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Sample records for macrophage cells electronic

  1. Macrophages and mast cells in dystrophic masseter muscle: a light and electron microscopic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S; Mikkelsen, H

    1988-01-01

    Macrophages and mast cells in masseter muscle from normal and dystrophic mice were studied by light and electron microscopy. Acid phosphatase activity and FITC-dextran were used to identify and describe macrophages. Toluidine blue was used as a marker for mast cells. In dystrophic muscle, the num......Macrophages and mast cells in masseter muscle from normal and dystrophic mice were studied by light and electron microscopy. Acid phosphatase activity and FITC-dextran were used to identify and describe macrophages. Toluidine blue was used as a marker for mast cells. In dystrophic muscle...

  2. Transmission electron microscopy reveals distinct macrophage- and tick cell-specific morphological stages of Ehrlichia chaffeensis.

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    Sarah E Dedonder

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ehrlichia chaffeensis is an emerging tick-borne rickettsial pathogen responsible for human monocytic ehrlichiosis. Despite the induction of an active host immune response, the pathogen has evolved to persist in its vertebrate and tick hosts. Understanding how the organism progresses in tick and vertebrate host cells is critical in identifying effective strategies to block the pathogen transmission. Our recent molecular and proteomic studies revealed differences in numerous expressed proteins of the organism during its growth in different host environments. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Transmission electron microscopy analysis was performed to assess morphological changes in the bacterium within macrophages and tick cells. The stages of pathogen progression observed included the attachment of the organism to the host cells, its engulfment and replication within a morulae by binary fission and release of the organisms from infected host cells by complete host cell lysis or by exocytosis. E. chaffeensis grown in tick cells was highly pleomorphic and appears to replicate by both binary fission and filamentous type cell divisions. The presence of Ehrlichia-like inclusions was also observed within the nucleus of both macrophages and tick cells. This observation was confirmed by confocal microscopy and immunoblot analysis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Morphological differences in the pathogen's progression, replication, and processing within macrophages and tick cells provide further evidence that E. chaffeensis employs unique host-cell specific strategies in support of adaptation to vertebrate and tick cell environments.

  3. Sites of inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport in macrophage-injured neoplastic cells.

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    Granger, D L; Lehninger, A L

    1982-11-01

    Previous work has shown that injury of neoplastic cells by cytotoxic macrophages (CM) in cell culture is accompanied by inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. We have investigated the nature of this inhibition by studying mitochondrial respiration in CM-injured leukemia L1210 cells permeabilized with digitonin. CM-induced injury affects the mitochondrial respiratory chain proper. Complex I (NADH-coenzyme Q reductase) and complex II (succinate-coenzyme Q reductase) are markedly inhibited. In addition a minor inhibition of cytochrome oxidase was found. Electron transport from alpha-glycerophosphate through the respiratory chain to oxygen is unaffected and permeabilized CM-injured L1210 cells oxidizing this substrate exhibit acceptor control. However, glycerophosphate shuttle activity was found not to occur within CM-injured or uninjured L1210 cells in culture hence, alpha-glycerophosphate is apparently unavailable for mitochondrial oxidation in the intact cell. It is concluded that the failure of respiration of intact neoplastic cells injured by CM is caused by the nearly complete inhibition of complexes I and II of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The time courses of CM-induced electron transport inhibition and arrest of L1210 cell division are examined and the possible relationship between these phenomena is discussed.

  4. Chromatic aberration-corrected tilt series transmission electron microscopy of nanoparticles in a whole mount macrophage cell.

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    Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Jinschek, Joerg R; Boothroyd, Chris B; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; de Jonge, Niels

    2013-08-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in combination with electron tomography is widely used to obtain nanometer scale three-dimensional (3D) structural information about biological samples. However, studies of whole eukaryotic cells are limited in resolution and/or contrast on account of the effect of chromatic aberration of the TEM objective lens on electrons that have been scattered inelastically in the specimen. As a result, 3D information is usually obtained from sections and not from whole cells. Here, we use chromatic aberration-corrected TEM to record bright-field TEM images of nanoparticles in a whole mount macrophage cell. Tilt series of images are used to generate electron tomograms, which are analyzed to assess the spatial resolution that can be achieved for different vertical positions in the specimen. The uptake of gold nanoparticles coated with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is studied. The LDL is found to assemble in clusters. The clusters contain nanoparticles taken up on different days, which are joined without mixing their nanoparticle cargo.

  5. Cell elasticity determines macrophage function.

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    Naimish R Patel

    Full Text Available Macrophages serve to maintain organ homeostasis in response to challenges from injury, inflammation, malignancy, particulate exposure, or infection. Until now, receptor ligation has been understood as being the central mechanism that regulates macrophage function. Using macrophages of different origins and species, we report that macrophage elasticity is a major determinant of innate macrophage function. Macrophage elasticity is modulated not only by classical biologic activators such as LPS and IFN-γ, but to an equal extent by substrate rigidity and substrate stretch. Macrophage elasticity is dependent upon actin polymerization and small rhoGTPase activation, but functional effects of elasticity are not predicted by examination of gene expression profiles alone. Taken together, these data demonstrate an unanticipated role for cell elasticity as a common pathway by which mechanical and biologic factors determine macrophage function.

  6. Macrophages and dendritic cells in the rat meninges and choroid plexus: three-dimensional localisation by environmental scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMenamin, Paul G; Wealthall, Rosamund J; Deverall, Marie; Cooper, Stephanie J; Griffin, Brendan

    2003-09-01

    The present investigation provides novel information on the topographical distribution of macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) in normal meninges and choroid plexus of the rat central nervous system (CNS). Whole-mounts of meninges and choroid plexus of Lewis rats were incubated with various anti-leucocyte monoclonal antibodies and either visualised with gold-conjugated secondary antibody followed by silver enhancement and subsequent examination by environmental scanning electron microscopy or by the use of fluorochromes and confocal microscopy. Large numbers of MHC class II(+) putative DCs were identified on the internal or subarachnoid aspect of dural whole-mounts, on the surface of the cortex (pia/arachnoid) and on the surface of the choroid plexus. Occupation of these sites would allow DCs access to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and therefore allow antigens into the subarachnoid space and ventricles. By contrast, macrophages were less evident at sites exposed to CSF and were more frequently located within the connective tissue of the dura/arachnoid and choroid plexus stroma and also in a sub-pial location. The present data suggest that DC may be strategically located within the CNS to sample CSF-borne antigens. Furthermore, the data suggest that CNS tissue samples collected without careful removal of the meninges may inadvertently be contaminated by DCs and meningeal macrophages.

  7. Electron microscope study on the relationship between macrophages of the alevolar space and spheroid alveolar epithelial cells on mice after injection of squid-ink (sepia-melanin solution into the trachea

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    Suwa,Kiichi

    1977-02-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between alveolar macrophages and spheroid alveolar epithelial cells was studied with the electron microscope after injection of squid-ink solution into the trachea of the mouse. At 20 hours after injection of squid-ink solution slight degeneration was evident in alveolar macrophages with sepia-melanin particles being phagocytized with partial digestion by lysosmes. Furthermore, hardly any changes were seen in mitochondria and inclusion bodies of the spheroid alveolar epithelial cells. In contrast, at one week after injection of squid-ink solution, almost all alveolar macrophages were degenerated with destruction of the ectoplasm in which the ingested sepia-melanin particles were digested by lysosomes into fine particles, and the mitochondria of spheroid alveolar epithelial cells were degenerated and the inclusion bodies were hardly formed. At three weeks after injection of squid-ink solution, alveolar macrophages as well as speroid alveolar epithelial cells showed almost complete recovery of functional structure. As the phagocyte in the alveolar space, neutrophile leucocytes were also observed in addition to the so-called alveolar macrophage.

  8. Uterine NK cells and macrophages in pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faas, Marijke M.; de Vos, Paul

    The presence of immune cells in the placental bed is important for both mother and child. Although various immune cells can be found in the placental bed, such as regulatory T cells and dendritic cells, uterine NK cells and macrophages are the most prominent immune cells in the placental bed in

  9. Uterine NK cells and macrophages in pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faas, Marijke M; de Vos, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The presence of immune cells in the placental bed is important for both mother and child. Although various immune cells can be found in the placental bed, such as regulatory T cells and dendritic cells, uterine NK cells and macrophages are the most prominent immune cells in the placental bed in earl

  10. Macrophages and Dendritic Cells: Partners in Atherogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulsky, Myron I; Cheong, Cheolho; Robbins, Clinton S

    2016-02-19

    Atherosclerosis is a complex chronic disease. The accumulation of myeloid cells in the arterial intima, including macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), is a feature of early stages of disease. For decades, it has been known that monocyte recruitment to the intima contributes to the burden of lesion macrophages. Yet, this paradigm may require reevaluation in light of recent advances in understanding of tissue macrophage ontogeny, their capacity for self-renewal, as well as observations that macrophages proliferate throughout atherogenesis and that self-renewal is critical for maintenance of macrophages in advanced lesions. The rate of atherosclerotic lesion formation is profoundly influenced by innate and adaptive immunity, which can be regulated locally within atherosclerotic lesions, as well as in secondary lymphoid organs, the bone marrow and the blood. DCs are important modulators of immunity. Advances in the past decade have cemented our understanding of DC subsets, functions, hematopoietic origin, gene expression patterns, transcription factors critical for differentiation, and provided new tools for study of DC biology. The functions of macrophages and DCs overlap to some extent, thus it is important to reassess the contributions of each of these myeloid cells taking into account strict criteria of cell identification, ontogeny, and determine whether their key roles are within atherosclerotic lesions or secondary lymphoid organs. This review will highlight key aspect of macrophage and DC biology, summarize how these cells participate in different stages of atherogenesis and comment on complexities, controversies, and gaps in knowledge in the field.

  11. Macrophages, Dendritic Cells, and Regression of Atherosclerosis

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    Jonathan E. Feig

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is the number one cause of death in the Western world. It results from the interaction between modified lipoproteins and monocyte-derived cells such as macrophages, dendritic cells, T cells, and other cellular elements of the arterial wall. This inflammatory process can ultimately lead to the development of complex lesions, or plaques, that protrude into the arterial lumen. Ultimately, plaque rupture and thrombosis can occur leading to the clinical complications of myocardial infarction or stroke. Although each of the cell types plays roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, in this review, the focus will be primarily on the monocyte derived cells- macrophages and dendritic cells. The roles of these cell types in atherogenesis will be highlighted. Finally, the mechanisms of atherosclerosis regression as it relates to these cells will be discussed.

  12. Characterization of macrophage-like cells in the external layers of human small and large intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, H B; Rumessen, J J

    1992-01-01

    -DR-positive (expressing the MHC class-II antigen), in contrast to macrophage-like cells in the subserosa and submucosa. Macrophage-like cells in the external muscle layer were mostly acid phosphatase-negative, and at the electron-microscopic level they were found to have features of macrophages: primary lysosomes, coated...... vesicles and pits. However, very few secondary lysosomes were present. Birbeck granules were not observed. It is concluded that in the external muscle layer of human small and large intestine numerous macrophages of a special type are present. It is discussed whether this cell type plays a role...

  13. Interactions between neutrophils and macrophages promote macrophage killing of rat muscle cells in vitro

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    Nguyen, Hal X.; Tidball, James G.

    2003-01-01

    Current evidence indicates that the physiological functions of inflammatory cells are highly sensitive to their microenvironment, which is partially determined by the inflammatory cells and their potential targets. In the present investigation, interactions between neutrophils, macrophages and muscle cells that may influence muscle cell death are examined. Findings show that in the absence of macrophages, neutrophils kill muscle cells in vitro by superoxide-dependent mechanisms, and that low concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) protect against neutrophil-mediated killing. In the absence of neutrophils, macrophages kill muscle cells through a NO-dependent mechanism, and the presence of target muscle cells causes a three-fold increase in NO production by macrophages, with no change in the concentration of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Muscle cells that are co-cultured with both neutrophils and macrophages in proportions that are observed in injured muscle show cytotoxicity through a NO-dependent, superoxide-independent mechanism. Furthermore, the concentration of myeloid cells that is necessary for muscle killing is greatly reduced in assays that use mixed myeloid cell populations, rather than uniform populations of neutrophils or macrophages. These findings collectively show that the magnitude and mechanism of muscle cell killing by myeloid cells are modified by interactions between muscle cells and neutrophils, between muscle cells and macrophages and between macrophages and neutrophils.

  14. Use of back-scatter electron signals to visualise cell/nanowires interactions in vitro and in vivo; frustrated phagocytosis of long fibres in macrophages and compartmentalisation in mesothelial cells in vivo

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    Schinwald Anja

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frustrated phagocytosis has been stated as an important factor in the initiation of an inflammatory response after fibre exposure. The length of fibrous structures has been linked to the potential of fibres to induce adverse health effects for at least 40 years. However, we only recently reported for the first time the threshold length for fibre-induced inflammation in the pleural space and we implicated frustrated phagocytosis in the pro-inflammatory effects of long fibres. This study extends the examination of the threshold value for frustrated phagocytosis using well-defined length classes of silver nanowires (AgNW ranging from 3–28 μm and describes in detail the morphology of frustrated phagocytosis using a novel technique and also describes compartmentalisation of fibres in the pleural space. Methods A novel technique, backscatter scanning electron microscopy (BSE was used to study frustrated phagocytosis since it provides high-contrast detection of nanowires, allowing clear discrimination between the nanofibres and other cellular features. A human monocyte-derived macrophage cell line THP-1 was used to investigate cell-nanowire interaction in vitro and the parietal pleura, the site of fibre retention after inhalation exposure was chosen to visualise the cell- fibre interaction in vivo after direct pleural installation of AgNWs. Results The length cut-off value for frustrated phagocytosis differs in vitro and in vivo. While in vitro frustrated phagocytosis could be observed with fibres ≥14 μm, in vivo studies showed incomplete uptake at a fibre length of ≥10 μm. Recently we showed that inflammation in the pleural space after intrapleural injection of the same nanofibre panel occurs at a length of ≥5 μm. This onset of inflammation does not correlate with the onset of frustrated phagocytosis as shown in this study, leading to the conclusion that intermediate length fibres fully enclosed within macrophages as

  15. Macrophages in cardiac homeostasis, injury responses and progenitor cell mobilisation

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    Alexander R. Pinto

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are an immune cell type found in every organ of the body. Classically, macrophages are recognised as housekeeping cells involved in the detection of foreign antigens and danger signatures, and the clearance of tissue debris. However, macrophages are increasingly recognised as a highly versatile cell type with a diverse range of functions that are important for tissue homeostasis and injury responses. Recent research findings suggest that macrophages contribute to tissue regeneration and may play a role in the activation and mobilisation of stem cells. This review describes recent advances in our understanding of the role played by macrophages in cardiac tissue maintenance and repair following injury. We examine the involvement of exogenous and resident tissue macrophages in cardiac inflammatory responses and their potential activity in regulating cardiac regeneration.

  16. Beryllium-stimulated apoptosis in macrophage cell lines.

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    Sawyer, R T; Fadok, V A; Kittle, L A; Maier, L A; Newman, L S

    2000-08-21

    In vitro stimulation of bronchoalveolar lavage cells from patients with chronic beryllium disease (CBD) induces the production of TNF-alpha. We tested the hypothesis that beryllium (Be)-stimulated TNF-alpha might induce apoptosis in mouse and human macrophage cell lines. These cell lines were selected because they produce a range of Be-stimulated TNF-alpha. The mouse macrophage cell line H36.12j produces high levels of Be-stimulated TNF-alpha. The mouse macrophage cell line P388D.1 produces low, constitutive, levels of TNF-alpha and does not up-regulate Be-stimulated TNF-alpha production. The DEOHS-1 human CBD macrophage cell line does not produce constitutive or Be-stimulated TNF-alpha. Apoptosis was determined by microscopic observation of propidium iodide stained fragmented nuclei in unstimulated and BeSO(4)-stimulated macrophage cell lines. BeSO(4) induced apoptosis in all macrophage cell lines tested. Beryllium-stimulated apoptosis was dose-responsive and maximal after 24 h of exposure to 100 microM BeSO(4). In contrast, unstimulated and Al(2)(SO(4))(3)-stimulated macrophage cell lines did not undergo apoptosis. The general caspase inhibitor BD-fmk inhibited Be-stimulated macrophage cell line apoptosis at concentrations above 50 microM. Our data show that Be-stimulated macrophage cell line apoptosis was caspase-dependent and not solely dependent on Be-stimulated TNF-alpha levels. We speculate that the release of Be-antigen from apoptotic macrophages may serve to re-introduce Be material back into the lung microenvironment, make it available for uptake by new macrophages, and thereby amplify Be-stimulated cytokine production, promoting ongoing inflammation and granuloma maintenance in CBD.

  17. Resident macrophages influence stem cell activity in the mammary gland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gyorki, D.E.; Asselin-Labat, M.L.; Rooijen, van N.; Lindeman, G.J.; Visvader, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Macrophages in the mammary gland are essential for morphogenesis of the ductal epithelial tree and have been implicated in promoting breast tumor metastasis. Although it is well established that macrophages influence normal mammopoiesis, the mammary cell types that these accessory cells

  18. Novel interactions between erythroblast macrophage protein and cell migration.

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    Javan, Gulnaz T; Can, Ismail; Yeboah, Fred; Lee, Youngil; Soni, Shivani

    2016-09-01

    Erythroblast macrophage protein is a novel protein known to mediate attachment of erythroid cells to macrophages to form erythroblastic islands in bone marrow during erythropoiesis. Emp-null macrophages are small with round morphologies, and lack cytoplasmic projections which imply immature structure. The role of Emp in macrophage development and function is not fully elucidated. Macrophages perform varied functions (e.g. homeostasis, erythropoiesis), and are implicated in numerous pathophysiological conditions such as cellular malignancy. The objective of the current study is to investigate the interaction of Emp with cytoskeletal- and cell migration-associated proteins involved in macrophage functions. A short hairpin RNA lentiviral system was use to down-regulate the expression of Emp in macrophage cells. A cell migration assay revealed that the relocation of macrophages was significantly inhibited when Emp expression was decreased. To further analyze changes in gene expression related to cell motility, PCR array was performed by down-regulating Emp expression. The results indicated that expression of mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 and thymoma viral proto-oncogene 1 were significantly higher when Emp was down-regulated. The results implicate Emp in abnormal cell motility, thus, warrants to assess its role in cancer where tumor cell motility is required for invasion and metastasis.

  19. Disruption of Lipid Rafts Interferes with the Interaction of Toxoplasma gondii with Macrophages and Epithelial Cells

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    Cruz, Karla Dias; Cruz, Thayana Araújo; Veras de Moraes, Gabriela; Paredes-Santos, Tatiana Christina; Attias, Marcia; de Souza, Wanderley

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii can penetrate any warm-blooded animal cell. Conserved molecular assemblies of host cell plasma membranes should be involved in the parasite-host cell recognition. Lipid rafts are well-conserved membrane microdomains that contain high concentrations of cholesterol, sphingolipids, glycosylphosphatidylinositol, GPI-anchored proteins, and dually acylated proteins such as members of the Src family of tyrosine kinases. Disturbing lipid rafts of mouse peritoneal macrophages and epithelial cells of the lineage LLC-MK2 with methyl-beta cyclodextrin (MβCD) and filipin, which interfere with cholesterol or lidocaine, significantly inhibited internalization of T. gondii in both cell types, although adhesion remained unaffected in macrophages and decreased only in LLC-MK2 cells. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy confirmed these observations. Results are discussed in terms of the original role of macrophages as professional phagocytes versus the LLC-MK2 cell lineage originated from kidney epithelial cells. PMID:24734239

  20. Of macrophages and red blood cells; a complex love story.

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    Djuna Zoe de Back

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages tightly control the production and clearance of red blood cells (RBC. During steady state haematopoiesis, approximately 1010 red blood cells are produced per hour within erythroblastic islands in humans. In these erythroblastic islands, resident bone marrow macrophages provide erythroblasts with interactions that are essential for erythroid development. New evidence suggests that not only under homeostasis but also under stress conditions, macrophages play an important role in promoting erythropoiesis. Once RBC have matured, these cells remain in circulation for about 120 days. At the end of their life span, RBC are cleared by macrophages residing in the spleen and the liver. Current theories about the removal of senescent RBC and the essential role of macrophages will be discussed as well as the role of macrophages in facilitating the removal of damaged cellular content from the RBC. In this review we will provide an overview on the role of macrophages in the regulation of RBC production, maintenance and clearance. In addition, we will discuss the interactions between these two cell types during transfer of immune complexes and pathogens from RBC to macrophages.

  1. Unique proteomic signatures distinguish macrophages and dendritic cells.

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    Lev Becker

    Full Text Available Monocytes differentiate into heterogeneous populations of tissue macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs that regulate inflammation and immunity. Identifying specific populations of myeloid cells in vivo is problematic, however, because only a limited number of proteins have been used to assign cellular phenotype. Using mass spectrometry and bone marrow-derived cells, we provided a global view of the proteomes of M-CSF-derived macrophages, classically and alternatively activated macrophages, and GM-CSF-derived DCs. Remarkably, the expression levels of half the plasma membrane proteins differed significantly in the various populations of cells derived in vitro. Moreover, the membrane proteomes of macrophages and DCs were more distinct than those of classically and alternatively activated macrophages. Hierarchical cluster and dual statistical analyses demonstrated that each cell type exhibited a robust proteomic signature that was unique. To interrogate the phenotype of myeloid cells in vivo, we subjected elicited peritoneal macrophages harvested from wild-type and GM-CSF-deficient mice to mass spectrometric and functional analysis. Unexpectedly, we found that peritoneal macrophages exhibited many features of the DCs generated in vitro. These findings demonstrate that global analysis of the membrane proteome can help define immune cell phenotypes in vivo.

  2. Dengue tropism for macrophages and dendritic cells : the host cell effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flipse, Jacky; Torres, Silvia; Diosa-Toro, Mayra; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Herrera-Rodriguez, Jose; Urcuqui-Inchima, Silvio; Huckriede, Anke; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A; Smit, Jolanda M

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus infects immune cells, including monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DC). We compared virus infectivity in macrophages and DC, and found that the virus-origin determined the cell tropism of progeny virus. The highest efficiency of re-infection was seen for macrophage-derived deng

  3. Modulation of macrophage antitumor potential by apoptotic lymphoma cells.

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    Voss, Jorine J L P; Ford, Catriona A; Petrova, Sofia; Melville, Lynsey; Paterson, Margaret; Pound, John D; Holland, Pam; Giotti, Bruno; Freeman, Tom C; Gregory, Christopher D

    2017-06-01

    In aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), constitutive apoptosis of a proportion of the tumor cell population can promote net tumor growth. This is associated with the accumulation of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) that clear apoptotic cells and exhibit pro-oncogenic transcriptional activation profiles characteristic of reparatory, anti-inflammatory and angiogenic programs. Here we consider further the activation status of these TAMs. We compare their transcriptomic profile with that of a range of other macrophage types from various tissues noting especially their expression of classically activated (IFN-γ and LPS) gene clusters - typically antitumor - in addition to their previously described protumor phenotype. To understand the impact of apoptotic cells on the macrophage activation state, we cocultured apoptotic lymphoma cells with classically activated macrophages (M(IFN-γ/LPS), also known as M1, macrophages). Although untreated and M(IFN-γ/LPS) macrophages were able to bind apoptotic lymphoma cells equally well, M(IFN-γ/LPS) macrophages displayed enhanced ability to phagocytose them. We found that direct exposure of M(IFN-γ/LPS) macrophages to apoptotic lymphoma cells caused switching towards a protumor activation state (often referred to as M2-like) with concomitant inhibition of antitumor activity that was a characteristic feature of M(IFN-γ/LPS) macrophages. Indeed, M(IFN-γ/LPS) macrophages exposed to apoptotic lymphoma cells displayed increased lymphoma growth-promoting activities. Antilymphoma activity by M(IFN-γ/LPS) macrophages was mediated, in part, by galectin-3, a pleiotropic glycoprotein involved in apoptotic cell clearance that is strongly expressed by lymphoma TAMs but not lymphoma cells. Intriguingly, aggressive lymphoma growth was markedly impaired in mice deficient in galectin-3, suggesting either that host galectin-3-mediated antilymphoma activity is required to sustain net tumor growth or that additional functions of galectin-3

  4. Networked T cell death following macrophage infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

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    Stephen H-F Macdonald

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Depletion of T cells following infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb impairs disease resolution, and interferes with clinical test performance that relies on cell-mediated immunity. A number of mechanisms contribute to this T cell suppression, such as activation-induced death and trafficking of T cells out of the peripheral circulation and into the diseased lungs. The extent to which Mtb infection of human macrophages affects T cell viability however, is not well characterised. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that lymphopenia (<1.5 × 10(9 cells/l was prevalent among culture-positive tuberculosis patients, and lymphocyte counts significantly improved post-therapy. We previously reported that Mtb-infected human macrophages resulted in death of infected and uninfected bystander macrophages. In the current study, we sought to examine the influence of infected human alveolar macrophages on T cells. We infected primary human alveolar macrophages (the primary host cell for Mtb or PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells with Mtb H37Ra, then prepared cell-free supernatants. The supernatants of Mtb-infected macrophages caused dose-dependent, caspase-dependent, T cell apoptosis. This toxic effect of infected macrophage secreted factors did not require TNF-α or Fas. The supernatant cytotoxic signal(s were heat-labile and greater than 50 kDa in molecular size. Although ESAT-6 was toxic to T cells, other Mtb-secreted factors tested did not influence T cell viability; nor did macrophage-free Mtb bacilli or broth from Mtb cultures. Furthermore, supernatants from Mycobacterium bovis Bacille de Calmette et Guerin (BCG- infected macrophages also elicited T cell death suggesting that ESAT-6 itself, although cytotoxic, was not the principal mediator of T cell death in our system. CONCLUSIONS: Mtb-Infected macrophages secrete heat-labile factors that are toxic to T cells, and may contribute to the immunosuppression seen in tuberculosis as well as

  5. Macrophages as APC and the dendritic cell myth.

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    Hume, David A

    2008-11-01

    Dendritic cells have been considered an immune cell type that is specialized for the presentation of Ag to naive T cells. Considerable effort has been applied to separate their lineage, pathways of differentiation, and effectiveness in Ag presentation from those of macrophages. This review summarizes evidence that dendritic cells are a part of the mononuclear phagocyte system and are derived from a common precursor, responsive to the same growth factors (including CSF-1), express the same surface markers (including CD11c), and have no unique adaptation for Ag presentation that is not shared by other macrophages.

  6. Mimicking the tumor microenvironment to regulate macrophage phenotype and assessing chemotherapeutic efficacy in embedded cancer cell/macrophage spheroid models.

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    Tevis, Kristie M; Cecchi, Ryan J; Colson, Yolonda L; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2017-03-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are critical stromal components intimately involved with the progression, invasion, and metastasis of cancer cells. To address the need for an in vitro system that mimics the clinical observations of TAM localizations and subsequent functional performance, a cancer cell/macrophage spheroid model is described. The central component of the model is a triple negative breast cancer spheroid embedded in a three-dimensional collagen gel. Macrophages are incorporated in two different ways. The first is a heterospheroid, a spheroid containing both tumor cells and macrophages. The heterospheroid mimics the population of TAMs infiltrated into the tumor mass, thus being exposed to hypoxia and metabolic gradients. In the second model, macrophages are diffusely seeded in the collagen surrounding the spheroid, thus modeling TAMs in the cancer stroma. The inclusion of macrophages as a heterospheroid changes the metabolic profile, indicative of synergistic growth. In contrast, macrophages diffusely seeded in the collagen bear the same profile regardless of the presence of a tumor cell spheroid. The macrophages in the heterospheroid secrete EGF, a cytokine critical to tumor/macrophage co-migration, and an EGF inhibitor decreases the metabolic activity of the heterospheroid, which is not observed in the other systems. The increased secretion of IL-10 indicates that the heterospheroid macrophages follow an M2/TAM differentiation pathway. Lastly, the heterospheroid exhibits resistance to paclitaxel. In summary, the collagen embedded heterospheroid model promotes TAM-like characteristics, and will be of utility in cancer biology and drug discovery.

  7. Macrophages and Leydig Cells in Testicular Biopsies of Azoospermic Men

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    Trpimir Goluža

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies have indicated that testicular macrophages play an important role in regulating steroidogenesis of Leydig cells and maintain homeostasis within the testis. The current paper deals with macrophages (CD68 positive cells and Leydig cells in patients with nonobstructive azoospermia (NOA. Methods employed included histological analysis on semi- and ultrathin sections, immunohistochemistry, morphometry, and hormone analysis in the blood serum. Histological analysis pointed out certain structural changes of macrophages and Leydig cells in NOA group of patients when compared to controls. In the testis interstitium, an increased presence of CD68 positive cells has been noted. Leydig cells in NOA patients displayed a kind of a mosaic picture across the same bioptic sample: both normal and damaged Leydig cells with pronounced vacuolisation and various intensity of expression of testosterone have been observed. Stereological analysis indicated a significant increase in volume density of both CD68 positive and vacuolated Leydig cells and a positive correlation between the volume densities of these cell types. The continuous gonadotropin overstimulation of Leydig cells, together with a negative paracrine action of macrophages, could result in the damage of steroidogenesis and deficit of testosterone in situ.

  8. Macrophages: supportive cells for tissue repair and regeneration.

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    Chazaud, Bénédicte

    2014-03-01

    Macrophages, and more broadly inflammation, have been considered for a long time as bad markers of tissue homeostasis. However, if it is indisputable that macrophages are associated with many diseases in a deleterious way, new roles have emerged, showing beneficial properties of macrophages during tissue repair and regeneration. This discrepancy is likely due to the high plasticity of macrophages, which may exhibit a wide range of phenotypes and functions depending on their environment. Therefore, regardless of their role in immunity, macrophages play a myriad of roles in the maintenance and recovery of tissue homeostasis. They take a major part in the resolution of inflammation. They also exert various effects of parenchymal cells, including stem and progenitor cell, of which they regulate the fate. In the present review, few examples from various tissues are presented to illustrate that, beyond their specific properties in a given tissue, common features have been described that sustain a role of macrophages in the recovery and maintenance of tissue homeostasis.

  9. Physalis angulata induces in vitro differentiation of murine bone marrow cells into macrophages.

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    da Silva, Bruno José Martins; Rodrigues, Ana Paula D; Farias, Luis Henrique S; Hage, Amanda Anastácia P; Do Nascimento, Jose Luiz M; Silva, Edilene O

    2014-10-03

    The bone marrow is a hematopoietic tissue that, in the presence of cytokines and growth factors, generates all of the circulating blood cells. These cells are important for protecting the organism against pathogens and for establishing an effective immune response. Previous studies have shown immunomodulatory effects of different products isolated from plant extracts. This study aimed to evaluate the immunomodulatory properties of aqueous Physalis angulata (AEPa) extract on the differentiation of bone marrow cells. Increased cellular area, higher spreading ability and several cytoplasmatic projections were observed in the treated cells, using optical microscopy, suggesting cell differentiation. Furthermore, AEPa did not promote the proliferation of lymphocytes and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, however promotes increased the number of macrophages in the culture. The ultrastructural analysis by Transmission Electron Microscopy of treated cells showed spreading ability, high number of cytoplasmatic projections and increase of autophagic vacuoles. Moreover, a high level of LC3b expression by treated cells was detected by flow cytometry, suggesting an autophagic process. Cell surface expression of F4/80 and CD11b also indicated that AEPa may stimulate differentiation of bone marrow cells mainly into macrophages. In addition, AEPa did not differentiate cells into dendritic cells, as assessed by CD11c analysis. Furthermore, no cytotoxic effects were observed in the cells treated with AEPa. Results demonstrate that AEPa promotes the differentiation of bone marrow cells, particularly into macrophages and may hold promise as an immunomodulating agent.

  10. Intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis after macrophage cell death leads to serial killing of host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahamed, Deeqa; Boulle, Mikael; Ganga, Yashica; Mc Arthur, Chanelle; Skroch, Steven; Oom, Lance; Catinas, Oana; Pillay, Kelly; Naicker, Myshnee; Rampersad, Sanisha; Mathonsi, Colisile; Hunter, Jessica; Wong, Emily B; Suleman, Moosa; Sreejit, Gopalkrishna; Pym, Alexander S; Lustig, Gila; Sigal, Alex

    2017-01-28

    A hallmark of pulmonary tuberculosis is the formation of macrophage-rich granulomas. These may restrict Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) growth, or progress to central necrosis and cavitation, facilitating pathogen growth. To determine factors leading to Mtb proliferation and host cell death, we used live cell imaging to track Mtb infection outcomes in individual primary human macrophages. Internalization of Mtb aggregates caused macrophage death, and phagocytosis of large aggregates was more cytotoxic than multiple small aggregates containing similar numbers of bacilli. Macrophage death did not result in clearance of Mtb. Rather, it led to accelerated intracellular Mtb growth regardless of prior activation or macrophage type. In contrast, bacillary replication was controlled in live phagocytes. Mtb grew as a clump in dead cells, and macrophages which internalized dead infected cells were very likely to die themselves, leading to a cell death cascade. This demonstrates how pathogen virulence can be achieved through numbers and aggregation states.

  11. Entrance and Survival of Brucella pinnipedialis Hooded Seal Strain in Human Macrophages and Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briquemont, Benjamin; Sørensen, Karen K.; Godfroid, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Marine mammal Brucella spp. have been isolated from pinnipeds (B. pinnipedialis) and cetaceans (B. ceti) from around the world. Although the zoonotic potential of marine mammal brucellae is largely unknown, reports of human disease exist. There are few studies of the mechanisms of bacterial intracellular invasion and multiplication involving the marine mammal Brucella spp. We examined the infective capacity of two genetically different B. pinnipedialis strains (reference strain; NTCT 12890 and a hooded seal isolate; B17) by measuring the ability of the bacteria to enter and replicate in cultured phagocytes and epithelial cells. Human macrophage-like cells (THP-1), two murine macrophage cell lines (RAW264.7 and J774A.1), and a human malignant epithelial cell line (HeLa S3) were challenged with bacteria in a gentamicin protection assay. Our results show that B. pinnipedialis is internalized, but is then gradually eliminated during the next 72 – 96 hours. Confocal microscopy revealed that intracellular B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain colocalized with lysosomal compartments at 1.5 and 24 hours after infection. Intracellular presence of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain was verified by transmission electron microscopy. By using a cholesterol-scavenging lipid inhibitor, entrance of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain in human macrophages was significantly reduced by 65.8 % (± 17.3), suggesting involvement of lipid-rafts in intracellular entry. Murine macrophages invaded by B. pinnipedialis do not release nitric oxide (NO) and intracellular bacterial presence does not induce cell death. In summary, B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain can enter human and murine macrophages, as well as human epithelial cells. Intracellular entry of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain involves, but seems not to be limited to, lipid-rafts in human macrophages. Brucella pinnipedialis does not multiply or survive for prolonged periods intracellulary. PMID:24376851

  12. Entrance and survival of Brucella pinnipedialis hooded seal strain in human macrophages and epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anett K Larsen

    Full Text Available Marine mammal Brucella spp. have been isolated from pinnipeds (B. pinnipedialis and cetaceans (B. ceti from around the world. Although the zoonotic potential of marine mammal brucellae is largely unknown, reports of human disease exist. There are few studies of the mechanisms of bacterial intracellular invasion and multiplication involving the marine mammal Brucella spp. We examined the infective capacity of two genetically different B. pinnipedialis strains (reference strain; NTCT 12890 and a hooded seal isolate; B17 by measuring the ability of the bacteria to enter and replicate in cultured phagocytes and epithelial cells. Human macrophage-like cells (THP-1, two murine macrophage cell lines (RAW264.7 and J774A.1, and a human malignant epithelial cell line (HeLa S3 were challenged with bacteria in a gentamicin protection assay. Our results show that B. pinnipedialis is internalized, but is then gradually eliminated during the next 72-96 hours. Confocal microscopy revealed that intracellular B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain colocalized with lysosomal compartments at 1.5 and 24 hours after infection. Intracellular presence of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain was verified by transmission electron microscopy. By using a cholesterol-scavenging lipid inhibitor, entrance of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain in human macrophages was significantly reduced by 65.8 % (± 17.3, suggesting involvement of lipid-rafts in intracellular entry. Murine macrophages invaded by B. pinnipedialis do not release nitric oxide (NO and intracellular bacterial presence does not induce cell death. In summary, B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain can enter human and murine macrophages, as well as human epithelial cells. Intracellular entry of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain involves, but seems not to be limited to, lipid-rafts in human macrophages. Brucella pinnipedialis does not multiply or survive for prolonged periods intracellulary.

  13. Macrophages overexpressing Aire induce CD4+Foxp3+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jitong; Fu, Haiying; Wu, Jing; Zhu, Wufei; Li, Yi; Yang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Aire plays an important role in central immune tolerance by regulating the transcription of thousands of genes. However, the role of Aire in the peripheral immune system is poorly understood. Regulatory T (Treg) cells are considered essential for the maintenance of peripheral tolerance, but the effect of Aire on Treg cells in the peripheral immune system is currently unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of macrophages overexpressing Aire on CD4+Foxp3+ Treg cells by co-culturing Aire-overexpressing RAW264.7 cells or their supernatant with splenocytes. The results show that macrophages overexpressing Aire enhanced the expression of Foxp3 mRNA and induced different subsets of Treg cells in splenocytes through cell-cell contact or a co-culture supernatants. TGF-β is a key molecule in the increases of CD4+CD45RA+Foxp3hi T cell and activating Treg (aTreg) levels observed following cell‑supernatant co-culturing. Subsets of Treg cells were induced by Aire-overexpressing macrophages, and the manipulation of Treg cells by the targeting of Aire may provide a method for the treatment of inflammatory or autoimmune diseases.

  14. p47phox Directs Murine Macrophage Cell Fate Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Liang; Liu, Qi; Orandle, Marlene S.; Sadiq-Ali, Sara; Koontz, Sherry M.; Choi, Uimook; Torres-Velez, Fernando J.; Jackson, Sharon H.

    2012-01-01

    Macrophage differentiation and function are pivotal for cell survival from infection and involve the processing of microenvironmental signals that determine macrophage cell fate decisions to establish appropriate inflammatory balance. NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2)–deficient chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) mice that lack the gp91phox (gp91phox−/−) catalytic subunit show high mortality rates compared with wild-type mice when challenged by infection with Listeria monocytogenes (Lm), whereas p47phox-deficient (p47phox−/−) CGD mice show survival rates that are similar to those of wild-type mice. We demonstrate that such survival results from a skewed macrophage differentiation program in p47phox−/− mice that favors the production of higher levels of alternatively activated macrophages (AAMacs) compared with levels of either wild-type or gp91phox−/− mice. Furthermore, the adoptive transfer of AAMacs from p47phox−/− mice can rescue gp91phox−/− mice during primary Lm infection. Key features of the protective function provided by p47phox−/− AAMacs against Lm infection are enhanced production of IL-1α and killing of Lm. Molecular analysis of this process indicates that p47phox−/− macrophages are hyperresponsive to IL-4 and show higher Stat6 phosphorylation levels and signaling coupled to downstream activation of AAMac transcripts in response to IL-4 stimulation. Notably, restoring p47phox protein expression levels reverts the p47phox-dependent AAMac phenotype. Our results indicate that p47phox is a previously unrecognized regulator for IL-4 signaling pathways that are important for macrophage cell fate choice. PMID:22222227

  15. Staining of Langerhans Cells with Monoclonal Antibodies to Macrophages and Lymphoid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Kathleen A.; Flotte, Thomas J.; Springer, Timothy A.; Gigli, Irma; Thorbecke, G. Jeanette

    1983-06-01

    Langerhans cells are Ia-bearing antigen-presenting cells in the epidermis that share many functions with macrophages. We have used monoclonal antibodies to the macrophage antigens, Mac-2 and -3, Ia antigen, Fc fragment receptor, and the common leukocyte antigen CLA to compare the cell surface antigens of these cells with those of interdigitating and follicular dendritic cells and of macrophages in lymphoid tissues. Immunoperoxidase staining was carried out with epidermal sheets from BALB/c mice and epidermal cell suspensions enriched for Langerhans cells by Fc rosetting. Langerhans cells stained for all of these antigens. Comparison with the staining properties of other dendritic cells and macrophages, in combination with previous observations, indicates a close relationship of Langerhans cells to the interdigitating cells of lymphoid tissues.

  16. Vascular endothelial growth factor enhances macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Samay; Horstmann, Sarah A.; Richens, Tiffany R.; Tanaka, Takeshi; Doe, Jenna M.; Boe, Darren M.; Voelkel, Norbert F.; Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laimute; Janssen, William J.; Lee, Chun G.; Elias, Jack A.; Bratton, Donna; Tuder, Rubin M.; Henson, Peter M.; Vandivier, R. William

    2012-01-01

    Efficient clearance of apoptotic cells from the lung by alveolar macrophages is important for the maintenance of tissue structure and function. Lung tissue from humans with emphysema contains increased numbers of apoptotic cells and decreased levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Mice treated with VEGF receptor inhibitors have increased numbers of apoptotic cells and develop emphysema. We hypothesized that VEGF regulates apoptotic cell clearance by alveolar macrophages (AM) via its interaction with VEGF receptor 1 (VEGF R1). Our data show that the uptake of apoptotic cells by murine AMs and human monocyte-derived macrophages is inhibited by depletion of VEGF and that VEGF activates Rac1. Antibody blockade or pharmacological inhibition of VEGF R1 activity also decreased apoptotic cell uptake ex vivo. Conversely, overexpression of VEGF significantly enhanced apoptotic cell uptake by AMs in vivo. These results indicate that VEGF serves a positive regulatory role via its interaction with VEGF R1 to activate Rac1 and enhance AM apoptotic cell clearance. PMID:22307908

  17. BIGH3 protein and macrophages in retinal endothelial cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondragon, Albert A; Betts-Obregon, Brandi S; Moritz, Robert J; Parvathaneni, Kalpana; Navarro, Mary M; Kim, Hong Seok; Lee, Chi Fung; LeBaron, Richard G; Asmis, Reto; Tsin, Andrew T

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a pandemic disease with a higher occurrence in minority populations. The molecular mechanism to initiate diabetes-associated retinal angiogenesis remains largely unknown. We propose an inflammatory pathway of diabetic retinopathy in which macrophages in the diabetic eye provide TGFβ to retinal endothelial cells (REC) in the retinal microvasculature. In response to TGFβ, REC synthesize and secrete a pro-apoptotic BIGH3 (TGFβ-Induced Gene Human Clone 3) protein, which acts in an autocrine loop to induce REC apoptosis. Rhesus monkey retinal endothelial cells (RhREC) were treated with dMCM (cell media of macrophages treated with high glucose and LDL) and assayed for apoptosis (TUNEL), BIGH3 mRNA (qPCR), and protein (Western blots) expressions. Cells were also treated with ΤGFβ1 and 2 for BIGH3 mRNA and protein expression. Inhibition assays were carried out using antibodies for TGFβ1 and for BIGH3 to block apoptosis and mRNA expression. BIGH3 in cultured RhREC cells were identified by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Distribution of BIGH3 and macrophages in the diabetic mouse retina was examined with IHC. RhRECs treated with dMCM or TGFβ showed a significant increase in apoptosis and BIGH3 protein expression. Recombinant BIGH3 added to RhREC culture medium led to a dose-dependent increase in apoptosis. Antibodies (Ab) directed against BIGH3 and TGFβ, as well as TGFβ receptor blocker resulted in a significant reduction in apoptosis induced by either dMCM, TGFβ or BIGH3. IHC showed that cultured RhREC constitutively expressed BIGH3. Macrophage and BIGH3 protein were co-localized to the inner retina of the diabetic mouse eye. Our results support a novel inflammatory pathway for diabetic retinopathy. This pathway is initiated by TGFβ released from macrophages, which promotes synthesis and release of BIGH3 protein by REC and REC apoptosis.

  18. Fucoidan reduced the invasion of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells and modified their effects to macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Junda; Wang, Ketao; Wang, Huayang; Shao, Qianqian; Luan, Yijun; Xu, Yan; Song, Xiaobin; Tan, Wanye; Liu, Shaohua; Wei, Fengcai; Qu, Xun

    2017-01-01

    Fucoidan is a complex of polysaccharides showing antitumor and immunomodulation properties. Our previous studies found its regulation to myeloid immune cells, including macrophages. Aberrant infiltration and functions of macrophages are commonly found in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). In this study, we analyzed the effects of fucoidan on invasion of OSCC cells, and their regulation to macrophages, trying to evaluate its role as a potential therapy for OSCC. CAL27 and THP-1-derived macrophages were used as models for OSCC cells and tumor-infiltrated macrophages in the in vitro study, respectively. The effects of fucoidan on invasion of OSCC cells and their recruitment to macrophages were analyzed by transwell assay. KIF4A siRNA transfection was performed to investigate its role in fucoidan-modulated OSCC cells invasion. CCL3-neutralizing antibody was added into the conditioned medium of OSCC cells to evaluate its role in fucoidan-mediated macrophages recruitment and re-education. Fucoidan reduced the invasive potential of CAL27 cells with a decrease of MMP-2 and KIF4A transcription. KIF4A knockdown in CAL27 cells led to decreased invasion and MMP-2 expression. The conditioned medium of fucoidan-treated CAL27 cells promoted recruitment and inflammatory cytokines secretion on THP-1-derived macrophages. Further analysis found that fucoidan increased CCL3 production in CAL27 cells. Blocking CCL3 expression reversed the effects of fucoidan on macrophage recruitment and re-education. Our study found that fucoidan regulated the invasion of OSCC cells and also their recruiting and re-educating effects on macrophages, suggesting it could be a complementary approach in the treatment of OSCC.

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  1. Signaling events in pathogen-induced macrophage foam cell formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik-Dasthagirisaheb, Yazdani B; Mekasha, Samrawit; He, Xianbao; Gibson, Frank C; Ingalls, Robin R

    2016-08-01

    Macrophage foam cell formation is a key event in atherosclerosis. Several triggers induce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake by macrophages to create foam cells, including infections with Porphyromonas gingivalis and Chlamydia pneumoniae, two pathogens that have been linked to atherosclerosis. While gene regulation during foam cell formation has been examined, comparative investigations to identify shared and specific pathogen-elicited molecular events relevant to foam cell formation are not well documented. We infected mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages with P. gingivalis or C. pneumoniae in the presence of LDL to induce foam cell formation, and examined gene expression using an atherosclerosis pathway targeted plate array. We found over 30 genes were significantly induced in response to both pathogens, including PPAR family members that are broadly important in atherosclerosis and matrix remodeling genes that may play a role in plaque development and stability. Six genes mainly involved in lipid transport were significantly downregulated. The response overall was remarkably similar and few genes were regulated in a pathogen-specific manner. Despite very divergent lifestyles, P. gingivalis and C. pneumoniae activate similar gene expression profiles during foam cell formation that may ultimately serve as targets for modulating infection-elicited foam cell burden, and progression of atherosclerosis.

  2. Neutrophils and macrophages: The main partners of phagocyte cell systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel T. Silva

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Biological cellular systems are groups of cells sharing a set of characteristics, mainly key function and origin. Phagocytes are crucial in the host defense against microbial infection. The previously proposed phagocyte cell systems including the most recent and presently prevailing one, the Mononuclear Phagocyte System (MPS, grouped mononuclear cells but excluded neutrophils, creating an unacceptable situation. As neutrophils are archetypical phagocytes that must be members of comprehensive phagocyte systems, M. T. Silva recently proposed the creation of a Myeloid Phagocyte System (MYPS that adds neutrophils to the MPS. The phagocytes grouped in the MYPS include the leukocytes neutrophils, inflammatory monocytes, macrophages and immature myeloid DCs. Here the justifications behind the inclusion of neutrophils in a phagocyte system is expanded and the MYPS are further characterized as a group of dedicated phagocytic cells that function in an interacting and cooperative way in the host defense against microbial infection. Neutrophils and macrophages are considered the main arms of this system.

  3. Metabolic and Epigenetic Coordination of T Cell and Macrophage Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Anthony T; Goldrath, Ananda W; Glass, Christopher K

    2017-05-16

    Recognition of pathogens by innate and adaptive immune cells instructs rapid alterations of cellular processes to promote effective resolution of infection. To accommodate increased bioenergetic and biosynthetic demands, metabolic pathways are harnessed to maximize proliferation and effector molecule production. In parallel, activation initiates context-specific gene-expression programs that drive effector functions and cell fates that correlate with changes in epigenetic landscapes. Many chromatin- and DNA-modifying enzymes make use of substrates and cofactors that are intermediates of metabolic pathways, providing potential cross talk between metabolism and epigenetic regulation of gene expression. In this review, we discuss recent studies of T cells and macrophages supporting a role for metabolic activity in integrating environmental signals with activation-induced gene-expression programs through modulation of the epigenome and speculate as to how this may influence context-specific macrophage and T cell responses to infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Removal of hematopoietic cells and macrophages from mouse bone marrow cultures: isolation of fibroblastlike stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modderman, W E; Vrijheid-Lammers, T; Löwik, C W; Nijweide, P J

    1994-02-01

    A method is described that permits the removal of hematopoietic cells and macrophages from mouse bone marrow cultures. The method is based on the difference in effect of extracellular ATP4- ions (ATP in the absence of divalent, complexing cations) on cells of hematopoietic origin, including macrophages, and of nonhematopoietic origin, such as fibroblastlike stromal cells. In contrast to fibroblastlike cells, hematopoietic cells and macrophages form under the influence of ATP4- lesions in their plasma membranes, which allows the entrance of molecules such as ethidium bromide (EB) and potassium thiocyanate (KSCN), which normally do not easily cross the membrane. The lesions can be rapidly closed by the addition of Mg2+ to the incubation medium, leaving the EB or KSCN trapped in the cell. This method allows the selective introduction of cell-toxic substances such as KSCN into hematopoietic cells and macrophages. By using this method, fibroblastlike stromal cells can be isolated from mouse bone marrow cultures.

  5. A common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) leucocyte cell line shares morphological and functional characteristics with macrophages.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weyts, F.A.A.; Rombout, J.H.W.M.; Flik, G.; Verburg-van Kemenade, B.M.L.

    1997-01-01

    A carp leucocyte cell line (CLC), originating from peripheral blood, was characterised to assess its suitability for studies into carp macrophage functions. The cells reacted with a monoclonal antibody raised against carp head kidney macrophages. Other macrophage characteristics observed were: bindi

  6. Direct visualization of macrophage-assisted tumor cell intravasation in mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyckoff, Jeffrey B; Wang, Yarong; Lin, Elaine Y; Li, Jiu-feng; Goswami, Sumanta; Stanley, E Richard; Segall, Jeffrey E; Pollard, Jeffrey W; Condeelis, John

    2007-03-15

    Although the presence of macrophages in tumors has been correlated with poor prognosis, until now there was no direct observation of how macrophages are involved in hematogenous metastasis. In this study, we use multiphoton microscopy to show, for the first time, that tumor cell intravasation occurs in association with perivascular macrophages in mammary tumors. Furthermore, we show that perivascular macrophages of the mammary tumor are associated with tumor cell intravasation in the absence of local angiogenesis. These results show that the interaction between macrophages and tumor cells lying in close proximity defines a microenvironment that is directly involved in the intravasation of cancer cells in mammary tumors.

  7. In vitro model of atherosclerosis using coculture of arterial wall cells and macrophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Y; Sugiyama, A; Kohro, T; Kobayashi, M; Takeya, M; Naito, M; Kodama, T

    2000-12-01

    In order to determine the precise mechanism of the interactions between different types of cells, which are common phenomena in tissues and organs, the importance of coculture techniques are becoming increasingly important. In the area of cardiology, artificial arteries have been developed, based on the understanding of physiological communication of the arterial smooth muscle cells (SMC), endothelial cells (EC), and the extracellular matrix (ECM). In the study of atherosclerosis, the modification of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), which result in the recruitment and accumulation of white blood cells, especially, monocytes/macrophages, and foam cell formation, are hypothesized. Although there are well known animal models, an in vitro model of atherogenesis with a precisely known atherogenesis mechanism has not yet been developed. In this paper, an arterial wall reconstruction model using rabbit primary cultivated aortic SMCs and ECs, was shown. In addition, human peripheral monocytes were used and the transmigration of monocytes was observed by scanning electron and laser confocal microscopy. Monocyte differentiation into macrophages was shown by immunohistochemistry and comprehensive gene expression analysis. With the modified form of LDL, the macrophages were observed to accumulate lipids with a foamy appearance and differentiate into the foam cells in the ECM between the ECs and SMCs in the area of our coculture model.

  8. The identification of markers of macrophage differentiation in PMA-stimulated THP-1 cells and monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Daigneault

    Full Text Available Differentiated macrophages are the resident tissue phagocytes and sentinel cells of the innate immune response. The phenotype of mature tissue macrophages represents the composite of environmental and differentiation-dependent imprinting. Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (VD(3 are stimuli commonly used to induce macrophage differentiation in monocytic cell lines but the extent of differentiation in comparison to primary tissue macrophages is unclear. We have compared the phenotype of the promonocytic THP-1 cell line after various protocols of differentiation utilising VD(3 and PMA in comparison to primary human monocytes or monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM. Both stimuli induced changes in cell morphology indicative of differentiation but neither showed differentiation comparable to MDM. In contrast, PMA treatment followed by 5 days resting in culture without PMA (PMAr increased cytoplasmic to nuclear ratio, increased mitochondrial and lysosomal numbers and altered differentiation-dependent cell surface markers in a pattern similar to MDM. Moreover, PMAr cells showed relative resistance to apoptotic stimuli and maintained levels of the differentiation-dependent anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 similar to MDM. PMAr cells retained a high phagocytic capacity for latex beads, and expressed a cytokine profile that resembled MDM in response to TLR ligands, in particular with marked TLR2 responses. Moreover, both MDM and PMAr retained marked plasticity to stimulus-directed polarization. These findings suggest a modified PMA differentiation protocol can enhance macrophage differentiation of THP-1 cells and identify increased numbers of mitochondria and lysosomes, resistance to apoptosis and the potency of TLR2 responses as important discriminators of the level of macrophage differentiation for transformed cells.

  9. Macrophages eat cancer cells using their own calreticulin as a guide: roles of TLR and Btk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mingye; Chen, James Y; Weissman-Tsukamoto, Rachel; Volkmer, Jens-Peter; Ho, Po Yi; McKenna, Kelly M; Cheshier, Samuel; Zhang, Michael; Guo, Nan; Gip, Phung; Mitra, Siddhartha S; Weissman, Irving L

    2015-02-17

    Macrophage-mediated programmed cell removal (PrCR) is an important mechanism of eliminating diseased and damaged cells before programmed cell death. The induction of PrCR by eat-me signals on tumor cells is countered by don't-eat-me signals such as CD47, which binds macrophage signal-regulatory protein α to inhibit phagocytosis. Blockade of CD47 on tumor cells leads to phagocytosis by macrophages. Here we demonstrate that the activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathways in macrophages synergizes with blocking CD47 on tumor cells to enhance PrCR. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) mediates TLR signaling in macrophages. Calreticulin, previously shown to be an eat-me signal on cancer cells, is activated in macrophages for secretion and cell-surface exposure by TLR and Btk to target cancer cells for phagocytosis, even if the cancer cells themselves do not express calreticulin.

  10. Cell-to-cell spread and massive vacuole formation after Cryptococcus neoformans infection of murine macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Casadevall Arturo; Alvarez Mauricio

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The interaction between macrophages and Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) is critical for containing dissemination of this pathogenic yeast. However, Cn can either lyse macrophages or escape from within them through a process known as phagosomal extrusion. Both events result in live extracellular yeasts capable of reproducing and disseminating in the extracellular milieu. Another method of exiting the intracellular confines of cells is through host cell-to-cell transfer of the ...

  11. Soluble factor from murine bladder tumor-2 cell elevates nitric oxide production in macrophages and enhances the taxol-mediated macrophage cytotoxicity on tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Suck-Chei; Oh, Hyun-Mee; Park, Jae-Sung; Han, Weon-Cheol; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Kim, Tae-Hyeon; Yun, Ki-Jung; Kim, Eun-Cheol; Nah, Yong-Ho; Cha, Young-Nam; Chung, Hun-Taeg; Jun, Chang-Duk

    2003-01-01

    The therapeutic mechanism of taxol is believed to reside primarily in its ability to stabilize microtubules and prevent cell progression through mitosis. Taxol also can activate macrophage-mediated antitumor mechanism through a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent pathway. To address whether any mechanisms account for superficial urinary bladder tumor cell killing, we evaluated the effects of taxol on the growth and viability of murine bladder tumor-2 (MBT-2) cells in vitro, both in the absence and presence of murine macrophages. In addition, we evaluated whether a soluble factor generated from MBT-2 cells could modulate the antitumor activity of the taxol-activated macrophages. Although taxol inhibited the growth of MBT-2 cells, it did not kill the tumor cells. However, preincubation of macrophages with taxol significantly decreased the viability of MBT-2 cells. Secretion of NO correlated with MBT-2 cell killing, and the activated macrophages failed to kill tumor cell targets in the presence of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, a competitive inhibitor of NO synthase. By the co-culture of macrophages and MBT-2 cells, untreated macrophages also released modest amount of NO and this was synergistically augmented by the treatment with taxol, indicating that MBT-2 tumor cells released some unknown factor that activated the macrophages and enhanced NO production. We named this factor the tumor-derived macrophage activating factor (TMAF). The TMAF-mediated activation of macrophages to enhance the NO production was not blocked by treatment of macrophages with oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL), implying that the scavenger receptor of macrophages is not involved. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP), an NO donor given to the MBT-2 cells, increased the activities of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and caspase-3 in MBT-2 cells and associated with nucleosomal fragmentation or apoptosis, whereas taxol had no direct effect on these parameters. Collectively, our results strongly suggest that taxol kills

  12. Generation of dendritic cells and macrophages from human induced pluripotent stem cells aiming at cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senju, S; Haruta, M; Matsumura, K; Matsunaga, Y; Fukushima, S; Ikeda, T; Takamatsu, K; Irie, A; Nishimura, Y

    2011-09-01

    This report describes generation of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. iPS cell-derived DC (iPS-DC) exhibited the morphology of typical DC and function of T-cell stimulation and antigen presentation. iPS-DC loaded with cytomegalovirus (CMV) peptide induced vigorous expansion of CMV-specific autologous CD8+ T cells. Macrophages (iPS-MP) with activity of zymosan phagocytosis and C5a-induced chemotaxis were also generated from iPS cells. Genetically modified iPS-MPs were generated by the introduction of expression vectors into undifferentiated iPS cells, isolation of transfectant iPS cell clone and subsequent differentiation. By this procedure, we generated iPS-MP expressing a membrane-bound form of single chain antibody (scFv) specific to amyloid β (Aβ), the causal protein of Alzheimer's disease. The scFv-transfectant iPS-MP exhibited efficient Aβ-specific phagocytosis activity. iPS-MP expressing CD20-specific scFv engulfed and killed BALL-1 B-cell leukemia cells. Anti-BALL-1 effect of iPS-MP in vivo was demonstrated in a xeno-transplantation model using severe combined immunodeficient mice. In addition, we established a xeno-free culture protocol to generate iPS-DC and iPS-MP. Collectively, we demonstrated the possibility of application of iPS-DC and macrophages to cell therapy.

  13. Cell-to-cell spread and massive vacuole formation after Cryptococcus neoformans infection of murine macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casadevall Arturo

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interaction between macrophages and Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn is critical for containing dissemination of this pathogenic yeast. However, Cn can either lyse macrophages or escape from within them through a process known as phagosomal extrusion. Both events result in live extracellular yeasts capable of reproducing and disseminating in the extracellular milieu. Another method of exiting the intracellular confines of cells is through host cell-to-cell transfer of the pathogen, and this commonly occurs with the human immuno-deficiency virus (HIV and CD4+ T cells and macrophages. In this report we have used time-lapse imaging to determine if this occurs with Cn. Results Live imaging of Cryptococcus neoformans interactions with murine macrophages revealed cell-to-cell spread of yeast cells from infected donor cells to uninfected cells. Although this phenomenon was relatively rare its occurrence documents a new capacity for this pathogen to infect adjacent cells without exiting the intracellular space. Cell-to-cell spread appeared to be an actin-dependent process. In addition, we noted that cryptococcal phagosomal extrusion was followed by the formation of massive vacuoles suggesting that intracellular residence is accompanied by long lasting damage to host cells. Conclusion C. neoformans can escape the intracellular confines of macrophages in an actin dependent manner by cell-to-cell transfer of the yeast leading to infection of adjacent cells. In addition, complete extrusion of internalized Cn cells can lead to the formation of a massive vacuole which may be a sign of damage to the host macrophage. These observations document new outcomes for the interaction of C. neoformans with host cells that provide precedents for cell biological effects that may contribute to the pathogenesis of cryptococcal infections.

  14. Macrophage polarization in nerve injury:do Schwann cells play a role?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jo Anne Stratton; Prajay T Shah

    2016-01-01

    In response to peripheral nerve injury, the inlfammatory response is almost entirely comprised of inifltrat-ing macrophages. Macrophages are a highly plastic, heterogenic immune cell, playing an indispensable role in peripheral nerve injury, clearing debris and regulating the microenvironment to allow for efifcient regen-eration. There are several cells within the microenvironment that likely interact with macrophages to support their function –most notably the Schwann cell, the glial cell of the peripheral nervous system. Schwann cells express several ligands that are known to interact with receptors expressed by macrophages, yet the effects of Schwann cells in regulating macrophage phenotype remains largely unexplored. This review discusses macrophages in peripheral nerve injury and how Schwann cells may regulate their behavior.

  15. Toxicity and antibacterial assessment of chitosan-coated silver nanoparticles on human pathogens and macrophage cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jena P

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Prajna Jena1, Soumitra Mohanty1, Rojee Mallick1, Biju Jacob2, Avinash Sonawane11School of Biotechnology, KIIT University, Bhubaneswar, Orissa, India; 2Center for Innovation, Technopark Technology Business Incubator, Bangalore, Karnataka, IndiaBackground: Pathogenic bacteria are able to develop various strategies to counteract the bactericidal action of antibiotics. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs have emerged as a potential alternative to conventional antibiotics because of their potent antimicrobial properties. The purpose of this study was to synthesize chitosan-stabilized AgNPs (CS-AgNPs and test for their cytotoxic, genotoxic, macrophage cell uptake, antibacterial, and antibiofilm activities.Methods: AgNPs were synthesized using chitosan as both a stabilizing and a reducing agent. Antibacterial activity was determined by colony-forming unit assay and scanning electron microscopy. Genotoxic and cytotoxic activity were determined by DNA fragmentation, comet, and MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assays. Cellular uptake and intracellular antibacterial activity were tested on macrophages.Results: CS-AgNPs exhibited potent antibacterial activity against different human pathogens and also impeded bacterial biofilm formation. Scanning electron microscopy analysis indicated that CS-AgNPs kill bacteria by disrupting the cell membrane. CS-AgNPs showed no significant cytotoxic or DNA damage effect on macrophages at the bactericidal dose. Propidium iodide staining indicated active endocytosis of CS-AgNPs resulting in reduced intracellular bacterial survival in macrophages.Conclusion: The present study concludes that at a specific dose, chitosan-based AgNPs kill bacteria without harming the host cells, thus representing a potential template for the design of antibacterial agents to decrease bacterial colonization and to overcome the problem of drug resistance.Keywords: chitosan-silver nanoparticles, antibiofilm, cytotoxicity

  16. Chemoattractant signaling between tumor cells and macrophages regulates cancer cell migration, metastasis and neovascularization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad E Green

    Full Text Available Tumor-associated macrophages are known to influence cancer progression by modulation of immune function, angiogenesis, and cell metastasis, however, little is known about the chemokine signaling networks that regulate this process. Utilizing CT26 colon cancer cells and RAW 264.7 macrophages as a model cellular system, we demonstrate that treatment of CT26 cells with RAW 264.7 conditioned medium induces cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Inflammatory gene microarray analysis indicated CT26-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages upregulate SDF-1alpha and VEGF, and that these cytokines contribute to CT26 migration in vitro. RAW 264.7 macrophages also showed a robust chemotactic response towards CT26-derived chemokines. In particular, microarray analysis and functional testing revealed CSF-1 as the major chemoattractant for RAW 264.7 macrophages. Interestingly, in the chick CAM model of cancer progression, RAW 264.7 macrophages localized specifically to the tumor periphery where they were found to increase CT26 tumor growth, microvascular density, vascular disruption, and lung metastasis, suggesting these cells home to actively invading areas of the tumor, but not the hypoxic core of the tumor mass. In support of these findings, hypoxic conditions down regulated CSF-1 production in several tumor cell lines and decreased RAW 264.7 macrophage migration in vitro. Together our findings suggest a model where normoxic tumor cells release CSF-1 to recruit macrophages to the tumor periphery where they secrete motility and angiogenic factors that facilitate tumor cell invasion and metastasis.

  17. Short Communication: HIV Controller T Cells Effectively Inhibit Viral Replication in Alveolar Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker-Sperling, Victoria E; Merlo, Christian A; Buckheit, Robert W; Lambert, Allison; Tarwater, Patrick; Kirk, Greg D; Drummond, M Bradley; Blankson, Joel N

    Macrophages are targets of HIV-1 infection, and control of viral replication within these cells may be an important component of a T-cell-based vaccine. Although several studies have analyzed the ability of CD8(+) T cells to inhibit viral replication in monocyte-derived macrophages, the effect of T cells on HIV-1-infected tissue macrophages is less clear. We demonstrate here that both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell effectors from HIV controllers are capable of suppressing viral replication in bronchoalveolar lavage-derived alveolar macrophages. These findings have implications for HIV-1 vaccine and eradication strategies.

  18. Dynamics of Salmonella infection of macrophages at the single cell level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gog, Julia R; Murcia, Alicia; Osterman, Natan; Restif, Olivier; McKinley, Trevelyan J; Sheppard, Mark; Achouri, Sarra; Wei, Bin; Mastroeni, Pietro; Wood, James L N; Maskell, Duncan J; Cicuta, Pietro; Bryant, Clare E

    2012-10-07

    Salmonella enterica causes a range of diseases. Salmonellae are intracellular parasites of macrophages, and the control of bacteria within these cells is critical to surviving an infection. The dynamics of the bacteria invading, surviving, proliferating in and killing macrophages are central to disease pathogenesis. Fundamentally important parameters, however, such as the cellular infection rate, have not previously been calculated. We used two independent approaches to calculate the macrophage infection rate: mathematical modelling of Salmonella infection experiments, and analysis of real-time video microscopy of infection events. Cells repeatedly encounter salmonellae, with the bacteria often remain associated with the macrophage for more than ten seconds. Once Salmonella encounters a macrophage, the probability of that bacterium infecting the cell is remarkably low: less than 5%. The macrophage population is heterogeneous in terms of its susceptibility to the first infection event. Once infected, a macrophage can undergo further infection events, but these reinfection events occur at a lower rate than that of the primary infection.

  19. Microvesicles secreted by macrophages shuttle invasion-potentiating microRNAs into breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Ling

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs are alternatively activated cells induced by interleukin-4 (IL-4-releasing CD4+ T cells. TAMs promote breast cancer invasion and metastasis; however, the mechanisms underlying these interactions between macrophages and tumor cells that lead to cancer metastasis remain elusive. Previous studies have found microRNAs (miRNAs circulating in the peripheral blood and have identified microvesicles, or exosomes, as mediators of cell-cell communication. Therefore, one alternative mechanism for the promotion of breast cancer cell invasion by TAMs may be through macrophage-secreted exosomes, which would deliver invasion-potentiating miRNAs to breast cancer cells. Results We utilized a co-culture system with IL-4-activated macrophages and breast cancer cells to verify that miRNAs are transported from macrophages to breast cancer cells. The shuttling of fluorescently-labeled exogenous miRNAs from IL-4-activated macrophages to co-cultivated breast cancer cells without direct cell-cell contact was observed. miR-223, a miRNA specific for IL-4-activated macrophages, was detected within the exosomes released by macrophages and was significantly elevated in the co-cultivated SKBR3 and MDA-MB-231 cells. The invasiveness of the co-cultivated breast cancer cells decreased when the IL-4-activated macrophages were treated with a miR-223 antisense oligonucleotide (ASO that would inhibit miR-223 expression. Furthermore, results from a functional assay revealed that miR-223 promoted the invasion of breast cancer cells via the Mef2c-β-catenin pathway. Conclusions We conclude that macrophages regulate the invasiveness of breast cancer cells through exosome-mediated delivery of oncogenic miRNAs. Our data provide insight into the mechanisms underlying the metastasis-promoting interactions between macrophages and breast cancer cells.

