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Sample records for macromolecules including dna

  1. DNA compaction by nonbinding macromolecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de R.J.

    2012-01-01

    Compaction of DNA by nonbinding macromolecules such as uncharged flexible polymer chains and negatively charged globular proteins is thought to have various applications in biophysics, for example in the formation of a nucleoid structure in bacteria. A simple experimental model that has been very

  2. DNA compaction by nonbinding macromolecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de R.J.

    2012-01-01

    Compaction of DNA by nonbinding macromolecules such as uncharged flexible polymer chains and negatively charged globular proteins is thought to have various applications in biophysics, for example in the formation of a nucleoid structure in bacteria. A simple experimental model that has been very we

  3. Persistence Length of DNA Macromolecule with Kinks

    CERN Document Server

    Simonov, Kyrylo

    2014-01-01

    The study of configurational parameters of deformed DNA is a relevant problem in research of such important biological process as double helix compactization in cell. The deformations accompanied with local disruptions of the regular macromolecule structure cause significant bending of the double helix, or kinks. In this paper an approach for Kratky-Porod model to calculate persistence length of DNA macromolecule with kinks is developed. The presented approach considers kinks of arbitrary configuration, including two basic types of kinks, type 1 - sharp kink caused by unstacking a single base pair step, and type 2 - intrinsic-induced kink that involves several base pairs. Within developed approach analytical expressions for persistence length, coil size and gyration radius of kinky double helix were obtained.

  4. The spectral properties of DNA and RNA macromolecules at low temperatures: fundamental and applied aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy M; Kudrya, Vladislav Yu

    2017-01-18

    This paper summarizes the results of studies of the spectral properties-optical absorption, fluorescence and phosphorescence-of DNA and RNA macromolecules and synthetic poly-, oligo- and mono-nucleotides, which have been carried out in our laboratory. The system of first excited singlet and triplet energy levels for DNA and RNA is evaluated using low-temperature (4.2 K-77 K) luminescent measurements. The traps of the singlet and triplet electronic excitations in these compounds are identified. An important self-protection mechanism against photo-damage of DNA and RNA by UV photons or penetrative radiation based on the capture of triplet electronic-energy excitations by the most photostable centers-in DNA, the complex formed by neighboring adenosine (A) and thymidine (T) links; in RNA, the adenosine links-is described. It is confirmed that despite similarities in the chemical and partly energy structures DNA is more stable than RNA. The spectral manifestation of the telomeres (the important functional system) in DNA macromolecules is examined. The results obtained on telomere fragments provide the possibility of finding the configuration peculiarities of the triplet excitations traps in DNA macromolecules. The resulting spreading length of the migrating singlet (l s) and triplet (l t) excitations for DNA and RNA macromolecules are evaluated.

  5. The spectral properties of DNA and RNA macromolecules at low temperatures: fundamental and applied aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy M.; Kudrya, Vladislav Yu

    2017-03-01

    This paper summarizes the results of studies of the spectral properties—optical absorption, fluorescence and phosphorescence—of DNA and RNA macromolecules and synthetic poly-, oligo- and mono-nucleotides, which have been carried out in our laboratory. The system of first excited singlet and triplet energy levels for DNA and RNA is evaluated using low-temperature (4.2 K-77 K) luminescent measurements. The traps of the singlet and triplet electronic excitations in these compounds are identified. An important self-protection mechanism against photo-damage of DNA and RNA by UV photons or penetrative radiation based on the capture of triplet electronic-energy excitations by the most photostable centers—in DNA, the complex formed by neighboring adenosine (A) and thymidine (T) links; in RNA, the adenosine links—is described. It is confirmed that despite similarities in the chemical and partly energy structures DNA is more stable than RNA. The spectral manifestation of the telomeres (the important functional system) in DNA macromolecules is examined. The results obtained on telomere fragments provide the possibility of finding the configuration peculiarities of the triplet excitations traps in DNA macromolecules. The resulting spreading length of the migrating singlet (l s) and triplet (l t) excitations for DNA and RNA macromolecules are evaluated.

  6. Free-energy calculations for semi-flexible macromolecules: Applications to DNA knotting and looping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovan, Stefan M. [Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75083 (United States); Scharein, Robert G. [Hypnagogic Software, Vancouver, British Columbia V6K 1V6 (Canada); Hanke, Andreas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, Brownsville, Texas 78520 (United States); Levene, Stephen D., E-mail: sdlevene@utdallas.edu [Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75083 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75083 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75083 (United States)

    2014-11-07

    We present a method to obtain numerically accurate values of configurational free energies of semiflexible macromolecular systems, based on the technique of thermodynamic integration combined with normal-mode analysis of a reference system subject to harmonic constraints. Compared with previous free-energy calculations that depend on a reference state, our approach introduces two innovations, namely, the use of internal coordinates to constrain the reference states and the ability to freely select these reference states. As a consequence, it is possible to explore systems that undergo substantially larger fluctuations than those considered in previous calculations, including semiflexible biopolymers having arbitrary ratios of contour length L to persistence length P. To validate the method, high accuracy is demonstrated for free energies of prime DNA knots with L/P = 20 and L/P = 40, corresponding to DNA lengths of 3000 and 6000 base pairs, respectively. We then apply the method to study the free-energy landscape for a model of a synaptic nucleoprotein complex containing a pair of looped domains, revealing a bifurcation in the location of optimal synapse (crossover) sites. This transition is relevant to target-site selection by DNA-binding proteins that occupy multiple DNA sites separated by large linear distances along the genome, a problem that arises naturally in gene regulation, DNA recombination, and the action of type-II topoisomerases.

  7. Recent Patents in Pulmonary Delivery of Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Animikh; Mandal, Abhirup; Mitra, Ashim K

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary delivery is a non-invasive form of delivery that holds tremendous therapeutic promise for topical and systemic administration of several macromolecules. Oral administration of macromolecules has several limitations such as low bioavailability, degradation of drug before reaching circulation and insufficient absorption across intestinal membrane. Administration of macromolecules such as proteins, peptides and nucleic acids via inhalation offers great potential due to the avoidance of first pass metabolism, higher surface area and rapid clinical response. However, delivery of reproducible, uniform and safe doses of inhaled particles remains a major challenge for clinical translation. Recent advances in the fields of biotechnology and particle engineering led to progress in novel pulmonary drug delivery systems. Moreover, significant developments in carriers and delivery devices prevent denaturation of macromolecules and control their release within the lungs. This article reviews the advances in pulmonary drug delivery systems by focusing on the recent patents in delivery of macromolecules. Furthermore, recent patents in gene delivery to the lungs have also been discussed. List of patents included in this review is comprehensive in terms of pulmonary delivery of therapeutics. It includes inventions related to proteins and peptides, DNA therapeutics, siRNA and other genetic materials with therapeutic applications. The diseases targeted by these therapeutic molecules are varied including but not limited to different forms of cancer, respiratory diseases etc.

  8. A Course on Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta, Arturo

    1985-01-01

    Describes a senior-level course that: (1) focuses on the structure and reactions of macromolecules; (2) treats industrial polymers in a unified way; and (3) uses analysis of conformation and conformational statistics as a unifying approach. Also discusses course topics, including polysaccharides, proteins, nucleic acids, and others. (JN)

  9. Modeling and time-dependent dynamics of processes of stimulated depolymerization, auto-repairing, degradation and radiation curing of DNA macromolecules and biopolymers at separated and combined actions of ionizing irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vysotskii, Vladimir I. E-mail: viv@vhome.kiev.ua; Pinchuk, Anatoliy O.; Kornilova, Alla A.; Samoylenko, Igor I

    2001-12-01

    The time-dependent dynamics of the formation, relaxation and auto-repairing of double breaks of DNA macromolecules at the combined radiation action and non-radiation processes of degradation (e.g. by free radicals) were considered. The auto-repairing of DNA double breaks is connected with the peculiarities of long-range interaction of nucleotide charges, atoms and molecules in the intracellular milieu. The properties of intracellular liquid and the characteristics of force interaction between the end-pairs of nucleotides in the area of DNA break in response to radiation are changed. Each kind of radiation is characterized by a certain effectiveness of the double DNA break formation but simultaneously one creates the conditions for their liquidation. On the basis of the analysis and correlation of these processes the time-dependent theory for DNA degradation was created, including hormesis phenomenon, radiation antagonism, the validity of anomaly influence of low and large doses at sharp and chronic radiation and other effects. The qualitative and quantitative correspondences of the theory and experimental results of radiation biology were obtained.

  10. Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 21 Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database (Web, free access)   The Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database and NASA Archive for Protein Crystal Growth Data (BMCD) contains the conditions reported for the crystallization of proteins and nucleic acids used in X-ray structure determinations and archives the results of microgravity macromolecule crystallization studies.

  11. Macromolecules in Undergraduate Physical Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattice, Wayne L.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests the topic of macromolecules and synthetic polymers be included in undergraduate courses. Two macromolecular systems (polyethylene in a state unperturbated by long-range interactions and a polypeptide undergoing a helix-coil transition) are described which are suitable for inclusion in the statistical mechanics section of physical…

  12. Ion specificities of artificial macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lvdan; Kou, Ran; Liu, Guangming

    2016-12-21

    Artificial macromolecules are well-defined synthetic polymers, with a relatively simple structure as compared to naturally occurring macromolecules. This review focuses on the ion specificities of artifical macromolecules. Ion specificities are influenced by solvent-mediated indirect ion-macromolecule interactions and also by direct ion-macromolecule interactions. In aqueous solutions, the role of water-mediated indirect ion-macromolecule interactions will be discussed. The addition of organic solvents to aqueous solutions significantly changes the ion specificities due to the formation of water-organic solvent complexes. For direct ion-macromolecule interactions, we will discuss specific ion-pairing interactions for charged macromolecules and specific ion-neutral site interactions for uncharged macromolecules. When the medium conditions change from dilute solutions to crowded environments, the ion specificities can be modified by either the volume exclusion effect, the variation of dielectric constant, or the interactions between ions, macromolecules, and crowding agents.

  13. Analysis of macromolecules, ligands and macromolecule-ligand complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Dreele, Robert B [Los Alamos, NM

    2008-12-23

    A method for determining atomic level structures of macromolecule-ligand complexes through high-resolution powder diffraction analysis and a method for providing suitable microcrystalline powder for diffraction analysis are provided. In one embodiment, powder diffraction data is collected from samples of polycrystalline macromolecule and macromolecule-ligand complex and the refined structure of the macromolecule is used as an approximate model for a combined Rietveld and stereochemical restraint refinement of the macromolecule-ligand complex. A difference Fourier map is calculated and the ligand position and points of interaction between the atoms of the macromolecule and the atoms of the ligand can be deduced and visualized. A suitable polycrystalline sample of macromolecule-ligand complex can be produced by physically agitating a mixture of lyophilized macromolecule, ligand and a solvent.

  14. Construction with macromolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Hecht

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The generation of nanosized features via the bottom-up organization of individual atoms and molecules represents one of the most rapidly emerging fields in modern science and technology. In order to gain general and modular access to nanostructures, a construction kit consisting of molecular building blocks with defined nanoscale dimensions, shape, and functionality is required. While nature has developed a hierarchical strategy to construct sophisticated and complex nanostructures, chemistry is just starting to explore artificial macromolecules as a means to synthesize specific nano-objects. In this review, recent advances in achieving control over conformation within macromolecules and the interconnection of conformationally defined subunits by either covalent bonds or self-assembly are discussed in analogy to natural structure evolution.

  15. Diffusion of macromolecules through sclera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Heng; Wu, Bi-Dong; Tao, Yong; Li, Xiao-Xin

    2013-02-01

    To quantify the in vitro permeability coefficient over different topographical locations of porcine sclera to macromolecules with different molecular weight. Fresh equatorial and posterior superotemporal porcine sclera was mounted in a two-chamber diffusion apparatus, and its permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated dextrans ranging in molecular weight from 40 kDa to 150 kDa was determined by fluorescence spectrophotometry. The sclera was processed as frozen sections and viewed with a fluorescence microscope. The thickness of the area and the thickness that macromolecules enriched in the surface of sclera were measured. The permeability coefficient (Pc) of porcine sclera to macromolecules was significantly higher (40 kDa, p = 0.028; 70 kDa, p = 0.033; 150 kDa, p = 0.007) in equatorial region than posterior, which could be attributed to the significant difference of thickness (p macromolecules enriched in the scleral surface was thicker for those with larger MW (p macromolecules. Larger macromolecules are more likely to accumulate in scleral surface. The difference between topographical locations may have pharmacokinetic implications when considering transscleral diffusion of macromolecules. © 2012 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2012 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  16. Inhalation therapy of macromolecules%大分子的吸入治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周煜

    2001-01-01

    随着重组DNA技术和分子生物学的发展,以蛋白质和多肽为主的大分子成为一类新型药物,并越来越受到重视,新兴的基因治疗技术使得核酸大分子也有可能成为药物。目前,绝大部分大分子药物都是通过注射途径给药, 病人在医院注射费用昂贵且不方便,因而许多注射替代给药途径成为研究热门,通过肺部吸入给药就是一种很有吸引力的非侵入性给药途径。本文介绍了肺吸收大分子的可能机制和大分子吸入治疗的临床与基础研究以及面临的问题。%Advances in molecular biology and recombinant DNA technology have led to the development of macromolecule as therapeutic agents for a variety of diseases including proteins, peptides and even nucleic acids. At present most of macromolecules are delivered by injection. Other routes of drug administration are being actively investigated. The inhalation therapy of macromolecule is an attractive noninvasive drug delivery method. In this review we describe the possible mechanisms of macromolecule absorption by the lung, then discuss the clinical and basic research of macromolecular inhalation therapy and analyze the problems of macromolecule inhalation delivery.

  17. Sandwich complex-containing macromolecules: property tunability through versatile synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-El-Aziz, Alaa S; Agatemor, Christian; Etkin, Nola

    2014-03-01

    Sandwich complexes feature unique properties as the physical and electronic properties of a hydrocarbon ligand or its derivative are integrated into the physical, electronic, magnetic, and optical properties of a metal. Incorporation of these complexes into macromolecules results in intriguing physical, electrical, and optical properties that were hitherto unknown in organic-based macromolecules. These properties are tunable through well-designed synthetic strategies. This review surveys many of the synthetic approaches that have resulted in tuning the properties of sandwich complex-containing macromolecules. While the past two decades have seen an ever-growing number of research publications in this field, gaps remain to be filled. Thus, we expect this review to stimulate research interest towards bridging these gaps, which include the insolubility of some of these macromolecules as well as expanding the scope of the sandwich complexes. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Persistence of Free Plasmid DNA in Soil Monitored by Various Methods, Including a Transformation Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowski, Gerd; Lorenz, Michael G.; Sayler, Gary; Wackernagel, Wilfried

    1992-01-01

    The persistence and stability of free plasmid pUC8-ISP DNA introduced into 10-g samples of various soils and kept at 23°C were monitored over a period of 60 days. The soils were sampled at a plant science farm and included a loamy sand soil (no. 1), a clay soil (no. 2), and a silty clay soil (no. 3). Four different methods allowed monitoring of (i) the production of acid-soluble radioactive material from [3H]thymidine-labeled plasmid DNA, (ii) the decrease of hybridizing nucleotide sequences in slot blot analysis, (iii) the loss of plasmid integrity measured by Southern hybridization, and (iv) the decay of the biological activity as determined by transformation of Ca2+-treated Escherichia coli cells with the DNA extracted from soil. Acid-soluble material was not produced within the first 24 h but then increased to 45% (soil no. 1), 27% (soil no. 2), and 77% (soil no. 3) until the end of incubation. A quite parallel loss of material giving a slot blot hybridization signal was observed. Southern hybridization indicated that after 1 h in the soils, plasmid DNA was mostly in the form of circular and full-length linear molecules but that, depending on the soil type, after 2 to 5 days full-length plasmid molecules were hardly detectable. The transforming activity of plasmid DNA reextracted from the soils followed inactivation curves over 2 to 4 orders of magnitude and dropped below the detection limit after 10 days. The inactivation was slower in soil no. 2 (28.2-h half-life time of the transforming activity of a plasmid molecule) than in soils no. 3 (15.1 h) and no. 1 (9.1 h). The studies provide data on the persistence of free DNA molecules in natural bacterial soil habitats. The data suggest that plasmid DNA may persist long enough to be available for uptake by competent recipient cells in situ. Images PMID:16348772

  19. Evolution and Phylogeny of Large DNA Viruses, Mimiviridae and Phycodnaviridae Including Newly Characterized Heterosigma akashiwo Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Fumito; Ueki, Shoko

    2016-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic DNA viruses are a large group of viruses that harbor double-stranded DNA genomes with sizes of several 100 kbp, challenging the traditional concept of viruses as small, simple ‘organisms at the edge of life.’ The most intriguing questions about them may be their origin and evolution, which have yielded the variety we see today. Specifically, the phyletic relationship between two giant dsDNA virus families that are presumed to be close, Mimiviridae, which infect Acanthamoeba, and Phycodnaviridae, which infect algae, is still obscure and needs to be clarified by in-depth analysis. Here, we studied Mimiviridae–Phycodnaviridae phylogeny including the newly identified Heterosigma akashiwo virus strain HaV53. Gene-to-gene comparison of HaV53 with other giant dsDNA viruses showed that only a small proportion of HaV53 genes show similarities with the others, revealing its uniqueness among Phycodnaviridae. Phylogenetic/genomic analysis of Phycodnaviridae including HaV53 revealed that the family can be classified into four distinctive subfamilies, namely, Megaviridae (Mimivirus-like), Chlorovirus-type, and Coccolitho/Phaeovirus-type groups, and HaV53 independent of the other three groups. Several orthologs found in specific subfamilies while absent from the others were identified, providing potential family marker genes. Finally, reconstruction of the evolutionary history of Phycodnaviridae and Mimiviridae revealed that these viruses are descended from a common ancestor with a small set of genes and reached their current diversity by differentially acquiring gene sets during the course of evolution. Our study illustrates the phylogeny and evolution of Mimiviridae–Phycodnaviridae and proposes classifications that better represent phyletic relationships among the family members. PMID:27965659

  20. Ultrastructure, macromolecules, and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Dillon, Lawrence S

    1981-01-01

    Thus far in the history of biology, two, and only two, fundamental principles have come to light that pervade and unify the entire science-the cell theory and the concept of evolution. While it is true that recently opened fields of inves­ tigation have given rise to several generalizations of wide impact, such as the universality of DNA and the energetic dynamics of ecology, closer inspection reveals them to be part and parcel of either of the first two mentioned. Because in the final analysis energy can act upon an organism solely at the cellular level, its effects may be perceived basically to represent one facet of cell me­ tabolism. Similarly, because the DNA theory centers upon the means by which cells build proteins and reproduce themselves, it too proves to be only one more, even though an exciting, aspect of the cell theory. In fact, if the matter is given closer scrutiny, evolution itself can be viewed as being a fundamental portion of the cell concept, for its effects arise only as a consequence ...

  1. Ion binding to biological macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petukh, Marharyta; Alexov, Emil

    2014-11-01

    Biological macromolecules carry out their functions in water and in the presence of ions. The ions can bind to the macromolecules either specifically or non-specifically, or can simply to be a part of the water phase providing physiological gradient across various membranes. This review outlines the differences between specific and non-specific ion binding in terms of the function and stability of the corresponding macromolecules. Furthermore, the experimental techniques to identify ion positions and computational methods to predict ion binding are reviewed and their advantages compared. It is indicated that specifically bound ions are relatively easier to be revealed while non-specifically associated ions are difficult to predict. In addition, the binding and the residential time of non-specifically bound ions are very much sensitive to the environmental factors in the cells, specifically to the local pH and ion concentration. Since these characteristics differ among the cellular compartments, the non-specific ion binding must be investigated with respect to the sub-cellular localization of the corresponding macromolecule.

  2. INFLUENCE OF MACROMOLECULES ON CHEMICAL TRANSPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macromolecules in the pore fluid influence the mobility of hydrophobic compounds through soils. his study evaluated the significance of macromolecules in facilitating chemical transport under laboratory conditions. Partition coefficients between 14C-labeled hexachlorobenzene and ...

  3. Hybrid Opto-electric Manipulation of Macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wereley, Steve

    2013-11-01

    Recently our research group has developed an innovative method for capturing, concentrating, manipulating and sorting populations of micro- and nanometer-scaled entities-particles, cells, macro-molecules, etc. These populations range from individual particles to thousands of particles (Lab-on-a-Chip, 2008; Microfluidics and Nanofluidics, 2008) while the sizes range from microns to nanometers. This novel technique combines features of optical trapping and dielectrophoresis in an innovative, dynamic way using a simple parallel plate electrode configuration. Transparent electrodes comprised of Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) on glass substrates are used to generate an electric field in the fluid while at the same time allowing light into and out of the fluid. Near-IR optical illumination causes subtle localized heating, creating an electric permittivity gradient that in turn drives a microscopic toroidal vortex. The vortex efficiently transports particles to a preferred location, usually the surface of the electrode. Recent advances have extended have allowed us to apply this technique to macromolecules (DNA, proteins) as well as nanoscale particles (quantum dots, nanowires and PSL particles).

  4. Thermally stable macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezdirtz, G. F.; Johnston, N. J.

    1972-01-01

    Man-made polymers are compared with certain naturally occurring polymers which have long been used at elevated temperatures. The pyrolysis of model compounds is discussed together with aspects of thermogravimetric analysis, torsional braid analysis, and questions of chemical and radiation stability. Some structure-property relationships are examined, giving attention to asbestos, mica, graphite, and diamond. Questions of bond strengths are investigated along with the stability of ladder polymers and some fundamental concepts in the synthesis of aromatic and heteroaromatic polymers. The substances considered include aromatic single-strand polymers, heteroaromatic polymers, polymers obtained by addition polymerizations, and nonhydrogen-containing polymers. Future trends are also explored.

  5. A flexible and qualitatively stable model for cell cycle dynamics including DNA damage effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Clark D; Johnson, Charles R; Zhou, Tong; Simpson, Dennis A; Kaufmann, William K

    2012-01-01

    This paper includes a conceptual framework for cell cycle modeling into which the experimenter can map observed data and evaluate mechanisms of cell cycle control. The basic model exhibits qualitative stability, meaning that regardless of magnitudes of system parameters its instances are guaranteed to be stable in the sense that all feasible trajectories converge to a certain trajectory. Qualitative stability can also be described by the signs of real parts of eigenvalues of the system matrix. On the biological side, the resulting model can be tuned to approximate experimental data pertaining to human fibroblast cell lines treated with ionizing radiation, with or without disabled DNA damage checkpoints. Together these properties validate a fundamental, first order systems view of cell dynamics. Classification Codes: 15A68.

  6. DNA sequence analyses of blended herbal products including synthetic cannabinoids as designer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Jun; Uchiyama, Nahoko; Kikura-Hanajiri, Ruri; Goda, Yukihiro

    2013-04-10

    In recent years, various herbal products adulterated with synthetic cannabinoids have been distributed worldwide via the Internet. These herbal products are mostly sold as incense, and advertised as not for human consumption. Although their labels indicate that they contain mixtures of several potentially psychoactive plants, and numerous studies have reported that they contain a variety of synthetic cannabinoids, their exact botanical contents are not always clear. In this study, we investigated the origins of botanical materials in 62 Spice-like herbal products distributed on the illegal drug market in Japan, by DNA sequence analyses and BLAST searches. The nucleotide sequences of four regions were analyzed to identify the origins of each plant species in the herbal mixtures. The sequences of "Damiana" (Turnera diffusa) and Lamiaceae herbs (Mellissa, Mentha and Thymus) were frequently detected in a number of products. However, the sequences of other plant species indicated on the packaging labels were not detected. In a few products, DNA fragments of potent psychotropic plants were found, including marijuana (Cannabis sativa), "Diviner's Sage" (Salvia divinorum) and "Kratom" (Mitragyna speciosa). Their active constituents were also confirmed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), although these plant names were never indicated on the labels. Most plant species identified in the products were different from the plants indicated on the labels. The plant materials would be used mainly as diluents for the psychoactive synthetic compounds, because no reliable psychoactive effects have been reported for most of the identified plants, with the exception of the psychotropic plants named above.

  7. Selective extraction of proteins and other macromolecules from biological samples using molecular imprinted polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Derek; El-Sharif, Hazim F; Reddy, Subrayal M

    2016-11-01

    The accurate determination of intact macromolecules in biological samples, such as blood, plasma, serum, urine, tissue and feces is a challenging problem. The increased interest in macromolecules both as candidate drugs and as biomarkers for diagnostic purposes means that new method development approaches are needed. This review charts developments in the use of molecularly imprinted polymers first for small-molecular-mass compounds then for proteins and other macromolecules. Examples of the development of molecularly imprinted polymers for macromolecules are highlighted. The two main application areas to date are sensors and separation science, particularly SPE. Examples include peptides and polypeptides, lysozyme, hemoglobin, ovalbumin, bovine serum albumin and viruses.

  8. The radiation chemistry of macromolecules

    CERN Document Server

    1973-01-01

    The Radiation Chemistry of Macromolecules, Volume II is a collection of papers that discusses radiation chemistry of specific systems. Part 1 deals with radiation chemistry of substituted vinyl polymers, particularly polypropylene (PP) as its structure is intermediate between polyethylene and polyisobutylene. This part also discusses polypropylene oxide (PPOx) for it can be prepared in the atactic, isotactic, and optically active forms. One paper focuses on the fundamental chemical processes and the changes in physical properties that give rise to many different applications of polystyrene. An

  9. Configurational diffusion of coal macromolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guin, J.A.; Curtis, C.W.; Tarrer, A.R.; Kim, S.; Hwang, D.; Chen, C.C.; Chiou, Z.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of our research was to obtain fundamental information regarding the functional dependence of the diffusion coefficient of coal molecules on the ratio of molecule to pore diameter. That is, the objective of our study was to examine the effect of molecule size and configuration on hindered diffusion of coal macromolecules through as porous medium. To best accomplish this task, we circumvented the complexities of an actual porous catalyst by using a well defined porous matrix with uniform capillaric pores, i.e., a track-etched membrane. In this way, useful information was obtained regarding the relationship of molecular size and configuration on the diffusion rate of coal derived macromolecules through a pore structure with known geometry. Similar studies were performed using a pellet formed of porous alumina, to provide a link between the idealized membranes and the actual complex pore structure of real catalyst extrudates. The fundamental information from our study will be useful toward the tailoring of catalysts to minimize diffusional influences and thereby increase coal conversion and selectivity for desirable products. (VC)

  10. DNA-free RNA isolation protocols for Arabidopsis thaliana, including seeds and siliques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente-Carbajosa Jesús

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High throughput applications of the reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR for quantification of gene expression demand straightforward procedures to isolate and analyze a considerable number of DNA-free RNA samples. Published protocols are labour intensive, use toxic organic chemicals and need a DNase digestion once pure RNAs have been isolated. In addition, for some tissues, the amount of starting material may be limiting. The convenience of commercial kits is often prohibitive when handling large number of samples. Findings We have established protocols to isolate DNA-free RNA from Arabidopsis thaliana tissues ready for RT-qPCR applications. Simple non-toxic buffers were used for RNA isolation from Arabidopsis tissues with the exception of seeds and siliques, which required the use of organic extractions. The protocols were designed to minimize the number of steps, labour time and the amount of starting tissue to as little as 10–20 mg without affecting RNA quality. In both protocols genomic DNA (gDNA can be efficiently removed from RNA samples before the final alcohol precipitation step, saving extra purification steps before cDNA synthesis. The expression kinetics of previously characterized genes confirmed the robustness of the procedures. Conclusion Here, we present two protocols to isolate DNA-free RNA from Arabidopsis tissues ready for RT-qPCR applications that significantly improve existing ones by reducing labour time and the use of organic extractions. Accessibility to these protocols is ensured by its simplicity and the low cost of the materials used.

  11. Karyotypic features including organizations of the 5S, 45S rDNA loci and telomeres of Scadoxus multiflorus (Amaryllidaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monkheang, Pansa; Chaveerach, Arunrat; Sudmoon, Runglawan; Tanee, Tawatchai

    2016-01-01

    Scadoxus multiflorus Martyn, 1795 is an ornamental plant with brilliantly colored flowers. Even though its chromosomes are rather large, there is no karyotype description reported so far. Therefore, conventional and molecular cytogenetic studies including fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 45S and 5S rDNA, and human telomere sequence (TTAGGG)n probes (Arabidopsis-type telomere probes yielded negative results) were carried out. The chromosome number is as reported previously, 2n = 18. The nine chromosome pairs include two large submetacentric, five large acrocentric, one medium acrocentric, two small metacentric and eight small submetacentric chromosomes. Hybridization sites of the 45S rDNA signals were on the short arm ends of chromosomes #1, #3 and #8, while 5S rDNA signals appeared on the long arm of chromosome 3, in one homologue as a double signal. The telomere signals were restricted to all chromosome ends. Three chromosome pairs could be newly identified, chromosome pair 3 by 5S rDNA and chromosomes #1, #3 and #8 by 45S rDNA loci. In addition to new information about rDNA locations we show that the ends of Scadoxus multiflorus chromosomes harbor human instead of Arabidopsis-type telomere sequences. Overall, the Scadoxus multiflorus karyotype presents chromosomal heteromorphy concerning size, shape and 45S and 5S rDNA positioning. As Scadoxus Rafinesque, 1838 and related species are poorly studied on chromosomal level the here presented data is important for better understanding of evolution in Amaryllidaceae.

  12. Should sperm DNA fragmentation testing be included in the male infertility work-up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Sheena E M

    2015-08-01

    A response to the editorial 'Are we ready to incorporate sperm DNA fragmentation testing into our male infertility work-up? A plea for more robust studies' by Erma Drobnis and Martin Johnson. Copyright © 2015 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Plasmodesmata: intercellular tunnels facilitating transport of macromolecules in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragler, Friedrich

    2013-04-01

    In plants, intercellular structures named plasmodesmata (PD) form a continuous cytoplasmic network between neighboring cells. PD pores provide channels for intercellular symplasmic (cell-to-cell) transport throughout most tissues of the plant body. Cell-defining proteins, such as transcription factors, and regulatory non-coding sequences, such as short interfering RNA, micro RNA, protein-encoding messenger RNAs, viroids, and viral RNA/DNA genomes move via PD channels to adjacent cells. PD-mediated intercellular transport of macromolecules is a regulated process depending on the tissue, developmental stage, and nature of the transported macromolecule. In this review, PD channels and their similarity to tunneling nanotubes present in animals are highlighted. In addition, homeodomain protein movement and cellular components regulating transport are discussed.

  14. Pleural fluid cell-free DNA integrity index to identify cytologically negative malignant pleural effusions including mesotheliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriram Krishna B

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diagnosis of malignant pleural effusions (MPE is often clinically challenging, especially if the cytology is negative for malignancy. DNA integrity index has been reported to be a marker of malignancy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of pleural fluid DNA integrity index in the diagnosis of MPE. Methods We studied 75 pleural fluid and matched serum samples from consecutive subjects. Pleural fluid and serum ALU DNA repeats [115bp, 247bp and 247bp/115bp ratio (DNA integrity index] were assessed by real-time quantitative PCR. Pleural fluid and serum mesothelin levels were quantified using ELISA. Results Based on clinico-pathological evaluation, 52 subjects had MPE (including 16 mesotheliomas and 23 had benign effusions. Pleural fluid DNA integrity index was higher in MPE compared with benign effusions (1.2 vs. 0.8; p Conclusion Pleural fluid DNA integrity index is a promising diagnostic biomarker for identification of MPEs, including mesothelioma. This biomarker may be particularly useful in cases of MPE where pleural aspirate cytology is negative, and could guide the decision to undertake more invasive definitive testing. A prospective validation study is being undertaken to validate our findings and test the clinical utility of this biomarker for altering clinical practice.

  15. Supramolecular Chemistry and Mechanochemistry of Macromolecules: Recent Advances by Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bo; Cui, Shuxun

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force spectroscopy (AFM)-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) was invented in the 1990s. Since then, SMFS has been developed into a powerful tool to study the inter- and intra-molecular interactions of macromolecules. Using SMFS, a number of problems in the field of supramolecular chemistry and mechanochemistry have been studied at the single-molecule level, which are not accessible by traditional ensemble characterization methods. In this review, the principles of SMFS are introduced, followed by the discussion of several problems of contemporary interest at the interface of supramolecular chemistry and mechanochemistry of macromolecules, including single-chain elasticity of macromolecules, interactions between water and macromolecules, interactions between macromolecules and solid surface, and the interactions in supramolecular polymers.

  16. DNA-inspired hierarchical polymer design: electrostatics and hydrogen bonding in concert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemp, Sean T; Long, Timothy E

    2012-01-01

    Nucleic acids and proteins, two of nature's biopolymers, assemble into complex structures to achieve desired biological functions and inspire the design of synthetic macromolecules containing a wide variety of noncovalent interactions including electrostatics and hydrogen bonding. Researchers have incorporated DNA nucleobases into a wide variety of synthetic monomers/polymers achieving stimuli-responsive materials, supramolecular assemblies, and well-controlled macromolecules. Recently, scientists utilized both electrostatics and complementary hydrogen bonding to orthogonally functionalize a polymer backbone through supramolecular assembly. Diverse macromolecules with noncovalent interactions will create materials with properties necessary for biomedical applications.

  17. Chaperoning roles of macromolecules interacting with proteins in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seong Il; Lim, Keo-Heun; Seong, Baik L

    2011-01-01

    The principles obtained from studies on molecular chaperones have provided explanations for the assisted protein folding in vivo. However, the majority of proteins can fold without the assistance of the known molecular chaperones, and little attention has been paid to the potential chaperoning roles of other macromolecules. During protein biogenesis and folding, newly synthesized polypeptide chains interact with a variety of macromolecules, including ribosomes, RNAs, cytoskeleton, lipid bilayer, proteolytic system, etc. In general, the hydrophobic interactions between molecular chaperones and their substrates have been widely believed to be mainly responsible for the substrate stabilization against aggregation. Emerging evidence now indicates that other features of macromolecules such as their surface charges, probably resulting in electrostatic repulsions, and steric hindrance, could play a key role in the stabilization of their linked proteins against aggregation. Such stabilizing mechanisms are expected to give new insights into our understanding of the chaperoning functions for de novo protein folding. In this review, we will discuss the possible chaperoning roles of these macromolecules in de novo folding, based on their charge and steric features.

  18. Chaperoning Roles of Macromolecules Interacting with Proteins in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baik L. Seong

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The principles obtained from studies on molecular chaperones have provided explanations for the assisted protein folding in vivo. However, the majority of proteins can fold without the assistance of the known molecular chaperones, and little attention has been paid to the potential chaperoning roles of other macromolecules. During protein biogenesis and folding, newly synthesized polypeptide chains interact with a variety of macromolecules, including ribosomes, RNAs, cytoskeleton, lipid bilayer, proteolytic system, etc. In general, the hydrophobic interactions between molecular chaperones and their substrates have been widely believed to be mainly responsible for the substrate stabilization against aggregation. Emerging evidence now indicates that other features of macromolecules such as their surface charges, probably resulting in electrostatic repulsions, and steric hindrance, could play a key role in the stabilization of their linked proteins against aggregation. Such stabilizing mechanisms are expected to give new insights into our understanding of the chaperoning functions for de novo protein folding. In this review, we will discuss the possible chaperoning roles of these macromolecules in de novo folding, based on their charge and steric features.

  19. Submillimeter wave spectroscopy of biological macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus, Tatiana

    2005-03-01

    The recently emergence of submillimeter-wave or terahertz (THz) spectroscopy of biological molecules has demonstrated the capability to detect low-frequency internal molecular vibrations involving the weakest hydrogen bonds of the DNA base pairs and/or non-bonded interactions. These multiple bonds, although having only ˜ 5% of the strength of covalent bonds, stabilize the structure of bio-polymers, by holding the two strands of the DNA double helix together, or polypeptides together in different secondary structure conformations. There will be a review of THz-frequency transmission (absorption) results for biological materials obtained from Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy during the last few years^1,2. Multiple resonances, due to low frequency vibrational modes within biological macromolecules, have been unambiguously demonstrated in qualitative agreement with theoretical prediction, thereby confirming the fundamental physical nature of observed resonance features. The discovery of resonance character of interaction between THz radiation and biological materials opens many possible applications for THz spectroscopy technique in biological sensing and biomedicine using multiple resonances as distinctive spectral fingerprints. However, many issues still require investigation. Kinetics of interactions with radiation at THz has not been studied and vibrational lifetimes have not been measured directly as a function of frequency. The strength of resonant modes of bio-molecules in aqueous environment and strong dependence of spectra on molecular orientation need explanation. Vibrational modes have not been assigned to specific motions within molecules. THz spectroscopy of bio-polymers makes it only in first steps. 1. T. Globus, D. Woolard, M. Bykhovskaia, B. Gelmont, L. Werbos, A. Samuels. International Journal of High Speed Electronics and Systems (IJHSES), 13, No. 4, 903-936 (2003). 2. T. Globus, T. Khromova, D. Woolard and B. Gelmont. Proceedings of

  20. Relaxation Dynamics of Semiflexible Fractal Macromolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Mielke

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We study the dynamics of semiflexible hyperbranched macromolecules having only dendritic units and no linear spacers, while the structure of these macromolecules is modeled through T-fractals. We construct a full set of eigenmodes of the dynamical matrix, which couples the set of Langevin equations. Based on the ensuing relaxation spectra, we analyze the mechanical relaxation moduli. The fractal character of the macromolecules reveals itself in the storage and loss moduli in the intermediate region of frequencies through scaling, whereas at higher frequencies, we observe the locally-dendritic structure that is more pronounced for higher stiffness.

  1. Inhibiting DNA methylation causes an interferon response in cancer via dsRNA including endogenous retroviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappinelli, Katherine B.; Strissel, Pamela L.; Desrichard, Alexis; Li, Huili; Henke, Christine; Akman, Benjamin; Hein, Alexander; Rote, Neal S.; Cope, Leslie M.; Snyder, Alexandra; Makarov, Vladimir; Buhu, Sadna; Slamon, Dennis J.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Zahnow, Cynthia A.; Mergoub, Taha; Chan, Timothy A.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Strick, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Summary We show that DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNMTis) upregulate immune signaling in cancer through the viral defense pathway. In ovarian cancer (OC), DNMTis trigger cytosolic sensing of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) causing a Type I Interferon response and apoptosis. Knocking down dsRNA sensors TLR3 and MAVS reduces this response twofold, and blocking interferon beta or its receptor abrogates it. Upregulation of hypermethylated endogenous retrovirus (ERV) genes accompanies the response and ERV overexpression activates the response. Basal levels of ERV and viral defense gene expression significantly correlate in primary OC and the latter signature separates primary samples for multiple tumor types from The Cancer Genome Atlas into low versus high expression groups. In melanoma patients treated with an immune checkpoint therapy, high viral defense signature expression in tumors significantly associates with durable clinical response and DNMTi treatment sensitizes to anti-CTLA4 therapy in a pre-clinical melanoma model. PMID:26317466

  2. ConSurf 2016: an improved methodology to estimate and visualize evolutionary conservation in macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazy, Haim; Abadi, Shiran; Martz, Eric; Chay, Ofer; Mayrose, Itay; Pupko, Tal; Ben-Tal, Nir

    2016-07-08

    The degree of evolutionary conservation of an amino acid in a protein or a nucleic acid in DNA/RNA reflects a balance between its natural tendency to mutate and the overall need to retain the structural integrity and function of the macromolecule. The ConSurf web server (http://consurf.tau.ac.il), established over 15 years ago, analyses the evolutionary pattern of the amino/nucleic acids of the macromolecule to reveal regions that are important for structure and/or function. Starting from a query sequence or structure, the server automatically collects homologues, infers their multiple sequence alignment and reconstructs a phylogenetic tree that reflects their evolutionary relations. These data are then used, within a probabilistic framework, to estimate the evolutionary rates of each sequence position. Here we introduce several new features into ConSurf, including automatic selection of the best evolutionary model used to infer the rates, the ability to homology-model query proteins, prediction of the secondary structure of query RNA molecules from sequence, the ability to view the biological assembly of a query (in addition to the single chain), mapping of the conservation grades onto 2D RNA models and an advanced view of the phylogenetic tree that enables interactively rerunning ConSurf with the taxa of a sub-tree.

  3. The Role of Sulforaphane in Epigenetic Mechanisms, Including Interdependence between Histone Modification and DNA Methylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Kaufman-Szymczyk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Carcinogenesis as well as cancer progression result from genetic and epigenetic changes of the genome that leads to dysregulation of transcriptional activity of genes. Epigenetic mechanisms in cancer cells comprise (i post-translation histone modification (i.e., deacetylation and methylation; (ii DNA global hypomethylation; (iii promoter hypermethylation of tumour suppressor genes and genes important for cell cycle regulation, cell differentiation and apoptosis; and (iv posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression by noncoding microRNA. These epigenetic aberrations can be readily reversible and responsive to both synthetic agents and natural components of diet. A source of one of such diet components are cruciferous vegetables, which contain high levels of a number of glucosinolates and deliver, after enzymatic hydrolysis, sulforaphane and other bioactive isothiocyanates, that are involved in effective up-regulation of transcriptional activity of certain genes and also in restoration of active chromatin structure. Thus a consumption of cruciferous vegetables, treated as a source of isothiocyanates, seems to be potentially useful as an effective cancer preventive factor or as a source of nutrients improving efficacy of standard chemotherapies. In this review an attempt is made to elucidate the role of sulforaphane in regulation of gene promoter activity through a direct down-regulation of histone deacetylase activity and alteration of gene promoter methylation in indirect ways, but the sulforaphane influence on non-coding micro-RNA will not be a subject of this review.

  4. The Role of Sulforaphane in Epigenetic Mechanisms, Including Interdependence between Histone Modification and DNA Methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman-Szymczyk, Agnieszka; Majewski, Grzegorz; Lubecka-Pietruszewska, Katarzyna; Fabianowska-Majewska, Krystyna

    2015-12-12

    Carcinogenesis as well as cancer progression result from genetic and epigenetic changes of the genome that leads to dysregulation of transcriptional activity of genes. Epigenetic mechanisms in cancer cells comprise (i) post-translation histone modification (i.e., deacetylation and methylation); (ii) DNA global hypomethylation; (iii) promoter hypermethylation of tumour suppressor genes and genes important for cell cycle regulation, cell differentiation and apoptosis; and (iv) posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression by noncoding microRNA. These epigenetic aberrations can be readily reversible and responsive to both synthetic agents and natural components of diet. A source of one of such diet components are cruciferous vegetables, which contain high levels of a number of glucosinolates and deliver, after enzymatic hydrolysis, sulforaphane and other bioactive isothiocyanates, that are involved in effective up-regulation of transcriptional activity of certain genes and also in restoration of active chromatin structure. Thus a consumption of cruciferous vegetables, treated as a source of isothiocyanates, seems to be potentially useful as an effective cancer preventive factor or as a source of nutrients improving efficacy of standard chemotherapies. In this review an attempt is made to elucidate the role of sulforaphane in regulation of gene promoter activity through a direct down-regulation of histone deacetylase activity and alteration of gene promoter methylation in indirect ways, but the sulforaphane influence on non-coding micro-RNA will not be a subject of this review.

  5. Bond Tension in Tethered Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheiko, Sergei S; Panyukov, Sergey; Rubinstein, Michael

    2011-06-14

    The paper presents scaling analysis of mechanical tension generated in densely branched macromolecules tethered to a solid substrate with a short linker. Steric repulsion between branches results in z-fold amplification of tension in the linker, where z is the number of chain-like arms. At large z ~ 100-1000, the generated tension may exceed the strength of covalent bonds and sever the linker. Two types of molecular architectures were considered: polymer stars and polymer "bottlebrushes" tethered to a solid substrate. Depending on the grafting density, one distinguishes the so-called mushroom, loose grafting, and dense grafting regimes. In isolated (mushroom) and loosely tethered bottlebrushes, the linker tension is by a factor of [Formula: see text] smaller than the tension in a tethered star with the same number of arms z. In densely tethered stars, the effect of interchain distance (d) and number of arms (z) on the magnitude of linker tension is given by f ≅ f0z(3/2)(b/d) for stars in a solvent environment and f ≅ f0z(2) (b/d)(2) for dry stars, where b is the Kuhn length and f0 ≅ kBT/b is intrinsic bond tension. These relations are also valid for tethered bottlebrushes with long side chains. However, unlike molecular stars, bottlebrushes demonstrate variation of tension along the backbone f ≅ f0s z(1/2) / d as a function of distance s from the free end of the backbone. In dense brushes [Formula: see text] with z ≅ 1000, the backbone tension increases from f ≅ f0 = 1 pN at the free end of the backbone (s ≅ b) to its maximum f ≅ zf0 ≅ 1 nN at the linker to the substrate (s ≅ zb).

  6. Macromolecule-Assisted de novo Protein Folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seong Il; Son, Ahyun; Lim, Keo-Heun; Jeong, Hotcherl; Seong, Baik L.

    2012-01-01

    In the processes of protein synthesis and folding, newly synthesized polypeptides are tightly connected to the macromolecules, such as ribosomes, lipid bilayers, or cotranslationally folded domains in multidomain proteins, representing a hallmark of de novo protein folding environments in vivo. Such linkage effects on the aggregation of endogenous polypeptides have been largely neglected, although all these macromolecules have been known to effectively and robustly solubilize their linked heterologous proteins in fusion or display technology. Thus, their roles in the aggregation of linked endogenous polypeptides need to be elucidated and incorporated into the mechanisms of de novo protein folding in vivo. In the classic hydrophobic interaction-based stabilizing mechanism underlying the molecular chaperone-assisted protein folding, it has been assumed that the macromolecules connected through a simple linkage without hydrophobic interactions and conformational changes would make no effect on the aggregation of their linked polypeptide chains. However, an increasing line of evidence indicates that the intrinsic properties of soluble macromolecules, especially their surface charges and excluded volume, could be important and universal factors for stabilizing their linked polypeptides against aggregation. Taken together, these macromolecules could act as folding helpers by keeping their linked nascent chains in a folding-competent state. The folding assistance provided by these macromolecules in the linkage context would give new insights into de novo protein folding inside the cell. PMID:22949867

  7. Physical Delivery of Macromolecules using High-Aspect Ratio Nanostructured Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kunwoo; Lingampalli, Nithya; Pisano, Albert P; Murthy, Niren; So, Hongyun

    2015-10-28

    There is great need for the development of an efficient delivery method of macromolecules, including nucleic acids, proteins, and peptides, to cell cytoplasm without eliciting toxicity or changing cell behavior. High-aspect ratio nanomaterials have addressed many challenges present in conventional methods, such as cell membrane passage and endosomal degradation, and have shown the feasibility of efficient high-throughput macromolecule delivery with minimal perturbation of cells. This review describes the recent advances of in vitro and in vivo physical macromolecule delivery with high-aspect ratio nanostructured materials and summarizes the synthesis methods, material properties, relevant applications, and various potential directions.

  8. Conserved DNA Motifs, Including the CENP-B Box-like, Are Possible Promoters of Satellite DNA Array Rearrangements in Nematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Car, Ana; Castagnone-Sereno, Philippe; Abad, Pierre; Plohl, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    Tandemly arrayed non-coding sequences or satellite DNAs (satDNAs) are rapidly evolving segments of eukaryotic genomes, including the centromere, and may raise a genetic barrier that leads to speciation. However, determinants and mechanisms of satDNA sequence dynamics are only partially understood. Sequence analyses of a library of five satDNAs common to the root-knot nematodes Meloidogyne chitwoodi and M. fallax together with a satDNA, which is specific for M. chitwoodi only revealed low sequence identity (32–64%) among them. However, despite sequence differences, two conserved motifs were recovered. One of them turned out to be highly similar to the CENP-B box of human alpha satDNA, identical in 10–12 out of 17 nucleotides. In addition, organization of nematode satDNAs was comparable to that found in alpha satDNA of human and primates, characterized by monomers concurrently arranged in simple and higher-order repeat (HOR) arrays. In contrast to alpha satDNA, phylogenetic clustering of nematode satDNA monomers extracted either from simple or from HOR array indicated frequent shuffling between these two organizational forms. Comparison of homogeneous simple arrays and complex HORs composed of different satDNAs, enabled, for the first time, the identification of conserved motifs as obligatory components of monomer junctions. This observation highlights the role of short motifs in rearrangements, even among highly divergent sequences. Two mechanisms are proposed to be involved in this process, i.e., putative transposition-related cut-and-paste insertions and/or illegitimate recombination. Possibility for involvement of the nematode CENP-B box-like sequence in the transposition-related mechanism and together with previously established similarity of the human CENP-B protein and pogo-like transposases implicate a novel role of the CENP-B box and related sequence motifs in addition to the known function in centromere protein binding. PMID:23826269

  9. Alignment of synaptic vesicle macromolecules with the macromolecules in active zone material that direct vesicle docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Mark L; Szule, Joseph A; Xu, Jing; Jung, Jae Hoon; Marshall, Robert M; McMahan, Uel J

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles dock at active zones on the presynaptic plasma membrane of a neuron's axon terminals as a precondition for fusing with the membrane and releasing their neurotransmitter to mediate synaptic impulse transmission. Typically, docked vesicles are next to aggregates of plasma membrane-bound macromolecules called active zone material (AZM). Electron tomography on tissue sections from fixed and stained axon terminals of active and resting frog neuromuscular junctions has led to the conclusion that undocked vesicles are directed to and held at the docking sites by the successive formation of stable connections between vesicle membrane proteins and proteins in different classes of AZM macromolecules. Using the same nanometer scale 3D imaging technology on appropriately stained frog neuromuscular junctions, we found that ∼10% of a vesicle's luminal volume is occupied by a radial assembly of elongate macromolecules attached by narrow projections, nubs, to the vesicle membrane at ∼25 sites. The assembly's chiral, bilateral shape is nearly the same vesicle to vesicle, and nubs, at their sites of connection to the vesicle membrane, are linked to macromolecules that span the membrane. For docked vesicles, the orientation of the assembly's shape relative to the AZM and the presynaptic membrane is the same vesicle to vesicle, whereas for undocked vesicles it is not. The connection sites of most nubs on the membrane of docked vesicles are paired with the connection sites of the different classes of AZM macromolecules that regulate docking, and the membrane spanning macromolecules linked to these nubs are also attached to the AZM macromolecules. We conclude that the luminal assembly of macromolecules anchors in a particular arrangement vesicle membrane macromolecules, which contain the proteins that connect the vesicles to AZM macromolecules during docking. Undocked vesicles must move in a way that aligns this arrangement with the AZM macromolecules for docking

  10. Sub-terahertz resonance spectroscopy of biological macromolecules and cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus, Tatiana; Moyer, Aaron; Gelmont, Boris; Khromova, Tatyana; Sizov, Igor; Ferrance, Jerome

    2013-05-01

    Recently we introduced a Sub-THz spectroscopic system for characterizing vibrational resonance features from biological materials. This new, continuous-wave, frequency-domain spectroscopic sensor operates at room temperature between 315 and 480 GHz with spectral resolution of at least 1 GHz and utilizes the source and detector components from Virginia Diode, Inc. In this work we present experimental results and interpretation of spectroscopic signatures from bacterial cells and their biological macromolecule structural components. Transmission and absorption spectra of the bacterial protein thioredoxin, DNA and lyophilized cells of Escherichia coli (E. coli), as well as spores of Bacillus subtillis and B. atrophaeus have been characterized. Experimental results for biomolecules are compared with absorption spectra calculated using molecular dynamics simulation, and confirm the underlying physics for resonance spectroscopy based on interactions between THz radiation and vibrational modes or groups of modes of atomic motions. Such interactions result in multiple intense and narrow specific resonances in transmission/absorption spectra from nano-gram samples with spectral line widths as small as 3 GHz. The results of this study indicate diverse relaxation dynamic mechanisms relevant to sub-THz vibrational spectroscopy, including long-lasting processes. We demonstrate that high sensitivity in resolved specific absorption fingerprints provides conditions for reliable detection, identification and discrimination capability, to the level of strains of the same bacteria, and for monitoring interactions between biomaterials and reagents in near real-time. Additionally, it creates the basis for the development of new types of advanced biological sensors through integrating the developed system with a microfluidic platform for biomaterial samples.

  11. Microsatellite DNA reveals population genetic differentiation among sprat (Sprattus sprattus) sampled throughout the Northeast Atlantic, including Norwegian fjords

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glover, Kevin A.; Skaala, Øystein; Limborg, Morten;

    2011-01-01

    Glover, K. A., Skaala, Ø., Limborg, M., Kvamme, C., and Torstensen, E. Microsatellite DNA reveals population genetic differentiation among sprat (Sprattus sprattus) sampled throughout the Northeast Atlantic, including Norwegian fjords. – ICES Journal of Marine Science, 68: 2145–2151. Sprat...... (Sprattus sprattus), small pelagic shoaling fish, were sampled from the Celtic, North, and Baltic seas, and 10 Norwegian fjords. Significant overall genetic differentiation was observed among samples when analysed with eight microsatellite DNA loci (Global FST = 0.0065, p ... differences were observed between the Baltic and all other samples (largest pairwise FST = 0.043, p sample from the Celtic Sea (CEL) and the North Sea (NSEA; FST = 0.001, p = 0.16), but variable levels of genetic differentiation were...

  12. A screening-corrected additivity rule for the calculation of electron scattering from macro-molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, F [Departamento de Fisica Atomica Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas. Universidad Complutense, Avda. Complutense s/n, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Garcia, G [Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: pacobr@fis.ucm.es

    2009-07-28

    A simplified form of the well-known screening-corrected additivity rule procedure for the calculation of electron-molecule cross sections is proposed for the treatment of some very large macro-molecules. While the comparison of the standard and simplified treatments for a DNA dodecamer reveals very similar results, the new treatment presents some important advantages for large molecules.

  13. Molecular Imprinting of Macromolecules for Sensor Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylan, Yeşeren; Yilmaz, Fatma; Özgür, Erdoğan; Derazshamshir, Ali; Yavuz, Handan; Denizli, Adil

    2017-04-19

    Molecular recognition has an important role in numerous living systems. One of the most important molecular recognition methods is molecular imprinting, which allows host compounds to recognize and detect several molecules rapidly, sensitively and selectively. Compared to natural systems, molecular imprinting methods have some important features such as low cost, robustness, high recognition ability and long term durability which allows molecularly imprinted polymers to be used in various biotechnological applications, such as chromatography, drug delivery, nanotechnology, and sensor technology. Sensors are important tools because of their ability to figure out a potentially large number of analytical difficulties in various areas with different macromolecular targets. Proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, antibodies, viruses and cells are defined as macromolecules that have wide range of functions are very important. Thus, macromolecules detection has gained great attention in concerning the improvement in most of the studies. The applications of macromolecule imprinted sensors will have a spacious exploration according to the low cost, high specificity and stability. In this review, macromolecules for molecularly imprinted sensor applications are structured according to the definition of molecular imprinting methods, developments in macromolecular imprinting methods, macromolecular imprinted sensors, and conclusions and future perspectives. This chapter follows the latter strategies and focuses on the applications of macromolecular imprinted sensors. This allows discussion on how sensor strategy is brought to solve the macromolecules imprinting.

  14. Macromolecular crowding: Macromolecules friend or foe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Shruti; Chowhan, Rimpy Kaur; Singh, Laishram Rajendrakumar

    2015-09-01

    Cellular interior is known to be densely crowded due to the presence of soluble and insoluble macromolecules, which altogether occupy ~40% of the total cellular volume. This results in altered biological properties of macromolecules. Macromolecular crowding is observed to have both positive and negative effects on protein folding, structure, stability and function. Significant data has been accumulated so far on both the aspects. However, most of the review articles so far have focused on the positive aspect of macromolecular crowding and not much attention has been paid on the deleterious aspect of crowding on macromolecules. In order to have a complete knowledge of the effect of macromolecular crowding on proteins and enzymes, it is important to look into both the aspects of crowding to determine its precise role under physiological conditions. To fill the gap in the understanding of the effect of macromolecular crowding on proteins and enzymes, this review article focuses on the deleterious influence of crowding on macromolecules. Macromolecular crowding is not always good but also has several deleterious effects on various macromolecular properties. Taken together, the properties of biological macromolecules in vivo appears to be finely regulated by the nature and level of the intracellular crowdedness in order to perform their biological functions appropriately. The information provided here gives an understanding of the role played by the nature and level of cellular crowdedness in intensifying and/or alleviating the burden of various proteopathies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Insights and Lessons from a Scientific Conference on Non-Invasive Delivery of Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savla, Ronak; Mrsny, Randall J; Park, Kinam; Aubert, Isabelle; Stamoran, Cornell

    2017-06-01

    A growing share of the pharmaceutical development pipeline is occupied by macromolecule drugs, which are primarily administered by injection. Despite decades of attempts, non-invasive delivery of macromolecules has seen only a few success stories. Potential benefits of non-invasive administration include better patient acceptance and adherence and potentially better efficacy and safety. Greater inter-disciplinary dialogue and collaboration are integral to realizing these benefits.

  16. Chromosome alterations in breast carcinomas: frequent involvement of DNA losses including chromosomes 4q and 21q.

    OpenAIRE

    Schwendel, A.; Richard, F.; Langreck, H.; Kaufmann, O.; Lage, H.; Winzer, K.J.; Petersen, I; Dietel, M

    1998-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization was applied to map DNA gains and losses in 39 invasive ductal breast carcinomas. Frequent abnormalities included gains on chromosomal regions 1q, 8q, 11q12-13, 16p, 19, 20q and X as well as frequent losses on 1p, 5q, 6q, 9p, 11q, 13q and 16q. Furthermore, frequent losses on 4q (20 cases) and 21q (14 cases) were found for the first time in this tumour type. High copy number amplifications were observed at 8q12-24, 11q11-13 and 20q13-ter. Highly differentiated ...

  17. General Differential Contact Identities for Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landy, Jonathan; Pincus, P A; Jho, YongSeok

    2015-10-16

    We discuss general Maxwell identities relating a macromolecule's charge, the forces acting at its surface, and the osmotic pressure of the solution in which it sits. The identities are closely related to the contact value relations that hold for certain special geometries, but are more general. In particular, the Maxwell identities can be applied to any macromolecule geometry, and they hold both within and outside of mean-field theory. Examples illustrate that combining the identities with approximate treatments of screening can often return simple, accurate osmotic pressure estimates.

  18. The Place of Macromolecules in Freshman Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, Bernhard

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the inclusion of knowledge on macromolecules into a freshman chemistry course which emphasizes topics in organic chemistry, polymer science and biochemistry, atoms, chemical thermodynamics, and inorganic chemistry. Indicates that the program is the only way to keep chemistry education up to date. (CC)

  19. Macromolecule diffusion and confinement in prokaryotic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mika, Jacek T.; Poolman, Bert

    We review recent observations on the mobility of macromolecules and their spatial organization in live bacterial cells. We outline the major fluorescence microscopy-based methods to determine the mobility and thus the diffusion coefficients (D) of molecules, which is not trivial in small cells. The

  20. Macromolecule diffusion and confinement in prokaryotic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mika, Jacek T.; Poolman, Bert

    2011-01-01

    We review recent observations on the mobility of macromolecules and their spatial organization in live bacterial cells. We outline the major fluorescence microscopy-based methods to determine the mobility and thus the diffusion coefficients (D) of molecules, which is not trivial in small cells. The

  1. Macromolecule diffusion and confinement in prokaryotic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mika, Jacek T.; Poolman, Bert

    2011-01-01

    We review recent observations on the mobility of macromolecules and their spatial organization in live bacterial cells. We outline the major fluorescence microscopy-based methods to determine the mobility and thus the diffusion coefficients (D) of molecules, which is not trivial in small cells. The

  2. PlaMoM: a comprehensive database compiles plant mobile macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Daogang; Yan, Bin; Thieme, Christoph; Hua, Jingmin; Zhu, Hailong; Boheler, Kenneth R.; Zhao, Zhongying; Kragler, Friedrich; Xia, Yiji; Zhang, Shoudong

    2017-01-01

    In plants, various phloem-mobile macromolecules including noncoding RNAs, mRNAs and proteins are suggested to act as important long-distance signals in regulating crucial physiological and morphological transition processes such as flowering, plant growth and stress responses. Given recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies, numerous mobile macromolecules have been identified in diverse plant species from different plant families. However, most of the identified mobile macromolecules are not annotated in current versions of species-specific databases and are only available as non-searchable datasheets. To facilitate study of the mobile signaling macromolecules, we compiled the PlaMoM (Plant Mobile Macromolecules) database, a resource that provides convenient and interactive search tools allowing users to retrieve, to analyze and also to predict mobile RNAs/proteins. Each entry in the PlaMoM contains detailed information such as nucleotide/amino acid sequences, ortholog partners, related experiments, gene functions and literature. For the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, protein–protein interactions of mobile transcripts are presented as interactive molecular networks. Furthermore, PlaMoM provides a built-in tool to identify potential RNA mobility signals such as tRNA-like structures. The current version of PlaMoM compiles a total of 17 991 mobile macromolecules from 14 plant species/ecotypes from published data and literature. PlaMoM is available at http://www.systembioinfo.org/plamom/. PMID:27924044

  3. Calcium phosphate composite materials including inorganic powders, BSA or duplex DNA prepared by W/O/W interfacial reaction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Masahiro [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Kansai Center, 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan)], E-mail: m-fujiwara@aist.go.jp; Shiokawa, Kumi; Morigaki, Kenichi; Tatsu, Yoshiro; Nakahara, Yoshiko [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Kansai Center, 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan)

    2008-03-10

    We reported before that inorganic reaction occurring at the interface of W/O/W emulsion is advantageous to produce hollow spheres (microcapsules) of inorganic matrices such as silica. This process enables us to include various materials into inorganic matrices directly. Calcium phosphates were also produced from NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} and Ca(OH){sub 2} by this interfacial reaction method. Various biomaterials are directly incorporated into crystalline calcium phosphate matrices, when the biomaterials are added to the inner water phase of the W/O/W emulsion. ZrO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders were effectively encapsulated in calcium phosphates such as hydroxyapatite (HAp). The images of backscattered electron of FE-SEM observations indicated that ZrO{sub 2} particles were included in HAp, while they adhered to the surface of HAp in the case of a simple precipitation method. Biomacromolecules such as BSA and duplex DNA were also included in HAp using the inner water phases dissolving them. Fluorescent microscopy observations revealed that biomacromolecules incorporated in HAp localized in some domains of the HAp matrices. Biomacromolecules thus included were scarcely liberated into deionized water, indicating their strong encapsulation in HAp. This general and simple methodology will provide various composite materials of calcium phosphates, which are applicable to regenerative medicine, DDS, GDS and more.

  4. Macromolecules Inquiry: Transformation of a Standard Biochemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsworth, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Identification of macromolecules in food is a standard introductory high school biology lab. The intent of this article is to describe the conversion of this standard cookbook lab into an inquiry investigation. Instead of verifying the macromolecules found in food, students use their knowledge of the macromolecules in food to determine the…

  5. Sperm macromolecules associated with bull fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Abdullah; Memili, Erdoğan

    2016-06-01

    Bull fertility, ability of the sperm to fertilize and activate the egg that sustain embryo development, is vitally important for effective and efficient production of cattle. Fertility is a complex trait with low heritability. Despite recent advances in genomic selection and possibility of enormous paternal benefits to profitable cattle production, there exist no reliable tests for evaluating semen quality and predicting bull fertility. This review focuses on sperm macromolecules such as transcripts, proteins and the epigenome, i.e., the functional genome that are associated with bull fertility. Generating new information in these systems is important beyond agriculture because such progress advances the fundamental science of the mammalian male gamete while at the same time introduces biotechnology into livestock production. Sperm macromolecules and epigenome markers associated with bull fertility can be used alone or in combination with the current SNP microarrays to determine sperm quality and to indicate bull fertility.

  6. An Overview of Biological Macromolecule Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Irene Russo; Merlino, Antonello; Vergara, Alessandro; Sica, Filomena

    2013-01-01

    The elucidation of the three dimensional structure of biological macromolecules has provided an important contribution to our current understanding of many basic mechanisms involved in life processes. This enormous impact largely results from the ability of X-ray crystallography to provide accurate structural details at atomic resolution that are a prerequisite for a deeper insight on the way in which bio-macromolecules interact with each other to build up supramolecular nano-machines capable of performing specialized biological functions. With the advent of high-energy synchrotron sources and the development of sophisticated software to solve X-ray and neutron crystal structures of large molecules, the crystallization step has become even more the bottleneck of a successful structure determination. This review introduces the general aspects of protein crystallization, summarizes conventional and innovative crystallization methods and focuses on the new strategies utilized to improve the success rate of experiments and increase crystal diffraction quality. PMID:23727935

  7. Behavior of macromolecules in adsorbed layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A model for describing the behavior of macromolecules in adsorbed layers is developed by introducing a concept of distribution density of layer thickness U based on stochastic process and probabilistic statistics. The molecular behavior of layers adsorbed on clay particle surfaces is discussed; the random distribution and its statistics of the layer thickness are given by incorporating experimental results with an ionic polyelectrolyte with the molecular weight of 1.08×106 and chain charged density of 0.254.

  8. Identifiability, reducibility, and adaptability in allosteric macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohner, Gergő; Venkataraman, Gaurav

    2017-05-01

    The ability of macromolecules to transduce stimulus information at one site into conformational changes at a distant site, termed "allostery," is vital for cellular signaling. Here, we propose a link between the sensitivity of allosteric macromolecules to their underlying biophysical parameters, the interrelationships between these parameters, and macromolecular adaptability. We demonstrate that the parameters of a canonical model of the mSlo large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) ion channel are non-identifiable with respect to the equilibrium open probability-voltage relationship, a common functional assay. We construct a reduced model with emergent parameters that are identifiable and expressed as combinations of the original mechanistic parameters. These emergent parameters indicate which coordinated changes in mechanistic parameters can leave assay output unchanged. We predict that these coordinated changes are used by allosteric macromolecules to adapt, and we demonstrate how this prediction can be tested experimentally. We show that these predicted parameter compensations are used in the first reported allosteric phenomena: the Bohr effect, by which hemoglobin adapts to varying pH. © 2017 Bohner and Venkataraman.

