced to a reduction in cell surface HIV receptor (CD4, CCR5 and CXCR4) expression that diminished entry efficiency. PMID:24562630

  16. Pathogen vacuole purification from legionella-infected amoeba and macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Christine; Finsel, Ivo; Hilbi, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila replicates intracellularly in environmental and immune phagocytes within a unique membrane-bound compartment, the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). Formation of LCVs is strictly dependent on the Icm/Dot type IV secretion system and the translocation of "effector" proteins into the cell. Some effector proteins decorate the LCV membrane and subvert host cell vesicle trafficking pathways. Here we describe a method to purify intact LCVs from Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae and RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. The method comprises a two-step protocol: first, LCVs are enriched by immuno-magnetic separation using an antibody against a bacterial effector protein specifically localizing to the LCV membrane, and second, the LCVs are further purified by density gradient centrifugation. The purified LCVs can be characterized by proteomics and other biochemical approaches.

  17. 17-AAG Kills Intracellular Leishmania amazonensis while Reducing Inflammatory Responses in Infected Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Antonio Luis de Oliveira Almeida; Guedes, Carlos Eduardo Sampaio; Versoza, Carolina Leite; Lima, José Geraldo Bomfim; de Freitas, Luiz Antônio Rodrigues; Borges, Valéria Matos; Veras, Patrícia Sampaio Tavares

    2012-01-01

    Background Leishmaniasis is a neglected endemic disease with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations. Pentavalent antimonials have been the treatment of choice for the past 70 years and, due to the emergence of resistant cases, the efficacy of these drugs has come under scrutiny. Second-line drugs are less efficacious, cause a range of side effects and can be costly. The formulation of new generations of drugs, especially in developing countries, has become mandatory. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the anti-leishmanial effect of 17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), an HSP90 inhibitor, in vitro. This inhibitor is currently in clinical trials for cancer treatment; however, its effects against intracellular Leishmania remain untested. Macrophages infected with L. amazonensis were treated with 17-AAG (25–500 nM) and parasite load was quantified using optical microscopy. Parasite load declined in 17-AAG-treated macrophages in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Intracellular parasite death became irreversible after 4 h of treatment with 17-AAG, and occurred independent of nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide (O2−) production. Additionally, intracellular parasite viability was severely reduced after 48 h of treatment. Interestingly, treatment with 17-AAG reduced pro-inflammatory mediator production, including TNF-α, IL-6 and MCP-1, yet IL-12 remained unaffected. Electron microscopy revealed morphological alterations, such as double-membrane vacuoles and myelin figures at 24 and 48 h after 17-AAG treatment. Conclusions/Significance The HSP90 inhibitor, 17-AAG, possesses high potency under low dosage and reduces both pro-inflammatory and oxidative molecule production. Therefore, further studies are warranted to investigate this inhibitor’s potential in the development of new generations of anti-leishmanials. PMID:23152914

  18. Integrated Transcriptomics Establish Macrophage Polarization Signatures and have Potential Applications for Clinical Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Matheus; De Bastiani, Marco A.; Parisi, Mariana M.; Guma, Fátima T. C. R.; Markoski, Melissa M.; Castro, Mauro A. A.; Kaplan, Mark H.; Barbé-Tuana, Florencia M.; Klamt, Fábio

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence defines macrophages (Mφ) as plastic cells with wide-ranging states of activation and expression of different markers that are time and location dependent. Distinct from the simple M1/M2 dichotomy initially proposed, extensive diversity of macrophage phenotypes have been extensively demonstrated as characteristic features of monocyte-macrophage differentiation, highlighting the difficulty of defining complex profiles by a limited number of genes. Since the description of macrophage activation is currently contentious and confusing, the generation of a simple and reliable framework to categorize major Mφ phenotypes in the context of complex clinical conditions would be extremely relevant to unravel different roles played by these cells in pathophysiological scenarios. In the current study, we integrated transcriptome data using bioinformatics tools to generate two macrophage molecular signatures. We validated our signatures in in vitro experiments and in clinical samples. More importantly, we were able to attribute prognostic and predictive values to components of our signatures. Our study provides a framework to guide the interrogation of macrophage phenotypes in the context of health and disease. The approach described here could be used to propose new biomarkers for diagnosis in diverse clinical settings including dengue infections, asthma and sepsis resolution. PMID:26302899

  19. Global Dynamics of HIV Infection of CD4+ T Cells and Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Elaiw

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the global dynamics of an HIV infection model describing the interaction of the HIV with CD4+ T cells and macrophages. The incidence rate of virus infection and the growth rate of the uninfected CD4+ T cells and macrophages are given by general functions. We have incorporated two types of distributed delays into the model to account for the time delay between the time the uninfected cells are contacted by the virus particle and the time for the emission of infectious (matures virus particles. We have established a set of conditions which are sufficient for the global stability of the steady states of the model. Using Lyapunov functionals and LaSalle's invariant principle, we have proven that if the basic reproduction number R0 is less than or equal to unity, then the uninfected steady state is globally asymptotically stable (GAS, and if the infected steady state exists, then it is GAS.

  20. A role for connexin43 in macrophage phagocytosis and host survival after bacterial peritoneal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Rahul J; Dai, Shipan; Gribar, Steven C; Richardson, Ward; Kohler, Jeff W; Hoffman, Rosemary A; Branca, Maria F; Li, Jun; Shi, Xiao-Hua; Sodhi, Chhinder P; Hackam, David J

    2008-12-15

    The pathways that lead to the internalization of pathogens via phagocytosis remain incompletely understood. We now demonstrate a previously unrecognized role for the gap junction protein connexin43 (Cx43) in the regulation of phagocytosis by macrophages and in the host response to bacterial infection of the peritoneal cavity. Primary and cultured macrophages were found to express Cx43, which localized to the phagosome upon the internalization of IgG-opsonized particles. The inhibition of Cx43 using small interfering RNA or by obtaining macrophages from Cx43 heterozygous or knockout mice resulted in significantly impaired phagocytosis, while transfection of Cx43 into Fc-receptor expressing HeLa cells, which do not express endogenous Cx43, conferred the ability of these cells to undergo phagocytosis. Infection of macrophages with adenoviruses expressing wild-type Cx43 restored phagocytic ability in macrophages from Cx43 heterozygous or deficient mice, while infection with viruses that expressed mutant Cx43 had no effect. In understanding the mechanisms involved, Cx43 was required for RhoA-dependent actin cup formation under adherent particles, and transfection with constitutively active RhoA restored a phagocytic phenotype after Cx43 inactivation. Remarkably, mortality was significantly increased in a mouse model of bacterial peritonitis after Cx43 inhibition and in Cx43 heterozygous mice compared with untreated and wild-type counterparts. These findings reveal a novel role for Cx43 in the regulation of phagocytosis and rearrangement of the F-actin cytoskeleton, and they implicate Cx43 in the regulation of the host response to microbial infection.

  1. Type II Toxoplasma gondii induction of CD40 on infected macrophages enhances interleukin-12 responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Pedro; Sudarshana, Dattanand M; Gov, Lanny; Harker, Katherine S; Lam, Tonika; Casali, Paolo; Boyle, Jon P; Lodoen, Melissa B

    2014-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that can cause severe neurological disease in infected humans. CD40 is a receptor on macrophages that plays a critical role in controlling T. gondii infection. We examined the regulation of CD40 on the surface of T. gondii-infected bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMdMs). T. gondii induced CD40 expression both at the transcript level and on the cell surface, and interestingly, the effect was parasite strain specific: CD40 levels were dramatically increased in type II T. gondii-infected BMdMs compared to type I- or type III-infected cells. Type II induction of CD40 was specific to cells harboring intracellular parasites and detectable as early as 6 h postinfection (hpi) at the transcript level. CD40 protein expression peaked at 18 hpi. Using forward genetics with progeny from a type II × type III cross, we found that CD40 induction mapped to a region of chromosome X that included the gene encoding the dense granule protein 15 (GRA15). Using type I parasites stably expressing the type II allele of GRA15 (GRA15II), we found that type I GRA15II parasites induced the expression of CD40 on infected cells in an NF-κB-dependent manner. In addition, stable expression of hemagglutinin-tagged GRA15II in THP-1 cells resulted in CD40 upregulation in the absence of infection. Since CD40 signaling contributes to interleukin-12 (IL-12) production, we examined IL-12 from infected macrophages and found that CD40L engagement of CD40 amplified the IL-12 response in type II-infected cells. These data indicate that GRA15II induction of CD40 promotes parasite immunity through the production of IL-12. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Arginase 2 deletion leads to enhanced M1 macrophage activation and upregulated polyamine metabolism in response to Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardbower, Dana M; Asim, Mohammad; Murray-Stewart, Tracy; Casero, Robert A; Verriere, Thomas; Lewis, Nuruddeen D; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Wilson, Keith T

    2016-10-01

    We reported that arginase 2 (ARG2) deletion results in increased gastritis and decreased bacterial burden during Helicobacter pylori infection in mice. Our studies implicated a potential role for inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS2), as Arg2 (-/-) mice exhibited increased NOS2 levels in gastric macrophages, and NO can kill H. pylori. We now bred Arg2 (-/-) to Nos2 (-/-) mice, and infected them with H. pylori. Compared to wild-type mice, both Arg2 (-/-) and Arg2 (-/-) ;Nos2 (-/-) mice exhibited increased gastritis and decreased colonization, the latter indicating that the effect of ARG2 deletion on bacterial burden was not mediated by NO. While Arg2 (-/-) mice demonstrated enhanced M1 macrophage activation, Nos2 (-/-) and Arg2 (-/-) ;Nos2 (-/-) mice did not demonstrate these changes, but exhibited increased CXCL1 and CXCL2 responses. There was an increased expression of the Th1/Th17 cytokines, interferon gamma and interleukin 17, in gastric tissues and splenic T-cells from Arg2 (-/-), but not Nos2 (-/-) or Arg2 (-/-) ;Nos2 (-/-) mice. Gastric tissues from infected Arg2 (-/-) mice demonstrated increased expression of arginase 1, ornithine decarboxylase, adenosylmethionine decarboxylase 1, spermidine/spermine N (1)-acetyltransferase 1, and spermine oxidase, along with increased spermine levels. These data indicate that ARG2 deletion results in compensatory upregulation of gastric polyamine synthesis and catabolism during H. pylori infection, which may contribute to increased gastric inflammation and associated decreased bacterial load. Overall, the finding of this study is that ARG2 contributes to the immune evasion of H. pylori by restricting M1 macrophage activation and polyamine metabolism.

  3. Enhanced expression of the decoy receptor IL-13Rα2 in macrophages of Schistosoma japonicum-infected mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; SHEN Yu-xian; LI Jing; ZHANG Shi-hai; LUO Qing-li; ZHONG Zhen-rong; JIANG Zuo-jun; SHEN Ji-long

    2009-01-01

    Background Type 2 cytokine interleukin (IL)-13 and its decoy receptor, IL-13 receptor (R)α2 appear to play a major role in tissue fibrosis of schistosomiasis and asthma. IL-13 is a key regulator of the extracellular matrix (ECM). It is known to signal to cells by binding to the IL-13Ra1, which then heterodimerizes with IL-4Rα. In contrast, IL-13Rα2 binds IL-13 with high affinity but does not signal. IL-13Rα2 is known to down-regulate granulomatous inflammation and prolong host survival in Schistosoma mansoni (S. Mansoni) infection, but little is known about the location and expression level of IL-13Ra2 in the context of S. Japonicum infection. Methods We established S. Japonicum-infected mouse models. Kinetic serum levels of IL-13Rα2 were examined with ELISA. IL-13Rα2 mRNA and protein of liver tissues were determined by PCR and immunoblotting analysis, respectively. Detection of IL-13Rα2 expression and location in macrophages was performed by TaqMan PCR and fluorescent immunocytochemistry technique, respectively. Results A marked elevation of mRNA and protein expression of IL-13Rα2 was observed in mice during S. Japonicum infection. An enhanced expression of IL-13Rg2 was further demonstrated in primary macrophages of murine schistosomiasis. Conclusions IL-13Rα2 in macrophages may be a critical contributor to pathogenesis of schistosomiasis. The data highlight the potential importance of cell signaling and antifibrotic gene therapeutics in T helper 2 cell (Th2)-mediated diseases.

  4. Macrophages expressing arginase 1 and nitric oxide synthase 2 accumulate in the small intestine during Giardia lamblia infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Jenny; Keselman, Aleksander; Li, Erqiu; Singer, Steven M

    2015-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to inhibit Giardia lamblia in vitro and in vivo. This study sought to determine if Giardia infection induces arginase 1 (ARG1) expression in host macrophages to reduce NO production. Stimulations of RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells with Giardia extract induced arginase activity. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry showed increased ARG1 and nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) expression in mouse intestine following infection. Flow cytometry demonstrated increased numbers of macrophages positive for both ARG1 and NOS2 in lamina propria following infection, but there was no evidence of increased expression of ARG1 in these cells.

  5. Apolipoprotein E4 impairs macrophage efferocytosis and potentiates apoptosis by accelerating endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, James G; Kuhel, David G; Basford, Joshua E; Jaeschke, Anja; Chatterjee, Tapan K; Weintraub, Neal L; Hui, David Y

    2012-08-10

    Apolipoprotein (apo) E4 is a major genetic risk factor for a wide spectrum of inflammatory metabolic diseases, including atherosclerosis, diabetes, and Alzheimer disease. This study compared diet-induced adipose tissue inflammation as well as functional properties of macrophages isolated from human APOE3 and APOE4 mice to identify the mechanism responsible for the association between apoE4 and inflammatory metabolic diseases. The initial study confirmed previous reports that APOE4 gene replacement mice were less sensitive than APOE3 mice to diet-induced body weight gain but exhibited hyperinsulinemia, and their adipose tissues were similarly inflamed as those in APOE3 mice. Peritoneal macrophages isolated from APOE4 mice were defective in efferocytosis compared with APOE3 macrophages. Increased cell death was also observed in APOE4 macrophages when stimulated with LPS or oxidized LDL. Western blot analysis of cell lysates revealed that APOE4 macrophages displayed elevated JNK phosphorylation indicative of cell stress even under basal culturing conditions. Significantly higher cell stress due mainly to potentiation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signaling was also observed in APOE4 macrophages after LPS and oxidized LDL activation. The defect in efferocytosis and elevated apoptosis sensitivity of APOE4 macrophages was ameliorated by treatment with the ER chaperone tauroursodeoxycholic acid. Taken together, these results showed that apoE4 expression causes macrophage dysfunction and promotes apoptosis via ER stress induction. The reduction of ER stress in macrophages may be a viable option to reduce inflammation and inflammation-related metabolic disorders associated with the apoE4 polymorphism.

  6. Macrophage Expression of Inflammatory Genes in Response to EMCV Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary R. Shaheen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The expression and production of type 1 interferon is the classic cellular response to virus infection. In addition to this antiviral response, virus infection also stimulates the production of proinflammatory mediators. In this review, the pathways controlling the induction of inflammatory genes and the roles that these inflammatory mediators contribute to host defense against viral pathogens will be discussed. Specific focus will be on the role of the chemokine receptor CCR5, as a signaling receptor controlling the activation of pathways leading to virus-induced inflammatory gene expression.

  7. Mycobacterium leprae-Infected Macrophages Preferentially Primed Regulatory T Cell Responses and Was Associated with Lepromatous Leprosy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Degang Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The persistence of Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae infection is largely dependent on the types of host immune responses being induced. Macrophage, a crucial modulator of innate and adaptive immune responses, could be directly infected by M. leprae. We therefore postulated that M. leprae-infected macrophages might have altered immune functions.Here, we treated monocyte-derived macrophages with live or killed M. leprae, and examined their activation status and antigen presentation. We found that macrophages treated with live M. leprae showed committed M2-like function, with decreased interleukin 1 beta (IL-1beta, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha and MHC class II molecule expression and elevated IL-10 and CD163 expression. When incubating with naive T cells, macrophages treated with live M. leprae preferentially primed regulatory T (Treg cell responses with elevated FoxP3 and IL-10 expression, while interferon gamma (IFN-gamma expression and CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity were reduced. Chromium release assay also found that live M. leprae-treated macrophages were more resistant to CD8+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity than sonicated M. leprae-treated monocytes. Ex vivo studies showed that the phenotype and function of monocytes and macrophages had clear differences between L-lep and T-lep patients, consistent with the in vitro findings.Together, our data demonstrate that M. leprae could utilize infected macrophages by two mechanisms: firstly, M. leprae-infected macrophages preferentially primed Treg but not Th1 or cytotoxic T cell responses; secondly, M. leprae-infected macrophages were more effective at evading CD8+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

  8. Evaluation of the relationship between fungal infection, neutrophil leukocytes and macrophages in cervicovaginal smears: Light microscopic examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayeste Demirezen

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Our findings indicate that macrophages and neutrophils may play a determining role in host defense against fungal infection together, but neither yeast nor filamentous forms affect the presence of neutrophil leukocytes and macrophages. As a result of this, both yeast and filamentous forms may have pathogenic effects.

  9. Lipid Droplet Formation, Their Localization and Dynamics during Leishmania major Macrophage Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh Rabhi

    Full Text Available Leishmania, the causative agent of vector-borne diseases, known as leishmaniases, is an obligate intracellular parasite within mammalian hosts. The outcome of infection depends largely on the activation status of macrophages, the first line of mammalian defense and the major target cells for parasite replication. Understanding the strategies developed by the parasite to circumvent macrophage defense mechanisms and to survive within those cells help defining novel therapeutic approaches for leishmaniasis. We previously showed the formation of lipid droplets (LDs in L. major infected macrophages. Here, we provide novel insights on the origin of the formed LDs by determining their cellular distribution and to what extent these high-energy sources are directed to the proximity of Leishmania parasites. We show that the ability of L. major to trigger macrophage LD accumulation is independent of parasite viability and uptake and can also be observed in non-infected cells through paracrine stimuli suggesting that LD formation is from cellular origin. The accumulation of LDs is demonstrated using confocal microscopy and live-cell imagin in parasite-free cytoplasmic region of the host cell, but also promptly recruited to the proximity of Leishmania parasites. Indeed LDs are observed inside parasitophorous vacuole and in parasite cytoplasm suggesting that Leishmania parasites besides producing their own LDs, may take advantage of these high energy sources. Otherwise, these LDs may help cells defending against parasitic infection. These metabolic changes, rising as common features during the last years, occur in host cells infected by a large number of pathogens and seem to play an important role in pathogenesis. Understanding how Leishmania parasites and different pathogens exploit this LD accumulation will help us define the common mechanism used by these different pathogens to manipulate and/or take advantage of this high-energy source.

  10. Exploring Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection-induced alterations in gene expression in macrophage by microarray hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE; Jianping; (谢建平); LI; Yao; (李; 瑶); YUE; Jun; (乐; 军); XU; Yongzhong; (徐永忠); HUANG; Daqiang; (黄达蔷); LIANG; Li; (梁; 莉); WANG; Honghai; (王洪海)

    2003-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a serious threat to public health. Its causative agent Mycobacte- rium tuberculosis is an intracellular pathogen which survives and replicates within cells of the host immune system, primarily macrophages. Knowledge of the bacteria-macrophage interaction can help to develop novel measures to combat the disease. The global gene expression of macro- phage following invasion by and growth of M. tuberculosis was studied by cDNA microarray. Of the 12800 human genes analyzed, totally 473 (3.7%) macrophage genes were differentially expressed after being infected by M. tuberculosis, among which, only 25 (5.2%, corresponding to less than 0.2% of the 12800 genes) genes were up-regulated, while others (94.8%) were down-regulated against the control. Of the 473 genes, 376 genes are registered in the GenBank, and 97 are novel genes. Expression of 5 up-regulated genes has been induced by more than 3-fold. 25 genes were down-regulated by more than 3-fold. Syndecan binding protein has been down-regu- lated up to 12.5-fold. The data gave an insight into the early gene expression in macrophage ensuing M. tuberculosis infection and a basis for further study.

  11. Changes in lymphocyte and macrophage subsets due to morphine and ethanol treatment during a retrovirus infection causing murine AIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, R.R.; Prabhala, R.H.; Darban, H.R.; Yahya, M.D.; Smith, T.L.

    1988-01-01

    The number of lymphocytes of various subsets were not significantly changed by the ethanol exposure except those showing activation markers which were reduced. The percentage of peripheral blood cells showing markers for macrophage functions and their activation were significantly reduced after binge use of ethanol. Ethanol retarded suppression of cells by retroviral infection. However by 25 weeks of infection there was a 8.6% survival in the ethanol fed mice infected with retrovirus which was much less than virally infected controls. Morphine treatment also increased the percentage of cells with markers for macrophages and activated macrophages in virally infected mice, while suppressing them in uninfected mice. The second and third morphine injection series suppressed lymphocyte T-helper and T-suppressor cells, but not total T cells. However, suppression by morphine was significantly less during retroviral disease than suppression caused by the virus only. At 25 weeks of infection 44.8% of morphine treated, infected mice survived.

  12. Viable group A streptococci in macrophages during acute soft tissue infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pontus Thulin

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Group A streptococcal severe soft tissue infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis, are rapidly progressive infections associated with high mortality. Group A streptococcus is typically considered an extracellular pathogen, but has been shown to reside intracellularly in host cells.We characterized in vivo interactions between group A streptococci (GAS and cells involved in innate immune responses, using human biopsies (n = 70 collected from 17 patients with soft tissue infections. Immunostaining and in situ image analysis revealed high amounts of bacteria in the biopsies, even in those collected after prolonged antibiotic therapy. Viability of the streptococci was assessed by use of a bacterial viability stain, which demonstrated viable bacteria in 74% of the biopsies. GAS were present both extracellularly and intracellularly within phagocytic cells, primarily within macrophages. Intracellular GAS were predominantly noted in biopsies from newly involved tissue characterized by lower inflammation and bacterial load, whereas purely extracellular GAS or a combination of intra- and extracellular GAS dominated in severely inflamed tissue. The latter tissue was also associated with a significantly increased amount of the cysteine protease streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin SpeB. In vitro studies confirmed that macrophages serve as reservoirs for viable GAS, and infection with a speB-deletion mutant produced significantly lower frequencies of cells with viable GAS following infection as compared to the wild-type bacteria.This is the first study to demonstrate that GAS survive intracellularly in macrophages during acute invasive infections. This intracellular presence may have evolved as a mechanism to avoid antibiotic eradication, which may explain our finding that high bacterial load is present even in tissue collected after prolonged intravenous antibiotic therapy. This new insight into the pathogenesis of streptococcal soft tissue infections

  13. Viable Group A Streptococci in Macrophages during Acute Soft Tissue Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Group A streptococcal severe soft tissue infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis, are rapidly progressive infections associated with high mortality. Group A streptococcus is typically considered an extracellular pathogen, but has been shown to reside intracellularly in host cells. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We characterized in vivo interactions between group A streptococci (GAS and cells involved in innate immune responses, using human biopsies (n = 70 collected from 17 patients with soft tissue infections. Immunostaining and in situ image analysis revealed high amounts of bacteria in the biopsies, even in those collected after prolonged antibiotic therapy. Viability of the streptococci was assessed by use of a bacterial viability stain, which demonstrated viable bacteria in 74% of the biopsies. GAS were present both extracellularly and intracellularly within phagocytic cells, primarily within macrophages. Intracellular GAS were predominantly noted in biopsies from newly involved tissue characterized by lower inflammation and bacterial load, whereas purely extracellular GAS or a combination of intra- and extracellular GAS dominated in severely inflamed tissue. The latter tissue was also associated with a significantly increased amount of the cysteine protease streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin SpeB. In vitro studies confirmed that macrophages serve as reservoirs for viable GAS, and infection with a speB-deletion mutant produced significantly lower frequencies of cells with viable GAS following infection as compared to the wild-type bacteria. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to demonstrate that GAS survive intracellularly in macrophages during acute invasive infections. This intracellular presence may have evolved as a mechanism to avoid antibiotic eradication, which may explain our finding that high bacterial load is present even in tissue collected after prolonged intravenous antibiotic therapy. This new insight into the pathogenesis

  14. The Nuclear Receptor LXR Limits Bacterial Infection of Host Macrophages through a Mechanism that Impacts Cellular NAD Metabolism

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    Jonathan Matalonga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages exert potent effector functions against invading microorganisms but constitute, paradoxically, a preferential niche for many bacterial strains to replicate. Using a model of infection by Salmonella Typhimurium, we have identified a molecular mechanism regulated by the nuclear receptor LXR that limits infection of host macrophages through transcriptional activation of the multifunctional enzyme CD38. LXR agonists reduced the intracellular levels of NAD+ in a CD38-dependent manner, counteracting pathogen-induced changes in macrophage morphology and the distribution of the F-actin cytoskeleton and reducing the capability of non-opsonized Salmonella to infect macrophages. Remarkably, pharmacological treatment with an LXR agonist ameliorated clinical signs associated with Salmonella infection in vivo, and these effects were dependent on CD38 expression in bone-marrow-derived cells. Altogether, this work reveals an unappreciated role for CD38 in bacterial-host cell interaction that can be pharmacologically exploited by activation of the LXR pathway.

  15. TNF and PGE2 in human monocyte-derived macrophages infected with Chlamydia trachomatis

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    E. Manor

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, tumour necrosis factor (TNF and interleukin-1 (IL-1 alpha in medium from monocyte derived macrophages (MdM infected with Chlamydia trachomatis (L2/434/Bu or K biovars. TNF and PGE2 were found in both cases while IL-1 alpha was not detected. Both TNF and PGE2 levels were higher in the medium of the MdM infected with K biovars. TNF reached maximum levels 24 h postinfection, and then declined, while PGE2 levels increased continuously during the infection time up to 96 h post-infection. Addition of dexamethasone inhibited production of TNF and PGE2. Inhibition of PGE2 production by indomethacin resulted in increased production of TNF, while addition of PGE2 caused partial inhibition of TNF production from infected MdM.

  16. Differences in the antigenic profile and infectivity of murine macrophages of Leishmania (Viannia) parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matta, Nubia E; Cysne-Finkelstein, Lea; Machado, Gerzia Maria C; Da-Cruz, Alda Maria; Leon, Leonor

    2010-06-01

    The antigenic profile and infectivity were compared between 3 recent Leishmania (Viannia) isolates from the Amazonian region (Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia [INPA] strains) and 3 World Health Organization (WHO) reference species (Leishmania guyanensis, Leishmania braziliensis, and Leishmania naiffi). Differences were observed in the peak and extent of promastigote growth. The WHO reference strains exhibited significantly higher exponential growth as promastigotes than INPA strains. In the immunoblot analyses, the INPA strains revealed several specific peptide fragments, as well as the greatest recognition frequencies by sera from Leishmania sp.-infected patients; among the latter, antigens derived from L. naiffi were the most frequently recognized. In vitro infection was carried out using mice peritoneal macrophages; all strains were able to enter the macrophages, but only L. amazonensis was able to reproduce. A striking observation was that L. naiffi exhibited the longest survival time inside the macrophages. Our data strongly suggest the application of recently isolated parasites as sources of antigen for diagnosis procedures. Moreover, L. naiffi species possesses several characteristics relevant for its use as a source of novel antigens to be explored in the design of diagnostic tools and vaccines.

  17. The transcriptome of Legionella pneumophila-infected human monocyte-derived macrophages.

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    Christopher T D Price

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that invades and replicates within alveolar macrophages through injection of ∼ 300 effector proteins by its Dot/Icm type IV translocation apparatus. The bona fide F-box protein, AnkB, is a nutritional virulence effector that triggers macrophages to generate a surplus of amino acids, which is essential for intravacuolar proliferation. Therefore, the ankB mutant represents a novel genetic tool to determine the transcriptional response of human monocyte-derived macrophages (hMDMs to actively replicating L. pneumophila.Here, we utilized total human gene microarrays to determine the global transcriptional response of hMDMs to infection by wild type or the ankB mutant of L. pneumophila. The transcriptomes of hMDMs infected with either actively proliferating wild type or non-replicative ankB mutant bacteria were remarkably similar. The transcriptome of infected hMDMs was predominated by up-regulation of inflammatory pathways (IL-10 anti-inflammatory, interferon signaling and amphoterin signaling, anti-apoptosis, and down-regulation of protein synthesis pathways. In addition, L. pneumophila modulated diverse metabolic pathways, particularly those associated with bio-active lipid metabolism, and SLC amino acid transporters expression.Taken together, the hMDM transcriptional response to L. pneumophila is independent of intra-vacuolar replication of the bacteria and primarily involves modulation of the immune response and metabolic as well as nutritional pathways.

  18. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 endocytic trafficking through macrophage bridging conduits facilitates spread of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadiu, Irena; Gendelman, Howard E

    2011-12-01

    Bridging conduits (BC) sustain communication and homeostasis between distant tethered cells. These are also exploited commonly for direct cell-to-cell transfer of microbial agents. Conduits efficiently spread infection, effectively, at speeds faster than fluid phase exchange while shielding the microbe against otherwise effective humoral immunity. Our laboratory has sought to uncover the mechanism(s) for these events for human immunodeficiency virus type one (HIV-1) infection. Indeed, in our prior works HIV-1 Env and Gag antigen and fluorescent virus tracking were shown sequestered into endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi organelles but the outcomes for spreading viral infection remained poorly defined. Herein, we show that HIV-1 specifically traffics through endocytic compartments contained within BC and directing such macrophage-to-macrophage viral transfers. Following clathrin-dependent viral entry, HIV-1 constituents bypass degradation by differential sorting from early to Rab11(+) recycling endosomes and multivesicular bodies. Virus-containing endocytic viral cargoes propelled by myosin II through BC spread to neighboring uninfected cells. Disruption of endosomal motility with cytochalasin D, nocodasole and blebbistatin diminish intercellular viral spread. These data lead us to propose that HIV-1 hijacks macrophage endocytic and cytoskeletal machineries for high-speed cell-to-cell spread.

  19. Coxiella burnetii Infects Primary Bovine Macrophages and Limits Their Host Cell Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobotta, Katharina; Hillarius, Kirstin; Mager, Marvin; Kerner, Katharina; Heydel, Carsten; Menge, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Although domestic ruminants have long been recognized as the main source of human Q fever, little is known about the lifestyle that the obligate intracellular Gram-negative bacterium Coxiella burnetii adopts in its animal host. Because macrophages are considered natural target cells of the pathogen, we established primary bovine monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) as an in vitro infection model to study reservoir host-pathogen interactions at the cellular level. In addition, bovine alveolar macrophages were included to take cell type peculiarities at a host entry site into account. Cell cultures were inoculated with the virulent strain Nine Mile I (NMI; phase I) or the avirulent strain Nine Mile II (NMII; phase II). Macrophages from both sources internalized NMI and NMII. MDM were particularly permissive for NMI internalization, but NMI and NMII replicated with similar kinetics in these cells. MDM responded to inoculation with a general upregulation of Th1-related cytokines such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-12, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) early on (3 h postinfection). However, inflammatory responses rapidly declined when C. burnetii replication started. C. burnetii infection inhibited translation and release of IL-1β and vastly failed to stimulate increased expression of activation markers, such as CD40, CD80, CD86, and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. Such capability of limiting proinflammatory responses may help Coxiella to protect itself from clearance by the host immune system. The findings provide the first detailed insight into C. burnetii-macrophage interactions in ruminants and may serve as a basis for assessing the virulence and the host adaptation of C. burnetii strains. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Characterization of the microRNAome in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infected macrophages.

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    Julie A Hicks

    Full Text Available Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV, a member of the arterivirus family, is the causative agent of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS. PRRS is characterized by late term abortions and respiratory disease, particularly in young pigs. Small regulatory RNAs termed microRNA (miRNA are associated with gene regulation at the post-transcriptional level. MiRNAs are known to play many diverse and complex roles in viral infections. To discover the impact of PRRSV infections on the cellular miRNAome, Illumina deep sequencing was used to construct small RNA expression profiles from in vitro cultured PRRSV-infected porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs. A total of forty cellular miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed within the first 48 hours post infection (hpi. The expression of six miRNAs, miR-30a-3p, miR-132, miR-27b*, miR-29b, miR-146a and miR-9-2, were altered at more than one time point. Target gene identification suggests that these miRNAs are involved in regulating immune signaling pathways, cytokine, and transcription factor production. The most highly repressed miRNA at 24 hpi was miR-147. A miR-147 mimic was utilized to maintain miR-147 levels in PRRSV-infected PAMs. PRRSV replication was negatively impacted by high levels of miR-147. Whether down-regulation of miR-147 is directly induced by PRRSV or if it is part of the cellular response and PRRSV indirectly benefits remains to be determined. No evidence could be found of PRRSV-encoded miRNAs. Overall, the present study has revealed that a large and diverse group of miRNAs are expressed in swine alveolar macrophages and that the expression of a subset of these miRNAs is altered in PRRSV infected macrophages.

  1. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with central nervous system infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Christian; Benfield, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) plays an essential pathophysiological role in septic shock; however, its role in central nervous system infection (CNS) remains to be defined. METHODS: The aim of the present study was to investigate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF...... suspected of but had no evidence of CNS infection. RESULTS: CSF MIF levels were significantly higher in patients with purulent meningitis of known aetiology (8639 ng/L (3344-20600)) as compared to patients with purulent meningitis of unknown aetiology (2209 ng/L (1516-6550), Mann Whitney test, P=0...

  2. Kinetics of liver macrophages (Kupffer cells) in SIV-infected macaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahsan, Muhammad H.; Gill, Amy F.; Alvarez, Xavier; Lackner, Andrew A.; Veazey, Ronald S., E-mail: rveazey@tulane.edu

    2013-11-15

    Since the liver drains antigens from the intestinal tract, and since the intestinal tract is a major site of viral replication, we examined the dynamics of liver macrophages (Kupffer cells) throughout SIV infection. Absolute numbers of Kupffer cells increased in the livers in acute infection, and in animals with AIDS. Significantly higher percentages of proliferating (BrdU+) Kupffer cells were detected in acute infection and in AIDS with similar trends in blood monocytes. Significantly higher percentages of apoptotic (AC3+) Kupffer cells were also found in acute and AIDS stages. However, productively infected cells were not detected in liver of 41/42 animals examined, despite abundant infected cells in gut and lymph nodes of all animals. Increased rates of Kupffer cell proliferation resulting in an increase in Kupffer cells without productive infection indicate SIV infection affects Kupffer cells, but the liver does not appear to be a major site of productive viral replication. - Highlights: • Kupffer cells increase in the liver of SIV-infected macaques. • Increased proliferation and apoptosis of Kupffer cells occurs in SIV infection. • Productively infected cells are rarely detected in the liver. • The liver is not a major site for SIV replication.

  3. Simultaneous gene expression profiling in human macrophages infected with Leishmania major parasites using SAGE

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    Smandi Sondos

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leishmania (L are intracellular protozoan parasites that are able to survive and replicate within the harsh and potentially hostile phagolysosomal environment of mammalian mononuclear phagocytes. A complex interplay then takes place between the macrophage (MΦ striving to eliminate the pathogen and the parasite struggling for its own survival. To investigate this host-parasite conflict at the transcriptional level, in the context of monocyte-derived human MΦs (MDM infection by L. major metacyclic promastigotes, the quantitative technique of serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE was used. Results After extracting mRNA from resting human MΦs, Leishmania-infected human MΦs and L. major parasites, three SAGE libraries were constructed and sequenced generating up to 28,173; 57,514 and 33,906 tags respectively (corresponding to 12,946; 23,442 and 9,530 unique tags. Using computational data analysis and direct comparison to 357,888 publicly available experimental human tags, the parasite and the host cell transcriptomes were then simultaneously characterized from the mixed cellular extract, confidently discriminating host from parasite transcripts. This procedure led us to reliably assign 3,814 tags to MΦs' and 3,666 tags to L. major parasites transcripts. We focused on these, showing significant changes in their expression that are likely to be relevant to the pathogenesis of parasite infection: (i human MΦs genes, belonging to key immune response proteins (e.g., IFNγ pathway, S100 and chemokine families and (ii a group of Leishmania genes showing a preferential expression at the parasite's intra-cellular developing stage. Conclusion Dual SAGE transcriptome analysis provided a useful, powerful and accurate approach to discriminating genes of human or parasitic origin in Leishmania-infected human MΦs. The findings presented in this work suggest that the Leishmania parasite modulates key transcripts in human MΦs that may

  4. Coxsackievirus B4 Can Infect Human Peripheral Blood-Derived Macrophages

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    Enagnon Kazali Alidjinou

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Beyond acute infections, group B coxsackieviruses (CVB are also reported to play a role in the development of chronic diseases, like type 1 diabetes. The viral pathogenesis mainly relies on the interplay between the viruses and innate immune response in genetically-susceptible individuals. We investigated the interaction between CVB4 and macrophages considered as major players in immune response. Monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM generated with either M-CSF or GM-CSF were inoculated with CVB4, and infection, inflammation, viral replication and persistence were assessed. M-CSF-induced MDM, but not GM-CSF-induced MDM, can be infected by CVB4. In addition, enhancing serum was not needed to infect MDM in contrast with parental monocytes. The expression of viral receptor (CAR mRNA was similar in both M-CSF and GM-CSF MDM. CVB4 induced high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNFα in both MDM populations. CVB4 effectively replicated and persisted in M-CSF MDM, but IFNα was produced in the early phase of infection only. Our results demonstrate that CVB4 can replicate and persist in MDM. Further investigations are required to determine whether the interaction between the virus and MDM plays a role in the pathogenesis of CVB-induced chronic diseases.

  5. The tyrosine kinase Btk regulates the macrophage response to Listeria monocytogenes infection.

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    Afitap Derya Köprülü

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the role of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk in the immune response to the Gram-positive intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes (Lm. In response to Lm infection, Btk was activated in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs and Btk (-/- BMMs showed enhanced TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-12p40 secretion, while type I interferons were produced at levels similar to wild-type (wt BMMs. Although Btk-deficient BMMs displayed reduced phagocytosis of E. coli fragments, there was no difference between wt and Btk (-/- BMMs in the uptake of Lm upon infection. Moreover, there was no difference in the response to heat-killed Lm between wt and Btk (-/- BMMs, suggesting a role for Btk in signaling pathways that are induced by intracellular Lm. Finally, Btk (-/- mice displayed enhanced resistance and an increased mean survival time upon Lm infection in comparison to wt mice. This correlated with elevated IFN-γ and IL-12p70 serum levels in Btk (-/- mice at day 1 after infection. Taken together, our data suggest an important regulatory role for Btk in macrophages during Lm infection.

  6. Modulation of chemokine and chemokine receptor expression following infection of porcine macrophages with African swine fever virus.

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    Fishbourne, Emma; Abrams, Charles C; Takamatsu, Haru-H; Dixon, Linda K

    2013-03-23

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is the only member of the Asfarviridae, a large DNA virus family which replicates predominantly in the cytoplasm. Most isolates cause a fatal haemorrhagic disease in domestic pigs, although some low virulence isolates cause little or no mortality. The modulation of chemokine responses following infection of porcine macrophages with low and high virulence isolates was studied to indicate how this may be involved in the induction of pathogenesis and of effective immune responses. Infection with both low and high virulence isolates resulted in down-regulation of mRNA levels for chemokines CCL2, CCL3L, CXCL2 and chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR5, CXCR3, CXCR4 and up-regulation in expression of mRNAs for CCL4, CXCL10 and chemokine receptor CCR7. Levels of CCL4, CXCL8, CXCL10 mRNAs were higher in macrophages infected with low virulence isolate OURT88/3 compared to high virulence isolate Benin 97/1. Levels of CXCL8 and CCL2 protein were significantly reduced in supernatants from macrophages infected with Benin 97/1 isolate compared to OURT88/3 and mock-infected macrophages. There was also a decreased chemotactic response of donor cells exposed to supernatants from Benin 97/1 infected macrophages compared to those from OURT88/3 and mock-infected macrophages. The data show that infection of macrophages with the low virulence strain OURT88/3 induces higher expression of key inflammatory chemokines compared to infection with high virulence strain Benin 97/1. This may be important for the induction of effective protective immunity that has been observed in pigs immunised with the OURT88/3 isolate.

  7. African swine fever virus infects macrophages, the natural host cells, via clathrin- and cholesterol-dependent endocytosis.

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    Galindo, Inmaculada; Cuesta-Geijo, Miguel Angel; Hlavova, Karolina; Muñoz-Moreno, Raquel; Barrado-Gil, Lucía; Dominguez, Javier; Alonso, Covadonga

    2015-03-16

    The main cellular target for African swine fever virus (ASFV) is the porcine macrophage. However, existing data about the early phases of infection were previously characterized in non-leukocyte cells such as Vero cells. Here, we report that ASFV enters the natural host cell using dynamin-dependent and clathrin-mediated endocytosis. This pathway is strongly pH-dependent during the first steps of infection in porcine macrophages. We investigated the effect of drugs inhibiting several endocytic pathways in macrophages and compared ASFV with vaccinia virus (VV), which apparently involves different entry pathways. The presence of cholesterol in cellular membranes was found to be essential for a productive ASFV infection while actin-dependent endocytosis and the participation of phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) activity were other cellular factors required in the process of viral entry. These findings improved our understanding of the ASFV interactions with macrophages that allow for successful viral replication.

  8. Identification and Characterization of miRNAs in Response to Leishmania donovani Infection: Delineation of Their Roles in Macrophage Dysfunction

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    Tiwari, Neeraj; Kumar, Vinod; Gedda, Mallikarjuna Rao; Singh, Ashish K.; Singh, Vijay K.; Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Singh, Surya P.; Singh, Rakesh K.

    2017-01-01

    The outcome of Leishmania infection depends on parasite abilities to evade host immune response and its survival in hostile environment of host macrophages. Despite a wealth of gained crucial information, parasite strategies by which it dampens host macrophage functions remain poorly understood. Micro RNAs (miRNAs) are evolutionarily conserved class of endogenous 22-nucleotide small non-coding RNA gene products, described to participate in the regulation of almost every cellular process investigated so far. In this study, we identified 940 miRNAs in Leishmania donovani infected macrophages by de novo sequencing out of which levels of 85 miRNAs were found to be consistently modified by parasite infection. Herein, we report the functional characteristics of 10 miRNAs i.e., mir-3620, mir-6385, mir-6973a, mir-6996, mir-328, mir-8113, mir-3473f, mir-763, mir-6540, and mir-1264 that were differentially but constantly regulated in infected macrophages for their role in regulation of macrophage effector functions. The target gene prediction and biological interaction analysis revealed involvement of these miRNAs in various biological processes such as apoptosis inhibition, phagocytosis, drug response, and T cell phenotypic transitions. These findings could contribute for the better understanding of macrophages dysfunction and leishmanial pathogenesis. Further, the identified miRNAs could also be used as biomarker/s in diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutics of Leishmania infection. PMID:28303124

  9. 17β-estradiol protects primary macrophages against HIV infection through induction of interferon-alpha.

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    Tasker, Carley; Ding, Jian; Schmolke, Mirco; Rivera-Medina, Amariliz; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Chang, Theresa L

    2014-05-01

    Estrogen has been shown to increase resistance to HIV/SIV transmission by increasing the thickness of the genital epithelium. The immunological role of estrogen in HIV infection of primary target cells is less well characterized. We have found that primary macrophages are a target for anti-HIV activity of 17β-estradiol (E2). E2 did not affect surface expression of CD4 and HIV co-receptors nor HIV attachment to monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). In addition, E2 treatment blocked infection by a co-receptor-independent HIV-1VSV-G pseudotyped virus. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of HIV reverse transcribed DNA products indicated that E2 blocked HIV reverse transcription. E2 upregulated gene expression of interferons (IFNs) in MDMs from multiple donors. However, induction of host restriction factors APOBEC3G, APOBEC3F, or SAMHD1 was not consistent, with exception of APOBEC3A. Anti-HIV activity of E2 was abolished in the presence of IFN-α neutralizing antibody, and was absent in bone marrow-derived macrophages from IFN-α receptor deficient mice. Interestingly, HIV overcame E2-mediated HIV inhibition by suppressing induction of IFNs when MDMs were exposed to HIV before E2 treatment. These results offer a new mechanism of E2 on HIV inhibition. Future studies on the interplay between HIV and E2-mediated innate immune responses will likely provide insights relevant for development of effective strategies for HIV prevention.

  10. Clofazimine modulates the expression of lipid metabolism proteins in Mycobacterium leprae-infected macrophages.

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    Yang Degang

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae lives and replicates within macrophages in a foamy, lipid-laden phagosome. The lipids provide essential nutrition for the mycobacteria, and M. leprae infection modulates expression of important host proteins related to lipid metabolism. Thus, M. leprae infection increases the expression of adipophilin/adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP and decreases hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL, facilitating the accumulation and maintenance of lipid-rich environments suitable for the intracellular survival of M. leprae. HSL levels are not detectable in skin smear specimens taken from leprosy patients, but re-appear shortly after multidrug therapy (MDT. This study examined the effect of MDT components on host lipid metabolism in vitro, and the outcome of rifampicin, dapsone and clofazimine treatment on ADRP and HSL expression in THP-1 cells. Clofazimine attenuated the mRNA and protein levels of ADRP in M. leprae-infected cells, while those of HSL were increased. Rifampicin and dapsone did not show any significant effects on ADRP and HSL expression levels. A transient increase of interferon (IFN-β and IFN-γ mRNA was also observed in cells infected with M. leprae and treated with clofazimine. Lipid droplets accumulated by M. leprae-infection were significantly decreased 48 h after clofazimine treatment. Such effects were not evident in cells without M. leprae infection. In clinical samples, ADRP expression was decreased and HSL expression was increased after treatment. These results suggest that clofazimine modulates lipid metabolism in M. leprae-infected macrophages by modulating the expression of ADRP and HSL. It also induces IFN production in M. leprae-infected cells. The resultant decrease in lipid accumulation, increase in lipolysis, and activation of innate immunity may be some of the key actions of clofazimine.

  11. Tim-3 blocking rescue macrophage and T cell function against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in HIV+ patients

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    Isabel Sada-Ovalle

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (Tim 3 and programmed death 1 (PD-1 are co-inhibitory receptors involved in the so-called T cell exhaustion, and in vivo blockade of these molecules restores T cell dysfunction. High expression of Tim-3 and PD-1 is induced after chronic antigen-specific stimulation of T cells during HIV infection. We have previously demonstrated that the interaction of Tim-3 with its ligand galectin-9 induces macrophage activation and killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our aim in this study was to analyze the Tim-3 expression profile before and after six months of antiretroviral therapy and the impact of Tim-3 and PD-1 blocking on immunity against M. tuberculosis. Materials and methods: HIV+ patients naïve to anti-retroviral therapy (ART were followed up for six months. Peripheral immune-cell phenotype (CD38/HLA-DR/galectin-9/Tim-3 and PD-1 was assessed by flow cytometry. Supernatants were analyzed with a multiplex cytokine detection system (human Th1/Th2 cytokine Cytometric Bead Array by flow cytometry. Control of bacterial growth was evaluated by using an in vitro experimental model in which virulent M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages were cultured with T cells in the presence or absence of Tim-3 and PD-1 blocking antibodies. Interleukin-1 beta treatment of infected macrophages was evaluated by enumerating colony-forming units. Results: We showed that HIV+ patients had an increased expression of Tim-3 in T cells and were able to control bacterial growth before ART administration. By blocking Tim-3 and PD-1, macrophages and T cells recovered their functionality and had a higher ability to control bacterial growth; this result was partially dependent on the restitution of cytokine production. Conclusions: In this study, we demonstrated that increased Tim-3 expression can limit the ability of the immune system to control the infection of intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. The use of ART and

  12. Tim-3 blocking rescue macrophage and T cell function against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in HIV+ patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sada-Ovalle, Isabel; Ocaña-Guzman, Ranferi; Pérez-Patrigeón, Santiago; Chávez-Galán, Leslie; Sierra-Madero, Juan; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; Addo, Marylyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (Tim) 3 and programmed death 1 (PD-1) are co-inhibitory receptors involved in the so-called T cell exhaustion, and in vivo blockade of these molecules restores T cell dysfunction. High expression of Tim-3 and PD-1 is induced after chronic antigen-specific stimulation of T cells during HIV infection. We have previously demonstrated that the interaction of Tim-3 with its ligand galectin-9 induces macrophage activation and killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our aim in this study was to analyze the Tim-3 expression profile before and after six months of antiretroviral therapy and the impact of Tim-3 and PD-1 blocking on immunity against M. tuberculosis. Materials and methods HIV+ patients naïve to anti-retroviral therapy (ART) were followed up for six months. Peripheral immune-cell phenotype (CD38/HLA-DR/galectin-9/Tim-3 and PD-1) was assessed by flow cytometry. Supernatants were analyzed with a multiplex cytokine detection system (human Th1/Th2 cytokine Cytometric Bead Array) by flow cytometry. Control of bacterial growth was evaluated by using an in vitro experimental model in which virulent M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages were cultured with T cells in the presence or absence of Tim-3 and PD-1 blocking antibodies. Interleukin-1 beta treatment of infected macrophages was evaluated by enumerating colony-forming units. Results We showed that HIV+ patients had an increased expression of Tim-3 in T cells and were able to control bacterial growth before ART administration. By blocking Tim-3 and PD-1, macrophages and T cells recovered their functionality and had a higher ability to control bacterial growth; this result was partially dependent on the restitution of cytokine production. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrated that increased Tim-3 expression can limit the ability of the immune system to control the infection of intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. The use of ART and the in vitro

  13. Potential of surface-eroding poly(ethylene carbonate) for drug delivery to macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Adam; Water, Jorrit J; Wang, Yingya

    2016-01-01

    Films composed of poly(ethylene carbonate) (PEC), a biodegradable polymer, were compared with poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) films loaded with and without the tuberculosis drug rifampicin to study the characteristics and performance of PEC as a potential carrier for controlled drug delivery...... degradation products the murine macrophage cell line J774A.1 showed less susceptibility to PEC than to PLGA. However, when seeding the macrophages on PLGA and PEC films no relevant difference in cell proliferation/growth kinetics was observed. Overall, this study emphasizes that PEC is an attractive polymer...