  20. DMPD: A role for caspases in the differentiation of erythroid cells and macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17905508 A role for caspases in the differentiation of erythroid cells and macropha...;90(2):416-22. Epub 2007 Sep 2. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show A role for caspases in the differentiatio...n of erythroid cells and macrophages. PubmedID 17905508 Title A role for caspases

  1. ATF-2 regulates lipopolysaccharide-induced transcription in macrophage cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Noriyuki; Maekawa, Toshio; Shinagawa, Toshie; Ishii, Shunsuke

    2009-07-17

    The transcription factor ATF-2, a member of the ATF/CREB family, is a target of p38 that are involved in stress-induced apoptosis and in Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated signaling. Phosphorylation of ATF-2 at Thr-71 was enhanced by treating of RAW264.7 macrophage cells with either LPS, MALP-2, or CpG-ODN. LPS treatment enhanced the trans-activation capacity of ATF-2. Among multiple LPS-induced genes, the LPS-induced expression of Socs-3 was significantly reduced by the treatment of RAW264.7 cells with an Atf-2 siRNA. Transcription from the Socs-3 promoter was synergistically stimulated by ATF-2 and LPS, whereas it was suppressed by Atf-2 siRNA. Histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) interacted with ATF-2 after LPS treatment, but not before treatment. Treatment of RAW264.7 cells with trichostatin A, an inhibitor of HDAC, suppressed the LPS-induced Socs-3 expression, suggesting that HDAC1 positively regulates the LPS-induced transcription of Socs-3. Thus, ATF-2 plays an important role in TLR-mediated transcriptional control in macrophage cells.

  2. Intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis after macrophage cell death leads to serial killing of host cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahamed, Deeqa; Boulle, Mikael; Ganga, Yashica; Mc Arthur, Chanelle; Skroch, Steven; Oom, Lance; Catinas, Oana; Pillay, Kelly; Naicker, Myshnee; Rampersad, Sanisha; Mathonsi, Colisile; Hunter, Jessica; Sreejit, Gopalkrishna; Pym, Alexander S; Lustig, Gila; Sigal, Alex

    2017-01-01

    A hallmark of pulmonary tuberculosis is the formation of macrophage-rich granulomas. These may restrict Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) growth, or progress to central necrosis and cavitation, facilitating pathogen growth. To determine factors leading to Mtb proliferation and host cell death, we used live cell imaging to track Mtb infection outcomes in individual primary human macrophages. Internalization of Mtb aggregates caused macrophage death, and phagocytosis of large aggregates was more cytotoxic than multiple small aggregates containing similar numbers of bacilli. Macrophage death did not result in clearance of Mtb. Rather, it led to accelerated intracellular Mtb growth regardless of prior activation or macrophage type. In contrast, bacillary replication was controlled in live phagocytes. Mtb grew as a clump in dead cells, and macrophages which internalized dead infected cells were very likely to die themselves, leading to a cell death cascade. This demonstrates how pathogen virulence can be achieved through numbers and aggregation states. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22028.001 PMID:28130921

  3. Hyphal growth of phagocytosed Fusarium oxysporum causes cell lysis and death of murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Katja; Bain, Judith M; Di Pietro, Antonio; Gow, Neil A R; Erwig, Lars P

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum is an important plant pathogen and an opportunistic pathogen of humans. Here we investigated phagocytosis of F. oxysporum by J774.1 murine cell line macrophages using live cell video microscopy. Macrophages avidly migrated towards F. oxysporum germlings and were rapidly engulfed after cell-cell contact was established. F. oxysporum germlings continued hyphal growth after engulfment by macrophages, leading to associated macrophage lysis and escape. Macrophage killing depended on the multiplicity of infection. After engulfment, F. oxysporum inhibited macrophages from completing mitosis, resulting in large daughter cells fused together by means of a F. oxysporum hypha. These results shed new light on the initial stages of Fusarium infection and the innate immune response of the mammalian host.

  4. Reciprocal interactions between endothelial cells and macrophages in angiogenic vascular niches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, Caroline; Squadrito, Mario Leonardo [The Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), School of Life Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Iruela-Arispe, M. Luisa, E-mail: arispe@mcdb.ucla.edu [The Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), School of Life Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Department of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology and Molecular Biology Institute, University of California, Los Angeles 90095, CA (United States); De Palma, Michele, E-mail: michele.depalma@epfl.ch [The Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), School of Life Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-07-01

    The ability of macrophages to promote vascular growth has been associated with the secretion and local delivery of classic proangiogenic factors (e.g., VEGF-A and proteases). More recently, a series of studies have also revealed that physical contact of macrophages with growing blood vessels coordinates vascular fusion of emerging sprouts. Interestingly, the interactions between macrophages and vascular endothelial cells (ECs) appear to be bidirectional, such that activated ECs also support the expansion and differentiation of proangiogenic macrophages from myeloid progenitors. Here, we discuss recent findings suggesting that dynamic angiogenic vascular niches might also exist in vivo, e.g. in tumors, where sprouting blood vessels and immature myeloid cells like monocytes engage in heterotypic interactions that are required for angiogenesis. Finally, we provide an account of emerging mechanisms of cell-to-cell communication that rely on secreted microvesicles, such as exosomes, which can offer a vehicle for the rapid exchange of molecules and genetic information between macrophages and ECs engaged in angiogenesis. -- Highlights: • Macrophages promote angiogenesis by secreting proangiogenic factors. • Macrophages modulate angiogenesis via cell-to-cell contacts with endothelial cells. • Endothelial cells promote the differentiation of proangiogenic macrophages. • Macrophages and endothelial cells may cooperate to form angiogenic vascular niches.

  5. Immunostimulatory effect of spinach aqueous extract on mouse macrophage-like J774.1 cells and mouse primary peritoneal macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Momoko; Ose, Saya; Nishi, Kosuke; Sugahara, Takuya

    2016-07-01

    We herein report the immunostimulatory effect of spinach aqueous extract (SAE) on mouse macrophage-like J774.1 cells and mouse primary peritoneal macrophages. SAE significantly enhanced the production of interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α by both J774.1 cells and peritoneal macrophages by enhancing the expression levels of these cytokine genes. In addition, the phagocytosis activity of J774.1 cells was facilitated by SAE. Immunoblot analysis revealed that SAE activates mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-κB cascades. It was found that SAE activates macrophages through not only TLR4, but also other receptors. The production of IL-6 was significantly enhanced by peritoneal macrophages from SAE-administered BALB/c mice, suggesting that SAE has a potential to stimulate macrophage activity in vivo. Taken together, these data indicate that SAE would be a beneficial functional food with immunostimulatory effects on macrophages.

  6. Comparative analysis of the internalization of the macrophage receptor sialoadhesin in human and mouse primary macrophages and cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Schryver, Marjorie; Leemans, Annelies; Pintelon, Isabel; Cappoen, Davie; Maes, Louis; Caljon, Guy; Cos, Paul; Delputte, Peter L

    2016-11-21

    Sialoadhesin (Sn) is a surface receptor expressed on resident macrophages with the ability to bind with sialic acids. During inflammation, an upregulation of Sn is observed. Upon binding of monoclonal antibodies to Sn, the receptor becomes internalized and this has been observed in multiple species. The latter characteristic, combined with the strong upregulation of Sn on inflammatory macrophages and the fact that Sn-positive macrophages contribute to certain inflammatory diseases, makes Sn an interesting entry portal for phenotype-modulating or cytotoxic drugs. Such drugs or toxins can be linked to Sn-specific antibodies which should enable their targeted uptake by macrophages. However, the activity of such drugs depends not only on their internalization but also on the intracellular trafficking and final fate in the endolysosomal system. Although information is available for porcine Sn, the detailed mechanisms of human and mouse Sn internalization and subsequent intracellular trafficking are currently unknown. To allow development of Sn-targeted therapies, differences across species and cellular background need to be characterized in more detail. In the current report, we show that internalization of human and mouse Sn is dynamin-dependent and clathrin-mediated, both in primary macrophages and CHO cell lines expressing a recombinant Sn. In primary macrophages, internalized Sn-specific F(ab')2 fragments are located mostly in the early endosomes. With Fc containing Sn-specific antibodies, there is a slight shift towards lysosomal localization in mouse macrophages, possibly because of an interaction with Fc receptors. Surprisingly, in CHO cell lines expressing Sn, there is a predominant lysosomal localization. Our results show that the mechanism of Sn internalization and intracellular trafficking is concurrent in the tested species. The cellular background in which Sn is expressed and the type of antibody used can affect the intracellular fate, which in turn can

  7. Krebs cycle rewired for macrophage and dendritic cell effector functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Dylan Gerard; O'Neill, Luke A J

    2017-07-07

    The Krebs cycle is an amphibolic pathway operating in the mitochondrial matrix of all eukaryotic organisms. In response to proinflammatory stimuli, macrophages and dendritic cells undergo profound metabolic remodelling to support the biosynthetic and bioenergetic requirements of the cell. Recently, it has been discovered that this metabolic shift also involves the rewiring of the Krebs cycle to regulate cellular metabolic flux and the accumulation of Krebs cycle intermediates, notably, citrate, succinate and fumarate. Interestingly, a new role for Krebs cycle intermediates as signalling molecules and immunomodulators that dictate the inflammatory response has begun to emerge. This review will discuss the latest developments in Krebs cycle rewiring and immune cell effector functions, with a particular focus on the regulation of cytokine production. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  8. Alginic acid cell entrapment: a novel method for measuring in vivo macrophage cholesterol homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sontag, Timothy J.; Chellan, Bijoy; Bhanvadia, Clarissa V.; Getz, Godfrey S.; Reardon, Catherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage conversion to atherosclerotic foam cells is partly due to the balance of uptake and efflux of cholesterol. Cholesterol efflux from cells by HDL and its apoproteins for subsequent hepatic elimination is known as reverse cholesterol transport. Numerous methods have been developed to measure in vivo macrophage cholesterol efflux. Most methods do not allow for macrophage recovery for analysis of changes in cellular cholesterol status. We describe a novel method for measuring cellular cholesterol balance using the in vivo entrapment of macrophages in alginate, which retains incorporated cells while being permeable to lipoproteins. Recipient mice were injected subcutaneously with CaCl2 forming a bubble into which a macrophage/alginate suspension was injected, entrapping the macrophages. Cells were recovered after 24 h. Cellular free and esterified cholesterol mass were determined enzymatically and normalized to cellular protein. Both normal and cholesterol loaded macrophages undergo measureable changes in cell cholesterol when injected into WT and apoA-I-, LDL-receptor-, or apoE-deficient mice. Cellular cholesterol balance is dependent on initial cellular cholesterol status, macrophage cholesterol transporter expression, and apolipoprotein deficiency. Alginate entrapment allows for the in vivo measurement of macrophage cholesterol homeostasis and is a novel platform for investigating the role of genetics and therapeutic interventions in atherogenesis. PMID:25465389

  9. Macrophage-like cells in the muscularis externa of mouse small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, H B; Thuneberg, L; Rumessen, J J;

    1985-01-01

    In muscularis externa of mouse small intestine, cells with ultrastructural features of macrophages were invariably observed in three layers: in the subserosal layer, between the circular and longitudinal muscle layers, and in association with the deep circular plexus. These macrophage-like cells...

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  12. Melanoma cell-derived exosomes alter macrophage and dendritic cell functions in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marton, Annamaria; Vizler, Csaba; Kusz, Erzsebet; Temesfoi, Viktoria; Szathmary, Zsuzsa; Nagy, Krisztina; Szegletes, Zsolt; Varo, Gyorgy; Siklos, Laszlo; Katona, Robert L; Tubak, Vilmos; Howard, O M Zack; Duda, Erno; Minarovits, Janos; Nagy, Katalin; Buzas, Krisztina

    2012-01-01

    To clarify controversies in the literature of the field, we have purified and characterized B16F1 melanoma cell derived exosomes (mcd-exosomes) then we attempted to dissect their immunological activities. We tested how mcd-exosomes influence CD4+ T cell proliferation induced by bone marrow derived dendritic cells; we quantified NF-κB activation in mature macrophages stimulated with mcd-exosomes, and we compared the cytokine profile of LPS-stimulated, IL-4 induced, and mcd-exosome treated macrophages. We observed that mcd-exosomes helped the maturation of dendritic cells, enhancing T cell proliferation induced by the treated dendritic cells. The exosomes also activated macrophages, as measured by NF-κB activation. The cytokine and chemokine profile of macrophages treated with tumor cell derived exosomes showed marked differences from those induced by either LPS or IL-4, and it suggested that exosomes may play a role in the tumor progression and metastasis formation through supporting tumor immune escape mechanisms.

  13. Primary macrophages and J774 cells respond differently to infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu, Nuria; Phelan, Jody; de Sessions, Paola F.; Cliff, Jacqueline M.; Clark, Taane G.; Hibberd, Martin L.

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages play an essential role in the early immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and are the cell type preferentially infected in vivo. Primary macrophages and macrophage-like cell lines are commonly used as infection models, although the physiological relevance of cell lines, particularly for host-pathogen interaction studies, is debatable. Here we use high-throughput RNA-sequencing to analyse transcriptome dynamics of two macrophage models in response to M. tuberculosis infection. Specifically, we study the early response of bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages and cell line J774 to infection with live and γ-irradiated (killed) M. tuberculosis. We show that infection with live bacilli specifically alters the expression of host genes such as Rsad2, Ifit1/2/3 and Rig-I, whose potential roles in resistance to M. tuberculosis infection have not yet been investigated. In addition, the response of primary macrophages is faster and more intense than that of J774 cells in terms of number of differentially expressed genes and magnitude of induction/repression. Our results point to potentially novel processes leading to immune containment early during M. tuberculosis infection, and support the idea that important differences exist between primary macrophages and cell lines, which should be taken into account when choosing a macrophage model to study host-pathogen interactions. PMID:28176867

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  12. Electron Transfer Pathways in Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Liu

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of the electron salvation process data indicates that the electron transfer between the electron donor and acceptor is hindered by the electron salvation process. It is proposed that the electron transfer in the cell environment must be assisted by intermediate messenger called the “transport protein”.

  13. Macrophage Recruitment and Epithelial Repair Following Hair Cell Injury in the Mouse Utricle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejbeer eKaur

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The sensory organs of the inner ear possess resident populations of macrophages, but the function of those cells is poorly understood. In many tissues, macrophages participate in the removal of cellular debris after injury and can also promote tissue repair. The present study examined injury-evoked macrophage activity in the mouse utricle. Experiments used transgenic mice in which the gene for the human diphtheria toxin receptor (huDTR was inserted under regulation of the Pou4f3 promoter. Hair cells in such mice can be selectively lesioned by systemic treatment with diphtheria toxin (DT. In order to visualize macrophages, Pou4f3-huDTR mice were crossed with a second transgenic line, in which one or both copies of the gene for the fractalkine receptor CX3CR1 were replaced with a gene for GFP. Such mice expressed GFP in all macrophages, and mice that were CX3CR1GFP/GFP lacked the necessary receptor for fractalkine signaling. Treatment with DT resulted in the death of ~70% of utricular hair cells within seven days, which was accompanied by increased numbers of macrophages within the utricular sensory epithelium. Many of these macrophages appeared to be actively engulfing hair cell debris, indicating that macrophages participate in the process of ‘corpse removal’ in the mammalian vestibular organs. However, we observed no apparent differences in injury-evoked macrophage numbers in the utricles of CX3CR1+/GFP mice vs. CX3CR1GFP/GFP mice, suggesting that fractalkine signaling is not necessary for macrophage recruitment in these sensory organs. Finally, we found that repair of sensory epithelia at short times after DT-induced hair cell lesions was mediated by relatively thin cables of F-actin. After 56 days recovery, however, all cell-cell junctions were characterized by very thick actin cables.

  14. Macropinocytosis contributes to the macrophage foam cell formation in RAW264.7 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenqi Yao; Ke Li; Kan Liao

    2009-01-01

    The key event in the atherosclerosis development is the lipids uptake by macrophage and the formation of foam cell in subendothelial arterial space. Besides the uptake of modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL) by scavenger receptor-mediated endocytosis, macrophages possess constitutive macropinocytosis, which is capable of taking up a large quantity of solute. Macrophage foam cell formation could be induced in RAW264.7 cells by increasing the serum concentration in the culture medium. Foam cell formation induced by serum could be blocked by phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibi-tor, LY294002 or wortmannin, which inhibited macro-pinocytosis but not receptor-mediated endocytosis. Further analysis indicated that macropinocytosis took place at the gangliosides-enriched membrane area. Cholesterol depletion by β-methylcyclodextrin-blocked macropinocytosis without affecting scavenger receptor-mediated endocytosis of modified LDLs. These results suggested that macropinocytosis might be one of the important mechanisms for lipid uptake in macrophage. And it made significant contribution to the lipid accumulation and foam cell formation.

  15. Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin-Induced Macrophage Cytotoxicity against Bladder Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Luo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many details of the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG immunotherapy of bladder cancer have been discovered in the past decades. However, information on a potential role for macrophage cytotoxicity as an effector mechanism is limited. Macrophages play pivotal roles in the host innate immunity and serve as a first line of defense in mycobacterial infection. In addition to their function as professional antigen-presenting cells, the tumoricidal activity of macrophages has also been studied with considerable interest. Studies have shown that activated macrophages are potent in killing malignant cells of various tissue origins. This review summarizes the current understanding of the BCG-induced macrophage cytotoxicity toward bladder cancer cells with an intention to inspire investigation on this important but underdeveloped research field.

  16. Embryonic stem cell-derived M2-like macrophages delay cutaneous wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreymueller, Daniela; Denecke, Bernd; Ludwig, Andreas; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi

    2013-01-01

    In adults, repair of deeply injured skin wounds results in the formation of scar tissue, whereas in embryos wounds heal almost scar-free. Macrophages are important mediators of wound healing and secrete cytokines and tissue remodeling enzymes. In contrast to host defense mediated by inflammatory M1 macrophages, wound healing and tissue repair involve regulatory M2/M2-like macrophages. Embryonic/fetal macrophages are M2-like, and this may promote scar-free wound healing. In the present study, we asked whether atopical application of ex vivo generated, embryonic stem cell-derived macrophages (ESDM) improve wound healing in mice. ESDM were tested side by side with bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM). Compared to BMDM, ESDM resembled a less inflammatory and more M2-like macrophage subtype as indicated by their reduced responsiveness to lipopolysaccharide, reduced expression of Toll-like receptors, and reduced bacterial phagocytosis. Despite this anti-inflammatory phenotype in cell culture, ESDM prolonged the healing of deep skin wounds even more than BMDM. Healed wounds had more scar formation compared to wounds receiving BMDM or cell-free treatment. Our data indicate that atopical application of ex vivo generated macrophages is not a suitable cell therapy of dermal wounds.

  17. Paracrine factors of mesenchymal stem cells recruit macrophages and endothelial lineage cells and enhance wound healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwen Chen

    Full Text Available Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs have been shown to enhance wound healing; however, the mechanisms involved are barely understood. In this study, we examined paracrine factors released by BM-MSCs and their effects on the cells participating in wound healing compared to those released by dermal fibroblasts. Analyses of BM-MSCs with Real-Time PCR and of BM-MSC-conditioned medium by antibody-based protein array and ELISA indicated that BM-MSCs secreted distinctively different cytokines and chemokines, such as greater amounts of VEGF-alpha, IGF-1, EGF, keratinocyte growth factor, angiopoietin-1, stromal derived factor-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha and beta and erythropoietin, compared to dermal fibroblasts. These molecules are known to be important in normal wound healing. BM-MSC-conditioned medium significantly enhanced migration of macrophages, keratinocytes and endothelial cells and proliferation of keratinocytes and endothelial cells compared to fibroblast-conditioned medium. Moreover, in a mouse model of excisional wound healing, where concentrated BM-MSC-conditioned medium was applied, accelerated wound healing occurred compared to administration of pre-conditioned or fibroblast-conditioned medium. Analysis of cell suspensions derived from the wound by FACS showed that wounds treated with BM-MSC-conditioned medium had increased proportions of CD4/80-positive macrophages and Flk-1-, CD34- or c-kit-positive endothelial (progenitor cells compared to wounds treated with pre-conditioned medium or fibroblast-conditioned medium. Consistent with the above findings, immunohistochemical analysis of wound sections showed that wounds treated with BM-MSC-conditioned medium had increased abundance of macrophages. Our results suggest that factors released by BM-MSCs recruit macrophages and endothelial lineage cells into the wound thus enhancing wound healing.

  18. Interstitial cells of Cajal, macrophages and mast cells in the gut musculature: morphology, distribution, spatial and possible functional interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Hanne B

    2010-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are recognized as pacemaker cells for gastrointestinal movement and are suggested to be mediators of neuromuscular transmission. Intestinal motility disturbances are often associated with a reduced number of ICC and/or ultrastructural damage, sometimes associated...... with immune cells. Macrophages and mast cells in the intestinal muscularis externa of rodents can be found in close spatial contact with ICC. Macrophages are a constant and regularly distributed cell population in the serosa and at the level of Auerbach's plexus (AP). In human colon, ICC are in close contact...... with macrophages at the level of AP, suggesting functional interaction. It has therefore been proposed that ICC and macrophages interact. Macrophages and mast cells are considered to play important roles in the innate immune defence by producing pro-inflammatory mediators during classical activation, which may...

  19. REACTIVE MILIEU OF HODGKIN LYMPHOMA WITH EMPHASIS ON MAST CELLS AND MACROPHAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhish Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM OF STUDY To study the clinical importance of reactive microenvironment inHodgkin Lymphoma (HL with special reference to macrophages and mast cells. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present prospective and retrospective study was undertaken for a period ranging from January 2011 to June 2015 at the Department of Pathology, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore. The Haematoxylin and Eosin (H and E stained slides were reviewed and classified using WHO (2008 classification. Six immuno-histochemical markers were used in the study. CD 68 was for the macrophage count. Giemsa stain was done to highlight the mast cells. RESULTS AND ANALYSIS Thirty cases of HL were studied. Out of the 5 cases of Lymphocyte Depleted (LD Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma (cHL, all cases showed high macrophage count. Out of 30 cases of HL, only 6 cases showed increased mast cell count. DISCUSSION Mast cells act actively in various types of cancers. They can either have a pro-tumorigenic function or an anti-tumorigenic function depending on the type of cancer. Four (80% cases of LD-cHL showed macrophage count between 25-50% and 1 (20% case showed macrophage count >50% correlating with the aggressive nature and advanced stage of the disease. CONCLUSION In this study of microenvironment of HL mast cells and macrophages were analysed in each subtype. Though the mast cells were seen in all cases, an increased count of >10/10 (High power field HPF was observed only in 6 cases. The macrophage count was highest in LD-cHL and was statistically significant and thus correlated with this aggressive subtype of HL. The mast cell and macrophage count did not correlate with B-symptoms and stage of the disease a conclusion on survival versus the macrophage count and mast cell count was not possible in this study because of shorter follow up. A longer follow up and more number of cases are needed for a significant outcome.

  20. Effects of 200cH medications on mice bone marrow cells and macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorly de F. Buchi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Paracelsus once wrote: "All things are poison and nothing is without poison, only the dose permits something not to be poisonous." Latter Hahnemann formulated the law of similars, preparations which cause certain symptoms in healthy individuals if given in diluted form to patients exhibiting similar symptoms will cure it. Highly diluted natural complexes prepared according to Hahnemann’s ancient techniques may represent a new form of immunomodulatory therapy. The lack of scientific research with highly diluted products led us to investigate the in vivo and in vitro actions of commonly used medications. Here we describe the results of experimental studies aimed at verifying the effects of Mercurius solubilis, Atropa Belladonna, Lachesis muta and Bryonia alba. All medications were at 200cH dilution. Animals were maintained for 7 days and were allowed to drink the medications, which were prepared in a way that the final dilution and agitation (200cH was performed in drinking water. The medication bottle was changed and sucussed every afternoon. Co-culture of non treated mice bone marrow cells and in vitro treated peritoneal macrophages were also performed. After animal treatment the bone marrow cells were immunophenotyped with hematopoietic lineage markers on a flow cytometer. We have determined CD11b levels on bone marrow cells after culture and co-culture with treated macrophages and these macrophages were processed to scanning electron microscopy. We have observed by morphological changes that macrophages were activated after all treatments. Mercurius solubilis treated mice showed an increase in CD3 expression and in CD11b on nonadherent bone marrow cells after co-culture with in vitro treatment. Atropa Belladonna increased CD45R and decreased Ly-6G expression on bone marrow cells after animal treatment. Lachesis muta increased CD3, CD45R and, CD11c expression and decreased CD11b ex vivo and in nonadherent cells from co

  1. Tumor-promoting macrophages induce the expression of the macrophage-specific receptor CD163 in malignant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Etzerodt, Anders; Ulhøi, Benedicte Parm; Steiniche, Torben; Borre, Michael; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Orntoft, Torben Falck; Moestrup, Søren Kragh; Møller, Holger Jon

    2012-11-15

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) represent a distinct malignancy-promoting phenotype suggested to play a key role in tumor formation and metastasis. We aimed to investigate the expression of the monocyte/macrophage-restricted receptor CD163 in bladder tumor biopsies and assess the potential mechanism inducing the CD163 expression in tumor cells. A high CD163 mRNA expression (n = 87) was significantly associated with a poor 13-year overall survival (log-rank test, χ(2) = 8.931; p = 0.0028). Moreover, CD163 mRNA expression was significantly increased in muscle invasive (T2-T4), p = 0.017, and aggressive (grade III/IV) cancers (p = 0.015). The expression strongly correlated with local expression of IL-6 (r = 0.72; p CD163 expression in vitro. CD163 immunostaining (n = 46) confirmed the association between dense TAM infiltration and histologically advanced disease. In 39% of the biopsies, CD163 immunoreactivity was also observed in tumor cells, and CD163-expressing metastatic cells were identified in lymph node biopsies (n = 8). Bladder cancer cell lines did not express CD163; however, when cocultured with macrophages the bladder cancer cell expression of CD163 was significantly induced in an IL-6/IL-10 independent manner. In conclusion, we show a strong association between CD163 mRNA expression in bladder cancer biopsies and poor patient outcome. CD163 expression was not confined to the infiltrating TAMs, but was also expressed by a significant portion of the malignant cells in both tumors and lymph nodes. CD163 expressing tumor cells may constitute a subpopulation of tumor cells with a phenotypic shift associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and increased metastatic activity induced by TAMs. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  2. File list: ALL.Bld.50.AllAg.Granulocyte-Macrophage_Progenitor_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  5. NPFF2 receptor is involved in the modulatory effects of neuropeptide FF for macrophage cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu-long; Sun, Tao; Zhang, Xiao-yuan; He, Ning; Zhuang, Yan; Li, Jing-yi; Fang, Quan; Wang, Kai-rong; Wang, Rui

    2014-05-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) interacts with specific receptors to regulate diverse biological processes. Its modulatory effect in the immune field, however, has not been fully explored yet. Here, we report that NPFF2 receptors may be functionally expressed in two immune cell models, the primary peritoneal macrophage and RAW 264.7 macrophage. Firstly, the mRNA levels of NPFF2 receptor were up-regulated in macrophages when treated with LPS for 24 to 72 h. Subsequently, our data hinted that NPFF regulates the viability of both kinds of macrophages. After treatment with RF9, a reported antagonist for both NPFF receptors, delayed or inhibited the NPFF-induced macrophages viability augmentation, suggesting the involvement of NPFF2 receptor. Furthermore, down-regulation of nitric oxide (NO) synthases (NOSs) partially significantly inhibited the viability augmentation of macrophages induced by NPFF, implying a nitric oxide synthases- dependent pathway is involved. However, the NOSs are not the only route by which NPFF affects the viability of macrophages. Pharmacological inhibitors of NF-κB signal pathway also blocked the NPFF-induced macrophages growth, suggesting the involvement of the NF-κB signal pathway. The regulation activity of NPFF for macrophages suggests that NPFF could act as a potential hormone in the control of immune system. Collectively, our data provide new evidence about the immune modulatory effect of NPFF, which will be helpful in extending the scope of NPFF functions.

  6. Structural environment built by AKAP12+ colon mesenchymal cells drives M2 macrophages during inflammation recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun-Mo; Lee, Hye Shin; Seo, Ji Hae; Park, Ji-Hyeon; Gelman, Irwin H.; Lo, Eng H.; Kim, Kyu-Won

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages exhibit phenotypic plasticity, as they have the ability to switch their functional phenotypes during inflammation and recovery. Simultaneously, the mechanical environment actively changes. However, how these dynamic alterations affect the macrophage phenotype is unknown. Here, we observed that the extracellular matrix (ECM) constructed by AKAP12+ colon mesenchymal cells (CMCs) generated M2 macrophages by regulating their shape during recovery. Notably, rounded macrophages were present in the linear and loose ECM of inflamed colons and polarized to the M1 phenotype. In contrast, ramified macrophages emerged in the contracted ECM of recovering colons and mainly expressed M2 macrophage markers. These contracted structures were not observed in the inflamed colons of AKAP12 knockout (KO) mice. Consequently, the proportion of M2 macrophages in inflamed colons was lower in AKAP12 KO mice than in WT mice. In addition, clinical symptoms and histological damage were more severe in AKAP12 KO mice than in WT mice. In experimentally remodeled collagen gels, WT CMCs drove the formation of a more compacted structure than AKAP12 KO CMCs, which promoted the polarization of macrophages toward an M2 phenotype. These results demonstrated that tissue contraction during recovery provides macrophages with the physical cues that drive M2 polarization. PMID:28205544

  7. Phototherapy-treated apoptotic tumor cells induce pro-inflammatory cytokines production in macrophage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cuixia; Wei, Yanchun; Xing, Da

    2014-09-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that as a mitochondria-targeting cancer phototherapy, high fluence low-power laser irradiation (HF-LPLI) induces mitochondrial superoxide anion burst, resulting in oxidative damage to tumor cells. In this study, we further explored the immunological effects of HF-LPLI-induced apoptotic tumor cells. When macrophages were co-incubated with apoptotic cells induced by HF-LPLI, we observed the increased levels of TNF-α secretion and NO production in macrophages. Further experiments showed that NF-κB was activated in macrophages after co-incubation with HF-LPLI-induced apoptotic cells, and inhibition of NF-κB activity by pyrrolidinedithiocarbamic acid (PDTC) reduced the elevated levels of TNF-α secretion and NO production. These data indicate that HF-LPLI-induced apoptotic tumor cells induce the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines in macrophages, which may be helpful for better understanding the biological effects of cancer phototherapy.

  8. microRNA-150 inhibits the formation of macrophage foam cells through targeting adiponectin receptor 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jing [Department of Geratory, Linzi District People’s Hospital of Zibo City, Zibo, Shandong (China); Zhang, Suhua, E-mail: drsuhuangzhang@qq.com [Department of HealthCare, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University (Qingdao), Qingdao City, Qingdao (China)

    2016-08-05

    Transformation of macrophages into foam cells plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to determine the expression and biological roles of microRNA (miR)-150 in the formation of macrophage foam cells and to identify its functional target(s). Exposure to 50 μg/ml oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) led to a significant upregulation of miR-150 in THP-1 macrophages. Overexpression of miR-150 inhibited oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation in THP-1 macrophages, while knockdown of miR-150 enhanced lipid accumulation. apoA-I- and HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux was increased by 66% and 43%, respectively, in miR-150-overexpressing macrophages relative to control cells. In contrast, downregulation of miR-150 significantly reduced cholesterol efflux from oxLDL-laden macrophages. Bioinformatic analysis and luciferase reporter assay revealed adiponectin receptor 2 (AdipoR2) as a direct target of miR-150. Small interfering RNA-mediated downregulation of AdipoR2 phenocopied the effects of miR-150 overexpression, reducing lipid accumulation and facilitating cholesterol efflux in oxLDL-treated THP-1 macrophages. Knockdown of AdipoR2 induced the expression of proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), liver X receptor alpha (LXRα), ABCA1, and ABCG1. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of PPARγ or LXRα impaired AdipoR2 silencing-induced upregulation of ABCA1 and ABCG1. Taken together, our results indicate that miR-150 can attenuate oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation in macrophages via promotion of cholesterol efflux. The suppressive effects of miR-150 on macrophage foam cell formation are mediated through targeting of AdipoR2. Delivery of miR-150 may represent a potential approach to prevent macrophage foam cell formation in atherosclerosis. -- Highlights: •miR-150 inhibits macrophage foam cell formation. •miR-150 accelerates cholesterol efflux from oxLDL-laden macrophages. •miR-150 suppresses macrophage foam cell

  9. Tumor-promoting macrophages induce the expression of the macrophage-specific receptor CD163 in malignant cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Etzerodt, Anders; Ulhøi, Benedicte Parm

    2012-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) represent a distinct malignancy-promoting phenotype suggested to play a key role in tumor formation and metastasis. We aimed to investigate the expression of the monocyte/macrophage-restricted receptor CD163 in bladder tumor biopsies and assess the potential...... mechanism inducing the CD163 expression in tumor cells. A high CD163 mRNA expression (n = 87) was significantly associated with a poor 13-year overall survival (log-rank test, χ(2) = 8.931; p = 0.0028). Moreover, CD163 mRNA expression was significantly increased in muscle invasive (T2-T4), p = 0.......017, and aggressive (grade III/IV) cancers (p = 0.015). The expression strongly correlated with local expression of IL-6 (r = 0.72; p CD163 expression in vitro. CD163 immunostaining (n = 46) confirmed the association between dense TAM infiltration...

  10. Tumor associated macrophage × cancer cell hybrids may acquire cancer stem cell properties in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxian Ding

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers among women, and metastasis makes it lethal. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs that acquire an alternatively activated macrophage (M2 phenotype may promote metastasis. However, the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Here, we examined how TAMs interact with breast cancer cells to promote metastasis. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the expression of the M2-specific antigen CD163 in paraffin-embedded mammary carcinoma blocks to explore fusion events in breast cancer patients. U937 cells were used as a substitute for human monocytes, and these cells differentiated into M2 macrophages following phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA and M-CSF stimulation. M2 macrophages and the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 fused in the presence of 50% polyethylene glycol. Hybrids were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and the relevant cell biological properties were compared with their parental counterparts. Breast cancer stem cell (BCSC-related markers were quantified by immunofluorescence staining, RT-PCR, quantitative RT-PCR and/or western blotting. The tumor-initiating and metastatic capacities of the hybrids and their parental counterparts were assessed in NOD/SCID mice. We found that the CD163 expression rate in breast cancer tissues varied significantly and correlated with estrogen receptor status (p0.05. Characterization of the fusion hybrids revealed a more aggressive phenotype, including increased migration, invasion and tumorigenicity, but reduced proliferative ability, compared with the parental lines. The hybrids also gained a CD44(+CD24(-/low phenotype and over-expressed epithelial-mesenchymal transition-associated genes. These results indicate that TAMs may promote breast cancer metastasis through cell fusion, and the hybrids may gain a BCSC phenotype.

  11. Whole-cell analysis of low-density lipoprotein uptake by macrophages using STEM tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Baudoin

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles of heavy materials such as gold can be used as markers in quantitative electron microscopic studies of protein distributions in cells with nanometer spatial resolution. Studying nanoparticles within the context of cells is also relevant for nanotoxicological research. Here, we report a method to quantify the locations and the number of nanoparticles, and of clusters of nanoparticles inside whole eukaryotic cells in three dimensions using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM tomography. Whole-mount fixed cellular samples were prepared, avoiding sectioning or slicing. The level of membrane staining was kept much lower than is common practice in transmission electron microscopy (TEM, such that the nanoparticles could be detected throughout the entire cellular thickness. Tilt-series were recorded with a limited tilt-range of 80° thereby preventing excessive beam broadening occurring at higher tilt angles. The 3D locations of the nanoparticles were nevertheless determined with high precision using computation. The obtained information differed from that obtained with conventional TEM tomography data since the nanoparticles were highlighted while only faint contrast was obtained on the cellular material. Similar as in fluorescence microscopy, a particular set of labels can be studied. This method was applied to study the fate of sequentially up-taken low-density lipoprotein (LDL conjugated to gold nanoparticles in macrophages. Analysis of a 3D reconstruction revealed that newly up-taken LDL-gold was delivered to lysosomes containing previously up-taken LDL-gold thereby forming onion-like clusters.

  12. Effects of everolimus on macrophage-derived foam cell behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Steven, E-mail: steven.hsu@av.abbott.com [Abbott Vascular, 3200 Lakeside Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95054 (United States); Koren, Eugen; Chan, Yen; Koscec, Mirna; Sheehy, Alexander [Abbott Vascular, 3200 Lakeside Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95054 (United States); Kolodgie, Frank; Virmani, Renu [CVPath Institute, Inc., 19 Firstfield Road, Gaithersburg, MD 20878 (United States); Feder, Debra [Abbott Vascular, 3200 Lakeside Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95054 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of everolimus on foam cell (FC) viability, mRNA levels, and inflammatory cytokine production to better understand its potential inhibitory effects on atheroma progression. Methods and materials: Human THP1 macrophage-derived FC were formed using acetylated LDL (acLDL, 100 μg/mL) for 72 hours, followed by everolimus treatment (10{sup -5}–10{sup -11} M) for 24 hours. FC viability was quantified using fluorescent calcein AM/DAPI staining. FC lysates and media supernatants were analyzed for apoptosis and necrosis using a Cell Death ELISA{sup PLUS} assay. FC lysates and media supernatants were also analyzed for inflammatory cytokine (IL1β, IL8, MCP1, TNFα) mRNA levels and protein expression using quantitative reverse transcription real-time polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) and a Procarta® immunoassay, respectively. mRNA levels of autophagy (MAP1LC3), apoptosis (survivin, clusterin), and matrix degradation (MMP1, MMP9) markers were evaluated by Quantigene® Plex assay and verified with QPCR. Additionally, hypercholesterolemic rabbits received everolimus-eluting stents (EES) for 28 or 60 days. RAM-11 immunohistochemical staining was performed to compare %RAM-11 positive area between stented sections and unstented proximal sections. Statistical significance was calculated using one-way ANOVA (p ≤ 0.05). Results: Calcein AM/DAPI staining showed that FC exposed to everolimus (10{sup -5} M) had significantly decreased viability compared to control. FC apoptosis was significantly increased at a high dose of everolimus (10{sup -5} M), with no necrotic effects at any dose tested. Everolimus did not affect endothelial (HUVEC) and smooth muscle (HCASMC) cell apoptosis or necrosis. Everolimus (10{sup -5} M) significantly increased MAP1LC3, caused an increased trend in clusterin (p = 0.10), and significantly decreased survivin and MMP1 mRNA levels in FC. MCP1 cytokine mRNA levels and secreted protein

  13. Direct Effects of Activin A on the Activation of Mouse Macrophage RAW264.7 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingyan Ge; Yinan Wang; Ye Feng; Haiyan Liu; Xueling Cui; Fangfang Chen; Guixiang Tai; Zhonghui Liu

    2009-01-01

    Macrophages play critical roles in innate immune and acquired immune via secreting pro-inflammatory mediators, phagocytosing microorganisms and presenting antigens. Activin A, a member of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) superfamily, is produced by macrophages and microglia cells. In this study, we reported a direct effect of activin A as a pro-inflammatory factor on mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 cells. Our data revealed that activin A could not only increase IL-1v and IL-6 production from RAW264.7 cells, but also promote pinocytic and phagocytic activities of RAW264.7 cells. In addition, activin A obviously up-regulated MHC Ⅱ expression on the surface of RAW264.7 cells, whereas did not influence MHC I expression. Activin A also enhanced CD80 expression, which is a marker of activated macrophages, but did not influence RAW264.7 cell proliferation. These data suggest that activin A may regulate primary macrophage-mediated innate and acquired immune response via promoting the activation of rest macrophages. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  14. Different cell death modes of pancreatic acinar cells on macrophage activation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Tao; LIU Tie-fu; XUE Dong-bo; SUN Bei; SHI Li-jun

    2008-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis is complex and largely unclear. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between modes of cell death in pancreatic acinar cells, the release of cell contents and the inflammatory response of macrophagas.Methods Our experiment included four groups: group A (the control group), group B (AR42J cells overstimulated by caerulein), group C (AR42J cells treated with lipopolysaccharide and caerulein), and group D (AR42J cells treated with octreotide and caerulein). Apoptosis and oncosis, and the release of amylase and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from AR42J cells were detected. Rat macrophages were stimulated by 1 ml supematant of culture medium of AR42J cells.Finally, NF-кB activation and TNF-α and IL-1β secretion by macrophages were detected.Results Oncotlc cells in group C increased while apoptctic cells decreased (P <0.05); cells in group D had the inverse reaction. The release of amylase and LDH changed directly with the occurrence of oncosis. The transcription factor NF-кB was activated and secretion of TNF-α and IL-1β were significantly higher in group C than in group B (P <0.05); in group D, these actions were significantly lower than in group B (P<0.05). This trend was in line with changes in amylase and LDH production.Conclusion There is a close relationship between modes of pancreatic acinar cell death, the release of cell contents and the inflammatory reaction of macrophages.

  15. An inflammatory gene signature distinguishes neurofibroma Schwann cells and macrophages from cells in the normal peripheral nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kwangmin; Komurov, Kakajan; Fletcher, Jonathan S.; Jousma, Edwin; Cancelas, Jose A.; Wu, Jianqiang; Ratner, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    Neurofibromas are benign peripheral nerve tumors driven by NF1 loss in Schwann cells (SCs). Macrophages are abundant in neurofibromas, and macrophage targeted interventions may have therapeutic potential in these tumors. We generated gene expression data from fluorescence-activated cell sorted (FACS) SCs and macrophages from wild-type and mutant nerve and neurofibroma to identify candidate pathways involved in SC-macrophage cross-talk. While in 1-month-old Nf1 mutant nerve neither SCs nor macrophages significantly differed from their normal counterparts, both macrophages and SCs showed significantly altered cytokine gene expression in neurofibromas. Computationally reconstructed SC-macrophage molecular networks were enriched for inflammation-associated pathways. We verified that neurofibroma SC conditioned medium contains macrophage chemo-attractants including colony stimulation factor 1 (CSF1). Network analysis confirmed previously implicated pathways and predict novel paracrine and autocrine loops involving cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. Network analysis also predicted a central role for decreased type-I interferon signaling. We validated type-I interferon expression in neurofibroma by protein profiling, and show that treatment of neurofibroma-bearing mice with polyethylene glycolyated (PEGylated) type-I interferon-α2b reduces the expression of many cytokines overexpressed in neurofibroma. These studies reveal numerous potential targetable interactions between Nf1 mutant SCs and macrophages for further analyses. PMID:28256556

  16. Macrophage specific overexpression of the human macrophage scavenger receptor in transgenic mice, using a 180-kb yeast artificial chromosome, leads to enhanced foam cell formation of isolated peritoneal macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winther, M.P.J. de; Dijk, K.W. van; Vlijmen, B.J.M. van; Gijbels, M.J.J.; Heus, J.J.; Wijers, E.R.; Bos, A.C. van den; Breuer, M.; Frants, R.R.; Havekes, L.M.; Hofker, M.H.

    1999-01-01

    Macrophage scavenger receptors class A (MSR) are thought to play an important role in atherogenesis by mediating the unrestricted uptake of modified lipoproteins by macrophages in the vessel wall leading to foam cell formation. To investigate the in vivo role of the MSR in this process, a transgenic

  17. The interplay between monocytes/macrophages and CD4+ T cell subsets in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceri A. Roberts

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by inflammation of the synovial lining (synovitis. The inflammation in the RA joint is associated with and driven by immune cell infiltration, synovial hyperproliferation and excessive production of pro-inflammatory mediators, such as TNFα, IFNγ, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-17, eventually resulting in damage to the cartilage and underlying bone. The RA joint harbors a wide range of immune cell types, including monocytes, macrophages and CD4+ T cells (both pro-inflammatory and regulatory. The interplay between CD14+ myeloid cells and CD4+ T cells can significantly influence CD4+ T cell function and conversely, effector vs. regulatory CD4+ T cell subsets can exert profound effects on monocyte/macrophage function. In this review, we will discuss how the interplay between CD4+ T cells and monocytes/macrophages may contribute to the immunopathology of RA.

  18. Cellular uptake of a dexamethasone palmitate-low density lipoprotein complex by macrophages and foam cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauchi, Yoshihiko; Chono, Sumio; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2003-04-01

    To evaluate the utility of a dexamethasone palmitate (DP)-low density lipoprotein (LDL) complex to transport drug into foam cells, the cellular uptake of DP-LDL complex by macrophages and foam cells was examined. The DP-LDL complex was prepared by incubation with DP and LDL, and the DP-LDL complex and murine macrophages were incubated. No cellular uptake of the DP-LDL complex by macrophages was found until 6 h after the start of incubation, but this gradually increased from 12 to 48 h. On the other hand, the cellular uptake of the oxidized DP-LDL complex was already apparent at 3 h after the start incubation, and then markedly increased until 48 h incubation along with that of the lipid emulsion (LE) containing DP (DP-LE). The cellular uptake of DP-LE by foam cells was significantly lower than that by macrophages. However, the cellular uptake of DP-LDL complex by foam cells was similar to that by macrophages. These findings suggest that the DP-LDL complex is oxidatively modified, and then incorporated into macrophages and foam cells through the scavenger receptor pathway. Since selective delivery of drugs into foam cells in the early stage of atherosclerosis is a useful protocol for antiatherosclerosis treatment, the DP-LDL complex appears to be a potentially useful drug-carrier complex for future antiatherosclerotic therapy.

  19. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 and cell division in neuroblastoma cells and bone marrow macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sans-Fons, M Gloria; Sole, Sonia; Sanfeliu, Coral; Planas, Anna M

    2010-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) degrade the extracellular matrix and carry out key functions in cell development, cancer, injury, and regeneration. In addition to its well recognized extracellular action, functional intracellular MMP activity under certain conditions is supported by increasing evidence. In this study, we observed higher gelatinase activity by in situ zymography and increased MMP-9 immunoreactivity in human neuroblastoma cells and in bone marrow macrophages undergoing mitosis compared with resting cells. We studied the pattern of immunoreactivity at the different stages of cell division by confocal microscopy. Immunostaining with different monoclonal antibodies against MMP-9 revealed a precise, dynamic, and well orchestrated localization of MMP-9 at the different stages of cell division. The cellular distribution of MMP-9 staining was studied in relation to that of microtubules. The spatial pattern of MMP-9 immunoreactivity suggested some participation in both the reorganization of the nuclear content and the process of chromatid segmentation. We then used several MMP-9 inhibitors to find out whether MMP-9 might be involved in the cell cycle. These drugs impaired the entry of cells into mitosis, as revealed by flow cytometry, and reduced cell culture growth. In addition, the silencing of MMP-9 expression with small interfering RNA also reduced cell growth. Taken together, these results suggest that intracellular MMP-9 is involved in the process of cell division in neuroblastoma cells and in primary cultures of macrophages.

  20. Interactions between colon cancer cells and tumor-infiltrated macrophages depending on cancer cell-derived colony stimulating factor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huayang; Shao, Qianqian; Sun, Jintang; Ma, Chao; Gao, Wenjuan; Wang, Qingjie; Zhao, Lei; Qu, Xun

    2016-04-01

    Tumor-infiltrated macrophages were potential targets of the immune therapy for patients with colon cancer. Colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1) is a primary chemoattractant and functional regulator for macrophages, and therefore would be a feasible intervention for the macrophage-targeting therapeutics. However, the expression of CSF1 in colon cancer microenvironment and its roles in cancer development is largely unknown. In the present study, we found that CSF1 was over-expressed exclusively in colon cancer cells and was correlated with macrophages infiltration. The high CSF1 expression and macrophages infiltration were related to the tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage of colon cancer, and suggested to be positively associated with survival of colon cancer patients. In the in vitro studies based on an indirect Transwell system, we found that co-culture with macrophage promoted CSF1 production in colon cancer cells. Further investigation on regulatory mechanisms suggested that CSF1 production in colon cancer cells was dependent on PKC pathway, which was activated by IL-8, mainly produced by macrophages. Moreover, colon cancer cell-derived CSF1 drove the recruitment of macrophages and re-educated their secretion profile, including the augment of IL-8 production. The mice tumor xenografts study also found that over-expression of CSF1 in colon cancer cells promoted intratumoral infiltration of macrophages, and partially suppressed tumor growth. In all, our results demonstrated that CSF1 was an important factor in the colon cancer microenvironment, involving in the interactions between colon cancer cells and tumor-infiltrated macrophages.

  1. Bone marrow-derived cells serve as proangiogenic macrophages but not endothelial cells in wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, Yuji; Nakamura-Ishizu, Ayako; Kishi, Kazuo; Suda, Toshio; Kubota, Yoshiaki

    2011-05-12

    Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) contribute to postnatal vascular growth by differentiating into endothelial cells or secreting angiogenic factors. However, the extent of their endothelial differentiation highly varies according to the angiogenic models used. Wound healing is an intricate process in which the skin repairs itself after injury. As a process also observed in cancer progression, neoangiogenesis into wound tissues is profoundly involved in this healing process, suggesting the contribution of BMDCs. However, the extent of the differentiation of BMDCs to endothelial cells in wound healing is unclear. In this study, using the green fluorescent protein-bone marrow chim-eric experiment and high resolution confocal microscopy at a single cell level, we observed no endothelial differentiation of BMDCs in 2 acute wound healing models (dorsal excisional wound and ear punch) and a chronic wound healing model (decubitus ulcer). Instead, a major proportion of BMDCs were macrophages. Indeed, colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) inhibition depleted approximately 80% of the BMDCs at the wound healing site. CSF-1-mutant (CSF-1(op/op)) mice showed significantly reduced neoangiogenesis into the wound site, supporting the substantial role of BMDCs as macrophages. Our data show that the proangiogenic effects of macrophages, but not the endothelial differentiation, are the major contribution of BMDCs in wound healing.

  2. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Inhibit Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Reactions in Macrophages and Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dequan Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS accompanied by trauma can lead to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS and even death. Early inhibition of the inflammation is necessary for damage control. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs, as a novel therapy modality, have been shown to reduce inflammatory responses in human and animal models. Methods. In this study, we used Western blot, quantitative PCR, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA to assess the activity of BMSCs to suppress the inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS in human umbilical cord endothelial cells (HUVECs and alveolar macrophages. Results. Our results demonstrated that LPS caused an inflammatory response in alveolar macrophages and HUVECs, increased permeability of HUVEC, upregulated expression of toll-like receptor (TLR 2, TLR4, phosphorylated p65, downregulated release of IL10, and promoted release of TNF-α in both cells. Coculture with BMSCs attenuated all of these activities induced by LPS in the two tested cell types. Conclusions. Together, our results demonstrate that BMSCs dosage dependently attenuates the inflammation damage of alveolar macrophages and HUVECs induced by LPS.

  3. Low Dose BCG Infection as a Model for Macrophage Activation Maintaining Cell Viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Chávez-Galán

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the current vaccine against tuberculosis, is ingested by macrophages promoting the development of effector functions including cell death and microbicidal mechanisms. Despite accumulating reports on M. tuberculosis, mechanisms of BCG/macrophage interaction remain relatively undefined. In vivo, few bacilli are sufficient to establish a mycobacterial infection; however, in vitro studies systematically use high mycobacterium doses. In this study, we analyze macrophage/BCG interactions and microenvironment upon infection with low BCG doses and propose an in vitro model to study cell activation without affecting viability. We show that RAW macrophages infected with BCG at MOI 1 activated higher and sustained levels of proinflammatory cytokines and transcription factors while MOI 0.1 was more efficient for early stimulation of IL-1β, MCP-1, and KC. Both BCG infection doses induced iNOS and NO in a dose-dependent manner and maintained nuclear and mitochondrial structures. Microenvironment generated by MOI 1 induced macrophage proliferation but not MOI 0.1 infection. In conclusion, BCG infection at low dose is an efficient in vitro model to study macrophage/BCG interactions that maintains macrophage viability and mitochondrial structures. This represents a novel model that can be applied to BCG research fields including mycobacterial infections, cancer immunotherapy, and prevention of autoimmunity and allergies.

  4. The Interaction of Adrenomedullin and Macrophages Induces Ovarian Cancer Cell Migration via Activation of RhoA Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Pang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs are correlated with poor prognosis in many human cancers; however, the mechanism by which TAMs facilitate ovarian cancer cell migration and invasion remains unknown. This study was aimed to examine the function of adrenomedullin (ADM in macrophage polarization and their further effects on the migration of ovarian cancer cells. Exogenous ADM antagonist and small interfering RNA (siRNA specific for ADM expression were treated to macrophages and EOC cell line HO8910, respectively. Then macrophages were cocultured with HO8910 cells without direct contact. Flow cytometry, Western blot and real-time PCR were used to detect macrophage phenotype and cytokine production. The migration ability and cytoskeleton rearrangement of ovarian cancer cells were determined by Transwell migration assay and phalloidin staining. Western blot was performed to evaluate the activity status of signaling molecules in the process of ovarian cancer cell migration. The results showed that ADM induced macrophage phenotype and cytokine production similar to TAMs. Macrophages polarized by ADM promoted the migration and cytoskeleton rearrangement of HO8910 cells. The expression of RhoA and its downstream effector, cofilin, were upregulated in macrophage-induced migration of HO8910 cells. In conclusion, ADM could polarize macrophages similar to TAMs, and then polarized macrophages promote the migration of ovarian cancer cells via activation of RhoA signaling pathway in vitro.

  5. Recent progress in understandıng the function of intestinal macrophages and dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsall, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal immune responses must be tightly controlled, particularly in the intestine, As members of the mononuclear phagocyte family, dendritic cells and macrophages, are well represented in intestinal tissues, and have developed unique functional niches. This review will focus on recent findings on antigen uptake and processing in the intestine, and the role of DCs in the imprinting homing receptors on T and B cells, the induction of IgA B cell responses, and the differentiation of regulatory T cells (Tregs). It will also address the unique phenotype of intestinal macrophages and briefly what is known regarding the relationships between these cell types. PMID:19079213

  6. Hoxb8 conditionally immortalised macrophage lines model inflammatory monocytic cells with important similarity to dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Marcela; Osorio, Fabiola; Robinson, Matthew J; Davies, Luke C; Dierkes, Nicola; Jones, Simon A; Reis e Sousa, Caetano; Taylor, Philip R

    2011-02-01

    We have examined the potential to generate bona fide macrophages (MØ) from conditionally immortalised murine bone marrow precursors. MØ can be derived from Hoxb8 conditionally immortalised macrophage precursor cell lines (MØP) using either M-CSF or GM-CSF. When differentiated in GM-CSF (GM-MØP) the resultant cells resemble GM-CSF bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC) in morphological phenotype, antigen phenotype and functional responses to microbial stimuli. In spite of this high similarity between the two cell types and the ability of GM-MØP to effectively present antigen to a T-cell hybridoma, these cells are comparatively poor at priming the expansion of IFN-γ responses from naïve CD4(+) T cells. The generation of MØP from transgenic or genetically aberrant mice provides an excellent opportunity to study the inflammatory role of GM-MØP, and reduces the need for mouse colonies in many studies. Hence differentiation of conditionally immortalised MØPs in GM-CSF represents a unique in vitro model of inflammatory monocyte-like cells, with important differences from bone marrow-derived dendritic cells, which will facilitate functional studies relating to the many 'sub-phenotypes' of inflammatory monocytes.

  7. Macrophage-independent T cell infiltration to the site of injury-induced brain inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fux, Michaela; van Rooijen, Nico; Owens, Trevor

    2008-01-01

    We have addressed the role of macrophages in glial response and T cell entry to the CNS after axonal injury, by using intravenous injection of clodronate-loaded mannosylated liposomes, in C57BL6 mice. As expected, clodronate-liposome treatment resulted in depletion of peripheral macrophages which...... was confirmed by F4/80(-) and MOMA-1(-) stainings in spleen. Sequential clodronate-liposome treatment 4, 2 and 0 days before axotomy resulted in significant reduction of infiltrating CD45(high) CD11b(+) macrophages in the hippocampus at 1, 2 and 3 days post-lesion, measured by flow cytometry. There was a slight...

  8. Impact of alginate-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa on alveolar macrophage apoptotic cell clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaslin, Charles A; Petrusca, Daniela N; Poirier, Christophe; Serban, Karina A; Anderson, Gregory G; Petrache, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is a hallmark of lung disease in cystic fibrosis. Acute infection with P. aeruginosa profoundly inhibits alveolar macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis) via direct effect of virulence factors. During chronic infection, P. aeruginosa evades host defense by decreased virulence, which includes the production or, in the case of mucoidy, overproduction of alginate. The impact of alginate on innate immunity, in particular on macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells is not known. We hypothesized that P. aeruginosa strains that exhibit reduced virulence impair macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells and we investigated if the polysaccharide alginate produced by mucoid P. aeruginosa is sufficient to inhibit alveolar macrophage efferocytosis. Rat alveolar or human peripheral blood monocyte (THP-1)-derived macrophage cell lines were exposed in vitro to exogenous alginate or to wild type or alginate-overproducing mucoid P. aeruginosa prior to challenge with apoptotic human Jurkat T-lymphocytes. The importance of LPS contamination and that of structural integrity of alginate polymers was tested using alginate of different purities and alginate lyase, respectively. Alginate inhibited alveolar macrophage efferocytosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This effect was augmented but not exclusively attributed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) present in alginates. Alginate-producing P. aeruginosa inhibited macrophage efferocytosis by more than 50%. A mannuronic-specific alginate lyase did not restore efferocytosis inhibited by exogenous guluronic-rich marine alginate, but had a marked beneficial effect on efferocytosis of alveolar macrophages exposed to mucoid P. aeruginosa. Despite decreased virulence, mucoid P. aeruginosa may contribute to chronic airway inflammation through significant inhibition of alveolar clearance of apoptotic cells and debris. The mechanism by which mucoid bacteria inhibit efferocytosis may involve alginate

  9. Coculture with intraocular lens material-activated macrophages induces an inflammatory phenotype in lens epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintwala, Robert; Postnikoff, Cameron; Molladavoodi, Sara; Gorbet, Maud

    2015-03-01

    Cataracts are the leading cause of blindness worldwide, requiring surgical implantation of an intraocular lens. Despite evidence of leukocyte ingress into the postoperative lens, few studies have investigated the leukocyte response to intraocular lens materials. A novel coculture model was developed to examine macrophage activation by hydrophilic acrylic (poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)) and hydrophobic acrylic (polymethylmethacrylate) commercial intraocular lens. The human monocytic cell line THP-1 was differentiated into macrophages and cocultured with human lens epithelial cell line (HLE-B3) with or without an intraocular lens for one, two, four, or six days. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, expression of the macrophage activation marker CD54 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1) and production of reactive oxygen species via the fluorogenic probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate were examined in macrophages. α-Smooth muscle actin, a transdifferentiation marker, was characterized in lens epithelial cells. The poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) intraocular lens prevented adhesion but induced significant macrophage activation (p intraocular lens), while the polymethylmethacrylate intraocular lens enabled adhesion and multinucleated fusion, but induced no significant activation. Coculture with either intraocular lens increased reactive oxygen species production in macrophages after one day (p intraocular lens, with hydrophilic surfaces inducing higher activation than hydrophobic surfaces. These findings provide a new method of inquiry into uveal biocompatibility, specifically through the quantification of cell-surface markers of leukocyte activation.

  10. Listeria monocytogenes infection of HD11, chicken macrophage-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, N A; Donaldson, J R; O'Bryan, C A; Ricke, S C; Crandall, P G

    2017-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes can be carried by and infect poultry, although the clinical disease in birds is rare. Escape from macrophage phagocytosis is a key step in pathogenesis for L. monocytogenes. Therefore, we investigated the infection of the chicken macrophage-like cell line HD11 with 2 strains of L. monocytogenes EGD-e and Scott A. After infection, L. monocytogenes was quantified by spread plating and HD11 was quantified with trypan blue exclusion stain before enumeration. The standard macrophage killing protocols require washing the cell monolayers 3 times with PBS, which was found to negatively influence HD11 monolayers. Maximum bacterial densities within macrophages were not different between the 2 Listeria strains. HD11 required more than 11 h to effectively reduce intracellular L. monocytogenes Scott A, and Scott A was more susceptible to HD11 killing than EGD-e. It appears that Listeria infection initially causes attenuation of HD11 growth, and infected HD11 cells do not begin to lyse until at least 11 h post infection. These results suggest that there are subtle strain to strain differences in response to HD11 macrophage phagocytosis. The long lead-time required for HD11 to kill L. monocytogenes cells means that there is sufficient time available for chicken macrophages to circulate in the blood and transfer the intracellular Listeria to multiple tissues. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  11. Combined 17β-Estradiol with TCDD Promotes M2 Polarization of Macrophages in the Endometriotic Milieu with Aid of the Interaction between Endometrial Stromal Cells and Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Wang

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to elucidate the effects of 17β-estradiol and TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin on macrophage phenotypes in the endometriotic milieu. Co-culture of endometrial stromal cells (ESCs and U937 cells (macrophage cell line was performed to simulate the endometriotic milieu and to determine the effects of 17β-estradiol and/or TCDD on IL10, IL12 production and HLA-DR, CD86 expression by U937 macrophages. We found that combining 17β-estradiol with TCDD has a synergistic effect on inducing M2 activation when macrophages are co-cultured with ESCs. Moreover, the combination of 17β-estradiol and TCDD significantly enhanced STAT3 and P38 phosphorylation in macrophages. Differentiation of M2 macrophages induced by 17β-estradiol and TCDD were effectively abrogated by STAT3 and P38MAPK inhibitors, but not by ERK1/2 and JNK inhibitors. In conclusion, 17β-estradiol and TCDD in the ectopic milieu may lead to the development of endometriosis by inducing M2 polarization of macrophages through activation of the STAT3 and P38MAPK pathways.

  12. Combined 17β-Estradiol with TCDD Promotes M2 Polarization of Macrophages in the Endometriotic Milieu with Aid of the Interaction between Endometrial Stromal Cells and Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Chen, Hong; Wang, NingLing; Guo, HaiYan; Fu, Yonglun; Xue, Songguo; Ai, Ai; Lyu, Qifeng; Kuang, Yanping

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to elucidate the effects of 17β-estradiol and TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin) on macrophage phenotypes in the endometriotic milieu. Co-culture of endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) and U937 cells (macrophage cell line) was performed to simulate the endometriotic milieu and to determine the effects of 17β-estradiol and/or TCDD on IL10, IL12 production and HLA-DR, CD86 expression by U937 macrophages. We found that combining 17β-estradiol with TCDD has a synergistic effect on inducing M2 activation when macrophages are co-cultured with ESCs. Moreover, the combination of 17β-estradiol and TCDD significantly enhanced STAT3 and P38 phosphorylation in macrophages. Differentiation of M2 macrophages induced by 17β-estradiol and TCDD were effectively abrogated by STAT3 and P38MAPK inhibitors, but not by ERK1/2 and JNK inhibitors. In conclusion, 17β-estradiol and TCDD in the ectopic milieu may lead to the development of endometriosis by inducing M2 polarization of macrophages through activation of the STAT3 and P38MAPK pathways.

  13. In vitro biodegradation of three brushite calcium phosphate cements by a macrophage cell-line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhidao; Grover, Liam Michael; Huang, Yizhong; Adamopoulos, Iannis E; Gbureck, Uwe; Triffitt, James T; Shelton, Richard M; Barralet, Jake E

    2006-09-01

    Depending upon local conditions, brushite (CaHPO4 x 2 H2O) cements may be largely resorbed or (following hydrolysis to hydroxyapatite) remain stable in vivo. To determine which factors influence cement resorption, previous studies have investigated the solution-driven degradation of brushite cements in vitro in the absence of any cells. However, the mechanism of cell-mediated biodegradation of the brushite cement is still unknown. The aim of the current study was to observe the cell-mediated biodegradation of brushite cement formulations in vitro. The cements were aged in the presence of a murine cell line (RAW264.7), which had the potential to form osteoclasts in the presence of the receptor for nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) in vitro, independently of macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF). The cytotoxicity of the cements on RAW264.7 cells and the calcium and phosphate released from materials to the culture media were analysed. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and focused ion beam (FIB) microscopy were used to characterise the ultrastructure of the cells. The results showed that the RAW264.7 cell line formed multinucleated TRAP positive osteoclast-like cells, capable of ruffled border formation and lacunar resorption on the brushite calcium phosphate cement in vitro. In the osteoclast-like cell cultures, ultrastructural analysis by SEM revealed phenotypic characteristics of osteoclasts including formation of a sealing zone and ruffled border. Penetration of the surface of the cement, was demonstrated using FIB, and this showed the potential demineralising effect of the cells on the cements. This study has set up a useful model to investigate the cell-mediated cement degradation in vitro.

  14. MiR-16 regulates mouse peritoneal macrophage polarization and affects T-cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiaoqin; Li, Xiaomin; Shen, Yating; Miao, Junjun; Liu, Hao; Li, Guoli; Wang, Zhengbing

    2016-10-01

    MiR-16 is a tumour suppressor that is down-regulated in certain human cancers. However, little is known on its activity in other cell types. In this study, we examined the biological significance and underlying mechanisms of miR-16 on macrophage polarization and subsequent T-cell activation. Mouse peritoneal macrophages were isolated and induced to undergo either M1 polarization with 100 ng/ml of interferon-γ and 20 ng/ml of lipopolysaccharide, or M2 polarization with 20 ng/ml of interleukin (IL)-4. The identity of polarized macrophages was determined by profiling cell-surface markers by flow cytometry and cytokine production by ELISA. Macrophages were infected with lentivirus-expressing miR-16 to assess the effects of miR-16. Effects on macrophage-T cell interactions were analysed by co-culturing purified CD4(+) T cells with miR-16-expressing peritoneal macrophages, and measuring activation marker CD69 by flow cytometry and cytokine secretion by ELISA. Bioinformatics analysis was applied to search for potential miR-16 targets and understand its underlying mechanisms. MiR-16-induced M1 differentiation of mouse peritoneal macrophages from either the basal M0- or M2-polarized state is indicated by the significant up-regulation of M1 marker CD16/32, repression of M2 marker CD206 and Dectin-1, and increased secretion of M1 cytokine IL-12 and nitric oxide. Consistently, miR-16-expressing macrophages stimulate the activation of purified CD4(+) T cells. Mechanistically, miR-16 significantly down-regulates the expression of PD-L1, a critical immune suppressor that controls macrophage-T cell interaction and T-cell activation. MiR-16 plays an important role in shifting macrophage polarization from M2 to M1 status, and functionally activating CD4(+) T cells. This effect is potentially mediated through the down-regulation of immune suppressor PD-L1.

  15. In vitro biodegradation of chrysotile fibres by alveolar macrophages and mesothelial cells in culture: comparison with a pH effect.

    OpenAIRE

    Jaurand, M C; Gaudichet, A; Halpern, S.; Bignon, J.

    1984-01-01

    The modification of the chemistry of asbestos chrysotile fibres (Mg3(Si2O5)(OH)4) after their ingestion by cultured cells has been studied. Two types of cells involved in asbestos related pulmonary disease were used, rabbit alveolar macrophages (AM), recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage, and pleural mesothelial cells (PMC) obtained from the rat parietal pleura. Chemical characterisation of intracellular fibres was performed on unstained ultrathin sections by electron probe microanalysis. The r...