  9. Shape transformation of lipid vesicles induced by diffusing macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góźdź, W T

    2011-01-14

    The attachment of macromolecules to the surface of a lipid vesicle may cause its deformations such as budding or creation of cylindrical protrusions. Diffusion of the macromolecules in the membranes may cause its shape transformations. The process of shrinking the protrusions due to diffusion of the macromolecules is investigated. It is assumed that macromolecules modify locally the spontaneous curvature and bending rigidity of the lipid membrane. Both spontaneous curvature and bending rigidities depend on the concentration of membrane components. It has been shown that cylindrical protrusions are created when the macromolecules which induce large spontaneous curvature are accumulated at a piece of the vesicle surface. It has been observed that here the elastic constants influence very little the evolution of the vesicle shape caused by diffusing macromolecules and the most important is the value the spontaneous curvature imposed by the macromolecules.

  10. Regulation of synaptic vesicle docking by different classes of macromolecules in active zone material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szule, Joseph A; Harlow, Mark L; Jung, Jae Hoon; De-Miguel, Francisco F; Marshall, Robert M; McMahan, Uel J

    2012-01-01

    The docking of synaptic vesicles at active zones on the presynaptic plasma membrane of axon terminals is essential for their fusion with the membrane and exocytosis of their neurotransmitter to mediate synaptic impulse transmission. Dense networks of macromolecules, called active zone material, (AZM) are attached to the presynaptic membrane next to docked vesicles. Electron tomography has shown that some AZM macromolecules are connected to docked vesicles, leading to the suggestion that AZM is somehow involved in the docking process. We used electron tomography on the simply arranged active zones at frog neuromuscular junctions to characterize the connections of AZM to docked synaptic vesicles and to search for the establishment of such connections during vesicle docking. We show that each docked vesicle is connected to 10-15 AZM macromolecules, which fall into four classes based on several criteria including their position relative to the presynaptic membrane. In activated axon terminals fixed during replacement of docked vesicles by previously undocked vesicles, undocked vesicles near vacated docking sites on the presynaptic membrane have connections to the same classes of AZM macromolecules that are connected to docked vesicles in resting terminals. The number of classes and the total number of macromolecules to which the undocked vesicles are connected are inversely proportional to the vesicles' distance from the presynaptic membrane. We conclude that vesicle movement toward and maintenance at docking sites on the presynaptic membrane are directed by an orderly succession of stable interactions between the vesicles and distinct classes of AZM macromolecules positioned at different distances from the membrane. Establishing the number, arrangement and sequence of association of AZM macromolecules involved in vesicle docking provides an anatomical basis for testing and extending concepts of docking mechanisms provided by biochemistry.

  11. Intracellular uptake of macromolecules by brain lymphatic endothelial cells during zebrafish embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lessen, Max; Shibata-Germanos, Shannon; van Impel, Andreas; Hawkins, Thomas A; Rihel, Jason; Schulte-Merker, Stefan

    2017-05-12

    The lymphatic system controls fluid homeostasis and the clearance of macromolecules from interstitial compartments. In mammals brain lymphatics were only recently discovered, with significant implications for physiology and disease. We examined zebrafish for the presence of brain lymphatics and found loosely connected endothelial cells with lymphatic molecular signature covering parts of the brain without forming endothelial tubular structures. These brain lymphatic endothelial cells (BLECs) derive from venous endothelium, are distinct from macrophages, and are sensitive to loss of Vegfc. BLECs endocytose macromolecules in a selective manner, which can be blocked by injection of mannose receptor ligands. This first report on brain lymphatic endothelial cells in a vertebrate embryo identifies cells with unique features, including the uptake of macromolecules at a single cell level. Future studies will address whether this represents an uptake mechanism that is conserved in mammals and how these cells affect functions of the embryonic and adult brain.

  12. Synthesis of deoxynucleoside triphosphates that include proline, urea, or sulfonamide groups and their polymerase incorporation into DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenstein, Marcel

    2012-10-15

    To expand the chemical array available for DNA sequences in the context of in vitro selection, I present herein the synthesis of five nucleoside triphosphate analogues containing side chains capable of organocatalysis. The synthesis involved the coupling of L-proline-containing residues (dU(tP)TP and dU(cP)TP), a dipeptide (dU(FP)TP), a urea derivative (dU(Bpu)TP), and a sulfamide residue (dU(Bs)TP) to a suitably protected common intermediate, followed by triphosphorylation. These modified dNTPs were shown to be excellent substrates for the Vent (exo(-)) and Pwo DNA polymerases, as well as the Klenow fragment of E. coli DNA polymerase I, although they were only acceptable substrates for the 9°N(m) polymerase. All of the modified dNTPs, with the exception of dU(Bpu)TP, were readily incorporated into DNA by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Modified oligonucleotides efficiently served as templates for PCR for the regeneration of unmodified DNA. Thermal denaturation experiments showed that these modifications are tolerated in the major groove. Overall, these heavily modified dNTPs are excellent candidates for SELEX.

  13. "Bio"-macromolecules: polymer-protein conjugates as emerging scaffolds for therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchmann, Dorothee E; Carberry, Tom P; Weck, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Polymer-protein conjugates are biohybrid macromolecules derived from covalently connecting synthetic polymers with polypeptides. The resulting materials combine the properties of both worlds: chemists can engineer polymers to stabilize proteins, to add functionality, or to enhance activity; whereas biochemists can exploit the specificity and complexity that Nature has bestowed upon its macromolecules. This has led to a wealth of applications, particularly within the realm of biomedicine. Polymer-protein conjugation has expanded to include scaffolds for drug delivery, tissue engineering, and microbial inhibitors. This feature article reflects upon recent developments in the field and discusses the applications of these hybrids from a biomaterials standpoint.

  14. Flexibility and Stability of Metal Coordination Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Heyan; Geng, Diya; Liu, Dapeng; Lanigan, Nicholas; Wang, Xiaosong

    2017-06-16

    The effect of chain structure on flexibility and stability of macromolecules containing weak P-Fe metal coordination bonds is studied. Migration insertion polymerization (MIP) of FpCX Fp (1) and PR2 CY PR2 (2) (Fp: CpFe(CO)2 ; CX and CY : alkyl spacers; P: phosphine; R: phenyl or isopropyl) generates P(1/2), in which the P-Fe and Fe-P bonds with opposite bonding direction are alternatively arranged in the backbone. On the other hand, P(FpCX P) synthesized from AB-type monomers (FpCX P) has P-Fe bonds arranged in the same direction. P(1/2) is more rigid and stable than P(FpCX P), which is attributed to the chain conformation resulting from the P-Fe bonding direction. In addition, the longer spacers render P(1/2) relatively flexible; the phenyl substituents, as compared with the isopropyl groups, improves the rigidity, thermal, and solution stability of P(1/2). It is therefore possible to incorporate weak metal coordination bonds into macromolecules with improved stability and adjustable flexibility for material processing. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Insights into the mechanisms of electromediated gene delivery and application to the loading of giant vesicles with negatively charged macromolecules

    CERN Document Server

    Portet, Thomas; Teissié, Justin; Dean, David S; Rols, Marie-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    We present experimental results regarding the electrotransfer of plasmid DNA into phosphatidylcholine giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). Our observations indicate that a direct entry is the predominant mechanism of electrotransfer. A quantitative analysis of the DNA concentration increments inside the GUVs is also performed, and we find that our experimental data are very well described by a simple theoretical model in which DNA entry is mostly driven by electrophoresis. Our theoretical framework allows for the prediction of the amount of transfered DNA as a function of the electric field parameters, and thus paves the way towards a novel method for encapsulating with high efficiency not only DNA, but any negatively charged macromolecule into GUVs.

  16. PlaMoM: a comprehensive database compiles plant mobile macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Daogang; Yan, Bin; Thieme, Christoph; Hua, Jingmin; Zhu, Hailong; Boheler, Kenneth R; Zhao, Zhongying; Kragler, Friedrich; Xia, Yiji; Zhang, Shoudong

    2017-01-04

    In plants, various phloem-mobile macromolecules including noncoding RNAs, mRNAs and proteins are suggested to act as important long-distance signals in regulating crucial physiological and morphological transition processes such as flowering, plant growth and stress responses. Given recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies, numerous mobile macromolecules have been identified in diverse plant species from different plant families. However, most of the identified mobile macromolecules are not annotated in current versions of species-specific databases and are only available as non-searchable datasheets. To facilitate study of the mobile signaling macromolecules, we compiled the PlaMoM (Plant Mobile Macromolecules) database, a resource that provides convenient and interactive search tools allowing users to retrieve, to analyze and also to predict mobile RNAs/proteins. Each entry in the PlaMoM contains detailed information such as nucleotide/amino acid sequences, ortholog partners, related experiments, gene functions and literature. For the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, protein-protein interactions of mobile transcripts are presented as interactive molecular networks. Furthermore, PlaMoM provides a built-in tool to identify potential RNA mobility signals such as tRNA-like structures. The current version of PlaMoM compiles a total of 17 991 mobile macromolecules from 14 plant species/ecotypes from published data and literature. PlaMoM is available at http://www.systembioinfo.org/plamom/. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Tonal Interface to MacroMolecules (TIMMol): A Textual and Tonal Tool for Molecular Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, Timothy J.; Carlson, C. Britt; Forest, Katrina T.

    2008-01-01

    We developed the three-dimensional visualization software, Tonal Interface to MacroMolecules or TIMMol, for studying atomic coordinates of protein structures. Key features include audio tones indicating x, y, z location, identification of the cursor location in one-dimensional and three-dimensional space, textual output that can be easily linked…

  18. Multiple hypothesis correction is vital and undermines reported mtDNA links to diseases including AIDS, cancer, and Huntingdon's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Iain G

    2016-09-01

    The ability to sequence mitochondrial genomes quickly and cheaply has led to an explosion in available mtDNA data. As a result, an expanding literature is exploring links between mtDNA features and susceptibility to, or prevalence of, a range of diseases. Unfortunately, this great technological power has not always been accompanied by great statistical responsibility. I will focus on one aspect of statistical analysis, multiple hypothesis correction, that is absolutely required, yet often absolutely ignored, for responsible interpretation of this literature. Many existing studies perform comparisons between incidences of a large number (N) of different mtDNA features and a given disease, reporting all those yielding p values under 0.05 as significant links. But when many comparisons are performed, it is highly likely that several p values under 0.05 will emerge, by chance, in the absence of any underlying link. A suitable correction (for example, Bonferroni correction, requiring p < 0.05/N) must, therefore, be employed to avoid reporting false positive results. The absence of such corrections means that there is good reason to believe that many links reported between mtDNA features and various diseases are false; a state of affairs that is profoundly negative both for fundamental biology and for public health. I will show that statistics matching those claimed to illustrate significant links can arise, with a high probability, when no such link exists, and that these claims should thus be discarded until results of suitable statistical reliability are provided. I also discuss some strategies for responsible analysis and interpretation of this literature.

  19. Human MUS81-EME2 can cleave a variety of DNA structures including intact Holliday junction and nicked duplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amangyeld, Tamir; Shin, Yong-Keol; Lee, Miju; Kwon, Buki; Seo, Yeon-Soo

    2014-05-01

    MUS81 shares a high-degree homology with the catalytic XPF subunit of the XPF-ERCC1 endonuclease complex. It is catalytically active only when complexed with the regulatory subunits Mms4 or Eme1 in budding and fission yeasts, respectively, and EME1 or EME2 in humans. Although Mus81 complexes are implicated in the resolution of recombination intermediates in vivo, recombinant yeast Mus81-Mms4 and human MUS81-EME1 isolated from Escherichia coli fail to cleave intact Holliday junctions (HJs) in vitro. In this study, we show that human recombinant MUS81-EME2 isolated from E. coli cleaves HJs relatively efficiently, compared to MUS81-EME1. Furthermore, MUS81-EME2 catalyzed cleavage of nicked and gapped duplex deoxyribonucleic acids (DNAs), generating double-strand breaks. The presence of a 5' phosphate terminus at nicks and gaps rendered DNA significantly less susceptible to the cleavage by MUS81-EME2 than its absence, raising the possibility that this activity could play a role in channeling damaged DNA duplexes that are not readily repaired into the recombinational repair pathways. Significant differences in substrate specificity observed with unmodified forms of MUS81-EME1 and MUS81-EME2 suggest that they play related but non-overlapping roles in DNA transactions. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Surface induced self-organization of comb-like macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Konstantin I; Palyulin, Vladimir V; Möller, Martin; Khokhlov, Alexei R

    2011-01-01

    Summary We present a review of the theoretical and experimental evidence for the peculiar properties of comb copolymers, demonstrating the uniqueness of these materials among other polymer architectures. These special properties include an increase in stiffness upon increasing side-chain length, the spontaneous curvature of adsorbed combs, rod–globule transition, and specific intramolecular self-assembly. We also propose a theory of chemically heterogeneous surface nanopattern formation in ultrathin films of comblike macromolecules containing two different types (A and B) of incompatible side chains (so-called binary combs). Side chains of the binary combs are strongly adsorbed on a surface and segregated with respect to the backbone. The thickness of surface domains formed by the B side chains is controlled by the interaction with the substrate. We predict the stability of direct and inverse disc-, torus- and stripelike nanostructures. Phase diagrams of the film are constructed. PMID:22003463

  1. Controlled doping by self-assembled dendrimer-like macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haigang; Guan, Bin; Sun, Yingri; Zhu, Yiping; Dan, Yaping

    2017-02-01

    Doping via self-assembled macromolecules might offer a solution for developing single atom electronics by precisely placing individual dopants at arbitrary location to meet the requirement for circuit design. Here we synthesize dendrimer-like polyglycerol macromolecules with each carrying one phosphorus atom in the core. The macromolecules are immobilized by the coupling reagent onto silicon surfaces that are pre-modified with a monolayer of undecylenic acid. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are employed to characterize the synthesized macromolecules and the modified silicon surfaces, respectively. After rapid thermal annealing, the phosphorus atoms carried by the macromolecules diffuse into the silicon substrate, forming dopants at a concentration of 10(17) cm(-3). Low-temperature Hall effect measurements reveal that the ionization process is rather complicated. Unlike the widely reported simple ionization of phosphorus dopants, nitrogen and carbon are also involved in the electronic activities in the monolayer doped silicon.

  2. Controlled doping by self-assembled dendrimer-like macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haigang; Guan, Bin; Sun, Yingri; Zhu, Yiping; Dan, Yaping

    2017-02-01

    Doping via self-assembled macromolecules might offer a solution for developing single atom electronics by precisely placing individual dopants at arbitrary location to meet the requirement for circuit design. Here we synthesize dendrimer-like polyglycerol macromolecules with each carrying one phosphorus atom in the core. The macromolecules are immobilized by the coupling reagent onto silicon surfaces that are pre-modified with a monolayer of undecylenic acid. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are employed to characterize the synthesized macromolecules and the modified silicon surfaces, respectively. After rapid thermal annealing, the phosphorus atoms carried by the macromolecules diffuse into the silicon substrate, forming dopants at a concentration of 1017 cm‑3. Low-temperature Hall effect measurements reveal that the ionization process is rather complicated. Unlike the widely reported simple ionization of phosphorus dopants, nitrogen and carbon are also involved in the electronic activities in the monolayer doped silicon.

  3. Intermediate scattering function for macromolecules in solutions probed by neutron spin echo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun

    2017-02-01

    The neutron-spin-echo method (NSE) is a powerful technique for studying internal dynamics of macromolecules in solutions because it can simultaneously probe length and time scales comparable to intramolecular density fluctuations of macromolecules. Recently, there has been increased, strong interest in studying protein internal motions using NSE. The coherent intermediate scattering function (ISF) measured by NSE depends on internal, rotational, and translational motions of macromolecules in solutions. It is thus critical, but highly nontrivial, to separate the internal motion from other motions in order to properly understand protein internal dynamics. Even though many experiments are performed at relatively high concentrations, current theories of calculating the ISF of concentrated protein solutions are either inaccurate or flawed by incorrect assumptions for realistic protein systems with anisotropic shapes. Here, a theoretical framework is developed to establish the quantitative relationship of different motions included in the ISF. This theory based on the dynamic decoupling approximation is applicable to a wide range of protein concentrations, including dilute cases. It is also, in general, useful for studying many other types of macromolecule systems studied by NSE.

  4. Intermediate scattering function for macromolecules in solutions probed by neutron spin echo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun

    2017-02-01

    The neutron-spin-echo method (NSE) is a powerful technique for studying internal dynamics of macromolecules in solutions because it can simultaneously probe length and time scales comparable to intramolecular density fluctuations of macromolecules. Recently, there has been increased, strong interest in studying protein internal motions using NSE. The coherent intermediate scattering function (ISF) measured by NSE depends on internal, rotational, and translational motions of macromolecules in solutions. It is thus critical, but highly nontrivial, to separate the internal motion from other motions in order to properly understand protein internal dynamics. Even though many experiments are performed at relatively high concentrations, current theories of calculating the ISF of concentrated protein solutions are either inaccurate or flawed by incorrect assumptions for realistic protein systems with anisotropic shapes. Here, a theoretical framework is developed to establish the quantitative relationship of different motions included in the ISF. This theory based on the dynamic decoupling approximation is applicable to a wide range of protein concentrations, including dilute cases. It is also, in general, useful for studying many other types of macromolecule systems studied by NSE.

  5. DNA barcoding approaches for fishing authentication of exploited grouper species including the endangered and legally protected goliath grouper Epinephelus itajara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo A. Torres

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Fishing strategies are constantly changing to meet the needs for new or alternative food sources. Consequently, management of fishing activities regarding rates of exploitation is essential, as a number of resources have reached situations of overexploitation. The aim of the present study was to use DNA barcoding from the goliath grouper and other exploited epinephelids in order to provide procedures for DNA authentication to be used as evidence for combating putative illegal fishing. The species studied were Epinephelus adscensionis, Mycteroperca bonaci, Mycteroperca interstitialis, Epinephelus itajara, Mycteroperca venenosa, Epinephelus mystacinus, Dermatolepis inermis, Alphestes afer, Cephalopholis fulva, Mycteroperca acutirostris, Rypticus saponaceus, Mycteroperca marginata and Epinephelus morio. Four of these species are the main epinephelids fished in the Atlantic Ocean. Differential patterns of polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism were obtained from the species and additional single nucleotide polymorphisms were also detected among the four main epinephelids studied. The procedures proved very efficient and we suggest their applicability to the other fish groups as a way to control illegal capture and retail around the world, especially in cases in which filleting and other forms of de-characterization cause a lack of morpho-anatomical key characters.

  6. Angiogenesis, Proliferative Activity and DNA Ploidy in Oral Verrucous Carcinoma: A Comparative Study Including Verrucous Hyperplasia and Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Saumyaranjan; Breta, Monika; Gupta, Siddhartha Datta; Dinda, Amit Kumar; Mohanty, Biddhu K; Singh, Manoj K

    2015-09-01

    Verrucous carcinoma (VC) is a rare and distinct clinicopathologic variant of well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). This study aims to evaluate the histomorphology, proliferative activity, level of angiogenesis, and DNA ploidy of these pathological entities. This was a retrospective-prospective study of 18 cases of verrucous hyperplasia (VH), 41 cases of VC, and 44 cases of SCC. Immunohistochemical analysis for Ki-67 (MIB-1) and CD34 were performed. The tumor proliferative index, endothelial proliferative index and microvascular density were calculated. DNA ploidy was determined using image cytometry. The age range and gender ratio were similar in all three groups. The differences in MIB-1 labeling index (p = 0.0001), microvascular density (p = 0.01), and endothelial proliferative index (p = 0.001) between VC and SCC were found to be statistically significant. A non-significant increasing trend was observed in all of these parameters between VH and VC. On ploidy analysis, 100 % of SCC cases were aneuploid, compared to 39 % of VH and 86 % of VC cases. Our study demonstrates a significant difference in tumor proliferation, microvessel density, and ploidy between VC and SCC while increasing trend between VH and VC. These parameters, along with morphological findings, may be useful in differentiating these entities in small mucosal biopsies.

  7. Chase the direct impact of rainfall into groundwater in Mt. Fuji from multiple analyses including microbial DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kenji; Sugiyama, Ayumi; Nagaosa, Kazuyo; Tsujimura, Maki

    2016-04-01

    A huge amount of groundwater is stored in subsurface environment of Mt. Fuji, the largest volcanic mountain in Japan. Based on the concept of piston flow transport of groundwater an apparent residence time was estimated to ca. 30 years by 36Cl/Cl ratio (Tosaki et al., 2011). However, this number represents an averaged value of the residence time of groundwater which had been mixed before it flushes out. We chased signatures of direct impact of rainfall into groundwater to elucidate the routes of groundwater, employing three different tracers; stable isotopic analysis (delta 18O), chemical analysis (concentration of silica) and microbial DNA analysis. Though chemical analysis of groundwater shows an averaged value of the examined water which was blended by various water with different sources and routes in subsurface environment, microbial DNA analysis may suggest the place where they originated, which may give information of the source and transport routes of the water examined. Throughout the in situ observation of four rainfall events showed that stable oxygen isotopic ratio of spring water and shallow groundwater obtained from 726m a.s.l. where the average recharge height of rainfall was between 1500 and 1800 m became higher than the values before a torrential rainfall, and the concentration of silica decreased after this event when rainfall exceeded 300 mm in precipitation of an event. In addition, the density of Prokaryotes in spring water apparently increased. Those changes did not appear when rainfall did not exceed 100 mm per event. Thus, findings shown above indicated a direct impact of rainfall into shallow groundwater, which appeared within a few weeks of torrential rainfall in the studied geological setting. In addition, increase in the density of Archaea observed at deep groundwater after the torrential rainfall suggested an enlargement of the strength of piston flow transport through the penetration of rainfall into deep groundwater. This finding was

  8. Amino acids 16-275 of minute virus of mice NS1 include a domain that specifically binds (ACCA)2-3-containing DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouw, M; Pintel, D J

    1998-11-10

    GST-NS1 purified from Escherichia coli and insect cells binds double-strand DNA in an (ACCA)2-3-dependent fashion under similar ionic conditions, independent of the presence of anti-NS1 antisera or exogenously supplied ATP and interacts with single-strand DNA and RNA in a sequence-independent manner. An amino-terminal domain (amino acids 1-275) of NS1 [GST-NS1(1-275)], representing 41% of the full-length NS1 molecule, includes a domain that binds double-strand DNA in a sequence-specific manner at levels comparable to full-length GST-NS1, as well as single-strand DNA and RNA in a sequence-independent manner. The deletion of 15 additional amino-terminal amino acids yielded a molecule [GST-NS1(1-275)] that maintained (ACCA)2-3-specific double-strand DNA binding; however, this molecule was more sensitive to increasing ionic conditions than full-length GST-NS1 and GST-NS1(1-275) and could not be demonstrated to bind single-strand nucleic acids. A quantitative filter binding assay showed that E. coli- and baculovirus-expressed GST-NS1 and E. coli GST-NS1(1-275) specifically bound double-strand DNA with similar equilibrium kinetics [as measured by their apparent equilibrium DNA binding constants (KD)], whereas GST-NS1(16-275) bound 4- to 8-fold less well. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  9. Leading-edge forensic DNA analyses and the necessity of including crime scene investigators, police officers and technicians in a DNA elimination database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapointe, Martine; Rogic, Anita; Bourgoin, Sarah; Jolicoeur, Christine; Séguin, Diane

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, sophisticated technology has significantly increased the sensitivity and analytical power of genetic analyses so that very little starting material may now produce viable genetic profiles. This sensitivity however, has also increased the risk of detecting unknown genetic profiles assumed to be that of the perpetrator, yet originate from extraneous sources such as from crime scene workers. These contaminants may mislead investigations, keeping criminal cases active and unresolved for long spans of time. Voluntary submission of DNA samples from crime scene workers is fairly low, therefore we have created a promotional method for our staff elimination database that has resulted in a significant increase in voluntary samples since 2011. Our database enforces privacy safeguards and allows for optional anonymity to all staff members. We also offer information sessions at various police precincts to advise crime scene workers of the importance and success of our staff elimination database. This study, a pioneer in its field, has obtained 327 voluntary submissions from crime scene workers to date, of which 46 individual profiles (14%) have been matched to 58 criminal cases. By implementing our methods and respect for individual privacy, forensic laboratories everywhere may see similar growth and success in explaining unidentified genetic profiles in stagnate criminal cases.

  10. Discovery of Reversible Crystallization of Macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, Bernhard

    2004-03-01

    For 10 years "reversing melting" was observed with temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry, TMDSC. This reversing melting is the first harmonic response beyond that caused by the heat capacity of a metastable, semicrystalline macromolecular sample. Before one can identify "reversible melting," the calorimeter response must be corrected for loss of linearity, stationarity, frequency, amplitude, and instrument lag, or proper experiment-design must avoid these problems. Using quasi-isothermal TMDSC, the following observations were made [Prog. Polymer Sci. 28 (2003) 383-450]: Equilibrium crystals of polymers may melt at the equilibrium melting-temperature, but crystallization needs supercooling, even in the presence of crystal nuclei, making the overall process irreversible. Metastable, folded-chain crystals of the same molecules also melt irreversibly, however, may have some specific reversibility. Flexible, linear molecules of up to 10 nm length may melt fully reversibly. Macromolecules of less flexibility may lose the ability to melt reversibly. Decoupling of molecular segments, molecular nucleation, segregation of molar masses, rigid amorphous fractions, effects of equilibrium point defects in crystals and glasses, and transition-less ordering and solidification will be discussed in some detail. Supported by NSF, Polymers Program, DMR-0312233, and the Div. of Mat. Sci., BES, of DOE at ORNL, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy, DOE-AC05-00OR22725.

  11. Second Harmonic Light Scattering from Macromolecules: Collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Shmuel

    In this work we present the theory and practice of optical second harmonic generation (SHG) as applied to rat-tail tendon collagen. Our work is the first quantitative application of SHG to biological systems. The angular dependence of SHG is found to display a sharp, intense, forward peak superimposed on a broad background. The sharp peak is shown to imply long-range polar order, while the broad background corresponds to that predicted for the random "up"/"down" array of collagen fibrils seen with the electron microscope. The dependence of fibril diameter distribution on age and state of hydration is measured. Our experiments also reveal information concerning the structure of the fibrils and their arrangement in the tendon. The degree of polar order, the coherence length of tendon for harmonic generation and the absolute magnitude of the nonlinear susceptibility of the collagen fibril are also determined. The biological significance of these findings and the many advantages of SHG for the structural study of biological macromolecules and tissues are discussed.

  12. Ligand Binding to Macromolecules: Allosteric and Sequential Models of Cooperativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, V. L.; Szabo, Attila

    1979-01-01

    A simple model is described for the binding of ligands to macromolecules. The model is applied to the cooperative binding by hemoglobin and aspartate transcarbamylase. The sequential and allosteric models of cooperative binding are considered. (BB)

  13. Organized monolayers of biological macromolecules on Au(111) surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin; Nielsen, Jens Ulrik

    2002-01-01

    Single-crystal electrochemistry and scanning tunneling microscopy directly in aqueous electrolyte solution (in situ STM) are established in physical electrochemistry but new in studies of adsorption and interfacial electrochemistry of biological macromolecules. These high-resolution techniques have...

  14. Effect of anionic macromolecules on intestinal permeability of furosemide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valizadeh, Hadi; Fahimfar, Hadi; Ghanbarzadeh, Saeed; Islambulchilar, Ziba; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin

    2015-02-01

    Furosemide is an anionic molecule and has very low absorption in gastro intestinal tract. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of anionic macromolecules on the intestinal permeability of Furosemide. The intestinal permeability of Furosemide was determined using single-pass intestinal perfusion technique in rats. Briefly a jejunal segment of ∼10 cm was isolated and cannulated in both ends for inlet and outlet solution. The perfusate was collected every 10 min and samples were analyzed using the RP-HPLC method. Test samples containing furosemide and two anionic macromolecules, sodium carboxy methyl cellulose and sodium alginate, at different concentrations were used. The obtained data showed that existence of Sodium carboxy methyl cellulose significantly increased the Peff values in all three investigated concentrations (p macromolecules at specific concentrations could alter the permeability of anionic drugs across the biological membranes. Donnan phenomenon and chelating property of macromolecules could be attributed to the observed effect.

  15. A general method to study equilibrium partitioning of macromolecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The distribution of macromolecules between a confined microscopic solution and a macroscopic bulk solution plays an important role in understanding separation processes such as Size Exclusion Chromatography (SEC). In this study, we have developed an efficient computational algorithm for obtaining...

  16. Electrically assisted delivery of macromolecules into the corneal epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    HAO, JINSONG; Li, S. Kevin; Liu, Chia-Yang; Kao, Winston W. Y.

    2009-01-01

    Electrically assisted delivery is noninvasive and has been investigated in a number of ocular drug delivery studies. The objectives of this study were to examine the feasibility of electrically assisted delivery of macromolecules such as small interfering RNA (siRNA) into the corneal epithelium, to optimize the iontophoresis and electroporation methods, and to study the mechanisms of corneal iontophoresis for macromolecules. Anodal and cathodal iontophoresis, electroporation and their combina...

  17. Differential scanning calorimetry: An invaluable tool for a detailed thermodynamic characterization of macromolecules and their interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H Chiu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC is a highly sensitive technique to study the thermotropic properties of many different biological macromolecules and extracts. Since its early development, DSC has been applied to the pharmaceutical field with excipient studies and DNA drugs. In recent times, more attention has been applied to lipid-based drug delivery systems and drug interactions with biomimetic membranes. Highly reproducible phase transitions have been used to determine values, such as, the type of binding interaction, purity, stability, and release from a drug delivery mechanism. This review focuses on the use of DSC for biochemical and pharmaceutical applications.

  18. Differential scanning calorimetry: An invaluable tool for a detailed thermodynamic characterization of macromolecules and their interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Michael H.; Prenner, Elmar J.

    2011-01-01

    Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) is a highly sensitive technique to study the thermotropic properties of many different biological macromolecules and extracts. Since its early development, DSC has been applied to the pharmaceutical field with excipient studies and DNA drugs. In recent times, more attention has been applied to lipid-based drug delivery systems and drug interactions with biomimetic membranes. Highly reproducible phase transitions have been used to determine values, such as, the type of binding interaction, purity, stability, and release from a drug delivery mechanism. This review focuses on the use of DSC for biochemical and pharmaceutical applications. PMID:21430954

  19. Mitochondrial DNA sequence evolution and phylogeny of the Atlantic Alcidae, including the extinct great auk (Pinguinus impennis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moum, Truls; Arnason, Ulfur; Arnason, Einar

    2002-09-01

    The Atlantic auk assemblage includes four extant species, razorbill (Alca torda), dovekie (Alle alle), common murre (Uria aalge), and thick-billed murre (U. lomvia), and one recently extinct species, the flightless great auk (Pinguinus impennis). To determine the phylogenetic relationships among the species, a contiguous 4.2-kb region of the mitochondrial genome from the extant species was amplified using PCR. This region included one ribosomal RNA gene, four transfer RNA genes, two protein-coding genes, the control region, and intergenic spacers. Sets of PCR primers for amplifying the same region from great auk were designed from sequences of the extant species. The authenticity of the great auk sequence was ascertained by alternative amplifications, cloning, and separate analyses in an independent laboratory. Phylogenetic analyses of the entire assemblage, made possible by the great auk sequence, fully resolved the phylogenetic relationships and split it into two primary lineages, Uria versus Alle, Alca, and Pinguinus. A sister group relationship was identified between Alca and Pinguinus to the exclusion of ALLE: Phylogenetically, the flightless great auk originated late relative to other divergences within the assemblage. This suggests that three highly divergent species in terms of adaptive specializations, Alca, Alle, and Pinguinus, evolved from a single lineage in the Atlantic Ocean, in a process similar to the initial adaptive radiation of alcids in the Pacific Ocean.

  20. Electrically assisted delivery of macromolecules into the corneal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jinsong; Li, S Kevin; Liu, Chia-Yang; Kao, Winston W Y

    2009-12-01

    Electrically assisted delivery is noninvasive and has been investigated in a number of ocular drug delivery studies. The objectives of this study were to examine the feasibility of electrically assisted delivery of macromolecules such as small interfering RNA (siRNA) into the corneal epithelium, to optimize the iontophoresis and electroporation methods, and to study the mechanisms of corneal iontophoresis for macromolecules. Anodal and cathodal iontophoresis, electroporation and their combinations were the methods examined with mice in vivo. Cyanine 3 (Cy3)-labeled glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) siRNA and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled dextran of different molecular weights (4-70 kDa) were the macromolecules studied. Microscopy and histology after cryostat sectioning were used to analyze and compare the delivery of the macromolecules to the cornea. Iontophoresis was effective in delivering siRNA and dextran up to 70 kDa into the cornea. The electroporation method studied was less effective than that of iontophoresis. Although both iontophoresis and electroporation alone can deliver the macromolecules into the cornea, these methods alone were not as effective as the combination of iontophoresis and electroporation (iontophoresis followed by electroporation). The significant enhancement of dextran delivery in anodal iontophoresis suggests that electroosmosis can be a significant flux-enhancing mechanism during corneal iontophoresis. These results illustrate the feasibility of electrically assisted delivery of macromolecules such as siRNA into the cornea.

  1. Earliest Detection of Oral Cancer Using Non-Invasive Brush Biopsy Including DNA-Image-Cytometry: Report on Four Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten W. Remmerbach

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We describe four patients presenting early oral cancers, detected cytologically on non‐invasive brush biopsies including DNA‐image cytometry as an adjunctive method before histology on scalpel biopsies confirmed the evidence of malignancy. Methods: Brush biopsies were performed and smears thereof investigated cytologically. After Feulgen restaining, DNA‐measurements were performed using a DNA‐Image‐Cytometer. Case reports: Oral squamous cell carcinomas were diagnosed cytologically in macroscopically suspicious lesions and malignancy confirmed by DNA‐cytometry. The initially performed scalpel biopsies did neither supply evidence of oral cancer nor of severe dysplasia. After at least one to 15 months the occurrence of cancer was finally proven histologically on a second scalpel biopsy each (three microinvasive and one in situ carcinoma. Conclusion: Non‐invasive brush biopsies are a suitable instrument for early cytologic detection of cancer of the mouth. DNA‐image‐cytometry, as an adjunctive method, can be used to confirm the cytologic diagnosis or suspicion of cancer in patients with doubtful lesions (dysplasias. DNA‐aneuploidy is a marker for (prospective malignancy in smears of the oral cavity, which may detect malignancy months prior to histology. In future this method could be used as a mass screening tool in dentists practise. Colour figures can be viewed on http://www.esacp.org/acp/2003/25‐4/remmerbach.htm.

  2. DNA sequence analysis of conserved and unique regions of swinepox virus: identification of genetic elements supporting phenotypic observations including a novel G protein-coupled receptor homologue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massung, R F; Jayarama, V; Moyer, R W

    1993-12-01

    Swinepox virus (SPV) contains a double-stranded cross-linked linear DNA genome of approximately 175 kilobase pairs with terminal inverted repetitions (TIRs) of 4.3 kb. The nucleotide sequence was determined for fragments from several regions of the genome including a 2.85-kb fragment from the central potentially conserved portion and two fragments within the presumed variable near-terminal regions which tend to be unique to a given poxvirus. The core sequence contains one partial and two complete open reading frames that are highly conserved and colinear with three contiguous ORFs within the HindIII D fragment of vaccinia virus (VV). The two near-terminal fragments, encompassing 14.2 and 3.6 kb, are respectively located 2.1 kb internal to the left and right cross-linked termini of the DNA and span the TIR junctions. The sequences encode 25 open reading frames including numerous proteins predicted to be membrane-bound or secreted in infected cells. Several ORFs unique to SPV were identified that may be involved in cell attachment, immune modulation, and pathogenesis including a novel poxvirus G protein-coupled receptor. In addition, several polypeptides encoded within the near-terminal regions of vaccinia virus DNA that function as host range or virulence factors are lacking within this region of swinepox virus including the VV growth factor, complement-binding protein, and ORFs C7L and K1L, associated with host range. The lack of these functional homologues could explain the characteristic attenuated phenotype and limited host range of SPV.

  3. The alkaline single cell electrophoresis assay with eight mouse organs: results with 22 mono-functional alkylating agents (including 9 dialkyl N-nitrosoamines) and 10 DNA crosslinkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, S; Matsusaka, N; Madarame, H; Miyamae, Y; Ishida, K; Satoh, M; Sekihashi, K; Sasaki, Y F

    2000-04-13

    The genotoxicity of 22 mono-functional alkylating agents (including 9 dialkyl N-nitrosoamines) and 10 DNA crosslinkers selected from IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer) groups 1, 2A, and 2B was evaluated in eight mouse organs with the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) (comet) assay. Groups of four mice were treated once intraperitoneally at the dose at which micronucleus tests had been conducted, and the stomach, colon, liver, kidney, bladder, lung, brain, and bone marrow were sampled 3, 8, and/or 24 h later. All chemicals were positive in the SCGE assay in at least one organ. Of the 22 mono-functional alkylating agents, over 50% were positive in all organs except the brain and bone marrow. The two subsets of mono-functional alkylating agents differed in their bone marrow genotoxicity: only 1 of the 9 dialkyl N-nitrosoamines was positive in bone marrow as opposed to 8 of the 13 other alkylating agents, reflecting the fact that dialkyl N-nitrosoamines are poor micronucleus inducers in hematopoietic cells. The two groups of mono-functional alkylating agents also differ in hepatic carcinogenicity in spite of the fact that they are similar in hepatic genotoxicity. While dialkyl N-nitrosoamines produce tumors primarily in mouse liver, only one (styrene-7,8-oxide) out of 10 of the other type of mono-functional alkylating agents is a mouse hepatic carcinogen. Taking into consideration our previous results showing high concordance between hepatic genotoxicity and carcinogenicity for aromatic amines and azo compounds, a possible explanation for the discrepancy might be that chemicals that require metabolic activation show high concordance between genotoxicity and carcinogenicity in the liver. A high percent of the 10 DNA crosslinkers were positive in the SCGE assay in the gastrointestinal mucosa, but less than 50% were positive in the liver and lung. In this study, we allowed 10 min alkali-unwinding to obtain low and stable control values

  4. A simple model for electrical charge in globular macromolecules and linear polyelectrolytes in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, M.

    2017-05-01

    We present a model for calculating the net and effective electrical charge of globular macromolecules and linear polyelectrolytes such as proteins and DNA, given the concentration of monovalent salt and pH in solution. The calculation is based on a numerical solution of the non-linear Poisson-Boltzmann equation using a finite element discretized continuum approach. The model simultaneously addresses the phenomena of charge regulation and renormalization, both of which underpin the electrostatics of biomolecules in solution. We show that while charge regulation addresses the true electrical charge of a molecule arising from the acid-base equilibria of its ionizable groups, charge renormalization finds relevance in the context of a molecule's interaction with another charged entity. Writing this electrostatic interaction free energy in terms of a local electrical potential, we obtain an "interaction charge" for the molecule which we demonstrate agrees closely with the "effective charge" discussed in charge renormalization and counterion-condensation theories. The predictions of this model agree well with direct high-precision measurements of effective electrical charge of polyelectrolytes such as nucleic acids and disordered proteins in solution, without tunable parameters. Including the effective interior dielectric constant for compactly folded molecules as a tunable parameter, the model captures measurements of effective charge as well as published trends of pKa shifts in globular proteins. Our results suggest a straightforward general framework to model electrostatics in biomolecules in solution. In offering a platform that directly links theory and experiment, these calculations could foster a systematic understanding of the interrelationship between molecular 3D structure and conformation, electrical charge and electrostatic interactions in solution. The model could find particular relevance in situations where molecular crystal structures are not available or

  5. A study of aneuploidy and DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa of three men with sex chromosome mosaicism including a 45,X cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh Huong; Morel, Frederic; Bujan, Louis; May-Panloup, Pascale; De Braekeleer, Marc; Perrin, Aurore

    2015-06-01

    Meiotic segregation of mosaic males with a 45,X cell line has been little examined. In this study, we evaluated the risk of aneuploid gametes using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and DNA fragmentation in ejaculated spermatozoa of three men with sex chromosome mosaicism including a 45,X cell line. Triple- and dual-color FISH were performed. Sperm DNA fragmentation was detected using the TUNEL assay. A significantly increased frequency of XY disomic spermatozoa was observed for patients (P)1 and P2. A significant increase in diploidy and autosomal aneuploidy was found in P2 and P3, respectively. The rate of DNA fragmentation was not different from that observed in a control group. Data from the literature are scarce (only 3 cases reported), making comparison of the present data difficult, especially as the frequencies of the cell lines comprising the mosaicism differed between patients. Furthermore, the proportion of the different cell lines can differ from one tissue to another in the same patient. Whether the relative levels of the several cell lines present in the mosaicism can influence the rate of aneuploid spermatozoa remains unknown.

  6. A Stochastic Finite Element Model for the Dynamics of Globular Macromolecules

    CERN Document Server

    Oliver, Robin; Harlen, Oliver G; Harris, Sarah A

    2012-01-01

    We describe a novel coarse-grained simulation method for modelling the dynamics of globular macromolecules, such as proteins. The macromolecule is treated as a continuum that is subject to thermal fluctuations. The model includes a non-linear treatment of elasticity and viscosity with thermal noise that is solved using finite element analysis. We have validated the method by demonstrating that the model provides average kinetic and potential energies that are in agreement with the classical equipartition theorem. In addition, we have performed Fourier analysis on the simulation trajectories obtained for a series of linear beams to confirm that the correct average energies are present in the first two Fourier bending modes. We have then used the new modelling method to simulate the thermal fluctuations of a representative protein over 500ns timescales. Using reasonable parameters for the material properties, we have demonstrated that the overall deformation of the biomolecule is consistent with the results obt...

  7. Biomimetic Transmembrane Channels with High Stability and Transporting Efficiency from Helically Folded Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Chao; Li, Wenfang; Dong, Zeyuan; Zhang, Xin; Yang, Feihu; Yang, Bing; Deng, Xiaoli; Zhang, Chenyang; Xu, Jiayun; Liu, Junqiu

    2016-08-08

    Membrane channels span the cellular lipid bilayers to transport ions and molecules into cells with sophisticated properties including high efficiency and selectivity. It is of particular biological importance in developing biomimetic transmembrane channels with unique functions by means of chemically synthetic strategies. An artificial unimolecular transmembrane channel using pore-containing helical macromolecules is reported. The self-folding, shape-persistent, pore-containing helical macromolecules are able to span the lipid bilayer, and thus result in extraordinary channel stability and high transporting efficiency for protons and cations. The lifetime of this artificial unimolecular channel in the lipid bilayer membrane is impressively long, rivaling those of natural protein channels. Natural channel mimics designed by helically folded polymeric scaffolds will display robust and versatile transport-related properties at single-molecule level. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Physicochemical Properties of Ion Pairs of Biological Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwahara, Junji; Esadze, Alexandre; Zandarashvili, Levani

    2015-09-30

    Ion pairs (also known as salt bridges) of electrostatically interacting cationic and anionic moieties are important for proteins and nucleic acids to perform their function. Although numerous three-dimensional structures show ion pairs at functionally important sites of biological macromolecules and their complexes, the physicochemical properties of the ion pairs are not well understood. Crystal structures typically show a single state for each ion pair. However, recent studies have revealed the dynamic nature of the ion pairs of the biological macromolecules. Biomolecular ion pairs undergo dynamic transitions between distinct states in which the charged moieties are either in direct contact or separated by water. This dynamic behavior is reasonable in light of the fundamental concepts that were established for small ions over the last century. In this review, we introduce the physicochemical concepts relevant to the ion pairs and provide an overview of the recent advancement in biophysical research on the ion pairs of biological macromolecules.

  9. Tailoring liquid crystalline lipid nanomaterials for controlled release of macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisset, Nicole B; Boyd, Ben J; Dong, Yao-Da

    2015-11-10

    Lipid-based liquid crystalline materials are being developed as drug delivery systems. However, the use of these materials for delivery of large macromolecules is currently hindered by the small size of the water channels in these structures limiting control over diffusion behaviour. The addition of the hydration-modulating agent, sucrose stearate, to phytantriol cubic phase under excess water conditions incrementally increased the size of these water channels. Inclusion of oleic acid enabled further control of swelling and de-swelling of the matrix via a pH triggerable system where at low pH the hexagonal phase is present and at higher pH the cubic phase is present. Fine control over the release of various sized model macromolecules is demonstrated, indicating future application to controlled loading and release of large macromolecules such as antibodies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A general method to study equilibrium partitioning of macromolecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The distribution of macromolecules between a confined microscopic solution and a macroscopic bulk solution plays an important role in understanding separation processes such as Size Exclusion Chromatography (SEC). In this study, we have developed an efficient computational algorithm for obtaining...... the equilibrium partition coefficient (pore-to-bulk concentration ratio) and the concentration profile inside the confining geometry. The algorithm involves two steps. First, certain characteristic structure properties of the studied macromolecule are obtained by sampling its configuration space, and second those...... data are used for the computation of partition coefficient and concentration profile for any confinement size. Our algorithm is versatile to the model and type of the macromolecule studied, and is capable of handling three types of confining geometries (slit, rectangular channel and rectangular box...

  11. Intellective high-precision macromolecule resistance temperature/humidity instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guixiong; Zhou, Qinhe; Kuang, Yongcong; Xu, Jing; Zeng, Zhixin

    2001-09-01

    Considering that the resistance of macromolecule resistor varies in a wide range and humidity sensor component is sensitive to temperature as well, a intelligent high- precision macromolecule resistance temperature/humidity instrument was proposed in this paper, the instrument is based on the integration of frequency-and-period-measuring method, and sensing characteristic calculation and compensation using interpolation. Practical applications show that the instrument has the advantages of high precision, simple peripheral circuit, low cost, suitability for remote measurement, strong ability of anti-interference and wide operation range.

  12. ASPHERICITY AND PROLATENESS OF LINEAR AND CIRCULAR MACROMOLECULES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Gaoyuan

    1995-01-01

    The shape asymmetry of gaussian models of linear and circular macromolecules has been numerically invesigated in terms of asphericity and prolateness parameters. These parameters are found to decrease with increasing length for the macromolecule either confined to a plane or in three dimensions. The effect of dimensionality on these parameters is visible only for low dimensions and is generally weak. As dimensionality goes to infinity, it is found that asphericity and prolateness for both chains and rings approach slowly yet descendingly values of corresponding asphericity and prolateness factors, with the exception of the chain which shows a minimum value of asphericity when the embedding space has a dimensionality of four.

  13. Effects of high hydrostatic pressures on living cells: a consequence of the properties of macromolecules and macromolecule-associated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentré, P; Hui Bon Hoa, G

    2001-01-01

    Sixty percent of the Earth's biomass is found in the sea, at depths greater than 1000 m, i.e., at hydrostatic pressures higher than 100 atm. Still more surprising is the fact that living cells can reversibly withstand pressure shifts of 1000 atm. One explanation lies in the properties of cellular water. Water forms a very thin film around macromolecules, with a heterogeneous structure that is an image of the heterogeneity of the macromolecular surface. The density of water in contact with macromolecules reflects the physical properties of their different domains. Therefore, any macromolecular shape variations involving the reorganization of water and concomitant density changes are sensitive to pressure (Le Chatelier's principle). Most of the pressure-induced changes to macromolecules are reversible up to 2000 atm. Both the effects of pressure shifts on living cells and the characteristics of pressure-adapted species are opening new perspectives on fundamental problems such as regulation and adaptation.

  14. A new highly adaptable design of shear-flow device for orientation of macromolecules for Linear Dichroism (LD) measurement

    KAUST Repository

    Lundahl, P. Johan

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a new design of flow-orientation device for the study of bio-macromolecules, including DNA and protein complexes, as well as aggregates such as amyloid fibrils and liposome membranes, using Linear Dichroism (LD) spectroscopy. The design provides a number of technical advantages that should make the device inexpensive to manufacture, easier to use and more reliable than existing techniques. The degree of orientation achieved is of the same order of magnitude as that of the commonly used concentric cylinders Couette flow cell, however, since the device exploits a set of flat strain-free quartz plates, a number of problems associated with refraction and birefringence of light are eliminated, increasing the sensitivity and accuracy of measurement. The device provides similar shear rates to those of the Couette cell but is superior in that the shear rate is constant across the gap. Other major advantages of the design is the possibility to change parts and vary sample volume and path length easily and at a low cost. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  15. cDNA cloning of the basement membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan core protein, bamacan: a five domain structure including coiled-coil motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, R R; Couchman, J R

    1997-01-01

    Basement membranes contain several proteoglycans, and those bearing heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans such as perlecan and agrin usually predominate. Most mammalian basement membranes also contain chondroitin sulfate, and a core protein, bamacan, has been partially characterized. We have now...... obtained cDNA clones encoding the entire bamacan core protein of Mr = 138 kD, which reveal a five domain, head-rod-tail configuration. The head and tail are potentially globular, while the central large rod probably forms coiled-coil structures, with one large central and several very short interruptions....... This molecular architecture is novel for an extracellular matrix molecule, but it resembles that of a group of intracellular proteins, including some proposed to stabilize the mitotic chromosome scaffold. We have previously proposed a similar stabilizing role for bamacan in the basement membrane matrix...

  16. Insulin facilitates transport of macromolecules and nutrients to muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, N J; Hilsted, J

    1993-01-01

    , systolic blood pressure and plasma noradrenaline. These changes were absent or attenuated in diabetic patients (without neuropathy) after an oral glucose load. These responses were normalized by insulin infusion. Our results suggest that insulin facilitates the transfer of macromolecules and nutrients from...

  17. DEDUCTION OF EVOLUTIONARY RELATIONSHIPS FROM THE STRUCTURE OF MACROMOLECULES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BEINTEMA, JJ

    1992-01-01

    Macromolecules can be used to derive evolutionary relationships. This discovery has led to the development of a new discipline in biology, molecular evolution. A brief survey of several aspects of this new field of investigation is presented, together with references to historical and more recent li

  18. Crystallogenesis of biological macromolecules. Biological, microgravity and other physicochemical aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giege, R; Drenth, J; Ducruix, A; McPherson, A; Saenger, W

    1995-01-01

    After an historical introduction and justification of the importance of proteins (as well as other macromolecules or macromolecular assemblies of biological origin) in modern biology but also in physics, this review presents the state of the field of macromolecular crystallogenesis. The basic questi

  19. Reduced adipose tissue lymphatic drainage of macromolecules in obese subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arngrim, N; Simonsen, L; Holst, Jens Juul

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate subcutaneous adipose tissue lymphatic drainage (ATLD) of macromolecules in lean and obese subjects and, furthermore, to evaluate whether ATLD may change in parallel with adipose tissue blood flow. Lean and obese male subjects were studied before and after ...... online publication, 3 July 2012; doi:10.1038/ijo.2012.98....

  20. Dermal and transdermal delivery of pharmaceutically relevant macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münch, S; Wohlrab, J; Neubert, R H H

    2017-10-01

    The skin offers an attractive way for dermal and transdermal drug delivery that is why the drug still needs certain qualities to transcend the outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum. The requirements are: drugs with a maximum molecular weight of 1kDa, high lipophilicity and a certain polarity. This would restrict the use of a transdermal delivery of macromolecules, which would make the drug more effective in therapeutic administration. Various studies have shown that macromolecules without support do not penetrate the human skin. This effect can be achieved using physical and chemical methods, as well as biological peptides. The most popular physical method is the use of microneedles to create micropores in the skin and release the active agent in different sections. But also, other methods have been tested. Microjets, lasers, electroporation, sonophoresis and iontophoresis are also promising methods to successfully deliver dermal and transdermal macromolecules. Additionally, there are different penetration enhancer groups and biological peptides, which are also considered to be interesting approaches of enabling macromolecules to travel along the skin. All these methods will be described and evaluated in this review article. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Antimicrobial resistance challenged with metal-based antimicrobial macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-El-Aziz, Alaa S; Agatemor, Christian; Etkin, Nola

    2017-02-01

    Antimicrobial resistance threatens the achievements of science and medicine, as it deactivates conventional antimicrobial therapeutics. Scientists respond to the threat by developing new antimicrobial platforms to prevent and treat infections from these resistant strains. Metal-based antimicrobial macromolecules are emerging as an alternative to conventional platforms because they combine multiple mechanisms of action into one platform due to the distinctive properties of metals. For example, metals interact with intracellular proteins and enzymes, and catalyse various intracellular processes. The macromolecular architecture offers a means to enhance antimicrobial activity since several antimicrobial moieties can be conjugated to the scaffold. Further, these macromolecules can be fabricated into antimicrobial materials for contact-killing medical implants, fabrics, and devices. As volatilization or leaching out of the antimicrobial moieties from the macromolecular scaffold is reduced, these medical implants, fabrics, and devices can retain their antimicrobial activity over an extended period. Recent advances demonstrate the potential of metal-based antimicrobial macromolecules as effective platforms that prevent and treat infections from resistant strains. In this review these advances are thoroughly discussed within the context of examples of metal-based antimicrobial macromolecules, their mechanisms of action and biocompatibility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Microfluidic device and method for processing of macromolecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    to the first set of outlets is guided through the reaction channels, and second inlet and outlet channels for feeding an enzymatic reagent to the reaction chamber essentially without displacing the macromolecule containers trapped in the reaction channels, wherein the second set of inlets and outlets...

  3. Crystallization of biological macromolecules in a reduced gravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, E. J., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A battery of micro techniques were developed which allow the screening of a large number of conditions using only a small amount of the macromolecule. The need to develop methodologies for growing large crystals required for neutron diffraction studies is discussed.

  4. Interactions between adsorbed macromolecules : measurements on emulsions and liquid films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, van T.

    1977-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain more insight into the factors, determining the inter- and intramolecular interactions between adsorbed macromolecules. To that end several experimental and theoretical approaches were followed, using well-defined systems. It was shown that these interactions could c

  5. Synthesis of main-chain metal carbonyl organometallic macromolecules (MCMCOMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Kai; Murshid, Nimer; Wang, Xiaosong

    2015-04-01

    Synthesis of main-chain metal carbonyl organometallic macromolecules (MCMCOMs) is difficult, mainly due to the instability of metal carbonyl complexes. Despite its challenge a number of MCMCOMs has been prepared by strategically using organometallic, organic, and polymer synthetic chemistry. Main contributions to this research field were reported by the groups of Tyler, Pannell, and Wang and are briefly summarized in this article.

  6. Adsorption of charged macromolecules on a gold electrode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barten, D.

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis we have examined the role of electrostatic interactions in the adsorption of charged macromolecules from aqueous solution to a solid surface and the possibilitiesfor manipulatingthis process through the electric potential

  7. Bioenergetic aspects of the translocation of macromolecules across bacterial membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palmen, Ronald; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Hellingwerf, K

    1994-01-01

    Bacteria are extremely versatile in the sense that they have gained the ability to transport all three major classes of biopolymers through their cell envelope: proteins, nucleic acids, and polysaccharides. These macromolecules are translocated across membranes in a large number of cellular processe

  8. Light-Switchable Azobenzene-Containing Macromolecules: From UV to Near Infrared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Philipp; Wu, Si

    2017-06-23

    Azobenzene-containing macromolecules (azo-macromolecules) such as azobenzene-containing polymers (azopolymers) and azobenzene-functionalized biomacromolecules are photoswitchable macromolecules. Trans-to-cis photoisomerization in conventional azo-macromolecules is induced by ultraviolet (UV) light. However, UV light cannot penetrate deeply into issue and has a very small fraction in sunlight. Therefore, conventional azo-macromolecules are problematic for biomedical and solar-energy-related applications. In this Feature Article, the strategies for constructing visible and near-infrared (NIR) light-responsive azo-macromolecules are reviewed, and the potential applications of visible- and NIR-light-responsive azo-macromolecules in biomedicine and solar energy conversion are highlighted. The remaining challenges in the field of photoswitchable azo-macromolecules are discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Surface Characteristics and Adhesion Behavior of Escherichia coli O157:H7: Role of Extracellular Macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface macromolecule cleavage experiments were conducted on enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells to investigate the influence of these macromolecules on cell surface properties. Electrophoretic mobility, hydrophobicity, and titration experiments were carried out on proteinase K treate...

  10. Vesicular uptake of macromolecules by human placental amniotic epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharshiner, Rita; Brace, Robert A; Cheung, Cecilia Y

    2017-09-01

    Studies in animal models have shown that unidirectional vesicular transport of amniotic fluid across the amnion plays a primary role in regulating amniotic fluid volume. Our objective was to explore vesicle type, vesicular uptake and intracellular distribution of vesicles in human amnion cells using high- and super-resolution fluorescence microscopy. Placental amnion was obtained at cesarean section and amnion cells were prepared and cultured. At 20%-50% confluence, the cells were incubated with fluorophore conjugated macromolecules for 1-30 min at 22 °C or 37 °C. Fluorophore labeled macromolecules were selected as markers of receptor-mediated caveolar and clathrin-coated vesicular uptake as well as non-specific endocytosis. After fluorophore treatment, the cells were fixed, imaged and vesicles counted using Imaris(®) software. Vesicular uptake displayed first order saturation kinetics with half saturation times averaging 1.3 min at 37 °C compared to 4.9 min at 22 °C, with non-specific endocytotic uptake being more rapid at both temperatures. There was extensive cell-to-cell variability in uptake rate. Under super-resolution microscopy, the pattern of intracellular spatial distribution was distinct for each macromolecule. Co-localization of fluorescently labeled macromolecules was very low at vesicular dimensions. In human placental amnion cells, 1) vesicular uptake of macromolecules is rapid, consistent with the concept that vesicular transcytosis across the amnion plays a role in the regulation of amniotic fluid volume; 2) uptake is temperature dependent and variable among individual cells; 3) the unique intracellular distributions suggest distinct functions for each vesicle type; 4) non-receptor mediated vesicular uptake may be a primary vesicular uptake mechanism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  12. Macromolecule Mediated Transport and Retention of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Saturated Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    The role of extracellular macromolecules on Escherichia coli O157:H7 transport and retention was investigated in saturated porous media. To compare the relative transport and retention of E. coli cells that are macromolecule rich and deficient, macromolecules were partially cleaved using a proteolyt...

  13. Measuring Equilibrium Binding Affinity of Biological Macromolecules in Solution by Thermophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-18

    Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Measuring Equilibrium Binding Affinity of Biological Macromolecules in Solution by...Equilibrium Binding Affinity of Biological Macromolecules in Solution by Thermophoresis Report Title The primary research focus of the San Diego State...equilibrium binding affinities of biological macromolecules in solution. This qauntitative information plays a vital role in supporting the static

  14. Innovative NMR strategies for complex macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years there has been an increasing research emphasis on complex macromolecular systems. These include polymers with precise control of structures, multicomponent systems with higher degrees of organization, polymers involved in micelles, interfaces, and confined environments, nanochemistr...

  15. A closure relation to molecular theory of solvation for macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobryn, Alexander E.; Gusarov, Sergey; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2016-10-01

    We propose a closure to the integral equations of molecular theory of solvation, particularly suitable for polar and charged macromolecules in electrolyte solution. This includes such systems as oligomeric polyelectrolytes at a finite concentration in aqueous and various non-aqueous solutions, as well as drug-like compounds in solution. The new closure by Kobryn, Gusarov, and Kovalenko (KGK closure) imposes the mean spherical approximation (MSA) almost everywhere in the solvation shell but levels out the density distribution function to zero (with the continuity at joint boundaries) inside the repulsive core and in the spatial regions of strong density depletion emerging due to molecular associative interactions. Similarly to MSA, the KGK closure reduces the problem to a linear equation for the direct correlation function which is predefined analytically on most of the solvation shells and has to be determined numerically on a relatively small (three-dimensional) domain of strong depletion, typically within the repulsive core. The KGK closure leads to the solvation free energy in the form of the Gaussian fluctuation (GF) functional. We first test the performance of the KGK closure coupled to the reference interaction site model (RISM) integral equations on the examples of Lennard-Jones liquids, polar and nonpolar molecular solvents, including water, and aqueous solutions of simple ions. The solvation structure, solvation chemical potential, and compressibility obtained from RISM with the KGK closure favorably compare to the results of the hypernetted chain (HNC) and Kovalenko-Hirata (KH) closures, including their combination with the GF solvation free energy. We then use the KGK closure coupled to RISM to obtain the solvation structure and thermodynamics of oligomeric polyelectrolytes and drug-like compounds at a finite concentration in electrolyte solution, for which no convergence is obtained with other closures. For comparison, we calculate their solvation

  16. Diversity of Dicotyledenous-Infecting Geminiviruses and Their Associated DNA Molecules in Southern Africa, Including the South-West Indian Ocean Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindy L. Esterhuizen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The family Geminiviridae comprises a group of plant-infecting circular ssDNA viruses that severely constrain agricultural production throughout the temperate regions of the world, and are a particularly serious threat to food security in sub-Saharan Africa. While geminiviruses exhibit considerable diversity in terms of their nucleotide sequences, genome structures, host ranges and insect vectors, the best characterised and economically most important of these viruses are those in the genus Begomovirus. Whereas begomoviruses are generally considered to be either monopartite (one ssDNA component or bipartite (two circular ssDNA components called DNA-A and DNA-B, many apparently monopartite begomoviruses are associated with additional subviral ssDNA satellite components, called alpha- (DNA-as or betasatellites (DNA-βs. Additionally, subgenomic molecules, also known as defective interfering (DIs DNAs that are usually derived from the parent helper virus through deletions of parts of its genome, are also associated with bipartite and monopartite begomoviruses. The past three decades have witnessed the emergence and diversification of various new begomoviral species and associated DI DNAs, in southern Africa, East Africa, and proximal Indian Ocean islands, which today threaten important vegetable and commercial crops such as, tobacco, cassava, tomato, sweet potato, and beans. This review aims to describe what is known about these viruses and their impacts on sustainable production in this sensitive region of the world.

  17. Diversity of dicotyledenous-infecting geminiviruses and their associated DNA molecules in southern Africa, including the South-west Indian ocean islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Marie E C; Ndunguru, Joseph; Berrie, Leigh C; Paximadis, Maria; Berry, Shaun; Cossa, Nurbibi; Nuaila, Valter N; Mabasa, Ken G; Abraham, Natasha; Rybicki, Edward P; Martin, Darren; Pietersen, Gerhard; Esterhuizen, Lindy L

    2012-09-01

    The family Geminiviridae comprises a group of plant-infecting circular ssDNA viruses that severely constrain agricultural production throughout the temperate regions of the world, and are a particularly serious threat to food security in sub-Saharan Africa. While geminiviruses exhibit considerable diversity in terms of their nucleotide sequences, genome structures, host ranges and insect vectors, the best characterised and economically most important of these viruses are those in the genus Begomovirus. Whereas begomoviruses are generally considered to be either monopartite (one ssDNA component) or bipartite (two circular ssDNA components called DNA-A and DNA-B), many apparently monopartite begomoviruses are associated with additional subviral ssDNA satellite components, called alpha- (DNA-αs) or betasatellites (DNA-βs). Additionally, subgenomic molecules, also known as defective interfering (DIs) DNAs that are usually derived from the parent helper virus through deletions of parts of its genome, are also associated with bipartite and monopartite begomoviruses. The past three decades have witnessed the emergence and diversification of various new begomoviral species and associated DI DNAs, in southern Africa, East Africa, and proximal Indian Ocean islands, which today threaten important vegetable and commercial crops such as, tobacco, cassava, tomato, sweet potato, and beans. This review aims to describe what is known about these viruses and their impacts on sustainable production in this sensitive region of the world.

  18. Dielectric many-body effects in arrays of charged cylindrical macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkovits, Daniel W.; Barros, Kipton; Dobnikar, Jure; Kandu&{Caron; C}, Matej; Naji, Ali; Podgornik, Rudolf; Luijten, Erik

    2012-02-01

    Nonuniform dielectric constants are a ubiquitous aspect of condensed-matter systems, but nevertheless widely ignored in simulations. Analytical work suggests that the polarization effects resulting from these inhomogeneities can produce many-body interactions that qualitatively alter the behavior of systems driven by electrostatic interactions, but such work relies on approximations. Recently, we have developed an algorithm that computes the fluctuating polarization charge at the interface between dielectric materials during a molecular dynamics simulation, without approximation. Here, we apply this approach to investigate arrays of charged cylindrical macromolecules in the presence of explicit counterions. We study the dielectric many-body effects as a function of separation, dielectric constant variation, and counterion valency. Our findings have implications for the aggregation of polyelectrolytes such as F-actin or DNA.

  19. Morphology and SSU rDNA sequence analysis of two hypotrichous ciliates (Protozoa, Ciliophora, Hypotrichia) including the new species Metaurostylopsis parastruederkypkeae n. sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Borong; Wang, Chundi; Huang, Jie; Shi, Yuhong; Chen, Xiangrui

    2016-10-01

    The morphology and phylogeny of two hypotrichous ciliates, Metaurostylopsis parastruederkypkeae n. sp. and Neourostylopsis flavicana (Wang et al., 2011) Chen et al., 2013 were investigated based on morphology, infraciliature and the small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA gene (rRNA) sequence. The new species, M. parastruederkypkeae n. sp. was identified according to its characteristics: body shape ellipsoidal, size about (165-200) × (45-60) μm in vivo, cell color reddish; two types of cortical granules including wheat grain-like and yellow-greenish larger ones along the marginal cirri rows and dorsal kineties and dot-like and reddish smaller ones, grouped around marginal cirri on ventral side and arranged in short lines on dorsal side; 26-41 adoral membranelles; three frontal and one parabuccal, five to seven frontoterminal, one buccal, and three to six transverse cirri; seven to thirteen midventral pairs; five to nine unpaired ventral cirri, five to seven left and three to five right marginal rows; and three complete dorsal kineties. Phylogenetic analysis based on SSU rDNA sequences showed that both Metaurostylopsis and Neourostylopsis are monophyletic. As the internal relationship between and within both genera are not clear, further studies on the species in these two genera are necessary. The key characteristics of all known twelve Metaurostylopsis-Apourostylopsis-Neourostylopsis species complex were updated.

  20. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry for Measuring Macromolecule-Ligand Affinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff,, Michael R.; Grubbs, Jordan; Howell, Elizabeth E.

