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Sample records for macrophage clones carrying

  1. Duration of gestation in pregnant dogs carrying cloned fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Jung; Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Kim, Geon A; Park, Eun Jung; Jo, Young Kwang; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2013-01-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate gestation duration and the physiologic characteristics of pregnant dogs bearing cloned fetuses, especially in the prepartum period. A retrospective study was performed to compare gestation duration in females pregnant with cloned (somatic cell nuclear transfer) fetuses (cloned group) with those bearing noncloned fetuses (control group), and effects of litter size, birth weight, and breed of somatic cell donors on gestation duration in the cloned group were evaluated. Clinical delivery onset signs associated with serum progesterone concentration and rectal temperature were also compared in both groups. The gestation duration calculated from day of ovulation was significantly longer in the cloned (62.8 ± 0.3 days) versus the control group (60.9 ± 0.5 days; P cell donors and gestation duration in the cloned group. Even though the basal rectal temperature in the prepartum period was not different between control and cloned groups (36.9 ± 0.1 °C and 37.2 ± 0.1 °C, respectively), serum progesterone concentration on delivery day was significantly higher in the cloned group (2.2 ± 0.4 ng/ml) compared with the control group (0.5 ± 0.1 ng/ml; P dogs bearing cloned fetuses might be because of the smaller litter size in this group. Also, the weaker drop in serum progesterone levels in the prepartum period in cloned dog pregnancies indicates that the parturition signaling process might be altered resulting in longer gestation periods.

  2. Cloning the human gene for macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF)

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    Paralkar, V.; Wistow, G. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1994-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was originally identified as a lymphokine. However, recent work strongly suggests a wider role for MIF beyond the immune system. It is expressed specifically in the differentiating cells of the immunologically privileged eye lens and brain, is a delayed early response gene in fibroblasts, and is expressed in many tissues. Here, the authors report the structure of the remarkably small gene for human MIF that has three exons separated by introns of only 189 and 95 bp and covers less than 1 kb. The cloned sequence also includes 1 kb of 5[prime] flanking region. Primer extension and 5[prime] rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) of human brain RNA both indicate the presence of a single transcription start site in a TATA-less promoter. Northern blot analysis shows a single size of MIF mRNA (about 800 nt) in all human tissues examined. In contrast to previous reports, they find no evidence for multiple genes for MIF in the human genome. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Carry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koijen, Ralph S.J.; Moskowitz, Tobias J.; Heje Pedersen, Lasse;

    that include global equities, global bonds, currencies, commodities, US Treasuries, credit, and equity index options. This predictability underlies the strong returns to "carry trades" that go long high-carry and short low-carry securities, applied almost exclusively to currencies, but shown here...

  4. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carrying SCCmec type II was more frequent than the Brazilian endemic clone as a cause of nosocomial bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiaffa-Filho, Helio Hehl; Trindade, Priscila A; Gabriela da Cunha, Paula; Alencar, Cecilia Salete; Prado, Gladys V B; Rossi, Flavia; Levin, Anna S

    2013-08-01

    Fifty consecutive MRSA blood isolates were evaluated: 30(60%) carried SCCmec type II (single PFGE clone; sequence type 5 or ST105); 12 (26%), IV; 5 (10%), III; 3 (6%), I. Brazilian endemic clone, carrying SCCmec type III, has been the main nosocomial clone in Brazil; however, this study showed that a clone carrying type II predominated.

  5. Stochastic differentiation into an osteoclast lineage from cloned macrophage-like cells

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    Hayashi, Shin-Ichi, E-mail: shayashi@med.tottori-u.ac.jp [Division of Immunology, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, School of Life Science, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, 86 Nishi-Cho, Yonago, Tottori 683-8503 (Japan); Murata, Akihiko; Okuyama, Kazuki; Shimoda, Yuhki; Hikosaka, Mari [Division of Immunology, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, School of Life Science, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, 86 Nishi-Cho, Yonago, Tottori 683-8503 (Japan); Yasuda, Hisataka [Planning and Development, Bioindustry Division, Oriental Yeast Co., Ltd, Itabashi-Ku, Tokyo 174-8505 (Japan); Yoshino, Miya [Division of Immunology, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, School of Life Science, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, 86 Nishi-Cho, Yonago, Tottori 683-8503 (Japan)

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The frequency of C7 differentiation into osteoclast was low and constant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Only extended C7 cell cultures exponentially increased osteoclast+ cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C7 cell differentiation into committed osteoclast precursors is on 'autopilot'. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The system may maintain the stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. -- Abstract: Differentiation into osteoclasts is induced by a macrophage colony-stimulating factor and receptor activator of nuclear-factor {kappa}B ligand. The macrophage-like cell line, C7 has the potential to differentiate into osteoclasts when it is cultured with both factors for 6 days. Although C7 is an established cell line, the frequency of differentiation into this lineage was less than 10%, and the ratio was maintained at a constant level, even after repeated cloning. In this study, to increase the differentiation of C7 cells to osteoclasts, C7 derivative treatments with several activators and/or inhibitors were performed for 3 days prior to setting osteoclast induction analysis; however, a reagent to significantly up-regulate the frequency of differentiation was not found. Only extended cultures for osteoclastogenesis exponentially increased the frequency of osteoclast precursors. It is likely that C7 cell differentiation into committed osteoclast precursors is on 'autopilot' rather than requiring specific signals to drive this process.

  6. Th1-like human T-cell clones recognizing Leishmania gp63 inhibit Leishmania major in human macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, M; Hey, A S; Bendtzen, K

    1994-01-01

    The major surface protease of Leishmania major, gp63, has been suggested as a vaccine candidate for cutaneous leishmaniasis. In this study gp63 was purified from L. major promastigotes. A panel of human T-cell clones recognizing this protein were generated from individuals who had previously had...... self-healing cutaneous leishmaniasis. The T-cell clones expressed CD4, and the alpha chain of the T-cell antigen receptor. GP63 reactive T-cell clones activated by antigen or by immobilized anti-CD3 antibody released relative large amounts of interferon-gamma and no or little interleukin-4, thereby...... resembling Th1 cells. Autologous mononuclear cells and Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B cell lines were equally efficient in presenting the antigen to the T cells. The gp63 reactive T cells induced resistance to infection in cultured human macrophages by L. major. The data confirm that human CD4+ T cells...

  7. Transfer of stem cells carrying engineered chromosomes with XY clone laser system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinko, Ildiko; Katona, Robert L

    2011-01-01

    Current transgenic technologies for gene transfer into the germline of mammals cause a random integration of exogenous naked DNA into the host genome that can generate undesirable position effects as well as insertional mutations. The vectors used to generate transgenic animals are limited by the amount of foreign DNA they can carry. Mammalian artificial chromosomes have large DNA-carrying capacity and ability to replicate in parallel with, but without integration into, the host genome. Hence they are attractive vectors for transgenesis, cellular protein production, and gene therapy applications as well. ES cells mediated chromosome transfer by conventional blastocyst injection has a limitation in unpredictable germline transmission. The demonstrated protocol of laser-assisted microinjection of artificial chromosome containing ES cells into eight-cell mouse embryos protocol described here can solve the problem for faster production of germline transchromosomic mice.

  8. Molecular Cloning and Functional Characterization of the Avian Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is recognized as a soluble factor produced by sensitized T lymphocytes and inhibits the random migration of macrophages. Recent studies have revealed a more prominent role for MIF as a multi-functional cytokine mediating both innate and adaptive immune r...

  9. Hospital clones of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus are carried by medical students even before healthcare exposure

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    Ido Orlin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA strains are prevalent in healthcare and the community. Few studies have examined MRSA carriage among medical students. The aim of this study is to examine Staphylococcus aureus (SA carriage, and particular MRSA, over time in cohort medical students Methods Prospective collection of nasal swabs from medical students in Israel and assessment of SA carriage. Three samples were taken per student in preclinical and clinical parts of studies. Antibiotic susceptibilities were recorded and MRSA typing was performed by staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec types, Panton Valentine Leukocidin (PVL encoding genes, and spa types. Clonality was assessed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Results Among 58 students, SA carriage rates increased from 33% to 38% to 41% at baseline (preclinical studies, 13 and 19 months (clinical studies, respectively (p = 0.07. Methicillin-susceptible SA (MSSA carriage increased in the clinical studies period (22 to 41%, p = 0.01. Overall, seven students (12% carried 13 MRSA isolates. MRSA isolates were PVL negative and were characterized as SCCmecII-t002, SCCmecIV-t032, or t12435 with untypable SCCmec. MRSA carriage during the pre-clinical studies was evident in 4/7 students. Two students carried different MRSA clones at various times and persistent MRSA carriage was noted in one student. Simultaneous carriage of MRSA and MSSA was not detected. Conclusions MSSA carriage increased during the clinical part of studies in Israeli medical students. Compared with previous reports, higher rates of MRSA carriage were evident. MRSA strains were genotypically similar to Israeli healthcare-associated clones; however, carriage occurred largely before healthcare exposure, implying community-acquisition of hospital strains.

  10. Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... copies of whole animals Therapeutic cloning, which creates embryonic stem cells. Researchers hope to use these cells to grow healthy tissue to replace injured or diseased tissues in the human body. NIH: National Human Genome Research Institute

  11. Cloning, expression and characterisation of a type II cystatin from Schistosoma japonicum, which could regulate macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Liu, Ju; Yue, Yuan; Chen, Wei; Song, Man; Zhan, Ximei; Wu, Zhongkai

    2014-11-01

    Cystatin play an important role in parasite immune evasion. It is involved in many immune responses processes regulations such as inhibiting antigen presentation, modifying cytokines production and macrophage polarization. In recent years, more and more cystatins were used in treating some inflammatory diseases such as asthma and inflammation bowel diseases; however, cystatins from Schistosoma japonicum were rarely studied. In the present study, we have cloned a cystatin from the adult stage of Schistosoma japonicum, named as SjCystatin, and its sequence shares conserved domains with other type II family cystatins. It was further verified by enzyme inhibition assays. SjCystatin retained its inhibitory activity under a wide range of pH values and temperatures, can maintain its inhibitory activity at pH 6.5-7.5 and 37 °C, respectively. Then, we investigated the effects of SjCystatin on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activated RAW264.7. Results showed that SjCystatin inhibit LPS-induced nitric oxide production in a dose-dependent manner. LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 production began to be inhibited at least 6 h after SjCystatin stimulation. SjCystatin significantly increased IL-10 production at 6 h after stimulation and its effect on IL-10 production diminished quickly. These results imply that SjCystatin can induce M2 macrophage polarization and can be expected to serve as a potential drug source for the medication of inflammatory disorders like other cystatins.

  12. Microparticles from apoptotic RAW 264.7 macrophage cells carry tumour necrosis factor-α functionally active on cardiomyocytes from adult mice

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    Edward Milbank

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available After ischaemic injury and in patients with atherosclerosis, the pool of inflammatory macrophages is enlarged in the heart and in atherosclerotic plaques. Monocyte/macrophage-derived microparticles (MPs are part of the pathological process of unstable atherosclerotic plaques. The present study focused on effects of MPs, produced by apoptotic murine RAW 264.7 macrophage cell line, in adult murine cardiomyocytes. Flow cytometry and western blot analysis showed that these MPs contained the soluble form of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α. Cardiomyocyte sarcomere shortening amplitudes and kinetics were reduced within 5 min of exposure to these MPs. Conversely, Ca2+ transient amplitude and kinetics were not modified. The contractile effects of MPs were completely prevented after pretreatment with nitric oxide synthase, guanylate cyclase or TNF-α inhibitors as well as blocking TNF-α receptor 1 with neutralizing antibody. Microscopy showed that, after 1 h, MPs were clearly surrounding rod-shaped cardiomyocytes, and after 2 h they were internalized into cardiomyocytes undergoing apoptosis. After 4 h of treatment with MPs, cardiomyocytes expressed increased caspase-3, caspase-8, Bax and cytochrome C. Thus, MPs from apoptotic macrophages induced a negative inotropic effect and slowing of both contraction and relaxation, similar to that observed in the presence of TNF-α. The use of specific inhibitors strongly suggests that TNF-α receptors and the guanylate cyclase/cGMP/PKG pathway were involved in the functional responses to these MPs and that the mitochondrial intrinsic pathway was implicated in their proapoptotic effects. These data suggest that MPs issued from activated macrophages carrying TNF-α could contribute to propagation of inflammatory signals leading to myocardial infarction.

  13. Molecular cloning, sequencing and structural studies of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) from Indian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis)

    KAUST Repository

    Sugumar, Thennarasu

    2013-06-25

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a cytokine that is essential for growth and development of progenitors of granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages. In this study, we report molecular cloning, sequencing and characterization of GM-CSF from Indian water buffalo, Bubalus bubalis. In addition, we performed sequence and structural analysis for buffalo GM-CSF. Buffalo GM-CSF has been compared with 17 mammalian GM-CSFs using multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree. Three-dimensional model for buffalo GM-CSF and human receptor complex was built using homology modelling to study cross-reactivity between two species. Detailed analysis was performed to study GM-CSF interface and various interactions at the interface. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Molecular cloning, sequencing and structural studies of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) from Indian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugumar, Thennarasu; Pugalenthi, Ganesan; Harishankar, Murugesan; Dhinakar Raj, G

    2014-02-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a cytokine that is essential for growth and development of progenitors of granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages. In this study, we report molecular cloning, sequencing and characterization of GM-CSF from Indian water buffalo, Bubalus bubalis. In addition, we performed sequence and structural analysis for buffalo GM-CSF. Buffalo GM-CSF has been compared with 17 mammalian GM-CSFs using multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree. Three-dimensional model for buffalo GM-CSF and human receptor complex was built using homology modelling to study cross-reactivity between two species. Detailed analysis was performed to study GM-CSF interface and various interactions at the interface.

  15. Morphology, testes development and behaviour of unusual triploid males in microchromosome-carrying clones of Poecilia formosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamatsch, D K; Stöck, M; Fuchs, R; Döbler, M; Wacker, R; Parzefall, J; Schlupp, I; Schartl, M

    2010-11-01

    In a microchromosome-carrying laboratory stock of the normally all-female Amazon molly Poecilia formosa triploid individuals were obtained, all of which spontaneously developed into males. A comparison of morphology of the external and internal insemination apparatus and the gonads, sperm ploidy and behaviour, to laboratory-bred F(1) hybrids revealed that the triploid P. formosa males, though producing mostly aneuploid sperm, are partly functional males that differ mainly in sperm maturation and sexual motivation from gonochoristic P. formosa males.

  16. High-level fluoroquinolone resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky ST198 epidemic clone with IncA/C conjugative plasmid carrying bla(CTX-M-25) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasyl, Dariusz; Kern-Zdanowicz, Izabela; Domańska-Blicharz, Katarzyna; Zając, Magdalena; Hoszowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-30

    Multidrug resistant Salmonella Kentucky strains have been isolated from turkeys in Poland since 2009. Multiple mutations within chromosomal genes gyrA and parC were responsible for high-level ciprofloxacin resistance. One of the isolates was extended spectrum β-lactamase- (ESBL) positive: the strain 1643/2010 carried a conjugative 167,779 bps plasmid of IncA/C family. The sequence analysis revealed that it carried a blaCTX-M-25 gene and an integron with another β-lactamase encoding gene-blaOXA-21. This is the first known report of a CTX-M-25 encoding gene both in Poland and in Salmonella Kentucky world-wide, as well as in the IncA/C plasmid. Analysis of the integron showed a novel arrangement of gene cassettes-aacA4, aacC-A1 and blaOXA-21 where the latter might result from an intergeneric gene transfer. The study confirmed Salmonella Kentucky population isolated in Poland belongs to global epidemics of high level fluoroquinolone resistant clone ST198 that can carry rare β-lactamase genes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Sheep (Ovis aries) Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor: molecular cloning, characterization, tissue distribution and expression in the ewe reproductive tract and in the placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Federica; Vannoni, Alessandro; Sestini, Silvia; Casciaro, Alessandra; Carducci, Antonietta; Bartolommei, Sabrina; Toschi, Paola; Ptak, Grazyna; Cintorino, Marcella; Arcuri, Felice

    2011-06-01

    Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) is a pivotal regulator of innate and acquired immunity affecting the response and behavior of macrophages and lymphocytes. However, a number of studies indicated wider physiological functions for this cytokine to include key-roles in reproductive biology. The present study was designed to clone the coding sequence of sheep MIF, to examine the characteristics of the protein in vitro, and to evaluate its expression in sheep tissues and in the ewe reproductive tract in vivo. Ovine MIF cDNA consisted of 348 nucleotides encoding a 115 amino acids protein with an estimated molecular mass of 12,343 Da and an isoelectric point of 7.68. Sheep MIF shared high amino acid identity with the other mammalian MIF family members and showed parallel functions to human MIF, displaying enzymatic oxoreductase activity and inducing monocyte transmigration. Expression studies detected a MIF transcript in all the sheep tissues examined. Among reproductive tissues, MIF mRNA and protein were detected in the ovary, oviduct, uterus and placenta. These results indicate that sheep MIF shares crucial features with other MIF family members and delineate its potential involvement in several aspects of ovine physiology.

  18. Dissemination of a clone carrying a fosA3-harbouring plasmid mediates high fosfomycin resistance rate of KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yan; Shen, Ping; Wei, Zeqing; Liu, Lilin; He, Fang; Shi, Keren; Wang, Yanfei; Wang, Haiping; Yu, Yunsong

    2015-01-01

    Fosfomycin has been proposed as an adjunct to other active agents for treating KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae infections. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of fosfomycin resistance and plasmid-mediated resistance determinants among KPC-producing K. pneumoniae isolates from clinical samples in China. In total, 278 KPC-producing and 80 extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing (non-KPC-producing) clinical K. pneumoniae isolates were collected in 12 hospitals from 2010 to 2013. Fosfomycin susceptibility testing was carried out using the agar dilution method. Phylogenetic clonal patterns were revealed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Isolates were screened for plasmid-mediated fosfomycin resistance genes (fosA, fosA3 and fosC2) by PCR amplification. A plasmid was completely sequenced by next-generation sequencing. The fosfomycin resistance rate in KPC-producers (60.8%; 169/278) was significantly higher than in ESBL-producers (12.5%; 10/80). In addition, 94 KPC-producing isolates were positive for fosA3 and most of them were clonally related. A 23939-bp plasmid (pFOS18) co-harbouring fosA3 and bla(KPC-2) was completely sequenced, revealing that the fosA3 gene was flanked by two copies of IS26; however, bla(KPC-2) was located on a Tn3-Tn4401 integration structure. Although the fosA3 and blaKPC-2 genes are located on different transposon systems, they are able to spread together worldwide through plasmid transfer. Dissemination of the clone carrying the fosA3-harbouring plasmid mediates the high fosfomycin resistance rate of KPC-producing K. pneumoniae in China. Fosfomycin as an alternative option for treating infections caused by KPC-producing K. pneumoniae should not be recommended in hospitals in which fosfomycin-resistant clonal dissemination is emerging.

  19. Construction and characterization of a new simian/human immunodeficiency viruses clone carrying an env gene derived from a CRF07_BC strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yue; YANG Gui-bo; CHEN Qi-min; LIU Qiang; MENG Zhe-feng; GENG Yun-qi; QIAO Wen-tao; SHAO Yi-ming

    2009-01-01

    Background The CRF07_BC recombinant strain has been one of the most predominantly circulated HIV-1 strains in China, it is therefore necessary and urgent to develop a relevant animal model to evaluate candidate vaccines targeting HIV-1 CRF07_BC. A highly replication-competent simian/human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIV) construct containing the Chinese CRF07_BC HIV-1 env gene with the ability to infect Chinese rhesus monkeys would serve as an important tool in the development of HIV vaccines. The aim of this study was to examine whether SHIV XJDC6431 with the env fragment from a Chinese HIV-1 isolate virus could infect the human and monkey peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC), establish infection in Chinese rhesus macaque.Methods A SHIV strain was constructed by replacing the rev/env genes of SHIV KB9 with the corresponding fragment derived from the HIV-1 CRF07_BC strain. The infectious activity of the SHIV clones was determined in vitro in PBMCs from both non-human primate animals and humans. Finally, one Chinese rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatto) was infected with one SHIV via intravenous infusion.Results One SHIV clone designated as SHIV XJDC6431, was generated that could infect macaque and human PBMC. The virus produced from this clone also efficiently infected the CCR5-expressing GHOST cell lines, indicating that it uses CCR5 as its coreceptor. Finally, the virus was intravenously inoculated into one Chinese rhesus macaque. Eventually, the animal became infected as shown by the occurrence of viremia within 3 of infection. The viral load reached 10~5 copies of viral RNA per ml of plasma during the acute phase of infection and lasted for 10 weeks post infection. Conclusions We conclude that SHIV XJDC6431 is an R5-tropic chimeric virus, which can establish infection not only in vitro but also in vivo in the Chinese rhesus macaque. Although the animal inoculated with SHIV XJDC6431 became infected without developing a pathologic phenotype, the virus efficiently

  20. An Update of the Evolving Epidemic of blaKPC Carrying Klebsiella pneumoniae in Sicily, Italy, 2014: Emergence of Multiple Non-ST258 Clones.

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    Celestino Bonura

    Full Text Available In Italy, Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase producing K. pneumoniae (KPC-Kp strains are highly endemic and KPC producing CC258 is reported as the widely predominating clone. In Palermo, Italy, previous reports have confirmed this pattern. However, recent preliminary findings suggest that an epidemiological change is likely ongoing towards a polyclonal KPC-Kp spread. Here we present the results of molecular typing of 94 carbapenem non susceptible K. pneumoniae isolates detected during 2014 in the three different hospitals in Palermo, Italy.Ninety-four consecutive, non replicate carbapenem non susceptible isolates were identified in the three largest acute general hospitals in Palermo, Italy, in the six-month period March-August 2014. They were characterized by PCR for β-lactam, aminoglycoside and plasmid mediated fluoroquinolone resistance genetic determinants. The mgrB gene of the colistin resistant isolates was amplified and sequenced. Clonality was assessed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. Eight non-CC258 sequence types (STs were identified accounting for 60% of isolates. In particular, ST307 and ST273 accounted for 29% and 18% of isolates. CC258 isolates were more frequently susceptible to gentamicin and non-CC258 isolates to amikacin. Colistin non susceptibility was found in 42% of isolates. Modifications of mgrB were found in 32 isolates.Concurrent clonal expansion of some STs and lateral transmission of genetic resistance determinants are likely producing a thorough change of the KPC-Kp epidemiology in Palermo, Italy. In our setting mgrB inactivation proved to substantially contribute to colistin resistance. Our findings suggest the need to continuously monitor the KPC-Kp epidemiology and to assess by a nationwide survey the possible shifting towards a polyclonal epidemic.

  1. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of macrophage growth locus A (MglA) protein from Francisella tularensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subburaman, P.; Austin, B.P.; Shaw, G.X.; Waugh, D.S.; Ji, X. (NCI)

    2010-11-03

    Francisella tularensis, a potential bioweapon, causes a rare infectious disease called tularemia in humans and animals. The macrophage growth locus A (MglA) protein from F. tularensis associates with RNA polymerase to positively regulate the expression of multiple virulence factors that are required for its survival and replication within macrophages. The MglA protein was overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The crystals diffracted to 7.5 {angstrom} resolution at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory and belonged to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 1} or P6{sub 5}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 125, c = 54 {angstrom}.

  2. Persistent replication of a hepatitis C virus genotype 1b-based chimeric clone carrying E1, E2 and p6 regions from GB virus B in a New World monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Saori; Mori, Ken-Ichi; Higashino, Atsunori; Iwasaki, Yuki; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Maki, Noboru; Akari, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    The development of effective hepatitis C virus (HCV) vaccines is essential for the prevention of further HCV dissemination, especially in developing countries. Therefore the aim of this study is to establish a feasible and immunocompetent surrogate animal model of HCV infection that will help in evaluation of the protective efficacy of newly developing HCV vaccine candidates. To circumvent the narrow host range of HCV, an HCV genotype 1b-based chimeric clone carrying E1, E2 and p6 regions from GB virus B (GBV-B), which is closely related to HCV, was generated. The chimera between HCV and GBV-B, named HCV/G, replicated more efficiently as compared with the HCV clone in primary marmoset hepatocytes. Furthermore, it was found that the chimera persistently replicated in a tamarin for more than 2 years after intrahepatic inoculation of the chimeric RNA. Although relatively low (virus. Our results will help establish a novel non-human primate model for HCV infection on the basis of the HCV/G chimera in the major framework of the HCV genome.

  3. Development of K562 cell clones expressing β-globin mRNA carrying the β039 thalassaemia mutation for the screening of correctors of stop-codon mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatori, Francesca; Cantale, Vera; Breveglieri, Giulia; Zuccato, Cristina; Finotti, Alessia; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Borgatti, Monica; Feriotto, Giordana; Destro, Federica; Canella, Alessandro; Breda, Laura; Rivella, Stefano; Gambari, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Nonsense mutations, giving rise to UAA, UGA and UAG stop codons within the coding region of mRNAs, promote premature translational termination and are the leading cause of approx. 30 % of inherited diseases, including cystic fibrosis, Duchenne muscular dystrophy and thalassaemia. For instance, in β039-thalassaemia the CAG (glutamine) codon is mutated to the UAG stop codon, leading to premature translation termination and to mRNA destabilization through the well-described NMD (nonsense-mediated mRNA decay). In order to develop an approach facilitating translation and, therefore, protection from NMD, aminoglycoside antibiotics have been tested on mRNAs carrying premature stop codons. These drugs decrease the accuracy in the codon–anticodon base-pairing, inducing a ribosomal read-through of the premature termination codons. Interestingly, recent papers have described drugs designed and produced for suppressing premature translational termination, inducing a ribosomal read-through of premature but not normal termination codons. These findings have introduced new hopes for the development of a pharmacological approach to the therapy of β039-thalassaemia. In this context, we started the development of a cellular model of the β039-thalassaemia mutation that could be used for the screening of a high number of aminoglycosides and analogous molecules. To this aim, we produced a lentiviral construct containing the β039-thalassaemia globin gene under a minimal LCR (locus control region) control and used this construct for the transduction of K562 cells, subsequently subcloned, with the purpose to obtain several K562 clones with different integration copies of the construct. These clones were then treated with Geneticin (also known as G418) and other aminoglycosides and the production of β-globin was analysed by FACS analysis. The results obtained suggest that this experimental system is suitable for the characterization of correction of the β039-globin mutation causing

  4. Development of K562 cell clones expressing beta-globin mRNA carrying the beta039 thalassaemia mutation for the screening of correctors of stop-codon mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatori, Francesca; Cantale, Vera; Breveglieri, Giulia; Zuccato, Cristina; Finotti, Alessia; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Borgatti, Monica; Feriotto, Giordana; Destro, Federica; Canella, Alessandro; Breda, Laura; Rivella, Stefano; Gambari, Roberto

    2009-07-09

    Nonsense mutations, giving rise to UAA, UGA and UAG stop codons within the coding region of mRNAs, promote premature translational termination and are the leading cause of approx. 30% of inherited diseases, including cystic fibrosis, Duchenne muscular dystrophy and thalassaemia. For instance, in beta(0)39-thalassaemia the CAG (glutamine) codon is mutated to the UAG stop codon, leading to premature translation termination and to mRNA destabilization through the well-described NMD (nonsense-mediated mRNA decay). In order to develop an approach facilitating translation and, therefore, protection from NMD, aminoglycoside antibiotics have been tested on mRNAs carrying premature stop codons. These drugs decrease the accuracy in the codon-anticodon base-pairing, inducing a ribosomal read-through of the premature termination codons. Interestingly, recent papers have described drugs designed and produced for suppressing premature translational termination, inducing a ribosomal read-through of premature but not normal termination codons. These findings have introduced new hopes for the development of a pharmacological approach to the therapy of beta(0)39-thalassaemia. In this context, we started the development of a cellular model of the beta(0)39-thalassaemia mutation that could be used for the screening of a high number of aminoglycosides and analogous molecules. To this aim, we produced a lentiviral construct containing the beta(0)39-thalassaemia globin gene under a minimal LCR (locus control region) control and used this construct for the transduction of K562 cells, subsequently subcloned, with the purpose to obtain several K562 clones with different integration copies of the construct. These clones were then treated with Geneticin (also known as G418) and other aminoglycosides and the production of beta-globin was analysed by FACS analysis. The results obtained suggest that this experimental system is suitable for the characterization of correction of the beta(0

  5. The impact of intermittent versus continuous exposure to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor on selection of EGFR T790M-mutant drug-resistant clones in a lung cancer cell line carrying activating EGFR mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngjoo; Choi, Yu-Ra; Kim, Kyoung-Yeon; Shin, Dong Hoon

    2016-07-12

    Drug-resistant cell lines are essential tools for investigating the mechanisms of resistance to molecular-targeted anti-cancer drugs. However, little is known about how to establish clinically relevant drug-resistant cell lines. Our study examined the impact of a drug-free period on the establishment of a cell line with clinically relevant resistance to molecular-targeted drugs. We used PC9 cells, a lung cancer cell line carrying EGFR mutation, because this is a validated target for EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). PC9 cells were intermittently or continuously exposed to increasing concentrations of gefitinib (0.01 μM to 1.0 μM) and the emergence of the most common acquired resistance mutation in EGFR, T790M, was determined. T790M was detected at a 25-fold lower drug concentration in cells continuously exposed to gefitinib (PC9/GRc) than in cells intermittently exposed to gefitinib (PC9/GRi) (0.04 μM vs 1.0 μM, respectively). The mutation frequencies at those drug concentrations were 19.8% and 8.0% in PC9/GRc and PC9/GRi cells, respectively. After drug-free culture for 8 weeks, resistance to gefitinib decreased in the PC9/GRi cells but not in the PC9/GRc cells. In the PC9/GRc cells, the frequency of the T790M mutation was consistently about 20% from 0.04 μM to 1.0 μM of gefitinib. In the PC9/GRc cells, the T790M mutation was detected in all single-cell clones, at frequencies ranging from 7.0% to 37.0%, with a median of 19.5% (95% confidence interval, 17.3%-20.9%). In conclusion, compared with intermittent drug exposure, continuous exposure might select better minor drug-resistant clones when creating cell lines resistant to molecular-targeted drugs.

  6. Carrying Capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroll, Henning; Andersen, Jan; Kjærgård, Bente

    2012-01-01

    A spatial planning act was introduced inIndonesia 1992 and renewed in 2008. It emphasised the planning role of decentralised authorities. The spatial planning act covers both spatial and environmental issues. It defines the concept of carrying capacity and includes definitions of supportive...... carrying capacity (SCC) and assimilative carrying capacity (ACC). The act mandates that the latter two aspects must be taken into consideration in the local spatial plans. The present study aimed at developing a background for a national guideline for carrying capacity in Indonesian provinces and districts...... standard or governmental political objective exists. In most cases it was possible to select a set of indicators, including thresholds that are workable in a carrying capacity planning at the local administrative levels. Not all relevant sectors at the decentralized level were included. Indicators of SCC...

  7. Carrying Capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroll, Henning; Andersen, Jan; Kjærgård, Bente

    2012-01-01

    A spatial planning act was introduced inIndonesia 1992 and renewed in 2008. It emphasised the planning role of decentralised authorities. The spatial planning act covers both spatial and environmental issues. It defines the concept of carrying capacity and includes definitions of supportive...... and ACC may increase the political focus on resources and environmental issues and may help to move local authorities towards a more holistic spatial planning approach. A carrying capacity approach could be an inspiration for local spatial planning in developing countries. A spatial planning act...... was introduced inIndonesia 1992 and renewed in 2008. It emphasised the planning role of decentralised authorities. The spatial planning act covers both spatial and environmental issues. It defines the concept of carrying capacity and includes definitions of supportive carrying capacity (SCC) and assimilative...

  8. Why Clone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How might cloning be used in medicine? Cloning animal models of disease Much of what researchers learn ... issue of the genetic reshuffling that happensduring sexual reproduction and simply clone our drug-producing cow. Cloning ...

  9. What is Cloning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donate Home Cloning What is Cloning What is Cloning Clones are organisms that are exact genetic copies. ... clones made through modern cloning technologies. How Is Cloning Done? Many people first heard of cloning when ...

  10. Quantum cloning

    OpenAIRE

    Scarani, Valerio; Iblisdir, Sofyan; Gisin, Nicolas; Acin, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    The impossibility of perfectly copying (or cloning) an arbitrary quantum state is one of the basic rules governing the physics of quantum systems. The processes that perform the optimal approximate cloning have been found in many cases. These "quantum cloning machines" are important tools for studying a wide variety of tasks, e.g. state estimation and eavesdropping on quantum cryptography. This paper provides a comprehensive review of quantum cloning machines (both for discrete-dimensional an...

  11. BIGH3 protein and macrophages in retinal endothelial cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondragon, Albert A; Betts-Obregon, Brandi S; Moritz, Robert J; Parvathaneni, Kalpana; Navarro, Mary M; Kim, Hong Seok; Lee, Chi Fung; LeBaron, Richard G; Asmis, Reto; Tsin, Andrew T

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a pandemic disease with a higher occurrence in minority populations. The molecular mechanism to initiate diabetes-associated retinal angiogenesis remains largely unknown. We propose an inflammatory pathway of diabetic retinopathy in which macrophages in the diabetic eye provide TGFβ to retinal endothelial cells (REC) in the retinal microvasculature. In response to TGFβ, REC synthesize and secrete a pro-apoptotic BIGH3 (TGFβ-Induced Gene Human Clone 3) protein, which acts in an autocrine loop to induce REC apoptosis. Rhesus monkey retinal endothelial cells (RhREC) were treated with dMCM (cell media of macrophages treated with high glucose and LDL) and assayed for apoptosis (TUNEL), BIGH3 mRNA (qPCR), and protein (Western blots) expressions. Cells were also treated with ΤGFβ1 and 2 for BIGH3 mRNA and protein expression. Inhibition assays were carried out using antibodies for TGFβ1 and for BIGH3 to block apoptosis and mRNA expression. BIGH3 in cultured RhREC cells were identified by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Distribution of BIGH3 and macrophages in the diabetic mouse retina was examined with IHC. RhRECs treated with dMCM or TGFβ showed a significant increase in apoptosis and BIGH3 protein expression. Recombinant BIGH3 added to RhREC culture medium led to a dose-dependent increase in apoptosis. Antibodies (Ab) directed against BIGH3 and TGFβ, as well as TGFβ receptor blocker resulted in a significant reduction in apoptosis induced by either dMCM, TGFβ or BIGH3. IHC showed that cultured RhREC constitutively expressed BIGH3. Macrophage and BIGH3 protein were co-localized to the inner retina of the diabetic mouse eye. Our results support a novel inflammatory pathway for diabetic retinopathy. This pathway is initiated by TGFβ released from macrophages, which promotes synthesis and release of BIGH3 protein by REC and REC apoptosis.

  12. DNA Damage Signaling Instructs Polyploid Macrophage Fate in Granulomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrtwich, Laura; Nanda, Indrajit; Evangelou, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Granulomas are immune cell aggregates formed in response to persistent inflammatory stimuli. Granuloma macrophage subsets are diverse and carry varying copy numbers of their genomic information. The molecular programs that control the differentiation of such macrophage populations in response to ...

  13. Functional characterization of the turkey macrophage migration inhibitory factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a soluble protein that inhibits the random migration of macrophages and plays a pivotal immunoregulatory function in innate and adaptive immunity. The aim of this study was to clone the turkey MIF (TkMIF) gene, express the active protein, and characte...

  14. Academic Cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikula, John P.; Sikula, Andrew F.

    1980-01-01

    The authors define "cloning" as an integral feature of all educational systems, citing teaching practices which reward students for closely reproducing the teacher's thoughts and/or behaviors and administrative systems which tend to promote like-minded subordinates. They insist, however, that "academic cloning" is not a totally…

  15. Prevalence of ST1193 clone and IncI1/ST16 plasmid in E-coli isolates carrying blaCTX-M-55 gene from urinary tract infections patients in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Liang; Liu, Yang; Xia, Shu; Kudinha, Timothy; Xiao, Shu-Nian; Zhong, Nan-Shan; Ren, Guo-Sheng; Zhuo, Chao

    2017-03-24

    To study molecular epidemiology of CTX-M-55-carrying Escherichia coli isolates from urinary tract infections (UTIs) in China. 111 blaCTX-M-55-positive E.coli isolates from UTIs patients in China were studied. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were used to analyze the homologies among the strains. Conjugation experiments, S1nuclease PFGE and PCR analysis were performed to characterize plasmids harboring blaCTX-M-55 and their genetic environment. 111 isolates were clustered into 86 individual pulsotypes and three clusters by PFGE. Fifty-five (49.5%) of the isolates belonged to 8 STs. Most of the ST1193 isolates belonged to one PFGE cluster. Transconjugants (n = 45) derived from randomly selected blaCTX-M-55 donors (n = 58), were found to contain a single 90-kb conjugative plasmid, which mainly belonged to the IncI1 groups (34, 76%). Among the IncI1 plasmids, the blaCTX-M-55/IncI1/ST16 predominated (23/34, 68%). The blaTEM-1 and aac (3')-II genes were frequently detected on the IncI1 plasmids, and the insertion of ISEcp1 or IS26 was observed at the 48 bp or 45 bp upstream of the start codon of blaCTX-M-55 gene. The dissemination of blaCTX-M-55 gene among E. coli UTI isolates, appeared to be due to both the major clonal lineage of ST1193 and the horizontal transfer of epidemic plasmid IncI1/ST16.

  16. Prevalence of ST1193 clone and IncI1/ST16 plasmid in E-coli isolates carrying blaCTX-M-55 gene from urinary tract infections patients in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Liang; Liu, Yang; Xia, Shu; Kudinha, Timothy; Xiao, Shu-nian; Zhong, Nan-shan; Ren, Guo-sheng; Zhuo, Chao

    2017-01-01

    To study molecular epidemiology of CTX-M-55-carrying Escherichia coli isolates from urinary tract infections (UTIs) in China. 111 blaCTX-M-55-positive E.coli isolates from UTIs patients in China were studied. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were used to analyze the homologies among the strains. Conjugation experiments, S1nuclease PFGE and PCR analysis were performed to characterize plasmids harboring blaCTX-M-55 and their genetic environment. 111 isolates were clustered into 86 individual pulsotypes and three clusters by PFGE. Fifty-five (49.5%) of the isolates belonged to 8 STs. Most of the ST1193 isolates belonged to one PFGE cluster. Transconjugants (n = 45) derived from randomly selected blaCTX-M-55 donors (n = 58), were found to contain a single 90-kb conjugative plasmid, which mainly belonged to the IncI1 groups (34, 76%). Among the IncI1 plasmids, the blaCTX-M-55/IncI1/ST16 predominated (23/34, 68%). The blaTEM-1 and aac (3′)-II genes were frequently detected on the IncI1 plasmids, and the insertion of ISEcp1 or IS26 was observed at the 48 bp or 45 bp upstream of the start codon of blaCTX-M-55 gene. The dissemination of blaCTX-M-55 gene among E. coli UTI isolates, appeared to be due to both the major clonal lineage of ST1193 and the horizontal transfer of epidemic plasmid IncI1/ST16. PMID:28338012

  17. Classically activated macrophages promote anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent clone formation of breast cancer cells%经典激活巨噬细胞促进乳腺癌细胞贴壁和非贴壁克隆形成

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈静琦; 朱必胜; 侯开连

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨经典激活巨噬细胞(M1)对乳腺癌细胞贴壁和非贴壁克隆形成的影响,进一步阐明M1促乳腺癌进展的作用.方法 用密度梯度离心法,从健康成人外周血中分离单个核细胞,体外诱导M1.在乳腺癌细胞与巨噬细胞的无血清共培养体系中,做平板克隆实验;在M1-乳腺癌细胞软琼脂培养体系中,做非贴壁克隆形成实验,检测M1对乳腺癌贴壁克隆和非贴壁克隆形成的影响.结果 在M1的作用下,乳腺癌SK-3rd细胞贴壁克隆和非贴壁克隆形成的能力均增强(P<0.001).结论 M1促进乳腺癌细胞贴壁克隆和非贴壁克隆的形成.%Objective To investigate the effect of activated microphages (M1) on the clone formation of breast cancer cells.Methods Mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood of adult normal subjects by density gradient centrifugation,and M1 was induced in vitro.In the serum-free co-culture system of breast cancer cells and macrophages,the fiat cloning assay was performed and in soft agar culture system of Ml-breast cancer cells,anchorage-independent clone formation assay was performed.Results The anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent clone formation of SK-3rd breast cancer cells was induced by M1 (P < 0.001).Conclusion M1 promotes anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent clone formation of breast cancer cells.

  18. Molecular cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessard, Juliane C

    2013-01-01

    This protocol describes the basic steps involved in conventional plasmid-based cloning. The goals are to insert a DNA fragment of interest into a receiving vector plasmid, transform the plasmid into E. coli, recover the plasmid DNA, and check for correct insertion events.

  19. Human Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-20

    genes , for example, has led to new treatments developed by the biotechnology industry for diseases such as diabetes and hemophilia . In the context of...stem cells should be permitted because of the potential for developing new therapies and advancing biomedical knowledge. On May 24, 2005, the House...to describe many different processes that involve making copies of biological material, such as a gene , a cell, a plant or an animal. The cloning of

  20. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacks, S.A.

    1991-12-31

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA and chromosomal DNA cloned by this method are disclosed. The method includes the selection of a target organism having a segment of chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned. A first DNA segment, having a first restriction enzyme site on either side. homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  1. The genetic basis of Escherichia coli pathoadaptation to macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Migla Miskinyte

    Full Text Available Antagonistic interactions are likely important driving forces of the evolutionary process underlying bacterial genome complexity and diversity. We hypothesized that the ability of evolved bacteria to escape specific components of host innate immunity, such as phagocytosis and killing by macrophages (MΦ, is a critical trait relevant in the acquisition of bacterial virulence. Here, we used a combination of experimental evolution, phenotypic characterization, genome sequencing and mathematical modeling to address how fast, and through how many adaptive steps, a commensal Escherichia coli (E. coli acquire this virulence trait. We show that when maintained in vitro under the selective pressure of host MΦ commensal E. coli can evolve, in less than 500 generations, virulent clones that escape phagocytosis and MΦ killing in vitro, while increasing their pathogenicity in vivo, as assessed in mice. This pathoadaptive process is driven by a mechanism involving the insertion of a single transposable element into the promoter region of the E. coli yrfF gene. Moreover, transposition of the IS186 element into the promoter of Lon gene, encoding an ATP-dependent serine protease, is likely to accelerate this pathoadaptive process. Competition between clones carrying distinct beneficial mutations dominates the dynamics of the pathoadaptive process, as suggested from a mathematical model, which reproduces the observed experimental dynamics of E. coli evolution towards virulence. In conclusion, we reveal a molecular mechanism explaining how a specific component of host innate immunity can modulate microbial evolution towards pathogenicity.

  2. Nanomedicine engulfed by macrophages for targeted tumor therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Siwen; Feng, Song; Ding, Li; Liu, Yuxi; Zhu, Qiuyun; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages, exhibiting high intrinsic accumulation and infiltration into tumor tissues, are a novel drug vehicle for directional drug delivery. However, the low drug-loading (DL) capacity and the drug cytotoxicity to the cell vehicle have limited the application of macrophages in tumor therapy. In this study, different drugs involving small molecular and nanoparticle drugs were loaded into intrinsic macrophages to find a better way to overcome these limitations. Their DL capacity and cytotoxicity to the macrophages were first compared. Furthermore, their phagocytic ratio, dynamic distributions, and tumoricidal effects were also investigated. Results indicated that more lipid-soluble molecules and DL particles can be phagocytized by macrophages than hydrophilic ones. In addition, the N-succinyl-N′-octyl chitosan (SOC) DL particles showed low cytotoxicity to the macrophage itself, while the dynamic biodistribution of macrophages engulfed with different particles/small molecules showed similar profiles, mainly excreted from liver to intestine pathway. Furthermore, macrophages loaded with SOC–paclitaxel (PTX) particles exhibited greater therapeutic efficacies than those of macrophages directly carrying small molecular drugs such as doxorubicin and PTX. Interestingly, macrophages displayed stronger targeting ability to the tumor site hypersecreting chemokine in immunocompetent mice in comparison to the tumor site secreting low levels of chemokine in immunodeficiency mice. Finally, results demonstrated that macrophages carrying SOC–PTX are a promising pharmaceutical preparation for tumor-targeted therapy. PMID:27601898

  3. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacks, S.A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes. 9 figs.

  4. Analysis of Sister Carrie

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙淑珍

    2004-01-01

    Chapter Ⅰ Introduction  Sitting in the rocking chair,Carrie dreams her future.This is the deep impression the novel"Sister Carrie"gives us,which is written by Theodore Dreiser(1871-1945),the great American realism writer.  ……

  5. Characterization of Neospora caninum macrophage migration inhibitory factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study is the first characterization of Neospora caninum macrophage migration inhibitory factor (NcMIF). BLAST-N analysis of NcMIF revealed high similarity (87%) to the Toxoplasma gondii MIF. NcMIF was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli in three forms, NcMIF (mature protein), NcMI...

  6. Sister Carrie in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷希

    2015-01-01

    Sister Carrie has received many Chinese scholar's attention, and it has quantity relevance researches. Therefore, it is valuable to study why it is popular in China and it's education meaning for Chinese people. In addition, to analysis the domestic re-searches and find it's exist problems can help us make a new breakthrough from the study.

  7. The Clone Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Beryl

    2005-01-01

    Have humans been cloned? Is it possible? Immediate interest is sparked when students are asked these questions. In response to their curiosity, the clone factory activity was developed to help them understand the process of cloning. In this activity, students reenact the cloning process, in a very simplified simulation. After completing the…

  8. Cloning of observables

    OpenAIRE

    Ferraro, Alessandro; Galbiati, Matteo; Paris, Matteo G. A.

    2005-01-01

    We introduce the concept of cloning for classes of observables and classify cloning machines for qubit systems according to the number of parameters needed to describe the class under investigation. A no-cloning theorem for observables is derived and the connections between cloning of observables and joint measurements of noncommuting observables are elucidated. Relationships with cloning of states and non-demolition measurements are also analyzed.

  9. Modulation of Macrophage Efferocytosis in Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darlynn R Korns

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A critical function of macrophages within the inflammatory milieu is the removal of dying cells by a specialized phagocytic process called efferocytosis (to carry to the grave. Through specific receptor engagement and induction of downstream signaling, efferocytosing macrophages promote resolution of inflammation by i efficiently engulfing dying cells, thus avoiding cellular disruption and release of inflammatory contents, and ii producing anti-inflammatory mediators such as IL-10 and TGF-β that dampen pro-inflammatory responses. Evidence suggests that plasticity in macrophage programming, in response to changing environmental cues, modulates efferocytic capability. Essential to programming for enhanced efferocytosis is activation of the nuclear receptors PPARγ, PPARδ, LXR and possibly RXRα. Additionally, a number of signals in the inflammatory milieu, including those from dying cells themselves, can influence efferocytic efficacy either by acting as immediate inhibitors/enhancers or by altering macrophage programming for longer-term effects. Importantly, sustained inflammatory programming of macrophages can lead to defective apoptotic cell clearance and is associated with development of autoimmunity and other chronic inflammatory disorders. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the multiple factors that modulate macrophage efferocytic ability and highlights emerging therapeutic targets with significant potential for limiting chronic inflammation.

  10. Nanomedicine engulfed by macrophages for targeted tumor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li S

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Siwen Li,1,* Song Feng,1,* Li Ding,1 Yuxi Liu,1 Qiuyun Zhu,1 Zhiyu Qian,2 Yueqing Gu1 1Department of Biomedical Engineering, China Pharmaceutical University, 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Automation, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Macrophages, exhibiting high intrinsic accumulation and infiltration into tumor tissues, are a novel drug vehicle for directional drug delivery. However, the low drug-loading (DL capacity and the drug cytotoxicity to the cell vehicle have limited the application of macrophages in tumor therapy. In this study, different drugs involving small molecular and nanoparticle drugs were loaded into intrinsic macrophages to find a better way to overcome these limitations. Their DL capacity and cytotoxicity to the macrophages were first compared. Furthermore, their phagocytic ratio, dynamic distributions, and tumoricidal effects were also investigated. Results indicated that more lipid-soluble molecules and DL particles can be phagocytized by macrophages than hydrophilic ones. In addition, the N-succinyl-N'-octyl chitosan (SOC DL particles showed low cytotoxicity to the macrophage itself, while the dynamic biodistribution of macrophages engulfed with different particles/small molecules showed similar profiles, mainly excreted from liver to intestine pathway. Furthermore, macrophages loaded with SOC–paclitaxel (PTX particles exhibited greater therapeutic efficacies than those of macrophages directly carrying small molecular drugs such as doxorubicin and PTX. Interestingly, macrophages displayed stronger targeting ability to the tumor site hypersecreting chemokine in immunocompetent mice in comparison to the tumor site secreting low levels of chemokine in immunodeficiency mice. Finally, results demonstrated that macrophages carrying SOC–PTX are a promising pharmaceutical preparation

  11. "Christian carrying goomies".

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Dr. Passingan Usurup tells critics of his pragmatic approach on condom promotion that he is a Christian carrying condoms for Christ. He is head of the University of Papua New Guinea Medical Center and is credited with developing an AIDS/HIV policy for the Papua New Guinea Defence Force. The condoms were named Goomy and promoted at launching in 1992 in a blue packet under the slogan "The bond that guards." Goomy was chosen as the name because it is pidgin for rubber, chewing gum, and anything associated with rubber. Blue packets were chosen over the calls of most soldiers for a camouflage design because of its universal appeal as the color of the sea and sky and because it was the preference of women in the airlines. Once firmly ensconced in his role at the University, Usurup plans to develop a policy for students and staff and help to conduct AIDS prevention and education activities on campus. He will encourage students to test for HIV rather than highlighting the gloom and doom of infection and disease.

  12. Statement on Human Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ban on efforts to implant a human cloned embryo for the purpose of reproduction. The scientific evidence ... stem cell research, including the use of nuclear transplantation techniques (also known as research or therapeutic cloning), ...

  13. Ethical issues in cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satris, S

    2000-01-01

    There is great public concern with the ethics of human cloning. This paper briefly examines some of what I identify as pseudo-problems or myths associated with cloning, and some of the more substantial ethical concerns.

  14. Glutamine Modulates Macrophage Lipotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li He

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and diabetes are associated with excessive inflammation and impaired wound healing. Increasing evidence suggests that macrophage dysfunction is responsible for these inflammatory defects. In the setting of excess nutrients, particularly dietary saturated fatty acids (SFAs, activated macrophages develop lysosome dysfunction, which triggers activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and cell death. The molecular pathways that connect lipid stress to lysosome pathology are not well understood, but may represent a viable target for therapy. Glutamine uptake is increased in activated macrophages leading us to hypothesize that in the context of excess lipids glutamine metabolism could overwhelm the mitochondria and promote the accumulation of toxic metabolites. To investigate this question we assessed macrophage lipotoxicity in the absence of glutamine using LPS-activated peritoneal macrophages exposed to the SFA palmitate. We found that glutamine deficiency reduced lipid induced lysosome dysfunction, inflammasome activation, and cell death. Under glutamine deficient conditions mTOR activation was decreased and autophagy was enhanced; however, autophagy was dispensable for the rescue phenotype. Rather, glutamine deficiency prevented the suppressive effect of the SFA palmitate on mitochondrial respiration and this phenotype was associated with protection from macrophage cell death. Together, these findings reveal that crosstalk between activation-induced metabolic reprogramming and the nutrient microenvironment can dramatically alter macrophage responses to inflammatory stimuli.

  15. Clonal analysis of proliferation and differentiation of paired daughter cells: action of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor on granulocyte-macrophage precursors.

    OpenAIRE

    Metcalf, D.

    1980-01-01

    Mouse granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells were stimulated to divide by the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). The two daughter cells were separated; one daughter was transferred to medium containing a high concentration of GM-CSF, the other to medium containing a low concentration. Daughter cell-derived clones in the presence of 2500 units of GM-CSF had average cell cycle times 3.5 +/- 2.5 (SEM) hr shorter than clones derived from the paired daughter cell stimulate...

  16. Mammalian cloning: possibilities and threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitalipov, S M; Wolf, D P

    2000-10-01

    The cloning of mammals originated with the production of limited numbers of genetically identical offspring by blastomere separation or embryo splitting. In the past few years, remarkable progress has been reported in cloning by nuclear transfer (NT) with donor nuclei recovered from embryonic, fetal or adult cells. Factors that contribute to the successful reprogramming of the transferred nucleus and the normal term development of the newly reconstructed embryo include the cell cycle stage of both the donor nucleus and recipient cytoplast, the timing of fusion and cytoplast activation, and the source of donor nuclei. The possibility of producing live offspring by somatic cell NT carries potential applications in animal husbandry, biotechnology, transgenic and pharmaceutical production, biomedical research, and the preservation of endangered species. However, the low efficiencies of cloning by NT coupled with high embryonic, fetal and neonatal losses may restrict immediate commercial applications in agriculture. These limitations notwithstanding, the greatest benefits and practical implications of this new technology could be in transplantation medicine and therapeutic cloning.

  17. Quick and clean cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Frank; Marillonnet, Sylvestre

    2014-01-01

    Identification of unknown sequences that flank known sequences of interest requires PCR amplification of DNA fragments that contain the junction between the known and unknown flanking sequences. Since amplified products often contain a mixture of specific and nonspecific products, the quick and clean (QC) cloning procedure was developed to clone specific products only. QC cloning is a ligation-independent cloning procedure that relies on the exonuclease activity of T4 DNA polymerase to generate single-stranded extensions at the ends of the vector and insert. A specific feature of QC cloning is the use of vectors that contain a sequence called catching sequence that allows cloning specific products only. QC cloning is performed by a one-pot incubation of insert and vector in the presence of T4 DNA polymerase at room temperature for 10 min followed by direct transformation of the incubation mix in chemo-competent Escherichia coli cells.

  18. Predominance of Three Closely Related Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clones Carrying a Unique ccrC-Positive SCCmec type III and the Emergence of spa t304 and t690 SCCmec type IV pvl(+) MRSA Isolates in Kinta Valley, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Wai-Yew; Choo, Quok-Cheong; Chew, Choy-Hoong

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the epidemiology and clonality of 175 nonrepetitive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates from clinical specimens collected between 2011 and 2012 in Kinta Valley in Malaysia. Molecular tools such as polymerase chain reaction, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and staphylococcal protein A (spa) typing were used. Our study revealed the predominance of three closely related ermA(+) SCCmec type III pulsotypes belonging to spa type t037 (Brazilian-Hungarian clone), which were deficient in the locus F, but positive for the ccrC gene in majority (65.7%) of the MRSA infections in this region. The first evidence of SCCmec type II MRSA in the country, belonging to spa type t2460, was also noted. Although the carriage of pvl gene was uncommon (8.6%) and mostly confined to either SCCmec type IV or SCCmec type V isolates, most of these isolates belonged to spa types t345 or t657, which are associated with the Bengal-Bay CA-MRSA clone. Interestingly, spa t304 and t690 SCCmec type IV pvl(+) were also detected among the MRSA isolates. Data from this study show the rise of uncommon clones among MRSA isolates in Malaysia.

  19. Exponential megapriming PCR (EMP) cloning--seamless DNA insertion into any target plasmid without sequence constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Alexander; Andersen, Kasper R; Schwartz, Thomas U

    2012-01-01

    We present a fast, reliable and inexpensive restriction-free cloning method for seamless DNA insertion into any plasmid without sequence limitation. Exponential megapriming PCR (EMP) cloning requires two consecutive PCR steps and can be carried out in one day. We show that EMP cloning has a higher efficiency than restriction-free (RF) cloning, especially for long inserts above 2.5 kb. EMP further enables simultaneous cloning of multiple inserts.

  20. Exponential megapriming PCR (EMP cloning--seamless DNA insertion into any target plasmid without sequence constraints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Ulrich

    Full Text Available We present a fast, reliable and inexpensive restriction-free cloning method for seamless DNA insertion into any plasmid without sequence limitation. Exponential megapriming PCR (EMP cloning requires two consecutive PCR steps and can be carried out in one day. We show that EMP cloning has a higher efficiency than restriction-free (RF cloning, especially for long inserts above 2.5 kb. EMP further enables simultaneous cloning of multiple inserts.

  1. Intracellular survival of Clostridium chauvoei in bovine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Prhiscylla Sadanã; Santos, Renato Lima; da Paixão, Tatiane Alves; de Oliveira Bernardes, Laura Cristina; de Macêdo, Auricélio Alves; Gonçalves, Luciana Aramuni; de Oliveira Júnior, Carlos Augusto; Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria

    2017-02-01

    Clostridium chauvoei is the etiological agent of blackleg, a severe disease of domestic ruminants, causing myonecrosis and serious toxemia with high mortality. Despite the known importance of this agent, studies evaluating its pathogenesis of blackleg are scarce, and many are based on an unproven hypothesis that states that macrophages are responsible for carrying C. chauvoei spores from the intestines to muscles in the early stages of blackleg. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the survival of C. chauvoei vegetative cells or spores after phagocytosis by a murine macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7) and bovine monocyte-derived macrophages and to profile inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine transcripts of bovine macrophages infected with C. chauvoei vegetative cells or spores. Both vegetative cells and spores of C. chauvoei remain viable after internalization by murine and bovine macrophages. Bovine macrophages infected with vegetative cells showed a pro-inflammatory profile, while those infected with spores displayed an anti-inflammatory profile. Together, these results corroborate the classical hypothesis that macrophages may play a role in the early pathogenesis of blackleg. Moreover, this is the first study to evaluate the infection kinetics and cytokine profile of bovine monocyte-derived macrophages infected with a Clostridium species.