  16. Pure populations of murine macrophages from cultured embryonic stem cells. Application to studies of chemotaxis and apoptotic cell clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Lihui; Pound, John D; Willems, Jorine J L P; Taylor, A Helen; Forrester, Lesley M; Gregory, Christopher D

    2012-11-30

    Embryonic stem cells provide a potentially convenient source of macrophages in the laboratory. Given the propensity of macrophages for plasticity in phenotype and function, standardised culture and differentiation protocols are required to ensure consistency in population output and activity in functional assays. Here we detail the development of an optimised culture protocol for the production of murine embryonic stem cell-derived macrophages (ESDM). This protocol provides improved yields of ESDM and we demonstrate that the cells are suitable for application to the study of macrophage responses to apoptotic cells. ESDM so produced were of higher purity than commonly used primary macrophage preparations and were functional in chemotaxis assays and in phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. Maturation of ESDM was found to be associated with reduced capacity for directed migration and increased capacity for phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells. These results show ESDM to be functionally active in sequential phases of interaction with apoptotic cells and establish these macrophage populations as useful models for further study of molecular mechanisms underlying the recognition and removal of apoptotic cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor promotes cell death and aggravates neurologic deficits after experimental stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Inácio, Ana R; Ruscher, Karsten; Leng, Lin; Bucala, Richard; Deierborg, Tomas

    2010-01-01

    Multiple mechanisms contribute to tissue demise and functional recovery after stroke. We studied the involvement of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in cell death and development of neurologic deficits after experimental stroke. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor is upregulated in the brain after cerebral ischemia, and disruption of the Mif gene in mice leads to a smaller infarct volume and better sensory-motor function after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo)....

  18. Hemosiderin laden macrophages and hemosiderin within follicular cells distinguish benign follicular lesions from follicular neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaffar Reema

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Published criteria to distinguish benign colloid nodules from follicular neoplasms emphasize only three interdependent features: size of follicles, amount of colloid, and cellularity. There is a need for the validation of other independent criteria. Methods: This study quantified the significance of cystic change, defined as presence of macrophages, and the presence of hemosiderin in either the macrophages or follicular cells. The cohort consisted of 165 patients with fine needle aspiration (FNA and histologic follow-up of either goiter (101, follicular adenoma (47, or follicular carcinoma (17. Papillary thyroid carcinomas and Hürthle cell neoplasms were excluded from the cohort, because these categories are known to show cystic change and hemosiderin. FNAs were reviewed blindly with the most cellular slide scored for the presence of macrophages and/or hemosiderin. Results: Hemosiderin within macrophages were seen in 67% (68 of 101 of the goiters and only 6% (four of 64 of follicular neoplasms ( P < .0001. All four follicular neoplasms with hemosiderin in macrophages were adenomas. Three of these four had equivocal features of a benign colloid nodule histologically. None of the 17 follicular carcinomas had hemosiderin in macrophages ( P < .12. Macrophages without hemosiderin also strongly distinguished goiters from neoplasms (83% vs 17% but appears less useful as a criterion since macrophages were present within 3 of 17 follicular carcinomas. Hemosiderin within follicular epithelial cells was present in 18% (18 of 101 of goiters, whereas none of the 64 follicular neoplasms had intraepithelial hemosiderin ( P < .0003. Conclusions: If papillary thyroid carcinoma and Hürthle cell neoplasm are ruled out, our findings indicate that the presence of hemosiderin virtually excludes a clinically significant follicular neoplasm.

  19. Chitosan drives anti-inflammatory macrophage polarisation and pro-inflammatory dendritic cell stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MI Oliveira

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages and dendritic cells (DC share the same precursor and play key roles in immunity. Modulation of their behaviour to achieve an optimal host response towards an implanted device is still a challenge. Here we compare the differentiation process and polarisation of these related cell populations and show that they exhibit different responses to chitosan (Ch, with human monocyte-derived macrophages polarising towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype while their DC counterparts display pro-inflammatory features. Macrophages and DC, whose interactions with biomaterials are frequently analysed using fully differentiated cells, were cultured directly on Ch films, rather than exposed to the polymer after complete differentiation. Ch was the sole stimulating factor and activated both macrophages and DC, without leading to significant T cell proliferation. After 10 d on Ch, macrophages significantly down-regulated expression of pro-inflammatory markers, CD86 and MHCII. Production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, particularly TNF-α, decreased with time for cells cultured on Ch, while anti-inflammatory IL-10 and TGF-β1, significantly increased. Altogether, these results suggest an M2c polarisation. Also, macrophage matrix metalloproteinase activity was augmented and cell motility was stimulated by Ch. Conversely, DC significantly enhanced CD86 expression, reduced IL-10 secretion and increased TNF-α and IL-1β levels. Our findings indicate that cells with a common precursor may display different responses, when challenged by the same biomaterial. Moreover, they help to further comprehend macrophage/DC interactions with Ch and the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory signals associated with implant biomaterials. We propose that an overall pro-inflammatory reaction may hide the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines, likely relevant for tissue repair/regeneration.

  20. Morphological and biochemical changes during formocresol induced cell death in murine peritoneal macrophages: apoptotic and necrotic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, María Lorena; Todaro, Juan Santiago; Aguirre, María Victoria; Juaristi, Julián Antonio; Brandan, Nora Cristina

    2010-10-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the role of Formocresol (FC)-induced apoptosis and necrotic cell death in murine peritoneal macrophages (pMø). Macrophages were cultured with 1:100 FC for 2 to 24 h. The viability (trypan blue assay), cell morphology (scanning electronic microscope), and apoptotic and necrotic indexes (light and fluorescent microscopy) were determined at different scheduled times. Simultaneously, the expressions of proteins related to stress, survival, and cell death were measured by western blotting. FC-exposed macrophages exhibited maximal apoptosis from 2 to 6 h, coincident with Bax overexpression (P < 0.001). Additionally, Bcl-x(L) showed maximal expression between 12 and 24 h suggesting its survival effect in pMø. The lowest pMø viability and the increment of the necrotic rate from 4 to 12 h were observed in accordance to Fas and Hsp60 overexpressions. In summary, all the experimental data suggest that two different pathways emerge in pMø exposed to FC, one leading Bax-dependent apoptosis (2-6 h) and the other one favoring necrosis (4-18 h), related to Fas-receptor and Hsp60 stress signal.

  1. Cell-death-mode switch from necrosis to apoptosis in hydrogen peroxide treated macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Cell death is typically defined either as apoptosis or necrosis. Because the consequences of apoptosis and necrosis are quite different for an entire organism, the investigation of the cell-death-mode switch has considerable clinical significance. The existence of a necrosis-to-apoptosis switch induced by hydrogen peroxide in macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 cells was confirmed by using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. With the help of computational simulations, this study predicted that negative feedbacks between NF-κB and MAPKs are implicated in converting necrosis into apoptosis in macrophages exposed to hydrogen peroxide, which has significant implications.

  2. Macrophages retain hematopoietic stem cells in the spleen via VCAM-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Friedrich Felix; Grigoryeva, Lubov S.; Sager, Hendrik B.; Leuschner, Florian; Courties, Gabriel; Borodovsky, Anna; Novobrantseva, Tatiana; Ruda, Vera M.; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory; Sun, Yuan; Da Silva, Nicolas; Libby, Peter; Anderson, Daniel G.; Swirski, Filip K.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Splenic myelopoiesis provides a steady flow of leukocytes to inflamed tissues, and leukocytosis correlates with cardiovascular mortality. Yet regulation of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) activity in the spleen is incompletely understood. Here, we show that red pulp vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1)+ macrophages are essential to extramedullary myelopoiesis because these macrophages use the adhesion molecule VCAM-1 to retain HSCs in the spleen. Nanoparticle-enabled in vivo RNAi silencing of the receptor for macrophage colony stimulation factor (M-CSFR) blocked splenic macrophage maturation, reduced splenic VCAM-1 expression and compromised splenic HSC retention. Both, depleting macrophages in CD169 iDTR mice or silencing VCAM-1 in macrophages released HSCs from the spleen. When we silenced either VCAM-1 or M-CSFR in mice with myocardial infarction or in ApoE−/− mice with atherosclerosis, nanoparticle-enabled in vivo RNAi mitigated blood leukocytosis, limited inflammation in the ischemic heart, and reduced myeloid cell numbers in atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:25800955

  3. Interstitial cells of Cajal, macrophages and mast cells in the gut musculature: morphology, distribution, spatial and possible functional interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Hanne B

    2010-04-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are recognized as pacemaker cells for gastrointestinal movement and are suggested to be mediators of neuromuscular transmission. Intestinal motility disturbances are often associated with a reduced number of ICC and/or ultrastructural damage, sometimes associated with immune cells. Macrophages and mast cells in the intestinal muscularis externa of rodents can be found in close spatial contact with ICC. Macrophages are a constant and regularly distributed cell population in the serosa and at the level of Auerbach's plexus (AP). In human colon, ICC are in close contact with macrophages at the level of AP, suggesting functional interaction. It has therefore been proposed that ICC and macrophages interact. Macrophages and mast cells are considered to play important roles in the innate immune defence by producing pro-inflammatory mediators during classical activation, which may in itself result in damage to the tissue. They also take part in alternative activation which is associated with anti-inflammatory mediators, tissue remodelling and homeostasis, cancer, helminth infections and immunophenotype switch. ICC become damaged under various circumstances - surgical resection, possibly post-operative ileus in rodents - where innate activation takes place, and in helminth infections - where alternative activation takes place. During alternative activation the muscularis macrophage can switch phenotype resulting in up-regulation of F4/80 and the mannose receptor. In more chronic conditions such as Crohn's disease and achalasia, ICC and mast cells develop close spatial contacts and piecemeal degranulation is possibly triggered.

  4. Clonal analysis of proliferation and differentiation of paired daughter cells: action of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor on granulocyte-macrophage precursors.

    OpenAIRE

    Metcalf, D.

    1980-01-01

    Mouse granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells were stimulated to divide by the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). The two daughter cells were separated; one daughter was transferred to medium containing a high concentration of GM-CSF, the other to medium containing a low concentration. Daughter cell-derived clones in the presence of 2500 units of GM-CSF had average cell cycle times 3.5 +/- 2.5 (SEM) hr shorter than clones derived from the paired daughter cell stimulate...

  5. Comparative Analysis of the Interaction of Helicobacter pylori with Human Dendritic Cells, Macrophages, and Monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehlings, Michael; Drobbe, Lea; Moos, Verena; Renner Viveros, Pablo; Hagen, Jana; Beigier-Bompadre, Macarena; Pang, Ervinna; Belogolova, Elena; Churin, Yuri; Schneider, Thomas; Meyer, Thomas F.; Aebischer, Toni

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori may cause chronic gastritis, gastric cancer, or lymphoma. Myeloid antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are most likely involved in the induction and expression of the underlying inflammatory responses. To study the interaction of human APC subsets with H. pylori, we infected monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs), and monocyte-derived (classically activated; M1) macrophages with H. pylori and analyzed phenotypic alterations, cytokine secretion, phagocytosis, and immunostimulation. Since we detected CD163+ (alternatively activated; M2) macrophages in gastric biopsy specimens from H. pylori-positive patients, we also included monocyte-derived M2 macrophages in the study. Upon H. pylori infection, monocytes secreted interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, and IL-12p40 (partially secreted as IL-23) but not IL-12p70. Infected DCs became activated, as shown by the enhanced expression of CD25, CD80, CD83, PDL-1, and CCR7, and secreted IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, and IL-23. However, infection led to significantly downregulated CD209 and suppressed the constitutive secretion of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). H. pylori-infected M1 macrophages upregulated CD14 and CD32, downregulated CD11b and HLA-DR, and secreted mainly IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40, and IL-23. Activation of DCs and M1 macrophages correlated with increased capacity to induce T-cell proliferation and decreased phagocytosis of dextran. M2 macrophages upregulated CD14 and CD206 and secreted IL-10 but produced less of the proinflammatory cytokines than M1 macrophages. Thus, H. pylori affects the functions of human APC subsets differently, which may influence the course and the outcome of H. pylori infection. The suppression of MIF in DCs constitutes a novel immune evasion mechanism exploited by H. pylori. PMID:22615251

  6. Macrophage Infiltration in Tumor Stroma is Related to Tumor Cell Expression of CD163 in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabo, Ivan; Olsson, Hans; Elkarim, Rihab; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Svanvik, Joar

    2014-08-01

    The scavenger receptor, CD163, is a macrophage-specific marker. Recent studies have shown that CD163 expression in breast and rectal cancer cells is associated with poor prognosis. This study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between CD163 expression as a macrophage trait in cancer cells, and macrophage infiltration and its clinical significance in colorectal cancer. Immunostaining of CD163 and macrophage infiltration were evaluated in paraffin-embedded specimens, earlier analyzed for CD31, D2-40 and S-phase fraction, from primary tumors and normal colorectal mucosa of 75 patients with colorectal carcinoma. The outcomes were analyzed in relation to clinical-pathological data. CD163 expression was positive in cancer cells in 20 % of colorectal cancer patients and was related to advanced tumor stages (P = 0.008) and unfavorable prognosis (p = 0.001). High macrophage infiltration was related to shorter survival and positive CD163 expression in tumor cells. The prognostic impact of macrophage infiltration was independent of tumor stage and CD163 expression in cancer cells (p = 0.034). The expression of macrophage phenotype in colorectal cancer cells is associated with macrophage density in tumor stroma and lower survival rates. Macrophage infiltration has an independent prognostic impact on mortality in colorectal cancer. In accordance with previous experimental studies, these findings provide new insights into the role of macrophages in colorectal cancer.

  7. Media from macrophages co-incubated with Enterococcus faecalis induces epithelial cell monolayer reassembly and altered cell morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belogortseva, Natalia; Krezalek, Monika; Guyton, Kristina; Labno, Christine; Poroyko, Valeriy; Zaborina, Olga; Alverdy, John C

    2017-01-01

    Signal exchange between intestinal epithelial cells, microbes and local immune cells is an important mechanism of intestinal homeostasis. Given that intestinal macrophages are in close proximity to both the intestinal epithelium and the microbiota, their pathologic interactions may result in epithelial damage. The present study demonstrates that co-incubation of murine macrophages with E. faecalis strains producing gelatinase (GelE) and serine protease (SprE) leads to resultant condition media (CM) capable of inducing reassembly of primary colonic epithelial cell monolayers. Following the conditioned media (CM) exposure, some epithelial cells are shed whereas adherent cells are observed to undergo dissolution of cell-cell junctions and morphologic transformation with actin cytoskeleton reorganization resulting in flattened and elongated shapes. These cells exhibit marked filamentous filopodia and lamellipodia formation. Cellular reorganization is not observed when epithelial monolayers are exposed to: CM from macrophages co-incubated with E. faecalis GelE/SprE-deficient mutants, CM from macrophages alone, or E. faecalis (GelE/SprE) alone. Flow cytometry analysis reveals increased expression of CD24 and CD44 in cells treated with macrophage/E. faecalis CM. This finding in combination with the appearance colony formation in matrigel demonstrate that the cells treated with macrophage/E. faecalis CM contain a higher proportion progenitor cells compared to untreated control. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for a triangulated molecular dialogue between E. faecalis, macrophages and colonic epithelial cells, which may have important implications for conditions in the gut that involve inflammation, injury or tumorigenesis.

  8. Media from macrophages co-incubated with Enterococcus faecalis induces epithelial cell monolayer reassembly and altered cell morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belogortseva, Natalia; Krezalek, Monika; Guyton, Kristina; Labno, Christine; Poroyko, Valeriy; Zaborina, Olga

    2017-01-01

    Signal exchange between intestinal epithelial cells, microbes and local immune cells is an important mechanism of intestinal homeostasis. Given that intestinal macrophages are in close proximity to both the intestinal epithelium and the microbiota, their pathologic interactions may result in epithelial damage. The present study demonstrates that co-incubation of murine macrophages with E. faecalis strains producing gelatinase (GelE) and serine protease (SprE) leads to resultant condition media (CM) capable of inducing reassembly of primary colonic epithelial cell monolayers. Following the conditioned media (CM) exposure, some epithelial cells are shed whereas adherent cells are observed to undergo dissolution of cell-cell junctions and morphologic transformation with actin cytoskeleton reorganization resulting in flattened and elongated shapes. These cells exhibit marked filamentous filopodia and lamellipodia formation. Cellular reorganization is not observed when epithelial monolayers are exposed to: CM from macrophages co-incubated with E. faecalis GelE/SprE-deficient mutants, CM from macrophages alone, or E. faecalis (GelE/SprE) alone. Flow cytometry analysis reveals increased expression of CD24 and CD44 in cells treated with macrophage/E. faecalis CM. This finding in combination with the appearance colony formation in matrigel demonstrate that the cells treated with macrophage/E. faecalis CM contain a higher proportion progenitor cells compared to untreated control. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for a triangulated molecular dialogue between E. faecalis, macrophages and colonic epithelial cells, which may have important implications for conditions in the gut that involve inflammation, injury or tumorigenesis. PMID:28793333

  9. Induction of Monocyte Chemoattractant Proteins in Macrophages via the Production of Granulocyte-macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor by Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teizo eYoshimura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2 plays an important role in the initiation and progression of cancer. We previously reported that in 4T1 murine breast cancer, non-tumor stromal cells, including macrophages, were the major source of MCP-1. In the present study, we analyzed the potential mechanisms by which MCP-1 is upregulated in macrophages infiltrating 4T1 tumors. We found that cell-free culture supernatants of 4T1 cells (4T1-sup markedly upregulated MCP-1 production by peritoneal inflammatory macrophages. 4T1-sup also upregulated other MCPs, such as MCP-3/CCL7 and MCP-5/CCL12, but modestly neutrophil chemotactic chemokines, such as KC/CXCL1 or MIP-2/CXCL2. Physicochemical analysis indicated that an approximately 2 to 3 kDa 4T1 cell product was responsible for the capacity of 4T1-sup to upregulate MCP-1 expression by macrophages. A neutralizing antibody against granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF, but not macrophage-colony stimulating factor, almost completely abrogated MCP-1-inducing activity of 4T1-sup, and recombinant GM-CSF potently up-regulated MCP-1 production by macrophages. The expression levels of GM-CSF in 4T1 tumors in vivo were higher than other tumors, such as Lewis lung carcinoma. Treatment of mice with anti-GM-CSF antibody significantly reduced the growth of 4T1 tumors at the injection sites but did not reduce MCP-1 production or lung metastasis in tumor-bearing mice. These results indicate that 4T1 cells have the capacity to directly up-regulate MCP-1 production by macrophages by releasing GM-CSF; however, other mechanisms are also involved in increased MCP-1 levels in the 4T1 tumor microenvironment.

  10. Could a B-1 cell derived phagocyte "be one" of the peritoneal macrophages during LPS-driven inflammation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Flavia Popi

    Full Text Available The inflammatory response is driven by signals that recruit and elicit immune cells to areas of tissue damage or infection. The concept of a mononuclear phagocyte system postulates that monocytes circulating in the bloodstream are recruited to inflamed tissues where they give rise to macrophages. A recent publication demonstrated that the large increase in the macrophages observed during infection was the result of the multiplication of these cells rather than the recruitment of blood monocytes. We demonstrated previously that B-1 cells undergo differentiation to acquire a mononuclear phagocyte phenotype in vitro (B-1CDP, and we propose that B-1 cells could be an alternative origin for peritoneal macrophages. A number of recent studies that describe the phagocytic and microbicidal activity of B-1 cells in vitro and in vivo support this hypothesis. Based on these findings, we further investigated the differentiation of B-1 cells into phagocytes in vivo in response to LPS-induced inflammation. Therefore, we investigated the role of B-1 cells in the composition of the peritoneal macrophage population after LPS stimulation using osteopetrotic mice, BALB/Xid mice and the depletion of monocytes/macrophages by clodronate treatment. We show that peritoneal macrophages appear in op/op((-/- mice after LPS stimulation and exhibit the same Ig gene rearrangement (VH11 that is often found in B-1 cells. These results strongly suggest that op/op((-/- peritoneal "macrophages" are B-1CDP. Similarly, the LPS-induced increase in the macrophage population was observed even following monocyte/macrophage depletion by clodronate. After monocyte/macrophage depletion by clodronate, LPS-elicited macrophages were observed in BALB/Xid mice only following the transfer of B-1 cells. Based on these data, we confirmed that B-1 cell differentiation into phagocytes also occurs in vivo. In conclusion, the results strongly suggest that B-1 cell derived phagocytes are a component of

  11. Juxtacrine interaction of macrophages and bone marrow stromal cells induce interleukin-6 signals and promote cell migration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Chang; Amy J Koh; Hernan Roca; Laurie K McCauley

    2015-01-01

    The bone marrow contains a heterogeneous milieu of cells, including macrophages, which are key cellular mediators for resolving infection and inflammation. Macrophages are most well known for their ability to phagocytose foreign bodies or apoptotic cells to maintain homeostasis;however, little is known about their function in the bone microenvironment. In the current study, we investigated the in vitro interaction of murine macrophages and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), with focus on the juxtacrine induction of IL-6 signaling and the resultant effect on BMSC migration and growth. The juxtacrine interaction of primary mouse macrophages and BMSCs activated IL-6 signaling in the co-cultures, which subsequently enhanced BMSC migration and increased BMSC numbers. BMSCs and macrophages harvested from IL-6 knockout mice revealed that IL-6 signaling was essential for enhancement of BMSC migration and increased BMSC numbers via juxtacrine interactions. BMSCs were the main contributor of IL-6 signaling, and hence activation of the IL-6/gp130/STAT3 pathway. Meanwhile, macrophage derived IL-6 remained important for the overall production of IL-6 protein in the co-cultures. Taken together, these findings show the function of macrophages as co-inducers of migration and growth of BMSCs, which could directly influence bone formation and turnover.

  12. Phenotypic and functional plasticity of cells of innate immunity: macrophages, mast cells and neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galli, Stephen J; Borregaard, Niels; Wynn, Thomas A

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoietic cells, including lymphoid and myeloid cells, can develop into phenotypically distinct 'subpopulations' with different functions. However, evidence indicates that some of these subpopulations can manifest substantial plasticity (that is, undergo changes in their phenotype and functio...... a common mechanism for modulating innate or adaptive immunity.......). Here we focus on the occurrence of phenotypically distinct subpopulations in three lineages of myeloid cells with important roles in innate and acquired immunity: macrophages, mast cells and neutrophils. Cytokine signals, epigenetic modifications and other microenvironmental factors can substantially...... and, in some cases, rapidly and reversibly alter the phenotype of these cells and influence their function. This suggests that regulation of the phenotype and function of differentiated hematopoietic cells by microenvironmental factors, including those generated during immune responses, represents...

  13. HISTOCHEMICAL AND ELECTRON-MICROSCOPIC CHARACTERIZATION OF HEPATIC MACROPHAGE SUBFRACTIONS ISOLATED FROM NORMAL AND LIPOSOMAL MURAMYL DIPEPTIDE TREATED RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOEDEMAKERS, RMJ; ATMOSOERODJOBRIGGS, JE; MORSELT, HWM; DAEMEN, T; SCHERPHOF, GL; HARDONK, MJ

    1995-01-01

    Subfractions of the hepatic macrophage population, differing in cell size, were isolated from normal rats and rats treated with liposomal muramyl dipeptide (lipMDP) and analyzed histochemically and by ultrastructural peroxidase cytochemistry. The majority of cells in all subfractions of control rats

  14. Macrophages, Foreign Body Giant Cells and Their Response to Implantable Biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan Sheikh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available All biomaterials, when implanted in vivo, elicit cellular and tissue responses. These responses include the inflammatory and wound healing responses, foreign body reactions, and fibrous encapsulation of the implanted materials. Macrophages are myeloid immune cells that are tactically situated throughout the tissues, where they ingest and degrade dead cells and foreign materials in addition to orchestrating inflammatory processes. Macrophages and their fused morphologic variants, the multinucleated giant cells, which include the foreign body giant cells (FBGCs are the dominant early responders to biomaterial implantation and remain at biomaterial-tissue interfaces for the lifetime of the device. An essential aspect of macrophage function in the body is to mediate degradation of bio-resorbable materials including bone through extracellular degradation and phagocytosis. Biomaterial surface properties play a crucial role in modulating the foreign body reaction in the first couple of weeks following implantation. The foreign body reaction may impact biocompatibility of implantation devices and may considerably impact short- and long-term success in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, necessitating a clear understanding of the foreign body reaction to different implantation materials. The focus of this review article is on the interactions of macrophages and foreign body giant cells with biomaterial surfaces, and the physical, chemical and morphological characteristics of biomaterial surfaces that play a role in regulating the foreign body response. Events in the foreign body response include protein adsorption, adhesion of monocytes/macrophages, fusion to form FBGCs, and the consequent modification of the biomaterial surface. The effect of physico-chemical cues on macrophages is not well known and there is a complex interplay between biomaterial properties and those that result from interactions with the local environment. By having a

  15. A method for multiple sequential analyses of macrophage functions using a small single cell sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.R.F. Nascimento

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial pathogens such as bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG induce the activation of macrophages. Activated macrophages can be characterized by the increased production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen metabolites, generated via NADPH oxidase and inducible nitric oxide synthase, respectively, and by the increased expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules (MHC II. Multiple microassays have been developed to measure these parameters. Usually each assay requires 2-5 x 10(5 cells per well. In some experimental conditions the number of cells is the limiting factor for the phenotypic characterization of macrophages. Here we describe a method whereby this limitation can be circumvented. Using a single 96-well microassay and a very small number of peritoneal cells obtained from C3H/HePas mice, containing as little as <=2 x 10(5 macrophages per well, we determined sequentially the oxidative burst (H2O2, nitric oxide production and MHC II (IAk expression of BCG-activated macrophages. More specifically, with 100 µl of cell suspension it was possible to quantify H2O2 release and nitric oxide production after 1 and 48 h, respectively, and IAk expression after 48 h of cell culture. In addition, this microassay is easy to perform, highly reproducible and more economical.

  16. Interactions between macrophage/Kupffer cells and hepatocytes in surgical sepsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate the role of Kupffer cell/macrophage interactions with hepatocytes in modulating liver function during infections using direct in vitro cocultivation of rat macrophages or Kupffer cells with rat hepatocytes. Protein synthesis was assayed as a sensitive indicator of integrated hepatocellular function by measuring {sup 3}H-leucine incorporation into hepatocyte protein. Septic stimuli such as lipoploysaccharide and killed bacteria were added to cocultures of hepatocytes and macrophages or Kupffer cells and the responses compared to hepatocytes alone. Information about the types of proteins synthesized by hepatocytes under various culture conditions was determined using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. These experiments showed that septic stimuli alter the amount and type of protein synthesized by hepatocytes and had no direct effect on hepatocytes in the absence of macrophages or Kupffer cells. The mediator(s) appears to be a heat labile, soluble monokine(s) which is distinct from interleukin-1 or tumor necrosis factor. The important role of Kupffer cells/macrophages in mediating alterations in hepatocellular function in sepsis may ultimately improve patient care.

  17. Immunostimulatory activity of polysaccharides isolated from Caulerpa lentillifera on macrophage cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Reiko; Ida, Tomoaki; Ihara, Hideshi; Sakamoto, Tatsuji

    2012-01-01

    Polysaccharides were extracted from Caulerpa lentillifera by treating with water and then purified by size-exclusion chromatography. The purified polysaccharides, termed SP1, were found to be sulfated xylogalactans with a molecular mass of more than 100 kDa. Adding SP1 to murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells increased the production of nitric oxide (NO) in a dose-dependent manner. NO was found by immunoblotting and RT-PCR analyses to be synthesized by an inducible NO synthase. SP1 caused the degradation of IκB-α and the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB subunit p65 in macrophage cells. SP1 also increased the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). These results demonstrate that SP1 activated macrophage cells via both the NF-κB and p38 MAPK signaling pathways. Moreover, SP1 increased the expression of various genes encoding cytokines, and the phagocytic activity of macrophage cells. These combined results show that SP1 immunostimulated the activity of macrophage cells.

  18. iPS-cell derived dendritic cells and macrophages for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senju, Satoru

    2016-08-01

    Antibody-based anti-cancer immunotherapy was recently recognized as one of the truly effective therapies for cancer patients. Antibodies against cell surface cancer antigens, such as CD20, and also those against immune-inhibitory molecules called "immune checkpoint blockers", such as CTLA4 or PD1, have emerged. Large-scale clinical trials have confirmed that, in some cases, antibody-based drugs are superior to conventional chemotherapeutic agents. These antibody-based drugs are now being manufactured employing a mass-production system by pharmaceutical companies. Anti-cancer therapy by immune cells, i.e. cell-based immunotherapy, is expected to be more effective than antibody therapy, because immune cells can recognize, infiltrate, and act in cancer tissues more directly than antibodies. In order to achieve cell-based anti-cancer immunotherapy, it is necessary to develop manufacturing systems for mass-production of immune cells. Our group has been studying immunotherapy with myeloid cells derived from ES cells or iPS cells. These pluripotent stem cells can be readily propagated under constant culture conditions, with expansion into a large quantity. We consider these stem cells to be the most suitable cellular source for mass-production of immune cells. This review introduces our studies on anti-cancer therapy with iPS cell-derived dendritic cells and iPS cell-derived macrophages.

  19. Global Dynamics of HIV Infection of CD4+ T Cells and Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    A. M. Elaiw; A. S. Alsheri

    2013-01-01

    We study the global dynamics of an HIV infection model describing the interaction of the HIV with CD4+ T cells and macrophages. The incidence rate of virus infection and the growth rate of the uninfected CD4+ T cells and macrophages are given by general functions. We have incorporated two types of distributed delays into the model to account for the time delay between the time the uninfected cells are contacted by the virus particle and the time for the emission of infectious (matures) virus ...

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    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.10.AllAg.Granulocyte-Macrophage_Progenitor_Cells mm9 RNA polymerase Blood Granulocyte-Mac...rophage Progenitor Cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Bld.10.AllAg.Granulocyte-Macrophage_Progenitor_Cells.bed ...

  4. File list: DNS.Bld.50.AllAg.Granulocyte-Macrophage_Progenitor_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Bld.50.AllAg.Granulocyte-Macrophage_Progenitor_Cells mm9 DNase-seq Blood Granulocyte-Mac...rophage Progenitor Cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Bld.50.AllAg.Granulocyte-Macrophage_Progenitor_Cells.bed ...

  5. Muscle cells challenged with saturated fatty acids mount an autonomous inflammatory response that activates macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pillon Nicolas J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Obesity is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation. Within adipose tissue of mice fed a high fat diet, resident and infiltrating macrophages assume a pro-inflammatory phenotype characterized by the production of cytokines which in turn impact on the surrounding tissue. However, inflammation is not restricted to adipose tissue and high fat-feeding is responsible for a significant increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in muscle. Although skeletal muscle is the major disposer of dietary glucose and a major determinant of glycemia, the origin and consequence of muscle inflammation in the development of insulin resistance are poorly understood. We used a cell culture approach to investigate the vectorial crosstalk between muscle cells and macrophages upon exposure to physiological, low levels of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. Inflammatory pathway activation and cytokine expression were analyzed in L6 muscle cells expressing myc-tagged GLUT4 (L6GLUT4myc exposed to 0.2 mM palmitate or palmitoleate. Conditioned media thereof, free of fatty acids, were then tested for their ability to activate RAW264.7 macrophages. Palmitate -but not palmitoleate- induced IL-6, TNFα and CCL2 expression in muscle cells, through activation of the NF-κB pathway. Palmitate (0.2 mM alone did not induce insulin resistance in muscle cells, yet conditioned media from palmitate-challenged muscle cells selectively activated macrophages towards a pro-inflammatory phenotype. These results demonstrate that low concentrations of palmitate activate autonomous inflammation in muscle cells to release factors that turn macrophages pro-inflammatory. We hypothesize that saturated fat-induced, low-grade muscle cell inflammation may trigger resident skeletal muscle macrophage polarization, possibly contributing to insulin resistance in vivo.

  6. Macrophage-derived microvesicles promote proliferation and migration of Schwann cell on peripheral nerve repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhan, Chuan, E-mail: zhchuansy@163.com; Ma, Cheng-bin; Yuan, Hong-mou; Cao, Bao-yuan; Zhu, Jia-jun

    2015-12-04

    Background: Macrophages have been implicated in peripheral nerve regeneration. However, whether macrophages-derived microvesicles (MVs) are involved in this process remains unknown. In the present study, the effects of macrophages-derived MVs on proliferation and migration of Schwann cells (SCs) were evaluated in both in vitro and in vivo. Methods: Human monocytic leukaemia cell line (THP-1) was successfully driven to M1 and M2 phenotypes by delivery of either IFN-γ or IL-4, respectively. SCs incubated with M1 or M2 macrophages-derived MVs, the cell migration and proliferation were assessed, and expression levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) and Laminin were measured. A rat model of sciatic nerve was established and the effects of macrophages-derived MVs on nerve regeneration were investigated. Results: M2-derived MVs elevated migration, proliferation, NFG and Laminin protein levels of SCs compared with M1-or M0-derived MVs. The relative expression levels of miR-223 were also increased in M2 macrophages and M2-derived MVs. Transfected M2 macrophages with miR-223 inhibitor then co-incubated with SCs, an inhibition of cell migration and proliferation and a down-regulated levels of NFG and Laminin protein expression were observed. In vivo, M2-derived MVs significantly increased the infiltration and axon number of SCs. Conclusion: M2-derived MVs promoted proliferation and migration of SCs in vitro and in vivo, which provided a therapeutic strategy for nerve regeneration. - Highlights: • M2 macrophages-derived MVs elevated migration and proliferation of SCs. • M2 macrophages-derived MVs up-regulated NFG and Laminin expression of SCs. • MiR-223 expression was increased in M2 macrophages-derived MVs. • MiR-223 inhibitor reduced migration and proliferation of SCs co-incubated with MVs. • MiR-223 inhibitor down-regulated NFG and Laminin levels of SCs co-incubated with MVs.

  7. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Cooperates in Zearalenone-Induced Cell Death of RAW 264.7 Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenglei Chen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Zearalenone (ZEA is a fungal mycotoxin that causes cell apoptosis and necrosis. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of ZEA toxicity. The objective of this study was to explore the effects of ZEA on the proliferation and apoptosis of RAW 264.7 macrophages and to uncover the signaling pathway underlying the cytotoxicity of ZEA in RAW 264.7 macrophages. This study demonstrates that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress pathway cooperated in ZEA-induced cell death of the RAW 264.7 macrophages. Our results show that ZEA treatment reduced the viability of RAW 264.7 macrophages in a dose- and time-dependent manner as shown by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay (MTT and flow cytometry assay. Western blots analysis revealed that ZEA increased the expression of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78 and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein homologous protein (CHOP, two ER stress-related marker genes. Furthermore, treating the cells with the ER stress inhibitors 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA or knocking down CHOP, using lentivirus encoded short hairpin interfering RNAs (shRNAs, significantly diminished the ZEA-induced increases in GRP78 and CHOP, and cell death. In summary, our results suggest that ZEA induces the apoptosis and necrosis of RAW 264.7 macrophages in a dose- and time-dependent manner via the ER stress pathway in which the activation of CHOP plays a critical role.

  8. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Cooperates in Zearalenone-Induced Cell Death of RAW 264.7 Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fenglei; Li, Qian; Zhang, Zhe; Lin, Pengfei; Lei, Lanjie; Wang, Aihua; Jin, Yaping

    2015-08-20

    Zearalenone (ZEA) is a fungal mycotoxin that causes cell apoptosis and necrosis. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of ZEA toxicity. The objective of this study was to explore the effects of ZEA on the proliferation and apoptosis of RAW 264.7 macrophages and to uncover the signaling pathway underlying the cytotoxicity of ZEA in RAW 264.7 macrophages. This study demonstrates that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway cooperated in ZEA-induced cell death of the RAW 264.7 macrophages. Our results show that ZEA treatment reduced the viability of RAW 264.7 macrophages in a dose- and time-dependent manner as shown by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay (MTT) and flow cytometry assay. Western blots analysis revealed that ZEA increased the expression of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), two ER stress-related marker genes. Furthermore, treating the cells with the ER stress inhibitors 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA) or knocking down CHOP, using lentivirus encoded short hairpin interfering RNAs (shRNAs), significantly diminished the ZEA-induced increases in GRP78 and CHOP, and cell death. In summary, our results suggest that ZEA induces the apoptosis and necrosis of RAW 264.7 macrophages in a dose- and time-dependent manner via the ER stress pathway in which the activation of CHOP plays a critical role.

  9. Impaired phagocytosis of apoptotic cells causes accumulation of bone marrow-derived macrophages in aged mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ok-Hee; Kim, Hyojung; Kang, Jinku; Yang, Dongki; Kang, Yu-Hoi; Lee, Dae Ho; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Park, Sang Chul; Oh, Byung-Chul

    2017-01-01

    Accumulation of tissue macrophages is a significant characteristic of disease-associated chronic inflammation, and facilitates the progression of disease pathology. However, the functional roles of these bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) in aging are unclear. Here, we identified age-dependent macrophage accumulation in the bone marrow, showing that aging significantly increases the number of M1 macrophages and impairs polarization of BMDMs. We found that age-related dysregulation of BMDMs is associated with abnormal overexpression of the anti-inflammatory interleukin-10. BMDM dysregulation in aging impairs the expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and genes involved in B-cell maturation and activation. Phagocytosis of apoptotic Jurkat cells by BMDMs was reduced because of low expression of phagocytic receptor CD14, indicating that increased apoptotic cells may result from defective phagocytosis of apoptotic cells in the BM of aged mice. Therefore, CD14 may represent a promising target for preventing BMDM dysregulation, and macrophage accumulation may provide diagnostic and therapeutic clues. PMID:27866511

  10. Responses of macrophages to the danger signals released from necrotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Toshifumi; Kobayashi, Shuhei; Hanihara-Tatsuzawa, Fumito; Sayama, Aoi; MaruYama, Takashi; Muta, Tatsushi

    2014-12-01

    The immune system maintains homeostasis by recognizing and responding to cell death caused by various stresses. The immune response is considered to be elicited by 'danger signals' released from necrotic cells. However, the identity of the danger signals remains elusive. In this study, we focused on the expression of chemokines by macrophages stimulated with necrotic cells. In mouse bone-marrow-derived macrophages, the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-3 was induced at both the mRNA and protein levels in response to heat-killed murine cells. The induction of MCP-3 was also observed in MyD88-deficient macrophages, indicating that Toll-like receptors and the IL-1 receptor are not involved in this response. Consistent with this observation, the activation of NF-κB was not detected in RAW264.7 macrophages stimulated with necrotic cells. Treatments with proteinase K, DNaseI or RNaseA did not affect the ' STIMULATING ACTIVITY': of necrotic cells. In contrast, treatment with apyrase, which removes phosphates from nucleoside tri- and di-phosphates, abolished the inducing activity. Purified UDP at 30 µM concentration elicited similar induction of MCP-3 in RAW264.7 macrophages. Small interfering RNA-mediated knock-down of the UDP receptor P2Y6 in RAW264.7 cells significantly reduced the induction of MCP-3 in response to necrotic cells, but not its induction by lipopolysaccharide. Furthermore, ectopic expression of the P2Y6 receptor in HEK293 cells conferred responsiveness to necrotic cells. These results suggest that UDP released by necrotic cells plays a critical role as an endogenous danger signal and that P2Y6 is required for the induction of MCP-3 in response to necrotic cells.

  11. Role of macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha in T-cell-mediated immunity to viral infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas N; Nansen, Anneline; Christensen, Jan P

    2003-01-01

    The immune response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in mice lacking macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha) was evaluated. Generation of virus-specific effector T cells is unimpaired in MIP-1alpha-deficient mice. Furthermore, MIP-1alpha is not required for T-cell-mediated virus...

  12. Nocardia brasiliensis Induces Formation of Foamy Macrophages and Dendritic Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meester, Irene; Rosas-Taraco, Adrian Geovanni; Salinas-Carmona, Mario Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Foamy cells have been described in various infectious diseases, for example in actinomycetoma induced by Nocardia brasiliensis. These cells are generally considered to be macrophages, although they present dendritic cell (DC)-specific surface markers. In this study, we determined and confirmed the lineage of possible precursors of foamy cells in vitro and in vivo using an experimental actinomycetoma model in BALB/c mice. Bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) or DC (BMDC) were infected in vitro with N. brasiliensis or labeled with carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE). Both, macrophages and DC, differentiated into foamy cells after in vitro infection. CFSE-labeled BMDM or BMDC were tested for phagocytosis and CD11c/CD11b receptors markers expression before being transferred into the actinomycetoma lesion site of infected mice. In vivo studies showed that BMDM and BMDC were traced at the site where foamy cells are present in the experimental actinomycetoma. Interestingly, many of the transferred BMDM and BMDC were stained with the lipid-droplet fluorophore Nile Red. In conclusion, macrophages and DC cells can be differentiated into foamy cells in vitro and in vivo during N. brasiliensis infection. PMID:24936860

  13. Nocardia brasiliensis induces formation of foamy macrophages and dendritic cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Meester

    Full Text Available Foamy cells have been described in various infectious diseases, for example in actinomycetoma induced by Nocardia brasiliensis. These cells are generally considered to be macrophages, although they present dendritic cell (DC-specific surface markers. In this study, we determined and confirmed the lineage of possible precursors of foamy cells in vitro and in vivo using an experimental actinomycetoma model in BALB/c mice. Bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM or DC (BMDC were infected in vitro with N. brasiliensis or labeled with carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE. Both, macrophages and DC, differentiated into foamy cells after in vitro infection. CFSE-labeled BMDM or BMDC were tested for phagocytosis and CD11c/CD11b receptors markers expression before being transferred into the actinomycetoma lesion site of infected mice. In vivo studies showed that BMDM and BMDC were traced at the site where foamy cells are present in the experimental actinomycetoma. Interestingly, many of the transferred BMDM and BMDC were stained with the lipid-droplet fluorophore Nile Red. In conclusion, macrophages and DC cells can be differentiated into foamy cells in vitro and in vivo during N. brasiliensis infection.

  14. The influence of microbial metabolites on human intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuenen, M.H.M.C. van; Ligt, R.A.F. de; Doornbos, R.P.; Woude, J.C.J. van der; Kuipers, E.J.; Venema, K.

    2005-01-01

    Microbial metabolites may influence the metabolic integrity of intestinal epithelial cells and induce mucosal immune responses. Therefore, we investigated the effects of the microbial metabolites butyrate, iso-valerate, and ammonium on Caco-2 cells and macrophages. Barrier functioning was determined

  15. Nocardia brasiliensis induces formation of foamy macrophages and dendritic cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meester, Irene; Rosas-Taraco, Adrian Geovanni; Salinas-Carmona, Mario Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Foamy cells have been described in various infectious diseases, for example in actinomycetoma induced by Nocardia brasiliensis. These cells are generally considered to be macrophages, although they present dendritic cell (DC)-specific surface markers. In this study, we determined and confirmed the lineage of possible precursors of foamy cells in vitro and in vivo using an experimental actinomycetoma model in BALB/c mice. Bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) or DC (BMDC) were infected in vitro with N. brasiliensis or labeled with carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE). Both, macrophages and DC, differentiated into foamy cells after in vitro infection. CFSE-labeled BMDM or BMDC were tested for phagocytosis and CD11c/CD11b receptors markers expression before being transferred into the actinomycetoma lesion site of infected mice. In vivo studies showed that BMDM and BMDC were traced at the site where foamy cells are present in the experimental actinomycetoma. Interestingly, many of the transferred BMDM and BMDC were stained with the lipid-droplet fluorophore Nile Red. In conclusion, macrophages and DC cells can be differentiated into foamy cells in vitro and in vivo during N. brasiliensis infection.

  16. M3 Macrophages Stop Division of Tumor Cells In Vitro and Extend Survival of Mice with Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalish, Sergey; Lyamina, Svetlana; Manukhina, Eugenia; Malyshev, Yuri; Raetskaya, Anastasiya; Malyshev, Igor

    2017-01-26

    BACKGROUND M1 macrophages target tumor cells. However, many tumors produce anti-inflammatory cytokines, which reprogram the anti-tumor M1 macrophages into the pro-tumor M2 macrophages. We have hypothesized that the problem of pro-tumor macrophage reprogramming could be solved by using a special M3 switch phenotype. The M3 macrophages, in contrast to the M1 macrophages, should respond to anti-inflammatory cytokines by increasing production of pro-inflammatory cytokines to retain its anti-tumor properties. Objectives of the study were to form an M3 switch phenotype in vitro and to evaluate the effect of M3 macrophages on growth of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) in vitro and in vivo. MATERIAL AND METHODS Tumor growth was initiated by an intraperitoneal injection of EAC cells into C57BL/6J mice. RESULTS 1) The M3 switch phenotype can be programed by activation of M1-reprogramming pathways with simultaneous inhibition of the M2 phenotype transcription factors, STAT3, STAT6, and/or SMAD3. 2) M3 macrophages exerted an anti-tumor effect both in vitro and in vivo, which was superior to anti-tumor effects of cisplatin or M1 macrophages. 3) The anti-tumor effect of M3 macrophages was due to their anti-proliferative effect. CONCLUSIONS Development of new biotechnologies for restriction of tumor growth using in vitro reprogrammed M3 macrophages is very promising.

  17. M3 Macrophages Stop Division of Tumor Cells In Vitro and Extend Survival of Mice with Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalish, Sergey; Lyamina, Svetlana; Manukhina, Eugenia; Malyshev, Yuri; Raetskaya, Anastasiya; Malyshev, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Background M1 macrophages target tumor cells. However, many tumors produce anti-inflammatory cytokines, which reprogram the anti-tumor M1 macrophages into the pro-tumor M2 macrophages. We have hypothesized that the problem of pro-tumor macrophage reprogramming could be solved by using a special M3 switch phenotype. The M3 macrophages, in contrast to the M1 macrophages, should respond to anti-inflammatory cytokines by increasing production of pro-inflammatory cytokines to retain its anti-tumor properties. Objectives of the study were to form an M3 switch phenotype in vitro and to evaluate the effect of M3 macrophages on growth of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) in vitro and in vivo. Material/Methods Tumor growth was initiated by an intraperitoneal injection of EAC cells into C57BL/6J mice. Results 1) The M3 switch phenotype can be programed by activation of M1-reprogramming pathways with simultaneous inhibition of the M2 phenotype transcription factors, STAT3, STAT6, and/or SMAD3. 2) M3 macrophages exerted an anti-tumor effect both in vitro and in vivo, which was superior to anti-tumor effects of cisplatin or M1 macrophages. 3) The anti-tumor effect of M3 macrophages was due to their anti-proliferative effect. Conclusions Development of new biotechnologies for restriction of tumor growth using in vitro reprogrammed M3 macrophages is very promising. PMID:28123171

  18. Macrophages help NK cells to attack tumor cells by stimulatory NKG2D ligand but protect themselves from NK killing by inhibitory ligand Qa-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhixia; Zhang, Cai; Zhang, Jian; Tian, Zhigang

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells and their crosstalk with other immune cells are important for innate immunity against tumor. To explore the role of the interaction between NK cells and macrophages in the regulation of anti-tumor activities of NK cells, we here demonstrate that poly I:C-treated macrophages increased NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against target tumor cells in NKG2D-dependent manner. In addition, IL-15, IL-18, and IFN-β secreted by poly I:C-treated macrophages are also involved in NKG2D expression and NK cell activation. Interestingly, the increase in expression of NKG2D ligands on macrophages induced a highly NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against tumor cells, but not against macrophages themselves. Notably, a high expression level of Qa-1, a NKG2A ligand, on macrophages may contribute to such protection of macrophages from NK cell-mediated killing. Furthermore, Qa-1 or NKG2A knockdown and Qa-1 antibody blockade caused the macrophages to be sensitive to NK cytolysis. These results suggested that macrophages may activate NK cells to attack tumor by NKG2D recognition whereas macrophages protect themselves from NK lysis via preferential expression of Qa-1.

  19. Macrophages help NK cells to attack tumor cells by stimulatory NKG2D ligand but protect themselves from NK killing by inhibitory ligand Qa-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixia Zhou

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells and their crosstalk with other immune cells are important for innate immunity against tumor. To explore the role of the interaction between NK cells and macrophages in the regulation of anti-tumor activities of NK cells, we here demonstrate that poly I:C-treated macrophages increased NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against target tumor cells in NKG2D-dependent manner. In addition, IL-15, IL-18, and IFN-β secreted by poly I:C-treated macrophages are also involved in NKG2D expression and NK cell activation. Interestingly, the increase in expression of NKG2D ligands on macrophages induced a highly NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against tumor cells, but not against macrophages themselves. Notably, a high expression level of Qa-1, a NKG2A ligand, on macrophages may contribute to such protection of macrophages from NK cell-mediated killing. Furthermore, Qa-1 or NKG2A knockdown and Qa-1 antibody blockade caused the macrophages to be sensitive to NK cytolysis. These results suggested that macrophages may activate NK cells to attack tumor by NKG2D recognition whereas macrophages protect themselves from NK lysis via preferential expression of Qa-1.

  20. Human macrophage foam cells degrade atherosclerotic plaques through cathepsin K mediated processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barascuk, Natasha; Skjøt-Arkil, Helene; Register, Thomas C

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Proteolytic degradation of Type I Collagen by proteases may play an important role in remodeling of atherosclerotic plaques, contributing to increased risk of plaque rupture.The aim of the current study was to investigate whether human macrophage foam cells degrade the extracellular......-I in areas of intimal hyperplasia and in shoulder regions of advanced plaques. Treatment of human monocytes with M-CSF or M-CSF+LDL generated macrophages and foam cells producing CTX-I when cultured on type I collagen enriched matrix. Circulating levels of CTX-I were not significantly different in women...... with aortic calcifications compared to those without. CONCLUSIONS: Human macrophage foam cells degrade the atherosclerotic plaques though cathepsin K mediated processes, resulting in increase in levels of CTX-I. Serum CTX-I was not elevated in women with aortic calcification, likely due to the contribution...

  1. Electronic Interfacing with Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, James T.

    The direct interfacing of living cells with inorganic electronic materials, components or systems has led to the development of two broad categories of devices that can (1) transduce biochemical signals generated by biological components into electrical signals and (2) transduce electronically generated signals into biochemical signals. The first category of devices permits the monitoring of living cells, the second, enables control of cellular processes. This review will survey this exciting area with emphasis on the fundamental issues and obstacles faced by researchers. Devices and applications that use both prokaryotic (microbial) and eukaryotic (mammalian) cells will be covered. Individual devices described include microbial biofuel cells that produce electricity, bioelectrical reactors that enable electronic control of cellular metabolism, living cell biosensors for the detection of chemicals and devices that permit monitoring and control of mammalian physiology.

  2. Role of tumor-associated macrophages in renal cell carcinoma pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Kovaleva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of tumor stroma in malignant tumor pathogenesis cannot be disputed. Macrophages are one of the crucial elements of tumor stroma. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs are type 2-activated macrophages (M2. They were first described in 1992. They carry CD206, CD163, FXIIIa, βIG-H3, stabilin 1, YKL-39, SI-CLP, tenascin С, LOX-1, fibronectin, MARCO, interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA and other markers. Unlike proinflammatory macrophages (M1, М2 display high anti-inflammatory activity and are responsible for inflammation reaction suppression and tissue recovery in inflamed area. TAMs significantly contribute to tumor progression by stimulating cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and suppression of antitumor immune response. Identification of macrophages in renal tumors involves a limited number of markers, which doesn’t allow making a conclusive answer about their function. However, a correlation between TAMs content and a negative disease prognosis can be considered proven. Studies of M1 and M2 using different markers have shown that renal tumors contain high levels of TAMs with mixed M1/M2 phenotype. TAMs in renal tumors are highly proangiogenic and immunosuppressive. TAMs density can be used as a prognostic marker, but development of an effective treatment strategy aimed at inhibition of TAMs antitumor activity requires systemic research involving a wide panel of M1 and M2 macrophage markers. 

  3. Regulation of ICAM-1 in Cells of the Monocyte/Macrophage System in Microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Paulsen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cells of the immune system are highly sensitive to altered gravity, and the monocyte as well as the macrophage function is proven to be impaired under microgravity conditions. In our study, we investigated the surface expression of ICAM-1 protein and expression of ICAM-1 mRNA in cells of the monocyte/macrophage system in microgravity during clinostat, parabolic flight, sounding rocket, and orbital experiments. In murine BV-2 microglial cells, we detected a downregulation of ICAM-1 expression in clinorotation experiments and a rapid and reversible downregulation in the microgravity phase of parabolic flight experiments. In contrast, ICAM-1 expression increased in macrophage-like differentiated human U937 cells during the microgravity phase of parabolic flights and in long-term microgravity provided by a 2D clinostat or during the orbital SIMBOX/Shenzhou-8 mission. In nondifferentiated U937 cells, no effect of microgravity on ICAM-1 expression could be observed during parabolic flight experiments. We conclude that disturbed immune function in microgravity could be a consequence of ICAM-1 modulation in the monocyte/macrophage system, which in turn could have a strong impact on the interaction with T lymphocytes and cell migration. Thus, ICAM-1 can be considered as a rapid-reacting and sustained gravity-regulated molecule in mammalian cells.

  4. Regulation of ICAM-1 in cells of the monocyte/macrophage system in microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Katrin; Tauber, Svantje; Dumrese, Claudia; Bradacs, Gesine; Simmet, Dana M; Gölz, Nadine; Hauschild, Swantje; Raig, Christiane; Engeli, Stephanie; Gutewort, Annett; Hürlimann, Eva; Biskup, Josefine; Unverdorben, Felix; Rieder, Gabriela; Hofmänner, Daniel; Mutschler, Lisa; Krammer, Sonja; Buttron, Isabell; Philpot, Claudia; Huge, Andreas; Lier, Hartwin; Barz, Ines; Engelmann, Frank; Layer, Liliana E; Thiel, Cora S; Ullrich, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the immune system are highly sensitive to altered gravity, and the monocyte as well as the macrophage function is proven to be impaired under microgravity conditions. In our study, we investigated the surface expression of ICAM-1 protein and expression of ICAM-1 mRNA in cells of the monocyte/macrophage system in microgravity during clinostat, parabolic flight, sounding rocket, and orbital experiments. In murine BV-2 microglial cells, we detected a downregulation of ICAM-1 expression in clinorotation experiments and a rapid and reversible downregulation in the microgravity phase of parabolic flight experiments. In contrast, ICAM-1 expression increased in macrophage-like differentiated human U937 cells during the microgravity phase of parabolic flights and in long-term microgravity provided by a 2D clinostat or during the orbital SIMBOX/Shenzhou-8 mission. In nondifferentiated U937 cells, no effect of microgravity on ICAM-1 expression could be observed during parabolic flight experiments. We conclude that disturbed immune function in microgravity could be a consequence of ICAM-1 modulation in the monocyte/macrophage system, which in turn could have a strong impact on the interaction with T lymphocytes and cell migration. Thus, ICAM-1 can be considered as a rapid-reacting and sustained gravity-regulated molecule in mammalian cells.

  5. Oxidized low density lipoprotein induced caspase-1 mediated pyroptotic cell death in macrophages: implication in lesion instability?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Macrophage death in advanced lesion has been confirmed to play an important role in plaque instability. However, the mechanism underlying lesion macrophage death still remains largely unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: Immunohistochemistry showed that caspase-1 activated in advanced lesion and co-located with macrophages and TUNEL positive reaction. In in-vitro experiments showed that ox-LDL induced caspase-1 activation and this activation was required for ox-LDL induced macrophages lysis, IL-1β and IL-18 production as well as DNA fragmentation. Mechanism experiments showed that CD36 and NLRP3/caspase-1/pathway involved in ox-LDL induced macrophage pyroptosis. CONCLUSION: Our study here identified a novel cell death, pyroptosis in ox-LDL induced human macrophage, which may be implicated in lesion macrophages death and play an important role in lesion instability.

  6. YKL-40 in giant cells and macrophages from patients with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J S; Baslund, B; Garbarsch, C

    1999-01-01

    of this study was to evaluate whether macrophages and giant cells of patients with GCA produce YKL-40, and whether serum YKL-40 concentrations are elevated in these patients. METHODS: Serum YKL-40 was determined by radioimmunoassay in 19 patients with GCA and 8 patients with polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) who......-matched controls (median 118 microg/liter), and the serum level of YKL-40 decreased to normal levels during prednisolone treatment (-38% after 1 month; PPMR had normal serum YKL-40 levels (median 158 microg/liter) and had no changes in the serum YKL-40 levels during prednisolone...

  7. Functional expression of P2X family receptors in macrophages is affected by microenvironment in mouse T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shayan; Feng, Wenli; Yang, Xiao; Yang, Wanzhu; Ru, Yongxin; Liao, Jinfeng; Wang, Lina; Lin, Yongmin; Ren, Qian [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin 300020 (China); Zheng, Guoguang, E-mail: zhengggtjchn@aliyun.com [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin 300020 (China); Center for Stem Cell Medicine, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100730 (China)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • We study the impact of leukemic microenvironment on P2X family receptors in Mφs. • Bone marrow and spleen Mφs are studied in Notch1-induced mouse leukemia model. • Increased expression of P2X7R is found in Mφs during the development of leukemia. • Elevated P2X7R-mediated calcium response is found in Mφs at late stage of leukemia. • More apoptotic Mφs are found in bone marrow and spleen at late stage of leukemia. - Abstract: Nucleotides are important players in intercellular signaling communication network. P2X family receptors (P2XRs) are ATP-gated plasma membrane ion channels with diverse biological functions. Macrophages are important components in the microenvironment of hematopoiesis participating in both physiological and pathological processes. However, the role of P2XRs in macrophages in leukemia has not been established. Here we investigated expression pattern and functions of P2XRs in macrophages from bone marrow (BM) and spleen of Notch1-induced T-ALL mice. Real-time PCR showed that P2XRs except P2X5R were expressed in BM and spleen macrophages. Furthermore, with the development of leukemia, the expression of P2X7R increased in both BM and spleen macrophages whereas expression of P2X1R increased in spleen macrophages. Live cell imaging recoding the Ca{sup 2+} response demonstrated that P2X7R expressed in macrophages was functional. TUNEL and electron microscopy analysis found that apoptotic macrophages were frequently observed in BM and spleen at late stage of leukemia, which was partly contributed by the activation of overexpressed P2X7R. Our results suggested that the intercellular communication mediated by nucleotides might orchestrate in the pathological process of leukemia and could be a potential target for the treatment of leukemia.

  8. Oval cell response is attenuated by depletion of liver resident macrophages in the 2-AAF/partial hepatectomy rat.

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    Shuai Xiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIMS: Macrophages are known to play an important role in hepatocyte mediated liver regeneration by secreting inflammatory mediators. However, there is little information available on the role of resident macrophages in oval cell mediated liver regeneration. In the present study we aimed to investigate the role of macrophages in oval cell expansion induced by 2-acetylaminofluorene/partial hepatectomy (2-AAF/PH in rats. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We depleted macrophages in the liver of 2-AAF/PH treated rats by injecting liposome encapsulated clodronate 48 hours before PH. Regeneration of remnant liver mass, as well as proliferation and differentiation of oval cells were measured. We found that macrophage-depleted rats suffered higher mortality and liver transaminase levels. We also showed that depletion of macrophages yielded a significant decrease of EPCAM and PCK positive oval cells in immunohistochemical stained liver sections 9 days after PH. Meanwhile, oval cell differentiation was also attenuated as a result of macrophage depletion, as large foci of small basophilic hepatocytes were observed by day 9 following hepatectomy in control rats whereas they were almost absent in macrophage depleted rats. Accordingly, real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed lower expression of albumin mRNA in macrophage depleted livers. Then we assessed whether macrophage depletion may affect hepatic production of stimulating cytokines for liver regeneration. We showed that macrophage-depletion significantly inhibited hepatic expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6, along with a lack of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 phosphorylation during the early period following hepatectomy. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that macrophages play an important role in oval cell mediated liver regeneration in the 2-AAF/PH model.

  9. Estradiol reduces susceptibility of CD4+ T cells and macrophages to HIV-infection.

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    Marta Rodriguez-Garcia

    Full Text Available The magnitude of the HIV epidemic in women requires urgent efforts to find effective preventive methods. Even though sex hormones have been described to influence HIV infection in epidemiological studies and regulate different immune responses that may affect HIV infection, the direct role that female sex hormones play in altering the susceptibility of target cells to HIV-infection is largely unknown. Here we evaluated the direct effect of 17-β-estradiol (E2 and ethinyl estradiol (EE in HIV-infection of CD4(+ T-cells and macrophages. Purified CD4(+ T-cells and monocyte-derived macrophages were generated in vitro from peripheral blood and infected with R5 and X4 viruses. Treatment of CD4(+ T-cells and macrophages with E2 prior to viral challenge reduced their susceptibility to HIV infection in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of E2 2 h after viral challenge however did not result in reduced infection. In contrast, EE reduced infection in macrophages to a lesser extent than E2 and had no effect on CD4(+ T-cell infection. Reduction of HIV-infection induced by E2 in CD4(+ T-cells was not due to CCR5 down-regulation, but was an entry-mediated mechanism since infection with VSV-G pseudotyped HIV was not modified by E2. In macrophages, despite the lack of an effect of E2 on CCR5 expression, E2-treatment reduced viral entry 2 h after challenge and increased MIP-1β secretion. These results demonstrate the direct effect of E2 on susceptibility of HIV-target cells to infection and indicate that inhibition of target cell infection involves cell-entry related mechanisms.

  10. In vitro biocorrosion of Co-Cr-Mo implant alloy by macrophage cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsin-Yi; Bumgardner, Joel D

    2004-11-01

    We hypothesized that macrophage cells and their released reactive chemical species (RCS) affect Co-Cr-Mo alloy's corrosion properties and that alloy corrosion products change macrophage cell behavior. A custom cell culture corrosion cell was used to evaluate how culture medium, cells, and RCS altered alloy corrosion in 3-day tests. Corrosion was evaluated by measuring total charge transfer at a constant potential using a potentiostat and metal ion release by atomic emission spectroscopy. Viability, proliferation, and NO (nitric oxide) and IL-1beta (interlukin-1beta) release were used to assess cellular response to alloy corrosion products. In the presence of activated cells, total charge transfers and Co ion release were the lowest (p < 0.05). This was attributed to an enhancement of the surface oxide by RCS. Cr and Mo release were not different between cells and activated cells. Low levels of metal ions did not affect cell viability, proliferation, or NO release, though IL-1beta released from the activated cells was higher on the alloy compared to the controls. These data support the hypothesis that macrophage cells and their RCS affect alloy corrosion. Changes in alloy corrosion by cells may be important to the development of host responses to the alloy and its corrosion products.

  11. Prostaglandin E2 in tick saliva regulates macrophage cell migration and cytokine profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Ticks are obligate hematophagous ectoparasites that suppress the host’s immune and inflammatory responses by secreting immuno-modulatory and anti-inflammatory molecules in their saliva. In previous studies we have shown that tick salivary gland extract (SGE) and saliva from Dermacentor variabilis have distinct effects on platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated IC-21 macrophage and NIH3T3-L1 fibroblast migration. Since tick saliva contains a high concentration of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a potent modulator of inflammation, we used a PGE2 receptor antagonist to evaluate the role of PGE2 in the different migratory responses induced by saliva and its impact on macrophage cytokine profile. Methods Adult ticks were fed on female New Zealand white rabbits for 5-8 days. Female ticks were stimulated with dopamine/theophylline to induce salivation and saliva was pooled. Competitive enzyme immunoassays (EIA) were used to measure saliva PGE2 content and the changes in macrophage intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels. The effects of tick saliva on macrophage and fibroblast migration were assessed in the absence and presence of the PGE2 receptor antagonist, AH 6809, using blind well chamber assays. A cytokine antibody array was used to examine the effects of tick saliva on macrophage cytokine secretion. Statistical significance was determined by one-way ANOVA; Student Newman-Kuels post-test was used for multiple comparisons. Results The saliva-induced increase in PDGF-stimulated macrophage migration was reversed by AH 6809. The inhibition of PDGF-stimulated fibroblast migration by saliva was also antagonist-sensitive. Tick saliva induced macrophages to secrete copious amounts of PGE2, and conditioned medium from these cells caused an AH 6809-sensitive inhibition of stimulated fibroblast migration, showing that macrophages can regulate fibroblast activity. We show that tick saliva decreased the secretion of the pro

  12. Aminopeptidase N (CD13 Is Involved in Phagocytic Processes in Human Dendritic Cells and Macrophages

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    Mónica I. Villaseñor-Cardoso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aminopeptidase N (APN or CD13 is a membrane ectopeptidase expressed by many cell types, including myelomonocytic lineage cells: monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. CD13 is known to regulate the biological activity of various peptides by proteolysis, and it has been proposed that CD13 also participates in several functions such as angiogenesis, cell adhesion, metastasis, and tumor invasion. We had previously reported that, in human monocytes and macrophages, CD13 modulates the phagocytosis mediated by receptors for the Fc portion of IgG antibodies (FcγRs. In this work, we analyzed the possible interaction of CD13 with other phagocytic receptors. We found out that the cross-linking of CD13 positively modulates the phagocytosis mediated by receptors of the innate immune system, since a significant increase in the phagocytosis of zymosan particles or heat-killed E. coli was observed when CD13 was cross-linked using anti-CD13 antibodies, in both macrophages and dendritic cells. Also, we observed that, during the phagocytosis of zymosan, CD13 redistributes and is internalized into the phagosome. These findings suggest that, besides its known functions, CD13 participates in phagocytic processes in dendritic cells and macrophages.

  13. Cytokines, macrophage lipid metabolism and foam cells: implications for cardiovascular disease therapy.

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    McLaren, James E; Michael, Daryn R; Ashlin, Tim G; Ramji, Dipak P

    2011-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the biggest killer globally and the principal contributing factor to the pathology is atherosclerosis; a chronic, inflammatory disorder characterized by lipid and cholesterol accumulation and the development of fibrotic plaques within the walls of large and medium arteries. Macrophages are fundamental to the immune response directed to the site of inflammation and their normal, protective function is harnessed, detrimentally, in atherosclerosis. Macrophages contribute to plaque development by internalizing native and modified lipoproteins to convert them into cholesterol-rich foam cells. Foam cells not only help to bridge the innate and adaptive immune response to atherosclerosis but also accumulate to create fatty streaks, which help shape the architecture of advanced plaques. Foam cell formation involves the disruption of normal macrophage cholesterol metabolism, which is governed by a homeostatic mechanism that controls the uptake, intracellular metabolism, and efflux of cholesterol. It has emerged over the last 20 years that an array of cytokines, including interferon-γ, transforming growth factor-β1, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-10, are able to manipulate these processes. Foam cell targeting, anti-inflammatory therapies, such as agonists of nuclear receptors and statins, are known to regulate the actions of pro- and anti-atherogenic cytokines indirectly of their primary pharmacological function. A clear understanding of macrophage foam cell biology will hopefully enable novel foam cell targeting therapies to be developed for use in the clinical intervention of atherosclerosis.