    2011-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a useful tool for understanding the complete thermodynamic picture of a binding reaction. In biological sciences, macromolecular interactions are essential in understanding the machinery of the cell. Experimental conditions, such as buffer and temperature, can be tailored to the particular binding system being studied. However, careful planning is needed since certain ligand and macromolecule concentration ranges are necessary to obtain useful data. Concentrations of the macromolecule and ligand need to be accurately determined for reliable results. Care also needs to be taken when preparing the samples as impurities can significantly affect the experiment. When ITC experiments, along with controls, are performed properly, useful binding information, such as the stoichiometry, affinity and enthalpy, are obtained. By running additional experiments under different buffer or temperature conditions, more detailed information can be obtained about the system. A protocol for the basic setup of an ITC experiment is given. PMID:21931288

  1. High and low thermal conductivity of amorphous macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xu; Yang, Kexin; Li, Dongyao; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Shin, Jungwoo; Braun, Paul V.; Cahill, David G.

    2017-01-01

    We measure the thermal conductivity, heat capacity and sound velocity of thin films of five polymers, nine polymer salts, and four caged molecules to advance the fundamental understanding of the lower and upper limits to heat conduction in amorphous macromolecules. The thermal conductivities vary by more than one order of magnitude, from 0.06 W m-1K-1 for [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester to 0.67 W m-1K-1 for poly(vinylphosphonic acid calcium salt). Minimum thermal conductivity calculated from the measured sound velocity and effective atomic density is in good agreement with the thermal conductivity of macromolecules with various molecular structures and intermolecular bonding strength.

  2. Synthesis, Characterisation and Application of 68Ga-labelled Macromolecules

    OpenAIRE

    Velikyan, Irina

    2005-01-01

    The positron emitting radionuclide 68Ga (T1/2 = 68 min) might become of practical interest for clinical positron emission tomography (PET). The metallic cation, 68Ga(III), is suitable for complexation with chelators, either naked or conjugated with biological macromolecules. Such labelling procedures require pure and concentrated preparations of 68Ga(III), which cannot be sufficiently fulfilled by the presently available 68Ge/68Ga generator eluate. This thesis presents methods to increase the...

  3. Dehydroepiandrosterone affects the expression of multiple genes in rat liver including 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1: a cDNA array analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shi; Ripp, Sharon L; Prough, Russell A; Geoghegan, Thomas E

    2003-03-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is a C-19 adrenal steroid precursor to the gonadal steroids. In humans, circulating levels of DHEA, as its sulfated conjugate, are high at puberty and throughout early adulthood but decline with age. Dietary supplementation to maintain high levels of DHEA purportedly has beneficial effects on cognitive memory, the immune system, and fat and carbohydrate metabolism. In rodents, DHEA is a peroxisome proliferator that induces genes for the classical peroxisomal and microsomal enzymes associated with this response. These effects are mediated through activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR alpha). However, DHEA can affect the expression of genes independently of PPAR alpha, including the gene for the major inducible drug and xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme, cytochrome P450 3A23. To elucidate the biochemistry associated with DHEA treatment, we employed a cDNA gene expression array using liver RNA from rats treated with DHEA or the classic peroxisome proliferator nafenopin. Principal components analysis identified 30 to 35 genes whose expression was affected by DHEA and/or nafenopin. Some were genes previously identified as PPAR-responsive genes. Changes in expression of several affected genes were verified by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. These included aquaporin 3, which was induced by DHEA and to a lesser extent nafenopin, nuclear tyrosine phosphatase, which was induced by both agents, and 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1, which was decreased by treatment with DHEA in a dose-dependent fashion. Regulation of 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 expression is important since the enzyme is believed to amplify local glucocorticoid signaling, and its repression may cause some of the metabolic effects associated with DHEA.

  4. MEASURING THE SHAPES OF MACROMOLECULES – AND WHY IT MATTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Li

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The molecular basis of life rests on the activity of biological macromolecules, mostly nucleic acids and proteins. A perhaps surprising finding that crystallized over the last handful of decades is that geometric reasoning plays a major role in our attempt to understand these activities. In this paper, we address this connection between geometry and biology, focusing on methods for measuring and characterizing the shapes of macromolecules. We briefly review existing numerical and analytical approaches that solve these problems. We cover in more details our own work in this field, focusing on the alpha shape theory as it provides a unifying mathematical framework that enable the analytical calculations of the surface area and volume of a macromolecule represented as a union of balls, the detection of pockets and cavities in the molecule, and the quantification of contacts between the atomic balls. We have shown that each of these quantities can be related to physical properties of the molecule under study and ultimately provides insight on its activity. We conclude with a brief description of new challenges for the alpha shape theory in modern structural biology.

  5. Localization of intracrystalline organic macromolecules in mollusk shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Michio; Okumura, Taiga; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Kogure, Toshihiro

    2011-12-01

    As a crucial first step for understanding the organic-inorganic interaction in biomineralization of mollscan shells, localization of the intracrystalline organic macromolecules in biogenic calcium carbonate crystals of the nacreous, prismatic ( Pinctada fucata) and foliated ( Cellana toreuma) microstructures were investigated using Fresnel contrast analysis in a transmission electron microscope. Spherular Fresnel contrasts in the crystals correspond to organic substances, which was confirmed by the detection of 1s→π * (CC) transition peak at 284 eV in electron energy loss spectroscopy. Nano-sized (5-10 nm) spherules in the aragonite tablets constituting the nacreous layer of P. fucata specifically concentrate in the vicinity of the interlamellar membrane between the aragonite tablets. The dominant sizes of the organic macromolecules extracted by dissolving the aragonite tablets in the nacreous layer of P. fucata were estimated using the gel-filtration analysis to be roughly 10 and 4 nm, which dimensionally corresponds to the sizes observed by Fresnel contrast imaging in the tablets. These results will serve for understanding the functions of intracrystalline organic macromolecules in mollusk shells.

  6. Measuring the shapes of macromolecules – and why it matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Li

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The molecular basis of life rests on the activity of biological macromolecules, mostly nucleic acids and proteins. A perhaps surprising finding that crystallized over the last handful of decades is that geometric reasoning plays a major role in our attempt to understand these activities. In this paper, we address this connection between geometry and biology, focusing on methods for measuring and characterizing the shapes of macromolecules. We briefly review existing numerical and analytical approaches that solve these problems. We cover in more details our own work in this field, focusing on the alpha shape theory as it provides a unifying mathematical framework that enable the analytical calculations of the surface area and volume of a macromolecule represented as a union of balls, the detection of pockets and cavities in the molecule, and the quantification of contacts between the atomic balls. We have shown that each of these quantities can be related to physical properties of the molecule under study and ultimately provides insight on its activity. We conclude with a brief description of new challenges for the alpha shape theory in modern structural biology.

  7. Measuring the shapes of macromolecules - and why it matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Mach, Paul; Koehl, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    The molecular basis of life rests on the activity of biological macromolecules, mostly nucleic acids and proteins. A perhaps surprising finding that crystallized over the last handful of decades is that geometric reasoning plays a major role in our attempt to understand these activities. In this paper, we address this connection between geometry and biology, focusing on methods for measuring and characterizing the shapes of macromolecules. We briefly review existing numerical and analytical approaches that solve these problems. We cover in more details our own work in this field, focusing on the alpha shape theory as it provides a unifying mathematical framework that enable the analytical calculations of the surface area and volume of a macromolecule represented as a union of balls, the detection of pockets and cavities in the molecule, and the quantification of contacts between the atomic balls. We have shown that each of these quantities can be related to physical properties of the molecule under study and ultimately provides insight on its activity. We conclude with a brief description of new challenges for the alpha shape theory in modern structural biology.

  8. Self-organization of amphiphilic macromolecules with local helix structure in concentrated solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glagolev, M K; Vasilevskaya, V V; Khokhlov, A R

    2012-08-28

    Concentrated solutions of amphiphilic macromolecules with local helical structure were studied by means of molecular dynamic simulations. It is shown that in poor solvent the macromolecules are assembled into wire-like aggregates having complex core-shell structure. The core consists of a hydrophobic backbone of the chains which intertwine around each other. It is protected by the shell of hydrophilic side groups. In racemic mixture of right-hand and left-hand helix macromolecules the wire-like complex is a chain of braid bundles of macromolecules with the same chirality stacking at their ends. The average number of macromolecules in the wire cross-section is close to that of separate bundles observed in dilute solutions of such macromolecules. The effects described here could serve as a simple model of self-organization in solutions of macromolecules with local helical structure.

  9. Advanced ensemble modelling of flexible macromolecules using X-ray solution scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tria, Giancarlo; Mertens, Haydyn D T; Kachala, Michael; Svergun, Dmitri I

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic ensembles of macromolecules mediate essential processes in biology. Understanding the mechanisms driving the function and molecular interactions of 'unstructured' and flexible molecules requires alternative approaches to those traditionally employed in structural biology. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is an established method for structural characterization of biological macromolecules in solution, and is directly applicable to the study of flexible systems such as intrinsically disordered proteins and multi-domain proteins with unstructured regions. The Ensemble Optimization Method (EOM) [Bernadó et al. (2007 ▶). J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129, 5656-5664] was the first approach introducing the concept of ensemble fitting of the SAXS data from flexible systems. In this approach, a large pool of macromolecules covering the available conformational space is generated and a sub-ensemble of conformers coexisting in solution is selected guided by the fit to the experimental SAXS data. This paper presents a series of new developments and advancements to the method, including significantly enhanced functionality and also quantitative metrics for the characterization of the results. Building on the original concept of ensemble optimization, the algorithms for pool generation have been redesigned to allow for the construction of partially or completely symmetric oligomeric models, and the selection procedure was improved to refine the size of the ensemble. Quantitative measures of the flexibility of the system studied, based on the characteristic integral parameters of the selected ensemble, are introduced. These improvements are implemented in the new EOM version 2.0, and the capabilities as well as inherent limitations of the ensemble approach in SAXS, and of EOM 2.0 in particular, are discussed.

  10. Advanced ensemble modelling of flexible macromolecules using X-ray solution scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Tria

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic ensembles of macromolecules mediate essential processes in biology. Understanding the mechanisms driving the function and molecular interactions of `unstructured' and flexible molecules requires alternative approaches to those traditionally employed in structural biology. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS is an established method for structural characterization of biological macromolecules in solution, and is directly applicable to the study of flexible systems such as intrinsically disordered proteins and multi-domain proteins with unstructured regions. The Ensemble Optimization Method (EOM [Bernadó et al. (2007. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129, 5656–5664] was the first approach introducing the concept of ensemble fitting of the SAXS data from flexible systems. In this approach, a large pool of macromolecules covering the available conformational space is generated and a sub-ensemble of conformers coexisting in solution is selected guided by the fit to the experimental SAXS data. This paper presents a series of new developments and advancements to the method, including significantly enhanced functionality and also quantitative metrics for the characterization of the results. Building on the original concept of ensemble optimization, the algorithms for pool generation have been redesigned to allow for the construction of partially or completely symmetric oligomeric models, and the selection procedure was improved to refine the size of the ensemble. Quantitative measures of the flexibility of the system studied, based on the characteristic integral parameters of the selected ensemble, are introduced. These improvements are implemented in the new EOM version 2.0, and the capabilities as well as inherent limitations of the ensemble approach in SAXS, and of EOM 2.0 in particular, are discussed.

  11. Impacts of Organic Macromolecules, Chlorophyll and Soot on Arctic Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunro, O. O.; Wingenter, O. W.; Elliott, S.; Flanner, M.; Dubey, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    Recent intensification of Arctic amplification can be strongly connected to positive feedback relating black carbon deposition to sea ice surface albedo. In addition to soot deposition on the ice and snow pack, ice algal chlorophyll is likely to compete as an absorber and redistributor of energy. Hence, solar radiation absorption by chlorophyll and some components of organic macromolecules in/under the ice column is currently being examined to determine the level of influence on predicted rate of ice loss. High amounts of organic macromolecules and chlorophyll are produced in global sea ice by the bottom microbial community and also in vertically distributed layers where substantial biological activities take place. Brine channeling in columnar ice can allow for upward flow of nutrients which leads to greater primary production in the presence of moderate light. Modeling of the sea-ice processes in tandem with experiments and field observations promises rapid progress in enhancing Arctic ice predictions. We are designing and conducting global climate model experiments to determine the impact of organic macromolecules and chlorophyll on Arctic sea ice. Influences on brine network permeability and radiation/albedo will be considered in this exercise. Absorption by anthropogenic materials such as soot and black carbon will be compared with that of natural pigments. We will indicate areas of soot and biological absorption dominance in the sense of single scattering, then couple into a full radiation transfer scheme to attribute the various contributions to polar climate change amplification. The work prepares us to study more traditional issues such as chlorophyll warming of the pack periphery and chemical effects of the flow of organics from ice internal communities. The experiments started in the Arctic will broaden to include Antarctic sea ice and shelves. Results from the Arctic simulations will be presented.

  12. Detection of Macromolecules in Desert Cyanobacteria Mixed with a Lunar Mineral Analogue After Space Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baqué, Mickael; Verseux, Cyprien; Rabbow, Elke; de Vera, Jean-Pierre Paul; Billi, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    In the context of future exposure missions in Low Earth Orbit and possibly on the Moon, two desert strains of the cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis, strains CCMEE 029 and 057, mixed or not with a lunar mineral analogue, were exposed to fractionated fluencies of UVC and polychromatic UV (200-400 nm) and to space vacuum. These experiments were carried out within the framework of the BIOMEX (BIOlogy and Mars EXperiment) project, which aims at broadening our knowledge of mineral-microorganism interaction and the stability/degradation of their macromolecules when exposed to space and simulated Martian conditions. The presence of mineral analogues provided a protective effect, preserving survivability and integrity of DNA and photosynthetic pigments, as revealed by testing colony-forming abilities, performing PCR-based assays and using confocal laser scanning microscopy. In particular, DNA and pigments were still detectable after 500 kJ/m2 of polychromatic UV and space vacuum (10-4 Pa), corresponding to conditions expected during one-year exposure in Low Earth Orbit on board the EXPOSE-R2 platform in the presence of 0.1 % Neutral Density (ND) filter. After exposure to high UV fluencies (800 MJ/m2) in the presence of minerals, however, altered fluorescence emission spectrum of the photosynthetic pigments were detected, whereas DNA was still amplified by PCR. The present paper considers the implications of such findings for the detection of biosignatures in extraterrestrial conditions and for putative future lunar missions.

  13. Small and Wide Angle X-ray Scattering studies of biological macromolecules in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Boldon, Lauren; Urquhart, Melissa; Wang, Xiangyu

    2013-01-08

    In this paper, Small and Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (SWAXS) analysis of macromolecules is demonstrated through experimentation. SWAXS is a technique where X-rays are elastically scattered by an inhomogeneous sample in the nm-range at small angles (typically 0.1 - 5°) and wide angles (typically > 5°). This technique provides information about the shape, size, and distribution of macromolecules, characteristic distances of partially ordered materials, pore sizes, and surface-to-volume ratio. Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) is capable of delivering structural information of macromolecules between 1 and 200 nm, whereas Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (WAXS) can resolve even smaller Bragg spacing of samples between 0.33 nm and 0.49 nm based on the specific system setup and detector. The spacing is determined from Bragg's law and is dependent on the wavelength and incident angle. In a SWAXS experiment, the materials can be solid or liquid and may contain solid, liquid or gaseous domains (so-called particles) of the same or another material in any combination. SWAXS applications are very broad and include colloids of all types: metals, composites, cement, oil, polymers, plastics, proteins, foods, and pharmaceuticals. For solid samples, the thickness is limited to approximately 5 mm. Usage of a lab-based SWAXS instrument is detailed in this paper. With the available software (e.g., GNOM-ATSAS 2.3 package by D. Svergun EMBL-Hamburg and EasySWAXS software) for the SWAXS system, an experiment can be conducted to determine certain parameters of interest for the given sample. One example of a biological macromolecule experiment is the analysis of 2 wt% lysozyme in a water-based aqueous buffer which can be chosen and prepared through numerous methods. The preparation of the sample follows the guidelines below in the Preparation of the Sample section. Through SWAXS experimentation, important structural parameters of lysozyme, e.g. the radius of gyration, can be analyzed.

  14. Isolation of cell nuclei using inert macromolecules to mimic the crowded cytoplasm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Hancock

    Full Text Available Cell nuclei are commonly isolated and studied in media which include millimolar concentrations of cations, which conserve the nuclear volume by screening the negative charges on chromatin and maintaining its compaction. However, two factors question if these ionic conditions correctly reproduce the environment of nuclei in vivo: the small-scale motion and conformation of chromatin in vivo are not reproduced in isolated nuclei, and experiments and theory suggest that small ions in the cytoplasm are not free in the soluble phase but are predominantly bound to macromolecules. We studied the possible role in maintaining the structure and functions of nuclei in vivo of a further but frequently overlooked property of the cytoplasm, the crowding or osmotic effects caused by diffusible macromolecules whose concentration, measured in several studies, is in the range of 130 mg/ml. Nuclei which conserved their volume in the cell and their ultrastructure seen by electron microscopy were released from K562 cells in media containing the inert polymer 70 kDa Ficoll (50% w/v or 70 kDa dextran (35% w/v to replace the diffusible cytoplasmic molecules which were dispersed on cell lysis with digitonin, with 100 microM K-Hepes buffer as the only source of ions. Immunofluorescence labelling and experiments using cells expressing GFP-fusion proteins showed that internal compartments (nucleoli, PML and coiled bodies, foci of RNA polymerase II were conserved in these nuclei, and nascent RNA transcripts could be elongated. Our observations are consistent with the hypothesis that crowding by diffusible cytoplasmic macromolecules is a crucial but overlooked factor which supports the nucleus in vivo by equilibrating the opposing osmotic pressure cause by the high concentration of macromolecules in the nucleus, and suggest that crowded media provide more physiological conditions to study nuclear structure and functions. They may also help to resolve the long-standing paradox

  15. Cryo-electron microscopy for structural analysis of dynamic biological macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Kazuyoshi; Wolf, Matthias

    2017-07-27

    Since the introduction of what became today's standard for cryo-embedding of biological macromolecules at native conditions more than 30years ago, techniques and equipment have been drastically improved and the structure of biomolecules can now be studied at near atomic resolution by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) while capturing multiple dynamic states. Here we review the recent progress in cryo-EM for structural studies of dynamic biological macromolecules. We provide an overview of the cryo-EM method and introduce contemporary studies to investigate biomolecular structure and dynamics, including examples from the recent literature. Cryo-EM is a powerful tool for the investigation of biological macromolecular structures including analysis of their dynamics by using advanced image-processing algorithms. The method has become even more widely applicable with present-day single particle analysis and electron tomography. The cryo-EM method can be used to determine the three-dimensional structure of biomacromolecules in near native condition at close to atomic resolution, and has the potential to reveal conformations of dynamic molecular complexes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Biophysical Exploration of Dynamical Ordering of Biomolecular Systems" edited by Dr. Koichi Kato. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of cAMP on macromolecule synthesis in the pathogenic protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilvani O. Santos

    1988-09-01

    Full Text Available Macromolecule synthesis of Trypanosoma cruzi in culture was monitored using radioactive tracers. Cells of different days in culture displayed a preferential incorporation of precursors as follows: 1 day for (³H-thymidine cells; 3 days for (³H-uridine cells, and 4 days for (³H-leucine cells. Autoradiographic studies showed that (³H-thymidine was incorporated in the DNA of both kinetoplast and nucleus in this order. Shifts in the intracellular content of cAMP either by addition of dibutyryl-cAMP or by stimulation of the adenylcyclase by isoproterenol, caused an inhibition in the synthesis of DNA, RNA and proteins. Addition to the T. cruzi cultures of these agents which elevate the intracellular content ofcAMP provoked an interruption of cell proliferation as a result of the impairment of macromolecule synthesis. A discrimination was observed among the stereoisomers of isoproterenol, the L configuration showing to be most active.A síntese de macromoléculas de T. cruzi em cultura foi monitorada usando traçadores radioativos. Células de diferentes dias em cultura mostraram uma incorporação preferencial de precursores comco se seguez: 1 dia para (3H-timidina; 3 dias para (3H-uridina e 4 dias para (3H-leucina. Estudos autoradiográficos mostraram que (3H-leucina. Estudos autoradiográficos mostraram que (3H-timidina foi incorporada no DNA de ambos, cinetoplasto e núcleo, nesta ordem. Alterações no conteúdo intracelular de cAMP seja por adição de dibutiril-cAMP ou por estimulação de adenilciclase por isoproterenol, causav am inibição na síntese de DNA, RNA e proteínas. A adição destes agentes que elevam o conteúdo intracelular de cAMP em culturas de T.cruzi provocou inibição de crescimento, com resultado da síntese macromolecular imperfeita. Foi observada uma discriminação entre os estereoisômeros de isoproterenol, sendo a configuração L, a mais ativa.

  17. A physiologically based in silico model for trans-2-hexenal detoxification and DNA adduct formation in human including interindividual variation indicates efficient detoxification and a negligible genotoxicity risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiwamoto, R; Spenkelink, A; Rietjens, I M C M; Punt, A

    2013-09-01

    A number of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes are present in food both as natural constituents and as flavouring agents. Their reaction with DNA due to their electrophilic α,β-unsaturated aldehyde moiety may result in genotoxicity as observed in some in vitro models, thereby raising a safety concern. A question that remains is whether in vivo detoxification would be efficient enough to prevent DNA adduct formation and genotoxicity. In this study, a human physiologically based kinetic/dynamic (PBK/D) model of trans-2-hexenal (2-hexenal), a selected model α,β-unsaturated aldehyde, was developed to examine dose-dependent detoxification and DNA adduct formation in humans upon dietary exposure. The kinetic model parameters for detoxification were quantified using relevant pooled human tissue fractions as well as tissue fractions from 11 different individual subjects. In addition, a Monte Carlo simulation was performed so that the impact of interindividual variation in 2-hexenal detoxification on the DNA adduct formation in the population as a whole could be examined. The PBK/D model revealed that DNA adduct formation due to 2-hexenal exposure was 0.039 adducts/10⁸ nucleotides (nt) at the estimated average 2-hexenal dietary intake (0.04 mg 2-hexenal/kg bw) and 0.18 adducts/10⁸ nt at the 95th percentile of the dietary intake (0.178 mg 2-hexenal/kg bw) in the most sensitive people. These levels are three orders of magnitude lower than natural background DNA adduct levels that have been reported in disease-free humans (6.8-110 adducts/10⁸ nt), suggesting that the genotoxicity risk for the human population at realistic dietary daily intakes of 2-hexenal may be negligible.

  18. Activity of levofloxacin alone and in combination with a DnaK inhibitor against gram-negative rods, including levofloxacin-resistant strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credito, Kim; Lin, Gengrong; Koeth, Laura; Sturgess, Michael A; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2009-02-01

    Synergy time-kill testing of levofloxacin alone and in combination with CHP-105, a representative DnaK inhibitor, against 50 gram-negative rods demonstrated that 34 of the 50 strains tested showed significant synergy between levofloxacin and CHP-105 after 12 h and 24 h. Fourteen of these 34 organisms were quinolone resistant (levofloxacin MICs of > or =4 microg/ml).

  19. The structure of a single unit of ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) including intergenic subrepeats in the Australian bulldog ant Myrmecia croslandi (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Masa-Toshi

    2004-02-01

    A complete single unit of a ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) of M. croslandi was sequenced. The ends of the 18S, 5.8S and 28S rRNA genes were determined by using the sequences of D. melanogaster rDNAs as references. Each of the tandemly repeated rDNA units consists of coding and non-coding regions whose arrangement is the same as that of D. melanogaster rDNA. The intergenic spacer (IGS) contains, as in other species, a region with subrepeats, of which the sequences are different from those previously reported in other insect species. The length of IGSs was estimated to be 7-12 kb by genomic Southern hybridization, showing that an rDNA repeating unit of M. croslandi is 14-19 kb-long. The sequences of the coding regions are highly conserved, whereas IGS and ITS (internal transcribed spacer) sequences are not. We obtained clones with insertions of various sizes of R2 elements, the target sequence of which was found in the 28S rRNA coding region. A short segment in the IGS that follows the 3' end of the 28S rRNA gene was predicted to form a secondary structure with long stems.

  20. Heuristic modeling of macromolecule release from PLGA microspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szlęk J

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Jakub Szlęk,1 Adam Pacławski,1 Raymond Lau,2 Renata Jachowicz,1 Aleksander Mendyk11Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland; 2School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (NTU, SingaporeAbstract: Dissolution of protein macromolecules from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA particles is a complex process and still not fully understood. As such, there are difficulties in obtaining a predictive model that could be of fundamental significance in design, development, and optimization for medical applications and toxicity evaluation of PLGA-based multiparticulate dosage form. In the present study, two models with comparable goodness of fit were proposed for the prediction of the macromolecule dissolution profile from PLGA micro- and nanoparticles. In both cases, heuristic techniques, such as artificial neural networks (ANNs, feature selection, and genetic programming were employed. Feature selection provided by fscaret package and sensitivity analysis performed by ANNs reduced the original input vector from a total of 300 input variables to 21, 17, 16, and eleven; to achieve a better insight into generalization error, two cut-off points for every method was proposed. The best ANNs model results were obtained by monotone multi-layer perceptron neural network (MON-MLP networks with a root-mean-square error (RMSE of 15.4, and the input vector consisted of eleven inputs. The complicated classical equation derived from a database consisting of 17 inputs was able to yield a better generalization error (RMSE of 14.3. The equation was characterized by four parameters, thus feasible (applicable to standard nonlinear regression techniques. Heuristic modeling led to the ANN model describing macromolecules release profiles from PLGA microspheres with good predictive efficiency. Moreover genetic programming technique resulted in classical equation with

  1. Improved Measurement of B(sub 22) of Macromolecules in a Flow Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Wilbur; Fanguy, Joseph; Holman, Steven; Guo, Bin

    2008-01-01

    An improved apparatus has been invented for use in determining the osmotic second virial coefficient of macromolecules in solution. In a typical intended application, the macromolecules would be, more specifically, protein molecules, and the protein solution would be pumped through a flow cell to investigate the physical and chemical conditions that affect crystallization of the protein in question. Some background information is prerequisite to a meaningful description of the novel aspects of this apparatus. A method of determining B22 from simultaneous measurements of the static transmittance (taken as an indication of concentration) and static scattering of light from the same location in a flowing protein solution was published in 2004. The apparatus used to implement the method at that time included a dual-detector flow cell, which had two drawbacks: a) The amount of protein required for analysis of each solution condition was of the order of a milligram - far too large a quantity for a high-throughput analysis system, for which microgram or even nanogram quantities of protein per analysis are desirable. b) The design of flow cell was such that two light sources were used to probe different regions of the flowing solution. Consequently, the apparatus did not afford simultaneous measurements at the same location in the solution and, hence, did not guarantee an accurate determination of B22.

  2. Ordered mesoporous polymer-silica hybrid nanoparticles as vehicles for the intracellular controlled release of macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Wan; Slowing, Igor I; Chung, Po-Wen; Lin, Victor Shang-Yi

    2011-01-25

    A two-dimensional hexagonal ordered mesoporous polymer-silica hybrid nanoparticle (PSN) material was synthesized by polymerization of acrylate monomers on the surface of SBA-15 mesoporous silica nanoparticles. The structure of the PSN material was analyzed using a series of different techniques, including transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and N(2) sorption analysis. These structurally ordered mesoporous polymer-silica hybrid nanoparticles were used for the controlled release of membrane-impermeable macromolecules inside eukaryotic cells. The cellular uptake efficiency and biocompatibility of PSN with human cervical cancer cells (HeLa) were investigated. Our results show that the inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of PSN is very high (>100 μg/mL per million cells), while the median effective concentration for the uptake (EC(50)) of PSN is low (EC(50) = 4.4 μg/mL), indicating that PSNs are fairly biocompatible and easily up-taken in vitro. A membrane-impermeable macromolecule, 40 kDa FITC-Dextran, was loaded into the mesopores of PSNs at low pH. We demonstrated that the PSN material could indeed serve as a transmembrane carrier for the controlled release of FITC-Dextran at the pH level inside live HeLa cells. We believe that further developments of this PSN material will lead to a new generation of nanodevices for intracellular controlled delivery applications.

  3. Bending dynamics of semi-flexible macromolecules in isotropic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ali, Aamir; Vincenzi, Dario

    2014-01-01

    We study the Lagrangian dynamics of semi-flexible macromolecules in laminar as well as in homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flows by means of analytically solvable stochastic models and direct numerical simulations. The statistics of the bending angle is qualitatively different in laminar and turbulent flows and exhibits a strong dependence on the topology of the velocity field. In particular, in two-dimensional turbulence, particles are either found in a fully extended or in a fully folded configuration; in three dimensions, the predominant configuration is the fully extended one.

  4. Conformations of Macromolecules and their Complexes from Heterogeneous Datasets

    CERN Document Server

    Schwander, P; Ourmazd, A

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new generation of algorithms capable of mapping the structure and conformations of macromolecules and their complexes from large ensembles of heterogeneous snapshots, and demonstrate the feasibility of determining both discrete and continuous macromolecular conformational spectra. These algorithms naturally incorporate conformational heterogeneity without resort to sorting and classification, or prior knowledge of the type of heterogeneity present. They are applicable to single-particle diffraction and image datasets produced by X-ray lasers and cryo-electron microscopy, respectively, and particularly suitable for systems not easily amenable to purification or crystallization.

  5. DNA: Structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinden, Richard R.; E. Pearson, Christopher; N. Potaman, Vladimir

    1998-01-01

    for a long period of time before its information is accessed by the cell. Although DNA plays a critical role as an informational storage molecule, it is by no means as unexciting as a computer tape or disk drive. The structure of the DNA described by Watson and Crick in 1953 is a right handed helix of two......This chapter discusses the structure and function of DNA. DNA occupies a critical role in cells, because it is the source of all intrinsic genetic information. Chemically, DNA is a very stable molecule, a characteristic important for a macromolecule that may have to persist in an intact form...... individual antiparallel DNA strands. Hydrogen bonds provide specificity that allows pairing between the complementary bases (A.T and G.C) in opposite strands. Base stacking occurs near the center of the DNA helix and provides a great deal of stability to the helix (in addition to hydrogen bonding). The sugar...

  6. Arrangement of a nanostructure array to control equilibrium and nonequilibrium transports of macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Takao; Kaji, Noritada; Ogawa, Ryo; Hashioka, Shingi; Tokeshi, Manabu; Horiike, Yasuhiro; Baba, Yoshinobu

    2015-05-13

    Exploiting the nonequilibrium transport of macromolecules makes it possible to increase the separation speed without any loss of separation resolution. Here we report the arrangement of a nanostructure array in microchannels to control equilibrium and nonequilibrium transports of macromolecules. The direct observation and separation of macromolecules in the nanopillar array reported here are the first to reveal the nonequilibrium transport, which has a potential to overcome the intrinsic trade-off between the separation speed and resolution.

  7. Dual Use of Amphiphilic Macromolecules As Cholesterol Efflux Triggers and Inhibitors of Macrophage Athero-inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Nicole; Plourde, Nicole M.; Sparks, Sarah M.; Wang, Jinzhong; Patel, Ekta; Shah, Pratik; Lewis, Daniel R.; Zablocki, Kyle; Nackman, Gary B.; Uhrich, Kathryn E.; Moghe, Prabhas V.

    2011-01-01

    Activated vascular wall macrophages can rapidly internalize modified lipoproteins and escalate the growth of atherosclerotic plaques. This article proposes a biomaterials-based therapeutic intervention for depletion of non-regulated cholesterol accumulation and inhibition of inflammation of macrophages. Macromolecules with high scavenger receptor (SR)-binding activity were investigated for SR-mediated delivery of agonists to cholesterol-trafficking nuclear liver-X receptors. From a diverse feature space of a family of amphiphilic macromolecules of linear and aromatic mucic acid backbones modified with varied aliphatic chains and conjugated with differentially branched poly(ethylene glycol), a key molecule (carboxyl-terminated, C12-derivatized, linear mucic acid backbone) was selected for its ability to preferentially bind scavenger receptor A (SR-A) as the key target. At a basal level, this macromolecule suppressed the pro-inflammatory signaling of activated THP-1 macrophages while competitively lowering oxLDL uptake in vitro through scavenger receptor SRA-1 targeting. To further deplete intracellular cholesterol, the core macromolecule structure was exploited to solubilize a hydrophobic small molecule agonist for nuclear Liver-X Receptors, which regulate the efflux of intracellular cholesterol. The macromolecule-encapsulated agonist system was found to reduce oxLDL accumulation by 88% in vitro in comparison to controls. In vivo studies were designed to release the macromolecules (with or without encapsulated agonist) to injured carotid arteries within Sprague Dawley rats fed a high fat diet, conditions that yield enhanced cholesterol accumulation and macrophage recruitment. The macromolecules lowered intimal levels of accumulated cholesterol (50% for macromolecule alone; 70% for macromolecule-encapsulated agonist) and inhibited macrophage retention (92% for macromolecule; 96% for macromolecule-encapsulated agonist; 4 days) relative to non-treated controls. Thus

  8. Activity of Levofloxacin Alone and in Combination with a DnaK Inhibitor against Gram-Negative Rods, Including Levofloxacin-Resistant Strains▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credito, Kim; Lin, Gengrong; Koeth, Laura; Sturgess, Michael A.; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2009-01-01

    Synergy time-kill testing of levofloxacin alone and in combination with CHP-105, a representative DnaK inhibitor, against 50 gram-negative rods demonstrated that 34 of the 50 strains tested showed significant synergy between levofloxacin and CHP-105 after 12 h and 24 h. Fourteen of these 34 organisms were quinolone resistant (levofloxacin MICs of ≥4 μg/ml). PMID:19015359

  9. Genetically targeted fluorogenic macromolecules for subcellular imaging and cellular perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magenau, Andrew J D; Saurabh, Saumya; Andreko, Susan K; Telmer, Cheryl A; Schmidt, Brigitte F; Waggoner, Alan S; Bruchez, Marcel P

    2015-10-01

    The alteration of cellular functions by anchoring macromolecules to specified organelles may reveal a new area of therapeutic potential and clinical treatment. In this work, a unique phenotype was evoked by influencing cellular behavior through the modification of subcellular structures with genetically targetable macromolecules. These fluorogen-functionalized polymers, prepared via controlled radical polymerization, were capable of exclusively decorating actin, cytoplasmic, or nuclear compartments of living cells expressing localized fluorgen-activating proteins. The macromolecular fluorogens were optimized by establishing critical polymer architecture-biophysical property relationships which impacted binding rates, binding affinities, and the level of internalization. Specific labeling of subcellular structures was realized at nanomolar concentrations of polymer, in the absence of membrane permeabilization or transduction domains, and fluorogen-modified polymers were found to bind to protein intact after delivery to the cytosol. Cellular motility was found to be dependent on binding of macromolecular fluorogens to actin structures causing rapid cellular ruffling without migration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Terahertz spectroscopy of dry, hydrated, and thermally denatured biological macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipscomb, Dawn; Echchgadda, Ibtissam; Ibey, Bennett L.; Beier, Hope; Thomas, Robert J.; Peralta, Xomalin; Wilmink, Gerald J.

    2012-03-01

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) is an effective technique to probe the intermolecular and collective vibrational modes of biological macromolecules at THz frequencies. To date, the vast majority of spectroscopic studies have been performed on dehydrated biomolecular samples. Given the fact that all biochemical processes occur in aqueous environments and water is required for proper protein folding and function, we hypothesize that valuable information can be gained from spectroscopic studies performed on hydrated biomolecules in their native conformation. In this study, we used a THz-TDS system that exploits photoconductive techniques for THz pulse generation and freespace electro-optical sampling approaches for detection. We used the THz spectrometer to measure the time-dependent electric field of THz waves upon interaction with water, phosphate buffered saline (PBS), and collagen gels. By comparing these waveforms with references, we simultaneously determined each sample's index of refraction (n) and absorption coefficients (μa) as a function of frequency. Our data show that the properties we measure for the water, PBS and collagen are comparable to those reported in the literature. In the future, we plan to examine the effect that both temperature and pH have on the optical properties of other biological macromolecules. Studies will also be performed to compare our results to those generated using molecular dynamics simulations.

  11. A Biology Laboratory Exercise Using Macromolecule Assays to Distinguish Four Types of Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte W. Pratt

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the drawbacks of cookbook-style laboratory exercises for General Biology courses is that students are not challenged to develop skills in scientific reasoning, such as formulating hypotheses and designing and carrying out experiments. Several traditional laboratory curricula include exercises involving semi-quantitative colorimetric assays to detect proteins (biuret test, reducing sugars (Benedict’s test, starch (Lugol’s test, and lipids (Sudan red test in a variety of easily prepared solutions (glucose, albumin, glycine, etc. and familiar food items (lemon juice, cornstarch, egg white, etc.. An extension of this lab exercise was developed to allow students to use their knowledge of the macromolecule assays to design an experiment to distinguish four types of “milk”: whole milk, skim milk, cream, and soy milk (rice milk or almond milk could also be included.

  12. [The contribution of magnetic resonance spectroscopy to the classification of high grade gliomas. The predictive value of macromolecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Bisbal, M C; Celda-Muñoz, B; Martí-Bonmatí, L; Ferrer-Ripollés, P; Revert-Ventura, A J; Piquer-Belloch, J; Mollá-Olmos, E; Arana-Fernández de Moya, E; Dosdá-Muñoz, R

    1H MRS allows the study of metabolite concentration changes in intracranial tumours, relating them, more or less successfully, to the histological type and grade of the tumour. To analyse the patterns which are useful for classifying the grades of cerebral gliomas by means of various ratios obtained using 1H MRS with two echo times (ET), with and without water suppression, paying special attention to the macromolecules. We studied 8 gliomas (1 grade II, 2 grade III and 5 grade IV) with single volume 1H MRS at ET 31 ms (8/8) and 136 ms (7/8). The intensities of the metabolites, including macromolecules (MMA, 0.9 ppm; MMB, 1.3 ppm), were normalised to water signal intensity for ET 31, to Cr at ET 31 and 136 ms and NAA/Cho for both ET and the ratio MMA/MMB at ET 31. There were significant differences between the three grades on the ratios MMA/MMB (p= 0.000) with descent of the MMA/MMB coefficient as the grade increases, and NNA/Cho at ET 136 (p= 0.018). We found an inverse relationship between the quantity in mI and the increase in grade. No macromolecules were found at ET 136 in any of the tumours of grade II or III. The spectra of gliomas with ET 31 showed macromolecules around 0.9 and 1.3 ppm with different relative ratios for each tumour grade. The ET 136 spectra informs about the content of NNA and Cho. Apart from the increase in MMB (0.9 ppm), with short ET the higher grades showed lower content of mI. The study of gliomas using 1H MRS with ET 31 and 136 ms contributes to the diagnosis of the grade of tumour.

  13. DNA Import into Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinov, Yu M; Dietrich, A; Weber-Lotfi, F; Ibrahim, N; Klimenko, E S; Tarasenko, V I; Bolotova, T A; Koulintchenko, M V

    2016-10-01

    In recent decades, it has become evident that the condition for normal functioning of mitochondria in higher eukaryotes is the presence of membrane transport systems of macromolecules (proteins and nucleic acids). Natural competence of the mitochondria in plants, animals, and yeasts to actively uptake DNA may be directly related to horizontal gene transfer into these organelles occurring at much higher rate compared to the nuclear and chloroplast genomes. However, in contrast with import of proteins and tRNAs, little is known about the biological role and molecular mechanism underlying import of DNA into eukaryotic mitochondria. In this review, we discuss current state of investigations in this area, particularly specificity of DNA import into mitochondria and its features in plants, animals, and yeasts; a tentative mechanism of DNA import across the mitochondrial outer and inner membranes; experimental data evidencing several existing, but not yet fully understood mechanisms of DNA transfer into mitochondria. Currently available data regarding transport of informational macromolecules (DNA, RNA, and proteins) into the mitochondria do not rule out that the mechanism of protein and tRNA import as well as tRNA and DNA import into the mitochondria may partially overlap.

  14. New water-soluble copper (II) complexes including 4,7-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline and L-tyrosine: synthesis, characterization, DNA interactions and cytotoxicities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İnci, Duygu; Aydın, Rahmiye; Yılmaz, Dilek; Gençkal, Hasene Mutlu; Vatan, Özgür; Çinkılıç, Nilüfer; Zorlu, Yunus

    2015-02-05

    Two new water-soluble copper(II) complexes, [Cu(dmphen)2(NO3)]NO3 (1), [Cu(dmphen)(tyr)(H2O)]NO3·H2O (2) and the diquarternary salt of dmphen (dmphen = 4,7-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline and tyr = L-tyrosine), have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and IR spectroscopy, thermal analysis and single crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. The CT-DNA binding properties of these compounds have been investigated by absorption, emission spectroscopy and thermal denaturation measurements. The supercoiled pBR322 plasmid DNA cleavage activity of these compounds has been explored by agarose gel electrophoresis. The cytotoxicity of these compounds against MCF-7, Caco-2, A549 cancer cells and BEAS-2B healthy cells was also studied by the XTT method. Complexes 1 and 2 exhibit significant cytotoxicity, with lower IC50 values than those of cisplatin.

  15. DNA barcode identification of lichen-forming fungal species in the Rhizoplaca melanophthalma species-complex (Lecanorales, Lecanoraceae, including five new species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Leavitt

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies using sequence data from multiple loci and coalescent-based species delimitation have revealed several species-level lineages within the phenotypically circumscribed taxon Rhizoplaca melanophthalma sensu lato. Here, we formally describe five new species within this group, R. occulta, R. parilis, R. polymorpha, R. porterii, and R. shushanii, using support from the coalescent-based species delimitation method implemented in the program Bayesian Phylogenetics and Phylogeography (BPP as the diagnostic feature distinguishing new species. We provide a reference DNA sequence database using the ITS marker as a DNA barcode for identifying species within this complex. We also assessed intraspecific genetic distances within the six R. melanophthalma sensu lato species. While intraspecific genetic distances within the five new species were less than or equal to the lowest interspecific pairwise comparison values, an overlap in genetic distances within the R. melanophthalma sensu stricto clade suggests the potential for additional phenotypically cryptic lineages within this broadly distributed lineage. Overall, our results demonstrate the potential for accurately identifying species within the R. melanophthalma group by using molecular-based identification methods.

  16. Detection of Bartonella henselae DNA in clinical samples including peripheral blood of immune competent and immune compromised patients by three nested amplifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Hatamoto Kawasato

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria of the genus Bartonella are emerging pathogens detected in lymph node biopsies and aspirates probably caused by increased concentration of bacteria. Twenty-three samples of 18 patients with clinical, laboratory and/or epidemiological data suggesting bartonellosis were subjected to three nested amplifications targeting a fragment of the 60-kDa heat shock protein (HSP, the internal transcribed spacer 16S-23S rRNA (ITS and the cell division (FtsZ of Bartonella henselae, in order to improve detection in clinical samples. In the first amplification 01, 04 and 05 samples, were positive by HSP (4.3%, FtsZ (17.4% and ITS (21.7%, respectively. After the second round six positive samples were identified by nested-HSP (26%, eight by nested-ITS (34.8% and 18 by nested-FtsZ (78.2%, corresponding to 10 peripheral blood samples, five lymph node biopsies, two skin biopsies and one lymph node aspirate. The nested-FtsZ was more sensitive than nested-HSP and nested-ITS (p < 0.0001, enabling the detection of Bartonella henselae DNA in 15 of 18 patients (83.3%. In this study, three nested-PCR that should be specific for Bartonella henselae amplification were developed, but only the nested-FtsZ did not amplify DNA from Bartonella quintana. We conclude that nested amplifications increased detection of B. henselae DNA, and that the nested-FtsZ was the most sensitive and the only specific to B. henselae in different biological samples. As all samples detected by nested-HSP and nested-ITS, were also by nested-FtsZ, we infer that in our series infections were caused by Bartonella henselae. The high number of positive blood samples draws attention to the use of this biological material in the investigation of bartonellosis, regardless of the immune status of patients. This fact is important in the case of critically ill patients and young children to avoid more invasive procedures such as lymph nodes biopsies and aspirates.

  17. Recent Advances in Non-Invasive Delivery of Macromolecules using Nanoparticulate Carriers System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadab, Md; Haque, Shadabul; Sheshala, Ravi; Meng, Lim Wei; Meka, Venkata Srikanth; Ali, Javed

    2017-01-01

    The drug delivery of macromolecules such as proteins and peptides has become an important area of research and represents the fastest expanding share of the market for human medicines. The most common method for delivering macromolecules is parenterally. However parenteral administration of some therapeutic macromolecules has not been effective because of their rapid clearance from the body. As a result, most macromolecules are only therapeutically useful after multiple injections, which causes poor compliance and systemic side effects. Therefore, there is a need to improve delivery of therapeutic macromolecules to enable non-invasive delivery routes, less frequent dosing through controlled-release drug delivery, and improved drug targeting to increase efficacy and reduce side effects. Non-invasive administration routes such as intranasal, pulmonary, transdermal, ocular and oral delivery have been attempted intensively by formulating macromolecules into nanoparticulate carriers system such as polymeric and lipidic nanoparticles. This review discusses barriers to drug delivery and current formulation technologies to overcome the unfavorable properties of macromolecules via non-invasive delivery (mainly intranasal, pulmonary, transdermal oral and ocular) with a focus on nanoparticulate carrier systems. This review also provided a summary and discussion of recent data on non-invasive delivery of macromolecules using nanoparticulate formulations. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. The Origin and the Future of Macromolecule Ionization by Laser Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KoichiTanaka

    2004-01-01

    Starting in 1984,a Shimadzu Corporation Central Research Laboratory development team set about the challenge of developinng an instrument for analyzing macromolecules such as proteins. At the time, the conventional consensus among chemists was that, “laser ionization of macromolecules exceeding a molecular weight of 10,000 is imposible”. However, not being a chemist, I was unaware of this widelyheld belief.

  19. Organometallic macromolecules with piano stool coordination repeating units: chain configuration and stimulated solution behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Kai; Ward, Jonathan; Amos, Ryan C; Jeong, Moon Gon; Kim, Kyoung Taek; Gauthier, Mario; Foucher, Daniel; Wang, Xiaosong

    2014-09-11

    Theoretical calculations illustrate that organometallic macromolecules with piano stool coordination repeating units (Fe-acyl complex) adopt linear chain configuration with a P-Fe-C backbone surrounded by aromatic groups. The macromolecules show molecular weight-dependent and temperature stimulated solution behaviour in DMSO.

  20. The flavonoid herbacetin diglucoside as a constituent of the lignan macromolecule from flaxseed hulls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijs, K.; Vincken, J.P.; Verhoef, R.P.; Oostveen, van W.H.M.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Gruppen, H.

    2007-01-01

    Lignans in flaxseed are known to be part of a macromolecule in which they are connected through the linker-molecule hydroxy-methyl-glutaric acid (HMGA). In this study, the lignan macromolecule was extracted from flaxseed hulls and degraded to its monomeric constituents by complete saponification. Be

  1. Responsive inverse opal hydrogels for the sensing of macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couturier, Jean-Philippe; Sütterlin, Martin; Laschewsky, André; Hettrich, Cornelia; Wischerhoff, Erik

    2015-05-26

    Dual responsive inverse opal hydrogels were designed as autonomous sensor systems for (bio)macromolecules, exploiting the analyte-induced modulation of the opal's structural color. The systems that are based on oligo(ethylene glycol) macromonomers additionally incorporate comonomers with various recognition units. They combine a coil-to-globule collapse transition of the LCST type with sensitivity of the transition temperature toward molecular recognition processes. This enables the specific detection of macromolecular analytes, such as glycopolymers and proteins, by simple optical methods. While the inverse opal structure assists the effective diffusion even of large analytes into the photonic crystal, the stimulus responsiveness gives rise to strong shifts of the optical Bragg peak of more than 100 nm upon analyte binding at a given temperature. The systems' design provides a versatile platform for the development of easy-to-use, fast, and low-cost sensors for pathogens.

  2. Covalent binding of foreign chemicals to tissue macromolecules. [Acetaminophen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorgeirsson, S.S.; Wirth, P.J.

    1977-03-01

    In vivo and in vitro covalent binding of foreign chemicals to tissue macromolecules via metabolic activation is described, using the analgesic acetaminophen as an example. Acetaminophen is metabolized through a variety of pathways. The arylating metabolite is formed by a cytochrome P-450 dependent N-hydroxylation process. The resulting hydroxamic acid is then conjugated with glutathione, and the resulting conjugate is subsequently excreted as the mercapturic acid in the urine. It is not until the glutathione concentration is reduced to about 20% of the initial concentration that covalent binding of acetaminophen to amino acids of proteins occurs and subsequent liver necrosis is seen. The extent of in vitro binding correlates with treatments that alter hepatic necrosis and in vivo binding, indicating that in vitro binding is a valid index of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. A simple bacterial test system for detecting chemical carcinogens as mutagens is described.

  3. Novel macromolecules derived from coumarin: synthesis and antioxidant activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amiery, Ahmed A.; Al-Majedy, Yasameen K.; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2015-07-01

    The rational design of 4-hydroxycoumarins with tailor-made antioxidant activities is required nowadays due to the wide variety of pharmacologically significant, structurally interesting of coumarins and researcher orientation toward green chemistry and natural products. A simple and unique coumarins have been achieved by reaction of 4-hydroxycoumarin with aromatic aldehyde accompanied with the creation of a macromolecules have 2-aminothiazolidin-4-one. The molecular structures of the compounds were characterized by the Fourier transformation infrared and Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies, in addition to CHN analysis. The scavenging abilities of new compounds against stable DPPH radical (DPPH•) and hydrogen peroxide were done and the results show that the compounds exhibited high antioxidant activates.

  4. Enzyme kinetics and transport in a system crowded by mobile macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria, Carlos; Kapral, Raymond

    2015-11-21

    The dynamics of an elastic network model for the enzyme 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase is studied in a system crowded by mobile macromolecules, also modeled by elastic networks. The system includes a large number of solvent molecules, as well as substrate and product molecules which undergo catalytic reactions with this hexameric protein. The time evolution of the entire system takes place through a hybrid dynamics that combines molecular dynamics for solute species and multiparticle collision dynamics for the solvent. It is shown that crowding leads to subdiffusive dynamics for the protein, in accord with many studies of diffusion in crowded environments, and increases orientational relaxation times. The enzyme reaction kinetics is also modified by crowding. The effective Michaelis constant decreases with crowding volume fraction, and this decrease is attributed to excluded volume effects, which dominate over effects due to reduced substrate diffusion that would cause the Michaelis constant to increase.

  5. Sequence analysis of a Molluscum contagiosum virus DNA region which includes the gene encoding protein kinase 2 and other genes with unique organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Gallardo, A; Moratilla, M; Funes, J M; Agromayor, M; Nuñez, A; Varas, A J; Collado, M; Valencia, A; Lopez-Estebaranz, J L; Esteban, M

    1996-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a near left-terminal region from the genome of Molluscum contagiosum virus subtype I (MCVI) was determined. This region was contained within three adjacent BamHI fragments, designated L (2.4 kilobases (kb)), M (1.8 kb), and N (1.6 kb). BamHI cleavage of MCVI DNA produced another 1.6-kb fragment (N'), which had been mapped 30-50 kb from the L,M region. The MCVI restriction fragments were cloned and end-sequenced. The N fragment that maps at the L,M region was identified by the polymerase chain reaction, using primers devised from the sequence of each fragment. The results from this analysis led to establish the relative position of these fragments within the MCVI genome. The analysis of 3.6 kb of DNA sequence revealed the presence of ten open reading frames (ORFs). Comparison of the amino acid sequence of these ORFs to the amino acid sequence of vaccinia virus (VAC) proteins revealed that two complete MCVI ORFs, termed N1L and L1L, showed high degree of homology with VAC F9 and F10 genes, respectively. The F10 gene encodes a 52-kDa serine/threonine protein kinase (protein kinase 2), an essential protein involved in virus morphogenesis. The MCVI homologue (L1L) encoded a putative polypeptide of 443 aa, with a calculated molecular mass of 53 kDa, and 60.5/30.2% sequence identity/similarity to VAC F10. The MCV N1L (213 aa, 24 kDa) showed 42.6/40.6% amino acid sequence identity/similarity to VAC F9, a gene of unknown function encoding a 24-kDa protein with a hydrophobic C-terminal domain, which was conserved in MCVI. The genomic arrangement of MCVI N1L and L1L was equivalent to that of the vaccinia and variola virus homologues. However, the ORFs contained within MCVI fragment M (leftward) showed no homology, neither similarity in genetic organization, to the genes encoded by the corresponding regions of vaccinia and variola viruses.

  6. Molecular Modeling on the Recognition of Wobble DNA Including G:T Mismatched Pairs by Two Structures of Chiral Metal Complex △,∧-[Ru(phen)2hpip]2+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Cui-Ping; WU Yan-Bo; YANG Pin

    2006-01-01

    In this work, the recognition of DNA including G:T mismatched pairs by the two different structures of[Ru(phen)2hpip]2+ was firstly studied with molecular modeling respectively. The results revealed that all of the four chiral isomers of the two structures could recognize the mismatched DNA from the minor groove orientation especially and the interaction was enantioselective and sitespecific. The two left isomers were more preferential than the right ones. Especially, the structure Ⅱ which had much lower energy after interacting with DNA was the advantaged structure. Detailed energy analysis indicated that the steric interaction in the process of the complex inserting base stack determined the recognition results and the electrostatic interaction made an effect to some extent.

  7. DNA and RNA sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Tao; LIN; Lin; ZHAO; Hong; JIANG; Long

    2005-01-01

    This review summarizes recent advances in DNA sensor. Major areas of DNA sensor covered in this review include immobilization methods of DNA, general techniques of DNA detection and application of nanoparticles in DNA sensor.

  8. Glycoxidation of biological macromolecules: a critical approach to halt the menace of glycation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Saheem; Khan, M Salman; Akhter, Firoz; Khan, Mohd Sajid; Khan, Amir; Ashraf, J M; Pandey, Ramendra Pati; Shahab, Uzma

    2014-11-01

    Glycation is the result of covalent bonding of a free amino group of biological macromolecules with a reducing sugar, which results in the formation of a Schiff base that undergoes rearrangement, dehydration and cyclization to form a more stable Amadori product. The final products of nonenzymatic glycation of biomacromolecules like DNA, proteins and lipids are known as advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs may be generated rapidly or over long times stimulated by distinct triggering mechanisms, thereby accounting for their roles in multiple settings and disease states. Both Schiff base and Amadori glycation products generate free radicals resulting in decline of antioxidant defense mechanisms and can damage cellular organelles and enzymes. This critical review primarily focuses on the mechanistic insight of glycation and the most probable route for the formation of glycation products and their therapeutic interventions. Furthermore, the prevention of glycation reaction using therapeutic drugs such as metformin, pyridoxamine and aminoguanidine (AG) are discussed with special emphasis on the novel concept of the bioconjugation of these drugs like, AG with gold nanoparticles (GNPs). At or above 10 mM concentration, AG is found to be toxic and therefore has serious health concerns, and the study warrants doing this novel bioconjugation of AG with GNPs. This approach might increase the efficacy of the AG at a reduced concentration with low or no toxicity. Using the concept of synthesis of GNPs with abovementioned drugs, it is assumed that toxicity of various drugs which are used at high doses can be minimized more effectively.

  9. DNA commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics: Recommendations on the evaluation of STR typing results that may include drop-out and/or drop-in using probabilistic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, P.; Gusmão, L.; Haned, H.; Mayr, W.R.; Morling, N.; Parson, W.; Prieto, L.; Prinz, M.; Schneider, H.; Schneider, P.M.; Weir, B.S.

    2015-01-01

    DNA profiling of biological material from scenes of crimes is often complicated because the amount of DNA is limited and the quality of the DNA may be compromised. Furthermore, the sensitivity of STR typing kits has been continuously improved to detect low level DNA traces. This may lead to (1) partial DNA profiles and (2) detection of additional alleles. There are two key phenomena to consider: allelic or locus ‘drop-out’, i.e. ‘missing’ alleles at one or more genetic loci, while ‘drop-in’ may explain alleles in the DNA profile that are additional to the assumed main contributor(s). The drop-in phenomenon is restricted to 1 or 2 alleles per profile. If multiple alleles are observed at more than two loci then these are considered as alleles from an extra contributor and analysis can proceed as a mixture of two or more contributors. Here, we give recommendations on how to estimate probabilities considering drop-out, Pr(D), and drop-in, Pr(C). For reasons of clarity, we have deliberately restricted the current recommendations considering drop-out and/or drop-in at only one locus. Furthermore, we offer recommendations on how to use Pr(D) and Pr(C) with the likelihood ratio principles that are generally recommended by the International Society of Forensic Genetics (ISFG) as measure of the weight of the evidence in forensic genetics. Examples of calculations are included. An Excel spreadsheet is provided so that scientists and laboratories may explore the models and input their own data. PMID:22864188

  10. DNA commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics: Recommendations on the evaluation of STR typing results that may include drop-out and/or drop-in using probabilistic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, P; Gusmão, L; Haned, H; Mayr, W R; Morling, N; Parson, W; Prieto, L; Prinz, M; Schneider, H; Schneider, P M; Weir, B S

    2012-12-01

    DNA profiling of biological material from scenes of crimes is often complicated because the amount of DNA is limited and the quality of the DNA may be compromised. Furthermore, the sensitivity of STR typing kits has been continuously improved to detect low level DNA traces. This may lead to (1) partial DNA profiles and (2) detection of additional alleles. There are two key phenomena to consider: allelic or locus 'drop-out', i.e. 'missing' alleles at one or more genetic loci, while 'drop-in' may explain alleles in the DNA profile that are additional to the assumed main contributor(s). The drop-in phenomenon is restricted to 1 or 2 alleles per profile. If multiple alleles are observed at more than two loci then these are considered as alleles from an extra contributor and analysis can proceed as a mixture of two or more contributors. Here, we give recommendations on how to estimate probabilities considering drop-out, Pr(D), and drop-in, Pr(C). For reasons of clarity, we have deliberately restricted the current recommendations considering drop-out and/or drop-in at only one locus. Furthermore, we offer recommendations on how to use Pr(D) and Pr(C) with the likelihood ratio principles that are generally recommended by the International Society of Forensic Genetics (ISFG) as measure of the weight of the evidence in forensic genetics. Examples of calculations are included. An Excel spreadsheet is provided so that scientists and laboratories may explore the models and input their own data. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cloning and analysis of DnaJ family members in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinü; Bu, Cuiyu; Li, Tiantian; Wang, Shibao; Jiang, Feng; Yi, Yongzhu; Yang, Huipeng; Zhang, Zhifang

    2016-01-15

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are involved in a variety of critical biological functions, including protein folding, degradation, and translocation and macromolecule assembly, act as molecular chaperones during periods of stress by binding to other proteins. Using expressed sequence tag (EST) and silkworm (Bombyx mori) transcriptome databases, we identified 27 cDNA sequences encoding the conserved J domain, which is found in DnaJ-type Hsps. Of the 27 J domain-containing sequences, 25 were complete cDNA sequences. We divided them into three types according to the number and presence of conserved domains. By analyzing the gene structures, intron numbers, and conserved domains and constructing a phylogenetic tree, we found that the DnaJ family had undergone convergent evolution, obtaining new domains to expand the diversity of its family members. The acquisition of the new DnaJ domains most likely occurred prior to the evolutionary divergence of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The expression of DnaJ genes in the silkworm was generally higher in the fat body. The tissue distribution of DnaJ1 proteins was detected by western blotting, demonstrating that in the fifth-instar larvae, the DnaJ1 proteins were expressed at their highest levels in hemocytes, followed by the fat body and head. We also found that the DnaJ1 transcripts were likely differentially translated in different tissues. Using immunofluorescence cytochemistry, we revealed that in the blood cells, DnaJ1 was mainly localized in the cytoplasm.

  12. Synthesis of biocontrol macromolecules by derivative of chitosan with surfactin and antifungal evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bo; Xu, Pei-Yuan; Zhang, Yue-Ji; Wang, Pei-Pei; Yu, Hong; Jiang, Ji-Hong

    2014-05-01

    A derivative of chitosan was prepared with chitosan and β-cyclodextrins, which was synthesized by the immobilization reaction, as a carrier to adsorb surfactin produced from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and got biological macromolecules. The antifungal activity against three sapstain fungi by a combination of macromolecules was tested. The results showed that the macromolecules inhibited the mycelium growth of sapstain fungi Lasiodiplodia rubropurpurea, L. crassispora, and L. theobromae by about 73.22%, 76.72%, and 70.22%, respectively. The macromolecules were relatively thermally stable with more than 50% of the antifungal activity even after being held at 121°C for 30 min. Meanwhile, the activity of the macromolecules remained more than 55% at a pH value ranging from 4 to 12. The macromolecules were resistant to hydrolysis by most protein-denaturing detergents and other enzymes. The results indicated the macromolecules might provide an alternative bioresource for the bio-control of sapstain. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Transpapillary (Nipple) Delivery of Macromolecules to the Breast: Proof of Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Kaushalkumar; Alsharif, Fahd M; Perumal, Omathanu

    2016-11-07

    Localized drug delivery to the breast can maximize drug concentration at the target site and minimize systemic drug distribution. To this end, the study explored the feasibility of delivering macromolecules to the breast through mammary papilla (nipple). The in vitro penetration of model macromolecules (inulin, dextran, ovalbumin, and bovine serum albumin) varying in molecular weight from 5 to 67 kDa was studied using excised porcine and human mammary papilla. The penetration of macromolecules decreased with increase in molecular weight. The penetration of the macromolecules was significantly higher through the mammary papilla in comparison to breast skin. In vitro penetration of the macromolecules was similar in human and porcine mammary papilla. Iontophoresis was used to enhance the transport of bovine serum albumin (BSA) through the mammary papilla. The flux and cumulative amount permeated was increased by 2- to 4-fold by iontophoresis. The macromolecules were transported through the ducts and the surrounding connective tissue in the mammary papilla. Overall, the results from this study for the first time demonstrate the feasibility of delivering macromolecules through the mammary papilla. These findings have implications for developing safe and effective localized therapeutic approaches for breast cancer.

  14. Channel-Forming Bacterial Toxins in Biosensing and Macromolecule Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip A. Gurnev

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available To intoxicate cells, pore-forming bacterial toxins are evolved to allow for the transmembrane traffic of different substrates, ranging from small inorganic ions to cell-specific polypeptides. Recent developments in single-channel electrical recordings, X-ray crystallography, protein engineering, and computational methods have generated a large body of knowledge about the basic principles of channel-mediated molecular transport. These discoveries provide a robust framework for expansion of the described principles and methods toward use of biological nanopores in the growing field of nanobiotechnology. This article, written for a special volume on “Intracellular Traffic and Transport of Bacterial Protein Toxins”, reviews the current state of applications of pore-forming bacterial toxins in small- and macromolecule-sensing, targeted cancer therapy, and drug delivery. We discuss the electrophysiological studies that explore molecular details of channel-facilitated protein and polymer transport across cellular membranes using both natural and foreign substrates. The review focuses on the structurally and functionally different bacterial toxins: gramicidin A of Bacillus brevis, α-hemolysin of Staphylococcus aureus, and binary toxin of Bacillus anthracis, which have found their “second life” in a variety of developing medical and technological applications.

  15. Channel-forming bacterial toxins in biosensing and macromolecule delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnev, Philip A; Nestorovich, Ekaterina M

    2014-08-21

    To intoxicate cells, pore-forming bacterial toxins are evolved to allow for the transmembrane traffic of different substrates, ranging from small inorganic ions to cell-specific polypeptides. Recent developments in single-channel electrical recordings, X-ray crystallography, protein engineering, and computational methods have generated a large body of knowledge about the basic principles of channel-mediated molecular transport. These discoveries provide a robust framework for expansion of the described principles and methods toward use of biological nanopores in the growing field of nanobiotechnology. This article, written for a special volume on "Intracellular Traffic and Transport of Bacterial Protein Toxins", reviews the current state of applications of pore-forming bacterial toxins in small- and macromolecule-sensing, targeted cancer therapy, and drug delivery. We discuss the electrophysiological studies that explore molecular details of channel-facilitated protein and polymer transport across cellular membranes using both natural and foreign substrates. The review focuses on the structurally and functionally different bacterial toxins: gramicidin A of Bacillus brevis, α-hemolysin of Staphylococcus aureus, and binary toxin of Bacillus anthracis, which have found their "second life" in a variety of developing medical and technological applications.

  16. Graphical Methods for Quantifying Macromolecules through Bright Field Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Hang; DeFilippis, Rosa Anna; Tlsty, Thea D.; Parvin, Bahram

    2008-08-14

    Bright ?eld imaging of biological samples stained with antibodies and/or special stains provides a rapid protocol for visualizing various macromolecules. However, this method of sample staining and imaging is rarely employed for direct quantitative analysis due to variations in sample fixations, ambiguities introduced by color composition, and the limited dynamic range of imaging instruments. We demonstrate that, through the decomposition of color signals, staining can be scored on a cell-by-cell basis. We have applied our method to Flbroblasts grown from histologically normal breast tissue biopsies obtained from two distinct populations. Initially, nuclear regions are segmented through conversion of color images into gray scale, and detection of dark elliptic features. Subsequently, the strength of staining is quanti?ed by a color decomposition model that is optimized by a graph cut algorithm. In rare cases where nuclear signal is significantly altered as a result of samplepreparation, nuclear segmentation can be validated and corrected. Finally, segmented stained patterns are associated with each nuclear region following region-based tessellation. Compared to classical non-negative matrix factorization, proposed method (i) improves color decomposition, (ii) has a better noise immunity, (iii) is more invariant to initial conditions, and (iv) has a superior computing performance

  17. Quantification of the Molecular Topology for Hierarchical Macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaucage, Gregory

    2009-03-01

    Hierarchical structures are often produced from ramified macromolecules such as comb, star, hyperbranched and dendritic polymers. We have recently derived a method for the description of complex molecular and nanostructural topologies based on a statistical analysis [1,2]. The method has been applied to a wide range of hierarchical materials from long chain branched polyolefins, hyperbranched polymers [3], star polymers, H-branched polymers to cyclics, biopolymers [4], and branched nanostructured aggregates. This method, when applied to neutron scattering data, yields the mole fraction of a structure involved in branching, the number of branch sites, the average branch length, and the number if inner chain segments. Further, quantitative measures of the convolution or tortuosity of the structure and the connectivity of the branching network can be made, opening a new window for our understanding of complex molecular topologies. This understanding has recently been applied to biological chain molecules to understand protein and RNA folding [4] for example as well as to aggregated, nanostructured, carbon soot. [0pt] [1] Beaucage, G, Phys. Rev. E 2004, 70, 031401. [2] Kulkarni, AS & Beaucage, G, J. Polym. Sci. Part B: Polym. Phys. 2006, 44, 1395. [3] Kulkarni, AS & Beaucage, G, Macromol. Rapid Comm. 2007, 28, 1312.?4) Beaucage, G, Biophysical J. 2008, 95, 503.