  14. Macrophages largely contribute to heterologous anti-Propionibacterium acnes antibody-mediated protection from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae infection in mice.

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    Ma, Qiuyue; Sun, Changjiang; Yang, Feng; Wang, Lei; Qin, Wanhai; Xia, Xiaojing; Feng, Xin; Du, Chongtao; Gu, Jingmin; Han, Wenyu; Lei, Liancheng

    2015-03-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the causative agent of acute and chronic pleuropneumonia. Propionibacterium acnes is a facultative anaerobic gram-positive corynebacterium. We have previously found that anti-P. acnes antibodies can prevent A. pleuropneumoniae infections in mice. To investigate the role of macrophages in this process, affinity-purified anti-P. acnes IgG and anti-A. pleuropneumoniae IgG were used in opsonophagocytosis assays. Additionally, the efficacy of passive immunization with P. acnes serum against A. pleuropneumoniae was tested in macrophage-depleted mice. It was found that anti-P. acnes IgG had an effect similar to that of anti-A. pleuropneumoniae IgG (P > 0.05), which significantly promotes phagocytosis of A. pleuropneumoniae by macrophages (P pleuropneumoniae infection under conditions of macrophage depletion (P > 0.05). Furthermore, in mice that had been passively immunized with anti-P. acnes serum, macrophage depletion resulted in a greater A. pleuropneumoniae burden and more severe pathological features of pneumonia in lung tissues than occurred in macrophage-replete mice. It was concluded that macrophages are essential for the process by which anti-P. acnes antibody prevents A. pleuropneumoniae infection in mice. © 2015 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Microarray analysis of macrophage response to infection with Streptococcus oralis reveals the immunosuppressive effect of hydrogen peroxide.

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    Matsushima, Hitomi; Kumagai, Yutaro; Vandenbon, Alexis; Kataoka, Hideo; Kadena, Miki; Fukamachi, Haruka; Arimoto, Takafumi; Morisaki, Hirobumi; Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Okahashi, Nobuo; Kuwata, Hirotaka

    2017-02-13

    Oral streptococci including mitis group streptococci are commensal residents and are also the first to colonize the oral cavity. However, various species of these oral streptococci have the potential to invade the host and occasionally lead to severe infectious disease such as cardiovascular diseases. Oral streptococci have close interactions with the host immune system including macrophages at the oral mucosal surface. One notable common trait of oral streptococcus including Streptococcus oralis (S. oralis) is the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Using a comprehensive microarray approach, we sought to understand the innate immune response profiling affected by H2O2 production from oral streptococci. We compared the gene expression patterns of macrophages infected with S. oralis wild type (WT) and streptococcal pyruvate oxidase knockout (SpxB-KO), a strain that does not produce H2O2. We found that H2O2 from S. oralis suppressed proinflammatory gene expression such as TNF-α, that is induced in response to infection, and activated the cellular stress genes such as Egr-1 in response to oxidative stress. A comparative gene ontology analysis of S. oralis WT and SpxB-KO strains revealed that during infection, down regulated genes were closely related to the processes involved in the host defense reaction and up regulated genes were related with the cellular stress responses. Using qPCR analysis, we also confirmed the same pattern of expression changes such as TNF-α, IL-6 and Egr-1. Furthermore, supernatant from SpxB-KO could not suppress the expression of TNF-α in macrophages stimulated with LPS. These findings suggested that H2O2 production from S. oralis leads to the suppression of inflammatory responses and NF-κB signaling pathways in macrophages as well as the induction of the oxidative stress response. We concluded that streptococcal H2O2 production has the beneficial effects of modulating the innate immune response, thereby stabilizing streptococcal

  16. Suppression of NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against PRRSV-infected porcine alveolar macrophages in vitro.

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    Cao, Jun; Grauwet, Korneel; Vermeulen, Ben; Devriendt, Bert; Jiang, Ping; Favoreel, Herman; Nauwynck, Hans

    2013-06-28

    The adaptive immunity against PRRSV has already been studied in depth, but only limited data are available on the innate immune responses against this pathogen. In the present study, we analyzed the interaction between porcine natural killer (NK) cells and PRRSV-infected primary porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs), since NK cells are one of the most important components of innate immunity and PAMs are primary target cells of PRRSV infection. NK cytotoxicity assays were performed using enriched NK cells as effector cells and virus-infected or mock-inoculated PAMs as target cells. The NK cytotoxicity against PRRSV-infected PAMs was decreased starting from 6h post inoculation (hpi) till the end of the experiment (12 hpi) and was significantly lower than that against pseudorabies virus (PrV)-infected PAMs. UV-inactivated PRRSV also suppressed NK activity, but much less than infectious PRRSV. Furthermore, co-incubation with PRRSV-infected PAMs inhibited degranulation of NK cells. Finally, using the supernatant of PRRSV-infected PAMs collected at 12 hpi showed that the suppressive effect of PRRSV on NK cytotoxicity was not mediated by soluble factors. In conclusion, PRRSV-infected PAMs showed a reduced susceptibility toward NK cytotoxicity, which may represent one of the multiple evasion strategies of PRRSV.

  17. Critical Role for Monocytes/Macrophages in Rapid Progression to AIDS in Pediatric Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Rhesus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Chie; Merino, Kristen M; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Wang, Xiaolei; Alvarez, Xavier A; Wakao, Hiroshi; Mori, Kazuyasu; Kim, Woong-Ki; Veazey, Ronald S; Didier, Elizabeth S; Kuroda, Marcelo J

    2017-09-01

    Infant humans and rhesus macaques infected with the human or simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV or SIV), respectively, express higher viral loads and progress more rapidly to AIDS than infected adults. Activated memory CD4(+) T cells in intestinal tissues are major primary target cells for SIV/HIV infection, and massive depletion of these cells is considered a major cause of immunodeficiency. Monocytes and macrophages are important cells of innate immunity and also are targets of HIV/SIV infection. We reported previously that a high peripheral blood monocyte turnover rate was predictive for the onset of disease progression to AIDS in SIV-infected adult macaques. The purpose of this study was to determine if earlier or higher infection of monocytes/macrophages contributes to the more rapid progression to AIDS in infants. We observed that uninfected infant rhesus macaques exhibited higher physiologic baseline monocyte turnover than adults. Early after SIV infection, the monocyte turnover further increased, and it remained high during progression to AIDS. A high percentage of terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase dUTP nick end label (TUNEL)-positive macrophages in the lymph nodes (LNs) and intestine corresponded with an increasing number of macrophages derived from circulating monocytes (bromodeoxyuridine positive [BrdU(+)] CD163(+)), suggesting that the increased blood monocyte turnover was required to rapidly replenish destroyed tissue macrophages. Immunofluorescence analysis further demonstrated that macrophages were a significant portion of the virus-producing cells found in LNs, intestinal tissues, and lungs. The higher baseline monocyte turnover in infant macaques and subsequent macrophage damage by SIV infection may help explain the basis of more rapid disease progression to AIDS in infants.IMPORTANCE HIV infection progresses much more rapidly in pediatric cases than in adults; however, the mechanism for this difference is unclear. Using the rhesus macaque model

  18. HIV-1-infected monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages are impaired in their ability to produce superoxide radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, A L; Groveman, D S; Wallace, P K; Fanger, M W

    1997-01-01

    Monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages play a key role in immune defense against pathogenic organisms. Superoxide anion production is a key mechanism by which phagocytes kill pathogens. We sought to determine whether human immunodeficiency virus-infected monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages are compromised in their ability to produce the superoxide anion following stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or after cross-linking the type I Fc receptor for IgG (Fc gamma RI). Fc gamma RI was cross-linked by the binding of monoclonal antibody 197, which reacts with an epitope of Fc gamma RI via its Fc region. Monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages obtained from seronegative donors were infected in vitro with human immunodeficiency virus-1JR-FL and used in effector assays that measured superoxide anion production by the reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium. Reduced nitroblue tetrazolium was measured spectrophotometrically and by microscopy in which the percentage of cells containing intracellular deposits of the dye was assessed. By spectrophotometric measurement, we found that human immunodeficiency virus-infected monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages produced less superoxide anion following either phorbol myristate acetate stimulation or Fc gamma RI cross-linking than uninfected cells from the same donor. Using microscopy we saw no difference in the percentage of infected and uninfected macrophages containing intracellular deposits of nitroblue tetrazolium suggesting that human immunodeficiency virus-infected macrophages produce less superoxide anion on a per cell basis than uninfected macrophages. Activation of human immunodeficiency virus-infected monocytes with interferon-gamma for 72 h prior to stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate or monoclonal antibody 197 increased their ability to reduce nitroblue tetrazolium. These findings suggest that impairment in the production of reactive oxygen intermediates may, in some cases, contribute to

  19. Gene expression study of monocytes/macrophages during early foreign body reaction and identification of potential precursors of myofibroblasts.

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    Lindsay Mesure

    Full Text Available Foreign body reaction (FBR, initiated by adherence of macrophages to biomaterials, is associated with several complications. Searching for mechanisms potentially useful to overcome these complications, we have established the signaling role of monocytes/macrophages in the development of FBR and the presence of CD34(+ cells that potentially differentiate into myofibroblasts. Therefore, CD68(+ cells were in vitro activated with fibrinogen and also purified from the FBR after 3 days of implantation in rats. Gene expression profiles showed a switch from monocytes and macrophages attracted by fibrinogen to activated macrophages and eventually wound-healing macrophages. The immature FBR also contained a subpopulation of CD34(+ cells, which could be differentiated into myofibroblasts. This study showed that macrophages are the clear driving force of FBR, dependent on milieu, and myofibroblast deposition and differentiation.

  20. Evaluation of the relationship between fungal infection, neutrophil leukocytes and macrophages in cervicovaginal smears: Light microscopic examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirezen, Şayeste; Dönmez, Hanife Güler; Özcan, Merve; Beksaç, Mehmet Sinan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Right after opportunistic fungi become pathogenic, they face immune system cells including macrophages and neutrophil leukocytes. Although the relationship between fungi and immune cells are being widely studied by using animal models and culture techniques, cervicovaginal smears have not been used to evaluate this interaction yet. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the interactions between fungal infection, macrophages and neutrophil leukocytes in cervicovaginal smear. Materials and Methods: Papanicolaou-stained cervicovaginal smears from 2307 women, aged between 18 and 73 years, were examined by light microscopy. Periodic acid–Schiff stain was also used to confirm the presence of fungal cell walls. Results: Fungal infections were detected in 239 of 2307 patients (10.4%), and these cases were taken as the study group. Cases without any infectious agents (n = 1800, 78%) were considered as the control group. When the study and control groups were statistically compared in view of macrophages and neutrophil leukocytes, a significant relationship between presence of fungal infection, macrophages and neutrophil leukocytes was detected (P 0.05). Conclusions: Our findings indicate that macrophages and neutrophils may play a determining role in host defense against fungal infection together, but neither yeast nor filamentous forms affect the presence of neutrophil leukocytes and macrophages. As a result of this, both yeast and filamentous forms may have pathogenic effects. PMID:26229242

  1. Protective Role of Toll-like Receptor 3-Induced Type I Interferon in Murine Coronavirus Infection of Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Navas-Martin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like Receptors (TLRs sense viral infections and induce production of type I interferons (IFNs, other cytokines, and chemokines. Viral recognition by TLRs and other pattern recognition receptors (PRRs has been proven to be cell-type specific. Triggering of TLRs with selected ligands can be beneficial against some viral infections. Macrophages are antigen-presenting cells that express TLRs and have a key role in the innate and adaptive immunity against viruses. Coronaviruses (CoVs are single-stranded, positive-sense RNA viruses that cause acute and chronic infections and can productively infect macrophages. Investigation of the interplay between CoVs and PRRs is in its infancy. We assessed the effect of triggering TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, and TLR7 with selected ligands on the susceptibility of the J774A.1 macrophage cell line to infection with murine coronavirus (mouse hepatitis virus, [MHV]. Stimulation of TLR2, TLR4, or TLR7 did not affect MHV production. In contrast, pre-stimulation of TLR3 with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C hindered MHV infection through induction of IFN-β in macrophages. We demonstrate that activation of TLR3 with the synthetic ligand poly I:C mediates antiviral immunity that diminishes (MHV-A59 or suppresses (MHV-JHM, MHV-3 virus production in macrophages.

  2. Staphylococcus aureus α toxin potentiates opportunistic bacterial lung infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Taylor S; Hilliard, Jamese J; Jones-Nelson, Omari; Keller, Ashley E; O'Day, Terrence; Tkaczyk, Christine; DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Hamilton, Melissa; Pelletier, Mark; Wang, Qun; Diep, Binh An; Le, Vien T M; Cheng, Lily; Suzich, JoAnn; Stover, C Kendall; Sellman, Bret R

    2016-03-01

    Broad-spectrum antibiotic use may adversely affect a patient's beneficial microbiome and fuel cross-species spread of drug resistance. Although alternative pathogen-specific approaches are rationally justified, a major concern for this precision medicine strategy is that co-colonizing or co-infecting opportunistic bacteria may still cause serious disease. In a mixed-pathogen lung infection model, we find that the Staphylococcus aureus virulence factor α toxin potentiates Gram-negative bacterial proliferation, systemic spread, and lethality by preventing acidification of bacteria-containing macrophage phagosomes, thereby reducing effective killing of both S. aureus and Gram-negative bacteria. Prophylaxis or early treatment with a single α toxin neutralizing monoclonal antibody prevented proliferation of co-infecting Gram-negative pathogens and lethality while also promoting S. aureus clearance. These studies suggest that some pathogen-specific, antibody-based approaches may also work to reduce infection risk in patients colonized or co-infected with S. aureus and disparate drug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial opportunists.

  3. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor is elevated in alveolar macrophages from sheep naturally infected with maedi-visna virus and stimulates maedi-visna virus replication in macrophages in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; Harkiss, G D; Hopkins, J; Woodall, C J

    2002-08-01

    Infection by maedi-visna virus, a lentivirus of sheep, leads to chronic inflammatory reactions of various tissues. In this report we have analysed the role of specific cytokines in the disease process. A significant increase in expression of interleukin-6, interleukin-10, granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and transforming growth factor-beta1 mRNA was observed in alveolar macrophages isolated from the lungs of naturally infected animals when compared with lungs of seronegative controls. Levels of GM-CSF mRNA expression in alveolar macrophages correlated with the presence of lung lesions, but there was no correlation of interleukin-10, interleukin-6, tumour necrosis factor-alpha and transforming growth factor-beta1 mRNA levels in alveolar macrophages from animals with pulmonary lesions. In vitro investigation showed that GM-CSF in the range 0.1-10 ng/ml induced a significant increase in viral p25 production after 7 days in acutely infected blood monocyte-derived macrophages. The production of p25 peaked between 7 and 14 days exposure to 10 ng/ml of GM-CSF. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that the level of viral DNA in monocyte-derived macrophages was dose-dependent following GM-CSF treatment in the range 0.1-100 ng/ml after 7 days. Viral mRNA expression was also enhanced. These findings indicate a role for GM-CSF in the pathogenesis of lymphoid interstitial pneumonia in infected animals.

  4. Infections with avian pathogenic and fecal Escherichia coli strains display similar lung histopathology and macrophage apoptosis.

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    Fabiana Horn

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare histopathological changes in the lungs of chickens infected with avian pathogenic (APEC and avian fecal (A(fecal Escherichia coli strains, and to analyze how the interaction of the bacteria with avian macrophages relates to the outcome of the infection. Chickens were infected intratracheally with three APEC strains, MT78, IMT5155, and UEL17, and one non-pathogenic A(fecal strain, IMT5104. The pathogenicity of the strains was assessed by isolating bacteria from lungs, kidneys, and spleens at 24 h post-infection (p.i.. Lungs were examined for histopathological changes at 12, 18, and 24 h p.i. Serial lung sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (HE, terminal deoxynucleotidyl dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL for detection of apoptotic cells, and an anti-O2 antibody for detection of MT78 and IMT5155. UEL17 and IMT5104 did not cause systemic infections and the extents of lung colonization were two orders of magnitude lower than for the septicemic strains MT78 and IMT5155, yet all four strains caused the same extent of inflammation in the lungs. The inflammation was localized; there were some congested areas next to unaffected areas. Only the inflamed regions became labeled with anti-O2 antibody. TUNEL labeling revealed the presence of apoptotic cells at 12 h p.i in the inflamed regions only, and before any necrotic foci could be seen. The TUNEL-positive cells were very likely dying heterophils, as evidenced by the purulent inflammation. Some of the dying cells observed in avian lungs in situ may also be macrophages, since all four avian E. coli induced caspase 3/7 activation in monolayers of HD11 avian macrophages. In summary, both pathogenic and non-pathogenic fecal strains of avian E. coli produce focal infections in the avian lung, and these are accompanied by inflammation and cell death in the infected areas.

  5. Modulation of macrophage cytokine profiles during solid tumor progression: susceptibility to Candida albicans infection

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    Venturini James

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to attain a better understanding of the interactions between opportunist fungi and their hosts, we investigated the cytokine profile associated with the inflammatory response to Candida albicans infection in mice with solid Ehrlich tumors of different degrees. Methods Groups of eight animals were inoculated intraperitoneally with 5 × 106 C. albicans 7, 14 or 21 days after tumor implantation. After 24 or 72 hours, the animals were euthanized and intraperitoneal lavage fluid was collected. Peritoneal macrophages were cultivated and the levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-12, IL-10 and IL-4 released into the supernatants were measured by ELISA. Kidney, liver and spleen samples were evaluated for fungal dissemination. Tumor-free animals and animals that had only been subjected to C. albicans infection were used as control groups. Results Our results demonstrated that the mice produced more IFN-γ and TNF-α and less IL-10, and also exhibited fungal clearance, at the beginning of tumor evolution. With the tumor progression, this picture changed: IL-10 production increased and IFN-γ and TNF-α release decreased; furthermore, there was extensive fungal dissemination. Conclusion Our results indicate that solid tumors can affect the production of macrophage cytokines and, in consequence, affect host resistance to opportunistic infections.

  6. Human Alveolar Macrophages May Not Be Susceptible to Direct Infection by a Human Influenza Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettensohn, David B; Frampton, Mark W; Nichols, Joan E; Roberts, Norbert J

    2016-12-01

    The current studies were undertaken to determine the susceptibility of human alveolar macrophages (AMs) to influenza A virus (IAV) infection in comparison with autologous peripheral blood-derived monocytes-macrophages (PBMs). AMs and PBMs were exposed to IAV in vitro and examined for their ability to bind and internalize IAV, and synthesize viral proteins and RNA. PBMs but not AMs demonstrated binding and internalization of the virus, synthesizing viral proteins and RNA. Exposure of AMs in the presence of a sialidase inhibitor or anti-IAV antibody resulted in viral protein synthesis by the cells. Exposure of AMs to fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled IAV in the presence of anti-fluorescein isothiocyanate antibody also resulted in viral protein synthesis. Thus, human AMs are apparently not susceptible to direct infection by a human IAV but are likely to be infected indirectly in the setting of exposure in the presence of antibody that binds the challenging strain of IAV. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Monarch-1 Activation in Murine Macrophage Cell Line (J774 A.1 Infected with Iranian Strain of Leishmania Major

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    A Fata

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leishmania major is an intracellular parasite transmitted through the bite of the female phlebotomine sand flies. Leishmania major is able to escape the host immune defense and survive within macrophages. Modulation of the NF-κB (Nuclear Factor-Kappa B activation and suppression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines by L. major are the main evasion mechanisms that remain to be explored. This study aims to examine the expression level of the Monarch-1 in L. major-infected macrophages, as a negative regulator of the NF-κB activation.Methods: Murine macrophage cell line (J774 A.1 was infected by metacyclic form of Leishmania promasti­gotes at macrophage/parasite ratio of 1:10. After harvesting infected cells at different times, total RNA was extracted and converted to cDNA. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was performed for Monarch-1 by specific primers. Hypoxanthine Phospho-Ribosyl Transferase (HPRT was used as an internal control to adjust the amount of mRNA in each sample.Results: Semiquantitive analysis of Monarch-1 mRNA expression level showed a significant expres­sion increase within 6 to 30 hours after L. major infection of macrophages when compared to the con­trol macrophages.Conclusion: Monarch-1 expression level reveals a significant increase in the early phase of macro­phage infection with L. major, which in turn may suppress IL-12 production in Leishmania infected macrophages and deeply influence the relationship between host and parasite.

  8. Distinct Macrophage Fates after in vitro Infection with Different Species of Leishmania: Induction of Apoptosis by Leishmania (Leishmania amazonensis, but Not by Leishmania (Viannia guyanensis.

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    Jarina Pena DaMata

    Full Text Available Leishmania is an intracellular parasite in vertebrate hosts, including man. During infection, amastigotes replicate inside macrophages and are transmitted to healthy cells, leading to amplification of the infection. Although transfer of amastigotes from infected to healthy cells is a crucial step that may shape the outcome of the infection, it is not fully understood. Here we compare L. amazonensis and L. guyanensis infection in C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice and investigate the fate of macrophages when infected with these species of Leishmania in vitro. As previously shown, infection of mice results in distinct outcomes: L. amazonensis causes a chronic infection in both strains of mice (although milder in C57BL/6, whereas L. guyanensis does not cause them disease. In vitro, infection is persistent in L. amazonensis-infected macrophages whereas L. guyanensis growth is controlled by host cells from both strains of mice. We demonstrate that, in vitro, L. amazonensis induces apoptosis of both C57BL/6 and BALB/c macrophages, characterized by PS exposure, DNA cleavage into nucleosomal size fragments, and consequent hypodiploidy. None of these signs were seen in macrophages infected with L. guyanensis, which seem to die through necrosis, as indicated by increased PI-, but not Annexin V-, positive cells. L. amazonensis-induced macrophage apoptosis was associated to activation of caspases-3, -8 and -9 in both strains of mice. Considering these two species of Leishmania and strains of mice, macrophage apoptosis, induced at the initial moments of infection, correlates with chronic infection, regardless of its severity. We present evidence suggestive that macrophages phagocytize L. amazonensis-infected cells, which has not been verified so far. The ingestion of apoptotic infected macrophages by healthy macrophages could be a way of amastigote spreading, leading to the establishment of infection.

  9. The balance of apoptotic and necrotic cell death in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infected macrophages is not dependent on bacterial virulence.

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An important mechanism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis pathogenesis is the ability to control cell death pathways in infected macrophages: apoptotic cell death is bactericidal, whereas necrotic cell death may facilitate bacterial dissemination and transmission. METHODS: We examine M.tuberculosis control of spontaneous and chemically induced macrophage cell death using automated confocal fluorescence microscopy, image analysis, flow cytometry, plate-reader based vitality assays, and ...

  10. Dysregulated Type I Interferon and Inflammatory Monocyte-Macrophage Responses Cause Lethal Pneumonia in SARS-CoV-Infected Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channappanavar, Rudragouda; Fehr, Anthony R; Vijay, Rahul; Mack, Matthias; Zhao, Jincun; Meyerholz, David K; Perlman, Stanley

    2016-02-10

    Highly pathogenic human respiratory coronaviruses cause acute lethal disease characterized by exuberant inflammatory responses and lung damage. However, the factors leading to lung pathology are not well understood. Using mice infected with SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome)-CoV, we show that robust virus replication accompanied by delayed type I interferon (IFN-I) signaling orchestrates inflammatory responses and lung immunopathology with diminished survival. IFN-I remains detectable until after virus titers peak, but early IFN-I administration ameliorates immunopathology. This delayed IFN-I signaling promotes the accumulation of pathogenic inflammatory monocyte-macrophages (IMMs), resulting in elevated lung cytokine/chemokine levels, vascular leakage, and impaired virus-specific T cell responses. Genetic ablation of the IFN-αβ receptor (IFNAR) or IMM depletion protects mice from lethal infection, without affecting viral load. These results demonstrate that IFN-I and IMM promote lethal SARS-CoV infection and identify IFN-I and IMMs as potential therapeutic targets in patients infected with pathogenic coronavirus and perhaps other respiratory viruses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Lymphocytes and macrophages are infected by Theileria equi, but T cells and B cells are not required to establish infection in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Joshua D; Ueti, Massaro W; Johnson, Wendell C; Scoles, Glen A; Knowles, Donald P; Mealey, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    Theileria equi has a biphasic life cycle in horses, with a period of intraleukocyte development followed by patent erythrocytic parasitemia that causes acute and sometimes fatal hemolytic disease. Unlike Theileria spp. that infect cattle (Theileria parva and Theileria annulata), the intraleukocyte stage (schizont) of Theileria equi does not cause uncontrolled host cell proliferation or other significant pathology. Nevertheless, schizont-infected leukocytes are of interest because of their potential to alter host cell function and because immune responses directed against this stage could halt infection and prevent disease. Based on cellular morphology, Theileria equi has been reported to infect lymphocytes in vivo and in vitro, but the specific phenotype of schizont-infected cells has yet to be defined. To resolve this knowledge gap in Theileria equi pathogenesis, peripheral blood mononuclear cells were infected in vitro and the phenotype of infected cells determined using flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. These experiments demonstrated that the host cell range of Theileria equi was broader than initially reported and included B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes and monocyte/macrophages. To determine if B and T lymphocytes were required to establish infection in vivo, horses affected with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), which lack functional B and T lymphocytes, were inoculated with Theileria equi sporozoites. SCID horses developed patent erythrocytic parasitemia, indicating that B and T lymphocytes are not necessary to complete the Theileria equi life cycle in vivo. These findings suggest that the factors mediating Theileria equi leukocyte invasion and intracytoplasmic differentiation are common to several leukocyte subsets and are less restricted than for Theileria annulata and Theileria parva. These data will greatly facilitate future investigation into the relationships between Theileria equi leukocyte tropism and pathogenesis, breed

  12. Lymphocytes and macrophages are infected by Theileria equi, but T cells and B cells are not required to establish infection in vivo.

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    Joshua D Ramsay

    Full Text Available Theileria equi has a biphasic life cycle in horses, with a period of intraleukocyte development followed by patent erythrocytic parasitemia that causes acute and sometimes fatal hemolytic disease. Unlike Theileria spp. that infect cattle (Theileria parva and Theileria annulata, the intraleukocyte stage (schizont of Theileria equi does not cause uncontrolled host cell proliferation or other significant pathology. Nevertheless, schizont-infected leukocytes are of interest because of their potential to alter host cell function and because immune responses directed against this stage could halt infection and prevent disease. Based on cellular morphology, Theileria equi has been reported to infect lymphocytes in vivo and in vitro, but the specific phenotype of schizont-infected cells has yet to be defined. To resolve this knowledge gap in Theileria equi pathogenesis, peripheral blood mononuclear cells were infected in vitro and the phenotype of infected cells determined using flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. These experiments demonstrated that the host cell range of Theileria equi was broader than initially reported and included B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes and monocyte/macrophages. To determine if B and T lymphocytes were required to establish infection in vivo, horses affected with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID, which lack functional B and T lymphocytes, were inoculated with Theileria equi sporozoites. SCID horses developed patent erythrocytic parasitemia, indicating that B and T lymphocytes are not necessary to complete the Theileria equi life cycle in vivo. These findings suggest that the factors mediating Theileria equi leukocyte invasion and intracytoplasmic differentiation are common to several leukocyte subsets and are less restricted than for Theileria annulata and Theileria parva. These data will greatly facilitate future investigation into the relationships between Theileria equi leukocyte tropism and pathogenesis

  13. Rhinovirus infection induces interleukin-13 production from CD11b-positive, M2-polarized exudative macrophages.

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    Chung, Yutein; Hong, Jun Young; Lei, Jing; Chen, Qiang; Bentley, J Kelley; Hershenson, Marc B

    2015-02-01

    Rhinovirus (RV) causes asthma exacerbations. Previously, we showed that adherent bronchoalveolar cells from allergen-treated mice produce IL-13 when stimulated with RV ex vivo, implicating cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage in viral-induced airway inflammation. In this study, we hypothesized that RV infection of allergen-treated mice results in IL-13 production by CD11b+ exudative macrophages in vivo. We sensitized and challenged BALB/c mice with ovalbumin (OVA), after which mice were inoculated with RV or sham HeLa cell lysate. After 1 day, lungs were harvested, and cell suspensions were analyzed by flow cytometry. We repeated this process in IL-13 reporter mice, CD11b-DTR mice in which diphtheria toxin selectively depletes CD11b+ cells, and chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) null mice. We found that lungs of mice infected with RV alone showed increases in CD45+, CD68+, F4/80+, Ly6C+, and CD11b(high) cells, indicating an influx of inflammatory monocytes and exudative macrophages. The combination of OVA and RV had synergistic effects on the exudative macrophage number. However, CD11b+ cells from OVA-treated, RV-infected mice showed M2 polarization, including expression of CD206 and CD301 and production of IL-13. Similar results were obtained in IL-13 reporter mice. Diphtheria toxin depleted CD11b+, IL-13-producing cells in OVA-treated, RV-infected, CD11b-DTR mice, decreasing airway inflammation and responsiveness. CD11b+, Ly6C+ cells were reduced in CCR2 knockout mice. We conclude that, in contrast to naive mice, RV infection of mice with allergic airways disease induces an influx of IL-13-producing CD11b+ exudative macrophages bearing M2 macrophage markers. This finding further implicates alternatively activated macrophages in RV-induced asthma exacerbations.

  14. Depletion of macrophages in mice results in higher dengue virus titers and highlights the role of macrophages for virus control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fink, K.; Ng, C.; Nkenfou, C.; Vasudevan, S.G.; Rooijen, van N.; Schul, W.

    2009-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are target cells for dengue infection. Besides their potential role for virus replication, activated monocytes/macrophages produce cytokines that may be critical for dengue pathology. To study the in vivo role of monocytes and macrophages for virus replication, we depleted

  15. Soluble CD40 Ligand in Sera of Subjects Exposed to Leishmania infantum Infection Reduces the Parasite Load in Macrophages.

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    Fabrícia Alvisi de Oliveira

    Full Text Available While CD40L is typically a membrane glycoprotein expressed on activated T cells and platelets that binds and activates CD40 on the surface on antigen presenting cells, a soluble derivative (sCD40L that appears to retain its biological activity after cleavage from cell membrane also exists. We recently reported that sCD40L is associated with clinical resolution of visceral leishmaniasis and protection against the disease. In the present study we investigated if this sCD40L is functional and exerts anti-parasitic effect in L. infantum-infected macrophages.Macrophages from normal human donors were infected with L. infantum promastigotes and incubated with either sera from subjects exposed to L. infantum infection, monoclonal antibodies against human CD40L, or an isotype control antibody. We then evaluated infection by counting the number of infected cells and the number of parasites in each cell. We also measured a variety of immune modulatory cytokines in these macrophage culture supernatants by Luminex assay. The addition of sCD40L, either recombinant or from infected individuals' serum, decreased both the number of infected macrophages and number of intracellular parasites. Moreover, this treatment increased the production of IL-12, IL-23, IL-27, IL-15, and IL1β such that negative correlations between the levels of these cytokines with both the infection ratio and number of intracellular parasites were observed.sCD40L from sera of subjects exposed to L. infantum is functional and improves both the control of parasite and production of inflamatory cytokines of infected macrophages. Although the mechanisms involved in parasite killing are still unclear and require further exploration, these findings indicate a protective role of sCD40L in visceral leishmaniasis.

  16. Differential expression of iron acquisition genes by Brucella melitensis and Brucella canis during macrophage infection.

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    Linda Eskra

    Full Text Available Brucella spp. cause chronic zoonotic disease often affecting individuals and animals in impoverished economic or public health conditions; however, these bacteria do not have obvious virulence factors. Restriction of iron availability to pathogens is an effective strategy of host defense. For brucellae, virulence depends on the ability to survive and replicate within the host cell where iron is an essential nutrient for the growth and survival of both mammalian and bacterial cells. Iron is a particularly scarce nutrient for bacteria with an intracellular lifestyle. Brucella melitensis and Brucella canis share ~99% of their genomes but differ in intracellular lifestyles. To identify differences, gene transcription of these two pathogens was examined during infection of murine macrophages and compared to broth grown bacteria. Transcriptome analysis of B. melitensis and B. canis revealed differences of genes involved in iron transport. Gene transcription of the TonB, enterobactin, and ferric anguibactin transport systems was increased in B. canis but not B. melitensis during infection of macrophages. The data suggest differences in iron requirements that may contribute to differences observed in the lifestyles of these closely related pathogens. The initial importance of iron for B. canis but not for B. melitensis helps elucidate differing intracellular survival strategies for two closely related bacteria and provides insight for controlling these pathogens.

  17. Exosomes released from M. tuberculosis infected cells can suppress IFN-γ mediated activation of naive macrophages.

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    Prachi P Singh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb are known to be refractory to IFN-γ stimulation. Previous studies have shown that M.tb express components such as the 19-kDa lipoprotein and peptidoglycan that can bind to macrophage receptors including the Toll-like receptor 2 resulting in the loss in IFN-γ responsiveness. However, it is unclear whether this effect is limited to infected macrophages. We have previously shown that M.tb-infected macrophages release exosomes which are 30-100 nm membrane bound vesicles of endosomal origin that function in intercellular communication. These exosomes contain mycobacterial components including the 19-kDa lipoprotein and therefore we hypothesized that macrophages exposed to exosomes may show limited response to IFN-γ stimulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Exosomes were isolated from resting as well as M.tb-infected RAW264.7 macrophages. Mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMØ were treated with exosomes +/- IFN-γ. Cells were harvested and analyzed for suppression of IFN-γ responsive genes by flow cytometry and real time PCR. We found that exosomes derived from M.tb H37Rv-infected but not from uninfected macrophages inhibited IFN-γ induced MHC class II and CD64 expression on BMMØ. This inhibition was only partially dependent on the presence of lipoproteins but completely dependent on TLR2 and MyD88. The exosomes isolated from infected cells did not inhibit STAT1 Tyrosine phosphorylation but down-regulated IFN-γ induced expression of the class II major histocompatibility complex transactivator; a key regulator of class II MHC expression. Microarray studies showed that subsets of genes induced by IFN-γ were inhibited by exosomes from H37Rv-infected cells including genes involved in antigen presentation. Moreover, this set of genes partially overlapped with the IFN-γ-induced genes inhibited by H37Rv infection. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that exosomes, as

  18. Effect of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection on the clearance of Haemophilus parasuis by porcine alveolar macrophages.

    OpenAIRE

    Solano, G I; Bautista, E.; Molitor, T W; Segales, J.; Pijoan, C

    1998-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection in young piglets is frequently associated with secondary infection due to various pathogens, especially those of the respiratory tract. One of the most important mechanisms in respiratory diseases is related to the alteration of function of porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs). The objective of this study was to determine how PRRS virus infection affects the capabilities of PAMs in the phagocytosis and destruction of Haemoph...

  19. Reactomes of porcine alveolar macrophages infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

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    Zhihua Jiang

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS has devastated pig industries worldwide for many years. It is caused by a small RNA virus (PRRSV, which targets almost exclusively pig monocytes or macrophages. In the present study, five SAGE (serial analysis of gene expression libraries derived from 0 hour mock-infected and 6, 12, 16 and 24 hours PRRSV-infected porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs produced a total 643,255 sequenced tags with 91,807 unique tags. Differentially expressed (DE tags were then detected using the Bayesian framework followed by gene/mRNA assignment, arbitrary selection and manual annotation, which determined 699 DE genes for reactome analysis. The DAVID, KEGG and REACTOME databases assigned 573 of the DE genes into six biological systems, 60 functional categories and 504 pathways. The six systems are: cellular processes, genetic information processing, environmental information processing, metabolism, organismal systems and human diseases as defined by KEGG with modification. Self-organizing map (SOM analysis further grouped these 699 DE genes into ten clusters, reflecting their expression trends along these five time points. Based on the number one functional category in each system, cell growth and death, transcription processes, signal transductions, energy metabolism, immune system and infectious diseases formed the major reactomes of PAMs responding to PRRSV infection. Our investigation also focused on dominant pathways that had at least 20 DE genes identified, multi-pathway genes that were involved in 10 or more pathways and exclusively-expressed genes that were included in one system. Overall, our present study reported a large set of DE genes, compiled a comprehensive coverage of pathways, and revealed system-based reactomes of PAMs infected with PRRSV. We believe that our reactome data provides new insight into molecular mechanisms involved in host genetic complexity of antiviral activities against PRRSV and

  20. Aerosol-based efficient delivery of azithromycin to alveolar macrophages for treatment of respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togami, Kohei; Chono, Sumio; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of aerosol-based delivery of azithromycin (AZM) for the treatment of respiratory infections caused by pathogenic microorganisms infected in alveolar macrophages (AMs) was evaluated by comparison with oral administration. The aerosol formulation of AZM (0.2 mg/kg) was administered to rat lungs using a Liquid MicroSprayer(®). The oral formulation of AZM (50 mg/kg) was used for comparison. Time-courses of concentrations of AZM in AMs following administration were obtained, and then the therapeutic availability (TA) was calculated. In addition, the area under the concentrations of AZM in AMs - time curve/minimum inhibitory concentration at which 90% of isolates ratio (AUC/MIC90) were calculated to estimate the antibacterial effects in AMs. The TA of AZM in AMs following administration of aerosol formulation was markedly greater than that following administration of oral formulation. In addition, the AUC/MIC90 of AZM in AMs was markedly higher than the effective values. This indicates that the aerosol formulation could be useful for the treatment of respiratory infections caused by pathogenic microorganisms infected in AMs. This study suggests that aerosolized AZM is an effective pulmonary drug delivery system for the treatment of respiratory infections.

  1. Macrophage inflammatory protein-2 is a mediator of polymorphonuclear neutrophil influx in ocular bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernacki, K A; Barrett, R P; Hobden, J A; Hazlett, L D

    2000-01-15

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected cornea are required to clear bacteria from affected tissue, yet their persistence may contribute to irreversible tissue destruction. This study examined the role of C-X-C chemokines in PMN infiltration into P. aeruginosa-infected cornea and the contribution of these mediators to disease pathology. After P. aeruginosa challenge, corneal PMN number and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and KC levels were compared in mice that are susceptible (cornea perforates) or resistant (cornea heals) to P. aeruginosa infection. While corneal PMN myeloperoxidase activity (indicator of PMN number) was similar in both groups of mice at 1 and 3 days postinfection, by 5-7 days postinfection corneas of susceptible mice contained a significantly greater number of inflammatory cells. Corneal MIP-2, but not KC, levels correlated with persistence of PMN in the cornea of susceptible mice. To test the biological relevance of these data, resistant mice were treated systemically with rMIP-2. This treatment resulted in increased corneal PMN number and significantly exacerbated corneal disease. Conversely, administration of neutralizing MIP-2 pAb to susceptible mice reduced both PMN infiltration and corneal destruction. Collectively, these findings support an important role for MIP-2 in recruitment of PMN to P. aeruginosa-infected cornea. These data also strongly suggest that a timely down-regulation of the host inflammatory response is critical for resolution of infection.

  2. Alveolar macrophages are essential for protection from respiratory failure and associated morbidity following influenza virus infection.

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    Christoph Schneider

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar macrophages (AM are critical for defense against bacterial and fungal infections. However, a definitive role of AM in viral infections remains unclear. We here report that AM play a key role in survival to influenza and vaccinia virus infection by maintaining lung function and thereby protecting from asphyxiation. Absence of AM in GM-CSF-deficient (Csf2-/- mice or selective AM depletion in wild-type mice resulted in impaired gas exchange and fatal hypoxia associated with severe morbidity to influenza virus infection, while viral clearance was affected moderately. Virus-induced morbidity was far more severe in Csf2-/- mice lacking AM, as compared to Batf3-deficient mice lacking CD8α+ and CD103+ DCs. Csf2-/- mice showed intact anti-viral CD8+ T cell responses despite slightly impaired CD103+ DC development. Importantly, selective reconstitution of AM development in Csf2rb-/- mice by neonatal transfer of wild-type AM progenitors prevented severe morbidity and mortality, demonstrating that absence of AM alone is responsible for disease severity in mice lacking GM-CSF or its receptor. In addition, CD11c-Cre/Ppargfl/fl mice with a defect in AM but normal adaptive immunity showed increased morbidity and lung failure to influenza virus. Taken together, our results suggest a superior role of AM compared to CD103+ DCs in protection from acute influenza and vaccinia virus infection-induced morbidity and mortality.

  3. Monocytes/macrophages infected with Toxoplasma gondii do not increase co-stimulatory molecules while maintaining their migratory ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seipel, Daniele; Ribeiro-Gomes, Flavia Lima; Barcelos, Michelle Willmen; Ramalho, André Villaça; Kanashiro, Milton M; Kipnis, Thereza Liberman; Arnholdt, Andrea Cristina Veto

    2009-09-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that is able to disseminate into deep tissues and cross biological barriers, reaching immunoprivileged sites such as the brain and retina. The parasite is able to infect macrophages and dendritic cells and use them for dispersal throughout the body, but the activation state of those cells is unknown. We investigated the ability of human and murine cells from monocytic/macrophage lineages that had not previously been exposed to inflammatory cytokines to up-regulate co-stimulatory and adhesion molecules upon infection. Toxoplasma gondii-infected human monocytes (freshly isolated and THP1 lineage) were unable to up-regulate CD86, CD83, CD40 or CD1a. CD80 expression increased in infected cells but expression of l-selectin and beta2 integrin was unaltered. We evaluated the ability of infected macrophages from wild type C57/BL/6 or CD14(-/-) mice to migrate in 8 mum transwells. Infected cells from CD14(-/-) mice were more likely to de-adhere than infected cells from wild type mice but they did not show any increase in migratory ability. The non-stimulatory profile of these infected cells may contribute to parasite spread throughout the lymphatic circulation in the initial phases of infection.

  4. HIV infection enhances TRAIL-induced cell death in macrophage by down-regulating decoy receptor expression and generation of reactive oxygen species.

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    Dan-Ming Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL could induce apoptosis of HIV-1-infected monocyte-derived macrophage (MDM, but the molecular mechanisms are not well understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By using an HIV-1 Env-pseudotyped virus (HIV-1 PV-infected MDM cell model we demonstrate that HIV-1 PV infection down-regulates the expression of TRAIL decoy receptor 1 (DcR1 and 2 (DcR2, and cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP, but dose not affect the expression of death receptor 4 and 5 (DR4, DR5, and Bcl-2 family members in MDM cells. Furthermore, recombinant soluble TRAIL and an agonistic anti-DR5 antibody, AD5-10, treatment stimulates reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and JNK phosphorylation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HIV infection facilitates TRIAL-induced cell death in MDM by down-regulating the expression of TRAIL decoy receptors and intracellular c-FLIP. Meanwhile, the agonistic anti-DR5 antibody, AD5-10, induces apoptosis synergistically with TRAIL in HIV-1-infected cells. ROS generation and JNK phosphorylation are involved in this process. These findings potentiate clinical usage of the combination of TRAIL and AD5-10 in eradication of HIV-infected macrophage and AIDS.

  5. The predominance of alternatively activated macrophages following challenge with cell wall peptide-polysaccharide after prior infection with Sporothrix schenckii.

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    Alegranci, Pamela; de Abreu Ribeiro, Livia Carolina; Ferreira, Lucas Souza; Negrini, Thais de Cássia; Maia, Danielle Cardoso Geraldo; Tansini, Aline; Gonçalves, Amanda Costa; Placeres, Marisa Campos Polesi; Carlos, Iracilda Zeppone

    2013-08-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycosis that is caused by the dimorphic fungus Sporothrix schenckii. This disease generally occurs within the skin and subcutaneous tissues, causing lesions that can spread through adjacent lymphatic vessels and sometimes leading to systemic diseases in immunocompromised patients. Macrophages are crucial for proper immune responses against a variety of pathogens. Furthermore, macrophages can play different roles in response to different microorganisms and forms of activation, and they can be divided into "classic" or "alternatively" activated populations, as also known as M1 and M2 macrophages. M1 cells can lead to tissue injury and contribute to pathogenesis, whereas M2 cells promote angiogenesis, tissue remodeling, and repair. The aim of this study was to investigate the roles of M1 and M2 macrophages in a sporotrichosis model. Toward this end, we performed phenotyping of peritoneal exudate cells and evaluated the concomitant production of several immunomediators, including IL-12, IL-10, TGF-β, nitric oxide, and arginase-I activity, which were stimulated ex vivo with cell wall peptide-polysaccharide. Our results showed the predominance of the M2 macrophage population, indicated by peaks of arginase-I activity as well as IL-10 and TGF-β production during the 6th and 8th weeks after infection. These results were consistent with cellular phenotyping that revealed increases in CD206-positive cells over this period. This is the first report of the participation of M2 macrophages in sporotrichosis infections.

  6. Genetic-and-epigenetic Interspecies Networks for Cross-talk Mechanisms in Human Macrophages and Dendritic Cells During MTB Infection

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    Cheng-Wei Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb infection. Mtb is one of the oldest human pathogens, and evolves mechanisms implied in human evolution. The lungs are the first organ exposed to aerosol-transmitted Mtb during gaseous exchange. Therefore, the guards of the immune system in the lungs, such as macrophages (Mϕs and dendritic cells (DCs, are the most important defense against Mtb infection. There have been several studies discussing the functions of Mϕs and DCs during Mtb infection, but the genome-wide pathways and networks are still incomplete. Furthermore, the immune response induced by Mϕs and DCs varies. Therefore, we analyzed the cross-talk genome-wide genetic-and-epigenetic interspecies networks (GWGEINs between Mϕs vs. Mtb and DCs vs. Mtb to determine the varying mechanisms of both the host and pathogen as it relates to Mϕs and DCs during early Mtb infection.First, we performed database mining to construct candidate cross-talk GWGEIN between human cells and Mtb. Then we constructed dynamic models to characterize the molecular mechanisms, including intraspecies gene/microRNA (miRNA regulation networks (GRNs, intraspecies protein-protein interaction networks (PPINs, and the interspecies PPIN of the cross-talk GWGEIN. We applied a system identification method and a system order detection scheme to dynamic models to identify the real cross-talk GWGEINs using the microarray data of Mϕs, DCs and Mtb.After identifying the real cross-talk GWGEINs, the principal network projection (PNP method was employed to construct host-pathogen core networks (HPCNs between Mϕs vs. Mtb and DCs vs. Mtb during infection process. Thus, we investigated the underlying cross-talk mechanisms between the host and the pathogen to determine how the pathogen counteracts host defense mechanisms in Mϕs and DCs during Mtb H37Rv early infection. Based on our findings, we propose Rv1675c as a potential drug target because of its important defensive

  7. Losartan and enalapril decrease viral absorption and interleukin 1 beta production by macrophages in an experimental dengue virus infection.

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    Hernández-Fonseca, Juan Pablo; Durán, Anyelo; Valero, Nereida; Mosquera, Jesús

    2015-11-01

    The role of angiotensin II (Ang II) in dengue virus infection remains unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of losartan, an antagonist of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1 receptor), and enalapril, an inhibitor of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE), on viral antigen expression and IL-1β production in peritoneal macrophages infected with dengue virus type 2. Mice treated with losartan or enalapril and untreated controls were infected intraperitoneally with the virus, and macrophages were analyzed. Infection resulted in increased IL-1β production and a high percentage of cells expressing viral antigen, and this was decreased by treatment with anti-Ang II drugs, suggesting a role for Ang II in dengue virus infection.

  8. Autocrine interferon priming in macrophages but not dendritic cells results in enhanced cytokine and chemokine production after coronavirus infection.

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    Zhou, Haixia; Zhao, Jincun; Perlman, Stanley

    2010-10-19

    Coronaviruses efficiently inhibit interferon (IFN) induction in nonhematopoietic cells and conventional dendritic cells (cDC). However, IFN is produced in infected macrophages, microglia, and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC). To begin to understand why IFN is produced in infected macrophages, we infected bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) and as a control, bone marrow-derived DC (BMDC) with the coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus (MHV). As expected, BMM but not BMDC expressed type I IFN. IFN production in infected BMM was nearly completely dependent on signaling through the alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) receptor (IFNAR). Several IFN-dependent cytokines and chemokines showed the same expression pattern, with enhanced production in BMM compared to BMDC and dependence upon signaling through the IFNAR. Exogenous IFN enhanced IFN-dependent gene expression in BMM at early times after infection and in BMDC at all times after infection but did not stimulate expression of molecules that signal through myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Collectively, our results show that IFN is produced at early times postinfection (p.i.) in MHV-infected BMM, but not in BMDC, and primes expression of IFN and IFN-responsive genes. Further, our results also show that BMM are generally more responsive to MHV infection, since MyD88-dependent pathways are also activated to a greater extent in these cells than in BMDC.