  14. Impaired differentiation of macrophage lineage cells attenuates bone remodeling and inflammatory angiogenesis in Ndrg1 deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Kosuke; Shibata, Tomohiro; Nabeshima, Hiroshi; Shinoda, Ai; Fukunaga, Yuichi; Kawahara, Akihiko; Karasuyama, Kazuyuki; Fukushi, Jun-Ichi; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Kuwano, Michihiko; Ono, Mayumi

    2016-01-18

    N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is a responsible gene for a hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy-Lom (Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4D). This is the first study aiming to assess the contribution of NDRG1 to differentiation of macrophage lineage cells, which has important implications for bone remodeling and inflammatory angiogenesis. Ndrg1 knockout (KO) mice exhibited abnormal curvature of the spine, high trabecular bone mass, and reduced number of osteoclasts. We observed that serum levels of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and macrophage-related cytokines were markedly decreased in KO mice. Differentiation of bone marrow (BM) cells into osteoclasts, M1/M2-type macrophages and dendritic cells was all impaired. Furthermore, KO mice also showed reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis by cancer cells, accompanied by decreased infiltration of tumor-associated macrophages. The transfer of BM-derived macrophages from KO mice into BM-eradicated wild type (WT) mice induced much less tumor angiogenesis than observed in WT mice. Angiogenesis in corneas in response to inflammatory stimuli was also suppressed with decreased infiltration of macrophages. Taken together, these results indicate that NDRG1 deficiency attenuates the differentiation of macrophage lineage cells, suppressing bone remodeling and inflammatory angiogenesis. This study strongly suggests the crucial role of NDRG1 in differentiation process for macrophages.

  15. Classically and alternatively activated bone marrow derived macrophages differ in cytoskeletal functions and migration towards specific CNS cell types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dijkstra Christine D

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages play an important role in neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS and spinal cord injury (SCI, being involved in both damage and repair. The divergent effects of macrophages might be explained by their different activation status: classically activated (CA/M1, pro-inflammatory, macrophages and alternatively activated (AA/M2, growth promoting, macrophages. Little is known about the effect of macrophages with these phenotypes in the central nervous system (CNS and how they influence pathogenesis. The aim of this study was therefore to determine the characteristics of these phenotypically different macrophages in the context of the CNS in an in vitro setting. Results Here we show that bone marrow derived CA and AA macrophages have a distinct migratory capacity towards medium conditioned by various cell types of the CNS. AA macrophages were preferentially attracted by the low weight ( Conclusion In conclusion, since AA macrophages are more motile and are attracted by NCM, they are prone to migrate towards neurons in the CNS. CA macrophages have a lower motility and a stronger adhesion to ECM. In neuroinflammatory diseases the restricted migration and motility of CA macrophages might limit lesion size due to bystander damage.

  16. File list: ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Granulocyte-Macrophage_Progenitor_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Granulocyte-Macrophage_Progenitor_Cells mm9 All antigens Blood Granulocyte-Macrop...ciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Granulocyte-Macrophage_Progenitor_Cells.bed ...

  17. Liquid Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hong-Gang; Zheng, Haimei

    2016-05-01

    Liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has attracted significant interest in recent years. With nanofabricated liquid cells, it has been possible to image through liquids using TEM with subnanometer resolution, and many previously unseen materials dynamics have been revealed. Liquid cell TEM has been applied to many areas of research, ranging from chemistry to physics, materials science, and biology. So far, topics of study include nanoparticle growth and assembly, electrochemical deposition and lithiation for batteries, tracking and manipulation of nanoparticles, catalysis, and imaging of biological materials. In this article, we first review the development of liquid cell TEM and then highlight progress in various areas of research. In the study of nanoparticle growth, the electron beam can serve both as the illumination source for imaging and as the input energy for reactions. However, many other research topics require the control of electron beam effects to minimize electron beam damage. We discuss efforts to understand electron beam-liquid matter interactions. Finally, we provide a perspective on future challenges and opportunities in liquid cell TEM.

  18. Nuclear DAMP complex-mediated RAGE-dependent macrophage cell death

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    Chen, Ruochan [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Department of Infectious Diseases and State Key Lab of Viral Hepatitis, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Fu, Sha; Fan, Xue-Gong [Department of Infectious Diseases and State Key Lab of Viral Hepatitis, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Lotze, Michael T.; Zeh, Herbert J. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Tang, Daolin, E-mail: tangd2@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Kang, Rui, E-mail: kangr@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2015-03-13

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), histone, and DNA are essential nuclear components involved in the regulation of chromosome structure and function. In addition to their nuclear function, these molecules act as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) alone or together when released extracellularly. The synergistic effect of these nuclear DNA-HMGB1-histone complexes as DAMP complexes (nDCs) on immune cells remains largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that nDCs limit survival of macrophages (e.g., RAW264.7 and peritoneal macrophages) but not cancer cells (e.g., HCT116, HepG2 and Hepa1-6). nDCs promote production of inflammatory tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) release, triggering reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis and necrosis. Moreover, the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), but not toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 and TLR-2, was required for Akt-dependent TNFα release and subsequent cell death following treatment with nDCs. Genetic depletion of RAGE by RNAi, antioxidant N-Acetyl-L-cysteine, and TNFα neutralizing antibody significantly attenuated nDC-induced cell death. These findings provide evidence supporting novel signaling mechanisms linking nDCs and inflammation in macrophage cell death. - Highlights: • Nuclear DAMP complexes (nDCs) selectively induce cell death in macrophages, but not cancer cells. • TNFα-mediated oxidative stress is required for nDC-induced death. • RAGE-mediated Akt activation is required for nDC-induced TNFα release. • Blocking RAGE and TNFα inhibits nDC-induced macrophage cell death.

  19. Differences in Intracellular Fate of Two Spotted Fever Group Rickettsia in Macrophage-Like Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curto, Pedro; Simões, Isaura; Riley, Sean P.; Martinez, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    Spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsiae are recognized as important agents of human tick-borne diseases worldwide, such as Mediterranean spotted fever (Rickettsia conorii) and Rocky Mountain spotted fever (Rickettsia rickettsii). Recent studies in several animal models have provided evidence of non-endothelial parasitism by pathogenic SFG Rickettsia species, suggesting that the interaction of rickettsiae with cells other than the endothelium may play an important role in pathogenesis of rickettsial diseases. These studies raise the hypothesis that the role of macrophages in rickettsial pathogenesis may have been underappreciated. Herein, we evaluated the ability of two SFG rickettsial species, R. conorii (a recognized human pathogen) and Rickettsia montanensis (a non-virulent member of SFG) to proliferate in THP-1 macrophage-like cells, or within non-phagocytic cell lines. Our results demonstrate that R. conorii was able to survive and proliferate in both phagocytic and epithelial cells in vitro. In contrast, R. montanensis was able to grow in non-phagocytic cells, but was drastically compromised in the ability to proliferate within both undifferentiated and PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells. Interestingly, association assays revealed that R. montanensis was defective in binding to THP-1-derived macrophages; however, the invasion of the bacteria that are able to adhere did not appear to be affected. We have also demonstrated that R. montanensis which entered into THP-1-derived macrophages were rapidly destroyed and partially co-localized with LAMP-2 and cathepsin D, two markers of lysosomal compartments. In contrast, R. conorii was present as intact bacteria and free in the cytoplasm in both cell types. These findings suggest that a phenotypic difference between a non-pathogenic and a pathogenic SFG member lies in their respective ability to proliferate in macrophage-like cells, and may provide an explanation as to why certain SFG rickettsial species are not associated

  20. Differences in intracellular fate of two spotted fever group Rickettsia in macrophage-like cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Curto

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Spotted fever group (SFG rickettsiae are recognized as important agents of human tick-borne diseases worldwide, such as Mediterranean spotted fever (R. conorii and Rocky Mountain spotted fever (R. rickettsii. Recent studies in several animal models have provided evidence of non-endothelial parasitism by pathogenic SFG Rickettsia species, suggesting that the interaction of rickettsiae with cells other than the endothelium may play an important role in pathogenesis of rickettsial diseases. These studies raise the hypothesis that the role of macrophages in rickettsial pathogenesis may have been underappreciated. Herein, we evaluated the ability of two SFG rickettsial species, R. conorii (a recognized human pathogen and R. montanensis (a non-virulent member of SFG to proliferate in THP-1 macrophage-like cells, or within non-phagocytic cell lines. Our results demonstrate that R. conorii was able to survive and proliferate in both phagocytic and epithelial cells in vitro. In contrast, R. montanensis was able to grow in non-phagocytic cells, but was drastically compromised in the ability to proliferate within both undifferentiated and PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells. Interestingly, association assays revealed that R. montanensis was defective in binding to THP-1-derived macrophages; however, the invasion of the bacteria that are able to adhere did not appear to be affected. We have also demonstrated that R. montanensis which entered into THP-1-derived macrophages were rapidly destroyed and partially co-localized with LAMP-2 and cathepsin D, two markers of lysosomal compartments. In contrast, R. conorii was present as intact bacteria and free in the cytoplasm in both cell types. These findings suggest that a phenotypic difference between a non-pathogenic and a pathogenic SFG member lies in their respective ability to proliferate in macrophage-like cells, and may provide an explanation as to why certain SFG rickettsial species are not associated with

  1. Excess Lymphangiogenesis Cooperatively Induced by Macrophages and CD4(+) T Cells Drives the Pathogenesis of Lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Fusa; Fujiu, Katsuhito; Matsumoto, Sahohime; Nakayama, Yukiteru; Shibata, Munehiko; Oike, Yuichi; Koshima, Isao; Watabe, Tetsuro; Nagai, Ryozo; Manabe, Ichiro

    2016-03-01

    Lymphedema is a debilitating progressive condition that severely restricts quality of life and is frequently observed after cancer surgery. The mechanism underlying lymphedema development remains poorly understood, and no effective pharmacological means to prevent or alleviate the ailment is currently available. Using a mouse model of lymphedema, we show here that excessive generation of immature lymphatic vessels is essential for initial edema development and that this early process is also important for later development of lymphedema pathology. We found that CD4(+) T cells interact with macrophages to promote lymphangiogenesis, and that both lymphangiogenesis and edema were greatly reduced in macrophage-depleted mice, lymphocyte-deficient Rag2(?/?) mice or CD4(+) T-cell-deficient mice. Mechanistically, T helper type 1 and T helper type 17 cells activate lesional macrophages to produce vascular endothelial growth factor-C, which promotes lymphangiogenesis, and inhibition of this mechanism suppressed not only early lymphangiogenesis, but also later development of lymphedema. Finally, we show that atorvastatin suppresses excessive lymphangiogenesis and lymphedema by inhibiting T helper type 1 and T helper type 17 cell activation. These results demonstrate that the interaction between CD4(+) T cells and macrophages is a potential therapeutic target for prevention of lymphedema after surgery.

  2. Macrophage phagocytosis alters the MRI signal of ferumoxytol-labeled mesenchymal stromal cells in cartilage defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejadnik, Hossein; Lenkov, Olga; Gassert, Florian; Fretwell, Deborah; Lam, Isaac; Daldrup-Link, Heike E.

    2016-05-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are a promising tool for cartilage regeneration in arthritic joints. hMSC labeling with iron oxide nanoparticles enables non-invasive in vivo monitoring of transplanted cells in cartilage defects with MR imaging. Since graft failure leads to macrophage phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, we evaluated in vitro and in vivo whether nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs show distinct MR signal characteristics before and after phagocytosis by macrophages. We found that apoptotic nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs were phagocytosed by macrophages while viable nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs were not. Serial MRI scans of hMSC transplants in arthritic joints of recipient rats showed that the iron signal of apoptotic, nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs engulfed by macrophages disappeared faster compared to viable hMSCs. This corresponded to poor cartilage repair outcomes of the apoptotic hMSC transplants. Therefore, rapid decline of iron MRI signal at the transplant site can indicate cell death and predict incomplete defect repair weeks later. Currently, hMSC graft failure can be only diagnosed by lack of cartilage defect repair several months after cell transplantation. The described imaging signs can diagnose hMSC transplant failure more readily, which could enable timely re-interventions and avoid unnecessary follow up studies of lost transplants.

  3. Enniatin B-induced cell death and inflammatory responses in RAW 267.4 murine macrophages

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    Gammelsrud, A. [Norwegian Veterinary Institute, P.O. Box 750, Centrum, N-0106 Oslo (Norway); Department of Air Pollution and Noise, Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, N-0403 Oslo (Norway); Solhaug, A. [Norwegian Veterinary Institute, P.O. Box 750, Centrum, N-0106 Oslo (Norway); Dendelé, B. [EA 4427 SeRAIC, IRSET, Université de Rennes 1, IFR 140, Rennes (France); Sandberg, W.J. [Department of Air Pollution and Noise, Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, N-0403 Oslo (Norway); Ivanova, L. [Norwegian Veterinary Institute, P.O. Box 750, Centrum, N-0106 Oslo (Norway); Kocbach Bølling, A. [Department of Air Pollution and Noise, Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, N-0403 Oslo (Norway); Lagadic-Gossmann, D. [EA 4427 SeRAIC, IRSET, Université de Rennes 1, IFR 140, Rennes (France); Refsnes, M.; Becher, R. [Department of Air Pollution and Noise, Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, N-0403 Oslo (Norway); Eriksen, G. [Norwegian Veterinary Institute, P.O. Box 750, Centrum, N-0106 Oslo (Norway); Holme, J.A., E-mail: jorn.holme@fhi.no [Department of Air Pollution and Noise, Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, N-0403 Oslo (Norway)

    2012-05-15

    The mycotoxin enniatin B (EnnB) is predominantly produced by species of the Fusarium genera, and often found in grain. The cytotoxic effect of EnnB has been suggested to be related to its ability to form ionophores in cell membranes. The present study examines the effects of EnnB on cell death, differentiation, proliferation and pro-inflammatory responses in the murine monocyte–macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. Exposure to EnnB for 24 h caused an accumulation of cells in the G0/G1-phase with a corresponding decrease in cyclin D1. This cell cycle-arrest was possibly also linked to the reduced cellular ability to capture and internalize receptors as illustrated by the lipid marker ganglioside GM1. EnnB also increased the number of apoptotic, early apoptotic and necrotic cells, as well as cells with elongated spindle-like morphology. The Neutral Red assay indicated that EnnB induced lysosomal damage; supported by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showing accumulation of lipids inside the lysosomes forming lamellar structures/myelin bodies. Enhanced levels of activated caspase-1 were observed after EnnB exposure and the caspase-1 specific inhibitor ZYVAD-FMK reduced EnnB-induced apoptosis. Moreover, EnnB increased the release of interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) in cells primed with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and this response was reduced by both ZYVAD-FMK and the cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074Me. In conclusion, EnnB was found to induce cell cycle arrest, cell death and inflammation. Caspase-1 appeared to be involved in the apoptosis and release of IL-1β and possibly activation of the inflammasome through lysosomal damage and leakage of cathepsin B. -- Highlights: ► The mycotoxin EnnB induced cell cycle arrest, cell death and inflammation. ► The G0/G1-arrest was linked to a reduced ability to internalize receptors. ► EnnB caused lysosomal damage, leakage of cathepsin B and caspase-1 cleavage. ► Caspase-1 was partly involved in both apoptosis and release of IL-1

  4. Flt3+ macrophage precursors commit sequentially to osteoclasts, dendritic cells and microglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanau Daniel

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages, osteoclasts, dendritic cells, and microglia are highly specialized cells that belong to the mononuclear phagocyte system. Functional and phenotypic heterogeneity within the mononuclear phagocyte system may reveal differentiation plasticity of a common progenitor, but developmental pathways leading to such diversity are still unclear. Results Mouse bone marrow cells were expanded in vitro in the presence of Flt3-ligand (FL, yielding high numbers of non-adherent cells exhibiting immature monocyte characteristics. Cells expanded for 6 days, 8 days, or 11 days (day 6-FL, day 8-FL, and day 11-FL cells, respectively exhibited constitutive potential towards macrophage differentiation. In contrast, they showed time-dependent potential towards osteoclast, dendritic, and microglia differentiation that was detected in day 6-, day 8-, and day 11-FL cells, in response to M-CSF and receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating-factor (GM-CSF and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα, and glial cell-conditioned medium (GCCM, respectively. Analysis of cell proliferation using the vital dye CFSE revealed homogenous growth in FL-stimulated cultures of bone marrow cells, demonstrating that changes in differential potential did not result from sequential outgrowth of specific precursors. Conclusions We propose that macrophages, osteoclasts, dendritic cells, and microglia may arise from expansion of common progenitors undergoing sequential differentiation commitment. This study also emphasizes differentiation plasticity within the mononuclear phagocyte system. Furthermore, selective massive cell production, as shown here, would greatly facilitate investigation of the clinical potential of dendritic cells and microglia.

  5. Macrophage-tumour cell interactions: identification of MUC1 on breast cancer cells as a potential counter-receptor for the macrophage-restricted receptor, sialoadhesin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, D; Hartnell, A; Happerfield, L; Miles, D W; Burchell, J; Taylor-Papadimitriou, J; Crocker, P R

    1999-10-01

    In many carcinomas, infiltrating macrophages are commonly found closely associated with tumour cells but little is known concerning the nature or significance of adhesion molecules involved in these cellular interactions. Here we demonstrate in primary human breast cancers that sialoadhesin (Sn), a macrophage-restricted adhesion molecule, is frequently expressed on infiltrating cells that often make close contact with breast carcinoma cells. To determine whether Sn could act as a specific receptor for ligands on breast cancer cell lines, binding assays were performed with a recombinant form of the protein fused to the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) (Sn-Fc). Sn-Fc was found to bind specifically and in a sialic acid-dependent manner to the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7, T47.D and BT-20 both in solid- and solution-phase binding assays. To investigate the nature of the sialoglycoproteins recognized by Sn on breast cancer cells, MCF-7 cells were labelled with [6-3H]glucosamine. Following precipitation with Sn-Fc, a major band of approximately 240000 MW was revealed, which was shown in reprecipitation and Western blotting experiments to be the epithelial mucin, MUC1.

  6. Ebola Virus: The Role of Macrophages and Dendritic Cells in the Pathogenesis of Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Impairment of den- dritic cells and adaptive immunity by Ebola and Lassa viruses . J. Immunol., 170(6), 2797–2801. Reed, D. S., Hensley, L. E., Geisbert, J...The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology 37 (2005) 1560–1566 Medicine in focus Ebola virus : The role of macrophages and dendritic...In consequence, virus disseminates to these and other cell types throughout the body, causing multifocal necrosis and a syndrome resembling septic

  7. Macrophage Activation in Pediatric Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD Correlates with Hepatic Progenitor Cell Response via Wnt3a Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Carpino

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is one of the most important causes of liver-related morbidity in children. In non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, the activation of liver resident macrophage pool is a central event in the progression of liver injury. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the polarization of liver macrophages and the possible role of Wnt3a production by macrophages in hepatic progenitor cell response in the progression of pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. 32 children with biopsy-proven non-alcoholic fatty liver disease were included. 20 out of 32 patients were treated with docosahexaenoic acid for 18 months and biopsies at the baseline and after 18 months were included. Hepatic progenitor cell activation, macrophage subsets and Wnt/β-catenin pathway were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Our results indicated that in pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, pro-inflammatory macrophages were the predominant subset. Macrophage polarization was correlated with Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease Activity Score, ductular reaction, and portal fibrosis; docosahexaenoic acid treatment determined a macrophage polarization towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype in correlation with the reduction of serum inflammatory cytokines, with increased macrophage apoptosis, and with the up-regulation of macrophage Wnt3a expression; macrophage Wnt3a expression was correlated with β-catenin phosphorylation in hepatic progenitor cells and signs of commitment towards hepatocyte fate. In conclusion, macrophage polarization seems to have a key role in the progression of pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; the modulation of macrophage polarization could drive hepatic progenitor cell response by Wnt3a production.

  8. Induction of interferon and cell death in response to cytosolic DNA in chicken macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitak, Nazarii; Hume, David A; Chappell, Keith J; Sester, David P; Stacey, Katryn J

    2016-06-01

    Responses to cytosolic DNA can protect against both infectious organisms and the mutagenic effect of DNA integration. Recognition of invading DNA is likely to be fundamental to eukaryotic cellular life, but has been described only in mammals. Introduction of DNA into chicken macrophages induced type I interferon mRNA via a pathway conserved with mammals, requiring the receptor cGAS and the signalling protein STING. A second pathway of cytosolic DNA recognition in mammalian macrophages, initiated by absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2), results in rapid inflammasome-mediated pyroptotic cell death. AIM2 is restricted to mammals. Nevertheless, chicken macrophages underwent lytic cell death within 15 min of DNA transfection. The mouse AIM2-mediated response requires double stranded DNA, but chicken cell death was maintained with denatured DNA. This appears to be a novel form of rapid necrotic cell death, which we propose is an ancient response rendered redundant in mammalian macrophages by the appearance of the AIM2 inflammasome. The retention of these cytosolic DNA responses through evolution, with both conserved and non-conserved mechanisms, suggests a fundamental importance in cellular defence.

  9. How antibodies alter the cell entry pathway of dengue virus particles in macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayala-Nunez, Nilda V.; Hoornweg, Tabitha E.; van de Pol, Denise P. I.; Sjollema, Klaas A.; Flipse, Jacky; van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus (DENV) infection plays an important role in the exacerbation of DENV-induced disease. To understand how antibodies influence the fate of DENV particles, we explored the cell entry pathway of DENV in the absence and presence of antibodies in macrophage-l

  10. Evidence for lipopolysaccharide-induced differentiation of RAW264⋅ 7 murine macrophage cell line into dendritic like cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajiv K Saxena; Val Vallyathan; Daniel M Lewis

    2003-02-01

    Effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on RAW264.7 macrophage cell line was studied. LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells increased in cell size and acquired distinct dendritic morphology. At the optimal dose of LPS (1 g/ml), almost 70% RAW264.7 cells acquired dendritic morphology. Flow cytometric studies indicate that the cell surface markers known to be expressed on dendritic cells and involved in antigen presentation and T cell activation (B7.1, B7.2, CD40, MHC class II antigens and CD1d) were also markedly upregulated on LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells. Our results suggest the possibility that LPS by itself could constitute a sufficient signal for differentiation of macrophages into DC-like cells.

  11. Rat natural killer cell, T cell and macrophage functions after intracerebroventricular injection of SNC 80.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, J E; Gomez-Flores, R; Calderon, S N; Rice, K C; Weber, R J

    1998-08-01

    We investigated the effects of (+)-4-[(alpha R)-alpha-((2S, 5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-methoxybenzyl]-N, N-diethylbenzamide (SNC 80), a nonpeptidic delta-opioid receptor-selective agonist, on rat leukocyte functions. Intracerebroventricular injection of SNC 80 (20 nmol) in Fischer 344N male rats did not affect splenic natural killer cell activity compared with intracerebroventricular saline-injected controls. SNC 80 also had no effect on concanavalin A-, anti-T cell receptor-, interleukin-2- and anti-T cell receptor + interleukin-2-induced splenic and thymic lymphocyte proliferation in most experiments. In some experiments, however, SNC 80 significantly (P SNC 80 did not significantly affect splenic T cell or natural killer cell populations as measured by the expression of T cell receptoralphabeta, and T helper (CD4), T suppressor/cytotoxic (CD8) and natural killer cell surface markers. Finally, SNC 80 did not affect interferon-gamma- or lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced splenic nitric oxide, and LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha production by splenic macrophages. These results suggest that SNC 80 could be useful in the treatment of pain without suppressing immune function. However, the potential immunoenhancing properties of SNC 80 may be also valuable in immunocompromised individuals.

  12. Injury-induced GR-1+ macrophage expansion and activation occurs independently of CD4 T-cell influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Fionnuala M; Tajima, Goro; Delisle, Adam J; Ikeda, Kimiko; Dolan, Sinead M; Hanschen, Marc; Mannick, John A; Lederer, James A

    2011-08-01

    Burn injury initiates an enhanced inflammatory condition referred to as the systemic inflammatory response syndrome or the two-hit response phenotype. Prior reports indicated that macrophages respond to injury and demonstrate a heightened reactivity to Toll-like receptor stimulation. Since we and others observed a significant increase in splenic GR-1 F4/80 CD11b macrophages in burn-injured mice, we wished to test if these macrophages might be the primary macrophage subset that shows heightened LPS reactivity. We report here that burn injury promoted higher level TNF-α expression in GR-1, but not GR-1 macrophages, after LPS activation both in vivo and ex vivo. We next tested whether CD4 T cells, which are known to suppress injury-induced inflammatory responses, might control the activation and expansion of GR-1 macrophages. Interestingly, we found that GR-1 macrophage expansion and LPS-induced TNF-α expression were not significantly different between wild-type and CD4 T cell-deficient CD4(-/-) mice. However, further investigations showed that LPS-induced TNF-α production was significantly influenced by CD4 T cells. Taken together, these data indicate that GR-1 F4/80 CD11b macrophages represent the primary macrophage subset that expands in response to burn injury and that CD4 T cells do not influence the GR-1 macrophage expansion process, but do suppress LPS-induced TNF-α production. These data suggest that modulating GR-1 macrophage activation as well as CD4 T cell responses after severe injury may help control the development of systemic inflammatory response syndrome and the two-hit response phenotype.

  13. Leptomeningeal Cells Transduce Peripheral Macrophages Inflammatory Signal to Microglia in Reponse to Porphyromonas gingivalis LPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yicong Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report here that the leptomeningeal cells transduce inflammatory signals from peripheral macrophages to brain-resident microglia in response to Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g. LPS. The expression of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2, TLR4, TNF-α, and inducible NO synthase was mainly detected in the gingival macrophages of chronic periodontitis patients. In in vitro studies, P.g. LPS induced the secretion of TNF-α and IL-1β from THP-1 human monocyte-like cell line and RAW264.7 mouse macrophages. Surprisingly, the mean mRNA levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in leptomeningeal cells after treatment with the conditioned medium from P.g. LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages were significantly higher than those after treatment with P.g. LPS alone. Furthermore, the mean mRNA levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in microglia after treatment with the conditioned medium from P.g. LPS-stimulated leptomeningeal cells were significantly higher than those after P.g. LPS alone. These observations suggest that leptomeninges serve as an important route for transducing inflammatory signals from macrophages to microglia by secretion of proinflammatory mediators during chronic periodontitis. Moreover, propolis significantly reduced the P.g. LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-1 β production by leptomeningeal cells through inhibiting the nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway. Together with the inhibitory effect on microglial activation, propolis may be beneficial in preventing neuroinflammation during chronic periodontitis.

  14. Leukocyte TLR5 deficiency inhibits atherosclerosis by reduced macrophage recruitment and defective T-cell responsiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenbroek, Guilielmus H.J.M.; van Puijvelde, Gijs H.M.; Anas, Adam A.; Bot, Martine; Asbach, Miriam; Schoneveld, Arjan; van Santbrink, Peter J.; Foks, Amanda C.; Timmers, Leo; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Hoefer, Imo E.; van der Poll, Tom; Kuiper, Johan; de Jager, Saskia C.A.

    2017-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) provide a critical link between innate and adaptive immunity, both important players in atherosclerosis. Since evidence for the role of TLR5 is lacking, we aimed to establish this in the immune axis of atherosclerosis. We assessed the effect of the TLR5-specific ligand Flagellin on macrophage maturation and T-cell polarisation. Next, we generated TLR5−/−LDLr−/− chimeras to study the effect of hematopoietic TLR5 deficiency on atherosclerosis formation. Flagellin stimulation did not influence wildtype or TLR5−/− macrophage maturation. Only in wildtype macrophages, Flagellin exposure increased MCP-1 and IL6 expression. Flagellin alone reduced T-helper 1 proliferation, which was completely overruled in the presence of T-cell receptor activation. In vivo, hematopoietic TLR5 deficiency attenuated atherosclerotic lesion formation by ≈25% (1030*103 ± 63*103 vs. 792*103 ± 61*103 μm2; p = 0.013) and decreased macrophage area (81.3 ± 12.0 vs. 44.2 ± 6.6 μm2; p = 0.011). In TLR5−/− chimeric mice, we observed lower IL6 plasma levels (36.4 ± 5.6 vs. 15.1 ± 2.2 pg/mL; p = 0.003), lower (activated) splenic CD4+ T-cell content (32.3 ± 2.1 vs. 21.0 ± 1.2%; p = 0.0018), accompanied by impaired T-cell proliferative responses. In conclusion, hematopoietic TLR5 deficiency inhibits atherosclerotic lesion formation by attenuated macrophage accumulation and defective T-cell responsiveness. PMID:28202909

  15. Impact of individual intravenous iron preparations on the differentiation of monocytes towards macrophages and dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fell, Lisa H.; Seiler-Mußler, Sarah; Sellier, Alexander B.; Rotter, Björn; Winter, Peter; Sester, Martina; Fliser, Danilo; Heine, Gunnar H.; Zawada, Adam M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Treatment of iron deficiency with intravenous (i.v.) iron is a first-line strategy to improve anaemia of chronic kidney disease. Previous in vitro experiments demonstrated that different i.v. iron preparations inhibit differentiation of haematopoietic stem cells to monocytes, but their effect on monocyte differentiation to macrophages and mature dendritic cells (mDCs) has not been assessed. We investigated substance-specific effects of iron sucrose (IS), sodium ferric gluconate (SFG), ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) and iron isomaltoside 1000 (IIM) on monocytic differentiation to M1/M2 macrophages and mDCs. Methods Via flow cytometry and microRNA (miRNA) expression analysis, we morphologically and functionally characterized monocyte differentiation to M1/M2 macrophages and mDCs after monocyte stimulation with IS, SFG, FCM and IIM (0.133, 0.266 and 0.533 mg/mL, respectively). To assess potential clinical implications, we compared monocytic phagocytosis capacity in dialysis patients who received either 500 mg IS or IIM. Results Phenotypically, IS and SFG dysregulated the expression of macrophage (e.g. CD40, CD163) and mDC (e.g. CD1c, CD141) surface markers. Functionally, IS and SFG impaired macrophage phagocytosis capacity. Phenotypic and functional alterations were less pronounced with FCM, and virtually absent with IIM. In miRNA expression analysis of mDCs, IS dysregulated miRNAs such as miR-146b-5p and miR-155-5p, which are linked to Toll-like receptor and mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathways. In vivo, IS reduced monocytic phagocytosis capacity within 1 h after infusion, while IIM did not. Conclusions This study demonstrates that less stable i.v. iron preparations specifically affect monocyte differentiation towards macrophages and mDCs. PMID:27190361

  16. Primary Tr1 cells from metastatic melanoma eliminate tumor-promoting macrophages through granzyme B- and perforin-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hongxia; Zhang, Ping; Kong, Xue; Hou, Xianglian; Zhao, Li; Li, Tianhang; Yuan, Xiaozhou; Fu, Hongjun

    2017-04-01

    In malignant melanoma, tumor-associated macrophages play multiple roles in promoting tumor growth, such as inducing the transformation of melanocytes under ultraviolet irradiation, increasing angiogenesis in melanomas, and suppressing antitumor immunity. Because granzyme B- and perforin-expressing Tr1 cells could specifically eliminate antigen-presenting cells of myeloid origin, we examined whether Tr1 cells in melanoma could eliminate tumor-promoting macrophages and how the interaction between Tr1 cells and macrophages could affect the growth of melanoma cells. Tr1 cells were characterized by high interleukin 10 secretion and low Foxp3 expression and were enriched in the CD4(+)CD49b(+)LAG-3(+) T-cell fraction. Macrophages derived from peripheral blood monocytes in the presence of modified melanoma-conditioned media demonstrated tumor-promoting capacity, exemplified by improving the proliferation of cocultured A375 malignant melanoma cells. But when primary Tr1 cells were present in the macrophage-A375 coculture, the growth of A375 cells was abrogated. The conventional CD25(+) Treg cells, however, were unable to inhibit macrophage-mediated increase in tumor cell growth. Further analyses showed that Tr1 cells did not directly eliminate A375 cells, but mediated the killing of tumor-promoting macrophages through the secretion of granzyme B and perforin. The tumor-infiltrating interleukin 10(+)Foxp3(-)CD4(+) T cells expressed very low levels of granzyme B and perforin, possibly suggested the downregulation of Tr1 cytotoxic capacity in melanoma tumors. Together, these data demonstrated an antitumor function of Tr1 cells through the elimination of tumor-promoting macrophages, which was not shared by conventional Tregs.

  17. The balance of apoptotic and necrotic cell death in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infected macrophages is not dependent on bacterial virulence.

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An important mechanism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis pathogenesis is the ability to control cell death pathways in infected macrophages: apoptotic cell death is bactericidal, whereas necrotic cell death may facilitate bacterial dissemination and transmission. METHODS: We examine M.tuberculosis control of spontaneous and chemically induced macrophage cell death using automated confocal fluorescence microscopy, image analysis, flow cytometry, plate-reader based vitality assays, and ...

  18. The inhibition of macrophage foam cell formation by tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside is driven by suppressing vimentin cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wenjuan; Huang, Lei; Sun, Qinju; Yang, Lifeng; Tang, Lian; Meng, Guoliang; Xu, Xiaole; Zhang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Macrophage foam cell formation triggered by oxLDL is an important event that occurs during the development of atherosclerosis. 2,3,5,4'-Tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-d-glucoside (TSG) exhibits significant anti-atherosclerotic activity. Herein we used U937 cells induced by PMA and oxLDL in vitro to investigate the inhibitory effects of TSG on U937 differentiation and macrophage foam cell formation. TSG pretreatment markedly inhibited cell differentiation induced by PMA, macrophage apoptosis and foam cell formation induced by oxLDL. The inhibition of vimentin expression and cleavage was involved in these inhibitory effects of TSG. The suppression of vimentin by siRNA in U937 significantly inhibited cell differentiation, apoptosis and foam cell formation. Using inhibitors for TGFβR1 and PI3K, we found that vimentin production in U937 cells is regulated by TGFβ/Smad signaling, but not by PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling. Meanwhile, TSG pretreatment inhibited both the expression of TGFβ1 and the phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3, and TSG suppressed the nuclear translocation of Smad4 induced by PMA and oxLDL. Furthermore, TSG attenuated the induced caspase-3 activation and adhesion molecules levels by PMA and oxLDL. PMA and oxLDL increased the co-localization of vimentin with ICAM-1, which was attenuated by pretreatment with TSG. These results suggest that TSG inhibits macrophage foam cell formation through suppressing vimentin expression and cleavage, adhesion molecules expression and vimentin-ICAM-1 co-localization. The interruption of TGFβ/Smad pathway and caspase-3 activation is responsible for the downregulation of TSG on vimentin expression and degradation, respectively.

  19. Effects of copper sulfate-oxidized or myeloperoxidase- modified LDL on lipid loading and programmed cell death in macrophages under hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlaminck B

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Benoit Vlaminck,1 Damien Calay,1 Marie Genin,1 Aude Sauvage,1 Noelle Ninane,1 Karim Zouaoui Boudjeltia,2 Martine Raes,1 Carine Michiels1 1Laboratory of Biochemistry and Cellular Biology (URBC, Namur Research Institute for Life Sciences (NARILIS, University of Namur, Namur, Belgium; 2Laboratory of Experimental Medicine (ULB 222 Unit, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, CHU de Charleroi, Charleroi, Belgium Abstract: Atheromatous plaques contain heavily lipid-loaded macrophages that die, hence generating the necrotic core of these plaques. Since plaque instability and rupture is often correlated with a large necrotic core, it is important to understand the mechanisms underlying foam cell death. Furthermore, macrophages within the plaque are associated with hypoxic areas but little is known about the effect of low oxygen partial pressure on macrophage death. The aim of this work was to unravel macrophage death mechanisms induced by oxidized low-density lipoproteins (LDL both under normoxia and hypoxia. Differentiated macrophages were incubated in the presence of native, copper sulfate-oxidized, or myeloperoxidase-modified LDL. The unfolded protein response, apoptosis, and autophagy were then investigated. The unfolded protein response and autophagy were triggered by myeloperoxidase-modified LDL and, to a larger extent, by copper sulfate-oxidized LDL. Electron microscopy observations showed that oxidized LDL induced excessive autophagy and apoptosis under normoxia, which were less marked under hypoxia. Myeloperoxidase-modified LDL were more toxic and induced a higher level of apoptosis. Hypoxia markedly decreased apoptosis and cell death, as marked by caspase activation. In conclusion, the cell death pathways induced by copper sulfate-oxidized and myeloperoxidase-modified LDL are different and are differentially modulated by hypoxia. Keywords: Ox-LDL, myeloperoxidase, hypoxia, UPR, apoptosis, autophagy, macrophages

  20. Apigenin induces the apoptosis and regulates MAPK signaling pathways in mouse macrophage ANA-1 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuexia Liao

    Full Text Available Apigenin is a naturally occurring plant flavonoid that possesses antioxidant, anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties. However, there are few reports has been done on the ability of apigenin to induce apoptosis in macrophages. In this study, mouse macrophage ANA-1 cells were incubated with different concentrations of apigenin. The cell viability was determined by an MTT assay. The cell apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometric analysis. Apoptosis were also analyzed using a TUNEL assay and a DNA ladder. The level of intracellular ROS was detected using a dichlorofluorescein -diacetate probe. The expression levels of apoptosis-related proteins were detected by western blot analysis. The results showed that apigenin decreased the viability of ANA-1 cells and induced apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Apigenin increased the level of intracellular ROS, downregulated the expression of Bcl-2 and upregulated the expression of caspase-3 and caspase-8 in ANA-1 cells. Furthermore, apigenin downregulated the expression of phospho-ERK and phospho-JNK, upregulated the expression of phospho-p38 and had no significant effect on the expression of Bax, ERK, JNK and p38. The results suggested that apigenin induced cell apoptosis in mouse macrophage ANA-1 cells may via increasing intracellular ROS, regulating the MAPK pathway, and then inhibiting Bcl-2 expression.

  1. Apigenin induces the apoptosis and regulates MAPK signaling pathways in mouse macrophage ANA-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yuexia; Shen, Weigan; Kong, Guimei; Lv, Houning; Tao, Wenhua; Bo, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Apigenin is a naturally occurring plant flavonoid that possesses antioxidant, anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties. However, there are few reports has been done on the ability of apigenin to induce apoptosis in macrophages. In this study, mouse macrophage ANA-1 cells were incubated with different concentrations of apigenin. The cell viability was determined by an MTT assay. The cell apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometric analysis. Apoptosis were also analyzed using a TUNEL assay and a DNA ladder. The level of intracellular ROS was detected using a dichlorofluorescein -diacetate probe. The expression levels of apoptosis-related proteins were detected by western blot analysis. The results showed that apigenin decreased the viability of ANA-1 cells and induced apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Apigenin increased the level of intracellular ROS, downregulated the expression of Bcl-2 and upregulated the expression of caspase-3 and caspase-8 in ANA-1 cells. Furthermore, apigenin downregulated the expression of phospho-ERK and phospho-JNK, upregulated the expression of phospho-p38 and had no significant effect on the expression of Bax, ERK, JNK and p38. The results suggested that apigenin induced cell apoptosis in mouse macrophage ANA-1 cells may via increasing intracellular ROS, regulating the MAPK pathway, and then inhibiting Bcl-2 expression.

  2. Melanoma Cells Can Adopt the Phenotype of Stromal Fibroblasts and Macrophages by Spontaneous Cell Fusion in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemény, Lajos V; Kurgyis, Zsuzsanna; Buknicz, Tünde; Groma, Gergely; Jakab, Ádám; Zänker, Kurt; Dittmar, Thomas; Kemény, Lajos; Németh, István B

    2016-06-02

    After the removal of primary cutaneous melanoma some patients develop local recurrences, even after having histologically tumor-free re-excision. A potential explanation behind this phenomenon is that tumor cells switch their phenotype, making their recognition via standard histopathological assessments extremely difficult. Tumor-stromal cell fusion has been proposed as a potential mechanism for tumor cells to acquire mesenchymal traits; therefore, we hypothesized that melanoma cells could acquire fibroblast- and macrophage-like phenotypes via cell fusion. We show that melanoma cells spontaneously fuse with human dermal fibroblasts and human peripheral blood monocytes in vitro. The hybrid cells' nuclei contain chromosomes from both parental cells and are indistinguishable from the parental fibroblasts or macrophages based on their morphology and immunophenotype, as they could lose the melanoma specific MART1 marker, but express the fibroblast marker smooth muscle actin or the macrophage marker CD68. Our results suggest that, by spontaneous cell fusion in vitro, tumor cells can adopt the morphology and immunophenotype of stromal cells while still carrying oncogenic, tumor-derived genetic information. Therefore, melanoma-stromal cell fusion might play a role in missing tumor cells by routine histopathological assessments.

  3. The Ca2+ Antagonizing Effect of Chinese Cobra Venom Factor on Formation of Macrophage-derived Foam Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭健苗; 杨向东; 姜志胜; 李亮

    2007-01-01

    Purpose CCVF was isolated from Chinese cobra (Naja naja) venom, its Ca2+ antagonizing effect on formation of macrophage-derived foam cells was explored in these studies. Methods Foam cell models were induced with C57BL/6J mouse peritoneal macrophages incubated in 10mg/L oxidized low density lipoprotein (OLDL), and their intracellular Ca2+ levels influenced both slowly and transiently by CCVF were determined with the technique of Ca2+ fluorescent indicator. Results The intracellular Ca2+ level with the macrophages incubated in 10mg/L OLDL and 10mg/L CCVF was 40.2% of the macrophages incubated in 10mg/L OLDL (P<0.05); While the transient influence of CCVF on the intracellular Ca2+ levels were not significant. Conclusion CCVF exerted a long-lasting antagonizing role on the enhancement of intracellular Ca2+ levels, thus inhibited the formation of macrophage-derived foam cell.

  4. Coxiella burnetii Infects Primary Bovine Macrophages and Limits Their Host Cell Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobotta, Katharina; Hillarius, Kirstin; Mager, Marvin; Kerner, Katharina; Heydel, Carsten; Menge, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Although domestic ruminants have long been recognized as the main source of human Q fever, little is known about the lifestyle that the obligate intracellular Gram-negative bacterium Coxiella burnetii adopts in its animal host. Because macrophages are considered natural target cells of the pathogen, we established primary bovine monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) as an in vitro infection model to study reservoir host-pathogen interactions at the cellular level. In addition, bovine alveolar macrophages were included to take cell type peculiarities at a host entry site into account. Cell cultures were inoculated with the virulent strain Nine Mile I (NMI; phase I) or the avirulent strain Nine Mile II (NMII; phase II). Macrophages from both sources internalized NMI and NMII. MDM were particularly permissive for NMI internalization, but NMI and NMII replicated with similar kinetics in these cells. MDM responded to inoculation with a general upregulation of Th1-related cytokines such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-12, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) early on (3 h postinfection). However, inflammatory responses rapidly declined when C. burnetii replication started. C. burnetii infection inhibited translation and release of IL-1β and vastly failed to stimulate increased expression of activation markers, such as CD40, CD80, CD86, and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. Such capability of limiting proinflammatory responses may help Coxiella to protect itself from clearance by the host immune system. The findings provide the first detailed insight into C. burnetii-macrophage interactions in ruminants and may serve as a basis for assessing the virulence and the host adaptation of C. burnetii strains. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Fusion between Intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages in a cancer context results in nuclear reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Anne E; Anderson, Eric C; Davies, Paige S; Silk, Alain D; Pelz, Carl; Impey, Soren; Wong, Melissa H

    2011-02-15

    The most deadly phase in cancer progression is attributed to the inappropriate acquisition of molecular machinery leading to metastatic transformation and spread of disease to distant organs. Although it is appreciated that metastasis involves epithelial-mesenchymal interplay, the underlying mechanism defining this process is poorly understood. Specifically, how cancer cells evade immune surveillance and gain the ability to navigate the circulatory system remains a focus. One possible mechanism underlying metastatic conversion is fusion between blood-derived immune cells and cancer cells. While this notion is a century old, in vivo evidence that cell fusion occurs within tumors and imparts genetic or physiologic changes remains controversial. We have previously demonstrated in vivo cell fusion between blood cells and intestinal epithelial cells in an injury setting. Here, we hypothesize that immune cells, such as macrophages, fuse with tumor cells imparting metastatic capabilities by transferring their cellular identity. We used parabiosis to introduce fluorescent-labeled bone marrow-derived cells to mice with intestinal tumors, finding that fusion between circulating blood-derived cells and tumor epithelium occurs during the natural course of tumorigenesis. Moreover, we identify the macrophage as a key cellular partner for this process. Interestingly, cell fusion hybrids retain a transcriptome identity characteristic of both parental derivatives, while also expressing a unique subset of transcripts. Our data supports the novel possibility that tumorigenic cell fusion may impart physical behavior attributed to migratory macrophages, including navigation of circulation and immune evasion. As such, cell fusion may represent a promising novel mechanism underlying the metastatic conversion of cancer cells.

  6. Generation and Identification of GM-CSF Derived Alveolar-like Macrophages and Dendritic Cells From Mouse Bone Marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yifei; Arif, Arif A; Poon, Grace F T; Hardman, Blair; Dosanjh, Manisha; Johnson, Pauline

    2016-06-25

    Macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) are innate immune cells found in tissues and lymphoid organs that play a key role in the defense against pathogens. However, they are difficult to isolate in sufficient numbers to study them in detail, therefore, in vitro models have been developed. In vitro cultures of bone marrow-derived macrophages and dendritic cells are well-established and valuable methods for immunological studies. Here, a method for culturing and identifying both DCs and macrophages from a single culture of primary mouse bone marrow cells using the cytokine granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is described. This protocol is based on the established procedure first developed by Lutz et al. in 1999 for bone marrow-derived DCs. The culture is heterogeneous, and MHCII and fluoresceinated hyaluronan (FL-HA) are used to distinguish macrophages from immature and mature DCs. These GM-CSF derived macrophages provide a convenient source of in vitro derived macrophages that closely resemble alveolar macrophages in both phenotype and function.

  7. Macrophage peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ deficiency delays skin wound healing through impairing apoptotic cell clearance in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H; Shi, R; Luo, B; Yang, X; Qiu, L; Xiong, J; Jiang, M; Liu, Y; Zhang, Z; Wu, Y

    2015-01-15

    Skin wound macrophages are key regulators of skin repair and their dysfunction causes chronic, non-healing skin wounds. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) regulates pleiotropic functions of macrophages, but its contribution in skin wound healing is poorly defined. We observed that macrophage PPARγ expression was upregulated during skin wound healing. Furthermore, macrophage PPARγ deficiency (PPARγ-knock out (KO)) mice exhibited impaired skin wound healing with reduced collagen deposition, angiogenesis and granulation formation. The tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) expression in wounds of PPARγ-KO mice was significantly increased and local restoration of TNF-α reversed the healing deficit in PPARγ-KO mice. Wound macrophages produced higher levels of TNF-α in PPARγ-KO mice compared with control. In vitro, the higher production of TNF-α by PPARγ-KO macrophages was associated with impaired apoptotic cell clearance. Correspondingly, increased apoptotic cell accumulation was found in skin wound of PPARγ-KO mice. Mechanically, peritoneal and skin wound macrophages expressed lower levels of various phagocytosis-related molecules. In addition, PPARγ agonist accelerated wound healing and reduced local TNF-α expression and wound apoptotic cells accumulation in wild type but not PPARγ-KO mice. Therefore, PPARγ has a pivotal role in controlling wound macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells to ensure efficient skin wound healing, suggesting a potential new therapeutic target for skin wound healing.

  8. Unusual cutaneous histiocytosis expressing an intermediate immunophenotype between Langerhans' cells and dermal macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, E; Gianotti, R; Alessi, E

    1988-08-01

    Cutaneous histiocytosis was discovered in a 40-year-old man with a slow-growing nodule located on his right arm. Histologic findings showed an epidermotropic infiltrate of histiocytes with folded, irregular nuclei. Immunologically, the cells presented an intermediate phenotype between Langerhans' cells and dermal macrophages. After surgical removal of the lesion, neither a relapse nor visceral involvement was observed during two years of follow-up.

  9. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with increased expression of macrophage migration inhibitory factor by T cells and macrophages in gastric mucosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Xing Xiang; Harry Hua Xiang XIA; ZHAO Ying Heng; LIN Man Peng; SHEN Qing Yan; LIU Wei; ZHENG Xue Ling

    2004-01-01

    AIM Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) plays a pivotal role in inflammatory/immune diseases.This study aimed to determine MIF expression in H.pylori-induced gastritis,and the effect of H.pylori on MIF expression in monocytes in vitro.METHODS Seventy-nine patients (M/F,39/40,mean age,52 yrs) referred for upper endoscopy were selected;19 with gastric ulcer,15 with duodenal ulcer and 45 with non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD).Gastric antral and body biopsies were obtained for histological examinations,double immunostaining for MIF/T-cells (CD45RO) and MIF/macrophage (KP1),and in situ hybridization for the expression of MIF mRNA.THp-1,a monocyte cell line,was co-incubated with different concentrations of the whole cell proteins prepared from H.pylori strain ATCC26695 or its isogenic type with cagA gene deleted.The expression of MIF protein was determined by using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and the MIF mRNA by retrospective transcription-polymerase chain reaction techniques.RESULTS H.pylori was detected in 50 patients (10 with gastric ulcer, 15 with duodenal ulcer and 25 with NUD).Overall,the numbers of total T-cells,MIF+T-cells,total macrophages,MIF+macrophages and MIF mRNA+ cells were greater in the gastric antrum than in the body.There was a significant increase in the numbers of total T-cells, MIF+ T-cells,total macrophages,MIF+macrophages and MIF mRNA+cells in H. pylori positive,compared with H.pylori negative patients,in both the antral and body mucosa.Moreover,the cell numbers increased with more severe chronic gastritis in both the antrum and body.The numbers were also significantly higher in ulcer patients than in NUD patients, particularly in H. pylori positive patients.In vitro,the expression of MIF protein and mRNA in monocytes was significantly increased by incubation with H.pylori whole cell proteins,in a time and dose dependent manner.CONCLUSIONS H.pylori infection stimulates the expression of MIF in the gastric inflammatory cells,which may play a

  10. Mycobacterium leprae-Infected Macrophages Preferentially Primed Regulatory T Cell Responses and Was Associated with Lepromatous Leprosy.

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    Degang Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The persistence of Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae infection is largely dependent on the types of host immune responses being induced. Macrophage, a crucial modulator of innate and adaptive immune responses, could be directly infected by M. leprae. We therefore postulated that M. leprae-infected macrophages might have altered immune functions.Here, we treated monocyte-derived macrophages with live or killed M. leprae, and examined their activation status and antigen presentation. We found that macrophages treated with live M. leprae showed committed M2-like function, with decreased interleukin 1 beta (IL-1beta, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha and MHC class II molecule expression and elevated IL-10 and CD163 expression. When incubating with naive T cells, macrophages treated with live M. leprae preferentially primed regulatory T (Treg cell responses with elevated FoxP3 and IL-10 expression, while interferon gamma (IFN-gamma expression and CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity were reduced. Chromium release assay also found that live M. leprae-treated macrophages were more resistant to CD8+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity than sonicated M. leprae-treated monocytes. Ex vivo studies showed that the phenotype and function of monocytes and macrophages had clear differences between L-lep and T-lep patients, consistent with the in vitro findings.Together, our data demonstrate that M. leprae could utilize infected macrophages by two mechanisms: firstly, M. leprae-infected macrophages preferentially primed Treg but not Th1 or cytotoxic T cell responses; secondly, M. leprae-infected macrophages were more effective at evading CD8+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

  11. STAT6 expression in T cells, alveolar macrophages and bronchial biopsies of normal and asthmatic subjects

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    Tomita Katsuyuki

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthma is characterised by increased numbers of Th2-like cells in the airways and IgE secretion. Generation of Th2 cells requires interleukin (IL-4 and IL-13 acting through their specific receptors and activating the transcription factor, signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6. STAT6 knockout mice fail to produce IgE, airway hyperresponsiveness and bronchoalveolar lavage eosinophilia after allergen sensitisation, suggesting a critical role for STAT6 in allergic responses. Methods We have investigated the expression of STAT6 in peripheral blood T-lymphocytes, alveolar macrophages and bronchial biopsies from 17 normal subjects and 18 mild-moderate steroid-naïve stable asthmatic patients. Results STAT6 expression was variable and was detected in T-lymphocytes, macrophages and bronchial epithelial cells from all subjects with no difference between normal and stable asthmatic subjects. Conclusions STAT6 expression in different cells suggests that it may be important in regulating the expression of not only Th2-like cytokines in T cells of man, but may also regulate STAT-inducible genes in alveolar macrophages and airway epithelial cells.

  12. Feedback mechanisms between M2 macrophages and Th17 cells in colorectal cancer patients.

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    Mao, Hui; Pan, Fei; Guo, Hongxia; Bu, Fangfang; Xin, Tong; Chen, Shukun; Guo, Yajun

    2016-09-01

    IL-17 and IL-22 are linked to the development of intestinal inflammation and colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the maintenance of IL-17 and IL-22 production, as well as the cell type (Th17) that mediates these cytokines in CRC patients, remains unknown. To examine this, untreated CRC patients and healthy controls were recruited in this study. We first observed that CRC patients contained significantly elevated levels of IL-17- and IL-22-producing CD4(+) T cells. The vast majority of IL-22-expressing CD4(+) T cells also expressed IL-17. We then found that the production of both IL-17 and IL-22 required support from autologous monocytes, since the depletion of monocytes significantly downregulated IL-17 and IL-22 secretion. Naive T cells from CRC patients did not secrete IL-17 or IL-22 initially, but long-term coculture with autologous monocytes significantly upregulated IL-17 and IL-22 production in an IL-6-dependent manner. Blockade of IL-6 significantly reduced the levels of both IL-17 and IL-22. We then observed that CD163(+) M2 macrophages were the main contributor of IL-6. Interestingly, incubation of monocytes with CCR4(+)CCR6(+) Th17 cells resulted in significantly higher levels of CD163(+) macrophages as well as higher IL-6 secretion, than incubation with non-Th17 CD4(+) T cells. Together, our study discovered a positive feedback mechanism between Th17 and M2 macrophages in CRC patients.

  13. Cytotoxicity of quantum dots and graphene oxide to erythroid cells and macrophages

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    Qu, Guangbo; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Zhe; Liu, Sijin; Jiang, Guibing

    2013-04-01

    Great concerns have been raised about the exposure and possible adverse influence of nanomaterials due to their wide applications in a variety of fields, such as biomedicine and daily lives. The blood circulation system and blood cells form an important barrier against invaders, including nanomaterials. However, studies of the biological effects of nanomaterials on blood cells have been limited and without clear conclusions thus far. In the current study, the biological influence of quantum dots (QDs) with various surface coating on erythroid cells and graphene oxide (GO) on macrophages was closely investigated. We found that QDs posed great damage to macrophages through intracellular accumulation of QDs coupled with reactive oxygen species generation, particularly for QDs coated with PEG-NH2. QD modified with polyethylene glycol-conjugated amine particles exerted robust inhibition on cell proliferation of J744A.1 macrophages, irrespective of apoptosis. Additionally, to the best of our knowledge, our study is the first to have demonstrated that GO could provoke apoptosis of erythroid cells through oxidative stress in E14.5 fetal liver erythroid cells and in vivo administration of GO-diminished erythroid population in spleen, associated with disordered erythropoiesis in mice.

  14. Cell-autonomous sex differences in gene expression in chicken bone marrow-derived macrophages.

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    Garcia-Morales, Carla; Nandi, Sunil; Zhao, Debiao; Sauter, Kristin A; Vervelde, Lonneke; McBride, Derek; Sang, Helen M; Clinton, Mike; Hume, David A

    2015-03-01

    We have identified differences in gene expression in macrophages grown from the bone marrow of male and female chickens in recombinant chicken M-CSF (CSF1). Cells were profiled with or without treatment with bacterial LPS for 24 h. Approximately 600 transcripts were induced by prolonged LPS stimulation to an equal extent in the male and female macrophages. Many transcripts encoded on the Z chromosome were expressed ∼1.6-fold higher in males, reflecting a lack of dosage compensation in the homogametic sex. A smaller set of W chromosome-specific genes was expressed only in females. LPS signaling in mammals is associated with induction of type 1 IFN-responsive genes. Unexpectedly, because IFNs are encoded on the Z chromosome of chickens, unstimulated macrophages from the female birds expressed a set of known IFN-inducible genes at much higher levels than male cells under the same conditions. To confirm that these differences were not the consequence of the actions of gonadal hormones, we induced gonadal sex reversal to alter the hormonal environment of the developing chick and analyzed macrophages cultured from male, female, and female sex-reversed embryos. Gonadal sex reversal did not alter the sexually dimorphic expression of either sex-linked or IFN-responsive genes. We suggest that female birds compensate for the reduced dose of inducible IFN with a higher basal set point of IFN-responsive genes.

  15. CD28 ligation increases macrophage suppression of T-cell proliferation.

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    Silberman, Daniel; Bucknum, Amanda; Bartlett, Thomas; Composto, Gabriella; Kozlowski, Megan; Walker, Amanda; Werda, Amy; Cua, Jackelyn; Sharpe, Arlene H; Somerville, John E; Riggs, James E

    2012-07-01

    When compared to spleen or lymph node cells, resident peritoneal cavity cells respond poorly to T-cell activation in vitro. The greater proportional representation of macrophages in this cell source has been shown to actively suppress the T-cell response. Peritoneal macrophages exhibit an immature phenotype (MHC class II(lo), B7(lo)) that reduces their efficacy as antigen-presenting cells. Furthermore, these cells readily express inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), an enzyme that promotes T-cell tolerance by catabolism of the limiting amino acid arginine. Here, we investigate the ability of exogenous T-cell costimulation to recover the peritoneal T-cell response. We show that CD28 ligation failed to recover the peritoneal T-cell response and actually suppressed responses that had been recovered by inhibiting iNOS. As indicated by cytokine ELISpot and neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb) treatment, this 'cosuppression' response was due to CD28 ligation increasing the number of interferon (IFN)-γ-secreting cells. Our results illustrate that cellular composition and cytokine milieu influence T-cell costimulation biology.Cellular & Molecular Immunology advance online publication, 23 April 2012; doi:10.1038/cmi.2012.13.

  16. RNY (YRNA)-derived small RNAs regulate cell death and inflammation in monocytes/macrophages.

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    Hizir, Zoheir; Bottini, Silvia; Grandjean, Valerie; Trabucchi, Michele; Repetto, Emanuela

    2017-01-05

    The recent discovery of new classes of small RNAs has opened unknown territories to explore new regulations of physiopathological events. We have recently demonstrated that RNY (or Y RNA)-derived small RNAs (referred to as s-RNYs) are an independent class of clinical biomarkers to detect coronary artery lesions and are associated with atherosclerosis burden. Here, we have studied the role of s-RNYs in human and mouse monocytes/macrophages and have shown that in lipid-laden monocytes/macrophages s-RNY expression is timely correlated to the activation of both NF-κB and caspase 3-dependent cell death pathways. Loss- or gain-of-function experiments demonstrated that s-RNYs activate caspase 3 and NF-κB signaling pathways ultimately promoting cell death and inflammatory responses. As, in atherosclerosis, Ro60-associated s-RNYs generated by apoptotic macrophages are released in the blood of patients, we have investigated the extracellular function of the s-RNY/Ro60 complex. Our data demonstrated that s-RNY/Ro60 complex induces caspase 3-dependent cell death and NF-κB-dependent inflammation, when added to the medium of cultured monocytes/macrophages. Finally, we have shown that s-RNY function is mediated by Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7). Indeed using chloroquine, which disrupts signaling of endosome-localized TLRs 3, 7, 8 and 9 or the more specific TLR7/9 antagonist, the phosphorothioated oligonucleotide IRS954, we blocked the effect of either intracellular or extracellular s-RNYs. These results position s-RNYs as relevant novel functional molecules that impacts on macrophage physiopathology, indicating their potential role as mediators of inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis.

  17. Human macrophage foam cells degrade atherosclerotic plaques through cathepsin K mediated processes

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    Larsen Lise

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteolytic degradation of Type I Collagen by proteases may play an important role in remodeling of atherosclerotic plaques, contributing to increased risk of plaque rupture. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether human macrophage foam cells degrade the extracellular matrix (ECM of atherosclerotic plaques by cathepsin K mediated processes. Methods We 1 cultured human macrophages on ECM and measured cathepsin K generated fragments of type I collagen (C-terminal fragments of Type I collagen (CTX-I 2 investigated the presence of CTX-I in human coronary arteries and 3 finally investigated the clinical potential by measuring circulating CTX-I in women with and without radiographic evidence of aortic calcified atherosclerosis. Results Immune-histochemistry of early and advanced lesions of coronary arteries demonstrated co-localization of Cathepsin-K and CTX-I in areas of intimal hyperplasia and in shoulder regions of advanced plaques. Treatment of human monocytes with M-CSF or M-CSF+LDL generated macrophages and foam cells producing CTX-I when cultured on type I collagen enriched matrix. Circulating levels of CTX-I were not significantly different in women with aortic calcifications compared to those without. Conclusions Human macrophage foam cells degrade the atherosclerotic plaques though cathepsin K mediated processes, resulting in increase in levels of CTX-I. Serum CTX-I was not elevated in women with aortic calcification, likely due to the contribution of CTX-I from osteoclastic bone resorption which involves Cathepsin-K. The human macrophage model system may be used to identify important pathway leading to excessive proteolytic plaque remodeling and plaque rupture.

  18. Activation of the Nlrp3 inflammasome in infiltrating macrophages by endocannabinoids mediates beta cell loss in type 2 diabetes.

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    Jourdan, Tony; Godlewski, Grzegorz; Cinar, Resat; Bertola, Adeline; Szanda, Gergő; Liu, Jie; Tam, Joseph; Han, Tiffany; Mukhopadhyay, Bani; Skarulis, Monica C; Ju, Cynthia; Aouadi, Myriam; Czech, Michael P; Kunos, George

    2013-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) progresses from compensated insulin resistance to beta cell failure resulting in uncompensated hyperglycemia, a process replicated in the Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rat. The Nlrp3 inflammasome has been implicated in obesity-induced insulin resistance and beta cell failure. Endocannabinoids contribute to insulin resistance through activation of peripheral CB1 receptors (CB₁Rs) and also promote beta cell failure. Here we show that beta cell failure in adult ZDF rats is not associated with CB₁R signaling in beta cells, but rather in M1 macrophages infiltrating into pancreatic islets, and that this leads to activation of the Nlrp3-ASC inflammasome in the macrophages. These effects are replicated in vitro by incubating wild-type human or rodent macrophages, but not macrophages from CB₁R-deficient (Cnr1(-/-)) or Nlrp3(-/-) mice, with the endocannabinoid anandamide. Peripheral CB₁R blockade, in vivo depletion of macrophages or macrophage-specific knockdown of CB₁R reverses or prevents these changes and restores normoglycemia and glucose-induced insulin secretion. These findings implicate endocannabinoids and inflammasome activation in beta cell failure and identify macrophage-expressed CB₁R as a therapeutic target in T2DM.

  19. Interaction of apoptotic cells with macrophages upregulates COX-2/PGE2 and HGF expression via a positive feedback loop.

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    Byun, Ji Yeon; Youn, Young-So; Lee, Ye-Ji; Choi, Youn-Hee; Woo, So-Yeon; Kang, Jihee Lee

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of apoptotic cells by macrophages is crucial for resolution of inflammation, immune tolerance, and tissue repair. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)/prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) play important roles in the tissue repair process. We investigated the characteristics of macrophage COX-2 and PGE2 expression mediated by apoptotic cells and then determined how macrophages exposed to apoptotic cells in vitro and in vivo orchestrate the interaction between COX-2/PGE2 and HGF signaling pathways. Exposure of RAW 264.7 cells and primary peritoneal macrophages to apoptotic cells resulted in induction of COX-2 and PGE2. The COX-2 inhibitor NS-398 suppressed apoptotic cell-induced PGE2 production. Both NS-398 and COX-2-siRNA, as well as the PGE2 receptor EP2 antagonist, blocked HGF expression in response to apoptotic cells. In addition, the HGF receptor antagonist suppressed increases in COX-2 and PGE2 induction. The in vivo relevance of the interaction between the COX-2/PGE2 and HGF pathways through a positive feedback loop was shown in cultured alveolar macrophages following in vivo exposure of bleomycin-stimulated lungs to apoptotic cells. Our results demonstrate that upregulation of the COX-2/PGE2 and HGF in macrophages following exposure to apoptotic cells represents a mechanism for mediating the anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic consequences of apoptotic cell recognition.

  20. Interaction of Apoptotic Cells with Macrophages Upregulates COX-2/PGE2 and HGF Expression via a Positive Feedback Loop

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    Ji Yeon Byun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of apoptotic cells by macrophages is crucial for resolution of inflammation, immune tolerance, and tissue repair. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2/prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF play important roles in the tissue repair process. We investigated the characteristics of macrophage COX-2 and PGE2 expression mediated by apoptotic cells and then determined how macrophages exposed to apoptotic cells in vitro and in vivo orchestrate the interaction between COX-2/PGE2 and HGF signaling pathways. Exposure of RAW 264.7 cells and primary peritoneal macrophages to apoptotic cells resulted in induction of COX-2 and PGE2. The COX-2 inhibitor NS-398 suppressed apoptotic cell-induced PGE2 production. Both NS-398 and COX-2-siRNA, as well as the PGE2 receptor EP2 antagonist, blocked HGF expression in response to apoptotic cells. In addition, the HGF receptor antagonist suppressed increases in COX-2 and PGE2 induction. The in vivo relevance of the interaction between the COX-2/PGE2 and HGF pathways through a positive feedback loop was shown in cultured alveolar macrophages following in vivo exposure of bleomycin-stimulated lungs to apoptotic cells. Our results demonstrate that upregulation of the COX-2/PGE2 and HGF in macrophages following exposure to apoptotic cells represents a mechanism for mediating the anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic consequences of apoptotic cell recognition.

  1. Global Dynamics of HIV Infection of CD4+ T Cells and Macrophages

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    A. M. Elaiw

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the global dynamics of an HIV infection model describing the interaction of the HIV with CD4+ T cells and macrophages. The incidence rate of virus infection and the growth rate of the uninfected CD4+ T cells and macrophages are given by general functions. We have incorporated two types of distributed delays into the model to account for the time delay between the time the uninfected cells are contacted by the virus particle and the time for the emission of infectious (matures virus particles. We have established a set of conditions which are sufficient for the global stability of the steady states of the model. Using Lyapunov functionals and LaSalle's invariant principle, we have proven that if the basic reproduction number R0 is less than or equal to unity, then the uninfected steady state is globally asymptotically stable (GAS, and if the infected steady state exists, then it is GAS.

  2. Placental growth factor is a survival factor for tumor endothelial cells and macrophages.

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    Adini, Avner; Kornaga, Tad; Firoozbakht, Farshid; Benjamin, Laura E

    2002-05-15

    The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-related factor, placental growth factor (PlGF),has been shown recently to play an important role in pathological VEGF-driven angiogenesis. In this study, we examine the effects of mPlGF/PlGF-2 overexpression in tumors grown from glioma cells containing a tetracycline-regulated mPlGF cDNA. Overexpression of mPlGF leads to increased tumor growth and vascular survival. When tetracycline is used to abruptly withdraw mPlGF overexpression, we see increased apoptosis in both vascular cells and macrophages. In addition, PlGF-2 induces survival gene expression and inhibits apoptosis in vitro. Thus, we propose that PlGF-2 contributes to tumor angiogenesis by providing increased survival function to endothelial cells and macrophages.

  3. Chemical and physical effects on the adhesion, maturation, and survival of monocytes, macrophages, and foreign body giant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Terry Odell, III

    Injury caused by biomedical device implantation initiates inflammatory and wound healing responses. Cells migrate to the site of injury to degrade bacteria and toxins, create new vasculature, and form new and repair injured tissue. Blood-proteins rapidly adsorb onto the implanted material surface and express adhesive ligands which mediate cell adhesion on the material surface. Monocyte-derived macrophages and multi-nucleated foreign body giant cells adhere to the surface and degrade the surface of the material. Due to the role of macrophage and foreign body giant cell on material biocompatibility and biostability, the effects of surface chemistry, surface topography and specific proteins on the maturation and survival of monocytes, macrophages and foreign body giant cells has been investigated. Novel molecularly designed materials were used to elucidate the dynamic interactions which occur between inflammatory cells, proteins and surfaces. The effect of protein and protein adhesion was investigated using adhesive protein depleted serum conditions on RGD-modified and silane modified surfaces. The effects of surface chemistry were investigated using temperature responsive surfaces of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) and micropatterned surfaces of N-(2 aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane regions on an interpenetrating polymer network of polyacrylamide and poly(ethylene glycol). The physical effects were investigated using polyimide scaffold materials and polyurethane materials with surface modifying end groups. The depletion of immunoglobulin G caused decreased levels of macrophage adhesion, foreign body giant cell formation and increased levels of apoptosis. The temporal nature of macrophage adhesion was observed with changing effectiveness of adherent cell detachment with time, which correlated to increased expression of beta1 integrin receptors on detached macrophages with time. The limited ability of the micropatterned surface, polyimide scaffold and surface

  4. Defect density in multiwalled carbon nanotubes influences ovalbumin adsorption and promotes macrophage activation and CD4(+) T-cell proliferation.