  18. The Circle of Dust: From Nanoparticles to Macromolecules and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micelotta, E.; Jones, A.; Bocchio, M.; Cami, J.; Peeters, E.; Bernard-Salas, J.

    There is increasing observational evidence that a non-negligible fraction of the cosmic carbon is locked up into macromolecules and nanoparticles. Carbonaceous nanoparticles and Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon (HAC) nanoparticles represent one of the main components of interstellar dust. HAC nanoparticles have been proposed as a viable carrier for the Unidentified InfraRed (UIR) bands, which dominate the mid-infrared spectrum of almost any astronomical object. Fullerene molecules C60 and C70 have been detected in various circumstellar and interstellar environments. We present some of our recent results about the evolution of such carbonaceous structures and the possible connections between each other. We show how photo-processing of HAC nanoparticles can lead to the formation of C60 and C70 in space. There the low density of the gas precludes the formation of fullerene materials following known vaporization or combustion synthesis routes, even on astronomical timescales. We then discuss the processing of small hydrocarbon dust by energetic ions and electrons under extreme conditions, e.g., in shocked regions. Finally, we derive the astrophysical implications of such processing in terms of the observed emission.

  19. Binding of chemical carcinogens to macromolecules in cultured human colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1977-01-01

    Metabolic activation of different chemical classes of carcinogens was studied in cultured human colon epithelia. Human colon epithelia were maintained in explant culture up to 4 days. Binding of benzo(a)pyrene, dimethylnitrosamine, and 1,2- dimethylhydrazine was found in both cell DNA and protein....... 1,2-Dimethylhydrazine methylated DNA at both N·7 and 0-6 positions of guanin....

  20. Rapid identification of clinically significant species and taxa of aerobic actinomycetes, including Actinomadura, Gordona, Nocardia, Rhodococcus, Streptomyces, and Tsukamurella isolates, by DNA amplification and restriction endonuclease analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steingrube, V A; Wilson, R W; Brown, B A; Jost, K C; Blacklock, Z; Gibson, J L; Wallace, R J

    1997-04-01

    A previously described PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) identification schema for Nocardia that used an amplified 439-bp segment (amplicon) of the 65-kDa heat shock protein gene was evaluated for potential use with isolates of all clinically significant aerobic actinomycetes. The study included 28 reference (American Type Culture Collection) strains and 198 clinical isolates belonging to 20 taxonomic groups. Of these 198 isolates, 188 could be differentiated by this PCR-RFLP method. Amplicons from all aerobic actinomycete isolates lacked BstEII recognition sites, thereby distinguishing them from those of mycobacteria that contain one or more such sites. Of 29 restriction endonucleases, MspI plus HinfI produced RFLP patterns that differentiated 16 of the 20 taxa. A single RFLP pattern was observed for 15 of 20 taxa that included 65% of phenotypically clustered isolates. Multiple patterns were seen with Gordona bronchialis, Nocardia asteroides complex type VI, Nocardia otitidiscaviarum, Nocardia transvalensis, and Streptomyces spp. Streptomyces RFLP patterns were the most heterogeneous (five patterns among 19 isolates), but exhibited a unique HinfI fragment of > 320 bp. RFLP patterns that matched those from type strains of Streptomyces albus, Streptomyces griseus, or Streptomyces somaliensis were obtained from 14 of 19 Streptomyces isolates. Only 10 of 28 isolates of N. otitidiscaviarum failed to yield satisfactory amplicons, while only 6 of 188 (3.2%) clinical isolates exhibited patterns that failed to match one of the 21 defined RFLP patterns. These studies extended the feasibility of using PCR-RFLP analysis as a rapid method for the identification of all clinically significant species and taxa of aerobic actinomycetes.

  1. New expanded bed adsorbents for the recovery of DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theodossiou, Irini; Olander, M. A.; Sondergaard, M.;

    2000-01-01

    A 20-40 mum pellicular high density (similar to3.7 g cm(-3)) expanded bed material has been designed for the capture of DNA and other large macromolecules. Anion exchangers fashioned out of these supports exhibited dramatically enhanced DNA binding capacities over commercial anion exchange...

  2. DNA repair and transcription deficiency syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Vermeulen (Wim)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe genetic information of all living organisms is stored in DNA, a long macromolecule composed of four different nucleotides. Preservation of the sequence of nucleotides, defining the genetic code, is a prerequisite for a faithful transmission of the genetic information to subsequent ge

  3. COMPUTATIONAL METHODS FOR STUDYING THE INTERACTION BETWEEN POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND BIOLOGICAL MACROMOLECULES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computational Methods for Studying the Interaction between Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Biological Macromolecules .The mechanisms for the processes that result in significant biological activity of PAHs depend on the interaction of these molecules or their metabol...

  4. Electric Birefringence: A Simple Apparatus for Determining Physical Parameters of Macromolecules and Colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimm, Harold H.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes a birefringence apparatus that can be assembled for less than $100 and can be used to measure both the dimensions and dipole moments of many macromolecules. Details are given of the construction and manipulation of the apparatus. (JN)

  5. Development of modified release gliclazide biological macromolecules using natural biodegradable polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Vipulkumar D; Mashru, Krupa H; Solanki, Himanshu K; Jani, Girish K

    2013-04-01

    Modified release biological macromolecules (beads) of gliclazide using sodium alginate combined with either gellan gum or pectin in different ratios were prepared by Ionotropic gelation method. Biological macromolecules were evaluated for different physico-chemical parameters. Increase in polymers proportion showed difficulty in production of biological macromolecules due to high viscosity of dispersion. As the polymer concentration increases, the swelling and entrapment efficiency of drug increased. Compared to all other batches and commercial modified release gliclazide tablet, formulated biological macromolecules of sodium alginate with pectin (2:1 ratio) and with gellan gum (6:0.75 ratio) exhibited spherical shape, biphasic in vitro release profile and initial high drug release followed by moderate release up to 12 h as matrix diffusion kinetics and Higuchi model as well as Korsmeyer model. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The flavonoid herbacetin diglucoside as a constituent of the lignan macromolecule from flaxseed hulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struijs, Karin; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Verhoef, René; van Oostveen-van Casteren, Willemiek H M; Voragen, Alphons G J; Gruppen, Harry

    2007-04-01

    Lignans in flaxseed are known to be part of a macromolecule in which they are connected through the linker-molecule hydroxy-methyl-glutaric acid (HMGA). In this study, the lignan macromolecule was extracted from flaxseed hulls and degraded to its monomeric constituents by complete saponification. Besides secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG), the phenolic compounds p-coumaric acid glucoside (CouAG) and ferulic acid glucoside (FeAG) were isolated, which was expected based on indications from the literature. Also the flavonoid herbacetin diglucoside (HDG) was found. The presence of HDG was confirmed by NMR following preparative RP-HPLC purification. Also the presence of the three other constituents (CouAG, FeAG and SDG) was confirmed by NMR. To prove that HDG is a substructure of the lignan macromolecule, the macromolecule was fragmented by partial saponification. A fragment consisting of HDG and HMGA was indicated. This fragment was isolated by preparative RP-HPLC and its identity was confirmed by NMR. It is concluded that the flavonoid HDG is a substructure of the lignan macromolecule from flaxseed hulls and that it is incorporated in the macromolecule via the same linker-molecule as SDG.

  7. Analysis of Mammalian Cell Proliferation and Macromolecule Synthesis Using Deuterated Water and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria C. Foletta

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Deuterated water (2H2O, a stable isotopic tracer, provides a convenient and reliable way to label multiple cellular biomass components (macromolecules, thus permitting the calculation of their synthesis rates. Here, we have combined 2H2O labelling, GC-MS analysis and a novel cell fractionation method to extract multiple biomass components (DNA, protein and lipids from the one biological sample, thus permitting the simultaneous measurement of DNA (cell proliferation, protein and lipid synthesis rates. We have used this approach to characterize the turnover rates and metabolism of a panel of mammalian cells in vitro (muscle C2C12 and colon cancer cell lines. Our data show that in actively-proliferating cells, biomass synthesis rates are strongly linked to the rate of cell division. Furthermore, in both proliferating and non-proliferating cells, it is the lipid pool that undergoes the most rapid turnover when compared to DNA and protein. Finally, our data in human colon cancer cell lines reveal a marked heterogeneity in the reliance on the de novo lipogenic pathway, with the cells being dependent on both ‘self-made’ and exogenously-derived fatty acid.

  8. Rapid DNA typing for HLA-C using sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP): identification of serological and non-serologically defined HLA-C alleles including several new alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunce, M; Welsh, K I

    1994-01-01

    Detection of HLA-C antigens by complement mediated cytotoxicity using human alloantisera is often difficult. Between 20 to 40% of individuals in every race have undetectable HLA-C locus antigens and 9 out of the 29 sequenced HLA-C alleles so far published encode serologically undetected antigens. In addition, HLA-C molecules are expressed at the cell surface at about 10% of the levels of HLA-A and HLA-B. Recently, amplification of DNA using sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) has proved a reliable and rapid method for typing HLA-DR, HLA-DQA and HLA-DQB genes. PCR-SSP takes two hours to perform and is therefore suitable for the genotyping of cadaveric donors. We have designed a set of primers which will positively identify the HLA-C alleles corresponding to the serologically defined series HLA-Cw1, Cw2, Cw3, Cw4, Cw5, Cw6, Cw7 and Cw8. The serologically undetectable alleles have also been detected in groups according to sequence homology. In addition, three new unsequenced variants have been identified. DNA samples from 56 International Histocompatibility Workshop reference cell lines and 103 control individuals have been typed by the HLA-C PCR-SSP technique. 4/56 cell line types and 11/103 normal control individuals types were discrepant with the reported serological types. All combinations of serologically detectable and most of the serologically blank HLA-C antigens can be readily identified. DNA typing for HLA-Cw by PCR-SSP can take as little as 130 minutes from start to finish, including DNA preparation.

  9. Conformation-independent structural comparison of macromolecules with ProSMART

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholls, Robert A., E-mail: nicholls@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Francis Crick Avenue, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom); Fischer, Marcus [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94158 (United States); McNicholas, Stuart [University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Murshudov, Garib N. [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Francis Crick Avenue, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-01

    The Procrustes Structural Matching Alignment and Restraints Tool (ProSMART) has been developed to allow local comparative structural analyses independent of the global conformations and sequence homology of the compared macromolecules. This allows quick and intuitive visualization of the conservation of backbone and side-chain conformations, providing complementary information to existing methods. The identification and exploration of (dis)similarities between macromolecular structures can help to gain biological insight, for instance when visualizing or quantifying the response of a protein to ligand binding. Obtaining a residue alignment between compared structures is often a prerequisite for such comparative analysis. If the conformational change of the protein is dramatic, conventional alignment methods may struggle to provide an intuitive solution for straightforward analysis. To make such analyses more accessible, the Procrustes Structural Matching Alignment and Restraints Tool (ProSMART) has been developed, which achieves a conformation-independent structural alignment, as well as providing such additional functionalities as the generation of restraints for use in the refinement of macromolecular models. Sensible comparison of protein (or DNA/RNA) structures in the presence of conformational changes is achieved by enforcing neither chain nor domain rigidity. The visualization of results is facilitated by popular molecular-graphics software such as CCP4mg and PyMOL, providing intuitive feedback regarding structural conservation and subtle dissimilarities between close homologues that can otherwise be hard to identify. Automatically generated colour schemes corresponding to various residue-based scores are provided, which allow the assessment of the conservation of backbone and side-chain conformations relative to the local coordinate frame. Structural comparison tools such as ProSMART can help to break the complexity that accompanies the constantly growing

  10. Macromolecule simulation and CH4 adsorption mechanism of coal vitrinite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Song; Yan-ming, Zhu; Wu, Li

    2017-02-01

    The microscopic mechanism of interactions between CH4 and coal macromolecules is of significant practical and theoretical importance in CBM development and methane storage. Under periodic boundary conditions, the optimal energy configuration of coal vitrinite, which has a higher torsion degree and tighter arrangement, can be determined by the calculation of molecular mechanics (MM) and molecular dynamics (MD), and annealing kinetics simulation based on ultimate analysis, 13C NMR, FT IR and HRTEM. Macromolecular stabilization is primarily due to the van der Waals energy and covalent bond energy, mainly consisting of bond torsion energy and bond angle energy. Using the optimal configuration as the adsorbent, GCMC simulation of vitrinite adsorption of CH4 is conducted. A saturated state is reached after absorbing 17 CH4s per coal vitrinite molecule. CH4 is preferentially adsorbed on the edge, and inclined to gathering around the branched chains of the inner vitrinite sites. Finally, the adsorption parameters are calculated through first principle DFT. The adsorbability order is as follows: aromatic structure> heteroatom rings > oxygen functional groups. The adsorption energy order is as follows: Top < Bond < Center, Up < Down. The order of average RDF better reflects the adsorption ability and that of [-COOH] is lower than those of [sbnd Cdbnd O] and [Csbnd Osbnd C]. CH4 distributed in the distance of 0.99-16 Å to functional groups in the type of monolayer adsorption and the average distance order manifest as [sbnd Cdbnd O] (1.64 Å) < [Csbnd Osbnd C] (1.89 Å) < [sbnd COOH] (3.78 Å) < [-CH3] (4.11 Å) according to the average RDF curves. CH4 enriches around [sbnd Cdbnd O] and [Csbnd O-C] whereas is rather dispersed about [-COOH] and [CH3]. Simulation and experiment data are both in strong agreement with the Langmuir and D-A isothermal adsorption model and the D-A model fit better than Langmuir model. Preferential adsorption sites and orientations in vitrinite are

  11. Surface characteristics and adhesion behavior of Escherichia coli O157:H7: role of extracellular macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunjung N; Hong, Yongsuk; Lee, Ilkeun; Bradford, Scott A; Walker, Sharon L

    2009-09-14

    Experiments were conducted using enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells to investigate the influence of extracellular macromolecules on cell surface properties and adhesion behavior to quartz sand. Partial removal of the extracellular macromolecules on cells by a proteolytic enzyme (proteinase K) was confirmed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses. The proteinase K treated cells exhibited more negative electrophoretic mobility (EPM) at an ionic strength (IS) macromolecules resulted in polymeric layers outside the cell surface that were less electrophoretically soft. The more negative mobility for the treated cells was likely due to the combined effects of a change in the distribution of functional groups and an increase in the charges per unit volume after enzyme treatment and not just removal of extracellular macromolecules. The proteolytic digestion of extracellular macromolecules led to a significant difference in the cell adhesion to quartz sand. The adhesion behavior for treated cells was consistent with DLVO theory and increased with IS due to less negativity in the EPM. In contrast, the adhesion behavior of untreated cells was much more complex and exhibited a maximum at IS = 1 mM. The treated cells exhibited less adhesion than the untreated cells when the IS or = 10 mM, a sudden decrease in the removal efficiency was observed only for the untreated cells even through EPM values were similar for both treated and untreated cells. This result suggested that an additional non-DLVO type interaction, electrosteric repulsion, occurred at higher IS (> or =10 mM in this study) for the untreated cells due to the presence of extracellular macromolecules that hindered cell adhesion to the quartz surface. This finding provides important insight into the role of macromolecule-induced E. coli O157:H7 interactions in aquatic environments.

  12. Electronic method for autofluorography of macromolecules on two-D matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Jackson B.; Case, Arthur L.

    1983-01-01

    A method for detecting, localizing, and quantifying macromolecules contained in a two-dimensional matrix is provided which employs a television-based position sensitive detection system. A molecule-containing matrix may be produced by conventional means to produce spots of light at the molecule locations which are detected by the television system. The matrix, such as a gel matrix, is exposed to an electronic camera system including an image-intensifier and secondary electron conduction camera capable of light integrating times of many minutes. A light image stored in the form of a charge image on the camera tube target is scanned by conventional television techniques, digitized, and stored in a digital memory. Intensity of any point on the image may be determined from the number at the memory address of the point. The entire image may be displayed on a television monitor for inspection and photographing or individual spots may be analyzed through selected readout of the memory locations. Compared to conventional film exposure methods, the exposure time may be reduced 100-1000 times.

  13. Assessment of permeability barriers to macromolecules in the rodent endometrium at the onset of implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bany, Brent M; Hamilton, G Scot

    2011-01-01

    In rodents, embryo implantation is an invasive process, which begins with its attachment to the uterine wall and culminates in the formation of the definitive placenta several days later. It is critical that the endometrium provide a supportive environment for the implanting embryo during this process, as the placenta is not yet established. The concept of changing permeability barriers to macromolecules between different extracellular compartments in the rodent uterus at the onset of implantation has been established. This chapter provides protocols that can be used to assess this changing permeability barrier and the associated redistribution of macromolecules during the early phases of implantation in rodents. An increased permeability of the endometrial vasculature to plasma proteins occurs in areas adjacent to the implanting blastocyst. In addition, alterations in the extracellular matrix enhance the accumulation of fluid and extravasated macromolecules. We describe several protocols proven to be effective in studying and quantifying early vascular and extravascular responses to natural and artificial "implantation stimuli." The first three protocols represent qualitative and quantitative methods to assess the early endometrial "vascular permeability" response. On the contrary, the fourth protocol addresses the onset of decidualization and the arising permeability barrier, which restricts the movement of macromolecules through the extracellular space. This barrier is believed to provide transient protection for the implanting embryo against potentially harmful maternal serum proteins. This protocol describes assessment of resistance of the primary decidual zone to the movement of macromolecules across the compartments of the extracellular space.

  14. Nanoscale amphiphilic macromolecules as lipoprotein inhibitors: the role of charge and architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinzhong; Plourde, Nicole M; Iverson, Nicole; Moghe, Prabhas V; Uhrich, Kathryn E

    2007-01-01

    A series of novel amphiphilic macromolecules composed of alkyl chains as the hydrophobic block and poly(ethylene glycol) as the hydrophilic block were designed to inhibit highly oxidized low density lipoprotein (hoxLDL) uptake by synthesizing macromolecules with negatively charged moieties (ie, carboxylic acids) located in the two different blocks. The macromolecules have molecular weights around 5,500 g/mol, form micelles in aqueous solution with an average size of 20–35 nm, and display critical micelle concentration values as low as 10−7 M. Their charge densities and hydrodynamic size in physiological buffer solutions correlated with the hydrophobic/hydrophilic block location and quantity of the carboxylate groups. Generally, carboxylate groups located in the hydrophobic block destabilize micelle formation more than carboxylate groups in the hydrophilic block. Although all amphiphilic macromolecules inhibited unregulated uptake of hoxLDL by macrophages, inhibition efficiency was influenced by the quantity and location of the negatively charged-carboxylate on the macromolecules. Notably, negative charge is not the sole factor in reducing hoxLDL uptake. The combination of smaller size, micellar stability and charge density is critical for inhibiting hoxLDL uptake by macrophages. PMID:18203436

  15. Active macromolecules of honey form colloidal particles essential for honey antibacterial activity and hydrogen peroxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudzynski, Katrina; Miotto, Danielle; Kim, Linda; Sjaarda, Calvin; Maldonado-Alvarez, Liset; Fukś, Henryk

    2017-08-09

    Little is known about the global structure of honey and the arrangement of its main macromolecules. We hypothesized that the conditions in ripened honeys resemble macromolecular crowding in the cell and affect the concentration, reactivity, and conformation of honey macromolecules. Combined results from UV spectroscopy, DLS and SEM showed that the concentration of macromolecules was a determining factor in honey structure. The UV spectral scans in 200-400 nm visualized and allowed quantification of UV-absorbing compounds in the following order: dark > medium > light honeys (p macromolecules promoted their self-assembly to micron-size superstructures, visible in SEM as two-phase system consisting of dense globules distributed in sugar solution. These particles showed increased conformational stability upon dilution. At the threshold concentration, the system underwent phase transition with concomitant fragmentation of large micron-size particles to nanoparticles in hierarchical order. Honey two-phase conformation was an essential requirement for antibacterial activity and hydrogen peroxide production. These activities disappeared beyond the phase transition point. The realization that active macromolecules of honey are arranged into compact, stable multicomponent assemblies with colloidal properties reframes our view on global structure of honey and emerges as a key property to be considered in investigating its biological activity.

  16. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of macromolecules and strategy to enhance their transport in alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Mikihisa; Kawami, Masashi; Aoki, Ayako; Yumoto, Ryoko

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary delivery is an attractive administration route for therapeutic proteins and peptides. In this context, endocytosis/transcytosis at the distal lung epithelial barrier is an important process in the pulmonary absorption of therapeutic macromolecules. The alveolar epithelium is comprised of type I and type II cells. Understanding the transport mechanisms in these cells is essential for the development of efficient pulmonary delivery systems of therapeutic macromolecules. Endocytic pathways for albumin and insulin in alveolar epithelial cells and possible receptors for the endocytosis are discussed. Strategies to enhance the endocytosis and pulmonary absorption of macromolecules are also discussed, by focusing on the effects of cationic poly(amino acid)s. Although the surface area occupied by type II cells in alveoli is much smaller than that covered by type I cells, type II cells may significantly contribute to the endocytosis/transcytosis of macromolecules such as albumin. Identification of the receptors involved in the cellular uptake of each macromolecule is prerequisite for the understanding and regulation of its transport into and across alveolar epithelial cells. Establishment of novel in-vitro culture cell models of type I and type II cells would be a great help for the future advance of this research field.

  17. Cathepsin B degradable star-shaped peptidic macromolecules for delivery of 2-methoxyestradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Ravi; Samykutty, Abhilash; Riggin, Corinne; Kannan, Sneha; Wenzel, Ursula; Kolhatkar, Rohit

    2013-10-07

    2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME), a natural metabolite of estradiol, has antiproliferative and antiangiogenic activity. However, its clinical success is limited due to poor water solubility and poor pharmacokinetic parameters suggesting the need for a delivery vehicle. In this study we evaluated cathepsin B degradable star-shaped peptidic macromolecules (SPMs) that can potentially be used to create higher generation and high molecular weight peptidic polymer as delivery vehicle of 2ME. Two peptidic macromolecules having positively charged amine (ASPM) or negatively charged carboxyl surface groups (CSPM) were synthesized and evaluated for their degradation in the presence of cathepsin B and stability in the presence of neutral or acidic buffer and serum. Both ASPM and CSPM degraded rapidly in the presence of cathepsin B. Both were stable in neutral and acidic buffer whereas only CSPM exhibited substantial stability in the presence of serum. Both macromolecules were nontoxic toward breast cancer cells whereas 2ME-containing macromolecules exhibited antiproliferative activity in the micromolar range. Overall, results from the current study indicate that tetrapeptide GFLG can be used to create star-shaped macromolecules that are degraded in the presence of cathepsin B and have the potential to be developed as delivery vehicles of 2ME.

  18. Locust bean gum in the development of sustained release mucoadhesive macromolecules of aceclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Vipul D; Jani, Girish K; Moradiya, Naresh G; Randeria, Narayan P; Maheriya, Pankaj M; Nagar, Bhanu J

    2014-11-26

    The study shows the development and optimization of locust bean gum (LBG)-alginate mucoadhesive macromolecules containing aceclofenac through ionotropic-gelation using 3(2) factorial design. The effect of amount of LBG and sodium alginate on drug entrapment efficiency (%DEE), % mucoadhesion at 8h (M8) and % in vitro drug release at 10h (%Q10h) were optimized. The percentage yield, average size and DEE of macromolecules were found within the range of 93.19 to 96.65%, 1.328 ± 0.11 to 1.428 ± 0.13 μm, and 56.37 to 68.54%, respectively. The macromolecules were also characterized by SEM, FTIR and DSC. The in vitro drug release from these macromolecules (84.95 ± 2.02 to 95.33 ± 1.56% at 10h) exhibited sustained release (first-order) pattern with super case-II transport mechanism. The swelling and mucoadhesivity of these macromolecules were affected by pH of the medium. The design established the role of derived polynomial equations and plots in predicting the values of dependent variables for the preparation and optimization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mechanoporation of living cells for delivery of macromolecules using nanoneedle array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Daisuke; Yamagishi, Ayana; Saito, Megumi; Sathuluri, Ramachandra Rao; Silberberg, Yaron R; Iwata, Futoshi; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Nakamura, Chikashi

    2016-12-01

    Efficient and rapid delivery of macromolecule probes, such as quenchbodies and other large biomarkers that cannot readily pass through the plasma membrane, is necessary for live-cell imaging and other intracellular analyses. We present here an alternative, simple method for delivery of macromolecules into live cells. In this method, which we term here mechanoporation, a nanoneedle array is used for making transient pores in the plasma membrane to allow access of desired macromolecules into thousands of live cells, simultaneously. This rapid, 3-step method facilitates an efficient delivery by adding macromolecules into the medium, inserting nanoneedles into the cells and oscillating the nanoneedle array, a process that takes no more than 5 min in total. In addition, we demonstrate here how this method can repeatedly and reproducibly deliver molecules into specifically-selected locations on a given cell culture dish. The results presented here show how this unique mechanoporation method enables rapid and high-throughput bio-macromolecule delivery and live-cell imaging. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of composition on diffusion of macromolecules in a crowded environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrat, Svyatoslav; Zimmermann, Olav; Wiechert, Wolfgang; von Lieres, Eric

    2015-05-28

    We study diffusion of macromolecules in a crowded cytoplasm-like environment, focusing on its dependence on composition and its crossover to the anomalous subdiffusion. The crossover and the diffusion itself depend on both the volume fraction and the relative concentration of macromolecules. In accordance with previous theoretical and experimental studies, diffusion slows down when the volume fraction increases. Contrary to expectations, however, the diffusion is also strongly dependent on the molecular composition. The crossover time decreases and diffusion slows down when the smaller macromolecules start to dominate. Interestingly, diffusion is faster in a cytoplasm-like (more polydisperse) system than it is in a two-component system, at comparable packing fractions, or even when the cytoplasm packing fraction is larger.

  1. Anisotropic diffusion of macromolecules in the contiguous nucleocytoplasmic fluid during eukaryotic cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Nisha; Donth, Claudia; Weiss, Matthias

    2014-08-18

    Character and rapidity of protein diffusion in intracellular fluids are key determinants of the dynamics and steady state of a plethora of biochemical reactions. So far, an anomalous diffusion in cytoplasmic fluids with viscoelastic and even glassy characteristics has been reported in a variety of organisms on several length scales and timescales. Here, we show that the contiguous fluid of former cytoplasm and nucleoplasm features an anisotropically varying diffusion of macromolecules during eukaryotic cell division. In metaphase, diffusion in the contiguous nucleocytoplasmic fluid appears less anomalous along the spindle axis as compared to perpendicular directions. As a consequence, the long-time diffusion of macromolecules preferentially points along the spindle axis, leading to prolonged residence of macromolecules in the spindle region. Based on our experimental data, we suggest that anisotropic diffusion facilitates the encounter and interaction of spindle-associated proteins, e.g., during the formation of a dynamic spindle matrix. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Nonuniform elastic properties of macromolecules and effect of prestrain on their continuum nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Ankush; May, Eric R; Brooks, Charles L; Klug, William S

    2016-01-01

    Many experimental and theoretical methods have been developed to calculate the coarse-grained continuum elastic properties of macromolecules. However, all of those methods assume uniform elastic properties. Following the continuum mechanics framework, we present a systematic way of calculating the nonuniform effective elastic properties from atomic thermal fluctuations obtained from molecular dynamics simulation at any coarse-grained scale using a potential of the mean-force approach. We present the results for a mutant of Sesbania mosaic virus capsid, where we calculate the elastic moduli at different scales and observe an apparent problem with the chosen reference configuration in some cases. We present a possible explanation using an elastic network model, where inducing random prestrain results in a similar behavior. This phenomenon provides a novel insight into the continuum nature of macromolecules and defines the limits on details that the elasticity theory can capture. Further investigation into prestrains could elucidate important aspects of conformational dynamics of macromolecules.

  3. Scalable synthesis of sequence-defined, unimolecular macromolecules by Flow-IEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibfarth, Frank A; Johnson, Jeremiah A; Jamison, Timothy F

    2015-08-25

    We report a semiautomated synthesis of sequence and architecturally defined, unimolecular macromolecules through a marriage of multistep flow synthesis and iterative exponential growth (Flow-IEG). The Flow-IEG system performs three reactions and an in-line purification in a total residence time of under 10 min, effectively doubling the molecular weight of an oligomeric species in an uninterrupted reaction sequence. Further iterations using the Flow-IEG system enable an exponential increase in molecular weight. Incorporating a variety of monomer structures and branching units provides control over polymer sequence and architecture. The synthesis of a uniform macromolecule with a molecular weight of 4,023 g/mol is demonstrated. The user-friendly nature, scalability, and modularity of Flow-IEG provide a general strategy for the automated synthesis of sequence-defined, unimolecular macromolecules. Flow-IEG is thus an enabling tool for theory validation, structure-property studies, and advanced applications in biotechnology and materials science.

  4. Improved microchip design and application for in situ transmission electron microscopy of macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukes, Madeline J; Thomas, Rebecca; Damiano, John; Klein, Kate L; Balasubramaniam, Sharavanan; Kayandan, Sanem; Riffle, Judy S; Davis, Richey M; McDonald, Sarah M; Kelly, Deborah F

    2014-04-01

    Understanding the fundamental properties of macromolecules has enhanced the development of emerging technologies used to improve biomedical research. Currently, there is a critical need for innovative platforms that can illuminate the function of biomedical reagents in a native environment. To address this need, we have developed an in situ approach to visualize the dynamic behavior of biomedically relevant macromolecules at the nanoscale. Newly designed silicon nitride devices containing integrated "microwells" were used to enclose active macromolecular specimens in liquid for transmission electron microscopy imaging purposes.We were able to successfully examine novel magnetic resonance imaging contrast reagents, micelle suspensions, liposome carrier vehicles, and transcribing viral assemblies. With each specimen tested, the integrated microwells adequately maintained macromolecules in discrete local environments while enabling thin liquid layers to be produced.

  5. Equilibrium partitioning of macromolecules in confining geometries: Improved universality with a new molecular size parameter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yanwei; Peters, Günther H.J.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    2008-01-01

    We present a new framework for the description of macromolecules subject to confining geometries. The two main ingredients are a new computational method and the definition of a new molecular size parameter. The computational method, hereafter referred to the confinement analysis from bulk...... structures (CABS), allows the computation of equilibrium partition coefficients as a function of confinement size solely based on a single sampling of the configuration space of a macromolecule in bulk. Superior in computational speed to previous computational methods, CABS is capable of handling slits...... parameter for characterization of spatial confinement effects on macromolecules. Results for the equilibrium partition coefficient in the weak confinement regime depend only on the ratio ofR-s to the confinement size regardless of molecular details....

  6. Extracellular matrix macromolecules: potential tools and targets in cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainio, Annele; Järveläinen, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    Tumour cells create their own microenvironment where they closely interact with a variety of soluble and non-soluble molecules, different cells and numerous other components within the extracellular matrix (ECM). Interaction between tumour cells and the ECM is bidirectional leading to either progression or inhibition of tumourigenesis. Therefore, development of novel therapies targeted primarily to tumour microenvironment (TME) is highly rational. Here, we give a short overview of different macromolecules of the ECM and introduce mechanisms whereby they contribute to tumourigenesis within the TME. Furthermore, we present examples of individual ECM macromolecules as regulators of cell behaviour during tumourigenesis. Finally, we focus on novel strategies of using ECM macromolecules as tools or targets in cancer gene therapy in the future.

  7. Silicification and biosilicification: The role of macromolecules in bioinspired silica synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Siddharth Vijay

    Diatoms, sponges and grasses are all known to produce ornate biogenic silica structures under ambient conditions. Some aspects of the molecular mechanism controlling biosilicification have recently been elucidated. The entrapment of the catalyzing/templating/scaffolding biomacromolecules enables them to be recovered by selective dissolution of biosilica. The proteins extracted from the diatom Cylindrotheca fusiformis (silaffins) and the sponge Tethya aurantia (silicateins) have been shown to precipitate silica from silica precursors in vitro. The identification of synthetic macromolecules that can act as catalysts/templates/scaffolds for silica formation gives exciting possibilities for bioinspired silica synthesis. Herein, the role of various synthetic (bio)macromolecules in silicification is studied. Attempts have also been made to understand the mechanism(s) governing (bio)macromolecule mediated (bio)silicification. Furthermore, the results and the understanding gained from various synthetic systems are used to demonstrate the potential of such bioinspired routes to develop new materials.

  8. Global analysis of fluorescence decays to probe the internal dynamics of fluorescently labeled macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhamel, Jean

    2014-03-11

    The aim of this review is to introduce the reader first to the mathematical complexity associated with the analysis of fluorescence decays acquired with solutions of macromolecules labeled with a fluorophore and its quencher that are capable of interacting with each other via photophysical processes within the macromolecular volume, second to the experimental and mathematical approaches that have been proposed over the years to handle this mathematical complexity, and third to the information that one can expect to retrieve with respect to the internal dynamics of such fluorescently labeled macromolecules. In my view, the ideal fluorophore-quencher pair to use in studying the internal dynamics of fluorescently labeled macromolecules would involve a long-lived fluorophore, a fluorophore and a quencher that do not undergo energy migration, and a photophysical process that results in a change in fluorophore emission upon contact between the excited fluorophore and quencher. Pyrene, with its ability to form an excimer on contact between excited-state and ground-state species, happens to possess all of these properties. Although the concepts described in this review apply to any fluorophore and quencher pair sharing pyrene's exceptional photophysical properties, this review focuses on the study of pyrene-labeled macromolecules that have been characterized in great detail over the past 40 years and presents the main models that are being used today to analyze the fluorescence decays of pyrene-labeled macromolecules reliably. These models are based on Birks' scheme, the DMD model, the fluorescence blob model, and the model free analysis. The review also provides a step-by-step protocol that should enable the noneducated user to achieve a successful decay analysis exempt of artifacts. Finally, some examples of studies of pyrene-labeled macromolecules are also presented to illustrate the different types of information that can be retrieved from these fluorescence decay

  9. Hydrodynamic Forces on Macromolecules Protruding from Lipid Bilayers Due to External Liquid Flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönsson, Peter; Jönsson, Bengt

    2015-11-24

    It has previously been observed that an externally applied hydrodynamic shear flow above a fluid lipid bilayer can change the local concentration of macromolecules that are associated with the lipid bilayer. The external liquid flow results in a hydrodynamic force on molecules protruding from the lipid bilayer, causing them to move in the direction of the flow. However, there has been no quantitative study about the magnitude of these forces. We here use finite element simulations to investigate how the magnitude of the external hydrodynamic forces varies with the size and shape of the studied macromolecule. The simulations show that the hydrodynamic force is proportional to the effective hydrodynamic area of the studied molecule, Ahydro, multiplied by the mean hydrodynamic shear stress acting on the membrane surface, σhydro. The parameter Ahydro depends on the size and shape of the studied macromolecule above the lipid bilayer and scales with the cross-sectional area of the molecule. We also investigate how hydrodynamic shielding from other surrounding macromolecules decreases Ahydro when the surface coverage of the shielding macromolecules increases. Experiments where the protein streptavidin is anchored to a supported lipid bilayer on the floor of a microfluidic channel were finally performed at three different surface concentrations, Φ = 1%, 6%, and 10%, where the protein is being moved relative to the lipid bilayer by a liquid flow through the channel. From photobleaching measurements of fluorescently labeled streptavidin we found the experimental drift data to be within good accuracy of the simulated results, less than 12% difference, indicating the validity of the results obtained from the simulations. In addition to giving a deeper insight into how a liquid flow can affect membrane-associated molecules in a lipid bilayer, we also see an interesting potential of using hydrodynamic flow experiments together with the obtained results to study the size and

  10. Synthesis and Characterization of a Chondroitin Sulfate Based Hybrid Bio/Synthetic Biomimetic Aggrecan Macromolecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sumona

    Lower back pain resulting from intervertebral disc degeneration is one of the leading musculoskeletal disorders confronting our health system. In order to mechanically stabilize the disc early in the degenerative cascade and prevent the need for spinal fusion surgeries, we have proposed the development of a hybrid-bio/synthetic biomimetic proteoglycan macromolecule for injection into the disc in the early stages of degeneration. The goal of this thesis was to incorporate natural chondroitin sulfate (CS) chains into bottle brush polymer synthesis strategies for the fabrication of CS-macromolecules which mimic the proteoglycan structure and function while resisting enzymatic degradation. Both the "grafting-to" and "grafting-through" techniques of bottle brush synthesis were explored. CS was immobilized via a terminal primary amine onto a model polymeric backbone (polyacrylic acid) for investigation of the "grafting-to" strategy and an epoxy-amine step-growth polymerization technique was utilized for the "grafting-through" synthesis of CS-macromolecules with polyethylene glycol backbone segments. Incorporation of a synthetic polymeric backbone at the terminal amine of CS was confirmed via biochemical assays, 1H-NMR and FTIR spectroscopy, and CS-macromolecule size was demonstrated to be higher than that of natural CS via gel permeation chromatography, transmission electron microscopy and viscosity measurements. Further analysis of CS-macromolecule functionality indicated maintenance of natural CS properties such as high fixed charge density, high osmotic potential and low cytotoxicity with nucleus pulposus cells. These studies are the first attempt at the incorporation of natural CS into biomimetic bottle brush structures. CS-macromolecules synthesized via the methods developed in these studies may be utilized in the treatment and prevention of debilitating back pain as well as act as mimetics for other proteoglycans implicated in cartilage, heart valve, and nervous

  11. Single molecule optical measurements of orientation and rotations of biological macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroder, Deborah Y.; Lippert, Lisa G.; Goldman, Yale E.

    2016-12-01

    Subdomains of macromolecules often undergo large orientation changes during their catalytic cycles that are essential for their activity. Tracking these rearrangements in real time opens a powerful window into the link between protein structure and functional output. Site-specific labeling of individual molecules with polarized optical probes and measurement of their spatial orientation can give insight into the crucial conformational changes, dynamics, and fluctuations of macromolecules. Here we describe the range of single molecule optical technologies that can extract orientation information from these probes, review the relevant types of probes and labeling techniques, and highlight the advantages and disadvantages of these technologies for addressing specific inquiries.

  12. Templated and self-limiting calcite formation directed by coccolith organic macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Assaf; Wirth, Richard; Barkay, Zahava; Eliaz, Noam; Scheffel, André; Faivre, Damien

    2017-07-06

    The formation of intricately shaped crystalline minerals by organisms is orchestrated by specialized biomacromolecules. The macromolecules associated with coccoliths, nanometer-sized calcite crystal arrays produced by marine microalgae, can form a distinct calcium-rich phase via macromolecular recognition. Here, we show that this calcium-rich phase can be mineralized into a thin film of single-crystalline calcite by the balanced addition of carbonate ions. Such a crystallization process provides a strategy to direct crystalline products via local interactions between soluble macromolecules and compatible templates.

  13. Method for selective immobilization of macromolecules on self assembled monolayer surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskin, Julia [Richland, WA; Wang, Peng [Billerica, MA

    2011-11-29

    Disclosed is a method for selective chemical binding and immobilization of macromolecules on solid supports in conjunction with self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces. Immobilization involves selective binding of peptides and other macromolecules to SAM surfaces using reactive landing (RL) of mass-selected, gas phase ions. SAM surfaces provide a simple and convenient platform for tailoring chemical properties of a variety of substrates. The invention finds applications in biochemistry ranging from characterization of molecular recognition events at the amino acid level and identification of biologically active motifs in proteins, to development of novel biosensors and substrates for stimulated protein and cell adhesion.

  14. Click chemistry approach to functionalize two-dimensional macromolecules of graphene oxide nanosheets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Kou; Hongkun He; Chao Gao

    2010-01-01

    A facile “click chemistry” approach to functionalize 2D macromolecules of graphene oxide nanosheets with poly (ethylene glycol) of different molecular weights, polystyrene, palmitic acid and various amino acids was presented. FTIR, TGA, Raman spectroscopy, XPS, XRD, TEM, AFM and SEM were utilized to characterize the products. High degree of functionalization was achieved on the flat surfaces of graphene oxide, affording polymer-grafted 2D brushes and amino acids-immobilized nanosheets, which show improved solubility in organic solvents. The click chemistry strategy reported herein provides a facile and general method for functionalization of graphene oxide with macromolecules and desired biomolecules.

  15. A new bead-spring model for simulation of semi-flexible macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadat, Amir; Khomami, Bamin

    2016-11-01

    A bead-spring model for semi-flexible macromolecules is developed to overcome the deficiencies of the current coarse-grained bead-spring models. Specifically, model improvements are achieved through incorporation of a bending potential. The new model is designed to accurately describe the correlation along the backbone of the chain, segmental length, and force-extension behavior of the macromolecule even at the limit of 1 Kuhn step per spring. The relaxation time of different Rouse modes is used to demonstrate the capabilities of the new model in predicting chain dynamics.

  16. Dna Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  17. Induced liquid-crystalline ordering in solutions of stiff and flexible amphiphilic macromolecules: Effect of mixture composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glagolev, Mikhail K; Vasilevskaya, Valentina V; Khokhlov, Alexei R

    2016-07-28

    Impact of mixture composition on self-organization in concentrated solutions of stiff helical and flexible macromolecules was studied by means of molecular dynamics simulation. The macromolecules were composed of identical amphiphilic monomer units but a fraction f of macromolecules had stiff helical backbones and the remaining chains were flexible. In poor solvents the compacted flexible macromolecules coexist with bundles or filament clusters from few intertwined stiff helical macromolecules. The increase of relative content f of helical macromolecules leads to increase of the length of helical clusters, to alignment of clusters with each other, and then to liquid-crystalline-like ordering along a single direction. The formation of filament clusters causes segregation of helical and flexible macromolecules and the alignment of the filaments induces effective liquid-like ordering of flexible macromolecules. A visual analysis and calculation of order parameter relaying the anisotropy of diffraction allow concluding that transition from disordered to liquid-crystalline state proceeds sharply at relatively low content of stiff components.

  18. Visualization of recombinant DNA and protein complexes using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Patrick J M; Shannon, Morgan; Goertz, John

    2011-07-18

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows for the visualizing of individual proteins, DNA molecules, protein-protein complexes, and DNA-protein complexes. On the end of the microscope's cantilever is a nano-scale probe, which traverses image areas ranging from nanometers to micrometers, measuring the elevation of macromolecules resting on the substrate surface at any given point. Electrostatic forces cause proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids to loosely attach to the substrate in random orientations and permit imaging. The generated data resemble a topographical map, where the macromolecules resolve as three-dimensional particles of discrete sizes (Figure 1). Tapping mode AFM involves the repeated oscillation of the cantilever, which permits imaging of relatively soft biomaterials such as DNA and proteins. One of the notable benefits of AFM over other nanoscale microscopy techniques is its relative adaptability to visualize individual proteins and macromolecular complexes in aqueous buffers, including near-physiologic buffered conditions, in real-time, and without staining or coating the sample to be imaged. The method presented here describes the imaging of DNA and an immunoadsorbed transcription factor (i.e. the glucocorticoid receptor, GR) in buffered solution (Figure 2). Immunoadsorbed proteins and protein complexes can be separated from the immunoadsorbing antibody-bead pellet by competition with the antibody epitope and then imaged (Figure 2A). This allows for biochemical manipulation of the biomolecules of interest prior to imaging. Once purified, DNA and proteins can be mixed and the resultant interacting complex can be imaged as well. Binding of DNA to mica requires a divalent cation, such as Ni(2+) or Mg(2+), which can be added to sample buffers yet maintain protein activity. Using a similar approach, AFM has been utilized to visualize individual enzymes, including RNA polymerase and a repair enzyme, bound to individual DNA strands. These experiments provide

  19. From the Cover: Microfabricated needles for transdermal delivery of macromolecules and nanoparticles: Fabrication methods and transport studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Devin V.; Wang, Ping M.; Davis, Shawn P.; Park, Jung-Hwan; Canatella, Paul J.; Allen, Mark G.; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2003-11-01

    Arrays of micrometer-scale needles could be used to deliver drugs, proteins, and particles across skin in a minimally invasive manner. We therefore developed microfabrication techniques for silicon, metal, and biodegradable polymer microneedle arrays having solid and hollow bores with tapered and beveled tips and feature sizes from 1 to 1,000 μm. When solid microneedles were used, skin permeability was increased in vitro by orders of magnitude for macromolecules and particles up to 50 nm in radius. Intracellular delivery of molecules into viable cells was also achieved with high efficiency. Hollow microneedles permitted flow of microliter quantities into skin in vivo, including microinjection of insulin to reduce blood glucose levels in diabetic rats. transdermal drug delivery | skin | microelectromechanical systems | solid microneedle | hollow needle injection

  20. Effects of Several Natural Macromolecules on the Stability and Controlled Release Properties of Water-in-Oil-in-Water Emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinlong; Shi, Yiheng; Zhu, Yunping; Teng, Chao; Li, Xiuting

    2016-05-18

    Water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) emulsions are effective vehicles for embedding application of active compounds but limited by their thermodynamic instability and rapid release properties. The present study added bovine serum albumin, whey protein isolate, whey protein hydrolysate, sodium caseinate, carboxymethylcellulose sodium, fish gelatin, apple pectin, gum arabic, ι-carrageenan, and hydroxypropyl chitosan separately to the internal or external aqueous phase to investigate their effects on the physical stabilities and controlled release properties of W/O/W emulsions. The effects of the natural macromolecules in the internal and external aqueous phases were different and depended upon the macromolecule structure and its mass fraction. The addition of the natural macromolecule strengthened the interfaces of emulsions, which improved the physical stability. The natural macromolecules that improved the stability often did not improve controlled release. Therefore, the balance between these properties needs to be considered when adding natural macromolecules to a W/O/W emulsion.

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of Tailored Macromolecules via Stable Free Radical Polymerization Methodologies

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    The stable free radical polymerization methodology for production of controlled macromolecules was investigated using a novel monomer, 2-vinylnaphthalene. Initial polymerizations resulted in molecular weight distributions typical of conventional free radical polymerization techniques (>2.0). Manipulation of the initiator concentration and the molar ratio of initiator to nitroxide demonstrated no significant control over the resulting polymer products. Analysis of the polymerization kinetics...

  2. A novel method for imaging sites of paracellular passage of macromolecules in epithelial sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Jan F; Schmauder, Ralf; Krug, Susanne M; Gebert, Andreas; Schumann, Michael

    2016-05-10

    Understanding the dynamics of intestinal barrier function is key to elucidating oral delivery routes of therapeutics as well as to understanding various diseases that involve the mucosal immune system. Passage of macromolecules across barrier-forming epithelia is classically analyzed by means of various tracer flux measurements. This approach averages over contributions from many cells and lacks labeling of passage-sites. Thus, abundance and nature of involved cells have remained unidentified. We present a novel method that allowed for optical analysis of passage of various macromolecules on large-scale and single-cell level. To achieve tracking of passage loci in epithelia at submicrometer resolution we used biotinylated and fluorescent macromolecules that bind to basolateral membranes pre-labeled with cell-adherent avidin. We applied this method to epithelial cell lines and isolated mucosae in order to 3-dimensionally determine barrier leak properties over time. Tracer passage was found in all epithelia examined. However, it was infrequent, strikingly inhomogeneous, depended on culture duration and tightness of the monolayer. Stimulating passage with barrier-perturbing agents increased the number of leaks exposition time-dependently in cell lines and explanted mucosae. After stepwise opening of the paracellular passage pathway, integrated tracer-signal measured by our assay strictly correlated to simultaneously performed standard fluxes. Thus, our assay allows for the study of transepithelial macromolecule passage in various physiological and pathological conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. New strategy to create ultra-thin surface layer of grafted amphiphilic macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazutin, A A; Govorun, E N; Vasilevskaya, V V; Khokhlov, A R

    2015-05-14

    It was found first that macromolecules made of amphiphilic monomer units could form spontaneously an ultra-thin layer on the surface which the macromolecules are grafted to. The width of such layer is about double size of monomer unit consisting of hydrophilic A (repulsive) and hydrophobic (attractive) B beads. The hydrophilic A beads are connected in a polymer chain while hydrophobic B beads are attached to A beads of the backbone as side groups. Three characteristic regimes are distinguished. At low grafting density, the macromolecules form ultra-thin micelles of the shape changing with decrease of distance d between grafting points as following: circular micelles-prolonged micelles-inverse micelles-homogeneous bilayer. Those micelles have approximately constant height and specific top-down A-BB-A structure. At higher grafting density, the micelles start to appear above the single bilayer of amphiphilic macromolecules. The thickness of grafted layer in these cases is different in different regions of grafting surface. Only at rather high density of grafting, the height of macromolecular layer becomes uniform over the whole grafting surface. The study was performed by computer modeling experiments and confirmed in framework of analytical theory.

  4. Prospective frequency correction for macromolecule-suppressed GABA editing at 3T

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edden, Richard A E; Oeltzschner, Georg; Harris, Ashley D

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of B0 field offsets and drift on macromolecule (MM)-suppressed GABA-editing experiments, and to implement and test a prospective correction scheme. "Symmetric" editing schemes are proposed to suppress unwanted coedited MM signals in GABA editing. MATERIALS...

  5. Stress growth and relaxation of dendritically branched macromolecules in shear and uniaxial extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Qian; Costanzo, S.; Das, C.

    2017-01-01

    of the remarkable properties of these highly branched macromolecules. In particular, we address three questions pertinent to the specific molecular structure: (i) is steady state attainable during uniaxial extension? (ii) what is the respective transient response in simple shear? and (iii) how does stress relax...

  6. A Method for Decomposition of the Basic Reaction of Biological Macromolecules into Exponential Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabash, Yu M; Lyamets, A K

    2016-12-01

    The structural and dynamical properties of biological macromolecules under non-equilibrium conditions determine the kinetics of their basic reaction to external stimuli. This kinetics is multiexponential in nature. This is due to the operation of various subsystems in the structure of macromolecules, as well as the effect of the basic reaction on the structure of macromolecules. The situation can be interpreted as a manifestation of the stationary states of macromolecules, which are represented by monoexponential components of the basic reaction (Monod-Wyman-Changeux model) Monod et al. (J Mol Cell Biol 12:88-118, 1965). The representation of multiexponential kinetics of the basic reaction in the form of a sum of exponential functions [Formula: see text] is a multidimensional optimization problem. To solve this problem, a gradient method of optimization with software determination of the amount of exponents and reasonable calculation time is developed. This method is used to analyze the kinetics of photoinduced electron transport in the reaction centers (RC) of purple bacteria and the fluorescence induction in the granum thylakoid membranes which share a common function of converting light energy.

  7. Theory of Brushes Formed by Ψ-Shaped Macromolecules at Solid-Liquid Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhulina, Ekaterina B; Leermakers, Frans A M; Borisov, Oleg V

    2015-06-16

    We present a theoretical analysis targeted to describe the structural properties of brushes formed by Ψ-shaped macromolecules tethered by terminal segment of stem to planar surface while exposing multiple free branches to the surrounding solution. We use an analytical self-consistent field approach based on the strong stretching approximation, and the assumption of Gaussian elasticity for linear chain fragments of the tethered macromolecules. The effect of weak and strong polydispersity of branches is analyzed. In the case of weakly polydisperse macromolecules, variations in length of branches lead to a more uniform polymer density distribution with slight increase in the brush thickness compared to the case of monodisperse chains with the same degree of polymerization. We demonstrate that in contrast to linear chains, strong polydispersity of Ψ-shaped macromolecules does not necessarily lead to strong perturbations in polymer density distribution. In particular, mixed brushes of the so-called "mirror" dendrons (in which number of stem monomers in one component coincides with number of monomers in a branch of the other component, and vice versa) give rise to a unified polymer density distribution with shape independent of the brush composition. The predictions of analytical theory are systematically compared to the results of numerical self-consistent field modeling based on the Scheutjens-Fleer approach.

  8. Preface: Special Topic on Coarse Graining of Macromolecules, Biopolymers, and Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Christian; Gompper, Gerhard; Dill, Ken A

    2015-12-28

    This special issue highlights new developments in theory and coarse-graining in biological and synthetic macromolecules and membranes. Such approaches give unique insights into the principles and design of the structures, dynamics, and assembly processes of these complex fluids and soft materials, where the length and time scales are often prohibitively long for fully atomistic modeling.

  9. Preface: Special Topic on Coarse Graining of Macromolecules, Biopolymers, and Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, Christian [Institut für Computerphysik, Universität Stuttgart, Allmandring 3, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Gompper, Gerhard [Theoretical Soft Matter and Biophysics, Institute of Complex Systems and Institute for Advanced Simulation, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52428 Jülich (Germany); Dill, Ken A. [Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    This special issue highlights new developments in theory and coarse-graining in biological and synthetic macromolecules and membranes. Such approaches give unique insights into the principles and design of the structures, dynamics, and assembly processes of these complex fluids and soft materials, where the length and time scales are often prohibitively long for fully atomistic modeling.

  10. Distribution of various forms of organic nitrogen in a lignite macromolecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Polovetskaya, O.S.; Shavyrina, O.A.; Ryl' tsova, S.V. [Lev Tolstoi State Pedalogical University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    The chemical composition of organic bases from tars of stepwise semicoking of lignite was studied. The features of distribution of organic nitrogen in a coal macromolecule and the most probable pathways of thermal degradation of the nitrogen-containing fragments were examined.

  11. Advances in industrial prospective of cellulosic macromolecules enriched banana biofibre resources: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappu, Asokan; Patil, Vikas; Jain, Sonal; Mahindrakar, Amit; Haque, Ruhi; Thakur, Vijay Kumar

    2015-08-01

    Biological macromolecules enriched resources are rapidly emerging as sustainable, cost effective and environmental friendly materials for several industrial applications. Among different biological macromolecules enriched resources, banana fibres are one of the unexplored high potential bio-resources. Compared to various natural fibres such as jute, coir, palm etc., the banana fibres exhibits a better tensile strength i.e. 458 MPa with 17.14 GPa tensile modulus. Traditionally used petroleum based synthetic fibres have been proven to be toxic, non-biodegradable and energy intensive for manufacturing. Cellulosic banana fibres are potential engineering materials having considerable scope to be used as an environmental friendly reinforcing element for manufacturing of polymer based green materials. This paper summarizes the world scenario of current production of biological macromolecules rich banana residues and fibres; major user's of banana fibres. The quality and quantity of biological macromolecules especially the cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, wax, engineering and mechanical properties of banana biofibre resources are reported and discussed. Subsequently, the findings of the recent research on bio resource composites, materials performance and opportunities have been discussed which would be a real challenge for the tomorrow world to enhance the livelihood environmental friendly advancement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Classification of the ejection mechanisms of charged macromolecules from liquid droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consta, Styliani; Malevanets, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    The relation between the charge state of a macromolecule and its ejection mechanism from droplets is one of the important questions in electrospray ionization methods. In this article, effects of solvent-solute interaction on the manifestation of the charge induced instability in a droplet are examined. We studied the instabilities in a prototype system of a droplet comprised of charged poly(ethylene glycol) and methanol, acetonitrile, and water solvents. We observed instances of three, previously only conjectured, [S. Consta, J. Phys. Chem. B 114, 5263 (2010), 10.1021/jp912119v] mechanisms of macroion ejection. The mechanism of ejection of charged macroion in methanol is reminiscent of "pearl" model in polymer physics. In acetonitrile droplets, the instability manifests through formation of solvent spines around the solvated macroion. In water, we find that the macroion is ejected from the droplet through contiguous extrusion of a part of the chain. The difference in the morphology of the instabilities is attributed to the interplay between forces arising from the macroion solvation energy and the surface energy of the droplet interface. For the contiguous extrusion of a charged macromolecule from a droplet, we demonstrate that the proposed mechanism leads to ejection of the macromolecule from droplets with sizes well below the Rayleigh limit. The ejected macromolecule may hold charge significantly higher than that suggested by prevailing theories. The simulations reveal new mechanisms of macroion evaporation that differ from conventional charge residue model and ion evaporation mechanisms.

  13. A Method for Decomposition of the Basic Reaction of Biological Macromolecules into Exponential Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabash, Yu. M.; Lyamets, A. K.

    2016-12-01

    The structural and dynamical properties of biological macromolecules under non-equilibrium conditions determine the kinetics of their basic reaction to external stimuli. This kinetics is multiexponential in nature. This is due to the operation of various subsystems in the structure of macromolecules, as well as the effect of the basic reaction on the structure of macromolecules. The situation can be interpreted as a manifestation of the stationary states of macromolecules, which are represented by monoexponential components of the basic reaction (Monod-Wyman-Changeux model) Monod et al. (J Mol Cell Biol 12:88-118, 1965). The representation of multiexponential kinetics of the basic reaction in the form of a sum of exponential functions (A(t)={sum}_{i=1}^n{a}_i{e}^{-{k}_it}) is a multidimensional optimization problem. To solve this problem, a gradient method of optimization with software determination of the amount of exponents and reasonable calculation time is developed. This method is used to analyze the kinetics of photoinduced electron transport in the reaction centers (RC) of purple bacteria and the fluorescence induction in the granum thylakoid membranes which share a common function of converting light energy.

  14. A chip sustem for size separation of macromolecules and particles by hydrodynamic chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chmela, Emil; Tijssen, Robert; Blom, M.T.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; van den Berg, Albert

    2002-01-01

    For the first time, a miniaturized hydrodynamic chromatography chip system has been developed and tested on separation of fluorescent nanospheres and macromolecules. The device can be applied to size characterization of synthetic polymers, biopolymers, and particles, as an attractive alternative to

  15. Hollow fiber membrane modification with functional zwitterionic macromolecules for improved thromboresistance in artificial lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Sang-Ho; Arazawa, David T; Zhu, Yang; Shankarraman, Venkat; Malkin, Alexander D; Kimmel, Jeremy D; Gamble, Lara J; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Federspiel, William J; Wagner, William R

    2015-03-03

    Respiratory assist devices seek optimized performance in terms of gas transfer efficiency and thromboresistance to minimize device size and reduce complications associated with inadequate blood biocompatibility. The exchange of gas with blood occurs at the surface of the hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) used in these devices. In this study, three zwitterionic macromolecules were attached to HFM surfaces to putatively improve thromboresistance: (1) carboxyl-functionalized zwitterionic phosphorylcholine (PC) and (2) sulfobetaine (SB) macromolecules (mPC or mSB-COOH) prepared by a simple thiol-ene radical polymerization and (3) a low-molecular weight sulfobetaine (SB)-co-methacrylic acid (MA) block copolymer (SBMAb-COOH) prepared by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Each macromolecule type was covalently immobilized on an aminated commercial HFM (Celg-A) by a condensation reaction, and HFM surface composition changes were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Thrombotic deposition on the HFMs was investigated after contact with ovine blood in vitro. The removal of CO2 by the HFMs was also evaluated using a model respiratory assistance device. The HFMs conjugated with zwitterionic macromolecules (Celg-mPC, Celg-mSB, and Celg-SBMAb) showed expected increases in phosphorus or sulfur surface content. Celg-mPC and Celg-SBMAb experienced rates of platelet deposition significantly lower than those of unmodified (Celg-A, >95% reduction) and heparin-coated (>88% reduction) control HFMs. Smaller reductions were seen with Celg-mSB. The CO2 removal rate for Celg-SBMAb HFMs remained comparable to that of Celg-A. In contrast, the rate of removal of CO2 for heparin-coated HFMs was significantly reduced. The results demonstrate a promising approach to modifying HFMs using zwitterionic macromolecules for artificial lung devices with improved thromboresistance without degradation of gas transfer.

  16. Reading polymers: sequencing of natural and synthetic macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Hatice; Lutz, Jean-François

    2014-11-24

    The sequencing of biopolymers such as proteins and DNA is among the most significant scientific achievements of the 20th century. Indeed, modern chemical methods for sequence analysis allow reading and understanding the codes of life. Thus, sequencing methods currently play a major role in applications as diverse as genomics, gene therapy, biotechnology, and data storage. However, in terms of fundamental science, sequencing is not really a question of molecular biology but rather a more general topic in macromolecular chemistry. Broadly speaking, it can be defined as the analysis of comonomer sequences in copolymers. However, relatively different approaches have been used in the past to study monomer sequences in biological and manmade polymers. Yet, these "cultural" differences are slowly fading away with the recent development of synthetic sequence-controlled polymers. In this context, the aim of this Minireview is to present an overview of the tools that are currently available for sequence analysis in macromolecular science. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Amelioration of oxidative stress in bio-membranes and macromolecules by non-toxic dye from Morinda tinctoria (Roxb.) roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakta, Dipita; Siva, Ramamoorthy

    2012-06-01

    Plant dyes have been in use for coloring and varied purposes since prehistoric times. A red dye found in the roots of plants belonging to genus Morinda is a well recognized coloring ingredient. The dye fraction obtained from the methanolic extract of the roots of Morinda tinctoria was explored for its role in attenuating damages caused by H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress. The antioxidant potential of the dye fraction was assessed through DPPH radical scavenging, deoxyribose degradation and inhibition of lipid peroxidation in mice liver. It was subsequently screened for its efficiency in extenuating damage incurred to biomembrane (using erythrocytes and their ghost membranes) and macromolecules (pBR322 DNA, lipids and proteins) from exposure to hydrogen peroxide. In addition, the non-toxic nature of the dye was supported by the histological evaluation conducted on the tissue sections from the major organs of Swiss Albino mice as well as effect on Hep3B cell line (human hepatic carcinoma). The LC-MS confirms the dye fraction to be morindone. Our study strongly suggests that morindone present in the root extracts of M. tinctoria, in addition to being a colorant, definitely holds promise in the pharmaceutical industry.

  18. Permselectivity of the liver blood-lymph (ascitic fluid) barrier to macromolecules in decompensated cirrhosis: relation to calculated pore-size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1983-01-01

    ) exchange of endogeneous macromolecules. A significant 'sieving' is present in this barrier to the largest macromolecule (IgM). Calculations of pore-size equivalent to the observed permselectivity of macromolecules suggest microvascular gaps (or channels) with an average radius about 300 A, i...

  19. Methods and compositions for targeting macromolecules into the nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chook, Yuh Min

    2013-06-25

    The present invention includes compositions, methods and kits for directing an agent across the nuclear membrane of a cell. The present invention includes a Karyopherin beta2 translocation motif in a polypeptide having a slightly positively charged region or a slightly hydrophobic region and one or more R/K/H-X.sub.(2-5)-P-Y motifs. The polypeptide targets the agent into the cell nucleus.

  20. Hydroxycinnamic acids are ester-linked directly to glucosyl moieties within the lignan macromolecule from flaxseed hulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struijs, Karin; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Verhoef, René; Voragen, Alphons G J; Gruppen, Harry

    2008-03-01

    In flaxseed hulls, lignans are present in an oligomeric structure. Secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG), ester-linked to hydroxy-methyl-glutaric acid (HMGA), forms the backbone of this lignan macromolecule. The hydroxycinnamic acids p-coumaric acid glucoside (CouAG) and ferulic acid glucoside (FeAG) are also part of the lignan macromolecule. However, their position and type of linkage are still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate how CouAG and FeAG are linked within the lignan macromolecule from flaxseed hulls. Fragments of the lignan macromolecule were obtained by partial saponification. After isolation of the fragments by preparative RP-HPLC, several key structures were identified by MS and NMR. Within the lignan macromolecule, CouAG is attached to the C-6 position of a glucosyl moiety of SDG. FeA is linked to the C-2 position of a glucosyl moiety of SDG. FeAG is ester-linked within the lignan macromolecule with its carboxyl group, but it remains unclear whether FeAG links to the C-2 or C-6 position of SDG. Attachment of HMGA to the glucosyl moiety of CouAG or FeAG was not observed. The results clearly show that within the lignan macromolecule, the hydroxycinnamic acids are linked directly via an ester bond to the glucosyl moiety of SDG.

  1. Bimane Derivatives as Fluorescent Probes for Biological Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    with mBBr . 9 Suitable samples include sections of frozen tissues dried and fixed on slides and paraffin sections of fixed tis- sues, after treatment ...slides are treated only with DTT and washed prior to mBBr treatment . 9 Analytical Drocedures Spectroscopic data for bramobimanes and bimane-labeled...Kosower and Kosower three brcmobimanes for fluorescent labeling of biological systems. The three *: bromobimanes,2 6 mBBr (1), bBBr (2) and q8Br (3

  2. Complete nucleotide sequences and construction of full-length infectious cDNA clones of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) in a versatile newly developed binary vector including both 35S and T7 promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan-Hwan; Ju, Hye-Kyoung; Han, Jae-Yeong; Park, Jong-Seo; Kim, Ik-Hyun; Seo, Eun-Young; Kim, Jung-Kyu; Hammond, John; Lim, Hyoun-Sub

    2017-04-01

    Seed-transmitted viruses have caused significant damage to watermelon crops in Korea in recent years, with cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) infection widespread as a result of infected seed lots. To determine the likely origin of CGMMV infection, we collected CGMMV isolates from watermelon and melon fields and generated full-length infectious cDNA clones. The full-length cDNAs were cloned into newly constructed binary vector pJY, which includes both the 35S and T7 promoters for versatile usage (agroinfiltration and in vitro RNA transcription) and a modified hepatitis delta virus ribozyme sequence to precisely cleave RNA transcripts at the 3' end of the tobamovirus genome. Three CGMMV isolates (OMpj, Wpj, and Mpj) were separately evaluated for infectivity in Nicotiana benthamiana, demonstrated by either Agroinfiltration or inoculation with in vitro RNA transcripts. CGMMV nucleotide identities to other tobamoviruses were calculated from pairwise alignments using DNAMAN. CGMMV identities were 49.89% to tobacco mosaic virus; 49.85% to pepper mild mottle virus; 50.47% to tomato mosaic virus; 60.9% to zucchini green mottle mosaic virus; and 60.96% to kyuri green mottle mosaic virus, confirming that CGMMV is a distinct species most similar to other cucurbit-infecting tobamoviruses. We further performed phylogenetic analysis to determine relationships of our new Korean CGMMV isolates to previously characterized isolates from Canada, China, India, Israel, Japan, Korea, Russia, Spain, and Taiwan available from NCBI. Analysis of CGMMV amino acid sequences showed three major clades, broadly typified as 'Russian,' 'Israeli,' and 'Asian' groups. All of our new Korean isolates fell within the 'Asian' clade. Neither the 128 nor 186 kDa RdRps of the three new isolates showed any detectable gene silencing suppressor function.