  9. Alveolar macrophages infected with Ames or Sterne strain of Bacillus anthracis elicit differential molecular expression patterns.

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    Felicia D Langel

    Full Text Available Alveolar macrophages (AMs phagocytose Bacillus anthracis following inhalation and induce the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines to mediate the activation of innate immunity. Ames, the virulent strain of B. anthracis, contains two plasmids that encode the antiphagocytic poly-γ-d-glutamic acid capsule and the lethal toxin. The attenuated Sterne strain of B. anthracis, which lacks the plasmid encoding capsule, is widely adapted as a vaccine strain. Although differences in the outcome of infection with the two strains may have originated from the presence or absence of an anti-phagocytic capsule, the disease pathogenesis following infection will be manifested via the host responses, which is not well understood. To gain understanding of the host responses at cellular level, a microarray analysis was performed using primary rhesus macaque AMs infected with either Ames or Sterne spores. Notably, 528 human orthologs were identified to be differentially expressed in AMs infected with either strain of the B. anthracis. Meta-analyses revealed genes differentially expressed in response to B. anthracis infection were also induced upon infections with multiple pathogens such as Francisella Novicida or Staphylococcus aureus. This suggests the existence of a common molecular signature in response to pathogen infections. Importantly, the microarray and protein expression data for certain cytokines, chemokines and host factors provide further insights on how cellular processes such as innate immune sensing pathways, anti-apoptosis versus apoptosis may be differentially modulated in response to the virulent or vaccine strain of B. anthracis. The reported differences may account for the marked difference in pathogenicity between these two strains.

  10. Leishmania donovani infection enhances lateral mobility of macrophage membrane protein which is reversed by liposomal cholesterol.

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    Moumita Ghosh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani (LD reduces cellular cholesterol of the host possibly for its own benefit. Cholesterol is mostly present in the specialized compartment of the plasma membrane. The relation between mobility of membrane proteins and cholesterol depletion from membrane continues to be an important issue. The notion that leishmania infection alters the mobility of membrane proteins stems from our previous study where we showed that the distance between subunits of IFNγ receptor (R1 and R2 on the cell surface of LD infected cell is increased, but is restored to normal by liposomal cholesterol treatment.We determined the lateral mobility of a membrane protein in normal, LD infected and liposome treated LD infected cells using GFP-tagged PLCδ1 as a probe. The mobility of PLCδ1 was computationally analyzed from the time lapse experiment using boundary distance plot and radial profile movement. Our results showed that the lateral mobility of the membrane protein, which is increased in infection, is restored to normal upon liposomal cholesterol treatment. The results of FRAP experiment lent further credence to the above notion. The membrane proteins are intimately linked with cellular actin and alteration of cellular actin may influence lateral mobility. We found that F-actin is decreased in infection but is restored to normal upon liposomal cholesterol treatment as evident from phalloidin staining and also from biochemical analysis by immunoblotting.To our knowledge this is the first direct demonstration that LD parasites during their intracellular life cycle increases lateral mobility of membrane proteins and decreases F-actin level in infected macrophages. Such defects may contribute to ineffective intracellular signaling and other cellular functions.

  11. Transcriptional Response of Bovine Monocyte-Derived Macrophages after the Infection with Different Argentinean Mycobacterium bovis Isolates

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    Karina Caimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection of bovines with Mycobacterium bovis causes important financial hardship in many countries presenting also a risk for humans. M. bovis is known to be adapted to survive and thrive within the intramacrophage environment. In spite of its relevance, at present the information about macrophage expression patterns is scarce, particularly regarding the bovine host. In this study, transcriptomic analysis was used to detect genes differentially expressed in macrophages derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells at early stages of infection with two Argentinean strains of M. bovis, a virulent and an attenuated strains. The results showed that the number of differentially expressed genes in the cells infected with the virulent strain (5 was significantly lower than those in the cells infected with the attenuated strain (172. Several genes were more strongly expressed in infected macrophages. Among them, we detected encoding transcription factors, anthrax toxin receptor, cell division and apoptosis regulator, ankyrin proteins, cytoskeleton proteins, protein of cell differentiation, and regulators of endocytic traffic of membrane. Quantitative real-time PCR of a selected group of differentially expressed genes confirmed the microarrays results. Altogether, the present results contribute to understanding the mechanisms involved in the early interaction of M. bovis with the bovine macrophage.

  12. Immunotherapy of HIV-infected patients with Gc protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF).

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    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Ushijima, Naofumi; Koga, Yoshihiko

    2009-01-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D3-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of HIV-infected patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein is deglycosylated by alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from HIV-infected cells. Therefore, macrophages of HIV-infected patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Since Nagalase is the intrinsic component of the envelope protein gp120, serum Nagalase activity is the sum of enzyme activities carried by both HIV virions and envelope proteins. These Nagalase carriers were already complexed with anti-HIV immunoglobulin G (IgG) but retained Nagalase activity that is required for infectivity. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent macrophage activating factor (termed GcMAF), which produces no side effects in humans. Macrophages activated by administration of 100 ng GcMAF develop a large amount of Fc-receptors as well as an enormous variation of receptors that recognize IgG-bound and unbound HIV virions. Since latently HIV-infected cells are unstable and constantly release HIV virions, the activated macrophages rapidly intercept the released HIV virions to prevent reinfection resulting in exhaustion of infected cells. After less than 18 weekly administrations of 100 ng GcMAF for nonanemic patients, they exhibited low serum Nagalase activities equivalent to healthy controls, indicating eradication of HIV-infection, which was also confirmed by no infectious center formation by provirus inducing agent-treated patient PBMCs. No recurrence occurred and their healthy CD + cell counts were maintained for 7 years.

  13. Effects of age and macrophage lineage on intracellular survival and cytokine induction after infection with Rhodococcus equi.

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    Berghaus, Londa J; Giguère, Steeve; Sturgill, Tracy L

    2014-07-15

    Rhodococcus equi, a facultative intracellular pathogen of macrophages, causes life-threatening pneumonia in foals and in people with underlying immune deficiencies. As a basis for this study, we hypothesized that macrophage lineage and age would affect intracellular survival of R. equi and cytokine induction after infection. Monocyte-derived and bronchoalveolar macrophages from 10 adult horses and from 10 foals (sampled at 1-3 days, 2 weeks, 1 month, 3 months, and 5 months of age) were infected ex vivo with virulent R. equi. Intracellular R. equi were quantified and mRNA expression of IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12 p40, IL-18, IFN-γ, and TNF-α was measured. Intracellular replication of R. equi was significantly (Pequi was significantly (P=0.002) higher in 3-month-old foals than in 3-day old foals, 2-week-old foals, 1-month-old foals, and adult horses. Expression of IL-4 mRNA was significantly higher in monocyte-derived macrophages whereas expression of IL-6, IL-18, and TNF-α was significantly higher in bronchoalveolar macrophages. Induction of IL-1β, IL-10, IL-12 p40, and IL-8 mRNA in bronchoalveolar macrophages of 1-3-day old foals was significantly higher than in older foals or adult horses. Preferential intracellular survival of R. equi in bronchoalveolar macrophages of juvenile horses may play a role in the pulmonary tropism of the pathogen and in the window of age susceptibility to infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. YC-1 potentiates cAMP-induced CREB activation and nitric oxide production in alveolar macrophages

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    Hwang, Tsong-Long, E-mail: htl@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chinese Herbal Medicine Research Team, Healthy Aging Research Center, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Tang, Ming-Chi [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Liang-Mou [Department of General Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Chia-Yi, Taiwan (China); Chang, Wen-De; Chung, Pei-Jen; Chang, Ya-Wen; Fang, Yao-Ching [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

    2012-04-15

    Alveolar macrophages play significant roles in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory lung diseases. Increases in exhaled nitric oxide (NO) are well documented to reflect disease severity in the airway. In this study, we investigated the effect of 3-(5′-hydroxymethyl-2′-furyl)-1-benzyl indazole (YC-1), a known activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase, on prostaglandin (PG)E{sub 1} (a stable PGE{sub 2} analogue) and forskolin (a adenylate cyclase activator) induced NO production and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression in rat alveolar macrophages (NR8383). YC-1 did not directly cause NO production or iNOS expression, but drastically potentiated PGE{sub 1}- or forskolin-induced NO production and iNOS expression in NR8383 alveolar macrophages. Combination treatment with YC-1 and PGE{sub 1} significantly increased phosphorylation of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), but not nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation. The combined effect on NO production, iNOS expression, and CREB phosphorylation was reversed by a protein kinase (PK)A inhibitor (H89), suggesting that the potentiating functions were mediated through a cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. Consistent with this, cAMP analogues, but not the cGMP analogue, caused NO release, iNOS expression, and CREB activation. YC-1 treatment induced an increase in PGE{sub 1}-induced cAMP formation, which occurred through the inhibition of cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity. Furthermore, the combination of rolipram (an inhibitor of PDE4), but not milronone (an inhibitor of PDE3), and PGE{sub 1} also triggered NO production and iNOS expression. In summary, YC-1 potentiates PGE{sub 1}-induced NO production and iNOS expression in alveolar macrophages through inhibition of cAMP PDE activity and activation of the cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway. Highlights: ► YC-1 potentiated PGE1-induced iNOS expression in alveolar macrophages. ► The combination of YC-1 and PGE1 increased CREB but not NFκB activation.

  15. The scavenger protein apoptosis inhibitor of macrophages (AIM potentiates the antimicrobial response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis by enhancing autophagy.

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    Lucía Sanjurjo

    Full Text Available Apoptosis inhibitor of macrophages (AIM, a scavenger protein secreted by tissue macrophages, is transcriptionally regulated by the nuclear receptor Liver X Receptor (LXR and Retinoid X Receptor (RXR heterodimer. Given that LXR exerts a protective immune response against M. tuberculosis, here we analyzed whether AIM is involved in this response. In an experimental murine model of tuberculosis, AIM serum levels peaked dramatically early after infection with M. tuberculosis, providing an in vivo biological link to the disease. We therefore studied the participation of AIM in macrophage response to M. tuberculosis in vitro. For this purpose, we used the H37Rv strain to infect THP-1 macrophages transfected to stably express AIM, thereby increasing infected macrophage survival. Furthermore, the expression of this protein enlarged foam cell formation by enhancing intracellular lipid content. Phagocytosis assays with FITC-labeled M. tuberculosis bacilli indicated that this protein was not involved in bacterial uptake; however, AIM expression decreased the number of intracellular cfus by up to 70% in bacterial killing assays, suggesting that AIM enhances macrophage mycobactericidal activity. Accordingly, M. tuberculosis-infected AIM-expressing cells upregulated the production of reactive oxygen species. Moreover, real-time PCR analysis showed increased mRNA levels of the antimicrobial peptides cathelicidin and defensin 4B. These increases were concomitant with greater cellular concentrations of the autophagy-related molecules Beclin 1 and LC3II, as well as enhanced acidification of mycobacterial phagosomes and LC3 co-localization. In summary, our data support the notion that AIM contributes to key macrophage responses to M. tuberculosis.

  16. Macroautophagy regulation during HIV-1 infection of CD4+ T cells and macrophages

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    Sophie eBorel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an intracellular mechanism whereby pathogens, particularly viruses, are destroyed in autolysosomes after their entry into targets cells. Therefore, to survive and replicate in host cells, viruses have developed multiple strategies to either counteract or exploit this process. The aim of this review is to outline the known relationships between HIV-1 and autophagy in CD4+ T lymphocytes and macrophages, two main HIV-1 cell targets. The differential regulation of autophagy in these two cell types is highlighted and its potential consequences in terms of viral replication and physiopathology discussed.

  17. Keratinocyte growth factor administration attenuates murine pulmonary mycobacterium tuberculosis infection through granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-dependent macrophage activation and phagolysosome fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasula, Rajamouli; Azad, Abul K; Gardner, Jason C; Schlesinger, Larry S; McCormack, Francis X

    2015-03-13

    Augmentation of innate immune defenses is an appealing adjunctive strategy for treatment of pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections, especially those caused by drug-resistant strains. The effect of intranasal administration of keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), an epithelial mitogen and differentiation factor, on M. tuberculosis infection in mice was tested in prophylaxis, treatment, and rescue scenarios. Infection of C57BL6 mice with M. tuberculosis resulted in inoculum size-dependent weight loss and mortality. A single dose of KGF given 1 day prior to infection with 10(5) M. tuberculosis bacilli prevented weight loss and enhanced pulmonary mycobacterial clearance (compared with saline-pretreated mice) for up to 28 days. Similar effects were seen when KGF was delivered intranasally every third day for 15 days, but weight loss and bacillary growth resumed when KGF was withdrawn. For mice with a well established M. tuberculosis infection, KGF given every 3 days beginning on day 15 postinoculation was associated with reversal of weight loss and an increase in M. tuberculosis clearance. In in vitro co-culture experiments, M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages exposed to conditioned medium from KGF-treated alveolar type II cell (MLE-15) monolayers exhibited enhanced GM-CSF-dependent killing through mechanisms that included promotion of phagolysosome fusion and induction of nitric oxide. Alveolar macrophages from KGF-treated mice also exhibited enhanced GM-CSF-dependent phagolysosomal fusion. These results provide evidence that administration of KGF promotes M. tuberculosis clearance through GM-CSF-dependent mechanisms and enhances host defense against M. tuberculosis infection.

  18. Brucella melitensis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis depict overlapping gene expression patterns induced in infected THP-1 macrophages.

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    Masoudian, M; Derakhshandeh, A; Ghahramani Seno, M M

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens infecting mammalian cells have developed various strategies to suppress and evade their hosts' defensive mechanisms. In this line, the intracellular bacteria that are able to survive and propagate within their host cells must have developed strategies to avert their host's killing attitude. Studying the interface of host-pathogen confrontation can provide valuable information for defining therapeutic approaches. Brucellosis, caused by the Brucella strains, is a zoonotic bacterial disease that affects thousands of humans and animals around the world inflicting discomfort and huge economic losses. Similar to many other intracellular dwelling bacteria, infections caused by Brucella are difficult to treat, and hence any attempt at identifying new and common therapeutic targets would prove beneficial for the purpose of curing infections caused by the intracellular bacteria. In THP-1 macrophage infected with Brucella melitensis we studied the expression levels of four host's genes, i.e. EMP2, ST8SIA4, HCP5 and FRMD5 known to be involved in pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our data showed that at this molecular level, except for FRMD5 that was downregulated, the other three genes were upregulated by B. melitensis. Brucella melitensis and M. tuberculosis go through similar intracellular processes and interestingly two of the investigated genes, i.e. EMP2 and ST4SIA8 were upregulated in THP-1 cell infected with B. melitensis similar to that reported for THP-1 cells infected with M. tuberculosis. At the host-pathogen interaction interface, this study depicts overlapping changes for different bacteria with common survival strategies; a fact that implies designing therapeutic approaches based on common targets may be possible.

  19. CD163+CD14+ macrophages, a potential immune biomarker for malignant pleural effusion.

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    Wang, Fei; Yang, Li; Gao, Qun; Huang, Lan; Wang, Liping; Wang, Jing; Wang, Shengdian; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Yi

    2015-08-01

    Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) is a common complication caused by malignant diseases. However, subjectivity, poor sensitivity, and substantial false-negative rates of cytology assay hamper accurate MPE diagnosis. The aim of this study was to assess whether CD163+CD14+ tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) could be used as a biomarker for enabling sensitive and specific MPE diagnosis. Pleural effusion samples and peripheral blood samples were collected from 50 MPE patients and 50 non-malignant pleural effusion (NMPE) patients, respectively. Flow cytometry was performed to analyze cell phenotypes, and RT-qPCR was used to detect cytokine expression in these monocytes and macrophages. A blinded validation study (n = 40) was subsequently performed to confirm the significance of CD163+CD14+ TAMs in MPE diagnosis. Student's t test, rank sum test, and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis were used for statistical analysis. Notably, CD163+CD14+ cell frequency in MPE was remarkably higher than that in NMPE (P CD163+CD14+ TAMs as a MPE biomarker. In total (n = 140), by using a cutoff level of 3.65 %, CD163+CD14+ cells had a sensitivity of 81.2 % and a specificity of 100 % for MPE diagnosis. Notably, MPE diagnosis by estimating CD163+CD14+ cells in pleural effusion could be obtained one week earlier than that obtained by cytological examination. CD163+CD14+ macrophages could be potentially used as an immune diagnostic marker for MPE and has better assay sensitivity than that of cytological analysis.

  20. Response activity of alveolar macrophages in pulmonary dysfunction caused by Leptospira infection

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    M. Marinho

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptopspirosis is a syndrome with different clinical manifestations including the most severe and often fatal forms of pulmonary disease of unknown etiology. Pulmonary injury during the inflammatory process has been associated with the excessive number of alveolar macrophages (AMs and polymorphonuclear leukocytes stimulated in the lungs and with the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates and other inflammatory mediators. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the cellular immune response of AMs or inflammatory cells of hamsters during leptospirosis. The activity of AMs was determined by measuring nitric oxide (NO and protein production as well as inflammatory cell infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid. Pulmonary activity during infection was monitored by measuring pH, pressure of oxygen (PaO2, and pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2 in blood samples. Cellular immune response and its role in the genesis of leptospirosis have been incriminated as the main causes of tissue and pulmonary injuries, which consequently lead to the pulmonary dysfunction in severe cases of leptospirosis. The present results show a low production of NO in both supernatant of alveolar macrophage culture and BAL. In the latter, protein production was high and constant, especially during acute infection. Total and differential cell count values were 2.5X10(6 on day 4; 7.3X10(6 on day 21; and 2.3X10(6 on day 28 after infection, with lymphocytes (84.04% predominating over neutrophils (11.88% and monocytes (4.07%. Arterial blood gas analysis showed pulmonary compromising along with the infectious process, as observed in parameter values (mean±SD evidenced in the infected versus control group: PaO2 (60.47mmHg±8.7 vs. 90.09mmHg±9.18, PaCO2 (57.01mmHg±7.87 vs. 47.39mmHg±4.5 and pH (7.39±0.03 vs. 6.8±1.3. Results indicated that Leptospira infection in hamsters is a good experimental model to study leptospirosis. However, some of the immune

  1. Neutrophils exert protection in the early tuberculous granuloma by oxidative killing of mycobacteria phagocytosed from infected macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao-Tsung; Cambier, C J; Davis, J Muse; Hall, Christopher J; Crosier, Philip S; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2012-09-13

    Neutrophils are typically the first responders in host defense against invading pathogens, which they destroy by both oxidative and nonoxidative mechanisms. However, despite a longstanding recognition of neutrophil presence at disease sites in tuberculosis, their role in defense against mycobacteria is unclear. Here we exploit the genetic tractability and optical transparency of zebrafish to monitor neutrophil behavior and its consequences during infection with Mycobacterium marinum, a natural fish pathogen. In contrast to macrophages, neutrophils do not interact with mycobacteria at initial infection sites. Neutrophils are subsequently recruited to the nascent granuloma in response to signals from dying infected macrophages within the granuloma, which they phagocytose. Some neutrophils then rapidly kill the internalized mycobacteria through NADPH oxidase-dependent mechanisms. Our results provide a mechanistic link to the observed patterns of neutrophils in human tuberculous granulomas and the susceptibility of humans with chronic granulomatous disease to mycobacterial infection.

  2. Anti-Inflammatory and Antiapoptotic Responses to Infection: A Common Denominator of Human and Bovine Macrophages Infected with Mycobacterium avium Subsp. paratuberculosis

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    Naiara Abendaño

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map is the causative agent of a chronic intestinal inflammation in ruminants named Johne's disease or paratuberculosis and a possible etiopathological agent of human Crohn's disease (CD. Analysis of macrophage transcriptomes in response to Map infection is expected to provide key missing information in the understanding of the role of this pathogen in establishing an inappropriate and persistent infection in a susceptible host and of the molecular mechanisms that might underlie the early phases of CD. In this paper we summarize transcriptomic studies of human and bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs, and macrophages-like cell lines in vitro infected with Map. Most studies included in this paper consistently reported common gene expression signatures of bovine and human macrophages in response to Map such as enhanced expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and IL-6, which promote bacterial survival. Overexpression of IL-10 could be responsible for the Map-associated reduction in the expression of the proapoptotic TNF-α gene observed in bovine and human macrophages.

  3. The balance of apoptotic and necrotic cell death in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infected macrophages is not dependent on bacterial virulence.

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    Rachel E Butler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An important mechanism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis pathogenesis is the ability to control cell death pathways in infected macrophages: apoptotic cell death is bactericidal, whereas necrotic cell death may facilitate bacterial dissemination and transmission. METHODS: We examine M.tuberculosis control of spontaneous and chemically induced macrophage cell death using automated confocal fluorescence microscopy, image analysis, flow cytometry, plate-reader based vitality assays, and M.tuberculosis strains including H37Rv, and isogenic virulent and avirulent strains of the Beijing lineage isolate GC1237. RESULTS: We show that bacterial virulence influences the dynamics of caspase activation and the total level of cytotoxicity. We show that the powerful ability of M.tuberculosis to inhibit exogenously stimulated apoptosis is abrogated by loss of virulence. However, loss of virulence did not influence the balance of macrophage apoptosis and necrosis--both virulent and avirulent isogenic strains of GC1237 induced predominantly necrotic cell death compared to H37Rv which induced a higher relative level of apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS: This reveals that macrophage necrosis and apoptosis are independently regulated during M. tuberculosis infection of macrophages. Virulence affects the level of host cell death and ability to inhibit apoptosis but other strain-specific characteristics influence the ultimate mode of host cell death and alter the balance of apoptosis and necrosis.

  4. FleA Expression in Aspergillus fumigatus Is Recognized by Fucosylated Structures on Mucins and Macrophages to Prevent Lung Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Sheena C; Fischer, Gregory J; Sinha, Meenal; McCabe, Orla; Palmer, Jonathan M; Choera, Tsokyi; Lim, Fang Yun; Wimmerova, Michaela; Carrington, Stephen D; Yuan, Shaopeng; Lowell, Clifford A; Oscarson, Stefan; Keller, Nancy P; Fahy, John V

    2016-04-01

    The immune mechanisms that recognize inhaled Aspergillus fumigatus conidia to promote their elimination from the lungs are incompletely understood. FleA is a lectin expressed by Aspergillus fumigatus that has twelve binding sites for fucosylated structures that are abundant in the glycan coats of multiple plant and animal proteins. The role of FleA is unknown: it could bind fucose in decomposed plant matter to allow Aspergillus fumigatus to thrive in soil, or it may be a virulence factor that binds fucose in lung glycoproteins to cause Aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia. Our studies show that FleA protein and Aspergillus fumigatus conidia bind avidly to purified lung mucin glycoproteins in a fucose-dependent manner. In addition, FleA binds strongly to macrophage cell surface proteins, and macrophages bind and phagocytose fleA-deficient (∆fleA) conidia much less efficiently than wild type (WT) conidia. Furthermore, a potent fucopyranoside glycomimetic inhibitor of FleA inhibits binding and phagocytosis of WT conidia by macrophages, confirming the specific role of fucose binding in macrophage recognition of WT conidia. Finally, mice infected with ΔfleA conidia had more severe pneumonia and invasive aspergillosis than mice infected with WT conidia. These findings demonstrate that FleA is not a virulence factor for Aspergillus fumigatus. Instead, host recognition of FleA is a critical step in mechanisms of mucin binding, mucociliary clearance, and macrophage killing that prevent Aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia.

  5. Use of a capture-based pathogen transcript enrichment strategy for RNA-Seq analysis of the Francisella tularensis LVS transcriptome during infection of murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, Zachary W; Brazel, David M; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary B; Hamblin, Rachelle Y; VanderNoot, Victoria A; Branda, Steven S

    2013-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a zoonotic intracellular pathogen that is capable of causing potentially fatal human infections. Like all successful bacterial pathogens, F. tularensis rapidly responds to changes in its environment during infection of host cells, and upon encountering different microenvironments within those cells. This ability to appropriately respond to the challenges of infection requires rapid and global shifts in gene expression patterns. In this study, we use a novel pathogen transcript enrichment strategy and whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) to perform a detailed characterization of the rapid and global shifts in F. tularensis LVS gene expression during infection of murine macrophages. We performed differential gene expression analysis on all bacterial genes at two key stages of infection: phagosomal escape, and cytosolic replication. By comparing the F. tularensis transcriptome at these two stages of infection to that of the bacteria grown in culture, we were able to identify sets of genes that are differentially expressed over the course of infection. This analysis revealed the temporally dynamic expression of a number of known and putative transcriptional regulators and virulence factors, providing insight into their role during infection. In addition, we identified several F. tularensis genes that are significantly up-regulated during infection but had not been previously identified as virulence factors. These unknown genes may make attractive therapeutic or vaccine targets.

  6. Use of a capture-based pathogen transcript enrichment strategy for RNA-Seq analysis of the Francisella tularensis LVS transcriptome during infection of murine macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary W Bent

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a zoonotic intracellular pathogen that is capable of causing potentially fatal human infections. Like all successful bacterial pathogens, F. tularensis rapidly responds to changes in its environment during infection of host cells, and upon encountering different microenvironments within those cells. This ability to appropriately respond to the challenges of infection requires rapid and global shifts in gene expression patterns. In this study, we use a novel pathogen transcript enrichment strategy and whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq to perform a detailed characterization of the rapid and global shifts in F. tularensis LVS gene expression during infection of murine macrophages. We performed differential gene expression analysis on all bacterial genes at two key stages of infection: phagosomal escape, and cytosolic replication. By comparing the F. tularensis transcriptome at these two stages of infection to that of the bacteria grown in culture, we were able to identify sets of genes that are differentially expressed over the course of infection. This analysis revealed the temporally dynamic expression of a number of known and putative transcriptional regulators and virulence factors, providing insight into their role during infection. In addition, we identified several F. tularensis genes that are significantly up-regulated during infection but had not been previously identified as virulence factors. These unknown genes may make attractive therapeutic or vaccine targets.

  7. Differential Regulation of Proinflammatory Cytokine Expression by Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases in Macrophages in Response to Intestinal Parasite Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Mei Xing; Png, Chin Wen; Tay, Crispina Yan Bing; Teo, Joshua Ding Wei; Jiao, Huipeng; Lehming, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Blastocystis is a common enteric protistan parasite that can cause acute, as well as chronic, infection and is associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, the pathogenic status of Blastocystis infection remains unclear. In this study, we found that Blastocystis antigens induced abundant expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), in mouse intestinal explants, in mouse colitis colon, and in macrophages. Further investigation utilizing RAW264.7 murine macrophages showed that Blastocystis treatment in RAW264.7 macrophages induced the activation of ERK, JNK, and p38, the three major groups of mammalian mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases that play essential roles in the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. ERK inhibition in macrophages significantly suppressed both mRNA and protein expression of IL-6 and TNF-α and mRNA expression of IL-1β. On the other hand, JNK inhibition resulted in reductions in both c-Jun and ERK activation and significant suppression of all three proinflammatory cytokines at both the mRNA and protein levels. Inhibition of p38 suppressed only IL-6 protein expression with no effect on the expression of IL-1β and TNF-α. Furthermore, we found that serine proteases produced by Blastocystis play an important role in the induction of ERK activation and proinflammatory cytokine expression by macrophages. Our study thus demonstrated for the first time that Blastocystis could induce the expression of various proinflammatory cytokines via the activation of MAP kinases and that infection with Blastocystis may contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory intestinal diseases through the activation of inflammatory pathways in host immune cells, such as macrophages. PMID:25156742

  8. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with increased expression of macrophage migration inhibitory factor by T cells and macrophages in gastric mucosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Xing Xiang; Harry Hua Xiang XIA; ZHAO Ying Heng; LIN Man Peng; SHEN Qing Yan; LIU Wei; ZHENG Xue Ling

    2004-01-01

    AIM Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) plays a pivotal role in inflammatory/immune diseases.This study aimed to determine MIF expression in H.pylori-induced gastritis,and the effect of H.pylori on MIF expression in monocytes in vitro.METHODS Seventy-nine patients (M/F,39/40,mean age,52 yrs) referred for upper endoscopy were selected;19 with gastric ulcer,15 with duodenal ulcer and 45 with non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD).Gastric antral and body biopsies were obtained for histological examinations,double immunostaining for MIF/T-cells (CD45RO) and MIF/macrophage (KP1),and in situ hybridization for the expression of MIF mRNA.THp-1,a monocyte cell line,was co-incubated with different concentrations of the whole cell proteins prepared from H.pylori strain ATCC26695 or its isogenic type with cagA gene deleted.The expression of MIF protein was determined by using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and the MIF mRNA by retrospective transcription-polymerase chain reaction techniques.RESULTS H.pylori was detected in 50 patients (10 with gastric ulcer, 15 with duodenal ulcer and 25 with NUD).Overall,the numbers of total T-cells,MIF+T-cells,total macrophages,MIF+macrophages and MIF mRNA+ cells were greater in the gastric antrum than in the body.There was a significant increase in the numbers of total T-cells, MIF+ T-cells,total macrophages,MIF+macrophages and MIF mRNA+cells in H. pylori positive,compared with H.pylori negative patients,in both the antral and body mucosa.Moreover,the cell numbers increased with more severe chronic gastritis in both the antrum and body.The numbers were also significantly higher in ulcer patients than in NUD patients, particularly in H. pylori positive patients.In vitro,the expression of MIF protein and mRNA in monocytes was significantly increased by incubation with H.pylori whole cell proteins,in a time and dose dependent manner.CONCLUSIONS H.pylori infection stimulates the expression of MIF in the gastric inflammatory cells,which may play a

  9. Electroacupuncture at the ST36 acupoint increases interleukin-4 responsiveness in macrophages, generation of alternatively activated macrophages and susceptibility to Leishmania major infection

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    Aguiar Danillo N

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electroacupuncture (EA has been used to treat inflammatory diseases. Alternatively activated macrophages (AAMo stimulated by cytokines such as interleukin (IL-4, IL-10 and IL-13 are anti-inflammatory and mildly microbicidal. This study aimed to evaluate whether EA at the Zusanli acupoint (ST36 would change the profile of healthy murine macrophages, particularly the generation of AAMo and susceptibility to Leishmania major infection. Methods BALB/c mice were treated with EA (15/30 Hz at the ST36 acupoint for 20 min/d for 5 d. After the final EA session, the mice were euthanized and their peritoneal cells were harvested and counted for determination of arginase activity, nitric oxide (NO production and microbicidal activity after culture in the presence or absence of IL-4, interferon-γ (IFNγ or lipopolysaccharide (LPS or both IFNγ and LPS. Twelve mice were infected with L. major promastigotes into the footpads after the final EA session and the infection course was monitored. Results Peritoneal cells freshly obtained from EA-treated mice had similar arginase and microbicidal activities to cells from sham-treated mice. After culture with IL-4, cells from EA-treated mice exhibited significant increases in the arginase activity (sham: 58 ± 11.3 vs. EA: 80.7 ± 4.6%, P = 0.025 and number of parasites/infected cell (sham: 2.5 ± 0.4 vs. EA: 4.3 ± 0.8 cells, P = 0.007. The NO production was lower in cells from EA-treated mice cultured in the presence of a combination of IFNγ and LPS (sham: 31.6 ± 6.5 vs. EA: 22.3 ± 2.1 μM, P = 0.025. The lesion size in mice infected with L. major promastigotes was larger in EA-treated mice (sham: 3.26 ± 0.29 vs. EA: 2.23 ± 0.4 mm, P = 0.039. Conclusion EA at the ST36 acupoint increases IL-4 responsiveness in macrophages, Generation of AAMo and susceptibility to L. major infection

  10. Proteomic alteration of equine monocyte-derived macrophages infected with equine infectious anemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Cheng; Liu, Hai-Fang; Lin, Yue-Zhi; Wang, Xue-Feng; Ma, Jian; Li, Yi-Jing; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2015-06-01

    Similar to the well-studied viruses human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is another member of the Lentivirus genus in the family Retroviridae. Previous studies revealed that interactions between EIAV and the host resulted in viral evolution in pathogenicity and immunogenicity, as well as adaptation to the host. Proteomic analysis has been performed to examine changes in protein expression and/or modification in host cells infected with viruses and has revealed useful information for virus-host interactions. In this study, altered protein expression in equine monocyte-derived macrophages (eMDMs, the principle target cell of EIAV in vivo) infected with the EIAV pathogenic strain EIAV(DLV34) (DLV34) was examined using 2D-LC-MS/MS coupled with the iTRAQ labeling technique. The expression levels of 210 cellular proteins were identified to be significantly upregulated or downregulated by infection with DLV34. Alterations in protein expression were confirmed by examining the mRNA levels of eight selected proteins using quantitative real-time reverse-transcription PCR, and by verifying the levels of ten selected proteins using parallel reaction monitoring (PRM). Further analysis of GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG)-Pathway enrichment demonstrated that these differentially expressed proteins are primarily related to the biological processes of oxidative phosphorylation, protein folding, RNA splicing, and ubiquitylation. Our results can facilitate a better understanding of the host response to EIAV infection and the cellular processes required for EIAV replication and pathogenesis. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Association of carotid plaque Lp-PLA(2 with macrophages and Chlamydia pneumoniae infection among patients at risk for stroke.

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    Berna Atik

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We previously showed that the burden of Chlamydia pneumoniae in carotid plaques was significantly associated with plaque interleukin (IL-6, and serum IL-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP, suggesting that infected plaques contribute to systemic inflammatory markers in patients with stroke risk. Since lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA(2 mediates inflammation in atherosclerosis, we hypothesized that serum Lp-PLA(2 mass and activity levels and plaque Lp-PLA(2 may be influenced by plaque C. pneumoniae infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Forty-two patients underwent elective carotid endarterectomy. Tissue obtained at surgery was stained by immunohistochemistry for Lp-PLA(2 grade, macrophages, IL-6, C. pneumoniae and CD4+ and CD8+ cells. Serum Lp-PLA(2 activity and mass were measured using the colorimetric activity method (CAM and ELISA, respectively. Serum homocysteine levels were measured by HPLC. Eleven (26.2% patients were symptomatic with transient ischemic attacks. There was no correlation between patient risk factors (smoking, coronary artery disease, elevated cholesterol, diabetes, obesity, hypertension and family history of genetic disorders for atherosclerosis and serum levels or plaque grade for Lp-PLA(2. Plaque Lp-PLA(2 correlated with serum homocysteine levels (p = 0.013, plaque macrophages (p<0.01, and plaque C. pneumoniae (p<0.001, which predominantly infected macrophages, co-localizing with Lp-PLA(2. CONCLUSIONS: The significant association of plaque Lp-PLA(2 with plaque macrophages and C. pneumoniae suggests an interactive role in accelerating inflammation in atherosclerosis. A possible mechanism for C. pneumoniae in the atherogenic process may involve infection of macrophages that induce Lp-PLA(2 production leading to upregulation of inflammatory mediators in plaque tissue. Additional in vitro and in vivo research will be needed to advance our understanding of specific C. pneumoniae and Lp-PLA(2

  12. The killing of macrophages by Corynebacterium ulcerans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Elena; Ott, Lisa; Schulze-Luehrmann, Jan; Lührmann, Anja; Wiesmann, Veit; Wittenberg, Thomas; Burkovski, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium ulcerans is an emerging pathogen transmitted by a zoonotic pathway with a very broad host spectrum to humans. Despite rising numbers of infections and potentially fatal outcomes, data on the molecular basis of pathogenicity are scarce. In this study, the interaction of 2 C. ulcerans isolates - one from an asymptomatic dog, one from a fatal case of human infection - with human macrophages was investigated. C. ulcerans strains were able to survive in macrophages for at least 20 hours. Uptake led to delay of phagolysosome maturation and detrimental effects on the macrophages as deduced from cytotoxicity measurements and FACS analyses. The data presented here indicate a high infectious potential of this emerging pathogen.

  13. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation potentially contributing to cystic fibrosis pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynan, Aisling; Mawhinney, Leona; Armstrong, Michelle E; O'Reilly, Ciaran; Kennedy, Sarah; Caraher, Emma; Jülicher, Karen; O'Dwyer, David; Maher, Lewena; Schaffer, Kirsten; Fabre, Aurélie; McKone, Edward F; Leng, Lin; Bucala, Richard; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Cooke, Gordon; Donnelly, Seamas C

    2017-08-02

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a key proinflammatory mediator that we have previously shown to be associated with an aggressive clinical phenotype in cystic fibrosis. It possesses unique tautomerase enzymatic activity. However, to date, no human-derived substrate has been identified that has the capacity to interact with this cytokine's unique tautomerase activity. This led us to hypothesize that MIF may have the capacity to interact with external substrates. We describe for the first time how Pseudomonas aeruginosa can utilize human recombinant MIF (rMIF) to significantly (P < 0.01) enhance its endogenous biofilm formation. Our in vivo studies demonstrate that utilizing a small-molecular-weight inhibitor targeting MIF's tautomerase activity (SCD-19) significantly reduces the inflammatory response in a murine pulmonary chronic P. aeruginosa model. In addition, we show that in in vitro experiments, pretreatment of P. aeruginosa with rMIF is associated with reduced bacterial killing by tobramycin. Our novel findings support the concept of an anti-MIF strategy that targets this enzymatic activity as a potential future antibacterial therapeutic approach.-Tynan, A., Mawhinney, L., Armstrong, M. E., O'Reilly, C., Kennedy, S., Caraher, E., Jülicher, K., O'Dwyer, D., Maher, L., Schaffer, K., Fabre, A., McKone, E. F., Leng, L., Bucala, R., Bernhagen, J., Cooke, G., Donnelly, S. C. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation potentially contributing to cystic fibrosis pathogenesis. © FASEB.

  14. Transcriptional Regulation of CXCL5 in HIV-1-Infected Macrophages and Its Functional Consequences on CNS Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Debjani; Klamar, Cynthia R; Reinhart, Todd; Ayyavoo, Velpandi

    2015-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)-infected monocytes/macrophages and microglia release increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including ELR+ (containing glutamic acid-leucine-arginine motif) chemokines. To investigate the role of HIV-1 infection on chemokine regulation, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) from normal donors were infected with HIV-1 and the expression of chemokines and their downstream biological functions were evaluated. Among the tested chemokines, CXCL5 was upregulated significantly both at the mRNA and protein level in the HIV-1-infected MDMs compared with mock-infected cultures. Upregulation of CXCL5 in the HIV-1-infected MDMs is, in part, regulated by increased interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production and phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Functional analyses indicate that HIV-1-induced overexpression of CXCL5 has enhanced the ability to attract neutrophils, as observed by chemotaxis assay. However, exposure of NT2, SH-SY5Y cells, and primary neurons to HIV-1-infected MDM supernatants resulted in cell death that was not rescued by anti-CXCL5 antibody suggesting that CXCL5 does not have direct effect on neuronal death. Together, these results suggest that the increased level of CXCL5 in tissue compartments, including the central nervous system of HIV-1-infected individuals might alter the inflammatory response through the infiltration of neutrophils into tissue compartment, thus causing secondary effects on resident cells.

  15. Urine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in children with urinary tract infection: a possible predictor of acute pyelonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otukesh, Hasan; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Hoseini, Rozita; Hekmat, Sepideh; Chalian, Hamid; Chalian, Majid; Bedayat, Arash; Salman Yazdi, Reza; Sabaghi, Saeed; Mahdavi, Saeed

    2009-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an important pro-inflammatory cytokine expressed at sites of inflammation. We have assessed this factor (MIF) in urinary tract infections with the aim of determining a non-invasive and sensitive method to differentiate upper and lower renal involvement. Thirty-three pediatric patients with urinary track infection (25 with acute pyelonephritis, eight with acute cystitis) and 40 healthy subjects were recruited for this prospective case-control study. Pyelonephritis was differentiated from cystitis by dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scan. Urinary MIF concentration was determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. The urine MIF/creatinine (Cr) ratio was significantly higher in pyelonephritis patients than in those with acute cystitis and the control group (P < 0.001). The optimal cut-point of 4.90 pg/micromol Cr for the urine MIF/Cr ratio has the potential to be a biomarker for distinguishing patients with acute pyelonephritis from those with acute cystitis. Determination of the urinary MIF was also useful in selecting the patients at risk of permanent renal damage. Of those patients with pyelonephritis, based on the DMSA scan at the time of infection, scarring on follow-up DMSA scan 9-12 months later occurred in patients with the highest urinary MIF/Cr ratios. We conclude that the urine MIF/Cr ratio is a sensitive test for differentiating acute pyelonephritis from acute cystitis and also for detecting children with acute pyelonephritis who are at a higher risk for permanent renal scars in the future.

  16. HIV-1 inhibits phagocytosis and inflammatory cytokine responses of human monocyte-derived macrophages to P. falciparum infected erythrocytes.

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    Louise E Ludlow

    Full Text Available HIV-1 infection increases the risk and severity of malaria by poorly defined mechanisms. We investigated the effect of HIV-1(Ba-L infection of monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM on phagocytosis of opsonised P. falciparum infected erythrocytes (IE and subsequent proinflammatory cytokine secretion. Compared to mock-infected MDM, HIV-1 infection significantly inhibited phagocytosis of IE (median (IQR (10 (0-28 versus (34 (27-108; IE internalised/100 MDM; p = 0.001 and decreased secretion of IL-6 (1,116 (352-3,387 versus 1,552 (889-6,331; pg/mL; p = 0.0078 and IL-1β (16 (7-21 versus 33 (27-65; pg/mL; p = 0.0078. Thus inadequate phagocytosis and cytokine production may contribute to impaired control of malaria in HIV-1 infected individuals.

  17. HIV-1 Infection of T Cells and Macrophages Are Differentially Modulated by Virion-Associated Hck: A Nef-Dependent Phenomenon

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    Gilda Tachedjian

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The proline repeat motif (PxxP of Nef is required for interaction with the SH3 domains of macrophage-specific Src kinase Hck. However, the implication of this interaction for viral replication and infectivity in macrophages and T lymphocytes remains unclear. Experiments in HIV-1 infected macrophages confirmed the presence of a Nef:Hck complex which was dependent on the Nef proline repeat motif. The proline repeat motif of Nef also enhanced both HIV-1 infection and replication in macrophages, and was required for incorporation of Hck into viral particles. Unexpectedly, wild-type Hck inhibited infection of macrophages, but Hck was shown to enhance infection of primary T lymphocytes. These results indicate that the interaction between Nef and Hck is important for Nef-dependent modulation of viral infectivity. Hck-dependent enhancement of HIV-1 infection of T cells suggests that Nef-Hck interaction may contribute to the spread of HIV-1 infection from macrophages to T cells by modulating events in the producer cell, virion and target cell.

  18. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I Induces Arginase Activity in Leishmania amazonensis Amastigote-Infected Macrophages through a Cytokine-Independent Mechanism

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    Celia Maria Vieira Vendrame

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania (Leishmania amazonensis exhibits peculiarities in its interactions with hosts. Because amastigotes are the primary form associated with the progression of infection, we studied the effect of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I on interactions between L. (L. amazonensis amastigotes and macrophages. Upon stimulation of infected macrophages with IGF-I, we observed decreased nitric oxide production but increased arginase expression and activity, which lead to increased parasitism. However, stimulation of amastigote-infected macrophages with IGF-I did not result in altered cytokine levels compared to unstimulated controls. Because IGF-I is present in tissue fluids and also within macrophages, we examined the possible effect of this factor on phosphatidylserine (PS exposure on amastigotes, seen previously in tissue-derived amastigotes leading to increased parasitism. Stimulation with IGF-I induced PS exposure on amastigotes but not on promastigotes. Using a PS-liposome instead of amastigotes, we observed that the PS-liposome but not the control phosphatidylcholine-liposome led to increased arginase activity in macrophages, and this process was not blocked by anti-TGF-β antibodies. Our results suggest that in L. (L. amazonensis amastigote-infected macrophages, IGF-I induces arginase activity directly in amastigotes and in macrophages through the induction of PS exposure on amastigotes in the latter, which could lead to the alternative activation of macrophages through cytokine-independent mechanisms.

  19. Pre-exposure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected macrophages to crystalline silica impairs control of bacterial growth by deregulating the balance between apoptosis and necrosis.

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    Leslie Chávez-Galán

    Full Text Available Inhalation of crystalline silica (CS particles increases the risk of pulmonary tuberculosis; however, the precise mechanism through which CS exposure facilitates Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb infection is unclear. We speculate that macrophage exposure to CS deregulates the cell death pathways that could explain, at least in part, the association observed between exposure to CS and pulmonary tuberculosis. We therefore established an in vitro model in which macrophages were exposed to CS and then infected with Mtb. Expression of surface markers was analyzed by flow cytometry, JNK1/2, ASK1, caspase 9, P-p38, Bcl-2 and Mcl-1 were analyzed by Western blot, and cytokines by ELISA. Our results show that exposure to CS limits macrophage ability to control Mtb growth. Moreover, this exposure reduced the expression of TLR2, Bcl-2 and Mcl-1, but increased that of JNK1 and ASK1 molecules in the macrophages. Finally, when the pre-exposed macrophages were infected with Mtb, the concentrations of TNFα, IL-1β and caspase-9 expression increased. This pro-inflammatory profile of the macrophage unbalanced the apoptosis/necrosis pathway. Taken together, these data suggest that macrophages exposed to CS are sensitized to cell death by MAPK kinase-dependent signaling pathway. Secretion of TNF-α and IL-1β by Mtb-infected macrophages promotes necrosis, and this deregulation of cell death pathways may favor the release of viable bacilli, thus leading to the progression of tuberculosis.

  20. The co-transcriptome of uropathogenic Escherichia coli-infected mouse macrophages reveals new insights into host-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavromatis, Charalampos Harris; Bokil, Nilesh J; Totsika, Makrina; Kakkanat, Asha; Schaale, Kolja; Cannistraci, Carlo V; Ryu, Taewoo; Beatson, Scott A; Ulett, Glen C; Schembri, Mark A; Sweet, Matthew J; Ravasi, Timothy

    2015-05-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most common infections in humans. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) can invade and replicate within bladder epithelial cells, and some UPEC strains can also survive within macrophages. To understand the UPEC transcriptional programme associated with intramacrophage survival, we performed host-pathogen co-transcriptome analyses using RNA sequencing. Mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) were challenged over a 24 h time course with two UPEC reference strains that possess contrasting intramacrophage phenotypes: UTI89, which survives in BMMs, and 83972, which is killed by BMMs. Neither of these strains caused significant BMM cell death at the low multiplicity of infection that was used in this study. We developed an effective computational framework that simultaneously separated, annotated and quantified the mammalian and bacterial transcriptomes. Bone marrow-derived macrophages responded to the two UPEC strains with a broadly similar gene expression programme. In contrast, the transcriptional responses of the UPEC strains diverged markedly from each other. We identified UTI89 genes up-regulated at 24 h post-infection, and hypothesized that some may contribute to intramacrophage survival. Indeed, we showed that deletion of one such gene (pspA) significantly reduced UTI89 survival within BMMs. Our study provides a technological framework for simultaneously capturing global changes at the transcriptional level in co-cultures, and has generated new insights into the mechanisms that UPEC use to persist within the intramacrophage environment.

  1. The co-transcriptome of uropathogenic Escherichia coli-infected mouse macrophages reveals new insights into host-pathogen interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Mavromatis, Charalampos Harris

    2015-01-24

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most common infections in humans. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) can invade and replicate within bladder epithelial cells, and some UPEC strains can also survive within macrophages. To understand the UPEC transcriptional programme associated with intramacrophage survival, we performed host–pathogen co-transcriptome analyses using RNA sequencing. Mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) were challenged over a 24 h time course with two UPEC reference strains that possess contrasting intramacrophage phenotypes: UTI89, which survives in BMMs, and 83972, which is killed by BMMs. Neither of these strains caused significant BMM cell death at the low multiplicity of infection that was used in this study. We developed an effective computational framework that simultaneously separated, annotated and quantified the mammalian and bacterial transcriptomes. Bone marrow-derived macrophages responded to the two UPEC strains with a broadly similar gene expression programme. In contrast, the transcriptional responses of the UPEC strains diverged markedly from each other. We identified UTI89 genes up-regulated at 24 h post-infection, and hypothesized that some may contribute to intramacrophage survival. Indeed, we showed that deletion of one such gene (pspA) significantly reduced UTI89 survival within BMMs. Our study provides a technological framework for simultaneously capturing global changes at the transcriptional level in co-cultures, and has generated new insights into the mechanisms that UPEC use to persist within the intramacrophage environment.