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    Bai, Wei; Raghavendra, Achyut; Podila, Ramakrishna; Brown, Jared M

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are of great interest for the development of drugs and vaccines due to their unique physicochemical properties. The high surface area to volume ratio and delocalized pi-electron cloud of CNTs promote binding of proteins to the surface forming a protein corona. This unique feature of CNTs has been recognized for potential delivery of antigens for strong and long-lasting antigen-specific immune responses. Based on an earlier study that demonstrated increased protein binding, we propose that carboxylated multiwalled CNTs (MWCNTs) can function as an improved carrier to deliver antigens such as ovalbumin (OVA). To test this hypothesis, we coated carboxylated MWCNTs with OVA and measured uptake and activation of antigen-presenting cells (macrophages) and their ability to stimulate CD4(+) T-cell proliferation. We employed two types of carboxylated MWCNTs with different surface areas and defects (MWCNT-2 and MWCNT-30). MWCNT-2 and MWCNT-30 have surface areas of ~215 m(2)/g and 94 m(2)/g, respectively. The ratios of D- to G-band areas (I D/I G) were 0.97 and 1.37 for MWCNT-2 and MWCNT-30, respectively, samples showing that MWCNT-30 contained more defects. The increase in defects in MWCNT-30 led to increased binding of OVA as compared to MWCNT-2 (1,066±182 μg/mL vs 582±41 μg/mL, respectively). Both types of MWCNTs, along with MWCNT-OVA complexes, showed no observable toxicity to bone-marrow-derived macrophages up to 5 days. Surprisingly, we found that MWCNT-OVA complex significantly increased the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II on macrophages and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin 6), while MWCNTs without OVA protein corona did not. The coculture of MWCNT-OVA-complex-treated macrophages and OVA-specific CD4(+) T-cells isolated from OT-II mice demonstrated robust proliferation of CD4(+) T-cells. This study provides strong evidence for a role for defects in carboxylated MWCNTs

  5. Seven Murine Cell Lines with Properties of Macrophages,

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    1981-02-01

    of this study; BALB-G-F, a fibroblast-like line derived from the same culture as BALB-G-M by cloning; L929 cells, a gift from Dr. Rolf Zinkernagel...less than 3% of cells ingested E under the same conditions. BW-J-T, NZW-D-T, BALB-G-T, BALB-G-F, L929 and TE-1 control cells were all nonphagocytic under...induced spreading. Exp. Cell Res. 79, 423, 1973. 30. Rabinovitch, M. and DeStefano, M. J. Use of the local anesthetic lidocaine for cell harvesting

  6. SIRT6 reduces macrophage foam cell formation by inducing autophagy and cholesterol efflux under ox-LDL condition.

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    He, Jiangping; Zhang, Guangya; Pang, Qi; Yu, Cong; Xiong, Jie; Zhu, Jing; Chen, Fengling

    2017-03-09

    SIRT6 is a pivotal regulator of lipid metabolism. It is also closely connected to cardiovascular diseases, which are the main cause of death in diabetic patients. We observed a decrease in the expression of SIRT6 and key autophagy effectors (ATG5, LC3B, and LAMP1) in ox-LDL-induced foam cells, a special form of lipid-laden macrophages. In these cells, SIRT6 WT but not SIRT6 H133Y overexpression markedly reduced foam cell formation, as shown by Oil Red O staining, while inducing autophagy flux, as determined by both mRFP-GFP-LC3 labeling and transmission electron microscopy. Silencing the key autophagy initiation gene ATG5, reversed the autophagy-promoting effect of SIRT6 in ox-LDL-treated THP1 cells, as evidenced by an increase in foam cells. Cholesterol efflux assays indicated that SIRT6 overexpression in foam cells promoted cholesterol efflux, increased the levels of ABCA1 and ABCG1, and reduced miR-33 levels. By transfecting miR-33 into cells overexpressing SIRT6, we observed that reduced foam cell formation and autophagy flux induction were largely reversed. These data imply that SIRT6 plays an essential role in protecting against atherosclerosis by reducing foam cell formation through an autophagy-dependent pathway. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Dendritic cells and macrophages in the kidney: a spectrum of good and evil.

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    Rogers, Natasha M; Ferenbach, David A; Isenberg, Jeffrey S; Thomson, Angus W; Hughes, Jeremy

    2014-11-01

    Renal dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages represent a constitutive, extensive and contiguous network of innate immune cells that provide sentinel and immune-intelligence activity; they induce and regulate inflammatory responses to freely filtered antigenic material and protect the kidney from infection. Tissue-resident or infiltrating DCs and macrophages are key factors in the initiation and propagation of renal disease, as well as essential contributors to subsequent tissue regeneration, regardless of the aetiological and pathogenetic mechanisms. The identification, and functional and phenotypic distinction of these cell types is complex and incompletely understood, and the same is true of their interplay and relationships with effector and regulatory cells of the adaptive immune system. In this Review, we discuss the common and distinct characteristics of DCs and macrophages, as well as key advances that have identified the renal-specific functions of these important phagocytic, antigen-presenting cells, and their roles in potentiating or mitigating intrinsic kidney disease. We also identify remaining issues that are of priority for further investigation, and highlight the prospects for translational and therapeutic application of the knowledge acquired.

  8. Efficient replication of pneumonia virus of mice (PVM in a mouse macrophage cell line

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    Martin Brittany V

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pneumonia virus of mice (PVM; family Paramyxoviridae, subfamily Pneumovirinae is a natural respiratory pathogen of rodent species and an important new model for the study of severe viral bronchiolitis and pneumonia. However, despite high virus titers typically detected in infected mouse lung tissue in vivo, cell lines used routinely for virus propagation in vitro are not highly susceptible to PVM infection. We have evaluated several rodent and primate cell lines for susceptibility to PVM infection, and detected highest virus titers from infection of the mouse monocyte-macrophage RAW 264.7 cell line. Additionally, virus replication in RAW 264.7 cells induces the synthesis and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines relevant to respiratory virus disease, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interferon-β (IFN-β, macrophage inflammatory proteins 1α and 1β (MIP-1α and MIP-1β and the functional homolog of human IL-8, mouse macrophage inflammatory peptide-2 (MIP-2. Identification and characterization of a rodent cell line that supports the replication of PVM and induces the synthesis of disease-related proinflammatory mediators will facilitate studies of molecular mechanisms of viral pathogenesis that will complement and expand on findings from mouse model systems.

  9. PPARy phosphorylation mediated by JNK MAPK: a potential role in macrophage-derived foam cell formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ran YIN; Yu-gang DONG; Hong-lang LI

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) modulates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) activity through phosphorylation in macrophages, and the effect of PPARy phosphorylation on macrophages-derived foam cell formation. Methods: After exposing the cultured THP-1 cells to ox-LDL in the presence or absence of different mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors, PPARγ and phosphorylated PPARγ protein levels were detected by Western blot. MAPK activity was analyzed using MAP Kinase Assay Kit. Intracellular cholesterol accumulation was assessed by Oil red O staining and cholesterol oxidase enzymatic method. The Mrna level of PPARγ target gene was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results: ox-LDL evaluated PPARγ phosphorylation status and subsequently decreased PPARγ target gene expression in a dose-dependent manner. Ox-LDL also induced MAPK activation. Treatment of THP-1 cells with c-Jun N-terminal kinase-, but not p38- or extracellular signal-regulated kinase-MAPK inhibitor, significantly suppressed PPARγ phosphorylation induced by ox-LDL, which in turn inhibited foam cell formation. Conclusion: In addition to its ligand-dependent activation, ox-LDL modulates PPARγ activity through phosphorylation, which is mediated by MAPK activation. PPARγ phosphorylation mediated by MAPK facilitates foam cell formation from macrophages exposed to ox-LDL.

  10. Different endocytotic uptake mechanisms for nanoparticles in epithelial cells and macrophages

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    Dagmar A. Kuhn

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Precise knowledge regarding cellular uptake of nanoparticles is of great importance for future biomedical applications. Four different endocytotic uptake mechanisms, that is, phagocytosis, macropinocytosis, clathrin- and caveolin-mediated endocytosis, were investigated using a mouse macrophage (J774A.1 and a human alveolar epithelial type II cell line (A549. In order to deduce the involved pathway in nanoparticle uptake, selected inhibitors specific for one of the endocytotic pathways were optimized regarding concentration and incubation time in combination with fluorescently tagged marker proteins. Qualitative immunolocalization showed that J774A.1 cells highly expressed the lipid raft-related protein flotillin-1 and clathrin heavy chain, however, no caveolin-1. A549 cells expressed clathrin heavy chain and caveolin-1, but no flotillin-1 uptake-related proteins. Our data revealed an impeded uptake of 40 nm polystyrene nanoparticles by J774A.1 macrophages when actin polymerization and clathrin-coated pit formation was blocked. From this result, it is suggested that macropinocytosis and phagocytosis, as well as clathrin-mediated endocytosis, play a crucial role. The uptake of 40 nm nanoparticles in alveolar epithelial A549 cells was inhibited after depletion of cholesterol in the plasma membrane (preventing caveolin-mediated endocytosis and inhibition of clathrin-coated vesicles (preventing clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Our data showed that a combination of several distinguishable endocytotic uptake mechanisms are involved in the uptake of 40 nm polystyrene nanoparticles in both the macrophage and epithelial cell line.

  11. PRESENCE OF MYCOBACTERIA IN OTHER CELLS OF LUNG AND LIVER EXEPT IN MACROPHAGES

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    Dimitrina Kazachka

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are the key cells for invading and replication of mycobacteria in the host and they play principal role in the pathogenesis of the tuberculosis. The aim of the present study was to reveal if mycobacterium invade other cells except these of immune defense and macrophages fi rst of all as a common feature. The results of ultrastructural studies of lungs of Mycobacterium bovis intraperitonealy infected rabbits and livers of Mycobacterium avium subcutaneously infected chickens showed the presence of mycobacteria into the cytoplasm of pneumocytes II type and capillary endothelial cells of rabbit lungs as well as in the cytoplasm of chicken liver parenchyma cells. On the base of these results and in particular invading of pneumocytes II type as a producers of the surfactant it was suggested that the surfactant or some of his components likely enhance phagocytosis of mycobacteria by macrophages. It could be a reason for mycobacterium affi nity to invade pneumocyte II type and to manipulate quality and quantity of the surfactant or some of his components. These results show that M. bovis invaded pneumocytes II type in vivo and it is an important step may be in the investigation of the possibility role of these cells in the pathogenesis of lung infection.

  12. O-glycosylation in cell wall proteins in Scedosporium prolificans is critical for phagocytosis and inflammatory cytokines production by macrophages.

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    Mariana I D S Xisto

    Full Text Available In this study, we analyze the importance of O-linked oligosaccharides present in peptidorhamnomannan (PRM from the cell wall of the fungus Scedosporium prolificans for recognition and phagocytosis of conidia by macrophages. Adding PRM led to a dose-dependent inhibition of conidia phagocytosis, whereas de-O-glycosylated PRM did not show any effect. PRM induced the release of macrophage-derived antimicrobial compounds. However, O-linked oligosaccharides do not appear to be required for such induction. The effect of PRM on conidia-induced macrophage killing was examined using latex beads coated with PRM or de-O-glycosylated PRM. A decrease in macrophage viability similar to that caused by conidia was detected. However, macrophage killing was unaffected when beads coated with de-O-glycosylated PRM were used, indicating the toxic effect of O-linked oligosaccharides on macrophages. In addition, PRM triggered TNF-α release by macrophages. Chemical removal of O-linked oligosaccharides from PRM abolished cytokine induction, suggesting that the O-linked oligosaccharidic chains are important moieties involved in inflammatory responses through the induction of TNF-α secretion. In summary, we show that O-glycosylation plays a role in the recognition and uptake of S. prolificans by macrophages, killing of macrophages and production of pro- inflammatory cytokines.

  13. O-Glycosylation in Cell Wall Proteins in Scedosporium prolificans Is Critical for Phagocytosis and Inflammatory Cytokines Production by Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xisto, Mariana I. D. S.; Bittencourt, Vera C. B.; Liporagi-Lopes, Livia Cristina; Haido, Rosa M. T.; Mendonça, Morena S. A.; Sassaki, Guilherme; Figueiredo, Rodrigo T.; Romanos, Maria Teresa V.; Barreto-Bergter, Eliana

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we analyze the importance of O-linked oligosaccharides present in peptidorhamnomannan (PRM) from the cell wall of the fungus Scedosporium prolificans for recognition and phagocytosis of conidia by macrophages. Adding PRM led to a dose-dependent inhibition of conidia phagocytosis, whereas de-O-glycosylated PRM did not show any effect. PRM induced the release of macrophage-derived antimicrobial compounds. However, O-linked oligosaccharides do not appear to be required for such induction. The effect of PRM on conidia-induced macrophage killing was examined using latex beads coated with PRM or de-O-glycosylated PRM. A decrease in macrophage viability similar to that caused by conidia was detected. However, macrophage killing was unaffected when beads coated with de-O-glycosylated PRM were used, indicating the toxic effect of O-linked oligosaccharides on macrophages. In addition, PRM triggered TNF-α release by macrophages. Chemical removal of O-linked oligosaccharides from PRM abolished cytokine induction, suggesting that the O-linked oligosaccharidic chains are important moieties involved in inflammatory responses through the induction of TNF-α secretion. In summary, we show that O-glycosylation plays a role in the recognition and uptake of S. prolificans by macrophages, killing of macrophages and production of pro- inflammatory cytokines. PMID:25875427

  14. HIV-related proteins prolong macrophage survival through induction of Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhihong; Fan, Xian; Staitieh, Bashar; Bedi, Chetna; Spearman, Paul; Guidot, David M; Sadikot, Ruxana T

    2017-01-01

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1(TREM-1) is a member of the superimmunoglobulin receptor family. We have previously shown that TREM-1 prolongs survival of macrophages treated with lipoolysaccharide through Egr2-Bcl2 signaling. Recent studies suggest a role for TREM-1 in viral immunity. Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV) targets the monocyte/macrophage lineage at varying stages of infection. Emerging data suggest that macrophages are key reservoirs for latent HIV even in individuals on antiretroviral therapy. Here, we investigated the potential role of TREM-1 in HIV latency in macrophages. Our data show that human macrophages infected with HIV show an increased expression of TREM-1. In parallel, direct exposure to the HIV-related proteins Tat or gp120 induces TREM-1 expression in macrophages and confers anti-apoptotic attributes.NF-κB p65 silencing identified that these proteins induce TREM-1 in p65-dependent manner. TREM-1 silencing in macrophages exposed to HIV-related proteins led to increased caspase 3 activation and reduced Bcl-2 expression, rendering them susceptible to apotosis. These novel data reveal that TREM-1 may play a critical role in establishing HIV reservoir in macrophages by inhibiting apoptosis. Therefore, targeting TREM-1 could be a novel therapeutic approach to enhance clearance of the HIV reservoir, at least within the macrophage pools. PMID:28181540

  15. Role of Gag and lipids during HIV-1 assembly in CD4 T cells and Macrophages

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    Charlotte eMariani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 is an RNA enveloped virus that preferentiallyinfects CD4+ T lymphocytes andalso macrophages. In CD4+ T cells, HIV-1mainly buds from the host cell plasma membrane.The viral Gag polyprotein targets theplasma membrane and is the orchestrator ofthe HIV assembly as its expression is sufficientto promote the formation of virus-likeparticles particles carrying a lipidic envelopederiving from the host cell membrane. Certainlipids are enriched in the viral membraneand are thought to play a key role in theassembly process and the envelop composition.A large body of work performed oninfected CD4+ T cells has provided importantknowledge about the assembly process andthe membrane virus lipid composition. WhileHIV assembly and budding in macrophages isthought to follow the same general Gag-drivenmechanism as in T-lymphocytes, the HIV cyclein macrophage exhibits specific features.In these cells, new virions bud from the limitingmembrane of seemingly intracellular compartments,where they accumulate while remaininginfectious. These structures are now oftenreferred to as Virus Containing Compartments(VCCs. Recent studies suggest that VCCsrepresent intracellularly sequestered regionsof the plasma membrane, but their precisenature remains elusive. The proteomic andlipidomic characterization of virions producedby T cells or macrophages has highlightedthe similarity between their composition andthat of the plasma membrane of producercells, as well as their enrichment in acidiclipids, some components of raft lipids andin tetraspanin-enriched microdomains. Greatchances are that Gag promotes the coalescenceof these components into an assemblyplatform from which viral budding takesplace. How Gag exactly interacts with membranelipids and what are the mechanisms involvedin the interaction between the differentmembrane nanodomains within the assemblyplatform remains unclear. Here we review recentliterature regarding the role of Gag andlipids

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis replicates within necrotic human macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Thomas R.; Repnik, Urska; Herbst, Susanne; Collinson, Lucy M.; Griffiths, Gareth

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulation of macrophage cell death is a well-documented phenomenon, but its role during bacterial replication is less characterized. In this study, we investigate the impact of plasma membrane (PM) integrity on bacterial replication in different functional populations of human primary macrophages. We discovered that IFN-γ enhanced bacterial replication in macrophage colony-stimulating factor–differentiated macrophages more than in granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor–differentiated macrophages. We show that permissiveness in the different populations of macrophages to bacterial growth is the result of a differential ability to preserve PM integrity. By combining live-cell imaging, correlative light electron microscopy, and single-cell analysis, we found that after infection, a population of macrophages became necrotic, providing a niche for M. tuberculosis replication before escaping into the extracellular milieu. Thus, in addition to bacterial dissemination, necrotic cells provide first a niche for bacterial replication. Our results are relevant to understanding the environment of M. tuberculosis replication in the host. PMID:28242744

  17. Macroautophagy regulation during HIV-1 infection of CD4+ T cells and macrophages

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    Sophie eBorel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an intracellular mechanism whereby pathogens, particularly viruses, are destroyed in autolysosomes after their entry into targets cells. Therefore, to survive and replicate in host cells, viruses have developed multiple strategies to either counteract or exploit this process. The aim of this review is to outline the known relationships between HIV-1 and autophagy in CD4+ T lymphocytes and macrophages, two main HIV-1 cell targets. The differential regulation of autophagy in these two cell types is highlighted and its potential consequences in terms of viral replication and physiopathology discussed.

  18. Osteogenesis differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells by CO2 laser-treatment stimulating macrophages via BMP2 signalling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Wen-Hui; Chen, Yi-Jyun; Hung, Chi-Jr; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Kao, Chia-Tze; Shie, Ming-You

    2014-11-01

    Immune reactions play an important role in determining the biostimulation of bone formation, either in new bone formation or inflammatory fibrous tissue encapsulation. Macrophage cell, the important effector cells in the immune reaction, which are indispensable for osteogenesis and their heterogeneity and plasticity, render macrophages a primer target for immune system modulation. However, there are very few studies about the effects of macrophage cells on laser treatment-regulated osteogenesis. In this study, we used CO2 laser as a model biostimulation to investigate the role of macrophage cells on the CO2 laser stimulated osteogenesis. Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) was also significantly up regulated by the CO2 laser stimulation, indicating that macrophage may participate in the CO2 laser stimulated osteogenesis. Interestingly, when laser treatment macrophage-conditioned medium were applied to human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLs), the osteogenesis differentiation of hPDLs was significantly enhanced, indicating the important role of macrophages in CO2 laser-induced osteogenesis. These findings provided valuable insights into the mechanism of CO2 laser-stimulated osteogenic differentiation, and a strategy to optimize the evaluation system for the in vitro osteogenesis capacity of laser treatment.

  19. A method for generation of bone marrow-derived macrophages from cryopreserved mouse bone marrow cells.

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    Fernanda M Marim

    Full Text Available The broad use of transgenic and gene-targeted mice has established bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM as important mammalian host cells for investigation of the macrophages biology. Over the last decade, extensive research has been done to determine how to freeze and store viable hematopoietic human cells; however, there is no information regarding generation of BMDM from frozen murine bone marrow (BM cells. Here, we establish a highly efficient protocol to freeze murine BM cells and further generate BMDM. Cryopreserved murine BM cells maintain their potential for BMDM differentiation for more than 6 years. We compared BMDM obtained from fresh and frozen BM cells and found that both are similarly able to trigger the expression of CD80 and CD86 in response to LPS or infection with the intracellular bacteria Legionella pneumophila. Additionally, BMDM obtained from fresh or frozen BM cells equally restrict or support the intracellular multiplication of pathogens such as L. pneumophila and the protozoan parasite Leishmania (L. amazonensis. Although further investigation are required to support the use of the method for generation of dendritic cells, preliminary experiments indicate that bone marrow-derived dendritic cells can also be generated from cryopreserved BM cells. Overall, the method described and validated herein represents a technical advance as it allows ready and easy generation of BMDM from a stock of frozen BM cells.

  20. Human amniotic epithelial cell transplantation induces markers of alternative macrophage activation and reduces established hepatic fibrosis.

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    Ursula Manuelpillai

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatic inflammation from multiple etiologies leads to a fibrogenic response that can progress to cirrhosis and liver failure. Transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells (hAEC from term delivered placenta has been shown to decrease mild to moderate hepatic fibrosis in a murine model. To model advanced human liver disease and assess the efficacy of hAEC therapy, we transplanted hAEC in mice with advanced hepatic fibrosis. Immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice were administered carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4 twice weekly resulting in bridging fibrosis by 12 weeks. hAEC (2 × 10(6 were infused via the tail vein at week 8 or weeks 8 and 10 (single and double dose, respectively. Human cells were detected in mouse liver four weeks after transplantation showing hAEC engraftment. CCl(4 treated mice receiving single or double hAEC doses showed a significant but similar decrease in liver fibrosis area associated with decreased activation of collagen-producing hepatic stellate cells and decreased hepatic protein levels of the pro-fibrogenic cytokine, transforming growth factor-beta1. CCl(4 administration caused hepatic T cell infiltration that decreased significantly following hAEC transplantation. Hepatic macrophages play a crucial role in both fibrogenesis and fibrosis resolution. Mice exposed to CCl(4 demonstrated increased numbers of hepatic macrophages compared to normal mice; the number of macrophages decreased significantly in CCl(4 treated mice given hAEC. These mice had significantly lower hepatic protein levels of the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 than mice given CCl(4 alone. Alternatively activated M2 macrophages are associated with fibrosis resolution. CCl(4 treated mice given hAEC showed increased expression of genes associated with M2 macrophages including YM-1, IL-10 and CD206. We provide novel data showing that hAEC transplantation induces a wound healing M2 macrophage phenotype associated with reduction of established

  1. Tim-3 blocking rescue macrophage and T cell function against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in HIV+ patients

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    Isabel Sada-Ovalle

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (Tim 3 and programmed death 1 (PD-1 are co-inhibitory receptors involved in the so-called T cell exhaustion, and in vivo blockade of these molecules restores T cell dysfunction. High expression of Tim-3 and PD-1 is induced after chronic antigen-specific stimulation of T cells during HIV infection. We have previously demonstrated that the interaction of Tim-3 with its ligand galectin-9 induces macrophage activation and killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our aim in this study was to analyze the Tim-3 expression profile before and after six months of antiretroviral therapy and the impact of Tim-3 and PD-1 blocking on immunity against M. tuberculosis. Materials and methods: HIV+ patients naïve to anti-retroviral therapy (ART were followed up for six months. Peripheral immune-cell phenotype (CD38/HLA-DR/galectin-9/Tim-3 and PD-1 was assessed by flow cytometry. Supernatants were analyzed with a multiplex cytokine detection system (human Th1/Th2 cytokine Cytometric Bead Array by flow cytometry. Control of bacterial growth was evaluated by using an in vitro experimental model in which virulent M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages were cultured with T cells in the presence or absence of Tim-3 and PD-1 blocking antibodies. Interleukin-1 beta treatment of infected macrophages was evaluated by enumerating colony-forming units. Results: We showed that HIV+ patients had an increased expression of Tim-3 in T cells and were able to control bacterial growth before ART administration. By blocking Tim-3 and PD-1, macrophages and T cells recovered their functionality and had a higher ability to control bacterial growth; this result was partially dependent on the restitution of cytokine production. Conclusions: In this study, we demonstrated that increased Tim-3 expression can limit the ability of the immune system to control the infection of intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. The use of ART and

  2. Tim-3 blocking rescue macrophage and T cell function against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in HIV+ patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sada-Ovalle, Isabel; Ocaña-Guzman, Ranferi; Pérez-Patrigeón, Santiago; Chávez-Galán, Leslie; Sierra-Madero, Juan; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; Addo, Marylyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (Tim) 3 and programmed death 1 (PD-1) are co-inhibitory receptors involved in the so-called T cell exhaustion, and in vivo blockade of these molecules restores T cell dysfunction. High expression of Tim-3 and PD-1 is induced after chronic antigen-specific stimulation of T cells during HIV infection. We have previously demonstrated that the interaction of Tim-3 with its ligand galectin-9 induces macrophage activation and killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our aim in this study was to analyze the Tim-3 expression profile before and after six months of antiretroviral therapy and the impact of Tim-3 and PD-1 blocking on immunity against M. tuberculosis. Materials and methods HIV+ patients naïve to anti-retroviral therapy (ART) were followed up for six months. Peripheral immune-cell phenotype (CD38/HLA-DR/galectin-9/Tim-3 and PD-1) was assessed by flow cytometry. Supernatants were analyzed with a multiplex cytokine detection system (human Th1/Th2 cytokine Cytometric Bead Array) by flow cytometry. Control of bacterial growth was evaluated by using an in vitro experimental model in which virulent M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages were cultured with T cells in the presence or absence of Tim-3 and PD-1 blocking antibodies. Interleukin-1 beta treatment of infected macrophages was evaluated by enumerating colony-forming units. Results We showed that HIV+ patients had an increased expression of Tim-3 in T cells and were able to control bacterial growth before ART administration. By blocking Tim-3 and PD-1, macrophages and T cells recovered their functionality and had a higher ability to control bacterial growth; this result was partially dependent on the restitution of cytokine production. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrated that increased Tim-3 expression can limit the ability of the immune system to control the infection of intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. The use of ART and the in vitro

  3. Nitric oxide and cell viability in inflammatory cells: a role for NO in macrophage function and fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscá, Lisardo; Zeini, Miriam; Través, Paqui G; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2005-03-15

    Macrophages participate actively in the inflammatory response by releasing cytokines, chemokines and factors that recruit additional cells to sites of infection or tissue injury or alteration. In addition to this, activated macrophages rapidly activate the expression of genes responsible for the high-output synthesis of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (NO, O2-, H2O2 and peroxynitrite, among others) and bioactive lipids derived from arachidonic acid. All of these agents contribute to the regulation of the inflammatory response. Most of these molecules, when synthesized at these high concentrations, exert pro-apoptotic effects in many cell types. Macrophages themselves are a notable and important exception, being resistant to apoptotic death upon activation. This resistance is necessary to enable these cells to perform their functional role during the early phases of an inflammatory response. However, after cumulative damage, or when the synthesis of inflammatory mediators decreases, macrophages undergo the characteristic mitochondrial-dependent cell death program, contributing in this way to the resolution of the inflammatory reaction. In the case of infectious diseases, this also helps to prevent the development of parasitic strategies by phagocytosed pathogens.

  4. Exosomes derived from human macrophages suppress endothelial cell migration by controlling integrin trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Doo; Kim, Yeon Hyang; Kim, Doo-Sik

    2014-04-01

    Integrin trafficking, including internalization, recycling, and lysosomal degradation, is crucial for the regulation of cellular functions. Exosomes, nano-sized extracellular vesicles, are believed to play important roles in intercellular communications. This study demonstrates that exosomes released from human macrophages negatively regulate endothelial cell migration through control of integrin trafficking. Macrophage-derived exosomes promote internalization of integrin β1 in primary HUVECs. The internalized integrin β1 persistently accumulates in the perinuclear region and is not recycled back to the plasma membrane. Experimental results indicate that macrophage-derived exosomes stimulate trafficking of internalized integrin β1 to lysosomal compartments with a corresponding decrease in the integrin destined for recycling endosomes, resulting in proteolytic degradation of the integrin. Moreover, ubiquitination of HUVEC integrin β1 is enhanced by the exosomes, and exosome-mediated integrin degradation is blocked by bafilomycin A, a lysosomal degradation inhibitor. Macrophage-derived exosomes were also shown to effectively suppress collagen-induced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway and HUVEC migration, which are both dependent on integrin β1. These observations provide new insight into the functional significance of exosomes in the regulation of integrin trafficking.

  5. The amount of macrophages and activated plasma cells on wound healing process affected by spirulina

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    Regina Purnama Dewi Iskandar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spirulina which grows abundantly in tropical seas have been investigated to enhance immune system. The administration of spirulina in tooth extraction sockets was expected to optimise the function of immunocompetent cells. Therefore, wound healing process would be improved. Purpose: The aim of this study was to prove that administration of spirulina could influence immune system in tooth extraction sockets. Method: There were 28 Cavia cobayas used in this study and were put in group of four. Mandibular left incisive were extracted from each of them. The basis made from mixture of polyethylene glycol (PEG 400 and PEG 4000 was administrated into each socket in control group (TG0. In addition, spirulina 12% was administrated into group TG1, spirulina 24% was administrated into group TG2, and spirulina 48% was administrated into group TG3. All of the Cavia cobaya were decapitated and the jaws were removed in day 5 after tooth extraction. The jaws were decalcified in EDTA solution, formed into paraffin block, processed for hematoxylin and eosin (H & E and immunohistochemistry staining afterwards. Datas were analysed statistically using Anova method. Result: There was an augmentation in the number of macrophages and activated plasma cells after spirulina application. The administration of higher concentrations of Spirulina leads to greater amount of macrophages and activated plasma cells in each groups. Conclusion: In conclusion, spirulina is able to increase the amount of macrophages and activated plasma cells which play important role in healing process.

  6. Intravital live cell triggered imaging system reveals monocyte patrolling and macrophage migration in atherosclerotic arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArdle, Sara; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Ray, Nilanjan; Ley, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Intravital multiphoton imaging of arteries is technically challenging because the artery expands with every heartbeat, causing severe motion artifacts. To study leukocyte activity in atherosclerosis, we developed the intravital live cell triggered imaging system (ILTIS). This system implements cardiac triggered acquisition as well as frame selection and image registration algorithms to produce stable movies of myeloid cell movement in atherosclerotic arteries in live mice. To minimize tissue damage, no mechanical stabilization is used and the artery is allowed to expand freely. ILTIS performs multicolor high frame-rate two-dimensional imaging and full-thickness three-dimensional imaging of beating arteries in live mice. The external carotid artery and its branches (superior thyroid and ascending pharyngeal arteries) were developed as a surgically accessible and reliable model of atherosclerosis. We use ILTIS to demonstrate Cx3cr1GFP monocytes patrolling the lumen of atherosclerotic arteries. Additionally, we developed a new reporter mouse (Apoe-/-Cx3cr1GFP/+Cd11cYFP) to image GFP+ and GFP+YFP+ macrophages "dancing on the spot" and YFP+ macrophages migrating within intimal plaque. ILTIS will be helpful to answer pertinent open questions in the field, including monocyte recruitment and transmigration, macrophage and dendritic cell activity, and motion of other immune cells.

  7. From blood to brain: amoeboid microglial cell, a nascent macrophage and its functions in developing brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Charanjit KAUR; S Thameem DHEEN; Eng-ang LING

    2007-01-01

    Amoeboid microglial cells (AMC) in the developing brain are active macrophages.The macrophagic nature of these cells has been demonstrated by many methods,such as the localization of various hydrolytic enzymes and the presence of comple-ment type 3 surface receptors in them. More importantly is the direct visualization of these cells engaged in the phagocytosis of degenerating cells at the ultrastruc-tural level. Further evidence of them being active macrophages is the avid inter-nalization of tracers administered by the intravenous or intraperitoneal routes in developing rats. The potential involvement of AMC in immune functions is sup-ported by the induced expression of major histocompatibility complex class Ⅰ and Ⅱ antigens on them when challenged by lipopolysaccharide or interferon-γ. Im-munosuppressive drugs, such as glucocorticoids and immune function-enhanc-ing drugs like melatonin, affect the expression of surface receptors and antigens and the release of cytokines by AMC. Recent studies in our laboratory have shown the expression of insulin-like growth factors, endothelins, 21,31-cyclic nucle-otide 31-phosphodiesterase, and N-methyl-D-asparate receptors. This along with the release of chemokines, such as stromal derived factor-la and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, suggests multiple functional roles of AMC in early brain development.

  8. Dendritic cells produce macrophage inflammatory protein-1 gamma, a new member of the CC chemokine family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamadzadeh, M; Poltorak, A N; Bergstressor, P R; Beutler, B; Takashima, A

    1996-05-01

    Langerhans cells (LC) are skin-specific members of the dendritic cell (DC) family. DC are unique among APC for their capacity to activate immunologically naive T cells, but little is known about their chemotactic recruitment of T cells. We now report that LC produce macrophage inflammatory protein-1 gamma (MIP-1 gamma), a newly identified CC chemokine. MIP-1 gamma mRNA was detected in epidermal cells freshly procured from BALB/c mice, and depletion of I-A+ epidermal cells (i.e., LC) abrogated that expression. MIP-1 gamma mRNA was detected in the XS52 LC-like DC line as well as by 4F7+ splenic DC and granulocyte-macrophage CSF-propagated bone marrow DC. XS52 DC culture supernatants contained 9 and 10.5 kDa immunoreactivities with anti-MIP-1 gamma Abs. We observed in Boyden chamber assays that 1) XS52 DC supernatant (added to the lower chambers) induced significant migration by splenic T cells; 2) this migration was blocked by the addition of anti-MIP-1 gamma in the lower chambers or by rMIP-1 gamma in the upper chambers; and 3) comparable migration occurred in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and in both activated and nonactivated T cells. We conclude that mouse DC (including LC) have the capacity to elaborate the novel CC chemokine MIP-1 gamma, suggesting the active participation of DC in recruiting T cells before activation.

  9. Global gene expression profiles of canine macrophages and canine mammary cancer cells grown as a co-culture in vitro

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    Król Magdalena

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Solid tumours comprise various cells, including cancer cells, resident stromal cells, migratory haemopoietic cells and other. These cells regulate tumour growth and metastasis. Macrophages constitute probably the most important element of all interactions within the tumour microenvironment. However, the molecular mechanism, that guides tumour environment, still remains unknown. Exploring the underlying molecular mechanisms that orchestrate these phenomena has been the aim of our study. A co-culture of canine mammary cancer cells and macrophages was established and maintained for 72 hrs. Having sorted the cells, gene expression in cancer cells and macrophages, using DNA microarrays, was examined. The results were confirmed using real-time qPCR and confocal microscopy. Moreover, their ability for migration and invasion has been assessed. Results Microarray analysis showed that the up-regulated genes in the cancer cell lines are involved in 15 highly over-manifested pathways. The pathways that drew our diligent attention included: the inflammation pathway mediated by chemokine and cytokine, the Toll receptor signalling pathway and the B cell activation. The up-regulated genes in the macrophages were involved in only 18 significantly over-manifested pathways: the angiogenesis, the p53 pathway feedback loops2 and the Wnt signalling pathway. The microarray analysis revealed that co-culturing of cancer cells with macrophages initiated the myeloid-specific antigen expression in cancer cells, as well as cytokine/chemokine genes expression. This finding was confirmed at mRNA and protein level. Moreover, we showed that macrophages increase cancer migration and invasion. Conclusions The presence of macrophages in the cancer environment induces acquisition of the macrophage phenotype (specific antigens and chemokines/cytokines expression in cancer cells. We presumed that cancer cells also acquire other myeloid features, such as

  10. Comparative effects of metal oxide nanoparticles on human airway epithelial cells and macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotoli, Bianca Maria; Bussolati, Ovidio [University of Parma, Department of Experimental Medicine (Italy); Costa, Anna Luisa; Blosi, Magda [National Research Council, Institute of Science and Technology for Ceramics (Italy); Di Cristo, Luisana [University of Parma, Department of Pharmacological, Biological and Applied Chemical Sciences (Italy); Zanello, Pier Paolo; Bianchi, Massimiliano G.; Visigalli, Rossana [University of Parma, Department of Experimental Medicine (Italy); Bergamaschi, Enrico, E-mail: enrico.bergamaschi@unipr.it [University of Parma, Unit of Occupational Medicine, Department of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Health Sciences (Italy)

    2012-09-15

    Among nanomaterials of industrial relevance, metal-based nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used, but their effects on airway cells are relatively poorly characterized. To compare the effects of metal NPs on cells representative of the lung-blood barrier, Calu-3 epithelial cells and Raw264.7 macrophages were incubated with three industrially relevant preparations of TiO{sub 2} NPs (size range 4-33 nm), two preparations of CeO{sub 2} NPs (9-36 nm) and CuO NPs (25 nm). While Raw264.7 were grown on standard plasticware, Calu-3 cells were seeded on permeable filters, where they form a high-resistance monolayer, providing an in vitro model of the airway barrier. Metal NPs, obtained from industrial sources, were characterized under the conditions adopted for the biological tests. Cytotoxicity was assessed with resazurin method in both epithelial and macrophage cells, while epithelial barrier permeability was monitored measuring the trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER). In macrophages, titania and ceria had no significant effect on viability in the whole range of nominal doses tested (15-240 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} of monolayer), while CuO NPs produced a marked viability loss. Moreover, only CuO NPs, but not the other NPs, lowered TEER of Calu-3 monolayers, pointing to the impairment of the epithelial barrier. TEER decreased by 30 % at the dose of 10 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} of CuO NPs, compared to untreated control, and was abolished at doses {>=}80 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}, in strict correlation with changes in cell viability. These results indicate that (1) CuO NPs increase airway epithelium permeability even at relatively low doses and are significantly toxic for macrophages and airway epithelial cells, likely through the release of Cu ions in the medium; (2) TiO{sub 2} and CeO{sub 2} NPs do not affect TEER and exhibit little acute toxicity for airway epithelial cells and macrophages; and (3) TEER measurement can provide a simple method to assess the impairment of in vitro airway

  11. Comparative effects of metal oxide nanoparticles on human airway epithelial cells and macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotoli, Bianca Maria; Bussolati, Ovidio; Costa, Anna Luisa; Blosi, Magda; Di Cristo, Luisana; Zanello, Pier Paolo; Bianchi, Massimiliano G.; Visigalli, Rossana; Bergamaschi, Enrico

    2012-09-01

    Among nanomaterials of industrial relevance, metal-based nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used, but their effects on airway cells are relatively poorly characterized. To compare the effects of metal NPs on cells representative of the lung-blood barrier, Calu-3 epithelial cells and Raw264.7 macrophages were incubated with three industrially relevant preparations of TiO2 NPs (size range 4-33 nm), two preparations of CeO2 NPs (9-36 nm) and CuO NPs (25 nm). While Raw264.7 were grown on standard plasticware, Calu-3 cells were seeded on permeable filters, where they form a high-resistance monolayer, providing an in vitro model of the airway barrier. Metal NPs, obtained from industrial sources, were characterized under the conditions adopted for the biological tests. Cytotoxicity was assessed with resazurin method in both epithelial and macrophage cells, while epithelial barrier permeability was monitored measuring the trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER). In macrophages, titania and ceria had no significant effect on viability in the whole range of nominal doses tested (15-240 μg/cm2 of monolayer), while CuO NPs produced a marked viability loss. Moreover, only CuO NPs, but not the other NPs, lowered TEER of Calu-3 monolayers, pointing to the impairment of the epithelial barrier. TEER decreased by 30 % at the dose of 10 μg/cm2 of CuO NPs, compared to untreated control, and was abolished at doses ≥80 μg/cm2, in strict correlation with changes in cell viability. These results indicate that (1) CuO NPs increase airway epithelium permeability even at relatively low doses and are significantly toxic for macrophages and airway epithelial cells, likely through the release of Cu ions in the medium; (2) TiO2 and CeO2 NPs do not affect TEER and exhibit little acute toxicity for airway epithelial cells and macrophages; and (3) TEER measurement can provide a simple method to assess the impairment of in vitro airway epithelial barrier model by manufactured nanomaterials.

  12. Distribution of Matrix Metalloproteinases in Human Atherosclerotic Carotid Plaques and Their Production by Smooth Muscle Cells and Macrophage Subsets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, Nynke A.; de Vries, Bastiaan M. Wallis; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Harlaar, Niels J.; Tio, Rene A.; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.; van Dam, Gooitzen M.; Boersma, Hendrikus H.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Westra, Johanna

    In this study, the potential of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) sense for detection of atherosclerotic plaque instability was explored. Secondly, expression of MMPs by macrophage subtypes and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) was investigated. Twenty-three consecutive plaques removed during carotid

  13. Cytokine treatment of macrophage suppression of T cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Daniel; Bucknum, Amanda; Kozlowski, Megan; Matlack, Robin; Riggs, James

    2010-01-01

    High Mphi:T cell ratios suppress the immune response to the retroviral superantigen Mls by IFNgamma-triggered production of the arg- and trp-consuming enzymes iNOS and IDO. Attempts to reverse suppression by treatment with pro-inflammatory cytokines revealed that IL-6 improved the T cell response to Mls and the pro-hematopoietic cyokines IL-3 and GM-CSF increased suppression. GM-CSF treatment increased Mphi expression of CD80, a ligand for the immune suppressive B7H1 and CTLA-4 receptors. These results illustrate potential strategies for reversing the suppression of cell-mediated immunity characteristic of the high Mphi:T cell ratios found in many tumors.

  14. Müller and macrophage-like cell interactions in an organotypic culture of porcine neuroretina

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the in vitro Müller cell modifications in an organotypic culture of porcine neuroretina in response to the addition of a blood-derived mononuclear fraction (MNF; monocytes and lymphocytes) as a source of macrophages. Methods: Control and MNF-stimulated neuroretinal explants were examined at 3, 6, and 9 days of culture. Specimens were processed for epoxy-resin embedding and cryosectioning. Light and immunofluorescence microscopy were performed, using toluidine blue staining...

  15. Macrophages are required for dendritic cell uptake of respiratory syncytial virus from an infected epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugonna, Kelechi; Bingle, Colin D; Plant, Karen; Wilson, Kirsty; Everard, Mark L

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that the respiratory syncytial virus [RSV] can productively infect monocyte derived dendritic cells [MoDC] and remain dormant within the same cells for prolonged periods. It is therefore possible that infected dendritic cells act as a reservoir within the airways of individuals between annual epidemics. In the present study we explored the possibility that sub-epithelial DCs can be infected with RSV from differentiated bronchial epithelium and that in turn RSV from DCs can infect the epithelium. A dual co-culture model was established in which a differentiated primary airway epithelium on an Air Liquid Interface (ALI) was cultured on a transwell insert and MoDCs were subsequently added to the basolateral membrane of the insert. Further experiments were undertaken using a triple co-culture model in which in which macrophages were added to the apical surface of the differentiated epithelium. A modified RSV [rr-RSV] expressing a red fluorescent protein marker of replication was used to infect either the MoDCs or the differentiated epithelium and infection of the reciprocal cell type was assessed using confocal microscopy. Our data shows that primary epithelium became infected when rr-RSV infected MoDCs were introduced onto the basal surface of the transwell insert. MoDCs located beneath the epithelium did not become infected with virus from infected epithelial cells in the dual co-culture model. However when macrophages were present on the apical surface of the primary epithelium infection of the basal MoDCs occurred. Our data suggests that RSV infected dendritic cells readily transmit infection to epithelial cells even when they are located beneath the basal layer. However macrophages appear to be necessary for the transmission of infection from epithelial cells to basal dendritic cells.

  16. A novel photodynamic therapy targeting cancer cells and tumor-associated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Noriyuki; Kataoka, Hiromi; Yano, Shigenobu; Tanaka, Mamoru; Moriwaki, Kazuhiro; Akashi, Haruo; Suzuki, Shugo; Mori, Yoshinori; Kubota, Eiji; Tanida, Satoshi; Takahashi, Satoru; Joh, Takashi

    2015-02-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) in cancer stroma play important roles for cancer cell growth, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastases. We synthesized a novel photosensitizer, mannose-conjugated chlorin (M-chlorin), designed to bind mannose receptors highly expressed on TAMs. We evaluated the newly available photodynamic therapy (PDT) with M-chlorin against gastric and colon cancer. We evaluated PDT with M-chlorin for in vitro cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction in cancer cells compared with chlorin alone and glucose-conjugated chlorin (G-chlorin). The subcellular localization of M-chlorin was observed by confocal microscopy, and the M-chlorin PDT effects against TAMs including THP-1-induced M2-polarized macrophages were evaluated. Anticancer effects were also investigated in an allograft model where cytotoxic effects against TAMs in the cancer cell stroma were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. M-chlorin PDT strongly induced cell death in cancer cells to almost the same extent as G-chlorin PDT by inducing apoptosis. M-chlorin was incorporated into cancer cells where it localized mainly in lysosomes and endoplasmic reticula. M-chlorin PDT revealed strong cytotoxicity for M2 macrophages induced from THP-1 cell lines, and it induced stronger cytotoxicity than G-chlorin PDT in the allograft model through killing both cancer cells and TAMs in the cancer stroma. The M-chlorin PDT produced strong cytotoxicity against cancer tissue by inducing apoptosis of both cancer cells and TAMs in the cancer stroma. This novel PDT thus stands as a new candidate for very effective, next-generation PDT.

  17. Effects of beauvericin, enniatin b and moniliformin on human dendritic cells and macrophages: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficheux, A S; Sibiril, Y; Parent-Massin, D

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro effects of emerging mycotoxins beauvericin, enniatin B and moniliformin on human dendritic cells and macrophages. Beauvericin and enniatin B were cytotoxic on these cells. IC50 were equal to 1.0 μM, 2.9 μM and 2.5 μM beauvericin for immature dendritic cells, mature dendritic cells and macrophages, respectively. IC50 were equal to 1.6 μM, 2.6 μM and 2.5 μM for immature dendritic cells, mature dendritic cells and macrophages exposed to enniatin B, respectively. Effects on the differentiation process of monocytes into macrophages or into immature dendritic cells as well as effects on dendritic cells maturation have been studied. The differentiation process of monocytes into immature dendritic cells was not disturbed in the presence of beauvericin. Dendritic cells exposed to beauvericin during the maturation process presented a decrease of CCR7 expression and an increase of IL-10 secretion. Monocytes exposed to beauvericin during the differentiation process into macrophages presented a decrease of endocytosis ability. The differentiation process of monocytes into immature dendritic cells was not disturbed in the presence of enniatin B. Dendritic cells exposed to enniatin B during the maturation process presented a decrease of expression of the maturation makers CD80, CD86 and CCR7 and an increase of IL-10 secretion. Monocytes exposed to enniatin B during the differentiation process into macrophages presented a decrease of endocytosis ability and an increase of CD71. CD1a expression and endocytosis capacity were decreased on immature dendritic cells exposed to moniliformin. Monocytes-derived macrophages exposed to moniliformin during the differentiation process presented a decrease of endocytosis ability, and a decrease of CD71 and HLA-DR expression. According to these results, immunological disorders could be observed on human after ingestion of these alimentary toxins.

  18. The activation pattern of macrophages in giant cell (temporal) arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihm, Bernhard; Bergmann, Markus; Brück, Wolfgang; Probst-Cousin, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    To determine if the pattern of macrophage activation reflects differences in the pathogenesis and clinical presentation of giant cell arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system, specimens of 10 patients with giant cell arteritis and five with primary angiitis of the central nervous system were immunohistochemically studied and the expression of the macrophage activation markers 27E10, MRP14, MRP8 and 25F9 was determined in the vasculitic infiltrates. Thus, a partly different expression pattern of macrophage activation markers in giant cell arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system was observed. The group comparison revealed that giant cell arteritis cases had significantly higher numbers of acute activated MRP14-positive macrophages, whereas primary angiitis of the central nervous system is characterized by a tendency toward more MRP8-positive intermediate/late activated macrophages. Furthermore, in giant cell arteritis comparably fewer CD8-positive lymphocytes were observed. These observations suggest, that despite their histopathological similarities, giant cell arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system appear to represent either distinct entities within the spectrum of granulomatous vasculitides or different stages of similar disease processes. Their discrete clinical presentation is reflected by different activation patterns of macrophages, which may characterize giant cell arteritis as a more acute process and primary angiitis of the central nervous system as a more advanced inflammatory process.

  19. ELECTRON BOMBARDMENT OF SILICON SOLAR CELLS,

    Science.gov (United States)

    DAMAGE, ELECTRON IRRADIATION, SOLAR CELLS , SILICON, PHOTOELECTRIC CELLS(SEMICONDUCTOR), QUARTZ, GLASS, SHIELDING, CRYSTAL DEFECTS, HEAT TREATMENT, ARTIFICIAL SATELLITES, SPACECRAFT, GRAPHICS, GRAPHICS.

  20. Immunological Demyelination Triggers Macrophage/Microglial Cells Activation without Inducing Astrogliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Cloutier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The glial scar formed by reactive astrocytes and axon growth inhibitors associated with myelin play important roles in the failure of axonal regeneration following central nervous system (CNS injury. Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that immunological demyelination of the CNS facilitates regeneration of severed axons following spinal cord injury. In the present study, we evaluate whether immunological demyelination is accompanied with astrogliosis. We compared the astrogliosis and macrophage/microglial cell responses 7 days after either immunological demyelination or a stab injury to the dorsal funiculus. Both lesions induced a strong activated macrophage/microglial cells response which was significantly higher within regions of immunological demyelination. However, immunological demyelination regions were not accompanied by astrogliosis compared to stab injury that induced astrogliosis which extended several millimeters above and below the lesions, evidenced by astroglial hypertrophy, formation of a glial scar, and upregulation of intermediate filaments glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. Moreover, a stab or a hemisection lesion directly within immunological demyelination regions did not induced astrogliosis within the immunological demyelination region. These results suggest that immunological demyelination creates a unique environment in which astrocytes do not form a glial scar and provides a unique model to understand the putative interaction between astrocytes and activated macrophage/microglial cells.

  1. Activating transcription factor 1 directs Mhem atheroprotective macrophages through coordinated iron handling and foam cell protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Joseph J; Johns, Michael; Kampfer, Theresa; Nguyen, Aivi T; Game, Laurence; Schaer, Dominik J; Mason, Justin C; Haskard, Dorian O

    2012-01-06

    Intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH) drives atherosclerosis through the dual metabolic stresses of cholesterol-enriched erythrocyte membranes and pro-oxidant heme/iron. When clearing tissue hemorrhage, macrophages are typically seen storing either iron or lipid. We have recently defined hemorrhage-associated macrophages (HA-mac) as a plaque macrophage population that responds adaptively to IPH. This study aimed to define the key transcription factor(s) involved in HO-1 induction by heme. To address this question, we used microarray analysis and transfection with siRNA and plasmids. To maintain physiological relevance, we focused on human blood-derived monocytes. We found that heme stimulates monocytes through induction of activating transcription factor 1 (ATF-1). ATF-1 coinduces heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and Liver X receptor beta (LXR-β). Heme-induced HO-1 and LXR-β were suppressed by knockdown of ATF-1, and HO-1 and LXR-β were induced by ATF-1 transfection. ATF-1 required phosphorylation for full functional activity. Expression of LXR-β in turn led to induction of other genes central to cholesterol efflux, such as LXR-α and ABCA1. This heme-directed state was distinct from known macrophage states (M1, M2, Mox) and, following the same format, we have designated them Mhem. These results show that ATF-1 mediates HO-1 induction by heme and drives macrophage adaptation to intraplaque hemorrhage. Our definition of an ATF-1-mediated pathway for linked protection from foam cell formation and oxidant stress may have therapeutic potential.

  2. Phenotypic and functional heterogeneity of macrophages and dendritic cell subsets in the healthy and atherosclerosis-prone aorta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V Galkina

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis continues to be the leading cause of cardiovascular disease. Development of atherosclerosis depends on chronic inflammation in the aorta and multiple immune cells are involved in this process. Importantly, resident macrophages and dendritic cells are present within the healthy aorta, but the functions of these cells remain poorly characterized. Local inflammation within the aortic wall promotes the recruitment of monocytes and dendritic cell precursors to the aorta and micro-environmental factors direct the differentiation of these emigrated cells into multiple subsets of macrophages and dendritic cells. Recent data suggest that several populations of macrophages and dendritic cells can co-exist within the aorta. Although the functions of M1, M2, Mox and M4 macrophages are well characterized in vitro, there is a limited set of data on the role of these populations in atherogenesis in vivo. Recent studies on the origin and the potential role of aortic dendritic cells provide novel insights into the biology of aortic dendritic cell subsets and prospective mechanisms of the immune response in atherosclerosis. This review integrates the results of experiments analyzing heterogeneity of dendritic cells and macrophage subsets in healthy and diseased vessels and briefly discusses the known and potential functions of these cells in atherogenesis.

  3. Dendritic cell and macrophage infiltration in microsatellite-unstable and microsatellite-stable colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Kathrin; Michel, Sara; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Nelius, Nina; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Kloor, Matthias

    2011-09-01

    High level microsatellite instability (MSI-H) is a hallmark of Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal cancer (CRC). MSI-H CRC express immunogenic tumour antigens as a consequence of DNA mismatch repair deficiency-induced frameshift mutations. Consequently, frameshift antigen-specific immune responses are commonly observed in patients with Lynch syndrome-associated MSI-H CRC. Dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages play a crucial role in the induction and modulation of immune responses. We here analysed DC and macrophage infiltration in MSI-H and microsatellite-stable CRC. Sixty-nine CRC (MSI-H, n = 33; microsatellite-stable, n = 36) were examined for the density of tumour-infiltrating DC, Foxp3-positive regulatory T cells, and CD163-positive macrophages. In MSI-H lesions, S100-positive and CD163-positive cell counts were significantly higher compared to microsatellite-stable lesions (S100: epithelium P = 0.018, stroma P = 0.042; CD163: epithelium P < 0.001, stroma P = 0.046). Additionally, numbers of CD208-positive mature DC were significantly elevated in the epithelial compartment of MSI-H CRC (P = 0.027). High numbers of tumour-infiltrating Foxp3-positive T cells were detected in tumours showing a low proportion of CD208-positive, mature DC among the total number of S100-positive cells. Our study demonstrates that infiltration with DC, mature DC, and macrophages is elevated in MSI-H compared to microsatellite-stable CRC. The positive correlation of Foxp3-positive Treg cell density with a low proportion of mature DC suggests that impaired DC maturation may contribute to local immune evasion in CRC. Our results demonstrate that DC and macrophages in the tumour environment likely play an important role in the induction of antigen-specific immune responses in Lynch syndrome. Moreover, impaired DC maturation might contribute to local immune evasion in CRC.

  4. The role of macrophages in the removal of apoptotic B-cells in the sheep ileal Peyer's patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhogal, Hardeep S; Kennedy, Laurie J; Babic, Kelly; Reynolds, John D

    2004-06-01

    In the process of generating the cells that populate the sheep's B-cell pool, the ileal Peyer's patch (PP) produces an immense number of B-cells and then destroys most of them by apoptosis. Rapid clearance of these apoptotic cells is essential for tissue homeostasis and for preventing pathology. Macrophages comprise a small percentage of cells in the follicles. They resemble macrophages found in other tissues and can be identified by the expression of MHC Class II and CD14. In this study, enriched macrophages co-cultured with apoptotic ileal PP cells showed increased DNA content as they ingested apoptotic cells. The higher the proportion of apoptotic cells in culture the greater the increase in DNA content of the macrophages. This occurred when B-cell apoptosis was initiated by a period in culture or in response to treating the animals with steroids. Thus, macrophages resident in the ileal PP follicle mediate the phagocytosis and removal of discarded B-cells.

  5. African swine fever virus infects macrophages, the natural host cells, via clathrin- and cholesterol-dependent endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, Inmaculada; Cuesta-Geijo, Miguel Angel; Hlavova, Karolina; Muñoz-Moreno, Raquel; Barrado-Gil, Lucía; Dominguez, Javier; Alonso, Covadonga

    2015-03-16

    The main cellular target for African swine fever virus (ASFV) is the porcine macrophage. However, existing data about the early phases of infection were previously characterized in non-leukocyte cells such as Vero cells. Here, we report that ASFV enters the natural host cell using dynamin-dependent and clathrin-mediated endocytosis. This pathway is strongly pH-dependent during the first steps of infection in porcine macrophages. We investigated the effect of drugs inhibiting several endocytic pathways in macrophages and compared ASFV with vaccinia virus (VV), which apparently involves different entry pathways. The presence of cholesterol in cellular membranes was found to be essential for a productive ASFV infection while actin-dependent endocytosis and the participation of phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) activity were other cellular factors required in the process of viral entry. These findings improved our understanding of the ASFV interactions with macrophages that allow for successful viral replication.

  6. Suppression of cell division-associated genes by Helicobacter pylori attenuates proliferation of RAW264.7 monocytic macrophage cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Grace Min Yi; Looi, Chung Yeng; Fernandez, Keith Conrad; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Loke, Mun Fai; Wong, Won Fen

    2015-06-16

    Helicobacter pylori at multiplicity of infection (MOI ≥ 50) have been shown to cause apoptosis in RAW264.7 monocytic macrophage cells. Because chronic gastric infection by H. pylori results in the persistence of macrophages in the host's gut, it is likely that H. pylori is present at low to moderate, rather than high numbers in the infected host. At present, the effect of low-MOI H. pylori infection on macrophage has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the genome-wide transcriptional regulation of H. pylori-infected RAW264.7 cells at MOI 1, 5 and 10 in the absence of cellular apoptosis. Microarray data revealed up- and down-regulation of 1341 and 1591 genes, respectively. The expression of genes encoding for DNA replication and cell cycle-associated molecules, including Aurora-B kinase (AurkB) were down-regulated. Immunoblot analysis verified the decreased expression of AurkB and downstream phosphorylation of Cdk1 caused by H. pylori infection. Consistently, we observed that H. pylori infection inhibited cell proliferation and progression through the G1/S and G2/M checkpoints. In summary, we suggest that H. pylori disrupts expression of cell cycle-associated genes, thereby impeding proliferation of RAW264.7 cells, and such disruption may be an immunoevasive strategy utilized by H. pylori.

  7. Stochastic differentiation into an osteoclast lineage from cloned macrophage-like cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Shin-Ichi, E-mail: shayashi@med.tottori-u.ac.jp [Division of Immunology, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, School of Life Science, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, 86 Nishi-Cho, Yonago, Tottori 683-8503 (Japan); Murata, Akihiko; Okuyama, Kazuki; Shimoda, Yuhki; Hikosaka, Mari [Division of Immunology, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, School of Life Science, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, 86 Nishi-Cho, Yonago, Tottori 683-8503 (Japan); Yasuda, Hisataka [Planning and Development, Bioindustry Division, Oriental Yeast Co., Ltd, Itabashi-Ku, Tokyo 174-8505 (Japan); Yoshino, Miya [Division of Immunology, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, School of Life Science, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, 86 Nishi-Cho, Yonago, Tottori 683-8503 (Japan)

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The frequency of C7 differentiation into osteoclast was low and constant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Only extended C7 cell cultures exponentially increased osteoclast+ cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C7 cell differentiation into committed osteoclast precursors is on 'autopilot'. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The system may maintain the stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. -- Abstract: Differentiation into osteoclasts is induced by a macrophage colony-stimulating factor and receptor activator of nuclear-factor {kappa}B ligand. The macrophage-like cell line, C7 has the potential to differentiate into osteoclasts when it is cultured with both factors for 6 days. Although C7 is an established cell line, the frequency of differentiation into this lineage was less than 10%, and the ratio was maintained at a constant level, even after repeated cloning. In this study, to increase the differentiation of C7 cells to osteoclasts, C7 derivative treatments with several activators and/or inhibitors were performed for 3 days prior to setting osteoclast induction analysis; however, a reagent to significantly up-regulate the frequency of differentiation was not found. Only extended cultures for osteoclastogenesis exponentially increased the frequency of osteoclast precursors. It is likely that C7 cell differentiation into committed osteoclast precursors is on 'autopilot' rather than requiring specific signals to drive this process.

  8. Effects of 1.5 T magnetic fields on cell cultures of macrophages and amniocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, C. [IBILI-Biomedical Institute for Research on Light and Image, Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, Azinhaga de Santa Comba, Celas 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Pinto, M. [Laboratorio Citogenetica, Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, Azinhaga de Santa Comba, Celas 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Caramelo, F. [IBILI-Biomedical Institute for Research on Light and Image, Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, Azinhaga de Santa Comba, Celas 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Pinto, A. [Servico de Imagiologia, Hospitais da Universidade de Coimbra, Av. Bissaya Barreto, 3000 Coimbra (Portugal); Pires, D.; Fernandes, H.; Duarte, I; Amaro, J.; Caldas, J.; Medeiros, J.; Inacio, R.; Lavrador, R.; Almeida, T. [Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Coimbra, Rua Larga da Universidade, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Caseiro-Alves, F. [Servico de Imagiologia, Hospitais da Universidade de Coimbra, Av. Bissaya Barreto, 3000 Coimbra (Portugal); Carreira, I [Laboratorio Citogenetica, Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, Azinhaga de Santa Comba, Celas 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Botelho, M.F. [IBILI-Biomedical Institute for Research on Light and Image, Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, Azinhaga de Santa Comba, Celas 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2009-05-15

    Magnetic resonance is frequently used to obtain medical images for diagnosis. To perform these exams high magnetic fields are applied, implying at least circa 10000 times the value of the Earth basal field (0.00003 to 0.00007 T). In our experimental study we used two different adherent types of cells (rat peritoneal macrophages and human amniocytes), cultured in standard conditions (37 C, 5% CO2) with adequate media in 6 wells plates. Three groups for each type of cell were established: control, head and body coil, being the irradiation performed with a MR System MAGNETON 1.5 T (University Hospital of Coimbra). Macrophages' cytotoxicity and viability were tested with the MTT1 assay 0, 12, 36, 60 and 84 hours post-irradiation, amniocytes viability and chromosome alteration were studied 3, 13, 37, 109, 205 hours post-irradiation. Irradiated macrophages presented slightly less viability and adhesion features compared to control, although no differences between the head and body coil were found. Amniocytes showed no significant differences amongst them. (author)

  9. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor promotes cell death and aggravates neurologic deficits after experimental stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inácio, Ana R; Ruscher, Karsten; Leng, Lin; Bucala, Richard; Deierborg, Tomas

    2011-04-01

    Multiple mechanisms contribute to tissue demise and functional recovery after stroke. We studied the involvement of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in cell death and development of neurologic deficits after experimental stroke. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor is upregulated in the brain after cerebral ischemia, and disruption of the Mif gene in mice leads to a smaller infarct volume and better sensory-motor function after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo). In mice subjected to tMCAo, we found that MIF accumulates in neurons of the peri-infarct region, particularly in cortical parvalbumin-positive interneurons. Likewise, in cultured cortical neurons exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation, MIF levels increase, and inhibition of MIF by (S,R)-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4,5-dihydro-5-isoxazole acetic acid methyl ester (ISO-1) protects against cell death. Deletion of MIF in Mif(-/-) mice does not affect interleukin-1β protein levels in the brain and serum after tMCAo. Furthermore, disruption of the Mif gene in mice does not affect CD68, but it is associated with higher galectin-3 immunoreactivity in the brain after tMCAo, suggesting that MIF affects the molecular/cellular composition of the macrophages/microglia response after experimental stroke. We conclude that MIF promotes neuronal death and aggravates neurologic deficits after experimental stroke, which implicates MIF in the pathogenesis of neuronal injury after stroke.

  10. Effect of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 on chemotactic gene expression by macrophage cell line U937

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BIAN Guang-xing; GUO Bao-yu; MIAO Hong; QIU Lei; CAO Dong-mei; DAO Shu-yan; ZHANG Ran

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the chemotactic superfamily genes expression profiling of macrophage line U937 treated with monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) using gene chip technique. Methods: Total RNA from macrophage line U937 (as control) and U937 with MCP-1 was extracted, made reverse transcript to cDNA and tested with gene expression chip HO2 human. Results: Some chemotactic-related gene expressions were changed in all analyzed genes. Regulated upon activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) was up-regulated over 2-fold and 7 chemotactic-related genes (CCR2, CCR5, CCL16, GROβ, GROγ, IL-8 and granulocyte chemotactic protein 2) were down-regulated over 2-fold inMCP-1 treated U937 cells at mRNA level. Conclusion: MCP-1 can influence some chemokines and receptors expression in macrophage in vitro, in which MCP-1 mainly down-regulates the chemotactic genes expression of those influencing neutrophilic granulocyte (GROβ, GROγ, IL-8 and granulocyte chemotactic protein 2). Another novel finding is that it can also down-regulate the mRNA level of CCR5, which plays a critical role in many disorders and illnesses.

  11. Modulating in vitro bone cell and macrophage behavior by immobilized enzymatically tailored pectins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussy, Cyrill; Verhoef, René; Haeger, Ash; Morra, Marco; Duval, Jean-Luc; Vigneron, Pascale; Bensoussan, Anne; Velzenberger, Elodie; Cascardo, Giovanna; Cassinelli, Clara; Schols, Henk; Knox, J Paul; Nagel, Marie-Danielle

    2008-09-01

    Previous work has reported the results of a multidisciplinary effort producing a proof-of-concept on the use of pectic polysaccharides in the surface modification of medical devices. This study was designed to learn more about the capability of engineered rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) fractions of apple pectin to control bone cell and macrophage behavior. Thermanox or polystyrene Petri dishes were surface modified with two different modified hairy regions (MHRs) obtained by different enzymatic liquefaction processes of apples differing in relative amounts and lengths of their neutral side chains: (long-haired) MHR-alpha and (short-haired) MHR-B. Bone explants from 14-day-old chick embryos were cultured for 14 days on both pectic substrata. MHR-B promoted cell migration and differentiation, MHR-alpha did not. On MHR-alpha, J774.2 macrophages grew well, their percentage in G1 phase was decreased and in S phase increased, and they did not secrete either proinflammatory-cytokines or nitrites. Contrasting results were gained from macrophages on MHR-B, except for nitrite secretion. Thus, we conclude that coatings from tailored pectins show different biological activities in vitro and are potential innovative candidates for improving the biocompatibility of medical devices in various applications.