  3. Marine-derived biological macromolecule-based biomaterials for wound healing and skin tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandika, Pathum; Ko, Seok-Chun; Jung, Won-Kyo

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex biological process that depends on the wound condition, the patient's health, and the physicochemical support given through external materials. The development of bioactive molecules and engineered tissue substitutes to provide physiochemical support to enhance the wound healing process plays a key role in advancing wound-care management. Thus, identification of ideal molecules in wound treatment is still in progress. The discovery of natural products that contain ideal molecules for skin tissue regeneration has been greatly advanced by exploration of the marine bioenvironment. Consequently, tremendously diverse marine organisms have become a great source of numerous biological macromolecules that can be used to develop tissue-engineered substitutes with wound healing properties. This review summarizes the wound healing process, the properties of macromolecules from marine organisms, and the involvement of these molecules in skin tissue regeneration applications.

  4. Mitochondrial transit peptide exhibits cell penetration ability and efficiently delivers macromolecules to mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Aastha; Chugh, Archana

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial malfunction under various circumstances can lead to a variety of disorders. Effective targeting of macromolecules (drugs) is important for restoration of mitochondrial function and treatment of related disorders. We have designed a novel cell-penetrating mitochondrial transit peptide (CpMTP) for delivery of macromolecules to mitochondria. Comparison between properties of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and mitochondrial signal sequences enabled prediction of peptides with dual ability for cellular translocation and mitochondrial localization. Among the predicted peptides, CpMTP translocates across HeLa cells and shows successful delivery of noncovalently conjugated cargo molecules to mitochondria. CpMTP may have applications in transduction and transfection of mitochondria for therapeutics. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  5. Recent Progress in the Design of Monodisperse, Sequence-Defined Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solleder, Susanne C; Schneider, Rebekka V; Wetzel, Katharina S; Boukis, Andreas C; Meier, Michael A R

    2017-05-01

    This review describes different synthetic strategies towards sequence-defined, monodisperse macromolecules, which are built up by iterative approaches and lead to linear non-natural polymer structures. The review is divided in three parts: solution phase-, solid phase-, and fluorous- and polymer-tethered approaches. Moreover, synthesis procedures leading to conjugated and non-conjugated macromolecules are considered and discussed in the respective sections. A major focus in the evaluation is the applicability of the different approaches in polymer chemistry. In this context, simple procedures for monomer and oligomer synthesis, overall yields, scalability, purity of the oligomers, and the achievable level of control (side-chains, backbone, stereochemistry) are important benchmarks. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Encoding of Primary Structures of Biological Macromolecules Within a Data Mining Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mondher Maddouri; Mourad Elloumi

    2004-01-01

    An encoding method has a direct effect on the quality and the representation of the discovered knowledge in data mining systems. Biological macromolecules are encoded by strings of characters, called primary structures. Knowing that data mining systems usually use relational tables to encode data, we have then to reencode these strings and transform them into relational tables. In this paper, we do a comparative study of the existing static encoding methods, that are based on the Biologist know-how, and our new dynamic encoding one,that is based on the construction of Discriminant and Minimal Substrings (DMS). Different classification methods are used to do this study. The experimental results show that our dynamic encoding method is more efficient than the static ones, to encode biological macromolecules within a data mining perspective.

  7. Synthesis and mechanisms of formation of polymers composed of different macromolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korshak, V.V.; Askadskii, A.A.; Vointseva, I.I.; Mustafaeva, B.B.; Slonimskii, G.L.; Suprun, A.P.

    1983-02-01

    The fundamental possibility of synthesizing soluble and fusible aggregates of different macromolecules was discovered in the reaction of chlorinated and aromatic polymers under the conditions of the Friedel-Crafts reaction. Such an approach opens the prospects of combining in one macromolecule two or more different types of chain, and of the synthesis of polymers with a new combination of properties. In this reaction poly-1,1,2-trichlorobutadiene (PTCB) and polyvinylcholoride can be used as chlorine-containing compounds, and polystyrene (PS), poly-..cap alpha..-methyl-styrene, polyarylates, polycarbonates, etc., as the aromatic polymers. The mechanism of the reaction of chlorinated and aromatic polymers was studied with PTCB and PS as the model pair of polymers.

  8. Spreading of a chain macromolecule onto a cell membrane by a computer simulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jun; Pandey, Ras

    2002-03-01

    Computer simulations are performed to study conformation and dynamics of a relatively large chain macromolecule at the surface of a model membrane - a preliminary attempt to ultimately realistic model for protein on a cell membrane. We use a discrete lattice of size Lx × L × L. The chain molecule of length Lc is modeled by consecutive nodes connected by bonds on the trail of a random walk with appropriate constraints such as excluded volume, energy dependent configurational bias, etc. Monte Carlo method is used to move chains via segmental dynamics, i.e., end-move, kink-jump, crank-shaft, reptation, etc. Membrane substrate is designed by a self-assemble biased short chains on a substrate. Large chain molecule is then driven toward the membrane by a field. We investigate the dynamics of chain macromolecule, spread of its density, and conformation.

  9. Load-release of small and macromolecules from elastomers with reversible gyroid mesoporosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Fengxiao; Schulte, Lars; Ndoni, Sokol

    2012-01-01

    . However, in the gel state in the presence of a good solvent the swollen matrix did show a nanoporous structure originated from the gyroid block copolymer precursor. Nanopores can be opened or closed depending on the presence or absence of a solvent. Macromolecules like PEG of different molecular weights...... or small molecules like the surfactant SDS were loaded into the opened nanoporous matrix in the presence of a solvent and remained trapped. The loaded molecules could be released again in the presence of a solvent. The load and release of the molecules in deuterated form were monitored by in situ time......-resolved small angle neutron scattering, SANS. The bicontinuous gyroid pore structure is accessible to macromolecules without the need for sample pre-alignment. The materials presented here are model systems for a novel type of load-delivery systems that could show great potential in e.g. diagnostics or drug...

  10. Ultrasound-enhanced penetration through sclera depends on frequency of sonication and size of macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Ying; Suen, Wai Leung Langston; Tse, Ho Yan; Wong, Hoi Sang

    2017-03-30

    We previously employed ultrasound as a needleless approach to deliver macromolecules via the transscleral route to the back of the eye in live animals (Suen et al., 2013). Here, we investigated the nature of the ultrasound-enhanced transport through sclera, the outermost barrier in the transscleral route. Thus, the possible role of cavitation from ultrasound was explored; its effect during and after sonication on scleral penetration was measured; and the dependence on the size of macromolecules was determined. We applied ultrasound frequency from 40kHz to 3MHz at ISATA (spatial-average-temporal-average intensity) of 0.05W/cm(2) to fresh rabbit sclera ex vivo. Fluorescent dextran of size 20kDa to 150kDa was used as macromolecular probes. We measured the distance of penetration of the probes through the sclera over 30s during sonication and over 15min after sonication from cryosectioned tissue images. Deeper penetration in the sclera was observed with decreasing frequency. The presence of stable cavitation was further verified by passive acoustic detection. The effect during sonication increased penetration distance up to 20 fold and was limited to macromolecular probes ≤70kDa. The effect post sonication increased penetration distance up to 3 fold and attributed to the improved intrasscleral transport of macromolecules ≥70kDa. Post-sonication enhancement diminished gradually in 3h. As the extent of cavitation increased with decreasing frequency, the trend observed supports the contribution of (stable) cavitation to enhancing transport through sclera. Effect during sonication was attributed to flow associated with acoustic microstreaming. Effect post sonication was attributed to the temporary increase in scleral permeability. Flow-associated effect was more pronounced but only applied to smaller macromolecules. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Bioinformatic science and devices for computer analysis and visualization of macromolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.B. Porozov

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The goals and objectives of bioinformatic science are presented in the article. The main methods and approaches used in computer biology are highlighted. Areas in which bioinformatic science can greatly facilitate and speed up the work of practical biologist and pharmacologist are revealed. The features of both the basic packages and software devices for complete, thorough analysis of macromolecules and for development and modeling of ligands and binding centers are described

  12. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation in the study of water-soluble macromolecules

    OpenAIRE

    Yohannes, Gebrenegus

    2007-01-01

    Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF) was constructed, and its applicability to industrial, biochemical, and pharmaceutical applications was studied. The effect of several parameters, such as pH, ionic strength, temperature and the reactants mixing ratios on the particle sizes, molar masses, and the formation of aggregates of macromolecules was determined by AsFlFFF. In the case of industrial application AsFlFFF proved to be a valuable tool in the characterization of the hydrod...

  13. RNautophagy/DNautophagy possesses selectivity for RNA/DNA substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hase, Katsunori; Fujiwara, Yuuki; Kikuchi, Hisae; Aizawa, Shu; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Wada, Keiji; Kabuta, Tomohiro

    2015-07-27

    Lysosomes can degrade various biological macromolecules, including nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. Recently, we identified novel nucleic acid-degradation systems termed RNautophagy/DNautophagy (abbreviated as RDA), in which RNA and DNA are directly taken up by lysosomes in an ATP-dependent manner and degraded. We also found that a lysosomal membrane protein, LAMP2C, the cytoplasmic region of which binds to RNA and DNA, functions, at least in part, as an RNA/DNA receptor in the process of RDA. However, it has been unclear whether RDA possesses selectivity for RNA/DNA substrates and the RNA/DNA sequences that are recognized by LAMP2C have not been determined. In the present study, we found that the cytosolic region of LAMP2C binds to poly-G/dG, but not to poly-A/dA, poly-C/dC, poly-dT or poly-U. Consistent with this binding activity, poly-G/dG was transported into isolated lysosomes via RDA, while poly-A/dA, poly-C/dC, poly-dT and poly-U were not. GGGGGG or d(GGGG) sequences are essential for the interaction between poly-G/dG and LAMP2C. In addition to poly-G/dG, G/dG-rich sequences, such as a repeated GGGGCC sequence, interacted with the cytosolic region of LAMP2C. Our findings indicate that RDA does possess selectivity for RNA/DNA substrates and that at least some consecutive G/dG sequence(s) can mediate RDA. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Application of Symmetry Adapted Function Method for Three-Dimensional Reconstruction of Octahedral Biological Macromolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songjun Zeng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for three-dimensional (3D reconstruction of macromolecule assembles, that is, octahedral symmetrical adapted functions (OSAFs method, was introduced in this paper and a series of formulations for reconstruction by OSAF method were derived. To verify the feasibility and advantages of the method, two octahedral symmetrical macromolecules, that is, heat shock protein Degp24 and the Red-cell L Ferritin, were utilized as examples to implement reconstruction by the OSAF method. The schedule for simulation was designed as follows: 2000 random orientated projections of single particles with predefined Euler angles and centers of origins were generated, then different levels of noises that is signal-to-noise ratio (S/N =0.1,0.5, and 0.8 were added. The structures reconstructed by the OSAF method were in good agreement with the standard models and the relative errors of the structures reconstructed by the OSAF method to standard structures were very little even for high level noise. The facts mentioned above account for that the OSAF method is feasible and efficient approach to reconstruct structures of macromolecules and have ability to suppress the influence of noise.

  15. Prevention of H-Aggregates Formation in Cy5 Labeled Macromolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Kang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available H-aggregates of the cyanine dye Cy5 are formed during covalent linkage to the cationic macromolecule Poly(allylamine (PAH. The nonfluorescent H-aggregates strongly restrict the usage of the dye for analytical purposes and prevent a quantitative determination of the labeled macromolecules. The behavior of the H-aggregates has been studied by investigation of the absorption and fluorescence spectra of the dye polymer in dependence on solvent, label degree and additional sulfonate groups. H-aggregate formation is caused by an inhomogeneous distribution of the Cy5 molecules on the polymer chain. The H-aggregates can be destroyed by conformational changes of the PAH induced by interactions with polyanions or in organic solvents. It has been found that the polymer labeling process in high content of organic solvents can prevent the formation of H-aggregates. The results offer a better understanding and improvement of the use of the Cy5 dye for labeling purposes in fluorescence detection of macromolecules.

  16. Synthetic mimetics of the endogenous gastrointestinal nanomineral: Silent constructs that trap macromolecules for intracellular delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pele, Laetitia C; Haas, Carolin T; Hewitt, Rachel E; Robertson, Jack; Skepper, Jeremy; Brown, Andy; Hernandez-Garrido, Juan Carlos; Midgley, Paul A; Faria, Nuno; Chappell, Helen; Powell, Jonathan J

    2017-02-01

    Amorphous magnesium-substituted calcium phosphate (AMCP) nanoparticles (75-150nm) form constitutively in large numbers in the mammalian gut. Collective evidence indicates that they trap and deliver luminal macromolecules to mucosal antigen presenting cells (APCs) and facilitate gut immune homeostasis. Here, we report on a synthetic mimetic of the endogenous AMCP and show that it has marked capacity to trap macromolecules during formation. Macromolecular capture into AMCP involved incorporation as shown by STEM tomography of the synthetic AMCP particle with 5nm ultra-fine iron (III) oxohydroxide. In vitro, organic cargo-loaded synthetic AMCP was taken up by APCs and tracked to lysosomal compartments. The AMCP itself did not regulate any gene, or modify any gene regulation by its cargo, based upon whole genome transcriptomic analyses. We conclude that synthetic AMCP can efficiently trap macromolecules and deliver them to APCs in a silent fashion, and may thus represent a new platform for antigen delivery. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Structure-Correlation NMR Spectroscopy for Macromolecules Using Repeated Bidirectional Photoisomerization of Azobenzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Toshio; Ueda, Keisuke; Nishimura, Chiaki; Yamazaki, Toshio

    2015-11-17

    Control over macromolecular structure offers bright potentials for manipulation of macromolecular functions. We here present structure-correlation NMR spectroscopy to analyze the correlation between polymorphic macromolecular structures driven by photoisomerization of azobenzene. The structural conversion of azobenzene was induced within the mixing time of a NOESY experiment using a colored light source, and the reverse structural conversion was induced during the relaxation delay using a light source of another color. The correlation spectrum between trans- and cis-azobenzene was then obtained. To maximize the efficiency of the bidirectional photoisomerization of azobenzene-containing macromolecules, we developed a novel light-irradiation NMR sample tube and method for irradiating target molecules in an NMR radio frequency (rf) coil. When this sample tube was used for photoisomerization of an azobenzene derivative at a concentration of 0.2 mM, data collection with reasonable sensitivity applicable to macromolecules was achieved. We performed isomerization of an azobenzene-cross-linked peptide within the mixing time of a NOESY experiment that produced cross-peaks between helix and random-coil forms of the peptide. Thus, these results indicate that macromolecular structure manipulation can be incorporated into an NMR pulse sequence using an azobenzene derivative and irradiation with light of two types of wavelengths, providing a new method for structural analysis of metastable states of macromolecules.

  18. Nasal Absorption of Macromolecules from Powder Formulations and Effects of Sodium Carboxymethyl Cellulose on Their Absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Akiko; Furubayashi, Tomoyuki; Matsushita, Akifumi; Inoue, Daisuke; Kimura, Shunsuke; Katsumi, Hidemasa; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The nasal absorption of macromolecules from powder formulations and the effect of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC-Na) as a pharmaceutical excipient on their absorption were studied. Model macromolecules were fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran (average molecular weight of 4.4kDa, FD4) and insulin. The plasma concentration of FD4 after application of the powder containing 50% starch (control) was higher than that after application of the solution, and the absorption from 50% starch powder was enhanced by the substitution of starch with CMC-Na. The fractional absorption of FD4 after administration of the CMC-Na powder formulation was 30% and 40% higher than that after administration from the solution and the starch powder, respectively. The nasal absorption of insulin from the powder and the effect of CMC-Na were similar with those of FD4. The effective absorption of FD4 and insulin after application of powder with CMC-Na could be due to the increase in the nasal residence of FD4 and insulin. No damage in the nasal mucosa or dysfunction of the mucociliary clearance was observed after application of the drug powder and CMC-Na. The present findings indicate that nasal delivery of powder formulations with the addition of CMC-Na as an excipient is a promising approach for improving the nasal absorption of macromolecules.

  19. Ordinary-extraordinary transition in dynamics of solutions of charged macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2016-10-24

    The occurrence of the ubiquitous and intriguing "ordinary-extraordinary" behavior of dynamics in solutions of charged macromolecules is addressed theoretically by explicitly considering counterions around the macromolecules. The collective and coupled dynamics of macromolecules and their counterion clouds in salt-free conditions are shown to lead to the "ordinary" behavior (also called the "fast" mode) where diffusion coefficients are independent of molar mass and polymer concentration and are comparable to those of isolated metallic ions in aqueous media, in agreement with experimental facts observed repeatedly over the past four decades. The dipoles arising from adsorbed counterions on polymer backbones can form many pairwise physical cross-links, leading to microgel-like aggregates. Balancing the swelling from excluded volume effects and counterion pressure with elasticity of the microgel, we show that there is a threshold value of a combination of polymer concentration and electrolyte concentration for the occurrence of the "extraordinary" phase (also called the "slow" mode) and the predicted properties of diffusion coefficient for this phase are in qualitative agreement with well-known experimental data.

  20. Immunomodulatory Properties of Taranjebin (Camel's Thorn) Manna and Its Isolated Carbohydrate Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedi, Azadeh; Farjadian, Shirin; Karami, Mohammad Reza

    2015-10-01

    Taranjebin manna is a substance produced by Poophilus nebulosus Leth. (Aphrophoridae) larva that feed from host plant Alhagi maurorum (Leguminosae). In Persian ethnomedicine, it is used as an antipyretic, antiviral, antimicrobial, demulcent, and adaptogen. But it is contraindicated in acute fever and some infections. This controversy might be due to its immunomodulatory properties. This study evaluated immunomodulatory properties of Taranjebin and its macromolecules. Taranjebin solution was prepared as described in traditional literature. After dialysis and precipitation, the macromolecules were isolated on DEAE Sephadex A-25. The cytotoxic/proliferative properties of Taranjebin and its isolated macromolecules on human Jurkat E6.1 cells were investigated (15.62-1000 μg/mL) using WST-1 reagent. Three of 4 isolated acidic polysaccharides inhibited the proliferation of Jurkat cells in a dose-dependent manner at concentrations higher than 31.25 μg/mL (IC50 range of 44.81-147.97 μg/mL). The crude aqueous Taranjebin solution had proliferative effects. These results indicate the immunomodulatory properties of Taranjebin. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Silica-based systems for oral delivery of drugs, macromolecules and cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diab, Roudayna; Canilho, Nadia; Pavel, Ileana A; Haffner, Fernanda B; Girardon, Maxime; Pasc, Andreea

    2017-04-20

    According to the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Food Safety Authority, amorphous forms of silica and silicates are generally recognized to be safe as oral delivery ingredients in amounts up to 1500mg per day. Silica is used in the formulation of solid dosage forms, e.g. tablets, as glidant or lubricant. The synthesis of silica-based materials depends on the payload nature, drug, macromolecule or cell, and on the target release (active or passive). In the literature, most of the examples deal with the encapsulation of drugs in mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Still to date limited reports concerning the delivery of encapsulated macromolecules and cells have been reported in the field of oral delivery, despite the multiple promising examples demonstrating the compatibility of the sol-gel route with biological entities, likewise the interest of silica as an oral carrier. Silica diatoms appear as an elegant, cost-effective and promising alternative to synthetic sol-gel-based materials. This review reports the latest advances silica-based systems and discusses the potential benefits and drawbacks of using silica for oral delivery of drugs, macromolecules or cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Diffusion profile of macromolecules within and between human skin layers for (trans)dermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römgens, Anne M; Bader, Dan L; Bouwstra, Joke A; Baaijens, Frank P T; Oomens, Cees W J

    2015-10-01

    Delivering a drug into and through the skin is of interest as the skin can act as an alternative drug administration route for oral delivery. The development of new delivery methods, such as microneedles, makes it possible to not only deliver small molecules into the skin, which are able to pass the outer layer of the skin in therapeutic amounts, but also macromolecules. To provide insight into the administration of these molecules into the skin, the aim of this study was to assess the transport of macromolecules within and between its various layers. The diffusion coefficients in the epidermis and several locations in the papillary and reticular dermis were determined for fluorescein dextran of 40 and 500 kDa using a combination of fluorescent recovery after photobleaching experiments and finite element analysis. The diffusion coefficient was significantly higher for 40 kDa than 500 kDa dextran, with median values of 23 and 9 µm(2)/s in the dermis, respectively. The values only marginally varied within and between papillary and reticular dermis. For the 40 kDa dextran, the diffusion coefficient in the epidermis was twice as low as in the dermis layers. The adopted method may be used for other macromolecules, which are of interest for dermal and transdermal drug delivery. The knowledge about diffusion in the skin is useful to optimize (trans)dermal drug delivery systems to target specific layers or cells in the human skin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Formation and characterization of calcium orthophosphates in the presence of two different acidic macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelin, Irina M.; Maier, Vasilica; Suflet, Dana M.; Popescu, Irina; Darie-Nita, Raluca N.; Aflori, Magdalena; Butnaru, Maria

    2017-10-01

    The synthetic nanocrystalline calcium orthophosphates have a notable bioactivity due to the chemical similarity with biological apatite from calcified tissues. In mineralized tissues, the highly ordered structures come from organized assemblies of biomacromolecules and inorganic nanoparticles. One of the purposes of this work was to study the effect of two types of acidic macromolecules: atelocollagen and phosphorylated curdlan onto calcium orthophosphates formation after 30 days of maturation at 2 ± 2 °C. The resulted samples after a long aging time, either calcium orthophosphates or composites, were first investigated by FT-IR spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry and the results indicated that precipitated hydroxyapatite with low crystallinity was obtained when the synthesis was performed in the presence of phosphorylated curdlan. The macromolecules influenced the morphology of the particles as shown by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The presence of macromolecules as demonstrated by thermal investigation also influenced the rheological properties of the samples. The second purpose of the work was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of the samples using the MTT assay, and the results revealed very good cells viability. The preliminary results are encouraging regarding the use of these materials for further tests in order to develop injectable bone substitutes.

  4. Nasal Absorption of Macromolecules from Powder Formulations and Effects of Sodium Carboxymethyl Cellulose on Their Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Akiko; Furubayashi, Tomoyuki; Matsushita, Akifumi; Inoue, Daisuke; Kimura, Shunsuke; Katsumi, Hidemasa; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The nasal absorption of macromolecules from powder formulations and the effect of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC-Na) as a pharmaceutical excipient on their absorption were studied. Model macromolecules were fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran (average molecular weight of 4.4kDa, FD4) and insulin. The plasma concentration of FD4 after application of the powder containing 50% starch (control) was higher than that after application of the solution, and the absorption from 50% starch powder was enhanced by the substitution of starch with CMC-Na. The fractional absorption of FD4 after administration of the CMC-Na powder formulation was 30% and 40% higher than that after administration from the solution and the starch powder, respectively. The nasal absorption of insulin from the powder and the effect of CMC-Na were similar with those of FD4. The effective absorption of FD4 and insulin after application of powder with CMC-Na could be due to the increase in the nasal residence of FD4 and insulin. No damage in the nasal mucosa or dysfunction of the mucociliary clearance was observed after application of the drug powder and CMC-Na. The present findings indicate that nasal delivery of powder formulations with the addition of CMC-Na as an excipient is a promising approach for improving the nasal absorption of macromolecules. PMID:27598527

  5. Size and average density spectra of macromolecules obtained from hydrodynamic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, G M

    2007-02-01

    It is proposed to normalize the Mark-Kuhn-Houwink-Sakurada type of equation relating the hydrodynamic characteristics, such as intrinsic viscosity, velocity sedimentation coefficient and translational diffusion coefficient of linear macromolecules to their molecular masses for the values of linear density M(L) and the statistical segment length A. When the set of data covering virtually all known experimental information is normalized for M(L), it is presented as a size spectrum of linear polymer molecules. Further normalization for the A value reduces all data to two regions: namely the region exhibiting volume interactions and that showing hydrodynamic draining. For chains without intachain excluded volume effects these results may be reproduced using the Yamakawa-Fujii theory of wormlike cylinders. Data analyzed here cover a range of contour lengths of linear chains varying by three orders of magnitude, with the range of statistical segment lengths varying approximately 500 times. The plot of the dependence of [eta]M on M represents the spectrum of average specific volumes occupied by linear and branched macromolecules. Dendrimers and globular proteins for which the volume occupied by the molecule in solution is directly proportional to M have the lowest specific volume. The homologous series of macromolecules in these plots are arranged following their fractal dimensionality.

  6. DOMMINO 2.0: integrating structurally resolved protein-, RNA-, and DNA-mediated macromolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Xingyan; Dhroso, Andi; Han, Jing Ginger; Shyu, Chi-Ren; Korkin, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Macromolecular interactions are formed between proteins, DNA and RNA molecules. Being a principle building block in macromolecular assemblies and pathways, the interactions underlie most of cellular functions. Malfunctioning of macromolecular interactions is also linked to a number of diseases. Structural knowledge of the macromolecular interaction allows one to understand the interaction's mechanism, determine its functional implications and characterize the effects of genetic variations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms, on the interaction. Unfortunately, until now the interactions mediated by different types of macromolecules, e.g. protein-protein interactions or protein-DNA interactions, are collected into individual and unrelated structural databases. This presents a significant obstacle in the analysis of macromolecular interactions. For instance, the homogeneous structural interaction databases prevent scientists from studying structural interactions of different types but occurring in the same macromolecular complex. Here, we introduce DOMMINO 2.0, a structural Database Of Macro-Molecular INteractiOns. Compared to DOMMINO 1.0, a comprehensive database on protein-protein interactions, DOMMINO 2.0 includes the interactions between all three basic types of macromolecules extracted from PDB files. DOMMINO 2.0 is automatically updated on a weekly basis. It currently includes ∼1,040,000 interactions between two polypeptide subunits (e.g. domains, peptides, termini and interdomain linkers), ∼43,000 RNA-mediated interactions, and ∼12,000 DNA-mediated interactions. All protein structures in the database are annotated using SCOP and SUPERFAMILY family annotation. As a result, protein-mediated interactions involving protein domains, interdomain linkers, C- and N- termini, and peptides are identified. Our database provides an intuitive web interface, allowing one to investigate interactions at three different resolution levels: whole subunit network

  7. DNA nanostructure immobilization to lithographic DNA arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrete, Omar D.

    Although DNA is well known for its genetic role in biology, DNA has also been sought-after as a material for the self-assembly of biological and electronic devices. Examples of DNA nanostructure construction include DNA tiled self-assembly and DNA Origami, where by controlling the sequence and concentration of DNA molecules, the rational design of geometric DNA nanostructures is possible. The assembly of DNA nanostructures takes place in solution and thus they are in disorder and require further organization to construct circuitry or devices. Hence, it is essential for future applications of this technology to develop methods to direct the placement of DNA nanostructures on a surface. To address this challenge my research examines the use of DNA microarrays to capture DNA nanostructures via DNA hybridization. Modern DNA arrays offer a high-density of sequence-specific molecular recognition sites where the addressable placement of DNA nanostructures can be achieved. Using Maskless Array Synthesizer (MAS) technology, I have characterized photolithographic DNA arrays for the hybridization of DNA complexes like large DNA molecules (> 1 kb), DNA-gold nanoparticle conjugates, and DNA Origami. Although modern photolithographic DNA arrays can possess a high-density of sequence (106/cm2), the printed DNA areas are on the order of tens of microns. Thus, I have also developed a method to reduce the DNA array spot size to nanoscale dimensions through the combined use of electron beam lithography with photolithographic DNA synthesis. This work addresses the key elements towards developing a surface patterning technology that takes advantage of DNA base-pairing for both molecular sub-assembly and surface patterning.

  8. FUNCTION OF PHLOEM-BORNE INFORMATION MACROMOLECULES IN INTEGRATING PLANT GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William J. Lucas

    2012-11-12

    Studies on higher plants have revealed the operation of cell-to-cell and long-distance communication networks that mediate the transport of information macromolecules, such as proteins and RNA. Based on the findings from this DOE-funded project and results from other groups, it is now well established that the enucleate sieve tube system of the angiosperms contains a complex set of proteins including RNA binding proteins as well as a unique population of RNA molecules, comprised of both mRNA and small RNA species. Hetero-grafting experiments demonstrated that delivery of such RNA molecules, into the scion, is highly correlated with changes in developmental phenotypes. Furthermore, over the course of this project, our studies showed that plasmodesmata and the phloem are intimately involved in the local and systemic spread of sequence-specific signals that underlie gene silencing in plants. Major advances were also made in elucidating the underlying mechanisms that operate to mediate the selective entry and exit of proteins and RNA into and out of the phloem translocation stream. Our pioneering studies identified the first plant protein with the capacity to both bind specifically to small RNA molecules (si-RNA) and mediate in the cell-to-cell movement of such siRNA. Importantly, studies conducted with support from this DOE program also yielded a detailed characterization of the first phloem-mobile RNP complex isolated from pumpkin, namely the CmRBP50-RNP complex. This RNP complex was shown to bind, in a sequence-specific manner, to a set of transcripts encoding for transcription factors. The remarkable stability of this CmRBP50-RNP complex allows for long-distance delivery of bound transcripts from mature leaves into developing tissues and organs. Knowledge gained from this project can be used to exert control over the long-distance signaling networks used by plants to integrate their physiological and developmental programs at a whole plant level. Eventually, this

  9. Chemical composition, structural properties, and source apportionment of organic macromolecules in atmospheric PM10 in a coastal city of Southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanting; Du, Wenjiao; Chen, Jinsheng; Hong, Youwei; Zhao, Jinping; Xu, Lingling; Xiao, Hang

    2017-02-01

    Particulate matter (PM10) associated with the fractions of organic macromolecules, including humic acid (HA), kerogen + black carbon (KB), and black carbon (BC), was determined during summer and winter at urban and suburban sites in a coastal city of southeast China. The organic macromolecules were characterized by elemental analysis (EA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and their sources were identified by using stable carbon/nitrogen isotope (δ(13)C/δ(15)N) and the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) Model. The results showed that HA, kerogen (K), and BC accounted for the range of 3.89 to 4.55 % in PM10, while they were the dominant fractions of total organic carbon (TOC), ranging from 64.70 to 84.99 %. SEM analysis indicated that BC particles were porous/nonporous and consisted of spherical and non-spherical (i.e., cylindrical and elongate) structures. The FTIR spectra of HA, KB, and BC exhibited similar functional groups, but the difference of various sites and seasons was observed. HA in PM10 contained a higher fraction of aliphatic structures, such as long-chain fatty and carbohydrates with a carboxylic extremity. The C/N ratio, SEM, and δ(13)C/δ(15)N values provided reliable indicators of the sources of HA, K, and BC in PM10. The results suggested that HA and K majorly originated from terrestrial plants, and BC came from the mixture of combustion of terrestrial plants, fossil fuel, and charcoal. The air masses in winter originated from Mongolia (4 %), the northern area of China (48 %), and northern adjacent cities (48 %), suggesting the influence of anthropogenic sources through long-range transport, while the air masses for the summer period came from South China Sea (34 %) and Western Pacific Sea (66 %), representing clean marine air masses with low concentrations of organic macromolecules.

  10. Research Progress of Quantum Dots for Biological Macromolecules Detection%量子点在生物大分子检测中的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李志刚

    2011-01-01

    Optical properties of quantum dots are advantageous against convenrtional organic fluorescent dyes, including extreme brightness, good photochemical stability, and other unique properties. Quantum dots have been used as a fluorescent marker for biological molecules both in vivo and in vitro, cells and drugs imaging, and long - time tracer studies, with a great developmental prospect. In recent years, different quantum dot materials are coupled with various biological macromolecule phases for the study of biological macromolecules function, cellular positioning, interaction, and trajectory. In this article, we summarize the implications of quantum dots in biological macromolecules.%与传统的荧光标志物相比,量子点由于具有荧光度强、光化学稳定性好等独特的光学性质,已被作为荧光标志用于体内外生物分子、细胞及药物作用的成像和长时间示踪等研究,显示出了巨大的发展前景.近年来人们将不同材料的纳米量子点与各种生物大分子相耦联,用于对生物大分子的功能、细胞内定位、相互作用及运动轨迹等观察研究.现就目前量子点在生物大分子中的研究概况进行总结.

  11. Enzyme-free translation of DNA into sequence-defined synthetic polymers structurally unrelated to nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jia; Hili, Ryan; Liu, David R

    2013-04-01

    The translation of DNA sequences into corresponding biopolymers enables the production, function and evolution of the macromolecules of life. In contrast, methods to generate sequence-defined synthetic polymers with similar levels of control have remained elusive. Here, we report the development of a DNA-templated translation system that enables the enzyme-free translation of DNA templates into sequence-defined synthetic polymers that have no necessary structural relationship with nucleic acids. We demonstrate the efficiency, sequence-specificity and generality of this translation system by oligomerizing building blocks including polyethylene glycol, α-(D)-peptides, and β-peptides in a DNA-programmed manner. Sequence-defined synthetic polymers with molecular weights of 26 kDa containing 16 consecutively coupled building blocks and 90 densely functionalized β-amino acid residues were translated from DNA templates using this strategy. We integrated the DNA-templated translation system developed here into a complete cycle of translation, coding sequence replication, template regeneration and re-translation suitable for the iterated in vitro selection of functional sequence-defined synthetic polymers unrelated in structure to nucleic acids.

  12. DNA tagged microparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farquar, George Roy; Leif, Roald N; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2015-05-05

    A simulant that includes a carrier and DNA encapsulated in the carrier. Also a method of making a simulant including the steps of providing a carrier and encapsulating DNA in the carrier to produce the simulant.

  13. DNA tagged microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquar, George Roy; Leif, Roald N; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2015-05-05

    A simulant that includes a carrier and DNA encapsulated in the carrier. Also a method of making a simulant including the steps of providing a carrier and encapsulating DNA in the carrier to produce the simulant.

  14. Separation of polyamines, conjugated to DNA, by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, J L; Reyes, A; Vicente, C; Legaz, M E

    2000-02-18

    Genomic DNA was isolated from the lichen Evernia prunastri in order to analyze by high-performance liquid chromatography the occurrence of polyamines conjugated to the macromolecule. The acid-insoluble (PH) fraction of this DNA contained mainly conjugated spermidine, although small amounts of free putrescine and spermidine were also present. The PH fraction of DNA also contained conjugated evernic acid, the main phenol produced by this lichen species. Conjugation of polyamines to calf thymus DNA was carried out under in vitro conditions. Conjugation was to spermidine and mainly to spermine and produced DNA compactation. Evernic acid enhanced the action of polyamines in order to produce DNA aggregation.

  15. DNA Based Molecular Scale Nanofabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-04

    water adsorption on DNA origami template and its impact on DNA- mediated chemical reactions. We also extended the concept of DNA- mediated reaction to...addition, we have expanded our efforts to include DNA- mediated HF etching of SiÜ2, DNA- mediated nanoimprinting lithography, DNA-based patterning of self...detailed kinetics study of DNA- mediated chemical reactions. Examples of such reactions include chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of inorganic oxide and HF

  16. Aqueous self-assembly of hydrophobic macromolecules with adjustable rigidity of the backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhou; Liu, Dapeng; Lin, Jiaping; Wang, Xiaosong

    2017-08-02

    P(FpC3P) (Fp: CpFe(CO)2; C3P: propyl diphenyl phosphine) has a helical backbone, resulting from piano stool metal coordination geometry, which is rigid with intramolecular aromatic interaction of the phenyl groups. The macromolecule is hydrophobic, but the polarized CO groups can interact with water for aqueous self-assembly. The stiffness of P(FpC3P), which is adjustable by temperature, is an important factor influencing the morphologies of kinetically trapped assemblies. P(FpC3P)7 self-assembles in DMSO/water (10/90 by volume) into lamellae at 25 °C, vesicles at 40 °C and irregular aggregates at higher temperatures (60 and 70 °C). The colloidal stability decreases in the order of lamellae, vesicles and irregular aggregates. Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulation reveals the same temperature-dependent self-assembled morphologies with an interior of hydrophobic aromatic groups covered with the metal coordination units. The rigid backbone at 25 °C accounts for the formation of the layered morphology, while the reduced rigidity of the same P(FpC3P)7 at 40 °C curves up the lamellae into vesicles. At a higher temperature (60 or 70 °C), P(FpC3P)7 behaves as a random coil without obvious amphiphilic segregation, resulting in irregular aggregates. The stiffness is, therefore, a crucial factor for the aqueous assembly of macromolecules without obvious amphiphilic segregation, which is reminiscent of the solution behavior observed for many hydrophobic biological macromolecules such as proteins.

  17. Key factors regulating the mass delivery of macromolecules to model cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, Richard A.; Watkins, Erik B.; Jagalski, Vivien

    2014-01-01

    We show that both gravity and electrostatics are key factors regulating interactions between model cell membranes and self-assembled liquid crystalline aggregates of dendrimers and phospholipids. The system is a proxy for the trafficking of reservoirs of therapeutic drugs to cell membranes for slow...... diffusion and continuous delivery. Neutron reflectometry measurements were carried out on supported lipid bilayers of varying charge and on hydrophilic silica surfaces. Translocation of the macromolecule across the membrane and adsorption of the lamellar aggregates occur only when the membrane (1...... of the aggregates to activate endocytosis pathways on specific cell types is discussed in the context of targeted drug delivery applications....

  18. Controlled uniform coating from the interplay of Marangoni flows and surface-adsorbed macromolecules

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Hyoungsoo; Um, Eujin; Jacobi, Ian; Button, Ernie; Stone, Howard A

    2016-01-01

    Surface coatings and patterning technologies are essential for various physicochemical applications. In this Letter, we describe key parameters to achieve uniform particle coatings in binary solutions: First, multiple sequential Marangoni flows, set by solute and surfactant simultaneously, prevent non-uniform particle distributions and continuously mix suspended materials during droplet evaporation. Second, we show the importance of particle-surface interactions that can be established by surface-adsorbed macromolecules. To achieve a uniform deposit in a binary mixture a small concentration of surfactant and surface-adsorbed polymer (0.05 wt% each) is sufficient, which offers a new physicochemical avenue for control of coatings.

  19. Cluster of red blood cells in microcapillary flow: hydrodynamic versus macromolecule induced interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Clavería, Viviana; Thiébaud, Marine; Abkarian, Manouk; Coupier, Gwennou; Misbah, Chaouqi; John, Thomas; Wagner, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We present experiments on RBCs that flow through microcapillaries under physiological conditions. We show that the RBC clusters form as a subtle imbrication between hydrodynamics interaction and adhesion forces because of plasma proteins. Clusters form along the capillaries and macromolecule-induced adhesion contribute to their stability. However, at high yet physiological flow velocities, shear stresses overcome part of the adhesion forces, and cluster stabilization due to hydrodynamics becomes the only predominant mechanism. For the case of pure hydrodynamic interaction, cell-to-cell distances have a pronounced bimodal distribution. Our 2D-numerical simulations on vesicles captures the transition between adhesive and non-adhesive clusters at different flow velocities.

  20. Macromolecules Mimicking Backbones of Nucleic and Teichoic Acids.Synthesis,Some Properties and Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stanislaw; Penczek; Julia; B.Pretula; Krzysztof; Kaluzynski

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Several methods have been elaborated in this laboratory allowing preparation of macromolecules with phosphodiester bonds,and having sequence of atoms similar as in the chains of biomacromolecules - nucleic or teichoic acids (TA),namely:-(C)n-O-PO-,where n=2 (for teichoic acids) or 3.These methods,to be discussed in the lecture,are based on the ring-opening polymerization,transesterification,and recently elaborated direct addition of phosphoric acid to diepoxides.For the first time an attempt h...

  1. Interactions between macromolecule-bound antioxidants and Trolox during liposome autoxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celik, Ecem Evrim; Amigo Rubio, Jose Manuel; Andersen, Mogens Larsen

    2017-01-01

    The interactions between free and macromolecule-bound antioxidants were investigated in order to evaluate their combined effects on the antioxidant environment. Dietary fiber (DF), protein and lipid-bound antioxidants, obtained from whole wheat, soybean and olive oil products, respectively...... of the simple addition effects of Trolox and bound antioxidants with measured values on lipid oxidation revealed synergetic interactions for DF and refined olive oil-bound antioxidants, and antagonistic interactions for protein and extra virgin olive oil-bound antioxidants with Trolox. A generalized version...

  2. Ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair......ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair...

  3. Comprehensive approach to intrinsic charge carrier mobility in conjugated organic molecules, macromolecules, and supramolecular architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Akinori; Koizumi, Yoshiko; Aida, Takuzo; Seki, Shu

    2012-08-21

    Si-based inorganic electronics have long dominated the semiconductor industry. However, in recent years conjugated polymers have attracted increasing attention because such systems are flexible and offer the potential for low-cost, large-area production via roll-to-roll processing. The state-of-the-art organic conjugated molecular crystals can exhibit charge carrier mobilities (μ) that nearly match or even exceed that of amorphous silicon (1-10 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)). The mean free path of the charge carriers estimated from these mobilities corresponds to the typical intersite (intermolecular) hopping distances in conjugated organic materials, which strongly suggests that the conduction model for the electronic band structure only applies to μ > 1 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for the translational motion of the charge carriers. However, to analyze the transport mechanism in organic electronics, researchers conventionally use a disorder formalism, where μ is usually less than 1 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and dominated by impurities, disorders, or defects that disturb the long-range translational motion. In this Account, we discuss the relationship between the alternating-current and direct-current mobilities of charge carriers, using time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) and other techniques including field-effect transistor, time-of-flight, and space-charge limited current. TRMC measures the nanometer-scale mobility of charge carriers under an oscillating microwave electric field with no contact between the semiconductors and the metals. This separation allows us to evaluate the intrinsic charge carrier mobility with minimal trapping effects. We review a wide variety of organic electronics in terms of their charge carrier mobilities, and we describe recent studies of macromolecules, molecular crystals, and supramolecular architecture. For example, a rigid poly(phenylene-co-ethynylene) included in permethylated cyclodextrin shows a high intramolecular hole mobility of 0.5 cm(2) V

  4. Natural macromolecule based carboxymethyl cellulose as a gel polymer electrolyte with adjustable porosity for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y. S.; Xiao, S. Y.; Li, M. X.; Chang, Z.; Wang, F. X.; Gao, J.; Wu, Y. P.

    2015-08-01

    A porous membrane of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) from natural macromolecule as a host of a gel polymer electrolyte for lithium ion batteries is reported. It is prepared, for the first time, by a simple non-solvent evaporation method and its porous structure is fine-adjusted by varying the composition ratio of the solvent and non-solvent mixture. The electrolyte uptake of the porous membrane based on CMC is 75.9%. The ionic conductivity of the as-prepared gel membrane saturated with 1 mol L-1 LiPF6 electrolyte at room temperature can be up to 0.48 mS cm-1. Moreover, the lithium ion transference in the gel membrane at room temperature is as high as 0.46, much higher than 0.27 for the commercial separator Celgard 2730. When evaluated by using LiFePO4 cathode, the prepared gel membrane exhibits very good electrochemical performance including higher reversible capacity, better rate capability and good cycling behaviour. The obtained results suggest that this porous polymer membrane shows great attraction to the lithium ion batteries requiring high safety, low cost and environmental friendliness.

  5. DNA methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Kristine; Christensen, Jesper; Helin, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is involved in key cellular processes, including X-chromosome inactivation, imprinting and transcriptional silencing of specific genes and repetitive elements. DNA methylation patterns are frequently perturbed in human diseases such as imprinting disorders and cancer. The recent...... discovery that the three members of the TET protein family can convert 5-methylcytosine (5mC) into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) has provided a potential mechanism leading to DNA demethylation. Moreover, the demonstration that TET2 is frequently mutated in haematopoietic tumours suggests that the TET...... proteins are important regulators of cellular identity. Here, we review the current knowledge regarding the function of the TET proteins, and discuss various mechanisms by which they contribute to transcriptional control. We propose that the TET proteins have an important role in regulating DNA methylation...

  6. FY05 LDRD Fianl Report Investigation of AAA+ protein machines that participate in DNA replication, recombination, and in response to DNA damage LDRD Project Tracking Code: 04-LW-049

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawicka, D; de Carvalho-Kavanagh, M S; Barsky, D; Venclovas, C

    2006-12-04

    The AAA+ proteins are remarkable macromolecules that are able to self-assemble into nanoscale machines. These protein machines play critical roles in many cellular processes, including the processes that manage a cell's genetic material, but the mechanism at the molecular level has remained elusive. We applied computational molecular modeling, combined with advanced sequence analysis and available biochemical and genetic data, to structurally characterize eukaryotic AAA+ proteins and the protein machines they form. With these models we have examined intermolecular interactions in three-dimensions (3D), including both interactions between the components of the AAA+ complexes and the interactions of these protein machines with their partners. These computational studies have provided new insights into the molecular structure and the mechanism of action for AAA+ protein machines, thereby facilitating a deeper understanding of processes involved in DNA metabolism.

  7. Configurational diffusion of coal macromolecules. Final technical report, September 15, 1986--September 14, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guin, J.A.; Curtis, C.W.; Tarrer, A.R.; Kim, S.; Hwang, D.; Chen, C.C.; Chiou, Z.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of our research was to obtain fundamental information regarding the functional dependence of the diffusion coefficient of coal molecules on the ratio of molecule to pore diameter. That is, the objective of our study was to examine the effect of molecule size and configuration on hindered diffusion of coal macromolecules through as porous medium. To best accomplish this task, we circumvented the complexities of an actual porous catalyst by using a well defined porous matrix with uniform capillaric pores, i.e., a track-etched membrane. In this way, useful information was obtained regarding the relationship of molecular size and configuration on the diffusion rate of coal derived macromolecules through a pore structure with known geometry. Similar studies were performed using a pellet formed of porous alumina, to provide a link between the idealized membranes and the actual complex pore structure of real catalyst extrudates. The fundamental information from our study will be useful toward the tailoring of catalysts to minimize diffusional influences and thereby increase coal conversion and selectivity for desirable products. (VC)

  8. Toward detecting and identifying macromolecules in a cellular context: Template matching applied to electron tomograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Jochen; Frangakis, Achilleas S.; Hegerl, Reiner; Nickell, Stephan; Typke, Dieter; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2000-01-01

    Electron tomography is the only technique available that allows us to visualize the three-dimensional structure of unfixed and unstained cells currently with a resolution of 6–8 nm, but with the prospect to reach 2–4 nm. This raises the possibility of detecting and identifying specific macromolecular complexes within their cellular context by virtue of their structural signature. Templates derived from the high-resolution structure of the molecule under scrutiny are used to search the reconstructed volume. Here we outline and test a computationally feasible two-step procedure: In a first step, mean-curvature motion is used for segmentation, yielding subvolumes that contain with a high probability macromolecules in the expected size range. Subsequently, the particles contained in the subvolumes are identified by cross-correlation, using a set of three-dimensional templates. With simulated and real tomographic data we demonstrate that such an approach is feasible and we explore the detection limits. Even structurally similar particles, such as the thermosome, GroEL, and the 20S proteasome can be identified with high fidelity. This opens up exciting prospects for mapping the territorial distribution of macromolecules and for analyzing molecular interactions in situ. PMID:11087814

  9. Development of a Non-Aqueous Dispersion to Improve Intestinal Epithelial Flux of Poorly Permeable Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Sam; Medani, Mekki; Carballeira, Nestor N; Winter, Desmond C; Baird, Alan W; Brayden, David J

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal permeation enhancers (PEs) offer an attractive strategy to enable oral peptide administration. However, optimal presentation of peptide and PE from solid-dosage forms is offset by slow dissolution rates in the small intestine, which reduces the likelihood that the PE can reach the threshold concentration for sufficient permeability enhancement. The purpose of this study was to design a PE-based liquid dispersion that can improve intestinal permeation of macromolecules across Caco-2 monolayers and isolated rat/human intestinal mucosae mounted in Ussing chambers. An enhancer screen in monolayers based on permeability (TEER, Papp [(14)C]-mannitol) and cytotoxicity (MTT assay) initially identified methyl 10-hydroxydecanoate (10-OHC10CH3) as a candidate. 10-OHC10CH3 (20 mM) increased the Papp of fluorescent dextran of 4 kDa (FD4) (167-fold), 10 kDa (FD10) (429-fold), and 40 kDa (FD40) (520-fold) across monolayers. Blends of 10-OHC10CH3 with low molecular weight PEGs (0.2-1 kDa) formed liquid dispersions in which enhancement capacity across monolayers of 10-OHC10CH3 was increased over 10-OHC10CH3 alone in the order PEG200 macromolecules.

  10. Coupled Segmentation of Nuclear and Membrane-bound Macromolecules through Voting and Multiphase Level Set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hang; Wen, Quan; Parvin, Bahram

    2015-03-01

    Membrane-bound macromolecules play an important role in tissue architecture and cell-cell communication, and is regulated by almost one-third of the genome. At the optical scale, one group of membrane proteins expresses themselves as linear structures along the cell surface boundaries, while others are sequestered; and this paper targets the former group. Segmentation of these membrane proteins on a cell-by-cell basis enables the quantitative assessment of localization for comparative analysis. However, such membrane proteins typically lack continuity, and their intensity distributions are often very heterogeneous; moreover, nuclei can form large clump, which further impedes the quantification of membrane signals on a cell-by-cell basis. To tackle these problems, we introduce a three-step process to (i) regularize the membrane signal through iterative tangential voting, (ii) constrain the location of surface proteins by nuclear features, where clumps of nuclei are segmented through a delaunay triangulation approach, and (iii) assign membrane-bound macromolecules to individual cells through an application of multi-phase geodesic level-set. We have validated our method using both synthetic data and a dataset of 200 images, and are able to demonstrate the efficacy of our approach with superior performance.

  11. Effect of poly-L-arginine on intestinal absorption of hydrophilic macromolecules in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaki, Tsutomu; Uchida, Masaki; Kuwahara, Yusuke; Shimazaki, Yohei; Ohtake, Kazuo; Kimura, Mitsutoshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Jun; Ogihara, Masahiko; Morimoto, Yasunori; Natsume, Hideshi

    2013-01-01

    We have already reported that poly-L-arginine (PLA) remarkably enhanced the in vivo nasal absorption of hydrophilic macromolecules without producing any significant epithelial damage in rats. In the present study, we examined whether PLA could enhance the absorption of a model hydrophilic macromolecule, fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FD-4), across the intestinal mucosa, as well as the nasal mucosa, by an in situ closed-loop method using the rat intestine. PLA was found to enhance the intestinal absorption of FD-4 in a concentration-dependent manner within the concentrations investigated in this study, but segment-specific differences were found to be associated with this effect (ileum>jejunum>duodenum≧colon). The factors responsible for the segment-specific differences were also investigated by intestinal absorption studies using aprotinin, a trypsin inhibitor, and an analysis of the expression of occludin, a tight junction protein. In the small intestine, the differences in the effect of PLA on the absorption of FD-4 may be related to the enzymatic degradation of PLA. In the colon, the reduced effect of PLA on the absorption of FD-4 may be related to the smaller surface area for absorption and the higher expression of occludin compared with other segments.

  12. Complexation between a macromolecule and an amphiphile by Monte Carlo technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharibi, Hussein; Behjatmanesh-Ardakani, Reza; Hashemianzadeh, Majid; Mousavi-Khoshdel, Morteza

    2006-07-13

    Using a simple modified version of Larson's model, we studied the complexation between a macromolecule and an amphiphile in a dilute range of concentrations. The main characteristic of amphiphile molecules, that is, the hydrophobicity of the tails and hydrophilicity of the heads, is used to model the self-assembling process. Contrary to the molecular thermodynamics approaches, no prior shape was considered for the aggregates and the system was allowed to choose the most stable structure. For true ensemble averaging, without any synthetic results, configurational bias Monte Carlo and reptation moves are used to produce a Markov chain of configurations. From the results, it is found that the macromolecule causes the clusters of surfactants to be formed at a concentration much lower than the critical micelle concentration. Furthermore, the shape of the clusters tends to be more spherical, which is in line with theory and experiments. From the results, it is learned how a polymer can change the behavior of an amphiphilic molecule. All of the results are in good qualitative agreement with experimental and molecular thermodynamics results. Furthermore, the model predicts network formation between bound clusters at high concentrations of the surfactant.

  13. Combining modular ligation and supramolecular self-assembly for the construction of star-shaped macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Ozcan; Muller, Thierry; Lejeune, Elise; Plietzsch, Oliver; Bräse, Stefan; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2012-06-14

    A well-defined random copolymer of styrene (S) and chloromethylstyrene (CMS) featuring lateral chlorine moieties with an alkyne terminal group is prepared (P(S-co-CMS), M(n) = 5500 Da, PDI = 1.13). The chloromethyl groups are converted into Hamilton wedge (HW) entities (P(S-co-HWS), M(n) = 6200 Da, PDI = 1.13). The P(S-co-HWS) polymer is subsequently ligated with tetrakis(4-azidophenyl)methane to give HW-functional star-shaped macromolecules (P(S-co-HWS))(4), M(n) = 25,100 Da, PDI = 1.08). Supramolecular star-shaped copolymers are then prepared via self-assembly between the HW-functionalized four-arm star-shaped macromolecules (P(S-co-HW))(4) and cyanuric acid (CA) end-functionalized PS (PS-CA, M(n) = 3700 Da, PDI = 1.04), CA end-functionalized poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA-CA, M(n) = 8500 Da, PDI = 1.13) and CA end-functionalized polyethylene glycol (PEG-CA, M(n) = 1700 Da, PDI = 1.05). The self-assembly is monitored by (1)H NMR spectroscopy and light scattering analyses.

  14. SETOR: hardware-lighted three-dimensional solid model representations of macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, S V

    1993-06-01

    SETOR is designed to exploit the hardware lighting capabilities of the IRIS-4D series graphics workstations to render high-quality raster images of macromolecules that can undergo rotation and translation interactively. SETOR can render standard all-atom and backbone models of proteins or nucleic acids, but focuses on displaying protein molecules by highlighting elements of secondary structure. The program has a very friendly user interface that minimizes the number of input files by allowing the user to interactively edit parameters, such as colors, lighting coefficients, and descriptions of secondary structure via mouse activated dialogue boxes. The choice of polymer chain representation can be varied from standard vector models and van der Waal models, to a B-spline fit of polymer backbones that yields a smooth ribbon that approximates the polymer chain, to strict Cardinal splines that interpolate the smoothest curve possible that will precisely follow the polymer chain. The program provides a photograph mode, save/restore facilities, and efficient generation of symmetry-related molecules and packing diagrams. Additionally, SETOR is designed to accept commands and model coordinates from the standard input stream, and to control standard output. Ancillary programs provide a method to interactively edit hardcopy plots of all vector and many solid models generated by SETOR, and to produce standard HPGL or PostScript files. Examples of figures rendered by SETOR of a number of macromolecules of various classes are presented.

  15. Smooth deuterated cellulose films for the visualisation of adsorbed bio-macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jielong; Raghuwanshi, Vikram S; Raverty, Warwick; Garvey, Christopher J; Holden, Peter J; Gillon, Marie; Holt, Stephen A; Tabor, Rico; Batchelor, Warren; Garnier, Gil

    2016-10-31

    Novel thin and smooth deuterated cellulose films were synthesised to visualize adsorbed bio-macromolecules using contrast variation neutron reflectivity (NR) measurements. Incorporation of varying degrees of deuteration into cellulose was achieved by growing Gluconacetobacter xylinus in deuterated glycerol as carbon source dissolved in growth media containing D2O. The derivative of deuterated cellulose was prepared by trimethylsilylation(TMS) in ionic liquid(1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride). The TMS derivative was dissolved in toluene for thin film preparation by spin-coating. The resulting film was regenerated into deuterated cellulose by exposure to acidic vapour. A common enzyme, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), was adsorbed from solution onto the deuterated cellulose films and visualized by NR. The scattering length density contrast of the deuterated cellulose enabled accurate visualization and quantification of the adsorbed HRP, which would have been impossible to achieve with non-deuterated cellulose. The procedure described enables preparing deuterated cellulose films that allows differentiation of cellulose and non-deuterated bio-macromolecules using NR.

  16. Smooth deuterated cellulose films for the visualisation of adsorbed bio-macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jielong; Raghuwanshi, Vikram S.; Raverty, Warwick; Garvey, Christopher J.; Holden, Peter J.; Gillon, Marie; Holt, Stephen A.; Tabor, Rico; Batchelor, Warren; Garnier, Gil

    2016-10-01

    Novel thin and smooth deuterated cellulose films were synthesised to visualize adsorbed bio-macromolecules using contrast variation neutron reflectivity (NR) measurements. Incorporation of varying degrees of deuteration into cellulose was achieved by growing Gluconacetobacter xylinus in deuterated glycerol as carbon source dissolved in growth media containing D2O. The derivative of deuterated cellulose was prepared by trimethylsilylation(TMS) in ionic liquid(1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride). The TMS derivative was dissolved in toluene for thin film preparation by spin-coating. The resulting film was regenerated into deuterated cellulose by exposure to acidic vapour. A common enzyme, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), was adsorbed from solution onto the deuterated cellulose films and visualized by NR. The scattering length density contrast of the deuterated cellulose enabled accurate visualization and quantification of the adsorbed HRP, which would have been impossible to achieve with non-deuterated cellulose. The procedure described enables preparing deuterated cellulose films that allows differentiation of cellulose and non-deuterated bio-macromolecules using NR.

  17. STUDY ON THE EFFECT OF POLYSTYRENE SULFONIC ACID MACROMOLECULES ON THE POLYMERIZATION OF ACRYLAMIDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shenguo; XI Fu; LI Zhifen

    1983-01-01

    The effect of polystyrene sulfonic acid (PSSA) macromolecules on the polymerization of acrylamide (AM) has been studied. It was found that the rates of polymerization of AM were greatly increased in the presence of PSSA in the polymerization system. The maximum value of the rate of polymerization of AM was obtained when the ratio of[-SO3H]: [AM] reached 3:1. When the insoluble crosslinked PSSA was used instead of the soluble one, this effect decreased considerably. The interaction between molecules of PSSA and AM was determined by infrared spectroscopy, elementary analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.The combination form, -SO3-NH3+ CO-, formed between sulfonic group and amide group was found to be existed since the infrared absorption band of -NH2 shifted from 3400 cm-1 to 3150cm-1, the binding energy of electron N1S changed from 399.7 eV to 401.3 eV, and the atomic ratio of N to S of the products was similar to the ratio of reagents. Based on these experimental results, the mechanism of AM polymerization in the presence of PSSA is proposed. The initial step is the combination of AM with sulfonic group to form -CONH3+, then followed by polymerization on the PSSA macromolecule. The role of PSSA on the polymerization of AM is discussed.

  18. Food macromolecule based nanodelivery systems for enhancing the bioavailability of polyphenols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Hu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diet polyphenols—primarily categorized into flavonoids (e.g., flavonols, flavones, flavan-3-ols, anthocyanidins, flavanones, and isoflavones and nonflavonoids (with major subclasses of stilbenes and phenolic acids—are reported to have health-promoting effects, such as antioxidant, antiinflammatory, anticarcinoma, antimicrobial, antiviral, and cardioprotective properties. However, their applications in functional foods or medicine are limited because of their inefficient systemic delivery and poor oral bioavailability. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate, curcumin, and resveratrol are the well-known representatives of the bioactive diet polyphenols but with poor bioavailability. Food macromolecule based nanoparticles have been fabricated using reassembled proteins, crosslinked polysaccharides, protein–polysaccharide conjugates (complexes, as well as emulsified lipid via safe procedures that could be applied in food. The human gastrointestinal digestion tract is the first place where the food grade macromolecule nanoparticles exert their effects on improving the bioavailability of diet polyphenols, via enhancing their solubility, preventing their degradation in the intestinal environment, elevating the permeation in small intestine, and even increasing their contents in the bloodstream. We contend that the stability and structure behaviors of nanocarriers in the gastrointestinal tract environment and the effects of nanoencapsulation on the metabolism of polyphenols warrant more focused attention in further studies.

  19. Upgraded ESRF BM29 beamline for SAXS on macromolecules in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pernot, Petra, E-mail: rejma@esrf.fr [ESRF, 6 Jules Horowitz, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Round, Adam [EMBL, 6 Jules Horowitz, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Barrett, Ray; De Maria Antolinos, Alejandro [ESRF, 6 Jules Horowitz, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Gobbo, Alexandre [EMBL, 6 Jules Horowitz, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Gordon, Elspeth [ESRF, 6 Jules Horowitz, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Huet, Julien [EMBL, 6 Jules Horowitz, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Kieffer, Jerôme; Lentini, Mario; Mattenet, Muriel; Morawe, Christian; Mueller-Dieckmann, Christoph; Ohlsson, Staffan; Schmid, Werner; Surr, John; Theveneau, Pascal; Zerrad, Louiza; McSweeney, Sean [ESRF, 6 Jules Horowitz, F-38043 Grenoble (France)

    2013-07-01

    A description of the new ESRF BioSAXS beamline is given. The beamline presented is dedicated to small-angle X-ray scattering of macromolecules in solution operating with a high-throughput sample-changer robot and automated data analysis for quality control and feedback. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements of proteins in solution are becoming increasingly popular with biochemists and structural biologists owing to the presence of dedicated high-throughput beamlines at synchrotron sources. As part of the ESRF Upgrade program a dedicated instrument for performing SAXS from biological macromolecules in solution (BioSAXS) has been installed at the renovated BM29 location. The optics hutch has been equipped with new optical components of which the two principal elements are a fixed-exit double multilayer monochromator and a 1.1 m-long toroidal mirror. These new dedicated optics give improved beam characteristics (compared with the previous set-up on ID14-3) regarding the energy tunability, flux and focusing at the detector plane leading to reduced parasitic scattering and an extended s-range. User experiments on the beamline have been successfully carried out since June 2012. A description of the new BioSAXS beamline and the set-up characteristics are presented together with examples of obtained data.

  20. Distribution volumes of macromolecules in human ovarian and endometrial cancers--effects of extracellular matrix structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslene-Hox, Hanne; Oveland, Eystein; Woie, Kathrine; Salvesen, Helga B; Tenstad, Olav; Wiig, Helge

    2015-01-01

    Elements of the extracellular matrix (ECM), notably collagen and glucosaminoglycans, will restrict part of the space available for soluble macromolecules simply because the molecules cannot occupy the same space. This phenomenon may influence macromolecular drug uptake. To study the influence of steric and charge effects of the ECM on the distribution volumes of macromolecules in human healthy and malignant gynecologic tissues we used as probes 15 abundant plasma proteins quantified by high-resolution mass spectrometry. The available distribution volume (VA) of albumin was increased in ovarian carcinoma compared with healthy ovarian tissue. Furthermore, VA of plasma proteins between 40 and 190 kDa decreased with size for endometrial carcinoma and healthy ovarian tissue, but was independent of molecular weight for the ovarian carcinomas. An effect of charge on distribution volume was only found in healthy ovaries, which had lower hydration and high collagen content, indicating that a condensed interstitium increases the influence of negative charges. A number of earlier suggested biomarker candidates were detected in increased amounts in malignant tissue, e.g., stathmin and spindlin-1, showing that interstitial fluid, even when unfractionated, can be a valuable source for tissue-specific proteins. We demonstrate that the distribution of abundant plasma proteins in the interstitium can be elucidated by mass spectrometry methods and depends markedly on hydration and ECM structure. Our data can be used in modeling of drug uptake, and give indications on ECM components to be targeted to increase the uptake of macromolecular substances.

  1. Bionic design for surface optimization combining hydrophilic and negative charged biological macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Fen; Song, Haiming; Niu, Xiaoqin; Yang, Aimei; Nie, Shengqiang; Wang, Lingren; Li, Jie; Sun, Shudong; Zhao, Changsheng

    2014-06-01

    While polyethersulfone (PES) membrane represents a promising option for blood purification, the blood compatibility must be dramatically enhanced to meet today's ever-increasing demands for many emerging application. In this study, we report a bionic design for optimization and development of a modified PES membrane combining hydrophilic and negative charged biological macromolecules on its surface. The hydrophilic and ionic charged biological macromolecules sulfonated poly(styrene)-b-poly(methyl methacrylate)-b-poly-(styrene) (PSSMSS) and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone)-b-poly(methyl methacrylate)-b-poly-(vinyl pyrrolidone) were synthesized via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization and used together to modify PES membranes by blending method. A hydrophilic membrane surface with negative charged surface coating was obtained, imitating the hydrophilic and negatively charged structure feature of heparin. The modified PES membranes showed suppressed platelet adhesion, and a prolonged blood clotting time, and thereby improved blood compatibility. In addition, the blood clotting time of the modified membranes increased with the blended PSSMSS amounts increment, indicating that both the hydrophilic and negative charged groups play important roles in improving the blood compatibility of PES membranes.

  2. A dural lymphatic vascular system that drains brain interstitial fluid and macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspelund, Aleksanteri; Antila, Salli; Proulx, Steven T; Karlsen, Tine Veronica; Karaman, Sinem; Detmar, Michael; Wiig, Helge; Alitalo, Kari

    2015-06-29

    The central nervous system (CNS) is considered an organ devoid of lymphatic vasculature. Yet, part of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drains into the cervical lymph nodes (LNs). The mechanism of CSF entry into the LNs has been unclear. Here we report the surprising finding of a lymphatic vessel network in the dura mater of the mouse brain. We show that dural lymphatic vessels absorb CSF from the adjacent subarachnoid space and brain interstitial fluid (ISF) via the glymphatic system. Dural lymphatic vessels transport fluid into deep cervical LNs (dcLNs) via foramina at the base of the skull. In a transgenic mouse model expressing a VEGF-C/D trap and displaying complete aplasia of the dural lymphatic vessels, macromolecule clearance from the brain was attenuated and transport from the subarachnoid space into dcLNs was abrogated. Surprisingly, brain ISF pressure and water content were unaffected. Overall, these findings indicate that the mechanism of CSF flow into the dcLNs is directly via an adjacent dural lymphatic network, which may be important for the clearance of macromolecules from the brain. Importantly, these results call for a reexamination of the role of the lymphatic system in CNS physiology and disease.