  2. Statement on Human Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as our understanding of this technology advances. Support Stem Cell Research (including Research Cloning) AAAS supports stem cell research, including the use of nuclear transplantation techniques (also ...

  3. [Macrophages in asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina Avalos, M A; Orea Solano, M

    1997-01-01

    Every time they exist more demonstrations of the paper than performs the line monocytes-macrophage in the patogenesis of the bronchial asthma. The mononuclear phagocytes cells, as the alveolar macrophages, also they can be activated during allergic methods. The monocytes macrophages are possible efficient inductors of the inflammation; this due to the fact that they can secrete inflammatory mediators, between those which are counted the pre-forming granules of peptides, metabolites of oxidation activation, activator of platelets activator and metabolites of the arachidonic acid. The identification of IL-1 in the liquidate of the bronchial ablution of sick asthmatic, as well as the identification of IL-1 in the I bronchioalveolar washing of places of allergens cutaneous prick, supports the activation concept mononuclear of phagocytic cells in allergic sufferings.

  4. Macrophages and Iron Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Miguel P; Hamza, Iqbal

    2016-03-15

    Iron is a transition metal that due to its inherent ability to exchange electrons with a variety of molecules is essential to support life. In mammals, iron exists mostly in the form of heme, enclosed within an organic protoporphyrin ring and functioning primarily as a prosthetic group in proteins. Paradoxically, free iron also has the potential to become cytotoxic when electron exchange with oxygen is unrestricted and catalyzes the production of reactive oxygen species. These biological properties demand that iron metabolism is tightly regulated such that iron is available for core biological functions while preventing its cytotoxic effects. Macrophages play a central role in establishing this delicate balance. Here, we review the impact of macrophages on heme-iron metabolism and, reciprocally, how heme-iron modulates macrophage function.

  5. Cloning of the Bovine Natural Resistance-associated Macrophage Protein Ⅰ Gene Isoform (NRA MPI-ISO) and Its Expression in the Cells and the Tissues%牛巨噬细胞天然抗性蛋白Ⅰ基因可变剪接体(NRAMPI-ISO)的克隆及在细胞和组织中的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程祥; 邓捷; 孟书燕; 来威锋; 王华岩

    2011-01-01

    巨噬细胞天然抗性蛋白1 (NRAMP1)可抑制结核分枝杆菌(Mycobacterium)和布氏杆菌(Brucella)等多种胞内寄生病原菌的感染,提高动物机体的抗病能力.本研究从秦川牛脾脏中克隆了NRA MP1基因的一种可变剪接体NRA MPI-ISO,序列分析表明,NRA MPI-ISO比NRAMP1多了第3个内含子,从而导致编码序列提前终止于第3个内含子,NRA MPI-ISO编码200个氨基酸.为了探索可变剪接体NRAMPI-ISO的表达情况,本研究分别构建了原核表达载体pET-41-NRA MPI-ISO和真核表达载体pEGFP-NRA MPI-ISO.原核表达载体pET-41 -NRA MPI-ISO可在不同浓度的IPTG诱导下在大肠杆菌BL21中高效表达.真核表达载体pEGFP-NRA MPI-ISO转染牛成纤维细胞后,EGFP-NRAMP 1-ISO融合蛋白分布在细胞核和细胞质中,而正常的NRAMP1蛋白只分布在细胞质的溶酶体膜周围.半定量RT-PCR检测表明,NRA MPI-ISO基因在心、脾脏、肺脏等组织有较高的表达,而在脑、胰、生殖嵴中的表达量相对较低.本研究为进一步研究NRA MPI-ISO基因生物学功能提供了重要信息.%Natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (NRAMP1) can defense the invasion of the intracellular bacteria such as Mycobacterium and Brucella to improve the ability of resisting disease, hi this study we cloned a NRAMP1 isoform from the spleen of Qinchuan Bos Taurus. Sequence analysis showed that NRAMP1 isoform had a third intron in comparison with NRAMP1, which resulted in the protein only containing 200 amino acids because the translation stopped in the third intron. In order to get further study on the expression of NRAMP1-ISO, we constructed the prokaryotic expression vector pET-41-NRAMP1-ISO and the eukaryotic expression vector pEGFP-NRAMPl-ISO. The prokaryotic expression vector pET-41-NRAMPl-ISO could efficiently express in the BL21 Escherichia coli under different concentrations of the IPTG. The eukaryotic expression vector pEGFP-MRAMP1-ISO could both express in the

  6. Comparison and early selection of new clones in Populus tomentosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zi-hui; WANG Ze-Liang; LIN Shan-zhi; ZHANG Zhi-yi

    2008-01-01

    In our study, two experimental plantations, respectively, with 24 and 32 new clones of P. tomentosa, were established in Weixian County, Hebei Province and Wuzhi County, Henan Province using a completely randomized block design. A comparative study was conducted on the continuous 5-year-old height and diameter at breast height (DBH) of new clones in the two plantations. As well, based on genetic correlation over the years of testing of these clones, a preliminary study of early selection was carried out. Results indicate that the growth traits of the new clones in Weixian were better than those in Wuzhi The traits show weak correlation between the two plantations. In some stands, the height, DBH and seedling volume of 5-year-old clones presented statistically sig-nificant differences among clones. In both plantations, the new clones showed over 0.6 repeatability of beight, DBH and volume, as well as larger coefficients of variation (CV). The fact that these clones achieved the largest repeatability and CV in the second year suggests that these traits are highly controlled by heredity. Thus, based on the growth traits of the second year, the new clones B305, B307, B303, H75, BT18, BTI7 and 21J-1 were considered suitable in Weixian. hi Wuzhi, the new clones had variable repeatability and CVs in various years and their correlation of growth traits among different years was not high. We conclude that early selection of new clones was not feasible in Wuzhi.

  7. Cell elasticity determines macrophage function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naimish R Patel

    Full Text Available Macrophages serve to maintain organ homeostasis in response to challenges from injury, inflammation, malignancy, particulate exposure, or infection. Until now, receptor ligation has been understood as being the central mechanism that regulates macrophage function. Using macrophages of different origins and species, we report that macrophage elasticity is a major determinant of innate macrophage function. Macrophage elasticity is modulated not only by classical biologic activators such as LPS and IFN-γ, but to an equal extent by substrate rigidity and substrate stretch. Macrophage elasticity is dependent upon actin polymerization and small rhoGTPase activation, but functional effects of elasticity are not predicted by examination of gene expression profiles alone. Taken together, these data demonstrate an unanticipated role for cell elasticity as a common pathway by which mechanical and biologic factors determine macrophage function.

  8. Complex determinants of macrophage tropism in env of simian immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, K; Ringler, D J; Kodama, T; Desrosiers, R C

    1992-04-01

    Macrophage-tropic virus variants evolved during the course of infection of individual rhesus monkeys with cloned, non-macrophagetropic simian immunodeficiency virus. Specific changes in the envelope gene (env) were found to be primarily responsible for the dramatic increase in the ability of the virus to replicate in macrophages. Cloned viruses differing at nine amino acid positions in env exhibited a more than 100-fold difference in replicative capacity for primary cultures of rhesus monkey alveolar macrophages. At least five of the nine amino acid changes contributed to macrophage tropism. These determinants were distributed across the full length of env, including both the gp120 and gp41 products of the env gene. Furthermore, the emergence of macrophagetropic variants in vivo was associated with specific pathologic manifestations in which the macrophage is the major infected cell type. Thus, major determinants of macrophage tropism reside in env, they can be complex in nature, and the presence of macrophage-tropic virus variants in vivo can influence the disease course and disease manifestations.

  9. Cloning-free CRISPR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arbab, Mandana; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Hashimoto, Tatsunori; Geijsen, Niels; Sherwood, Richard I

    2015-01-01

    We present self-cloning CRISPR/Cas9 (scCRISPR), a technology that allows for CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genomic mutation and site-specific knockin transgene creation within several hours by circumventing the need to clone a site-specific single-guide RNA (sgRNA) or knockin homology construct for each targ

  10. Cloning-free CRISPR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arbab, Mandana; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Hashimoto, Tatsunori; Geijsen, Niels; Sherwood, Richard I

    2015-01-01

    We present self-cloning CRISPR/Cas9 (scCRISPR), a technology that allows for CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genomic mutation and site-specific knockin transgene creation within several hours by circumventing the need to clone a site-specific single-guide RNA (sgRNA) or knockin homology construct for each

  11. Cloning-free CRISPR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arbab, Mandana; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Hashimoto, Tatsunori; Geijsen, Niels|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/194303403; Sherwood, Richard I

    2015-01-01

    We present self-cloning CRISPR/Cas9 (scCRISPR), a technology that allows for CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genomic mutation and site-specific knockin transgene creation within several hours by circumventing the need to clone a site-specific single-guide RNA (sgRNA) or knockin homology construct for each targ

  12. On fast carry select adders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamanna, M.; Whitaker, S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an architecture for a high-speed carry select adder with very long bit lengths utilizing a conflict-free bypass scheme. The proposed scheme has almost half the number of transistors and is faster than a conventional carry select adder. A comparative study is also made between the proposed adder and a Manchester carry chain adder which shows that the proposed scheme has the same transistor count, without suffering any performance degradation, compared to the Manchester carry chain adder.

  13. On fast carry select adders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamanna, M.; Whitaker, S.

    This paper presents an architecture for a high-speed carry select adder with very long bit lengths utilizing a conflict-free bypass scheme. The proposed scheme has almost half the number of transistors and is faster than a conventional carry select adder. A comparative study is also made between the proposed adder and a Manchester carry chain adder which shows that the proposed scheme has the same transistor count, without suffering any performance degradation, compared to the Manchester carry chain adder.

  14. Effects of formocresol alone vs. formocresol with eugenol on macrophage adhesion to plastic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, J J; Jiménez-Rubio, A; Calvo, J R

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the in-vitro effects of a European-based formocresol formulation that incorporates eugenol with formocresol alone on the adhesion of macrophages to plastic surfaces. Macrophages were obtained from Wistar rats. The adherence capacity of macrophages to a plastic surface was determined. Assays were carried out in Eppendorf tubes incubated for 15 min at 37 degrees C in a humidified atmosphere of 5% CO2. The adherence index was calculated. Results showed that both formocresol/eugenol and formocresol alone significantly decreased the adherence index of macrophages. The formocresol formulation that incorporated eugenol was more potent in inhibiting macrophage adhesion than formocresol alone. Taking into account that adherence to a substrate is the first step in the phagocytic process of macrophages and in antigen presentation, both formocresol formulations could inhibit macrophage function and modulate immune and inflammatory responses in dental pulp and periapical tissues.

  15. Seedling test and genetic analysis of white poplar hybrid clones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bo; JIANG Xi-bing; ZHANG You-hui; ZHANG Zhi-yi; LI Shan-wen; AN Xin-min

    2008-01-01

    Cross breeding strategies are very efficient for gaining new and superior genotypes. Ninety-eight new white poplar hybrid clones produced from 12 cross combinations within the Section Leuce Duby were studied using genetic analysis and seedling tests. We exploited the wide variation that exists in this population and found that the differences among diameter at breast height (DBH), root collar diameter (RCD) and height (H) were statistically extremely significant. The repeatability of clones of these measured traits ranged from 0.947-0.967, which indicated that these Waits were strongly controlled by genetic factors. Based on multiple comparisons, a total of 25 clones showed better performance in growth than the conlrol cultivar. These 25 clones were from six different cross combinations, which can guarantee a larger genetic background for future new clone promotion projects. This study provides a simple overview on these clones and can guide us to carry out subsequent selection plans.

  16. Transcriptional Regulation and Macrophage Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, David A; Summers, Kim M; Rehli, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are professional phagocytes that occupy specific niches in every tissue of the body. Their survival, proliferation, and differentiation are controlled by signals from the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (CSF-1R) and its two ligands, CSF-1 and interleukin-34. In this review, we address the developmental and transcriptional relationships between hematopoietic progenitor cells, blood monocytes, and tissue macrophages as well as the distinctions from dendritic cells. A huge repertoire of receptors allows monocytes, tissue-resident macrophages, or pathology-associated macrophages to adapt to specific microenvironments. These processes create a broad spectrum of macrophages with different functions and individual effector capacities. The production of large transcriptomic data sets in mouse, human, and other species provides new insights into the mechanisms that underlie macrophage functional plasticity.

  17. The macrophages in rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laria A

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Antonella Laria, Alfredomaria Lurati , Mariagrazia Marrazza , Daniela Mazzocchi, Katia Angela Re, Magda Scarpellini Rheumatology Unit, Fornaroli Hospital, Magenta, Italy Abstract: Macrophages belong to the innate immune system giving us protection against pathogens. However it is known that they are also involved in rheumatic diseases. Activated macrophages have two different phenotypes related to different stimuli: M1 (classically activated and M2 (alternatively activated. M1 macrophages release high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, reactive nitrogen and oxygen intermediates killing microorganisms and tumor cells; while M2 macrophages are involved in resolution of inflammation through phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils, reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and increased synthesis of mediators important in tissue remodeling, angiogenesis, and wound repair. The role of macrophages in the different rheumatic diseases is different according to their M1/M2 macrophages phenotype. Keywords: macrophage, rheumatic diseases

  18. Macrophage and microglial plasticity in the injured spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, S; Greenhalgh, A D; Kroner, A

    2015-10-29

    Macrophages in the injured spinal cord arise from resident microglia and from infiltrating peripheral myeloid cells. Microglia respond within minutes after central nervous system (CNS) injury and along with other CNS cells signal the influx of their peripheral counterpart. Although some of the functions they carry out are similar, they appear to be specialized to perform particular roles after CNS injury. Microglia and macrophages are very plastic cells that can change their phenotype drastically in response to in vitro and in vivo conditions. They can change from pro-inflammatory, cytotoxic cells to anti-inflammatory, pro-repair phenotypes. The microenvironment of the injured CNS importantly influences macrophage plasticity. This review discusses the phagocytosis and cytokine-mediated effects on macrophage plasticity in the context of spinal cord injury.

  19. Enzyme free cloning for high throughput gene cloning and expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, R.N.; Daniëls, M.; Kaptein, R.; Folkers, G.E.

    2006-01-01

    Structural and functional genomics initiatives significantly improved cloning methods over the past few years. Although recombinational cloning is highly efficient, its costs urged us to search for an alternative high throughput (HTP) cloning method. We implemented a modified Enzyme Free Cloning (EF

  20. Enzyme free cloning for high throughput gene cloning and expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, R.N.; Daniëls, M.; Kaptein, R.; Folkers, G.E.

    2006-01-01

    Structural and functional genomics initiatives significantly improved cloning methods over the past few years. Although recombinational cloning is highly efficient, its costs urged us to search for an alternative high throughput (HTP) cloning method. We implemented a modified Enzyme Free Cloning

  1. Unified Approach to Universal Cloning and Phase-Covariant Cloning

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Jia-Zhong; Yu, Zong-Wen; Wang, Xiang-Bin

    2008-01-01

    We analyze the problem of approximate quantum cloning when the quantum state is between two latitudes on the Bloch's sphere. We present an analytical formula for the optimized 1-to-2 cloning. The formula unifies the universal quantum cloning (UQCM) and the phase covariant quantum cloning.

  2. Enzyme free cloning for high throughput gene cloning and expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, R.N.; Daniëls, M.; Kaptein, R.; Folkers, G.E.

    2006-01-01

    Structural and functional genomics initiatives significantly improved cloning methods over the past few years. Although recombinational cloning is highly efficient, its costs urged us to search for an alternative high throughput (HTP) cloning method. We implemented a modified Enzyme Free Cloning (EF

  3. Main: Clone Detail [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Clone Detail Mapping Pseudomolecule data detail Detail information Mapping to the TIGR japonica Pseudomolecu...les kome_mapping_pseudomolecule_data_detail.zip kome_mapping_pseudomolecule_data_detail ...

  4. BIOETHICS AND HUMAN CLONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željko Kaluđerović

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors analyze the process of negotiating and beginning of the United Nations Declaration on Human Cloning as well as the paragraphs of the very Declaration. The negotiation was originally conceived as a clear bioethical debate that should have led to a general agreement to ban human cloning. However, more often it had been discussed about human rights, cultural, civil and religious differences between people and about priorities in case of eventual conflicts between different value systems. In the end, a non-binding Declaration on Human Cloning had been adopted, full of numerous compromises and ambiguous formulations, that relativized the original intention of proposer states. According to authors, it would have been better if bioethical discussion and eventual regulations on cloning mentioned in the following text had been left over to certain professional bodies, and only after the public had been fully informed about it should relevant supranational organizations have taken that into consideration.

  5. Do Managers Clone Themselves?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Alma S.

    1981-01-01

    A recent questionnaire survey provides statistics on male managers' views of female managers. The author recommends that male managers break out of their cloning behavior and that the goal ought to be a plurality in management. (Author/WD)

  6. An Analysis of English Carrie

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙淑珍

    2004-01-01

    @@ Chapter Ⅰ Introduction Sitting in the rocking chair,Carrie dreams her future.This is the deep impression the novel"Sister Carrie"gives us,which is written by Theodore Dreiser(1871-1945),the great American realism writer.

  7. Carrying Capacity:An Overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Shaofeng

    2004-01-01

    The concept of carrying capacity is derived from ecology, with widespread contentions of its theoretical connotations and applications in the international academic community, especially the impact of human activities on the environment.Disputes on carrying capacity have been occurring not only among biologists and ecologists, but also among mainstream economists. Based on their efforts,the author makes an attempt to describe its origin,connotations, problems, measurement, and at the same time note the latest international progress in this field.

  8. Effect in vitro of Tifell (formocresol-eugenol) on macrophage adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, J J; Jiménez-Rubio, A; Guerrero, J M; Calvo, J R; Feito, J J

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect in vitro on macrophage adhesion of Tifell (formocresoleugenol), used as an intracanal medicament and in therapeutic pulpotomies in primary teeth, Macrophages were obtained from Wistar rats. As a test of macrophage phagocytic function the adherence capacity of macrophages to a plastic surface was determined. Assays were carried out in Eppendorf tubes after 15 min of incubation at 37 degrees C in a humidified atmosphere of 5% carbon dioxide. The adherence index (AI) was calculated. Results showed that Tifell decreased significantly (P dental pulp and periapical tissues.

  9. Cloning of gp-340, a putative opsonin receptor for lung surfactant protein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmskov, U; Mollenhauer, J; Madsen, J

    1999-01-01

    in a soluble form and in association with the membranes of alveolar macrophages. The primary structure of gp-340 has been established by molecular cloning, which yielded a 7,686-bp cDNA sequence encoding a polypeptide chain of 2, 413 amino acids. The domain organization features 13 scavenger receptor cysteine...

  10. Bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunmei; Levin, Michael; Kaplan, David L.

    2016-02-01

    Macrophages play a critical role in regulating wound healing and tissue regeneration by changing their polarization state in response to local microenvironmental stimuli. The native roles of polarized macrophages encompass biomaterials and tissue remodeling needs, yet harnessing or directing the polarization response has been largely absent as a potential strategy to exploit in regenerative medicine to date. Recent data have revealed that specific alteration of cells’ resting potential (Vmem) is a powerful tool to direct proliferation and differentiation in a number of complex tissues, such as limb regeneration, craniofacial patterning and tumorigenesis. In this study, we explored the bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization by targeting ATP sensitive potassium channels (KATP). Glibenclamide (KATP blocker) and pinacidil (KATP opener) treatment not only affect macrophage polarization, but also influence the phenotype of prepolarized macrophages. Furthermore, modulation of cell membrane electrical properties can fine-tune macrophage plasticity. Glibenclamide decreased the secretion and gene expression of selected M1 markers, while pinacidil augmented M1 markers. More interestingly, glibencalmide promoted macrophage alternative activation by enhancing certain M2 markers during M2 polarization. These findings suggest that control of bioelectric properties of macrophages could offer a promising approach to regulate macrophage phenotype as a useful tool in regenerative medicine.

  11. 真核表达载体pIRES2-EGFP/TRAIL,pIRES2-EGFP/CD的构建和鉴定%Cloning and sequencing of reconstructed eukaryotic expression vector pIRES2-EGFP carrying CD and TRAIL genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁兵; 袁芳; 殷建瑞; 谭丽华; 高庆春; 高聪

    2011-01-01

    Objective To corstruct the eukaryotic expression vector encoding CD and TRAIL genes, pIRES2-EGFP/TRAIL and pIRES2-EGFP/CD, and provide the research basis of the association between overexpression of CD and TRAIL genes in C6 glioma cells.Methods The received plasmids DNA were assessed by electrophoresis in 1% agarose gel and sequencing.CD and TRAIL genes were cloned directionally into eukaryotic expression vector, pIRES2-EGFP, through double enzyme-cutting by Sac Ⅱ/Xho Ⅰ and BamH Ⅰ/Xho Ⅰ.The recombinant plasmids were converted into E.coli DH5α competent cell, and then bolted and identified by double enzyme-cutting of restriction enzyme, PCR, and nucleic acid sequence analysis.Results The length of two pIRES2-EGFP/TRAIL fragments after double-cutting by Sac Ⅱ/Xho Ⅰ were confident with theoretic length of 1.0 kb and 5.2 kb.The length of two pIRES2-EGFP/CD fragments after double-cutting by BamH Ⅰ/Xho Ⅰ were confident with theoretic length of 1.3 kb and 5.2 kb.pIRES2-EGFP/TRAIL and pIRES2-EGFP/CD were confirmed to be contained CD and TRAIL genes by PCR and nucleic acid sequence analysis.Conclusions Reconstructing pIRES2-EGFP/TRAIL and pIRES2-EGFP/CD could successfully establish abasis of further research of the association between overexpression of CD and TRAIL genes in C6 glioma cells.%目的 构建真核表达载体pIRES2-EGFP/TRAIL和pIRES2-EGFP/CD,为研究其联合表达对恶性胶质瘤的联合治疗作用提供基础.方法 将pCMV/CD质粒和pcDNA3.1(+)/TRAIL质粒行琼脂糖凝胶电泳检测,确定其完整性,并进行序列测定确定有无基因突变.pCMV/CD质粒用Sac Ⅱ/ Xho Ⅰ双酶切,pcDNA3.1(+)TRAIL质粒用BamH Ⅰ/XhoⅠ双酶切,将目的 基因定向克隆到真核细胞表达载体pIRES2-EGFP中,转化E.coli DH5α感受态细胞,通过限制性内切酶双酶切、PCR及核酸序列分析等筛选、鉴定重组质粒.结果 所构建的真核表达载体pIRES2-EGFP/TRAIL经Sac Ⅱ/ XhoⅠ双酶切回收片段分别为1

  12. Placentation in cloned cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miglino, M A; Pereira, F T V; Visintin, J A

    2007-01-01

    To elucidate the morphological differences between placentas from normal and cloned cattle pregnancies reaching term, the umbilical cord, placentomes and interplacentomal region of the fetal membranes were examined macroscopically as well as by light and scanning electron microscopy. In pregnancies...... than one primary villus, as opposed to a single villus in non-cloned placentae. Scanning electron microscopy of blood vessel casts revealed that there was also more than one stem artery per villous tree and that the ramification of the vessels failed to form dense complexes of capillary loops...

  13. Naturalistic Elements in Sister Carrie

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘艳晖

    2007-01-01

    @@ Theodore Dreiser is considered to be a controversial writer.His first novel.Sister Carrie makes a new way of presenting re-ality.This paper discusses the naturalistic elements from the de-tailed description of the environment in that society.

  14. Why clone flies? Using cloned Drosophila to monitor epigenetic defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigh, Andrew J; Lloyd, Vett K

    2007-01-01

    Since the birth of the first cloned sheep in 1996, advances in nuclear transplantation have led to both the creation of genetically tailored stem cells and the generation of a number of cloned organisms. The list of cloned animals reared to adulthood currently includes the frog, sheep, mouse, cow, goat, pig, rabbit, cat, zebrafish, mule, horse, rat and dog. The addition of Drosophila to this elite bestiary of cloned animals has prompted the question - why clone flies? Organisms generated by nuclear transplantation suffer from a high rate of associated defects, and many of these defects appear to be related to aberrant genomic imprinting. Imprinted gene expression also appears to be compromised in Drosophila clones. Proper imprinted gene regulation relies on a suite of highly conserved chromatin-modifying genes first identified in Drosophila. Thus, Drosophila can potentially be used to study epigenetic dysfunction in cloned animals and to screen for genetic and epigenetic conditions that promote the production of healthy clones.

  15. SIV Infection of Lung Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Li

    Full Text Available HIV-1 depletes CD4+ T cells in the blood, lymphatic tissues, gut and lungs. Here we investigated the relationship between depletion and infection of CD4+ T cells in the lung parenchyma. The lungs of 38 Indian rhesus macaques in early to later stages of SIVmac251 infection were examined, and the numbers of CD4+ T cells and macrophages plus the frequency of SIV RNA+ cells were quantified. We showed that SIV infected macrophages in the lung parenchyma, but only in small numbers except in the setting of interstitial inflammation where large numbers of SIV RNA+ macrophages were detected. However, even in this setting, the number of macrophages was not decreased. By contrast, there were few infected CD4+ T cells in lung parenchyma, but CD4+ T cells were nonetheless depleted by unknown mechanisms. The CD4+ T cells in lung parenchyma were depleted even though they were not productively infected, whereas SIV can infect large numbers of macrophages in the setting of interstitial inflammation without depleting them. These observations point to the need for future investigations into mechanisms of CD4+ T cell depletion at this mucosal site, and into mechanisms by which macrophage populations are maintained despite high levels of infection. The large numbers of SIV RNA+ macrophages in lungs in the setting of interstitial inflammation indicates that lung macrophages can be an important source for SIV persistent infection.

  16. Clip, connect, clone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fujima, Jun; Lunzer, Aran; Hornbæk, Kasper

    2010-01-01

    using three mechanisms: clipping of input and result elements from existing applications to form cells on a spreadsheet; connecting these cells using formulas, thus enabling result transfer between applications; and cloning cells so that multiple requests can be handled side by side. We demonstrate...

  17. The Cloning of America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Judith E.; Dobson, Russell L.

    1981-01-01

    Proposes that the U.S. school system purports to prize human variability, but many educators are engaged in activities that seek to homogenize students. Describes these activities, including diagnosis, labeling, ability grouping, and positive reinforcement. Presents suggestions for counselors to combat sources of cloning and self-validation. (RC)

  18. Asian Yellow Goat Cloned

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ It was released on August 24,2005 by Prof. CHEN Dayuan (Da-Yuan Chen) from the CAS Institute of Zoology that the first success in cloning the Asian Yellow Goat by nuclear transfer had recently been achieved in east China's Shandong Province.

  19. Properties of Carry Value Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryakanta Pal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carry Value Transformation (CVT is a model of discrete deterministic dynamical system. In the present study, it has been proved that (1 the sum of any two nonnegative integers is the same as the sum of their CVT and XOR values. (2 the number of iterations leading to either CVT=0 or XOR=0 does not exceed the maximum of the lengths of the two addenda expressed as binary strings. A similar process of addition of modified Carry Value Transformation (MCVT and XOR requires a maximum of two iterations for MCVT to be zero. (3 an equivalence relation is shown to exist on Z×Z which divides the CV table into disjoint equivalence classes.

  20. [Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-Ming; Lei, An-Min; Hua, Jin-Lian; Dou, Zhong-Ying

    2005-03-01

    Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning have widespread and attractive prospects in animal agriculture and biomedical applications. We reviewed that the quality of oocytes and nuclear reprogramming of somatic donor cells were the main reasons of the common abnormalities in cloned animals and the low efficiency of cloning and showed the problems and outlets in therapeutic cloning, such as some basic problems in nuclear transfer affected clinical applications of therapeutic cloning. Study on isolation and culture of nuclear transfer embryonic stem (ntES) cells and specific differentiation of ntES cells into important functional cells should be emphasized and could enhance the efficiency. Adult stem cells could help to cure some great diseases, but could not replace therapeutic cloning. Ethics also impeded the development of therapeutic cloning. It is necessary to improve many techniques and reinforce the research of some basic theories, then somatic nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning may apply to agriculture reproduction and benefit to human life better.

  1. The First Human Cloned Embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibelli, Jose B.; Lanza, Robert P.; West, Michael D.; Ezzell, Carol

    2002-01-01

    Describes a process known as parthenogenesis which produces cloned, early-stage embryos and human embryos generated only from eggs. Speculates that this technology puts therapeutic cloning within reach. (DDR)

  2. Animal Cloning and Food Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Animal Cloning and Food Safety Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... evaluate the issue. back to top FDA Studies Cloning For more than five years, CVM scientists studied ...

  3. Molecular cloning of nif DNA from Azotobacter vinelandii.

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Two clones which contained nif DNA were isolated from a clone bank of total EcoRI-digested Azotobacter vinelandii DNA. The clones carrying the recombinant plasmids were identified by use of the 32P-labeled 6.2-kilobase (kb) nif insert from pSA30 (which contains the Klebsiella pneumoniae nifK, nifD, and nifH genes) as a hybridization probe. Hybridization analysis with fragments derived from the nif insert of pSA30 showed that the 2.6-kb insert from one of the plasmids (pLB1) contains nifK wher...

  4. Probabilistic Cloning and Quantum Computation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Ting; YAN Feng-Li; WANG Zhi-Xi

    2004-01-01

    @@ We discuss the usefulness of quantum cloning and present examples of quantum computation tasks for which the cloning offers an advantage which cannot be matched by any approach that does not resort to quantum cloning.In these quantum computations, we need to distribute quantum information contained in the states about which we have some partial information. To perform quantum computations, we use a state-dependent probabilistic quantum cloning procedure to distribute quantum information in the middle of a quantum computation.

  5. Peripheral blood and intrathyroidal T cell clones from patients with thyroid autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massart, C; Caroff, G; Maugendre, D; Genetet, N; Gibassier, J

    1999-01-01

    For a better understanding of the pathogenesis of thyroid autoimmune diseases, we have studied morphological and functional properties of T clones from peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and from intrathyroidal lymphocytes (ITL) obtained from 3 patients with Graves' disease or 1 Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Investigations were carried out on clones cultured alone or cocultured with autologous thyrocytes. Clonage efficiency ranged from 30% to 33% for PBL and 10% to 36% for ITL. A predominance of CD4-positive clones was observed whatever the origin of the lymphocytes or the autoimmune pathology. Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) was detected in the majority (17/19) of the clones tested. Intracytoplasmic interleukin (IL-4) was secreted in 7/19 clones and both cytokines were produced in 5/19 clones. In coculture a proliferative response and tumour necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) production were observed with 6 clones (4 from Graves thyrocytes and 2 from thyroiditis). No cytotoxic clone was derived from Graves or thyroiditis tissues. These data demonstrate that the large majority of T clones are principally CD4-T cells; all the clones secreted TNF-alpha and a large majority produced IFN-gamma. Only a few clones produced IL-4 alone or associated with IFN-gamma. Six T clones induced proliferative response and of TNF-alpha secretion in coculture. Further investigations must be performed on these antigen-reactive T clones to analyse their role in the pathogenesis of the human thyroid autoimmune diseases.

  6. DMPD: Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potentialregulators of macrophage inflammatory activities. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12472665 Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potential...:545-53. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase:... potentialregulators of macrophage inflammatory activities. PubmedID 12472665 Title Macrophage-stimulatin

  7. Macrophage models of Gaucher disease for evaluating disease pathogenesis and candidate drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflaki, Elma; Stubblefield, Barbara K; Maniwang, Emerson; Lopez, Grisel; Moaven, Nima; Goldin, Ehud; Marugan, Juan; Patnaik, Samarjit; Dutra, Amalia; Southall, Noel; Zheng, Wei; Tayebi, Nahid; Sidransky, Ellen

    2014-06-11

    Gaucher disease is caused by an inherited deficiency of glucocerebrosidase that manifests with storage of glycolipids in lysosomes, particularly in macrophages. Available cell lines modeling Gaucher disease do not demonstrate lysosomal storage of glycolipids; therefore, we set out to develop two macrophage models of Gaucher disease that exhibit appropriate substrate accumulation. We used these cellular models both to investigate altered macrophage biology in Gaucher disease and to evaluate candidate drugs for its treatment. We generated and characterized monocyte-derived macrophages from 20 patients carrying different Gaucher disease mutations. In addition, we created induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived macrophages from five fibroblast lines taken from patients with type 1 or type 2 Gaucher disease. Macrophages derived from patient monocytes or iPSCs showed reduced glucocerebrosidase activity and increased storage of glucocerebroside and glucosylsphingosine in lysosomes. These macrophages showed efficient phagocytosis of bacteria but reduced production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and impaired chemotaxis. The disease phenotype was reversed with a noninhibitory small-molecule chaperone drug that enhanced glucocerebrosidase activity in the macrophages, reduced glycolipid storage, and normalized chemotaxis and production of reactive oxygen species. Macrophages differentiated from patient monocytes or patient-derived iPSCs provide cellular models that can be used to investigate disease pathogenesis and facilitate drug development.

  8. Entering the Clone Age

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    Suppose you make your parents so happy,they decide to have another baby just like you.It might be flattering,but how would you feel about having a little brother or sister who is also your twin? A laboratory experiment conducted last fall suggests it may someday be possible.For the first time ever,scientists made exact copies, or clones, of a human embryo.

  9. Cloning-free CRISPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandana Arbab

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We present self-cloning CRISPR/Cas9 (scCRISPR, a technology that allows for CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genomic mutation and site-specific knockin transgene creation within several hours by circumventing the need to clone a site-specific single-guide RNA (sgRNA or knockin homology construct for each target locus. We introduce a self-cleaving palindromic sgRNA plasmid and a short double-stranded DNA sequence encoding the desired locus-specific sgRNA into target cells, allowing them to produce a locus-specific sgRNA plasmid through homologous recombination. scCRISPR enables efficient generation of gene knockouts (∼88% mutation rate at approximately one-sixth the cost of plasmid-based sgRNA construction with only 2 hr of preparation for each targeted site. Additionally, we demonstrate efficient site-specific knockin of GFP transgenes without any plasmid cloning or genome-integrated selection cassette in mouse and human embryonic stem cells (2%–4% knockin rate through PCR-based addition of short homology arms. scCRISPR substantially lowers the bar on mouse and human transgenesis.

  10. Secure the Clones

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Thomas; Pichardie, David

    2012-01-01

    Exchanging mutable data objects with untrusted code is a delicate matter because of the risk of creating a data space that is accessible by an attacker. Consequently, secure programming guidelines for Java stress the importance of using defensive copying before accepting or handing out references to an internal mutable object. However, implementation of a copy method (like clone()) is entirely left to the programmer. It may not provide a sufficiently deep copy of an object and is subject to overriding by a malicious sub-class. Currently no language-based mechanism supports secure object cloning. This paper proposes a type-based annotation system for defining modular copy policies for class-based object-oriented programs. A copy policy specifies the maximally allowed sharing between an object and its clone. We present a static enforcement mechanism that will guarantee that all classes fulfil their copy policy, even in the presence of overriding of copy methods, and establish the semantic correctness of the ove...

  11. Ethical issues in livestock cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, P B

    1999-01-01

    Although cloning may eventually become an important technology for livestock production, four ethical issues must be addressed before the practice becomes widespread. First, researchers must establish that the procedure is not detrimental to the health or well-being of affected animals. Second, animal research institutions should evaluate the net social benefits to livestock producers by weighing the benefits to producers against the opportunity cost of research capacity lost to biomedical projects. Third, scientists should consider the indirect effects of cloning research on the larger ethical issues surrounding human cloning. Finally, the market structure for products of cloned animals should protect individual choice, and should recognize that many individuals find the prospect of cloning (or consuming cloned animals) repugnant. Analysis of these four issues is complicated by spurious arguments alleging that cloning will have a negative impact on environment and genetic diversity.

  12. Construction of expression vectors carrying mouse peroxisomal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-16

    cloned in pGEX6p2 prokaryotic expression vector ... network controls biogenesis and division (Pex11p, 23p, ... The coding region of PEP (PEP-cDNA) was inserted into the ..... Metabolic and molecular basis of peroxisomal.

  13. DMPD: Monocyte/macrophage traffic in HIV and SIV encephalitis. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12960230 Monocyte/macrophage traffic in HIV and SIV encephalitis. Kim WK, Corey S, ...Show Monocyte/macrophage traffic in HIV and SIV encephalitis. PubmedID 12960230 Title Monocyte/macrophage traffic

  14. Ethical issues in animal cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiester, Autumn

    2005-01-01

    The issue of human reproductive cloning has recently received a great deal attention in public discourse. Bioethicists, policy makers, and the media have been quick to identify the key ethical issues involved in human reproductive cloning and to argue, almost unanimously, for an international ban on such attempts. Meanwhile, scientists have proceeded with extensive research agendas in the cloning of animals. Despite this research, there has been little public discussion of the ethical issues raised by animal cloning projects. Polling data show that the public is decidedly against the cloning of animals. To understand the public's reaction and fill the void of reasoned debate about the issue, we need to review the possible objections to animal cloning and assess the merits of the anti-animal cloning stance. Some objections to animal cloning (e.g., the impact of cloning on the population of unwanted animals) can be easily addressed, while others (e.g., the health of cloned animals) require more serious attention by the public and policy makers.

  15. To clone or not to clone--whither the law?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupton, M L

    1999-01-01

    The cloning of Dolly the lamb from adult cells by scientists at the Roslin Laboratories near Edinburgh in February 1997 has startled the world because it now opens the way to clone adult human beings. The reaction to Ian Wilmut's breakthrough has been instant and largely negative. Bills were rushed into both the US Senate and House of Representatives aimed at banning the cloning of human beings. Human cloning is premature at this stage, but there are many positive spin-offs of cloning in the field of genetic engineering, such as the production of human proteins such as blood clotting factors which aid in healing wounds. Progress by means of cloning can also be made into devising a cure for Parkinson's Disease amongst others. No lesser ethicist than John C. Fletcher of the University of Virginia foresees circumstances in which human cloning is acceptable e.g. to enable a couple to replace a dying child, to enable a couple, one of whom is infertile, to clone a child from either partner. Extensive regulation of cloning by the law is inevitable but, in doing so, the legislation should be careful not to outlaw research in this area which could be beneficial to mankind.

  16. Genetic divergence for growth and wood parameters in different clones of Dalbergia sissoo Roxb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kumar A; Bhatt A; Ravichandran S; Pande PK; Dobhal S

    2012-01-01

    The wood analysis for different parameters was carried out in a clonal seed orchard of Dalbergia sissoo Roxb.established during 1997 at Hoshiarpur,Punjab,India.Twelve clones with higher index value were subjected to Euclidean Cluster Analysis based on wood and growth parameters to group into seven clusters.Cluster Ⅰ and Ⅱ contained four and three clones,respectively,and remaining clusters had just one clone each.Clone originated from Barielly,Uttar Pradesh of cluster Ⅶ was found to be the most divergent clone.Cluster Ⅱ with three clones maintained greater inter-cluster distance with other clusters.The divergence analysis has confirmed that the clones planted in the clonal seed orchard are sufficiently divergent and seed harvested from the orchard would maintain high diversity.

  17. Soil-borne wheat mosaic virus infectious clone and manipulation for gene-carrying capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soilborne wheat mosaic virus (SBWMV) is a bipartite single stranded positive sense RNA virus with rigid-rod shaped virions. Taxonomically the virus is in the family Viragviridae, as are commonly used gene silencing or expression viral vectors, Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) and Barley stripe mosaic viru...

  18. Lessons learned from cloning dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M J; Oh, H J; Kim, G A; Park, J E; Park, E J; Jang, G; Ra, J C; Kang, S K; Lee, B C

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this article is to review dog cloning research and to suggest its applications based on a discussion about the normality of cloned dogs. Somatic cell nuclear transfer was successfully used for production of viable cloned puppies despite limited understanding of in vitro dog embryo production. Cloned dogs have similar growth characteristics to those born from natural fertilization, with no evidence of serious adverse effects. The offspring of cloned dogs also have similar growth performance and health to those of naturally bred puppies. Therefore, cloning in domestic dogs can be applied as an assisted reproductive technique to conserve endangered species, to treat sterile canids or aged dogs, to improve reproductive performance of valuable individuals and to generate disease model animals.

  19. Molecular Cloning of Adenosinediphosphoribosyl Transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-08

    ACCESSION NO.D,. 03261102F 2312 A~5 11. TITLE (include Securqt Classification) 0 Molecular Cloning of Adenosinediphosphoribosyl Transferase 12. PERSONAL...I’:- AFOSR.Tlt. 8 7 - 0 9 8,2 0IL * pi AFOSR- 85 -0377 PROGRESS REPORT Molecular Cloning of Adenosinediphosphoribosyl Transferase 5." Period of...Pharmacology and the Cardiovascular Research Institute September 8, 1987 .’, 5.’- "’S ". -f, AFOSR - 85 -0377 PROGRESS REPORT Molecular Cloning of

  20. Human cloning and child welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, J; Harris, J

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we discuss an objection to human cloning which appeals to the welfare of the child. This objection varies according to the sort of harm it is expected the clone will suffer. The three formulations of it that we will consider are: 1. Clones will be harmed by the fearful or prejudicial attitudes people may have about or towards them (H1); 2. Clones will be harmed by the demands and expectations of parents or genotype donors (H2); 3. Clones will be harmed by their own awareness of their origins, for example the knowledge that the genetic donor is a stranger (H3). We will show why these three versions of the child welfare objection do not necessarily supply compelling reasons to ban human reproductive cloning. The claim that we will develop and defend in the course of our discussion is that even if it is the case that a cloned child will suffer harms of the type H1-H3, it is none the less permissible to conceive by cloning so long as these cloning-induced welfare deficits are not such as to blight the existence of the resultant child, whoever this may be. PMID:10226914

  1. Imaging of macrophage-related lung diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marten, Katharina; Hansell, David M. [Royal Brompton Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-01

    Macrophage-related pulmonary diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by macrophage accumulation, activation or dysfunction. These conditions include smoking-related interstitial lung diseases, metabolic disorders such as Niemann-Pick or Gaucher disease, and rare primary lung tumors. High-resolution computed tomography abnormalities include pulmonary ground-glass opacification secondary to infiltration by macrophages, centrilobular nodules or interlobular septal thickening reflecting peribronchiolar or septal macrophage accumulation, respectively, emphysema caused by macrophage dysfunction, and honeycombing following macrophage-related lung matrix remodeling. (orig.)

  2. Climbing Mount Efficiency--small steps, not giant leaps towards higher cloning success in farm animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oback, Björn

    2008-07-01

    Despite more than a decade of research efforts, farm animal cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is still frustratingly inefficient. Inefficiency manifests itself at different levels, which are currently not well integrated. At the molecular level, it leads to widespread genetic, epigenetic and transcriptional aberrations in cloned embryos. At the organismal level, these genome-wide abnormalities compromise development of cloned foetuses and offspring. Specific molecular defects need to be causally linked to specific cloned phenotypes, in order to design specific treatments to correct them. Cloning efficiency depends on the ability of the nuclear donor cell to be fully reprogrammed into an embryonic state and the ability of the enucleated recipient cell to carry out the reprogramming reactions. It has been postulated that reprogrammability of the somatic donor cell epigenome is influenced by its differentiation status. However, direct comparisons between cells of divergent differentiation status within several somatic lineages have found no conclusive evidence for this. Choosing somatic stem cells as donors has not improved cloning efficiency, indicating that donor cell type may be less critical for cloning success. Different recipient cells, on the other hand, vary in their reprogramming ability. In bovine, using zygotes instead of oocytes has increased cloning success. Other improvements in livestock cloning efficiency include better coordinating donor cell type with cell cycle stage and aggregating cloned embryos. In the future, it will be important to demonstrate if these small increases at every step are cumulative, adding up to an integrated cloning protocol with greatly improved efficiency.

  3. Cloning of Leishmania Major P4 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoo Shaddel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Leishmania major P4 gene is normally expressed during amastigote form ofthe parasite and can be good candidate for producing an effective vaccine. In this study wecloned this gene in suitable vector (pQE-30 for further vaccine preparation studies.Materials and Methods: Leishmania promastigotes were grown in N.N.N.medium and culturein RPMI 1640 cell culture medium. Total genomic DNA was extracted by centrifugationof promastigotes. The pellet was suspended in lysis buffer and followed by boiling method.PCR was carried out using P4 gene specific primers. PCR product was detected by agarosgel electrophoresis and cloned into Bluescript plasmid via T/A cloning method. Reactionwas transformed into XL1- Blue competent cell and recombinant plasmid screened usingagar plate contained X-gal and IPTG. The product was extracted, digested by restrictionenzyme and electrophoresed on agarose gel.Results: Plasmid was extracted and cloned gene was released by restriction enzyme andsubcloned into pQE-30 expression vector.Conclusion: This construct is ready for protein expression in in-vitro.

  4. Adaptabilidade e estabilidade de clones de guaraná Adaptability and phenotypic stability in guarana clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firmino José do Nascimento Filho

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar parâmetros de adaptabilidade e estabilidade fenotípica de clones de guaraná (Paullinia cupana no Estado do Amazonas. Foram instalados dez experimentos, em três municípios, nos quais foi avaliado o desempenho produtivo de 27 clones pré-selecionados de guaraná, durante quatro anos. Os experimentos foram instalados em blocos ao acaso, com duas repetições, com parcelas constituídas por três plantas espaçadas em 5x5 m. Foram avaliados quatro métodos de determinação de adaptabilidade e estabilidade. O método não paramétrico de Lin & Binns modificado apresentou resultados satisfatórios e discriminou os clones quanto ao desempenho nos ambientes favoráveis e desfavoráveis e quanto aos graus de estabilidade. O clone CMU871 destacou-se pela ampla adaptabilidade e elevada estabilidade fenotípica. Os clones CMU619 e CMU609 apresentaram adaptabilidade específica a ambientes favoráveis e desfavoráveis, respectivamente.The objective of this work was to determine parameters of adaptability and phenotypic stability of guarana clones (Paullinia cupana in the state of Amazonas, Brazil. Ten trials were carried out in three counties, where 27 preselected guarana clones were evaluated in a four-year period. A randomized complete block design with two replicates were used, with plots formed by three plants spaced at 5x5 m. Four methods of adaptability and stability were evaluated. The nonparametric method of Lin & Binns modified showed satisfactory results and discriminated the clones performance both in favorable and unfavorable environments, and according to their stability levels. The CMU871 had good adaptability and high phenotypic stability. The CMU619 and CMU609 had specific adaptability to favorable and unfavorable environments, respectively.

  5. Infections That Pets Carry (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Infections That Pets Carry KidsHealth > For Parents > Infections That Pets Carry ... how to protect your family from infections. How Pets Spread Infections Like people, all animals carry germs . ...

  6. [The discrete horror of cloning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guibourg, Ricardo A

    2009-01-01

    The author raises the topic of cloning after the decision of the Argentine government, which concerned for the "dignity of the human person", passed a decree of need and urgency, No. 200/97 (Annex), prohibiting cloning experiments with human beings. Therefore, considering that the topic is so terribly urgent and necessary, the author feels it is timely to consider it.

  7. CATO: The Clone Alignment Tool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter V Henstock

    Full Text Available High-throughput cloning efforts produce large numbers of sequences that need to be aligned, edited, compared with reference sequences, and organized as files and selected clones. Different pieces of software are typically required to perform each of these tasks. We have designed a single piece of software, CATO, the Clone Alignment Tool, that allows a user to align, evaluate, edit, and select clone sequences based on comparisons to reference sequences. The input and output are designed to be compatible with standard data formats, and thus suitable for integration into a clone processing pipeline. CATO provides both sequence alignment and visualizations to facilitate the analysis of cloning experiments. The alignment algorithm matches each of the relevant candidate sequences against each reference sequence. The visualization portion displays three levels of matching: 1 a top-level summary of the top candidate sequences aligned to each reference sequence, 2 a focused alignment view with the nucleotides of matched sequences displayed against one reference sequence, and 3 a pair-wise alignment of a single reference and candidate sequence pair. Users can select the minimum matching criteria for valid clones, edit or swap reference sequences, and export the results to a summary file as part of the high-throughput cloning workflow.

  8. CATO: The Clone Alignment Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henstock, Peter V; LaPan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput cloning efforts produce large numbers of sequences that need to be aligned, edited, compared with reference sequences, and organized as files and selected clones. Different pieces of software are typically required to perform each of these tasks. We have designed a single piece of software, CATO, the Clone Alignment Tool, that allows a user to align, evaluate, edit, and select clone sequences based on comparisons to reference sequences. The input and output are designed to be compatible with standard data formats, and thus suitable for integration into a clone processing pipeline. CATO provides both sequence alignment and visualizations to facilitate the analysis of cloning experiments. The alignment algorithm matches each of the relevant candidate sequences against each reference sequence. The visualization portion displays three levels of matching: 1) a top-level summary of the top candidate sequences aligned to each reference sequence, 2) a focused alignment view with the nucleotides of matched sequences displayed against one reference sequence, and 3) a pair-wise alignment of a single reference and candidate sequence pair. Users can select the minimum matching criteria for valid clones, edit or swap reference sequences, and export the results to a summary file as part of the high-throughput cloning workflow.

  9. Isolation and culture of murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, John Q; Gordon, Siamon

    2005-01-01

    The two most convenient sources of primary murine macrophages are the bone marrow and the peritoneal cavity. Resident peritoneal macrophages can readily be harvested from mice and purified by adherence to tissue culture plastic. The injection of Bio-Gel polyacrylamide beads or thioglycollate broth into the peritoneal cavity produces an inflammatory response allowing the purification of large numbers of elicited macrophages. The production of an activated macrophage population can be achieved by using Bacillus-Calmette-Guerin as the inflammatory stimulus. Resident bone marrow macrophages can be isolated following enzymatic separation of cells from bone marrow plugs and enrichment on 30% fetal calf serum containing medium or Ficoll-Hypaque gradients. Bone marrow-derived macrophages can be produced by differentiating nonadherent macrophage precursors with medium containing macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

  10. HIV-1 assembly in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benaroch Philippe

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The molecular mechanisms involved in the assembly of newly synthesized Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV particles are poorly understood. Most of the work on HIV-1 assembly has been performed in T cells in which viral particle budding and assembly take place at the plasma membrane. In contrast, few studies have been performed on macrophages, the other major target of HIV-1. Infected macrophages represent a viral reservoir and probably play a key role in HIV-1 physiopathology. Indeed macrophages retain infectious particles for long periods of time, keeping them protected from anti-viral immune response or drug treatments. Here, we present an overview of what is known about HIV-1 assembly in macrophages as compared to T lymphocytes or cell lines. Early electron microscopy studies suggested that viral assembly takes place at the limiting membrane of an intracellular compartment in macrophages and not at the plasma membrane as in T cells. This was first considered as a late endosomal compartment in which viral budding seems to be similar to the process of vesicle release into multi-vesicular bodies. This view was notably supported by a large body of evidence involving the ESCRT (Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport machinery in HIV-1 budding, the observation of viral budding profiles in such compartments by immuno-electron microscopy, and the presence of late endosomal markers associated with macrophage-derived virions. However, this model needs to be revisited as recent data indicate that the viral compartment has a neutral pH and can be connected to the plasma membrane via very thin micro-channels. To date, the exact nature and biogenesis of the HIV assembly compartment in macrophages remains elusive. Many cellular proteins potentially involved in the late phases of HIV-1 cycle have been identified; and, recently, the list has grown rapidly with the publication of four independent genome-wide screens. However, their respective

  11. 草鱼天然抗性相关巨噬蛋白基因全长cDNA的克隆与表达分析%Molecular cloning, characterization and expression of natural resistance associated macrophage protein(Nramp)gene cDNA from grass carp(Ctenopharyngodon idella)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范玉顶; 徐进; 罗晓松; 周勇; 肖艺; 曾令兵

    2011-01-01

    Natural resistance associated macrophage protein (Nramp) family is a novel family of functional related proteins with innate resistance to intracellular parasites in mammals, which has the capacity of enhancing macrophages that are meant to kill pathogens. However, few reports are available about the structure and function of Nramp in lower vertebrates such as teleosts. In this study, cDNA of Nramp gene was amplified from liver of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The full-length cDNA of Nramp gene was 3 158 bp, including a 155 bp 5'terminal UTR, a 1 368 bp 3' terminal UTR and a 1 635 bp open reading frame encoding a protein with 554 amino acid residues, which contained the signature features of the Nramp protein family: 12 transmembrane (TM)domains, a consensus transport motif (CTM) with 20 amino acid residues between the transmembrane domains 8 and 9. The deduced amino acid sequence of grass carp Nramp exhibited about 62.5%-90.2% homology with 16 other vertebrate Nramp sequences. Compared with the other fish's Nramps, the unique feature of grass carp Nramp was the presence of two iron-responsive regulatory-protein-binding sites (IRE) in 3'UTR and 5'UTR. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the grass carp Nramp was clustered with other fish Nramps and was closer to Nramp2 of mammals. RT-PCR results of grass carp Nramp transcripts in different tissues indicated that the grass carp Nramp transcripts were highly abundant in head kidney and spleen and low in muscle and skin. The grass carp kidney cells (CIK) challenged with the grass carp reovirus (GCRV) could evidently elevate Nramp mRNA levels in cell cultures.%天然抗性相关巨噬蛋白(Nramp)家族是一类抑制胞内寄生菌侵染的天然免疫相关蛋白.本研究克隆了草鱼(Ctenopharyngodon idellus)Nramp基因并进行了表达分析.该基因cDNA序列全长为3158 bp,编码1个含544个

  12. The membrane-bound ectopeptidase CPM as a marker of macrophage maturation in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehli, M; Krause, S W; Andreesen, R

    2000-01-01

    During terminal maturation of human blood monocytes into macrophages, a multitude of phenotypic and functional changes occurs: cells increase in size, they enhance their capacity for phagocytosis and tumor cytotoxicity but decrease their ability for T-lymphocyte stimulation. The pattern of secreted cytokines is shifted as is the profile of surface antigens. We recently identified carboxypeptidase M (CPM) as a macrophage maturation-associated antigen detected by mAb MAX. 1/MAX. 11. CPM, a phosphoinositol-linked ectopeptidase, is able to process a multitude of different substrates, among them immunologically important peptides like bradykinin, anaphylatoxins and enkephalins. It was previously shown to be expressed in placenta, lung, and kidney. CPM as detected by MAX. 1/11 shows a strong expression on monocyte-derived macrophages in vitro and on macrophages in vivo accompanying T-lymphocyte activation like during allogeneic transplant rejection or allergic alveolitis. In contrast, its expression is suppressed on macrophages by some types of tumor cells. CPM expression seems to correlate with macrophage cytotoxic functions. However, the biological importance of CPM expression in human macrophages in vivo is difficult to predict. A wide range of biologically active peptides are cleaved by CPM, and the relevance of CPM peptide processing during an immune reaction is only poorly understood. The generation and analysis of CPM-deficient animals might improve our understanding of CPM function. Therefore we cloned a cDNA for the murine homologue of CPM. However, expression of mCPM was undetectable in murine primary macrophages and macrophage cell-lines, suggesting that CPM expression and function is not conserved between human and mouse macrophages.

  13. [Scientific ethics of human cloning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Carlos Y

    2005-01-01

    True cloning is fission, budding or other types of asexual reproduction. In humans it occurs in monozygote twinning. This type of cloning is ethically and religiously good. Human cloning can be performed by twinning (TWClo) or nuclear transfer (NTClo). Both methods need a zygote or a nuclear transferred cell, obtained in vitro (IVTec). They are under the IVTec ethics. IVTecs use humans (zygotes, embryos) as drugs or things; increase the risk of malformations; increase development and size of abnormalities and may cause long-term changes. Cloning for preserving extinct (or almost extinct) animals or humans when sexual reproduction is not possible is ethically valid. The previous selection of a phenotype in human cloning violates some ethical principles. NTClo for reproductive or therapeutic purposes is dangerous since it increases the risk for nucleotide or chromosome mutations, de-programming or re-programming errors, aging or malignancy of the embryo cells thus obtained.

  14. Quantum probabilistically cloning and computation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this article we make a review on the usefulness of probabilistically cloning and present examples of quantum computation tasks for which quantum cloning offers an advantage which cannot be matched by any approach that does not resort to it.In these quantum computations,one needs to distribute quantum information contained in states about which we have some partial information.To perform quantum computations,one uses state-dependent probabilistic quantum cloning procedure to distribute quantum information in the middle of a quantum computation.And we discuss the achievable efficiencies and the efficient quantum logic network for probabilistic cloning the quantum states used in implementing quantum computation tasks for which cloning provides enhancement in performance.