  12. In vitro interactions between bacteria, osteoblast-like cells and macrophages in the pathogenesis of biomaterial-associated infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbiahdoss, Guruprakash; Fernández, Isabel C Saldarriaga; Domingues, Joana F da Silva; Kuijer, Roel; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2011-01-01

    Biomaterial-associated infections constitute a major clinical problem that is difficult to treat and often necessitates implant replacement. Pathogens can be introduced on an implant surface during surgery and compete with host cells attempting to integrate the implant. The fate of a biomaterial implant depends on the outcome of this race for the surface. Here we studied the competition between different bacterial strains and human U2OS osteoblast-like cells (ATCC HTB-94) for a poly(methylmethacrylate) surface in the absence or presence of macrophages in vitro using a peri-operative contamination model. Bacteria were seeded on the surface at a shear rate of 11 1/s prior to adhesion of U2OS cells and macrophages. Next, bacteria, U2OS cells and macrophages were allowed to grow simultaneously under low shear conditions (0.14 1/s). The outcome of the competition between bacteria and U2OS cells for the surface critically depended on bacterial virulence. In absence of macrophages, highly virulent Staphylococcus aureus or Pseudomonas aeruginosa stimulated U2OS cell death within 18 h of simultaneous growth on a surface. Moreover, these strains also caused cell death despite phagocytosis of adhering bacteria in presence of murine macrophages. Thus U2OS cells are bound to loose the race for a biomaterial surface against S. aureus or P. aeruginosa, even in presence of macrophages. In contrast, low-virulent Staphylococcus epidermidis did not cause U2OS cell death even after 48 h, regardless of the absence or presence of macrophages. Clinically, S. aureus and P. aeruginosa are known to yield acute and severe biomaterial-associated infections in contrast to S. epidermidis, mostly known to cause more low-grade infection. Thus it can be concluded that the model described possesses features concurring with clinical observations and therewith has potential for further studies on the simultaneous competition for an implant surface between tissue cells and pathogenic bacteria in

  13. Free cholesterol-induced cytotoxicity a possible contributing factor to macrophage foam cell necrosis in advanced atherosclerotic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabas, I

    1997-10-01

    A major characteristic of advanced atherosclerotic lesions is the necrotic, or lipid, core, which likely plays an important role in the clinical progression of these lesions. Recent data suggest that the necrotic core forms primarily as a consequence of macrophage foam cell necrosis. Lesional macrophages initially accumulate mostly cholesteryl esters, but macrophages in advanced lesions contain large amounts of unesterified, or free, cholesterol (FC). Although there are many theories as to why macrophage foam cells die in advanced lesions, the fact that a high FC:phospholipid (PL) ratio in cellular membranes can be toxic to cells suggests that FC-induced cytotoxicity may contribute to foam cell necrosis. The mechanism of FC cytotoxicity can be explained by disturbances in membrane protein function as a result of "stiffening" of the bilayer and by formation of intracellular FC crystals that can cause physical damage to cellular organelles. Macrophages appear to respond to FC loading by a fascinating adaptive response, namely the induction of PL biosynthesis, which initially keeps the cellular FC:PL ratio below toxic levels. Studies with cultured macrophages have demonstrated that a failure of this adaptive response leads to FC-induced foam cell cytotoxicity and necrosis, and thus a similar series of events in advanced atherosclerotic lesions could provide an explanation for the development of the necrotic core. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7: 256-263). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  14. THP-1-derived macrophages render lung epithelial cells hypo-responsive to Legionella pneumophila - a systems biology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Christine; Lai, Xin; Bertrams, Wilhelm; Jung, Anna Lena; Sittka-Stark, Alexandra; Herkt, Christina Elena; Janga, Harshavadhan; Zscheppang, Katja; Stielow, Christina; Schulte, Leon; Hippenstiel, Stefan; Vera, Julio; Schmeck, Bernd

    2017-09-20

    Immune response in the lung has to protect the huge alveolar surface against pathogens while securing the delicate lung structure. Macrophages and alveolar epithelial cells constitute the first line of defense and together orchestrate the initial steps of host defense. In this study, we analysed the influence of macrophages on type II alveolar epithelial cells during Legionella pneumophila-infection by a systems biology approach combining experimental work and mathematical modelling. We found that L. pneumophila-infected THP-1-derived macrophages provoke a pro-inflammatory activation of neighboring lung epithelial cells, but in addition render them hypo-responsive to direct infection with the same pathogen. We generated a kinetic mathematical model of macrophage activation and identified a paracrine mechanism of macrophage-secreted IL-1β inducing a prolonged IRAK-1 degradation in lung epithelial cells. This intercellular crosstalk may help to avoid an overwhelming inflammatory response by preventing excessive local secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and thereby negatively regulating the recruitment of immune cells to the site of infection. This suggests an important but ambivalent immunomodulatory role of macrophages in lung infection.

  15. The predominance of alternatively activated macrophages following challenge with cell wall peptide-polysaccharide after prior infection with Sporothrix schenckii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegranci, Pamela; de Abreu Ribeiro, Livia Carolina; Ferreira, Lucas Souza; Negrini, Thais de Cássia; Maia, Danielle Cardoso Geraldo; Tansini, Aline; Gonçalves, Amanda Costa; Placeres, Marisa Campos Polesi; Carlos, Iracilda Zeppone

    2013-08-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycosis that is caused by the dimorphic fungus Sporothrix schenckii. This disease generally occurs within the skin and subcutaneous tissues, causing lesions that can spread through adjacent lymphatic vessels and sometimes leading to systemic diseases in immunocompromised patients. Macrophages are crucial for proper immune responses against a variety of pathogens. Furthermore, macrophages can play different roles in response to different microorganisms and forms of activation, and they can be divided into "classic" or "alternatively" activated populations, as also known as M1 and M2 macrophages. M1 cells can lead to tissue injury and contribute to pathogenesis, whereas M2 cells promote angiogenesis, tissue remodeling, and repair. The aim of this study was to investigate the roles of M1 and M2 macrophages in a sporotrichosis model. Toward this end, we performed phenotyping of peritoneal exudate cells and evaluated the concomitant production of several immunomediators, including IL-12, IL-10, TGF-β, nitric oxide, and arginase-I activity, which were stimulated ex vivo with cell wall peptide-polysaccharide. Our results showed the predominance of the M2 macrophage population, indicated by peaks of arginase-I activity as well as IL-10 and TGF-β production during the 6th and 8th weeks after infection. These results were consistent with cellular phenotyping that revealed increases in CD206-positive cells over this period. This is the first report of the participation of M2 macrophages in sporotrichosis infections.

  16. Differential regulation of macropinocytosis in macrophages by cytokines: implications for foam cell formation and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Daryn R; Ashlin, Tim G; Davies, Charlotte S; Gallagher, Hayley; Stoneman, Thomas W; Buckley, Melanie L; Ramji, Dipak P

    2013-10-01

    A key event during the formation of lipid-rich foam cells during the progression of atherosclerosis is the uptake of modified low-density lipoproteins (LDL) by macrophages in response to atherogenic mediators in the arterial intima. In addition to scavenger receptor-dependent uptake of LDL, macropinocytosis is known to facilitate the uptake of LDL through the constitutive and passive internalization of large quantities of extracellular solute. In this study we confirm the ability of macropinocytosis to facilitate the uptake of modified LDL by human macrophages and show its modulation by TGF-β, IFN-γ, IL-17A and IL-33. Furthermore we show that the TGF-β-mediated inhibition of macropinocytosis is a Smad-2/-3-independent process.

  17. Tumor associated macrophages protect colon cancer cells from TRAIL-induced apoptosis through IL-1beta-dependent stabilization of Snail in tumor cells.

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    Pawan Kaler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We recently reported that colon tumor cells stimulate macrophages to release IL-1beta, which in turn inactivates GSK3beta and enhances Wnt signaling in colon cancer cells, generating a self-amplifying loop that promotes the growth of tumor cells. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe that macrophages protect HCT116 and Hke-3 colon cancer cells from TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Inactivation of IL-1beta by neutralizing IL-1beta antibody, or silencing of IL-1beta in macrophages inhibited their ability to counter TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Accordingly, IL-1beta was sufficient to inhibit TRAIL-induced apoptosis. TRAIL-induced collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential (Delta psi and activation of caspases were prevented by macrophages or by recombinant IL-1beta. Pharmacological inhibition of IL-1beta release from macrophages by vitamin D(3, a potent chemopreventive agent for colorectal cancer, restored the ability of TRAIL to induce apoptosis of tumor cells cultured with macrophages. Macrophages and IL-1beta failed to inhibit TRAIL-induced apoptosis in HCT116 cells expressing dnIkappaB, dnAKT or dnTCF4, confirming that they oppose TRAIL-induced cell death through induction of Wnt signaling in tumor cells. We showed that macrophages and IL-1beta stabilized Snail in tumor cells in an NF-kappaB/Wnt dependent manner and that Snail deficient tumor cells were not protected from TRAIL-induced apoptosis by macrophages or by IL-1beta, demonstrating a crucial role of Snail in the resistance of tumor cells to TRAIL. SIGNIFICANCE: We have identified a positive feedback loop between tumor cells and macrophages that propagates the growth and promotes the survival of colon cancer cells: tumor cells stimulate macrophages to secrete IL-1beta, which in turn, promotes Wnt signaling and stabilizes Snail in tumor cells, conferring resistance to TRAIL. Vitamin D(3 halts this amplifying loop by interfering with the release of IL-1beta from macrophages

  18. Radiation Therapy Induces Macrophages to Suppress T-Cell Responses Against Pancreatic Tumors in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Lena; Werba, Gregor; Tiwari, Shaun; Giao Ly, Nancy Ngoc; Nguy, Susanna; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Avanzi, Antonina; Daley, Donnele; Barilla, Rocky; Tippens, Daniel; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R; Hajdu, Cristina; Pellicciotta, Ilenia; Oh, Philmo; Du, Kevin; Miller, George

    2016-06-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the treatment of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is controversial. Randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced unresectable PDA have reported mixed results, with effects ranging from modest benefit to worse outcomes compared with control therapies. We investigated whether radiation causes inflammatory cells to acquire an immune-suppressive phenotype that limits the therapeutic effects of radiation on invasive PDAs and accelerates progression of preinvasive foci. We investigated the effects of radiation therapy in p48(Cre);LSL-Kras(G12D) (KC) and p48(Cre);LSLKras(G12D);LSL-Trp53(R172H) (KPC) mice, as well as in C57BL/6 mice with orthotopic tumors grown from FC1242 cells derived from KPC mice. Some mice were given neutralizing antibodies against macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1 or MCSF) or F4/80. Pancreata were exposed to doses of radiation ranging from 2 to 12 Gy and analyzed by flow cytometry. Pancreata of KC mice exposed to radiation had a higher frequency of advanced pancreatic intraepithelial lesions and more foci of invasive cancer than pancreata of unexposed mice (controls); radiation reduced survival time by more than 6 months. A greater proportion of macrophages from radiation treated invasive and preinvasive pancreatic tumors had an immune-suppressive, M2-like phenotype compared with control mice. Pancreata from mice exposed to radiation had fewer CD8(+) T cells than controls, and greater numbers of CD4(+) T cells of T-helper 2 and T-regulatory cell phenotypes. Adoptive transfer of T cells from irradiated PDA to tumors of control mice accelerated tumor growth. Radiation induced production of MCSF by PDA cells. A neutralizing antibody against MCSF prevented radiation from altering the phenotype of macrophages in tumors, increasing the anti-tumor T-cell response and slowing tumor growth. Radiation treatment causes macrophages

  19. Preliminary analysis of cellular sociology of co-cultured glioma initiating cells and macrophages in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingxia Zhang; Xingliang Dai; Xiaonan Li; Qiang Huang; Jun Dong; Junjie Chen; Lin Wang; Xiaoyan Ji; Lin Yang; Yujing Sheng; Hairui Liu; Haiyang Wang; Aidong Wang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:Real-time monitoring of cytokine secretion at the single immunocyte level, based on the concept of immune cells, sociology has been recently reported. However, the relationships between glioma-initiating cells (GICs) and host immune cells and their mutual interactions in the tumor microenvironment have not been directly observed and remain unclear. Methods:The dual fluorescence tracing technique was applied to label the co-cultured GICs and host macrophages (Mø), and the interactions between the two types of cells were observed using a live cell imaging system. Fusion cells in the co-culture system were monocloned and proliferated in vitro and their social interactions were observed and recorded. Results:Using real-time dynamic observation of target cells, 6 types of intercellular conjunction microtubes were found to function in the transfer of intercellular information between GICs and Mø;GICs and host Mø can fuse into hybrid cells after several rounds of mutual interactions, and then these fusion cells fused with each other;Fusion cells generated offspring cells through symmetrical and asymmetrical division or underwent apoptosis. A“cell in cell” phenomenon was observed in the fusion cells, which was often followed by cell release, namely entosis. Conclusions:Preliminary studies revealed the patterns of cell conjunction via microtubes between GICs and host Mø and the processes of cell fusion, division, and entosis. The results revealed malignant transformation of host Mø, induced by GICs, suggesting complex social relationships among tumor-immune cells in gliomas.

  20. Tumor cell-macrophage interactions increase angiogenesis through secretion of EMMPRIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bat-Chen eAmit-Cohen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Tumor macrophages are generally considered to be alternatively/M2 activated to induce secretion of pro-angiogenic factors such as VEGF and MMPs. EMMPRIN (CD147, basigin is overexpressed in many tumor types, and has been shown to induce fibroblasts and endothelial cell expression of MMPs and VEGF. We first show that tumor cell interactions with macrophages resulted in increased expression of EMMPRIN and induction of MMP-9 and VEGF. Human A498 renal carcinoma or MCF-7 breast carcinoma cell lines were co-cultured with the U937 monocytic-like cell line in the presence of TNFalpha (1 ng/ml. Membranal EMMPRIN expression was increased in the co-cultures (by 3-4 folds, p<0.01, as was the secretion of MMP-9 and VEGF (by 2-5 folds for both MMP-9 and VEGF, p<0.01, relative to the single cultures with TNFalpha. Investigating the regulatory mechanisms, we show that EMMPRIN was post-translationally regulated by miR-146a, as no change was observed in the tumoral expression of EMMPRIN mRNA during co-culture, expression of miR-146a was increased and its neutralization by its antagomir inhibited EMMPRIN expression. The secretion of EMMPRIN was also enhanced (by 2-3 folds, p<0.05, only in the A498 co-culture via shedding off of the membranal protein by a serine protease that is yet to be identified, as demonstrated by the use of wide range protease inhibitors. Finally, soluble EMMPRIN enhanced monocytic secretion of MMP-9 and VEGF, as inhibition of its expression levels by neutralizing anti-EMMPRIN or siRNA in the tumor cells lead to subsequent decreased induction of these two pro-angiogenic proteins. These results reveal a mechanism whereby tumor cell-macrophage interactions promote angiogenesis via an EMMPRIN-mediated pathway.

  1. Effects of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid on prostate cancer cell migration and invasion induced by tumor-associated macrophages.

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    Cheng-Chung Li

    Full Text Available Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA are the major n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs in fish oil that decrease the risk of prostate cancer. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs are the main leukocytes of intratumoral infiltration, and increased TAMs correlates with poor prostate cancer prognosis. However, the mechanism of n-3 PUFAs on prostate cancer cell progression induced by TAMs is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of EPA and DHA on modulating of migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells induced by TAMs-like M2-type macrophages. PC-3 prostate cancer cells were pretreated with EPA, DHA, or the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-γ antagonist, GW9662, before exposure to conditioned medium (CM. CM was derived from M2-polarized THP-1 macrophages. The migratory and invasive abilities of PC-3 cells were evaluated using a coculture system of M2-type macrophages and PC-3 cells. EPA/DHA administration decreased migration and invasion of PC-3 cells. The PPAR-γ DNA-binding activity and cytosolic inhibitory factor κBα (IκBα protein expression increased while the nuclear factor (NF-κB p65 transcriptional activity and nuclear NF-κB p65 protein level decreased in PC-3 cells incubated with CM in the presence of EPA/DHA. Further, EPA/DHA downregulated mRNA expressions of matrix metalloproteinase-9, cyclooxygenase-2, vascular endothelial growth factor, and macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Pretreatment with GW9662 abolished the favorable effects of EPA/DHA on PC-3 cells. These results indicate that EPA/DHA administration reduced migration, invasion and macrophage chemotaxis of PC-3 cells induced by TAM-like M2-type macrophages, which may partly be explained by activation of PPAR-γ and decreased NF-κB p65 transcriptional activity.

  2. Recruitment of CCR6-expressing Th17 cells by CCL20 secreted from plasmin-stimulated macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qun Li; Yves Laumonnier; Tatiana Syrovets; Thomas Simmet

    2013-01-01

    In the present study,monocyte-derived human macrophages were differentiated from buffy coats.Na(i)ve CD4+ T-cells enriched from peripheral blood mononuclear cells using anti-CD4 magnetic beads and the autoMACS separation system were polarized under T-helper 17 (Th17)-promoting conditions for 6 days to get Th17 cells.The frequency of Th17 cell differentiation and the expression of C-C chemokine receptor type 6 (CCR6) on Th17 cells were investigated by flow cytometry.Plasmin-triggered induction of macrophage inflammatory protein-3alpha/C-C chemokine ligand 20 (CCL20) genes in macrophages was assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction,and secreted protein levels were measured by enzymelinked immunosorbent assay.Th17 cell migration induced by CCL20 secreted from plasmin-stimulated macrophages was tested in vitro by chemotaxis using a transwell system.These results demonstrate that plasmin triggers the expression of chemokine CCL20 messenger RNA and the release of CCL20 protein in human monocyte-derived macrophages,which critically depend on the proteolytic activity of plasmin and activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-kappaB signaling pathways.Expression of CCR6 was detected on 87.23 ± 8.6% of Th17 cells in vitro.Similar to chemotaxis triggered by recombinant human CCL20,supernatants collected from plasmin-stimulated macrophage-induced chemotactic migration of Th17 cells,which could be inhibited by an anti-CCL20 neutralizing antibody.These results suggest that plasmin generated in inflamed tissues might elicit production of chemokine CCL20 by human macrophages leading to the recruitmentof CCR6 positive Th17 cells to the inflammatory sites.

  3. Identification of cell surface receptors for murine macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, K O; Zhou, Z; Kim, K K; Samanta, H; Fraser, M; Kim, Y J; Broxmeyer, H E; Kwon, B S

    1991-11-01

    We have produced recombinant proteins for a cytokine, L2G25BP (macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha) (MIP-1 alpha). By using the recombinant protein (rMIP-1 alpha), receptors for MIP-1 alpha were identified on Con A-stimulated and unstimulated CTLL-R8, a T cell line, and LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7, a macrophage cell line. The 125I-rMIP-1 alpha binds to the receptor in a specific and saturable manner. Scatchard analysis indicated a single class of high affinity receptor, with a Kd of approximately 1.5 x 10(-9) M and approximately 1200 binding sites/Con A-stimulated CTLL-R8 cell and a Kd of 0.9 x 10(-9) M and approximately 380 binding sites/RAW 264.7 cell. 125I-rMIP-1 alpha binding was inhibited by unlabeled rMIP-1 alpha in a dose-dependent manner, but not by IL-1 alpha or IL-2. rMIP-1 alpha inhibited the proliferation of unstimulated CTLL-R8 cells. Rabbit anti-rMIP-1 alpha antibodies blocked the growth-inhibitory effect of the rMIP-1 alpha on CTLL-R8 cells.

  4. Role of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) in human granulosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Song; Zhang, Zhifen; Xia, Li-Xia; Huang, Jian

    2016-12-01

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) has been proved to have a positive role in the follicular development. We investigated its effect on human granulosa cells and found that M-CSF could stimulate the production of E2. The production of FSH receptors was enhanced by M-CSF in vitro in a dose-dependent manner with or without the addition of tamoxifen (p M-CSF and its receptor (p M-CSF (p M-CSF has a role in regulating the response of granulosa cells to gonadotropins. Its function is associated with JAK/STAT-signaling pathway.

  5. Large-Scale Hematopoietic Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Provides Granulocytes or Macrophages for Cell Replacement Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Lachmann

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-3 (IL-3 is capable of supporting the proliferation of a broad range of hematopoietic cell types, whereas granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF and macrophage CSF (M-CSF represent critical cytokines in myeloid differentiation. When this was investigated in a pluripotent-stem-cell-based hematopoietic differentiation model, IL-3/G-CSF or IL-3/M-CSF exposure resulted in the continuous generation of myeloid cells from an intermediate myeloid-cell-forming complex containing CD34+ clonogenic progenitor cells for more than 2 months. Whereas IL-3/G-CSF directed differentiation toward CD45+CD11b+CD15+CD16+CD66b+ granulocytic cells of various differentiation stages up to a segmented morphology displaying the capacity of cytokine-directed migration, respiratory burst response, and neutrophil-extracellular-trap formation, exposure to IL-3/M-CSF resulted in CD45+CD11b+CD14+CD163+CD68+ monocyte/macrophage-type cells capable of phagocytosis and cytokine secretion. Hence, we show here that myeloid specification of human pluripotent stem cells by IL-3/G-CSF or IL-3/M-CSF allows for prolonged and large-scale production of myeloid cells, and thus is suited for cell-fate and disease-modeling studies as well as gene- and cell-therapy applications.

  6. Cerebral regulatory T cells restrain microglia/macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses via IL-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Luokun; Choudhury, Gourav Roy; Winters, Ali; Yang, Shao-Hua; Jin, Kunlin

    2014-01-01

    Forkhead box P3 (Foxp3)+ regulatory T (Treg) cells maintain the immune tolerance and prevent inflammatory responses in the periphery. However, the presence of Treg cells in the central nervous system under steady state has not been studied. Here, for the first time, we show a substantial TCRαβ+CD4+Foxp3+ T-cell population (cerebral Treg cells) in the normal rat cerebrum, constituting more than 15% of the cerebral CD4+ T-cell compartment. Cerebral Treg cells showed an activated/memory phenotype and expressed many Treg-cell signature genes at higher levels than peripheral Treg cells. Consistent with their activated/memory phenotype, cerebral Treg cells robustly restrained the LPS-induced inflammatory responses of brain microglia/macrophages, suggesting a role in maintaining the cerebral homeostasis by inhibiting the neuroinflammation. In addition, brain astrocytes were the helper cells that sustained Foxp3 expression in Treg cells through IL-2/STAT5 signaling, showing that the interaction between astrocytes and Treg cells contributes to the maintenance of Treg-cell identity in the brain. Taken together, our work represents the first study to characterize the phenotypic and functional features of Treg cells in the normal rat cerebrum. Our data have provided a novel insight for the contribution of Treg cells to the immunosurveillance and immunomodulation in the cerebrum under steady state. PMID:25329858

  7. Involvement of formyl peptide receptors in the stimulatory effect of crotoxin on macrophages co-cultivated with tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, E S; Faiad, O J; Landgraf, R G; Ferreira, A K; Brigatte, P; Curi, R; Cury, Y; Sampaio, S C

    2013-11-01

    Crotoxin (CTX) is the main neurotoxic component of Crotalus durissus terrificus snake venom. It inhibits tumour growth and modulates the function of macrophages, which are essential cells in the tumour microenvironment. The present study investigated the effect of CTX on the secretory activity of monocultured macrophages and macrophages co-cultivated with LLC-WRC 256 cells. The effect of the macrophage secretory activities on tumour cell proliferation was also evaluated. Macrophages pre-treated with CTX (0.3 μg/mL) for 2 h were co-cultivated with LLC-WRC 256 cells, and the secretory activity of the macrophages was determined after 12, 24 and 48 h. The co-cultivation of CTX-treated macrophages with the tumour cells caused a 20% reduction in tumour cell proliferation. The production of both H2O2 and NO was increased by 41% and 29% after 24 or 48 h of co-cultivation, respectively, compared to the values for the co-cultures of macrophages of control. The level of secreted IL-1β increased by 3.7- and 3.2-fold after 12 h and 24 h of co-cultivation, respectively. Moreover, an increased level of LXA4 (25%) was observed after 24 h of co-cultivation, and a 2.3- and 2.1-fold increased level of 15-epi-LXA4 was observed after 24 h and 48 h, respectively. Boc-2, a selective antagonist of formyl peptide receptors, blocked both the stimulatory effect of CTX on the macrophage secretory activity and the inhibitory effect of these cells on tumour cell proliferation. Taken together, these results indicate that CTX enhanced the secretory activity of macrophages, which may contribute to the antitumour activity of these cells, and that activation of formyl peptide receptors appears to play a major role in this effect.

  8. Macrophage and T cell dynamics during the development and disintegration of mycobacterial granulomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egen, Jackson G; Rothfuchs, Antonio Gigliotti; Feng, Carl G; Winter, Nathalie; Sher, Alan; Germain, Ronald N

    2008-02-01

    Granulomas play a key role in host protection against mycobacterial pathogens, with their breakdown contributing to exacerbated disease. To better understand the initiation and maintenance of these structures, we employed both high-resolution multiplex static imaging and intravital multiphoton microscopy of Mycobacterium bovis BCG-induced liver granulomas. We found that Kupffer cells directly capture blood-borne bacteria and subsequently nucleate formation of a nascent granuloma by recruiting both uninfected liver-resident macrophages and blood-derived monocytes. Within the mature granuloma, these myeloid cell populations formed a relatively immobile cellular matrix that interacted with a highly dynamic effector T cell population. The efficient recruitment of these T cells was highly dependent on TNF-alpha-derived signals, which also maintained the granuloma structure through preferential effects on uninfected macrophage populations. By characterizing the migration of both innate and adaptive immune cells throughout the process of granuloma development, these studies provide a new perspective on the cellular events involved in mycobacterial containment and escape.

  9. Impact of the histone deacetylase inhibitor 4-phenylbutyrate on the clearance of apoptotic pancreatic carcinoma cells by human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Lena; Welsch, Thilo; Dovzhanskiy, Dmitriy I; Felix, Klaus; Giese, Nathalia A; Krysko, Dmitri V; Werner, Jens

    2012-02-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors have been found to have potent anticancer activities, partly induced by tumour cell apoptosis. The clearance of apoptotic tumour cells is an important mechanism of antitumour immune surveillance. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PB) and its immunological effects on the macrophage clearance of apoptotic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells. To this end, a co-culture system of human macrophages from donors and PDAC patients, and PDAC cell lines (T3M4, PANC-1 and AsPC-1) was established to study the effect of 4-PB. Apoptosis and phagocytic activity were analysed using flow cytometry, and phagocytosis was confirmed by confocal microscopy. Further, p21 expression was quantified by immunoblot analysis. 4-PB treatment (0-10 mM) resulted in a dose-dependent induction of tumour cell apoptosis in two of the cell lines (T3M4 and PANC-1), but it also induced human macrophage apoptosis. The apoptotic effect of gemcitabine on PDAC cells was further enhanced by 4-PB. Moreover, 4-PB led to a dose-dependent overexpression of the cell cycle regulator p21 in tumour cells. In co-culture, apoptotic PDAC cells were phagocytosed by donor macrophages and phagocytosis was increased through tumour cell exposure to 4-PB and/or gemcitabine, whereas phagocytosis of PANC-1 cells was reduced using macrophages of PDAC patients treated with 4-PB. The 4-PB treatment induced human macrophage expression of the pro-angiogenic IL-8 and simultaneously inhibited inflammatory cytokine release through modulation of IL-10 and TNFα after phagocytosis of apoptotic PDAC cells. In conclusion, the 4-PB treatment activated tumour cell death in PDAC cells, resulting in tumour cell phagocytosis by macrophages. The latter were characterized by an anti-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic cytokine response demonstrating adverse, tumour-promoting effects of macrophages on tumour cells. Thus, the potential of 4-PB as an anticancer agent against

  10. Macrophages in T cell/histiocyte rich large B cell lymphoma strongly express metal-binding proteins and show a bi-activated phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Sylvia; Tousseyn, Thomas; Döring, Claudia; Flüchter, Patricia; Hackstein, Holger; Herreman, An; Ponzoni, Maurilio; de Wolf-Peeters, Chris; Facchetti, Fabio; Gascoyne, Randy D; Küppers, Ralf; Steidl, Christian; Hansmann, Martin-Leo

    2013-12-01

    Abundant macrophage infiltration in tumors often correlates with a poor prognosis. T cell/histiocyte rich large B cell lymphoma (THRLBCL) is a distinct aggressive B cell lymphoma entity showing a high macrophage content. To further elucidate the role of tumor-associated macrophages in THRLBCL, we performed gene expression profiling of microdissected histiocyte subsets of THRLBCL, nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL), Piringer lymphadenitis, sarcoidosis, nonspecific lymphadenitis and monocytes from peripheral blood. In a supervised principal component analysis, histiocytes from THRLBCL were most closely related to epithelioid cells from NLPHL, with both types of cells expressing genes related to proinflammatory and regulatory macrophage activity. Moreover, histiocytes from THRLBCL strongly expressed metal-binding proteins like MT2A, by which histiocytes of THRLBCL can be distinguished from the other histiocyte subsets investigated. Interestingly, the validation at the protein level showed a strong expression of TXN, CXCL9, MT2A and SOD2 not only in macrophages of THRLBCL but also in the tumor cells of NLPHL and classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL). Overall, the present findings indicate that macrophages in the microenvironment of THRLBCL have acquired a distinct gene expression pattern that is characterized by a mixed M1/M2 phenotype and a strong expression of several metal binding proteins. The microenvironments in NLPHL and THRLBCL appear to have a similar influence on the macrophage phenotype. The high expression of metal binding proteins in histiocytes of THRLBCL may be diagnostically useful, but a potential pathophysiological role remains to be identified.

  11. 3D correlative light and electron microscopy of cultured cells using serial blockface scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Thomas R.; Burden, Jemima J.; Nkwe, David O.; Pelchen-Matthews, Annegret; Domart, Marie-Charlotte; Durgan, Joanne; Weston, Anne; Jones, Martin L.; Peddie, Christopher J.; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Florey, Oliver; Marsh, Mark; Gutierrez, Maximiliano G.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The processes of life take place in multiple dimensions, but imaging these processes in even three dimensions is challenging. Here, we describe a workflow for 3D correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) of cell monolayers using fluorescence microscopy to identify and follow biological events, combined with serial blockface scanning electron microscopy to analyse the underlying ultrastructure. The workflow encompasses all steps from cell culture to sample processing, imaging strategy, and 3D image processing and analysis. We demonstrate successful application of the workflow to three studies, each aiming to better understand complex and dynamic biological processes, including bacterial and viral infections of cultured cells and formation of entotic cell-in-cell structures commonly observed in tumours. Our workflow revealed new insight into the replicative niche of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in primary human lymphatic endothelial cells, HIV-1 in human monocyte-derived macrophages, and the composition of the entotic vacuole. The broad application of this 3D CLEM technique will make it a useful addition to the correlative imaging toolbox for biomedical research. PMID:27445312

  12. 3D correlative light and electron microscopy of cultured cells using serial blockface scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Matthew R G; Lerner, Thomas R; Burden, Jemima J; Nkwe, David O; Pelchen-Matthews, Annegret; Domart, Marie-Charlotte; Durgan, Joanne; Weston, Anne; Jones, Martin L; Peddie, Christopher J; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Florey, Oliver; Marsh, Mark; Gutierrez, Maximiliano G; Collinson, Lucy M

    2017-01-01

    The processes of life take place in multiple dimensions, but imaging these processes in even three dimensions is challenging. Here, we describe a workflow for 3D correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) of cell monolayers using fluorescence microscopy to identify and follow biological events, combined with serial blockface scanning electron microscopy to analyse the underlying ultrastructure. The workflow encompasses all steps from cell culture to sample processing, imaging strategy, and 3D image processing and analysis. We demonstrate successful application of the workflow to three studies, each aiming to better understand complex and dynamic biological processes, including bacterial and viral infections of cultured cells and formation of entotic cell-in-cell structures commonly observed in tumours. Our workflow revealed new insight into the replicative niche of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in primary human lymphatic endothelial cells, HIV-1 in human monocyte-derived macrophages, and the composition of the entotic vacuole. The broad application of this 3D CLEM technique will make it a useful addition to the correlative imaging toolbox for biomedical research. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Leishmania Donovani Cell Surface Sialoglycans Regulate Susceptibility for Siglec Mediated Macrophage Invasion and Parasite Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripti De

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Glycoconjugates play a pivotal role in the survival of Leishmania parasites in destructive surroundings. An important constituent present on many glycoconjugates is sialic acid. By virtue of their peripheral position on oligosaccharide chains of glycoconjugates, sialic acids are well suited as molecular determinants of specific biological processes, including the interaction of pathogenic microorganisms with sialylated cellular receptors. Differences in a2,3- and a2,6-sialoglycan patterns detected in clonal virulent Leishmania donovani promastigotes, correlated with the level of a2,3- and a2,6-sialyltransferase activity present in these parasites. The role of macrophage sialic acid-receptors in uptake and survival of L.donovani was studied in the murine macrophage cell line raw 264.7. Macrophage invasion was dependent on the binding to Siglec-1, while suppression of MAPK signaling was mediated through Siglec-5. Sialic acid removal by neuraminidase treatment reduced parasite infectivity. The presence of trypsin resistant sialic acid residues in the neuraminidase treated parasites grown in a serum free medium in presence of sialoglycoconjugates indicated that the parasites could salvage sialic acid from exogenous sialoglycans and reutilize it for de novo glycoprotein sialylation in L.donovani parasites. Thus, our results demonstrate the involvement of sialoglycans in the invasion as well as the survival process of L.donovani parasites.

  14. Myelopoietic Efficacy of Orlistat in Murine Hosts Bearing T Cell Lymphoma: Implication in Macrophage Differentiation and Activation

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Orlistat, an inhibitor of fatty acid synthase (FASN), acts as an antitumor agent by blocking de novo fatty acid synthesis of tumor cells. Although, myelopoiesis also depends on de novo fatty acid synthesis, the effect of orlistat on differentiation of macrophages, which play a central role in host's antitumor defence, remains unexplored in a tumor-bearing host. Therefore, the present investigation was undertaken to examine the effect of orlistat administration on macrophage differentiation in...

  15. The balance of apoptotic and necrotic cell death in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infected macrophages is not dependent on bacterial virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E Butler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An important mechanism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis pathogenesis is the ability to control cell death pathways in infected macrophages: apoptotic cell death is bactericidal, whereas necrotic cell death may facilitate bacterial dissemination and transmission. METHODS: We examine M.tuberculosis control of spontaneous and chemically induced macrophage cell death using automated confocal fluorescence microscopy, image analysis, flow cytometry, plate-reader based vitality assays, and M.tuberculosis strains including H37Rv, and isogenic virulent and avirulent strains of the Beijing lineage isolate GC1237. RESULTS: We show that bacterial virulence influences the dynamics of caspase activation and the total level of cytotoxicity. We show that the powerful ability of M.tuberculosis to inhibit exogenously stimulated apoptosis is abrogated by loss of virulence. However, loss of virulence did not influence the balance of macrophage apoptosis and necrosis--both virulent and avirulent isogenic strains of GC1237 induced predominantly necrotic cell death compared to H37Rv which induced a higher relative level of apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS: This reveals that macrophage necrosis and apoptosis are independently regulated during M. tuberculosis infection of macrophages. Virulence affects the level of host cell death and ability to inhibit apoptosis but other strain-specific characteristics influence the ultimate mode of host cell death and alter the balance of apoptosis and necrosis.

  16. Macrophage-Induced Blood Vessels Guide Schwann Cell-Mediated Regeneration of Peripheral Nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattin, Anne-Laure; Burden, Jemima J; Van Emmenis, Lucie; Mackenzie, Francesca E; Hoving, Julian J A; Garcia Calavia, Noelia; Guo, Yanping; McLaughlin, Maeve; Rosenberg, Laura H; Quereda, Victor; Jamecna, Denisa; Napoli, Ilaria; Parrinello, Simona; Enver, Tariq; Ruhrberg, Christiana; Lloyd, Alison C

    2015-08-27

    The peripheral nervous system has remarkable regenerative capacities in that it can repair a fully cut nerve. This requires Schwann cells to migrate collectively to guide regrowing axons across a 'bridge' of new tissue, which forms to reconnect a severed nerve. Here we show that blood vessels direct the migrating cords of Schwann cells. This multicellular process is initiated by hypoxia, selectively sensed by macrophages within the bridge, which via VEGF-A secretion induce a polarized vasculature that relieves the hypoxia. Schwann cells then use the blood vessels as "tracks" to cross the bridge taking regrowing axons with them. Importantly, disrupting the organization of the newly formed blood vessels in vivo, either by inhibiting the angiogenic signal or by re-orienting them, compromises Schwann cell directionality resulting in defective nerve repair. This study provides important insights into how the choreography of multiple cell-types is required for the regeneration of an adult tissue.

  17. Spiral Ganglion Cells and Macrophages Initiate Neuro-inflammation and Scarring Following Cochlear Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esperanza eBas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Conservation of a patient’s residual hearing and prevention of fibrous tissue/new bone formation around an electrode array are some of the major challenges in cochlear implant (CI surgery. Although it is well known that fibrotic tissue formation around the electrode array can interfere with hearing performance in implanted patients, and that associated intracochlear inflammation can initiate loss of residual hearing, little is known about the molecular and cellular mechanisms that promote this response in the cochlea. In vitro studies in neonatal rats and in vivo studies in adult mice were performed to gain insight into the pro-inflammatory, proliferative, and remodeling phases of pathological wound healing that occur in the cochlea following an electrode analogue insertion. Resident Schwann cells, macrophages/microglia, and fibroblasts had a prominent role in the inflammatory process in the cochlea. Leukocytes were recruited to the cochlea following insertion of a nylon filament in adult mice, where contributed to the inflammatory response. The reparative stages in wound healing are characterized by persistent neuro-inflammation of spiral ganglion neurons and expression of regenerative macrophages in the cochlea. Accordingly, genes involved in extracellular matrix deposition and remodeling were up-regulated in implanted cochleae.Maturation of scar tissue occurs in the remodeling phase of wound healing in the cochlea. Similar to other damaged peripheral nerves, M2 macrophages and de-differentiated Schwann cells were observed in damaged cochleae and may play a role in cell survival and axonal regeneration. In conclusion, the insertion of an electrode analogue into the cochlea is associated with robust early and chronic inflammatory responses characterized by recruitment of leukocytes and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines that promote intracochlear fibrosis and loss of auditory hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons important for hearing

  18. Isolation of human monocytes by double gradient centrifugation and their differentiation to macrophages in teflon-coated cell culture bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menck, Kerstin; Behme, Daniel; Pantke, Mathias; Reiling, Norbert; Binder, Claudia; Pukrop, Tobias; Klemm, Florian

    2014-09-09

    Human macrophages are involved in a plethora of pathologic processes ranging from infectious diseases to cancer. Thus they pose a valuable tool to understand the underlying mechanisms of these diseases. We therefore present a straightforward protocol for the isolation of human monocytes from buffy coats, followed by a differentiation procedure which results in high macrophage yields. The technique relies mostly on commonly available lab equipment and thus provides a cost and time effective way to obtain large quantities of human macrophages. Briefly, buffy coats from healthy blood donors are subjected to a double density gradient centrifugation to harvest monocytes from the peripheral blood. These monocytes are then cultured in fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) Teflon-coated cell culture bags in the presence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). The differentiated macrophages can be easily harvested and used for subsequent studies and functional assays. Important methods for quality control and validation of the isolation and differentiation steps will be highlighted within the protocol. In summary, the protocol described here enables scientists to routinely and reproducibly isolate human macrophages without the need for cost intensive tools. Furthermore, disease models can be studied in a syngeneic human system circumventing the use of murine macrophages.

  19. Mycobacterium avium MAV2052 protein induces apoptosis in murine macrophage cells through Toll-like receptor 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang-In; Choi, Han-Gyu; Son, Yeo-Jin; Whang, Jake; Kim, Kwangwook; Jeon, Heat Sal; Park, Hye-Soo; Back, Yong Woo; Choi, Seunga; Kim, Seong-Woo; Choi, Chul Hee; Kim, Hwa-Jung

    2016-04-01

    Mycobacterium avium and its sonic extracts induce apoptosis in macrophages. However, little is known about the M. avium components regulating macrophage apoptosis. In this study, using multidimensional fractionation, we identified MAV2052 protein, which induced macrophage apoptosis in M. avium culture filtrates. The recombinant MAV2052 induced macrophage apoptosis in a caspase-dependent manner. The loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm), mitochondrial translocation of Bax, and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria were observed in macrophages treated with MAV2052. Further, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was required for the apoptosis induced by MAV2052. In addition, ROS and mitogen-activated protein kinases were involved in MAV2052-mediated TNF-α and IL-6 production. ROS-mediated activation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1)-JNK pathway was a major signaling pathway for MAV2052-induced apoptosis. Moreover, MAV2052 bound to Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 molecule and MAV2052-induced ROS production, ΔΨm loss, and apoptosis were all significantly reduced in TLR4(-/-) macrophages. Altogether, our results suggest that MAV2052 induces apoptotic cell death through TLR4 dependent ROS production and JNK pathway in murine macrophages.

  20. Macrophage Interaction with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Yeast Cells Modulates Fungal Metabolism and Generates a Response to Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente-Rocha, Juliana Alves; Parente, Ana Flávia Alves; Baeza, Lilian Cristiane; Bonfim, Sheyla Maria Rondon Caixeta; Hernandez, Orville; McEwen, Juan G.; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Taborda, Carlos Pelleschi; Borges, Clayton Luiz; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are key players during Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection. However, the relative contribution of the fungal response to counteracting macrophage activity remains poorly understood. In this work, we evaluated the P. brasiliensis proteomic response to macrophage internalization. A total of 308 differentially expressed proteins were detected in P. brasiliensis during infection. The positively regulated proteins included those involved in alternative carbon metabolism, such as enzymes involved in gluconeogenesis, beta-oxidation of fatty acids and amino acids catabolism. The down-regulated proteins during P. brasiliensis internalization in macrophages included those related to glycolysis and protein synthesis. Proteins involved in the oxidative stress response in P. brasiliensis yeast cells were also up-regulated during macrophage infection, including superoxide dismutases (SOD), thioredoxins (THX) and cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP). Antisense knockdown mutants evaluated the importance of CCP during macrophage infection. The results suggested that CCP is involved in a complex system of protection against oxidative stress and that gene silencing of this component of the antioxidant system diminished the survival of P. brasiliensis in macrophages and in a murine model of infection. PMID:26360774

  1. Exosomes contribute to the transmission of anti-HIV activity from TLR3-activated brain microvascular endothelial cells to macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li; Wang, Xu; Zhou, Yu; Zhou, Run-Hong; Ho, Wen-Zhe; Li, Jie-Liang

    2017-01-01

    Human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs), the major cell type in the blood-brain barrier (BBB), play a key role in maintaining brain homeostasis. However, their role in the BBB innate immunity against HIV invasion of the central nervous system (CNS) remains to be determined. Our early work showed that TLR3 signaling of HBMECs could produce the antiviral factors that inhibit HIV replication in macrophages. The present study examined whether exosomes from TLR3-activated HBMECs mediate the intercellular transfer of antiviral factors to macrophages. Primary human macrophages could take up exosomes from TLR3-activated HBMECs. HBMECs-derived exosomes contained multiple antiviral factors, including several key IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs; ISG15, ISG56, and Mx2) at mRNA and protein levels. The depletion of exosomes from TLR3-activated HBMECs culture supernatant diminished HBMECs-mediated anti-HIV activity in macrophages. In conclusion, we demonstrate that exosomes shed by HBMECs are able to transport the antiviral molecules to macrophages. This finding suggests the possibility that HIV nonpermissive BBB cells (HBMECs) can help to restore the antiviral state in HIV-infected macrophages, which may be a defense mechanism against HIV neuroinvasion. PMID:27496004

  2. Lung-resident tissue macrophages generate Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and promote airway tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroosh, Pejman; Doherty, Taylor A; Duan, Wei; Mehta, Amit Kumar; Choi, Heonsik; Adams, Yan Fei; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Khorram, Naseem; Rosenthal, Peter; Broide, David H; Croft, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Airway tolerance is the usual outcome of inhalation of harmless antigens. Although T cell deletion and anergy are likely components of tolerogenic mechanisms in the lung, increasing evidence indicates that antigen-specific regulatory T cells (inducible Treg cells [iTreg cells]) that express Foxp3 are also critical. Several lung antigen-presenting cells have been suggested to contribute to tolerance, including alveolar macrophages (MØs), classical dendritic cells (DCs), and plasmacytoid DCs, but whether these possess the attributes required to directly promote the development of Foxp3(+) iTreg cells is unclear. Here, we show that lung-resident tissue MØs coexpress TGF-β and retinal dehydrogenases (RALDH1 and RALDH 2) under steady-state conditions and that their sampling of harmless airborne antigen and presentation to antigen-specific CD4 T cells resulted in the generation of Foxp3(+) Treg cells. Treg cell induction in this model depended on both TGF-β and retinoic acid. Transfer of the antigen-pulsed tissue MØs into the airways correspondingly prevented the development of asthmatic lung inflammation upon subsequent challenge with antigen. Moreover, exposure of lung tissue MØs to allergens suppressed their ability to generate iTreg cells coincident with blocking airway tolerance. Suppression of Treg cell generation required proteases and TLR-mediated signals. Therefore, lung-resident tissue MØs have regulatory functions, and strategies to target these cells might hold promise for prevention or treatment of allergic asthma.

  3. β3-Adrenoceptor activation upregulates apolipoprotein A-I expression in HepG2 cells, which might further promote cholesterol efflux from macrophage foam cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xia-Qing; Li, Yan-Fang; Jiang, Zhi-Li

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effects of β3-adrenoceptor (β3-AR) activation on HepG2 cells and its influence on cholesterol efflux from macrophage foam cells. HepG2 cells were cultured and treated with the β3-AR agonist, BRL37344, and antagonist, SR52390A, and the expression of apolipoprotein (Apo) A-I, ApoA-II, ApoB, and β3-AR in the supernatants and cells was determined. The expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ and PPARα in the HepG2 cells was also assessed. Next, using the RAW264.7 macrophage foam cell model, we also assessed the influence of the HepG2 cell supernatants on lipid efflux. The cholesterol content of the foam cells was also measured, and the cholesterol efflux from the macrophages was examined by determining (3)H-labeled cholesterol levels. Expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABC) A1 and ABCG1 of the macrophage foam cells was also assessed. β3-AR activation increased ApoA-I expression in both the HepG2 cells and the supernatants; PPARγ expression was upregulated, but PPARα expression was not. Treatment with GW9662 abolished the increased expression of ApoA-I induced by the β3-AR agonist. The HepG2 cell supernatants decreased the lipid accumulation and increased the cholesterol efflux from the macrophage foam cells. ABCA1 expression, but not ABCG1 expression, increased in the macrophage foam cells treated with BRL37344-treated HepG2 cell supernatants. Activation of β3-AR in HepG2 cells upregulates ApoA-I expression, which might further promote cholesterol efflux from macrophage foam cells. PPARγ might be required for the induction of ApoA-I expression.

  4. Ratiometric fluorescent probe with AIE property for monitoring endogenous hydrogen peroxide in macrophages and cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong; Nie, Jing; Niu, Jie; Meng, Fangfang; Lin, Weiying

    2017-08-04

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) plays a key role in the progression of human illnesses, such as autoimmune and auto-inflammatory diseases, infectious diseases, diabetes, and cancer, etc. In this work, we have discribed a novel probe, TPE-TLE, which remarkably displayed AIE property and ratiometric fluorescence emission profiles in the presence of H2O2. This ratiometric fluorescent probe with AIE property exhibits outstanding features such as the well-resolved emission peaks, high sensitivity, high selectivity, low cytotoxicity, and good cell-membrane permeability. These excellent attributes enable us to demonstrate the ratiometric imaging of endogenously produced H2O2 in macrophages and cancer cells based on the novel ratiometric probe with AIE property for the first time. By comparing two kinds of cells, it is firstly found that cancer cells should contain much more endogenous H2O2 than macrophages. We expect that TPE-TLE will be useful fluorescent platform for the development of a variety of ratiometric fluorescent probes with AIE property to achieve unique biological applications.

  5. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine alter monocyte, macrophage and T cell functions: implications for HAND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Calderon, Tina M.; Coley, Jacqueline S.; Berman, Joan W.

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) complications resulting from HIV infection remain a major public health problem as individuals live longer due to the success of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). As many as 70% of HIV infected people have HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Many HIV infected individuals abuse drugs, such as cocaine, heroin or methamphetamine, that may be important cofactors in the development of HIV CNS disease. Despite different mechanisms of action, all drugs of abuse increase extracellular dopamine in the CNS. The effects of dopamine on HIV neuropathogenesis are not well understood, and drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which different types of drugs of abuse impact the development of HAND. Monocytes and macrophages are central to HIV infection of the CNS and to HAND. While T cells have not been shown to be a major factor in HIV-associated neuropathogenesis, studies indicate that T cells may play a larger role in the development of HAND in HIV infected drug abusers. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may dysregulate functions of, or increase HIV infection in, monocytes, macrophages and T cells in the brain. Thus, characterizing the effects of dopamine on these cells is important for understanding the mechanisms that mediate the development of HAND in drug abusers. PMID:23456305

  6. Infiltration of M2 Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Correlates with Tumor Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Shimada

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs are a major cellular component in the tumor microenvironment of many solid tumors. The functional competence of TAMs varies depending on the type of tumors and their respective microenvironments. The classically activated M1 macrophages exhibit antitumor functions, whereas the alternatively activated M2 macrophages exhibit protumor functions that contribute to tumor development and progression. Although TAMs have been detected in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, little is known about their phenotype. In the present study, we performed an immunohistochemical analysis to identify TAMs in surgically resected specimens from 50 patients with OSCC and evaluated the relationship between infiltrated TAMs and the pathological grade of OSCC. Positive staining for CD163, which has been used as a marker for M2 macrophages, was observed in OSCC specimens, and the percentages of CD163+ cells were significantly increased based on the pathological grade. CD163+ cells were detected in the tumor stroma in grade I tumors, whereas an increase in the CD163+ cells in the tumor nest was observed in higher grades of tumors. Although infiltrated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were detected in all pathological grades of OSCC, no correlation between the infiltrated T cells and the CD163+ TAMs was observed. These results indicate that the infiltrated TAMs in OSCC have an M2 phenotype and that the M2 macrophages may participate in the development of OSCC.

  7. Infiltration of M2 Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Correlates with Tumor Malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Kazumasa [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Diagnosis and Therapeutics, Meikai University of School of Dentistry, 1-1 Keyakidai, Sakado, Saitama 350-0283 (Japan); Hiroi, Miki [Division of Microbiology and Immunology, Department of Oral Biology and Tissue Engineering, Meikai University School of Dentistry, 1-1 Keyakidai, Sakado, Saitama 350-0283 (Japan); Shimada, Jun [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Diagnosis and Therapeutics, Meikai University of School of Dentistry, 1-1 Keyakidai, Sakado, Saitama 350-0283 (Japan); Ohmori, Yoshihiro, E-mail: ohmori@dent.meikai.ac.jp [Division of Microbiology and Immunology, Department of Oral Biology and Tissue Engineering, Meikai University School of Dentistry, 1-1 Keyakidai, Sakado, Saitama 350-0283 (Japan)

    2011-09-28

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are a major cellular component in the tumor microenvironment of many solid tumors. The functional competence of TAMs varies depending on the type of tumors and their respective microenvironments. The classically activated M1 macrophages exhibit antitumor functions, whereas the alternatively activated M2 macrophages exhibit protumor functions that contribute to tumor development and progression. Although TAMs have been detected in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), little is known about their phenotype. In the present study, we performed an immunohistochemical analysis to identify TAMs in surgically resected specimens from 50 patients with OSCC and evaluated the relationship between infiltrated TAMs and the pathological grade of OSCC. Positive staining for CD163, which has been used as a marker for M2 macrophages, was observed in OSCC specimens, and the percentages of CD163{sup +} cells were significantly increased based on the pathological grade. CD163{sup +} cells were detected in the tumor stroma in grade I tumors, whereas an increase in the CD163{sup +} cells in the tumor nest was observed in higher grades of tumors. Although infiltrated CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells were detected in all pathological grades of OSCC, no correlation between the infiltrated T cells and the CD163{sup +} TAMs was observed. These results indicate that the infiltrated TAMs in OSCC have an M2 phenotype and that the M2 macrophages may participate in the development of OSCC.

  8. Morphometric Characterization of Rat and Human Alveolar Macrophage Cell Models and their Response to Amiodarone using High Content Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Ewelina; Patel, Aateka; Ball, Doug; Klapwijk, Jan; Millar, Val; Kumar, Abhinav; Martin, Abigail; Mahendran, Rhamiya; Dailey, Lea Ann; Forbes, Ben; Hutter, Victoria

    2017-05-24

    Progress to the clinic may be delayed or prevented when vacuolated or "foamy" alveolar macrophages are observed during non-clinical inhalation toxicology assessment. The first step in developing methods to study this response in vitro is to characterize macrophage cell lines and their response to drug exposures. Human (U937) and rat (NR8383) cell lines and primary rat alveolar macrophages obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage were characterized using high content fluorescence imaging analysis quantification of cell viability, morphometry, and phospholipid and neutral lipid accumulation. Cell health, morphology and lipid content were comparable (p content. Responses to amiodarone, a known inducer of phospholipidosis, required analysis of shifts in cell population profiles (the proportion of cells with elevated vacuolation or lipid content) rather than average population data which was insensitive to the changes observed. A high content image analysis assay was developed and used to provide detailed morphological characterization of rat and human alveolar-like macrophages and their response to a phospholipidosis-inducing agent. This provides a basis for development of assays to predict or understand macrophage vacuolation following inhaled drug exposure.

  9. The inhibition of macrophage foam cell formation by 9-cis β-carotene is driven by BCMO1 activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Zolberg Relevy

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed societies, and begins when activated endothelial cells recruit monocytes and T-cells from the bloodstream into the arterial wall. Macrophages that accumulate cholesterol and other fatty materials are transformed into foam cells. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated that a diet rich in carotenoids is associated with a reduced risk of heart disease; while previous work in our laboratory has shown that the 9-cis β-carotene rich alga Dunaliella inhibits atherogenesis in mice. The effect of 9-cis β-carotene on macrophage foam cell formation has not yet been investigated. In the present work, we sought to study whether the 9-cis β-carotene isomer, isolated from the alga Dunaliella, can inhibit macrophage foam cell formation upon its conversion to retinoids. The 9-cis β-carotene and Dunaliella lipid extract inhibited foam cell formation in the RAW264.7 cell line, similar to 9-cis retinoic acid. Furthermore, dietary enrichment with the algal powder in mice resulted in carotenoid accumulation in the peritoneal macrophages and in the inhibition of foam cell formation ex-vivo and in-vivo. We also found that the β-carotene cleavage enzyme β-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase (BCMO1 is expressed and active in macrophages. Finally, 9-cis β-carotene, as well as the Dunaliella extract, activated the nuclear receptor RXR in hepa1-6 cells. These results indicate that dietary carotenoids, such as 9-cis β-carotene, accumulate in macrophages and can be locally cleaved by endogenous BCMO1 to form 9-cis retinoic acid and other retinoids. Subsequently, these retinoids activate the nuclear receptor RXR that, along with additional nuclear receptors, can affect various metabolic pathways, including those involved in foam cell formation and atherosclerosis.

  10. Iron oxide nanoparticles surface coating and cell uptake affect biocompatibility and inflammatory responses of endothelial cells and macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Antonina; Colombo, Miriam; Prosperi, Davide; Gregori, Maria; Panariti, Alice; Rivolta, Ilaria; Masserini, Massimo; Cazzaniga, Emanuela

    2015-09-01

    Engineered iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) offer the possibility of a wide range of medical uses, from clinical imaging to magnetically based hyperthermia for tumor treatment. These applications require their systemic administration in vivo. An important property of nanoparticles is their stability in biological media. For this purpose, a multicomponent nanoconstruct combining high colloidal stability and improved physical properties was synthesized and characterized. IONP were coated with an amphiphilic polymer (PMA), which confers colloidal stability, and were pegylated in order to obtain the nanoconstruct PEG-IONP-PMA. The aim of this study was to utilize cultured human endothelial cells (HUVEC) and murine macrophages, taken as model of cells exposed to NP after systemic administration, to assess the biocompatibility of PEG-IONP-PMA (23.1 ± 1.4 nm) or IONP-PMA (15.6 ± 3.4 nm). PEG-IONP-PMA, tested at different concentrations as high as 20 μg mL-1, exhibited no cytotoxicity or inflammatory responses. By contrast, IONP-PMA showed a concentration-dependent increase of cytotoxicity and of TNF-α production by macrophages and NO production by HUVECs. Cell uptake analysis suggested that after PEGylation, IONP were less internalized either by macrophages or by HUVEC. These results suggest that the choice of the polymer and the chemistry of surface functionalization are a crucial feature to confer to IONP biocompatibility.

  11. Iron oxide nanoparticles surface coating and cell uptake affect biocompatibility and inflammatory responses of endothelial cells and macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlando, Antonina [University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Health Sciences (Italy); Colombo, Miriam; Prosperi, Davide [University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Biotechnology and Biosciences (Italy); Gregori, Maria; Panariti, Alice; Rivolta, Ilaria; Masserini, Massimo; Cazzaniga, Emanuela, E-mail: emanuela.cazzaniga@unimib.it [University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Health Sciences (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    Engineered iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) offer the possibility of a wide range of medical uses, from clinical imaging to magnetically based hyperthermia for tumor treatment. These applications require their systemic administration in vivo. An important property of nanoparticles is their stability in biological media. For this purpose, a multicomponent nanoconstruct combining high colloidal stability and improved physical properties was synthesized and characterized. IONP were coated with an amphiphilic polymer (PMA), which confers colloidal stability, and were pegylated in order to obtain the nanoconstruct PEG-IONP-PMA. The aim of this study was to utilize cultured human endothelial cells (HUVEC) and murine macrophages, taken as model of cells exposed to NP after systemic administration, to assess the biocompatibility of PEG-IONP-PMA (23.1 ± 1.4 nm) or IONP-PMA (15.6 ± 3.4 nm). PEG-IONP-PMA, tested at different concentrations as high as 20 μg mL{sup −1}, exhibited no cytotoxicity or inflammatory responses. By contrast, IONP-PMA showed a concentration-dependent increase of cytotoxicity and of TNF-α production by macrophages and NO production by HUVECs. Cell uptake analysis suggested that after PEGylation, IONP were less internalized either by macrophages or by HUVEC. These results suggest that the choice of the polymer and the chemistry of surface functionalization are a crucial feature to confer to IONP biocompatibility.

  12. HIV Blocks Interferon Induction in Human Dendritic Cells and Macrophages by Dysregulation of TBK1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Andrew N.; Nasr, Najla; Feetham, Alexandra; Galoyan, Ani; Alshehri, Abdullateef A.; Rambukwelle, Dharshini; Botting, Rachel A.; Hiener, Bonnie M.; Diefenbach, Eve; Diefenbach, Russell J.; Kim, Min; Mansell, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages are present in the tissues of the anogenital tract, where HIV-1 transmission occurs in almost all cases. These cells are both target cells for HIV-1 and represent the first opportunity for the virus to interfere with innate recognition. Previously we have shown that both cell types fail to produce type I interferons (IFNs) in response to HIV-1 but that, unlike T cells, the virus does not block IFN induction by targeting IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) for cellular degradation. Thus, either HIV-1 inhibits IFN induction by an alternate mechanism or, less likely, these cells fail to sense HIV-1. Here we show that HIV-1 (but not herpes simplex virus 2 [HSV-2] or Sendai virus)-exposed DCs and macrophages fail to induce the expression of all known type I and III IFN genes. These cells do sense the virus, and pattern recognition receptor (PRR)-induced signaling pathways are triggered. The precise stage in the IFN-inducing signaling pathway that HIV-1 targets to block IFN induction was identified; phosphorylation but not K63 polyubiquitination of TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) was completely inhibited. Two HIV-1 accessory proteins, Vpr and Vif, were shown to bind to TBK1, and their individual deletion partly restored IFN-β expression. Thus, the inhibition of TBK1 autophosphorylation by binding of these proteins appears to be the principal mechanism by which HIV-1 blocks type I and III IFN induction in myeloid cells. IMPORTANCE Dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages are key HIV target cells. Therefore, definition of how HIV impairs innate immune responses to initially establish infection is essential to design preventative interventions, especially by restoring initial interferon production. Here we demonstrate how HIV-1 blocks interferon induction by inhibiting the function of a key kinase in the interferon signaling pathway, TBK1, via two different viral accessory proteins. Other viral proteins have been shown to target the

  13. Kinetics of liver macrophages (Kupffer cells) in SIV-infected macaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahsan, Muhammad H.; Gill, Amy F.; Alvarez, Xavier; Lackner, Andrew A.; Veazey, Ronald S., E-mail: rveazey@tulane.edu

    2013-11-15

    Since the liver drains antigens from the intestinal tract, and since the intestinal tract is a major site of viral replication, we examined the dynamics of liver macrophages (Kupffer cells) throughout SIV infection. Absolute numbers of Kupffer cells increased in the livers in acute infection, and in animals with AIDS. Significantly higher percentages of proliferating (BrdU+) Kupffer cells were detected in acute infection and in AIDS with similar trends in blood monocytes. Significantly higher percentages of apoptotic (AC3+) Kupffer cells were also found in acute and AIDS stages. However, productively infected cells were not detected in liver of 41/42 animals examined, despite abundant infected cells in gut and lymph nodes of all animals. Increased rates of Kupffer cell proliferation resulting in an increase in Kupffer cells without productive infection indicate SIV infection affects Kupffer cells, but the liver does not appear to be a major site of productive viral replication. - Highlights: • Kupffer cells increase in the liver of SIV-infected macaques. • Increased proliferation and apoptosis of Kupffer cells occurs in SIV infection. • Productively infected cells are rarely detected in the liver. • The liver is not a major site for SIV replication.

  14. Dexamethasone Regulates Macrophage and Cd4+Cd25+ Cell Numbers in the Chicken Spleen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AS Calefi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dexamethasone (DEX is a corticoid hormone that is experimentally used to mimic the effects of increased levels of endogenous corticosterone observed during the stress response. Currently, stress is considered one of the major predisposing factors for diseases in the poultry industry. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of DEX and/or of a 20-fold coccidial vaccine dose on leukocyte phenotypes in the spleen and cecal tonsils of chickens. Twenty specific-pathogen-free (SPF Leghorn chickens were divided into four groups: a non-treated group (NT, a DEX-treated group (Dex, a vaccinated group (V and a DEX-treated+vaccinated group (Dex+V. On experimental day (ED 42, each bird in the vaccinated groups received a anti-coccidial vaccine. DEX was injected in the birds of the Dex and Dex+V groups (0.9 mg/kg onED42 and ED45. The immunophenotyping was performed by flow cytometry analysis of splenocytes and cecal tonsils cells onED48. DEX treatment per se was unable to change CD4+CD8+, CD4+CD8+ and CD4-CD8+ populations with TCRgd or CD28 in the spleen, or macrophages and T lymphocytes in the cecal tonsils. V group birds presented higher numbers of splenic macrophages compared with those measured in the Dex+V group. The number of CD4+CD25+ cells in the spleen of birds of the V group was higher than those measured in the other experimental groups. Our data suggest that CD4+CD25+ cells and macrophages might be influenced by DEX treatment in spleen, but not in the cecal tonsils of chickens inoculated with Eimeria.

  15. miR-181a Induces Macrophage Polarized to M2 Phenotype and Promotes M2 Macrophage-mediated Tumor Cell Metastasis by Targeting KLF6 and C/EBPα

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Jia; Zeng, Xianxin; Zhao, Lin; Wei, Qian; Yu, Lifeng; Wang, Xinnan; Yu, Zhaojin; Cao, Yaming; Shan, Fengping; Wei, Minjie

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages can acquire a variety of polarization status and functions: classically activated macrophages (M1 macrophages); alternatively activated macrophages (M2 macrophages). However, the molecular basis of the process is still unclear. Here, this study addresses that microRNA-181a (miR-181a) is a key molecule controlling macrophage polarization. We found that miR-181a is overexpressed in M2 macrophages than in M1 macrophages. miR-181a expression was decreased when M2 phenotype converted to M1, whereas it increased when M1 phenotype converted to M2. Overexpression of miR-181a in M1 macrophages diminished M1 phenotype expression while promoting polarization to the M2 phenotype. In contrast, knockdown of miR-181a in M2 macrophages promoted M1 polarization and diminished M2 phenotype expression. Mechanistically, Bioinformatic analysis revealed that Kruppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-α (C/EBPα) is a potential target of miR-181a and luciferase assay confirmed that KLF6 and C/EBPα translation is suppressed by miR-181a through interaction with the 3′UTR of KLF6 and C/EBPα mRNA. Further analysis showed that induction of miR-181a suppressed KLF6 and C/EBPα protein expression. Importantly, miR-181a also diminishes M2 macrophages-mediated migration and invasion capacity of tumor cells. Collectively, our results suggest that miR-181a plays a significant role in regulating macrophage polarization through directly target KLF6 and C/EBPα. PMID:27673564

  16. Staphylococcus aureus exhibit similarities in their interactions with Acanthamoeba and ThP1 macrophage-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardas, Mihaela; Khan, Naveed Ahmed; Alsam, Selwa

    2012-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of nosocomial infections. Haematogenous spread is a pre-requisite but it is not clear how S. aureus survive the onslaught of macrophages. Acanthamoeba is a protozoan pathogen that is remarkably similar to macrophages, particularly in their cellular structure (morphological and ultra-structural features), molecular motility, biochemical physiology, ability to capture prey by phagocytosis and interactions with microbial pathogens. Thus, we hypothesize that S. aureus exhibit similarities in their interactions with Acanthamoeba and ThP1 macrophage-like cells. Here, we studied interactions of methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (SE) with Acanthamoeba castellanii belonging to the T4 genotype and macrophage-like cells (ThP1). The findings revealed that both MRSA and MSSA exhibited similarities in their binding/association and invasion of A. castellanii and ThP1 cells. Long-term incubation showed that MRSA and MSSA can survive intracellularly of both Acanthamoeba and ThP1 cells. Overall, these findings suggest that Acanthamoeba exhibit similar characteristics with ThP1 macrophage-like cells in their interaction with MRSA and MSSA. Additionally it was shown that bacteria survive inside Acanthamoeba during the encystment process as evidenced by bacterial recovery from mature cysts. Given that Acanthamoeba cysts are airborne, these findings suggest that cysts may act as "Trojan horse" to help spread MRSA to susceptible hosts.

  17. Phenotypic and functional heterogeneity of macrophages and dendritic cell subsets in the healthy and atherosclerosis-prone aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Matthew J; Galkina, Elena V

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis continues to be the leading cause of cardiovascular disease. Development of atherosclerosis depends on chronic inflammation in the aorta and multiple immune cells are involved in this process. Importantly, resident macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) are present within the healthy aorta, but the functions of these cells remain poorly characterized. Local inflammation within the aortic wall promotes the recruitment of monocytes and DC precursors to the aorta and micro-environmental factors direct the differentiation of these emigrated cells into multiple subsets of macrophages and DCs. Recent data suggest that several populations of macrophages and DCs can co-exist within the aorta. Although the functions of M1, M2, Mox, and M4 macrophages are well characterized in vitro, there is a limited set of data on the role of these populations in atherogenesis in vivo. Recent studies on the origin and the potential role of aortic DCs provide novel insights into the biology of aortic DC subsets and prospective mechanisms of the immune response in atherosclerosis. This review integrates the results of experiments analyzing heterogeneity of DCs and macrophage subsets in healthy and diseased vessels and briefly discusses the known and potential functions of these cells in atherogenesis.

  18. Therapeutic activation of macrophages and microglia to suppress brain tumor-initiating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Susobhan; Döring, Axinia; Zemp, Franz J; Silva, Claudia; Lun, Xueqing; Wang, Xiuling; Kelly, John; Hader, Walter; Hamilton, Mark; Mercier, Philippe; Dunn, Jeff F; Kinniburgh, Dave; van Rooijen, Nico; Robbins, Stephen; Forsyth, Peter; Cairncross, Gregory; Weiss, Samuel; Yong, V Wee

    2014-01-01

    Brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs) contribute to the genesis and recurrence of gliomas. We examined whether the microglia and macrophages that are abundant in gliomas alter BTIC growth. We found that microglia derived from non-glioma human subjects markedly mitigated the sphere-forming capacity of glioma patient-derived BTICs in culture by inducing the expression of genes that control cell cycle arrest and differentiation. This sphere-reducing effect was mimicked by macrophages, but not by neurons or astrocytes. Using a drug screen, we validated amphotericin B (AmpB) as an activator of monocytoid cells and found that AmpB enhanced the microglial reduction of BTIC spheres. In mice harboring intracranial mouse or patient-derived BTICs, daily systemic treatment with non-toxic doses of AmpB substantially prolonged life. Notably, microglia and monocytes cultured from glioma patients were inefficient at reducing the sphere-forming capacity of autologous BTICs, but this was rectified by AmpB. These results provide new insights into the treatment of gliomas.