  2. Regulation of L-type Voltage Gated Calcium Channel CACNA1S in Macrophages upon Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Cecil; Mehto, Subhash; Tiwari, Brijendra K; Singh, Yogendra; Natarajan, Krishnamurthy

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated earlier the inhibitory role played by Voltage Gated Calcium Channels (VGCCs) in regulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) survival and pathogenesis. In this report, we investigated mechanisms and key players that regulate the surface expression of VGCC-CACNA1S by Rv2463 and M. tb infection in macrophages. Our earlier work identified Rv2463 to be expressed at early times post infection in macrophages that induced suppressor responses to dendritic cells and macrophages. Our results in this study demonstrate a role of MyD88 independent TLR pathway in mediating CACNA1S expression. Dissecting the role for second messengers, we show that calcium homeostasis plays a key role in CACNA1S expression during M. tb infection. Using siRNAs against molecular sensors of calcium regulation, we show an involvement of ER associated Stromal Interaction Molecules 1 and 2 (STIM1 and STIM2), and transcription factor pCREB, towards CACNA1S expression that also involved the MyD88 independent pathway. Interestingly, reactive oxygen species played a negative role in M. tb mediated CACNA1S expression. Further, a cross-regulation of ROS and pCREB was noted that governed CACNA1S expression. Characterizing the mechanisms governing CACNA1S expression would improve our understanding of the regulation of VGCC expression and its role in M. tb pathogenesis during M. tb infection.

  3. Burkholderia cenocepacia type VI secretion system mediates escape of type II secreted proteins into the cytoplasm of infected macrophages.

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    Roberto Rosales-Reyes

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic pathogen that survives intracellularly in macrophages and causes serious respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. We have previously shown that bacterial survival occurs in bacteria-containing membrane vacuoles (BcCVs resembling arrested autophagosomes. Intracellular bacteria stimulate IL-1β secretion in a caspase-1-dependent manner and induce dramatic changes to the actin cytoskeleton and the assembly of the NADPH oxidase complex onto the BcCV membrane. A Type 6 secretion system (T6SS is required for these phenotypes but surprisingly it is not required for the maturation arrest of the BcCV. Here, we show that macrophages infected with B. cenocepacia employ the NLRP3 inflammasome to induce IL-1β secretion and pyroptosis. Moreover, IL-1β secretion by B. cenocepacia-infected macrophages is suppressed in deletion mutants unable to produce functional Type VI, Type IV, and Type 2 secretion systems (SS. We provide evidence that the T6SS mediates the disruption of the BcCV membrane, which allows the escape of proteins secreted by the T2SS into the macrophage cytoplasm. This was demonstrated by the activity of fusion derivatives of the T2SS-secreted metalloproteases ZmpA and ZmpB with adenylcyclase. Supporting this notion, ZmpA and ZmpB are required for efficient IL-1β secretion in a T6SS dependent manner. ZmpA and ZmpB are also required for the maturation arrest of the BcCVs and bacterial intra-macrophage survival in a T6SS-independent fashion. Our results uncover a novel mechanism for inflammasome activation that involves cooperation between two bacterial secretory pathways, and an unanticipated role for T2SS-secreted proteins in intracellular bacterial survival.

  4. Leishmania donovani activates SREBP2 to modulate macrophage membrane cholesterol and mitochondrial oxidants for establishment of infection.

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    Mukherjee, Madhuchhanda; Basu Ball, Writoban; Das, Pijush K

    2014-10-01

    Establishment of infection by an intracellular pathogen depends on successful internalization with a concomitant neutralization of host defense machinery. Leishmania donovani, an intramacrophage pathogen, targets host SREBP2, a critical transcription factor, to regulate macrophage plasma membrane cholesterol and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation, favoring parasite invasion and persistence. Leishmania infection triggered membrane-raft reorientation-dependent Lyn-PI3K/Akt pathway activation which in turn deactivated GSK3β to stabilize nuclear SREBP2. Moreover, cells perceiving less available intracellular cholesterol due to its sequestration at the plasma membrane resulted in the deregulation of the ER-residing SCAP-SREBP2-Insig circuit thereby assisting increased nuclear translocation of SREBP2. Both increased nuclear transport and stabilization of SREBP2 caused HMGCR-catalyzed cholesterol biosynthesis-mediated plasma membrane cholesterol enrichment leading to decreased membrane-fluidity and plausibly assisting delay in phagosomal acidification. Parasite survival ensuing entry was further ensured by SREBP2-dependent transcriptional up-regulation of UCP2, which suppressed mitochondrial ROS generation, one of the primary microbicidal molecules in macrophages recognized for its efficacy against Leishmania. Functional knock-down of SREBP2 both in vitro and in vivo was associated with reduction in macrophage plasma membrane cholesterol, increased ROS production and lower parasite survival. To our knowledge, this study, for the first time, reveals that Leishmania exploits macrophage cholesterol-dependent SREBP2 circuit to facilitate its entry and survival within the host.

  5. A novel mycobacterial In Vitro infection assay identifies differences of induced macrophage apoptosis between CD4+ and CD8+ T cells

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    Nkwouano, Vanesa; Witkowski, Sven; Rehberg, Nidja; Kalscheuer, Rainer; Nausch, Norman; Mayatepek, Ertan

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages are natural host cells for pathogenic mycobacteria, like Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb). Immune surveillance by T cells and interaction with M.tb infected macrophages is crucial for protection against M.tb reactivation and development of active tuberculosis. Several factors play a role in the control of M.tb infection but reliable biomarkers remain elusive. One major obstacle is the absence of functional in vitro assays which allow concomitant determination of i) mycobacterial eradication; ii) cytotoxic effects on host macrophages; and iii) effector T-cell functions. We established a novel functional in vitro assay based on flow cytometry analysis of monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) infected with a Mycobacterium bovis BCG strain containing a tetracycline inducible live/dead reporter plasmid (LD-BCG). MDM of healthy human donors were generated in vitro and infected with defined LD-BCG numbers. After short-term MDM/LD-BCG co-incubation with autologous effector T cells or in the presence of antibiotics, proportions of MDM containing live or dead LD-BCG were determined by flow cytometry. Concomitant measure of defined numbers of added beads allowed comparison of absolute MDM numbers between samples. Differential effects of T-cell subpopulations on anti-mycobacterial cytotoxicity and on MDM apoptosis were determined. Flow cytometry measure of MDM/LD-BCG treated with rifampicin correlated well with mycobacterial colony forming units and fluorescence microscopy results. Co-culture with pre-activated effector T cells reduced viability of both, LD-BCG and MDM, in a concentration-dependent manner. M.tb protein specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells contributed similarly to anti-mycobacterial cytotoxicity but CD4+ T cells induced higher levels of apoptosis in infected MDMs. This novel assay enables rapid quantification of anti-mycobacterial cytotoxicity and characterization of effector functions. Our functional in vitro assay has the potential to contribute to the

  6. Innate immune responses to rotavirus infection in macrophages depend on MAVS but involve neither the NLRP3 inflammasome nor JNK and p38 signaling pathways.

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    Di Fiore, Izabel J M; Holloway, Gavan; Coulson, Barbara S

    2015-10-02

    Rotavirus infection is a major cause of life-threatening infantile gastroenteritis. The innate immune system provides an immediate mechanism of suppressing viral replication and is necessary for an effective adaptive immune response. Innate immunity involves host recognition of viral infection and establishment of a powerful antiviral state through the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as type-1 interferon (IFN). Macrophages, the front-line cells of innate immunity, produce IFN and other cytokines in response to viral infection. However, the role of macrophages during rotavirus infection is not well defined. We demonstrate here that RRV rotavirus triggers the production of proinflammatory cytokines from mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages. IFN and antiviral cytokine production was abolished in rotavirus-infected MAVS (-/-) macrophages. This indicates that rotavirus triggers innate immunity in macrophages through RIG-I and/or MDA5 viral recognition, and MAVS signaling is essential for cytokine responses in macrophages. Rotavirus induced IFN expression in both wild type and MDA5 (-/-) macrophages, showing that MDA5 is not essential for IFN secretion following infection, and RIG-I and MDA5 may act redundantly in promoting rotavirus recognition. Interestingly, rotavirus neither stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinases p38 and JNK nor activated the NLRP3 inflammasome, demonstrating that these components might not be involved in innate responses to rotavirus infection in macrophages. Our results indicate that rotavirus elicits intracellular signaling in macrophages, resulting in the induction of IFN and antiviral cytokines, and advance our understanding of the involvement of these cells in innate responses against rotavirus.

  7. Macrophage activation and histopathological findings in Calomys callosus and Swiss mice infected with several strains of Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Monamaris Marques Borges

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available Peritoneal macrophage activation as measured by H2O2 release and histopathology was compared between Swiss mice and Calomys callosus, a wild rodent, reservoir of Trypanosoma cruzi, during the course of infection with four strains of this parasite. In mice F and Y strain infections result in high parasitemia and mortality while with silvatic strains Costalimai and M226 parasitemia is sub-patent, with very low mortality. H2O2 release peaked at 33,6 and 59 nM/2 x 10(elevado a sexta potência cells for strains Y and F, respectively, 48 and 50 nM/2 x 10 (elevado a sexta potência for strains Costalimai and M226, at different days after infection. Histopathological findings of myositis, myocarditis, necrotizing artheritis and abscence of macrophage parasitism were foud for strains F and Costalimai. Y strain infection presented moderate myocarditis and myositis, with parasites multiplying within macrophages. In C. callosus all four strains resulted in patent parasitemia wich was eventually overcome, with scarce mortality. H2O2 release for strains Y or F was comparable to that of mice-peaks of 27 and 53 nM/2 x 10 (elevado a sexta potência cells, with lower values for strains Costalimai and M226 - 16.5 and 4.6 nM/2 x 10(elevado a sexta potênciacells, respectively. Histopathological lesions with Y and F strain injected animals were comparable to those of mice at the onset of infections; they subsided completely at the later stages with Y strain and partially with F strain infected C. callosus. In Costalimai infected C. callosus practically no histopathological alterations were observed.

  8. Exosomes derived from M. Bovis BCG infected macrophages activate antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vitro and in vivo.

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    Pramod K Giri

    Full Text Available Activation of both CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells is required for an effective immune response to an M. tuberculosis infection. However, infected macrophages are poor antigen presenting cells and may be spatially separated from recruited T cells, thus limiting antigen presentation within a granuloma. Our previous studies showed that infected macrophages release from cells small membrane-bound vesicles called exosomes which contain mycobacterial lipid components and showed that these exosomes could stimulate a pro-inflammatory response in naïve macrophages. In the present study we demonstrate that exosomes stimulate both CD4(+ and CD8(+ splenic T cells isolated from mycobacteria-sensitized mice. Although the exosomes contain MHC I and II as well as costimulatory molecules, maximum stimulation of T cells required prior incubation of exosomes with antigen presenting cells. Exosomes isolated from M. bovis and M. tuberculosis infected macrophages also stimulated activation and maturation of mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Interestingly, intranasal administration of mice with exosomes isolated from M. bovis BCG infected macrophages induce the generation of memory CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells. The isolated T cells also produced IFN-gamma upon restimulation with BCG antigens. The release of exosomes from infected macrophages may overcome some of the defects in antigen presentation associated with mycobacterial infections and we suggest that exosomes may be a promising M. tuberculosis vaccine candidate.

  9. Lipoxin Inhibits Fungal Uptake by Macrophages and Reduces the Severity of Acute Pulmonary Infection Caused by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

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    Laura R. R. Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs and lipoxins (LXs are lipid mediators that control inflammation, with the former inducing and the latter inhibiting this process. Because the role played by these mediators in paracoccidioidomycosis was not investigated, we aimed to characterize the role of CysLT in the pulmonary infection developed by resistant (A/J and susceptible (B10.A mice. 48 h after infection, elevated levels of pulmonary LTC4 and LXA4 were produced by both mouse strains, but higher levels were found in the lungs of susceptible mice. Blocking the CysLTs receptor by MTL reduced fungal loads in B10.A, but not in A/J mice. In susceptible mice, MLT treatment led to reduced influx of PMN leukocytes, increased recruitment of monocytes, predominant synthesis of anti-inflammatory cytokines, and augmented expression of 5- and 15-lipoxygenase mRNA, suggesting a prevalent LXA4 activity. In agreement, MTL-treated macrophages showed reduced fungal burdens associated with decreased ingestion of fungal cells. Furthermore, the addition of exogenous LX reduced, and the specific blockade of the LX receptor increased the fungal loads of B10.A macrophages. This study showed for the first time that inhibition of CysLTs signaling results in less severe pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis that occurs in parallel with elevated LX activity and reduced infection of macrophages.

  10. Probing host pathogen cross-talk by transcriptional profiling of both Mycobacterium tuberculosis and infected human dendritic cells and macrophages.

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    Ludovic Tailleux

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcriptional profiling using microarrays provides a unique opportunity to decipher host pathogen cross-talk on the global level. Here, for the first time, we have been able to investigate gene expression changes in both Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a major human pathogen, and its human host cells, macrophages and dendritic cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In addition to common responses, we could identify eukaryotic and microbial transcriptional signatures that are specific to the cell type involved in the infection process. In particular M. tuberculosis shows a marked stress response when inside dendritic cells, which is in accordance with the low permissivity of these specialized phagocytes to the tubercle bacillus and to other pathogens. In contrast, the mycobacterial transcriptome inside macrophages reflects that of replicating bacteria. On the host cell side, differential responses to infection in macrophages and dendritic cells were identified in genes involved in oxidative stress, intracellular vesicle trafficking and phagosome acidification. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides the proof of principle that probing the host and the microbe transcriptomes simultaneously is a valuable means to accessing unique information on host pathogen interactions. Our results also underline the extraordinary plasticity of host cell and pathogen responses to infection, and provide a solid framework to further understand the complex mechanisms involved in immunity to M. tuberculosis and in mycobacterial adaptation to different intracellular environments.

  11. Haemophilus ducreyi infection induces activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in nonpolarized but not in polarized human macrophages.

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    Li, Wei; Katz, Barry P; Bauer, Margaret E; Spinola, Stanley M

    2013-08-01

    Recognition of microbial infection by certain intracellular pattern recognition receptors leads to the formation of a multiprotein complex termed the inflammasome. Inflammasome assembly activates caspase-1 and leads to cleavage and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and IL-18, which help control many bacterial pathogens. However, excessive inflammation mediated by inflammasome activation can also contribute to immunopathology. Here, we investigated whether Haemophilus ducreyi, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes the genital ulcer disease chancroid, activates inflammasomes in experimentally infected human skin and in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). Although H. ducreyi is predominantly extracellular during human infection, several inflammasome-related components were transcriptionally upregulated in H. ducreyi-infected skin. Infection of MDM with live, but not heat-killed, H. ducreyi induced caspase-1- and caspase-5-dependent processing and secretion of IL-1β. Blockage of H. ducreyi uptake by cytochalasin D significantly reduced the amount of secreted IL-1β. Knocking down the expression of the inflammasome components NLRP3 and ASC abolished IL-1β production. Consistent with NLRP3-dependent inflammasome activation, blocking ATP signaling, K(+) efflux, cathepsin B activity, and lysosomal acidification all inhibited IL-1β secretion. However, inhibition of the production and function of reactive oxygen species did not decrease IL-1β production. Polarization of macrophages to classically activated M1 or alternatively activated M2 cells abrogated IL-1β secretion elicited by H. ducreyi. Our study data indicate that H. ducreyi induces NLRP3 inflammasome activation via multiple mechanisms and suggest that the heterogeneity of macrophages within human lesions may modulate inflammasome activation during human infection.

  12. Reduced transcript stabilization restricts TNF-alpha expression in RAW264.7 macrophages infected with pathogenic mycobacteria: evidence for an involvement of lipomannan.

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    Basler, Tina; Holtmann, Helmut; Abel, Jens; Eckstein, Torsten; Baumer, Wolfgang; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Goethe, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Despite the critical role that TNF-alpha plays in the containment of mycobacterial infection, the mechanisms involved in regulation of its expression by mycobacteria are poorly defined. We addressed this question by studying MAP, which causes a chronic enteritis in ruminants and is linked to human Crohn's disease. We found that in MAP infected macrophages, TNF-alpha gene expression was substantially lower than in macrophages infected with nonpathogenic MS or stimulated with LPS. TNF-alpha transcriptional one could not fully explain the differential TNF-alpha mRNA expression, suggesting that there must be a substantial contribution by post-transcriptional mechanisms.Accordingly, we found reduced TNF-alpha mRNA stability in MAP-infected macrophages. Further comparison of MAP- and MS-infected macrophages revealed that lower TNF-alpha mRNA stability combined with lower mRNA and protein expression in MAP-infected macrophages correlated with lower p38 MAPK phosphorylation. These findings were independent of viability of MAP and MS. We demonstrate that the major mycobacterial cell-wall lipoglycan LM of MAP and MS induced TNF-alpha mRNA transcription,but only the MS-LM induced p38 MAPK-dependent transcript stabilization. Overall, our data suggest that pathogenic mycobacteria cause weak p38 and TNF-alpha mRNA stabilization as a result of their structural cell-wall components such as LM and thereby, restrict TNF-alpha expression in macrophages.

  13. Effect of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) (isolate ATCC VR-2385) infection on bactericidal activity of porcine pulmonary intravascular macrophages (PIMs): in vitro comparisons with pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs).

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    Thanawongnuwech, R; Thacker, E L; Halbur, P G

    1997-11-01

    Porcine pulmonary intravascular macrophages (PIMs) were recovered by in situ pulmonary vascular perfusion with 0.025% collagenase in saline from six 8-week old, crossbred pigs. Pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs) were recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage from the same pigs for comparisons in each assay. The macrophages were exposed to PRRSV (ATCC VR-2385) in vitro for 24 h and infection was confirmed by an indirect immunofluorescence test or transmission electron microscopy. Viral particles tended to accumulate in the vesicles of the Golgi apparatus or endoplasmic reticulum. Bactericidal function assays were performed on the recovered macrophages to determine the effects of the virus on macrophage functions. In vitro PRRSV infection reduced the bactericidal ability of PIMs from 68.3% to 56.4% (P PAMs from 69.3% to 61.0% (P > 0.1) at 24 h post-infection. The mean percentage of bacteria killed by macrophages after PRRSV infection was not significantly different among the treatment groups or between the treatment groups and non-infected controls based on colorimetric MTT bactericidal (Staphylococcus aureus) assay. PRRSV did not affect the ability of PIMs or PAMs to internalize opsonized 125I-iododeoxyuridine-labeled S. aureus (P > 0.05). PRRSV infection significantly decreased the production of superoxide anion (P PAMs. PRRSV reduced the myeloperoxidase-H2O2-halide product (P PAMs. The results suggest: (1) PIMs should be considered as an important replication site of PRRSV; (2) PRRSV may have a detrimental effect on both PIMs and PAMs; (3) loss of bactericidal function in PIMs may facilitate hematogenous bacterial infections.

  14. Characterization of HIV-1 Infection and Innate Sensing in Different Types of Primary Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

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    Elisabeth A. Diget

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages play an important role in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV pathogenesis and contribute to establishment of a viral reservoir responsible for continuous virus production and virus transmission to T cells. In this study, we investigated the differences between various monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs generated through different differentiation protocols and evaluated different cellular, immunological, and virological properties. We found that elevated and persistent HIV-1 pWT/BaL replication could be obtained only in MDMs grown in RPMI containing macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF. Interestingly, this MDM type was also most responsive to toll-like receptor stimulation. By contrast, all MDM types were activated to a comparable extent by intracellular DNA, and the macrophage serum-free medium-(Mac-SFM-differentiated MDMs responded strongly to membrane fusion through expression of CXCL10. Finally, we found that HIV infection of RPMI/M-CSF-differentiated MDMs induced low-grade expression of two interferon-stimulated genes in some donors. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the differentiation protocol used greatly influences the ability of MDMs to activate innate immune reactions and support HIV-1 replication. Paradoxically, the data show that the MDMs with the strongest innate immune response were also the most permissive for HIV-1 replication.

  15. Innate invariant NKT cells recognize Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected macrophages, produce interferon-gamma, and kill intracellular bacteria.

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    Isabel Sada-Ovalle

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Cellular immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb requires a coordinated response between the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system, resulting in a type 1 cytokine response, which is associated with control of infection. The contribution of innate lymphocytes to immunity against Mtb remains controversial. We established an in vitro system to study this question. Interferon-gamma is produced when splenocytes from uninfected mice are cultured with Mtb-infected macrophages, and, under these conditions, bacterial replication is suppressed. This innate control of bacterial replication is dependent on CD1d-restricted invariant NKT (iNKT cells, and their activation requires CD1d expression by infected macrophages as well as IL-12 and IL-18. We show that iNKT cells, even in limiting quantities, are sufficient to restrict Mtb replication. To determine whether iNKT cells contribute to host defense against tuberculosis in vivo, we adoptively transferred iNKT cells into mice. Primary splenic iNKT cells obtained from uninfected mice significantly reduce the bacterial burden in the lungs of mice infected with virulent Mtb by the aerosol route. Thus, iNKT cells have a direct bactericidal effect, even in the absence of synthetic ligands such as alpha-galactosylceramide. Our finding that iNKT cells protect mice against aerosol Mtb infection is the first evidence that CD1d-restricted NKT cells mediate protection against Mtb in vivo.

  16. Modulation of actin dynamics as potential macrophage subtype-targeting anti-tumour strategy

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    Pergola, Carlo; Schubert, Katrin; Pace, Simona; Ziereisen, Jana; Nikels, Felix; Scherer, Olga; Hüttel, Stephan; Zahler, Stefan; Vollmar, Angelika M.; Weinigel, Christina; Rummler, Silke; Müller, Rolf; Raasch, Martin; Mosig, Alexander; Koeberle, Andreas; Werz, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Tumour-associated macrophages mainly comprise immunosuppressive M2 phenotypes that promote tumour progression besides anti-tumoural M1 subsets. Selective depletion or reprogramming of M2 may represent an innovative anti-cancer strategy. The actin cytoskeleton is central for cellular homeostasis and is targeted for anti-cancer chemotherapy. Here, we show that targeting G-actin nucleation using chondramide A (ChA) predominantly depletes human M2 while promoting the tumour-suppressive M1 phenotype. ChA reduced the viability of M2, with minor effects on M1, but increased tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α release from M1. Interestingly, ChA caused rapid disruption of dynamic F-actin filaments and polymerization of G-actin, followed by reduction of cell size, binucleation and cell division, without cellular collapse. In M1, but not in M2, ChA caused marked activation of SAPK/JNK and NFκB, with slight or no effects on Akt, STAT-1/-3, ERK-1/2, and p38 MAPK, seemingly accounting for the better survival of M1 and TNFα secretion. In a microfluidically-supported human tumour biochip model, circulating ChA-treated M1 markedly reduced tumour cell viability through enhanced release of TNFα. Together, ChA may cause an anti-tumoural microenvironment by depletion of M2 and activation of M1, suggesting induction of G-actin nucleation as potential strategy to target tumour-associated macrophages in addition to neoplastic cells. PMID:28134280

  17. Lower expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and higher expression of arginase in rat alveolar macrophages are linked to their susceptibility to Toxoplasma gondii infection.

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    Zhi-Jun Zhao

    Full Text Available Rats are naturally resistant to Toxoplasma gondii infection, particularly the RH strain, while mice are not. Previous studies have demonstrated that inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and arginase-1 of rodent peritoneal macrophages are linked to the mechanism of resistance. As an increasing number of studies on human and animal infections are showing that pulmonary toxoplasmosis is one of the most severe clinical signs from T. gondii infection, we are interested to know whether T. gondii infection in alveolar macrophages of rats is also linked to the levels of iNOS and arginase-1 activity. Our results demonstrate that T. gondii could grow and proliferate in rat alveolar macrophages, both in vitro and in vivo, at levels higher than resistant rat peritoneal macrophages and at comparable levels to sensitive mouse peritoneal macrophages. Lower activity and expression levels of iNOS and higher activity and expression levels of arginase-1 in rat alveolar macrophages were found to be linked to the susceptibility of T. gondii infection in these cells. These novel findings could aid a better understanding of the pathogenesis of clinical pulmonary toxoplasmosis in humans and domestic animals.

  18. Essential role of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) in the maintenance of lipid storage in Mycobacterium leprae-infected macrophages.

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    Tanigawa, Kazunari; Degang, Yang; Kawashima, Akira; Akama, Takeshi; Yoshihara, Aya; Ishido, Yuko; Makino, Masahiko; Ishii, Norihisa; Suzuki, Koichi

    2012-05-01

    Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae), the causative agent of leprosy, parasitizes within the foamy or enlarged phagosome of macrophages where rich lipids accumulate. Although the mechanisms for lipid accumulation in the phagosome have been clarified, it is still unclear how such large amounts of lipids escape degradation. To further explore underlying mechanisms involved in lipid catabolism in M. leprae-infected host cells, we examined the expression of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), a key enzyme in fatty acid mobilization and lipolysis, in human macrophage THP-1 cells. We found that infection by live M. leprae significantly suppressed HSL expression levels. This suppression was not observed with dead M. leprae or latex beads. Macrophage activation by peptidoglycan (PGN), the ligand for toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), increased HSL expression; however, live M. leprae suppressed this increase. HSL expression was abolished in the slit-skin smear specimens from patients with lepromatous and borderline leprosy. In addition, the recovery of HSL expression was observed in patients who experienced a lepra reaction, which is a cell-mediated, delayed-type hypersensitivity immune response, or in patients who were successfully treated with multi-drug therapy. These results suggest that M. leprae suppresses lipid degradation through inhibition of HSL expression, and that the monitoring of HSL mRNA levels in slit-skin smear specimens may be a useful indicator of patient prognosis.

  19. Vitamin D inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in macrophages through the induction of autophagy.

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    Grant R Campbell

    Full Text Available Low vitamin D levels in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV infected persons are associated with more rapid disease progression and increased risk for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. We have previously shown that 1α,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25D3, the active form of vitamin D, inhibits HIV replication in human macrophages through the induction of autophagy. In this study, we report that physiological concentrations of 1,25D3 induce the production of the human cathelicidin microbial peptide (CAMP and autophagic flux in HIV and M. tuberculosis co-infected human macrophages which inhibits mycobacterial growth and the replication of HIV. Using RNA interference for Beclin-1 and the autophagy-related 5 homologue, combined with the chemical inhibitors of autophagic flux, bafilomycin A₁, an inhibitor of autophagosome-lysosome fusion and subsequent acidification, and SID 26681509 an inhibitor of the lysosome hydrolase cathepsin L, we show that the 1,25D3-mediated inhibition of HIV replication and mycobacterial growth during single infection or dual infection is dependent not only upon the induction of autophagy, but also through phagosomal maturation. Moreover, through the use of RNA interference for CAMP, we demonstrate that cathelicidin is essential for the 1,25D3 induced autophagic flux and inhibition of HIV replication and mycobacterial growth. The present findings provide a biological explanation for the benefits and importance of vitamin D sufficiency in HIV and M. tuberculosis-infected persons, and provide new insights into novel approaches to prevent and treat HIV infection and related opportunistic infections.

  20. NK cells are strongly activated by Lassa and Mopeia virus-infected human macrophages in vitro but do not mediate virus suppression.

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    Russier, Marion; Reynard, Stéphanie; Tordo, Noël; Baize, Sylvain

    2012-07-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) and Mopeia virus (MOPV) are closely related Arenaviruses. LASV causes hemorrhagic fever, whereas MOPV is not pathogenic. Both viruses display tropism for APCs such as DCs and macrophages. During viral infections, NK cells are involved in the clearance of infected cells and promote optimal immune responses by interacting with APCs. We used an in vitro model of human NK and APC coculture to study the role of NK cells and to characterize their interactions with APCs during LASV and MOPV infections. As expected, NK cells alone were neither infected nor activated by LASV and MOPV, and infected DCs did not activate NK cells. By contrast, LASV- and MOPV-infected macrophages activated NK cells, as shown by the upregulation of CD69, NKp30, and NKp44, the downregulation of CXCR3, and an increase in NK-cell proliferation. NK cells acquired enhanced cytotoxicity, as illustrated by the increase in granzyme B (GrzB) expression and killing of K562 targets, but did not produce IFN-γ. Contact between NK cells and infected macrophages and type I IFNs were essential for activation; however, NK cells could not kill infected cells and control infection. Overall, these findings show that MOPV- as well as pathogenic LASV-infected macrophages mediate NK-cell activation.

  1. Modulation of monocyte/macrophage-derived cytokine and chemokine profile by persistent Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection leads to chronic inflammation

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    Penelope Mavromara

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available HCV infection presents a major public health problem, with more than 170 million people infected worldwide. Chronicity and persistence of infection constitute the hallmark of the disease. Although HCV is a hepatotropic virus, subsets of immune cells have been found to be permissive to infection and viral replication. Peripheral blood monocytes, attracted to the site of infection and differentiated into macrophages, and resident hepatic macrophages, known as Kupffer cells, are important mediators of innate immunity, through production of several chemokines and cytokines in addition to their phagocytic activity. HCV proteins have been shown to modulate the cytokine and chemokine production profile of monocytes/macrophages, as it is suggested by both in vitro and clinical studies. This modified expression profile appears crucial for the establishment of aberrant inflammation that leads to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.

  2. Leishmania panamensis infection and antimonial drugs modulate expression of macrophage drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes: impact on intracellular parasite survival

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    Gómez, Maria Adelaida; Navas, Adriana; Márquez, Ricardo; Rojas, Laura Jimena; Vargas, Deninson Alejandro; Blanco, Victor Manuel; Koren, Roni; Zilberstein, Dan; Saravia, Nancy Gore

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Treatment failure is multifactorial. Despite the importance of host cell drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes in the accumulation, distribution and metabolism of drugs targeting intracellular pathogens, their impact on the efficacy of antileishmanials is unknown. We examined the contribution of pharmacologically relevant determinants in human macrophages in the antimony-mediated killing of intracellular Leishmania panamensis and its relationship with the outcome of treatment with meglumine antimoniate. Methods Patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis who failed (n = 8) or responded (n = 8) to treatment were recruited. Gene expression profiling of pharmacological determinants in primary macrophages was evaluated by quantitative RT–PCR and correlated to the drug-mediated intracellular parasite killing. Functional validation was conducted through short hairpin RNA gene knockdown. Results Survival of L. panamensis after exposure to antimonials was significantly higher in macrophages from patients who failed treatment. Sixteen macrophage drug-response genes were modulated by infection and exposure to meglumine antimoniate. Correlation analyses of gene expression and intracellular parasite survival revealed the involvement of host cell metallothionein-2A and ABCB6 in the survival of Leishmania during exposure to antimonials. ABCB6 was functionally validated as a transporter of antimonial compounds localized in both the cell and phagolysosomal membranes of macrophages, revealing a novel mechanism of host cell-mediated regulation of intracellular drug exposure and parasite survival within phagocytes. Conclusions These results provide insight into host cell mechanisms regulating the intracellular exposure of Leishmania to antimonials and variations among individuals that impact parasite survival. Understanding of host cell determinants of intracellular pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics opens new avenues to improved drug efficacy for intracellular

  3. The Macrophage Galactose-Type Lectin-1 (MGL1 Recognizes Taenia crassiceps Antigens, Triggers Intracellular Signaling, and Is Critical for Resistance to This Infection

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    Daniel Montero-Barrera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available C-type lectins are multifunctional sugar-binding molecules expressed on dendritic cells (DCs and macrophages that internalize antigens for processing and presentation. Macrophage galactose-type lectin 1 (MGL1 recognizes glycoconjugates expressing Lewis X structures which contain galactose residues, and it is selectively expressed on immature DCs and macrophages. Helminth parasites contain large amounts of glycosylated components, which play a role in the immune regulation induced by such infections. Macrophages from MGL1−/− mice showed less binding ability toward parasite antigens than their wild-type (WT counterparts. Exposure of WT macrophages to T. crassiceps antigens triggered tyrosine phosphorylation signaling activity, which was diminished in MGL1−/− macrophages. Following T. crassiceps infection, MGL1−/− mice failed to produce significant levels of inflammatory cytokines early in the infection compared to WT mice. In contrast, MGL1−/− mice developed a Th2-dominant immune response that was associated with significantly higher parasite loads, whereas WT mice were resistant. Flow cytometry and RT-PCR analyses showed overexpression of the mannose receptors, IL-4Rα, PDL2, arginase-1, Ym1, and RELM-α on MGL1−/− macrophages. These studies indicate that MGL1 is involved in T. crassiceps recognition and subsequent innate immune activation and resistance.

  4. The macrophage galactose-type lectin-1 (MGL1) recognizes Taenia crassiceps antigens, triggers intracellular signaling, and is critical for resistance to this infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Barrera, Daniel; Valderrama-Carvajal, Héctor; Terrazas, César A; Rojas-Hernández, Saúl; Ledesma-Soto, Yadira; Vera-Arias, Laura; Carrasco-Yépez, Maricela; Gómez-García, Lorena; Martínez-Saucedo, Diana; Becerra-Díaz, Mireya; Terrazas, Luis I

    2015-01-01

    C-type lectins are multifunctional sugar-binding molecules expressed on dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages that internalize antigens for processing and presentation. Macrophage galactose-type lectin 1 (MGL1) recognizes glycoconjugates expressing Lewis X structures which contain galactose residues, and it is selectively expressed on immature DCs and macrophages. Helminth parasites contain large amounts of glycosylated components, which play a role in the immune regulation induced by such infections. Macrophages from MGL1(-/-) mice showed less binding ability toward parasite antigens than their wild-type (WT) counterparts. Exposure of WT macrophages to T. crassiceps antigens triggered tyrosine phosphorylation signaling activity, which was diminished in MGL1(-/-) macrophages. Following T. crassiceps infection, MGL1(-/-) mice failed to produce significant levels of inflammatory cytokines early in the infection compared to WT mice. In contrast, MGL1(-/-) mice developed a Th2-dominant immune response that was associated with significantly higher parasite loads, whereas WT mice were resistant. Flow cytometry and RT-PCR analyses showed overexpression of the mannose receptors, IL-4Rα, PDL2, arginase-1, Ym1, and RELM-α on MGL1(-/-) macrophages. These studies indicate that MGL1 is involved in T. crassiceps recognition and subsequent innate immune activation and resistance.

  5. Potential use of rapamycin in HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donia, Marco; McCubrey, James A; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    The strong need for the development of alternative anti-HIV agents is primarily due to the emergence of strain-resistant viruses, the need for sustained adherence to complex treatment regimens and the toxicity of currently used antiviral drugs. This review analyzes proof of concept studies...... indicating that the immunomodulatory drug rapamycin (RAPA) possesses anti-HIV properties both in vitro and in vivo that qualifies it as a potential new anti-HIV drug. It represents a literature review of published studies that evaluated the in vitro and in vivo activity of RAPA in HIV. RAPA represses HIV-1...... replication in vitro through different mechanisms including, but not limited, to down regulation of CCR5. In addition RAPA synergistically enhances the anti-HIV activity of entry inhibitors such as vicriviroc, aplaviroc and enfuvirtide in vitro. RAPA also inhibits HIV-1 infection in human peripheral blood...

  6. Potential use of rapamycin in HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donia, Marco; McCubrey, James A; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    The strong need for the development of alternative anti-HIV agents is primarily due to the emergence of strain-resistant viruses, the need for sustained adherence to complex treatment regimens and the toxicity of currently used antiviral drugs. This review analyzes proof of concept studies...... indicating that the immunomodulatory drug rapamycin (RAPA) possesses anti-HIV properties both in vitro and in vivo that qualifies it as a potential new anti-HIV drug. It represents a literature review of published studies that evaluated the in vitro and in vivo activity of RAPA in HIV. RAPA represses HIV-1...... replication in vitro through different mechanisms including, but not limited, to down regulation of CCR5. In addition RAPA synergistically enhances the anti-HIV activity of entry inhibitors such as vicriviroc, aplaviroc and enfuvirtide in vitro. RAPA also inhibits HIV-1 infection in human peripheral blood...

  7. The Local Inflammatory Responses to Infection of the Peritoneal Cavity in Humans: Their Regulation by Cytokines, Macrophages, and Other Leukocytes

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    Marien Willem Johan Adriaan Fieren

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies on infection-induced inflammatory reactions in humans rely largely on findings in the blood compartment. Peritoneal leukocytes from patients treated with peritoneal dialysis offer a unique opportunity to study in humans the inflammatory responses taking place at the site of infection. Compared with peritoneal macrophages (pM from uninfected patients, pM from infected patients display ex vivo an upregulation and downregulation of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators, respectively. Pro-IL-1 processing and secretion rather than synthesis proves to be increased in pM from infectious peritonitis suggesting up-regulation of caspase-1 in vivo. A crosstalk between pM, γ T cells, and neutrophils has been found to be involved in augmented TNF expression and production during infection. The recent finding in experimental studies that alternatively activated macrophages (M2 increase by proliferation rather than recruitment may have significant implications for the understanding and treatment of chronic inflammatory conditions such as encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS.

  8. Macrophages as target cells for Mayaro virus infection: involvement of reactive oxygen species in the inflammatory response during virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalheiro, Mariana G; Costa, Leandro Silva DA; Campos, Holmes S; Alves, Letícia S; Assunção-Miranda, Iranaia; Poian, Andrea T DA

    2016-09-01

    Alphaviruses among the viruses that cause arthritis, consisting in a public health problem worldwide by causing localized outbreaks, as well as large epidemics in humans. Interestingly, while the Old World alphaviruses are arthritogenic, the New World alphaviruses cause encephalitis. One exception is Mayaro virus (MAYV), which circulates exclusively in South America but causes arthralgia and is phylogenetically related to the Old World alphaviruses. Although MAYV-induced arthritis in humans is well documented, the molecular and cellular factors that contribute to its pathogenesis are completely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that macrophages, key players in arthritis development, are target cells for MAYV infection, which leads to cell death through apoptosis. We showed that MAYV replication in macrophage induced the expression of TNF, a cytokine that would contribute to pathogenesis of MAYV fever, since TNF promotes an inflammatory profile characteristic of arthritis. We also found a significant increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at early times of infection, which coincides with the peak of virus replication and precedes TNF secretion. Treatment of the cells with antioxidant agents just after infection completely abolished TNF secretion, indicating an involvement of ROS in inflammation induced during MAYV infection.

  9. Macrophages as target cells for Mayaro virus infection: involvement of reactive oxygen species in the inflammatory response during virus replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIANA G. CAVALHEIRO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Alphaviruses among the viruses that cause arthritis, consisting in a public health problem worldwide by causing localized outbreaks, as well as large epidemics in humans. Interestingly, while the Old World alphaviruses are arthritogenic, the New World alphaviruses cause encephalitis. One exception is Mayaro virus (MAYV, which circulates exclusively in South America but causes arthralgia and is phylogenetically related to the Old World alphaviruses. Although MAYV-induced arthritis in humans is well documented, the molecular and cellular factors that contribute to its pathogenesis are completely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that macrophages, key players in arthritis development, are target cells for MAYV infection, which leads to cell death through apoptosis. We showed that MAYV replication in macrophage induced the expression of TNF, a cytokine that would contribute to pathogenesis of MAYV fever, since TNF promotes an inflammatory profile characteristic of arthritis. We also found a significant increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS at early times of infection, which coincides with the peak of virus replication and precedes TNF secretion. Treatment of the cells with antioxidant agents just after infection completely abolished TNF secretion, indicating an involvement of ROS in inflammation induced during MAYV infection.

  10. Neutrophil and Alveolar Macrophage-Mediated Innate Immune Control of Legionella pneumophila Lung Infection via TNF and ROS.

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    Pascal Ziltener

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a facultative intracellular bacterium that lives in aquatic environments where it parasitizes amoeba. However, upon inhalation of contaminated aerosols it can infect and replicate in human alveolar macrophages, which can result in Legionnaires' disease, a severe form of pneumonia. Upon experimental airway infection of mice, L. pneumophila is rapidly controlled by innate immune mechanisms. Here we identified, on a cell-type specific level, the key innate effector functions responsible for rapid control of infection. In addition to the well-characterized NLRC4-NAIP5 flagellin recognition pathway, tumor necrosis factor (TNF and reactive oxygen species (ROS are also essential for effective innate immune control of L. pneumophila. While ROS are essential for the bactericidal activity of neutrophils, alveolar macrophages (AM rely on neutrophil and monocyte-derived TNF signaling via TNFR1 to restrict bacterial replication. This TNF-mediated antibacterial mechanism depends on the acidification of lysosomes and their fusion with L. pneumophila containing vacuoles (LCVs, as well as caspases with a minor contribution from cysteine-type cathepsins or calpains, and is independent of NLRC4, caspase-1, caspase-11 and NOX2. This study highlights the differential utilization of innate effector pathways to curtail intracellular bacterial replication in specific host cells upon L. pneumophila airway infection.

  11. Cell-to-cell spread and massive vacuole formation after Cryptococcus neoformans infection of murine macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Casadevall Arturo; Alvarez Mauricio

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The interaction between macrophages and Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) is critical for containing dissemination of this pathogenic yeast. However, Cn can either lyse macrophages or escape from within them through a process known as phagosomal extrusion. Both events result in live extracellular yeasts capable of reproducing and disseminating in the extracellular milieu. Another method of exiting the intracellular confines of cells is through host cell-to-cell transfer of the ...

  12. Changes in macrophage phenotype after infection of pigs with Haemophilus parasuis strains with different levels of virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Hurtado, Mar; Olvera, Alexandre; Martinez-Moliner, Verónica; Galofré-Milà, Nuria; Martínez, Paloma; Dominguez, Javier; Aragon, Virginia

    2013-07-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is a colonizer of healthy piglets and the etiological agent of Glässer's disease. Differences in virulence among strains of H. parasuis have been widely observed. In order to explore the host-pathogen interaction, snatch-farrowed colostrum-deprived piglets were intranasally infected with 4 strains of H. parasuis: reference virulent strain Nagasaki, reference nonvirulent strain SW114, field strain IT29205 (from a systemic lesion and virulent in a previous challenge), and field strain F9 (from the nasal cavity of a healthy piglet). At different times after infection, two animals of each group were euthanized and alveolar macrophages were analyzed for the expression of CD163, CD172a, SLA I (swine histocompatibility leukocyte antigen I), SLA II, sialoadhesin (or CD169), and CD14. At 1 day postinfection (dpi), virulent strains induced reduced expression of CD163, SLA II, and CD172a on the surfaces of the macrophages, while nonvirulent strains induced increased expression of CD163, both compared to noninfected controls. At 2 dpi, the pattern switched into a strong expression of CD172a, CD163, and sialoadhesin by the virulent strains, which was followed by a steep increase in interleukin 8 (IL-8) and soluble CD163 in serum at 3 to 4 dpi. The early increase in surface expression of CD163 induced by nonvirulent strains went along with higher levels of IL-8 in serum than those induced by virulent strains in the first 2 days of infection. Alpha interferon (IFN-α) induction was observed only in animals infected with nonvirulent strains. Overall, these results are compatible with a delay in macrophage activation by virulent strains, which may be critical for disease production.

  13. Modeling of HIV-1 infection: insights to the role of monocytes/macrophages, latently infected T4 cells, and HAART regimes.

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    Qiang Li

    Full Text Available A novel dynamic model covering five types of cells and three connected compartments, peripheral blood (PB, lymph nodes (LNs, and the central nervous system (CNS, is here proposed. It is based on assessment of the biological principles underlying the interactions between the human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1 and the human immune system. The simulated results of this model matched the three well-documented phases of HIV-1 infection very closely and successfully described the three stages of LN destruction that occur during HIV-1 infection. The model also showed that LNs are the major location of viral replication, creating a pool of latently infected T4 cells during the latency period. A detailed discussion of the role of monocytes/macrophages is made, and the results indicated that infected monocytes/macrophages could determine the progression of HIV-1 infection. The effects of typical highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART drugs on HIV-1 infection were analyzed and the results showed that efficiency of each drug but not the time of the treatment start contributed to the change of the turnover of the disease greatly. An incremental count of latently infected T4 cells was made under therapeutic simulation, and patients were found to fail to respond to HAART therapy in the presence of certain stimuli, such as opportunistic infections. In general, the dynamics of the model qualitatively matched clinical observations very closely, indicating that the model may have benefits in evaluating the efficacy of different drug therapy regimens and in the discovery of new monitoring markers and therapeutic schemes for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  14. Nitric oxide induces tyrosine nitration and release of cytochrome c preceding an increase of mitochondrial transmembrane potential in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortelano, S; Alvarez, A M; Boscá, L

    1999-12-01

    Treatment of elicited peritoneal macrophages or the macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 with high concentrations of nitric oxide donors is followed by apoptotic cell death. Analysis of the changes in the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)) with specific fluorescent probes showed a rapid and persistent increase of DeltaPsi(m), a potential that usually decreases in cells undergoing apoptosis through mitochondrial-dependent mechanisms. Using confocal microscopy, the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol was characterized as an early event preceding the rise of DeltaPsi(m). The cytochrome c from cells treated with nitric oxide donors was modified chemically, probably through the formation of nitrotyrosine residues, suggesting the synthesis of peroxynitrite in the mitochondria. These results indicate that nitric oxide-dependent apoptosis in macrophages occurs in the presence of a sustained increase of DeltaPsi(m), and that the chemical modification and release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria precede the changes of DeltaPsi(m).-Hortelano, S., Alvarez, A. M., Boscá, L. Nitric oxide induces tyrosine nitration and release of cytochrome c preceding an increase of mitochondrial transmembrane potential in macrophages.

  15. HIV-1-infected and immune-activated macrophages induce astrocytic differentiation of human cortical neural progenitor cells via the STAT3 pathway.

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    Hui Peng

    Full Text Available Diminished adult neurogenesis is considered a potential mechanism in the pathogenesis of HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD. In HAD, HIV-1-infected and immune-activated brain mononuclear phagocytes (MP; perivascular macrophages and microglia drive central nervous system (CNS inflammation and may alter normal neurogenesis. We previously demonstrated HIV-1-infected and lipopolysaccharide (LPS activated monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM inhibit human neural progenitor cell (NPC neurogenesis, while enhancing astrogliogenesis through the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, in vitro and in vivo. Here we further test the hypothesis that HIV-1-infected/activated MDM promote NPC astrogliogenesis via activation of the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3, a critical factor for astrogliogenesis. Our results show that LPS-activated MDM-conditioned medium (LPS-MCM and HIV-infected/LPS-activated MDM-conditioned medium (LPS+HIV-MCM induced Janus kinase 1 (Jak1 and STAT3 activation. Induction of the Jak-STAT3 activation correlated with increased glia fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP expression, demonstrating an induction of astrogliogenesis. Moreover, STAT3-targeting siRNA (siSTAT3 decreased MCM-induced STAT3 activation and NPC astrogliogenesis. Furthermore, inflammatory cytokines (including IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α produced by LPS-activated and/or HIV-1-infected MDM may contribute to MCM-induced STAT3 activation and astrocytic differentiation. These observations were confirmed in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID mice with HIV-1 encephalitis (HIVE. In HIVE mice, siRNA control (without target sequence, sicon pre-transfected NPCs injected with HIV-1-infected MDM showed more astrocytic differentiation and less neuronal differentiation of NPCs as compared to NPC injection alone. siSTAT3 abrogated HIV-1-infected MDM-induced astrogliogenesis of injected NPCs. Collectively, these

  16. Effect of inducible nitric oxide synthase binding with peroxisomes on early infection of macrophages by Salmonella typhimurium

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    Xin PAN

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigation on the early carrying inducible nitric oxide synthase for peroxisomes to Salmonella typhimurium during the bacteria infection mouse macrophages.Methods RAW264.7 macrophages were transfected with pTassC-GFP plasmids to analysis the existence form of green fluorescent protein labeled target for Salmonella secreted protein SpiC(TassCprotein in the cell.The interaction between the fusion protein TassC-GFP and peroxisomes were analyzed by co-transfection of pTassC-GFP and pDsRed2-Perxi(labels peroxisomes red plasmids to RAW264.7 macrophages,the positive transfected cells named RAW-DT.RAW-D cells were named by transfecting RAW264.7 with pDsRed2-Perxi plasmids.S.typhimurium was detected with mono-antibody and visualized with Alexa Fluor 350 conjugated donkey anti-mouse antibodies.Inducible nitric oxide synthase(iNOS or NOS2 was detected with iNOS-antibody and visualized with Alexa Fluor 488 conjugated goat anti-rabbit antibodies.S.typhimurium were used to infect the RAW-DT cells to analyze the interaction among bacteria,TassC-GFPs and peroxisomes.The RAW-D cells were infected with S.typhimurium 1h to analyze the interaction among bacteria,iNOS and peroxisomes.Results TassC vesicles co-localized with peroxisomes when RAW264.7 macrophages were co-transfected with pTassC-GFP and pDsRed2-Perxi plasmids.It was determined by a three-dimensional(xyz fluorescence microscopy that the recruitment or overlapping of TassC-GFP and pemxiomes to the Salmonella-containing vacuoles(SCV after infection of RAW-DT macrophages with S.typhimurium for 1h.The SCVs also could co-localized with peroxisomes and iNOS after infection of RAW-D cells with S.typhimurium for 1h.Upon entry of Salmonella,peroxisomes were recruited to the Salmonella-containing vesicles and remain aggregated around the SCV for the duration of the 60 minutes observation time.Conclusion These findings indicated that,wild type S.typhimurium could induce iNOS production in RAW264

  17. Important role of interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-3 in the interferon response of mouse macrophages upon infection by Newcastle disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilden, Holger; Schirrmacher, Volker; Fournier, Philippe

    2011-08-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is an interesting agent for activating innate immune activity in macrophages including secretion of TNF-α and IFN-α, upregulation of TRAIL and activation of NF-κB and iNOS. However, the molecular mechanism of such cellular activities remains largely unknown. Tumor selectivity of replication of NDV has been described to be linked to deviations in tumor cells of the type I interferon response. We therefore focused on the interferon response to NDV of macrophages as part of innate anti-viral and anti-tumor activity. In particular, we investigated the functional significance of the interferon regulatory factor genes (IRF)-3 and IRF-7. Deletion of the IRF-3 or IRF-7 gene was found to increase susceptibility of mouse macrophages to virus infection. Surprisingly, NDV replicated better in IRF-3 KO than in IRF-7 KO macrophages. Further analysis showed that IRF-3 KO macrophages have a lower basal and NDV-induced RIG-I expression in comparison to IRF-7 KO macrophages. This might explain why, in IRF-3 KO macrophages, the secretion of type I interferons after NDV infection is delayed, when compared to IRF-7 KO and wild-type macrophages. In addition, IRF-3 KO cells showed reduced NDV-induced levels of IRF-7. This effect could be prevented by priming the cells first by interferon-α. Further results indicated that an early production of type I interferon rather than high maximal levels at later time points are important for resistance to infection by NDV. In conclusion, these results demonstrate an important role of IRF-3 for the innate anti-viral response to NDV of mouse macrophages.