  15. Molecular Cloning, Expression and SNP Screening of Natural Resistance-Associated Macrophage Protein (Nramp) Gene cDNA from Half Smooth Tongue Sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis)%半滑舌鳎(Cynoglossus semilaevis)Nramp基因克隆与表达分析及SNP筛选

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢贺飞; 高峰涛; 张永珍; 董忠典; 陈松林

    2016-01-01

    天然抗性相关巨噬细胞蛋白(Natural resistance-associated macrophage protein, Nramp)属于膜整合转运蛋白,具有抑制胞内寄生菌侵染、调节巨噬细胞的抗菌活性等作用。本研究对半滑舌鳎(Cynoglossus semilaevis)Nramp基因进行了克隆和表达分析,并对其与抗鳗弧菌感染相关的单核苷酸多态性(Single Nucleotide Polymorphism, SNP)位点进行了筛选。该基因cDNA序列全长3717 bp,其中开放阅读框(Open reading frame, ORF)1677 bp,所编码蛋白含有558个氨基酸,该蛋白具有Nramp家族的典型特征,包括10个跨膜区(Transmembrane, TM)、1个由20个氨基酸残基组成的胞质内转运蛋白特征结构域(Consensus Transport Motif, CTM)。半滑舌鳎Nramp的ORF末端有1个类似于脊椎动物Nramp2中的铁反应控制蛋白结合位点(Iron-responsive regulatory protein-binding site, IRE)。半滑舌鳎Nramp与其他14个物种的Nramp氨基酸序列同源性在63%−91%之间,系统进化分析表明,半滑舌鳎Nramp和所有鱼类Nramp聚集为一簇,与其他物种Nramp2的亲缘关系较近。实时荧光定量PCR分析显示,Nramp基因在半滑舌鳎脾脏和肾脏中的表达量最高,而在肌肉和性腺中的表达量最低;在哈维氏弧菌感染的半滑舌鳎肾脏、脾脏和肝脏中表达量呈升高趋势,而在鳃中则表现为下调趋势。利用直接测序法检测感染鳗弧菌后同一家系的233个个体(抗病个体165个,感病个体68个),共检测到15个SNP位点,对其中3个SNP 位点即 SNP-g.3113(T→C)、SNP-g.3125(A→G)和 SNP-g.3164(A→T)进行测序分型后发现,SNP- g.3125(A→G)的等位基因(G)频率和基因型(GG)频率与半滑舌鳎抗鳗弧菌疾病呈极显著相关(P<0.01)。研究结果表明,Nramp 基因不同基因型对半滑舌鳎的抗病能力有着极其重要的影响,SNP-g.3125(A→G)可作为潜在的抗性遗传标记位点。本研究将为半滑舌鳎抗性品系

  16. Analysis of an epigenetic argument against human reproductive cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgren, Anders

    2006-08-01

    Human reproductive cloning is a much disputed ethical issue. This technology is often condemned as being contrary to human dignity. However, there are also risk arguments. An ethical argument that is often put forward by scientists but seldom developed in more detail focuses on health risks in animal cloning. There is a high risk that animal clones exhibit abnormalities and these are increasingly believed to be due to errors in epigenetic reprogramming. The argument is that human reproductive cloning should not be carried out because human clones are also likely to exhibit abnormalities due to inappropriate epigenetic reprogramming. Different versions of this epigenetic argument are analysed, a categorical version and a non-categorical. The non-categorical version is suggested to be more well-considered. With regard to policy making on human reproductive cloning, the categorical version can be used to prescribe a permanent ban, while the non-categorical version can be used to prescribe a temporary ban. The implications of the precautionary principle--as interpreted in the European Union--are investigated. The conclusion is that it seems possible to support a temporary ban by reference to this principle.

  17. Field test of new poplar clone in Shangdong Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Guang-hua; JIANG Yue-zhong; QIAO Yu-ling; B.Nottola

    2003-01-01

    Poplar is one of the dominant tree species for the establishment of fast growing plantations in Shandong Province. Eighteen poplar clones belonging to Populus aigeiros section were introduced from Italy, Turkey and domestic regions. Populus deltoides cv. 'Lux' I-69/55 (I-69), which was widely used in Shandong Province, China, was taken as control clone (I-69). Following a randomized complete block design, seedling test and controlled afforestation trials were carried out at Juxian County, Caoxian County and Laiyang City. The results showed that the poplar clone (Populus × euramericana cv. '102/74'), namely 102/74, performed well both in terms of adaptability and growth rate. The mean height of 13.9 m (H), diameter at breast height of 18.0 cm (DBH) and volume growth of 0.1445 m3 (V) were 2.2 %, 21.6% and 52.9 % higher than those of I-69 (CK), respectively, at the age of 5 years at three experimental sites. Moreover, the clone can be propagated easily and showed high resistance to poplar disease, pest as well as salinity and had longer growing period. Furthermore, wood basic density and fiber length of new poplar clone (102/74) were as same as I-69 (CK). It was concluded that the selected clone (102/74) was ideal for the establishment of fast-growing poplar plantations, especially for the pulpwood plantations in Shandong Province.

  18. Clone Networks, Clone Extensions and Biregularizations of Varieties of Algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Plonka

    2001-01-01

    We consider algebras of type τ- without nullary operations. An identity ψ≈ψ of type τ is clone compatible if ψ and ψ are the same variable or the sets of fundamental operation symbols in ψ and ψ are non-empty and identical. For a variety V, we denote by Vc the variety defined by all clone compatible identities from Id(V). In this paper, we give a construction of algebras called a clone network. Under some assumptions, we describe algebras from Vc by means of this construction. We find some properties of Vc and applications.

  19. A Brief Analysis of Sister Carrie's Character

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hanying

    2010-01-01

    Carrie is always dreaming while the rocking chair is rocking again and again, this is the deep impression on us after we read "Sister Carrie" which is the first novel of Theodore Dreiser. In this novel the protagonist Sister Carrie is a controversial person. This paper tries to analyze the character of Sister Carrie in order to find out…

  20. Macrophage responsiveness to light therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, S.; Bolton, P.; Dyson, M.; Harvey, W.; Diamantopoulos, C. (United Medical School, London (England))

    1989-01-01

    Macrophages are a source of many important mediators of wound repair. It was the purpose of this study to see if light could stimulate the release of these mediators. In this study an established macrophage-like cell line (U-937) was used. The cells were exposed in culture to the following wavelengths of light: 660 nm, 820 nm, 870 nm, and 880 nm. The 820-nm source was coherent and polarised, and the others were non-coherent. Twelve hours after exposure the macrophage supernatant was removed and placed on 3T3 fibroblast cultures. Fibroblast proliferation was assessed over a 5-day period. The results showed that 660-nm, 820-nm, and 870-nm wavelengths encouraged the macrophages to release factors that stimulated fibroblast proliferation above the control levels, whereas the 880-nm wavelength either inhibited the release of these factors or encouraged the release of some inhibitory factors of fibroblast proliferation. These results suggest that light at certain wavelengths may be a useful therapeutic agent by providing a means of either stimulating or inhibiting fibroblast proliferation where necessary. At certain wavelengths coherence is not essential.

  1. Limitations on Cloning in Classical Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Fenyes, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we show that a result precisely analogous to the traditional quantum no-cloning theorem holds in classical mechanics. This classical no-cloning theorem does not prohibit classical cloning, we argue, because it is based on a too-restrictive definition of cloning. Using a less popular, more inclusive definition of cloning, we give examples of classical cloning processes. We also prove that a cloning machine must be at least as complicated as the object it is supposed to clone.

  2. Seamless Ligation Cloning Extract (SLiCE) cloning method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongwei; Werling, Uwe; Edelmann, Winfried

    2014-01-01

    SLiCE (Seamless Ligation Cloning Extract) is a novel cloning method that utilizes easy to generate bacterial cell extracts to assemble multiple DNA fragments into recombinant DNA molecules in a single in vitro recombination reaction. SLiCE overcomes the sequence limitations of traditional cloning methods, facilitates seamless cloning by recombining short end homologies (15-52 bp) with or without flanking heterologous sequences and provides an effective strategy for directional subcloning of DNA fragments from bacterial artificial chromosomes or other sources. SLiCE is highly cost-effective and demonstrates the versatility as a number of standard laboratory bacterial strains can serve as sources for SLiCE extract. We established a DH10B-derived E. coli strain expressing an optimized λ prophage Red recombination system, termed PPY, which facilitates SLiCE with very high efficiencies.

  3. Therapeutic cloning in the mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mombaerts, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear transfer technology can be applied to produce autologous differentiated cells for therapeutic purposes, a concept termed therapeutic cloning. Countless articles have been published on the ethics and politics of human therapeutic cloning, reflecting the high expectations from this new opportunity for rejuvenation of the aging or diseased body. Yet the research literature on therapeutic cloning, strictly speaking, is comprised of only four articles, all in the mouse. The efficiency of derivation of embryonic stem cell lines via nuclear transfer is remarkably consistent among these reports. However, the efficiency is so low that, in its present form, the concept is unlikely to become widespread in clinical practice. PMID:12949262

  4. Biomimetic Cloning of Quantum Observables

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Rodriguez, U; Lamata, L; Solano, E

    2013-01-01

    We propose a bio-inspired sequential quantum protocol for the cloning and preservation of the statistics associated to quantum observables of a given system. It combines the cloning of a set of commuting observables, permitted by the no-cloning and no-broadcasting theorems, with a controllable propagation of the initial state coherences to the subsequent generations. The protocol mimics the scenario in which an individual in an unknown quantum state copies and propagates its quantum information into an environment of blank qubits. Finally, we propose a realistic experimental implementation of this protocol in trapped ions.

  5. Cloning: revisiting an old debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhey, Allen D

    1994-09-01

    The debate about cloning that took place 25 years ago, although directed toward a different sort of cloning, elucidates fundamental issues currently at stake in reproductive technologies and research. Paul Ramsey and Joseph Fletcher were participants in this early debate. The differences between Ramsey and Fletcher about the meaning and sufficiency of freedom, the understanding and weighing of good and evil, the connection between embodiment and personhood, the relationship of humans with nature, and the meaning of parenthood suggest both a broader agenda for the debate about cloning and a cautious move forward in the development of embryo-splitting.

  6. Interaction with extracellular matrix proteins influences Lsh/Ity/Bcg (candidate Nramp) gene regulation of macrophage priming/activation for tumour necrosis factor-alpha and nitrite release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formica, S; Roach, T I; Blackwell, J M

    1994-05-01

    The murine resistance gene Lsh/Ity/Bcg regulates activation of macrophages for tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-dependent production of nitric oxide mediating antimicrobial activity against Leishmania, Salmonella and Mycobacterium. As Lsh is differentially expressed in macrophages from different tissue sites, experiments were performed to determine whether interaction with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins would influence the macrophage TNF-alpha response. Plating of bone marrow-derived macrophages onto purified fibrinogen or fibronectin-rich L929 cell-derived matrices, but not onto mannan, was itself sufficient to stimulate TNF-alpha release, with significantly higher levels released from congenic B10.L-Lshr compared to C57BL/10ScSn (Lshs) macrophages. Only macrophages plated onto fibrinogen also released measurable levels of nitrites, again higher in Lshr compared to Lshs macrophages. Addition of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), but not bacterial lipopolysaccharide or mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan, as a second signal enhanced the TNF-alpha and nitrite responses of macrophages plated onto fibrinogen, particularly in the Lshr macrophages. Interaction with fibrinogen and fibronectin also primed macrophages for an enhanced TNF-alpha response to leishmanial parasites, but this was only translated into enhanced nitrite responses in the presence of IFN-gamma. In these experiments, Lshr macrophages remained superior in their TNF-alpha responses throughout, but to a degree which reflected the magnitude of the difference observed on ECM alone. Hence, the specificity for the enhanced TNF-alpha responses of Lshr macrophages lay in their interaction with fibrinogen and fibronectin ECM, while a differential nitrite response was only observed with fibrinogen and/or IFN-gamma. The results are discussed in relation to the possible function of the recently cloned candidate gene Nramp, which has structural identity to eukaryote transporters and an N-terminal cytoplasmic

  7. Methylotroph cloning vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Richard S.; Allen, Larry N.

    1989-04-25

    A cloning vehicle comprising: a replication determinant effective for replicating the vehicle in a non-C.sub.1 -utilizing host and in a C.sub.1 -utilizing host; DNA effective to allow the vehicle to be mobilized from the non-C.sub.1 -utilizing host to the C.sub.1 -utilizing host; DNA providing resistance to two antibiotics to which the wild-type C.sub.1 -utilizing host is susceptible, each of the antibiotic resistance markers having a recognition site for a restriction endonuclease; a cos site; and a means for preventing replication in the C.sub.1 -utilizing host. The vehicle is used for complementation mapping as follows. DNA comprising a gene from the C.sub.1 -utilizing organism is inserted at the restriction nuclease recognition site, inactivating the antibiotic resistance marker at that site. The vehicle can then be used to form a cosmid structure to infect the non-C.sub.1 -utilizing (e.g., E. coli) host, and then conjugated with a selected C.sub.1 -utilizing mutant. Resistance to the other antibiotic by the mutant is a marker of the conjugation. Other phenotypical changes in the mutant, e.g., loss of an auxotrophic trait, is attributed to the C.sub.1 gene. The vector is also used to inactivate genes whose protein products catalyze side reactions that divert compounds from a biosynthetic pathway to a desired product, thereby producing an organism that makes the desired product in higher yields.

  8. αEnv-decorated phosphatidylserine liposomes trigger phagocytosis of HIV-virus-like particles in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramatica, Andrea; Petazzi, Roberto A; Lehmann, Maik J; Ziomkowska, Joanna; Herrmann, Andreas; Chiantia, Salvatore

    2014-07-01

    Macrophages represent an important cellular target of HIV-1. Interestingly, they are also believed to play a potential role counteracting its infection. However, HIV-1 is known to impair macrophage immune functions such as antibody-mediated phagocytosis. Here, we present immunoliposomes that can bind HIV-1 virus-like particles (HIV-VLPs) while being specifically phagocytosed by macrophages, thus allowing the co-internalization of HIV-VLPs. These liposomes are decorated with anti-Env antibodies and contain phosphatidylserine (PS). PS mediates liposome internalization by macrophages via a mechanism not affected by HIV-1. Hence, PS-liposomes mimic apoptotic cells and are internalized into the macrophages due to specific recognition, carrying the previously bound HIV-VLPs. With a combination of flow cytometry, confocal live-cell imaging and electron microscopy we demonstrate that the PS-immunoliposomes presented here are able to elicit efficient HIV-VLPs phagocytosis by macrophages and might represent a new nanotechnological approach to enhance HIV-1 antigen presentation and reduce the ongoing inflammation processes. This team of authors demonstrate that specific phosphatidylserin immunoliposomes are able to elicit efficient phagocytosis of HIV-virus-like particle by macrophages and might represent a new nanomedicine approach to enhance HIV-1 antigen presentation and reduce ongoing inflammation processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of polarized macrophage subsets in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Chi, Mai; Laplace-Builhe, Béryl; Travnickova, Jana; Luz-Crawford, Patricia; Tejedor, Gautier; Phan, Quang Tien; Duroux-Richard, Isabelle; Levraud, Jean-Pierre; Kissa, Karima; Lutfalla, Georges; Jorgensen, Christian; Djouad, Farida

    2015-07-08

    While the mammalian macrophage phenotypes have been intensively studied in vitro, the dynamic of their phenotypic polarization has never been investigated in live vertebrates. We used the zebrafish as a live model to identify and trail macrophage subtypes. We generated a transgenic line whose macrophages expressing tumour necrosis factor alpha (tnfa), a key feature of classically activated (M1) macrophages, express fluorescent proteins Tg(mpeg1:mCherryF/tnfa:eGFP-F). Using 4D-confocal microscopy, we showed that both aseptic wounding and Escherichia coli inoculation triggered macrophage recruitment, some of which started to express tnfa. RT-qPCR on Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS)-sorted tnfa(+) and tnfa(-) macrophages showed that they, respectively, expressed M1 and alternatively activated (M2) mammalian markers. Fate tracing of tnfa(+) macrophages during the time-course of inflammation demonstrated that pro-inflammatory macrophages converted into M2-like phenotype during the resolution step. Our results reveal the diversity and plasticity of zebrafish macrophage subsets and underline the similarities with mammalian macrophages proposing a new system to study macrophage functional dynamic.

  10. Bartonella-like bacteria carried by domestic mite species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopecký, Jan; Nesvorná, Marta; Hubert, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Bartonella are carried by haematophagous mites, ticks, fleas and flies, and attack the erythrocytes of mammals. Here we describe a Bartonella-like clade, a distinct group related to Bartonellaceae, in stored-product mites (Acari: Astigmata) and a predatory mite Cheyletus eruditus (Acari: Prostigmata) based on the analysis of cloned 16S rRNA gene sequences. By using the clade-specific primers, closely related Bartonella-like 16S rRNA sequences were amplified from both laboratory colonies and field strains of three synanthropic mite species (Acarus siro, Lepidoglyphus destructor and Tyrophagus putrescentiae) and a predatory mite. Altogether, sequences of Bartonella-like bacteria were found in 11 strains, but were not detected in Dermatophagoides farinae and D. pteronyssinus and two strains of L. destructor. All obtained sequences formed a separate cluster branching as a sister group to Bartonellaceae and related to other separate clusters comprising uncultured bacterial clones from human skin and hemipteran insects (Nysius plebeius and Nysius sp.). The classification of sequences into operational taxonomic units (OTUs) showed a difference between A. siro and T. putrescentiae suggesting that the Bartonella-like bacteria are different in these two mite species. However, species specific sequences in separate OTUs were observed also for C. eruditus. Possible symbiotic interactions between Bartonella-like bacteria and their mite hosts are discussed.

  11. The Role of Macrophages in Tumor Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerben J. van der Bij

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages constitute a large proportion of the immune cell infiltrate, which is present in many tumors. Activation state of macrophages is greatly influenced by their environment, leading to different macrophage subsets with diverse functions. Although previously regarded as potent immune cells that are capable of destroying tumor cells, recent literature focuses on the ability of macrophages to promote tumor development due to secretion of mediators, like growth and angiogenic factors. It is now becoming increasingly clear that a complicated synergistic relationship exists between macrophages and malignant cells whereby tumor cells can affect macrophage phenotype, and vice versa. As such, macrophages and their contribution in cancer development are currently subject of debate.

  12. Macrophages in Tissue Repair, Regeneration, and Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Thomas A; Vannella, Kevin M

    2016-03-15

    Inflammatory monocytes and tissue-resident macrophages are key regulators of tissue repair, regeneration, and fibrosis. After tissue injury, monocytes and macrophages undergo marked phenotypic and functional changes to play critical roles during the initiation, maintenance, and resolution phases of tissue repair. Disturbances in macrophage function can lead to aberrant repair, such that uncontrolled production of inflammatory mediators and growth factors, deficient generation of anti-inflammatory macrophages, or failed communication between macrophages and epithelial cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and stem or tissue progenitor cells all contribute to a state of persistent injury, and this could lead to the development of pathological fibrosis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms that instruct macrophages to adopt pro-inflammatory, pro-wound-healing, pro-fibrotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic, pro-resolving, and tissue-regenerating phenotypes after injury, and we highlight how some of these mechanisms and macrophage activation states could be exploited therapeutically.

  13. Alveolar Macrophage Polarisation in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh A. Almatroodi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of alveolar macrophages in lung cancer is multifaceted and conflicting. Alveolar macrophage secretion of proinflammatory cytokines has been found to enhance antitumour functions, cytostasis (inhibition of tumour growth, and cytotoxicity (macrophage-mediated killing. In contrast, protumour functions of alveolar macrophages in lung cancer have also been indicated. Inhibition of antitumour function via secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 as well as reduced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and reduction of mannose receptor expression on alveolar macrophages may contribute to lung cancer progression and metastasis. Alveolar macrophages have also been found to contribute to angiogenesis and tumour growth via the secretion of IL-8 and VEGF. This paper reviews the evidence for a dual role of alveolar macrophages in lung cancer progression.

  14. Extracellular vesicles from Leishmania-infected macrophages confer an anti-infection cytokine-production profile to naïve macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Cronemberger-Andrade

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are structures with phospholipid bilayer membranes and 100-1000 nm diameters. These vesicles are released from cells upon activation of surface receptors and/or apoptosis. The production of EVs by dendritic cells, mast cells, macrophages, and B and T lymphocytes has been extensively reported in the literature. EVs may express MHC class II and other membrane surface molecules and carry antigens. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of EVs from Leishmania-infected macrophages as immune modulatory particles.In this work it was shown that BALB/c mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages, either infected in vitro with Leishmania amazonensis or left uninfected, release comparable amounts of 50-300 nm-diameter extracellular vesicles (EVs. The EVs were characterized by flow cytometry and electron microscopy. The incubation of naïve macrophages with these EVs for 48 hours led to a statistically significant increase in the production of the cytokines IL-12, IL-1β, and TNF-α.EVs derived from macrophages infected with L. amazonensis induce other macrophages, which in vivo could be bystander cells, to produce the proinflammatory cytokines IL-12, IL-1β and TNF-α. This could contribute both to modulate the immune system in favor of a Th1 immune response and to the elimination of the Leishmania, leading, therefore, to the control the infection.

  15. Cytokines and macrophage function in humans - role of stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    We have begun this study to commence the determination of the role of mild chronic stress in the effects of space flight on macrophage/monocyte function, a component of the immune response. Medical students undergoing regular periods of stress and relaxation have been shown to be an excellent model for determining the effects of stress on immune responses. We have begun using this model using the macrophage/monocyte as model leukocyte. The monocyte/macrophage plays a central role in immunoregulation. The studies to be included in this three year project are the effects of stress on: (1) interactions of monocytes with microbes, (2) monocyte production of cytokines, (3) monocyte phagocytosis and activity, and (4) monocyte expression of cell surface antigens important in immune responses. Stress hormone levels will also be carried out to determine if there is a correlation between stress effects on immune responses and hormonal levels. Psychological testing to insure subjects are actually stressed or relaxed at the time of testing will also be carried out. The results obtained from the proposed studies should be comparable with space flight studies with whole animals and isolated cell cultures. When complete this study should allow the commencement of the establishment of the role of stress as one compartment of the induction of immune alterations by space flight.

  16. Human Cloning: Let's Discuss It.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taras, Loretta; Stavroulakis, Anthea M.; Ortiz, Mary T.

    1999-01-01

    Describes experiences with holding discussions on cloning at a variety of levels in undergraduate biology courses. Discusses teaching methods used and student reactions to the discussions. Contains 12 references. (WRM)

  17. A Clone of Your Own.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilodeau, Kirsten

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity used at the Washington Park Arboretum that helps students understand cloning through plant propagation. Students also learn how to make a pot from recycled newspapers and how to make soil that is appropriate for the plants. (DDR)

  18. Human cloning and 'posthuman' society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackford, Russell

    2005-01-01

    Since early 1997, when the creation of Dolly the sheep by somatic cell nuclear transfer was announced in Nature, numerous government reports, essays, articles and books have considered the ethical problems and policy issues surrounding human reproductive cloning. In this article, I consider what response a modern liberal society should give to the prospect of human cloning, if it became safe and practical. Some opponents of human cloning have argued that permitting it would place us on a slippery slope to a repugnant future society, comparable to that portrayed in Aldous Huxley's novel, Brave New World. I conclude that, leaving aside concerns about safety, none of the psychological or social considerations discussed in this article provides an adequate policy justification for invoking the state's coercive powers to prevent human cloning.

  19. Computational modeling and analysis of iron release from macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alka A Potdar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A major process of iron homeostasis in whole-body iron metabolism is the release of iron from the macrophages of the reticuloendothelial system. Macrophages recognize and phagocytose senescent or damaged erythrocytes. Then, they process the heme iron, which is returned to the circulation for reutilization by red blood cell precursors during erythropoiesis. The amount of iron released, compared to the amount shunted for storage as ferritin, is greater during iron deficiency. A currently accepted model of iron release assumes a passive-gradient with free diffusion of intracellular labile iron (Fe2+ through ferroportin (FPN, the transporter on the plasma membrane. Outside the cell, a multi-copper ferroxidase, ceruloplasmin (Cp, oxidizes ferrous to ferric ion. Apo-transferrin (Tf, the primary carrier of soluble iron in the plasma, binds ferric ion to form mono-ferric and di-ferric transferrin. According to the passive-gradient model, the removal of ferrous ion from the site of release sustains the gradient that maintains the iron release. Subcellular localization of FPN, however, indicates that the role of FPN may be more complex. By experiments and mathematical modeling, we have investigated the detailed mechanism of iron release from macrophages focusing on the roles of the Cp, FPN and apo-Tf. The passive-gradient model is quantitatively analyzed using a mathematical model for the first time. A comparison of experimental data with model simulations shows that the passive-gradient model cannot explain macrophage iron release. However, a facilitated-transport model associated with FPN can explain the iron release mechanism. According to the facilitated-transport model, intracellular FPN carries labile iron to the macrophage membrane. Extracellular Cp accelerates the oxidation of ferrous ion bound to FPN. Apo-Tf in the extracellular environment binds to the oxidized ferrous ion, completing the release process. Facilitated-transport model can

  20. Cholesterol efflux pathways regulate myelopoiesis: A potential link to altered macrophage function in atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew James Murphy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD is a chronic inflammatory disease of the blood vessels that can lead to myocardial infarction or stroke. The major cell in the atherosclerotic lesion, the macrophage is thought to be an important contributor to the production of inflammatory mediators that exacerbate this disease. Macrophages are generally derived from circulating monocytes, which are in turn produced by hematopoietic stem and multipotential progenitor cells (HSPCs in the bone marrow and other medullary organs. Recent studies suggest that disruption in cholesterol homeostasis or prolonged exposure to a hypercholesterolemic environment can influence HSPCs to over-produce monocytes, resulting in monocytosis. These monocytes may carry a pre-programed ability to become M1-like macrophages once they enter the atherosclerotic lesion. Future studies may help to differentiate the role of such pre-programming versus responses to local environmental cues in determining M1, M2 or other macrophage phenotypes in atherosclerotic lesions.

  1. Staining of Langerhans Cells with Monoclonal Antibodies to Macrophages and Lymphoid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Kathleen A.; Flotte, Thomas J.; Springer, Timothy A.; Gigli, Irma; Thorbecke, G. Jeanette

    1983-06-01

    Langerhans cells are Ia-bearing antigen-presenting cells in the epidermis that share many functions with macrophages. We have used monoclonal antibodies to the macrophage antigens, Mac-2 and -3, Ia antigen, Fc fragment receptor, and the common leukocyte antigen CLA to compare the cell surface antigens of these cells with those of interdigitating and follicular dendritic cells and of macrophages in lymphoid tissues. Immunoperoxidase staining was carried out with epidermal sheets from BALB/c mice and epidermal cell suspensions enriched for Langerhans cells by Fc rosetting. Langerhans cells stained for all of these antigens. Comparison with the staining properties of other dendritic cells and macrophages, in combination with previous observations, indicates a close relationship of Langerhans cells to the interdigitating cells of lymphoid tissues.

  2. A recombinant fusion toxin based on enzymatic inactive C3bot1 selectively targets macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Dmochewitz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The C3bot1 protein (~23 kDa from Clostridium botulinum ADP-ribosylates and thereby inactivates Rho. C3bot1 is selectively taken up into the cytosol of monocytes/macrophages but not of other cell types such as epithelial cells or fibroblasts. Most likely, the internalization occurs by a specific endocytotic pathway via acidified endosomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we tested whether enzymatic inactive C3bot1E174Q serves as a macrophage-selective transport system for delivery of enzymatic active proteins into the cytosol of such cells. Having confirmed that C3bot1E174Q does not induce macrophage activation, we used the actin ADP-ribosylating C2I (∼50 kDa from Clostridium botulinum as a reporter enzyme for C3bot1E174Q-mediated delivery into macrophages. The recombinant C3bot1E174Q-C2I fusion toxin was cloned and expressed as GST-protein in Escherichia coli. Purified C3bot1E174Q-C2I was recognized by antibodies against C2I and C3bot and showed C2I-specific enzyme activity in vitro. When applied to cultured cells C3bot1E174Q-C2I ADP-ribosylated actin in the cytosol of macrophages including J774A.1 and RAW264.7 cell lines as well as primary cultured human macrophages but not of epithelial cells. Together with confocal fluorescence microscopy experiments, the biochemical data indicate the selective uptake of a recombinant C3-fusion toxin into the cytosol of macrophages. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In summary, we demonstrated that C3bot1E174Q can be used as a delivery system for fast, selective and specific transport of enzymes into the cytosol of living macrophages. Therefore, C3-based fusion toxins can represent valuable molecular tools in experimental macrophage pharmacology and cell biology as well as attractive candidates to develop new therapeutic approaches against macrophage-associated diseases.

  3. Islamic perspectives on human cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Mahmoud

    2007-01-01

    The present paper seeks to assess various views from Islamic jurists relating to human cloning, which is one of the controversial topics in the recent past. Taking Islamic jurisprudence principles, such as the rule of necessity for self preservation and respect for human beings, the rule of la darar wa la dirar ('the necessity to refrain from causing harm to oneself and others') and the rule of usr wa haraj, one may indicate that if human cloning could not be prohibited, as such, it could still be opposed because it gives way to various harmful consequences, which include family disorder, chaos in the clone's family relationships, physical and mental diseases for clones and suffering of egg donors and surrogate mothers. However with due attention to the fact that the reasons behind the prohibition of abortion only restrict the destruction of human embryos in their post-implantation stages, human cloning for biomedical research and exploitation of stem cells from cloned embryos at the blastocyst stage for therapeutic purposes would be acceptable.

  4. Cloning goes to the movies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormick, Craig

    2006-10-01

    Public attitude research conducted by Biotechnology Australia shows that one of the major sources of information on human reproductive cloning is movies. Traditionally, understanding of new and emerging technologies has come through the mass media but human cloning, being so widely addressed through the popular culture of movies, is more effectively defined by Hollywood than the news media or science media. But how well are the science and social issues of cloning portrayed in box office hits such as The Island, Multiplicity, Star Wars: Attack of the Clones and Jurassic Park? These movies have enormous reach and undoubted influence, and are therefore worth analyzing in some detail. This study looks at 33 movies made between 1971 and 2005 that address human reproductive cloning, and it categorizes the films based on their genre and potential influence. Yet rather than simply rating the quality of the science portrayed, the study compares the key messages in these movies with public attitudes towards cloning, to examine the correlations.

  5. Artificial cloning of domestic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefer, Carol L

    2015-07-21

    Domestic animals can be cloned using techniques such as embryo splitting and nuclear transfer to produce genetically identical individuals. Although embryo splitting is limited to the production of only a few identical individuals, nuclear transfer of donor nuclei into recipient oocytes, whose own nuclear DNA has been removed, can result in large numbers of identical individuals. Moreover, clones can be produced using donor cells from sterile animals, such as steers and geldings, and, unlike their genetic source, these clones are fertile. In reality, due to low efficiencies and the high costs of cloning domestic species, only a limited number of identical individuals are generally produced, and these clones are primarily used as breed stock. In addition to providing a means of rescuing and propagating valuable genetics, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) research has contributed knowledge that has led to the direct reprogramming of cells (e.g., to induce pluripotent stem cells) and a better understanding of epigenetic regulation during embryonic development. In this review, I provide a broad overview of the historical development of cloning in domestic animals, of its application to the propagation of livestock and transgenic animal production, and of its scientific promise for advancing basic research.

  6. Structured Review of Code Clone Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hordijk, Wiebe; Ponisio, María Laura; Wieringa, Roel

    2008-01-01

    This report presents the results of a structured review of code clone literature. The aim of the review is to assemble a conceptual model of clone-related concepts which helps us to reason about clones. This conceptual model unifies clone concepts from a wide range of literature, so that findings ab

  7. Structured Review of Code Clone Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hordijk, W.T.B.; Ponisio, Laura; Wieringa, Roelf J.

    2008-01-01

    This report presents the results of a structured review of code clone literature. The aim of the review is to assemble a conceptual model of clone-related concepts which helps us to reason about clones. This conceptual model unifies clone concepts from a wide range of literature, so that findings ab

  8. 25 CFR 167.6 - Carrying capacities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carrying capacities. 167.6 Section 167.6 Indians BUREAU... Carrying capacities. (a) The Commissioner of Indian Affairs on June 26, 1943, promulgated the authorized carrying capacity for each land management district of the Navajo Reservation. (b) Recommended...

  9. 7 CFR 1437.402 - Carrying capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carrying capacity. 1437.402 Section 1437.402... Determining Coverage of Forage Intended for Animal Consumption § 1437.402 Carrying capacity. (a) CCC will establish a carrying capacity for all grazed forage present in the county for purposes of administering...

  10. A FEMINIST READING OF SISTER CARRIE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高陈科

    2011-01-01

    In the history of American literature, Sister Carrie has always been a controversial character. The critics regard Carrie either as a "fallen woman" or as a "new women". This thesis aims to offer a feminist reading of the image of Sister Carrie in the con

  11. Local Dynamic Stability Associated with Load Carrying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Liu

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: Current study confirmed the sensitivity of local dynamic stability measure in load carrying situation. It was concluded that load carrying tasks were associated with declined local dynamic stability, which may result in increased risk of fall accident. This finding has implications in preventing fall accidents associated with occupational load carrying.

  12. Interaction of glucocorticoids with macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werb, Z.; Foley, R.; Munck, A.

    1978-01-01

    The mononuclear phagocyte system plays a central role in mediating host responses in inflammation. Glucocorticoids have anti-inflammatory actions that may be of considerable importance in the therapeutic effects of these agents in chronic inflammation; it is possible that some of these effects are mediated through direct hormonal action on macrophages. Although the site of action of the glucocorticoids on macrophages has not been established, it has been shown that in many other glucocorticoid target systems the effects of glucocorticoids are mediated by specific macromolecular binding proteins, referred to as receptors. In this study we have established that monocytes and macophages contain saturable glucocorticoid-binding proteins, with specificity of binding for cortisol, corticosterone, and related synthetic steroids such as dexamethasone, and that they have dissociation constants for binding within physiological ranges.

  13. Effects of ischemia on lung macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aigul Moldobaeva

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis after pulmonary ischemia is initiated by reactive O(2 species and is dependent on CXC chemokine growth factors, and its magnitude is correlated with the number of lavaged macrophages. After complete obstruction of the left pulmonary artery in mice, the left lung is isolated from the peripheral circulation until 5-7 days later, when a new systemic vasculature invades the lung parenchyma. Consequently, this model offers a unique opportunity to study the differentiation and/or proliferation of monocyte-derived cells within the lung. In this study, we questioned whether macrophage subpopulations were differentially expressed and which subset contributed to growth factor release. We characterized the change in number of all macrophages (MHCII(int, CD11C+, alveolar macrophages (MHCII(int, CD11C+, CD11B- and mature lung macrophages (MHCII(int, CD11C+, CD11B+ in left lungs from mice immediately (0 h or 24 h after left pulmonary artery ligation (LPAL. In left lung homogenates, only lung macrophages increased 24 h after LPAL (vs. 0 h; p<0.05. No changes in proliferation were seen in any subset by PCNA expression (0 h vs. 24 h lungs. When the number of monocytic cells was reduced with clodronate liposomes, systemic blood flow to the left lung 14 days after LPAL decreased by 42% (p<0.01 compared to vehicle controls. Furthermore, when alveolar macrophages and lung macrophages were sorted and studied in vitro, only lung macrophages secreted the chemokine MIP-2α (ELISA. These data suggest that ischemic stress within the lung contributes to the differentiation of immature monocytes to lung macrophages within the first 24 h after LPAL. Lung macrophages but not alveolar macrophages increase and secrete the proangiogenic chemokine MIP-2α. Overall, an increase in the number of lung macrophages appears to be critical for neovascularization in the lung, since clodronate treatment decreased their number and attenuated functional angiogenesis.

  14. Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophages (BMM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Porse, Bo

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTIONBone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) are primary macrophage cells, derived from bone marrow cells in vitro in the presence of growth factors. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) is a lineage-specific growth factor that is responsible for the proliferation and differentiation...... of committed myeloid progenitors into cells of the macrophage/monocyte lineage. Mice lacking functional M-CSF are deficient in macrophages and osteoclasts and suffer from osteopetrosis. In this protocol, bone marrow cells are grown in culture dishes in the presence of M-CSF, which is secreted by L929 cells...... and is used in the form of L929-conditioned medium. Under these conditions, the bone marrow monocyte/macrophage progenitors will proliferate and differentiate into a homogenous population of mature BMMs. The efficiency of the differentiation is assessed using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS...

  15. Dexamethasone palmitate ameliorates macrophages-rich graft-versus-host disease by inhibiting macrophage functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Nishiwaki

    Full Text Available Macrophage infiltration of skin GVHD lesions correlates directly with disease severity, but the mechanisms underlying this relationship remain unclear and GVHD with many macrophages is a therapeutic challenge. Here, we characterize the macrophages involved in GVHD and report that dexamethasone palmitate (DP, a liposteroid, can ameliorate such GVHD by inhibiting macrophage functions. We found that host-derived macrophages could exacerbate GVHD in a mouse model through expression of higher levels of pro-inflammatory TNF-α and IFN-γ, and lower levels of anti-inflammatory IL-10 than resident macrophages in mice without GVHD. DP significantly decreased the viability and migration capacity of primary mouse macrophages compared to conventional dexamethasone in vitro. DP treatment on day 7 and day 14 decreased macrophage number, and attenuated GVHD score and subsequent mortality in a murine model. This is the first study to provide evidence that therapy for GVHD should be changed on the basis of infiltrating cell type.

  16. Macrophage-mediated tumor cytotoxicity: role of macrophage surface sialic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, D J

    1983-02-01

    Cell surface sialic acid levels were compared for monocytes and macrophages obtained from normal volunteers and breast cancer patients. Equal quantities of sialic acid were found on the monocytes obtained from normal volunteers and breast cancer patients. Approximately 60% more cell surface sialic acid was found on the macrophages from breast cancer patients than was found on the macrophages from normal volunteers. In order to determine whether cell surface sialic acid had any effect on macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity, macrophages were pretreated with neuraminidase (NANAse) prior to co-cultivation with tumor cells. The normal macrophages, after neuraminidase treatment, no longer retained their ability to kill tumor cells. However, when macrophages from breast cancer patients were treated with NANAse, no difference was observed in the ability of untreated and NANAse treated macrophages to kill tumor cells.

  17. DMPD: Silica binding and toxicity in alveolar macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18226603 Silica binding and toxicity in alveolar macrophages. Hamilton RF Jr, Thaku...l) Show Silica binding and toxicity in alveolar macrophages. PubmedID 18226603 Title Silica binding and toxicity in alveolar

  18. High-resolution transcriptome of human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Beyer

    Full Text Available Macrophages are dynamic cells integrating signals from their microenvironment to develop specific functional responses. Although, microarray-based transcriptional profiling has established transcriptional reprogramming as an important mechanism for signal integration and cell function of macrophages, current knowledge on transcriptional regulation of human macrophages is far from complete. To discover novel marker genes, an area of great need particularly in human macrophage biology but also to generate a much more thorough transcriptome of human M1- and M1-like macrophages, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq of human macrophages. Using this approach we can now provide a high-resolution transcriptome profile of human macrophages under classical (M1-like and alternative (M2-like polarization conditions and demonstrate a dynamic range exceeding observations obtained by previous technologies, resulting in a more comprehensive understanding of the transcriptome of human macrophages. Using this approach, we identify important gene clusters so far not appreciated by standard microarray techniques. In addition, we were able to detect differential promoter usage, alternative transcription start sites, and different coding sequences for 57 gene loci in human macrophages. Moreover, this approach led to the identification of novel M1-associated (CD120b, TLR2, SLAMF7 as well as M2-associated (CD1a, CD1b, CD93, CD226 cell surface markers. Taken together, these data support that high-resolution transcriptome profiling of human macrophages by RNA-seq leads to a better understanding of macrophage function and will form the basis for a better characterization of macrophages in human health and disease.

  19. The clone selection studies on Siyah Gemre grape variety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilli Yıldız

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available V. vinifera L.cv. “Siyah Gemre” is an important table grape variety of Mediterranean Region in Turkey. It is late sea- son, medium bunch density, round berry, red-black colored and seeded. The study was carried out to make clone selection for increasing the yield and quality in “Siyah Gemre” grape variety The project was completed in two stages. First one was selection nominees of mother clone vine and second was establishing of clonal collection vineyard. The first stage studies were carried out at grower vineyards of İsparta, Turkey surroundings where “Siyah Gemre” is grown wide spread, between 2001 and 2003. Clonal nominees were selected by using counting the cluster and shoot at the end of the project. After that, the clonal collection vineyard was established with spacing 3.0 m × 1.65 m in 2004. Twelve vines of each clonal nominees were grafted onto 110R rootstock. In the study the values of yield, number of cluster, weight of cluster, 100 berry weight, index of maturity, sensory analysis, weight of pruning and bud productivity were evaluated between 2007–2012. At the end of this study, according to the values of total point, five clone nominees were selected and among their 3, 19, 24 numbered clones were chosen in terms of total sensory analysis score, yield and stability, cluster and berry properties respectively.

  20. [Mystery and problems of cloning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, V A

    2010-01-01

    The attention of investigators is attracted to the fact that, in spite of great efforts in mammalian cloning, advances that have been made in this area of research are not great, and cloned animals have developmental pathologies often incompatible with life and/or reproduction ability. It is yet not clear what technical or biological factors underlie this, and how they are connected or interact with each other, which is more realistic strategically. There is a great number of articles dealing with the influence of cloning with the nuclear transfer on genetic and epigenetic reprogramming of donor cells. At the same time we can see the practical absence of analytical investigations concerning the technology of cloning as such, its weak points, and possible sources of cellular trauma in the course of microsurgery of nuclear transfer or twinning. This article discusses step by step several nuclear transfer techniques and the methods of dividing early preimplanted embryos for twinning with the aim to reveal possible sources of cell damage during micromanipulation that may have negative influence on the development of cloned organisms. Several new author's technologies based on the study of cell biophysical characteristics are described, which allow one to avoid cellular trauma during manipulation and minimize the possibility of cell damage at any rate.

  1. [Cloning and law in Hungary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julesz, Máté

    2015-03-01

    Reproductive human cloning is prohibited in Hungary, as in many other countries. Therapeutic human cloning is not prohibited, just like in many other countries. Stem cell therapy is also allowed. Article III, paragraph (3) of the Hungarian basic law (constitution) strictly forbids total human cloning. Article 1 of the Additional Protocol to the Oviedo Convention, on the Prohibition of Cloning Human Beings (1998) stipulates that any intervention seeking to create a human being genetically identical to another human being, whether living or dead, is prohibited. In Hungary, according to Article 174 of the Criminal Code, total human cloning constitutes a crime. Article 180, paragraph (3) of the Hungarian Act on Health declares that embryos shall not be brought about for research purposes; research shall be conducted only on embryos brought about for reproductive purposes when this is authorized by the persons entitled to decide upon its disposal, or when the embryo is damaged. Article 180, paragraph (5) of the Hungarian Act on Health stipulates that multiple individuals who genetically conform to one another shall not be brought about. According to Article 181, paragraph (1) of the Hungarian Act on Health, an embryo used for research shall be kept alive for not longer than 14 days, not counting the time it was frozen for storage and the time period of research.

  2. [Cloning: necessary reflections on the imaginary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minahim, María Auxiliadora

    2009-01-01

    The article covers the innumerable reasons given for using cloning for therapeutic and reproductive purposes. The most commonly used argument in favour of the procedure has been that of preserving human dignity, which would include the wide exercising of personal autonomy without restrictions of an ethical nature. This view is countered by questions relating to the use of the technique, namely self-determination and the loss of the integrity of the species, which would include the transformation of a generation through the production of human beings and tissues. It must also be made clear that therapeutic cloning (which is carried out through the use of stem cells) is not yet a reality in the scientific world, with the result that the procedure that is supposedly necessary, which argues in favour of the destruction of the young embryo is misleading, as are also certain discourses used to refer to the theme and the science. Criminal law, on prohibiting this practice is anticipating it becoming a reality, protecting legal rights that affect supra-individual interests, such as the destruction of the young embryo, one of the issues of concern to ADIN (Acción Directa de Inconstitucionalidad en Brasil - Direct Action on Unconstitutionality in Brazil) 3510-0.

  3. Quantitative GPCR and ion channel transcriptomics in primary alveolar macrophages and macrophage surrogates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groot-Kormelink Paul J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alveolar macrophages are one of the first lines of defence against invading pathogens and play a central role in modulating both the innate and acquired immune systems. By responding to endogenous stimuli within the lung, alveolar macrophages contribute towards the regulation of the local inflammatory microenvironment, the initiation of wound healing and the pathogenesis of viral and bacterial infections. Despite the availability of protocols for isolating primary alveolar macrophages from the lung these cells remain recalcitrant to expansion in-vitro and therefore surrogate cell types, such as monocyte derived macrophages and phorbol ester-differentiated cell lines (e.g. U937, THP-1, HL60 are frequently used to model macrophage function. Methods The availability of high throughput gene expression technologies for accurate quantification of transcript levels enables the re-evaluation of these surrogate cell types for use as cellular models of the alveolar macrophage. Utilising high-throughput TaqMan arrays and focussing on dynamically regulated families of integral membrane proteins, we explore the similarities and differences in G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR and ion channel expression in alveolar macrophages and their widely used surrogates. Results The complete non-sensory GPCR and ion channel transcriptome is described for primary alveolar macrophages and macrophage surrogates. The expression of numerous GPCRs and ion channels whose expression were hitherto not described in human alveolar macrophages are compared across primary macrophages and commonly used macrophage cell models. Several membrane proteins known to have critical roles in regulating macrophage function, including CXCR6, CCR8 and TRPV4, were found to be highly expressed in macrophages but not expressed in PMA-differentiated surrogates. Conclusions The data described in this report provides insight into the appropriate choice of cell models for

  4. Sister Carrie:A Material Pursuer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马春花

    2015-01-01

    Sister Carrie dramatized by Dreiser is totally a material pursuer. She is selfish and accumulates money in a crazy way. What she does inevitably centers on materials. Living with Drouet and later Hurstwood, Carrie gets what she wants and enjoys the luxurious life in an easy way. However, with the satisfaction of some of her desires, Carrie ’s desires grow and expand. With enough food and clothes, she needs luxury. Hurstwood’s failure in business leads Carrie to the stage and finally she makes a suc⁃cess and becomes a famous actress in Broadway. She gets more money, but her desires grow even higher. Nothing can satisfy her. In this essay, the author tries to analyze Carrie according to Freud’s and Guo Weilu’s theories and prove that Carrie is totally a material pursuer.

  5. Measuring Social Carrying Capacity: An Exploratory Study

    OpenAIRE

    López-Bonilla, Jesús Manuel; López-Bonilla, Luis Miguel

    2007-01-01

    The tourist carrying capacity commands a growing interest given that it is closely linked with sustainable tourist development. The justification of the utility of this concept is given by means of a simple and efficient methodological proposal, by analysing the social carrying capacity. To this end, an empirical application is carried out in the Western Andalusia. In some of the cases analysed, the satisfaction of the tourist is found to decline when the levels of the tourist use are higher ...

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL CARRYING CAPACITY BASED ON SPATIAL PLANNING

    OpenAIRE

    Luthfi Muta'ali

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this research were to examine environmental carrying capacity analyzed based on aspects of spatial planning and eco-region. The result showed that Kulonprogo Regency has low value of environmental carrying capacity and can only support as much as 79.81% of its total population. Analysis of variance showed significant difference of environmental carrying capacity of protected and cultivated area. The main factor among 12 variables determining the degree of environmen...

  7. Liver macrophages in healthy and diseased liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Zeinab; Knolle, Percy A

    2017-04-01

    Kupffer cells, the largest tissue resident macrophage population, are key for the maintenance of liver integrity and its restoration after injury and infections, as well as the local initiation and resolution of innate and adaptive immunity. These important roles of Kupffer cells were recently identified in healthy and diseased liver revealing diverse functions and phenotypes of hepatic macrophages. High-level phenotypic and genomic analysis revealed that Kupffer cells are not a homogenous population and that the hepatic microenvironment actively shapes both phenotype and function of liver macrophages. Compared to macrophages from other organs, hepatic macrophages bear unique properties that are instrumental for their diverse roles in local immunity as well as liver regeneration. The diverse and, in part, contradictory roles of hepatic macrophages in anti-tumor and inflammatory immune responses as well as regulatory and regenerative processes have been obscured by the lack of appropriate technologies to specifically target or ablate Kupffer cells or monocyte-derived hepatic macrophages. Future studies will need to dissect the exact role of the hepatic macrophages with distinct functional properties linked to their differentiation status and thereby provide insight into the functional plasticity of hepatic macrophages.

  8. DMPD: Nuclear receptor signaling in macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14698033 Nuclear receptor signaling in macrophages. Valledor AF, Ricote M. Biochem ...Pharmacol. 2004 Jan 15;67(2):201-12. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Nuclear receptor signaling in macrop...hages. PubmedID 14698033 Title Nuclear receptor signaling in macrophages. Authors Valledor AF, Ricote M. Pub

  9. DMPD: Cellular signaling in macrophage migration and chemotaxis. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 11073096 Cellular signaling in macrophage migration and chemotaxis. Jones GE. J Leu...koc Biol. 2000 Nov;68(5):593-602. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Cellular signaling in macrophage migration... and chemotaxis. PubmedID 11073096 Title Cellular signaling in macrophage migration and chemotaxis. Autho

  10. DMPD: Macrophage migration inhibitory factor and host innate immune responses tomicrobes. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14620137 Macrophage migration inhibitory factor and host innate immune responses to...microbes. Calandra T. Scand J Infect Dis. 2003;35(9):573-6. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage migration... inhibitory factor and host innate immune responses tomicrobes. PubmedID 14620137 Title Macrophage migration

  11. DMPD: Macrophage differentiation and function in health and disease. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18251777 Macrophage differentiation and function in health and disease. Naito M. Pa...thol Int. 2008 Mar;58(3):143-55. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage differentiation and function in health... and disease. PubmedID 18251777 Title Macrophage differentiation and function in health and disease

  12. DMPD: Shaping of monocyte and macrophage function by adenosine receptors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17056121 Shaping of monocyte and macrophage function by adenosine receptors. Hasko ...tml) (.csml) Show Shaping of monocyte and macrophage function by adenosine receptors. PubmedID 17056121 Titl...e Shaping of monocyte and macrophage function by adenosine receptors. Authors Has

  13. DMPD: Receptor tyrosine kinases and the regulation of macrophage activation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14726496 Receptor tyrosine kinases and the regulation of macrophage activation. Cor...(.csml) Show Receptor tyrosine kinases and the regulation of macrophage activation. PubmedID 14726496 Title ...Receptor tyrosine kinases and the regulation of macrophage activation. Authors Co

  14. DMPD: Macrophage activation by endogenous danger signals. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18161744 Macrophage activation by endogenous danger signals. Zhang X, Mosser DM. J ...Pathol. 2008 Jan;214(2):161-78. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage activation by endogenous dange...r signals. PubmedID 18161744 Title Macrophage activation by endogenous danger signals. Authors Zhang X, Moss

  15. DMPD: Regulation of endogenous apolipoprotein E secretion by macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18388328 Regulation of endogenous apolipoprotein E secretion by macrophages. Kockx ...svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Regulation of endogenous apolipoprotein E secretion by macrophages. PubmedID 18388...328 Title Regulation of endogenous apolipoprotein E secretion by macrophages. Aut

  16. DMPD: Iron regulation of hepatic macrophage TNFalpha expression. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 11841920 Iron regulation of hepatic macrophage TNFalpha expression. Tsukamoto H. Fr...ee Radic Biol Med. 2002 Feb 15;32(4):309-13. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Iron regulation of hepatic macrophage TNFalpha expres...sion. PubmedID 11841920 Title Iron regulation of hepatic macrophage TNFalpha express

  17. Both host and parasite MIF molecules bind to chicken macrophages via CD74 surface receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungwon; Cox, Chasity M; Jenkins, Mark C; Fetterer, Ray H; Miska, Katarzyna B; Dalloul, Rami A

    2014-12-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is recognized as a soluble protein that inhibits the random migration of macrophages and plays a pivotal immunoregulatory function in innate and adaptive immunity. Our group has identified both chicken and Eimeria MIFs, and characterized their function in enhancing innate immune responses during inflammation. In this study, we report that chicken CD74 (ChCD74), a type II transmembrane protein, functions as a macrophage surface receptor that binds to MIF molecules. First, to examine the binding of MIF to chicken monocytes/macrophages, fresh isolated chicken peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated with rChIFN-γ and then incubated with recombinant chicken MIF (rChMIF). Immunofluorescence staining with anti-ChMIF followed by flow cytometry revealed the binding of MIF to stimulated PBMCs. To verify that ChCD74 acts as a surface receptor for MIF molecules, full-length ChCD74p41 was cloned, expressed and its recombinant protein (rChCD74p41) transiently over-expressed with green fluorescent protein in chicken fibroblast DF-1 cells. Fluorescence analysis revealed a higher population of cells double positive for CD74p41 and rChMIF, indicating the binding of rChMIF to DF-1 cells via rChCD74p41. Using a similar approach, it was found that Eimeria MIF (EMIF), which is secreted by Eimeria sp. during infection, bound to chicken macrophages via ChCD74p41 as a surface receptor. Together, this study provides conclusive evidence that both host and parasite MIF molecules bind to chicken macrophages via the surface receptor ChCD74.

  18. The topsy-turvy cloning law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassington, Iain; Oultram, Stuart

    2011-03-01

    In debates about human cloning, a distinction is frequently drawn between therapeutic and reproductive uses of the technology. Naturally enough, this distinction influences the way that the law is framed. The general consensus is that therapeutic cloning is less morally problematic than reproductive cloning--one can hold this position while holding that both are morally unacceptable--and the law frequently leaves the way open for some cloning for the sake of research into new therapeutic techniques while banning it for reproductive purposes. We claim that the position adopted by the law has things the wrong way around: if we accept a moral distinction between therapeutic and reproductive cloning, there are actually more reasons to be morally worried about therapeutic cloning than about reproductive cloning. If cloning is the proper object of legal scrutiny, then, we ought to make sure that we are scrutinising the right kind of clone.

  19. Animal cloning: advances and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuaire Lilian

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Few recent advances have revolutionized the developmental biology as the animal cloning has. Since the birth of Dolly, the sheep, in 1996, which was the first derived clone of a mature animal, a new scientific era began. It has been characterized by growing demystification that differentiated cells are unalterable entities in its nuclear organization and chromatin structure, and by a better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate the development. Throughout this paper, we will review some of the achievements and limitations of the techniques used, both in therapeutic and in the reproductive cloning, as well as the perspectives that its application allows to glimpse within a close future. At the same time, we will point out some considerations regarding the ethical debate that surrounds such a controversial issue.

  20. Public perceptions of animal cloning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsøe, Erling; Vincentsen, Ulla; Andersen, Ida-Elisabeth

    What was from the outset meant to be a survey testing predefined categories of ethical positions related to new biotechnologies with animal cloning as an example was subsequently developed into a process of broader involvement of groups of citizens in the issue. The survey was conducted at meetings...... in four different cities in Denmark. The participants were introduced to animal cloning and after that they filled out the questionnaire. Finally, the issue was discussed in focus groups. The process as a whole was run in a dialogue oriented way. Through the information they received in combination...... with reflecting on the survey questions the participants were well prepared for discussions in the focus groups. This approach made it possible, on the one hand to get a measure of the citizen's perceptions of the ethical aspects of animal cloning, but also to go deeper into their own thoughts of the issue...

  1. Listeria monocytogenes infection of HD11, chicken macrophage-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, N A; Donaldson, J R; O'Bryan, C A; Ricke, S C; Crandall, P G

    2017-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes can be carried by and infect poultry, although the clinical disease in birds is rare. Escape from macrophage phagocytosis is a key step in pathogenesis for L. monocytogenes. Therefore, we investigated the infection of the chicken macrophage-like cell line HD11 with 2 strains of L. monocytogenes EGD-e and Scott A. After infection, L. monocytogenes was quantified by spread plating and HD11 was quantified with trypan blue exclusion stain before enumeration. The standard macrophage killing protocols require washing the cell monolayers 3 times with PBS, which was found to negatively influence HD11 monolayers. Maximum bacterial densities within macrophages were not different between the 2 Listeria strains. HD11 required more than 11 h to effectively reduce intracellular L. monocytogenes Scott A, and Scott A was more susceptible to HD11 killing than EGD-e. It appears that Listeria infection initially causes attenuation of HD11 growth, and infected HD11 cells do not begin to lyse until at least 11 h post infection. These results suggest that there are subtle strain to strain differences in response to HD11 macrophage phagocytosis. The long lead-time required for HD11 to kill L. monocytogenes cells means that there is sufficient time available for chicken macrophages to circulate in the blood and transfer the intracellular Listeria to multiple tissues. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  2. Role of tumor-associated macrophages in renal cell carcinoma pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Kovaleva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of tumor stroma in malignant tumor pathogenesis cannot be disputed. Macrophages are one of the crucial elements of tumor stroma. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs are type 2-activated macrophages (M2. They were first described in 1992. They carry CD206, CD163, FXIIIa, βIG-H3, stabilin 1, YKL-39, SI-CLP, tenascin С, LOX-1, fibronectin, MARCO, interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA and other markers. Unlike proinflammatory macrophages (M1, М2 display high anti-inflammatory activity and are responsible for inflammation reaction suppression and tissue recovery in inflamed area. TAMs significantly contribute to tumor progression by stimulating cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and suppression of antitumor immune response. Identification of macrophages in renal tumors involves a limited number of markers, which doesn’t allow making a conclusive answer about their function. However, a correlation between TAMs content and a negative disease prognosis can be considered proven. Studies of M1 and M2 using different markers have shown that renal tumors contain high levels of TAMs with mixed M1/M2 phenotype. TAMs in renal tumors are highly proangiogenic and immunosuppressive. TAMs density can be used as a prognostic marker, but development of an effective treatment strategy aimed at inhibition of TAMs antitumor activity requires systemic research involving a wide panel of M1 and M2 macrophage markers. 