  19. Berberine promotes the development of atherosclerosis and foam cell formation by inducing scavenger receptor A expression in macrophage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke Li; Wenqi Yao; Xiudan Zheng; Kan Liao

    2009-01-01

    Berberine is identified to lower the serum cholesterol level in human and hamster through the induction of low density lipoproteins (LDL) receptor in hepatic cells. To evaluate its potential in preventing atherosclerosis, the effect of berberine on atherosclerosis development in apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE-/-) mice was investigated, in apoE-/-mice, berberine induced in vivo foam cell formation and promoted atherosclerosis development. The foam cell for-mation induced by berberine was also observed in mouse RAW264.7 cells, as well as in mouse and human primary macrophages. By inducing scavenger receptor A (SR-A) expression in macrophages, berberine increased the uptake of modified LDL (DiO-Ac-LDL). Berberine-induced SR-A expression was also observed in macrophage foam cells in vivo and in the cells at atherosclerotic lesion. Analysis in RAW264.7 cells indicated that berberine induced SR-A ex-pression by suppressing PTEN expression, which led to sustained Akt activation. Our results suggest that to evaluate the potential of a cholesterol-reducing compound in alleviating atherosclerosis, its effect on the cells involved in ath-erosclerosis development, such as macrophages, should also be considered. Promotion of foam cell formation could counter-balance the beneficial effect of lowering serum cholesterol.

  20. Radiation effects and radioprotection by Thai medicinal plants in mouse macrophage cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheeraratana Cheeramakara; Kriyaporn Songmueng; Wanyarat Nakosiri; Montri Chairojana; Arag Vitittheeranon; Nopchai Suthisai; Nongnuch Jangsawang; Channarong Sanghiran; Apichart Nontprasert

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effects of radiation on growth-arrested (GA)and micronucleus-production (MP) rates,and the radioprotective properties of Thai medicinal plants in mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 in vitro.Methods:Mouse macrophage cell line (RAW264.7)was cultured in vitro.Various radiation expo-sures,growth-arrested rate assay,micronucleus production assay,and radioprotection by Thai medicinal plants were performed.Results:The results showed that GA and MP rates for γ-rays and UV were dose-dependent. The 50%-affected dose of γand UV radiation for the GA rate was 10 Gy and 159 microwatt/cm2 for 0.5 sec-onds,respectively.After X-ray exposure,there was no apparent effect on RAW264.7 cells,even with a forty-fold human diagnostic dose.Two exposures to γradiation at 20 Gy resulted in a significantly higher MP rate than 20 Gy single exposure or control (P <0.05).The Thai medicinal plants (Kamin-chun capsules,Curcu-ma longa Linn;Hed lingeu,Ganoderma lucidum;Ya Pakking capsule,Murdannia loriformis)could not pre-vent cell damage,but epigallocatechin gallate and L-cysteine could provide protection from 2 Gy γ-ray expo-sure.Conclusion:γradiation caused chromosomal damage during cell division and UV caused cell death, while X-ray radiation was safe.The radioprotective effects of Thai medicinal plants,Kamin-chun,Hed lingeu, and Ya Pakking,could not prevent cell damage in this study.

  1. Regulation of angiogenesis, mural cell recruitment and adventitial macrophage behavior by Toll-like receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aplin, Alfred C; Ligresti, Giovanni; Fogel, Eric; Zorzi, Penelope; Smith, Kelly; Nicosia, Roberto F

    2014-01-01

    The angiogenic response to injury can be studied by culturing rat or mouse aortic explants in collagen gels. Gene expression studies show that aortic angiogenesis is preceded by an immune reaction with overexpression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and TLR-inducible genes. TLR1, 3, and 6 are transiently upregulated at 24 h whereas TLR2, 4, and 8 expression peaks at 24 h but remains elevated during angiogenesis and vascular regression. Expression of TLR5, 7 and 9 steadily increases over time and is highest during vascular regression. Studies with isolated cells show that TLRs are expressed at higher levels in aortic macrophages compared to endothelial or mural cells with the exception of TLR2 and TLR9 which are more abundant in the aortic endothelium. LPS and other TLR ligands dose dependently stimulate angiogenesis and vascular endothelial growth factor production. TLR9 ligands also influence the behavior of nonendothelial cell types by blocking mural cell recruitment and inducing formation of multinucleated giant cells by macrophages. TLR9-induced mural cell depletion is associated with reduced expression of the mural cell recruiting factor PDGFB. The spontaneous angiogenic response of the aortic rings to injury is reduced in cultures from mice deficient in myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MyD88), a key adapter molecule of TLRs, and following treatment with an inhibitor of the NFκB pathway. These results suggest that the TLR system participates in the angiogenic response of the vessel wall to injury and may play an important role in the regulation of inflammatory angiogenesis in reactive and pathologic processes.

  2. Trichomonas vaginalis homolog of macrophage migration inhibitory factor induces prostate cell growth, invasiveness, and inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twu, Olivia; Dessí, Daniele; Vu, Anh; Mercer, Frances; Stevens, Grant C; de Miguel, Natalia; Rappelli, Paola; Cocco, Anna Rita; Clubb, Robert T; Fiori, Pier Luigi; Johnson, Patricia J

    2014-06-03

    The human-infective parasite Trichomonas vaginalis causes the most prevalent nonviral sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Infections in men may result in colonization of the prostate and are correlated with increased risk of aggressive prostate cancer. We have found that T. vaginalis secretes a protein, T. vaginalis macrophage migration inhibitory factor (TvMIF), that is 47% similar to human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (HuMIF), a proinflammatory cytokine. Because HuMIF is reported to be elevated in prostate cancer and inflammation plays an important role in the initiation and progression of cancers, we have explored a role for TvMIF in prostate cancer. Here, we show that TvMIF has tautomerase activity, inhibits macrophage migration, and is proinflammatory. We also demonstrate that TvMIF binds the human CD74 MIF receptor with high affinity, comparable to that of HuMIF, which triggers activation of ERK, Akt, and Bcl-2-associated death promoter phosphorylation at a physiologically relevant concentration (1 ng/mL, 80 pM). TvMIF increases the in vitro growth and invasion through Matrigel of benign and prostate cancer cells. Sera from patients infected with T. vaginalis are reactive to TvMIF, especially in males. The presence of anti-TvMIF antibodies indicates that TvMIF is released by the parasite and elicits host immune responses during infection. Together, these data indicate that chronic T. vaginalis infections may result in TvMIF-driven inflammation and cell proliferation, thus triggering pathways that contribute to the promotion and progression of prostate cancer.

  3. Herp depletion inhibits zearalenone-induced cell death in RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fenglei; Lin, Pengfei; Wang, Nan; Yang, Diqi; Wen, Xin; Zhou, Dong; Wang, Aihua; Jin, Yaping

    2016-04-01

    Herp is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein and strongly induced by the ER stress that not only participates in the unfolded protein response (UPR) under the ER stress, but also in cell autophagy under glucose starvation (GS). However, we do not know whether Herp plays any roles in other responses, such as zearalenone (ZEA). In this study, we constructed recombinant lentiviral vectors for Herp shRNA expression and generated stable Herp knockdown RAW 264.7 macrophages. Flow cytometry analysis showed Herp depletion could inhibit cell death induced by ZEA. Western blot analysis revealed that Herp depletion could up-regulate autophagy-related protein LC3-I conversion into LC3-II and the expression of ER stress-related protein CHOP. These results suggest that Herp depletion inhibits cell death by up-regulating autophagy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Physiological Role of TNF in MucosalImmunology: Regulation of Macrophage/Dendritic Cell Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rivollier, Aymeric Marie Christian; Marsal, J.; Agace, William Winston

    2015-01-01

    to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. In this review, we discuss the role of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) in regulating multiple aspects of intestinal Mϕ and DC physiology, including their differentiation, migration, maturation, survival and effector functions. In inflammatory bowel disease, TNF...... signaling has been implicated in reprogramming monocyte differentiation from the anti-inflammatory Mϕ lineage towards the pro-inflammatory mononuclear phagocyte lineage.These cells become a major source of TNF and, thus,may contribute to the chronic inflammatory process. Finally,we highlight some......Intestinal mononuclear phagocytes, comprising macrophages(Mϕs) and dendritic cells (DCs), play important roles in the generation and the regulation of immune responses to intestinal antigens, and alterations in the development and/or the function of these cells are thought to contribute...

  5. Oncocytic pleomorphic adenoma of palatal salivary gland with macrophages and giant cells associated with cholesterol crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargi S. Sarode

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Pleomorphic adenoma (PA is the most common salivary gland tumor characterized by histo-morphological diversity in the form of myxoid, hyalinized, chondroid, osseous, and squamous areas. In this paper, we report a rare case of predominantly oncocytic variant of PA in a 45-year-old male patient on the posterior palatal region. Microscopic examination showed homogenous eosinophilic cellular mass composed of epithelial components arranged in the form of tubular and solid patterns. The polygonal and oval cells showed abundant dark eosinophilic granular cytoplasm. The cell borders were distinct with a central nucleus showing prominent nucleoli. Interestingly at few places, cholesterol clefts were seen surrounded by macrophages and giant cells. The tumor was surgically excised with no evidence of recurrence after 2 years.

  6. Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells precondition lung monocytes/macrophages to produce tolerance against allo- and autoimmunity in the eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jung Hwa; Lee, Hyun Ju; Jeong, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Mee Kum; Wee, Won Ryang; Yoon, Sun-Ok; Choi, Hosoon; Prockop, Darwin J; Oh, Joo Youn

    2016-01-01

    Intravenously administered mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) engraft only transiently in recipients, but confer long-term therapeutic benefits in patients with immune disorders. This suggests that MSCs induce immune tolerance by long-lasting effects on the recipient immune regulatory system. Here, we demonstrate that i.v. infusion of MSCs preconditioned lung monocytes/macrophages toward an immune regulatory phenotype in a TNF-α-stimulated gene/protein (TSG)-6-dependent manner. As a result, mice were protected against subsequent immune challenge in two models of allo- and autoimmune ocular inflammation: corneal allotransplantation and experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). The monocytes/macrophages primed by MSCs expressed high levels of MHC class II, B220, CD11b, and IL-10, and exhibited T-cell-suppressive activities independently of FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells. Adoptive transfer of MSC-induced B220(+)CD11b(+) monocytes/macrophages prevented corneal allograft rejection and EAU. Deletion of monocytes/macrophages abrogated the MSC-induced tolerance. However, MSCs with TSG-6 knockdown did not induce MHC II(+)B220(+)CD11b(+) cells, and failed to attenuate EAU. Therefore, the results demonstrate a mechanism of the MSC-mediated immune modulation through induction of innate immune tolerance that involves monocytes/macrophages.

  7. Small early gastric cancer with special reference to macrophage infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, R A; Vitullo, P; Modesti, A; Inferrera, C

    1999-04-01

    The authors investigate the tumor-infiltrating cells in small early gastric cancer (EGC) (ultrastructural features and interactions of macrophages with tumor cells and other inflammatory cells. Sections from 20 small EGCs were stained by immunohistochemical methods for CD20, UCHL1, CD4, CD8, and CD68 (electron microscopic examination was used in 6 of the 20). In all of the tumors, CD68-positive macrophages accounted for most tumor-infiltrating cells, with UCHL1-positive T lymphocytes, eosinophils, and neutrophils being the next most frequent. We found only a few CD20-positive B lymphocytes. Electron microscopic analysis revealed macrophages with many phagocytic vesicles, cellular debris, and apoptotic bodies. These morphologic data show that macrophages are actively phagocytic. The tumor cells in contact with macrophages showed no cytopathic changes. These data do not support a macrophage-mediated cancer lysis like the ones reported in some systems in vitro. Contacts among macrophages and other inflammatory cells formed a recurrent ultrastructural hallmark and suggest a communication among varying inflammatory cell types during the precocious host response to gastric neoplasia.

  8. Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei stimulate differential inflammatory responses from human alveolar type II cells (ATII and macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard eLu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar type II pneumocytes (ATII and alveolar macrophages (AM play a crucial role in the lung’s innate immune response. Burkholderia pseudomallei (BP and Burkholderia mallei (BM are facultative Gram-negative bacilli that cause melioidosis and glanders, respectively. The inhalation of these pathogens can cause lethal disease and death in humans. We sought to compare the pathogenesis of and host responses to BP and BM through contact with human primary ATII cells and monocytes-derived macrophages (MDM. We hypothesized that because BP and BM induce different disease outcomes, each pathogen would induce distinct, unique host immune responses from resident pulmonary cells. Our findings showed that BP adhered readily to ATII cells compared to BM. BP, but not BM, was rapidly internalized by macrophages where it replicated to high numbers. Further, BP induced significantly higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion from ATII cells (IL-6, IL-8 and macrophages (IL-6, TNFα at 6h post-infection compared to BM (p<0.05. Interestingly, BM induced the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, in ATII cells and macrophages at 6h post-infection, with delayed induction of inflammatory cytokines at 24h post-infection. Because BP is flagellated and produces LPS, we confirmed that it stimulated both Toll-like receptor (TLR 4 and TLR5 via NF-κb activation while the non-flagellated BM stimulated only TLR4. These data show the differences in BP and BM pathogenicity in the lung when infecting human ATII cells and macrophages and demonstrate the ability of these pathogens to elicit distinct immune responses from resident lung cells which may open new targets for therapeutic intervention to fight against these pathogens.

  9. Nocardia brasiliensis Cell Wall Lipids Modulate Macrophage and Dendritic Responses That Favor Development of Experimental Actinomycetoma in BALB/c Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino-Villarreal, J. Humberto; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Valero-Guillén, Pedro L.

    2012-01-01

    Nocardia brasiliensis is a Gram-positive facultative intracellular bacterium frequently isolated from human actinomycetoma. However, the pathogenesis of this infection remains unknown. Here, we used a model of bacterial delipidation with benzine to investigate the role of N. brasiliensis cell wall-associated lipids in experimental actinomycetoma. Delipidation of N. brasiliensis with benzine resulted in complete abolition of actinomycetoma without affecting bacterial viability. Chemical analyses revealed that trehalose dimycolate and an unidentified hydrophobic compound were the principal compounds extracted from N. brasiliensis with benzine. By electron microscopy, the extracted lipids were found to be located in the outermost membrane layer of the N. brasiliensis cell wall. They also appeared to confer acid-fastness. In vitro, the extractable lipids from the N. brasiliensis cell wall induced the production of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and CCL-2 in macrophages. The N. brasiliensis cell wall extractable lipids inhibited important macrophage microbicidal effects, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and nitric oxide (NO) production, phagocytosis, bacterial killing, and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) expression in response to gamma interferon (IFN-γ). In dendritic cells (DCs), N. brasiliensis cell wall-associated extractable lipids suppressed MHC-II, CD80, and CD40 expression while inducing tumor growth factor β (TGF-β) production. Immunization with delipidated N. brasiliensis induced partial protection preventing actinomycetoma. These findings suggest that N. brasiliensis cell wall-associated lipids are important for actinomycetoma development by inducing inflammation and modulating the responses of macrophages and DCs to N. brasiliensis. PMID:22851755

  10. Expression and prognostic value of regulatory T cells and M2 macrophages in diffuse large Bcell lymphoma tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐原林

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the prognostic value of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and M2 macrophages in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) tissues.Methods The expression of CD163 and Foxp3 was detected by immunohistochemistry in 92 cases of DLBCL,and it was

  11. The monoclonal antibody ER-BMDM1 recognizes a macrophage and dendritic cell differentiation antigen with aminopeptidase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. Leenen (Pieter); M.L. Melis (Marleen); G. Kraal (Georg); A.T. Hoogeveen (Andre); W. van Ewijk (Willem)

    1992-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Here we describe the reactivity of monoclonal antibody (mAb) ER-BMDM1, directed against a 160-kDa cell membrane-associated antigen (Ag) with aminopeptidase activity. The aminopeptidase recognized by ER-BMDM1 is present on various mouse macrophage (MΦ) and dendritic cell (D

  12. The interplay of the Notch signaling in hepatic stellate cells and macrophages determines the fate of liver fibrogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bansal, Ruchi; Van Baarlen, Joop; Storm, G|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073356328; Prakash, Jai

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) known as master producers and macrophages as master regulators, are the key cell types that strongly contribute to the progression of liver fibrosis. Since Notch signaling regulates multiple cellular processes, we aimed to study the role of Notch signaling in HSCs diffe

  13. The interplay of the Notch signaling in hepatic stellate cells and macrophages determines the fate of liver fibrogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bansal, Ruchi; Baarlen, van Joop; Storm, G.; Prakash, Jai

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) known as “master producers” and macrophages as “master regulators”, are the key cell types that strongly contribute to the progression of liver fibrosis. Since Notch signaling regulates multiple cellular processes, we aimed to study the role of Notch signaling in HSCs d

  14. Effect of lactoferrin protein on red blood cells and macrophages: mechanism of parasite–host interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Namrata Anand,1 Rupinder K Kanwar,2 Mohan Lal Dubey,1 R K Vahishta,3 Rakesh Sehgal,1,* Anita K Verma,4 Jagat R Kanwar2,*1Department of Medical Parasitology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India; 2Nanomedicine Laboratory of Immunology and Molecular Biomedical Research, School of Medicine, Molecular and Medical Research Strategic Research Centre, Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia; 3Department of Histopathology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, 4Nanobiotech Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Kirorimal College, University of Delhi, Delhi, India*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Lactoferrin is a natural multifunctional protein known to have antitumor, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory activity. Apart from its antimicrobial effects, lactoferrin is known to boost the immune response by enhancing antioxidants. Lactoferrin exists in various forms depending on its iron saturation. The present study was done to observe the effect of lactoferrin, isolated from bovine and buffalo colostrum, on red blood cells (RBCs and macrophages (human monocytic cell line-derived macrophages THP1 cells.Methods: Lactoferrin obtained from both species and in different iron saturation forms were used in the present study, and treatment of host cells were given with different forms of lactoferrin at different concentrations. These treated host cells were used for various studies, including morphometric analysis, viability by MTT assay, survivin gene expression, production of reactive oxygen species, phagocytic properties, invasion assay, and Toll-like receptor-4, Toll-like receptor-9, and MDR1 expression, to investigate the interaction between lactoferrin and host cells and the possible mechanism of action with regard to parasitic infections.Results: The mechanism of interaction between host cells and lactoferrin have shown various aspects of gene

  15. HIV-1 assembly in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benaroch Philippe

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The molecular mechanisms involved in the assembly of newly synthesized Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV particles are poorly understood. Most of the work on HIV-1 assembly has been performed in T cells in which viral particle budding and assembly take place at the plasma membrane. In contrast, few studies have been performed on macrophages, the other major target of HIV-1. Infected macrophages represent a viral reservoir and probably play a key role in HIV-1 physiopathology. Indeed macrophages retain infectious particles for long periods of time, keeping them protected from anti-viral immune response or drug treatments. Here, we present an overview of what is known about HIV-1 assembly in macrophages as compared to T lymphocytes or cell lines. Early electron microscopy studies suggested that viral assembly takes place at the limiting membrane of an intracellular compartment in macrophages and not at the plasma membrane as in T cells. This was first considered as a late endosomal compartment in which viral budding seems to be similar to the process of vesicle release into multi-vesicular bodies. This view was notably supported by a large body of evidence involving the ESCRT (Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport machinery in HIV-1 budding, the observation of viral budding profiles in such compartments by immuno-electron microscopy, and the presence of late endosomal markers associated with macrophage-derived virions. However, this model needs to be revisited as recent data indicate that the viral compartment has a neutral pH and can be connected to the plasma membrane via very thin micro-channels. To date, the exact nature and biogenesis of the HIV assembly compartment in macrophages remains elusive. Many cellular proteins potentially involved in the late phases of HIV-1 cycle have been identified; and, recently, the list has grown rapidly with the publication of four independent genome-wide screens. However, their respective

  16. Macrophage interactions with polylactic acid and chitosan scaffolds lead to improved recruitment of human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells: a comprehensive study with different immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caires, Hugo R; Esteves, Tiago; Quelhas, Pedro; Barbosa, Mário A; Navarro, Melba; Almeida, Catarina R

    2016-09-01

    Despite the importance of immune cell-biomaterial interactions for the regenerative outcome, few studies have investigated how distinct three-dimensional biomaterials modulate the immune cell-mediated mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) recruitment and function. Thus, this work compares the response of varied primary human immune cell populations triggered by different model scaffolds and describes its functional consequence on recruitment and motility of bone marrow MSC. It was found that polylactic acid (PLA) and chitosan scaffolds lead to an increase in the metabolic activity of macrophages but not of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), natural killer (NK) cells or monocytes. PBMC and NK cells increase their cell number in PLA scaffolds and express a secretion profile that does not promote MSC recruitment. Importantly, chitosan increases IL-8, MIP-1, MCP-1 and RANTES secretion by macrophages while PLA stimulates IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1 production, all chemokines that can lead to MSC recruitment. This secretion profile of macrophages in contact with biomaterials correlates with the highest MSC invasion. Furthermore, macrophages enhance stem cell motility within chitosan scaffolds by 44% but not in PLA scaffolds. Thus, macrophages are the cells that in contact with engineered biomaterials become activated to secrete bioactive molecules that stimulate MSC recruitment.

  17. Uptake of dexamethasone incorporated into liposomes by macrophages and foam cells and its inhibitory effect on cellular cholesterol ester accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chono, Sumio; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2006-09-01

    To confirm the efficacy of dexamethasone incorporated into liposomes in the treatment of atherosclerosis, the uptake of dexamethasone-liposomes by macrophages and foam cells and its inhibitory effect on cellular cholesterol ester accumulation in these cells were investigated in-vitro. Dexamethasone-liposomes were prepared with egg yolk phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol and dicetylphosphate in a lipid molar ratio of 7/2/1 by the hydration method. This was adjusted to three different particle sizes to clarify the influence of particle size on the uptake by the macrophages and foam cells, and the inhibitory effect on cellular cholesterol ester accumulation. The distribution of particle sizes of dexamethasone-liposomes were 518.7+/-49.5 nm (L500), 202.2+/-23.1 nm (L200), and 68.6+/-6.5 nm (L70), respectively. For each size, dexamethasone concentration and dexamethasone/lipid molar ratio in dexamethasone-liposome suspension were 1 mg dexamethasone mL-1 and 0.134 mol dexamethasone mol-1 total lipids, respectively. The zeta potential was approximately -70 mV for all sizes. Dexamethasone-liposomes or free dexamethasone were added to the macrophages in the presence of oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and foam cells, and then incubated at 37 degrees C. The uptake amount of dexamethasone by the macrophages and foam cells after a 24-h incubation was L500>L200>free dexamethasone>L70. The macrophages in the presence of oxLDL and foam cells were incubated with dexamethasone-liposomes or free dexamethasone for 24 h at 37 degrees C to evaluate the inhibitory effect on the cellular cholesterol ester accumulation. The cellular cholesterol ester level in the macrophages treated with oxLDL was significantly increased compared with that in macrophages without additives. L500, L200 and free dexamethasone significantly inhibited this cholesterol ester accumulation. L500, L200 and free dexamethasone also significantly reduced cellular cholesterol ester accumulation in foam cells. In

  18. CX3CL1(+ Microparticles Mediate the Chemoattraction of Alveolar Macrophages toward Apoptotic Acute Promyelocytic Leukemic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hui Tsai

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: During the resolution phase of inflammation, release of “find-me” signals by apoptotic cells is crucial in the chemoattraction of macrophages toward apoptotic cells for subsequent phagocytosis, in which microparticles derived from apoptotic cells (apo-MPs are involved. A recent study reports that CX3CL1 is released from apoptotic cells to stimulate macrophages chemotaxis. In this study, we investigated the role of CX3CL1 in the apo-MPs in the cell-cell interaction between alveolar macrophage NR8383 cells and apoptotic all-trans retinoic acid-treated NB4 (ATRA-NB4 cells. Methods/Results: Apoptotic ATRA-NB4 cells and their conditioning medium (CM enhanced the chemoattraction of NR8383 cells as well as their phagocytosis activity in engulfing apoptotic ATRA-NB4 cells. The levels of CX3CL1(+ apo-MPs and CX3CL1 were rapidly elevated in the CM of ATRA-NB4 cell culture after induction of apoptosis. Both exogenous CX3CL1 and apo-MPs enhanced the transmigration of NR8383 cells toward apoptotic ATRA-NB4 cells. This pro-transmigratory activity was able to be partially inhibited either by blocking the CX3CR1 (CX3CL1 receptor of NR8383 cells with its specific antibody or by blocking the surface CX3CL1 of apo-MPs with its specific antibody before incubating these apo-MPs with NR8383 cells. Conclusion: CX3CL1(+ apo-MPs released by apoptotic cells mediate the chemotactic transmigration of alveolar macrophages.

  19. Bole of macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the differentiation and expansion of monocytes and dendritic cells from CD34(+) progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamps, AWA; Smit, JW; Vellenga, E

    1999-01-01

    The present study focused on whether it is possible to expand monocytic cells from CD34(+) progenitor cells by using macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) in the absence and presence of mast cell growth factor (MGF) and IL-6. It was demonstrated that CD34(+) cells differentiate without expans

  20. Legionella pneumophila Strain 130b Evades Macrophage Cell Death Independent of the Effector SidF in the Absence of Flagellin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speir, Mary; Vogrin, Adam; Seidi, Azadeh; Abraham, Gilu; Hunot, Stéphane; Han, Qingqing; Dorn, Gerald W.; Masters, Seth L.; Flavell, Richard A.; Vince, James E.; Naderer, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The human pathogen Legionella pneumophila must evade host cell death signaling to enable replication in lung macrophages and to cause disease. After bacterial growth, however, L. pneumophila is thought to induce apoptosis during egress from macrophages. The bacterial effector protein, SidF, has been shown to control host cell survival and death by inhibiting pro-apoptotic BNIP3 and BCL-RAMBO signaling. Using live-cell imaging to follow the L. pneumophila-macrophage interaction, we now demonstrate that L. pneumophila evades host cell apoptosis independent of SidF. In the absence of SidF, L. pneumophila was able to replicate, cause loss of mitochondria membrane potential, kill macrophages, and establish infections in lungs of mice. Consistent with this, deletion of BNIP3 and BCL-RAMBO did not affect intracellular L. pneumophila replication, macrophage death rates, and in vivo bacterial virulence. Abrogating mitochondrial cell death by genetic deletion of the effectors of intrinsic apoptosis, BAX, and BAK, or the regulator of mitochondrial permeability transition pore formation, cyclophilin-D, did not affect bacterial growth or the initial killing of macrophages. Loss of BAX and BAK only marginally limited the ability of L. pneumophila to efficiently kill all macrophages over extended periods. L. pneumophila induced killing of macrophages was delayed in the absence of capsase-11 mediated pyroptosis. Together, our data demonstrate that L. pneumophila evades host cell death responses independently of SidF during replication and can induce pyroptosis to kill macrophages in a timely manner. PMID:28261564

  1. Degradation of amyloid beta by human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived macrophages expressing Neprilysin-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koutaro Takamatsu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cell-derived macrophage-like cells for Alzheimer's disease (AD. In previous studies, we established the technology to generate macrophage-like myeloid lineage cells with proliferating capacity from human iPS cells, and we designated the cells iPS-ML. iPS-ML reduced the level of Aβ added into the culture medium, and the culture supernatant of iPS-ML alleviated the neurotoxicity of Aβ. We generated iPS-ML expressing the Fc-receptor-fused form of a single chain antibody specific to Aβ. In addition, we made iPS-ML expressing Neprilysin-2 (NEP2, which is a protease with Aβ-degrading activity. In vitro, expression of NEP2 but not anti-Aβ scFv enhanced the effect to reduce the level of soluble Aβ oligomer in the culture medium and to alleviate the neurotoxicity of Aβ. To analyze the effect of iPS-ML expressing NEP2 (iPS-ML/NEP2 in vivo, we intracerebrally administered the iPS-ML/NEP2 to 5XFAD mice, which is a mouse model of AD. We observed significant reduction in the level of Aβ in the brain interstitial fluid following administration of iPS-ML/NEP2. These results suggested that iPS-ML/NEP2 may be a potential therapeutic agent in the treatment of AD.

  2. Enhancement of CD147 on M1 macrophages induces differentiation of Th17 cells in the lung interstitial fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Jie-jie; Zhang, Kui; Chen, Li-na; Miao, Jin-lin; Yao, Meng; Ren, Ying; Fu, Zhi-guang; Chen, Zhi-nan; Zhu, Ping

    2014-09-01

    Lung interstitial fibrosis is a chronic lung disease, and few effective therapies are available to halt or reverse the progression of the disease. In murine and human lung fibrosis, the expression of CD147 is increased. However, the role of CD147 in lung fibrosis has not been identified, and it remains to be determined whether lung fibrosis would be improved by decreasing the expression of CD147. A murine bleomycin-induced lung interstitial fibrosis model was used in the experiments, and HAb18 mAbs and CsA were administered during the induction of lung fibrosis. In our study, we found that the HAb18 mAbs markedly reduced the collagen score and down-regulated M1 macrophages and Th17 cells. In vitro, flow cytometry analysis showed that M1 macrophages induced higher Th17 differentiation than M2 macrophages. After treatment with HAb18 mAbs or after reducing the expression of CD147 by lentivirus interference in M1 macrophages, the level of Th17 cells were significantly inhibited. In conclusion, HAb18 mAbs or CsA treatment ameliorates lung interstitial fibrosis. CD147 promoted M1 macrophage and induced the differentiation of Th17 cells in lung interstitial fibrosis, perhaps by regulating some cytokines such as IL-6, IL-1β, IL-12 and IL-23. These results indicated that CD147 may play an important role in the development of lung interstitial fibrosis.

  3. Expression of phenotypic markers of mast cells, macrophages and dendritic cells in gallbladder mucosa with calculous cholecystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprzak, A A; Szmyt, M; Malkowski, W; Surdyk-Zasada, J; Przybyszewska, W; Szmeja, J; Helak-Łapaj, C; Seraszek-Jaros, A; Kaczmarek, E

    2013-12-01

    The study aimed at quantitative analysis of expression involving markers of mast cells (tryptase), monocytes/macrophages (CD68 molecule) and dendritic cells (S100 protein) in gallbladder mucosa with acute and chronic calculous cholecystitis. Routinely prepared tissue material from the patients with acute (ACC) (n = 16) and chronic calculous cholecystitis (CCC) (n = 55) was evaluated. Three cellular markers were localized by immunocytochemistry. Their expression was quantified using spatial visualization technique. The expression of tryptase was similar in acute and chronic cholecystitis. CD68 expression in ACC was significantly higher than in the CCC group. Expression of S100 protein was significantly higher in CCC as compared to the ACC group. No significant correlations were disclosed between expression of studied markers and grading in the gallbladder wall. A weak negative correlation was noted between expression of CD68 and number of gallstones in the CCC group. The spatial visualization technique allowed for a credible quantitative evaluation of expression involving markers of mast cells (MCs), monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) and dendritic cells (DCs) in gallbladder mucosa with ACC and CCC. For the first time mucosal expression of S100 protein-positive DCs was evaluated in calculous cholecystitis. The results point to distinct functions of studied cell types in the non-specific immune response in calculous cholecystitis.

  4. In Vitro Immune Toxicity of Depleted Uranium: Effects on Murine Macrophages, CD4+ T Cells, and Gene Expression Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Bin; Fleming, James T.; Schultz, Terry W.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2006-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is a by-product of the uranium enrichment process and shares chemical properties with natural and enriched uranium. To investigate the toxic effects of environmental DU exposure on the immune system, we examined the influences of DU (in the form of uranyl nitrate) on viability and immune function as well as cytokine gene expression in murine peritoneal macrophages and splenic CD4+ T cells. Macrophages and CD4+ T cells were exposed to various concentrations of DU, and cell death via apoptosis and necrosis was analyzed using annexin-V/propidium iodide assay. DU cytotoxicity in both cell types was concentration dependent, with macrophage apoptosis and necrosis occurring within 24 hr at 100 μM DU exposure, whereas CD4+ T cells underwent cell death at 500 μM DU exposure. Noncytotoxic concentrations for macrophages and CD4+ T cells were determined as 50 and 100 μM, respectively. Lymphoproliferation analysis indicated that macrophage accessory cell function was altered with 200 μM DU after exposure times as short as 2 hr. Microarray and real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that DU alters gene expression patterns in both cell types. The most differentially expressed genes were related to signal transduction, such as c-jun, NF-κ Bp65, neurotrophic factors (e.g., Mdk), chemokine and chemokine receptors (e.g., TECK/CCL25), and interleukins such as IL-10 and IL-5, indicating a possible involvement of DU in cancer development, autoimmune diseases, and T helper 2 polarization of T cells. The results are a first step in identifying molecular targets for the toxicity of DU and the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms for the immune modulation ability of DU. PMID:16393663

  5. 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells Enhance Macrophage-Mediated Innate Inflammatory Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Laurence Madera; Anna Greenshields; Power Coombs, Melanie R.; Hoskin, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor progression and the immune response are intricately linked. While it is known that cancers alter macrophage inflammatory responses to promote tumor progression, little is known regarding how cancers affect macrophage-dependent innate host defense. In this study, murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) were exposed to murine carcinoma-conditioned media prior to assessment of the macrophage inflammatory response. BMDMs exposed to 4T1 mammary carcinoma-conditioned medium demonstrated...

  6. Bright field microscopy as an alternative to whole cell fluorescence in automated analysis of macrophage images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyrki Selinummi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fluorescence microscopy is the standard tool for detection and analysis of cellular phenomena. This technique, however, has a number of drawbacks such as the limited number of available fluorescent channels in microscopes, overlapping excitation and emission spectra of the stains, and phototoxicity. METHODOLOGY: We here present and validate a method to automatically detect cell population outlines directly from bright field images. By imaging samples with several focus levels forming a bright field -stack, and by measuring the intensity variations of this stack over the -dimension, we construct a new two dimensional projection image of increased contrast. With additional information for locations of each cell, such as stained nuclei, this bright field projection image can be used instead of whole cell fluorescence to locate borders of individual cells, separating touching cells, and enabling single cell analysis. Using the popular CellProfiler freeware cell image analysis software mainly targeted for fluorescence microscopy, we validate our method by automatically segmenting low contrast and rather complex shaped murine macrophage cells. SIGNIFICANCE: The proposed approach frees up a fluorescence channel, which can be used for subcellular studies. It also facilitates cell shape measurement in experiments where whole cell fluorescent staining is either not available, or is dependent on a particular experimental condition. We show that whole cell area detection results using our projected bright field images match closely to the standard approach where cell areas are localized using fluorescence, and conclude that the high contrast bright field projection image can directly replace one fluorescent channel in whole cell quantification. Matlab code for calculating the projections can be downloaded from the supplementary site: http://sites.google.com/site/brightfieldorstaining.

  7. Integrated metabolic modelling reveals cell-type specific epigenetic control points of the macrophage metabolic network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Maria Pires; John, Elisabeth; Kaoma, Tony; Heinäniemi, Merja; Nicot, Nathalie; Vallar, Laurent; Bueb, Jean-Luc; Sinkkonen, Lasse; Sauter, Thomas

    2015-10-19

    The reconstruction of context-specific metabolic models from easily and reliably measurable features such as transcriptomics data will be increasingly important in research and medicine. Current reconstruction methods suffer from high computational effort and arbitrary threshold setting. Moreover, understanding the underlying epigenetic regulation might allow the identification of putative intervention points within metabolic networks. Genes under high regulatory load from multiple enhancers or super-enhancers are known key genes for disease and cell identity. However, their role in regulation of metabolism and their placement within the metabolic networks has not been studied. Here we present FASTCORMICS, a fast and robust workflow for the creation of high-quality metabolic models from transcriptomics data. FASTCORMICS is devoid of arbitrary parameter settings and due to its low computational demand allows cross-validation assays. Applying FASTCORMICS, we have generated models for 63 primary human cell types from microarray data, revealing significant differences in their metabolic networks. To understand the cell type-specific regulation of the alternative metabolic pathways we built multiple models during differentiation of primary human monocytes to macrophages and performed ChIP-Seq experiments for histone H3 K27 acetylation (H3K27ac) to map the active enhancers in macrophages. Focusing on the metabolic genes under high regulatory load from multiple enhancers or super-enhancers, we found these genes to show the most cell type-restricted and abundant expression profiles within their respective pathways. Importantly, the high regulatory load genes are associated to reactions enriched for transport reactions and other pathway entry points, suggesting that they are critical regulatory control points for cell type-specific metabolism. By integrating metabolic modelling and epigenomic analysis we have identified high regulatory load as a common feature of metabolic

  8. Use of enzyme label for quantitative evaluation of liposome adhesion on cell surface: studies with J774 macrophage monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, V S; Dormeneva, E V; Tsibulsky, V P; Repin, V S; Torchilin, V P

    1988-07-01

    A method for quantitation of cell surface-bound liposomes utilizing J774 macrophage monolayers is developed. Surface-bound biotinyl-containing and 125I-labeled liposomes were quantified with avidin-peroxidase in an ELISA-like assay. Peroxidase substrate absorbance values were recalculated into the absolute amount of liposomal lipid using a special calibration plot. Total liposome uptake by macrophages was determined following the binding of 125I radioactivity. The approach suggested allows quantitative evaluation of the changes in the content of surface-adhered liposomes during their interaction with cells in vitro.

  9. Differentially activated macrophages orchestrate myogenic precursor cell fate during human skeletal muscle regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saclier, Marielle; Yacoub-Youssef, Houda; Mackey, Abigail;

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages (MPs) exert either beneficial or deleterious effects on tissue repair, depending on their activation/polarization state. They are crucial for adult skeletal muscle repair, notably by acting on myogenic precursor cells. However, these interactions have not been fully characterized. Here......, we explored both in vitro and in vivo, in human, the interactions of differentially activated MPs with myogenic precursor cells (MPCs) during adult myogenesis and skeletal muscle regeneration. We showed in vitro that through the differential secretion of cytokines and growth factors, proinflammatory...... MPs inhibited MPC fusion while anti-inflammatory MPs strongly promoted MPC differentiation by increasing their commitment into differentiated myocytes and the formation of mature myotubes. Furthermore, the in vivo time course of expression of myogenic and MP markers was studied in regenerating human...

  10. Quercetin increases macrophage cholesterol efflux to inhibit foam cell formation through activating PPARγ-ABCA1 pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liqiang; Li, En; Wang, Feng; Wang, Tao; Qin, Zhiping; Niu, Shaohui; Qiu, Chunguang

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of cholesterol in macrophages could induce the formation of foam cells and increase the risk of developing atherosclerosis. We wonder if quercetin, one of flavonoids with anti-inflammation functions in different cell types, could elevate the development of foam cells formation in atherosclerosis. We treated foam cells derived from oxLDL induced THP-1 cells with quercetin, and evaluated the foam cells formation, cholesterol content and apoptosis of the cells. We found that quercetin induced the expression of ABCA1 in differentiated THP-1 cells, and increased the cholesterol efflux from THP-1 cell derived foam cells. Eventually, cholesterol level and the formation of foam cell derived from THP-1 cells decreased after quercetin treatment. In addition, quercetin activated PPARγ-LXRα pathway to upregulate ABCA1 expression through increasing protein level of PPARγ and its transcriptional activity. Inhibition of PPARγ activity by siRNA knockdown or the addition of chemical inhibitor, GW9662, abolished quercetin induced ABCA1 expression and cholesterol efflux in THP-1 derived macrophages. Our data demonstrated that quercetin increased cholesterol efflux from macrophages through upregulating the expressions of PPARγ and ABCA1. Taken together, increasing uptake of quercetin or quercetin-rich foods would be an effective way to lower the risk of atherosclerosis. PMID:26617799

  11. In vitro biocorrosion of Ti-6Al-4V implant alloy by a mouse macrophage cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsin-Yi; Bumgardner, Joel D

    2004-03-15

    Corrosion of implant alloys releasing metal ions has the potential to cause adverse tissue reactions and implant failure. We hypothesized that macrophage cells and their released reactive chemical species (RCS) affect the alloy's corrosion properties. A custom cell culture corrosion box was used to evaluate how cell culture medium, macrophage cells and RCS altered the Ti-6Al-4V corrosion behaviors in 72 h and how corrosion products affected the cells. There was no difference in the charge transfer in the presence (75.2 +/- 17.7 mC) and absence (62.3 +/- 18.8 mC) of cells. The alloy had the lowest charge transfer (28.2 +/- 4.1 mC) and metal ion release (Ti < 10 ppb, V < 2 ppb) with activated cells (releasing RCS) compared with the other two conditions. This was attributed to an enhancement of the surface oxides by RCS. Metal ion release was very low (Ti < 20 ppb, V < 10 ppb) with nonactivated cells and did not change cell morphology, viability, and NO and ATP release compared with controls. However, IL-1beta released from the activated cells and the proliferation of nonactivated cells were greater on the alloy than the controls. In summary, macrophage cells and RCS reduced the corrosion of Ti-6Al-4V alloys as hypothesized. These data are important in understanding host tissue-material interactions.

  12. Suppression of NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against PRRSV-infected porcine alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jun; Grauwet, Korneel; Vermeulen, Ben; Devriendt, Bert; Jiang, Ping; Favoreel, Herman; Nauwynck, Hans

    2013-06-28

    The adaptive immunity against PRRSV has already been studied in depth, but only limited data are available on the innate immune responses against this pathogen. In the present study, we analyzed the interaction between porcine natural killer (NK) cells and PRRSV-infected primary porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs), since NK cells are one of the most important components of innate immunity and PAMs are primary target cells of PRRSV infection. NK cytotoxicity assays were performed using enriched NK cells as effector cells and virus-infected or mock-inoculated PAMs as target cells. The NK cytotoxicity against PRRSV-infected PAMs was decreased starting from 6h post inoculation (hpi) till the end of the experiment (12 hpi) and was significantly lower than that against pseudorabies virus (PrV)-infected PAMs. UV-inactivated PRRSV also suppressed NK activity, but much less than infectious PRRSV. Furthermore, co-incubation with PRRSV-infected PAMs inhibited degranulation of NK cells. Finally, using the supernatant of PRRSV-infected PAMs collected at 12 hpi showed that the suppressive effect of PRRSV on NK cytotoxicity was not mediated by soluble factors. In conclusion, PRRSV-infected PAMs showed a reduced susceptibility toward NK cytotoxicity, which may represent one of the multiple evasion strategies of PRRSV.

  13. Adipose Natural Killer Cells Regulate Adipose Tissue Macrophages to Promote Insulin Resistance in Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung-Cheol; Kim, Myung-Sunny; Pae, Munkyong; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Eberlé, Delphine; Shimada, Takeshi; Kamei, Nozomu; Park, Hee-Sook; Sasorith, Souphatta; Woo, Ju Rang; You, Jia; Mosher, William; Brady, Hugh J M; Shoelson, Steven E; Lee, Jongsoon

    2016-04-12

    Obesity-induced inflammation mediated by immune cells in adipose tissue appears to participate in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. We show that natural killer (NK) cells in adipose tissue play an important role. High-fat diet (HFD) increases NK cell numbers and the production of proinflammatory cytokines, notably TNFα, in epididymal, but not subcutaneous, fat depots. When NK cells were depleted either with neutralizing antibodies or genetic ablation in E4bp4(+/-) mice, obesity-induced insulin resistance improved in parallel with decreases in both adipose tissue macrophage (ATM) numbers, and ATM and adipose tissue inflammation. Conversely, expansion of NK cells following IL-15 administration or reconstitution of NK cells into E4bp4(-/-) mice increased both ATM numbers and adipose tissue inflammation and exacerbated HFD-induced insulin resistance. These results indicate that adipose NK cells control ATMs as an upstream regulator potentially by producing proinflammatory mediators, including TNFα, and thereby contribute to the development of obesity-induced insulin resistance.

  14. Fisetin antagonizes cell fusion, cytoskeletal organization and bone resorption in RANKL-differentiated murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun-Ho; Kim, Jung-Lye; Lee, Eun-Jung; Park, Sin-Hye; Han, Seon-Young; Kang, Soon Ah; Kang, Young-Hee

    2014-03-01

    Osteoclastogenesis is comprised of several stage s including progenitor survival, differentiation to mononuclear preosteoclasts, cell fusion to multinuclear mature osteoclasts, and activation to osteoclasts with bone resorbing activity. Botanical antioxidants are now being increasingly investigated for their health-promoting effects on bone. This study investigated that fisetin, a flavonol found naturally in many fruits and vegetables, suppressed osteoclastogenesis by disturbing receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated signaling pathway and demoting osteoclastogenic protein induction. Nontoxic fisetin at ≤10 μM inhibited the induction of RANK, tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and the activation of NF-κB in RANKL-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. In RANKL-differentiated osteoclasts cell fusion protein of E-cadherin was induced, which was dampened by fisetin. The formation of tartrate-resistance acid phosphatase-positive multinucleated osteoclasts was suppressed by adding fisetin to RANKL-exposed macrophages. It was also found that fisetin reduced actin ring formation and gelsolin induction of osteclasts enhanced by RANKL through disturbing c-Src-proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 signaling. Fisetin deterred preosteoclasts from the cell-cell fusion and the organization of the cytoskeleton to seal the resorbing area and to secret protons for bone resorption. Consistently, the 5 day-treatment of fisetin diminished RANKL-induced cellular expression of carbonic anhydrase II and integrin β3 concurrently with a reduction of osteoclast bone-resorbing activity. Therefore, fisetin was a natural therapeutic agent retarding osteoclast fusion and cytoskeletal organization such as actin rings and ruffled boarder, which is a property of mature osteoclasts and is required for osteoclasts to resorb bone. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The antioxidative effect of bread crust in a mouse macrophage reporter cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pötzsch, Sandy; Dalgalarrondo, Michele; Bakan, Benedicte; Marion, Didier; Somoza, Veronika; Stangl, Gabriele; Silber, Rolf-Edgar; Simm, Andreas; Navarrete Santos, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    Free radicals and oxidative stress are important factors in the biology of aging and responsible for the development of age-related diseases. One way to reduce the formation of free radicals is to boost the antioxidative system by nutrition. Heat treatment of food promote the Maillard reaction which is responsible for their characteristic color and taste. During the Maillard reaction reducing sugars react with proteins in a non-enzymatic way leading to the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). As an AGE-rich source our group used bread crust (BCE) to investigate the effect of AGEs on the antioxidant defense. It is well known that the NF-kB pathway is activated by treatment of cells with AGEs. Therefore for stimulation with the BCE we used the macrophage reporter cell line RAW/NF-kB/SEAPorter™. Amino acid analysis and LC-MS/MS by Orbitrap Velo was used to determine the bioactive compounds in the soluble BCE. The radical scavenging effect was conducted by the DPPH-assay. BCE induced the NF-kB pathway in RAW/NF-kB/SEAPorter™ cells and also showed a concentration-dependent antioxidative capacity by the DPPH-assay. With the LC/MS and amino acid analyses, we identified the presence of gliadin in BCE confirmed by using specific gliadin antibodies. By immunoprecipitation (IP) with an antibody against γ-gliadin and western blot probing against the AGE carboxymethyllysine (CML) the presence of AGE-gliadin in BCE was confirmed. Stimulation of the RAW/NF-kB/SEAPorter™ cells with the γ-gliadin depleted fractions did not activate the NF-kB pathway. CML-modified gliadin in the BCE is a bioactive compound of the bread crust which is responsible for the antioxidative capacity and for the induction of the NF-kB pathway in mouse macrophages. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Monarch-1 Activation in Murine Macrophage Cell Line (J774 A.1 Infected with Iranian Strain of Leishmania Major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Fata

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leishmania major is an intracellular parasite transmitted through the bite of the female phlebotomine sand flies. Leishmania major is able to escape the host immune defense and survive within macrophages. Modulation of the NF-κB (Nuclear Factor-Kappa B activation and suppression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines by L. major are the main evasion mechanisms that remain to be explored. This study aims to examine the expression level of the Monarch-1 in L. major-infected macrophages, as a negative regulator of the NF-κB activation.Methods: Murine macrophage cell line (J774 A.1 was infected by metacyclic form of Leishmania promasti­gotes at macrophage/parasite ratio of 1:10. After harvesting infected cells at different times, total RNA was extracted and converted to cDNA. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was performed for Monarch-1 by specific primers. Hypoxanthine Phospho-Ribosyl Transferase (HPRT was used as an internal control to adjust the amount of mRNA in each sample.Results: Semiquantitive analysis of Monarch-1 mRNA expression level showed a significant expres­sion increase within 6 to 30 hours after L. major infection of macrophages when compared to the con­trol macrophages.Conclusion: Monarch-1 expression level reveals a significant increase in the early phase of macro­phage infection with L. major, which in turn may suppress IL-12 production in Leishmania infected macrophages and deeply influence the relationship between host and parasite.

  17. Dendritic cells and macrophages in the pituitary and the gonads. Evidence for their role in the fine regulation of the reproductive endocrine response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, A; Allaerts, W; Leenen, PJM; Schoemaker, J; Drexhage, HA

    1997-01-01

    Blood monocytes are able to mature into macrophages as well as into dendritic cells, Dendritic cells and macrophages have mainly been studied for their function in the immune response, e.g. in the presentation of antigens to lymphocytes and in the phagocytosis/degradation of unwanted material. The c

  18. Cutting Edge: Marginal Zone Macrophages Regulate Antigen Transport by B Cells to the Follicle in the Spleen via CD21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopec, Kajsa E; Georgoudaki, Anna-Maria; Sohn, Silke; Wermeling, Fredrik; Grönlund, Hans; Lindh, Emma; Carroll, Michael C; Karlsson, Mikael C I

    2016-09-15

    Marginal zone macrophages (MZM) are strategically located in the spleen, lining the marginal sinus where they sense inflammation and capture Ag from the circulation. One of the receptors expressed by MZM is scavenger receptor macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO), which has affinity for modified self-antigens. In this article, we show that engagement of MARCO on murine macrophages induces extracellular ATP and loss of CD21 and CD62L on marginal zone B cells. Engagement of MARCO also leads to reduction of Ag transport by marginal zone B cells and affects the subsequent immune response. This study highlights a novel function for MZM in regulating Ag transport and activation, and we suggest that MARCO-dependent ATP release regulates this through shedding of CD21 and CD62L. Because systemic lupus erythematosus patients were shown to acquire autoantibodies against MARCO, this highlights a mechanism that could affect a patient's ability to combat infections.

  19. Prognostic Impact of CD163+ Macrophages in Tumor Stroma and CD8+ T-Cells in Cancer Cell Nests in Invasive Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Takuya; Yoshizawa, Tadashi; Hirai, Hideaki; Seino, Hiroko; Morohashi, Satoko; Wu, Yunyan; Wakiya, Taiichi; Kimura, Norihisa; Kudo, Daisuke; Ishido, Keinosuke; Toyoki, Yoshikazu; Kijima, Hiroshi; Hakamada, Kenichi

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the clinicopathological influence of tumor-infiltrating cluster of differentiation (CD) 163(+) macrophages and CD8(+) T-cells, and to clarify the prognostic effects of these cells in patients with invasive extrahepatic bile duct cancer (EHBC). The numbers of CD8(+) T-cells in cancer cell nests and CD163(+) macrophages in tumor stroma were evaluated using immunohistochemistry in 101 resected EHBC specimens. Correlations with clinicopathological variables and overall survival were analyzed. Perihilar EHBC and perineural invasion were significantly associated with a low number of tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T-cells. Poorly- differentiated histology and nodal metastasis were significantly associated with a high number of tumor-infiltrating CD163(+) macrophages. A combination of high number of CD8(+) T-cells and low number of CD163(+) macrophages was independently related to better overall survival in the whole patient cohort (hazard ratio=0.127, pCD163(+) macrophages in tumor stroma and CD8(+) T-cells in cancer cell nests have a prognostic impact in patients with EHBC following resection and also after adjuvant chemotherapy. Copyright© 2017 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  20. Cryptococcus neoformans activates bone marrow-derived conventional dendritic cells rather than plasmacytoid dendritic cells and down-regulates macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegemund, Sabine; Alber, Gottfried

    2008-04-01

    Induction of IL-12 and IL-23 is essential for protective immunity against Cryptococcusneoformans. The contribution of dendritic cells vs. macrophages to IL-12/23 production in response to C. neoformans infection is unclear. Activation of conventional bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC), plasmacytoid BMDC, and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMPhi) was assessed by analyzing cytokine responses and the expression of MHC-II, CD86, and CD80 in each cell type. Cryptococcus neoformans induced the release of IL-12/23p40 by BMDC, but not by BMMPhi, in a TLR2- and TLR4-independent but MyD88-dependent manner. Conventional BMDC rather than plasmacytoid BMDC up-regulated MHC-II and CD86, while BMMPhi down-regulated MHC-II and CD86 in response to C. neoformans. The up-regulation of MHC-II and CD86 on BMDC required MyD88. Our data point to conventional DC as critical IL-12/23-producing antigen-presenting cells during cryptococcosis.

  1. Inflammatory mechanisms in sepsis: elevated invariant natural killer T-cell numbers in mouse and their modulatory effect on macrophage function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Daithi S; Monaghan, Sean F; Thakkar, Rajan K; Tran, Mai L; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Gregory, Stephen H; Cioffi, William G; Ayala, Alfred

    2013-08-01

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT) cells are emerging as key mediators of innate immune cellular and inflammatory responses to sepsis and peritonitis. Invariant natural killer T cells mediate survival following murine septic shock. Macrophages are pivotal to survival following sepsis. Invariant natural killer T cells have been shown to modulate various mediators of the innate immune system, including macrophages. We demonstrate sepsis-inducing iNKT-cell exodus from the liver appearing in the peritoneal cavity, the source of the sepsis. This migration was affected by programmed death receptor 1. Programmed death receptor 1 is an inhibitory immune receptor, reported as ubiquitously expressed at low levels on iNKT cells. Programmed death receptor 1 has been associated with markers of human critical illness. Programmed death receptor 1-deficient iNKT cells failed to demonstrate similar migration. To the extent that iNKT cells affected peritoneal macrophage function, we assessed peritoneal macrophages' ability to phagocytose bacteria. Invariant natural killer T(-/-) mice displayed dysfunctional macrophage phagocytosis and altered peritoneal bacterial load. This dysfunction was reversed when peritoneal macrophages from iNKT(-/-) mice were cocultured with wild-type iNKT cells. Together, our results indicate that sepsis induces liver iNKT-cell exodus into the peritoneal cavity mediated by programmed death receptor 1, and these peritoneal iNKT cells appear critical to regulation of peritoneal macrophage phagocytic function. Invariant natural killer T cells offer therapeutic targets for modulating immune responses and detrimental effects of sepsis.

  2. Secondary Metabolites from Fungal Endophytes of Echinacea purpurea Suppress Cytokine Secretion by Macrophage-Type Cells.

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    Kaur, Amninder; Oberhofer, Martina; Juzumaite, Monika; Raja, Huzefa A; Gulledge, Travis V; Kao, Diana; Faeth, Stanley H; Laster, Scott M; Oberlies, Nicholas H; Cech, Nadja B

    2016-01-01

    Botanical extracts of Echinacea purpurea have been widely used for the treatment of upper respiratory infections. We sought to chemically examine fungal endophytes inhabiting E. purpurea, and to identify compounds produced by these endophytes with in vitro cytokine-suppressive activity. Twelve isolates from surface sterilized seeds of E. purpurea were subjected to fractionation and major components were isolated. Sixteen secondary metabolites belonging to different structural classes were identified from these isolates based on NMR and mass spectrometry data. The compounds were tested for their influence on cytokine secretion by murine macrophage-type cells. Alternariol (1), O-prenylporriolide (4), porritoxin (10) β-zearalenol (13), and (S)-zearalenone (14) inhibited production of TNF-α from RAW 264.7 macrophages stimulated with LPS in the absence of any significant cytotoxicity. This is the first report of a cytokine-suppressive effect for 4. The results of this study are particularly interesting given that they show the presence of compounds with cytokine-suppressive activity in endophytes from a botanical used to treat inflammation. Future investigations into the role of fungal endophytes in the biological activity of E. purpurea dietary supplements may be warranted.

  3. Induced pluripotent stem cell derived macrophages as a cellular system to study salmonella and other pathogens.

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    Christine Hale

    Full Text Available A number of pathogens, including several human-restricted organisms, persist and replicate within macrophages (Mφs as a key step in pathogenesis. The mechanisms underpinning such host-restricted intracellular adaptations are poorly understood, in part, due to a lack of appropriate model systems. Here we explore the potential of human induced pluripotent stem cell derived macrophages (iPSDMs to study such pathogen interactions. We show iPSDMs express a panel of established Mφ-specific markers, produce cytokines, and polarise into classical and alternative activation states in response to IFN-γ and IL-4 stimulation, respectively. iPSDMs also efficiently phagocytosed inactivated bacterial particles as well as live Salmonella Typhi and S. Typhimurium and were able to kill these pathogens. We conclude that iPSDMs can support productive Salmonella infection and propose this as a flexible system to study host/pathogen interactions. Furthermore, iPSDMs can provide a flexible and practical cellular platform for assessing host responses in multiple genetic backgrounds.

  4. Tumor cell alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity and its involvement in GcMAF-related macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Saharuddin B; Nagasawa, Hideko; Uto, Yoshihiro; Hori, Hitoshi

    2002-05-01

    Alpha-N-acetyl galactosaminidase (alpha-NaGalase) has been reported to accumulate in serum of cancer patients and be responsible for deglycosylation of Gc protein, which is a precursor of GcMAF-mediated macrophage activation cascade, finally leading to immunosuppression in advanced cancer patients. We studied the biochemical characterization of alpha-NaGalase from several human tumor cell lines. We also examined its effect on the potency of GcMAF to activate mouse peritoneal macrophage to produce superoxide in GcMAF-mediated macrophage activation cascade. The specific activity of alpha-NaGalases from human colon tumor cell line HCT116, human hepatoma cell line HepG2, and normal human liver cells (Chang liver cell line) were evaluated using two types of substrates; GalNAc-alpha-PNP (exo-type substrate) and Gal-beta-GalNAc-alpha-PNP (endo-type substrate). Tumor-derived alpha-NaGalase having higher activity than normal alpha-NaGalase, had higher substrate specificity to the exo-type substrate than to the endo-type substrate, and still maintained its activity at pH 7. GcMAF enhance superoxide production in mouse macrophage, and pre-treatment of GcMAF with tumor cell lysate reduce the activity. We conclude that tumor-derived alpha-NaGalase is different in biochemical characterization compared to normal alpha-NaGalase from normal Chang liver cells. In addition, tumor cell-derived alpha-NaGalase decreases the potency of GcMAF on macrophage activation.

  5. Nimbolide Inhibits Nuclear Factor-КB Pathway in Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Macrophages and Alleviates Experimental Colitis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Ji Yeon; Lee, Changhyun; Hwang, Sung Wook; Chun, Jaeyoung; Im, Jong Pil; Kim, Joo Sung

    2016-10-01

    Nimbolide is a limonoid extracted from neem tree (Azadirachta indica) that has antiinflammatory properties. The effect of nimbolide on the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), macrophages and in murine colitis models was investigated. The IEC COLO 205, the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7, and peritoneal macrophages from interleukin-10-deficient (IL-10(-/-) ) mice were preconditioned with nimbolide and then stimulated with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) or lipopolysaccharide. Dextran sulfate sodium-induced acute colitis model and chronic colitis model in IL-10(-/-) mice were used for in vivo experiments. Nimbolide significantly suppressed the expression of inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, and TNF-α) and inhibited the phosphorylation of IκBα and the DNA-binding affinity of NF-κB in IECs and macrophages. Nimbolide ameliorated weight loss, colon shortening, disease activity index score, and histologic scores in dextran sulfate sodium colitis. It also improved histopathologic scores in the chronic colitis of IL-10(-/-) mice. Staining for phosphorylated IκBα was significantly decreased in the colon tissue after treatment with nimbolide in both models. Nimbolide inhibits NF-κB signaling in IECs and macrophages and ameliorates experimental colitis in mice. These results suggest nimbolide could be a potentially new treatment for inflammatory bowel disease. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Playing hide-and-seek with host macrophages through the use of mycobacterial cell envelope phthiocerol dimycocerosates and phenolic glycolipids

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    Ainhoa eARBUES

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterial pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB, have evolved a remarkable ability to evade the immune system in order to survive and to colonize the host. Among the most important evasion strategies is the capacity of these bacilli to parasitize host macrophages, since these are major effector cells against intracellular pathogens that can be used as long-term cellular reservoirs. Mycobacterial pathogens employ an array of virulence factors that manipulate macrophage function to survive and establish infection. Until recently, however, the role of mycobacterial cell envelope lipids as virulence factors in macrophage subversion has remained elusive. Here, we will address exclusively the proposed role for phthiocerol dimycocerosates (DIM in the modulation of the resident macrophage response and that of phenolic glycolipids (PGL in the regulation of the recruitment and phenotype of incoming macrophage precursors to the site of infection. We will provide a unique perspective of potential additional functions for these lipids, and highlight obstacles and opportunities to further understand their role in the pathogenesis of TB and other mycobacterial diseases.

  7. Myelopoietic efficacy of orlistat in murine hosts bearing T cell lymphoma: implication in macrophage differentiation and activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Shiva; Kumar, Ajay; Singh, Sukh Mahendra

    2013-01-01

    Orlistat, an inhibitor of fatty acid synthase (FASN), acts as an antitumor agent by blocking de novo fatty acid synthesis of tumor cells. Although, myelopoiesis also depends on de novo fatty acid synthesis, the effect of orlistat on differentiation of macrophages, which play a central role in host's antitumor defence, remains unexplored in a tumor-bearing host. Therefore, the present investigation was undertaken to examine the effect of orlistat administration on macrophage differentiation in a T cell lymphoma bearing host. Administration of orlistat (240 mg/kg/day/mice) to tumor-bearing mice resulted in a decline of tumor load accompanied by an augmentation of bone marrow cellularity and survival of bone marrow cells (BMC). The expression of apoptosis regulatory caspase-3, Bax and Bcl2 was modulated in the BMC of orlistat-administered tumor-bearing mice. Orlistat administration also resulted in an increase in serum level of IFN-γ along with decreased TGF-β and IL-10. BMC of orlistat-administered tumor-bearing mice showed augmented differentiation into macrophages accompanied by enhanced expression of macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and its receptor (M-CSFR). The macrophages differentiated from BMC of orlistat-administered mice showed characteristic features of M1 macrophage phenotype confirmed by expression of CD11c, TLR-2, generation of reactive oxygen species, phagocytosis, tumor cell cytotoxicity, production of IL-1,TNF-α and nitric oxide. These novel findings indicate that orlistat could be useful to support myelopoesis in a tumor-bearing host.

  8. Mycelial Extract of Phellinus linteus Induces Cell Death in A549 Lung Cancer Cells and Elevation of Nitric Oxide in Raw 264.7 Macrophage Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Jin; Kwon, Ho-Kyun; Lee, Dong-Soo; Lee, Seung-Woo; Lee, Kye-Kwan; Kim, Kyu-Joong; Kim, Jong-Lae

    2006-09-01

    In the present study, in order to investigate the anti-proliferative phenomenon of PLME, the effects of mycelial extract of Phellinus linteus (PLME) on the growth of human lung carcinoma cell line A549 was examined. We studied on the effects of PLME on the release of nitric oxide (NO) in mouse macrophage Raw 264.7 cells. Treatment of PLME to A549 cells resulted in the growth inhibition, morphological change and induction of apoptotic cell death in a dose-dependent manner as measured by MTT assay. We found that PLME stimulated a dose-dependent increase in NO production. These findings suggest that PLME enhances the anti-tumoral activity of macrophage and may be a potential therapeutic agent for the control of human lung carcinoma cells.

  9. Differential cell reaction upon Toll-like receptor 4 and 9 activation in human alveolar and lung interstitial macrophages

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    Meyerhans Andreas

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigations on pulmonary macrophages (MΦ mostly focus on alveolar MΦ (AM as a well-defined cell population. Characteristics of MΦ in the interstitium, referred to as lung interstitial MΦ (IM, are rather ill-defined. In this study we therefore aimed to elucidate differences between AM and IM obtained from human lung tissue. Methods Human AM and IM were isolated from human non-tumor lung tissue from patients undergoing lung resection. Cell morphology was visualized using either light, electron or confocal microscopy. Phagocytic activity was analyzed by flow cytometry as well as confocal microscopy. Surface marker expression was measured by flow cytometry. Toll-like receptor (TLR expression patterns as well as cytokine expression upon TLR4 or TLR9 stimulation were assessed by real time RT-PCR and cytokine protein production was measured using a fluorescent bead-based immunoassay. Results IM were found to be smaller and morphologically more heterogeneous than AM, whereas phagocytic activity was similar in both cell types. HLA-DR expression was markedly higher in IM compared to AM. Although analysis of TLR expression profiles revealed no differences between the two cell populations, AM and IM clearly varied in cell reaction upon activation. Both MΦ populations were markedly activated by LPS as well as DNA isolated from attenuated mycobacterial strains (M. bovis H37Ra and BCG. Whereas AM expressed higher amounts of inflammatory cytokines upon activation, IM were more efficient in producing immunoregulatory cytokines, such as IL10, IL1ra, and IL6. Conclusion AM appear to be more effective as a non-specific first line of defence against inhaled pathogens, whereas IM show a more pronounced regulatory function. These dissimilarities should be taken into consideration in future studies on the role of human lung MΦ in the inflammatory response.

  10. Prostaglandin E2 regulates macrophage colony stimulating factor secretion by human bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besse, A; Trimoreau, F; Faucher, J L; Praloran, V; Denizot, Y

    1999-07-08

    Bone marrow stromal cells regulate marrow haematopoiesis by secreting growth factors such as macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) that regulates the proliferation, differentiation and several functions of cells of the mononuclear-phagocytic lineage. By using a specific ELISA we found that their constitutive secretion of M-CSF is enhanced by tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). The lipid mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) markedly reduces in a time- and dose-dependent manner the constitutive and TNF-alpha-induced M-CSF synthesis by bone marrow stromal cells. In contrast, other lipid mediators such as 12-HETE, 15-HETE, leukotriene B4, leukotriene C4 and lipoxin A4 have no effect. EP2/EP4 selective agonists (11-deoxy PGE1 and 1-OH PGE1) and EP2 agonist (19-OH PGE2) inhibit M-CSF synthesis by bone marrow stromal cells while an EP1/EP3 agonist (sulprostone) has no effect. Stimulation with PGE2 induces an increase of intracellular cAMP levels in bone marrow stromal cells. cAMP elevating agents (forskolin and cholera toxin) mimic the PGE2-induced inhibition of M-CSF production. In conclusion, PGE2 is a potent regulator of M-CSF production by human bone marrow stromal cells, its effects being mediated via cAMP and PGE receptor EP2/EP4 subtypes.

  11. 7-Ketocholesterol Induces Cell Apoptosis by Activation of Nuclear Factor kappa B in Mouse Macrophages

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    Huang,Zhenyu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available

    We investigated the molecular mechanisms responsible for the induction of apoptosis in mouse monocytic macrophage cell line J774A.1 stimulated by 7-ketocholesterol (7-KC. Cell apoptosis was detected by Annexin V-propidium iodide (PI staining. The DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB was assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA. Results showed that 7-KC-stimulation in J774A.1 cells activated NF-kappaB, which is involved in cell apoptosis, in a time- and dose-dependent manners. 7-KC was also found to increase the binding activity of NF-kappaB to specific DNA binding sites, a possible mechanism for the induction of the cell apoptosis. Moreover, these effects were partially inhibited by pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC, an NF-kappaB inhibitor. Taken together, 7-KC may be an important factor in atherosclerosis due to the ability of 7-KC to induce cell apoptosis, which is at least partially mediated through the activation of NF-kappaB.