  18. Persistent Arthralgia Induced by Chikungunya Virus Infection is Associated with Interleukin-6 and Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Angela; Her, Zhisheng; Ong, Edward K. S.; Chen, Jin-miao; Dimatatac, Frederico; Kwek, Dyan J. C.; Barkham, Timothy; Yang, Henry; Rénia, Laurent; Leo, Yee-Sin

    2011-01-01

    Background. Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection induces arthralgia. The involvement of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines has been suggested, but very little is known about their secretion profile in CHIKV-infected patients. Methods. A case-control longitudinal study was performed that involved 30 adult patients with laboratory-confirmed Chikungunya fever. Their profiles of clinical disease, viral load, and immune mediators were investigated. Results. When patients were segregated into high viral load and low viral load groups during the acute phase, those with high viremia had lymphopenia, lower levels of monocytes, neutrophilia, and signs of inflammation. The high viral load group was also characterized by a higher production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interferon-α and interleukin (IL)–6, during the acute phase. As the disease progressed to the chronic phase, IL-17 became detectable. However, persistent arthralgia was associated with higher levels of IL-6 and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, whereas patients who recovered fully had high levels of Eotaxin and hepatocyte growth factor. Conclusions. The level of CHIKV viremia during the acute phase determined specific patterns of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which were associated with disease severity. At the chronic phase, levels of IL-6, and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor found to be associated with persistent arthralgia provide a possible explanation for the etiology of arthralgia that plagues numerous CHIKV-infected patients. PMID:21288813

  19. Disruption of the phagosomal membrane and egress of Legionella pneumophila into the cytoplasm during the last stages of intracellular infection of macrophages and Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molmeret, Maëlle; Bitar, Dina M; Han, Lihui; Kwaik, Yousef Abu

    2004-07-01

    Although the early stages of intracellular infection by Legionella pneumophila are well established at the ultrastructural level, a detailed ultrastructural analysis of late stages of intracellular replication has never been done. Here we show that the membrane of the L. pneumophila-containing phagosome (LCP) is intact for up to 8 h postinfection of macrophages and Acanthamoeba polyphaga. At 12 h, 71 and 74% of the LCPs are disrupted within macrophages and A. polyphaga, respectively, while the plasma membrane remains intact. At 18 and 24 h postinfection, cytoplasmic elements such as mitochondria, lysosomes, vesicles, and amorphous material are dispersed among the bacteria and these bacteria are considered cytoplasmic. At 18 h, 77% of infected macrophages and 32% of infected A. polyphaga amoebae harbor cytoplasmic bacteria. At 24 h, 99 and 78% of infected macrophages and amoebae, respectively, contain cytoplasmic bacteria. On the basis of lysosomal acid phosphatase staining of infected macrophages and A. polyphaga, the lysosomal enzyme is present among the bacteria when host vesicles are dispersed among bacteria. Our data indicate that bacterial replication proceeds despite physical disruption of the phagosomal membrane. We also show that an lspG mutant that is defective in the type II secretion system and therefore does not secrete the hydrolytic enzymes metalloprotease, p-nitrophenol phosphorylcholine hydrolase, lipase, phospholipase A, and lysophospholipase A is as efficient as the wild-type strain in disruption of the LCP. Therefore, L. pneumophila disrupts the phagosomal membrane and becomes cytoplasmic at the last stages of infection in both macrophages and A. polyphaga. Lysosomal elements, mitochondria, cytoplasmic vesicles, and amorphous material are all dispersed among the bacteria, after phagosomal disruption, within both human macrophages and A. polyphaga. The disruption of the LCP is independent of the hydrolytic enzymes exported by the type II secretion

  20. Biocompatibility and Inflammatory Potential of Titanium Alloys Cultivated with Human Osteoblasts, Fibroblasts and Macrophages

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    Jana Markhoff

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The biomaterials used to maintain or replace functions in the human body consist mainly of metals, ceramics or polymers. In orthopedic surgery, metallic materials, especially titanium and its alloys, are the most common, due to their excellent mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. Aside from the established Ti6Al4V alloy, shape memory materials such as nickel-titanium (NiTi have risen in importance, but are also discussed because of the adverse effects of nickel ions. These might be reduced by specific surface modifications. In the present in vitro study, the osteoblastic cell line MG-63 as well as primary human osteoblasts, fibroblasts, and macrophages were cultured on titanium alloys (forged Ti6Al4V, additive manufactured Ti6Al4V, NiTi, and Diamond-Like-Carbon (DLC-coated NiTi to verify their specific biocompatibility and inflammatory potential. Additive manufactured Ti6Al4V and NiTi revealed the highest levels of metabolic cell activity. DLC-coated NiTi appeared as a suitable surface for cell growth, showing the highest collagen production. None of the implant materials caused a strong inflammatory response. In general, no distinct cell-specific response could be observed for the materials and surface coating used. In summary, all tested titanium alloys seem to be biologically appropriate for application in orthopedic surgery.

  1. Long-term effects of neonatal malnutrition on microbicide response, production of cytokines, and survival of macrophages infected by Staphylococcus aureus sensitive/resistant to methicillin

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    Natália Gomes de Morais

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess microbicide function and macrophage viability after in vitro cellular infection by methicillin-sensitive/resistant Staphylococcus aureus in nourished rats and rats subjected to neonatal malnutrition. METHODS: Male Wistar rats (n=40 were divided in two groups: Nourished (rats suckled by dams consuming a 17% casein diet and Malnourished (rats suckled by dams consuming an 8% casein diet. Macrophages were recovered after tracheotomy, by bronchoalveolar lavage. After mononuclear cell isolation, four systems were established: negative control composed exclusively of phagocytes; positive control composed of macrophages plus lipopolysaccharide; and two testing systems, macrophages plus methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus and macrophages plus methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The plates were incubated in a humid atmosphere at 37 degrees Celsius containing 5% CO2 for 24 hours. After this period tests the microbicidal response, cytokine production, and cell viability were analyzed. The statistical analysis consisted of analysis of variance (p<0.05. RESULTS: Malnutrition reduced weight gain, rate of phagocytosis, production of superoxide anion and nitric oxide, and macrophage viability. Production of nitrite and interleukin 18, and viability of macrophages infected with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were lower. CONCLUSION: The neonatal malnutrition model compromised phagocyte function and reduced microbicidal response and cell viability. Interaction between malnutrition and the methicillin-resistant strain decreased the production of inflammatory mediators by effector cells of the immune response, which may compromise the immune system's defense ability.

  2. Cholesterol efflux pathways regulate myelopoiesis: A potential link to altered macrophage function in atherosclerosis

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    Andrew James Murphy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD is a chronic inflammatory disease of the blood vessels that can lead to myocardial infarction or stroke. The major cell in the atherosclerotic lesion, the macrophage is thought to be an important contributor to the production of inflammatory mediators that exacerbate this disease. Macrophages are generally derived from circulating monocytes, which are in turn produced by hematopoietic stem and multipotential progenitor cells (HSPCs in the bone marrow and other medullary organs. Recent studies suggest that disruption in cholesterol homeostasis or prolonged exposure to a hypercholesterolemic environment can influence HSPCs to over-produce monocytes, resulting in monocytosis. These monocytes may carry a pre-programed ability to become M1-like macrophages once they enter the atherosclerotic lesion. Future studies may help to differentiate the role of such pre-programming versus responses to local environmental cues in determining M1, M2 or other macrophage phenotypes in atherosclerotic lesions.

  3. Metabolism of myo-Inositol by Legionella pneumophila Promotes Infection of Amoebae and Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manske, Christian; Schell, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Legionella pneumophila is a natural parasite of environmental amoebae and the causative agent of a severe pneumonia termed Legionnaires' disease. The facultative intracellular pathogen employs a bipartite metabolism, where the amino acid serine serves as the major energy supply, while glycerol and glucose are mainly utilized for anabolic processes. The L. pneumophila genome harbors the cluster lpg1653 to lpg1649 putatively involved in the metabolism of the abundant carbohydrate myo-inositol (here termed inositol). To assess inositol metabolism by L. pneumophila, we constructed defined mutant strains lacking lpg1653 or lpg1652, which are predicted to encode the inositol transporter IolT or the inositol-2-dehydrogenase IolG, respectively. The mutant strains were not impaired for growth in complex or defined minimal media, and inositol did not promote extracellular growth. However, upon coinfection of Acanthamoeba castellanii, the mutants were outcompeted by the parental strain, indicating that the intracellular inositol metabolism confers a fitness advantage to the pathogen. Indeed, inositol added to L. pneumophila-infected amoebae or macrophages promoted intracellular growth of the parental strain, but not of the ΔiolT or ΔiolG mutant, and growth stimulation by inositol was restored by complementation of the mutant strains. The expression of the Piol promoter and bacterial uptake of inositol required the alternative sigma factor RpoS, a key virulence regulator of L. pneumophila. Finally, the parental strain and ΔiolG mutant bacteria but not the ΔiolT mutant strain accumulated [U-14C6]inositol, indicating that IolT indeed functions as an inositol transporter. Taken together, intracellular L. pneumophila metabolizes inositol through the iol gene products, thus promoting the growth and virulence of the pathogen. IMPORTANCE The environmental bacterium Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of a severe pneumonia termed Legionnaires' disease. The

  4. Activation of Phosphotyrosine Phosphatase Activity Attenuates Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling and Inhibits c-FOS and Nitric Oxide Synthase Expression in Macrophages Infected with Leishmania donovani

    OpenAIRE

    Nandan, Devki; Lo, Raymond; Reiner, Neil E

    1999-01-01

    Intracellular protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania antagonize host defense mechanisms by interfering with cell signaling in macrophages. In this report, the impact of Leishmania donovani on mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression in the macrophage cell line RAW 264 was investigated. Overnight infection of cells with leishmania led to a significant decrease in phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated MAP kinase activity and inhibited PM...

  5. Infection of equine monocyte-derived macrophages with an attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) strain induces a strong resistance to the infection by a virulent EIAV strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian; Wang, Shan-Shan; Lin, Yue-Zhi; Liu, Hai-Fang; Liu, Qiang; Wei, Hua-Mian; Wang, Xue-Feng; Wang, Yu-Hong; Du, Cheng; Kong, Xian-Gang; Zhou, Jian-Hua; Wang, Xiaojun

    2014-08-09

    The Chinese attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine has successfully protected millions of equine animals from EIA disease in China. Given that the induction of immune protection results from the interactions between viruses and hosts, a better understanding of the characteristics of vaccine strain infection and host responses would be useful for elucidating the mechanism of the induction of immune protection by the Chinese attenuated EIAV strain. In this study, we demonstrate in equine monocyte-derived macrophages (eMDM) that EIAVFDDV13, a Chinese attenuated EIAV strain, induced a strong resistance to subsequent infection by a pathogenic strain, EIAVUK3. Further experiments indicate that the expression of the soluble EIAV receptor sELR1, Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and interferon β (IFNβ) was up-regulated in eMDM infected with EIAVFDDV13 compared with eMDM infected with EIAVUK3. Stimulating eMDM with poly I:C resulted in similar resistance to EIAV infection as induced by EIAVFDDV13 and was correlated with enhanced TLR3, sELR1 and IFNβ expression. The knock down of TLR3 mRNA significantly impaired poly I:C-stimulated resistance to EIAV, greatly reducing the expression of sELR1 and IFNβ and lowered the level of infection resistance induced by EIAVFDDV13. These results indicate that the induction of restraining infection by EIAVFDDV13 in macrophages is partially mediated through the up-regulated expression of the soluble viral receptor and IFNβ, and that the TLR3 pathway activation plays an important role in the development of an EIAV-resistant intracellular environment.

  6. Secretion of multi-protein migratory complex induced by Toxoplasma gondii infection in macrophages involves the uPA/uPAR activation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuindt, Sara Hellen Santos; Oliveira, Bruno Cabral de Lima; Pimentel, Pollyana Maria de Oliveira; Resende, Thatiane Lacerda; Retamal, Cláudio A; DaMatta, Renato A; Seipel, Daniele; Arnholdt, Andrea Cristina Vetö

    2012-05-25

    Toxoplasmosis is a world wide spread zoonosis caused by Toxoplasma gondii, an obligate intracellular parasite that is able to disseminate into deep tissues and cross biological barriers, reaching immunoprivileged sites such as the brain and retina. The parasite is able to infect macrophages and dendritic cells for dispersal throughout the body. However, the molecular mechanisms or outcomes of the subversion of the host cell are largely unknown. Recently our group established that metalloproteinases are involved in migration of infected macrophages. Herein, we evaluated the recruitment of host invasive machinery components in T. gondii infected murine macrophages. We showed by immunoprecipitation assays that MMP-9, CD44 TIMP-1 and uPAR were secreted as a multi-protein complex by infected macrophages. Zymographic analysis revealed that MMP-9 was present in its pro- and active form. Moreover, inhibition of uPA/uPAR pathway by PAI-1 decreased secretion of MMP-9 active forms, as well those associated to uPAR and TIMP-1, but not to CD44. Data presented here suggest that MMP-9 is secreted as a multiprotein complex by T. gondii infected macrophages, similar to that observed in metastatic cells. We further speculate that uPA/uPAR system is involved in the expression/secretion of complexes containing active MMP-9 forms.

  7. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), produced by feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) virus-infected monocytes and macrophages, induces vascular permeability and effusion in cats with FIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Tomomi; Ohyama, Taku; Kokumoto, Aiko; Satoh, Ryoichi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2011-06-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) causes a fatal disease called FIP in Felidae. The effusion in body cavity is commonly associated with FIP. However, the exact mechanism of accumulation of effusion remains unclear. We investigated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to examine the relationship between VEGF levels and the amounts of effusion in cats with FIP. Furthermore, we examined VEGF production in FIPV-infected monocytes/macrophages, and we used feline vascular endothelial cells to examine vascular permeability induced by the culture supernatant of FIPV-infected macrophages. In cats with FIP, the production of effusion was related with increasing plasma VEGF levels. In FIPV-infected monocytes/macrophages, the production of VEGF was associated with proliferation of virus. Furthermore, the culture supernatant of FIPV-infected macrophages induced hyperpermeability of feline vascular endothelial cells. It was suggested that vascular permeability factors, including VEGF, produced by FIPV-infected monocytes/macrophages might increase the vascular permeability and the amounts of effusion in cats with FIP.

  8. Urokinase plasminogen activator inhibits HIV virion release from macrophage-differentiated chronically infected cells via activation of RhoA and PKCε.

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    Francesca Graziano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV replication in mononuclear phagocytes is a multi-step process regulated by viral and cellular proteins with the peculiar feature of virion budding and accumulation in intra-cytoplasmic vesicles. Interaction of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA with its cell surface receptor (uPAR has been shown to favor virion accumulation in such sub-cellular compartment in primary monocyte-derived macrophages and chronically infected promonocytic U1 cells differentiated into macrophage-like cells by stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA. By adopting this latter model system, we have here investigated which intracellular signaling pathways were triggered by uPA/uPAR interaction leading the redirection of virion accumulation in intra-cytoplasmic vesicles. RESULTS: uPA induced activation of RhoA, PKCδ and PKCε in PMA-differentiated U1 cells. In the same conditions, RhoA, PKCδ and PKCε modulated uPA-induced cell adhesion and polarization, whereas only RhoA and PKCε were also responsible for the redirection of virions in intracellular vesicles. Distribution of G and F actin revealed that uPA reorganized the cytoskeleton in both adherent and polarized cells. The role of G and F actin isoforms was unveiled by the use of cytochalasin D, a cell-permeable fungal toxin that prevents F actin polymerization. Receptor-independent cytoskeleton remodeling by Cytochalasin D resulted in cell adhesion, polarization and intracellular accumulation of HIV virions similar to the effects gained with uPA. CONCLUSIONS: These findings illustrate the potential contribution of the uPA/uPAR system in the generation and/or maintenance of intra-cytoplasmic vesicles that actively accumulate virions, thus sustaining the presence of HIV reservoirs of macrophage origin. In addition, our observations also provide evidences that pathways controlling cytoskeleton remodeling and activation of PKCε bear relevance for the design of new antiviral strategies aimed

  9. Expression of bacterial virulence factors and cytokines during in vitro macrophage infection by enteroinvasive Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri: a comparative study

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    Silvia Y Bando

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC and Shigellaspp cause bacillary dysentery in humans by invading and multiplying within epithelial cells of the colonic mucosa. Although EIEC and Shigellashare many genetic and biochemical similarities, the illness caused by Shigellais more severe. Thus, genomic and structure-function molecular studies on the biological interactions of these invasive enterobacteria with eukaryotic cells have focused on Shigella rather than EIEC. Here we comparatively studied the interactions of EIEC and of Shigella flexneriwith cultured J774 macrophage-like cells. We evaluated several phenotypes: (i bacterial escape from macrophages after phagocytosis, (ii macrophage death induced by EIEC and S. flexneri, (iii macrophage cytokine expression in response to infection and (iv expression of plasmidial (pINV virulence genes. The results showed thatS. flexneri caused macrophage killing earlier and more intensely than EIEC. Both pathogens induced significant macrophage production of TNF, IL-1 and IL-10 after 7 h of infection. Transcription levels of the gene invasion plasmid antigen-C were lower in EIEC than in S. flexneri throughout the course of the infection; this could explain the diminished virulence of EIEC compared to S. flexneri.

  10. Analysis of cell cycle and replication of mouse macrophages after in vivo and in vitro Cryptococcus neoformans infection using laser scanning cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Carolina; Tesfa, Lydia; Zhang, Jinghang; Rivera, Johanna; Gonçalves, Teresa; Casadevall, Arturo

    2012-04-01

    We investigated the outcome of the interaction of Cryptococcus neoformans with murine macrophages using laser scanning cytometry (LSC). Previous results in our lab had shown that phagocytosis of C. neoformans promoted cell cycle progression. LSC allowed us to simultaneously measure the phagocytic index, macrophage DNA content, and 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation such that it was possible to study host cell division as a function of phagocytosis. LSC proved to be a robust, reliable, and high-throughput method for quantifying phagocytosis. Phagocytosis of C. neoformans promoted cell cycle progression, but infected macrophages were significantly less likely to complete mitosis. Hence, we report a new cytotoxic effect associated with intracellular C. neoformans residence that manifested itself in impaired cell cycle completion as a consequence of a block in the G(2)/M stage of the mitotic cell cycle. Cell cycle arrest was not due to increased cell membrane permeability or DNA damage. We investigated alveolar macrophage replication in vivo and demonstrated that these cells are capable of low levels of cell division in the presence or absence of C. neoformans infection. In summary, we simultaneously studied phagocytosis, the cell cycle state of the host cell and pathogen-mediated cytotoxicity, and our results demonstrate a new cytotoxic effect of C. neoformans infection on murine macrophages: fungus-induced cell cycle arrest. Finally, we provide evidence for alveolar macrophage proliferation in vivo.

  11. Expression of macrophage migration-inhibitory factor in duodenal ulcer and its relation to Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, X H; Zhang, Q; Yang, X P; Yang, W; Dai, F; Qian, Z; Wang, Z L; Wu, C F; Zhao, H Z; Wang, G H

    2015-10-30

    The aim of this study was to examine the expression of macrophage migration-inhibitory factor (MIF) in duodenal ulcer epithelial cells and its relation to Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection, and to discuss the pathogenic roles of MIF expression and Hp infection in duodenal ulcer. MIF protein and mRNA expression was examined in samples from patients with duodenal ulcer with and without Hp infection (N = 40 each, experimental group), and in normal duodenal bulb mucosal tissue (N = 40, control group) using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Patients without Hp infection received routine treatment, and treatment was provided to the patients positive for Hp to eradicate Hp infection. Hp and MIF expression levels before treatment and after the ulcer had been cured were compared. The positive rates of MIF protein and mRNA in patients with Hp infection before treatment were 67.5 and 65%, respectively, and were 18.9 and 21.6% in the 37 patients from whom Hp was eliminated. These were statistically different both before and after treatment compared with controls (P 0.05). The results of this study suggested that MIF is related to the development of duodenal ulcer, and that the presence of Hp is closely related with the expression of MIF in the duodenal mucosa and the development of duodenal ulcer.

  12. DMPD: Role of Nods in bacterial infection. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17379560 Role of Nods in bacterial infection. Bourhis LL, Werts C. Microbes Infect.... 2007 Apr;9(5):629-36. Epub 2007 Jan 27. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Role of Nods in bacterial infect...ion. PubmedID 17379560 Title Role of Nods in bacterial infection. Authors Bourhis LL, Werts C. Publication M

  13. DMPD: Innate immune responses during infection. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15576198 Innate immune responses during infection. Ulevitch RJ, Mathison JC, da Sil...ses during infection. PubmedID 15576198 Title Innate immune responses during infection. Authors Ulevitch RJ, Math

  14. Role of macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha in T-cell-mediated immunity to viral infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas N; Nansen, Anneline; Christensen, Jan P

    2003-01-01

    The immune response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in mice lacking macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha) was evaluated. Generation of virus-specific effector T cells is unimpaired in MIP-1alpha-deficient mice. Furthermore, MIP-1alpha is not required for T-cell-mediated virus...

  15. Mycobacterium marinum: a potential immunotherapy for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

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    Tian WW

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Wei-wei Tian,1 Qian-qiu Wang,1 Wei-da Liu,2 Jian-ping Shen,1 Hong-sheng Wang11Laboratory of Mycobacterial Disease, Institute of Dermatology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology for Skin Diseases and STIs, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Mycology, Institute of Dermatology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology for Skin Diseases and STIs, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of ChinaPurpose: The aim of the present study was to investigate the immune response induced by Mycobacterium marinum infection in vitro and the potential of M. marinum as an immunotherapy for M. tuberculosis infection.Methods: The potential human immune response to certain bacillus infections was investigated in an immune cell–bacillus coculture system in vitro. As a potential novel immunotherapy, M. marinum was studied and compared with two other bacilli, Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG and live attenuated M. tuberculosis. We examined the changes in both the bacilli and immune cells, especially the time course of the viability of mycobacteria in the coculture system and host immune responses including multinuclear giant cell formation by Wright–Giemsa modified staining, macrophage polarization by cell surface antigen expression, and cytokines/chemokine production by both mRNA expression and protein secretion.Results: The M. marinum stimulated coculture group showed more expression of CD209, CD68, CD80, and CD86 than the BCG and M. tuberculosis (an attenuated strain, H37Ra groups, although the differences were not statistically significant. Moreover, the M. marinum group expressed more interleukin (IL-1B and IL-12p40 on day 3 (IL-1B: P = 0.003 and 0.004, respectively; IL-12p40: P = 0.001 and 0.011, respectively, a higher level of CXCL10 on day 1 (P = 0.006 and 0.026, respectively, and

  16. Placental Pathology of Zika Virus: Viral Infection of the Placenta Induces Villous Stromal Macrophage (Hofbauer Cell) Proliferation and Hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Avi Z; Yu, Weiying; Hill, D Ashley; Reyes, Christine A; Schwartz, David A

    2017-01-01

    -The placenta is an important component in understanding the fetal response to intrauterine Zika virus infection, but the pathologic changes in this organ remain largely unknown. Hofbauer cells are fetal-derived macrophages normally present in the chorionic villous stroma. They have been implicated in a variety of physiological and pathologic processes, in particular involving infectious agents. -To characterize the fetal and maternal responses and viral localization in the placenta following Zika virus transmission to an 11 weeks' gestation fetus. The clinical course was notable for prolonged viremia in the mother and extensive neuronal necrosis in the fetus. The fetus was delivered at 21 weeks' gestation after pregnancy termination. -The placenta was evaluated by using immunohistochemistry for inflammatory cells (macrophages/monocytes [Hofbauer cells], B and T lymphocytes) and proliferating cells, and an RNA probe to Zika virus. The fetal brain and the placenta were previously found to be positive for Zika virus RNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. -The placenta demonstrated prominently enlarged, hydropic chorionic villi with hyperplasia and focal proliferation of Hofbauer cells. The degree of Hofbauer cell hyperplasia gave an exaggerated immature appearance to the villi. No acute or chronic villitis, villous necrosis, remote necroinflammatory abnormalities, chorioamnionitis, funisitis, or hemorrhages were present. An RNA probe to Zika virus was positive in villous stromal cells, presumably Hofbauer cells. -Zika virus placental infection induces proliferation and prominent hyperplasia of Hofbauer cells in the chorionic villi but does not elicit villous necrosis or a maternal or fetal lymphoplasmacellular or acute inflammatory cell reaction.

  17. Antibodies Against Glycolipids Enhance Antifungal Activity of Macrophages and Reduce Fungal Burden After Infection with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Renata A; Thomaz, Luciana; Muñoz, Julian E; da Silva, Cássia J; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Pinto, Márcia R; Travassos, Luiz R; Taborda, Carlos P

    2016-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis is a fungal disease endemic in Latin America. Polyclonal antibodies to acidic glycosphingolipids (GSLs) from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis opsonized yeast forms in vitro increasing phagocytosis and reduced the fungal burden of infected animals. Antibodies to GSL were active in both prophylactic and therapeutic protocols using a murine intratracheal infection model. Pathological examination of the lungs of animals treated with antibodies to GSL showed well-organized granulomas and minimally damaged parenchyma compared to the untreated control. Murine peritoneal macrophages activated by IFN-γ and incubated with antibodies against acidic GSLs more effectively phagocytosed and killed P. brasiliensis yeast cells as well as produced more nitric oxide compared to controls. The present work discloses a novel target of protective antibodies against P. brasiliensis adding to other well-studied mediators of the immune response to this fungus.

  18. Antibodies against glycolipids enhance antifungal activity of macrophages and reduce fungal burden after infection with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Amelia eBueno

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioidomycosis is a fungal disease endemic in Latin America. Polyclonal antibodies to acidic glycosphingolipids (GSLs from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis opsonized yeast forms in vitro increasing phagocytosis and reduced the fungal burden of infected animals. Antibodies to GSL were active in both prophylactic and therapeutic protocols using a murine intratracheal infection model. Pathological examination of the lungs of animals treated with antibodies to GSL showed well-organized granulomas and minimally damaged parenchyma compared to the untreated control. Murine peritoneal macrophages activated by IFN-γ and incubated with antibodies against acidic GSLs more effectively phagocytosed and killed P. brasiliensis yeast cells as well as produced more nitric oxide compared to controls. The present work discloses a novel target of protective antibodies against P. brasiliensis adding to other well-studied mediators of the immune response to this fungus.

  19. Intraphagosomal peroxynitrite as a macrophage-derived cytotoxin against internalized Trypanosoma cruzi: consequences for oxidative killing and role of microbial peroxiredoxins in infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, María Noel; Peluffo, Gonzalo; Piacenza, Lucía; Radi, Rafael

    2011-02-25

    Macrophage-derived radicals generated by the NADPH oxidase complex and inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) participate in cytotoxic mechanisms against microorganisms. Nitric oxide ((•)NO) plays a central role in the control of acute infection by Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, and we have proposed that much of its action relies on macrophage-derived peroxynitrite (ONOO(-) + ONOOH) formation, a strong oxidant arising from the reaction of (•)NO with superoxide radical (O(2)(-)). Herein, we have shown that internalization of T. cruzi trypomastigotes by macrophages triggers the assembly of the NADPH oxidase complex to yield O(2)(-) during a 60-90-min period. This does not interfere with IFN-γ-dependent iNOS induction and a sustained (•)NO production (∼24 h). The major mechanism for infection control via reactive species formation occurred when (•)NO and O(2)() were produced simultaneously, generating intraphagosomal peroxynitrite levels compatible with microbial killing. Moreover, biochemical and ultrastructural analysis confirmed cellular oxidative damage and morphological disruption in internalized parasites. Overexpression of cytosolic tryparedoxin peroxidase in T. cruzi neutralized macrophage-derived peroxynitrite-dependent cytotoxicity to parasites and favored the infection in an animal model. Collectively, the data provide, for the first time, direct support for the action of peroxynitrite as an intraphagosomal cytotoxin against pathogens and the premise that microbial peroxiredoxins facilitate infectivity via decomposition of macrophage-derived peroxynitrite.

  20. Macrophage and Galleria mellonella infection models reflect the virulence of naturally occurring isolates of B. pseudomallei, B. thailandensis and B. oklahomensis

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    Michell Stephen L

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a tropical disease of humans with a variable and often fatal outcome. In murine models of infection, different strains exhibit varying degrees of virulence. In contrast, two related species, B. thailandensis and B. oklahomensis, are highly attenuated in mice. Our aim was to determine whether virulence in mice is reflected in macrophage or wax moth larvae (Galleria mellonella infection models. Results B. pseudomallei strains 576 and K96243, which have low median lethal dose (MLD values in mice, were able to replicate and induce cellular damage in macrophages and caused rapid death of G. mellonella. In contrast, B. pseudomallei strain 708a, which is attenuated in mice, showed reduced replication in macrophages, negligible cellular damage and was avirulent in G. mellonella larvae. B. thailandensis isolates were less virulent than B. pseudomallei in all of the models tested. However, we did record strain dependent differences. B. oklahomensis isolates were the least virulent isolates. They showed minimal ability to replicate in macrophages, were unable to evoke actin-based motility or to form multinucleated giant cells and were markedly attenuated in G. mellonella compared to B. thailandensis. Conclusions We have shown that the alternative infection models tested here, namely macrophages and Galleria mellonella, are able to distinguish between strains of B. pseudomallei, B. thailandensis and B. oklahomensis and that these differences reflect the observed virulence in murine infection models. Our results indicate that B. oklahomensis is the least pathogenic of the species investigated. They also show a correlation between isolates of B. thailandensis associated with human infection and virulence in macrophage and Galleria infection models.

  1. Phagosomal Acidification Prevents Macrophage Inflammatory Cytokine Production to Malaria, and Dendritic Cells Are the Major Source at the Early Stages of Infection: IMPLICATION FOR MALARIA PROTECTIVE IMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xianzhu; Gowda, Nagaraj M; Gowda, D Channe

    2015-09-18

    Inflammatory cytokines produced at the early stages of malaria infection contribute to shaping protective immunity and pathophysiology. To gain mechanistic insight into these processes, it is important to understand the cellular origin of cytokines because both cytokine input and cytokine-producing cells play key roles. Here, we determined cytokine responses by monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DCs) to purified Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium berghei ANKA, and by spleen macrophages and DCs from Plasmodium yoelii 17NXL-infected and P. berghei ANKA-infected mice. The results demonstrate that monocytes and macrophages do not produce inflammatory cytokines to malaria parasites and that DCs are the primary source early in infection, and DC subsets differentially produce cytokines. Importantly, blocking of phagosomal acidification by inhibiting vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase enabled macrophages to elicit cytokine responses. Because cytokine responses to malaria parasites are mediated primarily through endosomal Toll-like receptors, our data indicate that the inability of macrophages to produce cytokines is due to the phagosomal acidification that disrupts endosomal ligand-receptor engagement. Macrophages efficiently produced cytokines to LPS upon simultaneously internalizing parasites and to heat-killed Escherichia coli, demonstrating that phagosomal acidification affects endosomal receptor-mediated, but not cell surface receptor-mediated, recognition of Toll-like receptor agonists. Enabling monocytes/macrophages to elicit immune responses to parasites by blocking endosomal acidification can be a novel strategy for the effective development of protective immunity to malaria. The results have important implications for enhancing the efficacy of a whole parasite-based malaria vaccine and for designing strategies for the development of protective immunity to pathogens that induce immune responses primarily through endosomal receptors.

  2. Dysregulation of alveolar macrophage PPARγ, NADPH oxidases and TGFβsub>1sub> in otherwise healthy HIV-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeligar, Samantha M; Ward, Janine M; Harris, Frank L; Brown, Lou Ann; Guidot, David; Cribbs, Sushma K

    2017-03-17

    Rationale: Despite antiretroviral therapy (ART), respiratory infections increase mortality in individuals living with chronic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. In experimental and clinical studies of chronic HIV infection, alveolar macrophages (AMs) exhibit impaired phagocytosis and bacterial clearance. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ, NADPH oxidase (Nox) isoforms Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGFβsub>1sub>) are critical mediators of AM oxidative stress and phagocytic dysfunction. Therefore, we hypothesized that HIV alters AM expression of these targets, resulting in chronic lung oxidative stress and subsequent immune dysfunction. Methods: A cross-sectional study of HIV-infected (n=22) and HIV-uninfected (n=6) subjects was conducted. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed and AMs were isolated. Lung Hsub>2sub>Osub>2sub> generation was determined by measuring Hsub>2sub>Osub>2sub> in the BAL fluid. In AMs, PPARγ, Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, and TGFβsub>1sub> mRNA (qRT-PCR) and protein (fluorescent immunomicroscopy) levels were assessed. Results: Compared to HIV-uninfected (control) subjects, HIV-infected subjects were relatively older and the majority were African American; ~86% were on ART and their median CD4 count was 445 with a median viral load of 0 log copies/mL. HIV infection was associated with increased Hsub>2sub>Osub>2sub> in the BAL, decreased AM mRNA and protein levels of PPARγ, and increased AM mRNA and protein levels of Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, and TGFβsub>1sub>. Conclusions: PPARγ attenuation and increases in Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, and TGFβsub>1sub> contribute to AM oxidative stress and immune dysfunction in the AMs of otherwise healthy HIV-infected subjects. These findings provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms by which HIV increases susceptibility to pulmonary infections.

  3. Pace of macrophage recruitment during different stages of soft tissue infection: Semi-quantitative evaluation by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Seong; Sohn, Jin Young [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Laboratory for Molecular and Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Jung, Hyun-Don; Kim, Sang-Tae [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Kyoung Geun [Korea University College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Division of Biotechnology, Seoul (Korea); Kang, Hee Jung [Hallym University College of Medicine, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Anyang (Korea)

    2008-10-15

    We describe the pace of recruitment of iron-oxide-labeled macrophages to the site of different stages of infection by in vivo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Peritoneal macrophages were labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide ex vivo and administered through the tail vein 6 (acute) or 48 (subacute) h after bacterial inoculation. The legs of the mice were imaged sequentially on a 4.7-T MR unit before and 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 48 and 72 h after macrophage administration. The band-shaped lower signal intensity zone around the abscess on T2*-weighted GRE images became more obvious due to recruited macrophages up until 24 h after injection in the subacute and 48 h after injection in the acute group, indicating that the relative SI of the abscess wall decreased more rapidly and the pace of recruitment of macrophages was faster in the subacute than in the acute group. Chemokine antibody arrays of mouse sera detected increased concentration of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 beginning at 12 h and increased interleukin-13 at 18 h. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and macrophage-colony-stimulating factor began to increase at 96 h after infection. This difference in pace of recruitment may result from the release of chemokines. (orig.)

  4. YopJ-induced caspase-1 activation in Yersinia-infected macrophages: independent of apoptosis, linked to necrosis, dispensable for innate host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ying; Lilo, Sarit; Mena, Patricio; Bliska, James B

    2012-01-01

    Yersinia outer protein J (YopJ) is a type III secretion system (T3SS) effector of pathogenic Yersinia (Yersinia pestis, Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis) that is secreted into host cells. YopJ inhibits survival response pathways in macrophages, causing cell death. Allelic variation of YopJ is responsible for differential cytotoxicity in Yersinia strains. YopJ isoforms in Y. enterocolitica O:8 (YopP) and Y. pestis KIM (YopJ(KIM)) strains have high cytotoxic activity. In addition, YopJ(KIM)-induced macrophage death is associated with caspase-1 activation and interleukin-1β (IL-1β secretion. Here, the mechanism of YopJ(KIM)-induced cell death, caspase-1 activation, and IL-1β secretion in primary murine macrophages was examined. Caspase-3/7 activity was low and the caspase-3 substrate poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) was not cleaved in Y. pestis KIM5-infected macrophages. In addition, cytotoxicity and IL-1β secretion were not reduced in the presence of a caspase-8 inhibitor, or in B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-associated X protein (Bax)/Bcl-2 homologous antagonist/killer (Bak) knockout macrophages, showing that YopJ(KIM)-mediated cell death and caspase-1 activation occur independent of mitochondrial-directed apoptosis. KIM5-infected macrophages released high mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1), a marker of necrosis, and microscopic analysis revealed that necrotic cells contained active caspase-1, indicating that caspase-1 activation is associated with necrosis. Inhibitor studies showed that receptor interacting protein 1 (RIP1) kinase and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were not required for cytotoxicity or IL-β release in KIM5-infected macrophages. IL-1β secretion was reduced in the presence of cathepsin B inhibitors, suggesting that activation of caspase-1 requires cathepsin B activity. Ectopically-expressed YopP caused higher cytotoxicity and secretion of IL-1β in Y. pseudotuberculosis-infected macrophages than YopJ(KIM). Wild-type and

  5. HIV-1 infection induces changes in expression of cellular splicing factors that regulate alternative viral splicing and virus production in macrophages

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    Purcell Damian FJ

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages are important targets and long-lived reservoirs of HIV-1, which are not cleared of infection by currently available treatments. In the primary monocyte-derived macrophage model of infection, replication is initially productive followed by a decline in virion output over ensuing weeks, coincident with a decrease in the levels of the essential viral transactivator protein Tat. We investigated two possible mechanisms in macrophages for regulation of viral replication, which appears to be primarily regulated at the level of tat mRNA: 1 differential mRNA stability, used by cells and some viruses for the rapid regulation of gene expression and 2 control of HIV-1 alternative splicing, which is essential for optimal viral replication. Results Following termination of transcription at increasing times after infection in macrophages, we found that tat mRNA did indeed decay more rapidly than rev or nef mRNA, but with similar kinetics throughout infection. In addition, tat mRNA decayed at least as rapidly in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Expression of cellular splicing factors in uninfected and infected macrophage cultures from the same donor showed an inverse pattern over time between enhancing factors (members of the SR family of RNA binding proteins and inhibitory factors (members of the hnRNP family. While levels of the SR protein SC35 were greatly up-regulated in the first week or two after infection, hnRNPs of the A/B and H groups were down-regulated. Around the peak of virus production in each culture, SC35 expression declined to levels in uninfected cells or lower, while the hnRNPs increased to control levels or above. We also found evidence for increased cytoplasmic expression of SC35 following long-term infection. Conclusion While no evidence of differential regulation of tat mRNA decay was found in macrophages following HIV-1 infection, changes in the balance of cellular splicing factors which regulate alternative

  6. Contribution of cyclopentenone prostaglandins to the resolution of inflammation through the potentiation of apoptosis in activated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortelano, S; Castrillo, A; Alvarez, A M; Boscá, L

    2000-12-01

    Activation of the macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 with LPS and IFN-gamma induces apoptosis through the synthesis of high concentrations of NO due to the expression of NO synthase-2. In addition to NO, activated macrophages release other molecules involved in the inflammatory response, such as reactive oxygen intermediates and PGs. Treatment of macrophages with cyclopentenone PGs, which are synthesized late in the inflammatory onset, exerted a negative regulation on cell activation by impairing the expression of genes involved in host defense, among them NO synthase-2. However, despite the attenuation of NO synthesis, the percentage of apoptotic cells increased with respect to activated cells in the absence of cyclopentenone PGs. Analysis of the mechanisms by which these PGs enhanced apoptosis suggested a potentiation of superoxide anion synthesis that reacted with NO, leading to the formation of higher concentrations of peroxynitrite, a more reactive and proapoptotic molecule than the precursors. The effect of the cyclopentenone 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-PGJ(2) on superoxide synthesis was dependent on p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activity, but was independent of the interaction with peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma. The potentiation of apoptosis induced by cyclopentenone PGs involved an increase in the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol and in the nitration of this protein. These results suggest a role for cyclopentenone PGs in the resolution of inflammation by inducing apoptosis of activated cells.

  7. The role of IgG subclass of mouse monoclonal antibodies in antibody-dependent enhancement of feline infectious peritonitis virus infection of feline macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohdatsu, T; Tokunaga, J; Koyama, H

    1994-01-01

    Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) infection was studied in feline alveolar macrophages and human monocyte cell line U937 using mouse neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed to the spike protein of FIPV. Even among the MAbs that have been shown to recognize the same antigenic site, IgG 2a MAbs enhanced FIPV infection strongly, whereas IgG 1 MAbs did not. These IgG 2a MAbs enhanced the infection even when macrophages pretreated with the MAb were washed and then inoculated with the virus. Immunofluorescence flow cytometric analysis of the macrophages treated with each of the MAbs showed that the IgG 2a MAbs but not the IgG 1 MAbs bound to feline alveolar macrophages. Treatment of the IgG 2a MAb with protein A decreased the binding to the macrophages and, in parallel, diminished the ADE activity. Although no infection was observed by inoculation of FIPV to human monocyte cell line U937 cells, FIPV complexed with either the IgG 2a MAb or the IgG 1 MAb caused infection in U937 cells which are shown to express Fc gamma receptor (Fc gamma R) I and II that can bind mouse IgG 2a and IgG 1, respectively. These results suggest that the enhancing activity of MAb is closely correlated with IgG subclass and that the correlation is involved in binding of MAb to Fc gamma R on feline macrophage.

  8. Differential modulation of ATP-induced P2X7-associated permeabilities to cations and anions of macrophages by infection with Leishmania amazonensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques-da-Silva, Camila; Chaves, Mariana Martins; Rodrigues, Juliany Cola; Corte-Real, Suzana; Coutinho-Silva, Robson; Persechini, Pedro Muanis

    2011-01-01

    Leishmania and other parasites display several mechanisms to subvert host immune cell function in order to achieve successful infection. The ATP receptor P2X7, an agonist-gated cation channel widely expressed in macrophages and other cells of the immune system, is also coupled to inflammasome activation, IL-1 beta secretion, production of reactive oxygen species, cell death and the induction of the permeabilization of the plasma membrane to molecules of up to 900 Da. P2X7 receptors can function as an effective microbicidal triggering receptor in macrophages infected with several microorganisms including Mycobacteria tuberculosis, Chlamydia and Leishmania. We have previously shown that its expression is up-regulated in macrophages infected with L. amazonensis and that infected cells also display an increase in P2X7-induced apoptosis and membrane permeabilization to some anionic fluorescent dyes. In an independent study we recently showed that the phenomenon of macrophage membrane permeabilization can involve at least two distinct pathways for cations and anions respectively. Here, we re-addressed the effects of ATP-induced P2X7-associated phenomena in macrophages infected with L. amazonensis and demonstrated that the P2X7-associated dye uptake mechanisms are differentially modulated. While the membrane permeabilization for anionic dyes is up-modulated, as previously described, the uptake of cationic dyes is strongly down-modulated. These results unveil new characteristics of two distinct permeabilization mechanisms associated with P2X7 receptors in macrophages and provide the first evidence indicating that these pathways can be differentially modulated in an immunologically relevant situation. The possible importance of these results to the L. amazonensis escape mechanism is discussed.

  9. Differential modulation of ATP-induced P2X7-associated permeabilities to cations and anions of macrophages by infection with Leishmania amazonensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Marques-da-Silva

    Full Text Available Leishmania and other parasites display several mechanisms to subvert host immune cell function in order to achieve successful infection. The ATP receptor P2X7, an agonist-gated cation channel widely expressed in macrophages and other cells of the immune system, is also coupled to inflammasome activation, IL-1 beta secretion, production of reactive oxygen species, cell death and the induction of the permeabilization of the plasma membrane to molecules of up to 900 Da. P2X7 receptors can function as an effective microbicidal triggering receptor in macrophages infected with several microorganisms including Mycobacteria tuberculosis, Chlamydia and Leishmania. We have previously shown that its expression is up-regulated in macrophages infected with L. amazonensis and that infected cells also display an increase in P2X7-induced apoptosis and membrane permeabilization to some anionic fluorescent dyes. In an independent study we recently showed that the phenomenon of macrophage membrane permeabilization can involve at least two distinct pathways for cations and anions respectively. Here, we re-addressed the effects of ATP-induced P2X7-associated phenomena in macrophages infected with L. amazonensis and demonstrated that the P2X7-associated dye uptake mechanisms are differentially modulated. While the membrane permeabilization for anionic dyes is up-modulated, as previously described, the uptake of cationic dyes is strongly down-modulated. These results unveil new characteristics of two distinct permeabilization mechanisms associated with P2X7 receptors in macrophages and provide the first evidence indicating that these pathways can be differentially modulated in an immunologically relevant situation. The possible importance of these results to the L. amazonensis escape mechanism is discussed.

  10. Nicotine potentiates proatherogenic effects of oxLDL by stimulating and upregulating macrophage CD36 signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadipiralla, Kiranmai; Mendez, Armando J.; Jaimes, Edgar A.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Webster, Keith; Raij, Leopoldo

    2013-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. CD36 mediates oxidized LDL (oxLDL) uptake and contributes to macrophage foam cell formation. We investigated a role for the CD36 pathway in nicotine-induced activation of macrophages and foam cell formation in vitro and in vivo. Nicotine in the same plasma concentration range found in smokers increased the CD36+/CD14+ cell population in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, increased CD36 expression of human THP1 macrophages, and increased macrophage production of reactive oxygen species, PKCδ phosphorylation, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) expression. Nicotine-induced CD36 expression was suppressed by antioxidants and by specific PKCδ and PPARγ inhibitors, implicating mechanistic roles for these intermediates. Nicotine synergized with oxLDL to increase macrophage expression of CD36 and cytokines TNF-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, IL-6, and CXCL9, all of which were prevented by CD36 small interfering (si)RNA. Incubation with oxLDL (50 μg/ml) for 72 h resulted in lipid deposition in macrophages and foam cell formation. Preincubation with nicotine further increased oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation and foam cell formation, which was also prevented by CD36 siRNA. Treatment of apoE−/− mice with nicotine markedly exacerbated inflammatory monocyte levels and atherosclerotic plaque accumulation, effects that were not seen in CD36−/− apoE−/− mice. Our results show that physiological levels of nicotine increase CD36 expression in macrophages, a pathway that may account at least in part for the known proinflammatory and proatherogenic properties of nicotine. These results identify such enhanced CD36 expression as a novel nicotine-mediated pathway that may constitute an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis in smokers. The results also suggest that exacerbated atherogenesis by this pathway may be an adverse side effect of

  11. Toll-like receptor 4 is involved in the cell cycle modulation and required for effective human cytomegalovirus infection in THP-1 macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcangeletti, Maria-Cristina, E-mail: mariacristina.arcangeletti@unipr.it [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Germini, Diego; Rodighiero, Isabella [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Mirandola, Prisco [Department of Biomedical, Biotechnological and Translational Sciences, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); De Conto, Flora; Medici, Maria-Cristina [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Gatti, Rita [Department of Biomedical, Biotechnological and Translational Sciences, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Chezzi, Carlo; Calderaro, Adriana [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Parma, Parma (Italy)

    2013-05-25

    Suitable host cell metabolic conditions are fundamental for the effective development of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) lytic cycle. Indeed, several studies have demonstrated the ability of this virus to interfere with cell cycle regulation, mainly by blocking proliferating cells in G1 or G1/S. In the present study, we demonstrate that HCMV deregulates the cell cycle of THP-1 macrophages (a cell line irreversibly arrested in G0) by pushing them into S and G2 phases. Moreover, we show that HCMV infection of THP-1 macrophages leads to Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation. Since various studies have indicated TLR4 to be involved in promoting cell proliferation, here we investigate the possible role of TLR4 in the observed HCMV-induced cell cycle perturbation. Our data strongly support TLR4 as a mediator of HCMV-triggered cell cycle activation in THP-1 macrophages favouring, in turn, the development of an efficient viral lytic cycle. - Highlights: ► We studied HCMV infection impact on THP-1 macrophage cell cycle. ► We analysed the role played by Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 upon HCMV infection. ► HCMV pushes THP-1 macrophages (i.e. resting cells) to re-enter the cell cycle. ► TLR4 pathway inhibition strongly affects the effectiveness of HCMV replication. ► TLR4 pathway inhibition significantly decreases HCMV-induced cell cycle re-entry.