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis expressing phospholipase C subverts PGE2 synthesis and induces necrosis in alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assis, Patricia A; Espíndola, Milena S; Paula-Silva, Francisco W G; Rios, Wendy M; Pereira, Priscilla A T; Leão, Sylvia C; Silva, Célio L; Faccioli, Lúcia H

    2014-05-19

    Phospholipases C (PLCs) are virulence factors found in several bacteria. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) they exhibit cytotoxic effects on macrophages, but the mechanisms involved in PLC-induced cell death are not fully understood. It has been reported that induction of cell necrosis by virulent Mtb is coordinated by subversion of PGE2, an essential factor in cell membrane protection. Using two Mtb clinical isolates carrying genetic variations in PLC genes, we show that the isolate 97-1505, which bears plcA and plcB genes, is more resistant to alveolar macrophage microbicidal activity than the isolate 97-1200, which has all PLC genes deleted. The isolate 97-1505 also induced higher rates of alveolar macrophage necrosis, and likewise inhibited COX-2 expression and PGE2 production. To address the direct effect of mycobacterial PLC on cell necrosis and PGE2 inhibition, both isolates were treated with PLC inhibitors prior to macrophage infection. Interestingly, inhibition of PLCs affected the ability of the isolate 97-1505 to induce necrosis, leading to cell death rates similar to those induced by the isolate 97-1200. Finally, PGE2 production by Mtb 97-1505-infected macrophages was restored to levels similar to those produced by 97-1200-infected cells. Mycobacterium tuberculosis bearing PLCs genes induces alveolar macrophage necrosis, which is associated to subversion of PGE2 production.

  4. Genetic and Phenotypic Characterization of a Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Emerging Strain with Superior Intra-macrophage Replication Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shomer, Inna; Avisar, Alon; Desai, Prerak; Azriel, Shalhevet; Smollan, Gill; Belausov, Natasha; Keller, Nathan; Glikman, Daniel; Maor, Yasmin; Peretz, Avi; McClelland, Michael; Rahav, Galia; Gal-Mor, Ohad

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is one of the ubiquitous Salmonella serovars worldwide and a major cause of food-born outbreaks, which are often associated with poultry and poultry derivatives. Here we report a nation-wide S. Enteritidis clonal outbreak that occurred in Israel during the last third of 2015. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis and whole genome sequencing identified genetically related strains that were circulating in Israel as early as 2008. Global comparison linked this outbreak strain to several clinical and marine environmental isolates that were previously isolated in California and Canada, indicating that similar strains are prevalent outside of Israel. Phenotypic comparison between the 2015 outbreak strain and other clinical and reference S. Enteritidis strains showed only limited intra-serovar phenotypic variation in growth in rich medium, invasion into Caco-2 cells, uptake by J774.1A macrophages, and host cell cytotoxicity. In contrast, significant phenotypic variation was shown among different S. Enteritidis isolates when biofilm-formation, motility, invasion into HeLa cells and uptake by THP-1 human macrophages were studied. Interestingly, the 2015 outbreak clone was found to possess superior intra-macrophage replication ability within both murine and human macrophages in comparison to the other S. Enteritidis strains studied. This phenotype is likely to play a role in the virulence and host-pathogen interactions of this emerging clone. PMID:27695450

  5. The effect of activated alveolar macrophages on experimental lung emphysema development. II. The study of fibroblast and alveolar macrophage co-culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulkowska, M; Wołczyński, S; Sulkowski, S; Sobaniec-Lotowska, M; Chyczewski, L; Sulik, M; Kulikowski, M; Dziecioł, J; Berger, W

    1995-01-01

    The cell-cell interaction between fibroblasts and alveolar macrophages was examined using a co-culture system. Alveolar macrophages (AM) were harvested from the bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) of rats with papain induced lung emphysema. The BCG-vaccine was applied as a macrophage mobilizing and activating agent. The morphological examinations carried out in scanning electron microscope (SEM) as well as the evaluation of the uptake of 3H-thymidine did not show any significant differences between respective co-cultures of fibroblasts and AM isolated both from the lungs of control and experimental animals (treated with BCG or papain, and BCG+papain). However, significant growth were noted in 3H-thymidine uptake between fibroblast cultures done with or without cells isolated from the lungs. The results obtained suggest that AM can promote fibroblast proliferation during the progression of experimental lung emphysema.

  6. Bivalve carrying capacity in coastal ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dame, R.F.; Prins, T.C.

    1998-01-01

    carrying capacity of suspension feeding bivalves in 11 coastal and estuarine ecosystems is examined. Bivalve carrying capacity is defined in terms of water mass residence time, primary production time and bivalve clearance time. Turnover times for the 11 ecosystems are compared both two and three di

  7. Comments on the image of Sister Carrie

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张楠

    2016-01-01

    Thedore Oreiser was one of America's greatest writers and one of his famous masterpieces is Sister Carrie. the heroin of the novel was a country girl who struggled for success and finally became a movie star. Analysis on the image of Carrie is of practical significance to the country girls swarming into the city nowdays in our country.

  8. Carrie Chapman Catt and Woman Suffrage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, Carolyn, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Most of the material for this issue of the "Goldfinch," which explores the life of Carrie Chapman Catt, came from the archives of the State Historical Society of Iowa. Carrie Chapman Catt (1859-1947) was an Iowan who advocated woman suffrage and spent 26 years actively working for that cause. The issue contains a biography of Catt, and…

  9. Genes encoding putative effector proteins of the type III secretion system of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 are required for bacterial virulence and proliferation in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensel, M; Shea, J E; Waterman, S R; Mundy, R; Nikolaus, T; Banks, G; Vazquez-Torres, A; Gleeson, C; Fang, F C; Holden, D W

    1998-10-01

    The type III secretion system of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2) is required for systemic infection of this pathogen in mice. Cloning and sequencing of a central region of SPI-2 revealed the presence of genes encoding putative chaperones and effector proteins of the secretion system. The predicted products of the sseB, sseC and sseD genes display weak but significant similarity to amino acid sequences of EspA, EspD and EspB, which are secreted by the type III secretion system encoded by the locus of enterocyte effacement of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli. The transcriptional activity of an sseA::luc fusion gene was shown to be dependent on ssrA, which is required for the expression of genes encoding components of the secretion system apparatus. Strains carrying nonpolar mutations in sseA, sseB or sseC were severely attenuated in virulence, strains carrying mutations in sseF or sseG were weakly attenuated, and a strain with a mutation in sseE had no detectable virulence defect. These phenotypes were reflected in the ability of mutant strains to grow within a variety of macrophage cell types: strains carrying mutations in sseA, sseB or sseC failed to accumulate, whereas the growth rates of strains carrying mutations in sseE, sseF or sseG were only modestly reduced. These data suggest that, in vivo, one of the functions of the SPI-2 secretion system is to enable intracellular bacterial proliferation.

  10. Parallelization of Reversible Ripple-carry Adders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Michael Kirkedal; Axelsen, Holger Bock

    2009-01-01

    The design of fast arithmetic logic circuits is an important research topic for reversible and quantum computing. A special challenge in this setting is the computation of standard arithmetical functions without the generation of \\emph{garbage}. Here, we present a novel parallelization scheme...... wherein $m$ parallel $k$-bit reversible ripple-carry adders are combined to form a reversible $mk$-bit \\emph{ripple-block carry adder} with logic depth $\\mathcal{O}(m+k)$ for a \\emph{minimal} logic depth $\\mathcal{O}(\\sqrt{mk})$, thus improving on the $mk$-bit ripple-carry adder logic depth $\\mathcal......{O}(m\\cdot k)$. The underlying mechanisms of the parallelization scheme are formally proven correct. We also show designs for garbage-less reversible comparison circuits. We compare the circuit costs of the resulting ripple-block carry adder with known optimized reversible ripple-carry adders in measures...

  11. The Concept of Carrying Capacity in Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Zelenka

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Carrying capacity is often pragmatically, theoretically as well as purely intuitively considered as a concept in the context of tourism sustainability. The carrying capacity application has the greatest potential in protected areas, in frequently visited cultural and natural attractions, and in relation to sustaining of the lifestyle of the local community and tourism destination potential in general. Despite its importance, partial applications, determination of basic theoretical principles, and specifying connection to the other theoretical concepts in tourism (particularly destination life cycle, LAC concept, visitors management, there still is a rightful opinion of some authors suggesting that there is no consistent theory of tourism carrying capacity. This theory would be the base for sophisticated practical carrying capacity applications. This paper is therefore focused on introduction of the theoretical concept of carrying capacity, which can be discussed and possibly further elaborated.

  12. Sister Carrie, an Adherent of Desires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裴水妹

    2007-01-01

    Sister Carrie is one of the most controversial characters in American literature.Thought as a "fallen woman" firstly,she was defined as a "new woman" by some critics later. However, by digging into the motivaton behind the whole process of Carrie's "success", the relationship between Carrie and her creator (the author), the social conditions of then American, it can be found that Carrie has never been free-standing on her thought and she has never found her real-sdf even after becoming a famous actress. In a society dominated by mass consumerism Carrie is only an adherent of her own desires. She also is a representative of all those country girls flooded into cities, a symbol and a sacrifice of the urbanization of America in a time countryside was overcome by cities.

  13. A sensitive flow cytometric methodology for studying the binding of L. chagasi to canine peritoneal macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosser David M

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Leishmania promastigote-macrophage interaction occurs through the association of multiple receptors on the biological membrane surfaces. The success of the parasite infection is dramatically dependent on this early interaction in the vertebrate host, which permits or not the development of the disease. In this study we propose a novel methodology using flow cytometry to study this interaction, and compare it with a previously described "in vitro" binding assay. Methods To study parasite-macrophage interaction, peritoneal macrophages were obtained from 4 dogs and adjusted to 3 × 106 cells/mL. Leishmania (Leishmania chagasi parasites (stationary-phase were adjusted to 5 × 107 cells/mL. The interaction between CFSE-stained Leishmania chagasi and canine peritoneal macrophages was performed in polypropylene tubes to avoid macrophage adhesion. We carried out assays in the presence or absence of normal serum or in the presence of a final concentration of 5% of C5 deficient (serum from AKR/J mice mouse serum. Then, the number of infected macrophages was counted in an optical microscope, as well as by flow citometry. Macrophages obtained were stained with anti-CR3 (CD11b/CD18 antibodies and analyzed by flow citometry. Results Our results have shown that the interaction between Leishmania and macrophages can be measured by flow cytometry using the fluorescent dye CFSE to identify the Leishmania, and measuring simultaneously the expression of an important integrin involved in this interaction: the CD11b/CD18 (CR3 or Mac-1 β2 integrin. Conclusion Flow cytometry offers rapid, reliable and sensitive measurements of single cell interactions with Leishmania in unstained or phenotypically defined cell populations following staining with one or more fluorochromes.

  14. Quantum cloning machines and the applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Heng, E-mail: hfan@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100190 (China); Wang, Yi-Nan; Jing, Li [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yue, Jie-Dong [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Shi, Han-Duo; Zhang, Yong-Liang; Mu, Liang-Zhu [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-11-20

    No-cloning theorem is fundamental for quantum mechanics and for quantum information science that states an unknown quantum state cannot be cloned perfectly. However, we can try to clone a quantum state approximately with the optimal fidelity, or instead, we can try to clone it perfectly with the largest probability. Thus various quantum cloning machines have been designed for different quantum information protocols. Specifically, quantum cloning machines can be designed to analyze the security of quantum key distribution protocols such as BB84 protocol, six-state protocol, B92 protocol and their generalizations. Some well-known quantum cloning machines include universal quantum cloning machine, phase-covariant cloning machine, the asymmetric quantum cloning machine and the probabilistic quantum cloning machine. In the past years, much progress has been made in studying quantum cloning machines and their applications and implementations, both theoretically and experimentally. In this review, we will give a complete description of those important developments about quantum cloning and some related topics. On the other hand, this review is self-consistent, and in particular, we try to present some detailed formulations so that further study can be taken based on those results.

  15. Intracellular screen to identify metagenomic clones that induce or inhibit a quorum-sensing biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Lynn L; Borlee, Bradley R; Schloss, Patrick D; Guan, Changhui; Allen, Heather K; Handelsman, Jo

    2005-10-01

    The goal of this study was to design and evaluate a rapid screen to identify metagenomic clones that produce biologically active small molecules. We built metagenomic libraries with DNA from soil on the floodplain of the Tanana River in Alaska. We extracted DNA directly from the soil and cloned it into fosmid and bacterial artificial chromosome vectors, constructing eight metagenomic libraries that contain 53,000 clones with inserts ranging from 1 to 190 kb. To identify clones of interest, we designed a high throughput "intracellular" screen, designated METREX, in which metagenomic DNA is in a host cell containing a biosensor for compounds that induce bacterial quorum sensing. If the metagenomic clone produces a quorum-sensing inducer, the cell produces green fluorescent protein (GFP) and can be identified by fluorescence microscopy or captured by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Our initial screen identified 11 clones that induce and two that inhibit expression of GFP. The intracellular screen detected quorum-sensing inducers among metagenomic clones that a traditional overlay screen would not. One inducing clone carries a LuxI homologue that directs the synthesis of an N-acyl homoserine lactone quorum-sensing signal molecule. The LuxI homologue has 62% amino acid sequence identity to its closest match in GenBank, AmfI from Pseudomonas fluorescens, and is on a 78-kb insert that contains 67 open reading frames. Another inducing clone carries a gene with homology to homocitrate synthase. Our results demonstrate the power of an intracellular screen to identify functionally active clones and biologically active small molecules in metagenomic libraries.

  16. Gun Carrying by High School Students in Boston, MA: Does Overestimation of Peer Gun Carrying Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemenway, David; Vriniotis, Mary; Johnson, Renee M.; Miller, Matthew; Azrael, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates: (1) whether high school students overestimate gun carrying by their peers, and (2) whether those students who overestimate peer gun carrying are more likely to carry firearms. Data come from a randomly sampled survey conducted in 2008 of over 1700 high school students in Boston, MA. Over 5% of students reported carrying a…

  17. Gun Carrying by High School Students in Boston, MA: Does Overestimation of Peer Gun Carrying Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemenway, David; Vriniotis, Mary; Johnson, Renee M.; Miller, Matthew; Azrael, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates: (1) whether high school students overestimate gun carrying by their peers, and (2) whether those students who overestimate peer gun carrying are more likely to carry firearms. Data come from a randomly sampled survey conducted in 2008 of over 1700 high school students in Boston, MA. Over 5% of students reported carrying a…

  18. Carry Select Adder Circuit with A Successively Incremented Carry Number Block

    OpenAIRE

    Deepak; Bal Krishan

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a conditional carry select (CCS) adder circuit with a successively-incremented-carry-number block (SICNB) structure for low-voltage VLSI implementation. Owing to the successively-incremented-carry-number block (SICNB) structure, the new 16-bit SICNB CCS adder provides a 37% faster speed as compared to the conventional conditional Carry select adder based on the SPICE results

  19. Macrophage diversity in renal injury and repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricardo, Sharon D.; van Goor, Harry; Eddy, Allison A.

    2008-01-01

    Monocyte-derived macrophages can determine the outcome of the immune response and whether this response contributes to tissue repair or mediates tissue destruction. In addition to their important role in immune-mediated renal disease and host defense, macrophages play a fundamental role in tissue re

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis replicates within necrotic human macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Thomas R.; Repnik, Urska; Herbst, Susanne; Collinson, Lucy M.; Griffiths, Gareth

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulation of macrophage cell death is a well-documented phenomenon, but its role during bacterial replication is less characterized. In this study, we investigate the impact of plasma membrane (PM) integrity on bacterial replication in different functional populations of human primary macrophages. We discovered that IFN-γ enhanced bacterial replication in macrophage colony-stimulating factor–differentiated macrophages more than in granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor–differentiated macrophages. We show that permissiveness in the different populations of macrophages to bacterial growth is the result of a differential ability to preserve PM integrity. By combining live-cell imaging, correlative light electron microscopy, and single-cell analysis, we found that after infection, a population of macrophages became necrotic, providing a niche for M. tuberculosis replication before escaping into the extracellular milieu. Thus, in addition to bacterial dissemination, necrotic cells provide first a niche for bacterial replication. Our results are relevant to understanding the environment of M. tuberculosis replication in the host. PMID:28242744

  1. A broken krebs cycle in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Luke A J

    2015-03-17

    Macrophages undergo metabolic rewiring during polarization but details of this process are unclear. In this issue of Immunity, Jha et al. (2015) report a systems approach for unbiased analysis of cellular metabolism that reveals key metabolites and metabolic pathways required for distinct macrophage polarization states.

  2. The Alternative Faces of Macrophage Generate Osteoclasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Lampiasi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of how osteoclasts are generated and whether they can be altered by inflammatory stimuli is a topic of particular interest for osteoclastogenesis. It is known that the monocyte/macrophage lineage gives rise to osteoclasts (OCs by the action of macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF and receptor activator of nuclear factor-kB ligand (RANKL, which induce cell differentiation through their receptors, c-fms and RANK, respectively. The multinucleated giant cells (MGCs generated by the engagement of RANK/RANKL are typical OCs. Nevertheless, very few studies have addressed the question of which subset of macrophages generates OCs. Indeed, two main subsets of macrophages are postulated, the inflammatory or classically activated type (M1 and the anti-inflammatory or alternatively activated type (M2. It has been proposed that macrophages can be polarized in vitro towards a predominantly M1 or M2 phenotype with the addition of granulocyte macrophage- (GM- CSF or M-CSF, respectively. Various inflammatory stimuli known to induce macrophage polarization, such as LPS or TNF-α, can alter the type of MGC obtained from RANKL-induced differentiation. This review aims to highlight the role of immune-related stimuli and factors in inducing macrophages towards the osteoclastogenesis choice.

  3. Mycobacteria, metals, and the macrophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neyrolles, Olivier; Wolschendorf, Frank; Mitra, Avishek; Niederweis, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that thrives inside host macrophages. A key trait of M. tuberculosis is to exploit and manipulate metal cation trafficking inside infected macrophages to ensure survival and replication inside the phagosome. Here, we describe the recent fascinating discoveries that the mammalian immune system responds to infections with M. tuberculosis by overloading the phagosome with copper and zinc, two metals which are essential nutrients in small quantities but are toxic in excess. M. tuberculosis has developed multi-faceted resistance mechanisms to protect itself from metal toxicity including control of uptake, sequestration inside the cell, oxidation, and efflux. The host response to infections combines this metal poisoning strategy with nutritional immunity mechanisms that deprive M. tuberculosis from metals such as iron and manganese to prevent bacterial replication. Both immune mechanisms rely on the translocation of metal transporter proteins to the phagosomal membrane during the maturation process of the phagosome. This review summarizes these recent findings and discusses how metal-targeted approaches might complement existing TB chemotherapeutic regimens with novel anti-infective therapies.

  4. Operads, clones, and distributive laws

    CERN Document Server

    Curien, Pierre-Louis

    2012-01-01

    We show how non-symmetric operads (or multicategories), symmetric operads, and clones, arise from three suitable monads on Cat, each extending to a (pseudo-)monad on the bicategory of categories and profunctors. We also explain how other previous categorical analyses of operads (via Day's tensor products, or via analytical functors) fit with the profunctor approach.

  5. Positional cloning of deafness genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, H.; Cremers, F.P.M.

    2009-01-01

    The identification of the majority of the known causative genes involved in nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss (NSHL) started with linkage analysis as part of a positional cloning procedure. The human and mouse genome projects in combination with technical developments on genotyping, transcript

  6. EasyClone-MarkerFree

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabre, Mathew Malcolm Jessop; Jakociunas, Tadas; Stovicek, Vratislav

    2016-01-01

    Clone-MarkerFree. The integration of linearized expression cassettes into defined genomic loci is facilitated by CRISPR/Cas9. Cas9 is recruited to the chromosomal location by specific guide RNAs (gRNAs) expressed from a set of gRNA helper vectors. Using our genome engineering vector suite, single and triple insertions are obtained...

  7. Clone Poems and the Microcomputer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irizarry, Estelle

    1989-01-01

    Describes how students can use the computer to study and create clone poems (altering original Spanish-language poems by substituting words and expressions), and how students can gain a deeper appreciation of the original poem's poetic structure and semantics. (CB)

  8. Graph rewriting with polarized cloning

    CERN Document Server

    Duval, Dominique; Prost, Frédéric

    2009-01-01

    We tackle the problem of graph transformation with a particular focus on node cloning. We propose a graph rewriting framework where nodes can be cloned zero, one or more times. A node can be cloned together with all its incident edges, with only the outgoing edges, with only the incoming edges or without any of the incident edges. We thus subsume previous works such as the sesqui-pushout, the heterogeneous pushout and the adaptive star grammars approaches. A rule is defined as a span $\\spa{\\grpol{L}}{l}{\\grpol{K}}{r}{R}$ where the right-hand side $R$ is a multigraph, the left-hand side $\\grpol{L}$ and the interface $\\grpol{K}$ are polarized multigraphs. A polarized multigraph is a multigraph endowed with some cloning annotations on nodes and edges. We introduce the notion of polarized multigraphs and define a rewriting step as pushback followed by a pushout in the same way as in the sesqui-pushout approach.

  9. [Molecular mechanisms regulating the activity of macrophages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoprienko, L V

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews modern concepts of the most common types of macrophage activation: classical, alternative, and type II. Molecular mechanisms of induction and regulation of these three types of activation are discussed. Any population of macrophages was shown to change its properties depending on its microenvironment and concrete biological situation (the "functional plasticity of macrophages"). Many intermediate states of macrophages were described along with the most pronounced and well-known activation types (classical activation, alternative activation, and type II activation). These intermediate states are characterized by a variety of combinations of their biological properties, including elements of the three afore mentioned types of activation. Macrophage activity is regulated by a complex network of interrelated cascade mechanisms.

  10. Macrophage serum markers in pneumococcal bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Holger Jon; Moestrup, Søren K; Weis, Nina

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Soluble CD163 (sCD163) is a new macrophage-specific serum marker. This study investigated sCD163 and other markers of macrophage activation (neopterin, ferritin, transcobalamin, and soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor [suPAR]) as prognostic factors in patients with pneumoc......OBJECTIVE: Soluble CD163 (sCD163) is a new macrophage-specific serum marker. This study investigated sCD163 and other markers of macrophage activation (neopterin, ferritin, transcobalamin, and soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor [suPAR]) as prognostic factors in patients...... on the probability of survival when sCD163 and CRP were known (p = .25). CONCLUSIONS: Macrophage marker response in pneumococcal bacteremia was compromised in old age. In patients disease outcome....

  11. Macrophage Polarization in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Cassetta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are terminally differentiated cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system that also encompasses dendritic cells, circulating blood monocytes, and committed myeloid progenitor cells in the bone marrow. Both macrophages and their monocytic precursors can change their functional state in response to microenvironmental cues exhibiting a marked heterogeneity. However, there are still uncertainties regarding distinct expression patterns of surface markers that clearly define macrophage subsets, particularly in the case of human macrophages. In addition to their tissue distribution, macrophages can be functionally polarized into M1 (proinflammatory and M2 (alternatively activated as well as regulatory cells in response to both exogenous infections and solid tumors as well as by systems biology approaches.

  12. Human reproductive cloning: a conflict of liberties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havstad, Joyce C

    2010-02-01

    Proponents of human reproductive cloning do not dispute that cloning may lead to violations of clones' right to self-determination, or that these violations could cause psychological harms. But they proceed with their endorsement of human reproductive cloning by dismissing these psychological harms, mainly in two ways. The first tactic is to point out that to commit the genetic fallacy is indeed a mistake; the second is to invoke Parfit's non-identity problem. The argument of this paper is that neither approach succeeds in removing our moral responsibility to consider and to prevent psychological harms to cloned individuals. In fact, the same commitment to personal liberty that generates the right to reproduce by means of cloning also creates the need to limit that right appropriately. Discussion of human reproductive cloning ought to involve a careful and balanced consideration of both the relevant aspects of personal liberty - the parents' right to reproductive freedom and the cloned child's right to self-determination.

  13. Effects of carrying methods and box handles on two-person team carrying capacity for females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Swei-Pi; Chang, Shu-Yu

    2010-07-01

    This study used a psychophysical approach to examine the effects of carrying methods and the presence or absence of box handles on the maximum acceptable weight carried and resulting responses (heart rate and rating of perceived exertion) in a two-person carrying task. After training, 16 female subjects performed a two-person carrying task at knuckle height for an 8-h work period. Each subject performed 4 different carrying combinations two times. The independent variables were carrying methods (parallel and tandem walking) and box handles (with and without handles). For comparison with two-person carrying, the subjects also performed one-person carrying. The results showed that the maximum acceptable weight carried (MAWC), heart rate (HR), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were significantly affected by the presence of box handles. However, the subjects' MAWC, HR, and RPE values were not significantly influenced by the carrying methods. The test-retest reliability of the psychophysical approach was 0.945. The carrying efficiency of two-person carrying was 96.2% of the one-person carrying method. In general, the use of box with handles allows the subjects to carry a higher MAWC (with lower HR and RPE) compared to carrying boxes without handles.

  14. Gravitational waves carrying orbital angular momentum

    CERN Document Server

    Bialynicki-Birula, Iwo

    2015-01-01

    Spinorial formalism is used to map every electromagnetic wave into the gravitational wave (within the linearized gravity). In this way we can obtain the gravitational counterparts of Bessel, Laguerre-Gauss, and other light beams carrying orbital angular momentum.

  15. POPULATION DENSITIES AND THE RANGE-CARRYING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CAPACITY FOR LARGE MAMMALS IN QUEEN ELIZABETH ... The highest known densities oflarge terrestrial mammals occur on the grasslands in ...... It is estimated that the proper average biomass carrying capacity for the several herbivore.

  16. Transgenic cassava lines carrying heterologous alternative oxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To screen positive lines for gene function, leaf lobes from two transgenic lines with a line carrying an empty vector and the wild type were subjected to somatic embryogenesis (SE), a known oxidative ... African Journal of Biotechnology Vol.

  17. Superovulation of the Cloned Cattle Derived from Somatic Cells and the Transfer of the Vitrified-Thawed Embryos of the Cloning Cattle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Ya-juan; BAI Xue-jin; LI Jian-dong; CHENG Ming

    2004-01-01

    In this experiment, it was designed to carry out superovulation on the two cloned cattles, vitrification and transfer of the embryos recovered from them. First of all, it was carried out vitrification on embryos obtained by IVF. Results showed that there were no significant differences between the blastocysts (obtained by IVF) vitrified in EPS10 and these in EPS20 on the resuscitative rate and the developmental rate. The hatched rate of the blastocysts vitrified in EPS10 (31.3%, 35/112) was significantly higher than that in EPS20 (12.2%, 13/107) (P<0.01), so EPS20 was selected as the vitrification solution to freeze the embryos recovered from the cloned cattle. After superovulation, six (four usable embryos) and ten (nine usable embryos) embryos were respectively recovered from Kangkang and Shuanghuang. Two embryos were selected from the recovered embryos of each cloned cattle to freeze in EPS20, subsequently thawed and transferred into luteal ipsilateral uterine horns of 4 Holstein recipient cows after synchronization of estrus, respectively. At last, one recipient cow (No. 9908) became pregnant and delivered one healthy calf (descendant of the cloned cattle-Shuangshuang). The results of this experiment show that the cloned cattle as well as common cattle had better response to the exotic FSH and better ability to multiovulation, the embryos recovered from the cloned cattle can be vitrificated.

  18. Microarray analysis identifies a common set of cellular genes modulated by different HCV replicon clones

    OpenAIRE

    Gerosolimo Germano; Dallapiccola Bruno; Bruni Roberto; Ferraris Alessandro; Tataseo Paola; Tritarelli Elena; Marcantonio Cinzia; Ciccaglione Anna; Costantino Angela; Rapicetta Maria

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA synthesis and protein expression affect cell homeostasis by modulation of gene expression. The impact of HCV replication on global cell transcription has not been fully evaluated. Thus, we analysed the expression profiles of different clones of human hepatoma-derived Huh-7 cells carrying a self-replicating HCV RNA which express all viral proteins (HCV replicon system). Results First, we compared the expression profile of HCV replicon clone 21-5 ...

  19. Structural analysis and molecular modeling of two antitrichosanthin IgE clones from phage antibody library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIZONGDONG; YURENYUAN; 等

    1997-01-01

    Recently we constructed a murine IgE phage surface display library and screened out two IgE (Fab) clones with specific binding activity to Trichosanthin (TCS).In this work,the Vε and Vκ genes of the two clones were sequenced and their putative germline gene usages were studied.On the basis of the known 3D structure of Trichosanthin and antibody,molecular modeling was carried out to study the antigen-antibody interaction.The possible antigenic determinant sites on the surface of TCS recognized by both the clones were analyzed,and the reaction forces between TCS and two Fab fragments were also analyzed respectively.

  20. A Naturalistic Reading of Sister Carrie

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谈月

    2016-01-01

    Sister Carrie is well known as the works in which naturalism attained maturity in America. Up until now, the relevant research on Dreiser and his Sister Carrie abroad and at home is primarily concerned with the frustration of American dream, the naturalistic thoughts and pessimism. The paper attempts to study it from naturalistic point of view and explain how environmental, hereditary factors and the idea of“survival of the fittest”influence Carrie’s fate.

  1. Macrophage Activation Syndrome in Paediatric Rheumatic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M I; Talukder, M K; Islam, M M; Laila, K; Rahman, S A

    2017-04-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a potentially fatal complication of rheumatic disorders, which commonly occurs in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA).This study was carried out with the aims of describing the clinical features, laboratory findings and outcomes of MAS associated with paediatric rheumatic diseases in the Department of Paediatrics, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) and compare these results with previous studies on MAS. This retrospective study was conducted in the paediatric rheumatology wing of the Department of Paediatrics, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka, Bangladesh. Clinical and laboratory profile of all the diagnosed cases of MAS were analyzed from the medical records from January 2010 to July 2015. Among 10 MAS patients, 6 were female and 4 were male. Seven patients of systemic JIA, two patients of SLE and one patient with Kawasaki Disease developed MAS in their course of primary disease. Mean duration of primary disease prior to development of MAS was 2.9 years and mean age of onset was 9.1 years. High continued fever and new onset hepatosplenomegaly were the hallmark of the clinical presentation. White blood cell count and platelet count came down from the mean of 16.2 to 10.2×10⁹/L and 254 to 90×10⁹/L. Mean erythrocyte sedimentation rate was dropped from 56 to 29 mm/hr. Six patients had abnormal liver enzyme level (ALT) and 5 had evidence of coagulopathy (prolonged prothrombin time and APTT) at the onset of disease. Hyperferritinnemia were found in all the patients. Bone marrow study was done in 5 patients but features of hamophagocytosis were found only in 2 patients. All patients received intravenous steroid and 3 patients who did not respond to steroid received additional cyclosporine. Mortality rate was 30% in this series. Macrophage activation syndrome is a fatal complication of paediatric rheumatic diseases among which s-JIA was predominant. Early diagnosis and

  2. Cloning and expression of two human genes encoding calcium-binding proteins that are regulated during myeloid differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagasse, E.; Clerc, R.G.

    1988-06-01

    The cellular mechanisms involved in chronic inflammatory processes are poorly understood. This is especially true for the role of macrophages, which figure prominently in the inflammatory response. Two proteins, MRP8 and MRP14, which are expressed in infiltrate macrophages during inflammatory reactions but not in normal tissue macrophages, which have been characterized. Here the authors report that MRP8 and MRP14 mRNAs are specially expressed in human cells of myeloid origin and that their expression is regulated during monocycle-macrophage and granulocyte differentiation. To initiate the analysis of cis-acting elements governing the tissue-specific expression of the MRP genes, the authors cloned the human genes encoding MRP8 and MRP14. Both genes contain three exons, are single copy, and have a strikingly similar organization. They belong to a novel subfamily of highly homologous calcium-binding proteins which includes S100..cap alpha.., S100BETA, intestinal calcium-binding protein, P11, and calcyclin (2A9). A transient expression assay was devised to investigate the tissue-specific regulatory elements responsible for MRP gene expression after differentiation in leukemia HL60 cells. The results of this investigation demonstrated that the cis-acting element responsible for MRP expression are present on the cloned DNA fragment containing the MRP gene loci.

  3. Economical Phase-Covariant Cloning of Qudits

    CERN Document Server

    Buscemi, F; Macchiavello, C; Buscemi, Francesco; Ariano, Giacomo Mauro D'; Macchiavello, Chiara

    2004-01-01

    We derive the optimal $N\\to M$ phase-covariant quantum cloning for equatorial states in dimension $d$ with $M=kd+N$, $k$ integer. The cloning maps are optimal for both global and single-qudit fidelity. The map is achieved by an ``economical'' cloning machine, which works without ancilla. The connection between optimal phase-covariant cloning and optimal multi-phase estimation is finally established.

  4. Effect of 14-kDa and 47-kDa protein molecules of age garlic extract on peritoneal macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshmandi, Saeed; Hajimoradi, Monire; Ahmadabad, Hasan Namdar; Hassan, Zuhair Mohammad; Roudbary, Maryam; Ghazanfari, Tooba

    2011-03-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum), traditionally being used as a spice worldwide, has different applications and is claimed to possess beneficial effects in several health ailments such as tumor and atherosclerosis. Garlic is also an immunomodulator and its different components are responsible for different properties. The present work aimed to assess the effect of protein fractions of garlic on peritoneal macrophages. 14-kDa and 47-kDa protein fractions of garlic were purified. Mice peritoneal macrophages were lavaged and cultured in a microtiter plate and exposed to different concentrations of garlic proteins. MTT assay was performed to evaluate the viability of macrophage. The amount of nitric oxide (NO) was detected in culture supernatants of macrophages by Griess reagent and furthermore, the cytotoxicity study of culture supernatants was carried out on WEHI-164 fibrosarcoma cell line as tumor necrosis factor-α bioassay. MTT assay results for both 14-kDa and 47-kDa protein fractions of stimulated macrophages were not significant (P > 0.05). Both 14-kDa and 47-kDa fractions significantly suppressed production of NO from macrophages (P = 0.007 and P = 0.003, respectively). Cytotoxicity of macrophages' supernatant on WEHI-164 fibrosarcoma cells was not affected by garlic protein fractions (P = 0.066 for 14-kDa and P = 0.085 for 47-kDa fractions). according to our finding, 14-kDa and 47-kDa fractions of aged garlic extract are able to suppress NO production from macrophages, which can be used as a biological advantage. These molecules had no cytotoxic effect on macrophages and do not increase tumoricidal property of macrophages.

  5. Prevalence of Adhesion and Regulation of Biofilm-Related Genes in Different Clones of Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Sahab Atshan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical information about genotypically different clones of biofilm-producing Staphylococcus aureus is largely unknown. We examined whether different clones of methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MSSA and MRSA differ with respect to staphylococcal microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs in biofilm formation. The study used 60 different types of spa and determined the phenotypes, the prevalence of the 13 MSCRAMM, and biofilm genes for each clone. The current investigation was carried out using a modified Congo red agar (MCRA, a microtiter plate assay (MPA, polymerase chain reaction (PCR, and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Clones belonging to the same spa type were found to have similar properties in adheringto thepolystyrene microtiter plate surface. However, their ability to produce slime on MCRA medium was different. PCR experiments showed that 60 clones of MSSA and MRSA were positive for 5 genes (out of 9 MSCRAMM genes. icaADBC genes were found to be present in all the 60 clones tested indicating a high prevalence, and these genes were equally distributed among the clones associated with MSSA and those with MRSA. The prevalence of other MSCRAMM genes among MSSA and MRSA clones was found to be variable. MRSA and MSSA gene expression (MSCRAMM and icaADBC was confirmed by RT-PCR.

  6. Characterization and multivariate classification of grapes and wines of two Cabernet Sauvignon clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vívian Maria Burin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to assess and characterize two clones, 169 and 685, of Cabernet Sauvignon grapes and to evaluate the wine produced from these grapes. The experiment was carried out in São Joaquim, SC, Brazil, during the 2009 harvest season. During grape ripening, the evolution of physical-chemical properties, phenolic compounds, organic acids, and anthocyanins was evaluated. During grape harvest, yield components were determined for each clone. Individual and total phenolics, individual and total anthocyanins, and antioxidant activity were evaluated for wine. The clones were also assessed regarding the duration of their phenological cycle. During ripening, the evolution of phenolic compounds and of physical-chemical parameters was similar for both clones; however, during harvest, significant differences were observed regarding yield, number of bunches per plant and berries per bunch, leaf area, and organic acid, polyphenol, and anthocyanin content. The wines produced from these clones showed significant differences regarding chemical composition. The clones showed similar phenological cycle and responses to bioclimatic parameters. Principal component analysis shows that clone 685 is strongly correlated with color characteristics, mainly monomeric anthocyanins, while clone 169 is correlated with individual phenolic compounds.

  7. Tagging the expressed protein with 6 histidines: rapid cloning of an amplicon with three options.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manika Indrajit Singh

    Full Text Available We report the designing of three expression vectors that can be used for rapid cloning of any blunt-end DNA segment. Only a single set of oligonucleotides are required to perform the amplification of the target DNA and its cloning in all three vectors simultaneously. The DNA thus cloned can express a protein either with or without a hexa-histidine tag depending upon the vector used. The expression occurs from T7 promoter when transformed into E. coli BL21(DE3. Two of the three plasmids have been designed to provide the expressed protein with either N- or C-terminus 6 histidine amino acids in tandem. The third plasmid, however, does not add any tag to the expressed protein. The cloning is achieved quickly with the requirement of phosphorylation of PCR product without any restriction digestion. Additionally, the generated clones can be confirmed with a single step PCR reaction carried out from bacterial colonies (generally termed as "colony PCR". We show the cloning, expression and purification of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP as proof-of-concept. Additionally, we also show the cloning and expression of four sigma factors from Mycobacterium tuberculosis further demonstrating the utility of the designed plasmids. We strongly believe that the vectors and the strategy that we have developed will facilitate the rapid cloning and expression of any gene in E. coli BL21(DE3 with or without a hexa-histidine tag.

  8. Dealing with clones in the tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, E

    2006-01-01

    The note describes the way clone tracks are found and eliminated in the LHCb tracking. Both the "clone killer" algorithm and the related "clone finder" tool are presented. The performance of the algorithm as it is used at present in Brunel is also discussed.

  9. Effects of box handle position and carrying range on bi-manual carrying capacity for females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Swei-Pi; Loiu, Yi; Chien, Te Hong

    2015-01-01

    This study utilizes a psychophysical approach to examine the effects on carrying capacity for bi-manual carrying tasks involving different handle positions and carrying ranges. A total of 16 female subjects participated in the experiment in groups of two people, and each group of subjects performed the tasks in a random order with 12 different combinations of carrying task. The independent variables are handle position (upper, middle, lower) and carrying range (F-F: floor height carried to floor height, F-W: floor height carried to waist height, W-W: waist height carried to waist height, W-F: waist height carried to floor height), the dependent variable is the maximum acceptable carried weight (MAWC), heart rate (HR), and the rating of perceived exertion (RPE). The results show that the handle position has a significant effect on MAWC and overall RPE but no significant effect on HR. Carrying range has a significant effect on the MAWC and HR, but no significant effect on overall HR. The handle position and carrying range have a significant interaction on the MAWC and HR. The RPE for different body parts shows significant differences, and the hands feel the most tired. Overall, this study confirms that the lower handle position with the W-W carrying range is the best combination for a two-person carrying task.

  10. Clonal spread of blaOXA-72-carrying Acinetobacter baumannii sequence type 512 in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Han-Yueh; Hsu, Po-Jui; Chen, Jiann-Yuan; Liao, Po-Cheng; Lu, Chia-Wei; Chen, Chang-Hua; Liou, Ming-Li

    2016-07-01

    This is the first report to show an insidious outbreak of armA- and blaOXA-72-carrying Acinetobacter baumannii sequence type 512 (ST512) at a study hospital in northern Taiwan. Multilocus sequence typing revealed that this was a ST512 clone. All of the isolates with ST512 carried a novel 12,056-bp repGR2 in combination with a repGR12-type plasmid. This plasmid, designated pAB-ML, had one copy of the blaOXA-72 gene that was flanked by XerC/XerD-like sites and conferred resistance to carbapenems.

  11. A single-copy galK promoter cloning vector suitable for cloning strong promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dandanell, Gert; Court, Donald L.; Hammer, Karin

    1986-01-01

    We report the construction of lambda galK promoter cloning vectors for cloning and characterization of strong promoters. This phage, which contains a unique HindIII cloning site, was applied to the cloning and analysis of transcription initiations of the regulatory region of the deo-operon of...

  12. A single-copy galK promoter cloning vector suitable for cloning strong promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dandanell, Gert; Court, Donald L.; Hammer, Karin

    1986-01-01

    We report the construction of lambda galK promoter cloning vectors for cloning and characterization of strong promoters. This phage, which contains a unique HindIII cloning site, was applied to the cloning and analysis of transcription initiations of the regulatory region of the deo-operon of...

  13. Changing pattern of the subcellular distribution of erythroblast macrophage protein (Emp) during macrophage differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Shivani; Bala, Shashi; Kumar, Ajay; Hanspal, Manjit

    2007-01-01

    Erythroblast macrophage protein (Emp) mediates the attachment of erythroid cells to macrophages and is required for normal differentiation of both cell lineages. In erythroid cells, Emp is believed to be involved in nuclear extrusion, however, its role in macrophage differentiation is unknown. Information on the changes in the expression level and subcellular distribution of Emp in differentiating macrophages is essential for understanding the function of Emp. Macrophages of varying maturity were examined by immunofluorescence microscopy and biochemical methods. Our data show that Emp is expressed in all stages of maturation, but its localization pattern changes dramatically during maturation: in immature macrophages, a substantial fraction of Emp is associated with the nuclear matrix, whereas in more mature cells, Emp is expressed largely at cell surface. Pulse-chase experiments show that nascent Emp migrates intracellularly from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane more efficiently in mature macrophages than in immature cells. Incubation of erythroid cells with macrophages in culture shows that erythroid cells attach to mature macrophages but not to immature macrophage precursors. Together, our data show that the temporal and spatial expression of Emp correlates with its role in erythroblastic island formation and suggest that Emp may be involved in multiple cellular functions.

  14. Cholesteryl ester hydrolase activity is abolished in HSL-/- macrophages but unchanged in macrophages lacking KIAA1363.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchebner, Marlene; Pfeifer, Thomas; Rathke, Nora; Chandak, Prakash G; Lass, Achim; Schreiber, Renate; Kratzer, Adelheid; Zimmermann, Robert; Sattler, Wolfgang; Koefeler, Harald; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Kostner, Gerhard M; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Chiang, Kyle P; Haemmerle, Guenter; Zechner, Rudolf; Levak-Frank, Sanja; Cravatt, Benjamin; Kratky, Dagmar

    2010-10-01

    Cholesteryl ester (CE) accumulation in macrophages represents a crucial event during foam cell formation, a hallmark of atherogenesis. Here we investigated the role of two previously described CE hydrolases, hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and KIAA1363, in macrophage CE hydrolysis. HSL and KIAA1363 exhibited marked differences in their abilities to hydrolyze CE, triacylglycerol (TG), diacylglycerol (DG), and 2-acetyl monoalkylglycerol ether (AcMAGE), a precursor for biosynthesis of platelet-activating factor (PAF). HSL efficiently cleaved all four substrates, whereas KIAA1363 hydrolyzed only AcMAGE. This contradicts previous studies suggesting that KIAA1363 is a neutral CE hydrolase. Macrophages of KIAA1363(-/-) and wild-type mice exhibited identical neutral CE hydrolase activity, which was almost abolished in tissues and macrophages of HSL(-/-) mice. Conversely, AcMAGE hydrolase activity was diminished in macrophages and some tissues of KIAA1363(-/-) but unchanged in HSL(-/-) mice. CE turnover was unaffected in macrophages lacking KIAA1363 and HSL, whereas cAMP-dependent cholesterol efflux was influenced by HSL but not by KIAA1363. Despite decreased CE hydrolase activities, HSL(-/-) macrophages exhibited CE accumulation similar to wild-type (WT) macrophages. We conclude that additional enzymes must exist that cooperate with HSL to regulate CE levels in macrophages. KIAA1363 affects AcMAGE hydrolase activity but is of minor importance as a direct CE hydrolase in macrophages.

  15. Impaired macrophage autophagy increases the immune response in obese mice by promoting proinflammatory macrophage polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kun; Zhao, Enpeng; Ilyas, Ghulam; Lalazar, Gadi; Lin, Yu; Haseeb, Muhammad; Tanaka, Kathryn E; Czaja, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence that excessive lipid accumulation can decrease cellular levels of autophagy and that autophagy regulates immune responsiveness suggested that impaired macrophage autophagy may promote the increased innate immune activation that underlies obesity. Primary bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) and peritoneal macrophages from high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice had decreased levels of autophagic flux indicating a generalized impairment of macrophage autophagy in obese mice. To assess the effects of decreased macrophage autophagy on inflammation, mice with a Lyz2-Cre-mediated knockout of Atg5 in macrophages were fed a HFD and treated with low-dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Knockout mice developed systemic and hepatic inflammation with HFD feeding and LPS. This effect was liver specific as knockout mice did not have increased adipose tissue inflammation. The mechanism by which the loss of autophagy promoted inflammation was through the regulation of macrophage polarization. BMDM and Kupffer cells from knockout mice exhibited abnormalities in polarization with both increased proinflammatory M1 and decreased anti-inflammatory M2 polarization as determined by measures of genes and proteins. The heightened hepatic inflammatory response in HFD-fed, LPS-treated knockout mice led to liver injury without affecting steatosis. These findings demonstrate that autophagy has a critical regulatory function in macrophage polarization that downregulates inflammation. Defects in macrophage autophagy may underlie inflammatory disease states such as the decrease in macrophage autophagy with obesity that leads to hepatic inflammation and the progression to liver injury.

  16. Seleção de clones de batata-doce resistentes a insetos de solo Screening of sweet potato clones resistant to soil insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Peixoto

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi selecionar clones comerciais de batata-doce para a região do Triângulo Mineiro. Dos clones avaliados, 60 foram obtidos por policruzamentos e cedidos pela Universidade Federal de Lavras (UFLA, três, entre produtores rurais dos municípios de Araguari, Uberlândia e Machado, todos do Estado de Minas Gerais, e outros nove foram usados como testemunhas (Brazlândia Branca, Brazlândia Rosada, Surpresa, Rio Doce, Morena Roxa, Coquinho, Arroba, Pira 1 e o Clone 042. O experimento foi instalado no espaçamento de 1,10 x 0,45 m, utilizando-se o delineamento blocos casualizados, com 72 tratamentos, quatro repetições e 16 plantas por parcela. Entre os clones avaliados 32,8% apresentaram alta ou moderada resistência a insetos de solo. O clone 95041 foi o mais produtivo, com 28.048,96 kg/ha. Os clones 95009, 95010, 95014, 95020, 95033, 95042 e 95057 foram altamente resistentes a insetos de solo.A research was carried out with the objective of selecting commercial clones for weather conditions of the Triângulo Mineiro, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Sixty of the clones evaluated were obtained by polycross and given by the Universidade Federal de Lavras, three were from the farmers of the municipalities of Araguari, Uberlândia and Machado, located in Minas Gerais State, and nine clones were used as standards (Brazlândia Branca, Brazlândia Rosada, Surpresa, Rio Doce, Morena Roxa, Coquinho, Arroba, Pira 1 and Clone 042. The experiment was installed in a spacing of 1.10 x 0.45 m, using a randomized block design, with 72 treatments, four replicates and 16 plants per plot. Among the evaluated clones, 32.8% showed high or moderate resistance to soil insects. The clone with the highest yield was the clone number 95041, which produced 28,048.96 kg/ha. The others, 95009, 95010, 95014, 95020, 95033, 95042 and 95057 were highly resistant to soil insects.

  17. Macrophages and Dendritic Cells: Partners in Atherogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulsky, Myron I; Cheong, Cheolho; Robbins, Clinton S

    2016-02-19

    Atherosclerosis is a complex chronic disease. The accumulation of myeloid cells in the arterial intima, including macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), is a feature of early stages of disease. For decades, it has been known that monocyte recruitment to the intima contributes to the burden of lesion macrophages. Yet, this paradigm may require reevaluation in light of recent advances in understanding of tissue macrophage ontogeny, their capacity for self-renewal, as well as observations that macrophages proliferate throughout atherogenesis and that self-renewal is critical for maintenance of macrophages in advanced lesions. The rate of atherosclerotic lesion formation is profoundly influenced by innate and adaptive immunity, which can be regulated locally within atherosclerotic lesions, as well as in secondary lymphoid organs, the bone marrow and the blood. DCs are important modulators of immunity. Advances in the past decade have cemented our understanding of DC subsets, functions, hematopoietic origin, gene expression patterns, transcription factors critical for differentiation, and provided new tools for study of DC biology. The functions of macrophages and DCs overlap to some extent, thus it is important to reassess the contributions of each of these myeloid cells taking into account strict criteria of cell identification, ontogeny, and determine whether their key roles are within atherosclerotic lesions or secondary lymphoid organs. This review will highlight key aspect of macrophage and DC biology, summarize how these cells participate in different stages of atherogenesis and comment on complexities, controversies, and gaps in knowledge in the field.

  18. HIV-1 Latency in Monocytes/Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 targets CD4+ T cells and cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. HIV pathogenesis is characterized by the depletion of T lymphocytes and by the presence of a population of cells in which latency has been established called the HIV-1 reservoir. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has significantly improved the life of HIV-1 infected patients. However, complete eradication of HIV-1 from infected individuals is not possible without targeting latent sources of infection. HIV-1 establishes latent infection in resting CD4+ T cells and findings indicate that latency can also be established in the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. Monocyte/macrophage lineage includes among others, monocytes, macrophages and brain resident macrophages. These cells are relatively more resistant to apoptosis induced by HIV-1, thus are important stable hideouts of the virus. Much effort has been made in the direction of eliminating HIV-1 resting CD4+ T-cell reservoirs. However, it is impossible to achieve a cure for HIV-1 without considering these neglected latent reservoirs, the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. In this review we will describe our current understanding of the mechanism of latency in monocyte/macrophage lineage and how such cells can be specifically eliminated from the infected host.

  19. Optimal growth trajectories with finite carrying capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravelli, F; Sindoni, L; Caccioli, F; Ududec, C

    2016-08-01

    We consider the problem of finding optimal strategies that maximize the average growth rate of multiplicative stochastic processes. For a geometric Brownian motion, the problem is solved through the so-called Kelly criterion, according to which the optimal growth rate is achieved by investing a constant given fraction of resources at any step of the dynamics. We generalize these finding to the case of dynamical equations with finite carrying capacity, which can find applications in biology, mathematical ecology, and finance. We formulate the problem in terms of a stochastic process with multiplicative noise and a nonlinear drift term that is determined by the specific functional form of carrying capacity. We solve the stochastic equation for two classes of carrying capacity functions (power laws and logarithmic), and in both cases we compute the optimal trajectories of the control parameter. We further test the validity of our analytical results using numerical simulations.

  20. Optimal growth trajectories with finite carrying capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravelli, F.; Sindoni, L.; Caccioli, F.; Ududec, C.

    2016-08-01

    We consider the problem of finding optimal strategies that maximize the average growth rate of multiplicative stochastic processes. For a geometric Brownian motion, the problem is solved through the so-called Kelly criterion, according to which the optimal growth rate is achieved by investing a constant given fraction of resources at any step of the dynamics. We generalize these finding to the case of dynamical equations with finite carrying capacity, which can find applications in biology, mathematical ecology, and finance. We formulate the problem in terms of a stochastic process with multiplicative noise and a nonlinear drift term that is determined by the specific functional form of carrying capacity. We solve the stochastic equation for two classes of carrying capacity functions (power laws and logarithmic), and in both cases we compute the optimal trajectories of the control parameter. We further test the validity of our analytical results using numerical simulations.

  1. Therapeutic and reproductive cloning: a critique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowring, Finn

    2004-01-01

    This article is a critical examination of the science and ethics of human cloning. It summarises the key scientific milestones in the development of nuclear transplantation, explains the importance of cloning to research into the medical potential of embryonic stem cells, and discusses the well-worn distinction between 'therapeutic' and 'reproductive' cloning. Suggesting that this distinction will be impossible to police, it goes on to consider the ethics of full human cloning. It is concluded that it represents an unacceptable form of parental despotism, and that the genetic engineering and cloning of future human beings will fracture the foundations of modern humanism.

  2. The Many Alternative Faces of Macrophage Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Hume

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Monocytes and macrophages provide the first line of defense against pathogens. They also initiate acquired immunity by processing and presenting antigens and provide the downstream effector functions. In large gene expression datasets from multiple cells and tissues, it is possible to identify sets of genes that are co-regulated with the transcription factors that regulate them. In macrophages, they include lineage-specific genes, interferon-responsive genes, early inflammatory genes, and those associated with endocytosis. Macrophages enter tissues and alter their function to deal with a wide range of challenges related to development and organogenesis, tissue injury, malignancy, sterile or pathogenic inflammatory stimuli. These stimuli alter gene expression to produce activated macrophages that are better equipped to eliminate the cause of their influx, and to restore homeostasis. Activation or polarization states of macrophages have been classified as classical and alternative or M1 and M2. These proposed states of cells are not supported by large-scale transcriptomic data, including macrophage-associated signatures from large cancer tissue datasets, where the supposed markers do not correlate with other. Individual macrophage cells differ markedly from each other, and change their functions in response to doses and combinations of agonists and time. The most studied macrophage activation response is the transcriptional cascade initiated by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS. This response is reviewed herein. The network architecture is conserved across species, but many of the target genes evolve rapidly and differ between mouse and human. There is also considerable divergence in the sets of target genes between mouse strains, between individuals and in other species such as pigs. The data and publication deluge related to macrophage activation requires the development of new analytical tools, and ways of presenting information in an

  3. Carry Select Adder Circuit with A Successively Incremented Carry Number Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a conditional carry select (CCS adder circuit with a successively-incremented-carry-number block (SICNB structure for low-voltage VLSI implementation. Owing to the successively-incremented-carry-number block (SICNB structure, the new 16-bit SICNB CCS adder provides a 37% faster speed as compared to the conventional conditional Carry select adder based on the SPICE results

  4. An Optical Carry Chain Fast Adder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Al-Dabass

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available A significant problem in Arithmetic Unit design and particularly for systolic arrays remains the speed attainable in achieving high speed addition. The root of the problem is carry propagation and a method is presented which is relatively independent of word length. The problem is addressed by the description of a suggested radical design involving a hybrid optical and electronic approach. The method of carry chain addition through pass gates is explained and a suggested implementation utilising Fabry-Perott resonators, optical waveguides and voltage controlled couplers is described. The design is suitable for n-stage modular expansion.

  5. Clone DB: an integrated NCBI resource for clone-associated data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Valerie A; Chen, Hsiu-Chuan; Clausen, Cliff; Meric, Peter A; Zhou, Zhigang; Bouk, Nathan; Husain, Nora; Maglott, Donna R; Church, Deanna M

    2013-01-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Clone DB (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/clone/) is an integrated resource providing information about and facilitating access to clones, which serve as valuable research reagents in many fields, including genome sequencing and variation analysis. Clone DB represents an expansion and replacement of the former NCBI Clone Registry and has records for genomic and cell-based libraries and clones representing more than 100 different eukaryotic taxa. Records provide details of library construction, associated sequences, map positions and information about resource distribution. Clone DB is indexed in the NCBI Entrez system and can be queried by fields that include organism, clone name, gene name and sequence identifier. Whenever possible, genomic clones are mapped to reference assemblies and their map positions provided in clone records. Clones mapping to specific genomic regions can also be searched for using the NCBI Clone Finder tool, which accepts queries based on sequence coordinates or features such as gene or transcript names. Clone DB makes reports of library, clone and placement data on its FTP site available for download. With Clone DB, users now have available to them a centralized resource that provides them with the tools they will need to make use of these important research reagents.

  6. Rice's Salt Tolerance Gene Cloned

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ In cooperation with US colleagues, CAS researchers have made significant progress in their studies into functional genes for key agronomic traits by cloning SKC1, a salt-tolerant functional gene of rice and making clear its biological functions and mechanisms. This pioneering work,which was reported in the Oct. issue of Nature Genetics (37:1141-1146), is believed to hold promise to increase the output of the crop plant in this country.

  7. El envejecimiento de los clones

    OpenAIRE

    Trippi, Victorio S.

    2007-01-01

    El envejecimiento de los clones se observa en plantas que muestran crecimiento definido por un determinismo genético, cuando se multiplican con tejidos que evolucionan hacia el crecimiento reproductivo. Las plantas fuertemente influenciadas por el ambiente, pueden mostrar fenómenos de senescencia cuando la condición de ambiente determina el crecimiento reproductivo. Los cambios asociados con la edad resultan de alteraciones del citoplasma como un tipo de diferenciación cel...