  12. Identification of the Common Origins of Osteoclasts, Macrophages, and Dendritic Cells in Human Hematopoiesis

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    Yanling Xiao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Osteoclasts (OCs originate from the myeloid cell lineage, but the successive steps in their lineage commitment are ill-defined, especially in humans. To clarify OC origin, we sorted cell populations from pediatric bone marrow (BM by flow cytometry and assessed their differentiation potential in vitro. Within the CD11b−CD34+c-KIT+ BM cell population, OC-differentiation potential was restricted to FLT3+ cells and enriched in an IL3 receptor (Rαhigh subset that constituted less than 0.5% of total BM. These IL3Rαhigh cells also generated macrophages (MΦs and dendritic cells (DCs but lacked granulocyte (GR-differentiation potential, as demonstrated at the clonal level. The IL3Rαlow subset was re-defined as common progenitor of GR, MΦ, OC, and DC (GMODP and gave rise to the IL3Rαhigh subset that was identified as common progenitor of MΦ, OC, and DC (MODP. Unbiased transcriptome analysis of CD11b−CD34+c-KIT+FLT3+ IL3Rαlow and IL3Rαhigh subsets corroborated our definitions of the GMODP and MODP and their developmental relationship.

  13. Identification of the Common Origins of Osteoclasts, Macrophages, and Dendritic Cells in Human Hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yanling; Zijl, Sebastiaan; Wang, Liqin; de Groot, Daniel C; van Tol, Maarten J; Lankester, Arjan C; Borst, Jannie

    2015-06-01

    Osteoclasts (OCs) originate from the myeloid cell lineage, but the successive steps in their lineage commitment are ill-defined, especially in humans. To clarify OC origin, we sorted cell populations from pediatric bone marrow (BM) by flow cytometry and assessed their differentiation potential in vitro. Within the CD11b(-)CD34(+)c-KIT(+) BM cell population, OC-differentiation potential was restricted to FLT3(+) cells and enriched in an IL3 receptor (R)α(high) subset that constituted less than 0.5% of total BM. These IL3Rα(high) cells also generated macrophages (MΦs) and dendritic cells (DCs) but lacked granulocyte (GR)-differentiation potential, as demonstrated at the clonal level. The IL3Rα(low) subset was re-defined as common progenitor of GR, MΦ, OC, and DC (GMODP) and gave rise to the IL3Rα(high) subset that was identified as common progenitor of MΦ, OC, and DC (MODP). Unbiased transcriptome analysis of CD11b(-)CD34(+)c-KIT(+)FLT3(+) IL3Rα(low) and IL3Rα(high) subsets corroborated our definitions of the GMODP and MODP and their developmental relationship.

  14. Pioglitazone treatment reduces adipose tissue inflammation through reduction of mast cell and macrophage number and by improving vascularity.

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    Michael Spencer

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue in insulin resistant subjects contains inflammatory cells and extracellular matrix components. This study examined adipose pathology of insulin resistant subjects who were treated with pioglitazone or fish oil.Adipose biopsies were examined from nine insulin resistant subjects before/after treatment with pioglitazone 45 mg/day for 12 weeks and also from 19 subjects who were treated with fish oil (1,860 mg EPA, 1,500 mg DHA daily. These studies were performed in a clinical research center setting.Pioglitazone treatment increased the cross-sectional area of adipocytes by 18% (p = 0.01, and also increased capillary density without affecting larger vessels. Pioglitazone treatment decreased total adipose macrophage number by 26%, with a 56% decrease in M1 macrophages and an increase in M2 macrophages. Mast cells were more abundant in obese versus lean subjects, and were decreased from 24 to 13 cells/mm(2 (p = 0.02 in patients treated with pioglitazone, but not in subjects treated with FO. Although there were no changes in total collagen protein, pioglitazone increased the amount of elastin protein in adipose by 6-fold.The PPARγ agonist pioglitazone increased adipocyte size yet improved other features of adipose, increasing capillary number and reducing mast cells and inflammatory macrophages. The increase in elastin may better permit adipocyte expansion without triggering cell necrosis and an inflammatory reaction.

  15. Regulation of the expression of chaperone gp96 in macrophages and dendritic cells.

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    Lutz Wolfram

    Full Text Available The chaperone function of the ER-residing heat shock protein gp96 plays an important role in protein physiology and has additionally important immunological functions due to its peptide-binding capacity. Low amounts of gp96 stimulate immunity; high quantities induce tolerance by mechanisms not fully understood. A lack of gp96 protein in intestinal macrophages (IMACs from Crohn`s disease (CD patients correlates with loss of tolerance against the host gut flora, leading to chronic inflammation. Since gp96 shows dose-dependent direction of immunological reactions, we studied primary IMACs and developed cell models to understand the regulation of gp96 expression. Induction of gp96-expression was higher in in vitro differentiated dendritic cells (i.v.DCs than in in vitro differentiated macrophages (i.v.MACs, whereas monocytes (MOs expressed only low gp96 levels. The highest levels of expression were found in IMACs. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, muramyl dipeptide (MDP, tumour necrosis factor (TNF, and Interleukin (IL-4 induced gp96-expression, while IL12, IL-17, IL-23 and interferon (IFN-γ were not effective indicating that Th1 and Th17 cells are probably not involved in the induction of gp96. Furthermore, gp96 was able to induce its own expression. The ER-stress inducer tunicamycin increased gp96-expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Both ulcerative colitis (UC and CD patients showed significantly elevated gp96 mRNA levels in intestinal biopsies which correlated positively with the degree of inflammation of the tissue. Since gp96 is highly expressed on the one hand upon stress induction as during inflammation and on the other hand possibly mediating tolerance, these results will help to understand the whether gp96 plays a role in the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD.

  16. Hypoxic pretreatment of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells regulating macrophage polarization

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    Chuan TONG

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the effect of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs on macrophage polarization under hypoxia. Methods  hUC-MSCs were obtained by explants adherent culture and cultured under normoxia (21% O2 and hypoxia (5% O2. The multi-directional differentiation of hUC-MSCs was observed by osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation induction. Live/death staining was performed to detect the cell viability, and ELISA was executed to detect the protein content in supernatant of hUC-MSCs. Transwell chamber was employed to co-culture the hUC-MSCs cultured under normoxia and hypoxia and macrophage (THP-1 stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (IPS, then the polarization of THP-1 was detected by immunofluorescence, and the secretions of inflammatory factor and anti-inflammatory factor of THP-1 were detected by ELISA. Results  hUC-MSCs cultured under hypoxia showed the ability of osteogenic and adipogenic multi-directional differentiation. Live/death staining showed the high cell viability of hUC-MSCs cultured under normoxia and hypoxia. The expression levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO were significantly higher in the hUC-MSCs cultured under hypoxia than in those cultured under normoxia. hUCMSCs cultured under hypoxia promoted the polarization of THP-1 to M2, obviously reduced the expression of TNF-α and IL-1β, and increased the expression of IL-10 significantly. Conclusion hUC-MSCs cultured under hypoxia may promote the polarization of THP-1 to M2 and improve the viability of anti-inflammatory. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.07.01

  17. Characterization of PAMP/PRR interactions in European eel (Anguilla anguilla) macrophage-like primary cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callol, A; Roher, N; Amaro, C; MacKenzie, S

    2013-10-01

    The eel (Anguilla anguilla) has been identified as a vulnerable species with stocks dramatically declining over the past decade. In an effort to support the species from overfishing of wild stocks increased interest in eel aquaculture has been notable. In order to expand the scarce knowledge concerning the biology of this species significant research efforts are required in several fields of biology. The development of cell culture systems to study the immune response is a key step towards an increased understanding of the immune response and to develop resources to support further study in this threatened species. Macrophages are one of the most important effector cells of the innate immune system. The capacity to engulf pathogens and orchestrate the immune response relies on the existence of different surface receptors, such as scavenger receptors and toll-like receptors. We have developed and described an eel macrophage-like in vitro model and studied its functional and transcriptomic responses. Macrophage-like cells from both head kidney and purified peripheral blood leukocytes were obtained and phagocytic activity measured for different whole bacteria and yeast. Moreover, based on PAMP-PRR association the innate immune response of both head kidney and PBL derived macrophage-like cells was evaluated against different pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Results highlight that peptidoglycan stimulation strongly induces inflammatory mRNA expression reflected in the up-regulation of pro-inflammatory genes IL1β and IL18 in PBL derived cells whereas IL8 is upregulated in head kidney derived cells. Furthermore TLR2 mRNA abundance is regulated by all stimuli supporting a multifunctional role for this pathogen recognition receptor (PRR) in eel macrophage-like cells.

  18. A transmission electron microscopic study of microglia/macrophages in the hippocampal cortex and neocortex following chronic exposure to valproate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobaniec-Lotowska, Maria E

    2005-04-01

    In chronic administration of sodium valproate to rats, significant disorders of structural integrity of the hippocampal gyrus and the neocortex of the temporal lobe, observed in the last two stages of the experiment (after 9 and 12 months), coexisted with increased number of microglial cells and, especially after 12 months, with intense phagocytic activity within these cells. At the ultrastructural level, phagocyte microglial cells were hypertrophied with several broadened processes. Their cytoplasm contained rich lysosomal apparatus, numerous lipofuscin-like structures, lipid droplets and multilaminated bodies. The nuclei of these cells were characteristic oval or round and sometimes triangle in shape with dense and highly clumped heterochromatin, distinctly accumulated under nuclear envelope, and sparse euchromatin. Microglia/macrophages were frequently present in a close vicinity of changed neuronal somata and also close to the altered elements of the neuropil pyramidal layer of the cortex. Microglial response may, together with abnormalities in neurones, astroglia and blood-brain barrier, play a significant role in the development of experimental valproate encephalopathy.

  19. Enhanced invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells after co-culture with THP-1-derived macrophages via the induction of EMT by IL-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehai, Che; Bo, Pan; Qiang, Tian; Lihua, Shang; Fang, Liu; Shi, Jin; Jingyan, Cao; Yan, Yu; Guangbin, Wang; Zhenjun, Yuan

    2014-07-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide, and the cause of death is metastasis. The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a key role in the process of metastasis. Macrophages within the lung cancer microenvironment release cytokines, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), and promote lung cancer cell invasion and metastasis. However, the interaction between macrophages and lung cancer cells and the effect of this interaction on the expression of IL-6, EMT, and the invasiveness of lung cancer cells remain unclear. Therefore, we established an in vitro co-culture model of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 or H1299 cells with THP-1-derived macrophages to illuminate the important role of macrophages in the invasion of lung cancer. In this study, we demonstrated that the concentrations of IL-6 in the co-culture supernatants were significantly increased compared with controls. Thus, a complex chemical cross-talk is induced by the indirect cell-to-cell contact between lung cancer cells and THP-1-derived macrophages. THP-1-derived macrophages appeared to play an important initiator role in the process. The analysis of the mRNA expression profiles of the sorted cells from the co-culture system revealed that the co-cultured lung cancer cells are the main source of the observed increase in IL-6 secretion. In addition, the interactions between lung cancer cells and THP-1-derived macrophages are bidirectional. The THP-1-derived macrophages underwent differentiation towards the M2-macrophage phenotype during the co-culture process. The expression of IL-6 was correlated with the induction of EMT, which contributed to a significant increase in the invasiveness of the A549 and H1299 cells in vitro. In addition, the addition of an anti-IL-6 antibody reversed these changes. In summary, we demonstrated that the in vitro co-culture of A549 or H1299 cells with THP-1-derived macrophages upregulates IL-6 expression, which increases the invasion ability of the A549 and

  20. Human mesenchymal stem cells alter macrophage phenotype and promote regeneration via homing to the kidney following ischemia-reperfusion injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wise, Andrea F; Williams, Timothy M; Kiewiet, Mensiena B G; Payne, Natalie L; Siatskas, Christopher; Samuel, Chrishan S; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) ameliorate injury and accelerate repair in many organs, including the kidney, although the reparative mechanisms and interaction with macrophages have not been elucidated. This study investigated the reparative potential of human bone marrow-derived MSCs and traced thei

  1. Human mesenchymal stem cells alter macrophage phenotype and promote regeneration via homing to the kidney following ischemia-reperfusion injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wise, Andrea F; Williams, Timothy M; Kiewiet, Mensiena B G; Payne, Natalie L; Siatskas, Christopher; Samuel, Chrishan S; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) ameliorate injury and accelerate repair in many organs, including the kidney, although the reparative mechanisms and interaction with macrophages have not been elucidated. This study investigated the reparative potential of human bone marrow-derived MSCs and traced thei

  2. Distribution of Matrix Metalloproteinases in Human Atherosclerotic Carotid Plaques and Their Production by Smooth Muscle Cells and Macrophage Subsets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, Nynke A.; de Vries, Bastiaan M. Wallis; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Harlaar, Niels J.; Tio, Rene A.; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.; van Dam, Gooitzen M.; Boersma, Hendrikus H.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Westra, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the potential of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) sense for detection of atherosclerotic plaque instability was explored. Secondly, expression of MMPs by macrophage subtypes and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) was investigated. Twenty-three consecutive plaques removed during carotid endarter

  3. Distinct cytokine release profiles from human endothelial and THP-1 macrophage-like cells exposed to different amphotericin B formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtinen, Lloyd W; Bremer, Lindsay A; Prall, David N; Schwartzhoff, Jenifer; Hartsel, Scott C

    2005-01-01

    Amphotericin B(AmB) formulations, Fungizone, and Amphotec caused substantially greater proinflammatory cytokine release than AmBisome (L-AMB) and Abelcet in TPA differentiated THP-1 macrophages as determined by antibody based protein arrays. Lipopolysaccharide but not AmB induced significant pro-inflammatory cytokines in human endothelial cells.

  4. Regulation of alternative macrophage activation in the liver following acetaminophen intoxication by stem cell-derived tyrosine kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, Carol R., E-mail: cgardner@pharmacy.rutgers.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Hankey, Pamela [Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Science, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Mishin, Vladimir; Francis, Mary [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Yu, Shan [Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Science, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Stem cell-derived tyrosine kinase (STK) is a transmembrane receptor reported to play a role in macrophage switching from a classically activated/proinflammatory phenotype to an alternatively activated/wound repair phenotype. In the present studies, STK{sup −/−} mice were used to assess the role of STK in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity as evidence suggests that the pathogenic process involves both of these macrophage subpopulations. In wild type mice, centrilobular hepatic necrosis and increases in serum transaminase levels were observed within 6 h of acetaminophen administration (300 mg/kg, i.p.). Loss of STK resulted in a significant increase in sensitivity of mice to the hepatotoxic effects of acetaminophen and increased mortality, effects independent of its metabolism. This was associated with reduced levels of hepatic glutathione, rapid upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, and prolonged induction of heme oxygenase-1, suggesting excessive oxidative stress in STK{sup −/−} mice. F4/80, a marker of mature macrophages, was highly expressed on subpopulations of Kupffer cells in livers of wild type, but not STK{sup −/−} mice. Whereas F4/80{sup +} macrophages rapidly declined in the livers of wild type mice following acetaminophen intoxication, they increased in STK{sup −/−} mice. In wild type mice hepatic expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-12, products of classically activated macrophages, increased after acetaminophen administration. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and its receptor, CCR2, as well as IL-10, mediators involved in recruiting and activating anti-inflammatory/wound repair macrophages, also increased in wild type mice after acetaminophen. Loss of STK blunted the effects of acetaminophen on expression of TNFα, IL-1β, IL-12, MCP-1 and CCR2, while expression of IL-10 increased. Hepatic expression of CX3CL1, and its receptor, CX3CR1 also increased in STK{sup −/−} mice

  5. Exosomes released from M. tuberculosis infected cells can suppress IFN-γ mediated activation of naive macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prachi P Singh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb are known to be refractory to IFN-γ stimulation. Previous studies have shown that M.tb express components such as the 19-kDa lipoprotein and peptidoglycan that can bind to macrophage receptors including the Toll-like receptor 2 resulting in the loss in IFN-γ responsiveness. However, it is unclear whether this effect is limited to infected macrophages. We have previously shown that M.tb-infected macrophages release exosomes which are 30-100 nm membrane bound vesicles of endosomal origin that function in intercellular communication. These exosomes contain mycobacterial components including the 19-kDa lipoprotein and therefore we hypothesized that macrophages exposed to exosomes may show limited response to IFN-γ stimulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Exosomes were isolated from resting as well as M.tb-infected RAW264.7 macrophages. Mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMØ were treated with exosomes +/- IFN-γ. Cells were harvested and analyzed for suppression of IFN-γ responsive genes by flow cytometry and real time PCR. We found that exosomes derived from M.tb H37Rv-infected but not from uninfected macrophages inhibited IFN-γ induced MHC class II and CD64 expression on BMMØ. This inhibition was only partially dependent on the presence of lipoproteins but completely dependent on TLR2 and MyD88. The exosomes isolated from infected cells did not inhibit STAT1 Tyrosine phosphorylation but down-regulated IFN-γ induced expression of the class II major histocompatibility complex transactivator; a key regulator of class II MHC expression. Microarray studies showed that subsets of genes induced by IFN-γ were inhibited by exosomes from H37Rv-infected cells including genes involved in antigen presentation. Moreover, this set of genes partially overlapped with the IFN-γ-induced genes inhibited by H37Rv infection. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that exosomes, as

  6. P2X7R activation drives distinct IL-1 responses in dendritic cells compared to macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Englezou, Pavlos C.; Rothwell, Simon W.; Ainscough, Joseph S.; Brough, David; Landsiedel, Robert; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Kimber, Ian; Dearman, Rebecca J

    2015-01-01

    The P2X7R is a functionally distinct member of the P2X family of non-selective cation channels associated with rapid activation of the inflammasome complex and signalling interleukin (IL)-1β release in macrophages. The main focus of this investigation was to compare P2X7R-driven IL-1 production by primary murine bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC) and macrophages (BMM). P2X7R expression in murine BMDC and BMM at both transcriptional (P2X7A variant) and protein levels was demonstrated....

  7. Metformin Reduces Desmoplasia in Pancreatic Cancer by Reprogramming Stellate Cells and Tumor-Associated Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao Incio

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is a highly desmoplastic tumor with a dismal prognosis for most patients. Fibrosis and inflammation are hallmarks of tumor desmoplasia. We have previously demonstrated that preventing the activation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs and alleviating desmoplasia are beneficial strategies in treating PDAC. Metformin is a widely used glucose-lowering drug. It is also frequently prescribed to diabetic pancreatic cancer patients and has been shown to associate with a better outcome. However, the underlying mechanisms of this benefit remain unclear. Metformin has been found to modulate the activity of stellate cells in other disease settings. In this study, we examine the effect of metformin on PSC activity, fibrosis and inflammation in PDACs.In overweight, diabetic PDAC patients and pre-clinical mouse models, treatment with metformin reduced levels of tumor extracellular matrix (ECM components, in particular hyaluronan (HA. In vitro, we found that metformin reduced TGF-ß signaling and the production of HA and collagen-I in cultured PSCs. Furthermore, we found that metformin alleviates tumor inflammation by reducing the expression of inflammatory cytokines including IL-1β as well as infiltration and M2 polarization of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs in vitro and in vivo. These effects on macrophages in vitro appear to be associated with a modulation of the AMPK/STAT3 pathway by metformin. Finally, we found in our preclinical models that the alleviation of desmoplasia by metformin was associated with a reduction in ECM remodeling, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT and ultimately systemic metastasis.Metformin alleviates the fibro-inflammatory microenvironment in obese/diabetic individuals with pancreatic cancer by reprogramming PSCs and TAMs, which correlates with reduced disease progression. Metformin should be tested/explored as part of the treatment strategy in overweight diabetic PDAC patients.

  8. Peroxiredoxin I deficiency attenuates phagocytic capacity of macrophage in clearance of the red blood cells damaged by oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ying-Hao; Kwon, Taeho; Kim, Sun-Uk; Ha, Hye-Lin; Lee, Tae-Hoon; Kim, Jin-Man; Jo, Eun-Kyeong; Kim, Bo Yeon; Yoon, Do Young; Yu, Dae-Yeul

    2012-10-01

    The role of peroxiredoxin (Prx) I as an erythrocyte antioxidant defense in red blood cells (RBCs) is controversial. Here we investigated the function of Prx I by using Prx I(-/-) and Prx I/II(-/-) mice. Prx I(-/-) mice exhibited a normal blood profile. However, Prx I/II(-/-) mice showed more significantly increased Heinz body formation as compared with Prx II(-/-) mice. The clearance rate of Heinz body-containing RBCs in Prx I(-/-) mice decreased significantly through the treatment of aniline hydrochloride (AH) compared with wild-type mice. Prx I deficiency decreased the phagocytic capacity of macrophage in clearing Heinz body-containing RBCs. Our data demonstrate that Prx I deficiency did not cause hemolytic anemia, but showed that further increased hemolytic anemia symptoms in Prx II(-/-) mice by attenuating phagocytic capacity of macrophage in oxidative stress damaged RBCs, suggesting a novel role of Prx I in phagocytosis of macrophage.

  9. Splenic B cells from Hymenolepis diminuta-infected mice ameliorate colitis independent of T cells and via cooperation with macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, José L; Wang, Arthur; Fernando, Maria R; Graepel, Rabea; Leung, Gabriella; van Rooijen, Nico; Sigvardsson, Mikael; McKay, Derek M

    2015-01-01

    Helminth parasites provoke multicellular immune responses in their hosts that can suppress concomitant disease. The gut lumen-dwelling tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta, unlike other parasites assessed as helminth therapy, causes no host tissue damage while potently suppressing murine colitis. With the goal of harnessing the immunomodulatory capacity of infection with H. diminuta, we assessed the putative generation of anti-colitic regulatory B cells following H. diminuta infection. Splenic CD19(+) B cells isolated from mice infected 7 [HdBc(7(d))] and 14 d (but not 3 d) previously with H. diminuta and transferred to naive mice significantly reduced the severity of dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS)-, oxazolone-, and dextran-sodium sulfate-induced colitis. Mechanistic studies with the DNBS model, revealed the anti-colitic HdBc(7(d)) was within the follicular B cell population and its phenotype was not dependent on IL-4 or IL-10. The HdBc(7(d)) were not characterized by increased expression of CD1d, CD5, CD23, or IL-10 production, but did spontaneously, and upon LPS plus anti-CD40 stimulation, produce more TGF-β than CD19(+) B cells from controls. DNBS-induced colitis in RAG1(-/-) mice was inhibited by administration of HdBc(7(d)), indicating a lack of a requirement for T and B cells in the recipient; however, depletion of macrophages in recipient mice abrogated the anti-colitic effect of HdBc(7(d)). Thus, in response to H. diminuta, a putatively unique splenic CD19(+) B cell with a functional immunoregulatory program is generated that promotes the suppression of colitis dominated by TH1, TH2, or TH1-plus-TH2 events, and may do so via the synthesis of TGF-β and the generation of, or cooperation with, a regulatory macrophage.

  10. Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation induced by the synergistic effects of low dose irradiation and adoptive T cell therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, Noemi

    2016-12-19

    The detection of cancerous cells by the immune system elicits spontaneous antitumour immune responses. Still, during their progression, tumours acquire characteristics that enable them to escape immune surveillance. Cancer immunotherapy aims to reverse tumour immune evasion by activating and directing the immune system against transformed tumour cells. However, the tumours' intrinsic resistance mechanisms limit the success of many immunotherapeutic approaches. The functionally and morphologically abnormal tumour vasculature forms a physical barrier and prevents the entry of tumour-reactive immune effector cells, while the immunosuppressive tumour microenvironment impairs their function. To block tumour immune evasion, therapeutic strategies are being developed that combine cancer immunotherapy with treatment modalities, such as radiotherapy, that reprogram the tumour microenvironment to increase treatment efficacies and improve clinical outcome. In various preclinical models radiotherapy was shown to enhance the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. Our group showed that in the RIP1-TAg5 mouse model of spontaneous insulinoma, the transfer of in vitro-activated tumour-specific T cells induces T cell infiltration and promotes long-term survival only in combination with neoadjuvant local low dose irradiation (LDI). These treatment effects were mediated by iNOS+ macrophages. In this thesis, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the improved T cell infiltration and prolonged survival upon combination therapy with adoptive T cell transfer and local LDI. We demonstrate that combination therapy leads to a normalization of the aberrant tumour vasculature and endothelial activation, an increase in intratumoural macrophages, a reduction of intratumoural myeloid derived suppressor cells and, most importantly, to tumour regression. These findings suggest that this treatment inhibits tumour immune suppression but also facilitates immune effector cell infiltration through

  11. Induction of apoptosis and change of bcl—2 expression in macrophage Ana—1 cells by all—trans retinoic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YINDELING; XIUHAIREN; 等

    1996-01-01

    Macrophage cells play an important role in the initiation and regulation of the immune response.All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and its natural and synthetic analogs (retinoids)affect a large number of biological processes.Recently,retinoids have been shown promise in the therapy and prevention of various cancers.However,many interesting questions related to the activities of retinoids remain to be answered:(I) Molecular mechanisms by which retinoids exert their effects;(Ⅱ)why the clinical uses of retinoids give undesirable side effects of varying severity with a higher frequency of blood system symptoms;(Ⅲ)little is known for its impacts on macrophage cells etc.We set up this experiment,therefore,to examine the apoptosis of ATRA on macrophage Ana-1 cell line.Apoptosis of the cells was quantitated,after staining cells with propidium iodide(PI),by both accounting nuclear condensation and flow cytometry.When the cells were treated with ATRA at or higher than 1μM for more than 24h,significant amount of the apoptotic cells was observed.Induction of apoptosis of Ana-1 cells by ATRA was in time-and dose-dependent manners,exhibiting the similar pattern as the apoptosis induced by actinomycin D (ACTD).ATRA treatment of Ana-1 cells also caused the changes of the mRNA levels of apoptosis-associated gene bcl-2,as detected by Northern blot analysis.The temporal changes of bcl-2 expression by ATRA was also parallel to that by ACTD.In conclusion,ATRA can induce apoptosis in macrophage cells,which may be helpful in understanding of immunological functions retinoids.

  12. Inducing effects of macrophage stimulating protein on the expansion of early hematopoietic progenitor cells in liquid culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Li-xia; HUANG Yan-hong; CHENG La-mei; LEI Jun; WANG Qi-ru

    2007-01-01

    Background Macrophage stimulating protein (MSP) is produced by human bone marrow endothelial cells. In this study,we sought to observe its effects on inducing the expansion of early hematopoietic progenitor cells which were cultured in a liquid culture system in the presence of the combination of stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin 3 (IL-3), interleukin 6 (IL-6), granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), erythropoietin (EPO) (Cys) and MSP or of Cys and bone marrow endothelial cell conditioned medium (EC-CM).Methods Human bone marrow CD34+ cells were separated and cultured in a liquid culture system for 6 days.Granulocyte-macrophage colony forming unit (CFU-GM) and colony forming unit-granulocyte, erythrocyte, macrophage,megakaryocyte (CFU-GEMM) were employed to assay the effects of different treatment on the proliferation of hematopoeitic stem/progenitor cells. The nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reductive test and hoechest 33258 staining were employed to reflect the differentiation and apoptosis of the cells respectively.Results MSP inhibited the proliferation of CFU-GM and CFU-GEMM in semi-solid culture and the inhibitory effect on CFU-GEMM was stronger than on CFU-GM. MSP inhibited the differentiation of early hematopoietic progenitor cells induced by hematopoietic stimulators. Bone marrow (BM) CFU-GEMM was 2.3-fold or 1.7-fold increase or significantly decreased in either Cys+EC-CM, Cys+MSP or Cys compared with 0 hour control in liquid culture system after 6 days.Conclusion MSP, a hematopoietic inhibitor, inhibits the differentiation of early hematopoietic progenitor cells induced by hematopoietic stimulators and makes the early hematopoietic progenitor cells expand in a liquid culture system.

  13. Cell surface syndecan-1 contributes to binding and function of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) on epithelial tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualon, Tobias; Lue, Hongqi; Groening, Sabine; Pruessmeyer, Jessica; Jahr, Holger; Denecke, Bernd; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Ludwig, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Surface expressed proteoglycans mediate the binding of cytokines and chemokines to the cell surface and promote migration of various tumor cell types including epithelial tumor cells. We here demonstrate that binding of the chemokine-like inflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) to epithelial lung and breast tumor cell lines A549 and MDA-MB231 is sensitive to enzymatic digestion of heparan sulphate chains and competitive inhibition with heparin. Moreover, MIF interaction with heparin was confirmed by chromatography and a structural comparison indicated a possible heparin binding site. These results suggested that proteoglycans carrying heparan sulphate chains are involved in MIF binding. Using shRNA-mediated gene silencing, we identified syndecan-1 as the predominant proteoglycan required for the interaction with MIF. MIF binding was decreased by induction of proteolytic shedding of syndecan-1, which could be prevented by inhibition of the metalloproteinases involved in this process. Finally, MIF induced the chemotactic migration of A549 cells, wound closure and invasion into matrigel without affecting cell proliferation. These MIF-induced responses were abrogated by heparin or by silencing of syndecan-1. Thus, our study indicates that syndecan-1 on epithelial tumor cells promotes MIF binding and MIF-mediated cell migration. This may represent a relevant mechanism through which MIF enhances tumor cell motility and metastasis.

  14. Integrin CD11b positively regulates TLR4-induced signalling pathways in dendritic cells but not in macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Guang Sheng; Bennett, Jason; Woollard, Kevin J.; Szajna, Marta; Fossati-Jimack, Liliane; Taylor, Philip R.; Scott, Diane; Franzoso, Guido; Cook, H. Terence; Botto, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Tuned and distinct responses of macrophages and dendritic cells to Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) underpin the balance between innate and adaptive immunity. However, the molecule(s) that confer these cell-type-specific LPS-induced effects remain poorly understood. Here we report that the integrin αM (CD11b) positively regulates LPS-induced signalling pathways selectively in myeloid dendritic cells but not in macrophages. In dendritic cells, which express lower levels of CD14 and TLR4 than macrophages, CD11b promotes MyD88-dependent and MyD88-independent signalling pathways. In particular, in dendritic cells CD11b facilitates LPS-induced TLR4 endocytosis and is required for the subsequent signalling in the endosomes. Consistent with this, CD11b deficiency dampens dendritic cell-mediated TLR4-triggered responses in vivo leading to impaired T-cell activation. Thus, by modulating the trafficking and signalling functions of TLR4 in a cell-type-specific manner CD11b fine tunes the balance between adaptive and innate immune responses initiated by LPS.

  15. Monocyte/macrophage lineage commitment and distribution are affected by the lack of regulatory T cells in scurfy mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skuljec, Jelena; Cabanski, Maciej; Surdziel, Ewa; Lachmann, Nico; Brennig, Sebastian; Pul, Refik; Jirmo, Adan C; Habener, Anika; Visic, Julia; Dalüge, Kathleen; Hennig, Christian; Moritz, Thomas; Happle, Christine; Hansen, Gesine

    2016-07-01

    Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells play a pivotal role in maintaining immunological tolerance. Loss-of-function mutations in the Foxp3 gene result in multiorgan inflammation known as immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked syndrome in humans and scurfy (Sf) disease in mice. While the impact of missing Treg cells on adaptive immune cells is well documented, their role in regulation of myeloid cells remains unclear. Here we report that Sf mice exhibit an altered composition of stem and progenitor cells, characterized by increased numbers of myeloid precursors and higher efficiency of macrophage generation ex vivo. The proportion of monocytes/macrophages in the bone marrow, blood, and spleen was significantly elevated in Sf mice, which was accompanied with tissue-specific monocyte expression of homing receptor and phagocytic activity. Sf mice displayed high levels of M-CSF and other inflammatory cytokines, including monocyte-recruiting chemokines. Adoptive transfer of WT CD4(+) cells and in vivo neutralization of M-CSF normalized frequencies of monocyte subsets and their progenitors and reduced high levels of monocyte-related cytokines in Sf mice, while Treg cell transfer to RAG2(-/-) mice had no effect on myelopoiesis and monocyte/macrophage counts. Our findings illustrate that deregulated myelopoiesis in Sf mice is mainly caused by the inflammatory reaction resulting from the lack of Treg cells.

  16. Fast Electronic Solar Cell Tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathrop, J. W.; Saylor, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    Microcomputer controlled system gather current and voltage data. System consists of light source, microcomputer, programable dc power supply, analog/ digital interface, and data storage display equipment. Applies series of test loads to cell via programable dc power supply to obtain I/V characteristic curve and key cell-peformance parameter. Apparatus and programming technique are applicable to devices such as batteries and sensors.

  17. Sesamin inhibits macrophage-induced vascular endothelial growth factor and matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression and proangiogenic activity in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chun-Chung; Liu, Ko-Jiunn; Wu, Yu-Chen; Lin, Sue-Jane; Chang, Ching-Chun; Huang, Tze-Sing

    2011-06-01

    Sesamin is a sesame component with antihypertensive and antioxidative activities and has recently aroused much interest in studying its potential anticancer application. Macrophage is one of the infiltrating inflammatory cells in solid tumor and may promote tumor progression via enhancement of tumor angiogenesis. In this study, we investigated whether sesamin inhibited macrophage-enhanced proangiogenic activity of breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. Using vascular endothelial cell capillary tube and network formation assays, both breast cancer cell lines exhibited elevated proangiogenic activities after coculture with macrophages or pretreatment with macrophage-conditioned medium. This elevation of proangiogenic activity was drastically suppressed by sesamin. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) induced by macrophages in both cell lines were also inhibited by sesamin. Nuclear levels of HIF-1α and NF-κB, important transcription factors for VEGF and MMP-9 expression, respectively, were obviously reduced by sesamin. VEGF induction by macrophage in MCF-7 cells was shown to be via ERK, JNK, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and NF-κB-mediated pathways. These signaling molecules and additional p38(MAPK) were also involved in macrophage-induced MMP-9 expression. Despite such diverse pathways were induced by macrophage, only Akt and p38(MAPK) activities were potently inhibited by sesamin. Expression of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-α were substantially increased and involved in macrophage-induced VEGF and MMP-9 mRNA expression in MCF-7 cells. Sesamin effectively inhibited the expression of these cytokines to avoid the reinforced induction of VEGF and MMP-9. In conclusion, sesamin potently inhibited macrophage-enhanced proangiogenic activity of breast cancer cells via inhibition of VEGF and MMP-9 induction.

  18. Rheumatoid arthritis and pigmented villonodular synovitis: comparative analysis of cell polyploidy, cell cycle phases and expression of macrophage and fibroblast markers in proliferating synovial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, I; Weckauf, H; Helmchen, B; Ehemann, V; Penzel, R; Fink, B; Bernd, L; Autschbach, F

    2005-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) are aggressive diseases with progressive joint destruction. The present study aims to define cell cycle phases, polyploidy and the immunophenotype of proliferating synovial cells in both diseases. Synovial tissues from patients with proliferative-active RA, localized and diffuse PVNS were analysed by DNA flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry and double immunofluorescence with confocal laser scan microscopy. Expression of macrophage markers (CD68/CD163), fibroblast markers (h4Ph/CD55) and Ki67 antigen was examined. Synovial cells positive for either macrophage or fibroblast markers as well as double-labelled cells were found in both RA and PVNS. In RA, CD68/CD163+ synoviocytes were preferentially located in the vicinity of the synovial lining layer, while they were more randomly distributed in PVNS. Of cases with diffuse PVNS, 20% showed an aneuploid cell pattern. All samples of localized PVNS and RA were diploid. Proliferative activity was significantly higher in aneuploid PVNS. In spite of their histologically homogeneous appearance, proliferating synovial cells display a heterogeneous immunophenotype in both RA and PVNS, indicating functional properties of both macrophages and fibroblasts. Aneuploidy seems to be a special feature of diffuse PVNS.

  19. Identification of macrophage external membrane proteins and their possible role in cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlstein, E; Dienstman, S R; Defendi, V

    1978-10-01

    Starch-activated mouse peritoneal macrophages (STpMAC) plated on plastic demonstrate the adhesive properties typical for activated pMAC: attaching as round cells and, within 15 min, spreading out with marginal membrane ruffles. These attached STpMAC were labeled by lactoperoxidase-catalysed 125I surface iodination, sodium dodecyl-sulfate-lysed, and the lysates electrophoresed on polyacrylamide gels which were examined by autoradiography. The STpMAC morphological phenotype correlates with the labeling of a particular protein (195,000, estimated mol wt). Normal pMAC (NpMAC), from unstimulated mice, do not spread and do not display the 195,000 band. Both pMAC band patterns, including the 195,000 band, are relatively resistant to trypsin digestion, as is pMAC adhesion itself trypsin-resistant. Neither class of pMAC exhibits fibronectin (Cell Adhesion Factor, LETS protein) which is a component in the adhesive matrix of cells forming trypsin-sensitive monolayers. When pMAC are tested against antifibronectin antibody, these cells do not give immunofluorescent staining. In summary, two functions in pMAC adhesion, enzyme resistance and the ability to spread, appear related to molecular properties distinctive for pMAC surface protein.

  20. Upregulation of macrophage migration inhibitory factor and calgizzarin by androgen in TM4 mouse Sertoli cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroyuki Kasumi; Shinji Komori; Kazuko Sakata; Naoko Yamamoto; Tomohiko Yamasaki; Yonehiro Kanemura; Koji Koyama

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To identify proteins induced by androgen in Sertoli cells during spermatogenesis. Methods: We analyzed protein profiles in TM4 Sertoli cells treated with dihydrotestosterone (DHT) using surface enhanced laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS). Results: We found increases in the expression of a 5.0-kDa protein at 15 min, an 11.3-kDa protein at 24 h and 4.3 kDa, 5.7 kDa, 5.8 kDa, 9.95 kDa and 9.98 kDa proteins at 48 h after the treatment. In contrast, the expression of 6.3 kDa and 8.6 kDa proteins decreased at 30 min,and 4.9 kDa, 5.0 kDa, 12.4 kDa and 19.8 kDa proteins at 48 h after the treatment. The 11.3-kDa protein was identified as macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) known to having various functions. The 9.98-kDa protein was identified as calgizzarin related to calcium channels. The timing of their expression suggests that MIF and calgizzarin are involved in late regulation of spermatogenesis in Sertoli cells by androgen. Conclusion: MIF and calgizzarin are two important androgen-responsive proteins produced by Sertoli cells and they might play a role in regulating spermatogenesis.

  1. Upregulation of macrophage migration inhibitory factor and calgizzarin by androgen in TM4 mouse Sertoli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasumi, Hiroyuki; Komori, Shinji; Sakata, Kazuko; Yamamoto, Naoko; Yamasaki, Tomohiko; Kanemura, Yonehiro; Koyama, Koji

    2006-09-01

    To identify proteins induced by androgen in Sertoli cells during spermatogenesis. We analyzed protein profiles in TM4 Sertoli cells treated with dihydrotestosterone (DHT) using surface enhanced laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS). We found increases in the expression of a 5.0-kDa protein at 15 min, an 11.3-kDa protein at 24 h and 4.3 kDa, 5.7 kDa, 5.8 kDa, 9.95 kDa and 9.98 kDa proteins at 48 h after the treatment. In contrast, the expression of 6.3 kDa and 8.6 kDa proteins decreased at 30 min, and 4.9 kDa, 5.0 kDa, 12.4 kDa and 19.8 kDa proteins at 48 h after the treatment. The 11.3-kDa protein was identified as macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) known to having various functions. The 9.98-kDa protein was identified as calgizzarin related to calcium channels. The timing of their expression suggests that MIF and calgizzarin are involved in late regulation of spermatogenesis in Sertoli cells by androgen. MIF and calgizzarin are two important androgen-responsive proteins produced by Sertoli cells and they might play a role in regulating spermatogenesis.

  2. Electron Microscopy of Nanostructures in Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Købler, Carsten

    with cells is therefore increasingly more relevant from both an engineering and a toxicological viewpoint. My work involves developing and exploring electron microscopy (EM) for imaging nanostructures in cells, for the purpose of understanding nanostructure-cell interactions in terms of their possibilities...... in science and concerns in toxicology. In the present work, EM methods for imaging nanostructure-cell interactions have been explored, and the complex interactions documented and ordered. In particular the usability of the focused ion beam scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) was explored. Using EM...

  3. Crosstalk between Tumor Cells and Macrophages in Stroma Renders Tumor Cells as the Primary Source of MCP-1/CCL2 in Lewis Lung Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Teizo; Liu, Mingyong; Chen, Xin; Li, Liangzhu; Wang, Ji Ming

    2015-01-01

    The chemokine MCP-1/CCL2 is produced by a variety of tumors and plays an important role in cancer progression. We and others previously demonstrated that the primary source of MCP-1 in several mouse tumors, including 4T1 breast cancer, M5076 sarcoma, and B16 melanoma, was stromal cells. In the present study, we identified that tumor cells were the primary source of MCP-1 in Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC), because MCP-1 mRNA was highly expressed in tumors grown in both wild type (WT) and MCP-1(-/-) mice with elevated serum MCP-1 levels. Since LLC cells isolated from tumors expressed low levels of MCP-1 in vitro, it appeared that the tumor-stromal cell interaction in a tumor microenvironment increased MCP-1 expression in LLC cells. In fact, co-culture of LLC cells with normal mouse peritoneal macrophages or normal lung cells containing macrophages increased MCP-1 expression by LLC cells. Macrophages from TNFα(-/-) mice failed to activate LLC cells and anti-TNFα neutralizing antibody abolished the effect of WT macrophages on LLC cells. When LLC cells were transplanted into TNFα(-/-) mice, the levels of MCP-1 mRNA in tumors and serum MCP-1 levels were markedly lower as compared to WT mice, and importantly, tumors grew more slowly. Taken together, our results indicate that TNFα released by tumor cell-activated macrophages is critical for increased MCP-1 production by tumors cells. Thus, disruption of tumor-stromal cell interaction may inhibit tumor progression by reducing the production of tumor-promoting proinflammatory mediators, such as MCP-1.

  4. Crosstalk between Tumor Cells and Macrophages in Stroma Renders Tumor Cells as the Primary Source of MCP-1/CCL2 in Lewis Lung Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teizo eYoshimura

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The chemokine MCP-1/CCL2 is produced by a variety of tumors and plays an important role in cancer progression. We and others previously demonstrated that the primary source of MCP-1 in several mouse tumors, including 4T1 breast cancer, M5076 sarcoma and B16 melanoma, was stromal cells. In the present study, we identified that tumor cells were the primary source of MCP-1 in Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC, because MCP-1 mRNA was highly expressed in tumors grown in both WT and MCP-1-/- mice with elevated serum MCP-1 levels. Since LLC cells isolated from tumors expressed low levels of MCP-1 in vitro, it appeared that the tumor-stromal cell interaction in a tumor microenvironment increased MCP-1 expression in LLC cells. In fact, co-culture of LLC cells with normal mouse peritoneal macrophages or normal lung cells containing macrophages increased MCP-1 expression by LLC cells. Macrophages from TNFα-/- mice failed to activate LLC cells and anti-TNFα neutralizing antibody abolished the effect of WT macrophages on LLC cells. When LLC cells were transplanted into TNFα-/- mice, the levels of MCP-1 mRNA in tumors and serum MCP-1 levels were markedly lower as compared to WT mice, and importantly tumors grew more slowly. Taken together, our results indicate that TNFα released by tumor cell-activated macrophages is critical for increased MCP-1 production by tumors cells. Thus, disruption of tumor-stromal cell interaction may inhibit tumor progression by reducing the production of tumor-promoting proinflammatory mediators, such as MCP-1.

  5. Effects of autophagy regulation of tumor-associated macrophages on radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cells.

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    Shao, Le-Ning; Zhu, Bao-Song; Xing, Chun-Gen; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Young, Wu; Cao, Jian-Ping

    2016-03-01

    Tumor‑associated macrophages (TAMs), a major component of the tumor microenvironment, are crucial to the processes of tumor growth, infiltration and metastasis, and contribute to drug resistance. The importance of TAMs in radiation resistance of colorectal cancer remains unclear. To investigate the effects of autophagy regulation of TAMs on the radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cells, the current study induced TAM formation from THP‑1 monocyte cells. Sequential treatment of THP‑1 cells with PMA for 72 h and human recombinant interleukin‑4 for 24 h was used to stimulate THP‑1 differentiation to TAMs. Expression of the cell surface markers CD68, CD204 and CD206, and changes to cell morphology were used to confirm successful differentiation. The TAMs were stimulated to promote or inhibit autophagy during co‑culture with LoVo colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. The cells were irradiated, with subsequent measurement of LoVo colony formation and apoptosis. Additionally, the expression of p53, Bcl‑2, survivin and Smac proteins was assessed by western blotting. Monodansylcadaverin staining was used to analyze the presence of autophagic vacuoles in TAM, and western blot analysis was used to assess the expression of Beclin‑1, LC3B I and II, ATG‑3, ‑5 and ‑7. The results demonstrated TAM autophagy to be markedly altered by rapamycin and bafilomycin A1 treatment. Following co‑culture with TAMs, the colony formation rate and survival fraction of LoVo cells were significantly higher than those in the control group (PLoVo colorectal cancer cells. Upregulation of TAM autophagy using rapamycin exhibited more effective inhibition of LoVo colony formation than autophagy downregulation. Notably, apoptosis was significantly increased in LoVo cells when co‑cultured with TAMs only, or with rapamycin‑mediated autophagy upregulated TAMs, compared with LoVo cells cultured alone (PLoVo cells co‑cultured with TAMs, compared with the control group (P<0

  6. Quantification and localization of M2 macrophages in human kidneys with acute tubular injury

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    Palmer MB

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Matthew B Palmer,1 Alfred A Vichot,2 Lloyd G Cantley,2 Gilbert W Moeckel1 1Department of Pathology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA Abstract: This study addresses for the first time the question whether there is significant macrophage population in human kidney sections from patients with acute tubular injury (ATI. We examined therefore the interstitial macrophage population in human kidney tissue with biopsy-proven diagnosis of ATI, minimal change disease (MCD, and MCD with ATI. Kidney biopsies from patients with the above diagnoses were stained with antibodies directed against CD68 (general macrophage marker, CD163 (M2 marker, and HLA-DR (M1 marker and their respective electron microscopy samples were evaluated for the presence of interstitial macrophages. Our study shows that patients with ATI have significantly increased numbers of interstitial CD68+ macrophages, with an increase in both HLA-DR+ M1 macrophages and CD163+ M2 macrophages as compared to patients with MCD alone. Approximately 75% of macrophages were M2 (CD163+ whereas only 25% were M1 (HLA-DR+. M2 macrophages, which are believed to be critical for wound healing, were found to localize close to the tubular basement membrane of injured proximal tubule cells. Ultra structural examination showed close adherence of macrophages to the basement membrane of injured tubular epithelial cells. We conclude that macrophages accumulate around injured tubules following ATI and exhibit predominantly an M2 phenotype. We further speculate that macrophage-mediated repair may involve physical contact between the M2 macrophage and the injured tubular epithelial cell. Keywords: macrophages, acute kidney injury, CD163, HLA-DR, CD68, electron microscopy

  7. Hsp70 confines tumor progression of rat histiocytoma and impedes the cytotoxicity induced by natural killer cells and peritoneal macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amere Subbarao Sreedhar

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To study the role of inducible form of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in the host tumor regression of rat tumor model.Methods: We examined the role of Hsp70 in host tumorigenicity andin vitro cellular cytotoxicity using a rat histocytoma. The differential tumor growth and regression kinetics were studied and correlated with the expression of Hsp70, activation of macrophages and natural killer (NK) cells, and circulating or tumor infiltrating immune molecules in the host system.Results: The sub cuteaneous (s.c.) tumor regression was correlated with increased serum cytokines such as IL-12, TNFα,IFNγ and Hsp70. Despite of similar increase of Hsp70 in intraperitoneal (i.p.) tumor implanted animals, animals succumb to tumor growth, further, evidently, no immune molecule activation was observed. The viral promoter driven Hsp70 over expression in these tumor cells restrained solid tumor growth, however, failed to inhibit ascites growth. The NK cells from s.c. immunized animals induces cytotoxicity in the presence of anti-tumor antibody, which necessitated CD40-L expression, conversely, NK cells from i.p. immunized animals failed to induce cytotoxicity. The NK cells from s.c. or i.p. implanted animals with Hsp70 positive tumor cells failed to induce such cytotoxicity. The peritoneal macrophages isolated from s.c. tumor implanted animals when co-cultured with parental BC-8 cells lyses tumor cells, nevertheless entail macrophage specific TNFα expression. On the contrary, Hsp70 expressing BC-8 tumor cells were resistant to peritoneal macrophage induced cytolysis.Conclusions:This study brings out that Hsp70 possibly involved in regulating the host tumor response and cellular cytotoxicity.

  8. Probing host pathogen cross-talk by transcriptional profiling of both Mycobacterium tuberculosis and infected human dendritic cells and macrophages.

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    Ludovic Tailleux

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcriptional profiling using microarrays provides a unique opportunity to decipher host pathogen cross-talk on the global level. Here, for the first time, we have been able to investigate gene expression changes in both Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a major human pathogen, and its human host cells, macrophages and dendritic cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In addition to common responses, we could identify eukaryotic and microbial transcriptional signatures that are specific to the cell type involved in the infection process. In particular M. tuberculosis shows a marked stress response when inside dendritic cells, which is in accordance with the low permissivity of these specialized phagocytes to the tubercle bacillus and to other pathogens. In contrast, the mycobacterial transcriptome inside macrophages reflects that of replicating bacteria. On the host cell side, differential responses to infection in macrophages and dendritic cells were identified in genes involved in oxidative stress, intracellular vesicle trafficking and phagosome acidification. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides the proof of principle that probing the host and the microbe transcriptomes simultaneously is a valuable means to accessing unique information on host pathogen interactions. Our results also underline the extraordinary plasticity of host cell and pathogen responses to infection, and provide a solid framework to further understand the complex mechanisms involved in immunity to M. tuberculosis and in mycobacterial adaptation to different intracellular environments.

  9. Analysis of cell cycle and replication of mouse macrophages after in vivo and in vitro Cryptococcus neoformans infection using laser scanning cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Carolina; Tesfa, Lydia; Zhang, Jinghang; Rivera, Johanna; Gonçalves, Teresa; Casadevall, Arturo

    2012-04-01

    We investigated the outcome of the interaction of Cryptococcus neoformans with murine macrophages using laser scanning cytometry (LSC). Previous results in our lab had shown that phagocytosis of C. neoformans promoted cell cycle progression. LSC allowed us to simultaneously measure the phagocytic index, macrophage DNA content, and 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation such that it was possible to study host cell division as a function of phagocytosis. LSC proved to be a robust, reliable, and high-throughput method for quantifying phagocytosis. Phagocytosis of C. neoformans promoted cell cycle progression, but infected macrophages were significantly less likely to complete mitosis. Hence, we report a new cytotoxic effect associated with intracellular C. neoformans residence that manifested itself in impaired cell cycle completion as a consequence of a block in the G(2)/M stage of the mitotic cell cycle. Cell cycle arrest was not due to increased cell membrane permeability or DNA damage. We investigated alveolar macrophage replication in vivo and demonstrated that these cells are capable of low levels of cell division in the presence or absence of C. neoformans infection. In summary, we simultaneously studied phagocytosis, the cell cycle state of the host cell and pathogen-mediated cytotoxicity, and our results demonstrate a new cytotoxic effect of C. neoformans infection on murine macrophages: fungus-induced cell cycle arrest. Finally, we provide evidence for alveolar macrophage proliferation in vivo.

  10. Interaction between {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin and secreted fibronectin is involved in macrophage differentiation of human HL-60 myeloid leukemia cells.

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    Laouar, A.; Collart, F. R.; Chubb, C. B. H.; Xie, B.; Huberman, E.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; anl-cmb

    1999-01-01

    We examined the role of fibronectin (FN) and FN-binding integrins in macrophage differentiation. Increased FN and {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin gene expression was observed in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate PMA-treated HL-60 cells and PMA- or macrophage-CSF-treated blood monocytes before the manifestation of macrophage markers. After treatment of HL-60 cells and monocytes, newly synthesized FN was released and deposited on the dishes. An HL-60 cell variant, HL-525, which is deficient in the protein kinase C{beta} (PKC-{beta}) and resistant to PMA-induced differentiation, failed to express FN after PMA treatment. Transfecting HL-525 cells with a PKC-{beta} expression plasmid restored PMA-induced FN gene expression and macrophage differentiation. Untreated HL-525 cells (which have a high level of the {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin) incubated on FN differentiated into macrophages. The percentage of cells having a macrophage phenotype induced by PMA in HL-60 cells, by FN in HL-525 cells, or by either PMA or macrophage-CSF in monocytes was reduced in the presence of mAbs to FN and {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin. The integrin-signaling nonreceptor tyrosine kinase, p72{sup Syk}, was activated in PMA-treated HL-60 and FN-treated HL-525 cells. We suggest that macrophage differentiation involves the activation of PKC-{beta} and expression of extracellular matrix proteins such as FN and the corresponding integrins, {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin in particular. The stimulated cells, through the integrins, attach to substrates by binding to the deposited FN. This attachment, in turn, may through integrin signaling activate nonreceptor tyrosine kinases, including p72{sup Syk}, and later lead to expression of other genes involved in evoking the macrophage phenotype.

  11. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor stimulated by Helicobacter pyloriincreases proliferation of gastric epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Harry Hua-Xiang Xia; Shiu Kum Lam; Annie O.O. Chan; Marie Chia Mi Lin; Hsiang Fu Kung; Keiji Ogura; Douglas E. Berg; Benjamin Chun-Yu Wong

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) is associated with increased gastric inflammatory and epithelial expression of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and gastric epithelial cell proliferation. This study aimed at determining whether H pylori directly stimulates release of MIF in monocytes, whether the cay pathogenicity island (PAI) is involved for this function, and whether MIF stimulated by H pylori increases gastric epithelial cell proliferation in vitro.METHODS: A cytotoxic wild-type H pylori strain (TN2),its three isogenic mutants (TN2△cag, TN2△cagA and TN2△cagE) were co-cultured with cells of a human monocyte cell line, THP-1, for 24 h at different organism/cell ratios. MIF in the supernatants was measured by an ELISA. Cells of a human gastric cancer cell line, MKN45,were then co-cultured with the supernatants, with and without monoclonal anti-MIF antibody for 24 h. The cells were further incubated for 12 h after addition of 3H-thymidine, and the levels of incorporation of 3H-thymidine were measured with a liquid scintillation counter.RESULTS: The wild-type strain and the isogenic mutants,TN2△cagA and TN2△cagE, increased MIF release at organism/cell ratios of 200/1 and 400/1, but not at the ratios of 50/1 and 100/1. However, the mutant TN2△cag did not increase the release of MIF at any of the four ratios.3H-thymidine readings for MKN-45 cells were significantly increased with supernatants derived from the wild-type strain and the mutants TN2△cagA and TN2△cagE, but not from the mutant TN2△cag. Moreover, in the presence of monoclonal anti-MIF antibody, the stimulatory effects of the wild-type strain on cell proliferation disappeared.CONCLUSION: H pylori stimulates MIF release in monocytes, likely through its cag PAI, but not related to cagA or cagE. H pylori-stimulated monocyte culture supernatant increases gastric cell proliferation, which is blocked by anti-MIF antibody, suggesting that MIF plays an important role in H pylori

  12. Apoptosis-Inducing Factor Participation in Bovine Macrophage Mycobacterium bovis-Induced Caspase-Independent Cell Death▿

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    Vega-Manriquez, X.; López-Vidal, Y.; Moran, J.; Adams, L. G.; Gutiérrez-Pabello, J. A.

    2007-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species survive and replicate in phagosomes of the host cell. Cell death (CD) has been highlighted as one of the probable outcomes in this host-pathogen interaction. Previously, our group demonstrated macrophage apoptosis as a consequence of Mycobacterium bovis infection. In this study, we aimed to identify the contribution of apoptotic effector elements in M. bovis-induced CD. Bovine macrophages were either infected with M. bovis (multiplicity of infection, 10:1) or treated with an M. bovis cell extract (CFE). Structural changes compatible with CD were evaluated. Chromatin condensation was increased three times by the CFE. On the other hand, a terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay demonstrated that levels of DNA fragmentation induced by M. bovis and CFE were 53.7% ± 24% and 38.9% ± 14%, respectively, whereas control cells had a basal proportion of 8.9% ± 4.1%. Rates of DNA fragmentation were unaffected by the presence of the pan-caspase inhibitor N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp (z-VAD). Cells treated with 100 μg of CFE for 12 h had a fivefold decrease in the level of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization compared to that of untreated cells. Neither M. bovis infection nor CFE treatment induced activation of caspase 3, 8, or 9. Translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) to the nucleus was identified in 32% ± 3.5% and 26.3% ± 4.9% of M. bovis-infected and CFE-treated cells, respectively. Incubation of macrophages with z-VAD prior to infection did not alter the percentage of cells showing AIF translocation. Our data suggest that M. bovis-induced CD in bovine macrophages is caspase independent with AIF participation. PMID:17158896

  13. Alveolar macrophages are the main target cells in feline calicivirus-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monné Rodriguez, J M; Soare, T; Malbon, A; Blundell, R; Papoula-Pereira, R; Leeming, G; Köhler, K; Kipar, A

    2014-08-01

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) is a pathogen of felids and one of the most common causative agents of feline upper respiratory disease (URD). Reports of natural FCV pneumonia in the course of respiratory tract infections are sparse. Therefore, knowledge on the pathogenesis of FCV-induced lung lesions comes only from experimental studies. The aim of the present study was to assess the type and extent of pulmonary involvement in natural respiratory FCV infections of domestic cats and to identify the viral target cells in the lung. For this purpose, histology, immunohistochemistry and RNA-in situ hybridisation for FCV and relevant cell markers were performed on diagnostic post-mortem specimens collected after fatal URD, virulent systemic FCV or other conditions. All groups of cats exhibited similar acute pathological changes, dominated by multifocal desquamation of activated alveolar macrophages (AM) and occasional type II pneumocytes with fibrin exudation, consistent with diffuse alveolar damage (DAD). In fatal cases, this was generally seen without evidence of epithelial regeneration. In cats without clinical respiratory signs, type II pneumocyte hyperplasia was present alongside the other changes, consistent with the post-damage proliferative phase of DAD. FCV infected and replicated in AM and, to a lesser extent, type II pneumocytes. This study shows that lung involvement is an infrequent but important feature of FCV-induced URD. AM are the main viral target cell and pulmonary replication site, and their infection is associated with desquamation and activation, as well as death via apoptosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Electron Tomography in Plant Cell Biology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This review focuses on the contribution of electron tomography-based techniques to our understanding of cellular processes in plant cells. Electron microscopy techniques have evolved to provide better three-dimensional resolution and improved preservation of the subcellular components. In particular, the combination of cryofixation/freeze substitution and electron tomography have allowed plant cell biologists to image organelles and macromolecular complexes in their native cellular context with unprecedented three-dimensional resolution (4-7 nm). Until now, electron tomography has been applied in plant cell biology for the study of cytokinesis, Golgi structure and trafficking, formation of plant endosome/prevacuolar compartments, and organization of photosynthetic membranes. We discuss in this review the new insights that these tomographic studies have brought to the plant biology field.

  15. Activated human mast cells induce LOX-1-specific scavenger receptor expression in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

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    Mervi Alanne-Kinnunen

    Full Text Available Activated mast cells in atherosclerotic lesions degranulate and release bioactive compounds capable of regulating atherogenesis. Here we examined the ability of activated human primary mast cells to regulate the expression of the major scavenger receptors in cultured human primary monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs.Components released by immunologically activated human primary mast cells induced a transient expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor (LOX-1 mRNA in HMDMs, while the expression of two other scavenger receptors, MSR1 and CD36, remained unaffected. The LOX-1-inducing secretory components were identified as histamine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1, which exhibited a synergistic effect on LOX-1 mRNA expression. Histamine induced a transient expression of LOX-1 protein. Mast cell -induced increase in LOX-1 expression was not associated with increased uptake of oxidized LDL by the macrophages.Mast cell-derived histamine, TNF-α, and TGF-β1 act in concert to induce a transient increase in LOX-1 expression in human primary monocyte-derived macrophages. The LOX-1-inducing activity potentially endows mast cells a hitherto unrecognized role in the regulation of innate immune reactions in atherogenesis.

  16. Nanosized silver (II) pyridoxine complex to cause greater inflammatory response and less cytotoxicity to RAW264.7 macrophage cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Avijit; Ju, Hee; Rangasamy, Sabarinathan; Shim, Yumi; Song, Joon Myong

    2015-03-01

    With advancements in nanotechnology, silver has been engineered into a nanometre size and has attracted great research interest for use in the treatment of wounds. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have emerged as a potential alternative to conventional antibiotics because of their potential antimicrobial property. However, AgNPs also induce cytotoxicity, generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cause mitochondrial damage to human cells. Pyridoxine possesses antioxidant and cell proliferation activity. Therefore, in the present investigation, a nanosilver-pyridoxine complex (AgPyNP) was synthesized, and its cytotoxicity and immune response was compared with AgNPs in macrophage RAW264.7 cells. Results revealed that AgPyNPs showed less cytotoxicity compared with AgNPs by producing a smaller amount of ROS in RAW264.7 cells. Surprisingly, however, AgPyNPs caused macrophage RAW264.7 cells to secrete a larger amount of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and generate a more active inflammatory response compared to AgNPs. It activated TNF-α, NF-κB p65, and NF-κB p50 to generate a more vigorous immune protection that produces a greater amount of IL-8 compared to AgNPs. Overall findings indicate that AgPyNPs exhibited less cytotoxicity and evoked a greater immune response in macrophage RAW264.7 cells. Thus, it can be used as a better wound-healing agent than AgNPs.

  17. Tumor-associated macrophages favor C26 murine colon carcinoma cell proliferation in an oxidative stress-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luput, Lavinia; Licarete, Emilia; Sesarman, Alina; Laura, Patras; Alupei, Marius Costel; Banciu, Manuela

    2017-02-17

    The role of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in the development of colon carcinoma is still controversial. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the TAM‑driven processes that may affect colon cancer cell proliferation. To achieve this purpose, murine macrophages were co-cultured with C26 murine colon carcinoma cells at a cell density ratio that approximates physiological conditions for colon carcinoma development in vivo. In this respect, the effects of TAM-mediated angiogenesis, inflammation and oxidative stress on the proliferative capacity of C26 murine colon carcinoma cells were studied. To gain insight into the TAM-driven oxidative stress, NADPH oxidase, the main pro-oxidant enzyme in macrophages, was inhibited. Our data revealed that the stimulatory effects of TAMs on C26 cell proliferation may be related mainly to their pro-oxidant actions exerted by NADPH oxidase activity, which maintains the redox status and the angiogenic capacity of the tumor microenvironment. Additionally, the anti-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic effects of TAMs on tumor cells were found to create a favorable microenvironment for C26 colon carcinoma development and progression. In conclusion, our data confirmed the protumor role of TAMs in the development of colon carcinoma in an oxidative stress-dependent manner that potentiates the angiogenic capacity of the tumor microenvironment. These data may offer valuable information for future tumor-targeted therapies based on TAM 're-education' strategies.

  18. Immunological priming requires regulatory T cells and IL-10-producing macrophages to accelerate resolution from severe lung inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Neil R; Tsushima, Kenji; Eto, Yoshiki; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Mandke, Pooja; Mock, Jason R; Garibaldi, Brian T; Singer, Benjamin D; Sidhaye, Venkataramana K; Horton, Maureen R; King, Landon S; D'Alessio, Franco R

    2014-05-01

    Overwhelming lung inflammation frequently occurs following exposure to both direct infectious and noninfectious agents and is a leading cause of mortality worldwide. In that context, immunomodulatory strategies may be used to limit severity of impending organ damage. We sought to determine whether priming the lung by activating the immune system, or immunological priming, could accelerate resolution of severe lung inflammation. We assessed the importance of alveolar macrophages, regulatory T cells, and their potential interaction during immunological priming. We demonstrate that oropharyngeal delivery of low-dose LPS can immunologically prime the lung to augment alveolar macrophage production of IL-10 and enhance resolution of lung inflammation induced by a lethal dose of LPS or by Pseudomonas bacterial pneumonia. IL-10-deficient mice did not achieve priming and were unable to accelerate lung injury resolution. Depletion of lung macrophages or regulatory T cells during the priming response completely abrogated the positive effect of immunological priming on resolution of lung inflammation and significantly reduced alveolar macrophage IL-10 production. Finally, we demonstrated that oropharyngeal delivery of synthetic CpG-oligonucleotides elicited minimal lung inflammation compared with low-dose LPS but nonetheless primed the lung to accelerate resolution of lung injury following subsequent lethal LPS exposure. Immunological priming is a viable immunomodulatory strategy used to enhance resolution in an experimental acute lung injury model with the potential for therapeutic benefit against a wide array of injurious exposures.

  19. Brazilian red propolis effects on peritoneal macrophage activity: Nitric oxide, cell viability, pro-inflammatory cytokines and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno-Silva, Bruno; Kawamoto, Dione; Ando-Suguimoto, Ellen S; Casarin, Renato C V; Alencar, Severino M; Rosalen, Pedro L; Mayer, Marcia P A

    2017-07-31

    Propolis has been used in folk medicine since ancient times and it presented inhibitory effect on neutrophil recruitment previously. However, its effect on macrophage obtained from mice remains unclear. To demonstrate BRP effects on LPS activated peritoneal macrophage. Peritoneal macrophages, obtained from C57BL6 mice and activated with LPS, were treated with 50-80µg/mL of crude extract of Brazilian red propolis (BRP) during 48h. Cell viability, levels of NO, 20 cytokines and expression of 360 genes were evaluated. BRP 60µg/mL reduced NO production by 65% without affecting the cell viability and decreased production IL1α, IL1β, IL4, IL6, IL12p40, Il12p70, IL13, MCP1 and GM-CSF. Molecular mechanism beyond the anti-inflammatory activity may be due to BRP-effects on decreasing expression of Mmp7, Egfr, Adm, Gata3, Wnt2b, Txn1, Herpud1, Axin2, Car9, Id1, Vegfa, Hes1, Hes5, Icam1, Wnt3a, Pcna, Wnt5a, Tnfsf10, Ccl5, Il1b, Akt1, Mapk1, Noxa1 and Cdkn1b and increasing expression of Cav1, Wnt6, Calm1, Tnf, Rb1, Socs3 and Dab2. Therefore, BRP has anti-inflammatory effects on macrophage activity by reducing NO levels and diminished release and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine and genes, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Enhancement of human ACAT1 gene expression to promote the macrophage-derived foam cell formation by dexamethasone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li YANG; Ta Yuan CHANG; Bo Liang LI; Jin Bo YANG; Jia CHEN; Guang Yao YU; Pei ZHOU; Lei LEI; Zhen Zhen WANG; Catherine CY CHANG; XinYing YANG

    2004-01-01

    In macrophages, the accumulation of cholesteryl esters synthesized by the activated acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT1) results in the foam cell formation, a hallmark of early atherosclerotic lesions. In this study,with the treatment of a glucocorticoid hormone dexamethasone (Dex), lipid staining results clearly showed the large accumulation of lipid droplets containing cholesteryl esters in THP- 1-derived macrophages exposed to lower concentration of the oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL). More notably, when treated together with specific anti-ACAT inhibitors, the abundant cholesteryl ester accumulation was markedly diminished in THP-l-derived macrophages, confirming that ACAT is the key enzyme responsible for intracellular cholesteryl ester synthesis. RT-PCR and Western blot results indicated that Dex caused up-regulation of human ACAT1 expression at both the mRNA and pr