  3. Self-assembly of an amphiphilic macromolecule under spherical confinement: An efficient route to generate hollow nanospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glagoleva, A. A.; Vasilevskaya, V. V.; Yoshikawa, K.; Khokhlov, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    In general, bio-macromolecules are composed of hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties and are confined within small cavities, such as cell membranes and intracellular organelles. Here, we studied the self-organization of macromolecules having groups with different affinities to solvents under spherical nano-scale confinement by means of computer modeling. It is shown that depending on the interaction parameters of monomer units composed of side- and main-chain monomer groups along a single linear macromolecule and on cavity size, such amphiphilic polymers undergo the conformational transitions between hollow nanospheres, rod-like and folded cylindrical structures, and a necklace conformation with and without a particular ordering of beads. The diagram of the conformations in the variables the incompatibility parameter of monomer units and the cavity radius is constructed.

  4. Changes in the infrared microspectroscopic characteristics of DNA caused by cationic elements, different base richness and single-stranded form.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luiza S Mello

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The infrared (IR analysis of dried samples of DNA and DNA-polypeptide complexes is still scarce. Here we have studied the FT-IR profiles of these components to further the understanding of the FT-IR signatures of chromatin and cell nuclei. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Calf thymus and salmon testis DNA, and complexes of histone H1, protamine, poly-L-lysine and poly-L-arginine (histone-mimic macromolecules with DNA were analyzed in an IR microspectroscope equipped with an attenuated total reflection diamond objective and Grams software. Conditions including polypeptides bound to the DNA, DNA base composition, and single-stranded form were found to differently affect the vibrational characteristics of the chemical groups (especially, PO(2(- in the nucleic acid. The antisymmetric stretching (ν(as of the DNA PO(2(- was greater than the symmetric stretching (ν(s of these groups and increased in the polypeptide-DNA complexes. A shift of the ν(as of the DNA PO(2(- to a lower frequency and an increased intensity of this vibration were induced especially by lysine-rich histones. Lysine richness additionally contributed to an increase in the vibrational stretching of the amide I group. Even in simple molecules such as inorganic phosphates, the vibrational characteristics of the phosphate anions were differently affected by different cations. As a result of the optimization of the DNA conformation by binding to arginine-rich polypeptides, enhancements of the vibrational characteristics in the FT-IR fingerprint could be detected. Although different profiles were obtained for the DNA with different base compositions, this situation was no longer verified in the polypeptide-DNA complexes and most likely in isolated chromatin or cell nuclei. However, the ν(as PO(2(-/ν(s PO(2(- ratio could discriminate DNA with different base compositions and DNA in a single-stranded form. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: FT-IR spectral profiles are a valuable tool

  5. DNA adductomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbo, Silvia; Turesky, Robert J; Villalta, Peter W

    2014-03-17

    Systems toxicology is a broad-based approach to describe many of the toxicological features that occur within a living system under stress or subjected to exogenous or endogenous exposures. The ultimate goal is to capture an overview of all exposures and the ensuing biological responses of the body. The term exposome has been employed to refer to the totality of all exposures, and systems toxicology investigates how the exposome influences health effects and consequences of exposures over a lifetime. The tools to advance systems toxicology include high-throughput transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and adductomics, which is still in its infancy. A well-established methodology for the comprehensive measurement of DNA damage resulting from every day exposures is not fully developed. During the past several decades, the (32)P-postlabeling technique has been employed to screen the damage to DNA induced by multiple classes of genotoxicants; however, more robust, specific, and quantitative methods have been sought to identify and quantify DNA adducts. Although triple quadrupole and ion trap mass spectrometry, particularly when using multistage scanning (LC-MS(n)), have shown promise in the field of DNA adductomics, it is anticipated that high-resolution and accurate-mass LC-MS(n) instrumentation will play a major role in assessing global DNA damage. Targeted adductomics should also benefit greatly from improved triple quadrupole technology. Once the analytical MS methods are fully mature, DNA adductomics along with other -omics tools will contribute greatly to the field of systems toxicology.

  6. MASSIF-1: a beamline dedicated to the fully automatic characterization and data collection from crystals of biological macromolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowler, Matthew W., E-mail: mbowler@embl.fr [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Grenoble Outstation, 71 avenue des Martyrs, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Université Grenoble Alpes-EMBL-CNRS, 71 avenue des Martyrs, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Nurizzo, Didier, E-mail: mbowler@embl.fr; Barrett, Ray; Beteva, Antonia; Bodin, Marjolaine [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 71 avenue des Martyrs, F-38043 Grenoble (France)

    2015-10-03

    MASSIF-1 (ID30A-1) is a new beamline dedicated to the completely automatic characterization and data collection from crystals of biological macromolecules. MASSIF-1 (ID30A-1) is an ESRF undulator beamline operating at a fixed wavelength of 0.969 Å (12.8 keV) that is dedicated to the completely automatic characterization of and data collection from crystals of biological macromolecules. The first of the ESRF Upgrade MASSIF beamlines to be commissioned, it has been open since September 2014, providing a unique automated data collection service to academic and industrial users. Here, the beamline characteristics and details of the new service are outlined.

  7. Modeling DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  8. Simple & Safe Genomic DNA Isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Robert; Solomon, Sondra

    1991-01-01

    A procedure for purifying DNA using either bacteria or rat liver is presented. Directions for doing a qualitative DNA assay using diphenylamine and a quantitative DNA assay using spectroscopy are included. (KR)

  9. Estimating attachment of nano- and submicrometer-particles coated with organic macromolecules in porous media: development of an empirical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phenrat, Tanapon; Song, Jee Eun; Cisneros, Charlotte M; Schoenfelder, Daniel P; Tilton, Robert D; Lowry, Gregory V

    2010-06-15

    Assessing the environmental transport and fate of manufactured nanoparticles (NPs) and potential exposure risks requires models for predicting attachment of NPs coated with organic macromolecules in porous media. The objective of this study was to determine the properties of coated nanoparticles that control their attachment behavior. Deposition data for a variety of nanoparticles with different types of anionic organic coatings, including natural organic matter (NOM)-coated latex and hematite nanoparticles, and poly(styrenesulfonate)-, carboxymethylcellulose-, and polyaspartate-coated hematite and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (80 data points), were used to develop an empirical correlation between measurable NP properties and their sticking coefficient (alpha) under a variety of electrolyte conditions and flow velocities. Available semiempirical correlations used to predict the attachment efficiency of electrostatically stabilized (uncoated) NPs overestimate the attachment efficiency of nanoparticles coated with NOM or synthetic polyelectrolytes because the correlations neglect electrosteric repulsions and the decreased friction afforded by such coatings that can inhibit attachment to surfaces. Adding a dimensionless parameter (N(LEK)) representing steric repulsions and the decreased friction force afforded by adsorbed NOM or anionic polyelectrolytes in the correlation significantly improves the correlation. This establishes the importance of including the adsorbed NOM- or polyelectrolyte layer properties for estimating the attachment efficiency of NPs in the environment. The form of N(LEK) suggests that limiting unintended transport and exposure to NPs could be achieved by using coatings with the smallest adsorbed mass and polymer density, shortest extended layer thickness, and largest molecular weight that would still afford the desired functionality of the coating.

  10. Quantum Confinement in Hydrogen Bond of DNA and RNA

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, da Silva dos; Ricotta, Regina Maria

    2015-01-01

    The hydrogen bond is a fundamental ingredient to stabilize the DNA and RNA macromolecules. The main contribution of this work is to describe quantitatively this interaction as a consequence of the quantum confinement of the hydrogen. The results for the free and confined system are compared with experimental data. The formalism to compute the energy gap of the vibration motion used to identify the spectrum lines is the Variational Method allied to Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics.

  11. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Paramagnetic Macromolecules

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    Since A. Kowalsky's first report of the spectrum of cytochrome c in 1965, interest in the detection, assignment and interpretation of paramagnetic molecules has surged, especially in the last decade. Two classes of systems have played a key role in the development of the field: heme proteins and iron-sulfur proteins. These two systems are unique in many respects, one of which is that they contain well-defined chromophores, each of which can be studied in detail outside the protein matrix. They are the most successfully studied macromolecules, and the first eight and last six of the seventeen contributions to this book deal with heme and/or iron-sulfur proteins. The middle three chapters survey the progress on, and significant promise of, more difficult systems which do not possess a chromophore, but which have nevertheless yielded remarkable insights into their structure.

  12. [Diffusion and diffusion-osmosis models of the charged macromolecule transfer in barriers of biosystems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varakin, A I; Mazur, V V; Arkhipova, N V; Serianov, Iu V

    2009-01-01

    Mathematical models of the transfer of charged macromolecules have been constructed on the basis of the classical equations of electromigration diffusion of Helmholtz-Smolukhovskii, Goldman, and Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz. It was shown that ion transfer in placental (mimicking lipid-protein barriers) and muscle barriers occurs by different mechanisms. In placental barriers, the electromigration diffusion occurs along lipid-protein channels formed due to the conformational deformation of phospholipid and protein molecules with the coefficients of diffusion D = (2.6-3.6) x 10(-8) cm2/s. The transfer in muscle barriers is due to the migration across charged interfibrillar channels with the negative diffusion activation energy, which is explained by changes in the structure of muscle fibers and expenditures of thermal energy for the extrusion of Cl- from channel walls with the diffusion coefficient D = (6.0-10.0) x 10(-6) cm2/s.

  13. Enhanced ileal absorption of a hydrophilic macromolecule, pentosan polysulfate sodium (PPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Liang; Yum, Alicia; Nguyen, Joe; Wong, Pat

    2004-01-01

    An in situ gelling, bioadhesive liquid formulation was developed to enhance the bioavailbility (BA) of a polysaccharide, pentosan polysulfate sodium (PPS). The formulation was tested to determine its bioavailability enhancement in a non-flush/non-ligated rat ileal model. A potent synergistic effect was found with a gelling agent Cremophor and a permeation enhancer sodium salicylate. The absolute bioavailabilities were 1.9%, 4.6%, 6.3% and 46.4%, respectively, for the PPS solution in saline, sodium salicylate/PPS, Cremophor/PPS and Cremophor/sodium salicylate/PPS. Therefore, we successfully demonstrated the approach of utilizing an in situ gelling/bioadhesive liquid carrier to enhancing the bioavailability of a hydrophilic macromolecule at the distal small intestine.

  14. Specific features of 5S rRNA structure - its interactions with macromolecules and possible functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, A V; Entelis, N S; Krasheninnikov, I A; Martin, R; Tarassov, I A

    2008-12-01

    Small non-coding RNAs are today a topic of great interest for molecular biologists because they can be regarded as relicts of a hypothetical "RNA world" which, apparently, preceded the modern stage of organic evolution on Earth. The small molecule of 5S rRNA (approximately 120 nucleotides) is a component of large ribosomal subunits of all living beings (5S rRNAs are not found only in mitoribosomes of fungi and metazoans). This molecule interacts with various protein factors and 23S (28S) rRNA. This review contains the accumulated data to date concerning 5S rRNA structure, interactions with other biological macromolecules, intracellular traffic, and functions in the cell.

  15. Spirulina cultivation with a CO2 absorbent: Influence on growth parameters and macromolecule production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Gabriel Martins da; Moraes, Luiza; de Souza, Michele da Rosa Andrade Zimmermann; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to select a concentration of CO2 absorbents to supplement Spirulina sp. LEB 18 cultivation and to evaluate the effect of these compounds on the growth and production of macromolecules. Three initial biomass concentrations (X0), eight concentrations of monoethanolamine (MEA), and three NaOH concentrations were tested. The selected MEA concentrations did not inhibit the growth of Spirulina and doubled the dissolved inorganic carbon concentration in the assay medium in relation to the concentration of NaOH. The protein concentration in the biomass grown with MEA was, on average, 17% higher than that obtained with NaOH. Thus, it was found that MEA did not reduce the productivity of Spirulina sp. LEB 18, and its use can be further explored as a means for converting the carbon dissolved in the medium to biomolecules.

  16. Microwave-assisted extraction of Shenfu coal and its macromolecule structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hong; LI Jian-wei; LEI Zhao; GE Ling-mei

    2009-01-01

    Coals consist of some molecules trapped within an organic matrix from which some organic compounds can be extracted by solvents. The Soxhlet technique has been widely used for extracting organic compounds. Microwave heating methods may be successfully applied in the field of coal science. Acetone extraction yields and the chemical composition of the extract were inves-tigated using a typical Chinese coal, Shenfu coal, with microwave-assisted extraction. The acetone extract and residue were ana-lyzed by GC/MS and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy respectively. The carbon spectra were converted into several numerical parameters, fa, Ha, Xb, which indicate the difference in macromolecular structure between Shenfu coal and its residue. Furthermore, a hybrid genetic algorithm was employed using these parameters to approximate a coal macromolecule by assembling the structural fragments or functional groups into a large and complicated structure.

  17. Ex vitro experimental study on concentration polarization of macromolecules (LDL) at an arterial stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, ZhiGuo; Deng, XiaoYan; Fan, YuBo; Li, DeYu

    2007-08-01

    To verify the previous theoretical prediction that the disturbed flow distal to a stenosis enhances lipid accumulation at the blood/arterial wall interface, we designed a canine carotid arterial stenosis model and measured ex vitro the luminal surface concentration of bovine serum albumin (as a tracer macromolecule) by directly taking liquid samples from the luminal surface of the artery. The experimental results showed that due to the presence of a filtration flow, the luminal surface albumin concentration c(w) was higher than the bulk concentration c(0) as predicted by our theory. The measurement revealed that the luminal surface concentration of macromolecules was indeed enhanced significantly in regions of the disturbed flow. At Re = 50, the relative luminal surface concentration c(w)/c(0) was 1.66 +/- 0.10 in the vortex region, while the c(w)/c(0) was 1.37 +/- 0.06 in the laminar flow region. When Re increased to 100, the c(w)/c(0) in the vortex flow region and the laminar flow region reduced to 1.39 +/- 0.07 and 1.24 +/- 0.04, respectively. The effect of the filtration rate, v(w), on the luminal surface concentration of albumin was remarkably apparent. At Re = 50 and 100, when v(w) = 8.9 +/- 1.7 x 10(-6) cm/s, c(w) in the vortex region was 77% and 52% higher than c(0) respectively, meanwhile when v(w) = 4.8 +/- 0.6 x 10(-6) cm/s, c(w) in the vortex region was only 66% and 39% higher than c(0) respectively. In summary, the present study has provided further experimental evidence that concentration polarization can occur in the arterial system and fluid layer with highly concentrated lipids in the area of flow separation point may be responsible for the formation and development of atherosclerosis.

  18. Enhanced Sampling Methods for the Computation of Conformational Kinetics in Macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazioli, Gianmarc

    Calculating the kinetics of conformational changes in macromolecules, such as proteins and nucleic acids, is still very much an open problem in theoretical chemistry and computational biophysics. If it were feasible to run large sets of molecular dynamics trajectories that begin in one configuration and terminate when reaching another configuration of interest, calculating kinetics from molecular dynamics simulations would be simple, but in practice, configuration spaces encompassing all possible configurations for even the simplest of macromolecules are far too vast for such a brute force approach. In fact, many problems related to searches of configuration spaces, such as protein structure prediction, are considered to be NP-hard. Two approaches to addressing this problem are to either develop methods for enhanced sampling of trajectories that confine the search to productive trajectories without loss of temporal information, or coarse-grained methodologies that recast the problem in reduced spaces that can be exhaustively searched. This thesis will begin with a description of work carried out in the vein of the second approach, where a Smoluchowski diffusion equation model was developed that accurately reproduces the rate vs. force relationship observed in the mechano-catalytic disulphide bond cleavage observed in thioredoxin-catalyzed reduction of disulphide bonds. Next, three different novel enhanced sampling methods developed in the vein of the first approach will be described, which can be employed either separately or in conjunction with each other to autonomously define a set of energetically relevant subspaces in configuration space, accelerate trajectories between the interfaces dividing the subspaces while preserving the distribution of unassisted transition times between subspaces, and approximate time correlation functions from the kinetic data collected from the transitions between interfaces.

  19. Opinion: hazards faced by macromolecules when confined to thin aqueous films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaeser, Robert M; Han, Bong-Gyoon

    2017-01-01

    Samples prepared for single-particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) necessarily have a very high surface-to-volume ratio during the short period of time between thinning and vitrification. During this time, there is an obvious risk that macromolecules of interest may adsorb to the air-water interface with a preferred orientation, or that they may even become partially or fully unfolded at the interface. In addition, adsorption of macromolecules to an air-water interface may occur even before thinning. This paper addresses the question whether currently used methods of sample preparation might be improved if one could avoid such interfacial interactions. One possible way to do so might be to preemptively form a surfactant monolayer over the air-water interfaces, to serve as a structure-friendly slide and coverslip. An alternative is to immobilize particles of interest by binding them to some type of support film, which-to continue using the analogy-thus serves as a slide. In this case, the goal is not only to prevent the particles of interest from diffusing into contact with the air-water interface but also to increase the number of particles seen in each image. In this direction, it is natural to think of developing various types of affinity grids as structure-friendly alternatives to thin carbon films. Perhaps ironically, if precautions are not taken against adsorption of particles to air-water interfaces, sacrificial monolayers of denatured protein may take the roles of slide, coverslip, or even both.

  20. A mathematical model for filtration and macromolecule transport across capillary walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchini, L; Bellin, A; Toro, E F

    2014-07-01

    Metabolic substrates, such as oxygen and glucose, are rapidly delivered to the cells of large organisms through filtration across microvessels walls. Modelling this important process is complicated by the strong coupling between flow and transport equations, which are linked through the osmotic pressure induced by the colloidal plasma proteins. The microvessel wall is a composite media with the internal glycocalyx layer exerting a strong sieving effect on macromolecules, with respect to the external layer composed by the endothelial cells. The physiological structure of the microvessel is represented as the superimposition of two membranes with different properties; the inner membrane represents the glycocalyx, while the outer membrane represents the surrounding endothelial cells. Application of the mass conservation principle and thermodynamic considerations lead to a model composed of two coupled second-order ordinary differential equations for the hydrostatic and osmotic pressures, one, expressing volumetric mass conservation and the other, which is non-linear in the unknown osmotic pressure, expressing macromolecules mass conservation. Despite the complexity of the system, the assumption that the properties of the layers are piece-wise constant allows us to obtain analytical solutions for the two pressures. This solution is in agreement with experimental observations, which contrary to common belief, show that flow reversal cannot occur in steady-state conditions unless the hydrostatic pressure in the lumen drops below physiologically plausible values. The observed variations of the volumetric flux and the solute mass flux in case of a significant reduction of the hydrostatic pressure at the lumen are in qualitative agreement with observed variations during detailed experiments reported in the literature. On the other hand, homogenising the microvessel wall into a single-layer membrane with equivalent properties leads to a very different distribution of

  1. Ex vitro experimental study on concentration polari-zation of macromolecules (LDL) at an arterial stenosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To verify the previous theoretical prediction that the disturbed flow distal to a stenosis enhances lipid accumulation at the blood/arterial wall interface, we designed a canine carotid arterial stenosis model and measured ex vitro the luminal surface concentration of bovine serum albumin (as a tracer mac-romolecule) by directly taking liquid samples from the luminal surface of the artery. The experimental results showed that due to the presence of a filtration flow, the luminal surface albumin concentration cw was higher than the bulk concentration co as predicted by our theory. The measurement revealed that the luminal surface concentration of macromolecules was indeed enhanced significantly in re-gions of the disturbed flow. At Re = 50, the relative luminal surface concentration cw/co was 1.66 ± 0.10 in the vortex region, while the cw/co was 1.37 ± 0.06 in the laminar flow region. When Re increased to 100, the cw/co in the vortex flow region and the laminar flow region reduced to 1.39 ± 0.07 and 1.24 ± 0.04, respectively. The effect of the filtration rate, vw, on the luminal surface concentration of albumin was remarkably apparent. At Re = 50 and 100, when vw = 8.9 ± 1.7 × 10-6 cm/s, cw in the vortex region was 77% and 52% higher than co respectively, meanwhile when vw = 4.8 ± 0.6 × 10-6 cm/s, cw in the vortex region was only 66 % and 39% higher than co respectively. In summary, the present study has provided further experimental evidence that concentration polarization can occur in the arterial system and fluid layer with highly concentrated lipids in the area of flow separation point may be responsible for the formation and development of atherosclerosis.

  2. Ex vitro experimental study on concentration polarization of macromolecules (LDL) at an arterial stenosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG ZhiGuo; DENG XiaoYan; FAN YuBo; LI DeYu

    2007-01-01

    To verify the previous theoretical prediction that the disturbed flow distal to a stenosis enhances lipid accumulation at the blood/arterial wall interface, we designed a canine carotid arterial stenosis model and measured ex vitro the luminal surface concentration of bovine serum albumin (as a tracer macromolecule) by directly taking liquid samples from the luminal surface of the artery. The experimental results showed that due to the presence of a filtration flow, the luminal surface albumin concentration cw was higher than the bulk concentration co as predicted by our theory. The measurement revealed that the luminal surface concentration of macromolecules was indeed enhanced significantly in regions of the disturbed flow. At Re = 50, the relative luminal surface concentration cw/co was 1.66±0.10 in the vortex region, while the cw/co was 1.37±0.06 in the laminar flow region. When Re increased to 100,the cw/co in the vortex flow region and the laminar flow region reduced to 1.39±0.07 and 1.24±0.04,respectively. The effect of the filtration rate, vw, on the luminal surface concentration of albumin was remarkably apparent. At Re=50 and 100, when vw=8.9±1.7×10-6 cm/s, cw in the vortex region was 77% and 52% higher than co respectively, meanwhile when vw = 4.8±0.6×10-6 cm/s, cw in the vortex region was only 66% and 39% higher than co respectively. In summary, the present study has provided further experimental evidence that concentration polarization can occur in the arterial system and fluid layer with highly concentrated lipids in the area of flow separation point may be responsible for the formation and development of atherosclerosis.

  3. Exciton scattering approach for optical spectra calculations in branched conjugated macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Wu, Chao; Malinin, Sergey V.; Tretiak, Sergei; Chernyak, Vladimir Y.

    2016-12-01

    The exciton scattering (ES) technique is a multiscale approach based on the concept of a particle in a box and developed for efficient calculations of excited-state electronic structure and optical spectra in low-dimensional conjugated macromolecules. Within the ES method, electronic excitations in molecular structure are attributed to standing waves representing quantum quasi-particles (excitons), which reside on the graph whose edges and nodes stand for the molecular linear segments and vertices, respectively. Exciton propagation on the linear segments is characterized by the exciton dispersion, whereas exciton scattering at the branching centers is determined by the energy-dependent scattering matrices. Using these ES energetic parameters, the excitation energies are then found by solving a set of generalized "particle in a box" problems on the graph that represents the molecule. Similarly, unique energy-dependent ES dipolar parameters permit calculations of the corresponding oscillator strengths, thus, completing optical spectra modeling. Both the energetic and dipolar parameters can be extracted from quantum-chemical computations in small molecular fragments and tabulated in the ES library for further applications. Subsequently, spectroscopic modeling for any macrostructure within a considered molecular family could be performed with negligible numerical effort. We demonstrate the ES method application to molecular families of branched conjugated phenylacetylenes and ladder poly-para-phenylenes, as well as structures with electron donor and acceptor chemical substituents. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) is used as a reference model for electronic structure. The ES calculations accurately reproduce the optical spectra compared to the reference quantum chemistry results, and make possible to predict spectra of complex macromolecules, where conventional electronic structure calculations are unfeasible.

  4. Anti-Arrhenius cleavage of covalent bonds in bottlebrush macromolecules on substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, Natalia V; Nese, Alper; Sun, Frank C; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Sheiko, Sergei S

    2012-06-12

    Spontaneous degradation of bottlebrush macromolecules on aqueous substrates was monitored by atomic force microscopy. Scission of C ─ C covalent bonds in the brush backbone occurred due to steric repulsion between the adsorbed side chains, which generated bond tension on the order of several nano-Newtons. Unlike conventional chemical reactions, the rate of bond scission was shown to decrease with temperature. This apparent anti-Arrhenius behavior was caused by a decrease in the surface energy of the underlying substrate upon heating, which results in a corresponding decrease of bond tension in the adsorbed macromolecules. Even though the tension dropped minimally from 2.16 to 1.89 nN, this was sufficient to overpower the increase in the thermal energy (k(B)T) in the Arrhenius equation. The rate constant of the bond-scission reaction was measured as a function of temperature and surface energy. Fitting the experimental data by a perturbed Morse potential V = V(0)(1 - e(-βx))(2) - fx, we determined the depth and width of the potential to be V(0) = 141 ± 19 kJ/mol and β(-1) = 0.18 ± 0.03 Å, respectively. Whereas the V(0) value is in reasonable agreement with the activation energy E(a) = 80-220 kJ/mol of mechanical and thermal degradation of organic polymers, it is significantly lower than the dissociation energy of a C ─ C bond D(e) = 350 kJ/mol. Moreover, the force constant K(x) = 2β(2)V(0) = 1.45 ± 0.36 kN/m of a strained bottlebrush along its backbone is markedly larger than the force constant of a C ─ C bond K(l) = 0.44 kN/m, which is attributed to additional stiffness due to deformation of the side chains.

  5. Do column frits contribute to the on-column, flow-induced degradation of macromolecules?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striegel, André M

    2014-09-12

    Flow-induced, on-column degradation is a major hindrance to the accurate characterization of ultra-high molar mass macromolecules and colloids. This degradation is a direct result of the large shear rates which are generated within the column, which cause chain scission to occur both in the interstitial medium and, it has been postulated, at the packing particle pore boundary. An additional putative source of degradation has been the column frits, though little experimental evidence exists to either support or refute this claim. To this effect, the present experiments examine the role of the frits in the degradation of high molar mass macromolecules. Two narrow dispersity polystyrene standards, the molar mass of which differs by a factor of two, were analyzed on three different size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) columns, each with frits of different pore size, at various flow rates. In the smallest pore size column, which also contained the smallest frits and which was packed with the smallest diameter particles, the larger standard was forced to degrade by increasing the flow rate of the mobile phase. During the course of the latter portion of the study, the inlet and the outlet frits were removed from the column, in stepwise fashion. It was concluded that neither frit played any appreciable role in the degradation. Results of our studies were applied to explain previously observed degradation in ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography of polymers. The general conclusion arrived at herein is that the column frits are likely to have a secondary role (as compared to interstitial and pore boundary stresses), or no role at all, in polymer degradation for cases where the frit radius is larger than or equal to the hydraulic radius rcof the column.

  6. Comparison of gold nanoparticle mediated photoporation: vapor nanobubbles outperform direct heating for delivering macromolecules in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ranhua; Raemdonck, Koen; Peynshaert, Karen; Lentacker, Ine; De Cock, Ine; Demeester, Jo; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Skirtach, Andre G; Braeckmans, Kevin

    2014-06-24

    There is a great interest in delivering macromolecular agents into living cells for therapeutic purposes, such as siRNA for gene silencing. Although substantial effort has gone into designing nonviral nanocarriers for delivering macromolecules into cells, translocation of the therapeutic molecules from the endosomes after endocytosis into the cytoplasm remains a major bottleneck. Laser-induced photoporation, especially in combination with gold nanoparticles, is an alternative physical method that is receiving increasing attention for delivering macromolecules in cells. By allowing gold nanoparticles to bind to the cell membrane, nanosized membrane pores can be created upon pulsed laser illumination. Depending on the laser energy, pores are created through either direct heating of the AuNPs or by vapor nanobubbles (VNBs) that can emerge around the AuNPs. Macromolecules in the surrounding cell medium can then diffuse through the pores directly into the cytoplasm. Here we present a systematic evaluation of both photoporation mechanisms in terms of cytotoxicity, cell loading, and siRNA transfection efficiency. We find that the delivery of macromolecules under conditions of VNBs is much more efficient than direct photothermal disturbance of the plasma membrane without any noticeable cytotoxic effect. Interestingly, by tuning the laser energy, the pore size could be changed, allowing control of the amount and size of molecules that are delivered in the cytoplasm. As only a single nanosecond laser pulse is required, we conclude that VNBs are an interesting photoporation mechanism that may prove very useful for efficient high-throughput macromolecular delivery in live cells.

  7. Application of flow field-flow fractionation for the characterization of macromolecules of biological interest: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qureshi, R.N.; Kok, W.T.

    2011-01-01

    An overview is given of the recent literature on (bio) analytical applications of flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF). FlFFF is a liquid-phase separation technique that can separate macromolecules and particles according to size. The technique is increasingly used on a routine basis in a variety

  8. Effect of adsorption of charged macromolecules on streaming and membrane potential values measured with a microporous polysulfone membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benavente, J.; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    1997-01-01

    Changes in streaming and membrane potentials measured across a commercial microporous polysulfone membrane as a result of the adsorption of differently charged macromolecules were studied. Measurements were carried out with different NaCl solutions (10(-3) M to 5 x 10(-2) M) and their mixtures...

  9. Hydroxycinnamic acids are ester-linked directly to glucosyl moieties within the lignan macromolecule from flaxseed hulls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijs, K.; Vincken, J.P.; Verhoef, R.P.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Gruppen, H.

    2008-01-01

    In flaxseed hulls, lignans are present in an oligomeric structure. Secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG), ester-linked to hydroxy-methyl-glutaric acid (HMGA), forms the backbone of this lignan macromolecule. The hydroxycinnamic acids p-coumaric acid glucoside (CouAG) and ferulic acid glucoside (FeA

  10. Application of flow field-flow fractionation for the characterization of macromolecules of biological interest: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.N. Qureshi; W.T. Kok

    2011-01-01

    An overview is given of the recent literature on (bio) analytical applications of flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF). FlFFF is a liquid-phase separation technique that can separate macromolecules and particles according to size. The technique is increasingly used on a routine basis in a variety o

  11. Functionalized gold nanoparticles for the binding, stabilization, and delivery of therapeutic DNA, RNA, and other biological macromolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K DeLong

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Robert K DeLong1, Christopher M Reynolds1, Yaneika Malcolm1, Ashley Schaeffer1, Tiffany Severs2, Adam Wanekaya21Department of Biomedical Science (Cell and Molecular Biology Program, 2Department of Chemistry, Missouri State University, Springfield, MO, USAAbstract: Nanotechnology has virtually exploded in the last few years with seemingly limitless opportunity across all segments of our society. If gene and RNA therapy are to ever realize their full potential, there is a great need for nanomaterials that can bind, stabilize, and deliver these macromolecular nucleic acids into human cells and tissues. Many researchers have turned to gold nanomaterials, as gold is thought to be relatively well tolerated in humans and provides an inert material upon which nucleic acids can attach. Here, we review the various strategies for associating macromolecular nucleic acids to the surface of gold nanoparticles (GNPs, the characterization chemistries involved, and the potential advantages of GNPs in terms of stabilization and delivery.Keywords: gold, nanoparticles, nanomaterials, RNA, nucleic acid

  12. Damage, DNA Repair, Aging, and Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Scott; Fang, Evandro Fei; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Croteau, Deborah L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2017-01-01

    Aging in mammals is accompanied by a progressive atrophy of tissues and organs, and stochastic damage accumulation to the macromolecules DNA, RNA, proteins, and lipids. The sequence of the human genome represents our genetic blueprint, and accumulating evidence suggests that loss of genomic maintenance may causally contribute to aging. Distinct evidence for a role of imperfect DNA repair in aging is that several premature aging syndromes have underlying genetic DNA repair defects. Accumulation of DNA damage may be particularly prevalent in the central nervous system owing to the low DNA repair capacity in postmitotic brain tissue. It is generally believed that the cumulative effects of the deleterious changes that occur in aging, mostly after the reproductive phase, contribute to species-specific rates of aging. In addition to nuclear DNA damage contributions to aging, there is also abundant evidence for a causative link between mitochondrial DNA damage and the major phenotypes associated with aging. Understanding the mechanistic basis for the association of DNA damage and DNA repair with aging and age-related diseases, such as neurodegeneration, would give insight into contravening age-related diseases and promoting a healthy life span. PMID:26385091

  13. Sperm DNA oxidative damage and DNA adducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Hueiwang Anna; Pan, Chih-Hong; Chao, Mu-Rong; Lin, Wen-Yi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate DNA damage and adducts in sperm from coke oven workers who have been exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. A longitudinal study was conducted with repeated measurements during spermatogenesis. Coke-oven workers (n=112) from a coke-oven plant served the PAH-exposed group, while administrators and security personnel (n=67) served the control. Routine semen parameters (concentration, motility, vitality, and morphology) were analyzed simultaneously; the assessment of sperm DNA integrity endpoints included DNA fragmentation, bulky DNA adducts, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dGuo). The degree of sperm DNA fragmentation was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay and sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). The PAH-exposed group had a significant increase in bulky DNA adducts and 8-oxo-dGuo compared to the control subjects (Ps = 0.002 and 0.045, respectively). Coke oven workers' percentages of DNA fragmentation and denaturation from the PAH-exposed group were not significantly different from those of the control subjects (Ps = 0.232 and 0.245, respectively). Routine semen parameters and DNA integrity endpoints were not correlated. Concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo were positively correlated with percentages of DNA fragmentation measured by both TUNEL and SCSA (Ps = 0.045 and 0.034, respectively). However, the concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo and percentages of DNA fragmentation did not correlate with concentrations of bulky DNA adducts. In summary, coke oven workers with chronic exposure to PAHs experienced decreased sperm DNA integrity. Oxidative stress could contribute to the degree of DNA fragmentation. Bulky DNA adducts may be independent of the formation of DNA fragmentation and oxidative adducts in sperm. Monitoring sperm DNA integrity is recommended as a part of the process of assessing the impact of occupational and environmental toxins on

  14. Chimeric proteins for detection and quantitation of DNA mutations, DNA sequence variations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric proteins having both DNA mutation binding activity and nuclease activity are synthesized by recombinant technology. The proteins are of the general formula A-L-B and B-L-A where A is a peptide having DNA mutation binding activity, L is a linker and B is a peptide having nuclease activity. The chimeric proteins are useful for detection and identification of DNA sequence variations including DNA mutations (including DNA damage and mismatches) by binding to the DNA mutation and cutting the DNA once the DNA mutation is detected.

  15. Effective interactions of DNA-stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaurrea Velasco, Clara; Likos, Christos N.; Kahl, Gerhard

    2015-09-01

    We put forward a model that allows the calculation of the effective potential of two interacting DNA-stars, i.e., three-armed, Y-shaped, charged macromolecules, built up by three intertwined single-stranded DNAs. These particles are assumed to float on a flat interface separating two media with different dielectric properties. As the only input, our model requires the charge density along the branches and the interaction between two infinitesimally short segments, along two interacting rods. With this effective interaction at hand, a detailed investigations of the self-assembly scenarios of these molecules either via computer simulations or via theoretical frameworks comes within reach.

  16. A Mo-anode-based in-house source for small-angle X-ray scattering measurements of biological macromolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruetzel, Linda K.; Fischer, Stefan; Salditt, Annalena; Sedlak, Steffen M.; Nickel, Bert; Lipfert, Jan, E-mail: Jan.Lipfert@lmu.de [Department of Physics, Nanosystems Initiative Munich, and Center for Nanoscience, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Amalienstr. 54, 80799 Munich, Germany and Geschwister-Scholl Platz 1, 80539 Munich (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    We demonstrate the use of a molybdenum-anode-based in-house small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) setup to study biological macromolecules in solution. Our system consists of a microfocus X-ray tube delivering a highly collimated flux of 2.5 × 10{sup 6} photons/s at a beam size of 1.2 × 1.2 mm{sup 2} at the collimation path exit and a maximum beam divergence of 0.16 mrad. The resulting observable scattering vectors q are in the range of 0.38 Å{sup −1} down to 0.009 Å{sup −1} in SAXS configuration and of 0.26 Å{sup −1} up to 5.7 Å{sup −1} in wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) mode. To determine the capabilities of the instrument, we collected SAXS data on weakly scattering biological macromolecules including proteins and a nucleic acid sample with molecular weights varying from ∼12 to 69 kDa and concentrations of 1.5–24 mg/ml. The measured scattering data display a high signal-to-noise ratio up to q-values of ∼0.2 Å{sup −1} allowing for an accurate structural characterization of the samples. Moreover, the in-house source data are of sufficient quality to perform ab initio 3D structure reconstructions that are in excellent agreement with the available crystallographic structures. In addition, measurements for the detergent decyl-maltoside show that the setup can be used to determine the size, shape, and interactions (as characterized by the second virial coefficient) of detergent micelles. This demonstrates that the use of a Mo-anode based in-house source is sufficient to determine basic geometric parameters and 3D shapes of biomolecules and presents a viable alternative to valuable beam time at third generation synchrotron sources.

  17. DNA damage and autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely [Redox Biology Center and School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583 (United States); Panayiotidis, Mihalis I. [School of Community Health Sciences, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Franco, Rodrigo, E-mail: rfrancocruz2@unl.edu [Redox Biology Center and School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583 (United States)

    2011-06-03

    Both exogenous and endogenous agents are a threat to DNA integrity. Exogenous environmental agents such as ultraviolet (UV) and ionizing radiation, genotoxic chemicals and endogenous byproducts of metabolism including reactive oxygen species can cause alterations in DNA structure (DNA damage). Unrepaired DNA damage has been linked to a variety of human disorders including cancer and neurodegenerative disease. Thus, efficient mechanisms to detect DNA lesions, signal their presence and promote their repair have been evolved in cells. If DNA is effectively repaired, DNA damage response is inactivated and normal cell functioning resumes. In contrast, when DNA lesions cannot be removed, chronic DNA damage triggers specific cell responses such as cell death and senescence. Recently, DNA damage has been shown to induce autophagy, a cellular catabolic process that maintains a balance between synthesis, degradation, and recycling of cellular components. But the exact mechanisms by which DNA damage triggers autophagy are unclear. More importantly, the role of autophagy in the DNA damage response and cellular fate is unknown. In this review we analyze evidence that supports a role for autophagy as an integral part of the DNA damage response.

  18. Multiplexed DNA-Modified Electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Slinker, Jason D.; Muren, Natalie B.; Gorodetsky, Alon A.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2010-01-01

    We report the use of silicon chips with 16 DNA-modified electrodes (DME chips) utilizing DNA-mediated charge transport for multiplexed detection of DNA and DNA-binding protein targets. Four DNA sequences were simultaneously distinguished on a single DME chip with fourfold redundancy, including one incorporating a single base mismatch. These chips also enabled investigation of the sequence-specific activity of the restriction enzyme Alu1. DME chips supported dense DNA monolayer formation with ...

  19. Synthesis and application of functional branched macromolecules: From site isolation and energy harvesting to catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Stefan

    The symbiosis of our understanding of structure property relationships in many biological macromolecules and our increased ability to prepare large synthetic macromolecules with exquisite structural precision has generated a new area of research where chemistry and materials science join with biology. For example, numerous biological systems utilize the concept of site isolation whereby an active center or catalytic site is encapsulated, frequently within a protein, to afford properties that would not be encountered in the bulk state. The ability of a dendritic shell to encapsulate functional core moieties and to create specific site-isolated nanoenvironments, thereby affecting molecular properties, not only mimics natural systems but affords novel materials with unique characteristics. Furthermore, introduction of donor chromophores at periphery of dendrimers having a central acceptor dye enables spatial and spectral energy concentration at the core. Continuing the effort towards designing bio-inspired macromolecules, this dissertation describes the use of different polymer architectures to encapsulate active sites that have either photophysical, photochemical, or catalytic functions and the evaluation of site isolation using a variety of different techniques. While the first part is mainly concerned with different synthetic approaches towards site isolation of porphyrin moieties, the second part describes the design of light-driven catalytic systems incorporating both light harvesting and energy conversion. The fundamental knowledge that can be gleaned from such investigations has implications that range from the preliminary design of artificial enzymes to the construction of molecular-scale devices. After an overview of dendritically encapsulated functions (Chapter 1) and a brief account of a novel synthetic approach to benzene core dendrimers (Chapter 2), site isolation of porphyrin moieties within dendrimers, their linear structural isomers, and branched star

  20. Optical modulator including grapene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  1. Physics of base-pairing dynamics in DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manghi, Manoel; Destainville, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    As a key molecule of life, Deoxyribo-Nucleic Acid (DNA) is the focus of numbers of investigations with the help of biological, chemical and physical techniques. From a physical point of view, both experimental and theoretical works have brought quantitative insights into DNA base-pairing dynamics that we review in this Report, putting emphasis on theoretical developments. We discuss the dynamics at the base-pair scale and its pivotal coupling with the polymer one, with a polymerization index running from a few nucleotides to tens of kilo-bases. This includes opening and closure of short hairpins and oligomers as well as zipping and unwinding of long macromolecules. We review how different physical mechanisms are either used by Nature or utilized in biotechnological processes to separate the two intertwined DNA strands, by insisting on quantitative results. They go from thermally-assisted denaturation bubble nucleation to force- or torque-driven mechanisms. We show that the helical character of the molecule, possibly supercoiled, can play a key role in many denaturation and renaturation processes. We categorize the mechanisms according to the relative timescales associated with base-pairing and chain orientational degrees of freedom such as bending and torsional elastic ones. In some specific situations, these chain orientational degrees of freedom can be integrated out, and the quasi-static approximation is valid. The complex dynamics then reduces to the diffusion in a low-dimensional free-energy landscape. In contrast, some important cases of experimental interest necessarily appeal to far-from-equilibrium statistical mechanics and hydrodynamics.

  2. Surface behavior and kinetic analysis of macromolecules separated from beer in aqueous solution; Biru yori bunrishita kobunshi no suiyoeki deno hyomen kyodo to sono sokudo ronteki kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segawa, S.; Mitani, Y. [Sapporo Breweries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan). Brewing Research Lab.; Ogaki, K. [Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan). Division of Chemical Engineering

    2000-09-10

    In a solution of macromolecules such as proteins that have surface activity, the macromolecules stabilize the foam by adsorbing at the bubble surface. These surface-active macromolecules at the gas/liquid interface lower surface energy. The macromolecules adhere to the gas/liquid interface, and then change their shapes. Hydrophobic groups in the molecule turn to the gas phase and hydrophilic groups turn to the liquid phase. The macromolecules separated from beer were dissolved in an acetic acid buffer solution, and then the surface behavior was speculated by the surface tension change. Their surface tension did not reach a constant value for several seconds, not like the low molecular solutions such as ethanol. The decrease in this surface tension could be kinetically analyzed. The surface tension decreased by the adsorption of macromolecules on the liquid surface, and by the shape changes in the molecule (the extension of molecule at the surface). In the {beta}-casein solution, the surface tension decreased in 2 steps that were more clear than in the beer macromolecule solution. This surface tension decrease is also supposed to show the adsorption of protein molecules and the shape change at the liquid surface. (author)

  3. The chain length of lignan macromolecule from flaxseed hulls is determined by the incorporation of coumaric acid glucosides and ferulic acid glucosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struijs, Karin; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Doeswijk, Timo G; Voragen, Alphons G J; Gruppen, Harry

    2009-01-01

    Lignan macromolecule from flaxseed hulls is composed of secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG) and herbacetin diglucoside (HDG) moieties ester-linked by 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric acid (HMGA), and of p-coumaric acid glucoside (CouAG) and ferulic acid glucoside (FeAG) moieties ester-linked directly to SDG. The linker molecule HMGA was found to account for 11% (w/w) of the lignan macromolecule. Based on the extinction coefficients and RP-HPLC data, it was determined that SDG contributes for 62.0% (w/w) to the lignan macromolecule, while CouAG, FeAG, and HDG contribute for 12.2, 9.0, and 5.7% (w/w), respectively. Analysis of fractions of lignan macromolecule showed that the higher the molecular mass, the higher the proportion of SDG was. An inverse relation between the molecular mass and the proportion (%) CouAG+FeAG was found. Together with the structural information of oligomers of lignan macromolecule obtained after partial saponification, it is hypothesized that the amount of CouAG+FeAG present during biosynthesis determines the chain length of lignan macromolecule. Furthermore, the chain length was estimated from a model describing lignan macromolecule based on structural and compositional data. The average chain length of the lignan macromolceule was calculated to be three SDG moieties with CouAG or FeAG at each of the terminal positions, with a variation between one and seven SDG moieties.

  4. Visual Impairment, Including Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Who Knows What? Survey Item Bank Search for: Visual Impairment, Including Blindness Links updated, April 2017 En ... doesn’t wear his glasses. Back to top Visual Impairments in Children Vision is one of our ...

  5. A statistical model of macromolecules dynamics for Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitri Koroliouk

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a new mathematical model to describe the mechanisms of biological macromolecules interactions. Our model consists of a discrete stationary random sequence given by a solution of difference stochastic equation, characterized by a drift predictive component and by a diffusion term. The relative statistical estimations are very simple and effective, promising to be a good tool for the mathematical description of collective biological reactions. This paper presents the mathematical model and its verification on a simulated data set, obtained on the basis of the well-known Stokes-Einsteinmodel. In particular, we considered several mix of particles of different diffusion coefficient, respectively: D1=10 mm2/sec and D2=100 mm2/sec. The parameters evaluated by this new mathematical model on simulated data show good estimation accuracy, in comparison with the prior parameters used in the simulations. Furthermore, when analyzing the data for the mix of particles with different diffusion coefficient, the proposed model parameters  (regression and  (square variance of the stochastic component have a good discriminative ability for the molar fraction determination.  In this paper, we propose a new mathematical model to describe the mechanisms of biological macromolecules interactions. Our model consists of a discrete stationary random sequence given by a solution of difference stochastic equation, characterized by a drift predictive component and by a diffusion term. The relative statistical estimations are very simple and effective, promising to be a good tool for mathematical description of collective biological reactions. This paper presents the mathematical model and its verification on simulated data set, obtained on the basis of the well-known Stokes-Einsteinmodel. In particular we considered several mix of particles of different diffusion coefficient, respectively: D1=10 mm2/sec and D2=100 mm2/sec. The parameters

  6. Left-handed DNA crossovers. Implications for DNA-DNA recognition and structural alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timsit, Y; Shatzky-Schwartz, M; Shakked, Z

    1999-02-01

    The close approach of DNA segments participates in many biological functions including DNA condensation and DNA processing. Previous crystallographic studies have shown that B-DNA self-fitting by mutual groove-backbone interaction produces right-handed DNA crossovers. These structures have opened new perspectives on the role of close DNA-DNA interactions in the architecture and activity the DNA molecule. In the present study, the analysis of the crystal packing of two B-DNA decamer duplexes d(CCIIICCCGG) and d(CCGCCGGCGG) reveals the existence of new modes of DNA crossing. Symmetric left-handed crossovers are produced by mutual fitting of DNA grooves at the crossing point. New sequence patterns contribute to stabilize longitudinal fitting of the sugar-phosphate backbone into the major groove. In addition, the close approach of DNA segments greatly influences the DNA conformation in a sequence dependent manner. This study provides new insights into the role of DNA sequence and structure in DNA-DNA recognition. In providing detailed molecular views of DNA crossovers of opposite chirality, this study can also help to elucidate the role of symmetry and chirality in the recognition of complex DNA structures by protein dimers or tetramers, such as topoisomerase II and recombinase enzymes. These results are discussed in the context of the possible relationships between DNA condensation and DNA processing.

  7. Cobalt-mediated radical coupling (CMRC): an unusual route to midchain-functionalized symmetrical macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debuigne, Antoine; Poli, Rinaldo; De Winter, Julien; Laurent, Pascal; Gerbaux, Pascal; Dubois, Philippe; Wathelet, Jean-Paul; Jérôme, Christine; Detrembleur, Christophe

    2010-02-01

    Cobalt-mediated radical coupling (CMRC) is a straightforward approach to the synthesis of symmetrical macromolecules that relies on the addition of 1,3-diene compounds onto polymer precursors preformed by cobalt-mediated radical polymerization (CMRP). Mechanistic features that make this process so efficient for radical polymer coupling are reported here. The mechanism was established on the basis of NMR spectroscopy and MALDI-MS analyses of the coupling product and corroborated by DFT calculations. A key feature of CMRC is the preferential insertion of two diene units in the middle of the chain of the coupling product mainly according to a trans-1,4-addition pathway. The large tolerance of CMRC towards the diene structure is demonstrated and the impact of this new coupling method on macromolecular engineering is discussed, especially for midchain functionalization of polymers. It is worth noting that the interest in CMRC goes beyond the field of polymer chemistry, since it constitutes a novel carbon-carbon bond formation method that could be applied to small organic molecules.

  8. Controlled method of reducing electrophoretic mobility of macromolecules, particles, or cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanalstine, James M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method of reducing electrophoretic mobility of macromolecules, particles, cells, and other substances is provided which comprises interacting in a conventional electrophoretic separating procedure, the substances with a polymer-linked affinity compound comprised of a hydrophilic neutral polymer such as polyethylene glycol bound to a second component such as a hydrophobic compound, an immunocompound such as an antibody or antibody active fragment, or a ligand such as a hormone, drug, antigen, or a hapten. The reduction of electrophoretic mobility achieved is directly proportional to the concentration of the polymer-linked affinity compound employed, and such reduction can comprise up to 100 percent for particular particles and cells. The present invention is advantageous in that electrophoretic separation can now be achieved for substances whose native surface charge structure had prevented them from being separated by normal electrophoretic means. Depending on the affinity component utilized, separation can be achieved on the basis of the specific/irreversible, specific/reversible, semi-specific/reversible, relatively nonspecific/reversible, or relatively nonspecific/irreversible ligand-substance interactions.

  9. Rappertk: a versatile engine for discrete restraint-based conformational sampling of macromolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmali Anjum M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macromolecular structures are modeled by conformational optimization within experimental and knowledge-based restraints. Discrete restraint-based sampling generates high-quality structures within these restraints and facilitates further refinement in a continuous all-atom energy landscape. This approach has been used successfully for protein loop modeling, comparative modeling and electron density fitting in X-ray crystallography. Results Here we present a software toolkit (Rappertk which generalizes discrete restraint-based sampling for use in structural biology. Modular design and multi-layered architecture enables Rappertk to sample conformations of any macromolecule at many levels of detail and within a variety of experimental restraints. Performance against a Cα-tracing benchmark shows that the efficiency has not suffered despite the overhead required by this flexibility. We demonstrate the toolkit's capabilities by building high-quality β-sheets and by introducing restraint-driven sampling. RNA sampling is demonstrated by rebuilding a protein-RNA interface. Ability to construct arbitrary ligands is used in sampling protein-ligand interfaces within electron density. Finally, secondary structure and shape information derived from EM are combined to generate multiple conformations of a protein consistent with the observed density. Conclusion Through its modular design and ease of use, Rappertk enables exploration of a wide variety of interesting avenues in structural biology. This toolkit, with illustrative examples, is freely available to academic users from http://www-cryst.bioc.cam.ac.uk/~swanand/mysite/rtk/index.html.

  10. Perspective: On the importance of hydrodynamic interactions in the subcellular dynamics of macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    An outstanding challenge in computational biophysics is the simulation of a living cell at molecular detail. Over the past several years, using Stokesian dynamics, progress has been made in simulating coarse grained molecular models of the cytoplasm. Since macromolecules comprise 20%-40% of the volume of a cell, one would expect that steric interactions dominate macromolecular diffusion. However, the reduction in cellular diffusion rates relative to infinite dilution is due, roughly equally, to steric and hydrodynamic interactions, HI, with nonspecific attractive interactions likely playing rather a minor role. HI not only serve to slow down long time diffusion rates but also cause a considerable reduction in the magnitude of the short time diffusion coefficient relative to that at infinite dilution. More importantly, the long range contribution of the Rotne-Prager-Yamakawa diffusion tensor results in temporal and spatial correlations that persist up to microseconds and for intermolecular distances on the order of protein radii. While HI slow down the bimolecular association rate in the early stages of lipid bilayer formation, they accelerate the rate of large scale assembly of lipid aggregates. This is suggestive of an important role for HI in the self-assembly kinetics of large macromolecular complexes such as tubulin. Since HI are important, questions as to whether continuum models of HI are adequate as well as improved simulation methodologies that will make simulations of more complex cellular processes practical need to be addressed. Nevertheless, the stage is set for the molecular simulations of ever more complex subcellular processes. PMID:27634243

  11. Antioxidant, antimicrobial, cell viability and enzymatic inhibitory of antioxidant polymers as biological macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi Gahruie, Hadi; Niakousari, Mehrdad

    2017-11-01

    Polymeric antioxidants such as Catechinaldehyde Polycondensates, Catechin-acelaldehydepolycondensates, Flavonoid-grafted chitosan fibers, Ferulate hydrogel, Dextran ferulate hydrogel, Starch-quercetin conjugate, Gallic acid- and Caffeic acid-functionalized chitosan, Gallic acid - chitosan conjugate, Poly(rutin), Gallic acid grafted chitosan, Dextran-Catechin Conjugate belong to biological macromolecules. These kinds of compounds have stronger antioxidant potential and pharmacokinetic activities, as compared to similar low molecular weight preservatives. Most of these compounds sources are either antioxidants with low molecules polymerization, or polymers conjugation such as synthetic or natural preservatives. Additives are well known as being an important ingredient of food products due to their strong preservative potential. Many researchers and industries attempt to find synthesize materials with the same antioxidant potential and higher stability than the similar compounds with low molecular weight. Recently, macromolecular antioxidants have received wide attention as food additives and dietary supplements in functional foods. It seems that the main usage of these compounds is in the food packaging industry. Most of these compounds have strong antioxidant, antimicrobial, cell viability and enzymatic inhibitory properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Coupling of the fusion and budding of giant phospholipid vesicles containing macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasawa, Hidetoshi; Nishimura, Kazuya; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2012-04-17

    Mechanisms that enabled primitive cell membranes to self-reproduce have been discussed based on the physicochemical properties of fatty acids; however, there must be a transition to modern cell membranes composed of phospholipids [Budin I, Szostak JW (2011) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108:5249-5254]. Thus, a growth-division mechanism of membranes that does not depend on the chemical nature of amphiphilic molecules must have existed. Here, we show that giant unilamellar vesicles composed of phospholipids can undergo the coupled process of fusion and budding transformation, which mimics cell growth and division. After gaining excess membrane by electrofusion, giant vesicles spontaneously transform into the budded shape only when they contain macromolecules (polymers) inside their aqueous core. This process is a result of the vesicle maximizing the translational entropy of the encapsulated polymers (depletion volume effect). Because the cell is a lipid membrane bag containing highly concentrated biopolymers, this coupling process that is induced by physical and nonspecific interactions may have a general importance in the self-reproduction of the early cellular compartments.

  13. Preparation, characterization and application of a novel biodegradable macromolecule: carboxymethyl zein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Huayue; Lu, Tao; Liu, Li; Lu, Chuanhua

    2015-01-01

    Zein, a naturally biocompatible and biodegradable macromolecule, is widely used as plastic film material; however, the poor water solubility limits its other applications. In this study, we aimed to obtain carboxymethyl zein (CM-zein) by modifying it with sodium monochloroacetate in weakly basic environment. CM-zein showed a new FTIR peak of C-O-C bond at 1080 cm(-1), with a new signal region appearing at 4.0-4.05 ppm that assigned to the protons of the CH2 group from a carboxymethyl on (1)H NMR and a Tg of 168.0 °C by thermal analysis. Compared with the -12.3 mV of zeta potential of unmodified zein, CM-zein increased it significantly to -23.9 mV as a consequence of carboxymethylation. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), a model drug used in CM-zein-based tablet, was rarely detected in 0.1 mol/L HCl (pH 1.0) but it was released massively and quickly in phosphates buffer (pH 6.8) in vitro assays. The unmodified zein-based tablet illustrated much lower release level in these two fluids. Furthermore, the pharmacokinetic study of rats showed that CM-zein released 5-FU in intestine but not in stomach after dissolving. These findings indicated that CM-zein has the potential to be used for enteric preparation as a novel pH-selective biomaterial.

  14. Introduction to 3D reconstruction of macromolecules using single particle electron microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oscar LLORCA

    2005-01-01

    Single-particle electron microscopy has now reached maturity, becoming a commonly used method in the examination ofmacromolecular structure. Using a small amount of purified protein, isolated molecules are observed under the electron microscope and the data collected can be averaged into a 3D reconstruction.Single-particle electron microscopy is an appropriate tool for the analysis of proteins that can only be obtained in modest quantities, like many of the large complexes currently of interest in biomedicine. Whilst the use of electron microscopy expands, new methods are being developed and improved to deal with further challenges, such as reaching higher resolutions and the combination of information at different levels of structural detail. More importantly, present methodology is still not robust enough when studying certain "tricky" proteins like those displaying extensive conformational flexibility and a great deal of user expertise is required, posing a threat to the consistency of the final structure. This mini review describes a brief outline of the methods currently used in the 3D analysis of macromolecules using single-particle electron microscopy, intended for those first approaching this field. A summary of methods, techniques, software, and some recent work is presented. The spectacular improvements to the technique in recent years, its advantages and limitations compared to other structural methods,and its future developments are discussed.

  15. Correction: Membrane-active macromolecules resensitize NDM-1 gram-negative clinical isolates to tetracycline antibiotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divakara S S M Uppu

    Full Text Available Gram-negative 'superbugs' such as New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase-1 (blaNDM-1 producing pathogens have become world's major public health threats. Development of molecular strategies that can rehabilitate the 'old antibiotics' and halt the antibiotic resistance is a promising approach to target them. We report membrane-active macromolecules (MAMsthat restore the antibacterial efficacy (enhancement by >80-1250 fold of tetracycline antibiotics towards blaNDM-1 Klebsiella pneumonia and blaNDM-1 Escherichia coli clinical isolates.Organismic studies showed that bacteria had an increased and faster uptake of tetracyclinein the presence of MAMs which is attributed to the mechanism of re-sensitization. Moreover,bacteria did not develop resistance to MAMs and MAMs stalled the development of bacterial resistance to tetracycline. MAMs displayed membrane-active properties such as dissipation of membrane potential and membrane-permeabilization that enabled higher uptake of tetracycline in bacteria. In-vivo toxicity studies displayed good safety profiles and preliminary in-vivo antibacterial efficacy studies showed that mice treated with MAMs in combination with antibiotics had significantly decreased bacterial burden compared to the untreated mice. This report of re-instating the efficacy of the antibiotics towards blaNDM-1 pathogens using membrane-active molecules advocates their potential for synergistic co-delivery of antibiotics to combat Gram-negative superbugs.

  16. Membrane-active macromolecules resensitize NDM-1 gram-negative clinical isolates to tetracycline antibiotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divakara S S M Uppu

    Full Text Available Gram-negative 'superbugs' such as New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase-1 (blaNDM-1 producing pathogens have become world's major public health threats. Development of molecular strategies that can rehabilitate the 'old antibiotics' and halt the antibiotic resistance is a promising approach to target them. We report membrane-active macromolecules (MAMs that restore the antibacterial efficacy (enhancement by >80-1250 fold of tetracycline antibiotics towards blaNDM-1 Klebsiella pneumonia and blaNDM-1 Escherichia coli clinical isolates. Organismic studies showed that bacteria had an increased and faster uptake of tetracycline in the presence of MAMs which is attributed to the mechanism of re-sensitization. Moreover, bacteria did not develop resistance to MAMs and MAMs stalled the development of bacterial resistance to tetracycline. MAMs displayed membrane-active properties such as dissipation of membrane potential and membrane-permeabilization that enabled higher uptake of tetracycline in bacteria. In-vivo toxicity studies displayed good safety profiles and preliminary in-vivo antibacterial efficacy studies showed that mice treated with MAMs in combination with antibiotics had significantly decreased bacterial burden compared to the untreated mice. This report of re-instating the efficacy of the antibiotics towards blaNDM-1 pathogens using membrane-active molecules advocates their potential for synergistic co-delivery of antibiotics to combat Gram-negative superbugs.

  17. Characterization of magnetically oriented phospholipid micelles for measurement of dipolar couplings in macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottiger, M; Bax, A

    1998-10-01

    Weak alignment of solute molecules with the magnetic field can be achieved in a dilute liquid crystalline medium, consisting of an aqueous mixture of dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dihexanoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DHPC). For a certain range of molar ratios, DMPC and DHPC can form large, disc-shaped particles, commonly referred to as bicelles (Sanders and Schwonek, 1992), which cooperatively align in the magnetic field and induce a small degree of alignment on asymmetrically shaped solute molecules. As a result, dipolar couplings between pairs of 1H, 13C or 15N nuclei are no longer averaged to zero by rotational diffusion and they can be readily measured, providing valuable structural information. The stability of these liquid crystals and the degree of alignment of the solute molecules depend strongly on experimental variables such as the DMPC:DHPC ratio and concentration, the preparation protocol of the DMPC/DHPC mixtures, as well as salt, temperature, and pH. The lower temperature limit for which the liquid crystalline phase is stable can be reduced to 20 degrees C by using a ternary mixture of DHPC, DMPC, and 1-myristoyl-2-myristoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, or a binary mixture of DHPC and ditridecanoyl-phosphatidylcholine. These issues are discussed, with an emphasis on the use of the medium for obtaining weak alignment of biological macromolecules.

  18. Characterization of magnetically oriented phospholipid micelles for measurement of dipolar couplings in macromolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ottiger, Marcel; Bax, Ad [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States)

    1998-10-15

    Weak alignment of solute molecules with the magnetic field can be achieved in a dilute liquid crystalline medium, consisting of an aqueous mixture of dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dihexanoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DHPC). For a certain range of molar ratios, DMPC and DHPC can form large, disc-shaped particles, commonly referred to as bicelles (Sanders and Schwonek, 1992), which cooperatively align in the magnetic field and induce a small degree of alignment on asymmetrically shaped solute molecules. As a result, dipolar couplings between pairs of {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C or {sup 15}N nuclei are no longer averaged to zero by rotational diffusion and they can be readily measured, providing valuable structural information. The stability of these liquid crystals and the degree of alignment of the solute molecules depend strongly on experimental variables such as the DMPC:DHPC ratio and concentration, the preparation protocol of the DMPC/DHPC mixtures, as well as salt, temperature, and pH. The lower temperature limit for which the liquid crystalline phase is stable can be reduced to 20 deg. C by using a ternary mixture of DHPC, DMPC, and 1-myristoyl-2-myristoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, or a binary mixture of DHPC and ditridecanoyl-phosphatidylcholine. These issues are discussed, with an emphasis on the use of the medium for obtaining weak alignment of biological macromolecules.

  19. Suspendable macromolecules are responsible for ice nucleation activity of birch and conifer pollen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. G. Pummer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The ice nucleation of bioaerosols (bacteria, pollen, spores, etc. is a topic of growing interest, since their impact on ice cloud formation and thus on radiative forcing, an important parameter in global climate, is not yet fully understood. Here we show that pollen of different species strongly differ in their ice nucleation behaviour. The average freezing temperatures in laboratory experiments range from 240 to 255 K. As the most efficient nuclei (silver birch, Scots pine and common juniper pollen have a distribution area up to the Northern timberline, their ice nucleation activity might be a cryoprotective mechanism. Far more intriguingly, it has turned out that water, which has been in contact with pollen and then been separated from the bodies, nucleates as good as the pollen grains themselves. The ice nuclei have to be easily-suspendable macromolecules located on the pollen. Once extracted, they can be distributed further through the atmosphere than the heavy pollen grains and so presumably augment the impact of pollen on ice cloud formation even in the upper troposphere. Our experiments lead to the conclusion that pollen ice nuclei, in contrast to bacterial and fungal ice nucleating proteins, are non-proteinaceous compounds.

  20. Electron Microscopy and Image Processing: Essential Tools for Structural Analysis of Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belnap, David M

    2015-11-02

    Macromolecular electron microscopy typically depicts the structures of macromolecular complexes ranging from ∼200 kDa to hundreds of MDa. The amount of specimen required, a few micrograms, is typically 100 to 1000 times less than needed for X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Micrographs of frozen-hydrated (cryogenic) specimens portray native structures, but the original images are noisy. Computational averaging reduces noise, and three-dimensional reconstructions are calculated by combining different views of free-standing particles ("single-particle analysis"). Electron crystallography is used to characterize two-dimensional arrays of membrane proteins and very small three-dimensional crystals. Under favorable circumstances, near-atomic resolutions are achieved. For structures at somewhat lower resolution, pseudo-atomic models are obtained by fitting high-resolution components into the density. Time-resolved experiments describe dynamic processes. Electron tomography allows reconstruction of pleiomorphic complexes and subcellular structures and modeling of macromolecules in their cellular context. Significant information is also obtained from metal-coated and dehydrated specimens. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. Oxidative damage to macromolecules in human Parkinson disease and the rotenone model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Laurie H; Greenamyre, J Timothy

    2013-09-01

    Parkinson disease (PD), the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder, is associated with selective degeneration of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons. Although the underlying mechanisms contributing to neurodegeneration in PD seem to be multifactorial, mitochondrial impairment and oxidative stress are widely considered to be central to many forms of the disease. Whether oxidative stress is a cause or a consequence of dopaminergic death, there is substantial evidence for oxidative stress both in human PD patients and in animal models of PD, especially using rotenone, a complex I inhibitor. There are many indices of oxidative stress, but this review covers the recent evidence for oxidative damage to nucleic acids, lipids, and proteins in both the brain and the peripheral tissues in human PD and in the rotenone model. Limitations of the existing literature and future perspectives are discussed. Understanding how each particular macromolecule is damaged by oxidative stress and the interplay of secondary damage to other biomolecules may help us design better targets for the treatment of PD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Film Self-Assembly of Oppositely Charged Macromolecules Triggered by Electrochemistry through a Morphogenic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dochter, Alexandre; Garnier, Tony; Pardieu, Elodie; Chau, Nguyet Trang Thanh; Maerten, Clément; Senger, Bernard; Schaaf, Pierre; Jierry, Loïc; Boulmedais, Fouzia

    2015-09-22

    The development of new surface functionalization methods that are easy to use, versatile, and allow local deposition represents a real scientific challenge. Overcoming this challenge, we present here a one-pot process that consists in self-assembling, by electrochemistry on an electrode, films made of oppositely charged macromolecules. This method relies on a charge-shifting polyanion, dimethylmaleic-modified poly(allylamine) (PAHd), that undergoes hydrolysis at acidic pH, leading to an overall switching of its charge. When a mixture of the two polyanions, PAHd and poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS), is placed in contact with an electrode, where the pH is decreased locally by electrochemistry, the transformation of PAHd into a polycation (PAH) leads to the continuous self-assembly of a nanometric PAH/PSS film by electrostatic interactions. The pH decrease is obtained by the electrochemical oxidation of hydroquinone, which produces protons locally over nanometric distances. Using a negatively charged enzyme, alkaline phosphatase (AP), instead of PSS, this one-pot process allows the creation of enzymatically active films. Under mild conditions, self-assembled PAH/AP films have an enzymatic activity which is adjustable simply by controlling the self-assembly time. The selective functionalization of microelectrode arrays by PAH/AP was achieved, opening the route toward miniaturized biosensors.