  8. Conotoxins Are Purified and Cloned

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ A group of CAS scientists have succeeded in purifying many conotoxins and cloning more than 100 new genes from six species of cone snails living in waters off the coast of the South China Sea, paving the way for the development of new drugs to relieve neuropathic pains. The work has been honored with a first prize from the 2005 Awards for S&T Progress in Shanghai.

  9. A potential target gene for the host-directed therapy of mycobacterial infection in murine macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Zhang; Chen, Ran; Zhang, Pei; Lu, Shan; Chen, Xing; Yao, Yake; Jin, Xiaozheng; Sun, Yilan; Zhou, Jianying

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), one of the major bacterial pathogens for lethal infectious diseases, is capable of surviving within the phagosomes of host alveolar macrophages; therefore, host genetic variations may alter the susceptibility to MTB. In this study, to identify host genes exploited by MTB during infection, genes were non-selectively inactivated using lentivirus-based antisense RNA methods in RAW264.7 macrophages, and the cells that survived virulent MTB infection were then screened. Following DNA sequencing of the surviving cell clones, 26 host genes affecting susceptibility to MTB were identified and their pathways were analyzed by bioinformatics analysis. In total, 9 of these genes were confirmed as positive regulators of collagen α-5(IV) chain (Col4a5) expression, a gene encoding a type IV collagen subunit present on the cell surface. The knockdown of Col4a5 consistently suppressed intracellular mycobacterial viability, promoting the survival of RAW264.7 macrophages following mycobacterial infection. Furthermore, Col4a5 deficiency lowered the pH levels of intracellular vesicles, including endosomes, lysosomes and phagosomes in the RAW264.7 cells. Finally, the knockdown of Col4a5 post-translationally increased microsomal vacuolar-type H+-ATPase activity in macrophages, leading to the acidification of intracellular vesicles. Our findings reveal a novel role for Col4a5 in the regulation of macrophage responses to mycobacterial infection and identify Col4a5 as a potential target for the host-directed anti-mycobacterial therapy. PMID:27432120

  10. Macrophages and Uveitis in Experimental Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Mérida

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Resident and infiltrated macrophages play relevant roles in uveitis as effectors of innate immunity and inductors of acquired immunity. They are major effectors of tissue damage in uveitis and are also considered to be potent antigen-presenting cells. In the last few years, experimental animal models of uveitis have enabled us to enhance our understanding of the leading role of macrophages in eye inflammation processes, including macrophage polarization in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis and the major role of Toll-like receptor 4 in endotoxin-induced uveitis. This improved knowledge should guide advantageous iterative research to establish mechanisms and possible therapeutic targets for human uveitis resolution.

  11. The killing of macrophages by Corynebacterium ulcerans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Elena; Ott, Lisa; Schulze-Luehrmann, Jan; Lührmann, Anja; Wiesmann, Veit; Wittenberg, Thomas; Burkovski, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium ulcerans is an emerging pathogen transmitted by a zoonotic pathway with a very broad host spectrum to humans. Despite rising numbers of infections and potentially fatal outcomes, data on the molecular basis of pathogenicity are scarce. In this study, the interaction of 2 C. ulcerans isolates - one from an asymptomatic dog, one from a fatal case of human infection - with human macrophages was investigated. C. ulcerans strains were able to survive in macrophages for at least 20 hours. Uptake led to delay of phagolysosome maturation and detrimental effects on the macrophages as deduced from cytotoxicity measurements and FACS analyses. The data presented here indicate a high infectious potential of this emerging pathogen.

  12. Cloning expeditions: risky but rewarding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Harvey

    2013-12-01

    In the 1980s, a good part of my laboratory was using the then-new recombinant DNA techniques to clone and characterize many important cell surface membrane proteins: GLUT1 (the red cell glucose transporter) and then GLUT2 and GLUT4, the red cell anion exchange protein (Band 3), asialoglycoprotein receptor subunits, sucrase-isomaltase, the erythropoietin receptor, and two of the subunits of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) receptor. These cloned genes opened many new fields of basic research, including membrane insertion and trafficking of transmembrane proteins, signal transduction by many members of the cytokine and TGF-β families of receptors, and the cellular physiology of glucose and anion transport. They also led to many insights into the molecular biology of several cancers, hematopoietic disorders, and diabetes. This work was done by an exceptional group of postdocs and students who took exceptionally large risks in developing and using novel cloning technologies. Unsurprisingly, all have gone on to become leaders in the fields of molecular cell biology and molecular medicine.

  13. Error propagation in energetic carrying capacity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearse, Aaron T.; Stafford, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Conservation objectives derived from carrying capacity models have been used to inform management of landscapes for wildlife populations. Energetic carrying capacity models are particularly useful in conservation planning for wildlife; these models use estimates of food abundance and energetic requirements of wildlife to target conservation actions. We provide a general method for incorporating a foraging threshold (i.e., density of food at which foraging becomes unprofitable) when estimating food availability with energetic carrying capacity models. We use a hypothetical example to describe how past methods for adjustment of foraging thresholds biased results of energetic carrying capacity models in certain instances. Adjusting foraging thresholds at the patch level of the species of interest provides results consistent with ecological foraging theory. Presentation of two case studies suggest variation in bias which, in certain instances, created large errors in conservation objectives and may have led to inefficient allocation of limited resources. Our results also illustrate how small errors or biases in application of input parameters, when extrapolated to large spatial extents, propagate errors in conservation planning and can have negative implications for target populations.

  14. Increased carrying capacity with perennial forage kochia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrying capacity can be increased on grass-dominated rangeland pastures by including perennial forage kochia (Kochia prostrata) as one of the plant components. The objectives of the study reported here were to compare the differences of traditional winter pastures versus pastures with forage kochi...

  15. A methylcellulose microculture assay for the in vitro assessment of drug toxicity on granulocyte/macrophage progenitors (CFU-GM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessina, Augusto; Croera, Cristina; Bayo, Maria; Malerba, Ilaria; Passardi, Laura; Cavicchini, Loredana; Neri, Maria G; Gribaldo, Laura

    2004-03-01

    In a recent prevalidation study, the use of a methylcellulose colony-forming unit-granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM) macroassay for two independent in vitro tests (human and murine cell based) was suggested for quantifying the potential haematotoxicity of xenobiotics. In this paper, we describe the transfer of the macroassay to a 96-well plate microassay, in which the linearity of the response was studied (both in terms of CFU-GM and optical density [OD] versus the number of cells cultured), and the inhibitory concentration (IC) values for doxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil and taxol were determined and compared with those obtained by using the original macroassay. Fresh murine bone marrow and human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells were used as a source of myeloid progenitors. The cells were cultured in methylcellulose containing granulocyte/macrophage-colony-stimulating factor, and in the presence of increasing drug concentrations. The cloning capacity of the progenitors was measured both as the number of colonies counted manually (CFU-GM), and as OD evaluated with an automated plate reader in an MTT test. Our results show that, in the microassay, up to 20 colonies/well could be easily counted, and that this range (20 to zero) gave a regression line from which IC values were calculated, which were very close to those obtained by using the macroassay (where the range of colony numbers was from 100 to zero). The test did not give good results when the OD (instead of the colony count) was used as the endpoint, because, although a high coefficient of determination was obtained, the OD values ranged from 0.6 to zero and the IC values determined were not comparable to those obtained by manual counts. The use of the microassay dramatically reduces the quantity of methylcellulose needed, and permits hundreds of cultures to be processed in the same experiment, contributing to significant reductions in both the work involved and the cost. A further important benefit is a

  16. Macrophage Polarization in Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes: Weighing Down our Understanding of Macrophage Function?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael James Kraakman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and type 2 diabetes are now recognized as chronic pro-inflammatory diseases. In the last decade, the role of the macrophage in particular has become increasingly implicated in their pathogenesis. Abundant literature now establishes that monocytes get recruited to peripheral tissues (ie pancreas, liver and adipose tissue to become resident macrophages and contribute to local inflammation, development of insulin resistance or even pancreatic dysfunction. Furthermore, an accumulation of evidence has established an important role for macrophage polarisation in the development of metabolic diseases. The general view in obesity is that there is an imbalance in the ratio of M1/M2 macrophages, with M1 pro-inflammatory macrophages being enhanced compared with M2 anti-inflammatory macrophages being down-regulated, leading to chronic inflammation and the propagation of metabolic dysfunction. However, there is emerging evidence revealing a more complex scenario with the spectrum of macrophage states exceeding well beyond the M1/M2 binary classification and confused further by human and animal models exhibiting different macrophage profiles. In this review we will discuss the recent findings regarding macrophage polarization in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  17. Activation of Macrophages by Lipopolysaccharide for Assessing the Immunomodulatory Property of Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shengwei; Chen, Zetao; Han, Pingping; Hu, Qingang; Xiao, Yin

    2017-03-24

    The design paradigm of biomaterials has been changed to ones with favorable immunomodulatory effects, indicating the importance of accurately evaluating the immunomodulatory properties of biomaterials. Among all the immune cells macrophages receive most attention, due to their plasticity and multiple roles in the materials and host interactions, and thereby become model immune cells for the evaluation of immunomodulatory properties of biomaterials in many studies. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), a polysaccharide in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, elicit strong immune responses, which was often applied to activate macrophages, resulting in a proinflammatory M1 phenotype, and the release of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interleukin (IL)-1, and IL-6. However, there is no consensus on how to apply macrophages and LPS to detect the immunomodulatory properties of biomaterials. The lack of scientific consideration of this issue has led to some inaccurate and insufficient conclusions on the immunomodulatory properties of biomaterials, and inconsistences between different research groups. In this study, we carried out a systemic study to investigate the stimulatory effects of LPS with different times, doses, and conditions on the activation of macrophages. An experimental pathway was proposed accordingly for the activation of macrophages using LPS for assessing the immunomodulatory property of biomaterials.

  18. Characterization of Neospora caninum macrophage migration inhibitory factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Guanggang; Fetterer, Raymond; Jenkins, Mark; Leng, Lin; Shen, Zhiqiang; Murphy, Charles; Han, Wenyu; Bucala, Richard; Tuo, Wenbin

    2013-10-01

    The present study is the first characterization of Neospora caninum macrophage migration inhibitory factor (NcMIF). BLAST-N analysis of NcMIF revealed high similarity (87%) to the Toxoplasma gondii MIF. NcMIF was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli in 3 forms, NcMIF (mature protein), NcMIFm (mutation of proline-2 to glycine), and NcMIFhis (addition of a polyhistidine tag at the N-terminus). None of these recombinant NcMIFs (rNcMIF) had tautomerase, oxidoreductase, or immunologic regulatory activities. rNcMIF was unable to compete with recombinant human MIF for a MIF receptor (CD74), suggesting that NcMIF does not bind to this MIF receptor. The glycine substitution for proline-2 of NcMIF resulted in increased retention time on SEC-HPLC and decreased formation of dimers and trimers. The addition of N-terminal HIS-tag led to increased formation of trimers. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that NcMIF was localized to the apical end of N. caninum tachyzoites. Immunoelectron microscopy further revealed that NcMIF was present in the micronemes, rhoptries, dense granules, and nuclei. NcMIF was abundant in the tachyzoite lysate and present in excretory and secretory antigen (ESAg) preparations. Total and secretory NcMIF was more abundant in a non-pathologic clone, Ncts-8, than in the wild type isolate (NC1). Furthermore, NcMIF release by the both isolates was increased in the presence of calcium ionophore. This differential production of NcMIF by the pathologic and non-pathologic isolates of N. caninum may suggest a critical role of this molecule in the infectious pathogenesis of this parasite.

  19. The Many Alternative Faces of Macrophage Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages provide the first line of defense against pathogens. They also initiate acquired immunity by processing and presenting antigens and provide the downstream effector functions. Analysis of large gene expression datasets from multiple cells and tissues reveals sets of genes that are co-regulated with the transcription factors that regulate them. In macrophages, the gene clusters include lineage-specific genes, interferon-responsive genes, early inflammatory genes, and genes required for endocytosis and lysosome function. Macrophages enter tissues and alter their function to deal with a wide range of challenges related to development and organogenesis, tissue injury, malignancy, sterile, or pathogenic inflammatory stimuli. These stimuli alter the gene expression to produce “activated macrophages” that are better equipped to eliminate the cause of their influx and to restore homeostasis. Activation or polarization states of macrophages have been classified as “classical” and “alternative” or M1 and M2. These proposed states of cells are not supported by large-scale transcriptomic data, including macrophage-associated signatures from large cancer tissue datasets, where the supposed markers do not correlate with other. Individual macrophage cells differ markedly from each other, and change their functions in response to doses and combinations of agonists and time. The most studied macrophage activation response is the transcriptional cascade initiated by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. This response is reviewed herein. The network topology is conserved across species, but genes within the transcriptional network evolve rapidly and differ between mouse and human. There is also considerable divergence in the sets of target genes between mouse strains, between individuals, and in other species such as pigs. The deluge of complex information related to macrophage activation can be accessed with new analytical tools and new databases

  20. Dakin Solution Alters Macrophage Viability and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-18

    crobial for wound care. DS has been shown to be toxic to host cells, but effects on immune cells are not well documented. Materials and methods: DS at 0.5...characterize the impact of DS on macrophage viability and function in vitro. 2. Materials and methods 2.1. Cell lines and reagents Murine macrophages...strainer to separate conidia from mycelium , and stored in DMEM at 4C. 2.3. Cellular viability assays Effect of DS on cellular viability was

  1. Lack of RNase L attenuates macrophage functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yi

    Full Text Available Macrophages are one of the major cell types in innate immunity against microbial infection. It is believed that the expression of proinflammatory genes such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, and cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2 by macrophages is also crucial for activation of both innate and adaptive immunities. RNase L is an interferon (IFN inducible enzyme which is highly expressed in macrophages. It has been demonstrated that RNase L regulates the expression of certain inflammatory genes. However, its role in macrophage function is largely unknown.Bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs were generated from RNase L(+/+and (-/- mice. The migration of BMMs was analyzed by using Transwell migration assays. Endocytosis and phagocytosis of macrophages were assessed by using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-Dextran 40,000 and FITC-E. coli bacteria, respectively. The expression of inflammatory genes was determined by Western Blot and ELISA. The promoter activity of Cox-2 was measured by luciferase reporter assays.Lack of RNase L significantly decreased the migration of BMMs induced by M-CSF, but at a less extent by GM-CSF and chemokine C-C motif ligand-2 (CCL2. Interestingly, RNase L deficient BMMs showed a significant reduction of endocytic activity to FITC-Dextran 40,000, but no any obvious effect on their phagocytic activity to FITC-bacteria under the same condition. RNase L impacts the expression of certain genes related to cell migration and inflammation such as transforming growth factor (TGF-β, IL-1β, IL-10, CCL2 and Cox-2. Furthermore, the functional analysis of the Cox-2 promoter revealed that RNase L regulated the expression of Cox-2 in macrophages at its transcriptional level. Taken together, our findings provide direct evidence showing that RNase L contributes to innate immunity through regulating macrophage functions.

  2. The Many Alternative Faces of Macrophage Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Hume, David A

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages provide the first line of defense against pathogens. They also initiate acquired immunity by processing and presenting antigens and provide the downstream effector functions. Analysis of large gene expression datasets from multiple cells and tissues reveals sets of genes that are co-regulated with the transcription factors that regulate them. In macrophages, the gene clusters include lineage-specific genes, interferon-responsive genes, early inflammatory genes, and g...

  3. Macrophage subsets and microglia in multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Along with microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages, macrophages in the perivascular space, choroid plexus, and meninges are the principal effector cells in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. These phagocytes are highly heterogeneous cells displaying spatial- and temporal-dependent identities in the healthy, injured, and inflamed CNS. In the last decade, researchers have debated on whether phagocytes subtypes and phenotypes are pathogenic or protective in CNS pathologies. In...

  4. Macrophage Efferocytosis and Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0408 TITLE: Macrophage Efferocytosis and Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jacqueline D. Jones...0408 Macrophage Efferocytosis and Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...efferocytosis. The translation of this functional role during pathophysiological states such as tumor metastasis to the skeleton is unknown. The purpose of this

  5. Macrophage Polarization in Metabolism and Metabolic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is now recognized as the main cause of the worldwide epidemic of type 2 diabetes. Obesity-associated chronic inflammation is a contributing key factor for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Numbers of studies have clearly demonstrated that the immune system and metabolism are highly integrated. CONTENT: Macrophages are an essential component of innate immunity and play a central role in inflammation and host defense. Moreover, these cells have homeostatic functions beyond defense, including tissue remodeling in ontogenesis and orchestration of metabolic functions. Diversity and plasticity are hallmarks of cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage. In response to interferons (IFNs, toll-like receptor (TLR, or interleukin (IL-4/IL-13 signals, macrophages undergo M1 (classical or M2 (alternative activation. Progress has now been made in defining the signaling pathways, transcriptional networks, and epigenetic mechanisms underlying M1, M2 or M2-like polarized activation. SUMMARY: In response to various signals, macrophages may undergo classical M1 activation (stimulated by TLR ligands and IFN-γ or alternative M2 activation (stimulated by IL-4/IL-13; these states mirror the T helper (Th1–Th2 polarization of T cells. Pathology is frequently associated with dynamic changes in macrophage activation, with classically activated M1 cells implicate in initiating and sustaining inflammation, meanwhile M2 or M2-like activated cells associated with resolution or smoldering chronic inflammation. Identification of the mechanisms and molecules that are associated with macrophage plasticity and polarized activation provides a basis for macrophage centered diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. KEYWORDS: obesity, adipose tissue, inflammation, macrophage polarization.

  6. Persistence of avian oncoviruses in chicken macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzolo, L; Moscovici, C; Moscovici, M G

    1979-01-01

    Inoculation of avian oncoviruses into 1- to 2-month old chickens led to a rapid production of antiviral humoral antibodies. Under these conditions it was found that avian leukosis viruses are sequestered in macrophages of peripheral blood, in which they can persist for a long period of time (up to about 3 years). In contrast, avian sarcoma viruses were never found in macrophages from chickens during the progression of sarcomas or after regression of the tumors. PMID:217827

  7. Bifunctional effect of E2 on macrophage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MinHONG; QuanZHU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Our previous study showed that the effect of 1713-estradiol(E2) on macrophage does not strengthen when concentrationincreased. So the effect of E2 on cytokines, intracellular free Ca2+([Ca2+]i) and morphological change of macrophages at differentconcentrations were studied. METHODS: TNF-α was measured by MTT via L929 cell. Nitrate and nitrite level(NO) wasmeasured by the method of Griess. [Ca2+]i was examined by laser scanning confocal microscopy(LSCM). Fluorescent microscopy

  8. Plot size variation to quantify yield of potato clones Variação do tamanho de parcela para acessar o rendimento de clones de batata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilson Antônio Bisognin

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper was to study plot size variation among potato clones to increase experimental precision of yield performance trials. The experiment was carried out at the experimental area of the Horticulture Dept., UFSM, Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. Tubers of five potato clones were planted in two rows of 60 hills in August 2004. For all ten experimental rows, combined plots were formed adding a different number of adjacent hills of the same row. Soil heterogeneity index and optimum plot size were estimated for each row. Real differences between treatment means for each clone and all clones were estimated using the Hatheway technique. The experimental precision of potato yield trials varied with the evaluated clone because of different optimum plot sizes. Eight-hill plots are the optimum size to quantify yield of potato clones, but experimental precision depends upon adjustments of the number of treatments and replications to the availability of experimental area. Genetic diversity indeed decreases experimental precision and justifies the use of different plot sizes. Practical applicattions and strategies to increase experimental precision of yields performance trials of potato clones are discussed.O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar a variação do tamanho de parcela entre clones de batata visando aumentar a precisão experimental nos ensaios de avaliação de rendimento. Tubérculos de cinco clones de batata foram plantados em duas fileiras de 60 covas na área experimental do Depto. de Fitotecnia-UFSM, em Santa Maria-RS, em agosto de 2004. Para cada uma das 10 fileiras do experimento foram planejadas parcelas de diferentes tamanhos, agrupando os resultados de covas adjacentes dentro da mesma fileira. Foram estimados o índice de heterogeneidade do solo e o tamanho ótimo da parcela. A diferença verdadeira entre médias de tratamentos, para cada clone e no geral foi estimada pelo método de Hatheway. A precis

  9. Proof-Carrying Code with Correct Compilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Andrew W.

    2009-01-01

    In the late 1990s, proof-carrying code was able to produce machine-checkable safety proofs for machine-language programs even though (1) it was impractical to prove correctness properties of source programs and (2) it was impractical to prove correctness of compilers. But now it is practical to prove some correctness properties of source programs, and it is practical to prove correctness of optimizing compilers. We can produce more expressive proof-carrying code, that can guarantee correctness properties for machine code and not just safety. We will construct program logics for source languages, prove them sound w.r.t. the operational semantics of the input language for a proved-correct compiler, and then use these logics as a basis for proving the soundness of static analyses.

  10. Computer Simulation Instruction: Carrying out Chemical Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibtesam Al-Mashaqbeh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of computer simulation Instruction (CSI on students' achievements: Carrying out chemical experiments to acquire chemical concepts for eleventh grade students. The subject of the study consisted two sections of a one girl's high school in Jordan. One section was randomly assigned to experimental group in which computer simulation Instruction (CSI was used, and the other section was randomly assigned to control group in which students were instructed by using the traditional teaching instruction. The findings indicated that there is progress on the part of the experimental group which used the computer simulation Instruction (CSI and this was reflected positively in the students’ achievement in carrying out chemical experiments to acquire chemical concepts.

  11. A decimal carry-free adder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikmehr, Hooman; Phillips, Braden; Lim, Cheng-Chew

    2005-02-01

    Recently, decimal arithmetic has become attractive in the financial and commercial world including banking, tax calculation, currency conversion, insurance and accounting. Although computers are still carrying out decimal calculation using software libraries and binary floating-point numbers, it is likely that in the near future, all processors will be equipped with units performing decimal operations directly on decimal operands. One critical building block for some complex decimal operations is the decimal carry-free adder. This paper discusses the mathematical framework of the addition, introduces a new signed-digit format for representing decimal numbers and presents an efficient architectural implementation. Delay estimation analysis shows that the adder offers improved performance over earlier designs.

  12. Like an eagle carries its young

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Georg Wünch

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The picture of an eagle carrying its young on its wings (Dt 32:11 is a powerful and encouraging image of trust and security in God. It is particularly relevant for Western culture, where the eagle is a prominent symbol of power and strength. In recent years, though, the translation of the Hebrew term רֶשֶׁנ as ‘eagle’ has come into question and modern exegetes claim that it is more accurately translated as ‘vulture’. But can this really be a symbol of comfort? Furthermore, do eagles (or vultures even carry their young on their wings? This article intends to shed some light on these questions.Keywords: Old Testament; Deuteronomy; Eagle; Vulture

  13. A Feminist Reading of Sister Carrie

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang; Jiatong

    2015-01-01

    In the history of American literature,Sister Carrie is the first novel of Theodore Dreiser,it impresses people deeply.Carrie,a poor country girl,becomes a famous star in a big city.She has totally changed from her hard experiences,and she becomes financially independent as a new woman when she goes through hesitation.In he whole novel,the author has planted some strong points of Carrie’s character.At the end of this paper,it analyzes woman’s status in modern time from two aspects of the improvement of female’s social status and the comparison between men and women.

  14. Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sheep that have been genetically modified to produce milk that contains a human protein essential for blood clotting. The hope is that someday this protein can be purified from the milk and given to humans whose blood does not ...

  15. Cloning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭荣华

    2002-01-01

    As we come near to the 21st century, it is clear than ever that science and technology are changing the way we live and work. The breakthroughs1 in bioengineering2 science are helping to uncover the mysteries of life, holding out new hope for life-saving cures to some of our greatly terrible diseases.

  16. Development and validation of a bovine macrophage specific cDNA microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waddington David

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The response of macrophages to danger signals is an important early stage in the immune response. Our understanding of this complex event has been furthered by microarray analysis, which allows the simultaneous investigation of the expression of large numbers of genes. However, the microarray resources available to study these events in livestock animals are limited. Results Here we report the development of a bovine macrophage specific (BoMP cDNA microarray. The BoMP microarray contains 5026 sequence elements (printed in duplicate and numerous controls. The majority of the clones incorporated on the microarray were derived from the BoMP cDNA library generated from bovine myeloid cells subjected to various stimuli, including over 900 sequences unique to the library. Additional clones representing immunologically important genes have been included on the BoMP microarray. The microarray was validated by investigating the response of bovine monocytes to stimulation with interferon-γ and lipopolysaccharide using amplified RNA. At 2 and 16 hours post stimulation 695 genes exhibited statistically significant differential expression, including; 26 sequences unique to the BoMP library, interleukin 6, prion protein and toll-like receptor 4. Conclusion A 5 K cDNA microarray has been successfully developed to investigate gene expression in bovine myeloid cells. The BoMP microarray is available from the ARK-Genomics Centre for Functional Genomics in Farm Animals, UK.

  17. Macrophages - silent enemies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świdrowska-Jaros, Joanna; Orczyk, Krzysztof; Smolewska, Elżbieta

    2016-07-06

    The inflammatory response by secretion of cytokines and other mediators is postulated as one of the most significant factors in the pathophysiology of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The effect of macrophage action depends on the type of their activation. Classically activated macrophages (M1) are responsible for release of molecules crucial for joint inflammation. Alternatively activated macrophages (M2) may recognize self antigens by scavenger receptors and induce the immunological reaction leading to autoimmune diseases such as JIA. Molecules essential for JIA pathophysiology include: TNF-α, the production of which precedes synovial inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis; IL-1 as a key mediator of synovial damage; chemotactic factors for macrophages IL-8 and MCP-1; IL6, the level of which correlates with the radiological joint damage; MIF, promoting the secretion of TNF-α and IL-6; CCL20 and HIF, significant for the hypoxic synovial environment in JIA; GM-CSF, stimulating the production of macrophages; and IL-18, crucial for NK cell functions. Recognition of the role of macrophages creates the potential for a new therapeutic approach.

  18. A lotka-volterra model of coexistence between a sexual population and multiple asexual clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pound, Graeme E; Doncaster, C Patrick; Cox, Simon J

    2002-08-21

    At carrying capacity, small advantages in competitive ability can compensate a sexual population for its two-fold disadvantage in growth capacity when facing invasion by asexual mutants. In this paper, we develop a generic analytical model to consider the ecology of a sexual population comprising equal numbers of males and females, competing for shared prey resources with multiple female-only clones. We assume that the clones arise from the sexual population and are distinguished from it only by having narrower resource niches and twice the growth capacity. For sexual populations, at density-dependent carrying capacity, intra-specific competition between clonal individuals prevents them from realizing their two-fold advantage in intrinsic growth. This prediction leads to three novel outcomes: (i) a sexual population can coexist with any number of clones, provided their combined competitive impact remains less than the impact of the clones on each other; (ii) a sexual species can immediately exclude asexual invaders if it is a fast growing and strong competitor of shared resources and also has refuge in an abundant alternative resource; (iii) the rate of accumulation of clones in a sexual population will be slowed by intra and inter-specific competition amongst the clones themselves, in addition to the competitive impact from the original sexual population.

  19. Influence of temperature on biomass production of clones of Atriplex halimus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessena, Leonarda; Mulas, Maurizio

    2016-05-01

    A very effective tool to combat desertification is revegetation. Promising species for this purpose are the evergreen shrubs of the genus Atriplex. The objective of the research was to study the growing responses of Atriplex halimus under different thermal regimes and to evaluate the biomass accumulation of selected clones. The test was carried out in four sites of Sardinia Island (Italy) characterized by different latitude, altitude and air temperature trends along the year. In every site, potted plants of five clones of A. halimus were compared for biomass production as measured by linear growth of plants (central axis and secondary shoots), as well as by dry weight of leaves, shoots and roots per plant. Correlations between sums of hour-degrees under or above the thresholds of critical air temperatures, comprised between 0 and 35 °C, and the plant growth indicators were analysed. Differences among the five clones, with regard to the influence of low temperatures on plant growth and on the biomass production were evaluated. Among five tested clones, GIO1 and SAN3 resulted more sensitive to low temperatures. Clones MAR1, PAL1 and FAN3 resulted less sensitive to low temperatures and in the site characterized by the lowest minimum temperatures also have shown greater adaptability and thus biomass growth in the observed period. The clone PAL1 showed a lower shoot/root biomass ratio as adaptation to cold temperature, and the clone FAN3, the opposite behaviour and a general preference to temperate thermal regimes.

  20. Optimized transgenesis in Xenopus laevis/gilli isogenetic clones for immunological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedelkovska, Hristina; Robert, Jacques

    2012-03-01

    Xenopus laevis provides a unique animal model, alternative to mouse, to study immunology. Even though, several methodologies have been developed for the generation of transgenic Xenopus, to date none have been adapted for the X. laevis/gilli (LG) isogenetic clones that are essential for immunological studies. Since LG clones are generated via gynogenesis, transgenic methods using transgene integration into the sperm nuclei are not suited. Therefore, we have tested three alternative methods for LG transgenesis: the phiC31 integrase, the Sleeping Beauty transposase, and the I-SceI meganuclease. All three techniques produced transgenic LG clones; however, the I-SceI meganuclease was most effective. It resulted in high transgenesis efficiency (35-50%), bright nonmosaic GFP expression as well as stable germline transmission with 100% of the progeny carrying the transgene. Production of transgenic LG clones will allow us to modulate immune gene expression and further strengthen X. laevis as a biomedical model.

  1. Telomere length status of somatic cell sheep clones and their offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Basil; Coppola, Gianfranco; Perrault, Steven D; Peura, Teija T; Betts, Dean H; King, W Allan

    2007-12-01

    This study was carried out to determine the telomere length status of sheep clones and their offspring, and to examine telomere dynamics and chromosomal abnormalities in culture propagated donor cells. Skin samples were collected from somatic cell nuclear transfer-derived sheep clones, and three of their progeny generated by natural mating. Samples were collected from control animals (n = 35), spanning in age from 1 month to 36 months of age. Genomic DNA was extracted from cell/tissue samples and their telomere lengths were assessed by terminal restriction fragment (TRF) analysis. Results revealed: that (a) sheep clones derived from cultured somatic cells have shortened telomere lengths compared to age-matched controls; (b) the offspring derived from natural mating between clones had normal telomere lengths compared to their age-matched counterparts; and donor cell cultures beyond 20 population doublings had significantly (P < 0.05) shortened telomeres and exhibited a higher numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities.

  2. Nuclear transfer technology in mammalian cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, D P; Mitalipov, S; Norgren, R B

    2001-01-01

    The past several years have witnessed remarkable progress in mammalian cloning using nuclear transfer (NT). Until 1997 and the announcement of the successful cloning of sheep from adult mammary gland or fetal fibroblast cells, our working assumption was that cloning by NT could only be accomplished with relatively undifferentiated embryonic cells. Indeed, live offspring were first produced by NT over 15 years ago from totipotent, embryonic blastomeres derived from early cleavage-stage embryos. However, once begun, the progression to somatic cell cloning or NT employing differentiated cells as the source of donor nuclei was meteoric, initially involving differentiated embryonic cell cultures in sheep in 1996 and quickly thereafter, fetal or adult somatic cells in sheep, cow, mouse, goat, and pig. Several recent reviews provide a background for and discussion of these successes. Here we will focus on the potential uses of reproductive cloning along with recent activities in the field and a discussion concerning current interests in human reproductive and therapeutic cloning.

  3. Towards Clone Detection in UML Domain Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Störrle, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Code clones (i.e., duplicate fragments of code) have been studied for long, and there is strong evidence that they are a major source of software faults. Anecdotal evidence suggests that this phenomenon occurs similarly in models, suggesting that model clones are as detrimental to model quality...... as they are to code quality. However, programming language code and visual models have significant differences that make it difficult to directly transfer notions and algorithms developed in the code clone arena to model clones. In this article, we develop and propose a definition of the notion of “model clone” based...... on the thorough analysis of practical scenarios. We propose a formal definition of model clones, specify a clone detection algorithm for UML domain models, and implement it prototypically. We investigate different similarity heuristics to be used in the algorithm, and report the performance of our approach. While...

  4. Effective and efficient model clone detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Störrle, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Code clones are a major source of software defects. Thus, it is likely that model clones (i.e., duplicate fragments of models) have a significant negative impact on model quality, and thus, on any software created based on those models, irrespective of whether the software is generated fully...... automatically (“MDD-style”) or hand-crafted following the blueprint defined by the model (“MBSD-style”). Unfortunately, however, model clones are much less well studied than code clones. In this paper, we present a clone detection algorithm for UML domain models. Our approach covers a much greater variety...... of model types than existing approaches while providing high clone detection rates at high speed....

  5. Cloning cattle: the methods in the madness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oback, Björn; Wells, David N

    2007-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is much more widely and efficiently practiced in cattle than in any other species, making this arguably the most important mammal cloned to date. While the initial objective behind cattle cloning was commercially driven--in particular to multiply genetically superior animals with desired phenotypic traits and to produce genetically modified animals-researchers have now started to use bovine SCNT as a tool to address diverse questions in developmental and cell biology. In this paper, we review current cattle cloning methodologies and their potential technical or biological pitfalls at any step of the procedure. In doing so, we focus on one methodological parameter, namely donor cell selection. We emphasize the impact of epigenetic and genetic differences between embryonic, germ, and somatic donor cell types on cloning efficiency. Lastly, we discuss adult phenotypes and fitness of cloned cattle and their offspring and illustrate some of the more imminent commercial cattle cloning applications.

  6. Metabolomic phenotyping of a cloned pig model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Morten Rahr; Christensen, Kirstine Lykke; Hedemann, Mette Skou

    2011-01-01

    and possibly also phenotypes and this offer an extra level of experimental control which could possibly make them a desirable tool for intervention studies. Therefore, in the present study, we address how phenotype and phenotypic variation is affected by cloning, through comparison of cloned pigs and normal...... outbred pigs. Results The metabolic phenotype of cloned pigs (n = 5) was for the first time elucidated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomic analysis of multiple bio-fluids including plasma, bile and urine. The metabolic phenotype of the cloned pigs was compared with normal outbred pigs (n...... = 6) by multivariate data analysis, which revealed differences in the metabolic phenotypes. Plasma lactate was higher for cloned vs control pigs, while multiple metabolites were altered in the bile. However a lower inter-individual variability for cloned pigs compared with control pigs could...

  7. The Role of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) in Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Tadamichi [Department of Dermatology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Sugitani, 930-0194, Toyama (Japan)

    2010-08-09

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is the most common cause of physical injury to the skin due to environmental damage, and UV exposure substantially increases the risk of actinic damage to the skin. The inflammatory changes induced by acute UV exposure include erythema (sunburn) of the skin, while chronic exposure to solar UV radiation causes photo-aging, immunosuppression, and ultimately, carcinogenesis of the skin. After skin damage by UV radiation, the cells are known to secrete many cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). MIF was originally identified as a lymphokine that concentrates macrophages at inflammatory loci, and is known to be a potent activator of macrophages in vivo. MIF is considered to play an important role in cell-mediated immunity. Since the molecular cloning of MIF cDNA, MIF has been re-evaluated as a proinflammatory cytokine and pituitary-derived hormone that potentiates endotoxemia. MIF is ubiquitously expressed in various tissues, including the skin. Recent studies have suggested a potentially broader role for MIF in growth regulation because of its ability to antagonize p53-mediated gene activation and apoptosis. This article reviews the latest findings on the roles of MIF with regard to UV-induced skin cancer.

  8. Generation of dendritic cells and macrophages from human induced pluripotent stem cells aiming at cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senju, S; Haruta, M; Matsumura, K; Matsunaga, Y; Fukushima, S; Ikeda, T; Takamatsu, K; Irie, A; Nishimura, Y

    2011-09-01

    This report describes generation of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. iPS cell-derived DC (iPS-DC) exhibited the morphology of typical DC and function of T-cell stimulation and antigen presentation. iPS-DC loaded with cytomegalovirus (CMV) peptide induced vigorous expansion of CMV-specific autologous CD8+ T cells. Macrophages (iPS-MP) with activity of zymosan phagocytosis and C5a-induced chemotaxis were also generated from iPS cells. Genetically modified iPS-MPs were generated by the introduction of expression vectors into undifferentiated iPS cells, isolation of transfectant iPS cell clone and subsequent differentiation. By this procedure, we generated iPS-MP expressing a membrane-bound form of single chain antibody (scFv) specific to amyloid β (Aβ), the causal protein of Alzheimer's disease. The scFv-transfectant iPS-MP exhibited efficient Aβ-specific phagocytosis activity. iPS-MP expressing CD20-specific scFv engulfed and killed BALL-1 B-cell leukemia cells. Anti-BALL-1 effect of iPS-MP in vivo was demonstrated in a xeno-transplantation model using severe combined immunodeficient mice. In addition, we established a xeno-free culture protocol to generate iPS-DC and iPS-MP. Collectively, we demonstrated the possibility of application of iPS-DC and macrophages to cell therapy.

  9. Telomeres and the ethics of human cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allhoff, Fritz

    2004-01-01

    In search of a potential problem with cloning, I investigate the phenomenon of telomere shortening which is caused by cell replication; clones created from somatic cells will have shortened telomeres and therefore reach a state of senescence more rapidly. While genetic intervention might fix this problem at some point in the future, I ask whether, absent technological advances, this biological phenomenon undermines the moral permissibility of cloning.

  10. Quantum cloning with an optical fiber amplifier

    CERN Document Server

    Fasel, S; Ribordy, G; Scarani, V; Zbinden, H; Fasel, Sylvain; Gisin, Nicolas; Ribordy, Gregoire; Scarani, Valerio; Zbinden, Hugo

    2002-01-01

    It has been shown theoretically that a light amplifier working on the physical principle of stimulated emission should achieve optimal quantum cloning of the polarization state of light. We demonstrate close-to-optimal universal quantum cloning of polarization in a standard fiber amplifier for telecom wavelengths. For cloning $1\\to 2$ we find a fidelity of 0.82, the optimal value being ${5/6}=0.83$.

  11. Optimal quantum cloning via stimulated emission

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, C; Zeilinger, Anton; Simon, Christoph; Weihs, Gregor; Zeilinger, Anton

    2000-01-01

    We show that optimal universal quantum cloning can be realized via stimulated emission. Universality of the cloning procedure is achieved by choosing systems that have appropriate symmetries. We first discuss a scheme based on stimulated emission in certain three-level-systems, e.g. atoms in a cavity. Then we present a way of realizing optimal universal cloning based on stimulated parametric down-conversion. This scheme also implements the optimal universal NOT operation.

  12. Information carrying capacity of a cosmological constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simidzija, Petar; Martín-Martínez, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the exchange of information in different cosmological backgrounds when sender and receiver are timelike separated and communicate through massless fields (without the exchange of light signals). Remarkably, we show that the dominance of a cosmological constant makes the amount of recoverable information imprinted in the field by the sender extremely resilient: it does not decay in time or with the spatial separation of the sender and receiver, and it actually increases with the rate of expansion of the Universe. This is in stark contrast with the information carried by conventional light signals and with previous results on timelike communication through massless fields in matter-dominated cosmologies.

  13. DMPD: Nuclear receptors in macrophages: a link between metabolism and inflammation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18022390 Nuclear receptors in macrophages: a link between metabolism and inflammati...on. Szanto A, Roszer T. FEBS Lett. 2008 Jan 9;582(1):106-16. Epub 2007 Nov 20. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Nuclear... receptors in macrophages: a link between metabolism and inflammation. PubmedID 18022390 Title Nuclear

  14. Interactions between neutrophils and macrophages promote macrophage killing of rat muscle cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hal X.; Tidball, James G.

    2003-01-01

    Current evidence indicates that the physiological functions of inflammatory cells are highly sensitive to their microenvironment, which is partially determined by the inflammatory cells and their potential targets. In the present investigation, interactions between neutrophils, macrophages and muscle cells that may influence muscle cell death are examined. Findings show that in the absence of macrophages, neutrophils kill muscle cells in vitro by superoxide-dependent mechanisms, and that low concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) protect against neutrophil-mediated killing. In the absence of neutrophils, macrophages kill muscle cells through a NO-dependent mechanism, and the presence of target muscle cells causes a three-fold increase in NO production by macrophages, with no change in the concentration of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Muscle cells that are co-cultured with both neutrophils and macrophages in proportions that are observed in injured muscle show cytotoxicity through a NO-dependent, superoxide-independent mechanism. Furthermore, the concentration of myeloid cells that is necessary for muscle killing is greatly reduced in assays that use mixed myeloid cell populations, rather than uniform populations of neutrophils or macrophages. These findings collectively show that the magnitude and mechanism of muscle cell killing by myeloid cells are modified by interactions between muscle cells and neutrophils, between muscle cells and macrophages and between macrophages and neutrophils.

  15. DMPD: The actions of bacterial DNA on murine macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10534106 The actions of bacterial DNA on murine macrophages. Sester DP, Stacey KJ, ...Sweet MJ, Beasley SJ, Cronau SL, Hume DA. J Leukoc Biol. 1999 Oct;66(4):542-8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The... actions of bacterial DNA on murine macrophages. PubmedID 10534106 Title The actions of bacterial D

  16. MAP kinase phosphatase 2 regulates macrophage-adipocyte interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huipeng Jiao

    Full Text Available Inflammation is critical for the development of obesity-associated metabolic disorders. This study aims to investigate the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 2 (MKP-2 in inflammation during macrophage-adipocyte interaction.White adipose tissues (WAT from mice either on a high-fat diet (HFD or normal chow (NC were isolated to examine the expression of MKP-2. Murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 stably expressing MKP-2 was used to study the regulation of MKP-2 in macrophages in response to saturated free fatty acid (FFA and its role in macrophage M1/M2 activation. Macrophage-adipocyte co-culture system was employed to investigate the role of MKP-2 in regulating inflammation during adipocyte-macrophage interaction. c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK- and p38-specific inhibitors were used to examine the mechanisms by which MKP-2 regulates macrophage activation and macrophage-adipocytes interaction.HFD changed the expression of MKP-2 in WAT, and MKP-2 was highly expressed in the stromal vascular cells (SVCs. MKP-2 inhibited the production of proinflammatory cytokines in response to FFA stimulation in macrophages. MKP-2 inhibited macrophage M1 activation through JNK and p38. In addition, overexpression of MKP-2 in macrophages suppressed inflammation during macrophage-adipocyte interaction.MKP-2 is a negative regulator of macrophage M1 activation through JNK and p38 and inhibits inflammation during macrophage-adipocyte interaction.

  17. Human cloning: Eastern Mediterranean Region perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdur Rab, M; Khayat, M H

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in genomics and biotechnology have ushered in a new era in health development. Therapeutic cloning possesses enormous potential for revolutionizing medical and therapeutic techniques. Cloning technology, however, is perceived as having the potential for reproductive cloning, which raises serious ethical and moral concerns. It is important that the Islamic countries come to a consensus on this vital issue. Developing science and technology for better health is a religious and moral obligation. There is an urgent need for Muslim scholars to discuss the issue of stem cell research and cloning rationally; such dialogue will not only consider the scientific merits but also the moral, ethical and legal implications.

  18. Metabolomic phenotyping of a cloned pig model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callesen Henrik

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pigs are widely used as models for human physiological changes in intervention studies, because of the close resemblance between human and porcine physiology and the high degree of experimental control when using an animal model. Cloned animals have, in principle, identical genotypes and possibly also phenotypes and this offer an extra level of experimental control which could possibly make them a desirable tool for intervention studies. Therefore, in the present study, we address how phenotype and phenotypic variation is affected by cloning, through comparison of cloned pigs and normal outbred pigs. Results The metabolic phenotype of cloned pigs (n = 5 was for the first time elucidated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR-based metabolomic analysis of multiple bio-fluids including plasma, bile and urine. The metabolic phenotype of the cloned pigs was compared with normal outbred pigs (n = 6 by multivariate data analysis, which revealed differences in the metabolic phenotypes. Plasma lactate was higher for cloned vs control pigs, while multiple metabolites were altered in the bile. However a lower inter-individual variability for cloned pigs compared with control pigs could not be established. Conclusions From the present study we conclude that cloned and normal outbred pigs are phenotypically different. However, it cannot be concluded that the use of cloned animals will reduce the inter-individual variation in intervention studies, though this is based on a limited number of animals.

  19. Experimental Quantum Cloning of Single Photons

    CERN Document Server

    Lamas-Linares, A; Howell, J C; Bouwmeester, D; Lamas-Linares, Antia; Simon, Christoph; Howell, John C.; Bouwmeester, Dik

    2002-01-01

    Although perfect copying of unknown quantum systems is forbidden by the laws of quantum mechanics, approximate cloning is possible. A natural way of realizing quantum cloning of photons is by stimulated emission. In this context the fundamental quantum limit to the quality of the clones is imposed by the unavoidable presence of spontaneous emission. In our experiment a single input photon stimulates the emission of additional photons from a source based on parametric down-conversion. This leads to the production of quantum clones with near optimal fidelity. We also demonstrate universality of the copying procedure by showing that the same fidelity is achieved for arbitrary input states.

  20. Quantum cloning disturbed by thermal Davies environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dajka, Jerzy; Łuczka, Jerzy

    2016-06-01

    A network of quantum gates designed to implement universal quantum cloning machine is studied. We analyze how thermal environment coupled to auxiliary qubits, `blank paper' and `toner' required at the preparation stage of copying, modifies an output fidelity of the cloner. Thermal environment is described in terms of the Markovian Davies theory. We show that such a cloning machine is not universal any more but its output is independent of at least a part of parameters of the environment. As a case study, we consider cloning of states in a six-state cryptography's protocol. We also briefly discuss cloning of arbitrary input states.

  1. Species-specific challenges in dog cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, G A; Oh, H J; Park, J E; Kim, M J; Park, E J; Jo, Y K; Jang, G; Kim, M K; Kim, H J; Lee, B C

    2012-12-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is now an established procedure used in cloning of several species. SCNT in dogs involves multiple steps including the removal of the nuclear material, injection of a donor cell, fusion, activation of the reconstructed oocytes and finally transfer to a synchronized female recipient. There are therefore many factors that contribute to cloning efficiency. By performing a retrospective analysis of 2005-2012 published papers regarding dog cloning, we define the optimum procedure and summarize the specific feature for dog cloning.

  2. Macrophage polarisation: an immunohistochemical approach for identifying M1 and M2 macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Henrique M Barros

    Full Text Available Macrophage polarization is increasingly recognised as an important pathogenetic factor in inflammatory and neoplastic diseases. Proinflammatory M1 macrophages promote T helper (Th 1 responses and show tumoricidal activity. M2 macrophages contribute to tissue repair and promote Th2 responses. CD68 and CD163 are used to identify macrophages in tissue sections. However, characterisation of polarised macrophages in situ has remained difficult. Macrophage polarisation is regulated by transcription factors, pSTAT1 and RBP-J for M1, and CMAF for M2. We reasoned that double-labelling immunohistochemistry for the detection of macrophage markers together with transcription factors may be suitable to characterise macrophage polarisation in situ. To test this hypothesis, we have studied conditions associated with Th1- and Th2-predominant immune responses: infectious mononucleosis and Crohn's disease for Th1 and allergic nasal polyps, oxyuriasis, wound healing and foreign body granulomas for predominant Th2 response. In all situations, CD163+ cells usually outnumbered CD68+ cells. Moreover, CD163+ cells, usually considered as M2 macrophages, co-expressing pSTAT1 and RBP-J were found in all conditions examined. The numbers of putative M1 macrophages were higher in Th1- than in Th2-associated diseases, while more M2 macrophages were seen in Th2- than in Th1 related disorders. In most Th1-related diseases, the balance of M1 over M2 cells was shifted towards M1 cells, while the reverse was observed for Th2-related conditions. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed two distinct clusters: cluster I included Th1 diseases together with cases with high numbers of CD163+pSTAT1+, CD68+pSTAT1+, CD163+RBP-J+ and CD68+RBP-J+ macrophages; cluster II comprised Th2 conditions together with cases displaying high numbers of CD163+CMAF+ and CD68+CMAF+ macrophages. These results suggest that the detection of pSTAT1, RBP-J, and CMAF in the context of CD68 or CD163 expression is a

  3. Lysosomal trafficking functions of mucolipin-1 in murine macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dang Hope

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mucolipidosis Type IV is currently characterized as a lysosomal storage disorder with defects that include corneal clouding, achlorhydria and psychomotor retardation. MCOLN1, the gene responsible for this disease, encodes the protein mucolipin-1 that belongs to the "Transient Receptor Potential" family of proteins and has been shown to function as a non-selective cation channel whose activity is modulated by pH. Two cell biological defects that have been described in MLIV fibroblasts are a hyperacidification of lysosomes and a delay in the exit of lipids from lysosomes. Results We show that mucolipin-1 localizes to lysosomal compartments in RAW264.7 mouse macrophages that show subcompartmental accumulations of endocytosed molecules. Using stable RNAi clones, we show that mucolipin-1 is required for the exit of lipids from these compartments, for the transport of endocytosed molecules to terminal lysosomes, and for the transport of the Major Histocompatibility Complex II to the plasma membrane. Conclusion Mucolipin-1 functions in the efficient exit of molecules, destined for various cellular organelles, from lysosomal compartments.

  4. BMP pathway regulation of and by macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha Talati

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a disease of progressively increasing pulmonary vascular resistance, associated with mutations of the type 2 receptor for the BMP pathway, BMPR2. The canonical signaling pathway for BMPR2 is through the SMAD family of transcription factors. BMPR2 is expressed in every cell type, but the impact of BMPR2 mutations affecting SMAD signaling, such as Bmpr2delx4+, had only previously been investigated in smooth muscle and endothelium. In the present study, we created a mouse with universal doxycycline-inducible expression of Bmpr2delx4+ in order to determine if broader expression had an impact relevant to the development of PAH. We found that the most obvious phenotype was a dramatic, but patchy, increase in pulmonary inflammation. We crossed these double transgenic mice onto an NF-κB reporter strain, and by luciferase assays on live mice, individual organs and isolated macrophages, we narrowed down the origin of the inflammatory phenotype to constitutive activation of tissue macrophages. Study of bone marrow-derived macrophages from mutant and wild-type mice suggested a baseline difference in differentiation state in Bmpr2 mutants. When activated with LPS, both mutant and wild-type macrophages secrete BMP pathway inhibitors sufficient to suppress BMP pathway activity in smooth muscle cells (SMC treated with conditioned media. Functionally, co-culture with macrophages results in a BMP signaling-dependent increase in scratch closure in cultured SMC. We conclude that SMAD signaling through BMP is responsible, in part, for preventing macrophage activation in both live animals and in cells in culture, and that activated macrophages secrete BMP inhibitors in sufficient quantity to cause paracrine effect on vascular smooth muscle.

  5. Dexamethasone targeted directly to macrophages induces macrophage niches that promote erythroid expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falchi, Mario; Varricchio, Lilian; Martelli, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    with proerythroblasts leading to formation of transient erythroblastic island-like structures. By contrast, CD169(neg) macrophages established 'tight' interactions with mature erythroblasts and phagocytosed these cells. 'Loose' interactions of CD169(pos) macrophages were associated with proerythroblast cytokinesis (the...... M phase of the cell cycle) suggesting that these interactions may promote proerythroblast duplication. This hypothesis was tested by experiments that showed that as few as 103 macrophages significantly increased levels of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide incorporation...... frequency in S/G2/M and cytokinesis expressed by proerythroblasts over 24 h of culture. These effects were observed also when macrophages were co-cultured with dexamethasone directly conjugated to a macrophage-specific CD163 antibody. In conclusion, in addition to promoting proerythroblast proliferation...

  6. Identification and characterization of CTX-M-15 producing Klebsiella pneumoniae clone ST101 in a Hungarian university teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melegh, Szilvia; Schneider, György; Horváth, Marianna; Jakab, Ferenc; Emődy, Levente; Tigyi, Zoltán

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the molecular epidemiology of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates derived from the teaching hospitals of University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary in the time period 2004-2008. Molecular typing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, detection of common β-lactamase genes (bla(CTX-M), bla(TEM) and bla(SHV)) and virulence associated traits (hypermucoviscosity, magA, k2a, rmpA, siderophores, type 1 and 3 fimbria, biofilm formation, serum resistance) were performed for 102 isolates. The results showed the presence of three major ciprofloxacin resistant CTX-M-15 producing clones (ST15 n = 69, ST101 n = 10, and ST147 n = 9), of which ST15 was predominant and universally widespread. Considering distribution in time and place, ST101 and ST147 were detected at fewer inpatient units and within a narrower time frame, as compared to ST15. Beside major clones, eleven minor clones were identified, and were shown to harbour the following β-lactamase genes: six clones carried bla(CTX-M), four clones harboured bla(SHV-5) and one clone possessed both bla(CTX-M) and ESBL type bla(SHV). Among the SHV-5 producing K. pneumoniae clones a novel sequence type was found, namely ST1193, which harboured a unique infB allele. Different virulence factor content and peculiar antimicrobial susceptibility profile were characteristic for each clone. In contrast to major clone isolates, which showed high level resistance to ciprofloxacin, minor clone isolates displayed significantly lower MIC values for ciprofloxacin suggesting a role for fluoroquinolones in the dissemination of the major K. pneumoniae clones. This is the first description of the CTX-M-15 producing K. pneumoniae clone ST101 in Hungary.

  7. The Neisseria meningitidis Macrophage Infectivity Potentiator Protein Induces Cross-Strain Serum Bactericidal Activity and Is a Potential Serogroup B Vaccine Candidate ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Hung, Miao-Chiu; Salim, Omar; Williams, Jeannette N.; Heckels, John E.; Christodoulides, Myron

    2011-01-01

    A gene encoding a 29-kDa protein from Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B strain MC58 with homology to the macrophage infectivity potentiator (MIP) protein of Legionella pneumophila was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified soluble recombinant protein (rMIP) was used for immunization studies. Analysis of the predicted amino acid sequences of MIP from 13 well-characterized meningococcal strains, isolated from carriers or patients and differing in serogroup, serotype, and su...

  8. Macrophage plasticity in experimental atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamila Khallou-Laschet

    Full Text Available As in human disease, macrophages (MØ are central players in the development and progression of experimental atherosclerosis. In this study we have evaluated the phenotype of MØ associated with progression of atherosclerosis in the apolipoprotein E (ApoE knockout (KO mouse model.We found that bone marrow-derived MØ submitted to M1 and M2 polarization specifically expressed arginase (Arg II and Arg I, respectively. This distinct arginase expression was used to evaluate the frequency and distribution of M1 and M2 MØ in cross-sections of atherosclerotic plaques of ApoE KO mice. Early lesions were infiltrated by Arg I(+ (M2 MØ. This type of MØ favored the proliferation of smooth muscle cells, in vitro. Arg II(+ (M1 MØ appeared and prevailed in lesions of aged ApoE KO mice and lesion progression was correlated with the dominance of M1 over the M2 MØ phenotype. In order to address whether the M2->M1 switch could be due to a phenotypic switch of the infiltrated cells, we performed in vitro repolarization experiments. We found that fully polarized MØ retained their plasticity since they could revert their phenotype. The analysis of the distribution of Arg I- and Arg II-expressing MØ also argued against a recent recruitment of M1 MØ in the lesion. The combined data therefore suggest that the M2->M1 switch observed in vivo is due to a conversion of cells already present in the lesion. Our study suggests that interventional tools able to revert the MØ infiltrate towards the M2 phenotype may exert an atheroprotective action.

  9. ES cells derived from cloned embryos in monkey - a jump toward human therapeutic cloning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangzhong Yang; Sadie L Smith

    2007-01-01

    @@ Therapeutic cloning refers to the derivation of embryonic stem cells (ntESC) from embryos derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) also known as cloning. Cloning involves transplanting a differentiated cell into an oocyte that has had its nucleus (DNA) removed.

  10. Cloning non-transformed sheep B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebel, P J; Beskorwayne, T; Godson, D L; Popowych, Y; Hein, W

    2000-04-03

    The capacity to clone B cells and establish permanent B cell lines has greatly facilitated a wide variety of studies characterising the growth, differentiation, and gene expression of murine and human B cells. Similar investigations of B cell biology for other species have been severely restricted by an inability to culture or clone B cells. This is the first report of a method to clone non-transformed sheep B cells using a culture system based on murine CD154 and a combination of human gamma chain-common cytokines. Sheep Peyer's patch B cells were cultured for 120 days and then cloned by limiting dilution culture. The parental B cell culture contained both surface immunoglobulin (sIg)M(+) and sIgG1(+) B cells and both types of B cell were cloned. Clonality was confirmed by PCR analysis of Ig heavy chain (HC) and light chain (LC) expression and DNA sequencing of HC V genes. There was agreement between the PCR and flow cytometric analyses of HC isotype expression on the B cell clones but the available monoclonal antibodies specific for sheep lambda and kappa LC did not react with all clones. Soluble Ig was detected in the culture supernatant of sIgG1(+) clones but not sIgM(+) clones. The B cell clones remained dependent upon CD154 and gamma chain-common cytokine co-stimulation for sustained growth and maintained stable Ig expression. The cloning of non-transformed sheep B cells should provide a valuable tool for studying sheep B cell biology, establishing Ig HC- and LC-specific monoclonal antibodies, analysing the B cell Ig repertoire, and may be used to produce sheep monoclonal antibodies.