  12. Heme oxygenase-1 induction alters chemokine regulation and ameliorates human immunodeficiency virus-type-1 infection in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Zhao-Hua [Division of Monoclonal Antibodies, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kumari, Namita; Nekhai, Sergei [Center for Sickle Cell Disease, Department of Medicine, Howard University, Washington, DC (United States); Clouse, Kathleen A. [Division of Monoclonal Antibodies, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Wahl, Larry M. [National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Yamada, Kenneth M. [Laboratory of Cell and Development Biology, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Dhawan, Subhash, E-mail: subhash.dhawan@fda.hhs.gov [Viral Immunology Section, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, Division of Emerging and Transfusion Transmitted Diseases, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •Lipopolysaccharide stimulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) ameliorated HIV-1 infection of primary human macrophages. •The partial protection by HO-1 against HIV infection was associated with induction of chemokines such as MIP1α and MIP1β. •This mechanism explains lipopolysaccharide-stimulated HO-1-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 infection of macrophages. -- Abstract: We have elucidated a putative mechanism for the host resistance against HIV-1 infection of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We show that LPS-activated MDM both inhibited HIV-1 entry into the cells and were refractory to post-entry productive viral replication. LPS-treated cells were virtually negative for mature virions as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. LPS activation of MDM markedly enhanced the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a potent inducible cytoprotective enzyme. Increased HO-1 expression was accompanied by elevated production of macrophage inflammatory chemokines (MIP1α and MIP1β) by LPS-activated MDM, significantly decreased surface chemokine receptor-5 (CCR-5) expression, and substantially reduced virus replication. Treatment of cells with HO-1 inhibitor SnPP IX (tin protoporphyrin IX) attenuated the LPS-mediated responses, HIV-1 replication and secretion of MIP1α, MIP1β, and LD78β chemokines with little change in surface CCR-5 expression. These results identify a novel role for HO-1 in the modulation of host immune response against HIV infection of MDM.

  13. Splenic B cells from Hymenolepis diminuta-infected mice ameliorate colitis independent of T cells and via cooperation with macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, José L; Wang, Arthur; Fernando, Maria R; Graepel, Rabea; Leung, Gabriella; van Rooijen, Nico; Sigvardsson, Mikael; McKay, Derek M

    2015-01-01

    Helminth parasites provoke multicellular immune responses in their hosts that can suppress concomitant disease. The gut lumen-dwelling tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta, unlike other parasites assessed as helminth therapy, causes no host tissue damage while potently suppressing murine colitis. With the goal of harnessing the immunomodulatory capacity of infection with H. diminuta, we assessed the putative generation of anti-colitic regulatory B cells following H. diminuta infection. Splenic CD19(+) B cells isolated from mice infected 7 [HdBc(7(d))] and 14 d (but not 3 d) previously with H. diminuta and transferred to naive mice significantly reduced the severity of dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS)-, oxazolone-, and dextran-sodium sulfate-induced colitis. Mechanistic studies with the DNBS model, revealed the anti-colitic HdBc(7(d)) was within the follicular B cell population and its phenotype was not dependent on IL-4 or IL-10. The HdBc(7(d)) were not characterized by increased expression of CD1d, CD5, CD23, or IL-10 production, but did spontaneously, and upon LPS plus anti-CD40 stimulation, produce more TGF-β than CD19(+) B cells from controls. DNBS-induced colitis in RAG1(-/-) mice was inhibited by administration of HdBc(7(d)), indicating a lack of a requirement for T and B cells in the recipient; however, depletion of macrophages in recipient mice abrogated the anti-colitic effect of HdBc(7(d)). Thus, in response to H. diminuta, a putatively unique splenic CD19(+) B cell with a functional immunoregulatory program is generated that promotes the suppression of colitis dominated by TH1, TH2, or TH1-plus-TH2 events, and may do so via the synthesis of TGF-β and the generation of, or cooperation with, a regulatory macrophage.

  14. Type I interferons and interferon regulatory factors regulate TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL in HIV-1-infected macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlong Huang

    Full Text Available TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL is a member of the TNF family that participates in HIV-1 pathogenesis through the depletion of CD4+ T cells. TRAIL is expressed on the cell membrane of peripheral immune cells and can be cleaved into a soluble, secreted form. The regulation of TRAIL in macrophages during HIV-1 infection is not completely understood. In this study, we investigated the mechanism(s of TRAIL expression in HIV-1-infected macrophages, an important cell type in HIV-1 pathogenesis. A human monocyte-derived macrophage (MDM culture system was infected with macrophage-tropic HIV-1(ADA, HIV-1(JR-FL, or HIV-1(BAL strains. TRAIL, predominantly the membrane-bound form, increased following HIV-1 infection. We found that HIV-1 infection also induced interferon regulatory factor (IRF-1, IRF-7 gene expression and signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1 activation. Small interfering RNA knockdown of IRF-1 or IRF-7, but not IRF-3, reduced STAT1 activation and TRAIL expression. Furthermore, the upregulation of IRF-1, IRF-7, TRAIL, and the activation of STAT1 by HIV-1 infection was reduced by the treatment of type I interferon (IFN-neutralizing antibodies. In addition, inhibition of STAT1 by fludarabine abolished IRF-1, IRF-7, and TRAIL upregulation. We conclude that IRF-1, IRF-7, type I IFNs, and STAT1 form a signaling feedback loop that is critical in regulating TRAIL expression in HIV-1-infected macrophages.

  15. HIV aspartyl peptidase inhibitors interfere with cellular proliferation, ultrastructure and macrophage infection of Leishmania amazonensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia O Santos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leishmania is the etiologic agent of leishmanisais, a protozoan disease whose pathogenic events are not well understood. Current therapy is suboptimal due to toxicity of the available therapeutic agents and the emergence of drug resistance. Compounding these problems is the increase in the number of cases of Leishmania-HIV coinfection, due to the overlap between the AIDS epidemic and leishmaniasis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present report, we have investigated the effect of HIV aspartyl peptidase inhibitors (PIs on the Leishmania amazonensis proliferation, ultrastructure, interaction with macrophage cells and expression of classical peptidases which are directly involved in the Leishmania pathogenesis. All the HIV PIs impaired parasite growth in a dose-dependent fashion, especially nelfinavir and lopinavir. HIV PIs treatment caused profound changes in the leishmania ultrastructure as shown by transmission electron microscopy, including cytoplasm shrinking, increase in the number of lipid inclusions and some cells presenting the nucleus closely wrapped by endoplasmic reticulum resembling an autophagic process, as well as chromatin condensation which is suggestive of apoptotic death. The hydrolysis of HIV peptidase substrate by L. amazonensis extract was inhibited by pepstatin and HIV PIs, suggesting that an aspartyl peptidase may be the intracellular target of the inhibitors. The treatment with HIV PIs of either the promastigote forms preceding the interaction with macrophage cells or the amastigote forms inside macrophages drastically reduced the association indexes. Despite all these beneficial effects, the HIV PIs induced an increase in the expression of cysteine peptidase b (cpb and the metallopeptidase gp63, two well-known virulence factors expressed by Leishmania spp. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In the face of leishmaniasis/HIV overlap, it is critical to further comprehend the sophisticated interplays among Leishmania

  16. Treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Infected Macrophages with Poly(Lactic-Co-Glycolic Acid) Microparticles Drives NFκB and Autophagy Dependent Bacillary Killing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lawlor, Ciaran

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of multiple-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) has pushed our available repertoire of anti-TB therapies to the limit of effectiveness. This has increased the urgency to develop novel treatment modalities, and inhalable microparticle (MP) formulations are a promising option to target the site of infection. We have engineered poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) MPs which can carry a payload of anti-TB agents, and are successfully taken up by human alveolar macrophages. Even without a drug cargo, MPs can be potent immunogens; yet little is known about how they influence macrophage function in the setting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. To address this issue we infected THP-1 macrophages with Mtb H37Ra or H37Rv and treated with MPs. In controlled experiments we saw a reproducible reduction in bacillary viability when THP-1 macrophages were treated with drug-free MPs. NFκB activity was increased in MP-treated macrophages, although cytokine secretion was unaltered. Confocal microscopy of immortalized murine bone marrow-derived macrophages expressing GFP-tagged LC3 demonstrated induction of autophagy. Inhibition of caspases did not influence the MP-induced restriction of bacillary growth, however, blockade of NFκB or autophagy with pharmacological inhibitors reversed this MP effect on macrophage function. These data support harnessing inhaled PLGA MP-drug delivery systems as an immunotherapeutic in addition to serving as a vehicle for targeted drug delivery. Such "added value" could be exploited in the generation of inhaled vaccines as well as inhaled MDR-TB therapeutics when used as an adjunct to existing treatments.

  17. Intracellular Propionibacterium acnes infection in glandular epithelium and stromal macrophages of the prostate with or without cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Bae

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent reports on Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes suggest that this bacterium is prevalent in the prostate, is associated with acute and chronic prostatic inflammation, and might have a role in prostate carcinogenesis. METHODS: To evaluate the pathogenic role of this indigenous bacterium, we screened for the bacterium in radical prostatectomy specimens using enzyme immunohistochemistry with a novel P. acnes-specific monoclonal antibody (PAL antibody, together with an anti-nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB antibody. We examined formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue sections of radical prostatectomy specimens from 28 patients with prostate cancer and 18 age-matched control patients with bladder cancer, but without prostate cancer. RESULTS: Immunohistochemistry with the PAL antibody revealed small round bodies within some non-cancerous glandular epithelium and stromal macrophages in most prostate samples. Prostate cancer samples had higher frequencies of either cytoplasmic P. acnes or nuclear NF-κB expression of glandular epithelium and higher numbers of stromal macrophages with P. acnes than control samples. These parameters were also higher in the peripheral zone than in the transitional zone of the prostate, especially in prostate cancer samples. Nuclear NF-κB expression was more frequent in glands with P. acnes than in glands without P. acnes. The number of stromal macrophages with the bacterium correlated with the grade of chronic inflammation in both the PZ and TZ areas and with the grade of acute inflammation in the TZ area. CONCLUSIONS: Immunohistochemical analysis with a novel monoclonal antibody for detecting P. acnes in the prostate suggested that intraepithelial P. acnes infection in non-cancerous prostate glands and inflammation caused by the bacterium may contribute to the development of prostate cancer.

  18. Mutation in alkylhydroperoxidase D gene dramatically decreases persistence of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus calmette-guerin in infected macrophage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farivar Taghi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the leading cause of death from a single bacterial species in the world and is subjected to a highly oxidative environment in its host macrophage and consequently has evolved protective mechanisms against reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates. Alkyl hydroperoxidase D (AhpD is a molecule from these mycobacterial defense systems that has a dual function. It not only works with Alkyl hydroperoxidase C (AhpC in mycobacterial defense system against oxidative stress but also has a role in oxidation/reduction of succinyltransferase B (SucB, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (LPD and AhpC. The present study was undertaken to find out the effects of inactivation of ahpD gene in the intra-macrophage persistence of resulted BCG mutant. Materials and Methods: We did allelic exchange mutagenesis in Mycobacterium bovis BCG and evaluate the effects of this mutagenesis in intracellular persistence of wild type BCG strains and ahpD mutant ones by comparing colony forming units (CFU in infected macrophage. Results: Our findings showed that after producing allelic exchange mutagenesis in ahpD gene of M.bovis BCG a sever decrease in the CFU′s of ahpD mutant BCG strains has been observed and intracellular persistence of ahpD mutant BCG strains decreased significantly. Conclusion: Mutagenesis in ahpD gene will cause significant decrease in intracellular survival of ahpD mutant strains than wild type M.bovis BCG strains and could leads to an inefficiency in pyruvate dehydrogenase pathway and could also impair impairs mycobacterial defense system against oxidative and nitrosative stress.

  19. DMPD: Is HIV infection a TNF receptor signalling-driven disease? [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18178131 Is HIV infection a TNF receptor signalling-driven disease? Herbein G, Khan... KA. Trends Immunol. 2008 Feb;29(2):61-7. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Is HIV infection a TNF receptor sig...nalling-driven disease? PubmedID 18178131 Title Is HIV infection a TNF receptor signalling-driven diseas

  20. DMPD: Toll-like receptors regulation of viral infection and disease. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18280610 Toll-like receptors regulation of viral infection and disease. Thompson JM...how Toll-like receptors regulation of viral infection and disease. PubmedID 18280610 Title Toll-like recepto...rs regulation of viral infection and disease. Authors Thompson JM, Iwasaki A. Pub

  1. The Immunopathogenic Potential of Arcobacter butzleri - Lessons from a Meta-Analysis of Murine Infection Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta Gölz

    Full Text Available Only limited information is available about the immunopathogenic properties of Arcobacter infection in vivo. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis of published data in murine infection models to compare the pathogenic potential of Arcobacter butzleri with Campylobacter jejuni and commensal Escherichia coli as pathogenic and harmless reference bacteria, respectively.Gnotobiotic IL-10-/- mice generated by broad-spectrum antibiotic compounds were perorally infected with A. butzleri (strains CCUG 30485 or C1, C. jejuni (strain 81-176 or a commensal intestinal E. coli strain. Either strain stably colonized the murine intestines upon infection. At day 6 postinfection (p.i., C. jejuni infected mice only displayed severe clinical sequelae such as wasting bloody diarrhea. Gross disease was accompanied by increased numbers of colonic apoptotic cells and distinct immune cell populations including macrophages and monocytes, T and B cells as well as regulatory T cells upon pathogenic infection. Whereas A. butzleri and E. coli infected mice were clinically unaffected, respective colonic immune cell numbers increased in the former, but not in the latter, and more distinctly upon A. butzleri strain CCUG 30485 as compared to C1 strain infection. Both, A. butzleri and C. jejuni induced increased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IFN-γ, TNF, IL-6 and MCP-1 in large, but also small intestines. Remarkably, even though viable bacteria did not translocate from the intestines to extra-intestinal compartments, systemic immune responses were induced in C. jejuni, but also A. butzleri infected mice as indicated by increased respective pro-inflammatory cytokine concentrations in serum samples at day 6 p.i.A. butzleri induce less distinct pro-inflammatory sequelae as compared to C. jejuni, but more pronounced local and systemic immune responses than commensal E. coli in a strain-dependent manner. Hence, data point towards that A. butzleri is more than a

  2. Mouse macrophage galactose-type lectin (mMGL) is critical for host resistance against Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Alicia; Ruiz-Rosado, Juan de Dios; Terrazas, Luis I; Juárez, Imelda; Gomez-Garcia, Lorena; Calleja, Elsa; Camacho, Griselda; Chávez, Ana; Romero, Miriam; Rodriguez, Tonathiu; Espinoza, Bertha; Rodriguez-Sosa, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    The C-type lectin receptor mMGL is expressed exclusively by myeloid antigen presenting cells (APC) such as dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages (Mφ), and it mediates binding to glycoproteins carrying terminal galactose and α- or β-N-acetylgalactosamine (Gal/GalNAc) residues. Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) expresses large amounts of mucin (TcMUC)-like glycoproteins. Here, we show by lectin-blot that galactose moieties are also expressed on the surface of T. cruzi. Male mMGL knockout (-/-) and wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice were infected intraperitoneally with 10(4) T. cruzi trypomastigotes (Queretaro strain). Following T. cruzi infection, mMGL-/- mice developed higher parasitemia and higher mortality rates compared with WT mice. Although hearts from T. cruzi-infected WT mice presented few amastigote nests, mMGL-/- mice displayed higher numbers of amastigote nests. Compared with WT, Mφ from mMGL-/- mice had low production of nitric oxide (NO), interleukin (IL)-12 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in response to soluble T. cruzi antigens (TcAg). Interestingly, upon in vitro T. cruzi infection, mMGL-/- Mφ expressed lower levels of MHC-II and TLR-4 and harbored higher numbers of parasites, even when mMGL-/- Mφ were previously primed with IFN-γ or LPS/IFN-γ. These data suggest that mMGL plays an important role during T. cruzi infection, is required for optimal Mφ activation, and may synergize with TLR-4-induced pathways to produce TNF-α, IL-1β and NO during the early phase of infection.

  3. Genome-wide innate immune responses in HIV-1-infected macrophages are preserved despite attenuation of the NF-kappa B activation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Tsang, Jhen; Miller, Robert F; Straschewski, Sarah; Kellam, Paul; Chain, Benjamin M; Katz, David R

    2009-01-01

    Macrophages contribute to HIV-1 infection at many levels. They provide permissive cells at the site of inoculation, augment virus transfer to T cells, generate long-lived viral reservoirs, and cause bystander cell apoptosis. A body of evidence suggests that the role of macrophages in cellular host defense is also compromised by HIV-1 infection. In this respect, macrophages are potent cells of the innate immune system that initiate and regulate wide-ranging immunological responses. This study focuses on the effect of HIV-1 infection on innate immune responses by macrophages at the level of signal transduction, whole genome transcriptional profiling, and cytokine secretion. We show that in an ex vivo model, M-CSF-differentiated monocyte-derived macrophages uniformly infected with replicating CCR5-tropic HIV-1, without cytopathic effect, exhibit selective attenuation of the NF-kappaB activation pathway in response to TLR4 and TLR2 stimulation. However, functional annotation clustering analysis of genome-wide transcriptional responses to LPS stimulation suggests substantial preservation of gene expression changes at the systems level, with modest attenuation of a subset of up-regulated LPS-responsive genes, and no effect on a selection of inflammatory cytokine responses at the protein level. These results extend existing reports of inhibitory interactions between HIV-1 accessory proteins and NF-kappaB signaling pathways, and whole genome expression profiling provides comprehensive assessment of the consequent effects on immune response gene expression. Unexpectedly, our data suggest innate immune responses are broadly preserved with limited exceptions, and pave the way for further study of the complex relationship between HIV-1 and immunological pathways within macrophages.

  4. Exenatide (a GLP-1 agonist) improves the antioxidative potential of in vitro cultured human monocytes/macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bułdak, Łukasz; Łabuzek, Krzysztof; Bułdak, Rafał Jakub; Machnik, Grzegorz; Bołdys, Aleksandra; Okopień, Bogusław

    2015-09-01

    Macrophages are dominant cells in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. They are also a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidative stress, which is particularly high in subjects with diabetes, is responsible for accelerated atherosclerosis. Novel antidiabetic drugs (e.g., glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonists) were shown to reduce ROS level. Therefore, we conceived a study to evaluate the influence of exenatide, a GLP-1 agonist, on redox status in human monocytes/macrophages cultured in vitro, which may explain the beneficial effects of incretin-based antidiabetic treatment. Human macrophages obtained from 10 healthy volunteers were in vitro subjected to the treatment with GLP-1 agonist (exenatide) in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), antagonist of GLP-1 receptors (exendin 9-39), or protein kinase A inhibitor (H89). Afterwards, reactive oxygen species, malondialdehyde level, NADPH oxidase, and antioxidative enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and catalase] expression was evaluated. Finally, we estimated the activity of the abovementioned enzymes in the presence of H89. According to our findings, exenatide reduced ROS and malondialdyhyde (MDA) level by decreasing the expression of ROS-generating NADPH oxidase and by increasing the expression and activities of SOD and GSH-Px. We also showed that this effect was significantly inhibited by exendin 9-39 (a GLP-1 antagonist) and blocked by H89. Exenatide improved the antioxidative potential and reduced oxidative stress in cultured human monocytes/macrophages, and this finding may be responsible for the pleiotropic effects of incretin-based therapies. This effect relied on the stimulation of GLP-1 receptor.

  5. In depth global analysis of gene expression levels in porcine alveolar macrophages following infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major pathogen of swine worldwide. Infection of the preferential target cells, porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs), by PRRSV causes significant changes in their function by mechanisms that are not understood. Serial Analysis of Gene Ex...

  6. In depth global analysis of transcript abundance levels in porcine alveolar macrophages following infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major pathogen of swine worldwide and causes considerable economic loss. Infection of the primary target cells, porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs), by PRRSV causes significant changes in their function by mechanisms that are not under...

  7. Activation of ERK1/2 and TNF-α production are regulated by calcium/calmodulin signaling pathway during Penicillium marneffei infection within human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Renqiong; Ji, Guangquan; Wang, Ling; Ren, Hong; Xi, Liyan

    2016-04-01

    Previous study have shown that Penicillium marneffei (P. marneffei)-induced TNF-α production via an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent mechanism is an important host defence mechanism against P. marneffei in human macrophages. Therefore, we explore signaling pathway that regulates TNF-α secretion and activation of ERK1/2 by intracellular signaling mechanisms during P. marneffei infection. We found that ERK1/2 activation was dependent on the calcium/calmodulin/calmodulin kinase Ⅱ pathway in P. marneffei-infected human macrophages. In contrast, P. marneffei-induced p38 MAPK activation was negatively regulated by calcium/calmodulin/calmodulin kinase Ⅱ signaling pathway. Furthermore, TNF-α production in P. marneffei-infected human macrophages was also dependent on Ca(2+)/calmodulin/calmodulin kinase Ⅱ pathway. These data suggest that Ca(2+)/calmodulin/calmodulin kinase Ⅱ pathway plays vital regulatory roles in macrophage activation and subsequent cytokine production during P. marneffei infection.

  8. Identification of an autophagy defect in smokers' alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monick, Martha M; Powers, Linda S; Walters, Katherine; Lovan, Nina; Zhang, Michael; Gerke, Alicia; Hansdottir, Sif; Hunninghake, Gary W

    2010-11-01

    Alveolar macrophages are essential for clearing bacteria from the alveolar surface and preventing microbe-induced infections. It is well documented that smokers have an increased incidence of infections, in particular lung infections. Alveolar macrophages accumulate in smokers' lungs, but they have a functional immune deficit. In this study, we identify an autophagy defect in smokers' alveolar macrophages. Smokers' alveolar macrophages accumulate both autophagosomes and p62, a marker of autophagic flux. The decrease in the process of autophagy leads to impaired protein aggregate clearance, dysfunctional mitochondria, and defective delivery of bacteria to lysosomes. This study identifies the autophagy pathway as a potential target for interventions designed to decrease infection rates in smokers and possibly in individuals with high environmental particulate exposure.

  9. NF-kappaB Activity in Macrophages Determines Metastatic Potential of Breast Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    inflammation, neonatal sepsis , and chronic lung disease: a 13-year hospital cohort study. Pe- diatrics 123: 1314–1319. 8. Paananen, R., A. K. Husa, R... neonatal period. The inducible cIKKb transgene allows macrophage activation at distinct stages of lung development, as compared with postnatal rodent...Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network. 2010. Neonatal outcomes of extremely preterm infants from

  10. Inflammation and cancer: macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF)--the potential missing link.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Conroy, H

    2010-11-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was the original cytokine, described almost 50 years ago and has since been revealed to be an important player in pro-inflammatory diseases. Recent work using MIF mouse models has revealed new roles for MIF. In this review, we present an increasing body of evidence implicating the key pro-inflammatory cytokine MIF in specific biological activities related directly to cancer growth or contributing towards a microenvironment favouring cancer progression.

  11. Macrophage uptake of a lipoprotein-sequestered toxicant: a potential route of immunotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, N E; Wells, D S; Dauterman, W C; Roberts, J F; Guthrie, F E

    1986-03-15

    An experimental system was chosen to investigate the bioactivity of a lipoprotein-sequestered toxicant at the cellular level based on recent studies demonstrating receptor-mediated uptake of lipoproteins by macrophages. Rat peritoneal exudate cell suspensions (PEC) were exposed to DDT and lipoprotein-sequestered DDT, followed by measurement of DDT uptake, metabolism, and cellular toxicity. In vitro uptake assays demonstrated that PEC suspensions treated for 10, 20, and 30 min with 2.5 microM lipoprotein-sequestered DDT had approximately a twofold increase over the amount of DDT associated with PEC treated with 2.5 microM free DDT. PEC were assayed for DDT metabolites to serve as a measure of the cellular internalization of the toxicant after treatment in vitro for 18 hr with either 1.5 microM DDT or lipoprotein-sequestered DDT. Evidence of DDT metabolism was only observed with PEC which had been treated with lipoprotein-sequestered DDT. These cells contained significantly higher amounts of DDT metabolites as compared to cells treated with unsequestered DDT (over an eightfold difference). Assays measuring macrophage phagocytic activity indicated that macrophages treated for 4.5 hr in vitro with 2.5 microM lipoprotein-sequestered DDT showed significant inhibition in their ability to phagocytize yeast particles. These results suggest that serum lipoproteins may facilitate the cellular uptake of lipoprotein-sequestered toxicants leading to altered cellular function (phagocytosis).

  12. PPARy phosphorylation mediated by JNK MAPK: a potential role in macrophage-derived foam cell formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ran YIN; Yu-gang DONG; Hong-lang LI

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) modulates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) activity through phosphorylation in macrophages, and the effect of PPARy phosphorylation on macrophages-derived foam cell formation. Methods: After exposing the cultured THP-1 cells to ox-LDL in the presence or absence of different mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors, PPARγ and phosphorylated PPARγ protein levels were detected by Western blot. MAPK activity was analyzed using MAP Kinase Assay Kit. Intracellular cholesterol accumulation was assessed by Oil red O staining and cholesterol oxidase enzymatic method. The Mrna level of PPARγ target gene was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results: ox-LDL evaluated PPARγ phosphorylation status and subsequently decreased PPARγ target gene expression in a dose-dependent manner. Ox-LDL also induced MAPK activation. Treatment of THP-1 cells with c-Jun N-terminal kinase-, but not p38- or extracellular signal-regulated kinase-MAPK inhibitor, significantly suppressed PPARγ phosphorylation induced by ox-LDL, which in turn inhibited foam cell formation. Conclusion: In addition to its ligand-dependent activation, ox-LDL modulates PPARγ activity through phosphorylation, which is mediated by MAPK activation. PPARγ phosphorylation mediated by MAPK facilitates foam cell formation from macrophages exposed to ox-LDL.

  13. Microarray analysis of the effect of Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus M-like protein in infecting porcine pulmonary alveolar macrophage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Ma

    Full Text Available Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus (S. zooepidemicus, which belongs to Lancefield group C streptococci, is an important pathogen of domesticated species, causing septicemia, meningitis and mammitis. M-like protein (SzP is an important virulence factor of S. zooepidemicus and contributes to bacterial infection and antiphagocytosis. To increase our knowledge of the mechanism of SzP in infection, we profiled the response of porcine pulmonary alveolar macrophage (PAM to infection with S. zooepidemicus ATCC35246 wild strain (WD and SzP-knockout strain (KO using the Roche NimbleGen Porcine Genome Expression Array. We found SzP contributed to differential expression of 446 genes, with upregulation of 134 genes and downregulation of 312 genes. Gene Ontology category and KEGG pathway were analyzed for relationships among differentially expressed genes. These genes were represented in a variety of functional categories, including genes involved in immune response, regulation of chemokine production, signal transduction and regulation of apoptosis. The reliability of the data obtained from the microarray was verified by performing quantitative real-time PCR on 12 representative genes. The data will contribute to understanding of SzP mediated mechanisms of S. zooepidemicus pathogenesis.

  14. Ovine progressive pneumonia virus capsid antigen as found in CD163- and CD172a-positive alveolar macrophages of persistently infected sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann-Hoesing, L M; Noh, S M; Snekvik, K R; White, S N; Schneider, D A; Truscott, T; Knowles, D P

    2010-05-01

    In situ detection of ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) and the phenotypic identification of the cells that harbor OPPV have not been described for the OPPV-affected tissues, which include lung, mammary gland, synovial membranes of the carpal joint, and choroid plexus of the brain. In this study, the authors first developed a single enzyme-based automated immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis for detection of OPPV capsid antigen (CA) on OPPV-affected tissues, using 2 anti-CAEV CA monoclonal antibodies, 5A1 and 10A1, and 2 enzyme-based IHC systems. Out of 10 naturally and persistently OPPV-infected ewes, OPPV CA was detected in intercellular regions of the carpal synovial membrane of 1 ewe, in cells resembling alveolar macrophages and pulmonary interstitial macrophages in lung tissue of 3 ewes, and in mammary alveolar cells of 1 ewe. Furthermore, dual enzyme-based automated IHC analyses revealed that OPPV CA was predominantly detected in CD172a- or CD163-positive alveolar macrophages of the lungs and mammary gland. That anti-inflammatory (CD163) and downregulatory (CD172a) types of alveolar macrophage harbor OPPV CA leads to the possibility that during persistent infection with OPPV, the host alveolar macrophage might serve to limit inflammation while OPPV persists undetected by the host adaptive immune response in the lung and mammary gland.

  15. Sexual Transmission of XMRV: A Potential Infection Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prachi Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although XMRV dissemination in humans is a matter of debate, the prostate of select patients seem to harbor XMRV, which raises questions about its potential route of transmission. We established a model of infection in rhesus macaques inoculated with XMRV. In spite of the intravenous inoculation, all infected macaques exhibited readily detectable XMRV signal in the reproductive tract of all 4 males and 1 female during both acute and chronic infection stages. XMRV showed explosive growth in the acini of prostate during acute but not chronic infection. In seminal vesicles, epididymis, and testes, XMRV protein production was detected throughout infection in interstitial or epithelial cells. In the female monkey, epithelial cells in the cervix and vagina were also positive for XMRV gag. The ready detection of XMRV in the reproductive tract of male and female macaques infected intravenously suggests the potential for sexual transmission for XMRV.

  16. Potential of the Cnidium monnieri fruits as an immune enhancer in Escherichia coli infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malla, Bindu; Chang, Bo Yoon; Kim, Seon Beom; Park, Hyun; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Kim, Sung Yeon

    2016-11-01

    The Cnidium monnieri fruits (CMF) were studied how they act on immune system as a novel immunostimulator against the infectious disease. Macrophages were treated with CMF, and nitric oxide (NO) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were measured, and phagocytosis of macrophages was detected using FITC-labelled Escherichia coli. The protective effect of CMF against E. coli infection in mice was examined. The survival rate was monitored daily for up to 5 days. And then the viable bacteria count of serum and the immunological mediator (NO, TNF-α, interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-6) of serum, splenocyte and peritoneal macrophages were analysed. The CMF significantly enhanced the concentrations of NO and TNF-α and the phagocytosis activity in macrophages. The oral administration of CMF for five consecutive days before infection prolonged the survival rate. Treatment with CMF significantly stimulated the phagocytosis of peritoneal macrophages and induced the immunological mediator of serum, splenocyte and peritoneal macrophages against the E. coli infection. The host-protective effects of CMF might be archived by improving immune response, and CMF could act to prevent pathogenic microbial infections with immunomodulation. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  17. Transcriptional and Linkage Analyses Identify Loci that Mediate the Differential Macrophage Response to Inflammatory Stimuli and Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassan, Musa A.; Jensen, Kirk D.; Butty, Vincent; Hu, K.; Boedec, E.; Prins, J.C.P.; Saeij, J.P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages display flexible activation states that range between pro-inflammatory (classical activation) and anti-inflammatory (alternative activation). These macrophage polarization states contribute to a variety of organismal phenotypes such as tissue remodeling and susceptibility to infectious a

  18. Prostaglandins from Cytosolic Phospholipase A2α/Cyclooxygenase-1 Pathway and Mitogen-activated Protein Kinases Regulate Gene Expression in Candida albicans-infected Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Bogeon; Lee, HeeJung; Jayaraja, Sabarirajan; Suram, Saritha; Murphy, Robert C; Leslie, Christina C

    2016-03-25

    In Candida albicans-infected resident peritoneal macrophages, activation of group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2(cPLA2α) by calcium- and mitogen-activated protein kinases triggers the rapid production of prostaglandins I2 and E2 through cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and regulates gene expression by increasing cAMP. InC. albicans-infected cPLA2α(-/-)or COX-1(-/-)macrophages, expression ofI l10,Nr4a2, and Ptgs2 was lower, and expression ofTnfα was higher, than in wild type macrophages. Expression was reconstituted with 8-bromo-cAMP, the PKA activator 6-benzoyl-cAMP, and agonists for prostaglandin receptors IP, EP2, and EP4 in infected but not uninfected cPLA2α(-/-)or COX-1(-/-)macrophages. InC. albicans-infected cPLA2α(+/+)macrophages, COX-2 expression was blocked by IP, EP2, and EP4 receptor antagonists, indicating a role for both prostaglandin I2 and E2 Activation of ERKs and p38, but not JNKs, by C. albicansacted synergistically with prostaglandins to induce expression of Il10,Nr4a2, and Ptgs2. Tnfα expression required activation of ERKs and p38 but was suppressed by cAMP. Results using cAMP analogues that activate PKA or Epacs suggested that cAMP regulates gene expression through PKA. However, phosphorylation of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), the cAMP-regulated transcription factor involved inIl10,Nr4a2,Ptgs2, andTnfα expression, was not mediated by cAMP/PKA because it was similar inC. albicans-infected wild type and cPLA2α(-/-)or COX-1(-/-)macrophages. CREB phosphorylation was blocked by p38 inhibitors and induced by the p38 activator anisomycin but not by the PKA activator 6-benzoyl-cAMP. Therefore, MAPK activation inC. albicans-infected macrophages plays a dual role by promoting the cPLA2α/prostaglandin/cAMP/PKA pathway and CREB phosphorylation that coordinately regulate immediate early gene expression.

  19. Type I Interferon Induced Epigenetic Regulation of Macrophages Suppresses Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Acute Respiratory Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroetz, Danielle N; Allen, Ronald M; Schaller, Matthew A; Cavallaro, Cleyton; Ito, Toshihiro; Kunkel, Steven L

    2015-12-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is an airborne pathogen that causes significant morbidity and mortality each year. Macrophages (Mϕ) are the first immune population to encounter IAV virions in the lungs and are required to control infection. In the present study, we explored the mechanism by which cytokine signaling regulates the phenotype and function of Mϕ via epigenetic modification of chromatin. We have found that type I interferon (IFN-I) potently upregulates the lysine methyltransferase Setdb2 in murine and human Mϕ, and in turn Setdb2 regulates Mϕ-mediated immunity in response to IAV. The induction of Setdb2 by IFN-I was significantly impaired upon inhibition of the JAK-STAT signaling cascade, and chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that both STAT1 and interferon regulatory factor 7 bind upstream of the transcription start site to induce expression. The generation of Setdb2LacZ reporter mice revealed that IAV infection results in systemic upregulation of Setdb2 in myeloid cells. In the lungs, alveolar Mϕ expressed the highest level of Setdb2, with greater than 70% lacZ positive on day 4 post-infection. Silencing Setdb2 activity in Mϕ in vivo enhanced survival in lethal IAV infection. Enhanced host protection correlated with an amplified antiviral response and less obstruction to the airways. By tri-methylating H3K9, Setdb2 silenced the transcription of Mx1 and Isg15, antiviral effectors that inhibit IAV replication. Accordingly, a reduced viral load in knockout mice on day 8 post-infection was linked to elevated Isg15 and Mx1 transcript in the lungs. In addition, Setdb2 suppressed the expression of a large number of other genes with proinflammatory or immunomodulatory function. This included Ccl2, a chemokine that signals through CCR2 to regulate monocyte recruitment to infectious sites. Consistently, knockout mice produced more CCL2 upon IAV infection and this correlated with a 2-fold increase in the number of inflammatory monocytes and alveolar Mϕ in the

  20. Type I Interferon Induced Epigenetic Regulation of Macrophages Suppresses Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Acute Respiratory Viral Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle N Kroetz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV is an airborne pathogen that causes significant morbidity and mortality each year. Macrophages (Mϕ are the first immune population to encounter IAV virions in the lungs and are required to control infection. In the present study, we explored the mechanism by which cytokine signaling regulates the phenotype and function of Mϕ via epigenetic modification of chromatin. We have found that type I interferon (IFN-I potently upregulates the lysine methyltransferase Setdb2 in murine and human Mϕ, and in turn Setdb2 regulates Mϕ-mediated immunity in response to IAV. The induction of Setdb2 by IFN-I was significantly impaired upon inhibition of the JAK-STAT signaling cascade, and chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that both STAT1 and interferon regulatory factor 7 bind upstream of the transcription start site to induce expression. The generation of Setdb2LacZ reporter mice revealed that IAV infection results in systemic upregulation of Setdb2 in myeloid cells. In the lungs, alveolar Mϕ expressed the highest level of Setdb2, with greater than 70% lacZ positive on day 4 post-infection. Silencing Setdb2 activity in Mϕ in vivo enhanced survival in lethal IAV infection. Enhanced host protection correlated with an amplified antiviral response and less obstruction to the airways. By tri-methylating H3K9, Setdb2 silenced the transcription of Mx1 and Isg15, antiviral effectors that inhibit IAV replication. Accordingly, a reduced viral load in knockout mice on day 8 post-infection was linked to elevated Isg15 and Mx1 transcript in the lungs. In addition, Setdb2 suppressed the expression of a large number of other genes with proinflammatory or immunomodulatory function. This included Ccl2, a chemokine that signals through CCR2 to regulate monocyte recruitment to infectious sites. Consistently, knockout mice produced more CCL2 upon IAV infection and this correlated with a 2-fold increase in the number of inflammatory monocytes and

  1. Infection of murine peritoneal macrophages with toxoplasma gondii exposed to ultraviolet light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, T.; Pelster, B.; Piekarski, G.

    1981-01-01

    Exposure of Toxoplasma trophozoites to ultraviolet light (UV; 2.539 A) remarkably inhibited intracellular multiplication of the toxoplasmas within cultured mouse peritoneal macrophages. These toxoplasmas possessed the ability to induce normal parasitophorous vacuoles (PV) and underwent gradual degeneration in the PV without participation of host-cell lysosomes. Apparently, the basic conformation of the PV, i.e. the association of mitochondria, rough endoplasmic reticulum, and microtubules of the host cell and the presence of microvillous infoldings, was maintained as seen under the electron microscope even after the toxoplasmas had died within the PV. Even PV, in which debris of the toxoplasmas could be observed, did not show the sign of fusion with ferritin-labeled secondary lysosomes.

  2. Diagnostic and prognostic potential of the macrophage specific receptor CD163 in inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buechler, Christa; Eisinger, Kristina; Krautbauer, Sabrina

    2013-12-01

    CD163 is a scavenger receptor for the endocytosis of hemoglobin and hemoglobin/haptoglobin complexes and is nearly exclusively expressed on monocytes and macrophages. CD163 is induced by IL-10 and glucocorticoids while proinflammatory cytokines like TNF reduce its expression. The cytokine IL-6 which exerts pro- and anti-inflammatory effects depending on the signaling pathway activated strongly upregulates CD163. Anti-inflammatory cells involved in the down-modulation of inflammation express high CD163 which controls immune response. Ligands of the toll-like receptors 2, 4 and 5 stimulate ectodomain shedding of CD163 thereby releasing soluble CD163 (sCD163) which mediates cellular uptake of free hemoglobin. Soluble CD163 circulates in blood and is increased in serum of critically ill patients, in chronic inflammatory and infectious diseases. Serum concentrations of sCD163 are related to disease severity and are suitable biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic drug monitoring in several inflammatory disorders. Raised sCD163 even predicts comorbidity and mortality in some diseases. Relationship of CD163/sCD163 and disease severity demonstrates a fundamental role of monocytes/macrophages in various diseases. CD163 is a target to specifically deliver drugs to macrophages intending advanced therapeutic efficiency and minimization of adverse reactions. In this review article factors regulating CD163 expression and shedding, current knowledge on the function of CD163 and sCD163, and inflammatory diseases where CD163 and/or sCD163 are mostly increased are summarized.

  3. OmpW is a potential target for eliciting protective immunity against Acinetobacter baumannii infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weiwei; Wang, Shijie; Yao, Yufeng; Xia, Ye; Yang, Xu; Long, Qiong; Sun, Wenjia; Liu, Cunbao; Li, Yang; Ma, Yanbing

    2015-08-26

    Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) is an important conditioned pathogen that causes nosocomial and community-associated infections. In this study, we sought to investigate whether outer membrane protein W (OmpW) is a potential target for eliciting protective immunity against A. baumannii infections. Mice immunized with the fusion protein thioredoxin-OmpW generated strong OmpW-specific IgG responses. In a sepsis model, both active and passive immunizations against OmpW effectively protected mice from A. baumannii infections. This protection was demonstrated by a significantly improved survival rate, reduced bacterial burdens within organs, and the suppressed accumulation of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in sera. Opsonophagocytic assays with murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells indicated that the bactericidal effects of the antisera derived from the immunized mice are mediated synergistically by specific antibodies and complement components. The antisera presented significant opsonophagocytic activities against homologous strains and clonally distinct clinical isolates in vitro. Protein data analysis showed that the sequence of OmpW, which has a molecule length of 183 amino acids, is more than 91% conserved in reported A. baumannii strains. In conclusion, we identified OmpW as a highly immunogenic and conserved protein as a valuable antigen candidate for the development of an effective vaccine or the preparation of antisera to control A. baumannii infections.

  4. CARD9 negatively regulates NLRP3-induced IL-1β production on Salmonella infection of macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Milton; Tourlomousis, Panagiotis; Wright, John; P Monie, Tom; Bryant, Clare E

    2016-09-27

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is a proinflammatory cytokine required for host control of bacterial infections, and its production must be tightly regulated to prevent excessive inflammation. Here we show that caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9), a protein associated with induction of proinflammatory cytokines by fungi, has a negative role on IL-1β production during bacterial infection. Specifically, in response to activation of the nucleotide oligomerization domain receptor pyrin-domain containing protein 3 (NLRP3) by Salmonella infection, CARD9 negatively regulates IL-1β by fine-tuning pro-IL-1β expression, spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK)-mediated NLRP3 activation and repressing inflammasome-associated caspase-8 activity. CARD9 is suppressed during Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection, facilitating increased IL-1β production. CARD9 is, therefore, a central signalling hub that coordinates a pathogen-specific host inflammatory response.

  5. CARD9 negatively regulates NLRP3-induced IL-1β production on Salmonella infection of macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Milton; Tourlomousis, Panagiotis; Wright, John; P. Monie, Tom; Bryant, Clare E.

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is a proinflammatory cytokine required for host control of bacterial infections, and its production must be tightly regulated to prevent excessive inflammation. Here we show that caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9), a protein associated with induction of proinflammatory cytokines by fungi, has a negative role on IL-1β production during bacterial infection. Specifically, in response to activation of the nucleotide oligomerization domain receptor pyrin-domain containing protein 3 (NLRP3) by Salmonella infection, CARD9 negatively regulates IL-1β by fine-tuning pro-IL-1β expression, spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK)-mediated NLRP3 activation and repressing inflammasome-associated caspase-8 activity. CARD9 is suppressed during Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection, facilitating increased IL-1β production. CARD9 is, therefore, a central signalling hub that coordinates a pathogen-specific host inflammatory response. PMID:27670879

  6. Activity-Based Proteomic Profiling of Deubiquitinating Enzymes in Salmonella-Infected Macrophages Leads to Identification of Putative Function of UCH-L5 in Inflammasome Regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangel Kummari

    Full Text Available Although protein ubiquitination has been shown to regulate multiple processes during host response to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection, specific functions of host deubiquitinating enzymes remain unknown in this bacterial infection. By using chemical proteomics approach, in which deubiquitinating enzymes were labeled by an active-site probe and analyzed by quantitative proteomics, we identified novel deubiquitinases in chicken macrophages based on their reactivity with the probe. Also, we detected down-regulation of UCH-L3, and USP4 as well as up-regulation of USP5 and UCH-L5 deubiquitinating enzymes in macrophages infected with Salmonella Typhimurium. We showed that decrease in either UCH-L5 activity, or in UCH-L5 protein amount in chicken and human macrophages infected or stimulated with LPS/nigericin, led to decreased IL-1β release. These data point towards a putative role of UCH-L5 in inflammasome regulation during Salmonella infection. Because inflammasome activation is important in innate resistance to these bacteria, one would expect that naturally occurring or therapeutically induced alteration in UCH-L5 activation would influence disease outcome and could represent a target for new therapeutic approaches.

  7. Activity-Based Proteomic Profiling of Deubiquitinating Enzymes in Salmonella-Infected Macrophages Leads to Identification of Putative Function of UCH-L5 in Inflammasome Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummari, Evangel; Alugubelly, Navatha; Hsu, Chuan-Yu; Dong, Brittany; Nanduri, Bindu; Edelmann, Mariola J

    2015-01-01

    Although protein ubiquitination has been shown to regulate multiple processes during host response to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection, specific functions of host deubiquitinating enzymes remain unknown in this bacterial infection. By using chemical proteomics approach, in which deubiquitinating enzymes were labeled by an active-site probe and analyzed by quantitative proteomics, we identified novel deubiquitinases in chicken macrophages based on their reactivity with the probe. Also, we detected down-regulation of UCH-L3, and USP4 as well as up-regulation of USP5 and UCH-L5 deubiquitinating enzymes in macrophages infected with Salmonella Typhimurium. We showed that decrease in either UCH-L5 activity, or in UCH-L5 protein amount in chicken and human macrophages infected or stimulated with LPS/nigericin, led to decreased IL-1β release. These data point towards a putative role of UCH-L5 in inflammasome regulation during Salmonella infection. Because inflammasome activation is important in innate resistance to these bacteria, one would expect that naturally occurring or therapeutically induced alteration in UCH-L5 activation would influence disease outcome and could represent a target for new therapeutic approaches.

  8. A Novel Strategy for TNF-Alpha Production by 2-APB Induced Downregulated SOCE and Upregulated HSP70 in O. tsutsugamushi-Infected Human Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ching-Ying; Hsu, Wen-Li; Wang, Chun-Hsiung; Liang, Jui-Lin; Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Yen, Chia-Jung; Li, Hsiu-Wen; Chiu, Siou-Jin; Chang, Chung-Hsing; Huang, Yaw-Bin; Lin, Ming-Wei; Yoshioka, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    Orientia (O.) tsutsugamushi-induced scrub typhus is endemic across many regions of Asia and the Western Pacific, where an estimated 1 million cases occur each year; the majority of patients infected with O. tsutsugamushi end up with a cytokine storm from a severe inflammatory response. Previous reports have indicated that blocking tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α reduced cell injury from a cytokine storm. Since TNF-α production is known to be associated with intracellular Ca2+ elevation, we examined the effect of store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) inhibitors on TNF-α production in O. tsutsugamushi-infected macrophages. We found that 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), but not SKF96365, facilitates the suppression of Ca2+ mobilization via the interruption of Orai1 expression in O. tsutsugamushi-infected macrophages. Due to the decrease of Ca2+ elevation, the expression of TNF-α and its release from macrophages was repressed by 2-APB. In addition, a novel role of 2-APB was found in macrophages that causes the upregulation of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) expression associated with ERK activation; upregulated TNF-α production in the case of knockdown HSP70 was inhibited with 2-APB treatment. Furthermore, elevated HSP70 formation unexpectedly did not help the cell survival of O. tsutsugamushi-infected macrophages. In conclusion, the parallelism between downregulated Ca2+ mobilization via SOCE and upregulated HSP70 after treatment with 2-APB against TNF-α production was found to efficiently attenuate an O. tsutsugamushi-induced severe inflammatory response.

  9. PERIODONTAL INFECTION AS A POTENTIAL RISK FACTOR FOR SYSTEMIC DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumintarti Sumintarti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Oral infection can have an adverse effect on other organs of the body. Oral infections, especially periodontitis, may affect the course and pathogenesis of a number of systemic diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, pre-term low birth weight infant and respiratory disease. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the current status of oral infection especially periodontitis as a potential risk factor of systemic diseases. Three main pathways linking oral infection to secondary systemic effects have been proposed: metastatic infection, metastatic injury and metastatic inflammation. Periodontitis can cause bacteria to enter the blood stream and activate immune cells. These activated cells produce inflammatory cytokines that have a destructive effect throughout the entire body. Therefore, periodontitis as a major oral infection may affect the host’s susceptibility to systemic disease.