  3. A new force-extension formula for stretched macromolecules and polymers based on the Ising model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yue; Haverkamp, Richard G.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we derive a new force-extension formula for stretched macromolecules and homogeneous polymer matrices. The Ising model arising from paramagnetism is employed, where the magnetic force is replaced by the external force, and the resistance energy is addressed in this model instead of the usual persistent length arising from the freely jointed chain and worm-like chain models. While the force-extension formula reveals the distinctive stretching features for stretched polymers, the resistance energy is found to increase almost linearly with the external force for our two polysaccharides stretching examples with and without ring conformational changes. In particular, a jump in the resistance energy which is caused by a conformational transition is investigated, and the gap between the jump determines the energy barrier between two conformational configurations. Our theoretical model matches well with experimental results undergoing no and single conformational transitions, and a Monte Carlo simulation has also been performed to ensure the correctness of the resistance energy. This technique might also be employed to determine the binding energy from other causes during molecular stretching and provide vital information for further theoretical investigations.

  4. Quantum propagation of electronic excitations in macromolecules: A computationally efficient multiscale approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, E.; a Beccara, S.; Mascherpa, F.; Faccioli, P.

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a theoretical approach to study the quantum-dissipative dynamics of electronic excitations in macromolecules, which enables to perform calculations in large systems and cover long-time intervals. All the parameters of the underlying microscopic Hamiltonian are obtained from ab initio electronic structure calculations, ensuring chemical detail. In the short-time regime, the theory is solvable using a diagrammatic perturbation theory, enabling analytic insight. To compute the time evolution of the density matrix at intermediate times, typically ≲ps , we develop a Monte Carlo algorithm free from any sign or phase problem, hence computationally efficient. Finally, the dynamics in the long-time and large-distance limit can be studied combining the microscopic calculations with renormalization group techniques to define a rigorous low-resolution effective theory. We benchmark our Monte Carlo algorithm against the results obtained in perturbation theory and using a semiclassical nonperturbative scheme. Then, we apply it to compute the intrachain charge mobility in a realistic conjugated polymer.

  5. Electric double layer and electrokinetic potential of pectic macromolecules in sugar beet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuljanin Tatjana A.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrokinetic potential is an important property of colloidal particles and, regarding the fact that it is a well defined and easily measurable property, it is considered to be a permanent characteristic of a particular colloidal system. In fact, it is a measure of electrokinetic charge that surrounds the colloidal particle in a solution and is in direct proportion with the mobility of particles in an electric field. Gouy-Chapman-Stern-Graham's model of electric double layer was adopted and it was proven experimentally that the addition of Cu++ ions to sugar beet pectin caused a reduction in the negative electrokinetic potential proportional to the increase of Cu++ concentration. Higher Cu++ concentrations increased the proportion of cation specific adsorption (Cu++ and H+ with regard to electrostatic Coulombic forces. Consequently, there is a shift in the shear plane between the fixed and diffuse layers directed towards the diffuse layer, i.e. towards its compression and decrease in the electrokinetic potential or even charge inversion of pectin macromolecules.

  6. Role of macromolecules in the safety of use of body wash cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujak, Tomasz; Wasilewski, Tomasz; Nizioł-Łukaszewska, Zofia

    2015-11-01

    One of the most challenging problems related to the use of surfactants in body wash cosmetics is their potential to cause skin irritations. Surfactants can bind with proteins, remove lipids from the epidermal surface, contribute to the disorganization of liquid crystal structures in the intercellular lipids, and interact with living skin cells. These processes can lead to skin irritations and allergic reactions, and impair the epidermal barrier function. The present study is an attempt to assess the effect of polymers and hydrolysed proteins present in the formulations of model body wash cosmetics on product properties. Special attention was given to the safety of use of this product type. The study examined three macromolecules: polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), hydrolysed wheat protein (HWP) and polyvinylpyrrolidone/hydrolysed wheat protein crosspolymer (PVP/HWP). The addition of the substances under study was found to improve the foaming properties of body wash cosmetics, increase their stability during storage, and contribute significantly to an improvement in the safety of product use by reducing the irritant potential. The strongest ability to reduce the skin irritation potential was determined for the formula enriched with the PVP/HWP crosspolymer.

  7. Upgraded ESRF BM29 beamline for SAXS on macromolecules in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernot, Petra; Round, Adam; Barrett, Ray; De Maria Antolinos, Alejandro; Gobbo, Alexandre; Gordon, Elspeth; Huet, Julien; Kieffer, Jerôme; Lentini, Mario; Mattenet, Muriel; Morawe, Christian; Mueller-Dieckmann, Christoph; Ohlsson, Staffan; Schmid, Werner; Surr, John; Theveneau, Pascal; Zerrad, Louiza; McSweeney, Sean

    2013-07-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements of proteins in solution are becoming increasingly popular with biochemists and structural biologists owing to the presence of dedicated high-throughput beamlines at synchrotron sources. As part of the ESRF Upgrade program a dedicated instrument for performing SAXS from biological macromolecules in solution (BioSAXS) has been installed at the renovated BM29 location. The optics hutch has been equipped with new optical components of which the two principal elements are a fixed-exit double multilayer monochromator and a 1.1 m-long toroidal mirror. These new dedicated optics give improved beam characteristics (compared with the previous set-up on ID14-3) regarding the energy tunability, flux and focusing at the detector plane leading to reduced parasitic scattering and an extended s-range. User experiments on the beamline have been successfully carried out since June 2012. A description of the new BioSAXS beamline and the set-up characteristics are presented together with examples of obtained data.

  8. New beamline dedicated to solution scattering from biological macromolecules at the ESRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pernot, P; Theveneau, P; Giraud, T; Fernandes, R Nogueira; Nurizzo, D; Spruce, D; Surr, J; McSweeney, S [ESRF, BP 220, Grenoble (France); Round, A; Felisaz, F; Foedinger, L; Gobbo, A; Huet, J; Villard, C; Cipriani, F, E-mail: rejma@esrf.f, E-mail: around@embl.f [EMBL Grenoble, BP 181, Grenoble (France)

    2010-10-01

    The new bio-SAXS beamline (ID14-3 at the ESRF, Grenoble, France) is dedicated exclusively to small-angle scattering experiments of biological macromolecules in solution and has been in user operation since November 2008. Originally a protein crystallography beamline, ID14-3 was refurbished, still as a part of the ESRF Structural Biology group, with the main aim to provide a facility with 'quick and easy' access to satisfy rapidly growing demands from crystallographers, biochemists and structural biologists. The beamline allows manual and automatic sample loading/unloading, data collection, processing (conversion of a 2D image to a normalized 1D X-ray scattering profile) and analysis. The users obtain on-line standard data concerning the size (radius of gyration, maximum dimension and volume) and molecular weight of samples which allow on-the fly ab-inito shape reconstruction in order to provide feedback enabling the data collection strategies to be optimized. Automation of sample loading is incorporated on the beamline using a device constructed in collaboration between the EMBL (Grenoble and Hamburg outstations) and the ESRF. Semi/automated data analysis is implemented following the model of the SAXS facility at X33, EMBL Hamburg. This paper describes the bio-SAXS beamline and set-up characteristics together with the examples of user data obtained.

  9. Electrospun ECM macromolecules as biomimetic scaffold for regenerative medicine: challenges for preserving conformation and bioactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Emma Campiglio

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM, the physiological scaffold for cells in vivo, provides structural support to cells and guaranties tissue integrity. At the same time, however, it represents an extremely complex and finely tuned signaling environment that contributes in regulating tissue homeostasis and repair. ECM can bind, release and activate signaling molecules and also modulate cell reaction to soluble factors. Cell-ECM interactions, as a result, are recognized to be critical for physiological wound healing, and consequently in guiding regeneration. Due to its complexity, mimicking ECM chemistry and architecture appears a straightforward strategy to exploit the benefits of a biologically recognizable and cell-instructive environment. As ECM consists primarily of sub-micrometric fibers, electrospinning, a simple and versatile technique, has attracted the majority efforts aimed at reprocessing of biologically occurring molecules. However, the ability to trigger specific cellular behavior is likely to depend on both the chemical and conformational properties of biological molecules. As a consequence, when ECM macromolecules are electrospun, investigating the effect of processing on their structure, and the extent to which their potential in directing cellular behavior is preserved, appears crucial. In this perspective, this review explores the electrospinning of ECM molecules specifically focusing on the effect of processing on polymer structure and on in vitro or in vivo experiments designed to confirm the maintenance of their instructive role.

  10. Microfiberoptic fluorescence photobleaching reveals size-dependent macromolecule diffusion in extracellular space deep in brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zador, Zsolt; Magzoub, Mazin; Jin, Songwan; Manley, Geoffrey T; Papadopoulos, Marios C; Verkman, A S

    2008-03-01

    Diffusion in brain extracellular space (ECS) is important for nonsynaptic intercellular communication, extracellular ionic buffering, and delivery of drugs and metabolites. We measured macromolecular diffusion in normally light-inaccessible regions of mouse brain by microfiberoptic epifluorescence photobleaching, in which a fiberoptic with a micron-size tip is introduced deep in brain tissue. In brain cortex, the diffusion of a noninteracting molecule [fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran, 70 kDa] was slowed 4.5 +/- 0.5-fold compared with its diffusion in water (D(o)/D), and was depth-independent down to 800 microm from the brain surface. Diffusion was significantly accelerated (D(o)/D of 2.9+/-0.3) in mice lacking the glial water channel aquaporin-4. FITC-dextran diffusion varied greatly in different regions of brain, with D(o)/D of 3.5 +/- 0.3 in hippocampus and 7.4 +/- 0.3 in thalamus. Remarkably, D(o)/D in deep brain was strongly dependent on solute size, whereas diffusion in cortex changed little with solute size. Mathematical modeling of ECS diffusion required nonuniform ECS dimensions in deep brain, which we call "heterometricity," to account for the size-dependent diffusion. Our results provide the first data on molecular diffusion in ECS deep in brain in vivo and demonstrate previously unrecognized hindrance and heterometricity for diffusion of large macromolecules in deep brain.

  11. Polyamine-DNA interactions and development of gene delivery vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, T J; Tajmir-Riahi, H A; Thomas, Thresia

    2016-10-01

    Polyamines are positively charged organic cations under physiologic ionic and pH conditions and hence they interact with negatively charged macromolecules such as DNA and RNA. Although electrostatic interaction is the predominant mode of polyamine-nucleic acid interactions, site- and structure-specific binding has also been recognized. A major consequence of polyamine-DNA interaction is the collapse of DNA to nanoparticles of approximately 100 nm diameter. Electron and atomic force microscopic studies have shown that these nanoparticles are spheroids, toroids and rods. DNA transport to cells for gene therapy applications requires the condensation of DNA to nanoparticles and hence the study of polyamines and related compounds with nucleic acids has received technological importance. In addition to natural and synthetic polyamines, several amine-terminated or polyamine-substituted agents are under intense investigation for non-viral gene delivery vehicles.

  12. Combining Two Methods of Sequence Definition in a Convergent Approach: Scalable Synthesis of Highly Defined and Multifunctionalized Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solleder, Susanne C; Martens, Steven; Espeel, Pieter; Du Prez, Filip; Meier, Michael A R

    2017-08-23

    The straightforward convergent synthesis of sequence-defined and multifunctionalized macromolecules is described herein. The first combination of two efficient approaches for the synthesis of sequence-defined macromolecules is reported: thiolactone chemistry and the Passerini three-component reaction (P-3CR). The thiolactone moiety was used as protecting group for the thiol, allowing the synthesis of a library of sequence-defined α,ω-functionalized building blocks. These building blocks were subsequently efficiently coupled to oligomers with carboxylic acid functionalities in a P-3CR. Thus, larger oligomers with molecular weights of up to 4629.73 g mol(-1) were obtained in gram quantities in a convergent approach along with the introduction of independently selectable side chains (up to 15), thus clearly demonstrating the high versatility and the efficiency of the reported approach. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Coil-globule transition of macromolecules in mixed solvent: A semi-grand canonical molecular dynamics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherji, Debashish; Kremer, Kurt

    2014-03-01

    Conformational transition of macromolecules in mixed solvents are intimately linked to large local concentration fluctuations of solvent components. The numerical studies in the field are limited to the closed boundary schemes, which, however, suffer from severe system size effects. To overcome this discrepancy, we have developed a semi-grand canonical molecular dynamics scheme for complex fluids. Our method makes use of the adaptive resolution scheme (AdResS) with a metropolis particle exchange criterion. In AdResS, an all-atom region, containing macromolecule, is coupled to a coarse-grained (CG) reservoir. The semi-grand canonical particle exchange is performed in the CG region. As the applications of the method, we study the concentration driven reentrant collapse and swelling transition of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAm) and poly(N,N-diethylacrylamide) (PDEAm) in aqueous methanol and demonstrate the role of the delicate interplay of the different intermolecular interactions.

  14. Solubility and stability of curcumin in solutions containing alginate and other viscosity modifying macromolecules. Studies of curcumin and curcuminoids. XXX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tønnesen, H Hjorth

    2006-08-01

    The solubility, chemical- and photochemical stability of curcumin in aqueous solutions containing alginate, gelatin or other viscosity modifying macromolecules have been investigated in order to obtain an alternative to the use of surfactants or cyclodextrins. The solubility of curcumin in aqueous solution at pH 5 increased by a factor > or = 10(4) in the presence of 0.5% (w/v) alginate (various qualities) or gelatin compared to plain buffer, while propylene glycol alginate ester, cesapectin and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose did not have a similar solubilizing effect. The solubilization was slightly influenced by pH, ionic strength and type and concentration of buffer salts. The macromolecules do, however, not stabilize towards hydrolytic- or photolytic degradation of curcumin.

  15. [Uracil-DNA glycosylases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytel, Dariusz; Słupianek, Artur; Ksiazek, Dominika; Skórski, Tomasz; Błasiak, Janusz

    2008-01-01

    Uracil is one of four nitrogen bases, most frequently found in normal RNA. Uracyl can be found also in DNA as a result of enzymatic or non-enzymatic deamination of cytosine as well as misincorporation of dUMP instead of dTMP during DNA replication. Uracil from DNA can be removed by DNA repair enzymes with apirymidine site as an intermediate. However, if uracil is not removed from DNA a pair C:G in parental DNA can be changed into a T:A pair in the daughter DNA molecule. Therefore, uracil in DNA may lead to a mutation. Uracil in DNA, similarly to thymine, forms energetically most favorable hydrogen bonds with adenine, therefore uracil does not change the coding properties of DNA. Uracil in DNA is recognized by uracil DNA glycosylase (UDGs), which initiates DNA base excision repair, leading to removing of uracil from DNA and replacing it by thymine or cytosine, when arose as a result of cytosine deamination. Eukaryotes have at least four nuclear UDGs: UNG2, SMUG1, TDG i MBD4, while UNG1 operates in the mitochondrium. UNG2 is involved in DNA repair associated with DNA replication and interacts with PCNA and RPA proteins. Uracil can also be an intermediate product in the process of antigen-dependent antibody diversification in B lymphocytes. Enzymatic deamination of viral DNA by host cells can be a defense mechanism against viral infection, including HIV-1. UNG2, MBD4 and TDG glycosylases may cooperate with mismatch repair proteins and TDG can be involved in nucleotide excision repair system.

  16. Analytic device including nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2015-07-02

    A device for detecting an analyte in a sample comprising: an array including a plurality of pixels, each pixel including a nanochain comprising: a first nanostructure, a second nanostructure, and a third nanostructure, wherein size of the first nanostructure is larger than that of the second nanostructure, and size of the second nanostructure is larger than that of the third nanostructure, and wherein the first nanostructure, the second nanostructure, and the third nanostructure are positioned on a substrate such that when the nanochain is excited by an energy, an optical field between the second nanostructure and the third nanostructure is stronger than an optical field between the first nanostructure and the second nanostructure, wherein the array is configured to receive a sample; and a detector arranged to collect spectral data from a plurality of pixels of the array.

  17. Digital X-ray camera for quality evaluation three-dimensional topographic reconstruction of single crystals of biological macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgstahl, Gloria (Inventor); Lovelace, Jeff (Inventor); Snell, Edward Holmes (Inventor); Bellamy, Henry (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention provides a digital topography imaging system for determining the crystalline structure of a biological macromolecule, wherein the system employs a charge coupled device (CCD) camera with antiblooming circuitry to directly convert x-ray signals to electrical signals without the use of phosphor and measures reflection profiles from the x-ray emitting source after x-rays are passed through a sample. Methods for using said system are also provided.

  18. Racemic DNA crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Pradeep K; Collie, Gavin W; Kauffmann, Brice; Huc, Ivan

    2014-12-22

    Racemates increase the chances of crystallization by allowing molecular contacts to be formed in a greater number of ways. With the advent of protein synthesis, the production of protein racemates and racemic-protein crystallography are now possible. Curiously, racemic DNA crystallography had not been investigated despite the commercial availability of L- and D-deoxyribo-oligonucleotides. Here, we report a study into racemic DNA crystallography showing the strong propensity of racemic DNA mixtures to form racemic crystals. We describe racemic crystal structures of various DNA sequences and folded conformations, including duplexes, quadruplexes, and a four-way junction, showing that the advantages of racemic crystallography should extend to DNA.

  19. A Redox-Activatable Fluorescent Sensor for the High-Throughput Quantification of Cytosolic Delivery of Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaohui; Luo, Min; Mao, Chengqiong; Wei, Qi; Zhao, Tian; Li, Yang; Huang, Gang; Gao, Jinming

    2017-01-24

    Efficient delivery of biomacromolecules (e.g., proteins, nucleic acids) into cell cytosol remains a critical challenge for the development of macromolecular therapeutics or diagnostics. To date, most common approaches to assess cytosolic delivery rely on fluorescent labeling of macromolecules with an "always on" reporter and subcellular imaging of endolysosomal escape by confocal microscopy. This strategy is limited by poor signal-to-noise ratio and only offers low throughput, qualitative information. Herein we describe a quantitative redox-activatable sensor (qRAS) for the real-time monitoring of cytosolic delivery of macromolecules. qRAS-labeled macromolecules are silent (off) inside the intact endocytic organelles, but can be turned on by redox activation after endolysosomal disruption and delivery into the cytosol, thereby greatly improving the detection accuracy. In addition to confocal microscopy, this quantitative sensing technology allowed for a high-throughput screening of a panel of polymer carriers toward efficient cytosolic delivery of model proteins on a plate reader. The simple and versatile qRAS design offers a useful tool for the investigation of new strategies for endolysosomal escape of biomacromolecules to facilitate the development of macromolecular therapeutics for a variety of disease indications. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Combined small angle X-ray solution scattering with atomic force microscopy for characterizing radiation damage on biological macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Luca; Andriatis, Alexander; Brennich, Martha; Teulon, Jean-Marie; Chen, Shu-Wen W; Pellequer, Jean-Luc; Round, Adam

    2016-10-27

    Synchrotron radiation facilities are pillars of modern structural biology. Small-Angle X-ray scattering performed at synchrotron sources is often used to characterize the shape of biological macromolecules. A major challenge with high-energy X-ray beam on such macromolecules is the perturbation of sample due to radiation damage. By employing atomic force microscopy, another common technique to determine the shape of biological macromolecules when deposited on flat substrates, we present a protocol to evaluate and characterize consequences of radiation damage. It requires the acquisition of images of irradiated samples at the single molecule level in a timely manner while using minimal amounts of protein. The protocol has been tested on two different molecular systems: a large globular tetremeric enzyme (β-Amylase) and a rod-shape plant virus (tobacco mosaic virus). Radiation damage on the globular enzyme leads to an apparent increase in molecular sizes whereas the effect on the long virus is a breakage into smaller pieces resulting in a decrease of the average long-axis radius. These results show that radiation damage can appear in different forms and strongly support the need to check the effect of radiation damage at synchrotron sources using the presented protocol.

  1. Supramolecular Assembly of Comb-like Macromolecules Induced by Chemical Reactions that Modulate the Macromolecular Interactions In Situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hongwei; Fu, Hailin; Zhang, Yanfeng; Shih, Kuo-Chih; Ren, Yuan; Anuganti, Murali; Nieh, Mu-Ping; Cheng, Jianjun; Lin, Yao

    2017-08-16

    Supramolecular polymerization or assembly of proteins or large macromolecular units by a homogeneous nucleation mechanism can be quite slow and require specific solution conditions. In nature, protein assembly is often regulated by molecules that modulate the electrostatic interactions of the protein subunits for various association strengths. The key to this regulation is the coupling of the assembly process with a reversible or irreversible chemical reaction that occurs within the constituent subunits. However, realizing this complex process by the rational design of synthetic molecules or macromolecules remains a challenge. Herein, we use a synthetic polypeptide-grafted comb macromolecule to demonstrate how the in situ modulation of interactions between the charged macromolecules affects their resulting supramolecular structures. The kinetics of structural formation was studied and can be described by a generalized model of nucleated polymerization containing secondary pathways. Basic thermodynamic analysis indicated the delicate role of the electrostatic interactions between the charged subunits in the reaction-induced assembly process. This approach may be applicable for assembling a variety of ionic soft matters that are amenable to chemical reactions in situ.

  2. Membrane-active macromolecules kill antibiotic-tolerant bacteria and potentiate antibiotics towards Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppu, Divakara S S M; Konai, Mohini M; Sarkar, Paramita; Samaddar, Sandip; Fensterseifer, Isabel C M; Farias-Junior, Celio; Krishnamoorthy, Paramanandam; Shome, Bibek R; Franco, Octávio L; Haldar, Jayanta

    2017-01-01

    Chronic bacterial biofilms place a massive burden on healthcare due to the presence of antibiotic-tolerant dormant bacteria. Some of the conventional antibiotics such as erythromycin, vancomycin, linezolid, rifampicin etc. are inherently ineffective against Gram-negative bacteria, particularly in their biofilms. Here, we report membrane-active macromolecules that kill slow dividing stationary-phase and antibiotic tolerant cells of Gram-negative bacteria. More importantly, these molecules potentiate antibiotics (erythromycin and rifampicin) to biofilms of Gram-negative bacteria. These molecules eliminate planktonic bacteria that are liberated after dispersion of biofilms (dispersed cells). The membrane-active mechanism of these molecules forms the key for potentiating the established antibiotics. Further, we demonstrate that the combination of macromolecules and antibiotics significantly reduces bacterial burden in mouse burn and surgical wound infection models caused by Acinetobacter baumannii and Carbapenemase producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC) clinical isolate respectively. Colistin, a well-known antibiotic targeting the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram-negative bacteria fails to kill antibiotic tolerant cells and dispersed cells (from biofilms) and bacteria develop resistance to it. On the contrary, these macromolecules prevent or delay the development of bacterial resistance to known antibiotics. Our findings emphasize the potential of targeting the bacterial membrane in antibiotic potentiation for disruption of biofilms and suggest a promising strategy towards developing therapies for topical treatment of Gram-negative infections.

  3. Using a water-confined carbon nanotube to probe the electricity of sequential charged segments of macromolecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yu; Zhao Yan-Jiao; Huang Ji-Ping

    2012-01-01

    The detection of macromolecular conformation is particularly important in many physical and biological applications.Here we theoretically explore a method for achieving this detection by probing the electricity of sequential charged segments of macromolecules.Our analysis is based on molecular dynamics simulations,and we investigate a single file of water molecules confined in a half-capped single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with an external electric charge of +e or -e (e is the elementary charge).The charge is located in the vicinity of the cap of the SWCNT and along the centerline of the SWCNT.We reveal the picosecond timescaie for the re-orientation (namely,from one unidirectional direction to the other) of the water molecules in response to a switch in the charge signal,-e → +e or +e → e.Our results are well understood by taking into account the electrical interactions between the water molecules and between the water molecules and the external charge.Because such signals of re-orientation can be magnified and transported according to Tu et al.[2009 Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.USA 106 18120],it becomes possible to record fingerprints of electric signals arising from sequential charged segments of a macromolecule,which are expected to be useful for recognizing the conformations of some particular macromolecules.

  4. Diffusion and partitioning of macromolecules in casein microgels: evidence for size-dependent attractive interactions in a dense protein system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Paulo D S; Bouchoux, Antoine; Huet, Sébastien; Madec, Marie-Noëlle; Thomas, Daniel; Floury, Juliane; Gésan-Guiziou, Geneviève

    2015-02-10

    Understanding the mechanisms that determine the diffusion and interaction of macromolecules (such as proteins and polysaccharides) that disperse through dense media is an important fundamental issue in the development of innovative technological and medical applications. In the current work, the partitioning and diffusion of macromolecules of different sizes (from 4 to 10 nm in diameter) and shapes (linear or spherical) within dispersions of casein micelles (a protein microgel) is studied. The coefficients for diffusion and partition are measured using FRAP (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching) and analyzed with respect to the structural characteristics of the microgel determined by the use of TEM (transmission electron microscopy) tomography. The results show that the casein microgel displays a nonspecific attractive interaction for all macromolecules studied. When the macromolecular probes are spherical, this affinity is clearly size-dependent, with stronger attraction for the larger probes. The current data show that electrostatic effects cannot account for such an attraction. Rather, nonspecific hydration molecular forces appear to explain these results. These findings show how weak nonspecific forces affect the diffusion and partitioning of proteins and polysaccharides in a dense protein environment. These results could be useful to better understand the mechanisms of diffusion and partitioning in other media such as cells and tissues. Furthermore, there arises the possibility of using the casein micelle as a size-selective molecular device.

  5. Replicating animal mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. McKinney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication has been experiencing incredible progress in recent years, and yet little is certain about the mechanism(s used by animal cells to replicate this plasmid-like genome. The long-standing strand-displacement model of mammalian mtDNA replication (for which single-stranded DNA intermediates are a hallmark has been intensively challenged by a new set of data, which suggests that replication proceeds via coupled leading-and lagging-strand synthesis (resembling bacterial genome replication and/or via long stretches of RNA intermediates laid on the mtDNA lagging-strand (the so called RITOLS. The set of proteins required for mtDNA replication is small and includes the catalytic and accessory subunits of DNA polymerase y, the mtDNA helicase Twinkle, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (which most likely functions as the mtDNA primase. Mutations in the genes coding for the first three proteins are associated with human diseases and premature aging, justifying the research interest in the genetic, biochemical and structural properties of the mtDNA replication machinery. Here we summarize these properties and discuss the current models of mtDNA replication in animal cells.

  6. Amphiphilic macromolecule nanoassemblies suppress smooth muscle cell proliferation and platelet adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jennifer W; Lewis, Daniel R; Petersen, Latrisha K; Moghe, Prabhas V; Uhrich, Kathryn E

    2016-04-01

    While the development of second- and third-generation drug-eluting stents (DES) have significantly improved patient outcomes by reducing smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation, DES have also been associated with an increased risk of late-stent thrombosis due to delayed re-endothelialization and hypersensitivity reactions from the drug-polymer coating. Furthermore, DES anti-proliferative agents do not counteract the upstream oxidative stress that triggers the SMC proliferation cascade. In this study, we investigate biocompatible amphiphilic macromolecules (AMs) that address high oxidative lipoprotein microenvironments by competitively binding oxidized lipid receptors and suppressing SMC proliferation with minimal cytotoxicity. To determine the influence of nanoscale assembly on proliferation, micelles and nanoparticles were fabricated from AM unimers containing a phosphonate or carboxylate end-group, a sugar-based hydrophobic domain, and a hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) domain. The results indicate that when SMCs are exposed to high levels of oxidized lipid stimuli, nanotherapeutics inhibit lipid uptake, downregulate scavenger receptor expression, and attenuate scavenger receptor gene transcription in SMCs, and thus significantly suppress proliferation. Although both functional end-groups were similarly efficacious, nanoparticles suppressed oxidized lipid uptake and scavenger receptor expression more effectively compared to micelles, indicating the relative importance of formulation characteristics (e.g., higher localized AM concentrations and nanotherapeutic stability) in scavenger receptor binding as compared to AM end-group functionality. Furthermore, AM coatings significantly prevented platelet adhesion to metal, demonstrating its potential as an anti-platelet therapy to treat thrombosis. Thus, AM micelles and NPs can effectively repress early stage SMC proliferation and thrombosis through non-cytotoxic mechanisms, highlighting the promise of nanomedicine for

  7. Application of accelerator mass spectrometry to macromolecules: preclinical pharmacokinetic studies on a polybisphosphonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehpour, Mehran; Håkansson, Karl; Höglund, Urban; Grahn-Westin, Annika; Nilsson, Sten; Márquez, Marcela; Possnert, Göran; Holmberg, Anders R

    2011-09-15

    Data on the use of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in conjunction with in vivo studies of macromolecular drugs are scarce. The present study shows the versatility of this technique when investigating the pharmacokinetics (PK) of a macromolecular drug candidate, a polybisphosphonate conjugate (ODX). The aforementioned is a polymer (molecular weight ~30 kDa) constituting a carbohydrate backbone with covalently linked ligands (aldendronate and aminoguanidine) and is intended for treatment of osteoporosis and the therapy of bone metastasis from prostate cancer. The conjugate is prepared through partial oxidation of the carbohydrate and sequential coupling of the ligands by reductive amination. (14)C was incorporated in the conjugate by means of coupling a commercially available (14)C-lysine in the conjugation sequence. Fifteen rats were injected intravenously with (14)C-labelled ODX (150 µg, 14 Bq/rat) and blood samples were collected at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 24 h post-injection (3 rats/time point). Liver, spleen and kidney samples were collected at 4 and 24 h post-injection. Blood from each time point (triplicate) were collected for AMS measurement determining the isotopic ratio ((14)C/(12)C) and consequently the drug concentration in blood. ODX showed a transient presence in blood circulation; 93% of the total dose was cleared from the circulation within 1 h. The half-life after 1 h was estimated to be about 3 h; 0.7% of the administered (14)C dose of ODX remained in circulation after 24 h. The major (14)C accumulation was in the liver, the spleen and the kidneys indicating the probable route of metabolism and excretion. This study demonstrates the versatility of AMS for pharmacological in vivo studies of macromolecules. Labelling with (14)C is relatively simple, inexpensive and the method requires minimal radioactivity, eliminating the need for radioprotection precautions in contrast to methods using scintillation counting.

  8. Sedimentation of Reversibly Interacting Macromolecules with Changes in Fluorescence Quantum Yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Sumit K.; Zhao, Huaying; Schuck, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation with fluorescence detection has emerged as a powerful method for the study of interacting systems of macromolecules. It combines picomolar sensitivity with high hydrodynamic resolution, and can be carried out with photoswitchable fluorophores for multi-component discrimination, to determine the stoichiometry, affinity, and shape of macromolecular complexes with dissociation equilibrium constants from picomolar to micromolar. A popular approach for data interpretation is the determination of the binding affinity by isotherms of weight-average sedimentation coefficients, sw. A prevailing dogma in sedimentation analysis is that the weight-average sedimentation coefficient from the transport method corresponds to the signal- and population-weighted average of all species. We show that this does not always hold true for systems that exhibit significant signal changes with complex formation - properties that may be readily encountered in practice, e.g., from a change in fluorescence quantum yield. Coupled transport in the reaction boundary of rapidly reversible systems can make significant contributions to the observed migration in a way that cannot be accounted for in the standard population-based average. Effective particle theory provides a simple physical picture for the reaction-coupled migration process. On this basis we develop a more general binding model that converges to the well-known form of sw with constant signals, but can account simultaneously for hydrodynamic co-transport in the presence of changes in fluorescence quantum yield. We believe this will be useful when studying interacting systems exhibiting fluorescence quenching, enhancement or Forster resonance energy transfer with transport methods.

  9. Permeation of macromolecules into the renal glomerular basement membrane and capture by the tubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Marlon G.; Altenburg, Michael K.; Sanford, Ryan; Willett, Julian D.; Bleasdale, Benjamin; Ballou, Byron; Wilder, Jennifer; Li, Feng; Miner, Jeffrey H.; Berg, Ulla B.; Smithies, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    How the kidney prevents urinary excretion of plasma proteins continues to be debated. Here, using unfixed whole-mount mouse kidneys, we show that fluorescent-tagged proteins and neutral dextrans permeate into the glomerular basement membrane (GBM), in general agreement with Ogston's 1958 equation describing how permeation into gels is related to molecular size. Electron-microscopic analyses of kidneys fixed seconds to hours after injecting gold-tagged albumin, negatively charged gold nanoparticles, and stable oligoclusters of gold nanoparticles show that permeation into the lamina densa of the GBM is size-sensitive. Nanoparticles comparable in size with IgG dimers do not permeate into it. IgG monomer-sized particles permeate to some extent. Albumin-sized particles permeate extensively into the lamina densa. Particles traversing the lamina densa tend to accumulate upstream of the podocyte glycocalyx that spans the slit, but none are observed upstream of the slit diaphragm. At low concentrations, ovalbumin-sized nanoparticles reach the primary filtrate, are captured by proximal tubule cells, and are endocytosed. At higher concentrations, tubular capture is saturated, and they reach the urine. In mouse models of Pierson’s or Alport’s proteinuric syndromes resulting from defects in GBM structural proteins (laminin β2 or collagen α3 IV), the GBM is irregularly swollen, the lamina densa is absent, and permeation is increased. Our observations indicate that size-dependent permeation into the lamina densa of the GBM and the podocyte glycocalyx, together with saturable tubular capture, determines which macromolecules reach the urine without the need to invoke direct size selection by the slit diaphragm. PMID:28246329

  10. Dry powder inhalation of macromolecules using novel PEG-co-polyester microparticle carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfeek, Hesham M; Evans, Andrew R; Iftikhar, Abid; Mohammed, Afzal R; Shabir, Anjum; Somavarapu, Satyanarayana; Hutcheon, Gillian A; Saleem, Imran Y

    2013-01-30

    This study investigated optimizing the formulation parameters for encapsulation of a model mucinolytic enzyme, α-chymotrypsin (α-CH), within a novel polymer; poly(ethylene glycol)-co-poly(glycerol adipate-co-ω-pentadecalactone), PEG-co-(PGA-co-PDL) which were then applied to the formulation of DNase I. α-CH or DNase I loaded microparticles were prepared via spray drying from double emulsion (w(1)/o/w(2)) utilizing chloroform (CHF) as the organic solvent, L-leucine as a dispersibility enhancer and an internal aqueous phase (w(1)) containing PEG4500 or Pluronic(®) F-68 (PLF68). α-CH released from microparticles was investigated for bioactivity using the azocasein assay and the mucinolytic activity was assessed utilizing the degradation of mucin suspension assay. The chemical structure of PEG-co-(PGA-co-PDL) was characterized by (1)H NMR and FT-IR with both analyses confirming PEG incorporated into the polymer backbone, and any unreacted units removed. Optimum formulation α-CH-CHF/PLF68, 1% produced the highest bioactivity, enzyme encapsulation (20.08±3.91%), loading (22.31±4.34 μg/mg), FPF (fine particle fraction) (37.63±0.97%); FPD (fine particle dose) (179.88±9.43 μg), MMAD (mass median aerodynamic diameter) (2.95±1.61 μm), and the mucinolytic activity was equal to the native non-encapsulated enzyme up to 5h. DNase I-CHF/PLF68, 1% resulted in enzyme encapsulation (17.44±3.11%), loading (19.31±3.27 μg/mg) and activity (81.9±2.7%). The results indicate PEG-co-(PGA-co-PDL) can be considered as a potential biodegradable polymer carrier for dry powder inhalation of macromolecules for treatment of local pulmonary diseases.

  11. Composite Nanoformulation Therapeutics for Long-Term Ocular Delivery of Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrahari, Vibhuti; Agrahari, Vivek; Hung, Wei-Ting; Christenson, Lane K; Mitra, Ashim K

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to design and synthesize novel pentablock (PB) copolymer (PB-1: PCL-PLA-PEG-PLA-PCL) based nanoformulations suspended in a thermosensitive gelling copolymer (PB-2: mPEG-PCL-PLA-PCL-PEGm) termed as composite nanoformulation. The composite nanoformulation was prepared to provide a sustained delivery of macromolecules over a longer duration with negligible burst release effect. The delivery system was designed to be utilized for the treatment of posterior segment ocular diseases such as age-related (wet) macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and diabetic macular edema. The novel PB copolymers were characterized for their functional groups by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, molecular weight and purity by (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and gel permeation chromatography. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to determine the crystallinity of copolymers. The size distribution of PB-1 nanoparticles (NPs) prepared using emulsification-solvent evaporation method was found to be ∼150 nm analyzed by nanoparticle tracking analysis. The % encapsulation efficiency and % drug loading were found to be 66.64% w/w ± 1.75 and 18.17% w/w ± 0.39, respectively, (n = 3). Different weight percentages (15 and 20 wt %) of the PB-2 copolymer have been utilized for in vitro release studies of IgG-Fab from composite nanoformulation. A negligible burst release with continuous near zero-order release has been observed from the composite nanoformulation analyzed up to 80 days. In vitro cell viability and biocompatibility studies performed on ocular (human corneal epithelial and retinal pigment epithelium) and mouse macrophage (RAW 264.7) cell lines showed that the synthesized PB copolymer based composite nanoformulations were safe for clinical applications. On the basis of the results observed, it is concluded that PB copolymer based composite nanoformulations can serve as a platform for ocular delivery of therapeutic proteins. In addition, the

  12. [Role of rapid movement of spin labels in interpreting EPR spectra for spin-labelled macromolecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikol'skiĭ, D O; Timofeev, V P

    2003-01-01

    The method of spin labeling was used to monitor quick movements of side residues in protein monocrystals. The EPR spectra of monocrystals of spin-labeled lysozyme at different orientations of the tetrahonal crystal relative to the direction of the magnetic field were interpreted using the molecular dynamics method. A simple model was proposed, which enables one to calculate the trajectory of movements of the spin label by the molecular dynamic method over a relatively short period of time. The entire "frozen" protein molecule and a "defrozen" spin-labeled amino acid residue were considered in the framework of the model. To calculate the trajectories in vacuum, a model of spin-labeled lysozyme was constructed, and the parameters of force potentials for the atoms of the protein molecule and the spin label were specified. It follows from the calculations that the protein environment sterically hinders the range of eventual angular reorientations of the reporter NO-group of nitroxyl incorporated into the spin label, thereby affecting the shape of the EPR spectrum. However, the scatter in the positions of the reporter group in the angular space turned out to correspond to the Gauss distribution. Using the atomic coordinates of the spin label, obtained in a chosen time interval by the method of molecular dynamics, and taking into account the distribution of the states of the spin label in the ensemble of spin-labeled macromolecules in the crystal, we simulated the EPR spectra of monocrystals of spin-labeled lysozyme. The theoretical EPR spectra coincide well with the experimental.

  13. Phosphocholine-Modified Macromolecules and Canonical Nicotinic Agonists Inhibit ATP-Induced IL-1β Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Andreas; Küllmar, Mira; Wilker, Sigrid; Richter, Katrin; Zakrzewicz, Anna; Atanasova, Srebrena; Mathes, Verena; Timm, Thomas; Lerner, Sabrina; Klein, Jochen; Kaufmann, Andreas; Bauer, Stefan; Padberg, Winfried; Kummer, Wolfgang; Janciauskiene, Sabina; Fronius, Martin; Schweda, Elke K H; Lochnit, Günter; Grau, Veronika

    2015-09-01

    IL-1β is a potent proinflammatory cytokine of the innate immune system that is involved in host defense against infection. However, increased production of IL-1β plays a pathogenic role in various inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, gout, sepsis, stroke, and transplant rejection. To prevent detrimental collateral damage, IL-1β release is tightly controlled and typically requires two consecutive danger signals. LPS from Gram-negative bacteria is a prototypical first signal inducing pro-IL-1β synthesis, whereas extracellular ATP is a typical second signal sensed by the ATP receptor P2X7 that triggers activation of the NLRP3-containing inflammasome, proteolytic cleavage of pro-IL-1β by caspase-1, and release of mature IL-1β. Mechanisms controlling IL-1β release, even in the presence of both danger signals, are needed to protect from collateral damage and are of therapeutic interest. In this article, we show that acetylcholine, choline, phosphocholine, phosphocholine-modified LPS from Haemophilus influenzae, and phosphocholine-modified protein efficiently inhibit ATP-mediated IL-1β release in human and rat monocytes via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing subunits α7, α9, and/or α10. Of note, we identify receptors for phosphocholine-modified macromolecules that are synthesized by microbes and eukaryotic parasites and are well-known modulators of the immune system. Our data suggest that an endogenous anti-inflammatory cholinergic control mechanism effectively controls ATP-mediated release of IL-1β and that the same mechanism is used by symbionts and misused by parasites to evade innate immune responses of the host.

  14. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulation of DNA: implementation and validation of the AMBER98 force field in LAMMPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindon, Christina; Harris, Sarah; Evans, Tom; Novik, Keir; Coveney, Peter; Laughton, Charles

    2004-07-15

    Molecular modelling played a central role in the discovery of the structure of DNA by Watson and Crick. Today, such modelling is done on computers: the more powerful these computers are, the more detailed and extensive can be the study of the dynamics of such biological macromolecules. To fully harness the power of modern massively parallel computers, however, we need to develop and deploy algorithms which can exploit the structure of such hardware. The Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS) is a scalable molecular dynamics code including long-range Coulomb interactions, which has been specifically designed to function efficiently on parallel platforms. Here we describe the implementation of the AMBER98 force field in LAMMPS and its validation for molecular dynamics investigations of DNA structure and flexibility against the benchmark of results obtained with the long-established code AMBER6 (Assisted Model Building with Energy Refinement, version 6). Extended molecular dynamics simulations on the hydrated DNA dodecamer d(CTTTTGCAAAAG)(2), which has previously been the subject of extensive dynamical analysis using AMBER6, show that it is possible to obtain excellent agreement in terms of static, dynamic and thermodynamic parameters between AMBER6 and LAMMPS. In comparison with AMBER6, LAMMPS shows greatly improved scalability in massively parallel environments, opening up the possibility of efficient simulations of order-of-magnitude larger systems and/or for order-of-magnitude greater simulation times.

  15. DNA Microarray Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thakare SP

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available DNA Microarray is the emerging technique in Biotechnology. The many varieties of DNA microarray or DNA chip devices and systems are described along with their methods for fabrication and their use. It also includes screening and diagnostic applications. The DNA microarray hybridization applications include the important areas of gene expression analysis and genotyping for point mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, and short tandem repeats (STRs. In addition to the many molecular biological and genomic research uses, this review covers applications of microarray devices and systems for pharmacogenomic research and drug discovery, infectious and genetic disease and cancer diagnostics, and forensic and genetic identification purposes.

  16. Electron transfer behaviour of biological macromolecules towards the single-molecule level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Grubb, Mikala; Hansen, Allan G.; Kuznetsov, Alexander M.; Boisen, Anja; Wackerbarth, Hainer; Ulstrup, Jens

    2003-05-01

    Redox metalloproteins immobilized on metallic surfaces in contact with aqueous biological media are important in many areas of pure and applied sciences. Redox metalloprotein films are currently being addressed by new approaches where biotechnology including modified and synthetic proteins is combined with state-of-the-art physical electrochemistry with emphasis on single-crystal, atomically planar electrode surfaces, in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and other surface techniques. These approaches have brought bioelectrochemistry important steps forward towards the nanoscale and single-molecule levels. We discuss here these advances with reference to two specific redox metalloproteins, the blue single-copper protein Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin and the single-haem protein Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cytochrome c, and a short oligonucleotide. Both proteins can be immobilized on Au(111) by chemisorption via exposed sulfur-containing residues. Voltammetric, interfacial capacitance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and microcantilever sensor data, together with in situ STM with single-molecule resolution, all point to a coherent view of monolayer organization with protein electron transfer (ET) function retained. In situ STM can also address the microscopic mechanisms for electron tunnelling through the biomolecules and offers novel notions such as coherent multi-ET between the substrate and tip via the molecular redox levels. This differs in important respects from electrochemical ET at a single metal/electrolyte interface. Similar data for a short oligonucleotide immobilized on Au(111) show that oligonucleotides can be characterized with comparable detail, with novel perspectives for addressing DNA electronic conduction mechanisms and for biological screening towards the single-molecule level.

  17. Electron transfer behaviour of biological macromolecules towards the single-molecule level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Jingdong [Department of Chemistry, Building 207, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Grubb, Mikala [Department of Chemistry, Building 207, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Hansen, Allan G [Department of Chemistry, Building 207, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Kuznetsov, Alexander M [A N Frumkin Institute of Electrochemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskij Prospect 31, 117071 Moscow (Russian Federation); Boisen, Anja [Microelectronics Centre, Building 345, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Wackerbarth, Hainer [Department of Chemistry, Building 207, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Ulstrup, Jens [Department of Chemistry, Building 207, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark)

    2003-05-14

    Redox metalloproteins immobilized on metallic surfaces in contact with aqueous biological media are important in many areas of pure and applied sciences. Redox metalloprotein films are currently being addressed by new approaches where biotechnology including modified and synthetic proteins is combined with state-of-the-art physical electrochemistry with emphasis on single-crystal, atomically planar electrode surfaces, in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and other surface techniques. These approaches have brought bioelectrochemistry important steps forward towards the nanoscale and single-molecule levels. We discuss here these advances with reference to two specific redox metalloproteins, the blue single-copper protein Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin and the single-haem protein Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cytochrome c, and a short oligonucleotide. Both proteins can be immobilized on Au(111) by chemisorption via exposed sulfur-containing residues. Voltammetric, interfacial capacitance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and microcantilever sensor data, together with in situ STM with single-molecule resolution, all point to a coherent view of monolayer organization with protein electron transfer (ET) function retained. In situ STM can also address the microscopic mechanisms for electron tunnelling through the biomolecules and offers novel notions such as coherent multi-ET between the substrate and tip via the molecular redox levels. This differs in important respects from electrochemical ET at a single metal/electrolyte interface. Similar data for a short oligonucleotide immobilized on Au(111) show that oligonucleotides can be characterized with comparable detail, with novel perspectives for addressing DNA electronic conduction mechanisms and for biological screening towards the single-molecule level.

  18. Luminescent DNA- and agar-based membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leones, R; Fernandes, M; Ferreira, R A S; Cesarino, I; Lima, J F; Carlos, L D; Bermudez, V de Zea; Magon, C J; Donoso, J P; Silva, M M; Pawlicka, A

    2014-09-01

    Luminescent materials containing europium ions are investigated for different optical applications. They can be obtained using bio-macromolecules, which are promising alternatives to synthetic polymers based on the decreasing oil resources. This paper describes studies of the DNA- and Agar-europium triflate luminescent membranes and its potential technological applications are expanded to electroluminescent devices. Polarized optical microscopy demonstrated that the samples are birefringent with submicrometer anisotropy. The X-ray diffraction analysis revealed predominantly amorphous nature of the samples and the atomic force microscopy images showed a roughness of the membranes of 409.0 and 136.1 nm for the samples of DNA10Eu and Agar1.11Eu, respectively. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of the DNA(n)Eu membranes with the principal lines at g ≈ 2.0 and g ≈ 4.8 confirmed uniform distribution of rare earth ions in a disordered matrix. Moreover, these strong and narrow resonance lines for the samples of DNA(n)Eu when compared to the Agar(n)Eu suggested a presence of paramagnetic radicals arising from the DNA matrix. The emission spectra suggested that the Eu3+ ions occupy a single local environment in both matrices and the excitation spectra monitored around the Eu emission lines pointed out that the Eu3+ ions in the Agar host were mainly excited via the broad band component rather than by direct intra-4f(6) excitation, whereas the opposite case occurred for the DNA-based sample.

  19. Label-free electrical quantification of the dielectrophoretic response of DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Henning, Anja; Bier, Frank F; Hoelzel, Ralph; 10.1186/1757-5036-1-4

    2009-01-01

    A purely electrical sensing scheme is presented that determines the concentration of macromolecules in solution by measuring the capacitance between planar microelectrodes. Concentrations of DNA in the ng/mL range have been used in samples of 1 microL volume. The method has been applied to the characterisation of the dielectrophoretic response of DNA without the need for any chemical modifications. The influence of electrical parameters like duty cycle, voltage and frequency has been investigated. The results are in good agreement with data from dielectrophoretic studies on fluorescently labelled DNA. Extension of the method down to the single molecule level appears feasible.

  20. Influence of polyethylene glycol on the ligation reaction with calf thymus DNA ligases I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teraoka, H; Tsukada, K

    1987-01-01

    High concentrations of the nonspecific macromolecule polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG 6000) enabled DNA ligases I and II from calf thymus to catalyze intermolecular blunt-end ligation of duplex DNA. Intermolecular cohesive-end ligation with these enzymes was markedly stimulated in the presence of 10-16% (w/v) PEG 6000. The effect of PEG 6000 (4-16%) on the sealing of single-stranded breaks in duplex DNA with DNA ligases I and II was not appreciably stimulatory but rather inhibitory. PEG 6000 (15%) enhanced more twofold the rate of DNA ligase II-AMP complex formation, but moderately suppressed the rate of formation of DNA ligase 1-AMP complex. Polyamines and KCl inhibited blunt-end and cohesive-end ligations with DNA ligases I and II in the presence of PEG 6000.

  1. Conformational and phase transitions in DNA--photosensitive surfactant solutions: Experiment and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasyanenko, N; Lysyakova, L; Ramazanov, R; Nesterenko, A; Yaroshevich, I; Titov, E; Alexeev, G; Lezov, A; Unksov, I

    2015-02-01

    DNA binding to trans- and cis-isomers of azobenzene containing cationic surfactant in 5 mM NaCl solution was investigated by the methods of dynamic light scattering (DLS), low-gradient viscometry (LGV), atomic force microscopy (AFM), circular dichroism (CD), gel electrophoresis (GE), flow birefringence (FB), UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Light-responsive conformational transitions of DNA in complex with photosensitive surfactant, changes in DNA optical anisotropy and persistent length, phase transition of DNA into nanoparticles induced by high surfactant concentration, as well as transformation of surfactant conformation under its binding to macromolecule were studied. Computer simulations of micelles formation for cis- and trans-isomers of azobenzene containing surfactant, as well as DNA-surfactant interaction, were carried out. Phase diagram for DNA-surfactant solutions was designed. The possibility to reverse the DNA packaging induced by surfactant binding with the dilution and light irradiation was shown.

  2. 高分子材料的老化研究%Aging studies of macromolecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周勇

    2012-01-01

    The paper demonstrated the changes of surface physical properties, mechanical properties electrical properties caused by the aging of macromolecule, analyzed the internal factors and external factors inducing aging, such as chemical structure, physical morphology, stereo structure, molecular weight distribution, metal impurities, temperature, humidity, oxygen, light, chemical mediator, biological factors and so on; explained the aging evaluation method such as the natural aging test, artificial aging test, weather resistance method, heating aging experiment, hydrothermal aging test, ozone aging test, salt fog test, cold resistant test and anti fungus test; introduced the aging performance evaluation index on the physical properties, mechanical properties, microanalysis, durability and systematic analysis technology, inferred the future trend of preventive measures on heating aging, hydrothermal aging, oxidative aging photo aging and biological aging%本文介绍了由高分子材料老化引起的外观、物理性能、力学性能、电性能的变化;分析了引起高分子材料老化的内在因素和外在因素,例如化学结构、物理形态、立体规整性、分子量及其分布情况、金属杂质、温度、湿度、氧气、光照、化学介质、生物等;阐述了自然环境老化实验、人工加速老化实验、耐候性实验、热老化实验、湿热老化实验、臭氧老化实验、盐雾腐蚀实验、耐寒性实验、抗霉实验等老化评价方法和物理性能、力学性能、微观分析、耐久性能以及系统分析技术等老化性能评价指标;并对热老化预防措施、湿热老化预防措施、氧老化预防措施、光老化预防措施以及生物老化预防措施进行了展望。

  3. Investigation of the optical properties of novel organic macromolecules for solar cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegoke, Oluwasegun Oluwasina

    The search for renewable energy sources to replace fossil fuel has been a major research focus in the energy sector. The sun, with its vast amount of energy, remains the most abundant and ubiquitous energy source that far exceeds the world energy demand. The ability to effectively capture and convert energy from the sun in the form of photons will be the key to its effective utilization. Organic macromolecules have tremendous potentials to replace and out-perform existing materials, due to their low-cost, ease of tunability, high absorption coefficient and "green" nature. In this dissertation, spectroscopic techniques of steady state absorption and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy were used to show the improved absorption of the oligothiophene-functionalized ZnPc through ultrafast energy transfer. ZnPc is known for its chemical and thermal stability. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) in ZnPc-based solar devices is however, very low because of the poor absorption of ZnPc in the 300 - 550 nm region of the solar spectrum. Oligothiophenes have good absorption in the spectral region where the absorption of ZnPc is poor. Other groups of organic compounds that have gained prominence in the study for the design of efficient active materials for photovoltaic cells are the polymers. In the dissertation, different factors which can affect the performance of organic polymers in photovoltaics systems were investigated and analyzed. The effects of the alteration of conjugation, donor-acceptor groups, heteroatoms and alkyl side chains on the photophysical properties and ultimately the performance of organic polymers in organic photovoltaics were investigated. The different effects were investigated using ultrafast spectroscopic techniques which are capable of providing insight of fluorescence decay dynamics at very short times in a time scale of femtosecond. The electronic structure calculations of the polymers were carried out to provide further evidence to the

  4. Detection of Bartonella henselae DNA in clinical samples including peripheral blood of immune competent and immune compromised patients by three nested amplifications Detecção de DNA de Bartonella henselae em amostras clínicas, incluindo sangue periférico, de pacientes imunocompetentes e imunodeprimidos por meio de três amplificações duplas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Hatamoto Kawasato

    2013-02-01

    aspirado de gânglio. A nested-FtsZ foi mais sensível que a nested-HSP e a nested-ITS (p < 0,0001, possibilitando a detecção de DNA de Bartonella henselae em 15 de 18 pacientes (83,3%. No presente estudo, três nested-PCR, consideradas específicas para a amplificação da Bartonella henselae, foram desenvolvidas, porém somente a nested-FtsZ não amplificou o DNA de Bartonella quintana. Concluímos que amplificações duplas aumentaram a detecção de DNA de B. henselae, e que a nested-FtsZ foi a mais sensível e a única específica para B. henselae em diferentes amostras biológicas. Como todas as amostras detectadas pelo HSP-nested e nested-ITS foram também pela nested-FtsZ, inferimos que, em nossa casuística, as infecções foram causadas por Bartonella henselae. A elevada positividade de amostras de sangue chamou a atenção para a utilização deste material biológico na investigação de bartoneloses, independentemente do estado imune dos pacientes. Este fato é importante no caso de pacientes criticamente enfermos e crianças pequenas para evitar procedimentos mais invasivos, como biópsias e punções de gânglios.

  5. Defects of mitochondrial DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, William C

    2014-09-01

    Mitochondrial DNA is replicated by DNA polymerase γ in concert with accessory proteins such as the mitochondrial DNA helicase, single-stranded DNA binding protein, topoisomerase, and initiating factors. Defects in mitochondrial DNA replication or nucleotide metabolism can cause mitochondrial genetic diseases due to mitochondrial DNA deletions, point mutations, or depletion, which ultimately cause loss of oxidative phosphorylation. These genetic diseases include mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes such as Alpers or early infantile hepatocerebral syndromes, and mitochondrial DNA deletion disorders, such as progressive external ophthalmoplegia, ataxia-neuropathy, or mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy. This review focuses on our current knowledge of genetic defects of mitochondrial DNA replication (POLG, POLG2, C10orf2, and MGME1) that cause instability of mitochondrial DNA and mitochondrial disease.

  6. EGFR and HER2 exert distinct roles on colon cancer cell functional properties and expression of matrix macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellina, Maria-Ioanna; Bouris, Panagiotis; Aletras, Alexios J; Theocharis, Achilleas D; Kletsas, Dimitris; Karamanos, Nikos K

    2014-08-01

    ErbB receptors, EGFR and HER2, have been implicated in the development and progression of colon cancer. Several intracellular pathways are mediated upon activation of EGFR and/or HER2 by EGF. However, there are limited data regarding the EGF-mediated signaling affecting functional cell properties and the expression of extracellular matrix macromolecules implicated in cancer progression. Functional assays, such as cell proliferation, transwell invasion assay and migration were performed to evaluate the impact of EGFR/HER2 in constitutive and EGF-treated Caco-2 cells. Signaling pathways were evaluated using specific intracellular inhibitors. Western blot was also utilized to examine the phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2. Real time PCR was performed to evaluate gene expression of matrix macromolecules. EGF increases cell proliferation, invasion and migration and importantly, EGF mediates overexpression of EGFR and downregulation of HER2. The EGF-EGFR axis is the main pathway affecting colon cancer's invasive potential, proliferative and migratory ability. Intracellular pathways (PI3K-Akt, MEK1/2-Erk and JAK-STAT) are all implicated in the migratory profile. Notably, MT1- and MT2-MMP as well as TIMP-2 are downregulated, whereas uPA is upregulated via an EGF-EGFR network. The EGF-EGFR axis is also implicated in the expression of syndecan-4 and TIMP-1. However, glypican-1 upregulation by EGF is mainly mediated via HER2. The obtained data highlight the crucial importance of EGF on the expression of both receptors and on the EGF-EGFR/HER2 signaling network, reveal the distinct roles of EGFR and HER2 on expression of matrix macromolecules and open a new area in designing novel agents in targeting colon cancer. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Matrix-mediated cell behaviour and properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Single Cell Assay for Molecular Diagnostics and Medicine: Monitoring Intracellular Concentrations of Macromolecules by Two-photon Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliss, Artem; Peng, Xiao; Liu, Lixin; Kuzmin, Andrey; Wang, Yan; Qu, Junle; Li, Yuee; Prasad, Paras N

    2015-01-01

    Molecular organization of a cell is dynamically transformed along the course of cellular physiological processes, pathologic developments or derived from interactions with drugs. The capability to measure and monitor concentrations of macromolecules in a single cell would greatly enhance studies of cellular processes in heterogeneous populations. In this communication, we introduce and experimentally validate a bio-analytical single-cell assay, wherein the overall concentration of macromolecules is estimated in specific subcellular domains, such as structure-function compartments of the cell nucleus as well as in nucleoplasm. We describe quantitative mapping of local biomolecular concentrations, either intrinsic relating to the functional and physiological state of a cell, or altered by a therapeutic drug action, using two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). The proposed assay utilizes a correlation between the fluorescence lifetime of fluorophore and the refractive index of its microenvironment varying due to changes in the concentrations of macromolecules, mainly proteins. Two-photon excitation in Near-Infra Red biological transparency window reduced the photo-toxicity in live cells, as compared with a conventional single-photon approach. Using this new assay, we estimated average concentrations of proteins in the compartments of nuclear speckles and in the nucleoplasm at ~150 mg/ml, and in the nucleolus at ~284 mg/ml. Furthermore, we show a profound influence of pharmaceutical inhibitors of RNA synthesis on intracellular protein density. The approach proposed here will significantly advance theranostics, and studies of drug-cell interactions at the single-cell level, aiding development of personal molecular medicine.

  8. Synthesis and biological incorporation of icons into macromolecules for NMR study. Progress report, June 1, 1976--May 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, D.M.

    1977-02-01

    Progress is reported on methods to synthesize novel /sup 13/C-labeled materials for incorporation into macromolecules. Gram quantities (9 grams) of labeled uracil have been synthesized and incorporated, by means of a mutant bacterial strain into t-RNA. The bulk t-RNA has been isolated, purified, and carbon-13 T/sub 1/ studies completed. Work now in progress is directed towards the production of greater quantities of t-RNA from E. coli instead of Salmonella and the ultimate isolation of individual t-RNA molecules.

  9. MASSIF-1: a beamline dedicated to the fully automatic characterization and data collection from crystals of biological macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, Matthew W.; Nurizzo, Didier; Barrett, Ray; Beteva, Antonia; Bodin, Marjolaine; Caserotto, Hugo; Delagenière, Solange; Dobias, Fabian; Flot, David; Giraud, Thierry; Guichard, Nicolas; Guijarro, Mattias; Lentini, Mario; Leonard, Gordon A.; McSweeney, Sean; Oskarsson, Marcus; Schmidt, Werner; Snigirev, Anatoli; von Stetten, David; Surr, John; Svensson, Olof; Theveneau, Pascal; Mueller-Dieckmann, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    MASSIF-1 (ID30A-1) is an ESRF undulator beamline operating at a fixed wavelength of 0.969 Å (12.8 keV) that is dedicated to the completely automatic characterization of and data collection from crystals of biological macromolecules. The first of the ESRF Upgrade MASSIF beamlines to be commissioned, it has been open since September 2014, providing a unique automated data collection service to academic and industrial users. Here, the beamline characteristics and details of the new service are outlined. PMID:26524320

  10. Eukaryotic DNA Replication Fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, Peter M J; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2017-06-20

    This review focuses on the biogenesis and composition of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork, with an emphasis on the enzymes that synthesize DNA and repair discontinuities on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Physical and genetic methodologies aimed at understanding these processes are discussed. The preponderance of evidence supports a model in which DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) carries out the bulk of leading strand DNA synthesis at an undisturbed replication fork. DNA polymerases α and δ carry out the initiation of Okazaki fragment synthesis and its elongation and maturation, respectively. This review also discusses alternative proposals, including cellular processes during which alternative forks may be utilized, and new biochemical studies with purified proteins that are aimed at reconstituting leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis separately and as an integrated replication fork.

  11. The role of the fast motion of the spin label in the interpretation of EPR spectra for spin-labeled macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, Vladimir P; Nikolsky, Dmitriy O

    2003-12-01

    The spin label method was used to observe the nature of the fast motions of side chains in protein monocrystals. The EPR spectra of spin-labeled lysozyme monocrystals (with different orientations of the tetragonal protein crystal in relation to the direction of the magnetic field) were interpreted using the method of molecular dynamics (MD). Within the proposed simple model, MD calculations of the spin label motion trajectories are performed in a reasonable real time. The model regards the protein molecule as frozen as a whole and the spin-labeled amino acid residue as unfrozen. To calculate the trajectories in vacuum, a model of spin-labeled lysozyme was assembled, and the parameters of the force fields were specified for atoms of the protein molecule, including the spin label. The calculations show that the protein environment sterically limits the area of the possible angular reorientations for the NO reporter group of the nitroxide (within the spin label), and this, in turn, affects the shape of the EPR spectrum. However, it turned out that the spread in the positions of the reporter group in the angle space strictly adheres to the Gaussian distribution. Using the coordinates of the spin label atoms obtained by the MD method within a selected time range and considering the distribution of the spin label states over the ensemble of spin-labeled macromolecules in a crystal, the EPR spectra of spin-labeled lysozyme monocrystals were simulated. The resultant theoretical EPR spectra appeared to be similar to experimental ones.

  12. An Efficient Multi-Scale Modelling Approach for ssDNA Motion in Fluid Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Benke; E.Shapiro; D.Drikakis

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents a multi-scale modelling approach for simulating macromolecules in fluid flows. Macromolecule transport at low number densities is frequently encountered in biomedical devices, such as separators, detection and analysis systems. Accurate modelling of this process is challenging due to the wide range of physical scales involved. The continuum approach is not valid for low solute concentrations, but the large timescales of the fluid flow make purely molecular simulations prohibitively expensive. A promising multi-scale modelling strategy is provided by the meta-modelling approach considered in this paper. Meta-models are based on the coupled solution of fluid flow equations and equations of motion for a simplified mechanical model of macromolecules. The approach enables simulation of individual macromolecules at macroscopic time scales. Meta-models often rely on particle-corrector algorithms, which impose length constraints on the mechanical model. Lack of robustness of the particle-corrector algorithm employed can lead to slow convergence and numerical instability. A new FAst Linear COrrector (FALCO) algorithm is introduced in this paper, which significantly improves computational efficiency in comparison with the widely used SHAKE algorithm. Validation of the new particle corrector against a simple analytic solution is performed and improved convergence is demonstrated for ssDNA motion in a lid-driven micro-cavity.

  13. DNA repair protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergbæk, Lotte

    In its 3rd edition, this Methods in Molecular Biology(TM) book covers the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including advanced protocols and standard techniques in the field of DNA repair. Offers expert guidance for DNA repair, recombination, and replication. Current knowledge of the mechanisms...... that regulate DNA repair has grown significantly over the past years with technology advances such as RNA interference, advanced proteomics and microscopy as well as high throughput screens. The third edition of DNA Repair Protocols covers various aspects of the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including...... recent advanced protocols as well as standard techniques used in the field of DNA repair. Both mammalian and non-mammalian model organisms are covered in the book, and many of the techniques can be applied with only minor modifications to other systems than the one described. Written in the highly...

  14. Function of terahertz spectra in monitoring the decomposing process of biological macromolecules and in investigating the causes of photoinhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yuangang; Zhang, Shuai; Lian, Yuji; Kuang, Tingyun

    2017-03-01

    Chlorophyll a and β-carotene play an important role in harvesting light energy, which is used to drive photosynthesis in plants. In this study, terahertz (THz) and visible range spectra of chlorophyll a and β-carotene and their changes under light treatment were investigated. The results show that the all THz transmission and absorption spectra of chlorophyll a and β-carotene changed upon light treatment, with the maximum changes at 15 min of illumination indicating the greatest changes of the collective vibrational mode of chlorophyll a and β-carotene. The absorption spectra of chlorophyll a in the visible light region decreased upon light treatment, signifying the degradation of chlorophyll a molecules. It can be inferred from these results that the THz spectra are very sensitive in monitoring the changes of the collective vibrational mode, despite the absence of changes in molecular configuration. The THz spectra can therefore be used to monitor the decomposing process of biological macromolecules; however, visible absorption spectra can only be used to monitor the breakdown extent of biological macromolecules.

  15. Enhanced pulmonary absorption of a macromolecule through coupling to a sequence-specific phage display-derived peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Christopher J; Smith, Mathew W; Griffiths, Peter C; McKeown, Neil B; Gumbleton, Mark

    2011-04-10

    With the aim of identifying a peptide sequence that promotes pulmonary epithelial transport of macromolecule cargo we used a stringent peptide-phage display library screening protocol against rat lung alveolar epithelial primary cell cultures. We identified a peptide-phage clone (LTP-1) displaying the disulphide-constrained 7-mer peptide sequence, C-TSGTHPR-C, that showed significant pulmonary epithelial translocation across highly restrictive polarised cell monolayers. Cell biological data supported a differential alveolar epithelial cell interaction of the LTP-1 peptide-phage clone and the corresponding free synthetic LTP-1 peptide. Delivering select phage-clones to the intact pulmonary barrier of an isolated perfused rat lung (IPRL) resulted in 8.7% of lung deposited LTP-1 peptide-phage clone transported from the IPRL airways to the vasculature compared (pprobes. This study shows proof-of principle that array technologies can be effectively exploited to identify peptides mediating enhanced transmucosal delivery of macromolecule therapeutics across an intact organ.