  11. Macrophage adaptation in airway inflammatory resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manminder Kaur

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial and viral infections (exacerbations are particularly problematic in those with underlying respiratory disease, including post-viral infection, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary fibrosis. Patients experiencing exacerbations tend to be at the more severe end of the disease spectrum and are often difficult to treat. Most of the unmet medical need remains in this patient group. Airway macrophages are one of the first cell populations to encounter airborne pathogens and, in health, exist in a state of reduced responsiveness due to interactions with the respiratory epithelium and specific factors found in the airway lumen. Granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-10, transforming growth factor-β, surfactant proteins and signalling via the CD200 receptor, for example, all raise the threshold above which airway macrophages can be activated. We highlight that following severe respiratory inflammation, the airspace microenvironment does not automatically re-set to baseline and may leave airway macrophages more restrained than they were at the outset. This excessive restraint is mediated in part by the clearance of apoptotic cells and components of extracellular matrix. This implies that one strategy to combat respiratory exacerbations would be to retune airway macrophage responsiveness to allow earlier bacterial recognition.

  12. Cloning of thienamycin biosynthetase genes from Streptomyces cattleya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, R; Wang, Y; Zeng, Y

    1993-01-01

    A mutant Y3 blocked in the thienamycin biosynthetic pathway was obtained from thienamycin producing strain Streptomyces cattleya by NTG treatment. Preliminary cloning system has been established on the basis of studies on the conditions for protoplast formation, regeneration, as well as DNA transformation for Y3 mutant strain. The shotgun cloning was carried out from S. cattleya using pIJ680 as a vector and the Y3 mutant as a host. The transformant No. 12 produced a thienamycin-like substance identified by paper chromatography and HPLC analysis. A recombinant plasmid p6BC12, which has molecular size of 9.8kb and an insert of 4.5kb, could be recovered. Southern hybridization confirmed that the transformant No. 12 harbors the recombinant plasmid p6BC12. The intermediate accumulated by Y3 mutant was identified as a polypeptide. The product of transformant containing p6BC12 could turn this polypeptide to a bioactivity substance in vitro. This gene can hybridizate with S. lipmanii IPNS gene. We presume that a cyclase gene from S. cattleya was cloned according to the function of the expression product.

  13. Functional analysis of bovine Nramp1 and production of transgenic cloned embryos in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiang; Yu, Xiaoli; Liu, Yajun; Deng, Jie; Ma, Xiaoling; Wang, Huayan

    2015-02-01

    Natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (Nramp1) plays an important role in restraining the growth of intracellular pathogens within macrophages. In this study, Nramp1 cDNA was cloned from Qinchuan cattle and its anti-bacterial activity was demonstrated as being able to significantly inhibit the growth of Salmonella abortusovis and Brucella abortus in macrophages. Calf fibroblasts stably transfected with pSP-NRAMP1-HA vector were used to reconstruct bovine embryos by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Reconstructed embryos were maturated in vitro and the blastocyst formation rate (14.0%) was similar to that of control embryos (14.5%). Transgenic blastocysts were transplanted into 43 recipient cattle, of which 14 recipients became pregnant as evidenced by non-return estrus and by rectal palpation. One fetus was aborted after 6½ months of pregnancy and transgene integration was confirmed by semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Together, this study showed that bovine Nramp1 retains biological function against the growth of intracellular bacteria and can be used to reconstruct embryos and produce Nramp1 transgenic cattle, which may benefit the animal and enhance their ability to prevent attack by intracellular pathogens.

  14. DESIGN OF OPTIMAL CARRY SKIP ADDER AND CARRY SKIP BCD ADDER USING REVERSIBLE LOGIC GATES

    OpenAIRE

    Praveena Murugesan; Thanushkodi Keppanagounder

    2014-01-01

    Reversible logic circuits have the ability to produce zero power dissipation which has found its importance in quantum computing, optical computing and low power digital circuits. The study presents improved and efficient reversible logic circuits for carry skip adder and carry skip BCD adder. The performance of the proposed architecture is better than the existing works in terms of gate count, garbage outputs and constant inputs. This design forms the basis for different quantum ALU and embe...

  15. Probabilistic cloning with supplementary information

    CERN Document Server

    Azuma, K; Koashi, M; Imoto, N; Azuma, Koji; Shimamura, Junichi; Koashi, Masato; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2005-01-01

    We consider probabilistic cloning of a state chosen from a mutually nonorthogonal set of pure states, with the help of a party holding supplementary information in the form of pure states. When the number of states is two, we show that the best efficiency of producing m copies is always achieved by a two-step protocol in which the helping party first attempts to produce m-1 copies from the supplementary state, and if it fails, then the original state is used to produce m copies. On the other hand, when the number of states exceeds two, the best efficiency is not always achieved by such a protocol. We give examples in which the best efficiency is not achieved even if we allow any amount of one-way classical communication from the helping party.

  16. The ethics of human reproductive cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Carson

    2005-03-01

    This article addresses the question of whether human reproductive cloning could be ethically justifiable in at least some cases involving infertile couples who would choose cloning as a way to have a genetically related child. At present, the risk of congenital anomalies constitutes a compelling argument against human reproductive cloning. The article explores whether reproductive cloning could be ethically justifiable if, at some future time, cloning becomes possible without an elevated risk of anomalies. It is argued that freedom to use cloning is a form of procreative freedom and, as such, deserves respect. All of the objections that have been raised against human reproductive cloning fall under three main categories: those that appeal to the interests of the child, those based on consequences for society, and those arising from teleological views. Objections that appeal to the child's interests are, in turn, of two main kinds: consequentialist and deontological. All of these types of objections are examined, and it is found that each involves serious problems that prevent it from being a reasonable objection in the context of the infertility cases considered. It is concluded that human reproductive cloning would be ethically justifiable in at least some cases involving infertile couples, provided that it could be performed without an elevated risk of anomalies.

  17. Progress in interspecies cloning of mammals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Duancheng; BI Chunming; CHEN Dayuan

    2004-01-01

    Interspecies mammalian cloning can be achieved by application of two key techniques, i.e.the technique of interspecies nuclear transfer and the technique of interspecies pregnancy.The general principles, problems and possible solutions, as well as the recent advances of interspecies mammalian cloning have been summarized in this review.

  18. Towards Clone Detection in UML Domain Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Störrle, Harald

    2010-01-01

    Code clones - that is, duplicate fragments of code - have been studied for a long time. There is strong evidence that code clones are a major source of software faults. Anecdotal evidence suggests that this phenomenon is not restricted to code, but occurs in models in a very similar way. So it is...

  19. Challenges in regulating farm animal cloning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunning, Jennifer; Hartlev, Mette; Gamborg, Christian

    Report from the project Cloning in Public: A specific support action within the 6th framework programme, priority 5: Food quality and safety......Report from the project Cloning in Public: A specific support action within the 6th framework programme, priority 5: Food quality and safety...

  20. Computerized adaptive testing with item cloning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glas, Cornelis A.W.; van der Linden, Willem J.

    2003-01-01

    To increase the number of items available for adaptive testing and reduce the cost of item writing, the use of techniques of item cloning has been proposed. An important consequence of item cloning is possible variability between the item parameters. To deal with this variability, a multilevel item

  1. Cloning of endangered mammalian species: any progress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loi, Pasqualino; Galli, Cesare; Ptak, Grazyna

    2007-05-01

    Attempts through somatic cell nuclear transfer to expand wild populations that have shrunk to critical numbers is a logical extension of the successful cloning of mammals. However, although the first mammal was cloned 10 years ago, nuclear reprogramming remains phenomenological, with abnormal gene expression and epigenetic deregulation being associated with the cloning process. In addition, although cloning of wild animals using host oocytes from different species has been successful, little is known about the implication of partial or total mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in cloned embryos, fetuses and offspring. Finally, there is a need for suitable foster mothers for inter-intra specific cloned embryos. Considering these issues, the limited success achieved in cloning endangered animals is not surprising. However, optimism comes from the rapid gain in the understanding of the molecular clues underlying nuclear reprogramming. If it is possible to achieve a controlled reversal of the differentiated state of a cell then it is probable that other issues that impair the cloning of endangered animals, such as the inter-intra species oocyte or womb donor, will be overcome in the medium term.

  2. Skin wound healing modulation by macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodero, Mathieu P; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash

    2010-07-25

    Skin wound healing is a multi stage phenomenon that requires the activation, recruitment or activity of numerous cell types as keratinocytes, endothelial cells, fibroblast and inflammatory cells. Among the latter, macrophages appear to be central to this process. They colonize the wound at its very early stage and in addition to their protective immune role seem to organize the activity of other cell types at the following stages of the healing. Their benefit to this process is however controversial, as macrophages are described to promote the speed of healing but may also favour the fibrosis resulting from it in scars. Moreover wound healing defects are associated with abnormalities in the inflammatory phase. In this review, we summarise our knowledge on what are the Wound Associated Macrophages, and how they interact with the other cell types to control the reepithelisation, angiogenesis and the extracellular matrix remodelling. We believe this knowledge may open new avenues for therapeutic intervention on skin wounds.

  3. Experimental Trichinellosis in rats: Peritoneal macrophage activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruden-Movsesijan Alisa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of Trichinella spiralis infection on macrophage activity in rats during the first 28 days of infection was examined by measuring the production of NO and IL-6, as well as the expression of mannose receptor on the surface of peritoneal macrophages. During the course of a dynamic shift in the 3 life-cycle stages of the parasite, intermittent variations in NO production were observed but ended with increased values that coincided with the highest values for IL-6 release in the final, muscle phase of infection. No change in mannose receptor expression was observed during the course of infection. These results confirm that the Trichinella spiralis infection provokes changes in macrophage activity that could influence not only the course of the parasitic disease but also the overall immune status of the host.

  4. Emergence of Acinetobacter baumannii ST730 carrying the bla OXA-72 gene in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Mariana; Rozales, Franciéli P; Bertolini, Diego; Rocha, Lisiane; Sampaio, Jorge LM; Barth, Afonso L; Martins, Andreza F

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, Acinetobacter baumannii resistant to carbapenems has emerged in many medical centres and has been commonly associated with high morbimortality. In Brazil, this resistance is mainly attributed to the spread of OXA-23-producing clones and, to a lesser extent, to OXA-143-producing clones. Here, we describe, for the first time, two OXA-72-producing A. baumannii isolates in southern Brazil to a broad spectrum of antibiotics, except polymyxin B and tigecycline. Molecular typing by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) demonstrated that both OXA-72-producing isolates belong to a new sequence type (ST), ST730, which was recently identified in OXA-23-producing A. baumannii isolates in São Paulo, Brazil. We demonstrate that the two A. baumannii ST730 isolates carrying blaOXA-72share a common ancestral origin with the blaOXA-23producers in Brazil. This observation reinforces the importance of strain-typing methods in order to clarify the dynamics of the emergence of new clones in a geographic region. PMID:27653364

  5. Cloned Sheep May Age Prematurely

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joseph; B.Verrengia; 孙颖

    1999-01-01

    1996年的头条科技新闻之一是:多利羊被克隆成功。世人曾为消息雀跃,以为克隆技术马上可以造福人类了,而且科幻作家也开始忙碌起来。而今,当多利羊过3岁生日时,人们却伤感地发现: In Dolly’s case,she is 3,but her genetic material is aging at the rate of the6-year-old sheep from which she was cloned. 这就是所谓aging prematurely。这则消息给人们带来的忧虑有两条。一是:被克隆的动物的预期寿命比人们想象的要短;二是:人们是否能够有效利用克隆的人体细胞去治疗疾病。目前,科学家们的担心还是集中于后者。本书收入的另一篇有关克隆的文章(It’s A Boy!Scientists Clone First Male Mammal)和本篇构成了强烈的对照,可谓一喜一忧。然而,无论喜忧,人类在克隆技术方面正在以坚实的步伐向前迈进。

  6. CLONING, SEQUENCING, AND EXPRESSION OF BACILLUS-SUBTILIS GENES INVOLVED IN ATP-DEPENDENT NUCLEASE SYNTHESIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOOISTRA, J; VENEMA, G

    1991-01-01

    The genes encoding the subunits of the Bacillus subtilis ATP-dependent nuclease (add genes) have been cloned. The genes were located on an 8.8-kb SalI-SmaI chromosomal DNA fragment. Transformants of a recBCD deletion mutant of Escherichia coli with plasmid pGV1 carrying this DNA fragment showed ATP-

  7. Ontogeny and Polarization of Macrophages in Inflammation: Blood monocytes versus tissue macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adwitia eDey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The explosion of new information in recent years on the origin of macrophages in the steady-state and in the context of inflammation has opened up numerous new avenues of investigation and possibilities for therapeutic intervention. In contrast to the classical model of macrophage development, it is clear that tissue-resident macrophages can develop from yolk sac-derived erythromyeloid progenitors, fetal liver progenitors and bone marrow-derived monocytes. Under both homeostatic conditions and in response to pathophysiological insult, the contribution of these distinct sources of macrophages varies significantly between tissues. Furthermore, while all of these populations of macrophages appear to be capable of adopting the polarized M1/M2 phenotypes, their respective contribution to inflammation, resolution of inflammation and tissue repair remains poorly understood and is likely to be tissue- and disease-dependent. A better understanding of the ontology and polarization capacity of macrophages in homeostasis and disease will be essential for the development of novel therapies that target the inherent plasticity of macrophages in the treatment of acute and chronic inflammatory disease.

  8. Macrophage mannose receptor-specific gene delivery vehicle for macrophage engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Gui-Xin; Chen, Yu-Zhe; Yao, Xing-Lei; Du, Anariwa; Tang, Gu-Ping; Shen, You-Qing; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2014-05-01

    Macrophages are the most plastic cells in the hematopoietic system and they exhibit great functional diversity. They have been extensively applied in anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic and anti-cancer therapies. However, the application of macrophages is limited by the efficiency of their engineering. The macrophage mannose receptor (MMR, CD206), a C-type lectin receptor, is ubiquitously expressed on macrophages and has a high affinity for mannose oligosaccharides. In the present study, we developed a novel non-viral vehicle with specific affinity for MMR. Mannan was cationized with spermine at a grafted ratio of ∼12% to deliver DNA and was characterized as a stable system for delivery. This spermine-mannan (SM)-based delivery system was evaluated as a biocompatible vehicle with superior transfection efficiency on murine macrophages, up to 28.5-fold higher than spermine-pullulan, 11.5-fold higher than polyethylenimine and 3.0-fold higher than Lipofectamine™ 2000. We confirmed that the SM-based delivery system for macrophages transfection was MMR-specific and we described the intracellular transport of the delivery system. To our knowledge, this is the first study using SM to demonstrate a mannose receptor-specific gene delivery system, thereby highlighting the potential of a novel specific non-viral delivery vehicle for macrophage engineering.

  9. Finding Code Clones for Refactoring with Clone Metrics : A Case Study of Open Source Software

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Eunjong; Yoshida, Norihiro; IshioTakashi; Inoue, Katsuro; Sano, Tateki

    2011-01-01

    A code clone is a code fragment that has identical or similar code fragments to it in the source code. Code clone has been regarded as one of the factors that makes software maintenance more difficult. Therefore, to refactor code clones into one method is promising way to reduce maintenance cost in the future. In our previous study, we proposed a method to extract code clones for refactoring using clone metrics. We had conducted an empirical study on Java application developed by NEC Corporat...

  10. "Goodbye Dolly?" The ethics of human cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J

    1997-01-01

    The ethical implications of human clones have been much alluded to, but have seldom been examined with any rigour. This paper examines the possible uses and abuses of human cloning and draws out the principal ethical dimensions, both of what might be done and its meaning. The paper examines some of the major public and official responses to cloning by authorities such as President Clinton, the World Health Organisation, the European parliament, UNESCO, and others and reveals their inadequacies as foundations for a coherent public policy on human cloning. The paper ends by defending a conception of reproductive rights of "procreative autonomy" which shows human cloning to be not inconsistent with human rights and dignity. PMID:9451604

  11. [Human cloning in Muslim and Arab law].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldeeb Abu-Sahlieh, Sami A

    2009-01-01

    Cloning is a modern medical procedure that Muslim religious authorities treat en resorting to the general principles established by classical Muslim law based on the Koran and the Sunnah of Muhhamad as the messenger of God. In this regard, human beings are not capable of deciding what is or what is not lawful without resorting to divine norms. Cloning clashes with several principles. Firstly, the principle of the respect for life in relation to surpernumeraries, but Muslim authors are not in unanimous agreement on the determination of the moment at which life begins. Secondly, is the respect of progeny: cloning could only take place between a married couple. But even if these two principles are respected, cloning poses two major problems: the diversity of species expounded by the Koran and the Sunnah and a lack of interest. Which explains the quasi-unanimous opposition of Muslim writings regarding cloning.

  12. CCL2 Mediates Neuron-Macrophage Interactions to Drive Proregenerative Macrophage Activation Following Preconditioning Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Min Jung; Shin, Hae Young; Cui, Yuexian; Kim, Hyosil; Thi, Anh Hong Le; Choi, Jun Young; Kim, Eun Young; Hwang, Dong Hoon; Kim, Byung Gon

    2015-12-01

    CNS neurons in adult mammals do not spontaneously regenerate axons after spinal cord injury. Preconditioning peripheral nerve injury allows the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory axons to regenerate beyond the injury site by promoting expression of regeneration-associated genes. We have previously shown that peripheral nerve injury increases the number of macrophages in the DRGs and that the activated macrophages are critical to the enhancement of intrinsic regeneration capacity. The present study identifies a novel chemokine signal mediated by CCL2 that links regenerating neurons with proregenerative macrophage activation. Neutralization of CCL2 abolished the neurite outgrowth activity of conditioned medium obtained from neuron-macrophage cocultures treated with cAMP. The neuron-macrophage interactions that produced outgrowth-promoting conditioned medium required CCL2 in neurons and CCR2/CCR4 in macrophages. The conditioning effects were abolished in CCL2-deficient mice at 3 and 7 d after sciatic nerve injury, but CCL2 was dispensable for the initial growth response and upregulation of GAP-43 at the 1 d time point. Intraganglionic injection of CCL2 mimicked conditioning injury by mobilizing M2-like macrophages. Finally, overexpression of CCL2 in DRGs promoted sensory axon regeneration in a rat spinal cord injury model without harmful side effects. Our data suggest that CCL2-mediated neuron-macrophage interaction plays a critical role for amplification and maintenance of enhanced regenerative capacity by preconditioning peripheral nerve injury. Manipulation of chemokine signaling mediating neuron-macrophage interactions may represent a novel therapeutic approach to promote axon regeneration after CNS injury.

  13. Retinal oscillations carry visual information to cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kilian Koepsell

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Thalamic relay cells fire action potentials that transmit information from retina to cortex. The amount of information that spike trains encode is usually estimated from the precision of spike timing with respect to the stimulus. Sensory input, however, is only one factor that influences neural activity. For example, intrinsic dynamics, such as oscillations of networks of neurons, also modulate firing pattern. Here, we asked if retinal oscillations might help to convey information to neurons downstream. Specifically, we made whole-cell recordings from relay cells to reveal retinal inputs (EPSPs and thalamic outputs (spikes and then analyzed these events with information theory. Our results show that thalamic spike trains operate as two multiplexed channels. One channel, which occupies a low frequency band (<30 Hz, is encoded by average firing rate with respect to the stimulus and carries information about local changes in the visual field over time. The other operates in the gamma frequency band (40-80 Hz and is encoded by spike timing relative to retinal oscillations. At times, the second channel conveyed even more information than the first. Because retinal oscillations involve extensive networks of ganglion cells, it is likely that the second channel transmits information about global features of the visual scene.

  14. Testability Synthesis for Jumping Carry Adders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-In Henry Chen

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis for testability ensures that the synthesized circuit is testable by exploring the fundamental relationship between don't care and redundancy. With the exploration of the relationship, redundancy removal can be applied to improve the testability, reduce the area and improve the speed of a synthesized circuit. The test generation problems have been adequately solved, therefore an innovative testability synthesis strategy is necessary for achieving the maximum fault coverage and area reduction for maximum speed. This paper presents a testability synthesis methodology applicable to a top–down design method based on the identification and removal of redundant faults. Emphasis has been placed on the testability synthesis of a high-speed binary jumping carry adder. A synthesized 32-bit testable adder implemented by a 1.2 μm CMOS technology performs addition in 4.09 ns. Comparing with the original synthesized circuit, redundancy removal yields a 100% testable design with a 15% improvement in speed and a 25% reduction in area.

  15. Robust ferromagnetism carried by antiferromagnetic domain walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Hishiro T.; Yamaura, Jun-Ichi; Hiroi, Zenji

    2017-02-01

    Ferroic materials, such as ferromagnetic or ferroelectric materials, have been utilized as recording media for memory devices. A recent trend for downsizing, however, requires an alternative, because ferroic orders tend to become unstable for miniaturization. The domain wall nanoelectronics is a new developing direction for next-generation devices, in which atomic domain walls, rather than conventional, large domains themselves, are the active elements. Here we show that atomically thin magnetic domain walls generated in the antiferromagnetic insulator Cd2Os2O7 carry unusual ferromagnetic moments perpendicular to the wall as well as electron conductivity: the ferromagnetic moments are easily polarized even by a tiny field of 1 mT at high temperature, while, once cooled down, they are surprisingly robust even in an inverse magnetic field of 7 T. Thus, the magnetic domain walls could serve as a new-type of microscopic, switchable and electrically readable magnetic medium which is potentially important for future applications in the domain wall nanoelectronics.

  16. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor and autism spectrum disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigorenko, Elena L.; Han, Summer S.; Yrigollen, Carolyn M.; Leng, Lin; Mizue, Yuka; Anderson, George M.; Mulder, Erik J.; de Bildt, Annelies; Minderaa, Ruud B.; Volkmar, Fred R.; Chang, Joseph T.; Bucala, Richard

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Autistic spectrum disorders are childhood neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by social and communicative impairment and repetitive and stereotypical behavior. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an upstream regulator of innate immunity that promotes monocyte/macrophage

  17. AQUA Cloning: A Versatile and Simple Enzyme-Free Cloning Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes M Beyer

    Full Text Available Assembly cloning is increasingly replacing conventional restriction enzyme and DNA-ligase-dependent cloning methods for reasons of efficiency and performance. Here, we describe AQUA (advanced quick assembly, a simple and versatile seamless assembly cloning approach. We demonstrate the applicability and versatility of AQUA Cloning in selected proof-of-principle applications including targeted insertion-, deletion- and site-directed point-mutagenesis, and combinatorial cloning. Furthermore, we show the one pot de novo assembly of multiple DNA fragments into a single circular plasmid encoding a complex light- and chemically-regulated Boolean A NIMPLY B logic operation. AQUA Cloning harnesses intrinsic in vivo processing of linear DNA fragments with short regions of homology of 16 to 32 bp mediated by Escherichia coli. It does not require any kits, enzymes or preparations of reagents and is the simplest assembly cloning protocol to date.

  18. Identification of an Autophagy Defect in Smokers’ Alveolar Macrophages1

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages are essential for clearing bacteria from the alveolar surface and preventing microbial-induced infections. It is well documented that smokers have an increased incidence of infections, in particular lung infections. Alveolar macrophages accumulate in smokers’ lungs but they have a functional immune deficit. In this study, we identify for the first time an autophagy defect in smokers’ alveolar macrophages. Smokers’ alveolar macrophages accumulate both autophagosomes and p6...

  19. Macrophage phenotype modulation by CXCL4 in vascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Albert Gleissner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During atherogenesis, blood monocytes transmigrate into the subendothelial space and differentiate towards macrophages and foam cells. The major driver of this differentiation process is macrophage colony-stimulation factor (M-CSF. M-CSF-induced macrophages are important promoters of atherogenesis as demonstrated in M-CSF and M-CSF receptor knock out mice. However, M-CSF is not the only relevant promoter of macrophage differentiation. The platelet chemokine CXCL4 prevents monocyte apoptosis and promotes macrophage differentiation in vitro. It is secreted from activated platelets and has effects on various cell types relevant in atherogenesis. Knocking out the Pf4 gene coding for CXCL4 in Apoe-/- mice leads to reduced atherogenesis. Thus, it seems likely that CXC4-induced macrophages may have specific pro-atherogenic capacities. We have studied CXC4-induced differentiation of human macrophages using gene chips, systems biology and functional in vitro and ex vivo experiments. Our data indicate that CXCL4-induced macrophages are distinct from both their M-CSF-induced counterparts and other known macrophage polarizations like M1 macrophages (induced by LPS and interferon-gamma or M2 macrophages (induced by interleukin-4. CXCL4-induced macrophages have distinct phenotypic and functional characteristics, e.g. the complete loss of the hemoglobin-haptoglobin (Hb-Hp scavenger receptor CD163 which is necessary for effective hemoglobin clearance after plaque hemorrhage. Lack of CD163 is accompanied by the inability to upregulate the atheroprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 in response to Hb-Hp complexes.This review covers the current knowledge about CXCL4-induced macrophages, which based on their unique properties we have suggested to call these macrophages M4. CXCL4 may represent an important driver of macrophage heterogeneity within atherosclerotic lesions. Further dissecting its effects on macrophage differentiation may help to identify novel

  20. Heteroduplex DNA mismatch repair system of Streptococcus pneumoniae: cloning and expression of the hexA gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Balganesh, T S; Lacks, S A

    1985-01-01

    Mutations affecting heteroduplex DNA mismatch repair in Streptococcus pneumoniae were localized in two genes, hexA and hexB, by fractionation of restriction fragments carrying mutant alleles. A fragment containing the hexA4 allele was cloned in the S. pneumoniae cloning system, and the hexA+ allele was introduced into the recombinant plasmid by chromosomal facilitation of plasmid transfer. Subcloning localized the functional hexA gene to a 3.5-kilobase segment of the cloned pneumococcal DNA. ...

  1. Cloning, sequencing and expression of cDNA encoding growth hormone from Indian catfish (Heteropneustes fossilis)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vikas Anathy; Thayanithy Venugopal; Ramanathan Koteeswaran; Thavamani J Pandian; Sinnakaruppan Mathavan

    2001-09-01

    A tissue-specific cDNA library was constructed using polyA+ RNA from pituitary glands of the Indian catfish Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch) and a cDNA clone encoding growth hormone (GH) was isolated. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers representing the conserved regions of fish GH sequences the 3′ region of catfish GH cDNA (540 bp) was cloned by random amplification of cDNA ends and the clone was used as a probe to isolate recombinant phages carrying the full-length cDNA sequence. The full-length cDNA clone is 1132 bp in length, coding for an open reading frame (ORF) of 603 bp; the reading frame encodes a putative polypeptide of 200 amino acids including the signal sequence of 22 amino acids. The 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions of the cDNA are 58 bp and 456 bp long, respectively. The predicted amino acid sequence of H. fossils GH shared 98% homology with other catfishes. Mature GH protein was efficiently expressed in bacterial and zebrafish systems using appropriate expression vectors. The successful expression of the cloned GH cDNA of catfish confirms the functional viability of the clone.

  2. Cloning, sequencing and expression of cDNA encoding growth hormone from Indian catfish (Heteropneustes fossilis)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vikas Anathy; Thayanithy Venugopal; Ramanathan Koteeswaran; Thavamani J Pandian; Sinnakaruppan Mathavan

    2013-03-01

    A tissue-specific cDNA library was constructed using polyA+ RNA from pituitary glands of the Indian catfish Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch) and a cDNA clone encoding growth hormone (GH) was isolated. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers representing the conserved regions of fish GH sequences the 3′ region of catfish GH cDNA (540 bp) was cloned by random amplification of cDNA ends and the clone was used as a probe to isolate recombinant phages carrying the full-length cDNA sequence. The full-length cDNA clone is 1132 bp in length, coding for an open reading frame (ORF) of 603 bp; the reading frame encodes a putative polypeptide of 200 amino acids including the signal sequence of 22 amino acids. The 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions of the cDNA are 58 bp and 456 bp long, respectively. The predicted amino acid sequence of H. fossils GH shared 98% homology with other catfishes. Mature GH protein was efficiently expressed in bacterial and zebrafish systems using appropriate expression vectors. The successful expression of the cloned GH cDNA of catfish confirms the functional viability of the clone.

  3. AMMI Model for Interpreting Clone-Environment Interaction in Starch Yield of Cassava

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHOLIHIN

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to analyze the interaction between clone and environment for starch yield in six month-old plants of cassava clones based on additive main effects and multiplicative interaction (AMMI model. The experiments were conducted on mineral soil in four different locations: Lumajang (inceptisol, Kediri (entisol, Pati (alfisol, and Tulangbawang (ultisol. The experiments were carried out during 2004-2005, using a split plot design withthree replications. The main plots were the simple and the improved technology. The clones used were fifteen clones. Parameter recorded was starch yield (kg/ha of the 6 month old plants. The data were analyzed using the AMMI model. Based on the AMMI analysis, environmental factors being important in determining the stability of the starch yield were soil density for subsoil, pH of topsoil, and the maximum air humidity four months after planting. The clones of CMM97001-87, CMM97002-183, CMM97011-191, CMM97006-44, and Adhira 4 were identified as stable clones in starch yield within 6 month-old plants. CMM97007-235 was adapted to maximum relative humidity 4 months after planting and to lower pH of topsoil, whereas, MLG 10311 was adapted to lower bulk density. The mean starch yield of MLG 10311 was the highest six months after planting.

  4. Rapid restriction enzyme-free cloning of PCR products: a high-throughput method applicable for library construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Vijay K; Shrivastava, Nimisha; Verma, Vaishali; Das, Shilpi; Kaur, Charanpreet; Grover, Payal; Gupta, Amita

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we describe a novel cloning strategy for PCR-amplified DNA which employs the type IIs restriction endonuclease BsaI to create a linearized vector with four base-long 5'-overhangs, and T4 DNA polymerase treatment of the insert in presence of a single dNTP to create vector-compatible four base-long overhangs. Notably, the insert preparation does not require any restriction enzyme treatment. The BsaI sites in the vector are oriented in such a manner that upon digestion with BsaI, a stuffer sequence along with both BsaI recognition sequences is removed. The sequence of the four base-long overhangs produced by BsaI cleavage were designed to be non-palindromic, non-compatible to each other. Therefore, only ligation of an insert carrying compatible ends allows directional cloning of the insert to the vector to generate a recombinant without recreating the BsaI sites. We also developed rapid protocols for insert preparation and cloning, by which the entire process from PCR to transformation can be completed in 6-8 h and DNA fragments ranging in size from 200 to 2200 bp can be cloned with equal efficiencies. One protocol uses a single tube for insert preparation if amplification is performed using polymerases with low 3'-exonuclease activity. The other protocol is compatible with any thermostable polymerase, including those with high 3'-exonuclease activity, and does not significantly increase the time required for cloning. The suitability of this method for high-throughput cloning was demonstrated by cloning batches of 24 PCR products with nearly 100% efficiency. The cloning strategy is also suitable for high efficiency cloning and was used to construct large libraries comprising more than 108 clones/µg vector. Additionally, based on this strategy, a variety of vectors were constructed for the expression of proteins in E. coli, enabling large number of different clones to be rapidly generated.

  5. Modulation of neutrophil influx in glomerulonephritis in the rat with anti-macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) antibody.

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, L.; Xia, Y.; Yoshimura, T.; Wilson, C. B.

    1995-01-01

    The role of the chemokine, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2), during anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibody (Ab) glomerulonephritis (GN) was studied. Rat MIP-2 cDNA had been cloned previously. Recombinant rat MIP-2 (rMIP-2) from Escherichia coli exhibited neutrophil chemotactic activity and produced neutrophil influx when injected into the rat bladder wall. By using a riboprobe derived from the cDNA and an anti-rMIP-2 polyclonal Ab, MIP-2 was found to be induced in glomeruli...

  6. DMPD: Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation and deactivation bylipopolysaccharide: roles of the receptor complex. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14609719 Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation and deactivation bylipopolysaccharide: role...ivation and deactivation bylipopolysaccharide: roles of the receptor complex. Pub...medID 14609719 Title Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation and deactivation bylipopolysaccharide: role

  7. Drug Trafficking into Macrophages via the Endocytotic Receptor CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2015-01-01

    In inflammatory diseases, macrophages are a main producer of a range of cytokines regulating the inflammatory state. This also includes inflammation induced by tumor growth, which recruits so-called tumor-associated macrophages supporting tumor growth. Macrophages are therefore relevant targets f...

  8. Macrophage Polarization Modulates Development of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Macrophages have recently been shown to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Methods: Here, we used an activated lymphocyte-derived DNA (ALD-DNA method to induce SLE in mice. We used a macrophage-specific eliminator clodronate to selectively deplete macrophages in mice. We isolated macrophages from bone marrow of the mice and used cytokines to differentiate M1 and M2 macrophages, respectively. Adoptive transplantation of M1 or M2 macrophages was performed in clodronate-treated mice. The effects on SLE were evaluated by serum anti-dsDNA autoantibody, by renal pathological changes, and by urine protein levels. Results: ALD-DNA induced SLE-like features in mice, manifested by induction of serum anti-dsDNA autoantibody, by renal pathological changes, and by increases in urine protein levels. Clodronate significantly decreased macrophages in mice, which significantly increased SLE severity. Adoptive transplantation of M2, but not M1 macrophages significantly reduced SLE severity in clodronate- and ALD-DNA-treated mice. Conclusion: M1 and M2 macrophages play different roles in development of SLE. M1 macrophages increase the severity of SLE, while M2 macrophages reduce it. Modulation of macrophage polarity may be an attractive therapy for SLE.

  9. Efficient carry skip Adder design using full adder and carry skip block based on reversible Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun Pratap Singh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, Reversible Logic is becoming more and more prominent technology having its applications in Quantum Computing, Nanotechnology, and Optical Computing. Reversibility plays an important role when energy efficient computations are considered. In this paper, binary full Adder with Design I and Design II are proposed. The performance analysis is verified using number of reversible gates, Garbage input/outputs, delay, number of logical calculations and Quantum Cost. According to the suitability of full adder design I and design II carry skip adder block is also constructed with some improvement in terms of delay in block carry generation. It is observed that Reversible carry skip Binary Adder with Design II is efficient compared to Design I

  10. 杉木耐贫瘠优良无性系苗期初选%Preliminary Evaluation on Fine Clones of Chinese fir Based on Sexual Progeny Tests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐明; 何贵平; 曹高铨; 程亚平; 罗修宝; 翁春媚

    2013-01-01

    In order to shorten the breeding cycle of Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) clone,and select good clones with stronger tolerance to barrenness,in the light of 31 clones,artificial design nutrient environments,the experiment was carried out according to two factors randomized blocks,8 individuals (in 8 cups) in each plot.After the experiment finished,the height and diameter at base of seedling were measured on entire experiment.The other traits such as the aboveground biomass,the underground biomass,the total biomass,the root-shoot ratio and the entire P content of individual have been measured according to sampling method.The results of statistical analysis showed that:(1)There were obvious differences among the clones in all the traits besides root-shoot ratio; (2)Obvious differences in all the traits existed under different nutrient stress and different sites conditions among different clones ; (3) The interaction of clone × nutrient coercion processing was complex ; (4) The research traits showed a certain variation and repeatability over intermediate level.Based on the variance analysis (fixed model),the PCA selection index under different situations was derived and obtained.Using certain selected intensity,13outstanding clones were evaluated from the entire experiment.Among them 7 clones were anti-phosphorus and the anti-potassium lack (happy nitrogenous fertilizer) clones,7 clones were anti-phosphorus lack (happy nitrogen potassium fertilizer) clones,8 fine clones were selected under normal nutrient management (happy nitrogenous,phosphorus,potassium),there were 5 fine clones with good performance,and simultaneously very stable under all kind of conditions.These clones may be applied to field tests.

  11. Streptokinase: cloning, expression, and excretion by Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malke, H; Ferretti, J J

    1984-06-01

    Genomic DNA from Streptococcus equisimilis strain H46A was cloned in Escherichia coli by using the bacteriophage lambda replacement vector L47 and an in vitro packaging system. A casein/plasminogen overlay technique was used to screen the phage bank for recombinants carrying the streptokinase gene ( skc ). The gene was present with a frequency of 1 in 836 recombinants, and 10 independent clones containing skc were isolated and physically characterized. One recombinant clone was used to subclone skc in E. coli plasmid vectors. Plasmid pMF2 [10.4 kilobases (kb)] consisting of pACYC184 with a 6.4-kb H46A DNA fragment in the EcoRI site and pMF5 (6.9 kb) carrying a 2.5-kb fragment in the Pst I site of pBR322 were among the recombinant plasmids determining streptokinase production in three different E. coli host strains. Expression of skc was independent of its orientation in either vector, indicating that its own promoter was present and functional in E. coli. However, expression in pBR322 was more efficient in one orientation than in the other, suggesting that one or both of the bla gene promoters contributed to skc expression. Several lines of evidence, including proof obtained by the immunodiffusion technique, established the identity of E. coli streptokinase. Testing cell-free culture supernatant fluids, osmotic shock fluids, and sonicates of osmotically shocked cells for streptokinase activity revealed the substance to be present in all three principal locations, indicating that E. coli cells were capable of releasing substantial amounts of streptokinase into the culture medium.

  12. Specific transfection of inflamed brain by macrophages: a new therapeutic strategy for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Haney

    Full Text Available The ability to precisely upregulate genes in inflamed brain holds great therapeutic promise. Here we report a novel class of vectors, genetically modified macrophages that carry reporter and therapeutic genes to neural cells. Systemic administration of macrophages transfected ex vivo with a plasmid DNA (pDNA encoding a potent antioxidant enzyme, catalase, produced month-long expression levels of catalase in the brain resulting in three-fold reductions in inflammation and complete neuroprotection in mouse models of Parkinson's disease (PD. This resulted in significant improvements in motor functions in PD mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that transfected macrophages secreted extracellular vesicles, exosomes, packed with catalase genetic material, pDNA and mRNA, active catalase, and NF-κb, a transcription factor involved in the encoded gene expression. Exosomes efficiently transfer their contents to contiguous neurons resulting in de novo protein synthesis in target cells. Thus, genetically modified macrophages serve as a highly efficient system for reproduction, packaging, and targeted gene and drug delivery to treat inflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders.

  13. Cholesterol glucosylation by Helicobacter pylori delays internalization and arrests phagosome maturation in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Shin-Yi; Wang, Hung-Jung; Cheng, Hsin-Hung; Chen, Sheng-De; Wang, Lily Hui-Ching; Wang, Wen-Ching

    2016-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the human stomach and contributes to chronic inflammation of the gastric mucosa. H. pylori persistence occurs because of insufficient eradication by phagocytic cells. A key factor of H. pylori, cholesterol-α-glucosyltransferase encoded by capJ that extracts host cholesterol and converts it to cholesteryl glucosides, is important to evade host immunity. Here, we examined whether phagocytic trafficking in macrophages was perturbed by capJ-carrying H. pylori. J774A.1 cells were infected with H. pylori at a multiplicity of infection of 50. Live-cell imaging and confocal microscopic analysis were applied to monitor the phagocytic trafficking events. The viability of H. pylori inside macrophages was determined by using gentamicin colony-forming unit assay. The phagocytic routes were characterized by using trafficking-intervention compounds. Wild type (WT) H. pylori exhibited more delayed entry into macrophages and also arrested phagosome maturation more than did capJ knockout mutant. Pretreatment of genistein and LY294002 prior to H. pylori infection reduced the internalization of WT but not capJ-knockout H. pylori in macrophages. Cholesterol glucosylation by H. pylori interferes with phagosome trafficking via a lipid-raft and PI3K-dependent manner, which retards engulfment of bacteria for prolonged intracellular survival of H. pylori. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Anti-tumor and macrophage activation induced by alkali-extracted polysaccharide from Pleurotus ostreatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fanli; Li, Feng-E; He, Zhongmei; Jiang, Yong; Hao, Ruoyi; Sun, Xin; Tong, Haibin

    2014-08-01

    Pleurotus ostreatus is popularly consumed as traditional medicine and health food for enhancing immune function in China. Polysaccharides from mushroom have been demonstrated to possess a wide range of health beneficial properties. This study was carried out to elucidate the immunomodulating effects and molecular mechanism involved in the in vivo and in vitro anti-tumor activities of alkali-extracted polysaccharide (WPOP-N1) from the fruiting bodies of P. ostreatus. The results showed that WPOP-N1 significantly inhibited the tumor growth of Sarcoma 180 tumor-bearing mice, and markedly increased the secretion level of TNF-α in serum. In addition, WPOP-N1 enhanced the phagocytic capability of peritoneal macrophages in vitro. Furthermore, the secretion of TNF-α and NO and the amount of TNF-α and iNOS transcript were increased significantly when the peritoneal macrophages were exposed to WPOP-N1. Meanwhile, Western blot analysis revealed that the stimulation of peritoneal macrophages by WPOP-N1 induced the phosphorylation of p65 and a marked decrease of IκB expression. These results suggest that WPOP-N1 could activate macrophages through NF-κB signaling pathway, and the anti-tumor effects of WPOP-N1 can be achieved by its immunostimulating property. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Recloned dogs derived from adipose stem cells of a transgenic cloned beagle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Kim, Min Jung; Hong, So Gun; Ra, Jeong Chan; Jo, Jung Youn; Kang, Sung Keun; Jang, Goo; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2011-04-15

    A number of studies have postulated that efficiency in mammalian cloning is inversely correlated with donor cell differentiation status and may be increased by using undifferentiated cells as nuclear donors. Here, we attempted the recloning of dogs by nuclear transfer of canine adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (cAd-MSCs) from a transgenic cloned beagle to determine if cAd-MSCs can be a suitable donor cell type. In order to isolate cAd-MSCs, adipose tissues were collected from a transgenic cloned beagle produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) of canine fetal fibroblasts modified genetically with a red fluorescent protein (RFP) gene. The cAd-MSCs expressed the RFP gene and cell-surface marker characteristics of MSCs including CD29, CD44 and thy1.1. Furthermore, cAd-MSCs underwent osteogenic, adipogenic, myogenic, neurogenic and chondrogenic differentiation when exposed to specific differentiation-inducing conditions. In order to investigate the developmental potential of cAd-MSCs, we carried out SCNT. Fused-couplets (82/109, 75.2%) were chemically activated and transferred into the uterine tube of five naturally estrus-synchronized surrogates. One of them (20%) maintained pregnancy and subsequently gave birth to two healthy cloned pups. The present study demonstrated for the first time the successful production of cloned beagles by nuclear transfer of cAd-MSCs. Another important outcome of the present study is the successful recloning of RFP-expressing transgenic cloned beagle pups by nuclear transfer of cells derived from a transgenic cloned beagle. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that adipose stem cells can be a good nuclear donor source for dog cloning.

  16. Bioactivities of Culture Supernatants from Retroviral Packaging Cells Carrying the Mouse Fas Ligand Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lingbo; ZOU Ping; GUO Rong; XIAO Juan; XU Zhiliang

    2001-01-01

    The bioactivities of culture supernatants from retroviral packaging cells carrying the mouse Fas ligand (mFasL) gene was investigated. FasLcDNA was cloned into PLXIN with an internal ribosome entry site to link two cistrons through gene recombination technology, PLXIN and the recombinant vector PLFIN were separately transfected into PA317 retrovirus packing cell line by lipofectamine 2000, and the resistant clones were selected with G418 selective medium. The integration of genome DNA was assayed by genomic DNA PCR. NIH3T3 cells were transduced by the culture supernatants from PA317 carrying the mFasLcDNA gene, and were selected with G418 selective medium, so as to select the PLFIN-PA317 clone capable of producing higher titer of supernatants. The levels of mFasL protein on NIH3T3 cells membrane were assayed by flow cytometry (FCM). The biological activity of mFasL on NIH3T3 cells membrane was investigated by the inducing apoptosis of Fas+ Yac-1 cells co-cultured with NIH3T3 cells expressing Fas ligand. To explore the direct mFasL cytotoxicity of culture supernatants from retroviral packaging cells carrying the mFasL gene, the culture supernatants from PLFIN-PA317 and PLXIN-PA317 were separately co-cultured with Yac-1cells in parallel. The recombinant PLFIN was successfully constructed. The highest titer of supernatants from twelve resistant clones was 8. 5 × 105 colony-forming-unit (CFU)/ml. The NIH3T3cells transfected by above supernatants had a higher level of mFasL (53.81±6.9 %), and significantly induced the apoptosis of Fas+ Yac-1 cells (56. 78±4.5 %), as both were cocultured for 5 h at1 : 1 ratio, whereas it is 7. 08±3.4 % in control group (P<0. 01). Supernatant from PLFINPA317 could also directly induce the apoptosis of Yac-1 within 5 h of incubation. Thus, the culture supernatants from PLFIN-PA317 possessed both infectivity and cytotoxicity of mFasL.

  17. Aberrant DNA methylation in cloned ovine embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lei; HOU Jian; LEI TingHua; BAI JiaHua; GUAN Hong; AN XiaoRong

    2008-01-01

    By using the approach of immunofluorescence staining with an antibody against 5-methylcytosine (5MeC), the present study detected the DNA methylation patterns of cloned ovine embryos. The em-bryos derived from in vitro fertilization were also examined for reference purpose. The results showed that: (1) during the pre-implantation development, cloned embryos displayed a similar demethylation profile to the fertilized embryos; that is, the methylation level decreased to the lowest at 8-cell stage, and then increased again at morulae stage. However, methylation level was obviously higher in cloned embryos than in stage-matched fertilized embryos, especially at 8-cell stage and afterwards; (2) at blastocyst stage, the methylation pattern in cloned embryos was different from that in fertilized em-bryos. In cloned blastocyst, inner cell mass (ICM) exhibited a comparable level to trophectoderm cells (TE), while in in-vitro fertilized blastocyst the methylation level of ICM was lower than that of TE, which is not consistent with that reported by other authors. These results indicate that DNA methylation is abnormally reprogrammed in cloned embryos, implying that aberrant DNA methylation reprogramming may be one of the factors causing cloned embryos developmental failure.

  18. Human embryo cloning prohibited in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Athena

    2005-12-01

    Since the birth of Dolly (the cloned sheep) in 1997, debates have arisen on the ethical and legal questions of cloning-for-biomedical-research (more commonly termed "therapeutic cloning") and of reproductive cloning using human gametes. Hong Kong enacted the Human Reproductive Technology Ordinance (Cap 561) in 2000. Section 15(1)(e) of this Ordinance prohibits the "replacing of the nucleus of a cell of an embryo with a nucleus taken from any other cell," i.e., nucleus substitution. Section 15(1)(f) prohibits the cloning of any embryo. The scope of the latter, therefore, is arguably the widest, prohibiting all cloning techniques such as cell nucleus replacement, embryo splitting, parthenogenesis, and cloning using stem cell lines. Although the Human Reproductive Technology Ordinance is not yet fully operative, this article examines how these prohibitions may adversely impact on basic research and the vision of the Hong Kong scientific community. It concludes that in light of recent scientific developments, it is time to review if the law offers a coherent set of policies in this area.

  19. Proprotein convertase 1/3 inhibited macrophages: A novel therapeutic based on drone macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Duhamel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated here thanks to proteomic, that proprotein convertase 1/3 knockdown macrophages present all the characteristic of activated pro-inflammatory macrophages. TLR4 and TLR9 signaling pathways can be enhanced leading to the secretion of pro-inflammatory factors and antitumor factors. We can control their activation by controlling one enzyme, PC1/3. In a tumor context, PC1/3 inhibition in macrophages may reactivate them and lead to a cytokine storm after stimulation “at distance” with a TLR ligand. Therefore, we name these proprotein convertase inhibited macrophages the “drone macrophages”. They constitute an innovative cell therapy to treat efficiently tumors.

  20. IFNγ: Issuing macrophages a license to kill

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    T cells tell macrophages when to start making the toxic soup of lysosomal enzymes, reactive oxygen species, and nitric oxide that destroys intracellular pathogens. In 1983, Carl Nathan proved that this start signal comes in the form of the secreted cytokine IFNγ.

  1. Uterine NK cells and macrophages in pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faas, Marijke M.; de Vos, Paul

    The presence of immune cells in the placental bed is important for both mother and child. Although various immune cells can be found in the placental bed, such as regulatory T cells and dendritic cells, uterine NK cells and macrophages are the most prominent immune cells in the placental bed in

  2. Atherosclerosis & inflammation: Macrophage heterogeneity in focus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stöger, J.L.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages characteristically feature a considerable degree of heterogeneity and plasticity to accommodate for the enormous variety in stimuli and challenges that their microenvironment presents them with. By virtue of their activation status, these cells can be classified into one of several subse

  3. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor in Protozoan Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo T. Bozza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is a cytokine that plays a central role in immune and inflammatory responses. In the present paper, we discussed the participation of MIF in the immune response to protozoan parasite infections. As a general trend, MIF participates in the control of parasite burden at the expense of promoting tissue damage due to increased inflammation.

  4. Ameobal pathogen mimivirus infects macrophages through phagocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Ghigo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Mimivirus, or Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APMV, a giant double-stranded DNA virus that grows in amoeba, was identified for the first time in 2003. Entry by phagocytosis within amoeba has been suggested but not demonstrated. We demonstrate here that APMV was internalized by macrophages but not by non-phagocytic cells, leading to productive APMV replication. Clathrin- and caveolin-mediated endocytosis pathways, as well as degradative endosome-mediated endocytosis, were not used by APMV to invade macrophages. Ultrastructural analysis showed that protrusions were formed around the entering virus, suggesting that macropinocytosis or phagocytosis was involved in APMV entry. Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases were required for APMV entry. Blocking macropinocytosis and the lack of APMV colocalization with rabankyrin-5 showed that macropinocytosis was not involved in viral entry. Overexpression of a dominant-negative form of dynamin-II, a regulator of phagocytosis, inhibited APMV entry. Altogether, our data demonstrated that APMV enters macrophages through phagocytosis, a new pathway for virus entry in cells. This reinforces the paradigm that intra-amoebal pathogens have the potential to infect macrophages.

  5. Autophagy regulation in macrophages and neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalache, Cristina C; Simon, Hans-Uwe

    2012-07-01

    Autophagy is a conserved proteolytic mechanism that degrades cytoplasmic material including cell organelles. Accumulating evidence exists that autophagy also plays a major role in immunity and inflammation. Specifically, it appears that autophagy protects against infections and inflammation. Here, we review recent work performed in macrophages and neutrophils, which both represent critical phagocytes in mammalians. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Uterine NK cells and macrophages in pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faas, Marijke M; de Vos, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The presence of immune cells in the placental bed is important for both mother and child. Although various immune cells can be found in the placental bed, such as regulatory T cells and dendritic cells, uterine NK cells and macrophages are the most prominent immune cells in the placental bed in earl

  7. A broken krebs cycle in macrophages

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Neill, Luke A J

    2015-01-01

    ... and an intact Krebs cycle as hallmark metabolic features. It is still not fully understood why these differences occur, or indeed how the metabolic rewiring is regulated. Rapidity of response might be an important reason for the metabolic differences (Ganeshan and Chawla, 2014 ). In M1 macrophages, glycolysis would allow for rapid ATP ...

  8. Macrophage plasticity and polarization: in vivo veritas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sica, Antonio; Mantovani, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Diversity and plasticity are hallmarks of cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage. In response to IFNs, Toll-like receptor engagement, or IL-4/IL-13 signaling, macrophages undergo M1 (classical) or M2 (alternative) activation, which represent extremes of a continuum in a universe of activation states. Progress has now been made in defining the signaling pathways, transcriptional networks, and epigenetic mechanisms underlying M1-M2 or M2-like polarized activation. Functional skewing of mononuclear phagocytes occurs in vivo under physiological conditions (e.g., ontogenesis and pregnancy) and in pathology (allergic and chronic inflammation, tissue repair, infection, and cancer). However, in selected preclinical and clinical conditions, coexistence of cells in different activation states and unique or mixed phenotypes have been observed, a reflection of dynamic changes and complex tissue-derived signals. The identification of mechanisms and molecules associated with macrophage plasticity and polarized activation provides a basis for macrophage-centered diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:22378047

  9. Construction of a recombinant attenuated Salmonella typhimurium DNA vaccine carrying Helicobacter pylori hpaA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Can; Li, Zhao-Shen; Du, Yi-Qi; Tu, Zhen-Xing; Gong, Yan-Fang; Jin, Jing; Wu, Hong-Yu; Xu, Guo-Ming

    2005-01-07

    To construct a recombinant attenuated Salmonella typhimurium DNA vaccine carrying Helicobacter pylori hpaA gene and to detect its immunogenicity. Genomic DNA of the standard H pylori strain 17 874 was isolated as the template, hpaA gene fragment was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cloned into pUCmT vector. DNA sequence of the amplified hpaA gene was assayed, then cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pIRES through enzyme digestion and ligation reactions. The recombinant plasmid was used to transform competent Escherichia coli DH5alpha, and the positive clones were screened by PCR and restriction enzyme digestion. Then, the recombinant pIRES-hpaA was used to transform LB5000 and the recombinant plasmid isolated from LB5000 was finally used to transform SL7207. After that, the recombinant strain was grown in vitro repeatedly. In order to identify the immunogenicity of the vaccine in vitro, the recombinant pIRES-hpaA was transfected to COS-7 cells using Lipofectamine2000, the immunogenicity of expressed HpaA protein was detected with SDS-PAGE and Western blot. The 750-base pair hpaA gene fragment was amplified from the genomic DNA and was consistent with the sequence of H pylori hpaA by sequence analysis. It was confirmed by PCR and restriction enzyme digestion that H pylori hpaA gene was inserted into the eukaryotic expression vector pIRES and a stable recombinant live attenuated Salmonella typhimurium DNA vaccine carrying H pylori hpaA gene was successfully constructed and the specific strip of HpaA expressed by pIRES-hpaA was detected through Western blot. The recombinant attenuated Salmonella typhimurium DNA vaccine strain expressing HpaA protein with immunogenicity can be constructed and it may be helpful for further investigating the immune action of DNA vaccine in vivo.

  10. Construction of a recombinant attenuated Salmonella typhimurium DNA vaccine carrying Helicobacter pylori hpaA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Can Xu; Zhao-Shen Li; Yi-Qi Du; Zhen-Xing Tu; Yan-Fang Gong; Jing Jin; Hong-Yu Wu; Guo-Ming Xu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To construct a recombinant attenuated Salmonella typhimurium DNA vaccine carrying Helicobacter pylori hpaA gene and to detect its immunogenicity.METHODS: Genomic DNA of the standard H pylori strain 17 874 was isolated as the template, hpaA gene fragment was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cloned into pUCmT vector. DNA sequence of the amplified hpaA gene was assayed, then cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pIRES through enzyme digestion and ligation reactions. The recombinant plasmid was used to transform competent Escherichia coliDH5α, and the positive clones were screened by PCR and restriction enzyme digestion. Then, the recombinant pIRES-hpaA was used to transform LB5000 and the recombinant plasmid isolated from LB5000 was finally used to transform SL7207. After that, the recombinant strain was grown in vitrorepeatedly. In order to iclentify the immunogenicity of the vaccinein vitro, the recombinant pIRES-hpaA was transfected to COS-7 cells using LipofectamineTM2000, the immunogenicity of expressed HpaA protein was detected with SDS-PAGE and Western blot.RESULTS: The 750-base pair hpaA gene fragment was amplified from the genomic DNA and was consistent with the sequence of H pylori hpaA by sequence analysis. It was confirmed by PCR and restriction enzyme digestion that H pylori hpaA gene was inserted into the eukaryotic expression vector pIRES and a stable recombinant live attenuated Salmonella typhimurium DNA vaccine carrying H pylori hpaA gene was successfully constructed and the specific strip of HpaA expressed by pIRES-hpaA was detected through Western blot.CONCLUSION: The recombinant attenuated Salmonella typhimurium DNA vaccine strain expressing HpaA protein with immunogenicity can be constructed and it may be helpful for further investigating the immune action of DNA vaccine in vivo.

  11. Toxicity of mercury in macrophages. Structure and function of macrophages after experimental mercury exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, M.M.

    1995-12-31

    Mercury is recognized as an environmental heavy metal pollutant with a toxic effect on living organisms. The toxicity of this heavy metal at cellular level is described for many types of cells. Macrophages are ubiquitous in the organism and play a central role in the non-specific defence barrier against intruding micro-organisms. As a first line of defence, macrophages are crucial for the course of generalized infection, for instance with herpes simplex virus. Functions such as phagocytosis, migration, activation during infection and cytokine production are important in this context. Mercury, detectable by auto metallography, is found in the lysosomes of macrophages and this accumulation is dependent upon dose and length of time of mercury exposure. But higher concentrations cause auto interference, which indicates that mercury accumulation is dependent on lysosome functional integrity and that mercury inhibits lysosome functions. In mice intraperitoneally exposed to mercury chloride, mercury is found localized in the lysosomes of macrophages in the spleen, thymus, lymph nodes and liver as well as in peritoneal macrophages. The effect of mercury on a virus infection was examined in studies of the course of infection in mice treated with mercury and infected with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) under further exposure to mercury. To further elucidate aspects of interactions between heavy metals and macrophages and their eventual significance for the antiviral effect of macrophages, the effect of mercury on cell respiratory burst capacity and the influence of mercury on cell production of and reaction to cytokines was examined. This thesis shows that mercury is immunotoxic in that it affects macrophages both with regard to the viability and function of the cells. This is also valid for mercury concentrations that do not result in apparent pathological changes. (EG) 98 refs.