  10. Cholesterol Corrects Altered Conformation of MHC-II Protein in Leishmania donovani Infected Macrophages: Implication in Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koushik Roy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Previously we reported that Kala-azar patients show progressive decrease in serum cholesterol as a function of splenic parasite burden. Splenic macrophages (MΦ of Leishmania donovani (LD infected mice show decrease in membrane cholesterol, while LD infected macrophages (I-MΦ show defective T cell stimulating ability that could be corrected by liposomal delivery of cholesterol. T helper cells recognize peptide antigen in the context of class II MHC molecule. It is known that the conformation of a large number of membrane proteins is dependent on membrane cholesterol. In this investigation we tried to understand the influence of decreased membrane cholesterol in I-MΦ on the conformation of MHC-II protein and peptide-MHC-II stability, and its bearing on the antigen specific T-cell activation.MΦ of CBA/j mice were infected with Leishmania donovani (I-MΦ. Two different anti-Aκ mAbs were used to monitor the status of MHC-II protein under parasitized condition. One of them (11.5-2 was conformation specific, whereas the other one (10.2.16 was not. Under parasitized condition, the binding of 11.5-2 decreased significantly with respect to the normal counterpart, whereas that of 10.2.16 remained unaltered. The binding of 11.5-2 was restored to normal upon liposomal delivery of cholesterol in I-MΦ. By molecular dynamics (MD simulation studies we found that there was considerable conformational fluctuation in the transmembrane domain of the MHC-II protein in the presence of membrane cholesterol than in its absence, which possibly influenced the distal peptide binding groove. This was evident from the faster dissociation of the cognate peptide from peptide-MHC complex under parasitized condition, which could be corrected by liposomal delivery of cholesterol in I-MΦ.The decrease in membrane cholesterol in I-MΦ may lead to altered conformation of MHC II, and this may contribute to a faster dissociation of the peptide. Furthermore, liposomal delivery of

  11. A FRET-based DNA biosensor tracks OmpR-dependent acidification of Salmonella during macrophage infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Smarajit; Mizusaki, Hideaki; Kenney, Linda J

    2015-04-01

    In bacteria, one paradigm for signal transduction is the two-component regulatory system, consisting of a sensor kinase (usually a membrane protein) and a response regulator (usually a DNA binding protein). The EnvZ/OmpR two-component system responds to osmotic stress and regulates expression of outer membrane proteins. In Salmonella, EnvZ/OmpR also controls expression of another two-component system SsrA/B, which is located on Salmonella Pathogenicity Island (SPI) 2. SPI-2 encodes a type III secretion system, which functions as a nanomachine to inject bacterial effector proteins into eukaryotic cells. During the intracellular phase of infection, Salmonella switches from assembling type III secretion system structural components to secreting effectors into the macrophage cytoplasm, enabling Salmonella to replicate in the phagocytic vacuole. Major questions remain regarding how bacteria survive the acidified vacuole and how acidification affects bacterial secretion. We previously reported that EnvZ sensed cytoplasmic signals rather than extracellular ones, as intracellular osmolytes altered the dynamics of a 17-amino-acid region flanking the phosphorylated histidine. We reasoned that the Salmonella cytoplasm might acidify in the macrophage vacuole to activate OmpR-dependent transcription of SPI-2 genes. To address these questions, we employed a DNA-based FRET biosensor ("I-switch") to measure bacterial cytoplasmic pH and immunofluorescence to monitor effector secretion during infection. Surprisingly, we observed a rapid drop in bacterial cytoplasmic pH upon phagocytosis that was not predicted by current models. Cytoplasmic acidification was completely dependent on the OmpR response regulator, but did not require known OmpR-regulated genes such as ompC, ompF, or ssaC (SPI-2). Microarray analysis highlighted the cadC/BA operon, and additional experiments confirmed that it was repressed by OmpR. Acidification was blocked in the ompR null background in a Cad

  12. Medicago truncatula natural resistance-associated macrophage Protein1 is required for iron uptake by rhizobia-infected nodule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada-Jiménez, Manuel; Castro-Rodríguez, Rosario; Kryvoruchko, Igor; Lucas, M Mercedes; Udvardi, Michael; Imperial, Juan; González-Guerrero, Manuel

    2015-05-01

    Iron is critical for symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) as a key component of multiple ferroproteins involved in this biological process. In the model legume Medicago truncatula, iron is delivered by the vasculature to the infection/maturation zone (zone II) of the nodule, where it is released to the apoplast. From there, plasma membrane iron transporters move it into rhizobia-containing cells, where iron is used as the cofactor of multiple plant and rhizobial proteins (e.g. plant leghemoglobin and bacterial nitrogenase). MtNramp1 (Medtr3g088460) is the M. truncatula Natural Resistance-Associated Macrophage Protein family member, with the highest expression levels in roots and nodules. Immunolocalization studies indicate that MtNramp1 is mainly targeted to the plasma membrane. A loss-of-function nramp1 mutant exhibited reduced growth compared with the wild type under symbiotic conditions, but not when fertilized with mineral nitrogen. Nitrogenase activity was low in the mutant, whereas exogenous iron and expression of wild-type MtNramp1 in mutant nodules increased nitrogen fixation to normal levels. These data are consistent with a model in which MtNramp1 is the main transporter responsible for apoplastic iron uptake by rhizobia-infected cells in zone II.

  13. Caspase-1 but Not Caspase-11 Is Required for NLRC4-Mediated Pyroptosis and Restriction of Infection by Flagellated Legionella Species in Mouse Macrophages and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, Daiane M; Pereira, Marcelo S F; Silva, Alexandre L N; Cunha, Larissa D; Zamboni, Dario S

    2015-09-01

    Gram-negative bacteria from the Legionella genus are intracellular pathogens that cause a severe form of pneumonia called Legionnaires' disease. The bacteria replicate intracellularly in macrophages, and the restriction of bacterial replication by these cells is critical for host resistance. The activation of the NAIP5/NLRC4 inflammasome, which is readily triggered in response to bacterial flagellin, is essential for the restriction of bacterial replication in murine macrophages. Once activated, this inflammasome induces pore formation and pyroptosis and facilitates the restriction of bacterial replication in macrophages. Because investigations related to the NLRC4-mediated restriction of Legionella replication were performed using mice double deficient for caspase-1 and caspase-11, we assessed the participation of caspase-1 and caspase-11 in the functions of the NLRC4 inflammasome and the restriction of Legionella replication in macrophages and in vivo. By using several species of Legionella and mice singly deficient for caspase-1 or caspase-11, we demonstrated that caspase-1 but not caspase-11 was required for pore formation, pyroptosis, and restriction of Legionella replication in macrophages and in vivo. By generating F1 mice in a mixed 129 × C57BL/6 background deficient (129 × Casp-11(-/-) ) or sufficient (129 × C57BL/6) for caspase-11 expression, we found that caspase-11 was dispensable for the restriction of Legionella pneumophila replication in macrophages and in vivo. Thus, although caspase-11 participates in flagellin-independent noncanonical activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, it is dispensable for the activities of the NLRC4 inflammasome. In contrast, functional caspase-1 is necessary and sufficient to trigger flagellin/NLRC4-mediated restriction of Legionella spp. infection in macrophages and in vivo.

  14. Anti-inflammatory effects of silver-polyvinyl pyrrolidone (Ag-PVP nanoparticles in mouse macrophages infected with live Chlamydia trachomatis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilma AN

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Abebayehu N Yilma, Shree R Singh, Saurabh Dixit, Vida A DennisCenter for Nanobiotechnology and Life Sciences Research, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL, USAAbstract: Chlamydia trachomatis is a very common sexually transmissible infection in both developing and developed countries. A hallmark of C. trachomatis infection is the induction of severe inflammatory responses which play critical roles in its pathogenesis. Antibiotics are the only treatment option currently available for controlling C. trachomatis infection; however, they are efficacious only when administered early after an infection. The objectives of this study are to explore alternative strategies in the control and regulation of inflammatory responses triggered by a C. trachomatis infection. We employed silver-polyvinyl pyrrolidone (Ag-PVP nanoparticles, which have been shown to possess anti-inflammatory properties, as our target and the in vitro mouse J774 macrophage model of C. trachomatis infection. Our hypothesis is that small sizes of Ag-PVP nanoparticles will control inflammatory mediators triggered by a C. trachomatis infection. Cytotoxicity studies using Ag-PVP nanoparticles of 10, 20, and 80 nm sizes revealed >80% macrophage viability up to a concentration of 6.25 µg/mL, with the 10 nm size being the least toxic. All sizes of Ag-PVP nanoparticles, especially the 10 nm size, reduced the levels of the prototypic cytokines, tumor necrosis factor (TNF and interleukin (IL-6, as elicited from C. trachomatis infected macrophages. Additionally, Ag-PVP nanoparticles (10 nm selectively inhibited a broad spectrum of other cytokines and chemokines produced by infected macrophages. Of significance, Ag-PVP nanoparticles (10 nm caused perturbations in a variety of upstream (toll like receptor 2 [TLR2], nucleotide-binding oligomerization-protein 2 [NOD2], cluster of differentiation [CD]40, CD80, and CD86 and downstream (IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 3 [IRAK3] and matrix

  15. Anti-inflammatory effects of silver-polyvinyl pyrrolidone (Ag-PVP) nanoparticles in mouse macrophages infected with live Chlamydia trachomatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilma, Abebayehu N; Singh, Shree R; Dixit, Saurabh; Dennis, Vida A

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a very common sexually transmissible infection in both developing and developed countries. A hallmark of C. trachomatis infection is the induction of severe inflammatory responses which play critical roles in its pathogenesis. Antibiotics are the only treatment option currently available for controlling C. trachomatis infection; however, they are efficacious only when administered early after an infection. The objectives of this study are to explore alternative strategies in the control and regulation of inflammatory responses triggered by a C. trachomatis infection. We employed silver-polyvinyl pyrrolidone (Ag-PVP) nanoparticles, which have been shown to possess anti-inflammatory properties, as our target and the in vitro mouse J774 macrophage model of C. trachomatis infection. Our hypothesis is that small sizes of Ag-PVP nanoparticles will control inflammatory mediators triggered by a C. trachomatis infection. Cytotoxicity studies using Ag-PVP nanoparticles of 10, 20, and 80 nm sizes revealed >80% macrophage viability up to a concentration of 6.25 μg/mL, with the 10 nm size being the least toxic. All sizes of Ag-PVP nanoparticles, especially the 10 nm size, reduced the levels of the prototypic cytokines, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin (IL)-6, as elicited from C. trachomatis infected macrophages. Additionally, Ag-PVP nanoparticles (10 nm) selectively inhibited a broad spectrum of other cytokines and chemokines produced by infected macrophages. Of significance, Ag-PVP nanoparticles (10 nm) caused perturbations in a variety of upstream (toll like receptor 2 [TLR2], nucleotide-binding oligomerization-protein 2 [NOD2], cluster of differentiation [CD]40, CD80, and CD86) and downstream (IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 3 [IRAK3] and matrix metallopeptidase 9 [MMP9]) inflammatory signaling pathways by downregulating their messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) gene transcript expressions as induced by C. trachomatis in macrophages

  16. Production of IFN-β during Listeria monocytogenes infection is restricted to monocyte/macrophage lineage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenia Solodova

    Full Text Available The family of type I interferons (IFN, which consists of several IFN-α and one IFN-β, are produced not only after stimulation by viruses, but also after infection with non-viral pathogens. In the course of bacterial infections, these cytokines could be beneficial or detrimental. IFN-β is the primary member of type I IFN that initiates a cascade of IFN-α production. Here we addressed the question which cells are responsible for IFN-β expression after infection with the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes by using a genetic approach. By means of newly established reporter mice, maximum of IFN-β expression was observed at 24 hours post infection in spleen and, surprisingly, 48 hours post infection in colonized cervical and inguinal lymph nodes. Colonization of lymph nodes was independent of the type I IFN signaling, as well as bacterial dose and strain. Using cell specific reporter function and conditional deletions we could define cells expressing LysM as the major IFN-β producers, with cells formerly defined as Tip-DCs being the highest. Neutrophilic granulocytes, dendritic cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells did not significantly contribute to type I IFN production.

  17. The late endosomal adaptor p14 is a macrophage host-defense factor against Salmonella infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Nicole; Nairz, Manfred; Hilber, Diana; Hess, Michael W; Weiss, Günter; Huber, Lukas A

    2012-06-01

    The outcome of an infection depends on the balance between host resistance and bacterial virulence. Here, we show that the late endosomal adaptor p14 (also known as LAMTOR2) is one of the components for cellular host defense against the intracellular pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. During Salmonella infection, the complex of p14 and MP1 is required for the accurately timed transport of Salmonella through the endolysosomal system. Loss of p14 opens a time window that allows Salmonella to populate a replication niche, in which early and late antimicrobial effector systems, comprising NADPH phagocytic oxidase and inducible nitric oxide synthase, respectively, are inappropriately activated. Thus, p14 supports the accurate transport of Salmonella through the endolysosomal system, thereby limiting bacterial replication in both, professional phagocytes and in non-phagocytic cells in vitro, and helps mice to successfully battle Salmonella infection in vivo.

  18. Regulation of Apoptosis in African Swine Fever Virus–Infected Macrophages

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    Laslo Zsak

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of viruses have evolved antiapoptotic mechanisms to promote infected-cell survival, either to ensure efficient productive viral replication or to promote long-term survival of virus-infected cells. Recent studies identified critical African swine fever virus genes involved in the complex regulation of ASFV-host interactions. Here we review the present knowledge of the recently identified ASFV genes with special attention to those which affect viral virulence, host range, and pathogenesis by regulating viral-induced apoptotic mechanisms.

  19. Proliferating Cellular Nuclear Antigen Expression as a Marker of Perivascular Macrophages in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kenneth; Schwartz, Annette; Corey, Sarah; Orandle, Marlene; Kennedy, William; Thompson, Brendon; Alvarez, Xavier; Brown, Charlie; Gartner, Suzanne; Lackner, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Brain perivascular macrophages are a major target of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in rhesus macaques and HIV infection in humans. Perivascular macrophages are distinct from parenchymal microglia in their location, morphology, expression of myeloid markers, and turnover in the CNS. In contrast to parenchymal microglia, perivascular macrophages are continuously repopulated by blood monocytes, which undergo maturation to macrophages on entering the central nervous system (CNS). We studied differences in monocyte/macrophages in vivo that might account for preferential infection of perivascular macrophages by SIV. In situ hybridization for SIV and proliferating cellular nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemistry demonstrated that SIV-infected and PCNA-positive cells were predominantly found in perivascular cuffs of viremic animals and in histopathological lesions that characterize SIV encephalitis (SIVE) in animals with AIDS. Multilabel techniques including double-label immunohistochemistry and combined in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy revealed numerous infected perivascular macrophages that were PCNA-positive. Outside the CNS, SIV-infected, PCNA-expressing macrophage subpopulations were found in the small intestine and lung of animals with AIDS. While PCNA is used as a marker of cell proliferation it is also strongly expressed in non-dividing cells undergoing DNA synthesis and repair. Therefore, more specific markers for cell proliferation including Ki-67, topoisomerase IIα, and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation were used which indicated that PCNA-positive cells within SIVE lesions were not proliferating. These observations are consistent with perivascular macrophages as terminally differentiated, non-dividing cells and underscores biological differences that could potentially define mechanisms of preferential, productive infection of perivascular macrophages in the rhesus macaque model of neuroAIDS. These studies

  20. In vitro killing assays of antisera antibody sheep post-infected with Fasciola gigantica with the presence of macrophages cells against homologous and heterologous liver flukes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.E Estuningsih

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available The previous artificial infection known that the Indonesian Thin Tail (ITT sheep was resistance against the liver fluke of Fasciola gigantica, the resistances occurred in the early infection. In order to observe the immune resistance, some in vitro studies were undertaken in the laboratory, to assay the ability of the antisera antibody of ITT sheep post-infected with F. gigantica, with the presence of macrophages cells in killing the homologous and heterologous liver flukes. The viability of liver flukes were observed within 24-72 hours of incubation period by observing their motility (motile flukes were designated live and non-motile once were death. The results showed that after 72 hours incubation, the motilities of the Newly Excysted Juvenile (NEJ of F. gigantica incubated with the presence of post-infected sera and macrophages cells solution were significantly lower (P0.05. It seems that the occurrence of homologous antibody to the antigens is very important in the development of killing mechanism. The absence of homologous antibody did not reduce the number of flukes or the ability of macrophages cells in killing F. hepatica was not apparent.

  1. The Effect of Aqueous Garlic Extract on Interleukin-12 and 10 Levels in Leishmania Major (MRHO/IR/75/ER Infected Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Roozbehani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the present study was to investigate the immunomodulation effects of aqueous garlic extract (AGE in the cultured macrophages infected by Leishmania major.Methods: After J774 macrophages proliferation in RPMI1640 and incubation with Leishmania for 72 hours, AGE was added in doses of 9.25, 18.5, 37, 74 and 148 mg/ml for 18, 24 and 48 hours and cell culture supernatants were harvested. The Leishmania infected J774 cells to assess the cell viability was examined using trypan blue and methylthiazol tetrazolium assay (MTT. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was performed on cell culture supernatants for measurement of interleukin IL-10 and IL-12.Results: Dose of 37 mg/ml for 48 hours of garlic extract was the most potent dose for activation of amastigotes infected macrophages. In addition, AGE increased the level of IL-12 in Leishmania infected cell lines significantly.Conclusions: AGE treated cell is effective against parasitic pathogens, and AGE induced IL-12 differentially affected the immune response to invading Leishmania parasites.

  2. The absence of MyD88 has no effect on the induction of alternatively activated macrophage during Fasciola hepatica infection

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    Luo HongLin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternatively activated macrophages (AAMϕ play important roles in allergies and responses to parasitic infections. However, whether signaling through toll-like receptors (TLRs plays any role in AAMϕ induction when young Fasciola hepatica penetrates the liver capsule and migrates through the liver tissue is still unclear. Results The data show that the lack of myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88 has no effect on the AAMϕ derived from the bone marrow (BMMϕ in vitro and does not impair the mRNA expression of arginase-1, resistin-like molecule (RELMα, and Ym1 in BMMϕs. The Th2 cytokine production bias in splenocytes was not significantly altered in F. hepatica-infected mice in the absence of MyD88 in vitro and in the pleural cavity lavage in vivo. In addition, MyD88-deficiency has no effect on the arginase production of the F. hepatica elicited macrophages (Fe Mϕs, production of RELMα and Ym1 proteins and mRNA expression of Ym1 and RELMα of macrophages in the peritoneal cavity 6 weeks post F. hepatica infection. Conclusions The absence of MyD88 has no effect on presence of AAMϕ 6 weeks post F. hepatica infection.

  3. Cross-Regulation of Proinflammatory Cytokines by Interleukin-10 and miR-155 in Orientia tsutsugamushi-Infected Human Macrophages Prevents Cytokine Storm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Chang, Chung-Hsing; Tsai, Rong-Kung; Hong, Yi-Ren; Chuang, Tsung-Hsien; Fan, Kan-Tang; Peng, Chi-Wen; Wu, Ching-Ying; Hsu, Wen-Li; Wang, Lih-Shinn; Chen, Li-Kuang; Yu, Hsin-Su

    2016-07-01

    Scrub typhus is caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium Orientia tsutsugamushi. Macrophages are host cells for its replication and clearance. Severe complications in patients are mainly caused by a cytokine storm resulting from overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines; nevertheless, the molecular mechanism for the occurrence remains obscure. Herein, we investigate the interactive regulation of cytokines and micro-RNA (miR) in human macrophages infected with low and high doses of O. tsutsugamushi. During low dose infection, macrophages produce high levels of IL-10 through extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation, which inhibits proinflammatory cytokine production and facilitates pathogen replication. Increasing levels of pathogen results in reduced levels of IL-10, and macrophages begin to generate high levels of proinflammatory cytokines through NF-κB activation. However, during a high dose infection, macrophages produce high levels of miR-155 to slow the proinflammatory response. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/IL-10 axis suppresses the NF-κB/tumor necrosis factor alpha axis via activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. Both IL-10 and miR-155 inhibit the NF-κB signaling pathway. Furthermore, IL-10 is a potent inhibitor of miR-155. Patients susceptible to a cytokine storm, peripheral blood mononuclear cells showed significantly lower IL-10 and miR-155 responses to O. tsutsugamushi challenge. Thus, IL-10 and miR-155 operate inhibitory mechanisms to achieve a proper defense mechanism and prevent a cytokine storm.

  4. Cystatin B and HIV regulate the STAT-1 signaling circuit in HIV-infected and INF-β-treated human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, L E; Kraiselburd, E; Meléndez, L M

    2016-10-01

    Cystatin B is a cysteine protease inhibitor that induces HIV replication in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). This protein interacts with signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT-1) factor and inhibits the interferon (IFN-β) response in Vero cells by preventing STAT-1 translocation to the nucleus. Cystatin B also decreases the levels of tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT-1 (STAT-1PY). However, the mechanisms of cystatin B regulation on STAT-1 phosphorylation in MDM are unknown. We hypothesized that cystatin B inhibits IFN-β antiviral responses and induces HIV replication in macrophage reservoirs through the inhibition of STAT-1 phosphorylation. Macrophages were transfected with cystatin B siRNA prior to interferon-β treatment or infected with HIV-ADA to determine the effect of cystatin B modulation in STAT-1 localization and activation using immunofluorescence and proximity ligation assays. Cystatin B decreased STAT-1PY and its transportation to the nucleus, while HIV infection retained unphosphorylated STAT (USTAT-1) in the nucleus avoiding its exit to the cytoplasm for eventual phosphorylation. In IFN-β-treated MDM, cystatin B inhibited the nuclear translocation of both, USTAT-1 and STAT-1PY. These results demonstrate that cystatin B interferes with the STAT-1 signaling and IFN-β-antiviral responses perpetuating HIV in macrophage reservoirs.

  5. Global Dynamics of HIV Infection of CD4+T Cells and Macrophages

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elaiw, A. M; Alsheri, A. S

    2013-01-01

    .... Using Lyapunov functionals and LaSalle's invariant principle, we have proven that if the basic reproduction number R0 is less than or equal to unity, then the uninfected steady state is globally asymptotically stable (GAS), and if the infected steady state exists, then it is GAS.

  6. Acute stress reduces wound-induced activation of microbicidal potential of ex vivo isolated human monocyte-derived macrophages.

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    Ulrike Kuebler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Psychological stress delays wound healing but the precise underlying mechanisms are unclear. Macrophages play an important role in wound healing, in particular by killing microbes. We hypothesized that (a acute psychological stress reduces wound-induced activation of microbicidal potential of human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM, and (b that these reductions are modulated by stress hormone release. METHODS: Fourty-one healthy men (mean age 35 ± 13 years were randomly assigned to either a stress or stress-control group. While the stress group underwent a standardized short-term psychological stress task after catheter-induced wound infliction, stress-controls did not. Catheter insertion was controlled. Assessing the microbicidal potential, we investigated PMA-activated superoxide anion production by HMDM immediately before and 1, 10 and 60 min after stress/rest. Moreover, plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine and salivary cortisol were repeatedly measured. In subsequent in vitro studies, whole blood was incubated with norepinephrine in the presence or absence of phentolamine (norepinephrine blocker before assessing HMDM microbicidal potential. RESULTS: Compared with stress-controls, HMDM of the stressed subjects displayed decreased superoxide anion-responses after stress (p's <.05. Higher plasma norepinephrine levels statistically mediated lower amounts of superoxide anion-responses (indirect effect 95% CI: 4.14-44.72. Norepinephrine-treated HMDM showed reduced superoxide anion-production (p<.001. This effect was blocked by prior incubation with phentolamine. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that acute psychological stress reduces wound-induced activation of microbicidal potential of HMDM and that this reduction is mediated by norepinephrine. This might have implications for stress-induced impairment in wound healing.

  7. In-Depth Global Analysis of Transcript Abundance Levels in Porcine Alveolar Macrophages Following Infection with Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

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    Laura C. Miller

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV is a major pathogen of swine worldwide and causes considerable economic loss. Identifying specific cell signaling or activation pathways that associate with variation in PRRSV replication and macrophage function may lead to identification of novel gene targets for the control of PRRSV infection. Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE was used to create and survey the transcriptome of in vitro mock-infected and PRRSV strain VR-2332-infected porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM at 0, 6, 12, 16, and 24 hours after infection. The transcriptome data indicated changes in transcript abundance occurring in PRRSV-infected PAMs over time after infection with more than 590 unique tags with significantly altered transcript abundance levels identified (P<.01. Strikingly, innate immune genes (whose transcript abundances are typically altered in response to other pathogens or insults including IL-8, CCL4, and IL-1β showed no or very little change at any time point following infection.

  8. Infiltrating Macrophages Are Key to the Development of Seizures following Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Cusick, Matthew F.; Libbey, Jane E.; Patel, Dipan C.; Doty, Daniel J.; FUJINAMI, ROBERT S.

    2013-01-01

    Viral infections of the central nervous system (CNS) can trigger an antiviral immune response, which initiates an inflammatory cascade to control viral replication and dissemination. The extent of the proinflammatory response in the CNS and the timing of the release of proinflammatory cytokines can lead to neuronal excitability. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), two proinflammatory cytokines, have been linked to the development of acute seizures in Theiler's murine...

  9. Dependence of macrophage superoxide release on the pulse amplitude of an applied pressure regime: a potential factor at the soft tissue-implant interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hainsworth Y; Frechette, Danielle M; Rohner, Nathan; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Puleo, David A; Bjursten, Lars M

    2016-03-01

    Failure of soft tissue implants has been largely attributed to the influence of biomaterial surface properties on the foreign body response, but some implant complications, e.g. macrophage accumulation and necrosis, are still not effectively addressed with surface treatments to minimize deleterious biomaterial effects. We explored an alternative explanation for implant failure, linking biocompatibility with implant micromotion-induced pressure fluctuations at the tissue-biomaterial interface. For this purpose, we used a custom in vitro system to characterize the effects of pressure fluctuations on the activity of macrophages, the predominant cells at a healing implant site. Initially, we quantified superoxide production by HL60-derived macrophage-like cells under several different pressure regimes with means of 5-40 mmHg, amplitudes of 0-15 mmHg and frequencies of 0-1.5 Hz. All pressure regimes tested elicited significantly (p superoxide production by macrophage-like cells relative to parallel controls. Notably, pressure-sensitive reductions in superoxide release correlated (r(2)  = 0.74; p superoxide production and cell viability, we also explored the influence of cyclic pressure on macrophage numbers and death. Compared to controls, adherent macrophage-like cells exposed to 7.5/2.5 mmHg cyclic pressures for 6 h exhibited significantly (p superoxide dismutase. Collectively, our results suggest that pressure pulses are a putative regulator of macrophage adhesion via a superoxide-related effect. Pressure fluctuations, e.g. due to implant micromotion, may, therefore, potentially modulate macrophage-dependent wound healing.

  10. HIV-1 assembly in macrophages

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    Benaroch Philippe

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The molecular mechanisms involved in the assembly of newly synthesized Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV particles are poorly understood. Most of the work on HIV-1 assembly has been performed in T cells in which viral particle budding and assembly take place at the plasma membrane. In contrast, few studies have been performed on macrophages, the other major target of HIV-1. Infected macrophages represent a viral reservoir and probably play a key role in HIV-1 physiopathology. Indeed macrophages retain infectious particles for long periods of time, keeping them protected from anti-viral immune response or drug treatments. Here, we present an overview of what is known about HIV-1 assembly in macrophages as compared to T lymphocytes or cell lines. Early electron microscopy studies suggested that viral assembly takes place at the limiting membrane of an intracellular compartment in macrophages and not at the plasma membrane as in T cells. This was first considered as a late endosomal compartment in which viral budding seems to be similar to the process of vesicle release into multi-vesicular bodies. This view was notably supported by a large body of evidence involving the ESCRT (Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport machinery in HIV-1 budding, the observation of viral budding profiles in such compartments by immuno-electron microscopy, and the presence of late endosomal markers associated with macrophage-derived virions. However, this model needs to be revisited as recent data indicate that the viral compartment has a neutral pH and can be connected to the plasma membrane via very thin micro-channels. To date, the exact nature and biogenesis of the HIV assembly compartment in macrophages remains elusive. Many cellular proteins potentially involved in the late phases of HIV-1 cycle have been identified; and, recently, the list has grown rapidly with the publication of four independent genome-wide screens. However, their respective

  11. A fibroblast/macrophage co-culture model to evaluate the biocompatibility of an electrospun Dextran/PLGA scaffold and its potential to induce inflammatory responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan Hui; Kantharia, Sarah [Department of Biomedical Engineering, State University of New York-Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-2580 (United States); Jiang Hongliang [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Chen Weiliam, E-mail: weiliam.chen@nyumc.org [Division of Wound Healing and Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    Fibroblasts and macrophages are the two major types of cells responding to implanted biomaterials. They play crucial roles in inflammatory responses, host-material interactions and tissue remodeling. However, the synergistic interactions of these two cell types with biomaterials are not fully understood. In this investigation, an in vitro fibroblast/macrophage co-culture system was utilized to examine the biocompatibility and the potential to induce inflammatory responses of an electrospun Dextran/PLGA scaffold. The scaffold did not affect the morphologies, attachments, proliferations and viabilities of both the fibroblasts and macrophages, cultured separately or together. Moreover, it only activated a small subset of the macrophages implicating a low potential to induce either severe acute or chronic inflammatory response. Additionally, fibroblasts played a role in prolonging macrophage activation in the presence of the scaffolds. Using antibody arrays, IL-10, SDF-1, MIP-1 gamma and RANTES were found to be up-regulated when the cells were incubated with the scaffolds. The results of subdermal implantation of the Dextran/PLGA scaffolds confirmed its biocompatibility and low inflammatory potential.

  12. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor-A potential diagnostic tool in severe burn injuries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieb, Gerrit; Simons, David; Piatkowski, Andrzej; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Steffens, Guy; Pallua, Norbert

    2010-05-01

    Serum macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and procalcitonin (PCT) concentrations as well as leucocyte numbers were evaluated in a retrospective study with 23 patients with severe burn injuries. The MIF and PCT concentrations as well as the number of leucocytes (LEU) were monitored over a period of 5 days. The total body surface area (TBSA) and sepsis-related organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores were also evaluated. The MIF, PCT concentrations and leucocyte counts were profoundly increased in all patients with severe burn wounds. At the time of admission into the intensive care unit, no significant differences were observed for the MIF and PCT levels between patients with a TBSApatients with a TBSA>60% (Group 2). After 48 h, however, the MIF and PCT levels reached very high levels in a subgroup of the patients, whereas these levels became normal again in other subgroups. The group of patients with a TBSA>60% was, therefore, subdivided in three groups (subgroups 2a-c). The MIF and PCT data pairs in these subgroups appeared to correlate in an inhomogeneous manner. These levels in the subgroup 2a (i.e., lethal within 5 days) were strongly elevated over those observed in Group 1 (TBSAburn inflammation and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) or sepsis with lethal outcome.

  13. Overview of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF as a Potential Biomarker Relevant to Adiposity

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    Jun Nishihira

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The cytokine “macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF” is generally recognized as a proinflammatory cytokine, and MIF is involved in broad range of acute and chronic inflammatory states. With regard to glucose metabolism and insulin secretion, MIF is produced by pancreatic β cells and acts as a positive regulator of insulin secretion. In contrast, it is evident that MIF expressed in adipose tissues causes insulin resistance. Concerning MIF gene analysis, we found four alleles: 5-, 6-, 7-and 8-CATT at position −794 of MIF gene in a Japanese population. Genotypes without the 5-CATT allele were more common in the obese subjects than in the lean or overweight groups. It is conceivable that promoter polymorphism in the MIF gene is profoundly linked with obesity relevant to lifestyle diseases, such as diabetes. Obesity has become a serious social issue due to the inappropriate nutritional balance, and the consumption of functional foods (including functional foods to reduce fat mass is expected to overcome this issue. In this context, MIF would be a reliable quantitative biomarker to evaluate the effects of functional foods on adiposity.

  14. IFN-γ-induced macrophage antileishmanial mechanisms in mice: A role for immunity-related GTPases, Irgm1 and Irgm3, in Leishmania donovani infection in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Henry W; Mitchell-Flack, Marisa; Taylor, Gregory A; Ma, Xiaojing

    2015-10-01

    In C57BL/6 mice, Leishmania donovani infection in the liver provoked IFN-γ-induced expression of the immunity-related GTPases (IRG), Irgm1 and Irgm3. To gauge the antileishmanial effects of these macrophage factors in the liver, intracellular infection was analyzed in IRG-deficient mice. In early- (but not late-) stage infection, Irgm3(-/-) mice failed to properly control parasite replication, generated little tissue inflammation and were hyporesponsive to pentavalent antimony (Sb) chemotherapy. Observations limited to early-stage infection in Irgm1(-/-) mice demonstrated increased susceptibility and virtually no inflammatory cell recruitment to heavily-parasitized parenchymal foci but an intact response to chemotherapy. In L. donovani infection in the liver, the absence of either Irgm1 or Irgm3 impairs early inflammation and initial resistance; the absence of Irgm3, but not Irgm1, also appears to impair the intracellular efficacy of Sb chemotherapy.

  15. Leishmania (L. mexicana infected bats in Mexico: novel potential reservoirs.

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    Miriam Berzunza-Cruz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania (Leishmania mexicana causes cutaneous leishmaniasis, an endemic zoonosis affecting a growing number of patients in the southeastern states of Mexico. Some foci are found in shade-grown cocoa and coffee plantations, or near perennial forests that provide rich breeding grounds for the sand fly vectors, but also harbor a variety of bat species that live off the abundant fruits provided by these shade-giving trees. The close proximity between sand flies and bats makes their interaction feasible, yet bats infected with Leishmania (L. mexicana have not been reported. Here we analyzed 420 bats from six states of Mexico that had reported patients with leishmaniasis. Tissues of bats, including skin, heart, liver and/or spleen were screened by PCR for Leishmania (L. mexicana DNA. We found that 41 bats (9.77%, belonging to 13 species, showed positive PCR results in various tissues. The infected tissues showed no evidence of macroscopic lesions. Of the infected bats, 12 species were frugivorous, insectivorous or nectarivorous, and only one species was sanguivorous (Desmodus rotundus, and most of them belonged to the family Phyllostomidae. The eco-region where most of the infected bats were caught is the Gulf Coastal Plain of Chiapas and Tabasco. Through experimental infections of two Tadarida brasiliensis bats in captivity, we show that this species can harbor viable, infective Leishmania (L. mexicana parasites that are capable of infecting BALB/c mice. We conclude that various species of bats belonging to the family Phyllostomidae are possible reservoir hosts for Leishmania (L. mexicana, if it can be shown that such bats are infective for the sand fly vector. Further studies are needed to determine how these bats become infected, how long the parasite remains viable inside these potential hosts and whether they are infective to sand flies to fully evaluate their impact on disease epidemiology.

  16. Leishmania (L.) mexicana Infected Bats in Mexico: Novel Potential Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzunza-Cruz, Miriam; Rodríguez-Moreno, Ángel; Gutiérrez-Granados, Gabriel; González-Salazar, Constantino; Stephens, Christopher R.; Hidalgo-Mihart, Mircea; Marina, Carlos F.; Rebollar-Téllez, Eduardo A.; Bailón-Martínez, Dulce; Balcells, Cristina Domingo; Ibarra-Cerdeña, Carlos N.; Sánchez-Cordero, Víctor; Becker, Ingeborg

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana causes cutaneous leishmaniasis, an endemic zoonosis affecting a growing number of patients in the southeastern states of Mexico. Some foci are found in shade-grown cocoa and coffee plantations, or near perennial forests that provide rich breeding grounds for the sand fly vectors, but also harbor a variety of bat species that live off the abundant fruits provided by these shade-giving trees. The close proximity between sand flies and bats makes their interaction feasible, yet bats infected with Leishmania (L.) mexicana have not been reported. Here we analyzed 420 bats from six states of Mexico that had reported patients with leishmaniasis. Tissues of bats, including skin, heart, liver and/or spleen were screened by PCR for Leishmania (L.) mexicana DNA. We found that 41 bats (9.77%), belonging to 13 species, showed positive PCR results in various tissues. The infected tissues showed no evidence of macroscopic lesions. Of the infected bats, 12 species were frugivorous, insectivorous or nectarivorous, and only one species was sanguivorous (Desmodus rotundus), and most of them belonged to the family Phyllostomidae. The eco-region where most of the infected bats were caught is the Gulf Coastal Plain of Chiapas and Tabasco. Through experimental infections of two Tadarida brasiliensis bats in captivity, we show that this species can harbor viable, infective Leishmania (L.) mexicana parasites that are capable of infecting BALB/c mice. We conclude that various species of bats belonging to the family Phyllostomidae are possible reservoir hosts for Leishmania (L.) mexicana, if it can be shown that such bats are infective for the sand fly vector. Further studies are needed to determine how these bats become infected, how long the parasite remains viable inside these potential hosts and whether they are infective to sand flies to fully evaluate their impact on disease epidemiology. PMID:25629729

  17. Extracellular vesicles from infected cells: potential for direct pathogenesis

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    Angela M Schwab

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Infections that result in natural or manmade spread of lethal biological agents are a concern and require national and focused preparedness. In this manuscript, as part of an early diagnostics and pathogen treatment strategy, we have focused on extracellular vesicles (EVs that arise following infections. Although the field of biodefense does not currently have a rich resource in EVs literature, none the less, similar pathogens belonging to the more classical emerging and non-emerging diseases have been studied in their EV/exosomal contents and function. These exosomes are formed in late endosomes and released from the cell membrane in almost every cell type in vivo. These vesicles contain proteins, RNA, and lipids from the cells they originate from and function in development, signal transduction, cell survival, and transfer of infectious material. The current review focuses on how different forms of infection exploit the exosomal pathway and how exosomes can be exploited artificially to treat infection and disease and potentially also be used as a source of vaccine. Virally-infected cells can secrete viral as well as cellular proteins and RNA in exosomes, allowing viruses to cause latent infection and spread of miRNA to nearby cells prior to a subsequent infection. In addition to virally-infected host cells, bacteria, protozoa, and fungi can all release small vesicles that contain Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMPs, regulating the neighboring uninfected cells. Examples of exosomes from both virally and bacterially infected cells point toward a re-programming network of pathways in the recipient cells. Finally, many of these exosomes contain cytokines and miRNAs that in turn can effect gene expression in the recipient cells through the classical TLR and NFkB pathway. Therefore, although exosomes do not replicate as an independent entity, they however facilitate movement of infectious material through tissues and may be the cause of

  18. Leptospirosis risk around a potential source of infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loaiza-Echeverry, Erica; Hincapié-Palacio, Doracelly; Ochoa Acosta, Jesús; Ospina Giraldo, Juan

    2015-05-01

    Leptospirosis is a bacterial zoonosis with world distribution and multiform clinical spectrum in men and animals. The etiology of this disease is the pathogenic species of Leptospira, which cause diverse manifestations of the disease, from mild to serious, such as the Weil disease and the lung hemorrhagic syndrome with lethal proportions of 10% - 50%. This is an emerging problem of urban health due to the growth of marginal neighborhoods without basic sanitary conditions and an increased number of rodents. The presence of rodents and the probability of having contact with their urine determine the likelihood for humans to get infected. In this paper, we simulate the spatial distribution of risk infection of human leptospirosis according to the proximity to rodent burrows considered as potential source of infection. The Bessel function K0 with an r distance from the potential point source, and the scale parameter α in meters was used. Simulation inputs were published data of leptospirosis incidence rate (range of 5 to 79 x 10 000), and a distance of 100 to 5000 meters from the source of infection. We obtained an adequate adjustment between the function and the simulated data. The risk of infection increases with the proximity of the potential source. This estimation can become a guide to propose effective measures of control and prevention.

  19. Characterizing the transmission potential of zoonotic infections from minor outbreaks.

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    Adam J Kucharski

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The transmission potential of a novel infection depends on both the inherent transmissibility of a pathogen, and the level of susceptibility in the host population. However, distinguishing between these pathogen- and population-specific properties typically requires detailed serological studies, which are rarely available in the early stages of an outbreak. Using a simple transmission model that incorporates age-stratified social mixing patterns, we present a novel method for characterizing the transmission potential of subcritical infections, which have effective reproduction number R<1, from readily available data on the size of outbreaks. We show that the model can identify the extent to which outbreaks are driven by inherent pathogen transmissibility and pre-existing population immunity, and can generate unbiased estimates of the effective reproduction number. Applying the method to real-life infections, we obtained accurate estimates for the degree of age-specific immunity against monkeypox, influenza A(H5N1 and A(H7N9, and refined existing estimates of the reproduction number. Our results also suggest minimal pre-existing immunity to MERS-CoV in humans. The approach we describe can therefore provide crucial information about novel infections before serological surveys and other detailed analyses are available. The methods would also be applicable to data stratified by factors such as profession or location, which would make it possible to measure the transmission potential of emerging infections in a wide range of settings.

  20. Cell elasticity determines macrophage function.

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    Naimish R Patel

    Full Text Available Macrophages serve to maintain organ homeostasis in response to challenges from injury, inflammation, malignancy, particulate exposure, or infection. Until now, receptor ligation has been understood as being the central mechanism that regulates macrophage function. Using macrophages of different origins and species, we report that macrophage elasticity is a major determinant of innate macrophage function. Macrophage elasticity is modulated not only by classical biologic activators such as LPS and IFN-γ, but to an equal extent by substrate rigidity and substrate stretch. Macrophage elasticity is dependent upon actin polymerization and small rhoGTPase activation, but functional effects of elasticity are not predicted by examination of gene expression profiles alone. Taken together, these data demonstrate an unanticipated role for cell elasticity as a common pathway by which mechanical and biologic factors determine macrophage function.

  1. Screening for potential anti-infective agents towards Burkholderia pseudomallei infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Su Anne; Nathan, Sheila

    2014-09-01

    The established treatment for melioidosis is antibiotic therapy. However, a constant threat to this form of treatment is resistance development of the causative agent, Burkholderia pseudomallei, towards antibiotics. One option to circumvent this threat of antibiotic resistance is to search for new alternative anti-infectives which target the host innate immune system and/or bacterial virulence. In this study, 29 synthetic compounds were evaluated for their potential to increase the lifespan of an infected host. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was adopted as the infection model as its innate immune pathways are homologous to humans. Screens were performed in a liquid-based survival assay containing infected worms exposed to individual compounds and survival of untreated and compound-treated worms were compared. A primary screen identified nine synthetic compounds that extended the lifespan of B. pseudomallei-infected worms. Subsequently, a disc diffusion test was performed on these selected compounds to delineate compounds into those that enhanced the survival of worms via antimicrobial activity i.e. reducing the number of infecting bacteria, or into those that did not target pathogen viability. Out of the nine hits selected, two demonstrated antimicrobial effects on B. pseudomallei. Therefore, the findings from this study suggest that the other seven identified compounds are potential anti-infectives which could protect a host against B. pseudomallei infection without developing the risk of drug resistance.

  2. The analysis of exosomal micro-RNAs in peripheral blood mononuclear cell-derived macrophages after infection with bacillus Calmette-Guérin by RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortaz, Esmaeil; Alipoor, Shamila D; Tabarsi, Payam; Adcock, Ian M; Garssen, Johan; Velayati, Ali Akbar

    2016-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global threat to human health, especially in low-income countries. The diagnosis of TB is challenging because of the limitations of specificity and sensitivity with the current diagnostics. Novel, selective biomarkers for TB would be of great practical value. Exosomes are bioactive vesicles with 30-100nm in diameter, which are secreted from almost all cell types and are found in virtually every human body fluid. Exosomes transport micro-RNAs (miRNAs), which are post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, around the body and allow miRNAs to modulate biological pathways in target cells. Our aim was to investigate the potential of exosomal miRNAs as biomarkers by examining their release from human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) after infection with Mycobacterium using miRNA sequencing. Human monocytes were obtained from blood and driven to an MDM phenotype using standard protocols. MDMs were infected with Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) or left uninfected as control. Exosomes were collected 72 h postinfection from the cell culture medium and subjected to RNA isolation. Small RNA libraries were constructed and RNA sequencing performed. The raw reads were filtered to eliminate adaptor and primer sequences, and the sequences in FASTQ format were run against the mature human miRNA sequences available in miRBase using BLAST software using a Linux operating system. Micro-RNAs were identified using E=0.01 or 1. Infection of MDMs with BCG lead to the release of a number of exosomal miRNAs. These mainly consisted with Let-7 family members, miR-155, miR-146a, miR-145, and miR-21 all of which were predicted to target important immune-related genes and pathways. This study provides evidence for the release of specific miRNAs from BCG-infected MDMs. These results need to be confirmed and the presence of this panel of miRNAs tested in the blood of patients to determine their selectivity and specificity as a diagnostic in

  3. Evidence of a pro-apoptotic effect of specific antibodies in a bovine macrophage model of infection with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Ana; Lompardía, Silvina; Hajos, Silvia E; Mundo, Silvia L

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD), a chronic granulomatous enteritis in ruminants. Understanding the protective immune response following infection is crucial to improve the diagnosis and the development of vaccines against this disease. The goal of this work was to assess whether specific antibodies were able to modulate the macrophage response to MAP infection by evaluating apoptosis and TNF-α secretion in an in vitro model. Sera from healthy (n=2), MAP-infected (n=3) and lipoarabinomannan (LAM)-immunized (n=3) bovines were evaluated. LAM was chosen as immunogen due to its relevant role in mycobacterial pathogenesis. We demonstrated by two different techniques (Acridine Orange/Ethidium Bromide microscopy and Annexin V/7-Amino-Actinomycin D flow cytometry) that the immune sera from both, MAP-infected and LAM-immunized bovines, significantly increased macrophage apoptosis in infected cultures. Comparable levels of apoptosis were detected when MAP was pre-incubated with purified specific antibodies instead of whole serum. Furthermore, this effect was accompanied by a significantly higher secretion of TNF-α. These results strongly suggest that specific antibodies could limit the impact of MAP on the apoptosis of bovine cells. This work would contribute to elucidate the role of the specific antibody response in bovine JD and its prevention.

  4. Biliverdin Reductase A (BVRA) Mediates Macrophage Expression of Interleukin-10 in Injured Kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhizhi; Pei, Guangchang; Wang, Pengge; Yang, Juan; Zhu, Fengmin; Guo, Yujiao; Wang, Meng; Yao, Ying; Zeng, Rui; Liao, Wenhui; Xu, Gang

    2015-09-18

    Biliverdin reductase A is an enzyme, with serine/threonine/tyrosine kinase activation, converting biliverdin (BV) to bilirubin (BR) in heme degradation pathway. It has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effect in monocytes and human glioblastoma. However, the function of BVRA in polarized macrophage was unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effect of BVRA on macrophage activation and polarization in injured renal microenvironment. Classically activated macrophages (M1macrophages) and alternative activation of macrophages (M2 macrophages) polarization of murine bone marrow derived macrophage was induced by GM-CSF and M-CSF. M1 polarization was associated with a significant down-regulation of BVRA and Interleukin-10 (IL-10), and increased secretion of TNF-α. We also found IL-10 expression was increased in BVRA over-expressed macrophages, while it decreased in BVRA knockdown macrophages. In contrast, BVRA over-expressed or knockdown macrophages had no effect on TNF-α expression level, indicating BVRA mediated IL-10 expression in macrophages. Furthermore, we observed in macrophages infected with recombinant adenoviruses BVRA gene, which BVRA over-expressed enhanced both INOS and ARG-1 mRNA expression, resulting in a specific macrophage phenotype. Through in vivo study, we found BVRA positive macrophages largely existed in mice renal ischemia perfusion injury. With the treatment of the regular cytokines GM-CSF, M-CSF or LPS, excreted in the injured renal microenvironment, IL-10 secretion was significantly increased in BVRA over-expressed macrophages. In conclusion, the BVRA positive macrophage is a source of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in injured kidney, which may provide a potential target for treatment of kidney disease.

  5. Some bioactive potentials of two biflavanols isolated from Garcinia kola on cadmium-induced alterations of raw U937 cells and U937-derived macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tebekeme Okoko; Diepreye Ere

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the abilities of two flavonoids - Garcinia biflavanol-1 (GB-1) and Garcinia biflavanol-2 (GB-2) from Garcinia kola (G. kola) in reducing cadmium-induced effects on raw U937 cells and U937-derived macrophages. Methods: Macrophage U937 cells were incubated with cadmium followed by treatment with the flavonoids and cell viability assessed via trypan blue staining. In the other experiment, the U937 cells were transformed to the macrophage form and treated with cadmium in order to activate them. The cells were later incubated with the flavonoids and finally the supernatant of each cell culture was analysed for the secretion of nitric oxide, catalyse activity, and the release of tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1 and interleukin-2 as indices of macrophage activation. Quercetin (a flavonol) was used as the reference flavonoid in all experiments. Results: It revealed that the flavonoids significantly increased the viability of the cells and also reduced the cadmium-induced activation of the macrophage cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The flavanols GB-1 and GB-2 possessed higher activities than quercetin in all cases (P<0.05). Garcinia biflavanol-2 possessed a higher bioactivity than GB-1 significantly (P<0.05). Conclusions: In addition to corroborating the several reported importance of G. kola as a potential neutraceutical and pharmacological condiment, the study also clearly indicates the role hydroxylation especially at the 3´- position of polyphenols could play in enhancing bioactivities of flavonoids.