  16. Vesicular Trans-Cell Wall Transport in Fungi: A Mechanism for the Delivery of Virulence-Associated Macromolecules?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio L. Rodrigues

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal cells are encaged in rigid, complex cell walls. Until recently, there was remarkably little information regarding the trans-fungal cell wall transfer of intracellular macromolecules to the extracellular space. Recently, several studies have begun to elucidate the mechanisms that fungal cells utilize to secrete a wide variety of macromolecules through the cell wall. The combined use of transmission electron microscopy, serology, biochemistry, proteomics and lipidomics have revealed that the fungal pathogens Cryptococcus neoformans, Histoplasma capsulatum, Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis and Sporothrix schenckii, as well as the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, each produces extracellular vesicles that carry lipids, proteins, polysaccharides and pigment-like structures of unquestionable biological significance. Compositional analysis of the C. neoformans and H. capsulatum extracellular vesicles suggests that they may function as ‘virulence bags’, with the potential to modulate the host-pathogen interaction in favor of the fungus. The cellular origin of the extracellular vesicles remains unknown, but morphological and biochemical features indicate that they are similar to the well-described mammalian exosomes.

  17. Optimization of input parameters of acoustic-transfection for the intracellular delivery of macromolecules using FRET-based biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sangpil; Wang, Yingxiao; Shung, K. K.

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic-transfection technique has been developed for the first time. We have developed acoustic-transfection by integrating a high frequency ultrasonic transducer and a fluorescence microscope. High frequency ultrasound with the center frequency over 150 MHz can focus acoustic sound field into a confined area with the diameter of 10 μm or less. This focusing capability was used to perturb lipid bilayer of cell membrane to induce intracellular delivery of macromolecules. Single cell level imaging was performed to investigate the behavior of a targeted single-cell after acoustic-transfection. FRET-based Ca2+ biosensor was used to monitor intracellular concentration of Ca2+ after acoustic-transfection and the fluorescence intensity of propidium iodide (PI) was used to observe influx of PI molecules. We changed peak-to-peak voltages and pulse duration to optimize the input parameters of an acoustic pulse. Input parameters that can induce strong perturbations on cell membrane were found and size dependent intracellular delivery of macromolecules was explored. To increase the amount of delivered molecules by acoustic-transfection, we applied several acoustic pulses and the intensity of PI fluorescence increased step wise. Finally, optimized input parameters of acoustic-transfection system were used to deliver pMax-E2F1 plasmid and GFP expression 24 hours after the intracellular delivery was confirmed using HeLa cells.

  18. Microvillus-Specific Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase SAP-1 Plays a Role in Regulating the Intestinal Paracellular Transport of Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Shingo; Kamei, Noriyasu; Murata, Yoji; Takayama, Kozo; Matozaki, Takashi; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2017-09-01

    The stomach cancer-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SAP-1) is a receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase that is specifically expressed on the apical membrane of the intestinal epithelium. SAP-1 is known to maintain the balance of phosphorylation of proteins together with protein kinases; however, its biological function and impact on pharmacokinetics in the intestine remain unclear. The present study, therefore, aimed at clarifying the relationship between SAP-1 and the intestinal absorption behaviors of typical transporter substrates and macromolecules. The endogenous levels of glucose and total cholesterol in the blood were similar between wild-type and SAP-1-deficient mice (Sap1(-/-)), suggesting no contribution of SAP-1 to biogenic influx. Moreover, in vitro transport study with everted ileal sacs demonstrated that there was no difference in the absorption of breast cancer resistance protein, P-glycoprotein, and peptide transporter substrates between both mice. However, absorptive clearance of macromolecular model dextrans (FD-4 and FD-10) in Sap1(-/-) mice was significantly higher than that in wild-type mice, and this was confirmed by the trend of increased FD-4 absorption from colonic loops of Sap1(-/-) mice. Therefore, the results of this study suggest the partial contribution of SAP-1 to the regulated transport of hydrophilic macromolecules through paracellular tight junctions. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. DNA Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Masateru; Kawai, Tomoji

    2002-11-01

    DNA is one candidate of promising molecules for molecular electronic devices, since it has the double helix structure with pi-electron bases for electron transport, the address at 0.4 nm intervals, and the self-assembly. Electrical conductivity and nanostructure of DNA and modified DNA molecules are investigated in order to research the application of DNA in nanoelectronic devices. It has been revealed that DNA is a wide-gap semiconductor in the absence of doping. The conductivity of DNA has been controlled by chemical doping, electric field doping, and photo-doping. It has found that Poly(dG)[middle dot]Poly(dC) has the best conductivity and can function as a conducting nanowire. The pattern of DNA network is controlled by changing the concentration of the DNA solution.

  20. Mechanisms and aplications of macromolecule translocation across membranes of eukaryotic cells by bacterial toxins

    OpenAIRE

    Poledňák, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial protein toxins endowed with the ability to translocate across the plasmatic membrane are often crucial virulence factors of pathogenic bacteria invading eukaryotic organisms. These toxins translocate either their own protein domains carrying toxic activity or can form pores transferring other substances like small ions, DNA, RNA or proteins. By observing the translocation of these molecules together with other artificially prepared agents on synthetic membranes it allows detaile...

  1. DNA Methylation

    OpenAIRE

    Alokail, Majed S.; Alenad, Amal M.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA of E. coli contains 19,120 6-methyladenines and 12,045 5-methylcytosines in addition to the four regular bases and these are formed by the postreplicative action of three DNA methyltransferases. The majority of the methylated bases are formed by the Dam and Dcm methyltransferases encoded by the dam (DNA adenine methyltransferase) and dcm (DNA cytosine methyltransferase) genes. Although not essential, Dam methylation is important for strand discrimination during repair of replication e...

  2. Electrochemical direct immobilization of DNA sequences for label-free herpes virus detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Phuong Dinh; Trung, Tran; Tuan, Mai Anh; Chien, Nguyen Duc

    2009-09-01

    DNA sequences/bio-macromolecules of herpes virus (5'-AT CAC CGA CCC GGA GAG GGA C-3') were directly immobilized into polypyrrole matrix by using the cyclic voltammetry method, and grafted onto arrays of interdigitated platinum microelectrodes. The morphology surface of the obtained PPy/DNA of herpes virus composite films was investigated by a FESEM Hitachi-S 4800. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to characterize the PPy/DNA film and to study the specific interactions that may exist between DNA biomacromolecules and PPy chains. Attempts are made to use these PPy/DNA composite films for label-free herpes virus detection revealed a response time of 60 s in solutions containing as low as 2 nM DNA concentration, and self life of six months when immerged in double distilled water and kept refrigerated.

  3. 生物大分子结晶技术研究进展%Progress in Research of Technologies for Crystallization of Biological Macromolecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐乐慧; 洪鸣凰; 赵文杰; 任国宾

    2011-01-01

    获得具有高分辨率的晶体是目前生物大分子结构测定的主要瓶颈,生物大分子的结晶是一个复杂的物理化学过程,涉及多方面的影响因素.本文综述了近年来生物大分子结晶的热点方法和技术.%Obtaining the high-resolution crystal structure has become a bottleneck for structure determination of biological macromolecules. The crystallization of biological macromolecules is a complicated process influenced by many parameters. The recent technologies for preparing crystal of biological macromolecules as well as techniques for controlling the crystallization process are reviewed.

  4. Apoptosis and DNA Methylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Huan X.; Hackett, James A. [MRC Human Genetics Unit, IGMM, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU (United Kingdom); Nestor, Colm [MRC Human Genetics Unit, IGMM, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU (United Kingdom); Breakthrough Research Unit, University of Edinburgh, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU (United Kingdom); Dunican, Donncha S.; Madej, Monika; Reddington, James P. [MRC Human Genetics Unit, IGMM, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU (United Kingdom); Pennings, Sari [Queen' s Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ (United Kingdom); Harrison, David J. [Breakthrough Research Unit, University of Edinburgh, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU (United Kingdom); Meehan, Richard R., E-mail: Richard.Meehan@hgu.mrc.ac.uk [MRC Human Genetics Unit, IGMM, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU (United Kingdom); Breakthrough Research Unit, University of Edinburgh, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms assist in maintaining gene expression patterns and cellular properties in developing and adult tissues. The molecular pathology of disease states frequently includes perturbation of DNA and histone methylation patterns, which can activate apoptotic pathways associated with maintenance of genome integrity. This perspective focuses on the pathways linking DNA methyltransferases and methyl-CpG binding proteins to apoptosis, and includes new bioinformatic analyses to characterize the evolutionary origin of two G/T mismatch-specific thymine DNA glycosylases, MBD4 and TDG.

  5. Apoptosis and DNA Methylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard R. Meehan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic mechanisms assist in maintaining gene expression patterns and cellular properties in developing and adult tissues. The molecular pathology of disease states frequently includes perturbation of DNA and histone methylation patterns, which can activate apoptotic pathways associated with maintenance of genome integrity. This perspective focuses on the pathways linking DNA methyltransferases and methyl-CpG binding proteins to apoptosis, and includes new bioinformatic analyses to characterize the evolutionary origin of two G/T mismatch-specific thymine DNA glycosylases, MBD4 and TDG.

  6. Synthesis of damaged DNA containing the oxidative lesion 3'-oxothymidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedi, Mel F; Li, Weiye; Gutwald, Taylor; Bryant-Friedrich, Amanda C

    2017-09-01

    Oxidative events that take place during regular oxygen metabolism can lead to the formation of organic or inorganic radicals. The interaction of these radicals with macromolecules in the organism and with DNA in particular is suspected to lead to apoptosis, DNA lesions and cell damage. Independent generation of DNA lesions resulting from oxidative damage is used to promote the study of their effects on biological systems. An efficient synthesis of oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODNs) containing the oxidative damage lesion 3'-oxothymidine has been accomplished via incorporation of C3'-hydroxymethyl thymidine as its corresponding 5'-phosphoramidite. Through oxidative cleavage using sodium periodate in aqueous solution, the lesion of interest is easily generated. Due to its inherent instability it cannot be directly isolated, but must be generated in situ. 3'-Oxothymidine is a demonstrated damage product formed upon generation of the C3'-thymidinyl radical in ODN. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. DNA-PK assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carl W.; Connelly, Margery A.

    2004-10-12

    The present invention provides a method for detecting DNA-activated protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity in a biological sample. The method includes contacting a biological sample with a detectably-labeled phosphate donor and a synthetic peptide substrate defined by the following features to provide specific recognition and phosphorylation by DNA-PK: (1) a phosphate-accepting amino acid pair which may include serine-glutamine (Ser-Gln) (SQ), threonine-glutamine (Thr-Gln) (TQ), glutamine-serine (Gln-Ser) (QS), or glutamine-threonine (Gln-Thr) (QT); (2) enhancer amino acids which may include glutamic acid or glutamine immediately adjacent at the amino- or carboxyl- side of the amino acid pair and forming an amino acid pair-enhancer unit; (3) a first spacer sequence at the amino terminus of the amino acid pair-enhancer unit; (4) a second spacer sequence at the carboxyl terminus of the amino acid pair-enhancer unit, which spacer sequences may include any combination of amino acids that does not provide a phosphorylation site consensus sequence motif; and, (5) a tag moiety, which may be an amino acid sequence or another chemical entity that permits separating the synthetic peptide from the phosphate donor. A compostion and a kit for the detection of DNA-PK activity are also provided. Methods for detecting DNA, protein phosphatases and substances that alter the activity of DNA-PK are also provided. The present invention also provides a method of monitoring protein kinase and DNA-PK activity in living cells. -A composition and a kit for monitoring protein kinase activity in vitro and a composition and a kit for monitoring DNA-PK activities in living cells are also provided. A method for identifying agents that alter protein kinase activity in vitro and a method for identifying agents that alter DNA-PK activity in living cells are also provided.

  8. Specific DNA-RNA Hybrid Recognition by TAL Effectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Yin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The transcription activator-like (TAL effector targets specific host promoter through its central DNA-binding domain, which comprises multiple tandem repeats (TALE repeats. Recent structural analyses revealed that the TALE repeats form a superhelical structure that tracks along the forward strand of the DNA duplex. Here, we demonstrate that TALE repeats specifically recognize a DNA-RNA hybrid where the DNA strand determines the binding specificity. The crystal structure of a designed TALE in complex with the DNA-RNA hybrid was determined at a resolution of 2.5 Å. Although TALE repeats are in direct contact with only the DNA strand, the phosphodiester backbone of the RNA strand is inaccessible by macromolecules such as RNases. Consistent with this observation, sequence-specific recognition of an HIV-derived DNA-RNA hybrid by an engineered TALE efficiently blocked RNase H-mediated degradation of the RNA strand. Our study broadens the utility of TALE repeats and suggests potential applications in processes involving DNA replication and retroviral infections.

  9. DNA tagged microparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farquar, George R.; Leif, Roald N.; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2016-03-22

    In one embodiment, a product includes a plurality of particles, each particle including: a carrier that includes a non-toxic material; and at least one DNA barcode coupled to the carrier, where the particles each have a diameter in a range from about 1 nanometer to about 100 microns.

  10. Exploring the structure of biological macromolecules in solution using Quokka, the small angle neutron scattering instrument, at ANSTO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Kathleen; Jeffries, Cy M.; Knott, Robert B.; Sokolova, Anna; Jacques, David A.; Duff, Anthony P.

    2015-10-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) is widely used to extract structural parameters, shape and other types of information from a vast array of materials. The technique is applied to biological macromolecules and their complexes in solution to reveal information often not accessible by other techniques. SANS measurements on biomolecules present some particular challenges however, one of which is suitable instrumentation. This review details SANS experiments performed on two well-characterised globular proteins (lysozyme and glucose isomerase) using Quokka, the recently commissioned SANS instrument at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). The instrument configuration as well as data collection and reduction strategies for biological investigations are discussed and act as a general reference for structural biologists who use the instrument. Both model independent analysis of the two proteins and ab initio modelling illustrate that Quokka-SANS data can be used to successfully model the overall shapes of proteins in solution, providing a benchmark for users.

  11. Exploring the structure of biological macromolecules in solution using Quokka, the small angle neutron scattering instrument, at ANSTO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Kathleen, E-mail: kw@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Rd, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Jeffries, Cy M.; Knott, Robert B.; Sokolova, Anna [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Rd, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Jacques, David A. [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Duff, Anthony P. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Rd, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia)

    2015-10-21

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) is widely used to extract structural parameters, shape and other types of information from a vast array of materials. The technique is applied to biological macromolecules and their complexes in solution to reveal information often not accessible by other techniques. SANS measurements on biomolecules present some particular challenges however, one of which is suitable instrumentation. This review details SANS experiments performed on two well-characterised globular proteins (lysozyme and glucose isomerase) using Quokka, the recently commissioned SANS instrument at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). The instrument configuration as well as data collection and reduction strategies for biological investigations are discussed and act as a general reference for structural biologists who use the instrument. Both model independent analysis of the two proteins and ab initio modelling illustrate that Quokka-SANS data can be used to successfully model the overall shapes of proteins in solution, providing a benchmark for users.

  12. Preparation and XPS studies of macromolecule mixed-valent Cu(I, II) and Fe(II, III) complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Bo [Institute of Energy Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' An 710062 (China)]. E-mail: wangbo@snnu.edu.cn; Gao Fengqin [Institute of Energy Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' An 710062 (China); Department of Chemistry, Xianyang Normal University, Xianyang (China); Ma Hongzhu [Institute of Energy Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' An 710062 (China)

    2007-06-01

    A new macromolecule ligand and its mixed-valent Cu(I, II) and Fe(II, III) complexes have been prepared by using ethylenediamine as core and maleic anhydride as branched units and characterized by UV-vis, FT-IR, thermal analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The data obtained from these studies suggested that the coordinate bonds of N {sup {yields}} M, Cl {sup {yields}} M, Ph-OH {sup {yields}} M and H{sub 2}O {sup {yields}} M have been formed and possible binding models are proposed for these complexes. The thermal analysis (TG-DTG) reveals that these complexes possess thermal stable property below 800 deg. C.

  13. Multiplexed DNA-modified electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slinker, Jason D; Muren, Natalie B; Gorodetsky, Alon A; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2010-03-03

    We report the use of silicon chips with 16 DNA-modified electrodes (DME chips) utilizing DNA-mediated charge transport for multiplexed detection of DNA and DNA-binding protein targets. Four DNA sequences were simultaneously distinguished on a single DME chip with 4-fold redundancy, including one incorporating a single base mismatch. These chips also enabled investigation of the sequence-specific activity of the restriction enzyme Alu1. DME chips supported dense DNA monolayer formation with high reproducibility, as confirmed by statistical comparison to commercially available rod electrodes. The working electrode areas on the chips were reduced to 10 microm in diameter, revealing microelectrode behavior that is beneficial for high sensitivity and rapid kinetic analysis. These results illustrate how DME chips facilitate sensitive and selective detection of DNA and DNA-binding protein targets in a robust and internally standardized multiplexed format.

  14. Spontaneous encapsulation and concentration of biological macromolecules in liposomes: an intriguing phenomenon and its relevance in origins of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Tereza Pereira; Fahr, Alfred; Luisi, Pier Luigi; Stano, Pasquale

    2014-12-01

    One of the main open questions in origin of life research focuses on the formation, by self-organization, of primitive cells composed by macromolecular compounds enclosed within a semi-permeable membrane. A successful experimental strategy for studying the emergence and the properties of primitive cells relies on a synthetic biology approach, consisting in the laboratory assembly of cell models of minimal complexity (semi-synthetic minimal cells). Despite the recent advancements in the construction and characterization of synthetic cells, an important physical aspect related to their formation is still not well known, namely, the mechanism of solute entrapment inside liposomes (in particular, the entrapment of macromolecules). In the past years, we have investigated this phenomenon and here we shortly review our experimental results. We show how the detailed cryo-transmission electron microscopy analyses of liposome populations created in the presence of ferritin (taken as model protein) or ribosomes have revealed that a small fraction of liposomes contains a high number of solutes, against statistical expectations. The local (intra-liposomal) macromolecule concentration in these liposomes largely exceeds the bulk concentration. A similar behaviour is observed when multi-molecular reaction mixtures are used, whereby the reactions occur effectively only inside those liposomes that have entrapped high number of molecules. If similar mechanisms operated in early times, these intriguing results support a scenario whereby the formation of lipid compartments plays an important role in concentrating the components of proto-metabolic systems-in addition to their well-known functions of confinement and protection.

  15. Freeze-thaw and high-voltage discharge allow macromolecule uptake into ileal brush-border vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donowitz, M; Emmer, E; McCullen, J; Reinlib, L; Cohen, M E; Rood, R P; Madara, J; Sharp, G W; Murer, H; Malmstrom, K

    1987-06-01

    High-voltage discharge or one cycle of freeze-thawing are shown to transiently permeabilize rabbit ileal brush-border membrane vesicles to macromolecules. Uptake of the radiolabeled macromolecule dextran, mol wt 70,000, used as a marker for vesicle permeability, was determined by a rapid filtration technique, with uptake defined as substrate associated with the vesicle and releasable after incubation of vesicles with 0.1% saponin. Dextran added immediately after electric shock (2,000 V) or at the beginning of one cycle of freeze-thawing was taken up approximately eightfold compared with control; with both techniques, the concentration of dextran after being taken up into the vesicles was similar to that in the incubation medium, suggesting attainment of equilibrium. ATP also was taken up into freeze-thawed vesicles, whereas there was no significant uptake into control vesicles. The increase in vesicle permeability was reversible, based on Na-dependent D-glucose uptake being decreased when studied 5 but not 15 min after electric shock, and was not significantly decreased after completion of one cycle of freeze-thawing. In addition, adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate and Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase activity were similar in control vesicles and vesicles exposed to high-voltage discharge or freeze-thawing. Also, vesicles freeze-thawed with [32P]ATP demonstrated increased phosphorylation compared with nonfrozen vesicles, while freeze-thawing did not alter vesicle protein as judged by Coomassie blue staining. These techniques should allow intestinal membrane vesicles to be used for studies of intracellular control of transport processes, for instance, studies of protein kinase regulation of transport.

  16. "Artifactual" arsenate DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2012-01-01

    The recent claim by Wolfe-Simon et al. that the Halomonas bacterial strain GFAJ-1 when grown in arsenate-containing medium with limiting phosphate is able to substitute phosphate with arsenate in biomolecules including nucleic acids and in particular DNA(1) arose much skepticism, primarily due...... to the very limited chemical stability of arsenate esters (see ref. 2 and references therein). A major part of the criticisms was concerned with the insufficient (bio)chemical evidence in the Wolfe-Simon study for the actual chemical incorporation of arsenate in DNA (and/or RNA). Redfield et al. now present...... evidence that the identification of arsenate DNA was artifactual....

  17. Preliminary results on an innovative plasmonic device for macromolecules analysis and sequencing

    KAUST Repository

    Francardi, Marco

    2013-11-01

    In this work we present the fabrication and theoretical simulation for a new device constituted by a on Substrate Plasmonic Antenna (SPA) combined with a bio-functionalized Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) cantilever. This device could represent a new strategy to sequence and analyze a single protein or DNA. The idea is to use an SPA composed of an innovative "wedding cake"shaped grating (WCG), in order to excite a Surface Plasmon Polariton (SPP) mode, and a 30-tilted Plasmonic Antenna (PA), able to compress adiabatically the SPP until the tip. The Plasmonic device is placed inside an electrical contact that could be used to unfold protein molecules or DNA. A bio-functionalized AFM tip can be used to fish a single biological element and for alignment with the SPA. Then the unfolded element could be scanned close to the PA and a Tip Enhanced Raman Signal (TERS) can be recorded from the biomolecule. The spatial resolution is limited by the size of the radius of curvature of the antenna, which in this work is about 15 nm, while the vertical scanning is controlled by the piezoelectric of the AFM set up. In this work we demonstrate the possibility to fabricate this innovative plasmonic device and we report FDTD simulations of the innovative WCG. The FDTD simulations show the generation of a plasmonic mode that, coupled with the antenna, give rise to an adiabatic compression which produce an increase of the electric field of about 40 times. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Increased intestinal permeability to macromolecules and endotoxemia in patients with chronic alcohol abuse in different stages of alcohol-induced liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Schäfer, C.; Schütz, Tanja

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: No information is yet available about the influence of alcohol abuse on the translocation of larger molecules (Mr>1200) through the intestinal mucosa in man. The present study aimed to determine the intestinal permeability to macromolecules in patients with chronic alcohol abuse ...... the translocation of bacterial toxins, thereby contributing to inflammatory processes in alcoholic liver disease....

  19. The preferential homing of a platelet derived growth factor receptor-recognizing macromolecule to fibroblast-like cells in fibrotic tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beljaars, L.; Weert, B; Geerts, Albert; Meijer, D.K F; Poelstra, Klaas

    2003-01-01

    Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) is a key factor in the induction and progression of fibrotic diseases with the activated fibroblast as its target cell. Drug targeting to the PDGF-receptor is explored as a new approach to treat this disease. Therefore, we constructed a macromolecule with affini

  20. 生物大分子结晶过程的动力学%The Kinetics of Crystallization Process of Biological Macromolecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    桂林; 李琳; 胡松青; 陈玲; 范治国; 李坚斌

    2006-01-01

    In this paper ,the crystallization process of biological macromolecules was presented, and the mechanisms and kinetics of crystallization were analyzed.%阐述了生物大分子结晶的一般过程,分析了结晶的机制和动力学.

  1. The chain length of lignan macromolecule from flaxseed hulls is determined by the incorporation of coumaric acid glucosides and ferulic acid glucosides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijs, K.; Vincken, J.P.; Doeswijk, T.G.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Gruppen, H.

    2009-01-01

    Lignan macromolecule from flaxseed hulls is composed of secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG) and herbacetin diglucoside (HDG) moieties ester-linked by 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric acid (HMGA), and of p-coumaric acid glucoside (CouAG) and ferulic acid glucoside (FeAG) moieties ester-linked directly t

  2. Exposure to Ultrafine Particles from Ambient Air and Oxidative Stress-Induced DNA Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner, Elvira Vaclavik; Forchhammer, Lykke; Møller, Peter

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Particulate matter, especially ultrafine particles (UFPs), may cause health effects through generation of oxidative stress, with resulting damage to DNA and other macromolecules. OBJECTIVE: We investigated oxidative damage to DNA and related repair capacity in peripheral blood...... mononuclear cells (PBMCs) during controlled exposure to urban air particles with assignment of number concentration (NC) to four size modes with average diameters of 12, 23, 57, and 212 nm. DESIGN. Twenty-nine healthy adults participated in a randomized, two-factor cross-over study with or without biking...... exercise for 180 min and with exposure to particles (NC 6169-15362/cm3) or filtered air (NC 91-542/cm3) for 24 hr. METHODS: The levels of DNA strand breaks (SBs), oxidized purines as formamidopyrimidine DNA glycolase (FPG) sites, and activity of 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase (OGG1) in PBMCs were...

  3. Cryo-EM structure of a 3D DNA-origami object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiao-chen; Martin, Thomas G.; Scheres, Sjors H. W.; Dietz, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    A key goal for nanotechnology is to design synthetic objects that may ultimately achieve functionalities known today only from natural macromolecular complexes. Molecular self-assembly with DNA has shown potential for creating user-defined 3D scaffolds, but the level of attainable positional accuracy has been unclear. Here we report the cryo-EM structure and a full pseudoatomic model of a discrete DNA object that is almost twice the size of a prokaryotic ribosome. The structure provides a variety of stable, previously undescribed DNA topologies for future use in nanotechnology and experimental evidence that discrete 3D DNA scaffolds allow the positioning of user-defined structural motifs with an accuracy that is similar to that observed in natural macromolecules. Thereby, our results indicate an attractive route to fabricate nanoscale devices that achieve complex functionalities by DNA-templated design steered by structural feedback. PMID:23169645

  4. An investigation into the role of macromolecules of different polarity as passivating agent on the physical, chemical and structural properties of fluorescent carbon nanodots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alas, Melis Ozge; Genc, Rukan

    2017-05-01

    In this study, comparative evaluation of fluorescent carbon nanodots (C-Dots) prepared using carob molasses was reported by screening various biocompatible macromolecules as passivating agent (PA). Incorporation of PAs with different molecular weight, polarity, and chemical structure was examined, and compared with the polyethylene glycol (PEG, Mn = 10 kN) passivated and pristine C-Dots. Not only the fluorescence properties but also many other features including size, crystal structure, colloidal conductivity, resistance to photobleaching, quantum yield, and UV-modulated surface interaction of them with the reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as ROS production were investigated. Photoluminescence (PL) capacity of C-Dots was found to be associated with the number of surface alkyl groups and polymeric hydrogen bounding present on the C-Dot surface (increased number is associated with decreased PL) while surface conductivity of C-Dots in water was proportional to the PL intensity. More importantly, C-Dots with relatively poorer fluorescent were investigated in various organic solvents (hexane, methanol, acetone, ethanol, dimethylformamide (DMF), and DMSO). As happens with the fluorescent dyes, their PL intensities were significantly enhanced (even for pristine C-Dots) depending on the solvent characteristics. All of the C-Dots synthesized were further evaluated by means of UV-induced generation of ROS and inhibition of ROS by using H2O2 as model. In contrary to other carbonaceous nanomaterials, they did not show any ROS generation, on the contrary, they showed ROS scavenging activity that can be modulated by UV-irradiation ( λ exc = 365 nm). PEG and alginate passivated C-Dots inhibited H2O2 activity at LC50 values below 10 mg/mL.

  5. Spectroscopic and molecular docking studies on the interaction of troxerutin with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subastri, A; Ramamurthy, C H; Suyavaran, A; Mareeswaran, R; Lokeswara Rao, P; Harikrishna, M; Suresh Kumar, M; Sujatha, V; Thirunavukkarasu, C

    2015-01-01

    Troxerutin (TXER) is a derivative of naturally occurring bioflavonoid rutin. It possesses different biological activities in rising clinical world. The biological activity possessed by most of the drugs mainly targets on macromolecules. Hence, in the current study we have examined the interaction mechanism of TXER with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) by using various spectroscopic methods, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and molecular docking studies. Further, DNA cleavage study was carried out to find the DNA protection activity of TXER. UV-absorption and emission spectroscopy showed low binding constant values via groove binding. Circular dichroism study indicates that TXER does not modify native B-form of DNA, and it retains the native B-conformation. Furthermore, no effective positive potential peak shift was observed in TXER-DNA complex during electrochemical analysis by which it represents an interaction of TXER with DNA through groove binding. Molecular docking study showed thymine guanine based interaction with docking score -7.09 kcal/mol. This result was compared to experimental ITC value. The DNA cleavage study illustrates that TXER does not cause any DNA damage as well as TXER showed DNA protection against hydroxyl radical induced DNA damage. From this study, we conclude that TXER interacts with DNA by fashion of groove binding.

  6. Insights on protein-DNA recognition by coarse grain modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulain, Pierre; Saladin, Adrien; Hartmann, Brigitte; Prévost, Chantal

    2008-01-01

    Coarse grain modelling of macromolecules is a new approach potentially well adapted to answer numerous issues, ranging from physics to biology. We propose here an original DNA coarse grain model specifically dedicated to protein–DNA docking, a crucial, but still largely unresolved, question in molecular biology. Using a representative set of protein–DNA complexes, we first show that our model is able to predict the interaction surface between the macromolecular partners taken in their bound form. In a second part, the impact of the DNA sequence and electrostatics, together with the DNA and protein conformations on docking is investigated. Our results strongly suggest that the overall DNA structure mainly contributes in discriminating the interaction site on cognate proteins. Direct electrostatic interactions between phosphate groups and amino acids side chains strengthen the binding. Overall, this work demonstrates that coarse grain modelling can reveal itself a precious auxiliary for a general and complete description and understanding of protein–DNA association mechanisms. PMID:18478582

  7. Single DNA Condensation Induced by Hexammine Cobalt with Molecular Combing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao-ming Hu; Yu Lin; Shi-yong Ran; Yan-wei Wang; Guang-can Yang

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the interaction between DNA and hexammine cobalt Ⅲ [Co(NH3)6]3+ by a simple molecular combing method and dynamic light scattering.The average extension of λ-DNA-YOYO-1 complex is found to be 20.9 μm,about 30% longer than the contour length of the DNA in TE buffer (10 mmol/L Tris,1 mmol/L EDTA,pH=8.0),due to bis-intercalation of YOYO-1.A multivalent cation,hexammine cobalt,is used for DNA condensation.We find that the length of DNA-[Co(NH3)6]3+ complexes decrease from 20.9 μm to 5.9 μm as the concentration of the [Co(NH3)6]3+ vary from 0 to 3 μmol/L.This observation provides a direct visualization of single DNA condensation induced by hexammine cobalt.The results from the molecular combing studies are supported by dynamic light scattering investigation,where the average hydrodynamic radius of the DNA complex decreases from 203.8 nm to 39.26 nm under the same conditions.It shows that the molecular combing method is feasible for quantitative conformation characterization of single bio-macromolecules.

  8. The Dynamic Interplay Between DNA Topoisomerases and DNA Topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Yeonee; Neuman, Keir C

    2016-09-01

    Topological properties of DNA influence its structure and biochemical interactions. Within the cell DNA topology is constantly in flux. Transcription and other essential processes including DNA replication and repair, alter the topology of the genome, while introducing additional complications associated with DNA knotting and catenation. These topological perturbations are counteracted by the action of topoisomerases, a specialized class of highly conserved and essential enzymes that actively regulate the topological state of the genome. This dynamic interplay among DNA topology, DNA processing enzymes, and DNA topoisomerases, is a pervasive factor that influences DNA metabolism in vivo. Building on the extensive structural and biochemical characterization over the past four decades that established the fundamental mechanistic basis of topoisomerase activity, the unique roles played by DNA topology in modulating and influencing the activity of topoisomerases have begun to be explored. In this review we survey established and emerging DNA topology dependent protein-DNA interactions with a focus on in vitro measurements of the dynamic interplay between DNA topology and topoisomerase activity.

  9. DNA glue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filichev, Vyacheslav V; Astakhova, Irina V.; Malakhov, Andrei D.

    2008-01-01

    Significant alterations in thermal stability of parallel DNA triplexes and antiparallel duplexes were observed upon changing the attachment of ethynylpyrenes from para to ortho in the structure of phenylmethylglycerol inserted as a bulge into DNA (TINA). Insertions of two ortho-TINAs as a pseudo...

  10. Nano-ranged low-energy ion-beam-induced DNA transfer in biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, L. D.; Wongkham, W.; Prakrajang, K.; Sangwijit, K.; Inthanon, K.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Wanichapichart, P.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2013-06-01

    Low-energy ion beams at a few tens of keV were demonstrated to be able to induce exogenous macromolecules to transfer into plant and bacterial cells. In the process, the ion beam with well controlled energy and fluence bombarded living cells to cause certain degree damage in the cell envelope in nanoscales to facilitate the macromolecules such as DNA to pass through the cell envelope and enter the cell. Consequently, the technique was applied for manipulating positive improvements in the biological species. This physical DNA transfer method was highly efficient and had less risk of side-effects compared with chemical and biological methods. For better understanding of mechanisms involved in the process, a systematic study on the mechanisms was carried out. Applications of the technique were also expanded from DNA transfer in plant and bacterial cells to DNA transfection in human cancer cells potentially for the stem cell therapy purpose. Low-energy nitrogen and argon ion beams that were applied in our experiments had ranges of 100 nm or less in the cell envelope membrane which was majorly composed of polymeric cellulose. The ion beam bombardment caused chain-scission dominant damage in the polymer and electrical property changes such as increase in the impedance in the envelope membrane. These nano-modifications of the cell envelope eventually enhanced the permeability of the envelope membrane to favor the DNA transfer. The paper reports details of our research in this direction.

  11. The basic chemistry of exercise-induced DNA oxidation: oxidative damage, redox signalling and their interplay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Nathan Cobley

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute exercise increases reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation. This phenomenon is associated with two major outcomes: (1 redox signalling and (2 macromolecule damage. Mechanistic knowledge of how exercise-induced redox signalling and macromolecule damage are interlinked is limited. This review focuses on the interplay between exercise-induced redox signalling and DNA damage, using hydroxyl radical (·OH and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 as exemplars. It is postulated that the biological fate of H2O2 links the two processes and thus represents a bifurcation point between redox signalling and damage. Indeed, H2O2 can participate in two electron signalling reactions but its diffusion and chemical properties permit DNA oxidation following reaction with transition metals and ·OH generation. It is also considered that the sensing of DNA oxidation by repair proteins constitutes a non-canonical redox signalling mechanism. Further layers of interaction are provided by the redox regulation of DNA repair proteins and their capacity to modulate intracellular H2O2 levels. Overall, exercise-induced redox signalling and DNA damage may be interlinked to a greater extent than was previously thought but this requires further investigation.

  12. Nano-ranged low-energy ion-beam-induced DNA transfer in biological cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@fnrf.science.cmu.ac.th [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Wongkham, W. [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Prakrajang, K. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Sangwijit, K.; Inthanon, K. [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thongkumkoon, P. [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Wanichapichart, P. [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Membrane Science and Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkla 90112 (Thailand); Anuntalabhochai, S. [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2013-06-15

    Low-energy ion beams at a few tens of keV were demonstrated to be able to induce exogenous macromolecules to transfer into plant and bacterial cells. In the process, the ion beam with well controlled energy and fluence bombarded living cells to cause certain degree damage in the cell envelope in nanoscales to facilitate the macromolecules such as DNA to pass through the cell envelope and enter the cell. Consequently, the technique was applied for manipulating positive improvements in the biological species. This physical DNA transfer method was highly efficient and had less risk of side-effects compared with chemical and biological methods. For better understanding of mechanisms involved in the process, a systematic study on the mechanisms was carried out. Applications of the technique were also expanded from DNA transfer in plant and bacterial cells to DNA transfection in human cancer cells potentially for the stem cell therapy purpose. Low-energy nitrogen and argon ion beams that were applied in our experiments had ranges of 100 nm or less in the cell envelope membrane which was majorly composed of polymeric cellulose. The ion beam bombardment caused chain-scission dominant damage in the polymer and electrical property changes such as increase in the impedance in the envelope membrane. These nano-modifications of the cell envelope eventually enhanced the permeability of the envelope membrane to favor the DNA transfer. The paper reports details of our research in this direction.

  13. Coordinate expression of Escherichia coli dnaA and dnaN genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sako, T; Sakakibara, Y

    1980-01-01

    The defects of temperature-sensitive dnaA and dnaN mutants of Escherichia coli are complemented by a recombinant lambda phage, which carries the bacterial DNA segment composed of two EcoRI segments of 1.0 and 3.3 kilobases. Derivatives of the phage, which have an insertion segment of Tn3 in the dnaA gene, are much less active in expressing the dnaN gene function than the parent phage. The dnaN gene activity was determined as the efficiency of superinfecting phage to suppress loss of the viability of lambda lysogenic dnaN59 cells at the non-permissive temperature. Deletions that include the end of the dnaA gene distal to the dnaN gene also reduce the expression of the dnaN gene function. Deletion and insertion in the dnaN gene do not affect the expression of the dnaA gene function. The expression of the dnaN gene function by the dnaA- dnaN+ phages remains weak upon simultaneous infection with dnaA+ dnaN- phages. Thus the insertion and deletion of the dnaA gene influence in cis the expresion of the dnaN gene. We propose that the dnaA and dnaN genes constitute an operon, where the former is upstream to the latter.

  14. DNA vaccines against influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachyra, Anna; Góra-Sochacka, Anna; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Genetic vaccine technology has been considerably developed within the last two decades. This cost effective and promising strategy can be applied for therapy of cancers and for curing allergy, chronic and infectious diseases, such as a seasonal and pandemic influenza. Despite numerous advantages, several limitations of this technology reduce its performance and can retard its commercial exploitation in humans and its veterinary applications. Inefficient delivery of the DNA vaccine into cells of immunized individuals results in low intracellular supply of suitable expression cassettes encoding an antigen, in its low expression level and, in turn, in reduced immune responses against the antigen. Improvement of DNA delivery into the host cells might significantly increase effectiveness of the DNA vaccine. A vast array of innovative methods and various experimental strategies have been applied in order to enhance the effectiveness of DNA vaccines. They include various strategies improving DNA delivery as well as expression and immunogenic potential of the proteins encoded by the DNA vaccines. Researchers focusing on DNA vaccines against influenza have applied many of these strategies. Recent examples of the most successful modern approaches are discussed in this review.

  15. Advances in Effects of Opioid on Macromolecule Constituents of Tissues in Mouse%阿片对小白鼠组织大分子成分的影响研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李定健

    2012-01-01

    As one of the systems which modulate physiological events of the body, the opioid system is presumed to play a vital role in controlling the growth of farm animals and other species of animals. The influences of opioid on DNA, RNA and protein of tissues in fetal and neonatal mice were reviewed in this paper. Opioid can also affect macromolecule constituents of tissues in the adult mouse. Although it is unclear whether opioid influence the function of tissues or not, opioid can induce immunosuppression in rodents and human.%阿片系统是调节机体生理活动的系统之一.近年来,阿片被认为在控制家畜和其他种类动物生长中起着重要作用.阐述了阿片对小白鼠胚胎以及新生小白鼠组织DNA、RNA和蛋白质的影响.阿片亦能影响成年小白鼠组织大分子成分.虽然阿片是否影响组织功能尚不清楚,但是阿片抑制啮齿动物和人类的免疫功能.

  16. Analysis of length distribution of short DNA fragments induced by 7Li ions using the random-breakage model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG Fuquan; ZHAO Kui; ZHAN Yong; CAO Tianguang; NI Meinan; SUI Li; CAI Minghui; ZHUO Yizhong

    2005-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is an important bio-macromolecule. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are considered to be the most important initial damage responsible for all biological effects induced by ionizing radiation. In this paper the length distribution of DNA fragments induced by 7Li ionizing radiation is fitted with the random breakage model. In this model, the parameter u is the average number of DSBs on every DNA molecule induced by ionizing radiation. The fitting result shows that the random breakage model cannot describe the distribution of DNA fragments in lower doses, while the random breakage model is in better accordance with the experimental data in higher doses. It is shown that the length distribution of DNA fragments has random statistical feature in higher doses. In this situation, the random breakage model looks like a model without any parameter since the u has specific physical meaning and can directly be obtained from experimental data.

  17. Transfer of DNA from Bacteria to Eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Lacroix

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Historically, the members of the Agrobacterium genus have been considered the only bacterial species naturally able to transfer and integrate DNA into the genomes of their eukaryotic hosts. Yet, increasing evidence suggests that this ability to genetically transform eukaryotic host cells might be more widespread in the bacterial world. Indeed, analyses of accumulating genomic data reveal cases of horizontal gene transfer from bacteria to eukaryotes and suggest that it represents a significant force in adaptive evolution of eukaryotic species. Specifically, recent reports indicate that bacteria other than Agrobacterium, such as Bartonella henselae (a zoonotic pathogen, Rhizobium etli (a plant-symbiotic bacterium related to Agrobacterium, or even Escherichia coli, have the ability to genetically transform their host cells under laboratory conditions. This DNA transfer relies on type IV secretion systems (T4SSs, the molecular machines that transport macromolecules during conjugative plasmid transfer and also during transport of proteins and/or DNA to the eukaryotic recipient cells. In this review article, we explore the extent of possible transfer of genetic information from bacteria to eukaryotic cells as well as the evolutionary implications and potential applications of this transfer.

  18. Binding of DNA by a dinitro-diester calix[4]arene: denaturation and condensation of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostos, F J; Lebron, J A; Moyá, M L; Deasy, M; López-Cornejo, P

    2015-03-01

    A study of a dinitro-diester calix[4]arene (5,17-(3-nitrobenzylideneamino)-11,23-di-tert-butyl-25,27-diethoxycarbonyl methyleneoxy-26,28-dihydroxycalix[4]arene) interaction with calf-thymus DNA was carried out using several techniques. The measurements were done at various molar ratios X=[calixarene]/[DNA]. Results show diverse changes in the DNA conformation depending on the X value. Thus, at low macrocycle concentrations, the calixarene binds to the polynucleotide. This interaction, mainly in groove mode, weakens the hydrogen bonds between base pairs of the helix inducing denaturation of the double strands, as well as condensation of the macromolecule, from an extended coil state to a globular state. An opposite effect is observed at X molar ratios higher than 0.07. The de-condensation of DNA happens, that is, the transition from a compact state to a more extended conformation, probably due to the stacking of calixarene molecules in the solution. Results also show the importance of making a proper choice of the system under consideration.

  19. DNA from keratinous tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Camilla F.; Olsen, Maja E.; Brandt, Luise Ørsted

    2011-01-01

    Keratinous tissues such as nail, hair, horn, scales and feather have been used as a source of DNA for over 20 years. Particular benefits of such tissues include the ease with which they can be sampled, the relative stability of DNA in such tissues once sampled, and, in the context of ancient...... genetic analyses, the fact that sampling generally causes minimal visual damage to valuable specimens. Even when freshly sampled, however, the DNA quantity and quality in the fully keratinized parts of such tissues is extremely poor in comparison to other tissues such as blood and muscle – although little...... systematic research has been undertaken to characterize how such degradation may relate to sample source. In this review paper we present the current understanding of the quality and limitations of DNA in two key keratinous tissues, nail and hair. The findings indicate that although some fragments of nuclear...

  20. Mapping of brain macromolecules and their use for spectral processing of (1)H-MRSI data with an ultra-short acquisition delay at 7 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Považan, Michal; Hangel, Gilbert; Strasser, Bernhard; Gruber, Stephan; Chmelik, Marek; Trattnig, Siegfried; Bogner, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    Long echo time (TE) MR spectroscopy (MRS) sequences are sensitive only to metabolites of low molecular weight. At shorter TE, significantly more metabolite signals are detectable, including broad signals of high-molecular-weight macromolecules (MMs). Although the presence of MM resonances can bias metabolite quantification at short TE, proper quantification of MMs is important since MMs themselves may serve as potentially valuable biomarkers for many pathologies. We have therefore developed an FID-based 2D-MR Spectroscopic Imaging (2D-MRSI) sequence to map MMs in healthy brain tissue at 7 T within a scan time of ~17 min and a repetition time of 879 ms. This 2D-MRSI technique provides MM maps over a whole slice (i.e., including cortical gray matter) at an ultra-short acquisition delay of 1.3 ms, using double inversion for efficient nulling of low-molecular-weight metabolites. The optimal sequence parameters were estimated using Bloch simulations, phantom testing, and in vivo validation. The acquired in vivo MM spectra (n=6) included nine distinct MM peaks in the range of ~0.9-3.7 ppm. The measured average MM spectrum was incorporated into the LCModel basis set and utilized for further quantification of MRSI data sets without metabolite nulling, which were acquired in five additional volunteers. The quantification results for two basis sets, one including the MMs and one without MM spectrum, were compared. Due to the high spectral resolution and full signal detection provided by the FID-MRSI sequence, we could successfully map five important brain metabolites. Most quantified metabolite signal amplitudes were significantly lower since the inclusion of MMs into the basis set corrected the overestimation of metabolite signals. The precision of fit (i.e., Cramér Rao lower bounds) remained unchanged. Our MM maps show that the overall MM contribution was higher in gray matter than in white matter. In conclusion, the acquired MM spectrum improved the accuracy of

  1. DNA Charge Transport within the Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodick, Michael A.; Muren, Natalie B.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2015-01-01

    The unique characteristics of DNA charge transport (CT) have prompted an examination of roles for this chemistry within a biological context. Not only can DNA CT facilitate long range oxidative damage of DNA, but redox-active proteins can couple to the DNA base stack and participate in long range redox reactions using DNA CT. DNA transcription factors with redox-active moieties such as SoxR and p53 can use DNA CT as a form of redox sensing. DNA CT chemistry also provides a means to monitor the integrity of the DNA, given the sensitivity of DNA CT to perturbations in base stacking as arise with mismatches and lesions. Enzymes that utilize this chemistry include an interesting and ever-growing class of DNA-processing enzymes involved in DNA repair, replication, and transcription that have been found to contain 4Fe-4S clusters. DNA repair enzymes containing 4Fe-4S clusters, that include Endonuclease III (EndoIII), MutY, and DinG from bacteria, as well as XPD from archaea, have been shown to be redox-active when bound to DNA, share a DNA-bound redox potential, and can be reduced and oxidized at long range via DNA CT. Interactions between DNA and these proteins in solution, in addition to genetics experiments within E. coli, suggest that DNA-mediated CT can be used as a means of cooperative signaling among DNA repair proteins that contain 4Fe-4S clusters as a first step in finding DNA damage, even within cells. Based on these data, we can consider also how DNA-mediated CT may be used as a means of signaling to coordinate DNA processing across the genome. PMID:25606780

  2. Direct measurement of DNA-mediated adhesion between lipid bilayers

    CERN Document Server

    Shimobayashi, S F; Parolini, L; Orsi, D; Cicuta, P; Di Michele, L

    2015-01-01

    Multivalent interactions between deformable mesoscopic units are ubiquitous in biology, where membrane macromolecules mediate the interactions between neighbouring living cells and between cells and solid substrates. Lately, analogous artificial materials have been synthesised by functionalising the outer surface of compliant Brownian units, for example emulsion droplets and lipid vesicles, with selective linkers, in particular short DNA sequences. This development extended the range of applicability of DNA as a selective glue, originally applied to solid nano and colloidal particles. On very deformable lipid vesicles, the coupling between statistical effects of multivalent interactions and mechanical deformation of the membranes gives rise to complex emergent behaviours, as we recently contributed to demonstrate [Parolini et al., Nature Communications, 2015, 6, 5948]. Several aspects of the complex phenomenology observed in these systems still lack a quantitative experimental characterisation and fundamental...

  3. The Role of Amines, Hydrogen Sulfide and Carbon Dioxide in the Formation of Prebiotic Macromolecules Surrounded by Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajen, Gaurav

    2016-04-01

    Amphiphilic compounds are known to self-assemble into membranous structures when exposed to alternate dry and wet conditions. This paper presents a model of how such structures could form near hydrothermal vents while containing macromolecules such as amino acids. The formation of amino acids near deep ocean hydrothermal vents as precursors for the origins of life is problematic as amino acids degrade from thermal energy. In the model proposed here, amino acids would degrade into amines (near hydrothermal vents). Amines have an affinity to interact with carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S), form weak heat-unstable salts, and then through exposure to thermal energy release the acid gases and regenerate back to amines. Amines carrying and releasing H2S and CO2 would help other macromolecules form along with amino acids within protected cell-like structures; the cyclical release and recapture of acid gases would subsequently help the amino acids form bonds; further thermal action would degrade some of the amines into polymers that provide more strength and rigidity to the membrane walls; and also enable escaping gases to form tubes within the surrounding membranes for inlet and outlet of chemicals. Consider that liquids and gases are undergoing thermal convection inside a porous medium, and the convecting liquids contain some amines. Consider now that an amine weak salt carrying H2S and another carrying CO2 is inside a vesicle that formed through self-assembly. As this vesicle moves around in the thermal convection cell it will come close to the heat source and release the H2S and CO2 inside the vesicle. As the vesicle moves away from the heat source, the gases would be reabsorbed into the amines. This process would create stability and a repeating set of reactions, reactants, and products forming and reforming - cyclical stability is a key criterion for more complex reactions to occur. Some of the amines present would reform into an amino acid (as occurs

  4. DNA data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Raw DNA chromatogram data produced by the ABI 373, 377, 3130 and 3730 automated sequencing machines in ABI format. These are from fish (primarily Sebastes spp.,...

  5. A Possible Role of DNA Superstructures in Genome Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmi, Claudio; de Santis, Pasquale; Paparcone, Raffaella; Savino, Maria; Scipioni, Anita

    2004-02-01

    The concept of DNA as a simple repository of the gene information has changed in that of a polymorphic macromolecule, which plays a relevant part in the management of the complex biochemical transformations in living matter. As a consequence of the slight stereochemical differences between base pairs, the direction of the DNA double helix axis undergoes deterministic writhing. A useful representation of such sequence-dependent structural distortions is the curvature diagram. Here, it is reported as an evolution simulation obtained by extensive point mutations along a biologically important DNA tract. The curvature changes, consequence of the point mutations, were compared to the related experimental gel electrophoresis mobility. The curvature of most mutants decreases and the mobility increases accordingly, suggesting the curvature of that tract is genetically selected. Moreover, DNA images by scanning force microscopy, show evidence of a sequence-dependent adhesion of curved DNA tracts to inorganic crystal surfaces. In particular, mica shows a large affinity towards the TT-rich dinucleotide sequences. This suggests a possible mechanism of selection of curved DNA regions, characterized by AA ˙ TT dinucleotides in phase with double-helical periodicity, in the very early evolution steps.

  6. Cation charge dependence of the forces driving DNA assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRouchey, Jason; Parsegian, V Adrian; Rau, Donald C

    2010-10-20

    Understanding the strength and specificity of interactions among biologically important macromolecules that control cellular functions requires quantitative knowledge of intermolecular forces. Controlled DNA condensation and assembly are particularly critical for biology, with separate repulsive and attractive intermolecular forces determining the extent of DNA compaction. How these forces depend on the charge of the condensing ion has not been determined, but such knowledge is fundamental for understanding the basis of DNA-DNA interactions. Here, we measure DNA force-distance curves for a homologous set of arginine peptides. All forces are well fit as the sum of two exponentials with 2.4- and 4.8-Å decay lengths. The shorter-decay-length force is always repulsive, with an amplitude that varies slightly with length or charge. The longer-decay-length force varies strongly with cation charge, changing from repulsion with Arg¹ to attraction with Arg². Force curves for a series of homologous polyamines and the heterogeneous protein protamine are quite similar, demonstrating the universality of these forces for DNA assembly. Repulsive amplitudes of the shorter-decay-length force are species-dependent but nearly independent of charge within each species. A striking observation was that the attractive force amplitudes for all samples collapse to a single curve, varying linearly with the inverse of the cation charge.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA maintenance: an appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmedov, Alexander T; Marín-García, José

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondria play a crucial role in a variety of cellular processes ranging from energy metabolism, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and Ca(2+) handling to stress responses, cell survival, and death. Malfunction of the organelle may contribute to the pathogenesis of neuromuscular disorders, cancer, premature aging, and cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial ischemia, cardiomyopathy, and heart failure. Mitochondria are unique as they contain their own genome organized into DNA-protein complexes, so-called mitochondrial nucleoids, along with multiprotein machineries, which promote mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication, transcription, and repair. Although the organelle possesses almost all known nuclear DNA repair pathways, including base excision repair, mismatch repair, and recombinational repair, the proximity of mtDNA to the main sites of ROS production and the lack of protective histones may result in increased susceptibility to oxidative stress and other types of mtDNA damage. Defects in the components of these highly organized machineries, which mediate mtDNA maintenance (replication and repair), may result in accumulation of point mutations and/or deletions in mtDNA and decreased mtDNA copy number impairing mitochondrial function. This review will focus on the mechanisms of mtDNA maintenance with emphasis on the proteins implicated in these processes and their functional role in various disease conditions and aging.

  8. DNA expressions - A formal notation for DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, Rudy van

    2015-01-01

    We describe a formal notation for DNA molecules that may contain nicks and gaps. The resulting DNA expressions denote formal DNA molecules. Different DNA expressions may denote the same molecule. Such DNA expressions are called equivalent. We examine which DNA expressions are minimal, which

  9. DNA expressions - A formal notation for DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, Rudy van

    2015-01-01

    We describe a formal notation for DNA molecules that may contain nicks and gaps. The resulting DNA expressions denote formal DNA molecules. Different DNA expressions may denote the same molecule. Such DNA expressions are called equivalent. We examine which DNA expressions are minimal, which

  10. DNA controlled assembly of liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Stefan; Jakobsen, Ulla; Simonsen, Adam Cohen

    2009-01-01

    DNA-encoding of solid nanoparticles requires surfacechemistry, which is often tedious and not generally applicable. In the present study non-covalently attached DNA are used to assemble soft nanoparticles (liposomes) in solution. This process displays remarkably sharp thermal transitions from...... assembled to disassembled state for which reason this method allows easy and fast detection of polynucleotides (e.g. DNA or RNA), including single nucleotide polymorphisms as well as insertions and deletions....

  11. Monodisperse spherical meso-macroporous silica particles: Synthesis and adsorption of biological macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovpiaga, E. Yu.; Grudinkin, S. A.; Kurdyukov, D. A.; Kukushkina, Yu. A.; Nashchekin, A. V.; Sokolov, V. V.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Golubev, V. G.

    2016-11-01

    Monodispersed spherical silica particles, including large mesopores (over 10 nm) and macropores (up to 100 nm) were obtained by chemical etching in an autoclave. A method for introducing globular protein myoglobin molecules into the pores is developed. The method of filling is based on a high adsorption capacity of the developed internal pore structure of the particles. The structure and adsorption properties of the materials are studied.

  12. Chromenone-conjugated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Toward conveyable DNA binders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousuf, Sameena; Enoch, Israel V M V; Paulraj, Mosae Selvalumar; Dhanaraj, Premnath

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles can transport drug and possibly target cancer. DNA-binding of ligands loaded in dextran coated magnetic nanoparticles, could aid their better target-specific binding. In this work, we report the loading of chromenones onto aminoethylamino-modified dextran coated iron oxide nanoparticles, their loading efficiency, and openness for binding to DNA. The magnetic behavior, the size, and the morphology of the nanoparticles are analyzed. The crystallite size of the magnetic nanoparticles is around 40 nm. The chromenones are present on the surface of the dextran shell, as revealed by their cyclodextrin-binding characteristics, which is a new approach in comprehending the accessibility of the surface-bound molecules by macromolecules. The mode of binding of the chromenones to DNA is not altered on surface loading on dextran shell, although the binding strength is generally diminished, compared to the strength of binding of the free chromenones to DNA.

  13. Carbohydrate-Derived Amphiphilic Macromolecules: A Biophysical Structural Characterization and Analysis of Binding Behaviors to Model Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Adriana A. T.; Tomasini, Michael; Kholodovych, Vladyslav; Gu, Li; Sommerfeld, Sven Daniel; Uhrich, Kathryn E.; Murthy, N. Sanjeeva; Welsh, William J.; Moghe, Prabhas V.

    2015-01-01

    The design and synthesis of enhanced membrane-intercalating biomaterials for drug delivery or vascular membrane targeting is currently challenged by the lack of screening and prediction tools. The present work demonstrates the generation of a Quantitative Structural Activity Relationship model (QSAR) to make a priori predictions. Amphiphilic macromolecules (AMs) “stealth lipids” built on aldaric and uronic acids frameworks attached to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) polymer tails were developed to form self-assembling micelles. In the present study, a defined set of novel AM structures were investigated in terms of their binding to lipid membrane bilayers using Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D) experiments coupled with computational coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CG MD) and all-atom MD (AA MD) simulations. The CG MD simulations capture the insertion dynamics of the AM lipophilic backbones into the lipid bilayer with the PEGylated tail directed into bulk water. QCM-D measurements with Voigt viscoelastic model analysis enabled the quantitation of the mass gain and rate of interaction between the AM and the lipid bilayer surface. Thus, this study yielded insights about variations in the functional activity of AM materials with minute compositional or stereochemical differences based on membrane binding, which has translational potential for transplanting these materials in vivo. More broadly, it demonstrates an integrated computational-experimental approach, which can offer a promising strategy for the in silico design and screening of therapeutic candidate materials. PMID:25855953

  14. Organic fouling of thin-film composite polyamide and cellulose triacetate forward osmosis membranes by oppositely charged macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yangshuo; Wang, Yi-Ning; Wei, Jing; Tang, Chuyang Y

    2013-04-01

    Fouling of cellulose triacetate (CTA) and thin-film composite (TFC) forward osmosis (FO) membranes by organic macromolecules were studied using oppositely charged lysozyme (LYS) and alginate (ALG) as model foulants. Flux performance and foulant deposition on membranes were systematically investigated for a submerged membrane system. When an initial flux of 25 L/m(2)h was applied, both flux reduction and foulant mass deposition were severe for feed water containing the mixture of LYS and ALG (e.g., 50% LYS and 50% ALG at a total foulant concentration of 100 mg/L). In comparison, fouling was much milder for feed water containing either LYS or ALG alone. Compared to the CTA FO membrane, the TFC FO membrane showed greater fouling propensity under mild FO fouling conditions due to its much rougher surface. Nevertheless, under severe FO fouling conditions, fouling was dominated by foulant-deposited-foulant interaction and membrane surface properties played a less important role. Furthermore, when the feed water contained both LYS and ALG in sufficient amount, the deposited cake layer foulant composition (i.e., the LYS/ALG mass ratio) was not strongly affected by membrane types (CTA versus TFC) nor testing modes (pressure-driven NF mode versus osmosis-driven FO mode). In contrast, solution chemistry such as pH and calcium concentration had remarkable effect on the cake layer composition due to their effects on foulant-foulant interaction.

  15. Nanoscale amphiphilic macromolecules with variable lipophilicity and stereochemistry modulate inhibition of oxidized low-density lipoprotein uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poree, Dawanne E; Zablocki, Kyle; Faig, Allison; Moghe, Prabhas V; Uhrich, Kathryn E

    2013-08-12

    Amphiphilic macromolecules (AMs) based on carbohydrate domains functionalized with poly(ethylene glycol) can inhibit the uptake of oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and counteract foam cell formation, a key characteristic of early atherogenesis. To investigate the influence of lipophilicity and stereochemistry on the AMs' physicochemical and biological properties, mucic acid-based AMs bearing four aliphatic chains (2a) and tartaric acid-based AMs bearing two (2b and 2l) and four aliphatic chains (2g and 2k) were synthesized and evaluated. Solution aggregation studies suggested that both the number of hydrophobic arms and the length of the hydrophobic domain impact AM micelle sizes, whereas stereochemistry impacts micelle stability. 2l, the meso analogue of 2b, elicited the highest reported oxLDL uptake inhibition values (89%), highlighting the crucial effect of stereochemistry on biological properties. This study suggests that stereochemistry plays a critical role in modulating oxLDL uptake and must be considered when designing biomaterials for potential cardiovascular therapies.

  16. Identification of a macromolecule containing an anticarcinoembryonic antigen-reactive substance and immunoglobulin M in human pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, S R; Van Dusen, L R; Douglass, H O; Holyoke, E D; Chu, T M

    1978-11-01

    Ascitic fluid from a patient with carcinoma of the pancreas was fractionated by ammonium sulfate precipitation. The fraction precipitated between 25 and 50% saturation of ammonium sulfate was sequentially chromatographed on Sephadex G-200 and Sepharose 6B. A macromolecular fraction (greater than 10(6) daltons) obtained was found to react with both antihuman IgM and antiserum to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). This fraction was further purified by adsorption with protein A-Sepharose CL-4B and chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel. The purified macromolecular fraction had a sedimentation value of 28S as determined by ultracentrifugation. Upon dissociation of the purified macromolecule at pH 2.3 and purification of the dissociated components on Sepharose CL-2B and BioGel A 1.5M, a 19S protein and a 5S protein were recovered. The 19S protein showed a complete line of identity with a reference human IgM when reacted with antihuman IgM in gel diffusion, whereas the 5S protein showed a partial immunologic identity with colon CEA against anti-CEA. These results indicated the existence of an IgM-containing macromolecular complex with an anti-CEA cross-reactive substance in the extracellular fluid of human pancreatic cancer.

  17. Nanometer-scale structure of alkali-soluble bio-macromolecules of maize plant residues explains their recalcitrance in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adani, Fabrizio; Salati, Silvia; Spagnol, Manuela; Tambone, Fulvia; Genevini, Pierluigi; Pilu, Roberto; Nierop, Klaas G J

    2009-07-01

    The quantity and quality of plant litter in the soil play an important role in the soil organic matter balance. Besides other pedo-climatic aspects, the content of recalcitrant molecules of plant residues and their chemical composition play a major role in the preservation of plant residues. In this study, we report that intrinsically resistant alkali-soluble bio-macromolecules extracted from maize plant (plant-humic acid) (plant-HA) contribute directly to the soil organic matter (OM) by its addition and conservation in the soil. Furthermore, we also observed that a high syringyl/guaiacyl (S/G) ratio in the lignin residues comprising the plant tissue, which modifies the microscopic structure of the alkali-soluble plant biopolymers, enhances their recalcitrance because of lower accessibility of molecules to degrading enzymes. These results are in agreement with a recent study, which showed that the humic substance of soil consists of a mixture of identifiable biopolymers obtained directly from plant tissues that are added annually by maize plant residues.

  18. Force-extension curves for broken-rod macromolecules: Dramatic effects of different probing methods for two and three rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexeev, A. V.; Maltseva, D. V.; Ivanov, V. A., E-mail: ivanov@polly.phys.msu.ru [Faculty of Physics, Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Klushin, L. I., E-mail: leo@aub.edu.lb [Department of Physics, American University of Beirut, P.O. Box 11-0236, Beirut 1107 2020 (Lebanon); Skvortsov, A. M., E-mail: astarling@yandex.ru [Chemical-Pharmaceutical Academy, Prof. Popova 14, 197022 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-28

    We study force-extension curves of a single semiflexible chain consisting of several rigid rods connected by flexible spacers. The atomic force microscopy and laser optical or magnetic tweezers apparatus stretching these rod-coil macromolecules are discussed. In addition, the stretching by external isotropic force is analyzed. The main attention is focused on computer simulation and analytical results. We demonstrate that the force-extension curves for rod-coil chains composed of two or three rods of equal length differ not only quantitatively but also qualitatively in different probe methods. These curves have an anomalous shape for a chain of two rods. End-to-end distributions of rod-coil chains are calculated by Monte Carlo method and compared with analytical equations. The influence of the spacer’s length on the force-extension curves in different probe methods is analyzed. The results can be useful for interpreting experiments on the stretching of rod-coil block-copolymers.

  19. Heat, Aromatic Units, and Iron-Rich Phyllosilicates: A Mechanism for Making Macromolecules in the Early Solar System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jonathan S; Sephton, Mark A

    2015-10-01

    The major organic component in carbonaceous chondrites is a highly aromatic macromolecular material. Aromatic organic matter and phyllosilicates are colocated in these meteorites, and it is possible that the physical association represents a synthetic chemical relationship. To explore the potential reactions that could take place to produce the aromatic macromolecular material, we heated various simple aromatic units in the presence of montmorillonite with different exchanged cations. The majority of cation-exchanged montmorillonites tested, sodium-, aluminum-, iron-, nickel-, and cobalt-rich montmorillonites, do not produce polymerization products. By contrast, Fe(3+) cation-exchanged montmorillonite readily facilitates addition reactions between aromatic hydrocarbons. A feasible mechanism for the process is oxidative coupling, which involves a corresponding reduction of the Fe(3+) cation to its Fe(2+) counterpart. A similar reduction process for the other metal cations does not take place, highlighting the importance of iron. This simple process is one feasible mechanism for the construction of aromatic macromolecules such as those found in carbonaceous chondrites. The search for a relationship between Fe(3+)-rich phyllosilicates and aromatic organic structures (particularly dimers, trimers, and more polymerized forms) in carbonaceous chondrites would represent an effective test for constraining the role of clay catalysis in the early Solar System.

  20. Chromatin Dynamics in Genome Stability: Roles in Suppressing Endogenous DNA Damage and Facilitating DNA Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Nair

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Genomic DNA is compacted into chromatin through packaging with histone and non-histone proteins. Importantly, DNA accessibility is dynamically regulated to ensure genome stability. This is exemplified in the response to DNA damage where chromatin relaxation near genomic lesions serves to promote access of relevant enzymes to specific DNA regions for signaling and repair. Furthermore, recent data highlight genome maintenance roles of chromatin through the regulation of endogenous DNA-templated processes including transcription and replication. Here, we review research that shows the importance of chromatin structure regulation in maintaining genome integrity by multiple mechanisms including facilitating DNA repair and directly suppressing endogenous DNA damage.