  12. DMPD: Mechanism of age-associated up-regulation in macrophage PGE2 synthesis. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15331118 Mechanism of age-associated up-regulation in macrophage PGE2 synthesis. Wu...e-associated up-regulation in macrophage PGE2 synthesis. PubmedID 15331118 Title Mechanism of age-associated... up-regulation in macrophage PGE2 synthesis. Authors Wu D, Meydani SN. Publicatio

  13. DMPD: Pathogen-induced apoptosis of macrophages: a common end for different pathogenicstrategies. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 11207583 Pathogen-induced apoptosis of macrophages: a common end for different pathogenicstrategies...ml) Show Pathogen-induced apoptosis of macrophages: a common end for different pathogenicstrategies. PubmedI...D 11207583 Title Pathogen-induced apoptosis of macrophages: a common end for different pathogenicstrategie

  14. DMPD: Genetic regulation of macrophage priming/activation: the Lsh gene story. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1757110 Genetic regulation of macrophage priming/activation: the Lsh gene story. Bl... (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Genetic regulation of macrophage priming/activation: the Lsh gene story. Pubmed...ID 1757110 Title Genetic regulation of macrophage priming/activation: the Lsh gen

  15. DMPD: Toll receptors, CD14, and macrophage activation and deactivation by LPS. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12106783 Toll receptors, CD14, and macrophage activation and deactivation by LPS. D...ceptors, CD14, and macrophage activation and deactivation by LPS. PubmedID 12106783 Title Toll receptors, CD14, and macrophage activa...tion and deactivation by LPS. Authors Dobrovolskaia MA,

  16. Depletion of macrophages in mice results in higher dengue virus titers and highlights the role of macrophages for virus control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fink, K.; Ng, C.; Nkenfou, C.; Vasudevan, S.G.; Rooijen, van N.; Schul, W.

    2009-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are target cells for dengue infection. Besides their potential role for virus replication, activated monocytes/macrophages produce cytokines that may be critical for dengue pathology. To study the in vivo role of monocytes and macrophages for virus replication, we depleted

  17. Maximum confidence measurements via probabilistic quantum cloning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Wen-Hai; Yu Long-Bao; Cao Zhuo-Liang; Ye Liu

    2013-01-01

    Probabilistic quantum cloning (PQC) cannot copy a set of linearly dependent quantum states.In this paper,we show that if incorrect copies are allowed to be produced,linearly dependent quantum states may also be cloned by the PQC.By exploiting this kind of PQC to clone a special set of three linearly dependent quantum states,we derive the upper bound of the maximum confidence measure of a set.An explicit transformation of the maximum confidence measure is presented.

  18. Leaf anatomy of rubber-tree clones Anatomia foliar de clones de seringueira

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Bernadete Gonçalves Martins

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Rubber trees are easily recognizable for being woody, medium to large-sized plants, having a typical deciduous behavior, and especially because they produce latex. The purpose of this work was to study the anatomy and morphology of the leaf, comparing rubber tree &91;Hevea brasiliensis (Willd. ex Adr. de Juss. Muell.-Arg.&93; clones (RRIM 600 and GT 1 grafted on the same root stock (Tjir 1, grown under the same climatic and soil conditions. This study allowed clones to be differentiated and also provided information on the location and disposition of laticifers in the leaf tissue. Cross sections of the mesophyll, center ribbing and petiole regions were made, followed by usual permanent histological blade methods. Biometric analyses of tissue extensions in the palisade and spongy parenchymas were carried out, and the number of cells in the spongy parenchyma were counted. At the same time, biometrical analyses were made for stomata. The comparison between the clones showed that there were no significant differences in epidermal cell height, spongy parenchyma height, number of cells in the spongy parenchyma layer, and size and width of leaflets. However, variation was observed for cell thickness in the palisade parenchyma. The clone GT1 presented greater thickness as compared to the RRIM 600 clone. GT1 had also a greater number of stomata in comparison to RRIM 600, but they were smaller. GT1 presented greater petiole and center ribbing diameters in the leaves and a greater amount of sclerenchyma fibers than RRIM 600.A seringueira é uma planta de fácil reconhecimento por ser lenhosa, de porte mediano a grande, que apresenta um padrão característico de desfolha e reenfolhamento e, sobretudo, pela produção de látex. O objetivo do trabalho foi efetuar um estudo anatômico e morfológico foliar, comparando os clones RRIM 600 e GT 1 de seringueira &91;Hevea brasiliensis (Wild. ex Adr. de Juss. Muell.- Arg&93;, desenvolvidos sob as mesmas condi

  19. Macrophage-Mediated Lymphangiogenesis: The Emerging Role of Macrophages as Lymphatic Endothelial Progenitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ran, Sophia, E-mail: sran@siumed.edu; Montgomery, Kyle E. [Department of Medical Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, 801 N. Rutledge, Springfield, IL 62794 (United States)

    2012-06-27

    It is widely accepted that macrophages and other inflammatory cells support tumor progression and metastasis. During early stages of neoplastic development, tumor-infiltrating macrophages (TAMs) mount an immune response against transformed cells. Frequently, however, cancer cells escape the immune surveillance, an event that is accompanied by macrophage transition from an anti-tumor to a pro-tumorigenic type. The latter is characterized by high expression of factors that activate endothelial cells, suppress immune response, degrade extracellular matrix, and promote tumor growth. Cumulatively, these products of TAMs promote tumor expansion and growth of both blood and lymphatic vessels that facilitate metastatic spread. Breast cancers and other epithelial malignancies induce the formation of new lymphatic vessels (i.e., lymphangiogenesis) that leads to lymphatic and subsequently, to distant metastasis. Both experimental and clinical studies have shown that TAMs significantly promote tumor lymphangiogenesis through paracrine and cell autonomous modes. The paracrine effect consists of the expression of a variety of pro-lymphangiogenic factors that activate the preexisting lymphatic vessels. The evidence for cell-autonomous contribution is based on the observed tumor mobilization of macrophage-derived lymphatic endothelial cell progenitors (M-LECP) that integrate into lymphatic vessels prior to sprouting. This review will summarize the current knowledge of macrophage-dependent growth of new lymphatic vessels with specific emphasis on an emerging role of macrophages as lymphatic endothelial cell progenitors (M-LECP)

  20. Yersinia pestis and host macrophages: immunodeficiency of mouse macrophages induced by YscW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yujing; Du, Zongmin; Han, Yanping; Guo, Zhaobiao; Tan, Yafang; Zhu, Ziwen; Yang, Ruifu

    2009-09-01

    The virulence of the pathogenic Yersinia species depends on a plasmid-encoded type III secretion system (T3SS) that transfers six Yersinia outer protein (Yop) effector proteins into the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, leading to disruption of host defence mechanisms. It is shown in this study that Yersinia pestis YscW, a protein of the T3SS injectisome, contributes to the induction of a deficiency in phagocytosis in host macrophages and a reduction in their antigen-presenting capacity. A Y. pestis strain lacking yscW had no effect on uptake by host macrophages. In mice infected with wild-type Y. pestis, the yscW mutant or a complement strain, immunodeficiency was observed in host macrophages compared with those from uninfected mice. However, the phagocytosis and antigen presenting capacities of macrophages infected by yscW mutant strain both in vivo and in vitro were significantly higher than those by wild type strain. Consistent with this finding, when YscW was expressed in the RAW264.7 macrophage cell line, phagocytosis and antigen-presenting capacities were significantly lower than those of the control groups. These results indicate that Y. pestis YscW may directly induce immunodeficiency in murine macrophages by crippling their phagocytosis and antigen-presenting capacities. These data provide evidences to Y. pestis pathogenesis that some proteins in T3SS injectisome, such as YscW protein, might play independent roles in disrupting host defense apart from their known functions.

  1. Effects of nanoparticles on murine macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevallet, M; Aude-Garcia, C; Lelong, C; Candeias, S; Luche, S; Collin-Faure, V; Triboulet, S; Diallo, D; Rabilloud, T [CEA/DSV/IRTSV, laboratoire de Biochimie et Biophysique des Systemes Integres, Unite Mixte CNRS UMR5092, Universite Joseph Fourier - Grenoble, CEA Grenoble, 17 rue des martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Diemer, H; Dorsselaer, A van, E-mail: thierry.rabilloud@cea.fr [IPHC, Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, CNRS UMR7178, Universite Louis Pasteur - Strasbourg I (France)

    2011-07-06

    Metallic nanoparticles are more and more widely used in an increasing number of applications. Consequently, they are more and more present in the environment, and the risk that they may represent for human health must be evaluated. This requires to increase our knowledge of the cellular responses to nanoparticles. In this context, macrophages appear as an attractive system. They play a major role in eliminating foreign matter, e.g. pathogens or infectious agents, by phagocytosis and inflammatory responses, and are thus highly likely to react to nanoparticles. We have decided to study their responses to nanoparticles by a combination of classical and wide-scope approaches such as proteomics. The long term goal of this study is the better understanding of the responses of macrophages to nanoparticles, and thus to help to assess their possible impact on human health. We chose as a model system bone marrow-derived macrophages and studied the effect of commonly used nanoparticles such as TiO{sub 2} and Cu. Classical responses of macrophage were characterized and proteomic approaches based on 2D gels of whole cell extracts were used. Preliminary proteomic data resulting from whole cell extracts showed different effects for TiO{sub 2}-NPs and Cu-NPs. Modifications of the expression of several proteins involved in different pathways such as, for example, signal transduction, endosome-lysosome pathway, Krebs cycle, oxidative stress response have been underscored. These first results validate our proteomics approach and open a new wide field of investigation for NPs impact on macrophages.

  2. Effects of nanoparticles on murine macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevallet, M.; Aude-Garcia, C.; Lelong, C.; Candéias, S.; Luche, S.; Collin-Faure, V.; Triboulet, S.; Diallo, D.; Diemer, H.; van Dorsselaer, A.; Rabilloud, T.

    2011-07-01

    Metallic nanoparticles are more and more widely used in an increasing number of applications. Consequently, they are more and more present in the environment, and the risk that they may represent for human health must be evaluated. This requires to increase our knowledge of the cellular responses to nanoparticles. In this context, macrophages appear as an attractive system. They play a major role in eliminating foreign matter, e.g. pathogens or infectious agents, by phagocytosis and inflammatory responses, and are thus highly likely to react to nanoparticles. We have decided to study their responses to nanoparticles by a combination of classical and wide-scope approaches such as proteomics. The long term goal of this study is the better understanding of the responses of macrophages to nanoparticles, and thus to help to assess their possible impact on human health. We chose as a model system bone marrow-derived macrophages and studied the effect of commonly used nanoparticles such as TiO2 and Cu. Classical responses of macrophage were characterized and proteomic approaches based on 2D gels of whole cell extracts were used. Preliminary proteomic data resulting from whole cell extracts showed different effects for TiO2-NPs and Cu-NPs. Modifications of the expression of several proteins involved in different pathways such as, for example, signal transduction, endosome-lysosome pathway, Krebs cycle, oxidative stress response have been underscored. These first results validate our proteomics approach and open a new wide field of investigation for NPs impact on macrophages.

  3. Resistance of potato clones to necrotic recombinant strains of potato virus y (pvy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Regina Rodrigues de Paula Ribeiro

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Ry adg allele is widely used by breeders to confer extreme resistance to all strains of PVY. However, the necrotic strain has increased recombination resulting in recent considerable losses in productivity. Thus far, not all necrotic recombinant strains of PVY have been tested for their reaction to the Ry gene. The objective of this study was to identify potato clones carrying the resistant allele and to assess their reaction to the following recombinant strains: NTN (PVY NTN, Wilga (PVY N-Wi, and "curly top" (PVY E. Advanced clones from the potato breeding program at Universidade Federal de Lavras were evaluated through a specific molecular marker for the Ry adg allele. The clones carrying the resistance allele were grafted on tobacco plants infected with necrotic recombinant strains of PVY. The clones carrying the allele for resistance to PVY were not infected with any of the recombinants during the grafting test. These results confirm that resistance to necrotic recombinant strains has not yet been overcome and that the Ry adg allele also confers resistance to the three recombinant strains tested.

  4. Cloning of DNA sequences localized on proximal fluorescent chromosome bands by microdissection in Pinus densiflora Sieb. & Zucc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hizume, M; Shibata, F; Maruyama, Y; Kondo, T

    2001-09-01

    Japanese red pine, Pinus densiflora, has 2n=24 chromosomes, of which most carry chromomycin A3 (CMA) and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) bands at their centromere-proximal regions. It was proposed that these regions contain highly repetitive DNA. The DNA localized in the proximal fluorescent bands was isolated and characterized. In P. densiflora, centromeric and neighboring segments of the somatic chromosomes were dissected with a manual micromanipulator. The centromeric DNA was amplified from the DNA contained in dissected centromeric segments by degenerate oligonucleotide primed-polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR) and a cloned DNA library was constructed. Thirty-one clones carrying highly repetitive DNA were selected by colony hybridization using Cot-1 DNA from this species as a probe, and their chromosomal localization was determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Clone PDCD501 was localized to the proximal CMA band of 20 chromosomes. This clone contained tandem repeats, comprising a 27 bp repeat unit, which was sufficient to provide the proximal FISH signal, with a 52.3% GC content. The repetitive sequence was named PCSR (proximal CMA band-specific repeat). Clone PDCD159 was 1700 bp in length, with a 61.7% AT content, and produced FISH signals at the proximal DAPI band of the remaining four chromosomes. Four clones hybridized strongly to the secondary constriction and gave weak signals at the centromeric region of several chromosomes. Clone PDCD537, one of the four clones, was homologous to the 26S rRNA gene. A PCR experiment using microdissected centromeric regions suggested that the centromeric region contains 18S and 26S rDNA. Another 24 clones hybridized to whole chromosome arms, with varying intensities and might represent dispersed repetitive DNA.

  5. The Heme Connection: Linking Erythrocytes and Macrophage Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Zahidul; Devalaraja, Samir; Haldar, Malay

    2017-01-01

    Erythroid function and development is intimately linked to macrophages. The primary function of erythrocytes is oxygen delivery, which is mediated by iron-containing hemoglobin. The major source of this iron is a recycling pathway where macrophages scavenge old and damaged erythrocytes to release iron contained within the heme moiety. Macrophages also promote erythropoiesis by providing a supportive niche in the bone marrow as an integral component of “erythorblastic islands.” Importantly, inflammation leads to alterations in iron handling by macrophages with significant impact on iron homeostasis and erythropoiesis. The importance of macrophages in erythropoiesis and iron homeostasis is well established and has been extensively reviewed. However, this developmental relationship is not one way, and erythrocytes can also regulate macrophage development and function. Erythrocyte-derived heme can induce the development of iron-recycling macrophages from monocytes, engage pattern recognition receptors to activate macrophages, and act as ligand for specific nuclear receptors to modulate macrophage function. Here, we discuss the role of heme as a signaling molecule impacting macrophage homeostasis. We will review these actions of heme within the framework of our current understanding of the role of micro-environmental factors in macrophage development and function. PMID:28167947

  6. Drug Trafficking into Macrophages via the Endocytotic Receptor CD163.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2015-06-23

    In inflammatory diseases, macrophages are a main producer of a range of cytokines regulating the inflammatory state. This also includes inflammation induced by tumor growth, which recruits so-called tumor-associated macrophages supporting tumor growth. Macrophages are therefore relevant targets for cytotoxic or phenotype-modulating drugs in the treatment of inflammatory and cancerous diseases. Such targeting of macrophages has been tried using the natural propensity of macrophages to non-specifically phagocytose circulating foreign particulate material. In addition, the specific targeting of macrophage-expressed receptors has been used in order to obtain a selective uptake in macrophages and reduce adverse effects of off-target delivery of drugs. CD163 is a highly expressed macrophage-specific endocytic receptor that has been studied for intracellular delivery of small molecule drugs to macrophages using targeted liposomes or antibody drug conjugates. This review will focus on the biology of CD163 and its potential role as a target for selective macrophage targeting compared with other macrophage targeting approaches.

  7. Paeoniflorin inhibits macrophage-mediated lung cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qi; Chen, Gang-Ling; Li, Ya-Juan; Chen, Yang; Lin, Fang-Zhen

    2015-12-01

    Alternatively activated macrophages are more frequently involved in tumor growth, angiogenesis, and immunosuppression. A previous study showed that paeoniflorin, the major active constituent of Paeonia lactiflora Pallas, can inhibit tumor growth and lung metastases of Lewis lung tumor-bearing mice. This study tried to investigate whether paeoniflorin inhibited lung cancer metastasis by inhibiting the alternative activation of macrophages (M2 macrophage). Using a viability assay, the cytotoxicity of paeoniflorin on Lewis lung cancer cells and peritoneal macrophages were investigated. In vitro scratch wound and in vivo lung metastasis experiments were used to test the ability to inhibit the migration of paeoniflorin and the function of M2 macrophages. Flow cytometry was performed to test the cell cycle of Lewis lung cancer cells, and to test the M2 macrophages in peritoneal macrophages and subcutaneous transplantable tumor. It was found that paeoniflorin showed no inhibitory effect on the growth of Lewis lung cancer cells and peritoneal macrophages of mouse in vitro. Paeoniflorin could attenuate the migration of LLC stimulated by alternatively activated macrophages (stimulated for 24 h and 48 h, paeoniflorin 1, 3, 10, 30, 100 μmol·L(-1), P lung cancer cells (paeoniflorin 100 μmol·L(-1), P lung metastasis of Lewis lung cancer cells xenograft and decrease the numbers of M2 macrophages in subcutaneous xenograft tumour in vivo (paeoniflorin 20, 40 mg·kg(-1), P lung metastasis of Lewis lung cancer cells xenograft partly through inhibiting the alternative activation of macrophages.

  8. Drug Trafficking into Macrophages via the Endocytotic Receptor CD163

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2015-01-01

    In inflammatory diseases, macrophages are a main producer of a range of cytokines regulating the inflammatory state. This also includes inflammation induced by tumor growth, which recruits so-called tumor-associated macrophages supporting tumor growth. Macrophages are therefore relevant targets for cytotoxic or phenotype-modulating drugs in the treatment of inflammatory and cancerous diseases. Such targeting of macrophages has been tried using the natural propensity of macrophages to non-specifically phagocytose circulating foreign particulate material. In addition, the specific targeting of macrophage-expressed receptors has been used in order to obtain a selective uptake in macrophages and reduce adverse effects of off-target delivery of drugs. CD163 is a highly expressed macrophage-specific endocytic receptor that has been studied for intracellular delivery of small molecule drugs to macrophages using targeted liposomes or antibody drug conjugates. This review will focus on the biology of CD163 and its potential role as a target for selective macrophage targeting compared with other macrophage targeting approaches. PMID:26111002

  9. The macrophage in HIV-1 infection: From activation to deactivation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varin Audrey

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Macrophages play a crucial role in innate and adaptative immunity in response to microorganisms and are an important cellular target during HIV-1 infection. Recently, the heterogeneity of the macrophage population has been highlighted. Classically activated or type 1 macrophages (M1 induced in particular by IFN-γ display a pro-inflammatory profile. The alternatively activated or type 2 macrophages (M2 induced by Th-2 cytokines, such as IL-4 and IL-13 express anti-inflammatory and tissue repair properties. Finally IL-10 has been described as the prototypic cytokine involved in the deactivation of macrophages (dM. Since the capacity of macrophages to support productive HIV-1 infection is known to be modulated by cytokines, this review shows how modulation of macrophage activation by cytokines impacts the capacity to support productive HIV-1 infection. Based on the activation status of macrophages we propose a model starting with M1 classically activated macrophages with accelerated formation of viral reservoirs in a context of Th1 and proinflammatory cytokines. Then IL-4/IL-13 alternatively activated M2 macrophages will enter into the game that will stop the expansion of the HIV-1 reservoir. Finally IL-10 deactivation of macrophages will lead to immune failure observed at the very late stages of the HIV-1 disease.

  10. The macrophage in HIV-1 infection: from activation to deactivation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbein, Georges; Varin, Audrey

    2010-04-09

    Macrophages play a crucial role in innate and adaptative immunity in response to microorganisms and are an important cellular target during HIV-1 infection. Recently, the heterogeneity of the macrophage population has been highlighted. Classically activated or type 1 macrophages (M1) induced in particular by IFN-gamma display a pro-inflammatory profile. The alternatively activated or type 2 macrophages (M2) induced by Th-2 cytokines, such as IL-4 and IL-13 express anti-inflammatory and tissue repair properties. Finally IL-10 has been described as the prototypic cytokine involved in the deactivation of macrophages (dM). Since the capacity of macrophages to support productive HIV-1 infection is known to be modulated by cytokines, this review shows how modulation of macrophage activation by cytokines impacts the capacity to support productive HIV-1 infection. Based on the activation status of macrophages we propose a model starting with M1 classically activated macrophages with accelerated formation of viral reservoirs in a context of Th1 and proinflammatory cytokines. Then IL-4/IL-13 alternatively activated M2 macrophages will enter into the game that will stop the expansion of the HIV-1 reservoir. Finally IL-10 deactivation of macrophages will lead to immune failure observed at the very late stages of the HIV-1 disease.

  11. Adoptive transfer of macrophages ameliorates renal fibrosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Masashi; Okumura, Yasuko; Fujimoto, Shin-Ichiro; Shiraishi, Isao; Itoi, Toshiyuki; Hamaoka, Kenji

    2005-06-24

    We performed adoptive transfer of bone marrow-derived (BM) macrophages following pharmacological depletion of leukocytes in a mouse model of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). Treatment with cyclophosphamide (CPM) caused marked decrease in the numbers of F4/80-positive interstitial macrophages as well as in peripheral blood leukocyte counts, and adoptive transfer of BM macrophages to CPM-treated mice resulted in significant increase in the numbers of interstitial macrophages both at day 5 and at day 14 after UUO. At day 5 after UUO, no significant change was observed in the degree of renal interstitial fibrosis either by treatment with CPM or with CPM+macrophage. However, at day 14 after UUO, treatment with CPM caused significant increase in the degree of interstitial fibrosis, and adoptive macrophage transfer to these mice attenuated this enhancement in renal fibrosis. Our result suggests the role of infiltrating macrophages on facilitating tissue repair at late stage of UUO.

  12. Monocyte and Macrophage Plasticity in Tissue Repair and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Amitava; Sinha, Mithun; Datta, Soma; Abas, Motaz; Chaffee, Scott; Sen, Chandan K.; Roy, Sashwati

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity and high versatility are the characteristic features of the cells of monocyte-macrophage lineage. The mononuclear phagocyte system, derived from the bone marrow progenitor cells, is primarily composed of monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. In regenerative tissues, a central role of monocyte-derived macrophages and paracrine factors secreted by these cells is indisputable. Macrophages are highly plastic cells. On the basis of environmental cues and molecular mediators, these cells differentiate to proinflammatory type I macrophage (M1) or anti-inflammatory or proreparative type II macrophage (M2) phenotypes and transdifferentiate into other cell types. Given a central role in tissue repair and regeneration, the review focuses on the heterogeneity of monocytes and macrophages with current known mechanisms of differentiation and plasticity, including microenvironmental cues and molecular mediators, such as noncoding RNAs. PMID:26118749

  13. Spread of carbapenem-resistant international clones of Acinetobacter baumannii in Turkey and Azerbaijan: a collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, S S; Alp, E; Ulu-Kilic, A; Dinc, G; Aktas, Z; Ada, B; Bagirova, F; Baran, I; Ersoy, Y; Esen, S; Guven, T G; Hopman, J; Hosoglu, S; Koksal, F; Parlak, E; Yalcin, A N; Yilmaz, G; Voss, A; Melchers, W

    2016-09-01

    Epidemic clones of Acinetobacter baumannii, described as European clones I, II, and III, are associated with hospital epidemics throughout the world. We aimed to determine the molecular characteristics and genetic diversity between European clones I, II, and III from Turkey and Azerbaijan. In this study, a total of 112 bloodstream isolates of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter spp. were collected from 11 hospitals across Turkey and Azerbaijan. The identification of Acinetobacter spp. using conventional and sensitivity tests was performed by standard criteria. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect OXA carbapenemase-encoding genes (bla OXA-23-like, bla OXA-24-like, bla OXA-51-like, and bla OXA-58-like). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing was used to investigate genetic diversity. The bla OXA-51-like gene was present in all 112 isolates, 75 (67 %) carried bla OXA-23-like, 7 (6.2 %) carried bla OXA-58-like genes, and 5 (4.5 %) carried bla OXA-24-like genes. With a 90 % similarity cut-off value, 15 clones and eight unique isolates were identified. The largest clone was cluster D, with six subtypes. Isolates from clusters D and I were widely spread in seven different geographical regions throughout Turkey. However, F cluster was found in the northern and eastern regions of Turkey. EU clone I was grouped within J cluster with three isolates found in Antalya, Istanbul, and Erzurum. EU clone II was grouped in the U cluster with 15 isolates and found in Kayseri and Diyarbakır. The bla OXA-24-like gene in carbapenemases was identified rarely in Turkey and has been reported for the first time from Azerbaijan. Furthermore, this is the first multicenter study in Turkey and Azerbaijan to identify several major clusters belonging to European clones I and II of A. baumannii.

  14. Efficient Approaches for Designing Fault Tolerant Reversible Carry Look-Ahead and Carry-Skip Adders

    CERN Document Server

    Islam, Md Saiful; begum, Zerina; Hafiz, Mohd Zulfiquar

    2010-01-01

    Combinational or Classical logic circuits dissipate heat for every bit of information that is lost. Information is lost when the input vector cannot be recovered from its corresponding output vector. Reversible logic circuit implements only the functions having one-to-one mapping between its input and output vectors and therefore naturally takes care of heating. Reversible logic design becomes one of the promising research directions in low power dissipating circuit design in the past few years and has found its application in low power CMOS design, digital signal processing and nanotechnology. This paper presents the efficient approaches for designing fault tolerant reversible fast adders that implement carry look-ahead and carry-skip logic. The proposed high speed reversible adders include MIG gates for the realization of its basic building block. The MIG gate is universal and parity preserving. It allows any fault that affects no more than a single signal readily detectable at the circuit's primary outputs...

  15. Endangered wolves cloned from adult somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Kyu; Jang, Goo; Oh, Hyun Ju; Yuda, Fibrianto; Kim, Hye Jin; Hwang, Woo Suk; Hossein, Mohammad Shamim; Kim, Joung Joo; Shin, Nam Shik; Kang, Sung Keun; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2007-01-01

    Over the world, canine species, including the gray wolf, have been gradually endangered or extinct. Many efforts have been made to recover and conserve these canids. The aim of this study was to produce the endangered gray wolf with somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for conservation. Adult ear fibroblasts from a female gray wolf (Canis lupus) were isolated and cultured in vitro as donor cells. Because of limitations in obtaining gray wolf matured oocytes, in vivo matured canine oocytes obtained by flushing the oviducts from the isthmus to the infundibulum were used. After removing the cumulus cells, the oocyte was enucleated, microinjected, fused with a donor cell, and activated. The reconstructed cloned wolf embryos were transferred into the oviducts of the naturally synchronized surrogate mothers. Two pregnancies were detected by ultrasonography at 23 days of gestation in recipient dogs. In each surrogate dog, two fetal sacs were confirmed by early pregnancy diagnosis at 23 days, but only two cloned wolves were delivered. The first cloned wolf was delivered by cesarean section on October 18, 2005, 60 days after embryo transfer. The second cloned wolf was delivered on October 26, 2005, at 61 days postembryo transfer. Microsatellite analysis was performed with genomic DNA from the donor wolf, the two cloned wolves, and the two surrogate female recipients to confirm the genetic identity of the cloned wolves. Analysis of 19 microsatellite loci confirmed that the cloned wolves were genetically identical to the donor wolf. In conclusion, we demonstrated live birth of two cloned gray wolves by nuclear transfer of wolf somatic cells into enucleated canine oocyte, indicating that SCNT is a practical approach for conserving endangered canids.

  16. Economical phase-covariant cloning with multiclones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Wen-Hai; Ye Liu

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a very simple method to derive the explicit transformations of the optimal economical to M phase-covariant cloning. The fidelity of clones reaches the theoretic bound [D'Ariano G M and Macchiavello C 2003 Phys. Rcv. A 67 042306]. The derived transformations cover the previous contributions [Delgado Y,Lamata L et al,2007 Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 150502] in which M must be odd.

  17. Royana: Successful Experience in Cloning the Sheep

    OpenAIRE

    Saeed Kazemi Ashtiani; Mohammad Hossein Nasr-Esfahani; Sayyed Mortaza Hosseini; Fariba Moulavi; Mahdi Hajian; Mohsen Frouzanfar; Parvaneh Abedi; Maryam Meamar; Mojtaba Rezazadeh Valojerdi; Hamid Gourabi; Abdolhossein Shahverdi; Hossein Baharvand; Ahmad Vosough Dizaj; Hossein Imani; Poopak Eftekhari-Yazdi

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This study describes our experiences in reproductive cloning using two differentprocedures resulting in birth of the first successfully cloned sheep in Iran and theMiddle-East, nick-named "Royana".Materials and Methods: Abattoir-derived sheep oocytes were enucleated after in vitromaturation for 18-20hrs and then reconstructed by ear-derived sheep somatic cells usingtwo different procedures of renucleation (subzonary, intracytoplasmic), embryo culture (coculture,sequential medium) a...

  18. A modified version of the digestion-ligation cloning method for more efficient molecular cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Song; Li, Yanling; Zhang, Jiannan; Chen, Hongman; Ren, Daming; Zhang, Lijun; An, Yingfeng

    2014-05-15

    Here we describe a modified version of the digestion-ligation approach for efficient molecular cloning. In comparison with the original method, the modified method has the additional steps of gel purification and a second ligation after the first ligation of the linearized vector and DNA insert. During this process, the efficiency and reproducibility could be significantly improved for both stick-end cloning and blunt-end cloning. As an improvement of the very important molecular cloning technique, this method may find a wide range of applications in bioscience and biotechnology.

  19. Do Clones Dream of Love? Images of Clones in Popular Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Antonijević

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Fantasies about clones, cyborgs and androids have become part and parcel of the mythology of modern times – the mythologies of the biotechnological era in which the achievements of genetic engineering have inflamed fears of possible abuse of scientific knowledge and the consequences of such abuse. The paper considers the phenomenon of reproductive cloning of human beings as it is represented in popular culture, especially film as it is one of the most important sources of representations and constructions of ideas about clones. After the introductory consideration of this phenomenon in scientific, ethical and media debates which are imbued with rejection of reproductive cloning, I have analyzed the different uses of the clone motif in selected movies. I have examined the structure and content of the genre formula of "social melodrama" which is present in films about clones, and have analyzed the mythical patterns pertaining to the topic of cloning, such as the myth of immortality, the myth of twins, the myth of the uniqueness of human kind etc. Ultimately, the nature and origins of the fear of clones and disgust that clones cause have been examined, and it has been shown that they mostly boil down to the fear of the dehumanization of human beings, the fear of the loss of difference and the transgression of biological, sociocultural and metaphysical boundaries.

  20. CloneAssistant 1.0: a stand-alone software for automated cloning primer design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Chaogang; Meng, Yijun; Lv, Shaolei; Zhong, Wei; Wang, Zheyu; Chen, Ming

    2010-11-01

    "CloneAssistant 1.0" is a stand-alone software compatible with the current Windows operating systems, which can automatically design cloning primers with full consideration of the sequence information of vectors and genes, cloning strategies, the principles of primer design, reading frames, position effects, and enzymatic reaction conditions for users. Five internal XML (extensible markup language) databases [restriction enzymes, plasmids, universal buffers, PCR (polymerase chain reaction) protection bases, and an MCS (multiple cloning site) double digest interference database] were established to serve as the basic support for "CloneAssistant 1.0". The primer pairs designed are sorted according to the difficulty of the follow-up experiments. Once a primer pair is selected by the user, detailed experimental guidance for this primer pair will be provided. In addition, "CloneAssistant 1.0" can be used for restriction map analysis, ORF (open reading frame) finding, sequence alignment and complementary analysis, translation, restriction enzyme and universal buffer queries, and isocaudamer analysis. "CloneAssistant 1.0" makes gene clone design much easier, and it can be freely downloaded from http://bis.zju.edu.cn/clone. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Reproductive cloning combined with genetic modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, C

    2005-11-01

    Although there is widespread opposition to reproductive cloning, some have argued that its use by infertile couples to have genetically related children would be ethically justifiable. Others have suggested that lesbian or gay couples might wish to use cloning to have genetically related children. Most of the main objections to human reproductive cloning are based on the child's lack of unique nuclear DNA. In the future, it may be possible safely to create children using cloning combined with genetic modifications, so that they have unique nuclear DNA. The genetic modifications could be aimed at giving such children genetic characteristics of both members of the couple concerned. Thus, cloning combined with genetic modification could be appealing to infertile, lesbian, or gay couples who seek genetically related children who have genetic characteristics of both members. In such scenarios, the various objections to human reproductive cloning that are based on the lack of genetic uniqueness would no longer be applicable. The author argues that it would be ethically justifiable for such couples to create children in this manner, assuming these techniques could be used safely.

  2. Emotional reactions to human reproductive cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Extant surveys of people's attitudes towards human reproductive cloning focus on moral judgements alone, not emotional reactions or sentiments. This is especially important given that some (especially Leon Kass) have argued against such cloning on the ground that it engenders widespread negative emotions, like disgust, that provide a moral guide. To provide some data on emotional reactions to human cloning, with a focus on repugnance, given its prominence in the literature. This brief mixed-method study measures the self-reported attitudes and emotions (positive or negative) towards cloning from a sample of participants in the USA. Most participants condemned cloning as immoral and said it should be illegal. The most commonly reported positive sentiment was by far interest/curiosity. Negative emotions were much more varied, but anxiety was the most common. Only about a third of participants selected disgust or repugnance as something they felt, and an even smaller portion had this emotion come to mind prior to seeing a list of options. Participants felt primarily interested and anxious about human reproductive cloning. They did not primarily feel disgust or repugnance. This provides initial empirical evidence that such a reaction is not appropriately widespread. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  3. Role for macrophage inflammatory protein-2 in lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, H; Shanley, T P; Jones, M L;

    1996-01-01

    Macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) is a C-X-C chemokine that possesses chemotactic activity for neutrophils. Rat MIP-2 was cloned and expressed as a 7.9-kDa peptide that exhibited dose-dependent neutrophil chemotactic activity at concentrations from 10 to 250 nM. Rabbit polyclonal Ab...... to the 7.9-kDa peptide showed reactivity by western blot analysis and suppressed its in vitro chemotactic activity. Cross-desensitization chemotaxis experiments suggested that the chemotactic responses elicited by MIP-2 and the related chemokine, cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant, may be mediated...... through a common receptor. Also, chemotactic responses to human GRO-alpha were blocked by exposure of human neutrophils to either GRO-alpha or rat MIP-2, suggesting conservation of this receptor-mediated response. After LPS instillation into rat lung, mRNA for MIP-2 was up-regulated in a time...

  4. Granulocyte and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factors as therapy in human and veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Varón, Emilio; Villamayor, Lucía

    2007-07-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSFs) and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factors (GM-CSFs) are endogenous cytokines that regulate granulocyte colonies and play a major role in the stimulation of granulopoiesis (neutrophils, basophils and eosinophils) and in the regulation of microbicidal functions. There are numerous pathological conditions in which neutrophils are decreased, the most common being neutropenia associated with cancer chemotherapy, which increases the risk of serious microbial infections developing with the potential for high morbidity and mortality. New methods in molecular biology have led to the identification and cloning of CSF genes and biopharmaceutical production. Since then, CSFs have been widely used for the prevention and treatment of neutropenia associated with cancer chemotherapy, for mobilising haematopoietic cell precursors, and for other neutropenia-related pathologies. This review focuses on the use of CSFs within both human and veterinary medicine. Clinical applications, pharmacology, tolerability and the potential role of these factors in veterinary medicine are considered.

  5. Role of macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1 alpha) in acute lung injury in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shanley, T P; Schmal, H; Friedl, H P

    1995-01-01

    The role of macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1 alpha) in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury in rats after intrapulmonary deposition of IgG immune complexes or intratracheal administration of LPS has been assessed. Critical to these studies was the cloning and functional expression...... of rat MIP-1 alpha. The resulting product shared 92% and 90% homology with the known murine sequence at the cDNA level and protein level, respectively. Recombinant rat MIP-1 alpha exhibited dose-dependent chemotactic activity for both rat and human monocytes and neutrophils, which could be blocked...... by anti-murine MIP-1 alpha Ab. Rat MIP-1 alpha mRNA and protein expression were determined as a function of time in both injury models. A time-dependent increase in MIP-1 alpha mRNA in lung extracts was observed in both models. In the LPS model, MIP-1 alpha protein could also be detected...

  6. A methanolic extract of Trigonella foenum-graecum (fenugreek seeds regulates markers of macrophage polarization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurudeen Hassan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Macrophages are key cellular mediators in diabetes-related inflammation. Molecular cues such as cytokines found in the tissue microenvironment regulates the polarization of macrophages into an M1 (pro-inflammatory or M2 (immunoregulatory phenotype. Recent evidence suggests that M1 macrophages in diabetic patients may contribute to the complications associated with the disease such as atherosclerosis. Trigonella foenum- graecum (Tfg: fenugreek seeds have been used in traditional medicine in Asia, Africa and the Middle-East for their alleged anti-diabetic properties. Objective: To identify the molecular mechanism(s through which Tfg seeds exert their effects, we investigated the role of a crude methanolic extract of Tfg (FME seeds on macrophage polarization in vitro. Method: THP-1 macrophages (Mϕ were treated with gBSA in the presence/absence of FME and the release and expression of M1 and M2 markers/cytokines were analysed. The role of FME on NF-κB activity was also explored using transfected HEK-293T cells. Results: This study found that the FME significantly (P<0.05 decreased gBSA-induced secretion of M1 cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 in THP-1 Mϕ cells. In the presence of gBSA, FME also significantly increased the gene expression of the M2 marker Dectin-1, but had no effect on IL-10, IL-1Ra. FME also significantly decreased TNF-α induced NF-kB reporter activity. Conclusion: These results suggest that FME can regulate the expression of M1 and M2 markers in THP-1 Mϕ cells. This may be potentially through the modulation of NF-kB activity. Further work should be carried out to identify precise mechanism(s involved in the effects of FME and Tfg seeds.

  7. Curcumin retunes cholesterol transport homeostasis and inflammation response in M1 macrophage to prevent atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang-Yuan; Zhou, Juan; Guo, Ning; Ma, Wang-Ge; Huang, Xin; Wang, Huan; Yuan, Zu-Yi

    2015-11-27

    Lipoprotein cholesterol metabolism dysfunction in the arterial wall is a major contributor to atherosclerosis, and excessive lipid intake and failed cholesterol homeostasis may accelerate the atherogenic process. Curcumin exerts multiple effects by alleviating inflammation, hyperlipidemia, and atherosclerosis; however, its role in cholesterol transport homeostasis and its underlying impact on inflammatory M1 macrophages are poorly understood. This work aimed to investigate the effect of curcumin on cholesterol transport, the inflammatory response and cell apoptosis in M1 macrophages. RAW264.7 macrophages (M0) were induced with LPS plus IFN-γ for 12 h to develop a M1 subtype and were then incubated with curcumin at different concentrations (6.25 and 12.5 μmol/L) in the presence or absence of oxLDL. Then, cholesterol influx/efflux and foam cell formation as well as inflammation and apoptosis were evaluated. It was found that curcumin increased cholesterol uptake measured by the Dil-oxLDL binding assay, and simultaneously increased cholesterol efflux carried out by Apo-A1 and HDL in M1 cells. Curcumin further reinforced ox-LDL-induced cholesterol esterification and foam cell formation as determined by Oil Red O and BODIPY staining. Moreover, curcumin dramatically reduced ox-LDL-induced cytokine production such as IL-1β, IL-6 as well as TNF-α and M1 cell apoptosis. We also found that curcumin upregulated CD36 and ABCA1 in M1 macrophages. Curcumin increased PPARγ expression, which in turn promoted CD36 and ABCA1 expression. In conclusion, curcumin may increase the ability of M1 macrophages to handle harmful lipids, thus promoting lipid processing, disposal and removal, which may support cholesterol homeostasis and exert an anti-atherosclerotic effect.

  8. Universal Quantum Cloning Machines for Two Identical Mixed Qubits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Shuai; ZHAO Mei-Sheng; LIU Nai-Le; CHEN Zeng-Bing

    2007-01-01

    We present a series of universal quantum cloning machines for two identical mixed qubits. Every machine is optimal in the sense that it achieves the optimal bound of the single copy shrinking factor. Unlike in the case of pure state cloning, the single copy shrinking factor does not uniquely determine the cloning map in the case of mixed state cloning.

  9. Public perceptions of farm animal cloning in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Jesper

    This report presents a picture of European opinion on farm animal cloning. In the report, both agricultural and biomedical applications of farm animal cloning are considered. With the arrival of Dolly, animal cloning became an integral part of the biotech debate, but this debate did not isolate...... animal cloning as a single issue....

  10. AN APPROACH FOR CLONE DETECTION IN DOCUMENTATION REUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Lutsiv

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the searching method for repetitions in DocBook/DRL or plain text documents. An algorithm has been designed based on software clone detection. The algorithm supports filtering results: clones are rejected if clone length in the group is less than 5 symbols, intersection of clone groups is eliminated, meaningfulness clones are removed, the groups containing clones consisting only of XML are eliminated. Remaining search is supported: found clones are extracted from the documentation, and clone search is repeated. One step is proved to be enough. Adaptive reuse technique of Paul Bassett – Stan Jarzabek has been implemented. A software tool has been developed on the basis of the algorithm. The tool supports setting parameters for repetitions detection and visualization of the obtained results. The tool is integrated into DocLine document development environment, and provides refactoring of documents using found clones. The Clone Miner clone detection utility is used for clones search. The method has been evaluated for Linux Kernel Documentation (29 documents, 25000 lines. Five semantic kinds of clones have been selected: terms (abbreviations, one word and two word terms, hyperlinks, license agreements, functionality description, and code examples. 451 meaningful clone groups have been found, average clone length is 4.43 tokens, and average number of clones in a group is 3.56.

  11. Cloning: Past, Present, and the Exciting Future. Breakthroughs in Bioscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Berardino, Marie A.

    This document explores the history of cloning by focusing on Dolly the Sheep, one of the first large animal clonings. The disadvantages and advantages of transgenic clones are discussed as well as the future implications of cloning from the perspective of human health. (Contains 10 resources.) (YDS)

  12. Probabilistic Cloning of two Single-Atom States via Thermal Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Pin-Shu; Liu, Dao-Jun

    2016-12-01

    We propose a cavity QED scheme for implementing the 1 → 2 probabilistic quantum cloning (PQC) of two single-atom states. In our scheme, after the to-be-cloned atom and the assistant atom passing through the first cavity, a measurement is carried out on the assistant atom. Based on the measurement outcome we can judge whether the PQC should be continued. If the cloning fails, the other operations are omitted. This makes our scheme economical. If the PQC is continued (with the optimal probability) according to the measurement outcome, two more cavities and some unitary operations are used for achieving the PQC in a deterministic way. Our scheme is insensitive to the decays of the cavities and the atoms.

  13. Role of bone marrow macrophages in controlling homeostasis and repair in bone and bone marrow niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Simranpreet; Raggatt, Liza Jane; Batoon, Lena; Hume, David Arthur; Levesque, Jean-Pierre; Pettit, Allison Robyn

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages, named for their phagocytic ability, participate in homeostasis, tissue regeneration and inflammatory responses. Bone and adjacent marrow contain multiple functionally unique resident tissue macrophage subsets which maintain and regulate anatomically distinct niche environments within these interconnected tissues. Three subsets of bone-bone marrow resident tissue macrophages have been characterised; erythroblastic island macrophages, haematopoietic stem cell niche macrophages and osteal macrophages. The role of these macrophages in controlling homeostasis and repair in bone and bone marrow niches is reviewed in detail.

  14. [Ethical considerations on human cloning. A psychoanalytic perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, A

    2000-01-01

    A brief review of ethical issues related to two types of human cloning is presented: cloning embryonic cells not intended to culminate in the birth of a new individual and cloning human beings. Advantages and objections related to both types of human cloning are analyzed from an ethical point of view. Repercussions on individuals born by the technique of cloning are discussed from a psychoanalytical perspective. It can be concluded that cloning embryonic cells could be admissible, while not cloning considered as a reproductive option.

  15. The impact of pneumolysin on the macrophage response to Streptococcus pneumoniae is strain-dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M Harvey

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is the world's leading cause of pneumonia, bacteremia, meningitis and otitis media. A major pneumococcal virulence factor is the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin, which has the defining property of forming pores in cholesterol-containing membranes. In recent times a clinically significant and internationally successful serotype 1 ST306 clone has been found to express a non-cytolytic variant of Ply (Ply306. However, while the pneumococcus is a naturally transformable organism, strains of the ST306 clonal group have to date been virtually impossible to transform, severely restricting efforts to understand the role of non-cytolytic Ply in the success of this clone. In this study isogenic Ply mutants were constructed in the D39 background and for the first time in the ST306 background (A0229467 to enable direct comparisons between Ply variants for their impact on the immune response in a macrophage-like cell line. Strains that expressed cytolytic Ply were found to induce a significant increase in IL-1β release from macrophage-like cells compared to the non-cytolytic and Ply-deficient strains in a background-independent manner, confirming the requirement for pore formation in the Ply-dependent activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. However, cytolytic activity in the D39 background was found to induce increased expression of the genes encoding GM-CSF (CSF2, p19 subunit of IL-23 (IL23A and IFNβ (IFNB1 compared to non-cytolytic and Ply-deficient D39 mutants, but had no effect in the A0229467 background. The impact of Ply on the immune response to the pneumococcus is highly dependent on the strain background, thus emphasising the importance of the interaction between specific virulence factors and other components of the genetic background of this organism.

  16. Structural and functional changes in pulmonary macrophages during phagocytosis caused by natural zeolite-clinoptilolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruglikov, G.G.; Velichkovskii, B.T.; Garmash, T.I.; Volkogonova, V.M. (Rossiiskii Gosudarstvennyi Meditsinskii Universitet, Moscow (Russian Federation))

    1992-11-01

    Invstigates cytotoxic properties of clinoptilolite and structural and functional state of pulmonary macrophages in the course of phagocytosis caused by exposure to clinoptilolite. Investigations were carried out on white rats with quartz dust and dust of black coal from the Kemerovo coal deposit used in two reference groups. Toxic dust was administered intratracheally in saline solution, coal dust in a 1% starch solution. Pathological processes in phagocytic cells observed using electron microscopy are described. More pronounced cytotoxic effects of clinoptilolite in comparison with those of coal dust are pointed out. The following pathological phenomena in cells were observed: vigorous phagocytic processes on clinoptilolite particles; active lysosome reaction and lipid accumulation; irreversible changes in mitochondrea; development of destructive types of macrophages. 5 refs.

  17. Macrophages, Dendritic Cells, and Regression of Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E. Feig

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is the number one cause of death in the Western world. It results from the interaction between modified lipoproteins and monocyte-derived cells such as macrophages, dendritic cells, T cells, and other cellular elements of the arterial wall. This inflammatory process can ultimately lead to the development of complex lesions, or plaques, that protrude into the arterial lumen. Ultimately, plaque rupture and thrombosis can occur leading to the clinical complications of myocardial infarction or stroke. Although each of the cell types plays roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, in this review, the focus will be primarily on the monocyte derived cells- macrophages and dendritic cells. The roles of these cell types in atherogenesis will be highlighted. Finally, the mechanisms of atherosclerosis regression as it relates to these cells will be discussed.

  18. Modulation of macrophage activation by prostaglandins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sautebin

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of prostaglandtn E2, iloprost and cAMP on both nitric oxide and tumour necrosis factor-α release in J774 macrophages has been studied. Both prostaglandin E2 and iloprost inhibited, in a concentration-dependent fashion, the lipopolysaccharide-induced generation of nitric oxide and tumour necrosis factor-α. The inhibitory effect of these prostanoids seems to be mediated by an increase of the second messenger cAMP since it was mimicked by dibutyryl cAMP and potentiated by the selective type IV phosphodiesterase inhibitor RO-20-1724. Our results suggest that the inhibition of nitric oxide release by prostaglandin E2 and iloprost in lipopolysaccharide-activated J774 macrophages may be secondary to the inhibition of tumour necrosis factor-α generation, which in turn is likely to be mediated by cAMP.

  19. The role of macrophages in skin homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanez, Diana A; Lacher, Richard K; Vidyarthi, Aurobind; Colegio, Oscar R

    2017-04-01

    The skin and its appendages comprise the largest and fastest growing organ in the body. It performs multiple tasks and maintains homeostatic control, including the regulation of body temperature and protection from desiccation and from pathogen invasion. The skin can perform its functions with the assistance of different immune cell populations. Monocyte-derived cells are imperative for the completion of these tasks. The comprehensive role of macrophages and Langerhans cells in establishing and maintaining skin homeostasis remains incompletely defined. However, over the past decade, innovations in mouse genetics have allowed for advancements in the field. In this review, we explore different homeostatic roles of macrophages and Langerhans cells, including wound repair, follicle regeneration, salt balance, and cancer regression and progression in the skin. The understanding of the precise functions of myeloid-derived cells in the skin under basal conditions can help develop specific therapies that aid in skin and hair follicle regeneration and cutaneous cancer prevention.

  20. Identification of BCAP-{sub L} as a negative regulator of the TLR signaling-induced production of IL-6 and IL-10 in macrophages by tyrosine phosphoproteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, Takayuki [Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-0041 (Japan); Department of Life Science and Medical Bio-Science, Waseda University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8480 (Japan); Oyama, Masaaki; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko [Medical Proteomics Laboratory, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Ishikawa, Kosuke; Inoue, Takafumi [Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-0041 (Japan); Department of Life Science and Medical Bio-Science, Waseda University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8480 (Japan); Muta, Tatsushi [Laboratory of Cell Recognition and Response, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Semba, Kentaro, E-mail: ksemba@waseda.jp [Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-0041 (Japan); Department of Life Science and Medical Bio-Science, Waseda University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8480 (Japan); Inoue, Jun-ichiro, E-mail: jun-i@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Medical Proteomics Laboratory, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Division of Cellular and Molecular Biology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan)

    2010-09-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Twenty five tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in LPS-stimulated macrophages were determined. {yields} BCAP is a novel tyrosine-phosphorylated protein in LPS-stimulated macrophages. {yields} BCAP-{sub L} inhibits IL-6 and IL-10 production in LPS-stimulated macrophages. -- Abstract: Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling in macrophages is essential for anti-pathogen responses such as cytokine production and antigen presentation. Although numerous reports suggest that protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) are involved in cytokine induction in response to lipopolysaccharides (LPS; TLR4 ligand) in macrophages, the PTK-mediated signal transduction pathway has yet to be analyzed in detail. Here, we carried out a comprehensive and quantitative dynamic tyrosine phosphoproteomic analysis on the TLR4-mediated host defense system in RAW264.7 macrophages using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). We determined the temporal profiles of 25 proteins based on SILAC-encoded peptide(s). Of these, we focused on the tyrosine phosphorylation of B-cell adaptor for phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (BCAP) because the function of BCAP remains unknown in TLR signaling in macrophages. Furthermore, Bcap has two distinct transcripts, a full-length (Bcap-{sub L}) and an alternatively initiated or spliced (Bcap-{sub S}) mRNA, and little is known about the differential functions of the BCAP-{sub L} and BCAP-{sub S} proteins. Our study showed, for the first time, that RNAi-mediated selective depletion of BCAP-{sub L} enhanced IL-6 and IL-10 production but not TNF-{alpha} production in TLR ligand-stimulated macrophages. We propose that BCAP-{sub L} (but not BCAP-{sub S}) is a negative regulator of the TLR-mediated host defense system in macrophages.

  1. Macrophage microvesicles induce macrophage differentiation and miR-223 transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Noura; Wang, Yijie; Dakhlallah, Duaa; Moldovan, Leni; Agarwal, Kitty; Batte, Kara; Shah, Prexy; Wisler, Jon; Eubank, Tim D; Tridandapani, Susheela; Paulaitis, Michael E; Piper, Melissa G; Marsh, Clay B

    2013-02-07

    Microvesicles are small membrane-bound particles comprised of exosomes and various-sized extracellular vesicles. These are released by several cell types. Microvesicles have a variety of cellular functions from communication to mediating growth and differentiation. Microvesicles contain proteins and nucleic acids. Previously, we showed that plasma microvesicles contain microRNAs (miRNAs). Based on our previous report, the majority of peripheral blood microvesicles are derived from platelets, while mononuclear phagocytes, including macrophages, are the second most abundant population. Here, we characterized macrophage-derived microvesicles and explored their role in the differentiation of naive monocytes. We also identified the miRNA content of the macrophage-derived microvesicles. We found that RNA molecules contained in the macrophage-derived microvesicles were transported to target cells, including mono cytes, endothelial cells, epithelial cells, and fibroblasts. Furthermore, we found that miR-223 was transported to target cells and was functionally active. Based on our observations, we hypothesize that microvesicles bind to and activate target cells. Furthermore, we find that microvesicles induce the differentiation of macrophages. Thus, defining key components of this response may identify novel targets to regulate host defense and inflammation.

  2. Macrophage migration and invasion is regulated by MMP10 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Y Murray

    Full Text Available This study was designed to identify metalloproteinase determinants of macrophage migration and led to the specific hypothesis that matrix metalloproteinase 10 (MMP10/stromelysin-2 facilitates macrophage migration. We first profiled expression of all MMPs in LPS-stimulated primary murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and Raw264.7 cells and found that MMP10 was stimulated early (3 h and down-regulated later (24 h. Based on this pattern of expression, we speculated that MMP10 plays a role in macrophage responses, such as migration. Indeed, using time lapse microscopy, we found that RNAi silencing of MMP10 in primary macrophages resulted in markedly reduced migration, which was reversed with exogenous active MMP10 protein. Mmp10 (-/- bone marrow-derived macrophages displayed significantly reduced migration over a two-dimensional fibronectin matrix. Invasion of primary wild-type macrophages into Matrigel supplemented with fibronectin was also markedly impaired in Mmp10 (-/- cells. MMP10 expression in macrophages thus emerges as an important moderator of cell migration and invasion. These findings support the hypothesis that MMP10 promotes macrophage movement and may have implications in understanding the control of macrophages in several pathologies, including the abnormal wound healing response associated with pro-inflammatory conditions.

  3. ACAT1 deficiency increases cholesterol synthesis in mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, Dwayne E; Su, Yan Ru; Swift, Larry L; Linton, MacRae F; Fazio, Sergio

    2006-06-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) esterifies free cholesterol and stores cholesteryl esters in lipid droplets. Macrophage ACAT1 deficiency results in increased atherosclerotic lesion area in hyperlipidemic mice via disrupted cholesterol efflux, increased lipoprotein uptake, accumulation of intracellular vesicles, and accelerated apoptosis. The objective of this study was to determine whether lipid synthesis is affected by ACAT1. The synthesis, esterification, and efflux of new cholesterol were measured in peritoneal macrophages from ACAT1(-/-) mice. Cholesterol synthesis was increased by 134% (p=0.001) in ACAT1(-/-) macrophages compared to wildtype macrophages. Increased synthesis resulted in a proportional increase in the efflux of newly synthesized cholesterol. Although the esterification of new cholesterol was reduced by 93% (pSREBP1a mRNA was increased 6-fold in ACAT1(-/-) macrophages compared to wildtype macrophages, suggesting an up-regulation of cholesterol and fatty acid synthesis in ACAT1(-/-) macrophages. Increased cholesterol synthesis and up-regulation of SREBP in ACAT1(-/-) macrophages suggests that ACAT1 affects the regulation of lipid metabolism in macrophages. This change in cholesterol homeostasis may contribute to the atherogenic potential of ACAT1(-/-) macrophages.

  4. Macrophage depletion disrupts immune balance and energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bonggi; Qiao, Liping; Kinney, Brice; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Shao, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    Increased macrophage infiltration in tissues including white adipose tissue and skeletal muscle has been recognized as a pro-inflammatory factor that impairs insulin sensitivity in obesity. However, the relationship between tissue macrophages and energy metabolism under non-obese physiological conditions is not clear. To study a homeostatic role of macrophages in energy homeostasis, we depleted tissue macrophages in adult mice through conditional expression of diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor and DT-induced apoptosis. Macrophage depletion robustly reduced body fat mass due to reduced energy intake. These phenotypes were reversed after macrophage recovery. As a potential mechanism, severe hypothalamic and systemic inflammation was induced by neutrophil (NE) infiltration in the absence of macrophages. In addition, macrophage depletion dramatically increased circulating granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) which is indispensable for NE production and tissue infiltration. Our in vitro study further revealed that macrophages directly suppress G-CSF gene expression. Therefore, our study indicates that macrophages may play a critical role in integrating immune balance and energy homeostasis under physiological conditions.