  6. Adipocyte Fatty Acid Binding Protein Potentiates Toxic Lipids-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Macrophages via Inhibition of Janus Kinase 2-dependent Autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoo, Ruby L. C.; Shu, Lingling; Cheng, Kenneth K. Y.; Wu, Xiaoping; Liao, Boya; Wu, Donghai; Zhou, Zhiguang; Xu, Aimin

    2017-01-01

    Lipotoxicity is implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity-related inflammatory complications by promoting macrophage infiltration and activation. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP) play key roles in obesity and mediate inflammatory activity through similar signaling pathways. However, little is known about their interplay in lipid-induced inflammatory responses. Here, we showed that prolonged treatment of palmitic acid (PA) increased ER stress and expression of A-FABP, which was accompanied by reduced autophagic flux in macrophages. Over-expression of A-FABP impaired PA-induced autophagy associating with enhanced ER stress and pro-inflammatory cytokine production, while genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of A-FABP reversed the conditions. PA-induced expression of autophagy-related protein (Atg)7 was attenuated in A-FABP over-expressed macrophages, but was elevated in A-FABP-deficient macrophages. Mechanistically, A-FABP potentiated the effects of PA by inhibition of Janus Kinase (JAK)2 activity, thus diminished PA-induced Atg7 expression contributing to impaired autophagy and further augmentation of ER stress. These findings suggest that A-FABP acts as autophagy inhibitor to instigate toxic lipids-induced ER stress through inhibition of JAK2-dependent autophagy, which in turn triggers inflammatory responses in macrophages. A-FABP-JAK2 axis may represent an important pathological pathway contributing to obesity-related inflammatory diseases. PMID:28094778

  7. Mapping of the Co-Transcriptomes of UPEC-Infected Macrophages Reveals New Insights into the Molecular Basis of Host-Pathogen Interactions in Human and Mouse

    KAUST Repository

    Mavromatis, Charalampos Harris

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most common infections in humans. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the main causative agent of UTIs, can invade and replicate within bladder epithelial cells, and recent evidence demonstrated that some UPEC strains also survive within macrophages. To understand the mechanisms of host subversion that enable UPEC to survive within macrophages, and the contribution of macrophages to UPEC-mediated pathology, I performed hostpathogen co-transcriptome analyses using RNA sequencing. I developed an effective computational framework that simultaneously separated, annotated, and quantified the mammalian and bacterial transcriptomes. First, mouse bone morrow-derived macrophages (BMM) were challenged over a 24 h time course with UPEC reference strains, UTI89 (cystitis strain), 83972 and VR50 (asymptomatic bacteriuria strains) that possess contrasting intramacrophage phenotypes. My results showed that BMM responded to the three different UPEC strains with broadly similar gene expression programs. In contrast to the conserved pattern of BMM responses, the transcriptional responses of the different UPEC strains diverged markedly from each other. Hypothesizing that genes upregulated at 24 h post-infection may contribute to intramacrophage survival, I identified UTI89 genes upregulated at this time point, and showed that deletion of one of these genes (pspA) compromised intramacrophage survival of UPEC strain UTI89. Second, human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM) and BMM were challenged over a 24 h course with the UPEC strain EC958, a globally disseminated, multi-drug resistant strain. My analysis identified extensive divergence in UPEC-regulated orthologous gene expression between HMDM and BMM, and I validated both known and novel genes in the context of differential regulation. On the contrary, the transcriptional response of EC958 showed a broad conservation across both mammalian intramacrophage environments. My study thus

  8. Ehrlichia chaffeensis infection in the reservoir host (white-tailed deer and in an incidental host (dog is impacted by its prior growth in macrophage and tick cell environments.

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    Arathy D S Nair

    Full Text Available Ehrlichia chaffeensis, transmitted from Amblyomma americanum ticks, causes human monocytic ehrlichiosis. It also infects white-tailed deer, dogs and several other vertebrates. Deer are its reservoir hosts, while humans and dogs are incidental hosts. E. chaffeensis protein expression is influenced by its growth in macrophages and tick cells. We report here infection progression in deer or dogs infected intravenously with macrophage- or tick cell-grown E. chaffeensis or by tick transmission in deer. Deer and dogs developed mild fever and persistent rickettsemia; the infection was detected more frequently in the blood of infected animals with macrophage inoculum compared to tick cell inoculum or tick transmission. Tick cell inoculum and tick transmission caused a drop in tick infection acquisition rates compared to infection rates in ticks fed on deer receiving macrophage inoculum. Independent of deer or dogs, IgG antibody response was higher in animals receiving macrophage inoculum against macrophage-derived Ehrlichia antigens, while it was significantly lower in the same animals against tick cell-derived Ehrlichia antigens. Deer infected with tick cell inoculum and tick transmission caused a higher antibody response to tick cell cultured bacterial antigens compared to the antibody response for macrophage cultured antigens for the same animals. The data demonstrate that the host cell-specific E. chaffeensis protein expression influences rickettsemia in a host and its acquisition by ticks. The data also reveal that tick cell-derived inoculum is similar to tick transmission with reduced rickettsemia, IgG response and tick acquisition of E. chaffeensis.

  9. Macrophage-tumour cell interactions: identification of MUC1 on breast cancer cells as a potential counter-receptor for the macrophage-restricted receptor, sialoadhesin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, D; Hartnell, A; Happerfield, L; Miles, D W; Burchell, J; Taylor-Papadimitriou, J; Crocker, P R

    1999-10-01

    In many carcinomas, infiltrating macrophages are commonly found closely associated with tumour cells but little is known concerning the nature or significance of adhesion molecules involved in these cellular interactions. Here we demonstrate in primary human breast cancers that sialoadhesin (Sn), a macrophage-restricted adhesion molecule, is frequently expressed on infiltrating cells that often make close contact with breast carcinoma cells. To determine whether Sn could act as a specific receptor for ligands on breast cancer cell lines, binding assays were performed with a recombinant form of the protein fused to the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) (Sn-Fc). Sn-Fc was found to bind specifically and in a sialic acid-dependent manner to the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7, T47.D and BT-20 both in solid- and solution-phase binding assays. To investigate the nature of the sialoglycoproteins recognized by Sn on breast cancer cells, MCF-7 cells were labelled with [6-3H]glucosamine. Following precipitation with Sn-Fc, a major band of approximately 240000 MW was revealed, which was shown in reprecipitation and Western blotting experiments to be the epithelial mucin, MUC1.

  10. Induction of interleukin-10 is dependent on p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in macrophages infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

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    Hou Jun

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV causes reproductive failure and respiratory illness in pigs and usually establishes a persistent infection. Previous studies suggested that interleukin-10 (IL-10 could play a critical role in PRRSV-induced immunosuppression. However, the ability of PRRSV to induce IL-10 in infected cells is controversial. In this study, we further investigated this issue using PRRSV strain CH-1a, which is the first North American genotype strain isolated in China. Results PRRSV strain CH-1a could significantly up-regulate IL-10 production both at mRNA and protein levels in porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs, bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs, and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs. However, up-regulation of IL-10 by PRRSV was retarded by specific inhibitors of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK (SB203580 and NF-κB (BAY11-7082. Additionally, p38 MAPK and NF-κB pathways but not ERK1/2 MAPK were actually activated in PRRSV-infected BMDMs as demonstrated by western blot analysis, suggesting that p38 MAPK and NF-κB pathways are involved in the induction of IL-10 by PRRSV infection. Transfection of PAMs and PAM cell line 3D4/21 (CRL-2843 with viral structural genes showed that glycoprotein5 (GP5 could significantly up-regulate IL-10 production, which was dependent on p38 MAPK and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3 activation. We also demonstrated that a full-length glycoprotein was essential for GP5 to induce IL-10 production. Conclusions PRRSV strain CH-1a could significantly up-regulate IL-10 production through p38 MAPK activation.

  11. 替代性活化的巨噬细胞在蠕虫感染中的作用%Alternatively Activated Macrophages in Helminth Infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白雪; 于建立; 王峰; 赵颖; 刘明远; 王光明

    2011-01-01

    巨噬细胞不仅可以启动、调节免疫应答,也可作为最终的效应细胞.但相关研究表明巨噬细胞不仅与γ干扰素(IFN-γ)主导的Th1型反应相关,而且在Th2型反应中也发挥重要的作用,其活化途径与Th1型应答中经典活化途径的巨噬细胞存在明显不同,因此,该途径活化的巨噬细胞被称为替代性活化的巨噬细胞(AAMΦ).AAMΦ在蠕虫感染中发挥多种作用,包括控制炎症反应、促进损伤部位纤维化并进行修复,以及有效地抵抗蠕虫感染.本文综述了蠕虫感染过程中AAMΦ对疾病的发展和宿主保护方面的最新研究进展.%Macrophages not only initiate and modulate immune responses, but also are the final effector cells. Recent studies suggested that macrophages conventionally associated with IFN--y dominant Thl-type responses and also playing an essential role in the Th2-type inflammatory response, exhibit a quite different activation from the classically activated macrophages (CAM4>) stimulated during Till-type responses, therefore named as alternatively activated macrophages (AAM3>). AAM have multiple effects during helminth infection, including control of inflammatory reaction, contribution to fibrosis and repair at the site of injury, and anti-helminth effect. This article reviews recent findings regarding the role of AAM<& in the development of disease and host protection following helminth infection.[

  12. Baicalein attenuates the quorum sensing-controlled virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and relieves the inflammatory response in P. aeruginosa-infected macrophages by downregulating the MAPK and NFκB signal-transduction pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo J

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Jing Luo,* Jin-liang Kong,* Bi-ying Dong, Hong Huang, Ke Wang, Li-hong Wu, Chang-chun Hou, Yue Liang, Bing Li, Yi-qiang Chen Department of Respiratory Disease, First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Burgeoning antibiotic resistance and unfavorable outcomes of inflammatory injury after Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection have necessitated the development of novel agents that not only target quorum sensing (QS but also combat inflammatory injury with the least risk of resistance. This study aimed to assess the anti-QS and anti-inflammatory activities of baicalein, a traditional herbal medicine that is widely used in the People’s Republic of China, against P. aeruginosa infection. We found that subminimum inhibitory concentrations of baicalein efficiently interfered with the QS-signaling pathway of P. aeruginosa via downregulation of the transcription of QS-regulated genes and the translation of QS-signaling molecules. This interference resulted in the global attenuation of QS-controlled virulence factors, such as motility and biofilm formation, and the secretion into the culture supernatant of extracellular virulence factors, including pyocyanin, LasA protease, LasB elastase, and rhamnolipids. Moreover, we examined the anti-inflammatory activity of baicalein and its mode of action via a P. aeruginosa-infected macrophage model to address its therapeutic effect. Baicalein reduced the P. aeruginosa-induced secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNFα. In addition, baicalein suppressed P. aeruginosa-induced activation of the MAPK and NFκB signal-transduction pathways in cocultured macrophages; this may be the mechanism by which baicalein inhibits the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Therefore, our study demonstrates that baicalein represents a potential treatment for P. aeruginosa infection because it

  13. Methamphetamine enhances human immunodeficiency virus 1 infection in macrophages%甲基苯丙胺对HIV-1感染人巨噬细胞的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晖; 梁冰玉; 蒋俊俊; 廖艳研; 蒋敦科; 曾锦荣; 阮族明

    2014-01-01

    目的 研究甲基苯丙胺(METH)是否促进HIV-1感染人巨噬细胞及其机制.方法 采集健康成人新鲜外周血,分离单核细胞,再经贴壁法培养纯化为巨噬细胞.用METH和/或多巴胺受体D1阻滞剂对巨噬细胞作预处理,加进HIV Bal病毒感染细胞,收集细胞,检测细胞中HIV RNA的水平;同时,采用实时荧光定量PCR检测巨噬细胞多巴胺受体D1的表达,探讨METH在HIV-1感染人巨噬细胞中的作用及可能机制.结果 METH处理可增强HIV Bal在人巨噬细胞中的感染和复制,呈剂量依赖和时间效应关系;机制研究表明METH是通过细胞的多巴胺受体发挥作用,用多巴胺受体D1阻滞剂(SCH23390)可以阻断METH处理导致的人巨噬细胞感染HIV Bal的增强.此外,METH处理可以上调细胞多巴胺受体D1的表达,有助于HIV在细胞中的感染和复制.结论 METH可能通过诱导巨噬细胞多巴胺受体D1的表达,促进HIV在巨噬细胞中的感染和复制,是HIV感染的协同因子.%Objective To investigate whether methamphetamine (METH) can enhance human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) infection in macrophages and the possible mechanism.Methods Peripheral blood samples were collected from eight healthy adult donors.Monocytes were isolated from blood samples and then cultured in vitro to induce differentiation to macrophages.These macrophages were treated with METH and/or dopamine receptor D1 (DRD1) antagonist,and then infected with HIV Bal strains.The levels of HIV RNA were measured in HIV Bal-infected macrophages by RT-PCR analysis.The real-time RTPCR was performed for the quantification of cellular DRD1.Results METH promoted HIV replication in macrophages in a dose and time dependent manner.This METH-mediated enhancement of HIV infection and replication in macrophages could be blocked by the DRD1 antagonist (SCH23390).Moreover,METH could induce the expression of DRD1.Conclusion METH might play a co-factor role in HIV infection in human

  14. Identification of potential anti-infectives against Staphylococcus aureus using a Caenorhabditis elegans infection model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Cin; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abd; Nathan, Sheila

    2014-09-01

    The alarming increase of antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and a delay in antibiotics development point to the need for novel therapeutic approaches to combat infection. To discover novel anti-infective agents, we screened a number of synthetic compounds comprising mainly of chalcone derivatives to explore their potential in promoting the survival of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans upon infection by S. aureus. Screening of seven chalcone derivatives using both agar- and liquid-based assays revealed three positive hits that significantly prolonged the survival of S. aureus-infected nematodes. All the hits did not interfere with bacterial growth in vitro, proposing that the three compounds identified most probably act through mechanisms distinct from conventional antibiotics that target bacterial replication.

  15. Nanoformulated antiretroviral drug combinations extend drug release and antiretroviral responses in HIV-1-infected macrophages: implications for neuroAIDS therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacek, Ari S; McMillan, JoEllyn; Miller, Reagan; Anderson, Alec; Rabinow, Barrett; Gendelman, Howard E

    2010-12-01

    We posit that improvements in pharmacokinetics and biodistributions of antiretroviral therapies (ART) for human immunodeficiency virus type one-infected people can be achieved through nanoformulationed drug delivery systems. To this end, we manufactured nanoparticles of atazanavir, efavirenz, and ritonavir (termed nanoART) and treated human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) in combination therapies to assess antiretroviral responses. This resulted in improved drug uptake, release, and antiretroviral efficacy over monotherapy. MDM rapidly, within minutes, ingested nanoART combinations, at equal or similar rates, as individual formulations. Combination nanoART ingested by MDM facilitated individual drug release from 15 to >20 days. These findings are noteworthy as a nanoART cell-mediated drug delivery provides a means to deliver therapeutics to viral sanctuaries, such as the central nervous system during progressive human immunodeficiency virus type one infection. The work brings us yet another step closer to realizing the utility of nanoART for virus-infected people.

  16. The prostaglandin E2 receptor EP4 is integral to a positive feedback loop for prostaglandin E2 production in human macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Tomoyasu; Zhao, Xiaomin; Gan, Huixian; Koyasu, Shigeo; Remold, Heinz G

    2013-09-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is an important biological mediator involved in the defense against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. Previously, we reported that in macrophages (Mϕs), infection with avirulent Mtb H37Ra resulted in inhibition of necrosis by an inhibitory effect on mitochondrial permeability transition via the PGE2 receptor EP2. However, human Mϕs also express EP4, a PGE2 receptor functionally closely related to EP2 that also couples to stimulatory guanine nucleotide binding protein, but the functional differences between EP2 and EP4 in Mtb-infected Mϕs have been unclear. EP4 antagonist addition to H37Ra-infected Mϕs inhibited the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1), which are involved in PGE2 production. Moreover, H37Ra infection induced PGE2 production through the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Induction of COX2 and mPGES-1 expression by TLR2 stimulation or Mtb infection was increased after additional stimulation with EP4 agonist. Hence, in Mtb-infected Mϕs, PGE2 production induced by pathogen recognition receptors/p38 MAPK signaling is up-regulated by EP4-triggered signaling to maintain an effective PGE2 concentration.

  17. Macrophage-Lineage Cells Negatively Regulate the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Pool in Response to Interferon Gamma at Steady State and During Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Amanda; Zhang, Yubin; Thai, Vinh; Jones, Maura; Jordan, Michael B; MacNamara, Katherine C

    2015-07-01

    Bone marrow (BM) resident macrophages (Mϕs) regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) mobilization; however, their impact on HSC function has not been investigated. We demonstrate that depletion of BM resident Mϕs increases HSC proliferation as well as the pool of quiescent HSCs. At the same time, during bacterial infection where BM resident Mϕs are selectively increased we observe a decrease in HSC numbers. Moreover, strategies that deplete or reduce Mϕs during infection prevent HSC loss and rescue HSC function. We previously found that the transient loss of HSCs during infection is interferon-gamma (IFNγ)-dependent. We now demonstrate that IFNγ signaling specifically in Mϕs is critical for both the diminished HSC pool and maintenance of BM resident Mϕs during infection. In addition to the IFNγ-dependent loss of BM HSC and progenitor cells (HSPCs) during infection, IFNγ reduced circulating HSPC numbers. Importantly, under infection conditions AMD3100 or G-CSF-induced stem cell mobilization was impaired. Taken together, our data show that IFNγ acts on Mϕs, which are a negative regulator of the HSC pool, to drive the loss in BM and peripheral HSCs during infection. Our findings demonstrate that modulating BM resident Mϕ numbers can impact HSC function in vivo, which may be therapeutically useful for hematologic conditions and refinement of HSC transplantation protocols.

  18. DMPD: Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potentialregulators of macrophage inflammatory activities. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12472665 Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potential...:545-53. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase:... potentialregulators of macrophage inflammatory activities. PubmedID 12472665 Title Macrophage-stimulatin

  19. The Immunopathogenic Potential of Arcobacter butzleri – Lessons from a Meta-Analysis of Murine Infection Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gölz, Greta; Alter, Thomas; Bereswill, Stefan; Heimesaat, Markus M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Only limited information is available about the immunopathogenic properties of Arcobacter infection in vivo. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis of published data in murine infection models to compare the pathogenic potential of Arcobacter butzleri with Campylobacter jejuni and commensal Escherichia coli as pathogenic and harmless reference bacteria, respectively. Methodology / Principal Findings Gnotobiotic IL-10-/- mice generated by broad-spectrum antibiotic compounds were perorally infected with A. butzleri (strains CCUG 30485 or C1), C. jejuni (strain 81-176) or a commensal intestinal E. coli strain. Either strain stably colonized the murine intestines upon infection. At day 6 postinfection (p.i.), C. jejuni infected mice only displayed severe clinical sequelae such as wasting bloody diarrhea. Gross disease was accompanied by increased numbers of colonic apoptotic cells and distinct immune cell populations including macrophages and monocytes, T and B cells as well as regulatory T cells upon pathogenic infection. Whereas A. butzleri and E. coli infected mice were clinically unaffected, respective colonic immune cell numbers increased in the former, but not in the latter, and more distinctly upon A. butzleri strain CCUG 30485 as compared to C1 strain infection. Both, A. butzleri and C. jejuni induced increased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IFN-γ, TNF, IL-6 and MCP-1 in large, but also small intestines. Remarkably, even though viable bacteria did not translocate from the intestines to extra-intestinal compartments, systemic immune responses were induced in C. jejuni, but also A. butzleri infected mice as indicated by increased respective pro-inflammatory cytokine concentrations in serum samples at day 6 p.i. Conclusion / Significance A. butzleri induce less distinct pro-inflammatory sequelae as compared to C. jejuni, but more pronounced local and systemic immune responses than commensal E. coli in a strain-dependent manner. Hence

  20. Architecture and regulation of the HIV-1 assembly and holding compartment in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Sonja; Groot, Fedde; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Keppler, Oliver T; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2011-08-01

    Productive infection of macrophages is central to HIV-1 pathogenesis. Newly formed virions bud into a tubular membranous compartment that is contiguous with the plasma membrane. However, little is known about the structure of this compartment and its potential regulation by infection. Here we characterized this compartment in macrophages using electron tomography and electron microscopy with stereology. We found an intricate, interconnected membrane network that constitutes a preexisting physiologic structure in macrophages but which expands in size upon HIV-1 infection. Membranes required for this expansion were apparently derived from preexisting pools of plasma membrane. Physical connections between this compartment and the extracellular milieu were frequently made by tube-like structures of insufficient diameter for virion passage. We conclude that HIV-1 induces the expansion of a complex membranous labyrinth in macrophages in which the virus buds and can be retained, with potential consequences for transmission and immune evasion.

  1. Architecture and Regulation of the HIV-1 Assembly and Holding Compartment in Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Sonja; Groot, Fedde; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Keppler, Oliver T.; Sattentau, Quentin J.

    2011-01-01

    Productive infection of macrophages is central to HIV-1 pathogenesis. Newly formed virions bud into a tubular membranous compartment that is contiguous with the plasma membrane. However, little is known about the structure of this compartment and its potential regulation by infection. Here we characterized this compartment in macrophages using electron tomography and electron microscopy with stereology. We found an intricate, interconnected membrane network that constitutes a preexisting physiologic structure in macrophages but which expands in size upon HIV-1 infection. Membranes required for this expansion were apparently derived from preexisting pools of plasma membrane. Physical connections between this compartment and the extracellular milieu were frequently made by tube-like structures of insufficient diameter for virion passage. We conclude that HIV-1 induces the expansion of a complex membranous labyrinth in macrophages in which the virus buds and can be retained, with potential consequences for transmission and immune evasion. PMID:21613397

  2. In vivo and ex vivo phagocytic potential of macrophages from progeny of breeder hens kept on ochratoxin A (OTA)-contaminated diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahoor-ul-Hassan; Khan, Muhammad Zargham; Khan, Ahrar; Javed, Ijaz; Noreen, Mnaza

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the phagocytic potential of macrophages in progeny of breeder hens kept on an OTA-contaminated diet. For this purpose, 84 White Leghorn (WL) layer breeder hens (40-weeks-of-age) were divided into seven groups (A-G). Hens in Group A were fed a commercial layer ration while those in Groups B-G were kept on a diet amended with 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 3.0, 5.0, or 10.0 mg OTA/kg, respectively, for up to 3 weeks (n = 12/treatment group; n = 4/time sub-group/treatment group). Fertile eggs were set for hatching on a weekly basis to get the progeny of each week separately. Hatched chicks (n = 10 from each group) were injected with India ink at day 14-of-age to study the in vivo phagocytosis of carbon particles. At day 30, abdominal macrophages were collected from 15 chicks/group and were used to assess their ex vivo/in vitro phagocytic potential against sheep red blood cells (SRBC) as well as for nitrite production upon challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The phagocytic indices of the reticuloendothelial system of all three sets of progeny (chicks obtained from hens fed OTA for 7, 14, and 21 days) were significantly lower than values seen with Group A chicks. The number of macrophages that were actively phagocytic, the number of SRBC internalized per macrophage, and the extent of nitrite production after stimulation with LPS were each significantly lower in the cells obtained from chicks of breeder hens that had been maintained on the OTA-contaminated diets. The findings of this study clearly showed that there are immunosuppressive effects-in terms of depressed in vivo and in vitro macrophage functionality-in progeny of OTA-fed breeder hens.

  3. Benzothiazole Derivatives as Potential Anti-Infective Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prabodh Chander; Bansal, Kushal Kumar; Deep, Aakash; Pathak, Meenakshi

    2017-01-01

    Severity of microbial infections and escalating resistance towards antibiotics has created a deep necessity for discovery of novel anti-infective agents. Heterocyclic chemistry of benzothiazole has become one of the most prolific areas in the field of drug discovery and development that has attracted great attention in recent time due to its increasing importance in the field of pharmaceuticals. The importance of benzothiazole and derivatives as potential antimicrobial agents has been well established and a large number of papers have been published in this regard. The present communication is an earnest attempt to review the chemistry, synthetic aspects including click chemistry and antimicrobial activities of benzothiazole derivatives reported in recent scientific literature. The scientific information of this manuscript may be worthwhile in encouraging the prospective researchers working on this heterocyclic scaffold.

  4. Human immunodeficiency virus infection alters tumor necrosis factor alpha production via Toll-like receptor-dependent pathways in alveolar macrophages and U1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Marlynne Q; Mathys, Jean-Marie; Pereira, Albertina; Ollington, Kevin; Ieong, Michael H; Skolnik, Paul R

    2008-08-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive persons are predisposed to pulmonary infections, even after receiving effective highly active antiretroviral therapy. The reasons for this are unclear but may involve changes in innate immune function. HIV type 1 infection of macrophages impairs effector functions, including cytokine production. We observed decreased constitutive tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) concentrations and increased soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor type II (sTNFRII) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples from HIV-positive subjects compared to healthy controls. Moreover, net proinflammatory TNF-alpha activity, as measured by the TNF-alpha/sTNFRII ratio, decreased as HIV-related disease progressed, as manifested by decreasing CD4 cell count and increasing HIV RNA (viral load). Since TNF-alpha is an important component of the innate immune system and is produced upon activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathways, we hypothesized that the mechanism associated with deficient TNF-alpha production in the lung involved altered TLR expression or a deficit in the TLR signaling cascade. We found decreased Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1) and TLR4 surface expression in HIV-infected U1 monocytic cells compared to the uninfected parental U937 cell line and decreased TLR message in alveolar macrophages (AMs) from HIV-positive subjects. In addition, stimulation with TLR1/2 ligand (Pam(3)Cys) or TLR4 ligand (lipopolysaccharide) resulted in decreased intracellular phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase and subsequent decreased transcription and expression of TNF-alpha in U1 cells compared to U937 cells. AMs from HIV-positive subjects also showed decreased TNF-alpha production in response to these TLR2 and TLR4 ligands. We postulate that HIV infection alters expression of TLRs with subsequent changes in mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and cytokine production that ultimately leads to deficiencies of innate immune responses that

  5. Phenylbutyrate Is Bacteriostatic against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Regulates the Macrophage Response to Infection, Synergistically with 25-Hydroxy-Vitamin D3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna K Coussens

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Adjunctive vitamin D treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis enhances resolution of inflammation but has modest effects on bacterial clearance. Sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA is in clinical use for a range of conditions and has been shown to synergise with vitamin D metabolites to upregulate cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP expression. We investigated whether clinically attainable plasma concentrations of PBA (0.4-4 mM directly affect Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb growth and human macrophage and PBMC response to infection. We also tested the ability of PBA to enhance the immunomodulatory actions of the vitamin D metabolite 25(OHD3 during infection and synergistically inhibit intracellular Mtb growth. PBA inhibited Mtb growth in broth with an MIC99 of 1 mM, which was reduced to 0.25 mM by lowering pH. During human macrophage infection, PBA treatment restricted Mtb uptake, phagocytic receptor expression and intracellular growth in a dose-dependent manner. PBA independently regulated CCL chemokine secretion and induced expression of the antimicrobial LTF (lactoferrin, the anti-inflammatory PROC (protein C and multiple genes within the NLRP3 inflammasome pathway. PBA co-treatment with 25(OHD3 synergistically modulated expression of numerous vitamin D-response genes, including CAMP, CYP24A1, CXCL10 and IL-37. This synergistic effect was dependent on MAPK signalling, while the effect of PBA on LTF, PROC and NLRP3 was MAPK-independent. During PBA and 25(OHD3 co-treatment of human macrophages, in the absence of exogenous proteinase 3 (PR3 to activate cathelicidin, Mtb growth restriction was dominated by the effect of PBA, while the addition of PR3 enhanced growth restriction by 25(OHD3 and PBA co-treatment. This suggests that PBA augments vitamin D-mediated cathelicidin-dependent Mtb growth restriction by human macrophages and independently induces antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory action. Therefore through both host-directed and bacterial

  6. Potential Vaccines and Post-Exposure Treatments for Filovirus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gene G. Olinger

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Viruses of the family Filoviridae represent significant health risks as emerging infectious diseases as well as potentially engineered biothreats. While many research efforts have been published offering possibilities toward the mitigation of filoviral infection, there remain no sanctioned therapeutic or vaccine strategies. Current progress in the development of filovirus therapeutics and vaccines is outlined herein with respect to their current level of testing, evaluation, and proximity toward human implementation, specifically with regard to human clinical trials, nonhuman primate studies, small animal studies, and in vitro development. Contemporary methods of supportive care and previous treatment approaches for human patients are also discussed.

  7. Matrine displayed antiviral activity in porcine alveolar macrophages co-infected by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and porcine circovirus type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Na; Sun, Panpan; Lv, Haipeng; Sun, Yaogui; Guo, Jianhua; Wang, Zhirui; Luo, Tiantian; Wang, Shaoyu; Li, Hongquan

    2016-04-15

    The co-infection of porcine reproductive respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is quite common in clinical settings and no effective treatment to the co-infection is available. In this study, we established the porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) cells model co-infected with PRRSV/PCV2 with modification in vitro, and investigated the antiviral activity of Matrine on this cell model and further evaluated the effect of Matrine on virus-induced TLR3,4/NF-κB/TNF-α pathway. The results demonstrated PAM cells inoculated with PRRSV followed by PCV2 2 h later enhanced PRRSV and PCV2 replications. Matrine treatment suppressed both PRRSV and PCV2 infection at 12 h post infection. Furthermore, PRRSV/PCV2 co- infection induced IκBα degradation and phosphorylation as well as the translocation of NF-κB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus indicating that PRRSV/PCV2 co-infection induced NF-κB activation. Matrine treatment significantly down-regulated the expression of TLR3, TLR4 and TNF-α although it, to some extent, suppressed p-IκBα expression, suggesting that TLR3,4/NF-κB/TNF-α pathway play an important role of Matrine in combating PRRSV/PCV2 co-infection. It is concluded that Matrine possesses activity against PRRSV/PCV2 co-infection in vitro and suppression of the TLR3,4/NF-κB/TNF-α pathway as an important underlying molecular mechanism. These findings warrant Matrine to be further explored for its antiviral activity in clinical settings.

  8. TLR and NLRP3 inflammasome expression deregulation in macrophages of adult rats subjected to neonatal malnutrition and infected with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes de Morais, Natália; Barreto da Costa, Thacianna; Bezerra de Lira, Joana Maria; da Cunha Gonçalves de Albuquerque, Suênia; Alves Pereira, Valéria Rêgo; de Paiva Cavalcanti, Milena; Machado Barbosa de Castro, Célia Maria

    2017-01-01

    Nutritional aggression in critical periods may lead to epigenetic changes that affect gene expression. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of neonatal malnutrition on the expression of toll-like receptor (TLR)-2, TLR-4, and NLRP3 receptors, caspase-1 enzyme, and interleukin (IL)-1 β production in macrophages infected with methicillin-resistant (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive (MSSA) Staphylococcus aureus. Wistar rats (N = 24) were divided in two distinct groups: nourished (17% casein) and malnourished (8% casein). Four systems were established after the isolation of mononuclear cells: negative control, positive control, MRSA, and MSSA. The plates were incubated at 37°C for 24 h in humidified atmosphere and 5% carbon dioxide. Tests were performed after this period to analyze the expression of standard recognition receptors, caspase-1 enzyme, and the production of IL-1 β. Student's t test and analysis of variance were used in the statistical analysis; P Malnutrition reduced animal growth and the expression of TLR-2, TLR-4, and NLRP3 receptors, the caspase-1 enzyme, and the IL-1 β levels in macrophages infected with lipopolysaccharides in the present study. However, the interaction between the S. aureus and the macrophages promoted greater gene expression of receptors and enzymes. The neonatal malnutrition model compromised the expression of standard recognition receptors, of the caspase-1 enzyme as well as the production of IL-1 β. However, the S. aureus and neonatal malnutrition combination led to intense transcription of such innate immunity components. Therefore, the deregulation in the expression of TLR and NLRP3 receptors and of the caspase-1 enzyme may induce extensive tissue injury and favor the permanence and spread of these bacteria, especially those that are methicillin resistant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Inflammatory responses of a macrophage/epithelial cell co-culture model to mono and mixed infections with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodet, Charles; Chandad, Fatiha; Grenier, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Accumulated evidence points to Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia as three major etiologic agents of chronic periodontitis. Epithelial cells and macrophages play a major role in the host response to periodontopathogens, and the secretion of inflammatory mediators and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) by these host cells is believed to contribute to periodontal tissue destruction. The aim of this study was to investigate the inflammatory response of a macrophage/epithelial cell co-culture model following mono or mixed infections with the above three periodontopathogens. An in vitro co-culture model composed of epithelial-like transformed cells (HeLa cell line) and macrophage-like cells (phorbol myristic acid-differentiated U937 monocytic cell line) was challenged with whole cells or lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of P. gingivalis, T. denticola, and T. forsythia, individually and in combination. Following stimulation, the production of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and MMP-9 were quantified by enzyme-linked immunoassays. We observed that mono or mixed infections of the co-culture model induced the secretion of IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, PGE2, and MMP-9. P. gingivalis and T. forsythia induced an increase in RANTES secretion, whereas T. denticola alone or in combination resulted in a significant decrease in RANTES levels. All LPS challenges induced an increase in chemokine, MMP-9, and PGE2 production. No synergistic effect on the production of cytokines, chemokines, PGE2, and MMP-9 was observed for any of the bacterial or LPS mixtures tested. This study supports the view that P. gingivalis, T. denticola, and T. forsythia may induce high levels of pro-inflammatory mediators and MMP-9 in periodontal lesions, thus contributing to the progression of periodontitis.

  10. Transmission potential of Zika virus infection in the South Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiura, Hiroshi; Kinoshita, Ryo; Mizumoto, Kenji; Yasuda, Yohei; Nah, Kyeongah

    2016-04-01

    Zika virus has spread internationally through countries in the South Pacific and Americas. The present study aimed to estimate the basic reproduction number, R0, of Zika virus infection as a measurement of the transmission potential, reanalyzing past epidemic data from the South Pacific. Incidence data from two epidemics, one on Yap Island, Federal State of Micronesia in 2007 and the other in French Polynesia in 2013-2014, were reanalyzed. R0 of Zika virus infection was estimated from the early exponential growth rate of these two epidemics. The maximum likelihood estimate (MLE) of R0 for the Yap Island epidemic was in the order of 4.3-5.8 with broad uncertainty bounds due to the small sample size of confirmed and probable cases. The MLE of R0 for French Polynesia based on syndromic data ranged from 1.8 to 2.0 with narrow uncertainty bounds. The transmissibility of Zika virus infection appears to be comparable to those of dengue and chikungunya viruses. Considering that Aedes species are a shared vector, this finding indicates that Zika virus replication within the vector is perhaps comparable to dengue and chikungunya. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Analyzing time-dependent microarray data using independent component analysis derived expression modes from human macrophages infected with F. tularensis holartica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutter, D; Langmann, Th; Ugocsai, P; Moehle, C; Seibold, E; Splettstoesser, W D; Gruber, P; Lang, E W; Schmitz, G

    2009-08-01

    The analysis of large-scale gene expression profiles is still a demanding and extensive task. Modern machine learning and data mining techniques developed in linear algebra, like Independent Component Analysis (ICA), become increasingly popular as appropriate tools for analyzing microarray data. We applied ICA to analyze kinetic gene expression profiles of human monocyte derived macrophages (MDM) from three different donors infected with Francisella tularensis holartica and compared them to more classical methods like hierarchical clustering. Results were compared using a pathway analysis tool, based on the Gene Ontology and the MeSH database. We could show that both methods lead to time-dependent gene regulatory patterns which fit well to known TNFalpha induced immune responses. In comparison, the nonexclusive attribute of ICA results in a more detailed view and a higher resolution in time dependent behavior of the immune response genes. Additionally, we identified NFkappaB as one of the main regulatory genes during response to F. tularensis infection.

  12. Human monocytes and macrophages express NADPH oxidase 5; a potential source of reactive oxygen species in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manea, Adrian; Manea, Simona-Adriana; Gan, Ana Maria; Constantin, Alina; Fenyo, Ioana Madalina; Raicu, Monica; Muresian, Horia; Simionescu, Maya

    2015-05-22

    Monocytes (Mon) and Mon-derived macrophages (Mac) orchestrate important oxidative and inflammatory reactions in atherosclerosis by secreting reactive oxygen species (ROS) due, in large part, to the upregulated NADPH oxidases (Nox). The Nox enzymes have been extensively investigated in human Mon and Mac. However, the expression and functional significance of the Nox5 subtypes is not known. We aimed at elucidating whether Nox5 is expressed in human Mon and Mac, and examine its potential role in atherosclerosis. Human monocytic THP-1 cell line and CD14(+) Mon were employed to search for Nox5 expression. RT-PCR, Western blot, lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence and dihydroethidium assays were utilized to examine Nox5 in these cells. We found that Nox5 transcription variants and proteins are constitutively expressed in THP-1 cells and primary CD14(+) Mon. Silencing of Nox5 protein expression by siRNA reduced the Ca(2+)-dependent Nox activity and the formation of ROS in Mac induced by A23187, a selective Ca(2+) ionophore. Exposure of Mac to increasing concentrations of IFNγ (5-100 ng/ml) or oxidized LDL (5-100 μg/ml) resulted in a dose-dependent increase in Nox5 protein expression and elevation in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that Nox5 is present in CD68(+) Mac-rich area within human carotid artery atherosclerotic plaques. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first evidence that Nox5 is constitutively expressed in human Mon. Induction of Nox5 expression in IFNγ- and oxidized LDL-exposed Mac and the presence of Nox5 in Mac-rich atheroma are indicative of the implication of Nox5 in atherogenesis.

  13. Human Leukocyte Antigen-Presented Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Is a Surface Biomarker and Potential Therapeutic Target for Ovarian Cancer.

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    Patterson, Andrea M; Kaabinejadian, Saghar; McMurtrey, Curtis P; Bardet, Wilfried; Jackson, Ken W; Zuna, Rosemary E; Husain, Sanam; Adams, Gregory P; MacDonald, Glen; Dillon, Rachelle L; Ames, Harold; Buchli, Rico; Hawkins, Oriana E; Weidanz, Jon A; Hildebrand, William H

    2016-02-01

    T cells recognize cancer cells via HLA/peptide complexes, and when disease overtakes these immune mechanisms, immunotherapy can exogenously target these same HLA/peptide surface markers. We previously identified an HLA-A2-presented peptide derived from macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and generated antibody RL21A against this HLA-A2/MIF complex. The objective of the current study was to assess the potential for targeting the HLA-A2/MIF complex in ovarian cancer. First, MIF peptide FLSELTQQL was eluted from the HLA-A2 of the human cancerous ovarian cell lines SKOV3, A2780, OV90, and FHIOSE118hi and detected by mass spectrometry. By flow cytometry, RL21A was shown to specifically stain these four cell lines in the context of HLA-A2. Next, partially matched HLA-A*02:01+ ovarian cancer (n = 27) and normal fallopian tube (n = 24) tissues were stained with RL21A by immunohistochemistry to assess differential HLA-A2/MIF complex expression. Ovarian tumor tissues revealed significantly increased RL21A staining compared with normal fallopian tube epithelium (P < 0.0001), with minimal staining of normal stroma and blood vessels (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.001 compared with tumor cells) suggesting a therapeutic window. We then demonstrated the anticancer activity of toxin-bound RL21A via the dose-dependent killing of ovarian cancer cells. In summary, MIF-derived peptide FLSELTQQL is HLA-A2-presented and recognized by RL21A on ovarian cancer cell lines and patient tumor tissues, and targeting of this HLA-A2/MIF complex with toxin-bound RL21A can induce ovarian cancer cell death. These results suggest that the HLA-A2/MIF complex should be further explored as a cell-surface target for ovarian cancer immunotherapy.

  14. Inactivation of Tautomerase Activity of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor by Sulforaphane: A Potential Biomarker for Anti-inflammatory Intervention

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    Healy, Zachary R.; Liu, Hua; Holtzclaw, W. David; Talalay, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Background Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a proinflammatory cytokine with keto-enol tautomerase activity, rises rapidly in response to inflammation, and is elevated in many chronic diseases. Isothiocyanates, such as sulforaphane from broccoli, are very potent inactivators of MIF tautomerase activity. A simple rapid method for determining this activity in tissues and body fluids may therefore be valuable for assessing severity of inflammation and efficacy of intervention. Methods Existing spectrophotometric assays of MIF, based on conversion of methyl L-dopachrome to methyl 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylate and associated loss of absorption at 475 nm, lack sensitivity. Assay sensitivity and efficiency were markedly improved by reducing the nonenzymatic rate, by lowering pH to 6.2, replacing phosphate (which catalyzes the reaction) with Bis-Tris buffer, and converting to a microtiter plate format. Results A structure-potency study of MIF tautomerase inactivation by isothiocyanates showed that sulforaphane, benzyl, n-hexyl, and phenethyl isothiocyanates were especially potent. MIF tautomerase could be readily quantified in human urine concentrated by ultrafiltration. This activity comprised: (i) a heat-labile, sulforaphane-inactivated macromolecular fraction (presumably MIF) that was concentrated during ultrafiltration; (ii) a flow-through fraction, with constant activity during filtration, that was heat-stable, and insensitive to sulforaphane. Administration of the sulforaphane precursor glucoraphanin to human volunteers almost completely abolished urinary tautomerase activity, which was recovered over many hours. Conclusions A simple, rapid, quantitative MIF tautomerase assay has been developed as a potential biomarker for assessing inflammatory severity and effectiveness of intervention. Impact An improved assay for measuring MIF tautomerase activity and its applications are described. PMID:21602309

  15. Inflammation and pharmacokinetics: potential implications for HIV-infection.

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    Seifert, Sharon M; Castillo-Mancilla, Jose R; Erlandson, Kristine M; Anderson, Peter L

    2017-06-01

    The physiological changes accompanying inflammation may alter the pharmacokinetics (PK) of certain medications. Individuals infected with HIV have chronically elevated inflammatory markers despite viral suppression following effective antiretroviral therapy (ART), as well as age-related inflammation. Understanding the potential clinical implications of inflammation on the PK of medications is important for understanding dose-response relationships and necessitates future research. Areas covered: An extensive literature search was carried out using PubMed and associated bibliographies to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding altered PK in response to inflammation and its application to the field of HIV. Expert opinion: Preclinical and clinical studies show that inflammation leads to a downregulation of certain drug metabolizing enzymes and both up and down regulation of transporters depending on the transporter and cell type. Decreased gastric acidity, fluid shifts, and plasma protein alterations also occur with inflammation, leading to potential absorption, distribution, and clearance changes. More research is needed including controlled PK studies to address the clinical relevance of these observations, especially in the aging HIV-infected population. Results from future studies will enable us to better predict drug concentrations in individuals with inflammation, in line with efforts to provide personalized pharmacotherapy in our healthcare system.

  16. Identification of differentially expressed proteins in porcine alveolar macrophages infected with virulent/attenuated strains of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

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    Yan-Jun Zhou

    Full Text Available The highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV is still a serious threat to the swine industry. However, the pathogenic mechanism of HP-PRRSV remains unclear. We infected host porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs with the virulent HuN4 strain and the attenuated HuN4-F112 strain and then utilized fluorescent two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE to screen for intracellular proteins that were differentially expressed in host cells infected with the two strains. There were 153 proteins with significant different expression (P<0.01 observed, 42 of which were subjected to mass spectrometry, and 24 proteins were identified. PAM cells infected with the virulent strain showed upregulated expression of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2, heat shock protein beta-1 (HSPB1, and proteasome subunit alpha type 6 (PSMA6, which were downregulated in cells infected with the attenuated strain. The upregulation of PKM2 provides sufficient energy for viral replication, and the upregulation of HSPB1 inhibits host cell apoptosis and therefore facilitates mass replication of the virulent strain, while the upregulation of PSMA6 facilitates the evasion of immune surveillance by the virus. Studying on those molecules mentioned above may be able to help us to understand some unrevealed details of HP-PRRSV infection, and then help us to decrease its threat to the swine industry in the future.

  17. ATP Induces IL-1β Secretion in Neisseria gonorrhoeae-Infected Human Macrophages by a Mechanism Not Related to the NLRP3/ASC/Caspase-1 Axis

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    Killen García

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Ngo has developed multiple immune evasion mechanisms involving the innate and adaptive immune responses. Recent findings have reported that Ngo reduces the IL-1β secretion of infected human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM. Here, we investigate the role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP in production and release of IL-1β in Ngo-infected MDM. We found that the exposure of Ngo-infected MDM to ATP increases IL-1β levels about ten times compared with unexposed Ngo-infected MDM (P0.05 and caspase-1 (CASP1, P>0.05. In addition, ATP was not able to modify caspase-1 activity in Ngo-infected MDM but was able to increase pyroptosis (P>0.01. Notably ATP treatment defined an increase of positive staining for IL-1β with a distinctive intracellular pattern of distribution. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ATP induces IL-1β secretion by a mechanism not related to the NLRP3/ASC/caspase-1 axis and likely is acting at the level of vesicle trafficking or pore formation.

  18. ATP Induces IL-1β Secretion in Neisseria gonorrhoeae-Infected Human Macrophages by a Mechanism Not Related to the NLRP3/ASC/Caspase-1 Axis

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    García, Killen; Escobar, Gisselle; Mendoza, Pablo; Beltran, Caroll; Perez, Claudio; Vernal, Rolando; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Ngo) has developed multiple immune evasion mechanisms involving the innate and adaptive immune responses. Recent findings have reported that Ngo reduces the IL-1β secretion of infected human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). Here, we investigate the role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in production and release of IL-1β in Ngo-infected MDM. We found that the exposure of Ngo-infected MDM to ATP increases IL-1β levels about ten times compared with unexposed Ngo-infected MDM (P 0.05) and caspase-1 (CASP1, P > 0.05). In addition, ATP was not able to modify caspase-1 activity in Ngo-infected MDM but was able to increase pyroptosis (P > 0.01). Notably ATP treatment defined an increase of positive staining for IL-1β with a distinctive intracellular pattern of distribution. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ATP induces IL-1β secretion by a mechanism not related to the NLRP3/ASC/caspase-1 axis and likely is acting at the level of vesicle trafficking or pore formation. PMID:27803513

  19. Extraintestinal Helminth Infection Limits Pathology and Proinflammatory Cytokine Expression during DSS-Induced Ulcerative Colitis: A Role for Alternatively Activated Macrophages and Prostaglandins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma-Soto, Yadira; Callejas, Blanca E; Terrazas, César A; Reyes, Jose L; Espinoza-Jiménez, Arlett; González, Marisol I; León-Cabrera, Sonia; Morales, Rosario; Olguín, Jonadab E; Saavedra, Rafael; Oghumu, Steve; Satoskar, Abhay R; Terrazas, Luis I

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation of the intestinal mucosa is characteristic of inflammatory bowel diseases such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Helminth parasites have developed immunomodulatory strategies that may impact the outcome of several inflammatory diseases. Therefore, we investigated whether Taenia crassiceps infection is able to decrease the inflammatory effects of dextran sulfate sodium- (DSS-) induced ulcerative colitis in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. Preinfection significantly reduced the manifestations of DSS-induced colitis, as weight loss and shortened colon length, and decreased the disease activity index independently of the genetic background of the mice. Taenia infection decreased systemic levels of proinflammatory cytokines while increasing levels of IL-4 and IL-10, and the inflammatory infiltrate into the colon was also markedly reduced. RT-PCR assays from colon showed that T. crassiceps-infected mice displayed increased expression of Arginase-1 but decreased expression of iNOS compared to DSS-treated uninfected mice. The percentages of T regulatory cells were not increased. The adoptive transfer of alternatively activated macrophages (AAMФs) from infected mice into mice with DSS-induced colitis reduced the severity of colon inflammation. Administration of indomethacin abrogated the anticolitic effect of Taenia. Thus, T. crassiceps infection limits the pathology of ulcerative colitis by suppressing inflammatory responses mechanistically associated with AAMФs and prostaglandins.

  20. Thalidomide inhibits alternative activation of macrophages in vivo and in vitro: a potential mechanism of anti-asthmatic effect of thalidomide.

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    Hyun Seung Lee

    Full Text Available Thalidomide is known to have anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory actions. However, the effect and the anti-asthmatic mechanism of thalidomide in the pathogenesis of asthmatic airways are not fully understood.This study is designed to determine the effect and the potential mechanism of thalidomide in the pathogenesis of asthmatic airways using animal model of allergic asthma.Six-week-old female BALB/C mice were sensitized with alum plus ovalbumin (OVA and were exposed to OVA via intranasal route for 3 days for challenge. Thalidomide 200 mg/kg was given via gavage twice a day from a day before the challenge and airway hyperresponsivenss (AHR, airway inflammatory cells, and cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF were evaluated. The expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and other mediators were evaluated using ELISA, real time (RT-qPCR, and flow cytometry. CRL-2456, alveolar macrophage cell line, was used to test the direct effect of thalidomide on the activation of macrophages in vitro.The mice with thalidomide treatment showed significantly reduced levels of allergen-induced BALF and lung inflammation, AHR, and the expression of a number of pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediators including Th2 related, IL-17 cytokines, and altered levels of allergen-specific IgG1/IgG2a. Of interesting note, thalidomide treatment significantly reduced expression levels of allergen- or Th2 cytokine-stimulated alternative activation of macrophages in vivo and in vitro.These studies highlight a potential use of thalidomide in the treatment of allergic diseases including asthma. This study further identified a novel inhibitory effect of thalidomide on alternative activation of macrophages as a potential mechanism of anti-asthmatic effect of thalidomide.

  1. Systemic Actinomyces infection. A potential complication of intrauterine contraceptive devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Monte, S M; Gupta, P K; White, C L

    1982-10-15

    Infections caused by Actinomyces organisms have been demonstrated to occur in association with IUD use. Uterine actinomycosis infection is usually superficial, but it is potentially invasive. It may prove fatal. When Actinomyces is detected in a vaginal Papanicolaou smear, establishment of the correct diagnosis followed by IUD removal and appropriate antibiotic therapy are recommended. A case history is presented of a 28 year old woman who had been using an IUD and who had systemic Actinomyces infection and a brain abscess develop several years after removal of her uterus and fallopian tubes. The woman was referred to the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore in 1977 for evaluation of headaches and grand mal seizures. 4 years earlier, in 1973, she had been seen at another hospital with a recent weight loss of 18 kg. She was found to have a tubo-ovarian abscess, for which she underwent a hysterectomy, bilateral salpingectomy, and unilateral oophorectomy. At the time of surgery, an IUD was in place. A histopathological diagnosis of botryomycosis tubo-ovarian abscess was made on submitted tissues. She received no antibiotic therapy. In 1975, pulmonary infiltrates developed that were attributed to bronchopneumonia. She was treated with a short course of tetracycline hydrochloride. Later that year she was thought to have sarcoidosis and was treated for 1