  5. Macrophage depletion disrupts immune balance and energy homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonggi Lee

    Full Text Available Increased macrophage infiltration in tissues including white adipose tissue and skeletal muscle has been recognized as a pro-inflammatory factor that impairs insulin sensitivity in obesity. However, the relationship between tissue macrophages and energy metabolism under non-obese physiological conditions is not clear. To study a homeostatic role of macrophages in energy homeostasis, we depleted tissue macrophages in adult mice through conditional expression of diphtheria toxin (DT receptor and DT-induced apoptosis. Macrophage depletion robustly reduced body fat mass due to reduced energy intake. These phenotypes were reversed after macrophage recovery. As a potential mechanism, severe hypothalamic and systemic inflammation was induced by neutrophil (NE infiltration in the absence of macrophages. In addition, macrophage depletion dramatically increased circulating granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF which is indispensable for NE production and tissue infiltration. Our in vitro study further revealed that macrophages directly suppress G-CSF gene expression. Therefore, our study indicates that macrophages may play a critical role in integrating immune balance and energy homeostasis under physiological conditions.

  6. Nonlocal quantum cloning via quantum dots trapped in distant cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Tao; Zhu Ai-Dong; Zhang Shou

    2012-01-01

    A scheme for implementing nonlocal quantum cloning via quantum dots trapped in cavities is proposed.By modulating the parameters of the system,the optimal 1 → 2 universal quantum cloning machine,1 → 2 phase-covariant cloning machine,and 1 → 3 economical phase-covariant cloning machine are constructed.The present scheme,which is attainable with current technology,saves two qubits compared with previous cloning machines.

  7. Whole genome comparison of donor and cloned dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hak-Min; Cho, Yun Sung; Kim, Hyunmin; Jho, Sungwoong; Son, Bongjun; Choi, Joung Yoon; Kim, Sangsoo; Lee, Byeong Chun; Bhak, Jong; Jang, Goo

    2013-01-01

    Cloning is a process that produces genetically identical organisms. However, the genomic degree of genetic resemblance in clones needs to be determined. In this report, the genomes of a cloned dog and its donor were compared. Compared with a human monozygotic twin, the genome of the cloned dog showed little difference from the genome of the nuclear donor dog in terms of single nucleotide variations, chromosomal instability, and telomere lengths. These findings suggest that cloning by somatic ...

  8. Influence of Plasmid Type on the Replication of Rhodococcus equi in Host Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willingham-Lane, Jennifer M; Berghaus, Londa J; Giguère, Steeve; Hondalus, Mary K

    2016-01-01

    The soil-dwelling, saprophytic actinomycete Rhodococcus equi is a multihost, facultative intracellular pathogen of macrophages. When inhaled by susceptible foals, it causes severe bronchopneumonia. It is also a pathogen of pigs, which may develop submaxillary lymphadenitis upon exposure. R. equi isolates obtained from foals and pigs possess conjugative plasmids housing a pathogenicity island (PAI) containing a novel family of genes of unknown function called the virulence-associated protein or vap family. The PAI regions of the equine and swine plasmids differ in vap gene composition, with equine isolates possessing six vap genes, including the major virulence determinant vapA, while the PAIs of swine isolates house vapB and five other unique vap genes. Possession of the pVAPA-type virulence plasmid by equine isolates bestows the capacity for intramacrophage replication essential for disease development in vivo. Swine isolates of R. equi are largely unstudied. Here, we show that R. equi isolates from pigs, carrying pVAPB-type plasmids, are able to replicate in a plasmid-dependent manner in macrophages obtained from a variety of species (murine, swine, and equine) and anatomical locations. Similarly, equine isolates carrying pVAPA-type plasmids are capable of replication in swine macrophages. Plasmid swapping between equine and swine strains through conjugation did not alter the intracellular replication capacity of the parental strain, indicating that coevolution of the plasmid and chromosome is not crucial for this attribute. These results demonstrate that while distinct plasmid types exist among R. equi isolates obtained from equine and swine sources, this tropism is not determined by host species-specific intramacrophage replication capabilities. IMPORTANCE This work greatly advances our understanding of the opportunistic pathogen Rhodococcus equi, a disease agent of animals and immunocompromised people. Clinical isolates from diseased foals carry a

  9. M2 polarization enhances silica nanoparticle uptake by macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica eHoppstädter

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available While silica nanoparticles have enabled numerous industrial and medical applications, their toxicological safety requires further evaluation. Macrophages are the major cell population responsible for nanoparticle clearance in vivo. The prevailing macrophage phenotype largely depends on the local immune status of the host. Whereas M1-polarized macrophages are considered as pro-inflammatory macrophages involved in host defense, M2 macrophages exhibit anti-inflammatory and wound-healing properties, but also promote tumor growth.We employed different models of M1 and M2 polarization: GM-CSF/LPS/IFN-gamma was used to generate primary human M1 cells and M-CSF/IL-10 to differentiate M2 monocyte-derived macrophages. PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells were polarized towards an M1 type by LPS/IFN-gamma and towards M2 by IL-10. Uptake of fluorescent silica nanoparticles (Ø 26 and 41 nm and microparticles (Ø 1.75 µm was quantified. At the concentration used (50 µg/ml, silica nanoparticles did not influence cell viability as assessed by MTT assay. Nanoparticle uptake was enhanced in M2-polarized primary human monocyte-derived macrophages compared with M1 cells, as shown by flow cytometric and microscopic approaches. In contrast, the uptake of microparticles did not differ between M1 and M2 phenotypes. M2 polarization was also associated with increased nanoparticle uptake in the macrophage-like THP-1 cell line. In accordance, in vivo polarized M2-like primary human tumor-associated macrophages (TAM obtained from lung tumors took up more nanoparticles than M1-like alveolar macrophages isolated from the surrounding lung tissue.In summary, our data indicate that the M2 polarization of macrophages promotes nanoparticle internalization. Therefore, the phenotypical differences between macrophage subsets should be taken into consideration in future investigations on nanosafety, but might also open up therapeutic perspectives allowing to specifically target M2

  10. Functional characterization of recombinant rat macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha and mRNA expression in pulmonary inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, M M; Chong, I W; Long, N C; Love, J A; Godleski, J J; Paulauskis, J D

    1998-02-01

    Chemokines are important inflammatory mediators that function by activating and recruiting leukocytes to an inflamed tissue. We have recently cDNA cloned the rat chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1 alpha) (1). In the present study, we characterize the biological function of recombinant MIP-1 alpha protein and describe expression of its mRNA both in vitro and in a rat model of lung inflammation. In vitro rat rMIP-1 alpha protein was chemotactic for both polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and macrophages with maximal activity at 50 nM for both cell types. In in vivo studies, we found that intratracheal instillation of 1 and 5 micrograms of rMIP-1 alpha resulted in a significant (P < 0.05) influx of cells, primarily monocytes/macrophages, into the airspace of the lungs after 6 h. Mean numbers of lavagable PMNs were not elevated significantly (P < 0.05) for either dose of MIP-1 alpha. As a model of inflammation, rats were intratracheally instilled with 0.1 mg/kg bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed 3 h later. Instillation of LPS resulted in an acute neutrophilia, but no significant change in lavagable macrophages. BAL cells from control animals (saline instilled) displayed no basal mRNA expression of either MIP-1 alpha or MIP-2 (positive control). In contrast, both MIP-1 alpha and MIP-2 mRNA levels increased markedly in BAL cells from rats instilled with LPS. The rat alveolar macrophage cell line (NR8383) also showed increased MIP-1 alpha mRNA levels in response to LPS (10 micrograms/ml) with a maximal increase after 6-8 h. The induction of MIP-1 alpha mRNA expression by LPS in NR8383 cells was attenuated by cotreatment with the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and dimethylsulfoxide, suggesting that the induction of MIP-1 alpha mRNA by LPS is mediated via the generation of reactive oxygen species. We conclude that MIP-1 alpha is a potent chemoattractant for macrophages in vivo, and its mRNA expression in

  11. Effects of Recombinant Toxoplasma gondii Citrate Synthase I on the Cellular Functions of Murine Macrophages In vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinchao Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasmosis, which is one of the most widespread zoonoses worldwide, has a high incidence and infection can result in severe disease in humans and livestock. Citrate synthase (CS is a component of nearly all living cells that plays a vital role in the citric acid cycle, which is the central metabolic pathway of aerobic organisms. In the present study, the citrate synthase I gene of Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii (TgCSI was cloned and characterized. The TgCSI gene had an open reading frame of 1665 bp nucleotides encoding a 555 amino acid protein with a molecular weight of 60 kDa. Using western blotting assay, the recombinant protein was successfully recognized by the sera of rats experimentally infected with T. gondii, while the native protein in the T. gondii tachyzoites was detected in sera from rats immunized with the recombinant protein of TgCSI. Binding of the protein to murine macrophages was confirmed by immuno fluorescence assay. Following incubation of macrophages with rTgCSI, the rTgCSI protein was found to have a dual function, with low concentrations (5–10 μg/mL enhancing phagocytosis and high levels (80 μg/mL inhibiting phagocytosis. Investigation of murine macrophage apoptosis illustrated that 5 μg/mL rTgCSI protein can significantly induce early apoptosis and late stage apoptosis (*p < 0.05, while 10 μg/mL rTgCSI protein significantly induced early apoptosis, but had no effect on late stage of apoptosis (**p < 0.01, and 80 μg/mL rTgCSI protein inhibited late stage apoptosis of macrophages (*p < 0.05. Cytokine detection revealed that the secretion of interleukin-10, interleukin-1β, transforming growth factor-β1 and tumor necrosis factor-α of macrophages increased after the cells were incubated with all concentration of rTgCSI, with the exception that 5 μg/mL rTgCSI had no effect on the secretion of interleukin-10 and interleukin-1β. However, secretion of NO and cell proliferation of the macrophages were substantially

  12. Regenerative Capacity of Macrophages for Remyelination

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    Khalil eRawji

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available White matter injury, consisting of loss of axons, myelin and oligodendrocytes, is common in many neurological disorders and is believed to underlie several motor and sensory deficits. Remyelination is the process in which the insulative myelin sheath is restored to axons, thereby facilitating recovery from functional loss. Remyelination proceeds with oligodendrocyte precursor cells that differentiate into oligodendrocytes to synthesize the new myelin sheath after demyelination. This process is influenced by several factors, including trophic factors, inhibitory molecules in the lesion microenvironment, age of the subject, as well as the inflammatory response. Currently studied strategies that enhance remyelination consist of pharmacological approaches that directly induce oligodendrocyte precursor cell differentiation or using agents to neutralize the inhibitory microenvironment. Another strategy is to harness a reparative inflammatory response. This response, coordinated by central nervous system resident microglia and peripherally-derived infiltrating macrophages, has been shown to be important in the remyelination process. These innate immune cells perform important functions in remyelination, including the proteolysis and phagocytosis of inhibitory molecules present in the lesion microenvironment, the provision of trophic and metabolic factors to oligodendrocyte precursor cells, in addition to iron handling capacity. Additionally, an initial pro-inflammatory phase followed by a regulatory/anti-inflammatory phase has been shown to be important for oligodendrocyte precursor cell proliferation and differentiation, respectively. This review will discuss the beneficial roles of macrophages/microglia in remyelination and discuss therapeutic strategies to obtain the optimal regenerative macrophage phenotype for enhanced remyelination.

  13. Trafficking of Estrella lausannensis in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusconi, Brigida; Kebbi-Beghdadi, Carole; Greub, Gilbert

    2015-07-01

    Estrella lausannensis is a new member of the Chlamydiales order. Like other Chlamydia-related bacteria, it is able to replicate in amoebae and in fish cell lines. A preliminary study investigating the pathogenic potential of Chlamydia-related bacteria found a correlation between antibody response to E. lausannensis and pneumonia in children. To further investigate the pathogenic potential of E. lausannensis, we determined its ability to grow in human macrophages and its intracellular trafficking. The replication in macrophages resulted in viable E. lausannensis; however, it caused a significant cytopathic effect. The intracellular trafficking of E. lausannensis was analyzed by determining the interaction of the Estrella-containing inclusions with various endocytic markers as well as host organelles. The E. lausannensis inclusion escaped the endocytic pathway rapidly avoiding maturation into phagolysosomes by preventing both EEA-1 and LAMP-1 accumulation. Compared to Waddlia chondrophila, another Chlamydia-related bacteria, the recruitment of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum was minimal for E. lausannensis inclusions. Estrella lausannensis appears to use a distinct source of nutrients and energy compared to other members of the Chlamydiales order. In conclusion, we hypothesize that E. lausannensis has a restricted growth in human macrophages, due to its reduced capacity to control programmed cell death.

  14. Pegylated silica nanoparticles: cytotoxicity and macrophage uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glorani, Giulia; Marin, Riccardo; Canton, Patrizia; Pinto, Marcella; Conti, Giamaica; Fracasso, Giulio; Riello, Pietro

    2017-08-01

    Here, we present a thorough study of pegylated silica nanoparticle (SNP) interaction with different biological environments. The SNPs have a mean diameter of about 40 nm and are coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) of different molecular weights. The physicochemical characterization of SNPs allowed the confirmation of the binding of PEG chains to the silica surface, the reproducibility of the synthesis and the narrow size-dispersion. In view of clarifying the SNP interaction with biological environments, we first assessed the SNP reactivity after the incubation with two cell lines (macrophages RAW 264.7 and primary human fibroblasts), observing a reduced toxicity of pegylated SNPs compared to the bare ones. Then, we investigated the effect of the protein adsorption on the SNP surface using the model serum protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA). We found that the protein adsorption takes place more heavily on poorly pegylated SNPs, promoting the uptake of the latter by macrophages and leading to an increased mortality of these cells. To better understand this mechanism by means of flow cytometry, the dye Ru(bpy)3Cl2 was incorporated in the SNPs. The overall results highlight the SNP potentialities as a drug delivery system, thanks to the low interactions with the macrophages.

  15. Cloning and sequencing genes related to preeclampsia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Juan-zi; LIU Yan-fang; YAO Yuan-qing; YAN Wei; ZHU Feng; ZHAO Zhong-liang

    2001-01-01

    To clone genes specifically expressed in the placenta of patients with preeclampsia, and to explain the mechanism in the etiopathology ofpreeclampsia. Methods: The placentae ofpreeclamptic and normotensive subjects with pregnancy were used as models, and the cDNA Library was constructed and 20 differentially expressed fragments were cloned after a new version of PCR-based subtractive hybridization. The false positive clones were identified by reverse dot blot analysis. With one of the obtained gene taken as the probe, the placentas of 10 normal pregnant women and 10 preeclamptic patients were studied by using dot hybridization methods. Results: Six false positive clones were identified by reverse dot blot, and the rest 14 clones were identified as preeclampsia-related genes. These clones were sequenced, and analyzed with BLAST analysis system. Eleven of 14 clones were genes already known, among which one belongs to necdin family; the rest 3 were identified as novel genes. These 3 genes were acknowledged by GenBank, with the accession numbers AF232216, AF232217, AF233648. The results of dot hybridization using necdin gene as probe were as follows: (1) There was this mRNA in the placental tissues of normal pregnancy as well as in that ofpreeclampsia.(2) The intensity of transcription of this mRNA in the placental tissues of preeclampsia increased significantly compared with that of the normal pregnancy (P<0.05). Conclusions: This study for the first time reported this group of genes, especially necdin-expressing gene, which are related to the etiopathology of preeclampsia. In addition, the overtranscription ofnecdin gene has been found in preeclampsia. It is helpful in further studies of the etiology ofpreeclampsia.

  16. Yield Performance of Locally Selected Cocoa Clones in North Luwu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agung Wahyu Soesilo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Participatory selection in North Luwu District selected some locally cocoa clones, of which MCC 01 and MCC 02 the most promising to be developed as clonal material. This research has objectives to observe the stability performance of yield of these clones that enable be characterized of the potency as the basis for recommendation. Observation were carried out in 35 selected-farms be differentiated according to clone’s type, namely MCC 01, MCC 02 and Sulawesi 01 (control and the year of planting (age. These farms were establised at the main area of cocoa in North Luwu. The assessed variables were the number of pod, yield components, the resistance to cocoa pod borer (CPB, vascular-streak dieback (VSD and phytophthora pod rot (PPR. Data were recorded through 20 sampled-trees per farm in the period of April 2013 to April 2014 with monthly basis assessment. Data were analyzed refer to Eberhart & Russel method to perform stability parameters of the yield. The results indicate that these clones stable performing yield potency among plant age. MCC 01 and MCC 02 performed yield potency in amount of 3,682 kg/ha and 3,132 kg/ha respectively higher than Sulawesi 01 of 2,772 kg/ha. Evaluation of the resistance, MCC 01 having moderate resistance to CPB and VSD and resistance to PPR, however MCC 02 having resistance to CPB, VSD and PPR. Referring to the potency thus MCC 01 and MCC 02 were legally recommended as clonal material for farmers, restricted at the agroclimatic area similar to the condition in North Luwu.

  17. Transformation of Bacillus Subtilis with cloned thymidylate synthetases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Edward M.

    1980-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis carries two genes, thyA and thyB, each encoding different protein products, with thymidylate synthetase (TSase) activity. Either of these genes alone is sufficient for thymidine independence in B. subtilis. In addition there exist two B. subtilis temperate bacteriophages which upon infection of thymine requiring auxotrophs results in conversion of the organism to thymine independence. Chimeric plasmids selected for Thy/sup +/ transforming activity in E. coli were constructed and then used as a source of defined highly enriched DNA with which to transform competent B. subtilis. These plasmids were studied for their: (1) abiility to transform B. subtilis to thymine independence; (2) site of integration within the B. subtilis chromosome upon transformation; (3) phenotype of Thy/sup +/ plasmid generated transformants; and (4) nucleotide sequence homology among the cloned DNA fragments conferring thymine independence. Plasmids containing the two bacteriophage thy genes displayed the phenotype associated with thyA, whereas the plasmids containing the cloned B. subtilis chromosomal genes displayed the phenotype associated with thyB. Utilizing similar technology, the ability of an entirely foreign hybred bacterial plasmiid to transform B. subtilis was examined. In this case the gene from E. coli encoding thymidylate synthetase was cloned in the plasmid pBR322. The resulting chimeric plasmid was effective in transforming both E. coli and B. subtilis to thymine prototrophy. Uncloned linear E. coli chromosomal DNA was unable to transform thymine requiring strains of B. subtilis to thymine independence. Although the Thy/sup +/ transformants of E. coli contained plasmid DNA, the Thy/sup +/ transformants derived from the transformation of B. subtilis did not contain detectable extrachromosomal DNA. Instead the DNA from the chimeric plasmid was integrated into the chromosome of B. subtilis. (ERB)

  18. Fault tolerant reversible logic synthesis: Carry look-ahead and carry-skip adders

    CERN Document Server

    Islam, Md Saiful; Begum, Zerina; Hafiz, Mohd Zulfiquar; 10.1109/ACTEA.2009.5227871

    2010-01-01

    Irreversible logic circuits dissipate heat for every bit of information that is lost. Information is lost when the input vector cannot be recovered from its corresponding output vector. Reversible logic circuit naturally takes care of heating because it implements only the functions that have one-to-one mapping between its input and output vectors. Therefore reversible logic design becomes one of the promising research directions in low power dissipating circuit design in the past few years and has found its application in low power CMOS design, digital signal processing and nanotechnology. This paper presents the efficient approaches for designing reversible fast adders that implement carry look-ahead and carry-skip logic. The proposed 16-bit high speed reversible adder will include IG gates for the realization of its basic building block. The IG gate is universal in the sense that it can be used to synthesize any arbitrary Boolean-functions. The IG gate is parity preserving, that is, the parity of the input...

  19. Molecular cloning of cat interleukin 12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Schijns, Virgil E.C.J.; Wierda, C.M.; Vahlenkamp, T.W.

    1997-01-01

    The recently discovered interleukin-12 (IL-12) is a heterodimeric 70000 Mr cytokine composed of a disulphide-bonded 35000 Mr (p35) subunit and a 40000 Mr (p40) subunit. Produced mainly by activated monocytes/macrophages and B cells, it enhances NK/LAK cell cytolytic activity and stimulates

  20. Description of genomic islands associated to the multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clone ST277.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Melise Chaves; Albano, Rodolpho Mattos; Asensi, Marise Dutra; Carvalho-Assef, Ana Paula D'Alincourt

    2016-08-01

    Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clone ST277 is disseminated in Brazil where it is mainly associated with the presence of metallo-β-lactamase SPM-1. Furthermore, it carries the class I integron In163 and a 16S rRNA methylase rmtD that confers aminoglycoside resistance. To analyze the genetic characteristics that might be responsible for the success of this endemic clone, genomes of four P. aeruginosa strains that were isolated in distinct years and in different Brazilian states were sequenced. The strains differed regarding the presence of the genes blaSPM-1 and rmtD. Genomic comparisons that included genomes of other clones that have spread worldwide from this species were also performed. These analyses revealed a 763,863bp region in the P. aeruginosa chromosome that concentrates acquired genetic structures comprising two new genomic islands (PAGI-13 and PAGI-14), a mobile element that could be used for ST277 fingerprinting and a recently reported Integrative and Conjugative Element (ICE) associated to blaSPM-1. The genetic elements rmtD and In163 are inserted in PAGI-13 while PAGI-14 has genes encoding proteins related to type III restriction system and phages. The data reported in this study provide a basis for a clearer understanding of the genetic content of clone ST277 and illustrate the mechanisms that are responsible for the success of these endemic clones.

  1. WOOD BASIC DENSITY EFFECT OF Eucalyptus grandis x Eucalyptus urophylla CLONES ON BLEACHED PULP QUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Rodrigues dos Santos

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The study analyzed the wood basic density effect in two Eucalyptus grandis x Eucalyptus urophylla hybrid clones (440 kg/m3 e 508 kg/m3 on bleached pulp quality (fiber dimensions and physical-mechanical properties. The woods performance on pulping, bleaching and beating results were analyzed. The Kraft pulping was carried out in forced circulation digester in order to obtain 17±1 kappa number targets. The pulps were bleached to 90±1 using delignification oxygen and D0EOPD1 bleaching sequence. Bleached pulp of low basic density clone showed, significantly, lowest revolutions number in the PFI mill to reach tensile index of 70 N.m/g, low Schopper Riegler degree and generated sheets with higher values to bulk and opacity. These characteristics and properties allow concluding that bleached pulp of low basic density clone was the most indicated to produce printing and writing sheets. The bleached pulp of high basic density clone showed higher values of bulk and capillarity Klemm and lower water retention value when analyzed without beating. The bleached pulp of high basic density clone showed more favorable characteristics to the production of tissue papers.

  2. Cloning Mice and Men: Prohibiting the Use of iPS Cells for Human Reproductive Cloning

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, Bernard; Parham, Lindsay; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Cedars, Marcelle; Conklin, Bruce; Fisher, Susan; Gates, Elena; Giudice, Linda; Halme, Dina Gould; Hershon, William; Kriegstein, Arnold; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Wagner, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The use of iPSCs and tetraploid complementation for human reproductive cloning would raise profound ethical objections. Professional standards and laws that ban human reproductive cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer should be revised to also forbid it by other methods, such as iPSCs via tetraploid complementation.

  3. Update on the First Cloned Dog and Outlook for Canine Cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Goo; Lee, ByeongChun

    2015-10-01

    As man's best friend, dogs have an important position in human society. Ten years ago, we reported the first cloned dog, and his birth has raised various scientific issues, such as those related to health, reproduction, and life span. He has developed without any unique health issues. In this article, we summarize and present perspectives on canine cloning.

  4. Cloning mice and men: prohibiting the use of iPS cells for human reproductive cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Bernard; Parham, Lindsay; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Cedars, Marcelle; Conklin, Bruce; Fisher, Susan; Gates, Elena; Giudice, Linda; Halme, Dina Gould; Hershon, William; Kriegstein, Arnold; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Wagner, Richard

    2010-01-08

    The use of iPSCs and tetraploid complementation for human reproductive cloning would raise profound ethical objections. Professional standards and laws that ban human reproductive cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer should be revised to also forbid it by other methods, such as iPSCs via tetraploid complementation.

  5. Mimicking the tumor microenvironment to regulate macrophage phenotype and assessing chemotherapeutic efficacy in embedded cancer cell/macrophage spheroid models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tevis, Kristie M; Cecchi, Ryan J; Colson, Yolonda L; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2017-03-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are critical stromal components intimately involved with the progression, invasion, and metastasis of cancer cells. To address the need for an in vitro system that mimics the clinical observations of TAM localizations and subsequent functional performance, a cancer cell/macrophage spheroid model is described. The central component of the model is a triple negative breast cancer spheroid embedded in a three-dimensional collagen gel. Macrophages are incorporated in two different ways. The first is a heterospheroid, a spheroid containing both tumor cells and macrophages. The heterospheroid mimics the population of TAMs infiltrated into the tumor mass, thus being exposed to hypoxia and metabolic gradients. In the second model, macrophages are diffusely seeded in the collagen surrounding the spheroid, thus modeling TAMs in the cancer stroma. The inclusion of macrophages as a heterospheroid changes the metabolic profile, indicative of synergistic growth. In contrast, macrophages diffusely seeded in the collagen bear the same profile regardless of the presence of a tumor cell spheroid. The macrophages in the heterospheroid secrete EGF, a cytokine critical to tumor/macrophage co-migration, and an EGF inhibitor decreases the metabolic activity of the heterospheroid, which is not observed in the other systems. The increased secretion of IL-10 indicates that the heterospheroid macrophages follow an M2/TAM differentiation pathway. Lastly, the heterospheroid exhibits resistance to paclitaxel. In summary, the collagen embedded heterospheroid model promotes TAM-like characteristics, and will be of utility in cancer biology and drug discovery.

  6. Recombinant glycoprotein 63 (Gp63) of Trypanosoma carassii suppresses antimicrobial responses of goldfish (Carassius auratus L.) monocytes and macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladiran, Ayoola; Belosevic, Miodrag

    2012-06-01

    We previously reported that proteins secreted by Trypanosoma carassii play a role in evasion of fish host immune responses. To further understand how these parasites survive in the host, we cloned and expressed T. carassii glycoprotein 63 (Tcagp63), and generated a rabbit polyclonal antibody to the recombinant protein (rTcagp63). Tcagp63 was similar to gp63 of other trypanosomes and grouped with Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei gp63 in phylogenetic analysis. We showed that rTcagp63 down-regulated Aeromonas salmonicida and recombinant goldfish TNFα2-induced production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates. Macrophages treated with rTcagp63 also exhibited significant reduction in the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-A, TNFα-1 and TNFα-2. Recombinant Tcagp63 bound to and was internalised by goldfish macrophages. The Tcagp63 may act by altering the signalling events important in downstream monocyte/macrophage antimicrobial and other cytokine-induced functions. We believe that this is the first report on downregulation of antimicrobial responses by trypanosome gp63.

  7. Consensus maps of cloned plant cuticle genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eviatar; Nevo

    2010-01-01

    Plant cuticle,which covers the plant surface,consists of waxes and cutins,and is associated with plant drought,cold,and salt resistance.Hitherto,at least 47 genes participating in the formation of plant cuticle have been cloned from Arabidopsis thaliana,Oryza sativa,Zea mays,Ricinus communis,Brassica napus,and Medicago truncatula;and about 85% of them encode proteins sharing above 50% identities with their rice homologous sequences.These cloned cuticle genes were mapped in silico on different chromosomes of rice and Arabidopsis,respectively.The mapping results revealed that plant cuticle genes were not evenly distributed in both genomes.About 40% of the mapped cuticle genes were located on chromosome 1 in Arabidopsis,while 20% of the mapped cuticle genes were located on chromosome 2 but none on chromosome 12 in rice.Some cloned plant cuticle genes have several rice homologous sequences,which might be produced by chromosomal segment duplication.The consensus map of cloned plant cuticle genes will provide important clues for the selection of candidate genes in a positional cloning of an unknown cuticle gene in plants.

  8. Elephant grass clones for silage production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rerisson José Cipriano dos Santos

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Ensiling warm-season grasses often requires wilting due to their high moisture content, and the presence of low-soluble sugars in these grasses usually demands the use of additives during the ensiling process. This study evaluated the bromatological composition of the fodder and silage from five Pennisetum sp. clones (IPA HV 241, IPA/UFRPE Taiwan A-146 2.114, IPA/UFRPE Taiwan A-146 2.37, Elephant B, and Mott. The contents of 20 Polyvinyl chloride (PVC silos, which were opened after 90 days of storage, were used for the bromatological analysis and the evaluation of the pH, nitrogen, ammonia, buffer capacity, soluble carbohydrates, and fermentation coefficients. The effluent losses, gases and dry matter recovery were also calculated. Although differences were observed among the clones (p < 0.05 for the concentrations of dry matter, insoluble nitrogen in acid detergents, insoluble nitrogen in neutral detergents, soluble carbohydrates, fermentation coefficients, and in vitro digestibility in the forage before ensiling, no differences were observed for most of these variables after ensiling. All of the clones were efficient in the fermentation process. The IPA/UFRPE TAIWAN A-146 2.37 clone, however, presented a higher dry matter concentration and the best fermentation coefficient, resulting in a better silage quality, compared to the other clones.

  9. Sequence structure of Lowary/Widom clones forming strong nucleosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonov, Edward N

    2016-01-01

    Lowary and Widom selected from random sequences those which form exceptionally stable nucleosomes, including clone 601, the current champion of strong nucleosome (SN) sequences. This unique sequence database (LW sequences) carries sequence elements which confer stability on the nucleosomes formed on the sequences, and, thus, may serve as source of information on the structure of "ideal" or close to ideal nucleosome DNA sequence. An important clue is also provided by crystallographic study of Vasudevan and coauthors on clone 601 nucleosomes. It demonstrated that YR·YR dinucleotide stacks (primarily TA·TA) follow one another at distances 10 or 11 bases or multiples thereof, such that they all are located on the interface between DNA and histone octamer. Combining this important information with alignment of the YR-containing 10-mers and 11-mers from LW sequences, the bendability matrices of the stable nucleosome DNA are derived. The matrices suggest that the periodically repeated TA (YR), RR, and YY dinucleotides are the main sequence features of the SNs. This consensus coincides with the one for recently discovered SNs with visibly periodic DNA sequences. Thus, the experimentally observed stable LW nucleosomes and SNs derived computationally appear to represent the same entity - exceptionally stable SNs.

  10. Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Oncolytic Virotherapy: Friend or Foe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas L. Denton

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cancer therapy remains a challenge due to toxicity limitations of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Oncolytic viruses that selectively replicate and destroy cancer cells are of increasing interest. In addition to direct cell lysis, these vectors stimulate an anti-tumor immune response. A key regulator of tumor immunity is the tumor-associated macrophage population. Macrophages can either support oncolytic virus therapy through pro-inflammatory stimulation of the anti-tumor response at the cost of hindering direct oncolysis or through immunosuppressive protection of virus replication at the cost of hindering the anti-tumor immune response. Despite similarities in macrophage interaction between adult and pediatric tumors and the abundance of research supporting macrophage modulation in adult tumors, there are few studies investigating macrophage modulation in pediatric cancers or modulation of immunotherapy. We review the current state of knowledge regarding macrophages in cancers and their influence on oncolytic virotherapy.

  11. The relationship between LDL oxidation and macrophage myeloperoxidase activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武军驻; 刘艳红; 李小明; 陈丽达; 夏腊菊; 洪嘉玲

    2003-01-01

    Objective To explore low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation by macrophage myeloperoxidase (MPO) at molecular level.Methods Using a mouse macrophage model, we examined the relationship between LDL oxidation and macrophage MPO by measuring macrophage MPO activity, LDL oxidation products, MPO gene expression and cellular orientation of LDL oxidation. Results MPO gene expression increased to its maximum gradually when the concentration of LDL was increased, and then maintained at that level. NaN3 inhibied the elevation of MPO activity and LDL oxidation, which was LDL concentration-dependent. After the composition of macrophage membrane was roughly analyzed, it was determined that the contents of MPO and LDL in 5% sucrose were 7.667 and 21 times higher than those in 10% sucrose, respectively. Conclusion LDL is attached to the "microdomain" of the macrophage membrane in which LDL is oxidized by MPO.

  12. Role of macrophages in the progression of acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sabrina; Gea-Sorlí; Daniel; Closa

    2010-01-01

    In addition to pancreatic cells,other inflammatory cell populations contribute to the generation of inflammatory mediators during acute pancreatitis.In particular,macrophages could be activated by mediators released during pancreatitis by a damaged pancreas.It has been reported that peritoneal macrophages,alveolar macrophages and Kupffer cells become activated in different stages of severe acute pancreatitis.However,macrophages display remarkable plasticity and can change their physiology in response to environmental cues.Depending on their microenvironmental stimulation,macrophages could follow different activation pathways resulting in marked phenotypic heterogeneity.This ability has made these cells interesting therapeutical targets and several approaches have been assayed to modulate the progression of inflammatory response secondary to acute pancreatitis.However,despite the recent advances in the modulation of macrophage function in vivo,the therapeutical applications of these strategies require a better understanding of the regulation of gene expression in these cells.

  13. Polarization of macrophages and microglia in inflammatory demyelination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Cao; Cheng He

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune demyelinating disease of the central nervous system,and microglia and macrophages play important roles in its pathogenesis.The activation of microglia and macrophages accompanies disease development,whereas depletion of these cells significantly decreases disease severity.Microglia and macrophages usually have diverse and plastic phenotypes.Both pro-inflammatory and antiinflammatory microglia and macrophages exist in MS and its animal model,experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.The polarization of microglia and macrophages may underlie the differing functional properties that have been reported.In this review,we discuss the responses and polarization of microglia and macrophages in MS,and their effects on its pathogenesis and repair.Harnessing their beneficial effects by modulating their polarization states holds great promise for the treatment of inflammatory demyelinating diseases.

  14. Macrophages in cardiac homeostasis, injury responses and progenitor cell mobilisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander R. Pinto

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are an immune cell type found in every organ of the body. Classically, macrophages are recognised as housekeeping cells involved in the detection of foreign antigens and danger signatures, and the clearance of tissue debris. However, macrophages are increasingly recognised as a highly versatile cell type with a diverse range of functions that are important for tissue homeostasis and injury responses. Recent research findings suggest that macrophages contribute to tissue regeneration and may play a role in the activation and mobilisation of stem cells. This review describes recent advances in our understanding of the role played by macrophages in cardiac tissue maintenance and repair following injury. We examine the involvement of exogenous and resident tissue macrophages in cardiac inflammatory responses and their potential activity in regulating cardiac regeneration.

  15. Pre-weaning performance and health of pigs born to cloned (fetal cell derived) swine versus non-cloned swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, M; Adams, C; Wiseman, B

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the pre-weaning performance of pigs derived from cloned versus non-cloned parents. Five cloned gilts and one cloned boar were used to produce five litters of pigs. One of five cloned females and the cloned boar were derived from two genetically unmanipulated fetal fibroblast cell lines. The remaining female clones were derived from a fetal fibroblast cell line in which random insertion of a alpha-1,3-galactosyltransferase gene targeting construct had occurred. Fetal cell lines had similar genetic backgrounds and were derived from three different fetuses in three different litters. Five litters of pigs were also generated from matings between two non-cloned boars and five non-cloned gilts. The mean gestation length, mean litter size, mean birth and weaning weights for male and female pigs were similar for litters derived from cloned parents versus non-cloned parents. The proportions of pigs born live and pigs that survived to weaning were also similar for pigs born to cloned as compared to non-cloned parents. In summary, matings between cloned swine derived from fetal fibroblast cell lines yielded litters of pigs that were similar in the number born, piglet birth weight and perinatal and pre-weaning mortality to litters produced by non-cloned swine.

  16. Medroxyprogesterone acetate drives M2 macrophage differentiation toward a phenotype of decidual macrophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yung-Chieh; Tseng, Joseph T; Wang, Chia-Yih; Su, Mei-Tsz; Huang, Jyun-Yuan; Kuo, Pao-Lin

    2017-09-05

    M1 macrophage differentiation plays a crucial role in enhanced inflammation during pregnancy, which may lead to pregnancy complications. Therefore, modulation of macrophage differentiation toward the M2 phenotype is desirable to ensure a successful pregnancy. Medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) is a potent progestin with an anti-inflammatory property, but its effect on macrophage differentiation is unknown. This study aimed to examine whether MPA can induce an M2 macrophage differentiation by using the human monocytes cell line THP-1 or primary monocytes. THP-1 cells were primed with phorbol-12-myristate-13 acetate (PMA) to initiate macrophage differentiation. By incubating with MPA, the cells (denoted as MPA-pTHP-1) underwent M2 macrophage differentiation with downregulations of CD11c, IL-1β and TNF-α, and upregulations of CD163 and IL-10; while cells incubated with progesterone (P4) did not show the M2 phenotype. Primary monocytes treated with MPA also had the same M2 phenotype. Moreover, M1 macrophages derived from IFN-γ/LPS-treated THP-1 cells, which had high levels of IL-1b and iNOS, and low levels of IL-10 and IDO, were reversed to the M2 phenotype by the MPA treatment. We also found that the MPA-pTHP-1 promoted the decidualization of endometrial stromal cells and the invasion of trophoblast cells. To mimic conditions of exposure to various pathogens, MPA-pTHP-1 cells were stimulated by different types of TLR ligands. We found they produced lower levels of IL-1β and TNF-α, as well as a higher level of IL-10, compared to untreated cells. Finally, we found the level of phosphorylated ERK in the MPA-pTHP-1 cells was increased, but its IL-10 production was suppressed by either the progesterone/glucocorticoid antagonist (Mifepristone) or MEK inhibitor (U0126). Taken together, MPA could drive monocyte differentiation toward an M2 phenotype that mimics decidual macrophages. This finding holds great potential to combat chronic endometrial inflammation

  17. Pneumocystis carinii glycoprotein A binds macrophage mannose receptors.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Riordan, D.M.; Standing, J E; Limper, A H

    1995-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii causes life-threatening pneumonia in patients with impaired immunity. Recent studies suggest that alveolar macrophages interact with P. carinii through macrophage mannose receptors. However, the ligand(s) on P. carinii that is recognized by these receptors has not been fully defined. P. carinii contains a major mannose-rich surface antigen complex termed glycoprotein A (gpA). It was therefore hypothesized that gpA binds directly to macrophage mannose receptors and mediate...

  18. Particulate Systems for Targeting of Macrophages: Basic and Therapeutic Concepts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moien; Parhamifar, Ladan; Ahmadvand, Davoud;

    2012-01-01

    and intracellular drug release processes can be optimized through modifications of the drug carrier physicochemical properties, which include hydrodynamic size, shape, composition and surface characteristics. Through such modifications together with understanding of macrophage cell biology, targeting may be aimed...... at a particular subset of macrophages. Advances in basic and therapeutic concepts of particulate targeting of macrophages and related nanotechnology approaches for immune cell modifications are discussed.Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel...

  19. Potencial de clones elite de batata como novas cultivares para Minas Gerais Potential of elite potato clones as new cultivars for Minas Gerais State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César ABP Pinto

    2010-12-01

    , lower fertility of soils, and higher pressure of pathogens and plagues. The objective of this study was to evaluate elite potato clones from the breeding program of Universidade Federal de Lavras which are more resistant to the most important diseases, with wide adaptation to the various planting seasons in south Minas Gerais State, and destined to the domestic use or industry. Six experiments were carried out in four localities in south Minas Gerais State during the dry, winter, and rainy seasons. The experimental design was randomized complete blocks with three replications 26 treatments (22 experimental clones and four control cultivars. Some clones presented desirable traits to be released as new cultivars to attend the various marketing needs. Clones NES 1-08 and PRM 348 could be indicated to the fresh market due to their good general tuber appearance and aptitude to multiple uses (frying, cooking, mashed potatoes Clones CBM 9-10 and CBM 4-48 could be indicated to the frozen frying industry because of their high specific gravity, high percentage of large tubers and long tuber shape. Clones CBM 19-11 and CBM 16-16 could be indicated to the chip industry or "straw potato" industry, because they present round tubers and adequate specific gravity.

  20. MOLECULAR CLONING OF HUMAN NEUROTROPHIN-4 GENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective Cloning and sequencing of the human neurotrophin-4(hNT-4) gene.Methods With the chromosomal DNA of human blood lymphocytes as template,hNT-4 coding genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction(PCR) and recombinated into phage vector pGEM-T Easy,which were sequenced by using Sanger's single stranded DNA terminal termination method.Results The sequence of the cloned gene is completely the same as that reported in the literature(GenBank data base,M86528).Conclusion This study successfully cloning and sequenced the gene of mhNT-4,and it would be convenient for us to study the expression of mhNT-4 in eukaryote,and to continue the research on the gene therapy of Alzheimer's disease intensively.This study indicate that the hNT-4 is conservative in different races and individuals.

  1. THE CLONING OF HUMAN NEUROTROPHIN-3 GENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    In the present study, we have cloned the gene of human neurotrophin-3 (hNT-3) from the genomic DNA of white blood cells (WBC) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The amplification products were cloned into pUC19 and sequenced. Genomic sequence comparison of the cloned fragment and the reported hNT-3 (GenBank M61180) reveals 7 base differences: 1 in the signal peptide, 3 in the prepro peptide, and 3 in the mature hNT-3. Except the 2 varied bases (16th, T to G; 285th, A to C) in the signal peptide and pro-sequence resulted in the change of their encoded amino-acids (Tyr→Asp; Gln→His), the other varied bases have no influence on their respective encoded amino-acids, and all the changes have no influence on the open reading frame (ORF) of the hNT-3.

  2. Dogs cloned from adult somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byeong Chun; Kim, Min Kyu; Jang, Goo; Oh, Hyun Ju; Yuda, Fibrianto; Kim, Hye Jin; Hossein, M Shamim; Shamim, M Hossein; Kim, Jung Ju; Kang, Sung Keun; Schatten, Gerald; Hwang, Woo Suk

    2005-08-04

    Several mammals--including sheep, mice, cows, goats, pigs, rabbits, cats, a mule, a horse and a litter of three rats--have been cloned by transfer of a nucleus from a somatic cell into an egg cell (oocyte) that has had its nucleus removed. This technology has not so far been successful in dogs because of the difficulty of maturing canine oocytes in vitro. Here we describe the cloning of two Afghan hounds by nuclear transfer from adult skin cells into oocytes that had matured in vivo. Together with detailed sequence information generated by the canine-genome project, the ability to clone dogs by somatic-cell nuclear transfer should help to determine genetic and environmental contributions to the diverse biological and behavioural traits associated with the many different canine breeds.

  3. Simplified cryopreservation of porcine cloned blastocysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Yutao; Zhang, Yunhai; Li, Juan

    2007-01-01

    Recently, a non-invasive delipation (lipid removal) method combined with ultrarapid vitrification has been used successfully for in vitro produced (IVP) porcine embryos. In the present study, this method was combined with parthenogenesis and a recent form of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT......)â€"handmade cloning (HMC)â€"to establish a simplified and efficient cryopreservation system for porcine cloned embryos. In Experiment 1, zonae pellucidae of oocytes were partially digested with pronase, followed by centrifugation to polarize lipid particles. Ninety percent (173/192) oocytes were successfully......). Our results prove that porcine embryos produced from delipated oocytes by PA or HMC can be cryopreserved effectively by ultrarapid vitrification. Further experiments are required to assess the in vivo developmental competence of the cloned-vitrified embryos  ...

  4. Bac clones generated from sheared dna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Vessere, Gery M.; Shu, Chung Li; Hoskins,Roger A.; Abad, Jose P.; de Pablos, Beatriz; Villasante, Alfredo; deJong, Pieter J.

    2006-08-09

    BAC libraries generated from restriction-digested genomic DNA display representational bias and lack some sequences. To facilitate completion of genome projects, procedures have been developed to create BACs from DNA physically sheared to create fragments extending up to 200kb. The DNA fragments were repaired to create blunt ends and ligated to a new BAC vector. This approach has been tested by generating BAC libraries from Drosophila DNA, with insert lengths of 50 kb to 150 kb. The libraries lack chimeric clone problems as determined by mapping paired BAC-end sequences of one library to the D. melanogaster genome sequence. The utility of ''sheared'' libraries was demonstrated by closure of a previous clone gap and by isolation of clones from telomeric regions, which were notably absent from previous Drosophila BAC libraries.

  5. Cloning for human reproduction: one American perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, R

    2001-09-01

    The author, an American law professor, believes that whole-body cloning of adult humans will be possible in the near future. He does not believe the procedure should be banned when used as a form of assisted reproduction, but that it should be regulated by the government to ensure proper testing and application. After raising a number of scientific, ethical, religious and legal issues, Professor Chester addresses parentage in light of both old and new concepts of the 'family.' Finally, he focuses on the problem of women as surrogate mothers of clones, arguing in the process that the surrogate, having no real genetic tie to the clone, would have less of a claim to parentage than at least some of the surrogates currently gestating foetuses.

  6. Human cloning: three mistakes and an alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylis, Françoise

    2002-06-01

    The current debate on the ethics of cloning humans is both uninspired and uninspiring. In large measure this is because of mistakes that permeate the discourse, including the mistake of thinking that cloning technology is strictly a reproductive technology when it is used to create whole beings. As a result, the challenge this technology represents regarding our understanding of ourselves and the species to which we belong typically is inappropriately downplayed or exaggerated. This has meant that important (albeit disquieting) societal issues and species-type concerns have not been fully explored. This paper, intended as a corrective, suggests that we take an alternate view of human cloning as both an enhancement and a reproductive technology. This proposed shift in the framework for analysis counters the current narrow framing of the issues and introduces new questions about the prospect of modifying the species.

  7. Human reproductive cloning and reasons for deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, D A

    2008-08-01

    Human reproductive cloning provides the possibility of genetically related children for persons for whom present technologies are ineffective. I argue that the desire for genetically related children is not, by itself, a sufficient reason to engage in human reproductive cloning. I show this by arguing that the value underlying the desire for genetically related children implies a tension between the parent and the future child. This tension stems from an instance of a deprivation and violates a general principle of reasons for deprivation. Alternative considerations, such as a right to procreative autonomy, do not appear helpful in making the case for human reproductive cloning merely on the basis of the desire for genetically related children.

  8. Oxygen Tension Regulates the Expression of Angiogenesis Factor by Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knighton, David R.; Hunt, Thomas K.; Scheuenstuhl, Heinz; Halliday, Betty J.; Werb, Zena; Banda, Michael J.

    1983-09-01

    When cultured in a hypoxic environment similar to that found in the center of a wound, macrophages secreted active angiogenesis factor into the medium. Under conditions similar to those of well-oxygenated tissue, macrophages did not secrete active angiogenesis factor. Macrophages that secreted the factor at hypoxic conditions stopped secreting it when returned to room air. Thus the control of angiogenesis in wound healing may be the result of macrophages responding to tissue oxygen tension without the necessity of interacting with other cell types or biochemical signals.

  9. Oxygen tension regulates the expression angiogenesis factor by macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knighton, D.R.; Hunt, T.K.; Scheuenstuhl, H.; Halliday, B.J.; Werb, Z.; Banda, M.J.

    1983-09-23

    When cultured in a hypoxic environment similar to that found in the center of a wound, macrophages secreted active angiogenesis factor into the medium. Under conditions similar to those of well-oxygenated tissue, macrophages did not secrete active angiogenesis factor. Macrophages that secreted the factor at hyposic conditions stopped secreting it when returned to room air. Thus the control of angiogenesis in wound healing may be the result of macrophages responding to tissue oxygen tension without the necessity of interacting with other cell types or biochemical signals.

  10. Oxygen tension regulated the expression of angiogenesis factor by macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knighton, D.R.; Hunt, T.K.; Scheuenstuhl, H.; Halliday, B.J.; Werb, Z.; Banda, M.J.

    1983-09-23

    When cultured in a hypoxic environment similar to that found in the center of a wound, macrophages secreted active angiogenesis factor into the medium. Under conditions similar to those of well-oxygenated tissue, macrophages did not secrete active angiogenesis factor. Macrophages that secreted the factor at hypoxic conditions stopped secreting it when returned to room air. Thus the control of angiogenesis in wound healing may be the result of macrophages responding to tissue oxygen tension without the necessity of interacting with other cell types or biochemical signals.

  11. Functional modifications of macrophage activity after sublethal irradiation. [Toxoplasma gondii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swartz, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The modifications of macrophage activity following sublethal irradiation, both in vivo and in vitro, were studied using spreading and C3b-receptor-mediated ingestion assays. Nonelicited peritoneal washout cells were examined for changes in activity and selected population characteristics. The cells from irradiated mice were from a resident peritoneal population and not immigrating cells. The macrophage population showed enhanced activity early with a refractory period (24-48) when the macrophages were unresponsive to stimulation by irradiated lymphocytes. The enhanced activity was inversely dose dependent on macrophage. The lymphocytes showed a regulatory function(s) on the time post irradiation at which they were examined. Early lymphocytes exhibited the ability to enhance the activity of normal macrophages while lymphocytes removed 24 hours post irradiation could suppress the activity of already activated macrophages. The effect(s) of the various lymphocyte populations were reproduced with cell-free supernatants which was indicative of the production of lymphokines. Separation on nylon wool columns indicated that the activity resided primarily in the T-cell population of lymphocytes. In vitro irradiation indicated that stimulation of the lymphocytes is macrophage dependent. Additional work indicated that sublethally irradiated macrophages did not inhibit replication of the coccidian protozoon Toxoplasma gondii although they did show increased phagocytosis. Examination of the serum from whole body irradiated mice showed the presence of a postirradiation substance which enhanced the phagocytosis of normal macrophages. It was not present in the serum of normal mice and was not endotoxin.

  12. Information cloning of harmonic oscillator coherent states

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N D Hari Dass; Pradeep Ganesh

    2002-08-01

    We show that in the case of unknown harmonic oscillator coherent statesit is possible to achieve what we call perfect information cloning. By this we mean that it is still possible to make arbitrary number of copies of a state which has exactly the same information content as the original unknown coherent state. By making use of this perfect information cloning it would be possible to estimate the original state through measurements and make arbitrary number of copies of the estimator. We define the notion of a measurement fidelity and calculate it for our case as well as for the Gaussian cloners.

  13. Photonic Programmable Tele-Cloning Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Chen, Ming-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    The concept of quantum teleportation allows an unknown quantum states to be broadcasted and processed in a distributed quantum network. The quantum information injected into the network can be diluted to distant multi-copies by quantum cloning and processed by arbitrary quantum logic gates which were programed in advance in the network quantum state. A quantum network combines simultaneously these fundamental quantum functions could lead to new intriguing applications. Here we propose a photonic programmable telecloning network based on a four-photon interferometer. The photonic network serves as quantum gate, quantum cloning and quantum teleportation and features experimental advantage of high brightness by photon recycling.

  14. Cloning arbuscule-related genes from mycorrhizas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burleigh, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    Until recently little was known about the identity of the genes expressed in the arbuscules of mycorrhizas, due in part to problems associated with cloning genes from the tissues of an obligate symbiont. However, the combination of advanced molecular techniques, innovative use of the materials...... available and fortuitous cloning has resulted in the recent identification of a number of arbuscule-related genes. This article provides a brief summary of the genes involved in arbuscule development, function and regulation, and the techniques used to study them. Molecular techniques include differential...

  15. Molecular cloning of genes that specify virulence in Pseudomonas solanacearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, P L; Leong, S; Sequeira, L

    1988-02-01

    The suicide plasmid pSUP2021 was used to introduce Tn5 into the Pseudomonas solanacearum wild-type strain K60. We isolated eight avirulent mutants after screening 6,000 kanamycin-resistant transconjugants by inoculating eggplant (Solanum melongena L. cv. Black Beauty) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Bottom Special) seedlings. The Tn5-containing EcoRI fragments from the eight mutants were unique, suggesting that numerous genes specify virulence in this species. These EcoRI fragments were cloned into pBR322 or pUC12, and one of the clones, pKD810, was transformed into K60. All of the kanamycin-resistant, ampicillin-sensitive transformants were avirulent. Three randomly selected avirulent transformants were shown to carry the Tn5-containing fragment in place of the wild-type fragment and to exhibit the same hybridization pattern as the original KD810 mutant did. With pKD810 as a probe, we identified cosmids carrying the wild-type virulence genes by using a genomic library of K60 prepared in pLAFR3. Two of the homologous cosmids, pL810A and pL810C, when introduced into KD810 by transformation, restored virulence and normal growth of this mutant in tobacco. Altogether, these data indicate that the gene(s) interrupted by Tn5 insertion in KD810 is essential for the virulence of P. solanacearum. Further characterization of this gene is now being completed by subcloning, transposon mutagenesis, and complementation analysis.

  16. Interleukin 2 inhibits in vitro growth of human T cell lines carrying retrovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugamura, K; Nakai, S; Fujii, M; Hinuma, Y

    1985-05-01

    Four human T cell lines, TL-Mor, TL-Su, TL-TerI, and TL-OmI, carrying human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV), were established previously. TL-Mor, TL-Su, and TL-TerI were derived from interleukin 2 (IL-2)-dependent parental cell lines cloned from peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) of three healthy HTLV carriers, while TL-OmI was directly established from PBL of a patient with adult T cell leukemia. These four TL cell lines grow autonomously without IL-2. When they were cultured in the presence of IL-2, their growth was inhibited after a few days. This growth inhibition depended on the dose of IL-2, and the effective dose significantly promoted growth of their parental IL-2-dependent cell lines. The growth inhibition is demonstrated to be due to specific binding of IL-2 to receptors on the TL cells.

  17. Whole genome comparison of donor and cloned dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hak-Min; Cho, Yun Sung; Kim, Hyunmin; Jho, Sungwoong; Son, Bongjun; Choi, Joung Yoon; Kim, Sangsoo; Lee, Byeong Chun; Bhak, Jong; Jang, Goo

    2013-10-21

    Cloning is a process that produces genetically identical organisms. However, the genomic degree of genetic resemblance in clones needs to be determined. In this report, the genomes of a cloned dog and its donor were compared. Compared with a human monozygotic twin, the genome of the cloned dog showed little difference from the genome of the nuclear donor dog in terms of single nucleotide variations, chromosomal instability, and telomere lengths. These findings suggest that cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer produced an almost identical genome. The whole genome sequence data of donor and cloned dogs can provide a resource for further investigations on epigenetic contributions in phenotypic differences.

  18. Construction and characterization of recombinant Japanese encephalitis virus carrying brainspecific miRNA target sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-yuan CAO

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To construct the recombinant Japanese encephalitis virus ( JEV carrying brain-specific miRNA targeting sequences. Methods The target sequences of brain-specific miR-124 and miR-125 were introduced into the infectious cDNA clone of JEV to generate recombinant plasmids based on reverse genetics technology. The recombinant plasmids were linearized with Xho Ⅰ and served as templates of transcription with SP6 RNA polymerase to generate infectious viral RNA. The RNA transcripts were then transfected into BHK-21 cells, and the supernatant was obtained after incubated at 37℃, 5% CO2 for 3 days. The cytopathic changes of BHK-21 cells inoculated with the supernatant were observed after one passage. The rescued viruses carrying miRNA target sequences were validated by RT-PCR, standard plaque forming test on BHK-21 cells and growth curves analysis. Results Two recombinant viruses carrying miR-124 or miR-125 target sequence were rescued, respectively. The insertion of miRNA target sequences was confirmed by DNA sequencing. The rescued viruses yielded similar plaque morphology and replication efficiency compared with wild type JEV. Conclusion The recombinant JEV containing brain-specific miRNA target sequences can be obtained by reverse genetics technique, which could be used in further studies of miRNA-mediated tissue-specific attenuation mechanism of JEV. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.06.01

  19. Carrying Capacity of Marine Region in Liaoning Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Carrying capacity is one of important studies on coordinating development of population, resources, and environment. At present, the researches on it mainly concentrate on the carrying capacity for population and economy,such as the water resources carrying capacity, the land resources carrying capacity, the environment carrying capacity,etc. Based on the related theories and methods, this paper creatively proposed the concept and meaning of carrying capacity of marine region, and formed the appraisal system. According to the developing situation of marine economy of Liaoning Province in recent years, and by employing the method of the state space, this paper also measured the cartying capacity and carrying state of marine region and discussed the sustainable problems of marine economy of Liaoning. The research results show that the carrying state of marine region of Liaoning is in the state of overloading at present, but taking a favorable turn.

  20. ROS play a critical role in the differentiation of alternatively activated macrophages and the occurrence of tumor-associated macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Zhang; Swati Choksi; Kun Chen; Yelena Pobezinskaya; Ilona Linnoila; Zheng-Gang Liu

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation to different types of macrophages determines their distinct functions.Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) promote tumorigenesis owing to their proangiogenic and immune-suppressive functions similar to those of alternatively activated (M2) macrophages.We report that reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is critical for macrophage differentiation and that inhibition of superoxide (O2-) production specifically blocks the differentiation of M2 macrophages.We found that when monocytes are triggered to differentiate,O2-is generated and is needed for the biphasic ERK activation,which is critical for macrophage differentiation.We demonstrated that ROS elimination by butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and other ROS inhibitors blocks macrophage differentiation.However,the inhibitory effect of ROS elimination on macrophage differentiation is overcome when cells are polarized to classically activated (M1),but not M2,macrophages.More importantly,the continuous administration of the ROS inhibitor BHA efficiently blocked the occurrence of TAMs and markedly suppressed tumorigenesis in mouse cancer models.Targeting TAMs by blocking ROS can be a potentially effective method for cancer treatment.